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REDMOND HIGH SCHOOL

Women’s Board says students not at risk in principal’s leave shelter will shut down By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

REDMOND — The Redmond School District broke its silence on former Redmond High School Principal Brian Lemos, saying students were never put at risk but providing no more insight into why he was

placed on leave in August. Administrators have declined to say why the move was made or whether the leave was paid. Lemos was hired despite convictions for driving under the influence and assault while he was employed by the Tillamook School District.

Bend City Council OKs $4M steel purchase The Bulletin

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while Lemos was in charge. “We as a board and a district are handcuffed by what we can say,” Erickson said. “I want to assure all of you ... there’s no claim students are at risk here or students are unsafe. That’s not the issue.” See Redmond / A6

Scenic cycling ahead

By Nick Grube There were at least a couple of references to Bend’s real estate market during a Wednesday meeting where Bend City Councilors approved spending $4 million to buy 6.9 miles worth of steel pipe for the $68.2 million reconstruction of the Bridge Creek water system. Those comments came from opponents of the project who said the city shouldn’t speculate on steel prices almost two years before contractors lay any pipe under Skyliners Road as a part of the costly overhaul. City officials want to purchase the steel before prices go up as projected by the American Metal Market. The hope is that by purchasing now instead of in the spring of 2012, the city could save about $400,000. “I guess I’m just a little concerned,” said Bruce Aylward, who has long been an opponent of the Bridge Creek project. “We don’t know what’s going to happen. Sometimes what goes up comes down, as we all know in Bend.” He wasn’t the only one who was skeptical. Two directors from the Bend Chamber of Commerce, President Steve Galash and Jack Holt, also cautioned city councilors on buying the steel and moving ahead with the project. See Steel / A5

He also had his teaching license suspended. Redmond School Board Chairman Jim Erickson said at a school board meeting Wednesday that he couldn’t discuss what was taking place between the district and Lemos, but said students were safe

Leaders hope 3 routes will ‘expand the horizons of cycling’ and tourism in Central Oregon By Dylan J. Darling The Bulletin

hree Central Oregon bicycling road routes are officially scenic bikeways, as designated by the state. The Oregon Parks and Recreation Commission voted 7-0 Wednesday to create the McKenzie Pass, Metolius Loops and SistersSmith Rock scenic bikeways. Along with rides near John Day and Heppner, the routes join last year’s first scenic bikeway in the Willamette Valley. In all, the state now has about 500 miles of scenic bikeways, which tourism leaders say will be highly marketed. “I think it is really going to expand the horizons of cycling in Oregon,” said Richard Walkoski, recreation programs manager for the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. Before signs go up marking the routes, maps and turn-by-turn directions will be available on the Oregon State Parks and other websites, he said.

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“People will be able to get out there with more confidence and be able to follow these routes,” he said. The Central Oregon routes approved by the commission at its meeting in John Day connect to Sisters. There, a committee of 20 volunteers with ties to cycling developed the routes and the plans to support them over the past 18 months, said Erin Borla, executive director for the Sisters Chamber of Commerce and a committee member. The goal is to draw people from around the state and country to Sisters, providing a kick to the economy. “We’d love to get them here,” Borla said. As a bike shop owner in Sisters, Brad Boyd was glad to hear of the scenic bikeways approval. “Central Oregon is a great place to cycle,” said Boyd, who owns Eurosports. “Anything we can do to get the word out about that is a good thing.” See Bikeways / A6

Approved scenic bikeways in Central Oregon MCKENZIE PASS A 40-mile route over the 5,000-foot McKenzie Pass, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. 20 JEFFERSON COUNTY

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METOLIUS LOOPS A family-friendly route offering 5- or 21-mile routes passing by giant ponderosa pines. DESCHUTES N ATION A L FOREST

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A 44-mile route with views of the Cascades near Sisters and rock formations close to Smith Rock State Park.

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By Hillary Borrud and Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

When the women and children of Lake Place awaken this morning, it’s possible their water won’t run and their lights won’t turn on. The 26-room shelter in Southwest Bend opened several years ago as a transitional facility for women and children fleeing domestic violence, coming out of drug and alcohol treatment, or otherwise struggling to avoid homelessness. But now, with the facility in foreclosure and the property owners nearly $90,000 behind in county taxes, residents have been served with 30- or 60-day eviction notices and told that the utilities will be turned off today. And Lake Place has more than just financial woes, as some residents allege the director drank with residents and that her husband — a convicted felon — harassed some of the women living there. “It’s become a place where you don’t want to come home,” said Bobbi Starr, a 41-year-old resident who said she must be out by Oct. 22. When Eseta Kaufusi moved into Lake Place in March, her rental applications featured a variety of rules and regulations for living in the house, including a zero-tolerance policy on drugs and alcohol, a two-hour monthly community service requirement and assigned chores each week. Trying to escape an abusive relationship, Kaufusi moved into Lake Place with her 2-year-old son after a brief stay at the Bethlehem Inn. Kaufusi learned about Lake Place through staff at the state Department of Human Services, who gave her a flier for the facility. In May, Kaufusi discovered that Lake Place was in foreclosure and after June stopped paying rent. She was evicted this month. Kaufusi said she shared the information with other women living at Lake Place and confronted staff about the situation. See Lake Place / A6

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Bend’s Lake Place in foreclosure; residents, staff trade accusations of harassment and drug use

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Longevity research is raising hopes — and questions By Nicholas Wade New York Times News Service

A trans-Atlantic dispute has formed between two camps of researchers pursuing a gene that could lead to drugs that enhance longevity. British scientists say the longevity gene is “nearing the end of its life,” but the Americans whose work is under attack say the approach remains as promising as ever. The dispute concerns genes that make sirtuins, proteins involved in controlling cells’ metabolism. Because of their metabolic role, the sirtuins may mediate the 40-percent-longer life enjoyed by laboratory rats and mice put on a very low-calorie diet. People cannot keep to such a low-fat diet, but drugs that activate sirtuin would in prinBulletin ile photo ciple be a painless way for humans to add years of lean Resveratrol, found and healthy life. This idea in red wine, may took wing when resveratrol, activate sirtuin, a a substance found in trace protein that helps quantities in red wine, was control metabolism. reported to activate sirtuin. But some scientists In 2008 GlaxoSmithKline, question that link. the pharmaceutical company, paid $720 million for Sirtris, a startup company trying to develop resveratrol-mimicking drugs that activate sirtuins. Since then, several aspects of the sirtuin story have come under scientific challenge, including doubts as to whether resveratrol’s effects are really exercised through sirtuin, and whether the sirtuins are the real or only mediators of the longevity increase linked to a low-calorie diet. See Longevity / A5


A2 Thursday, September 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

POWERBALL

The numbers drawn Wednesday night are:

12 47 48 52 55 13 Power Play: 4. The estimated jackpot is $30 million.

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn are:

9 12 15 39 43 44 Nobody won the jackpot Wednesday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $5.6 million for Saturday’s drawing.

F / Education

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Charters often shun special-needs kids Coulson, director of the Center for Educational Freedom at the NEW ORLEANS — When Cato Institute, a Washingtontalk-show host Oprah Winfrey based nonprofit research group. handed a $1 million check last The children need to stay in betSeptember to the principal of ter-funded districts, he said. New Orleans Charter Science “It’s just not practical and and Math Academy, 200 students feasible” for charter schools to watched the broadcast from a educate severely disabled chilchurch and celebrated with a dren, said Coulson, whose orbrass band. ganization favors free Lawrence Melrose, markets and limited a ninth-grader with “There’s no government. Parents learning and emotional incentive to “know that every disabilities, sat next school can’t serve evdoor in a school office. take these ery child.” The staff was con- kids. If you Charters on avercerned his fighting and age receive $9,460 per cursing could be an can avoid student in local, state embarrassment, said educating and federal money, 19 Shelton Joseph, his percent less than tradigreat-uncle. Because them, there tional districts, in part he has trouble com- are other because many don’t municating, Lawrence get money for buildthings you needed intensive counings under state laws, seling and speech ther- can do with according to a 2010 apy, which the school the money.” Ball State University didn’t provide, Joseph study. said. He was repeatedly — Thomas About 1.8 million suspended and told he Hehir, who children — or 4 percouldn’t take the school oversaw cent of public school bus with other kids, acstudents — attend special-ed cording to his lawyer. charters, five times the The education of programs in number in 1999-2000, 16-year-old Lawrence the Clinton according to the Narepresents a common administration tional Alliance for Pubcomplaint about prilic Charter Schools, vately run, taxpayer-fia nonprofit advocacy nanced charter schools: They of- group based in Washington. ten exclude children with serious Charters last year received disabilities or deny them the help $14.8 billion in local, state and they need, violating federal laws. federal money, up from $4.5 bil“They left me,” Joseph recalled lion in 2003, estimated Larry the boy telling him on the day of Maloney, president of Washingthe Winfrey celebration. “They ton-based Aspire Consulting, left me out.” which analyzes public-education Along with the academy sup- finances. ported by Oprah’s Angel Network — which the entertainer used to Many districts raise money from the public — New Orleans charter schools ac- are under fire cused of discrimination include New Orleans, Los Angeles those that are favored charities of and Washington, three districts Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates, that rely on charter schools, face Wal-Mart Stores’s Walton family claims of systemic discriminaand New Orleans Saints quarter- tion in special-education court back Drew Brees. cases, including allegations that Shunning special-education charters aren’t open to children students helps school budgets with serious disabilities. since the average disabled child While federal data show that costs twice as much to serve as charters and traditional disa nondisabled one, said Thomas tricts have similar percentages Hehir, who oversaw federal spe- of kids in special education, the cial-education programs under Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation President Bill Clinton. found that charters in Louisiana, “There’s no incentive to take California, New York and Texas these kids,” Hehir, now a Har- had fewer with more severe vard University professor, said disabilities. in an interview. “If you can avoid Only 1 percent of the students educating them, there are other in Los Angeles charter schools things you can do with the mon- have serious disabilities, such as ey. You can pay people more or autism, compared with 3.5 perreduce class size.” cent at district-operated schools, Under federal law, all public according to the system’s courtschools — including charters appointed monitor. Twenty— must educate students with nine out of 186 charters didn’t disabilities. Charters and other have a single child with serious public schools must come up disabilities. with an individual plan for every Charter enrollment practices child with a disability. They are may screen out children who expected, when appropriate, to are hard to educate, according place special-needs students in to reports by monitors in Los regular classrooms with extra Angeles and Washington. The support, such as an aide. Gates foundation disagrees. ParIf a child needs more help, ents are often leery of leaving the school can set up a separate established district programs, class or send the child elsewhere, where they are well served, said including a private school. The Don Shalvey, who oversees the school pays the bill, and parents group’s charter-school philanhave a legal right to challenge thropy of $475 million in the past each decision. Students with dis- decade. abilities also have special protecAfter Hurricane Katrina in tion when they are disciplined if 2005, New Orleans turned to the behaviors are related to their charters as a way to rebuild condition. schools and overhaul public education. Its charter schools now enroll more than 70 percent of ‘Just not practical’ students, a larger share than in Charter schools, which tend any other U.S. district. to be small and receive less tax Last October, 10 families, inmoney than traditional districts, cluding Lawrence’s, filed a fedcan’t afford to take on children eral special-education discrimiwho may cost tens of thousands nation suit against the state of of dollars to educate, said Andrew Louisiana. The Southern Pov-

Technology Consumer Environment Education Science

Universities seeking out students of means

By John Hechinger Bloomberg News

By Tamar Lewin New York Times News Service

John Hechinger / Bloomberg News

Lawrence Melrose, 16, left, suffers from learning and emotional difficulties. His great-uncle, Shelton Joseph, says Lawrence was excluded from a ceremony celebrating a $1 million gift to his charter school from entertainer Oprah Winfrey. erty Law Center, a civil-rights group in Montgomery, Ala., represents the families. Charter schools aren’t named as defendants, and the allegations include complaints about services at conventional schools, as well.

Kids kept away A lanky teenager who dreams of joining the Army, Lawrence reads and does math at roughly the third-grade level. Along with attention deficit disorder, he has language-related disabilities that make his speech difficult to understand. Rather than provide all the services he needed, New Orleans Charter Science and Math excluded him by suspending him repeatedly and keeping him from going to the Oprah celebration, according to the lawsuit. Some other students also didn’t attend the ceremony to protect children’s safety, Benjamin Marcovitz, the school’s founder and principal, said in a phone interview. Angela De Paul, an Oprah Winfrey spokeswoman, declined to comment. Lawrence struggles because of failings of his previous schools, and the academy did everything it could to help him, including paying for a mentor, Marcovitz said. “Lawrence is a pretty beloved member of our school community” and returned to school this year, Marcovitz said. After the lawsuit was filed and repeated meetings with the family, the school shifted its approach last December, providing the mentor, speech therapy and instituting a plan that rewarded him for good behavior, according to Eden Heilman, a Southern Poverty Law Center senior staff attorney. Kelly Fischer, another plaintiff, toured New Orleans charter schools in March 2010 to find a spot in fourth grade for her son Noah, who is blind, autistic and eats from a tube. Administrators from three charter schools told her they couldn’t handle Noah, according to her notes. “You do not want your son to come here,” Laura Todaro, a counselor at Samuel J. Green Charter School, told Fischer, according to her notes. “When people within the educational field, professionals, tell me that he’s too much for them, it’s kind of like telling me there’s no hope for him,” Fischer said. The Samuel Green school, run by FirstLine Schools, received a $279,000 donation from the foundation of NFL quarterback Brees. Chris Stuart, Brees’s agent, declined to comment. Todaro, FirstLine’s director of counseling services, said she remembers her conversation with Fischer differently. She told Fischer and another parent with her that the schools educated children with disabilities in regular classrooms — a philosophy of “complete and total inclusion” — and didn’t have anything already in place to serve Noah, Todaro said.

“I’m sorry if she took away that he couldn’t come here,” Todaro said in a telephone interview. “We always try to accommodate the needs of the kids.” The family of another child in the lawsuit said he was shortchanged at KIPP schools — a charter network that operates across the country. San Francisco-based KIPP is featured in “Waiting for ‘Superman,’” the documentary directed by Academy Award winner Davis Guggenheim that lauds charter schools. The Gates and Walton foundations support KIPP, which stands for Knowledge Is Power Program. In the New Orleans lawsuit, the mother of a 16-year-old said he didn’t get the help he needed from KIPP Believe College Prep. Because of his attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, the boy, identified in the suit only as L.W., reads at the second-grade level and had failing grades and scores on state standardized tests. The school’s special-education plan included no social work, counseling or psychological services, according to the complaint. At KIPP Renaissance High School last year, the boy received only 30 minutes of counseling a week, the suit said. “We are deeply committed to serving all students,” including the 9 percent last year who had disabilities, Rhonda KalifeyAluise, executive director of KIPP New Orleans Schools, said in a statement.

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend • www.highdesertbank.com EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

Money is talking a bit louder in college admissions these days, according to a new survey by Inside Higher Ed, an online publication for higher education professionals. More than half of the admissions officers at public research universities and more than a third at four-year colleges said they had been working harder in the past year to recruit students who need no financial aid and can pay full price, according to the survey of 462 admissions directors and enrollment managers conducted in August and September. Similarly, 22 percent of admissions officials at four-year institutions said the financial downturn had led them to pay more attention to applicants’ ability to pay. “As institutional pressures mount, between the decreased state funding, the pressure to raise a college’s profile, and the pressure to admit certain students, we’re seeing a fundamental change in the admissions process,” said David Hawkins, director of public policy and research at the National Association for College Admission Counseling. “Where many of the older admissions professionals came in through the institution and saw it as an ethically centered counseling role, there’s now a different dynamic that places a lot more emphasis on marketing.” In the survey, 10 percent of the admissions directors at four-year colleges — and almost 20 percent at private liberal-arts schools — said fullpay students they admitted, on average, had lower grades than other admitted applicants.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, September 22, 2011 A3

T S Justice Department’s $16 muffins don’t sit well after audit

Obama rebuffed as Palestinians pursue U.N. seat By Helene Cooper and Steven Lee Myers New York Times News Service

UNITED NATIONS — A last-ditch U.S. effort to head off a Palestinian bid for U.N. membership faltered. President Barack Obama tried to qualify his own call, just a year ago, for a Palestinian state. And French President Nicolas Sarkozy stepped forcefully into the void, with a proposal that pointedly repudiated Obama’s approach. The extraordinary tableau Wednesday at the United Nations underscored a stark new reality: The United States is facing the prospect of having to share, or even cede, its decades-long role as the architect of Middle East peacemaking. Even before Obama walked up to the General Assembly podium to make his difficult address, where he declared that “Peace will not come through statements and resolutions at the U.N.,” U.S. officials acknowledged that their various last-minute attempts to jumpstart Israeli-Palestinian negotiations with help from European allies and Russia had collapsed. U.S. diplomats turned their attention to how to navigate a new era in which questions of Palestinian statehood are squarely on the global diplomatic agenda. There used to be three relevant players in any Middle East peace effort: the Palestinians, Israel, and the United States. But expansions of settlements in the West Bank and a hardening of Israeli attitudes have isolated Israel and its main backer, the United States. Dissension among Palestinian factions has undermined the prospect for a new accord as well.

Finally, Washington politics has limited Obama’s ability to try to break the logjam if that means appearing to distance himself from Israel. Republicans have mounted a challenge to lure away Jewish voters who supported Democrats in the past, after some Jewish leaders criticized Obama for trying to push Israel too hard. The result has been 2½ years of stagnation on the Middle East peace front that has left Arabs — and many world leaders — frustrated, and ready to try an alternative to the U.S.-centric approach that has prevailed since the 1970s. “The U.S. cannot lead on an issue that it is so boxed in on by its domestic politics,” said Daniel Levy, a former Israeli peace negotiator in the government of Ehud Barak. “And therefore, with the region in such rapid upheaval and the two-state solution dying, as long as the U.S. is paralyzed, others are going to have to step up.” Obama himself seemed to forecast this back in May when, speaking to the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, he warned that events in the Middle East could lead to a challenge to the status quo if the Israelis and Palestinians did not move quickly toward a peace deal. “There’s a reason why the Palestinians are pursuing their interests at the United Nations,” Obama said then. “They recognize that there is an impatience with the peace process, or the absence of one, not just in the Arab world, in Latin America, in Asia, and in Europe. And that impatience is growing, and it’s already manifesting itself in capitals around the world.”

By Richard Simon Los Angeles Times

Doug Mills / New York Times News Service

President Barack Obama addresses the United Nations General Assembly on Wednesday. Obama said Wednesday that there is no shortcut to resolving the ongoing conflict between the Israelis and the Palestinians, and peace will not come through resolutions at the U.N. The Palestinian president, Mahmoud Abbas, delivered on the threat. He announced Friday his plans to go to the Security Council in a quest for Palestinian membership in the United Nations and international legal recognition of statehood, putting Obama in the position of having to stand in the way. Israel and its allies in Congress, where Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel enjoys broad influence, were sharply opposed. So Wednesday, Obama “did exactly what he had to do,” said David Rothkopf, a former Clinton administration official and a visiting fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. “He made a clear statement for what is a clear U.S. position and put himself squarely as a champion of the status quo.” Netanyahu, Rothkopf said, “has managed to read the U.S. political situation perfectly, making Obama acutely aware that he could be losing part of his base, and that, I think, in turn is what has locked Obama in.” The Palestinians have never fully trusted the United States to serve as an honest broker with Israel. But its credibility with the Palestinians has crumbled with the recognition that

More protesters killed NATO extends raids in Yemen street battles in Libya for 90 days By Laura Kasinof

By Kareem Fahim and Rick Gladstone

New York Times News Service

New York Times News Service

SANAA, Yemen — Street battles raged for a third day Tuesday in Sanaa, Yemen’s capital. A dozen protesters were killed as the conflict between government security forces and soldiers loyal to an army commander who has defected threatened to derail hopes for a resolution of the nation’s months-long political stalemate. Doctors at a field hospital at the site of an anti-government sit-in said the protesters had been killed by live ammunition, mortar fire and heavy artillery. That brought the death toll since fighting broke out in Sanaa on Sunday to nearly 60, making the past three days the most violent in the city since the beginning of the uprising against the government of President Ali Abdullah Saleh in January. Vice President Abed Rabbo Mansour al-Hadi announced a cease-fire Tuesday evening, a government spokesman, Mohammed Albasha, said. But loud explosions echoed across Sanaa on Tuesday night, after the announcement, indicating that the accord was not holding. The violence erupted Sunday after anti-government protesters marched outside the protected area of their sit-in. In response, security forces and armed government supporters fired at the thousands of demonstrators with heavy caliber machine guns. That, in turn, ignited fighting between government forces and troops loyal to Maj. Gen. Ali Mohsin al-Ahmar, who defected and whose forces have been protecting the protesters for months. The forces loyal to the government are controlled by the president’s relatives. It was an outcome many had feared since alAhmar announced his support for the protest movement in March. The two sides had been at a standoff ever since, with each controlling portions of Sanaa.

TRIPOLI, Libya — With armed loyalists of Moammar Gadhafi, the fallen Libyan leader, still ensconced in his hometown and a few other redoubts as the seven-month conflict in Libya winds down, NATO announced a three-month extension of its bombing campaign on Wednesday. “We are determined to continue our mission for as long as necessary, but ready to terminate the operation as soon as possible,” the NATO secretary general, Anders Fogh Rasmussen, said in a statement from the alliance’s Brussels headquarters. It is the second 90-day extension, and it was approved less than a week before the campaign was set to end. NATO’s aerial campaign in Libya, authorized under a United Nations Security Council mandate to protect civilians from Gadhafi’s military reprisals, effectively became a major weapon of the rebels who toppled him last month. The National Transitional Council, the interim government of anti-Gadhafi forces that has taken control in much of Libya, has expressed gratitude to NATO for its role. Gadhafi, who remained at large, has expressed outrage over the growing international acceptance of the National Transitional Council as the legitimate authority in the country he ruled for more than four decades. In an audio message broadcast Tuesday, Gadhafi taunted his opponents by predicting that their new government would collapse once NATO ended its attacks on loyalist forces that have yet to surrender. As if to answer him, Britain’s Defense Ministry announced Wednesday that its warplane contingent in the NATO Libya operation had attacked loyalists’ military deployments in three areas. Tornado GR4s hit targets in Gadhafi’s hometown, Sirte; in the loyalist desert enclave of Bani Walid; and in the north-central town of Hun, the ministry said in a statement.

House rejects GOP stopgap spending bill By Robert Pear and Jennifer Steinhauer New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — House Republican leaders suffered a surprising setback Wednesday when the House rejected their version of a stopgap spending bill, leaving unclear how Congress will provide money to keep the government open after Sept. 30 and aid victims of a string of costly recent natural disasters. The 230-195 vote came after fiscally conservative Republicans joined an overwhelming majority of Democrats in opposing the legislation. As it became clear that the bill was going down, a

number of Republicans changed their votes from yes to no. The unexpected outcome illustrated how the intense fiscal fights of recent months had transformed the politics of disaster relief, which in the past has typically been rushed out of Congress with strong backing from both parties. Democrats remained nearly united against the measure because they saw the amount of disaster assistance — $3.65 billion — as inadequate, and they objected to the Republicans’ insistence on offsetting some of the cost with cuts elsewhere. The vote also showed the Republican leadership’s continuing

struggle to corral the most conservative members of the caucus, as more than 40 Republicans rejected the measure because they did not believe it cut spending enough. The setback on a bill that only a week ago seemed headed for easy passage came just hours after Rep. Eric Cantor, R-Va., and the majority leader, joined other top Republicans in predicting that the House would pass it. The result could give new power to Senate Democrats to shape the legislation, which would finance government operations from the start of the fiscal year Oct. 1 until Nov. 18.

Obama may not have the clout to press the Israelis into a peace deal that requires significant compromises. After Obama laid out his defense of the peace process, Sarkozy took to the same podium in a forceful disavowal of Obama’s position. “Let us cease our endless debates on the parameters,” he said, calling instead for a General Assembly resolution that would upgrade the Palestinians to “observer status” as a bridge toward statehood. “Let us begin negotiations, and adopt a precise timetable.” The outcome of the Palestinian bid for membership remains uncertain. The administration still hopes that the process of considering the Palestinian bid at the Security Council could provide a fresh opportunity to get new talks started. The move puts new pressure on Netanyahu’s government, already reeling from setbacks to its security from the turmoil of the Arab Spring, with results that analysts say are hard to forecast. But a quick return to the status quo, when the United States dictated the terms of any talks, seems unlikely, given strong Russian and French support for a new approach by the Palestinians.

WASHINGTON — Remember the Pentagon’s $600 toilet seats and $400 hammers? Now, the $16 muffins at a Justice Department conference are causing, well, heartburn. Sen. Chuck Grassley, of Iowa, the top Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee, is steamed over a Justice Department inspector general audit that found apparently “extravagant and potentially wasteful” expenses at conferences, including $16 muffins and coffee and tea that cost as much as $8 per 8-ounce cup. “The Justice Department appears to be blind to the economic realities our country is facing,” Grassley said in a statement. “The inspector general’s office just gave a blueprint for the first cuts that should be made by the super committee,” he added, referring to the panel tasked with reducing the federal budget deficit. Rep. Frank Wolf, R-Va., who chairs the House appropriations subcommittee that oversees Justice Department spending, also weighed in with his displeasure over the food and beverage tab for conferences. “It is clear that while American taxpayers were tightening their belts and making difficult financial decisions, the department was splurging on wasteful snacks and drinks as well as unnecessary event planning ‘consultants,’” he said in a letter to U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder. A Justice Department spokeswoman said that most of the conferences that were the subject of the audit were planned and held in the last administration “when there were no strict limits on food and beverage costs” for such events. “We agree that excessive spending of the types identified in the OIG report should not occur,” the spokeswoman said in a statement, adding that the department has taken steps “to ensure that these problems do not occur again.” In the first six months of the 2011 fiscal year, overall conference spending was reduced, the spokeswoman added. In the case of the muffins, the report credited planners of a 2009 conference in Washington for not serving full meals. However, the audit noted that the planners spent $4,200 on 250 muffins and $2,880 on 300 cookies and brownies.


A4 Thursday, September 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Steel Continued from A1 By purchasing the steel, Holt said, the city would be committing to a project that he isn’t certain is the proper alternative for providing drinking water to Bend. “The city has not made the greatest decisions in the past, and the response has been, ‘We’ll never do that again,’” Holt said. “If you’re wrong this time, it’s going to take a long time to heal.”

One dissenting vote Several councilors defended their decisions, saying they’ve thoroughly vetted the project during the past two years. Many of them — with the exception of Jim Clinton, who voted against the steel purchase — said buying the pipe was a good decision. “We have the possibility of saving money,” Councilor Tom Greene said. “Are we acting as speculators? I don’t think so. I think we’re going to use the pipe.” Of the $4 million the council approved to spend, about $1.25 million will go toward buying 1,500 tons of steel. The remainder will go toward fabricating the steel, storing it and paying the city’s contractor on the project, Mortensen Construction, its share of $207,150. Earlier this year, Bend’s design consultant on the project, HDR Engineering Inc., estimated the 6.9-mile steel pipeline would cost about $6.3 million. Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

Longevity Continued from A1 Despite these concerns, the idea that sirtuins promote longevity appeals to scientists because of experiments that were started in yeast and repeated in two other standard laboratory organisms, the roundworm and the fruit fly. It is these foundation experiments that have now come un-

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, September 22, 2011 A5

No clemency granted, Troy Davis is executed

In Texas, white supremacist is put to death for dragging

“The fact that that kind of division was in the room is even New York Times News Service more of a sign that there is a JACKSON, Ga. — Troy Davis, strong possibility to save Troy’s who was convicted of gunning life,” he said. The NAACP said it had been down a Savannah police officer 22 years ago, was put to death in contact with the Department by lethal injection Wednesday of Justice on Wednesday, in the night, his life prolonged by sev- hope that the federal government eral hours while the Supreme would intervene on the basis of civil rights violations, Court reviewed but then meaning irregularities declined to act on a petiin the original investition from his lawyers to gation and at the trial. stay the execution. Earlier in the day, his Davis entered the lawyers asked the state death chamber shortly for another chance to before 11 p.m., four spare him: a lie detector hours after the schedtest. uled time. But the Georgia State Throughout the eve- Troy Davis had ning, police officers in support for his Board of Pardons and Parole, which Tuesday riot gear kept what ap- claim that he denied Davis’ clemency peared to be about 500 was wrongly after a daylong hearprotesters at bay across convicted. ing Monday, quickly the state highway from responded that there the prison entrance. A dozen supporters of the would be no reconsideration of death penalty, including people the case, and the polygraph test who knew the family of the was abandoned. Davis, 42, was convicted of the slain officer, Mark MacPhail, sat quietly, separated from the 1989 shooting of MacPhail, who Davis family and their support- was working a second job as a ers by a stretch of lawn and rope security guard. A homeless man called for help after a group that barriers. The appeal to the Supreme included Davis began to assault Court was one of several last- him, according to court testimoditch efforts by Davis on Wednes- ny. When MacPhail went to asday. Earlier in the day, an official sist him, he was shot in the face of the NAACP said that the vote and the heart. Before Wednesday, Davis had by the Georgia parole board to deny clemency to Davis, who is walked to the brink of execution black, was so close that he hoped three times. With this most recent executhere might still be a chance to tion date, Davis became an insave him from execution. Edward DuBose, president of ternational symbol of the battle the Georgia chapter, said the orga- over the death penalty and racial nization had “very reliable infor- imbalance in the justice system. His conviction came after tesmation from the board members directly that the board was split timony by some witnesses who 3-2 on whether to grant clemency. later recanted and on the scant-

est of physical evidence, adding fuel to those who relied increasingly on the Internet to rally against executions and to question the validity of eyewitness identification and of the court system itself. “It harkens back to some ugly days in the history of this state,” said the Rev. Raphael Warnock of Ebenezer Baptist Church, who visited Davis on Monday. But for the family of the slain officer, and countless others who believe that two decades’ worth of legal appeals and Supreme Court intervention is more than enough to ensure justice, it is not an issue of race but of law. Inside the prison, MacPhail’s widow and two grown children waited to see if the 22-year-long process would come to an end with Davis’ death.

MacPhail’s widow, Joan MacPhail-Harris, said calling Davis a victim was ludicrous. “We have lived this for 22 years,” she said Monday. “We are victims.” She added: “We have laws in this land so that there is not chaos. We are not killing Troy because we want to.” Davis, who refused a last meal, had been in good spirits and prayerful, said Wende Gozan Brown, a spokeswoman for Amnesty International, who visited him Tuesday. She said he had told her his death was for all the Troy Davises who came before and after him. “I will not stop fighting until I’ve taken my last breath,” she recounted him as saying. “Georgia is prepared to snuff out the life of an innocent man.”

HUNTSVILLE, Texas — White supremacist gang member Lawrence Russell Brewer was executed Wednesday evening for the infamous 1998 dragging death of James Byrd Jr., a black man from East Texas. Byrd, 49, Lawrence was chained Russell to the back Brewer of a pickup truck and pulled to his death along a bumpy asphalt road in one of the most grisly hate crime murders in recent history. Brewer, 44, was asked if he had any final words, to which he replied: “No. I have no final statement.” Appeals to the courts for Brewer were exhausted and no last-day attempts to save his life were filed. Besides Brewer, John William King, 36, also was convicted of capital murder and sent to death row for Byrd’s death. King’s conviction and death sentence remain under appeal. A third man, Shawn Berry, 36, received a life prison term. “One down and one to go,” Billy Rowles, the retired Jasper County sheriff who first investigated the horrific scene, said. “That’s kind of cruel but that’s reality.”

der attack by David Gems and Linda Partridge, researchers on aging at University College London. In an article published Wednesday in the journal Nature, they and colleagues have reexamined experiments in which roundworms and flies, genetically manipulated to produce more sirtuin than normal, were reported to live longer. Both experiments were flawed, they say, because the worms and flies used as a con-

had the effect of prolonging life, the London researchers report. When the mutated gene is removed, the worms with extra sirtuin do not live longer, they said. Guarente said he did not agree with the thrust of this criticism. The 2001 experiment was done with the best techniques then available, he said. When he heard of the mutated gene two years ago, he redid the experiment, using worms from which

the gene had been removed. The worms with extra sirtuin still lived longer, although the effect was less pronounced than before, a finding he also reports in the current Nature. “We agree there is a glitch in one of the worm strains used in the 2001 paper,” Guarente said in an interview. “We absolutely do not agree that there is a serious question about whether sir2 extends life span in worms,” he said, using the name for the

worm’s version of the sirtuin protein. “I think the whole thing is a tempest in a teapot,” he said. Stephen Helfand of Brown University is the author of the fly experiments. Like Guarente, Helfand criticized the London researchers for focusing on an old experiment of his and ignoring a subsequent one that reached the same conclusion with a much-improved technique.

By Kim Severson and John Schwartz

trol were not genetically identical to the test organisms. The London researchers report that they have repeated the experiments with proper controls and found that extra sirtuin does not, after all, make the worms or flies live longer. In the worm experiment, published by Leonard Guarente of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2001, the strain of worms used had picked up an extra mutation which also

By Michael Graczyk The Associated Press

Stephen Morton / The Associated Press

Minister Lynn Hopkins, left, comforts her partner, Carolyn Bond, after hearing that the Supreme Court rejected a plea by Georgia death row inmate Troy Davis, in Jackson, Ga., on Wednesday. Davis was executed for killing off-duty Savannah officer Mark MacPhail.


A6 Thursday, September 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Iran releases jailed American hikers

Bullied, then fired Haney, who lived at Lake Place from April 2010 until October 2010 and for part of that time worked as an assistant, said she was fired when she raised concerns about problems at the facility. “It is a locked facility, people come in there thinking they’re going to be safe,” Haney said. But,

Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@ bendbulletin.com. Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

Continued from A1 Erickson explained that the district was in the middle of “a legal process” and were keeping quiet to respect Lemos’ rights as an employee. Five people appeared at the meeting to address the board on Lemos’ behalf, saying he is a leader and a role model. Some said they knew Lemos as a man with integrity and hoped to see him get a second chance. Lemos was hired in 2009 to serve as principal of M.A.

Erik Hidle can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at ehidle@bendbulletin.com.

Dylan J. Darling can be reached at 541-617-7812 or at ddarling@bendbulletin.com.

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Clouart also worries that the stress of eviction may mean some of the women living at Lake Place will return to drugs, alcohol or other old habits. “That’s something that looks good again, because then maybe for two or three hours you’re not thinking about your eviction,” Clouart said. “That’s what scares us, that this will push a lot of people who are already on the edge right back over again.” That also concerns Ron Rice, who owns the property with his wife, Donita. The couple bought the property in June 2004 and operated it as a licensed residential care facility through 2006, when they tried to sell it. They couldn’t, so the Rices eventually negotiated a lease with an option to buy with Todd Bouchard and Randen Traughber, who operate Kingslin Capital in Portland. The lease, which is now defunct, was through another Bouchard company called Silver Lake Management, and that company found local investors to help start Lake Place, Rice said, with a plan to form it into a nonprofit. Bouchard and Traughber did not respond to requests for comment. For about a year, Rice said, Silver Lake Management paid him about $10,000 each month in rent, which Rice used to pay the mortgage. That monthly amount began to shrink, Rice said, until the company stopped paying him at all, and he let his mortgage with JPMorgan Chase lapse. Two default notices have been issued on the property, but the bank has never sold it. Deschutes County technically owns the property and has since it received a foreclosure judgment last fall, County Assistant Legal Counsel Laurie Craghead said Tuesday. However, state law gives property owners a two-year “redemption period” in which to pay all of the taxes, interest and fees they owe, Craghead said. While county tax and mortgage payments lapsed, rental applications show Lake Place charged residents $300 per month for a 12-foot-by-12-foot room, with a $100 nonrefundable cleaning deposit and a $20 background check. Rent increased $20 per month for each child. Martin blamed Lake Place’s problems on the fact it’s not a nonprofit. “Without being a nonprofit, there just isn’t the funding to keep

Three weeks ago, Rice discovered that the paperwork was never filed to make Lake Place a nonprofit and that it didn’t have 501(c)(3) status, which would have resulted in waived property taxes and other benefits. When Rice found that out, he said he hired Jim Floyd of First Oregon Properties to try to short-sale the property. Rice hopes to find investors who will lease the facility to a nonprofit that will continue the mission of Lake Place. “I’ll do anything in my power to keep (this facility) for women and children going,” Rice said. “It’s performed a tremendous service to the community for the past couple of years.” Whatever the fallout, the facility is shutting down and residents are searching for a place to go. According to Martin, as of Tuesday seven women and one child still lived at Lake Place. The gas was shut off on Sept. 15, but was turned on again the following day, Martin said. And although some residents aren’t due to leave until the end of October, utilities are due to be turned off again today. Martin said Kingslin Capital pays the utilities. “(Bouchard) says we just need to wash our hands of it,” Martin said. Last week, Legal Aid contacted Bouchard and threatened to file suit against the company if utilities don’t remain in place. Meanwhile, the Bend Police Department is investigating Lake Place after taking a police report from Haney on July 27. Sgt. Clint Burleigh confirmed on Aug. 24 that an investigation began recently and is ongoing. “It’s too early to say anything else about the case,” Burleigh said. “It would really jeopardize this investigation.” Oregon Department of Justice Spokesman Tony Green confirmed in August that his department received a complaint about Lake Place. “We have learned that the organization is in the process of closing,” Green wrote in an Aug. 24 e-mail. “The Department is reviewing the matter and has contacted the organization for additional information.” The Department of Justice declined to release a copy of the complaint in order to protect the privacy of the complainant, Green wrote in another e-mail Tuesday. Green also declined to describe the nature of the complaint. One thing is certain: when Lake Place closes, it will leave Bend with fewer options for women and children in need. “Lake Place filled a very, very important niche,” Bethlehem Inn’s Clouart said. “This community has a lack of transitional housing.”

Lynch Elementary School in Redmond. He took over as high school principal in 2010. The Teacher Standards and Practices Commission suspended Lemos’ license for 60 days and put him on four years’ probation, citing multiple convictions between 1992 and 1995. The most serious of the charges included driving under the influence and two separate counts of fourth-degree assault. Lemos worked for the Crook County School District between July 2004 and June 2009.

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it going,” she said. “It’s pretty much just come out of the board of directors’ pockets, and they’re tapped dry, they don’t have any more money to invest. It got to the point where about half the women weren’t paying rent anymore.” Martin said many residents stopped paying rent over the summer but did not give much of a reason. “They were complaining about stupid stuff, like the dishwasher not working and the air conditioner not working correctly,” Martin said. “Those are luxury items, not necessities.”

.

she said, that wasn’t the case. Haney said Lake Place staff bullied the women who lived there, telling them that they had to put up with the situation “because you don’t have anywhere else to go. You need us.” Haney also noted that although Lake Place is not a nonprofit, it accepted donations from a variety of sources, including refrigerators from an appliance store. Several nonprofits, including Saving Grace and the Bethlehem Inn, recommended Lake Place as transitional housing for women and children, as did the parole and probation department. Landlords often do not want to rent to people with criminal records, and the closure of Lake Place will eliminate one resource parole and probation relies upon. “That will be a problem,” Wark said. Chris Clouart, who manages the Bethlehem Inn, agreed. “We’re worried that with this eviction process we’re going to end up picking up some of the people from there. Hopefully we’ll have spaces available,” he said. “It’s hard to say no.”

vd

The release came a day before Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad was scheduled to address the U.N. General Assembly in New York, and it seemed timed at least in part as a good-

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Continued from A1 “I started getting worried,” she said. But Kaufusi had concerns about the transitional facility well before she was evicted. She and former resident Dolly Haney said Lake Place is supposed to be drug- and alcoholfree, yet Lake Place Community Outreach Director Catherine Dawn Martin often invited residents to her house, also on the property, to drink. Court records show Martin has twice been convicted of driving under the influence, most recently in 2010. Martin does not deny she drank with some of the women and said she invited some residents to her home. “I have friends over, and what I do in my own house is none of anyone’s business,” she said. “They can claim that it’s a drugand alcohol-free zone, but every one of them has abused that policy.” Martin said that at any time, Lake Place “reeks of pot,” and she did the best she could for two years to “hold the house together.” That’s not the only issue former residents had with the facility. Many residents at Lake Place have suffered domestic abuse, and Martin’s husband is a convicted felon with a history of domestic assault. According to court records, among other offenses, Christopher Jay Martin was sentenced to 70 months in prison for assaulting his wife beginning in 2002. In January, he pleaded no contest to driving under the influence of intoxicants. Kaufusi said he often came by and harassed women at Lake Place. Martin disputed that he harassed the women. “It’s vindictive behavior by disgruntled residents who are losing their place to live, who do drugs on the premises. ... I think they’re just people trying to cause problems,” he said. “I really have nothing to do with that place other than mow the grass and do some maintenance as a service to our community, and I feel that there are disgruntled people who are trying to raise hell with my wife and I, and wrongfully so. We have nothing to do with that place closing; that has nothing to do with us.” Catherine Dawn Martin said her relationship with her husband and their history of domestic violence did not affect the women living at Lake Place. “My personal life has nothing to do with Lake Place or the ladies there,” she said. “The only time he came over there to ‘harass’ was when they were smoking pot out there. “My husband does a lot of community service over there, or did, until they pretty much banned him from over there,” she continued. “His probation officer asked him not to go over there anymore for his own protection.” Tanner Wark, administrator for Deschutes County’s Adult Parole and Probation Department, said the department does not release details of parole and probation officers’ instructions to offenders.

hope that Wednesday’s release would lead to “freedom for political prisoners in America and Iran.” After making their brief statements, Bauer and Fattal left the airport with their families.

od

Lake Place

Sultan Al-Hasani / The Associated Press

Freed American Shane Bauer is welcomed upon arriving from Iran, in Muscat, Oman, on Wednesday. Joshua Fattal was also freed.

Both men were surrounded by journalists and U.S. Embassy officials, as Bauer hugged Shourd, who was released from Evin prison in September 2010 on medical grounds. “Today can only be described as the best day of our lives,” the family members said in a statement reported by the Associated Press. “We have waited for nearly 26 months for this moment,” it added. “We now all want nothing more than to wrap Shane and Josh in our arms, catch up on two lost years and make a new beginning, for them and for all of us.” Masoud Shafiei, an Iranian lawyer representing Bauer and Fattal, spent two hours inside the prison complex earlier in the day completing paperwork for the Americans’ release. He told the semiofficial Iranian Students News Agency that the government of Oman had paid $1 million bail for Bauer and Fattal. Oman also reportedly paid bail last year to secure the release of Shourd.

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TEHRAN, Iran — Two American hikers jailed in Iran since 2009 were freed from prison Wednesday and flown to Oman, where they were reunited with joyful family members. Shane Bauer and Joshua Fattal, both 29, were released Wednesday evening after spending more than two years in prison on charges of illegal entry and espionage since they and a companion, Sarah Shourd, were arrested on the border between Iraq and Iran while hiking in the mountainous region. Shourd, who was freed last year and is engaged to Bauer, was on hand in Oman to greet the two as they ran down the stairs from the private plane that picked them up in Iran and flew them to freedom. “We’re so happy we are free,” Fattal told reporters at Muscat International Airport in Oman. “Two years in prison is too long,” Bauer said. He expressed

will gesture ahead of the speech. “We are thrilled,” said President Barack Obama, also in New York for the U.N. session, after being informed of the release. He told reporters it was a “wonderful day” for the two men’s families “and for us.” In a statement issued later by the White House, Obama praised “the tireless advocacy” of the families. He also expressed gratitude to Oman’s Sultan Qaboos bin Said, the ruler of the tiny monarchy on the Arabian Peninsula, and to Iraqi President Jalal Talabani, the Swiss government and others around the world “who have worked steadfastly over the past two years to secure the release of Shane and Josh.” The plane carrying the hikers left Tehran’s Mehrabad Airport and arrived in Oman about 3:40 p.m. EST. The two men raced down the aircraft’s stairs to embrace family members waiting on the tarmac, television images showed.

ok

The Washington Post

Continued from A1 Another Central Oregon route, one starting and ending in Bend’s Drake Park, is set to join the others later this year, said Doug LaPlaca, president and CEO of Visit Bend. Visit Bend is leading the development of the 36-mile route that would loop between Bend and Tumalo. A public meeting about that route will likely be held in late October in Bend before the finalized proposal goes to the Oregon Parks and Recreation Commission for final approval, LaPlaca said. “We’ve been working on this for 2½ years,” LaPlaca said. Prompted by Cycle Oregon, the nomadic annual cycling tour of the state’s backroads, the commission formed an 11-member scenic bikeways committee in January 2009. The committee evaluates proposed routes and then recommends them to the commission for approval. Between Nov. 1, 2009, and Jan. 31, 2010, the committee received plans for 19 routes covering 1,400 miles around the state, Walkoski wrote in an e-mail. The committee cut those to nine routes covering 800 miles. On Wednesday, the commission approved five of the routes, stretching over about 500 miles. The routes represent the “best of the best” in the state, Walkoski said. “These were the ones that came to the top and were ready to go,” said Brad Chalfant, a member of the commission whose districts covers Central Oregon.

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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011

MARKET REPORT

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2,538.19 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE -52.05 -2.01%

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11,124.84 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE -283.82 -2.49%

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B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF SABMiller to buy Foster’s for $10.15B

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$40.420 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.339

By Tim Doran The Bulletin

SABMiller, the global brewer, reached an agreement to buy Australian brewer Foster’s for $10.15 billion Wednesday, ending a four-month hostile takeover battle. Under the terms of the deal, SABMiller will pay 5.10 Australian dollars ($5.22) a share, an increase from its previous bid of 4.90 Australian dollars ($5.01). Foster’s investors will also receive a special cash payout of 30 Australian cents per share, part of a previously announced capital initiative.

Court gives Saab chance to reorganize STOCKHOLM — Saab Automobile staved off bankruptcy after a Swedish court Wednesday granted the struggling carmaker’s appeal for protection from creditors, giving it a chance to restart production. The Court of Appeal for Western Sweden approved Saab’s request for voluntary reorganization, overturning a lower tribunal’s ruling, according to a decision posted on the Gothenburg-based court’s website. The decision halts pending bankruptcy petitions filed by creditors.

Retailers predict not-so-jolly holidays CHICAGO — With high unemployment and other gloomy economic trends, the first holiday shopping forecasts, not surprisingly, don’t present a merry picture for retailers. ShopperTrak says that national retail sales will rise by just 3 percent during November and December from the same period in 2010, less than last year’s 4.1 percent gain. The Chicago-based retail consultant makes its predictions using a mix of foot traffic at malls and economic trends. ShopperTrak’s forecast matches the prediction of the International Council of Shopping Centers, which said on Friday that sales trends are challenging for retailers. The holiday season accounts for about 20 percent of U.S. retail sales.

Sales of existing homes rise in August WASHINGTON — Sales of previously owned homes rose more than anticipated in August as investors scooped up distressed properties with cash. The 7.7 percent increase left purchases at a five-monthhigh 5.03 million annual rate, the National Association of Realtors said Wednesday in Washington. The August pace compares with a peak of 7.08 million in 2005, before the housing boom turned into a subprime-mortgage bust that dragged the economy into an 18-month recession. — From wire reports

Home sales rise Existing home sales rose 7.7 percent in August to 5.03 million units, below the 6 million needed to sustain a healthy housing market.

Thinkstock

A FINANCIAL CRYSTAL BALL? Some turn to psychics, aura readings for guidance By Rachael Rees • The Bulletin

W

hile some people take on second or even third jobs or rack up debt on credit cards to make ends meet in tough economic times, others are turning to practical magic in hopes of finding their financial fortunes.

Even as many businesses are still reeling from the Great Recession, psychics, energy healers and tarot card readers appear to be doing a brisk business nationally and here in Central Oregon as people search for alternative ways to secure their financial future. “People are down and out and they are turning more to the spiritual because it is all they have left,” said Carol Plattner, owner of Dream Pebbles Bath, located

in downtown Bend, who has seen sales increase at her store for aromatherapy products such as soaps, oils and candles as people look everywhere and anywhere for answers. “The aromatherapy leads into spiritual healing and uplifting,” Plattner said. “People need to have hope, feel better and push away the negative energies.” She says using the products gives her customers self-confidence, whether or not the candles

and soaps actually have any power to refill bank accounts or help keep or land jobs. On Saturday, Plattner along with the owners of the clothing store Giddy Up, also located on Northwest Minnesota Avenue, hosted a psychic and healing fair as a way to begin building a “wellness community.” Plattner leases space above her store to psychic Kaira Sherman of Divine Guidance. See Crystal ball / B5

“Everything in our life, including finances, are all energy issues. When the energy flow is blocked or congested, you aren’t going to experience whatever you want in this world.” — Ryan West, owner, Becoming Joy Energy Healing

HP expected to oust CEO By Quentin Hardy and Nick Wingfield New York Times News Service

Hewlett-Packard, the technology giant that has stumbled through repeated embarrassments, was preparing Wednesday to fire its chief executive, less than one year after naming

him to the post, according to several people with knowledge of the board’s actions. The leading candidate to replace HP’s chief, Leo Apotheker, was Meg Whitman, the former chief executive of eBay, who was sought for her ability to run a large technology company,

said the people, who asked for anonymity because they were not authorized by the board to speak publicly. With the move to fire its third chief executive in a row, HP risks looking like the tech company that cannot find its way. See HP / B2

Del Monte pushes back in food safety case

5.03

By William Neuman

4

New York Times News Service

3 2 1 0 ’10

$1,805.50 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE -$1.10

Bend experts demonstrate solar research

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When health investigators identified imported cantaloupes as the source of a salmonella outbreak early this year, the importer agreed to a recall. But now that company, Del Monte Fresh Produce, is trying to block additional restrictions

on melon imports, setting off an unusually public battle between the produce industry and food safety regulators. The company, which is one of the country’s largest produce marketers, says the restrictions could damage its reputation, and Thinkstock

it has sued the Food and Drug Administration to lift them. The effort is being cheered by many in the produce industry, who often complain about what they call overreaching by regulators and welcome a company with resources pushing back. But advocates of safe food said that it was extremely rare for a major food company to take such a publicly aggressive stance. See Produce / B5

PORTLAND — While the number of businesses and homeowners installing solar electrical systems continues to increase, their contribution to the nation’s power needs remains small. But experts from Bend have been researching ways to better integrate solar energy collected by rooftop and ground-based systems into the power grid for nearly three years, and this week they demonstrated their results to government, electrical utility and private business representatives. The work stemmed from an effort created by the U.S. Department of Energy in 2007 called Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems, a competitive program that sought “revolutionary changes,” said Ward Bower, project manager for Sandia National Lab, the agency managing the program. Federal energy officials wanted research that would potentially lead to commercial products and help solar power gain acceptance by utilities, which viewed it as a nuisance. The challenge “fired up” employees at PV Powered, a then 4-year-old Bend solar-electric inverter maker, said Steven Hummel, vice president of engineering for Advanced Energy Industries, which bought PV Powered last year. See Solar / B2

On the Web For more information about the Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems project, visit the U.S. Department of Energy’s Sandia National Lab at http://energy .sandia.gov/?page_id=408.

Fed twists and markets shout about new policy By Kevin G. Hall McClatchy-Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — Digging deep into its bag of leftover economic spark plugs, the Federal Reserve on Wednesday launched an unorthodox operation aimed at lowering long-term lending rates and thus sparking more spending and investment in an economy flirting with recession. Inside Specifically, the Fed announced • Q&A on how it would sell $400 billion in shortthe Fed’s term government bonds and remove may place them with longer-term govaffect the ernment bonds of equal value. economy, The controversial action is dubbed Operation Twist II bePage B2 cause it’s patterned after a similar move in the 1960s named after the then-popular dance craze. By the end of June 2012, the Fed intends to purchase $400 billion worth of Treasury securities with remaining maturities of six years to 30 years. See Fed / B2 P aid Advertisement


B2 Thursday, September 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Former Solyndra employees claim mismanagement, heavy spending By Carol D. Leonnig and Joe Stephens The Washington Post

Former employees of Solyndra, the shuttered solar company that exhausted half a billion dollars of taxpayer money, said they saw questionable spending by management almost as soon as a federal agency approved a $535 million government-backed loan for the start-up. A new factory built with public money boasted a gleaming conference room with glass walls that,

with the flip of a switch, turned a smoky gray to conceal the room’s occupants. Hastily purchased state-of-the-art equipment ended up being sold for pennies on the dollar, still in its plastic wrap, employees said. As the $344 million factory went up just down the road from the company’s leased plant in Fremont, Calif., workers watched as pallets of unsold solar panels stacked up in storage. Many wondered: Was the factory needed? “After we got the loan guar-

antee, they were just spending money left and right,” said former Solyndra engineer Lindsey Eastburn. Solyndra’s ability to secure federal backing also made the company eager for more assistance, interviews and records show. Company executives ramped up their Washington lobbying efforts. Within a week of getting a loan guarantee commitment from the Energy Department, Solyndra applied for another, worth $400 million. It never won final approval.

Michael Mills-Price of Bend-based Advanced Energy Industries Renewables — formerly PV Powered — explains electronics contained in a mobile lab Tuesday in Portland. Advanced Energy presented results from a research effort to better integrate solar power into the energy grid. Tim Doran The Bulletin

Solar Continued from B1 “We (wanted) to make a difference in the industry,” he told industry representatives Tuesday, “not just do more government work.” Out of more than two dozen companies and organizations that applied, the Energy Department selected PV Powered and 11 others for stage 1 in 2008. A year later, the PV Poweredled team became one of five picked to continue the effort, which required the companies to share costs. And last year, the team — which included Portland General Electric, Northern Plains Power Technologies, of South Dakota, and Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories, of Pullman, Wash., — was awarded an additional $2.4 million, one of four teams to make it to stage 3. Its research focused, in part, on how to get solar power — which can fluctuate depending on cloud cover — onto a grid created to handle electricity fueled by the constant burning of natu-

HP Continued from B1 It is one of the oldest and most successful tech companies, and yet in recent years it has been surpassed by far more innovative and better-managed companies like Google, Apple and Facebook in symbolizing innovation in Silicon Valley. The question facing HP is whether a new chief executive can restore its leadership position. On a day last month that crystallized the company’s careening strategy, Apotheker made a series of announcements: poor quarterly earnings; an $11.7 billion purchase of Autonomy, a British software company that analysts immediately branded as overpriced; discontinuation of its TouchPad tablet and its WebOs software that had been introduced only months before; and the possible sale or spinoff of HP’s mainstay PC business. The stock lost about a quarter of its value on the news. The company’s stock has fallen 47 percent, a loss of more than $40 billion in the company’s market value, on Apotheker’s watch.

Why Whitman? Investors liked the prospect of new leadership. HP’s stock was up 6.72 percent Wednesday to close at $23.98. It was not clear, however, that Whitman could undo much of what Apotheker had done or for that matter whether HP’s board would want her to. Analysts say it would be difficult for the company to walk away from the Autonomy bid, though the board may be considering hanging on to the PC business. Whitman, who ran eBay as it grew from a startup to a major online retailer, left the company just as growth began to stall. She unsuccessfully ran for governor

ral gas or coal at a central power plant. The solar integration program has helped shine the national spotlight on the Bend company that received a visit from thenpresidential candidate Barack Obama in May 2008 and a shout-out from the newly elected president during a White House speech on renewable energy in March 2009. It brought together government agencies, utilities and private companies to take on problems that no one company could solve on its own, said Gregg Patterson, president of Advanced Energy’s Bend-based solar business unit. The research will continue in Bend, too. Earlier this month, the Energy Department awarded Advanced Energy $3.1 million to keep going. On Tuesday, Advanced Energy demonstrated the results obtained so far, taking many of the 75 or so participants to a warehouse filled with solar panels east of Portland International Airport. From a trailer-turnedmobile lab in the parking lot, Michael Mills-Price, program

of California and was hired in March by Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, a venture capital firm, as a strategic adviser. The board conversations about Whitman are fluid, though, and might not result in her hiring, said a person briefed on the discussions who asked for anonymity because he was not authorized by the board to speak publicly. However, if Whitman were hired, she would most likely be a permanent, not an interim, replacement for Apotheker, this person said. While she lacks experience running a technology company as complex and mature as HP, the company’s board considers her communications skills and understanding of customers to be her strongest qualifications for the job, this person said. Whitman joined the HP board in January, several months after Apotheker was hired.

‘A decade-long drama’ Though HP’s board is comfortable with the strategy laid out last month by Apotheker, its members have increasingly begun to raise questions about his ability to communicate that strategy effectively within the company and to outsiders, especially investors. Last week, HP was hit with a lawsuit claiming that its executives misled investors about the health of the company, including its PC and mobile device business, before its recently announced a strategy shift. Some outside observers see the board itself as the problem. Since naming Carly Fiorina chief executive in 1999, HP has endured proxy wars with some of its founders’ children over the merger with Compaq; board room squabbles that culminated in Fiorina’s ouster; scandals involving spying on journalists, its own employees and board mem-

manager and technical lead for Advanced Energy, explained the research, using gauges displayed on two large-screen TVs on the side of the trailer. Results of the ongoing research stands in contrast to the heat the Energy Department and the Obama administration have been taking over the recent failure of Solyandra, a California solar panel maker that filed bankruptcy last month seeking reorganization — about two years after receiving a $535 million government-backed loan. Fallout from Solyndra’s bankruptcy, which forced the layoff of 1,100 employees, has prompted a renewed focus on diligence at the Energy Department, said Kevin Lynn, lead for the Systems Integration program of the Energy Department’s Solar Technologies Program. But Tuesday’s conference showcased accomplishments. “Very rarely do we look at the conclusion of some of the programs we do,” he said. Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@bendbulletin.com.

bers; and the firing of Mark Hurd, for expense account irregularities involving a female contract employee. “This is a decade-long drama that the board has let unfold,” said George Colony, chief executive of Forrester Research. “They have shown some dysfunction in the past and had difficulty coming to consensus.” For some board members, he said, Apotheker’s tenure “was too much change.”

Apotheker’s tenure Apotheker, 58, a soft-spoken, unassuming executive, oversaw a year of tumult at HP, which reported $126 billion in revenue in the fiscal year that ended in October 2010. By some measures, it is the largest technology company in the world. Even though he had not lasted long as chief executive of SAP, a large German software maker, the board quickly hired him to replace Hurd. HP’s board has for some time wondered whether businesses like PCs should even coexist alongside those like large-scale corporate computing, which now often includes racks of thousands, even millions, of servers within a single company. Apotheker’s response was to take the company into higher-value software and services. Apotheker’s goals for HP were clear from the start, but in almost a year his strategy never quite took shape. He was named to head HP on Sept. 30, and the next day declared that software was the “glue” that held HP together, a comment that surprised observers because it suggested that HP might start to resemble SAP. In the most recent quarter, software accounted for just 2 percent of Hewlett-Packard’s total revenue. Arriving at HP’s Palo Alto,

Fed Continued from B1 In tandem, it will sell an equal amount of Treasury securities with remaining maturities of three years or less. “This program should put downward pressure on longer-term interest rates and help make broader financial conditions more accommodative,” the Fed said in a statement at the conclusion of a two-day meeting. Three voting members dissented, arguing that the action wasn’t necessary. While financial markets had expected the move, it was accompanied by a Fed statement that noted “significant” risks of further economic downturn. That spooked investors, and stocks plunged. The Dow Jones Industrial Average shed 283.82 points to finish at 11,124.84. The S&P 500 was off 35.33 points to close at 1,166.76, and the NASDAQ lost 52.05 points to end at 2538.19. “Operation Twist is the right thing to do, but it won’t help the economy much,” said Mark Zandi, chief economist for forecaster Moody’s Analytics. “Long-term rates, notably fixed-mortgage rates, are already at record lows, given investors’ anticipating the Fed’s actions today. But the Fed went a bit beyond expectations, and thus I think rates will go even lower. I expect 30-year fixed-mortgage rates to fall below 4 percent.” Lower lending rates might spark greater mortgage refinancing, as well as home and car sales and perhaps business investment. But, said Zandi, “since rates are already so low, the boost to growth from the Fed’s actions will be on the margin.” On its website, the Fed acknowledged that Operation Twist II is not a panacea, just another step that contributes to a “broad easing” in a number of policies taken by the Fed, the White House and Congress. It said that by driving down the interest rate paid to investors on long-term government bonds, “interest rates on a range of instruments including home mortgages, corporate bonds, and loans to households and businesses will also likely be lower.” Experts warned that the realities of a weakening economy, reflected in the Fed statement, might outweigh the benefits from the new action. “This statement, with its increased assessment of downside risks, is more likely to unsettle the equity market than these twisting activities are to reassure investors,” economists for forecaster RDQ Economics wrote in a research note.

Calif., headquarters exactly one month later, Apotheker began drafting his vision of a new HP. As the world’s leading maker of computer hardware, primarily PCs, data storage and servers, the company would move into a socalled cloud model of large-scale data centers that customers access over the Internet, with largescale computing power available for sale or rent. HP would have its own data centers, the idea went, or build them for other companies, or sell individual components to corporations that wanted to build their own. He wanted HP to sell more software, in particular software to analyze databases for patterns and trends. The cloud strategy reflects current trends in technology. HP’s rival IBM is also selling cloud-based software to better plan and manage manufacturing, sales campaigns and even the delivery of government services. However, he worried privately about the challenges of transforming HP’s internal culture, which he saw as a confederation of fiefdoms. Executives reporting to Apotheker include the heads of what are effectively multibillion-dollar businesses in PCs, printing, storage and servers. It was never clear what role some of these businesses, like printers, could play in a cloud-centric HP model, which troubled some of the strong egos around the boss. Wall Street wearied of Apotheker well before the board considered moving. “To date, results have been very poor,” said A.M. Sacconaghi Jr., an analyst with Bernstein Research. “Autonomy was bad news for the price he was paying. Announcing you’re thinking of getting rid of the PC business without a concrete plan was No. 2. Deteriorating profitability, particularly in services, was No. 3.”

How the Fed’s move may affect economy, markets By Tom Petruno Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — The Federal Reserve on Wednesday announced a new thrust in its efforts to bolster the struggling economy. Here’s a look at what the central bank will do and the potential effects across the economy and markets:

Q: A:

What did the Fed announce? With short-term interest rates already near zero, the Fed hatched a new plan to drive down longer-term interest rates — including mortgage rates — as a way to stimulate economic growth.

Q: A:

How does the Fed expect to push longerterm rates down? Policymakers will manipulate their $2.65 trillion portfolio of U.S. Treasury and mortgage-backed bonds, most of which have been acquired since 2007. Over the next nine months, the Fed plans to sell $400 billion of the shorter-term Treasuries it owns and use the proceeds to buy bonds maturing between six and 30 years from now. By increasing demand for longer-term bonds, the Fed hopes to boost the prices of those securities, which in turn would lower market interest rates. As bond prices rise, the rates, or yields, on the securities decline.

Q: A:

How would lower Treasury bond yields drive down other interest rates? Treasury yields are the benchmarks for rates in general, so as they rise or fall they tend to pull other rates along.

Q: A:

How did the bond market react? The announcement triggered a new rush of buying in long-term Treasuries, driving yields sharply lower. The yield on the 30-year Treasury bond, the government’s longest-term bond, dropped to its lowest point since early 2009, plunging to 3.00 percent from 3.20 percent on Tuesday. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note, a benchmark that influences mortgage rates, slid to a 60-year low of 1.86 percent from 1.94 percent. Investors and traders snapped up bonds, betting that the Fed will succeed in driving rates down and keeping them down. If rates continue to fall, bonds purchased now will rise in value.

Q:

But if the Fed is selling shorter-term bonds, won’t that make short rates rise?

desertorthopedics.com Bend 541.388.2333

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A:

Possibly. But there is so much demand for Treasuries worldwide as a haven that many analysts believe the effect will be muted. On Wednesday, the yield on two-year T-notes edged up to 0.20 percent from 0.16 percent on Tuesday.

Q: A:

How does this Fed stimulus plan differ from previous plans? To buy the majority of its Treasury and mortgage bonds in the last few years, the Fed in effect printed new money. This time it isn’t doing that. “This is moving around the securities they already own,” Lederer said. The Fed has been sensitive to criticism that by pumping vast new sums into the financial system to buy bonds, it could eventually stoke inflation. By shifting existing assets into longer-term bonds, the Fed may hope to avoid fueling more inflation concerns.

Q: A:

What is likely to happen to mortgage rates? They should fall. Besides buying more longer-term Treasuries, the central bank threw the mortgage market another bone: The Fed said it would use the proceeds from maturing securities in its $885 billion mortgage-backed-bond portfolio to buy more of the same. Until now, the Fed has been using those proceeds to buy Treasury bonds. The shift back to mortgage bonds could bring $20 billion or more a month of Fed buying power into that market, said Walter Schmidt, a bond analyst at FTN Financial in Chicago. The average 30-year home loan rate in Freddie Mac’s weekly survey was a record low 4.09 percent last week, down from 4.60 percent in early July. The 4 percent level is a psychological barrier for the market, but “I think we can breach that” soon, Schmidt said. How low mortgage rates will go will depend on how low Treasury bond yields go. Ironically, though the Fed is trying to boost the economy by pulling longerterm bond yields down further, investors are more likely to join the new rush into bonds if they believe the economy will get worse before it gets better.

Q: A:

How does the Fed know that lower long-term rates will help the economy? It doesn’t. Rates already are very low, yet the economy has weakened significantly this year. Also, by pushing long-term rates lower the Fed will be helping borrowers that already have easy access to cheap money.


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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, September 22, 2011 B3

P F   RETIREMENT

A 2-step plan for building up your nest egg By John F. Wasik New York Times News Service

By now, you may have accepted, with grim reluctance, that you must delay taking your retirement benefits. But even if you’re looking at diminished balances from persistent market volatility, the news isn’t all that dour. Planning a twostep retirement will actually bolster your total retirement income. The best part of such a plan is that the longer you wait to collect Social Security, the higher the lifetime benefit. Once you retire, your monthly benefit will normally increase with annual inflation adjustments (except in 2009 and 2010). The earliest you can collect Social Security is age 62, and the highest-possible benefit comes at age 70. The Social Security Administration provides an incentive to wait, reducing the retirement benefit as much as 30 percent at 62 (compared with “normal” retirement age) and incrementally increasing it the longer you wait. Since the government will pay you a “delayed retirement credit” in the form of a higher monthly payment for each year you defer collecting benefits, you’ll need to use its calculator to plot the best strategy. The step-up in annual payments depends on when you were born, starting at 3 percent (for people born from 1917 to 1924) and increasing to 8 percent (for those born in 1943 and later). When you take Social Security, of course, depends upon your health, additional savings and debt situation. “You have to look at your health and financial resources first,” said Gary Gilgen, a certified financial planner with Rehmann Financial in Troy, Mich. “If your health is poor, it makes sense to draw out Social Security at younger ages. Managing debt is another concern.” What if you can afford to wait to collect Social Security? The second leg of the strategy is to fill the income gap until your government benefits begin. You can start withdrawing money from other savings, and you could also generate immediate cash by buying a fixed annuity from an insurance company that guarantees monthly payments. Most defined-benefit retirement plans, if you’re lucky enough to have one, include a feature that will pay out a fixed annuity benefit. If you have a defined-contribution plan like a 401(k), you’ll have to take a lump sum from your plan and buy the annuity on your own. In a study looking at household total net wealth from $349,000 to $1.5 million, the Government Accountability Office found that “delaying Social Security payments and buying an annuity” maximizes retirement income for nearly every income group. The one situation in which it did not was when one spouse was in poor health, in which case taking early Social Security benefits was recommended. “Some people may be inclined to want more guaranteed income,” said Christine Fahlund, a financial planner with T. Rowe Price, the mutual fund company. “There isn’t one best answer because people may have different goals.” In one retirement model she prepared, Fahlund showed that if a couple with $100,000 in combined preretirement income and $500,000 in investable assets each takes Social Security at 67 and combines annuity income for the first five years with savings withdrawals, it would wind up with $1.76 million in lifetime income — if both partners lived to be 95. About 80 percent of this income would be guaranteed. When you buy an annuity, make sure that the issuer is a toprated insurer. Ratings are provided by companies like A.M. Best and Weiss. The higher the letter grade, the better the financial health of the company.

Gen Y: Time is on your side with the stock market By Gail MarksJarvis Chicago Tribune

You can learn a lot from your parents, but when it comes to investing, you might want to be skeptical about mimicking them. A recent survey of Generation Y shows that many 18- to 30-year-olds have been so unnerved by the savagery of the stock market in the past few years that they are investing as conservatively as their parents and grandparents. These young adults have watched their parents struggle the past few years and are so afraid of the stock market that they are determined to keep their savings safe. For grandparents, it makes sense to be careful about the stock market. For parents about to retire, moderating stock market exposure is also smart. But people in their 20s who act like 50- or 60-year-olds with money could be making a grave mistake. Young investors may be playing it so safe with 401(k)s and other retirement savings that they will position them-

selves for a train wreck. By retirement, they will be far short of money. According to the MFS Investing Sentiment Survey by the Research Collaborative, 40 percent of Generation Y has concluded, “I will never feel comfortable investing in the stock market.” “Never” is a long time. But if you are among this group and have been warned by parents to stay clear of stocks, this is why you might want to reconsider.

A balanced approach First, it is true that the stock market can be brutal, and you have just witnessed one of the fiercest periods in stock market history. Stocks declined 49 percent in 2000-01; then, just as your parents recovered what they lost during that horrible bear market, the financial crisis arrived late in 2007 and destroyed 57 percent. You might have heard your parents curse stocks and mourn the losses in their 401(k)s. Their stress might have been intensi-

fied by the worst job market of their lifetime or a home plunging in value. Boomers went through much of their adulthood believing the stock market was a sure thing. In the 1980s, it delivered gains of 17.6 percent a year on average, according to Ibbotson data. In the ’90s, it was 18.2 percent. As boomers approached retirement, one in four had 90 percent of their 401(k) money invested in stocks, a dangerous amount for someone close to retirement but not necessarily for someone with 40 or 50 years of saving ahead of them. A central theme in investing is to select a mixture of stocks and bonds based on how close you are to retirement. At your parents’ age, you must be cautious, perhaps investing no more than 40 or 50 percent of retirement money in stocks so a loss doesn’t hit you just before you retire. But in your 20s, you are likely to enjoy plenty of good years in the stock market if you keep adding a little money from each paycheck to your 401(k) or an

IRA. Though you could suffer losses in the current rough period, over many years your early deposits in stock mutual funds in a 401(k) or IRA are likely to grow well. Historically, despite the awful periods in the market, stocks have gained 9.9 percent on average annually since 1926, and bonds have gained 5.5 percent, according to Ibbotson.

Why take the chance? A look back at history might provide courage. During the Great Depression, stocks crashed hard. The market dropped 86 percent and took more than 15 years to recover. It would have been a disaster for a person near retirement. An investor who put $10,000 into the stock market just before the crash had just $6,000 10 years later. But if you had been 25 years old and invested $10,000 in the stock market just before the crash, you would have had about $210,340 at retirement 40 years later. Time is on your side if you invest in stocks. You are investing in the long-term

growth of the economy. But you might say: Why take the chance? You wouldn’t have to if you were willing to save huge portions of your pay every year. But most people can’t stash enough into a savings account or safe U.S. bonds. Let’s say you are 30, you save $5,000 a year and earn the historical averages on your investments until retirement. In a savings account, you would accumulate about $247,000 by the time you retire. In Treasury bonds, you would have about $720,600, and in stocks, $2.3 million. If you divided your money half in stocks and half in bonds, you would have about $1.5 million. Perhaps $720,600 sounds like plenty to you. But remember, inflation requires you to have much more money in the future than you would today for a comparable standard of living. If you are used to living on $50,000 a year at age 30, you might need about $114,000 a year by retirement. Try www .c a lc x m l .c om /c a lc u lator s / ret05?sknequalsresults.


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B4 Thursday, September 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

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A-B-C-D AAR ABB Ltd ABM ACE Ltd AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGL Res AK Steel AMAG Ph AMC Net n AMN Hlth AMR AOL ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AVX Cp AXT Inc Aarons AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac AbitibiB n AboveNet Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaPh AcadiaRlt Accenture AccretivH Accuray Accuride n Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivePwr ActivsBliz Actuant Actuate Acuity Acxiom Adecaog n AdobeSy Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvATech AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs Adventrx AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeroflex n Aeropostl AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix Agenus AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agria Cp Agrium g AirProd AirTrnsp Aircastle Airgas Aixtron AkamaiT Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alere AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion s AlignTech Alkermes AllegTch Allergan Allete AlliData AlliancOne AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlliantTch AlldNevG AlldWldA AllosThera AllscriptH Allstate AlmadnM g AlphaNRs Alphatec AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AlteraCp lf AlterraCap AltraHldgs Altria AlumChina AmBev s Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL s AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AGreet AmIntlGrp AmOriBio AmSupr AmTower AVangrd AmWtrWks Ameriprise AmeriBrgn AmCasino Ametek s Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amylin Amyris n Anadarko Anadigc AnadysPh AnalogDev Anlogic Ancestry AnglogldA ABInBev Anixter Ann Inc Annaly Ansys AntaresP Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache AptInv ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldIndlT ApldMatl AMCC Approach AquaAm ArQule ArcelorMit ArchCap s ArchCh ArchCoal ArchDan ArcosDor n ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld ArmourRsd Arris ArrowEl ArtioGInv ArubaNet AsburyA AscenaRtl AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfoL AspenIns AspenTech AsscdBanc AsdEstat Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth AtlPwr g AtlasAir AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn AuRico g Aurizon g AuthenTec AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch AvalRare n AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AviatNetw AvisBudg

0.30 0.64 0.56 1.36

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Nm Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJsRest BJs Whls BMC Sft BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil BabckWil Baidu BakrHu BallCp s BallyTech BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantSA BcoSBrasil BcSanChile BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm pfH BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkAML pfQ BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BkOzarks s BankUtd n BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BiPCop BarcBk prD Barclay Bar iPVix rs BarVixMdT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BaytexE g BeaconP rs BeacnRfg Beam wi BeazerHm BebeStrs BectDck BedBath Belden Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett BioRefLab BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR BioSante BioScrip BlkHillsCp BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkBldAm BlkrkHigh Blackstone BlockHR BlueCoat BdwlkPpl BobEvans Boeing Boise Inc BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci BoydGm BradyCp Brandyw Braskem BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker Brinks BrMySq BristowGp Broadcom BroadrdgF BroadSoft Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfInfra BrkfldOfPr BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrukerCp Brunswick BuckTch Buckle Buenavent BuffaloWW BungeLt C&J Egy n CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBOE CBRE GRE CBS B CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNOOC CNinsure CPFL En s CSG Sys CSX s CTC Media CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVR Ptrs n CVS Care CYS Invest Cabelas CblvsNY s Cabot CabotO&G CACI CadencePh Cadence CalDive CalaStrTR Calgon CalifWtr s CaliperLSc Calix CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CalumetSp CamdenPT Cameco g CameltInfo Cameron CampSp CampCC n CIBC g CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar CapOne CapitlSrce CapFdF rs CapsteadM CpstnTrb h CarboCer CardnlHlth Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd CaribouC Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caseys CashAm CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen CatoCp Cavium CedarSh Celanese Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Celsion Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE Centene CenterFncl CenterPnt CnElBras pf CnElBras lf CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g CenGrdA lf CentAl CntryLink Cenveo Cephln Cepheid

D 1.10 23.76 -.89 26.88 -.23 0.92 21.01 -.72 1.26 -.02 0.92 26.08 -.94 0.64 21.00 -1.19 2.07 37.79 -.56 32.63 -.86 0.68 6.24 -.16 2.02 71.96 -3.63 2.02 57.17 -3.64 44.25 -1.58 51.05 40.86 -.45 1.68 36.90 -1.87 3.02 -.21 1.50 43.83 -2.65 0.35 17.58 -.78 19.88 -.42 138.33 -1.61 0.60 54.33 -3.54 0.28 32.77 -.74 28.21 -.41 1.36 60.11 -2.75 0.59 7.57 -.44 0.80 15.68 -.73 0.82 7.58 -.37 1.65 8.07 -.37 3.29 74.99 -2.71 0.04 9.02 -.73 0.04 6.38 -.52 2.05 22.33 -1.17 3.00 -.30 .90 -.12 2.16 22.85 -1.00 1.80 36.71 -1.99 1.01 -.03 2.80 56.81 -1.90 0.52 19.12 -1.09 2.08 50.43 -1.60 0.38 20.24 -.90 0.56 21.70 -.32 45.58 -.84 21.51 -.33 48.00 -.06 2.03 23.40 -.51 0.36 9.24 -.36 45.21 +2.33 67.78 +1.81 0.76 88.60 -3.07 11.04 -.35 0.32 19.88 -1.44 0.48 53.32 -.67 15.86 -2.44 1.24 54.56 -1.87 2.40 44.66 -2.58 .66 +.04 17.44 -.21 42.11 -1.39 1.71 -.02 0.10 7.05 -.28 1.64 73.70 -1.74 57.48 -1.46 0.20 27.82 -2.03 0.24 5.29 -.30 0.96 30.22 -.29 12.57 -.45 0.32 28.17 -.92 67.22 -2.50 0.32 43.71 -2.69 0.64 24.12 -.67 32.72 -.90 41.21 -1.46 18.03 -.43 96.96 -3.30 31.00 -.53 0.80 16.52 -.72 2.60 -.13 6.25 +.18 1.46 30.85 -.66 1.04 7.73 -.43 44.31 5.50 147.22 -8.36 1.42 19.92 +.01 0.17 2.01 -.01 0.40 12.68 -.47 0.60 13.16 -.93 15.39 +.07 2.10 26.07 -.23 1.00 28.46 -.73 1.68 61.02 -2.54 0.80 6.23 -.30 63.33 -5.67 0.04 5.70 -.50 2.00 95.05 -4.56 5.93 -.30 5.39 -.22 0.74 26.91 -.99 0.60 8.37 -.63 1.05 17.51 -.88 20.92 -.13 0.44 13.59 -.88 28.31 -.68 9.37 -.39 1.64 -.03 0.64 21.14 -.81 0.40 24.21 -.49 1.32 30.95 -.54 0.60 42.65 -.34 0.36 35.25 -.56 0.64 20.44 -.50 31.79 -1.12 .38 -.04 4.13 -.03 13.66 -.72 0.52 26.90 -1.36 1.40 26.93 -.65 0.56 15.19 -.79 0.34 7.51 -.43 0.32 8.16 -.40 0.32 18.05 -.56 0.28 6.51 -.42 13.69 -.29 0.05 13.95 -.56 0.24 25.72 -.82 0.80 37.58 -1.82 0.49 48.00 +1.00 61.18 -1.95 1.00 60.43 -2.45 19.87 -1.75 0.20 20.78 -.39 13.22 -.82 0.84 12.62 -.84 0.48 26.38 -.71 0.54 7.15 -.20 0.40 22.73 -1.03 1.60 152.94-10.73 1.16 66.46 -2.68 0.04 43.62 -2.01 32.33 -1.81 1.12 34.33 -.94 5.60 257.98 -5.68 0.84 20.06 -.41 29.77 -1.68 5.60 -.13 6.42 158.88 -9.97 6.95 -.17 1.60 23.88 -.57 13.01 -.48 0.48 18.59 -1.64 0.91 10.85 -.11 0.34 7.68 -.37 23.90 -1.48 0.41 26.02 -.71 0.50 35.33 -.48 2.20 12.25 -.32 20.81 -2.30 0.60 16.84 -.65 0.72 28.16 -2.22 0.12 70.03 -1.37 48.95 -2.30 5.80 -.36 9.51 -.06 2.11 -.11 0.63 8.27 -.23 13.87 -.75 0.62 17.16 -.61 10.43 -.01 10.82 -.13 0.04 5.64 -.21 5.03 -.32 15.31 -.25 1.98 16.96 -.58 1.96 56.18 -3.99 0.40 19.93 -.40 4.25 -.14 47.58 -3.04 1.16 30.67 -.56 0.64 11.60 -.14 3.60 73.31 -2.55 1.30 65.26 -3.91 0.36 31.74 -1.41 1.20 47.66 -3.43 4.48 +.16 0.20 41.39 -1.03 0.04 6.50 -.28 0.30 10.50 -.31 1.78 12.38 -.47 1.07 -.04 0.96 148.04 -4.34 0.86 42.65 -1.35 22.40 -.87 23.60 -.85 14.25 -.90 13.13 -.33 0.72 33.34 -1.83 27.43 -.65 1.00 32.76 -1.12 0.72 50.75 -1.91 25.74 -1.54 30.52 -1.40 0.60 44.22 -2.21 0.14 57.63 -1.92 58.21 -.38 1.84 79.36 -4.30 0.04 11.30 -.66 0.92 22.93 -.39 33.27 -.63 0.36 3.16 -.28 0.24 38.87 -4.32 7.83 -.25 63.80 -1.76 1.02 -.05 3.08 -.03 3.90 -.27 1.89 16.00 -.60 0.80 31.31 -1.54 30.26 -.95 4.60 -.27 0.79 19.36 -.77 0.03 12.72 -.31 1.56 9.63 -.17 6.42 -.44 8.96 -.32 0.01 25.18 -.20 6.93 -.25 9.86 -.71 2.90 33.45 -1.19 3.12 -.16 81.05 36.93 -.66

Nm Ceradyne Cerner s Changyou ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds ChkPoint Checkpnt Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemed Chemtura n CheniereEn ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinaFire ChinaLife ChinaMble ChinaSun ChinaTcF ChinaUni ChiValve Chipotle Chiquita ChrisBnk Chubb ChungTel n ChurchD s CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigp pfN Citigrp rs Citigp wtA Citigp wtB Citigrp pfS CitrixSys CityNC Clarcor ClaudeR g CleanEngy CleanH s Clearwire CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPeak Coach CobaltIEn CocaCola CocaCE Coeur CoffeeH CogdSpen CogentC CognizTech Cogo Grp Cohen&Str CohStQIR Coherent Coinstar ColdwtrCrk Colfax ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColonyFncl ColBnkg ColumLabs Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmclVehcl CmwREIT CmtyBkSy CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s CmGnom n CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Con-Way ConAgra ConchoRes ConcurTch ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Continucre Cnvrgys CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopaHold Copart Copel CoreLabs CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpExc CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costco Cntwd pfB CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CowenGp CrackerB Credicp CSVS2xVxS CSVelIVSt s CredSuiss Cree Inc CreXus Crocs CrosstexE CrosstxLP CrwnCstle CrownHold Ctrip.com CubeSmart CubistPh CullenFr Cummins CumMed CurEuro CurAstla CurrCda CurSwiss CurtisWrt Cymer CypSemi CytRx h Cytec Cytori DCT Indl DDR Corp DFC Gbl s DHT Hldgs DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DST Sys DSW Inc DTE DanaHldg Danaher Darden Darling Datalink DaVita DeVry DealrTrk DeanFds DeckrsOut Deere DejourE g Delcath Dell Inc DelphiFn DeltaAir Deluxe DemandTc DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DeutBCT5 pf DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevonE Dex One DexCom Diageo DiamondF DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigtlR pfE DigRiver DigitalGlb Dillards Diodes DirecTV A DrxTcBull DrSCBr rs DirFnBr rs DirLCBr rs DirDGldBr DirDGldBll DrxEMBull DrxTcBear DRE Bear DrxEnBear DrxSOXBll DirEMBear DrxFnBull Dir30TrBear Dir30TrBull DirLatBull

D 25.78 -1.53 69.25 -1.03 32.20 -.31 30.00 -.46 2.77 -.13 50.96 -1.83 56.36 -.35 14.08 -.51 25.58 -.67 4.24 -.12 0.64 52.71 -3.31 11.82 -1.07 6.44 -.50 0.35 29.42 -.99 3.12 94.27 -3.52 0.20 30.74 -1.25 0.20 12.66 -.66 43.94 -1.68 0.62 2.91 -.08 8.77 +.02 0.91 35.21 -.40 2.04 50.00 -1.48 1.34 -.18 2.05 -.10 0.12 21.46 -.62 2.41 -.07 333.25 +.06 8.46 -.28 0.24 4.44 -.10 1.56 57.55 -2.73 1.91 32.90 -.78 0.68 43.32 -1.14 3.13 +.02 12.04 -.71 0.40 61.75 -3.02 3.08 -.08 1.61 25.91 -1.41 0.84 19.34 -.74 0.49 29.61 -1.22 15.96 +.26 0.24 15.84 -.69 2.13 25.31 -.20 1.97 26.31 -.29 0.04 25.52 -1.41 .43 -.01 .09 -.00 1.50 22.28 -.31 55.00 +.16 0.80 38.57 -2.06 0.42 40.59 -1.69 2.23 +.05 11.96 -.40 53.39 -1.92 2.32 -.14 1.12 61.55 -9.05 2.40 66.75 -2.01 18.73 -1.25 0.90 56.76 -2.59 8.78 -.79 1.88 69.28 -1.37 0.52 25.67 -.96 26.95 -.32 0.12 11.93 -2.62 0.40 3.88 -.13 14.04 -.31 62.85 -1.16 2.31 -.02 0.60 32.35 -2.32 0.72 8.01 -.47 44.41 -.33 42.66 -2.53 1.23 -.17 23.71 -.17 2.32 89.99 -3.97 12.73 -.63 0.60 19.04 -1.51 1.32 13.76 -.83 0.24 14.68 -1.10 2.09 -.09 0.45 21.86 -.86 0.45 21.61 -.79 0.40 22.69 -1.80 0.92 34.26 -2.20 0.48 10.46 -.45 6.35 -.49 2.00 18.61 -1.15 0.96 22.06 -1.27 17.08 -.86 36.90 +.54 0.39 33.79 -1.38 6.60 -.36 22.74 -2.48 0.80 26.96 -1.18 7.88 -.31 17.62 -.95 0.40 23.32 -1.81 0.92 23.03 +.04 82.57 -4.45 37.33 -1.17 2.64 64.95 -2.06 0.40 37.92 -2.45 2.40 57.26 -.84 17.01 -1.29 18.04 -.67 0.96 38.99 -.67 52.79 -1.29 6.23 -.09 9.40 -.31 0.06 80.29 -2.71 1.16 45.55 -1.21 0.42 10.26 -.46 1.64 67.46 -3.15 37.65 -2.18 1.00 19.58 -.57 1.00 101.77 -2.91 11.20 -.42 1.81 -.09 0.64 42.64 -2.37 0.20 12.89 -.53 0.60 29.21 -1.91 1.65 23.51 -1.68 22.83 -.26 0.28 10.21 -.75 0.96 84.43 -.64 1.75 19.82 -.23 0.18 5.95 -.33 47.00 -1.29 0.30 13.91 -.87 29.93 -1.44 0.80 45.93 -1.54 2.96 -.09 1.00 39.90 -.78 1.95 100.60 -.91 65.50 +6.36 6.61 -.39 1.40 24.10 +.03 31.84 -.99 1.00 8.75 +.25 26.93 -.99 0.40 14.24 1.24 16.06 -.79 43.31 -.25 31.29 +.13 34.27 -1.71 0.28 9.25 -.37 34.99 -.31 1.84 45.18 -2.44 1.60 91.61 -2.64 2.89 -.09 0.19 135.45 -.74 3.82 100.76 -1.93 0.11 98.86 -1.20 109.98 -1.23 0.32 26.75 -2.05 40.56 -.34 0.36 16.99 -.02 .36 -.01 0.50 36.19 -2.27 3.33 +.08 0.28 4.76 -.24 0.24 11.03 -.64 23.06 -.79 0.40 2.18 -.22 0.78 10.17 -.01 1.33 30.07 -.01 0.15 9.65 -.13 0.70 43.55 -1.12 0.60 44.87 -1.22 2.35 49.50 -1.49 10.96 -1.02 0.10 44.78 -1.46 1.72 43.88 -.95 14.13 -.81 8.39 -.74 72.37 -1.05 0.24 38.60 -1.44 16.34 -.91 8.25 -.37 98.42 -2.03 1.64 72.82 -3.16 .29 +.00 3.64 -.24 14.69 -.19 0.48 21.29 -1.20 8.00 -.37 1.00 19.30 -1.78 5.61 -.28 12.99 -.76 10.96 -.09 1.36 -.06 3.38 -.12 0.20 32.25 -1.37 5.97 -.01 1.07 31.26 -1.74 2.01 24.66 -.08 64.40 -1.60 4.52 +.10 0.68 61.61 -3.26 .85 -.10 12.60 -.50 2.63 75.89 -2.09 0.18 91.91 -.56 0.50 60.22 -1.92 0.32 6.92 -.51 7.70 -.51 8.90 -.59 33.74 -1.50 1.12 27.50 -.58 2.72 53.58 -2.05 1.75 24.99 -.01 21.60 -.16 20.14 -.56 0.20 45.91 -1.74 17.97 -.19 41.61 -2.00 0.84 35.33 -1.31 49.85 +5.00 65.60 +8.07 42.89 +3.57 30.20 +1.17 40.13 -1.62 1.10 16.60 -2.08 20.71 +.69 13.63 +1.85 19.76 +2.18 29.22 -1.95 28.60 +2.89 11.50 -1.52 16.65 -1.81 1.28 68.82 +6.14 2.30 16.04 -2.00

Nm

D

DrxREBull DirxSCBull DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DishNetwk Disney DrReddy DolbyLab DoleFood DollarGen DollarTh DollarTree DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs Donldson DonlleyRR DoralFncl DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragonW g DrmWksA DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad Dunkin n DyaxCp Dycom Dynavax Dynegy

0.05 43.16 36.89 51.54 38.89 0.24 25.34 39.93 37.94 26.27 0.40 31.28 0.65 31.05 28.80 9.85 37.08 62.01 76.00 1.97 49.89 28.45 1.40 75.36 0.60 55.92 1.04 14.10 1.17 0.52 17.27 1.26 49.28 1.00 25.54 1.28 37.37 3.83 18.82 45.46 0.52 4.46 61.22 0.12 2.92 1.64 44.61 0.48 21.16 1.00 19.66 0.68 10.76 1.44 63.01 28.30 1.47 17.59 2.03 5.08

Nm -7.90 -4.61 -5.24 -4.85 -1.45 +.19 -.01 -.96 -1.03 -.41 -1.46 -.29 -.57 -1.04 +.31 -.71 +.12 -2.89 -1.35 -.60 -.09 -.63 -1.52 -1.73 -.83 -.17 -.49 -.60 -.10 -2.50 -.24 -1.35 -.76 -.09 -.48 -2.16 +.32 -.07 +.11 -.10 -.16

5.51 0.25 6.02 10.25 32.24 21.34 19.44 1.38 34.37 0.64 83.43 0.88 60.55 3.04 72.84 1.80 0.40 16.59 0.20 6.87 0.20 14.84 2.08 40.16 2.08 71.02 2.55 1.36 36.21 0.72 22.23 1.16 9.01 1.14 8.37 1.21 10.03 1.33 11.11 0.16 15.49 0.70 50.23 1.39 42.70 1.28 37.33 0.28 9.14 76.48 4.46 0.04 18.42 0.88 31.19 1.92 37.04 9.76 0.12 20.18 21.95 14.28 0.72 25.99 1.33 18.85 1.38 43.75 19.91 6.68 2.13 29.09 0.98 31.13 0.80 21.64 22.16 8.48 12.40 28.12 10.85 1.20 34.34 .17 0.54 43.30 68.54 .96 11.33 2.50 37.43 3.58 43.89 22.89 2.99 2.16 25.87 0.79 17.89 20.63 31.14 1.40 46.19 7.00 3.32 65.18 2.42 42.26 2.80 38.57 4.24 7.70 0.64 30.58 94.38 1.50 67.20 0.88 15.84 1.47 52.33 0.37 10.09 4.16 127.42 0.75 99.60 55.05 39.32 0.28 13.93 0.28 3.01 0.72 22.50 1.92 78.14 6.97 10.86 2.14 0.16 11.70 6.03 2.10 43.44 4.92 4.30 22.75 0.28 28.22 0.50 42.18 19.94 40.26 9.71 0.56 19.95 2.53 1.88 71.97 32.50 76.68 31.13 0.24 26.31 0.60 72.85 41.13 0.48 8.24 1.82 35.04 4.73 1.08 91.33 0.08 22.30 12.64 0.72 52.92 0.52 35.86 0.52 72.50 2.76 83.71 0.24 4.50 0.96 16.79 2.34 6.61 1.06 8.86 0.48 15.37 0.20 24.88 1.28 9.26 0.32 9.77 18.88 20.19 0.20 18.81 0.24 13.21 0.16 4.16 49.13 0.12 3.81 0.48 13.62 0.04 6.17 8.43 20.11 0.04 7.51 0.64 9.75 0.80 12.75 24.18 73.52 0.08 18.83 0.58 30.38 0.05 17.79 2.20 45.32 0.64 10.62 51.50 2.74 .50 0.16 7.04 5.76 5.02 0.60 18.17 1.28 79.93 0.50 53.76 30.43 1.16 67.36 0.66 20.41 3.66 9.97 2.38 11.70 31.41 17.62 6.71 17.52 3.19 6.95 13.40 0.76 55.46 0.28 28.02 97.69 19.92 2.02 15.91 1.00 110.67 0.76 11.60 0.20 10.98 1.00 35.59 12.51 0.40 22.77 36.49 0.75 6.37 0.47 5.62

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How to Read the Market in Review

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Nm FuelCell FullerHB FultonFncl Fusion-io n GATX GFI Grp GMX Rs GNC n GT AdvTc G-III GTx Inc GabelliET GabGldNR Gafisa SA Gallaghr GameStop Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin Gartner GascoEngy Gastar grs GaylrdEnt GenProbe GencoShip GenCorp Generac GnCable GenDynam GenElec GenGrPr n GenMarit GenMills GenMoly GenMot n GenesWyo GenOn En Genpact Gentex Gentiva h GenuPrt Genworth GeoGrp Geores GaGulf Gerdau GeronCp GiantInter s GigaMed Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc Glatfelter GlaxoSKln Gleacher GlimchRt GlbGeophy GloblInd GlobPay GlbShipLs GblXColm s GblXChCon GlbXSilvM Globalstr h GlbSpcMet GluMobile GolLinhas GolarLNG GoldFLtd GoldResrc Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldS60 n GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google GovPrpIT vjGrace Graco GrafTech Graingr Gramrcy lf GranTrra g GraniteC GraphPkg GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPanSilv g GtPlainEn GreenMtC GreenbCos Greenhill GrifolsSA n Group1 GrubbEllis GpTelevisa Guess GugSolar GulfRes GulfMrkA GulfportE H&E Eq HCA Hld n HCC Ins HCP Inc HDFC Bk s HFF Inc HMS Hld s HNI Corp HSBC HSN Inc HainCel Hallibrtn Halozyme HancHld Hanesbrds HanmiFncl HanoverIns HansenMed HansenNat HanwhaSol HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp Harsco HartfdFn HartfFn wt HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HlthCSvc s HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg Healthwys HrtlndEx Heckmann Heckmn wt HeclaM Heico s Heinz HelixEn HelmPayne HSchein Herbalife s HercOffsh HeritOkB Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewlettP Hexcel Hibbett HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HillenInc HilltopH HimaxTch HollyFrt s Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomeProp HomexDev Honda HonwllIntl Hormel s Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic

D 1.08 -.03 0.30 19.86 -.45 0.20 7.69 -.54 16.80 -1.67 1.16 31.09 -3.18 0.20 4.14 -.07 2.20 -.01 21.15 -1.53 8.06 -.32 22.73 -1.03 3.54 -.10 0.58 4.94 -.12 1.68 16.28 -.21 0.29 6.76 -.48 1.32 26.92 -.99 23.44 -.54 0.32 8.95 -.56 0.45 16.19 -.53 0.20 71.63 -2.52 2.00 32.57 -.64 36.00 -.89 .23 -.01 3.95 -.33 19.79 -1.45 60.49 -1.20 7.93 +.04 3.93 -.11 17.31 -1.10 23.07 -2.79 1.88 57.27 -2.28 0.60 15.38 -.66 0.40 12.24 -.80 .25 -.01 1.22 38.44 +.95 3.14 -.07 21.28 -1.15 46.76 -2.74 2.95 -.03 0.18 15.61 -.16 0.48 23.86 -1.47 5.63 -.35 1.80 50.15 -2.03 5.35 -.36 18.80 -1.07 21.49 -.31 17.91 -.84 0.25 7.83 -.38 2.29 -.11 0.18 3.69 -.16 .90 -.02 0.30 27.18 -1.42 39.67 -1.17 0.52 9.42 -.58 0.36 12.71 -.39 2.17 40.93 -1.10 1.26 -.03 0.40 7.79 -.43 8.20 -.89 7.86 +.01 0.08 41.88 -1.08 2.08 -.31 0.21 19.51 -.21 0.19 14.67 -.52 0.25 26.29 -.53 .45 +.01 0.20 15.65 +.40 3.01 -.04 0.12 6.60 -.22 1.10 34.71 -.82 0.24 17.89 +.12 0.60 21.60 -.63 0.41 51.28 -1.58 2.18 -.10 1.53 24.78 -.09 1.40 97.86 -4.75 1.16 109.49 -2.33 14.75 -.16 10.01 -.68 539.20 -7.43 1.68 21.41 -.34 36.32 -1.87 0.84 34.47 -1.69 13.90 -1.38 2.64 157.05 -3.42 3.22 -.01 5.57 -.30 0.52 19.17 -.40 3.61 -.18 2.12 -.12 0.08 4.25 -.21 3.29 -.08 0.83 19.37 -.45 110.01 +.26 13.06 -.77 1.80 28.44 -1.50 6.10 -.13 0.52 35.35 -1.91 .55 0.15 18.11 -.52 0.80 30.20 -1.43 0.03 3.79 -.22 2.82 -.13 40.05 -.23 26.35 -1.25 7.78 19.82 -.08 0.62 26.40 -1.22 1.92 35.48 -2.07 0.22 30.54 -.78 8.75 -.50 24.92 -.77 0.92 17.74 -.32 1.90 39.12 -1.44 34.18 +1.03 31.64 -.15 0.36 35.09 -2.89 6.11 -.10 0.96 26.68 -1.34 26.25 -.87 .85 -.05 1.10 34.76 -1.22 3.72 -.46 91.01 -.95 2.53 -.24 20.76 -.05 0.50 35.28 -1.41 0.30 31.93 -1.26 4.40 -.16 0.08 13.28 -.14 1.12 37.36 -1.76 0.82 20.74 -1.16 0.40 16.57 -1.36 9.66 -1.19 11.63 -.53 1.20 34.62 -.73 4.00 25.50 -.73 1.24 24.09 -.48 4.29 -.20 1.70 -.05 2.86 48.07 -2.60 0.64 15.46 -.68 6.76 -.28 1.20 17.30 -.51 24.58 -1.36 15.02 -1.48 34.52 -2.09 10.45 -.96 0.08 13.45 -.49 5.42 .08 -.01 7.02 -.05 0.12 47.50 +.84 1.92 49.71 -.90 14.86 -1.40 0.28 48.27 -2.80 63.80 -1.22 0.80 56.70 -1.21 3.63 -.30 3.46 +.01 0.24 3.44 -.19 1.38 58.21 -1.08 9.87 -.61 0.40 56.49 -3.27 0.48 23.98 +1.51 21.02 -.99 34.19 -1.00 1.70 28.10 -1.79 0.45 29.21 -1.33 0.76 18.37 -.48 7.41 -.17 0.24 1.15 -.05 0.35 29.64 -1.03 15.71 -.57 1.00 33.84 -.97 36.19 -.38 2.48 56.15 -2.29 15.49 -.93 30.15 -.91 1.33 44.87 -1.88 0.51 27.19 -.64 28.17 -.41 8.60 -.42 36.14 -1.72 1.80 22.39 -1.28 0.16 10.83 -.68 0.28 7.85 +.09

Nm HovnanE HubGroup HubbelB HudsCity HudsonHi HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn Hyperdyn

D

1.52 0.32 1.00 0.52 0.16 0.40

1.35 -.05 27.18 -.45 52.12 -2.41 5.46 -.48 3.53 -.46 14.58 +1.58 75.00 -1.87 35.98 -1.99 4.66 -.37 11.16 -.84 4.06 -.13

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41.25 -.91 0.20 22.59 -.66 0.63 36.60 -.29 73.24 -1.24 0.15 11.35 -.15 75.58 -4.31 17.72 -.51 1.20 9.45 -.19 6.52 -.40 2.13 23.14 +.25 0.31 5.13 -.06 5.64 -.43 60.84 -1.03 25.09 -.82 17.40 -.22 1.06 21.09 -.80 3.42 56.20 -2.57 0.53 27.08 -1.00 1.15 27.12 -.87 0.67 19.00 -.60 0.67 18.27 -.71 0.42 15.57 -.52 0.17 9.46 -.12 0.50 49.98 -1.85 0.39 12.58 -.27 0.71 50.85 -1.96 0.50 11.44 -.49 1.73 39.04 -1.33 2.41 60.43 -3.05 1.04 23.35 -1.01 0.29 12.60 -.27 0.48 15.16 -.58 0.98 57.07 -2.46 0.96 36.73 -1.40 1.33 49.12 -1.97 38.56 -.27 1.14 52.89 -1.53 1.80 48.89 -1.60 4.70 116.20 +.20 1.27 50.14 -1.65 0.85 33.67 -1.55 1.08 77.33 -4.35 2.45 117.46 -3.76 3.78 110.48 +.18 0.84 37.59 -1.45 5.09 113.37 +.26 1.02 40.51 -1.20 0.18 26.76 -1.77 1.24 63.96 -1.72 0.58 36.81 -1.58 1.10 41.45 -1.57 1.31 52.83 -1.91 4.02 118.66 +3.80 3.14 105.43 +.45 1.52 29.25 -.99 0.75 84.58 -.09 1.68 48.22 -1.48 0.99 39.91 -1.57 0.53 52.61 -1.68 1.64 92.19 -3.43 1.03 81.48 -2.96 7.28 86.15 -.75 0.21 49.62 -1.02 0.51 96.73 -1.73 1.97 63.87 -3.67 1.38 58.01 -2.14 0.77 55.09 -1.50 1.25 64.83 -2.10 1.31 58.52 -2.41 2.58 104.17 -.04 0.52 76.74 -2.87 0.94 66.59 -2.56 0.10 110.23 -.01 2.56 36.20 -.47 1.27 69.09 -2.23 0.62 21.01 -.66 0.32 61.84 -.90 2.09 52.76 -2.65 0.07 9.31 -.32 0.70 44.91 -2.28 0.52 36.29 -1.53 0.75 60.00 -2.27 1.06 63.17 -3.53 1.01 39.47 -.85 1.15 32.01 -.99 6.54 -.20 1.41 76.70 -.76 1.00 42.42 -1.73 61.30 -3.69 1.36 43.94 -2.63 17.16 -.35 16.72 -1.15 1.20 38.26 -.89 5.62 -.20 1.97 -.03 0.68 32.08 -1.92 1.44 43.65 -1.35 41.67 -3.31 16.78 -.94 10.20 -.07 3.75 20.91 -.14 0.44 37.10 -.80 13.80 -.45 1.50 32.62 -.44 2.82 26.81 -.63 7.83 -.37 8.76 -.36 40.82 +.74 1.35 49.00 -.95 0.48 31.79 -1.41 16.87 -.59 3.04 -.14 0.57 7.25 -.36 8.53 -.57 15.52 -.48 12.77 -.61 15.82 -.29 5.66 -.18 2.72 48.86 -1.62 0.84 21.94 -.26 0.40 14.26 -.13 5.98 -.04 122.87 +.42 0.40 58.36 -1.04 0.08 11.76 -.75 6.68 -.08 22.22 -1.78 4.86 -.26 3.00 173.02 -1.70 1.24 58.12 -1.42 0.24 14.58 -.45 1.05 25.97 -1.25 20.70 -.36 6.92 -.45 59.63 -1.29 0.24 7.67 -.46 0.48 10.92 -.22 7.77 -.57 30.91 -1.88 0.60 47.69 -1.25 380.29 -8.40 0.05 24.13 -.56 0.49 16.90 -.94 3.74 15.44 -.33 0.29 4.34 -.01 10.45 -.50 12.43 -.70 0.52 7.13 -.24 6.87 -.06 1.00 32.18 -1.36 6.82 +.02 0.84 15.54 -.72 33.96 -1.09 1.20 -.10 1.48 16.84 -2.00 7.58 -.35 0.80 29.93 -.32 2.25 +.25 12.46 -.60 1.00 30.34 -1.91 9.50 -.55 1.94 35.39 -.40 0.28 16.84 -.45 0.42 28.93 -.25 19.71 -.64 33.90 -1.09 6.38 -.22 0.40 19.82 +.01 1.52 -.03 7.74 -1.32 0.20 6.16 -.27 0.35 29.45 -1.01

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M-N-O-P M&T Bk MB Fncl MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MGIC MGM Rsts MI Devel MIPS Tech MKS Inst MPG OffTr MSC Ind MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macys MadCatz g MSG MagelnHl MagelMPtr Magma MagnaI gs MagHRes MaidenH MaidenBrd Majesco MAKO Srg Manitowoc MannKd ManpwrGp Manulife g MarathnO s MarathP n MarinaBio MktVGold MktV Steel MkVStrMet MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MktVIndo s MktVCoal MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MStewrt MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo Mastec MasterCrd

2.80 68.29 -3.54 0.04 14.41 -1.23 7.89 -.65 0.68 4.05 -.20 1.00 17.94 -.35 0.65 19.80 -.55 3.26 -.08 6.43 -.42 4.62 -.16 1.00 6.87 -.30 2.24 -.09 10.81 -.22 0.40 28.66 -.77 5.43 +.02 0.60 22.45 -.49 2.08 -.20 0.88 58.50 -1.94 29.67 -1.27 2.00 43.85 -2.68 1.80 28.25 -1.52 0.40 26.12 -1.22 .69 -.02 23.48 -.22 46.59 -1.07 3.14 61.29 -.11 5.10 -.05 1.00 34.01 -2.59 4.41 -.31 0.32 7.58 -.33 23.08 -.13 2.36 -.12 38.83 -.26 0.08 7.48 -.70 3.26 -.07 0.80 34.64 -1.43 0.52 11.82 -.71 0.60 23.73 -1.04 0.80 32.40 -1.29 .19 -.01 0.40 64.28 -1.35 1.03 47.82 -2.74 17.54 -1.14 0.18 28.98 -1.18 2.93 35.10 -1.21 0.33 47.01 -1.87 0.27 26.45 -1.65 0.19 34.48 -2.30 2.80 48.57 -.23 0.40 27.77 -.84 0.88 26.98 -1.06 3.30 +.01 1.60 62.94 -1.46 14.86 -.16 0.30 7.19 -.42 0.75 21.48 -.64 18.45 -.96 0.60 340.97-12.81

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D 8.93 -.61 0.92 26.29 -.61 0.88 24.55 -.20 1.35 -.02 1.12 45.52 -1.14 12.52 -.73 2.44 87.52 -1.79 1.00 43.35 -1.90 0.80 74.88 -2.50 11.10 -.57 1.04 74.23 -.94 1.00 25.95 -1.14 13.38 -.97 5.31 -.09 49.40 -.85 0.80 9.46 -.53 15.20 -.05 0.32 36.89 -1.55 16.56 -.32 16.57 -.22 18.06 -.22 62.86 -1.07 0.97 33.87 -.95 10.31 -.96 32.17 +.21 0.48 27.36 -.56 9.91 -.01 0.32 64.10 -4.17 1.52 31.85 -.65 1.02 22.04 -.98 6.70 -.21 0.76 16.51 -.77 15.90 -1.27 7.08 -.76 3.85 -.07 0.68 22.13 -1.10 0.74 29.03 -2.04 9.29 -.78 144.04 -8.19 0.16 9.97 +.23 1.39 33.19 -.54 4.61 -.04 6.61 -.25 46.80 -1.55 16.68 +.01 0.80 25.99 -.99 .80 -.04 2.51 62.18 -3.67 2.77 -.09 0.09 16.14 -.99 0.30 25.76 -.35 17.80 -.65 0.20 51.76 -1.25 10.15 -.43 4.23 -.08 2.85 -.11 1.06 13.95 -.44 9.36 -.39 42.23 -.89 0.80 20.76 -.62 15.58 -.90 1.28 40.63 -1.74 39.85 -1.60 10.62 -.98 2.29 -.01 10.96 -.58 1.20 65.86 -1.85 7.87 -.69 0.40 17.02 -.31 0.56 31.76 -1.11 0.20 13.82 -1.30 1.20 15.61 -.26 0.20 63.59 -2.45 0.88 43.11 -1.23 37.95 +.13 2.01 1.65 0.40 42.25 -1.81 0.07 2.25 -.16 1.10 48.03 -2.71 19.41 -.78 18.98 -.75 17.63 -.20 26.63 -.57 1.80 16.16 -.41 32.74 -1.94 6.33 -.47 22.37 -.63 0.63 19.24 +.06 0.48 14.27 -.55 17.12 -.81 1.20 25.70 -.69 15.63 -1.16 0.14 35.63 -.56 5.99 -.36 24.18 -.52 0.29 .93 +.04 0.88 14.06 +.03 11.31 -.55 1.42 55.14 -1.11 2.92 50.14 -.17 0.40 24.28 -.68 0.44 58.04 -3.65 0.12 6.83 -.47 1.54 26.17 -.53 0.40 24.99 +.08 9.82 -.12 0.24 3.31 -.26 1.76 14.44 -.16 35.11 -2.16 5.07 -.01 .60 -.04 2.86 -.06 7.68 6.37 +.08 48.16 +.06 35.89 +.63 43.23 -.45 128.50 -1.53 11.75 -.39 5.76 -.09 31.55 -.45 5.75 -.10 25.46 -.04 0.06 6.50 -.30 13.56 -.17 29.34 -3.00 1.00 11.87 -.74 6.18 -.46 0.60 4.55 -.35 0.32 11.96 -.63 44.30 -3.32 1.20 67.68 -2.22 7.07 -.59 0.19 16.13 -.70 0.19 16.22 -.68 0.20 17.19 -1.11 2.20 54.81 -.86 0.92 21.67 -.84 1.86 54.73 -1.00 28.59 +.92 1.24 85.74 -3.72 19.62 -.31 24.30 -.07 0.53 33.41 -1.09 0.88 77.09 -4.26 0.55 5.57 -.32 3.71 -.16 9.77 -.73 1.10 15.80 -.50 0.50 41.95 -1.21 0.92 46.18 -1.31 1.72 61.93 -5.61 5.77 -.36 3.14 -.18 1.44 32.33 -.79 1.10 34.25 -.56 7.34 -.56 21.67 +.48 1.12 34.83 -.81 3.71 -.17 2.00 51.89 -1.96 0.40 3.43 -.14 0.44 11.74 -.41 7.80 -.38 2.53 54.93 -.45 3.14 -.17 1.51 -.05 29.03 -.43 0.64 44.83 -1.14 18.65 -2.56 19.22 1.45 32.92 -1.19 0.70 10.82 -.42 0.76 7.79 -.10 14.47 -.29 18.74 -.66 5.32 -.04 1.50 47.92 -1.24 27.53 -1.25 69.79 -.63 26.06 -.40 1.84 76.32 -4.46 0.60 39.15 -2.23 1.08 9.42 -.36 4.11 +.03

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Oculus 1.55 +.33 OcwenFn 12.61 -.48 OdysMar 2.16 -1.08 OfficeDpt 2.17 -.10 OfficeMax 4.96 -.31 OilSvHT 1.58 118.60 -6.72 OilStates 58.32 -2.87 Oilsands g .21 -.01 OldDomFrt 29.40 -2.21 OldNBcp 0.28 9.02 -.52 OldRepub 0.70 9.10 -.39 Olin 0.80 18.55 -.89 OmegaHlt 1.60 16.95 -1.27 Omncre 0.16 27.83 -1.28 Omnicell 14.68 -.32 Omnicom 1.00 37.24 -1.66 OmniVisn 16.31 +.17 Omnova 3.71 -.20 OnSmcnd 7.72 -.18 Oncothyr 6.76 +.02 ONEOK 2.24 66.41 -1.65 Oneok Pt s 2.34 43.58 -.52 OnyxPh 31.75 -1.38 OpenTxt 53.73 -1.13 OpenTable 48.18 -1.46 OpnwvSy 1.80 -.01 OpkoHlth 4.39 -.14 Opnext 1.35 -.05 OptimerPh 16.77 +.65 Oracle 0.24 29.54 +1.19 OraSure 7.60 +.11 OrbitalSci 12.71 -.78 Orexigen 2.19 +.72 OrientEH 7.26 -.24 OrionMar 5.84 -.33 Oritani 0.40 12.83 -.47 OshkoshCp 17.14 -1.42 OvShip 0.88 15.84 -.72 OwensMin 0.80 28.81 -.88 OwensCorn 23.40 -1.84 OwensIll 16.80 -.80 Oxigne rsh 1.13 -.01 PDL Bio 0.60 5.58 -.07 PF Chng 0.96 27.59 -.80 PG&E Cp 1.82 42.41 -.55 PHH Corp 16.75 -.55 PMC Sra 6.45 +.05 PMI Grp .21 -.01 PNC 1.40 47.69 -2.50 PNM Res 0.50 14.26 -.62 POSCO 1.68 84.94 -4.99 PPG 2.28 73.54 -3.98 PPL Corp 1.40 28.98 -.29 PSS Wrld 19.97 -.90 PVH Corp 0.15 62.81 -3.10 PacWstBc 0.04 14.60 -.42 Paccar 0.72 35.44 -1.72 PacerIntl 3.74 -.20 PacBiosci n 4.25 -1.31 PacEth rsh .28 -.01 PacSunwr 1.45 -.07 PackAmer 0.80 25.46 -.94 PaetecHld 5.58 -.15 PallCorp 0.70 42.14 -1.76 PanASlv 0.10 32.08 -.41 Panasonic 0.12 9.54 -.25 Pandora n 10.01 -.50 PaneraBrd 112.52 -2.31 Pantry 12.19 -.64 ParPharm 26.47 -1.26 ParagShip 1.04 -.11 ParamTch 15.45 -.64 ParaG&S 2.94 -.05 Parexel 19.02 -1.24 ParkDrl 5.07 -.13 ParkerHan 1.48 64.61 -2.77 PrtnrCm 1.94 9.70 -.20 PartnerRe 2.40 54.12 -1.56 PatriotCoal 10.11 -1.30 Patterson 0.48 28.14 -.29 PattUTI 0.20 19.54 -1.82 Paychex 1.24 26.38 -.78 PeabdyE 0.34 39.96 -2.94 Pebblebrk 0.48 14.80 -.34 Pendrell 2.06 -.13 Pengrth g 0.84 9.91 -.17 PnnNGm 35.22 -.42 PennVa 0.23 6.45 -.55 PennVaRs 1.96 25.01 -1.28 PennWst g 1.08 16.90 -.69 PennantPk 1.08 9.17 -.34 Penney 0.80 26.29 -.75 PenRE 0.60 8.54 -.74 Penske 0.32 16.68 -1.15 Pentair 0.80 32.77 -.84 PeopUtdF 0.63 11.58 -.59 PepBoy 0.12 9.35 -.46 PepcoHold 1.08 18.73 -.46 PepsiCo 2.06 60.79 +.40 PeregrineP 1.17 -.05 PerfectWld 13.28 -.13 PerkElm 0.28 19.51 -.86 Perrigo 0.28 95.89 -1.40 PetMed 0.50 9.11 -.54 PetChina 5.34 115.98 -5.69 PetrbrsA 1.34 22.48 -.92 Petrobras 1.26 24.64 -1.01 PetroDev 23.14 -1.46 PtroqstE 6.57 -.49 PetsMart 0.56 43.12 -1.36 Pfizer 0.80 17.84 -.40 PharmPdt 0.60 26.37 -.58 Pharmacyc 11.86 +.36 Pharmsst s 77.29 -.72 Pharmerica 14.36 -.03 PhilipMor 3.08 66.80 -1.48 PhilipsEl 1.02 17.60 -.20 PhnxCos 1.44 -.10 PhotrIn 5.88 -.23 PiedNG 1.16 28.90 -.91 PiedmOfc 1.26 16.99 -.90 Pier 1 10.78 -.45 PilgrimsP 3.53 -.09 PimcoHiI 1.46 12.15 +.06 PinnclEnt 10.37 -.59 PinnaclFn 10.69 -.48 PinWst 2.10 43.47 -1.06 PionDrill 9.59 -.92 PioNtrl 0.08 74.34 -1.94 PitnyBw 1.48 19.32 -.52 PlainsAA 3.93 60.04 -.88 PlainsEx 25.75 -1.49 Plantron 0.20 29.42 -.72 PlatUnd 0.32 29.93 -.47 Plexus 22.96 -1.04 PlumCrk 1.68 35.45 -1.27 Polaris s 0.90 52.67 -1.62 Polycom s 20.22 -.71 PolyMet g 1.39 -.06 PolyOne 0.16 10.59 -.65 Polypore 61.75 -4.37 Pool Corp 0.56 26.81 -.61 Popular 1.47 -.15 PortfRec 59.61 -2.51 PortGE 1.06 24.15 -.10 PostPrp 0.88 38.55 -2.14 Potash s 0.28 50.14 -1.91 Potlatch 2.04 31.67 -1.34 Power-One 5.48 -.36 PwshDB 28.02 -.42 PS Agri 31.11 -.63 PS BasMet 20.88 -.14 PS USDBull 22.03 +.17 PS USDBear 27.56 -.25 PwSClnEn 0.09 6.08 -.25 PS OilSv 0.08 18.90 -1.11 PSFinPf 1.25 16.34 -.15 PSETecLd 0.09 15.61 -.62 PSBldABd 1.50 28.50 +.05 PwShPfd 0.96 13.66 -.13 PSIndia 0.19 19.28 -.43 PwShs QQQ 0.41 55.38 -.98 Powrwav 1.46 -.04 Praxair 2.00 97.06 -4.45 PrecCastpt 0.12 161.22 -9.62 PrecDrill 10.77 -.83 PriceTR 1.24 48.83 -2.48 PrSmrt 0.60 70.81 -1.75 priceline 531.27 -5.97 Primerica 0.12 20.15 +.02 PrimoWt n 6.01 -.27 PrinFncl 0.55 23.27 -1.24 PrivateB 0.04 7.81 -.29 ProLogis 1.12 26.69 -1.58 ProShtDow 43.84 +1.09 ProShtQQQ 32.38 +.56 ProShtS&P 44.87 +1.31 PrUShS&P 24.26 +1.40 ProUltDow 0.28 49.98 -2.78 PrUlShDow 19.83 +.97 ProUltMC 48.96 -3.71 PrUShMC rs 49.75 +3.27 ProUltQQQ 81.38 -2.97 PrUShQQQ rs 49.19 +1.62 ProUltSP 0.31 40.34 -2.66 PrUShtFn rs 83.26 +7.24 ProSShFn 43.36 +1.94 ProUShL20 20.41 -1.38 ProUSL7-10T 31.49 -.18 ProShtEM 36.00 +1.26 ProShRgBk 72.28 +4.47 PrUltSCh25 39.59 +3.18 ProUltSEM 41.85 +2.85 ProUltSRE 16.46 +1.48 ProUltSOG 35.38 +2.59 ProUltSBM 23.44 +2.26 ProUltRE 0.60 43.58 -4.70 ProUltFin 0.15 38.20 -3.97 PrUPShQQQ 23.06 +1.15 ProUPShD30 38.11 +2.74 PrUPShR2K 24.61 +2.44 ProUltO&G 0.06 37.49 -3.24 ProUBasM 31.75 -3.78 PrUPR2K s 40.57 -5.04 ProShtR2K 34.89 +1.25 PrUltPQQQ s 69.99 -3.75 ProUltR2K 29.16 -2.35 ProSht20Tr 32.87 -1.10 ProUSSP500 19.09 +1.62 PrUltSP500 s 0.03 50.43 -5.02 ProSUltGold 106.41 -2.51 ProUSSlv rs 12.58 +.16 PrUltCrde rs 31.81 -.97 PrUShCrde rs 57.64 +1.63 ProVixSTF 96.92 +4.99 ProUltSGld 16.25 +.43 ProSUltSilv 202.39 -2.83 ProUShEuro 18.75 +.20 ProctGam 2.10 63.02 -1.06 ProgrssEn 2.48 50.96 -.20 ProgrsSft s 18.75 -.50 ProgsvCp 1.40 17.28 -.72 ProgWaste 0.50 20.97 -.72 ProUSR2K rs 55.79 +3.87 PrUShEu rs 62.31 +4.06 ProspctCap 1.22 8.45 -.20 ProspBcsh 0.70 32.36 -2.21 ProtLife 0.64 15.72 -.67 ProvEn g 0.54 8.38 -.29 ProvidFS 0.48 10.94 -.78 Prudentl 1.15 45.73 -3.25

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Crystal ball Continued from B1 Kali Lane, the daughter of Giddy Up’s owner, operates a practice called Access Consciousness above the clothing store, which she says allows the businesses to cross-network with each other. Last week, Sherman held the first of a series of classes, which include learning how tarot cards can be used to empower a person’s life, healing with essential oils, and meditation and aura classes. Candlelight set the mood in the small room above Dream Pebbles Bath as seven people took part in an “aura cleansing class” Sherman calls “Clear It, Heal it and Seal It.” Participants sat in the dimly lit room reading about the different chakras, or energy centers, to wake up their minds,

Produce Continued from B1 They suspected Del Monte Fresh Produce was trying to bully regulators into thinking twice before pursuing recalls in the future. Aside from suing the FDA, the company has threatened legal action against a leading state food-borne disease investigator in Oregon, where the Del Monte cantaloupes were identified as the cause of the salmonella outbreak. And it has challenged some of the basic techniques of food safety investigations, like relying on ill people’s memories of what they ate when microbiological testing does not find pathogens on food. “This clearly looks like an attempt to intimidate state-level investigators,” said Caroline Smith DeWaal, food safety director of the Center for Science in the Public Interest, an advocacy group. “The chilling effect is real, and it could have serious implications for consumers who may be exposed to more tainted products because of delays in announcing the results of these epidemiologic investigations.” An executive of Del Monte Fresh Produce said that its melons did not make anyone sick and that the purpose of the law-

bodies and spirits. Class participant Laura Belle, 28, said the practice gives her a purpose and centers her when she starts losing control and having fear in her life. Belle said the practice allows people to manifest what they want in life, and for most people this includes money. “Picture it, if you can see it then you can make it happen,” she said. Sherman said her psychic readings are different from the typical “sidewalk psychic” readings. She said some people are frightened of what their future holds, so they live their life in fear until they have their next reading. Instead, she said she emphasizes readings or consultations that empower her clients. “We look to see what is here and what is ahead. If there is a challenge, it is a fabulous opportunity for you to awaken your purpose,” Sherman said. “You

reclaim the power to steer your own ship and manifest the type of life that you want.” However, getting psychic guidance from Sherman comes with a price tag. Sherman said she charges $98 for private 45-minute sessions and $52 for 25-minute readings. She said she has eight to 10 people a week coming in for readings. She charges $25 for classes if students book ahead, or $35 at the door. The size of the classes range in size from eight to 20 people. She said her most popular class in Bend is the tarot card class, and since August last year she has taught approximately 30 classes. Sherman said that most people are intuitive, but don’t trust themselves. She said she encourages her clients to come back as often as they feel they need it, but thinks of herself as “training

At Giddy Up, known more for its Western boots and sparkly rhinestone blouses, Lane runs her practice, “Access Consciousness.” Lane started teaching classes after receiving multiple calls inquiring about “bar sessions,” a hands-on “energy bodywork process” done on the head that dissipates the electromagnetic charge where points of view are locked into place, according to Lane. “A lot of people have had a hard time with the recession, (Access Consciousness) and all the tools can help bring people

suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Maryland last month, was to improve food safety by pointing out flaws in the way some investigations were handled. “It’s got to be a comprehensive and reliable investigation, and in our opinion this was neither,” said Dennis Christou, vice president of marketing for Del Monte Fresh Produce, which is based in Coral Gables, Fla. “There’s absolutely no basis in the claim that this was done intentionally to intimidate or bully anyone.” The company said Wednesday that it was in talks with the FDA to resolve the dispute and expected an agreement soon. Many in the produce industry, which has been buffeted by recalls for items as diverse as spinach, peppers and papayas, are quietly rooting for the company. “In this particular case, the FDA took on an adversary that has some ability to stand up and say, ‘We’re not going to be treated this way,’” said Jim Prevor, editor in chief of Produce Business, a trade magazine. The dispute is not related to the current recall of Rocky Ford cantaloupes grown in Colorado, which have caused a deadly listeria outbreak.

tussle began in February when people in several states began to fall ill with a rare bacterium known as salmonella Panama, which can cause severe diarrhea. Eventually, at least 20 people were sickened in 10 states. State public health investigators soon discovered that many of the victims had eaten cantaloupe bought at Costco, the large warehouse retailer. Using data from Costco membership cards, they found that the melons came from one farm in Guatemala, called Asuncion Mita, owned by Del Monte Fresh Produce. The early investigation involved 13 cases of illness, and officials found that at least 12 of them had a clear link to cantaloupes from Asuncion Mita, a very high correlation. The investigators, working with the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the FDA, asked Del Monte Fresh Produce for a recall, following the usual procedure. The company at first resisted but, according to its lawsuit, eventually agreed to a limited recall to prevent the FDA from issuing a broad warning about contaminated melons that could have affected the entire cantaloupe market. The recall was announced March 22. But in mid-July the FDA is-

sued an import alert, saying that the conditions that caused the contamination might still exist on the Asuncion Mita farm. The alert allowed inspectors to stop cantaloupes grown on the farm from entering this country. Del Monte Fresh Produce fired back, filing its lawsuit and accusing federal and state inspectors of conducting a slipshod investigation. And it questioned the validity of the results because investigators had not found a cantaloupe contaminated with the bacteria that had made people sick. It also wrote to the state of Oregon, saying it was considering a lawsuit against the state public health division and its senior epidemiologist, Dr. William Keene, who had helped lead the cantaloupe investigation. In addition it filed a complaint against Keene with the Oregon Government Ethics Commission. The state filings charged that Keene had defamed the company by identifying its melons as the cause of the outbreak. Oregon state officials said that neither they nor Keene would discuss the legal action. The ethics commission, however, wrote to Del Monte Fresh Produce last week saying it did not have jurisdiction over the issues the company had raised. An FDA spokeswoman said the agency

A salmonella story The Del Monte Fresh Produce

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out of their circumstances,” she said. Lane said the introductory classes that explain Access Consciousness cost $25. If clients are interested in learning more, they can attend an eight-hour class for $200. But for some people, it’s not about the money. Ryan West, who owns Becoming Joy Energy Healing on Northeast Kearney Avenue, only takes donations for her work. West said she has between five and 15 clients a week who donate between $20 and $200 for a session. West said she works with her client’s chakras as well as their energy fields to create change. Before opening her practice in Bend, West said she had never worked with clients on financial issues. But she said that has changed as people are willing to try different things such as

energy healing as they struggle to cope with tough economic times. “Everything in our life, including finances, are all energy issues,” she said. “When the energy flow is blocked or congested, you aren’t going to experience whatever you want in this world.” Financial issues are usually caused by the root chakra and sacral chakra, she said. The intention to change something is the most important part, she said, then she uses a light touch to open, balance and connect the chakras that are having issues. “To someone who doesn’t know what they are looking at, it looks like I am petting the air around them, but I’m moving their energy fields,” she said.

did not comment on pending litigation.

hired by Del Monte Fresh Produce, found that a pipe containing raw sewage and wastewater emptied into an open ditch about 110 yards from the farm’s packing house. The ditch led into a lagoon containing additional sewage, more than 220 yards from the packing house. The audit recommended that the ditch be eliminated. Christou said the ditch was protected by barbed wire to keep large animals from tracking the waste into fields. He said the lagoon contained chemicals to speed decomposition of the waste and was away from fields and wells. After the audit, he said, the company extended the pipe all the way to the lagoon and discontinued use of the open ditch. Asked if having raw sewage in an open ditch near its packing house was consistent with high food safety standards, Christou said that tests on melons had found no pathogens.

Strong evidence Public health specialists said that the evidence implicating Del Monte Fresh Produce cantaloupes was very strong. “There’s no doubt the data are very tight,” said Dr. Michael Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota. “Del Monte caused that outbreak.” And he said that many investigations involving sickness from produce did not find contaminated food because by the time officials became aware of the outbreak, the tainted produce had been eaten or discarded. The company’s filings include an audit report of the Guatemala farm, submitted to the FDA last month, which raises questions about the company’s practices. The audit, done by a company

Rachael Rees can be reached at 541-617-7818 or at rrees@bendbulletin.com.

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Div

PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB rs Weyerh

1.24 .92 1.74 ... .72f ... 1.68 .12 .58 .07 1.46 .86f .52 ... .28f .50 .24 .48 ... .60

19 15 17 9 18 ... 33 22 10 11 16 7 26 5 21 11 16 9 15 4

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1790.00 $1805.50 $40.420

Pvs Day $1800.00 $1806.60 $40.081

Market recap NYSE

YTD Last Chg %Chg 85.74 46.18 42.38 4.96 35.44 1.98 35.45 161.22 16.55 38.71 71.43 26.03 39.90 5.39 8.69 22.86 13.75 23.71 14.17 16.90

-3.72 -1.31 -1.36 -.31 -1.72 -.04 -1.27 -9.62 -.57 -1.29 -2.80 -1.48 -1.18 -.18 -.66 -1.23 -.57 -.96 +.03 -.61

+.4 +9.0 -8.8 -72.0 -38.2 -4.3 -5.3 +15.8 -26.4 -41.7 -14.7 -42.3 +24.2 -53.9 -28.7 -15.2 -18.7 -23.5 +.5 -10.7

Prime rate Time period

Most Active ($1 or more) Vol (00)

Last Chg

BkofAm S&P500ETF SPDR Fncl iShEMkts HewlettP

3687440 2751280 1128649 982893 879384

6.38 -.52 116.63 -3.54 11.90 -.62 37.59 -1.45 23.98 +1.51

Gainers ($2 or more) DRE Bear DirFnBr rs iP SXR1K C-TrCVOL DrxRsaBear

Last

Chg %Chg

13.63 65.60 49.37 58.55 54.47

+1.85 +8.07 +5.86 +6.69 +6.17

+15.7 +14.0 +13.5 +12.9 +12.8

Losers ($2 or more) Name TerraNitro AlphaNRs AOL DrxREBull Comeric wt

Last

3.25 3.25 3.25

Vol (00)

NwGold g NthgtM g CheniereEn GoldStr g NthnO&G

Last Chg

38594 13.56 -.17 38446 3.71 -.17 31724 6.44 -.50 30087 2.18 -.10 24519 21.67 +.48

Vol (00)

Last Chg

810263 738507 714557 709020 693308

29.54 +1.19 55.38 -.98 1.81 +.03 25.99 -.99 15.84 -.69

Oracle PwShs QQQ SiriusXM Microsoft Cisco

Gainers ($2 or more)

Gainers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

BovieMed Solitario EngySvcs NewEnSys WellsGard

3.09 2.39 2.30 2.28 2.45

+.24 +.17 +.14 +.14 +.15

Orexigen FlamelT Mattersight Celgene rt JA Solar

2.19 5.29 5.05 2.05 2.25

+.72 +.82 +.62 +.25 +.25

+8.4 +7.7 +6.5 +6.5 +6.5

Name

-18.3 -17.2 -15.6 -15.5 -14.6

MidsthBcp Geokinetics PionDrill GormanR s Teche

474 2,585 68 3,127 16 284

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last

+49.0 +18.3 +14.0 +13.9 +12.5

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

9.95 -1.17 -10.5 2.83 -.29 -9.3 9.59 -.92 -8.8 24.01 -2.26 -8.6 29.84 -2.48 -7.7

Name

Last

WestwdOne SpanBdc rs PacBiosci n TranS1 Wintrust wt

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

139.00 -31.06 22.30 -4.62 11.77 -2.17 43.16 -7.90 4.80 -.82

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Diary

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

Amex

Name

Name

Indexes

Chg %Chg

2.74 -.87 -24.1 2.15 -.67 -23.8 4.25 -1.31 -23.6 2.96 -.74 -20.0 10.97 -2.52 -18.7

Diary 151 305 27 483 4 28

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

438 2,126 88 2,652 10 277

12,876.00 10,604.07 Dow Jones Industrials 5,627.85 4,205.13 Dow Jones Transportation 449.09 381.99 Dow Jones Utilities 8,718.25 6,839.00 NYSE Composite 2,490.51 1,984.93 Amex Index 2,887.75 2,316.11 Nasdaq Composite 1,370.58 1,101.54 S&P 500 14,562.01 11,570.57 Wilshire 5000 868.57 639.85 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

11,124.84 4,281.16 435.74 6,981.33 2,160.96 2,538.19 1,166.76 12,243.97 664.58

-283.82 -238.06 -7.77 -236.19 -57.95 -52.05 -35.33 -375.93 -25.37

YTD %Chg %Chg -2.49 -5.27 -1.75 -3.27 -2.61 -2.01 -2.94 -2.98 -3.68

52-wk %Chg

-3.91 -16.17 +7.59 -12.34 -2.15 -4.32 -7.23 -8.35 -15.19

+3.59 -4.17 +9.69 -3.18 +8.17 +8.72 +2.86 +2.91 +1.20

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Wednesday.

Key currency exchange rates Wednesday compared with late Tuesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

% Change

275.68 2,115.87 2,935.82 5,288.41 5,433.80 18,824.17 34,021.39 14,119.76 3,308.83 8,741.16 1,854.28 2,791.79 4,153.60 4,985.95

-1.38 t -.79 t -1.62 t -1.40 t -2.47 t -1.00 t -.92 t -1.65 t +.55 s +.23 s +.89 s +.39 s +.70 s -.03 t

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

1.0125 1.5578 .9965 .001992 .1566 1.3667 .1284 .013051 .074549 .0318 .000868 .1488 1.1168 .0334

1.0278 1.5732 1.0089 .002042 .1566 1.3688 .1284 .013093 .075947 .0319 .000878 .1511 1.1250 .0334

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 16.37 -0.53 -11.7 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.68 -0.18 -5.7 GrowthI 24.35 -0.68 -5.8 Ultra 22.06 -0.59 -2.6 American Funds A: AmcpA p 17.67 -0.51 -5.8 AMutlA p 23.87 -0.62 -4.0 BalA p 17.36 -0.36 -1.6 BondA p 12.59 +0.02 +5.8 CapIBA p 47.27 -0.80 -2.6 CapWGA p 30.80 -0.84 -12.0 CapWA p 20.92 -0.10 +4.2 EupacA p 35.05 -0.90 -15.3 FdInvA p 33.21 -1.06 -8.6 GovtA p 14.69 +0.06 +7.1 GwthA p 28.00 -0.76 -8.0 HI TrA p 10.68 -0.03 -0.2 IncoA p 15.84 -0.28 -1.4 IntBdA p 13.67 -0.01 +3.4 ICAA p 25.26 -0.73 -9.0 NEcoA p 23.25 -0.55 -8.2 N PerA p 25.74 -0.63 -10.1 NwWrldA 46.78 -1.20 -14.3 SmCpA p 33.14 -0.83 -14.7 TxExA p 12.37 +0.01 +7.7 WshA p 26.22 -0.79 -2.6 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 24.61 -0.53 -18.3 IntEqII I r 10.21 -0.23 -18.1 Artisan Funds: Intl 19.20 -0.52 -11.5 IntlVal r 23.42 -0.53 -13.6 MidCap 33.29 -0.87 -1.0 MidCapVal 19.31 -0.55 -3.8 Baron Funds: Growth 47.98 -1.51 -6.3 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.27 +0.04 +6.8 DivMu 14.71 +0.01 +5.5 TxMgdIntl 12.71 -0.36 -19.2 BlackRock A:

EqtyDiv 16.71 -0.49 GlAlA r 18.38 -0.36 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.13 -0.34 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 16.75 -0.49 GlbAlloc r 18.47 -0.36 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 49.13 -1.13 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 55.80 -2.97 Columbia Class A: DivEqInc 8.83 -0.31 TxEA p 13.47 +0.02 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 26.96 -0.84 AcornIntZ 35.32 -0.76 LgCapGr 12.38 -0.27 ValRestr 41.80 -2.14 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 8.97 -0.07 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 9.23 -0.25 USCorEq1 9.91 -0.32 USCorEq2 9.67 -0.33 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 30.38 -0.90 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 30.75 -0.92 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.40 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 17.73 -0.48 EmMktV 27.57 -0.75 IntSmVa 14.13 -0.36 LargeCo 9.20 -0.28 USLgVa 17.60 -0.70 US Small 18.36 -0.68 US SmVa 20.92 -0.91 IntlSmCo 14.59 -0.34 Fixd 10.35 -0.01 IntVa 14.49 -0.43 Glb5FxInc 11.33 -0.01 2YGlFxd 10.23 -0.01 Dodge&Cox:

-3.8 -4.6 -5.1 -3.6 -4.4 -8.0 -3.8 -12.0 +9.2 -9.6 -11.5 -0.3 -16.8 -4.0 -16.2 -9.1 -11.1 -11.5 -11.4 +5.3 -19.0 -22.8 -16.6 -5.8 -11.6 -13.7 -18.0 -13.6 +0.6 -19.1 +5.3 +0.9

Balanced 64.38 -1.40 Income 13.52 +0.02 IntlStk 28.91 -0.81 Stock 94.71 -2.85 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.30 Dreyfus: Aprec 37.82 -0.96 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 15.88 -0.54 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 8.69 GblMacAbR 9.96 -0.04 LgCapVal 15.92 -0.55 FMI Funds: LgCap p 14.62 -0.46 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.84 FPACres 25.60 -0.46 Fairholme 24.81 -1.35 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.47 +0.05 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 19.28 -0.44 StrInA 12.42 -0.03 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 19.49 -0.45 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.21 -0.17 FF2015 11.02 -0.14 FF2015K 12.23 -0.16 FF2020 13.23 -0.20 FF2020K 12.51 -0.19 FF2025 10.87 -0.20 FF2025K 12.49 -0.22 FF2030 12.91 -0.24 FF2030K 12.58 -0.24 FF2035 10.57 -0.23 FF2040 7.37 -0.16 FF2040K 12.56 -0.28 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 11.45 -0.36 AMgr50 14.80 -0.19 AMgr20 r 12.79 -0.05 Balanc 17.77 -0.33

-7.3 +4.3 -19.0 -11.4 NA -1.0 -12.0 -0.2 -0.1 -11.9 -6.3 +2.0 -3.6 -30.3 +6.1 -3.2 +3.6 -3.1 -2.4 -2.5 -2.5 -3.7 -3.6 -5.3 -5.2 -5.9 -5.8 -7.5 -7.6 -7.6 -7.4 -3.2 +1.2 -1.7

BalancedK BlueChGr Canada CapAp CpInc r Contra ContraK DisEq DivIntl DivrsIntK r DivGth Eq Inc EQII Fidel FltRateHi r GNMA GovtInc GroCo GroInc GrowthCoK HighInc r Indepn IntBd IntmMu IntlDisc InvGrBd InvGB LgCapVal LowP r LowPriK r Magelln MidCap MuniInc NwMkt r OTC 100Index Puritn SCmdtyStrt SrsIntGrw SrsIntVal SrInvGrdF STBF StratInc StrReRt r

17.77 42.22 52.17 23.73 8.81 65.71 65.73 20.22 25.91 25.92 24.55 38.02 15.66 30.47 9.53 11.93 10.88 82.91 16.73 82.95 8.57 21.85 10.92 10.37 27.87 11.95 7.74 9.90 33.62 33.60 61.95 25.57 12.90 15.78 54.74 8.24 17.32 9.77 9.84 8.09 11.95 8.51 11.11 9.56

-0.33 -1.13 -1.60 -0.76 -0.07 -1.52 -1.53 -0.69 -0.68 -0.67 -0.82 -1.35 -0.57 -0.87 +0.01 +0.03 -1.67 -0.49 -1.67 -0.02 -0.77

-0.79 +0.03 +0.02 -0.34 -0.84 -0.84 -1.88 -0.79 +0.02 -0.06 -1.03 -0.23 -0.28 -0.12 -0.25 -0.21 +0.03 -0.02 -0.03 -0.08

-1.6 -3.3 -10.3 -6.4 -2.8 -2.9 -2.8 -10.3 -14.1 -13.9 -13.4 -13.4 -13.5 -5.0 -0.7 +7.2 +7.2 -0.3 -7.9 -0.2 +0.2 -10.3 +5.8 +6.2 -15.6 +7.0 +7.2 -13.6 -6.3 -6.3 -13.4 -6.8 +8.3 +4.9 -0.3 -5.7 -2.4 -6.1 -12.8 -18.6 +7.1 +1.6 +3.7 +1.2

TotalBd 11.11 +0.02 USBI 11.86 +0.03 Value 58.92 -2.19 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 52.80 -1.21 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 33.40 -1.16 500IdxInv 41.48 -1.26 IntlInxInv 29.82 -0.78 TotMktInv 33.81 -1.05 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 41.48 -1.26 TotMktAd r 33.81 -1.06 First Eagle: GlblA 44.91 -0.75 OverseasA 21.59 -0.19 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.05 +0.02 FoundAl p 9.50 -0.19 HYTFA px 10.16 +0.02 IncomA p 2.04 -0.02 USGovA p 6.95 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 12.86 -0.21 IncmeAd 2.02 -0.03 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.06 -0.02 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 18.61 -0.42 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 5.92 -0.09 GlBd A p 12.90 -0.21 GrwthA p 15.63 -0.37 WorldA p 13.27 -0.32 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 12.93 -0.21 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 36.87 -1.05 GMO Trust III: Quality 20.53 -0.39 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 11.45 -0.32 Quality 20.54 -0.39 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 6.86 -0.01

+6.3 +7.0 -14.2 +3.3 -11.4 -5.9 -14.9 -6.9 -5.9 -6.9 -3.1 -4.7 +9.6 -7.8 +9.5 -1.9 +5.9 -1.8 -2.3 -2.3 -9.0 -15.2 -1.9 -12.1 -10.6 -2.2 -8.4 +3.2 -15.4 +3.3 -0.7

MidCapV 31.59 -1.07 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.29 -0.04 CapApInst 36.79 -0.85 IntlInv t 50.42 -1.41 Intl r 51.01 -1.43 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 28.25 -0.88 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 28.31 -0.88 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 35.88 -1.13 Div&Gr 17.88 -0.56 TotRetBd 11.57 +0.04 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.88 +0.16 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r 15.96 -0.26 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 15.31 -0.42 CmstkA 14.05 -0.47 EqIncA 7.89 -0.17 GrIncA p 17.12 -0.54 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 22.29 -0.46 AssetStA p 23.06 -0.47 AssetStrI r 23.28 -0.48 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.93 +0.02 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.92 +0.02 HighYld 7.75 -0.01 ShtDurBd 11.02 -0.01 USLCCrPls 18.70 -0.60 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 35.57 -1.18 PrkMCVal T 20.61 -0.63 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 12.13 -0.21 LSGrwth 11.75 -0.28 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 18.04 -0.56 Longleaf Partners: Partners 25.95 -0.82 Loomis Sayles:

-12.6 +2.8 +0.2 -16.0 -15.8 -18.4 -18.3 -15.3 -8.2 +6.4 +4.8 -4.5 -5.3 -9.8 -6.9 -10.1 -6.1 -5.5 -5.4 +6.5 +6.6 -0.2 +1.6 -9.5 -29.8 -8.7 -5.2 -8.5 -16.8 -8.2

LSBondI 14.21 -0.08 StrInc C 14.64 -0.13 LSBondR 14.16 -0.08 StrIncA 14.56 -0.13 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.37 -0.02 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 9.69 -0.36 BdDebA p 7.55 -0.02 ShDurIncA p 4.54 -0.01 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.57 Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.54 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.44 -0.24 ValueA 20.64 -0.62 MFS Funds I: ValueI 20.74 -0.63 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.15 -0.20 MergerFd 15.69 -0.03 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.55 +0.02 TotRtBdI 10.55 +0.02 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 35.86 -0.93 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 25.84 -0.47 GlbDiscZ 26.21 -0.48 SharesZ 18.79 -0.43 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 44.28 -1.34 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 6.98 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 26.17 -0.59 Intl I r 15.70 -0.31 Oakmark 38.82 -1.03 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.16 -0.08 GlbSMdCap 13.42 -0.36 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 30.27 -0.77 GlobA p 53.57 -1.36

+3.6 +1.8 +3.3 +2.4 +5.5 -15.9 +1.0 +1.9 +1.3 +1.9 -3.3 -8.9 -8.7 -16.4 -0.6 +4.9 +5.2 -4.0 -9.2 -9.0 -8.8 -3.7 NA -5.7 -19.1 -6.0 -6.0 -11.6 -17.0 -11.3

GblStrIncA 4.13 -0.02 +0.6 IntBdA p 6.42 -0.07 +0.6 MnStFdA 30.08 -0.88 -7.1 RisingDivA 14.61 -0.47 -5.2 S&MdCpVl 28.04 -1.08 -12.5 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 13.22 -0.42 -5.9 S&MdCpVl 23.91 -0.91 -13.0 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 13.17 -0.42 -5.8 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 6.93 +0.02 +10.4 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 30.00 -0.77 -16.8 IntlBdY 6.42 -0.06 +0.7 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.94 -0.03 +3.0 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.49 -0.08 +2.1 AllAsset 11.87 -0.10 +1.4 ComodRR 8.24 -0.08 +0.8 DivInc 11.27 -0.03 +2.6 EmgMkCur 10.13 -0.17 -3.2 HiYld 8.87 +0.5 InvGrCp 10.66 +0.02 +5.6 LowDu 10.36 -0.03 +1.3 RealRtnI 12.17 +0.01 +10.4 ShortT 9.80 -0.01 +0.3 TotRt 10.94 -0.03 +3.2 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.36 -0.03 +1.0 RealRtA p 12.17 +0.01 +10.1 TotRtA 10.94 -0.03 +2.9 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.94 -0.03 +2.4 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.94 -0.03 +3.0 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.94 -0.03 +3.1 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 48.14 -0.52 +5.1 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 36.23 -1.26 -11.2 Price Funds: BlChip 37.67 -0.99 -1.2

CapApp 19.44 EmMktS 28.86 EqInc 21.25 EqIndex 31.56 Growth 31.02 HlthSci 31.69 HiYield 6.41 IntlBond 10.16 Intl G&I 11.24 IntlStk 12.21 MidCap 54.93 MCapVal 21.27 N Asia 16.82 New Era 43.79 N Horiz 32.58 N Inc 9.75 R2010 14.86 R2015 11.38 R2020 15.56 R2025 11.28 R2030 16.04 R2035 11.28 R2040 16.01 ShtBd 4.84 SmCpStk 30.41 SmCapVal 31.60 SpecIn 12.22 Value 20.94 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 11.64 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.22 PremierI r 18.89 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 34.77 S&P Sel 18.42 Scout Funds: Intl 27.22 Selected Funds: AmShD 36.85 Sequoia 132.18 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 17.04 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 41.82

-0.38 -0.88 -0.68 -0.96 -0.78 -0.72 -0.01 -0.08 -0.31 -0.36 -1.20 -0.65 -0.40 -1.90 -0.81 +0.03 -0.25 -0.22 -0.33 -0.27 -0.41 -0.30 -0.44 -1.09 -1.16 -0.05 -0.71

-4.3 -18.2 -9.6 -6.1 -3.5 +4.7 -0.3 +4.0 -15.6 -14.2 -6.2 -10.3 -12.3 -16.0 -2.7 +5.4 -3.1 -4.3 -5.4 -6.3 -7.2 -7.8 -8.1 +1.5 -11.7 -12.5 +1.8 -10.3

-0.43 -13.3 -0.35 -12.3 -0.62 -7.2 -1.06 -6.5 -0.55 -5.9 -0.64 -15.5 -1.06 -11.0 -3.20 +2.2 -0.28 -14.7 -1.42 -19.2

Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 23.95 IntValue I 24.49 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 21.61 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 20.92 CAITAdm 11.23 CpOpAdl 67.67 EMAdmr r 32.46 Energy 109.88 ExtdAdm 36.59 500Adml 108.00 GNMA Ad 11.21 GrwAdm 30.30 HlthCr 53.94 HiYldCp 5.61 InfProAd 28.03 ITBdAdml 11.95 ITsryAdml 12.18 IntGrAdm 52.69 ITAdml 13.87 ITGrAdm 10.16 LtdTrAd 11.16 LTGrAdml 10.41 LT Adml 11.21 MCpAdml 84.43 MuHYAdm 10.59 PrmCap r 62.77 ReitAdm r 75.03 STsyAdml 10.86 STBdAdml 10.69 ShtTrAd 15.94 STIGrAd 10.70 SmCAdm 30.52 TtlBAdml 11.08 TStkAdm 29.17 WellslAdm 53.85 WelltnAdm 51.52 Windsor 39.98 WdsrIIAd 41.81 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 22.91 CapOpp 29.28

-0.42 -14.0 -0.43 -13.8 -0.19 -9.3 -0.36 -1.1 +0.01 +7.8 -1.82 -11.9 -0.99 -18.6 -4.45 -9.2 -1.30 -11.3 -3.26 -5.9 +0.02 +6.9 -0.82 -3.6 -1.25 +5.2 +0.01 +3.6 +0.06 +12.0 +0.02 +10.0 +0.01 +9.3 -1.42 -14.4 +0.01 +7.4 +0.01 +6.8 +3.2 +0.21 +16.0 +0.02 +8.4 -2.72 -8.4 +0.02 +8.4 -1.65 -8.1 -4.12 -2.8 -0.01 +2.3 -0.02 +2.9 +1.5 -0.01 +1.8 -1.17 -12.2 +0.04 +7.0 -0.91 -6.8 -0.35 +4.3 -0.95 -2.7 -1.30 -11.7 -1.30 -7.2 -0.59 -5.7 -0.79 -11.9

DivdGro 14.06 Energy 58.50 EqInc 19.74 Explr 65.87 GNMA 11.21 GlobEq 15.72 HYCorp 5.61 HlthCre 127.80 InflaPro 14.27 IntlGr 16.55 IntlVal 26.58 ITIGrade 10.16 LifeCon 15.96 LifeGro 20.35 LifeMod 18.68 LTIGrade 10.41 Morg 16.97 MuInt 13.87 PrecMtls r 24.69 PrmcpCor 12.77 Prmcp r 60.46 SelValu r 17.28 STAR 18.29 STIGrade 10.70 StratEq 17.08 TgtRetInc 11.44 TgRe2010 22.30 TgtRe2015 12.14 TgRe2020 21.28 TgtRe2025 11.99 TgRe2030 20.33 TgtRe2035 12.11 TgtRe2040 19.81 TgtRe2045 12.45 USGro 17.57 Wellsly 22.22 Welltn 29.82 Wndsr 11.85 WndsII 23.56 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntAdm r 22.22 TotIntlIP r 88.91 500 107.96 MidCap 18.58

-0.38 -1.2 -2.37 -9.2 -0.56 -1.8 -2.13 -9.7 +0.02 +6.8 -0.44 -12.0 +0.01 +3.6 -2.95 +5.2 +0.03 +12.0 -0.45 -14.4 -0.73 -17.4 +0.01 +6.7 -0.19 -1.5 -0.51 -7.2 -0.33 -3.8 +0.21 +16.0 -0.47 -5.9 +0.01 +7.3 -0.94 -7.5 -0.35 -7.3 -1.59 -8.1 -0.61 -7.9 -0.27 -3.3 -0.01 +1.8 -0.67 -6.8 -0.07 +2.6 -0.26 -0.18 -2.3 -0.38 -3.7 -0.24 -5.0 -0.47 -6.2 -0.31 -7.5 -0.52 -7.9 -0.32 -7.8 -0.42 -3.7 -0.15 +4.2 -0.56 -2.8 -0.38 -11.7 -0.72 -7.3

SmCap

-0.60 -2.42 -3.27 -0.60

Yacktman Funds:

-15.7 -15.7 -6.0 -8.5

30.46 -1.17 -12.3

SmlCpGth

19.73 -0.70 -10.0

SmlCpVl

13.65 -0.57 -14.7

STBnd

10.69 -0.02 +2.8

TotBnd

11.08 +0.04 +7.0

TotlIntl

13.28 -0.36 -15.7

TotStk

29.16 -0.90 -6.9

Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst DevMkInst ExtIn

20.92 -0.36 -1.1 8.47 -0.23 -15.1 36.59 -1.30 -11.3

FTAllWldI r

78.97 -2.21 -15.8

GrwthIst

30.30 -0.82 -3.5

InfProInst

11.42 +0.03 +12.1

InstIdx

107.26 -3.25 -5.9

InsPl

107.27 -3.25 -5.9

InsTStPlus

26.39 -0.82 -6.8

MidCpIst

18.65 -0.60 -8.4

SCInst

30.52 -1.17 -12.2

TBIst

11.08 +0.04 +7.1

TSInst

29.18 -0.90 -6.8

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

89.21 -2.70 -5.9

STBdIdx

10.69 -0.02 +2.9

TotBdSgl

11.08 +0.04 +7.0

TotStkSgl

28.16 -0.87 -6.8

Western Asset: CorePlus I Fund p

11.13 +0.04 +5.9 16.59 -0.37 +0.3


B USI N ESS

B6 Thursday, September 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M  

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Marla Polenz at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. WHAT WORKS, A TIME-TESTED APPROACH TO INVESTING: Learn how to develop an investment plan, put the plan into action and know how to review and adjust the plan. Registration required; free; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@ schwab.com or www.schwab.com. BBG BEND BUSINESS GROUP: Weekly meeting. Guests please preregister with Matt Bassitt; free; 7:30 a.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541-323-7000. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF BEND: Business meeting. Registration required; free; noon; Boston’s, 61276 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 140; 541382-9086. FACEBOOK AND TWITTER BASICS: Registration required; $39; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. HOW TO BUY A FRANCHISE: Registration required; free; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. LIVE CONTRACTOR EDUCATION COURSE: Enables contractors to obtain their construction contractor board license. Three-day course. Registration required; $275; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. PROTECT YOUR INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY: Learn about patents, copyrights, trademarks, and how to protect ideas and creations. Registration required; $39; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. VALUE OF A DOLLAR, TEACHING YOUR K-8 CHILD: Learn tools to teach your child money management skills. Call to register; free; 6 p.m.;

Mid Oregon Credit Union, 1386 N.E. Cushing Drive, Bend; 541-382-1795. BUILDING A BETTER BEND LECTURE: Jeff Speck, a city planner and architectural designer, will discuss “What Makes Commercial Centers Work: Getting Planning and Transportation Right.” The presentation will look at how downtowns, main streets and commercial centers, if designed poorly, can thrive economically but not socially. Speck is the co-author of “Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream” and the “Smart Growth Manual,” is a contributing editor to Metropolis Magazine and is on the Sustainability Task Force of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security; $8; 7-9 p.m.; Bend Park & Recreation District Office, Community Room, 799 S.W. Columbia St.; 541-389-7275 or www.buildingabetterbend.org.

evening class. Registration required; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. DESIGN A BUSINESS LOGO WITH ILLUSTRATOR: Two-evening class. Registration required; $79; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. DREAMWEAVER, BEGINNING: Three Tuesday evening classes. Registration required; $89; 6-9 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. A NEW BEGINNING ADOPTION AGENCY INFORMATIONAL SEMINAR: RSVP requested; free; 6:30 p.m.; Rosie Bareis Community Campus, 1010 N.W. 14th St., Bend; 541-889-0048 or admin@adoptanewbeginning.org.

FRIDAY

WEDNESDAY

FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www.facebook.com/Zoomtax.

MONDAY BUILD A PROFESSIONAL WEBSITE FOR YOUR BUSINESS: Learn to use Wordpress to create a customized website. Monday evening course Sept. 26 through Oct. 31. Registration required; $149; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. MCITP, DESKTOP SUPPORT TECH CERTIFICATION PREP: Five Monday evening courses prepare participants for certification exam 70-685. Registration required; $289; 6-9 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

TUESDAY KNOW INTERNET SEARCHING: Reservations encouraged; free; 10:30 a.m.-noon; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-6177080. KNOW DIGITAL BOOKS: Reservations encouraged; free; 2-3:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7083. BEGINNING PHOTOSHOP: Two

BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Abby’s Pizza, 1938 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-447-6384 or www .happyhourtraining.com. BUSINESS SUCCESS PROGRAM, PROMOTE YOUR BUSINESS FOR FREE, CRAFTING MEDIA RELEASES THAT GET THE ‘WRITE’ ATTENTION: Linden Gross, the author of “The Legacy Of Luna” will lead an interactive session about when and how to write a media release. RSVPs required; $25 for Bend Chamber of Commerce members; $45 for others; 11 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-3823221 or www.bendchamber.org. SURVIVOR PANEL - REAL WORLD LESSONS LEARNED: Hosted by U.S. Small Business Administration and Agility Recovery Solutions weekly webinars with steps on preparing for emergencies for National Preparedness Month. Advance registration encouraged; free; 11 a.m.-noon; www1.gotomeeting. com/register/660249057. BEND CHAMBER BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: Free; 5 p.m.; Precision Body

Pick up a copy of the most comprehensive visitor’s guide in Central Oregon: • The Bulletin • Chambers of Commerce • Oregon Border Kiosks • Central Oregon Visitor’s Association • Bend Visitor and Convention Bureau • Deschutes County Expo Center • Other Points of Interest

This guide features a wide variety of informative maps, points of interest, spring and summer events and recreational opportunities. The Fall/Winter edition publishes October 21 Advertising Deadline: Wednesday, October 5 Call your advertising representative today.

541-382-1811

PRESENTED BY:

IN COOPERATION WITH:

& Paint, 61530 S. Highway 97; 541382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. NEIGHBORHOOD NIGHT: NorthWest Crossing businesses and restaurants will offer specials, entertainment and giveaways. Held the last Wednesday of each month; free; 5-8 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend.

THURSDAY Sept. 29 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. BBG BEND BUSINESS GROUP: Weekly meeting. Guests please preregister with Matt Bassitt; free; 7:30 a.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541-323-7000. BEND WEBCAM 2011: Hosted by Pixelsilk and the Advertising Federation of Central Oregon, this two-day event at The Oxford Hotel and The Tower Theatre features workshops, breakout sessions and keynote addresses about search engine optimization, social media, design, branding as well as more creative and marketing Web topics. Register for one day, two days or specific sessions; $479 for two days; $249 for one day; $129 per session; discounts available; Registration takes place from 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m both days.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave.; 541-385-1992 or www.bendwebcam.com/. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@ schwab.com or www.schwab.com. CENTRO PRINT SOLUTIONS HOLIDAY PROMOTIONALS SHOWCASE: A showcase of ideas in apparel and promotional products. E-mail or call with questions and to register; free; 4-7 p.m.; Bend Park & Recreation District Office, 799 S.W. Columbia St.; 541-382-3534 or promotionals@ centroprintsolutions.com. ON-FARM LANDOWNER WORKSHOP: Workshop focusing on water quality, wildlife habitat, irrigation water management, pasture weed management and energy efficiency. RSVP to Spring Olson; free; 4-6:30 p.m.; Leaning Pine Ranch, 53656 Huntington Road, La Pine; 541-6479604 or springalaska@hotmail.com.

BofA gives big investors, depositors better perks By Rick Rothacker McClatchy-Tribune News Service

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Bank of America Corp. this week is rolling out extra perks for customers in nine states who do extensive banking and investment business with the Charlotte-based bank. The Platinum Privileges program gives customers access to a specialized customer service center, preferred pricing on products such as retirement accounts, and other discounts and fee waivers. It’s for clients who have $50,000 or more in deposits

or investments with the bank. After testing the program in Arizona, Georgia and Massachusetts, Bank of America is expanding it to nine other states this month: Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island. Another expansion will occur in November; the nationwide rollout will be completed next year. The program is part of an array of new bundled accounts the bank has been testing since the beginning of this year.

NEWS OF RECORD PERMITS City of Bend

Brookswood Bend LLC, 19744 S.W. Aspen Meadows, $253,156 Brookswood Bend LLC, 19705 S.W. Aspen Meadows, $192,665 Brookswood Bend LLC, 19709 S.W. Aspen Meadows, $176,871 Brookswood Bend LLC, 19701 S.W. Aspen Meadows, $214,370 Brookswood Bend LLC, 61107 Solitude, $178,195 Brookswood Bend LLC, 61103 Solitude, $151,396 Brookswood Bend LLC, 61111 Solitude, $133,156 OSM Construction LLC, 1975 N.W. Harriman, $327,910 Century Park LLC, 320 S.W. Century, $120,000 John R. Baker, 2531 N.E. Cretia, $172,101

541-322-CARE

Melvin L. McDougal, 61551 Baptist, $232,168 Somerset Development, 20277 S.E. Knightsbridge, $196,563 Cutter Bridge Development LLC, 2162 N.W. Lolo, $428,924 Bend Associates, 63447 N. Highway 97, $650,000 Thomas A. Stein, 19442 Green Lakes, $458,001 Knight 1030 Bond LLC, 1030 N.W. Bond 100, $645,000 City of Redmond

Daren Curry and Pam Curry, 2345 N.W. Eighth St., $172,338 Luke Guynup, 1788 S.W. 25th St., $317,648 Deschutes County

Kenny L. Harrison, 70799 Indian Ford Road, Sisters, $192,415 Pine Mountain Observatory, 55005 Pine Mountain Road, Bend, $165,000.90

856 NW Bond • Downtown Bend • 541-330-5999 www.havenhomestyle.com


L

Inside

NORTHWEST Number of derelict vessels likely to rise, see Page C2. OREGON ODOT says it may have to cut some road projects, see Page C3. CALIFORNIA A baby boom for the endangered blue iguana, see Page C6.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011

Wyden demands Holder clarify Medical interpretation of the Patriot Act pots users oppose new fees

IN BRIEF Deschutes 911 will ask voters for funds The Deschutes County 911 Service District plans to go to voters next May to request approval of a permanent property tax rate to fund day-to-day operations. The seven-member executive board is proposing a rate of 39 cents per $1,000 in assessed value, and for the district to collect 33 cents of that rate for the first five years. Currently, the district receives its funding from two sources, a permanent rate and a levy that must be renewed by voters every few years. The current permanent rate is 16 cents per $1,000 in assessed value, and the levy is 23 cents per $1,000 in assessed value. The current levy, approved in 2008, is scheduled to expire in June 2013. The 911 district provides dispatch services for 19 police, fire and medical public safety agencies in Deschutes County. — Bulletin staff report

By Andrew Clevenger The Bulletin

WASHINGTON — Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., wrote to U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder on Wednesday, demanding that he clarify statements by Justice Department officials that Wyden says miscategorize the way the government is interpreting part of the Patriot Act. “While we are sure that you would agree that government

officials should not describe government authorities in a way that misleads the public, during your tenure Justice Department officials have — on a number of occasions — made what we believe are misleading statements pertaining to the government’s interpretation of surveillance law,” reads the letter, which was also signed by Sen. Mark Udall, D-Colo. Both men are members of the

Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. At issue is Section 215 of the Patriot Act, which allows the government to collect “tangible things,” such as books, records, papers and documents as it investigates foreign intelligence activities and try to prevent spying and terrorism. Under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, the government cannot use these

powers to investigate American citizens unless it has reason to believe they may be involved in those particular illegal activities. Critics maintain the government is using Section 215 to conduct much broader sweeps, such as collecting e-mail and other online information, or using GPS technology in mobile phones to track users’ locations. See Law / C5

Coyner Trail going to new lengths

CIVIC CALENDAR How to submit notices: E-mail: news@bendbulletin.com. Please write “Civic Calendar” in the subject line and include a contact name and daytime phone number.

BEND

• Bend City Manager Eric King will speak about the state of the city at a brunch sponsored by the Bend branch of the American Association of University Women, 9:30 a.m. to noon Oct. 15 at Touchmark, 19800 S.W. Touchmark Way, Bend. Cost is $13. RSVP by e-mail to bendaauw@ officeliveusers.com by Oct. 11. www .bendbranchaauw.club.officelive.

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Chad Godin, 40, left, and Casey Middaugh, 40, both employees of Alex Hodge Construction of Bend, work together on a new section of the Coyner Trail on Wednesday afternoon in Bend. The two were removing asphalt and gravel in preparation for new curbs. Another new section of Coyner Trail, which travels through Ponderosa Park and behind Bear Creek Elementary School, has been paved and is open for limited use. The remainder of the trail construction project from Bear Creek Elementary north to the roundabout at Franklin Avenue and Eighth Street is scheduled to be completed in October, according to the Bend Park & Recreation District.

Prosecutor for Crook County enters race for Deschutes bench

DOLLAR LAKE FIRE • Acres: 6,304 • Containment: 90 percent • Threatened structures: None • Cause: Lightning

SHADOW LAKE FIRE what you want,” he said. “I’ve been here in Crook County Crook County’s top ap- for a little over a year as chief pointed prosecutor is the first deputy district attorney and candidate to enter the race to I love my job, but these are succeed Deschutes County once-in-a-lifetime opportuniCircuit Court Judge Michael ties, so when I heard Judge Sullivan. Sullivan was retiring, that’s AaronBrenneman, when I made my dechief deputy district cision about putting attorney in Crook my candidacy in.” County for the past 14 Brenneman said months, announced he believes his exWednesday that he perience as a proswill be running for ecutor and defense the seat held by Sulattorney has made livan since 1988. Sulhim a “fair-minded livan, 63, said earlier Aaron person” and gives this month he will Brenneman him a unique perserve out the rest of spective on the jushis term through the tice system. He said end of 2012, but will not stand he’s learned from every case for re-election. he’s been involved with, but A Redmond resident, particularly from his defense Brenneman was a private prac- of Kaleb Brown, a Bend 17tice defense attorney in Bend year-old who impaled his between 2003 and 2010. Previ- mother’s boyfriend with a ously, he had been a deputy dis- samurai sword during a dotrict attorney in Crook County mestic dispute. between 2000 and 2003. Brown was originally Born in Anchorage, Alas- charged with murder, but ka, Brenneman moved with pleaded guilty by way of Alhis family to Portland as a ford plea to criminally negliteenager. He graduated from gent homicide and two counts Oregon State University, then of unlawful use of a weapon. earned his law degree at Wil- He is currently serving a 90lamette University. month sentence. Brenneman said Sullivan’s “That put a lot of things into retirement plans pushed him perspective for me about the to make a quick decision, grand jury process and chargthough he’s had an interest ing decisions,” Brenneman in becoming a judge for some said. “He was a good kid in a time. really bad situation.” “The timing is never exactly See Judge / C5

By Scott Hammers

• Acres: 10,000 • Containment: 40 percent • Threatened structures: None • Cause: Lightning

The Bulletin

MOTHER LODE FIRE • Acres: 2,241 • Containment: 10 percent • Threatened structures: 1 • Cause: Lightning

RED CONE COMPLEX FIRE • Acres: 922 • Containment: None • Threatened structures: None • Cause: Lightning

UMPQUA COMPLEX FIRE • Acres: 1,019 • Containment: 95 percent • Threatened structures: None • Cause: Lightning Pendleton

Mother Lode Fire

Madras

Mitchell Sisters Prineville John Day Bend

Shadow Lake Fire Burns

Umpqua Complex Fire MILES

Red Cone Complex Fire

0

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Coyner Trail Ponderosa Park Wilson Ave.

By Rachael Rees The Bulletin

Users and growers of medical marijuana can expect to pay more for the privilege beginning in October. Judging by those who attended a public hearing on the proposed fee hikes Tuesday night in Bend, the changes have relatively few fans among the nearly 2,300 Deschutes County residents who hold medical marijuana cards. In order to raise money for other public health programs, the state Legislature this year mandated an array of fee increases for the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program. For instance, annual fees for medical marijuana cards, currently $100, will jump to $180 next month. The state will create a $50 fee for people who grow marijuana for medical users, who often lack the expertise to grow their own. And those who lose their cards will soon pay $25 for each replacement rather than $10, as has been the case. Most of the dozen or so people who attended Tuesday’s meeting opposed the fee hikes. For Tristan Reisfar, who manages Mothers Against Misuse and Abuse (MAMA) in Bend, the “most disturbing part … is they quadrupled the price for the lowincome patients.” Those who apply for medical marijuana cards now pay only $20 per year if they also apply for Oregon Health Plan benefits or for food stamps. The new fee schedule will quadruple that fee. As of June 9, almost 36 percent of those who held medical marijuana cards also had applied for food stamps. Roughly 4 percent had applied for medical marijuana cards and for OHP benefits. About 53,000 Oregonians hold medical marijuana cards. Reisfar also said Tuesday that medical marijuana users shouldn’t be obligated to raise revenue for other health programs. See Marijuana / C5

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

The following fires were burning in the mapped area below as of 9:24 a.m. Wednesday. For updates, go to www.nwccweb.us/information/ firemap.aspx.

La Pine

Bear Creek Rd.

Ninth St.

Portion of trail under construction

Oregon wildfires

Dollar Lake Fire

Pilot Butte State Park 15th St.

Juniper Park

20

Tenth St.

Eighth St.

• State Rep. Jason Conger, R-Bend, will speak at a luncheon sponsored by the League of Women Voters of Deschutes County about topics pertaining to the legislative session. The luncheon will be from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Oct. 6 at Boston’s Restaurant, 61276 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend. There’s no cost to hear the speaker, but there will be a charge for lunch.

Hood River

C

50

Park Service seeks $1B endowment By Andrew Clevenger The Bulletin

WASHINGTON — In anticipation of its 100th anniversary in 2016, the National Park Service hopes to build a $1 billion endowment to help forge a lasting relationship with a new generation of Americans, the agency’s director told the Senate S u b c o m m i ttee on National Parks on Wednesday. “An investment in young people is going to reap benefits well into the future,” National Park Service Director Jonathan Jarvis told members of the subcommittee. Last month, the Park Service published A Call to Action, a plan for the agency’s second century. The plan is built on four themes, said Jarvis: Connecting people to parks; advancing the service’s educational mission; preserving and conserving America’s special places; and enhancing excellence within the agency’s workforce. The plan “is both a rededication to our mission and a recognition that we need to strategically integrate what we do in parks with our programs that offer historic preservation, recreation and conservation assistance to communities,” Jarvis said. One major goal is to interact with 25 percent of America’s school-aged children, he said. Because not everyone can visit a national park in person, virtual

field trips are one way to engage a new generation of students. “We have enormous content,” he said. “We have great interpreters (of that content), and we have great places,” he said. Neil Mulholland, president and CEO of the National Park Foundation, the congressionally created philanthropic partner to the Park Service, said studies

indicate that today’s youth spend more than seven hours a day tethered to electronic devices. The foundation provides grants to support the Park Service’s mission, he said, such as a grant to provide transportation to bring 100,000 students to visit a national park in person in 2012. See Parks / C5 PAID ADVERTISEMENT

IN CONGRESS

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541-382-3551 541-385-4702 541-548-4011 541-447-5686 541-475-3834 541-536-3009 541-549-1560 541-318-0281


C2 Thursday, September 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

L B 

N  R

Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Remond police arrest missing sex offender

Ranger district to mark Public Lands Day

The Redmond Police Department arrested a sex offender Wednesday afternoon after he had been on the loose since Tuesday night. Daniel Timmons, 29, was located around 1:45 p.m., and had been missing since walking away from a Bend transitional housing facility. He was previously convicted for first-degree sexual assault, public indecency and stalking. The Adult Parole and Probation Department says it will recommend revocation of Timmons’ probation and post-prison supervision with a return to prison.

The Sisters Ranger District will celebrate National Public Lands Day on Saturday with a series of conservation projects and events. Several conservation projects will take place along the Metolius River and on Black Butte. Half-day projects will include trail maintenance, native seed collection and planting. Those interested in volunteering should meet at Sisters Art Works, 204 W.Adams St. at 8:30 a.m. Saturday. Volunteers of all ages are welcome. All projects will finish by 2 p.m.

Flashers effective on Burglar rides through Parkway, ODOT says The Oregon Department of storefront on ATV Transportation said Tuesday a

Police are searching for a burglar who rammed into a Sunriver convenience storefront with an ATV on Monday morning, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office said. Summit Xpress, located on Spring River Road, was broken into around 5 a.m. Deputies discovered the front doors of the business had been broken down. Deputies said a suspect riding a 4-wheel ATV rode through the doors, backed out and entered the store on foot. The vehicle is described as a camouflage-colored 4wheel ATV with black fenders. Anyone with information about this incident is asked to contact the sheriff’s office, 541-693-6911.

new system to protect pedestrians crossing the Bend Parkway seems to be working. A series of pedestrian-activated flashing lights were installed this spring near the crosswalks at Badger Road, Reed Lane and Greenwood Avenue. In October, a bicyclist was struck and killed while crossing the Parkway at Reed Lane when a car failed to stop. Analysis of the new systems suggest more than 8 in 10 drivers are yielding to pedestrians where the beacons have been installed. However, it appears that only about 1 in 4 people attempting to cross the Parkway at Reed Lane are activating the beacons before heading across the highway.

Union conflict flares at Longview, Wash., terminal The Associated Press LONGVIEW, Wash. — Longshoremen returned to the railroad tracks near a Columbia River grain terminal with union members’ wives and mothers Wednesday, blocking a shipment and facing more arrests in their battle for jobs. Two union officers and about 10 of the women were detained, International Longshore and Warehouse Union Local 21 President Dan Coffman said in a statement. Coffman was among those involved despite a judge’s repeated orders that the union not block entrance to the site.

Law enforcement officers brought a massive force to various parts of the railroad tracks, including two tactical vehicles, canine units and about a dozen personnel in full riot gear. At least two protesters were treated after being hit with pepper spray, and the train eventually made its way into the EGT Development facility. Union leaders decried the law enforcement activity, saying it amount to a private security force paid for by taxpayers. The ILWU believes its members have the right to work at the new $200 million terminal.

POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 9:11 a.m. Sept. 19, in the 63200 block of Service Road. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 12:25 p.m. Sept. 19, in the 800 block of Northwest Riverside Boulevard. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 9:24 p.m. Sept. 19, in the 63000 block of Northeast Carnelian Lane. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 2:05 a.m. Sept. 20, in the 100 block of Northwest Hawthorne Avenue. Brent Wojahn / The Oregonian

David Harris walks on an abandoned barge he is trying to save and scrap near the Washington shore of the Columbia River west of The Dalles. The number of such large craft known as “derelict vessels� is likely to grow in the Northwest, in part because owners aren’t allowed to export them for scrap.

More derelict vessels expected in Northwest Export limitations keep owners from selling old crafts for scrap The Associated Press LYLE, Wash. — In January, the rusty, oil-filled barge Davy Crockett cracked in half near Washougal along the Columbia River, eventually costing $20 million to clean up. The number of such large craft known as “derelict vessels� is likely to grow in the Northwest, in part because owners aren’t allowed to export them for scrap, The Oregonian reported Wednesday. Agencies are monitoring about 30 large derelict vessels. Their owners are often out of business or absentee or can’t be tracked down. Under maritime law, a vessel without cargo and no means of propulsion doesn’t have to be registered.

Government limits And unless the vessels are hazards to navigation or present an imminent threat of pollution, government agencies have limited ability, resources and responsibility for getting the vessels off the river. A Lyle, Wash., man, David Harris, has claimed one vessel, the paper said. He has spent

many days aboard Barge 202, bailing water to keep it from sinking, and figures the rusty 250-ton craft has $75,000 worth of scrap steel. In July, Barge 202 broke loose from its moorings in Dallesport, Wash., and floated into the Columbia shipping channel. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers hired a contractor to grab it and anchor it near the shore. Kristin Swenddal, Washington’s division manager for aquatic resources, said legal owners are responsible for derelict ships, and the state doesn’t have money to remove them. The ownership of the barge is murky, the Oregonian reported. “We’re hoping the legal owners will step forward and try to do that right thing,� Swenddal said. The Corps’ role stops once the federal navigation channel is safe, spokesman Scott Clemans said. Randy Clark, a security specialist for the Coast Guard, said its authority requires a threat to navigation or an immediate threat of pollution. Aside from possible asbestos, Barge 202 doesn’t fit either of those bills.

Washington and Oregon state programs remove derelict vessels of 100 feet or less. But Barge 202, possibly a converted World War II-era tank carrier, is double that.

No fund for removal The two states and the EPA can extract pollution from stranded ships, but they don’t have separate funds to remove big vessels. Harris had a plan to use an old ferry landing on Lyle’s east end to dismantle the ship, but the Coast Guard clamped down, telling him not to move the barge because it could easily get away, with Bonneville Dam not far downstream. “Honestly, (Harris’ involvement) could be a solution,� Clark said. “But let’s do it the right way, rather than everybody getting surprised by it.� The Coast Guard wants Harris to prepare a plan, and he intends to file an ownership claim that could take more than a year to resolve. But, he says, in the meantime, the weather will only get worse, posing the possibility of a hazard to wind surfers and fishermen if it sinks.

Redmond Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:14 p.m. Sept. 20, in the 2000 block of Southwest Timber Avenue. Theft — A cellphone was reported stolen at 12:33 p.m. Sept. 20, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:04 a.m. Sept. 20, in the 2900 block of Southwest Volcano Circle. Theft — An iPod was reported stolen at 8:41 a.m. Sept. 20, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 10:48 a.m. Sept. 20, in the area of Southeast Lynn Boulevard. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:46 p.m. Sept. 20, in the area of Camp Polk and Wilt roads in Sisters.

BEND FIRE RUNS Monday 4:17 p.m. — Confined cooking fire, 2763 N.W. Crossing Dr. 14 — Medical aid calls. Tuesday 10:42 a.m. — Smoke odor reported, Old Bend Redmond Highway. 11:40 a.m. — Unauthorized burning, 64879 Half Mile Lane. 18 — Medical aid calls.

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The Associated Press Today is Thursday, Sept. 22, the 265th day of 2011. There are 100 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Sept. 22, 1776, during the Revolutionary War, Capt. Nathan Hale, 21, was hanged as a spy by the British in New York. ON THIS DATE In 1761, Britain’s King George III and his wife, Charlotte, were crowned in Westminster Abbey. In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, declaring all slaves in rebel states should be free as of Jan. 1, 1863. In 1911, pitcher Cy Young, 44, gained his 511th and final career victory as he hurled a 1-0 shutout for the Boston Rustlers against the Pittsburgh Pirates at Forbes Field. In 1927, Gene Tunney successfully defended his heavyweight boxing title against Jack Dempsey in the famous “longcount� fight in Chicago. In 1938, the musical comedy revue “Hellzapoppin’,� starring Ole Olsen and Chic Johnson, began a three-year run on Broadway. In 1961, the Interstate Commerce Commission issued rules prohibiting racial discrimination on interstate buses. Actress Marion Davies died in Los Angeles at age 64. In 1964, the musical “Fiddler on the Roof� opened on Broadway, beginning a run of 3,242 performances. In 1975, Sara Jane Moore attempted to shoot President Gerald Ford outside a San Francisco hotel, but missed. (Moore served 32 years in prison before being

paroled on Dec. 31, 2007.) In 1980, the Persian Gulf conflict between Iran and Iraq erupted into full-scale war that lasted nearly eight years. In 1989, songwriter Irving Berlin died in New York City at age 101. TEN YEARS AGO President George W. Bush consulted at length with Russian President Vladimir Putin as the United States mustered a military assault on terrorism in the wake of Sept. 11. Master violinist Isaac Stern died in New York at age 81. Miss Oregon Katie Harman was crowned Miss America 2002 in a patriotic telecast from Atlantic City, N.J. FIVE YEARS AGO A high-speed maglev train crashed in northwestern Germany, killing 23 people in the first fatal wreck involving the hightech system. Three Christian militants were executed in Indonesia for leading attacks on Muslims in May 2000 that left at least 70 people dead. Hewlett-Packard Co. Chairwoman Patricia Dunn resigned in the wake of the company’s ill-fated investigation of boardroom media leaks. Actor Edward Albert died in Malibu, Calif., at age 55.

ONE YEAR AGO Rutgers University freshman Tyler Clementi committed suicide by jumping off the George Washington Bridge into the Hudson River after an intimate gay encounter in his dormitory room was allegedly captured by a webcam and streamed online by his roommate without his knowledge. (The former roommate, Dharun Ravi, is accused of the hate crime of bias intimidation.) South African Ernie Els was elected to the World Golf Hall of Fame; Doug Ford and twotime major winner Jock Hutchison from Scotland were elected through the Veteran’s Category. “American Idol� announced that Jennifer Lopez and Steven Tyler would join Randy Jackson as judges the next season. Pop singer Eddie Fisher, 82, died in Los Angeles. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Baseball Hall of Fame manager Tommy Lasorda is 84. NBA Commissioner David Stern is 69. Musician King Sunny Ade is 65. Actor Paul Le Mat is 65. Capt. Mark Phillips is 63. Rock singer David Coverdale (Deep Purple, Whitesnake) is 60. Actress Shari Belafonte is 57. Singer Debby Boone is 55. Country singer June Forester (The Forester Sisters) is

Local schools directory For Web links to local schools, preschool through college, visit www.bendbulletin.com/schools.

The Bulletin

55. Singer Nick Cave is 54. Rock singer Johnette Napolitano is 54. Classical crossover singer Andrea Bocelli is 53. Singer-musician Joan Jett is 53. Actor Scott Baio is 51. Actress Catherine Oxenberg is 50. Actor Rob Stone is 49. Rock musician Matt Sharp is 42. Rock musician Dave Hernandez (The Shins) is 41. Rhythm-and-blues singer Big Rube (Society of Soul) is 40. Actress Mireille Enos is 36. Actor Michael Graziadei is 32. Actress Ashley Drane (Eckstein) is 30. Actor Tom Felton is 24. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Life resembles a novel more often than novels resemble life.� — George Sand, French author (1804-76)

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, September 22, 2011 C3

O ODOT says road projects may need to be cut

HANGING OUT ON THE JOB

O  B Oakridge officials survive recall vote

By Jonathan J. Cooper The Associated Press

SALEM — Oregon transportation officials say they may have to scale back plans for highway work because revenue from road users is coming in more slowly than expected. Cash-strapped drivers are using less gasoline, so they’re also paying less in gas taxes — and that means Oregon stands to lose $150 million or more in federal funding, officials warn. At the same time, Oregon Department of Transportation officials are also predicting a decline in state income. “One of the greatest risks we face is the uncertainty at the federal level,” Clyde Saiki, deputy director of ODOT’s Central Services Division, told state lawmakers Wednesday. It’s too early to know which projects would be canceled or delayed, officials say, but the decisions would be based on directions from Congress and the Oregon Transportation Commission. The federal Highway Trust Fund, which gets much of its funding from gas taxes, is collecting less revenue than Congress and the states have budgeted. Congress has injected cash three times to keep funding flowing to planned projects, but Oregon officials worry that deficit-reduction efforts will make another influx a tough sell. Rep. John Mica, R-Fla., who chairs the House Transportation Committee, has proposed aligning Highway Trust Fund revenues with expenditures. Under that plan, Oregon would get $150 to $175 million less from the federal government and would have to scale back transportation projects already in the works, state officials said. ODOT officials predicted the shortfall in federal funding and planned for a reduction of about 20 percent, but that’s not enough to handle a federal shortfall that could exceed 30 percent, said Travis Brouwer, ODOT’s federal affairs adviser. “We would have to further delay or cut projects below the cuts we have already made, which are pretty substantial,” he said. Projections of state transportation revenue aren’t much brighter. ODOT economists say the State Highway Fund — a roadimprovement account fed by state gas taxes, vehicle registration costs and other user fees — will collect $110 million less over the next four years when compared with their previous estimates six months ago. Economists have revised their forecasts downward each time since 2008. Officials say the combined state and federal funding shortfalls would mean fewer road and transit projects and more deterioration of existing highways. Local governments, which get about one-fourth of ODOT highway revenue, also stand to take a big hit. In 2009, the state Legislature boosted Oregon’s gasoline tax to 30 cents per gallon, projecting $300 million in revenue every year for transportation projects. Economists now say the Jobs and Transportation Act, as the effort was known, will raise about 7 percent less in the current fiscal year, shaving about $21 million of anticipated funding for state and local governments. ODOT is reducing its workforce by about 5 percent over the next three to five years, ODOT’s Saiki said. Rep. Phil Barnhart, D-Eugene, said the reduction in funding from the federal government will mean ODOT and local governments will have less money available to hire construction workers. “So whether we are able to proceed with economic activity that leads to job growth in Oregon will depend very much on what Congress does with this issue,” Barnhart said. “The Legislature’s done its job. Now it’s up to Congress.”

Kevin Clark / The Register-Guard

Tim Abbitt, with Abbitt’s Window Cleaning, dangles from a rope while washing the windows of the Broadway Commerce Center in Eugene on Wednesday.

Springfield police break down man’s door in suicide kit scare The Associated Press SPRINGFIELD — When the FBI notified police in Oregon that a Springfield man had purchased a mail-order suicide kit, officers went straight to his home and kicked down the door to make sure he was OK. He was. At the time, he was at work at the Register-Guard newspaper in Eugene, where the helium-hood kit was purchased as part of research for a story published months ago. Reporter Randi Bjornstad

B END

RIVER

said she asked a colleague in February to order it from a Southern California company called The Gladd Group — not wanting to raise red flags that could prevent her from obtaining a kit if she were identified as a reporter. Her story was published in March. In a story Wednesday, the newspaper didn’t identify the colleague, saying he cited privacy concerns and agreed to be interviewed only if his name were not used.

PROMENADE,

BEND

Sales of such devices have since been outlawed in Oregon. In December, a 29-year-old Eugene man committed suicide using one of the $60 kits. The Springfield police said they assumed the alert from the FBI on Tuesday required a quick response. The Register-Guard story says the police apologized and agreed to pay for repairs. The employee called it a misunderstanding and told officers he was glad they checked on him.

5 41 . 317. 6 0 0 0

OAKRIDGE — The mayor and three city councilors in the small Oregon timber town of Oakridge have survived a recall election despite a financial crisis that has turned recent council meetings into shouting matches. The Register-Guard reported that final, unofficial returns from Tuesday’s election show Mayor Don Hampton and councilors Rayetta Clark, Amy Kordosky and Glenn Fortune retaining their posts. The recall effort began weeks before city officials revealed the town blew through $1.2 million in cash reserves over a two-year period. However, once the budget crisis hit, the idea of booting those councilors who refused to fire City Administrator Gordon Zimmerman became a way for people in the town to vent. Recall foes organized in recent weeks and attended a recent council meeting wearing “no recall” T-shirts. They warned that a void on the council would do more harm than good.

Dams’ removal would help fish, agency says PORTLAND — The Interior Department says removing four hydroelectric dams on the Klamath River in California and Oregon would help boost salmon runs in a river marked by poor water quality and fish disease. The department has posted the draft of an environmental impact statement on the proposal to remove the dams in 2020, along with scientific and

technical papers. The department said Wednesday that drawing down the reservoirs would end conditions that create toxic algal blooms. It said millions of cubic yards of sediment would be flushed out, and fish numbers might suffer briefly but would soon rebound and then increase. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar is expected to decide next year whether to go ahead with the dam removal under a regional agreement that would maintain irrigation for agriculture.

Whooping cough diagnosed in Umatilla UMATILLA — Public health authorizes in Eastern Oregon say a school-age child has come down with whooping cough. KNDU quotes the Umatilla County Public Health Department as saying the diagnosis came from the western end of the county at the beginning of the month. The child had been in school before the diagnosis. Family members have been treated with antibiotics. Whooping cough, or pertussis, is a highly contagious bacterial disease that in rare cases can be fatal. — From wire reports

Contact your public officials Find an easily searchable list of contact information for federal, state, county and city officials at www.bendbulletin .com/officials.

The Bulletin


C4 Thursday, September 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA RICHARD COE

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Trails not the bane of Whychus Creek

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rails, a parking lot and a scenic overlook don’t imply ruin for Whychus Creek. The U.S. Forest Service’s plan to add those features would enable the public to enjoy one of the

region’s special places and channel that enjoyment to help protect the creek. Central Oregon LandWatch sees the plan differently. The group, which was created in part because of conservation work along the creek, argues the plan has it pretty much all wrong. LandWatch filed an appeal with the Forest Service this week. “The effect will be even greater use and impacts than currently exist and the elevation of recreation as the pre-eminent value over the outstanding remarkable values for which Whychus Creek was designated in the first place,” Attorney Paul Dewey wrote. Congress designated Whychus Creek as a Wild and Scenic River in 1988. That’s a recognition that the creek has memorable qualities. It is not a designation that excludes or expells the public. It’s about balance. Consider what the Wild and Scenic River act says. The rivers “shall be preserved in free-flowing condition, and … they and their immediate environments shall be protected for the benefit and enjoyment of present and future generations.” Whychus Creek is regrettably not

pristine now. It’s been somewhat despoiled by vandalism and trash. The Forest Service had to place boulders to keep drivers from churning up the creek with off-road vehicles. Restoration work needs to be done. LandWatch doesn’t like the Forest Service plans to do much more than restoration. But why not trails? Why no parking lot? Even popular, heavily used trails like those spurring off the Green Lakes trailhead on the Cascade Lakes Highway haven’t ruined that basin. They have impacted it. There is concern about overuse. There has been restoration work. What those trails do is find a balance to unlock a beautiful piece of public land for the public’s benefit. It’s hard not to leave them without a recognition of the importance of preservation. Adding trails to Whychus Creek will balance the creek’s qualities for the benefit and enjoyment of present and future generations. And if it is to become the practice that special designations for public lands means no more public trails, we don’t expect they’ll get much support.

Get a flu vaccine I t’s that time of year again, the season of the flu shot. And while this year’s shot is basically a repeat of the one available last year, experts say we should go ahead and get it anyway. There’s a good reason for that. Experts say immunity to the strains it protects against declines over time, leaving us vulnerable again. And while most of us think of the flu as an unpleasant illness that’s worth a few days off work, it can be much worse than that. In fact, influenza kills Americans every year, sometimes as few as 3,000 and sometimes as many as 49,000. In addition, an average of 200,000 Americans are hospitalized with the flu each year. While officials at the Centers for Disease Control recommend that everyone 6 months old or older be vaccinated against flu, some groups are more vulnerable than others. Among them are children younger than 5, but especially those younger than 2, pregnant women and adults 65 and older. Also at greater risk are those with asthma, diabetes, HIV, AIDS and cancer. It’s always a good idea to talk to your doctor.

Flu is one of those illnesses that is easy to catch and easy to give to others, according to the CDC. It is spread by direct contact — shaking hands, hugging — by sneezing, even by simply talking, and an infected person can spread it before he knows he’s ill. Aside from vaccination, frequent hand washing with soap and water can prevent the spread of flu and other respiratory illnesses, including the common cold, the CDC says. This year there are new options for many who cannot stand the thought of being poked by a needle, including nasal mist and injections without needles. The options and their local availability are discussed in the Health section of the newspaper. Meanwhile, flu shots and their alternatives are available at many grocery stores, Walmart, Target, drug stores, at some workplaces, from your doctor’s office and elsewhere. They’re often covered by health insurance and Medicare, as well. Flu not only costs time on the job, it can kill. Vaccination can prevent both the illness and the deaths. Being vaccinated his year will protect you and help protect those you love. It’s worth the effort.

My Nickel’s Worth Boon to Prineville The article in the Community Life section of the Sept. 13 edition of The Bulletin concerning the recent expansion of the Bowman Museum in Prineville was very interesting and well-written. This building is a boon to Prineville and Crook County. It may not be the Smithsonian, but it has a lot of artifacts in it from “old” Crook County, before Deschutes and Jefferson counties split off. It’s great to see an article in The Bulletin about places other than Bend, Redmond or La Pine. I guess that shows there’s more to Prineville than horses, cattle and rodeos. Prineville also had a long heritage as a major ponderosa pine lumber manufacturing center. Randy Avery Prineville

Check the numbers In his “In My View” in the Sept. 13 edition of The Bulletin, Richard Henry chastises liberals for expressing “typical far-left factless opinions.” His tirade praising Texas and the tea party contained one particular factoid that really caught my attention: Henry wrote, “It’s estimated that 600,000 people left Ohio and moved to Texas since the recession hit.” The entire

population of Ohio as of the 2010 census is only about 11.5 million, so this struck me as unlikely on the face of it, especially since the 2010 U.S. census showed that the population of Ohio had increased by a quarter-million people since the 2000 census. So being a typical liberal who does respect facts, I decided to check his claim. I got some help from Texans on the website www.texastribune.org, which has a map showing migration patterns into and out of Texas. They report that between 7,000 and 12,000 people moved from Ohio to Texas during 2009-10, the most recent period for which they show data. (The IRS also tracks migration from state to state using changes in taxpayers’ filing addresses. Their figure for 2008-09 is somewhat smaller, just under 5,000.) So even with the wildest assumptions about when the recession started, it’s clear that Henry’s claim that 600,000 people have left the Buckeye State for the paradise of Texas is absurd. Indeed, it’s just another example of typical far-right factless opinions. John Cushing Bend

Seniors and feds defrauded The funding of the (former) Bend Senior Center begs the question of whether the city of Bend and the Bend Park & Recreation District defrauded

both the seniors of Bend and the federal government (hence all of us) as well. The federal Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program is a principal revenue source for communities to address the roots and consequences of poverty. In order to receive CDBG funds, applicants must identify urgent needs of the community and solicit project plans from citizens and local organizations that address those needs. The city of Bend filed the application because the Bend Park & Recreation District was ineligible. However, the intent was clearly to obtain the funds for the park district since the center was quickly turned over to the district. At the time of the CDBG application, the funds were clearly purported to be used to build a senior center, impoverished seniors being in need of a free lunch and a decent central place to socialize. It matters not that seniors were unable to provide all of the matching funds themselves or who technically “owns” the building. The CDBG funds were obtained for the expressed purpose of a senior center. However, the end result is a generic activity center owned by an entity that was ineligible to apply for the CDBG funds and that no longer addresses the requirements for the federal funds. Harold Shrader Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

We must take back our economy from corporate importers By Scott Nunns

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nemployment in the U.S. will not drop below 8.5 to 9.5 percent in the next five or more years — unless domestic manufacturing replaces at least 25-45 percent of all currently imported manufactured goods. Unless we take back our own economy from the multinational and domestic corporate importers, we face descent into economic and social instability. We need blue-collar manufacturing jobs as well as technical jobs. This is why: • Loss of manufacturing jobs and the employment multipliers that accompany them. On average, loss of each domestic manufacturing job creates a loss of at least 10 additional satellite support jobs. Each new domestic manufacturing job creates 10-15 domestic support jobs. • No political will to withstand corporate and special-interest pressure to facilitate import of finished products under the guise of failing, bankruptcy, stockholders. • Political establishment does not require imported products meet all domestic quality, safety, environmental laws and regulations. Subsidies to imports.

• Political establishment does not require imported products pay their full burdened cost for inspection, analysis, verification and administrative costs associated with finished product imports. Heck, not even inspected. • No political will to resist corporate and special-interest emphatic resistance to any form of quotas, tariffs or domestic market share limits necessary for national security maintenance of the manufacturing industrial base. The political establishment has been bought off, bribed and lobbied for special-interest subsidies and tax breaks protecting their treasonous profits at the expense of the general public. • Cheap foreign finished products have protected politicians from having to explain our “real” declining standard of living as special interests and professional politicians garner greater concentrations of economic power and wealth. • Finished imports are a cheap stalking horse not recognized by most, even the supposedly intelligent politicians and educated citizens as a symptom of failed regulation and corruption of the political process. Waiting for the economy to improve and create the jobs necessary to bring

IN MY VIEW unemployment down to 6 percent and provide worthwhile, full-time jobs? Don’t hold your breath. It won’t happen for four to five years, if ever, unless the current political situation is turned on its head and power is wrested from our multinational corporations and special interests. This is not a Democrat or Republican thing, it’s an American thing necessary to return U.S. prosperity, and it will involve a revolution to make it happen. The U.S. funded the world economy for the past 70 years. Now it’s time for others to share the obligation. No one is talking about it except Donald Trump. It’s too bad our political aspirants are afraid to defend economic strategies directly benefiting U.S. workers and the domestic economy. Or respond tit for tat! They only pander to “indirect” economic stimulus for fear of being accused of being “anti-free trade.” Championing U.S. national economic activity and favoring U.S. domestic industry is the only thing that will prevent this country from descending into economic deflation and potential

stagflation as U.S. corporations source manufactured products overseas while they destroy the manufacturing multiplier effect on employment and income derived from domestic manufacturing. New jobs are created if aggregate domestic demand is increased (people have more money and are willing to spend it) and most incremental products consumers buy are produced in the U.S. Or, if aggregate demand doesn’t increase (stays steady or falls), a marginal increase of products bought in the U.S. must be made in the U.S. and imports restricted or repriced by tariffs, market restrictions, quotas or inspection compliance; and increased domestic manufacturing resulting from companies realizing higher domestic profits provides incentives to produce locally, invest in new plants and equipment and hire domestic workers. Eliminating foreign operation tax breaks won’t hurt either. Some inflation will occur, but reduce the ratio of debt to GDP. China is a master of this and restricted markets. The only other way to create new/additional jobs is government expenditure that stimulates employment: infrastructure construction and nonmarket-

generated demand funded by taxes or deficit spending. Import regulation would provide good new jobs. But these jobs have no or little multiplier effect. In the present environment, more jobs this way appears unlikely, even if they pay their own way. We, as a population, have only two alternatives: continue as we are now in economic depression/recession, or force our political and economic elite to stop the financial pillaging of the U.S. population for the benefit of special interests having no national allegiance. Destructive forces of special interests and corporate outsourcing act on U.S. national interests to reduce domestic manufacturing and eliminate employment multipliers from domestic manufacturing and supply chain sourcing of raw materials, parts, machine tools, technology and ready inventory availability. As each manufacturing job is destroyed, 10-15 times more jobs are lost across the domestic support spectrum. Call your congressman/senator and ask them about “manufacturing multipliers.” Scott Nunns lives in Bend.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, September 22, 2011 C5

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N   Jack V. Newman, of Prineville April 26, 1938 - Sept. 14, 2011 Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 541-416-9733 Services: In accordance with his wishes, no service will be held. Contributions may be made to:

Pioneer Memorial Hospice, 1201 NE Elm St., Prineville, OR 97754, 541-447-2510.

James Willard Schultz, of Redmond June 20, 1922 - Sept. 18, 2011 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel 541-382-5592 www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: Private family memorial services will be held at a later date.

John W. Livingston, of Bend, OR April 23, 1922 - Sept. 15, 2011 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, (541) 382-5592; www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: No public service will be held. The family will gather privately at a later date.

Maria Roca, of Bend Oct. 22, 1916 - Sept. 16, 2011 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend (541) 318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: At her request, no services will be held.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Law Continued from C1 Wyden and Udall had previously asked the Director of National Intelligence to clarify how many American citizens have had their communications reviewed under FISA, only to be told it was “not reasonably possible to identify the number of people” and that the government’s interpretation of parts of the Patriot Act and FISA is classified. “To say, as the Justice Department has said repeatedly and publicly, that Patriot Act Section 215 and a grand jury subpoena are analogous, is false (and) misleading,” Wyden said Wednesday. “I think the public is going to be very surprised at the gap between what they believe the law is and the way (the government is) interpreting it.” In the letter, Wyden and Udall maintain that Section 215 is not interpreted in a way that makes it similar to a grand jury issuing a subpoena, as Justice Department officials have stated publicly, including in testimony before Congress. They also single out a statement by Dean Boyd, a Justice Department spokesman, in an article published by Al Jazeera

Brian Derry Michael May 11, 1988 - Sept. 16, 2011 Brian Derry Michael, 23, of Bend, Oregon, passed away on September 16, 2011, in Troutdale, Oregon. Born in Salem, Oregon May 11, 1988, loving son of Jodie A. Michael of Bend and David D. Michael of Mount Angel. Brian loved life and Brian Derry enjoyed Michael many outdoor activities including snowboarding and river rafting. He attended Central Oregon Community College in Bend, Oregon. He will be remembered for his gentle and easy-going spirit. He is survived by his mother, Jodie Michael; stepmother, Alice Michael; father, David Michael; brother, Travis Rosbach; brother, Jeffrey Michael; brother, Will Michael; sister, Mikayla Michael; and niece, Maliah Michael. He also leaves grandfather, Derry Michael, and grandparents, Elmer and Bev Winegar. A celebration of his life will be held at Aspen Hall Shevlin Park on Saturday, September 24, 2011, from 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m., the service beginning at 2:00 p.m. All are welcome. Please send donations to Boys and Girls Club of Oregon.

Marijuana Continued from C1 Jim Klahr, CEO of Oregon Green Free, a nonprofit organization that connects medical marijuana users to growers, argued that many Oregonians who use medical marijuana won’t be able to afford the new and increased fees. As a result, the state won’t raise the expected revenue, said Klahr, who was contacted by phone. “They’re trying to roll snake eyes on a pair of dice that doesn’t have any ones on it,” Klahr said. Klahr said the new grower fee will create problems for users and growers alike. Growing

Judge Continued from C1 Brenneman said he’s observed several different styles of courtroom management from the different judges he’s practiced in front of. He said Sullivan has been one of the best judges he’s ever worked with. “I’ve always looked up to him. I think he runs a tight courtroom,” he said. “I think he’s the standard to live up to, and that’s not exclusive of the other judges. I’ve learned so much from all of them.”

English on Sept. 1: “Contrary to various claims in recent months and years, Section 215 is not a secret law, nor has it been implemented under secret legal opinions by the Justice Department,” Boyd is quoted as saying. But Wyden and Udall disagree. “As the (National Security Agency) General Counsel testified in July of this year, significant interpretations of Section 215 of the Patriot Act are contained in classified opinions of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court and these opinions — and the legal interpretations they contain — continue to be kept secret,” the letter states. Boyd did not return a call from The Bulletin. Wyden said he hopes the Justice Department will clarify or correct its statements regarding Section 215, or at the very least, make sure officials avoid misleading statements in the future. “It’s one thing not to tell the American people what you think is legal,” he said. “It’s another thing to mislead them into thinking you don’t think that (your interpretation is what it is).” Andrew Clevenger can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at aclevenger@bendbulletin.com.

Shifra Goldman, 85, champion of Mexican art By Elaine Woo Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — In the early 1970s, when Shifra Goldman proposed a doctoral dissertation on modern Mexican art, her professors at UCLA sneered. Compared to European art, the art of Latin America was, in their view, imitative, too political, unworthy of serious scholarly attention. But Goldman, a scrappy civil rights and anti-Vietnam War activist who went back to school in her mid-30s, refused to consider a more mainstream topic. Describing herself years later as a person who was “born on the margins, lived on the margins and ... always sympathized with the margins,” she bided her time for several years until a more open-minded professor arrived who was willing to supervise her research. She not only published her dissertation as a book, “Contemporary Mexican Painting in a Time of Change” (1981), but also went on to become a seminal figure in the rise of Latin American and Chicano art history as legitimate fields of study. Goldman died Sept. 11 in Los Angeles of Alzheimer’s disease, said her son, Eric Garcia. She was 85. Calling herself an activist art historian, Goldman was an early champion of Mexican muralist David Alfaro Siqueiros and persisted for decades to pre-

Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times

Shifra Goldman, a scholar of modern Latin American art, with her newly published book “Dimensions of the Americas” in 1995. Goldman died Sept. 11. She was 85. serve his last public work in the United States: the “America Tropical” mural at Olvera Street. The Getty Conservation Institute is collaborating with the city of Los Angeles to rescue the rare mural. “There was no one like Shifra,” said artist and Cal State Northridge professor Yreina D. Cervantez. “She was an advocate and a scholar on Chicano and Chicana art long before it was recognized and ... she put it in the context of the larger art world. Her commitment was unmovable and constant.” Goldman “was an intellectual pioneer with strong social convictions,” said Chon Noriega,

plants indoors costs him between $800 and $1,200 per month, Klahr said, and the law allows him to charge medical marijuana users only for supplies and utilities. Growers will respond to the new fee either by absorbing the cost themselves or by passing it along to their patients. “It is going to cause a number of patients to go to the black market,” he said. “Patients will lose the well-being of cannabis, and it will drive them to use harsh pharmaceuticals that are worse for them.” At least one medical marijuana advocate Tuesday supported the fee hikes, however. Chris Ricci characterized marijuana as a “sleeping beauty.”

“The state is missing out on a lot of revenue that could go to good things,” he said. “There’s a lot of good that could be done by taxing marijuana if it was legalized.” As for the fee hikes themselves, Ricci argued that if people “can afford to buy it on the black market for twice as much, they can afford registration.” People who missed the Tuesday’s public hearing may submit written testimony to Brittany Sande at brittany.a.sande@state. or.us. The deadline for comment is 5 p.m. today.

Brenneman’s wife, Alana Brown-Brenneman, is a Bend defense attorney. The couple have two children. Brenneman said if he is elected, he expects the court system will have no difficulty scheduling his case load so he is not overseeing cases where his wife is representing one of the parties. Although Circuit Court judge positions are nonpartisan, the election includes a primary of sorts in May and the general election in November. A candidate wins the position outright if he or she takes more than 50 percent of the votes in the May elec-

tion. If no candidate wins more than 50 percent in May, the two leading candidates in the race advance to the November general election. A second vacancy will be opening on the Circuit Court bench at the end of this year, when Judge Stephen Tiktin will retire. Because Tiktin is resigning before his seat is up for election, the vacancy will be filled through an appointment by Gov. John Kitzhaber.

Parks Continued from C1 As the generation of baby boomers passes on trillions of dollars of wealth to its children, there is a major opportunity to create an endowment that will improve the Park Service’s ability to perform its mission, he said. The Park Service collects roughly $175 million a year in entrance and camping fees and an additional $100 million from concessions, which accounts for roughly 10 percent of its $2.8 billion annual budget, Jarvis said. Allowing the Park Service to keep the

Rachael Rees can be reached at 541-617-7818 or at rrees@bendbulletin.com.

Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.

interest on the $275 million it collects every year would be a good way to start building the endowment before 2016, he said. Currently, the federal government keeps all the interest. On Sept. 24, however, the National Park Service will forgo collecting any fees as it celebrates the 18th annual National Public Lands Day. To encourage kids to get outside, the Park Service is teaming with the television network Nickelodeon, which will go dark for three hours between noon and 3 p.m. Saturday. Andrew Clevenger can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at aclevenger@bendbulletin.com.

• New saver programs • New lower fee programs • Interest rates are still low

61310 Columbine Lane Bend, OR 97702

director of the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center, where Goldman was a research associate in the mid-1990s. Noriega described one of her books — “Arte Chicano,” a comprehensive 1985 bibliography co-written with Tomas Ybarra-Frausto — as “the bible for Chicano art history.” “We really have to rewrite the history of modern art,” Goldman told the Los Angeles Times in 1992. “That’s the tall order that many of us have set for ourselves. You have to insert the modern art of Asia, Africa and Latin America.” Born Shifra Meyerowitz on July 18, 1926, she grew up in New York steeped in the leftist politics

of her parents, Jewish immigrants from Russia and Poland. She attended the city’s High School of Music and Art before moving to Los Angeles in the 1940s. A studio art major at UCLA, she joined a student boycott of Westwood barbers who refused haircuts to African-American veterans of World War II attending UCLA on the GI Bill. She left UCLA before earning her degree and immersed herself in the nascent Mexican American civil rights movement led by activist Bert Corona. She learned Spanish living in East Los Angeles and in 1952 married John Garcia. The marriage ended after a few years, and a second marriage also ended in divorce. She is survived by her son and a grandson. “She said she was a women’s libber before it existed,” her son, Eric, said last week. “She had a hard time with men. They didn’t want this intellectual powerhouse. She was a very intense woman.” During the 1950s Goldman worked in a factory assembling refrigerators and stoves; later she was a bookkeeper. She remained active in radical causes, which in 1959 led to a subpoena to appear before a panel of the House UnAmerican Activities Committee. She refused to answer questions. Unsatisfied with her life, she returned to UCLA, completing her bachelor’s degree in art in 1963. She earned a master’s from Cal State L.A. in 1966 and a doctorate from UCLA in 1977, both in art history.

Norma H. Johnson, 79, oversaw Lewinsky inquiry New York Times News Service Norma Holloway Johnson, the chief judge of the U.S. District Court in Washington who oversaw the grand jury investigation into President Bill Clinton’s affair with Monica Lewinsky, died Sunday at her brother’s home in Lake Charles, La. She was 79. The cause was a stroke, said her brother, Lionel Holloway. Known for her no-nonsense courtroom manner, Johnson — the first African-American woman appointed to the federal bench in Washington — held ultimate authority over

the direction of the 1998 investigation, led by the independent counsel Kenneth Starr, into Clinton’s relationship with Lewinsky, a White House intern. Among a series of pivotal decisions, Johnson delivered a setback to the president’s efforts to limit the scope of the investigation, ruling that he could not invoke executive privilege or lawyer-client privilege in trying to block prosecutors from questioning his aides. She also ruled that documents drafted by one of Lewinsky’s lawyers were not protected by lawyer-client privilege and had to be given to Starr.

Liz Hannum September 20, 1928 September 12, 2011 Liz Hannum, 82, died unexpectedly of natural causes at her home in The Springs at Clackamas Woods in Milwaukie, OR. Born to George “Bonnie” Butler and Martina Brown Butler in Richmond, Oregon, Liz grew up in Wheeler and Crook Counties with a country girl’s love of nature and life on a rural sheep ranch. In 1946, she graduated from Crook County High School, and after graduation moved to Prineville where she married and had five children: Marsha, Cindy, Kelly, Pat and Connie. After a divorce in 1960, she met the love of her life, Cecil Hannum, and they married in 1962. They first settled in Madras, but soon afterwards moved the family to Salem where Liz had another child, Susan. In 1968, Liz and Cec bought the Bend Storage and Transfer Company and relocated the family to Bend where they soon became a part of the business fabric of the community. In 1990, they sold the moving business and retired to a new home in Florence, but held on to their Central Oregon roots in the form of a rustic cabin that Cecil built in the Bend Elks’ Haner Park property on the Deschutes River outside La Pine. In 1997, Liz and Cecil sold their Florence house and bought a winter home in Palm Springs and spent the next 8 years “snow birding” between Palm Springs in the winter and their cabin in La Pine in the summer. In 2004, due to Cec’s declining health, they sold their condo in Palm Springs and returned “home” to Milwaukie, Oregon so they would be closer to family and friends all the time. Liz loved crocheting, reading, music, theater, travel and helping Cec gradually transform their rustic cabin into a beautiful, modern summer home with all the usual conveniences. Preceded in death by her beloved Cecil, her sister, Harriett Rhineschmitt and her brother, Sam Butler, she is survived by her 6 children: Marsha Hannum of Milwaukie, Cindy Saunders (Pete) of Silverdale, WA, Steven Hannum of Pittsfield, MA, Patrick Hannum (Ellie) of Salem, Connie Hannum of Eugene, and Susan Alexander (Judd) of Milwaukie. She is also survived by 9 grandchildren: Brandy Hannum, David Saunders, Steven Hannum, Richard Hannum, Josh Demers, Lauren Hannum, Mollie Berry, Michael Hannum, and Sam Berry, as well as 3 greatgrandchildren, Ashley and Alex Hannum and Amira Saunders. Service: Noon, September 24th, Milwaukie Covenant Church, 12201 SE Linwood, Milwaukie, OR. Disposition: inurnment. Memorial donations: The Friends of the Milwaukie Center, 5440 SE Kellogg Creek Dr., Milwaukie, OR 97222 or the charity of the donor’s choice.

NMLS 57716


W E AT H ER

C6 Thursday, September 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, SEPTEMBER 22

FRIDAY

Today: Mostly sunny and warm.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

LOW

87

43

Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

88/52

83/53

90/53

65/55

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

88/48

83/40

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras 88/46

80s

86/45

Camp Sherman 82/40 Redmond Prineville 87/43 Cascadia 84/44 86/44 Sisters 85/42 70s Bend Post 87/43

Oakridge Elk Lake 84/42

74/31

Partly cloudy skies today. Partly to mostly cloudy tonight. Central

89/47

83/40

84/39

85/41

84/39

82/38

82/40

Fort Rock

70s City

71/58

Missoula

80s

84/56

Grants Pass

Bend

85/50

90/52

Idaho Falls

86/42

100s

84/40

Elko

79/40

87/37

Reno

91/55

Mostly sunny skies today. San Francisco 72/55 Mostly clear skies tonight.

71/44

83/51

Boise

87/43

103/61

Crater Lake

80s

Helena

Eugene

Redding

Silver Lake

82/37

74/51

83/46

Salt Lake City

90s

83/56

LOW

HIGH

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases New

First

Sept. 27 Oct. 3

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

Full

Last

Oct. 11

Oct. 19

Astoria . . . . . . . . 70/53/0.00 . . . . . . 68/59/c. . . . . . 71/55/pc Baker City . . . . . . 83/30/0.00 . . . . . . 86/47/s. . . . . . . 89/47/s Brookings . . . . . . 68/50/0.00 . . . . . . 63/53/c. . . . . . 63/54/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 81/36/0.00 . . . . . . 88/52/s. . . . . . . 90/52/s Eugene . . . . . . . . 88/44/0.00 . . . . . 84/56/pc. . . . . . 85/53/pc Klamath Falls . . . 83/38/0.00 . . . . . . 84/44/s. . . . . . . 84/44/s Lakeview. . . . . . . 82/37/0.00 . . . . . . 88/47/s. . . . . . . 88/49/s La Pine . . . . . . . . 85/32/0.00 . . . . . . 84/39/s. . . . . . . 84/39/s Medford . . . . . . . 93/50/0.00 . . . . . . 91/54/s. . . . . . . 92/55/s Newport . . . . . . . 68/50/0.00 . . . . . 64/55/pc. . . . . . 69/52/pc North Bend . . . . . 66/46/0.00 . . . . . 68/53/pc. . . . . . 67/53/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 85/46/0.00 . . . . . . 87/52/s. . . . . . . 90/54/s Pendleton . . . . . . 84/46/0.00 . . . . . 89/51/pc. . . . . . . 91/54/s Portland . . . . . . . 84/58/0.00 . . . . . 80/61/pc. . . . . . . 83/59/s Prineville . . . . . . . 83/40/0.00 . . . . . . 84/44/s. . . . . . . 87/50/s Redmond. . . . . . . 88/35/0.00 . . . . . . 85/44/s. . . . . . . 87/48/s Roseburg. . . . . . . 92/50/0.00 . . . . . 86/56/pc. . . . . . 87/57/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 87/51/0.00 . . . . . 82/58/pc. . . . . . 84/55/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 84/36/0.00 . . . . . 85/42/pc. . . . . . . 81/48/s The Dalles . . . . . . 87/46/0.00 . . . . . 87/54/pc. . . . . . . 89/58/s

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

5 HIGH

MEDIUM 2

4

6

V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84/43 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .89 in 1967 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.03” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 in 1955 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.40” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.70” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 7.78” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.03 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.36 in 1944 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97.....High Sisters................................High Bend, east of Hwy. 97......High La Pine...............................High Redmond/Madras..........High Prineville ..........................High

LOW

LOW

76 44

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX Friday Hi/Lo/W

Slight chance of showers, seasonably cool. HIGH

77 42

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .6:28 a.m. . . . . . .7:00 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .7:46 a.m. . . . . . .7:28 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .1:50 a.m. . . . . . .4:46 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .8:28 p.m. . . . . .10:22 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .8:21 a.m. . . . . . .7:48 p.m. Uranus . . . . . . .7:01 p.m. . . . . . .7:13 a.m.

OREGON CITIES

Calgary

Seattle

Christmas Valley

Chemult

66/58

60s

85/41

77/33

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:52 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:03 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:53 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:01 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 1:09 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 4:08 p.m.

Vancouver

Eastern

Hampton

Crescent

Crescent Lake

BEND ALMANAC Yesterday’s state extremes • 93° Medford • 27° Meacham

MONDAY Mostly cloudy, chance of showers, cooler.

86 49

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

80/61

Burns

La Pine

HIGH

NORTHWEST

80/40

Mostly sunny skies today. Mostly clear skies tonight.

LOW

87 43

Portland

Brothers

Sunriver

HIGH

SUNDAY Partly sunny and warm.

A storm system to the northwest will result in rain over the northwest corner of the region.

Paulina

84/41

Mostly sunny and warm.

Tonight: Mostly clear.

HIGH

STATE

SATURDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35,419 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106,378 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 79,796 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 26,847 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106,117 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 384 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,130 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,567 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 257 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.1 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 66/58

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

• 107° Phoenix, Ariz.

• 23° Stanley, Idaho

• 3.13” Lincolnton, N.C.

Honolulu 88/73

S

Calgary 74/51

S

Saskatoon 77/47

Seattle 71/58

S Winnipeg 59/42

S

S

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 72/58

Thunder Bay 54/39

Halifax 69/60 Portland Billings To ronto Portland 71/60 83/50 71/55 80/61 St. Paul Green Bay Boston 55/39 55/43 Boise 73/63 Rapid City Detroit 85/50 Buffalo New York 71/49 67/52 71/56 Des Moines 77/65 62/42 Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus Chicago 73/43 72/56 79/67 62/50 Omaha San Francisco Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 66/42 72/55 City 79/69 Las Denver Louisville 83/56 Kansas City Vegas 79/47 76/54 Nashville 70/48 St. Louis 99/73 82/58 Charlotte 67/50 83/65 Albuquerque Los Angeles Atlanta Oklahoma City Little Rock 80/57 71/62 80/67 72/52 76/52 Phoenix 105/76 Birmingham Dallas Tijuana 83/65 80/60 80/61 Bismarck 63/40

Houston 94/69

Chihuahua 90/58

Anchorage 54/43

La Paz 99/77 Juneau 51/41

Mazatlan 91/75

New Orleans 87/73

Orlando 91/74 Miami 90/79

Monterrey 92/69

FRONTS

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .96/70/0.00 . . .75/57/t . . . 84/62/s Akron . . . . . . . . .77/61/0.03 . . .70/54/c . . 63/49/sh Albany. . . . . . . . .75/50/0.00 . . .76/62/r . . 72/60/sh Albuquerque. . . .84/62/0.00 . . .80/57/s . . . 81/54/s Anchorage . . . . .52/44/0.06 . .54/43/sh . . . 51/42/c Atlanta . . . . . . . .82/69/0.06 . . .80/67/t . . . .77/63/t Atlantic City . . . .77/57/0.00 . . .78/68/r . . . .76/63/r Austin . . . . . . . . .96/62/0.00 . . .92/67/c . . 92/62/pc Baltimore . . . . . .75/57/0.00 . . .78/67/t . . . .76/63/r Billings. . . . . . . . .70/37/0.00 . . .83/50/s . . . 88/50/s Birmingham . . . .84/67/0.00 . . .83/65/t . . . .77/55/t Bismarck . . . . . . .55/47/0.00 . . .63/40/s . . 78/45/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .84/51/0.00 . . .85/50/s . . . 88/53/s Boston. . . . . . . . .75/59/0.00 . . .73/63/r . . 71/64/sh Bridgeport, CT. . .75/61/0.00 . . .76/65/r . . 72/65/sh Buffalo . . . . . . . .79/56/0.01 . . .71/56/c . . 67/54/sh Burlington, VT. . .73/53/0.00 . . .77/59/r . . 74/61/sh Caribou, ME . . . .71/45/0.00 . . .68/54/r . . . 70/53/c Charleston, SC . .84/71/0.18 . . .84/73/t . . . .84/70/t Charlotte. . . . . . .75/68/0.46 . . .83/65/t . . . .80/61/t Chattanooga. . . .84/69/0.02 . .85/63/sh . . . .78/56/t Cheyenne . . . . . .63/36/0.00 . . .73/43/s . . 78/46/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .71/60/0.00 . . .62/50/c . . . 61/51/c Cincinnati . . . . . .74/66/0.28 . 72/56/pc . . 65/48/sh Cleveland . . . . . .74/61/0.16 . . .69/58/c . . 63/54/sh Colorado Springs 64/41/0.00 . . .74/46/s . . . 79/48/s Columbia, MO . .74/55/0.00 . 70/46/pc . . 70/46/pc Columbia, SC . . .89/71/0.46 . . .83/69/t . . . .81/65/t Columbus, GA. . .87/69/0.59 . . .82/68/t . . . .83/66/t Columbus, OH. . .74/66/0.01 . . .72/56/c . . 64/48/sh Concord, NH . . . .76/48/0.00 . . .76/61/r . . 73/60/sh Corpus Christi. . .93/72/0.00 . 87/75/pc . . 92/72/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .93/67/0.00 . . .80/60/t . . . 83/61/s Dayton . . . . . . . .73/64/0.87 . . .70/54/c . . 64/48/sh Denver. . . . . . . . .70/38/0.00 . . .79/47/s . . . 83/49/s Des Moines. . . . .69/54/0.00 . 62/42/pc . . . 66/44/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .79/63/0.00 . . .67/52/c . . . 63/51/c Duluth . . . . . . . . .56/46/0.20 . .51/39/sh . . 58/42/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .94/66/0.00 . 89/63/pc . . . 88/63/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .67/41/0.00 . . .55/36/c . . 51/34/sh Fargo. . . . . . . . . .53/47/0.04 . . .60/39/s . . . 67/46/s Flagstaff . . . . . . .75/40/0.00 . . .76/41/s . . . 76/42/s

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .74/58/0.00 . .60/45/sh . . 60/43/sh Green Bay. . . . . .63/54/0.00 . . .55/43/c . . 56/45/sh Greensboro. . . . .72/66/0.34 . . .78/67/t . . . .80/63/t Harrisburg. . . . . .75/64/0.00 . . .78/63/r . . . .70/59/t Hartford, CT . . . .79/58/0.00 . . .79/62/r . . 73/63/sh Helena. . . . . . . . .74/35/0.00 . . .83/51/s . . . 85/50/s Honolulu . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . .88/73/s . . . 87/72/s Houston . . . . . . .94/66/0.00 . . .94/69/c . . 88/68/pc Huntsville . . . . . .85/64/0.00 . . .82/60/t . . . .75/53/t Indianapolis . . . .82/64/0.00 . . .67/50/c . . 64/50/pc Jackson, MS . . . .88/63/0.00 . . .87/64/t . . . .82/56/t Jacksonville. . . . .88/71/0.00 . . .87/72/t . . . .89/70/t Juneau. . . . . . . . .53/48/0.75 . . .51/41/r . . . .53/42/r Kansas City. . . . .73/52/0.00 . 70/48/pc . . . 71/49/s Lansing . . . . . . . .76/58/0.00 . . .62/46/c . . 62/43/sh Las Vegas . . . . .100/73/0.00 . . .99/73/s . . . 99/73/s Lexington . . . . . .76/66/0.27 . 75/54/pc . . . 70/49/c Lincoln. . . . . . . . .71/47/0.00 . . .68/42/s . . . 70/49/s Little Rock. . . . . .86/61/0.00 . .77/55/sh . . 78/56/pc Los Angeles. . . . .69/61/0.00 . . .71/62/s . . . 71/63/s Louisville . . . . . . .81/68/0.02 . 76/54/pc . . 70/52/pc Madison, WI . . . .67/55/0.00 . . .57/43/c . . . 57/43/c Memphis. . . . . . .86/64/0.00 . . .76/58/t . . 76/56/pc Miami . . . . . . . . .90/78/0.17 . . .90/79/t . . . .91/79/t Milwaukee . . . . .69/59/0.00 . . .58/46/c . . . 56/49/c Minneapolis . . . .61/53/0.05 . . .55/39/c . . . 62/43/c Nashville . . . . . . .82/66/0.16 . . .82/58/c . . . .74/51/t New Orleans. . . .89/72/0.00 . . .87/73/t . . . .86/71/t New York . . . . . .73/63/0.06 . . .77/65/r . . 76/64/sh Newark, NJ . . . . .75/62/0.05 . . .78/64/r . . 76/64/sh Norfolk, VA . . . . .80/69/1.61 . . .80/70/t . . . .79/68/t Oklahoma City . .83/61/0.00 . 72/52/pc . . . 81/58/s Omaha . . . . . . . .70/52/0.00 . . .66/42/s . . . 68/44/s Orlando. . . . . . . .91/76/0.00 . . .91/74/t . . . .92/75/t Palm Springs. . .106/73/0.00 . .107/78/s . . 107/75/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .74/57/0.00 . 65/45/pc . . 64/46/pc Philadelphia . . . .78/60/0.03 . . .79/67/r . . . .76/64/r Phoenix. . . . . . .107/75/0.00 . .105/76/s . . 105/78/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .80/55/0.00 . . .73/55/r . . 65/52/sh Portland, ME. . . .72/47/0.00 . . .71/60/r . . 67/59/sh Providence . . . . .75/58/0.00 . . .75/64/r . . 73/64/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . .83/67/0.05 . . .80/68/t . . . .81/66/t

Yesterday Thursday Friday Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .65/37/0.00 . . .71/49/s . . 80/56/pc Savannah . . . . . .84/70/1.96 . . .85/72/t . . . .84/70/t Reno . . . . . . . . . .90/53/0.00 . . .91/55/s . . . 92/54/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .76/60/0.00 . . .71/58/r . . 76/57/pc Richmond . . . . . .79/66/0.66 . . .80/68/t . . . .78/62/t Sioux Falls. . . . . .61/52/0.00 . 59/35/pc . . . 66/45/s Rochester, NY . . .79/51/0.00 . . .73/58/r . . 72/56/sh Spokane . . . . . . .77/46/0.00 . 80/57/pc . . . 84/55/s Sacramento. . . .100/59/0.00 . .100/62/s . . . 99/60/s Springfield, MO. .75/55/0.00 . .67/47/sh . . 71/49/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .79/60/0.00 . 67/50/pc . . 70/48/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .92/77/0.01 . . .92/77/t . . . .90/77/t Salt Lake City . . .81/53/0.00 . . .83/56/s . . . 85/56/s Tucson. . . . . . . . .97/68/0.00 . . .98/68/s . . . 98/71/s San Antonio . . . .94/71/0.00 . . .93/70/c . . 90/68/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .80/60/0.00 . 70/50/pc . . . 80/56/s San Diego . . . . . .71/63/0.00 . . .72/64/s . . . 73/64/s Washington, DC .76/64/0.00 . . .79/69/t . . . .77/64/r San Francisco . . .78/54/0.00 . . .77/56/s . . . 75/55/s Wichita . . . . . . . .71/60/0.00 . . .76/53/s . . . 77/54/s San Jose . . . . . . .93/60/0.00 . . .87/59/s . . . 85/59/s Yakima . . . . . . . .84/40/0.00 . 85/51/pc . . . 87/55/s Santa Fe . . . . . . .80/50/0.00 . 72/46/pc . . 74/46/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . .106/74/0.00 . .106/71/s . . 106/71/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .64/57/0.00 . 59/50/pc . . 64/50/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .80/66/0.00 . . .79/61/t . . 84/68/pc Auckland. . . . . . .57/43/0.00 . .59/50/sh . . 61/49/sh Baghdad . . . . . . .99/77/0.00 . .103/74/s . . 106/74/s Bangkok . . . . . . .84/81/0.00 . . .88/78/t . . . .88/77/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .81/48/0.00 . . .80/53/s . . . 78/51/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .84/77/0.00 . . .85/76/s . . . .83/74/t Berlin. . . . . . . . . .68/48/0.00 . 64/49/pc . . 61/47/pc Bogota . . . . . . . .63/41/0.00 . .65/49/sh . . . .66/51/t Budapest. . . . . . .79/55/0.00 . 77/57/pc . . . 76/54/s Buenos Aires. . . .79/55/0.00 . 69/48/pc . . 64/47/pc Cabo San Lucas .97/79/0.00 . . .96/77/s . . . 97/79/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .91/72/0.00 . . .90/72/s . . . 87/69/s Calgary . . . . . . . .77/37/0.00 . 74/51/pc . . . 79/52/s Cancun . . . . . . . .88/70/0.00 . . .87/72/t . . . .88/72/t Dublin . . . . . . . . .59/50/0.00 . . .59/48/c . . 60/51/pc Edinburgh . . . . . .55/46/0.00 . 56/47/pc . . 60/51/sh Geneva . . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 . . .72/47/s . . . 72/49/s Harare . . . . . . . . .86/64/0.00 . . .85/56/s . . . 85/55/s Hong Kong . . . . .86/73/0.00 . . .86/78/c . . . 85/77/c Istanbul. . . . . . . .81/70/0.00 . . .76/65/t . . 78/64/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .90/64/0.00 . . .87/66/s . . . .80/64/t Johannesburg . . .73/45/0.00 . . .75/50/s . . 79/54/pc Lima . . . . . . . . . .66/59/0.00 . 65/59/pc . . 64/58/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .77/61/0.00 . . .81/62/s . . 76/60/pc London . . . . . . . .64/55/0.00 . 64/51/pc . . 68/53/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .86/54/0.00 . . .86/54/s . . 85/57/pc Manila. . . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . .87/77/t . . . .88/77/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .111/84/0.00 108/84/pc . 107/84/pc Mexico City. . . . .77/57/0.00 . .73/56/sh . . . .71/54/t Montreal. . . . . . .72/52/0.00 . . .72/58/t . . . 70/57/c Moscow . . . . . . .59/46/0.00 . .62/51/sh . . 60/45/sh Nairobi . . . . . . . .84/59/0.00 . . .81/60/t . . . .79/59/t Nassau . . . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . . .89/80/t . . . .89/81/t New Delhi. . . . . .90/77/0.00 . . .92/76/s . . . 92/77/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .79/72/0.00 . .76/63/sh . . 77/63/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .59/46/0.00 . . .56/45/c . . 58/42/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .75/52/0.00 . . .72/57/t . . . 70/56/c Paris. . . . . . . . . . .68/59/0.00 . . .69/51/s . . . 70/49/s Rio de Janeiro. . .82/72/0.00 . 80/66/pc . . 82/68/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . . .83/61/s . . 82/63/pc Santiago . . . . . . .73/45/0.00 . 69/42/pc . . . 75/47/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .72/59/0.00 . . .79/59/s . . . .71/60/r Sapporo. . . . . . . .55/55/0.00 . .61/52/sh . . 62/54/sh Seoul . . . . . . . . . .75/52/0.00 . . .74/53/s . . . 73/52/s Shanghai. . . . . . .75/63/0.00 . 74/65/pc . . . 77/66/s Singapore . . . . . .86/77/0.00 . . .85/77/t . . . .88/78/t Stockholm. . . . . .57/52/0.00 . .58/48/sh . . 57/47/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . .70/52/0.00 . . .76/55/s . . . 79/55/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . .75/73/0.00 . . .83/75/c . . . 85/75/c Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . . .88/76/s . . . .81/71/t Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .81/64/0.00 . .79/69/sh . . 78/67/sh Toronto . . . . . . . .72/57/0.00 . .71/55/sh . . 64/52/sh Vancouver. . . . . .68/59/0.00 . . .66/58/r . . 68/57/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . 71/52/pc . . 70/50/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . .70/46/0.00 . .70/53/sh . . 61/44/pc

Large-scale iguana project producing a baby boom By Tony Perry Los Angeles Times

SAN DIEGO — A baby boom is under way at the San Diego Zoo among the Grand Cayman blue iguanas, one of the world’s most endangered lizards. Since 2007, the zoo has been part of an international effort to save the blue iguana. Despite elaborate efforts at providing the right environment, results have been modest: three or four hatchlings a year. But in the past week, nine blue iguana hatchlings were reported at the zoo’s Anne and Kenneth Griffin Reptile Conservation Center. Jeff Lemm, the zoo’s research coor-

dinator for lizards, credits the changes that he made for the younger of the center’s two breeding females. She had never had a live hatchling. “I tweaked the nest situation,” Lemm said. “She fell for it.” As this spring’s breeding season had approached, Lemm was not worried about the male stud-lizards, Big Daddy and Bluey. But Lemm was unsure about a young, unnamed female selected as Bluey’s mate. To provide her with motivation to lay eggs after she and Bluey got together, Lemm found a hollowed-out tree stump, filled it with soft, warm dirt and bathed it in warm light. The female burrowed in and laid

a clutch of eggs. Tension mounted as Lemm and others waited weeks for the results. “I saw the eggs and said, ‘Please be fertile,’” Lemm said. “And when we got the hatchlings, it was beautiful. We were all very excited.” Two of the eggs were fertile, and in the past week, out came two hatchlings. Added to the seven from an older, more reliable female — Big Daddy’s mate — it gave the zoo more hatchlings than in any previous year. Many of the Caribbean’s lizard species are endangered but none so much as the blue iguana on Grand Cayman, a British territory south of

Cuba. Reptile specialists at one point named it the world’s most endangered iguana. In the wild, blue iguanas can take on a dragonlike mien at 5 feet long and up to 30 pounds. But they are vulnerable to cars, snakes and other predators, livestock and an occasional hurricane. Lemm thinks next year’s breeding season for the blue iguanas will be even better, as the younger female gets bigger, older and more accustomed to the ritual of mating and reproduction. “Next year, I expect her to lay even more good eggs,” Lemm said, “but you never know with reptiles.”

The Associated Press ile photo

Grand Cayman blue iguanas, like this one at the John G. Shedd Aquarium in Chicago, are among the world’s most endangered reptiles.


S

D

Golf Inside Webb Simpson, right, is the top seed heading to today’s PGA Tour Championship, see Page D2.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011

HUNTING & FISHING

NFL

PREP VOLLEYBALL

Memo warns teams not to fake injuries NEW YORK — To the fake handoff and fake field goals, add fake injuries. The NFL sent a memo Wednesday to all 32 teams warning of fines, suspensions and loss of draft picks if the league determines players faked injuries during a game. Yet several players admit its an accepted practice, and some coaches hinted they are not above condoning phony injuries if it provides a competitive edge. “I’ve been places where it has been (taught),” said Browns linebacker Scott Fujita, a member of the players union executive committee. “They have a name for it and I’ve been places where it’s been pre-called. I’ve been places where it’s one player who has been designated. Maybe I’m getting everyone in trouble, but I’m just being honest.” In the memo obtained by The Associated Press, the NFL reminded teams of league policy that calls on coaches to discourage the practice. There is no specific rule on the topic. Nonetheless, two days after there was speculation the Giants’ Deon Grant faked an injury against the Rams during Monday night’s game, the NFL is warning of disciplinary action. “It’s always been in the game,” Ravens All-Pro safety Ed Reed said. “It’s all tactical stuff you need to use. Whatever it takes. ... If you’re tired, you’re tired. You get a break however you can.” Added 49ers running back Frank Gore: “Hey, I feel if it helps, do it. I’m bound to do it. Whatever it takes to win ...” Rams coach Steve Spagnuolo said Tuesday the team notified the league office that it suspected the Giants were feigning injuries in St. Louis’ 28-16 loss. Rams quarterback Sam Bradford said it was obvious the Giants were just buying time with St. Louis running a no-huddle offense. — The Associated Press

INSIDE SOCCER

Cougars sweep Panthers Bulletin staff report

Photos by Mark Morical / The Bulletin

Dan Harry fights a smallmouth bass into the boat on the Columbia River just east of The Dalles.

A bass bonanza on the Columbia It’s not too late for smallmouth bass fishing on the mighty river

REDMOND — One day after a three-game loss to Crook County, the Mountain View volleyball team turned itself around with a 25-23, 25-14, 25-12 Intermountain hybrid win over Redmond on Wednesday. The Cougars beat the Panthers for the second time in nine days, sweeping Redmond on September 13. “The girls made their mental adjustments and really came in focused,” Cougars coach Jill McKae said. “They were wholeheartedly into the match.” Class 5A Mountain View took advantage of what Panthers coach Lisa Pom-Arleau deemed “unforced errors” to capture a tight first game, then capitalized on the momentum and won the following two games. Jill Roshak led the Cougars with eight kills, and sister Anna Roshak added seven of her own. “They are just a wall up on the net together,” McKae said. Rachel Beuhner recorded seven digs and two service aces on the night for the Cougars. Jesslyn Albrecht racked up six kills and 12 assists for Class 6A Redmond, and Jessica Nurge added 18 digs on defense. Mountain View (3-4) participates in the Rogue Valley Classic tournament on Saturday. Redmond (1-5) hosts Thurston tonight at 7 o’clock.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

MARYHILL STATE PARK, Wash. — s the sun began to rise over the barren hills flanking the Columbia River Gorge, more than 30 boats sat in the middle of the river. Most of the anglers on those boats were likely fishing for salmon or steelhead, the most sought-after types of fish on the Columbia in September. And most anglers at Fish Camp — an annual event organized by Northwest fishing guide Ed Iman, of The Dalles — seemed to have their eyes on a prized fall chinook salmon. But my target for the day was the smallmouth bass, a warm-water species that thrives in the mid-Columbia. Often overlooked because of all the other fishing opportunities on the Columbia, the bass fishing on the river can be electric. Fish Camp is a five-day camping and fishing event that brings together manufacturers, guides, tournament professionals and outdoor media types from throughout the Northwest to the Peach Beach RV Park in Washington, across the Columbia River from Biggs Junction. I was able to make the 2½-hour drive north this week for a night of camping and a day of fishing on the Columbia. See Bass / D5

Beavers’ Rodgers cleared to play Saturday

A

MARK MORICAL

By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

This smallmouth bass, which weighed more than three pounds, was landed with a Brush Hog near Browns Island on the Columbia River.

Oregon State says flanker James Rodgers has been cleared to play Saturday against UCLA. Rodgers is coming off two surgeries on his left knee. He was injured last October during a Beavers game at Arizona. Oregon State asked for and received a fifth year of eligibility for Rodgers, who is the older brother of former Beavers running back Jacquizz Rodgers. Quizz, as he is known, left school a year early for the NFL and now plays with the Atlanta Falcons. See Rodgers / D4

P R E P WAT E R P O L O Megan Rapinoe kicks a ball during the U.S. women’s national team’s practice Wednesday in Portland. The team is scheduled to play Canada today.

Central Oregon water polo teams look to state playoffs By Elise Gross

& Fitness Center — and all at the same time. High School water polo in Central Bend High boys coach Chris Sterry • A breakdown Oregon is fighting for some elbowsays the teams are grateful for Juniof all Central per’s facility. But due to a shortage of room — literally. Oregon water pool availability, the Juniper pool is Water polo, a team sport that compolo teams, bines swimming speed, strategy, endurdivided into thirds for evening pracPage D5 ance and ballhandling skills, is growtice, each team claiming a sliver of the ing in popularity at area high schools. water. In the past few years, water polo “There are at least a hundred kids team rosters at Central Oregon schools have in the water at once, climbing on top of each swelled from fewer than 10 players (seven are other,” says Sterry. needed for a team) to more than 20 players per Despite practicing in cramped conditions, school. Although the club sport is not officially Bend High’s boys and girls are considered the recognized by the Oregon School Activities teams to beat in their league this season. Last Association, five Central Oregon schools field year, both the Lava Bear boys and girls squads water polo programs in leagues governed by won Central Oregon League championships the Oregon High School Water Polo Commit- and went on to play in the 5A/4A state playoffs. tee: Redmond plays in the Class 6A Southern (The top two teams in each league advance to Valley League, while Summit, Bend, Mountain state.) View and Madras compose the Class 5A/4A Sterry says the Bend High teams are both Central Oregon League. aiming to return to state. He cites West Albany Bend and Summit have both boys and girls and Ashland as “perennial favorites” to comteams; Mountain View has only a boys team. pete for the boys state title, but adds that the The teams from all three Bend schools prac- Lava Bears will also be contenders. tice at the same pool — Bend’s Juniper Swim See State / D5 The Bulletin

U.S. women’s team takes on Canada Former Pilot returns to Portland for today’s Celebration Series game, see Page D4

INDEX S coreboard ................................D2 Golf ............................................D2 Major League Baseball ..............D3 Soccer ...................................... D4 College football ........................ D4 Prep sports ................................D5 Hunting & Fishing ............... D5, 6

Inside

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Bend high water polo player Michael Bird, 16 and a junior, makes a pass during practice at Juniper Swim and Fitness Center in Bend on Wednesday.


D2 Thursday, September 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

GOLF

Today Boys soccer: Crook County at Bend, 5:30 p.m.; Madras at La Salle, 6:30 p.m.; Junction City at Sisters, 4:30 p.m. Girls soccer: Bend at Crook County, 4 p.m.; Summit at Sherwood, 4 p.m.; La Salle at Madras, 4 p.m.; Sisters at Junction City, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Elmira, 4 p.m. Volleyball: Thurston at Redmond, 7 p.m.; Crook County at Bend, 6:30 p.m.; Madras at La Salle, 6 p.m.; La Pine at Cottage Grove, 6:45 p.m.; Sisters at Elmira, 6:45 p.m.; Kennedy at Culver, 6 p.m.

6 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Austrian Open, first round, Golf Channel. 10 a.m. — PGA Tour, Tour Championship, first round, Golf Channel. 11:30 p.m. — LPGA Tour, Solheim Cup, Golf Channel.

BASEBALL 10 a.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Minnesota Twins, Root Sports. 4 p.m. — MLB, Tampa Bay Rays at New York Yankees or Los Angeles Angels at Toronto Blue Jays, MLB Network.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — WNBA playoffs, Conference Finals, Atlanta Dream at Indiana Fever, ESPN2. 6 p.m. — WNBA playoffs, Conference Finals, Phoenix Mercury at Minnesota Lynx, ESPN2.

FOOTBALL 5 p.m. — College, North Carolina State at Cincinnati, ESPN.

SOCCER

IN THE BLEACHERS

vs. UTEP, Saturday. No. 21 Auburn (2-1) lost to Clemson 38-24. Next: vs. FAU, Saturday. No. 22 Arizona State (2-1) lost to Illinois 17-14. Next: vs. Southern Cal, Saturday. No. 23 TCU (2-1) beat Louisiana-Monroe 38-17. Next: vs. Portland State, Saturday. No. 23 Texas (3-0) beat UCLA 49-20. Next: at Iowa State, Saturday, Oct. 1. No. 25 Mississippi State (1-2) lost to No. 3 LSU 19-6, Thursday. Next: vs. Louisiana Tech, Saturday. Pacific-12 Conference All Times PDT ——— North Conference All Games W L W L Stanford 1 0 2 0 California 0 0 3 0 Washington 0 0 2 1 Washington St. 0 0 2 1 Oregon 0 0 2 1 Oregon St. 0 0 0 2 South Conference All Games W L W L Southern Cal 1 0 3 0 Arizona St. 0 0 2 1 UCLA 0 0 1 2 Colorado 0 0 1 2 Arizona 0 1 1 1 Utah 0 1 2 1 Saturday’s Games x-Colorado at Ohio State, 12:30 p.m. UCLA at Oregon State, 12:30 p.m. California at Washington, 12:30 p.m. USC at Arizona State, 7:15 p.m. Oregon at Arizona, 7:15 p.m. x=nonconference

Friday Cross country: Redmond, Bend at Far East Salem Invitational in Redmond, 4:15 p.m. Football: Oregon City at Redmond, 7 p.m.; Sandy at Bend, 7 p.m.; South Salem at Mountain View, 7 p.m.; The Dalles Wahtonka at Summit, 7 p.m.; Crook County at Madras, 7 p.m.; Sisters at Gladstone, 7 p.m.; Henley at La Pine, 7 p.m.; North Lake at Gilchrist, 4 p.m. Girls soccer: Thurston at Redmond, 3 p.m. Volleyball: North Lake at Gilchrist, 4 p.m.; Trinity Lutheran at Butte Falls, 3 p.m. Saturday Boys soccer: Central Catholic at Summit, 1 p.m.; Umatilla at Central Christian, 1 p.m. Cross country: Mountain View, Madras, Crook County, Sisters, La Pine at the Three Course Challenge in Seaside, TBA Volleyball: Redmond, Bend, Mountain View, Summit, Crook County at Rogue Valley Classic in Medford, TBA; Madras at Century Tournament, 8 a.m.; Sisters host Sisters Invitational, 8 a.m.; Gilchrist at Bend Freshman Tournament, 9 a.m.; Central Christian at Redside Tournament at South Wasco County, TBA.

8 p.m. — Women’s International, United States vs. Canada, ESPN2.

FRIDAY MOTOR SPORTS 8:30 a.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Sylvania 300, practice, ESPN2. Noon — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Sylvania 300, qualifying, ESPN2.

GOLF 9:30 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Austrian Open, second round, Golf Channel. 10 a.m. — PGA Tour, Tour Championship, second round, Golf Channel. 11:30 p.m. — LPGA Tour, Solheim Cup, Golf Channel.

BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, Boston Red Sox at New York Yankees or Toronto Blue Jays at Tampa Bay Rays, MLB Network. 5 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Texas Rangers, Root Sports.

FOOTBALL 5 p.m. — College, Central Florida at BYU, ESPN. 5 p.m. — High school, De La Salle (Calif.) vs. St. Thomas Aquinas (Fla.), ESPN2. 7 p.m. — High school, The Dalles Wahtonka at Summit, COTV.

RADIO FRIDAY FOOTBALL 7 p.m. — High school, Crook County at Madras, KWSO-FM 91.9. 7 p.m. — High school, The Dalles Wahtonka at Summit, KICE-AM 940. 7 p.m. — High school, Sandy at Bend, KBND-AM 1110. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Golf • Bend golfer advances in Q-School: Bend’s Chadd Cocco finished with two strong rounds in the 54-hole prequalifying stage of the PGA Tour’s National Qualifying Tournament to advance to Q-School’s first stage. Cocco, 26, shot a 3-under-par 75-69-69—213 last week to finish in an eight-way tie for 12th place at PGA West’s Greg Norman Course in La Quinta, Calif., to easily advance. He is scheduled to play in the first of Q-School’s three stages Oct. 25-28 at San Juan Oaks Golf Club in Hollister, Calif.

Football • Ex-Mizzou RB, captain found guilty of sex assault: Former Missouri running back and team leader Derrick Washington was convicted Wednesday in a Missouri court of sexually assaulting a former tutor who said he attacked her in her sleep. A Boone County Circuit Court jury deliberated 2 1⁄2 hours after a two-day trial before delivering its verdict late Wednesday afternoon. Washington, who faces a possible seven-year prison sentence, hung his head as jurors individually affirmed their decision. The tutor and her former roommate testified that in June 2010 Washington entered the woman’s bedroom while she slept at her off-campus apartment and fondled her without permission. The roommate, also a former tutor for Missouri athletes, had a consensual sexual relationship with Washington.

Motor sports • NASCAR tries to break up Talladega two-car tandems: NASCAR has made two rule changes for next month’s race at Talladega Superspeedway that should limit the length of time two cars can draft together. The restrictor plates used in the Oct. 23 race will be larger. The change should lead to an increase of horsepower that could make the cars 2 to 3 mph faster. NASCAR also ordered an adjustment on a pressure relief valve that should lower the maximum water temperature in engines. A threat of overheating could prevent cars from staying hooked together for too long. —From wire reports

FOOTBALL NFL National Football League All Times PDT AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct New England 2 0 0 1.000 Buffalo 2 0 0 1.000 N.Y. Jets 2 0 0 1.000 Miami 0 2 0 .000 South W L T Pct Houston 2 0 0 1.000 Jacksonville 1 1 0 .500 Tennessee 1 1 0 .500 Indianapolis 0 2 0 .000 North W L T Pct Baltimore 1 1 0 .500 Cincinnati 1 1 0 .500 Cleveland 1 1 0 .500 Pittsburgh 1 1 0 .500 West W L T Pct Oakland 1 1 0 .500 San Diego 1 1 0 .500 Denver 1 1 0 .500 Kansas City 0 2 0 .000 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct Washington 2 0 0 1.000 Dallas 1 1 0 .500 Philadelphia 1 1 0 .500 N.Y. Giants 1 1 0 .500 South W L T Pct New Orleans 1 1 0 .500 Atlanta 1 1 0 .500 Tampa Bay 1 1 0 .500 Carolina 0 2 0 .000 North W L T Pct Green Bay 2 0 0 1.000 Detroit 2 0 0 1.000 Chicago 1 1 0 .500 Minnesota 0 2 0 .000 West W L T Pct San Francisco 1 1 0 .500 Arizona 1 1 0 .500 St. Louis 0 2 0 .000 Seattle 0 2 0 .000 ——— Sunday’s Games Houston at New Orleans, 10 a.m. Denver at Tennessee, 10 a.m. Detroit at Minnesota, 10 a.m. San Francisco at Cincinnati, 10 a.m. New England at Buffalo, 10 a.m. N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, 10 a.m. Miami at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Jacksonville at Carolina, 10 a.m. Kansas City at San Diego, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Oakland, 1:05 p.m. Baltimore at St. Louis, 1:05 p.m. Arizona at Seattle, 1:15 p.m. Green Bay at Chicago, 1:15 p.m. Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 1:15 p.m. Pittsburgh at Indianapolis, 5:20 p.m. Monday’s Game Washington at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.

TENNIS WTA

PF 73 79 59 37

PA 45 42 27 61

PF 57 19 40 26

PA 20 46 29 61

PF 48 49 44 31

PA 33 41 46 35

PF 58 45 44 10

PA 58 52 45 89

PF 50 51 62 42

PA 35 51 48 44

PF 64 47 44 44

PA 55 61 47 58

PF 72 75 43 37

PA 57 23 42 48

PF 57 49 29 17

PA 44 43 59 57

Betting Line NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Sunday BENGALS 1.5 2.5 49ers Patriots 9 8.5 BILLS SAINTS 4 4 Texans EAGLES NL NL Giants BROWNS 3 2.5 Dolphins TITANS 5.5 7 Broncos Lions 3.5 3.5 VIKINGS PANTHERS 3 3.5 Jaguars CHARGERS 14.5 14.5 Chiefs Jets 3.5 3.5 RAIDERS Ravens 3.5 3.5 RAMS BUCCANEERS 1 1.5 Falcons Cardinals 3 3 SEAHAWKS Packers 3.5 3.5 BEARS Steelers 10.5 10.5 COLTS Monday COWBOYS NL NL Redskins Favorite

College Today CINCINNATI BYU OHIO ST DUKE SYRACUSE E. CAROLINA S. FLORIDA ILLINOIS

7

7.5 Friday 3.5 3 Saturday 15 15 10.5 10 3 2.5 13 12.5 28 29 13 12.5

NC State C. Florida Colorado Tulane Toledo Uab Utep W. Michigan

RUTGERS PENN ST MIAMI-FLA Smu MARYLAND MICHIGAN ST Georgia MIAMI-OHIO Army Virginia Tech ALABAMA WASHINGTON Lsu MICHIGAN GEORGIA TECH Florida Notre Dame CLEMSON SAN JOSE ST Fresno St Connecticut OREGON ST TEXAS TECH S. CAROLINA MISSISSIPPI ST BAYLOR VIRGINIA TEXAS A&M Nebraska OKLAHOMA UTAH ST BOISE ST Oregon ARIZONA ST AUBURN IOWA TROY Indiana FLORIDA INT’L

5 28.5 12.5 22.5 9 23.5 9.5 6 3 19 13 3 5 8.5 5 16.5 5.5 PK 9.5 6 10 3 20 15.5 18 18 3 3 23 20.5 6.5 29.5 14 2.5 32 18. 12 7.5 17

4.5 Ohio U. 28.5 E. Michigan 13 Kansas St 22 MEMPHIS 9 Temple 22 C. Michigan 9.5 MISSISSIPPI 4.5 Bowling Green 4 BALL ST 20 MARSHALL 12 Arkansas 1 California 6 W. VIRGINIA 10 San Diego St 6.5 N. Carolina 19 KENTUCKY 6.5 PITTSBURGH 2 Florida St 10 New Mexico St 3.5 IDAHO 9 BUFFALO 4 UCLA 20.5 Nevada 16 Vanderbilt 20 La. Tech 20.5 Rice 3 Southern Miss 4 Oklahoma St 23.5 WYOMING 22 Missouri 9 Colorado St 29.5 Tulsa 16 ARIZONA 2.5 Usc 33 Fla. Atlantic 17 UL-Monroe 12.5 Mid. Tenn. St 6.5 NORTH TEXAS 17 UL-Lafayette

College Schedule All Times PDT (Subject to change) Today’s Games SOUTH Murray St. at UT-Martin, 4 p.m. Hampton at Bethune-Cookman, 4:30 p.m. MIDWEST NC State at Cincinnati, 5 p.m. ——— Friday’s Game FAR WEST UCF at BYU, 5 p.m. ——— Saturday’s Games EAST Monmouth (NJ) at CCSU, 9 a.m. Old Dominion at Delaware, 9 a.m. E. Michigan at Penn St., 9 a.m. Notre Dame at Pittsburgh, 9 a.m. Toledo at Syracuse, 9 a.m. Cornell at Yale, 9 a.m. Albany (NY) at Columbia, 9:30 a.m. Liberty at Lehigh, 9:30 a.m. UMass at Boston College, 10 a.m. Wagner at Bryant, 10 a.m. Georgetown at Marist, 10 a.m. Fordham at Rhode Island, 10 a.m. Dartmouth at Sacred Heart, 10 a.m. Ohio at Rutgers, 11 a.m. Morgan St. vs. Howard at East Rutherford, N.J., 1 p.m. UConn at Buffalo, 3 p.m. Bucknell at Princeton, 3 p.m. Lafayette at Stony Brook, 3 p.m. Penn at Villanova, 3 p.m. Brown at Harvard, 4 p.m. Duquesne at St. Francis (Pa.), 4 p.m. Colgate at Towson, 4 p.m. LSU at West Virginia, 5 p.m. SOUTH North Carolina at Georgia Tech, 9 a.m. SMU at Memphis, 9 a.m. Georgia at Mississippi, 9:21 a.m. Temple at Maryland, 9:30 a.m. San Diego at Morehead St., 9:30 a.m. Jacksonville at Campbell, 10 a.m. Presbyterian at Furman, 10 a.m. Norfolk St. at Charleston Southern, 10:30 a.m. The Citadel at Elon, 10:30 a.m. Delaware St. at SC State, 11 a.m. Arkansas at Alabama, 12:30 p.m. Chattanooga at Appalachian St., 12:30 p.m. Florida St. at Clemson, 12:30 p.m. Tulane at Duke, 12:30 p.m. UAB at East Carolina, 12:30 p.m. Virginia Tech at Marshall, 12:30 p.m. Kansas St. at Miami, 12:30 p.m. New Hampshire at Richmond, 12:30 p.m. Florida A&M vs. Southern U. at Atlanta, 12:30 p.m. Middle Tennessee at Troy, 12:30 p.m. Southern Miss. at Virginia, 12:30 p.m. Coastal Carolina at NC A&T, 1 p.m. Northwestern St. at Nicholls St., 1 p.m. Alabama St. at Jackson St., 2 p.m. Louisiana-Lafayette at FIU, 3 p.m.

W. Carolina at Georgia Southern, 3 p.m. Alabama A&M at Grambling St., 3 p.m. Savannah St. at NC Central, 3 p.m. FAU at Auburn, 4 p.m. E. Kentucky at Austin Peay, 4 p.m. Johnson C. Smith at Davidson, 4 p.m. E. Illinois at Jacksonville St., 4 p.m. Florida at Kentucky, 4 p.m. Louisiana Tech at Mississippi St., 4 p.m. Vanderbilt at South Carolina, 4 p.m. UTEP at South Florida, 4 p.m. James Madison at William & Mary, 4 p.m. Samford at Wofford, 4 p.m. SE Louisiana at McNeese St., 5 p.m. SE Missouri at Tennessee Tech, 5 p.m. MIDWEST Louisiana-Monroe at Iowa, 9 a.m. San Diego St. at Michigan, 9 a.m. Cent. Michigan at Michigan St., 9 a.m. Drake at Butler, 10 a.m. Bowling Green at Miami (Ohio), 10 a.m. Dayton at Central St., Ohio, 10:30 a.m. VMI at Akron, 11 a.m. Army at Ball St., 11 a.m. Youngstown St. at Indiana St., 11:05 a.m. W. Michigan at Illinois, 12:30 p.m. South Alabama at Kent St., 12:30 p.m. Cal Poly at N. Illinois, 12:30 p.m. Colorado at Ohio St., 12:30 p.m. South Dakota at Wisconsin, 12:30 p.m. Clark Atlanta vs. Ark.-Pine Bluff at St. Louis, 1 p.m. W. Illinois at N. Iowa, 2 p.m. S. Dakota St. at Illinois St., 4 p.m. N. Dakota St. at Minnesota, 4 p.m. Black Hills St. at North Dakota, 4 p.m. Missouri St. at S. Illinois, 4 p.m. SOUTHWEST Portland St. at TCU, 11 a.m. Alcorn St. at Texas Southern, 11 a.m. Bacone at UTSA, 11 a.m. Rice at Baylor, 4 p.m. Indiana at North Texas, 4 p.m. MVSU at Prairie View, 4 p.m. Texas St. at Stephen F. Austin, 4 p.m. Oklahoma St. at Texas A&M, 4 p.m. Nevada at Texas Tech, 4 p.m. Cent. Arkansas at Arkansas St., 5 p.m. Georgia St. at Houston, 5 p.m. Missouri at Oklahoma, 5 p.m. FAR WEST Tennessee St. at Air Force, noon UCLA at Oregon St., 12:30 p.m. California at Washington, 12:30 p.m. Weber St. at N. Colorado, 12:35 p.m. New Mexico St. at San Jose St., 1 p.m. Fresno St. at Idaho, 2 p.m. Sam Houston St. at New Mexico, 3 p.m. Idaho St. at N. Arizona, 3:05 p.m. Montana St. at E. Washington, 4:05 p.m. Nebraska at Wyoming, 4:30 p.m. Tulsa at Boise St., 5 p.m. Colorado St. at Utah St., 5 p.m. S. Utah at UNLV, 6 p.m. Montana at Sacramento St., 6:05 p.m. Oregon at Arizona, 7:15 p.m. Southern Cal at Arizona St., 7:15 p.m. UC Davis at Hawaii, 9 p.m. The AP Top 25 Fared No. 1 Oklahoma (2-0) beat No. 5 Florida State 23-13. Next: vs. Missouri, Saturday. No. 2 Alabama (3-0) beat North Texas 41-0. Next: vs. No. 14 Arkansas, Saturday. No. 3 LSU (3-0) beat No. 25 Mississippi State 19-6, Thursday. Next: at No. 18 West Virginia, Saturday. No. 4 Boise State (2-0) beat Toledo 40-15, Friday. Next: vs. Tulsa, Saturday. No. 5 Florida State (2-1) lost to No. 1 Oklahoma 23-13. Next: at Clemson, Saturday. No. 6 Stanford (3-0) beat Arizona 37-10. Next: vs. UCLA, Saturday, Oct. 1. No. 7 Wisconsin (3-0) beat Northern Illinois 49-7. Next: vs. South Dakota, Saturday. No. 8 Oklahoma State (3-0) beat Tulsa 59-33. Next: at No. 9 Texas A&M, Saturday. No. 9 Texas A&M (2-0) beat Idaho 37-7. Next: vs. No. 8 Oklahoma State, Saturday. No. 10 South Carolina (3-0) beat Navy 24-21. Next: vs. Vanderbilt, Saturday. No. 11 Nebraska (3-0) beat Washington 51-38. Next: at Wyoming, Saturday. No. 12 Oregon (2-1) beat Missouri State 56-7. Next: at Arizona, Saturday. No. 13 Virginia Tech (3-0) beat Arkansas State 26-7. Next: at Marshall, Saturday. No. 14 Arkansas (3-0) beat Troy 38-28. Next: at No. 2 Alabama, Saturday. No. 15 Michigan State (2-1) lost to Notre Dame 31-13. Next: vs. Central Michigan, Saturday. No. 16 Florida (3-0) beat Tennessee 33-23. Next: at Kentucky, Saturday. No. 17 Ohio State (2-1) lost to Miami 24-6. Next: vs. Colorado, Saturday. No. 18 West Virginia (3-0) beat Maryland 37-31. Next: vs. No. 3 LSU, Saturday. No. 19 Baylor (2-0) beat Stephen F. Austin 48-0. Next: vs. Rice, Saturday. No. 20 South Florida (3-0) beat Florida A&M 70-17. Next:

WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— Hansol Korea Open Wednesday At Olympic Park Seoul, South Korea Purse: $220,000 (Intl.) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Second Round Klara Zakopalova, Czech Republic, def. Irina-Camelia Begu (7), Romania, 6-1, 6-1. Dominika Cibulkova (4), Slovakia, def. Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, 7-6 (4), retired. Vania King, United States, def. Marion Bartoli (2), France, 6-3, 7-5. Polona Hercog (5), Slovakia, def. Carla Suarez Navarro, Spain, 6-3, 7-5. Wanlima Guangzhou International Open Wednesday At Tianhe Sports Center Guangzhou, China Purse: $220,000 (Intl.) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Second Round Jarmila Gajdosova (2), Australia, def. Mandy Minella, Luxembourg, 4-6, 6-2, 6-3. Petra Martic (4), Croatia, def. Zarina Diyas, Kazakhstan, 4-6, 6-2, 6-4. Urszula Radwanska, Poland, def. Chan Yung-jan, Taiwan, 2-6, 6-2, 6-2. Maria Kirilenko (1), Russia, def. Iryna Bremond, France, 6-3, 6-1. Tetiana Luzhanska, Ukraine, def. Zhao Yi-jing, China, 6-4, 2-6, 7-5. Chanelle Scheepers (7), South Africa, def. Hsieh Suwei, Taiwan, 3-6,7-6 (1), 6-1. Magdalena Rybarikova (8), Slovakia, def. Aravane Rezai, France, 6-4, 6-1. Zheng Jie, China, def. Noppawan Lertcheewakarn, Thailand, 6-3, 7-5.

ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— Moselle Open Wednesday At Les Arenes de Metz Metz, France Purse: $616,500 (WT250) Surface: Hard-Indoor Singles First Round Philipp Kohlschreiber (7), Germany, def. John Dasnieres de Veigy, France, 6-4, 7-6 (4). Igor Kunitsyn, Russia, def. Kenny de Schepper, France, 7-5, 5-7, 6-4. Arnaud Clement, France, def. Michael Llodra (5), France, 6-3, 6-4. Second Round Gilles Muller (8), Luxembourg, def. Benoit Paire, France, 7-6 (5), 6-4. Alexandr Dolgopolov (3), Ukraine, def. Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus, 6-7 (5), 7-5, 6-3. Ivan Ljubicic (4), Croatia, def. Nicolas Renavand, France, 7-5, 7-5. Nastase Tiriac Trophy Wednesday At Progresul BNR Arenas Bucharest, Romania Purse: $579,200 (WT250) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles First Round Pere Riba, Spain, def. Potito Starace (6), Italy, 6-1, 3-2, retired. Second Round Andreas Seppi (7), Italy, def. Igor Andreev, Russia, 6-2, 3-6, 6-1. Juan Ignacio Chela (1), Argentina, def. Florent Serra, France, 6-1, 6-0.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts Columbus 11 10 8 41 Sporting Kansas City 10 9 10 40 Philadelphia 9 7 12 39 Houston 9 9 12 39 New York 7 7 15 36 D.C. 8 8 11 35 Chicago 5 8 15 30 Toronto FC 6 12 12 30 New England 5 12 12 27 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts x-Los Angeles 16 3 10 58 Real Salt Lake 15 7 6 51

Seattle 14 6 9 51 46 FC Dallas 13 9 7 46 36 Colorado 10 9 11 41 40 Portland 10 12 7 37 37 Chivas USA 7 12 11 32 36 San Jose 6 11 12 30 31 Vancouver 4 14 10 22 28 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. x- clinched playoff berth ——— Wednesday’s Games D.C. United 2, Chivas USA 2, tie Real Salt Lake 3, New York 1 Portland 1, San Jose 1, tie Friday’s Game Philadelphia at Sporting Kansas City, 5:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Houston at FC Dallas, 1 p.m. Portland at New York, 4:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m. San Jose at Colorado, 6 p.m. Seattle FC at Vancouver, 7:30 p.m. Toronto FC at Chivas USA, 7:30 p.m. Sunday’s Game New England at Chicago, 1 p.m.

31 32 39 42 38 38 46

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Playoff Glance All Times PDT CONFERENCE FINALS Eastern Conference Indiana vs. Atlanta Today, Sept. 22: Atlanta at Indiana, 4 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 25: Indiana at Atlanta, noon x-Tuesday, Sept. 27: Atlanta at Indiana, TBD Western Conference Minnesota vs. Phoenix Today, Sept. 22: Phoenix at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 25: Minnesota at Phoenix, 2 p.m. x-Tuesday, Sept. 27: Phoenix at Minnesota, TBD

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE Preseason All Times PDT ——— Wednesday’s Games Phoenix (ss) 2, Los Angeles (ss) 1, SO Toronto 4, Philadelphia 2 Columbus 4, Washington 3, OT Pittsburgh 3, Detroit 2 St. Louis 4, Tampa Bay 3 New Jersey 2, N.Y. Rangers 1, OT Buffalo 3, Montreal 1 Ottawa 2, Boston 1, OT San Jose 6, Anaheim 1 Los Angeles (ss) 3, Phoenix (ss) 2 Today’s Games Chicago at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Detroit vs. Philadelphia at London, Ontario, 4 p.m. Minnesota at St. Louis, 5 p.m. Colorado at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Vancouver at Edmonton, 6 p.m.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Agreed to terms with manager Bob Melvin on a three-year contract. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Fired minor league field coordinator Chad Kreuter. Named Jeff Pico minor league field coordinator and Mel Stottlemyre minor league pitching coordinator. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL—Fined Tennessee DE Derrick Morgan $7,500 for a late hit on Baltimore QB Joe Flacco in a game on Sept. 18. GREEN BAY PACKERS—Signed DL Johnny Jones to the practice squad. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS—Placed RB Jamaal Charles on season-ending injured reserve. Signed WR Jeremy Horne from the practice squad. Signed OL Lucas Patterson to the practice squad. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Placed C Dan Koppen and DL Myron Pryor on injured reserve. Re-signed DL Landon Cohen and DB Phillip Adams. NEW YORK JETS—Signed LB Matthias Berning and WR Scotty McKnight to the practice squad. SAN DIEGO CHARGERS—Placed LB Jonas Mouton on injured reserve. Signed S Paul Oliver to a one-year contract. HOCKEY National Hockey League CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Assigned F Phillip Danault and F Mark McNeill to their junior clubs. COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS—Signed F R.J. Umberger to a five-year contract extension through the 2016-17 season. Released F Wade MacLeod and F Mike Thomas. Assigned F Michael Chaput to Shawinigan (QMJHL), F Boone Jenner to Oshawa (OHL), F Dalton Smith to Ottawa (OHL), F Lukas Sedlak to Chicoutimi (QMJHL), D Brandon Archibald to Saginaw (OHL), D Austin Madaisky to Kamloops (WHL) and G Mathieu Corbeil to Saint John (QMJHL). DETROIT RED WINGS—C Mike Modano announced his retirement. LOS ANGELES KINGS—Released RW J.D. Watt, D Ray Macias, C C.J. Stretch and D Teigan Zahn. Returned LW Michael Schumacher, C Jordan Weal, G Christopher Gibson, D Pierre Durepos, G Michael Morrison, C Taylor Carnevale, RW Michael Kantor to their minor league camps. COLLEGE GEORGETOWN—Named Zach Samol men’s associate head soccer coach. RUTGERS—Named Keith Cromwell men’s assistant lacrosse coach. VIRGINIA—Named Eric Baumgartner associate athletics director for compliance.

FISH COUNT GF 35 43 36 38 44 39 33 32 32

GA 37 37 30 39 41 40 37 52 46

GF 43 41

GA 22 23

Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 7,065 2,483 2,079 535 The Dalles 6,164 2,003 2,706 635 John Day 5,271 1,772 3,183 719 McNary 5,317 1,512 5,148 991 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 595,288 158,102 345,377 122,749 The Dalles 370,698 121,490 252,782 90,465 John Day 298,449 111,214 197,359 72,130 McNary 269,376 80,545 173,919 57,430

Thirty players eye $10 million at FedEx Cup finale By Doug Ferguson The Associated Press

ATLANTA — Just being among the 30 players at the Tour Championship should be enough for Geoff Ogilvy. Only 16 days ago, Ogilvy was on the verge of being eliminated from the FedEx Cup playoffs. Needing a par-birdie finish at the TPC Boston, his tee shot on the 17th hole finished in a crevice behind a rock and he had to take a penalty drop. What followed is still hard to fathom. Ogilvy rolled in a 20-footer for par, then holed a 6-foot birdie putt to narrowly advance to the next playoff event outside Chicago. Then, he finished alone in third at Cog Hill — a two-way tie for third would not have been enough — to book a trip to East Lake. “I definitely wasn’t thinking of being here when I was in that hole,” Ogilvy said Wednesday. “So the fact that I am is pretty nice.” He is No. 24 among the 30 players who reached

GOLF: PGA CHAMPIONSHIP the Tour Championship, and while mathematically they all have a shot at the $10 million bonus for winning the FedEx Cup, the higher seeds have the greater odds. Webb Simpson is the top seed, followed by Dustin Johnson, Justin Rose, Luke Donald and Matt Kuchar. If any of them win, they are assured golf’s richest prize. Ogilvy’s hopes require a little more math. It starts with him winning, and the odds got even longer the more he studied the other scenarios that must unfold. “Webb Simpson must finish 17th or worse, which is probably not going to happen, you wouldn’t think,” he said, reading from a chart. “Dustin Johnson has to finish sixth or worse. Justin and Luke have to finish fourth or worse, which isn’t going to happen because Luke doesn’t finish out of the top

three anymore, does he?” That’s when he shifted to a prize that might be just as meaningful. “I’d love to win this golf tournament,” Ogilvy said. “That would be nice because people are forgetting this one of the tour’s special golf tournaments — The Players Championship, the Tour Championship, the Tournament of Champions. It’s still the Tour Championship, and it would be pretty special to have a Tour Championship on your mantle. “I guess I’ll view it like that and try to win,” he said. “And if the right things happen, that would be great.” The FedEx Cup is finishing up its fifth year, and while some promotional bluster created more skeptics than supporters in the early going, it is hard to find fault with what the playoffs have produced — four straight tournaments with the strongest fields, with only the best walking away with the $10 mil-

lion prize. Tiger Woods has won twice, with Vijay Singh and Jim Furyk the other cup champions. “I think the system has been validated because it’s had the biggest names in golf as its champions,” Kuchar said. The leading five candidates this year all are among the top 20 in the world, including topranked Donald. There is reason for others to hope, however, and all that requires is a chat with Nick Watney. A year ago, Watney narrowly got into the Tour Championship at No. 28 and was 12 shots behind going into the weekend. In the final hour, he was one shot off the lead and had a legitimate chance to win the FedEx Cup until a bogey on the 16th hole. “I was thinking I had no chance,” Watney said. “Kuchar was leading the FedEx Cup, and he was playing so consistently. They said I had to win and he had to finish worse than 25th or something. There were so many mathematical scenarios. It was like the BCS.”


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, September 22, 2011 D3

M A JOR L E AGUE BA SE BA L L AL BOXSCORES Angels 7, Blue Jays 2 Los Angeles M.Izturis 2b Aybar ss B.Abreu dh Tor.Hunter rf Trumbo 1b Callaspo 3b V.Wells lf Bourjos cf Mathis c Totals

AB 5 4 5 5 5 4 5 4 4 41

R H 0 3 0 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 3 3 0 0 7 14

BI 2 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 7

BB 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 4 3 0 1 3 0 2 13

Avg. .280 .282 .251 .263 .258 .288 .225 .272 .180

Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. McCoy ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .212 E.Thames lf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .269 Bautista rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .301 1-Loewen pr 0 1 0 0 0 0 .250 Lind 1b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .256 Encarnacion 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .277 K.Johnson 2b 3 0 2 1 1 0 .270 Arencibia c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .220 Rasmus cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .196 Cooper dh 3 0 0 0 0 2 .218 Totals 32 2 6 2 2 5 Los Angeles 001 012 030 — 7 14 0 Toronto 000 001 001 — 2 6 1 1-ran for Bautista in the 9th. E—Arencibia (6). LOB—Los Angeles 9, Toronto 5. 2B—Aybar (33), Tor.Hunter (22), Trumbo (31), K.Johnson 2 (3). 3B—Bourjos (10). HR—Bourjos (12), off McGowan; V.Wells (24), off Janssen; E.Thames (11), off Haren. RBIs— M.Izturis 2 (38), V.Wells 4 (65), Bourjos (39), E.Thames (34), K.Johnson (7). SB—M.Izturis (9), Bourjos (22). Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 5 (Tor. Hunter, B.Abreu 2, Aybar, Mathis); Toronto 4 (Arencibia 4). GIDP—Encarnacion. DP—Los Angeles 1 (Aybar, M.Izturis, Trumbo). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Haren W, 16-9 8 4 1 1 2 4 114 3.16 Takahashi 1 2 1 1 0 1 17 3.60 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McGwan L, 0-1 5 5 2 2 0 8 79 6.35 Litsch 1 3 2 2 1 1 27 4.52 L.Perez 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 10 5.14 Camp 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 4.43 Janssen 2-3 4 3 3 0 1 21 2.39 C.Villanueva 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 8 4.11 Beck 1 1 0 0 0 2 14 0.00 Inherited runners-scored—Camp 1-0, C.Villanueva 1-0. IBB—off Litsch (Callaspo). WP—McGowan. T—2:51. A—14,784 (49,260).

White Sox 8, Indians 4 Chicago De Aza lf-rf Al.Ramirez ss Pierzynski dh Rios cf A.Dunn 1b 1-Pierre pr-lf Viciedo rf-1b Morel 3b Flowers c Beckham 2b Totals

AB 5 5 4 4 3 0 3 4 4 3 35

R 0 1 0 1 0 1 2 2 0 1 8

H BI BB 2 2 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 3 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 9 8 3

SO 2 1 0 0 2 0 1 1 0 1 8

Avg. .328 .271 .292 .223 .166 .283 .278 .254 .210 .231

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fukudome rf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .254 Kipnis 2b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .294 C.Santana 1b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .238 Hafner dh 3 1 1 2 1 1 .280 Duncan lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Carrera cf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .249 Donald ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .311 Chisenhall 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .242 Marson c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .235 a-Hannahan ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Crowe cf-lf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .222 Totals 32 4 8 4 3 4 Chicago 000 010 340 — 8 9 0 Cleveland 000 002 020 — 4 8 0 a-struck out for Marson in the 9th. 1-ran for A.Dunn in the 8th. LOB—Chicago 3, Cleveland 5. 2B—Pierzynski (29), Morel (18), Flowers (5), Fukudome (12), Kipnis (9). HR—Al.Ramirez (15), off Durbin; Rios (12), off Durbin; Morel (9), off Durbin; Hafner (13), off Buehrle. RBIs—De Aza 2 (23), Al.Ramirez (68), Rios (42), Morel 3 (39), Flowers (12), Kipnis (16), C.Santana (78), Hafner 2 (57). SB—De Aza (11). CS—Donald (2). SF—Kipnis. Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 3 (Rios 2, Beckham); Cleveland 3 (Marson 2, Donald). Runners moved up—Pierzynski, Morel, Chisenhall. GIDP—Marson. DP—Chicago 1 (Beckham, Al.Ramirez, A.Dunn). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Buehrle W, 12-9 6 4 2 2 2 2 97 3.72 Crain H, 22 1 1 1 1 1 0 20 2.38 Frasor 1-3 2 1 1 0 0 14 3.39 Ohman 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 17 4.50 S.Santos 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 3.38 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jimenez L, 4-3 7 6 4 4 2 7 113 4.62 Durbin 1 3 4 4 1 1 25 5.45 Herrmann 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 5.37 Crain pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Frasor 1-1, Ohman 1-0. WP—U.Jimenez. T—2:52. A—12,400 (43,441).

Yankees 4, Rays 2 (First Game) Tampa Bay AB Jennings lf 5 B.Upton cf 5 Longoria 3b 5 Joyce rf 3 Damon dh 3 Kotchman 1b 3 Lobaton c 3 E.Johnson 2b 2 a-S.Rdriguez ph-2b 1 c-Zobrist ph-2b 1 Brignac ss 4 Totals 35

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

H BI BB SO 1 2 0 1 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 9 2 2 10

Avg. .287 .235 .243 .279 .259 .307 .100 .194 .222 .267 .187

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner cf-lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .262 Jeter ss 3 2 2 0 1 0 .298 Cano dh-2b 4 0 1 2 0 1 .304 Al.Rodriguez 3b 4 0 1 1 0 2 .281 Swisher rf-1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .259 Ma.Rivera p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Posada 1b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .236 1-Dickerson pr-rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 An.Jones lf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .240 b-Granderson ph-cf1 0 0 0 0 0 .270 E.Nunez 2b 3 1 2 1 0 0 .266 Teixeira 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .247 Au.Romine c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .111 d-Er.Chavez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .268 R.Martin c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .238 Totals 30 4 7 4 2 8 Tampa Bay 002 000 000 — 2 9 0 New York 100 000 03x — 4 7 0 a-struck out for E.Johnson in the 6th. b-popped out for An.Jones in the 7th. c-struck out for S.Rodriguez in the 8th. d-struck out for Au.Romine in the 8th. 1-ran for Posada in the 7th. LOB—Tampa Bay 10, New York 4. 2B—Kotchman (24), E.Johnson (7), Cano (46), Al.Rodriguez (21). HR—Jennings (10), off Noesi; E.Nunez (5), off Shields. RBIs—Jennings 2 (25), Cano 2 (115), Al.Rodriguez (61), E.Nunez (30). SB—B.Upton (31), Gardner (46), E.Nunez 2 (21). Runners left in scoring position—Tampa Bay 5 (Lobaton, Damon 2, Brignac 2); New York 2 (Swisher 2). Runners moved up—Kotchman, Brignac. DP—Tampa Bay 1 (Longoria). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Shlds L, 15-12 7 1-3 6 4 4 2 7 120 2.84 Howell 0 1 0 0 0 0 5 6.37 B.Gomes 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 3.24 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Noesi 2 2-3 4 2 2 1 2 55 4.14 Valdes 1 1-3 1 0 0 1 3 30 0.00 Kontos 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 10 3.86 Laffey 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 22 4.10 Wade 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 26 1.98 Logan 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 11 2.93 Ayala W, 2-2 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 11 1.69 Rivera S, 44-49 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 1.95 Howell pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Howell 2-2, B.Gomes 1-0, Valdes 1-0, Laffey 1-0, Wade 1-0, Logan 1-0, Ayala 2-0. HBP—by Logan (Kotchman), by Laffey (Joyce). T—3:20. A—42,755 (50,291).

Yankees 4, Rays 2 (Second Game) Tampa Bay Jennings lf B.Upton cf Longoria 3b Zobrist 2b Damon dh

AB 4 4 2 4 4

R 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 0 0 3 0

Avg. .286 .237 .242 .265 .257

S.Rodriguez ss 3 c-D.Johnson ph 1 Kotchman 1b 4 Guyer rf 3 d-Joyce ph 1 Shoppach c 3 Totals 33

1 0 0 0 0 1 2

2 0 2 0 0 1 8

1 0 0 0 0 1 2

0 0 0 0 0 0 2

0 0 0 2 1 0 7

.225 .111 .309 .189 .279 .172

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .261 a-Swisher ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .261 1-Golson pr-rf 0 1 0 0 0 0 .500 Granderson cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .270 Teixeira 1b 2 1 0 0 2 0 .246 Cano 2b 2 1 1 1 2 0 .305 J.Montero dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .267 b-Posada ph-dh 1 0 1 2 0 0 .239 Er.Chavez 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .263 R.Martin c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .236 Dickerson rf-lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .308 E.Nunez ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Totals 27 4 4 3 6 4 Tampa Bay 000 010 100 — 2 8 0 New York 010 100 02x — 4 4 1 a-doubled for Gardner in the 8th. c-grounded out for S.Rodriguez in the 9th. d-struck out for Guyer in the 9th. 1-ran for Swisher in the 8th. E—Cano (10). LOB—Tampa Bay 6, New York 5. 2B—Swisher (28), Granderson (26). HR—Shoppach (9), off Sabathia; S.Rodriguez (8), off Sabathia; Cano (27), off Hellickson. RBIs—S.Rodriguez (35), Shoppach (20), Cano (116), Posada 2 (42). Runners left in scoring position—Tampa Bay 4 (Guyer, Zobrist 2, Joyce); New York 2 (R.Martin, Er.Chavez). GIDP—Longoria, Zobrist, Guyer, J.Montero. DP—Tampa Bay 1 (S.Rodriguez, Kotchman); New York 3 (Cano, E.Nunez, Teixeira), (E.Nunez, Cano, Teixeira), (Cano, E.Nunez, Teixeira). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hellickson 7 2 2 2 4 3 96 2.90 McGee L, 3-2 2-3 1 1 1 0 1 14 4.91 J.Cruz 0 0 1 1 1 0 4 3.91 C.Ramos 0 0 0 0 1 0 5 4.10 B.Gomes 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 3 3.21 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sabathia 7 1-3 7 2 2 2 6 127 3.00 Robrtsn W, 4-0 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 1 1.11 Soriano S, 2-4 1 1 0 0 0 1 18 3.62 J.Cruz pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. C.Ramos pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—J.Cruz 1-0, C.Ramos 2-0, B.Gomes 3-2, Robertson 3-0. IBB—off C.Ramos (Cano), off Hellickson (Cano). WP—Hellickson. T—3:00. A—45,586 (50,291).

Orioles 6, Red Sox 4 Baltimore Andino 2b Hardy ss Markakis rf Guerrero dh Wieters c Ad.Jones cf Mar.Reynolds 1b C.Davis 3b Angle lf Totals

AB 5 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 36

R H 1 1 1 2 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 2 2 0 1 0 0 6 10

BI 0 1 0 2 0 0 3 0 0 6

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 1 1 2 0 1 0 1 2 9

Avg. .268 .263 .281 .292 .263 .283 .223 .256 .174

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ellsbury cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .319 Aviles 3b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .263 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 4 1 2 0 0 2 .341 D.Ortiz dh 4 0 1 1 0 0 .312 Pedroia 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .300 Reddick rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .282 C.Crawford lf 4 1 3 2 0 0 .259 Scutaro ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .293 Varitek c 3 0 0 1 0 0 .218 a-Lowrie ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .253 Totals 35 4 9 4 1 5 Baltimore 010 001 220 — 6 10 0 Boston 001 210 000 — 4 9 1 a-grounded out for Varitek in the 9th. E—Ad.Gonzalez (4). LOB—Baltimore 4, Boston 5. 2B—Markakis (28), Pedroia (37), C.Crawford (27). 3B— C.Crawford (6). HR—Mar.Reynolds 2 (36), off Beckett 2. RBIs—Hardy (75), Guerrero 2 (60), Mar.Reynolds 3 (85), D.Ortiz (96), C.Crawford 2 (55), Varitek (35). SB—Andino (12), Angle (10). Runners left in scoring position—Baltimore 3 (Guerrero, Andino 2); Boston 3 (Aviles, Scutaro, Pedroia). Runners moved up—Varitek. GIDP—Aviles. DP—Baltimore 1 (Tom.Hunter, Hardy, Mar.Reynolds); Boston 1 (Scutaro, Ad.Gonzalez). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO Tom.Hunter 6 2-3 9 4 4 1 4 Rapada W, 2-0 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 Eyre H, 3 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 Jhnson S, 9-14 1 0 0 0 0 0 Boston IP H R ER BB SO Beckett L, 13-6 7 1-3 7 6 6 1 8 Aceves 1 2-3 3 0 0 0 1 Inherited runners-scored—Aceves 2-2. T—2:59. A—38,004 (37,493).

NP 97 10 3 9 NP 109 21

ERA 4.86 6.19 3.31 2.66 ERA 2.70 2.70

SO 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 1 9

Avg. .274 .264 .280 .290 .232 .226 .225 .233 .151 .167 .230

T—2:57. A—45,083 (43,651).

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division x-New York Boston Tampa Bay Toronto Baltimore Central Division x-Detroit Cleveland Chicago Kansas City Minnesota West Division Texas Los Angeles Oakland Seattle x-clinched division

W 95 88 85 78 65 W 90 76 76 68 59 W 90 85 69 66

L 60 68 70 77 90 L 65 78 79 88 95 L 65 70 86 89

Pct .613 .564 .548 .503 .419 Pct .581 .494 .490 .436 .383 Pct .581 .548 .445 .426

Marlins 4, Braves 0

NATIONAL LEAGUE GB — 7½ 10 17 30 GB — 13½ 14 22½ 30½ GB — 5 21 24

Wednesday’s Games N.Y. Yankees 4, Tampa Bay 2, 1st game Chicago White Sox 8, Cleveland 4 N.Y. Yankees 4, Tampa Bay 2, 2nd game L.A. Angels 7, Toronto 2 Baltimore 6, Boston 4 Detroit 6, Kansas City 3 Seattle 5, Minnesota 4 Texas 3, Oakland 2

WCGB — — 2½ 9½ 22½ WCGB — 11 11½ 20 28 WCGB — 2½ 18½ 21½

L10 7-3 3-7 4-6 6-4 7-3 L10 7-3 4-6 3-7 8-2 0-10 L10 8-2 5-5 3-7 5-5

Str W-4 L-2 L-3 L-2 W-2 Str W-1 L-2 W-2 L-1 L-11 Str W-4 W-2 L-3 W-3

Home 50-27 45-36 42-33 41-39 37-41 Home 45-29 40-36 33-42 40-41 30-47 Home 49-29 44-31 42-38 38-43

Away 45-33 43-32 43-37 37-38 28-49 Away 45-36 36-42 43-37 28-47 29-48 Away 41-36 41-39 27-48 28-46

East Division x-Philadelphia Atlanta Washington New York Florida Central Division Milwaukee St. Louis Cincinnati Chicago Pittsburgh Houston West Division Arizona San Francisco Los Angeles Colorado San Diego

Today’s Games Seattle (Beavan 5-5) at Minnesota (Swarzak 3-7), 10:10 a.m. Texas (C.Lewis 13-10) at Oakland (Cahill 11-14), 12:35 p.m. Baltimore (Britton 10-10) at Detroit (Ja. Turner 0-1), 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Humber 9-8) at Cleveland (J.Gomez 4-2), 4:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (M.Moore 0-0) at N.Y. Yankees (Colon 8-9), 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (E.Santana 11-12) at Toronto (H.Alvarez 1-2), 4:07 p.m.

W 98 88 75 73 71 W 91 86 76 69 69 53 W 90 84 77 70 68

L 57 68 79 82 85 L 65 69 80 87 87 102 L 66 71 77 85 88

Pct .632 .564 .487 .471 .455 Pct .583 .555 .487 .442 .442 .342 Pct .577 .542 .500 .452 .436

GB — 10½ 22½ 25 27½ GB — 4½ 15 22 22 37½ GB — 5½ 12 19½ 22

Wednesday’s Games Cincinnati 2, Houston 0 Chicago Cubs 7, Milwaukee 1 San Diego 4, Colorado 0 Arizona 8, Pittsburgh 5 Washington 7, Philadelphia 5 Florida 4, Atlanta 0 St. Louis 6, N.Y. Mets 5 San Francisco 8, L.A. Dodgers 5

WCGB — — 12 14½ 17 WCGB — 1½ 12 19 19 34½ WCGB — 3½ 10 17½ 20

L10 4-6 4-6 8-2 2-8 4-6 L10 6-4 8-2 5-5 5-5 3-7 4-6 L10 5-5 9-1 5-5 2-8 6-4

Str L-5 L-1 W-4 L-2 W-1 Str L-1 W-4 W-2 W-1 L-1 L-2 Str W-1 W-1 L-1 L-7 W-3

Home 52-28 47-31 42-35 31-44 30-45 Home 52-23 43-34 42-39 39-42 34-44 28-46 Home 47-28 44-34 41-39 38-43 32-43

Away 46-29 41-37 33-44 42-38 41-40 Away 39-42 43-35 34-41 30-45 35-43 25-56 Away 43-38 40-37 36-38 32-42 36-45

Thursday’s Games N.Y. Mets (Capuano 11-12) at St. Louis (Westbrook 12-9), 10:45 a.m. Washington (Peacock 1-0) at Philadelphia (Oswalt 8-9), 4:05 p.m. Colorado (White 2-2) at Houston (Sosa 2-5), 5:05 p.m. San Francisco (Bumgarner 12-12) at L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 12-16), 7:10 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Yankees 4-4, Rays 2-2: NEW YORK — Jorge Posada came off the bench and helped the Yankees to yet another first-place finish with a go-ahead single in the eighth inning, and New York swept Tampa Bay by identical scores in a day-night doubleheader to win the AL East. Accomplishing most of their regular-season goals with a week to spare, the Yankees earned their 16th playoff berth in 17 seasons by winning the day game behind Robinson Cano’s tiebreaking, two-run double in the eighth. • Orioles 6, Red Sox 4: BOSTON — The reeling Red Sox blew another late lead and lost for the 14th time in 18 games, booed by fans at Fenway Park after Vladimir Guerrero and the Orioles rallied. Despite the loss, Boston’s lead over Tampa Bay for the AL wild-card spot increased to 2½ games. • Rangers 3, Athletics 2: OAKLAND, Calif. — Ian Kinsler hit a tying home run leading off the eighth and Josh Hamilton followed with another homer two batters later, lifting Texas to a win over the Athletics and reducing the Rangers magic number to clinch the AL West to three. Michael Young, Adrian Beltre and Mike Napoli added two hits apiece for Texas, which won its 90th game to match its win total of 2010. • Angels 7, Blue Jays 2: TORONTO — Dan Haren’s outing ended after he was hit by a line drive on the final out of the eighth inning, Peter Bourjos and Vernon Wells homered, and the Angels beat the Blue Jays. • Mariners 5, Twins 4: MINNEAPOLIS — Ichiro Suzuki stopped Kevin Slowey’s no-hitter with a two-out infield single in the sixth inning and added an RBI double in the seventh, spurring the Mariners to a victory in Minnesota, the 11th straight defeat for the Twins. • White Sox 8, Indians 4: CLEVELAND — Mark Buehrle bounced back from a poor outing and pitched six effective innings, leading the White Sox past the Indians. • Tigers 6, Royals 3: KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Ramon Santiago drove in the go-ahead run in the eighth inning, Don Kelly added a two-run homer and the Tigers beat the Royals.

• Diamondbacks 8, Pirates 5: PHOENIX — Miguel Montero had a two-run homer among his three hits and Arizona jumped on Pittsburgh early in a win that cut its magic number for clinching the NL West to two. • Giants 8, Dodgers 5: LOS ANGELES — Justin Christian had three hits and drove in three runs — all with two outs — and the Giants beat the Dodgers to keep their slim NL West playoff hopes alive. Any combination of two Arizona wins and/or Giants’ losses would eliminate the defending World Series champions. • Cubs 7, Brewers 1: CHICAGO — Matt Garza pitched a six-hitter, Marlon Byrd hit a threerun homer and the Chicago Cubs prolonged Milwaukee’s drive to clinch the NL Central, beating the Brewers in the final game at Wrigley Field this season. • Reds 2, Astros 0: CINCINNATI — Bronson Arroyo pitched a six-hitter, and Cincinnati wrapped up its home schedule with a win over Houston. • Padres 4, Rockies 0: DENVER — Rookie Anthony Bass pitched five solid innings to help San Diego complete a rare three-game sweep of Colorado with a win in the last game of the season at Coors Field. • Cardinals 6, Mets 5: ST. LOUIS — David Freese drove in five runs with a go-ahead three-run homer and a triple, and surging St. Louis beat the New York Mets. • Nationals 7, Phillies 5: PHILADELPHIA — Danny Espinosa and Wilson Ramos each hit two-run home runs to help Washington beat Philadelphia, sending the NL East-champion Phillies to their season-worst fifth straight loss. • Marlins 4, Braves 0: MIAMI — Struggling to secure a postseason berth, Atlanta was thwarted by a playoff-caliber pitching performance. Javier Vazquez allowed only two hits in seven innings against his former team, and Florida played the spoiler’s role by beating the Braves.

Mariners 5, Twins 4 Seattle AB R I.Suzuki rf 4 1 Seager ss 4 1 Ackley 2b 4 0 Carp lf-1b 4 0 Smoak dh 3 0 1-W.Pena pr-dh 1 1 Olivo c 4 1 A.Kennedy 1b 2 0 M.Saunders cf 1 0 Liddi 3b 4 0 T.Robinson cf-lf 4 1 Totals 35 5

H BI BB 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 8 5 0

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Span cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .260 Tosoni lf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .174 Revere lf-cf 5 1 1 0 0 0 .263 Cuddyer dh 5 1 3 0 0 1 .285 Parmelee 1b 4 0 3 1 1 1 .413 2-L.Hughes pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .227 Valencia 3b 4 0 0 0 1 0 .246 Plouffe ss 5 2 3 1 0 1 .231 Dinkelman 2b 5 0 2 1 0 0 .377 Benson rf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .229 R.Rivera c 2 0 0 0 1 2 .141 a-Tolbert ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .197 Butera c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .153 Totals 40 4 14 4 3 5 Seattle 000 002 300 — 5 8 0 Minnesota 100 100 011 — 4 14 1 a-grounded out for R.Rivera in the 8th. 1-ran for Smoak in the 7th. 2-ran for Parmelee in the 9th. E—Plouffe (11). LOB—Seattle 4, Minnesota 12. 2B— I.Suzuki (22), Seager (12), Ackley (14), Tosoni (3), Plouffe (16), Benson (6). RBIs—I.Suzuki (45), Seager (12), Ackley (35), T.Robinson 2 (14), Parmelee (9), Plouffe (27), Dinkelman (4), Benson (2). SB—Dinkelman (2). S—A.Kennedy. Runners left in scoring position—Seattle 2 (Carp, Seager); Minnesota 8 (Plouffe, Span, Revere 2, Dinkelman 3, Tosoni). Runners moved up—Span, Tolbert. GIDP—Plouffe. DP—Seattle 1 (Gray, Olivo, A.Kennedy). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pineda 4 6 2 2 2 2 81 3.74 Gray 2-3 2 0 0 1 0 14 4.53 Jimenez W, 1-0 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 20 5.40 Kelley H, 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 0.00 Wlhelmsen H, 3 1 2 1 1 0 0 14 3.52 Lgue S, 36-41 1 3 1 1 0 0 17 2.73 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Slowey L, 0-7 6 2-3 6 5 5 0 6 87 6.54 Dumatrait 2-3 2 0 0 0 1 15 3.96 Al.Burnett 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 5.36 S.Baker 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 3.19 Inherited runners-scored—C.Jimenez 2-0, Dumatrait 1-1, Al.Burnett 1-0. WP—Pineda, Gray, C.Jimenez, Wilhelmsen. T—2:48. A—36,263 (39,500).

Tigers 6, Royals 3 Detroit A.Jackson cf Kelly 1b D.Young lf V.Martinez dh Avila c Jh.Peralta ss Dirks rf a-Raburn ph-rf R.Santiago 2b b-Mi.Cabrera ph 1-Worth pr-2b Inge 3b Totals

AB 4 5 5 5 5 4 2 2 3 1 0 3 39

R H 2 1 2 3 0 1 0 2 0 2 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 6 13

Kansas City A.Gordon lf Me.Cabrera cf Butler dh Hosmer 1b Francoeur rf Moustakas 3b Giavotella 2b c-B.Pena ph

AB 4 3 4 4 4 4 3 1

R 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0

BI 0 2 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 6

BB 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 1 2 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 9

Avg. .249 .242 .269 .326 .298 .300 .254 .249 .262 .333 .270 .201

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 1 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 2 1 0 2 1 1 0

Avg. .303 .305 .294 .299 .285 .250 .226 .248

S.Perez c 4 0 2 0 0 0 .344 A.Escobar ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Totals 34 3 9 2 1 8 Detroit 100 010 130 — 6 13 1 Kansas City 200 001 000 — 3 9 1 a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Dirks in the 6th. b-doubled for R.Santiago in the 8th. c-popped out for Giavotella in the 9th. 1-ran for Mi.Cabrera in the 8th. E—Raburn (15), S.Perez (3). LOB—Detroit 10, Kansas City 5. 2B—Kelly (7), Avila (32), Mi.Cabrera (45), Me.Cabrera (43), Butler (40), Francoeur (47). HR—Kelly (6), off K.Herrera. RBIs—Kelly 2 (24), V.Martinez 3 (97), Mi.Cabrera (98), Butler (91), Francoeur (85). SB— A.Jackson (21), A.Escobar (25). S—Inge. Runners left in scoring position—Detroit 4 (A.Jackson, Avila, Jh.Peralta, Raburn); Kansas City 4 (Moustakas, A.Gordon, S.Perez 2). Runners moved up—V.Martinez. GIDP—Hosmer, A.Escobar. DP—Detroit 2 (Jh.Peralta, R.Santiago, Kelly), (Jh. Peralta, R.Santiago, Kelly). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Scherzer 5 5 2 2 1 5 84 4.37 Fister W, 10-13 3 2 1 0 0 2 39 2.94 Vlvrde S, 47-47 1 2 0 0 0 1 22 2.37 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA F.Paulino 5 6 2 2 2 8 103 4.10 Collins 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 13 3.68 L.Coleman 1 1 1 1 0 0 13 2.87 Crow BS, 7-7 1-3 2 0 0 0 0 11 2.80 K.Herrera L, 0-1 1 2 3 3 0 0 13 27.00 G.Holland 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 1.84 Inherited runners-scored—L.Coleman 1-0, Crow 1-1. HBP—by K.Herrera (Raburn). WP—Crow. PB—Avila. T—3:00. A—28,776 (37,903).

Rangers 3, Athletics 2 Texas Kinsler 2b Andrus ss J.Hamilton lf Mi.Young 1b Moreland 1b A.Beltre 3b Napoli c Dav.Murphy rf N.Cruz dh En.Chavez cf Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 0 4 4 4 4 4 36

R H 1 2 0 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 3 11

BI 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2

Avg. .249 .279 .300 .334 .262 .290 .321 .273 .265 .300

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. J.Weeks 2b 4 0 2 1 0 2 .297 Crisp cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .270 Matsui dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .255 Willingham lf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .251 1-Ja.Miller pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .167 S.Sizemore 3b 2 0 0 0 2 0 .238 Pennington ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .264 K.Suzuki c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .238 Allen 1b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .225 Taylor rf 2 0 0 0 1 2 .238 Totals 30 2 5 2 4 11 Texas 010 000 020 — 3 11 1 Oakland 000 020 000 — 2 5 1 1-ran for Willingham in the 9th. E—J.Hamilton (5), J.Weeks (13). LOB—Texas 6, Oakland 5. 2B—Pennington (24). HR—Kinsler (30), off Balfour; J.Hamilton (24), off Balfour. RBIs—Kinsler (74), J.Hamilton (92), J.Weeks (31), Allen (11). SB—Kinsler (26), Dav.Murphy (10), S.Sizemore (4), Pennington (14). CS—J.Weeks (11). Runners left in scoring position—Texas 4 (En.Chavez 3, Mi.Young); Oakland 4 (Crisp 2, Pennington, K.Suzuki). Runners moved up—J.Hamilton, Pennington. GIDP—A.Beltre, Napoli, En.Chavez, Pennington. DP—Texas 2 (Andrus, Mi.Young), (Napoli, Napoli, Kinsler, Mi.Young, Andrus); Oakland 3 (Pennington, Allen), (Pennington, Allen), (J.Weeks, Pennington, Allen). Texas C.Wilson Uehara W, 2-3 M.Adams H, 7

IP 6 1 1

H 5 0 0

R 2 0 0

ER 2 0 0

BB 3 0 0

SO 8 2 1

NP 111 13 17

ERA 2.97 2.47 2.08

Feliz S, 29-35 1 0 0 0 1 0 20 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP McCarthy 7 6 1 1 0 1 79 Balfour L, 4-2 1 3 2 2 0 0 25 Fuentes 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 7 De Los Santos 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 10 Inherited runners-scored—De Los Santos 1-0. T—2:59. A—19,589 (35,067).

2.88 ERA 3.26 2.54 3.77 3.90

NL BOXSCORES Giants 8, Dodgers 5 San Francisco Christian cf-rf Keppinger 2b 1-Burriss pr-2b Beltran rf An.Torres cf Pill 1b Belt lf DeRosa 3b Fontenot ss Ja.Lopez p Romo p e-P.Sandoval ph S.Casilla p Br.Wilson p C.Stewart c Vogelsong p b-Gillaspie ph Mota p R.Ramirez p B.Crawford ss Totals

AB 5 5 0 2 1 5 3 3 4 0 0 1 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 1 34

R H 0 3 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 3 1 0 2 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 12

BI 3 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 6

SO 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .258 .281 .212 .304 .219 .333 .212 .260 .221 .000 --.308 ----.209 .216 .273 .111 .000 .199

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. D.Gordon ss 5 1 2 0 0 1 .294 J.Carroll 2b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .288 Kemp cf 4 2 2 3 1 1 .322 J.Rivera lf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .291 Loney 1b 5 0 3 1 0 0 .288 Miles 3b 5 0 2 0 0 1 .280 Sands rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .249 A.Ellis c 4 0 1 0 0 2 .263 Eveland p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Hawksworth p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Velez ph 0 1 0 0 0 0 .000 Lindblom p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Oeltjen ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .215 Kuo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Guerrier p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Troncoso p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Barajas ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .229 Ely p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 38 5 13 5 2 9 San Francisco 300 201 200 — 8 12 1 Los Angeles 000 040 001 — 5 13 1 a-was hit by a pitch for Hawksworth in the 5th. b-walked for Vogelsong in the 6th. c-popped out for Lindblom in the 6th. d-struck out for Troncoso in the 8th. e-lined out for Romo in the 9th. 1-ran for Keppinger in the 9th. E—Belt (3), Miles (9). LOB—San Francisco 8, Los Angeles 10. 2B—Christian (3), Beltran (39), Pill (2). HR— Kemp (35), off Vogelsong. RBIs—Christian 3 (4), Pill 2 (8), DeRosa (10), Fontenot 2 (18), J.Carroll (15), Kemp 3 (116), Loney (63). SB—Burriss (11), D.Gordon (23). CS—Pill (1). S—Vogelsong, J.Carroll. SF—DeRosa. Runners left in scoring position—San Francisco 6 (C.Stewart 2, Keppinger 2, P.Sandoval 2); Los Angeles 5 (J.Rivera, Eveland, A.Ellis, Barajas, Miles). Runners moved up—Pill, Belt, Fontenot, C.Stewart. GIDP—Keppinger 2, Belt, J.Rivera. DP—San Francisco 1 (Vogelsong, Fontenot, Pill); Los Angeles 4 (Miles, J.Carroll, Loney), (J.Carroll, D.Gordon, Loney), (J.Carroll, D.Gordon, Loney), (A.Ellis, A.Ellis, D.Gordon). S. Francisco IP Vglsng W, 12-7 5 Mota H, 4 1 R.Ramirez 2-3 Ja.Lopez 2-3 Romo 2-3 S.Casilla 2-3

H 9 0 1 1 0 1

R 4 0 0 0 0 1

ER 4 0 0 0 0 1

BB 1 0 0 0 0 1

SO 3 1 2 1 2 0

NP 104 20 16 14 6 24

ERA 2.81 3.81 2.74 2.75 1.37 1.84

Wilsn S, 36-41 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 10 3.11 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Eveland L, 2-2 4 6 5 5 3 1 70 3.75 Hawksworth 1 1 0 0 0 2 12 4.13 Lindblom 1 2 1 1 1 1 19 2.89 Kuo 1-3 1 2 2 1 0 16 9.72 Guerrier 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 9 3.99 Troncoso 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 4.84 Ely 1 2 0 0 1 1 20 4.63 Inherited runners-scored—Ja.Lopez 1-0, Romo 1-0, Br.Wilson 2-1, Guerrier 1-1. IBB—off Ely (Belt). HBP— by Vogelsong (Velez), by Eveland (Beltran). T—3:45. A—32,334 (56,000).

Nationals 7, Phillies 5 Washington Desmond ss Bernadina rf Zimmerman 3b Morse lf 1-Bixler pr-lf Espinosa 2b Marrero 1b Ankiel cf W.Ramos c Lannan p a-Cora ph Stammen p c-J.Gomes ph Severino p Coffey p H.Rodriguez p Totals

AB 5 5 4 4 0 4 4 4 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 35

R H 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 1 2 2 1 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 10

BI 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 4 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 7

BB 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 2 1 2 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .248 .244 .287 .305 .207 .238 .273 .242 .267 .089 .221 1.000 .208 ----.000

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rollins ss 5 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Victorino cf 4 0 0 0 1 0 .281 Polanco 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .281 Utley 2b 3 1 0 0 1 2 .259 Mayberry 1b 4 3 3 2 0 0 .276 Ibanez lf 4 1 2 1 0 2 .244 B.Francisco rf 4 0 3 1 0 1 .248 Schneider c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .172 Worley p 2 0 1 1 0 0 .227 b-Moss ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Blanton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 De Fratus p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Bastardo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Schwimer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Gload ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Totals 36 5 10 5 2 7 Washington 020 002 030 — 7 10 1 Philadelphia 021 000 020 — 5 10 1 a-grounded out for Lannan in the 6th. b-grounded into a double play for Worley in the 6th. c-hit a sacrifice fly for Stammen in the 8th. d-flied out for Schwimer in the 9th. 1-ran for Morse in the 9th. E—W.Ramos (5), Bastardo (1). LOB—Washington 8, Philadelphia 6. 2B—Bernadina (11), Marrero (5). HR—W.Ramos (14), off Worley; Espinosa (21), off Worley; Mayberry (15), off Severino. RBIs—Espinosa 2 (64), W.Ramos 4 (50), J.Gomes (43), Mayberry 2 (49), Ibanez (81), B.Francisco (34), Worley (5). SB—Mayberry (8). CS—Bixler (3). S—Lannan. SF—J.Gomes. Runners left in scoring position—Washington 4 (Bernadina, Cora, Morse, Zimmerman); Philadelphia 3 (Victorino 2, Schneider). GIDP—Moss. DP—Washington 1 (Desmond, Marrero). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lnan W, 10-13 5 8 3 3 1 3 76 3.73 Stammen H, 1 2 1 0 0 0 1 23 1.04 Severino 1-3 1 2 2 1 1 18 9.00 Coffey H, 10 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 8 3.55 Rdriguez S, 1-4 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 3.59 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Worley L, 11-3 6 6 4 4 3 6 97 3.00 Blanton 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 5.30 De Fratus 0 0 2 1 1 0 5 4.50 Bastardo 1 2 1 1 0 1 16 2.22 Schwimer 1 1 0 0 0 0 8 6.35 De Fratus pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Bastardo 2-2. IBB—off Worley (W.Ramos). HBP—by De Fratus (Espinosa).

Atlanta Bourn cf Prado 3b-lf McCann c Uggla 2b Freeman 1b Heyward rf Ja.Wilson ss Constanza lf b-Hinske ph Varvaro p D.Lowe p Linebrink p c-C.Jones ph-3b Totals

AB 4 4 1 4 3 4 3 2 1 0 2 0 1 29

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 3

SO 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 8

Avg. .296 .265 .271 .231 .286 .227 .240 .311 .236 --.176 --.281

Florida AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bonifacio ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .289 Infante 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .277 Dobbs 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .274 Dominguez 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .229 Stanton rf 4 2 2 0 0 1 .267 Morrison lf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .249 G.Sanchez 1b 3 0 2 1 1 0 .265 Petersen cf 2 0 0 1 0 0 .263 Hayes c 2 1 1 1 1 1 .226 Vazquez p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .185 a-Jo.Baker ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Mujica p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 L.Nunez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 30 4 8 4 2 5 Atlanta 000 000 000 — 0 2 0 Florida 010 011 01x — 4 8 0 a-grounded out for Vazquez in the 7th. b-struck out for Constanza in the 8th. c-grounded out for Linebrink in the 8th. LOB—Atlanta 6, Florida 5. 2B—Heyward (18), Bonifacio (24), Stanton (28), G.Sanchez (33). HR—Hayes (5), off D.Lowe; Morrison (22), off Varvaro. RBIs—Morrison (71), G.Sanchez (76), Petersen (8), Hayes (16). SB—Bonifacio (39). SF—Petersen. Runners left in scoring position—Atlanta 4 (Freeman, Ja.Wilson 2, Heyward); Florida 2 (Vazquez, Dobbs). Runners moved up—Morrison, Petersen. Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP D.Lowe L, 9-16 6 1-3 6 3 3 2 3 111 Linebrink 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 9 Varvaro 1 2 1 1 0 1 23 Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP Vzqz W, 12-11 7 2 0 0 1 6 109 Mujica H, 17 1 0 0 0 0 2 17 L.Nunez 1 0 0 0 2 0 22 IBB—off D.Lowe (Hayes). HBP—by Vazquez Cann). Balk—D.Lowe. T—2:35. A—22,240 (38,560).

ERA 4.92 3.68 3.00 ERA 3.77 2.64 4.06 (Mc-

Diamondbacks 8, Pirates 5 Pittsburgh AB Presley lf 5 Ciriaco ss 3 D.McCutchen p 0 c-G.Jones ph 1 Meek p 0 Resop p 0 h-Paul ph 1 A.McCutchen cf 4 D.Lee 1b 4 Walker 2b 4 Ludwick rf 4 Br.Wood 3b-ss 3 d-P.Alvarez ph-3b 1 Pagnozzi c 3 e-Jaramillo ph-c 1 Ohlendorf p 1 J.Hughes p 0 Moskos p 0 a-J.Harrison ph-3b 2 f-Doumit ph 1 d’Arnaud ss 0 Totals 38

R H 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 5 11

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .295 .323 .000 .243 ----.254 .262 .363 .270 .237 .222 .194 .269 .321 .167 ----.265 .300 .200

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bloomquist ss 5 1 1 0 0 2 .268 Putz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --A.Hill 2b 3 1 2 2 0 0 .308 J.Upton rf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .292 M.Montero c 4 2 3 2 0 0 .285 C.Young cf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .235 Overbay 1b 2 1 0 0 2 0 .229 R.Roberts 3b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .249 G.Parra lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .295 Miley p 1 0 0 0 1 0 .077 b-Burroughs ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .264 Owings p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .211 Shaw p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ziegler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Paterson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --g-Blum ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .195 Jo.McDonald ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Totals 32 8 11 8 3 4 Pittsburgh 010 101 110 — 5 11 0 Arizona 305 000 00x — 8 11 0 a-flied out for Moskos in the 5th. b-grounded out for Miley in the 5th. c-grounded out for D.McCutchen in the 7th. d-singled for Br.Wood in the 8th. e-doubled for Pagnozzi in the 8th. f-grounded out for J.Harrison in the 8th. g-flied out for Paterson in the 8th. h-struck out for Resop in the 9th. LOB—Pittsburgh 7, Arizona 5. 2B—A.McCutchen (33), Br.Wood (9), Jaramillo (1), J.Harrison (12), C.Young (37), R.Roberts (24). HR—Ludwick (13), off Miley; D.Lee (7), off Owings; M.Montero (18), off Ohlendorf. RBIs— D.Lee 2 (18), Ludwick (73), Jaramillo (4), A.Hill 2 (14), J.Upton (88), M.Montero 2 (84), C.Young (70), R.Roberts 2 (58). SB—Bloomquist (19), A.Hill (3), C.Young (21), Overbay (2), G.Parra (14). CS—A.Hill (4). SF—J.Upton. Runners left in scoring position—Pittsburgh 4 (Pagnozzi 2, Doumit 2); Arizona 3 (G.Parra, J.Upton, Bloomquist). Runners moved up—G.Jones. GIDP—Overbay. DP—Pittsburgh 1 (Walker, Ciriaco, D.Lee). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ohlndorf L, 1-3 2 7 7 7 2 1 65 8.29 J.Hughes 1 2 1 1 1 1 25 1.00 Moskos 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 2.35 D.McCutchen 2 1 0 0 0 1 34 3.87 Meek 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 3.86 Resop 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 4.48 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Miley W, 4-2 5 5 2 2 1 3 89 4.15 Owings 1 2 1 1 0 0 12 3.10 Shaw 1 1 1 1 0 1 16 2.60 Ziegler 2-3 3 1 1 0 1 16 1.80 Paterson H, 10 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 2.97 Putz S, 43-47 1 0 0 0 0 3 14 2.29 Ohlendorf pitched to 4 batters in the 3rd. Inherited runners-scored—J.Hughes 3-3, Paterson 2-0. HBP—by Ohlendorf (A.Hill). WP—Shaw. T—3:03. A—25,296 (48,633).

Padres 4, Rockies 0 San Diego AB Maybin cf 5 Hermida rf 4 Denorfia lf 4 Headley 3b 2 Gregerson p 0 c-Cunningham ph 1 Qualls p 0 Thatcher p 0 H.Bell p 0 L.Martinez c 2 Alb.Gonzalez ss-3b 3 Rizzo 1b 4 Parrino 2b 4 Bass p 2 Frieri p 0 a-Bartlett ph-ss 2 Totals 33

R 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 3 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 9 4 3 11

Avg. .266 .180 .279 .291 --.171 ------.235 .218 .138 .184 .000 --.251

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. E.Young lf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .240 M.Ellis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .270 Fowler cf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .268 Tulowitzki ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .302 Mat.Reynolds p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Lindstrom p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Nelson ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .249 Belisle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 G.Reynolds p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .143 d-Wigginton ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .245 S.Smith rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .280 Pacheco 1b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .288 Kouzmanoff 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .212 Iannetta c 2 0 0 0 1 0 .236 A.Cook p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .147 Field ss 2 0 0 0 0 1 .214 Totals 31 0 6 0 1 4 San Diego 400 000 000 — 4 9 0 Colorado 000 000 000 — 0 6 0 a-singled for Frieri in the 7th. b-singled for Lindstrom in the 7th. c-struck out for Gregerson in the 8th. d-struck out for G.Reynolds in the 9th. LOB—San Diego 7, Colorado 5. 2B—Maybin (22), Fowler (32). RBIs—Headley (44), Alb.Gonzalez (31), Rizzo (9), Parrino (3). SB—E.Young (24), Iannetta (6). SF—Headley, Alb.Gonzalez. Runners left in scoring position—San Diego 3 (Bass, Parrino, Hermida); Colorado 5 (Tulowitzki, Fowler 2, S.Smith 2). GIDP—Maybin, Pacheco, Kouzmanoff. DP—San Diego 2 (Bass, Parrino, Rizzo), (Alb.Gonzalez, Parrino, Rizzo); Colorado 1 (Field, M.Ellis, Pacheco).

San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bass W, 2-0 5 2 0 0 1 1 52 1.66 Frieri 1 1 0 0 0 1 18 2.83 Gregerson 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 2.82 Qualls 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 3.24 Thatcher 1-3 2 0 0 0 0 9 5.19 H.Bell S, 41-46 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 11 2.52 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA A.Cook L, 3-10 5 6 4 4 2 8 78 6.03 Mat.Reynolds 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 4.28 Lindstrom 1 1 0 0 0 1 7 3.00 Belisle 1 0 0 0 1 1 19 3.34 G.Reynolds 1 2 0 0 0 1 20 6.00 Bass pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored—Frieri 1-0, H.Bell 2-0. T—2:30. A—31,457 (50,490).

Cubs 7, Brewers 1 Milwaukee C.Hart rf Morgan cf Braun lf Fielder 1b R.Weeks 2b Fiers p c-Counsell ph Hairston Jr. 3b Y.Betancourt ss Kottaras c Wolf p Loe p b-T.Green ph-2b Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 3 0 1 4 4 4 1 0 1 33

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6 0 1 10

Avg. .284 .306 .330 .293 .268 --.171 .264 .248 .248 .167 .000 .258

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. S.Castro ss 3 1 2 1 2 0 .307 LeMahieu 3b 5 1 2 2 0 1 .275 Re.Johnson rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .314 Je.Baker 2b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .273 a-DeWitt ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .260 Barney 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .278 Soto c 4 1 3 1 0 0 .228 Byrd cf 4 1 1 3 0 1 .281 A.Soriano lf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .243 Campana lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .263 LaHair 1b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .375 Garza p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .097 Totals 34 7 13 7 3 6 Milwaukee 001 000 000 — 1 6 0 Chicago 001 023 10x — 7 13 2 a-grounded into a double play for Je.Baker in the 7th. b-struck out for Loe in the 8th. c-grounded out for Fiers in the 9th. E—S.Castro (28), LeMahieu (3). LOB—Milwaukee 7, Chicago 7. 2B—Hairston Jr. (18), S.Castro (35), LeMahieu (2), Soto (26), A.Soriano (27), LaHair (5). HR—Byrd (9), off Wolf. RBIs—S.Castro (63), LeMahieu 2 (4), Soto (53), Byrd 3 (35). S—Garza. Runners left in scoring position—Milwaukee 4 (Braun, Kottaras 3); Chicago 4 (Re.Johnson, S.Castro, Byrd, LeMahieu). Runners moved up—LaHair, Garza. GIDP—C.Hart, Braun, DeWitt. DP—Milwaukee 1 (Y.Betancourt, Fielder); Chicago 2 (LeMahieu, Je.Baker, LaHair), (LeMahieu, Je.Baker, LaHair). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wolf L, 13-10 6 10 6 6 1 5 96 3.61 Loe 1 3 1 1 0 1 21 3.45 Fiers 1 0 0 0 2 0 21 0.00 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Garza W, 9-10 9 6 1 0 1 10 123 3.35 IBB—off Wolf (S.Castro). HBP—by Garza (Wolf). T—2:37. A—30,965 (41,159).

Reds 2, Astros 0 Houston AB R J.Schafer cf 4 0 Shuck rf 4 0 J.Martinez lf 4 0 Ca.Lee 1b 4 0 M.Downs 2b 3 0 C.Johnson 3b 3 0 Barmes ss 3 0 Towles c 3 0 W.Rodriguez p 2 0 a-Bogusevic ph 1 0 D.Carpenter p 0 0 Totals 31 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0

SO 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2

Avg. .243 .246 .281 .276 .278 .251 .248 .187 .167 .282 ---

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. B.Phillips 2b 4 1 3 0 0 0 .297 Renteria ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Janish ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .206 Votto 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .313 Heisey cf 3 0 1 1 1 1 .249 Bruce rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .257 Cairo 3b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .265 Sappelt lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Mesoraco c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .188 Arroyo p 2 0 0 0 1 1 .111 Totals 28 2 5 2 4 5 Houston 000 000 000 — 0 6 1 Cincinnati 110 000 00x — 2 5 1 a-struck out for W.Rodriguez in the 8th. E—C.Johnson (14), Renteria (13). LOB—Houston 4, Cincinnati 7. 2B—C.Johnson (21), Towles (7). HR—Cairo (8), off W.Rodriguez. RBIs—Heisey (47), Cairo (33). SB—B.Phillips (12). S—Renteria. Runners left in scoring position—Houston 3 (Barmes, Shuck, J.Schafer); Cincinnati 4 (Renteria 2, Cairo 2). Runners moved up—J.Schafer. GIDP—J.Martinez, M.Downs. DP—Cincinnati 3 (Renteria, B.Phillips, Votto), (B.Phillips, Votto), (Sappelt, B.Phillips, Votto). Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Rdrgez L, 11-11 7 4 2 2 2 4 95 3.51 D.Carpenter 1 1 0 0 2 1 22 3.38 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Arroyo W, 9-12 9 6 0 0 0 2 91 5.09 IBB—off D.Carpenter (Votto). Balk—D.Carpenter. T—2:12. A—20,875 (42,319).

Cardinals 6, Mets 5 New York Jos.Reyes ss Pagan cf D.Wright 3b Duda rf a-Satin ph-1b c-Pridie ph Evans 1b-rf Harris lf R.Paulino c d-Thole ph Ju.Turner 2b Schwinden p b-Pascucci ph Batista p D.Herrera p Beato p Parnell p Totals

AB 4 4 4 0 2 1 4 4 3 1 3 2 1 0 0 0 0 33

R 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 3 0

SO 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .330 .263 .260 .292 .250 .218 .262 .257 .274 .265 .263 .200 .167 .000 -------

St. Louis AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Furcal ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .230 Craig lf 4 0 1 1 0 2 .308 Punto 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Pujols 1b 4 2 2 0 0 0 .305 Berkman rf 3 2 1 0 1 0 .300 C.Patterson lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .157 Freese 3b 4 1 2 5 0 2 .293 Descalso 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .263 Jay cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .299 Motte p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Y.Molina c 3 1 2 0 1 0 .300 Schumaker 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .284 S.Robinson rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 J.Garcia p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .098 Chambers cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .400 Totals 33 6 9 6 2 7 New York 004 000 001 — 5 7 0 St. Louis 210 000 30x — 6 9 2 a-doubled for Duda in the 3rd. b-flied out for Schwinden in the 7th. c-popped out for Satin in the 9th. d-struck out for R.Paulino in the 9th. E—Furcal (13), Freese (11). LOB—New York 2, St. Louis 6. 2B—Jos.Reyes (30), Satin (1), Pujols (27), Schumaker (17). 3B—Freese (1). HR—Harris (2), off Motte; Freese (10), off Beato. RBIs—Satin 2 (2), Harris (21), Craig (33), Freese 5 (54). Runners left in scoring position—New York 1 (Evans); St. Louis 3 (Jay, Berkman 2). GIDP—Evans, R.Paulino 2. DP—St. Louis 3 (Furcal, Schumaker, Pujols), (Freese, Schumaker, Pujols), (Furcal, Schumaker, Pujols). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Schwinden 6 6 3 3 2 5 92 5.06 Batista H, 7 2-3 1 1 1 0 1 10 4.29 D.Herrera L, 0-1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 5.19 Beato BS, 1-1 1-3 1 1 1 0 0 8 4.41 Parnell 1 0 0 0 0 1 17 3.93 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Garcia W, 13-7 7 2-3 6 4 0 0 5 91 3.45 Motte S, 8-12 1 1-3 1 1 1 0 2 24 1.91 D.Herrera pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—D.Herrera 1-0, Beato 2-2. IBB—off Schwinden (Berkman). HBP—by Schwinden (Furcal), by J.Garcia (Duda). WP—Schwinden. T—2:24. A—40,658 (43,975).


D4 Thursday, September 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

WOMEN’S SOCCER

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Arizona searching for more points The Associated Press TUCSON, Ariz. — After struggling last season and losing his starting job during fall camp, kicker Alex Zendejas has another chance with Arizona. The Wildcats have named the senior their starting kicker again after junior-college transfer Jaime Salazar missed two field goals against Stanford last Saturday. “The kicking game needs to improve,” coach Mike Stoops said. “We need more consistency from a certain range in our field goals to be able to get points, and that hurts. We’ve got a chance to tie the game up with two kicks, first, the last play of the first half, and first drive of the second half. It’s demoralizing.” The kicking game is one of Arizona’s biggest concerns entering Saturday’s game against 10th-ranked Oregon in Tucson. Salazar, who won the starting job in camp, is one for four on field goals. He hit a 27-yarder in the loss to Stanford, but missed from 45 yards right before halftime and 36 early in the third quarter with the Wildcats trailing 16-10. The Cardinal pulled away after that for a 37-10 win. Since beating FCS school Northern Arizona in its opener, Arizona (1-2) has struggled to score points, also losing 37-14 to Oklahoma State two weeks ago. Needing a jumpstart in the kicking game, the Wildcats are turning to Zendejas, who has made 31 of 41 field-goal attempts in his career,

but had two extra points blocked in last year’s 30-29 loss to rival Arizona State. “I’ve continued to practice and Next up continued to pre• Oregon at pare like I was goArizona ing to play,” Zendejas said. “I haven’t • When: taken a day off. I’m Saturday, just grateful and 7:15 p.m. blessed to have an• TV: ESPN2 other opportunity out here.” • Radio: Arizona has othKBND-AM er options for place 1110 kicker. Special teams coach Jeff Hammerschmidt said John Bonano, who does kickoffs, is the closest to being available to kick field goals. However, Bonano hurt his groin when he kicked field goals last season. Another option is punter Kyle Dugandzic, who kicked field goals in junior college. Hammerschmidt said Zendejas has handled the situation well. Zendejas replaced Salazar for an extrapoint kick against Northern Arizona after Salazar missed one. “He’s been a rock,” Hammerschmidt said. “He’s gone through some stuff. (The) NAU game, he went out there to kick and (fans) booed. How do you handle that when you’re a young guy? He’s been sitting back and waiting for his opportunity, and right now the door is open a little bit.

Rodgers

Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press

U.S. national team’s Megan Rapinoe signs autographs following the U.S. national team’s practice on Wednesday in Portland. The U.S. women are scheduled to face Canada today at Jeld-Wen Field in what is to be the final match featuring the 21-player FIFA Women’s World Cup roster.

Former Pilot Rapinoe returns to Portland for Celebration Series By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

PORTLAND — Megan Rapinoe was thinking a little homage to Major League Soccer’s Portland Timbers might be in order if she scores when the U.S. women’s national team plays Canada today. “I want to go saw one of those pieces of wood off,” she joked, nodding to the log that mascot Timber Joey carves into each time the Timbers score at Jeld-Wen Field. “I’d probably get a red card for that.” Rapinoe, who played in college for the Portland Pilots, returned to the city this week with the national team for a postWorld Cup friendly. The U.S. women played Japan in the thrilling World Cup final, but ultimately lost on penalty kicks. As a thank you to American fans for their support during soccer’s premier event, the two-match Celebration Series with Canada opened in Kansas City on Saturday. That match ended in a 1-all draw. After tonight’s game in Portland, the U.S. women’s team will have some time off until they begin training for Olympic qualification. The World Cup squad was intact for the exhibition series, during which U.S. coach Pia Sundhage has been experimenting with a one-forward system. At a practice Wednesday that was open to the public, much of the focus was on the stars of the team, including Rapinoe, with her shock of bleached blond hair, veteran forward Abby Wambach, and goal keeper Hope Solo, who had just returned from an appearance on the television show “Dancing with the Stars.” During a lull in the workout, a little girl’s voice rang out: “Abby Wambach, you rock!” “It’s strange,” Rapinoe said of all the attention the team gets. “Hope’s on ‘Dancing with the Stars’. We get recognized wherever we go. It’s strange, weird, flattering, amazing.” On Saturday night in Kansas City, Wambach converted an early penalty kick to

give the United States the lead until Melissa Tancredi equalized it late in the first half. The result ended Canada’s seven-match losing streak to the U.S. women. Rapinoe is joined on the team by fellow Pilot Stephanie Cox. A former West Coast Conference Player of the Year, Rapinoe had 30 goals and 28 assists during her time with the Pilots, despite several injuries and commitments to the national team. Cox, a defender who played on the U.S. Olympic Team in Beijing, was a three-time All-American. She was happy to be back in soccer-crazy Portland. Members of the Timbers Army supporters group even serenaded her at Wednesday’s open practice. Portland proclaimed itself Soccer City, USA, back in the mid-1970s, when it embraced the Timbers’ early success in the North American Soccer League. The city’s support of the game has grown throughout the years with the Pilots’ success, and currently with the Timbers’ leap to Major League Soccer this season. The Portland Pilots women’s team won NCAA titles in 2002 and 2005. Former Pilot Sophie Schmidt is a member of the Canadian team, which did not fare well in the World Cup and is now breaking in new coach Jon Herdmann. The sixthranked Canadians lost to Germany, France and Nigeria in the World Cup and exited after the first round. Schmidt said the tournament was painful, but the Canadian women are determined not to let it define them going into Olympic qualification. The top two teams from the CONCACAF qualifying tournament, scheduled for Jan. 19-29 in Vancouver, British Columbia, advance to the London Games. The U.S. will compete along with Canada, Mexico, three teams from the Caribbean and two teams from Central America. “We don’t think we’re the team that showed up at the World Cup,” Schmidt said. “We’re working at getting that Canadian fighting spirit back.”

Timbers tie Earthquakes The Associated Press PORTLAND — Khari Stephenson’s goal from 18 yards in the 70th minute allowed the San Jose Earthquakes to salvage a 1-1 tie with the Portland Timbers on Wednesday night. The Timbers, who extended their unbeaten streak to five games, took a 1-0 lead in the ninth minute on a goal by Kenny Cooper. The tie boosts the Timbers’ chances of reaching the MLS playoffs. Portland (10-127, 37 points) moved into sole possession of the 10th and final playoff berth. With five games remaining in its inau-

MLS gural season, Portland is one point ahead of New York and two points ahead of DC United. Because they play four of their final five games on the road, the Timbers were hoping for a win. This season, Portland has won nine games at home, but is 1-8-4 on the road. “It feels like a loss,” Portland defender Mike Chabala said. “We didn’t have many games left at home. We should have walked away with three points.”

Continued from D1 Rodgers was ranked sixth in the nation with an average of 176.75 all-purpose yards last season when he was hurt. He holds Oregon State’s record for all-purpose yards with 5,784. “It would be a very good positive feeling for our team emotionally to have James back,” Oregon State coach Mike Riley told reporters this week about Rodgers’ possible return. “He is a captain. He has provided a ton of leadership and a lot of play-making to this team.” Rodgers brings some much-needed veteran leadership to a team that has had a turbulent start. The Beavers are 0-2, including a loss at home in their opener against Big Sky Conference opponent Sacramento State. Oregon State had a bye week after a 35-0 loss at then-No. 8 Wisconsin. During the break, Riley announced that starting quarterback

“We’ve got to get better in the kicking game. Everyone knows that. We’re hoping he’s the one to do it.” Some of what has gone wrong for Zendejas has been mechanical, but there’s a mental side of it, too. “I guess it’s a combination of things sometimes,” Zendejas said. “You’ve got to just trust you’re doing the right thing and go from there.” Arizona’s offensive struggles go beyond the kicking game. The Wildcats average 55.7 yards rushing per game, last in the Pac-12 and 116th nationally. Stoops said he saw positive signs in the running game against Stanford. Keola Antolin and Ka’Deem Carey helped the running backs amass 91 yards, but the Cardinal registered five sacks. Arizona finished with 51 yards rushing. “Those are very talented runners,” Stoops said. “We just have to keep giving them more opportunities and block better at the point of attack.” The Wildcats also need more big plays. Receiver Juron Criner might have made more plays if he were healthier — he missed the Oklahoma State game after undergoing an appendectomy — and Arizona could use someone else to break free when he’s doubled, especially against a talented team like Oregon. “We’re going to have to score more than 10 or 14 points,” Stoops said. “We need our offense to get the ball in the end zone and make kicks when you play a team like this.”

Ryan Katz would be replaced by redshirt freshman Sean Mannion. The Beavers hope the change, along with the return of Rodgers and senior H-back Joe Halahuni, gives the team a boost for its conJames ference opener against the Rodgers Bruins (1-2). Oregon State has not started a season 0-3 since 1996. Halahuni, who had six touchdown catches last season, had surgery this spring on his left shoulder. “I’m excited to have him back,” Riley said Tuesday during Oregon State’s weekly football press conference. “He provides us with a proven threat at tight end as a receiver. Physically, I think he feels a lot better than he has in a long time. He played a lot of last year with that shoulder.”

Next up • UCLA at Oregon State • W h en: Saturday, 12:30 p.m. • TV: Fox College Sports Pacific • Radio: KICEAM 940, KRCO-AM 690

Big 12, Big East start picking up pieces By Jeff Latzke and Jim Vertuno The Associated Press

Turned away by the Pac-12, the Big 12’s most powerful members are trying to find ways to live together again after weeks of hurtling toward a break up. Texas President William Powers declared Wednesday that the Longhorns — who receive more media money than other members of the Big 12 — are open to a new revenue-sharing model and have already suggested that top-level television and cable money be shared equally. What’s not on the table is the money from Texas’ 20-year, $300 million deal with ESPN to create the Longhorn Network, which has been blamed in large part for Texas A&M’s pending departure from the Big 12. “That’s never been in play, that’s not in play,” Texas athletic director DeLoss Dodds said. So with that line drawn in the sand, the Big 12 leadership has scheduled a key meeting today, Oklahoma President David Boren said. “The most important goal for the University of Oklahoma is conference stability,” he said. “We intend to support actions that will strengthen and stabilize the conference at the very important meeting of the conference board.” The Pac-12 late Tuesday squashed any hope of Oklahoma, Oklahoma State, Texas and Texas Tech heading west in what surely would have been a death blow to the Big 12. But the conference realignment wheels are still turning, especially with the Aggies planning to join the Southeastern Conference as soon as legal threats are out of the way. “Certainly the position of Oklahoma State and I think most of the schools, if not all, is that we want to add a 10th team,” said Oklahoma State president Burns Hargis, a member of the league’s expansion committee. He listed TCU, Houston, SMU, BYU, Utah and Air Force among the potential expansion targets before saying “we’ve talked about a lot of ideas.” The Big East, left with only six football members after Pitt and Syracuse announced plans to join the ACC, must also find a new way forward while the Mountain West and Conference USA are in discussions about a partnership. The talk of saving the Big 12 centers on sharing television revenue equally — a core principle of the Big Ten and

Pac-12. The Big 12 splits the revenue from its $1.2 billion Fox Sports contract evenly, but only half of the money from its top-tier deal with ABC goes into equal shares. The rest is weighted toward the programs that play on the network more frequently, such as Texas and Oklahoma. Dodds said Big 12 athletic directors more than a month ago approved Texas’ suggestion to equally share network revenue around the league. He said the plan has not been voted on by league presidents. Texas Tech president Guy Bailey said he doesn’t anticipate much opposition to that idea. “I would be surprised if there weren’t a change in that, in some way,” he said. “Now, how exactly it plays out, I don’t know.” Big 12 Commissioner Dan Beebe has not commented on the turmoil surrounding the league and there is speculation about his future. The Kansas City Star, citing two sources with knowledge of the decision, reported Wednesday night that Beebe was working on an agreement to leave his position and that an announcement of Beebe’s departure was expected today. Beebe’s contract was extended in November through June 2015, a decision made after Nebraska and Colorado announced they were leaving the Big 12 and before the 13-year deal was reached with Fox Sports in April. Dodds declined comment, and Bailey and Hargis called Beebe’s status a private “personnel” matter. Besides today’s meeting of the Big 12 conference board, a summit also is possible between Texas and Oklahoma officials. Big 12 athletic directors also have a previously scheduled meeting in Dallas next week. ESPN distanced itself from the conference affiliation uproar, saying the “driving force on realignment lies with the conferences and universities.” Still, the Longhorn Network created uncertainty in the Big 12 and Texas A&M said it was a big reason why the Aggies will leave the Big 12 by July — a decision that stands, the school said Wednesday. Nebraska athletic director Tom Osborne earlier this month said the Big 12’s revenue-sharing plan lends itself to instability. The Huskers are in their first season as a member of the Big Ten, where each school received $22.6 million this year — about twice as much as Nebraska could have ex-

pected if it had stayed in the Big 12. Texas’ Powers said revenue sharing will be subject to discussion in coming days. “A lot of these issues that you hear (about) whether it’s revenue sharing or whatever, we’ve been working on long before,” he said. “We will continue to work on those. I’m not going to prejudge on how those will come out. There are not any preconditions for the conference coming back together. “We want a stable, workable conference going forward,” Powers said. Once the Aggies leave, the Big 12 will have nine members unless a replacement — or replacements — are found. Only SMU has gone public with its interest in joining the Big 12. “It’s about quality, not quantity,” Dodds said. “In my mind, 10 is the perfect conference. You have a clear path to the national championship game without stumbling in a (conference) championship game.” There was still activity around the Big 12 on Wednesday. Oklahoma State’s regents gave Hargis the power to depart the Big 12 if necessary, while regents in Kansas reiterated their support for staying in the Big 12. Regents in Missouri are scheduled to meet today. Hargis said the decision to give him authority over a league change was important even after the Pac-12 was taken off the table as a potential destination because “there are a lot of moving parts here and we may have to make decisions fast.” He said his first priority is stabilizing the Big 12. Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback said he was optimistic that the Big 12 would remain intact, stabilize and add members. Elsewhere, former Big Eight Commissioner Chuck Neinas, a high-profile consultant for sports leagues and coaches, said he has been working on a partnership with the Mountain West and Conference USA in which they would merge as football playing programs into east and west divisions, spanning four time zones. East Carolina of Conference USA announced Wednesday that it has applied for membership in the Big East, where members are trying to rebuild after Syracuse and Pittsburgh accepted invitations to the Atlantic Coast Conference. Navy and Air Force are the top choices as footballonly members, according to a person who spoke on condition of anonymity because the conference does not want to publicly disclose its plans.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, September 22, 2011 D5

PREP CROSS COUNTRY

Lava Bear, Outlaw top Sisters Invite Bulletin staff report SISTERS — Bend’s Melissa Hebler and Sisters’ Mason Calmettes won the girls and boys varsity races at the Sisters Invitational, held Wednesday at Cold Springs Campground in Sisters. Both races were contested on a 5,200-meter course that included three logs for runners to jump over and a stream to cross. “It’s a true cross country course,” said Sisters coach Charlie Kanzig. In addition to the Class 5A Lava Bears and the Class 4A Outlaws, Class 4A Elmira, Class 3A/2A/ 1A McKenzie and Class 3A/2A/1A Regis also competed. Team scores were not kept during the event, and schools were encouraged to race as many participants as possible. Both races saw the top two spots taken by teammates: Hebler and Jenna Mattox of Bend in the

State Continued from D1 Bend returns several strong players, including Doug Steinhauff and Michael Bird. A newcomer, goalie Gage Kaufman, will also be a key contributor for the boys. On the girls side, Cheyenne Harrison and Madeline Torres are expected to lead the young Lava Bear squad. The Summit boys placed second in the league last season, losing to Bend in the state playoffs. This year, the Storm are optimistic about their abilities. “We have a deep roster of over 20 boys,” says Summit coach Jay Soles. Summit’s girls squad also shows promise after placing fourth in the league last season. “We are still building (our team), but every game we are getting better,” says Summit girls coach Erin Dugan. The Madras boys are looking to improve upon their thirdplace league finish last season. The squad has doubled in number this year, with Kyle Palmer and Aaron St. John as top returners. In its second season, the Madras girls team is hoping for another state berth. The White Buffaloes are led by Brianna Hunt, one of the league’s best players, according to Madras coach Bobby DeRoest. The Mountain View boys return only one player, but with a new batch of players in the mix, coach Ryan Duffy says the Cougars are looking to stay competitive within the league this season. The Redmond boys are also determined to improve after their seventh-place 2010 state finish. Panthers coach Tom Nichols says South Eugene will be their toughest competition. Redmond’s girls hope to better their seventh-place 6A state finish from last season. The Panthers are led by “super-fast” players Jenny White and Teagen Perkins, said Nichols. The 6A state playoffs are set for Nov. 4-5 at the Osborn Aquat-

Bass Continued from D1 The mid-Columbia offers a broad variety of species for which to fish, including salmon, steelhead, walleye and sturgeon. Over the campfire, campers told tales of reeling in salmon and walleye during a long day on the water. I hoped to develop my own bass tales the next day. Dan Harry, of Gresham, is a 72-year-old former bass tournament professional. He grew up fishing for salmon, he said, but lost interest. The past 20 years have been all about bass for Harry, a retired builder who spends three days a week casting for smallmouth bass on the Columbia. “I quit all the other stuff 20 years ago,” Harry told me. “Too many regulations, and not enough fish.” On the short drive from Peach Beach to Celilo Park Recreation Area on the Oregon side, where we would launch, we noticed those 30 or so boats on the river. “Salmon fishing, they can wait all day for a bite,” Harry said. “Bass fishing, you’re continuously searching and looking. I’m bored to death with salmon fishing. They’ll be out there all day sitting in the boat trolling or anchored. It’s like watching paint dry.” Also, the salmon boats don’t go as fast. After launching his bass boat with me aboard, Harry quickly hammered it up to 65 mph. Caught off guard, I almost lost my hat. The warm, sunny day was

girls’ race, and Calmettes and Brandon Pollard of Sisters in the boys’ race. The Lava Bears claimed six of the top seven places in the girls race and seven of the top 10 places in the boys race. Wednesday’s results ——— Sisters Invitational BOYS Individual winner — Mason Calmettes, Sisters, 18:45 Top 10 — 1, Mason Calmettes, Sisters, 18:45; 2, Brandon Pollard, Sisters, 18:49; 3, Daniel Ewing, Bend, 18:52; 4, Jared Schneider, Sisters, 19:12; 5, Derek Hebler, Bend, 19:19; 6, Peter Schwarz, Bend, 19:40; 7, Louis McCoy, Bend, 19:40; 8, Cody Maguire, Bend, 19:48; 9, Jack Peterson, Bend, 20:02; 10, Jesse Neilsen, Bend, 20:11 GIRLS Individual winner — Melissa Hebler, Bend, 21:02 Top 10 — 1, Melissa Hebler, Bend, 21:02; 2, Jenna Mattox, Bend, 21:32; 3, Zoe Falk, Sisters, 22:08; 4, Ally McConnell, Bend, 22:22; 5, Hannah Anderson, Bend, 22:59; 6, Makeila Lundy, Bend, 23:00; 7, Jessica Wolfe, Bend, 23:02; 8, Frances Payne, Sisters, 23:19; 9, Sarah Sherman, McKenzie, 23:21; 10, Madison Boettner, Sisters, 23:25

Water polo at a glance REDMOND Head coach (boys and girls): Tom Nichols (fourth season) 2010 finish: Seventh in the 6A state tournament (boys and girls) Key returners: Boys: Tom Gilbert, Cody Johnson. Girls: Jenny White, Teagen Perkins

BEND Head boys coach: Chris Sterry (second season) Head girls coach: Ryan Dixon (first season) 2010 finish: Central Oregon League champions (boys and girls), both teams competed in the 5A/4A state playoffs Key returners: Boys: Doug Steinhauff, Michael Bird. Girls: Cheyenne Harrison, Madeline Torres

MOUNTAIN VIEW Head boys coach: Ryan Duffy (fifth season) 2010 finish: did not field a complete team Key returners: Nick Adarno, Nate Cox, Noah Cox, Joe Murphy, John Murphy

SUMMIT Head boys coach: Jay Soles (sixth season) Head girls coach: Erin Dugan (first season) 2010 finish: Boys 4-2 overall in league play (second in league) and competed in the 5A/4A state playoffs; girls fourth in league Key returners: Girls: Kayanna Heffner, Katie Simpson, Kayla Van Cleve.

MADRAS Head coach (boys and girls): Bobby DeRoest (fourth season) 2010 finish: Boys third in Central Valley League, girls second in league and competed in 5A/4A state playoffs Key returners: Boys: Kyle Palmer, Aaron St. John. Girls: Tasheena George, Brianna Hunt

2011 6A STATE QUALIFYING LEAGUES Southern Valley 6A League: Medford Redmond Sheldon Sprague South Eugene South Salem West Salem Central Oregon 5A/4A League: Bend Madras Mountain View Summit ic Center in Corvallis. The 5A/4A state playoffs will be held Nov. 5 at a location to be announced.

Elise Gross can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at egross@ bendbulletin.com.

almost windless, quite a rarity in the gorge, and the blue water was calm and glasslike. Harry was looking for sections with strong river current, which, as he explained to me, brings food to the bass. We used split shot for weight and stuck Brush Hogs on our hooks. Brush Hogs are big, bulky, artificial baits made of soft plastic that feature tails, wings and arms to provide motion and water movement. We began fishing near Browns Island in about 15 feet of water. The bite started slow, and Harry moved us quickly to a few places before the fishing heated up. We found fish in weed beds just off the Washington bank, and just upriver of the gill nets put in place by Native Americans looking to catch salmon. The bass bites were so delicate, it was hard to tell if what I was feeling as I held my fishing rod were weeds, the bottom of the river or a fish. “They’re biting really soft,” Harry said. “There’s really no feel to it, just a little bit of weight. Sometimes in bass fishing the bite is so subtle, it’s almost instinctual (to know when to set the hook).” Harry seemed to have no

problem. By noon we had caught and released about eight bass. (Anglers are allowed to keep five per day, but no more than three longer than 15 inches.) Soon thereafter, Harry found a rocky shoreline on the Oregon side of the river, just a few feet from where freeway traffic whizzed by on Interstate 84. Almost as if a switch was turned on, the bass started biting nonstop. By day’s end we had caught and released more than 20 fish between us, Harry catching the majority. He also landed a hefty bass that he weighed (3 pounds, 12 ounces) before tossing it back in the river, and two more fish of more than three pounds. After a late spring and what is looking to be a summery start to autumn, bass fishing in the Columbia should remain productive for weeks to come. “This river is two months behind, and right now this is the summer doldrums for them,” Harry said of the bass. “There should be gobs of fish in the boat.” Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com.

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D6 Thursday, September 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

H U N T I N G & F ISH I N G

Carp hunting with harpoons adds a challenge for anglers GARY LE WIS

E C 

Fire Hall, 405 N. Belknap St.; contact: 541-447-5029. THE REDMOND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Redmond VFW Hall.

Please e-mail sports event information to sports@ bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin. com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

SHOOTING

FISHING

M

atthew McFarland opened the action of his Cogswell & Harrison gun and thumbed in a handloaded .50-70 blank. He closed the gun and inserted an aluminum shaft tipped with a trident. In the shallows of a Central Oregon farm pond, carp cruised and sipped at the surface, their dorsals and tails breaking the tension of the muddy water. Bill Herrick had arrived three hours before us and had already battled six carp on his fly rod. When Matthew, his boys Chisel and Finney, and I arrived, we began our hunt. Matthew’s harpoon gun was sold by Abercrombie & Fitch in the late 1890s, a singleshot blackpowder shotgun, sleeved with a 50-caliber barrel. It came in a felt-lined case, complete with blanks, wooden shafts and spear points. On the inside of the case, a typed page dated January 1898 sets out the directions for using the harpoon: “The gun can be accurately used to harpoon fish from 30 to 50 feet. The line to be used should be coiled on the deck in a keg — one end to be attached to dart, the other to keg on buoy, which should be thrown overboard when the fish has run out entire length. Great care should be taken to stand clear of line when firing gun. Gunner should stand to rear of coil on keg and to windward. “Attach harpoon head to stick — place stick in the muzzle, pushing in entire length so that butt rests on cartridge. Tie free end of line to free wire loop with gun at half cock. Place blank cartridge in gun, cock and fire.” You know there are a lot of carp when the water is so muddy you can’t see past the surface. In the shallows, fish bulged with great wakes that telegraphed their bulk. Close to the surface, carp can pick up the sound of voices and are likely to be put down by heavy footsteps. Our heaviest foot-steppers were 9-year-old Chisel and 6-year-old Finney, who with various bows and arrows and atlatls ran back and forth among the cattails and reeds to shoot. McFarland carried a bucket in one hand with a length of braided line attached to his dart. Using the cattails for cover, he would focus on a carp, wait for it to turn broadside, then hold the bead beneath the line of its back. At the trigger squeeze, the aluminum

Submitted photo

Gary Lewis caught this carp on fly tackle while taking a break from the harpoon hunt. shaft leapt out of the barrel. The cord would shoot from the bucket and pile out into the water. We’d hold our breath while he wound the line back in. Sometimes he brought back scales, but most shots struck the fish glancing blows to their armor. These carp averaged between four and 10 pounds. I began to believe that the gun and the spear were more properly suited to large saltwater fish. Though McFarland struck several, the prongs failed to hold. After several hours of stalking and shooting, McFarland grabbed an air rifle he had converted to shoot arrows. A red dot sight made it easy to track the carp as they cruised toward shore. The carp’s introduction to the Northwest was, according to Lampman’s 1946 publication “Coming of the Pond Fishes,” caused by the flooding of a Troutdale pond where a sea captain kept his prized German carp. In 1881, high water took them out to the Columbia. In less than 15 years, they were being sold for fertilizer by commercial fishermen. Today, carp fisheries can be found in the mid-Columbia, the Snake, the John Day and in various ponds in the Columbia basin. Like goldfish, the carp has large bronze scales forming an armor of diagonal lines in

a diamond pattern. Its mouth is supple and fleshy, with twin barbels on each side of the jaw. Carp average five to 10 pounds, but have been known to reach 20 pounds and beyond. It is a cautious feeder and not easily caught. When there was a lull in the action, I eased onto a dock over deeper water. At the end of the dock, plumes of fresh mud puddled at the surface. Unless I missed my guess, there were fish working close. Twenty feet out, the egg fly sunk and pulled the line down. On the third cast, the line straightened, I lifted and the rod plunged. When the fish came to the surface, its scales flashed gold, a huge goldfish on a fly rod — six pounds on a six-weight rod. Much maligned by salmon and trout fishermen in the United States, the lowly carp is a lofty prize in Europe and Asia. Here it is classified invasive, a rough fish considered harmful to native species. When hooked, carp are strong fighters and worthy of the respect of any angler. Gary Lewis is the host of “Adventure Journal” and author of “John Nosler — Going Ballistic,” “Black Bear Hunting,” “Hunting Oregon” and other titles. Contact Lewis at www.GaryLewisOutdoors.com.

Angling good on Metolius CENTRAL ZONE BIG LAVA LAKE: Bait anglers are reporting consistent catches and large fish, and fly angling has been good midday. Some anglers report success fishing in the top three feet of water. CLEAR LAKE: Limited reports have indicated good fishing. Lake levels may be getting low due to irrigation withdrawals. CRANE PRAIRIE RESERVOIR: Fishing is good, with some big fish available for the patient angler. There are still many fish scattered in five to nine feet of water, although fish are slightly more concentrated in the channels. CULTUS LAKE: Anglers have reported improved fishing. DAVIS LAKE: Water is higher than normal, and fish are moving to different habitats. DESCHUTES RIVER (mouth to the Pelton Regulating Dam): Steelhead fishing has been good from Sherars down to the mouth. Anglers have also seen good numbers of steelhead and salmon passing over Sherars Falls, so fishing should be picking up in the Maupin area. EAST LAKE: Kokanee fishing has been good in the early-morning hours. Some anglers report success in the top three feet of water. FALL RIVER: No recent reports, but fish-

HUNTING THE BEND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the King Buffet at the north end of the Wagner Mall, across from Robberson Ford in Bend; contact: Bendchapter_oha@yahoo.com. THE OCHOCO CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Prineville

FLY-TYING CORNER

FISHING REPORT

Here is the weekly fishing report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by fisheries biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife:

FLY-FISHING TRAVEL SEMINAR: On Chile, New Zealand and Alaska; Tuesday, 6 to 8 p.m., at REI in Bend; Gary Lewis will present a PowerPoint slideshow with stories of fish, fly-fishing, bears and backcountry from around the world; 541-385-0594. DESCHUTES CHAPTER OF TROUT UNLIMITED: Meets on the first Monday of each month at the Environmental Center in Bend; meeting starts at 6:45 p.m. for members to meet and greet and discuss what the chapter is up to; 541-306-4509; communications@deschutestu. org; www.deschutestu.org. BEND CASTING CLUB: The Bend Casting Club is a group of local fly anglers from around Central Oregon who are trying to improve their casting techniques; club meets on the fourth Wednesday of each month, from 6 to 8 p.m., at the Orvis Casting Course in Bend’s Old Mill District; 541-306-4509 or bendcastingclub@gmail.com. THE SUNRIVER ANGLERS CLUB: Meets on the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Sunriver Fire Station; contact: www.sunriveranglers.org. THE CENTRAL OREGON FLYFISHERS CLUB: Meets on the third Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; contact: www.coflyfishers.org.

FREE SHOOTERS’ CLINIC: Saturday, Oct. 1, from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.; learn about and practice firing the six-shooters, lever action rifles and shotguns of cowboy action shooting; guns and ammo provided; at the Central Oregon Sports Shooting Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 24; 541385-6021 or www.hrp-sass.com. BEND TRAP CLUB: Trap shooting, five-stand and skeet shooting are all open Thursdays and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; located east of Bend off U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 30; contact Bill Grafton at 541-383-1428 or visit www.bendtrapclub.com. CENTRAL OREGON SPORTING CLAYS AND HUNTING PRESERVE: Thirteen-station, 100-target course and five-stand open Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to dusk, and Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday from 11 a.m. to dusk (closed Wednesday); located at 9020 South Highway 97, Redmond; www.birdandclay. com or 541-383-0001. REDMOND ROD & GUN CLUB: Rifle and pistol are Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; skeet is Tuesdays and Sundays beginning at 10 a.m.; trap is Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. to closing, and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; 2011 family memberships now available for $50; nonmembers are welcome; www.rrandgc.com. PINE MOUNTAIN POSSE: Cowboy action shooting club that shoots at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 24; second Sunday of each month; 541-318-8199 or www.pinemountainposse.com. HORSE RIDGE PISTOLEROS: Cowboy action shooting with pistols, rifles and shotguns at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 24; first and third Sunday of each month at 10 a.m.; 541-4087027 or www.hrp-sass.com.

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ing should be good with mayfly and caddis imitations. HOOD RIVER: Anglers on the Hood River are reporting poor visibility caused by glacial run off. Anyone looking for somewhere to fish without other anglers around should head to the Hood. Fishing should pick up as the river starts to clear this fall.

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HOSMER LAKE: Fishing has been good at this fly-fishing-only lake. Anglers report good fishing with callibaetis, damsel nymph and traveling sedge patterns. LAURANCE LAKE RESERVOIR: Laurance Lake has been closed to the public because of a fire on Mount Hood. METOLIUS RIVER: Fishing continues to be good. Anglers should look for PMDs in the early afternoons, and mayfly spinners and caddis in the evenings. There also are golden stoneflies in the upper sections above Allingham Bridge. NORTH TWIN: Anglers have recently reported very good trout fishing. ODELL LAKE: Anglers are targeting kokanee at 30-40 feet, and catches are averaging 13-14 inches. PAULINA LAKE: Kokanee fishing has been good, with most anglers catching their limits. SOUTH TWIN LAKE: Fishing for legal-size stocked fish continues to be good. SUTTLE LAKE: Kokanee fishing has been slow. There are no recent reports for brown trout. WICKIUP RESERVOIR: Anglers have been reporting success jigging and trolling for kokanee, especially toward evening. Anglers have been catching kokanee in excess of three pounds, with some nearing four pounds.

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Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Kure’s Squirrel Micro Zonker Black, courtesy Rainy’s Flies.

By Gary Lewis For The Bulletin

Big fish eat little fish and lots of things that look like little fish, which is where Kure’s Squirrel Micro Zonker comes in. This tiny streamer has flash, movement and big eyes, a trigger that sparks strikes from toothy predators. Trout don’t like competition from baitfish. Fish the Squirrel Micro Zonker solo on a sink tip or employ it as the trailer behind a larger streamer. Prospecting the depths of a slow-moving creek, tie it as the top bug on a nymph rig and see if you don’t get more takes on

the dropper. Tie this pattern with black thread on a No. 8 Mustad 1930. At the rear of the hook, use a spray of pearl Krystal Flash. Tie in a black dyed pine squirrel strip. Build the body with black synthetic dubbing mixed with blue and purple Lite Bright or Ice Wing fiber. Tie down the squirrel strip. For flash, use two strips on each side of pearl embossed Flashabou. Wrap a pine squirrel collar. Build the head with white thread and 3mm flat stick-on eyes. Finish with epoxy on the head.

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U.S. invasion NBC’s “Prime Suspect” puts American spin on British drama, Page E2

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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011

As weather cools down, trail traffic heats up By Lydia Hoffman The Bulletin

The chill of fall is just beginning to set in as peak season on the trails continues. “This time of year is great for trail conditions, other than a little dust,” said Chris Sabo, U.S. Forest Service trails specialist. Weekend weather is forecast with highs in the quite comfortable mid-80s. The shoulder season offers great conditions for outdoor sports such as mountain biking, especially with the summer crowds dispersing. Some areas still seeing moderate to high use include South Sister and Green Lake. There are a few high-traffic events coming up this weekend on the trails. The Sisters Mountain Bike Festival this weekend includes a ride on the Mrazek and MetoliusWindigo trails to Sisters. See Trails / E3

TRAIL UPDATE

SPOTLIGHT Event connects people with services Central Oregonians in need are invited to a one-day event in Redmond to seek help ranging from access to medical care to a hot meal. Project Connect, will take place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday in the Hooker Creek Event Center at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center. Organizations will be on hand to help with homelessness, veteran’s services, legal aid and financial resources. Project Connect is also seeking volunteers. See website for details. Project Connect is free. It’s put on by the Partnership to End Poverty, a nonprofit organization working on assisting those in need throughout Central Oregon. Free transportation to the event is available from La Pine, Sunriver, Deschutes River Woods, Bend, Redmond, Sisters, Prineville, Terrebonne, Madras and Warm Springs. Transportation details are available from the contacts below. Contact: www.projectconnectco.org or 541-504-1389.

BendFilm fest tickets now on sale

Photos by Markain Hawryluk / The Bulletin

Bulletin reporter Markian Hawryluk stands on top of Phantom Bridge, a natural rock arch just outside of Detroit and the Opal Creek Wilderness. Although the rock is solid, walking out to the center takes at least a modicum of courage.

Phantom crossing Rock arch in Opal Creek Wilderness a euphoric experience By Markian Hawryluk The Bulletin

few months ago, while looking for information about a trail in the Detroit area, I came across a hike to Phantom Bridge, a natural rock arch hidden on a ridge overlooking the Opal Creek Wilderness. A rock bridge, here in Oregon? Neat. Cool. Boffo. With summer showing its first sign of weakness, I headed out in search of said arch last Friday. It was a cool morning, and the hills and valleys en route took on a mystical look as I crested Santiam Pass and descended toward Detroit and the Breitenbush River. The trailhead for the hike is off

A

a couple of logging roads, just on the west of the river’s bridge on state Highway 22. The first, Forest Road 2223, is paved. The second, Forest Road 2207, is not. It’s rough with precipitous drop-offs to the right. I was following directions from hiking guru and author William Sullivan, as listed in the his “100 Hikes in Central Oregon” guidebook. I was to follow 2207 for about 3.7 miles, keeping an eye out for a hiker sign on the left side of the road. Now, I imagine that Sullivan has driven quite a few treacherous roads in his day, but I had trouble keeping my eye on anything but the road in front of me. See Outing / E6

If you go Getting there: From Sisters, drive west on U.S. Highway 20, and continue west on state Highway 22 past Detroit. On the west side of the Breitenbush River bridge, turn right onto Forest Road 2223 (French Creek Road). After 4.2 miles, turn onto unpaved Forest Road 2207 for 3.6 miles. Turn into parking area on the right. The trail starts on the opposite side of the road. Difficulty: Strenuous Cost: Free Contact: Willamette National Forest, Detroit Ranger District, 503-854-3366

Tickets and festival passes for BendFilm are now available. Learn about the films being screened at this year’s independent film festival by going to the website below and clicking either on “2011 BendFilm Schedule” at right or on “Purchase Tickets Here” below. That links to the BendFilm section of the Festival Genius website, where there are film synopses, time and date information and links for buying tickets. A BendFilm guide with details on all the films will be published in The Bulletin on Monday. BendFilm is Oct. 6-9, with screenings in theaters throughout Bend and Sisters. Individual tickets cost $11 in advance or $12 at the door of the screening. A Full Film Pass costs $110 and provides access to all films, as well as a jump to the front of the line for seats. The Full Festival Pass costs $175 and provides not only the benefits of the Full Film Pass, but also a pass to all the parties, the opening night ceremony and the awards ceremony. Tickets are available online and, starting Oct. 6, also at the BendFilm Hub, 849 N.W. Wall St. in downtown Bend. The Hub will be open during the festival noon to 8 p.m. Oct. 6; 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Oct. 7; 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Oct. 8; and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Oct. 9. Contact: www.bendfilm .org or 541-388-3378.

Volunteer, celebrate public lands Volunteers are invited to celebrate National Public Lands Day by working on conservation projects within the Tale of Two Rivers site on the Metolius River and Black Butte in the Sisters area. The work party is from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Projects are meant to be fun and children are encouraged to participate. Participants should bring their own lunch and meet at 8:30 a.m. at Sisters Art Works, 204 W. Adams St. For information and to register: www.national forests.org/volunteer, khedrick@nationalforests. org, 541-549-0251. Registrants will be contacted with more details. — From staff reports


T EL EV ISION

E2 Thursday, September 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Readers differ on cemeteries as places to pray and to play Dear Abby: I am writing in response to the letter you printed from “Respectful in Ohio” (July 25). I am so glad you addressed the subject of proper etiquette in cemeteries. The cemetery where my family members are buried has become a playground for the neighbors in the area. When I visit, I see people walking their dogs on and off leashes even though they are aware of the “No Dogs Allowed” signs. Children are bicycling, rollerblading and skateboarding, along with joggers and walkers. I come to the cemetery to visit with my lost loved ones and tend to their graves. I find it disgusting and disturbing that these folks are using our sacred place for their personal pleasures. Abby, thank you so much for your wisdom on this matter. — Jean C. in Massachusetts Dear Jean: Thank you for agreeing with me. However, some readers felt differently, believing that cemeteries are for the living as well as the dead. My newspaper readers comment: Dear Abby: You should know that there is a trend where groups of dog walkers are taking over the care of deteriorating cemeteries. In return for cleaning up, restoring and maintaining graveyards, dog walkers are given permission to walk and run their dogs there. Some readers may find this practice disrespectful, but it has resulted in many cemeteries being restored to the beauty and dignity its occupants deserve. — Carla in Virginia Dear Abby: When I read the letter from “Respectful,” it took me back a few years. As I was mowing in the town cemetery, I went around a gravestone into some tall grass and my mower stalled. When I turned it over to see what I had hit, I found a pair of pantyhose wrapped around the blade of the mower. Apparently, cemeteries are sometimes used as a lover’s lane. I agree

DEAR ABBY with you about practicing good behavior in places like these. But I’ll always laugh recalling what happened to me. I wonder if the lady who forgot her hose that night caught a cold. — Groundskeeper Dear Abby: I have to disagree with you and “Respectful.” One needs to have a historical perspective about cemeteries and their place in our culture. Prior to the advent of public parks in the late 19th century, the only open, park-like setting in most communities was the local cemetery. People would stroll the lawns, picnic and socialize there. Today, some cemeteries even conduct historical and nature tours. While I don’t condone rowdy behavior, it’s wrong to think they are simply for the dead and mourning. Many families of our fallen soldiers go to Arlington Cemetery to picnic and visit their loved ones. Cemeteries fall into disrepair when they are not active and filled with living hikers, bikers, bird watchers, etc. Let’s encourage people to visit their local cemetery. The alternative is to allow them to go to seed and disappear from our landscape. — Patrick H., Ohio Dear Abby: Several years ago in a nearby church cemetery, a young couple and their 4-yearold were putting flowers on a relative’s grave. The child got a bit antsy and climbed on a headstone. The stone was loose and tipped over onto the child and killed him. No one should let children play in a cemetery. — Jan in Sartell, Minn. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

New NBC series ‘Prime’ for U.S. audience By Rich Heldenfels

‘Prime Suspect’

Akron Beacon Journal

Off and on over about 15 years beginning in the early ’90s, Helen Mirren dazzled British and American audiences by playing Jane Tennison, a detective rising through the ranks of Britain’s police in spite of the drawbacks attached to her being a woman in a male-dominated world. It was an often melancholy show, made more so by Mirren’s performance, but in its characters and cases the program remained powerfully watchable — one of the great police series. Now NBC thinks American audiences will be drawn to a similar dramatic structure — or maybe recognize the brand name — in a new “Prime Suspect,” which the network premieres tonight. This time around, the detective is called Jane Timoney, of the New York police. Playing her is Maria Bello, a splendid actress whose career has involved a lot of art films (I especially like her in “The Cooler,” with William H. Macy) and forays into TV, including a stint on an old NBC Thursday-night show, “ER.” The team behind the series — which includes “Friday Night Lights’” Peter Berg — pays homage to the British series both in the way Timoney has to battle a close-knit, male squad whose sexism is unabashed, and in plot flourishes. (A big dramatic moment in the premiere is right out of the Mirren “Prime Sus-

When: 10 tonight Where: NBC

Maria Bello, second from right, star of “Prime Suspect,” shares a laugh with executive producer and director Peter Berg, far left, and executive producer and writer Alexandra Cunningham during the summer press tour. The NBC series premieres tonight. Chris Pizzello The Associated Press

pect”). And Timoney, like Tennison, can be awkward in her dealings with other people, whether they are suspects or co-workers. But Bello’s rendition has a brashness that Mirren’s did not, and a more obviously humorous side. Timoney is also, at least based on the pilot, a consistently weird dresser, at times demonstrating confidence in her eccentricities, but other times just underlining her greater social clumsiness. Yet again like Tennison, Timoney is very good at her job. Better, in fact, than the men she works with. Her ambition is driven by her awareness of how good she is, even as the ambition and the ability make some men resent her all the more. You can see her utter lack of finesse in the way she gets a big case in the premiere, but you may also understand why she is so bold and blunt. In short, I like Timoney, and Bello’s performance. I am less

sure of the show as a whole, mainly because the story and the male attitudes seem part of an earlier time. That’s even more noticeable in a TV universe laden with women detectives. But there’s enough here to make me watch more than once: not only Timoney and Bello but the people around them, played

by fine actors such as Aidan Quinn, Kenny Johnson, Peter Gerety and Brian O’Byrne.

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Å River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘14’ Swamp Wars Cannibal Gator ‘PG’ Man-Eating Super Snake ‘14’ Å Rattlesnake Republic ’ ‘PG’ Å Swamp Wars Cannibal Gator ‘PG’ 68 50 26 38 I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ Kathy Griffin: Pants Off ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker (N) ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ 137 44 World’s Strictest Parents ‘14’ Å World’s Strictest Parents ‘14’ Å World’s Strictest Parents ‘14’ Å Angels Among Us (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Angels Among Us (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Angels Among Us ’ ‘PG’ Å 190 32 42 53 World’s Strictest Parents ‘14’ Å Mob Money: Murders and American Greed Mad Money Mob Money: Murders and American Greed Steam Wealth-Trading 51 36 40 52 Trash Inc: The Secret Life of Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Å John King, USA Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Å John King, USA 52 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 Å (5:29) South Park Daily Show Colbert Report 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ Futurama ’ ‘PG’ Futurama ’ ‘PG’ Futurama ’ ‘14’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 Always Sunny Desert The Yoga Show The Yoga Show Cooking Oregon City Club The Buzz Epic Conditions Word Travels ’ Paid Program Visions of NW Ride Guide ‘14’ Outside Presents 11 Capitol Hill Hearings 58 20 12 11 Capitol Hill Hearings Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Good-Charlie Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie So Random! ‘G’ Phineas and Ferb A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Good-Charlie So Random! ‘G’ Fish Hooks ‘G’ 87 43 14 39 Phineas and Ferb A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Desert Car Kings Chevelle SS ‘PG’ Pig Bomb ’ ‘PG’ Å Hogs Gone Wild Monster Quest ‘14’ MythBusters Duct Tape Hour ‘PG’ MythBusters ’ ‘PG’ Å MythBusters Duct Tape Hour ‘PG’ 156 21 16 37 Desert Car Kings ’ ‘PG’ Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 College Football North Carolina State at Cincinnati (N) (Live) WNBA Basketball Phoenix Mercury at Minnesota Lynx (N) (Live) Å Women’s Soccer United States vs. Canada From Portland, Ore. 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The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Secret Life of American Teen Political Debate (N) (Live) ‘G’ The O’Reilly Factor Å Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Best Dishes Iron Chef America Flay vs. Cardoz Chopped ‘G’ Chopped Wok This Way Chopped Champions Sweet Genius Dark Genius (N) Iron Chef America Cora vs. Smith 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa (4:00) ›› “Snakes on a Plane” How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Always Sunny (10:31) Archer (N) Always Sunny (11:31) Archer 131 Curb/Block Property Virgins Property Virgins Hunters Int’l House Hunters House Hunters My First Place Selling New York Property Brothers House Hunters Hunters Int’l House Hunters: Million Dollar 176 49 33 43 Curb/Block Nostradamus Effect ‘PG’ Å Modern Marvels Extreme Aircraft ‘G’ Ancient Aliens ‘PG’ Å Ancient Aliens ‘PG’ Å Ancient Aliens (N) ‘PG’ Å UFO Files ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 (4:00) After Armageddon ‘PG’ Å Project Runway ‘PG’ Å Project Runway ‘PG’ Å Project Runway ‘PG’ Å Project Runway Image Is Everything (N) ‘PG’ Å (10:32) Dance Moms ‘PG’ Å Russian Dolls (N) 138 39 20 31 Project Runway Off the Track ‘PG’ The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Ed Show (N) The Last Word The Rachel Maddow Show The Ed Show Hardball With Chris Matthews Å 56 59 128 51 The Last Word That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show The Substitute Ridiculousness Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore Meatball Mashup ‘14’ Jersey Shore (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å 192 22 38 57 That ’70s Show SpongeBob iCarly iCook ‘G’ Victorious ’ ‘G’ Supah Ninjas ‘G’ SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ Friends ’ ‘14’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ That ’70s Show That ’70s Show 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Huskies Beavers Cougars Access MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Minnesota Twins From Target Field in Minneapolis. The Dan Patrick Show UFC Countdown 135 20 45 28* 26 Seahawks UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ iMPACT Wrestling (N) ’ ‘14’ Å (11:02) “Damage” (2009, Action) ’ 132 31 34 46 UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ “Odysseus: Voyage to the Underworld” (2008) Arnold Vosloo. ‘14’ Å ››› “Troy” (2004, Adventure) Brad Pitt, Eric Bana. Achilles leads Greek forces in the Trojan War. Å Paranormal Witness Å 133 35 133 45 Paranormal Witness Å Behind Scenes Joel Osteen ‘PG’ Joseph Prince Hillsong TV Praise the Lord Å Live-Holy Land The Evidence Grant Jeffrey Creflo Dollar Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 Friends ’ ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Family Guy ’ ‘14’ Å Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory Conan (N) ‘14’ Å 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘14’ ›› “The Perfect Murder” (1989, Drama) Stoney Jackson, Liza Cruzat. Premiere. An Street Musicians of Bombay ›› “The Ballad of the Sad Cafe” (1991) Vanessa Redgrave, Keith Carradine. A dwarf ›› “The Deceivers” (1988, Adventure) Pierce Brosnan, Saeed Jaffrey. Premiere. A 101 44 101 29 fuels an odd couple’s rural feud in the 1930s South. Å British officer goes under cover to infiltrate a cult. actor attempts to improve a woman’s lower class image. LA Ink Liz gets caught in a lie. ‘PG’ LA Ink ’ ‘PG’ Å Lottery Changed My Life ‘PG’ Å Undercover Boss White Castle ‘PG’ Prison Diaries (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Undercover Boss White Castle ‘PG’ 178 34 32 34 Ultimate Cake Off ’ ‘PG’ Å Bones The He in the She ‘14’ Å Bones The Skull in the Sculpture ‘14’ Bones ’ ‘14’ Å Bones ’ ‘14’ Å Bones Fire in the Ice ’ ‘14’ Å CSI: NY Uncertainty Rules ‘14’ Å 17 26 15 27 Bones The Crank in the Shaft ‘14’ Regular Show Scaredy Squirrel Almost Naked World of Gumball MAD Adventure Time Regular Show Problem Solverz King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Food Feuds (N) Food Feuds (N) Sturgis: Wild Ride ‘PG’ Å Sturgis: Cops Å Truck Stop MO Truck Stop MO Food Feuds Food Feuds Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations (5:43) Sanford & Son ‘G’ Å Sanford & Son All in the Family All in the Family M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond (10:42) Everybody Loves Raymond Three’s Company 65 47 29 35 The Jeffersons NCIS Murdered model. ‘PG’ Å NCIS Boxed In ’ ‘PG’ Å Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Burn Notice Bloodlines ‘PG’ Å 15 30 23 30 NCIS Probie ’ ‘14’ Å (5:55) Tough Love ’ ‘PG’ Tough Love ’ ‘PG’ Tough Love ’ ‘PG’ Tough Love ’ ‘PG’ Tough Love ’ ‘PG’ “Fast Times at Ridgemont High” ’ 191 48 37 54 (4:50) Tough Love ’ ‘PG’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(6:05) ››› “8 Mile” 2002, Drama Eminem, Kim Basinger. ’ ‘R’ Å ›› “Rumble in the Bronx” 1995 Jackie Chan. ‘R’ Å ›› “Point of No Return” 1993, Suspense Bridget Fonda. ’ ‘R’ Å (11:20) Ransom ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:20) ›› “K-9” 1989 ‘PG-13’ Å Around the World in 80 Days ‘PG’ Å FMC 104 204 104 120 Around the World in 80 Days ‘PG’ Å Countdown to UFC 135 ‘14’ Strangers Strangers AMA MX Highlights 2011 (N) Å The Daily Habit Thrillbillies ‘14’ Strangers Strangers Countdown to UFC 135 ‘14’ The Daily Habit Thrillbillies ‘14’ FUEL 34 Golf Central (N) (Live) Golf Now Golf Central Special Golf GOLF 28 301 27 301 (4:00) PGA Tour Golf The Tour Championship, First Round From East Lake Golf Club in Atlanta. Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Frasier ‘PG’ Frasier ‘PG’ Frasier ‘PG’ Frasier ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Traveling Man ‘G’ (4:15) › “Just Married” 2003 Ashton 24/7 Mayweather/ › “Vampires Suck” 2010 Matt Lanter. A spoof of “Twilight” fea- ››› “Avatar” 2009, Science Fiction Sam Worthington, Voice of Zoe Saldana, Sigourney Weaver. A former Bored to Death: Real Sex Xtra: Go- Cathouse: Come to HBO 425 501 425 501 Kutcher. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Ortiz ’ tures a love-struck vampire and werewolf. Marine falls in love with a native of a lush alien world. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Another Hit ing Down the Party! ‘MA’ (4:05) ››› “The Last of the Mohicans” 1992 ‘R’ (6:35) ››› “The Last of the Mohicans” 1992, Adventure Daniel Day-Lewis. ‘R’ Å (9:05) › “The Order” 2003 Heath Ledger. A priest meets an immortal who swallows sins. ‘R’ Ballad, Jack IFC 105 105 (4:10) ››› “Drumline” 2002 Nick Cannon. (6:15) ›› “She’s Out of My League” 2010, Romance-Comedy Jay Baruchel, Alice ››› “Big Stan” 2007, Action Rob Schneider, Jennifer Morrison. A con artist learns ›› “The Losers” 2010 Jeffrey Dean Morgan. Elite commandos (11:40) Sin City MAX 400 508 508 ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Eve. An average Joe lands a gorgeous girlfriend. ’ ‘R’ Å martial arts to protect himself in jail. ’ ‘R’ Å hunt the man who betrayed them. ‘PG-13’ Diaries ’ ‘MA’ When Rome Ruled ‘14’ Finding Atlantis ‘PG’ Search for Noah’s Ark ‘G’ When Rome Ruled ‘14’ Finding Atlantis ‘PG’ Search for Noah’s Ark ‘G’ World’s Deadliest ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z: Broly: Second Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z: Wrath of the Dragon Dragon Ball Z: Broly: Second Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z: Wrath of the Dragon NTOON 89 115 189 115 Dragon Ball Z: Wrath of the Dragon Bow Madness Ult. Adventures Jimmy Big Time Game Chasers Jackie Bushman Trophy Hunt Wild Outdoors The Hit List Deer City USA Adv. Abroad OUTD 37 307 43 307 Beyond the Hunt In Pursuit, Miller Realtree Outdoor NASCAR Outd. (4:00) “Into Tempta- (5:35) ››› “The Tillman Story” 2010, Documentary Narrated by (7:15) › “The Six Wives of Henry Lefay” 2008 Tim Allen. iTV Premiere. A man’s cur- Web Therapy ’ The Big C Lee calls Weeds Qualitative The Big C Lee calls Gigolos ’ ‘MA’ Å “Sweet Karma” 2009 SHO 500 500 tion” 2009 Josh Brolin. iTV. ’ ‘R’ Å rent wife and ex-wives squabble over his funeral. ‘PG-13’ ‘14’ Å Cathy. ‘MA’ Spatial Reasoning Cathy. ‘MA’ ‘R’ Å Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Wrecked ‘14’ Wrecked ‘PG’ American Trucker American Trucker Speedmakers Aston Martin ‘PG’ SPEED 35 303 125 303 (1:00) Barrett-Jackson Automobile Auction From the Arena at Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas, Nevada. (N) ‘PG’ (7:10) ›› “You Again” 2010 Kristen Bell, Jamie Lee Curtis. ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “The Karate Kid” 2010, Drama Jaden Smith, Jackie Chan. ’ ‘PG’ Å (11:25) Easy A ’ STARZ 300 408 300 408 Starz Studios ‘14’ ›› “Planet 51” 2009 Voices of Dwayne Johnson. ‘PG’ ›› “The Twilight Saga: Eclipse” 2010, Romance Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson. (4:15) › “Krippendorf’s Tribe” 1998 Rich- Black Filmmaker “Deadline” 2009, Suspense Brittany Murphy. A screenwriter has ›› “Remember Me” 2010, Romance Robert Pattinson. Love begins to heal the TMC 525 525 ard Dreyfuss. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Showcase ‘14’ a psychological breakdown. ‘R’ troubled spirit of a rebellious young man. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Bella must choose between Edward and Jacob. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å NFL Turning Point (N) ’ ‘PG’ NFL Turning Point (N) ’ ‘PG’ NBC Sports Talk Countdown to UFC (N) ‘14’ NBC Sports Talk NFL Turning Point ’ ‘PG’ In-Sideout Adventure Sports VS. 27 58 30 209 (4:00) UFC Live 5: Hardy vs. Lytle Bridezillas Kim & Frankie ‘14’ Å Bridezillas Frankie & Marissa ‘14’ Big Easy Brides ‘14’ Å Big Easy Brides ‘14’ Ghost Whisperer Cat’s Claw ’ ‘PG’ Bridezillas Kim & Frankie ‘14’ Å WE 143 41 174 118 Bridezillas Kim & Danielle ‘14’ Å


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, September 22, 2011 E3

CALENDAR TODAY THE RENAISSANCE OF AMERICAN GEOGRAPHY: David Imus presents his award-winning map and introduces Geography Minutes; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-6174663 or ruthh@uoregon.edu. WILD & SCENIC FILM FESTIVAL: A screening of films to inspire and inform; proceeds benefit the Oregon Natural Desert Association; $10; 5-8 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-330-2638 or http://onda.org/events/wildscenic-film-festival. “FUDDY MEERS”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the dark comedy about a woman’s attempt to regain the memories she loses each night; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. “CHICAGO”: Cat Call Productions presents the musical vaudeville production about crime, corruption and imperfect justice in Prohibition-era Chicago; $25; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. “HARD TIMES”: Preview night of Innovation Theatre Works’ presentation of a play about people who lived through the Great Depression; $15, $10 ages 70 and older; 8 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-977-5677 or www .innovationtw.org.

FRIDAY QUILTERS SPECIAL EVENT: Fabulous Fabric, Craft Items and Yarn Sale; Proceeds to benefit the Sunriver Nature Center and Observatory; free; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Second Tern Thrift Store, 17377 Spring River Road, Sunriver; 541-593-3367. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998 or www.bendfarmersmarket.com. REDMOND FRIDAY FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Redmond Greenhouse, 4101 S. U.S. Highway 97; 541-604-5156 or redmondfridaymarket@gmail.com. BEND ROOTS REVIVAL: The sixth annual celebration of performing arts in Bend, with multiple stages and local acts, workshops and more; free; 5 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive; www.bendroots.net. OKTOBERFEST 2011: Oktoberfest celebration featuring Bavarian-style music, beer, wine, foods, and games; fundraiser for the Downtown Bend beautification projects; free; 5-10 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-7883628 or http://www.downtownbend .org/oktoberfest-2011/. NPRA FINALS RODEO: A Northwest Professional Rodeo Association performance, with roping and pageants; $10; 7 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 503-4813384, ccrodeo@hotmail.com or www .nwprorodeo.com. OWL PROWLS: Take a walk with a naturalist at dusk to explore and see the different nocturnal creatures that live in Sunriver; adults $4, Children ages 2-12 $3, SNCO members are free; pre-register by 3:30 p.m. day of walk; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394. SECRETS OF SHOOTING RAW: Photographer Mark Fitzgerald reveals the secrets of shooting and processing RAW files; free; Doors open at 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Center of Photography, 390 S.W. Columbia St., Suite 110, Bend; 541-241-2266. “FUDDY MEERS”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the dark comedy about a woman’s attempt to regain the memories she loses each night; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org.

“RADIO FLYER”: A screening of the 1992 PG-13-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. “CHICAGO”: Cat Call Productions presents the musical vaudeville production about crime, corruption and imperfect justice in Prohibitionera Chicago; $25; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. “HARD TIMES”: Opening night of Innovation Theatre Works’ presentation of an adaptation of Studs Terkel’s book about people who lived through the Great Depression; with a gala reception; $25, $10 ages 70 and older; 8 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-977-5677 or www.innovation tw.org. ELVIS CONCERT: Two nights of Elvis music featuring performer Justin Shandor, winner of the “Ultimate Elvis” contest in Memphis last year; Friday features early Elvis music, while Saturday features his songs from the 1970’s; $20 to $25 single at door, $30 couple at door; Doors open one hour early.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-548-4108.

SATURDAY PANCAKES FOR PUPPIES: Breakfast featuring pancakes, eggs, bacon, and coffee; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; $6; 7-10 a.m.; Redmond Grange, 707 S.W. Kalama Ave.; 541-480-4495. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503-739-0643. BEND ROOTS REVIVAL: The sixth annual celebration of performing arts in Bend, with multiple stages and local acts, workshops and more; free; 9 a.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive; www.bendroots.net. FALL HARVEST FESTIVAL AND BARN DANCE: Featuring a chili cook-off, a barn dance, contests and more; proceeds benefit the Crooked River Ranch Seniors; free admission to event; 9 a.m.; MacPherson Park, Clubhouse Road, Crooked River Ranch; 541-570-5564. PROJECT CONNECT: Event features medical and dental services, social services for low-income individuals, food and more; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, Hooker Creek Event Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-504-1389 or www .projectconnectco.org. SHANE’S WALK: Walk to Sam Johnson Park in honor of children with cancer; proceeds benefit Candlelighters for Children with Cancer; $20, free for kids; 8 a.m. registration, 9 a.m. honor lap; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-923-4800 or centraloregon candlelighters@gmail.com. WALK FOR THE POOR: A 5K run/walk; proceeds benefit St. Vincent de Paul; pledges accepted in advance, $35 day of race; 9-11 a.m.; Dry Canyon Trail, near Pershall Way, Redmond; 541-504-9840 or http:// stvincentdepaulredmond.com. 5K FUN RUN/WALK: Event features a 5K fun run/walk, a petting zoo, play area, live music, food and more; registration required; proceeds benefit the Opportunity Foundation of Central Oregon; $20, $15 ages 13-17, free ages 12 and younger; 9 a.m. registration, 10 a.m. race; DD Ranch, 3836 N.E. Smith Rock Way, Terrebonne; 541-548-2611 or www.ofco.org. NATIONAL ALPACA FARM DAY AT CRESCENT MOON RANCH: Event celebrating alpacas featuring an ice

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

cream social and fiber spinning and weaving demos; donations benefit Catholic Youth Ministry Fund; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Crescent Moon Ranch, 70397 Buckhorn Road, Terrebonne; 541-923-2285. QUILTERS SPECIAL EVENT: Fabulous Fabric, Craft Items and Yarn Sale; Proceeds to benefit the Sunriver Nature Center and Observatory; free; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Second Tern Thrift Store, 17377 Spring River Road, Sunriver; 541-593-3367. TUMALO FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Tumalo Garden Market, off of U.S. Highway 20 and Cook Avenue; 541-728-0088. WALK FOR WOMEN: Walk or run from the falls to the Old Mill District, choosing your own distance; registration required; proceeds benefit Saving Grace; sponsorship donations should be based on mileage walked; 10 a.m.; Benham Falls, Forest Road 9702, Bend; 541-330-1621 or patricia@ bendbroadband.com. DAY OF PLAY: With sports, games, activities and more; free; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-3897275 or www.bendparksandrec.org. OKTOBERFEST 2011: Oktoberfest celebration featuring Bavarian style music, beers, wines, foods, and games; fundraiser for the Downtown Bend beautification projects; free; noon-10 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-788-3628 or http://www .downtownbend.org/ oktoberfest-2011/. SISTERS FRESH HOP FESTIVAL: The second annual festival featuring the best fresh hop brews in the west; live music and beer tasting; free admission, $5 pint glass, $1 per 4 oz. taste; noon-9 p.m.; Village Green Park, 335 S. Elm St.; 541-549-0251 or www.SistersCountry.com. GROW & SHOW: Show off produce, share gardening tips, enter competitions and more; free; 1 p.m.; Madras Garden Depot, 60 N.W. Depot Road; 541-475-2068. “CHICAGO”: Cat Call Productions presents the musical vaudeville production about crime, corruption and imperfect justice in Prohibitionera Chicago; $25; 2 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre .org 75TH ANNIVERSARY DINNER AND RAFFLE: The Pine Tavern celebrates its 75th anniversary with a special anniversary menu and raffle drawing; portion of proceeds benefit the Deschutes Historical Museum; $35; event is from 5 p.m. until close; The Pine Tavern, 967 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-382-5581. NPRA FINALS RODEO: A Northwest Professional Rodeo Association performance, with roping and pageants; $10; 7 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 503-481-3384, ccrodeo@hotmail .com or www .nwprorodeo.com. “FUDDY MEERS”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the dark comedy about a woman’s attempt to regain the memories she loses each night; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. ELVIS CONCERT: Two nights of Elvis music featuring performer Justin Shandor, winner of the “Ultimate Elvis” contest in Memphis last year; Friday features early Elvis music, while Saturday features his songs from the 1970’s; $20 to $25 single at door, $30 couple at door; Doors open one hour early.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541548-4108.

“CHICAGO”: Cat Call Productions presents the musical vaudeville production about crime, corruption and imperfect justice in Prohibitionera Chicago; $25; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. “HARD TIMES”: Innovation Theatre Works presents an adaptation of Studs Terkel’s book about people who lived through the Great Depression; $20, $18 students and seniors, $10 ages 70 and older; 8 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541977-5677 or www.innovationtw.org. AWESOME ’80S PROM: Wear clothes from the 1980s and dance to ’80s hits; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon; $50 per couple; 8 p.m.-midnight; Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; 541-678-3767. STAND UP COMEDY: Comedy event featuring comedians Celeste Franklin, Jim Mortensen and Doug Morgan; may contain adult language and content; $8; Doors open at 7 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626.

SUNDAY BEND ROOTS REVIVAL: The sixth annual celebration of performing arts in Bend, with multiple stages and local acts, workshops and more; free; 9 a.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive; www .bendroots.net. BROOKSWOOD BIG BLOCK BASH: Old-fashioned style block party featuring live music, activities, and food; free; 1-6 p.m.; Brookswood Meadow Plaza, 19530 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; 541-306-1636 or http://www. brookswoodmeadowplaza.com/index .php?option=com_content&view=cate gory&layout=blog&id=38&Itemid=195. “FUDDY MEERS”: Final performance of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of the dark comedy about a woman’s attempt to regain the memories she loses each night; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. “HARD TIMES”: Innovation Theatre Works presents an adaptation of Studs Terkel’s book about people who lived through the Great Depression; $20, $18 students and seniors, $10 ages 70 and older; 2 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541977-5677 or www.innovationtw.org.

MONDAY AN EVENING IN MORNINGSTAR GARDENS: Stroll through the studio and portrait garden and view art photography; reservations requested; a portion of proceeds benefits Bethlehem Inn; donations accepted; 4:30-7:30 p.m.; Dornbusch Photography, 20834 Morningstar Drive, Bend; 541-306-6926 or dornbuschphotography@msn.com. WINDANCE HOUSE CONCERT: Mare and Nomad Wakefield perform a folk show; call for Bend location; $15 in advance, $17 at the door; 7 p.m.; 541-306-0048.

TUESDAY REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: 11:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-550-0066 or www.localharvest. org/redmond-farmers-market-M31522. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Half Broke Horses” by Jeannette Walls; free; 2 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. FIVE YEARS TO RETIREMENT: Learn how to refine and review your game plan with action steps and time lines for your retirement; $39; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050.

M T For Thursday, Sept. 22

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

CONTAGION (PG-13) 2:20, 4:50, 7:10 THE DEVIL’S DOUBLE (R) 2:40, 5:10, 7:40 THE GUARD (R) 2:50, 5:20, 7:50 THE HELP (PG-13) 2, 7 MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG13) 2:30, 5, 7:30 POINT BLANK (R) 2:10, 4:40, 7:20

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

APOLLO 18 (PG-13) 8, 10:20 BUCKY LARSON: BORN TO BE A STAR (R) 10:25 CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER (PG-13) 12:50, 6:30, 9:15 CONTAGION (PG-13) 1:10, 4:10, 7:40, 10:10 COWBOYS & ALIENS (PG-

13) 1:20, 6:50, 9:40 CRAZY, STUPID, LOVE. (PG-13) Noon, 6:10 THE DEBT (R) 12:45, 3:45, 6:40, 9:35 DRIVE (R) 1:30, 4:25, 7:30, 9:45 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 2 (PG-13) 12:25, 3:40, 7:10, 10 THE HELP (PG-13) 12:05, 3:30, 6:35, 9:50 HORRIBLE BOSSES (R) 1:50, 5, 7:55 I DON’T KNOW HOW SHE DOES IT (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 9:25 THE LION KING 3-D (G) 11:45 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30 THE LION KING (G) 12:15, 3, 5:10 OUR IDIOT BROTHER (R) 3:20, 9:20 RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 12:35, 3:10, 6:20, 9:10 SEVEN DAYS IN UTOPIA (G) 4:20 SPY KIDS 4: ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD 3-D (PG) 3:50 STRAW DOGS (R) 1:40, 4:45, 7:45, 10:15 WARRIOR (PG-13) 1, 4, 7:20, 10:20 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes.

EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL

CONTAGION (PG-13) 6:30 DRIVE (R) 6:45 THE HELP (PG-13) 6:15

MADRAS CINEMA 5 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and older only. Guests younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) BAD TEACHER (R) 9 GREEN LANTERN (PG-13) 6

REDMOND CINEMAS

1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

BAD TEACHER (R) 4:45 CONTAGION (PG-13) 4:30, 7 DRIVE (R) 4:50, 7:15 RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 6:45 SHARK NIGHT 3-D (PG-13) 4:40, 6:50

1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

CONTAGION (PG-13) 4:45, 7, 9:15 THE HELP (PG-13) 5:30, 8:30 OUR IDIOT BROTHER (R) 5, 7, 9 WARRIOR (PG-13) 5:45, 8:45

WARRIOR (PG-13) 6:40

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

COLOMBIANA (PG-13) 4, 7

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

BUCK (PG) 7

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

CONTAGION (UPSTAIRS — PG-13) 6 EDITOR’S NOTE: Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

ABC’s ‘Charlie’s Angels’ remake earns no wings By Chuck Barney Contra Costa Times

Out of all the moldy old TV shows available for reboot, you might think that “Charlie’s Angels” would be one of the easiest to pull off. Lord knows Aaron Spelling’s 1970s original didn’t exactly set the bar high. The acting was lightweight, the plots predictable and the premise laughable. Seemingly, all you’d need to do is find three beautiful (and braless) butt-kicking babes, ramp up the action scenes, set the show in an exciting hot spot like Miami and you’d be good to go. Evidently, it’s not that easy. At least it’s not judging by ABC’s new-look “Charlie’s Angels,” which debuts tonight with a pilot episode so flat and uninspired it will have fans of the original recalling the Shelley Hack era with newfound appreciation. Our 21st-century angels are Eve French (Minka Kelly), a whiz behind the steering wheel; Abby Sampson (Rachael Taylor), a break-in specialist; and Kate Prince (Annie Ilonzeh), a mixed martial arts buff who has a keen skill for kicking bad guys in the head. All three women, we learn, have checkered pasts. Kate, for example, was a cop who took bribes and got kicked off the force. Ah, but they’ve redeemed themselves as sexy sleuths working for an unseen financier named Charlie (Robert Wagner is probably thankful he bowed out of the role). Aside from the startling ap-

Trails Continued from E1 The Flagline 50K race on Saturday begins at Mount Bachelor and will continue around the south side of Tumalo Mountain, using the Flagline, MetoliusWindigo and Swampy-Dutchman trails and Forest Road 370 (northeast of Todd Lake). The Flagline trail will have runners going uphill and cyclists going downhill. Around 200 runners are expected on these trails in addition to regular fall weekend visitors. Saturday is National Public Lands Day, a natural resource protection project including restoration projects in areas of Black Butte and sections of the MetoliusWhychus rivers. People interested in helping out can visit www. national forests.org/connect/ volunteer/event/395/signup. There is a trail crew working on the Metolius River hiking trail near the fish hatchery. Recreationists should also be aware that hunting season has begun. Bow hunting runs through Sept. 25 and general rifle season starts Oct. 1. With hunting season comes an increase in backcountry traffic. Expect to see dispersed campers and campgrounds filling up quickly, said Sabo. Much of the Deschutes National Forest is open to hunting, including wilderness areas. Be aware that hunters may be near trails. It is

‘Charlie’s Angels’ When: 8 tonight Where: ABC

pearance of a younger, slimmer Bosley (Ramon Rodriguez), everything in the pilot goes down pretty much the way you’d expect. Bullets fly and so do fists. Things blow up. The women wear really hot outfits. And so on and so on. Of course, we’ve learned over the years not to expect too much from TV retreads, which more often than not are a big waste of time. But the “Charlie’s Angels” producers could have learned a lesson from CBS’ “Hawaii FiveO” update, which found a way to pay homage to its predecessor while still managing to exude a fresh sensibility and brand of humor. Instead, these new Angels just don’t pack any heat. Part of the problem might be that, unlike the mid-’70s, butt-kicking babes are now everywhere. And so are the guilty-pleasure ingredients that comprise what used to be known as “jiggle TV.” To stand out, you need something more. Unfortunately, no one pops off the screen the way Farrah once did. Even Kelly, impressive in previous low-key roles (“Friday Night Lights” and “Parenthood”), comes across as stiff and unconvincing. Like Charlie, she just phones it in.

best to wear bright colors to ensure being seen while hiking, said Sabo — and it is also a good idea to make more noise than usual, whether by whistling or calling out to hunters before passing by if you see them or hear rustling in the brush. For more information and resources about hunting seasons visit www.dfw.state.or.us/ resources/hunting. The public use fire restriction is still in effect for most of the forest, said Sabo. Campfires, smoking and vehicle use (including ATVs) are prohibited in many areas due to the high fire danger. Hunters should also be aware of the fire restrictions and be extremely careful with any legal fires. For detailed information about trail conditions and fire restrictions, visit www.fs.usda .gov/centraloregon. Part of the Pacific Crest Trail is still closed due to the Shadow Lake Fire. For updated information about fire closures, visit www.inciweb.org and choose “Oregon” from the drop-down menu. As always, go prepared as you head out on the trails. Check trail conditions, be aware of weather and temperature changes and take along the essentials — food, water, warm clothing, flashlight, map, navigational aids, etc. Lydia Hoffman can be reached at 541-383-0358 or lhoffman@bendbulletin.com.


E4 Thursday, September 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, September 22, 2011 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

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GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

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HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Thursday, Sept. 22, 2011: This year, a relationship or partnership could gain in importance. You value this tie, but this person seems to be changing right in front of you. Learn to flex. Education, travel and meeting people from various cultures could open your mind and change your perceptions. If you are single, you could meet someone very different while pursuing a spiritual or educational interest. Unpredictability could add to the excitement that exists between you. Focus on friends and expanding your immediate circle. Success will greet you this year if you can surround yourself with the right people. LEO reads you cold. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Your ability to identify with a close friend or loved one could determine the quality of the interaction. You also gain even more insight because of your willingness to read between the lines. Be willing to work with the situation. Tonight: Your fiery spirit returns. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Stay on top of communication, even if you are taken aback by what you hear. Take your time digesting information until you gain clarity as to what you really have heard. Others seek you out and prove to be full of information. Tonight: Tap into your creativity. GEMINI (May 21-June 20)

HHHH Remain sensitive to the costs of a situation or decision. Others appreciate your awareness of the stress they might be under. Be willing to head out alone. A friend exhibits a lot of unpredictability. Tonight: Balance your checkbook. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH You have a style and way of handling issues that allows others to feel comfortable and open. A boss or authority figure acts in a way that might cause you to wonder how well you know him or her! Tonight: Ready to go. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HH Take your time before jumping to a conclusion. A personal matter or an issue in general could have your mind working overtime and might be impacting your decisions and actions right now. Slow down; get feedback. Unexpected news heads your way. Tonight: Nap, then decide. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Key into a meeting. Your priorities become clear vis-a-vis the priorities of others. New information comes through a partner, whether in words or in action. Yes, your plate is full. Tonight: Make weekend plans that suit you. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH Take a stand and understand that others might be reactive. You will see their reactions. You can choose not to react so that the focus is on their responses and how they might be inappropriate. Tonight: A force to be dealt with. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH Reach out for more information. You might not like your

knee-jerk reaction, so stop and find out more. Your ability to do that is based on your ability to detach. Take a walk — a change of scenery works. Tonight: Working late. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH Continue making time for a key person in your life. An unexpected development involving a child or new friendship could force you to stop and think. Remember, people change and are multifaceted. Tonight: Wherever you are, make sure there is music around you. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH A boss, parent or another authority figure cannot help but be unpredictable. Listen to what is revealed, but choose not to react. Take an overview of a conversation. Understand what is happening. Tonight: Make time for a special person. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Stay mellow and direct. Others could be unpredictable or could see you as unpredictable. Run your errands, clear out paperwork and start thinking “weekend.” You’ll need a break if you continue to dive into work. Tonight: Return calls; make plans. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Tap into your creativity, but say “no” to a risk. Even if you can survive the loss if it doesn’t work, is this effort really worth it? Buy a lottery ticket, but keep financial risking to little to nothing. Tonight: Get a good night’s sleep.

© 2011 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T ORY

E6 Thursday, September 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Datebook is a weekly calendar of regularly scheduled nonprofit events and meetings. Listings are free, but must be updated monthly to continue to publish. Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-383-0351.

C D  

ORGANIZATIONS

Juniper Golf Course; 541-419-1889 or www.redmondoregonrotary.com.

TODAY

FRIDAY

BINGO: 6 p.m.; Elks Lodge, Bend; 541-382-1371. COMMUNICATORS PLUS TOASTMASTERS: 6:30-7:45 p.m.; IHOP, Bend; 541-5931656 or 541-480-0222. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HARMONEERS MEN’S CHORUS: 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, Bend; 541382-6287 or www.harmoneers.net. KIWANIS INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Meadow Lakes Restaurant, Prineville; 541-416-2191. REDMOND DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-322-9453. ROTARY CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon;

BEND KNITUP: $1; 10 a.m.noon; Rosie Bareis Community Campus, Bend; 541-728-0050. BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. BINGO: Noon; Bend’s Community Center; 541-312-2069. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. TABLE TALK: 10 a.m.; Common Table, Bend; 541-633-7163.

a.m.; Green Plow Coffee Roasters, Redmond; 541-504-9877. LIVE READ: 1 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library; 541-312-1080. REDMOND CHESS CLUB: 10 a.m.; Brookside Manor, Redmond; 541-410-6363.

SUNDAY A COURSE IN MIRACLES STUDY GROUP: 10-11:30 a.m.; 2693 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-390-5373. BINGO: 12:30 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:30-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752.

MONDAY

SATURDAY

CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107.

INTERCAMBIO SPANISH/ENGLISH CONVERSATION GROUP: 9:30-11:30

SWEET ADELINES: 6:30 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; www.showcasechorus. org or 541-447-4756. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 2-5 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE: 7-9 p.m.; Sons of Norway Hall, Bend; 541-549-7311 or 541-848-7523.

John C. Johnson Center, La Pine; 541-536-9235. LA PINE CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS: 8-9 a.m.; Crescent Creek Club House, La Pine; 541-5369771 or 541-536-9771. TUESDAY KNITTERS: 1-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-399-1133. VIETNAM VETERANS OF AMERICA: 6 p.m.; VFW Post 1643, Bend; 541-388-1512.

TUESDAY BINGO: 6 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, Prineville; 541-447-7659.

WEDNESDAY

CLASSICS BOOK CLUB: 6 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room; 541-312-1046 or kevinb@deschuteslibrary.org.

A COURSE IN MIRACLES STUDY GROUP: 5:30-7 p.m.; 2693 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-390-5373.

HIGHNOONERS TOASTMASTER CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; New Hope Church, Classroom D, Bend; 541390-5373 or 541-317-5052. LA PINE LIONS CLUB: Noon;

BEND CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS: Noon-1 p.m.; Environmental Center, Bend; 541-610-2308. BEND KNITUP: 5:30-8 p.m.; Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Bend; 541-728-0050.

BEND SUNRISE LIONS CLUB: 7 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 888-227-7414. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-788-7077. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HIGH DESERT CORVETTE CLUB: 7 p.m.; Brickhouse Restaurant, Redmond; 541-549-6175. KIWANIS CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon-1 p.m.; Juniper Golf and Country Club, Redmond; 541-548-5935 or www.redmondkiwanis.org. PRIME TIME TOASTMASTERS: 12:05-1 p.m.; Home Federal Bank, Prineville; 541-416-6549. REDMOND AREA TOASTMASTERS: Noon-1 p.m.; Ray’s Food Place, Redmond; 541-410-1758. WEDNESDAY MORNING BIRDERS: 7:30 a.m.; Nancy P’s Baking Co., Bend; 541-389-4039.

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Every Friday In

Photos by Markain Hawryluk / The Bulletin

Returning on the trail from Phantom Bridge, with Forest Road 2223 on the right. The trail from Forest Road 2207 is about 2.4 miles long with a lot of elevation gain and loss, but the trail connects with the end of 2223 about a third of a mile before the bridge.

Outing Continued from E1 Eventually I realized I had gone too far and turned around, still looking for the elusive hiker sign now to my right. Checking the odometer, I backtracked the mile and a half I figured I had overshot it by, finding a turnout with a trail register on the left side. That trailhead was closed due to a fire, but a posted map showed my trail veering off directly across the road. I collected my essentials, locked the car and crossed over to the other side. Sure enough, there, lying in a ditch at the side of the road, was the hiker sign. (On my odometer, it is about 3.6 miles up 2207. The parking area on the right is hard to miss.) Phantom Bridge is about 600 vertical feet above the trailhead, but the total elevation gain for the hike is listed at 1,400 feet. The trail undulates for the first 2 miles, finishing with a steep climb in the final quarter mile. The route starts out in a forest, then traverses a slope below Dog Rock. About a mile in, you’ll pass a series of rocky outcroppings that, when skies are clear, probably offer a pretty nice view of the Opal Creek Wilderness. The first outcropping is more of a scramble, requiring a bit of dexterity to overcome. Continue down the trail a bit and there are viewpoints that are easier to reach. The route passes tiny Cedar Lake, and then crosses an open area where rock cairns mark the route. Parts of the trail are bit tricky, particularly when descending on loose rock and sand. Eventually, you’ll reach a parking area at the end of Forest Road 2223, prompting you to wonder why you just hiked 2 miles to get here. But hey, that’s part of the fun, right? From the parking area, it’s about 0.3 miles to the arch, climbing fairly steeply. Again, the guidebook said to look for a Phantom Bridge sign on the main trail. Apparently it’s a phantom sign as well. There is a rock cairn that marks the spot where you leave the trail onto a faint path. From there it’s only about 50 feet to the arch. During the hike, I kept thinking about how the guidebook said a few “daring souls” walk out onto the arch. I kept telling myself there was no point in taking any unnecessary risks. After all, it was only three years ago that Wall Arch in Utah’s Arches National Park collapsed. And

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22

To Santiam Pass, Sisters

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

the Old Man of the Mountain rock formation had been around for so long, it was the image chosen for the New Hampshire state quarter. Yet, the old man came tumbling down in 2003. I had also spent much of the hike thinking about recent changes in my own life, how quickly something that seemed rock solid could come crumbling down. I had taken stability for granted and was having trouble reconciling myself with the impending upheaval in my life. But as I took the final steps up the slope and the arch came into view, my excitement was palpable. I set up my camera on its longest timer setting and carefully picked my way up to the rock bridge. I got as far across as I could before hearing the camera’s beeping heart rate quicken. The arch was solid as, well, a rock. The bridge is about three feet wide at its narrowest, but it slopes a bit on the far side. I’ve been on narrower mountain ridges before, but at least there was

WEDNESDAY September 28th 6-8 pm

always solid ground beneath me. On Phantom Bridge, I had solid air to the right, to the left, and below. It’s a unique experience. So was turning around midbridge. But I did my best Mary Lou Retton impression and stepped back off the arch with a perfect dismount. I’m not sure what it is about danger and risk that gets your adrenalin going and makes you feel euphoric afterward. But braving the bridge underscored a notion I’ve always known but seemed to have forgotten lately. Sometimes you don’t get what you want out of life or love or work without taking a few risks, without venturing outside of your comfort zone. There’s safety in stability and routine, but there’s also stagnation. Sometimes, you just have to take the leap of faith, and step out onto a Phantom Bridge. Markian Hawryluk can be reached at 541-617-7814 or mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com.

2450 NE Mary Rose Place, Suite 130 Bend, OR 97701 Presenters include: Dr. Andrew Jones of Inovia Patricia Grady of Agewise MD Patricia Trapnell, RN of Central Oregon Aesthetics RSVP: 541-312-7062 by September 26th, 2011 Sponsored by Bioform and SkinMedica Light appetizers and wine will be served www.centraloregonaesthetics.com


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IMPROVING YOUR HEALTH AND WELL-BEING No bones about it Eating prunes improves bone density, study says, Page F7

HEALTH

www.bendbulletin.com/health

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2011

NUTRITION MEDICINE

Know them, eat them Thinkstock

By Anne Aurand The Bulletin

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Be good, live longer Lengthen your life with healthy behavior, Page F6

MEDICINE Not blowing smoke Number of heavy cigarette smokers on decline, Page F4

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The federal government’s evidence-based Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010, emphasized this message: Eat more vegetables. With a goal to promote health, reduce the risk of chronic diseases, and reduce obesity, the nutritional Quiz guidelines said What do Americans the French should concall “love sume at least apples?” 2½ cups of vegPage F7 etables daily, based on a 2,000-calorieper-day diet. More specifically, vegetables were divided into five subgroups, with the following recommended weekly intake from each: • Dark green vegetables (1½ cups) • Red and orange vegetables (5½ cups) • Beans and peas (legumes) (1½ cups) • Starchy vegetables (5 cups) • Other vegetables (4 cups) See Quiz / F7

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or years, the message each fall from county health departments has been the same: Get your annual flu shot. But this year at least one part of the message is different. “I have to stop saying ‘the shot,’” said Heather Kaisner, immunization coordinator for the Deschutes County Health Department. With several new vaccine options coming on the market, to the delight of many, you no longer have to face a needle when getting immunized. And public health officials hope that means more individuals will get vaccinated, limiting the spread of the disease and protecting those populations that could have

All gassed up Health reporter tries needle-free vaccine, Page F4

you’re willing to do some leg work, you can choose between a needle, a smaller needle, a nose spray or a high-tech option.

Traditional flu shot truly bad outcomes if they catch the flu. “I think the biggest thing in the recommendation is we’re trying to simplify; anyone 6 months or older (without a contraindication) should get their annual influenza,” Kaisner said. For most people, the choice will come down to personal preference. The traditional flu shot is available to anyone who doesn’t have some reason not be immunized. Other alternatives have certain age restrictions, some may work better for certain groups than for others and not all options will be widely available. But if

The standard intramuscular flu shot is still the workhorse for flu vaccination. This year, vaccine manufacturers are expected to delivery 166 million doses. And despite the new choices, more people will get the traditional shot than any of the alternatives. “The regular flu shot is the easiest and the most widely available to the largest age range, so that can be used in anyone 6 months of age or older,” said Cindy Shuman, a physician assistant in the family medicine department at Bend Memorial Clinic. See Vaccine / F4

Just keep swimming — without pain Alpine Physical Therapy and Spine Care personal fitness trainer Caitlin Mastenbroek demonstrates a one-handed plank exercise, recommended to prevent injuries for swimmers. Make sure the shoulder is aligned right over the elbow, which is aligned right over the wrist. Engage the core muscles to keep both hips parallel to the ground. She said there is a natural reaction to let one hip drift up when the arm lifts. Hold the weight out with a straight arm and make small circles in both directions. Switch arms. Rob Kerr The Bulletin

MONEY

Gaining more Correct form can help prevent shoulder injury control with hypnotherapy By Anne Aurand The Bulletin

Swimming is an excellent form of exercise that provides an aerobic workout and improves muscle strength. Although its low-impact nature makes it easier on the joints than some sports, it can come with injury risk. The most common as- F I T N E S S sociated injury, known as swimmer’s shoulder, can Inside affect up to 70 percent of More exercise tips competitive swimmers, according to Dr. Scott Rodeo, that strengthen co-chief of the Sports Med- the rotator cuff, icine and Shoulder Service Page F6 at Hospital for Special Surgery in New York and chairman of the USA Swimming Sports Medicine Committee. People who swim several times a week, year round, are ripe for some shoulder pain. “If you think about a competitive swimmer’s number of stroke revolutions per day, per week, per month, per year, it’s phenomenal. We’re talking about half a million stroke revolutions per year,” Rodeo said. See Swimming / F6

By Lesley Alderman New York Times News Service

Kirsten Ritchie, 44, is no stranger to surgery — nearly 20 years ago, doctors removed four tumors from her brain. She remembers the operation and its aftermath as “horrific.” So the news that she needed brain surgery again was hardly welcome. Determined to make her second operation a better — or at least less traumatic — experience, Ritchie, an insurance marketing representative in Cleveland, turned to an unusual treatment. At the Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Integrative Medicine, she had four hypnosis sessions in the month before her procedure, during which she addressed her fear of the coming surgery. She also practiced self-hypnosis every day. See Hypnosis / F3


F2 Thursday, September 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

H D FLU SHOTS Many insurance plans will cover seasonal flu shots. The following prices apply to recipients without insurance accepted by the provider. FRIDAY: Noon-6 p.m.; $25; Newport Avenue Market, Bend. SATURDAY: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; $25; Bend Memorial Clinic; 865 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond.

CLASSES CHILDREN’S HEALTH SCREENING: Healthy Beginnings screens hearing, speech, cognitive development, vision, health, dentistry and more in children ages 5 and younger; by appointment only; RSVP required today; free; screenings on Friday; Bend; 541-383-6357. HEALTHY EATING HABITS IN HIGH SCHOOL: Seminar by Tracy Willett, wellness coach, sponsored by What I Wore; 6-7 p.m. today; preregister; All About Nutrition Store, 515 W. Antler Ave., Redmond; 541-504-1201. MAYA ABDOMINAL THERAPY: Arvigo techniques to aid in repositioning abdominal organs and restore the flow of blood, lymph, nerve and chi energy to the pelvis and abdomen; $395; 5-8 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; Hawthorn Healing Arts Center, 39 N.W. Louisiana Ave., Bend; 541-330-0334. PILOT BUTTE CHALLENGE: Annual one-mile nature run/fitness walk up Pilot Butte; $10 adults, $5 seniors or children 17 and younger; register online by 6 p.m. today, 4-7 p.m. Friday at the packet pickup at REI in Old Mill or 7:30-8:30 a.m. Saturday; event begins 9 a.m. Saturday; Pilot Butte State Park, Northeast Pilot Butte Summit Drive, Bend; https://www.signmeup.com/ site/online-event-registration/77039. ZUMBA CLASS: Dance fitness class; $45; 6:15-7:15 p.m. Tuesdays, Sept. 27-Nov. 15; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; http://noncredit .cocc.edu or 541-383-7270. • ACTIVE LIFE FITNESS: Tai Chi; 541-389-7536 or 541-788-7537. • ADVENTURE BOOT CAMP: www. bendbootcamp.com or 541-350-5343. • AFTERNOON FIT KIDS: Ages 5-12; 541-389-7665. • ANITA ELSEY: Feldenkrais; 541-408-3731. • ARTICULATION THERAPY CLASSES: 541-550-9424 or www.ashtangayogabend.com. • ASMI YOGA: 541-385-1140 or www.asmiyoga.com. • BABY BOOMERS & BEYOND: Yoga instruction; 541-948-9770. • BABY BOOT CAMP: Strollerfitness program; 541-617-6142 or www.babybootcamp.com. • BAKESTARR: Support for type 1 diabetics ages 18-24; 541-5984483 or www.bakestarr.com. • BALANCE YOGA CLASSES & RETREATS: Hilloah Rohr, 541330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • BEND FELDENKRAIS CENTER: 541-788-9232. • BEND PILATES: www.bendpilates.net. • BEND SENIOR CENTER: Dance, Tai Chi and more; 541-388-1133. • BEND YOGA: 503-998-8902. • BIKRAM’S YOGA COLLEGE OF INDIA: 541-389-8599 or www.bikramyogabend.com. • THE BODHI TREE, YOGA & HEALING ARTS: 541-390-2827. • BOOT CAMP FITNESS FOR WOMEN: 541-815-3783. • BOOST FAMILY FITNESS: 541-3905286 or www.boostfam.com. • BREEMA’S NINE PRINCIPLES OF HARMONY: 541-593-8812. • BRINGING THE BUDDHIST 8 FOLD PATH TO MINDFUL DAILY PRACTICE: Hilloah Rohr, 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE: 541-383-7290 or www.cocc.edu.

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Michael Waller, left, and Travis Neuman, run during the 2008 Pilot Butte Challenge. See Classes for details on the 2011 event.

• CENTRAL OREGON GYMNASTICS ACADEMY: 541-385-1163 or www.cogymnastics.com. • CHRONIC PAIN CLASSES: 541-3187041 or www.healingbridge.com. • CLASSIC HATHA YOGA/ANANDA INSPIRED: Lorette Simonet; 541-3859465 or www.wellnessbend.com. • CORE: Yoga; 541-389-6595 or www.coreconditioning.info. • FIT FOR THE KING EXERCISE MINISTRY: 541-923-3925 or www.fitfortheking.info. • FITNESS GUIDE SERVICE: 541-388-1685 or www.fitness guideservice.com. • FOCUS PHYSICAL THERAPY: Yoga, feldenkrais; 541-385-3344 or www.focusphysio.com. • FUNCTIONAL FITNESS TRAINING: PEAK Training Studio, 541-647-1346. • GOLF FITNESS AND PERFORMANCE: Chris Cooper, 541-350-1631 or ccooper@taiweb.com. • HEALING BRIDGE PHYSICAL THERAPY: Feldenkrais, back classes, screenings, 541-318-7041 or www.healingbridge.com. • HEALTHY HABITS YOGA STUDIO OF REDMOND: www.facebook. com/healthyhabitsredmond or 541-526-1097. • HEALTHY HAPPENINGS: St. Charles Health Systems; smoking cessation, parenting preparation; 541-706-6390 or www.stcharleshealthcare.org. • HULA HOOP CLASSES: www.hoop dazzle.com or 541-312-6910. • IMAGINE HEALTH NOW: QiGong classes; 541-318-4630, maggie@ imaginehealthnow.com or www .imaginehealthnow.com. • INNERGYSTICS: Yoga, cardio, weight lifting and meditation; 541-388-7395. • IYENGAR YOGA OF BEND: Nadine Sims; 541-318-1186 or www.yogaofbend.com. • IYENGAR YOGA CLASSES: 541-948-9770 or robyncastano@ bendbroadband.com. • JAZZERCISE: www.jazzercise.com or 541-280-5653. • JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER: 541-389-7665. • KIDS YOGA: 541-385-5437. • LAUGHTER YOGA: 541-420-2204. • LAUGHTER YOGA CLUB: 541389-0831 or www.pcoco.org. • LIVING FITNESS: Personal training; 541-382-2332. • MOVEMENT THAT MATTERS: Redmond Senior Center; 541-548-6067. • NAMASPA: Baptiste Power Vinyasa Yoga; Suzie Harris; 541-550-8550 or www.namaspa.com. • NORTHWEST CROSSING: Yoga; 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • PILATES CENTER OF BEND: 541-389-2900 or www.pilatescenter ofbend.com. • PILATES CONNECTION: Mat, chair and equipment classes; 541420-2927 or www.bendpilates connection.com. • PILATES MAT AND EQUIPMENT INSTRUCTION: FreshAirSports.com/

pilates or 541-318-7388. • PLAY OUTDOORS: Kids yoga; 541-678-5398. • QIGONG CLASSES: Michelle Wood, 541-330-8894. • REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT: 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org. • REDMOND RUNNING GROUP: dedwards@bendbroadband.com. • SALLY’S HATHA YOGA: 541-3900927 or www.sallyshathayoga.com. • SILVER STRIDERS: 541-383-8077 or www.silverstriders.com. • SPIRIT OF PILATES INC.: 541-4205730 or www.spiritofpilates.com. • STROLLER STRIDES: Stroller-fitness; 541-598-5231 or www.strollerstrides.com. • TERPSICHOREAN DANCE STUDIO: Yoga; 541-388-8497. • THERAPEUTIC YOGA PROGRAM: 541-350-1617. • TUESDAY PERFORMANCE GROUP: 541-317-3568. • TULEN CENTER FOR MARTIAL ARTS AND WELLNESS: 541-550-8550. • WILLRACE PERFORMANCE TRAINING STUDIO: 541-350-3938 or willpower05@msn.com. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: Dynamic Group Fitness: 541-350-0064. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: Seven Peaks Elementary School; 541-419-9699. • YOGA FOR 55 +: 541-948-9770. • YOGA FOR PEAK PERFORMANCE: 541322-9642 or info@bend-yoga.com. • YOGA HEART OF REDMOND: 541633-0530 or www.ericamason.net. • YOGA JOURNEY: 541-419-6778. • YOGA TO GO: robyncastano@ bendbroadband.com or 541-948-9770. • ZUMBA: Dance-based fitness classes; Davon Cabraloff; 541-383-1994. • ZUMBA: 541-306-0621. • ZUMBATOMIC: 541-728-0002.

SUPPORT GROUPS ADHD ADULT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-420-3023. AIDS EDUCATION FOR PREVENTION, TREATMENT, COMMUNITY RESOURCES AND SUPPORT (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7402. AIDS HOT LINE: 800-342-AIDS. AL-ANON: 541-728-3707 or www.centraloregonal-anon.org. AL-ANON PRINEVILLE: 541-416-0604. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS (AA): 541-548-0440 or www.coigaa.org. ALS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-977-7502. ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION: 541-548-7074. ALZHEIMER’S/DEMENTIA CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-948-7214. AUTISM RESOURCE GROUP OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-788-0339. BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING: 541-385-1787. BEND S-ANON FAMILY GROUP: 888-285-3742. BEND ZEN MEDITATION GROUP:

Bend Senior Center presents

Aging Well Living Well Flu Shot Fest & Health Fair $31 Flu Shots Thursday, September 29, 2011 9 am to 2 pm Bend Senior Center 1600 SE Reed Market Road Free Admission Flu Shots, Pneumonia Shots Over 40 health and wellness practitioners, senior service providers and medical professionals. Free presentations, information, health screenings and give-a-ways. Join us for a Wellness Scavenger hunt!

Call 541-388-1133 for more information

541-382-6122 or 541-382-6651. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUPS: 541-382-5882. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP/ ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 541-383-3910. BRAIN INJURY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-382-9451. BRAIN TUMOR SUPPORT GROUP: 541-350-7243 BREAST-FEEDING SUPPORT GROUP: 541-385-1787. CANCER FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-5864. CANCER INFORMATION LINE: 541-706-7743. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-536-7399. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. CELEBRATE RECOVERY: New Hope Church, Bend, 541-480-5276; Faith Christian Center, Bend, 541382-8274; Redmond Assembly of God Church, 541-548-4555; Westside Church, Bend, 541-3827504, ext. 201; Metolius Friends Community Church, 541-546-4974. CENTRAL OREGON ALZHEIMER’S/ DEMENTIA CAREGIVERS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-504-0571 CENTRAL OREGON AUTISM ASPERGER’S SUPPORT TEAM: 541-633-8293. CENTRAL OREGON AUTISM SPECTRUM RESOURCE AND FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-279-9040. CENTRAL OREGON COALITION FOR ACCESS (WORKING TO CREATE ACCESSIBLE COMMUNITIES): 541-385-3320. CENTRAL OREGON DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY GROUP: 541-420-2759 CENTRAL OREGON DOWN SYNDROME NETWORK: 541-5488559 or www.codsn.org. CENTRAL OREGON FAMILIES WITH MULTIPLES: 541-3305832 or 541-388-2220. CENTRAL OREGON LEAGUE OF AMPUTEES SUPPORT GROUP (COLA): 541-480-7420 or www.ourcola.org. CENTRAL OREGON RIGHT TO LIFE: 541-383-1593. CHILD CAR SEAT CLINIC (PROPER INSTALLATION INFORMATION FOR SEAT AND CHILD): 541-504-5016. CHILDREN’S VISION FOUNDATION: 541-330-3907. CHRONIC PAIN SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-7730. CLARE BRIDGE OF BEND (ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP): 541-385-4717 or rnorton1@brookdaleliving.com. COMPASSIONATE FRIENDS (FOR THOSE GRIEVING THE LOSS OF A CHILD): 541-480-0667 or 541-536-1709. CORIL SUPPORT GROUP: 541 388-8103, ext. 203. CREATIVITY & WELLNESS — MOOD GROUP: 541-647-0865. CROOKED RIVER RANCH ADULT GRIEF SUPPORT: 541-548-7483. DEFEATCANCER: 541-706-7743. DESCHUTES COUNTY MENTAL HEALTH 24-HOUR CRISIS LINE: 541-322-7500. DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE: 541-5499622 or 541-771-1620. DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP: 541-617-0543. DIABETIC SUPPORT GROUP: 541-598-4483. DISABILITY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-388-8103. DIVORCE CARE: 541-410-4201. DOUBLE TROUBLE RECOVERY: Addiction and mental illness

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

group; 541-317-0050. DYSTONIA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-388-2577. ENCOPRESIS (SOILING): 541-5482814 or encopresis@gmail.com. EVENING BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-460-4030 FAMILY PLANNING SERVICES (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER: 541-389-5468. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS: Redmond 541-280-7249, Bend 541-390-4365. GAMBLING HOT LINE: 800-233-8479. GLUCOSE CONTROL LOW CARB DIET SUPPORT GROUP: kjdnrcd@ yahoo.com or 541-504-0726. GLUTEN INTOLERANCE GROUP (CELIAC): 541-389-1731. GRANDMA’S HOUSE: Support for pregnant teens and teen moms; 541-383-3515. GRIEFSHARE GRIEF RECOVERY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-382-1832. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 541306-6633, 541-318-0384 or mullinski@bendbroadband.com. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 541-548-7483. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUPS: For the bereaved; 541-771-3247. GRIEFSHARE (FAITH-BASED) RECOVERY CLASS: 541-389-8780. HEALING ENCOURAGEMENT FOR ABORTION-RELATED TRAUMA (H.E.A.R.T.): 541-318-1949. HEALTHY BEGINNINGS: Free screenings ages 0-5; 541-383-6357. HEALTHY FAMILIES OF THE HIGH DESERT: Home visits for families with newborns; 541-749-2133 HEARING LOSS ASSOCIATION: 541-848-2806 or hlaco2@gmx.com. HEARTS OF HOPE: Abortion healing; 541-728-4673. IMPROVE YOUR STRESS LIFE: 541-706-2904. JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER: 541-389-7665. LA LECHE LEAGUE OF BEND: 541-317-5912. LIVING WELL (CHRONIC CONDITIONS): 541-322-7430. LIVING WITH CHRONIC ILLNESSES SUPPORT GROUP: 541-536-7399. LUPUS & FIBROMYALGIA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-526-1375. MADRAS NICOTINE ANONYMOUS GROUP: 541-993-0609. MATERNAL/CHILD HEALTH PROGRAM (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. MEN’S CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-5864. MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. NARCONON: 800-468-6933. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS (NA): 541-416-2146. NATIONAL ALLIANCE ON MENTAL ILLNESS OF CENTRAL OREGON (NAMI): 541-408-7779 or 541-504-1431. NEWBERRY HOSPICE OF LA PINE: 541-536-7399. OREGON COMMISSION FOR THE BLIND: 541-447-4915. OREGON CURE: 541-475-2164.

OREGON LYME DISEASE NETWORK: 541-312-3081 or www.oregonlyme.org. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS: 541-306-6844. PARENTS OF MURDERED CHILDREN (POMC) SUPPORT GROUP: 541-410-7395. PARISH NURSES AND HEALTH MINISTRIES: 541-383-6861. PARKINSON’S CAREGIVERS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-317-1188. PARKINSON’S SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. PARTNERS IN CARE: Home health and hospice services; 541-382-5882. PFLAG CENTRAL OREGON: For parents, families and friends of lesbians and gays; 541-317-2334 or www.pflagcentraloregon.org. PLAN LOVING ADOPTIONS NOW (PLAN): 541-389-9239. PLANNED PARENTHOOD: 888-875-7820. PMS ACCESS LINE: 800-222-4767. PREGNANCY RESOURCE CENTERS: Bend, 541-385-5334; Madras, 541-475-5338; Prineville, 541-4472420; Redmond, 541-504-8919. PULMONARY HYPERTENSION SUPPORT GROUP: 541-548-7489. RECOVERING COUPLES ANONYMOUS (RCA): 541-389-0969 or www.recovering-couples.org. SAVING GRACE SUPPORT GROUPS: Bend, 541-382-4420; Redmond, 541-504-2550, ext. 1; Madras, 541-475-1880. SCLERODERMA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-480-1958. SELF-ESTEEM GROUP FOR WOMEN: 541-389-7960. SEXAHOLICS ANONYMOUS: 541-595-8780. SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASE TESTING (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. SOUP AND SUPPORT: For mourners; 541-548-7483. SUPPORT GROUP FOR FAMILIES WITH DIABETIC CHILDREN: 541-526-6690. TOBACCO FREE ALLIANCE: 541-322-7481. TOPS OR: Bend, 541-388-5634; Culver, 541-546-4012; Redmond, 541-923-0878. VETERANS HOTLINE: 541-408-5594 or 818-634-0735. VISION NW: Peer support group; 541-330-0715. VOLUNTEERS IN MEDICINE: 541-330-9001. WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-385-0747 WOMEN’S SELF-ESTEEM GROUP: 541-389-7960. WOMEN’S SUPPORT GROUP FOR ANGER, ANXIETY, OR DEPRESSION: 541-389-7960. WOMEN SURVIVING WITH CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-5864. WOMEN WITH HIDDEN DISABILITIES PEER GROUP: 541-388-8103, ext. 207. ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 541-388-3179.

Laser Resurfacing | Fraxel | Restylane Precision Liposuction | Botox

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541-788-7537


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, September 22, 2011 F3

M Hypnosis Continued from F1 Eventually, she said, “I got to a place where I felt a sense of trust instead of fear.” In February, doctors removed a plum-sized tumor from her brain. But there the similarity to her previous experience ended. Ritchie woke up from the procedure, she said, feeling “alert and awesome.” She ate a full dinner that night and went home in two days. “My neurosurgeon was stunned at how little medication I required before and after surgery, and how quickly I bounced back,” she said. Ritchie attributes her speedy recovery and calm state to her hypnosis sessions. Used for more than two centuries to treat a host of medical problems, particularly pain management and anxiety, hypnosis is now available to patients at some of the most respected medical institutions in the country, including Stanford Hospital in California, the Cleveland Clinic and Mount Sinai Medical Center and Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Some critics find the research into mind-body therapies unconvincing, but their skepticism has not deterred patients like Ritchie. And there are researchers who say they believe that by helping patients feel in better control of their symptoms, hypnosis can reduce the need for medication and lower costs. “It is an effective and inexpensive way to manage medical care,” said Dr. David Spiegel, director of the Center on Stress and Health at Stanford Universi-

ty School of Medicine and a leading authority on hypnosis. A study by radiologists at Harvard Medical School, published in 2000, found that patients who received hypnosis during surgery required less medication, had fewer complications and shorter procedures than patients who did not have hypnosis. In a follow-up study in 2002, the radiologists concluded that if every patient undergoing catheterization were to receive hypnosis, the cost savings would amount to $338 per patient. “When patients are groggy from anesthesia drugs, it costs more to recover them,” said Dr. Elvira Lang, an associate professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and a lead author of both studies. “Hypnosis calms patients.” If you have a medical condition for which conventional medicine is not working, or you’d like to try a gentle mind-body alternative, hypnosis may be worth considering. Here are some things to keep in mind:

• The therapist There is no uniformly accepted definition of hypnosis, but most experts generally agree that it is an altered mental state in which a patient becomes highly focused and more receptive to social cues. During a session, the practitioner guides the subject into a relaxed state and then makes specific suggestions to help change a behavior, a perception or a physiological condition. Someone who is trying to quit smoking, for instance, might be told under hypnosis that cigarettes are poisons and that it’s important to care for

and respect his body. Some patients find that hypnosis is a helpful adjunct to traditional psychotherapy. “Talk therapy engages the conscious mind, which is overwhelmingly facile at creating blocks to avoid hurtful problems,” said Dr. Tanya Edwards, director of the Center for Integrative Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic. “In hypnosis, the therapist is dealing with the subconscious mind and can get at core problems more quickly.” Whatever the approach, it’s important to find a highly skilled practitioner. “Hypnosis is like a surgeon’s knife,” said Edward Frischholz, a clinical psychologist in Chicago who has written more than 50 papers on clinical and experimental hypnosis. “In the right hands it can be life-saving, but in the wrong it could cause harm.” There is no universal licensing process for practitioners who do hypnosis, so look for a licensed health professional — for instance, a psychologist, medical doctor or social worker — who has been trained in hypnosis. Ask your doctors and therapists for recommendations, or go to the Societies of Hypnosis website, which allows you to search by ZIP code and specialty.

• The session At your first session, the practitioner will discuss your condition and may administer a short test to assess how hypnotizable you are. Most people are susceptible to hypnosis. But if someone is clearly not, then the therapist or doctor may try another technique or

suggest a different approach to the patient’s problem. Most sessions last about 50 minutes. Specific conditions — like smoking, a fear of dogs or flying or temporary insomnia — may require just one session. In 2008, the personal health columnist Jane E. Brody recalled in this newspaper that her husband was able to stop smoking after just one session of hypnosis. “For very circumscribed disorders, hypnosis works very quickly or not at all,” said Frischholz. If your problem is more complex, like post-traumatic stress disorder or depression, it may require multiple sessions. “I might spend the first two sessions taking a history and learning about someone’s background,” said Carol Ginandes, an assistant clinical professor of psychology at Harvard Medical School who uses hypnosis in her private practice. “Then I would work with the patient in a very individualized way.” A session costs between $75 and $200, depending on where you live and the credentials of the practitioner. If the therapist or doctor is in your insurance network, then you may pay only a standard co-payment. Insurers do not cover hypnosis itself, however; it will have to be billed as a part of your counseling, or as an office visit.

HypnosisNetwork.com or HealthJourneys.com, may not be able to help you with a particular or complicated condition, like a lifelong struggle with depression, but they may help train you to calm down before a big test or surgical procedure. Some practitioners may send you home with a custom-made CD or tape that you can use on your own. Your therapist or doctor may also teach you self-hypnosis, as Ritchie’s therapist did. You learn how to put yourself in a deeply relaxed, receptive state in which you repeat statements such as “My body is strong and can handle this surgery,” or “I feel calm and relaxed.” “People think hypnosis is about giving up control,” said Spiegel. “But it’s actually giving control back to the patients.”

VITAL STATS Multispecialty clinics struggling Last year was a difficult year for large multispecialty physician clinics. According to a survey of 239 medical groups, most of whom had more than 100 physicians on staff, only groups in the Western region were close to the break-even mark for operating revenue. Region West East South North

Source: American Medical Group Association

Every Friday In

You’ve finally found what you’re looking for...

• The D-I-Y approach If the thought of someone putting you in a trancelike state makes you uncomfortable, hypnosis with tape or CD at home may be a practical alternative. CDs made for a general audience, available at websites like

Experience with Compassion Now accepting patients in

Please send information about people involved in health issues to communitylife@bendbulletin.com. Contact: 541-383-0351.

New Bend location (Next to Cascade Lakes Brewing Co.)

Andrew Knox PT, COMT

Dr. Jennifer Surber

Dr. David Kelly

Dr. Jennifer Surber has joined High Lakes Health Care’s east Bend location as a family practice physician. Surber graduated from The School of Medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center and completed her residency in family medicine. She also practiced emergency medicine in Colorado and California and worked internationally, providing medical relief in Haiti and teaching EMS students in China.

Jenny Anderson and Doug Christman, both personal trainers at Athletic Club of Bend, are now Z-Health movement reeducation specialists after receiving training in Z-Health, a neurologically based performance enhancement system. Scott Peery, Athletic Club of Bend movement coach and a Z-Health Master Trainer, also attended the training.

Dr. Lorissa Hemmer

Jenny Anderson

Doug Christman

Scott Peery

Rebecca Hayes DPT

1441 SW Chandler Ave., Ste. 103 • Bend • 541-318-8145 450 NW Greenwood Ave. • Redmond • 541-923-0410

www.peaktherapy.net

REMEMBER HOW YOU LOVE LISTENING TO WIND?

It’s time to hear the leaves in the breeze again ... clearly.

Dr. David Kelly has joined High Lakes Health Care’s Old Mill District location in Bend as a family practice physician. Kelly is a board certified family physician and has a certificate of added qualifications in sports medicine. He is a former resident of Treasure Valley, Idaho. Dr. Lorissa Hemmer has joined the Bend Memorial Clinic ophthalmology department after working several years as an optometrist in Bend. Hemmer completed her optometric doctorate at Pennsylvania College of Optometry and bachelor of science at University of Portland. She currently serves as a captain in the U.S. Army Reserves Medical Corps. She is a member of the American Optometric Association, Oregon Optometric Physicians Association and Central Oregon Optometric Physician Association. She volunteers with Volunteers in Medicine.

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

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Dr. Thomas Manning has been selected as medical director for Mountain View Hospital in Madras. Manning is a Dr. Thomas graduate of the Manning University of Oregon Health Sciences Center in Portland. He has 31 years of experience in medicine and previously served in the U.S. Public Health System.

Operating loss per physician -$27 -$1,597 -$1,870 -$10,669

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932 NE 3RD ST. BEND 541-382-3308 • 106 SW 7TH ST. REDMOND 541-548-7011


F4 Thursday, September 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M Vaccine Continued from F1 The vaccine also comes in a pediatric dose for children 6 months to 8 years old, but requires two shots to provide full protection. Clinics and pharmacies tend to order more of the standard flu shot because it has few age limitations, limiting the chance they will get stuck with unused vaccine.

Intradermal injection The newcomer this year is an intradermal injection made by Sanofi Pasteur. Rather than injecting the vaccine deep into the muscle, it injects a smaller amount of the vaccine just below the surface of the skin. That allows for a much shorter, ultrafine needle, which may minimize needle phobia. A traditional flu shot needle for injections in the muscle is about 1 inch to 1.5 inches long, while the intradermal needle is a mere 0.6 inches in length. The intradermal vaccine also has a smaller dose, 0.1 milliliters, rather than 0.5 milliliters. The vaccine is injected into the dermal layer of the skin, which contains a high concentration of specialized cells, called dendretic cells, which play a key role in generating an immune response. Many people who have received the intradermal shot say it hurts less. The product may be hard to find this flu season as FDA approval came only in May, well after most clinics had put in their orders for the 2011-12 flu season. According to Sanofi spokeswoman Donna Cary, the company would not start shipping the new Intraderm vaccine until late September, and will distribute only about 1 million doses nationwide this year. “Our goal this year is to let people get a chance to experience it, and then there will be more next year,” Cary said. The intradermal vaccine can be slightly more expensive for clinics to purchase, up to $2 more per shot, although some of that cost might be offset by not having to purchase needles. But for most individuals, especially those with health insurance, there likely won’t be a significant difference in cost. Medicare covers the cost of the shot under its Part B program.

FluZone High-Dose For individuals over age 65, a new high-dose vaccine came on the market last year. Also made by Sanofi, the FluZone HighDose vaccine contains four times the amount of antigen — the part of the vaccine that prompts the body to make antibodies — contained in regular flu shots. “As we age, our immune system doesn’t produce as much of a certain type of T-cell that’s needed to create an immune response when triggered by a new antigen,” Cary said. “So this is designed specifically for the seniors to get them up to where people that aren’t seniors should be.” The CDC said seniors could consider the high-dose vaccine as an option this year, but did not go so far as to recommend it over the standard flu shot. Officials are waiting on research comparing the two, and expect that data could come as early as next year. The high-dose shot is significantly more expensive. The Albertson’s chain of grocery stores, for example, is charging $59.99 for the high-dose flu shot, compared with $28.99 for a standard dose. Most elderly individuals, however, are covered by Medicare, which will pay the higher cost of the high-dose shot.

FluMist For those who just can’t stand needles, FluMist nasal spray is becoming popular. Approved several years ago, the nasal spray is a live attenuated virus, meaning the patient is actually getting exposed to a weakened form of the virus. It can cause a bit of a runny nose, but otherwise is well tolerated. “The nasal spray is a nice option if people are afraid of needles and they’re healthy, (and) they don’t have any chronic conditions that might predispose them to complications from the flu,” Shuman said. “But it’s only available for ages 2 to 49.” The spray is also not appropriate for pregnant women. Shuman

Next week New birth control method — OHSU researchers are working on an improvement to the pill.

VITAL STATS

All gassed up I’m not at all squeamish about needles, but when Fred Meyer pharmacies announced they had a needle-free flu vaccine that uses a CO2 gas cartridge, I was intrigued. I was curious how it would feel in comparison to a standard flu shot. So last week, I went to the Bend Fred Meyer store to try it out. For the sake of full disclosure, my insurance plan picked up the full cost of the shot. Pharmacist Randy Scott showed me how the device works. The Biojector 2000 looks as futuristic as it sounds. A flap opens on the side where a gas cartridge is inserted. The vaccine is drawn into a plastic syringe, which is then inserted into the end of the device. Scott grabbed my upper arm and pulled it toward him, pressing the end of the syringe tight against my skin. I could hear a couple of clicks and the sounds of the gas being released, something akin to the opening of a soda can. I felt the pinch of the vac-

said the flu mist gets the most use in kids, to ease vaccination especially for those squeamish about needles. “It’s just kind of a squirt in the nose,” she said. “It’s so quick, the nurses are so good at it, they sometimes don’t realize what’s happened to them.” A large international clinical trial found that FluMist was twice as effective as an intramuscular injection in preventing flu in children between the ages of 6 months and 5 years. But its real effectiveness may lie in getting more people immunized. “FluMist has been around quite a while, and that’s been a great option especially for kids or anybody who has needle phobia,” Kaisner said. “We all wish that could come in other vaccines.”

Biojector 2000 In the Pacific Northwest, individuals will also have a new home-grown option this year. Fred Meyer Pharmacies are offering needleless injections using a CO2 gas-powered needlefree injector manufactured by Portland-based Bioject Medical Technologies. “While needle-free vaccines have been used in the past in some public agencies and the military, this is the first time this option has been available to the public through their pharmacies,” said Marc Cecchini, vice president and director of pharmacy for Fred Meyer Stores. “This provides a great alternative for customers who are wary of needles but want to protect themselves against the flu.” The Biojector is not a vaccine but a new delivery device, an alternative to the traditional needle and syringe. The device can be used for any type of injection up to 1 milliliter of liquid, although Fred Meyer pharmacies are currently only using it for the flu vaccine. Patients get the same vaccine as the traditional flu shot, but it’s propelled through the skin with gas instead of being injected through a needle. The system has three components: a durable injection device, a disposable needle-free syringe, and a CO2 cartridge, similar to the gas cartridges used by cyclists to inflate bicycle tires. The plastic syringe is the only part of the system that comes in contact with the patient’s skin. After each injection, the used syringe is discarded and a new one is inserted. “We believe this will have greater patient compliance. Some people just don’t like needles,” said Raph Makar, Bioject’s president and CEO. “The pharmacist can’t stick himself with the needle, and with a needle syringe you have to have sharps disposal, so it eliminates sharps waste.” When a vaccine is injected into the muscle, it can pool in an area and take some time to disperse. With the Biojector, the vaccine tends to spread out immediately, which the company said can improve the immune response.

Flu season Clinics and pharmacies are just now receiving their first shipments of the various flu vac-

Number of heavy smokers declining in U.S.

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Fred Meyer pharmacist Randy Scott administers Bulletin reporter Markian Hawryluk’s annual flu vaccination using the Biojector 2000, a needleless syringe that delivers the vaccine using compressed gas, last week in the grocery chain’s Bend store. cine being pushed through my skin in less than a second. Scott said about half of people say the injection hurts just as much as with a needle, a quarter say it hurts more, a quarter say it hurts less. I fell into that last category. It hurt, but not as much as a needle,

and it certainly did not have that sharp sting of a traditional shot. The device also spreads the vaccine just below the skin. The next morning I woke up with a large reddish spot, about the size of a quarter, at the injection site. It was sore to

the touch, but not as sore as I was after last year’s flu shot. In short, I wouldn’t go out of my way to track down the Biojector next year. But given the choice, I’d choose it over a traditional shot every time. — Markian Hawryluk, The Bulletin

Submitted photo

Sanofi Pasteur offers a variety of flu vaccine options, including a high-dose version for seniors, standard and pediatric versions of its standard vaccine, and a new intradermal vaccine preloaded into a syringe with a much smaller needle. cines, and flu shot clinics will soon start in earnest (for current clinics, see Page F2). Each year, flu experts must predict months earlier what flu strains will circulate in the coming flu season to allow the vaccine manufacturers to grow the vaccine in eggs. (That’s why people with egg allergies can not be immunized against the flu.) The 2011-12 flu vaccine contains the same three strains as last year’s product, including the

H1N1 virus that caused much commotion last year. Nevertheless, the CDC is recommending that everyone get a flu vaccination again this year. “Annual vaccination is recommended, including people who were vaccinated last year, because levels of protective antibodies against influenza viruses decline over the course of the year, particularly in elderly and people with compromised immune systems,” said

Dr. Carolyn Bridges, CDC’s associate director for adult immunization. Last year, about 49 percent of children and 41 percent of adults were vaccinated, and some of those may still have some remaining immunity. Officials are hoping that a second winter with the same circulating strains may mean more of the population will be protected, limiting the severity of the flu season. But the flu virus is notorious for change, with strains combining with other strains to form new combinations that can outwit the immunization campaign. “I think we’re hoping that it’s a milder season, since it’s the same strains as last year,” Kaisner said. “But one never really knows with flu. It’s always unpredictable.” Markian Hawryluk can be reached at 541-617-7814 or mhawryluk@bend bulletin.com.

The percentage of Americans who smoke declined slightly between 2005 and 2010, according to a new federal report. More encouraging, the percentage of smokers who smoked more than 30 cigarettes a day dropped from 13 to 8 percent, while those who smoked nine or fewer increased. Researchers said that means that though only slighly fewer people are smoking, those who do smoke may be doing it less often.

Percentage of daily smokers, by number of cigarettes smoked per day 1–9 CPD 10–19 CPD

20–29 CPD ≥30 CPD

40 30

21.8% 20 16.4% 10 12.7%

8.3% 0 ’05

’06

’07

’08

’09

’10

Source: Centers for Diesease Control and Prevention Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Get a taste of Food, Home & Garden In

AT HOME Every Tuesday


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, September 22, 2011 F5

M Pertussis vaccine may require booster The Associated Press

Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Rates of abusive head trauma in children younger than 5 rose during the last recession, suggesting that economic woes may have led parents to lash out against their kids, researchers reported Monday in the journal Pediatrics. The data also suggest that physicians today may want to be extra vigilant for signs of child abuse as economic conditions remain in the doldrums, the team wrote. The notion that economic hardship leads to increases in child abuse is not new — scientific research and anecdotal reports have long shown a relationship. For example, the Los Angeles Times reported during the recession in 1994 about increases in child abuse and neglect in Los Angeles County. In recent years, the co-authors noted in the Pediatrics study, articles in the popular press have again stoked concerns that abuse was on the rise as the economy worsened. Hoping to better understand the relationship, Dr. Rachel Berger of the Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh and her co-authors reviewed medical records of children younger than 5 with abusive head trauma in three regions — six counties in the Seattle area, 23 counties in western Pennsylvania, and 45 counties in Ohio and northern Kentucky — between Jan. 1, 2004, and June 30, 2009. Roughly the first four years of that period preceded the recession; the last 19

are genetic factors causing or exacerbating a condition. Schirripa received his medical degree from St. George’s University School of Medicine in Grenada. He completed a number of residency and fellowship programs, including at Children’s Hospital in Denver, the University of Colorado Health Science Center and Swedish Medical Center in Seattle. He accepts most insurance plans, including Medicare and the Oregon Health Plan. — Betsy Q. Cliff, The Bulletin

Partners In Care presents OCTOBER 2011

FLU SHOT CLINICS Rich Pedroncelli / The Associated Press

Nurse Susan Peel gives a whooping cough vaccination earlier this week to a student at Inderkum High School in Sacramento, Calif. The whooping cough vaccine given to babies and toddlers loses much of its effectiveness after just three years — a lot faster than doctors believed — and that could help explain a recent series of outbreaks in the U.S. among children who were fully vaccinated, a study suggests. Marin County has a reputation for anti-vaccine sentiment, and Witt said that when he started the study he expected to see the illness concentrated in unvaccinated people. But more than 80 percent of the children who developed whooping cough in Witt’s study were fully vaccinated. California health officials told doctors last year that they could give the booster to kids as young as 7 in an effort to stifle the outbreak. Federal health officials said that they are still studying the issue and that it is too soon to make that a standard practice. At the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which makes recommendations on childhood shots, officials acknowledged that the vaccine’s protection declines, but they said the agency’s own studies show the drop-off is not as pronounced as Witt’s research found. The CDC has estimated that the risk of the disease can increase fourfold several years after vaccination, not 10 to 20 times. One reason may be differences in how a case of whooping cough is defined: Witt counted positive test results, while the CDC also requires more than a week of symptoms.

Child abuse rates climb in recession, study shows By Eryn Brown

Genetic clinic opens in Bend A new genetic counseling service has opened in Bend near the Old Mill District. Central Oregon Genetics Center, at 143 S.W. ShevlinHixon Drive, will do genetic evaluations, risk assessment and testing for individuals for a variety of genetic conditions. The clinic is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays. Dr. Osvaldo Schirripa, who runs the clinic, said he spends up to two hours with each patient and obtains a detailed history to try to determine whether there

By Mike Stobbe ATLANTA — The whooping cough vaccine given to babies and toddlers loses much of its effectiveness after just three years — a lot faster than doctors believed — and that could help explain a recent series of outbreaks in the U.S. among children who were fully vaccinated, a study suggests. The study is small and preliminary, and its authors said the results need to be confirmed through more research. Nevertheless, the findings are likely to stir debate over whether children should get a booster shot earlier than now recommended. “I was disturbed to find maybe we had a little more confidence in the vaccine than it might deserve,” said the lead researcher, Dr. David Witt, chief of infectious disease at the Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in San Rafael, Calif. Witt presented his findings Monday at a medical conference in Chicago. The study was done in California, where whooping cough vaccinations are a hot-button issue. The state had a huge spike in whooping cough cases last year, during which more than 9,100 people fell ill and 10 babies died. California schools have turned away thousands of middle and high school students this fall who haven’t gotten their booster shot. Government health officials recommend that children get vaccinated against whooping cough in five doses, with the first shot at age 2 months and the final one between 4 and 6 years. Then youngsters are supposed to get a booster shot around 11 or 12. That means a gap of five to eight years. Witt’s study looked at roughly 15,000 children in Marin County, Calif., including 132 who got whooping cough last year. He found that youngsters who had gone three years or more since the last of their five original shots were as much as 20 times more likely to become infected than children who had been more recently vaccinated. The largest number of cases was in children 8 to 12 years old. Whooping cough, or pertussis, is a highly contagious bacterial disease that in rare cases can be fatal. It leads to severe coughing that causes children to make a distinctive whooping sound as they gasp for breath.

IN BRIEF

months coincided with it. A total of 422 children in the studied regions, 58 percent of them boys, were treated for abusive head trauma during the research period. Their average age was 8.9 months; more than three-fourths were less than a year old. Sixty-three percent went to a pediatric intensive care unit. Sixteen percent died. All three areas had significant increases in abusive head trauma during the recession. Put together, the annual rate of the injuries went up from 8.9 per 100,000 before the recession to 14.7 per 100,000 during the recession, the team reported. The researchers did not find any correlation between unemployment rates in the counties and abusive head trauma. They speculated that this might be because official unemployment figures exclude people who are underemployed, people who are discouraged in their job searches and others who might be under economic pressure. “Although it is not possible to prove a causal relationship between the AHT rate and the economy with our analysis, we believe the data are compelling enough to influence policy and clinical decisions,” the researchers wrote. Possible approaches might include discussion of the ways economic stressors could be mediated to prevent the abuse, as well as increased vigilance for signs of abuse during times of economic stress.

CDC officials stressed that the vaccination is still much better than nothing — it reduces how sick a child becomes. Also, the nation no longer sees thousands of whooping cough deaths each year, as it did before there was a vaccine. The shots “are still our best protection against pertussis, and they still protect well against fatal disease,” said Dr. Tom Clark, who leads the CDC’s epidemiology team focused on vaccinepreventable diseases. Versions of the vaccine are made by two companies — Sanofi Pasteur and GlaxoSmithKline. The companies have acknowledged that the immunity conferred by the vaccine wanes over time, but they declined to comment on Witt’s study. The type of vaccine given in the U.S. has been in use since the late 1990s. It is typically administered in a combination shot that also protects against tetanus and diphtheria. Nearly every state requires children to get the full series of shots before enrolling in school. Periodic outbreaks still occur in places with high vaccination rates.

The short-term effectiveness of the vaccine has been shown to be 90 percent or higher in the first couple of years. The long-term effectiveness is not well understood, but researchers thought it was more than three years. A preliminary study conducted by the CDC last year found the five-dose vaccination for children was about 70 percent effective five years after the last shot. Witt’s research suggests the effectiveness may drop much lower than that, perhaps below 50 percent after just three years. Witt also found that shots work great in the short term. Rates of whooping cough dropped dramatically after kids were age 11 and 12, when many get the booster shot. The long-term effectiveness of that booster also is not known and has received relatively little study. Health officials are also discussing whether additional boosters may one day be recommended for teenagers or adults. “It’s a little too soon to say much” about the longer-term effectiveness of that booster, said Lara Misegades, a CDC epidemiologist.

Each shot includes both seasonal and H1N1 strains

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F6 Thursday, September 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

F Shoulder strengthening with resistance band

GOOD FOR YOU Lengthen your life with healthy behavior The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say people can live longer if they practice one or more of the following behaviors: not smoking, eating a healthy diet, getting regular physical activity and limiting alcohol. Some longevity benefit was found in those who adopted only one, but people who engaged in all four healthy behaviors were 66 percent less likely to die early from cancer, 65 percent less likely to die early from cardiovascular disease, and 57 percent less likely to

Caitlin Mastenbroek demonstrates an internal rotation exercise for rotator cuff rehabilitation or preventive therapy. She said: Keep the arms bent at 90 degrees, with elbows touching the body and pull against the resistance of an resistance band. For the internal rotation, start about 45 degree away from the

body and move the hand across the body until the fist touches the body. A towel can provide a physical reminder that the elbow needs to touch the side. Switch the anchor point for the resistance band and rotate externally. Start with fist against the stomach and pull out away from the body.

NO

die early from other causes compared to people who did not engage in any of the healthy behaviors. Not smoking provided the most protection from dying from all of the causes examined. Researchers analyzed data from the CDC’s National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III Mortality Study, a survey of people first recruited between 1988 and 1994 and followed through 2006. — Anne Aurand, The Bulletin

NO

YES

YES

Source: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Swimming

tween the shoulder and arm bones — the ball and socket — eventually wore down the Continued from F1 supraspinatus tendons in his Rodeo said shoulder pain in rotator cuffs. The problem was swimmers comes from: exacerbated because the front • Muscle fatigue from overdo- edge of the acromion bone in his ing it. shoulder joint was bent down• Degenerative changes in the ward into the joint, something he rotator cuff tendon, a condition was born with, which increased called tendonosis. the friction on the tendon. • Impingement of the rota“I never had pain stop me from tor cuff during the swimming swimming,” he said. “It was surstroke. The rotator cuff is a prising to me how much damage group of four tendons that hook there was before it tore.” up to muscles that stabilize the One day, while camping, shoulder joint. Impingement re- he was lifting a load and felt sults from pressure on the rota- something pop — the suprator cuff from part of the shoul- spinatus tendon in his right der blade — the scapula — as shoulder. Two years later while the arm is lifted. lifting weights, the same thing • Shoulder laxity — when happened in his left shoulder. there’s looseness in shoulder Mann, a physician at High support and stability from weak Lakes Health Care, had surmuscles and ligaments. gery on the right shoulder in “Shoulder stability is con- 2000 and the left in 2002. trolled by a synchronous pattern He’s recovered now and says of muscle firing. Changes in the he’s smarter about weight trainway the muscles ing, maintaining work due to overcore strength load or fatigue and stability. VIDEO DEMO can alter shoulHe’s also taken OF SWIMMING der mechanics lessons about and cause probproper form, and FORM PROBLEMS: lems,” he said. does yoga whenhttp://vid.ly/7d9c9r When a musever he can. All cle is fatigued, of these things other muscles try help his shoulto compensate, ders stay safe which creates an imbalance. The during swimming. And he’s still shoulder is no longer functioning swimming competitively. normally, and this, coupled with Mann comes from a family of repetitive motion, is a recipe for serious swimmers. pain. His brother, Mike Mann, owns Doctors, swimmers and physi- a swim school in Denver that cal therapists say a leading cause works with swimmers and triathof repetitive-use shoulder pain is letes on mechanics to prevent inpoor mechanics or technique. juries. Mike Mann said one comSteve Mann, of Bend, is 59 and mon form mistake is to stretch has been a swimmer since age the arms out to the side too much 4. For about 40 of those years, during a freestyle swim. Imagine, the avid and competitive swim- he suggested, that you’re swimmer used technique that was all ming in a tube, like a culvert, and wrong, he said. you have to keep your hands from Repetitive impingement be- hitting the sides.

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday In Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Alpine Physical Therapy and Spine Care personal fitness trainer Caitlin Mastenbroek demonstrates how to pull against a resistance band in a rowing exercise, recommended for swimmers. Tips to remember: keep the shoulders down and pinch shoulder blades together when you pull back.

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September 24, 30, October 8 • 12pm-5pm Typically, when one’s arms go out to the side, the body tilts too far over. That over-rotation can stress the shoulder. Keep the arms in line and pull under the body, he said. Another common mistake that will stress the shoulder in a freestyle stroke, he said, is to pull with the shoulder muscles instead of the latissimus dorsi — the upper back. To better focus just on one’s stroke, he suggested placing a foam pull buoy between the legs, which provides support and flotation for the lower body without kicking, and using a swimming snorkel made for swimming laps. He also says most people should avoid using paddles on their hands, unless they have perfect form. Scott Weber, a physical therapist and an owner of Alpine Physical Therapy and Spine Care in Bend, treats symptoms of swimmer’s shoulder pain once it’s too late, he said. But for people who are not currently experiencing pain, he recommends some basic exercises (see photos) to prevent injuries. For anyone experiencing pain, he said, doing exercises improperly could aggravate inflam-

mation and increase the risk of a rotator cuff tear. “We want to decrease the inflammatory process and rebuild the healthy tissues,” Weber said. Swimmers with pain should see a physician or a physical therapist.

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, September 22, 2011 F7

N FDA TO DR. OZ:

Quiz

Apple juice is safe

Continued from F1 The government’s comprehensive document says that vegetables and fruits provide many nutrients that are underconsumed in the United States, including folate, magnesium, potassium, dietary fiber, and vitamins A, C and K. Also, evidence suggests that intake of at least 2½ cups of vegetables and fruits per day is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, in-

By Marilynn Marchione The Associated Press

Arsenic in apple juice! Fed to babies! And it probably came from China! Television’s Dr. Mehmet Oz is under fire from the FDA and others for sounding what they say is a false alarm about the dangers of apple juice. Oz, one of TV’s most popular medical experts, said on his Fox show last week that testing by a New Jersey lab had found what he suggested were troubling levels of arsenic in many brands of juice. The Food and Drug Administration said its own tests show no such thing, even on one of the same juice batches Oz cited. “There is no evidence of any public health risk from drinking these juices. And FDA has been testing them for years,” the agency said in a statement. The flap escalated Sept. 15, when Oz’s former medical school classmate Dr. Richard Besser lambasted him on ABC’s “Good Morning America” show for what Besser called an “extremely irresponsible” report that was akin to “yelling ‘Fire!’ in a movie theater.” Besser was acting head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention before joining ABC news as health and medical editor several years ago. Arsenic is naturally present in water, air, food and soil in two forms — organic and inorganic. According to the FDA, organic arsenic passes through the body quickly and is essentially harmless. Inorganic arsenic — the type found in pesticides — can be toxic and may pose a cancer risk if consumed at high levels or over a long period. “The Dr. Oz Show” did not break down the type when it tested several dozen juice samples for total arsenic. As a result, the FDA said the results are misleading. Furthermore, the agency’s own tests found far lower total arsenic levels from one of the same juice batches the Oz show tested — 2 to 6 parts per billion of arsenic versus the 36 that Oz’s show had claimed. Tests of the same batch conducted by two different food testing labs for the juice’s maker, Nestle USA, which sells Juicy Juice under the Gerber brand, also found levels consistent with the FDA results. In a letter published on the Oz show’s website, Nestle said it told the program’s producer in advance that the method the show’s lab used was intended for testing waste water, not fruit juice, and “therefore their results would be unreliable at best.” The FDA also sent a letter in advance to the show and threatened to post its findings and the letters online if the program proceeded. Oz went ahead. “American apple juice is made from apple concentrate, 60 percent of which is imported from China,” the website version of his report says. “Other countries may use pesticides that contain arsenic, a heavy metal known to cause cancer.” The show tested three dozen samples from five brands, and Oz claimed that 10 had more arsenic than the limit allowed in drinking water — 10 parts per billion. However, the FDA said the arsenic in water tends to be inorganic, justifying the strict limit. In contrast, organic arsenic is the form usually found in food and juices. Tests over the last 20 years show apple juice typically has fewer than 10 parts per billion total arsenic. The mercurial Oz is a heart surgeon at Columbia University and heads an alternative medicine program at New York Presbyterian Hospital. He was a regular on Oprah Winfrey’s show for many years before getting his own program two years ago.

Next week Farmed or wild — which fish is healthier?

cluding heart attack and stroke. Some vegetables and fruits may be protective against certain types of cancer. And, most vegetables, if prepared without added fats or sugars, are low in calories. So how well do you know your vegetables? Can you recognize the characteristics of the following vegetables? Hint: There is one from each vegetable subgroup. Anne Aurand can be reached at 541-383-0304 or at aaurand@bendbulletin.com.

How well do you know your veggies? Match the description below with the vegetable photo to the right. Answers are printed below. Veggie 1: •Excellent source of protein, high in dietary fiber, potassium and folate •Often eaten cold in salads or hot in soups •The type sold in the United States is usually cream-colored and relatively round •Main ingredient in hummus

A) A) Tomato Tomato

RE SEARCH

Not just milk: Prunes make bones strong In a small study of postmenopausal women over a 12-month period, a Florida State University research team found that a group of women who ate about 10 prunes (dried plums) a day had higher bone density in their forearms and spines than a group of women who ate an equal amount of dried apples. Both groups also received daily doses of calcium and vitamin D. The research, “Comparative Effects of Dried Plum and Dried Apple on Bone in Post Menopausal Women,” published in the British Journal of Nutrition, suggests eating dried plums could help stave off fractures and osteoporosis. “Over my career, I have tested numerous fruits, includ-

Thinkstock

ing figs, dates, strawberries and raisins, and none of them come anywhere close to having the effect on bone density that dried plums or prunes have,” said Bahram H. Arjmandi, a professor and chairman of the Department of Nutrition, Food and Exer-

cise Sciences in the College of Human Sciences at Florida State University. “All fruits and vegetables have a positive effect on nutrition, but in terms of bone health, this particular food is exceptional.” –Anne Aurand, The Bulletin

B) B) Garbanzos Garbanzos

Veggie 2:

•The French call them “love apples” •High in lycopene, an antioxidant that may help lower the risk of certain cancers and other conditions such as cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis •Taste best when stored at room temperature •Botanically, they are a fruit

C) C) Potatoes Potatoes

Veggie 3: •High in vitamin A •A dark green lettuce •Had its start as a Mediterranean weed •Has a long, loaf-shaped head of sturdy leaves D) D) Romaine Romaine Veggie 4: •Contains phytochemicals that may help reduce the risk of certain cancers •Its four-petaled flowers bear a resemblance to a Greek cross, resulting in it frequently being referred to as a crucifer or cruciferous vegetable •Mark Twain called this vegetable “…a cabbage with a college education” •Commonly creamy white in color E) Cauliflower

Veggie 5: •The leading vegetable crop in the U.S. •A medium (5.3 oz.) skin-on serving has just 110 calories •High in potassium, a nutrient the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend Americans increase in their diet •A model of this vegetable serves as the basis for a toy named after it Answers: Veggie 1: B; Veggie 2: A; Veggie 3: D; Veggie 4: E; Veggie 5: C

Source: "Name that Veggie" by Alice Henneman, University of Nebraska, Lincoln Photos via Thinkstock Greg Cross / The Bulletin

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F8 Thursday, September 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

H E A LT H

HOT CHEMOTHERAPY BATH

Patients see hope, but critics have doubts about treatment By Andrew Pollack New York Times News Service

SAN DIEGO — This is cancer therapy at its most aggressive, a treatment patients liken to being filleted, disemboweled and then bathed in hot poison. The therapy, which couples extensive abdominal surgery with blasts of heated chemotherapy to the abdominal cavity and its organs, was once a niche procedure used mainly against rare cancers of the appendix. Most academic medical centers shunned it. More recently, as competition for patients and treatments intensifies, an increasing number of the nation’s leading medical centers have been offering the costly — and controversial — therapy to patients with the more common colorectal or ovarian cancers. And some hospitals are even publicizing the treatment as a hot “chemo bath.” To critics, the therapy is merely the latest example of one that catches on with little evidence that it really works. “We’re practicing this technique that has almost no basis in science,” said Dr. David Ryan, clinical director of the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center. But to some patients, the procedure, however grueling and invasive, represents their best hope for survival: “It’s throwing everything but the kitchen sink at cancer,” said Gloria Borges, a 29-year-old Los Angeles lawyer who had her colon cancer treated with what she called the “pick it out, pour it in” procedure. For hours on a recent morning at the University of California, San Diego, Dr. Andrew Lowy painstakingly performed the therapy on a patient. After slicing the man’s belly wide open, he thrust his gloved hands deep inside, and examined various organs, looking for tumors. He then lifted the small intestine out of the body to sift it through his fingers. As he found tumors, he snipped them out. “You can see how this is coming off like wallpaper,” Lowy said as he stripped out part of the lining of the man’s abdominal cavity. After about two hours of poking and cutting, Lowy began the so-called shake and bake. The machine pumped heated chemotherapy directly into the abdominal cavity for 90 minutes while nurses gently jiggled the man’s bloated belly to disperse the drug to every nook and cranny. The treatment is formally called cytoreductive surgery followed by hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy, or HIPEC. Recent converts include University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland, Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, and even Massachusetts General. The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center is looking at it, according to people in the field. Advocates predict that the number of procedures could grow to 10,000 a year from about 1,500 now. The therapy has even been featured on an episode of the TV series “Grey’s Anatomy.”

Up for debate But Ryan, a gastrointestinal oncologist, suggested in an interview that the procedure was being extended to colorectal cancer because “you can’t make a living doing this procedure in appendix cancer patients.” He debated the procedure publicly at the recent annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. While some patients did seem to live much longer than expected, he said that they had been carefully selected and might have fared well even without the therapy. Proponents say that if cancer has spread into the abdominal cavity but not elsewhere, then lives can be prolonged by removing all the visible tumor and killing what’s missed with HIPEC. By contrast, said Dr. Paul Sugarbaker, a surgeon at Washington Hospital Center and the leading proponent of HIPEC, “there are no long-term survivors with systemic chemotherapy — zero.” Sugarbaker, who opposed Ryan in the debate, said that it has long been known that can-

Jim Wilson / New York Times News Service

A machine pumps heated chemotherapy directly into a patient’s abdominal cavity as Dr. Andrew Lowy, left, jiggles the patient’s belly to help disperse the drug. The new procedure, called Hipec, uses a technique in which inner organs are bathed and swished in hot chemotherapy. Skeptics say the costly and terribly painful procedure has not been proven to work, but it may offer a glimmer of hope for some. cerous cells are unable to withstand as much heat as healthy cells. And putting the chemotherapy on top of tumors should be more effective than systematically delivering it through the bloodstream. One randomized trial done more than a decade ago involving 105 patients in the Netherlands did show a striking benefit. The median survival of those getting surgery and HIPEC, plus intravenous chemotherapy, was 22.3 months, almost double the 12.6 months for those getting only the intravenous chemotherapy. But 8 percent who got the surgery and HIPEC died from the treatment itself. And critics say that since that trial was conducted, new drugs have come to market that allow patients with metastatic colorectal cancer to live two years with intravenous chemotherapy alone. A new trial in the U.S. has been temporarily suspended so that researchers can find a way to recruit patients. After nearly a year only one patient had enrolled, because people were reluctant to chance winding up in the control group, according to one of the investigators. While proponents contend that the risk of dying from the surgery has been reduced since the Dutch trial, the procedure still lasts eight hours or more and full recovery can take three to six months. “It’s maximally invasive,” said Sugarbaker, who often removes the “spare parts” — organs a patient can live without, like the spleen, the gall bladder, the omentum, the ovaries, the uterus and maybe part of the colon.

A costly therapy The cost of the surgery and HIPEC, including hospitalization, ranges from $20,000 to more than $100,000, doctors said. While Medicare and insurers generally pay for the operation, the heated treatment may not be covered. But doctors added it may be if it is described merely as chemotherapy. Some patients, like Borges, who is a fitness devotee, recover well and say the procedure staved off a death sentence. But Dr. Alan Venook, a colon cancer specialist at the University of California, San Francisco, said that a couple of patients referred by him had “died miserable deaths. One lost much of her abdominal wall to infection and just died in misery.” Another risk is that the surgery may be done unnecessarily. CT scans cannot pick up many of the small tumors, so it is often unclear how much cancer is inside until the patient is opened. In June, Lowy sliced open a woman and saw, to his horror, that she had more tumors than he could remove. Taking out only some would not improve her chances of survival, so he closed the incision, and she is now starting intravenous chemotherapy. Things with the male patient, Andy S., went better. A 41-yearold father of two from near San Francisco, S. agreed to let a reporter observe the surgery, but

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME

asked that his full name not be published because he did not want his cancer history to surface through Web searches. S. had abdominal pain eventually diagnosed as appendicitis. But the appendix was found to be cancerous. Such cancers typically spew mucus containing tumor cells into the abdominal cavity. So he signed up for surgery and HIPEC with Lowy. “I’ve had to say my goodbyes to everybody,” S. said the day before the operation. “I had to talk to my priest. I had to do all these things I never thought I’d have to do at 41. I wouldn’t wish it on my worst enemy, but I have to go through with it.”

‘Never see this again’ Lowy explored the entire cavity from the diaphragm to the

pelvis. He found mucus in several spots that he sopped up with a cloth and also tiny tumors the size of a pencil eraser that had implanted in several spots. He snipped those out and sewed up the wounds. He removed the right side of the man’s colon and the omentum, a fatty structure. Then two Y-shaped tubes hooked to the HIPEC machine were inserted into the abdominal cavity, one to deliver the chemotherapy and the other to bring the drug back to the machine to be reheated. The incision was sewn up around the tubes so the chemotherapy would not leak. The man’s belly was filled with three liters of saline fluid and the chemotherapy, a generic drug called mitomycin C, heated to 42 degrees Celsius, or nearly 108 degrees Fahrenheit.

Stealth marketing by a ‘hot chemo’ company Dr. Jason Foster, a University of Nebraska surgeon, extolled the virtues of heated chemotherapy delivered directly into the abdominal cavity in a Web presentation in June. What he did not mention was that the website on which he appeared, HipecTreatment. com, is a marketing tool for ThermaSolutions, the leading manufacturer of equipment used for the controversial treatment. The moderator of the webcast, Glenn Keeling, is a founder and an executive at the company, though the website itself makes no mention of its connection to the company. Glenn Keeling and his brother Gary Keeling, the vice president for sales at ThermaSolutions, say they personally own the site. Still, one inducement for doctors to choose ThermaSolutions equipment is that their practices will be promoted on the website, according to doctors and industry executives. As medical equipment goes, Hipec represents a tiny market, but one that is attracting more competitors. For example, Belmont Instrument is gaining market share at the expense of ThermaSolutions. A third company, ThermalTherapeutic Solutions, is entering the market. And even more companies are lining up. The companies sell machines cleared by the Food and Drug Administration to circulate a heated sterile fluid through the abdomen. There are no medical claims made that this helps cancer patients. When ThermaSolutions got its regulatory approval in 1999, it commissioned a market research study that said Hipec might be used for 20,000 cancer patients a year, Gary Keeling said. There were only about 1,500

Any hotter could have caused injuries. Bloated with liquid, the man’s torso resembled a water bed. After 90 minutes, the fluid was drained, the incision reopened for a final check for tumors and bleeding, before the patient was stitched up. The procedure took six hours.

Hipec procedures done in the United States last year, he said. ThermaSolutions, now based in St. Paul, has had a series of financial problems, management turnover and name changes. Keeling said the company was now owned by a Dutch holding company whose name he would not disclose. He said ThermaSolutions’ machine was used in 68 of the roughly 80 hospitals in the United States that offered Hipec. The biggest challenger, Belmont Instrument of Billerica, Mass., started off making equipment for the military to heat blood being transfused on the battlefield. Its machine is considerably smaller and lighter than the ThermaSolutions machine. Lisa Fornicoia, director for sales and marketing at Belmont, said customers could buy its machine for $35,000 and then pay $410 a procedure for disposables. ThermaSolutions does not usually sell its machine, and charges something like $3,000 a procedure plus leasing fees. Gary Keeling of ThermaSolutions declined to discuss the company’s price. Thornton Hospital, part of the University of California, San Diego, switched to the Belmont equipment. “In one year, we saved $50,000,” said Dr. Andrew Lowy, a surgeon who performs the procedure there. With competition heating up, Belmont has taken a page out of its rival’s book. It has started its own website, HipecDoctor. com. The only physicians listed as offering Hipec are those who use Belmont equipment. — Andrew Pollack, New York Times News Service

“We got all of the visible disease, and he didn’t have a lot of visible disease,” Lowy said with satisfaction. S. left the hospital eight days later, happy to have undergone the treatment. “I want to have the best chance I can have to never see this again,” he said.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, September 22, 2011 G1

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263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Cavalier King Charles, female. Blenheim 4 yrs. Housebroke, gets along with other dogs, cats & kids. very loving. $400 w/papers 541-815-1629

Jack Russell female, 1 year 3 months. Not spayed. Purebred. $200. 541-890-4397

Kittens & cats avail. to adopt from rescue group, 1-5 PM Chihuahua Pups, Apple Sat/Sun, other days by appt. Head, 10 weeks, well bred, 65480 78th St., Bend. Al202 tered, shots, ID chip, free vet small, $200. 541-420-4825. visit incl. Kittens just $40 for Want to Buy or Rent Chihuahua, purebred,small toy, 1, $60 for 2. Adult cats just 1 boy, 1 girl, 1st shots, dew$25, $40 for 2. Adult cat free Wanted: $Cash paid for vintage ormed, $250, 541-771-2606 as mentor if kitten adopted! costume Jewelry. Top dollar 541-389-8420. Photos & paid for Gold & Silver. I buy more at www.craftcats.org. by the Estate, Honest Artist. Elizabeth, 541-633-7006 LAB PUPS AKC, 7x Master National Hunter sired, yellows & Wanted: Used wood splitter, in blacks, hips & elbows certigood condition, will pay fair fied, 541-771-2330 value. Also looking for split Dorkie Hybrid Puppies (Mini www.royalflushretrievers.com Juniper.. 541-508-0916 Daschund/Yorkie) Born July Labradoodles, Australian 27th. 3 males and 1 female. 205 Imports - 541-504-2662 1st shots. $400. Call Items for Free www.alpen-ridge.com (562)787-1828 (Cell). The cutest and sweetest puppies LABRADOR PUPPIES Free Firewood, 4 mature trees, in the world! 2 black males & 1 yellow male 2 pine, 2 juniper, you cut & www.3sislabs.com remove, 541-480-7823. 541-504-8550 or 541-788-4111 DO YOU HAVE Wheelchair carrier for folding SOMETHING TO SELL Manx/scottish fold kittens very wheelchair, direction incl., FOR $500 OR LESS? cute 7 wks. 4 bobtail and one FREE, call 541-322-0983 Non-commercial folded ear longtail. $100 & advertisers may $150 541-815-1629 208 place an ad with our Pets and Supplies Meet Arthur, "QUICK CASH Bernie & SPECIAL" Casey ... 1 week 3 lines The Bulletin recommends brothers $12 or extra caution when about 4 mo. 2 weeks $18! purchasing products or old who services from out of the Ad must have leukearea. Sending cash, checks, include price of single item mia. Local rescue group or credit information may of $500 or less, or mulneeds to find an inside-only be subjected to fraud. For tiple items whose total home/homes for them where more information about an does not exceed $500. there may already be a leuadvertiser, you may call the kemia-positive cat or no Oregon State Attorney Call Classifieds at other cats. These kittens are General’s Office Consumer 541-385-5809 very sweet & otherwise Protection hotline at www.bendbulletin.com healthy. They could live long 1-877-877-9392. lives, but there is no way to know. Most shelters euthaEnglish Bulldog, spayed female, nize kittens like these be3yrs, brindle. She would cause they are hard to place. prefer a male human comIf you have room in your panion. Serious inquiries only Adult companion cats FREE to heart & home, please conplease. 541-588-6490 $500 seniors, veterans & disabled! sider giving them a chance at Tame, altered, shots, ID chip, a normal life. They're neuEnglish Mastiff, Gentle Giant! more. 541-389-8420. Open tered, vaccinated, etc. Great with Kids, Dogs & Cats. Sat/Sun 1-5, other days by 541-389-8420, lv. msg. My hours at work leave little appt. 65480 78th St, Bend. time for him; asking $150. Photos at www.craftcats.org. Mini Aussies 2 females & 5 Please call 541-548-1151 males, $250 ea. Ready 9/16. Border Collie Pups - just ONE 541-420-9694. left! Working parents, first FREE barn/shop adult cats, expert rodent control in exshots, $100. 541-546-6171 Mini Aussies born 8/11. Ready change for safe shelter, food 10/06. $250. Accepting dep. Boxer/Bulldog CKC Reg. Flashy & water. Altered, shots, some and reservations. www.miniValley Bulldogs, ready now! tame, some not so much. aussiesbend.com $1000. 541-325-3376 We'll deliver! 541-389-8420. Pom/Pom-Chi Pups (4), beautiful, rare assorted colors, Boxer Pups Pure$250, 541-279-4838, Becca. bred, Brindles & fawns. $500 ea. 541-815-9157 POODLE PUPPIES STANDARDAKC, Champion lines, born Brindle PUGS boys & girls, big Aug 6, $750. (541)367-3883 and small, 8 weeks, pics by Frenchie/ Pug puppies. Beauwww.thepracticalpoodle.com tiful colors. Puppy package phone. $275. 541-977-7740. Pups, AKC toys for incl. $550 to $650 OBO ea. Poodle Cabin Creek Gun Dogs sale. Adults, rescued, for Ready now! 541-548-0747 or 3 Started male Pudel Pointers, adoption. 541-475-3889 541-279-3588. the breed known for their Queensland Heelers Hedgehog Babies ready in 1 wk, extreme intelligence & soft Standards & mini,$150 & up. salt & pepper color. $150. mouth, they are truly a ver541-280-1537 Text 5413068753 or e-mail satile gun/family dog. Steve, http://rightwayranch.wordpress.com/ guineapigpets@yahoo.com 541-680-0009

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Pets and Supplies

Guns, Hunting and Fishing

Health and Beauty Items

Building Materials

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Lost and Found

Redbone Puppy, Registered, 12 wks old, great looks, smart & 12g Mossberg maverick pump sweet, $400. 541-815-7868 shotgun, 28” bbl, like new, $200. 541-647-8931 210

Sisters Habitat ReStore Building Supply Resale Quality items. LOW PRICES! 150 N. Fir. 541 549-1621 Open to the public.

Furniture & Appliances 22LR Ruger semi-auto rifle, !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

The

A-1 Washers & Dryers

Belly Fat A Problem?

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neighborhood! Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 541-385-5809.

Mattress-Box Springs in plastic, frame, mattress pad, comforters sheets pillows. All new, $225. 541-350-4656. Refrigerator, Whirlpool, sideby-side, in-door ice/water, black, $195, 541-389-6372. The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

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Antiques & Collectibles Antiques Wanted: Tools, wood furniture, fishing, marbles, old signs, beer cans, costume jewelry. 541-389-1578

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Coins & Stamps Private collector buying postage stamp albums & collections, world-wide and U.S. 573-286-4343 (local, cell #)

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Bicycles and Accessories G Fisher Bikes, 1 male, 18.5”, 1 female, 16.5”, used very little, exc. cond., accessories incl., $150 ea., Yakima carrier, $100, 541-548-7254. Mtn. Bike, Specialized, Rock Hopper, barely ridden, like new, w/safety gear, top of line, $325, 541-382-7292 Two Mountain Bikes - His & Hers, new tires, helmets included. $100. 541-317-8516

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Guns, Hunting and Fishing Bend local, Pays CASH for GUNS! Call for info: 541-526-0617 12g Charles Daly, syn stock pump, 18” bbl, like new, $200. 541-647-8931

Wood Floor Super Store

FREE DVD Reveals weight loss myths. Get ANSWERS to lasting weight loss. Call 866-700-2424

255 22mag Marlin, $300. Taurus 40 auto, $350. Mossberg 30-06 SS, $350. 541-647-8931 Baretta 9000S 40 cal. S & W, new in box, $450, 541-390-8085. BENELLI Supernova 12 ga. like new. Extra choke w/tool, soft case $375 (541) 410-8878 CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Dan Wesson .357mag Model 715, SS, 4” bbl, 6-shot revolver, $450. 541-647-8931

Computers

260

Misc. Items Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $18! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500.

541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. Cell phones, 4 used, 1 new, Pro 200 Sanyo all w/chargers, 1 bluetooth, $75,541-480-7823

COWGIRL CASH I buy boots, buckles, jewelry, and more! 924 Brooks Street Downtown Bend•541-678-5162 DIABETIC TEST STRIPS wanted: will pay up to $25/box. Call Sharon 503-679-3605.

Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

Mossberg 12g maverick pump, 18” bbl, home protection, $200. 541-647-8931 Mossberg 22LR semi-auto rifle, syn stock, 2 mags & ammo, $200. 541-647-8931 Remington 1100 12 GA, 3” chambers, vented rib, recoil pad, exc. cond., call Hank, 541-548-1775.

Remington 700 25-06, Leupold 3x9, 50 rnds ammo, reloading dies, brass, bullets, very nice, $650. 541-389-3511 REWARD offered for Winchester 22 pump rifle reported stolen, Redmond Gun Show, 9/4. No questions asked. Serial #530. 541-915-9289 Rogue Rifles youth Chipmunk 22 w/Bushnell scope. excellent, $130. 541-647-7894

Over 40 Years Experience in Carpet Upholstery & Rug Cleaning Call Now! 541-382-9498 CCB #72129 www.cleaningclinicinc.com

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Building Materials Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 541-312-6709 Open to the public .

Ruger Red Label 12 ga. O/U, choke tubes, vent rib, exc. cond., $950, 541-390-6691 Savage 110 walnut stock, 30-06, 3x9 scope, never been fired, $325. 541-639-9484 Savage Model 10DL Series H, left hand rifle with 3x9 Redfield scope, adjustable trigger & case. $450. 541-598-7210

Weatherby Mark V 340, very nice, $1100. Please call 541-548-4774 Winchester M70, 7mm Rem blued/synthetic, limbsaver recoil pad, 3x9 scope, $475. 541-912-0359

• Laminate from .79¢ sq.ft. • Hardwood from $2.99 sq.ft. 541-322-0496

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with mul266 tiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ Heating and Stoves software, to disclose the name of the business or the Fireplace Xtrordinair 32DVS term "dealer" in their ads. gas insert, variable speed Private party advertisers are fan, wall thermostats, vent defined as those who sell one pipe & rain cap. Exc. cond., computer. $995. 541-325-1096.

Baseball Cards, 1954 Bowman, 129 cards in set, Mantle, Enfield 30.06, Sporterized, vinPeewee, Campenella & Yogi, tage 4X Pioneer scope, $225, $750, 541-923-4312. Model 700 Remington 30.06, INDIAN SUMMER Time to bring the outdoors in! 4x scope, $425, 541-923-4312 An affordable selection of art Furniture & handcrafts, vintage, new & like new goods inspired by GUN SHOW nature. For you, your home & Linn County Fairgrounds Albany, Oregon garden. The Whistle Stop Sat. Sept. 24, 9-5 1900 NE Division St, Bend. Sun. Sept. 25, 9-4 Visit our HUGE home decor Tue-Sat 10-4. www.indian420 Tables Admission $5 consignment store. New summerhome.com Sponsored by Albany items arrive daily! 930 SE Rifle and Pistol Club Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., 541-491-3755 Bend • 541-318-1501 Take I-5 to exit 234 www.redeuxbend.com The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

LOST CAT in area of Shevlin Drive at Pence; female, black

541-389-9663

Hardwood Outlet

$125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

Jackson Hi Temp Commercial Dishwasher $2000 cash or $2100 Visa/MC 1995 Model; 208-230v/60 amp (single phase.) Runs well. No dish tables attached. New pump 11/10 ($1566 part only.) New control circuit 5/11 ($240 part only). Will donate to accredited charity. 541-593-1019

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. BULK GARDEN MATERIALS Wholesale Peat Moss Sales

wood stock, w/case & ammo, $200. 541-647-8931

Cabinet Refacing & Refinishing. Save Thousands! Most jobs completed in 5 days or less. Best Pricing in the Industry.

541-647-8261

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove may be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

For newspaper delivery , call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email classified@bendbulletin.com

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

Think Ahead! Unused bio & non-biodegradable gardening pots, small to large, hanging ones too! 75 @ $1.00-5.00 ea. 541-330-9935

Found Fly Rod & Reel, at a high Cascade lake. Call to identify: 541-788-1309

The Bulletin Classiieds

Dry Lodgepole For Sale $165/cord rounds; $200/cord split. 1.5 Cord Minimum 36 years’ service to Central Oregon. Call 541-350-2859

Oregon Classified Advertising Network

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 Prineville, 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420.

REPORTED STOLEN 1965 Mustang Convertible from 77 yr-old man. OR License #663ANB. REWARD for info leading to recovery. Please contact Deschutes County Sheriff with any info: 541-693-6911.

Farm Market

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Fuel and Wood

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

Lost Cat - white female named Lucy, 13 yrs old, declawed, ran from car crash on 8/11/11, on Hwy 97 at Highland, Redmond. If seen, please call 541-504-4194.

Forum Center, Bend 541-617-8840 www.wbu.com/bend Lost and Found

All Year Dependable Firewood: Dry , split lodgepole, 1 for $155 or 2 for $300. No limit. Cash, check, or credit. Bend 541-420-3484

and dark grey tabby with white feet, white chest and belly. Tall, slim and young, wearing pink collar. Answers to Bella. Please call 425 780 0500 if you see her, thank you.

Your Backyard Birdfeeding Specialists!

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Check out OCANs online at classifieds.oregon.com!

T h e

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Found Jacket on Mt. Bailey, 9/18. Please call to identify: 541-317-4951 Found Remote Controlled Airplane, east of Pilot Butte. Call 541-388-1050 to ID & claim. Found Woman’s Ring, Big Sky Sports Complex, 9/16. Call to identify. 541-389-7952

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

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Farm Equipment and Machinery Ford Model 640 Tractor, circa 1954. Front loader hydraulic system totally rebuilt. 7-ft scraper blade; PTO; chains; new battery. Oldie but goodie! $3750. 541-382-5543 Kubota B7300, 4X4, loader, new rear blade, $7800 FIRM, 541-536-3889,541-420-6215 Premium orchard grass 3x3 mid-size bales, no rain, no weeds. $100 per bale. 541-419-2713.

YOUR AD WILL RECEIVE CLOSE TO 2,000,000 EXPOSURES FOR ONLY $250! Oregon Classified Advertising Network is a service of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association.

Week of September 19, 2011

541-385-5809

For Sale PUBLIC ONLINE AUCTION. Premium nursery stock. Small lots available. Online bidding Sept. 30-Oct 2. Klupenger Nurseries, Aurora, Oregon. Visit www.stevevangordon.com. GARAGE SALE Saturday! Hundreds of sales in Brookings-Harbor area October 1. Buy a Curry Coastal Pilot newspaper that day for special map and information.

Education/Schools ALLIED HEALTH career training. Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-481-9409, www.CenturaOnline.com.

Help Wanted DRIVERS/COMPANY-Lease - Work for us or let us work for you! Unbeatable career opportunities. Trainee, company driver, lease operator, earn up to $51k. Lease Trainers earn up to $80k. 877-369-7104. www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com.

Services DIVORCE $135. Complete preparation. Includes children, custody, support, property and bills division. No court appearances. Divorced in 1-5 weeks possible. 503-772-5295, www.paralegalalternatives.com, divorce@usa.com.

Business Opportunity THINK CHRISTMAS, start now! Own a red hot Dollar, Dollar Plus, Mailbox or Discount Party Store from $51,900 worldwide. 100% turnkey. 1-800-518-3064, www.drss30.com


G2 Thursday, September 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 325

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Hay, Grain and Feed

Farmers Column

Looking for Employment

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost. 541-546-6171.

10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1496 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

341

Horses and Equipment Picking up unwanted horses, cash paid for some, 509-520-8526. Reg. Tenn. Walkers: 6 yr. old Gelding, Sorrel, 15.3 Hands, sweet disposition, has had considerable intermittent training but needs finishing, $950, 4 Yr. old gelding, Chesnut w/Palomino markings, beautiful, 16.0 Hands, spirited, has had considerable intermittent training but needs finishing, $1250; 13 Yr. old mare, beautiful strawberry roan, 16 hands, well experienced trail horse, has had 2 beautiful foals, $1250, Lakeview OR, 360-981-0288, 503-819-0820

A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

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Meat & Animal Processing Angus Beef, 1/2 or whole, grass & grain-fed, no hormones $3.25/lb., hanging weight, cut & wrap included. Please call 541-383-2523.

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Produce and Food

Employment

400 421

Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

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Looking for Employment Family Helper - Senior Care Cooking - Errands - Etc., 541-419-8648. I am an experienced Admin Assistant with excellent customer service skills and references, seeking employment with stable, progressive firm. 541.382.6939

4-year old registered Red Angus bull, easy calving, $2500. Call Terry at 541-548-0731

THOMAS ORCHARDS Kimberly, OR: We will be at Farmer’s Market Wed. & Fri. in Bend, every week all summer! U-Pick: Freestone Canning Peaches: Angelus, Monroe/Elberta, O’Henry, $0.70/lb, Gala Apples, $0.60/lb Bartlett Pears, $0.60/lb. #2 Peaches, $10/box, Call for availability

Paying Cash for Sheep & Goats, Please call 509-520-8526 for more info.

Look for us on Facebook. Open 7 Days/week, 8-6 pm 541-934-2870

Need a caregiver or a little extra help around the house? I am an experienced caregiver, enjoy my work and can give that extra help suited to your needs. For questions call 541-647-1444, Mollie.

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Livestock & Equipment

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Estate Sales

BIG ESTATE SALE. Death forces sale of everything... Tools, antiques, furniture, hunting gear, knick-knacks and much more. PRICED TO SELL! Fri. & Sat., 9/23-24., 8-3. 64236 Crosswinds Rd., Bend. CASH ONLY! Estate Sale, Fri-Sat-Sun., 9-5. Antique tools, lots of woodworking tools, furniture, large refrigerator, freezer, camping gear, lots of misc. 23715 Groff Rd (take Rickard Rd, to Groff, follow signs)

ESTATE SALE IN HISTORIC ANTELOPE, OREGON Howard McMichael Estate, 127 Union & Wallace 1 block s. of Antelope Store SATURDAY ONLY9AM-4PM, CASH ONLY ENTIRE HOUSEHOLD & 32'X40' SHOP Furniture, Antiques, Fishing & Camping items, lots of tools, China, silver flatware, lots of misc. items Sale by: Farmhouse Estate Sales

282

Bring Containers

I provide Senior In-home Care (basic care services). Please call Judy, 541-388-2706.

Seeking a Head Hunter to help with my job search for an Admin Assistant position. Please call 541.382.6939.

Accounting/ HR Clerk

470

Domestic & In-Home Positions NANNY part-time live-in, for active outdoors family. We have lots of fun! 541-330-9193

476

Employment Opportunities

Account Executive KOHD 9, Central Oregon’s ABC, seeks an experienced Account Executive for its advertising sales team. Minimum 2 - 4 years experience in media sales or related field preferred. Looking for a team player with a proven record of new business development. Send cover letter and resume to: Debbie Carter, Executive Assistant, KEZI 9 News, PO Box 7009, Eugene, OR 97401. EOE. A pre-employment drug screen is required.

288

Mon.-Fri., full-time, 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., minimum of 3-5 years experience required. This position is responsible for a wide range of duties. Detail oriented, with strong organizational skills. Ability to handle multiple tasks and priorities simultaneously. This person will perform all duties necessary to process bi-weekly payrolls, all responsibilities associated with running a weekly AP check run. Able to work with employees regarding HR and benefit issues. Excellent written and verbal communication skills. ability to interact with all members of the management as well as all employees. Require someone with experience in Microsoft Word, Excel, Outlook skills and Quickbooks. ADP experience helpful. A background check will be required. Email resume to jobs@bendsurgery.com Open until filled.

Sales Redmond Area

HUGE MOVING SALE! Fri. only, 9-2. Pre-school closing, everything goes! Something for everyone! teachers, craters, canners small furn. items, large oak china cabinet, 7’ oval oak table & 6 barrel chairs, Suzuki piano, books, toys, clothes, garland, decorations, household & yard tools. Directions: 8 miles from Barnes & Noble, Hwy 20 E, R. on Gosney, L. on Rickard, R. on Groff, L. on Chisholm, R. on Barlow, L. on Brasada to 60629, the gray house with blue door. No early sales!

Sat. 8-4, household, tools, new smoker, extension table extends to seat 12, 2537 NW 22nd St. off 19th & Quince

286

Sales Northeast Bend

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

SAT 9/25 8-5pm Huge

Sale: Antiques, Tools, FurniGarage Sale, 21916 Katie ture, Original Art, Books, Drive (Boonesborough) Bend Games, Dolls, Chinese art & (541) 306-3161 costumes. Fri-Sat 9-5, Sun Yard Sale 63469 Crest View 10-1. 20959 Greenmont Dr Dr.; 325-340-5940. Saturday, September 24th, 8a.m.-2p.m. 290 TV, Air Hockey Table, Kid's Sales Redmond Area Bike, Toys, Clothes

288

Sales Southeast Bend $1 Jewelry Blowout! By Junkgirl. 5000+ pieces in all! Regardless of value, ALL must go at $1 ea. 387 SE Dell Ln, Fri.-Sun., 9 am 6pm. Call me, 541-420-7328.

3-Party Sale: Sat. Only 9-6, 625 NW 22nd St off NW 19th, oak claw foot table, camp, sport, tools, teen clothes, more. BIG YARD! Wed.-Sat., 9/21-24, 9-3. 580 C Ave., Terrebonne. Tools, fishing gear, baby backpack carrier, collectibles, household, Pioneer speakers, MORE EVERYTHING!

2-Household Sale: Sat. 8-3:30, 20662 Cherry Tree Ln, furniSales Northwest Bend PICK UP YOUR ture, tools, garden, bikes, toys, Fri. and Sun. only 9am - 5pm. GARAGE SALE 821 NE Larch Ave. (East of kids summer/ winter clothes. 9/24-9/25, 8-3. House/Garage KIT AT: St. Charles Hospital). Lots of /Estate Sale. Furniture, col1777 SW Chandler Ave. Estate/Garage Sale: Fri. & Sorel and Columbia snow lectibles/antiques, kitchenBend, OR 97702 Sat., 8-5, 1009 SE Castleboots, ice crushers, winter ware, too much to list! 63989 trek hiking boots, Bogs and wood Dr. Old quilts, Indian Old Bend Redmond Hwy. (1st sandals; Men’s - 7, 8, 10, 13 items, large collection of anhouse on left off Hwy 20). 14, 15 only, Womens - 5, 5.5, tique coffee & spice tins, 6, 6.5, 9, 10, 10.5, 11, 12 collectibles & lots more! Big Yard Sale: Thur.-Sun. only. Boots $30, sandals $15. 8-5, 65135 97th St off Lawton Noe Dressers, Pyrex, antique Tumalo Rd., Antiques, glass, office chair, coffee dolls, clothes, books, & stuff! table, childs rocker, genera2956 LOTNO DRIVE tor, auto parts, and houseHUGE ESTATE SALE hold items. Don’t Miss!! DON’T MISS: Fri. - Sun., FRIDAY, Sept. 23 • SATURDAY, Sept. 24 8-6, 3277 NW Starview, Hours 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Garage Sale: Fri., Sat., Sun., decorator’s dream sale Crowd control admittance numbers issued 8 a.m. Friday 8-5, Lots of everything, 2364 quality furniture, house Dana Butler Ct., near corner plants - Real & silk, women’s (Take Butler Market Road to Sandy Drive, go north and of 24th & Volcano clothes, business & office, follow straight through to Lotno) electronics, accessories, hair Huge 2-Family Yard Sale, salon products & furniture, 1994 Mercury Grand Marquis with only 57,000 miles; China cabiSat-Sun, 9am-6pm 3243 SW items for wine enthusiast, net; Large bookcase unit; Front Load washer and Dryer--KENJuniper Ave., Redmond. winter jackets, EVERYTHING MORE; Electric lift chair; Cream color ultra suede fabric sofa Electronics, furniture & more! MUST GO!Previewing posand loveseat; Coffee table; Round oak table with six chairs and sible, 541-610-8380 for appt. one leaf; Cross top refrigerator with ice maker; Free (you-haul) Pyromid compact grill, shakerlarge chest freezer; Free sofa; King bed; Queen bed; dressers; style futon couch/bed (very IN THE ALLEY Fri & Sat (Sept Linens; Clothing; Kitchen items; Two desks; side chairs; Two 8' comfortable), studio size fu23 & 24) 9am to 2pm by 5' rugs; Craftsman tool cabinet--3 unit; John Deere 22" lawn ton couch/bed (purple) w/ 2454 NW Hosmer Lake mower; Two compressors; Four studded tires on rims, matching accys, new scroll (off Mt Washington) 205/74/R14; Wheelbarrows ; Lots of misc. garage items; Large saw, 1996 Ford Explorer, four drawer legal file cabinet; Hand tools; Fishing poles and women’s clothing sizes 6-18, 284 reels; Shop and house vacuums; Pots and Pans and some elecfabulous women’s dress trical appliances; Nightstands; Lots and lots of other items. shoes (all sizes), Dean Koontz Sales Southwest Bend paperbacks & misc books, Presented by: HUGE HUGE SALE - Stop By NordicTrack sit-down excerDeedy's Estate Sales Co. LLC Fri. & Sat. Sept 23 & 24, 9-4, ciser, Soloflex fitness system 541-419-2242 days • 541-382-5950 eves Riverwoods Church - DRW, & more! Fri & Sat, 9-4, 3430 www.deedysestatesales.com 60377 Cinder Butte Rd. SW Reindeer Ave. Redmond.

ESTATE

SALE

DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

290

Sales Southwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Southeast Bend MOVING SALE - furniture: in- Garage Sale - Furniture, misc door-outdoor, misc. everyitems, Fri-Sat, 8-4, 22960 thing. 9-3, Fri. and Sat., Yucca Ct., (Cimarron City) 61380 Elkhorn St. follow signs from McGrath Rd Large Garage/Estate Sale Multi-Family Sale: Furniture, Fri-Sat, 9am-2pm, 1227 NE appliances, decor, house12th St. Furn., tools, kitchen, wares, tools, books, jewelry 30x30 Levi’s. 541-815-4052 & more! High quality items. Moving Sale: Fri, Sat, Sun., 9-2, Early Birds Pay Double! Sat. 1392 NE Tuscon Way, Ev8-3, 61277 Columbine Ln. erything must go! Housewares, furniture, tools, books Multiple Sales at Cinder Butte Rd: Sat. 7-5, 60181 Cinder Multi-Family Sale. 8-2, Fri. and Sat. at 2665 NE Jill Ct. Butte Rd, lots of great stuff, From Jewelry to Garden Tools something for everyone! and everything in between!

Accounting KEITH Mfg Company is looking to fill a CFO position. BS in Accounting or Finance, MBA or CPA preferred. Ten plus years experience, preferably in a manufacturing environment. Working knowledge of Excel, Exact and FAS. Lean Accounting and/or Lean Mfg knowledge preferred. Please send resume with cover letter including salary requirements to Brenda Jones, HR Manager @ bjones@keithwalkingfloor.com

292

Sales Other Areas BIG SISTERS SALE: Fri.-Sat., 8-5, 2 mi. E. of Sisters at 68175 Hwy 20, loads of antiques, furniture, guns, more!

Moving! Furniture, appliances, exercise equipment, blankets, nice clothes, lots of stuff! Sat, 10-3, 13303 SW Shumway Rd., Powell Butte Powell Butte Garage/Moving/Estate Sale: Fri., Sat., Sun, 9-5, Log home at 15200 Aquatic View, with tools drill press, planer, hand tools, shelving, teak patio furniture, camping, sporting, clothes, plants, jewelry & lots of misc. household & shop items. Turn off Schumway, 1.5 S. of Powell Butte/Schumway intersection to Aquatic View.

SALE IN SISTERS: 14468 CROSSROADS LP. Saturday & Sunday, 24TH & 25TH OF September. 9AM-4PM

NOTICE Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sale event is over! THANKS! From The Bulletin and your local Utility Companies

www.bendbulletin.com

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Home Visitor Medical - We are looking Mid-Columbia Children’s for a Full-Time Radiology Council is recruiting for a Technician/Medical Assisfull-time EHS Home Visitor in tant for a new Pain ManMadras. $11.22-$14.05/hr agement Clinic in Bend. DOQ + benefits. Requires: Competitive pay and benhas openings listed below. Go high school Diploma with efits offered. Email Reto https://jobs.cocc.edu to ECE training; AA or BA presumes to charlie@cemediview details & apply online. ferred & Bilingual calgroup.com Human Resources, Metolius English/Spanish. Visit Hall, 2600 NW College Way, www.mcccheadstart.org for Bend OR 97701; (541)383 info on how to apply or call Remember.... Add your web address to 7216. For hearing/speech (541) 386-2010. CLOSES: your ad and readers on impaired, Oregon Relay Ser9/23/2011 EOE The Bulletin's web site will vices number is 7-1-1. COCC be able to click through auis an AA/EO employer. Maintenance Coordinator tomatically to your site. Project Manager, Oregon Need Seasonal help? DEPARTMENT Trade Adjustment Assis- OREGON Need Part-time help? OF TRANSPORTATION tance Grant Consortium Need Full-time help? OTC (Temporary) Advertise your open positions. Section Maintenance Responsible for oversight of The Bulletin Classifieds Coordinator – John Day start- up activities and (Transportation Mainteimplementation of this Social Services nance Coordinator 1) statewide effort, coordinating the programs at COCC and eight partnering com- Apply your Leadership and Communication Skills in munity colleges in Oregon. these positions located in This is a grant funded posiJohn Day. The Maintenance tion. Full Time 3 yr Term. Madras Alcohol Drug Coordinator assists the $71,435- $83,857.Open Until Prevention Coordinator. Maintenance Manager by coFilled. NOTE: This job will be Grant-funded. 40 hrs/week, ordinating and overseeing filled only if the OTC grant plus benefits. the work of a single mainteapplication is accepted by Job info posted at nance crew. It has regular the Department of Labor. www.BestCarePrevention.org lead responsibilities over this Immediate opening, until filled. crew engaged in the repair, GED Chief Test Examiner 2nd Grade renovation, and reconstruc- Teacher (Temp Part Time) Needed, Full-time at Easttion of roadbeds, surfaces, Test proctoring managing fedmont Community School. structures, and facilities that eral GED program for CenMust have elementary are part of the State's Transtral Oregon. Will require teaching experience. Prefer portation systems. Duties travel. Requires confidentialOregon Teacher License. Apinvolve planning and assignity, understanding of ADA, ply online at: ing work. This position may and excellent customer serwww.eastmontschool.com assist in paper and recordvice. 50wks, 30hrs wk, keeping activities related to Job Closes: Mon. Sept. 26th, $17.60-$20.95/hr benefited 5:00 p.m. the crew. It coordinates the position Temp contract Oct day-to-day activities of a 2011-Jun 2013. Open Until crew and may perform simiFilled. lar work assigned to the crew. Salary $2816-$4089/ The Bulletin Classifieds is your month + excellent benefits. Employment Marketplace For details please visit www.odotjobs.com or call Call 541-385-5809 today! 866-ODOT-JOB (TTY 503-986-3854 for the hearHeavy Duty Truck Parts Counter ing impaired) for AnnouncePerson, full-time. Must be ment #ODOT11-0223OC and experienced. Job requires application. Opportunity good orgianizational/com528 closes 11:59 PM, Sepmunication skills & ability to tember 29, 2011 ODOT is Loans and Mortgages work at a fast pace. Benefit an AA/EEO Employer, compackage. Inquire: Gold Coast mitted to building workforce WARNING Truck Repair, Attn: Butch, PO diversity. The Bulletin recommends you Box 537, Coos Bay, OR use caution when you pro97420. 541-269-1223 vide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392. General

Central Oregon Community College

500

ESTATE SALE: Nice tools, furniture, dishes, clothing, too much to list! Fri., Sat. 8-5, Sun. 8-noon. 16777 Donner Place, LaPine.

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

Finance & Business

Church Yard Sale: Sat. 9-2, corner of Forest & 12th, many quality items, shop equip., lighting, bookcases, storage cupboards, Llamas to pet, 10-11.

Lost The Farm Sale, Fri., Sat., Sun. 8-6, 21115 Young Ave., off Old Bend-Redmond Hwy, between Bend & Redmond. Farm equip, antiques, guns, tools, glassware, clothes, Cataraft, hunting, fishing, wagon wheels, glass blocks, NO Early Sales.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

Operate Your Own Business

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor

visit our website at www.oregonfreshstart.com

Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Madras,

Prineville and Bend

H

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

541-382-3402 LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13. Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 632

Rentals

600 616

Want To Rent 61-year old woman with 2 therapy cats needs a room. 541-548-2105.

630

Rooms for Rent East Bend room avail. now, $400+ 1/2 utilities, no pets. large closet, 541-280-5936.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

Condo / Townhomes For Rent

638

Apt./Multiplex General Apt./Multiplex SE Bend The Bulletin is now offering a 1 Mile From Old Mill - 2 Bdrm, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental 1 bath, garage, security dep. rate! If you have a home or $595/mo. 580 SE Wilson, apt. to rent, call a Bulletin 541-385-0844 or se habla Classified Rep. to get the espanol: 714-227-3235. new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809 A clean & sharp 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath. Super new kitchen with dishwasher & microwave. 634 Great closet space, private Apt./Multiplex NE Bend fenced patio. Don’t just drive by - beautiful exte$525 rior remodel will be done by Very clean 1 bdrm. w/private Nov.! $560 incl w/s/g. 1/2 patio in quiet area no smokmo free w/1-yr lease. No ing/pets,1000 NE Butler Mkt. pets/no smkg. 541-678-8449 Rd. 541-633-7533, 382-6625

Alpine Meadows Townhomes 1, 2 and 3 bdrm apts. Starting at $625.

541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc. Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting. No pets/smoking. Near St. Charles.W/S/G pd; both w/d hkup + laundry facil. $625$650/mo. 541-385-6928. Great Mid-Town Deal! 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath townhouse, W/D hookup, W/S paid, $625+ dep., 2940 NE Nikki Ct., 541-390-5615.

Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

Ivy Creek Townhouse: 2 bdrm, 2 bath, garage, private patio, W/D hookup, W/S/G & lawn maint. paid, 1120 sq.ft., near St. Charles, no pets/smoking, $745/mo + dep., 541-382-4739.

personals

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 1815 SW 21st Quiet spacious 2/2 duplex, gorgeous fenced w/garage. Mint condition! W/S/G paid, new carpet, $715. 541-409-2175

FALL BLAST! Studios $375 1 Bdrm $400 Free Move-in Rent! • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond Close to schools, shopping, and parks! 541-548-8735 Managed by

GSL Properties

648

Seeking info on suspicious 1 Bdrm. $410+dep. Studio Houses for activity of individual $390+dep. No pets/smokRent General driving faded light blue ing, W/S/G paid. Apply at 38 GMC mini pickup, OrNW Irving #2, near down- The Bulletin is now offering a town Bend. 541-389-4902. egon plates, black lumLOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE ber rack, white toolboxes Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin on side, seen in area of Look at: Bendhomes.com Classified Rep. to get the Alfalfa Mkt Rd, Juniper for Complete Listings of new rates and get your ad Rd, Hwy 20 & 27th & NE Area Real Estate for Sale started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Watt Way. 541-848-0232

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Accounting/Bookkeeping

Electrical Services

Landscaping, Yard Care

BANKRUPTCY - $399

Quality Builders Electric

everything! 541-815-9256

• Remodels • Home Improvement • Lighting Upgrades • Hot Tub Hook-ups 541-389-0621 www.qbelectric.net CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Adult Care Heritage House AFH Quality care for the elderly. Private rooms, set rates, no add-ons! 1227 South Egan Rd, in Burns. 541-573-1845

Educational Services Free Math Tutoring In Exchange for housekeeping 541-548-4880, Redmond.

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Excavating Levi’s Dirt Works:Residential/ Commercial General Contractor For all your dirt and excavation needs. •Subcontracting • Public Works • Small & large jobs for contractors & home owners by the job - or hour. • Driveway grading (low cost get rid of pot holes & smooth out your driveway) • Custom pads large & small • Operated rentals & augering • Wet & dry utils. • Concrete CCB#194077 541-639-5282.

Russ Peterson Builder / Contractor 40 years experience Home Repairs & Remodels 541-318-8789 • CCB 50758

QB Digital Living

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Domestic Services I Will Cook For You! No time? Unable to cook? I will prepare your meals. Affordable; senior discounts, 20 yrs exp. Devora, 541-279-0141 Housekeeping Services: Residential & offices, 15 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call Bertha, 541-788-6669 refs. avail.

Drywall ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • Sprinkler Winterization & Repair • Sprinkler Installation • Trimming • Fall Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Computer/Cabling Install •Computer Networking •Phone/Data/TV Jacks •Whole House Audio •Flat Screen TV & Installation 541-280-6771 www.qbdigitalliving.com CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595 I DO THAT! Home Repairs, Remodeling, Deck Refinishing Time! Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768

Home Improvement Kelly Kerfoot Construction 28 years exp. in Central OR! Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to expert wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts; licenced, bonded, insured • CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

Call The Yard Doctor for yard maint., thatching, sod, hydroseeding, sprinkler sys, water features, walls, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012 Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874. 388-7605, 410-6945

Painting, Wall Covering WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. 541-388-6910. ccb#5184 Picasso Painting Interior/Exterior. Ask about our 10% discount, Affordable, Reliable. 25 yrs exp. CCB# 194351 Bruce Teague 541-280-9081.

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES PROBATE DEPARTMENT

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE

In the Matter of the Estate of JEFFREY C. MEYER, Deceased. Case No. 11 PB 0106 NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned personal representative c/o Bryant, Emerson & Fitch, LLP, Attorneys at Law, P.O. Box 457, Redmond, Oregon 97756, within four (4) months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose right may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative, or the attorney for the personal representative, Ronald L. Bryant, Bryant, Emerson & Fitch, LLP, Attorneys at Law, P.O. Box 457, Redmond, Oregon 97756. Date first published: September 8, 2011 CHARLES L. MEYER Personal Representative LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES PROBATE DEPARTMENT In the Matter of the Estate of JAMES LYLE COUCH, Deceased. Case No. 11 PB 0111 NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned personal representative c/o Bryant, Emerson & Fitch, LLP, Attorneys at Law, P.O. Box 457, Redmond, Oregon 97756, within four (4) months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose right may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative, or the attorney for the personal representative, Ronald L. Bryant, Bryant, Emerson & Fitch, LLP, Attorneys at Law, P.O. Box 457, Redmond, Oregon 97756. Date first published: September 8, 2011 MAHLON COUCH Personal Representative LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES In the Matter of the Estate of Dale Asher Mitchell, Deceased. No. 11PB0096 NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned personal representative at PO Box 6821, Bend, OR 97708, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative, or the lawyers for the personal representative, DeKalb & Associates, 1345 NW Wall St. Ste. 101, Bend, OR 97701. Dated and first published on September 15, 2011. De Eddra Ann Easley Personal Representative LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to ORS 128.264 that the undersigned is successor trustees to the WAYNE & ADELINE M. MAYFIELD 1991 TRUST dated December 3, 1991. A settlor of the Trust was ADELINE M. MAYFIELD who died July 28, 2011. All persons having claims against settlor of the WAYNE & ADELINE M. MAYFIELD 1991 TRUST are required to present them with vouchers attached, to: ROBERT (BOB) MAYFIELD, Successor Trustee WAYNE & ADELINE M. MAYFIELD 1991 TRUST c/o Ronald L. Bryant PO Box 457 Redmond, OR 97756 All claims against the WAYNE & ADELINE M. MAYFIELD 1991 TRUST dated December 3, 1991 must be presented to the Successor Trustee at the above address within four (4) months after the date of first publication of this notice, or such claims may be barred. Date first published: September 15, 2011 WAYNE & ADELINE M. MAYFIELD 1991 TRUST ROBERT (BOB) MAYFIELD, Successor Trustee

John A. Berge, Successor Trustee under the Trust Deed described below, hereby elects to sell, pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes Sections 86.705 to 86.795, the real property described below at 11:00 a.m. on Monday, November 10, 2011, in the lobby of the offices of Bryant, Lovlien & Jarvis, 591 SW Mill View Way, Bend, Oregon. All obligations of performance which are secured by the Trust Deed hereinafter described are in default for reasons set forth below and the beneficiary declares all sums due under the note secured by the trust deed described herein immediately due and payable. GRANTOR: Contract Developments, Inc. BENEFICIARY: Home Federal Bank TRUST DEED RECORDED: September 1, 2006 at 2006-60344, Official Records, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY COVERED BY TRUST DEED: Lot 9, Block 1, SUN DANCE PHASE I, Deschutes County, Oregon. This property is commonly known at 55996 Remington Drive, Bend, Oregon 97707. Real Property Tax Identification No. 20 10 24 BO 02900. DEFAULT: Failure to pay: 1. Regular installment payments due January 2011 through May 2011 at $635.86 each for a total of $3,179.30, including interest through June 1, 2011, in the amount of $3,913.64; 2. Late charges of $390.74; 3. Other - Trustee's Sale Guarantee: $420.00. SUM OWING ON OBLIGATION SECURED BY TRUST DEED: Principal balance of $82,002.14 with interest at 18 percent per annum from June 1, 2011, until paid. Notice is given that any person named pursuant to Section 86.753, Oregon Revised Statutes, has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by curing the above-described defaults, by payment of the entire amount due (other than such portions of principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale. JOHN A. BERGE, Successor Trustee LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF SEIZURE FOR CIVIL FORFEITURE TO ALL POTENTIAL CLAIMANTS AND TO ALL UNKNOWN PERSONS READ THIS CAREFULLY If you have any interest in the seized property described below, you must claim that interest or you will automatically lose that interest. If you do not file a claim for the property, the property may be forfeited even if you are not convicted of any crime. To claim an interest, you must file a written claim with the forfeiture counsel named below, The written claim must be signed by you, sworn to under penalty of perjury before a notary public, and state: (a) Your true name; (b) The address at which you will accept future mailings from the court and forfeiture counsel; and (3) A statement that you have an interest in the seized property. Your deadline for filing the claim document with forfeiture counsel named below is 21 days from the last day of publication of this notice. Where to file a claim and for more information: Daina Vitolins, Crook County District Attorney Office, 300 NE Third Street, Prineville, OR 97754. Notice of reasons for Forfeiture: The property described below was seized for forfeiture because it: (1) Constitutes the proceeds of the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violates, the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution, or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter475); and/or (2) Was used or intended for use in committing or facilitating the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violate the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475). IN THE MATTER OF: U.S. Currency in the amount of $1,741.00; One 2000 Honda S2000, license plate CA13028; One 2001 Mercedes 500, license plate 348 EVE; One Honda 450, VIN: JHP2P805354M206259; One KTM 65 SX, Apple I-Pad, #GB032VRQETU; One silver laptop, Apple, #W8928GJ166D, Case #11-240138 seized 6/30/11 from Gavin Fraser and Hannah Carr; IN THE MATTER OF: U.S. Currency in the amount of $4,105.00; One 1997 Dodge Dakota, license plate XZZ 061, Case #11-03-06155 seized 7/29/11 from Jose Valenzuela-Pineda, Micah Warren and Heather Cordier.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1.PARTIES: Grantor: RICK A. GALLAMORE and KATHY A. GALLAMORE. Trustee:AMERITITLE, INC. Successor Trustee:NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary:VIRGIL S. WILSON AND LEAH H. WILSON, TRUSTEE UNDER THE WILSON FAMILY TRUST DATED FEBRUARY 28, 2006. 2.DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Seventeen (17), Block Fifty-three (53), DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES UNIT 9 PART 2, recorded March 5, 1965, in Cabinet A, Page 121, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: November 14, 2007. Recording No. 2007-59554 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4.DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $665.40 each, due the fourteenth of each month, for the months of April 2011 through June 2011; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $64,794.83; plus interest at the rate of 11.00% per annum from April 12, 2011; plus late charges of $99.81; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6.SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7.TIME OF SALE. Date:December 1, 2011. Time:11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8.RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #31562.00011). DATED: July 6, 2011. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031330160 T.S. No: 11-03164-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of September 5, 2006 made by, REBECCA A LARSEN, as the original grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as the original trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ACCEPTANCE, INC, as the original beneficiary, recorded on September 12, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-61964 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Indenture Trustee for American Home Mortgage Investment Trust 2007-2, {the "Beneficiary"). APN: 122554/122556 PARCEL 1: LOT SIX (6), IN BLOCK FOUR (4), OF RIM ROCK ACRES, RECORDED JULY 3, 1968 IN CABINET A,PAGE 271, REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. PARCEL 2: THE NORTH THIRTY-FIVE FEET (35') OF LOT FOUR (4) IN BLOCK FOUR (4), RIM ROCK ACRES, RECORDED JULY 3, 1968 IN CABINET A, PAGE 271, REDMOND DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 524 NW CANYON DR., REDMOND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $5,677.36 as of August 23, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and pay-

able, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $197,655.56 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.25000% per annum from April 1, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on January 6, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 7, 2011 FIDELITY NATlONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature ASAP# 4086271 09/15/2011, 09/22/2011, 09/29/2011, 10/06/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0119218246 T.S. No.: 11-03041-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of March 18, 2010 made by, CAROLINE T. RAMOZ AND ERIC A RAMOZ, WIFE AND HUSBAND, as the original grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INS CO, as the original trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, NA., as the original beneficiary, recorded on March 31, 2010, as Instrument No. 2010-13058 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Wells Fargo Bank, NA, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 105835 As more particularly described in A portion of Lots 3, 4 and 5 in Block 4 of BEND PARK, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: BEGINNING at the Northwest corner of Lot 5, Block 4, BEND PARK, City of Bend; thence due East a distance of 79.62 feet; thence Southeasterly on a curve whose central angle is 30 DEGREES and whose radius is 100.00 feet for a distance of 35.66 feet, more or less; thence due South a distance of 43.71 feet, more or less; thence due West a distance of 115.00 feet; thence due North a distance of 50.00 feet to the point of beginning. Commonly known as: 335 NE 10TH ST., BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $8,346.92 as of August 22, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $218,970.39 together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.25000% per annum from February 1, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trusteed fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on January 5, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the

time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trusteed or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 30, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature ASAP# 4082582 09/08/2011, 09/15/2011, 09/22/2011, 09/29/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0030762025 T.S. No.: 11-02964-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of September 28. 2005 made by, JAMES E. CARROLL, MERLE D. CARROLL, as the original grantor, to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as the original trustee, in favor of MERS AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, as the original beneficiary, recorded on October 4, 2005, as Instrument No. 2005-67496 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for GSR Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-AR1, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2006-AR1, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 202882 LOT 29, TANGLEWOOD, PHASE V11, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 751SE BRIARWOOD COURT, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $15,846.13 as of August 9, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $427,110.60 together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.00000% per annum from December 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on January 3, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due {other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any

successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 30, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature ASAP# 4081912 09/08/2011, 09/15/2011, 09/22/2011, 09/29/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0085857464 T.S. No.: 11-02946-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of June 4, 2008 made by, CYNTHIA GONZALEZ, A SINGLE PERSON, as the original grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INS CO, as the original trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as the original beneficiary, recorded on June 11, 2008, as Instrument No. 2008-25076 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Oregon Housing and Community Services, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 112022 PARCEL ONE OF PARTITION PLAT NO. 2004-79, RECORDED IN OCTOBER 4, 2004, IN PP3, PAGE 24, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 61170 FERGUSON ROAD, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; and which defaulted amounts total: $5,449.12 as of August 22, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $191,444.71 together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.95000% per annum from April 1, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on January 5, 2012 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86,753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 30, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature ASAP# 4082574 09/08/2011, 09/15/2011, 09/22/2011, 09/29/2011

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Houses for Rent NE Bend

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2008, Model 208 LTD. Like brand new. Used 4x Bend to Camp Sherman. Winterized, Hunters, Take a Look at This! in storage. 3855 lbs Sleeps 1978 Dynacruiser 9½’ camper, 5. Queen walk around bed fully self-contained, no leaks, w/storage, full bathroom, full clean, everything works, will kitchen & lrg fridge. Dual fit 1988 or older pickup. batteries & propane tanks, $2500 firm. 541-420-6846 awning,corner-leveling jacks, Easylift Elite load hitch w/ Lance-Legend 990 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, exc. cond., genbars, furnace, AC, AM/FM erator, solar-cell, large refrig, stereo. Couch & dining table AC, micro., magic fan, bathfold out for extra sleeping. room shower, removable $11,795 OBO. 760-699-5125. carpet, custom windows, outdoor shower/awning SPRINGDALE 2005 27’ eatset-up for winterizing, elec. ing area slide, A/C and jacks, CD/stereo/4’ stinger. heat, new tires, all con$9500. Bend, 541.279.0458 tents included, bedding towels, cooking and eating utensils. Great for vacation, fishing, hunting or living! $15,500 541-408-3811

Fresh 400 Turbo Transmission w/torque converter, fits Cadillac, Oldsmobile, Buick,$500 541-420-6215; 541-536-3889

A Nice 3 bdrm, 1.75 bath 1428 sq.ft., woodstove, fenced yard, RV parking, 2.5 acres, horse OK. $895/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 Newer Home, 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, loft area, near Forum shops & medical centers, $1095, Call 541-550-0333.

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend Adorable home in THE PARKS, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, mtn. views, W/D, corner lot, $1345, Please call 541-408-0877

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Houses for Rent SE Bend

• Available Now• Cute 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1200 sq.ft., all appl. $795/mo. 437 SE Roosevelt Ave. 541-306-5161 AVAIL. NOW 3 bedroom, 1 bath, appliances, garage, yard, deck. . No pets/smoking. $750 month 1st, last + deposit. 541-389-7734.

100+Ponderosa Pines on 5 acres 3 bdrm, 3 bath, semi-secluded home, 45x24 Morton insulated metal shop, $425,000, Baker City, 541-523-2368. HORSE RANCH RV PARK located by Fort Rock, OR. 3 bdrm main house, 1 bdrm attached apt., 1 bdrm rental house, 17 RV spaces. Lots of trees, on almost 28 acres. $380,000. 541-576-2488, 503-250-3435.

773 2 Acres flat, in Prineville, with creek running thru. Standard septic approval, nice mountain view, near Prineville Res. $19,900. 541-279-0591 Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, septic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $114,900, 541-350-4684.

Snowmobiles

Small Home, 1 bdrm, 1 bath on ranch property, 8 mi. W. of Terrebonne on Lower Bridge, refs. req., no smoking, $650, $500 dep., 541-419-6542

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Yamaha 600 Mtn. Max 1997 Now only $850! Sled plus trailer package $1550. Many Extras, call for info, 541-548-3443.

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HARLEY CUSTOM 2007 Dyna Super Glide FXDI loaded, all options, bags, exhaust, wheels, 2 helmets, low mi., beautiful, $10,995. 541-408-7908

Office / Warehouse 1792 sq.ft. & 1680 sq.ft. spaces, 827 Business Way, Bend. 30¢/sq.ft.; 1st mo. + $300 dep. 541-678-1404 Office/Warehouse located in SE Bend. Up to 30,000 sq.ft., competitive rate, 541-382-3678.

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008 Too many upgrades to list, immaculate cond., clean, 15K miles. $14,900 541-693-3975

Office/Warehouse Space 6400 sq ft., (3) 12x14 doors, on Boyd Acres Rd. Reasonable rates. 541-382-8998 The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

693

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $200 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 Approximately 1800 sq.ft., perfect for office or church south end of Bend. Ample parking. $675. 541-408-2318.

Real Estate For Sale

700 740

Condo / Townhomes For Sale $75,000 - Great Boulder Brooks townhome, Redmond, mt. views, decks, 1817 sq. ft., 3 bdrm, 2.5 baths. MLS#201102766 Call JEANNE SCHARLUND, Principal Broker 541-420-7978 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate

2010 Custom Pro-street Harley DNA Pro-street swing arm frame, Ultima 107, Ultima 6-spd over $23,000 in parts alone; 100s of man hours into custom fabrication. Past show winner & a joy to ride. $20,000 obo 541-408-3317

1984, 23K, many new parts, battery charger, good condition, $3000 OBO. 541-382-1891 KAWASAKI 750 2005 like new, 2400 miles, stored 5 years. New battery, sports shield, shaft drive, $3400 firm. 541-447-6552.

Kawasaki KLR650 Dual Sport, 2005, low miles, $4200. 541-350-3921

Yamaha XT225 Dual Sport, 2006, low miles, $3700. Call 541-350-3921

bend and beyond real estate 20967 yeoman, bend or

865

ATVs

www.BendHomeHunter.com bend and beyond real estate 20967 yeoman, bend or

748

New Constrution, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, dbl. garage, Close to parks, hospital, schools, slab granite counters, hardwood floors, landscape w/sprinkler systems, starting at $152,900, Bend River Realty, Rob Marken, Broker/Owner 541-410-4255. More photos: www.RobMarken.com

749

Southeast Bend Homes 3 Bdrm, 1 bath home, 6 yrs. old, wonderful condition, $89,900, Call Rob Marken, Broker, 541-410-4255 or visit www.RobMarken.com

EXTENDED FAMILY, 6 bdrm, 4 bath, (2) 1/2 baths, 4270 sq.ft., 2 kitchens, 4 car garage on .8 acre, corner lot, view, owner. $590,000 541-390-0886

875

Watercraft Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

880

Motorhomes Hurricane by Four Winds 32’, 2007, 12K miles, cherry wood, leather, queen, sleeps 6, 2 slides, 2 TVs, 2 roof airs, jacks, camera, new condition, non-smoker, $59,900 or best offer. 541-548-5216.

Polaris 330 Trail Bosses (2), used very little, like new, $1800 ea. OBO, 541-420-1598

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504 Tent Trailer 1995 Viking, sleeps 6-8. Awning, new screened room, 2-yr tags, extras. Great cond! $3950. 541-549-8747

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

882

29’ Alpenlite Riviera 1997 5th whl. 1 large slide-out. New carpeting, solar panel, AC & furnace. 4 newer batteries & inverter. Great shape. Price reduced, now $12,900 541-389-8315 541-728-8088

Beaver Santiam 2002, 2 slides, 48K, immaculate, 330 Cummins diesel, $75,000. Call for details: 541-504-0874 Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417. Four Winds Chateau M-31F 2006, 2 power slides, back-up camera, many upgrades, great cond. $43,900. 541-419-7099 Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Jayco 24’ Class C, 1996, 19,400 mi, new battery, Onan gen, sleeps 6, very well cared for, $19,900. 541-388-1112

Cardinal 34.5 RL (40’) 2009, 4 slides, convection oven + micro., dual A/C, fireplace, extra ride insurance (3 yr. remaining incl. tires), air sleeper sofa + queen bed, $50,900 OBO, must see to appreciate, 406-980-1907, Terrebonne

Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, frplc, 2 flat scrn TVs. $65,000. 541-480-3923

COACHMAN 1997 Jayco Greyhawk 2004, 31’ Class C, 6800 mi., hyd. jacks, new tires, slide out, exc. cond, $54,000, 541-480-8648

Catalina 5th wheel 23’, slide, new tires, extra clean, below book. $6,500. 541-548-1422. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $89,400. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

900

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

755

Yamaha Grizzly Sportsman Special 2000, 600cc 4-stroke, push button 4x4 Ultramatic, 945 mi, $3850. 541-279-5303

Winnebago Access 31J 2008, Class C, Near Low Retail Price! One owner, nonsmoker, garaged, 7,400 miles, auto leveling jacks, (2) slides, upgraded queen bed, bunk beds, microwave, 3-burner range/oven, (3) TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, maintained, and very clean! Only $76,995! Extended warranty available! Call (541) 388-7179. Winnebago Sightseer 30B Class A 2008 $79,500 OBO Top of the line! cell 805-368-1575

870

881

Boats & Accessories

Travel Trailers

19-ft Mastercraft Pro-Star 190 inboard, 1989, 290hp, V8, 822 hrs, great cond, lots of extras, $10,000. 541-231-8709

Forest River 26’ Surveyor 2011, Echo light model, aluminum construction, used 1 time, flat screen TV, DVD & CD player, outside speakers, 1 slide out, cherry cabinets, power awning, power tongue lift, can be towed by most autos, $19,500, call now at 541-977-5358.

Cadillac Eldorado Convertible 1976 exc cond, 80K, beautiful, AC, cruise, power everything, leather interior, fuel inj V8, $8900. 541-815-5600

MUST SELL For Memorial 70 Monte Carlo All original, beautiful, car, completely new suspension and brake system, plus extras. $4000 OBO. 541-593-3072

Chevy Camaro Z28 I-ROC 1989, 22K mi, T-Top, almost show room cond, 5.7L, always garaged, $9995. 541-389-5645

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Fleetwood Wilderness 36’ 2005 4 slides, rear bdrm, fireplace, AC, W/D hkup beautiful unit! $30,500. 541-815-2380

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $138,500. Call 541-647-3718

Executive Hangar at Bend Airport (KBDN). 60’ wide x 50’ deep, with 55’ wide x 17’ high bi-fold door. Natural gas heat, office & bathroom. Parking for 6 cars. Adjacent to Frontage Rd; great visibility for aviation bus. $235K 541-948-2126

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, quality built, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more.$59,500. 541-317-9185

MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $37,500. 541-420-3250

Chevy Corvette Coupe 2006, 8,471 orig miles, 1 owner, always garaged, red, 2 tops, auto/paddle shift, LS-2, Corsa exhaust, too many options to list, pristine car, $37,500. Serious only, call 541-504-9945

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Chevy

933

935

975

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Nissan Xterra S - 4x4 2006,

Chevy Corvette 1988 4-spd manual with 3-spd O/D. Sharp, loaded, 2 tops, (tinted & metal. New AC, water pump, brake & clutch, master cylinder & clutch slave cyl. $6500 OBO. 541-419-0251.

FORD F250 4x4 - 1994 460 engine, cab and a half, 4-spd stick shift, 5th wheel hitch, 181K miles. $2100. Call 541-389-9764 FORD F350 2003, crew cab 4x4 V-10, great tires, towing pkg, power windows, locks and seats, CD. 132,621 miles, Carfax avail. $10,550. See craigslist 255692031 for pics. 541-390-7649.

1982 INT. Dump with Arborhood, 6k on rebuilt 392, truck refurbished, has 330 gal. water tank with pump and hose. Everything works, $8,500 OBO. 541-977-8988 Chevrolet 3500 Service Truck, 1992, 4x4, automatic, 11-ft storage bed. Liftgate, compressor & generator shelf inside box, locked storage boxes both sides of bed, new tires, regular maintenance & service every 3K miles, set up for towing heavy equip. $3995. 541-420-1846

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $9000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Chrysler SD 4-Door 1930, CDS Royal Standard, 8-cylinder, body is good, needs some restoration, runs, taking bids, 541-383-3888, 541-815-3318

Shadow Cruiser 25’ RK 1994 Very rare, many new parts, 30,000 BTU heater, aerodynamic, $5250, fantastic cond, must see, 541-923-6116.

GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi motor, mechanically A-1, interior great; body needs some TLC. $4000 OBO. Call 541-382-9441

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

Chevy 18 ft. Flatbed 1975, 454 eng., 2-spd trans, tires 60%, Runs/drives well, motor runs great, $1650. 541-771-5535

ToyotaTundra 2000 SR5 4x4 perfect cond., all scheduled maint. completed, looks new in/out. $10,000 541-420-2715

935

MUST SELL GMC 6000 dump truck 1990. 7 yard bed, low miles, good condition, new tires! ONLY $3500 OBO. 541-593-3072

Ford Model A Sport Coupe 1930, $25,000, call 619-733-8472

Chevy Suburban LT 2004, 90K, 1-owner, soccer/ski trip ready, leather, cruise, Onstar, $15,000, 541-389-7365

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199 CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005 72,000 miles, new shocks, rear brakes, one owner, $16,995, 541-480-0828.

GMC Ventura 3500 1986, refrigerated, w/6’x6’x12’ box, has 2 sets tires w/rims., 1250 lb. lift gate, new engine, $5500, 541-389-6588, ask for Bob.

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $30,000. 541-548-1422

Mac Mid Liner 1991, with cabin chassis, air brakes, power steering, auto transmission, diesel, near new recap rear tires, 30% front tires, new starter, PTO & hydraulic pump. Will take Visa or Mastercard, $2500, 541-923-0411.

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

Ford Excursion 2005, 4WD, diesel, exc.

stage, propane, hardrubber tires, $4000, 541-389-5355.

Truck with Snow Plow!

Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. $6500 OBO. Call 541-390-1466.

12 ft. Hydraulic dump trailer w/extra sides, dual axle, steel ramps, spare tire, tarp, excellent condition. $6500 firm. 541-419-6552

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597

VW BAJA BUG 1974 1776cc engine. New: shocks, tires, disc brakes, interior paint, flat black. $5900 OBO. partial trades considered. 541-322-9529.

Willis Jeep 1956, new rebuilt motor, no miles, power take off winch, exc. tires, asking $3999, 541-389-5355.

933

Pickups Chevy Classic Pickup 1969, C-20 Model CST, 396 Turbo 400, equiped w/all options, orig. owner, $24,000 OBO, 541-410-7774

Dodge Dakota 4x4 X-Cab, 1994, w/canopy, 180K mi, 5-spd, tow pkg $2200. 541-550-6689

Interstate West Enclosed Trailer, 20’ Car

F-250

1986,

Lariat, x-cab, 2WD, auto, gas or propane, 20K orig. mi., new tires, $5000, 541-480-8009.

Jeep 4-dr Wagon, 1987 4WD, silver, nice wheels, 183K, lots of miles left yet! Off-road or on-road, 4-wheeler’s or Hunter’s Special - $1900. Call 541-318-9999 or 541-815-3639. Free trip to D.C. for WWII Vets!

Porsche Cayenne S 2008 Nearly every option: 20" wheels, navigation, Bi-Xenon lights, thermally insulated glass, tow pkg, stainless steel nose trim, moonroof, Bose sys, heated seats. 66K mi. MSRP was over $75K; $34,900. 541-954-0230

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 38K mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $59,750 firm. 541-480-1884

940

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Vans CHEVY ASTRO EXT 1993 AWD mini van, 3 seats, rear barn doors, white, good tires/wheels. Pretty interior, clean, no rips or tears. Drives exc! $2500. Free trip to D.C. for WWII Vets! (541) 318-9999 or (541) 815-3639

mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $3950 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

Dodge Grand Caravan SXT 2005: StoNGo, 141k miles, power doors/trunk $7850. Call 541-639-9960

FORD MUSTANG GT 2005 CONVERTIBLE, 9,000 miles, Shaker Sound Sys, Leather int. Immaculate condition. Must See! $23,995. 541-771-3980

Kia Rhondo 2009, loaded,USB & aux ports,satellite radio,DVD, 3rd row,brand new snows, 52K, $15,500, 541-280-4875.

Mercury Cougar 1994, XR7 V8, 77K mi, excellent cond. $4995. 541-526-1443

Dodge Ram Van 1990 Customized to carry livestock such as Alpacas, Sheep, Goats etc. Runs Great, Needs a paint job. 78K miles, $2,000. (541) 447-4570 FORD Windstar Mini Van, 1995, 138K, nice inside & out, only half worn out! Seats 7, Michelins, nice wheels, drives excellent 1 look is worth 1000 words! $2495. 541-318-9999 or 541-815-3639. Free Trip to D.C. for WWII Vets!

All British Car Cruise-in! Every Thurs, 5-7pm at McBain’s British Fish & Chips, Hwy 97 Redmond, OR. 541-408-3317

Sportsmobile Van 2000 Ford E350 4x4, V-10, pop-top, many extras, 47,000 miles, $41,000. 541-383-0014

1980 Classic Mini Cooper All original, rust-free, classic Mini Cooper in perfect cond. $10,000 OBO. 541-408-3317

975

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Automobiles Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Jeep CJ-7 1984 4WD. New Snow/Mud tires, runs Great and has a custom installed 2nd rear axle. Great for hunting and fishing. Soft Top, Clean $5,500 (541) 447-4570 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 2004 $8500 OBO, 6cyl. 4x4 tow pkg., extra wheels/tires white cloth, 102k original owner runs looks great 541-593-1453

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 1996, V-6, 153K, burgandy, leather interior, fully loaded, new all weather tires, new muffler/shock absorbers, great cond., $3800 OBO, 541-678-5482,541-410-6608

JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LIMITED 2001 4x4 90k, leather, cream puff, one nice lady’s car.

only $7900. 541-815-3639, 318-9999

Ford F250 1997 X-cab 4x4 , 112K, 460, AC, PW, PL, Split window, factory tow pkg, receiver hitches, front & rear, incl. 5th wheel platform & Warn winch. Unit incl. cloth interior, exc. cond. $7,000. call: 541-546-9821, Culver

Dodge Durango 1999 126K mi. 4X4 Great cond. 7 passenger $4200. 541-475-2197

call

hauler, cabinets, tile floor, $4995, 541-595-5363. Towmaster Equipment Trailer, 14,000 lb capacity. Tandemn axle, 4-wheel brakes, 18’ bed, heavy duty ramps, spare tire mounted, side mounted fork pockets, all tires in good condition. $3995. Call 541-420-1846.

Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k, immac.,loaded, dealer maint, $19,500. 503-459-1580.

Chevy Tahoe, 1999, very clean, loaded, 23,600 miles on new motor; new tires & battery, $5500. 541-330-1151

cond., $24,000, 541-923-0231.

Pette Bone Mercury Fork Lift, 6000 lb., 2

Chrysler La Baron Convertible 1990, Good condition, $3200, 541-416-9566

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great

Sport Utility Vehicles

Dodge pickup 1962 D100 classic, original 318 wide block, push button trans, straight, runs good, $1250 firm. Bend, 831-295-4903

AT, 76K, good all-weather tires, $13,500 obo. 858-345-0084

Ford Sport Trac Ltd Ed. 2007 4x4, many extras incl. new tires, 107k, perfect winter SUV, $15,495. 541-306-7546

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

Ford

Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th wheel, 1 slide, AC, TV, full awning, excellent shape, $23,900. 541-350-8629

Wagon

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

Pickups

FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $3800 OBO. 541-350-1686

908

925 Phoenix Cruiser 2001, 23 ft. V10, 51K. Large bath, bed & kitchen. Seats 6-8. Awning. $30,950. 541-923-4211

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Autos & Transportation

Utility Trailers Polaris Phoenix, 2005, 2+4 200cc, like new, low hours, runs great, $1700 or best offer. Call 541-388-3833

We Buy Scrap Auto & Truck Batteries, $10 each Also buying junk cars & trucks, (up to $500), & scrap metal! Call 541-912-1467

1950 CHEVY CLUB COUPE Cobalt Blue, Great condition, runs well, lots of spare parts. $9995. Call 541-419-7828

Fifth Wheels

Honda Foreman Rubicon 2003, Red, 14 mi, cover, chains, gun mounts, $5500, 541-771-3355.

Sunriver/La Pine Homes

New Custom Finished home, 1000’ river frontage, 5+/-acres Mtn views. Gourmet kitchen, 4 large bdrms w/walk-in closets. 3.5 baths, large bonus rm, ready to move in! Bank owned. Reduced, now $324,500. Bend River Realty, Rob Marken, Broker/ Owner 541-410-4255. More photos www.RobMarken.com

Used out-drive parts Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

Honda VT700 Shadow

BANK OWNED HOMES! FREE List w/Pics! www.BendRepos.com

Northeast Bend Homes

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

1981 Honda CB900F, silver & blue, 13K, pristine! Call for Alfa See Ya 40 2005. 2 slides, 350 CAT. Tile. 2 door fridge details, 541-548-3439 with ice-maker. $98,000. 541-610-9985

Yamaha YZF600-R, 2007 perfect condition, always garaged, never been down. $4,250 OBO. Illness forces sale. Call 541-410-2323

Hot West Side Properties! FREE List w/Pics & Maps

Springdale 20’ 179RD 2007 new tires, dinette w/rear window, 3- burner stove,oven,micro, tub /shower, A/C, outside shower, cover, $9200, 503-639-3355

A-Class

745

Homes for Sale

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

800

Houses for Rent Redmond

A 3 bdrm, 1.5 bath, 1376 sq.ft., wood stove, brand new carpet, brand new oak floors, W/S paid, rear deck, $850. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

25’ Catalina Sailboat 1983, w/trailer, swing keel, pop top, fully loaded, $10,000, call for details, 541-480-8060

Boats & RV’s

850

659

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Acreages

658

Houses for Rent Sunriver

Skyline Layton 25’

Jeep Ltd Wagoneer 4WD, 1989 runs great, exc cond, lthr seats, full pwr, winch, brushgrd, tow pkg, 96K, perfect 2nd car/hunting rig, 24 mpg, $3850. Steve, 541-815-5600

BMW 323i convertible, 1999. 91K miles. Great condition, beautiful car, incredibly fun ride! $9300. 541-419-1763

BMW 330 CI 2002 great cond., Newer tires. Harmon/Kardon stereo system. Asking $13,500. 541-480-7752.

BMW convertible 2003 in exlnt cond, just 54,500 mi. Silver, black top, great handling, fun car! $15,400. 541-788-4229 Buicks 1995 LeSabre Limited, 113K, $2950; 1998 LeSabre, 93k, $3900; 1999 Regal GS V-6 supercharged $3500; 2002 LeSabre, 102k, $4950; 2006 Lucerne CX, stunning black, 70k, $7900; 2006 Lucerne CXL 58k, white, $12,500. Bob 541-318-9999 or Sam 541-815-3639. Cadillac El Dorado 1994, Total cream puff, body, paint, trunk as showroom, blue leather, nicely patina-ed gorgeous light blue, $1700 wheels w/snow tires although car has not been wet in 8 years. On trip to Boise last week avg. 28.5 mpg., $5700, 541-593-4016.

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

SUBARUS!!! Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Volvo 780 1990, extremely rare car, Bertone designed & built, Volvo reliability & safety, Italian elegance, all parts avail., Italian leather, Burl Wood, drives beautifully, $5500, 541-593-4016.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Bulletin Daily Paper 09/22/11  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Thursday September 22, 2011