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Budget trouble can take schools in many directions By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

The ways school districts handle a budget crisis can seem infinitely diverse and sometimes contradictory. One common target is schedules. When teaching positions are cut, districts scramble to find ways to keep

class sizes down and offerings up. In 2009-10, the Redmond School District ran on a four-day school week, a model it dropped after one year. Districts in the region have moved to semester models or switched daily schedules. That districts sometimes move in opposite directions is evident in the

Questioned, Redmond Chamber makes case for funds

approaches Portland Public Schools and Bend-La Pine Schools took to high school schedules this year. Both wanted to maintain average high school class sizes: about 35 in BendLa Pine and in the mid- to high 20s in Portland. To do that, Portland moved to a block schedule of four classes

per day that allowed for up to eight credits a year. Bend-La Pine adopted a seven-period schedule, shifting away from the block approach. Those two moves reflect the complexity of budget challenges districts face across Oregon. See Schools / A5

And there was Jubelale-tion

Settlement talks unsuccessful; Biedscheid pleads not guilty By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

A Bend man accused in a fatal hit and run earlier this year entered not guilty pleas on Tuesday and will be going to trial in January. Bret Lee Biedscheid, 38, faces charges of criminally negligent homicide and failure to perform the duties of a driver in the death of Anthony “Tony” Martin on Jan. 26. Martin was pushing his bicycle across Third Street near Revere Avenue when he was struck and killed by a southbound driver who failed to stop after the collision. A few days later, police said Bret Lee they had processed a pickup Biedscheid truck for evidence and were looking at the owner as a “person of interest” in the case, though they declined to identify the person. Nearly a month after the crash, police confirmed that their person of interest was Biedscheid, an executive at Les Schwab Tire Centers. In April, a grand jury indicted Biedscheid, and he was formally arraigned and booked into the Deschutes County jail. Biedscheid’s bail was set at $250,000, and he was released after posting the required 10 percent. Tuesday, Biedscheid and his attorney, Stephen Houze, of Portland, were back in court for a settlement conference with prosecutors to try to resolve the case without going to trial. After five hours of closed-door negotiations, Deschutes County Circuit Court Judge Michael Sullivan announced the talks had failed, and set a trial date of Jan. 17. Prosecutors and defense attorneys anticipate Biedscheid’s trial will last five days. See Trial / A4

By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

REDMOND — City Councilor Ed Boero was troubled last week at the thought of $152,000 going to the Chamber of Commerce without discussion or oversight. The chamber’s response: not a problem. Eric Sande, executive director of the chamber, wasn’t fazed when challenged. He told the City Council of the chamber’s success and the direction it plans to head in. “We welcome the question,” Sande said. “We’re happy to meet with the city and discuss what we’re doing. We’re completely open.” At the end of the day, the council agreed unanimously to allocate the funds to the chamber on a one-year contract. The money is intended to market the city and improve tourism. Mayor George Endicott said a gentleman’s agreement for the two sides to meet in the future was enough of a guarantee for him to feel comfortable with how the money was being spent. The funds come from a transient room tax, or TRT, levied by the city on hotel rooms and, despite a down economy, the numbers appear to be growing. Between fiscal years 2009-10 and 2010-11, revenue from the tax increased by 17 percent. That boost was largely due to the efforts of the chamber bringing events, meetings and seminars to the area. Those included national meetings of the BMW Motorcycle Owners of America and the Family Motor Coach Association held at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center. Over the course of last year, the chamber estimates around 500,000 people attended some type of event at the fairgrounds. Sande said this year’s goal is to grow the TRT revenues by seven percent over last year. See Redmond / A4

Correction In a story headlined “Rattled but still resolute,” which appeared Saturday, Sept. 17, on Page A1, it was reported incorrectly that Mountain View Hospital in Madras does not carry antivenin. The hospital currently carries six vials of the antivenin Crofab in its pharmacy. The Bulletin regrets the error.

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Fatal hit and run will go to trial

END OF ‘DON’T ASK’

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Deschutes Brewery brewer Veronica Vega raises a pint of the 2011 Jubelale, introducing it for the upcoming season at a release party Tuesday evening at the Deschutes Brewery & Public House in downtown Bend. In addition to sampling the brew, attendees got to meet the beer-label artists. The label was a collaboration of work by Cara Thayer and Louie Van Patten, who were on hand to sign posters for collectors.

Marines hit the ground running at gay center By Elisabeth Bumiller New York Times News Service

U.S. said to build secret drone bases By Craig Whitlock and Greg Miller The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration is assembling a constellation of secret drone bases for counterterrorism operations in the Horn of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula as part of a newly aggressive campaign to attack al-Qaida affiliates in Somalia and Yemen, U.S. officials said.

One of the installations is being established in Ethiopia, a U.S. ally in the fight against al-Shabab, the Somali militant group that controls much of that country. Another base is in the Seychelles, an archipelago in the Indian Ocean, where a small fleet of “hunter-killer” drones resumed operations this month after an experimental mission demonstrated that the unmanned aircraft

The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 108, No. 264, 36 pages, 6 sections

could effectively patrol Somalia from there. The U.S. military also has flown drones over Somalia and Yemen from bases in Djibouti, a tiny African nation at the junction of the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden. In addition, the CIA is building a secret airstrip in the Arabian Peninsula so it can deploy armed drones over Yemen. See Drones / A5

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TULSA, Okla. — Master Sgt. Anthony Henry, a top Marine recruiting trainer for the southwestern United States, pulled up to Tulsa’s biggest gay community center Tuesday morning and left his van where he could make a fast getaway. “I have an exit strategy,” he said. “I know where my choke points are, I’ve strategically parked my car right on the curbside, I have an out.” But as it happened, one of the strangest days in the history of the U.S. Marine Corps unfolded without the protests and insults that Henry had feared. Henry, who had been invited to set up a recruiting booth on the first day of the end of “don’t ask, don’t tell” at the Dennis R. Neill Equality Center in downtown Tulsa, instead spent it in quiet conversation with a trickle of gay women who came in to ask about joining the Marines. See Marines / A4

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AFGHANISTAN: Suicide blast kills key leader, Page A3 YEMEN: Prospect of civil war looms, Page A3


A2 Wednesday, September 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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A new type of financing will pay for a solar array at this California development. With modern techniques and equipment, a retrofit can typically cut a building’s energy use so much that the project pays for itself in as little as five years, experts say.

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Rebuilding in green, fueled by a tax boost By Justin Gillis New York Times News Service

A business consortium that includes Lockheed Martin and Barclays plans to invest as much as $650 million over the next few years to slash the energy consumption of buildings in the Miami and Sacramento areas. It is the most ambitious effort yet to jump-start a national market for energy upgrades that many people believe could eventually be worth billions. Focusing mainly on commercial property at first, the group plans to exploit a new tax arrangement that allows property owners to upgrade their buildings at no upfront cost, typically cutting their energy use and their utility bills by a third. The building owners would pay for the upgrades over five to 20 years through surcharges on their property-tax bills, but that would be less than the savings. The consortium is led by a company called Ygrene Energy Fund of Santa Rosa, Calif., which has already won an exclusive contract to manage a retrofit program for a half-dozen communities in the Miami area, with the city expected to join in a few weeks. It is in the late stages of completing a contract with Sacramento, and is seeking deals in other cities. State and city officials are optimistic they may have found a way to tackle one of the nation’s biggest energy issues — waste in older buildings — without new money from Washington. If enough building owners sign on, private capital would be put to work paying for retrofit projects that promise to save local businesses money while creating thousands of new construction jobs. “We are so used to reaching our hand out and saying, ‘Washington, we need this,’ and ‘Tallahassee, give us that,’” said Edward MacDougall, the mayor of Cutler Bay, Fla., a Miami suburb that took the lead in setting up the deal in that region. “This is really a home-grown mechanism where we don’t need to do that.”

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Branson to the rescue? The consortium was put together by the Carbon War Room, a nonprofit environmental group based in Washington set up by Richard Branson, the British entrepreneur and billionaire, to tackle the world’s climate and energy problems in cost-saving ways. With the U.S. government nearly paralyzed on climate policy, he said, his group is seeking a way forward. “We see this as the first of hopefully many, many, many projects, and a big step in the right direction,” Branson said in an interview last weekend in New York. In the past three years, half the

Part of the retrofitted interior at the same California building. A large solar array will power the development. states have passed legislation permitting energy retrofits financed by property-tax surcharges, and hundreds of cities and counties are considering such programs. While the situation poses some risks, and programs aimed specifically at homeowners have run into a snag, many jurisdictions are moving forward with plans to focus on commercial properties. Environmental groups have lauded the trend as one of the most exciting developments in years regarding climate change. They point out that wide use of such programs could cut emissions of heat-trapping carbon dioxide from power plants by reducing electricity demand. “It’s a big deal,” said James Marston, head of energy programs for the Environmental Defense Fund, a group that has worked with Carbon War Room in developing the approach. Over the long haul, he said, “we’re talking about tens of billions of dollars in investments, and energy savings that are 10 times that amount. If you do this correctly, you would be able to shut down a third of the coal plants in the country.” While that may take a while, there seems to be little question that the new approach could draw substantial private capital into the market for energy upgrades, which have historically been difficult for many midsize and smaller businesses to finance. As envisioned for Miami and Sacramento, the plans will work like this: Ygrene and its partners will gain exclusive rights for five years to offer this type of energy upgrade to businesses in a particular community. They will market the plan aggressively, helping property owners figure out what kinds of upgrades make sense for them. Lockheed Martin is expected to do the engineering work on many larger projects. The retrofits might include new windows and doors, insulation, and more efficient lights and me-

chanical systems. In some cases, solar panels or other renewable power might be included. For factories, the retrofits might include new motors or other gear. Short-term loans provided by Barclays Capital will be used to pay for the upgrades. Contractors will offer a warranty that the utility savings they have promised will actually materialize, and an insurance underwriter, Energi, of Peabody, Mass., will back up that warranty. Those insurance contracts, in turn, will be backed by Hannover Re, one of the world’s largest reinsurance companies. As projects are completed, the upgrade loans, typically carrying interest rates of 7 percent, will be bundled into long-term bonds resembling those routinely issued by governmental taxing districts. Barclays will market the bonds. Retirement funds have expressed interest in buying these bonds, which will be repaid by tax surcharges on each property that undergoes a retrofit.

‘Cowboy’ risk Perhaps the most serious risk is that fly-by-night contractors will be drawn to the new pot of money, pushing energy retrofits that are too costly or work poorly. “Contractors are cowboys,” acknowledged Dennis Hunter, chairman of Ygrene. He promised close scrutiny of the ones selected for the Miami and Sacramento programs. Ygrene is one of about a dozen startup companies around the country pursuing such deals. The company appears to have substantial momentum, but some of its competitors have already stumbled, telling property owners they qualified for retrofits but then failing to deliver the necessary short-term financing. Still, many people are optimistic this approach will get off the ground. “This is a game-changer,” said John Kinney, whose company, Clean Fund of San Rafael, Calif.,

has raised $250 million to invest in such projects. The company just used the technique to help finance a large solar installation at a development called Sonoma Mountain Village in Rohnert Park, Calif. Experts point out that, with modern techniques and equipment, a retrofit can typically cut a building’s energy use so much that the project pays for itself in as little as five years. The most famous recent example was the refurbishment of the Empire State Building, which cut energy use by nearly 40 percent, turning it into one of New York’s greenest buildings. The new financing approach is called Property Assessed Clean Energy, or PACE. For decades, cities and counties have created special taxing districts to finance improvements that benefit private property, such as streetlights or sewers. Bonds are issued to pay for the projects, then repaid with surcharges on tax bills. If an owner sells, the surcharge stays with the property. Several years ago, the city of Berkeley, Calif., hit on the idea of using that approach to finance energy upgrades on private homes. The idea took off, and 25 states and the District of Columbia soon passed PACE legislation. One of the most successful programs to date has been in Sonoma County, Calif., where retrofit projects exceeding $50 million have been financed.

MADRID — The U.S. government’s $8 billion bet on solar energy that would pave the deserts with mirrors risks following the Betamax into the technological wilderness because of Chinese backing for a cheaper system. The Department of Energy guaranteed loans to six plants that will reflect sunlight to boil water for making electricity, aiming to kick-start commercial projects. Four of those, and a third of a $26 billion pipeline encouraged by U.S. aid, may switch to standard photovoltaic panels that generate a charge directly from the sun, said Brett Prior, a solar analyst at GTM Research. The cost of generating power with panels plunged about 37 percent in the past year as Chinese factories cut prices, pushing three U.S. makers including Solyndra into bankruptcy protection in the past quarter. Germany’s Solar Millennium walked away from a $2.1 billion U.S. loan guarantee last month and ditched thermal devices for a cheaper photovoltaic system. “If Solar Millennium, a major developer that has the technology, can’t do it with a loan guarantee, then it’s not clear who could,” Prior said in a phone interview from Boston. While the developers of some of the U.S. guaranteed projects said they are sticking with mirror-based devices, a switch by others will drain momentum for the technology and shift engineering jobs President Barack Obama aims to create in the southwestern U.S. to the panel plants of eastern China. Congress is probing White House support for Solyndra, with some lawmakers saying loan guarantees were given without a thorough vetting of the Fremont, Calif.-based company, one of many solarequipment makers in the United States, Germany and Japan that were weakened by the same Chinese competition. Solyndra wasn’t in the solar thermal business, focusing instead on photovoltaics. Tiffany Edwards, an Energy Department spokeswoman, declined to comment on the competing solar technologies. Photovoltaic, or PV, panels have benefited from tumbling costs. That in turn fueled demand and allowed manufacturers such as China’s Suntech Power Holdings to boost capacity and cut prices for use in fields and on rooftops.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 21, 2011 A3

T S Key Afghan leader killed under peace-talk pretext By Ernesto Londono The Washington Post

KABU, Afghanistan — Former Afghan president Burhanuddin Rabbani, who was appointed last year to head a commission trying to broker a peace deal with the Taliban, was killed inside his Kabul home Tuesday afternoon in a suicide bombing, Afghan officials said. The man who killed Rabbani was brought to his house under the pretext of peace talks, Gen. Abdul Zahir, director of investigations for the Kabul police, said in a phone interview. The suicide bomber had hidden explosives in his turban, Zahir said.

“A group of people were brought to his room, saying they wanted to discuss the peace process,” Zahir said. “The man hugged Rabbani and blew himself up.” Zahir said Rabbani’s killer was not searched because he was brought to the residence by senior members of the peace council. He said the council members thought the men, who arrived at the heavily-fortified residence at approximately 6 p.m., were representatives of the Taliban. Before detonating the explosives, the suicide bomber lowered his head in an ostensible gesture of respect, the general added.

“He was killed on the spot,” Zahir said, referring to Rabbani. Four other people in the room, including Rabbani’s secretary, were also killed in the attack, Zahir said. Security officials said Masoom Stanekzai, a senior adviser to President Hamid Karzai and another key player in the peace effort, suffered serious injuries during the attack. Upon hearing the news, Karzai cut short a trip to New York, where he planned to attend the annual meeting of the United Nations General Assembly. “The enemy has shown it has no mercy for the people who love their country,” he said in a statement.

Before leaving New York, Karzai met there with President Barack Obama to discuss the transition of security responsibility to Afghan forces. In a joint appearance with Karzai before their meeting, Obama called the assassination of Rabbani “a tragic loss” and hailed his “enormous contribution to rebuilding the country.” Obama vowed that “we will not be deterred from creating a path whereby Afghans can live in freedom and safety and security and prosperity,” and he called for continuing efforts to unite Afghans and end “a senseless cycle of violence.”

Embracing Israel, GOP candidates take aim at Obama

At U.N., Obama praises Libya’s transitional leaders By Helene Cooper and Neil Macfarquhar New York Times News Service

UNITED NATIONS — President Barack Obama on Tuesday extended to Libya’s transitional leader a diplomatic honor never offered his predecessor, meeting formally with Mustafa Abdul-Jalil here and heralding the victory of former rebels who brought an end to the 42-year reign of Moammar Gadhafi. It was not quite a victory lap but came pretty close. Obama credited his new doctrine with helping to topple the man who Ronald Reagan once famously called the “mad dog of the Middle East.” And he held Libya up as “a lesson in what the international community can achieve when we stand together as one.” While he cautioned that “we cannot and should not intervene every time there’s an injustice in the world,” Obama said that the international community’s action in Libya means that after four decades, Libyan people “can walk the streets,

free from a tyrant.” Obama announced that the United States was officially reopening its embassy in Tripoli, which was closed in the early days of the conflict. The U.S. ambassador there will be returning, he said. An advance military team has been in Libya’s capital for the past week to prepare for the reopening. For Obama, Libya represents a much-needed foreign policy victory in the middle of trying times at home. He initially committed to the U.S. military involvement in Libya only grudgingly, after being pressed by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and other members of his administration, and sought to sketch out a limited U.S. role. But even so, the toppling of Gadhafi allows Obama to point to Libya as an example of how the United States can balance assistance to the democratic movements across the region against domestic opposition to foreign interventions, particularly during tight economic times.

Gunmen kill 26 Shiite pilgrims in Pakistan

By Beth Fouhy and Kasie Hunt The Associated Press

The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Rick Perry, Mitt Romney and their GOP presidential rivals slammed President Barack Obama’s Middle East policies Tuesday while emphatically declaring their own support for Israel as the United Nations considered a bid for Palestinian statehood. Republican front-runner Perry, the Texas governor, denounced the president’s Israel policy as “misguided and dangerous,” speaking to supporters in New York as the Obama administration worked a few miles away to thwart a U.N. vote to grant formal recognition to the Palestinian Authority. Perry also accused Obama of appeasement, as did Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann, who assailed the president from the Midwest. Perry’s chief rival for the nomination, former Massachusetts Gov. Romney, issued a statement accusing Obama of “throwing Israel under the bus.” The Republican campaigns have similar goals: establish contrasts with Obama on an issue where he’s struggled; chip away at American Jews’ support for Democrats and prove their conservative, pro-Israel bona fides with the evangelical voters who will play a significant role in the GOP presidential primaries. During the 2008 election campaign, Obama worked hard to reassure nervous Jewish voters that he would defend Israel as president. But he’s faced doubts and criticism since then. Perry criticized Obama’s stated goal that any negotiations should be based on Israel’s borders prior to the 1967 Mideast war, with mutually agreed adjustments and land swaps to accommodate population shifts and some homebuilding since 1967. Perry called that stance “insulting and naïve.” Obama angered Israel earlier this year by endorsing a Palestinian demand that negotiations over future borders begin with the lines Israel held before capturing the West Bank, Gaza and East Jerusalem in 1967. In regard to potential official recognition, the administration has been working intensively behind the scenes to restart direct negotiations between Israelis and Palestinians and to persuade Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas to drop his push and avoid an explosive confrontation at the U.N. later in the week.

ISLAMABAD — Suspected Sunni extremists opened fire on Shiite Muslim pilgrims traveling by bus through southwest Pakistan on Tuesday on their way to in Iran, killing 26 people, officials and survivors said. Sunni militants with ideological and operational links to al-Qaida and the Taliban have carried out scores of bombings and shootings against Shiites in recent years, but this attack was especially bloody. At least eight attackers in a pickup truck blocked the path of the bus as it traveled through Baluchistan province, and then forced the passengers off, said Khushhal Khan, the driver of the vehicle. The passengers tried to run

Anees Mahyoub / The Associated Press

Yemeni riot police use water cannons to disperse anti-government protesters during clashes Tuesday in Taiz, Yemen. A cease-fire halted three days of fighting in Sanaa, the capital, but the key dispute of who will lead the nation remains.

Prospect of civil war draws closer in Yemen By Ahmed Al-haj and Hamza Hendawi The Associated Press

SANAA, Yemen — The grim prospect of civil war in Yemen has drawn closer as mutinous soldiers have become more deeply involved in a rapidly spreading battle against regime forces for control of the capital. A negotiated cease-fire Tuesday halted three days of fighting that killed dozens of people, but it will not hold without a quick resolution of the key dispute: Who will lead the nation. A peaceful way out of Yemen’s seven-month crisis may not come easily, if at all, making it more likely to be settled in large-scale and ruinous street battles pitting renegade army soldiers and their allied tribal fighters against U.S.trained forces loyal to embattled President Ali Abdullah Saleh and led by his son and one-time heir

apparent, Ahmed. Already, pro-regime forces reinforced their positions in their strongholds in the south of the capital, apparently in anticipation of renewed fighting. The potential for bloody strife has been shown in Yemen since the uprising against Saleh’s regime began in February, with hundreds of protesters killed and thousands wounded at the hands of security forces. In the past three days, pro-regime forces killed more than 70 people, mostly protesters, using anti-aircraft guns, rocket-propelled grenades and mortars. At least 23 people were killed in Sanaa on Tuesday as the fighting intensified and spread to sensitive areas of the capital before the cease-fire took hold after nightfall. In one incident, 13 followers of a tribal leader who changed sides and joined the opposition in

Earth to satellite: When will you hit — and where? The Associated Press CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — NASA scientists are doing their best to tell us where a plummeting six-ton satellite will fall later this week. It’s just that if they’re off a little bit, it could mean the difference between hitting Florida or landing on New York. Or, say, Iran or India. Pinpointing where and when hurtling space debris will strike is an imprecise science. For now, scientists predict the earliest it will hit is Thursday U.S. time, the latest Saturday. The strike zone covers most of Earth. Not that citizens need to take cover. The satellite will break

into pieces, and NASA put the chances that somebody somewhere on Earth will get hurt at 1 in 3,200. But any one person’s odds of being struck have been estimated at 1 in 21 trillion. As far as anyone knows, falling space debris has never injured anyone. Nor has significant property damage been reported. That’s because most of the planet is covered in water and there are vast regions of empty land. If you do come across what you suspect is a satellite piece, NASA doesn’t want you to pick it up. The space agency says there are no toxic chemicals present, but there could be sharp edges.

March were killed when mortar shells fired by pro-government forces rained down on the upscale Hedah area of southern Sanaa, also home to top regime figures. “It’s a war zone,” said Sanaa activist Hakim al-Masmari. “We can’t even sit near windows because we could be killed.” Thousands have been forced to flee Sanaa for the relative safety of rural areas. Scores of pickup trucks and cars loaded with families and their belongings were seen early Tuesday heading out of the city, repeatedly shaken by loud explosions overnight. The United States condemned the violence and called on all parties to exercise restraint. “We urge a prompt, impartial investigation into the events that led to the recent violence,” Victoria Nuland, the State Department’s spokeswoman, said in a statement Tuesday.

away, but the gunmen opened fire, killing 26 people and wounding six others, said Khan. The attackers then drove off, leaving the dying and wounded where they lay. It was nearly an hour before rescue teams arrived, he said. There were around 40 people on the bus. Local television footage showed rescue workers loading the dead and wounded into ambulances to take them to the main southwestern town of Quetta, about 35 miles to the north.

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A4 Wednesday, September 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Georgia man denied clemency 1 day before execution The Associated Press Georgia’s board of pardons rejected a last-ditch clemency bid from Troy Davis on Tuesday, one day before his scheduled execution, despite support from figures including an ex-president and a former FBI director for the claim that he was wrongly convicted of killing a police officer in 1989. Davis is scheduled to die today at 7 p.m. EDT by injection for killing off-duty Savannah officer Mark MacPhail, who was shot dead while rushing to help a homeless man being attacked. It is the fourth time in four years that Davis’ execution has been scheduled by Georgia officials. The decision appeared to leave Davis with little chance of avoiding his execution date. Defense attorney Jason Ewart has said that the pardons board was likely Davis’ last option, but he didn’t rule out filing another legal appeal. Georgia’s State Board of Pardons and Paroles said it considered “the totality of the information presented” before deciding to deny clemency.

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Blurred vision plagues space station astronauts By Mark K. Matthews The Orlando Sentinel

WASHINGTON — If NASA ever wants to send astronauts to Mars, it first must solve a problem that has nothing to do with rockets or radiation exposure. A newly discovered eye condition — found to erode the vision of some astronauts who’ve spent months aboard the International Space Station — has doctors worried that future explorers could go blind by the end of long missions, such as a multi-year trip to Mars. While blindness is the worstcase scenario, the threat of blurred vision is enough that NASA has asked scores of researchers to study the issue and has put special eyeglasses on the space station to help those affected see what they’re doing. “We are certainly treating this with a great deal of respect,” said Dr. Rich Williams, NASA’s Chief Health and Medical Officer. “This (eye condition) is comparable to the other risks like bone demineralization (loss) and radiation that we have to consider. ... It does have the potential for causing mission impact.” According to one NASA survey of about 300 astronauts, nearly 30 percent of those who have flown on space shuttle missions — which usually lasted two weeks — and 60 percent who’ve

completed six-month shifts aboard the station reported a gradual blurring of eyesight. Williams put the figure lower — at roughly 35 percent for station crew — but did not dispute the severity of the problem, nor the mystery surrounding it. The disorder, similar to an Earthbound condition called papilledema, is believed to be caused by increased spinal-fluid pressure on the head and eyes due to microgravity, although the exact cause is uncertain. Oftentimes, the problem goes away once an astronaut returns to Earth. But a recent study by the National Academies noted there had been “some lingering substantial effects on vision,” and that astronauts were “not always able to re-qualify for subsequent flights” — at least not immediately. Williams declined to discuss specific cases, but acknowledged at least one astronaut never regained normal vision. “We have seen visual acuity not return to baseline,” he said. Though it will be years before NASA has a rocket powerful enough to launch humans to Mars, the agency has long worried about the effects on astronauts of the nearly threeyear-long round trip. But the chief worry has been exposure to

“It’s loaded. We call it the ‘L word,’ said Ethan Nadelmann of the Drug Policy Alliance, a New York-based group in favor of decriminalization. “It’s essentially like uttering out loud a political heresy, and he wants to avoid that.” Calderon is under growing pressure to reduce violence by organized crime groups in Mexico that has caused more than 40,000 deaths since he took office in late 2006. His ruling party lags in polling for 2012 presidential elections in which he himself cannot seek re-election. Calderon first used the phrase “market alternatives” on Aug. 26, the day after gangsters firebombed a casino in Monterrey, killing 52 people. His voice cracking on occasion, he lashed out at U.S. gun shops and their “criminal sale” of assault rifles to Mexican traffickers, and said that high U.S. demand for narcotics made Americans, too, responsible for Mexico’s turmoil. Calderon repeated those criticisms during a speech Monday night at the Council of the Americas in New York even as he lauded growing U.S.-Mexico security cooperation.

cosmic radiation and, to a lesser extent, loss of bone mass due to microgravity. For decades, though, NASA had also heard anecdotal evidence of vision problems. But the agency only began studying the issue in earnest around 2005 when an unnamed astronaut came forward. “You didn’t hear about it at all until you had one fellow come back (from space) and had problems and was very open about it. His openness led to other people reporting the same,” said Garrett Reisman, a former astronaut who spent three months aboard the station in 2008. Reisman said he noticed a slight decrease in his vision toward the end of this space station stint, but he said that was minor compared to what happened during a 2010 shuttle flight. “Ten days into the mission, there was a carbon dioxide spike in the cabin due to problems with the carbon dioxide filter,” he said. The next day, Reisman said, he had headaches and his vision blurred so much that he had a tough time reading the cockpit gauges. The symptoms passed within 24 hours and his vision returned to mostly normal, he said, but it took two days on the ground before his sight was back to 100 percent.

MEXICO CITY — For the second time in less than a month, Mexican President Felipe Calderon has inched toward suggesting that the United States decriminalize narcotics if that’s what it takes to reduce the “astronomical profits” of the crime gangs roiling his nation. If the United States cannot reduce demand for drugs, Calderon said in New York on Monday night, then “decision makers must look for other solutions, including market alternatives.” Calderon was asked Tuesday morning on CBS’s “Early Show” if he was suggesting drugs should be legalized. “I’m talking about market alternatives, market solutions,” Calderon said. “Either we reduce consumption or we need more alternatives, more solutions.” Calderon declined to specify the alternatives, or how they might reduce the profits of narcotics traffickers. But some analysts in Mexico and the United States said it was code language to open debate about legalization without using a word that draws contentious reaction.

Trial

and Biedscheid. Howes said his office is not interested in viewing communications between Biedscheid and Houze, but believes there may be information on the computers and hard drives that could be useful to prosecutors. He expects the issue will be resolved before the case goes to trial. “It’s a very collegial thing; me and Mr. Houze are just going to work this out,” Howes said. Members of Martin’s family were in the courthouse earlier in the day Tuesday, but left before attorneys broke off their closed-door negotiations to appear in open court.

Continued from A1 Reached Tuesday afternoon, Deschutes County Deputy District Attorney Thomas Howes said he didn’t think it was advisable for him to comment on what was discussed in negotiations that morning, as it could potentially taint the jury pool when the case goes to trial. The District Attorney’s office is continuing to try to gain access to computers and hard drives seized during a search of Biedscheid’s home in February. Houze sought and secured a protective order barring police from examining the computers, claiming they contain privileged attorney-client communications between himself

Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.

Redmond Photos by Michael Stravato / New York Times News Service

Staff Sgt. Chris Cano, a Marine recruiter, arrives Tuesday at a recruiting booth at the Dennis R. Neill Equality Center on the fist day of the end of “don’t ask, don’t tell,” in Tulsa, Okla. With the ban gone, the Marines appear determined to prove that they will be better than the other service branches in recruiting gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender service members.

Few recruits Still, judging by the traffic at the gay rights center Tuesday, there will not be an immediate flood of gay and lesbian Marine applicants. By 3 p.m., more than four hours after the Marines had set up their booth opposite the center’s AIDS quilt, only three women had wandered in, none ideal recruits. The local television crews who had come to watch the action — or inaction, as it turned out — easily outnumbered them. The first potential recruit, 1st Lt. Misty McConahy of the Oklahoma National Guard, asked if the Marines had openings for any behavioral health officers, her specialty in the guard. She was told no, the Marines use the Navy for medical care. (Later, Henry said that he should have sent her to a recruiter for Marine Corps officers, given her rank.) “It’s a lot of courage for her to come out like that,” Henry said, after watching McConahy surrounded by reporters. “Her commander is probably going to see that on TV tonight.” The second potential recruit, Pratt, the niece of a late benefactor of the gay rights center, had scars up her left arm from cutting herself in high school — an almost certain medical disqualification for the Marines. “I’ve been recruiting for a very long time,” Henry told her, gently. “Those are very tough to deal with.” He took her name and number and said he would make some calls to see what he could do. The third potential recruit was a 25-year-old overweight high school dropout. Henry told her, again gently, that she should come back after she got her diploma and got in shape. Not that getting into the Marines is easy for anyone right now. As the Marines tell it, only 1 in 10 applicants qualify for service, with most turned away for a va-

By Tim Johnson McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Marines Continued from A1 “It’s your business and you don’t have to share it,” Henry told Ariel Pratt, who asked whether she would face discrimination in the military as a lesbian. “But you’re also free to be at the mall with your girlfriend.” Pratt, 20, asked Henry what he liked about the Marines. “It’s like a little family,” he said. “We get mad at each other, we joke with each other, but we don’t let anybody else make fun of us.” “That’s pretty cool,” Pratt said. The Marines were the service most opposed to ending the “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy but were the only one of five invited branches of the military to turn up with their recruiting table and chin-up bar at the center Tuesday morning. Although Marines pride themselves on being the most testosteronefueled of the services, they also ferociously promote their view of themselves as the best. With the law now changed, the Marines appear determined to prove that they will be better than the Army, Navy, Air Force and Coast Guard in recruiting gay, lesbian and bisexual service members.

Mexican leader hints again at U.S. drug legalization

Ariel Pratt, a lesbian, speaks with Marine recruiters Tuesday in Tulsa. Though Pratt was just one of three women to inquire about joining in more than four hours, the Marines said the exposure and public relations boost was more than worth the time. riety of afflictions: asthma, attention deficit disorder, overweight (a 5-foot, 8-inch, 18-year-old male can’t weigh more than 180 pounds before boot camp), excessive tattoos, joint injuries, lack of a high school diploma and a history of drugs beyond infrequent marijuana use. A bad economy has made jobs in the Marines all the more desirable, at a time when Marines anticipate shrinking their force — down to an undetermined number from the current 200,000 on active duty — as the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan wind down. Beyond the economy, said Henry, a veteran of three tours in Iraq, the other motivator is the same as always: “They want to be a Marine and they want to blow stuff up.”

Recruiting recruiters The Marines were at the gay rights center at the invitation of Toby Jenkins, the center’s executive director, who said he saw no better way to celebrate the end of “don’t ask, don’t tell” in a conservative state that strongly supports the military.

“If we’ve been fighting for 15 years for the right to be in the military, we said let’s just ask military recruiters if they’d be available,” he said. “But no one was prepared for that question. It was like I was talking to people like they were deer in the headlights.” The Marines did in fact think Jenkins’ invitation might be a hoax, so they checked him out and talked to their superiors, who talked to their superiors. Then they took a deep breath and decided to go. As the day wore on, the Marines said the bust in recruiting had been made up for in media

exposure and public relations. Henry and his public affairs officer, Capt. Abraham Sipe, did interviews at the center with five local television stations, three print reporters and one correspondent for National Public Radio. In between, gay rights supporters stopped by to shake their hands. “Toby said there were cute guys in uniform here,” said Cecilia Wessinger, 46, a longtime friend of the center, who wandered in about 2 p.m. She thanked Henry for coming and acknowledged that she was surprised to see him. A few hours later, Kelly Kirby, 57, a retired Air Force sergeant, thanked Sipe. In the 1970s, he said, his boyfriend had been discharged from the Air Force, but he himself had not been discovered, and the memory still haunted him. “I appreciate you being here,” Kirby said. By 5 p.m. the Marines had packed up their booth and chinup bar and headed out, with plans to come back later to attend a panel discussion. It was all uncharted territory. As Henry had said the day before of the new world the Marines now inhabit, “At first it’s going to be kind of shock and awe.” But like a good Marine, he was with the program: “My take is, if they can make it through our boot camp, which is the toughest boot camp in the world, then they ought to have the opportunity to wear the uniform.”

“We don’t have the branding power others might have,” said Heather Cassaro, marketing director for the chamber. “So we’ve found a way to appeal with that visual impact of the area. Websites are one way we can do that.” A new website is in the works, code named “RedmondBuzz,” but the chamber is keeping tightlipped on it. Last year, it launched DiscoverRedmond.com, a site intended to show the benefits of locating a business in the area. Chamber leaders said at this point the plan is to continue with business as usual and continue to update the council at more regular intervals. “We welcome the chance to tell our story,” Cassaro said.

Continued from A1 To do that, he plans to recruit a sporting event to the area by attending the Travel, Events and Management in Sports, or TEAMS, conference in Las Vegas in October. “It’s a place where sporting events gather to talk,” Sande said. “We’re talking as large as the Super Bowl and as small as the horseshoe championships. This is the place where Bend met the beard-growing championships a few years ago.” During the council meeting, Boero asked if the chamber was doing anything to get people out of the fairgrounds and into the town. Sande said it had set up a shuttle system to help get visitors downtown and had provided a coupon package for local businesses. Furthermore, the chamber is working on promotional material and new media to gain repeat visits — or even to gain residents.

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 21, 2011 A5

Typhoon aimed at Japan disaster zone

U.S. scientists testing quake alert system

The Associated Press

The Associated Press

TOKYO — A powerful typhoon was bearing down on Japan’s tsunami-ravaged northeastern coast early today, approaching a nuclear power plant crippled in that disaster and prompting calls for the evacuation of more than a million people. Even before its arrival Typhoon Roke turned deadly, with local media and police reporting five people killed or missing after being swept away by rivers swollen with rain. The storm, packing winds of up to 134 mph, was expected to make landfall along Japan’s southeast coast and then cut a path northeast through Tokyo and into the northeastern Tohoku region, which was devastated by the March 11 tsunami and earthquake.

PASADENA, Calif. — Elizabeth Cochran was sitting in her office when her computer suddenly sounded an alarm. Beep. Beep. Beep. A map of California on her screen lit up with a red dot, signaling an earthquake had struck. A clock next to the map counted down the seconds until shock waves fanning out from the epicenter north of Los Angeles reached her location in Pasadena: 5-4-3-2-1. Right on cue, Cochran felt her chair quiver ever so slightly from a magnitude-4.2 that rumbled through Southern California on Sept. 1. “If I hadn’t known it was an earthquake, I would have thought it was a truck going by,” she said. After years of lagging behind Japan, Mexico and other quake-prone countries, the U.S. government has been quietly testing an earthquake early warning system in California since February. Cochran belongs to an exclusive club of scientists who receive a heads up every time the state shakes. The alert system is still crude and messages are not yet broadcast to residents or businesses. With more testing and funding, researchers hope to build a public warning system similar to the Japanese that has been credited with saving lives during the March 11 magnitude-9 disaster. Since earthquakes are unpredictable, supporters of early warning say it’s the next best thing to prepare people and the

Schools Continued from A1 “Bend went from eight to seven credits. Portland did the opposite. How could that be? There are so many different variables,” said Vicki Van Buren, Bend-La Pine’s chief academic officer for secondary programs. Budget-related concerns can shift a district’s perspective. About five years ago, Bend-La Pine considered changing to a seven-period day, but did not find enough compelling evidence to do so. Faced with another year of shortfalls, the district reevaluated that evidence and found it supported the move. Had the district not changed the schedule, Bend-La Pine officials project an average high school class would have had 40 students, or five more than this year. “There’s no question we’re having to make decisions in some respects for the wrong reasons,” Bend-La Pine Superintendent Ron Wilkinson said. “We would like every decision to be something we proactively moved into because we thought it would improve instruction. For me, if I thought we were somehow watering down our high school program … I couldn’t have advocated for it.” The math behind the decisions is fairly basic. Last year, an average high school teacher taught three of four periods, totalling 270 minutes in the classroom. An average teacher in Bend’s three large high schools will handle six of seven periods this year, for a total of 300 minutes a day in class. That means fewer teachers can teach more and help keep average high school class sizes flat from year to year. Teachers in Portland high schools taught five of seven periods last year, averaging about 250 minutes in class each day. Had Portland teachers taken on six of seven periods, the district could have cut jobs and maintained class sizes. That, however, was a “non-starter,” according to district spokesman Matt Shelby. With the block schedule, Portland high school teachers are in class for three of four 90-minute periods — or about 20 minutes more than last year. An increased levy that raised $57 million kept Portland Public from making deeper cuts. Even with that, there were dozens of job cuts. With the equivalent of 45 fewer full-time teachers in Portland high schools, the district has been able to maintain program offerings and class sizes, Shelby said. At Portland’s Cleveland High School last year, the average class had 27.9 students, and the school offered more than 360 course sections. Had the district left the schedule unchanged, those numbers would have increased to 33 students in an average class and about 60 fewer offerings, according to the district. “The high school schedule change allowed us to offer what we feel needed to be offered,” Shelby said. For three consecutive years, districts’ expected costs have outpaced state funding, a run that Wilkinson believes is unprecedented. That consistency has pushed districts to look far and wide to save money and to stay somewhere near normal. “The trouble is, this is my 40th year in education, so I’ve been through more than one budget challenge in my life,” Wilkinson said. “I’ve never been in a situation where we’re dealing with three significantly down years back to back.” Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

By Alicia Chang

Drones Continued from A1 The rapid expansion of the undeclared drone wars is a reflection of the growing alarm with which U.S. officials view the activities of al-Qaida affiliates in Yemen and Somalia, even as alQaida’s core leadership in Pakistan has been weakened by U.S. counterterrorism operations.

Negotiating bases The U.S. government is known to have used drones to carry out lethal attacks in at least six countries: Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya, Pakistan, Somalia and Yemen. The negotiations that preceded the establishment of the base in the Republic of Seychelles illustrate the efforts the United States is making to broaden the range of its drone weapons. The island nation of 85,000 people has hosted a small fleet of MQ-9 Reaper drones operated by the U.S. Navy and Air Force since September 2009. U.S. and Seychellois officials have previously acknowledged the drones’ presence but have said that their primary mission was to track pirates in regional waters. But classified U.S. diplomatic cables show that the unmanned aircraft have also conducted counterterrorism missions over Somalia, about 800 miles to the northwest. The cables, obtained by the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks, reveal that U.S. officials asked leaders in the Seychelles to keep the counterterrorism missions secret. The Reapers are described by the military as “hunter-killer” drones because

“You want to get under a sturdy table before things start falling off the wall. We don’t want people to start running out of buildings.” — Richard Allen, seismologist, University of California, Berkeley

Reed Saxon / The Associated Press

Anthony Guarino Jr., a seismic analyst at the California Institute of Technology, demonstrates an early earthquake warning system in Pasadena, Calif. The U.S. government has been testing the alert system in California. commercial sector before the ground rocks. Even a 5-second advance notice can be precious, they contend. “You want to get under a sturdy table before things start falling off the wall,” said University of California, Berkeley seismologist Richard Allen, a project participant. “We don’t want people to start running out of buildings.” Early warning is designed to sense the first pulses of energy after a fault breaks and estimate the magnitude based on limited information. This is possible because of the different speeds at which seismic waves travel. A sprawling web of underground sensors can detect the faster-moving and less damag-

ing primary or “P” waves before the secondary “S” waves that can cause buildings to pancake. A warning is issued ahead of the arrival of the stronger waves. How much warning — a few seconds to tens of seconds — depends on the distance from the epicenter. The farther away, the more lead time. Project chief Doug Given of the U.S. Geological Survey ticked off actions that can be taken: Trains can be slowed or stopped. Air traffic controllers can halt takeoffs and landings. Power plants and factories can close valves. Schoolchildren can dive under their desks and cover their heads. Early warning is useless

they can be equipped with Hellfire missiles and satellite-guided bombs. To allay concerns among islanders, U.S. officials said they had no plans to arm the Reapers when the mission was announced two years ago. The cables show, however, that U.S. officials were thinking about weaponizing the drones. During a meeting with Seychelles President James Michel on Sept. 18, 2009, American diplomats said the U.S. government “would seek discrete (sic), specific discussions . . . to gain approval” to arm the Reapers “should the desire to do so ever arise,” according to a cable summarizing the meeting. Michel concurred, but asked U.S. officials to approach him exclusively for permission “and not anyone else” in his government, the cable reported. Michel’s chief deputy told a U.S. diplomat on a separate occasion that the Seychelles president “was not philosophically against” arming the drones, according to another cable. But the deputy urged the Americans “to be extremely careful in raising the issue with anyone in the Government outside of the President. Such a request would be ‘politically extremely sensitive’ and would have to be handled with ‘the utmost discreet care.’” A U.S. military spokesman declined to say whether the Reapers in the Seychelles have ever been armed. “Because of operational security concerns, I can’t get into specifics,” said Lt. Cmdr. James Stockman, a public affairs officer for the U.S. Africa Command, which oversees the base

in the Seychelles. He noted, however, that the MQ-9 Reapers “can be configured for both surveillance and strike.” A spokeswoman for Michel said the president was unavailable for comment. Jean-Paul Adam, who was Michel’s chief deputy in 2009 and now serves as minister of foreign affairs, said U.S. officials had not asked for permission to equip the drones with missiles or bombs. “The operation of the drones in Seychelles for the purposes of counter-piracy surveillance and other related activities has always been unarmed, and the U.S. government has never asked us for them to be armed,” Adam said in an e-mail. “This was agreed between the two governments at the first deployment and the situation has not changed.” The State Department cables show that U.S. officials were sensitive to perceptions that the drones might be armed, noting that they “do have equipment that could appear to the public as being weapons.”

Allaying concerns To dispel potential concerns, they held a “media day” for about 30 journalists and Seychellois officials at the small, one-runway airport in Victoria, the capital, in November 2009. One of the Reapers was parked on the tarmac. “The government of Seychelles invited us here to fight against piracy and that is its mission,” Craig White, a U.S. diplomat, said during the event. “However, these aircraft have a great deal

at the quake’s origin because the tremors radiate out almost simultaneously. Japan invested in a public alert system after the deadly 1995 magnitude-6.9 Kobe earthquake. Development began in 2000. Seven years and $500 million later, Japan unveiled the world’s first early warning network. Parts of Mexico, Taiwan and Turkey also have embraced early warning, but their systems are less sophisticated. The Japanese got their big test in March when a massive quake hit off the northeast coast and spawned a tsunami. A public emergency announcement was sent out 8 seconds after sensors detected the first inkling of the quake, interrupting regular TV and radio programming, and buzzing cellphones. Millions received 5 to 40 seconds of warning, depending on how far they were from the epicenter. Tokyo — about 230 miles away — got about 10 to 30 seconds of notice before highrises swayed. A dozen trains were stopped in their tracks without derailing. There were glitches. Sensors underestimated the quake at a magnitude-8.1 when it was actually 22 times stronger. Because of the error, warnings were not sent to certain cities. The jolt was so violent that it knocked

55 seismic stations offline and there were no warnings sent for aftershocks for several hours. Still, in a hearing before a House subcommittee a week after the disaster, USGS director Marcia McNutt told lawmakers the Japanese early warning system saved thousands of lives. McNutt also acknowledged the financial cloud surrounding the U.S. effort. “Shame on us if we do not learn from their misfortune,” she testified. Since 2006, the U.S. has been testing three alert systems and launched a prototype internally known as “ShakeAlert” in February, a month before the Japan devastation. For now, messages are only blasted out to about 30 scientists at the USGS, California Institute of Technology and University of California, Berkeley, where they are working out software bugs on a shoestring budget. Where possible, the U.S. has borrowed aspects of Japan’s warning system. Researchers said it’s not possible to just replicate it because of differences in the countries’ seismic sensor networks. “It’s not perfect,” said Berkeley’s Allen of the U.S. effort. “Frankly, it’s stuck together with duct tape, but it’s operational.”

of capabilities and could be used for other missions.” In fact, U.S. officials had already outlined other purposes for the drones in a classified mission review with Michel and Adam. Saying that the U.S. government “desires to be completely transparent,” the American diplomats informed the Seychellois leaders that the Reapers would also fly over Somalia “to support ongoing counter-terrorism efforts,” though not “direct attacks,” according to a cable summarizing the meeting. U.S. officials “stressed the sensitive nature of this counterterrorism mission and that this not be released outside of the highest … channels,” the cable stated. “The President wholeheartedly concurred with that request, noting that such issues could be politically sensitive for him as well.” The Seychelles drone operation has a relatively small footprint. Based in a hangar located about a quarter-mile from the main passenger terminal at the airport, it includes between three and four Reapers and about 100 U.S. military personnel and contractors, according to the cables. The military operated the flights on a continuous basis until April, when it paused the operations. They resumed this month, said Stockman, the Africa Command spokesman. The aim in assembling a constellation of bases in the Horn of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula is to create overlapping circles of surveillance in a region where al-Qaida offshoots could emerge for years to come, U.S. officials said. The locations “are based on

potential target sets,” said a senior U.S. military official. “If you look at it geographically, it makes sense — you get out a ruler and draw the distances (drones) can fly and where they take off from.” One U.S. official said that there had been discussions about putting a drone base in Ethiopia for as long as four years, but that plan was delayed because “the Ethiopians were not all that jazzed.” Other officials said Ethiopia has become a valued counterterrorism partner because of threats posed by al-Shabab. “We have a lot of interesting cooperation and arrangements with the Ethiopians when it comes to intelligence collection and linguistic capabilities,” said a former senior U.S. military official familiar with special operations missions in the region. An Ethiopian Embassy spokesman in Washington could not be reached for comment Tuesday night. The former official said the United States relies on Ethiopian linguists to translate signals intercepts gathered by U.S. agencies monitoring calls and e-mails of al-Shabab members. The CIA and other agencies also employ Ethiopian informants who gather information from across the border. Overall, officials said, the cluster of bases reflects an effort to have wider geographic coverage, greater leverage with countries in the region and backup facilities if individual airstrips are forced to close. “It’s a conscious recognition that those are the hot spots developing right now,” said the former senior U.S. military official.


A6 Wednesday, September 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN


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THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2011

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‘Discouraging’ number of jobs lost before end of the summer season The Bulletin

SAN FRANCISCO — Google on Tuesday opened its invitation-only social network, Google+, to the public. Google+, which the company introduced in June to select people who could invite others, is its longanticipated Facebook competitor. Google’s announcement that anyone could now join was made two days before Facebook’s f8 Developer Conference, where it is expected to introduce media partners, tools for software developers and possibly mobile apps. Google, which was late to social networking, started Google+ to fend off Facebook, which has been attracting users and advertisers, and to gain social data to improve other Google services like search. Under the direction of Google’s co-founder and new chief executive, Larry Page, the company moved quickly to finish Google+ and is opening it to the public in an unusually short time. Gmail, for example, was not widely available for almost three years.

Housing starts fall more than forecast

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Region’s jobless rates flat By Ed Merriman

Google opens social network to the public

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Summer’s seasonal layoffs arrived a month early with 510 job losses in Deschutes County, 80 in Jefferson County and 50 in Crook County, marking what Carolyn Eagan, regional economist with the Oregon Employment Department in Bend, called a “discouraging” aspect of the region’s August employment report. “It is unfortunate that we got this gloomy report at the end of the summer. Usually we don’t get summer season layoffs until September,” Eagan said in an interview after the report was released on Tuesday. Despite the job losses, she said unemployment numbers

for the region were relatively flat from July to August, but down from a year ago (August 2010). Seasonally adjusted unemployment rates in Deschutes County remained unchanged from July at 12.7 percent in August. But unemployment dropped from 14.6 percent in August 2010. In Crook County, unemployment fell to 15.6 percent in August, down slightly from 15.7 in July, and down more than two percentage points from August 2010’s 17.9 percent unemployment rate. Jefferson County’s unemployment rate ticked up to 13.6 percent in August, from 13.5 in July, but was down from 14.5 in August 2010. See Jobless / B5

Central Oregon unemployment rates increase Seasonally adjusted jobless rates in Central Oregon rose last month from July, but were lower than in August 2010.

Crook County

United States 9.6% 9.1% 9.1%

Aug. 2010

July 2011

Aug. 2011

Deschutes County

Oregon 10.7%

Aug. 2010

9.5% 9.6%

July 2011

Aug. 2011

Jefferson County

17.9% 15.7% 15.6%

14.6% 12.7% 12.7%

Aug. 2010

July 2011

Aug. 2011

Aug. 2010

July 2011

Aug. 2011

14.5%

Aug. 2010

13.5% 13.6%

July 2011

Aug. 2011

Source: Oregon Employment Department Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

PORTLAND BUSINESSES GET

BIKE-FRIENDLY

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Builders began work on fewer homes than forecast in August, showing an industry that’s languishing more than two years into the U.S. economic recovery. Housing starts dropped 5 percent to a three-month low 571,000 annual rate, Commerce Department figures showed Tuesday in Washington. The median forecast in a Bloomberg News survey called for a 590,000 pace. Construction slumped in the Northeast during August, when Hurricane Irene battered the region. Building permits, a proxy for future construction, unexpectedly climbed.

Factory output

Daniel Pasley / New York Times News Service

EcoFlats, an apartment building in Portland, features a 30-unit bicycle rack in the lobby but no dedicated vehicle parking.

By Linda Baker • New York Times News Service PORTLAND — Christian Ettinger, the owner of Hopworks Urban Brewery here, is a longtime bicycle enthusiast. He grew up riding around the Portland suburb of Lake Oswego, and now owns six bicycles — “two if my wife is asking” — and races in cyclocross events. So when he decided to open a second brewpub this summer, he settled on a location that reflected his passion: North Williams Avenue, one of the most-used commuter cycling corridors in a city already mad for all things two-wheeled. Some 3,000 riders a day pass by Ettinger’s new brewpub, which he calls the Hopworks BikeBar. It has racks for 75 bicycles and free locks, to-go entrees that fit in bicycle water bottle cages, and dozens of handmade bicycle frames suspended over the bar areas. Portland is nationally recognized as a leader in the movement to create bicycle-

friendly cities. About 7 percent of commuters here travel by bike (the national average is under 1 percent) and the city has an ambitious plan, adopted last year, to increase that proportion to 25 percent by 2030. Until recently, Portland’s bike initiatives focused on improving the transportation infrastructure, said Roger

Geller, the city’s bicycle coordinator. But as businesses awaken to the purchasing power of cyclists, “bicycle-supported developments” are also beginning to appear around town, Geller said. These are residential and commercial projects built near popular bikeways and outfitted with cycling-related services and amenities. See Bikes / B2

Inquiry sought on SEC aide in Madoff case

90.7

By Louise Story and Gretchen Morgenson

88

New York Times News Service

86 84 A S ON DJ FMAMJ J A 2011 2010 AP

Children’s Place will close, be replaced by The Buckle By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

The Children’s Place apparel store in Bend’s Old Mill District will close in January or February and will be replaced by The Buckle Inc., a store that caters to young adults, said Noelle Fredland, the Old Mill’s marketing director. The Children’s Place did not renew its lease at the Old Mill, Fredland said. “It is imminent, but it is kind of a little bit heartbreaking,” she said, adding that Children’s Place employees have been “so excited about sales” recently. A manager at the store Tuesday declined to comment. Neither company responded to several voice mail messages from The Bulletin about the changes, and it was not clear at press time whether The Children’s Place store will move to another location in Central Oregon. The Children’s Place has been an Old Mill District tenant since retail stores opened there in 2001, according to Bulletin archives. The Secaucus, N.J.-based company, which sells clothing, shoes and accessories for newborns, babies and young children, has four stores in the Portland area, an outlet in Woodburn and other Oregon locations, according to the company’s website. See Buckle / B2

New York Times News Service

2007=100

90

OLD MILL

By Matt Richtel

Factory ouput rose in August. 92

$40.081 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.971

Poker site misused players’ money, U.S. says

GM partners with Chinese automaker HONG KONG — General Motors said Tuesday that it would develop electric cars in China through a joint venture with a Chinese automaker, and would transfer battery and other electric car technology to the venture. Tuesday’s announcement was being made as the Chinese government was putting heavy pressure on foreign automakers to transfer electric car technology to joint ventures in China. But GM took pains to say that its jointventure agreement was not connected to its plans to begin importing its new U.S.-made Chevrolet Volt electric car to China this year. “They are not linked,” Stephen Girsky, GM’s vice chairman, said in a telephone interview after GM’s first board meeting in China, held in Shanghai on Tuesday. — From wire reports

s

After Bernard Madoff’s giant Ponzi scheme was revealed, the Securities and Exchange Commission went to great lengths to make sure that none of its employees working on the case posed a conflict of interest, barring anyone who had accepted gifts or attended a Madoff wedding.

But as a new report made clear on Tuesday, one top official received a pass: David Becker, the SEC’s general counsel, who went on to recommend how the scheme’s victims would be compensated, despite his family’s $2 million inheritance from a Madoff account. Becker’s actions were referred by H. David Kotz, the inspector general of the SEC, to the Justice Department, on the advice

of the Office of Government Ethics, which oversees the ethics of the executive branch of government. The report by Kotz provides fresh details about the weakness of the agency’s ethics office and reveals that none of its commissioners, except for Mary Schapiro, its chairwoman, had been advised of Becker’s conflict. See Madoff / B5

The millions of people who signed up for a website called Full Tilt Poker knew they were there to gamble. But it turns out they were taking on a lot more risk than they realized, even when they had no chips on the virtual table. That is the essence of a civil complaint filed Tuesday by federal prosecutors. It alleges that players around the world entrusted Full Tilt with $390 million in gambling money, and that the company promised to keep those funds in secure accounts. In reality, prosecutors found, the money wasn’t there; instead, much of it had been transferred to the owners and management of Full Tilt, some of whom were themselves among the most prominent and popular poker players in the world. “Full Tilt was not a legitimate poker company but a global Ponzi scheme,” said Preet Bharara, the U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York in Manhattan, whose office filed the complaint. Barry Boss, a lawyer for Full Tilt, which had its headquarters in Ireland, was on a flight and unavailable to comment, said a person at his office. Prosecutors said they exposed the scheme earlier this year while investigating other problems at Full Tilt Poker and two other poker sites, Poker Stars and Absolute Poker, all of which were based outside the U.S. See Poker / B2


B2 Wednesday, September 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Global economy headed toward New U.S. ambassador, ‘dangerous new phase,’ IMF says old demands on China By Howard Schneider The Washington Post

The world economy is entering a “dangerous new phase” of slowing growth and eroding confidence that threatens to undermine economic activity even further, the International Monetary Fund warned Tuesday in its primary annual forecast. “Global activity has weakened and become more uneven; confidence has fallen sharply recently; and downside risks are growing,” the fund said in its World Economic Outlook, published ahead of this week’s an-

nual meetings. The semiannual report took aim at high public debt in the United States and Europe, particularly the 17-nation euro area’s inability to reach political agreement over how to deal with Greece’s plunge toward default and the continent’s weakened banking system. At a news conference, IMF economic counselor Olivier Blanchard issued what he referred to as a “call to arms” for European governments in particular to shore up their banks and use stronger measures to

secure the finances of highly indebted countries. The IMF’s report said that if European banks begin acknowledging possible losses on their holdings of Greek and other government bonds, it could tip the world into a new recession. “We can’t assume we have another three months or six months or a year,” he said. On Sept. 27, Greek and European officials are to continue discussing the latest round of shortterm fixes to the Mediterranean country’s shrinking economy and eroding public accounts, but

Bikes

entry. “You hit a button and the door opens,” said Shawn Sullivan, the development manager for Winkler. And in Southeast Portland, the national homebuilder D.R. Horton is building a 29-unit condominium complex advertised on city buses as “a whole new kind of neighborhood,” with a picture of a bicycle substituting for the final syllable.

Continued from B1 “The change is coming from the private sector,” Geller said. “Cyclists are a great potential market for businesses that want people traveling at human-scale speed and will stop and buy something.” The North Williams business cluster, located about 2 miles northeast of downtown, is the most prominent example of this type of development. In addition to the BikeBar at 3907 North Williams, a two-block stretch of the street houses the United Bicycle Institute, which teaches bike repair and frame building, at No. 3961; the Friendly Bike Guest House, a hostel that caters to cyclists, at No. 4039; and EcoFlats, an 18-unit rental apartment building with a 30-unit bicycle rack in the lobby but no dedicated vehicle parking. The BikeBar is on the ground floor of the EcoFlats building, which also has a shower for commercial tenant commuters. At No. 3901 is Pix Patisserie, featuring an on-street bike parking corral, one of 67 that have been installed by the city, typically at the request of businesses owners. “The vision is businesses oriented toward bicycles,” said John Baxter, the administrator of the United Bicycle Institute.

The skeptics

Gentrification? But not everyone is unreservedly enthusiastic about the district’s new orientation. Located in a historic African-American community, the North Williams businesses are almost exclusively white-owned, and many residents see bicycles as a symbol of the gentrification taking place in the neighborhood. “North Williams has grown to be a bike neighborhood out of gentrification,” said Debora Leopold Hutchins, the chairwoman of the North Williams Stakeholder Advisory Committee, a group helping oversee proposed traffic changes. Hutchins, who organizes an African-American women’s cycling group, said she “truly loves” cycling. But, she said, “The process has not been inclusive of the people who live there.” A proposal this summer to remove a lane of automobile traffic for bikes on North Williams set off an outcry from residents. That proposal has been tabled while the city conducts more outreach with the neighborhood. And as businesses and developers around the city jump on the bicycle bandwagon, other concerns about the fledgling bike-friendly projects are emerging: namely, that there is a bit of “bikewash-

Poker Continued from B1 In April, the government shut down access to the sites for U.S. players, arguing that they were violating fraud and money-laundering laws. Prior to that, U.S. players had wagered hundreds of millions of dollars on the sites. From their home computers, they would put money into accounts with the virtual poker clubs and then bet against one another. Full Tilt, like the others, told players that it kept their money — including their winnings — in accounts that they could tap into or close out at any time. And the company had a reputation for paying back players in a timely fashion. When the sites were shut down, prosecutors worked out agreements with them to help them repay players what they were owed. But reimbursements to Full Tilt players slowed or stopped altogether. The money available turned out to be insufficient, according to prosecutors, because

the IMF, the United States and world markets are urging a longterm solution that will give the country time to turn its economy around. Such an agreement has been approved in principle but remains stalled in practice as the region’s 17 national parliaments argue over the details. Meanwhile, as if to emphasize the region’s difficulties, Standard & Poor’s downgraded Italy’s credit standing on Tuesday, saying that slow growth and weak political leadership had shaken confidence in the country.

Daniel Pasley / New York Times News Service

Jean-Pierre Veillet is the developer of the EcoFlats complex, an 18-unit rental apartment building with a 30-unit bicycle rack. “You can’t just throw up a (bike) building,” Veillet says. “You have to go where the bikeways and the people on bikes are going to be.”

Some view these projects with a critical eye. “Have you seen the ‘Portlandia’ sketch ‘Put a bird on it’”? asked Kirsten Kaufman, a real estate agent, referring to the IFC cable show that pokes fun at Portland life. “Well, this is a case of ‘put a bike on it.’” Kaufman, who has carved out a niche showing clients homes by bike, said the Horton complex lacked sufficient bike storage, especially “for people with cargo trailers who want to run errands on their bike.” The project is located a few blocks from a popular bikeway, the Clinton Street bike boulevard. Jessica Hansen, a Horton spokeswoman, declined to comment. In addition to the bike amenities, Killingsworth Station includes 57 car parking spaces — one for each housing unit. “It’s an ironic twist,” said Sullivan, adding that the spaces were a concession to neighbors who did not want residents or visitors at the condominium parking in front of their homes.

Future developments ing” going on as cycling becomes a marketing tool in a city where the vast majority still get around by car. “People say: ‘I own piece of land. I want to build a bike building,’” said Jean-Pierre Veillet, the developer of the $3.4 million EcoFlats complex, which was fully leased within a month of opening last March. “Well, you can’t just throw up a building; you have to go where the bikeways and the people on bikes are going to be.”

Located in North Portland, an area that has one of the highest rates of biking for work trips, North Williams Avenue parallels Interstate 5 and is one of the area’s flattest cross-town bike routes. As a result, “the bike traffic is just phenomenal — it’s just one cyclist after another going by,” Baxter said. Ettinger said he was so taken with the mass of cyclists that he installed a sidewalk bar so pa-

trons could watch what he calls “Cat 6 commuter racing.” (Amateur bicycle racing in America is divided into categories, with Cat 1 events for the elite riders and 5 for beginners.) Christopher Frick, a Portland real estate agent, said the mass of cyclists helped persuade him to convert a duplex he owned last year into the Friendly Bike Guest House, a 2,025-square-foot space that includes indoor bike parking and a 500-square-foot “repair area, bike lock and gear dump.” The guest house is aimed at students enrolled in the United Bicycle Institute. Other new developments around Portland are acknowledging the city’s bicycle craze. Two miles northwest of the North Williams Avenue district is Killingsworth Station, a 60,000-squarefoot mixed-use project built by the Winkler Development Corp. that has alcoves for bike parking on each floor and a bike lobby with a hard floor surface, access to a repair station and easy bike

As the city presses forward with more ambitious bike transportation projects, some of the contradictions associated with the current crop of developments may be resolved. Ten years ago, Portland pioneered the return of the streetcar, an effort that has since helped generate several billion dollars in private development, including office space, condos and affordable housing. That kind of deliberate “transit-oriented development” has yet to be replicated with bicycles, Geller said. But, he said, the city’s Bureau of Transportation is now considering working with the Bureau of Planning on such bicycle-oriented developments, possibly connected to “cycle tracks” — physically separated bike lanes that have some of the permanence of a streetcar line. Veillet, of EcoFlats, said the developments on North Williams were a step in that direction. “The bikeway started exploding,” he said. “It was the perfect place for a bike building.”

the owners and board members of Full Tilt had themselves tapped those accounts to the tune of $440 million since April 2007. The management’s luck, it would seem, ran out. Among those profiting, the complaint claims, were some of the biggest names in poker: Howard Lederer, nicknamed “The Professor,” is said to have received payouts of $42 million. Chris Ferguson, nicknamed “Jesus” in the poker-playing community for his long hair, received at least $25 million and was owed $60 million more, prosecutors said. The two men could not be reached for comment. Greg Brooks, an accomplished poker player who was once a regular player at Full Tilt, said the federal complaint was a painful eye-opener about what was happening behind the scenes. In the past, he said, he regularly received sums in excess of $100,000 from Full Tilt, paid within a week of his request, suggesting that he could get access to his money whenever he wanted. “My impression was that things were working well for years. I had no inkling, not even

the slightest guess it wasn’t like that,” he said. Brooks, who lives in New York, said that he was owed a sum in the “low- to mid-six figures” by Full Tilt that he doubts that he will get back. (He said he was reimbursed a substantial but lesser amount by Poker Stars.) And he added that he was particularly upset with some of the fixtures in the poker community who, he said, paraded around as “brand ambassadors” for Full Tilt. Their behavior, he said, represented a major breach of trust and honor among poker players. “There’s an inherent level of trust and handshaking in the poker community that is unique to it,” he said. In its complaint, which is meant to amend the original criminal complaint unsealed in April, the government asks that the members of Full Tilt management forfeit illicitly gained funds. Under federal rules, Full Tilt players could have the opportunity to petition for their money once the lawsuit is resolved. Some advocates for legalizing online poker pointed to the complaint as another reason the ac-

tivity should be licensed and regulated by the U.S. government. “This is a system that has been forced into place by the failure of the U.S. to regulate online gambling,” said Lawrence Walters, a Florida lawyer who specializes in gambling and First Amendment law, arguing that players were forced to send their money into risky overseas accounts. “The prohibitionists have gotten their way so far.” He also quibbled with the government’s characterization of Full Tilt as a Ponzi scheme. He said that the government was using a “focus-group” tested term to get attention, when the allegations suggest that the management of Full Tilt may simply have been lying to players and possibly embezzling funds. He also said he didn’t think that what prosecutors say happened at Full Tilt was happening in the rest of the online gambling industry. “This is not endemic to the industry,” Walters said. “Sites live and die on their reputation. To the extent sites get a reputation for slow pay or no pay, that will quickly circulate.”

Bicycle craze

and its monetary policy

government leaders, including my colleagues in Washington,” BEIJING — U.S. Ambassador Locke said in the speech outlinto China Gary Locke has been ing his vision for the U.S.-China something of an enigma to the economic and trade relationship. Locke warned that if foreign Chinese in the month he’s been access to China’s economy didn’t in Beijing. His no-frills style of flying widen, “it will mean less innovacoach and buying his own cof- tions from Chinese businesses, fee at an airport Starbucks has fewer opportunities for the Chinese people (and) divided observslower growth ers used to seefor the Chinese ing pampered “China’s current economy.” Chinese officials. business climate The ambasMany here have sador cited wondered: Is it a is causing growing regulations in publicity stunt? frustrations industries such Or something as mining, banklocal leaders among foreign ing, energy and should emulate? business and transportation Still, one of the as being unremaining ques- government duly restrictive tions about the leaders, including and, as a result, third-generation my colleagues in “creating seeds Chinese-Ameriof doubt in the can was whether Washington.” minds of foreign he would be investors as to more sympathet- — Gary Locke, U.S. whether they are ic toward Chi- ambassador to China truly welcome in nese interests. China.” As one popular He offered credit cards as an saying goes, “You can’t betray area in which foreign banks your ancestors.” But speaking to American ex- could play a larger role to help ecutives Tuesday in the Chinese boost sorely needed domestic capital, the former Washington consumption in China. Chinese governor showed no hint of soft- banks are mostly geared toward ening U.S. demands. He called serving state-owned companies on Beijing to let its currency and aren’t permitted to compete appreciate, eliminate trade and with regard to interest rates. Discussing intellectual propinvestment barriers and strictly enforce intellectual-property erty, Locke cited rampant software piracy as a significant rights. Locke also echoed growing problem. “In the United States, for evconcerns from foreigners that China was becoming an in- ery $1 in computer hardware creasingly unwelcome place to sales, there is about 88 cents in software sales,” he said. “But in do business. “China’s current business cli- China, for every dollar in hardmate is causing growing frustra- ware sales there is only eight tions among foreign business and cents in software sales.”

By David Pierson Los Angeles Times

Buckle Continued from B1 The Buckle, based in Kearney, Neb., targets “fashionconscious young men and women” and offers an exclusive brand of denim, BKE, according to a description of the company in a recent news release. The Buckle has stores in Eugene, Happy Valley, Medford and Salem, according to the company’s website. The city of Bend earlier this month received a building permit application for an estimated $240,000 in commercial-remodeling work at the 4,400-square-foot space on Southwest Powerhouse Drive. Building plans show intentions to demolish walls, furniture and floors and replace them with new materials. The Old Mill District has tended to have the lowest vacancy rate among the commercial areas in Bend in the past few years, generally between 1 and 4 percent, according to quarterly reports Interior Design & Finishes by

Patty Jones 541.610.3796 www.perryjonesdesigns.com

from Compass Commercial Real Estate Services in Bend. Still, stores have closed in the shopping area, including Allyson’s Kitchen and Ann Taylor Loft earlier this year. But Ginger’s Kitchenware and Mio Sushi replaced the space occupied by Allyson’s Kitchen. The other space remains vacant, said Marcelene Trujillo, the Old Mill’s marketing associate. A Savory Spice Shop Inc. store is under construction in part of a previously vacant space next to Ginger’s Kitchenware, Trujillo said. Both The Children’s Place and The Buckle are publicly traded. The Children’s Place stock on Nasdaq closed at $45.62 on Tuesday, while The Buckle’s stock on the New York Stock Exchange closed at $39.40. Jordan Novet can be reached at 541-633-2117 or at jnovet@bendbulletin.com.


B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 21, 2011 B3

A W The changing face of Sign of the times: Hallmark the part-time worker adds job-loss sympathy cards By Christina Rosales The Dallas Morning News

Marice Cohn Band / Miami Herald

Chaim LieberPerson, right, works with Lisa Chariff Better to set up for a Miami Book Fair International event. LieberPerson has worked several part-time jobs while looking for full-time employment.

Desperation becoming driving force for growing labor segment By Cindy Krischer Goodman McClatchy-Tribune News Service

I recently met Luis, a Miami father of two young children, who sits atop his lawn mower like it’s a throne. Luis used to be a mortgage banker, but he’s been out of work for more than 20 months. Like others, he has become frustrated with the job hunt. One day, while Luis was mowing his lawn, a neighbor offered him a few bucks to do his yard. Word spread, plentiful rain caused Miami lawns to grow tall and Luis now has cobbled together enough business to consider mowing lawns a part-time job. “At least it’s some income,” said the humbled executive, who asked me not to use his full name. Today the face of the parttime worker is drastically different from what it was only a few years ago. It used to look more like mine, a mother who wanted to better balance her work and family. It might also have been the college student who needed to earn income while in school. But the recession and high unemployment have changed the once coveted status. Increasingly, the face of the part-time worker has become the dad jumping at any chance of income or the college graduate desperate for an opportunity to get a foot in the door. It might be the loyal worker whose weekly hours have been cut to save the company a few bucks or the desperate former executive patching together jobs to pay rent. As of September, about 8.8 million Americans are working part time while desiring full-time work. That number is double what it was in 2007, just before the recession began. And, another roughly 2.6 million people want work — even parttime work — but have stopped actively looking. Combined, the “underemployed” part-timers who want full-time work; and “discouraged” people who have stopped looking make up 16.2

percent of working-age Americans. The Labor Department compiles the figure to assess how many people want full-time work and can’t find it — a number the unemployment rate alone doesn’t capture. “There are a ton of desperate people who can’t get hours they need to provide for their families,” said Heidi Shierholz, labor economist at the Economic Policy Institute. For the past few years, there hasn’t been any significant improvement.

Pay, but no benefits That’s the case for Chaim LieberPerson, a former parochial grade school principal. LieberPerson dashes between the office of the Miami Book Fair International and his children’s school for dismissal. He’s on call to handle child care now that his wife is the full-time wage earner. In June, when the school LieberPerson worked at restructured its administration, his job was eliminated. Now, he works two part-time jobs — one as a project worker for the book fair and the other as a Sunday school teacher. LieberPerson says he enjoys the flexibility of his current schedule but needs a full time job with benefits. “In most jobs in America, you can’t have health care unless you’re full-time. Without that coverage, we all know how quickly your fortunes could change.” Indeed, part-time workers still significantly lag full-time employees in the benefits they are offered. Only about 25 percent of part-time workers have access to employer-sponsored benefits such as medical or paid sick leave, according to a 2011 report by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. James Stubbs considers himself fortunate to get benefits as a part-timer at DentalPlans.com in Plantation, Fla. He voluntarily scaled back his weekly hours, from 40-plus to 30, trying to be more productive in fewer hours.

Stubbs says he saw friends in myriad professions working crushing schedules. Newly married and active in his church, he wanted work-life balance. He also wanted to spend time on an online business his wife operates full-time. “I like having two sources of income,” Stubbs said. Having watched friends get downsized, Stubbs says there’s comfort in working two part-time jobs. “I’ve seen that anything can happen.”

Part-time allure When consumer demand picks up, companies will likely boost the hours of their part-timers before they add jobs, economists say. It means they have room to expand without hiring. In some cases, that’s already happening. After graduating from college this spring, Chaya Muldavin took part-time digital media work on a contract basis for a national cable television network, where she had completed an internship. To support herself, she also took a job selling cosmetics at a department store. “It was exhausting because I really didn’t have a day off.” A few weeks ago, the network hired her full time. “They saw I had the skills and they realized they had enough for me to do full-time,” she says. “I consider it part luck, part opportunity.” Suzanne Hodes, chief financial officer of Career Xchange, a Florida staffing company, said with the economy still sputtering, companies are risk-averse about hiring. “If their business has picked up, they don’t know if it’s short term or long term.” That’s why part-time hiring has become appealing, she says. “If business continues to pick up, they have the option to add hours. If business drops off, they let the part-timer go and pick up the ball themselves again.” In most cases, the part-timer is well aware of the instability. Most continue job hunting, she said.

Business e-mails you’ll be proud to sign By Diane Stafford McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Workers, especially job hunters, sometimes ask me how they should sign their business e-mails. Best? Sincerely? Regards? They want to strike the right balance between personable and businesslike. So what’s wrong with simply signing your name? Nothing. Worrying about what kind of closing to use counts as sweating the small stuff. There’s a good chance readers will simply read over the closing, or they won’t give it a second thought if they do read it. Of course, it’s silly to veer into “Love” or “Fondly” territory.

That’s just plain wrong in a business setting. What matters far more is what’s written above the closing. Spelling, grammar and punctuation make a difference to most readers. But content is king. Whatever is written should be concise and relevant. Respect the reader’s time — especially if the e-mail is going to a hiring manager or a boss. It should go without saying, but my e-mails show this bears repeating: • Do not use all capital letters. • Do not type one big run-on paragraph. Break it up with white space that’s easy on the eyes. • Do not use fancy type fonts, such as hard-to-read italics or light-colored type.

• Use at least 12-point type. • Don’t insert happy faces and other emoticons. There’s no question that communicating through the written word can be harder than conversing person to person. When facial expression and tone of voice are missing, it can be difficult to figure out exactly what the written words mean. That’s why it’s important to take care when composing written messages. We tend to hit “send” quickly — that’s the nature of e-mail. Pause. Reread. Maybe even sleep on it if it’s not time-sensitive, or ask someone you trust to evaluate it if it’s a really important note. Then send it with confidence. And proudly sign your name.

DALLAS — Greeting card companies have taken a cue from the nation’s 9 percent unemployment rate. In a six-by-four inch envelope, someone can send a friend who lost his or her job a pre-printed message of encouragement and sympathy. Though not available at every corner store, layoff greeting cards are being manufactured by Hallmark and sold at its stores and online — and selling well, said Frank Fernandez, owner of two Hallmark stores in North Texas. “We’re in the emotional business,” said Fernandez. “You want to say something emotionally correct and give them (your friends) a card that you’ve chosen to express your own thoughts.” One Hallmark card with a photo of a cat reads: “Is there anywhere I could hack up a hairball, like say, on a former employer’s head?” Another card says: “Losing a job is just plain painful. So I want you to remember I’m in your cheering section …” Online companies such as Zazzle and Greeting Card Universe have also begun selling layoff cards. The second largest greeting card company, Ohiobased American Greetings, has not produced greeting cards with specific captions about job loss. Spokesman Frank Cirillo said consumers can write their own messages to make the cards more personal. David Smason, 25, moved to Dallas from New Orleans and was laid off from his last job in the hospitality industry. While standing in line at a downtown job fair last week, he said he

“Losing a job is just plain painful. So I want you to remember I’m in your cheering section ...” — Excerpt from a Hallmark sympathy card was unsure if getting a layoff card would have been all that encouraging for him. “I do think it’s thoughtful,” he said. “But I think you have to have a healthy sense of humor to appreciate that kind of thing.” Stanford University professor Bob Sutton said layoff cards might be a good way to show compassion to someone who needs support during a tough time. “Treating them as if they are invisible is often the worst thing,” said Sutton, who has written several books on management and the workplace. “It is a very small thing, but may matter to some people.” Still, he said, not everyone would appreciate it, especially those who consider losing one’s job a private or embarrassing issue. That’s the reason pre-printed cards are sold, said Emily West, a communications professor at the University of Massachusetts who has studied the greeting card culture. Hallmark and similar companies are taking some of the difficulty out of sending concern and support to a friend who might have lost his or her job, she said. “The production of the cards can help legitimize a sentiment,” West said. “It can be comfort-

ing. It says that it’s OK to send a card or to have this sentiment or say these things.” Hallmark, based in Kansas City, Mo., has always adapted its cards to the current events, and it has taken into consideration the economy since 1910, said spokeswoman Jaci Twidwell. Hallmark produces six kinds of layoff sympathy cards. The company would not disclose sales figures, but the manager of a Dallas store said such sympathy and encouragement cards sell out quickly. In the past, some Hallmark cards have dealt with difficult issues — such as the military draft in the 1960s, nuclear warfare and the Great Depression. Cards have also offered sentimental greetings to members of the military during the 1940s and to those who suffered loss after Sept. 11, 2001. Addressing the current economy is another way for Hallmark to take a cultural snapshot of people’s concerns. “We know these job-loss captions are not going to be the strongest performer,” Twidwell said. “But they are meant to meet a relevant and niche consumer need for many who are looking for it.” Rodney Johnson, a former private school owner, said he has had to let go of some of his employees. He said it’s often emotional for the employees to face the loss of a job. It’s important to let them know they have support. “If they’re devastated and get a nice card in the mail, it might make their day a little better,” he said. He added that he had never seen a card about job loss, but that he was interested in finding them.


B USI N ESS

B4 Wednesday, September 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

D

A-B-C-D AAR ABB Ltd ABM ACE Ltd ACI Wwde AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGIC Cv AGL Res AK Steel AMAG Ph AMC Net n AMR AOL ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AXT Inc Aarons AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaPh AcadiaRlt Accenture AccoBrds AccretivH Accuray Accuride n Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivePwr ActivsBliz Actuant Actuate Acuity Acxiom AdamsEx AdobeSy Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvATech AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi Adventrx AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeropostl AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix Agenus AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd AirTrnsp Aircastle Airgas Aixtron AkamaiT Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alere AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion s Alexza AlignTech Alkermes AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlliantTch AlldNevG AlldWldA AllosThera AllotComm AllscriptH Allstate AlmadnM g AlnylamP AlonUSA AlphaNRs AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AlteraCp lf Altria Alumina AmBev s Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL s AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AGreet AmIntlGrp AmSupr AmTower AVangrd AmWtrWks Ameriprise AmeriBrgn AmCasino Ameron Ametek s Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amsurg Amylin Amyris n Anadarko Anadigc AnadysPh AnalogDev Ancestry AnglogldA ABInBev Anixter Ann Inc Annaly Ansys AntaresP Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache AptInv ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldIndlT ApldMatl AMCC Approach AquaAm ArQule ArcelorMit ArchCap s ArchCh ArchCoal ArchDan ArcosDor n ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArmHld ArmourRsd ArmstrW s ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArtioGInv ArubaNet AsburyA AscenaRtl AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfoL AspenIns AspenTech AsscdBanc Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth AtlPwr g AtlasAir Atmel ATMOS Atrins rsh AtwoodOcn Augusta g AuRico g Aurizon g AuthenTec AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch AvalRare n AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AviatNetw AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis

0.30 0.64 0.56 1.36

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Nm AXIS Cap B&G Foods BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJs Whls BMB Munai BMC Sft BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil Baidu BakrHu BallCp s BallyTech BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoMacro BcoSantSA BcoSBrasil BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm pfH BkA SP5-12 BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g Bankrate n BankUtd n Banro g BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BiPCop Barclay Bar iPVix rs BarVixMdT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BaytexE g BeaconP rs BeacnRfg Beam wi BeazerHm BebeStrs BectDck BedBath Belden Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BigBandN BBarrett BioRefLab Biodel BioFuelE h BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR BioSante BioScrip BlkHillsCp BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkBldAm BlkDebtStr BlkEqDiv BlkEEqDv BlkIntlG&I BlkStEqDv Blackstone BlockHR BlueCoat BdwlkPpl BodyCen n Boeing Boise Inc BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci BoydGm Brandyw Braskem BreitBurn BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker Brinks BrMySq BristowGp Broadcom BroadrdgF BroadSoft Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfInfra BrkfldOfPr BrklneB BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrownFB BrukerCp Brunswick Buckeye BuckTch Buckle Buenavent BuffaloWW BldrFstSrc BungeLt C&J Egy n CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBOE CBRE GRE CBS B CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNinsure CPFL En s CSX s CTC Media CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVR Ptrs n CVS Care CYS Invest Cabelas CblvsNY s Cabot CabotO&G CACI Cadence CalDive CalaStrTR Calgon CaliperLSc Calix CallGolf Callidus CallonP h Calpine CalumetSp CamdenPT Cameco g CameltInfo Cameron CampSp CIBC g CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar Canon CapellaEd CapOne CapitlSrce CapFdF rs CapsteadM CpstnTrb h Carbonite n CardnlHlth Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd CaribouC Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarnUK CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caseys CashAm CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen CatoCp Cavium Cbeyond CedarSh CelSci Celadon Celanese Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom CelldexTh Celsion Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE Centene CenterPnt CnElBras pf CnElBras lf CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g CentAl

D 0.92 0.84 0.64 2.07

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Nm CntryLink Cenveo Cephln Cepheid Cerner s CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds ChkPoint Cheesecake ChefsWhs n Chemtura n CheniereEn CheniereE ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinaDigtl ChinaGreen ChinaLife ChinaMble ChinaShen ChinaSun ChinaUni ChiValve Chipotle Chiquita ChoiceHtls Chubb ChungTel n ChurchD s CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigrp rs CitrixSys CityNC Clarcor ClaudeR g CleanEngy CleanH s ClearEnFd Clearwire CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPeak Coach CobaltIEn CocaCola CocaCE Coeur CoffeeH CogdSpen CogentC Cognex CognizTech Cogo Grp CohStQIR Coherent Coinstar ColdwtrCrk Colfax ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColumLabs Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmclVehcl CmwREIT CmtyBkSy CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s CmGnom n CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComScore ComstkRs Con-Way ConAgra ConchoRes ConcurTch ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Continucre Cnvrgys CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopanoEn Copart Copel CoreLabs CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpExc CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costco Cott Cp Cntwd pfB CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CowenGp CrackerB Credicp CSVS2xVxS CSVelIVSt s CredSuiss Cree Inc CreXus Crocs CrosstexE CrwnCstle CrownHold Ctrip.com CubeSmart CubistPh CullenFr Cummins CumMed CurEuro CurrCda CurJpn CurSwiss Cymer CypSemi CytRx h Cytec DCT Indl DDR Corp DFC Gbl s DG FastCh DHT Hldgs DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DST Sys DSW Inc DTE DanaHldg Danaher Darden Darling Datalink DaVita DeVry DealrTrk DeanFds DeckrsOut Deere Delcath Dell Inc DelphiFn DeltaAir Deluxe DemMda n DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DeutBCT2 pf DeutBCT5 pf DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevonE DexCom Diageo DiamondF DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver Dillards Diodes DirecTV A DrxTcBull DrSCBr rs DSOXBr rs DirFnBr rs DirLCBr rs DirDGldBr DirDGldBll DrxEMBull DrxTcBear DRE Bear DrxEnBear DrxSOXBll DirEMBear DrxFnBull Dir30TrBear DrxREBull DirxSCBull DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C

D 2.90 34.64 3.28 -.20 81.05 +.05 37.59 -.81 70.28 +2.91 2.08 -.02 30.46 2.90 -.03 52.79 -3.33 56.71 -.88 26.25 -1.10 14.84 -.30 12.89 -.33 6.94 -.25 1.70 14.30 -.28 0.35 30.41 -.65 3.12 97.79 -.92 0.20 31.99 -2.02 0.20 13.32 -.30 45.62 -1.22 0.62 2.99 -.05 1.56 4.17 -.08 5.02 -.46 0.91 35.61 +.56 2.04 51.48 +.26 2.22 -.06 1.52 +.12 0.12 22.08 +.01 2.48 +.37 333.19 -2.95 8.74 -.25 0.74 30.31 -.37 1.56 60.67 +.81 1.91 33.68 -.06 0.68 44.46 +.32 3.11 -.21 12.75 +.15 0.40 64.77 -1.31 3.16 -.07 1.61 27.32 +.43 0.84 20.08 -.28 0.49 30.83 -.18 15.70 -.03 0.24 16.53 +.02 0.04 26.93 -.78 54.84 -1.21 0.80 40.63 -.40 0.42 42.28 -.59 2.18 +.06 12.36 -.38 55.31 +.23 1.42 20.56 -.05 2.46 +.08 1.12 70.60 -4.86 2.40 68.76 -.07 19.98 -.57 0.90 59.35 -.70 9.57 -.56 1.88 70.65 +.16 0.52 26.63 -.23 27.27 +.37 0.12 14.55 -1.68 0.40 4.11 +.04 14.35 +.01 0.36 28.84 -.55 64.01 -.03 2.33 -.08 0.72 8.48 -.03 44.74 -.15 45.19 -2.20 1.40 +.10 23.88 -.35 2.32 93.96 +.64 13.36 -.50 0.60 20.55 -.22 2.18 -.18 0.45 22.72 -.14 0.45 22.40 -.20 0.40 24.49 +.08 0.92 36.46 -.09 0.48 10.91 -.21 6.84 -.06 2.00 19.76 +.37 0.96 23.33 -.14 17.94 -.25 36.36 +.12 0.39 35.17 -.86 6.96 -.17 25.22 -1.51 0.80 28.14 -.47 8.19 -.22 17.02 +.05 18.57 -.71 0.40 25.13 -.81 0.92 22.99 -.40 87.02 +1.23 38.50 -1.74 2.64 67.01 +.24 0.40 40.37 -1.82 2.40 58.10 +.85 18.30 -.17 18.71 -.09 0.96 39.66 +.93 54.08 -.67 6.32 -.07 9.71 -.22 0.06 83.00 +3.04 1.16 46.76 -.99 0.42 10.72 -.12 2.30 32.50 -.48 39.83 -.67 1.00 20.15 +.01 1.00 104.68 -.84 11.62 -.18 1.90 -.11 0.64 45.01 -.65 0.20 13.42 +.05 0.60 31.12 -.38 1.65 25.19 -.52 23.09 -.25 0.28 10.96 -.01 0.96 85.07 +.04 7.34 -.20 1.75 20.05 +.07 0.18 6.28 -.10 48.29 -.51 0.30 14.78 -.37 31.37 -2.30 0.80 47.47 +.29 3.05 -.08 1.00 40.68 -1.04 1.95 101.51 +.14 59.14 +.09 7.00 +.01 1.40 24.07 -.14 32.83 -.32 0.87 8.50 -.15 27.92 -.65 0.40 14.24 -.32 43.56 -.25 31.16 -.15 35.98 -1.53 0.28 9.62 -.14 35.30 +1.35 1.84 47.62 -.46 1.60 94.25 -2.78 2.98 +.48 0.19 136.19 -.19 0.11 100.06 -.41 129.05 +.22 111.21 -.95 40.90 +.38 0.36 17.01 -.09 .37 -.00 0.50 38.46 -.99 0.28 5.00 +.09 0.24 11.67 +.22 23.85 -.15 19.51 -1.05 0.40 2.40 -.04 0.78 10.18 +.04 1.33 30.08 -.08 0.15 9.78 +.22 0.70 44.67 -.51 0.60 46.09 -1.76 2.35 50.99 +.65 11.98 -.46 0.10 46.24 +.23 1.72 44.83 -1.38 14.94 -.58 9.13 -.77 73.42 +.45 0.24 40.04 -.50 17.25 -.82 8.62 -.11 100.45 -1.98 1.64 75.98 -1.21 3.88 -.15 14.88 +.01 0.48 22.49 -.36 8.37 +.06 1.00 21.08 -.66 8.05 +.06 13.75 -.37 11.05 -.25 1.42 -.03 3.50 -.09 0.20 33.62 -.11 5.98 -.05 1.07 33.00 -.23 1.64 20.61 -.26 2.01 24.74 -.12 66.00 +1.79 4.42 -.12 0.68 64.87 +.32 13.09 +.32 2.63 77.98 +1.75 0.18 92.47 +4.97 0.50 62.14 -.79 0.32 7.43 -.13 8.21 -.22 9.49 -.57 35.24 +.39 1.12 28.08 -.66 2.72 55.63 -.22 21.76 -.72 0.20 47.65 -1.46 18.15 -.50 43.61 +.21 0.84 36.64 -.63 44.85 +2.08 0.75 67.78 +2.30 57.53 +.20 39.32 +.33 29.03 -2.09 41.75 +2.63 1.20 18.68 -.43 20.02 +.32 11.78 +.05 17.58 +.35 0.01 31.17 -1.06 25.71 +.58 13.02 -.04 18.46 -.25 0.05 51.06 -.14 41.50 -2.08 0.10 56.78 -.40 43.74 -.91 0.24 26.79 +.52 39.74 +.12 37.95 +.24

Nm

D

DiscLab rs DishNetwk Disney DolbyLab DoleFood DollarGen DollarTh DollarTree DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs Donldson DonlleyRR DoralFncl DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragonW g DrmWksA DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty Dunkin n DyaxCp Dycom Dynavax Dynegy

0.40

1.97 1.40 0.60 1.04 0.52 1.26 1.00 1.28

0.52 0.12 1.64 0.48 1.00 0.68

Nm 2.17 27.23 32.31 30.26 10.14 37.65 63.05 75.69 50.60 28.33 78.25 57.27 14.70 1.26 17.90 50.80 27.27 38.20 4.00 19.31 46.06 4.56 63.72 3.16 45.96 21.92 19.75 11.24 27.98 1.54 17.48 2.13 5.24

-.17 -.03 -.20 -.28 -.17 -.25 -.96 -.60 +.86 -.54 -2.22 -.70 +.05 -.06 +.03 -1.02 -.45 +.29 -.12 -.08 +.37 +.06 -1.10 -.42 +.15 +.20 -.05 +.51 -.70 -.05 -.16

E-F-G-H ECDang n 5.92 -.56 E-House 0.25 6.26 -.18 E-Trade 10.70 -.29 eBay 32.73 -.37 EMC Cp 21.81 -.69 EMCOR 20.22 -.26 ENI 1.38 35.18 -.15 EOG Res 0.64 87.12 -.64 EQT Corp 0.88 61.86 -.76 ETF Pall 70.76 +.05 EV Engy 3.04 72.31 -4.84 EagleBulk 1.89 -.05 EagleMat 0.40 17.11 -.55 EaglRkEn 0.75 10.41 +.02 ErthLink 0.20 7.12 -.09 EstWstBcp 0.20 15.96 -.39 EastChm 2.08 73.19 -1.99 EKodak 2.61 -.08 Eaton s 1.36 38.56 -1.21 EatnVan 0.72 23.44 -.21 EV LtdDur 1.25 15.07 +.02 EVRiskMgd 1.28 11.43 +.08 EV TxDiver 1.16 9.20 -.07 EVTxMGlo 1.14 8.60 -.05 EVTxGBW 1.21 10.55 -.05 EVTxBWOp 1.33 11.69 Ebix Inc 0.16 16.27 -.83 EchoStar 23.00 -.30 Ecolab 0.70 51.41 +.09 Ecopetrol 1.39 44.56 -.05 EdisonInt 1.28 38.01 +.36 EducRlty 0.28 9.28 -.01 EdwLfSci 78.50 +1.25 8x8 Inc 4.60 -.20 ElPasoCp 0.04 19.20 -.06 ElPasoEl 0.88 32.09 +.02 ElPasoPpl 1.92 37.72 +.67 Elan 9.98 +.32 EldorGld g 0.12 20.54 +.42 ElectArts 22.91 +.04 EFII 14.44 -.15 eMagin 2.94 -.12 Embraer 0.72 25.67 -.53 Emcore lf 1.41 -.04 Emdeon 18.77 -.09 EmersonEl 1.38 45.55 +.11 EmpIca 5.26 -.28 Emulex 6.83 -.27 EnbrEPt s 2.13 29.15 +.36 Enbridge s 0.98 32.04 +.23 EnCana g 0.80 22.84 -.11 EndvSilv g 12.61 +.27 EndoPhrm 28.92 -.63 Endologix 11.15 -.02 EndurSpec 1.20 35.33 -.10 Ener1 hlf .20 -.04 EnerNOC 10.70 -.19 Energen 0.54 45.46 -.78 Energizer 70.77 -.79 EngyConv .80 +.08 EngyPtrs 11.84 -.26 EngyTEq 2.50 38.50 -.02 EngyTsfr 3.58 44.52 +.50 EngyXXI 23.97 -.26 EnergySol 3.01 -.01 Enerpls g 2.16 26.42 -.37 Enersis 0.79 18.44 +.18 EnerSys 21.20 -1.16 ENSCO 1.40 47.75 -.42 Entegris 7.36 -.35 Entergy 3.32 66.46 +1.19 EntPrPt 2.42 42.91 +.85 EntropCom 4.51 -.17 EnzoBio 2.66 -.17 EnzonPhar 7.90 +.02 Equifax 0.64 31.62 -.12 Equinix 94.73 -.46 EqLfPrp 1.50 71.83 -.04 EqtyOne 0.88 16.67 -.20 EqtyRsd 1.47 55.67 -1.05 EricsnTel 0.37 10.40 +.02 EssexPT 4.16 136.28 -2.03 EsteeLdr 0.75 102.88 +1.66 Esterline 58.05 -1.69 EtfSilver 39.60 +.12 EverestRe 1.92 79.42 +1.30 ExactSci h 7.40 -.58 ExcelM 2.38 +.03 ExcoRes 0.16 12.07 -.44 Exelixis 6.44 -.47 Exelon 2.10 44.07 +.76 ExeterR gs 4.97 +.01 ExideTc 4.48 -.33 ExlSvcHld 22.79 -.02 Expedia 0.28 28.87 +.08 ExpdIntl 0.50 43.50 -.86 Express 20.79 +.09 ExpScripts 41.53 +.25 ExterranH 9.96 -.28 ExtraSpce 0.56 21.08 -.09 ExtrmNet 2.63 -.17 ExxonMbl 1.88 74.01 +.31 EZchip 33.62 -.85 Ezcorp 32.75 -.66 F5 Netwks 78.17 -4.72 FEI Co 32.19 +.38 FLIR Sys 0.24 27.13 -.30 FMC Corp 0.60 76.43 -.23 FMC Tch s 43.13 -.02 FNBCp PA 0.48 8.74 -.08 FSI Intl 1.93 -.14 FTI Cnslt 34.93 -.02 FX Ener 4.99 +.07 FactsetR 1.08 90.88 +2.07 FairIsaac 0.08 23.30 -.29 FairchldS 13.12 -.71 FamilyDlr 0.72 53.61 +.10 Fastenal s 0.52 36.62 +.13 FedExCp 0.52 75.22 -.54 FedRlty 2.76 84.88 +.28 FedInvst 0.96 17.12 +.02 FelCor 2.52 -.09 Ferro 7.50 -.34 FiberTwr 1.09 +.03 FibriaCelu 9.39 -.67 FidlNFin 0.48 15.93 -.08 FidNatInfo 0.20 26.02 FifthStFin 1.28 9.62 +.01 FifthThird 0.32 10.38 -.09 FinclEngin 19.94 -.68 Finisar 21.89 +.64 FinLine 0.20 19.44 -1.31 FstAFin n 0.24 13.79 -.37 FstCashFn 50.36 -.93 FstCwlth 0.12 3.98 -.05 FstHorizon 0.04 6.55 -.01 FstInRT 8.95 -.23 FMajSilv g 20.69 +.36 FstMarblhd 1.11 -.01 FMidBc 0.04 7.99 -.15 FstNiagara 0.64 10.19 -.11 FstPotom 0.80 13.25 +.24 FstRepB n 24.94 +.02 FstSolar 79.21 -4.70 FTDJMic 0.11 18.00 -.51 FirstEngy 2.20 46.02 +1.09 FstMerit 0.64 11.37 -.21 Fiserv 53.53 -.32 FiveStar 2.87 -.05 FlagstBcp .55 +.01 Flextrn 5.87 -.12 Flotek 5.64 -.28 FlowrsFd s 0.60 18.20 -.13 Flowserve 1.28 85.02 -2.00 Fluor 0.50 57.16 -1.40 FocusMda 31.51 -1.15 FEMSA 1.16 67.50 -.39 FootLockr 0.66 21.10 -.75 ForcePro 3.79 -.17 FordM 10.42 -.12 FordM wt 2.60 -.09 ForestCA 12.01 -.38 ForestLab 32.38 -.07 ForestOil 18.50 -.62 FormFac 6.84 -.16 Fortinet s 17.39 -.99 Fortress 3.31 +.12 FortunaSlv 6.93 +.39 FBHS wi 13.70 -.08 FortuneBr 0.76 57.06 -.45 ForwrdA 0.28 29.00 +.27 Fossil Inc 97.08 -3.25 FosterWhl 21.39 -.77 FranceTel 2.02 16.35 +.05 Francesc n 19.97 +.02 FrankRes 1.00 115.30 -.36 FrkStPrp 0.76 12.10 +.03 FredsInc 0.20 11.18 -.21 FMCG s 1.00 38.55 -1.67 Freescale n 12.63 -.45 FDelMnt 0.40 23.35 -.12 FreshMkt n 38.56 -1.09 FrontierCm 0.75 6.78 -.22 Frontline 0.47 5.91 -.10 FuelSysSol 21.05 -.63 FuelCell 1.11 -.05 FullerHB 0.30 20.31 -.12 FultonFncl 0.20 8.23 -.12 FushiCopp 6.08 -.15 Fusion-io n 18.47 -2.00 GATX 1.16 34.27 -.90 GFI Grp 0.20 4.21 +.09 GMX Rs 2.21 -.01 GNC n 22.68 -.32 GT AdvTc 8.38 -.72 G-III 23.76

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D 0.58 5.06 +.02 1.68 16.49 -.02 0.29 7.24 -.64 0.15 3.68 -.08 5.66 +.20 1.32 27.91 -.11 23.98 -.25 0.32 9.51 -.44 0.45 16.72 -.31 0.20 74.15 -1.45 2.00 33.21 -.23 36.89 -.71 .24 +.01 4.28 +.01 21.24 -.95 61.69 -.39 7.89 +.29 4.04 +.05 18.41 -.14 25.86 -.68 1.88 59.55 -.62 0.60 16.04 -.14 0.40 13.04 +.39 .26 -.05 1.22 37.49 -.05 3.21 -.19 22.43 -.62 2.38 37.90 -.66 52.03 -2.40 49.50 -.79 2.98 -.12 0.18 15.77 -.21 0.48 25.33 -.79 5.98 -.31 1.80 52.18 -.65 5.71 -.18 19.87 -.13 .35 +.04 18.75 -.21 0.25 8.21 -.30 2.40 -.06 0.18 3.85 -.24 .93 +.04 0.30 28.60 -.06 40.84 +.79 0.52 10.00 -.15 2.17 42.03 +.52 1.29 0.40 8.22 -.03 7.85 -.04 0.08 42.96 -.42 13.97 0.40 9.43 -.16 0.25 26.82 +.38 .44 -.06 0.15 15.25 -1.15 3.05 -.27 0.12 6.82 -.38 1.10 35.53 +1.79 0.24 17.77 +.63 0.60 22.23 -.22 0.41 52.86 +2.22 12.13 +.74 2.28 +.12 1.40 102.61 -2.20 1.16 111.82 +4.22 14.91 -.23 10.69 -.27 546.63 -.05 38.19 -.70 0.84 36.16 -1.56 15.28 -.16 2.64 160.47 +.11 3.23 -.20 5.87 -.13 16.17 -.16 0.52 19.57 -.22 3.79 -.06 2.24 +.07 0.08 4.46 -.07 3.37 -.05 0.83 19.82 +.19 109.75 -1.87 9.90 -.19 13.83 -.78 1.80 29.94 -.52 1.68 47.32 +.04 6.23 +.03 0.52 37.26 -1.13 0.15 18.63 -.10 0.80 31.63 -1.17 1.01 19.90 -.04 0.03 4.01 -.27 2.95 +.36 40.28 +1.55 27.60 -1.13 2.41 -.35 19.90 +.09 0.62 27.62 -.19 1.92 37.55 +.62 0.22 31.32 +.31 25.69 -.14 0.92 18.06 -.21 1.90 40.56 +.19 2.00 25.76 -.10 33.15 -.80 31.79 +.11 0.36 37.98 -.28 6.21 -.02 0.96 28.02 -.44 27.12 -1.44 .90 -.02 1.10 35.98 -.03 4.18 -.02 91.96 -.29 2.77 -.24 20.81 +.03 0.50 36.69 -.40 0.30 33.19 +.24 4.56 -.15 0.08 13.42 +.28 1.12 39.12 -.91 0.82 21.90 -.58 0.32 8.19 -.26 0.40 17.93 -.39 12.16 -.37 1.20 35.35 -.38 4.00 27.23 -.43 1.24 24.57 +.10 4.49 -.06 1.75 -.09 2.86 50.67 +.31 0.64 16.14 +.03 7.04 -.29 1.20 17.81 +.20 25.94 -.61 16.50 -1.48 36.61 -1.76 0.08 13.96 -.31 5.42 -.16 .09 -.02 7.07 +.05 0.12 46.66 -2.17 1.92 50.61 -.03 16.26 -.14 0.28 51.07 -1.43 65.02 +.26 0.80 57.91 +.82 3.93 -.18 0.24 3.63 -.12 1.38 59.29 +.22 10.48 -.61 0.40 59.76 -1.00 0.48 22.47 -.44 22.01 +.33 33.84 -.87 35.19 -.66 1.70 29.89 -.60 0.45 30.54 -.24 0.76 18.85 -.29 0.24 1.20 -.03 54.56 -.37 0.35 30.67 -1.38 16.28 +.01 1.00 34.81 +.46 36.57 -.18 2.48 58.44 -3.75 31.06 -.40 1.33 46.75 -.57 .42 -.01 0.51 27.83 +.10 28.58 +.02 9.02 -.84 37.86 -.64 1.80 23.67 -.13 0.16 11.51 -.14 0.28 7.76 -.34 1.40 +.01 27.63 -1.75 1.52 54.53 -1.88 0.32 5.94 +.12 13.00 +.38 1.00 76.87 -2.37 0.52 37.97 -1.36 0.16 5.03 +.07 0.40 12.00 -.51

Nm Hyatt Hyperdyn

D 34.32 -.34 4.19 -.10

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42.16 -.02 0.20 23.25 +1.02 0.63 36.89 +.69 74.48 +.76 0.15 11.50 +.07 79.89 +.83 18.23 -.84 6.92 +.14 2.13 22.89 -.11 0.31 5.19 -.03 6.07 -.28 61.87 -1.03 25.91 -1.46 17.62 +.26 1.06 21.89 -.13 3.42 58.77 -.67 0.53 28.08 -.02 1.15 27.99 +.06 0.67 18.98 +.20 0.42 16.09 -.06 0.17 9.58 -.01 0.50 51.83 +.26 0.39 12.85 -.13 0.71 52.81 -1.40 0.50 11.93 -.01 1.73 40.37 -.26 0.29 12.87 -.08 0.48 15.74 +.16 1.33 51.09 +1.89 38.83 +.18 1.14 54.42 -.05 1.80 50.49 +.13 4.70 116.00 +.50 1.27 51.79 -.28 0.85 35.22 -.19 1.08 81.68 -1.07 2.45 121.22 -.14 3.78 110.30 +.22 0.84 39.04 -.29 5.09 113.11 +.05 1.02 41.71 -.09 5.57 109.37 +.05 0.18 28.53 -.36 1.24 65.68 -.10 0.58 38.39 -.23 1.10 43.02 -.42 1.31 54.74 -.05 4.02 114.86 +.48 0.43 30.02 -.02 3.14 104.98 +.14 0.75 84.67 -.04 1.68 49.70 +.20 0.99 41.48 -.24 0.53 54.29 -.51 1.03 84.44 -1.09 7.28 86.90 +.14 54.25 -1.07 0.21 50.64 -.66 0.03 27.47 -.52 0.51 98.46 +.82 1.97 67.54 +.11 1.38 60.15 -.05 0.72 97.80 -1.18 0.77 56.59 -.19 1.25 66.93 -.08 1.31 60.93 -.88 2.58 104.21 -.13 0.52 79.61 -1.40 0.94 69.15 -1.09 0.24 51.28 +.36 0.10 110.24 2.56 36.67 -.04 1.27 71.32 -.23 0.62 21.67 -.07 0.32 62.74 -.30 2.09 55.41 -.16 0.07 9.63 -.03 0.70 47.19 -.12 0.75 62.27 -1.08 1.06 66.69 -1.07 1.15 33.00 +.22 6.74 -.10 1.41 77.46 +.86 1.00 44.15 -.22 64.99 -.94 17.87 -.48 1.20 39.15 +.10 5.82 +.17 2.00 -.08 0.68 34.00 -.30 .94 -.03 1.44 45.00 -.11 44.98 -2.45 6.85 -.25 17.72 +.02 10.27 -.10 3.75 +.01 21.05 +.69 0.44 37.90 +.18 14.25 -.26 1.50 33.06 -.15 2.82 27.44 -.17 8.20 +.16 40.08 -1.23 1.25 -.05 1.35 49.95 +.51 0.48 33.20 -.44 17.46 -.23 3.18 -.18 0.57 7.61 -.05 9.10 -.11 16.00 -.51 13.38 -.22 16.11 -.27 5.84 -.16 2.72 50.48 +.93 0.84 22.20 +.27 0.40 14.39 +.02 122.45 -.43 0.35 16.93 +.02 0.40 59.40 -3.74 0.08 12.51 -.72 6.76 -.18 24.00 -.71 5.12 -.11 3.00 174.72 +1.59 1.24 59.54 -.17 0.24 15.03 -.13 1.05 27.22 -.39 21.06 -.47 7.37 +.17 60.92 -2.30 0.24 8.13 +.62 0.48 11.14 -.34 8.34 -.11 32.79 -1.32 0.60 48.94 -.42 388.69 -4.86 0.05 24.69 +.21 0.49 17.84 -.18 3.74 15.77 -.53 0.29 4.35 -.01 10.95 -.33 0.52 7.37 -.11 6.93 -.08 1.00 33.79 -.03 6.80 -.03 10.23 -.30 0.84 16.26 -.11 35.05 -1.58 1.30 -.05 1.48 18.84 -.79 7.93 -.18 0.80 30.25 -.81 2.00 -.20 13.05 -.03 1.00 32.25 -.24 10.05 -.14 1.94 35.79 +.13 1.80 25.46 -.11 0.28 17.29 -.22 0.42 29.18 -.35 20.35 -.43 34.99 -.60 6.60 +.35 0.40 19.81 +.01 1.55 -.11 9.06 -.63 0.20 6.43 -.16 0.35 30.46 -.22 46.80 +3.06 0.30 13.95 -.17 4.35 -.10 8.41 -1.10 5.89 -.61 .65 -.04 2.28 64.22 +.08 0.64 29.40 -.71 0.20 11.22 -.06 0.30 57.18 -1.50 51.42 -.63 0.70 75.87 -4.06

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D 5.40 -.13 10.46 -.36 50.25 +.02 0.80 9.99 -.11 15.25 -.03 0.32 38.44 +.34 16.79 +.08 18.28 -.66 63.93 -.96 9.32 +.71 0.97 34.82 +.75 11.27 -.59 31.96 -3.64 0.48 27.92 -.96 9.92 -.55 0.32 68.27 -.28 1.52 32.50 +.25 1.02 23.02 -.49 6.91 -.05 0.76 17.28 -.17 14.09 -.32 17.17 -.02 7.84 -.24 4.92 +.05 3.92 -.11 0.74 31.07 -.44 10.07 +.07 152.23 0.16 9.74 -.38 1.39 33.73 -.46 4.65 +.08 6.85 -.03 48.35 -.01 16.67 -.18 0.64 26.98 -.23 .84 -.05 2.51 65.85 -.89 2.86 +.06 0.09 17.13 -.63 0.30 26.11 -.02 1.04 29.66 -.63 18.45 +1.27 0.20 53.01 +.04 10.58 -.36 4.31 -.08 2.96 -.02 1.06 14.39 -.02 9.75 -.26 43.12 -1.53 0.80 21.38 -.14 16.48 -.44 1.28 42.37 +.13 41.45-11.56 11.60 -.70 2.30 -.20 1.20 67.71 -1.57 8.56 +.09 0.40 17.33 +.27 0.56 32.87 +.17 0.20 15.12 -.03 1.20 15.87 -.50 0.20 66.04 -2.47 0.88 44.34 -.15 37.82 -.03 2.01 -.11 1.65 +.05 0.40 44.06 -.83 0.07 2.41 -.03 1.10 50.74 -.16 20.19 -.10 19.73 +.42 1.81 -.01 17.83 -.32 27.20 -.41 1.80 16.57 -.01 0.25 11.21 -.21 34.68 -1.08 6.80 +.24 23.00 +.03 0.48 14.82 +.29 17.93 -.77 1.20 26.39 +.11 16.79 -.74 0.14 36.19 +.04 15.77 -.18 1.32 +.01 24.70 -.09 0.29 .89 +.01 0.88 14.03 +.13 11.86 -.35 1.42 56.25 -1.84 2.92 50.31 +.98 0.40 24.96 -.78 0.44 61.69 -1.78 0.12 7.30 -.04 1.54 26.70 +.04 0.40 24.91 -.01 2.16 29.27 -.08 10.30 +.09 9.94 -.04 0.24 3.57 -.07 37.27 -.93 0.44 15.21 -.04 5.08 +.10 2.92 -.13 48.10 -.05 35.26 -1.09 43.68 -.92 130.03-13.72 5.09 -.04 12.14 -.31 .72 +.01 32.00 -.51 5.85 -.06 25.50 +.03 9.95 -.19 0.06 6.80 +.31 13.73 +.47 32.34 -.41 1.00 12.61 -.12 6.64 -.31 0.60 4.90 -.75 0.32 12.59 -.36 47.62 -.89 1.20 69.90 +3.63 7.66 -.29 11.96 -.45 0.19 16.82 -.07 0.19 16.90 -.03 0.20 18.30 -.59 2.20 55.67 +.92 0.92 22.51 +.30 1.86 55.73 +.38 27.67 -.59 1.24 89.46 -.74 19.93 -.39 24.37 +.21 0.53 34.50 -.15 0.88 81.35 +1.87 0.55 5.89 +.02 3.87 -.04 10.50 -.61 0.50 43.16 -.97 0.92 47.49 -.49 1.72 67.54 -.68 6.13 -.06 3.32 -.09 1.10 34.81 +.29 7.90 -.37 21.19 -.84 1.12 35.64 -.03 3.88 +.20 2.00 53.85 -.03 0.40 3.57 -.13 0.44 12.15 -.12 8.18 +.30 2.53 55.38 +.11 3.31 +.04 1.56 -.09 29.46 -.41 1.70 45.66 +.17 0.64 45.97 +1.16 21.21 -.33 19.22 -.08 1.45 34.11 -.28 0.70 11.24 -.35 0.76 7.89 -.09 0.66 7.85 -.03 14.75 -.39 19.40 -.20 5.36 -.21 1.50 49.16 -.17 70.42 -1.30 26.46 -.68 1.84 80.78 -1.68 0.60 41.38 +.16 1.08 9.78 +.07 4.08 -.12 13.09 +.01 3.24 +.21 2.27 -.07 5.27 -.14 1.58 125.32 -1.71 61.19 -2.11 .22 +.01 31.61 -.99

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+.04 Perficient 8.00 +.03 PerkElm 0.28 20.37 -.20 Perrigo 0.28 97.29 +.85 PetrbrsA 1.34 23.40 -.35 Petrobras 1.26 25.65 -.34 PetroDev 24.60 +1.07 PtroqstE 7.06 -.15 PetsMart 0.56 44.48 -.49 Pfizer 0.80 18.24 +.18 PharmPdt 0.60 26.95 -.42 Pharmacyc 11.50 +.23 Pharmsst s 78.01 -.57 Pharmerica 14.39 -.24 PhilipMor 3.08 68.28 +.37 PhilipsEl 1.02 17.80 +.01 PhnxCos 1.54 -.14 PhotrIn 6.11 -.43 PiedNG 1.16 30.10 +.05 PiedmOfc 1.26 17.89 +.07 Pier 1 11.23 -.57 PilgrimsP 3.62 -.18 PimIncStr2 0.78 9.23 +.06 PimcoHiI 1.46 12.09 -.06 PinnaclA 2.94 -.21 PinnclEnt 10.96 -.33 PinnaclFn 11.17 +.37 PinWst 2.10 44.53 +.70 PionDrill 10.51 -.34 PioNtrl 0.08 76.28 -1.43 PitnyBw 1.48 19.84 -.24 PlainsAA 3.93 60.92 +.10 PlainsEx 27.24 -1.00 Plantron 0.20 30.14 -.59 Plexus 24.00 -1.94 PlumCrk 1.68 36.72 +.07 Polaris s 0.90 54.29 -2.05 Polycom s 20.93 -1.34 PolyOne 0.16 11.24 -.22 Polypore 66.12 -1.58 Pool Corp 0.56 27.42 -.28 Popular 1.62 -.04 PortfRec 62.12 -3.25 PortGE 1.06 24.25 +.06 PortglTel 3.18 7.61 -.15 PostPrp 0.88 40.69 -.22 Potash s 0.28 52.05 -1.97 Potlatch 2.04 33.01 +.53 PwrInteg 0.20 32.45 -1.07 Power-One 5.84 -.47 PwshDB 28.44 -.05 PS Agri 31.74 -.03 PS USDBull 21.86 PwSClnEn 0.09 6.33 -.21 PSFinPf 1.25 16.49 -.02 PSETecLd 0.09 16.23 -.15 PSBldABd 1.50 28.46 +.05 PSVrdoTF 0.12 25.00 -.01 PSHYCpBd 1.29 17.95 -.04 PwShPfd 0.96 13.79 PShEMSov 1.51 27.40 +.04 PSIndia 0.19 19.71 +.12 PwShs QQQ 0.41 56.36 -.25 Powrwav 1.50 -.07 PranaBio 1.79 -.14 Praxair 2.00 101.51 +1.42 PrecCastpt 0.12 170.84 +.05 PrecDrill 11.60 +.11 PriceTR 1.24 51.31 -.15 PrSmrt 0.60 72.56 -1.60 priceline 537.24 +5.79 Primerica 0.12 20.13 +.20 Primero g 3.03 -.21 PrinctnR h .16 +.02 PrinFncl 0.55 24.51 -.02 PrivateB 0.04 8.10 -.09 ProLogis 1.12 28.27 +.36 ProShtDow 42.75 -.01 ProShtQQQ 31.82 +.12 ProShtS&P 43.56 +.05 PrUShS&P 22.86 +.07 ProUltDow 0.28 52.86 +.15 PrUlShDow 18.86 -.06 ProUltMC 0.01 52.67 -1.28 PrUShMC rs 46.48 +1.09 ProUltQQQ 84.35 -.73 PrUShQQQ rs 47.57 +.44 ProUltSP 0.35 43.09 -.09 PrUShtFn rs 76.02 +.24 ProSShFn 41.42 +.10 ProUShL20 21.79 -.21 ProShtEafe 54.00 -.20 ProUltSEM 39.00 +.60 ProUltSRE 14.98 +.07 ProUltSOG 32.79 +.44 ProUltSBM 21.18 +.65 ProUltRE 0.36 48.68 -.20 ProUltFin 0.05 42.28 -.21 PrUPShQQQ 21.91 +.28 ProUPShD30 35.37 -.14 PrUPShR2K 22.17 +1.05 ProUltO&G 0.16 40.73 -.57 ProUBasM 0.01 35.53 -1.19 PrUPR2K s 45.61 -2.25 ProShtR2K 33.64 +.53 PrUltPQQQ s 73.74 -1.06 ProUltR2K 0.01 31.51 -1.02 ProSht20Tr 33.97 -.16 ProUSSP500 17.47 +.04 PrUltSP500 s 0.05 55.49 -.16 ProSUltGold 108.92 +3.07 ProUSSlv rs 12.42 -.11 PrUltCrde rs 32.78 +.21 PrUShCrde rs 56.01 -.46 ProUltSGld 15.82 -.46 ProSUltSilv 205.22 +.72 ProUltShYen 13.51 -.06 ProUShEuro 18.55 +.04 ProctGam 2.10 64.08 +.27 ProgrssEn 2.48 51.16 +.42 ProgrsSft s 19.25 -.44 ProgsvCp 1.40 18.00 +.02 ProgWaste 0.50 21.69 -.54 ProUSR2K rs 51.92 +1.65 PrUShEu rs 58.25 -1.07 ProspctCap 1.22 8.65 -.03 ProspBcsh 0.70 34.57 -.77 ProtLife 0.64 16.39 -.35 ProvEn g 0.54 8.67 +.07 Prudentl 1.15 48.98 -.58 PSEG 1.37 34.81 +.47 PubStrg 3.80 120.65 +.12 PulseElec 0.10 2.97 -.23 PulteGrp 4.51 +.13 PPrIT 0.52 5.86 +.05

Q-R-S-T QEP Res 0.08 33.12 +.23 QIAGEN 14.15 -.03 Qihoo360 n 18.38 -1.53 QlikTech 22.32 -1.62

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11.39 -.12 0.80 25.63 -.37 1.04 28.74 +.18 1.73 33.02 +.24 30.88 -1.04 5.97 +.17 5.61 1.87 -.08 6.95 +.04 1.90 -.04 7.99 -.10 1.15 -.05 0.06 13.72 -.31 70.18 -2.68 33.02 +.15 0.57 16.68 -.15 19.81 -.09 0.28 9.35 -.20 76.53 -2.06 1.68 37.60 +.40 1.21 31.07 +.17 1.21 31.20 +.24 1.90 88.38 -1.25 16.36 -.14 45.03 -.78 1.20 20.75 -.16 20.77 +.01 0.19 1.93 38.32 -.21 0.40 5.53 -.03 2.08 66.21 +.41 17.87 -.47 0.50 24.09 +.20 9.51 -.16 33.43 +.14 0.20 26.36 -.94 0.52 29.30 +.05 1.92 76.01 +.46 42.19 -.64 0.65 49.83 -.12 10.73 -.19 55.30 -3.06 0.20 36.71 -.53 0.42 22.11 -.31 1.11 -.07 1.80 -.06 3.10 -.11 .97 -.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Madoff

Texas, who leads the oversight and investigations subcommittee of the financial services committee, said on Monday that the hearing “will examine whether there need to be process improvements at the commission to vet conflicts of interest in a way that gives the public confidence. The Becker matter raises serious questions about the decision making by senior management at the SEC” On Tuesday, Schapiro issued a statement of support for Becker, saying, “I do want to state that I’ve known David for many years to be a talented, highly skilled lawyer and a dedicated civil servant who served under three chairmen.” She said that, as the report recommended, the commission would retake a critical vote that established its position in the continuing battle over how Madoff victims will be compensated. William Lenox, the ethics officer who approved Becker’s participation in the Madoff matters, left the SEC this year. When asked about the report, the lawyer representing Lenox, Harvey Pitt, a former SEC commissioner, said via e-mail that based on the inspector general’s questions, “the result was a foregone conclusion.” According to the report, Lenox indicated to Kotz that he did not keep records of his rulings on employees’ ethics questions because of the confidential nature of the information that was disclosed to him. Kotz was particularly critical that Lenox’s boss at the commission was Becker. The year that Lenox permitted Becker to work on matters related to the Madoff situation, Becker wrote Lenox’s performance review, saying, “The performance of the ethics office has been superb,” and, “The quality of the ethics advice is very high,” the report said. In his conclusion of the report, Kotz recommended that the SEC change its reporting lines so that the ethics officer reports directly to the chairman. Schapiro said in her statement on Tuesday that the commission would carry out Kotz’s recommendations.

“(The hearing) will examine whether there need to be process improvements at the commission to vet conflicts of interest in a way that gives the public confidence. The Becker matter raises serious questions about the decision making by senior management at the SEC”

Continued from B1 It says Schapiro agreed with a decision to keep Becker from testifying before Congress, where he would have disclosed his financial interest in the Madoff account. Kotz’s inquiry also produced evidence that at least one SEC employee had been barred from working on Madoff-related matters because of a conflict, suggesting there was a double standard at the agency.

— Rep. Randy Neugebauer, R-Texas

mous Ponzi scheme for more than a decade, costing investors more than $20 billion in actual losses. He is now serving a 150-year sentence in a prison in North Carolina. Becker’s lawyer, William Baker III, said in a statement that the report confirmed Becker had notified seven senior SEC officials about his late mother’s Madoff account, including Schapiro and the agency’s designated ethics officer. “The inspector general concluded that ‘none of these individuals recognized a conflict or took any action to suggest that Becker consider recusing himself from the Madoff liquidation,’” wrote Baker, a lawyer at Latham & Watkins who spent 15 years as associate director of enforcement at the SEC, working alongside Becker at times. He said the report contained “a number of critical factual and legal errors,” but declined to enumerate them. Among the actions taken by Becker that were cited in the report were his efforts to influence the deliberations concerning how Madoff victims would be compensated, which could have had a direct impact on his financial standing. The report cited testimony from a witness who said that by early 2009, Schapiro indicated that most of the SEC commissioners had agreed on a method that would give investors a claim to only the money they had put into their Madoff accounts. This might have meant the Beckers would be able to keep only around $500,000 of the $2 million withdrawn when the account was closed, Kotz’s report said. But after Becker rejoined the SEC in February 2009, he argued for a reversal of this decision, the report says, at first pushing for victims to be compensated in part based on the final balance listed in their account. That position was supported by Annette

Another blow The findings are another black eye for an agency that has tried to be more aggressive in recent years after failing to uncover the Madoff fraud. More recently, the SEC has been criticized for routine destruction of some enforcement documents that might have been useful in later investigations. The agency has also been criticized for its slow pace in writing new financial regulations mandated by the Dodd-Frank law and for the dearth of cases brought against individuals at major financial companies that were involved in the mortgage crisis. Federal conflict of interest law requires government employees to be disqualified from participating in a matter “if it would have a direct and predictable effect on the employee’s own financial interests.” Nevertheless, Becker “participated personally and substantially in particular matters in which he had a personal financial interest,” Kotz wrote in his report. Though the referral was made to the Justice Department’s criminal division, it could be handled as a civil matter. A Justice Department spokeswoman declined to comment, other than confirming the referral.

Conflict of interest Becker’s tie to the Madoff situation came from a Madoff account held by his mother, who died in 2004. Her three sons inherited the account and closed it shortly thereafter, with a $1.5 million profit, based on Madoff’s fraud. Madoff carried out an enor-

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 21, 2011 B5

Nazareth, a former SEC commissioner who is representing some Madoff victims, according to the report. In the end, Becker supported a compromise position that victims should be able to keep some of the gains their investments had generated, since the investment might have grown over time even in a low-interest account. The Becker family stood to benefit from this approach by $138,500, according to Kotz’s calculations. The SEC approved that compensation plan backed by Becker in the fall of 2009, though final payouts and clawbacks from those who gained in the scheme are being determined in the court system. But none of the commissioners except Schapiro knew of Becker’s ties to the Madoff account, the report said. As a result, Kotz has recommended that the commission take another vote on the Madoff compensation matter “in a process free from any possible bias or taint.” One commissioner, Luis A. Aguilar, told the inspector general that it was “incredibly surprising and incredibly disappointing” that the conflict had not been shared with the commissioners.

‘Serious questions’ Becker’s financial interest came to light this year after he and his brothers were sued by the Madoff trustee, who is suing many Madoff clients to redistribute money. The trustee, Irving Picard, is seeking to recover about $1.5 million of the roughly $2 million the Beckers received from the account. Two House subcommittees have called a hearing for Thursday about the incident with Becker. He is expected to testify alongside Schapiro and Kotz, the inspector general who issued the report. Rep. Randy Neugebauer, R-

Jobless Continued from B1 Trade, transportation and utilities led the August list of private-sector employers laying off workers in Deschutes County with a one-month loss of 120 jobs, followed by retail trade with 110 and health care and private education services with 80 layoffs, Eagan said. “For these businesses to be laying off people in August is very unusual,” she said. “If we continue to see layoffs of 100 people a month in retail, that will be concerning.” Eagan attributed the county’s health care employment decline partly to recent layoffs announced by the St. Charles Health System. Private-sector job losses in Crook County were led by a decline of 30 jobs in manufacturing, followed by losses of 10 jobs each in wood products manufacturing, transportation, warehousing and utilities, professional and business services, and health care and private education, according to the report. In Jefferson County, manufacturing and wood products manufacturing each lost 20 jobs during the month. Trade, transportation and utilities, retail trade, and financial services each lost 10 jobs, according to the report. In addition to the one-month job losses reported from July to August in all three counties, Eagan said all three counties reported a decline in August 2011 job numbers compared to August 2010, including declines of 410 jobs in Deschutes County, 240 jobs in Crook County and 210 in Jefferson County. Eagan said the year-overyear declines in unemployment rates contrast with the relatively large job losses reported, which she said may indicate that a number of people who are still listed as residents of Central Oregon may have gone to work outside the area. “With the jobs survey and the unemployment survey heading in different directions, it indi-

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cates people may have had to find jobs someplace else, but can’t sell their house (in Central Oregon),” Eagan said. Government sector employment also declined in all three counties from July to August. She said that trend is expected to continue into September, when more staff reductions at area schools are expected to show up in employment reports. From July to August, the public sector lost 190 jobs in Deschutes County, 20 jobs in Crook County and 50 jobs in Jefferson County, according to the report. Eagan said much of the Deschutes and Crook county government job losses in August reflect a combination of positions eliminated due to budget cuts, as well as early layoffs in seasonal summer employment. However, Eagan said these seasonal job losses are expected to be followed by reductions in teachers and other school staff in September, when more positions eliminated due to budget cuts hit the employment report. It’s a different story in Jefferson County, where Eagan said most of the August job losses were in tribal employment for the Warm Springs Indian Reservation. A handful of employment sectors in the region posted job gains in August. For Crook County, the gains included 20 jobs in other services, such as tattoo parlors, hair salons, auto repair and nonprofit organizations, and 10 jobs in construction, which Eagan said most likely stemmed from expansion at the Facebook Data Center in Prineville. Deschutes County gained 20 jobs in mining, logging and construction and 10 in federal government; and in Jefferson County, leisure and hospitality gained 10 jobs. All other employment sectors in the August report either held even or lost jobs, Eagan said.

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... 1.10 .04 .36 1.68 ... 1.00f .88 .96 ... .24 .48 .22 .84f .12 .46f ... ... .65 ... .64

7 14 ... 9 13 10 9 23 27 14 21 5 ... 10 6 12 13 ... 15 17 10

57.93 -1.22 +2.2 24.65 +.21 +9.5 6.90 -.09 -48.3 14.31 -.32 -8.0 63.56 -.59 -2.6 7.12 -.38 -15.7 34.23 -.86 -27.6 51.81 -.67 -14.1 85.07 +.04 +17.8 5.68 +.11 -23.1 27.13 -.30 -8.8 22.47 -.44 -46.6 8.55 -.09 -30.3 22.20 +.27 +5.6 6.34 +.02 -28.4 22.41 +.03 +.2 5.58 +.17 -7.9 5.82 -.18 -38.5 20.35 -.20 +.4 9.92 -.55 -17.3 26.98 -.23 -3.3

Name

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB rs Weyerh

1.24 .92 1.74 ... .72f ... 1.68 .12 .58 .07 1.46 .86f .52 ... .28f .50 .24 .48 ... .60

20 15 18 9 19 ... 34 23 10 11 16 8 27 5 22 12 17 10 15 4

89.46 -.74 +4.7 47.49 -.49 +12.1 43.74 -.21 -5.9 5.27 -.14 -70.2 37.16 -.49 -35.2 2.02 -.02 -2.4 36.72 +.07 -1.9 170.84 +.05 +22.7 17.12 -.40 -23.9 40.00 -1.50 -39.7 74.23 -.44 -11.4 27.51 -.08 -39.1 41.08 -.08 +27.9 5.57 -.15 -52.4 9.35 -.20 -23.2 24.09 +.20 -10.7 14.32 -.22 -15.4 24.67 +.34 -20.4 14.14 -.15 +.3 17.51 ... -7.5

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1800.00 $1806.60 $40.081

Market recap

Pvs Day $1775.00 $1776.40 $39.110

Prime rate Time period

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

S&P500ETF BkofAm iShR2K SPDR Fncl GenElec

1985491 1332139 577813 545677 541734

Last Chg 120.17 6.90 69.15 12.52 16.04

-.14 -.09 -1.09 -.04 -.14

Gainers ($2 or more) Name MLFact7-12 Interpublic MagHRes RBSct prT ChinaDEd

Last

Chg %Chg

9.83 +1.13 +13.0 8.13 +.62 +8.3 4.72 +.35 +8.0 13.00 +.95 +7.9 2.77 +.20 +7.8

Losers ($2 or more) Name Molycorp Molycp pfA TrinaSolar Suntech Newcastle

Last

3.25 3.25 3.25

Vol (00)

NthgtM g NwGold g GoldStr g NovaGld g RareEle g

Last Chg

57889 3.88 +.20 51683 13.73 +.47 47284 2.28 +.12 40826 8.18 +.30 27467 7.13 -.86

UQM Tech FieldPnt HelixBio g Minefnd g GoldenMin

Last

Quepasa RareEle g AvalRare n QuestRM g VirnetX

1,103 1,920 105 3,128 48 81

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last

Last Chg 22.20 56.36 16.53 26.98 28.35

+.27 -.25 +.02 -.23 -.67

Name

Last

TransceptP KonaGrill h CumMed Trimeris h ChiValve

7.01 +1.38 +24.5 6.46 +1.20 +22.8 2.98 +.48 +19.2 2.32 +.37 +19.0 2.48 +.37 +17.5

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

4.21 -.56 -11.7 7.13 -.86 -10.8 3.45 -.36 -9.4 3.42 -.32 -8.6 18.99 -1.66 -8.0

Name

Last

Accuray Sina H&E Eq FstSecur rs Travelzoo

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

698553 575613 470918 470666 461977

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

2.24 +.26 +13.1 2.85 +.32 +12.8 2.19 +.15 +7.4 18.45 +1.27 +7.4 12.13 +.74 +6.5

Name

-21.8 -17.8 -15.4 -14.6 -13.3

Vol (00)

Intel PwShs QQQ Cisco Microsoft Oracle

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

41.45 -11.56 83.74 -18.16 8.04 -1.46 3.05 -.52 4.90 -.75

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Diary

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

NYSE

Indexes

Chg %Chg

4.12 -.79 92.76 -16.59 7.78 -1.34 2.65 -.42 28.20 -4.34

-16.1 -15.2 -14.7 -13.7 -13.3

Diary 208 242 44 494 5 20

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

708 1,820 118 2,646 35 106

12,876.00 10,604.07 Dow Jones Industrials 5,627.85 4,205.13 Dow Jones Transportation 442.01 381.99 Dow Jones Utilities 8,718.25 6,839.00 NYSE Composite 2,490.51 1,984.93 Amex Index 2,887.75 2,316.11 Nasdaq Composite 1,370.58 1,101.54 S&P 500 14,562.01 11,570.57 Wilshire 5000 868.57 639.85 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

11,408.66 4,519.22 443.51 7,217.11 2,218.90 2,590.24 1,202.09 12,619.90 689.95

+7.65 -67.23 +5.93 -17.52 +18.47 -22.59 -2.00 -54.33 -12.28

YTD %Chg %Chg +.07 -1.47 +1.36 -.24 +.84 -.86 -.17 -.43 -1.75

52-wk %Chg

-1.46 -11.51 +9.51 -9.38 +.48 -2.36 -4.42 -5.54 -11.96

+6.02 +.18 +12.24 -.40 +10.68 +10.25 +5.47 +5.50 +3.80

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Tuesday.

Key currency exchange rates Tuesday compared with late Monday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

% Change

279.54 2,132.73 2,984.05 5,363.71 5,571.68 19,014.80 34,337.97 14,356.13 3,290.62 8,721.24 1,837.97 2,780.84 4,124.80 4,987.21

+1.79 s +1.52 s +1.50 s +1.98 s +2.88 s +.51 s -2.11 t +1.91 s +.07 s -1.61 t +.94 s +.86 s -.94 t +1.88 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

1.0278 1.5732 1.0089 .002042 .1566 1.3688 .1284 .013093 .075947 .0319 .000878 .1511 1.1250 .0334

1.0182 1.5691 1.0091 .002079 .1565 1.3671 .1283 .013073 .075838 .0320 .000903 .1493 1.1331 .0336

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 16.90 -0.01 -8.8 Amer Century Inv: EqInc x 6.86 -0.04 -3.1 GrowthI 25.03 -0.13 -3.1 Ultra 22.65 -0.19 American Funds A: AmcpA p 18.18 -0.05 -3.1 AMutlA p 24.49 +0.03 -1.5 BalA p 17.72 -0.04 +0.5 BondA p 12.57 +5.6 CapIBA p 48.07 +0.19 -1.0 CapWGA p 31.64 +0.09 -9.6 CapWA p 21.02 -0.01 +4.7 EupacA p 35.95 +0.02 -13.1 FdInvA p 34.27 -0.10 -5.7 GovtA p 14.63 +0.01 +6.6 GwthA p 28.76 -0.12 -5.5 HI TrA p 10.71 +0.1 IncoA p 16.12 +0.02 +0.3 IntBdA p 13.68 +0.01 +3.5 ICAA p 25.99 -0.03 -6.4 NEcoA p 23.80 -0.16 -6.0 N PerA p 26.37 +0.03 -7.9 NwWrldA 47.98 -0.09 -12.1 SmCpA p 33.97 -0.31 -12.6 TxExA p 12.36 +0.01 +7.6 WshA p 27.01 +0.4 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 25.14 -0.06 -16.6 IntEqII I r 10.44 -0.01 -16.2 Artisan Funds: Intl 19.72 -9.1 IntlVal r 23.95 -0.02 -11.7 MidCap 34.16 -0.31 +1.6 MidCapVal 19.86 -0.13 -1.1 Baron Funds: Growth 49.49 -0.50 -3.4 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.23 -0.01 +6.5 DivMu 14.70 +5.4 TxMgdIntl 13.07 +0.05 -16.9 BlackRock A:

EqtyDiv 17.20 +0.01 GlAlA r 18.74 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.47 +0.01 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 17.24 +0.01 GlbAlloc r 18.83 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 50.26 -0.73 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 58.77 -0.07 Columbia Class A: DivEqInc 9.14 -0.02 TxEA p 13.45 +0.01 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 27.80 -0.36 AcornIntZ 36.08 -0.21 LgCapGr 12.65 -0.12 ValRestr 43.94 -0.42 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.04 +0.04 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 9.48 -0.01 USCorEq1 10.23 -0.07 USCorEq2 10.00 -0.09 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 31.28 -0.02 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 31.67 -0.01 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.40 -0.01 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 18.21 -0.09 EmMktV 28.32 -0.15 IntSmVa 14.49 -0.09 LargeCo 9.48 -0.01 USLgVa 18.30 -0.10 US Small 19.04 -0.36 US SmVa 21.83 -0.46 IntlSmCo 14.93 -0.07 Fixd 10.36 IntVa 14.92 +0.02 Glb5FxInc 11.34 2YGlFxd 10.24 Dodge&Cox:

-1.0 -2.8 -3.2 -0.8 -2.6 -5.8 +1.3 -8.9 +9.0 -6.7 -9.6 +1.9 -12.6 -3.2 -13.9 -6.1 -8.0 -8.9 -8.7 +5.3 -16.8 -20.7 -14.5 -3.0 -8.1 -10.5 -14.4 -11.6 +0.7 -16.7 +5.4 +1.0

Balanced 65.78 -0.21 Income 13.50 IntlStk 29.72 -0.01 Stock 97.56 -0.43 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.30 Dreyfus: Aprec 38.78 +0.01 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 16.42 -0.01 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 8.69 +0.01 GblMacAbR 10.00 LgCapVal 16.47 FMI Funds: LgCap p 15.08 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.84 FPACres 26.06 -0.03 Fairholme 26.16 -0.09 Federated Instl: TotRetBd 11.42 +0.01 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 19.72 -0.03 StrInA 12.45 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 19.94 -0.03 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.38 -0.01 FF2015 11.16 -0.01 FF2015K 12.39 -0.01 FF2020 13.43 -0.01 FF2020K 12.70 -0.01 FF2025 11.07 -0.01 FF2025K 12.71 -0.02 FF2030 13.15 -0.02 FF2030K 12.82 -0.02 FF2035 10.80 -0.02 FF2040 7.53 -0.01 FF2040K 12.84 -0.02 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 11.81 -0.02 AMgr50 14.99 -0.02 AMgr20 r 12.84 -0.01 Balanc 18.10 -0.01

-5.3 +4.2 -16.8 -8.7 +9.0 +1.5 -9.0 -0.2 +0.3 -8.8 -3.4 +2.0 -1.9 -26.5 +5.6 -1.0 +3.9 -0.8 -1.2 -1.2 -1.2 -2.2 -2.2 -3.5 -3.5 -4.1 -4.0 -5.5 -5.6 -5.6 -4.5 -2.0 +1.6 +0.1

BalancedK BlueChGr Canada CapAp CpInc r Contra ContraK DisEq DivIntl DivrsIntK r DivGth Eq Inc EQII Fidel FltRateHi r GNMA GovtInc GroCo GroInc GrowthCoK HighInc r Indepn IntBd IntmMu IntlDisc InvGrBd InvGB LgCapVal LowP r LowPriK r Magelln MidCap MuniInc NwMkt r OTC 100Index Puritn SCmdtyStrt SrsIntGrw SrsIntVal SrInvGrdF STBF StratInc StrReRt r

18.10 43.35 53.77 24.49 8.88 67.23 67.26 20.91 26.59 26.59 25.37 39.37 16.23 31.34 9.53 11.92 10.85 84.58 17.22 84.62 8.59 22.62 10.92 10.37 28.66 11.92 7.72 10.24 34.46 34.44 63.83 26.36 12.88 15.84 55.77 8.47 17.60 9.89 10.09 8.30 11.92 8.53 11.14 9.64

-0.01 -0.30 +0.13 -0.10 -0.02 -0.08 -0.08 -0.08 +0.14 +0.13 -0.17 -0.01 -0.05 +0.02 -0.01 -0.82 +0.02 -0.81 +0.02 -0.29 +0.01 +0.08 +0.01 +0.01 -0.04 -0.27 -0.27 -0.29 -0.25 +0.01 +0.03 -0.48 -0.01 -0.01 +0.07 +0.04 +0.01

+0.2 -0.7 -7.5 -3.4 -2.0 -0.6 -0.5 -7.2 -11.8 -11.7 -10.5 -10.3 -10.4 -2.3 -0.7 +7.1 +6.9 +1.7 -5.2 +1.8 +0.4 -7.1 +5.8 +6.2 -13.3 +6.7 +6.9 -10.7 -4.0 -3.9 -10.8 -3.9 +8.2 +5.2 +1.5 -3.1 -0.9 -5.0 -10.6 -16.5 +6.8 +1.9 +4.0 +2.0

TotalBd 11.09 +0.01 USBI 11.83 +0.01 Value 61.11 -0.33 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 54.01 +1.55 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 34.56 -0.51 500IdxInv 42.74 -0.07 IntlInxInv 30.60 +0.17 TotMktInv 34.86 -0.15 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 42.74 -0.07 TotMktAd r 34.87 -0.14 First Eagle: GlblA 45.66 +0.06 OverseasA 21.78 +0.02 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.03 +0.01 FoundAl p 9.69 +0.03 HYTFA p 10.14 +0.01 IncomA p 2.06 +0.01 USGovA p 6.95 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 13.07 -0.02 IncmeAd 2.05 +0.01 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.08 +0.01 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 19.03 +0.01 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.01 +0.04 GlBd A p 13.11 -0.02 GrwthA p 16.00 +0.06 WorldA p 13.59 +0.07 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.14 -0.01 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 37.92 -0.10 GMO Trust III: Quality 20.92 +0.05 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 11.77 -0.04 Quality 20.93 +0.05 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 6.87

+6.1 +6.7 -11.0 +5.7 -8.3 -3.1 -12.7 -4.0 -3.0 -4.0 -1.5 -3.9 +9.5 -6.0 +9.3 -1.0 +5.9 -0.2 -0.9 -1.4 -7.0 -13.9 -0.3 -10.1 -8.4 -0.6 -5.7 +5.1 -13.0 +5.2 -0.5

MidCapV 32.66 -0.26 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.33 -0.01 CapApInst 37.64 -0.21 IntlInv t 51.83 +0.31 Intl r 52.44 +0.31 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 29.13 -0.19 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 29.19 -0.19 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 37.01 -0.24 Div&Gr 18.44 +0.02 TotRetBd 11.53 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.72 -0.04 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r 16.22 -0.01 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 15.73 -0.05 CmstkA 14.52 -0.03 EqIncA 8.06 GrIncA p 17.66 +0.01 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 22.75 -0.02 AssetStA p 23.53 -0.02 AssetStrI r 23.76 -0.02 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.91 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.90 HighYld 7.76 +0.01 ShtDurBd 11.03 USLCCrPls 19.30 -0.06 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 36.75 -0.34 PrkMCVal T 21.24 -0.09 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 12.34 -0.02 LSGrwth 12.03 -0.04 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 18.60 -0.01 Longleaf Partners: Partners 26.77 -0.22 Loomis Sayles:

-9.7 +3.2 +2.5 -13.6 -13.4 -15.9 -15.7 -12.6 -5.4 +6.0 +3.5 -3.0 -2.7 -6.7 -4.9 -7.3 -4.1 -3.6 -3.5 +6.3 +6.5 -0.1 +1.6 -6.6 -27.4 -5.9 -3.6 -6.3 -14.2 -5.3

LSBondI x 14.29 -0.08 StrInc C x 14.77 -0.07 LSBondR x 14.24 -0.07 StrIncA x 14.69 -0.07 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.39 -0.02 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.05 -0.05 BdDebA p 7.57 +0.01 ShDurIncA p 4.55 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.57 Lord Abbett F: ShtDurInco 4.54 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.68 -0.02 ValueA 21.26 -0.03 MFS Funds I: ValueI 21.37 -0.02 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.35 +0.01 MergerFd 15.72 -0.01 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.53 -0.01 TotRtBdI 10.53 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 36.79 -0.63 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 26.31 +0.14 GlbDiscZ 26.69 +0.15 SharesZ 19.22 +0.02 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 45.62 -0.46 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 6.98 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 26.76 -0.06 Intl I r 16.01 +0.02 Oakmark 39.85 -0.03 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.24 GlbSMdCap 13.78 -0.10 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 31.04 -0.11 GlobA p 54.93 +0.03

+4.1 +2.7 +3.9 +3.3 +5.7 -12.8 +1.2 +2.1 +1.3 +1.9 -1.5 -6.1 -6.0 -14.1 -0.4 +4.7 +4.9 -1.5 -7.6 -7.4 -6.7 -0.7 +0.7 -3.5 -17.5 -3.5 -4.9 -9.2 -14.9 -9.0

GblStrIncA 4.15 +1.1 IntBdA p 6.49 -0.01 +1.6 MnStFdA 30.96 -0.01 -4.4 RisingDivA 15.08 -0.02 -2.2 S&MdCpVl 29.12 -0.30 -9.1 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 13.64 -0.02 -2.9 S&MdCpVl 24.82 -0.27 -9.7 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 13.59 -0.02 -2.8 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 6.91 +0.01 +10.0 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 30.77 -0.10 -14.7 IntlBdY 6.48 -0.02 +1.7 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.97 +3.3 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.57 +0.01 +2.9 AllAsset 11.97 +0.02 +2.2 ComodRR 8.32 +0.04 +1.8 DivInc 11.30 +2.8 EmgMkCur 10.30 -0.02 -1.6 HiYld 8.87 +0.5 InvGrCp 10.64 +0.01 +5.4 LowDu 10.39 +1.6 RealRtnI 12.16 +0.03 +10.3 ShortT 9.81 +0.4 TotRt 10.97 +3.5 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.39 +1.3 RealRtA p 12.16 +0.03 +10.0 TotRtA 10.97 +3.2 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.97 +2.6 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.97 +3.3 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.97 +3.4 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 48.66 +0.04 +6.2 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 37.64 NA Price Funds: BlChip 38.66 -0.15 +1.4

CapApp 19.82 EmMktS 29.74 EqInc 21.93 EqIndex 32.52 Growth 31.80 HlthSci 32.41 HiYield 6.42 IntlBond 10.24 Intl G&I 11.55 IntlStk 12.57 MidCap 56.13 MCapVal 21.92 N Asia 17.22 New Era 45.69 N Horiz 33.39 N Inc 9.72 R2010 15.11 R2015 11.60 R2020 15.89 R2025 11.55 R2030 16.45 R2035 11.58 R2040 16.45 ShtBd 4.84 SmCpStk 31.50 SmCapVal 32.76 SpecIn 12.27 Value 21.65 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 12.07 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.57 PremierI r 19.51 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 35.83 S&P Sel 18.97 Scout Funds: Intl 27.86 Selected Funds: AmShD 37.91 Sequoia 135.38 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 17.32 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 43.24

-0.03 -0.22 -0.02 -0.05 -0.18 +0.18 -0.01 -0.02 -0.03 -0.41 -0.14 -0.12 -0.50 -0.44 -0.02 -0.03 -0.05 -0.04 -0.06 -0.05 -0.06 -0.51 -0.52 -0.01 -0.04

-2.4 -15.7 -6.7 -3.2 -1.1 +7.0 -0.2 +4.8 -13.2 -11.7 -4.1 -7.5 -10.2 -12.4 -0.3 +5.0 -1.5 -2.4 -3.3 -4.1 -4.8 -5.3 -5.6 +1.5 -8.5 -9.3 +2.2 -7.2

-0.05 -10.1 -0.17 -9.3 -0.15 -4.1 -0.11 -3.6 -0.04 -3.1 +0.09 -13.5 -8.5 -0.08 +4.7 +0.17 -13.3 -0.09 -16.5

Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 24.37 IntValue I 24.92 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 21.80 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 21.28 CAITAdm 11.22 CpOpAdl 69.49 EMAdmr r 33.45 Energy 114.33 ExtdAdm 37.89 500Adml 111.26 GNMA Ad 11.19 GrwAdm 31.12 HlthCr 55.19 HiYldCp 5.60 InfProAd 27.97 ITBdAdml 11.93 ITsryAdml 12.17 IntGrAdm 54.11 ITAdml 13.86 ITGrAdm 10.15 LtdTrAd 11.16 LTGrAdml 10.20 LT Adml 11.19 MCpAdml 87.15 MuHYAdm 10.57 PrmCap r 64.42 ReitAdm r 79.15 STsyAdml 10.87 STBdAdml 10.71 ShtTrAd 15.94 STIGrAd 10.71 SmCAdm 31.69 TtlBAdml 11.04 TStkAdm 30.08 WellslAdm 54.20 WelltnAdm 52.47 Windsor 41.28 WdsrIIAd 43.11 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 23.50 CapOpp 30.07

+0.20 -12.5 +0.20 -12.3 +0.29 -8.5 -0.05 +0.6 +7.7 -0.38 -9.5 -0.11 -16.1 -0.73 -5.5 -0.55 -8.2 -0.18 -3.0 -0.01 +6.7 -0.12 -0.9 +0.27 +7.7 +3.4 +0.08 +11.8 +0.01 +9.8 +9.2 +0.13 -12.0 +7.3 +6.7 +3.2 +0.03 +13.7 +0.01 +8.2 -0.82 -5.4 +0.01 +8.2 -0.33 -5.6 -0.10 +2.5 +2.4 +3.1 +1.5 +1.9 -0.51 -8.9 +6.6 -0.12 -3.9 +0.08 +5.0 +0.09 -0.9 -0.09 -8.8 +0.03 -4.4 -0.05 -3.3 -0.17 -9.5

DivdGro 14.44 Energy 60.87 EqInc 20.30 Explr 68.00 GNMA 11.19 GlobEq 16.16 HYCorp 5.60 HlthCre 130.75 InflaPro 14.24 IntlGr 17.00 IntlVal 27.31 ITIGrade 10.15 LifeCon 16.15 LifeGro 20.86 LifeMod 19.01 LTIGrade 10.20 Morg 17.44 MuInt 13.86 PrecMtls r 25.63 PrmcpCor 13.12 Prmcp r 62.05 SelValu r 17.89 STAR 18.56 STIGrade 10.71 StratEq 17.75 TgtRetInc 11.51 TgRe2010 22.56 TgtRe2015 12.32 TgRe2020 21.66 TgtRe2025 12.23 TgRe2030 20.80 TgtRe2035 12.42 TgtRe2040 20.33 TgtRe2045 12.77 USGro 17.99 Wellsly 22.37 Welltn 30.38 Wndsr 12.23 WndsII 24.28 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntAdm r 22.82 TotIntlIP r 91.33 500 111.23 MidCap 19.18

+0.03 -0.39 +0.02 -1.09 -0.01 -0.04

+1.4 -5.5 +1.0 -6.7 +6.6 -9.5 +3.4 +0.63 +7.6 +0.04 +11.7 +0.05 -12.1 +0.06 -15.1 +6.6 -0.02 -0.3 -0.04 -4.8 -0.03 -2.1 +0.03 +13.6 -0.15 -3.3 +7.3 +0.43 -4.0 -0.07 -4.7 -0.32 -5.7 -0.06 -4.6 -0.02 -1.8 +1.8 -0.22 -3.1 -0.01 +3.3 -0.02 +1.1 -0.02 -0.8 -0.04 -2.0 -0.03 -3.1 -0.04 -4.1 -0.03 -5.1 -0.05 -5.4 -0.03 -5.4 -0.13 -1.4 +0.03 +4.9 +0.06 -1.0 -0.03 -8.9 +0.01 -4.4

SmCap

+0.02 +0.09 -0.18 -0.18

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-13.4 -13.4 -3.1 -5.6

31.63 -0.52 -9.0

SmlCpGth

20.43 -0.36 -6.8

SmlCpVl

14.22 -0.21 -11.2

STBnd

10.71

+3.0

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11.04

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TotlIntl

13.64 +0.01 -13.5

TotStk

30.06 -0.13 -4.0

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21.28 -0.05 +0.6 8.70 +0.04 -12.8 37.89 -0.55 -8.2

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81.18 +0.12 -13.5

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31.12 -0.12 -0.9

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11.39 +0.03 +11.8

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110.51 -0.18 -3.0

InsPl

110.52 -0.18 -3.0

InsTStPlus

27.21 -0.11 -3.9

MidCpIst

19.25 -0.18 -5.4

SCInst

31.69 -0.51 -8.9

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11.04

TSInst

30.08 -0.13 -3.9

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Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

91.91 -0.15 -3.0

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10.71

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11.04

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29.03 -0.12 -3.9

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11.09 -0.01 +5.5 16.96 -0.01 +2.5


B USI N ESS

B6 Wednesday, September 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M  BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603. RESILIENT AMERICA — PERSONAL AND COMMUNITY PREP: Hosted by U.S. Small Business Administration and Agility Recovery Solutions weekly webinars with steps on preparing for emergencies for National Preparedness Month. Advance registration encouraged; free; 11 a.m.-noon; www1.gotomeeting.com/ register/652630793. CUSTOMER SERVICE, GAINING AND RETAINING A STRONG MARKET: An Opportunity Knocks event with presenters Ben Perle, regional manager for the Oxford Hotel Group who will discuss remembering customers and making them feel special; Ali Cammelletti, client training specialist for Navis, who will discuss how to get your employees to implement and sustain a customer service environment and Teague Hatfield, owner of Footzone, who will discuss striving for a genuine, healthy culture where good people are empowered to do what is right for their customers. Registration required; $30 for Opportunity Knocks members; $45 for others; 11:30 a.m.1:30 p.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541-3184650, info@opp-knocks.org or www .eventbrite.com/event/1885986035/ eorg. SOCIAL SECURITY SEMINAR: A speaker from the Social Security Administration will give a general overview of Social Security followed by a question-and-answer session. Hosted by Miller Ferrari Wealth Management. RSVP by Sept. 19; free; 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; Greg’s Grill, 395 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541639-8055. RISK MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION SOCIAL: RSVP requested; $5; 4-7 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-389-8140 or jay.g.clark@chase.com. NETWORK OF ENTREPRENEURIAL WOMEN MONTHLY MEETING: Topic this month is “Speed networking: can you describe what you do in 60 seconds or less?”; free; 5-8 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-508-8136 or www.network women.org. UNDERSTANDING AND MANAGING CREDIT: Registration required; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541318-7506, ext. 109.

THURSDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. WHAT WORKS, A TIME-TESTED APPROACH TO INVESTING: Learn how to develop an investment plan, put the plan into action and know how to review and adjust the plan. Registration required; free; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@ schwab.com or www.schwab.com. BBG BEND BUSINESS GROUP: Weekly meeting. Guests please preregister with Matt Bassitt; free; 7:30 a.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541-323-7000. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF BEND: Business meeting. Registration required; free; noon; Boston’s, 61276 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 140; 541-382-9086. FACEBOOK AND TWITTER BASICS: Registration required; $39; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. HOW TO BUY A FRANCHISE: Registration required; free; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. LIVE CONTRACTOR EDUCATION COURSE: Enables contractors to obtain their construction contractor board license. Three-day course. Registration required; $275; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. PROTECT YOUR INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY: Learn about patents, copyrights, trademarks, and how to protect ideas and creations. Registration required; $39; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. VALUE OF A DOLLAR, TEACHING YOUR K-8 CHILD: Learn tools to teach your child money management skills. Call to register; free; 6 p.m.; Mid Oregon Credit Union, 1386 N.E. Cushing Drive, Bend; 541-382-1795. BUILDING A BETTER BEND LECTURE: Jeff Speck, a city planner and architectural designer will discuss “What Makes Commercial Centers Work: Getting Planning and Transportation Right.” The presentation will look at how

downtowns, main streets and commercial centers if designed poorly can thrive economically but not socially. Speck is the co-author of “Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream” and the “Smart Growth Manual,” is a contributing editor to Metropolis Magazine and is on the Sustainability Task Force of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security; $8; 7-9 p.m.; Bend Park & Recreation District Office, Community Room, 799 S.W. Columbia St.; 541-389-7275 or www.buildingabetterbend.org.

FRIDAY FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www.facebook.com/Zoomtax.

MONDAY BUILD A PROFESSIONAL WEBSITE FOR YOUR BUSINESS: Learn to use Wordpress to create a customized website. Monday evening course Sept. 26 through Oct. 31. Registration required; $149; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. MCITP, DESKTOP SUPPORT TECH CERTIFICATION PREP: Five Monday evening courses prepare participants for certification exam 70-685. Registration required; $289; 6-9 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

TUESDAY KNOW INTERNET SEARCHING: Reservations encouraged; free; 10:30 a.m.-noon; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-6177080. KNOW DIGITAL BOOKS: Reservations encouraged; free; 2-3:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7083. BEGINNING PHOTOSHOP: Twoevening class. Registration required; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. DESIGN A BUSINESS LOGO WITH ILLUSTRATOR: Two-evening class. Registration required; $79; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. DREAMWEAVER, BEGINNING: Three Tuesday evening classes. Registration required; $89; 6-9 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit .cocc.edu. A NEW BEGINNING ADOPTION AGENCY INFORMATIONAL SEMINAR: RSVP requested; free; 6:30 p.m.; Rosie Bareis Community Campus, 1010 N.W. 14th St., Bend; 541-889-0048 or admin@ adoptanewbeginning.org.

WEDNESDAY Sept. 28 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Abby’s Pizza, 1938 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. BUSINESS SUCCESS PROGRAM, PROMOTE YOUR BUSINESS FOR FREE, CRAFTING MEDIA RELEASES THAT GET THE ‘WRITE’ ATTENTION: Linden Gross, the author of “The Legacy Of Luna,” will lead an interactive session about when and how to write a media release. RSVPs required; $25 for Bend Chamber of Commerce members; $45 for others; 11 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-3823221 or www.bendchamber.org. SURVIVOR PANEL — REAL-WORLD LESSONS LEARNED: Hosted by the U.S. Small Business Administration and Agility Recovery Solutions weekly webinars with steps on preparing for emergencies for National Preparedness Month. Advance registration encouraged; free; 11 a.m.-noon; www1.gotomeeting.com/ register/660249057. BEND CHAMBER BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: Free; 5 p.m.; Precision Body & Paint, 61530 S. Highway 97; 541382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. NEIGHBORHOOD NIGHT: NorthWest Crossing businesses and restaurants will offer specials, entertainment and giveaways. Held the last Wednesday of each month; free; 5-8 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend.

BBG BEND BUSINESS GROUP: Weekly meeting. Guests please preregister with Matt Bassitt; free; 7:30 a.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541-323-7000. BEND WEBCAM 2011: Hosted by Pixelsilk and the Advertising Federation of Central Oregon, this two-day event at The Oxford Hotel and The Tower Theatre features workshops, breakout sessions and keynote addresses about search engine optimization, social media, design and branding as well as more creative and marketing Web topics. Register for one day, two days or specific sessions; $479 for two days; $249 for one day; $129 per session; discounts available; 8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave.; 541-385-1992 or www.bendwebcam.com. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@ schwab.com or www.schwab.com. CENTRO PRINT SOLUTIONS HOLIDAY PROMOTIONALS SHOWCASE: A showcase of ideas in apparel and promotional products. E-mail or call with questions and to register; free; 4-7 p.m.; Bend Park & Recreation District Office, 799 S.W. Columbia St.; 541-382-3534 or promotionals@ centroprintsolutions.com. ON-FARM LANDOWNER WORKSHOP: Workshop focusing on water quality, wildlife habitat, irrigation water management, pasture weed management and energy efficiency. RSVP to Spring Olson; free; 4-6:30 p.m.; Leaning Pine Ranch, 53656 Huntington Road, La Pine; 541-647-9604 or springalaska@ hotmail.com. GREEN DRINKS: Monthly networking event for environmental professionals and anyone interested in green things. Hosted by A Greener Clean; free; 5-7 p.m.; A Greener Clean, 210 S.E. Third St., Bend; 541-385-6908 ext. 11 or www.envirocenter.org.

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Marla Polenz at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

New labor pact will allow GM to hire more lower-paid workers By Bill Vlasic New York Times News Service

DETROIT — The new labor contract between General Motors and the United Automobile Workers union will accelerate the hiring of lower-paid, entrylevel workers at the company and bring jobs to the U.S. that were headed for Mexico. While the UAW achieved only modest economic gains for its 48,000 members at GM — longtime GM workers will receive no wage increases under the deal — the emphasis on adding jobs was the top concern for the union’s leadership. “What we were looking for was jobs, jobs, jobs, and that’s what we came away with,” Joe Ashton, a UAW vice president, said at a media briefing here Tuesday. The union estimates that GM will create or preserve 6,400 jobs over the next four years, mostly by hiring new, entry-level employees but also by retaining work in the U.S. that was going to move to Mexico. The impact will be felt in several communities that are home to GM facilities. The company agreed to reopen idled assembly operations at a plant in

BEND WEBCAM 2011: Hosted by Pixelsilk and the Advertising Federation of Central Oregon, this two-day event at The Oxford Hotel and The Tower Theatre features workshops, breakout sessions and keynote addresses about search engine optimization, social media, design, branding as well as more creative and marketing web topics. Register for one day, two days or specific sessions; $479 for two days; $249 for one day; $129 per session; discounts available; 7:30 a.m.-5:40 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave.; 541-385-1992 or www.bendwebcam.com/. ENTRELEADERSHIP TRAINING PROGRAM: Dave Ramsey’s daylong leadership training program teaches individuals, teams and businesses how to thrive in tough times. This workshop is a live simulcast with Ramsey from Dallas, Texas. Ramsey is a personal money management expert, author and host of a national radio program. Purchase tickets online at www.cocba.com or from any Mid-Oregon Credit Union location as well as Cornerstone Book and Gifts in Redmond; Life Song Christian Books in Prineville; Hearthside Books in Madras, and Eastmont Church and Westside Church Bookstore in Bend; $39; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 N.E. 27th St.; 541382-5496 or info@cocba.org.

Spring Hill, Tenn., add a shift of workers at a truck plant in Wentzville, Mo., and increase employment at an engine plant in Romulus, Mich. Overall, the union said GM would invest $2.5 billion in factories in this country over the life of the contract, which expires in

BANKRUPTCIES Chapter 7 Filed September 13

Janet Baker Abbott, 2910 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond Debra D. Light, 63065 Casey Place, Bend Jesse G. Mitchell and Melissa D. Mitchell, 2455 N.W. 12th St., Redmond Filed September 14

Richard A. Archer and Carol C. Archer, 61431 Yakwahtin Court, Bend Levi S. Strunk, 62740 Hamby Road, Bend Harold M. Blan Jr., 711 N.E. Court St., Prineville Jon B. Duncan and Jocelyn D. Duncan, 715 N.E. Mason Road, Bend Joseph P. Spencer, P.O. Box 8572, Bend Filed September 15

Glen D. Sallee and Wendy L. Sallee, 16483 Sprague Loop, La Pine Janice E. Harding, 1341 N.W. Davidson Way, Terrebonne Kristen Smith Ehlers, P.O. Box 5991, Bend Billy V. Burk, 4063 N.W.

Elliott Lane, Prineville Todd A. Forrester and Reatha R. Forrester, 651 N.W. Second St., Prineville Filed September 16

Silverio R. Duran and Rebecca A. Duran, 1720 N.W. Elm Court, Redmond Nancy R. Reynolds and Richard C. Reynolds, 635 N.W. Creeks Edge Court, Prineville Eric A. Smith and Tonia M. Smith, 2828 N.W. Coyner Ave., Redmond Filed September 19

Mark L. Ayres and Carrie A. Ayres, 61082 Springcrest Drive, Bend Adam J. Schneider, 21368 Pelican Drive, Bend Dorothy A. Adams, 24859 Elk Lane, Bend Gary L. Slater and Jennifer A. Slater, 16060 Wright Ave., La Pine Kathryn J. Carter, 1085 S.E. Second St., Prineville Ian J. Knight and Megan M. Knight, 1933 S.W. 35th Place, Redmond

BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125.

Shadow Brook Place, Bend Chapter 13 Filed September 13

Donald J. Nowell Sr. and Sandra J. Nowell, 21373 Oakview Drive, Bend Filed September 14

Carrie A. Tibbitts, 23045 Alfalfa Market Road, Bend Donald W. Collins and Linda K. Collins, 19130 Choctaw Road, Bend Lela M. Lupton, P.O. Box 7529, Bend Filed September 15

Michael J. Schlachter and Mary E. Schlachter, 840 S.W. 24th Court, Redmond Filed September 16

Norma A. Evans, 1676 N.W. Portland Ave., Bend Filed September 19

Michael A. Hall, 15525 Lacar Lane, La Pine Keith E. Ashcraft, 961 N.E. Hidden Valley Drive, Bend

Filed September 20

June A. Powell, 6215 S.W. Badger Road, Terrebonne Jennifer J. Hudson, 2342

SOLAR & RADIANT HEATING SYSTEMS 541-389-7365 CCB# 18669

www.bobcatsun.com

THE 2011

GREEN & SOLAR HOMES TOUR SATURDAY OCTOBER 1ST 9 am - 5 pm

Featuring Central Oregon homes packed with green and solar features Produced by the High Desert Branch of Cascadia

THURSDAY Sept. 29

2015. While some of the additional jobs will be taken by workers laid off during GM’s bankruptcy, the majority of the positions will be filled by new, entry-level workers, Ashton said. The union won better wages and benefits for lower-tier workers in the agreement as well.

NEWS OF RECORD

FRIDAY Sept. 30

Paul Sancya / The Associated Press

United Auto Workers President Bob King, right, speaks during a news conference in Detroit on Tuesday. Next to him is Vice President Joe Ashton. Union leaders from General Motors factories around the U.S. have endorsed a new four-year contract with the company.

For more information, go to www.greenandsolarhometour.com


L

Inside

C

LOCAL SCHOOLS Senior balances tough studies with roller derby, see Page C3. OREGON Escaped mental patient caught in Sandy, see Page C2. Democratic leader wants focus on small business, foreclosures, see Page C6.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2011

Bend dad Suspect in armed robbery still at large arrested after baby boy almost drowns

SUNRIVER

IN BRIEF Settlement attempt in Blaylock case fails An attempt at a negotiated settlement for a man accused of killing his wife failed Tuesday, meaning Steven Paul Blaylock’s trial will begin as scheduled Oct. 25. Blaylock, 47, is accused of murder and first-degree manslaughter in connection with the disappearance of his wife, Lori “Woody” Blaylock. Lori Blaylock was Steven last seen in Blaylock late October 2010, and was reported missing after she failed to show up at work at St. Charles Bend. Investigators have not located Lori Blaylock, though they have repeatedly searched an area along the North Santiam River where they believe her husband may have disposed of her body. Steven Blaylock was arrested in November and has been held at the Deschutes County jail ever since. He pleaded not guilty to both charges in March. Deschutes County Deputy District Attorney Kandy Gies declined to discuss specifics of Tuesday’s discussions with Blaylock’s attorneys. Blaylock could face life in prison if convicted.

By Rachael Rees The Bulletin

A man wearing a black hoodie and ski mask and armed with a handgun burst into a Sunriver home early Tuesday morning, demanding money and the keys to the homeowner’s car. He then fired a bullet into the ceil-

ing before leaving in the woman’s car, authorities said. The woman was not hurt. The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office said the unidentified man is still on the run. He is described as 5 feet 6 inches tall, with a stocky build. The incident at the home on Chief Pauline Drive happened at 7:30 p.m.

The vehicle was found on Fountainebleau Drive shortly after the robbery. “As the crow flies his tracks were probably a mile, but the (officers) covered three or four miles at least,” Sgt. Dan Bilyeu, said. “This guy did not walk a straight line; he wandered a bit out there.” See Robbery / C2

SPLASHING IN THE SEPTEMBER SUN

By Megan Kehoe The Bulletin

A Bend father was arrested on suspicion of child neglect after his unattended 13-month-old son nearly drowned in a bathtub, Bend Police said. James Dean Jones, 24, was arrested following the incident Friday morning at his apartment on Northeast “He went next Purcell Boulevard. door for what Police say Jones was giving his son a bath, would have then left the child un- been legitimate attended in the tub to reasons had he visit a neighbor. “He went next door not left child for what would have been legitimate rea- unattended in sons had he not left the bathtub.” a child unattended in the bathtub,” Lt. Paul — Lt. Paul Kansky, Bend Police Kansky said. The child was left in a bathtub seat equipped with suction cups to keep him above the water, but at some point, the infant tipped the seat over and became submerged. Police say the mother was in the apartment at the time, but was unaware that Jones had left the child alone. See Tub / C2

— Bulletin staff report

More local briefing, plus News of Record, on Page C2.

USFS TRAIL SYSTEM

Conservation group appeals Whychus plan

HOW TO SUBMIT Civic Calendar notices: • E-mail: news@bendbulletin.com • Please write “Civic Calendar” in the subject line and include a contact name and daytime phone number.

By Dylan J. Darling

Oregon wildfires

The Bulletin

Creating an official trail system along Whychus Creek near Sisters may create new problems for the area, argues a Bend nonprofit group appealing a U.S. Forest Service plan. “It’s just going to invite a lot more people in there,” said Paul Dewey, executive director and attorney for Central Oregon Landwatch. The group filed its appeal Monday. The U.S. Forest Service has until early next month to set up a meeting with the group and then until early November to respond to the appeal. Saying he’s been busy with the still-burning Shadow Lake Fire, Bill Anthony, Sisters District Ranger for the Deschutes National Forest, said Tuesday that he hadn’t had a chance to read the 19-page appeal. But he did defend the Forest Service’s plan. “We’ve taken a good, hard look at that area,” he said. See Appeal / C2

DOLLAR LAKE FIRE • Acres: 6,304 • Containment: 90 percent • Threatened structures: None • Cause: Lightning

SHADOW LAKE FIRE Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Makenzie Hoeft, 6, gets some last-days-of-summer playtime in the fountain at Centennial Park in Redmond on Tuesday afternoon. Daytime highs are expected to remain in the mid-80s through Saturday. For a five-day forecast, see Page C6.

RED CONE COMPLEX FIRE • Acres: 922 • Containment: None • Threatened structures: None • Cause: Lightning

By Duffie Taylor

UMPQUA COMPLEX FIRE • Acres: 1,019 • Containment: 95 percent • Threatened structures: None • Cause: Lightning Hood River

Dollar Lake Fire Mother Lode Fire

Pendleton

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

B St. C St.

Duffie Taylor can be reached at 541-383-0376 or dtaylor@bendbulletin.com

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Ashwood Rd.

k Madras Elementary

3 miles finished so far So far the city has about three miles of loop completed along the northeast side of Madras. Construction on the Fairgrounds Road segment is expected to begin in March and be finished by next summer. An Oregon Department of Transportation grant will pay for the bulk of the $556,000 project. The city recently increased its funding by 50 percent to cover unanticipated engineering services mandated by the grant, which brought its total contribution to about $100,000. Burril said plans for segments that connect the Madras Bike and Skatepark to the Willow Creek Canyon Trail and the Central Oregon Community College Madras branch to existing trails on the city’s northeast side are also under way.

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It also makes up a segment of a proposed six-mile pedestrian trail loop that’s outlined in the city’s 2004 Parks Master Plan, Madras City Planner Gus Burril said. It will run around the city and connect tributary trails that extend outside city limits, such

Ashwood Rd.

Grizzly Rd.

MILES

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Last week, the city of Madras put forward $50,000 in additional funds for a trail extension project that aims to provide more access for pedestrians on the city’s southwest side. The move is also part of a larger plan to create a trail network system that surrounds and connects the city. The walking and bicycling trail will run about a half-mile along Fairgrounds Road between U.S. Highway 97 and the Old Culver Highway, and connect to the Jefferson County Youth Fishing Pond on fairground property. The purpose of the segment is “to link neighborhoods to commercial retail zones and jobs centers, and provide trail access to the Jefferson County Youth Fishing Pond,” according to the city’s public works department.

Loucks Rd.

Existing trails Proposed trails Construction 2011-12

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Shadow Lake Fire

The Bulletin

as the seven-mile Willow Creek Canyon Trail leading west to Lake Simtustus. “It’s really all about connectivity and providing safe pedestrian access to communities in and around the city,” Burril said.

26

Construction planned for section of Madras trail system

Mc

Madras Mitchell Sisters Prineville John Day Bend La Pine

City of Madras invests $50K in citywide trail extensions

r Hwy .

• Acres: 2,171 • Containment: 10 percent • Threatened structures: 1 • Cause: Lightning

Culve

MOTHER LODE FIRE

Adams Dr.

• Acres: 10,000 • Containment: 40 percent • Threatened structures: None • Cause: Lightning

Kinkade Rd.

The following fires were burning in the mapped area below as of 9:04 a.m. Monday. For updates, go to www.nwccweb.us/information/ firemap.aspx.

Merritt Ln. 26 97

MILES

0

1/2

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin


C OV ER S T OR I ES

C2 Wednesday, September 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Escaped mental patient caught by Oregon State Police in Sandy

L B   Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Sawyers granted leave to travel to Mexico Tami and Kevin Sawyer, the Bend couple due to go to trial in federal court in December on charges of wire fraud and conspiracy to commit wire fraud, money laundering and bank fraud, have been granted permission to once again travel to Mexico. According to federal court records, Judge Thomas Coffin on Monday granted the Sawyers permission to leave the country beginning today and returning Oct. 4. It’s the third time since May that one or both Sawyers have

The Associated Press been allowed to travel to Mexico, where they own property. In July, Tami Sawyer was arraigned on charges of felony first-degree criminal mistreatment and aggravated theft. She is due to enter a plea in that case on Oct. 17.

Awbrey Butte man faces drug charges A Bend man was arrested at his Awbrey Butte-area residence in Bend and now faces drug charges, authorities said. Steven Depatie, 58, was arrested on suspicion of possession and delivery of cocaine and tampering with physical evidence at his

residence on Northwest Colonial Drive on Friday. Depatie was the subject of a nearly three-month investigation by the Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team. During the arrest, detectives discovered a small amount of cocaine and marijuana, four firearms, scales and packaging materials, according to authorities. Additional evidence indicates Depatie destroyed narcotics while detectives were entering the residence, authorities said.

Bend police bust alleged drug deal Two Bend men were arrested

after detectives interrupted a drug deal taking place at a southeast Bend parking lot Aug. 25, authorities said. Thanh Nguyen, 33, was arrested on suspicion of conspiracy to deliver cocaine, and Edward Milne III, 31, was arrested on suspicion of possession and delivery of cocaine after police said they attempted to sell cocaine to another individual. The incident took place at a parking lot near the intersection of Southeast Third Street and Southeast Wilson Avenue. During the arrest, Milne was found to be in possession of nearly two ounces of cocaine, according to authorities.

Appeal

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 9:26 a.m. Sept. 16, in the 1800 block of Southeast Arborwood Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 10:07 a.m. Sept. 16, in the 21100 block of Southeast Philly Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 12:02 p.m. Sept. 16, in the 3100 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 12:15 p.m. Sept. 16, in the area of Hawkview Road and Northeast Hope Drive. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 5:17 p.m. Sept. 16, in the 800 block of Northeast Savannah Drive. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 5:33 p.m. Sept. 16, in the 200 block of Southeast Sixth Street. Theft — A cellphone was reported stolen at 6:11 p.m. Sept. 16, in the 200 block of Northeast Sixth Street. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 10:35 p.m. Sept. 16, in the 61500 block of South U.S. Highway 97. DUII — Venancio Gonzalez Zarete, 32, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:05 a.m. Sept. 17, in the area of Northeast Olney Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:27 a.m. Sept. 17, in the 61100 block of Magnolia Lane. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 11:14 a.m. Sept. 17, in the 21200 block of Keyte Road. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 2:59 p.m. Sept. 17, in the 20600 block of Beaumont Drive. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 4:05

p.m. Sept. 17, in the 2700 block of Northeast 27th Street. DUII — Cody Allen Aschenbrenner, 27, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:58 a.m. Sept. 18, in the area of Southeast Third Street and Southeast Miller Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 9:27 a.m. Sept. 18, in the 1000 block of Northwest Wall Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:01 a.m. Sept. 18, in the 63200 block of Boyd Acres Road. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 5:45 p.m. Sept. 18, in the 61400 block of Parrell Road. Theft — A theft was reported at 6:46 p.m. Sept. 18, in the 800 block of Northeast Third Street. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 8:59 p.m. Sept. 18, in the 2000 block of Northeast Monterey Avenue. DUII — Kevin James Bemrose, 27, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 9:58 p.m. Sept. 18, in the 500 block of Northeast Bellevue Drive. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 10:09 p.m. Sept. 18, in the 500 block of Northeast Bellevue Drive. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:12 p.m. Sept. 18, in the 100 block of Southeast Third Street. Theft — Gasoline was reported stolen at 5:43 a.m. Sept. 19, in the 21200 block of U.S. Highway 20. Redmond Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 8:17 p.m. Sept. 19, in the 1700 block of Southwest Canyon Drive. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5:16 p.m. Sept. 19, in the area of Southwest Highland Avenue and Southwest Rimrock Way. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 4:15 p.m. Sept. 19, in the area of Southwest 10th Street and Southwest Highland Avenue. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 1:18 p.m. Sept. 19, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:24 p.m. Sept. 19, in the 800

block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 10:24 a.m. Sept. 19, in the area of Southwest Sixth Street and Southwest Forest Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:38 a.m. Sept. 19, in the 1600 block of Southwest First Street. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 7:43 a.m. Sept. 19, in the 3400 block of Southwest Metolius Meadow Court. Theft — A theft was reported at 7:42 a.m. Sept. 19, in the 2000 block of Southwest 38th Street. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 7:28 a.m. Sept. 19, in the 2700 block of Southwest 25th Street. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 7:24 a.m. Sept. 19, in the 2200 block of Southwest 37th Street. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 7:11 a.m. Sept. 19, in the 3300 block of Southwest Metolius Meadow Court. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 6:49 a.m. Sept. 19, in the 2700 block of Southwest 25th Street. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 6:21 a.m. Sept. 19, in the 2100 block of Southwest 37th Street. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 5:33 a.m. Sept. 19, in the 2100 block of Southwest 37th Street. Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 1:43 p.m. Sept. 19, in the area of Northwest Second Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:43 p.m. Sept. 19, in the area of Northeast Elm Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 7:40 p.m. Sept. 19, in the 16000 block of Aqua Road in La Pine. Theft — A street sign was reported stolen at 6:36 p.m. Sept. 19, in the area of Bluegrass Loop in Sisters. Theft — A theft was reported at

6:30 p.m. Sept. 19, in the 16500 block of Reed Road in La Pine. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 3:25 p.m. Sept. 19, in the 1900 block of Cinnamon Teal Drive in Redmond. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 3:16 p.m. Sept. 19, in the 19000 block of Baker Road in Bend. DUII — David Michael Berger, 35, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:40 p.m. Sept. 19, in the area of South Century Drive and Spring River Road in Bend. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 1:36 p.m. Sept. 19, in the 1400 block of Red Wing Loop in Redmond. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 12:27 p.m. Sept. 19, in the 11900 block of Eagle Crest Boulevard in Redmond. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:37 a.m. Sept. 19, in the 1500 block of Southwest Cline Falls Road in Redmond. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 9:56 a.m. Sept. 19, in the 60200 block of Sunset View Drive in Bend. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 5:05 a.m. Sept. 19, in the 17300 block of Spring River Road in Bend. Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office

DUII — Cyle Richardson, 42, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:05 a.m. Sept. 11, in the area of Southwest Belmont Lane and Sunnyside in Madras. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 5:30 p.m. Sept. 11, in the area of the Cove Palisades State Park in Culver. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7 a.m. Sept. 11, in the 1600 block of South Adams Drive in Madras. Oregon State Police

DUII — Jaxon D. Ware, 29, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 9:34 p.m. Sept. 19, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 144.

‘NFL Monday Night Football’ debuts in 1970 The Associated Press Today is Wednesday, Sept. 21, the 264th day of 2011. There are 101 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Sept. 21, 1897, the New York Sun ran its famous editorial, written anonymously by Francis P. Church, that responded to a letter from 8-year-old Virginia O’Hanlon asking whether Santa Claus really existed. Church wrote, “Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus. He exists as certainly as love and generosity and devotion exist, and you know that they abound and give to your life its highest beauty and joy.� ON THIS DATE In 1792, the French National Convention voted to abolish the monarchy. In 1893, one of America’s first horseless carriages was taken for a short test drive in Springfield, Mass., by Frank Duryea, who had designed the vehicle with his brother, Charles. In 1937, “The Hobbit,� by J.R.R. Tolkien, was first published. In 1938, a hurricane struck parts of New York and New England, causing widespread damage and claiming some 700 lives. In 1948, Milton Berle made his debut as permanent host of “The Texaco Star Theater� on NBC-TV. In 1961, the first Boeing CH47 Chinook military helicopter made its first hovering flight.

T O D AY IN HISTORY

during a telethon for victims of the terrorist attacks that was carried on more than 30 networks.

In 1970, “NFL Monday Night Football� made its debut on ABC-TV as the Cleveland Browns defeated the visiting New York Jets, 31-21. In 1981, the Senate unanimously confirmed the nomination of Sandra Day O’Connor to become the first female justice on the Supreme Court. Belize attained full independence from Britain. In 1989, Hurricane Hugo crashed into Charleston, S.C. Twenty-one students in Alton, Texas, died when their school bus, involved in a collision with a soft-drink delivery truck, careened into a water-filled pit. In 1991, an 18-hour hostage drama ended in Sandy, Utah, as Richard Worthington, who’d killed a nurse and seized control of a hospital maternity ward, finally freed nine captives, including a baby who was born during the siege. (Worthington committed suicide in prison in 1993.) Armenians voted overwhelmingly to declare their independence from the Soviet Union.

FIVE YEARS AGO The White House and rebellious Senate Republicans announced agreement on rules for the interrogation and trial of suspects in the war on terror. Space shuttle Atlantis and its six astronauts safely returned from a 12day mission to install a new piece of the orbiting outpost. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced it would recommend all Americans ages 13 to 64 be routinely tested for HIV.

TEN YEARS AGO Congress again opened the federal coffers to those harmed by terrorism, providing $15 billion to the airline industry, which was suffering mounting economic losses since the Sept. 11 attacks. Hollywood’s finest paid tribute to real-life heroes

ONE YEAR AGO The mayor and ex-city manager of the Los Angeles suburb of Bell were among eight current and former city officials arrested in a corruption scandal that authorities said cost the blue-collar city more than $5.5 million in excessive salaries and illegal personal loans. Two men filed a lawsuit accusing Atlanta megachurch pastor Bishop Eddie Long of coercing them into sexual relationships when they were teenage members of his congregation. (Long, who denied the allegations, later reached out-ofcourt settlements with them and two other men.) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actor Karl Slover (“The Wizard of Oz�) is 93. Actor Larry Hagman is 80. Poet-songwriter Leonard Cohen is 77. Author-comedian Fannie Flagg is 70. Pro-

PORTLAND — Oregon State Police have arrested a 21-yearold man who escaped from a psychiatric hospital on Sept. 3 while on a supervised walk. Matthew Ingle had been held at the Oregon State Hospital since he was convicted of two counts of second-degree manslaughter in a 2009 car crash. Court testimony indicated Ingle was suffering from schizophrenic delusions when he blew through a red light and slammed into another car, killing a woman and her young daughter.

ducer Jerry Bruckheimer is 68. Musician Don Felder is 64. Author Stephen King is 64. Basketball Hall of Famer Artis Gilmore is 62. Actor-comedian Bill Murray is 61. Hall of Fame jockey Eddie Delahoussaye is 60. Rock musician Philthy Animal is 57. Former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd is 54. Movie producer-writer Ethan Coen is 54. Actor-comedian Dave Coulier is 52. Actor David James Elliott is 51. Actress Serena Scott-Thomas is 50. Actress Nancy Travis is 50. Actor Rob Morrow is 49. Retired MLB All-Star Cecil Fielder is 48. Actress Cheryl Hines is 46. Country singer Faith Hill is 44. Rock musician Tyler Stewart (Barenaked Ladies) is 44. Country singer Ronna Reeves is 43. Actress-talk show host Ricki Lake is 43. Rapper Dave (De La Soul) is 43. Actor Rob Benedict is 41. Actor James Lesure is 40. Actor Alfonso Ribeiro is 40. Actor Luke Wilson is 40. Actor Paulo Costanzo is 33. Actress Autumn Reeser is 31. TV personality Nicole Richie is 30. Actress Maggie Grace is 28. Actor Joseph Mazzello is 28. Rapper Wale is 27. Actors Lorenzo and Nikolas Brino (“7th Heaven�) are 13. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “The only true measure of success is the ratio between what we might have done and what we might have been on the one hand, and the thing we have made and the things we have made of ourselves on the other.� — H.G. Wells English author (born this date in 1866, died 1946)

Continued from C1 The current logging roads and trails along the creek south of Sisters have created a place where people drop trash, vandals spray-paint rocks, illegal campers hide and partiers gather for beer bashes, according to the Forest Service. The plan calls for ripping up roads off Three Creeks Road and formalizing the trail system to make the woods around the creek more inviting to hikers, bikers and others. The trail system would have a trail three miles along the creek and a mile loop to an overlook. While Dewey said Central Oregon Landwatch agrees that shutting down roads and building parking lots could help stop the dumping, camping and partying problems,

Tub Continued from C1 “The father definitely had a clear responsibility for the child at the time,� Kansky said. Jones returned and discovered the infant submerged. Police do not know how long the baby was underwater, but when he was found, he was not breathing and was blue from lack of oxygen. The child’s mother called 911, while Jones and a neighbor performed lifesaving procedures, which caused the infant to start breathing again.

Robbery Continued from C1 Bilyeu said the next step is to take a look at the evidence that was gathered and play the waiting game until they get a good tip. He is encouraging anyone in the Oregon Water Wonderland area to lock their doors, and to contact the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office at 541-693-6911 if they observe someone fitting the suspect’s description.

541-322-CARE

Lt. Gregg Hastings says state police detectives arrested Ingle on Tuesday at a home in Sandy, southeast of Portland, after receiving a tip. They were taking him to the Marion County Jail. The Oregonian reports that Ingle ran ahead of a group of patients and staff out for a walk on the hospital’s Salem campus and jumped into a waiting car. State police continue to investigate the escape. Hospital spokeswoman Rebeka Gipson-King says Ingle’s program and treatment will be reassessed.

the group doesn’t think the trail system is a good idea. The trails would link to the Peterson Ridge Trail, which is popular with mountain bikers, and the Metolius-Windigo National Recreation Trail, which is popular among horseback riders, Dewey said. The trail system would likely be highlighted in guidebooks, he said, and would likely draw crowds. That’s a concern to Central Oregon Landwatch because the upper Whychus Creek was designated by Congress in 1988 as a Wild and Scenic River. Dewey said the Forest Service should focus on restoration along the creek and keeping use of the woods to daylight hours rather than increasing recreation. “It is an area that is to be protected,� Dewey said. Dylan J. Darling can be reached at 541-617-7812 or at ddarling@bendbulletin.com.

Police and medics arrived, and the child was hospitalized at St. Charles-Bend. He was released Monday. “It looks like the child is going to make a full recovery at this point,� Kansky said. Jones was arrested the same day on suspicion of child neglect. Kansky says the charge carries the potential of one year in jail and a fine of up to $6,250. Kansky said because the child suffered no significant or long-term injury, Jones was arrested on a lesser charge. Megan Kehoe can be reached at 541-383-0354 or at mkehoe@bendbulletin.com.

“It could be somebody passing through, but based on the tracks it appears that it was someone who had knowledge of the area,� he said. Rachael Rees can be reached at 541-617-7818 or at rrees@bendbulletin.com.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 21, 2011 C3

L S Schools face the costs of healthier lunches

A special section featuring news from schools in Deschutes, Jefferson and Crook counties

Emily Robertson: In honors classes or on the derby track ...

The Associated Press

By Fernanda Santos New York Times News Service

The federal government is making school meals more nutritious this year, but also more expensive. Under a little-noticed provision of the child nutrition bill signed by President Barack Obama in December, which brought more fresh produce and less whole milk to cafeterias nationwide, school districts are required to start bringing their prices in line with what it costs to prepare the meals, eventually charging an average of $2.46 for the lunches they serve. Though the law suggests that prices go up by a maximum of 10 cents a year, the town of Seymour, Conn., raised its prices by 25 cents, after years without increases; the new prices, $2.25 a day for elementary school pupils, $2.50 for middle-school students and $2.75 for high school students — are listed on the district’s website, just under the words, “Welcome Back to School!” In Suffolk County, on Long Island, the president of the Board of Education at the Riverhead Central School District — which also raised prices by a quarter a day, or 12.5 percent for most students — said that parents had cornered her and other officials at supermarkets, gas stations and before meetings, questioning the increase. “All we could tell them was we really had no choice,” said the president, Ann Cotten-DeGrasse.

Bracing for backlash Officials are already bracing for a backlash as the increases pile up. “Our parents haven’t complained, but I don’t know if they’ll be as understanding if we do it again next year, and the year after, and then the year after that,” said Louise D’Angelo, director of food services at the North Syracuse Central School District in upstate New York, where lunch prices just went up by 25 cents across all grades — to $1.75 in elementary school, $2 in middle school and $2.25 in high school. The new pricing requirement, which comes amid school budget cuts and a lingering recession, marks the first time the federal government has gotten into the business of cafeteria prices since its school lunch program was established in 1946. Under the roughly $10 billion program, families with incomes up to 130 percent of the poverty level — $28,665 a year for a family of four — are eligible for free meals. Those that earn from 130 percent to 185 percent of poverty level, or $40,793 for a family of four, qualify for reduced-price meals. The federal government reimburses districts $2.72 for free meals, $2.32 for reduced-price meals and 26 cents for the rest. Generally, this money is combined with proceeds from the sale of meals and snacks into a single pot. A study published last year by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a research organization in Washington, argued that this arrangement “appears to be subsidizing meals for children whose families are much better off” than the children for whom the reimbursements are meant. It urged a gradual rise in lunch prices to prevent federal money from being “siphoned off to keep prices low for paid meals.” Congress heeded the suggestion, tying an increase of 6 cents in the reimbursement rates, the first in 30 years, to the mandate for increased meal prices in the child nutrition bill.

Salem school guard loses pistol

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Bend High School senior Emily Robertson, 17, has a 3.97 GPA and competes in roller derby with the Lava City Roller Dolls junior derby team. Her derby name is Bridget Ponz, after her favorite literary character, Bridget Jones.

Bend senior is on a roll By Megan Kehoe The Bulletin

D

uring the day, Bend High School senior Emily Robertson, 17, is a hard-working, high-achieving honor student. But when darkness falls, Emily becomes someone else: a hard-edged and spirited roller derby player named Bridget Ponz. “My confidence has grown so much since I started skating,” Emily said. Emily is a student who knows not only how do well in school, but also how to excel in extracurricular activities. Student Council, DECA and roller derby are all activities Emily has been involved in during her three years of high school. And she’s done all of it while maintaining a 3.97 GPA. “I’ve always really loved school,” Emily said. “And I take it very seriously. School is like a job.” This is Emily’s third year in student council, and during her time there she has helped organize blood drives, food drives and fundraisers.

“Being involved in all these activities has helped me to not fall into the wrong crowd. It’s helped me focus, and do everything that I need to do to stay on track.” — Emily Robertson, senior, Bend High School “I like being involved,” Emily said. “I’m a natural leader, and I like stepping up and getting things done.” This is the second year Emily will be in the school’s business and marketing program — DECA. Last year, she placed fourth at the state competition in the Entrepreneurial Written Event category for a business plan she created with another student. Academically, Emily has taken several years of rigorous advanced placement classes. Her favorite is English. He least fa-

Emily Robertson Age: 17 School: Bend High School Year: Senior Grade-point average: 3.97 Why she’s special: Student council, DECA, roller derby team After high school: Western Oregon University Favorite subject: English Least favorite subject: Math For fun: Roller derby Favorite TV shows: “Project Runway,” “Big Brother” Favorite movie: “Simon Birch” Role models: Her parents, Bend High science teacher Kathleen Yaeger

vorite is math. The precious free time that Emily does have is spent on the roller derby rink. Emily has been on the junior team of the Lava City Roller Dolls for about a year. She likes the fact that girls who aren’t necessarily athletic — or don’t fit in with the traditional girls sports of softball or

volleyball — can join and build confidence. Emily’s roller derby name is based on her favorite literary character, Bridget Jones, but with a roller derby twist on it. The term “ponz” means to own or beat someone on the rink. In terms of her future, Emily doesn’t have to give it much thought. Ever since she was in kindergarten, she’s known exactly what she’s wanted to do with her life. “I’ve always wanted to be a teacher,” Emily says. “In kindergarten, I had a great teacher. I wanted to be that for other people.” For now, she’s focusing on finishing up her last year in high school and enjoying the many activities she’s involved in. “Being involved in all these activities has helped me to not fall into the wrong crowd,” said Emily. “It’s helped me focus, and do everything that I need to do to stay on track.”

SALEM — The Salem-Keizer school district is re-examining a policy that allows private security guards to be armed on school grounds at night and on weekends after one of the guards lost his pistol. The company believes the weapon was misplaced in the men’s room at its headquarters, but nobody could be sure it wasn’t lost as the guard made rounds Thursday night at 14 schools. The school buildings were searched, parents were called, and teachers talked to students about gun safety. The guard was put on administrative leave. Prostar Security provides the agents who patrol schools, respond to alarms and enter buildings to investigate breakins and vandalism, which occur weekly. “We’ll discuss the pros and cons of them having weapons,” said schools spokesman Jay Remy. Losing a weapon, he said, “would be an obvious disadvantage.” The after-hours security costs $438,000 a year, and the schools still lose thousands of dollars a week to vandalism and theft, said Salem-Keizer Security Manager Ray Byrd. School resource officers and the night and weekend security officers are the only ones allowed to carry weapons on school grounds. “This has been a practice in the district for over a decade. This is the first incident we have had,” Byrd said. A Prostar Security official said its practices will change: Armed guards will have to check in with the dispatcher to make sure they have their weapons.

Megan Kehoe can be reached at 541-383-0354 or at mkehoe@bendbulletin.com.

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SAT scores down in 2011, College Board reports Los Angeles Times LOS ANGELES — The College Board announced last week that the average SAT reading score for the high school class of 2011 fell 3 points from 2010’s average — to 497, making it the lowest reading score since 1972. The average math score dipped to 489, 1 point lower than last year. And the average writing score dropped 2 points

C O N TAC T U S SCHOOL BRIEFS: Items and announcements of general interest. Please include details and contact information. Phone: 541-617-7831 E-mail: pcliff@bendbulletin.com TEEN FEATS: The Bulletin wants to recognize high school students’ achievements off the playing fields. Do you know of teens who have been recognized recently for their academic achievements or who have won an award or certificate for their participation in clubs, choirs or volunteer groups? If so, please submit the information and a photo. Phone: 541-383-0358 Mail: P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 E-mail: youth@bendbulletin .com

from last year’s score. The board also found that just 43 percent of college-bound seniors met the SAT benchmark score of 1550 (the critical-reading, mathematics and writing scores combined). The benchmark score indicates that a student has a 65 percent likelihood of achieving a B-minus or higher during the first year of college. And remember, that’s 43 percent of students who are

planning to go to college. In a statement sent to news outlets, Jeanne Allen, president of the Center for Education Reform, articulated what some people might feel after reading the SAT report. “Student achievement remains stagnant and we continue to let failure fester in our education system, jeopardizing the future of our children and our country,” she said.

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C4 Wednesday, September 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA RICHARD COE

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Steel pipe purchase a $4 million gamble

T

he city of Bend’s latest money-saving venture could maroon Bend with a $4 million pile of steel to sell. The city hopes it can save $400,000 on the price of steel pipe for its

Bridge Creek water project by paying $4 million now. But there’s so much uncertainty about the project that buying steel is a high-stakes gamble. The city is planning to upgrade its surface water supply. The project includes replacing the pipeline under existing roadways — Forest Road 4603 and Skyliners Road. The city’s plan to buy steel does have merit. The price of steel has generally gone up, even in a sputtering economy. The Associated General Contractors of America reported last week that steel was down by 1 percent for the month and up by 14.3 percent for the year. That doesn’t mean that steel will keep going up in price. What if steel prices dip instead of rise? But there’s much more uncertainty than price estimates. When city councilors first discussed buying the steel in 2009, the city didn’t even know how much steel it would need. The city considered buying it anyway. Is the city certain it knows how much it needs now? Designing and planning work is still being done on the project. What if the requirements change? The biggest uncertainty is perhaps the special use permit the city needs from the U.S. Forest Service. The Forest Service is doing an environmental analysis. The public should get its first look at the analysis in December. There will be a 45-day comment period. The Forest Service will then issue its decision. The Forest Service is reviewing

the damage that may be done by construction, such as taking out trees. Because the pipe would mostly go under roads, that may not be much of an issue. The Forest Service is also analyzing and modeling the cumulative effects on Tumalo Creek of the pipe running at maximum capacity. What will that do to things like water temperature and turbidity, and to fish? Are there any endangered species? Would they be negatively affected? Rod Bonacker, special projects coordinator for the Deschutes and Ochoco national forests, said this week if he had to make a decision now, he has not found anything yet to suggest that the Forest Service would not issue a permit. That’s now. Much work needs to be done, such as looking for endangered bull trout. The Forest Service could still deny the permit. It could decide to approve the project but insist that Bend alter its plans, requiring more engineering and new pipe specifications. Even if the Forest Service OKs the project, its decision can be appealed. An appeal would first go through a process within the Forest Service. An appeal could also end up in court. City staff may be confident that steel prices will continue to rise, the project will go through and the project’s opponents will lose appeals. We’d argue it’s much more certain that the project’s outcome is uncertain.

Silence will make hiring new administrator hard

I

magine yourself a skilled and energetic government administrator looking for a new position. You hear that Deschutes County is looking for an executive, and it looks pretty attractive. It’s a well-run county in a to-die-for place to live. But wait, just why is the position open? The commissioners have fired the incumbent. They give him high marks for technical management. They acknowledge he is smart, knowledgeable and has managed the county into an enviable condition as it weathers the current economic troubles. But at least two of the commissioner don’t like his leadership style. And so he’s gone, out of a job. Unless you can get a lot better explanation than the citizens of Deschutes County have received, you might just wonder how secure you’d be if you uprooted your family and moved across the country. If you don’t understand how your predecessor offended his bosses, how can you avoid doing the same?

A month after the firing of Dave Kanner from his post as Deschutes County administrator, we still don’t have enough information to understand how it could have happened. The commissioners’ evaluations of Kanner in the months preceding his firing don’t make the case, nor do their public explanations. It’s not that we can’t imagine a leadership style so offensive that it supports a firing, but we have no evidence of it. Commissioner Tammy Baney says more detailed explanations have been discussed in executive sessions, but it’s difficult to make them public, at least in part because Kanner’s attorney has written to commissioners requesting that they not make critical public statements about her client. Baney feels certain that commissioners can explore the issues of leadership style with candidates in ways that will make everyone present understand the issues. We hope she’s right, because otherwise the county’s chances of hiring a successful new administrator will be severely hampered.

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Sad state of affairs

Mirror Pond beavers

Recently I received two e-mail videos that prompted me to write this letter. The first scene was a crowded supermarket, loaded with Fourth of July shoppers. Spontaneously, a snare drum roll was heard, followed by a single band instrument, starting to play Sousa’s “Stars and Stripes Forever” — followed by another instrument and another, until the whole store seemed to be filled with a marching band. Soon, too, the shoppers began to clap in rhythm. lt was wonderful and heartwarming. The second video was also a crowded supermarket, filled with Christmas shoppers. A single young woman’s voice began to sing “Silent Night,” soon to be joined by other well-placed singers about the store, and eventually many shoppers joined in song. I thought to myself, wouldn’t it be wonderful if something like the above happened in Bend and Redmond to show that we have the patriotic and seasonal spirit? It will take lots of work to get it off the ground. Among others, disciplines needed are church choir directors, high school music department heads, Central Oregon Community College music department, Barbershop Harmony and Sweet Adeline members, as well as other individuals or groups who would be interested to participate. Most importantly, the approval and encouragement of local stores will be needed, so that store business will not be compromised too much. Also needed, TV coverage. Let’s hear from many civic-minded citizens of Bend and Redmond! Edward Hohensee Bend

In the 1930s and ’40s, one finished high school, got a job, learned a trade, stuck to it, managed to buy a house and educate a couple of kids. You thought you were content — even gave Uncle Sam a year of your life to fight World War II. In 2011, if you don’t finish high school and get a college degree plus an MA, you wind up pumping gas or clerking at Walmart! With today’s schooling, you may not even have as much basic education as we did with a high school diploma. Now government cannot produce the pre-war jobs — they no longer exist. Instead of spending scarce dollars to retrain the suddenly unemployed “over 50s,” they spend billions fighting wars in countries that hate our interference, or spend it on subsidies to huge companies that are making millions. Where we are getting our future electricians, plumbers or masons? If we are going to train immigrants to fill all these jobs, why not spend some of those dollars to retrain our unemployed? Forget 2012: the “worthless 500” in Washington will use all that time and untold millions of dollars to cadge their way into another term. What a sad state to find America in, at age 88! Think what all those unemployed could do in fire-stricken Texas or flood-ravaged Louisiana — but wait, there is hope. Maybe, like Jimmy Carter, some of them might accomplish more out of office than they accomplished in office. But they had better hurry! Russell B. Williams Sisters

I would like to make a suggestion to those in charge of “The Mirror Pond Duck Race.” Why not make the race “Ducks vs. Beavers?” I am an Oregon State University alumnus — class of 1957 — and it’s hard to pull out my wallet to buy more than one duck. If I could purchase beavers, I’d buy a bunch and stand at the finishing line cheering them on. Ken Paul Bend

Social Security scheme A Ponzi scheme is, according to Merriam-Webster, “An investment swindle in which some early investors are paid off with money put up by later ones in order to encourage more and bigger risks.” Looks correct to me, except “encourage” is taxing and the “more and bigger risks” are becoming less and bigger, as in most Ponzi schemes. It is true that the government hasn’t put a dime into Social Security. That’s the part that is coming. I have not heard of any proposal that would reduce the benefits of current recipients. Why are seniors not actively supporting the relatively minor changes that would extend the life of the program? I don’t know about “milk cow,” but “a retiree-funded part of the retirement plan for our citizens” is only true if all normal contributions are invested at a compound rate greater than 5 percent per year. This is the lowest rate that I could find. Most circumstances require from 8 percent to 10 percent, some up to 12.4 percent compounded annual rate. Otherwise it is subsidized by the taxpayer and future contributions of others. Ray Melchiori Sisters

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Government should keep promises on Social Security By Mel Coffin

S

eniors and soon-to-be seniors are being ripped off big time. Back in the 1970s, someone in a high government office looked into the Social Security trust fund coffers. They found millions of dollars just laying there. This could be used for something else rather than being paid to seniors. So they decided to open the lid and lend out our trust money, with no interest and no repayment date. Now, that was real smart, wasn’t it? Try this on your car or house payment. By law, they had no right to touch the funds this way. Some of you seniors were only 25 years old then and do not remember, nor did you care about retirement. Now the tide has changed; you’re older and smarter. This trust money was not the government’s to do with as they chose. Trust money is to be lent out, but with a repayment agreement and interest on

payback. This is where the big rip-off all started and is still going on. The Social Security trust fund is a trust — run by the trustees, set up with the understanding that the Social Security tax money we paid in at 17 percent of our wages, plus the same amount from our employers, is to be deposited into the trust fund. Then this money is lent out to the government on an I.O.U. basis, to be paid back with interest over the years. Appears this agreement has not been kept. Plus, the Social Security system has failed us. The repayment agreement has been broken, like a lot of other government promises over the years. Going back into the 1850s, the government has not lived up to a lot of agreements. This is a breach of contract, I think, to the trust fund system and to the seniors. This should be lived up to, and not by cutting our benefits to make up the shortfalls.

IN MY VIEW This Social Security trust fund was set up back in the late 1930s by F.D.R. as a workers’ retirement plan to help retired people live better in their older age, and for the disabled and others in need. In August, 2010, a few of our lawmakers who should have known better called us seniors “The greediest generation on the face of the Earth.” Now, that hurts. All those lawmakers have an “R” before their names. They also said we — the seniors — are milking a $310 million cow to death by draining off the Social Security trust funds. Well now, let’s take a good look at these big shots. Take a good look into the mirror the next time you shave or get shaved or put on your makeup. These “children” are being paid (not earning) some $180,000 a year of our tax money to play funny games in Congress. Appears

they have forgotten who voted them into office and pays them. They receive a 6 percent raise a year. They didn’t even ask us. Most employees ask their boss for a raise, but not these guys. They just give it to themselves. They pay nothing into the trust fund. Now they want to cut off some of our Social Security. We, the seniors, didn’t even get a good raise for two years, and only get 3 percent when it comes, maybe. Our raise is based on the cost of living. These are politicians who do not pay for health insurance, retirement insurance or Social Security tax; most of their income is tax free, because of the huge expense account they claim to have. You taxpayers and us seniors pay for all this. Now, who’s greedy and who’s ripping off our trust funds? The money is coming from someplace. Now, you guys keep your hands off our Social Security. It’s not yours to play house with. Want to cut

something? Cut some of your wages. You’re not worth your salt anyhow. Ask most children and you will get the same answer. I think, along with a lot of others in this country, that all politicians should serve only two terms in office, and then you’re out. We don’t need career politicians in office anymore. This is the 21st century. We need young ideas, not your old ones. Some of you lawmakers have served 40 years or more. Much too long. Now who is greedy? Now, this is my view and I’m stuck with it. I think all of us greedy seniors should be dipping a little more into our Social Security. It’s not as broke as they say. Also, I think we should be given a little more respect from our paid lawmakers. After all, who pays their wages? Mel Coffin lives in La Pine.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 21, 2011 C5

O D N   John W. Livingstone, of Bend, OR April 23, 1922 - Sept. 15, 2011 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, (541) 382-5592; www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: No public service will be held. The family will gather privately at a later date.

Larry "Bud" Keown Jr., of Bend Feb. 14, 1938 - Sept. 17, 2011 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: Memorial Remembrance Saturday September 24, 2011, 2:00 PM at Gilchrist Pine Room. Contributions may be made to:

Bend-LaPine Partners In Care Hospice House, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701.

Maria Roca, of Bend Oct. 22, 1916 - Sept. 16, 2011 Arrangements: Funeral home, Phone number, Web address only. Services: Autumn Funerals, Bend (541) 318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.net Contributions may be made to:

At her request, no services will be held.

Laurence ‘Larry’ D. Lanig, Sr., of La Pine July 15, 1938 - Sept. 16, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel of La Pine, 541-536-5104 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: No services are planned at this time.

Michael Randy Rachor, of Powell Butte Feb. 11, 1959 - Sept. 18, 2011 Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel Services: Memorial service will take place at Powell Butte Christian Church, on Sat., Sept. 24, 2011, at 2:00 p.m.

Norma Dolores Miner, of Bend July 24, 1924 - Sept. 18, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend, 541-382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A memorial service will be held at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701, www.partnersbend.org, or Alzheimer Assoc., PO Box 96011, Washington, DC 20090-6011, www.alz.org

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 FAX: 541-322-7254 MAIL: Obituaries E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

Colleen (Connie) A. Wood Aug. 21, 1927 - Sept. 15, 2011 Colleen (Connie) A. Wood died at Starlight Adult Foster Home, in Redmond, OR. She was a resident there from Oct. 16, 2009, until July 1, 2011, then living with her daughter, Becky, and husband, Frank, until September 2, 2011. Due to her health, she was readmitted to Starlight ADF to live out her final two weeks. Colleen was born in Bend, OR, to Ira C. Jaques, born in Thurston, OR, and Alda (Schmitz, Jaques) Burdett, born in Harrington, WA. She was a resident of Redmond most of her life with times in Hermiston, OR, and Parker, AZ. Survivors include three daughters, Sharon (Ron) M. Griffin of Parker, AZ, Becky (Frank) A. Larrew of Redmond, OR, and Cloydette (Ron) Y. Caudell of Hermiston, OR; a brother, Gerald (Peggy) Jaques of Prineville, OR; two sisters, Joyce Hoffman of Prineville, OR, and Wilma (Bill) McGahan of Klamath Falls, OR; step-brother, Sonny Jaques; she had quite a few grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her parents, her husband, Harold Wood, in 2011, and her son, Jerry A. Hall, in 1985. There will be no memorial service, as per the request of the deceased. Remembrances and/or donations may be made to Hospice of Redmond/Sisters or Starlight AFD.

Natural wine importer Joe Dressner dies at 60 By Eric Asimov New York Times News Service

Joe Dressner, an importer whose advocacy of Old World wines made without chemicals or manipulation inspired a sort of natural wine avantgarde, died Saturday at his home in Manhattan. He was 60. The cause was brain cancer, his son, Jules, said. Dressner’s Manhattanbased company, Louis/Dressner Selections, which he formed in 1988 with his wife, Denyse Louis, specialized in wines from France and Italy that he variously termed real, natural, authentic or heirloom. In an era when most wines are made with grapes grown in chemically farmed vineyards and then manipulated with cultured yeasts and other chemicals and enzymes, Dressner championed wines that were expressions of local cultures, made from grapes grown organically or in rough approximation to it. In the cellar, nothing was added or taken away. The winemaker simply shepherded the grape juice along its natural path through fermentation. In the past 10 years, interest in these wines, prompted by Dressner and others, has grown tremendously. Though they make up a relatively small slice of the market-

“It’s not being purist, or that we follow this guru or that guru, but that we feel the wines taste better.” — Joe Dressner, wine importer

place, the wines have had a disproportionate influence, filtering into the mainstream by way of sommeliers, writers and other importers. At the same time, they have stirred up polarizing debates about grape growing, winemaking, wine criticism and marketing.

Down-to-earth wines Though uncompromising, Dressner was by no means dogmatic. Some significant estates in his portfolio, like Didier Dagueneau of Pouilly-Fume, adhere to methods that do not square with natural wine doctrine. “It’s a taste and sensory preference,” he said in 2005. “It’s not being purist, or that we follow this guru or that guru, but that we feel the wines taste better.” Dressner always emphasized that the wines were the products of down-to-earth personalities. He often brought groups of vignerons to the United States so members of the trade and the public could make the connec-

Mother of commercial pottery in U.S. dies By Valerie J. Nelson Los Angeles Times

Larry ‘Bud’ Keown Jr.

Michael A. (Pete) White

Feb. 14, 1938 - Sept. 19, 2011

October 26, 1943 - Sept. 6, 2011

Larry M. Keown Jr., (Bud), son of Larry and Louise Keown, passed away peacefully on Sept. 17, 2011, after a courageous battle with cancer. Bud was born in Laurel, Mississippi, on Feb. 14, 1938. At a young age, he moved with his family to Larry ‘Bud’ Gilchrist, OrKeown Jr. egon, where he attended school and grew to love the town and surrounding area. Bud finished school in Bend, graduating from Bend High School in 1956. After graduation, he moved back to Gilchrist to work for the Gilchrist Timber Company, where he later became the head sawyer. Bud remained in that position until his retirement in 1999, after 43 years of dedicated work. Bud married in 1959, to his first love, Mary Ann Ward. He leaves his wife, Mary Ann; their son, Kevin and wife, Lisa; grandsons, Joshua and Benjamin; daughter, Kellie and her husband, Skip King; and grandsons, Zachary and Micah. He was like a father to brothers-in-law, Steve and Mike Ward, and a son to Evelyn Mayes, his aunt. He loved his entire family and they were first in his life and thoughts. Bud especially enjoyed family times and holiday get-togethers, traditional fishing and hunting trips with family and friends, the ocean, car shows, and vacations to Arizona and Hawaii. A memorial service will be held at the Gilchrist Banquet Room on Saturday, September 24, 2011, at 2:00 p.m. A potluck will follow the service. All friends are invited to attend. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Partners in Care, Bend Hospice House, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct. Bend, OR 97701. Please sign our guest book at www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Michael passed away at Partners in Care Hospice House, Bend, surrounded by his family, following an 18-month battle with lung cancer. He was born to Edward and Christina White in Baker, OR, and lived in Grant County until he graduated Michael White high school. He served in the US Army for three years with a tour in Germany, then moved to Modesto, CA, to begin his retail career. He met and married Brenda Killian there in 1964. He is survived by his wife, Brenda, their four children – Scott (Stephanie), Michael (Tricia), Christy (Torey) Smith, William; his mother, Christina Adelhart; sister, Kathy (Michael) Gilbert, seven grandchildren, five nieces and four nephews. Michael returned to John Day in 1967, operated multiple businesses in John Day before moving to Oklahoma in 1983. There he became a Farmers Insurance agent and opened his own office. He returned to Oregon in 1986 when he opened a Farmers office in Woodburn. In 1995, he moved to Redmond and became a realtor/broker, most recently with Prudential NW Properties. He always enjoyed working with a wide variety of colleagues and clients. Michael’s great passion was for spending time with his family while camping and hunting. His grandchildren gave him special joy and he loved teasing and laughing with them. Reading western novels, especially those by Louis L’Amour, and watching westerns on TV, helped him through this past year. A memorial service will be held at a later date. The family requests that memorial contributions be made to Partners In Care, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct. #1, Bend, OR 97701 or American Cancer Society, in lieu of flowers.

tion between wine and people. “It’s always been about the winemakers, how they work and their vision,” Kevin McKenna, a partner in Louis/Dressner, said in an interview. “We wanted to bring that to restaurants, distributors, retailers and to the general public. It was fundamental.” In addition to his wife and son, he is survived by their daughter, Alyce Dressner. While he worked as a freelance journalist, Dressner would spend time each summer at a farmhouse belonging to Louis’ family in the Maconnais region of Burgundy. While there they got the idea of importing wine from France. At first, Jules Dressner said, they had no particular philosophy about wine. They simply sought winemakers who did not yet have an importer. But over time they learned that the wines they liked best were made from low yields of grapes, harvested by hand and fermented with indigenous yeast. Soon they developed their own sense of how wine ought to be made, marketed and consumed. Dressner pioneered using the Internet as a tool for marketing wine, blogging and commenting on bulletin boards in a style that blended fact and absurdist fiction. “I enjoyed mixing facts and fantasy with my opinions, true stories, invented anecdotes and fictional characters,” he told the wine blogger Tom Wark in 2009.

LOS ANGELES — Nearly 40 years after she had stopped producing pottery, Barbara Willis made a startling discovery at a Long Beach, Calif., flea market in 1995. Without her knowledge, she had become a highly collectible artist. After she pointed to a vase and said, “I made that,” she learned that her vibrantly colored, crackle-glaze pottery from the 1940s and ’50s was in demand. Collectors had been searching for her for years. Prodded by fans, Willis restarted her career as a ceramist when she was in her late 70s, hand-molding pieces in her Malibu kitchen. The first time around, she was among the first to adapt studio techniques to commercial pottery, using molds to mass produce simple geometric wares that had a handmade look. Willis died Sept. 3 of natural causes at her home in San Ramon, Calif., said her daughter, Liz Graham. She was 94. “She was a really important figure in the commercial pottery scene in California,” said Bill Stern, executive director of the Museum of California Design. “She also was one of the first of what we now call Midcentury Modern designers in California.” “Barbara set out to make pottery that had the visual feel of handmade pottery that could be made inexpensively enough for the general public to afford,” he said. “She was enormously successful at it.” Her vintage pieces are prized for their combination of terra-cotta bisque and volcanic or crackled glazes, much like those thrown by master ceramist Laura Andreson, with whom Willis studied at the University of California, Los Angeles. In the early 1940s, Willis began making pottery in a studio her father built behind her family’s Los Angeles home. By 1948, she had a North Hollywood studio and more than a dozen employees. “Her glazes were really splendid and really distinctive,” Stern said. “And she achieved something difficult by making crackle

Ken Hively / Los Angeles Times

Barbara Willis, one of the great pottery artisans from the 1930s and ’40s, with her pottery in her Malibu, Calif., home in 2003. Willis died Sept. 3. She was 94. glazes that appear to have broken lines in them. She brought that to a new level by having employees use wire brushes to make striations. It was quite sophisticated.” She was soon making $25,000 a year at a time when “my girlfriends were making $1,200 a year,” Willis told the Los Angeles Times in 2003. “I was very successful, especially for a woman.” Her streamlined pieces that included vases, bowls and platters remain her most popular. She also made small items such as ashtrays, candle holders and housewares decorated with decals. As inexpensive ceramic imports flooded the market in the 1950s, most of California’s small potteries were forced out of business. Willis closed her shop in 1958 after having produced more than 250,000 pieces, she once estimated.

With characteristic matterof-factness, Willis later said: “It was just a business and it was over with.” Putting her clay away, she started a second business importing artificial flowers and later bought and resold Malibu real estate. Willis was largely forgotten as a potter until the 1980s, when there was renewed interest in her work. “She never considered herself

an artist until the 1990s, when she was rediscovered,” her daughter said. Of her late-in-life resurgence as a grand dame of commercial Modernist pottery, Willis told the Times in 2003: “I can’t get over this; it’s so ridiculous.” She was born Barbara Lucile Thompson on June 29, 1917, in Bakersfield, Calif., to Glenn Thompson, a farmer turned wrought-iron designer, and his wife, Lucile. When she was 8, she moved to Los Angeles with her parents and an older brother, who died in World War II. At UCLA, she majored in education and minored in art, receiving her bachelor’s degree in 1940. With her husband away in the military in the early 1940s, she turned to pottery, signing her pieces with her married name, “Barbara Willis.” The marriage and a second one ended in divorce. She was also known as Barbara Willis Abbott. Her work was featured in 2001 at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and in 2003 at what is now the Autry Museum of the American West in Los Angeles. It also is part of “California Design, 1930-1965,” set to open Oct. 1 at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and in an exhibit scheduled to open next August at the Autry. Unable to lift the heavy clay, Willis stopped making her modern line when she was 92. After living on the coast in Malibu for nearly 50 years, she moved to San Ramon in 2009 to be near her daughter, who is her sole survivor. Once Willis realized that her work was sought after, she built her own collection since she had kept so little of her art. The astonishment of others was an unexpected ally, her daughter recalled: “No one knew she was still around. Some people would give her the piece because they were so excited that she was still alive.”

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W E AT H ER

C6 Wednesday, September 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, SEPTEMBER 21

THURSDAY

Today: Mostly sunny and warm.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

LOW

84

42

STATE Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

84/50

80/51

90/51

68/53

Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

86/47

80/39

Mitchell

Madras

83/44

83/45

Camp Sherman 80/39 Redmond Prineville 84/42 Cascadia 81/43 83/43 Sisters 82/41 Bend Post 80s 84/42

Oakridge Elk Lake 81/41

71/30

80s

80/39

81/38

Burns 81/40

82/38

79/37

Fort Rock

79/39

68/58

Seattle

Chemult 79/36

Missoula 78/42

Helena

84/53

Grants Pass

Bend 84/42

90/51

81/41

90s

83/41

Elko

69/43

70s 60s

75/38

84/43

Reno

89/54

Mostly sunny skies today. San Francisco 72/55 Mostly clear skies tonight.

Crater Lake

81/49

Idaho Falls

99/61

Christmas Valley

76/46

Boise

80s Redding

Silver Lake

City

78/57

Eugene

LOW

Salt Lake City 80/54

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

HIGH

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases New

First

Sept. 27 Oct. 3

Wednesday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

Full

Last

Oct. 11

Oct. 19

Astoria . . . . . . . . 71/47/0.00 . . . . . 69/57/pc. . . . . . . 70/56/c Baker City . . . . . . 76/33/0.00 . . . . . . 82/46/s. . . . . . . 87/47/s Brookings . . . . . . 73/52/0.00 . . . . . . 61/54/c. . . . . . . 64/54/c Burns. . . . . . . . . . 78/40/0.00 . . . . . . 83/50/s. . . . . . . 85/52/s Eugene . . . . . . . . 83/44/0.00 . . . . . 84/53/pc. . . . . . 84/51/pc Klamath Falls . . . 80/36/0.00 . . . . . . 83/44/s. . . . . . . 83/44/s Lakeview. . . . . . . 81/34/0.00 . . . . . . 85/47/s. . . . . . . 86/48/s La Pine . . . . . . . . 79/30/0.00 . . . . . . 82/38/s. . . . . . . 83/33/s Medford . . . . . . . 90/53/0.00 . . . . . . 91/54/s. . . . . . . 92/54/s Newport . . . . . . . 70/48/0.00 . . . . . 65/52/pc. . . . . . . 64/52/c North Bend . . . . . 72/46/0.00 . . . . . 66/52/pc. . . . . . 66/53/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 83/50/0.00 . . . . . . 83/53/s. . . . . . . 87/55/s Pendleton . . . . . . 79/44/0.00 . . . . . . 86/51/s. . . . . . 89/52/pc Portland . . . . . . . 81/50/0.00 . . . . . 81/60/pc. . . . . . . 80/59/c Prineville . . . . . . . 76/39/0.00 . . . . . . 81/43/s. . . . . . 86/48/pc Redmond. . . . . . . 80/35/0.00 . . . . . . 84/42/s. . . . . . . 85/46/s Roseburg. . . . . . . 88/52/0.00 . . . . . . 87/53/s. . . . . . . 87/58/s Salem . . . . . . . . . 82/47/0.00 . . . . . 82/56/pc. . . . . . 82/53/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 76/37/0.00 . . . . . . 82/41/s. . . . . . 84/44/pc The Dalles . . . . . . 86/47/0.00 . . . . . . 87/53/s. . . . . . 88/56/pc

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

5 HIGH

MEDIUM 2

4

6

V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75/43 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .90 in 1936 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.03” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 in 1958 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.39” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.70” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 7.77” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.10 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 1.16 in 1982 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97.....High Sisters................................High Bend, east of Hwy. 97......High La Pine...............................High Redmond/Madras.........Mod. Prineville ..........................High

LOW

Partly to mostly cloudy, cooler, slight LOW chance of showers.

79 43

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX Thursday Hi/Lo/W

HIGH

86 47

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .6:22 a.m. . . . . . .7:00 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .7:44 a.m. . . . . . .7:29 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .1:50 a.m. . . . . . .4:48 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .8:33 p.m. . . . . .10:27 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .8:25 a.m. . . . . . .7:52 p.m. Uranus . . . . . . .7:05 p.m. . . . . . .7:17 a.m.

OREGON CITIES

Calgary 73/49

82/40

74/32

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:51 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:05 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:52 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:03 p.m. Moonrise today . . . 12:04 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 3:30 p.m.

Vancouver

Eastern

Hampton

Crescent

Yesterday’s state extremes • 90° Medford • 28° Meacham

SUNDAY Mostly sunny to partly cloudy, warm.

87 47

BEND ALMANAC

Portland

Mostly sunny skies today. Mostly clear skies tonight.

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

81/60

Brothers

LOW

85 45

NORTHWEST

77/39

81/40

Sunriver

HIGH

Mostly sunny and warm.

An approaching cold front will bring increasing clouds to western locations today.

Paulina

La Pine

70s Crescent Lake

Partly cloudy skies today. Partly to mostly cloudy tonight. Central

86/46

SATURDAY

Partly cloudy and warm.

Tonight: Mostly clear and not as cold.

HIGH

FRIDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35,460 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106,260 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 79,906 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 26,994 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106,568 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 384 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,120 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,630 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 257 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 14.4 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

Vancouver 68/58

S

S

Calgary 73/49

S

Saskatoon 67/44

Seattle 78/57

S Winnipeg 55/39

S

S

Thunder Bay 57/39

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 72/57

Halifax 70/52 P ortland Billings (in the 48 To ronto Portland 70/58 contiguous states): 71/44 74/59 81/60 St. Paul Green Bay Boston 52/45 64/47 Boise 73/62 Buffalo Rapid City 81/49 • 107° Detroit 76/59 New York 61/42 75/56 Borrego Springs, Calif. 76/66 Des Moines Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus 65/45 Chicago 61/38 • 25° 73/59 78/68 72/53 Omaha San Francisco Stanley, Idaho Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 67/42 72/55 St. Louis City 78/69 Las Denver 76/53 • 5.65” Louisville 80/54 Kansas City Vegas 65/43 75/60 70/47 Langdon, N.D. 99/73 Charlotte 81/64 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Nashville 80/54 68/66 77/56 79/61 Phoenix Atlanta Little Rock Birmingham 104/76 Honolulu 80/67 83/60 88/73 Dallas Tijuana 84/65 91/65 80/63 New Orleans 88/73 Orlando Houston 91/75 Chihuahua 92/72 90/58 Miami 91/80 Monterrey La Paz 94/69 98/77 Mazatlan Anchorage 90/75 53/41 Juneau 53/43 Bismarck 55/36

FRONTS

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .93/58/0.00 . 90/61/pc . . 79/59/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .74/60/0.01 . . .74/58/r . . 68/51/sh Albany. . . . . . . . .66/55/0.11 . . .73/62/c . . . .76/60/r Albuquerque. . . .86/57/0.00 . 80/54/pc . . . 77/55/s Anchorage . . . . .53/45/0.07 . . .53/41/r . . . .53/44/r Atlanta . . . . . . . 77/64/trace . . .80/67/t . . . .82/67/t Atlantic City . . . .72/54/0.08 . . .77/66/r . . . .77/66/r Austin . . . . . . . . .95/56/0.00 . 92/66/pc . . 92/65/pc Baltimore . . . . . .73/63/0.04 . . .78/70/r . . . .79/70/r Billings. . . . . . . . .66/39/0.00 . . .71/44/s . . . 84/53/s Birmingham . . . .72/64/3.49 . . .84/65/t . . . .86/57/t Bismarck . . . . . . .56/48/0.74 . 55/36/pc . . . 66/46/s Boise . . . . . . . . . .82/50/0.00 . . .81/49/s . . . 86/52/s Boston. . . . . . . . .67/55/0.13 . 73/62/pc . . . .75/64/r Bridgeport, CT. . .70/62/0.13 . . .75/65/c . . . .75/66/r Buffalo . . . . . . . .68/59/0.17 . . .76/59/r . . . 68/56/c Burlington, VT. . .66/53/0.30 . 73/60/pc . . . .74/58/r Caribou, ME . . . .57/38/0.01 . . .68/50/s . . . .69/54/r Charleston, SC . .84/69/0.00 . . .85/73/t . . . .85/72/t Charlotte. . . . . . .76/60/0.00 . . .81/64/t . . . .82/64/t Chattanooga. . . .74/64/0.04 . . .82/63/t . . . .82/58/t Cheyenne . . . . . .61/39/0.00 . . .61/38/s . . . 73/46/s Chicago. . . . . . . .74/49/0.00 . 72/53/pc . . 62/52/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .77/64/0.01 . . .73/59/t . . 72/52/sh Cleveland . . . . . .72/61/0.01 . .75/60/sh . . . 68/55/c Colorado Springs 68/49/0.00 . 63/40/pc . . . 72/47/s Columbia, MO . .78/50/0.00 . . .72/48/c . . 69/47/pc Columbia, SC . . .79/68/0.00 . . .83/66/t . . . .85/68/t Columbus, GA. . .87/68/0.01 . . .84/68/t . . . .87/69/t Columbus, OH. . .75/63/0.04 . . .73/59/t . . . 72/52/c Concord, NH . . . .66/47/0.09 . 74/57/pc . . . .76/60/r Corpus Christi. . .91/72/0.00 . 88/74/pc . . 88/73/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .90/62/0.00 . 91/65/pc . . 84/61/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .74/61/0.05 . . .73/56/t . . 70/51/sh Denver. . . . . . . . .67/44/0.00 . 65/43/pc . . . 75/47/s Des Moines. . . . .79/56/0.01 . 65/45/pc . . 62/41/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . .72/54/0.00 . . .75/56/t . . . 67/52/c Duluth . . . . . . . . .60/52/0.09 . .51/40/sh . . . 53/42/c El Paso. . . . . . . . .94/67/0.00 . 92/64/pc . . 87/63/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . .63/49/0.00 . 61/37/pc . . . 52/38/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . .64/54/0.06 . .53/36/sh . . . 60/43/s Flagstaff . . . . . . .77/40/0.00 . . .76/41/s . . . 75/42/s

Yesterday WednesdayThursday Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .73/48/0.00 . .71/50/sh . . 62/44/sh Rapid City . . . . . .64/48/0.00 . . .61/42/s . . . 70/52/s Green Bay. . . . . .72/42/0.00 . .64/47/sh . . . 57/42/c Reno . . . . . . . . . .88/53/0.00 . . .89/54/s . . . 90/54/s Greensboro. . . . .75/59/0.00 . . .77/66/r . . . .78/66/t Richmond . . . . . .76/62/0.00 . . .80/68/r . . . .81/69/t Harrisburg. . . . . .75/61/0.01 . . .78/62/r . . . .77/62/t Rochester, NY . . .71/59/0.14 . . .76/60/r . . . .70/56/r Hartford, CT . . . .68/54/0.03 . . .77/62/c . . . .75/61/r Sacramento. . . . .98/60/0.00 . . .97/61/s . . . 98/61/s Helena. . . . . . . . .66/33/0.00 . . .76/46/s . . 82/52/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .77/53/0.00 . . .76/53/c . . 69/49/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .89/78/0.00 . . .88/73/s . . . 88/73/s Salt Lake City . . .79/54/0.00 . . .80/54/s . . . 83/56/s Houston . . . . . . .93/66/0.00 . 92/72/pc . . 90/69/pc San Antonio . . . .94/65/0.00 . 94/69/pc . . 93/67/pc Huntsville . . . . . .73/64/0.26 . . .82/62/t . . . .80/54/t San Diego . . . . . .71/63/0.00 . . .74/64/s . . . 75/64/s Indianapolis . . . .77/63/0.00 . . .77/55/t . . 69/50/pc San Francisco . . .86/58/0.00 . . .75/55/s . . . 75/55/s Jackson, MS . . . .85/69/0.00 . 84/65/pc . . . .86/60/t San Jose . . . . . . .94/63/0.00 . . .85/60/s . . . 86/59/s Jacksonville. . . . .85/71/1.05 . . .87/73/t . . . .87/71/t Santa Fe . . . . . . .81/46/0.00 . 73/46/pc . . 69/48/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .53/50/0.26 . . .53/43/r . . . .52/42/r Kansas City. . . . .82/54/0.00 . . .70/47/c . . 69/47/pc Lansing . . . . . . . .70/46/0.00 . .72/50/sh . . 64/46/sh Amsterdam. . . . .64/54/0.00 . .64/55/sh . . 60/49/pc Las Vegas . . . . .100/73/0.00 . . .99/73/s . . . 98/75/s Athens. . . . . . . . .84/62/0.00 . . .80/67/t . . . .83/68/t Lexington . . . . . .74/63/0.00 . . .73/60/t . . 71/53/sh Auckland. . . . . . .57/48/0.00 . 63/49/pc . . 61/50/sh Lincoln. . . . . . . . .75/55/0.00 . . .69/43/c . . 68/44/pc Baghdad . . . . . . .88/86/0.00 . .106/76/s . . 105/74/s Little Rock. . . . . .79/61/0.00 . 83/60/pc . . . 77/55/c Bangkok . . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . . .88/78/t . . . .88/77/t Los Angeles. . . . .70/60/0.00 . . .68/66/s . . . 70/66/s Beijing. . . . . . . . .79/46/0.00 . . .74/48/s . . . 79/52/s Louisville . . . . . . .75/64/0.00 . . .75/60/t . . . 73/54/c Beirut. . . . . . . . . .84/75/0.00 . . .86/76/s . . . 86/77/s Madison, WI . . . .76/44/0.00 . 64/46/pc . . 56/44/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . .66/46/0.00 . 69/51/pc . . 65/48/pc Memphis. . . . . . .79/66/0.00 . 81/63/pc . . . 79/55/c Bogota . . . . . . . .68/46/0.00 . .64/51/sh . . 65/52/sh Miami . . . . . . . . .91/79/0.01 . 91/80/pc . . . .90/80/t Budapest. . . . . . .68/57/0.00 . 78/55/pc . . 79/54/pc Milwaukee . . . . .75/49/0.00 . 68/50/pc . . . 60/50/c Buenos Aires. . . .73/45/0.00 . . .74/51/s . . 69/51/pc Minneapolis . . . .73/55/0.04 . .52/45/sh . . . 59/44/c Cabo San Lucas .99/75/0.00 . . .95/78/s . . . 96/79/s Nashville . . . . . . .78/64/0.17 . . .79/61/t . . . 81/53/c Cairo . . . . . . . . . .91/73/0.00 . . .90/72/s . . . 91/72/s New Orleans. . . .86/70/0.00 . . .88/73/t . . . .88/69/t Calgary . . . . . . . .63/37/0.00 . . .73/49/s . . 75/51/pc New York . . . . . .67/61/0.06 . . .76/66/r . . . .77/67/r Cancun . . . . . . . .86/68/0.00 . . .87/72/t . . . .87/73/t Newark, NJ . . . . .70/61/0.04 . . .77/66/r . . 78/66/sh Dublin . . . . . . . . .57/46/0.00 . .59/47/sh . . 59/48/sh Norfolk, VA . . . . .79/64/0.00 . . .80/70/r . . . .81/71/t Edinburgh . . . . . .59/48/0.00 . .56/49/sh . . 56/47/pc Oklahoma City . .88/54/0.00 . . .77/56/c . . . .70/56/t Geneva . . . . . . . .64/43/0.00 . . .75/49/s . . . 73/48/s Omaha . . . . . . . .75/62/0.00 . . .67/42/c . . 65/44/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .88/59/0.00 . . .87/57/s . . . 84/55/s Orlando. . . . . . . .88/74/0.00 . . .91/75/t . . . .91/74/t Hong Kong . . . . .82/77/0.00 . 88/76/pc . . . 87/77/c Palm Springs. . .106/76/0.00 . .105/74/s . . 106/75/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .81/68/0.00 . . .83/69/t . . . .78/66/t Peoria . . . . . . . . .77/50/0.00 . 72/48/pc . . 64/46/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .83/65/0.00 . . .87/67/s . . . 87/66/s Philadelphia . . . .70/60/0.03 . . .78/68/r . . . .78/67/r Johannesburg . . .68/45/0.00 . . .75/48/s . . . 77/51/s Phoenix. . . . . . .105/74/0.00 . .104/76/s . . 104/79/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .66/59/0.00 . 64/58/pc . . 65/59/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .73/62/0.03 . . .74/61/r . . . .71/55/r Lisbon . . . . . . . . .88/61/0.00 . . .84/62/s . . . 82/62/s Portland, ME. . . .65/48/0.04 . . .70/58/s . . . .72/59/r London . . . . . . . .66/57/0.00 . .64/49/sh . . 63/48/pc Providence . . . . .67/52/0.01 . 75/63/pc . . . .76/64/r Madrid . . . . . . . .86/50/0.00 . . .88/55/s . . 87/56/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . .78/64/0.00 . . .79/67/r . . . .80/70/t Manila. . . . . . . . .86/77/0.00 . . .86/76/t . . . .87/77/t

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . .83/71/0.02 . . .86/73/t . . . .86/72/t Seattle. . . . . . . . .77/48/0.00 . 78/57/pc . . . .68/57/r Sioux Falls. . . . . .68/56/0.03 . 61/38/pc . . 60/40/pc Spokane . . . . . . .72/44/0.00 . . .78/54/s . . 82/56/pc Springfield, MO. .79/49/0.00 . . .73/50/c . . 68/49/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .91/77/0.00 . . .91/76/t . . . .91/77/t Tucson. . . . . . . . .99/66/0.00 . . .96/68/s . . . 96/68/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .85/54/0.00 . . .76/55/c . . 74/54/sh Washington, DC .72/64/0.16 . . .78/69/r . . . .80/68/r Wichita . . . . . . . .87/56/0.00 . . .71/50/c . . 75/53/pc Yakima . . . . . . . .81/40/0.00 . . .85/51/s . . 86/51/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . .106/74/0.00 . .105/75/s . . 106/75/s

INTERNATIONAL Mecca . . . . . . . .109/84/0.00 . .108/85/s . . 109/85/s Mexico City. . . . .75/59/0.00 . . .75/55/t . . . .76/54/t Montreal. . . . . . .70/54/0.00 . 73/59/pc . . . .70/56/t Moscow . . . . . . .66/45/0.00 . .59/46/sh . . 60/48/sh Nairobi . . . . . . . .82/59/0.00 . 81/58/pc . . . .79/59/t Nassau . . . . . . . .91/81/0.00 . . .89/80/t . . . .90/81/t New Delhi. . . . . .90/75/0.00 . 91/77/pc . . . 93/77/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .72/70/0.00 . .81/66/sh . . 77/63/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .59/46/0.00 . 58/44/pc . . 55/43/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . .70/57/0.00 . 73/57/pc . . . .70/55/t Paris. . . . . . . . . . .66/57/0.00 . 70/50/pc . . . 68/49/s Rio de Janeiro. . .70/68/0.00 . 85/67/pc . . 82/66/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . .77/54/0.00 . 81/60/pc . . . 83/61/s Santiago . . . . . . .82/43/0.00 . 78/46/pc . . . .68/43/t Sao Paulo . . . . . .70/63/0.00 . .79/60/sh . . . 77/59/s Sapporo. . . . . . not available . .63/55/sh . . 61/52/sh Seoul . . . . . . . . . .73/54/0.00 . 73/54/pc . . . 76/54/s Shanghai. . . . . . .70/63/0.00 . 76/64/pc . . 77/65/pc Singapore . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . . .85/78/t . . . .86/78/t Stockholm. . . . . .61/50/0.00 . 61/49/pc . . 57/47/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . .84/59/0.00 . 70/55/pc . . . 74/53/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . .81/72/0.00 . .84/73/sh . . . 84/74/c Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . . .89/75/s . . . 87/74/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .72/68/0.00 . . .80/73/t . . 81/70/sh Toronto . . . . . . . .70/54/0.00 . . .74/59/t . . 69/53/sh Vancouver. . . . . .68/50/0.00 . . .68/58/r . . 66/58/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . .55/50/0.00 . 72/52/pc . . 70/52/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . 71/50/pc . . 69/49/pc

Oregon Democratic leader wants focus on foreclosures, small business By Jonathan J. Cooper The Associated Press

PORTLAND — The new Democratic leader in the Oregon House said Tuesday that she wants the Legislature to focus on foreclosures and on financing for small businesses. Those issues are among some of Rep. Tina Kotek’s top priorities as lawmakers figure out how to spend their time when they return to the Capitol early next year. “Banks don’t want us touching those things, and we are going to have a conversation about that in February,” Kotek told The Associated Press in an interview. “Those two things, capital for businesses and people in foreclosure, are going to help the middle class.” Kotek became her party’s leader in June when Democrats ousted Rep. Dave Hunt, of Gladstone, in a rare midterm leadership shake-up. Lawmakers are returning to Salem this week for their first official business since Kotek took over as the Democratic chief. They’ll hold committee meetings to discuss potential changes to state law but will not work on specific bills. Kotek and other Democrats tried this year to pass bills requiring banks to maintain foreclosed properties, slow the foreclosure process and require more regulations. But the bills languished without GOP support. Democrats are sharing power with Republicans in the House after voters elected 30 members from each party. Party leaders reached an agreement requiring members of each party to sign off on any bill before it can receive a vote. Aside from foreclosure and

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day

business finance issues, Kotek said she’s still working with other Democrats to finalize priorities for a 35-day Legislative session that begins in February. She said she expects discussion about a health insurance exchange and overhauling the state’s Medicaid system to dominate much of the Legislature’s time, along with updates to the state budget. Kotek, 44, was elected to the

Legislature in 2007 after working for several years as a lobbyist advocating for education, social justice and safety net programs for the Oregon Food Bank and later for Children First. She represents North and Northeast Portland and is the only openly gay member of the Legislature. She is the descendent of four grandparents who emigrated from Eastern Europe, and she

said her family’s benefits from public education have driven her to focus on improving conditions for vulnerable populations. “I always try to put our most low-income families and kids first,” Kotek said. Democrats won’t be able to accomplish their loftiest ambitions while sharing power with Republicans, Kotek said, so she’s focusing much of her time on trying to

retake the majority in the 2012 election. She said she decided to challenge Hunt because “there’s always room for change” and she felt she had the relationships and leadership skills needed for the job. “Given the environment that we have here, I’m very proud to be working as our caucus leader because I think I have a style that will get the job done but also help

us bring back the majority next year,” Kotek said. Hunt announced Tuesday that he’s running for chair of the Clackamas County Commission. “I’ll work with whoever I’m supposed to work with,” said Rep. Kevin Cameron, of Salem, Kotek’s Republican counterpart. “Each one of us has our own strengths, weaknesses, different personalities.”


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Golf Inside Teenager Lexi Thompson looks to join LPGA as a full-time player, see Page D5.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2011

COLLEGE BASEBALL UO baseball to play intrasquad game in Bend on Oct. 1 For the third year in a row, the University of Oregon baseball team will travel to Central Oregon as part of its fall schedule. The Ducks, under head coach George Horton, are scheduled to play an intrasquad game on Saturday, Oct. 1, at Vince Genna Stadium in Bend. The scrimmage is set to begin at 1 p.m. The event is hosted by the Bend Elks summer collegiate baseball club. Admission to the game is free. Concessions will be available on the barbecue deck at the stadium. Following the intrasquad contest, UO players and coaches will host a free baseball clinic for kids. Jim Richards, owner and general manager of the Bend Elks, confirmed that the Oregon State University baseball team, which has scheduled intrasquad games in Bend each of the last several years, does not plan to play in Central Oregon this fall. For more information, visit www.bendelks.com. — Bulletin staff report

PREP BOYS SOCCER

Storm cruise past Cowboys Quick start propels Summit Bulletin staff report Scoring three goals in the first 20 minutes of the match, Summit rolled past Crook County 8-0 on Tuesday in a Intermountain Hybrid boys soccer match at Summit High. Storm junior Dan Maunder scored twice in the first half to give the Storm a 4-0 lead at halftime. “The boys came out hard and focused,� said Summit coach Ron Kidder. In the second half, Michael Wilson, Dalio Losch, Nigel Jones and Duke Bendis all recorded goals for the Storm, who improved to

2-4 overall. “We executed what we were doing in practice, • Coverage of which was playing off the Tuesday’s forwards,â€? said Maunder, prep sports who scored the game’s first events, goal in the 11th minute. Page D4 In his first varsity match, Crook County goalkeeper Troy Jackson saved multiple shots. Jackson was filling in for the Cowboys’ starting goalkeeper, Brady Slater, who missed the game because of a knee injury. Crook County (0-3-1) is back on the field on Thursday at Bend High. The Storm play Saturday at Central Catholic of Portland.

Inside

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Summit’s Dan Maunder, right, takes a shot at goal past Michael Kreachbaum during the first half against Crook County on Tuesday in Bend.

TEE TO GREEN

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Pac-12 decides against further expansion

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

By Ralph D. Russo

Bend’s Enyart, former OSU star, to be feted Saturday Former Oregon State football great Bill Enyart, a longtime Bend resident and a recent selection to the College Football Hall of Fame, will be recognized by the National Football Foundation in Corvallis this Saturday during the Oregon State game at Reser Stadium. Enyart, who starred as a fullback at OSU in 1967 and 1968, will receive an NFF Hall of Fame On-Campus Salute during the Beavers’ 12:30 p.m. Pac-12 Conference game against UCLA, the NFF announced Tuesday. A first-team All-American in 1968 and a two-time allPac-8 selection for OSU, Enyart was drafted by the Buffalo Bills and played three seasons of pro football for the Bills and the Oakland Raiders. Enyart was one of 14 players and two coaches who in May were selected as the 2011 class for induction in the College Football Hall of Fame. — Bulletin staff report

INSIDE MLB AL

NL

Indians ....... 4-4 White Sox .. 3-5

Nationals ... 4-3 Phillies....... 3-0

Yankees .........5 Rays ...............0

Reds...............6 Astros ............4

Angels ......... 10 Blue Jays .......6

Braves............4 Marlins ..........0

Orioles ...........7 Red Sox .........5

Brewers..........5 Cubs ..............1

Royals .......... 10 Tigers ............2

Cardinals ..... 11 Mets...............6

Mariners ........5 Twins .............4

Padres ...........2 Rockies ..........1

Rangers .........7 Athletics.........2

Pirates ...........5 D’backs ..........3 Dodgers .........2 Giants ............1

Results, see Page D3

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Major League Baseball ........ D3, 4 Prep Sports .............................. D4 College football ........................ D4 Tee to Green......................... D5, 6

The Associated Press

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Golfer Willie Nelson, 48 of Beaverton, tees off on a hole at Tetherow Golf Club Saturday morning. “I’m kind of a fairweather golfer, that’s why I’m wearing all this stuff,� he said between each chilly breeze.

Fall is prime time Golf courses less expensive and quieter, weather milder for those in the know

L

ittle in the way of weather prevents Allen Hare from playing golf. “I don’t have the sense to come in from the cold,� confesses the 67-yearold retiree from Redmond, who says he plays golf all year: rain, snow or shine. Hare is wrapping up a round on a sunny though cool and breezy day. It is the kind of September afternoon that reminds Central Oregonians that fall is here and winter is not far off. But it is more than up to snuff for

10,000 meter runner Galen Rupp Yves Logghe / The Associated Press

ZACK HALL Hare. He, like most other local golfers, knows this part of year can be among the best times to play golf in this region. “It’s actually kind of refreshing,�

Hare says of the cooler weather as he loads his clubs into his sedan in the parking lot after a round at Juniper Golf Course, his home track. “The only downside is the breeze,� he adds. But for the most part, the shoulder golf season in Central Oregon — the time between the peak summer golf season and when snow and ice make finding a little white ball a chore — is ideal. For starters, many courses charge less for a round of golf in the fall, which can be a particularly good deal considering September and October often present dry, mild conditions that are comfortable to play in. See Fall / D6

TRACK & FIELD

Rupp gears up for London with American record

NEW YORK — Twelve is enough for the Pac-12, putting the Big 12 in position to survive yet another round of conference realignment. The Pac-12 presidents and chancellors decided late Tuesday night not to expand. “After careful review we have determined that it is in the best interests of our member institutions, student-athletes and fans to remain a 12-team conference,� Commissioner Larry Scott said in a statement. “While we have great respect for all of the institutions that have contacted us, and certain expansion proposals were financially attractive, we have a strong conference structure and culture of equality that we are committed to preserve.� Texas, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State and Texas Tech were considering a potential move from the Big 12 to the Pac-12. After expanding from the Pac-10 with new members Utah and Colorado last year, members of the new Pac-12 decided not to stretch the league farther east. “We were not surprised by the Pac 12’s decision to not expand at this time,� Oklahoma President David Boren said. “Even though we had decided not to apply for membership this year, we have developed a positive relationship with the leadership of the conference and we have kept them informed of the progress we’ve been making to gain agreement from the Big 12 for changes which will make the conference more stable in the future. See Expansion / D4

Experience‌

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

‌ Pronghorn

By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

PORTLAND — Galen Rupp’s American record in the 10,000 meters is both the culmination of a successful year and a jumping-off point for his bid for the London Olympics. Rupp, considered one of America’s best hopes for an Olympic medal in a distance that has been dominated for the past two decades by Ethiopians and Kenyans, set the American record in the 10,000 meters in 26 minutes, 48 seconds, at the Van Damme Memorial in Brussels last Friday. He came in third behind Olympic champion Kenenisa Bekele, of Ethiopia, who ran a season-best 26:43.16. Bekele took the lead from Kenyan Lucas Rotich with a lap to go. During the race, Rupp tried not to pay attention to the times. “I really tried to put it out of my head. Toward the end, I think, with about 600 meters to go, I saw what the time was. At that point I was able to kind of figure out that I was on pace to do something special.� Rupp’s time surpassed Chris Solinsky’s American record set last year by a full 11 seconds. See Rupp / D4

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D2 Wednesday, September 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, Tampa Bay Rays at New York Yankees, ESPN. 5 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Minnesota Twins, Root Sports. 7 p.m. — MLB, Texas Rangers at Oakland Athletics, ESPN.

VOLLEYBALL 6:30 p.m. — High school, Redmond at Mountain View, COTV.

THURSDAY SOCCER 12:30 a.m. — MLS, San Jose Earthquakes at Portland Timbers (sameday tape), Root Sports.

GOLF 6 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Austrian Open, first round, Golf Channel. 10 a.m. — PGA Tour, Tour Championship, first round, Golf Channel. 11:30 p.m. — LPGA Tour, Solheim Cup, Golf Channel.

BASEBALL 10 a.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Minnesota Twins, Root Sports. 4 p.m. — MLB, Tampa Bay Rays at New York Yankees or Los Angeles Angels at Toronto Blue Jays, MLB Network.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — WNBA playoffs, Conference Finals, Atlanta Dream at Indiana Fever, ESPN2. 6 p.m. — WNBA playoffs, Conference Finals, Phoenix Mercury at Minnesota Lynx, ESPN2.

FOOTBALL

Guangzhou, China Purse: $220,000 (Intl.) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles First Round Chanelle Scheepers (7), South Africa, def, Anastasija Sevastova, Latvia, 7-5, 1-6, 6-3. Tetiana Luzhanska, Ukraine, def. Bojana Jovanovski (5), Serbia, 6-3, 4-6, 7-6 (4). Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia, def. Jill Craybas, United States, 6-3, 4-6, 6-2. Hsieh Su-wei, Taiwan, def. Lu Jingjing, China, 6-0, 6-2. Aravane Rezai, France, def, Zhang Shuai, China, 6-2, 7-6 (2). Jarmila Gajdosova (2), Australia, def. Han Xinyun, China, 6-2, 6-1. Zhao Yijing, China, def. Misaki Doi, Japan, 6-4, 6-3. Zarina Diyas, Kazakhstan, def. Sun Shengnan, China, 6-1, 6-4. Chan Yung-jan, Taiwan, def. Ksenia Pervak, Russia, 4-1, retired. Mandy Minella, Luxembourg, def. Xu Yifan, China, 2-6, 7-6 (5), 6-0. Maria Kirilenko (1), Russia, def. Alona Bondarenko, Ukraine, 6-4, 6-2. Iryna Bremond, France, def. Mariya Koryttseva, Ukraine, 6-1, 6-3. Zheng Jie, China, def. Alberta Brianti (6), Italy, 7-6 (3), 6-4.

IN THE BLEACHERS

ON DECK

TODAY

Today Cross country: Bend at Sisters Invitational, 4 p.m. Volleyball: Mountain View at Redmond, 6:30 p.m. Thursday Boys soccer: Crook County at Bend, 5:30 p.m.; Madras at La Salle, 6:30 p.m.; Junction City at Sisters, 4:30 p.m. Girls soccer: Bend at Crook County, 4 p.m.; Summit at Sherwood, 4 p.m.; La Salle at Madras, 4 p.m.; Sisters at Junction City, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Elmira, 4 p.m. Volleyball: Thurston at Redmond, 7 p.m.; Crook County at Bend, 6:30 p.m.; Madras at La Salle, 6 p.m.; La Pine at Cottage Grove, 6:45 p.m.; Sisters at Elmira, 6:45 p.m.; Kennedy at Culver, 6 p.m. Friday Cross country: Redmond, Bend at Far East Salem Invitational in Redmond, 4:15 p.m. Football: Oregon City at Redmond, 7 p.m.; Sandy at Bend, 7 p.m.; South Salem at Mountain View, 7 p.m.; The Dalles Wahtonka at Summit, 7 p.m.; Crook County at Madras, 7 p.m.; Sisters at Gladstone, 7 p.m.; Henley at La Pine, 7 p.m.; North Lake at Gilchrist, 4 p.m. Girls soccer: Thurston at Redmond, 3 p.m. Volleyball: North Lake at Gilchrist, 4 p.m.; Trinity Lutheran at Butte Falls, 3 p.m. Saturday Boys soccer: Central Catholic at Summit, 1 p.m.; Umatilla at Central Christian, 1 p.m. Cross country: Mountain View, Madras, Crook County, Sisters, La Pine at the Three Course Challenge in Seaside, TBA Volleyball: Redmond, Bend, Mountain View, Summit, Crook County at Rogue Valley Classic in Medford, TBA; Madras at Century Tournament, 8 a.m.; Sisters host Sisters Invitational, 8 a.m.; Gilchrist at Bend Freshman Tournament, 9 a.m.; Central Christian at Redside Tournament at South Wasco County, TBA.

5 p.m. — College, North Carolina State at Cincinnati, ESPN.

AUTO RACING

SOCCER 8 p.m. — Women’s International, United States vs. Canada, ESPN2.

S   B Golf • Redmond golfer dominates college tournament: Redmond’s Alex Fitch, a Linfield College senior, blistered Chehalem Glenn Golf Course in Newberg last weekend to win the George Fox Invitational. Fitch, a former Redmond High School golf standout, shot a 4-under 70-70—140 to outpace Linfield teammate and runner-up A.J. Taylor by nine strokes. Fitch’s performance led Linfield, an NCAA Division III school in McMinnville, to a 55-stroke win over George Fox in the three-team tournament.

Basketball • Staffs of NBA, union to meet today, according to source: Representatives for NBA owners and players will meet twice this week, perhaps only days before training camps would have to be postponed without a new labor deal. Staffs from both sides will meet today without leadership from either side, a person with knowledge of the plans said Tuesday. Commissioner David Stern, Deputy Commissioner Adam Silver, union executive director Billy Hunter, president Derek Fisher of the Lakers and other top negotiators would rejoin the talks for another meeting Thursday. • Two officers indicted in Maryland college student beating: Two police officers were indicted Tuesday in the beating of a University of Maryland student in Upper Marlboro, Md., during a rowdy celebration that was caught on video after the school’s basketball win over Duke last year, prosecutors said. Prince George’s County Officers Reginald Baker and James Harrison, both of the department’s special operations division, were indicted on charges of first- and second-degree assault and misconduct in office, said County State’s Attorney Angela Alsobrooks.

Baseball • A’s manager Melvin getting three-year deal: Two people with knowledge of the negotiations say the Oakland Athletics have reached an agreement to name Bob Melvin their permanent manager with a new three-year contract. Melvin is expected to formally receive his new deal in the coming days, both people said, speaking on condition of anonymity to The Associated Press on Tuesday because there had been no announcement by the team. The 49year-old Melvin took over for the fired Bob Geren in June and had a 42-48 record heading into Tuesday night’s series opener with the AL West-leading Texas Rangers.

Boxing • Pascal may get rubber match with WBC champion Hopkins: Jean Pascal may get a third fight with WBC champion Bernard Hopkins after all. Promoter Yvon Michel said Tuesday that when a proposed bout with IBF champion Tavoris Cloud fell through, HBO told him Pascal would fight either Hopkins or Chad Dawson some time in 2012. Hopkins and Dawson are scheduled to fight on Oct. 15 in Los Angeles. Pascal, of Montreal, kept his title in a majority draw in his first meeting with Hopkins and lost the belt in the rematch.

Football • Ngata signs five-year, $61 million deal with Ravens: The Baltimore Ravens signed defensive tackle Haloti Ngata to a five-year, $61 million contract on Tuesday. His agent, Mike McCartney, said Ngata will get $40 million in the first two years of the deal. The All-Pro defensive tackle has 10 tackles, six solos, one forced fumble and two fumble recoveries. Ngata was selected 12th overall by the Ravens in the 2006 draft. The former Oregon player has 12 career sacks, three interceptions, three forced fumbles and four fumble recoveries. • Sugar Bowl made improper campaign donations: The Sugar Bowl acknowledged it made several campaign donations to then-Gov. Kathleen Blanco of Louisiana in the mid-2000s — in violation of federal tax law — and a group has filed a complaint about the matter with the IRS. Sugar Bowl spokesman John Sudsbury said Tuesday that bowl representatives mistakenly bought tickets for fundraising dinners for the Democratic governor in 2004 and 2006, totaling $3,000.

Soccer • Turkey bans men; 41,000 women attend soccer match: Turkey tried a new approach to curbing crowd violence at soccer games — kick out all the men, but let women and children attend for free. Under new rules approved by Turkey’s soccer association, only women and children under 12 will be admitted to games involving teams sanctioned for unruly fan behavior. On Tuesday, Fenerbahce handed out free tickets and more than 41,000 women and children attended the game against Manisaspor in Istanbul. Women formed long lines around Sukru Saracoglu stadium, some carrying babies in the team’s colors, for an opportunity to watch the club. — Staff and wire reports

MADRAS DRAGSTRIP ——— Sept. 17 Results (ET, MPH, dial) Sportsman — W: Ken Hudson, Mosier, 1957 Chev, 8.21, 84.91, 8.21. R/U: Loy Petersen, Madras, 1940 Buick Special, 8.64, 79.23, 8.66. Semis: Gregory Hentsen, Damascus, 1974 Camro, 9.30, 77.45, 9.29; Mark Tabert, Sherwood, 1954 Chevy, 9.31, 78.95, 9.28. Pro — W: Gregg Heriford, Vancouver, Wash., 1972 Vega GT, 6.81, 101.3, 6.81. R/U: David Carter, Powell Butte, 1978 Chev Camero, 7.57, 90.18, 7.60. Semis: Richard Gray, Crooked River Ranch, 1970 Nova, 12.9, 76.53, 7.18. Super Pro — W: Lindsay Keever, The Dalles, 1967 Camaro, 6.41, 106.1, 6.42. R/U: Jim Lovoi, Crooked River Ranch, 1965 Nova, 6.47, 106.3, 6.43. Semis: Rodney Gregg, Madras, 1963 Dodge 440, 6.44, 106.6, 6.41; Keith Johnson, Bend, 1966 Fairlane, 9.42, 52.88, 7.11. Sept. 18 Results (ET, MPH, dial) Sportsman — W: Dan Swick, Dufur, 1964 Rambler American, 9.12, 73.77, 9.08. R/U: James Love, Bend, 1970 Buick Grand Sport, 8.34, 82.27, 8.35. Pro — W: John Farlow, Bend, 1975 Datsun 280Z, 7.42, 92.59, 7.37. R/U: Marc Pruett, Vancouver, Wash., 1955 Chevy 150 Wagon, 6.68, 100.9, 6.63. Super Pro — W: Tok Stockero, Bend, 1967 Camaro, 5.96, 114.8, 5.96. R/U: Lindsay Keever, The Dalles, 1967 Camaro, 6.45, 105.1, 6.43. Semis: Richard Trickey, Eugene, 1957 Chev, 6.58, 110.5, 6.54. Test & Tune — W: Andrea Mathews, Bend, 1972 Vega, 7.16, 101.3, 0.00.

FOOTBALL NFL National Football League All Times PDT AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct New England 2 0 0 1.000 Buffalo 2 0 0 1.000 N.Y. Jets 2 0 0 1.000 Miami 0 2 0 .000 South W L T Pct Houston 2 0 0 1.000 Jacksonville 1 1 0 .500 Tennessee 1 1 0 .500 Indianapolis 0 2 0 .000 North W L T Pct Baltimore 1 1 0 .500 Cincinnati 1 1 0 .500 Cleveland 1 1 0 .500 Pittsburgh 1 1 0 .500 West W L T Pct Oakland 1 1 0 .500 San Diego 1 1 0 .500 Denver 1 1 0 .500 Kansas City 0 2 0 .000 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct Washington 2 0 0 1.000 Dallas 1 1 0 .500 Philadelphia 1 1 0 .500 N.Y. Giants 1 1 0 .500 South W L T Pct New Orleans 1 1 0 .500 Atlanta 1 1 0 .500 Tampa Bay 1 1 0 .500 Carolina 0 2 0 .000 North W L T Pct Green Bay 2 0 0 1.000 Detroit 2 0 0 1.000 Chicago 1 1 0 .500 Minnesota 0 2 0 .000 West W L T Pct San Francisco 1 1 0 .500 Arizona 1 1 0 .500 St. Louis 0 2 0 .000 Seattle 0 2 0 .000 ——— Sunday’s Games Houston at New Orleans, 10 a.m. Denver at Tennessee, 10 a.m. Detroit at Minnesota, 10 a.m. San Francisco at Cincinnati, 10 a.m. New England at Buffalo, 10 a.m. N.Y. Giants at Philadelphia, 10 a.m. Miami at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Jacksonville at Carolina, 10 a.m. Kansas City at San Diego, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Oakland, 1:05 p.m. Baltimore at St. Louis, 1:05 p.m. Arizona at Seattle, 1:15 p.m. Green Bay at Chicago, 1:15 p.m. Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 1:15 p.m. Pittsburgh at Indianapolis, 5:20 p.m. Monday’s Game Washington at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.

PF 73 79 59 37

PA 45 42 27 61

PF 57 19 40 26

PA 20 46 29 61

PF 48 49 44 31

PA 33 41 46 35

PF 58 45 44 10

PA 58 52 45 89

PF 50 51 62 42

PA 35 51 48 44

PF 64 47 44 44

PA 55 61 47 58

PF 72 75 43 37

PA 57 23 42 48

PF 57 49 29 17

PA 44 43 59 57

NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Sunday BENGALS 1.5 2.5 49ers Patriots 9 9 BILLS SAINTS 4 4 Texans EAGLES NL NL Giants BROWNS 3 2.5 Dolphins TITANS 5.5 7 Broncos Lions 3.5 3.5 VIKINGS PANTHERS 3 3.5 Jaguars CHARGERS 14.5 14.5 Chiefs Jets 3.5 3.5 RAIDERS Ravens 3.5 3.5 RAMS BUCCANEERS 1 1.5 Falcons Cardinals 3 3 SEAHAWKS Packers 3.5 3.5 BEARS Steelers 10.5 10.5 COLTS Monday COWBOYS NL NL Redskins Favorite

College BYU OHIO ST DUKE SYRACUSE E. CAROLINA S. FLORIDA ILLINOIS

Thursday 7.5 Friday 3.5 3 Saturday 15 14.5 10.5 10 3 2.5 13 13 28 29 13 13.5 7

5 28.5 12.5 22.5 9 23.5 9.5 6 3 19 13 3 5 8.5 5 16.5 5.5 PK 9.5 6 10 3 20 15.5 18 18 3 3 23 20.5 6.5 29.5 14 2.5 32 18. 12 7.5 17

4 Ohio U. 29 E. Michigan 13 Kansas St 22 MEMPHIS 9 Temple 24 C. Michigan 9.5 MISSISSIPPI 5 Bowling Green 4 BALL ST 20 MARSHALL 11.5 Arkansas 2 California 5.5 W. VIRGINIA 10 San Diego St 6.5 N. Carolina 19 KENTUCKY 6.5 PITTSBURGH PK Florida St 9.5 New Mexico St 4 IDAHO 9 BUFFALO 4 UCLA 20.5 Nevada 16 Vanderbilt 19.5 La. Tech 20 Rice 3 Southern Miss 3.5 Oklahoma St 24 WYOMING 22 Missouri 8.5 Colorado St 32.5 Tulsa 16 ARIZONA 2.5 Usc 33 Fla. Atlantic 17 UL-Monroe 12.5 Mid. Tenn. St 7 NORTH TEXAS 17 UL-Lafayette

College

Betting Line

CINCINNATI

RUTGERS PENN ST MIAMI-FLA Smu MARYLAND MICHIGAN ST Georgia MIAMI-OHIO Army Virginia Tech ALABAMA WASHINGTON Lsu MICHIGAN GEORGIA TECH Florida Notre Dame CLEMSON SAN JOSE ST Fresno St Connecticut OREGON ST TEXAS TECH S. CAROLINA MISSISSIPPI ST BAYLOR VIRGINIA TEXAS A&M Nebraska OKLAHOMA UTAH ST BOISE ST Oregon ARIZONA ST AUBURN IOWA TROY Indiana FLORIDA INT’L

NC State C. Florida Colorado Tulane Toledo Uab Utep W. Michigan

Schedule All Times PDT (Subject to change) Thursday’s Games SOUTH Murray St. at UT-Martin, 4 p.m. Hampton at Bethune-Cookman, 4:30 p.m. MIDWEST NC State at Cincinnati, 5 p.m. ——— Friday’s Game FAR WEST UCF at BYU, 5 p.m. ——— Saturday’s Games EAST Monmouth (NJ) at CCSU, 9 a.m. Old Dominion at Delaware, 9 a.m. E. Michigan at Penn St., 9 a.m. Notre Dame at Pittsburgh, 9 a.m. Toledo at Syracuse, 9 a.m. Cornell at Yale, 9 a.m. Albany (NY) at Columbia, 9:30 a.m. Liberty at Lehigh, 9:30 a.m. UMass at Boston College, 10 a.m. Wagner at Bryant, 10 a.m. Georgetown at Marist, 10 a.m. Fordham at Rhode Island, 10 a.m. Dartmouth at Sacred Heart, 10 a.m. Ohio at Rutgers, 11 a.m. Morgan St. vs. Howard at East Rutherford, N.J., 1 p.m. UConn at Buffalo, 3 p.m. Bucknell at Princeton, 3 p.m. Lafayette at Stony Brook, 3 p.m. Penn at Villanova, 3 p.m. Brown at Harvard, 4 p.m. Duquesne at St. Francis (Pa.), 4 p.m. Colgate at Towson, 4 p.m. LSU at West Virginia, 5 p.m. SOUTH North Carolina at Georgia Tech, 9 a.m. SMU at Memphis, 9 a.m. Georgia at Mississippi, 9:21 a.m. Temple at Maryland, 9:30 a.m. San Diego at Morehead St., 9:30 a.m. Jacksonville at Campbell, 10 a.m. Presbyterian at Furman, 10 a.m. Norfolk St. at Charleston Southern, 10:30 a.m. The Citadel at Elon, 10:30 a.m. Delaware St. at SC State, 11 a.m. Arkansas at Alabama, 12:30 p.m. Chattanooga at Appalachian St., 12:30 p.m. Florida St. at Clemson, 12:30 p.m. Tulane at Duke, 12:30 p.m. UAB at East Carolina, 12:30 p.m. Virginia Tech at Marshall, 12:30 p.m. Kansas St. at Miami, 12:30 p.m. New Hampshire at Richmond, 12:30 p.m. Florida A&M vs. Southern U. at Atlanta, 12:30 p.m. Middle Tennessee at Troy, 12:30 p.m. Southern Miss. at Virginia, 12:30 p.m. Coastal Carolina at NC A&T, 1 p.m. Northwestern St. at Nicholls St., 1 p.m. Alabama St. at Jackson St., 2 p.m. Louisiana-Lafayette at FIU, 3 p.m. W. Carolina at Georgia Southern, 3 p.m. Alabama A&M at Grambling St., 3 p.m. Savannah St. at NC Central, 3 p.m. FAU at Auburn, 4 p.m. E. Kentucky at Austin Peay, 4 p.m. Johnson C. Smith at Davidson, 4 p.m. E. Illinois at Jacksonville St., 4 p.m. Florida at Kentucky, 4 p.m. Louisiana Tech at Mississippi St., 4 p.m. Vanderbilt at South Carolina, 4 p.m. UTEP at South Florida, 4 p.m. James Madison at William & Mary, 4 p.m. Samford at Wofford, 4 p.m. SE Louisiana at McNeese St., 5 p.m. SE Missouri at Tennessee Tech, 5 p.m. MIDWEST Louisiana-Monroe at Iowa, 9 a.m. San Diego St. at Michigan, 9 a.m. Cent. Michigan at Michigan St., 9 a.m. Drake at Butler, 10 a.m. Bowling Green at Miami (Ohio), 10 a.m. Dayton at Central St., Ohio, 10:30 a.m. VMI at Akron, 11 a.m. Army at Ball St., 11 a.m. Youngstown St. at Indiana St., 11:05 a.m. W. Michigan at Illinois, 12:30 p.m. South Alabama at Kent St., 12:30 p.m. Cal Poly at N. Illinois, 12:30 p.m. Colorado at Ohio St., 12:30 p.m. South Dakota at Wisconsin, 12:30 p.m. Clark Atlanta vs. Ark.-Pine Bluff at St. Louis, 1 p.m. W. Illinois at N. Iowa, 2 p.m. S. Dakota St. at Illinois St., 4 p.m. N. Dakota St. at Minnesota, 4 p.m. Black Hills St. at North Dakota, 4 p.m. Missouri St. at S. Illinois, 4 p.m. SOUTHWEST Portland St. at TCU, 11 a.m. Alcorn St. at Texas Southern, 11 a.m. Bacone at UTSA, 11 a.m. Rice at Baylor, 4 p.m. Indiana at North Texas, 4 p.m. MVSU at Prairie View, 4 p.m.

Texas St. at Stephen F. Austin, 4 p.m. Oklahoma St. at Texas A&M, 4 p.m. Nevada at Texas Tech, 4 p.m. Cent. Arkansas at Arkansas St., 5 p.m. Georgia St. at Houston, 5 p.m. Missouri at Oklahoma, 5 p.m. FAR WEST Tennessee St. at Air Force, noon UCLA at Oregon St., 12:30 p.m. California at Washington, 12:30 p.m. Weber St. at N. Colorado, 12:35 p.m. New Mexico St. at San Jose St., 1 p.m. Fresno St. at Idaho, 2 p.m. Sam Houston St. at New Mexico, 3 p.m. Idaho St. at N. Arizona, 3:05 p.m. Montana St. at E. Washington, 4:05 p.m. Nebraska at Wyoming, 4:30 p.m. Tulsa at Boise St., 5 p.m. Colorado St. at Utah St., 5 p.m. S. Utah at UNLV, 6 p.m. Montana at Sacramento St., 6:05 p.m. Oregon at Arizona, 7:15 p.m. Southern Cal at Arizona St., 7:15 p.m. UC Davis at Hawaii, 9 p.m. The AP Top 25 Fared No. 1 Oklahoma (2-0) beat No. 5 Florida State 23-13. Next: vs. Missouri, Saturday. No. 2 Alabama (3-0) beat North Texas 41-0. Next: vs. No. 14 Arkansas, Saturday. No. 3 LSU (3-0) beat No. 25 Mississippi State 19-6, Thursday. Next: at No. 18 West Virginia, Saturday. No. 4 Boise State (2-0) beat Toledo 40-15, Friday. Next: vs. Tulsa, Saturday. No. 5 Florida State (2-1) lost to No. 1 Oklahoma 23-13. Next: at Clemson, Saturday. No. 6 Stanford (3-0) beat Arizona 37-10. Next: vs. UCLA, Saturday, Oct. 1. No. 7 Wisconsin (3-0) beat Northern Illinois 49-7. Next: vs. South Dakota, Saturday. No. 8 Oklahoma State (3-0) beat Tulsa 59-33. Next: at No. 9 Texas A&M, Saturday. No. 9 Texas A&M (2-0) beat Idaho 37-7. Next: vs. No. 8 Oklahoma State, Saturday. No. 10 South Carolina (3-0) beat Navy 24-21. Next: vs. Vanderbilt, Saturday. No. 11 Nebraska (3-0) beat Washington 51-38. Next: at Wyoming, Saturday. No. 12 Oregon (2-1) beat Missouri State 56-7. Next: at Arizona, Saturday. No. 13 Virginia Tech (3-0) beat Arkansas State 26-7. Next: at Marshall, Saturday. No. 14 Arkansas (3-0) beat Troy 38-28. Next: at No. 2 Alabama, Saturday. No. 15 Michigan State (2-1) lost to Notre Dame 31-13. Next: vs. Central Michigan, Saturday. No. 16 Florida (3-0) beat Tennessee 33-23. Next: at Kentucky, Saturday. No. 17 Ohio State (2-1) lost to Miami 24-6. Next: vs. Colorado, Saturday. No. 18 West Virginia (3-0) beat Maryland 37-31. Next: vs. No. 3 LSU, Saturday. No. 19 Baylor (2-0) beat Stephen F. Austin 48-0. Next: vs. Rice, Saturday. No. 20 South Florida (3-0) beat Florida A&M 70-17. Next: vs. UTEP, Saturday. No. 21 Auburn (2-1) lost to Clemson 38-24. Next: vs. FAU, Saturday. No. 22 Arizona State (2-1) lost to Illinois 17-14. Next: vs. Southern Cal, Saturday. No. 23 TCU (2-1) beat Louisiana-Monroe 38-17. Next: vs. Portland State, Saturday. No. 23 Texas (3-0) beat UCLA 49-20. Next: at Iowa State, Saturday, Oct. 1. No. 25 Mississippi State (1-2) lost to No. 3 LSU 19-6, Thursday. Next: vs. Louisiana Tech, Saturday. Pacific-12 Conference All Times PDT ——— North Conference All Games W L W L Stanford 1 0 2 0 California 0 0 3 0 Washington 0 0 2 1 Washington St. 0 0 2 1 Oregon 0 0 2 1 Oregon St. 0 0 0 2 South Conference All Games W L W L Southern Cal 1 0 3 0 Arizona St. 0 0 2 1 UCLA 0 0 1 2 Colorado 0 0 1 2 Arizona 0 1 1 1 Utah 0 1 2 1 Saturday’s Games x-Colorado at Ohio State, 12:30 p.m. UCLA at Oregon State, 12:30 p.m. California at Washington, 12:30 p.m. USC at Arizona State, 7:15 p.m. Oregon at Arizona, 7:15 p.m. x=nonconference

TENNIS WTA WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— Hansol Korea Open Tuesday At Olympic Park Seoul, South Korea Purse: $220,000 (Intl.) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles First Round Vania King, United States, def. Kimiko Date-Krumm, Japan, 6-2, 6-2. Iveta Benesova, Czech Republic, def. Anastasiya Yakimova, Japan, 6-3, 6-2. Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, def. Tamarine Tanasugarn, Thailand, 6-2, 6-0. Eleni Daniilidou, Greece, def. Kim So-jung, South Korea, 4-6, 6-2, 7-5. Galena Voskoboeva, Kazakhstan, def. Ekaterina Makarova (8), Russia, 6-4, 6-4. Carla Suarez Navarro, Spain, def. Eva Birnerova, Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-4. Vera Dushevina, Russia, def. Francesca Schiavone (1), Italy, 7-6 (4), 6-2. Polona Hercog (5), Slovenia, def. Zuzana Kucova, Slovakia, 6-0, 6-2. Irina-Camelia Begu (7), Romania, def. Akgul Amanmuradova, Uzbekistan, 6-1, 6-3. Marion Bartoli (2), France, def. Nuria LlagosteraVives, Spain, 6-2, 6-2. Julia Goerges (3), Germany, def. Yurika Sema, Japan, 6-1, 6-1. Kristyna Pliskova, Czech Republic, def. Nicole Rottmann, Austria, 6-1, 7-5. Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez (6), Spain, def. Irina Falconi, United States, 6-3, 6-3. Wanlima Guangzhou International Open Tuesday At Tianhe Sports Center

WTA Money Leaders Through Sept. 18 1. Petra Kvitova 2. Li Na 3. Maria Sharapova 4. Caroline Wozniacki 5. Sam Stosur 6. Victoria Azarenka 7. Kim Clijsters 8. Serena Williams 9. Francesca Schiavone 10. Vera Zvonareva 11. Marion Bartoli 12. Andrea Petkovic 13. Agnieszka Radwanska 14. Flavia Pennetta 15. Sabine Lisicki 16. Maria Kirilenko 17. Peng Shuai 18. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova 19. Svetlana Kuznetsova 20. Jelena Jankovic 21. Nadia Petrova 22. Daniela Hantuchova 23. Julia Goerges 24. Elena Vesnina 25. Katarina Srebotnik 26. Gisela Dulko 27. Angelique Kerber 28. Liezel Huber 29. Roberta Vinci 30. Dominika Cibulkova 31. Yanina Wickmayer 32. Sania Mirza 33. Lucie Hradecka 34. Kveta Peschke 35. Vania King 36. Bethanie Mattek-Sands 37. Iveta Benesova 38. Anabel Medina Garrigues 39. Lucie Safarova 40. Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez

$3,248,993 $3,247,322 $2,747,698 $2,745,581 $2,656,628 $2,585,957 $2,325,741 $1,978,930 $1,524,998 $1,457,193 $1,420,638 $1,214,521 $1,074,888 $935,324 $895,959 $851,517 $848,761 $813,034 $792,385 $780,301 $727,126 $726,537 $690,640 $674,187 $612,747 $609,107 $596,439 $591,931 $581,359 $581,262 $560,194 $548,834 $525,475 $516,488 $516,078 $483,583 $468,497 $462,040 $458,561 $448,650

ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— Moselle Open Tuesday At Les Arenes de Metz Metz, France Purse: $616,500 (WT250) Surface: Hard-Indoor Singles First Round Benoit Paire, France, def. Andrey Golubev, Kazakhstan, 7-5, 6-2. Mathieu Rodrigues, France, def. Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, 6-2, 3-6, 6-4. Igor Sijsling, Netherlands, def. Grigor Dimitrov, Bulgaria, 6-2, 6-2. Olivier Rochus, Belgium, def. Stephane Robert, France, 6-1, 6-3. Nicolas Renavand, France, def. Tobias Kamke, Germany, 7-5, 6-4. Nicolas Mahut, France, def. Diego Junqueira, Argentina, 6-3, 6-2. Xavier Malisse (6), Belgium, def. Michael Berrer, Germany, 6-4, 3-6, 6-4. Nastase Tiriac Trophy Tuesday At Progresul BNR Arenas Bucharest, Romania Purse: $579,200 (WT250) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles First Round Alessandro Giannessi, Italy, def. Albert Montanes (8), Spain, 7-5, 6-4. Florent Serra, France, def. Gianluca Naso, Italy, 6-2, 6-4. Albert Ramos, Spain, def. Victor Hanescu, Romania, 6-4, 6-3. Carlos Berlocq, Argentina, def. Andreas Haider-Maurer, Austria, 6-2, 6-1. Marius Copil, Romania, def. Victor Crivoi, Romania, 6-3, 6-3. Igor Andreev, Russia, def. Peter Torebko, Germany, 5-7, 6-4, 7-5. Filippo Volandri, Italy, def. Rui Machado, Portugal, 6-3, 6-3. Adrian Ungur, Romania, def. Lukas Rosol, Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-1. Andreas Seppi (7), Italy, def. Eric Prodon, France, 6-1, 4-6, 6-1. ATP MONEY LEADERS Through Sept. 18 Player YTD Money 1. Novak Djokovic $10,609,318 2. Rafael Nadal $6,251,514 3. Andy Murray $3,462,141 4. Roger Federer $3,047,362 5. David Ferrer $1,885,970 6. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga $1,413,395 7. Mardy Fish $1,396,442 8. Robin Soderling $1,323,835 9. Tomas Berdych $1,225,839 10. Nicolas Almagro $1,188,864 11. Gilles Simon $1,096,542 12. Alexandr Dolgopolov $994,014 13. John Isner $992,958 14. Jurgen Melzer $985,868 15. Michael Llodra $892,428 16. Andy Roddick $879,890 17. Philipp Petzschner $873,302 18. Bob Bryan $872,763 18. Mike Bryan $872,763 20. Gael Monfils $861,223 21. Janko Tipsarevic $851,145 22. Richard Gasquet $846,900 23. Juan Martin del Potro $845,687 24. Stanislas Wawrinka $802,603 25. Juan Ignacio Chela $783,239 26. Feliciano Lopez $764,495 27. Viktor Troicki $758,889 28. Florian Mayer $753,017 29. Marin Cilic $725,921 30. Fernando Verdasco $699,149 31. Mikhail Youzhny $684,410 32. Philipp Kohlschreiber $655,097 33. Xavier Malisse $651,467 34. Fabio Fognini $630,724 35. Radek Stepanek $629,893 36. Marcel Granollers $593,004 37. Sergiy Stakhovsky $592,001 38. Thomaz Bellucci $588,887 39. Ivan Ljubicic $581,802 40. Kevin Anderson $580,677

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts Columbus 11 10 8 41 Sporting Kansas City 10 9 10 40 Philadelphia 9 7 12 39 Houston 9 9 12 39 New York 7 6 15 36 D.C. 8 8 10 34 Chicago 5 8 15 30 Toronto FC 6 12 12 30 New England 5 12 12 27 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts x-Los Angeles 16 3 10 58 Seattle 14 6 9 51 Real Salt Lake 14 7 6 48 FC Dallas 13 9 7 46 Colorado 10 9 11 41

GF 35 43 36 38 43 37 33 32 32

GA 37 37 30 39 38 38 37 52 46

GF 43 46 38 36 40

GA 22 31 22 32 39

Portland 10 12 6 36 36 Chivas USA 7 12 10 31 34 San Jose 6 11 11 29 30 Vancouver 4 14 10 22 28 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. x- clinched playoff berth ——— Today’s Games Chivas USA at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at New York, 5 p.m. San Jose at Portland, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Game Philadelphia at Sporting Kansas City, 5:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Houston at FC Dallas, 1 p.m. Portland at New York, 4:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m. San Jose at Colorado, 6 p.m. Seattle FC at Vancouver, 7:30 p.m. Toronto FC at Chivas USA, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 25 New England at Chicago, 1 p.m.

41 36 37 46

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Playoff Glance All Times PDT CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-3) Eastern Conference Indiana 2, New York 1 Thursday, Sept. 15: Indiana 74, New York 72 Saturday, Sept. 17: New York 87, Indiana 72 Monday, Sept. 19: Indiana 72, New York 62 Atlanta 2, Connecticut 0 Friday, Sept. 16: Atlanta 89, Connecticut 84 Sunday, Sept. 18: Atlanta 69, Connecticut 64 Western Conference Minnesota 2, San Antonio 1 Friday, Sept. 16: Minnesota 66, San Antonio 65 Sunday, Sept. 18: San Antonio 84, Minnesota 75 Tuesday, Sept. 20: Minnesota 85, San Antonio 67 Phoenix 2, Seattle 1 Thursday, Sept. 15: Seattle 80, Phoenix 61 Saturday, Sept. 17: Phoenix 92, Seattle 83 Monday, Sept. 19: Phoenix 77, Seattle 75 CONFERENCE FINALS Eastern Conference Indiana vs. Atlanta Thursday, Sept. 22: Atlanta at Indiana, 4 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 25: Indiana at Atlanta, noon x-Tuesday, Sept. 27: Atlanta at Indiana, TBD Western Conference Minnesota vs. Phoenix Thursday, Sept. 22: Phoenix at Minnesota, 6 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 25: Minnesota at Phoenix, 2 p.m. x-Tuesday, Sept. 27: Phoenix at Minnesota, TBD

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE Preseason All Times PDT ——— Monday’s Games Nashville (ss) 5, Florida (ss) 3 Buffalo 3, Carolina 1 Toronto 4, Ottawa 2 Florida (ss) 4, Nashville (ss) 3 Tuesday’s Games Philadelphia 4, Toronto 0 Columbus (ss) 5, Winnipeg (ss) 1 Nashville 2, Washington 0 Dallas 6, Montreal 3 St. Louis 3, Tampa Bay 1 Winnipeg (ss) 6, Columbus (ss) 1 Edmonton (ss) 4, Chicago 2 Calgary (ss) 5, Vancouver (ss) 1 Minnesota 4, Edmonton (ss) 3 Phoenix 7, Anaheim 4 Vancouver (ss) 4, Calgary (ss) 3 Today’s Games Toronto at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Washington at Columbus, 4 p.m. Detroit at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. St. Louis vs. Tampa Bay at Orlando, FL, 4 p.m. New Jersey vs. N.Y. Rangers at Albany, NY, 4 p.m. Buffalo at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. Boston at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m. San Jose at Anaheim, 7 p.m. Los Angeles (ss) at Phoenix (ss), 7 p.m. Phoenix (ss) at Los Angeles (ss), 7:30 p.m.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS—Recalled RHP Corey Kluber from Columbus (IL). National League PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Acquired RHP Eliecer Cardenas from the Atlanta Braves as the player to be named in the Matt Diaz trade. WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Reinstated RHP Ryan Mattheus from the 15-day DL. FOOTBALL National Football League BALTIMORE RAVENS—Signed DT Haloti Ngata to a five-year contract. BUFFALO BILLS—Placed WR Roscoe Parrish on injured reserve. Signed WR Naaman Roosevelt from the practice squad. CINCINNATI BENGALS—Signed WR Andrew Hawkins from the practice squad. Signed WR Armon Binns to the practice squad. DALLAS COWBOYS—Re-signed WR Laurent Robinson. Released CB-KR Bryan McCann. DENVER BRONCOS—Signed WR Quan Cosby. Waived RB Jeremiah Johnson. Signed TE John Nalbone to the practice squad. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Signed WR Chastin West from the Green Bay practice squad. Waived WR Jamar Newsome. MIAMI DOLPHINS—Signed DL Igor Olshansky and CB Nate Jones. Terminated the contracts of RB Larry Johnson and TE Dante Rosario. MINNESOTA VIKINGS—Waived DE Adrian Awasom. Reinstated DT Kevin Williams from the suspended list. NEW YORK JETS—Released G Trevor Canfield and CB Julian Posey from the practice squad. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Released WR Owen Spencer from the practice squad. Signed G Brent Osborne to the practice squad. HOCKEY National Hockey League BUFFALO SABRES—Returned D Alex Lepkowski, F Steven Beyers and F Gregg Sutch to Barrie (OHL), F Dan Catenacci to Owen Sound (OHL), F Cedrick Henley to Val D FLORIDA PANTHERS—Assigned G Brian Foster, D Adam Comrie, D Michael Caruso, C Justin Bernhardt, C Jake Hauswirth, LW AJ Jenks, RW Bill Thomas and LW Garrett Wilson to San Antonio (AHL). Returned LW Vincent Trocheck and C John McFarland to Saginaw (OHL) and RW Josh Birkholz to Everett (WHL). OTTAWA SENATORS—Returned D Jordan Fransoo and F Mark Stone to Brandon (WHL), F Jakub Culek to Rimouski (QMJHL), F Stefan Noesen to Plymouth (OHL) and F Matt Puempel to Peterborough (OHL). Released G Matej Machovsky. COLLEGE WAC—Suspended Fresno State DL Tristan Okpalaugo for the first half of Saturday’s game at Idaho for kicking a North Dakota player in a game on Sept. 17. ILLINOIS STATE—Named Josip Maric men’s basketball administrative assistant. OHIO STATE—Named Scott Spencer and Candice Moxley women’s assistant ice hockey coaches. PRINCETON—Named Jeff Guy men’s assistant lacrosse coach. SOUTH DAKOTA STATE—Announced QB Thomas O’Brien has quit the football team. WOFFORD—Named Gus Hauser men’s assistant basketball coach.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 11,241 2,873 2,330 537 The Dalles 7,813 2,236 3,236 754 John Day 6,023 2,605 4,112 914 McNary 7,076 1,186 6,351 1,338 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 588,223 155,619 343,298 122,214 The Dalles 364,534 119,487 250,076 89,830 John Day 293,178 109,442 194,176 71,411 McNary 264,059 79,033 168,771 56,439


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 21, 2011 D3

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL AL BOXSCORES Yankees 5, Rays 0 Tampa Bay AB R Jennings lf 4 0 B.Upton cf 4 0 Longoria 3b 4 0 Damon dh 4 0 Kotchman 1b 2 0 Joyce rf 3 0 b-Guyer ph-rf 1 0 S.Rodriguez 2b 3 0 c-Jaso ph 1 0 Shoppach c 1 0 a-Lobaton ph-c 0 0 Brignac ss 2 0 d-D.Johnson ph 1 0 Totals 30 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 0 4

SO 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 3

Avg. .289 .234 .244 .260 .307 .276 .206 .222 .222 .169 .074 .190 .113

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jeter ss 5 0 2 0 1 2 .296 Granderson cf 5 0 3 4 1 1 .271 Teixeira 1b 4 0 1 0 1 1 .247 Al.Rodriguez dh 3 0 0 0 2 0 .281 Cano 2b 4 0 1 0 1 1 .305 Swisher rf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .261 Dickerson rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Er.Chavez 3b 5 1 2 1 0 2 .270 R.Martin c 4 1 2 0 1 0 .238 Gardner lf 5 2 2 0 0 0 .262 Totals 38 5 14 5 8 8 Tampa Bay 000 000 000 — 0 6 0 New York 040 010 00x — 5 14 0 a-was hit by a pitch for Shoppach in the 7th. b-fouled out for Joyce in the 8th. c-grounded out for S.Rodriguez in the 9th. d-grounded into a double play for Brignac in the 9th. LOB—Tampa Bay 9, New York 18. 2B—B.Upton (24), Granderson 2 (25), Cano (45), Swisher (27). RBIs—Granderson 4 (119), Er.Chavez (26). DP—New York 3 (Teixeira), (Er.Chavez, Cano, Teixeira), (Jeter, Cano, Teixeira). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA W.Dvis L, 10-10 4 2-3 8 5 5 5 2 109 4.55 C.Ramos 2-3 2 0 0 2 1 28 4.10 D.De La Rosa 1 2-3 2 0 0 1 3 30 4.91 Sonnanstine 1 2 0 0 0 2 25 5.55 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nova W, 16-4 7 2-3 6 0 0 3 3 103 3.62 Logan 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 2.97 Ayala 1 0 0 0 1 0 8 1.71 Inherited runners-scored—C.Ramos 2-1, D.De La Rosa 2-0, Logan 1-0. IBB—off W.Davis (Cano), off C.Ramos (Swisher). HBP—by W.Davis (Swisher), by Nova (Shoppach, Lobaton). WP—W.Davis. T—3:22. A—46,944 (50,291).

Indians 4, White Sox 3 (First Game) Chicago Pierre lf Al.Ramirez ss Konerko 1b Pierzynski c Rios cf A.Dunn dh De Aza rf Morel 3b Beckham 2b Totals

AB 4 3 3 4 4 4 4 3 3 32

R 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 3

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 2 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 7 3 2

SO 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 1 0 6

Avg. .283 .271 .304 .292 .223 .168 .320 .252 .227

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fukudome rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .255 Kipnis 2b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .295 A.Cabrera ss 4 1 1 1 0 1 .274 Donald ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .288 Hafner dh 4 1 2 2 0 0 .280 C.Santana 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .238 Duncan lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .267 Carrera cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .244 Chisenhall 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .242 Hannahan 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .248 Crowe cf-lf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .261 Marson c 3 0 0 0 0 3 .233 Totals 31 4 7 4 0 7 Chicago 020 001 000 — 3 7 0 Cleveland 200 110 00x — 4 7 1 E—Kipnis (5). LOB—Chicago 5, Cleveland 3. 2B—A.Dunn 2 (16), Kipnis (8). HR—Hafner (12), off Floyd; A.Cabrera (24), off Floyd; Fukudome (4), off Floyd. RBIs—A.Dunn (42), De Aza 2 (19), Fukudome (18), A.Cabrera (87), Hafner 2 (55). SB—De Aza (10), Kipnis (4), Crowe (3). CS—Al.Ramirez (5). DP—Cleveland 2 (Fukudome, C.Santana), (C.Santana). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO Floyd L, 12-12 6 2-3 7 4 4 0 7 Ohman 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO Crmna W, 7-15 6 7 3 3 2 3 J.Smith H, 15 1 0 0 0 0 0 Pestano H, 23 1 0 0 0 0 2 C.Prez S, 35-39 1 0 0 0 0 1 Inherited runners-scored—Ohman 1-0. Carmona (Al.Ramirez). WP—Carmona. T—2:19. A—28,603 (43,441).

NP ERA 97 4.46 15 4.56 NP ERA 94 5.23 10 1.85 8 2.29 11 3.43 HBP—by

White Sox 5, Indians 4 (Second Game) Chicago Pierre lf Al.Ramirez ss Konerko 1b A.Dunn dh Viciedo rf Rios cf De Aza cf-rf Vizquel 3b Morel 3b Flowers c Beckham 2b Totals

AB 4 3 4 2 4 0 4 4 0 4 3 32

R H 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 2 0 0 1 1 1 3 5 10

BI 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 5

BB 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 6

Avg. .283 .271 .301 .167 .276 .223 .326 .251 .252 .208 .232

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Carrera rf-lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .244 b-Crowe ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Donald ss 5 1 4 0 0 0 .310 C.Santana c 4 1 1 0 1 0 .238 Thome dh 2 1 1 1 2 0 .248 1-Phelps pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .141 Duncan lf 1 1 0 0 2 1 .265 Fukudome rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .254 G.Sizemore cf 2 0 0 1 1 1 .223 LaPorta 1b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .239 Hannahan 3b 3 0 0 1 0 1 .245 Valbuena 2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .214 a-Kipnis ph-2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .292 Totals 31 4 9 4 6 7 Chicago 000 012 200 — 5 10 0 Cleveland 000 400 000 — 4 9 0 a-popped out for Valbuena in the 8th. b-struck out for Carrera in the 9th. 1-ran for Thome in the 7th. LOB—Chicago 7, Cleveland 8. 2B—De Aza (10), Vizquel (7), Beckham 3 (22), LaPorta (21). RBIs—Pierre (48), Al.Ramirez (67), De Aza 2 (21), Beckham (43), Thome (46), G.Sizemore (31), LaPorta (48), Hannahan (37). SB—Valbuena (1). CS—Pierre (16). S—Pierre. SF—G.Sizemore, Hannahan. DP—Chicago 3 (Konerko, Al.Ramirez, Axelrod), (Konerko, Al.Ramirez, Axelrod), (Al.Ramirez, Beckham, Konerko); Cleveland 2 (Donald, Valbuena, LaPorta), (Donald, Kipnis, LaPorta). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Axelrod 4 2-3 7 4 4 4 3 101 4.26 Kinney 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 5.94 Thrnton W, 2-5 1 1-3 0 0 0 2 1 27 3.58 Crain H, 21 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 2.27 Sale S, 7-8 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 21 2.63 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McAllister 5 1-3 6 2 2 1 4 92 8.53 R.Perez H, 12 2-3 1 1 1 1 0 11 2.95 Putnam L, 0-1 1-3 3 2 2 0 0 14 10.80 Hagadone 1 2-3 0 0 0 1 2 21 5.40 Judy 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 5.11 Thornton pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Kinney 3-0, Thornton 1-0, Crain 1-0, Sale 1-0, R.Perez 1-1, Hagadone 2-0. IBB—off Axelrod (Thome). HBP—by Judy (Beckham, Al.Ramirez), by Putnam (Konerko). T—3:15. A—19,582 (43,441).

Angels 10, Blue Jays 6 Los Angeles Bourjos cf Callaspo 3b H.Kendrick 2b Tor.Hunter dh Trumbo 1b V.Wells lf Trout rf Aybar ss Bo.Wilson c Totals

AB 5 4 4 4 5 5 4 3 3 37

R 2 1 2 2 1 1 0 1 0 10

Toronto AB R McCoy ss 5 2 E.Thames lf 5 2 Bautista rf 4 1 Encarnacion 1b 4 0

H 3 3 2 2 2 2 0 1 0 15

BI 0 2 1 0 4 2 0 0 0 9

BB 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 3

SO 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 7

Avg. .268 .286 .290 .263 .258 .224 .209 .281 .186

H BI BB 3 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 0

SO 0 2 1 2

Avg. .217 .270 .301 .277

K.Johnson 2b 4 0 2 1 1 0 .256 Lawrie 3b 4 0 1 1 1 0 .293 Rasmus cf 5 1 1 0 0 2 .202 Arencibia c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .222 Loewen dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Totals 38 6 11 5 4 7 Los Angeles 013 501 000 — 10 15 1 Toronto 110 000 301 — 6 11 1 E—Trumbo (9), McCoy (3). LOB—Los Angeles 5, Toronto 10. 2B—Bourjos (26), Callaspo 2 (23), H.Kendrick (30), V.Wells (15), Aybar (32), McCoy (8), Rasmus (9). HR—V.Wells (23), off Cecil; Trumbo (29), off Drabek. RBIs—Callaspo 2 (45), H.Kendrick (62), Trumbo 4 (87), V.Wells 2 (61), McCoy (9), Encarnacion 2 (54), K.Johnson (6), Lawrie (25). SB—H.Kendrick (14), Aybar (29). CS— Aybar (5). S—Bo.Wilson. SF—Callaspo, Encarnacion. DP—Toronto 2 (K.Johnson, McCoy, Encarnacion), (K.Johnson, Encarnacion). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pineiro W, 7-7 6 9 4 4 2 3 104 5.36 R.Thompson 1 1 1 1 1 1 21 3.10 Cassevah 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 2.45 Richards 2-3 1 1 0 1 2 23 7.56 S.Downs S, 1-4 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 3 1.24 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cecil L, 4-10 3 6 4 4 2 3 65 4.56 Drabek 2 7 6 6 1 0 45 6.03 Camp 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 4.45 Carreno 2 1 0 0 0 3 20 1.32 Farquhar 1 1 0 0 0 0 8 16.20 Drabek pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. Pineiro pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—R.Thompson 2-2, S.Downs 2-0, Camp 2-0. WP—Drabek. T—3:06. A—13,514 (49,260).

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W New York 93 Boston 88 Tampa Bay 85 Toronto 78 Baltimore 64 Central Division W x-Detroit 89 Cleveland 76 Chicago 75 Kansas City 68 Minnesota 59 West Division W Texas 89 Los Angeles 84 Oakland 69 Seattle 65 x-clinched division

L 60 67 68 76 90 L 65 77 79 87 94 L 65 70 85 89

Pct .608 .568 .556 .506 .416 Pct .578 .497 .487 .439 .386 Pct .578 .545 .448 .422

NATIONAL LEAGUE GB — 6 8 15½ 29½ GB — 12½ 14 21½ 29½ GB — 5 20 24

WCGB — — 2 9½ 23½ WCGB — 11 12½ 20 28 WCGB — 3½ 18½ 22½

Tuesday’s Games Cleveland 4, Chicago White Sox 3, 1st game Chicago White Sox 5, Cleveland 4, 2nd game N.Y. Yankees 5, Tampa Bay 0 L.A. Angels 10, Toronto 6 Baltimore 7, Boston 5 Kansas City 10, Detroit 2 Seattle 5, Minnesota 4 Texas 7, Oakland 2

AB 5 5 3 3 1 2 1 1 1 4 4 4 34

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2

H BI BB 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 9 2 3

SO 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 5

Avg. .249 .234 .269 .331 .270 .325 .228 .297 .222 .300 .246 .266

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Gordon lf 4 1 1 1 1 0 .303 Me.Cabrera cf 5 2 3 1 0 0 .305 Hosmer 1b 5 1 5 3 0 0 .300 Francoeur rf 5 0 1 1 0 0 .286 Moustakas 3b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .250 Giavotella 2b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .231 Maier dh 2 2 0 0 2 2 .244 S.Perez c 3 2 3 3 1 0 .339 A.Escobar ss 3 1 1 1 1 0 .251 Totals 37 10 16 10 5 3 Detroit 000 010 100 — 2 9 1 Kansas City 100 620 01x — 10 16 2 1-ran for Avila in the 6th. E—D.Young (7), Moustakas (11), Giavotella (5). LOB—Detroit 10, Kansas City 8. 2B—A.Jackson (22), Dirks (12), Me.Cabrera (42). HR—A.Gordon (23), off Penny; Hosmer (18), off Penny; S.Perez (2), off Below. RBIs—A.Jackson (44), D.Young (54), A.Gordon (87), Me.Cabrera (84), Hosmer 3 (75), Francoeur (84), S.Perez 3 (15), A.Escobar (44). CS—A.Jackson (5). SF—D.Young. DP—Detroit 3 (Mi.Cabrera), (Jh.Peralta, R.Santiago, Mi.Cabrera), (Worth, R.Santiago, Kelly); Kansas City 2 (Moustakas, Giavotella, Hosmer), (A.Escobar, Giavotella, Hosmer). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Penny L, 10-11 4 10 7 7 2 1 65 5.31 Below 1 1 2 2 1 0 23 4.50 Pauley 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 2.78 Schlereth 1 1 0 0 2 2 23 3.40 L.Marte 1 3 1 1 0 0 19 2.45 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mndoza W, 1-0 7 6 2 1 3 3 102 1.29 Bl.Wood 2 3 0 0 0 2 30 3.68 HBP—by Mendoza (V.Martinez). WP—Bl.Wood. T—2:41. A—26,953 (37,903).

Orioles 7, Red Sox 5 Baltimore Andino 2b Hardy ss Markakis rf Guerrero dh Wieters c Ad.Jones cf Mar.Reynolds 1b C.Davis 3b Reimold lf Angle lf Totals

AB 5 5 5 5 3 4 5 4 3 0 39

R H 1 3 0 0 1 3 1 1 2 1 0 3 1 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 7 14

BI 3 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 6

BB 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 2 0 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 7

Avg. .269 .262 .281 .292 .263 .283 .221 .256 .241 .185

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ellsbury cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .319 Pedroia 2b 5 2 2 0 0 1 .301 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 5 1 3 3 0 0 .340 D.Ortiz dh 3 0 0 0 1 2 .313 Reddick rf 3 0 0 0 0 3 .286 a-Lowrie ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .253 D.McDonald rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .227 C.Crawford lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .255 Scutaro ss 3 1 0 0 1 1 .295 Saltalamacchia c 4 0 1 0 0 3 .241 Aviles 3b 3 1 2 1 1 0 .263 Totals 35 5 10 4 3 11 Baltimore 004 000 030 — 7 14 2 Boston 102 200 000 — 5 10 1 a-flied out for Reddick in the 7th. E—Mar.Reynolds (30), Wieters (5), Reddick (5). LOB—Baltimore 9, Boston 7. 2B—Andino (22), Markakis (27), Pedroia 2 (36), Ad.Gonzalez (45), Aviles (17). HR—Ad.Gonzalez (27), off VandenHurk. RBIs—Andino 3 (32), Markakis (71), Mar.Reynolds 2 (82), Ad.Gonzalez 3 (116), Aviles (39). SB—Andino (11), Reimold (7). CS—Guerrero (2), Ad.Jones (2). GIDP—Guerrero, Pedroia. DP—Baltimore 2 (Andino, Mar.Reynolds), (C.Davis, Andino, Mar.Reynolds); Boston 2 (Saltalamacchia, Saltalamacchia, Scutaro), (Pedroia, Scutaro, Ad.Gonzalez). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA VandenHurk 3 7 5 4 3 4 77 8.00 Jo-.Reyes 3 3 0 0 0 5 48 5.57 Rapada 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 6.46 Eyre W, 2-1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 3.45 Strop H, 3 1 0 0 0 0 2 22 2.08 Jhnson S, 8-13 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 2.69 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bedard 2 2-3 5 4 1 2 0 76 3.50 Atchison 2 1-3 3 0 0 0 2 37 3.71 Albers H, 10 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 4.71 Brd L, 2-9 H, 33 1 1-3 2 2 2 0 2 18 3.21 Papelbon 2-3 2 1 1 0 1 14 2.69 Doubront 2-3 2 0 0 1 0 8 6.75 Tazawa 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 6.75 VandenHurk pitched to 3 batters in the 4th. Jo-.Reyes pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Jo-.Reyes 2-1, Rapada 1-0, Eyre 1-0, Atchison 2-0, Papelbon 2-2, Tazawa 2-0. HBP—by Albers (Reimold). WP—Atchison. Catchers’ interference—Wieters. T—3:36. A—37,414 (37,493).

Mariners 5, Twins 4 Seattle AB R H I.Suzuki rf 5 1 1 Seager ss 4 2 1 Ackley 2b 4 0 2 Carp lf-1b 5 0 5 W.Pena dh 5 0 0 A.Kennedy 1b 4 0 1 a-Smoak ph 1 0 0 M.Saunders cf 0 0 0 Olivo c 4 1 2 Liddi 3b 4 1 1 T.Robinson cf-lf 4 0 0 Totals 40 5 13

BI 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 5

BB 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 1 3 10

Avg. .273 .264 .281 .291 .230 .234 .231 .152 .224 .200 .229

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Revere cf 5 1 4 1 0 0 .264 Plouffe ss 4 1 2 1 0 1 .224 Cuddyer rf 5 1 2 0 0 1 .281 Parmelee 1b 4 0 2 1 1 0 .381 Valencia 3b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .248 L.Hughes 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .227 Dinkelman dh 4 1 1 0 0 0 .375 Benson lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .227 Butera c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .153 b-Tosoni ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .170 Totals 38 4 12 3 2 6 Seattle 200 002 100 — 5 13 3 Minnesota 200 110 000 — 4 12 1 a-struck out for A.Kennedy in the 9th. b-singled for Butera in the 9th. E—League (3), Carp (5), Liddi (1), Duensing (4). LOB—Seattle 10, Minnesota 10. 2B—Seager (11), Carp 2 (17), Olivo 2 (18), Plouffe 2 (15), Parmelee (4). 3B— I.Suzuki (3). HR—Liddi (2), off Hendriks. RBIs—Seager (11), Carp (44), A.Kennedy (38), Liddi 2 (4), Revere (26), Plouffe (26), Parmelee (8). SB—Revere (33), Dinkelman (1). S—Plouffe.

Str W-2 L-1 L-1 L-1 W-1 Str L-1 L-1 W-1 W-1 L-10 Str W-3 W-1 L-2 W-2

Home 48-27 45-35 42-33 41-38 37-41 Home 45-29 40-35 33-42 40-40 30-46 Home 49-29 44-31 42-37 38-43

Away 45-33 43-32 43-35 37-38 27-49 Away 44-36 36-42 42-37 28-47 29-48 Away 40-36 40-39 27-48 27-46

East Division W x-Philadelphia 98 Atlanta 88 Washington 74 New York 73 Florida 70 Central Division W Milwaukee 91 St. Louis 85 Cincinnati 75 Pittsburgh 69 Chicago 68 Houston 53 West Division W Arizona 89 San Francisco 83 Los Angeles 77 Colorado 70 San Diego 67

Today’s Games Tampa Bay (Shields 15-11) at N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes 5-5), 10:05 a.m., 1st game Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 11-9) at Cleveland (U.Jimenez 4-2), 4:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Hellickson 13-10) at N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 19-8), 4:05 p.m., 2nd game L.A. Angels (Haren 15-9) at Toronto (McGowan 0-0), 4:07 p.m. Baltimore (Tom.Hunter 4-4) at Boston (Beckett 13-5), 4:10 p.m. Detroit (Scherzer 14-9) at Kansas City (F.Paulino 3-6), 5:10 p.m. Seattle (Pineda 9-10) at Minnesota (Slowey 0-6), 5:10 p.m. Texas (C.Wilson 16-7) at Oakland (McCarthy 9-8), 7:05 p.m.

Royals 10, Tigers 2 Detroit A.Jackson cf Kelly 3b-1b D.Young lf Mi.Cabrera 1b Worth 3b V.Martinez dh a-Rhymes ph-dh Avila c 1-O.Santos pr-c Jh.Peralta ss Dirks rf R.Santiago 2b Totals

L10 6-4 3-7 6-4 6-4 6-4 L10 7-3 5-5 2-8 8-2 0-10 L10 8-2 5-5 4-6 4-6

L 56 67 79 81 85 L 64 69 80 86 87 101 L 66 71 76 84 88

Pct .636 .568 .484 .474 .452 Pct .587 .552 .484 .445 .439 .344 Pct .574 .539 .503 .455 .432

GB — 10½ 23½ 25 28½ GB — 5½ 16 22 23 37½ GB — 5½ 11 18½ 22

Tuesday’s Games Washington 4, Philadelphia 3, 10 innings, 1st game Washington 3, Philadelphia 0, 2nd game Atlanta 4, Florida 0 Cincinnati 6, Houston 4 Milwaukee 5, Chicago Cubs 1 St. Louis 11, N.Y. Mets 6 San Diego 2, Colorado 1 Pittsburgh 5, Arizona 3 L.A. Dodgers 2, San Francisco 1

WCGB — — 13 14½ 18 WCGB — 2½ 13 19 20 34½ WCGB — 4½ 10 17½ 21

L10 4-6 4-6 8-2 2-8 4-6 L10 6-4 8-2 4-6 3-7 5-5 5-5 L10 5-5 8-2 6-4 3-7 5-5

Str L-4 W-1 W-3 L-1 L-1 Str W-1 W-3 W-1 W-1 L-1 L-1 Str L-1 L-1 W-4 L-6 W-2

Home 52-27 47-31 42-35 31-44 29-45 Home 52-23 42-34 41-39 34-44 38-42 28-46 Home 46-28 44-34 41-38 38-42 32-43

Away 46-29 41-36 32-44 42-37 41-40 Away 39-41 43-35 34-41 35-42 30-45 25-55 Away 43-38 39-37 36-38 32-42 35-45

Today’s Games Houston (W.Rodriguez 11-10) at Cincinnati (Arroyo 8-12), 9:35 a.m. Milwaukee (Wolf 13-9) at Chicago Cubs (Garza 8-10), 11:20 a.m. San Diego (Bass 1-0) at Colorado (A.Cook 3-9), 12:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Ohlendorf 1-2) at Arizona (Miley 3-2), 12:40 p.m. Washington (Lannan 9-13) at Philadelphia (Worley 11-2), 4:05 p.m. Atlanta (D.Lowe 9-15) at Florida (Vazquez 11-11), 4:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Schwinden 0-2) at St. Louis (J.Garcia 12-7), 5:15 p.m. San Francisco (Vogelsong 11-7) at L.A. Dodgers (Eveland 2-1), 7:10 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Royals 10, Tigers 2: KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Eric Hosmer went five for five with a three-run homer and Luis Mendoza got his first major league win in more than three years in Kansas City’s victory over Detroit. • Orioles 7, Red Sox 5: BOSTON — Robert Andino’s three-run double in the eighth inning gave Baltimore a win and ruined a chance for Boston to extend its two-game lead in the AL wild-card race. • Yankees 5, Rays 0: NEW YORK — Ivan Nova pitched shutout ball into the eighth inning, Curtis Granderson drove in four runs and the New York Yankees moved within one win of a playoff berth by beating Tampa Bay. • Angels 10, Blue Jays 6: TORONTO — Mark Trumbo hit a three-run homer, Vernon Wells added a solo shot and the Los Angeles Angels beat Toronto. • Indians 4-4, White Sox 3-5: CLEVELAND — Alexei Ramirez’s seventh-inning single broke the game’s final tie and led Chicago to a win over Cleveland, giving the White Sox a split of the daynight doubleheader. Asdrubal Cabrera’s solo home run and six strong innings from Fausto Carmona gave Cleveland a win in the first game. • Mariners 5, Twins 4: MINNEAPOLIS — Mike Carp had five hits, Adam Kennedy hit a tiebreaking infield single in the seventh inning and Seattle beat Minnesota, sending the Twins to their 10th straight loss. • Rangers 7, Athletics 2: OAKLAND, Calif. — Adrian Beltre hit a three-run homer in the first that held up for 15-game winner Derek Holland, and AL West-leading Texas beat Oakland.

• Nationals 4-3, Phillies 3-0: PHILADELPHIA — Ross Detwiler outpitched Cliff Lee by tossing 7 1⁄3 impressive innings and Washington beat NL East champion Philadelphia to complete a sweep of their day-night doubleheader. In the opener, Tommy Milone threw six scoreless innings and pinch hitter Ryan Zimmerman delivered an RBI single in the 10th to lift the Nationals to victory. • Braves 4, Marlins 0: MIAMI — Rookie Randall Delgado pitched five innings for his first majorleague win and Atlanta put the brakes on its recent skid with a win over Florida. • Brewers 5, Cubs 1: CHICAGO — Shaun Marcum threw eight strong innings and Milwaukee moved a step closer to the NL Central title by beating the Chicago Cubs. • Reds 6, Astros 4: CINCINNATI — Homer Bailey shut Houston down again and came up with a career-high three hits and Devin Mesoraco homered to help Cincinnati snap a four-game losing streak. • Padres 2, Rockies 1: DENVER — Mat Latos tossed 8 2⁄3 shutout innings, Orlando Hudson had two hits and San Diego beat Colorado. • Cardinals 11, Mets 6: ST. LOUIS — Pinch hitter Ryan Theriot hit a go-ahead double with the bases loaded in the seventh inning, and St. Louis came back to beat the New York Mets. • Dodgers 2, Giants 1: LOS ANGELES — Clayton Kershaw became the Los Angeles Dodgers’ first 20-game winner in 21 years, beating San Francisco and pushing the Giants closer to elimination from the NL West race. • Pirates 5, Diamondbacks 3: PHOENIX — Charlie Morton threw six scoreless innings and Pittsburgh slowed Arizona’s drive toward the NL West title.

DP—Seattle 1 (Ackley, Seager, A.Kennedy). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO Vargas W, 9-13 6 9 4 3 2 4 Ruffin H, 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 Wlhelmsen H, 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 Lgue S, 35-40 1 2 0 0 0 1 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO Hendriks 5 1-3 10 4 4 0 5 Dnsing L, 9-14 1 1-3 2 1 1 1 1 Capps 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 2 Perkins 1 1 0 0 1 2 Inherited runners-scored—Capps 2-0. T—2:59. A—35,995 (39,500).

NP 109 10 10 18 NP 94 25 19 22

ERA 4.38 3.21 3.34 2.62 ERA 6.23 5.29 4.20 2.61

SO 0 2 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 7

Avg. .247 .281 .300 .333 .288 .319 .273 .266 .305

Rangers 7, Athletics 2 Texas Kinsler 2b Andrus ss J.Hamilton lf Mi.Young 1b A.Beltre 3b Napoli c Dav.Murphy rf N.Cruz dh En.Chavez cf Totals

AB 3 5 5 5 5 3 5 5 4 40

R H 1 0 0 1 2 2 2 3 1 2 0 2 0 1 1 1 0 2 7 14

BI 0 0 0 2 3 1 0 0 0 6

BB 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. J.Weeks 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .295 Crisp cf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .272 Matsui lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .255 Willingham dh 3 0 0 0 1 0 .252 S.Sizemore 3b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .239 Carter 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .111 K.Suzuki c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .240 Pennington ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .264 Taylor rf 2 1 1 1 1 0 .263 Totals 29 2 3 2 3 7 Texas 312 000 010 — 7 14 0 Oakland 000 010 001 — 2 3 1 E—Taylor (2). LOB—Texas 10, Oakland 3. 2B—J.Hamilton (30), Dav.Murphy (14), N.Cruz (28). HR—A.Beltre (28), off Harden; Taylor (1), off D.Holland; Crisp (8), off Kirkman. RBIs—Mi.Young 2 (104), A.Beltre 3 (97), Napoli (68), Crisp (51), Taylor (1). DP—Texas 1 (Andrus, Kinsler, Mi.Young); Oakland 1 (Pennington, J.Weeks, Carter). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA D.Hllnd W, 15-5 7 2 1 1 3 7 107 3.92 M.Lowe 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 3.80 Kirkman 1 1 1 1 0 0 13 7.11 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harden L, 4-4 3 7 6 5 1 3 71 5.17 Godfrey 4 5 0 0 1 3 62 3.96 Wuertz 1-3 1 1 1 1 0 11 6.68 Blevins 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 8 2.96 Wagner 1 0 0 0 1 0 14 7.20 Inherited runners-scored—Blevins 2-1. WP—Harden. T—2:36. A—13,635 (35,067).

NL BOXSCORES Braves 4, Marlins 0 Atlanta AB Bourn cf 4 Prado lf 5 C.Jones 3b 5 Uggla 2b 4 McCann c 4 Freeman 1b 5 Ale.Gonzalez ss 3 1-Ja.Wilson pr-ss 1 Heyward rf 3 Delgado p 2 b-Conrad ph 1 C.Martinez p 0 d-Hinske ph 0 2-A.Richardson pr 0 Varvaro p 0 Totals 37

R H 1 1 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 11

Florida Bonifacio cf Infante 2b Stanton rf Morrison lf G.Sanchez 1b J.Buck c Do.Murphy ss

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

AB 3 4 3 4 4 4 3

BI 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 5

SO 1 0 2 3 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .298 .265 .281 .233 .272 .287 .241 .273 .227 .000 .230 .333 .237 .500 ---

H BI BB 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0

SO 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

Avg. .289 .279 .265 .247 .263 .233 .183

Dominguez 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .229 Ani.Sanchez p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .125 a-Jo.Baker ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Sanches p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Hatcher p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Petersen ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .266 Ceda p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --S.Rosario p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 0 5 0 2 2 Atlanta 030 001 000 — 4 11 0 Florida 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 a-struck out for Ani.Sanchez in the 5th. b-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Delgado in the 6th. c-flied out for Hatcher in the 7th. d-walked for C.Martinez in the 8th. 1-ran for Ale.Gonzalez in the 6th. 2-ran for Hinske in the 8th. LOB—Atlanta 11, Florida 6. 2B—Bourn (34), Heyward (17). HR—Ale.Gonzalez (15), off Ani.Sanchez; Freeman (20), off Sanches. RBIs—Bourn (50), Prado (56), Freeman (74), Ale.Gonzalez (55). SB—Bourn (56), Heyward (9). GIDP—Freeman. DP—Atlanta 1 (Ale.Gonzalez); Florida 1 (Do.Murphy, Infante, G.Sanchez). Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Delgado W, 1-1 5 5 0 0 2 1 92 2.70 C.Martinez 2 0 0 0 0 1 16 3.18 Varvaro 2 0 0 0 0 0 26 2.70 Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA A.Snchez L, 8-9 5 5 3 3 2 6 83 3.67 Sanches 1 2 1 1 1 1 22 3.86 Hatcher 1 2 0 0 1 0 24 6.75 Ceda 1 1 0 0 1 1 17 4.66 S.Rosario 1 1 0 0 0 1 24 3.38 IBB—off Ani.Sanchez (McCann). WP—Ani.Sanchez. T—3:02. A—21,733 (38,560).

Cardinals 11, Mets 6 New York Jos.Reyes ss Pagan cf D.Wright 3b Duda rf Harris lf f-Pascucci ph Thayer p Evans 1b Thole c R.Tejada 2b Pelfrey p a-Ju.Turner ph Stinson p Byrdak p D.Carrasco p Baxter lf Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 4 1 0 3 5 3 3 1 0 0 0 1 36

R H 2 1 1 3 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 10

BI 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 2 1 1 2 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 9

SO 0 0 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .331 .265 .260 .292 .248 .200 --.270 .266 .277 .109 .265 ------.238

St. Louis AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Furcal ss 5 1 1 1 0 0 .232 Craig lf 5 2 2 0 0 0 .309 C.Patterson lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .157 Pujols 1b 5 2 4 1 0 0 .304 Berkman rf 5 1 2 2 0 0 .300 Salas p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Freese 3b 3 1 1 1 1 0 .290 Rzepczynski p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --g-S.Robinson ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Jay cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .302 McClellan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Dotel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Descalso ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .263 c-Theriot ph-2b 1 1 1 2 0 0 .274 Y.Molina c 3 1 2 0 1 0 .298 Schumaker 2b-cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .284 d-T.Cruz ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .254 e-Chambers ph-cf 1 1 1 3 0 0 .500 E.Jackson p 2 1 1 0 0 1 .320 Punto 2b-3b 2 0 1 1 0 1 .261 Totals 39 11 16 11 2 2 New York 103 010 100 — 6 10 0 St. Louis 003 020 60x — 11 16 1 a-lined out for Pelfrey in the 7th. b-was announced for Dotel in the 7th. c-doubled for Descalso in the 7th. d-was announced for Schumaker in the 7th. e-tripled for T.Cruz in the 7th. f-grounded out for Harris in the 8th. g-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Rzepczynski in the 8th. E—E.Jackson (1). LOB—New York 13, St. Louis 6. 2B—Duda (21), Pelfrey (2), Furcal (15), Freese (13), Theriot (25), Y.Molina (30). 3B—Chambers (1). RBIs— Pagan (56), D.Wright (58), Duda (50), Harris (20), Thole (37), Pelfrey (4), Furcal (27), Pujols (97), Berkman 2 (91), Freese (49), Theriot 2 (44), Chambers 3 (4), Punto (17). SB—Pujols (8), Berkman (2). S—R.Tejada.

DP—New York 1 (Jos.Reyes, R.Tejada, Evans). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pelfrey 6 10 5 5 0 2 100 4.58 Stsn L, 0-2 H, 4 2-3 2 3 3 1 0 22 6.52 Byrdak BS, 3-4 0 1 2 2 1 0 7 3.38 D.Carrasco 1-3 2 1 1 0 0 15 5.40 Thayer 1 1 0 0 0 0 17 4.26 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA E.Jackson 5 9 5 5 4 4 94 3.73 McClellan 1 2-3 1 1 1 4 0 41 4.06 Dotel W, 2-2 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 3.60 Rzepczynski 1 0 0 0 1 1 18 3.60 Salas 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 2.26 Byrdak pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Byrdak 3-2, D.Carrasco 3-3, Dotel 3-0. IBB—off Byrdak (Y.Molina), off E.Jackson (R.Tejada). WP—E.Jackson. T—3:23. A—37,746 (43,975).

Nationals 4, Phillies 3 (First Game, 10 innings) Washington Desmond ss Bernadina rf Ankiel cf Marrero 1b L.Nix lf d-Bixler ph-lf h-Morse ph-lf Espinosa 2b Flores c i-Zimmerman ph Storen p Lombardozzi 3b Milone p a-Cora ph Slaten p Clippard p S.Burnett p f-J.Gomes ph Gorzelanny p I.Rodriguez c Totals

AB 4 5 5 5 3 0 0 4 4 1 0 5 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 39

R H 1 1 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 10

BI 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 8

Avg. .247 .245 .246 .275 .254 .207 .302 .234 .220 .291 --.167 .200 .222 --.000 1.000 .211 .107 .212

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Victorino cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Bowker 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .154 g-Polanco ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .283 2-Do.Brown pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .246 Gload 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .255 W.Valdez ss 3 0 1 0 1 1 .250 Mayberry 1b-cf 4 0 2 0 1 0 .272 Pence rf 3 0 2 0 0 0 .313 1-Moss pr-rf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 B.Francisco lf 5 0 0 0 0 0 .234 Kratz c 5 0 1 0 0 1 .200 Orr 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .226 M.Martinez 3b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .199 j-Schneider ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .169 K.Kendrick p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .217 Schwimer p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Ruiz ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .280 c-Ibanez ph 1 1 1 3 0 0 .243 Savery p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Lidge p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Rollins ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .268 Madson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Stutes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --k-Utley ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .262 Totals 39 3 10 3 4 4 Washington 000 000 300 1 — 4 10 1 Philadelphia 000 000 300 0 — 3 10 1 a-singled for Milone in the 7th. b-was announced for Schwimer in the 7th. c-homered for Ruiz in the 7th. d-sacrificed for L.Nix in the 8th. e-flied out for Lidge in the 8th. f-struck out for S.Burnett in the 9th. g-singled for Bowker in the 9th. h-walked for Bixler in the 10th. i-singled for Flores in the 10th. j-struck out for M.Martinez in the 10th. k-was intentionally walked for Stutes in the 10th. 1-ran for Pence in the 6th. 2-ran for Polanco in the 9th. E—Lombardozzi (1), Orr (2). LOB—Washington 10, Philadelphia 13. 2B—Espinosa (27), Kratz (1). HR—Bernadina (7), off Schwimer; Ibanez (20), off Clippard. RBIs—Bernadina 3 (24), Zimmerman (49), Ibanez 3 (80). SB—Desmond (24). S—Bixler, Milone, W.Valdez, K.Kendrick. Washington Milone Slaten Clippard S.Burnett

IP 6 0 1 1

H 4 2 2 0

R 0 2 1 0

ER 0 2 1 0

BB 0 0 1 1

SO 2 0 1 0

NP 93 5 22 18

ERA 3.32 4.20 1.92 3.86

Grzlanny W, 4-6 1 1 0 0 1 0 17 4.09 Storen S, 39-44 1 1 0 0 1 1 24 2.90 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA K.Kendrick 6 4 0 0 0 4 79 3.04 Schwimer 1 3 3 3 0 2 21 6.97 Savery 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 6 0.00 Lidge 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 9 1.13 Madson 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 2.50 Stutes L, 6-2 1 1 1 1 2 0 22 3.86 Slaten pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Clippard 2-2, Lidge 1-0. IBB—off Gorzelanny (Mayberry), off Storen (Utley), off Stutes (Espinosa). HBP—by Milone (Orr), by K.Kendrick (Desmond). PB—Kratz. T—3:28. A—44,263 (43,651).

Nationals 3, Phillies 0 (Second Game) Washington Desmond ss Werth cf Ankiel cf Zimmerman 3b Morse lf Storen p J.Gomes rf Bernadina rf Espinosa 2b Marrero 1b W.Ramos c Detwiler p H.Rodriguez p Bixler lf Totals

AB 5 4 1 4 5 0 4 0 4 4 4 4 0 0 39

R H 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 11

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 2 1 0 1 2 0 2 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 11

Avg. .249 .230 .245 .290 .303 --.208 .245 .238 .262 .261 .118 .000 .207

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rollins ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .266 Polanco 3b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .283 Victorino cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .284 Utley 2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .261 Mayberry 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .268 Ibanez lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .242 B.Francisco rf 3 0 2 0 0 0 .240 Ruiz c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .278 Cl.Lee p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .205 De Fratus p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Gload ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .252 Herndon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 28 0 3 0 1 6 Washington 010 001 100 — 3 11 0 Philadelphia 000 000 000 — 0 3 3 a-grounded out for De Fratus in the 8th. E—Rollins (6), Utley (5), Ruiz (4). LOB—Washington 10, Philadelphia 3. 2B—Desmond (24), Werth (26). HR—Espinosa (20), off Cl.Lee. RBIs—Espinosa (62), Detwiler (1). GIDP—Werth, Victorino, Cl.Lee. DP—Washington 2 (Zimmerman, Desmond, Espinosa), (Zimmerman, Espinosa, Marrero); Philadelphia 1 (Rollins, Utley, Mayberry). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Detwiler W, 3-5 7 1-3 3 0 0 1 3 81 3.30 H.Rdriguez H, 9 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 3.65 Storen S, 40-45 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 2.86 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cl.Lee L, 16-8 7 11 3 2 0 9 120 2.38 De Fratus 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 0.00 Herndon 1 0 0 0 1 2 14 3.42 Inherited runners-scored—H.Rodriguez 1-0. HBP— by Detwiler (Utley). T—2:34. A—45,408 (43,651).

Reds 6, Astros 4 Houston AB J.Schafer cf 4 Ang.Sanchez ss 3 f-Barmes ph 1 J.Martinez lf 5 Ca.Lee 1b 4 Bogusevic rf 4 Paredes 3b 3 b-C.Johnson ph-3b1 Altuve 2b 4 Quintero c 3 c-M.Downs ph 1 Towles c 0 Norris p 1 Harrell p 1 An.Rodriguez p 0 X.Cedeno p 0 a-Wallace ph 1 J.Abreu p 0 W.Lopez p 0 W.Wright p 0 e-Shuck ph 1 Totals 37

R H 1 2 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 10

BI 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .246 .237 .250 .282 .276 .284 .299 .247 .266 .249 .283 .176 .132 .000 .000 --.260 ----.000 .262

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. B.Phillips 2b 4 1 1 1 1 1 .294 Sappelt lf 4 1 2 1 1 0 .258 Votto 1b 4 0 1 0 1 0 .315 Bruce rf 5 0 3 2 0 1 .259 J.Francisco 3b 5 1 2 0 0 1 .250 Stubbs cf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .244 Mesoraco c 3 1 1 2 1 1 .207 Janish ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .206 H.Bailey p 3 1 3 0 0 0 .297 Arredondo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Bray p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Burton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Alonso ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .341 Cordero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 36 6 14 6 5 7 Houston 002 000 020 — 4 10 0 Cincinnati 030 200 01x — 6 14 0 a-struck out for X.Cedeno in the 7th. b-homered for Paredes in the 8th. c-grounded out for Quintero in the 8th. d-struck out for Burton in the 8th. e-lined out for W.Wright in the 9th. f-flied out for Ang.Sanchez in the 9th. LOB—Houston 8, Cincinnati 11. 2B—Altuve (10). HR—J.Martinez (6), off H.Bailey; C.Johnson (7), off Bray; Mesoraco (2), off Norris; B.Phillips (18), off W.Lopez. RBIs—J.Martinez 2 (33), C.Johnson 2 (40), B.Phillips (81), Sappelt (4), Bruce 2 (94), Mesoraco 2 (5). SB—J.Schafer (20). DP—Houston 1 (Ang.Sanchez, Ca.Lee). Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Norris L, 6-11 2 2-3 7 3 3 2 3 71 3.77 Harrell 1 1-3 2 2 2 1 0 25 2.00 An.Rodriguez 1 2-3 1 0 0 1 1 32 5.07 X.Cedeno 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 3 0.00 J.Abreu 1 0 0 0 1 2 22 2.45 W.Lopez 2-3 3 1 1 0 1 15 2.93 W.Wright 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 0.82 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA H.Bailey W, 9-7 7 6 2 2 2 5 119 4.32 Arredondo H, 3 1-3 1 1 1 0 0 9 3.26 Bray H, 20 1-3 1 1 1 0 1 14 2.91 Burton H, 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 8 4.91 Crdero S, 34-40 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 2.43 Inherited runners-scored—Harrell 2-0, X.Cedeno 2-0, W.Wright 2-0, Bray 1-1. IBB—off An.Rodriguez (Votto). WP—Harrell, An.Rodriguez. T—2:35. A—23,847 (42,319).

Brewers 5, Cubs 1 Milwaukee C.Hart rf Morgan cf Braun lf Fielder 1b R.Weeks 2b McGehee 3b Y.Betancourt ss Lucroy c Marcum p Fr.Rodriguez p Totals

AB 4 4 5 3 4 4 4 3 2 0 33

R 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 5

H BI BB 1 1 0 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 5 4

SO 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 4

Avg. .284 .307 .332 .294 .270 .227 .248 .263 .158 .500

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. S.Castro ss 4 1 1 1 0 1 .305 Barney 2b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .278 Ar.Ramirez 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .306 DeWitt 3b 1 0 1 0 0 0 .262 C.Pena 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .229 LaHair rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .378 A.Soriano lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .241 Byrd cf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .281 Soto c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .222 R.Wells p 1 0 1 0 0 0 .150 a-Colvin ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .154 R.Ortiz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Cashner p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Re.Johnson ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .315 Grabow p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 33 1 6 1 0 10 Milwaukee 004 010 000 — 5 7 1 Chicago 000 001 000 — 1 6 1 a-struck out for R.Wells in the 5th. b-singled for Cashner in the 8th. E—McGehee (20), Soto (12). LOB—Milwaukee 8, Chicago 5. 2B—C.Hart (22), Marcum (2), Barney 2 (23). HR—S.Castro (10), off Marcum. RBIs—C.Hart (57), Morgan (37), Braun (104), R.Weeks 2 (47), S.Castro (62). SB—Morgan (13). S—Marcum. DP—Milwaukee 1 (McGehee, R.Weeks, Fielder). Milwaukee IP Mrcum W, 13-7 8 Fr.Rodriguez 1 Chicago IP

H 5 1 H

R 1 0 R

ER 1 0 ER

BB 0 0 BB

SO 7 3 SO

NP 97 19 NP

ERA 3.31 2.78 ERA

R.Wells L, 7-5 5 6 5 5 2 3 87 5.09 R.Ortiz 2 1 0 0 1 1 28 4.96 Cashner 1 0 0 0 1 0 12 2.08 Grabow 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 4.76 IBB—off R.Wells (Fielder). HBP—by R.Wells (Marcum), by Grabow (C.Hart). WP—Marcum, R.Wells 2. T—2:39. A—36,571 (41,159).

Padres 2, Rockies 1 San Diego AB R Maybin cf 4 0 Bartlett ss 4 1 Hundley c 4 0 Blanks 1b 1 0 Rizzo 1b 3 0 O.Hudson 2b 3 1 Alb.Gonzalez 2b 0 0 Hermida rf 4 0 Cunningham lf 3 0 Parrino 3b 4 0 Latos p 4 0 H.Bell p 0 0 Totals 34 2

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 2 2

SO 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 2 2 0 9

Avg. .267 .248 .289 .230 .126 .243 .216 .196 .173 .176 .074 ---

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. E.Young lf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .233 M.Ellis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .274 Fowler cf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .265 S.Smith rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .282 Pacheco 1b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .286 Kouzmanoff 3b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .222 W.Rosario c 4 0 1 0 0 3 .200 Field ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .231 Chacin p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .169 a-Nelson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .244 Belisle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Brothers p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Tulowitzki ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .303 R.Betancourt p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 33 1 7 1 1 10 San Diego 100 001 000 — 2 6 2 Colorado 000 000 001 — 1 7 1 a-flied out for Chacin in the 6th. b-struck out for Brothers in the 8th. E—O.Hudson (4), Hundley (6), Kouzmanoff (2). LOB—San Diego 7, Colorado 6. 2B—O.Hudson (14), Hermida (1), Fowler (31). 3B—E.Young (2). RBIs— O.Hudson (42), Hermida (9), Pacheco (9). San Diego IP H R ER BB SO Latos W, 8-14 8 2-3 6 1 1 1 9 H.Bell S, 40-45 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO Chacin L, 11-13 6 6 2 1 2 4 Belisle 1 0 0 0 0 0 Brothers 1 0 0 0 0 2 R.Betancourt 1 0 0 0 0 3 Inherited runners-scored—H.Bell 1-0. T—2:36. A—32,465 (50,490).

NP 123 9 NP 98 5 18 10

ERA 3.60 2.55 ERA 3.66 3.39 3.03 2.98

SO 1 0 1 2 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .217 .282 .309 .303 .243 .212 .280 .213 .247 .192 .213 .085 .229 .231 -----

Dodgers 2, Giants 1 San Francisco AB An.Torres cf 3 Keppinger 2b 3 b-P.Sandoval ph-3b1 Beltran rf 4 DeRosa 3b-2b 4 2-Burriss pr 0 Pill 1b 4 O.Cabrera ss 3 c-A.Huff ph 1 Christian lf 3 C.Stewart c 3 Lincecum p 2 a-Burrell ph 0 1-Ford pr 0 Runzler p 0 Romo p 0 Totals 31

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 1 2

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. D.Gordon ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .291 Sellers 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .194 Kemp cf 4 1 2 0 0 2 .321 J.Rivera lf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .297 Oeltjen lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .219 Loney 1b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .285 Miles 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .278 Sands rf 3 1 1 1 1 2 .249 Barajas c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .230 Kershaw p 1 0 0 0 1 0 .232 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Guerra p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 2 8 2 3 6 San Francisco 000 000 010 — 1 6 0 Los Angeles 110 000 00x — 2 8 2 a-walked for Lincecum in the 8th. b-struck out for Keppinger in the 8th. c-grounded into a double play for O.Cabrera in the 9th. 1-ran for Burrell in the 8th. 2-ran for DeRosa in the 9th. E—Miles (8), Guerra (1). LOB—San Francisco 5, Los Angeles 8. 2B—Christian (2), Loney (28). HR— C.Stewart (3), off Kershaw; Sands (4), off Lincecum. RBIs—C.Stewart (10), Loney (62), Sands (26). SB— Christian (3), D.Gordon (22). CS—An.Torres (6), Beltran (2), Christian (2), Kemp (11). S—Kershaw. GIDP—A.Huff. DP—Los Angeles 1 (Loney, D.Gordon, Loney). San Fran. IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lncm L, 13-13 7 8 2 2 3 5 112 2.59 Runzler 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 8 6.84 Romo 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 1.39 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Krshaw W, 20-5 7 1-3 6 1 1 2 6 115 2.27 Jansen H, 8 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 7 3.10 Guerra S, 19-20 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 2.06 Inherited runners-scored—Jansen 2-0. WP—Kershaw. T—2:43. A—32,526 (56,000).

Pirates 5, Diamondbacks 3 Pittsburgh AB R H Presley lf 5 2 2 Walker 2b 5 0 2 A.McCutchen cf 3 1 0 D.Lee 1b 4 1 2 Doumit c 5 0 2 G.Jones rf 3 0 1 a-Ludwick ph-rf 1 0 0 Veras p 0 0 0 Watson p 0 0 0 e-Ciriaco ph 1 0 1 Hanrahan p 0 0 0 P.Alvarez 3b 4 1 1 R.Cedeno ss 5 0 1 Morton p 3 0 2 b-Jaramillo ph 1 0 0 Leroux p 0 0 0 Grilli p 0 0 0 Paul rf 0 0 0 Totals 40 5 14

BI 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 8

Avg. .298 .270 .262 .342 .302 .243 .236 --.000 .357 --.190 .254 .080 .296 --.000 .255

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bloomquist ss 5 0 1 1 0 0 .266 A.Hill 2b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .298 J.Upton rf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .292 M.Montero c 4 0 1 0 1 1 .281 Goldschmidt 1b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .254 C.Young cf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .233 R.Roberts 3b 4 1 1 1 0 2 .249 G.Parra lf 3 1 2 0 1 1 .296 D.Hudson p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .270 Owings p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .211 Paterson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Shaw p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Burroughs ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .267 Da.Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Blum ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 R.Cook p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 37 3 9 2 3 7 Pittsburgh 110 010 020 — 5 14 1 Arizona 000 000 120 — 3 9 1 a-flied out for G.Jones in the 7th. b-struck out for Morton in the 7th. c-singled for Shaw in the 7th. dpopped out for Da.Hernandez in the 8th. e-singled for Watson in the 9th. E—P.Alvarez (14), R.Roberts (14). LOB—Pittsburgh 12, Arizona 11. 2B—Presley 2 (11), Walker 2 (30), Doumit (12), Morton (3), A.Hill (10), C.Young (36). HR— P.Alvarez (4), off D.Hudson; D.Lee (6), off Da.Hernandez. RBIs—Walker (81), D.Lee 2 (16), Doumit (29), P.Alvarez (16), Bloomquist (25), R.Roberts (56). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mortn W, 10-10 6 3 0 0 3 5 106 3.67 Leroux 0 2 1 1 0 0 11 2.74 Grilli H, 7 1 1 0 0 0 0 17 2.73 Veras 1-3 3 2 1 0 0 10 3.60 Watson H, 8 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 8 3.96 Hanrahan S, 39-42 1 0 0 0 0 2 17 1.76 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hudsn L, 16-11 5 7 3 3 3 4 103 3.43 Owings 1 2 0 0 1 0 21 3.00 Paterson 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 11 3.00 Shaw 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 11 2.36 Da.Hernandez 1 2 2 2 0 1 19 3.53 R.Cook 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 8.44 Leroux pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Grilli 2-1, Watson 2-1, Shaw 1-0. IBB—off Morton (G.Parra), off D.Hudson (P.Alvarez). HBP—by Morton (A.Hill). WP—Morton. T—3:31. A—30,114 (48,633).


D4 Wednesday, September 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

BALL STOPS HERE

MLB

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Rooting for Yankees not an option for Red Sox

Mountain West considering options By Pat Graham The Associated Press

By Jimmy Golen The Associated Press

BOSTON — Things were looking dire for the Boston Red Sox when they dropped three of four to Tampa Bay and the opener of a doubleheader against last-place Baltimore on Monday. Fans were booing. Fans were panicking. Fans were ready to give up. But they weren’t willing to take the most drastic measure of all: Rooting for the New York Yankees when they play the Rays seven times over the next nine days. “Absolutely not. Anybody that’s going to beat the Yankees, I don’t care,” said Pat Smith, a plumber from Cambridge who watched the Red Sox lose to the Orioles on Monday afternoon — their 12th loss in 15 games. “Even if it hurts the Sox. You never root for the Yankees. I’m sorry. I don’t care.” The Red Sox led the AL East for much of the summer, and they still had a chance to coast into the playoffs with a ninegame lead over Tampa Bay in the wild-card race on Sept. 3. But the Rays beat Boston six times in seven games over a 10day span, trimming the deficit to two games before Baltimore cut it by another half-game Monday. The Red Sox won the nightcap to extend their lead to two games heading into Tuesday. The Rays play seven games over the final nine days against the first-place Yankees, a reason for Boston fans to cheer for the hated pinstripes. “It’s something that you don’t ever think you’re going to get to. But I understand that,” Yankees manager Joe Girardi said Tuesday. Seven of Boston’s last 10 are against the Orioles, who entered the doubleheader 29 games out in the AL East. “We need to control what we can control,” Red Sox manager Terry Francona said after losing three of four to the Rays. “Saying that, I hope they lose.” Before heading to New York for four games in three days, Rays manager Joe Maddon was asked if he ever thought he could turn a ballpark full of 37,000 Bostonians into Yankees fans. “That’s improbable, isn’t it?” he said. “It’s not just 37,000, it’s 37 in the ballpark and millions more in the nation.” But many Red Sox fans weren’t ready to take that step. “You’ve got to root for the Rays,” said Ted Sellars, a grocery manager from the Boston area. “You can’t root for the Yankees. Ever! Ever! Ever!” The rivalry between Boston and New York ebbs and flows, hitting its most recent peak in back-to-back AL championship series matchups in 2003-04. The Red Sox lost the first one with a spectacular collapse, but then won the next year with an even more impressive comeback en route to their first World Series title in 86 years. That cured much of the angst that has infested the town since Red Sox owner Harry Frazee sold Babe Ruth to the Yankees; the New Yorkers won 26 World Series before Boston won another, but with a 2-1 edge in titles in the past 10 years, the Hub seemed finally to have gotten over its inferiority complex. That’s why Billy Welsh, a firefighter from Trenton, N.J., who nonetheless grew up a Red Sox fan because his father liked Ted Williams, is willing to look at things from a pragmatic perspective. “As hard as it may seem, I would have to root for the Yankees because I don’t think the Red Sox are going to win the division, and the only way they’re going to get into the playoffs is if Tampa Bay goes down,” Welsh said. “Because the way they’re playing right now, it’s not looking good.” Try telling that to Jim Hopkins, an accountant from nearby Danvers. Rooting for the Yankees is “like telling Satan ‘You’re good,’ ” he said. “If the Sox can’t get there on their own, that’s their problem.”

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Crook County goal keeper Troy Jackson dives to stop a Summit player from scoring during the first half of Tuesday’s game in Bend. Summit won the game 8-0. For a related story, see Page D1.

PREP SPORTS ROUNDUP

Cougars shut out visiting Spartans Bulletin staff report In the 27th minute of Mountain View’s girls soccer game against Corvallis, McKayla Madison took matters into her own hands. Taking the ball up the field, Madison beat two Spartan defenders for what became the go-ahead goal in a 2-0 Cougars victory in Tuesday’s Class 5A nonconference match at Mountain View High School. “Even when she’s not getting an assist or a goal she’s such a huge part of the team,” Cougars coach Grant Mattox said. “She holds everything together in the middle (of our side).” Tash Anderson scored on a cross from Madison Shore during stoppage time in the first half for Mountain View’s second goal. The second half was played to a scoreless draw despite two Cougar shots on goal that bounced off the goal posts. “I felt like we were controlling the run of play pretty well,” Mattox said. “We had a lot of scoring opportunities that we didn’t finish, but we did get the ones we needed.” Mountain View goalkeeper Tia Hatton recorded seven saves in helping preserve the shutout. The Cougars (3-2) play at Bend on Tuesday. In other prep events Tuesday: BOYS SOCCER Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Burns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 BURNS — Gerson Gonzalez scored five goals and Brian Munoz and Edgar Villareal each added two assists as the Bulldogs improved to 2-2 in Class 3A/2A/ 1A Special District 5 play. Ryan Allen contributed two scores and Isaias Gutierrez added a goal as well. Culver (2-3 overall) hosts Grant Union in another league matchup next Tuesday. Grant Union . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Central Christian. . . . . . . . . . . . .1 JOHN DAY — Caleb Reyn-

olds scored for the White Tigers in their Class 3A/2A/1A Special District 5 loss to the Prospectors. Grant Union surged to a 2-0 halftime lead before Reynolds’ goal in the second half. Central Christian (2-2 SD5) plays Tuesday at home against Umatilla. GIRLS SOCCER Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Megan Buzzas and Raja Char each scored a pair of goals to lead the Storm in the Intermountain Hybrid victory over the Cowgirls. Marina Johannesen, Morgan Caldwell, Shannon Patterson, Annie Hill and Rachel Estopare all recorded goals for Summit, which was also helped by a Crook County own goal. The Storm (5-0-1 overall) led 4-0 at halftime. Summit is at Sherwood on Thursday in a nonleague contest while the Cowgirls (0-4) are at Bend the same day. VOLLEYBALL Crook County . . . . . . . .25-25-25 Mountain View. . . . . . . . 15-20-10 PRINEVILLE — Cowgirl junior Makayla Lindburg posted 20 kills against the Cougars, eight of which came in the final game of the Intermountain Hybrid match. Hannah Troutman added 11 kills and Kirsti Kelso ended the night with seven kills. Freshman Laken Berlin paced Crook County at the service line, going 14 of 14 with three aces. The Cowgirls are at Bend High on Thursday for another Intermountain Hybrid match. Mountain View is off until Saturday, when the Cougars travel to Medford for the Rogue Valley Classic. Burns. . . . . . . . . . . . . 25-23-25-25 Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-25-15-13 BURNS — The Lava Bears lost their second consecutive match, falling to the Class 3A Hilanders on the road. Alyssa Hemperley and Molly Maloney each recorded nine kills for Bend. Alicia Todd (14 digs) and Amanda Todd (13 digs) paced

Rupp Continued from D1 Rupp, a Portland native who ran track at Oregon, has steadily improved since the Beijing Olympics. His new record is a full 22 seconds faster than his previous personal best, set last year. He credits his training partner, Mo Farah, of Great Britain, for his success this season. The two were brought together this past year under coach Alberto Salazar, three-time winner of the New York City Marathon. Salazar runs Nike’s Oregon Project, a stable of elite runners. Farah won the 5,000 meters and placed second in the 10,000 meters at the world championships this summer in Daegu, South Korea. “I’m there at the end of races now. Two years ago it was hang on as long as you can. Now is the fun part where I’m going to be there at the end,” Rupp said. “It’s a matter of getting that last lap and last mile down. ... I’m close to making that big jump. I think I have the pieces in place to do something well.” Rupp was discovered by Salazar at Portland’s Central Catholic High School in 2000. A soccer player, Rupp was persuaded by Salazar to give track a try. He excelled from the start, breaking U.S. junior records in the 3,000, 5,000 and 10,000 meters. There was no surprise when Rupp decided to run for the Ducks. Salazar is an Oregon alum and Nike co-founder Phil Knight also ran track at Or-

the Lava Bear defense. Bend hosts Crook County in an Intermountain Hybrid match on Thursday. Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28-25-25 Sweet Home. . . . . . . . . . 26-17-21 SISTERS — Bailey Bremer and Lizzy Carhart combined for 23 kills as the Outlaws took down the Huskies in straight games in both teams’ Class 4A Sky-Em League opener. Shannon Fouts recorded 37 assists on the night for Sisters, while Sydney Stoneback added 20 digs. The Outlaws play at Elmira on Thursday. Elmira . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25-25-25 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16-16-13 LA PINE — The Hawks fell to the Falcons in the two teams’ Class 4A Sky-Em League opener. Holly Jackson recorded seven kills and six blocks for La Pine, while Brittaney Searcy contributed three service aces. The Hawks play Thursday at Cottage Grove. Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25-25-25 Santiam. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15-20-9 MILL CITY — Shealene Little led the Bulldogs with 14 kills in a straight-games victory over the Wolverines in the Class 2A Tri-River Conference contest. Kelsie Stafford added 12 kills for Culver, and Marie Schumacher contributed seven digs. The Bulldogs (8-3 overall, 5-0 Tri-River) play Thursday at home against Kennedy. Gilchrist . . . . . . . . . . 25-25-16-25 Trinity Lutheran. . . . 22-12-25-20 The Grizzlies posted their first Mountain Valley League win of the season behind Ashley James’ six aces, five kills and eight digs at Trinity’s gym in northeast Bend. Denise Gordon added five kills and three digs and Brenna Gravitt contributed six kills and eight digs in the Gilchrist win. Abegail Carpenter paced the Saints with 11 blocks. Gilchrist (1-4 league) hosts North Lake on Friday while Trinity Lutheran is at Butte Falls the same day.

egon and is one of the school’s most prominent boosters. Oregon was also the alma mater of Rupp’s hero, Steve Prefontaine. Pre, as he was known, was a charismatic and talented runner for the Ducks who competed in the Munich Olympics before his tragic death in a car accident at age 24. Rupp took time away from the Ducks in 2008 to train with Salazar for a shot at the Beijing Games. At the trials that summer at Oregon’s Hayward Field, he earned a spot on the U.S. team with a second-place finish to Abdi Abdirahman in the 10,000 meters. In Beijing, Rupp came in 13th as the top nonAfrican finisher of the race. Rupp returned to Eugene and won an unprecedented six national titles his senior season. He has since collected three straight U.S. championship titles in the 10,000 meters, his most recent coming at Oregon’s historic Hayward Field. Next year he’ll be back in the city known as Track Town USA for the U.S. Olympic trials. A top-three finish would earn him a trip to London, where there’s a good possibility he’ll face his training partner and Bekele. But before he starts working toward that goal, he’s taking a break for a couple of weeks in his hometown. “I’ve got high goals and high expectations for myself,” he said. “We just try to get better every year and look at it like that. I don’t really think you can look at things really long term and get caught up in that.”

DENVER — The Mountain West Conference has started informal conversations with universities that might be left out in the shake-up of the college football landscape. In addition to the league’s talks with schools from the Big 12 and Big East that might be excluded in conference realignment, Mountain West commissioner Craig Thompson has had conversations with Conference USA commissioner Britton Banowsky about a football merger. Such a union would create a super-conference with at least 22 teams in two divisions stretching from Hawaii to the East Coast. “You don’t want to be left standing in a position that doesn’t best drive you,” Thompson told The Associated Press on Tuesday. “You just want to put your membership in the best light possible. If that includes adding people, if that includes the creative consolidation conversation with Conference USA — you just want to be building the best stage for your members.” With the Big East’s shake-up, Thompson would be receptive to keeping TCU in the Mountain West beyond its scheduled departure after this season if school officials have second thoughts about joining a league that lost Syracuse and Pittsburgh to the Atlantic Coast Conference this week. On Tuesday night, Big East commissioner John Marinatto said all the members of his conference are committed to staying together. Thompson also is keeping an eye on any schools that might be left over from a possible breakup of the Big 12. Texas A&M made a decision to seek membership into the Southeastern Conference, which would welcome the Aggies if they can resolve any legal issues over leaving the Big 12. However, the possible exodus of Big 12 schools Texas, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State and Texas Tech to the Pac-12 appears to have hit a snag. The presidents and chancellors of the Pac-12 voted late Tuesday night to remain at a dozen members for now. The Mountain West’s conversations with other schools have been exploratory in nature. No

Expansion Continued from D1 “Conference stability has been our first goal and we look forward to achieving that goal through continued membership in the Big 12 Conference.” Meanwhile, across the county in New York, Big East Commissioner John Marinatto emerged from a three-hour meeting with officials from the league’s football schools to say his members “pledged to each other that they are committed to move forward together.” The Big East also has been staring at an uncertain future after Pittsburgh and Syracuse announced last weekend they are moving to the Atlantic Coast Conference. But now it appears the Big East, like the Big 12, stands a good chance to survive, too — for now. Marinatto said all the league’s members — including Notre Dame and the seven other non-football members — are committed to aggressively recruiting replacements for Syracuse and Pittsburgh, though he would not indicate which schools are candidates. He said the league will enforce the 27-month notice agreement in its bylaws and not allow Syracuse and Pitt to leave until the 2014-15 academic year. He also said he expects TCU to join the league in 2012 as previously agreed upon. As for the Big 12, the board of regents at Texas and Oklahoma voted to give their presidents the right to choose a new conference. Oklahoma State’s regents have scheduled a special meeting today about conference realignment. Oklahoma State was going to follow Oklahoma’s lead and Texas Tech planned to do the same with Texas. Texas and Oklahoma were not acting together. Texas offi-

invitations have been extended from the conference, which lost Utah and BYU this season as the Utes bolted for the Pac-12 and the Cougars became an independent in football and joined the West Coast Conference for all other sports. The Mountain West added Boise State this year and next year will bring in Hawaii (in football only), Nevada and Fresno State. “If in the worst case there’s a 10-team Mountain West Conference in August 2012, that’s not a terrible place to be,” Thompson said. “But are there better options? That’s what we’re trying to determine.” Thompson said he’s spoken with his counterpart at C-USA many times about merging football leagues. Should a plan be hatched, each conference would play separate schedules with the winners meeting in a title game. “Basically, it would be two separately run conferences and business as usual, if you will,” Thompson said. “We’re just trying to see if this is an option for these 22 schools.” A larger conference could give the Mountain West more leverage to garner an automatic BCS berth like the six major football conferences have. As it stands now, the Mountain West will know after this year whether it has qualified or needs to seek a waiver and get approval by a 75 percent majority of the BCS oversight committee members to obtain automatic status for the 2012-13 season. “One of the intended goals (of a super conference) is that the best team, however determined out of these 22 to 24 institutions, would get an automatic BCS berth,” Thompson said. “That’s something that would preclude whatever is perhaps happening in the Mountain West world.” These days, Thompson is trying to sort out fact from fiction with all the speculation from around the country. He’s also formulating quite a few contingency plans. “It’s trying to work in a world right now that’s speculative, but you’re asked to give definitive answers,” Thompson said. “What will we do if this happens? What will we do if that happens? We’re trying to position ourselves for any number of scenarios.”

cials had stated several times it wanted to keep the Big 12 alive. Oklahoma officials said they were looking for stability and equal revenue sharing, which does not occur in the Big 12. Texas has its own cable television network. Now it appears the Longhorns and Sooners will have to figure out a way to continue to live with each other. A person familiar with the schools’ discussions said Texas and Oklahoma officials are expected to meet in the next few days to negotiate an agreement to keep the universities in the league for at least the next five years. The person requested anonymity because the meeting had not been announced. Whether other schools would be invited to join that meeting was unclear Tuesday night. Scott tried to bring Oklahoma and Texas into his conference last summer, but his bid to create a Pac-16 fell short when Texas decided to stay in the Big 12, in part to start its own network. Nebraska and Colorado did leave the Big 12, but Big 12 Commissioner Dan Beebe managed to keep the conference together. When the Longhorn Network became a reality, Texas A&M had had enough. A&M, which flirted with the Southeastern Conference last year, reached out to the SEC and ended up being invited to join that league earlier this month. That deal has not yet been finalized because some Big 12 members, such as Baylor and Iowa State, have not waived the right to possibly sue Texas A&M and the SEC. But if the Big 12 and its new 13-year, $1 billion television deal reached with Fox Sports in April survives, the exit should be clear for Texas A&M. And the rest of the Big 12 can go back to looking for a replacement.


T EE T O G R EEN

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 21, 2011 D5

LPGA TOUR

After big win, Thompson hopes to be tour regular By Nancy Armour The Associated Press

Nam Y. Huh / The Associated Press

Luke Donald, from England, remains the No. 1 golfer in the world, despite having never won a major. Donald is not a heavy driver, but it has not stopped him from getting three wins on tour and finishing in the top 10 in 15 of 20 tournaments.

Donald shows there’s another way to the top By Doug Ferguson The Associated Press

ATLANTA — Luke Donald is unlike any other No. 1 player in golf over the past two decades. No, he still hasn’t won a major. What sets Donald apart from Lee Westwood and Martin Kaymer most recently, from Tiger Woods for an entire decade, and from Vijay Singh and David Duval during their brief stay at the top, is the way he hits the ball. In an era of extra large off the tee, Donald still wears a medium. He is No. 147 in driving distance, and while Donald isn’t exactly a peashooter, no one will ever talk about how he can overpower any golf course except for the Par 3 Course at Augusta National. The only numbers that matter, however, is that he has been No. 1 in the world longer than anyone else this year. He is No. 1 in Vardon Trophy for the lowest adjusted scoring average. He is No. 1 on the European Tour money list and No. 2 on the PGA Tour money list, with a chance to become the first player to win money titles on both sides of the Atlantic. And along with three wins this year, he has finished out of the top 10 in only five of the 20 tournaments he has played this year. In some respects, he has become an inspiration to those who don’t fall out of bed and crack 300-yard drives. “Getting to No. 1, a lot of people wouldn’t have thought I could get there with my kind of a game,” Donald said. “I’m more of a traditional player. That’s kind of my legacy right now, that I’ve been able to get to No. 1 without being a modern-day player. Through hard work and a little bit of thought, I’ve been able to do it.” Mark Wilson, a two-time winner on the PGA Tour this year who is No. 132 in driving distance, has been paying attention to his limitations for years. He drew inspiration from Zach Johnson winning the Masters in 2007, when he

laid up on all the par 5s; from Jim Furyk winning the FedEx Cup last year and reaching No. 2 in the world when Woods was at his peak; and most recently, from Donald. “I remember there was talk 10 years ago how there’s no way a Justin Leonard or a Luke Donald or a Mark Wilson could be No. 1 in the world because they don’t hit it far enough,” Wilson said. “I’ve gotten really mature in the last 12 months to work more on my wedges and realize that’s where the game ultimately lies. “It is an inspiration to see Luke at No. 1 in the world. He’s always at the top of the leaderboard.” There’s no reason to think that cannot continue, even if the traditional game is becoming less common. Power will always have an advantage in golf. It was like that for Bobby Jones and for Jack Nicklaus. John Daly made power golf appealing 20 years ago. Woods refined it. It’s becoming harder to find a promising young player who doesn’t smash it. “Most of the guys you see coming out now, they all bomb it,” said Dustin Johnson, who does just that. “It seems like that’s kind of a trend now. I don’t know any guys that have come out in the last couple years that were short hitters that are at the top of the PGA Tour.” The mistake can be chasing after distance. Matteo Manassero, the 18-year-old from Italy who already has won twice on the European Tour, talks about trying to add distance, even though he has spent his young career making sure his short game is immaculate because it has to be. It has worked so far. “I chase it every week,” said David Toms, whose 13 career tour wins include a major. “It seems like I ask for another driver every week and always go back to the same one.” The year after winning the PGA Championship, Toms played the opening round at Hazeltine with Woods and Ernie Els, two power hitters that made him

question what he was doing out there. Then again, this has gone on for years, and Toms has lost track of how many times his wife got tired of listening to it. Her message: He’s done all right with what he has. “It was funny, I had just gotten back from Boston when I played with Bubba the first or second day,” Toms said. “My son asked me something about his golf swing. I said, ‘Don’t worry about your swing, you need to go to the weight room.’ And that’s when she went off on me again.” The danger of chasing distance is ruining what already was working. Donald tried that himself in 2007, when he was obsessed with more distance to the point it affected a classic swing. He also wonders if it contributed to a wrist injury a year later that led to surgery and kept him out of the Ryder Cup. Those were lean times. He might not hit it far, but he hits it far enough. And it doesn’t hurt that his work ethic is as strong as anyone in golf. Few can appreciate what Donald has done better than Justin Leonard, who turned pro just as professional golf was becoming all about power. Leonard went nine years without missing a Tour Championship. He won 12 times, including the British Open. He lost in a playoff at two other majors and was the 54-hole leader in another. But he never chased length. He went to Butch Harmon to simplify his game and returned to Randy Smith for familiarity. “Don’t get me wrong,” Leonard said Tuesday. “I’m not trying to hit the ball shorter. But I’m not on this Phil Mickelson quest to see how far I can possibly hit the ball. What’s another 5 or 10 yards going to do for me? Yeah, it can make a difference. But I know my game is to put the ball in the fairway, play low-stress golf, rely on my wedge game and putting, and course management.” It’s not an advantage over guys who hit it forever. As Donald has shown, it still works.

Stricker worries about left-arm strength By Doug Ferguson The Associated Press

NOTEBOOK

ATLANTA — Steve Stricker is concerned about losing strength in his left arm, and it didn’t help “Something like this is different,” Toms said. “It’s Tuesday at East Lake that he was hitting balls next different than winning a tournament. It goes beyond to Bubba Watson. that. And to be a part of this award is truly special.” He watched Watson pound one drive so far that it Player of the year hit the net on the back of the range on the fly. It’s difficult enough to find a favorite for PGA “If my neck didn’t hurt, I could get that,” Stricker Tour player of the year going into the Tour Chamsaid with a grin. pionship. Keegan Bradley has two wins, including Stricker withdrew from the BMW the PGA Championship. Luke Donald is Championship last week after two rounds No. 1 in the world. Steve Stricker, Webb because of neck pain that affected his left Simpson, Nick Watney, Bubba Watson arm and made it difficult to hold onto the and Mark Wilson all are going for a third club. He had a cortisone shot on Monday — win at East Lake. his first one — and felt he was fine to play “I think a win this week would sway a in the Tour Championship. lot of people’s minds,” Donald said. The shot was between the C6 and C7 Tougher still might be finding the player vertebrae, and he played nine holes in Wisof the year on the European Tour, although consin that afternoon. its season still has nearly three months “I don’t feel better yet,” said Stricker, who Steve Stricker left. was told it would take three to five days for Thomas Bjorn has won three times. him to feel a difference. Rory McIlroy had a record-setting win at “The crazy thing is there’s no pain. My the U.S. Open, while Darren Clarke had a neck is a little stiff, that’s all. But there’s just a weak, sentimental win at the British Open, his second win heavy feeling in my left arm.” of the year. There’s also Masters champion Charl Still to come this year is the Presidents Cup on Schwartzel and Donald, who has three European Nov. 17-20. Stricker also had planned to play a Fall Tour wins and is atop the world ranking. Series event to stay sharp. Back to Bermuda Payne Stewart award The PGA Championship was at Atlanta Athletic David Toms was presented the Payne Stewart Club last month, which should help freshen some Award on Tuesday, in honor of the three-time major memories. Without that tournament, some players champion who died in a plane crash on his way to at East Lake for the Tour Championship will have the Tour Championship in 1999. gone four months without playing out of Bermuda The award is for a player who shares Stewart’s re- rough. spect for golf tradition, commitment to charity and Either way, the first three playoff events were presentation of himself and the sport through his played out of a far different grass in northern coursdress and conduct. es of Plainfield (Barclays), TPC Boston (Deutsche Toms, whose 13 wins include the PGA Champion- Bank) and the BMW Championship (Cog Hill). ship in 2001, has a foundation that works with atNick Watney said the biggest adjustment is on risk children, and he is building a golf academy for getting a flyer out of the rough. less privileged kids. “It’s not a matter of ‘if,’ it’s a matter of how much,” He also has raised more than $2 million through Watney said. “I hit a flyer nine times out of 10. So for a charity golf tournament that raises money for chil- me, it’s about trying to play the correct amount of a dren who have been abused or neglected. flyer.”

Golf’s latest female phenom has no interest in teeing it up with the guys. Being able to play full-time on the LPGA Tour is challenge enough for Lexi Thompson. Two days after becoming the youngest winner on the LPGA Tour, the 16-year-old said she plans to petition for an exemption to the tour’s 18year-old age requirement. That comes as no surprise to LPGA commissioner Mike Whan, who said he will consider any petition from Thompson when he returns from the Solheim Cup, which begins Friday in Ireland. “I’m not going to be playing on the men’s tour,” Thompson said Tuesday when asked if she’d consider playing any PGA Tour events, as Michelle Wie did before she joined the LPGA Tour full-time. “I really just want to focus on women’s golf. They’re so good out here. You have to shoot 20 under every week to win.” Or close to it. Thompson shot 17 under to win the Navistar LPGA Classic last weekend, making her the tour’s youngest champion by more than two years. In the 15 months since she turned professional, Thompson has played 14 events, had three top-10 finishes and earned more than $500,000. She also is the youngest player to qualify for the U.S. Open, as a 12-year-old in 2007. “I think they should give her full (membership),” seven-time major champion Juli Inkster said after Thompson’s victory. “It’s kind of silly, isn’t it? I think it makes us (the LPGA) look bad, too. Now, you have to go to qualifying school? To me, that’s silly.” The LPGA Tour’s age limit is designed to protect players — both emotionally and developmentally. Golf isn’t gymnastics or figure skating, where turning 21 gets you an AARP card. With most female players playing their best golf in their 20s and 30s, there’s no sense in a teenager rushing to get onto the tour — especially if it might come at the expense of other parts of her life. But Whan recognizes there are exceptions. “I look forward to reading (Thompson’s) petition and we’ll figure it out from there,” Whan said. “But it’s obviously an incredible win. ... Lexi shows us that 16 years of age isn’t just the time to get your driver’s license.” The LPGA already has shown a willingness to make allowances for Thompson, whose parents have carefully managed her development on and off the course. She is homeschooled to accommodate her practice and travel schedule, but has ample time to hang out with her friends. She sees a lot of movies — “I haven’t seen many good ones lately” — and spent the night before the Navistar began gabbing about boys with fellow teen golfer Janie Jackson. And while she said winning her first LPGA Tour event was “way more exciting” than getting her driver’s license earlier this year, she needed a second or two to think it over.

Dave Martin / The Associated Press

Lexi Thompson, 16, plans to petition for an exemption to the LPGA tour’s age requirement of 18 years. Following her win at the Navistar LPGA Classic last week, Thompson says she wants to focus on women’s golf full time, rather than play PGA Tour events. “I have the same lifestyle as a lot of high schoolers — playing sports, just working hard,” Thompson said. “I have sacrificed a lot for this game, but this is what I love.” Though Whan rejected Thompson’s request for 12 sponsor’s exemptions this year, double what’s allowed, the LPGA did allow nonmembers to participate in Monday’s qualifying, essentially allowing Thompson the chance to earn her way into additional tournaments. Whan also allowed Thompson to go through Q school, and said she would be accepted as a full tour member in 2012 if she succeeded in the three-stage process. Thompson won the first stage by 10 strokes in July. The second stage begins Tuesday, and Thompson said she is prepared to play if her request for an exemption is denied. Unlike Wie, who was touted from grade school on as “the next Tiger Woods,” Thompson is only now beginning to catch the general public’s attention. But she is personable and photogenic, and her deals with Cobra-Puma Golf and Red Bull could help the LPGA expand its appeal with that all-important youth market. Just look at what Rickie Fowler is doing for the men’s side. Fowler is in only his second year as a professional, but kids are showing up at tournaments in droves wearing his flat-billed Puma caps and trademark orange shirts. “I want women’s golf to be more well-known and to be out there. It is amazing to watch how the girls play and how low they shoot,” Thompson said. “There’s a lot of great young players coming up and on tour. Fans just need to see it.”

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T EE

D6 Wednesday, September 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

TO

G R EEN

GOLF SCOREBOARD LOCAL The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf results listings and events calendar. Clearly legible items should be faxed to the sports department, 541-385-0831, e-mailed to sports@ bendbulletin.com, or mailed to P.O. Box 6020; Bend, OR 97708.

Club Results AWBREY GLEN Central Oregon Senior Women’s Golf Association Sept. 13 Stroke Play Class A — Gross: 1, Judy Boulet, 87. 2, Sue Braithwaite, 88. 3 (tie), Kathleen Moobery, 89; Sue Adams, 89. Net: 1, Nancy Snyder, 67. 2, Bryna Reisinger, 69. 3 (tie), Pam Chase, 70; Molly Mount, 70. Class B — Gross: 1, Karen Wintermyre, 93. 2, Moe Bleyer, 96. 3, Denise Waddell, 97. 4 (tie), Lynda Weinstock, 98; Bonnie Gaston, 98. Net: 1 (tie), Pam Brooks, 69. Judy Davidson, 69. 3, Donna Loringer 72. 4, Hilary Kenyon, 73. Class C — Gross: 1, Shirley Cowden, 102. 2, Paula Reents, 105. 3, Teddie Crippen, 109. 4, Judi Price, 110. Net: 1, Joan Sheets, 75. 2 (tie), Deanna Cooper, 76; Darlene Ross, 76. 4, Cheree Johnson, 77. Class D — Gross: 1 (tie), Phyllis Lees, 106; Jo Modrell, 106. 3, Rosemary Norton, 109. 4, Jean Fincham, 111. Net: 1, Ellie Rutledge, 73. 2, Kathy Snavely, 74. 3 (tie), Pat Porter, 75; Betty Cook, 75. KPs — Class A: Deb Fitzpatrick. Class B: Juliane Kaneko. Class D: Sally Murphy. Accurate Drives — Class A: Carmen West. Class B: Lael Cooksley. Class C: Diane Storlie. Class D: Bev Ramsey. Nine-Hole Women’s Sweeps, Sept. 14 Odd/Even Shamble 1, Maryanne Adame/Jean Pedelty/Alicia Mehlis/Rosie Long, 45. 2, Tammy Florio/Sally Murphy/Donna Baird/Julie Haas, 46. Men’s Sweeps, Sept. 14 1, 2, 3, Net 5 Par, 4 Par, 3 Par 1, John Seaton/Shelly Grudin/Larry Haas/David Maul, 112. 2, Bill Macri/Larry Hinkle/Tom Stump/Bob Chamberlain. 116. 3, John Maniscalco/Bob Johanson/Jim Larsen/Dennis Baird, 117. Men’s Member-Member, Sept. 16-17 Member-Member Champions — 1, Jack Kavanagh/Ron Knapp. 2, Dennis Sienko/Bill Jackson. 3, John Murphy/Jim Bowlin. 4 (tie), Ken Renner/Brian Wasserman, Bill Macri/Michael Mount. 6 (tie), Joel Leisch/Larry Haas, Larry Hinkle/ Brock Olson, Hal Cowan/Chuck Woodbeck. First Flight — 1, Ken Renner/Brian Wasserman, 214.75. 2, John Murphy/Jim Bowlin, 218.75. Second Flight — 1, Hal Cowan/Chuck Woodbeck, 215.75. 2, Bill Macri/Michael Mount, 221. Third Flight — 1, Jack Kavanagh/Ron Knapp, 209.75. 2, Bill Jackson/Dennis Sienko, 222.75. Fourth Flight — 1, Larry Hinkle/Brock Olson, 219. 2, Joel Leisch/Larry Haas, 221. Bend Chamber Member Invitational Golf Tournament Sept. 19 Scramble 1, Ken Maes/Todd Williams/Dave Swisher/Tim Choquette (Skyline Home Loans), 51. 2, Bob Nelson/Jim Schoning/Kerry Schoning/Randy Schoning (State Farm Insurance, Fred Hornback), 54; 3, Jake Meyer/Jon Biggins/Shane Crowder/ Roman Shabashevich (AT&T), 54. 4, Doug Robbins/Joey Mazzone/Kevin Nelson/ Steve Knauss (Satellite Specialized Transportation), 55. Two Best Balls Gross: 1, Todd Goodew/Jeff Storm/Riley Cranston/James Chrisman (Rocky Mountain Products), 133 Net: 1, Adam Martin/Bill Martin/James Puckett/Robert Wolf (Bigfoot Wedges), 125. KPs — Men: Richard Grant, No. 13. Women: Carol Lee (hole-in-one), No. 6. LDs — Men: Jason Adams, No. 1. Kareen Queen, No. 10. BEND GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Men’s Daily Game, Sept. 8 Gross Skins First Flight (8 handicap or less) — Charlie Rice, Nos. 2, 6; Franz Miller, No. 1; Craig Smith, No. 8; Brian Mikkelborg, No. 9; Jeff Wilson, No. 14. Second Flight (9-12) — Pete Nielsen, Nos. 11, 17; Bill De Gree, No. 3;

Mac Ryder, No. 16. Third Flight (13 and higher) — Tom Riley, Nos. 8, 12, 13, 17; Gary Everton, Nos. 3, 18; Skip Marlatt, No. 4; Bob Caine, No. 6; Roy Bowen, No. 9. Ladies’ Golf Association, Sept. 14 Odd Nine Championship Flight — Gross: 1, Jane Goodwin , 38. 2, Nettie Morrison, 39. 3, Robin Prouty, 40. Net: 1, Janet Windman, 32. 2, Donna Keller, 34.5; Julane Dover, 34.5. A Flight — Gross: 1, Lynn Chase, 44. 2, Eloise Elliott, 48. Net: 1 (tie), Mari Tank, 36.5; Elaine Dehart, 36.5; Kay Miller, 36.5. B Flight — Gross: 1, Joan Thye, 46. 2, Pam Caine, 48. Net: 1, Sandy Edwards, 35. 2, Linda Bjorvik, 36.5. C Flight — Gross: 1, Anita Brown, 51. Net: 1, Robin Schueler, 37.5. D Flight — Gross: 1, Ann Moore, 53. Net: 1, Nancy Eldredge, 36. Nine-Hole Flight — Gross: 1, Judy Mckee, 59. 2, Linda Beccio, 67. Net: 1, Cherie Newlin, 40.5. 2, Judy Arthurs, 45.5.

KPs — A Flight: Jim Montgomery, No. 4; Mike Close, No. 8. B Flight: Larry Conklin, No. 4; J.W. Miller, No. 8. Men’s Association, Sept. 18 Sunday Skins Gross: 1, Les Bryan, 72. 2, Jon Wilber, 75. 3, Tony Ashcraft, 76. Net: 1, Les Bryan, 65. 2, Tony Ashcraft, 66. 3, Jon Wilber, 67. Skins — Gross: Clay Smith, Nos. 3, 5; Dewey Springer, Nos. 10, 16; Jeff Brown, No. 7; Les Bryan, No. 15. Net: Dennis Brockman, Nos. 2, 11; Dewey Springer, Nos. 10, 16; Clay Smith, No. 3; Tony Ashcraft, No. 6; Steve Kidder, No. 12; Les Bryan, No. 16. Senior Men’s League, Sept. 20 Skins Gross: Bob Wolcott, No. 2; Boyd Joyce, No. 4; John McCulloch, No. 7. Net: John Traven, Nos. 5, 6; Trevor Russell, No. 3; Boyd Joyce, No. 4; Allen Burnett, No. 9. KPs — John Traven, No. 4; Harold Simpson, No. 8.

BROKEN TOP Men’s Gathering, Sept. 14 Four Clubs First Flight — Gross: 1, Alan Wade, 76. Net: 1, Ken McCumber, 69. 2, Mike Peters, 69. Second Flight — Gross: 1, Bill DuBois, 81. Net: 1, Joe Mansfield, 67. 2, Bob Abraham, 70. Third Flight — Gross: 1, John Rennick, 88. Net: 1, Chuck Gardner, 70. 2, Tom Strange, 73.

QUAIL RUN Women’s Golf Association, Sept. 14 Nine-Hole Putts Flight A — 1, Shirley Olafson, 18. 2 (tie), Sandy Haniford, 19; Linda Bauman, 19. Flight B — 1, Betty Quinn, 21. Eagle Crest versus Quail Run, Sept. 14 One Net Best Ball Team Results — Eagle Crest def. Quail Run 25½-22½. Flight 1 — 1, Bob Hocker/Steve Austin, 61. 2, Ron Cady/Mike Narzisi, 62. 3, Nate Wilhite/Ken Wellman, 64; 4, Jerry Rogers/Jerry Coday, 64. Flight 2 — 1, Dennis Dorgan/Bill Carey, 59. 2, Bill Howiler/Billy Balding, 60. 3, Don Greenman/Larry Rygalski, 62. 4, Bill McCullough/Ned Ongaro, 64. KPs — Bill Hurst, No. 2; Phil Chappron, No. 8. 18-Hole Group, Sept. 15 Bingo 1, Donna Brown, 4. 2, Vivian Taylor, 3. 3, Linda Dyer, 2 (20 Xs). 4, Thelma Jansen, 2 (19 Xs).

EAGLE CREST Women’s Golf Group, Sept. 13 Net Par Fours at Resort Course Flight A — 1, Betty Stearns, 37. 2, Sherry Cady, 40.5. 3, Elaine Blyler, 43. 4 (tie), Dianne Rogers, 44; Janice Jackson, 44. Flight B — 1, Joni McDonald, 39. 2, Marli Perry, 39.5. 3 (tie), Adrienne Nickel, 41.5; Linda Kelly, 41.5. 5, Sharon Loberg, 44.5. THE GREENS AT REDMOND Ladies of the Greens, Sept. 13 Putters’ Challenge 1, Lonie Bibler/Linda Johnston/Claudia Powell/Kay Webb, 39.63. 2, Lynne Holm/ Sharon Rosengarth/Judy Thorgeirsson, 40.5. 3, Theone Ellis/Mallie Teasdale/Bev Tout/Sarah Winner, 41.38. 4, Ruth Backup/Norma Carter/Ethelmae Hammock/Hazel Schieferstein, 42.88. 5, Julie Fountain/Jackie Hester/Michello Oberg, 43.17. 6, Lynne Ekman/Bobbie Moore, 43.25. Golfer of the Week — Lonie Bibler, 45/28. Lowest Putts — Dee Baker, 15. LDs — A Flight: Sharon Rosengarth. B Flight: Norma Carter. C Flight: Pat Elliott. D Flight: Marilyn Marold. KPs — A Flight: Vivian Webster. B Flight: Carole Wolfe. C Flight: Lou Wayne Steiger. D Flight: Mary Bohler. Men’s Club, Sept. 15 Net Stroke Play A Flight — Nine Holes: 1, Ken Ennoor, 25. 2 (tie), Hoyt Norris, 28.5. Marv Bibler, 28.5. 4 (tie), Ted Brunot, 29; Dan Morris, 29. 18 Holes: 1, Ken Ennor, 56. 2, Hoyt Norris, 57. 3 (tie), Marv Bibler, 58; Norm Olson, 58. B Flight — Nine Holes: 1, Art Tassie, 27.5. 2, Pee Wee Blackmore, 28. 3 (tie), Roy Brown, 29; Arlie Holm, 29. 18 Holes: 1, Pee Wee Blackmore, 58. 2 (tie), Phil Backup, 60; Roy Brown, 60; Arlie Holm, 60; Keith McNeil, 60. KPs — Joe Carpenter, No. 1; Mike Frier, No. 5; Marv Bibler, No. 12; Don Offield, No. 14. MEADOW LAKES Ladies Club, Sept. 8 Even Holes Gross: 1, Karen Peterson, 41. 2, Sharon Taylor, 45. 3 (tie), Jean Gregerson, 46; Diane Hayes, 46. Net: 1, Ginny Gibson, 32. 2, Lee Miller, 34. 3, Jan Uffelman, 34.5. Men’s Association, Sept. 14 White Night Gross: 1 (tie), Jim Montgomery, 34; Mark Payne, 34. 3 (tie), Dustin Conklin, 35; Zach Lampert, 35. 5, Pat O’Gorman, 36. Net: 1, J.W. Miller, 30. 2 (tie), Les Bryan, 31; Steve Spangler, 31. 4, Jon Wilber, 32. 5, Jimmy George, 33. 6 (tie), Rick Fosburg, 34; Mark Jones, 34; Nelson Haas, 34.

G W PGA TOUR FEDEX CUP PLAYOFFS TOUR CHAMPIONSHIP Site: Atlanta. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: East Lake Golf Club (7,319 yards, par 70). Purse: $8 million. Winner’s share: $1.44 million. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-Friday, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Saturday, 10-11 a.m.; Sunday, 9-10:30 a.m.) and NBC (Saturday, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Sunday, 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m.).

by Paula Creamer in 2005. Marlene Hagge was 18 years, 14 days when she won a single-round tournament in 1952. ... Reid won the Spanish Women’s Open for her second Ladies European Tour victory of the year. Notes: Lincicome (ShopRite Classic, Canadian Women’s Open) and Lewis (Kraft Nabisco) are the only U.S. players with LPGA Tour victories this year. Pettersen (Sybase Match Play, Safeway Classic), Gal (Kia Classic) and Hjorth (Avnet LPGA Classic) also are LPGA Tour winners this season. Pettersen won the Ladies Irish Open at Killeen Castle in August.

EUROPEAN TOUR

Last week: Jim Furyk won the Tour Championship, earning $1.35 million for the tournament victory and $10 million for the FedEx Cup title. He closed with an even-par 70 in steady rain for a oneshot victory over Luke Donald.

Site: Atzenbrugg, Austria.

Last week: Justin Rose won the BMW Championship at Cog Hill in Lemont, Ill., chipping in for birdie on No. 17 en route to a two-shot victory over John Senden.

Purse: $1.36 million. Winner’s share: $226,840.

Notes: The top 30 in the FedEx Cup standings qualified for the event. The top five — No. 1 Webb Simpson, No. 2 Dustin Johnson, No. 3 Rose, No. 4 Donald and No. 5 Matt Kuchar — only have to win the tournament to earn the $10 million FedEx Cup prize. ... Johnson opened the four-event playoffs with a victory in the rain-shortened Barclays in New Jersey, and Simpson won the Deutsche Bank at TPC Boston. ... Phil Mickelson won the 2010 tournament. He’s 14th in the standings. ... East Lake, the course where Bobby Jones learned to play, was designed by Donald Ross and renovated by Rees Jones in 1995.

LPGA TOUR LADIES EUROPEAN TOUR SOLHEIM CUP Site: Dunsany, Ireland. Schedule: Friday-Sunday.

AUSTRIAN OPEN Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Diamond Country Club (7,386 yards, par 72).

Television: Golf Channel (Thursday, 6-9 a.m.; Friday, 9:30-11:30 a.m.; Saturday, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Sunday, 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.). Last year: Spain’s Jose Manuel Lara beat David Lynn with a par on the first hole of a playoff. Lara closed with a 64, holing a 35-foot birdie putt on the final hole. Last week: England’s Mark Foster beat France’s Raphael Jacquelin 1-up in the deciding match to give Britain and Ireland its sixth straight victory in the Seve Trophy, 15 1/2-12 1/2 over Continental Europe at Saint-Nom-laBreteche in France. Notes: Irish star Padraig Harrington and John Daly are in the field. ... The Alfred Dunhill Links Championship is next week in Scotland, followed by the Madrid Masters.

NATIONWIDE TOUR SOBOBA GOLF CLASSIC

Course: Killeen Castle (6,531 yards, par 72).

Site: San Jacinto, Calif.

Television: Golf Channel (ThursdayFriday, 11:30 p.m.-10 a.m.; Sunday, 2-8:30 a.m.).

Course: The Country Club at Soboda Springs (7,207 yards, par 71).

Format: Team match play. Friday and Saturday, four morning foursome (alternate-shot) and four afternoon fourball (best-ball) matches; Sunday, 12 singles matches.

Television: None.

United States (c-captain’s pick): Paula Creamer, c-Vicky Hurst, Juli Inkster, Cristie Kerr, Christina Kim, Brittany Lang, Brittany Lincicome, Stacy Lewis, c-Ryann O’Toole, Morgan Pressel, Angela Stanford, Michelle Wie. Captain: Rosie Jones. Europe: Christel Boeljon, Netherlands; Laura Davies, England; c-Sandra Gal, Germany; Sophie Gustafson, Sweden; c-Caroline Hedwall, Sweden; Maria Hjorth, Sweden; Catriona Matthew, Scotland; c-Azahara Munoz, Spain; Anna Nordqvist, Sweden; Suzann Pettersen, Norway; Melissa Reid, England; c-Karen Stupples, England. Captain: Alison Nicholas, England. Last matches: In 2009 at Rich Harvest Farms in Sugar Grove, Ill., the United States beat Europe 16-12 for its third straight victory. Wie led the U.S. with a 3-0-1 record. The Americans lead the series 8-3, going 6-0 at home. Last week: Sixteen-year-old Lexi Thompson became the youngest champion in LPGA Tour history, winning the Navistar LPGA Classic by five strokes. Thompson shattered the age record for a multiple-round event of 18 set

Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.

Purse: $750,000. Winner’s share: $135,000. Last year: Australia’s Steven Bowditch beat Daniel Summerhays by three strokes. Last week: Rookie Jason Kokrak won the Boise Open for his first Nationwide Tour victory, beating John Mallinger by two strokes. Kokrak jumped from 70th to 13th on the money list. The final top 25 will earn 2012 PGA Tour cards. Notes: J.J. Killeen leads the money list with $387,304, followed by Mathew Goggin with $357,352. Both are twotime winners this year, one short of an immediate promotion to the PGA Tour. ... The WNB Golf Classic is next week in Midland, Texas, followed by the Chattanooga Classic.

CHAMPIONS TOUR Next event: SAS Championship, Sept. 31-Oct. 2, Prestonwood Country Club, Cary, N.C. Last week: Jay Don Blake won the Songdo IBD in South Korea for his first Champions Tour title, beating John Cook with a birdie on the fifth hole of a playoff. ——— All Times PDT

RIVER’S EDGE Men’s Club, Sept. 13 Stroke Play Gross: 1, Hi Becker, 75. 2, Wayne Johnson, 77. 3, Paul Runge, 80. 4, Mike Brasher, 82. 5, Bob Drake, 83. 6 (tie), Dick Carroll, 86; Steve Langenberg, 86. 8, Roger Bean, 87. 9, Jerry Egge, 90. 10 (tie), Lee Agee, 93; Bob Deane, 93; Doug King, 93. Net: 1, Johnson, 64. 2, Carroll, 65. 3, Deane, 67. 4, King, 68. 5 (tie), Becker, 69; Drake, 69; Langenberg, 69. 8 (tie), Agee, 70; Runge, 70. 10 (tie), Bean, 73; Maury Pruitt, 73; David Black, 73; Richard Schieferstein, 73; Keith Wood, 73. KPs — Roger Bean, No. 4; Jerry Egge, No. 14. SUNRIVER Men’s Club, Sept. 7 Two-Man Net Best Ball at Woodlands 1, Tim Swezey/Tom Gleason, 60. 2, Don Larson/Greg Cotton, 61. 3, Tom Woodruff/Clair Spaulding, 62. Individual Stroke Play — Gross: 1, Mike Calhoun, 71. Net: 1, Greg Cotton, 64. KPs — Mike Calhoun, Nos. 12, 17; Don Olson, No 5; Gary Brooks, No. 7. Skins (0-18 handicaps) — Gross: Mike Calhoun, 7; Don Olson, 3; Jim Robertson. Net: Greg Cotton, Tim Swezey, Eric Selberg, Clair Spaulding. Skins (19-36 handicaps) — Net: D. Wood, 2; F. Vuillet, 2; Tom Gleason, 2; Howard Potts; Joe Woischke. Central Oregon Golf Tour, Sept. 8 Stroke Play at Woodlands Gross: 1, Mark Crose, 74. 2, Pat Woerner, 75. 3 (tie), Tony Battistella, 78; Verl Steppe, 78. Net: 1, Patrick Mayer, 68. 2, Lyle Zurflu, 69. 3, Bill Burley, 70. 2011 Resort Cup Final Match, Sept. 12 Team Stableford 1, Widgi Creek, 326 points. 2 (tie), Sunriver Resort, 301; Eagle Crest, 301. 4, Black Butte Ranch, 284. Season Results — 1, Widgi Creek, 1253. 2, Black Butte, 1228. 3, Sunriver, 1152. 4, Eagle Crest, 1119. Individual Net Stableford Tournament Tee Flight — 1, Joe Jezukewicz (Widgi Creek), 39. 2, Jim

Fall Continued from D1 Also, the peak tourist season begins to wind down after Labor Day, leaving courses less packed. And the courses have had an entire season to get the track in shape. But don’t just take my word for it. “September is THE best,” says 60-year-old Bob Brydges, of Bend, following a recent round at Widgi Creek. “It’s not too hot, but it is usually pretty nice. That, to me, is just ideal. “It’s a perfect time to play golf just from the standpoint of you have plenty of time to get your game in shape, you’ve got this perfect weather and the course is in great shape.” Tim Casey, a 69-year-old from Bend, agrees. “Fall golf is great,” says Casey while loading up his pickup truck after a round at Widgi. “The crowds are done, and school is in. And maybe some of the tourist traffic is off, and that takes some of the pressure off the golf courses. “It seems like the last couple years (the weather) has been good mostly through October,” Casey adds. “I think the last two years I was playing up until the second week of November.” Best of all, at least for local golfers, our fall golf seems to be our little secret. Nothing against the Portlanders and Willamette Valley golfers who populate our courses all summer, but it is kind of nice to play a course with a bit more room to roam. “That is huge,” says Brydges of the lack of tourists playing Central Oregon golf courses this time of year. Those folks don’t know what they’re missing. “Over there (on the west side of the Cascade Range) it starts to rain and it gets a little bit soggy,” says John Hodecker, 78, who has been a member at Juniper for 45 years. “But you don’t have to worry about that here.” Of course, shoulder-season golf in Central Oregon is far from perfect.

Wellock (Widgi Creek), 39. 3, John Deetz (Widgi Creek), 38. 4, Monte Stoughton (Black Butte), 35. White Tee Flight — 1, John Keenan (Black Butte), 38. 2, Ted Moore (Eagle Crest), 37. 3, Tom Ellis (Sunriver), 36. 4, Ed Seabloom (Black Butte), 36. Women’s Club, Sept. 14 Stroke Play Flight 1 — Gross: 1, Julie Sagalewicz, 82. Net: 1, Nancy Nevin, 66. 2, Helen Brown, 70. 3, Denice Gardemeyer, 72. Flight 2 — Gross: 1, Alice Holloway, 92. Net: 1, Barbara Weybright, 69. 2, Dolly Mealy. 3, Millie MacKenzie. KPs — Dolly Mealy, No. 4; Julie Sagaliewicz, No. 8; Mlllie MacKenzie, No. 13; Julie Sagaliecwz, No. 13; Nancy Nevin, No. 16. Chip-ins — Sharon Kelly, No. 7; Sallie Hennessey, No. 9; Barbara Weybright, No. 10; Nancy Nevin, No. 10; Dolly Mealy, No. 12; Helen Brown, No. 12; Nancy Nevin, No. 13. Birdies (No. 13) — Dolly Mealy, Julie Sagaliecwz, Barba Weybright, Nancy Nevin. Men’s Club, Sept. 14 Team Stableford at Meadows 1, Scott Brown/Clair Spaulding/Mike Sullivan/Robert Stephens III, 157. 2, Brian Holmes/Tim Swezey/Joe Woischke/Russ Porter, 147. 3, Robert Hill/Jim Robertson/ Robert Bristow/Tom Gleason, 146. Individual Stroke Play — Gross: 1, Mike Calhoun, 74. Net: 1, Mike Sullivan, 64. KPs — Scott Brown, No. 4; Bob Stephens, No. 8; Tim Swezey, No. 13; Clair Spaulding, No. 16. Skins (0-18 handicaps) — Gross: Scott Brown, 2; Robert Hill. Net: Eric Selberg, Tim Swezey, Clair Spaulding. Skins (19-36 handicaps) — Net: Eric Saukkonen, 4; Frank Vulliet, 2; Tom Gleason, 2; Don Larson; Mike Sullivan.

Hole-In-One Report Sept. 19 AWBREY GLEN Carol Lee, Bend No. 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 yards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-iron

Calendar The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf events calendar. Items should be mailed to P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708; faxed to the sports department at 541-385-0831; or e-mailed to sports@bendbulletin.com. ——— CLINICS OR CLASSES Wednesdays — Golf lessons for seniors at Missing Links Family Golf Center in Redmond. Classes are held from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. through October. Cost is $15. Drop-ins welcome. For more information or to register, call 541-923-3426. Thursdays — Ladies golf lessons at Missing Links Family Golf Center in Redmond. Beginning in October, classes are held from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. every Thursday. Cost is $15. Drop-ins welcome. For more information or to register, call 541-923-3426. ——— TOURNAMENTS Sept. 26 — Cougar Summer Baseball Fall Classic at the Club at Brasada Ranch. Four-person scramble begins with a 9 a.m. shotgun start. Cost is $100 per player, and includes golf cart, lunch, and on-course drinks. Proceeds benefit the Cougar summer baseball program of Mountain View High School. For more information or to register, e-mail Kory Bright at kory.bright@gmail.com. Sept. 26-29 — The Fall Tour is a pro-am tournament for teams and individuals through the Oregon Chapter of the PGA. This four-day event is held at Pronghorn Club in Bend, Widgi Creek Golf Club in Bend, Eagle Crest Resort’s Ridge Course in Redmond and Black Butte Ranch’s Big Meadow course. Admission is free for spectators. Contact: Amy Kerle, 800-574-0503 or www.pnwpga.com. Sept. 29 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com.

Oct. 1-2 — The 84th OGA Men’s Team Championship at the Club at Brasada Ranch in Powell Butte is an Oregon Golf Association 36-hole gross stroke-play event. OGA member clubs nominate four amateur golfers to represent the club. Team scores are calculated using the best three individual scores on the team each day. For more information, visit www.oga.org or call the OGA at 866-9814653. Oct. 1-2 — The Crooked River Ranch Couples Caper is a 36-hole mixed couples Chapman. Open to any golfer with an official USGA handicap. For more information or to register, call Crooked River Ranch at 541-923-6343, or visit www. crookedriveranch.com. Oct. 1-2 — Deer Widows Invitational at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond is a women-only tournament. For more information or to register, call Juniper at 541548-3121, or visit www.playjuniper.com. Oct. 3 — The 2011 Bpositiv Charity Golf Tournament at Bend Golf and Country Club. Four-person scramble begins with 1 p.m. shotgun start. Cost is $125 for a single golfer, $225 for a twosome, $325 for a threesome, or $425 for a foursome. Proceeds benefit Bpositiv, a nonprofit that serves families whose children are sent to hospice care. For more information or to register, call 541-330-7684, e-mail dtpite@aol.com or visit www.bpositiv.org. Oct. 8 — Red Dog Classic Golf Tournament at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. The four-person scramble begins with a noon shotgun. Cost is $100 per golfer and benefits the Humane Society of Redmond. For more information or to register, call 541-350-7605 or visit www.redmondhumane.org. Oct. 8 — The Patriot Challenge at Aspen Lakes Golf Course in Sisters. Two-Person Best Ball begins with a noon shotgun start. Maximum of a 10-stroke handicap differential between partners. Cost is $200 per team, and includes cart, range balls, contests, lunch and tee prizes. Proceeds benefit the Folds of Honor Foundation and Patriot Golf Day. For more information or to register, call Aspen Lakes head pro Josh McKinley at 541-549-4653 or e-mail him at josh@aspenlakes.com. Oct. 10 — Central Oregon Seniors Golf Organization event at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. The format is individual gross and net best ball, as well as team best ball. Cash prizes awarded at each event. Tournament series is open to men’s club members at host sites, and participants must have an Oregon Golf Association handicap. Cost is $110 for the season plus a $5 per-event fee. For more information, call Ron Meisner at 541-548-3307. Oct. 11 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Prineville Golf Club. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. Oct. 13 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. Oct. 14 — The Big ’n Bad Bogey Open at Widgi Creek Golf Club in Bend. Golfers in two-person net scramble will be challenged with an extreme course setup, including tucked pins. Tournament begins with 10:30 a.m. shotgun. Tournament split into three divisions: men, women and couples. USGA hanicap is required. Cost is $50 for nonmembers and includes golf, range balls and prizes. Space is limited to first 50 teams to register, and deadline to enter is Oct. 7. For more information or to register, call Widgi Creek at 541-382-4449. Oct. 20 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at the Club at Brasada Ranch in Powell Butte. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. Oct. 22-23 — The Tetherow Two-Ball Invitational is a two-person, select-drive best ball at Tetherow Golf Club in Bend. Tee times Saturday will be between 10:30 a.m. and noon. Play will begin Sunday at 11 a.m. Cost is $600 per team, with no more than one professional on each team, and includes Friday practice round, breakfast and on-course snacks, Saturday dinner, caddie, gifts, trophies and prizes. Gross and net divisions. The field will be limited to the first 30 teams to register. For more information, call Tetherow at 541-388-2582. Oct. 27 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Crooked River Ranch. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com.

Shoulder rates Central Oregon courses offering fall rates. Prices do not include additional cart fees unless otherwise noted (Summer peak rates in parentheses) Aspen Lakes Golf Course (begins Oct. 5): $45 ($75); $17 per-person cart fee. Black Butte Ranch Big Meadow (begins Oct. 1): $59 ($73); $32 cart fee, which can be shared by two golfers. Crooked River Ranch (begins Oct. 1): $36 weekdays, $40 weekends ($46); $15 per-person cart fee. Eagle Crest Resort (begins Oct. 15): Challenge Course, $35 ($44); Ridge Course, $50 ($69); Resort Course, $50 ($69); $16 per-person cart fee. The Greens at Redmond: $24 ($32); $20 cart fee, which can be shared by two golfers. Juniper Golf Course: $49 ($65); $15 per-person cart fee. Kah-Nee-Ta Resort (begins Sept. 26): $40, including cart ($45) Lost Tracks Golf Club (begins Oct. 1): $40 weekdays, $50 weekends ($72); $13 per-person cart fee. Meadow Lakes Golf Course (Oct. 1): $30 ($38); $14 per-person cart fee. Pronghorn Club’s Jack Nicklaus Course (begins Oct. 1): $90 ($175), including cart. Forecaddie fee of $20 in addition to green fee. Quail Run Golf Course (begins Oct. 5): $42, $25 after 1 p.m. ($55); $13 per-person cart fee. River’s Edge Golf Course (under way): $47 ($68); $16 per-person cart fee. Sunriver Resort Woodlands and Meadows courses (Sept. 26): $49 for Deschutes County residents, $55 for others ($79); includes cart and range balls. Tetherow Golf Club (begins Oct. 1 for Central Oregon residents): $99, $85 after 1:40 p.m. ($175), and includes cart and forecaddie. Widgi Creek Golf Club: $55 before noon, $39 after noon, $25 after 4 p.m.; $39 after Oct. 3 ($75); $16 per-person cart fee.

think the weather is more predictable in the fall.” Casey advises golfers in these parts to always be prepared before heading out. After all, no matter the season, Central Oregon weather is about as dependable as a hacker’s putting stroke. “You dress for it, just like anything else around Bend,” Casey says. “You have wind shirts, and dry pants, an umbrella and extra gloves. It’s part of the game.” The good news is that — for a while still, anyway — shorts could be in order. The local golf season, it turns out, is not quite over. Zack Hall can be reached at 541-617-7868 or zhall@ bendbulletin.com.

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Fall, which officially begins Friday, can bring all sorts of weather. The nights — and mornings — do get colder, and playable weather is no guarantee. “The only problem in October is that you can start getting frost,” Brydges observes. “Your window (to play) starts getting a little smaller. But even so, you can get some great golfing days in October.” Weather is generally more consistently pleasant in the autumn than in Central Oregon’s often-wild spring swings. And the courses are usually in better condition in the fall than in the spring, notes Casey, who usually plays about once a week at Widgi Creek. “The beginnings (of the golf season) are kind of rough,” Casey says. “The courses have snow damage, and the weather is iffy. And (the weather) is more volatile in the spring. I

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SHOPPING IN BRIEF Wrangle up new Western fashion Boot Barn, a California-based chain focusing on Western wear, is now open in Bend. The store is located at 2221 N.E. Third St., across the street from Robberson Ford in the former home of Spotted Mule Saddlery and Western Wear. It offers boots, shoes, accessories, clothing and more for men, women and children. In addition to Western-themed goods, Boot Barn carries outdoor and motorcycle-style goods. Brands include Ugg and Sorel. Boot Barn is presently open 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturdays and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays. Its opening hours are expected to change. Contact: www.bootbarn.com or 541-382-3795.

Website Altrec opens retail site in Bend Great Outdoors, the new brick-andmortar store of Redmondbased outdoor gear retailer Altrec.com, will open Oct. 7 in Bend. The store will sell first-line gear, as well as additional product lines Courtesy Altrec.om not currently Lucky Bums available on the Kid’s Dragwebsite. onfly 10L Altrec.com’s Backpack. offerings range from coats to backpacks to sunglasses to sleeping bags. Great Outdoors is located in the Century Park shopping center, next to Safeway and Pilot Butte Drive-In on Century Drive. Its hours will be 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Wednesdays and Saturdays; 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays; and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays. Hours will likely be extended for the winter and holiday season. Contact: www.altrec.com or 541-316-3900.

Know the ins, outs of pay-over-time program By Heidi Hagemeier The Bulletin

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hoppers might hear a new refrain at the register this coming holiday season: Will that be cash, credit or layaway? In an era when consumers are practicing frugality while retailers tempt them to spend, a number of larger merchants are bringing back layaway, that seemingly old-fashioned method of paying over time for purchases. Just earlier this month, Walmart announced it is bringing back layaway for the holidays. Sears, which revived layaway in 2008, is pushing it now in advance of the Christmas season. The return of layaway should be viewed as a good thing for consumers, experts said, as it offers advantages.

Nordstrom.com now ships for free Central Oregon may not have a Nordstrom, but the company recently made bringing a bit of Nordstrom to Central Oregon a lot easier. The upscale retailer now offers free shipping on online purchases. It previously required a minimum online purchase total above $200 to trigger free shipping, according to Dow Jones Newswires. The new free shipping policy applies to Nordstrom.com orders shipped within the U.S. and can be for any size of order. Free shipping is also in place now for catalog orders, according to Nordstrom.com. There are also free returns. Contact: Nordstrom.com or 888-282-6060. — Heidi Hagemeier, The Bulletin

Correction In the box that accompanied a story headlined “From door to store,” which appeared Wednesday, Sept. 14, on Page E1, the name and contact information of a business were incorrect. Wanna Wife can be reached at 541-419-6311 or gileadinbend@gmail.com. The Bulletin regrets the error.

“I think this will stick around even if the economy improves,” said Ludwig Bstieler, an associate professor of marketing at the University of New Hampshire. “Overall for consumers, it seems to be low risk.” And layaway has reemerged with online tools and websites that make the process even more consumer friendly.

A revived concept For those who haven’t experienced it, layaway functions as a payment plan in which customers make a down payment to reserve merchandise for a small fee and pay it off periodically. When the bill is settled at the end of the contract, customers can take the merchandise. See Layaway / E6

Illustration by Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Are hipster glasses over? When celebrities ache, From geek to chic to weak they reach for arnica By Bee-Shyuan Chang New York Times News Service

The Washington Post WASHINGTON — “Those new glasses?” When White House Press Secretary Jay Carney recently fielded a question about, of all things, his eyewear, he plunged into a danger zone more fraught than his sparring sessions with reporters over Syria’s regime or the latest unemployment figures. The question was a little flirty, a little taunting. After a middling attempt at humor (“The better to see you with”) and flattery (“You guys look great, actually”), Carney settled on humility, pleading that his new square-rimmed, biglensed, chunky-framed glasses were dictated by “the ravages of age.” No luck. “But they’re hipster,” a reporter retorted. “Really?” Carney said. “I thought they were sort of retro-nerdy.” Two weeks later, they were gone. Why? Were they too blue-state and threatening, like John Kerry’s windsurfing? Officially, no. In an absent-minded-dad tale, he claimed he left the glasses on the car bumper when dealing with a bike rack and then

Doug Mills / New York Times News Service

White House Press Secretary Jay Carney had to defend his new eyewear recently before answering questions about President Barack Obama’s jobs plan. drove away. He issued a mock apology: “I take full responsibility for the regrettable action that resulted in the loss of my fancy new glasses.” Or maybe he just got scared — because fancy can be fatal. See Hipster / E6

Arnica gel. William P. O’Donnell New York Times News Service

Before the CFDA Fashion Awards in June, the New York-based fashion designer Phillip Lim, who’d been traveling frequently and working hard, was feeling a bit puffy. “I heard of models and other designers taking arnica before big events or photo shoots, so I thought I’d try it out,” he said recently, referring to the homeopathic supplement arnica montana. “It’s supposed to slim you down because it flushes you out. And it clears up your skin.” Lim tried a three-day oral regimen of arnica before walking the red carpet, and was pleased with the results. “I did feel like my skin glowed afterwards,” he said. Available in pellets, topical gels, creams and even massage oil, arnica is the latest of many herbal remedies to invigorate, if not intoxicate, the fashion crowd. Linda Fargo, the fashion director of Bergdorf Goodman, counts the pellet form as one of her fashion week survival must-haves, and the stylist Isabel Dupre has long been a fan. See Arnica / E3


T EL EV ISION

E2 Wednesday, September 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

A smile goes a long way toward making friends

Mourning the Loss of ‘My Children’ By Lonnae O’Neal Parker

Jill Larson and Cady McClain appear in a scene this summer from “All My Children.” The soap opera will air its final episode Friday after 41 years of broadcasting. But in true soap form, it may be resurrected – on the Internet.

The Washington Post

Dear Abby: When I was in middle school, I was pretty much an outcast. In the summer between eighth grade and high school, I read a Dear Abby column where you offered advice to someone who was shy like me. You recommended that the writer smile and greet people every day. You also published a booklet to help us to be more outgoing. When I got to high school, I took your advice. Your column changed my life. During my senior year I became involved in drama, choir and sports, and I was elected student body president. I am now a mom with two children. I hold a master’s degree and have a wide array of friends all over the world. I am a public speaker, poet and actor — all because you wrote to someone like me and told that person how to make friends. Recently a friend and I were discussing that column, and he said, “I wish I had seen it!” Abby, please repeat those words and let people know if the booklet is still available. Folks of all ages need that message of friendship and guidance. Thank you for the impact it has had on my life. — Renee in Washington Dear Renee: I’m pleased that my column was so helpful for you at a time when you needed it. I think I know the column you mentioned. The reply echoed advice that’s in my booklet “How to Be Popular.” It said: “No matter what you wear, the expression on your face is your greatest asset — or liability. Would you want to strike up a conversation with someone who looks like he (or she) is mad at the world? Well, neither would anyone else. So, if you’re wearing a perpetual frown, get rid of it. Trade it for a smile. “You can walk down the street in any foreign country in the world, and even though you may

DEAR ABBY not be able to understand a word they’re saying, when you see a smile, you get a message. It’s the universal way of saying, ‘I’m friendly.’ “I’m not suggesting you go around with a perpetual phony grin pasted on your face, but try to develop the habit of looking cheerful, pleasant and happy. It attracts.” “How to Be Popular” was written in response to many thousands of letters from readers over the years who are not naturally socially assertive, and others who have asked for guidance on where and how to meet nice people like themselves, what to say or not to say, and how to be the kind of person others will find interesting, attractive and worth knowing better, and can be ordered by sending your name and address, plus check or money order for $6 (U.S. funds) to Dear Abby Popularity Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 610540447. Shipping and handling are included in the price. Another important observation from the booklet that wasn’t in the column you saw is, “There are two kinds of people — those who come into a room and their attitude says, ‘Here I am!’ and those who come into a room and their attitude is, ‘There you are! “The ‘there-you-are’ type is the winner. If you want to receive a warm welcome, remember the happier you are to see others, the happier they’ll be to see you.” Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

In “All My Children’s” final weeks on ABC, Angie struggles to regain her eyesight, Bianca and Marissa learn that J.R. is not going to put their sex tape on the Internet, and Kendall, bathed in candlelight, succeeds in seducing Zach, newly back from the dead, which apparently makes it really hard to focus on making love. Life, and love, after death (sometimes known as protracted contract negotiations) is a theme with characters such as Erica Kane — who had her debut as Pine Valley’s femme fatale in 1970 and went on to become the most famous name in daytime television — flying off recently in search of her formerly shotdead ex-lover Mike Roy. Erica has been played the whole time by actress Susan Lucci, who had the television-watching nation cheering her 1999 Daytime Emmy Award for lead actress after 18 unsuccessful nominations. And resurrection is an overarching theme for “All My Children,” airing Friday for a final time after a 41-year run on network television but slated to return online and possibly via Internet-enabled television, along with longrunning ABC soap “One Life To Live.” The Prospect Park production company has not released a return date for the soaps, and negotiations with some of the shows’ biggest stars are ongoing, and in the case of Lucci, who says she will not be moving with the show, thorny. Faithful viewers and soap insiders remain hopeful. Still, that hasn’t stopped the truest soap opera fans — and we are legion — from mourning. All switched-at-birth, eviltwin, hooker-turned-housewife jokes aside, something

ABC via The Washington Post

resonant and valuable is being lost in the culture. Seriously. And to miss that is to underestimate the connections that form around the characters we invite into our living rooms, dorm rooms and workplace lunchrooms; or what it means to form intentional community around enduringly beautiful, 10-to-12-times-wed, former petite models who really just want to fill the void left when their daddies abandoned them in childhood. The best story lines take an event — who killed Will Courtlandt? — and track how it affects everyone in town, says Jill Larson, who has played grewup-trailer-park-but-married-rich Opal Courtlandt since 1989. “It’s storytelling based on human emotions that were heightened enough to be wonderfully comedic, yet touching.” She once walked into the highend clothing store Jaeger in Chicago and the sales clerks, sporting teased ponytails and jeweled updos, squealed. Turns out they

had declared it “Opal Courtlandt Day” at the store. Spandexed, sequined and feathered, Opal loves hard, is a true-blue friend and lacks an edit function when she talks. Larson says she’s particularly beloved below the MasonDixon line. In the 1980s, Debbi Morgan was half of daytime television’s first African-American supercouple, Jessie and Angie. During their on-air courtship, Morgan says, “I had a lot of teens look up to me as this role model.” Jessie was kind of thuggy when that was cuter and less deadly, and Angie was the black American princess who wouldn’t sleep with him until they were married. There was an elopement, divorce, remarriage, death and a back-to-life train sequence, set to Alicia Keys, before they renewed their vows again in 2008. Now she’s chief of staff at Pine Valley Hospital to his chief of police. Morgan, who has signed up on the top-rated CBS soap “The Young & the Restless” but won’t

‘All My Children’ When: 12 p.m. Friday Where: ABC

reveal her character, says “All My Children” broke ground dealing with abortion, AIDS, race and sexuality. The story lines have remained topical “and kept that intimacy where people could relate to things in their own lives because that was what was happening in the show.” It’s one of the main draws of soap operas. Our “stories,” as our mommas called them, offer up parables; get over that hatred for your former best friend who slept with your son (because Pine Valley is only so big and you’re both stuck there) or watch it forever twist your soul. We index our lives to the most memorable plot twists, and our favorite characters become a proxy. Let us seduce like Greenlee, avenge like David, age like Dixie, except, you know, reasonably and on a budget, secure in the knowledge that everybody watching (or most everybody) understands it’s all pure fiction. Soaps “used to be like the campfire where people got together and heard stories,” said Larson. Sometimes it’s fantasy romance, things that could possibly be. And sometimes it’s great tragedy, or dramatic hijinks and violence and not all of it was justified, she says. Larson is banking on the success of “All My Children” in the new online format and hoping, by extension, that soap operas as we know them — character-driven, fictional and never-say-die — will continue as well. The culture needs them, she says. “We need our stories.”

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BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

WEDNESDAY PRIME TIME 9/21/11 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM ^ %% & )) *`

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KATU % % KTVZ KBNZ ) ) KOHD ` ` KFXO KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / OPBPL 175 173

5:00 KATU News at 5 News KOIN Local 6 at 5 KEZI 9 News The Simpsons ’ King of Queens Electric Comp. News That ’70s Show Caprial-John

5:30 ABC World News Nightly News Evening News ABC World News The Simpsons ’ King of Queens Fetch! With Ruff Nightly News That ’70s Show Cook’s Country

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KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å Access Hollyw’d Old Christine KEZI 9 News KEZI 9 News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ Travelscope ‘G’ Nightly Business News News ’Til Death ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens Outnumbered ’ Summer Wine

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Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune The Middle Forced Family Fun ‘PG’ Modern Family (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Up All Night ‘PG’ Free Agents ‘PG’ Harry’s Law Hosanna Roseanna ‘14’ How I Met 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ Survivor: South Pacific (N) ’ Å Criminal Minds (N) ’ ‘14’ Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Middle Forced Family Fun ‘PG’ Modern Family (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Big Bang Theory Big Bang Theory The X Factor Auditions No. 1 Hopefuls perform for the judges. (N) ‘PG’ FOX Pre-game MLS Soccer San Jose Earthquakes at Portland Timbers (N) (Live) FOX Post-game PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Nova scienceNOW ‘G’ Å (DVS) NOVA IBM supercomputer. ’ ‘G’ Live at 7 Å Inside Edition (N) Up All Night ‘PG’ Free Agents ‘PG’ Harry’s Law Hosanna Roseanna ‘14’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ H8R (N) ’ Å America’s Next Top Model (N) ‘14’ Doc Martin The Family Way ’ ‘PG’ New Tricks The death of a journalist. BBC World News Tavis Smiley (N)

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(10:01) Revenge Pilot (N) ‘PG’ Å Law & Order: Special Victims Unit CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ (10:01) Revenge Pilot (N) ‘PG’ Å News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Burn Notice Partners in Crime ‘PG’ Nature Clever Monkeys ’ ‘PG’ Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Cops ‘14’ Å ’Til Death ’ ‘14’ Charlie Rose (N) ’ ‘G’ Å

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KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ The Office ’ ‘14’ 2501 Migrants: A Journey ’ ‘PG’ News Jay Leno King of Queens South Park ‘14’ PBS NewsHour ’ Å

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Storage Wars ‘PG’ Å Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars 130 28 18 32 Criminal Minds Scared to Death ‘PG’ ››› “The Italian Job” (2003, Crime Drama) Mark Wahlberg, Charlize Theron, Edward Norton. A thief and ››› “The Italian Job” (2003) Mark Wahlberg. A thief and his ››› “We Were Soldiers” (2002, War) Mel Gibson, Madeleine Stowe, Greg Kinnear. Outnumbered U.S. troops battle the North 102 40 39 Vietnamese. Å his crew plan to steal back their gold. Å crew plan to steal back their gold. Å Confessions: Animal Hoarding ‘PG’ Confessions: Animal Hoarding ‘PG’ Animal Cops Houston Vanished ‘PG’ Confessions: Animal Hoarding ‘14’ Confessions: Animal Hoarding ‘PG’ Confessions: Animal Hoarding ‘14’ 68 50 26 38 Confessions: Animal Hoarding ‘14’ Top Chef: Just Desserts ‘14’ Top Chef: Just Desserts ‘14’ The Rachel Zoe Project ‘14’ Å Kathy Griffin: Pants Off ‘14’ Real Housewives/Beverly Top Chef: Just Desserts (N) ‘14’ Top Chef: Just Desserts ‘14’ 137 44 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition (7:38) ››› “My Cousin Vinny” (1992) Joe Pesci. An inept lawyer tries to free his cousin from a Dixie jail. ’ (10:38) The Singing Bee ‘PG’ Å The Singing Bee 190 32 42 53 The Singing Bee Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Ford: Rebuilding an American Icon American Greed Mad Money Coca-Cola: The Real Story American Greed Get Rich Now! 21st Century 51 36 40 52 Coca-Cola: The Real Story Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Å John King, USA Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Å John King, USA 52 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 Å (5:29) South Park Daily Show Colbert Report 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ Chappelle Show Chappelle Show South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 Always Sunny U of O Today City Edition Bend City Council Work Session Bend City Council (N) (Live) Epic Conditions Word Travels ’ Paid Program Visions of NW Ride Guide ‘14’ Volleyball 11 Capitol Hill Hearings 58 20 12 11 Capitol Hill Hearings Shake it Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Good-Charlie ›› “Little Manhattan” (2005) Josh Hutcherson. 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Å 23 25 123 25 Boxing: 2002 Larios vs. Vazquez 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express ›› “The Princess Diaries” (2001, Comedy) Julie Andrews, Anne Hathaway, Hector Elizondo. ›› “The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement” (2004) Anne Hathaway, Julie Andrews. The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Secret Life of American Teen Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Å Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Best Dishes Iron Chef America Batali vs. Blais Restaurant: Impossible Sweet Tea Restaurant: Impossible La Stanza Restaurant: Impossible Restaurant: Impossible The Trails The Great Food Truck Race 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa (4:00) ››› “Taken” (2008, Action) Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ››› “Forgetting Sarah Marshall” (2008, Romance-Comedy) Jason Segel, Kristen Bell. ››› “Forgetting Sarah Marshall” (2008), Kristen Bell 131 Get It Sold ‘G’ My First Place My First Place Hunters Int’l House Hunters House Hunters Income Property Property Brothers Monica & Sam ‘G’ Property Brothers Raun & Jasprit ‘G’ House Hunters: Beachfront Homes 176 49 33 43 Get It Sold ‘G’ Hooked: Illegal Drugs Hooked: Illegal Drugs American Pickers Motor City ‘PG’ The Stoned Ages (N) ‘PG’ Å Top Gear Hollywood Cars ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 Organized Crime: A World History Unsolved Mysteries ‘PG’ Å Unsolved Mysteries ‘PG’ Å Dance Moms She’s a Fighter ‘PG’ Dance Moms Abby plays cupid. ‘PG’ Dance Moms ‘PG’ Å Dance Moms ‘PG’ Å 138 39 20 31 Cold Case Files ’ ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Ed Show (N) The Last Word The Rachel Maddow Show The Ed Show Hardball With Chris Matthews Å 56 59 128 51 The Last Word The Substitute That ’70s Show That ’70s Show The Substitute Teen Mom Maci wants to cut Ryan out of her life. ‘PG’ › “Mr. Deeds” (2002, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Winona Ryder. ’ › “Billy Madison” (1995) ’ 192 22 38 57 The Substitute SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å Victorious ’ ‘G’ Big Time Rush SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ Friends ’ ‘PG’ Friends ’ ‘14’ That ’70s Show That ’70s Show 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Mariners Post. MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Minnesota Twins From Target Field in Minneapolis. Dan Patrick 20 45 28* 26 MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Minnesota Twins From Target Field in Minneapolis. (N) (Live) UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ UFC Unleashed (N) ’ ‘14’ The Ultimate Fighter (Season Premiere) (N) ’ ‘Y’ Blue Mountain Blue Mountain 132 31 34 46 UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ Paranormal Witness Ghost Hunters ’ ‘PG’ Å Ghost Hunters Phantoms of Jersey Ghost Hunters Ghost of Carnegie (N) Paranormal Witness (N) Ghost Hunters Ghost of Carnegie ’ 133 35 133 45 Stargate SG-1 Space Race ’ ‘PG’ Behind Scenes David Jeremiah Joseph Prince This Is Your Day Praise the Lord Å Easter Exper. Jesse Duplantis Thru History Creflo Dollar Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 Friends ’ ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Meet the Browns Meet the Browns House of Payne House of Payne House of Payne House of Payne Conan (N) ‘14’ Å 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘14’ ››› “James Dean: Forever Young” (2005, Documentary) Nar- (6:45) ›››› “East of Eden” (1955, Drama) James Dean, Julie Harris, Raymond Massey. Rebel Cal and twin ››› “Rebel Without a Cause” (1955, Drama) James Dean, Natalie Wood, Sal Mineo. ›››› “Giant” (1956, Drama) Elizabeth 101 44 101 29 rated by Martin Sheen. Premiere. Aron vie for their rigid father’s love. Å Volatile teens with feckless parents witness tragedy. Å Taylor, Rock Hudson. Å LA Ink ’ ‘PG’ Å Hoarding: Buried Alive ‘PG’ Å Know-Pregnant Know-Pregnant Hoarding: Buried Alive ‘PG’ Å Toddlers & Tiaras (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Hoarding: Buried Alive ‘PG’ Å 178 34 32 34 Ultimate Cake Off Top Dogs ’ ‘PG’ Bones Yanks in the U.K. ‘14’ Å Bones The Man in the Outhouse ‘14’ The Mentalist Throwing Fire ’ ‘14’ The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Å ››› “300” (2007, Action) Gerard Butler, Lena Headey. Å 17 26 15 27 Bones Yanks in the U.K. ‘14’ Å Regular Show MAD ‘PG’ Scaredy Squirrel Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Hole in the Wall Would Happen Destroy Build King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ’ ‘14’ Å 84 Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v Food Man v Food Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations (5:43) Sanford & Son ‘G’ Å Sanford & Son All in the Family All in the Family M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Happily Divorced Retired at 35 The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 65 47 29 35 The Jeffersons NCIS Under Covers ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Frame-Up ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Internal Affairs ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS In the Zone ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS Recoil ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS Mind Games ’ ‘PG’ Å 15 30 23 30 NCIS Honor Code ’ ‘PG’ Å La La’s Life La La’s Life ›› “You Got Served” (2004) Marques Houston, Omari Grandberry. ’ ›› “Johnson Family Vacation” (2004) Cedric the Entertainer. ’ Ton of Cash (N) ’ ‘14’ 191 48 37 54 (4:50) Basketball Wives LA ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(6:15) ›› “Uncle Buck” 1989, Comedy John Candy. ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “The Last Song” 2010, Drama Miley Cyrus, Greg Kinnear. ‘PG’ Å (9:50) ›› “Timecop” 1994 Jean-Claude Van Damme. Courage Under ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:40) › “When in Rome” 2010 ’ › “Porky’s II: The Next Day” 1983, Comedy Dan Monahan. ‘R’ Å ››› “Naked Lunch” 1991, Science Fiction Peter Weller. ‘R’ Å ›› “The Name of the Rose” 1986 FMC 104 204 104 120 ›› “The Chase” 1994, Action Charlie Sheen, Henry Rollins. ‘PG-13’ Å Master Debaters Master Debaters The Daily Habit ››› “Hero” (2002, Action) Jet Li, Tony Leung Chiu Wai. Master Debaters The Daily Habit Strangers ››› “Hero” (2002, Action) Jet Li, Tony Leung Chiu Wai. FUEL 34 Golf in America Feherty Golf’s Big Break 19th Hole Golf Central Morning Drive Playoff Preview Golf in America 19th Hole Golf Central 19th Hole GOLF 28 301 27 301 Morning Drive Playoff Preview (N) Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Remembrance ‘G’ › “Jonah Hex” 2010, Action Josh Brolin. A supernatural gunREAL Sports With Bryant Gumbel ’ ›› “Torque” 2004, Action Martin Henderson. A drug dealer ›› “Edge of Darkness” 2010, Suspense Mel Gibson, Ray Winstone. A Boston detec- Real Time With Bill Maher Political strateHBO 425 501 425 501 slinger faces an old enemy. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å frames a biker for murder. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ‘PG’ Å tive investigates his daughter’s murder. ’ ‘R’ Å gist Rich Galen. ’ ‘MA’ Å (4:00) ››› “Valhalla Rising” 2009 ›› “Vice Squad” 1982, Crime Drama Season Hubley. ‘R’ Å (8:15) ›› “Love and a .45” 1994, Action Gil Bellows, Renée Zellweger. ‘R’ Å (10:35) ››› “Valhalla Rising” 2009 Mads Mikkelsen. IFC 105 105 (4:10) ›› “Judge Dredd” 1995, Action (5:50) ››› “Terminator 2: Judgment Day” 1991 Arnold Schwarzenegger. Cyborgs (8:15) ›› “Going the Distance” 2010, Romance-Comedy Drew Barrymore, Justin ››› “Inception” 2010, Science Fiction Leonardo DiCaprio, Ellen Page. A thief enters MAX 400 508 508 Sylvester Stallone. ’ ‘R’ Å battle over a youth who holds the key to the future. ‘R’ Å Long. Lovers try to maintain a bicoastal romance. ’ ‘R’ Å people’s dreams and steals their secrets. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Border Wars No End in Sight ‘PG’ Border Wars Marijuana Airdrop ‘PG’ Border Wars Smuggler’s Tunnel ‘PG’ Border Wars No End in Sight ‘PG’ Border Wars Marijuana Airdrop ‘PG’ Border Wars Smuggler’s Tunnel ‘PG’ World’s Deadliest India ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Dragonball Z: Fusion Reborn ’ ‘Y7’ Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z: Broly: Second Dragonball Z: Fusion Reborn ’ ‘Y7’ Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z: Broly: Second NTOON 89 115 189 115 Dragon Ball Z: Broly: Second Shooting USA Å Impossible Shots Amer. Rifleman Gun Stories Shooting Gallery Gun Nuts Shooting USA Å Best Defense Gun Stories Impossible Shots Amer. Rifleman OUTD 37 307 43 307 Gun Nuts (5:15) “Glorious 39” 2009, Historical Drama Romola Garai, Bill Nighy, Julie Christie. iTV. A mystery sur“Talihina Sky: The Story of Kings of Leon” 2011 The rise of the Inside the NFL (iTV) (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Inside NASCAR Weeds Qualitative Inside the NFL (iTV) ’ ‘PG’ Å SHO 500 500 rounds a British family on the eve of WWII. ‘R’ Tennessee rock band Kings of Leon. ‘NR’ (iTV) (N) ‘PG’ Spatial Reasoning Dumbest Stuff My Ride Rules My Ride Rules The Car Show Road Trip (N) Dumbest Stuff Dumbest Stuff My Ride Rules My Ride Rules The Car Show Road Trip NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 303 Dumbest Stuff (5:50) ››› “Tangled” 2010 Voices of Mandy Moore. (7:35) › “Friday After Next” 2002 Ice Cube. ‘R’ Å ›› “Brooklyn’s Finest” 2009, Crime Drama Richard Gere, Don Cheadle. ’ ‘R’ Å (11:20) Armored STARZ 300 408 300 408 (4:10) ››› “Marvin’s Room” 1996 (4:05) ›› “The Twilight Saga: New Moon” (6:15) ›› “(Untitled)” 2009, Romance-Comedy Adam Goldberg, Eion Bailey. An art ››› “Outsourced” 2006, Comedy Josh Hamilton, Ayesha Dharker. A man trains his “Night of the Demons” 2009 Monica Keena. Evil entities attack (11:35) ››› “KaTMC 525 525 2009 Kristen Stewart. ‘PG-13’ dealer falls in love with an avant-garde musician. ’ ‘R’ Å replacement in India. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Halloween revelers at a New Orleans mansion. boom” 2010 Adventure Sports World of Adventure Sports ’ ‘PG’ NBC Sports Talk › “Bloodsport” (1988, Adventure) Jean-Claude Van Damme, Donald Gibb. NBC Sports Talk World of Adventure Sports ’ ‘PG’ VS. 27 58 30 209 NHL Preseason Hockey: Maple Leafs at Flyers ››› “Steel Magnolias” 1989, Comedy-Drama Sally Field, Dolly Parton. ‘PG’ Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å Joan & Melissa: Joan Knows Best? WE 143 41 174 118 ››› “Steel Magnolias” 1989, Comedy-Drama Sally Field, Dolly Parton. ‘PG’


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 21, 2011 E3

CALENDAR TODAY INTERNATIONAL DAY OF PEACE ANNIVERSARY: Featuring live music and a raffle; donations benefit the St. Vincent de Paul food bank; donations of nonperishable food accepted for raffle; 8 a.m.-6 p.m.; Pioneer Park, 450 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541350-5133 or hda4justice@yahoo.com. PICKIN’ AND PADDLIN’ MUSIC SERIES: Includes boat demonstrations in the Deschutes River, and music by Bluegrass act Blackstrap; proceeds benefit Bend Paddle Trail Alliance; donations accepted; 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. demonstrations, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. music; Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 6, Bend; 541-317-9407. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 3-7 p.m.; Mirror Pond parking lot, eastern end of Drake Park; 541-408-4998 or www.bendfarmersmarket.com. KNOW SOUTH AMERICA, ARGENTINA: COCC professor Robin Martinez takes a look at the dramatic time period in Argentina’s history between 1950 and 1980; free; 6:30 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1032. THE DEFIBULATORS: The Brooklyn, N.Y.-based honky-tonk band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “FUDDY MEERS”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the dark comedy about a woman’s attempt to regain the memories she loses each night; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. “CHICAGO”: Cat Call Productions presents the musical vaudeville production about crime, corruption and imperfect justice in Prohibition-era Chicago; $25; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

THURSDAY THE RENAISSANCE OF AMERICAN GEOGRAPHY: David Imus presents his award-winning map and introduces Geography Minutes; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-6174663 or ruthh@uoregon.edu. WILD & SCENIC FILM FESTIVAL: A screening of films to inspire and inform; proceeds benefit the Oregon Natural Desert Association; $10; 5-8 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-330-2638 or http://onda.org/ events/wild-scenic-film-festival. “FUDDY MEERS”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the dark comedy about a woman’s attempt to regain the memories she loses each night; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. “CHICAGO”: Cat Call Productions presents the musical vaudeville production about crime, corruption and imperfect justice in Prohibitionera Chicago; $25; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. “HARD TIMES”: Preview night of Innovation Theatre Works’ presentation of a play about people who lived through the Great Depression; $15, $10 ages 70 and older; 8 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-977-5677 or www .innovationtw.org.

FRIDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E.

Neff Road; 541-408-4998 or www.bendfarmersmarket.com. REDMOND FRIDAY FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Redmond Greenhouse, 4101 S. U.S. Highway 97; 541-604-5156 or redmondfridaymarket@gmail.com. BEND ROOTS REVIVAL: The sixth annual celebration of performing arts in Bend, with multiple stages and local acts, workshops and more; free; 5 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive; www.bendroots.net. OKTOBERFEST 2011: Oktoberfest celebration featuring Bavarian style music, beers, wines, foods, and games; fundraiser for the Downtown Bend beautification projects; free; 5-10 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-7883628 or http://www.downtownbend .org/oktoberfest-2011/. NPRA FINALS RODEO: A Northwest Professional Rodeo Association performance, with roping and pageants; $10; 7 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 503-481-3384, ccrodeo@ hotmail.com or www.nwprorodeo.com. OWL PROWLS: Take a walk with a naturalist at dusk to explore and see the different nocturnal creatures that live in Sunriver; adults $4, Children ages 2-12 $3, SNCO members are free; pre-register by 3:30 p.m. day of walk; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394. SECRETS OF SHOOTING RAW: Photographer Mark Fitzgerald reveals the secrets of shooting and processing RAW files; free; Doors open at 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Center of Photography, 390 S.W. Columbia St., Suite 110, Bend; 541-241-2266. “FUDDY MEERS”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the dark comedy about a woman’s attempt to regain the memories she loses each night; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. “RADIO FLYER”: A screening of the 1992 PG-13-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541475-3351 or www.jcld.org. “CHICAGO”: Cat Call Productions presents the musical vaudeville production about crime, corruption and imperfect justice in Prohibitionera Chicago; $25; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. “HARD TIMES”: Opening night of Innovation Theatre Works’ presentation of an adaptation of Studs Terkel’s book about people who lived through the Great Depression; with a gala reception; $25, $10 ages 70 and older; 8 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541-977-5677 or www.innovationtw.org. ELVIS CONCERT: Two nights of Elvis music featuring performer Justin Shandor, winner of the “Ultimate Elvis” contest in Memphis last year; Friday features early Elvis music, while Saturday features his songs from the 1970’s; $20 to $25 single at door, $30 couple at door; Doors open one hour early.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-548-4108.

SATURDAY PANCAKES FOR PUPPIES: Breakfast featuring pancakes, eggs, bacon, and coffee; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; $6; 7-10 a.m.; Redmond Grange, 707 S.W. Kalama Ave.; 541480-4495. REDMOND GRANGE BREAKFAST: Featuring sourdough pancakes, eggs, ham, coffee and more; proceeds benefit Redmond Habitat for Humanity; $6, $3 ages 12 and

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

younger; 7-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Grange, 707 S.W. Kalama Ave.; 541-480-4495. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503-739-0643. BEND ROOTS REVIVAL: The sixth annual celebration of performing arts in Bend, with multiple stages and local acts, workshops and more; free; 9 a.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive; www.bendroots.net. FALL HARVEST FESTIVAL AND BARN DANCE: Featuring a chili cook-off, a barn dance, contests and more; proceeds benefit the Crooked River Ranch Seniors; free admission to event; 9 a.m.; MacPherson Park, Clubhouse Road, Crooked River Ranch; 541-570-5564. PROJECT CONNECT: Event features medical and dental services, social services for low-income individuals, food and more; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, Hooker Creek Event Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-504-1389 or www.projectconnectco.org. SHANE’S WALK: Walk to Sam Johnson Park in honor of children with cancer; proceeds benefit Candlelighters for Children with Cancer; $20, free for kids; 8 a.m. registration, 9 a.m. honor lap; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-923-4800 or centraloregoncandlelighters@ gmail.com. WALK FOR THE POOR: A 5K run/walk; proceeds benefit St. Vincent de Paul; pledges accepted in advance, $35 day of race; 9-11 a.m.; Dry Canyon Trail, near Pershall Way, Redmond; 541-504-9840 or http:// stvincentdepaulredmond.com. 5K FUN RUN/WALK: Event features a 5K fun run/walk, a petting zoo, play area, live music, food and more; registration required; proceeds benefit the Opportunity Foundation of Central Oregon; $20, $15 ages 13-17, free ages 12 and younger; 9 a.m. registration, 10 a.m. race; DD Ranch, 3836 N.E. Smith Rock Way, Terrebonne; 541-548-2611 or www.ofco.org. TUMALO FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Tumalo Garden Market, off of U.S. Highway 20 and Cook Avenue; 541-728-0088. WALK FOR WOMEN: Walk or run from Benham Falls to the Old Mill District, choosing your own distance; registration required; proceeds benefit Saving Grace; sponsorship donations should be based on mileage walked; 10 a.m.; Benham Falls, Forest Road 9702, Bend; 541-330-1621 or patricia@bendbroadband. com. DAY OF PLAY: With sports, games, activities and more; free; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-389-7275 or www. bendparksandrec.org. OKTOBERFEST 2011: Oktoberfest celebration featuring Bavarian style music, beers, wines, foods, and games; fundraiser for the Downtown Bend beautification projects; free; noon-10 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-788-3628 or http://www .downtownbend.org/oktoberfest-2011/. SISTERS FRESH HOP FESTIVAL: The second annual festival featuring the best fresh hop brews in the west; live music and beer tasting; free admission, $5 pint glass, $1 per 4 oz. taste; noon-9 p.m.; Village Green Park, 335 S. Elm St.; 541-549-0251 or www.SistersCountry.com. GROW & SHOW: Show off produce, share gardening tips, enter competitions and more; free; 1 p.m.; Madras Garden Depot, 60 N.W. Depot Road; 541-475-2068. 75TH ANNIVERSARY DINNER AND RAFFLE: The Pine Tavern celebrates its 75th anniversary with a special anniversary menu and raffle drawing; portion of proceeds benefit the Deschutes Historical Museum; $35; event is from 5 p.m. until close; The Pine Tavern, 967 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-382-5581. NPRA FINALS RODEO: A Northwest

Professional Rodeo Association performance, with roping and pageants; $10; 7 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 503-481-3384, ccrodeo@ hotmail.com or www.nwprorodeo.com. “FUDDY MEERS”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents the dark comedy about a woman’s attempt to regain the memories she loses each night; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. ELVIS CONCERT: Two nights of Elvis music featuring performer Justin Shandor, winner of the “Ultimate Elvis” contest in Memphis last year; Friday features early Elvis music, while Saturday features his songs from the 1970’s; $20 to $25 single at door, $30 couple at door; Doors open one hour early.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-548-4108. “CHICAGO”: Cat Call Productions presents the musical vaudeville production about crime, corruption and imperfect justice in Prohibition-era Chicago; $25; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. “HARD TIMES”: Innovation Theatre Works presents an adaptation of Studs Terkel’s book about people who lived through the Great Depression; $20, $18 students and seniors, $10 ages 70 and older; 8 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541977-5677 or www.innovationtw.org. AWESOME ’80S PROM: Wear clothes from the 1980s and dance to ’80s hits; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon; $50 per couple; 8 p.m.-midnight; Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; 541-678-3767. STAND UP COMEDY: Comedy event featuring comedians Celeste Franklin, Jim Mortensen and Doug Morgan; may contain adult language and content; $8; Doors open at 7 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626.

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

CONTAGION (PG-13) 2:20, 4:50, 7:10 THE DEVIL’S DOUBLE (R) 2:40, 5:10, 7:40 THE GUARD (R) 2:50, 5:20, 7:50 THE HELP (PG-13) 2, 7 MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG13) 2:30, 5, 7:30 POINT BLANK (R) 2:10, 4:40, 7:20

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16

COWBOYS & ALIENS (PG13) 1:20, 6:50, 9:40 CRAZY, STUPID, LOVE. (PG-13) Noon, 6:10 THE DEBT (R) 12:45, 3:45, 6:40, 9:35 DRIVE (R) 1:30, 4:25, 7:30, 9:45 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 2 (PG-13) 12:25, 3:40, 7:10, 10 THE HELP (PG-13) 12:05, 3:30, 6:35, 9:50 HORRIBLE BOSSES (R) 1:50, 5, 7:55 I DON’T KNOW HOW SHE DOES IT (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 9:25 THE LION KING 3-D (G) 11:45 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30 THE LION KING (G) 12:15, 3, 5:10

680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

APOLLO 18 (PG-13) 8, 10:20 BUCKY LARSON: BORN TO BE A STAR (R) 10:25 CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER (PG-13) 12:50, 6:30, 9:15 CONTAGION (PG-13) 1:10, 4:10, 7:40, 10:10

OUR IDIOT BROTHER (R) 3:20, 9:20 RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 12:35, 3:10, 6:20, 9:10 SEVEN DAYS IN UTOPIA (G) 4:20 SPY KIDS 4: ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD 3-D (PG) 3:50 STRAW DOGS (R) 1:40, 4:45, 7:45, 10:15

WARRIOR (PG-13) 1, 4, 7:20, 10:20 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL

BEND ROOTS REVIVAL: The sixth annual celebration of performing arts in Bend, with multiple stages and local acts, workshops and more; free; 9 a.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive; www .bendroots.net. BROOKSWOOD BIG BLOCK BASH: Oldfashioned style block party featuring live music, activities, and food; free; 1-6 p.m.; Brookswood Meadow Plaza, 19530 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; 541-306-1636 or http://www .brookswoodmeadowplaza .com/index.php?option=com_content &view=category&layout=blog&id=38& Itemid=195. “FUDDY MEERS”: Final performance of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of the dark comedy about a woman’s attempt to regain the memories she loses each night; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. “HARD TIMES”: Innovation Theatre Works presents an adaptation of Studs Terkel’s book about people who lived through the Great Depression; $20, $18 students and seniors, $10 ages 70 and older; 2 p.m.; Innovation Theatre Works, 1155 S.W. Division St., Bend; 541977-5677 or www.innovationtw.org.

MONDAY AN EVENING IN MORNINGSTAR GARDENS: Stroll through the studio and portrait garden and view art photography; reservations requested; a portion of proceeds benefits Bethlehem Inn; donations accepted; 4:30-7:30 p.m.; Dornbusch Photography, 20834 Morningstar Drive, Bend; 541-306-

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

BUCK (PG) 7 CONTAGION (PG-13) 6:30 DRIVE (R) 6:45 THE HELP (PG-13) 6:15

MADRAS CINEMA 5 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and older only. Guests younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) BAD TEACHER (R) 9 GREEN LANTERN (PG-13) 6 ZOOKEEPER (PG) 3:30

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

CONTAGION (PG-13) 4:45, 7, 9:15 THE HELP (PG-13) 5:30, 8:30 OUR IDIOT BROTHER (R) 5, 7, 9 WARRIOR (PG-13) 5:45, 8:45

Wende Zomnir, executive creative director of Urban Decay cosmetics, at home in Newport Beach, Calif., uses arnica in several forms instead of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Amy Dickerson New York Times News Service

SUNDAY

M T For Wednesday, Sept. 21

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

BAD TEACHER (R) 4:45 CONTAGION (PG-13) 4:30, 7 DRIVE (R) 4:50, 7:15 RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 6:45 SHARK NIGHT 3-D (PG-13) 4:40, 6:50 WARRIOR (PG-13) 6:40

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

COLOMBIANA (PG-13) 4, 7 CONTAGION (UPSTAIRS — PG-13) 6 EDITOR’S NOTE: Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

Arnica Continued from E1 “I know it for its healing quality,” Dupre said. “It’s an old family remedy.” Wende Zomnir, the executive creative director of Urban Decay cosmetics, who uses arnica in several forms instead of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, said: “I think it’s amazing. I take it myself, give it to my kids and hand it out at the Crossfit gym I work out at. I use it after a tough workout to prevent muscle soreness, if myself or my kids have gotten bumped around and might be bruised, or if I’ve strained a muscle.” Derived from a yellow mountain daisy that grows in Europe and is also known as leopard’s bane, arnica has traditionally been used to treat bruising. It reputedly increases circulation by stimulating white-blood cell activity, thereby decreasing the amount of healing time and reducing inflammation. If taken internally, it must be diluted with water; arnica contains the toxin helenalin and is poisonous if consumed in large quantities. Dr. Macrene Alexiades-Armenakas, a Manhattan dermatologist and an assistant clinical professor at Yale, said that, “taken orally, arnica has been reported to cause irritation and toxicity for both the gastrointestinal system and the kidneys.” Still, even before the style set took it up, sports figures were showing interest in the substance. Pierre Barrieu, a former head fitness coach for the U.S. Men’s National Soccer Team, had been treating players with arnica pellets and topical formulations since 2002. “Basically, it was to relieve the effects of blows and bruises (i.e., prevent swelling and bleeding) when applied in a timely manner,” he wrote in an e-mail. “It’s best to apply as early as possible after the traumatic event. We also used it to accelerate the recovery, because arnica decreases the inflammation. And finally, it was used to prevent cramps.” Orthopedic surgeons have also “prescribed” arnica, which is sold in places like Duane Reade and Whole Foods, as a pre- and post-operative measure. And some dermatologists have recommended it after plastic surgery and injectables like Botox and Restylane. When the fashion designer Diane Von Furstenberg was injured in a ski accident in January, she tweeted during recovery: “Arnica gel is the best thing you can do for bruises. ... I cannot say it enough ...,” prompting rumors that the accident was a foil for plastic surgery (which she quickly batted away). In the hands of natural-beauty

William P. O’Donnell / New York Times News Service

Arnica, shown in pellet form, can be taken orally, and claims to treat inflammation. buffs, arnica has recently become something of a medicinecabinet and vanity catch-all. According to Sprayology, a company featured on Teen Vogue’s website that sells vitamin and homeopathic mouth sprays, arnica treats confusion and feelings of vertigo. That’s the claim, anyway, for including the herb in its “Brain Power” formulation. On online forums, especially of the ayurvedic and homeopathic variety, arnica oil has been touted as a remedy for alopecia, or hair loss.

Extracting evidence “Arnica has evolved,” said Alexiades-Armenakas. “Even though it has a long history, it’s never been terribly effective. Fast forward to the present, and we’ve had a good amount of labs analyze the active ingredients in arnica. They’ve identified a number of ingredients that account for anti-bruising, and among them are caffeine derivatives.” Alexiades-Armenakas has included these derivatives along with cacao extract in her 37 Extreme Actives facial cream, sold at Neiman Marcus for $295 for a 1.7-ounce pot. “The idea is to combat puffiness because caffeine has a constrictive ability on blood vessels and lymphatic vessels,” she said. Charles Passler, a Manhattan chiropractor and nutritionist who has worked with the Estee Lauder model Carolyn Murphy and with Dylan Lauren, recommends both oral and topical forms of arnica, mainly for bruising and inflammation. “As far as using arnica as a tool for changing body composition, I’m not aware of it,” he said. For temporary de-bloating, though, Passler conceded, “It will help decrease any puffiness in the body caused by inflammation.” Despite her use of arnica in a topical product, Alexiades-Armenakas remains concerned about long-term oral use. “I would be OK if they did it for a few days for a photo shoot once a month,” she said of the fashionable pill-poppers. “But if they’re having a photo shoot every week, and they’re regularly on it, I would be very worried. Especially for models, they’re very thin, and it’s easier to get toxicity.”


E4 Wednesday, September 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 21, 2011 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H By JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2011: This year, you experience more diversity within your circle of friends. As a result, you come into contact with more ideas and work opportunities. You might find yourself in the middle of a power play more than once. Though you might not think you have a control issue, this situation emerges because, on some level, you have a conflict to work through. Realize what is going on and accept the challenge of processing it. You will learn that the highest form of control is no control at all. If you are single, you will meet someone through a friend, or a friendship could evolve into much more. If you are attached, your compassion means more to your sweetie than you realize. More often than not, CANCER has your best interests in mind. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH You could wake up on the wrong side of the bed. You might want to slow down and take a walk to relieve some tension. How much are your judgments responsible for creating stress? Confusion could surround a male figure or a career matter. Tonight: Walk away from negativity. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Keep communication flowing. Quite clearly, someone might be vested in being difficult or rigid. Walk away from an unnecessary hassle. A friend could make an offer that you might want to jump on. Tonight: Hang out with your pals. Recognize when it is time to call it a night.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH Remain in touch with a tendency to go overboard or cause yourself a problem. Develop a strong sense of self-discipline. A boss has an expectation that you might not be able to meet. Let your creativity be like a genie out of a bottle — let it out! Tonight: Indulging doesn’t always have to cost! CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH Listen to your instincts. Your intellectual capacities are good, too, but a mix is even better. Your instincts also could be right-on about observations, but you might not necessarily recognize that you made them. Trust yourself. Tonight: Remain optimistic. Ask for what you want. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HH Continue a low profile and understand what is motivating someone in your daily life. If this person is presenting a control issue, be sure that it isn’t an issue for you, too. You don’t have to play. Tonight: Get some extra zzz’s. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Though you could stumble, you’ll come back stronger and more quickly. You know your expectations. You might need to make a small adjustment. A partner or friend might be more insecure than you thought. Tonight: Keep your goal in mind. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Avoid someone who walks hand in hand with power plays, if possible. Good fortune comes through a partner who makes it his or her pleasure to work with you. Fatigue weaves its tendrils through your dealings. Take a midday walk to recharge. Tap into your imagination as you establish your leadership. Tonight:

Know that you are cared about. Look at a loved one’s manipulation! SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Reach out for someone at a distance. You could feel like you need another perspective or a fresh attitude. You might not like what you hear, but you cannot control what someone else says. Tonight: Find your friends. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH A partner or associate wants you to notice him or her and go along with his or her thinking. Know that this is the time to be diplomatic, unless you want a War of the Roses. Clear out rather than play the game. Tonight: Share your feelings with a close friend. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH You could be more difficult than you realize. You might hit a brick wall, but you are not likely to share it. If others become reactive, know that you are part of the problem. You are empowered to change the situation. Tonight: Choose to be with a favorite person. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH Stay even and mellow when dealing with a situation in your daily life. Your inner dialogue might not be as peaceful, with you wanting to end a talk and do what you want. Resist the child within! Tonight: Working late. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Someone might be pushing you very hard. You have the right answers and solutions — trust yourself. Even if you are being diplomatic, know that you don’t have to lose your power. Share ideas with pride; give others the respect they deserve for their ideas! Tonight: Romp the night away again. © 2011 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

E6 Wednesday, September 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

DESIGNER CLOTHING FOR CHILDREN:

Nothing’s too good for my baby By Melissa Magsaysay Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — It’s hard to miss those paparazzi shots of celebrity toddlers being toted around by their famous parents, kids who are dressed, well, to look just like mom or dad. Gwen Stefani’s boys sport mohawks, black rocker Tshirts and baggy cargo pants like their dad Gavin Rossdale; Jessica Alba’s daughter Honor Warren mimics her mother’s frilly, feminine style; and little Suri Cruise seems to love perusing the shoe section at Barneys New York just as much as does her stylish mother, Katie Holmes. The parade of mini-me’s isn’t relegated to celebrities and seems to be a trend among many parents who are buying designer wear for their kids, much to the delight, no doubt, of luxury houses that have expanded to include tiny sizes. Some companies, such as Ralph Lauren, have offered children’s fare for years; others, such as Versace and Lanvin, are releasing their kids’ lines later this year. In the 12-month period that concluded in May 2011, sales of children’s clothing in the U.S. reached $32.4 billion, and $800 million of that was spent on designer lines, according to the NPD Group Inc. Consumer Tracking Service. “People are no longer buying over-the-top homes and cars,” said Marshal Cohen, chief analyst for NPD. “We did that, and that kind of backfired, but we will continue to splurge on our kids. In their minds, the best thing consumers can do is make sure their kids get all the right things and dress the part.” The wealthy, of course, have always garbed their children in luxurious fabrics; go to any large museum and check out paintings from the last several hun-

Photos via Los Angeles Times

Despite tough economic times, parents continue to splurge on their kids, and some go for high-priced designer clothing lines such as these looks from Gucci and Phillip Lim. dred years and you’ll see infants in lace; toddlers in velvet and 7-year-olds in dresses with embroidered pearls. Most families, of course, have never had that option. Nonetheless, in the last few decades, the sales of children’s clothing have grown rapidly, as parents in the U.S. have upped the number of garments in the family wardrobe. Even parents who might scrimp on clothing for themselves will buy beautiful dresses and jackets for a family photo portrait or a special occasion. And options for the wealthy have multiplied in the last several years. Many luxury fashion houses (think Fendi, Missoni, Prada, Armani, Gucci, Dior, Burberry, Marc Jacobs and Phillip Lim) have a children’s division, which generally includes garments designed to fit a range of ages that

runs from newborn to 12 years old. Some of the designers churn out mini versions of their men’s and women’s ready-to-wear lines or logo-heavy accessories; others merely riff on the aesthetic of their already established brand. “It is about picking the most charming and cute items, and scaling them down,” said Phillip Lim, whose whimsical children’s line is called Kid. “Nothing is skimped on. It’s just as you’d get in the adult version — Italian fabrics, hand embroidery, only smaller. It’s like ‘Mommy and me.’” “We’re finding that our customers are looking for very special emotional pieces with a wow factor,” said Colleen Sherin, fashion director of Saks Fifth Avenue, which carries a robust selection of designer kids lines, including Prada, Burberry and Fendi. “There’s an emotional re-

Hipster Continued from E1 Decades ago, everyone who got glasses got the same pair. Glasses were just glasses — a tool, not a statement. Think of NASA Mission Control, with its many bespectacled rocket scientists in Houston evaluating The Problem. Today’s problem is not what we’re seeing with glasses, but what we’re saying with them. Eyewear has become me-wear.

Help see and be seen Suddenly, the frames that Carney owned and then disowned are all over the place. The young and the slightly less young, the creative and the slightly less creative, the brainy and the slightly less brainy have chosen to look at the world through the same big, unignorable frames. These black plastic glasses give men and women alike the same aw-shucks Clark Kent vibe: a wordsmith with hidden powers. It’s been many years since “The Revenge of the Nerds,” the movie, turned into the Revenge of the Nerds, the business story, with uber-geek Bill Gates becoming a master of the universe. Not all who wear the big-and-clunkies are imagining themselves a future billionaire or a secret superhero, but the implication remains: I can pull off this look because I’m special. Until everyone else starts doing the same.

Lens defense The glasses assemble disparate personalities into the same in-the-know set: MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow and Drew Carey of “The Price Is Right”; CNN’s Don Lemon and Zooey Deschanel on Fox’s sitcom “The New Girl”; NBC’s Lester Holt and documentarian Davis Guggenheim; Sen. Al Franken and Fred Armisen of “Saturday Night Live”; Current TV’s Keith Olbermann and White

Elvis Costello

Drew Carey

House deputy economic adviser Jason Furman; Anderson Cooper and Kanye West. If the thick frames worn by Johnny Depp give the actor an Ivy League air, then with his new eyewear, Jay Carney (Yale ’87) gains an aura of Johnny Depp-ness. Yet none of this can be discussed in public. It’s a Federal City taboo. Carney’s I’m-not-ahipster discussion of his glasses felt as awkward as Christine O’Donnell’s I’m-not-a-witch commercial. In the White House’s nationally televised role, Carney makes a daily pitch to a disaffected electorate. He should not get defensive. After all, gravitas figures have long favored thick frames as projections of seriousness, symbols of intense concentration. Look back at old photos of then-CIA Director George H.W. Bush offering intel out of Lebanon to his fellow bespectacled mandarins in the Cabinet Room of Gerald Ford’s White House. From Dean Rusk to John Dean (who studiously donned frames for his Watergate testimony), from Henry Kissinger to Henry Fairlie, from David Broder to David Stockman, prominent glasses connoted prominence. They helped to see, but also to be seen.

Optical illusion The glasses can deliver any kind of message, just not one that is always defended in public. It gets too convoluted. On the cover of the New York Observer recently, an illustration depicted President Obama in a pair of thick-framed glasses

Johnny Depp

Sen. Al Franken

trying and failing to appeal to a cluster of similarly accoutred hipsters. Sticking the glasses on absolutely anyone or anything has become an Internet craze, a meme that satirizes how the glasses bestow cultural savvy. There’s even a hipster kitty wearing glasses, with a hoodie over its little head and ironic captions such as: “I donated to Haiti ... before the earthquake.” Or “I liked Nirvana ... when it was only a Buddhist concept.” How did glasses get to be such a statement of exaggerated self-worth? They didn’t start out that way, and maybe that’s what subjects them to today’s curse of popularity. There’s an iconic pair worn by Gregory Peck as the proud but humble Atticus Finch in “To Kill a Mockingbird.” And, of course, those very frames are now being remade by luxe eyewear designer Oliver Peoples. The glasses that are most knocked off belonged to Buddy Holly, who had a voice like a hiccup and who remains locked in his permanent nerdy innocence at age 22 because of a tragic plane crash. James Dean, the Pleasantville era’s hoodlum with a heart, wore horn-rimmed tortoiseshells that are so memorable that Michael Bastian, menswear’s emerging interpreter of all-American mythology, made those glasses the signature look at his show at Fashion Week, with each of his models sporting versions of them. Wherever you look in American culture, you can find wearers who embody a knowing nerdiness. Woody Allen’s frames

sponse to the items and not really any price resistance.” Sherin says footwear (from brands like Prada and Gucci) gets the biggest response in the children’s category on the Saks. com website and that the designer children’s wear category in general is an area of growth for the retailer. “These lines have the same innovative design found in the brand’s ready-to-wear collections,” she says. “They’ve translated the look into kid’s clothing, so the woman who wears these labels is going to find the children’s line appealing.” The price tags ($250 and higher for designer kids’ shoes and around $350 to $475 for a coat) are about half that for the grownup versions and, just as with the adult lines, the desire for having Burberry check on a collar or a Gucci horse bit detail on a ballet flat is appealing to parents with big bank accounts. “It’s all about the generation of the mini-me,” said Amy Tara Koch, style expert and author of “Bump It Up,” a book about how to have a stylish pregnancy. “They want their kids to stand out — or in the language of ‘Project Runway’ — to have a point of view. It’s like the fashion-forward version of playing dress-up with an American Girl doll.” “Especially with the first baby, people go crazy, they have no limits,” said Rosie Pope, a New York maternity concierge, designer of a maternity clothing line and star of the Bravo channel’s “Pregnant in Heels.” “They justify the purchase in their heads. And since at 6 months, the babies start to look like little people and parents can really start to see them as an extension of themselves, it’s part of the whole process of becoming a parent. It’s the fun part.”

are a salute to Groucho, but they also magnify his angst. Elvis Costello’s glasses work well with his nasal whine and post-punk snarl. Think also of thick-framed bruisers such as NBA beast Kurt Rambis and the elbow-throwing Hanson brothers in the hockey comedy “Slap Shot.” Rivers Cuomo of Weezer belted out that he didn’t care that people said he looked just like Buddy Holly; the Harvard-educated ironist rocker was declaring the glasses to be, at the very least, not a disqualifier in late-20th-century mating. There are so many optical allusions. Remember Max Fischer, Jason Schwartzman’s character in “Rushmore”? Think back to Devo as well as hip-hop pioneers such as Run DMC and the Beastie Boys and De La Soul. Recall those record-store clerks in the ’80s and video-store snobs in the ’90s and fair-trade-coffee professionals of our new century. Not everyone who wears geekchic glasses imagines himself or herself as a proto-Kanye who knows that kale is a super-food and that the New Pornographers are a super-group. But Urkel frames are obviously traveling up the cultural totem pole. Look no further than the NBA’s three current fly guys, Kevin Durant, LeBron James and Amar’e Stoudemire, each sporting oversize frames. Glasses have moved from lady repeller to babe magnet. So if everyone from ballers to brainiacs, rockers to reporters, is enjoying the same signature look, why isn’t that a good thing? Big, chunky glasses connoting cool and uncool at the same time could be like a stylistic harmonic convergence, an advance toward a more perfect union. Instead, we’re seeing what usually happens as a zone deemed hip grows crowded: The leaders scatter as the followers throng. Carney’s glasses do offer an object lesson for nerds and cool kids alike: If you wear big frames, don’t let anybody knock them off your face.

Layaway Continued from E1 Layaway works at most stores for one item or for multiple items. Thus, shoppers at Sears can put a washing machine on layaway or $300 worth of back-to-school clothes and work toward paying off the total sum. The practice originated in the 1920s, Bstieler said. Even Ford Motor Co. had a version of layaway for automobiles. It became a fixture in department stores like Marshall Fields and Montgomery Ward while Depression-era thrift ethos reigned. The advent of credit cards started making layaway obsolete. As credit lines became easier to get and debit cards came on the scene to tap directly into checking accounts, stores gradually began dropping layaway services. And that remained true until 2008, when the economy sank and banks immediately began tightening lines of credit. Today, Bstieler said larger stores are more likely to offer layaway, given it requires administration, paperwork and, in some cases, storage of merchandise. But he said smaller stores are offering it more these days as well, so it doesn’t hurt to ask. Some say consumers will continue to turn to layaway as more than a method of teaching teenagers how to budget their money. Sergio Pinon, founder of the website eLayaway.com, is counting on it. “People are getting smart,” he said. “They’re actually looking at their credit card statements and realizing how much they’re paying in interest on a purchase.” Advantages like avoiding a credit card balance — and the interest that comes along with it — while paying off that new washing machine are what Pinon and others want consumers to know about.

Consumer advantages Keeping purchases off the credit card is one of layaway’s biggest advantages. Fees for layaway plans are usually modest. Walmart, for instance, charges $5, although the total purchase must be at least $50. Using a layaway plan, Bstieler said, prevents dings on your credit score from carrying a high credit card balance and keeps that line of credit open for emergencies. By steering shoppers away from credit cards, layaway plans are also bringing back the old-school notion of budgeting ahead. “This gives people more control over their spending,” said Salima Yala, divisional vice president of layaway for Sears Holding Corp., which owns both Sears and Kmart. “This is not impulse spending. This is well-thought-out spending.” At the Sears in Bend, General Manager Kristina Van Hook said customers use layaway for merchandise they don’t need immediately but know they will want in a few months. They shopped for back-to-school supplies in June and July, are now making payments on snow throwers and are starting to shop for Christmas. For those who can’t make gift-giving decisions before the snow flies, merchants like eLayaway.com are pushing gift cards. Pinon said gift cards have been a popular option this year. For example, shoppers might gradually put money on a Best Buy gift card. By the time Black Friday rolls around, they already have $500 set aside for the holidays. “They don’t know what

COMING

Ask before signing When buying items on layaway, the national Better Business Bureau advises shoppers to get everything in writing. Also, ask the following questions before signing a contract: • How much time do I have to pay off the item? • When are the payments due? Must I pay only at the store, or can I also pay online? • How much do I have to put down? • Are there any storage or service plan fees? • What happens if I miss a payment? Are there penalties? Does the item return to inventory? • Can I get a refund or store credit if I no longer want the item after making a few payments? • What happens if the item goes on sale after I’ve put it on layaway? Source: Better Business Bureau

they’re going to buy when they load the card, they just know they will shop there,” he said. “With a gift card, you can shop at the last minute.”

Layaway’s future Retailers are trying to bring 21st-century flair to this age-old service. Yala said Sears wants to expose younger shoppers to the concept. One scenario she envisioned is parents buying goods on layaway for their child going away to college, then picking them up in a store location in that university town. The other way retailers are evolving layaway is to move it online. Sears allows layaway customers to order and pay on the Web. And online companies like eLayaway have also gotten into the game. Pinon said eLayaway, which launched in 2006, partners with businesses that don’t maintain their own layaway programs to offer the service for a fee. The goods on the site range from electronics to NFL tickets to vacations. The company makes money by charging a 1.9 percent fee on the total spent, or $1.90 for every $100. He added that younger customers like that they can choose how long they take to pay their purchases off. “It’s not always long term,” he said. “Sometimes it’s just a matter of one or two payments.” Even though layaway seems simple and safe, customers should keep a few things in mind while using the service. Buyers should be mindful of the sort of goods they put on layaway, particularly when it comes to technology. “By the time you’ve paid off your plan, your cell phone is three generations old,” Bstieler said. The Better Business Bureau advises that customers read layaway contracts and understand the store’s policies before signing. There are likely fees for missed payments or cancellations, and it’s important to know whether the store will give money already paid back. Another good question to ask is what happens if an item goes on sale after its been put on layaway. Sears, for instance, will change the contract to the sale price for up to two weeks after signing. While some see layaway expanding as hard times continue and merchants want to cement relationships with their customers, others say it may remain limited to certain types of stores. Bstieler said he doubts that higher-end merchants will start offering layaway again, as their clientele likely has the means to pay off purchases. “In reality, the layaway plan goes against the grain of retailing,” he said, “which is to move product as quickly as possible.” Heidi Hagemeier can be reached at 541-617-7828 or hhagemeier@bendbulletin.com.

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212

Antiques & Collectibles

Antiques Wanted: Tools, wood furniture, fishing, marbles, old signs, beer cans, costume jewelry. 541-389-1578 Baseball Cards, 1954 Bowman, Frenchie/ Pug puppies. Beau129 cards in set, Mantle, tiful colors. Puppy package Peewee, Campenella & Yogi, incl. $550 to $650 OBO ea. $750, 541-923-4312. Ready now! 541-548-0747 or Golden Gate Bridge, copy of 541-279-3588. 1931 blueprint. $100 or best Jack Russell female, 1 year 3 offer. 541-280-0663 months. Not spayed. PureThe Bulletin reserves the right bred. $200. 541-890-4397 to publish all ads from The Kittens & cats avail. to adopt Bulletin newspaper onto The from rescue group, 1-5 PM Bulletin Internet website. Sat/Sun, other days by appt. 65480 78th St., Bend. Altered, shots, ID chip, free vet visit incl. Kittens just $40 for 1, $60 for 2. Adult cats just 215 $25, $40 for 2. Adult cat free Coins & Stamps as mentor if kitten adopted! 541-389-8420. Photos & Private collector buying postmore at www.craftcats.org. age stamp albums & collecLAB PUPS AKC, 7x Master Nations, world-wide and U.S. tional Hunter sired, yellows & 573-286-4343 (local, cell #) blacks, hips & elbows certi241 fied, 541-771-2330 www.royalflushretrievers.com Bicycles and Labradoodles, Australian Accessories Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com G Fisher Bikes, 1 male, 18.5”, 1 female, 16.5”, used very LABRADOR PUPPIES little, exc. cond., accessories 2 black males & 1 yellow male incl., $150 ea., Yakima carwww.3sislabs.com rier, $100, 541-548-7254. 541-504-8550 or 541-788-4111 Manx/scottish fold kittens very Mtn. Bike, Specialized, Rock Hopper, barely ridden, like cute 7 wks. 4 bobtail and one new, w/safety gear, top of folded ear longtail. $100 & line, $325, 541-382-7292 $150 541-815-1629 246 Meet Arthur, Bernie & Guns, Hunting Casey ... and Fishing brothers about 4 mo. Bend local, old who Pays CASH for GUNS! have leukeCall for info: 541-526-0617 mia. Local rescue group needs to find an inside-only 12g Mossberg maverick pump home/homes for them where shotgun, 28” bbl, like new, there may already be a leu$200. 541-647-8931 kemia-positive cat or no other cats. These kittens are 1911 Para SS 45acp, $625. Mossberg 30-06, SS, scope & very sweet & otherwise sling, $375. 541-647-8931 healthy. They could live long lives, but there is no way to 22LR Ruger semi-auto rifle, know. Most shelters euthawood stock, w/case & ammo, nize kittens like these be$200. 541-647-8931 cause they are hard to place. Baretta 9000S 40 cal. S & W, If you have room in your new in box, $450, heart & home, please con541-390-8085. sider giving them a chance at a normal life. They're neuBENELLI Supernova 12 ga. like tered, vaccinated, etc. new. Extra choke w/tool, soft 541-389-8420, lv. msg. case $375 (541) 410-8878 Mini Aussies 2 females & 5 BROWNING GOLD CAMO males, $250 ea. Ready 9/16. 12 ga. like new, orig. box, 541-420-9694. $695. 541-948-3064. Mini Aussies born 8/11. Ready Browning/Winchester, Model 10/06. $250. Accepting dep. 12 28Ga, Grade V, $625 and reservations. www.miniOBO, calll 541-385-1179. aussiesbend.com CASH!! Pomeranians: 4 mo female, For Guns, Ammo & Reloading good w/animals, loves chilSupplies. 541-408-6900. dren, $100; CKC mom, $200; both reddish fawn. Chinese Dan Wesson .357mag Model 715, SS, 4” bbl, 6-shot reCrested male, 10 mos, not volver, $450. 541-647-8931 fixed, $150. 541-771-2593

All Year Dependable Firewood: Dry , split lodgepole, 1 for $155 or 2 for $300. No limit. Cash, check, or credit. Bend 541-420-3484 Dry Lodgepole For Sale $165/cord rounds; $200/cord split. 1.5 Cord Minimum 36 years’ service to Central Oregon. Call 541-350-2859

REWARD offered for Winchester 22 pump rifle reported stolen, Redmond Gun Show, 9/4. No questions asked. Serial #530. 541-915-9289 Rogue Rifles youth Chipmunk 22 w/Bushnell scope. excellent, $130. 541-647-7894 Savage Model 10DL Series H, left hand rifle with 3x9 Redfield scope, adjustable trigger & case. $450. 541-598-7210

269

Stoeger, 12 Ga. Over/Under, 3” Chambers, choke tubes, rib barrel, checker walnut stock, $300, 541-549-1385.

Over 40 Years Experience in Carpet Upholstery & Rug Cleaning Call Now! 541-382-9498 CCB #72129 www.cleaningclinicinc.com

Weatherby Mark V 340, very nice, $1100. Please call 541-548-4774

265

Winchester M70, 7mm Rem blued/synthetic, limbsaver recoil pad, 3x9 scope, $475. 541-912-0359

Building Materials

248

Cabinet Refacing & Refinishing. Save Thousands!

FREE DVD Reveals weight loss myths. Get ANSWERS to lasting weight loss. Call 866-700-2424

255

Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

258

Travel/Tickets DUCK TICKETS (2), for MO St., & Cal, variety of prices depending on which game. $75/up. 541-573-1100.

260

Misc. Items Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. Cell phones, 4 used, 1 new, Pro 200 Sanyo all w/chargers, 1 bluetooth, $75,541-480-7823

COWGIRL CASH I buy boots, buckles, jewelry, and more! 924 Brooks Street Downtown Bend•541-678-5162

Pom/Pom-Chi Pups (4), beau- Enfield 30.06, Sporterized, vintage 4X Pioneer scope, $225, tiful, rare assorted colors, Model 700 Remington 30.06, $250, 541-279-4838, Becca. 4x scope, $425, 541-923-4312 DIABETIC TEST STRIPS wanted: Chihuahua, purebred,small toy, POODLE PUPPIES STANDARDwill pay up to $25/box. Call AKC, Champion lines, born 1 boy, 1 girl, 1st shots, dewSharon 503-679-3605. GUN SHOW Aug 6, $750. (541)367-3883 ormed, $250, 541-771-2606 Linn County Fairgrounds www.thepracticalpoodle.com Albany, Oregon CHI-POMS (2) 8 weeks, tiny, Pups, AKC toys for Sat. Sept. 24, 9-5 fluffy, cute, 1st shots. $250 Poodle Sun. Sept. 25, 9-4 sale. Adults, rescued, for ea. 541-279-3987 420 Tables - Admission $5 adoption. 541-475-3889 Sponsored by Albany Dachshund, AKC minis, choc & Queensland Heelers Rifle and Pistol Club tan, female $375; male, $325 Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-491-3755 INDIAN SUMMER Pix available. 541-420-6044 541-280-1537 Take I-5 to exit 234 Time to bring the outdoors in! http://rightwayranch.wordpress.com/ An affordable selection of art & handcrafts, vintage, new & Redbone Puppy, Registered, 12 K1A1 Daewoo, $1400. Special like new goods inspired by wks old, great looks, smart & Weapons model 32, $1000. nature. For you, your home & sweet, $400. 541-815-7868 Micro-Galil style pistol, $950, garden. The Whistle Stop extra mags. Also a model 210 1900 NE Division St, Bend. 1911 45, $350 cash. Bob, Tue-Sat 10-4. www.indian541-504-9469 Dorkie Hybrid Puppies (Mini Furniture & Appliances summerhome.com Daschund/Yorkie) Born July Mossberg 12g maverick pump, 27th. 3 males and 1 female. !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty! 18” bbl, home protection, 1st shots. $400. Call A-1 Washers & Dryers $200. 541-647-8931 (562)787-1828 (Cell). The $125 each. Full Warranty. cutest and sweetest puppies Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s Mossberg 22LR semi-auto rifle, in the world! dead or alive. 541-280-7355. syn stock, 2 mags, ammo & case, $165. 541-647-8931 English Bulldog, spayed female, GENERATE SOME excitement in your neighborhood! Plan a Remington 1100 12 GA, 3” 3yrs, brindle. She would chambers, vented rib, recoil garage sale and don't forget prefer a male human compad, exc. cond., call Hank, to advertise in classified! panion. Serious inquiries only 541-548-1775. 541-385-5809. please. 541-588-6490 $500

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. BULK GARDEN MATERIALS Wholesale Peat Moss Sales

Health and Beauty Items

Belly Fat A Problem?

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Most jobs completed in 5 days or less. Best Pricing in the Industry.

541-389-9663

La Pine Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 52684 Hwy 97 541-536-3234 Open to the public .

The Hardwood Outlet Wood Floor Super Store

• Laminate from .79¢ sq.ft. • Hardwood from $2.99 sq.ft. 541-322-0496 266

Heating and Stoves Fireplace Xtrordinair 32DVS gas insert, variable speed fan, wall thermostats, vent pipe & rain cap. Exc. cond., $995. 541-325-1096. NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove may be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

267

Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

400 REPORTED STOLEN 1965 Mustang Convertible from 77 yr-old man. OR License #663ANB. REWARD for info leading to recovery. Please contact Deschutes County Sheriff with any info: 541-693-6911.

Farm Market

300

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High 308 humus level, exc. for flower Farm Equipment beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. and Machinery Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949. Ford Model 640 Tractor, circa 1954. Front loader hydraulic Tempered safety glass, perfect system totally rebuilt. 7-ft for greenhouse, 33” x 74” , 8 scraper blade; PTO; chains; pcs, $199 all. (new cost = new battery. Oldie but $120/sheet). Plus other sizes goodie! $3750. 541-382-5543 for free! 541-382-7292 Premium orchard grass Think Ahead! Unused bio & non-biodegradable garden- 3x3 mid-size bales, no rain, no weeds. $100 per bale. ing pots, small to large, 541-419-2713. hanging ones too! 75 @ $1.00-5.00 ea. 541-330-9935

325

541-647-8261

Hay, Grain and Feed

Your Backyard Birdfeeding Specialists!

Employment

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost. 541-546-6171.

341

Horses and Equipment

421

Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

454

Looking for Employment Family Helper - Senior Care Cooking - Errands - Etc., 541-419-8648. I am an experienced Admin Assistant with excellent customer service skills and references, seeking employment with stable, progressive firm. 541.382.6939

I provide Senior In-home Care (basic care services). Please call Judy, 541-388-2706. Seeking a Head Hunter to help with my job search for an Admin Assistant position. Please call 541.382.6939.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

470

Domestic & In-Home Positions

NANNY part-time live-in, for active outdoors family. We have Picking up unwanted horses, lots of fun! 541-330-9193 cash paid for some, 509-520-8526. 476 Reg. Tenn. Walkers: 6 yr. Employment old Gelding, Sorrel, 15.3 Opportunities Hands, sweet disposition, has Forum Center, Bend had considerable intermitAccounting/ HR Clerk 541-617-8840 tent training but needs finishing, $950, 4 Yr. old www.wbu.com/bend gelding, Chesnut w/Palomino markings, beautiful, 270 16.0 Hands, spirited, has had Lost and Found considerable intermittent training but needs finishing, Mon.-Fri., full-time, 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., minimum of 3-5 Found Fly Rod & Reel, at a high $1250; 13 Yr. old mare, years experience required. Cascade lake. Call to identify: beautiful strawberry roan, 16 This position is responsible 541-788-1309 hands, well experienced trail for a wide range of duties. horse, has had 2 beautiful Found Jacket on Mt. Bailey, Detail oriented, with strong foals, $1250, Lakeview OR, 9/18. Please call to identify: organizational skills. Ability 360-981-0288, 503-819-0820 541-317-4951 to handle multiple tasks and 345 priorities simultaneously. FOUND male Australian ShepThis person will perform all herd, Blue Merle, no collar, Livestock & Equipment duties necessary to process found near Alfalfa. Call to ID bi-weekly payrolls, all re541-389-7499 4-year old registered Red Ansponsibilities associated with gus bull, easy calving, $2500. Found pair of wading boots running a weekly AP check Call Terry at 541-548-0731 along Metolius Rvr. Please call run. Able to work with emto describe: 541-647-2405 Paying Cash for Sheep & Goats, ployees regarding HR and Found Remote Controlled AirPlease call 509-520-8526 for benefit issues. Excellent plane, east of Pilot Butte. Call more info. written and verbal communi541-388-1050 to ID & claim. cation skills. ability to inter358 act with all members of the Found Woman’s Ring, Big Sky management as well as all Farmers Column Sports Complex, 9/16. Call employees. Require someto identify. 541-389-7952 one with experience in Mi10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS Found young female Black Lab crosoft Word, Excel, Outlook for protecting hay, firewood, mix, 8/22, Sunriver. Call to livestock etc. $1496 Installed. skills and Quickbooks. ADP identify, 541-593-6825 experience helpful. A back541-617-1133. CCB #173684. ground check will be rekfjbuilders@ykwc.net LOST BOXER neutered male, quired. Email resume to fawn w/black mask, no tags, A farmer that does it right & is jobs@bendsurgery.com Red Carpet Car Wash 9/19. on time. Power no till seedOpen until filled. Reward! Call 541-480-6533 ing, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying serAccounting vices, cut, rake, bale, Gopher KEITH Mfg Company is control. 541-419-4516 looking to fill a CFO posi375 tion. BS in Accounting or Finance, MBA or CPA preMeat & Animal Processing ferred. Ten plus years expeLOST CAT in area rience, preferably in a Angus Beef, 1/2 or whole, of Shevlin Drive at manufacturing environgrass & grain-fed, no horPence; female, black ment. Working knowledge mones $3.25/lb., hanging and dark grey tabby with of Excel, Exact and FAS. weight, cut & wrap included. white feet, white chest and Lean Accounting and/or Please call 541-383-2523. belly. Tall, slim and young, Lean Mfg knowledge prewearing pink collar. Anferred. Please send resume 383 swers to Bella. Please call with cover letter including Produce and Food 425 780 0500 if you see salary requirements to her, thank you. Brenda Jones, HR Manager THOMAS ORCHARDS @ bjones@keithwalkingKimberly, OR: We will be at floor.com Lost Cat - white female named Farmer’s Market Wed. & Fri. in Lucy, 13 yrs old, declawed, Bend, every week all summer! ran from car crash on U-Pick: Freestone Canning 8/11/11, on Hwy 97 at Automotive Service Peaches: Angelus, Monroe/ElHighland, Redmond. If seen, Advisor berta, O’Henry, $0.70/lb, please call 541-504-4194. Gala Apples, $0.60/lb If you are hard working, Bartlett Pears, $0.60/lb. goal oriented, have REMEMBER: If you have lost an #2 Peaches, $10/box, proven experience, and animal, don't forget to check Call for availability The Humane Society in CSI focused we may have Bring Containers Bend, 541-382-3537 a career for you. Send Redmond, 541-923-0882 Look for us on Facebook. Open resume to P.O. 6676, Prineville, 541-447-7178; 7 Days/week, 8-6 pm Bend, OR 97708 541-934-2870 OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420.

DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 General

Central Oregon Community College has openings listed below. Go to https://jobs.cocc.edu to view details & apply online. Human Resources, Metolius Hall, 2600 NW College Way, Bend OR 97701; (541)383 7216. For hearing/speech impaired, Oregon Relay Services number is 7-1-1. COCC is an AA/EO employer. Project Manager, Oregon Trade Adjustment Assistance Grant Consortium OTC (Temporary) Responsible for oversight of start- up activities and implementation of this statewide effort, coordinating the programs at COCC and eight partnering community colleges in Oregon. This is a grant funded position. Full Time 3 yr Term. $71,435- $83,857.Open Until Filled. NOTE: This job will be filled only if the OTC grant application is accepted by the Department of Labor. GED Chief Test Examiner (Temp Part Time) Test proctoring managing federal GED program for Central Oregon. Will require travel. Requires confidentiality, understanding of ADA, and excellent customer service. 50wks, 30hrs wk, $17.60-$20.95/hr benefited position Temp contract Oct 2011-Jun 2013. Open Until Filled.

Heavy Duty Truck Parts Counter Person, full-time. Must be experienced. Job requires good orgianizational/communication skills & ability to work at a fast pace. Benefit package. Inquire: Gold Coast Truck Repair, Attn: Butch, PO Box 537, Coos Bay, OR 97420. 541-269-1223

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Kevin O’Connell Classified Department Manager The Bulletin

541-383-0398


F2 Wednesday, September 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

Rentals

600

Edited by Will Shortz

658

870

Houses for Rent Redmond

Boats & Accessories

Small Home, 1 bdrm, 1 bath on ranch property, 8 mi. W. of Terrebonne on Lower Bridge, refs. req., no smoking, $650, $500 dep., 541-419-6542

616

659

Want To Rent

Houses for Rent Sunriver

61-year old woman with 2 therapy cats needs a room. 541-548-2105.

630

Rooms for Rent East Bend room avail. now, $400+ 1/2 utilities, no pets. large closet, 541-280-5936.

STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

Condo / Townhomes For Rent Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

632

Apt./Multiplex General The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634

A 3 bdrm, 1.5 bath, 1376 sq.ft., wood stove, brand new carpet, brand new oak floors, W/S paid, rear deck, $850. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease

Very clean 1 bdrm. w/private patio in quiet area no smoking/pets,1000 NE Butler Mkt. Rd. 541-633-7533, 382-6625

Alpine Meadows Townhomes

800 850

1792 sq.ft. & 1680 sq.ft. spaces, 827 Business Way, Bend. 30¢/sq.ft.; 1st mo. + $300 dep. 541-678-1404 Office/Warehouse located in SE Bend. Up to 30,000 sq.ft., competitive rate, 541-382-3678. Office/Warehouse Space 6400 sq ft., (3) 12x14 doors, on Boyd Acres Rd. Reasonable rates. 541-382-8998 The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

Snowmobiles

Summer Price Yamaha 600 Mtn. Max 1997 Now only $850! Sled plus trailer package $1550. Many Extras, call for info, 541-548-3443.

860

476

476

HARLEY CUSTOM 2007 Dyna Super Glide FXDI loaded, all options, bags, exhaust, wheels, 2 helmets, low mi., beautiful, $10,995. 541-408-7908

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008 Too many upgrades to list, immaculate cond., clean, 15K miles. $14,900 541-693-3975

693

sizes and locations from $200 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Home Visitor Mid-Columbia Children’s Council is recruiting for a full-time EHS Home Visitor in Madras. $11.22-$14.05/hr DOQ + benefits. Requires: high school Diploma with ECE training; AA or BA preferred & Bilingual English/Spanish. Visit www.mcccheadstart.org for info on how to apply or call (541) 386-2010. CLOSES: 9/23/2011 EOE

Medical Assistant: Full-Time, Healthstat On-Site Chronic Disease Management Clinic. • Strong organization & communication skills. •Personable, professional, approachable, compassionate, listening, sensitive to diversity. •Proficient in Phlebotomy • HS Diploma (or equivalent) & 3-5 years exp. as a Medical Assistant • Basic Computer skills incl. word processing, data entry, typing, internet use & other applications. Contact Melissa Parks at 704-529-6161 for more information. Fax your resume to 704-323-7931 or email to melissa.parks@healthstatinc.com

Medical - We are looking for a Full-Time Radiology Technician/Medical Assistant for a new Pain Management Clinic in Bend. Competitive pay and benefits offered. Email Resumes to charlie@cemedicalgroup.com

Teacher 2nd Grade Needed, Full-time at Eastmont Community School. Must have elementary teaching experience. Prefer Oregon Teacher License. Apply online at: www.eastmontschool.com Job Closes: Mon. Sept. 26th, 5:00 p.m.

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions.

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

Approximately 1800 sq.ft., perfect for office or church south end of Bend. Ample parking. $675. 541-408-2318.

1981 Honda CB900F, silver & blue, 13K, pristine! Call for details, 541-548-3439

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

Independent Contractor Maintenance Coordinator

Section Maintenance Coordinator – John Day (Transportation Maintenance Coordinator 1)

Apply your Leadership and Communication Skills in these positions located in John Day. The Maintenance Coordinator assists the Maintenance Manager by coordinating and overseeing the work of a single maintenance crew. It has regular lead responsibilities over this crew engaged in the repair, renovation, and reconstruction of roadbeds, surfaces, structures, and facilities that are part of the State's Transportation systems. Duties involve planning and assigning work. This position may assist in paper and recordkeeping activities related to the crew. It coordinates the day-to-day activities of a crew and may perform similar work assigned to the crew. Salary $2816-$4089/ month + excellent benefits. For details please visit www.odotjobs.com or call 866-ODOT-JOB (TTY 503-986-3854 for the hearing impaired) for Announcement #ODOT11-0223OC and application. Opportunity closes 11:59 PM, September 29, 2011 ODOT is an AA/EEO Employer, committed to building workforce diversity.

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Madras,

Prineville and Bend

H

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

700

Ivy Creek Townhouse: 2 bdrm, 2 bath, garage, private patio, W/D hookup, W/S/G & lawn maint. paid, 1120 sq.ft., near St. Charles, no pets/smoking, $745/mo + dep., 541-382-4739.

Homes for Sale

Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc. NE 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath, 4-plex townhome, 960 sq.ft., newer carpet & paint, W/S/G paid, utility room, rear deck. $595. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 1 Bdrm. $410+dep. Studio $390+dep. No pets/smoking, W/S/G paid. Apply at 38 NW Irving #2, near downtown Bend. 541-389-4902.

638

Hot West Side Properties! FREE List w/Pics & Maps www.BendHomeHunter.com bend and beyond real estate 20967 yeoman, bend or

500 Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

541-322-7253

642

Kawasaki KLR650 Dual Sport, 2005, low miles, $4200. 541-350-3921

Yamaha XT225 Dual Sport, 2006, low miles, $3700. Call 541-350-3921 Yamaha YZF600-R, 2007 perfect condition, always garaged, never been down. $4,250 OBO. Illness forces sale. Call 541-410-2323

1815 SW 21st Quiet spacious 2/2 duplex, gorgeous fenced w/garage. Mint condition! W/S/G paid, new carpet, $715. 541-409-2175

FALL BLAST! • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond Close to schools, shopping, and parks! 541-548-8735

280

Estate Sales

BIG ESTATE SALE. Death forces sale of everything... Tools, antiques, furniture, hunting gear, knick-knacks and much more. PRICED TO SELL! Fri. & Sat., 9/23-24., 8-3. 64236 Crosswinds Rd., Bend. CASH ONLY!

ESTATE SALE IN HISTORIC ANTELOPE, OREGON Howard McMichael Estate, 127 Union & Wallace 1 block s. of Antelope Store SATURDAY ONLY9AM-4PM, CASH ONLY ENTIRE HOUSEHOLD & 32'X40' SHOP Furniture, Antiques, Fishing & Camping items, lots of tools, China, silver flatware, lots of misc. items Sale by: Farmhouse Estate Sales

282

Sales Northwest Bend IN THE ALLEY Fri & Sat (Sept 23 & 24) 9am to 2pm 2454 NW Hosmer Lake (off Mt Washington)

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

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Polaris 330 Trail Bosses (2), used very little, like new, $1800 ea. OBO, 541-420-1598 New Constrution, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, dbl. garage, Close to parks, hospital, schools, slab granite counters, hardwood floors, landscape w/sprinkler systems, starting at $152,900, Bend River Realty, Rob Marken, Broker/Owner 541-410-4255. More photos: www.RobMarken.com

Polaris Phoenix, 2005, 2+4 200cc, like new, low hours, runs great, $1700 or best offer. Call 541-388-3833

749

Southeast Bend Homes 3 Bdrm, 1 bath home, 6 yrs. old, wonderful condition, $89,900, Call Rob Marken, Broker, 541-410-4255 or visit www.RobMarken.com

EXTENDED FAMILY, 6 bdrm, 4 bath, (2) 1/2 baths, 4270 sq.ft., 2 kitchens, 4 car garage on .8 acre, corner lot, view, owner. $590,000 541-390-0886

755

Sunriver/La Pine Homes

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Sales Southwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend

Sales Redmond Area

visit our website at

HUGE HUGE SALE - Stop By Fri. & Sat. Sept 23 & 24, 9-4, Riverwoods Church - DRW, 60377 Cinder Butte Rd.

Garage Sale - Furniture, misc items, Fri-Sat, 8-4, 22960 Yucca Ct., (Cimarron City) follow signs from McGrath Rd

3-Party Sale: Sat. Only 9-6, 625 NW 22nd St off NW 19th, oak claw foot table, camp, sport, tools, teen clothes, more.

www.oregonfreshstart.com

Multi-Family Sale: Furniture, Multi-Family Sale. 8-2, Fri. and Sat. at 2665 NE Jill Ct. appliances, decor, houseFrom Jewelry to Garden Tools wares, tools, books, jewelry and everything in between! & more! High quality items. Early Birds Pay Double! Sat. 288 8-3, 61277 Columbine Ln.

BIG YARD! Wed.-Sat., 9/21-24, 9-3. 580 C Ave., Terrebonne. Tools, fishing gear, baby backpack carrier, collectibles, household, Pioneer speakers, MORE EVERYTHING!

286

Sales Northeast Bend

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Sales Southeast Bend Sat. 8-4, household, tools, new 2-Household Sale: Sat. 8-3:30, 20662 Cherry Tree Ln, furniture, tools, garden, bikes, toys, kids summer/ winter clothes. Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily HUGE MOVING SALE! Fri. only, 9-2. Pre-school closing, everything goes! Something for everyone! teachers, craters, canners small furn. items, large oak china cabinet, 7’ oval oak table & 6 barrel chairs, Suzuki piano, books, toys, clothes, garland, decorations, household & yard tools. Directions: 8 miles from Barnes & Noble, Hwy 20 E, R. on Gosney, L. on Rickard, R. on Groff, L. on Chisholm, R. on Barlow, L. on Brasada to 60629, the gray house with blue door. No early sales!

smoker, extension table extends to seat 12, 2537 NW 22nd St. off 19th & Quince

292

Sales Other Areas BIG SISTERS SALE: Fri.-Sat., 8-5, 2 mi. E. of Sisters at 68175 Hwy 20, loads of antiques, furniture, guns, more! Church Yard Sale: Sat. 9-2, corner of Forest & 12th, many quality items, shop equip., lighting, bookcases, storage cupboards, Llamas to pet, 10-11. ESTATE SALE: Nice tools, furniture, dishes, clothing, too much to list! Fri., Sat. 8-5, Sun. 8-noon. 16777 Donner Place, LaPine.

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

Newer Home, 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, loft area, near Forum shops & medical centers, $1095, Call 541-550-0333.

541-382-3402 LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

573

Business Opportunities Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend Adorable home in THE PARKS, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, mtn. views, W/D, corner lot, $1345, Please call 541-408-0877

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend

• Available Now•

New Custom Finished home, 1000’ river frontage, 5+/-acres Mtn views. Gourmet kitchen, 4 large bdrms w/walk-in closets. 3.5 baths, large bonus rm, ready to move in! Bank owned. Reduced, now $324,500. Bend River Realty, Rob Marken, Broker/ Owner 541-410-4255. More photos www.RobMarken.com

762

Homes with Acreage

773

Acreages

Cute 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1200 sq.ft., all appl. $795/mo. 437 SE Roosevelt Ave. 541-306-5161

2 Acres flat, in Prineville, with creek running thru. Standard septic approval, nice mountain view, near Prineville Res. $19,900. 541-279-0591

AVAIL. NOW 3 bedroom, 1 bath, appliances, garage, yard, deck. . No pets/smoking. $750 month 1st, last + deposit. 541-389-7734.

Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, septic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $114,900, 541-350-4684.

mi., hyd. jacks, new tires, slide out, exc. cond, $54,000, 541-480-8648

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $89,400. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Phoenix Cruiser 2001, 23 ft. V10, 51K. Large bath, bed & kitchen. Seats 6-8. Awning. $30,950. 541-923-4211

Winnebago Access 31J 2008, Class C, Near Low Retail Price! One owner, nonsmoker, garaged, 7,400 miles, auto leveling jacks, (2) slides, upgraded queen bed, bunk beds, microwave, 3-burner range/oven, (3) TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, maintained, and very clean! Only $76,995! Extended warranty available! Call (541) 388-7179. Winnebago Sightseer 30B Class A 2008 $79,500 OBO Top of the line! cell 805-368-1575

881

870

Boats & Accessories

Skyline Layton 25’

Yamaha Grizzly Sportsman Special 2000, 600cc 4-stroke, push button 4x4 Ultramatic, 945 mi, $3850. 541-279-5303

19-ft Mastercraft Pro-Star 190 inboard, 1989, 290hp, V8, 822 hrs, great cond, lots of extras, $10,000. 541-231-8709

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

100+Ponderosa Pines on 5 acres 3 bdrm, 3 bath, semi-secluded home, 45x24 Morton insulated metal shop, $425,000, Baker City, 541-523-2368. HORSE RANCH RV PARK located by Fort Rock, OR. 3 bdrm main house, 1 bdrm attached apt., 1 bdrm rental house, 17 RV spaces. Lots of trees, on almost 28 acres. $380,000. 541-576-2488, 503-250-3435.

Jayco Greyhawk 2004, 31’ Class C, 6800

Forest River 26’ Surveyor 2011, Echo light model, aluminum construction, used 1 time, flat screen TV, DVD & CD player, outside speakers, 1 slide out, cherry cabinets, power awning, power tongue lift, can be towed by most autos, $19,500, call now at 541-977-5358.

650

A Nice 3 bdrm, 1.75 bath 1428 sq.ft., woodstove, fenced yard, RV parking, 2.5 acres, horse OK. $895/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

Jayco 24’ Class C, 1996, 19,400 mi, new battery, Onan gen, sleeps 6, very well cared for, $19,900. 541-388-1112

Travel Trailers

GSL Properties

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Four Winds Chateau M-31F 2006, 2 power slides, back-up camera, many upgrades, great cond. $43,900. 541-419-7099 Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

865

Managed by

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION

Alfa See Ya 40 2005. 2 slides, 350 CAT. Tile. 2 door fridge with ice-maker. $98,000. 541-610-9985

ATVs

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Studios $375 1 Bdrm $400 Free Move-in Rent! BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

KAWASAKI 750 2005 like new, 2400 miles, stored 5 years. New battery, sports shield, shaft drive, $3400 firm. 541-447-6552.

748

1 Mile From Old Mill - 2 Bdrm, 1 bath, garage, security dep. $595/mo. 580 SE Wilson, 541-385-0844 or se habla espanol: 714-227-3235. A clean & sharp 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath. Super new kitchen with dishwasher & microwave. Great closet space, private fenced patio. Don’t just drive by - beautiful exterior remodel will be done by Nov.! $560 incl w/s/g. 1/2 mo free w/1-yr lease. No pets/no smkg. 541-678-8449

1984, 23K, many new parts, battery charger, good condition, $3000 OBO. 541-382-1891

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend Northeast Bend Homes

528

Hurricane by Four Winds 32’, 2007, 12K miles, cherry wood, leather, queen, sleeps 6, 2 slides, 2 TVs, 2 roof airs, jacks, camera, new condition, non-smoker, $59,900 or best offer. 541-548-5216.

745

Finance & Business

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

Real Estate For Sale

Great Mid-Town Deal! 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath townhouse, W/D hookup, W/S paid, $625+ dep., 2940 NE Nikki Ct., 541-390-5615.

Call for Specials!

The Bulletin Classifieds

OREGON DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

A-Class

2010 Custom Pro-street Harley DNA Pro-street swing arm Beaver Santiam 2002, 2 slides, 48K, immaculate, 330 Cumframe, Ultima 107, Ultima mins diesel, $75,000. Call for 6-spd over $23,000 in parts details: 541-504-0874 alone; 100s of man hours into custom fabrication. Past show winner & a joy to ride. $20,000 obo 541-408-3317

Honda VT700 Shadow Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting. No pets/smoking. Near St. Charles.W/S/G pd; both w/d hkup + laundry facil. $625$650/mo. 541-385-6928.

880

Motorhomes

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

476

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Motorcycles And Accessories

541-330-0719 476

875

Watercraft

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent

1, 2 and 3 bdrm apts. Starting at $625.

476

Used out-drive parts Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

Office / Warehouse

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend An Office with bath, various $525

Boats & RV’s

25’ Catalina Sailboat 1983, w/trailer, swing keel, pop top, fully loaded, $10,000, call for details, 541-480-8060

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

2008, Model 208 LTD. Like brand new. Used 4x Bend to Camp Sherman. Winterized, in storage. 3855 lbs Sleeps 5. Queen walk around bed w/storage, full bathroom, full kitchen & lrg fridge. Dual batteries & propane tanks, awning,corner-leveling jacks, Easylift Elite load hitch w/ bars, furnace, AC, AM/FM stereo. Couch & dining table fold out for extra sleeping. $11,795 OBO. 760-699-5125.

Springdale 20’ 179RD 2007 new tires, dinette w/rear window, 3- burner stove,oven,micro, tub /shower, A/C, outside shower, cover, $9200, 503-639-3355

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504 Tent Trailer 1995 Viking, sleeps 6-8. Awning, new screened room, 2-yr tags, extras. Great cond! $3950. 541-549-8747

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 21, 2011 F3

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882

916

932

933

935

975

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

882

Fifth Wheels

29’ Alpenlite Riviera 1997 5th whl. 1 large slide-out. New carpeting, solar panel, AC & furnace. 4 newer batteries & inverter. Great shape. Price reduced, now $12,900 541-389-8315 541-728-8088

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417. Cardinal 34.5 RL (40’) 2009, 4 slides, convection oven + micro., dual A/C, fireplace, extra ride insurance (3 yr. remaining incl. tires), air sleeper sofa + queen bed, $50,900 OBO, must see to appreciate, 406-980-1907, Terrebonne

Shadow Cruiser 25’ RK 1994 Very rare, many new parts, 30,000 BTU heater, aerodynamic, $5250, fantastic cond, must see, 541-923-6116.

885

Canopies and Campers

Hunters, Take a Look at This! 1978 Dynacruiser 9½’ camper, fully self-contained, no leaks, clean, everything works, will fit 1988 or older pickup. $2500 firm. 541-420-6846 Lance-Legend 990 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, exc. cond., generator, solar-cell, large refrig, AC, micro., magic fan, bathroom shower, removable carpet, custom windows, outdoor shower/awning set-up for winterizing, elec. jacks, CD/stereo/4’ stinger. $9500. Bend, 541.279.0458

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

Autos & Transportation

900 908

Aircraft, Parts and Service Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, frplc, 2 flat scrn TVs. $65,000. 541-480-3923

COACHMAN 1997 Catalina 5th wheel 23’, slide, new tires, extra clean, below book. $6,500. 541-548-1422.

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, quality built, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more.$59,500. 541-317-9185

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $138,500. Call 541-647-3718

Executive Hangar at Bend Airport (KBDN).

Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th wheel, 1 slide, AC, TV, full awning, excellent shape, $23,900. 541-350-8629

personals

Truck with Snow Plow! Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. $6500 OBO. Call 541-390-1466.

925

Utility Trailers

Chevrolet 3500 Service Truck, 1992, 4x4, automatic, 11-ft storage bed. Liftgate, compressor & generator shelf inside box, locked storage boxes both sides of bed, new tires, regular maintenance & service every 3K miles, set up for towing heavy equip. $3995. 541-420-1846

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $9000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Chrysler SD 4-Door 1930, CDS Royal Standard, 8-cylinder, body is good, needs some restoration, runs, taking bids, 541-383-3888, 541-815-3318

12 ft. Hydraulic dump trailer w/extra sides, dual axle, steel ramps, spare tire, tarp, excellent condition. $6500 firm. 541-419-6552

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Dodge pickup 1962 D100 classic, original 318 wide block, push button trans, straight, runs good, $1250 firm. Bend, 831-295-4903

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

Ford F250 1997 X-cab 4x4 , 112K, 460, AC, PW, PL, Split window, factory tow pkg, receiver hitches, front & rear, incl. 5th wheel platform & Warn winch. Unit incl. cloth interior, exc. cond. $7,000. call: 541-546-9821, Culver

FORD F250 4x4 - 1994 460 engine, cab and a half, 4-spd stick shift, 5th wheel hitch, 181K miles. $2100. Call 541-389-9764 FORD F350 2003, crew cab 4x4 V-10, great tires, towing pkg, power windows, locks and seats, CD. 132,621 miles, Carfax avail. $10,550. See craigslist 255692031 for pics. 541-390-7649. FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $3800 OBO. 541-350-1686

541-385-5809 Interstate West Enclosed Trailer, 20’ Car hauler, cabinets, tile floor, $4995, 541-595-5363. Towmaster Equipment Trailer, 14,000 lb capacity. Tandemn axle, 4-wheel brakes, 18’ bed, heavy duty ramps, spare tire mounted, side mounted fork pockets, all tires in good condition. $3995. Call 541-420-1846.

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories We Buy Scrap Auto & Truck Batteries, $10 each Also buying junk cars & trucks, (up to $500), & scrap metal! Call 541-912-1467

Ford Model A Sport Coupe 1930, $25,000, call 619-733-8472

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $30,000. 541-548-1422

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

Ford Sport Trac Ltd Ed. 2007 4x4, many extras incl. new tires, 107k, perfect winter SUV, $15,495. 541-306-7546

Ford XLT V10 Triton 2005, Club cab, 51K, looks like new in/ out, $18,500, 541-306-0677

GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi motor, mechanically A-1, interior great; body needs some TLC. $4000 OBO. Call 541-382-9441

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

932

Antique and Classic Autos Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Cadillac Eldorado Convertible 1976 exc cond, 80K, beautiful, AC, cruise, power everything, leather interior, fuel inj V8, $8900. 541-815-5600

MUST SELL For Memorial 70 Monte Carlo All original, beautiful, car, completely new suspension and brake system, plus extras. $4000 OBO. 541-593-3072

VW BAJA BUG 1974 1776cc engine. New: shocks, tires, disc brakes, interior paint, flat black. $5900 OBO. partial trades considered. 541-322-9529.

ToyotaTundra 2000 SR5 4x4 perfect cond., all scheduled maint. completed, looks new in/out. $10,000 541-420-2715 WANTED: Chevy or Ford 3/4-Ton truck, with hitch, low miles, reasonably priced, 541-923-0411.

MUST SELL GMC 6000 dump truck 1990. 7 yard bed, low miles, good condition, new tires! ONLY $3500 OBO. 541-593-3072

GMC Ventura 3500 1986, refrigerated, w/6’x6’x12’ box, has 2 sets tires w/rims., 1250 lb. lift gate, new engine, $5500, 541-389-6588, ask for Bob.

Chevy Camaro Z28 I-ROC 1989, 22K mi, T-Top, almost show room cond, 5.7L, always garaged, $9995. 541-389-5645

541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

1950 CHEVY CLUB COUPE Cobalt Blue, Great condition, runs well, lots of spare parts. $9995. Call 541-419-7828 Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Seeking info on suspicious activity of individual driving faded light blue Mac Mid Liner 1991, with cabin chassis, air brakes, power GMC mini pickup, Orsteering, auto transmission, Chevy Corvette Coupe 2006, egon plates, black lumdiesel, near new recap rear 8,471 orig miles, 1 owner, alber rack, white toolboxes ways garaged, red, 2 tops, tires, 30% front tires, new on side, seen in area of auto/paddle shift, LS-2, Corsa starter, PTO & hydraulic Alfalfa Mkt Rd, Juniper exhaust, too many options to pump. Will take Visa or list, pristine car, $37,500. SeRd, Hwy 20 & 27th & NE Mastercard, $2500, rious only, call 541-504-9945 541-923-0411. Watt Way. 541-848-0232

Dodge Dakota 4x4 X-Cab, 1994, w/canopy, 180K mi, 5-spd, tow pkg $2200. 541-550-6689

Computer/Cabling Install

Excavating

BANKRUPTCY - $399

QB Digital Living

everything! 541-815-9256

•Computer Networking •Phone/Data/TV Jacks •Whole House Audio •Flat Screen TV & Installation 541-280-6771 www.qbdigitalliving.com CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

Levi’s Dirt Works:Residential/ Commercial General Contractor For all your dirt and excavation needs. •Subcontracting • Public Works • Small & large jobs for contractors & home owners by the job - or hour. • Driveway grading (low cost get rid of pot holes & smooth out your driveway) • Custom pads large & small • Operated rentals & augering • Wet & dry utils. • Concrete CCB#194077 541-639-5282.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE

Adult Care Heritage House AFH Quality care for the elderly. Private rooms, set rates, no add-ons! 1227 South Egan Rd, in Burns. 541-573-1845

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Domestic Services I Will Cook For You!

Building/Contracting

No time? Unable to cook? I will prepare your meals. Affordable; senior discounts, 20 yrs exp. Devora, 541-279-0141

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction Housekeeping Services: Resiwork to be licensed with the dential & offices, 15 years Construction Contractors experience. Reasonable Board (CCB). An active rates. Call Bertha, license means the contractor 541-788-6669 refs. avail. is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB Electrical Services license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Quality Builders Electric

• Remodels • Home Improvement • Lighting Upgrades • Hot Tub Hook-ups 541-389-0621 www.qbelectric.net CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

Russ Peterson

Educational Services

Builder / Contractor 40 years experience Home Repairs & Remodels 541-318-8789 • CCB 50758

Free Math Tutoring In Exchange for housekeeping 541-548-4880, Redmond.

Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595 I DO THAT! Home Repairs, Remodeling, Deck Refinishing Time! Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768

Home Improvement Kelly Kerfoot Construction 28 years exp. in Central OR! Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to expert wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts; licenced, bonded, insured • CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

4WD. New Snow/Mud tires, runs Great and has a custom installed 2nd rear axle. Great for hunting and fishing. Soft Top, Clean $5,500 (541) 447-4570 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 2004 $8500 OBO, 6cyl. 4x4 tow pkg., extra wheels/tires white cloth, 102k original owner runs looks great 541-593-1453

Jeep Ltd Wagoneer 4WD, 1989 runs great, exc cond, lthr seats, full pwr, winch, brushgrd, tow pkg, 96K, perfect 2nd car/hunting rig, 24 mpg, $3850. Steve, 541-815-5600 Lexus RX350 2008, All wheel drive, Navigation. moonroof, back up camera. #082948 $32,988 541-598-3750

F-250

Chevy Suburban LT 2004, 90K, 1-owner, soccer/ski trip ready, leather, cruise, Onstar, $15,000, 541-389-7365

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005 72,000 miles, new shocks, rear brakes, one owner, $16,995, 541-480-0828.

Chevy Tahoe, 1999, very clean, loaded, 23,600 miles on new motor; new tires & battery, $5500. 541-330-1151

AT, 76K, good all-weather tires, $13,500 obo. 858-345-0084

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

FORD MUSTANG GT 2005 CONVERTIBLE, 9,000 miles, Shaker Sound Sys, Leather int. Immaculate condition. Must See! $23,995. 541-771-3980

Kia Rhondo 2009, loaded,USB & aux ports,satellite radio,DVD, 3rd row,brand new snows, 52K, $15,500, 541-280-4875. Porsche Cayenne S 2008 Nearly every option: 20" wheels, navigation, Bi-Xenon lights, thermally insulated glass, tow pkg, stainless steel nose trim, moonroof, Bose sys, heated seats. 66K mi. MSRP was over $75K; $34,900. 541-954-0230

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 38K mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $59,750 firm. 541-480-1884 TOYOTA SEQUOIA SR5 2007. Leather, moonroof, JBL. #288220 $27,695

940

Vans

Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $3950 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874. 388-7605, 410-6945

Dodge Grand Caravan SXT 2005: StoNGo, 141k miles, power doors/trunk $7850. Call 541-639-9960

Painting, Wall Covering WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. 541-388-6910. ccb#5184 Picasso Painting Interior/Exterior. Ask about our 10% discount, Affordable, Reliable. 25 yrs exp. CCB# 194351 Bruce Teague 541-280-9081.

• Sprinkler installation & repair • Aerate • Trimming • Summer Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Tile, Ceramic

Call The Yard Doctor for yard maint., thatching, sod, hydroseeding, sprinkler sys, water features, walls, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012

Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

Dodge Ram Van 1990 Customized to carry livestock such as Alpacas, Sheep, Goats etc. Runs Great, Needs a paint job. 78K miles, $2,000. (541) 447-4570

FORD Windstar Mini Van, 1995, 138K, nice inside & out, only half worn out! Seats 7, Michelins, nice wheels, drives excellent 1 look is worth 1000 words! $2495. 541-318-9999 or 541-815-3639. Free Trip to D.C. for WWII Vets!

Sportsmobile Van 2000 Ford E350 4x4, V-10, pop-top, many extras, 47,000 miles, $41,000. 541-383-0014

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LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Melinda Thomas, Successor Trustee under the Trust Deed described below, hereby elects to sell, pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes Sections 86.705 to 86.795, the real property described below at 10:00 a.m. on December 28, 2011 in the lobby of the offices of Bryant, Lovlien & Jarvis, 591 SW Mill View Way, Bend, Oregon, to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed described below. All obligations of performance which are secured by the Trust Deed hereinafter described are in default for reasons set forth below and the beneficiary declares all sums due under the note secured by the trust deed described herein immediately due and payable. The beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property described below to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed. GRANTOR: Mark B. Gerdes and Rebecca L. Gerdes BENEFICIARY: SELCO Community Credit Union TRUST DEED RECORDED: January 4, 2005, in Volume 2005, at Page 00532, Official Records, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY COVERED BY TRUST DEED: Lot One (1), AIRPORT BUSINESS CENTER PHASE 1, Deschutes County, Oregon. DEFAULT: Failure to pay: 1. $387.18, representing the difference between the full regular payment of principal and interest of $1,777.68 due on February 5, 2011, and the partial payment on February 28, 2011 in the amount of $1390.50; 2. Regular monthly payments of principal and interest of $1,777.68 due on March 5, 2011 and subsequent monthly payments due thereafter up to and including the date of this Notice of Default and Election to Sell, in the amount of $8,888.40; 3. Late charges of $88.80 for installments more than 15 days delinquent for a total amount of $800.00; 4. Taxes for the year 2009-2010 in the amount of $2,699.49 plus interest, and taxes for the year 2010-201 1 in the amount of $5,515.82. 5. Other - Trustee's Sale Guarantee: $795.00.

Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k, immac.,loaded, dealer maint, $19,500. 503-459-1580.

CHEVY ASTRO EXT 1993 AWD mini van, 3 seats, rear barn doors, white, good tires/wheels. Pretty interior, clean, no rips or tears. Drives exc! $2500. Free trip to D.C. for WWII Vets! (541) 318-9999 or (541) 815-3639

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

Dodge Durango 1999 126K mi. 4X4 Great cond. 7 passenger $4200. 541-475-2197

Nissan Xterra S - 4x4 2006,

West of 97 & Empire, Bend www.aaaoregonautosource.com

1986,

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Chysler La Baron Convertible 1990, Good condition, $3200, 541-416-9566

DLR# 0225

West of 97 & Empire, Bend Check out other inventory at www.aaaoregonautosource.com

DLR# 0225

Lariat, x-cab, 2WD, auto, gas or propane, 20K orig. mi., new tires, $5000, 541-480-8009.

BMW 330 CI 2002 great cond., Newer tires. Harmon/Kardon stereo system. Asking $13,500. 541-480-7752.

Buicks 1995 LeSabre Limited, 113K, $2950; 1998 LeSabre, 93k, $3900; 1999 Regal GS V-6 supercharged $3500; 2002 LeSabre, 102k, $4950; 2006 Lucerne CX, stunning black, 70k, $7900; 2006 Lucerne CXL 58k, white, Jeep Grand Cherokee Lim$12,500. Bob 541-318-9999 ited 1996, V-6, 153K, buror Sam 541-815-3639. gandy, leather interior, fully loaded, new all weather tires, Caddilac El Dorado 1994, Total cream puff, body, paint, new muffler/shock absorbtrunk as showroom, blue ers, great cond., $3800 OBO, leather, nicely patina-ed gor541-678-5482,541-410-6608 geous light blue, $1700 wheels w/snow tires alJEEP GRAND though car has not been wet in 8 years. On trip to Boise CHEROKEE last week avg. 28.5 mpg., LIMITED 2001 $5700, 541-593-4016. 4x4 90k, leather, cream Chevy Corvette 1988 4-spd puff, one nice lady’s car. manual with 3-spd O/D. only $7900. Sharp, loaded, 2 tops, (tinted 541-815-3639, 318-9999 & metal. New AC, water pump, brake & clutch, master cylinder & clutch slave cyl. $6500 OBO. 541-419-0251.

541-598-3750

Ford

BMW 323i convertible, 1999. 91K miles. Great condition, beautiful car, incredibly fun ride! $9300. 541-419-1763

Jeep CJ-7 1984

DLR# 0225

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Accounting/Bookkeeping

4WD, silver, nice wheels, 183K, lots of miles left yet! Off-road or on-road, 4-wheeler’s or Hunter’s Special - $1900. Call 541-318-9999 or 541-815-3639. Free trip to D.C. for WWII Vets!

West of 97 & Empire, Bend www.aaaoregonautosource.com

West of 97 & Empire, Bend www.aaaoregonautosource.com Chevy Classic Pickup 1969, C-20 Model CST, 396 Turbo 400, equiped w/all options, orig. owner, $24,000 OBO, 541-410-7774

Jeep 4-dr Wagon, 1987

541-598-3750

Pickups

$19,288

call

$33,995

933 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 2500 HD 2004 6.0 liter, bedliner, tow pkg. #109450.

cond., $24,000, 541-923-0231.

935 Chev Tahoe LTZ2007 2008 quads, moonroof, leather — loaded! #163280

rebuilt motor, no miles, power take off winch, exc. tires, asking $3999, 541-389-5355.

Ford Excursion 2005, 4WD, diesel, exc.

Sport Utility Vehicles

Willis Jeep 1956, new

Chevy 18 ft. Flatbed 1975, 454 eng., 2-spd trans, tires 60%, Runs/drives well, motor runs great, $1650. 541-771-5535 MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $37,500. 541-420-3250

stage, propane, hardrubber tires, $4000, 541-389-5355.

931

60’ wide x 50’ deep, with 55’ wide x 17’ high bi-fold door. Natural gas heat, office & bathroom. Parking for 6 cars. Adjacent to Frontage Rd; great visibility for aviation bus. $235K 541-948-2126 Fleetwood Wilderness 36’ 2005 4 slides, rear bdrm, fireplace, AC, W/D hkup beautiful unit! $30,500. 541-815-2380

Pette Bone Mercury Fork Lift, 6000 lb., 2

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Mercury Cougar 1994, XR7 V8, 77K mi, excellent cond. $4995. 541-526-1443 All British Car Cruise-in! Every Thurs, 5-7pm at McBain’s British Fish & Chips, Hwy 97 Redmond, OR. 541-408-3317

SUM OWING ON OBLIGATION SECURED BY TRUST DEED: Principal balance of $236,318.81 with interest at 6.750% per annum from June 22, 2011, until paid. Notice is given that any person named pursuant to Section 86.753, Oregon Revised Statutes, has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by curing the above-described defaults, by payment of the entire amount due (other than such portions of principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale. Melinda Thomas, Successor Trustee Bryant, Lovlien & Jarvis, P.C. 591 SW Mill View Way Bend, OR 97702 LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Sheriff's Sale Execution in Foreclosure (Real Property)

1980 Classic Mini Cooper All original, rust-free, classic Mini Cooper in perfect cond. $10,000 OBO. 541-408-3317

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

HOME FEDERAL BANK, successor to Community First Bank, an Oregon state-chartered commercial bank, Plaintiff, v. PATRICK M. GISLER, an individual, THE PATRICK M. GISLER LIVING TRUST, an Oregon trust, and GMC, LLC, an Oregon limited liability company, Defendants. Case No.: 10CV0031SF

SUBARUS!!! Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Volvo 780 1990, extremely rare car, Bertone designed & built, Volvo reliability & safety, Italian elegance, all parts avail., Italian leather, Burl Wood, drives beautifully, $5500, 541-593-4016.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Notice is hereby given that I will on October 13, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. at the front, west, entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash, the following real property, known as 21 NW Kearney Avenue, Bend, Oregon 97701, to wit, Lots Twelve (12), Thirteen (13), Fourteen (14), Fifteen (15), Sixteen (16), Seventeen (17), and Eighteen (18), Resubdivision of Block Twenty-four (24), PLAT OF BEND, recorded March 7, 1912 in Cabinet A, Page 7, Deschutes County, Oregon. TOGETHER with that portion of the vacated alley which inured to said Lots by Ordinance No. NS 257. Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated June 27, 2011, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein Home Federal Bank as successor in interest to Community First Bank, an Oregon state-chartered commercial bank (the "Bank") as plaintiff, recovered Stipulated Limited Judgment of Foreclosure on June 22, 2011, against Patrick M. Gisler, an individual, the Patrick M. Gisler Living Trust, an Oregon Trust and GMC, LLC, an Oregon Limited liability company as defendants. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD

INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c)Approved uses for the property; (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e)Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff By Lisa Griggs, Civil Technician Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications: September 7, 2011; September 14, 2011; September 21, 2011 Date of Last Publication September 28, 2011 Attorney: Peter S. Hicks, OSB #933057 Ball Janik LLP 101 SW Main Street, Suite 1200 Portland, OR 97204 (503) 228-2525 Conditions of Sale: Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale. LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Sheriff's Sale Execution in Foreclosure (Real Property) HOME FEDERAL BANK, successor to Community First Bank, an Oregon state-chartered commercial bank, Plaintiff, v. PATRICK M. GISLER, an individual, THE PATRICK M. GISLER LIVING TRUST, an Oregon trust, and GMC, LLC, an Oregon limited liability company, Defendants. Case No.: 10CV0031SF Notice is hereby given that I will on October 13, 2011, at 11:10 a.m. at the front, west, entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash, the following real property, known as 1430 NW Wall Street, Bend, Oregon 97701, to wit, A portion of the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (NE1/4 NE1/4) of Section Thirty-two (32), Township Seventeen (17) South, Range Twelve (12) East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, more particularly described as follows: Beginning at a point which is located North 03º19'02" East (sometimes erroneously shown of record as North 33º19'02" East), a distance of 474.38 feet from the Southwest corner of said Northeast Quarter (NE1/4 NE1/4) of Section 32; thence North 0º14'22" West, a distance of 149.76 feet to an iron pipe; thence North 89º25' East, a distance of 160.49 feet to an iron pipe at an existing fence line; thence North 89º25' East, a distance of 43.0 feet to an iron pipe; thence South 0º14' West, a distance of 198.90 feet to an iron pipe; thence South 89º25' West, a distance of 202.25 feet to an iron pipe marking the point of beginning, also being a portion of Tract 19 of the unofficial plat of Lytle Acres, Deschutes County, Oregon. EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion conveyed to the City of Bend by Warranty Deed recorded May 2, 1997 in Book 446, Page 2085, Deschutes County Records. Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated June 27, 2011, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein Home Federal Bank as successor in interest to Community First Bank, an Oregon state-chartered commercial bank (the "Bank") as plaintiff, recovered Stipulated Limited Judgment of Foreclosure on June 22, 2011, against Patrick M. Gisler, an individual, the Patrick M. Gisler Living Trust, an Oregon Trust and GMC, LLC, an Oregon Limited liability company as defendants. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c)Approved uses for the property; (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e)Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff By Lisa Griggs, Civil Technician Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications: September 7, 2011; September 14, 2011; September 21, 2011 Date of Last Publication September 28, 2011 Attorney: Peter S. Hicks, OSB #933057 Ball Janik LLP 101 SW Main Street,


F4 Wednesday, September 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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16, 2011. 304.78 Late Charges. $146,159.55 Total Amount Owing as of May 16,2011. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will on November 9, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, AM., in accord with the standard of time as established by ORS 187.110, at the front steps of the Deschutes County Courthouse, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the real property described above which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of the sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying those sums or ten-

dering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. DATED at McMinnville, Oregon this 2nd day of June, 2011. DAVID HAUGEBERG, Trustee. HAUGEBERG, RUETER, GOWELL, FREDRICKS & HIGGINS, P.C., P.O. Box 480, McMinnville, OR 97128. Date of First Publication: September 21, 2011. Date of Last Publication: October 12, 2011.

Suite 1200 Portland, OR 97204 (503) 228-2525 Conditions of Sale: Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Mary E. Cascio and Marc Osier, as grantor to Western Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated December 22, 2006, recorded December 28, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 84368, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, as purchaser of the loans and other assets of Washington Mutual Bank, formerly known as Washington Mutual Bank, FA (the "Savings Bank") from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, acting as receiver for the Savings Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot 5, Block 12, Unit No. 1, Oregon Water Wonderland, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 55315 Big River Drive, Bend, OR 97707. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,704.71, from May 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,335.25, from February 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees

incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $195,788.87, together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.275% per annum from April 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on November 21, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the

performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 07-19-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105094

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by INDIAN CIRCLE LLC an Oregon Limited Liability Company, as grantor, to DAVID C. HAUGEBERG, Attorney, as trustee, in favor of FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF McMINNVILLE, OREGON, as beneficiary, dated January 18, 2006, recorded on January 20, 2006, in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Reception No.. 2006-04147, covering the following described real property situated in that county and state, to-wit: LOT 57, JUNIPER GLEN NORTH, in the City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made in grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: $6,966.00 Monthly Payments for October 2010, through May, 2011. 304.78 Late Charges Owing. $7,270.78 Total Amount of Delinquency as of May 16, 2011. By reason of the default just described, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following, to-wit: $140,027.58 Principal Remaining Balance. 5,827.19 Accrued Interest to May

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. #: OR-11-448936-NH

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx2282 T.S. No.: 1337062-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Lysa Severson, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated April 25, 2007, recorded April 30, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-24789 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lots six (6), seven (7), eight (8), and nine (9) in block five (5) of Hillman, Deschutes County, Oregon Commonly known as: 8584 NW 19th St. Terrebonne OR 97760. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,090.10 Monthly Late Charge $.00. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following,

to-wit; The sum of $161,491.43 together with interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from December 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on December 21, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's

fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 15, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-390308 09/14/11, 09/21, 09/28, 10/05 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Steven R. Carter and Martha J. Carter, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated January 31, 2007, recorded February 8, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2007, at Page 08237, as covering the following described real property: Lot Thirty-Four (34), Westbrook Village, Phase II, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 61641 Kaci Lane, Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S.#: OR-11-453614-NH

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, DORI L REED UNMARRIED, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as Trustee, in favor of SAXON MORTGAGE, INC. D/B/A/ SAXON HOME MORTGAGE, as beneficiary, dated 1/11/2006, recorded 1/23/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-04370, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Saxon Mortgage Services, Inc.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 55 OF OBSIDIAN ESTATES, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 3001 SOUTHWEST PUMICE PLACE REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of September 8, 2011 Delinquent Payments from April 01, 2010 10 payments at $ 835.68 each $ 8,356.80 8 payments at $ 864.10 each $ 6,912.80 (04-01-10 through 09-08-11) Late Charges: $ 274.64 Beneficiary Advances: $ 1,872.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 17,416.24 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $106,871.41, PLUS interest thereon at 6.12% per annum from 03/01/10 to 2/1/2011, 6.125% per annum from 2/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on January 11, 2012, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for January 11, 2012. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 12/12/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from you rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe you current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar at 800-452-7636 and ask for lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance may be obtained through Safenet at 800-SAFENET. DATED: 9/8/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, SAMUEL F. FALLEY, A MARRIED MAN. as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY., as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ("MERS"), AS NOMINEE FOR GREYSTONE RESIDENTIAL FUNDING, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 9/25/2007, recorded 10/1/2007, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2007-53003,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 111164 LOT 1, BLOCK P, DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 60107 CINDER BUTTE ROAD BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 2/1/2011, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,379.51 Monthly Late Charge $68.98 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $148,843.31 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.1250 per annum from 1/1/2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 12/23/2011 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 12/23/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31,2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 11/23/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee 3 First American Way Santa Ana, CA 92707 Signature By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, ANN MARIE ROY, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ("MERS"), AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK, INC., DBA AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK OF OREGON, as Beneficiary, dated 11/5/2007, recorded 11/9/2007, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2007-58998,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 117316 LOT 21, BLOCK 25, DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, INC., UNIT 4, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 16973 DOWNEY RD. BEND, OR 97707 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 6/1/2010, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,368.74 Monthly Late Charge $68.44 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $215,502.74 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.2500 per annum from 5/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 1/6/2012 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 1/6/2012. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31,2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 12/7/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated; 8/30/2011 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee 3 First American Way Santa Ana, CA 92707 Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations.

ASAP# 4087014 09/21/2011, 09/28/2011, 10/05/2011, 10/12/2011

ASAP# 4072324 08/31/2011, 09/07/2011, 09/14/2011, 09/21/2011

ASAP# FNMA4082144 09/14/2011, 09/21/2011, 09/28/2011, 10/05/2011

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMG-109496


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, September 21, 2011 F5

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trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,336.54, from December 1, 2009,, monthly payments in the sum of $1,356.57, from February 1, 2010,, monthly payments in the sum of $1,440.85, from April 1, 2010,, monthly payments in the sum of $1,429.11, from February 1, 2011, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,519.71, from April 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $301,349.19, together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.98% per annum from November 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on December 1, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the

highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include

their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 07-27-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105172 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Stephen L. Barnette, as grantor to Western Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated April 5, 2007, recorded April 13, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2007, at Page 21250, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Federal De-

posit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot 15, Block 42, Center Addition to Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 616 N.E. Franklin Avenue, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,279.79, from May 1, 2009, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,264.98, from April 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $218,000.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.1% per annum from April 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on December 13, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes,

State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee"

and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 08-09-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105228 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Angela D. Garoutte, as grantor to Western Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated October 25, 2006, recorded October 30, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 72232, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, succes-

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. #: OR-11-436814-NH

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. #: OR-11-426757-NH

sor in interest to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot 26, Stonehaven, Phase 1, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 20404 Aberdeen Drive, Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,805.86, from December 1, 2009,, monthly payments in the sum of $1,815.65, from August 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,915.22, from December 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $363,160.41, together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.982% per annum from November 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on November 28, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard

time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the

feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 07-26-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-104829

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. #: OR-11-455904-NH

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JAMES G. PERKINS as Grantor to TICOR TITLE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of BOEING EMPLOYEES' CREDIT UNION, as Beneficiary, dated 7/14/2005, recorded 7/22/2005, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2005-47115,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 105406 LOTS FOURTEEN AND FIFTEEN, BLOCK FOURTY-FIVE, CENTER ADDITION TO BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 616 NE IRVING AVE. BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 1/1/2011, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,197.86 Monthly Late Charge $59.89 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $187,026.75 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.8750 per annum from 12/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 12/30/2011 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 12/30/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under State law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 11/30/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 8/29/2011 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee as trustee 818 Stewart Street, Suite 800 Seattle, WA 98101 Signature By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, STEPHEN COSTELLO AND LISA COSTELLO , HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of FIRST FRANKLIN A DIVISION OF NAT. CITY BANK OF IN A NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, as Beneficiary, dated 1/14/2005, recorded 1/21/2005, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2005-03558,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 119456 LOT FOURTEEN (14), BLOCK ONE (1), DAVIS FIRST ADDITION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 21089 CLA1RAWAY AVENUE BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 3/1/2011, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,286.82 Monthly Late Charge $64.34 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $184,297.87 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.7500 per annum from 2/1/2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 12/29/2011 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 12/29/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 11/29/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 08/22/2011 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee 3220 EI Camino Real Irvine, CA 92602 Signature By Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MARK S. VALCESCHINI, CYNTHIA A. VALESCHINI, HUSBAND & WIFE as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., as Beneficiary, dated 4/14/2008, recorded 4/16/2008, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2008-16663,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 100253 LOT THREE (3). BLOCK NINE (9), EASTWOOD ADDITION, CITY OF BEND, RECORDED APRIL 21, 1966, IN CABINET A, PAGE 134, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 1656 NE NORTH VIEW DR. BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 4/1/2011, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,227.88 Monthly Late Charge $61.39 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $197,223.89 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.0000 per annum from 3/1/2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 12/19/2011 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 12/19/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 11/19/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 8/15/2011 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee 3 First American Way Santa Ana, CA 92707 Signature By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations.

ASAP# 4081195 09/14/2011, 09/21/2011, 09/28/2011, 10/05/2011

ASAP# 4075699 09/07/2011, 09/14/2011, 09/21/2011, 09/28/2011

ASAP# FNMA4071564 08/31/2011, 09/07/2011, 09/14/2011, 09/21/2011


F6 Wednesday, September 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Richard Gross and Linda Gross, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated April 21, 2006, recorded April 28, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 29545, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lots Twenty-Four (24), and Twenty-Five (25), Rivers Edge Village, Phase III, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 3167 N.W. Quiet River Lane, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $2,399.99, from October 1, 2009,, monthly payments in the sum of $3,672.42, from February 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $2,805.45, from February 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $414,386.17, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.95% per annum from September 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on November 28, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 07/26/2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 09-103593

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx7163 T.S. No.: 1337063-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Julia Fleet and John Fleet, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated August 21, 2007, recorded August 24, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-46625 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot twenty-eight Wheeler Ranch, Phase 2, Deschutes County, Oregon Commonly known as: 16671 Wyatt Dr. Lapine OR 97739. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2008 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,514.56 Monthly Late Charge $63.03. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $188,213.41 together with interest thereon at 7.620%

per annum from October 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on December 21, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed,

at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 15, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-389740 09/14, 09/21, 09/28, 10/05 PUBLIC NOTICE Public Sale Secure Storage Self storage facility located at 3001 NW Canal Blvd., Redmond, OR 97756 must sell the contents in 6 storage units to collect past due rents. The public sale will take place on October 1, 2011 at 9:30 a.m. Registration begins at 9:00 a.m. The following units are currently for sale: Lot 313 Nicholson, Lot 508 Sutphin, Lot 513 Shaver, Lot 601 Frank, Lot 823 Bowles, Lot 208 Misc. Cash, Visa or MasterCard Credit/Debit cards will be accepted. No checks will be accepted.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. #: OR-10-374111-NH Reference is made to that certain deed made by, PEDRO VARGAS, SR as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR PACIFIC COMMUNITY MORTGAGE, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 11/30/2006, recorded 12/7/2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2006-80194,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 241945 LOT 25 OF FAIRHAVEN PHASE VI, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 533 NW 24TH STREET REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 4/1/2010, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,348.00 Monthly Late Charge $67.40 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $182,491.70 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.3750 per annum from 3/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 12/27/2011 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, At the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 12/27/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 11/27/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee 3220 El Camino Real Irvine, CA 92602 Signature By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# FNMA4072325 08/31/2011, 09/07/2011, 09/14/2011, 09/21/2011

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Sheriff's Sale Execution in Foreclosure (Real Property) KEHOE NORTHWEST PROPERTIES, LLC, an Oregon limited liability company, Plaintiff, v. CENTRAL OREGON INVESTORS, LLC, an Oregon limited liability company; et al., Defendants. OTAK ARCHITECTS, INC., an Oregon corporation, Cross-Claimant, v. SAN DIEGO NATIONAL BANK, a national banking association; et al., Cross-Defendants. OTAK, INC., an Oregon corporation, Cross-Claimant, v SAN DIEGO NATIONAL BANK, a national banking association; et al., Cross-Defendants. Case No.: 09-CV-0826-ST NOTICE OF SALE UNDER WRIT OF EXECUTION- REAL PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that I will on October 13, 2011, at 11:20 a.m. at the front, west, entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash or cashier's check, the real property described in the attached Exhibit "A", and also known as, 61533, 61536, 61550, and 61576 Alstrup Road, Bend, OR 97702. EXHIBIT A - LEGAL DESCRIPTION PARCEL 1: A portion of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SW1/4SW1/4) of Section Four (4), Township Eighteen (18) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: Beginning at the Southeast corner of the SW1/4 of the SW1/4 of Section 4, Township 18 South, Range 12, E.W.M.; thence North 89°11'47" West, a distance of 744.10 feet along the South line of said SW1/4SW1/4; thence due North, a distance of 15.00 feet; thence South 88°21'02" East, a distance of 744.33 feet to a point on the East boundary of the SW1/4SW1/4, Section 4, Township 18 South, Range 12, E.W.M.; thence South 0°05'25" East, a distance of 4.0 feet to the point of beginning. Also that certain parcel of land, more particularly described by metes and bounds as beginning at the Northeast corner of the West Half of the Northwest Quarter (W1/2NW1/4) of Section Nine (9), Township Eighteen (18) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian; thence South along the East line of said W1/2NW1/4 of said Section, Township, and Range, 326.46 feet; thence Westerly 338.24 feet; thence Northerly 69 feet; thence Westerly 407 feet; thence Northerly 250.69 feet to a point in the line between Sections 4 and 9 of said Township and Range; thence Easterly along said Section line for a distance of 744.10 feet to the place of beginning, said tract being a part of the Northwest Quarter Northwest Quarter (NW1/4NW1/4) of Section 9, Township 18 South, Range 12, E.W.M., D.C.O. Excepting therefrom the following: Beginning at a point on the line between Sections 4 and 9, which point is located North 89°11'47" West, a distance of 744.10 feet from the Southeast corner of the SW1/4SW1/4 of Section 4, Township 18 South, Range 12, E.W.M.; thence South 0°44'43" West, a distance of 225.69 feet; thence South 89°36'42" East, a distance of 365.00 feet; thence North 0°44'43" East, a distance of 232.66 feet; thence North 88°21'02" West, a distance of 365.15 feet; thence due South for 15.00 feet to the point of beginning. PARCEL 2: A portion of Tract Fourteen (14), CARROLL ACRES, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: Beginning at a point on the line between Sections Four (4) and Nine (9), which point is located North 89°11'47" West, a distance of 744.10 feet from the Southeast corner of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SW1/4SW1/4) of Section Four (4), Township Eighteen (18) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian; thence South 0°44'43" West, a distance of 225.69 feet; thence South 89°36'42" East, a distance of 365.00 feet; thence North 0°44'43" East, a distance of 232.66 feet; thence North 88°21'02" West, a distance of 365.15 feet; thence due South for 15.00 feet to the point of beginning. PARCEL 3: That part of the West Half of the Northwest Quarter (W1/2NW1/4) of Section Nine (9), Township Eighteen (18) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: Beginning at the Northeast corner of the W1/2NW1/4 of Section 9, Township 18 South, Range 12, E.W.M.; thence Southerly 326.46 feet along the Easterly boundary line of Tract Fourteen (14) of Carroll Acres to the Northeast corner of Tract Thirteen (13), Carroll Acres, being the point of beginning of the tract to be conveyed; thence Westerly along the North line of said Tract 13, a distance of 275 feet; thence Southerly on a line parallel with the East line of said Tract 13 to a point on the South line thereof; thence Easterly along the South line of said Tract 13, a distance of 275 feet to the Southeast corner thereof; thence Northerly along the East line of said Tract 13, a distance of 292.09 feet to the point of beginning. PARCEL 4: That part of the West Half of the Northwest Quarter (W1/2NW1/4) of Section Nine (9) Township Eighteen (18) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, as described as follows: Beginning at the Northeast corner of the W1/2NW1/4 of Section 9, Township 18 South, Range 12, E.W.M.; thence Southerly 326.46 feet along the Easterly boundary line of Tract 14 of Carroll Acres to the Southeast corner of said Tract 14; thence 275 feet Westerly along the Southerly boundary line of Tract 14 of Carroll Acres to the point of beginning; thence 63.24 feet Westerly along the Southerly boundary line of Tract 14 of Carroll Acres; thence 69 feet North; thence 232.02 feet Westerly to a point, which point measures as follows: From the Southwest corner of Tract 14; thence Easterly along the Southerly boundary of Tract 14, 175 feet and North from that point 75.8 feet, said point being the Northeast corner of the Berry Tract; thence 88.8 feet South; thence 175 feet West to the Westerly boundary of Tract 13; thence Southerly 279.2 feet along the Westerly boundary line of Tract 13 to the Southwest corner of said Tract 13; thence Easterly along the Southerly boundary of Tract 13 of Carroll Acres, 471.25 feet; thence North to the point of beginning, being a part of Tracts 13 and 14 of Carroll Acres. PARCEL 5: Tract Twelve (12) of Carroll Acres, being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at a point 618.55 feet South of the Northeast corner of the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (NW1/4NW1/4) of Section Nine (9), Township Eighteen (18) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon; thence South on the East line of said NW1/4NW1/4 for a distance of 291.66 feet; thence West (N. 89°36'42" W.) for 747.26 feet; thence North (N. 0°44'43" E.) for 291.66 feet; thence East (S. 89°36'42" E) for 746.25 feet. Excepting therefrom a tract in the Southwest corner of said Tract Twelve (12), more particularly described as follows: Beginning at an iron pipe at the Southwest corner of the above described Tract 12; thence North 0°44'43" East for 169.66 feet to an iron pipe; thence South 89°36'42" East for 192.00 feet to an iron pipe; thence South 0°44'43" West, for 169.66 feet to an iron pipe; thence North 89°36'42" West for 192.00 feet to the point of beginning. PARCEL 6: A triangular parcel of land lying Southeasterly of the right of way of the Central Oregon Irrigation Company's Canal, the same being situate in the Southeasterly corner of the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SW1/4SW1/4) of Section Four (4), Township Eighteen (18) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. Except a portion of the SW1/4 of the SW1/4 of Section 4, Township 18 South, Range 12, E.W.M., described as follows: Beginning at the Southeast corner of the SW1/4SW1/4 of Section 4, Township 18 South, Range 12, E.W.M.; thence North 89°11'47" West, a distance of 744.10 feet along the South line of said SW1/4SW1/4; thence due North, a distance of 15.00 feet; thence South 88°21'02" East, a distance of 744.33 feet to a point on the East boundary of the SW1/4SW1/4 of Section 4, Township 18 South, Range 12, E.W.M.; thence South 0°05'25" East, a distance of 4.0 feet to the point of beginning. Also except that part of the SW1/4SW1/4 described as follows: Beginning at a point located 380.0 feet North 0°05'25" West of the West 1/16 corner of Sections Four (4) and Nine (9); thence North 90° West 361.23 feet to the Easterly right-of-way line of the Central Oregon Canal; thence Northerly and Easterly along said Central Oregon Canal right-of-way to a point that is 611.06 feet North 0°05'25" West of said West 1/16 corner; thence South 0°05'25" East 231.06 feet to the point of beginning. Except that portion lying Westerly of Alstrup Road. PARCEL 7: A portion of Tract Twelve (12) of the unofficial plat of CARROLL ACRES, in the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (NW1/4NW1/4) of Section Nine (9), Township Eighteen (18) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: Beginning at an iron pipe at the Southwest corner of Tract Twelve (12); thence North 0?44'43" East for 169.66 feet to an iron pipe; thence South 89?36'42" East for 192.00 feet to an iron pipe; thence South 0?44'43" West for 169.66 feet to an iron pipe; thence North 89?36'42" West for 192.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. PARCEL 8: A tract of land located in the Northwest Quarter (NW1/4) of Section Nine (9), Township Eighteen (18) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, and being part of Tract 1 of Carroll Acres and being more fully described as follows: Beginning at a point 284.97 feet East and South 03?58' East, 710.2 feet from the Northwest corner of Section 9, Township 18 South, Range 12, East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, and running thence South 03?58' East, 82.53 feet to the North line of the Brosterhous Road; thence along the North right of way line of said Brosterhous Road, South 45?58'35" East, 42.70 feet; thence around a 389.25 foot radius curve right, 44.93 feet to the true point of beginning, long chord bears South 42?40'07" East, 44.91 feet; thence around a 389.25 foot radius curve right, 139.66 feet, long chord bears South 29?05'00" East, 138.91 feet; thence South 18?48'17" East, 43.84 feet; thence East, 22.39 feet to the West right of way line of the Alstrup Road; thence along the West right of way line of said Alstrup Road, North 01?01'43" East, 207.70 feet; thence South 67?26'48" West, 116.69 feet to the true point of beginning. PARCEL 9: That part of the West Half of the Northwest Quarter (W1/2NW1/4) of Section Nine (9), Township Eighteen (18) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows, to wit: Beginning at the Northeast corner of said West Half of the Northwest Quarter (W1/2NW1/4) and running thence Westerly 744.10 feet along the North line of Tract 14 Carroll Acres; thence South 250.69 feet to the actual point of beginning of this description; thence South 94 feet; thence East 175.0 feet; thence North 88.8 feet; thence Westerly along the line fence 175.2 feet to point of beginning. Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution of Real Property (Foreclosure) issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated August 2, 2011, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein KEHOE NORTHWEST PROPERTIES, LLC, an Oregon limited liability company, as plaintiff, recovered Limited Judgment of Foreclosure on June 27, 2011, against CENTRAL OREGON INVESTORS, LLC, and KITTLESON AND ASSOCIATES, INC., as defendants. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c)Approved uses for the property; (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e)Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff By: Anthony Raguine, Civil Technician Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications:September 7, 2011; September 14; and September 21, 2011 Date of Last Publication:September 28, 2011 Attorney:Kimberley Hanks McGair, OSB #984205 Farleigh Wada Witt 121 SW Morrison Street, Suite 600 Portland, OR 97204 (503) 228-6044 Conditions of Sale: Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale.

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Bulletin Daily Paper 09/21/11