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New way to evaluate, pay teachers nears reality in Bend

Audits of ODOT: Changes to improve oversight, director says, but many employees aren’t so sure

Private-sector ties elicit harsh criticism By Nick Budnick The Bulletin

By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

As Bend-La Pine Schools draws closer to implementing new models for evaluating and paying its teachers, district administrators are spending a lot of time explaining how the new systems would work and how they could benefit the district. At a May 10 board meeting, board member Nori Juba expressed concerns about whether a new compensation model in the district could end up backfiring, leaving the district with a higher payroll and few options to pay for it. But Superintendent Ron Wilkinson believes the district’s proposed new model will be cost-neutral and effective at weeding out teachers who aren’t performing well. The new models are the results of the Creative Leadership Achieves Student Success Project, also known as CLASS, a program run by the nonprofit education reform group The Chalkboard Project. CLASS focuses on increasing student achievement through teachers’ evaluations, leadership pathways, professional development and compensation. Since 2009, Bend-La Pine, Redmond and Crook County school districts have been in the planning phase of the CLASS Project. Now the districts, through Chalkboard Project, have received a federal Teacher Incentive Fund grant that will allow them to implement aspects of CLASS in their schools. See CLASS / A5

Submitted photo

The Oregon Department of Transportation settled a lawsuit against Ross Brothers Construction two years ago. Above is a crooked line of rebar at one Ross Brothers project, the Shady Bridge south of Roseburg on Interstate 5. The out-of-alignment rebar was meant to be the top of a stem wall. In internal interviews and documents, many ODOT employees say the department needs to do more to ensure money is well spent.

In Sunday’s Bulletin: Documents, interviews show years of poor roadwork and little quality control

SALEM — Two years ago, the Oregon Department of Transportation settled a lawsuit against Ross Brothers Construction, which had built numerous bridges and stretches of state highway, including parts of the Bend Parkway. The suit alleged the company had engaged in shoddy construction practices and bilked taxpayers by systematically falsifying bills and padding timesheets. What changes have ODOT employees recommended since then to protect taxpayers from

similar activity? ODOT Director Matt Garrett won’t say. While he claims recommendations to improve oversight have been made, he won’t divulge them. He says he needs to negotiate changes with industry groups before discussing the matter publicly. “There were lessons learned that we will apply, that we will pursue,” he says. “But I think it’s incumbent on me to make sure I engage the business partner I have that will be impacted by this direction.” Garrett’s stance reflects a relatively new way of doing business

Tallying the affordable housing fee Where the money’s gone

Looking for power way, way up By Jay Lindsay The Associated Press

The world’s strongest winds race high in the sky, but that doesn’t mean they’re out of reach as a potentially potent energy source. Flying, swooping and floating turbines are being developed to turn high-altitude winds into electricity. The challenges are huge, but the potential is immense. Scientists estimate the energy in the jet streams is 100 times the amount of power used worldwide annually. Cristina Archer, an atmospheric scientist at California State University, Chico, said there’s “not a doubt anymore” that high-altitude winds will be tapped for power. “This can be done, it can work,” she said. See Wind / A3

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Chuck Potterf, lower left, and Kenny Lichtenberg, both from Potterf Construction, work on an affordable green homes project that received a $500,000 loan from money collected through Bend’s affordable housing fee. The project, in a subdivision in southeast Bend, will result in the construction of several green homes expected to sell for less than $200,000 each.

It’s had a good impact, many agree, but not everyone in Bend is sure it should be renewed By Nick Grube The Bulletin

Richard Moke was one of the first people to move into Discovery Park Lodge in Bend’s Northwest Crossing neighborhood on the city’s outer west side. While an independent living facility for seniors wasn’t his first choice for a new home, he didn’t have many options.

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at ODOT, which has come to speak of industry as an equal partner in building and maintaining Oregon’s bridges and state highways. However, documentation of interviews with internal auditors show that ODOT’s effort to hand off core responsibilities to private firms and industry groups has been controversial within the department. In those documents, and in interviews, many ODOT employees and others say the department needs to do more to ensure that Oregon’s highway funding is well spent. See ODOT / A3

Moke was a general contractor and custom home builder during the real estate boom, and like many in his field he suffered from a lack of work when the recession hit. Running low on money, he was forced to get rid of his house through a short sale. He could have moved in with his daughter, but she lived in the Valley, west of the Cascades. He also could have moved into a

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small apartment in Bend, perhaps one built above a garage, but that also wasn’t something he looked forward to or even wanted. That’s when he found the Discovery Park Lodge, and its cheaper-than-expected rent for a place that boasted mountain views in an upscale part of Bend. “I just wasn’t going to make it,” Moke said during a recent game night at Discovery Park Lodge. “This was a real life saver.” Discovery Park Lodge is a 53-unit affordable housing complex that opened in December 2009 with help from Bend’s affordable housing fee. See Affordable / A5

Since its inception in June 2006, Bend’s affordable housing fee has collected about $2.7 million. Of this, $2.1 million has been allocated to 13 projects, listed below, creating 156 affordable housing units in Bend. • Bend Area Habitat for Humanity ($144,900): Construction financing for project on Daggett Lane • Discovery Park Lodge ($275,000): Development financing for a 54-unit independent living complex for seniors • Cascade Community Development Corporation ($136,000): Predevelopment loan for a phased 80-unit affordable housing project • Bend Area Habitat for Humanity ($150,600): Short-term construction financing for two homes • Schumacher Construction ($210,000): Short-term construction loan for affordable housing in Chase Village subdivision • Cascade Community Development Corporation ($34,000): Development loan for five affordable housing units for developmentally disabled adults • Bend Area Habitat for Humanity ($121,000): Short-term loan for construction funding for lowto moderate-income family homes • Building Partners for Affordable Housing ($145,000): Construction financing for affordable green home project See Projects / A5

Utah law encourages gold and silver coin use By William Yardley New York Times News Service

FARR WEST, Utah — Utah has passed a law intended to encourage residents to use gold or silver coins made by the U.S. Mint as cash, but with their value based on the weight of the precious metals in them, not the face value — if, that is, they can

find a merchant willing to accept the coins on that basis. After all, while the one-ounce American Eagle coin produced by the Mint says “One Dollar,” it is actually worth more like $38 based on the current price of silver. (An ounce of gold is worth more than $1,500).

The legislation, called the Legal Tender Act of 2011, was inspired in part by Tea Party supporters, some of who believe that the dollar should be backed by gold or silver and that Obama administration policies could cause a currency collapse. See Coins / A5


A2 Monday, May 30, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Serbian fugitive was slowly starved of friends and cash By Doreen Carvajal and Steven Erlanger New York Times News Service

BELGRADE, Serbia — The arrest of war crimes fugitive Ratko Mladic, found hiding inside a darkened house in a Serbian village last week, came from methodically pressuring his waning network of supporters and draining his financial lifeline so thoroughly that his most bitter complaint when captured was a demand for his frozen military pension of 140 euros a month, according to investigators in Serbia. “He asked for his pension three times: ‘I need my pension. I need my pension,’” said Bruno Vekaric, the deputy war crimes prosecutor, recalling the exchanges during a closed extradition hearing to transfer Mladic to The Hague to face charges for genocide in connection with the Srebenica massacre, the worst ethnically motivated mass murder on the Continent since World War II.

Critical questions remain about precisely who protected Mladic. The pro-Western government of President Boris Tadic says it will investigate, a politically delicate examination that could lead to former government officials and perhaps even to religious authorities, since Mladic revealed after his arrest that he had been visited over the years by many priests. His demand for his pension — frozen in 2005 while he was on the run — reflected a calculated strategy by investigators to sever Mladic’s ties with friends, supporters and cash to reduce his options for hiding, Vekaric said. That strategy was followed over three years, a period of growing impatience among Western nations and the international war crimes prosecutor, Serge Brammertz, who continually questioned Serbia’s resolve in trying to find Mladic, the most wanted war crimes fugitive from

Obama offers message of comfort in Joplin

Clashes erupt in Belgrade to protest arrest BELGRADE, Serbia — Protesters throwing stones and bottles clashed with baton-wielding riot police Sunday in Belgrade after several thousand Serbian nationalist supporters of jailed warcrimes suspect Ratko Mladic rallied outside the parliament building to demand his release. By the time the crowds broke up by late evening, about 100 people were arrested and 16 minor injuries were reported. That amounted to a victory for the pro-Western government, which arrested Mladic on Thursday, risking the wrath of the nationalist old guard in a country with a history of much larger and more virulent protests. Rioters overturned garbage containers, broke traffic lights and set off firecrackers as they rampaged through downtown. Cordons of riot police blocked their advances, and skirmishes took place in several locations in the center of the capital. Doctors said six police officers were among the 16 people brought to a hospital with minor injuries. Police remained on the streets as the crowds broke up. — The Associated Press

the Balkans conflict. The week of Mladic’s capture, Vekaric said, prosecutors issued 10 search warrants of homes of supporters amid signs that the

Bulletin wire reports

amount of suspicious cash they were finding was dropping. When Mladic was arrested, investigators said, he had just $800 in his possession.

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Visitors kneel at Arlington West, a Memorial Day display on the beach in Santa Monica, Calif., that uses crosses and other religious symbols to honor the service people killed in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars and is sponsored by Veterans for Peace.

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Dispute over casualties in Afghan NATO strike KABUL, Afghanistan — Afghan officials said Sunday that a NATO airstrike killed 14 civilians, all of them women and children, in the southern province of Helmand on Saturday night. Local officials said the strike was aimed at Taliban fighters and missed. NATO said it was investigating. But in a conflicting account, a high-level NATO official said Sunday night that nine civilians were killed in the strike, which was aimed at five insurgents who attacked a coalition foot patrol and killed a Marine. The insurgents continued to fire from inside a compound when NATO forces called in the strike.

Sudan threatens disputed regions JUBA, Sudan — The northern Sudanese army is threatening to seize two more areas along the combustible north-south border, risking war just weeks before southern Sudan is due to split off as an independent country, Western and Sudanese officials said Sunday. The northern government has already defied internationally brokered agreements with the south, sending its army storming into the contested border region of Abyei a week ago. Now, its threats strike again at a peace process, designed to lead the region out of a long conflict that has cost millions of lives, that seemed closer to realization af-

ter a jubilant and nonviolent vote for independence by southerners just this January.

Palin makes celebrity entrance in D.C., on back of a Harley By Michael D. Shear New York Times News Service

Islamists seize another Yemeni city SANAA, Yemen — Islamist militants consolidated control over a second city in southern Yemen on Sunday, seizing banks, government offices and the security headquarters as government forces responded with mortar fire. The fall of the coastal city of Zinjibar to self-styled holy warriors who claimed to have “liberated” it from “the agents of the Americans” fed into Western fears that militants sympathetic to al-Qaida could exploit the breakdown of authority to take control of territory. Political opponents of Yemen’s embattled president, Ali Abdullah Saleh, portrayed the takeover as a ploy by Saleh to prove to wavering allies why they needed to keep him in power. — From wire reports

WASHINGTON — For sheer mastery of celebrity theater, Sarah Palin cannot be beat. Palin, the former governor of Alaska, let the anticipation build for hours on Sunday in the Pentagon’s North Parking Lot, where thousands of bikers (and their rumbling Harleys) had gathered for the annual Rolling Thunder rally ahead of Memorial Day. And then, suddenly, there she was: Palin, with her husband, Todd, and the rest of the family. Wearing matching black Harley-Davidson helmets, they rode motorcycles toward the front of the procession through a crush of cameramen, photographers, reporters and leather-clad bikers, all jostling for just a peek at the woman who might be president. A traditional political ap-

UP TO

pearance, it was not. She did not make any public remarks or shake hands with dignitaries. There was no news release accompanying her visit. And after the short ride to the National Mall — she rode on the back of a volunteer’s bike — she sped off in a black sport utility vehicle to points unknown to anyone outside her small circle, even to the reporters covering her. Palin’s visit — to start her stillmysterious One Nation bus tour along the East Coast — provided no clarity about whether she will run for the Republican presidential nomination this year. But it did reinforce the idea that if she does, her campaign will not be conducted in the usual way.

JOPLIN, Mo. — A week ago the Missouri Southern State University campus here was rich with celebration and smiles as the graduating seniors of the public high school paraded across stage to grasp their diplomas. Within hours, a third of the town was destroyed — including Joplin High School — and scores of residents were dead, at least one of the newly minted graduates among them. On Sunday, the campus was filled with the grief of a community that for the first time paused from its digging to take collective note of what had been lost when a tornado of record proportions in carnage upended the heart of the city. President Barack Obama in an occasionally rousing speech peppered with religious imagery and pledges of national solidarity, praised the residents of Joplin for coming together in the face of tragedy. “The cameras may leave. The spotlight may shift. But we will be with you every step of the way until Joplin is restored,” the president said, bringing a round of applause from the audience. “We’re not going anywhere. That is not just my promise; that’s America’s promise.” The community memorial service fell on the Sunday of Memorial Day weekend, and it marked the deadliest tornado in what has been the deadliest tornado season in the 60 years that records have been kept. Authorities said Sunday that at least 139 people had been killed, with 39 others still unaccounted for. The tornado — an EF-5 packing 200 mph winds — also injured more than 900 people. Tallying and identifying the dead and the missing has proven a complex, delicate and sometimes confusing exercise for both authorities and loved ones. Newton County coroner Mark Bridges said most, if not all, of the people brought to the temporary morgue could be identified this weekend. He described officials there as “making real good progress.” After a mistake immediately after the storm — four people thought they had identified one person’s body, only to be wrong — authorities are relying instead on dental records, photos and unique tattoos or piercings, Bridges said. They’ve also used DNA tests in a handful of cases, he said. “We learned the hard way at the start,” he said. “It’s bad for the families.”

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Wind

A prototype airborne power turbine shroud has been developed by Altaeros Energies in Massachusetts. Several companies are pursuing designs that can capture power from some of the most powerful winds on earth, blowing thousands of feet above the surface.

Continued from A1 The question is, when? Some companies project their technology will hit the market by the middle of the decade, but Fort Felker at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory says the industry is 10 years away from making a meaningful contribution to the nation’s electricity demands. No company, for instance, has

The Associated Press

ODOT Continued from A1 The Ross Brothers case highlights some of those weaknesses. In 2008, Oregon Department of Justice lawyers filed a racketeering lawsuit that portrays Ross Brothers as making a game of bilking ODOT. Steve Ross and another top executive, Jeff Howell, even bet each other a dollar on whether the state could be convinced to pay for a questionable cost overrun, according to the suit. State investigators found evidence of padded billings, falsified payroll records and other fraudulent methods that included covering up shoddy and substandard work on ODOT bridge projects, though Ross Brothers denied wrongdoing. Steve Ross and other former Ross Brothers executives denied the state’s allegations, but refused to comment on the specifics of the case. The state dropped its suit in 2009, and in return Steve Ross dissolved his company and agreed to stop doing business personally with the state. The DOJ did not press criminal charges, nor did the state recover the money it said was stolen from ODOT. Steve Ross immediately set up a new road construction company while other former top executives of his firm, including his son, set up another company to take over Ross Brothers’ old contracts with ODOT. Garrett, the ODOT director, calls the outcome of the Ross Brothers case a victory. However, the story points to the weaknesses inherent in ODOT’s oversight of highway construction. ••• It was only through a tip from an anonymous employee that ODOT learned that Ross Brothers had apparently tricked quality inspectors on a 2007 overpass project near Ontario. The company had used plywood to camouflage the improper location of bridge pedestals, records show. Similar methods were used to hide the fact that metal straps used to stabilize an earthen retaining wall had been fastened incorrectly, creating a possible hazard. The state’s rules make it hard to ensure that taxpayers are getting their money’s worth from dishonest contractors, according to one prominent contractor. A DOJ investigative report shows that Portland construction executive Ted Aadland — who until recently served as the national president of the Association of General Contractors of America — said the state’s “system and its written rules just haven’t been strong enough to get Ross’ compliance.” Aadland said Ross had “conditioned ODOT to settle for what he gives them,” according to the report. “Ross Brothers has been very good at successfully bidding on ODOT contracts knowing that he can create (contract) change orders, pay his (subcontractors) a reduced fee and just generally make the life of the contract a living hell for those involved. Eventually his final price (for the project) is more than the highest bids of reputable higher bidding companies.” The state’s lawsuit took aim at the firm’s bidding practices, focusing on a $4.1 million 2001 contract to build a bridge in Ontario for which the firm submitted costoverrun claims of another $3.1 million. The Ross Brothers case also highlighted problems with ODOT’s reliance on outside firms to oversee companies that even

seasoned ODOT project managers had problems handling. In 2003, the Legislature approved a $2.5 billion outsourced bridge replacement program, the Oregon Transportation Investment Act. It has been common practice under the program to use private consultants and engineering firms to do the job of ODOT project managers, especially in “design-build” projects where the company delivers the entire project. The consultants like the Portland-based firm OTAK that oversee hundreds of millions worth of projects each year for ODOT do “crappy, crappy work,” ODOT’s top contract administrator, Bob Pappe, told internal auditors. “He named several firms that are known to be bad and said the list is a mile long. And ODOT keeps hiring them.” These consultant firms are not subject to the same rules as state agencies about accepting gifts from contractors. In the Ross Brothers investigation, a quality inspector for OTAK, Ned Wilson, said that Steve Ross’ son, Todd, had bought him “lunches, beers, visits to strip bars and lap dances” years before, according to a DOJ report. OTAK declined to comment on the DOJ report or on a scathing audit of another project in which the firm oversaw Ross Brothers. In 2007, a group of federal and state officials visited a Ross Brothers interchange project on Interstate 5 north of Central Point called Seven Oaks. They found that OTAK had not double-checked Ross Brothers quality testing or maintained records of oversight as required by OTAK’s contract with the state. ODOT had to step in and use its own inspectors, but never penalized OTAK for the work it had failed to do, documents show. Since then, it’s not clear how much has changed in terms of ODOT’s use of these private firms. Last year, Pappe told an internal auditor that lax oversight at Seven Oaks is “typical” of what it gets from these outside firms. Garrett, in an interview, rejected the criticism. He said the private firms managing ODOT projects have the same professional expertise as ODOT employees. In fact, he said, they are often staffed by former ODOT employees. One company that has come under scrutiny is KT Contractors, a firm whose principal owner is Rep. Kim Thatcher, R-Keizer. When the company filed a lawsuit based on cost overruns that the state refused to pay, ODOT investigated and submitted testimony that much of KT’s evidence appeared to be fabricated. Last year, citing the likelihood that the legislator’s company was under criminal investigation, Thatcher’s husband, Karl, and son invoked their right to avoid self-incrimination in a Marion County Circuit Court hearing. Asked about the case later, Karl Thatcher denied wrongdoing and said his firm was the victim of unscrupulous government officials. “We don’t trust them,” he said. ••• Like baking a cake, the recipe for asphalt on a specific road project has to be just right. ODOT relies largely on contractors to design their own asphalt mixes, which means ensuring the right blend of ingredients from the right sources such as aggregate quarries and asphalt plants. Those mix designs are submitted to the ODOT pavement materials laboratory in Salem for approval. Contractors also largely police themselves when it comes to the quality of highway construction, though sometimes they hire other

Featured in the February 17th, 2011 Bend Bulletin

private firms to help out. Both aspects of ODOT quality control have been questioned. In the materials lab, for instance, documents and several former employees raised questions about whether the lab does enough to watch contractors. In 2008, Karl Frick, an assistant pavement engineer, resigned from the ODOT materials lab. In an e-mail to the Federal Highway Administration that was obtained through the Freedom of Information Act, he cited what he considered an “unethical” failure by management to investigate possible contractor fraud and substandard asphalt on a Highway 97 overpass. Documents show other attempts by Frick to instigate investigations of quality inspector misconduct were also dismissed. Asked about the documents, Frick said that when he took the job in 2007, he found that many asphalt mix designs had not received the required level of contractor testing, particularly with respect to their “volumetric properties,” or density. Also, the contractor designs were only rarely double-checked by ODOT lab personnel, largely due to understaffing. “So much stuff had been let slide ... that I had little confidence in any of the mixes put out in recent years,” Frick said. Moreover, he added, trying to hold some contractors’ mix design technicians to the rules after they had been largely unenforced for years was “like pulling teeth.” ••• ODOT also has been criticized for its quality control oversight on highway projects. ODOT quality assurance technicians are called in to double-check contractors’ quality tests — for instance, to make sure a roadbed has been compacted sufficiently to ensure it lasts for decades, or to make sure that asphalt is dense enough to stand up to the pounding of passing trucks while remaining flexible enough to contract and expand as the weather changes. ODOT standards require state technicians to doublecheck only one out of every 10 contractor tests — far fewer than some other states do. And if ODOT project managers don’t agree with the quality verification test conducted by state employees, those managers can rely on contractor tests instead. As a result of these weak standards, ODOT “is vulnerable to contractors who fake data,” Federal Highway Administration engineer Anthony Boesen told internal auditors two years ago. Boesen, who works closely with the department, said Oregon should be doublechecking at least twice as frequently as it does now. He declined to be interviewed for this article. He was echoed by Charles Hughes, a Virginia-based expert on highway quality control who has written textbooks on the subject for the federal government. Hughes said Oregon’s infrequent testing regime opens up the possibility that friendships and cronyism will affect outcomes “simply because you don’t have enough tests to statistically verify the contractors’ results.” Unlike most states, Oregon has rejected a federal recommendation that technicians sign a statement certifying their quality test results. Hughes said such a statement would make quality standards and ethical rules easier to enforce. Moreover, the quality control specialists used by consultants to oversee the testing of some designbuild projects often lack training in the tests they are overseeing, ac-

THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 30, 2011 A3

met the basic requirement of demonstrating its turbine can safely fly unsupervised for prolonged periods of time. High-altitude wind power is similar to ground wind in the 1970s — facing questions but soon to prove its viability, said PJ Shepard of Oroville, Calif.based Sky WindPower, which is developing a “flying electric generator.” The world’s most powerful winds circulate in the jet streams, which are found four to 10 miles

off the ground and carry winds that regularly break 100 miles per hour. The dream is to eventually tap the jet streams, but high-altitude wind companies are focusing for now below a 2,000-foot ceiling, above which complex federal airspace restrictions kick in. Adam Rein, co-founder of the Boston company Altaeros Energies, said his company calculates winds at the 2,000 foot level are up to 2½ times stronger than winds that can be reached by a typical 350-

foot land turbine. Sky WindPower’s generator has four rotors, each 35 feet in diameter, that transmit power down the tether. Altaeros is developing a stationary turbine that sits inside a 60foot tall, helium-filled shroud that acts like a wind funnel. Similar blimp-like devices, called aerostats, have long been used to keep heavy equipment aloft, such as government surveillance radar tethered up to 15,000 feet above U.S. borders.

cording to an internal ODOT quality assurance audit completed last June. ODOT’s outsourced bridge unit, the Oregon Bridge Development Partners, does not require consultant quality inspectors who inspect bridge projects to receive the same certifications, or training, that their counterparts in ODOT do. Private-sector inspectors who oversee bridge construction must complete only five courses; ODOT quality inspectors must complete seven. Informed of this disparity by an internal ODOT auditor, Cole Mullis, the top quality assurance official for the state, wrote in a June 2009 e-mail that he was not aware of the reduced requirement for consultants. As for whether it’s a problem, he responded: “Yes!!! The two certifications they are not requiring are … important in performing their job functions. … and without this knowledge, I don’t feel that they can fulfill the requirements of this position.” Documents show these consultants have sometimes misinterpreted quality tests as passing when in fact they had failed. “They get taken advantage of left and right” by contractors, Frick said. However, Mullis’ supervisor, Jeff Gower, a top ODOT official who oversees construction contracts and quality control, defended the state’s quality program as sufficient. ••• ODOT’s alliance with some private-sector groups is a symbiotic one. The 2003 passage of the Oregon Transportation Improvement Act bond measure that funded bridge replacement projects is a good example. That year, a coalition that included truckers and construction contractors per-

suaded a Republican-led Legislature to back a new bridge-repair bond measure worth $2.5 billion, funded in part by higher vehicle registration and title fees. The influx of cash came with a big caveat: ODOT would have to eliminate 150 positions and use a reduced workforce to oversee the vast increase in construction work. As a result, it would have to contract out key design, engineering, and oversight work — and it would turn over the job of contracting out to a group of contractors called Oregon Bridge Delivery Partners. The creation of hundreds of higher-paying private sector jobs triggered a mass exodus of ODOT’s most qualified employees, who went to work for OBDP and other firms. But documents show the new world meant confused loyalties, particularly in the area of “designbuild” projects, the ones where ODOT hires contractors to both design and build a project in one lump contract. Cyndi Twite, a consultant hired to oversee contractors on the McKenzie River-Goshen project, sent a December 2008 e-mail to two ODOT officials to arrange a meeting with her and a colleague to discuss quality test results turned in by the contractor that failed an independent verification. “In the weird Design Build world I guess I kind of represent the contractor while still wearing an ODOT hat,” wrote Twite. In another design-build project, the Sutherlin-Roseburg section of I-5, consultant-hired quality inspector Ben Bliss sent ODOT officials an e-mail in 2005 alerting them that he’d fought to ensure good construction practices. How-

ever, he had been discouraged by his employer from requiring quality testing even when “badly needed,” adding that “if this e-mail gets to the wrong people I’m toast.” Five days later, his manager moved to fire him, and he quit. Asked about the conflict, Bliss said it was a natural outgrowth of design-build contracts, which he likened to “the fox guarding the henhouse.” Other changes have been made that further involve industry groups in ODOT affairs. No longer training its asphalt inspectors in-house, ODOT now lends its training equipment to an asphalt industry trade group, paying the industry to train the very ODOT quality inspectors who will oversee that industry. Industry representatives even sit in on interview panels of new hires in key ODOT technical positions, such as those who oversee pavement quality control efforts. Several employees say ODOT wants to get along with contractors and adopts no significant policy reform without industry signoff, for pragmatic reasons. As ODOT project manager Nathan Potter told an internal auditor: “ODOT is closely aligned with the Association of General Contractors and the American Council of Engineering Companies. … Internally, we think we need industry to get on board with ODOT to get things done.” Garrett said the success ODOT has had with its bridge replacement program, or OTIA III, shows that the department has made its partnership with industry work. “I’ll submit to you that that program is in its bell lap, and we are doing quite well in delivering that investment,” he said.


A4 Monday, May 30, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Affordable Continued from A1 Its residents must meet certain requirements before they can move in, the main ones being that they’re at least 55 years old and earn less than 60 percent of the area median income. For one person that income threshold at Discovery Park Lodge is around $22,250, and for two it’s $30,480. The median family income in Bend, according to U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development figures, is about $63,200. While the residents at Discovery Park Lodge all have their ages and incomes in common, how they wound up living at the apartment complex is as unique as they are. Some are widows. Others, like Moke, lost their homes during the recession. And there are some who are just down on their luck, including one woman who was practically homeless and living out of her car. But according to John Gilbert, one of the developers of the Discovery Park Lodge, his project almost didn’t happen, or at least would have experienced significant setbacks if it wasn’t for the city of Bend’s affordable housing fee. “We had a funding gap and the city of Bend was able to plug our funding gap,” Gilbert said. Bend’s affordable housing fee is the only one of its kind in the state. It was implemented in 2006, and charges builders one-third of 1 percent of the value of their new construction projects. So for a $200,000 home the charge would be approximately $670 that would be used for the purpose of adding more affordable housing to Bend. However, this fee is set to expire next month unless Bend City Councilors decide to extend it for another five years. If they don’t, state law will prohibit them from

CLASS Continued from A1 Wilkinson said the district’s new compensation model is not yet finalized. But the basic idea is that teachers will be divided into emerging professional, professional and advanced professional pathways, and will increase their pay by demonstrating student achievement, professional development and leadership. Right now, Bend-La Pine Schools’ salary schedule is similar to most other districts, with teachers increasing their salaries based on years in the classroom and how much education they’ve attained. “We haven’t seen any real direct correlation between those (steps) and teacher-student performance,” Wilkinson said.

New hires first The new salary schedule will at first apply only to new hires, and Wilkinson hopes to get it underway this fall. The district would maintain a parallel salary schedule for current employees until all the kinks are worked out, then eventually switch all teachers over to the new compensation model. “Some teachers will advance more quickly than they would have on the existing schedule, but an equal number will advance less quickly,” Wilkinson said. “That will all be based more in terms of their progression, their professional development, and their performance.” And Wilkinson said there are time frames built into the new schedule to prevent teachers advancing too quickly. There will be no automatic step advancements, as there are now. Once a teacher reaches the “professional” phase, he or she must stay there a minimum of three years before moving on to advanced professional. “It’s fairly stringent,” Wilkinson said. “To make the big moves there’s actually an external review process that’s part of making those high-stakes moves.” And the teacher must demonstrate students’ performance in order to move along. How that will look is not yet certain. Wilkinson is inclined to have teachers bring to the committee whatever evidence they think best demonstrates student success. “There will probably be criteria about what that evidence should look like,” he said. “The greatest gain comes when you get teachers looking at their results and figuring what they need to do differently based on what they’re seeing.” That pleases Juba, who worried the salary schedule would stay the same and teachers would be able to achieve higher pay faster than before. “My concern was that the new compensation scheme would allow us to accelerate people more quickly than in the past. Other districts have done that, they’ve

Projects Continued from A1 • Pfeifer and Associates ($60,000): Acquisition funding for a fourplex that will be used to house families in recovery from substance abuse issues • Building Partners for Affordable Housing ($500,000): Construction financing for affordable green home project • Bend Area Habitat for Humanity

($60,000): Short-term loan to provide materials to help with Brush with Kindness program to help low-income homeowners performing exterior improvements • Housing Works ($118,000): Development funding to turn transition condos in Putnam Pointe into affordable rentals • Central Oregon Veterans Outreach ($150,000): Acquisition and rehabilitation money to provide independent living for disabled veterans

implementing the fee again in the future. Bend Affordable Housing Manager Jim Long doesn’t want that to happen. He calls the affordable housing fee one of the best tools he’s seen in his 25 years of work in the field. It’s been especially effective in Bend, he said, particularly when home prices were skyrocketing and cheap rentals were hard to find. While home prices have fallen to what many would call affordable levels, he said there’s still a need to give people with low income a chance at ownership. “Your minimum wage worker is not going to be able to buy a house,” Long said. “Yes, we have a bunch of houses under $300,000, but how is your barista going to afford that?” There’s also what he calls a dearth of rentals in Bend, saying the vacancy rate is between 3.5 and 5.5 percent, which is less than the U.S. historical average of 7 percent. This makes adding more affordable rentals a priority. Since its inception, the city has collected about $2.7 million through its affordable housing fee. In that time it has doled out about $2.1 million to about a dozen projects, mainly through short-term, low interest construction loans, though longer-term development

loans are not uncommon. Among other things, these loans have been used to help Habitat Humanity with building projects, buy homes for families who are recovering from substance abuse problems and provide independent living quarters for disabled veterans. The fee was also used to help an affordable condominium project at Putnam Pointe in downtown Bend that had gone awry for Redmondbased Housing Works. That agency initially intended to sell the condos to people making 120 percent of the area median income, but at the time the market had dipped considerably and whatever demand existed was gone. After an unsuccessful attempt in 2009 to auction off the condos and avoid defaulting on a construction loan, Housing Works and its partners then decided it would be better to convert the top floor into affordable rentals using $118,000 in affordable housing fees. In a number of cases, the city’s contribution to affordable housing fee projects is relatively minimal. It doesn’t cover the entire cost of the project. But for places like the Discovery Park Lodge and others, that little boost is sometimes all it takes to make a project go. Like many affordable housing projects, the margins for building an apartment complex or home

maintained the current salary schedule and let people skip some columns and steps,” he said. “But what we’re doing is different.” While Wilkinson and Juba are confident that Bend-La Pine’s new compensation model will work, they’re less impressed by other CLASS districts’ models. “I’m concerned about some that are simply tweaking the existing system,” Wilkinson said. “The dollars available are largely out of our control. ... The thing is we know we can’t create a system that is expecting more money in compensation. It has to be a system recognizing teachers advancing for student achievement.” In Sherwood, the district chose to change its salary schedule to something called a leap schedule. Wilkinson said he wouldn’t support that in Bend-La Pine Schools. In a leap schedule, the salary schedule remains the same but teachers can do various things to skip steps on the schedule and move to a higher salary more quickly. Dan Jamison, the vice president of education policy for The Chalkboard Project, is the former Sherwood superintendent who oversaw the implementation of that district’s new compensation model. He said districts have in some cases struggled to pay for the new initiatives in the midst of state budget cuts. “We ask our districts to keep an eye on sustainability,” he said. “There is no more difficult economic context than there is today and so, in a way, it is good that we are all looking through this more rigorous lens of stewardship and accountability.” In Sherwood, Jamison said, the district created a 15-year financial model that examined the age of all staff to figure out their progression through the new pay scale. The model identified the most expensive possible plan: What would happen if all teachers achieved the maximum allowable acceleration through the pay scale? The answer: “In the most expensive years on a very long, longitudinal study, the greatest amount would have been 1 percent of the total operating budget,” Jamison said. “If we know that if we spend that much additional money and in return we have greatly increased student achievement and satisfied teachers ... is that investment (worthwhile)? The answer in Sherwood is yes.” The operating budget in Sherwood in 2010-11 was about $37 million. Bend-La Pine Schools has the benefit of a five-year federal Teacher Incentive Fund grant that will allow funding to remain steady at least for the next four school years. The TIF grant is a federal research project that will provide incentive pay to schools to determine whether increased compensation correlates with how well students perform. Of the 12 BendLa Pine schools in the study, half

will serve as a control group with all teachers receiving a 1 percent salary increase. The other half will serve as a test group. Those schools will operate a value-added schoolwide model, in which entire schools will be paid based partly on whether their students are moving to or beyond their expected growth level.

Measuring effectiveness Teachers will also be paid based on their effectiveness in the classroom. Details of how that will be measured are still being determined, and that program is temporary, while the new compensation model will be a permanent addition to the district. The research will go on for four years, then the funding will end. “I think that the beauty of the both the TIF and the CLASS Project is it gives enough of a window of time for teachers and administrators to learn what is working and then to choose at the end of the grant what they want to maintain because they see it as the biggest bang for the buck,” Jamison said. And, Jamison said, there are other sources of federal funding that districts might use in the future to continue funding their new compensation models. Title II dollars go through the state’s department of education and on to districts, traditionally to pay for cutting class sizes or funding professional development and training for teachers. But Title II funds can also be used on new compensation models, and so districts could shift the Title II funds they receive to pay for the compensation models they’re introducing. While Bend-La Pine continues to finalize the details of its new compensation model, Juba said there are still questions. He’s glad the district doesn’t plan to switch all teachers over to the new salary schedule. The

are precariously thin so the developer is able to keep costs down for future tenants. In the case of the Discovery Park Lodge, the city contributed only $275,000 in affordable housing fees despite the project costing more than $10 million. But that relatively small amount, according to Gilbert, is what made the project feasible because he wasn’t going to raise as much money as initially thought with state and federal tax credits he had received. The Discovery Park Lodge project had also received other incentives as well, including a 20-year property tax abatement from the city and school district. Long says the city’s affordable housing fee also provides an intangible, yet measurable, benefit as well, and over the past five years said it has brought more than $22.7 million in state and federal funds. The reason for this, he said, is because the state and federal governments tend to support projects that also have a financial commitment from a local government. It makes it cheaper, he said. He also believes its one of the reasons Bend received about $2.5 million in competitive Neighborhood Stabilization Program funds that were allocated to help people buy foreclosed properties. The entire state received $6.8 million of those federal dollars. “Having this in your hip pocket as a source of local match is like having Alex Rodriguez be able to play on your city league softball team,” Long said. “It gives us such an advantage. It puts us head and shoulders above everybody else.” The affordable housing fee has also helped put some builders back to work. Tim Knopp is the executive vice president of the Central Oregon Builders Association. His group vehemently opposed implementing the affordable housing fee, the argument being that by tacking on

challenge, he said, is figuring out how to transition all teachers, and whether that will require financial incentives to get current teachers to accept the new plan. “My concerns are, is it a model that’s sustainable over the long term?” he said. “And two ... I really believe the new evaluation system is a foundation for everything we do, but is this new compensation system and the evaluations that we’re going to put into place, are those going to allow us to remove teachers with poor performance more easily than the current system?” First, Juba said, the district must give all teachers the tools they need to see if they can be good at their jobs, and give them serious evaluations. But some, he said, probably won’t be good enough. So will the new evaluation system be a tool for getting rid of teachers who just don’t perform? “How do we move them along? I don’t see that in our current system in a substantial way. We get rid of a teacher here and there, but just for not being good instructors we don’t seem to be able to move them along,” he said. But with a new evaluation process and a new salary schedule based on student achievement instead of years in the classroom and education levels, Juba believes more teachers who are not meeting high standards will voluntarily leave the district. Juba said the funding could get dicey if the district chooses to continue the incentive program introduced by the TIF grant. “If all our schools are 90th percentile and all our teachers are getting good performance reviews ... if they do that year in and year out then you do have to pay out and how do we do that?” he said. “But that would actually be a good problem to have.” Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 30, 2011 A5 another charge it made all homes less affordable. But after the fee was implemented, COBA formed an offshoot nonprofit called Building Partners for Affordable Housing. Since then it has received $645,000 in loans from the affordable housing fee. Of that, $500,000 is being used to help build green homes in a subdivision in southeast Bend that are expected to sell for under $200,000 and are designed to serve families earning between 80 percent and 100 percent of median income. Standing on the construction site of that project last week, Knopp looked around at the contractors, roofers and plumbers who were building three homes and noted that many of those individuals hadn’t been busy in a long time. “By doing this we expanded the ability to put people back to work,” Knopp said. “Ultimately, I think this will be one of the most successful stimulus programs in Bend.” Mike Knighten is one those people who has benefited from being able to work on the Building Partners for Affordable Housing project. During the building boom he was constructing 10 to 15 homes in a year. The home he’s working on now, however, is the first he’s done in more than two years. In the interim, Knighten has survived with meager earnings from remodeling work. His home went into foreclosure and he has moved into a duplex owned by his father to save money. “The builders got hurt in the recession and I’m not different,” Knighten said from inside the shell of a future 1,750 square-foot green home. “This is getting my feet back on the ground and giving me a new start.” Even with the job creation, Knopp is cautious about the city’s affordable housing fee. He still doesn’t like the fee as it operates today, but said he and COBA

Coins Continued from A1 The law is the first of its kind in the U.S. Several other states, including Minnesota, Idaho and Georgia, have considered similar laws. “This is an incremental step in the right direction,” said Lowell Nelson, the interim coordinator for the Campaign for Liberty in Utah, a libertarian group rooted in Ron Paul’s presidential campaign. “If the federal government isn’t going to do it, then we here in Utah ought to be able to establish a monetary system that would survive a crash if and when that happens.” The Constitution says no state shall coin money, though Hilton and some others argue that a phrase used later, saying no state shall “make anything but gold and silver coin a tender in payment of debts” can be read as a license for Utah’s new law. For all the excitement, so far, it is hard to find anyone who is using gold or silver to buy anything. But here in Farr West, about 40 miles north of Salt Lake City, there is at least some precedent for such transactions. Decades ago, the rambling Smith and Edwards store had a special sale, offering a very

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444

would likely support it if the city enacted the proposed changes that the Affordable Housing Committee suggested. Some of these modifications include setting a limit on how much a single project can be charged in affordable housing fees and setting a limit on how much money can be collected in the fund to make sure it doesn’t start competing with private lenders. It’s unclear what Bend city councilors will decide to do with the affordable housing fee. During a discussion about it on May 18, Councilor Tom Greene, a realtor, was skeptical about continuing to impose a fee when home prices are so low. New city councilor Scott Ramsay also voiced some opposition to renewing the fee. Adding another wrinkle to this debate is that if one councilor votes against extending the fee it goes away. The reason for this is the timing of the fee’s expiration is forcing the city to declare an emergency to pass it. In those situations, the council must unanimously approve whatever is before it. Gilbert, the Discovery Park Lodge developer, is one person who hopes the council decides to pass the ordinance and extend the fee. He said the outside funds the fee helps to leverage is invaluable, especially when it comes to affordable housing. And while the market is down now, and it appears home values are scraping along the ground where anyone might be able to afford a home no matter their income, he notes that everything in real estate is cyclical. “Four years from now the market could be on fire again,” Gilbert said. “We’re talking about a policy now that transcends changes in the market.” Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

favorable rate if people made purchases with “junk silver” dollars and half dollars. In the 1980s, the store sold a man a $1,200 air compressor for a little less than 4 ounces of gold, recalled Bert Smith, one of the owners, who is now 91. “I don’t suppose there’s going to be a big run on it,” Smith said, “because people are going to hang on to their gold and silver more than ever.” Wayne Scholle, the marketing director for Old Glory Mint, in Spanish Fork, Utah, showed off a commemorative silver coin the company made honoring the new law, one he said he hoped could be a model for a future state-minted coin. The front — or obverse — includes an image representing “the miracle of the gulls,” an important story in Mormon folklore in which seagulls are said to have suddenly appeared and eaten insects that were destroying the first crops Mormon settlers raised, a year after arriving in Utah in 1847.

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A6 Monday, May 30, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Inside

MT. BACHELOR Pond-skimming closes spring season, see Page B2. OREGON Judge finds state’s mortgage practices ‘troubling’, see Page B3. OBITUARIES Army lineman Joe Steffy dies at 85, see Page B5.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MAY 30, 2011

Best

How do you elect a new chief?

blog

Wasco officials searching history for method used to refill lifelong position

of the Excerpts of last week’s posts to Politics & Policy, The Bulletin’s Salem weblog on state government.

When things get dirty at the Capitol, literally • Posted Tuesday by Lauren Dake Rep. Mitch Greenlick, D-Portland, said the e-mail he sent Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Bend, was “unfortunate.” “I said those things when I was angry,” Greenlick said. Here’s the dirt: Greenlick was pushing to make jory soil the state’s official soil. Telfer, along with several other senators, voted the measure down. It finally passed last Monday, but Telfer stood by her vote. Jory soil is predominantly found in the Willamette Valley. “Jory soil, I believe, represents a small part of the state; it doesn’t represent the east side of the mountains,” said Telfer, pictured. “On the east side, people are sick of people from the Valley running the show, dictating what the state is or what it represents. It’s not representative of the entire state of Oregon.” Beyond voting the measure down in the earlier vote, a heated debate surrounded the measure and its chief sponsor, Greenlick. It prompted Sen. Larry George, R-Sherwood, to release a statement about Greenlick and his personality, summing up the debate with, “One member has hijacked the entire process by holding good policy bills hostage, all to demand passage of a pet bill with zero policy impact.” Greenlick’s e-mail to Telfer told her he would do everything he could to kill a bill she’s pushing. That bill would help create a pilot program in Central Oregon to facilitate a regional health council. Greenlick has since backpedaled. “I was never going to kill it,” he said. He said he had worked hard for Telfer on her bill. “It hurt that something important to me was being laughed off,” he said.

By Eric Hidle The Bulletin

Tribal leaders are looking to the past for the proper way to elect a replacement for the longest serving chief in the history of the Wasco people. But with their last election held over 50 years ago, there are few in the tribe who remember how the election should be held. Add to that a cultural impetus to honor traditional ways and you find that the tribe is taking their time in doing things the right way. “The Indian people are ancient and we like to do things in ancient ways, but the people who know the ancient ways are getting fewer and fewer,” said Mike Clements, a member of the tribal business department. “I can tell you right now

we don’t know the way we will elect a new chief.” The role of chief is a relatively new position among the tribes. Clements said there have been only three men in the history of the Wascos to be called chief. Historically, the tribe had headmen who worked together to establish order. The Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, made up of the Paiyute, Warm Springs and Wasco people, first established a Tribal Government in 1938. As it stands now, the 11-member council is represented by two elected councilors and one lifetime chief from the Paiyute, three councilors and a chief from the Warm Springs and three councilors and a chief from the Wasco. See Wasco / B2

Confederated Tribes representatives Council members are elected for three-year terms while chiefs serve life terms.

Simnasho District One chief, three representatives Warm Springs chief: Delvis Heath Representatives: Ron Suppah (vice council chairman) Raymond Tsumpti Sr. Olney Patt Jr. Maupin 216

Warm Springs Indian Reservation

197

Simnasho Kah-Nee-Ta

Warm Springs Madras

Agency District One chief, three representatives Wasco chief: Vacant, last held by Nelson Wallulatum Representatives: Stanley'Buck' Smith Jr. (council chairman) Eugene 'Austin' Greene Jr. Lola Sohappy

Seekseekqua District One chief, two representatives Paiute chief: Joseph Moses Representatives: Scott Moses Rueben Henry Greg Cross / The Bulletin

The Decemberists

Watch for more blog updates at www .bendbulletin.com /politicsblog.

IN BRIEF Cool, wet weather continues this week The unseasonably cool, wet weather shows no sign of letting up this week. Anne Adams, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Pendleton, said spring showers and cloudy skies are expected to stick around for the next week. “It’s just those spring showers we can’t quite shake loose yet,” she said. Today, Memorial Day picnics and cookouts might be marred by some afternoon showers, with highs hitting the mid-50s and morning sunny skies turning into a rainy, cloudy evening, with overnight lows between 34 and 39 degrees. The rest of the week is expected to be more of the same. Skies are expected to remain mostly cloudy throughout the week, with afternoon and evening rain showers. There is a chance for evening thunderstorms as well, with overnight lows sitting in the 30s. On Wednesday and Thursday daytime high temperatures could increase a bit to the lower 60s. “It’s very slowly edging its way up,” Adams said. Over the weekend, Central Oregonians can expect slight chances of showers with daytime highs reaching the lower 60s, and the likelihood of rain increasing in the evenings. — From staff reports

More local briefing, plus News of Record, on Page B2.

HOW TO CO N TAC T Your state legislators SENATE Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Dist. 27 Phone: 503-986-1727 E-mail: sen.christelfer@state.or.us Sen. Doug Whitsett, R-Dist. 28 Phone: 503-986-1728 E-mail: sen.dougwhitsett@state.or.us Sen. Ted Ferrioli, R-Dist. 30 Phone: 503-986-1950 E-mail: sen.tedferrioli@state.or.us

HOUSE

Kitzhaber backs bill supporting tribal cops • Posted Thursday by Lauren Dake Gov. John Kitzhaber is throwing his weight behind a bill that would give tribal police officers more authority off reservations. The Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs wants Senate Bill 412 passed. But the Oregon State Sheriff’s Association has been as vocal in their opposition. The governor wrote in a letter he thinks the bill will improve public safety in Oregon. He said the state just celebrated the 15th anniversary that formalized the relationship the state has with the nine federally recognized tribes. The governor’s letter continued, “It is clear today that we must work together to develop mutual respect for the sovereign interest of the tribes and the state of Oregon.” The Sheriff’s Association said the bill would make tribal cops the most powerful in the state because they would be able to go off tribal lands but nontribal cops would not have any authority on the reservations. Sen. Ted Ferrioli, R-John Day, said what makes this issue so interesting is tribal members have citizen rights in tribal areas, and they are also citizens of the state of Oregon, but non-Indians do not have rights on tribal land. “We have certain limitations relative to nations within a nation. It’s not within legislative authority to convey certain police powers on Indian lands.” The Senate Rules Committee voted the bill out of committee Thursday. It now heads to the full Senate for a vote.

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Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

D

ecemberists frontman Colin Meloy interacts with the crowd while performing Sunday evening at the Les Schwab Amphitheater in Bend. Ween — an alternative rock band from Pennsylvania — is the next act scheduled to perform as part of the Les Schwab Amphitheater’s

Summer Concert Series on July 2.

Oregonian appointed to Measure 8 key to PERS problem, attorney says BLM’s wild horse board GOVERNMENT REFORM

By Andrew Clevenger The Bulletin

By Scott Hammers

ity of any changes, are themselves PERS members. Bend attorney Dan Re read“It’s the classic case of the ily admits it’ll be a “big mess” fox guarding the henhouse,” if he manages to prevail in his he said. “It’s not as though lawsuit taking on the Oregon these are bad people, but when Public Employees Reit’s your financial intirement System. terest, your family is Re, 62, spends most going to be impacted, of his working week your decision-makproviding legal ading is going to be vice on estate planaffected.” ning and tax law. Introduced in 1946, But in recent years, PERS was opened puzzled by the anto state legislators nual ritual of state Dan Re in 1975, then to state legislators pledging judges in 1983. Over to reform PERS but time, promised benlargely failing to do so, Re be- efits for retirees have grown gan digging into the history faster than PERS investment behind the program. funds, forcing the state and The problem, he concluded, local governments to divert a may be relatively simple — the larger and larger share of revlegislators who could change enues to keeping the program the system, and the judges afloat. who would rule on the legalSee Re / B2 The Bulletin

WASHINGTON — Even as a child growing up in a remote corner of Oregon, Jim Stephenson knew that a balance had to be struck between the animals he encountered and the environment that supported them. He still recalls seeing a wide area that had been stripped of all vegetation by the herd of a Bureau of Land Management permittee while he was out hunting deer with his father near the Oregon End Ranch south of Fields. “You have to think of all the resources out there, and try to maintain what you can,” his father told him. As a new appointee to the BLM’s National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board specializing in natural resource management, Stephenson hopes to put those early

lessons into practice. “Keeping things in balance with the ecosystem is my major goal, and I think that should be BLM’s goal, too,” he said in a recent interview. “I’ve spent my whole life trying to balance wildlife populations with the habitat. And I think it’s really important that we do that with wild horses as well.” Stephenson, 70, had an outdoor childhood that’s hard to imagine for many people these days. Much of it was spent in a sod house on the southern end of the Steens Mountain, where his father mined cinnabar. It was more than 120 miles north to Burns and south to Winnemucca, Nev. “When I think about it nowadays, it’s probably one of the remotest places in the U.S.,” he said. “There were three families when I grew up there.” See Stephenson / B5

Rep. Gene Whisnant, R-Dist. 53 Phone: 503-986-1453 E-mail: rep.genewhisnant@state.or.us Rep. Jason Conger, R-Dist. 54 Phone: 503-986-1454 E-mail: rep.jasonconger@state.or.us Rep. Mike McLane, R-Dist. 55 Phone: 503-986-1455 E-mail: rep.mikemclane@state.or.us Rep. John Huffman, R-Dist. 59 Phone: 503-986-1459 E-mail: rep.johnhuffman@state.or.us

HOW TO SUBMIT Letters and submissions: • Mail: My Nickel’s Worth or In My View, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 • E-mail: bulletin@bendbulletin.com • More details inside this section. Civic Calendar notices: • E-mail: news@bendbulletin.com • Please write “Civic Calendar” in the subject line and include a contact name and daytime phone number. School news and Teen Feats: • E-mail notices of general interest to smiller@bendbulletin.com. • E-mail announcements of a student’s academic achievements to youth@bendbulletin.com. • More details: The Bulletin’s Local Schools page publishes Wednesday in this section. Obituaries and death notices: • Mail: Obituaries, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 • E-mail: obits@bendbulletin.com • More details inside this section. Births, engagements, marriages and anniversaries: • Mail information to Milestones, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708, within one month of the celebration. • More details: Milestones publishes in Sunday’s Community Life section.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

B2 Monday, May 30, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

ENDING WITH A SPLASH

L B  

The ninth annual North American Pond-Skimming Championships drew a crowd in spite of the chilly weather on Sunday, as Mt. Bachelor celebrated its final day of the spring season with a variety of events. Josh Cook, left, dressed as “Doctor Good,� won the pond-skimming contest — skiing on one foot in the second round. With his first-place finish, Cook took home a season pass for next winter. Prizes were also awarded for best costume and best wipeout.

Bulletin staff reports

Woman hurt after fall from moving vehicle A 23-year-old woman was injured after she fell out of a Chevrolet Blazer on Saturday night. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to a call in Sunriver around 2:20 a.m. Sunday. According to a news release, 23-year-old driver Robert Reynolds told deputies that 23year-old Liberty Ramsey had

been riding in the front right passenger seat when she fell out of the vehicle on Lazy River Drive. Ramsey, a Sunriver resident, was not wearing her seat belt. Airlink transported Ramsey to St. Charles Bend with injuries. Reynolds is not under investigation for driving under the influence of intoxicants, although the news release states alcohol was likely a factor in Ramsey’s fall from the vehicle.

N  R CIVIL SUITS Filed May 16

11CV0372AB: MidFirst Bank v. Palo Desert Development LLC, Mike Chase and Linda Chase, complaint, principal judgement, $1,325,044.09; pre-judgement interest, $79,872.26; costs and disbursements, $6,071.26; attorney fees, $80,550.91 11CV0373MA: John Deere Landscapes Inc. v. Frank Israel Landscape, Frank Israel and Denise Israel, complaint, principal judgement, $7,550.53; total interest to date, $4,629.55; attorney fees, $1,000; costs, $277.50; treble damages, $1,500 Filed May 18

11CV0374MA: Ray Klein Inc. v. Alex Beard and Helen H. Beard aka Hope H. Beard aka Helen Higginbotham, complaint, $11,273.11 11CV0375AB: Capital One Bank N.A. v. Jeffrey S. Hoggard, complaint, $28,334.86 11CV0376MA: Livingston Financial LLC v. Dan Smith, complaint, $11,955.05 11CV0377AB: Discover Bank v. Harold L. Whitney and Denise C. Whitney, complaint, $11,912.45 Filed May 19

11CV0378ST: Metlife Home Loans v. Unknown heirs and devisees of Harold L. James deceased; Ramona Wulzen; the estate of Harold L. James deceased; United States of America, Secretary of Housing and Urban Development; and persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title, lien or interest in the property described in the complaint herein, complaint, principal, $337,838.37; interest, $28,251.29; attorney fees, $2,250 11CV0379MA: Financial Freedom Acquisition LLC v. Yvonne St. Clair aka Yvonne St. Clain successor trustee or unknown successor trustee of the Frank Morrell Living Trust UTD September 25, 2007; the United States of America, Secretary of Housing and Urban Development; and persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title, lien or interest in the property described

in the complaint herein, complaint, principal, $153,062.91; interest, $10,640.72 and attorney fees, $2,250 11CV0380AB: Kellie Brown-Bottino v. Michael J. Bewley, complaint, noneconomic damages, $30,000, economic damages, $17,690.33 11CV0381MA: Day, Vengley & Associates LLC v. Pixelsilk, Inc fka XAGG Inc., complaint, $21,380.00 Filed May 20

11CV0382MA: Asset Acceptance LLC v. Darci Bright, complaint, $19,811.94 11CV0383MA: Portfolio Recovery Associates LLC v. George S. Mendoza, complaint, $10,291.00 11CV0384MA: Portfolio Recovery Associates LLC v. Karen R. Bundy, complaint, $21,108.84 Filed May 23

11CV0385AB: Ryder Gauteraux dba Outlaw Productions v. Northwest Rodeo Association Inc. dba Northwest Professional Rodeo Association, complaint, Count 1, 2 and 3, $47,499 plus interest; Count 4-9 and 11, $10,000; Count 10, $60,024 plus $30,012 for each year 2011, 2012 and 2013 until legal proceedings are concluded 11CV0386SF: Courtney N. Miller v. Virginia A. Degarmo, complaint, $48,000 11CV0387ST: Dynamic Strategies Inc. v. Buddy L. Pinz aka Buddy Pinz, complaint, $16,731.96 11CV0388AB: Portfolio Recovery Associates v. Carla R. Smith, complaint, $10,464.78 11CV0389ST: Tim Haveman v. Amerititle Inc. and Steve Scott Realtors, complaint, $429,733.20 11CV0390AB: Village Properties LLC v. Pamela A. Cooper, complaint, $211,734.36 11CV0391SF: Home Federal Bank v. Michael L. Cappy, complaint, $28,156.80 Filed May 25

11CV0395ST: Credit Associates Inc. v. Lori R. Boyd and Ronald S. Boyd, complaint, $150,447.38

Joan of Arc burned at the stake in 1431 The Associated Press Today is Monday, May 30, the 150th day of 2011. There are 215 days left in the year. This is Memorial Day. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On May 30, 1911, the first Indy 500 (originally called the “International Sweepstakesâ€?) took place at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway; the winner was Ray Harroun, who drove a Marmon Wasp for more than 6½ hours at an average speed of 74.6 mph and collected a prize of $10,000. ON THIS DATE In 1431, Joan of Arc, condemned as a heretic, was burned at the stake in Rouen, France. In 1806, future president Andrew Jackson killed Charles Dickinson in a duel with pistols that left Jackson seriously wounded. In 1922, the Lincoln Memorial was dedicated in a ceremony attended by President Warren Harding, Chief Justice William Howard Taft and Robert Todd Lincoln. In 1958, unidentified American service members killed in World War II and the Korean War were interred in the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National

Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin

T O D AY IN HISTORY Cemetery. In 1961, Rafael Trujillo, longtime ruler of the Dominican Republic, was assassinated. In 1971, the American space probe Mariner 9 blasted off from Cape Kennedy, Fla. on a journey to Mars. In 2005, American teenager Natalee Holloway was last seen leaving a bar in Aruba with three young men before disappearing; her fate remains unknown. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Pro and College Football Hall of Famer Gayle Sayers is 68. Actor Colm Meaney is 58. Country singer Wynonna Judd is 47. Rock musician Tom Morello (Audioslave; Rage Against The Machine) is 47. Movie director Antoine Fuqua is 46. Rock musician Patrick Dahlheimer (Live) is 40. Actor Trey Parker is 39. Rapper Cee-Lo is 37. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “For happiness one needs security, but joy can spring like a flower even from the cliffs of despair.� — Anne Morrow Lindbergh, American writer (1906-2001)

Wasco Continued from B1 “The Wasco people first put in place a chief around 1932 and the first council was in 1936,� Clements said. “Looking back, we come to learn that only three in that role of chief have served.� George Meachum served as Wasco chief until his death in 1942. An 11-year span passed until Joe McCorkle was elected in 1953. After McCorkle’s death in 1958, the tribes elected Nelson Wallulatum in 1959, and he served until his death on June 13, 2010. Wallulatum served not only as a statesmen for the Confederated Tribes of Warm

Re Continued from B1 Central to Re’s legal efforts is ballot Measure 8, approved by Oregon voters in 1994. The first statewide initiative backed anti-tax activist and two-time gubernatorial candidate Bill Sizemore, Measure 8 was challenged by the Oregon State Police Officers Association and overturned by the state Supreme Court in 1996. The measure sought a number of changes to PERS, including the elimination of the minimum 8 percent annual return, the use of unused sick leave to pad a public employee’s compensation in their final year before retirement, and the “pickup� — the practice of public employers paying both theirs and the employee’s contribution to the retirement system. Under any other circumstances, Re (pronounced Ray) believes the judges who overturned Measure 8 would have recognized the conflict of interest and removed themselves from the case. Their failure to do so effectively nullifies the action, he said, meaning Measure 8 was not legitimately overturned, and is still in effect today. Last year, Re went to the state Tax Court to seek a property tax refund on this assumption, claiming he was due a refund equal to the pickup — six percent of salary for most public employees, seven percent of salary for judges. The case was rejected, and Re has since dropped it to pursue a new suit.

Springs but also as a keeper of culture, tradition and knowledge. His final headdress was adorned of 96 feathers, each Chief Nelson one earned, Wallulatum each an honor, representing an accomplishment he had helped secure for the tribes. Louie Pitt, government affairs director for the tribes, said the role of chief is to be a caretaker of history. “The role is to represent the Wasco tribe for decisions anywhere,� Pitt said. “They are expected to be the representative on the council and also in Salem or in Washington

The new suit, filed in the Oregon Court of Appeals earlier this month, argues for the reinstatement of all three planks of Measure 8, again pointing to the conflict of interest of the judges that overturned the ballot measure. In the next few weeks, Re expects to file for the case to be heard not by the Court of Appeals judges — who are PERS beneficiaries — but by a panel of private attorneys who do not have a financial stake in the outcome. Re concedes he will probably have to take his case to federal court to prevail, and even if he does, he’s not sure what should happen then. In theory, the reinstatement of Measure 8 would obligate public employees to refund hundreds of millions of dollars to their employers, Re said, something he doesn’t consider realistic. As called for under Measure 8, the guaranteed 8 percent annual return has been eliminated for all but the most senior public employees, but further changes would not be without pain. Eliminating the pickup could save government employers up to $750 million every two years, but the savings would come out of the take-home pay of public employees. Re said bringing back Measure 8 may not be the right approach. The judges who overturned it weren’t necessarily faulty in their legal reasoning, he said, or wrongly using their positions to enrich themselves. They’re just the wrong people to be making such a decision.

D.C. They are to speak for the tribes on matters and also to educate folks about the Wasco ways and belief systems. One of the main functions the great Chief Nelson Wallulatum created for himself was to be a constitutional know-it-all. That was a tool he used to help. The role is also ceremonial and to be present at some funerals, run life events, be present at first kill ceremonies, teach the language, teach songs and dances and show how to live a way of life.� Wallulatum will be mourned for a full year before an election is held. But as that date approaches, Clements continues to dig into the past. He said there are a couple of residents who were alive during the last election and he is working on learning from them the

“In order to have fair bargaining, both sides have to be represented. Since 1975, the people of Oregon have been excluded from the lawmaking part and since 1983, they’ve been excluded from everything,� Re said. “All of the decisions are made by PERS members.� Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@ bendbulletin.com.

BendSpineandPain.com (541) 647-1646

process of electing a chief. He has a group helping him dig into archives to determine the process as well. Who is eligible to vote is another complication. Bloodlines may need to be properly determined and a limit may need to be set for what percentage of Wasco blood allows someone to vote. “We need to do this in a respectful way and give it serious consideration,� Clements said. “We’ve had four meetings on it so far but we’ve ended up at a standstill right now. We’re at the point of not knowing what to do. But we will continue to work on it and talk about it.� Erik Hidle can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at ehidle@ bendbulletin.com

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O Tribes honor veterans on Memorial Day By Lori Tobias The Oregonian

GRAND RONDE — Moments before Jeff Larsen and Andrew Freeman pulled up to the West Valley Veterans Memorial to complete their somber task, the sky clouded, a sudden wind chilled the air and soon the raindrops came. The two members of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde stepped out into the gray and lowered each of the wind-snapped flags around the black granite memorial to half staff. Memorial Day was still a week away, but on this Monday afternoon, Larsen and Freeman were honoring one of their own. The night before, Marcellus “Marce” Norwest, 82, had lost a long battle with an enemy he couldn’t defeat, cancer. The tribe will add the names of 27 veterans to its memorial

in its annual Memorial Day observance, and they’ll remember, too, the Korean War veteran who started it all. “Marce was behind making the memorial happen,” said Steve Bobb Sr., the designer of the memorial and a tribal council member. “He had the idea we needed to honor community veterans. That started the ball rolling. It drug on for a few years, but he hung in there and hung in there.” First came the fundraising — $500,000 worth. They raised it the old-fashioned way, through spaghetti feeds, yard sales and can collections. It was as big a task as any of the committee members had tackled, and just keeping a chairman was a challenge. “They’d say, ‘I’ll be on the committee but I’m not chairing it,’ said tribal council vice-chairman Reynold Leno, laughing at the memory. “Marce would

always get frustrated and scold them.” In 2002, a good seven years after Norwest first began pushing the idea, construction on the memorial, named “Hail to the Brave” began. The black granite was shipped from India, polished in Italy and engraved in Oregon. The base rises 30 inches from the ground and has four quadrants of colored stone. “If you looked at it from the air, you’d see it looks like a medicine wheel,” said Bobb. Four 12,000-pound, 12-foot tall columns represent each branch of the military and plaques along the handrail list each of the wars or conflicts since WWII. There are eight flags, one each for the United States, Oregon, the tribe, POW/MIAs, the Air Force, Army, Navy and Marines. At its center are a native man

and woman dressed in traditional regalia. He carries a shield and a war club. She holds a feather to the sky. Two features make the memorial different from many others, Bobb said. “It represents men and women as equals on the battlefield,” he said. “And it is a living memorial. You don’t have to be gone.” They dedicated the memorial in 2003, starting with about 1,700 names of veterans from Grand Ronde, Willamina and Sheridan. The list is now up to about 2,200. Veterans who are also tribal members are designated as such with the engraving of a feather by their name. “We have people out there looking at it all the time,” said Leno. “A lot of them have been to Washington, D.C. They say, ‘This is one of the most beautiful memorials we’ve seen.’”

O  B Yamhill sheriff’s deputy arrested McMINVILLE — A deputy with the Yamhill County Sheriff’s Office has been arrested and placed on administrative leave. The (Salem) Statesman Journal reports that Deputy Steve Wilkinson is facing charges of first-degree criminal mistreatment, plus third- and fourth-degree assault, but no further details of the allegations were immediately available. An investigation by Oregon State Police led to Wilkinson’s arrest on Thursday. He has since been released pending his arraignment. The 48-year-old from Newberg has worked with the sheriff’s office for nearly six years. An internal investigation by the sheriff’s office is ongoing.

Eugene high-tech firm eas such as health care. outsources to Vietnam Frozen-food maker EUGENE — A high-tech com- expanding in Oregon pany says it will move most of the production work remaining in its Eugene operations to Vietnam and lay off 125 people in the next six months. The Eugene Register-Guard reports that’s about a third of Datalogic’s Eugene work force. Operations such as research and development, marketing, finance and logistics are to stay in Eugene. The company, based in Italy, said it made the move to cut labor and materials costs and to be better placed to do business in China and other Asian nations. The company designs and builds barcode scanners for food and retail applications mainly. Recently it has branched into ar-

WHITE CITY — Organic frozen-food maker Amy’s Kitchen is poised to expand its Oregon operations with the construction of a new warehouse and freezer unit in White City. The development is the Petaluma, Calif.-based company’s first significant expansion in the state since it opened its production facility five years ago. Chief Operating Officer Scott Reed tells the (Medford) Mail Tribune that Amy’s is consolidating raw materials and finished goods storage at the 50-acre site. The construction will also allow the company to ship directly by rail from its own campus by adding a spur to the adjacent rail line.

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State employment agency laying off 39 GRANTS PASS — A southwest Oregon employment agency is cutting nearly half its workers. The Job Council helps connect unemployed people with job training and services in Josephine and Jackson counties. Executive director Jim Fong said his staff is expected to shrink from 89 to 50 employees. Fong says that of 17,700 people who collected unemployment benefits in the two counties last year and more people who are underemployed or gave up their search for work, 14,500 got help from the Job Council. Fong says he’s talked with state representatives in an effort to keep the Legislature informed on the value of the programs. — From wire reports

Judge: Oregon’s mortgage practices ‘deeply troubling’ By Brent Hunsberger The Oregonian

PORTLAND — The foreclosure fight in Oregon jumped to a new level last week after a federal judge in Medford rebuked the industry’s sloppy practices in blocking the seizure of a Jacksonville home, and mortgage issuers turned to the Legislature to find a quick fix to the legal quagmire. U.S. District Judge Owen Panner questioned whether big banks should be allowed to foreclose without court supervision — as required in 23 states but not Oregon, where one in every 500 homes is in foreclosure, according to Realty Trac Inc. That’s compared with one out of 600 nationwide. Panner specifically warned of problems in cases involving the Mortgage Electronic Registration System. MERS was set up by the banking industry to rapidly package and sell mortgages as securities without recording each sale in county recorder offices. The “MERS system raises serious concerns regarding the appropriateness and validity of foreclosure by advertisement and sale outside of any judicial proceeding,” he said Wednesday in a 16-page ruling. “Given the numerous problems I see in nearly every non-judicial foreclosure case I preside over, a procedure ALWAYS STIRRING UP SOMETHING GOOD Serving Central Oregon Since 1975

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relying on a bank or trustee to self-assess its own authority to foreclose is deeply troubling to me,” he wrote. A spokeswoman for MERS, Janis Smith, said it would appeal the ruling, which Smith described as inconsistent with earlier court decisions in the state. Since October, federal judges in six separate Oregon cases have halted foreclosures involving MERS, saying its participation caused lenders to violate the state’s recording law. At least one federal judge has ruled in favor of MERS, industry lobbyists said. The mortgage and banking industry is turning to the Oregon Legislature for help. The House Judiciary Committee entertained a last-minute amendment to an affordable housing bill that would rid the recording requirements holding up MERS foreclosures. Lobbyists for banks, credit unions and title companies said the amendments were needed to lift a cloud over thousands of Oregon homes. Panner’s ruling is the most sharply worded among the six foreclosure cases blocked since last fall and the clearest outline of the confusion caused by MERS and banks as they foreclose on homeowners.


B4 Monday, May 30, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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The death of Capt. Waskow Editor’s Note: Pulitzer Prize-winning World War II correspondent Ernie Pyle wrote the following column after a stay with the 36th Division units near Mignano and Venafro, Italy. He was killed on April 18, 1945, by Japanese machine-gun fire.

I

n this war I have known a lot of officers who were loved and respected by the soldiers under them. But never have I crossed the trail of any man as beloved as Capt. Henry T. Waskow, of

Belton, Texas. Capt. Waskow was a company commander in the 36th Division. He had led his company since long before it left the States. He was very young, only in his mid-20s, but he carried in him a sincerity and a gentleness that made people want to be guided by him. “After my own father, he came next,” a sergeant told me. “He always looked after us, a soldier said. “He’d go to bat for us every time.” “I’ve never known him to do anything unfair,” another one said. I was at the foot of the mule trail the night they brought Capt. Waskow’s body down the mountain. The moon was nearly full at the time, and you could see far up the trail and even part way across the valley. Soldiers made shadows as they walked. Dead men had been coming down the mountain all evening, lashed onto the backs of mules. They came lying belly-down across wooden pack saddles, their heads hanging down on the left side of the mule, their stiffened legs sticking out awkwardly from the other side bobbing up and down as the mule walked. The Italian mule-skinners were afraid to walk beside dead men, so Americans had to lead the mules down that night. Even the Americans were reluctant to unlash and lift off the bodies at the bottom, so an officer had to do it himself and ask others to help. The first one came in early in the evening. They slid him down from the mule and stood him on his feet for a moment. In the half light, he might have been merely a sick man standing there, leaning on the others. Then they laid him on the ground in the shadow of the low stone wall alongside the road. I don’t know who that first one was. You feel small in the presence of the dead men and ashamed of being alive, and you don’t ask silly questions. We left him there beside the road, that first one, and we all went back into the cowshed and sat on water cans or laid on the straw, waiting for the next batch of mules. Somebody said the dead soldier had been dead for four days, and then nobody said anything more about it. We talked soldier talk for an hour or more. The dead man lay all alone outside, in the shadow of the stone wall. Then a soldier came into the dark cowshed and said there were some more bodies outside. We went out into the road.

Four mules stood there, in the moonlight, in the road where the trail came down off the mountain. The soldiers who led them stood there waiting. “This one is Capt. Waskow,” one of them said quietly. Two men unlashed his body from the mule and lifted it off and lay it in the shadow beside the low stone wall. Other men took the other bodies off. Finally there were five, lying end to end in a long row alongside the road. You don’t cover up dead men in the combat zone. They just lie there in the shadows until somebody else comes after them. The unburdened mules moved off to their olive orchard. The men in the road seemed reluctant to leave. They stood around, and gradually one by one you could sense them moving close to Capt. Waskow’s body. Not so much to look, I think, as to say something in finality, to him and to themselves. I stood close by and I could hear. One soldier came and looked down and he said out loud, “Goddammit.” That was all he said, and then he walked away. Another one came. He said “Goddammit to hell anyway.” He looked down for a few moments, and then he turned and left. Another man came; I think he was an officer. It was hard to tell officers from men in the half-light, for all were bearded and grimy dirty. The man looked down in to the dead captain’s face, and then he spoke directly to him, as though he were alive. He said: “I’m sorry, old man.” Then a soldier came and stood beside the officer, and bent over, and he too spoke to his dead captain, not in a whisper but awfully tenderly, and he said: “I sure am sorry, sir.” Then the first man squatted down, and he reached down and took the dead hand, and he sat there for five full minutes, holding the dead hand in his own and looking intently into the dead face, and he never uttered a sound all the time he sat there. And then finally he put the hand down, and then reached up and gently straightened the points of the captain’s shirt collar, and then he sort of rearranged the tattered edges of his uniform around the wound. And then he got up and walked away down the road in the moonlight, all alone. Reprinted by permission of Scripps Howard Foundation

My Nickel’s Worth Foreign policy question When will the American mainstream media begin a national dialogue with the American public about what our foreign policy should be? The issue is this: do we continue a policy of bribery or coercion (including assassination and overthrow of foreign leaders who do not bend to our will) to force other counties to do our bidding in order to maintain American political and economic hegemony, or do we change the way we conduct business with the rest of the world? Anti-Americanism does not happen in a vacuum, nor did 9/11. Over the last 100 years, our foreign policies and interventions in other countries’ internal affairs have contributed greatly to the political and economic instability in the world. Read “Overthrow: America’s Century of Regime Change from Hawaii to Iraq” by Stephen Kinzer if you are unaware of our history. This is a discussion that is long overdue here in this country. So when do we start it? Congress? President Obama, since you currently hold the office? The New York Times? The Bulletin? Does anyone besides me care? Robert Marvos Bend

Fix potholes right I have been a resident of Bend for six years from Portland and have lived in the area of Century Drive and Mt. Washington. Who determines how many and what potholes and/or ruts are to be patched, especially at the Century/ Mt. Washington circle? There could be 30 potholes. The city will have a crew out patching, not repairing, and there will still be half of the potholes left when

they are finished, not to mention two weeks later they are back again, bigger than ever. Why does the city spend the money to do half a job several times, when they should do it right one time? Pole Pedal Paddle is here, and the cyclists come down Century Drive at 50 mph. I would not want to see any of them getting hurt if they hit one of the potholes. It seems the city should have some obligation to keep those areas safe. Sometimes the cheapest way is not the best or safest way. Helen Kimbrough Bend

For the cougar Here is someone who speaks for the unfortunate cougar. I would like to know what he was guilty of that he had to be shot dead inside a trap. The last statistics I read said that there had never been a recorded cougar attack on a human in the entire state of Oregon. In The Bulletin, May 13, it was reported that the deputy encountered the cougar and “the cat ran off.” Doesn’t that tell you something? Cougars are afraid of humans. Mr. Wildlife Official, isn’t part of your job to protect the magnificent wildlife of Oregon? If not, it should be. If you keep on overseeing the unnecessary killing of cougars, one day we will look around and there won’t be any left. What a completely disingenuous statement, that “relocation is out of fashion” and “only a temporary fix.” If anyone really thought about it, there are thousands of square miles of wilderness in Eastern Oregon where unwanted cats from Bend would probably thrive, and certainly not return from. There are other states that successfully tranquilize

and relocate. Be honest, you just don’t really want to be bothered with it. So you oversaw the shooting while the cat was confined in a trap, what pure cruelty when there were better options! And then he was skinned. I wonder whose wall that “trophy” will be on? Where are the environmentalists on this issue, besides notably quiet? Don’t they realize that wildlife, such as the cougar, are an essential part of a balanced environment? I guess the only positive thing was that the cougar wasn’t a female that left babies behind. James (J.K.) Kirklin Bend

Bureaucratic arrogance Dave Lynn’s guest editorial of May 20 correctly nailed the local U.S. Forest Service for their bureaucratic arrogance. Specifically the location of the Kapka Butte Sno-park instead of expanding Dutchman Flats, and wasting money on the new visitors center on Century Drive and the Ryan Ranch Wetland Restoration Project. First, I have no “dog” in any of these projects, other than as a taxpayer watching money being wasted. In each case, the local federal mentality is this: We know what is best for you ignorant local people, and the money is already allocated so we need to spend it or we lose it. We cannot let public comments get in the way of our wonderful plans. It is no wonder the general public is so upset with federal spending. And while these amounts are small compared to the total federal deficit, every bit of waste or frivolous spending does add up. Bill Sager Bend

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Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Democrats do their happy dance after one special election

H

ey, did anybody notice that the Democrat won a special congressional race in a Republican district in upstate New York? Apparently, she campaigned a lot on protecting Medicare. OMG! The Democrats are levitating with joy. Never have you seen so many smiling liberals. “I’m feeling great. I’m ecstatic,” said Steve Israel, the chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. Israel is also a member of Congress from New York — a state where, in case you hadn’t heard, a Democrat won a special congressional race Tuesday night. There is no escaping our fate. We are going to spend the next 17 months hearing about how the Republicans want to kill off Medicare. By 2012, the current video on the Web showing a guy who resembles Rep. Paul Ryan pushing an old woman off a cliff will look like a Teletubbies skit. By the fall, there will be ads showing the Republicans hacking their way through rows of bedridden seniors with scimitars. Anybody who is hoping the two sides

can come together and work out a plan to control health care costs should plan a lengthy visit to some other country. I hear Finland is nice. “Look, if they didn’t get the hint in the special election in New York last night, they never will,” said Israel. Did I mention that there was a congressional election? And the Democrat won? So far, the Republicans are increasing their opponents’ Glad Bag of Happiness by sticking to their guns. Ryan, the House budget guru, was back on YouTube Wednesday with another defense of his Medicare plan and a cogent explanation of how the current health care system is all screwed up, rewarding doctors for the number of procedures they do rather than how well they treat their patients. “Washington has not been honest with you,” Ryan told the camera. He is the powerful chairman of the House Budget Committee, and, therefore, you would think, Washington. Meanwhile, in the Senate, Republicans were complaining about Democratic triumphalism. They had a point. How are we going to fix the hugely expensive,

GAIL COLLINS deeply flawed fee-for-service health care system with all this demagoguery? “I don’t think it’s responsible to try to scare seniors for political points,” said Sen. John Cornyn. Cornyn, R-Texas, is the author of the Health Care Bureaucrats Elimination Act. That bill would kill off the part of the Obama health care law that is aimed at reforming the hugely expensive, deeply flawed fee-for-service health care system. “They say the way to win the next election is to scare the daylights out of senior citizens. I think that’s irresponsible,” said Cornyn, who predicted, back in 2009, that the Democrats were going to turn Medicare into “a health care gulag.” The Democrats are still bitter about

the way the Republicans demonized them with those “death panel” diatribes. Sensible Republicans say that was very unfortunate, but you have to remember that when they tried to fix Social Security during the Bush presidency, the Democrats said they were trying to bankrupt retirees. We can keep going on like this until we get to the Battle of the Field of Blackbirds in 1371. The Senate had plenty of time to discuss who said what about whom, since they were engaged in a debate over the House budget, which includes the famous Medicare plan. The one that was such a big topic of discussion in upstate New York, where there was a special election Tuesday. Which the Democrat won. The Republican House and Democratic Senate are pursuing a bipartisan agenda this year, the Let’s Only Vote on Things That Will Fail initiative. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid decided to call for a vote on the House budget to trap the Republican moderates into choosing between betraying their party and ticking off their constituents. This is such a tiny group that you’d think torturing them

would be illegal under the Endangered Species Act. But no. Meanwhile, over in the House, videos were surfacing of a town hall meeting in which Rob Woodall, R-Ga., argued health care with a Democratic activist who wanted to know what she was supposed to do without Medicare when her employer didn’t provide coverage for retirees. “Hear yourself, ma’am. Hear yourself,” Woodall responded, rather triumphantly. “You want the government to take care of you because your employer decided not to take care of you. My question is: When do I decide I’m going to take care of me?” Asked why he allowed the congressional health care program to take care of him, Woodall responded, “because it’s free.” Really, it’s hard to think of anything more the Democrats need to achieve total political bliss. Except maybe GOP presidential nominee Newt Gingrich. Gail Collins is a columnist for The New York Times.


C OV ER S T ORY

THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 30, 2011 B5

O Clements, 94, Texas’ first Republican governor in 20th century

Irene Gilbert, co-founder of acting academy, dies at 76 By Valerie J. Nelson Los Angeles Times

Irene Gilbert, who persuaded her mentor, Stella Adler, to open an acting school in Los Angeles in 1985 and then served as its director for 20 years, has died. She was 76. Gilbert died May 21 of complications related to Alzheimer’s disease at her son’s home in Eureka, Calif., said John Jack Rodgers, executive director of the Stella Adler Academy of Acting and Theatre-Los Angeles. Adler was a noted acting coach with a long-established New York City conservatory when she began giving classes in Los Angeles in the 1960s and became close friends with Gilbert. With Gilbert and actress Joanne Linville, Adler founded the academy, which started out in a tiny theater at Hollywood Boulevard and Argyle Avenue. A 1991 fire shut down the school, and the building was facing demolition to make way for the subway when Adler died in late 1992. The last thing Adler “said to me was, ‘Are you going to rebuild the theater?’” Gilbert told the Los Angeles Times in 1994. “I swore to her I would. I want her teachings to go on.”

Notable alumni Notable Los Angeles alumni include Benicio Del Toro, Mark Ruffalo and Salma Hayek. The school reopened in 1994 at Hollywood Boulevard and Highland Avenue in what was once the Embassy Club, a private club in the 1930s for Hollywood’s elite. As the academy’s administrator, Gilbert followed Adler’s tenet that “you can’t tell a diamond from a rock until you polish it,” according to a 1999 Times article. “Can you tell right away if someone is talented?” Gilbert had said. “You can’t. It grows. I see it all the time. They come in and they don’t know anything, but then it starts to build.” From an early age, she wanted to go into acting and changed her last name to Gilbert partly because it sounded “movie-star-esque,” Rodgers said. On television, Gilbert appeared in such 1970s fare as “Barnaby Jones,” “Cannon” and “Emergency!” and continued to act into the late 1980s. She also taught at the academy and produced and directed many plays.

By Terrence Stutz The Dallas Morning News

The Associated Press ile photos

The 1946 Army football team poses in Yankee Stadium in New York. Joe Steffy — front row, third from right — a lineman on some of Army’s greatest teams and winner of the Outland Trophy as the nation’s top lineman in 1947, died May 21. He was 85.

Joe Steffy, a top blocker for Army Heisman winners, dies By Richard Goldstein New York Times News Service

Joe Steffy, a star guard who opened the way for the Heisman Trophy winners Doc Blanchard and Glenn Davis to burst through opposing lines for Army’s undefeated national football champions of the mid-1940s, died Saturday in Newburgh, N.Y. He was 85. The cause was a heart ailment, said his son, Benton. In one season at the University of Tennessee and three at West Point, Steffy played on teams that lost only three games. He was a first-team allAmerican in 1947 when he became the second recipient of the Outland Trophy as the nation’s best interior lineman. He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1987. Steffy’s No. 61 jersey was retired by Army in 2009. He joined Blanchard, the hard-driving fullback known as Mr. Inside, along with Davis, the speedy halfback called Mr. Outside, and the Heisman-winning halfback Pete Dawkins as the only West Point football players to receive that honor. Red Blaik, the West Point coach who recruited many of America’s leading college football players during World War II, called Steffy “one of the best guards in Academy history.” Steffy was only 5 feet 10 inches and 190 pounds, but he played guard on offense and at the center of the line on defense. Blaik remembered in his memoir, “The Red Blaik Story,” how Steffy could deliver a crushing blow

Riasanovsky, expert in Russia’s history, dies New York Times News Service Nicholas V. Riasanovsky, a Russian emigre who came to the United States at 14, served in the Army during World War II and became one of the country’s leading scholars of Russian history, died May 14 in Oakland, Calif. He was 87. His family said he died in a nursing home after a two-year illness. Riasanovsky taught Russian and European intellectual history at the University of California, Berkeley, from 1957 until his retirement in 1997. He specialized in the reign of Emperor Nicholas I (1825 to 1855), a period he examined from different perspectives in a halfdozen books focusing on the monarchy itself, the emergence of state-sponsored nationalism and the alienation of Russia’s intellectual elite. His writing was known for its scrupulous examination of perceptions and misperceptions on all sides in unfolding events. When Riasanovsky decided to write a textbook for under-

graduates in the early 1960s, he was motivated at least in part by concern with the perceptions that Americans had about Russia, said Mark Steinberg, a professor of Russian history at the University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign, and a former Riasanovsky student. The period known as the Red Scare and the nuclear brinksmanship of the 1950s and ‘60s had “created a prejudiced view” of his homeland, and Riasanovsky “considered it crucial for students in his adopted country to really understand Russia in all its complexity, in a balanced way,” Steinberg said. Riasanovsky’s book “A History of Russia,” scanning its history from its ninth-century Slavic roots to the Soviet era, has been in print continuously since it was published in 1963. John Challice, vice president and publisher of higher education texts at Oxford University Press, the book’s publisher, said it was “by a wide margin the top-selling book in Russian history in the U.S., and has been for decades.”

Joe Steffy, who played for Army’s football team from 1945-47, is shown at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y., in October 2007. while opening up holes. In the 1947 game against Navy, Blaik said, “Joe took out an end with one of the two most devastating blocks in my memory.” Blaik used that block as a training video. Joseph Benton Steffy Jr. was born April 3, 1926, in Chattanooga, Tenn. He played for the 1944 Tennessee team that went undefeated in the regular season but lost to Southern California in the Rose Bowl, then transferred to West Point. He played for the unbeaten Army teams of 1945 and 1946 and then was named captain of the 1947 team, which lost twice. Steffy graduated from West Point

Stephenson Continued from B1 In the summers, he worked on cattle and sheep ranches. Between mining and ranching, he estimated that he lived in tents for almost five years of his life. He also helped on wild horse roundups, learning how some horserunners used small planes to herd the animals. One pilot tied a rope with tin cans between the landing gear on his Piper Cub, and he’d swoop down so low that he’d hit the horses with the cans. On the ground, ropers would use trucks to lasso the horses with ropes tied to tires, then hop out and sit on the tire until the horse tired itself out. Many of those horses went to slaughterhouses, but some of the better ones were broken and turned into saddle horses, he said. That was 20 years before the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971 required the BLM to oversee the wild horse population. “Then, as now, you have to control numbers. So it was kind of up to the ranchers to gather them at that point,” he said.

in 1949 and married the former Ann Brown in April 1950. His best man was John Trent, the captain of Army’s 1949 football team (he played end) and a fellow Tennessean. Two months later, the Korean War began. Lt. John Trent was killed in action near the port of Wonsan in November 1950. A month after that, Steffy, a lieutenant, was injured by a grenade in combat. Suffering from frostbite as well, he was evacuated to Japan from the port of Hungnam and received a Bronze Star. Steffy coached the Army freshman football team in the early 1950s, then owned an auto dealership in Newburgh. He was a regular at Army football games for many years and spoke to Army’s players about the times when West Point ruled college football. In addition to his son, of Newburgh, Steffy is survived by his sisters, Florence DeGozzaldi of Deer Isle, Maine, and Ellen Waggoner of Huntsville, Ala.; and three grandsons. He wife died in 2004. Steffy recalled that sportswriters in New York would often ask him about the most intense game he played in. For all his memories of West Point, his thoughts went back to a 0-0 tie in his first year of college football. As he related it to The Chattanooga Times Free Press in 1999: “I told ‘em, Tennessee and Alabama. You determined who won that game by the number of teeth you had left when the game was over.”

Stephenson, who first used a telephone at the age of 19 and learned to type at 53, worked for a fire crew in Idaho during the summers to pay for college, eventually earning a degree from Oregon State University. His resume includes stints with the Oregon Game Commission, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and more than 20 years as the fish and wildlife manager at Fort Lewis in Washington. He has worked with everything from salmon to whooping cranes, but says he likes working with big game the best. Most recently, he has worked as a big game biologist for the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakima Nation in southcentral Washington. “On the board, what I’d like to do is help with what expertise I have there, and really encourage them to keep that balance on the landscape. Horses can really do a lot of damage when they get overpopulated,” he said. These days, horses don’t have enough natural predators, and a herd can grow up to 20 percent each year. “It’s something you have to keep up with,” he said. The BLM oversees 17 herd management areas in Oregon, including eight in the Burns Dis-

AUSTIN, Texas — Bill Clements, a Dallas businessman who shattered the image of Texas as a oneparty state by becoming its first Republican governor in more than a century, died Sunday at the age of 94. Not content to be the millionaire founder of a worldwide oil-drilling company, Clements sought to transfer his success in the business world into a successful career in politics. In his first try for office, in 1978, he won the governorship of the nation’s third-largest state. Although he lost his bid for re-election four years later, he staged a stunning comeback in 1986, beating incumbent Gov. Mark White in one of the closest races for governor in state history. As the state’s chief executive, Bill Clements Clements established a reputation as an efficient, businesslike manager. But his second administration was marred by his involvement in the Southern Methodist University pay-for-play football scandal. Clements helped broaden his party’s appeal among voters in the state and made it possible for hundreds of other Republicans to win local and state political offices. William Perry Clements Jr. was born in Dallas on April 13, 1917. He graduated from Highland Park High School in 1934, and as an all-state guard on the school’s football team was offered several athletic scholarships. But the Great Depression intervened, forcing the 17-year-old Clements to cancel his college plans and seek work when his father became unemployed.

Working in the oil fields With help from a classmate’s father, he found a job in the oil fields of South Texas, going to work as a roughneck and driller. He took time out to study engineering at Southern Methodist University in the late 1930s, then resumed his work in oil fields. Using his experience in the oil business, Clements, then 28, founded the Southeastern Drilling Co. with two partners in 1947, and he eventually turned SEDCO Inc. into the world’s largest drilling contracting company. By 1978, when Clements entered his first race for governor, his personal wealth was estimated at $30 million. Clements was active in Republican Party affairs for several years, and his business experience led President Richard Nixon to appoint him as deputy defense secretary in 1973. He served in the post until 1977, when Democrat Jimmy Carter became president. A year later, Clements, who had once considered running for the U.S. Senate, decided to run for governor. His campaign emphasized his success with SEDCO, pointing to the need for a businessman’s perspective in the governor’s office. No Republican had won the office since Reconstruction but Clements upset Hill in one of the closest elections in state history. His margin of victory was fewer than 17,000 votes out of 2.4 million cast. “They took my candidacy very lightly, as kind of a joke,” Clements recalled later. “I don’t think Mr. Hill ever did wake up to the fact that he had a very serious race on his hands.”

trict where Stephenson grew up. In that region, more than 1,000 wild horses run free on more than 800,000 acres of BLM land. There are roughly 2,500 wild horses on federal land in Oregon, according to a 2009 BLM report. Stephenson sees educating the public about controlling the size of these herds as an important part of his role. “You just try to do what you think is best based on the science and your knowledge of how these things work,” he said. “There are lots of people in this day and age who haven’t associated with farming or ranching, or had to deal with overabundant populations, whatever they might be, deer, horses or rabbits. A lot of the young people nowadays raised in front of a television don’t grasp that.” Andrew Clevenger can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at aclevenger@bendbulletin.com.

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W E AT H ER

B6 Monday, May 30, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, MAY 30

TUESDAY

Today: Partly cloudy, chance of late day showers.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

LOW

62

37

STATE Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

64/44

59/43

68/44

47/35



Willowdale 

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

65/44

58/44

61/48

59/38

Bend

62/37

Oakridge Elk Lake 59/46

Vancouver 61/48

Seattle 65/49

59/34

57/34

60/33

58/32

Mostly cloudy and cool with scattered showers possible today. Eastern

Burns

Hampton 57/34

Fort Rock

62/48



65/46







Idaho Falls Elko

71/48

53/38

60/37



Reno

66/46

San Francisco Partly sunny and cool 60/51 with a chance of showers today.

43/30

50/35

Boise

62/37

Redding 

58/35



Crater Lake

Bend

65/43

61/36

Silver Lake

58/31

59/39

Helena

Grants Pass

Christmas Valley

Chemult

Missoula

Eugene

61/35

53/27

City

64/49

60/35





Portland



Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:26 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:40 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:26 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:41 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 3:49 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 6:57 p.m.

Salt Lake City 56/47

LOW

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

HIGH

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases New

First

June 1

June 8

LOW

Full

Last

June 15 June 23

TEMPERATURE

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

Astoria . . . . . . . . 59/46/0.00 . . . . . . 60/48/c. . . . . . 60/48/sh Baker City . . . . . .57/42/trace . . . . . 62/41/sh. . . . . . 62/40/sh Brookings . . . . . . 58/40/0.02 . . . . . 56/48/sh. . . . . . 57/47/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 51/36/0.01 . . . . . 65/43/pc. . . . . . 62/40/sh Eugene . . . . . . . . 58/42/0.03 . . . . . . 62/48/c. . . . . . 62/47/sh Klamath Falls . . . 54/36/0.00 . . . . . . 56/35/c. . . . . . 57/34/sh Lakeview. . . . . . . 48/30/0.04 . . . . . 56/37/sh. . . . . . . 59/35/c La Pine . . . . . . . . 49/29/0.00 . . . . . 60/33/sh. . . . . . 56/31/sh Medford . . . . . . . 59/44/0.06 . . . . . . 68/44/c. . . . . . 67/45/sh Newport . . . . . . . 55/45/0.00 . . . . . . 55/47/c. . . . . . 55/48/sh North Bend . . . . . 55/MM/NA . . . . . . 57/46/c. . . . . . 57/46/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 63/42/0.25 . . . . . 68/49/sh. . . . . . 70/50/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 64/40/0.04 . . . . . 67/46/sh. . . . . . 71/47/sh Portland . . . . . . . 56/44/0.13 . . . . . . 64/49/c. . . . . . 63/51/sh Prineville . . . . . . . 52/36/0.00 . . . . . 59/38/sh. . . . . . 63/38/sh Redmond. . . . . . .56/33/trace . . . . . 61/40/sh. . . . . . 60/37/sh Roseburg. . . . . . . 58/46/0.31 . . . . . 65/47/sh. . . . . . 64/50/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 59/46/0.02 . . . . . . 63/48/c. . . . . . 63/47/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 60/34/0.00 . . . . . 60/36/sh. . . . . . 56/35/sh The Dalles . . . . . .66/49/trace . . . . . 70/46/sh. . . . . . 69/49/sh

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

5 HIGH

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

V.HIGH

6

8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53/30 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .92 in 2009 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.83” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 in 1979 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.84” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.11” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 5.35” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.87 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.84 in 1947 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97......Low Sisters.................................Low Bend, east of Hwy. 97.......Low La Pine................................Low Redmond/Madras...........Low Prineville ...........................Low

Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

66 37

FIRE INDEX

Monday Hi/Lo/W

Chance of showers.

HIGH

58 34

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .4:48 a.m. . . . . . .7:24 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .4:29 a.m. . . . . . .6:48 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .4:14 a.m. . . . . . .6:29 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .3:38 a.m. . . . . . .5:02 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .3:16 p.m. . . . . . .3:10 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .2:40 a.m. . . . . . .2:51 p.m.

OREGON CITIES

Calgary 59/39

Brothers

La Pine

Crescent

Crescent Lake

Post

55/35

Sunriver

50/25

BEND ALMANAC

FRIDAY Chance of showers.

57 33

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

55/34

60/36

HIGH

NORTHWEST

Paulina

Sisters

LOW

60 34

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 66° The Dalles • 30° Meacham

THURSDAY

Chance of showers.

Rain will be possible from the Cascades to Montana. Rain will also develop along the Oregon coast.

Central

Prineville

62/37

HIGH

60/39

63/42

Redmond

Cascadia

Mitchell

Madras

 Camp Sherman 57/34

Mostly cloudy with showers developing late today.

64/43

Chance of showers.

Tonight: Partly cloudy.

HIGH

WEDNESDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48,663 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182,918 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 78,723 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 42,518 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149,786 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 402 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 931 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 543 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,715 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . 1,123 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . 1,351 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,589 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 61/48

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

S

S

Calgary 59/39

Seattle 65/49

Cheyenne 59/42 San Francisco 60/51

Truckee, Calif.

• 2.07” Clinton, Iowa

Las Vegas 79/63

Salt Lake City 56/47

Honolulu 89/74

Tijuana 70/57

Denver 68/48 Albuquerque 76/49

Los Angeles 70/58

Phoenix 86/66

Chihuahua 102/65

Anchorage 68/50

La Paz 93/65 Juneau 74/45

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 72/54

Thunder Bay 50/50 To ronto 73/61

Mazatlan 88/65

Halifax 73/54

Portland 83/57

Boston 86/66 Buffalo Green Bay 82/66 New York 81/67 Detroit 87/69 90/74 Des Moines Philadelphia Columbus 90/69 Chicago 91/70 92/74 90/70 Omaha Washington, D. C. 87/63 95/74 Louisville Kansas City 94/75 86/70 St. Louis Charlotte 94/75 92/68 Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 92/70 93/71 91/70 Atlanta 91/69 Birmingham Dallas 93/69 94/75 New Orleans 92/73 Orlando Houston 90/70 92/77

Rapid City 62/45

Laredo, Texas

• 25°

S

St. Paul 87/65

Boise 65/46

• 107°

S

Bismarck 63/45

Billings 52/41

Portland 64/49

S

Saskatoon 58/41 Winnipeg 59/55

Miami 87/76 Monterrey 97/76

FRONTS

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . .101/74/0.00 . .96/73/w . . 91/72/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .86/64/0.02 . 89/68/pc . . . .90/69/t Albany. . . . . . . . .85/69/0.00 . . .88/66/t . . 89/66/pc Albuquerque. . . .90/61/0.00 . . .76/49/s . . . 83/64/s Anchorage . . . . .58/46/0.00 . 68/50/pc . . . 61/48/c Atlanta . . . . . . . .91/67/0.00 . 91/69/pc . . 92/70/pc Atlantic City . . . .83/69/0.00 . 84/68/pc . . 83/67/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .97/75/0.00 . 97/76/pc . . 95/72/pc Baltimore . . . . . .85/68/0.00 . 94/73/pc . . 95/72/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .46/43/0.21 . . .52/41/r . . 65/47/pc Birmingham . . . .94/68/0.00 . . .93/69/s . . 95/67/pc Bismarck . . . . . . .63/39/0.02 . . .63/45/r . . 60/47/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .57/41/0.06 . .65/46/sh . . 70/48/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .85/67/0.00 . . .86/66/t . . 78/62/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .81/66/0.00 . . .87/70/t . . 81/66/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .82/61/0.00 . 82/66/pc . . 85/66/pc Burlington, VT. . .81/68/0.09 . . .82/62/c . . 89/67/pc Caribou, ME . . . .66/53/0.69 . . .75/44/s . . . 75/53/c Charleston, SC . .90/71/0.00 . . .87/70/s . . 89/72/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .88/69/0.00 . 92/68/pc . . 94/70/pc Chattanooga. . . .93/64/0.00 . 94/67/pc . . 97/69/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .64/42/0.23 . 59/42/pc . . . 73/45/s Chicago. . . . . . . .68/52/1.88 . 90/70/pc . . . .87/66/t Cincinnati . . . . . .89/66/0.00 . . .91/72/s . . 91/69/pc Cleveland . . . . . .86/64/0.24 . 86/69/pc . . 87/68/pc Colorado Springs 87/53/0.00 . .67/39/w . . . 77/50/s Columbia, MO . .88/64/0.00 . . .90/70/s . . . .86/67/t Columbia, SC . . .91/72/0.00 . 92/69/pc . . 93/70/pc Columbus, GA. . .96/67/0.00 . 94/69/pc . . . 92/66/s Columbus, OH. . .90/68/0.00 . 91/70/pc . . 91/70/pc Concord, NH . . . .85/58/0.00 . . .89/61/t . . 84/61/pc Corpus Christi. . .93/78/0.00 . 92/78/pc . . 90/77/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .94/73/0.00 . 94/75/pc . . 94/72/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .88/69/0.00 . 90/72/pc . . 90/68/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .75/49/0.01 . .68/48/w . . . 78/50/s Des Moines. . . . .78/58/0.55 . 90/69/pc . . . 83/57/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .80/59/0.02 . 87/69/pc . . 89/68/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . .64/45/0.00 . . .64/56/t . . . .69/44/t El Paso. . . . . . . . .99/70/0.00 . . .92/67/s . . 97/72/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . .77/61/0.00 . 78/50/pc . . 79/55/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . .63/47/0.00 . . .79/55/t . . 63/50/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .62/50/0.00 . . .62/26/s . . . 73/38/s

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .73/52/0.48 . 90/70/pc . . . .90/59/t Green Bay. . . . . .69/56/0.00 . 81/67/pc . . . .80/59/t Greensboro. . . . .84/69/0.00 . 93/71/pc . . . 95/70/s Harrisburg. . . . . .86/68/0.00 . 93/68/pc . . . 94/69/s Hartford, CT . . . .84/69/0.00 . . .90/68/t . . 85/65/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .50/38/0.01 . .50/35/sh . . 63/41/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .86/74/0.00 . . .89/74/s . . 87/75/pc Houston . . . . . . .94/77/0.00 . 92/77/pc . . 92/77/pc Huntsville . . . . . .94/68/0.00 . . .93/68/s . . 94/70/pc Indianapolis . . . .88/69/0.00 . . .93/73/s . . 90/68/pc Jackson, MS . . . .94/70/0.00 . 94/68/pc . . 94/69/pc Madison, WI . . . .67/48/0.09 . 85/65/pc . . . .85/58/t Jacksonville. . . . .88/70/0.00 . . .87/73/s . . 87/70/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .57/48/0.01 . 74/45/pc . . 73/46/pc Kansas City. . . . .88/62/0.23 . .86/70/w . . 86/65/pc Lansing . . . . . . . .75/57/1.32 . 90/70/pc . . . .91/62/t Las Vegas . . . . . .70/58/0.00 . . .79/63/s . . . 90/70/s Lexington . . . . . .88/65/0.00 . . .92/69/s . . 91/69/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .80/57/0.14 . .87/60/w . . . 79/58/s Little Rock. . . . . .90/65/0.00 . . .91/70/s . . 92/70/pc Los Angeles. . . . .67/55/0.00 . . .70/58/s . . . 68/57/s Louisville . . . . . . .93/69/0.00 . . .94/75/s . . 95/73/pc Memphis. . . . . . .91/73/0.00 . . .93/75/s . . 94/74/pc Miami . . . . . . . . .89/78/0.00 . 87/76/pc . . 87/77/pc Milwaukee . . . . .65/50/0.23 . 87/65/pc . . . .83/59/t Minneapolis . . . .68/54/0.00 . . .87/65/t . . 75/55/pc Nashville . . . . . . .92/67/0.00 . . .93/71/s . . 94/70/pc New Orleans. . . .92/76/0.00 . 92/73/pc . . 91/74/pc New York . . . . . .82/67/0.00 . . .90/74/t . . 89/69/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .87/69/0.00 . . .94/73/t . . 92/67/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .87/69/0.00 . 89/72/pc . . 92/72/pc Oklahoma City . .89/74/0.00 . 92/70/pc . . 88/69/pc Omaha . . . . . . . .80/59/0.03 . .87/63/w . . . 79/58/s Orlando. . . . . . . .92/72/0.00 . 90/70/pc . . 90/70/pc Palm Springs. . . .79/64/0.00 . . .84/60/s . . . 89/64/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .78/62/0.66 . 92/72/pc . . 88/62/pc Philadelphia . . . .88/67/0.00 . 92/74/pc . . 95/71/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .89/76/0.00 . . .86/66/s . . . 97/73/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .87/64/0.00 . 92/64/pc . . 94/67/pc Portland, ME. . . .75/52/0.00 . 83/57/pc . . 72/54/pc Providence . . . . .81/64/0.00 . . .88/68/t . . 80/61/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . .89/70/0.00 . 93/70/pc . . 96/71/pc

Yesterday Monday Tuesday Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .52/46/0.97 . .62/45/sh . . 68/49/pc Savannah . . . . . .90/70/0.00 . . .89/68/s . . 91/69/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .53/36/0.00 . 66/46/pc . . 69/47/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .59/50/0.00 . . .65/49/c . . 64/48/sh Richmond . . . . . .85/67/0.00 . 94/71/pc . . 98/72/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . .65/51/0.00 . . .83/55/t . . . 74/51/s Rochester, NY . . .86/60/0.00 . 84/70/pc . . 90/67/pc Spokane . . . . . . .67/43/0.01 . .65/43/sh . . . .68/49/t Sacramento. . . . .74/44/0.04 . 72/50/pc . . 70/49/pc Springfield, MO. .88/70/0.00 . . .87/68/s . . 84/68/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .93/67/0.00 . . .94/75/s . . . .90/70/t Tampa . . . . . . . . .95/75/0.00 . 91/72/pc . . 91/72/pc Salt Lake City . . .50/39/0.52 . .56/47/sh . . . 76/53/s Tucson. . . . . . . . .94/73/0.00 . . .82/59/s . . . 96/69/s San Antonio . . . .97/75/0.00 . 95/77/pc . . 94/73/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .89/77/0.00 . 88/72/pc . . . .87/71/t San Diego . . . . . .66/59/0.09 . . .71/56/s . . . 70/56/s Washington, DC .83/69/0.00 . 95/74/pc . . 96/73/pc San Francisco . . .65/48/0.00 . 62/49/pc . . 60/48/pc Wichita . . . . . . . .93/65/0.00 . .89/69/w . . 88/69/pc San Jose . . . . . . .69/50/0.00 . 69/49/pc . . 68/48/pc Yakima . . . . . . . .74/48/0.00 . .68/50/sh . . 66/48/sh Santa Fe . . . . . . .87/52/0.00 . . .70/37/s . . 79/51/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .81/64/0.00 . . .88/63/s . . . 97/67/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .70/55/0.00 . 79/54/pc . . . 61/52/c Athens. . . . . . . . .75/61/0.00 . 77/66/pc . . . 78/65/s Auckland. . . . . . .61/48/0.00 . 60/52/pc . . . 61/53/s Baghdad . . . . . .109/79/0.00 . .111/82/s . . 110/79/s Bangkok . . . . . . .93/81/0.00 . . .92/80/t . . . .91/79/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .82/70/0.00 . . .92/68/s . . 85/65/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .75/70/0.00 . . .84/70/s . . . 85/69/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .73/54/0.00 . 82/61/pc . . . .84/50/t Bogota . . . . . . . .63/50/0.00 . .70/53/sh . . 68/52/sh Budapest. . . . . . .75/52/0.00 . . .81/59/s . . . .86/57/t Buenos Aires. . . .61/46/0.00 . 64/45/pc . . . 63/51/s Cabo San Lucas .88/68/0.00 . . .91/69/s . . . 89/70/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .86/68/0.00 . . .87/71/s . . . 88/70/s Calgary . . . . . . . .57/34/0.00 . 59/39/pc . . . 63/45/s Cancun . . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . 87/76/pc . . 85/74/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .63/50/0.00 . .55/43/sh . . 57/46/pc Edinburgh . . . . . .59/43/0.00 . .57/41/sh . . . 59/46/s Geneva . . . . . . . .79/46/0.00 . . .71/51/t . . . .66/42/t Harare . . . . . . . . .79/54/0.00 . . .75/57/s . . . 76/54/s Hong Kong . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . .86/76/s . . . 85/75/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .72/61/0.00 . 75/68/pc . . 81/61/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .81/59/0.00 . . .88/61/s . . . 87/58/s Johannesburg . . .63/48/0.00 . . .65/38/s . . . 59/36/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .70/63/0.00 . 71/66/pc . . 70/64/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .75/64/0.00 . . .77/61/t . . . 78/62/s London . . . . . . . .66/55/0.00 . .64/41/sh . . 65/43/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .84/61/0.00 . . .79/57/s . . 75/46/pc Manila. . . . . . . . .86/79/0.00 . . .88/82/t . . . .87/79/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .111/86/0.00 . .112/85/s . . 110/83/s Mexico City. . . . .90/63/0.00 . . .82/59/t . . . .85/58/t Montreal. . . . . . .70/61/0.00 . . .72/61/s . . . 81/72/c Moscow . . . . . . .81/57/0.00 . 79/52/pc . . 77/53/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . .82/59/0.00 . 78/59/pc . . . .77/55/t Nassau . . . . . . . .91/72/0.00 . 87/76/pc . . . .86/76/t New Delhi. . . . .106/79/0.00 . .107/87/s . . 106/84/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .68/64/0.00 . .72/64/sh . . . 74/65/c Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .57/45/0.00 . . .63/43/s . . . 62/41/c Ottawa . . . . . . . .75/61/0.00 . 72/61/pc . . . 79/68/c Paris. . . . . . . . . . .79/52/0.00 . 82/54/pc . . . .61/45/t Rio de Janeiro. . .73/66/0.00 . . .72/64/s . . . 44/67/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .81/57/0.00 . .82/59/sh . . . 83/64/s Santiago . . . . . . .70/32/0.00 . . .67/39/s . . . 68/40/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .63/48/0.00 . 67/52/pc . . . 69/56/s Sapporo. . . . . . . .68/57/0.00 . . .62/48/c . . . 61/47/c Seoul . . . . . . . . . .86/61/0.00 . . .79/63/c . . 73/59/sh Shanghai. . . . . . .82/57/0.00 . 86/68/pc . . 85/67/pc Singapore . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . . .91/78/t . . . .89/79/t Stockholm. . . . . .61/50/0.00 . . .68/52/s . . . .69/57/t Sydney. . . . . . . . .61/50/0.00 . .66/47/sh . . . .67/48/t Taipei. . . . . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . . .80/74/s . . . .82/73/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .81/68/0.00 . . .90/67/s . . . 89/66/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .66/63/0.00 . .71/64/sh . . 70/60/sh Toronto . . . . . . .59/55/60.00 . 73/61/pc . . 86/66/pc Vancouver. . . . . .64/48/0.00 . .61/48/sh . . 64/52/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . .72/45/0.00 . . .79/61/s . . . 82/64/s Warsaw. . . . . . . .72/55/0.00 . . .79/59/s . . 82/61/pc

THIS MEMORIAL DAY ... All American Hearing would like to Honor America’s Heroes All American Hearing and Starkey Hearing Instruments

American Owned • American Made • Best-in-Class Technology Approved Veterans Administration Provider

When it comes to your hearing .... The LONGER you wait, the MORE you have to lose!

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Did you know that wax can block your ear canal and make words sound muffled? We will examine your ear canal using a small fiber-optic otoscope to determine if wax build-up is the cause of your hearing problem. If it is, we can easily remove it.

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FREE HEARING EVALUATION

Mr. Sell, a licensed hearing professional, will conduct a complete hearing evaluation and discuss your audiogram with you. If you have a hearing loss, he will recommend a solution tailored to your individual needs.

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REDMOND • (541) 548-5335 974 SW Veterans Way, Suite 2

Dennis Sell

Hearing Instrument Specialist


G

GREEN, ETC.

Inside

The TV tax credit game “Body of Proof” heads west, wooed by California credit, Page C2

Getting wise to owls to gauge climate

First-year Manzama thriving Legal software firm exceeds expectation By Tim Doran The Bulletin

OTECH

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/greenetc

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MAY 30, 2011

If conventional business models say high-tech companies will spend their first year struggling to define their products and attract customers, then Bend-based Manzama is bucking convention. Since its official launch in January, Manzama’s founders say they have signed up 25 law firms for the company’s Web-based social media search service called the Listening Platform. The service gleans information for the legal community from Facebook, Twitter, blogs, RSS feeds, press releases and other sites to track trends and issues to bring in new clients and help support existing clients. About half of those clients show up on the National Law Journal’s list of the nation’s 250 largest law firms. Manzama’s founders, Peter Ozolin and Mark Hinkle, said they plan to enhance the software to reach additional lawyers, especially those at smaller law firms. They also said they raised 80 percent of their capital investment goal for the improvements to their product by mid-May, but declined to give specifics on the size of that capital amount. And earlier this month, they added two new board members, who are prominent in the legal software and venture capital sectors, respectively. “They’re in the stratosphere,” Roger Lee, executive director of Economic Development of Central Oregon, said of the company that was started just a year ago. “All these things are certainly strong markers for investors.” Anyone who has ever used a Google alert or RSS reader to monitor a topic, person or company will appreciate Manzama’s Listening Platform. Google alerts, RSS readers and other methods of research, while useful, can consume time like a black hole and generate volumes of information, much of it useless. For example, a Google alert created for Bend, Ore., may also return information about South Bend, Ind. Manzama’s software, however, finds the information, gathers it, analyzes and filters it based on user profiles. Then it ranks the information, which can be gathered for individual lawyers, groups of lawyers or the entire firm. The company, which picked up a $200,000 investment at the Bend Venture Conference in October, has earned rave reviews from some of the early users of the platform. Kristen Leis, business development manager at Stoel Rives in Portland, said the software has been well-received at the law firm, which is based in Oregon and has 11 offices in seven states. See Manzama / C6

C

GREEN LIVING, TECHNOLOGY & SCIENCE IN OREGON

By Jim Robbins New York Times News Service

N O T QUITE

RIPE Spring puts farmers market produce on slight rain delay By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

F

armers markets around Central Oregon are starting up this week, offering early crops such as fresh salad greens, green garlic, rhubarb, radishes and more. But observant local food fans might notice that some of the fresh fruits and veggies will be a little late to market this year, due to a cool and cloudy spring. “We’re probably two weeks behind on most of these things,” said Jim Fields, owner of Fields Farm in Bend that plans to sell produce Wednesday at the Bend Farmers Market. Still, last week he sent out Community Supported Agriculture boxes filled with asparagus, salad mix, greens and radishes, and he was harvesting the first round of arugula. The nighttime and daytime low temperatures have been hard on some of the crops, Fields said, with asparagus moving slowly and plum trees producing white flowers only just last week, which is a couple of weeks behind when they typically bloom. See Market / C6

GREEN

CHARLO, Mont. — For 19 years, the owl researcher Denver Holt has journeyed to Barrow, Alaska, each summer to map out the predator-prey relationship between the lemmings that crawl across the tundra and the white owls that hunt them from above. As he prepares for his 20th field season in the Arctic, he says that the snowy owl has a role to play in understanding ecological changes in one of the fastest-changing places in the world. “When lemmings are doing well, everything is doing well — eider ducks, sandhill cranes, arctic fox and weasels,” Holt said. “If climate change results in habitat changes and it affects the lemmings, it will show up in the snowy owls because 90 percent of their diet is lemmings. The owls are the key to everything else.” Twenty years of data provides an unusually deep look at a species’ population trends. And more research on snowy owls in other parts of the world — they are found throughout the Arctic region — could flag changes in the global arctic ecosystem even without other indicators. “It’s a believable point,” said John Fitzpatrick, director of the Cornell Lab of Orthinology, at Cornell University. “Systems are complex, and if we have an easily accessible barometer for the system beneath it that’s a really good thing, because we can measure cheaply and easily how an ecosystem is doing. It gives us a quick handle.” See Owls / C6

SCIENCE

Central Oregon farmers markets B END • 3-7 p.m. Wednesdays, starting Wednesday, Drake Park • 2-6 p.m., Fridays, starting Friday, St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road

MADRAS • 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturdays, starting Saturday, Sahalee Park

PRINEVILLE • 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Saturdays, starting June 18, City Plaza on Third St.

REDMOND • 3-7 p.m., Fridays, started May 27, Redmond Greenhouse, 4101 S. Highway 97 • 11:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m., Tuesdays, starting June 14, Centennial Park

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

“When lemmings are doing well, everything is doing well — eider ducks, sandhill cranes, arctic fox and weasels. If climate change results in habitat changes and it affects the lemmings, it will show up in the snowy owls because 90 percent of their diet is lemmings. The owls are the key to everything else.” — Denver Holt, owl researcher

Jim and Kathi Hayward look at items for sale Friday at Cinco Estrellas Organic Farm booth at the Redmond Greenhouse farmers market.

“They’re in the stratosphere. All these things are certainly strong markers for investors.” — Roger Lee, executive director of Economic Development of Central Oregon

Thinkstock Bulletin ile photos

A snowy owl.


T EL EV IS IO N

C2 Monday, May 30, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Don’t forget those who died for freedom Dear Abby: Memorial Day is not about war; it’s about PEOPLE. It’s about those dedicated individuals — most of them young — who died serving their country and their fellow Americans as well as future generations. In other words, all of us. We Americans are at our best when we come together bonded by a noble purpose. And that’s the reason for the National Moment of Remembrance on Memorial Day. Abby, your patriotism and compassion have helped us in our effort to unite the more than 311 million Americans who live in this land of the free and home of the brave. Please remind your millions of readers to come together by pausing for a moment at 3 p.m. local time, wherever they are, to acknowledge the sacrifice of our fallen. Unfortunately, too many of our citizens forget to remember. I am determined to find ways to help America continue to pay tribute to the nearly 2 million men and women who have died for us. They were the best of the best — the pride of the USA. We owe them the commitment to reflect on what they did and to put remembrance into action. This means to give back to our country and to live honoring them every day, not just on Memorial Day. Thank you for all you do to honor America’s heroes. — Carmella Laspada, Founder, No Greater Love Dear Carmella: You’re welcome. I hope readers will heed your request to offer a silent tribute this afternoon to the men and women who have given their lives in the service of this country. Considering the magnitude of their sacrifice, it’s the least we can do. To all of my friends out there — please join me, as well as the iron workers, sheet metal workers, firefighters and painters unions and thousands of AFLCIO members who have supported the Moment since its incep-

DEAR ABBY tion, in a moment of silence at 3 p.m. Today, as in the past, major league baseball games will stop, customers and staff will pause in more than 30,000 grocery stores throughout the country, and, of course, personnel serving in the military around the world will observe it, too. To learn what others are doing today, visit www .ngl.org. Dear Abby: My daughter visited us for a week with her two children. The older one, “Wendy,” age 9, was always “finding” money — in the parking lot, the driveway and other places. After they left, we discovered cash missing from our car and the savings jar in our house. I called my daughter to inform her of our discovery, and in a nonchalant, what’s-the-big-deal voice she said, “OK, Dad, how much did she take? I’ll write a check.” I told her the money isn’t the problem. The fact that Wendy is stealing is the problem. My daughter thinks I’m attacking my granddaughter and is no longer speaking to me. What should I do? — Taken by Surprise in Ohio Dear Taken by Surprise: Clearly your phone call wasn’t the first time your daughter has heard that Wendy has stolen. Whether the problem is lack of character, lack of parenting or an emotional issue, the child needs professional help. But unless her mother is willing to do more about it than write a check, there is nothing you or I can do to help your granddaughter. You did the responsible thing by informing your daughter. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

ABC show sets up shop in L.A. ‘Body of Proof’ production to take advantage of film tax credit By Richard Verrier Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — ABC is moving its high-rated TV drama “Body of Proof” to Los Angeles from Rhode Island. The new crime drama set in Philadelphia, which premiered in March and stars Dana Delany and Jeri Ryan, filmed its first season in Providence, R.I., but uncertainty surrounding the small state’s film tax credit program put California in play. Gov. Lincoln Chafee has recommended dismantling Rhode Island’s film tax credit program to balance the state budget. ABC received approval for a $7 million tax credit for “Body of Proof” in March, said Amy Lemisch, director of the California Film Commission. The production has a crew of about 200 people. “They have indicated they are moving the show and will start filming in Los Angeles in mid- to late July,” Lemisch said. “It’s a huge deal for us and another example of how our tax credit program is increasing production.” ABC representatives were not immediately available for comment. The move marks the highest-profile TV series to date to relocate to L.A. since California enacted a film tax credit program in 2009 aimed at curbing runaway production. The law was adopted partly in response to the outcry in Hollywood over ABC’s deci-

The Associated Press

From left: Geoffrey Arend, Windell Middlebrooks, Jeri Ryan, Dana Delany, Nic Bishop, Sonja Sohn and John Carroll Lynch star in the ABC series “Body of Proof.” The first season of the series was filmed in Rhode Island, but a $7 million tax credit in California shifted the production team west. sion to move the sitcom “Ugly Betty” from L.A. to New York in 2008 to take advantage of that state’s tax credits. The show has since been canceled. Since 2009, the state tax credit program has approved 125 projects accounting for $2.2 billion in production spending and $760 million in wages, state officials say. The program, which excludes movies costing more than $75 million, has mostly benefited lower-budget films and new cable shows but has attracted rela-

tively few TV series to California from other states or countries. Among the TV shows that have relocated was “Torchwood,” the BBC America sci-fi series that moved to L.A. from Wales this year, after receiving approval for a California production tax credit. Comedy Central’s “Important Things With Demetri Martin” came to L.A. from New York after receiving approval for a California tax credit in 2009. Network TV series like “Body of Proof” can qualify for California’s film tax program only

if they are moving to California from another location. “Body of Proof” finished as TV’s most-watched new show for the 2010-11 season and on average qualified as ABC’s mostwatched series from 10 to 11 p.m. Tuesdays, according to the network. In 2009, ABC moved production of “All My Children” to L.A. from New York to take advantage of lower production costs. ABC recently announced it was canceling the long-running soap opera.

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Å River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ River Monsters: The Lost Reels ‘PG’ River Monsters The Giants ’ ‘PG’ River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ River Monsters Jungle Killer (N) ‘PG’ Finding Bigfoot (N) ’ ‘PG’ 68 50 26 38 River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ The Real Housewives of New Jersey ‘14’ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Platinum Hit This is Platinum Hit ‘14’ Housewives/NJ 137 44 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Ron White’s Celebrity Salute to the Troops ‘PG’ Å Ron White’s Celebrity Salute to the Troops ‘PG’ Å The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ Å 190 32 42 53 World’s Strictest Parents ‘PG’ Å American Greed Marc Dreier American Greed Stephen Trantel American Greed Art Williams Jr. American Greed Apocalypse 2012 Celebrity Abs Paid Program 51 36 40 52 American Greed Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 CNN Presents Å (6:45) ››› “The 40-Year-Old Virgin” (2005) Steve Carell, Catherine Keener. 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Good-Charlie Shake It Up! ‘G’ Wizards-Place Wizards-Place 87 43 14 39 Shake It Up! ‘G’ American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. Swamp Brothers Swamp Brothers American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. 156 21 16 37 American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. 30 for 30 Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å NBA Tonight (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 30 for 30 Strongest Man Strongest Man Strongest Man Strongest Man Strongest Man World’s Strongest Man Competition Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Å NASCAR Now Å Strongest Man Strongest Man 22 24 21 24 Strongest Man 2011 Indianapolis 500 From Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis. (N) Best of-Poker Best of-Poker 2009 Poker - Europe 23 25 123 25 IndyCar Racing From May 24, 2009. Å SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Secret Life of American Teen Secret Life of American Teen Secret Life of American Teen Secret Life of American Teen The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 67 29 19 41 (4:30) ››› “Dirty Dancing” (1987) Jennifer Grey, Patrick Swayze. Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Å Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å 5 Ingredient Fix Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Iron Chef America ‘G’ Unwrapped Unwrapped Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Meat- Potatoes Best Thing Ate Challenge Steak cook-off in Texas. 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men 131 Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hollywood at Home ‘G’ Å House Hunters: Beachfront Homes House Hunters Hunters Int’l House Hunters House Hunters 176 49 33 43 Hunters Int’l Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Gettysburg Turning points, technology and facts of the Civil War. 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United at Portland Timbers MLB Baseball Baltimore Orioles at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. The Dan Patrick Show UEFA Soccer 20 45 28* 26 Dan Patrick ›› “Star Wars: Episode II -- Attack of the Clones” (2002, Science Fiction) Ewan McGregor, Natalie Portman. ’ ››› “Star Wars: Episode III -- Revenge of the Sith” 132 31 34 46 (3:30) ››› “Star Wars: Episode III -- Revenge of the Sith” (2005) ’ ›› “Underworld” (2003, Horror) Kate Beckinsale, Scott Speedman, Michael Sheen. Å ›› “Underworld: Evolution” (2006) Kate Beckinsale, Scott Speedman. Ginger Snaps 133 35 133 45 (4:30) ›› “Star Trek Generations” (1994) Patrick Stewart. Live-Holy Land Mark Chironna J. 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(4:10) ›› “The Karate Kid Part II” (6:05) ›› “The Karate Kid Part III” 1989 Ralph Macchio. ’ ‘PG’ Å ››› “Parenthood” 1989, Comedy Steve Martin. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (10:05) ›› “Some Kind of Wonderful” 1987 ‘PG-13’ Cheech-Next ››› “Von Ryan’s Express” 1965, War Frank Sinatra. ‘NR’ Å ›› “For the Boys” 1991, Musical Bette Midler, James Caan, George Segal. ‘R’ Å For the Boys ‘R’ ››› “Von Ryan’s Express” 1965, War Frank Sinatra. ‘NR’ Å Dirt Demons Dirt Demons Dirt Demons Dirt Demons Red Bull X-Fighters 2010 Moscow The Daily Habit Cubed ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ Red Bull X-Fighters 2010 Moscow The Daily Habit Cubed ‘14’ Big Break Indian Wells Big Break Indian Wells (N) The Golf Fix Golf Central Learning Center Big Break Indian Wells The Golf Fix Golf Fitness Learning Center Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ‘G’ Å Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ‘G’ Å Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (4:30) ››› “How to Train Your Dragon” (6:15) › “All About Steve” 2009 Sandra Bullock, Bradley Cooper. A smitten woman Real Time With Bill Maher Journalist Lady Gaga Presents the Monster Ball ››› “Taking Chance” 2009 Kevin Bacon. Lt. Col. Michael Strobl Too Big to Fail: HBO 425 501 425 10 2010, Fantasy ’ ‘PG’ Å follows a news cameraman around the country. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Reihan Salam. ’ ‘MA’ Å escorts a fallen Marine home. ’ ‘NR’ Å Opening Tour: Madison Square Garden (5:05) ››› “Heathers” 1989, Comedy Winona Ryder, Christian Slater, Shannen Doherty. ‘R’ ›› “The Dreamers” 2003 Michael Pitt. Young people play sexual games in 1968 Paris. ››› “Heathers” 1989, Comedy Winona Ryder, Christian Slater. ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (4:00) ›› “Percy Jackson & the Olympi- ›› “Predators” 2010 Adrien Brody, Alice Braga. Fearsome (7:45) ››› “The Blind Side” 2009, Drama Sandra Bullock, Tim McGraw, Quinton Aaron. A well-to-do white ›› “MacGruber” 2010, Comedy Will Forte. A clueless soldier-of- “Busty Cops and the MAX 400 508 7 ans: The Lightning Thief” ’ aliens hunt a band of human fighters. ’ ‘R’ Å couple adopts a homeless black teen. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å fortune must find a stolen nuke. ’ ‘R’ Å Jewel” (4:00) Inside the Vietnam War ‘14’ Supercarrier: USS Ronald Inside the Vietnam War ‘14’ Supercarrier: USS Ronald NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents Fanboy-Chum The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ CatDog ‘G’ Å CatDog ‘G’ Å NTOON 89 115 189 Destination Top Truck Chal ATV World Fear No Evil Whitetail Nation Young Blood Hunt Adv Best of the West Off Rd. Overhaul ATV World Destination Top Truck Chal Off Rd. Overhaul Western Extreme OUTD 37 307 43 (4:30) ››› “Adventureland” 2009, Comedy-Drama Jesse Eisen- › “Next Day Air” 2009 Donald Faison. A delivery man gives a Weeds Gentle Pup- Weeds ’ ‘MA’ Å The Big C ’ ‘MA’ Å The Big C ’ ‘MA’ Å › “The Back-up Plan” 2010 Jennifer Lopez. A single woman (11:45) ›› “Youth in SHO 500 500 berg, Kristen Stewart. iTV. ’ ‘R’ Å package of drugs to the wrong people. ‘R’ Å pies ’ ‘MA’ becomes pregnant, then meets her ideal man. Revolt” The 10 ‘PG’ The 10 ‘PG’ Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Car Warriors ’79 Cadillac ‘14’ AMA Pro Racing Salt Lake City (N) AMA Pro Racing Salt Lake City (N) Car Warriors ’79 Cadillac ‘14’ NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 Undercover Br. (5:25) ››› “The Princess and the Frog” 2009 ’ ‘G’ (7:10) ››› “Toy Story 3” 2010 Voices of Tom Hanks. ’ ‘G’ Å ›› “Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time” 2010 Jake Gyllenhaal. ‘PG-13’ ››› “Salt” 2010 Angelina Jolie. STARZ 300 408 300 (4:45) ››› “Cairo Time” 2009 Patricia (6:15) ›› “The Boys Are Back” 2009, Comedy-Drama Clive Owen. A grieving wid(11:45) ››› “Scary ›› “The Craft” 1996, Horror Robin Tunney, Fairuza Balk, Neve Campbell. L.A. teens › “Sorority Row” 2009, Horror Briana Evigan. A killer stalks a TMC 525 525 Clarkson. ’ ‘PG’ Å ower struggles to raise his two sons alone. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å strike back at tormentors with witchcraft. ’ ‘R’ Å group of sorority sisters. ’ ‘R’ Å Movie” Heads-Up Poker Heads-Up Poker Heads-Up Poker Heads-Up Poker Heads-Up Poker Heads-Up Poker Heads-Up Poker VS. 27 58 30 The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å Joan & Melissa: Joan Knows Best? WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 30, 2011 C3

CALENDAR TODAY

FRIDAY

NOT JUST A NUMBER: A continuous Memorial Day reading of the name, age and hometown of soldiers killed in Iraq and Afghanistan; free; 9 a.m.10 p.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 970-4269512 or firstamendmentsightings@ live.com. RECREATION SWIM: Afternoon recreation swim for kids out of school for Memorial Day; $5.50; $3.50 ages 3-15; $4.50 ages 16-18; noon-5 p.m.; Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, 800 N.E. Sixth St., Bend; 541-389-7665. BEND MEMORIAL DAY SERVICE: Featuring speaker Jeff Eager and a jet flyover; followed by a reception at VFW Post 1643; free; 1 p.m.; Deschutes Memorial Gardens, 63875 N. U.S. Highway 97; 541-3890775. CHARITY AND CHUCKLES: A comedy showcase performed by local comedians; proceeds benefit Bethlehem Inn; $3; 7 p.m.; Old Mill Brew Werks, 384 S.W. Upper Terrace Drive, Bend; 541-633-7670. CLAUDE BOURBON: The Englandbased musician performs blues, jazz and folk guitar; $15 suggested donation; 7-9:30 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; The Barn in Sisters, 68467 Three Creeks Road; 775-233-1433 or dooleysbarn@gmail.com. SING FOR ALL: A community sing open to the public; free; 7 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; 541-390-2441 or www. freewebs.com/bendgospel.

PATIO & BAKE SALE: Proceeds benefit church activities; free; 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Holy Redeemer Catholic Church, 16137 Burgess Road, La Pine; 541-536-2959. “THE SOUND OF MUSIC”: St. Francis of Assisi School presents the Broadway musical of the singing von Trapp family set in Austria during World War II; $5, $3 children, $20 families; 1 and 6:30 p.m.; St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church & School, 2450 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-382-4701 or www. saintfrancisschool.net. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998 or www.bendfarmersmarket. com. REDMOND FRIDAY FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Redmond Greenhouse, 4101 S. U.S. Highway 97; 541-604-5156 or redmondfridaymarket@gmail.com. BEND HAIKU WEEKEND: Featuring displays of haiku-related art, a haiku wall, haiku contest and more; free; 5 p.m.; Liberty Theater, 849 N.W. Wall St.; 541-433-2200, haikubyanya@ gmail.com or http://sites.google. com/site/haikuoregon/hsa-meeting. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend and the Old Mill District; free; 5-9 p.m.; throughout Bend. MUSIC IN PUBLIC PLACES: Featuring a performance by the Summit Express Jazz Band; free; 5 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jayne Pearson Faulkner reads from her memoir “The Place of Belonging”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. “OH YOU COWGIRL!”: A screening of the documentary, with a presentation by filmmaker Shirley Morris; proceeds benefit the Bend High Equestrian Team; $8, $5 children and students; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541410-0433 or http://thelonecowgirl. blogspot.com. BELLUS VOCIS AND CENTRAL SINGERS: The Central Oregon Community College choirs perform works from Claude Debussy, Moses Hogan and more, under the direction of James Knox; $6, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7512. “DEPARTURES”: A screening of the 2008 PG-13-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld. org. LAST BAND STANDING: A battle of the bands competition featuring local acts; tickets must be retrieved at participating venues; free; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; http:// url.bb/LBS11.

TUESDAY CRAGGING IN EUROPE: Wim Verhoeven talks about his four favorite European crags; free; 8 p.m.; Bend Rock Gym, 1182 S.E. Centennial Court; 541-633-6197 or www.bendrockgym.com.

WEDNESDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or www. bendfarmersmarket.com. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, DIE WALKÜRE”: Starring Bryn Terfel, Deborah Voigt, Jonas Kaufmann, Eva-Maria Westbroek and Stephanie Blythe in an encore presentation of Wagner’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-3826347. OR, THE WHALE: The Americana band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

THURSDAY “THE SOUND OF MUSIC”: St. Francis of Assisi School presents the Broadway musical of the singing von Trapp family set in Austria during World War II; $5, $3 children, $20 families; 1 and 6:30 p.m.; St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church & School, 2450 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-3824701 or www.saintfrancisschool.net. BOOK CLUB DISCUSSION: Discuss “A Visit from the Goon Squad” by Jennifer Egan; free; 6:30 p.m.; Camalli Book Co., 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541323-6134. YAMN: The Denver-based trancefusion band performs; $7; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com.

SATURDAY DRESS DASH: Search for discounted wedding gowns; proceeds benefit Making Memories Breast Cancer Foundation; free admission; 7-10 a.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 503-491-8091 or babc@ makingmemories.org. GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit scholarships for children in Rwanda; free; 7 a.m.-2 p.m.; 824 N.W. Stonepine Drive, Bend; 541-306-0864 or www. kurerafund.org.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

AGILITY TRIAL: Bend Agility Action Dogs presents a day of dogs navigating obstacle courses; free; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-410-4646. GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the school’s Sparrows and Sparrow Clubs USA; free admission; 8 a.m.-2 p.m.; Seven Peaks School, 19660 S.W. Mountaineer Way, Bend; 541-3827755. PLANT SALE: A sale of vegetable and landscape plants; proceeds benefit the Opportunity Center of Central Oregon; free admission; 8:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Zion Lutheran Church, 1113 S.W. Black Butte Blvd., Redmond; 541-382-7044. VFW BREAKFAST: Community breakfast with pancakes, sausage, ham, eggs, coffee and more; $7, $6 seniors and children; 8:30 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. “YEAR OF THE RIVER PART II” EXHIBIT OPENS: New exhibit explores sustainable uses of the Deschutes River and watershed; exhibit runs through Sept. 11; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org. BEND HAIKU WEEKEND: The Haiku Society of America meets, with haiku readings and a haiku walk through Drake Park; free; 9 a.m., 4:30 p.m. walk; Liberty Theater, 849 N.W. Wall St.; 541433-2200, haikubyanya@gmail. com or http://sites.google.com/site/ haikuoregon/hsa-meeting. HIGH DESERT RHUBARB FESTIVAL: Dutch-oven cooks prepare a variety of rhubarb dishes; with live music, and vendors selling antiques, crafts, rhubarb and more; proceeds benefit La Pine Community Kitchen; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; L&S Gardens and Land Clearing, 50792 S. Huntington Road, La Pine; 541-536-2049. PATIO & BAKE SALE: Proceeds benefit church activities; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Holy Redeemer Catholic Church, 16137 Burgess Road, La Pine; 541-536-2959. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www. centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. LARKSPUR FESTIVAL: Featuring a plant sale, family activities, games, craft sales, live entertainment, dance demonstrations, food and more; free; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Larkspur Park, 1700 S.E. Reed Market Road, Bend; 541388-1133. STREAM STEWARDSHIP DAY: Join the Upper Deschutes Watershed Council for a day of stewardship activities to keep local rivers and streams healthy; free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; McKay Park, 166 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-389-7275 or www. restorethedeschutes. org. YOUTH FLY-FISHING DAY: Ages 11-17 can learn to cast, tie flies and more; fishing licenses required; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Pine Nursery Park, 3750 N.E. Purcell Blvd, Bend; COFYouthDay@cofflyfishers. org. CRESCENDO BENDO: Cascade School of Music students and teachers perform a series of concerts; proceeds benefit the school’s scholarship fund; $2 first three concerts, $5 evening show; 3 p.m. guitar, 4 p.m. kids keyboard, 6 p.m. strings, 7 p.m. evening show; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org.

SITKA A LA ROAD: A open artist studio featuring writer Ellen Waterston; with information about the Sitka Center; free; 4-7 p.m.; The Nature of Words, 224 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-994-5485 or www. sitkacenter.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jayne Pearson Faulkner reads from her memoir “The Place of Belonging”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866.

SUNDAY AGILITY TRIAL: Bend Agility Action Dogs presents a day of dogs navigating obstacle courses; free; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-410-4646. HEAVEN CAN WAIT: 5K walk and run to benefit Sara’s Project; $20-$40; 9 a.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; 541-706-7743 or www. heavencanwait.org. FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-3 p.m.; Pine Forest Grange, 63214 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-447-5451. BROADWAY REVUE AND SINGALONG: A performance of Broadway show tunes, with audience participation; free; 2 p.m.; Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th St., Redmond; 541-548-3367. CASCADE WINDS SYMPHONIC BAND: The band performs “Space,” music from Star Wars, Star Trek and more, under the direction of Dan Judd; donations accepted; 2 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541593-1635 or www.cascadewinds. org. LA PHIL LIVE — DUDAMEL CONDUCTS BRAHMS: A screening of the live concert, featuring the Los Angeles Philharmonic performing music by Brahms; conducted by Gustavo Dudamel; $20, $16 children; 2 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. NOTABLES SWING BAND: The senior band plays favorites from the 1930s-50s; $5; 2-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. TYRONE WELLS: The Californiabased rock/pop musician performs, with the Eric Tollefson Duo; $12 plus fees in advance, $15 day of show; 7 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com.

MONDAY June 6 JAZZ SINGERS BENEFIT: Featuring performances by Michael Van Handel and Cascade School of Music jazz singers; proceeds will fund the group’s PA system; $10; 6 p.m.; Level 2 Global Food & Lounge, 360 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, #210, Bend; 541-3826866. CHARITY AND CHUCKLES: A comedy showcase performed by local comedians; proceeds benefit Friends of the Badlands; $3; 7 p.m.; Old Mill Brew Werks, 384 S.W. Upper Terrace Drive, Bend; 541-633-7670.

TUESDAY June 7 BENEFIT DINNER: With live music by CinderBlue; reservations requested; proceeds benefit Camp Sunrise; $35; 5:30 p.m.; Terrebonne Depot, 400 N.W. Smith Rock Way; 541-5487483.

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

BRIDESMAIDS (R) 11:15 a.m., 1:55, 4:35, 7:15 EVERYTHING MUST GO (R) 11:35 a.m., 2:15, 4:55, 7:35 THE GREATEST MOVIE EVER SOLD (PG-13) 11:40 a.m., 2:20, 5, 7:40 THE HANGOVER PART II (R) 12:15, 3, 6, 8:20 IN A BETTER WORLD (R) 11:20 a.m., 2, 4:40, 7:20 MEEK’S CUTOFF (PG) 11:30 a.m., 2:10, 4:50, 7:30

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

BRIDESMAIDS (R) 10:55 a.m., 1:45, 4:45, 7:35, 10:25 FAST FIVE (PG-13) 12:35, 3:35, 6:50, 9:45 THE HANGOVER PART II (R) 10:45 a.m., 12:20, 1:15, 1:55, 3:20, 4:15,

4:55, 6:40, 7:20, 8:05, 9:25, 10, 10:45 KUNG FU PANDA 2 (PG) 10:35 a.m., 1:05, 4:05, 7:10, 9:35 KUNG FU PANDA 2 (DP — PG) 12:30, 1:40, 3:30, 4:40, 6:35, 10:15 KUNG FU PANDA 2 3-D (PG) 11:05 a.m., noon, 3, 6:05, 7:45, 9:05 PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES 3-D (PG-13) 11 a.m., 12:55, 2, 3:55, 5, 7, 8, 10:05 PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:20, 9:30 PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (DP — PG-13) 10:30 a.m., 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:35 PRIEST 3-D (PG-13) 9:55 RIO (G) 12:05, 3:05, 6:10 SOUL SURFER (PG) 9:10 THOR (PG-13) 3:45, 9:15 THOR 3-D (PG-13) 12:45, 6:25 WATER FOR ELEPHANTS (PG-13) 10:40 a.m., 1:25, 4:25, 7:50, 10:30 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies. EDITOR’S NOTE: Digitally projected

shows (marked as DP) use one of several different technologies to provide maximum fidelity. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) HANNA (PG-13) 6 HOP (PG) Noon SOURCE CODE (PG-13) 9

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

FAST FIVE (PG-13) 10:15 a.m., 1, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 THE HANGOVER PART II (R) 11:15 a.m., 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 KUNG FU PANDA 2 (PG) 10 a.m., 12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 7, 9:15

Sharon Gekoski-Kimmel / Philadelphia Inquirer

Devin Hassan, left, works the camera, as the cast of five — Chris Ready, Tom Saporito, Kat Catanakis, Jamie Kerezsi and Jay Robins, from left to right on steps — watch a body being removed in one of the scenes of Drexel University’s “Off Campus.”

Drexel University TV students learn by producing a sitcom By Jonathan Storm The Philadelphia Inquirer

PHILADELPHIA — The FedEx man arrives with flowers at the apartments in the 200 block of North 35th Street. The medical examiner’s minions are just removing an old man’s body. Is the sender psychic? Nope. It’s another collision of reality and fantasy on this cool, sunny day. TV majors in the Antoinette Westphal College of Media Arts and Design are shooting a scene with the dead-man dummy on the last day of season three of “Off Campus,” the Drexel University sitcom. The flower delivery is to a real person in an apartment next door. At Drexel, each season is one half-hour episode, and this one will turn up on TV in Philadelphia in the fall, after postproduction.

Quiet on set?

M T For Monday, May 30

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13) 10:15 a.m., 1:30, 4:45, 8

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

BRIDESMAIDS (R) 5, 7:45 THE HANGOVER PART II (R) 3, 5:30, 8 KUNG FU PANDA 2 (PG) 1:45, 3:45, 5:45, 7:45 PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG13) 1:30, 4:30, 7:30 WATER FOR ELEPHANTS (PG-13) 2:15

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

KUNG FU PANDA 2 (PG) 3:40, 6 PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (UPSTAIRS — PG-13) 6 EDITOR’S NOTE: Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

Planes buzz overhead repeatedly. Trucks lumber loudly by on nearby Powelton Avenue. Motorcycles, street rods with glasspack mufflers, junkers with no mufflers — they all cruise noisily up 35th, drivers curious about the cameras. At least the guy on the clackety-clack skateboard has the decency to hop off and carry his board quietly by. “In a real shoot, probably, I would shut the street,” says executive producer (and Drexel television professor) Andrew Susskind, who has a 20-year string of TV credits behind him, including time as president of television at Ron Howard’s Imagine Entertainment. But a “real shoot” would have lots of Hollywood bucks to pay for police to man the detours and provide security for Natalie Portman or Bruce Willis or whatever big name had come to town. Instead, “Off Campus” has local actors in front of the cameras, and scads of students and noisy vehicles behind. What do you do, soundman Rich Mach, a sophomore from Norristown, Pa., is asked: “You pray. … Sometimes, you have to edit and dub the dialogue back in, but we try not to.”

Mairin McKinlay, a junior from Cheshire, Conn., who, at 5 feet 6, handles the boom mike, is stretching as tall she can, with her arms overhead to keep it out of the shot. She could have worked in costumes or writing or more “appropriate” fields for a woman, but it is 2011. “I know production’s a male-dominated area, but this mike isn’t that much heavy lifting, and I prefer being on set.” “Off Campus” is a cross between “Friends” and “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia,” with more serious moments, filmed in singlecamera style on location, unlike most classic sitcoms, which are done on a stage before a studio audience. At Drexel, sometimes it really is a single camera, as production jiggles along this day while somebody goes off to find the Steadicam. The show stars Kat Catanakis, Jamie Kerezsi, Chris Ready, Jay Robins and Tom Saporito — the only paid help besides professors — as roommates out of college and just beginning life in a not-soreal world. And it’s two things in one, not a floor wax and a dessert topping, but a TV show and college class: TV series production. The course is designed to give students an experience as close to real TV as possible, and in all aspects of production, even things like budgeting. But it’s a little different. No blocked streets, for instance, and no craft service, which is the specialized department on a TV or movie set that supplies the snacks. “Off Campus” is a good gig for a rising actor, too. “The production value is really outstanding,” says Saporito, who plays the annoying mooch and who Susskind says could be on network TV soon. “We’ve gotten some great demo-reel footage from this … something impressive to send to agencies and directors and people like that. The money’s not great, but there are all these connections. All these kids are going to be working in the industry at some point. Some of them already are.”


C4 Monday, May 30, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 30, 2011 C5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO SATURDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, May 30, 2011: This year, rethink decisions and premises on which you’ve based your life. Don’t fear expressing yourself from a new point of view or values system. If you are single, the person you choose today could be different from the one you choose next week or in a few months. Avoid a commitment this year. If you are attached, keep your sweetie tuned in to your changing mental portfolio. Be willing to discuss this transformation. TAURUS understands perhaps too much! The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH A loved one might be deep into a discussion with another person. Use your feelings to recognize just how much you care. Be willing to act emotionally to express the depth of caring you experience. Tonight: Remain sensitive to those around you. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Many observers will note how many people seem to be taken by you in some form. Some might be intellectually drawn to you, while others experience the magic of your charisma. Just be yourself and make your normal choices. Tonight: Your authenticity makes you so lovable. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH Not every holiday can be what you most want and desire. Though having strong desires is excellent, as it gives you drive. On the other hand, be accepting of a need to

distance yourself from others. You might need some space. Tonight: Keep your head down. You can do it even while flipping burgers. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH Many of your most treasured friends and loved ones will surround you, if you planned well. If not, it isn’t too late to pick up the phone and extend an invitation for tonight or next weekend. What is key is to see those you care about most with some frequency. Tonight: Living for the moment. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Accept that others really do depend on you, far more than you realize. Put on your chef’s hat and become the head cook. You discover you have plenty of time to socialize in between flipping burgers, basting chicken or whatever your personal take on a barbecue. Tonight: Taking time for a special friend. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH If you don’t want to be somewhere, don’t go. Your mind will tend to drift when you are not personally involved. Many of you could be thinking about loved ones at a distance or other such thoughts. Tonight: Dream away. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Your relationship with a particular person dominates your thoughts, actions and most likely your plans. Should you not be in sync across the board, you could experience some discomfort. Relax and see what is going on. Tonight: Stay with this person in thought, at least. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH Read Libra for a hint.

Recognize that you might need to hop on a plane in the near future. At least make a phone call to someone at a distance. Know what is going on within, and be willing to act on it. Express yourself — you need to, for you alone. Tonight: Put on a favorite piece of music. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Take a hint from Leo; you are in a very similar position. Today you are in the business of helping others enjoy their Memorial Day. Whether cook or chief bottle washer makes no difference. You are facilitating others’ enjoyment of the moment. Tonight: Try to make it early if you’re tired. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH Whether it is eyeing the pie or the girl or guy, you seem to attach far more possibilities than might exist. The other side of the coin is that you might not choose to realize this fantasy. Stay in the practical. Tonight: Let your inner child emerge. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Basics count, and you could find that you are dealing with a situation you would prefer not to. The obvious fact is you have no choice. A family member could pull you down like an albatross. Nevertheless, make the most of the moment. Tonight: Catch up with friends. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH Sometimes your expectations become too rigid, or too much like your mental pictures. Inevitably, disappointment follows. Try to stay grounded in the present, and visit with those around you. Tonight: The chatter could go to the wee hours. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C6 Monday, May 30, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Market Continued from C1 But the weather has been consistent, he said, without too many hard frosts, and the fruits and vegetables will grow through summer. “Hope springs eternal, and usually we’re rewarded,” Fields said. This spring in Central Oregon has been colder than usual — April’s average daytime highs recorded at Redmond Airport were 53.4 degrees, compared to an average high temperature for the month of 61.5 degrees, said Mike Vescio with the National Weather Service in Pendleton. April’s nighttime lows were an average of 24.2 degrees, compared to a typical average of 30.3 degrees. So far in May, the average temperature is about 4.4 degrees below normal for the month as well, he said. Statewide, the cooler-thanaverage temperatures have delayed crops some, said Bruce Pokarney, spokesman with the Oregon Department of Agriculture, although some of them have started to recover. Once the weather clears up and warms up, the rest could follow. “Things could catch up,” Pokarney said. “If we have a string of nice, warm days that first week of June, a lot of these things can catch up and people might not even notice it.” Plus, there are so many different microclimates throughout the state, he said. While the weather might affect some farmers, others might avoid the delay.

Manzama Continued from C1 “Their product just keeps getting better and better,” she said. Stoel Rives has been serving as beta client to test the software. During the last couple months, Leis said, she has seen major improvements that allow users to get only the most relevant information. For example, she said recently the Listening Platform turned up an item that could bring new business to the firm’s land-use attorneys. “It has completely replaced Google alerts,” Leis said. Leis said the company’s pricing model, which provides a license for a whole law firm, not individual seat licenses, has led to more employees trying and using the software platform. She also praised the customer service. Help is always available, Leis said. The company offered to attend an attorney retreat to discuss the software and also send someone to Stoel Rives’ Portland office to help. What caught the attention of Larry Bodine, who writes the LawMarketing blog, was the way Manzama displays its results in a chart showing emerging trends and spikes of online activity about companies or the chosen search terms. “(It) lets you see at a glance which of your topics suddenly became hot online,” he wrote Jan. 30, after Manzama’s launch. “You can click on the top of the spike to see exactly what discussions, tweets or news items were the source of the activity.” After seeing a demo May 13 of the software, which Ozolin and Hinkle call a Listening Platform, the founder of a New York City executive-search firm tweeted, “Law firms shld use 2 gain competitive edge!” The positive feedback from clients and reviewers has prompted the founders to move faster, grab market share and “separate ourselves from the pack,” Ozolin said. He and Hinkle both said the product took off faster than expected. Five months ago, Ozolin said, they didn’t know if they had a product that the legal community would embrace. He got an indication, however, several months ago while moderating a panel discussion at a legal trade show. When an audience member asked how to keep track of so much information, a panelist said she had to give a shout out to Manzama, whose software helped her prepare for the event. Ozolin thought to himself, “OK, that’s really good.” The two founders said they initially focused the software on large law firms because they have departments dedicated to business development or marketing that could use the service to bring in new clients or support existing clients. But even with that limited target audience, the response from the legal community overwhelmed them. For awhile, they could only respond to incoming calls, said

Still, agriculture reports show that some vegetables are a little behind, and strawberries are a couple of weeks behind in some parts of the state, he said. Groundwork Organics, a Willamette Valley farm that sells at the Bend Farmers Market on Wednesdays, has been selling produce in the Portland and Eugene markets, said Sophie Bello, who owns the farm with her husband. A big crop right now is new potatoes, she said, as well as salad mix, romaine lettuce, green garlic and fava beans. They’ve got lots of strawberries, she said, but they are seeing some delays in when some fruits and vegetables are ready for picking. “Our field berries are a little behind what we’re used to, but we should still be seeing them in full force in the first week of June or so,” Bello said. But many people come to farmers markets to just see the unusual varieties of food in season, she said, adding that she and others indulge in whatever’s ready to be harvested right then. “I would expect to see all the same beautiful stuff, just perhaps a bit later than usual,” Bello said. “The season is quick on a lot of these things.” While the larger producers like Groundwork Organics will all be at Bend Farmers Market for opening day Wednesday, some of the smaller ones will join in a couple weeks later, said farmers market manager Katrina Wiest. Kimberly Orchards, for example, won’t have anything ready to sell at the farmers market until July, she said.

Hinkle, who serves as the chief operating officer. They didn’t have time to make sales calls to prospective clients, but now they have hired a sales person to help make sales calls, and are in the process of hiring a second. The company has exceeded its business plan goals every month, including the decision to create a sister site for small law firms and sole practitioners to sign on to the Listening Platform and pay with a credit card. “That segment is three times the size of large law firms,” Ozolin said. Statistics from the American Bar Association bear that out. They show 76 percent of law firms in the U.S. had five or fewer lawyers in 2000, the latest figures available. And firms with 10 or fewer represented 89 percent. Lawyers are not limited to law firms, either, Ozolin said. Investment banks, accounting firms and other large companies have in-house lawyers. “From a small-firm perspective,” Hinkle said, “it’s kind of an equalizer.” The company’s growth is notable for a company that’s only a year old. Originally located on the second floor of a duplexturned-office building on Northwest Bond Street, Manzama moved recently to larger offices on Southwest Century Drive across from Safeway. It’s grown from its founders to about a dozen employees. Now the company also is attracting board members of note. On May 5, the company added two new board members, Nate Fineberg, former CEO of a software company that was sold to

C OV ER S T OR I ES Kim Kambak, who leases acres at The Last Stand Farm in Prineville, said that she hopes to be selling at the Wednesday Bend Farmers Market this summer, but not in the first two weeks. “I feel like I’m just about 10 days behind — it’s just that time of patience,” she said. But the plants are looking good, she said, the hens are producing eggs and there are good spring onions and greens on the way. The delay in Central Oregon crops, however, could be good for local consumers, she noted — fruits and veggies might be available from Willamette Valley growers now, and then from nearby producers later in the summer. Sarahlee Lawrence, owner of Rainshadow Organics in Terrebonne, is advising patience as well, even as people know how spring seems to be on a severalweek delay. “Central Oregon is so predictably unpredictable, so I’m not surprised in the slightest,” she said. She kicked off the season with the new Redmond Friday Farmer’s Market last week, with a table of kale, greens and more. And put in kohlrabi, cabbage and broccoli, which will be ready later this summer. “We’re going to be there with our few things, and in a couple more weeks … we’ll be in full swing,” Lawrence said. “We’re continuing despite the weather; it will get sunny eventually.” Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or at kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

Lexis Nexis in 2004 for more than $25 million, according to Manzama’s website, and Dino Vendetti, managing director at San Francisco venture capital firm Formative Ventures. He’s also been a partner at two other venture capital firms, including Vulcan Ventures, led by Paul Allen. Manzama’s founders also bring their own years of experience to the company. Ozolin spent nearly 15 years helping law firms use technology. In 1995, he founded Legal Anywhere, a company that created extranets, essentially private secure websites, for law firms and their clients to share documents. He sold the company in 2000. Ozolin, who has a joint lawMBA degree from Willamette University, headed up technology and knowledge management for a law firm that today has 18 offices worldwide. He also served as vice president at Thomson Reuters. Hinkle most recently worked for Autoweb, managing advertising and sales campaigns for Toyota, Honda, Nissan and others. He also held sales and operations positions at Oracle Software Corp. Their experience shows, said EDCO’s executive director. “What Peter (Ozolin) and his team have done is identify a need in the marketplace,” Lee said. “I think he’s really hit a nerve in the legal community.” Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@bendbulletin.com.

Owls Continued from C1 There’s an unscientific reason to study the snowy owl as well, Holt says. They are a charismatic ambassador to the world to warn of problems caused by climate change. The males are often pure white, and the females are white with mottled gray. “People pay attention to owls more than other birds because they look like us,” he said. “They have a symmetrical face, eyes facing forward, a round, flat face and a round head with feathers that look like hair.” Holt may know the order strigiformes better than anyone. He has been the director of the nonprofit Owl Research Institute for more than 30 years. “He’s Mr. Owl,” Fitzpatrick said. “He’s one of the premier owl researchers in the world.” The institute, with a staff of four, operates in a converted farmhouse at the foot of the snow-draped Mission Mountains near here, on the edge of a national wildlife refuge. Holt didn’t know it when he moved here from Boston 32 years ago, but there are 15 species of owls in western Montana, 14 of which breed here, more than any other state. Owls, because they are most often active in the dark and lowlight conditions and can’t rely on appearances, also communicate in a complex language. “Hooting, tooting, whistling, hissing and clacking at night — owls are very vocal birds,” Holt said. “Their mysterious calls at

“People pay attention to owls more than other birds because they look like us. They have a symmetrical face, eyes facing forward, a round, flat face and a round head with feathers that look like hair.” — Denver Holt, owl researcher

night are why they are associated with witches.” These attributes are the reason owls show up so frequently in literature, as product mascots, and in popular culture. Harry Potter, for example, travels with Hedwig, a snowy owl. Owls are also highly evolved hunters and killers. They have the best hearing in the bird world — some owls, like the great gray, can hear a mouse moving under a foot of snow or more and swoop down and capture it without ever seeing it. In owls with a facial disc, the ears are hidden behind it, and are asymmetrical — one is higher than the other. That allows the birds to locate prey both horizontally and vertically for more accurate detection. The round face functions as a kind of satellite dish, funneling the sound to the ears, so the owl can make in-flight course corrections based solely on sound. Their exquisite hearing does not mean that their powers of sight are diminished. Owls have many more rods in their eyes than humans, which bring in much more light, akin to natural night-vision goggles. Like humans, owls have binocular vision, which means they see in three dimensions. They

can also rotate their heads 270 degrees. “In two turns,” Holt said, “they can see all around them.” Their wings stand out as a marvel of evolutionary engineering. There is a comblike serrated feather on the leading edge of the wing, velourlike feathers on top and a trailing edge of feathers on the rear of the wing. “These three things combine to reduce aerodynamic flight noise,” so they can surprise their prey, Holt said. Being rigged for silent flying means they can also hear their prey better. There are about 250 species of owl worldwide, on every continent except Antarctica. They range from the two-ounce elf owl, found in the U.S. Southwest, to Blakiston’s fish owl, a Japanese bird that weights up to 10 pounds. Owls in the tropics eat mostly insects, while temperate owls eat mostly small mammals. “We don’t know a heck of a lot about most species,” Holt said. That means if they are in trouble, no one knows. The short-eared owl, a ground-nesting bird which has been thoroughly researched, has shown a 70 percent decline in recent years.

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S

D

Auto racing Inside Dan Wheldon takes the checkered flag at the 100th Indianapolis 500, see Page D4.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MAY 30, 2011

CYCLING CENTRAL

SOCCER

BEAU EASTES

DC United ends Timbers’ MLS home winning streak PORTLAND — Chris Pontius and Josh Wolff scored second-half goals and DC United beat Portland 3-2 on Sunday to end the expansion Timbers’ MLS home winning streak at five. Perry Kitchen also scored for DC United (4-4-3). The Washington D.C., club has two victories and two ties in its past four MLS matches. Jack Jewsbury and Jorge Perlaza scored in the second half for Portland (5-4-2). The Timbers won their first five league matches at Jeld-Wen Field, a record for an expansion team. Portland was coming off a 1-0 victory over Columbus in its last MLS match last weekend and a 2-0 loss Wednesday night in an international exhibition against AFC Ajax of the Dutch Eredivisie. Pontius gave United a 2-1 lead on a penalty kick in the seventh minute, firing a shot past goalkeeper Troy Perkins, who played for DC United from 2004-07 and again last season. Pontius was awarded the kick when Diego Chara was called for a handball. There was a flurry of activity in the final minutes. Wolff scored in the 85th minute to give United a 3-1 advantage, and Perlaza cut the margin to a goal in the 88th minute. — The Associated Press

INSIDE MLB

Local track hero ignites interest in multi-events A

Photos by Tyler Roemer / The Bulletin

Chris Sheppard, of Bend, splashes through a creek on his way to winning the pro men’s division on Sunday at the Sisters Stampede cross-country mountain bike race.

Stampede rolls on

NL

AL

Mets...............9 Phillies...........5

Red Sox ..... 4-0 Tigers ........ 3-3

Padres ...........5 Nationals .......4

Blue Jays ..... 13 White Sox ......4

Bend riders take top honors at the mountain bike race in Sisters

D’backs ..........4 Astros ............2

Rays ...............7 Indians ...........0

By Mark Morical

Brewers..........6 Giants ............0

Angels ...........6 Twins .............5

Cubs ..............3 Pirates ...........2

Rangers .........7 Royals ............6

Cardinals .......4 Rockies ..........3

Athletics.........6 Orioles ...........4

Dodgers .........8 Marlins ..........0

Yankees .........7 Mariners ........1

The Bulletin

SISTERS — The race was designed for mountain bikers of all skill levels, so pro rider Chris

Sheppard thought he would make it a little more challenging for himself by going full throttle on the downhill section. He paid for that decision, as shown by his scratched and bloodied lower legs after he finished the second annual Sisters Stampede Sunday near FivePine Lodge & Conference Center. See Stampede / D6

The pro women’s category races at the Sisters Stampede on Sunday in Sisters. The second annual mountain bike race drew more than 400 riders from across the Northwest.

Braves............2 Reds...............1

Sox/Tigers split two MLB roundup, see Page D3

GOLF Nelson won by Bradley in playoff Keegan Bradley beats Ryan Palmer for first tour victory, see Page D4

RUNNING

One happy day for hundreds of women By Amanda Miles

ed the races, including more than 500 in the half maraAs it turns out, the Happy thon, whose challenging 13.1• Results from mile course took runners and Girls Half Marathon & 5K Run Sunday’s was an aptly named event. walkers through much of west Happy Girls On Sunday morning — and Bend on a mix of paved and event in into the early afternoon in trail surfaces. Scoreboard, some cases — hundreds of “It’s not easy,” said Sarah women and girls streamed Raitter, the half-marathon Page D2 across the finish line at Rivwinner, of the course. “The erbend Park in Bend, many of second half is definitely fast. them with smiles on their faces, to the You get all that downhill. But it’s just cheers of family and friends. the first half being uphill, it’s not an And that is exactly how Happy Girls, easy course — but it’s really pretty.” in its inaugural year, was supposed to Raitter, 38 and of Reno, Nev., finbe. ished in 1 hour, 27 minutes, 13 seconds. “It was really just a way to celebrate She said she used to live in Bend and healthy lifestyles and camaraderie her husband talked her into running amongst women and give women an Happy Girls after he found out about opportunity to just be amongst their the race while in town to compete in peers and have a girls weekend,” said the Pole Pedal Paddle multisport race Gina Miller, marketing and sports on May 21. events director with Lay It Out Events, Also spotted at the finish were some the company putting on the Happy male participants, but just a few in this Girls events. women-oriented event. More than 850 participants completSee Happy / D5 The Bulletin

Keegan Bradley holds up the Byron Nelson Championship trophy after winning the tournament in Irving, Texas, Sunday.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Tennis ........................................D2 Major League Baseball ..............D3 Golf ........................................... D4 Auto racing ............................... D4 NBA ...........................................D5 Cycling Central.................... D5, 6

Inside

shton Eaton’s track and field career is still in its infancy, but the 2006 Mountain View grad already boasts a long list of accomplishments. Between 2008 and 2010, the former Cougar standout won three consecutive NCAA decathlon national championships — the first athlete ever to accomplish that feat. He was an eighttime all-American at the University of Oregon and is the current world record holder in the indoor heptathlon. He’s also an early medal favorite for next year’s Olympics in London. Not a bad start for a kid who now admits that before his senior year in high school he’d never even heard of the decathlon. Eaton, who last week was back in Bend and volunteered at a local youth track meet, has made quite a name for himself already at just 23 years old. But his most lasting mark on the sport of track and field may be his impact on future multi-event athletes. Around the state and especially in Central Oregon, everyone wants to be like Ashton. “He’s boosted interest in track overall,” says Dave Hood, Eaton’s track coach at Mountain View. “And in particular he’s opened kids’ eyes to the possibilities of participating in the multi-events.” See Hero / D5

COLLEGE BASEBALL

Beavers fall in season finale to Ducks; will host NCAA regional From wire reports EUGENE — The sixth-ranked Oregon State baseball team lost a 6-0 decision to Oregon Sunday at PK Park in the season finale for both teams. The Next up loss, however, came after the • Road to Beavers were announced as Omaha one of 16 regional hosts for Selection the NCAA postseason, which Show starts on Friday. The Beavers closed out the • When: regular season with a 38-17 Today, overall record and 17-10 mark 9:30 a.m. in Pacific-10 Conference play. The 17 league wins are the • TV: ESPN second-most for the club since the Pac-10 unified in 1999. The 17 wins also place the Beavers in second place, one game shy of league champion UCLA. Oregon State starter James Nygren worked just 2 1⁄3 innings, allowing two runs — a runscoring double by Ryon Healy in the first and a run-scoring single in the third off Ben Wetzler that was charged to the righty. See Beavers / D5

Runners participating in the Happy Girls Half Marathon take off from the starting line Sunday morning in Riverbend Park in Bend. Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin


D2 Monday, May 30, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

RUNNING

TENNIS

HAPPY GIRLS HALF MARATHON May 29 in Bend ——— Half Marathon (13.1 miles) Overall winner — Sarah Raitter, Reno, Nev., 1 hour, 27 minutes, 13.3 seconds. (Top 10 in each division) 19-under — 1, Piper McDonald, Bend, 1:33:18.8. 2, Carolyn Green, Notre Dame, Ind., 1:38:07.4. 3, Annie Brinich, Bend, 1:46:27.6. 4, Isabel Smith, Bend, 1:54:58.0. 5, Shelby Miller, Bend, 2:00:11.2. 6, Rachel Simmons, Madras, 2:11:12.6. 7, Amy Spielmaker, Bellingham, Wash., 2:13:46.4. 8, Carly Swisher, Bend, 2:15:08.1. 9, Kadie Clark, Wilsonville, 2:15:24.0. 10, Signe Gensen, Bend, 2:21:33.0. 20-24 — 1, Kristine Luque, Bend, 1:57:08.8. 2, Melissa Wolters, Mountain Home, Idaho, 2:04:11.5. 3, Tarra Ha, Bend, 2:06:27.6. 4, Tenaya Hauge, Bend, 2:07:23.9. 5, Karen Callahan, Naches, Wash., 2:07:49.7. 6, Carolyn Jackson, Corvallis, 2:10:44.6. 7, Tiffany Stevens, Corvallis, 2:10:45.5. 8, Rache Olsen, Springfield, 2:10:53.2. 9, Ally Thompson, Bend, 2:15:36.2. 10, Holly Bailey, Seattle, 2:17:13.1. 25-29 — 1, Allie Gruner, Lake Oswego, 1:32:00.9. 2, Erika Flahterty, Bend, 1:51:34.8. 3, Alma Sproul, Hillsboro, 1:52:21.4. 4, Meghan Conroy, Bend, 1:54:23.6. 5, Tawny Morris, Kennewick, Wash., 1:54:26.1. 6, Katie Banks, Bend, 1:55:43.8. 7, Danielle Bermingham, Bend, 1:57:56.8. 8, Andrea Wampler, Bend, 1:58:01.7. 9, Sara Hanson, Kelseyville, Calif., 1:59:54.8. 10, Tera Anderson, Bend, 2:00:10.1. 30-34 — 1, Nicole Smith, Bend, 1:39:49.1. 2, Amanda Ferrari, Bend, 1:40:26.5. 3, Bryn Singleton, Sisters, 1:40:44.0. 4, Christina Cooper, Moses Lake, Wash., 1:42:54.4. 5, Ryan Levering, Bend, 1:44:21.4. 6, April Wilbur, Boise, Idaho, 1:45:06.6. 7, Nicole Suttle, Bend, 1:47:21.2. 8, Heather Reichert, Bend, 1:48:53.6. 9, Cambria Gilsdorf, Bend, 1:50:07.7. 10, Keli Timm, Bend, 1:51:47.1. 35-39 — 1, Sarah Raitter, Reno, Nev., 1:27:13.3. 2, Charmion Freifeld, Bend, 1:35:47.4. 3, Deidre Trakany, Lake Tapps, Wash., 1:44:24.4. 4, Jeannie Mikalson, Bend, 1:44:57.6. 5, Melissa Chapin, Bend, 1:1:47:07.8. 6, Deb Shaffer, Redmond, 1:50:00.8. 7, Mary Heather Noble, Bend, 1:52:14.1. 8, Janice Heineman, Richland, Wash., 1:52:38.7. 9, Jennifer Briggs, Eugene, 1:53:48.3. 10, Susanna Abrahamson, Bend, 1:54:38.3. 40-44 — 1, Jennifer Sventek, Bend, 1:34:43.0. 2, Jen Roberts, Bend, 1:44:57.9. 3, Michelle Bjork, Bend, 1:45:18.1. 4, Julie Ray, Beaverton, 1:45:34.7. 5, Sharon Sieveking, Bend, 1:46:21.3. 6, Laura Fritz, Bend, 1:49:06.6. 7, Susan Kolb, Bend, 1:52:22.2. 8, Jennifer Donnelly, Hood River, 1:52:28.9. 9, Alex Hamilton, Medford, 1:52:37.4. 10, Sara Wuepper, Bend, 1:52:44.9. 45-49 — 1, Teri Sheasby, Bend, 1:30:46.4. 2, Carolyn Daubeny, Vancouver, British Columbia, 1:48:14.0. 3, Marian Nash, Lake Tapps, Wash., 1:49:47.9. 4, Jenni Mishler, Prineville, 1:51:55.4. 5, Melanie Mangin, Bend, 1:53:05.2. 6, Gina Crowder, Portland, 1:57:49.2. 7, Sharon Mosley, Eugene, 1:58:42.0. 8, Jenine Hoisington, Montague, Calif., 1:59:38.0. 9, Darci Fitzke, Sisters, 1:59:45.0. 10, Katie Callanan, Bend, 2:02:51.5. 50-54 — 1, Gayle Vanderford, Bend, 1:46:28.7. 2, Sue Dougherty, Bend, 1:49:08.7. 3, Leslie Brown, Yacolt, Wash., 1:55:03.2. 4, Cindy Sloan, Terrebonne, 1:57:18.6. 5, Holly Vincent, Bend, 1:50:50.4. 6, Jan Merna, Fairfax, Va., 2:01:08.9. 7, Marie Krasnow, Portland, 2:04:28.3. 8, Sheri Philpott, Terrebonne, 2:08:15.7. 9, Corina Jacquot, Bend, 2:08:51.6. 10, Linda Prendergast, Underwood, Wash., 2:12:55.9. 55-59 — 1, Leslie Cogswell, Bend, 1:56:54.1. 2, Roxanne Ramseyer, La Pine, 2:04:49.9. 3, Leslie Veenstra, Bend, 2:07:02.8. 4, Pauline Kinneman, Sammamish, Wash., 2:09:12.4. 5, Corkie Leblanc, Albany, 2:09:14.2. 6, Dee Mader, Bend, 2:10:18.8. 7, Peggy Philp, Redmond, 2:16:53.7. 8, Nikki Cheney, Bend, 2:20:28.5. 9, Pam Landry, Boulder, Colo., 2:22:08.8. 10, Laurie Marx, Beaverton, 2:22:24.0. 60-64 — 1, Susan Havens, Olympia, Wash., 1:53:55.7. 2, Suzie Miller, Bend, 2:17:28.0. 3, Dorothy Mallon, Bend, 2:28:57.6. 4, Barbara Tracy, Bend, 2:39:36.8. 5, Linda Murphy, Talent, 2:40:17.10. 6, Gayle Johnson, Newberg, 2:42:30.2. 7, Claudia Williams, Sisters, 3:12:02.7. 8, Fran Starry, Beaverton, 3:15:07.2. 9, Diane Seay, Bend, 3:16:07.9. 10, Sharon Hamel, Happy Valley, 3:16:13.8. 65-69 — 1, Eileen Dodson, Bend, 2:35:20.4. 2, Kay Johnson, Eugene, 3:04:20.0. 3, Sue McWilliams, Bend, 3:21:08.9. 4, Roberta Shirley, Terrebonne, 3:31:25.7. 70-over — 1, Judy French, Prineville, 3:24:20.9. Male — 1, John Watts, Nampa, Idaho, 2:35:01.5. ——— 5K Overall winner — Olivia Brooks, Bend, 22 minutes, 23.1 seconds. (Top three in each division) 19-under — 1, Olivia Brooks, Bend, 22:23.1. 2, Tess Nelson, Bend, 23:57.3. 3, Holly Stormberg, Bend, 26:08.0. 20-24 — 1, Sara Rosenbaum, Beaverton, 27:37.1. 2, Denise Green, Boise, Idaho, 27:50.8. 3, Angie Skosky, Bend, 29:59.8. 25-29 — 1, Kelly Boeing, Bend, 24:08.1. 2, Jill Schwartz, Bend, 25:36.4. 3, Leah Maio, Portland, 26:04.3. 30-34 — 1, Tansy Christ, Bend, 22:55.4. 2, Kristin Bishop, Bend, 26:29.3. 3, Michelle Placher, Redmond, 27:41.5. 35-39 — 1, Beth Bengston, Bend, 23:48.2. 2, Sara Miller, Anchorage, Alaska, 24:51.8. 3, Jennifer Egeland, Bend, 28:51.1. 40-44 — 1, Heidi Washenberger, Bainbridge, Wash., 23:01.4. 2, Natasha Nielsen-Porter, Portland, 27:31.6. 3, Samm Travers, Bend, 27:58.3. 45-49 — 1, Lauren Christensen, Portland, 26:33.2. 2, Erin Bevando, Bend, 29:28.4. 3, Cheryl Younger, Bend, 30:03.4. 50-54 — 1, Leila Shepherd, Bend, 28:52.0. 2, Mary Evjen, Bend, 30:30.0. 3, Jill Duncan, Bend, 31:07.4. 55-59 — 1, Beth McBride, Tualatin, 28:54.2. 2, Sally Harmon, Lake Oswego, 32:38.7. 3, Becky Van Verst, Bend, 35:28.1. 60-64 — 1, Cassie Kottkamp, Bend, 35:41.7. 2, Rita Miller, Anchorage, Alaska, 39:29.1. 3, Mary Jean Michels, Eugene, 40:07.5. 65-69 — 1, Barbara Bates, Bend, 33:40.7. 2, Sally Clemens, Bend, 58:22.2. 70-over — 1, Ivy Suber, Klamath Falls, 1:06:09.3. Male — 1, Jesse Smith, Bend, 24:36.4. 2, Dan Stephenson, Albany, 27:49.6. 3, Eric Peterson, Reno, Nev., 29:03.0.

2 a.m. — French Open, round of 16, Tennis Channel. 9 a.m. — French Open, round of 16, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 9:30 a.m. — College, NCAA Baseball Road to Omaha Selection Show, ESPN. 10 a.m. — MLB, Minnesota Twins at Detroit Tigers or San Diego Padres at Atlanta Braves, MLB Network. 1 p.m. — MLB, Baltimore Orioles at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports. 4 p.m. — MLB, Milwaukee Brewers at Cincinnati Reds or Chicago White Sox at Boston Red Sox, MLB Network.

LACROSSE 12:30 p.m. — Men’s college, NCAA Tournament, final, Maryland vs. Virginia, ESPN.

TUESDAY TENNIS 2 a.m. — French Open, quarterfinals, Tennis Channel. 9 a.m. — French Open, quarterfinals, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, San Francisco Giants at St. Louis Cardinals, ESPN. 7 p.m. — MLB, Baltimore Orioles at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports. 7 p.m. — MLB, Colorado Rockies at Los Angeles Dodgers or New York Yankees at Oakland Athletics, MLB Network.

BASKETBALL 6 p.m. — NBA finals, Dallas Mavericks at Miami Heat, ABC.

RADIO TUESDAY BASKETBALL 6 p.m. — NBA finals, Dallas Mavericks at Miami Heat, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Lacrosse Mercyhurst tops Adelphi 9-8 for D2 lacrosse title: Mercyhurst captured its first Division II national lacrosse title in Baltimore Sunday, beating Adelphi 9-8 on four goals from junior midfielder Ian Wild, the game’s Most Outstanding Player. Junior attackman Kyle Kallay added two goals and sophomore attackman Brian Scheetz had a goal and three assists in helping lift Mercyhurst (17-2) to the first national title in the program’s 15-year history. The Lakers lost to Le Moyne in the 2007 final on a last-second shot. Eric Janssen made 13 saves for Adelphi, which committed 15 turnovers and was just nine for 14 clearing the ball.

Soccer Blazer: Bin Hammam, Warner conspired ‘from start’: Suspended executives Mohamed bin Hammam and Jack Warner conspired to bribe voters “right from the start” of the FIFA presidential campaign, their longtime American colleague Chuck Blazer said Sunday. In an interview with The Associated Press, Blazer said more proof will emerge to back up the file of evidence he submitted which sparked an explosive FIFA ethics probe days before the election. Current FIFA President Sepp Blatter is now the only candidate on Wednesday’s ballot after the FIFA ethics committee cleared him on Sunday of ignoring corruption attempts, as his Qatari challenger had alleged. Bin Hammam withdrew from the presidential race early Sunday, hours before he was suspended from FIFA pending a full inquiry. Warner, a FIFA vice president and 28-year veteran of its executive board, was also suspended for his part in organizing a campaign visit in his native Trinidad for bin Hammam three weeks ago.

Baseball Giants’ Posey out for season after surgery: San Francisco Giants catcher Buster Posey is out for the season after having surgery Sunday to repair three torn ligaments in his ankle sustained in a collision at home plate last week. “He’s not going to be back this season,” head athletic trainer Dave Groeschner said in a conference call with reporters. Groeschner said Posey had two screws inserted into his lower leg to stabilize the ankle over a surgery that lasted about 90 minutes early Sunday morning. The 2010 NL Rookie of the Year broke a bone in his lower left leg and injured the ankle in a collision with Florida’s Scott Cousins on Wednesday night. Groeschner said the team is optimistic Posey will be ready for opening day next season, but that he has a long road ahead.

Tennis NCAA finals set for men, women: Southern California’s Steve Johnson advanced to the NCAA men’s singles final when his opponent retired in the middle of the second set Sunday following a disagreement with the chair umpire. Top-ranked Johnson was leading 7-6 (4), 3-2 and had a break point when Virginia’s Michael Shabaz hit a ball out of the stadium and was penalized a point. Shabaz walked over, shook the umpire’s hand and left the court. Shabaz wasn’t made available to the media after the match. “He’s a good kid,” Virginia coach Brian Boland said. “I cannot believe Michael made that decision regardless of his disagreement. I know his emotions were at a high point but you are never justified in quitting a tennis match no matter the circumstances. This, to me, is harder than the team loss.” California’s Jana Juricova, the top-ranked women’s player, survived a three-hour marathon, beating Stanford’s Nicole Gibbs 6-7 (5), 7-5, 7-6 (2) to reach the championship.

Cycling Contador wraps up second Giro d’Italia title: Alberto Contador captured his second Giro d’Italia title Sunday to give himself a chance at completing the historic feat with victories in the Tour de France and the Spanish Vuelta this summer. While he looks up to any challenge he’ll meet on the road, his doping appeal before the Court of Arbitration for Sport looms as a potential roadblock. Contador tested positive for the banned stimulant clenbuterol at the 2010 Tour de France, but was cleared of doping by the Spanish cycling federation after he blamed the result on eating contaminated beef. The Spaniard crossed the line in Milan’s Piazza del Duomo 36 seconds behind stage winner David Millar’s time of 30 minutes, 13 seconds. Contador was unchallenged in this year’s Giro after taking the lead by winning the ninth stage on Mount Etna in Sicily. —From wire reports

PREPS Softball CLASS 6A Friday game South Salem 020 215 0 — 10 12 1 Redmond 001 000 2 — 3 9 2 Phillips, K. Donovan (3) and Bliss; Callen, Pesek (4), Edwards (6) and McCarthy. W—K. Donovan. L—Callen. 2B—Redmond: Aubrey Nitschelm. HR—South Salem: Reece 2, Norris.

BASKETBALL NBA NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION Playoffs All Times PDT ———

Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Men Fourth Round Fabio Fognini, Italy, def. Albert Montanes, Spain, 4-6, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3, 11-9. Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def. Stanislas Wawrinka (14), Switzerland, 6-3, 6-2, 7-5. Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def. Richard Gasquet (13), France, 6-4, 6-4, 6-2. Gael Monfils (9), France, leads David Ferrer (7), Spain, 6-4, 2-6, 7-5, 0-2, susp., darkness. Women Fourth Round Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (14), Russia, def. Vera Zvonareva (3), Russia, 7-6 (4), 2-6, 6-2. Francesca Schiavone (5), Italy, def. Jelena Jankovic (10), Serbia, 6-3, 2-6, 6-4. Marion Bartoli (11), France, def. Gisela Dulko, Argentina, 7-5, 1-0, retired. Svetlana Kuznetsova (13), Russia, def. Daniela Hantuchova (28), Slovakia, 6-7 (6), 6-3, 6-2.

IN THE BLEACHERS

SOCCER MLS

FINALS (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) Miami vs. Dallas Tuesday, May 31: Dallas at Miami, 6 p.m. Thursday, June 2: Dallas at Miami, 6 p.m. Sunday, June 5: Miami at Dallas, 5 p.m. Tuesday, June 7: Miami at Dallas, 6 p.m. x-Thursday, June 9: Miami at Dallas, 6 p.m. x-Sunday, June 12: Dallas at Miami, 5 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 14: Dallas at Miami, 6 p.m.

Alex Prugh (6), $13,780 Zack Miller (6), $13,780 Jeff Quinney (6), $13,780 Alexandre Rocha (2), $13,260 Anthony Kim (2), $13,260 Josh Teater (2), $13,260 Cameron Percy (1), $13,000 Tag Ridings (1), $12,870 Tommy Gainey (1), $12,740 Tom Gillis (1), $12,610

71-72-72-77—292 67-74-73-78—292 66-75-72-79—292 71-70-78-74—293 72-71-76-74—293 66-71-76-80—293 71-72-75-77—295 70-73-81-74—298 72-71-76-80—299 69-72-80-80—301

Champions Tour

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE Playoffs All Times PDT ——— STANLEY CUP FINALS (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) Boston vs. Vancouver Wednesday, June 1: Boston at Vancouver, 5 p.m. Saturday, June 4: Boston at Vancouver, 5 p.m. Monday, June 6: Vancouver at Boston, 5 p.m. Wednesday, June 8: Vancouver at Boston, 5 p.m. x-Friday, June 10: Boston at Vancouver, 5 p.m. x-Monday, June 13: Vancouver at Boston, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 15: Boston at Vancouver, 5 p.m.

GOLF PGA Tour BYRON NELSON CHAMPIONSHIP Sunday At The Four Seasons Resort and Club Irving, Texas Purse: $5.5 million Yardage: 7,116; Par: 70 Final Round (a-amateur) (x-won on first playoff hole) x-Keegan Bradley (500), $1,170,000 66-71-72-68—277 Ryan Palmer (300), $702,000 65-67-73-72—277 Joe Ogilvie (163), $377,000 66-70-72-70—278 Ryuji Imada (163), $377,000 69-68-70-71—278 Jason Day (110), $260,000 72-71-69-67—279 John Rollins (95), $225,875 68-70-71-71—280 Matt Kuchar (95), $225,875 69-71-68-72—280 James Driscoll (73), $169,000 70-71-74-66—281 Jason Dufner (73), $169,000 70-70-72-69—281 Nick Watney (73), $169,000 68-68-73-72—281 Jeff Overton (73), $169,000 64-74-71-72—281 Rod Pampling (73), $169,000 70-68-71-72—281 Arjun Atwal (73), $169,000 68-72-67-74—281 Justin Hicks (55), $107,250 70-69-76-67—282 Harrison Frazar (55), $107,250 71-72-71-68—282 Brian Gay (55), $107,250 71-72-69-70—282 Chad Collins (55), $107,250 67-69-75-71—282 Hunter Haas (55), $107,250 70-72-69-71—282 Steve Flesch (55), $107,250 70-69-71-72—282 Robert Garrigus (49), $70,417 70-69-75-69—283 Charles Howell III (49), $70,417 71-70-72-70—283 Brandt Jobe (49), $70,417 67-72-72-72—283 Dustin Johnson (49), $70,417 66-75-69-73—283 Tim Petrovic (49), $70,417 69-66-74-74—283 Sergio Garcia (49), $70,417 66-66-74-77—283 Scott Piercy (45), $52,000 66-69-74-75—284 Billy Mayfair (42), $46,150 72-70-74-69—285 Jerry Kelly (42), $46,150 67-71-75-72—285 J.J. Henry (42), $46,150 69-72-72-72—285 Fredrik Jacobson (42), $46,150 70-73-70-72—285 Vijay Singh (42), $46,150 68-73-69-75—285 Will Strickler (36), $35,193 66-76-76-68—286 George McNeill (36), $35,193 69-74-73-70—286 Ricky Barnes (36), $35,193 67-72-75-72—286 Michael Putnam (36), $35,193 67-72-75-72—286 William McGirt (36), $35,193 69-71-74-72—286 Chris DiMarco (36), $35,193 70-67-75-74—286 Brett Wetterich (36), $35,193 69-69-72-76—286 a-Jordan Spieth 69-68-72-77—286 K.J. Choi (29), $26,650 71-71-74-71—287 Carl Pettersson (29), $26,650 70-69-76-72—287 D.A. Points (29), $26,650 68-75-71-73—287 Chad Campbell (29), $26,650 69-74-71-73—287 Vaughn Taylor (29), $26,650 67-73-70-77—287 Greg Chalmers (25), $20,800 73-70-75-70—288 Garth Mulroy (25), $20,800 67-74-73-74—288 Scott Gordon (25), $20,800 70-71-72-75—288 Chris Riley (25), $20,800 66-71-73-78—288 Scott McCarron (20), $16,337 69-73-76-71—289 Tim Herron (20), $16,337 68-75-74-72—289 Robert Gamez (20), $16,337 68-72-74-75—289 Michael Bradley (20), $16,337 68-73-73-75—289 Fran Quinn (20), $16,337 69-70-73-77—289 Gary Woodland (20), $16,337 69-71-68-81—289 Paul Stankowski (14), $14,820 69-70-80-71—290 Ted Purdy (14), $14,820 68-71-76-75—290 Martin Piller (14), $14,820 68-72-75-75—290 Michael Connell (14), $14,820 71-70-74-75—290 Kyle Stanley (14), $14,820 70-70-73-77—290 Steven Bowditch (10), $14,300 75-65-80-71—291 D.J. Trahan (10), $14,300 72-70-77-72—291 Rich Beem (10), $14,300 73-70-75-73—291 Ben Crane (6), $13,780 71-71-74-76—292 Kevin Kisner (6), $13,780 72-69-75-76—292

SENIOR PGA CHAMPIONSHIP Sunday At Valhalla Golf Club Louisville, Ky. Purse: $2 million Yardage: 7,297, Par: 72 Final (x-won on first playoff hole) x-Tom Watson, $260,000 70-70-68-70—278 David Eger, $216,000 74-68-69-67—278 Kiyoshi Murota, $136,000 66-67-74-72—279 Hale Irwin, $96,000 69-68-70-73—280 Eduardo Romero, $71,000 73-67-72-69—281 Peter Senior, $71,000 73-68-71-69—281 Nick Price, $62,000 67-70-73-72—282 Steve Pate, $54,000 72-69-73-69—283 Corey Pavin, $54,000 72-72-69-70—283 Loren Roberts, $54,000 68-70-73-72—283 Michael Allen, $44,000 71-70-72-71—284 Trevor Dodds, $44,000 67-75-67-75—284 Bob Tway, $33,200 73-70-73-69—285 John Cook, $33,200 71-74-70-70—285 Gary Hallberg, $33,200 72-67-75-71—285 Olin Browne, $33,200 68-70-74-73—285 Mark Calcavecchia, $33,200 72-69-71-73—285 D.A. Weibring, $23,000 74-73-70-69—286 Tom Pernice, $23,000 73-70-72-71—286 Jeff Sluman, $23,000 76-71-67-72—286 Mark O’Meara, $23,000 68-72-72-74—286 Brad Bryant, $17,000 74-69-76-69—288 Mark Mouland, $17,000 73-74-72-69—288 David Frost, $17,000 74-74-69-71—288 Kenny Perry, $17,000 69-75-71-73—288 Tom Lehman, $17,000 73-70-68-77—288 Dan Forsman, $13,250 75-68-77-69—289 Roger Chapman, $13,250 73-70-74-72—289 Bill Glasson, $13,250 75-70-73-71—289 Jay Don Blake, $13,250 73-72-70-74—289 Ted Schulz, $11,500 72-72-78-68—290 Bobby Clampett, $11,500 71-74-73-72—290 Rod Spittle, $11,500 73-73-71-73—290 Mike Harwood, $9,520 73-75-72-71—291 Mark McNulty, $9,520 70-72-77-72—291 Jim Rutledge, $9,520 75-73-71-72—291 Jay Haas, $9,520 73-73-73-72—291 Curt Byrum, $9,520 69-76-73-73—291 Chien-Soon Lu, $9,520 70-70-75-76—291 Chip Beck, $7,675 75-70-74-73—292 Fred Funk, $7,675 75-71-73-73—292 Larry Nelson, $7,675 75-71-72-74—292 Lonnie Nielsen, $6,750 69-73-73-78—293 Craig Stadler, $6,750 75-69-71-78—293 Massy Kuramoto, $6,000 75-71-76-72—294 Sonny Skinner, $6,000 72-73-76-73—294 Willie Wood, $6,000 76-72-72-74—294 David Peoples, $5,400 75-73-70-77—295 Michael Cunning, $5,100 72-73-76-75—296 Lee Rinker, $4,414 74-74-74-75—297 Barry Lane, $4,414 71-75-76-75—297 Morris Hatalsky, $4,414 74-71-76-76—297 Boonchu Ruangkit, $4,414 74-70-76-77—297 Hal Sutton, $4,414 77-67-76-77—297 Bruce Vaughan, $4,414 69-77-74-77—297 Des Smyth, $4,414 70-73-76-78—297 Mark Brooks, $4,100 74-71-81-72—298 Jerry Pate, $4,100 75-73-76-74—298 P.H. Horgan, III, $4,100 75-73-74-76—298 Michael Goodes, $3,917 75-73-78-73—299 Christopher Williams, $3,917 74-74-76-75—299 Kirk Hanefeld, $3,917 70-77-76-76—299 Mark Wiebe, $3,917 74-73-76-76—299 Stu Ingraham, $3,917 73-70-77-79—299 Jim Woodward, $3,917 73-75-69-82—299 Peter Fowler, $3,825 73-75-77-75—300 Marc Farry, $3,800 75-73-75-78—301 Joe Daley, $3,700 73-74-83-73—303 Mike San Filippo, $3,700 75-73-80-75—303 Hideki Kase, $3,700 74-74-79-76—303 Mike Lawrence, $3,700 72-76-79-76—303 Gene Fieger, $3,700 73-74-78-78—303 Matt Seitz, $3,700 75-73-76-79—303 Tom Jenkins, $3,700 72-71-78-82—303 Scott Simpson, $3,600 78-70-77-79—304 Ken Martin, $3,562 73-75-81-76—305 Ross Drummond, $3,562 77-71-79-78—305 Mark Faulkner, $3,525 73-75-81-77—306 Timothy Parun, $3,500 72-76-85-76—309

TENNIS French Open Sunday At Stade Roland Garros Paris Purse: $24.99 million (Grand Slam)

MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Philadelphia 6 3 2 20 14 New York 4 2 6 18 18 Houston 3 4 6 15 17 D.C. 4 4 3 15 16 Columbus 3 3 5 14 11 New England 3 5 4 13 10 Toronto FC 2 5 6 12 13 Chicago 1 4 6 9 15 Sporting Kansas City 1 6 2 5 12 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Los Angeles 8 2 5 29 20 FC Dallas 6 3 4 22 16 Seattle 5 4 5 20 16 Colorado 4 3 6 18 15 Portland 5 4 2 17 15 Real Salt Lake 5 2 2 17 10 Chivas USA 3 4 4 13 14 San Jose 3 4 4 13 14 Vancouver 1 5 6 9 13 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Sunday’s Game D.C. United 3, Portland 2 Wednesday’s Game Vancouver at Chivas USA, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Game D.C. United at Los Angeles, 8 p.m. Saturday’s Games Sporting Kansas City at Toronto FC, 4 p.m. Columbus at New York, 4:30 p.m. New England at FC Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Seattle FC at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Colorado, 6 p.m. Vancouver at Real Salt Lake, 6 p.m. Houston at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Portland at Chivas USA, 7:30 p.m.

GA 9 11 15 20 13 15 23 19 19 GA 12 12 13 13 17 4 13 14 17

BASEBALL College Pacific-10 Conference All Times PDT ——— Conference W L UCLA 18 9 Oregon State 17 10 Arizona State 17 10 Arizona 15 12 Stanford 14 12 California 13 13 USC 13 14 Oregon 11 16 Washington State 10 17 Washington 6 21 ——— Sunday’s Games Washington State 13, USC 1 Arizona 8, Washington 2 Arizona State 10, UCLA 5 Oregon 6, Oregon State 0 End of regular season

Overall W L 33 22 38 17 39 16 36 19 32 20 31 20 25 31 33 26 26 28 17 38

AUTO RACING IndyCar Indianapolis 500 Results Sunday At Indianapolis Motor Speedway Indianapolis Lap length: 2.5 miles (Starting position in parentheses) All cars Dallara chassis, Honda engine 1. (6) Dan Wheldon, 200 laps. 2. (12) J.R. Hildebrand, 200. 3. (29) Graham Rahal, 200. 4. (22) Tony Kanaan, 200. 5. (2) Scott Dixon, 200. 6. (3) Oriol Servia, 200. 7. (14) Bertrand Baguette, 200. 8. (21) Tomas Scheckter, 200. 9. (27) Marco Andretti, 200. 10. (25) Danica Patrick, 200. 11. (8) Ed Carpenter, 200. 12. (9) Dario Franchitti, 200. 13. (28) Charlie Kimball, 199. 14. (5) Will Power, 199. 15. (11) Vitor Meira, 199. 16. (19) Justin Wilson, 199. 17. (16) Helio Castroneves, 199. 18. (7) Buddy Rice, 198. 19. (30) Alex Lloyd, 198. 20. (31) Pippa Mann, 198. 21. (32) Ana Beatriz, 197. 22. (17) John Andretti, 197. 23. (33) Ryan Hunter-Reay, 197. 24. (15) Davey Hamilton, 193. 25. (24) Paul Tracy, 175. 26. (4) Townsend Bell, 157, Contact. 27. (26) Ryan Briscoe, 157, Contact. 28. (1) Alex Tagliani, 147, Contact. 29. (13) James Hinchcliffe, 99, Contact. 30. (20) Jay Howard, 60, Contact. 31. (23) Simona de Silvestro, 44, Handling. 32. (18) E.J. Viso, 27, Contact. 33. (10) Takuma Sato, 20, Contact. ——— Race Statistics Winners average speed: 170.265 mph. Time of Race: 2 hours, 56 minutes, 11.7267 seconds. Margin of Victory: Under caution. Cautions: 7 for 40 laps. Lead Changes: 23 among 10 drivers. Lap Leaders: Dixon 1-7, Tagliani 8-26, Dixon 27-33, Tagliani 34, Dixon 35-60, Franchitti 61, Carpenter 62-64, Franchitti 65-72, Dixon 73-98, Franchitti 99, Hildebrand 100-103, Franchitti 104-112, Servia 113128, Franchitti 129-137, Hildebrand 138, Baguette 139-140, Franchitti 141-163, Servia 164-165, Rahal

166-171, Dixon 172-178, Patrick 179-188, Baguette 189-197, Hildebrand 198-199, Wheldon 200. Points: Power 194, Franchitti 178, Servia 150, Kanaan 135, Dixon 129, Rahal 120, Briscoe 114, Hildebrand 113, Tagliani 110, Conway 102.

NASCAR SPRINT CUP Coca-Cola 600 Results Sunday At Charlotte Motor Speedway Concord, N.C. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (28) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 402 laps, 94.4 rating, 47 points, $406,786. 2. (8) David Ragan, Ford, 402, 117.3, 43, $244,375. 3. (23) Joey Logano, Toyota, 402, 71.5, 41, $194,475. 4. (26) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 402, 90.6, 41, $190,900. 5. (2) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 402, 106.6, 40, $186,861. 6. (24) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 402, 96.3, 39, $155,241. 7. (25) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 402, 103.6, 38, $131,575. 8. (20) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 402, 70, 36, $140,270. 9. (7) David Reutimann, Toyota, 402, 83.8, 35, $139,533. 10. (4) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 402, 119.3, 35, $165,800. 11. (9) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 402, 72.3, 0, $106,175. 12. (29) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 402, 78.2, 33, $141,883. 13. (15) Greg Biffle, Ford, 402, 97, 32, $121,750. 14. (19) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 402, 124.4, 32, $162,186. 15. (10) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 402, 77.7, 29, $144,033. 16. (3) Carl Edwards, Ford, 402, 108, 29, $145,941. 17. (22) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 402, 73.3, 28, $140,383. 18. (18) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 402, 65.1, 26, $124,789. 19. (1) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 402, 96.4, 26, $164,708. 20. (11) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 401, 80.7, 25, $138,611. 21. (5) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 401, 84.8, 24, $104,525. 22. (17) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 401, 80.3, 23, $117,583. 23. (37) Casey Mears, Toyota, 401, 52.4, 22, $93,175. 24. (27) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 400, 57.1, 20, $117,970. 25. (31) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 398, 47.9, 0, $105,233. 26. (14) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 397, 57.6, 18, $98,125. 27. (42) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 396, 37.6, 17, $101,483. 28. (6) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, engine, 395, 89.9, 16, $140,736. 29. (16) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 383, 69, 15, $93,950. 30. (39) Mike Bliss, Ford, 367, 39.6, 0, $96,597. 31. (12) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 358, 48, 13, $127,750. 32. (21) Kyle Busch, Toyota, accident, 344, 86.5, 13, $133,391. 33. (30) David Gilliland, Ford, accident, 301, 43.2, 11, $86,100. 34. (13) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, accident, 301, 55, 10, $93,300. 35. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, accident, 293, 37.1, 0, $84,875. 36. (32) David Starr, Ford, accident, 286, 43.4, 0, $84,750. 37. (35) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, engine, 181, 57.3, 8, $123,414. 38. (41) Robby Gordon, Dodge, brakes, 99, 30.7, 6, $84,410. 39. (33) Michael McDowell, Toyota, engine, 40, 33.4, 5, $84,300. 40. (38) David Stremme, Chevrolet, handling, 34, 30.3, 4, $84,165. 41. (36) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, clutch, 28, 30.2, 0, $84,005. 42. (34) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, brakes, 22, 29.9, 2, $83,925. 43. (43) Mike Skinner, Toyota, vibration, 6, 29.5, 0, $84,290. ——— Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 132.414 mph. Time of Race: 4 hours, 33 minutes, 14 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.703 seconds. Caution Flags: 14 for 64 laps. Lead Changes: 38 among 19 drivers. Top 12 in Points: 1. C.Edwards, 445; 2. K.Harvick, 409; 3. J.Johnson, 408; 4. D.Earnhardt Jr., 402; 5. Ky.Busch, 392; 6. Ku.Busch, 377; 7. M.Kenseth, 374; 8. C.Bowyer, 365; 9. T.Stewart, 356; 10. R.Newman, 353; 11. G.Biffle, 343; 12. D.Hamlin, 339.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL—Suspended Washington 3B Jerry Hairston one game and fined him an undisclosed amount for making contact with umpire Ed Hickox during Friday’s game against San Diego. American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Optioned RHP Brad Bergesen and RHP Chris Tillman to Norfolk (IL). Recalled LHP Pedro Viola from Bowie (EL). BOSTON RED SOX—Placed LHP Franklin Morales on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 26. Recalled RHP Michael Bowden from Pawtucket (IL). CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Placed RHP Tony Pena on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Lucas Harrell from Charlotte (IL). OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Activated RHP Andrew Bailey from the 15-day DL. Optioned LHP Bobby Cramer to Sacramento (PCL). National League ATLANTA BRAVES—Recalled RHP Cory Gearrin from Gwinnett (IL). Optioned OF Wilkin Ramirez to Gwinnett. CHICAGO CUBS—Activated C Geovany Soto from the 15-day DL. Placed OF Reed Johnson on the 15-day DL. Purchased the contract of OF Brad Snyder from Iowa (PCL). Transferred RHP Andrew Cashner from the 15- to the 60-day DL. CINCINNATI REDS—Placed RHP Sam LeCure on the 15-dat DL. Called up LHP Tom Cochran from Louisville (IL). COLORADO ROCKIES—Recalled INF Chris Nelson from Colorado Springs (PCL). Designated INF Alfredo Amezaga for assignment. WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Recalled RHP Yunesky Maya from Syracuse (IL). HOCKEY National Hockey League EDMONTON OILERS—Re-signed F Ryan Jones to a two-year contract.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Saturday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 2,450 1,385 61 14 The Dalles 2,004 1,233 6 1 John Day 1,760 1,020 5 2 McNary 1,864 1,171 7 0 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Saturday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 209,741 46,780 5,083 1,852 The Dalles 153,319 34,181 1,414 750 John Day 129,325 31,912 2,785 1,748 McNary 115,085 22,616 2,615 1,579

Djokovich, Federer nearing showdown By Howard Fendrich The Associated Press

PARIS — His 43rd consecutive victory complete, Novak Djokovic ripped off his white baseball cap, pivoted to look up at his parents, coach and other supporters in the stands, then let out a yell. It was the sort of visceral reaction one might expect at the conclusion of a taut, tense contest, not the rather routine 6-4, 6-4, 6-2 result the second-seeded Djokovic assembled Sunday at the expense of No. 13 Richard Gasquet in the fourth round of the French Open. “I didn’t expect it to be easy, that’s for sure,” said Serbia’s Djokovic, who briefly addressed the crowd in French, drawing laughter and cheers. Each match carries extra meaning these days for Djokovic, whose winning streak began with two Davis Cup victories in December and is the third longest since the Open era began in

TENNIS: FRENCH OPEN 1968. Now 41-0 in 2011, he’s one win shy of John McEnroe’s mark of 42-0 in 1984. “As soon as he hits a return, he grabs you by the throat,” said France’s Gasquet, a former top10 player and 2007 Wimbledon semifinalist who was supported by a partisan crowd Sunday. “To beat him, you need to produce the perfect match and not make any mistakes.” Roger Federer’s opponents over the years know that feeling, too. The 16-time major champion moved a step closer to a semifinal showdown against Djokovic by overwhelming No. 14 Stanislas Wawrinka 6-3, 6-2, 7-5, reaching the quarterfinals at a record 28th Grand Slam tournament in a row. Federer next faces No. 7 David Ferrer of Spain or No. 9 Gael Monfils of France, whose fourth-round

match was suspended in the fourth set because of darkness. Djokovic meets 49th-ranked Fabio Fognini of Italy, who set aside a left thigh injury that left him immobile and erased five match points to beat Albert Montanes of Spain 11-9 in the fifth set. While the elite men are still around — today, No. 1 Rafael Nadal, No. 4 Andy Murray and No. 5 Robin Soderling try to join Djokovic and No. 3 Federer in the quarterfinals — chaos continues in the women’s draw. No. 3 Vera Zvonareva, runner-up at Wimbledon and the U.S. Open last year, lost the last five games and was defeated 7-6 (4), 2-6, 6-2 by No. 14 Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova of Russia. Zvonareva’s exit followed those of No. 1 Caroline Wozniacki in the third round, and No. 2 Kim Clijsters in the second, making this the first French Open — and only third Grand Slam tournament — in the Open era with none of the top three seeded women in the quarterfinals.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 30, 2011 D3

M A JOR L E A GUE B A SE BA L L NL BOXSCORES Braves 2, Reds 1 Cincinnati Stubbs cf B.Phillips 2b Votto 1b Rolen 3b Bruce rf F.Lewis lf R.Hernandez c Janish ss Cueto p Totals

AB 4 4 2 4 3 4 4 3 2 30

R 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 7 1 3

SO 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 2 7

Avg. .256 .307 .333 .254 .285 .255 .307 .216 .111

Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schafer cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .286 Prado lf 3 1 1 2 1 0 .282 C.Jones 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .251 Hinske rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .316 Mather rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .325 Freeman 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .249 Uggla 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .180 Ale.Gonzalez ss 2 0 1 0 0 0 .274 D.Ross c 3 0 1 0 0 2 .308 Jurrjens p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .091 Kimbrel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 26 2 5 2 3 5 Cincinnati 010 000 000 — 1 7 0 Atlanta 000 002 00x — 2 5 0 LOB—Cincinnati 6, Atlanta 6. HR—Bruce (15), off Jurrjens; Prado (7), off Cueto. RBIs—Bruce (40), Prado 2 (32). CS—Votto (3). S—Cueto, Jurrjens. Runners left in scoring position—Cincinnati 2 (F.Lewis, R.Hernandez); Atlanta 3 (D.Ross, Schafer, Freeman). Runners moved up—Rolen, C.Jones, Hinske. GIDP—Prado, Jurrjens. DP—Cincinnati 2 (Janish, B.Phillips, Votto), (R.Hernandez, Rolen, B.Phillips). Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cueto L, 2-2 8 5 2 2 3 5 116 2.20 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jurrjens W, 7-1 8 6 1 1 2 5 98 1.51 Kmbrl S, 15-19 1 1 0 0 1 2 21 3.00 IBB—off Jurrjens (Bruce). HBP—by Cueto (Freeman, Ale.Gonzalez). T—2:29. A—36,392 (49,586).

Cubs 3, Pirates 2 Pittsburgh AB R Tabata lf 4 0 Meek p 0 0 D.McCutchen p 0 0 G.Jones rf 3 0 c-Diaz ph-rf 1 0 A.McCutchen cf 3 1 Walker 2b 3 1 Overbay 1b 3 0 Doumit c 1 0 C.Snyder c 2 0 Br.Wood 3b 4 0 Cedeno ss 4 0 Karstens p 2 0 Resop p 0 0 a-Paul ph-lf 0 0 Totals 30 2

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 2 5

SO 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 6

Avg. .252 ----.236 .244 .257 .266 .237 .269 .275 .179 .240 .118 --.240

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fukudome rf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .315 Barney 2b 3 0 2 0 0 0 .314 S.Castro ss 3 0 0 1 0 0 .318 Ar.Ramirez 3b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .281 C.Pena 1b 3 1 1 0 0 1 .222 A.Soriano lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Montanez lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 Campana cf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .278 K.Hill c 2 0 1 1 0 1 .217 Dempster p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .105 K.Wood p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-DeWitt ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .239 Marshall p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Marmol p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 27 3 9 3 0 5 Pittsburgh 200 000 000 — 2 5 1 Chicago 021 000 00x — 3 9 0 a-walked for Resop in the 7th. b-grounded into a double play for K.Wood in the 7th. c-grounded out for G.Jones in the 8th. E—Cedeno (4). LOB—Pittsburgh 6, Chicago 3. 2B—Overbay (10), Fukudome (5). HR—Ar.Ramirez (2), off Karstens. RBIs—Overbay 2 (19), S.Castro (24), Ar.Ramirez (18), K.Hill (7). CS—Tabata (4), Barney (2). S—Barney. SF—S.Castro, K.Hill. Runners left in scoring position—Pittsburgh 3 (Doumit, Tabata, Cedeno); Chicago 2 (Dempster, S.Castro). Runners moved up—Br.Wood. GIDP—C.Snyder, S.Castro, DeWitt. DP—Pittsburgh 2 (Br.Wood, Walker, Overbay), (Walker, Overbay); Chicago 1 (Dempster, Barney, C.Pena). Pittsburgh IP H R ER Karstens L, 3-4 5 7 3 2 Resop 1 0 0 0 Meek 1 1 0 0 D.McCutchen 1 1 0 0 Chicago IP H R ER Dmpster W, 4-4 6 4 2 2 K.Wood H, 8 1 1 0 0 Marshall H, 10 1 0 0 0 Mrmol S, 10-12 1 0 0 0 PB—C.Snyder. T—2:36. A—37,464 (41,159).

BB 0 0 0 0 BB 3 1 0 1

SO 4 0 1 0 SO 5 0 0 1

NP 71 11 11 7 NP 105 21 6 17

ERA 3.58 4.13 4.50 0.40 ERA 6.00 2.61 1.29 1.17

Dodgers 8, Marlins 0 Florida AB R Coghlan cf 3 0 Cishek p 0 0 b-Hayes ph 1 0 H.Ramirez ss 1 0 Helms 3b 3 0 Morrison lf 4 0 G.Sanchez 1b 2 0 Stanton rf 3 0 J.Buck c 3 0 Infante 2b 3 0 Bonifacio 3b-ss 3 0 Nolasco p 0 0 a-Cousins ph-cf 2 0 Totals 28 0

H BI BB SO 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 10

Avg. .243 --.357 .210 .200 .325 .314 .259 .213 .247 .265 .056 .167

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Furcal ss 5 2 3 3 0 0 .193 Blake 3b 5 0 2 2 0 2 .303 Ethier rf 3 1 3 0 2 0 .326 Kemp cf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .313 Gwynn Jr. cf 2 0 1 0 0 0 .195 Sands 1b-lf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .214 Gibbons lf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .239 Loney 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .238 Navarro c 5 1 2 1 0 0 .227 Carroll 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .293 Kershaw p 4 2 2 1 0 0 .240 Totals 40 8 17 8 3 6 Florida 000 000 000 — 0 2 1 Los Angeles 004 040 00x — 8 17 1 a-struck out for Nolasco in the 6th. b-flied out for Cishek in the 9th. E—Stanton (3), Furcal (4). LOB—Florida 3, Los Angeles 11. 2B—Morrison (10), Ethier (12), Navarro (2). HR—Furcal (1), off Nolasco. RBIs—Furcal 3 (5), Blake 2 (8), Gibbons (5), Navarro (3), Kershaw (1). S—Nolasco. Runners left in scoring position—Florida 2 (Coghlan, J.Buck); Los Angeles 6 (Kemp 2, Carroll, Gwynn Jr., Navarro 2). GIDP—J.Buck, Kemp. DP—Florida 1 (Helms, G.Sanchez); Los Angeles 1 (Blake, Carroll, Sands). Florida IP H R ER BB Nolasco L, 4-1 5 15 8 8 2 Cishek 3 2 0 0 1 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB Kershaw W, 6-3 9 2 0 0 1 IBB—off Nolasco (Ethier, Carroll). T—2:34. A—30,621 (56,000).

SO 5 1 SO 10

NP 101 44 NP 116

ERA 3.82 0.00 ERA 2.62

Cardinals 4, Rockies 3 St. Louis AB Theriot ss 4 Jay lf 4 Pujols 1b 4 Berkman rf 1 Craig 2b 3 1-Greene pr-2b 0 b-Schumaker ph-2b1 Salas p 0 Rasmus cf 4 Y.Molina c 4 Descalso 3b 4 Lohse p 3 E.Sanchez p 0 Kozma 2b 1 Totals 33

R 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 4 3 10

Avg. .302 .346 .257 .354 .321 .230 .217 .000 .287 .311 .233 .100 .000 .125

Colorado E.Young 2b Fowler cf C.Gonzalez lf Tulowitzki ss Helton 1b 2-J.Herrera pr-3b

R 0 0 0 0 1 0

H BI BB 1 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0

Avg. .357 .242 .257 .246 .303 .271

AB 4 5 5 4 3 0

SO 2 1 1 0 1 0

Wigginton 3b-1b 4 0 3 1 0 1 .257 Spilborghs rf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .261 Iannetta c 2 1 1 0 2 1 .246 Chacin p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .087 Mat.Reynolds p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Giambi ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .220 Lindstrom p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --R.Betancourt p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-S.Smith ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .303 Totals 33 3 9 3 4 10 St. Louis 300 100 000 — 4 6 0 Colorado 001 000 101 — 3 9 1 a-struck out for Mat.Reynolds in the 7th. b-lined out for Greene in the 8th. c-struck out for R.Betancourt in the 9th. 1-ran for Craig in the 6th. 2-ran for Helton in the 8th. E—Fowler (3). LOB—St. Louis 5, Colorado 9. 2B— Helton (11), Wigginton (8), Iannetta (7). HR—Jay (4), off Chacin; Rasmus (4), off Chacin. RBIs—Jay 2 (13), Rasmus (20), Y.Molina (24), E.Young 2 (3), Wigginton (14). S—Chacin. SF—E.Young. Runners left in scoring position—St. Louis 3 (Descalso, Y.Molina, Rasmus); Colorado 5 (Spilborghs, E.Young 2, Wigginton, C.Gonzalez). Runners moved up—Rasmus. GIDP—Craig. DP—St. Louis 1 (Greene, Theriot); Colorado 1 (Chacin, Tulowitzki, Helton). St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lohse W, 7-2 6 6 2 2 1 6 82 2.13 E.Sanchez H, 6 1 2-3 1 0 0 2 1 28 2.49 Salas S, 9-9 1 1-3 2 1 1 1 3 29 1.59 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chacin L, 5-4 6 6 4 4 2 7 110 3.33 Mat.Reynolds 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 2.57 Lindstrom 1 0 0 0 1 0 14 1.21 R.Betancourt 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 3.27 Lohse pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—E.Sanchez 2-0, Salas 2-0. IBB—off Lindstrom (Berkman). T—2:51. A—40,598 (50,490).

Gray 4 5 1 1 1 Ray 2 1 0 0 0 T—2:55. A—37,290 (47,878).

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division Boston New York Tampa Bay Toronto Baltimore Central Division Cleveland Detroit Kansas City Chicago Minnesota West Division Texas Los Angeles Oakland Seattle

W 30 28 28 27 24 W 31 26 23 24 17 W 28 28 27 26

L 23 23 24 26 27 L 19 26 29 31 34 L 25 27 27 26

Pct .566 .549 .538 .509 .471 Pct .620 .500 .442 .436 .333 Pct .528 .509 .500 .500

NATIONAL LEAGUE GB — 1 1½ 3 5 GB — 6 9 9½ 14½ GB — 1 1½ 1½

Sunday’s Games Boston 4, Detroit 3, 1st game Toronto 13, Chicago White Sox 4 Tampa Bay 7, Cleveland 0 L.A. Angels 6, Minnesota 5 Texas 7, Kansas City 6 Oakland 6, Baltimore 4 N.Y. Yankees 7, Seattle 1 Detroit 3, Boston 0, 2nd game

WCGB — — ½ 2 4 WCGB — 2½ 5½ 6 11 WCGB — 2 2½ 2½

L10 7-3 6-4 4-6 5-5 5-5 L10 5-5 4-6 3-7 4-6 3-7 L10 5-5 6-4 5-5 8-2

Str L-1 W-1 W-1 W-3 L-3 Str L-1 W-1 L-2 L-3 L-1 Str W-2 W-1 W-4 L-1

Home 16-10 17-13 13-14 14-12 15-14 Home 19-6 14-11 17-13 10-13 6-15 Home 19-11 13-13 14-12 13-13

Away 14-13 11-10 15-10 13-14 9-13 Away 12-13 12-15 6-16 14-18 11-19 Away 9-14 15-14 13-15 13-13

East Division Philadelphia Florida Atlanta New York Washington Central Division St. Louis Milwaukee Cincinnati Pittsburgh Chicago Houston West Division Arizona San Francisco Colorado Los Angeles San Diego

Today’s Games Minnesota (Blackburn 4-4) at Detroit (Penny 4-4), 10:05 a.m. N.Y. Yankees (Colon 2-3) at Oakland (Cahill 6-2), 1:05 p.m. Baltimore (Arrieta 6-2) at Seattle (Fister 2-5), 1:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (E.Santana 3-4) at Kansas City (Hochevar 3-5), 1:10 p.m. Texas (D.Holland 3-1) at Tampa Bay (W.Davis 4-4), 3:40 p.m. Cleveland (Carmona 3-5) at Toronto (Jo.Reyes 0-4), 4:07 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Peavy 1-0) at Boston (Lester 7-1), 4:10 p.m.

W 33 30 30 24 22 W 32 29 27 24 23 19 W 29 28 25 24 22

L 20 21 24 28 30 L 22 24 27 27 28 34 L 24 24 27 30 31

Pct .623 .588 .556 .462 .423 Pct .593 .547 .500 .471 .451 .358 Pct .547 .538 .481 .444 .415

GB — 2 3½ 8½ 10½ GB — 2½ 5 6½ 7½ 12½ GB — ½ 3½ 5½ 7

Sunday’s Games N.Y. Mets 9, Philadelphia 5 San Diego 5, Washington 4 Arizona 4, Houston 2 Milwaukee 6, San Francisco 0 Chicago Cubs 3, Pittsburgh 2 St. Louis 4, Colorado 3 L.A. Dodgers 8, Florida 0 Atlanta 2, Cincinnati 1

WCGB — — 1½ 6½ 8½ WCGB — 2 4½ 6 7 12 WCGB — 2½ 5½ 7½ 9

L10 7-3 6-4 5-5 4-6 2-8 L10 7-3 8-2 2-8 6-4 5-5 4-6 L10 9-1 5-5 2-8 4-6 4-6

Str L-1 L-1 W-2 W-1 L-2 Str W-1 W-2 L-2 L-1 W-1 L-3 Str W-6 L-2 L-1 W-1 W-2

Home 19-10 14-12 16-11 11-14 12-11 Home 14-9 21-7 15-11 9-14 12-16 11-17 Home 16-10 13-8 13-15 13-15 9-20

Away 14-10 16-9 14-13 13-14 10-19 Away 18-13 8-17 12-16 15-13 11-12 8-17 Away 13-14 15-16 12-12 11-15 13-11

Today’s Games Philadelphia (Halladay 6-3) at Washington (L.Hernandez 3-6), 10:05 a.m. San Diego (Harang 5-2) at Atlanta (T.Hudson 4-4), 10:05 a.m. Houston (An.Rodriguez 0-2) at Chicago Cubs (R.Lopez 0-0), 11:20 a.m. San Francisco (Bumgarner 1-6) at St. Louis (McClellan 6-1), 1:15 p.m. Milwaukee (Narveson 2-3) at Cincinnati (T.Wood 3-3), 4:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Morton 5-2) at N.Y. Mets (Gee 4-0), 4:10 p.m. Colorado (Hammel 3-4) at L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 3-4), 5:10 p.m. Florida (Volstad 2-3) at Arizona (J.Saunders 1-5), 5:10 p.m.

Diamondbacks 4, Astros 2 Arizona AB R Bloomquist ss 5 0 R.Roberts 2b 3 1 J.Upton rf 3 1 C.Young cf 1 1 Nady lf 4 1 Putz p 0 0 Miranda 1b 4 0 Mora 3b 4 0 H.Blanco c 3 0 Collmenter p 2 0 a-Burroughs ph 1 0 Heilman p 0 0 Da.Hernandez p 0 0 c-G.Parra ph-lf 1 0 Totals 31 4

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 2 0 1 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 4 5 10

Avg. .272 .280 .242 .233 .274 --.260 .260 .273 .222 .167 .000 --.262

Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bourn cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Keppinger 2b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .375 Pence rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .304 Ca.Lee lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .246 1-M.Downs pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Del Rosario p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Wallace 1b 3 0 1 0 1 2 .311 C.Johnson 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .210 Barmes ss 4 0 0 0 0 3 .216 Towles c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .205 Happ p 2 1 1 1 0 0 .389 W.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Hall ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .226 Fulchino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Escalona p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Michaels lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .152 Totals 33 2 5 1 2 9 Arizona 000 001 030 — 4 6 1 Houston 000 110 000 — 2 5 0 a-grounded out for Collmenter in the 7th. b-struck out for W.Lopez in the 7th. c-grounded out for Da.Hernandez in the 9th. 1-ran for Ca.Lee in the 8th. E—R.Roberts (5). LOB—Arizona 6, Houston 6. 2B—Nady (5), Keppinger (1). 3B—J.Upton (2). HR—Happ (1), off Collmenter. RBIs—C.Young (29), Nady 2 (16), Miranda (15), Happ (4). SB—R.Roberts (8). CS—H.Blanco (1). SF—C.Young. Runners left in scoring position—Arizona 3 (Miranda 2, R.Roberts); Houston 4 (Barmes 2, Wallace 2). Runners moved up—C.Johnson. Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Collmenter 6 4 2 2 1 5 108 1.49 Heilman W, 4-0 1 0 0 0 0 3 14 8.10 Hernandez H, 7 1 1 0 0 1 1 21 1.85 Putz S, 16-16 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 1.57 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Happ 6 2 1 1 4 8 112 4.66 W.Lopez H, 5 1 1 0 0 0 0 15 2.61 Fulchino L, 1-3 2-3 2 3 3 1 2 18 4.24 Escalona 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 4 4.15 Del Rosario 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 3.27 Inherited runners-scored—Escalona 1-1. IBB—off Fulchino (C.Young). WP—Da.Hernandez. Balk—Collmenter. T—2:59. A—21,882 (40,963).

Padres 5, Nationals 4 San Diego AB Tekotte cf 3 Qualls p 0 Gregerson p 0 d-Cantu ph-1b 1 Bartlett ss 4 Ludwick lf 4 Hawpe 1b 5 H.Bell p 0 Headley 3b 4 Denorfia rf 2 K.Phillips c 4 Ro.Johnson c 0 Forsythe 2b 4 Moseley p 1 b-E.Patterson ph-cf 2 Totals 34

R H 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 1 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 5 10

BI 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 2 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 7

Avg. .286 ----.198 .253 .239 .240 --.269 .300 .138 .169 .133 .188 .174

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bernadina cf 5 1 1 1 0 1 .247 Desmond ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .223 Werth rf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .255 L.Nix lf 3 0 1 1 0 0 .307 Morse 1b 3 0 1 1 1 0 .288 W.Ramos c 2 0 0 0 1 0 .243 Hairston Jr. 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .254 Clippard p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Stairs ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .091 Storen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Cora 2b-3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .241 Maya p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Slaten p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Ankiel ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .214 Kimball p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Espinosa 2b 2 0 1 0 0 1 .203 Totals 33 4 11 4 2 3 San Diego 000 130 001 — 5 10 2 Washington 200 011 000 — 4 11 0 a-singled for Slaten in the 5th. b-popped out for Moseley in the 6th. c-lined out for Clippard in the 8th. d-doubled for Gregerson in the 9th. E—Hawpe (4), Gregerson (1). LOB—San Diego 8, Washington 6. 2B—Cantu (3), Bartlett (6), Headley (14), Bernadina (4), Morse (5). RBIs—Ludwick 2 (32), Hawpe 2 (15), Headley (18), Bernadina (7), Werth (19), L.Nix (21), Morse (21). SB—Denorfia (4), Bernadina (7), Ankiel (5). CS—Tekotte (1). S—Denorfia, Moseley, W.Ramos. SF—L.Nix. Runners left in scoring position—San Diego 5 (K.Phillips 4, Forsythe); Washington 4 (W.Ramos, Hairston Jr., Desmond, Stairs). GIDP—Desmond, Hairston Jr., Maya. DP—San Diego 3 (Bartlett, Forsythe, Hawpe), (Bartlett, Forsythe, Hawpe), (Headley, Hawpe). San Diego IP H R ER BB SO Moseley 5 6 3 2 1 1 Qualls BS, 2-2 1 2 1 1 0 0 Grgrsn W, 2-1 2 3 0 0 1 0 H.Bell S, 12-13 1 0 0 0 0 2 Washington IP H R ER BB SO Maya 4 2-3 6 4 4 2 3 Slaten 1-3 1 0 0 1 0 Kimball 1 0 0 0 1 0 Clippard 2 1 0 0 0 3 Storen L, 4-2 1 2 1 1 0 1 Inherited runners-scored—Slaten 2-1. Slaten (Denorfia). WP—Qualls. T—3:19. A—23,169 (41,506).

NP ERA 81 3.18 18 2.22 16 2.63 16 1.71 NP ERA 90 7.71 11 2.25 22 4.26 28 2.12 16 2.03 IBB—off

Mets 9, Phillies 5 Philadelphia Rollins ss W.Valdez 2b Polanco 3b Ibanez lf B.Francisco rf Mayberry 1b M.Martinez cf Sardinha c Worley p K.Kendrick p a-Gload ph J.Romero p

AB 4 4 4 4 4 5 4 4 1 1 1 0

R 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 2 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 0 0 1 1 2 1 2 1 0 0 0

Avg. .271 .246 .314 .245 .229 .226 .184 .280 .250 .250 .289 ---

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Red Sox 4-0, Tigers 3-3: DETROIT — Justin Verlander took a shutout into the eighth inning as Detroit beat Boston to get a split of a day-night doubleheader. In the opening game, David Ortiz homered off Valverde — first pinch-hit homer in eight years — to break a 1-1 tie in the ninth inning and help Boston take the win. • Blue Jays 13, White Sox 4: TORONTO — Aaron Hill hit his first career grand slam, Corey Patterson added a two-run shot and Toronto routed the Chicago White Sox. • Rays 7, Indians 0: ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Jeremy Hellickson pitched seven impressive innings, John Jaso homered, and Tampa Bay beat Cleveland. • Angels 6, Twins 5: MINNEAPOLIS — Erick Aybar had three hits and three RBIs and Dan Haren earned his first win since April 17 in Los Angeles’ victory over Minnesota. • Rangers 7, Royals 6: ARLINGTON, Texas — Mike Napoli slid under the tag of catcher Brayan Pena on Elvis Andrus’ two-out single in the ninth inning, giving Texas a come-from-behind victory over Kansas City. • Athletics 6, Orioles 4: OAKLAND, Calif. — Josh Willingham hit a go-ahead three-run homer in the fifth inning, Daric Barton added an insurance run in the sixth and Oakland beat Baltimore to complete its first three-game sweep this season. • Yankees 7, Mariners 1: SEATTLE — CC Sabathia allowed one run in eight innings, Andruw Jones lined a bases-clearing double to highlight the Yankees’ five-run third inning, and New York avoided a three-game sweep with a win over Seattle. • Mariners 5, Yankees 4: SEATTLE — Adam Kennedy scored pinch-runner Luis Rodriguez with a bloop single off Mariano Rivera in the bottom of the 12th inning and Seattle won for the ninth time in 10 games with a victory over the New York Yankees on Saturday night.

• Mets 9, Phillies 5: NEW YORK — Jose Reyes tripled twice for the third time this season and a refreshed Josh Thole had three hits and three RBIs as the New York Mets enjoyed a rare offensive outburst in a victory over Philadelphia. • Brewers 6, Giants 0: MILWAUKEE — Yovani Gallardo allowed four hits in eight innings to win his fifth straight start, and Milwaukee topped San Francisco to wrap up an 8-1 homestand. • Padres 5, Nationals 4: WASHINGTON — Ryan Ludwick had three hits and two RBIs, including a go-ahead infield single in the ninth inning, Brad Hawpe had two hits and two RBIs, and San Diego beat Washington. • Diamondbacks 4, Astros 2: HOUSTON — Xavier Nady hit a two-run double in the eighth inning, helping Arizona rally for a victory and a series sweep of Houston. • Cardinals 4, Rockies 3: DENVER — Kyle Lohse pitched six solid innings to match a major league high with his seventh win and Jon Jay hit a two-run homer, helping St. Louis hold off Colorado. • Dodgers 8, Marlins 0: LOS ANGELES — Clayton Kershaw pitched a two-hitter for his second shutout and complete game in the majors, Rafael Furcal hit his first home run of the season and drove in three runs, and Los Angeles routed Florida. • Cubs 3, Pirates 2: CHICAGO — Aramis Ramirez ended a long home run drought, Ryan Dempster threw six solid innings and Chicago beat Pittsburgh in a game delayed by rain at the start. • Braves 2, Reds 1: ATLANTA — Jair Jurrjens (7-1) outpitched Johnny Cueto (2-2), Martin Prado hit a two-run homer and Atlanta beat Cincinnati, putting an end to the Reds’ damaging road trip.

b-Brown ph Baez p Totals

1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 37 5 11 5

0 0 5

0 .320 0 .000 8

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jos.Reyes ss 5 1 4 1 0 0 .335 Turner 3b 5 0 2 1 0 0 .330 Beltran rf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .274 Pridie rf 0 0 0 0 1 0 .239 Bay lf 5 2 2 0 0 1 .241 Dan.Murphy 1b 5 2 3 1 0 0 .268 Pagan cf 4 2 1 1 0 0 .185 Thole c 4 1 3 3 0 0 .230 R.Tejada 2b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .265 Niese p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .095 T.Buchholz p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Beato p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 40 9 17 8 1 3 Philadelphia 001 000 031 — 5 11 1 New York 440 010 00x — 9 17 1 a-flied out for K.Kendrick in the 7th. b-singled for J.Romero in the 8th. E—Rollins (4), Jos.Reyes (6). LOB—Philadelphia 10, New York 8. 2B—B.Francisco (5), Mayberry (4), Sardinha (1), Beltran (16), Dan.Murphy (10), Thole (5). 3B—Jos.Reyes 2 (8). HR—Ibanez (7), off T.Buchholz. RBIs—Polanco (29), Ibanez (27), B.Francisco (25), Sardinha (1), Brown (3), Jos.Reyes (17), Turner (20), Dan.Murphy (16), Pagan (7), Thole 3 (15), R.Tejada (1). SB—Rollins 2 (12). Runners left in scoring position—Philadelphia 6 (B.Francisco 2, Ibanez, Sardinha, Polanco, Mayberry); New York 5 (Niese, Beltran, Turner, Pagan, Dan.Murphy). Runners moved up—M.Martinez, Turner. GIDP— M.Martinez. DP—Philadelphia 1 (Rollins, W.Valdez); New York 1 (Turner, R.Tejada, Dan.Murphy). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Worley L, 2-1 3 12 8 5 0 1 71 3.75 K.Kendrick 3 3 1 1 0 2 33 3.18 J.Romero 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 3.46 Baez 1 2 0 0 1 0 21 3.20 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Niese W, 4-5 6 1-3 5 1 0 4 6 122 3.92 T.Buchholz 1 1-3 4 3 3 0 1 28 3.12 Beato 1 1-3 2 1 1 1 1 26 2.38 Inherited runners-scored—T.Buchholz 1-0, Beato 10. WP—Niese. PB—Sardinha. T—3:01. A—30,791 (41,800).

Brewers 6, Giants 0 San Francisco Torres cf Burriss 3b F.Sanchez 2b Huff 1b Schierholtz rf Belt lf B.Crawford ss C.Stewart c Cain p Affeldt p a-Burrell ph S.Casilla p Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 3 2 3 2 0 1 0 31

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 1

SO 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .250 .303 .302 .224 .255 .200 .200 .000 .043 .000 .236 ---

Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Weeks 2b 5 1 3 2 0 1 .288 Morgan cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .350 Braun lf 4 2 3 1 0 0 .320 Fielder 1b 3 0 1 1 1 0 .282 McGehee 3b 4 0 2 1 0 1 .256 Kotsay rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .245 Lucroy c 4 0 0 0 0 4 .322 Y.Betancourt ss 3 1 1 0 0 0 .224 b-Jo.Wilson ph-ss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .182 Gallardo p 3 1 1 0 0 0 .200 c-Counsell ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .196 Hawkins p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 35 6 13 5 2 7 San Francisco 000 000 000 — 0 6 1 Milwaukee 201 002 10x — 6 13 0 a-singled for Affeldt in the 8th. b-grounded out for Y.Betancourt in the 8th. c-walked for Gallardo in the 8th. E—Burriss (2). LOB—San Francisco 5, Milwaukee 7. 2B—Weeks (13), Braun (10). RBIs—Weeks 2 (21), Braun (38), Fielder (42), McGehee (23). SB—Braun (13).

Runners left in scoring position—San Francisco 2 (Torres, Schierholtz); Milwaukee 4 (Kotsay 2, McGehee, Morgan). Runners moved up—Braun. GIDP—Huff, Schierholtz, Weeks, McGehee, Kotsay. DP—San Francisco 3 (B.Crawford, Huff), (B.Crawford, F.Sanchez, Huff), (B.Crawford, F.Sanchez, Huff); Milwaukee 2 (Weeks, Y.Betancourt, Fielder), (Weeks, Jo.Wilson, Fielder). SF IP H R ER Cain L, 3-4 6 11 5 5 Affeldt 1 2 1 1 S.Casilla 1 0 0 0 Milwaukee IP H R ER Gallardo W, 7-2 8 4 0 0 Hawkins 1 2 0 0 IBB—off Cain (Fielder). T—2:25. A—43,035 (41,900).

BB 1 0 1 BB 1 0

SO 6 1 0 SO 5 0

NP 106 13 16 NP 109 16

ERA 3.88 6.00 4.50 ERA 3.89 0.68

AL BOXSCORES Red Sox 4, Tigers 3 (First Game) Boston Ellsbury cf Pedroia 2b Ad.Gonzalez 1b Youkilis dh Lowrie ss C.Crawford lf Sutton 3b Cameron rf a-J.Drew ph-rf Saltalamacchia c b-Ortiz ph Varitek c Totals

AB 4 4 3 3 4 4 4 2 1 3 1 0 33

R 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 4

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 7 4 3

SO 3 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .298 .247 .333 .267 .306 .240 .278 .200 .230 .224 .306 .203

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Jackson cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .224 Dirks lf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .269 Boesch dh 4 1 1 1 0 2 .261 Mi.Cabrera 1b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .311 V.Martinez c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Jh.Peralta ss 4 0 1 1 0 0 .304 Kelly rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .263 Raburn 2b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .195 Inge 3b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .203 Totals 33 3 6 3 2 7 Boston 111 000 001 — 4 7 0 Detroit 000 102 000 — 3 6 0 a-flied out for Cameron in the 9th. b-homered for Saltalamacchia in the 9th. LOB—Boston 7, Detroit 5. 2B—Ellsbury (16), Lowrie (10), Mi.Cabrera (15). HR—Cameron (3), off A.Oliver; Pedroia (4), off A.Oliver; Ortiz (11), off Valverde; Dirks (2), off C.Buchholz; Boesch (4), off C.Buchholz. RBIs— Pedroia (16), Ad.Gonzalez (45), Cameron (7), Ortiz (24), Dirks (3), Boesch (21), Jh.Peralta (29). SB—Ellsbury (19), Pedroia 2 (12), Youkilis (1). SF—Ad.Gonzalez. Runners left in scoring position—Boston 5 (C.Crawford 3, Pedroia, Saltalamacchia); Detroit 2 (Jh. Peralta, A.Jackson). Runners moved up—V.Martinez 2, Inge. Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP C.Buchholz 6 6 3 3 1 3 98 Albers W, 1-2 2 0 0 0 1 2 30 Pplbn S, 10-11 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP A.Oliver 6 5 3 3 3 3 106 Purcey 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 Benoit 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 Valverde L, 2-2 1 1 1 1 0 1 24 HBP—by A.Oliver (Youkilis). WP—A.Oliver. T—3:16. A—36,285 (41,255).

ERA 3.41 3.54 2.78 ERA 4.50 3.38 6.27 3.68

Tigers 3, Red Sox 0 (Second Game) Boston AB R Ellsbury cf 3 0 Pedroia 2b 4 0 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 3 0 Youkilis 3b 4 0 Ortiz dh 4 0

H BI BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 0 1 1 0

Avg. .298 .243 .329 .260 .300

C.Crawford lf Sutton ss J.Drew rf Varitek c Totals

3 3 3 3 30

0 0 0 0 0

0 0 2 1 4

0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 2

0 0 1 1 4

.236 .238 .240 .208

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Jackson cf 2 0 0 0 2 2 .222 Dirks lf 3 1 0 0 1 2 .241 Boesch rf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .260 Inge 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .203 Mi.Cabrera 1b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .315 V.Martinez dh 4 0 3 0 0 1 .299 Kelly 3b-rf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .262 Avila c 3 0 0 0 1 2 .279 Santiago ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .262 Worth 2b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .000 Totals 29 3 7 3 5 8 Boston 000 000 000 — 0 4 0 Detroit 200 000 01x — 3 7 1 E—A.Jackson (2). LOB—Boston 5, Detroit 7. 2B— Varitek (4), Boesch (12), Mi.Cabrera (16). RBIs—Boesch (22), Mi.Cabrera (36), Kelly (3). Runners left in scoring position—Boston 3 (Pedroia 2, C.Crawford); Detroit 3 (Avila, Boesch, Santiago). Runners moved up—Ortiz. GIDP—Ad.Gonzalez, Kelly, Avila. DP—Boston 2 (Pedroia, Ad.Gonzalez), (Ad.Gonzalez, Sutton, Pedroia, Sutton); Detroit 1 (Worth, Santiago, Mi.Cabrera). Boston IP H R ER BB SO Beckett L, 4-2 6 5 2 2 5 5 R.Hill 1 0 0 0 0 2 Atchison 1 2 1 1 0 1 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO Vrlander W, 5-3 7 2-3 4 0 0 2 3 Benoit H, 7 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 Vlvrde S, 12-12 1 0 0 0 0 1 Inherited runners-scored—Benoit 2-0. T—2:51. A—39,873 (41,255).

NP 107 10 16 NP 132 4 11

ERA 1.80 0.00 4.35 ERA 3.12 6.16 3.52

SO 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2

Avg. .258 .282 .258 .282 .279 .210 .236 .253 .250 .174

Yankees 7, Mariners 1 New York AB R H Jeter dh 3 0 1 Granderson cf 5 2 3 Teixeira 1b 5 0 1 Al.Rodriguez 3b 5 1 1 Cano 2b 5 1 1 Swisher rf 2 2 1 An.Jones lf 3 1 1 Gardner lf 0 0 0 E.Nunez ss 4 0 1 Cervelli c 4 0 1 Totals 36 7 11

BI 0 0 1 0 1 1 3 0 1 0 7

BB 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 5

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. I.Suzuki rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .272 Figgins 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .193 Smoak 1b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .256 F.Gutierrez cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .265 M.Wilson dh 3 0 1 0 1 1 .190 Ryan ss 3 0 2 0 1 0 .277 Ja.Wilson 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .248 M.Saunders lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .168 C.Gimenez c 2 0 0 0 1 0 .200 Totals 32 1 6 1 3 5 New York 015 100 000 — 7 11 0 Seattle 000 001 000 — 1 6 0 LOB—New York 7, Seattle 7. 2B—Granderson 2 (9), An.Jones (2), Ryan (8). 3B—E.Nunez (1). HR—Swisher (3), off Vargas; Smoak (7), off Sabathia. RBIs—Teixeira (36), Cano (34), Swisher (20), An.Jones 3 (10), E.Nunez (7), Smoak (28). SB—Cano (5). CS—Teixeira (1). Runners left in scoring position—New York 3 (Cervelli, Granderson, An.Jones); Seattle 4 (M.Saunders 2, I.Suzuki, Ja.Wilson). Runners moved up—Teixeira, Cano. GIDP— I.Suzuki. DP—New York 1 (Sabathia, Cervelli, Teixeira); Seattle 2 (C.Gimenez, C.Gimenez, Ja.Wilson), (I.Suzuki, Ja.Wilson, Smoak). New York IP Sabathia W, 6-3 8 Pendleton 1 Seattle IP Vargas L, 3-3 3

H 5 1 H 5

R 1 0 R 6

ER 1 0 ER 6

BB 3 0 BB 4

SO 5 0 SO 1

NP 118 13 NP 82

ERA 2.98 0.00 ERA 4.50

1 57 2.50 0 24 8.03

Athletics 6, Orioles 4 Baltimore Pie lf-cf a-R.Adams ph Ad.Jones cf Reimold lf Markakis rf Guerrero dh Wieters c Scott 1b Hardy ss Mar.Reynolds 3b Andino 2b Totals

AB 4 1 2 1 4 4 4 4 4 3 2 33

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 4

H BI BB 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 7 4 3

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2

Avg. .250 .182 .283 .368 .249 .300 .271 .232 .247 .196 .274

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Crisp cf 3 1 1 0 2 0 .273 Barton 1b 3 1 1 1 1 2 .211 C.Jackson lf 3 1 1 1 2 0 .264 Willingham dh 4 1 2 4 0 0 .244 K.Suzuki c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .250 DeJesus rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .247 M.Ellis 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .213 Kouzmanoff 3b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .220 Pennington ss 3 1 1 0 0 0 .259 Totals 31 6 10 6 6 3 Baltimore 000 040 000 — 4 7 0 Oakland 100 041 00x — 6 10 0 a-fouled out for Pie in the 9th. LOB—Baltimore 6, Oakland 9. 2B—Hardy (6). HR—Willingham (9), off Britton. RBIs—Pie (5), Reimold (7), Markakis (16), Guerrero (22), Barton (13), C.Jackson (13), Willingham 4 (35). SB—Mar.Reynolds (3), Crisp (16). S—Andino, Pennington. SF—Barton. Runners left in scoring position—Baltimore 4 (Mar.Reynolds 2, Wieters, Andino); Oakland 5 (DeJesus, C.Jackson 4). Runners moved up—Markakis, Guerrero, K.Suzuki. GIDP—Wieters, Pennington. DP—Baltimore 1 (Andino, Hardy, Scott); Oakland 1 (Balfour, Pennington, Barton). Baltimore IP H R ER BB Britton L, 5-3 5 2-3 10 6 6 3 Accardo 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 Gregg 1 0 0 0 3 Oakland IP H R ER BB Mscso W, 2-0 5 5 4 4 2 Breslow H, 3 1 0 0 0 1 A.Bailey H, 1 1 0 0 0 0 Balfour H, 11 1 1 0 0 0 Fnts S, 11-13 1 1 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—Accardo Britton (Crisp). T—2:39. A—15,373 (35,067).

SO NP ERA 3 97 2.93 0 11 3.96 0 25 3.54 SO NP ERA 1 71 3.27 1 19 4.05 0 14 0.00 0 9 2.92 0 15 4.63 2-0. IBB—off

Rangers 7, Royals 6 Kansas City Gordon lf Me.Cabrera cf Hosmer 1b Butler dh Betemit 3b Maier rf B.Pena c Getz 2b A.Escobar ss Totals

AB 5 4 5 4 4 3 4 4 3 36

R 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 6

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 2 1 1 2 3 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 9 6 2

SO 2 1 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .275 .274 .267 .293 .311 .348 .231 .234 .224

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .240 Andrus ss 2 0 1 1 0 0 .261 A.Blanco ss-2b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .273 J.Hamilton lf-cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .318 Mi.Young dh 4 2 2 2 0 0 .335 A.Beltre 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .251 N.Cruz rf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .220 Napoli 1b-c 4 2 3 2 0 1 .212 Torrealba c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .219 a-Moreland ph-1b 1 0 0 0 1 1 .296 Gentry cf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .194 b-Dav.Murphy ph-lf2 0 0 0 0 1 .225 Totals 35 7 10 7 2 7 Kansas City 000 500 001 — 6 9 0 Texas 011 010 022 — 7 10 2 Two outs when winning run scored. a-walked for Torrealba in the 7th. b-fouled out for Gentry in the 7th. E—N.Cruz (2), Moreland (2). LOB—Kansas City 6, Texas 4. 2B—Getz (4), Mi.Young (18), Napoli (5). HR— B.Pena (3), off Ogando; Kinsler (7), off Duffy; Napoli (8), off Duffy; Mi.Young (3), off Crow; N.Cruz (10), off Soria. RBIs—Betemit (22), Maier (3), B.Pena 3 (15), A.Escobar (13), Kinsler (20), Andrus (18), Mi.Young 2 (35), N.Cruz (24), Napoli 2 (20). CS—A.Blanco (1). SF—A.Escobar. Runners left in scoring position—Kansas City 1 (Getz); Texas 2 (Torrealba, Dav.Murphy). Runners moved up—J.Hamilton, N.Cruz. DP—Kansas City 1 (B.Pena, B.Pena, A.Escobar). Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Duffy 6 5 3 3 1 4 95 4.11 G.Holland H, 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 8 0.00 Teaford 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 1.80 Crow BS, 2-2 1 1-3 2 2 2 0 0 22 1.33 Soria L, 3-2 2-3 3 2 2 0 2 24 5.57 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ogando 6 7 5 5 1 4 106 2.33 Kirkman 2 1 0 0 1 3 43 10.38 Feliz 2-3 1 1 0 0 0 14 1.45 Rhodes W, 3-2 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 3.55 Duffy pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Teaford pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—G.Holland 1-0, Teaford 1-0, Crow 2-0, Rhodes 1-0. WP—Crow. T—3:07. A—45,011 (49,170).

Angels 6, Twins 5 Los Angeles Bourjos cf Aybar ss Abreu lf Willits lf Tor.Hunter rf Callaspo 3b Branyan dh Trumbo 1b Amarista 2b Mathis c Totals

AB 4 5 4 0 4 4 4 4 4 4 37

R H 0 0 2 3 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 2 1 0 2 2 6 11

BI 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 5

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3

Avg. .241 .313 .263 .056 .240 .296 .091 .244 .136 .204

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Span cf 5 2 3 1 0 0 .300 A.Casilla 2b 3 1 2 1 1 0 .237 Kubel dh 5 0 2 1 0 1 .305 Morneau 1b 5 0 3 2 0 0 .246 1-Repko pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Cuddyer rf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .257 D.Young lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .217 Valencia 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .230 Butera c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .126 a-Tolbert ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .162 Plouffe ss 3 1 0 0 1 0 .207 Totals 37 5 13 5 3 4 Los Angeles 003 010 011 — 6 11 0 Minnesota 101 000 102 — 5 13 2 a-walked for Butera in the 9th. 1-ran for Morneau in the 9th. E—Plouffe (3), Valencia (5). LOB—Los Angeles 5, Minnesota 9. 2B—Abreu (11), Span 2 (8), Valencia (8), Butera (4). 3B—Aybar (2). HR—Trumbo (9), off Hoey. RBIs—Aybar 3 (20), Abreu (22), Trumbo (25), Span (12), A.Casilla (6), Kubel (29), Morneau 2 (16). SB—Branyan (1), Mathis (1), A.Casilla (5), Tolbert (1). CS—Aybar (2). S—A.Casilla. Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 3 (Amarista, Branyan, Aybar); Minnesota 5 (Plouffe, Butera 2, Morneau, Cuddyer). Runners moved up—A.Casilla, Kubel. GIDP—Morneau, Cuddyer. DP—Los Angeles 2 (Amarista, Aybar, Trumbo), (Aybar, Trumbo); Minnesota 1 (A.Casilla, Morneau). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Haren W, 5-3 6 10 3 3 1 2 113 2.29 S.Downs H, 7 1 1 0 0 0 0 7 0.55 Rodney H, 10 1 0 0 0 0 1 18 4.05 Wlden S, 12-15 1 2 2 2 2 1 37 3.20 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pavano L, 2-5 8 10 5 4 0 3 114 5.19 Hoey 2-3 1 1 1 1 0 19 10.80 James 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 0.00 Haren pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—S.Downs 2-1, James 1-0. Balk—James. T—2:56. A—39,867 (39,500).

Rays 7, Indians 0 Cleveland Brantley cf A.Cabrera ss Choo rf T.Buck lf C.Santana 1b G.Sizemore dh O.Cabrera 2b Marson c Everett 3b Totals

AB 4 4 3 4 3 4 3 3 3 31

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 5 0 2

SO 0 0 0 1 1 4 1 0 0 7

Avg. .276 .302 .250 .270 .212 .244 .258 .208 .286

Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Longoria 3b 3 2 2 0 2 0 .237 Damon dh 4 1 2 1 0 0 .276 a-Ruggiano ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Zobrist 2b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .253 Joyce rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .365 Kotchman 1b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .361 S.Rodriguez 1b 1 1 0 0 1 0 .232 B.Upton cf 1 1 0 0 3 0 .241 Fuld lf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .227 Jaso c 4 1 2 2 0 0 .229 Brignac ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .173 Totals 32 7 10 5 6 2 Cleveland 000 000 000 — 0 5 1 Tampa Bay 002 230 00x — 7 10 0 E—A.Cabrera (5). LOB—Cleveland 6, Tampa Bay 7. 2B—T.Buck (5), Longoria (9). HR—Jaso (3), off Masterson. RBIs—Damon (29), Zobrist (29), Fuld (21), Jaso 2 (13). SB—B.Upton (10). CS—Longoria (1). Runners left in scoring position—Cleveland 3 (T.Buck, G.Sizemore 2); Tampa Bay 4 (Joyce, Jaso 2, Ruggiano). Runners moved up—Zobrist 2, Fuld. GIDP—T.Buck. DP—Tampa Bay 1 (Zobrist, Brignac, Kotchman). Cleveland IP H R ER Mstrson L, 5-3 5 8 7 6 Herrmann 3 2 0 0 Tampa Bay IP H R ER Hllckson W, 6-3 7 3 0 0 A.Russell 1 0 0 0 C.Ramos 1 2 0 0 PB—Marson. T—2:30. A—23,898 (34,078).

BB 5 1 BB 2 0 0

SO 0 2 SO 6 0 1

NP 98 55 NP 95 14 10

ERA 3.07 8.49 ERA 2.80 3.18 4.11

Blue Jays 13, White Sox 4 Chicago AB Pierre lf 5 Al.Ramirez ss 4 Quentin rf 3 Konerko 1b 3 a-McPherson ph-1b1 Rios cf 4 A.Dunn dh 3 R.Castro c 4 Lillibridge 2b 4 Morel 3b 4 Totals 35

R 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 4

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 9 4 2

SO 0 2 0 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 7

Avg. .265 .274 .253 .299 .133 .206 .181 .227 .291 .237

Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Y.Escobar ss 3 2 2 1 1 0 .289 McCoy ss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .217 C.Patterson lf 5 2 4 3 0 0 .301 Bautista rf 4 1 1 1 0 1 .350 E.Thames rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .233 J.Rivera 1b 5 1 2 0 0 1 .250 Arencibia c 4 1 2 1 1 1 .252 A.Hill 2b 5 1 1 4 0 0 .240 Encarnacion dh 5 2 3 1 0 0 .248 R.Davis cf 3 2 1 0 0 0 .263 J.Nix 3b 4 1 2 2 0 0 .183 Totals 40 13 18 13 2 3 Chicago 101 000 002 — 4 9 0 Toronto 600 331 00x — 13 18 0 a-struck out for Konerko in the 8th. LOB—Chicago 6, Toronto 6. 2B—Rios (10), Lillibridge (2), J.Rivera 2 (9), J.Nix (3). HR—Quentin (13), off R.Romero; R.Castro (2), off Camp; A.Hill (1), off Danks; Encarnacion (1), off Danks; C.Patterson (4), off Danks. RBIs—Quentin (33), Konerko (39), R.Castro 2 (6), Y.Escobar (18), C.Patterson 3 (24), Bautista (36), Arencibia (25), A.Hill 4 (23), Encarnacion (10), J.Nix 2 (8). SB—Pierre (9), R.Davis (15). Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 3 (Morel, R.Castro, Pierre); Toronto 2 (Bautista, R.Davis). Runners moved up—A.Dunn, A.Hill, J.Nix. GIDP— R.Davis. DP—Chicago 1 (Lillibridge, Al.Ramirez, Konerko); Toronto 1 (A.Hill, J.Rivera). Chicago IP H R ER Danks L, 0-8 4 9 9 9 Harrell 4 9 4 4 Toronto IP H R ER R.Rmro W, 5-4 7 6 2 2 Janssen 1 0 0 0 Camp 1 3 2 2 HBP—by Danks (R.Davis). T—2:33. A—18,325 (49,260).

BB 1 1 BB 2 0 0

SO 1 2 SO 5 2 0

NP 96 67 NP 107 16 13

ERA 5.25 9.00 ERA 2.88 1.61 2.42

Mariners 5, Yankees 4 (12 innings) late Saturday New York AB Jeter ss 5 Granderson cf 6 Teixeira 1b 3 Al.Rodriguez 3b 6 Cano 2b 5 Martin c 4 Posada dh 3 a-An.Jones ph-dh 2 Swisher rf 5 1-Dickerson pr-rf 0 Gardner lf 5 Totals 44

R 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

H BI BB 2 0 1 1 1 0 1 2 3 1 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 4 5

SO 0 1 0 1 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 7

Avg. .257 .274 .259 .284 .281 .253 .174 .231 .206 .308 .253

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. I.Suzuki rf 6 0 0 0 0 0 .277 Figgins 3b 5 0 0 0 1 2 .197 Smoak 1b 5 0 1 0 1 2 .256 3-L.Rodriguez pr 0 1 0 0 0 0 .180 Cust dh 5 1 1 0 1 1 .232 F.Gutierrez cf 5 1 3 0 1 0 .267 A.Kennedy 2b 6 1 3 1 0 0 .290 Olivo c 5 1 3 3 0 0 .243 2-Ja.Wilson pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .247 C.Gimenez c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .214 Peguero lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .185 M.Saunders lf 1 0 0 0 1 1 .173 Ryan ss 4 0 2 1 0 0 .268 Totals 45 5 13 5 5 8 New York 012 000 100 000 — 4 9 0 Seattle 010 300 000 001 — 5 13 1 One out when winning run scored. 1-ran for Swisher in the 11th. 2-ran for Olivo in the 11th. 3-ran for Smoak in the 12th. E—Smoak (2). LOB—New York 9, Seattle 12. 2B—Jeter (6), Cust (11), A.Kennedy (8), Olivo (5). 3B— Granderson (5). HR—Cano (10), off F.Hernandez; Teixeira (15), off F.Hernandez. RBIs—Granderson (37), Teixeira 2 (35), Cano (33), A.Kennedy (13), Olivo 3 (18), Ryan (16). SB—Jeter (4), I.Suzuki (12). CS—Cano (1), Olivo (3). Runners left in scoring position—New York 5 (Gardner, Al.Rodriguez 2, Martin, Jeter); Seattle 3 (Cust, Smoak, Ryan). Runners moved up—Posada, Gardner, I.Suzuki, Figgins. GIDP—Gardner, A.Kennedy. DP—New York 1 (Logan, Jeter, Teixeira); Seattle 1 (A.Kennedy, Ryan, Smoak). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nova 3 2-3 5 4 4 3 1 73 4.67 Noesi 2 1-3 2 0 0 0 1 32 0.96 Robertson 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 3 21 1.27 Chamberlain 1 2-3 0 0 0 1 2 28 3.12 Logan 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 4.15 Ayala 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 1.80 Rivera L, 1-1 1-3 3 1 1 1 0 17 2.11 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA F.Hernandez 7 6 4 4 5 4 128 3.19 Laffey 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 1.80 J.Wright 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 21 1.48 League 1 2 0 0 0 0 15 5.32 Pauley W, 4-0 2 1 0 0 0 1 26 0.84 Inherited runners-scored—Noesi 2-0, Chamberlain 1-0. IBB—off Ma.Rivera (F.Gutierrez). HBP—by Nova (Ryan). WP—Nova, F.Hernandez. T—4:18. A—37,354 (47,878).

LEADERS Through Sunday’s Games ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—Joyce, Tampa Bay, .365; Bautista, Toronto, .350; MiYoung, Texas, .335; AdGonzalez, Boston, .329; HKendrick, Los Angeles, .322; MiCabrera, Detroit, .315; Aybar, Los Angeles, .313. RUNS—Bautista, Toronto, 43; Granderson, New York, 42; MiCabrera, Detroit, 38; Ellsbury, Boston, 35; ACabrera, Cleveland, 34; AdGonzalez, Boston, 33; Joyce, Tampa Bay, 33; Kinsler, Texas, 33. RBI—AdGonzalez, Boston, 45; Beltre, Texas, 41; Konerko, Chicago, 39; Granderson, New York, 37; Bautista, Toronto, 36; MiCabrera, Detroit, 36; Teixeira, New York, 36. HITS—AdGonzalez, Boston, 72; MiYoung, Texas, 67; ACabrera, Cleveland, 62; Ellsbury, Boston, 62; Guerrero, Baltimore, 61; Span, Minnesota, 61; Konerko, Chicago, 60; Kubel, Minnesota, 60. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—Berkman, St. Louis, .354; Holliday, St. Louis, .347; JosReyes, New York, .335; Votto, Cincinnati, .333; Ethier, Los Angeles, .326; Braun, Milwaukee, .320; SCastro, Chicago, .318. RUNS—Braun, Milwaukee, 40; Stubbs, Cincinnati, 38; Weeks, Milwaukee, 37; Bruce, Cincinnati, 36; Rasmus, St. Louis, 36; JosReyes, New York, 36; Votto, Cincinnati, 36. RBI—Fielder, Milwaukee, 42; Bruce, Cincinnati, 40; Howard, Philadelphia, 40; Braun, Milwaukee, 38; Pence, Houston, 38; Berkman, St. Louis, 36; Kemp, Los Angeles, 35. HITS—JosReyes, New York, 76; SCastro, Chicago, 68; Pence, Houston, 66; Polanco, Philadelphia, 64; Prado, Atlanta, 64; Votto, Cincinnati, 64; Braun, Milwaukee, 62; Ethier, Los Angeles, 62; Kemp, Los Angeles, 62.


D4 Monday, May 30, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

AUTO RACING: INDIANAPOLIS 500

GOLF ROUNDUP

Wheldon wins stunning Indy By Paul Newberry The Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS — Dan Wheldon was zipping toward the final corner of Sunday’s Indianapolis 500, surely figuring the best he could do was another runner-up finish. Then he came upon JR Hildebrand’s crumpled car, all smashed up and sliding along the wall. The rookie had made the ultimate mistake with his very last turn of the wheel, and Wheldon, not Hildebrand, made an improbable turn into Victory Lane. “It’s obviously unfortunate, but that’s Indianapolis,” said Wheldon, who won Indy in 2005 and finished second the past two years. “That’s why it’s the greatest spectacle in racing. You never know what’s going to happen.” This might have been the strangest one ever. In his first event of the year, Wheldon captured the ultimate IndyCar prize. But the 100th anniversary of the “Greatest Spectacle in Racing” will be remembered more for the guy who let it slip away with the checkered flag in sight. Leading by almost 4 seconds and needing to make it around the 2½-mile track just one more time, Hildebrand cruised through the first three turns with no problem. The fourth one got him. He went too high, lost control and slammed into the outside wall. Wheldon sped past, while Hildebrand’s battered machine skidded across the line 2.1 seconds behind, still hugging the concrete barrier. “It’s a helpless feeling,” Hildebrand said. The 23-year-old Californian got into trouble when he came up on another rookie, Charlie Kimball, going much slower as they approached the last corner. Instead of backing off, the leader moved to the outside to make the pass — a decision that sent him slamming into the wall to a collective gasp from the crowd of 250,000. “I caught him in the wrong piece of track,” Hildebrand said. “I got up in the marbles and that was it.” While Wheldon celebrated his second Indy 500 win, series officials reviewed the video to see if Wheldon passed the wrecked machine before the caution lights went on. He clearly did, and Hildebrand’s team said it wouldn’t protest the result. That gave the Brit another spot on the Borg-Warner Trophy. Not bad, considering he doesn’t even have a full-time job. “I just felt a lot of relief. It’s an incredible feeling,” Wheldon

The Associated Press

AJ Mast / The Associated Press

IndyCar driver JR Hildebrand, left, crashes into the wall on the final lap as driver Dan Wheldon, of England, takes the checkered flag to win the Indianapolis 500 auto race at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis, Sunday. said. “I never gave up.” He took the traditional swig of milk and headed off on a triumphant lap around the speedway — a lap that Hildebrand should have been taking. Instead, the youngster stopped by the garage to get a look at his mangled car, which was hauled through Gasoline Alley instead of being wheeled into Victory Lane. He’s now in the company of athletes such as Jean Van de Velde, who squandered a threeshot lead on the last hole of the 1999 British Open, and Lindsey Jacobellis, whose hotdogging wipeout at the 2006 Winter Olympics cost her a certain gold medal. They had it in the bag — and threw it all away. “I’m just frustrated. It’s not because we came in here with the expectation of winning and we didn’t,” Hildebrand said. “I felt like I just made a mistake and it cost our boys. I guess that’s why rookies don’t win the Indianapolis 500 a whole lot, and we’ll be back next year, I guess.” After losing his ride from last season — with Hildebrand’s

Indianapolis 500 Top 10 results 1 . (6) Dan Wheldon, 200 laps. 2. (12) J.R. Hildebrand, 200. 3. (29) Graham Rahal, 200. 4. (22) Tony Kanaan, 200. 5. (2) Scott Dixon, 200. 6. (3) Oriol Servia, 200. 7. (14) Bertrand Baguette, 200. 8. (21) Tomas Scheckter, 200. 9. (27) Marco Andretti, 200. 10. (25) Danica Patrick, 200. For complete results, see Scoreboard, Page D2.

team, no less — Wheldon had plenty of time to hang out with his wife and two young children, while also dealing with the burden of his mother being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. He longed to get back behind the wheel, and when May rolled around he had a one-off deal with retired driver Bryan Herta’s fledgling team.

They came up with a winning combination, which may well lead to a bigger gig. For now, though, there are no guarantees — even for the Indy 500 champion. “I think my contract expires at midnight,” Wheldon said, managing a smile. The 200-lap race was dominated much of the day by Chip Ganassi’s top two drivers, defending champ Dario Franchitti and 2008 winner Scott Dixon. But after a series of late pit stops, things really got interesting. Second-generation racer Graham Rahal spent some time up front. Danica Patrick claimed the lead but had to stop for fuel with nine laps to go. Belgium driver Bertrand Baguette had already gotten past Patrick, but he didn’t have enough fuel, either. When Baguette went to the pits with three laps to go, the lead belonged to Hildebrand. All he had to do was make it to the end. He came up one turn short. “My disappointment is for the team,” Hildebrand said. “We should’ve won the race.”

AUTO RACING ROUNDUP

Harvick takes checkered flag in Charlotte The Associated Press CONCORD, N.C. — Dale Earnhardt Jr. closed out a day of wild finishes Sunday by running out of gas a half-lap short of snapping his nearly three-year losing streak. Kevin Harvick sailed by Earnhardt coming out of the final turn in the Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte Motor Speedway, where Earnhardt was comfortably out front in the closing laps of NASCAR’s longest race of the year. Earnhardt knew stretching his gas to the finish was going to be tough, but crew chief Steve Letarte ordered him to go for broke. It capped a frantic few minutes of strategy as nearly five hours of racing came down to fuel mileage and a final two-lap sprint to the finish. The crew chief begged Earnhardt to not worry about gas and chase down Greg Biffle and Kasey Kahne over the final 20 laps. But Letarte reversed course when Kahne closed in on Biffle, and Matt Kenseth, who was running fourth, stopped for gas. Figuring Biffle and Kahne would run out racing each other for the win, he urged Earnhardt to sit tight and try to exploit their misfortune. It might have worked, too, if Hendrick Motorsports teammate Jimmie Johnson’s engine didn’t fail four laps from the finish. Biffle had to stop for gas under caution, and Kahne and Earnhardt lined up side-by-side for the final restart. Earnhardt, on the bottom, got a great jump as Kahne got hit from behind by Brad Keselowski. It caused cars to stack up in the middle of the pack, and

Bradley gets first PGA Tour victory in playoff

Mike McCarn / The Associated Press

Kevin Harvick gives a thumbs up after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup series Coca-Cola 600 auto race in Concord, N.C., Sunday. debris was strewn everywhere. But the caution call from NASCAR never came, and Earnhardt needed only to get to the white flag to seal his win. He got to the flag just fine. But because the yellow never waved, he had to race and couldn’t make it to the finish. Earnhardt ran out on the back straightaway, coasted through the final turn, and Harvick cruised by for his third win of the season. “I just do what my dang crew chief says, and I believe that was the right call because if we would have pitted, I don’t know where we would have finished,” Earnhardt said. “We weren’t supposed to make it. We played our hand. I tried to save a ton of gas, as much as I could. I’m disappointed we didn’t win. To come so close. But if we had won that race, it would have been a gift.”

Earnhardt faded to seventh, and his losing streak hit 105 races. Earnhardt apologized to his fans — many of whom were jumping up and down in anticipation mere seconds from the finish. Earlier Sunday, rookie JR Hildebrand crashed coming out of the final turn to lose the Indianapolis 500. Both Earnhardt and Hildebrand are sponsored by the National Guard, and the finishes of the two big races spoiled what would have been a celebratory Memorial Day for the military, which makes sponsorship of auto racing its top marketing tool. David Ragan, meanwhile, finished second in a Ford behind the Chevrolet of Harvick. Joey Logano was third in a Toyota, and Kurt Busch was fourth in a Dodge. AJ Allmendinger and Marcos Ambrose were fifth in sixth in Fords for Richard Petty

Motorsports. Regan Smith was eighth in a Chevrolet, while the Toyotas of David Reutimann and Denny Hamlin rounded out the top 10. The finishing order wasn’t really indicative of how drivers managed the 600-mile race. Biffle and Kenseth probably had the best cars, but Biffle wound up 13th and Kenseth was 14th because of the fuel issues. Kahne, who came back from a pit road speeding penalty to have a shot at the win, wound up 22nd. Kyle Busch led 55 laps, but had two late spins and finished 32nd. It was so topsy-turvy, it opened the door for drivers who struggled mightily most of the race, and that included Hamlin, who changed his carburetor late in the race to drop from fourth to 27th with 99 laps to go. Also on Sunday: Vettel wins Monaco Grand Prix MONACO — Sebastian Vettel won the Monaco Grand Prix, beating Fernando Alonso and Jenson Button in a thrilling and incident-packed race that several drivers failed to finish. Defending F1 champion Vettel has won five of the six races this season, with only Lewis Hamilton beating him in China. The German gambled by staying out on the same set of soft tires, turning the last 15 laps into a battle of wits as both Alonso and Button were on his tail. That gamble looked certain to backfire until a crash on lap 72 resulted in a red flag that suspended the session just as he was close to being caught. When the race resumed, Vettel had changed his tires and the last few laps became a procession.

IRVING, Texas — Walking down the 18th fairway during a playoff and realizing he was about to get his first PGA Tour victory, Keegan Bradley got emotional thinking about a cowbell. The one that is in the World Golf Hall of Fame. The one his grandmother rang after every win by his famous aunt, LPGA Tour great Pat Bradley, whose 31 victories included six majors. “It was like pull it together, don’t start thinking about the cowbell,” Keegan Bradley said. “The cowbell in my family is an iconic thing.” Bradley settled himself and won the Byron Nelson Championship, parring the first hole of a playoff with Ryan Palmer on Sunday. Bradley sank a 2-foot par putt at the 419-yard 18th hole in the playoff, while Palmer’s approach went into the water before a 13-foot bogey putt. Bradley, a PGA Tour rookie who never won on the Nationwide Tour, got his first professional victory nine days before his 25th birthday. He looked forward to talking to his aunt. “She is a lot calmer on the golf course than she is watching me. I’m sure she was by the TV going crazy,” Bradley said. “I talk to her regularly through text messages and phone calls about tournaments and what it’s like to come down near the end. ... This is the closest thing we ever had in common in terms of playing.” About an hour before the playoff, Bradley finished his closing round of 2-under 68 with a par at No. 18, dropping into a squat and hopping a few times in frustration when his 10-foot birdie chance slid by the hole. Palmer (72) and Bradley finished at 3-under 277, the highest winning score on the PGA Tour this year — and the highest in relation to par in a nonmajor since 1999. It was the fifth playoff in six weeks and 10th overall. Palmer forced the extra hole with a 6-foot putt at No. 18 for only the second birdie there all day. When that putt dropped, Palmer punched his right fist in the air and then raised both arms over his head. Bradley and Palmer then played No. 18 again, both going way right with their tee shots to start the playoff. Tournament volunteers quickly dismantled and moved a temporary lemonade stand to give Bradley, a Vermont native who played at St. John’s, a line of sight to the green and avoid the necessity for a drop. Bradley’s approach was dangerously close to sliding off the side of the green into the water, but stayed up. Palmer went in the same direction but his ball didn’t stay dry. “I had a clear punch shot but it’s so easy to hit it left when I’m trying to hit a punch like that, and it squared left a little bit,”

LM Otero / The Associated Press

Keegan Bradley celebrates after sinking the winning putt on the 18th green of the first playoff hole during the Byron Nelson Championship golf tournament in Irving, Texas, Sunday. he said. “Then my putt, just wanted to tease myself a little more, I guess. But I got into the position to win the golf tournament and that’s all I can ask for.” On the 172-yard 17th hole, Bradley sank a 12-foot par-saving putt and responded with an emphatic fist pump. After Bradley tapped in his par putt at No. 18, third-round leader Palmer was in one of the five groups still playing. Bradley then sat for a few minutes before going to the practice range to prepare for a playoff that almost wasn’t necessary for him to become the PGA Tour’s sixth first-time winner this season. “It was funny. I was really, really nervous and then when (Palmer) made the birdie I calmed way down,” Bradley said. “I felt my heartbeat slow down. I calmed down.” In other events on Sunday: Donald beats Westwood at BMW VIRGINIA WATER, England — Luke Donald won a duel for No. 1 with a playoff victory over fellow Englishman Lee Westwood in the BMW PGA Championship. Donald, second behind Westwood entering the tournament, birdied the par-5 18th in the playoff, hitting his approach within 5 feet before Westwood’s wedge shot spun off the green and into the water hazard. Colombian wins Brazil Cup RIO DE JANEIRO — Colombia’s Mariajo Uribe won the LPGA Tour’s Brazil Cup, closing with a 6-under 66 in rainy conditions for a one-stroke victory over Lindsey Wright in the 36-hole exhibition tournament. Uribe birdied five of the first seven holes on the Itanhanga Golf Club course and had two more birdies and a bogey on the back nine before closing with four straight pars.

CHAMPIONS TOUR

Watson wins Senior PGA By Rusty Miller

Tour event. The victory came 10 years, 2 days LOUISVILLE, Ky. after he won his other — Tom Watson had Senior PGA Champistood over putts like onship at Ridgewood this pressure-packed Country Club in 2001. 3-footer at the Senior Watson may be well PGA Championship past his prime, but for most of his adult Tom Watson there have been very life. few players in history Why dawdle? as good at sealing the “I didn’t take much time with deal with the outcome teetering the putt,” he said with that fa- on the brink. mous toothy grin. “I took one Few realize that more than practice stroke and figured, Eger, who worked closely with ‘Let’s get this over with.’ ” Watson and the other giants Watson summoned up some of the game in the 1980s and of his old major magic, holing 1990s as a rules official. the short birdie putt on the first “I watched a lot of Trevino, playoff hole to beat David Eger Watson, Irwin — a lot of great on Sunday. players from the golf cart,” he The 61-year-old Watson, said. “And I got to really appredown a shot with four holes left ciate just how good they were in regulation, became the old- — and they still are.” est player to win a major since Watson closed with a 2-under the senior tour was created in 70 to finish at 10-under 278 and 1980. He also became the sec- capture his 14th career major, ond-oldest winner of the Senior six since turning 50 to go with PGA, behind only Jock Hutchi- five British Opens, two Masters son, who was 62, in 1947. and a U.S. Open. “If this is the last tournament “Coming into the tournament I ever win, it’s not a bad one,” I really didn’t give myself any Watson said. “I’m kind of on chance based on the way I was borrowed time out here at 61.” practicing last week in Kansas Watson became the third- City,” he said. “But the light oldest winner of a Champions switch went on.” The Associated Press


THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 30, 2011 D5

Happy Continued from D1 Perhaps most noticeable were the male pacers, who were sportingly dressed in short, sparkly, sequined skirts. Friends Tamra Caldwell, 41, and Kaye House, 43, were not wearing eye-catching skirts, but the two Bend women were decked out in flashy pink shirts — the color was a popular choice for apparel Sunday — made specifically for the half-marathon race. Each shirt featured a “smiley face” decal on the front and a slogan reading “Be happy … live happy … run” on the back. “We are very happy girls,” House explained. For Caldwell, Happy Girls was her first half marathon, and House helped her make it to the finish. “I thought it went really well. I had my energizer here,” Caldwell said, referring to House. “I’m just so proud of myself right now.” Like Caldwell, Janaya Wetzell completed her first half marathon at Happy Girls. She crossed the finish line with a big smile on her face and milled around nearby with her extensive support crew, which included her mother, grandmother, sister, nephew and six close friends. “I can’t believe I did it,” said the 29-year-old Bend resident. “I can’t believe I didn’t call for a ride.” Wetzell said she has been running for only about 18 months and previously completed two 5-kilometer races. Finishing the half marathon pushed her limits, but Wetzell — and hundreds of other Happy Girls — made it through. “It was absolutely horrible,” she said, “and I loved every second of it.” Amanda Miles can be reached at 541-383-0393 or at amiles@bendbulletin.com.

Hero Continued from D1 While covering the high school state track meet in Eugene last weekend, I heard a number of kids talk about wanting to try the decathlon, “like Ashton Eaton.” Other journalists and I added to the multi-event craze, sizing up the decathlon or heptathlon potential of just about any athlete who won a throw and a jump or showed any skill in pole vaulting. “Ashton’s had a huge influence on us,” says Redmond High track coach Scott Brown. “And we’ve taken that (interest) and decided to capitalize on it and promote (decathlon and heptathlon).” This past weekend in Redmond, Brown, a former decathlete, staged the inaugural Central Oregon Multi Event Championship. Eleven boys and two girls competed in multievents Friday and Saturday in Redmond, where athletes gathered from as far as Lakeview and Salem. “We saw a similar thing with Dan and Dave in the early ’90s,” Hood says, referring to decathletes Dan O’Brien and Dave Johnson, who were made famous by a series of Reebok commercials preceding the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona. Both athletes had Oregon con-

NBA NOTEBOOK

CYCLING SCOREBOARD

Mavs delighted by Cuban’s quiet time By Jaime Aron The Associated Press

DALLAS — Mark Cuban’s quiet time continues. Now that they’ve gotten used to it, the Dallas Mavericks kind of like it this way. “It’s fine with me,” Dirk Nowitzki said. “It should be all about the players.” The Mavs have roared into the NBA finals with Cuban taking the traditional, lowprofile role of most team owners. Of course, Cuban has never been like most team owners, making himself part of the story pretty much from the day he went from buying season tickets to buying the club. He’s racked up more than $1 million in fines over his 11year tenure, mostly for outspoken comments — like berating the officials during the 2006 NBA finals in Miami, where his team returns for Game 1 on Monday night. “Mark’s a smart guy, one of the smartest I’ve ever been around,” Dallas coach Rick Carlisle said. “Like all of us, he has great humility and respect for the position that we’re in right now. We’re all doing everything we can to put ourselves in the best possible position to do well.” Cuban’s silence began after Dallas won its first-round series against Portland. The Mavs are 9-1 since, so why mess with a good thing? “Mark is a very vocal guy,” Jason Kidd said. “He’s going to say what he wants to say at the right time, but I think he’s been a little been quiet during this playoff run.” Just to be clear, this is only a media silence. He chitchats with reporters, but has made

nections: O’Brien had graduated from Henley High School in Klamath Falls, and Johnson had graduated from Crescent Valley High in Corvallis. “There was a big resurgence (in multi-events) then,” Hood recalls. “It’s kind of the same thing with Ashton and his girlfriend Bri Theisen (a UO athlete who has won the past two heptathlon national titles). … It’s great anytime you can get some excitement around the sport of track and field.” While not everyone who takes up the decathlon or heptathlon in high school has the potential to go as far as Eaton, learning the unique nuances of multi-events at an early age can be extremely beneficial. “You have to learn how to manage yourself — when to eat, when to hydrate,” Brown says. “Where’s the shade covering? What (height) do I open at (in the high jump and pole vault)? What effect does taking 15 vaults have on my 1,500?” According to Brown, it makes perfect sense that Oregon athletes are showing a renewed interest in the multi-events. “We’re an adventurous state,” Brown says. “People like to try new stuff. In the decathlon, if your shins are hurting from jumping too much, you can go throw. If your arm’s hurting from throwing too much, you

only a few innocuous comments on the record. He has also remained active on Twitter, tweeting “Go Mavs” a few hours before every game. He may have even fired off a few e-mails to David Stern. The emphasis is that Cuban is avoiding the spotlight. The only exception was to accept the Western Conference trophy. His mainly thanked the crowd, then offered up the rallying cry, “We ain’t done yet.” Cuban refuses to explain why he’s taken this tact. If anyone in the organization knows the story, they’re not saying. Once upon a time On Memorial Day weekend 25 years ago, Mavs star Rick Carlisle was involved in another NBA finals as a backup guard on the Boston Celtics. With Larry Bird, Kevin McHale and Robert Parish at their best, and Bill Walton contributing off the bench, the 1985-86 Celtics went 67-15 in the regular season. They lost just one game on their way to the finals against the Houston Rockets. They went up 2-0, dropped two in Houston, then closed the series with a victory on the parquet floor of the Boston Garden. “That was a special team, one of the greatest teams ever,” Carlisle said Sunday. “The magnitude of our star power was phenomenal.” And what about Carlisle, who averaged 2.6 points in about 10 minutes per game? “In terms of my career, I played more games and more minutes that year than any other year, so I was proud of that,” said Carlisle, who also had the lone start of his career that season.

can go run.” Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@bendbulletin.com.

ROAD CYCLING BEND DON’T BRAKE May 28, Southeast Bend Category 1/2 Men — 1, Kyle Wuepper, Bend. 2, Karsten Hagen, Bend. 3, Andrew Boone, Bend. 4, Cliff Heaberlin, Portland. 5, Brad Pauly, Portland. 6, Luis Alejandro Zamudio. 7, Doug Perrin, Bend. 8, Warren Atkey. 9, Carl Decker, Bend. 10, Erk Hofland, Portland. 11, Galen Mittermann, Portland. 12, Adam Blanchard, Portland. 13. Matt Williams, Bend. 14, Doug Smith, Bend. 15, Derek Stallings, Bend. 16, Michael Larsen, Bend. 17, Brian Seguin, Bend. 18, Erik Bergstrom, Bend. 19, Tim Jones, Bend. 20, Cort Buchholz, Milwaukie. Category 3 Men — 1, Spencer Newell, Bend. 2, Ryan Ness, Bend. 3, Cole Sprague, Bend. 4, Joseph Ferron, Corvallis. 5, Brian Engelhard, West Linn. 6, Sean Haidet, Bend. 7, T.J. Paskewich, Bend. 8, Half Fast Velo, Beaverton. 9, Austin Line. 10, Matt Fox, Bend. 11, Rob Angelo, Bend. 12, Niels Thogersen III, Seattle. 13, Mike Olson, Bend. 14, Karl Choltus, Portland. 15, Mike Brown, Bend. 16, Erik Jacobsen. 17, Peter Christoff, Bend. 18, John Craft, Bend. Category 4/5 Men — 1, Darren Smith, Bend. 2, Zach Gilmour, Klamath Falls. 3, Michael Dennis, Bend. 4, Eric Schusterman, Bend. 5, Todd Berger, Bend. 6, Ian Mastenbrook, Milwaukie. 7, John Porter, Portland, 8, Dustin Harder, Portland. 9, Eddie Wang, Portland. 10, Austin Sommerfield, Eugene. 11, Matthew Erdelt, Eugene. 12, Thomas Pastor, Bend. 13, Earl Hazekamp, Salem. 14, Steve Wursta, Bend. 15, Tim Farrel, Farestart. 16, Andrew LaVeine, Newberg. 17, Drew Coleman, Portland. 18, Dawson Stallings, Bend. 19, George Wescott, Bend. 20, Richard Rosko, Portland. 21, Larry Moulton, Bend. 22, Rob Fleskes, Ridgefield. 23, Mike Abel, Bend. 24, David Caplan. 25, Patrick Miller, Bend. 26, Rick Christen, Bend. 27, Hivoji McKinstry. 28, Matthew Lasala, Bend. 29, Thomas Dryden, Stayton. 30. Ted Sweeney, Eugene. Masters Men 40+ — 1, Todd Schock, Bend. 2, Gregg Strome, Bend. 3, Wade Goff, Sherwood. 4, Michael Girard, Portland. 5, Jurgen Fennerl, Bend. 6, Sal Collura, Camp Adair. 7, Matthew Martel, Portland. 8, Mike Martine. 9, Mark Hinman, Seattle. 10, Richard Albrow, Bend. 11, Mike Rogers. 12, David Bjork. Masters Men 50+ — 1, Robert Sheasby, Bend. 2, Michael Dunn, Lake Oswego. 3, Scott Seaton, Bend. 4, John O’Brien, Ridgefield. 5, Joe Baratto. 6, Scott Harman, Lake Oswego. 7, Jeff Tedder, Portland. 8, Craig Beavers, Woodburn. 9, Kevin O’Connell, Portland. 10, Ambrose Su, Bend. Category 1/2 Women — 1,Brenna Lopez-Otero, Bend. 2, Mindy Simmons, Portland. 3, Tina Brubaker, Salem. 4, Jessica Cutler, Seattle. 5, Michelle Bazemore, Bend. Category 2 Women — 1, Erin Playman, Portland. 2, Annika Johannesen. 3, Beth Kobza, Meridian. 4, Erin Goodall, Portland. 5, Susanna Julber, Bend. 6, Sarah Tisdale, Hillsboro. 7, Anna Vaughn. 8, Alice Chang, Portland. 9, Alexandra Burton, Portland. 10, Cary

Brief Continued from D6 Clinic participants should meet by 2 p.m. at Cog Wild in Bend, from where they will be taken by shuttle to the clinic site. The clinic will run until 5 p.m. Participants should bring a bike and helmet, sunglasses, gloves, water and snacks. Safety equipment, including body armor, knee pads and fullface helmets are recommended. Cost is $25 for adults, $15 for youths. To register, go to www. bendenduranceacademy.com. • McKenzie River Trail shuttles now available: Cog Wild has commenced this year’s series of shuttles to the McKenzie River Trail, located about 90 minutes from Bend. The next scheduled shuttle date is this Sunday. Shuttles leave Bend at 8 a.m. and return at 5 p.m. Riders will be dropped off at the top of the trail and met at the bottom. Additional shuttles can also be

Schwarz, Bend. Category 4 Women — 1, Sandra Clark, Portland. 2, Suzanne Girard Eberle, Portland. 3, Kelly Sandow, Eugene. 4, Molly Blust. 5, Tracy Clow, Portland. 6, Shoshana Foxwell. 7, Aleah Davis, Tigard. 8, Susan Barrows. 9, Maureen Kavanagh, Portland. 10, Danielle Curran, Eugene. 11, Karin Wohlert, Portland. 12, Amanda Miles, Bend. 13, Michelle Kunec, Portland. 14, Allison Medellin, Portland. 15, Rebecca Twyerould, Eugene. Masters Women 40+ — 1, Daphne Moore, Portland. 2, Cinda Strauch. 3, Christine Jerko, Portland. 4, Kay Bork, Eugene. Masters Women 50+ — 1, Carey Macnaughton, Portland. 2, Flo Leibowitz, Corvallis. 3, Melissa Boyd, Corvallis.

MOUNTAIN BIKING 2011 SISTERS STAMPEDE May 29 Results (top five) Overall Men — 1, Chris Sheppard, Bend, 1:41:16. 2, Carl Decker, Bend, 1:42:18. 3, Brig Brandt, Bend, 1:46:12. 4, Brent Pontius, Ogden, Utah, 1:47:12. Overall Women — 1, Peggy Boggs, Boise, Idaho, 1:58:54. 2, Serena Bishop Gordon, Bend, 1:59:37. 3, Shawna Palanuk, Sisters, 1:59:41. 4, Brenna Lopez-Otero, Bend, 1:59:58. Category 3 Men 10-14 — 1, Lance Haidet, Bend, 50:11. 2, Massimo Larsen, Bend, 54:19. 3, Cameron Beard, Bend, 55:03. 4, Will Churchill, Bend, 56:04. 5, Thomas Wimberly, Bend, 56:20. Category 3 Men 15-18 — 1, Ian Mastenbrook, Milwaukie, 50:02. 2, Zachary Perrin, Grants Pass, 50:02. 3, Cameron Carrich, Bend, 52:00. 4, Keith Fawcett, Grants Pass, 55:12. 5, Zach Standish, Gresham, 56:18. Category 3 Men 19-35 — 1, Colin Armst, Wilsonville, 50:01. 2, Cliff Eslinger, Bend, 50:34. 3, David Eliopulos, Portland, 52:31. 4, Jacques Lafortune, Tigard, 54:40. 5, Dustin Harder, Portland, 56:14. Category 3 Men 35-44 — 1, Craig Snyder, Bend, 50:30. 2, Michael Girard, Portland, 51:12. 3, John Prosser, Hillsboro, 51:35. 4, Bradley Pfeiffer, Bend, 51:47. 5, Michael Fisher, Bend, 52:18. Category 3 Men 45+ — 1, John O’Brien, Ridgefield, 50:49. 2, Hiroji McKinstry, Madras, 54:16. 3, Ian Kennedy, Portland, 54:51. 4, Philip Carr, Springfield, 54:59. 5, David Anderson, Bend, 55:30. Clydesdale — 1, Matt Wilkin, Portland, 2:06:44. 2, Scott Pierce, Grants Pass, 2:09:15. 3, Paul Patton, Sisters, 2:10:15. 4, Mark De John, Bend, 2:12:26. 5, Wayne Nussbaum, Happy Valley, 2:15. Category 3 Women 10-18 — 1, Kylie Haidet, Bend, 1:13:24. 2, Amy Ziehnert, Tigard, 1:13:29. 3, Kate Ballantyne, Bend, 1:15:41. 4, Ivy Taylor, Bend, 1:19:49. 5, Lauren Ziehnet, Garden Home, 1:50:50. Category 3 Women 19-34 — 1, Stephanie Chase, Portland, 58:09. 2, Tiffany Gregg, Corvallis, 59:10. 3, Beth Flanagan, Portland, 59:58. 4, Meagan Masten, Salem, 1:00:08. 5, Erin Goodall, Portland, 1:01:17. Category 3 Women 35-44 — 1, Kendra Duong, Portland, 1:04:32. 2, Vonda Derksen, Corvallis, 1:06:39. 3, Amanda Wirth,

scheduled for any date other than the scheduled dates on the Cog Wild website. For more information, including pricing, go to www. cogwild.com.

Road cycling • Firecracker Ride now taking registration: Registration is now open for the 12th annual Firecracker Ride, scheduled for July 4. The Firecracker is a metric century (65 miles) supported ride from Alfalfa to Prineville and back.

Continued from D1 Nygren threw 38 pitches and struck out three but was charged with the loss to fall to 8-3 this season. Oregon added to its lead with a solo run in the fifth, two more in the sixth and a final run in the eighth. Alex Keudell got the win for Oregon (33-26-1, 10-16) to improve to 7-3 this season. Keudell went 8 2⁄3 innings, striking out six while walking two and allowing two hits. Healy led Oregon with three hits, while KC Serna and J.J. Altobelli had two apiece. The game marked the regularseason finale for Oregon State, but the Beavers are assured of a postseason berth after the NCAA awarded the club a regional host for next weekend. The NCAA selection show for the entire field will be announced at 9:30 a.m. today on ESPN. Regional tickets for purchase are currently available for season ticket holders until Tuesday

at noon. The general public may start purchasing all-session tickets starting online (osubeavers. com) at 8 a.m. Wednesday and over the phone (1-800-GOBEAVS) and in person at the ticket office at legendary Gill Coliseum starting at 9 a.m. The Beavers have hosted 18 postseason games at Goss Stadium, going 15-3 with an eightgame winning streak. Of those 18 games, 11 have come during an NCAA Regional, with the Beavers holding a 9-2 record. Oregon State last hosted an NCAA Regional in 2006, taking all three games from Wright State, Kansas and Hawaii. The other 15 regionals include: Atlanta (Georgia Tech), Austin, Texas (Texas), Fullerton, Calif. (Cal State Fullerton), Chapel Hill, N.C. (North Carolina), Clemson, S.C. (Clemson), College Station, Texas (Texas A&M), Columbia, S.C. (South Carolina), Fort Worth, Texas (TCU), Gainesville, Fla. (Florida), Houston, Texas (Rice), Los Angeles, Calif. (UCLA), Nashville, Tenn. (Vanderbilt), Tallahassee, Fla. (Florida State) and Tempe, Ariz. (Arizona State).

Riders may start between 8 and 8:30 a.m. Three hydration/food stations will be located along the route. Helmets are required. Registration fee is $15. Proceeds from the event will go to the Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation. To register, go to www.mbsef.org. Registration forms are also available at the MBSEF office and at WebCyclery. For more information, contact Molly Cogswell-Kelley at 541388-0002 or at molly@mbsef.org. — Bulletin staff reports

2011

pet pals PHOTO CONTEST ENTER TODAY 3 EASY WAYS:

Look for your pet’s photo online at bendbulletin.com/petpals and in the Pet Pals keepsake Guide Book, publishing June 15

1. ENTER YOUR PHOTO ONLINE

to www.bendbulletin.com/petpals

Beavers

Bend, 1:07:02. 4, Carol Petersen, Salem, 1:08:36. 5, Cari Bailey, Bend, 1:10:40. Category 3 Women 45+ — Shoshana Foxwell, Bend, 1:00:20. 2, Jill Ballantyne, Bend, 1:03:01. 3, Michelle Thorstrom, Bend, 1:03:03. 4, Ruth Williamson, Bend, 1:03:16. 5, Susan Hopkins, Bend, 1:03:27. Category 2 Men 15-18 — 1, Tyler Fox, Irrigon, 2:02:17. 2, Stephan Roberts, Portland, 2:04:49. 3, Javier Colton, Bend, 2:05:01. 4, Keenan O’Hern, Sisters, 2:33:47. Category 2 Men 19-34 — 1, Robert Gilbert, Redmond, 1:55:38. 2, James Kerr, Bend, 1:58:33. 3, Bjorn Kjellst, Portland, 2:01:12. 4, Matt Simeti, Bend, 2:03:47. 5, Christopher Ryan, Portland, 2:04:09. Category 2 Men 35-44 — 1, T.J. Paskewich, Bend, 1:55:17. 2, Kale Chalmers, Tigard, 1:56:05. 3, Matt Engel, Bend, 1:56:36. 4, Doug La Placa, Bend, 1:58:28. 5, Richard Himmel, Sisters, 1:58:27. Category 2 Men 45-54 — 1, Bob Jacobs, Portland, 1:58:23. 2, Todd Sprague, Bend, 2:02:24. 3, David Gilchrist, Bend, 2:02:35. 4, Michael Kender, Portland, 2:02:39. 5, Greg O’Brien, Portland, 2:05:32. Category 2 Men 55+ — 1, Don Leet, Bend, 2:02:33. 2, Steve Lacey, Portland, 2:07:26. 3, Eric Buckland, Bend, 2:08:28. 4, Dan MacNaughton, Portland, 2:09:25. 5, Mark Miller, Corvallis, 2:10:38. Category 2 Women 19-34 — Beth Ann Orton, Portland, 1:57:57. 2, Maire Osborn, Eugene, 2:11:26. 3, Solana Kline, Bend, 2:18:35. 4, Britney Wimberly, Central Point, 2:19:49. 5, Remy Maguire, Portland, 2:19:53. Category 2 Women 35+ — 1, Tiffani Snyder, Bend, 2:10:54. 2, Angela Mart, Bend, 2:10:59. 3, Mielle Blomberg, Portland, 2:11:18. 4, Cherie Touchette, Bend, 2:11:41. 5, Laura Trace, Portland, 2:14:06. Singlespeed — 1, Cordin Longiotti, Ashland, 1:50:07. 2, John Bravard, Portland, 1:50:07. 3, Michael Beno, Portland, 1:50:18. 4, Wade Goff, Sherwood, 1:56:13. 5, Brian Gerow, Portland, 1:56:45. Category 1 Men 15-18 — 1, Nick Creswick, Corvallis, 2:12:26. 2, Timothy Jaynes, Grants Pass, 2:19:59. Category 1 Men 19-34 — 1, Jeff Dengel, Bend, 1:49:35. 2, Ross Brody, Salem, 1:50:11. 3, Seth Patla, Hillsboro, 1:52:23. 4, Connor McCutcheon, Bend, 1:52:33. 5, Doug Turnbull, Springfield, 1:54:48. Category 1 Men 35-44 — 1, Tom Jones, Bend, 1:52:17. 2, Trevor Norland, Corvallis, 1:52:38. 3, Bart Bowen, Bend, 1:52:48. 4, Andrew Sargent, Bend, 1:53:23. 5, Bruce Rogers, Bend, 1:53:27. Category 1 Men 45+ — 1, William Sullivan, Lake Oswego, 1:48:43. 2, Gregg Strome, Bend, 1:51:54. 3, Jeffery Otto, Beaverton, 1:56:42. 4, Todd Raudy, Bend, 1:56:44. 5, Eric Martin, Bend, 1:59:01. Category 1 Women — 1, Peggy Boggs, Boise, Idaho, 1:58:54. 2, Shawna Palanuk, Sisters, 1:59:41. 3, Brenna Lopez-Otero, Bend, 1:59:58. 4, Brooke McDermid, Portland, 2:01:38. 5, Jill Hardiman, White Salmon, Wash., 2:01:56. Pro Women — 1, Serena Bishop Gordon, Bend, 1:59:37. 2, Pia Oravetz, Bend, 2:02:05. 3, Tina Brubaker, Portland, 2:05:45. Pro Men — 1, Chris Sheppard, Bend, 1:41:16. 2, Carl Decker, Bend, 1:42:18. 3, Brig Brandt, Bend, 1:46:12. 4, Brent Pontius, Ogden, Utah, 1:47:12. 5, James Williams, Bend, 1:47:27.

2. MAIL YOUR PHOTO to Pet Pals Contest,

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C YC L I NG C EN T R A L

D6 Monday, May 30, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C C   

At the Sisters Stampede cross-country mountain bike race, Bill McKinney starts the pro men’s circuit by firing his pistol and leading the pack of racers on the first stretch of trail.

Please e-mail sports event information to Cyclingcentral@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

CAMPS/CLASSES/ CLINICS

Tyler Roemer / The Bulletin

Stampede Continued from D1 “The bike just, uh, launched,” Sheppard explained, understating the accident that left him a sight for sore eyes at the finish. “Somehow, I weaved through lava rock and escaped with (road rash on the legs). It was a little bit of a wake-up call for sure. I was definitely hesitant on the descent the rest of the way.” But Sheppard, 38 and of Bend, hung on to the lead to win the 27-mile pro men’s race in 1 hour, 41 minutes, 15 seconds, for his second consecutive victory in the Stampede. Carl Decker, also of Bend, finished second in 1:42:17. Bend’s Brig Brandt was third in 1:46:11. The Sisters Stampede, staged along singletrack on the Peterson Ridge Trail network, included more than 400 mountain bikers from across the Northwest. Riders climbed Peterson Ridge Trail West and descended Peterson Ridge Trail East. Most divisions completed 26 miles on a cool and cloudy day, with trails in prime condition from recent rainfall. The race started and finished in a field just off U.S. Highway 20 near FivePine Lodge and Three Creeks Brewing Co. A few steps away from the start/finish area was the post-race party, which included live music and the launching of the brewery’s “Ridge Trail” Ale. The festive atmosphere and strong turnout of riders seemed extraordinary for a mountain bike race in just its second year. “I put my heart and soul into it, and the community puts their heart and soul into it, and it’s a wonderful thing for Sisters and Central Oregon, too,” said Joel Palanuk, Stampede promoter and organizer. Palanuk, who moved to Sisters from Bend three years ago, said he promotes the race heavily to beginners. “Getting word to people who may not race is important to me,” Palanuk said. “Last year I had no idea it would be such a hit. This year was equally as difficult, but very rewarding.” Bend’s Serena Bishop Gordon won the women’s pro race in 1:59:37. Pia Oravetz, also of Bend, was second in 2:02:05, and Tina Brubaker, of Portland, finished third (2:05:45).

The Category 1 women actually posted faster times than the pro women. Peggy Boggs, of Boise, Idaho, led the Cat 1 division and had the fastest time among all females (1:58:54). Shawna Palanuk, Joel Palanuk’s wife, was second in Cat 1 (1:59:41), and Brenna Lopez-Otero, of Bend, finished third (1:59:58). “It’s such a fun course,” said Bishop Gordon, 32. “(Two riders) were in front of me until the last three miles. I had two crashes, so I kind of got pushed behind. The last five miles, I just got a second wind.” Bishop Gordon said she had been disappointed with her fourth-place finish in the inaugural Sisters Stampede last year, so she was admittedly anxious about Sunday’s race. “There’s so many people in Bend that are supportive, and you want to race well for them,” she said. “It’s neat, because all these people from the community come out and support it. It’s cool to see so many people from Central Oregon coming out, and also people coming from the (Willamette) Valley.” Sheppard, who works at Rebound Physical Therapy in Bend, raced Sunday with a picture of his 10month-old son, Parker, taped to the top tube of his bike. When he needed some extra incentive to hold off the hard-charging Decker, he would simply look down at Parker. “I just put my head down and went my own pace,” Sheppard said. Next month Sheppard plans to travel to his native British Columbia for the BC Bike Race, a seven-day mountain bike event, all on singletrack, from Vancouver Island to Whistler. The event includes nearly 400 miles of singletrack. The 26 miles of singletrack on which Sisters Stampede competitors raced Sunday was enough for most of them. The Peterson Ridge Trail network, through work by the Sisters Trail Alliance and other groups, has grown from 10 miles of singletrack to 30 miles in the past few years. “When me moved here, there was very limited mountain bike trail,” Joel Palanuk said. “It was a little bit discouraging. And all of a sudden this huge revised network of trails just exploded. “I’m so thankful, and I just thought, ‘We’ve got to put on a mountain bike race.’ ”

FREERIDE MOUNTAIN BIKE CRASH COURSE CLINICS: Learn dirt jumping, pumping and and bike handling basics; meet at 2 p.m. at Cog Wild, 255 S.W. Century Drive in Bend; 2 to 5 p.m., Sunday; $25 adults, $15 juniors (ages 12 to 18); for beginning and intermediate riders age 12 and older; safety equipment recommended; register at www. bendenduranceacademy.org. DIRT DIVA NIGHTS: Women-only event features presentation by guest speaker and Bend mountain biker Lindsay Voreis and includes general information/ open discussion for women about learning to mountain bike; Wednesday; 6:30 p.m.; Pine Mountain Sports, 255 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; RSVP 541-385-8080. FREERIDE CLINIC: Sunday, June 4; WOMEN’S GRIT CLINICS: Mountain bike coaching for beginner and intermediate women riders; three remaining two-day clinics in Bend; June 11-12, July 30-31, Sept. 10-11; $100 for two-day clinic; register at Pine Mountain Sports, 255 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www.gritclinics.com.

JUNIOR DEVELOPMENT BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY: Open enrollment for numerous ongoing junior development programs in road cycling, cross-country mountain biking, and freeride mountain biking; ages 6 and older; www.bendenduranceacademy. org; 541-335-1346. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION: Recreational and racing programs in road and mountain biking for juniors ages 8 and older; multiple threeweek sessions and summerlong training programs offered; www. mbsef.org; 541-388-0002.

MISCELLANEOUS COTA WORK EVENT: Volunteer trail work on a site to be determined; 5 p.m., Thursday; meet at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; www.cotamtb.com for a list of required safety gear. AFTER WORK TRAIL WORK WITH COTA: Building new singletrack trails in Wanoga complex;

Wednesday, June 8; meet at 5 p.m. at Pine Mountain Sports, 255 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www.cotamb. com for a list of required safety gear. SPRING FLING: Twelfth annual volunteer trail work day with the Central Oregon Trail Alliance; 9 a.m. Saturday; meet at parking lot at corner of Simpson Avenue and Columbia Street, Bend; 2 p.m. barbecue and raffle; www.cotamtb.com.

RACES CENTRAL OREGON TIME TRIAL SERIES: Weeknight time trial series held along Century Drive: Wednesday; registration starts at 5:15 p.m. and closes at 6 p.m.; $10 for adults, $5 for students; 541-385-7413; www.centraloregonracing.net. CENTRAL OREGON CRIT SERIES: Weeknight criterium series held on the roads surrounding Summit High School in Bend: Wednesday, June 8; races start at 5:40 p.m.; registration starts at 5 p.m. and closes 10 minutes before each race; $10 for adults, $5 for students; 541-385-7413; www.centraloregonracing.net. PICKETT’S CHARGE!: Cross-country mountain bike race on trails at the Wanoga complex southwest of Bend; 10 a.m., Sunday, June 26; 13 or 25 miles, depending on division; $15 for juniors, $25 for adults through June 23, add $5 after June 23; add $10 on race day; registration forms at www. sunnysidesports.com or register online at www.obra.org; 541-788-6622.

RIDES PINE MOUNTAIN SPORTS BIKE RIDE: Twice-monthly guided mountain bike rides hosted by Pine Mountain Sports and open to all riders; 5:30 p.m. on the first and third Wednesdays of the month; free; rental and demo bikes available at no charge (be at the shop at 5 p.m.); meet at 255 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-385-8080; www.pinemountainsports.com. BEND BELLA CYCLISTS: Women-only group road bike ride includes spirited and conversational options; see website for meeting time, Saturday, June 4; meet at Pine Mountain Sports, 255 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www.bendbellacyclists.org.

DIRT DIVAS GROUP RIDES: Womenonly group mountain bike rides; rental and demo bikes available at no charge (be at the shop at 5 p.m.); Monday, June 6, and Monday, June 20; 5:30 p.m.; Pine Mountain Sports, 255 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-385-8080; www.pinemountainsports.com. 12TH ANNUAL FIRECRACKER RIDE: Metric century ride (65 miles) from Alfalfa to Prineville and back; Monday, July 4; three aid stations; riders start between 8 and 8:30 a.m.; $15; www.mbsef.org. WORKING WOMEN’S ROAD RIDE: Casual-paced road bike ride for women lasting 90 minutes to 2 hours; 5:30 p.m., Mondays beginning today; meet at Sunnyside Sports, 930 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-382-8018. RIDE FOR TWO RIVERS: Supported bike rides of 51 and 25 miles in the Sisters area benefit stewardship of the Metolius River and Whychus Creek; Saturday, June 18; Black Butte Ranch; $100 for 51-miler; $50 for adults and $25 for youth in 25-miler; includes post-ride dinner; www.nationalforests. org; Deborah Snyder at 406-830-3355.

OUT OF TOWN PIONEER CENTURY: Thirty-seventh annual supported bike ride starts and finishes at the Clackamas County Fairgrounds in Canby and includes ride options of 32, 45, 55, 77 and 100 miles; Saturday; $25; 503-775-8300; pwtc.com. STRAWBERRY CENTURY: Nineteenth annual supported bike ride starts from Lebanon High School and traverses rural and scenic roads in the central Willamette Valley; Saturday, June 11; ride begins between 7 and 10 a.m.; ride options of 13, 53, 72 and 101 miles; $20 if received before June 3; www.santiamspokes.org. PETAL PEDAL: Supported fundraiser bicycle tour of 30, 68 or 100 miles on rural and scenic Willamette Valley roads begins and ends at The Oregon Garden in Silverton; Saturday, June 18; $70, includes dinner; ride proceeds benefit The Oregon Garden; www.petalpedal.com.

Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

541.382.5882 www.partnersbend.org

Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@bendbulletin.com.

C  B

General • Women’s weekend slated at Hutch’s: Hutch’s Bicycles is conducting a “Women’s Weekend with Giant for Women” this Friday and Saturday. On Friday, Hutch’s is holding a clinic on proper posture and bike fit from 7 to 8:30 p.m. On Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., riders can test Giant women’s road, mountain and cyclocross bikes. A no-drop group mountain bike ride will be held from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., and a no-drop group road ride will be held from 1:30 to 3 p.m. All events will be based out of the Hutch’s store in west Bend on Columbia Street. Riders wishing to demo a bike should have with them a helmet, pedals from their own bike, a driver’s

license and a credit card. Participation in all events is free. For more information, contact Hutch’s Bicycles at 541-382-9253.

Mountain biking • Freeride clinic rescheduled: Originally scheduled to be held as a set of two clinics this past weekend, the Freeride Crash Course Clinic has been rescheduled for this Sunday in Bend. The clinic is geared toward beginning and intermediate riders age 12 and older, who will be divided into small groups for coaching and feedback. Skills to be covered include dirt jumping, pumping, bike handling, lines and features. See Brief / D5

DEAL of the

DAY TODAY ONLY ...

BUY ONE ITEM & GET ONE OF EQUAL OR LESSER VALUE FOR FREE Good for all men’s & women’s hair and beauty product in stock

50% OFF ANY PURCHASE OF $10 OR MORE ON ALL FRESH PRODUCE*

Classic Hair & Beauty Supply

*Excludes meat, grocery, flowers & frozen produce.

Deck & Fence Brightener • Cleans and restores decks and other weathered exterior wood • Removes stubborn black tannin stains from new cedar, redwood and exotic hardwoods • Chlorine free, 100% biodegradable– will not harm plant life • Restores UV-grayed, dirty, mildewstained wood surface to a bright, like new appearance • Fast and easy to use

After 80 years of experience, Wolman™ knows everything there is about preparing, restoring, beautifying and protecting outdoor wood. That’s why Wolman™ is the preferred brand of professional wood care specialists Deck Strip • Strips away weathered pigmented stains from exterior wood • Safer to use than paint strippers - no methylene chloride or caustic chemicals. • Fast and efficient - strips one or several layers in just 15 minutes. • Professional strength formula

Hours: 7:30-5:30 Mon.-Fri. • 8:00-3:00 Sat.

541-382-7434 In The Bend Factory Outlet Stores

In The Bend Factory Outlet Stores

Coupons good 5/30/11. Original newsprint only. One coupon per visit, per store. Coupons have no cash value.

Sign up to receive notification of these and other great money saving offers in The Bulletin. E-mail your name and address to emailnotifications@bendbulletin.com

Always stirring up something good. 2121 NE Division Bend 541-382-4171

641 NW Fir Ave Redmond 541-548-7707

www.denfeldpaints.com


THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 30, 2011 E1

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ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

General Merchandise

263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies Kittens/cats avail. thru rescue group. Sanctuary, 389-8420, 647-2181; kitten foster home 815-7278. Fixed, shots, ID chip, more. Hours, directions, photos at www.craftcats.org.

200 202

Want to Buy or Rent NOW BUYING ESTATES Top Prices Paid! 541-450-1270

1 7 7 7

Cashmere, thin & matted, was found waiting by a restaurant door. All winter she lived under the dumpster & staff fed her, but the business closed & someone who went by daily saw her still there. She's been groomed & is healthy, & needs a safe, loving home. Visit her & many other nice cats at nonprofit, all-volunteer CRAFT rescue, 389-8420, 647-2181 or visit www.craftcats.org for directions, hours, more.

LAB PUPS AKC, black & yellow, titled parents, performance pedigree, OFA cert hips & elbows, $500. 541-771-2330 www.royalflushretrievers.com Labradoodles, Australian Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com Labradoodles, F1-B, great dispositions, ready 5/25, dews, shots,wormed, females $600, males $500, 541-536-2250.

S . W .

Chihuahua, absolutely tiniest teacup, rare colors, 1st shots, wormed $250, 541-977-4686

Lots of toes! Mylie has extra toes on all 4 feet, a bob tail & a sweet personality. All she needs now is a great new home! Visit her & many others at CRAFT rescue. Call 541-389-8420, 647-2181 or visit www.craftcats.org for directions, hours, more.

Jack Russells, Reg., just 2 left, 9 wks, 1st shots, tails docked, $150. 541-385-8934

$125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

O r e g o n

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248

263

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Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Health and Beauty Items

Tools

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Sales Redmond Area

Bosch stainless steel dishwasher $150. Almond Maytag microhood and matching Jennaire smoothtop electric oven, $300 both. 541-389-9553, SE Bend. GENERATE SOME excitement in your neighborhood! Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 541-385-5809. Kenmore 27 cu ft. side by side refrigerator, stainless on black, water, ice in door, excellent, $450, 541-706-1820 Kenmore White 30” freestanding gas range, new $1699, sell $400. 541-549-8626 Loveseat, cream color, beautiful, $90 or best offer. 541-639-4053 Loveseat with sofa, new, light blue and beige, $300 Call 541-549-8626.

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call

541-598-4643.

AMMO, 50 BMG (150), $2.70 ea. Please call 541-639-5282 for more info. Ammunition, 1 case Norinco, 7.62x39mm, $300 OBO, 541-948-7295. CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900. DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $18! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500. Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

Top Grain leather loveseats, forest green, very good condition, $1200 or $650 individually. 541-593-7474 The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

212

Antiques & Collectibles

Fishing Pole, 8’ Graphite, Steelhead Rod, Cabella’s case, $50, 503-933-0814. Float Tube, Outcast Super Fat Cat, excellent condition, air pump & flippers included, $225. 541-480-4456 Fly tying bench, Thompson vise, tools, #9 weight fwd line, more! $140 all. 541-383-2059

GUN

SHOW

June 4th & 5th Deschutes Co. Fairgrounds Buy! Sell! Trade! SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-3 $8 Admission, 12 under free. OREGON TRAIL GUN SHOWS 541-347-2120

There is Hope! Call for FREE DVD Farewell To Fibromyalgia Cabinet Refacing & Refinishing. Save Thousands!

Fatigue, insomnia, cold hands, skin dryness, chronic pain?

Most jobs completed in 5 days or less. Best Pricing in the Industry.

Vanity, Antique, w/round mirror (Waterfall), $150 OBO, 503-933-0814.

La Pine Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 52684 Hwy 97 541-536-3234 Open to the public .

Call for FREE DVD Thyroid Health Secrets Revealed.

Prineville Habitat ReStore Building Supply Resale 1427 NW Murphy Ct. 541 447-6934 Open to the public.

Art, Jewelry

TV, Stereo and Video DVD Players (2), portable, new in box, many accessories, $50 ea., Bend, 503-933-0814 GameBoy Advance SP(2), with case & games, $45, 503-933-0814, Bend.

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

260

www.twodudesflyfishing.com

Misc. Items

Mossberg 12g 9200 semi-auto shotgun, syn. stock, 28”, like new, $200. 541-647-8931

Briefcase, new, leather, locking, Intellectual Locking Attache, $35, 541-598-7397.

Rem 338 WinMag with Leupold Varix2, seldom shot, excellent, wood stock, ammo 541-706-1820, anytime

BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

Remington Model 700 ADL 300 WinMag, Nikon Buckmaster 4.5-14 w/ BDC. $725 firm. 541-647-0667. Rifle SKS, w/ 400 rounds ammo plus extras. $325 for all. 503-830-6564 Springfield XD-40 auto pistol, 2-tone w/accessories, like new, $500. 541-647-8931 Tent, 12x14, Premium Canvas Wall Tent+Frame, sod cloth, wood stove, window, zipper dr., bought May 2010, used 5 nights, must sell, Paid $850, Sacrifice, $650, 541-593-9702

Tuna/Salmon

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash 541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. Cannon Copier, PC-430, both exc. cond., orig. box, $35/ea, 541-410-7778. Printer Cart, on rollers, $20, please call 541-410-7778 for more info.

Radios - 2 way, Cobra, handwith Capt. Curt / Capt. Greg. held mini’s, $50, Bend, Fish 2 days for $375 per per503-933-0814. son. Call now for dates & deWanted - paying cash for Hi-fi tails: 541-379-0362 audio & studio equip. McInWanted: Collector seeks high tosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, quality fishing items. Call Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746 NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808 WIN. Model 101, Pigeon Grade Word Processor, Brother Featherweight, 12ga. 95%, WP-760D, w/extras, orig. $1650 OBO. 541-728-1036 box, $35, 541-410-7778.

247

Camping kit, tent, sleeping pads, Coleman stove & lantern, $125 OBO, 503-933-0814, Bend.

261

Medical Equipment HOVEROUND lift chair and motorized wheel chair. $2500 both. Portable ramp, $500. 541-504-0824.

541-389-9663

5420 SW Harvest Ave., 1978 Dyna-Cruiser camper, 3 0-Clearance fireplaces, 12’ aluminum boat w/5HP, tack, household misc., too much to mention, Sat., Sun., Mon. 10-6, no early birds.

292

FIND IT! BUY IT! Sunriver Moving Sale, Sat., SELL IT! Sun. Mon., 10-5, 16932 JaThe Bulletin Classiieds cinto Rd., Pool table, hot tub, elec. sauna, furniture, Black & Decker Leaf Blower, art, toys, Golden T Machine, like new, $25. Please call misc. tools, TV’s, clothes, ski 541-383-4231 equip., follow signs - left on Stellar, right on Jacinto. JUNIPER TIES & BOARDS Full Measure Timbers “ Rot Resistant ” Raised Bed Garden Projects Instantlandscaping.com 541-389-9663

Farm Market

For newspaper delivery , call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email classified@bendbulletin.com

The Wood Floor Super Store

Hummingbirds Are Back!

266

Heating and Stoves Beckwell Pellet Stove, T-22 , good working cond., pipe/ pad, $950, 406-980-1907; 704-530-4051 (Terrebonne)

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove may be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

267

Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

All Year Dependable Firewood: Dry Lodgepole Avail. Semi dry mixed cords Split Del. 1 for $135 or 2 for $250 Cash check, credit Bend 541-420-3484 Lodgepole Seasoned rounds: 1 cord $129; 2@$124ea; 3@ $119ea. Split: 1 cord $159; 2@$154 ea; 3@$149 ea. Bin price 4’x4’x4’, $59 ea. Cash. Delivery avail. 541-771-0800

308

Farm Equipment and Machinery

325

Hay, Grain and Feed Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Barley Straw; Compost; 541-546-6171.

• Laminate from .79¢ sq.ft. • Hardwood from $2.99 sq.ft. 541-322-0496

300

International Tractor, loader, new tires, diesel, new rear blade, $6250, 541-536-3889.

Hardwood Outlet

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

Combo

Sporting Goods - Misc.

541-647-8261

•Current treatments offering no relief? • Been told to “Live with it”? •Tired of taking drugs that don’t fix the problem or make it worse? There is Hope!

249

Wholesale Peat Moss Sales

4 HR. SALE- 10-2 MON., MAY 30, 1060 NW TEAK AVE. ACROSS FROM SOUTH SIDE PLAYGROUND OF TOM MCCALL SCHOOL.

Sales Other Areas

Call 866-700-2424

Call 866-700-1414 and find out how to get better today!

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. BULK GARDEN MATERIALS

B & D electric mowers; regular $75 OBO good condition; Mulcher $150 OBO new; 18" cut. 541-447-6468

Chronic Pain & Fatigue, insomnia, brain fog, anxiety, migraines?

255

“Come fishing with the Locals”

7mm S&W rifle w/scope, $375. Rem. 572 Fieldmaster 22 pump, $250. 541-647-8931

265

Computers

McKenzie and Willamette River Guided Fly Fishing Tours.

Air Compressor, 2 gal, portable, pancake with upright handle, 125 psi, $70, 503-933-0814.

Building Materials

Gun Case, hard composite shell, and Furs with inner corral foam for rifle & scope, $45, 503-933-0814. Blue diamond, very rare 1ct emerald cut, valuable, sacriGUNS fice, $8500. 503-933-0814 Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036. 253

Antique window frames, circa 1905, 4 @ $40 ea or best offer. 541-639-4053

A-1 Washers & Dryers

Boxer pups, AKC & CKC Regist. Only 3 left, all shots. $500-$650. 541-325-3376

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Cocker Spaniel, American 10 mo., neutered male, choco240 late, vaccinated, housebroItems for Free ken, friendly, to good home Crafts and Hobbies only. $250. 541-639-7703 FREE LLAMA MANURE Shovel ready - you haul! Mini-Aussie, Darling, 5 yrs. old, 48” Weaving Loom, with books, Dachshund AKC mini puppies, weaving yarn, reeds, other Call 541-389-7329. neutered male, exc. comSee: www.bendweenies.com accys, $950. 541-416-0538 panion and/or watch dog, $325, Bend, 503-470-0729 208 prefer older lady or couple, DACHSHUND Mini AKC 242 no kids, $250, 541-923-1062. Pets and Supplies Male $350 Ready 5/28! Exercise Equipment Prineville, 541-633-3221 Mini Dachshund Pups, 2 girls $275 ea., 2 boys $250 Olympic Weight set & Bench, Dachshund / Patterdale Terrier The Bulletin recommends ea. Prineville. 360-607-0604. curling bar, etc., $125 OBO, cross, 10-wk old male, 1st extra caution when 541-390-1161. shots, $50. 541-480-0032 purchasing products or Pomeranian, white, male, services from out of the Doberman Pups, blacks & cute & lovable, shots, Schwinn Airdyne Exer-cycle, area. Sending cash, checks, blues, family raised, tails, wormed, unaltered, $250, $250, please call or credit information may dewclaws, shots, wormed, 541-633-0981 541-548-6857. be subjected to fraud. For $400 ea. 530-739-3280 more information about an POODLE Pups, AKC Toy Treadmill, good condition, advertiser, you may call the $150, OBO, please call Lovable, happy tail-waggers! English Springer Spaniel Oregon State Attorney 541-390-1161. Call 541-475-3889 Field-bred AKC Puppies General’s Office Consumer ready 5/28/11. Male $500 Protection hotline at Pug -mix 8 wks, shots, 3-boys, 246 liver/white 541-523-7951 1-877-877-9392. $150 each, for personal Guns & Hunting or www.millerbeavercompanions. 541-389-0322. creekkennels.com and Fishing Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 12g Mossberg-Maverick 88 FREE TO GOOD HOME, with 541-280-1537 fenced yard preferably ... pump shotgun, 18” bbl, syn. AKC Black Labs 3 left. $150 16-mo American Bully (pit- http://rightwayranch.wordpress.com/ stock, $200, 541-647-8931. shots/ wormed-dew-claws. bull) spayed female, very 541-281-8297 12g Remington 870 mag, pump Scottie female pup, 8 weeks, sweet. 541-771-3217. shotgun, wood stock, 28” bbl, papers, 1st shot, parents on AKC SHIH TZU Small, FREE working cats for barn/ $200. 541-647-8931 site, $500. 541-317-5624 home raised. 3 Female, 2 shop, companionship. Fixed, 1911 custom mil-spec 45acp, Males. Dews, 1st Shots, shots. Will deliver! 389-8420 Toy Poodle puppies for sale, $400. Winchester 94 30/30 Wormed. $400-$550 Ready Senior discount, home raised pre-’64, $350. 541-647-8931 6/9/2011. Call German Shepherd Pups, AKC, and spoiled. 541-771-0522 $700. www.sbhighdesertken541-526-1443 22LR JC Higgins M29, nels.com 509-406-3717 Yorkie/Maltese Cross Pups,males semi-auto rifle, wood stock, Aussie's Mini/Toy, AKC, all col- Goldens, Adorable! AKC Reg. 3 $250, females $300; older $185. 541-647-8931 ors, must see, family raised, Maltese cross pups, males, males & 1 female, ready now! 1st shots, wormed parents $100 OBO, cash, 541-546-7909 22 Rifle, Remington Nylon 66, $500. Terry 541-788-8877 on site 788-7799, 598-6264 $250. 410 single shot shotGreat Dane sweet 8 Month old 210 gun, $100. 541-771-5648 Border Collie/New Zealand Blue AKC male. Crate trained, Huntaway puppies, working cage incl. $500 Furniture & Appliances 7.62x39 Norinco SKS, wood parents, wonderful dogs, 541-610-5944 stock, w/case & mag, nice !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty! $250. 541-546-6171 Shelley_M_B@yahoo.com cond. $200. 541-647-8931

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A v e . ,

Furniture & Appliances

The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website. WANTED: Cars, trucks, boats, RVs, travel trailers, motorcycles, running or not. Call Dan, anytime, 408-599-6451

C h a n d l e r

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

333

Forum Center, Bend 541-617-8840 www.wbu.com/bend SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

Weed Eaters, gas powered, 1 Craftsman, $60, 1 Yardman, $35, 503-933-0814

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Lost and Found Found Bike: Small, boys, Country Club Dr., 5/20, call to ID, 541-389-6446. Found, misc. jewelry at the Redmond Municipal Airport, call to ID, 541-923-1699.

Poultry, Rabbits, and Supplies Wanted: Ringneck Pheasant Rooster; Breeding pair New Zealand white rabbits, 541-317-1948.

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Horses and Equipment COLT STARTING We build solid foundations that stay with the horse forever. No 30 day wonders, 90s rates. Steeldust Stables 541-419-3405 www.steelduststable.com

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Livestock & Equipment 8 Mo. Old Red Angus cross Polled Hereford Heifer, $750, 541-548-0731.

358

Farmers Column

A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher Lost Cat, Female Maine Coon, control. 541-419-4516 long hair, grey, white chin, green eyes, indoor kitty, “Sky”, Haying Contractor will mow around 5/11, Bear Creek Rd & rake & bale for percentage, Teal, 541-280-0835, Reward. or will buy standing hay. Call 541-948-2125 Lost cat, large neutered male from the south Redmond area. Answers to Archie Bunker. Mostly white with blackish brown on back and face. REWARD for return. Missing since Thursday May 19th. Please check your sheds or outbuildings if you live in this area. 541-633-6072. Found RX Glasses, on Riverwoods Dr., 5/21, in case, call 541-815-7914.

Lost Coat, White, dbl breasted, Guess, cell phone in pocket, on West Side, 5/22, 541-383-3904. Lost Newfoundland male, black, Cline Falls Hwy 126/Helmholtz Wy, 5/24. 541-280-7781

Lost Orange Cat, long hair, fluffy very friendly, ‘Tigger’, Tumalo area, Cline Falls Hwy 1 mi. N. of Tumalo store & High Ridge Dr., 4/15, Reward, 541-385-0194. REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 Prineville, 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420.

Where buyers meet sellers. Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809


E2 Monday, May 30, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Employment

400 421

Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

454

Looking for Employment

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Bank Tellers Columbia State Bank is now hiring for Float Bank Tellers in the Bend-Redmond, Oregon area. Applicants must have outstanding customer service, organization, multi- tasking skills and cash handling experience. Columbia State Bank offers an excellent compensation & benefits package and a fun professional environment. Please visit www.Columbiabank.com careers section to apply Equal Opportunity Employer

I provide housekeeping & caregiving svcs, & have 20+ yrs Body and Paint Tech experience. 541-508-6403 RV dealership is in need of and experienced body and paint technician. This posiRetired Estate Grounds Mantion requires the ability, ager & Master Gardener knowledge and experience to avail. now. Compensation perform all duties related to neg., would consider relocabody work including fibertion. 541-633-9895 eves. glass repairs, taping, masking, sanding, and painting of 476 large areas for a variety of Employment RV’s. Employee must supply own tools, pass background Opportunities check and drug testing. 40 Hr. work week, Mon.- Fri., benefits package includes CAUTION READERS: medical, dental, RX and Vision. Wage DOE. EOE. Send Ads published in "Employment resume to Box 16390171, Opportunities" include emc/o The Bulletin, PO Box ployee and independent po6020, Bend, OR 97708. sitions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront inChiropractic Tecnnician -Enthuvestment must be stated. siastic team player wanted With any independent job for a Chiropractic Technician opportunity, please investiposition. Must be customer gate thoroughly. focused, able to handle multiple interruptions and Use extra caution when maintain a friendly attitude. applying for jobs online and Chiropractic experience is never provide personal not necessary. Full-time information to any source Skills Tests given. (541) you may not have researched 388-0839 Call between 9am and deemed to be reputable. 10am and Noon - 2:30pm. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from Delivery Driver out-of-state. Must have valid CDL class A, driver for local deliveries. We suggest you call the State Willing to work in building of Oregon Consumer Hotline material yard, heavy lifting at 1-503-378-4320 required. Bobcat and forklift exp. a plus. Application at: For Equal Opportunity Laws: 63265 Jamison St., Bend. Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, DO YOU NEED A 503-731-4075 GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? If you have any questions, Call The Bulletin before 11 concerns or comments, a.m. and get an ad in to contact: publish the next day! Kevin O’Connell 385-5809. Classified Department Manager VIEW the Classifieds at: The Bulletin www.bendbulletin.com

541-383-0398

Administrator Harney Behavioral Health has an immediate opening for a full time Residential Program Administrator who will provide management and oversight of a ten bed adult psychiatric residential facility located in Burns, Oregon. This program provides active treatment to dually diagnosed clients in a home like setting with a focus on helping the individual return to a more independent lifestyle. The treatment philosophy is recovery oriented and designed to be completed within 6 to 12 months. A master’s degree and experience in behavioral health care is strongly preferred. Salary range begins at $40,000 per year and includes excellent benefits. Send resume an letter of interest to Chris Seigner, Harney Behavioral Health, 348 West Adams, Burns Oregon 97720. Phone (541) 573-8376. Position open until filled.

Education PRINCIPAL Eastmont Community School. Full-time position providing leadership at a Christian school serving pre-school - 5th grade with a total attendance over 150. For more information: job.eastmontschool.com/ Food Service Experienced Line Cook needed. Apply in Person with resume at 1045 NW Bond St., Bend.

HEALTHCARE

OB/GYN Practice Administrator East Cascade Women’s Group, consisting of six physicians and a staff of 21 employees, seeks a proven leader with minimum of 5 years’ Healthcare Administrator experience. Bachelors Degree in Business, Healthcare Administration, or related field preferred. Must communicate and relate well with our staff and patients. We offer competitive salary and benefits. Please email resume to: ecwgobgyn@gmail.com

HEAVY EQUIPMENT

Local Excavation company seeks experienced heavy equipment operators & pipe layers. Must be willing to travel. Email resume to applications37@yahoo.com Judicial

Drug Treatment Court Coordinator Oregon Judicial Department, Crook and Jefferson County Circuit Courts, Prineville and Madras, Oregon. Full time position. Salary: $3,692 $6,010/month. For the complete job announcement and to apply visit http:// courts.oregon.gov/OJD/jobs and click on "Paid Positions." EOE. Land Surveyor Bend civil engineering firm seeks land surveyor for all types of surveying; boundary and topography surveys, constr. staking, etc. Field & office work. Submit resume or qualifications to admin@dp2llc.com. Logging - Shovel Operator, at Warm Springs Reservation, needs experience. Please call 541-409-1337 for more information.

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Medical - Full Time Family Nurse Practitioner needed at our On-Site Health Clinic Located in Bend, OR at the Deschutes County powered by Healthstat. We are looking for Family Nurse Practitioner interested in joining a company focused on improving health and providing hands-on patient coaching & care. Through the care you provide, you impact the health of the employee. Healthstat hires clinicians who understand the health impact that can be made by managing chronic conditions and providing patients unencumbered access to care. Clinicians working in Healthstat worksite clinics assist patients in reaching personal health goals. The Clinician engage employees in personal health improvement, deliver primary care services, and act as a resource and advocate for employee health care needs. Contact Melissa Parks at 704-529-6161. You may also fax your resume to 704-323-7931 or email to melissa.parks@healthstatinc.c om Learn more about us at www.healthstatinc.com.

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

Sales - Full time. Wage + commission and benefits. Apply in person at 304 NE 3rd St., Bend.

Sales - Retail Silverado Jewelry Gallery is now accepting resumes for full and/or part time retail sales positions. Applicants must have retail sales experience, enjoy working with people, and have a strong eye for detail and fashion. Salary and benefits are depending on experience. Resumes accepted at Silverado Jewelry Gallery, located at 1001 NW Wall St., Bend, OR., please ask for Harmony or Heather. No phone calls or emails please. Sales Telephone prospecting position for important professional services. Income potential $50,000. (average income 30k-35k) opportunity for advancement. Base & Commission, Health and Dental Benefits. Will train the right person. Fax resume to: 541-848-6403 or call Mr. Green 541-330-0640.

Home Delivery Advisor P

The Bulletin Circulation Department is seeking a Home Delivery Advisor. This is a full time position and consists of managing a delivery area and working with an adult carrier force to ensure our customers receive superior service. Must be able to create and perform strategic plans to meet department objectives such as increasing market share and penetration. Ideal candidate will be a self-starter who can work both in the office and in their assigned territory with minimal supervision. Early a.m. hours are necessary with company vehicle provided. Strong customer service skills and management skills are necessary. Computer experience is helpful. We offer benefits including medical, dental, 401(k), paid vacation and sick time. We believe in promoting from within so advancement within the company is available. If you enjoy dealing with people from diverse backgrounds, and you are energetic, have great organizational skills and interpersonal communication skills, please fill out an application at The Bulletin or send your resume to:

Job

Opening-Circulation The Bulletin PO Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 or circulation@bendbulletin.com No phone calls, please. The Bulletin is a drug-free workplace, EOE.

Finance & Business

500 528

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

630

Rooms for Rent East Bend: Nice, large room, own bath & entrance, furnished, no smoking/pets, $360+dep. 541-389-0034. STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

Condo / Townhomes For Rent Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

632

Apt./Multiplex General rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 1, 2 and 3 bdrm apts. available starting at $625.

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

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Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent Redmond

3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1200 sq.ft., big wood stove, util. room, 1/2 acre lot, RV parking, dbl garage w/openers, $895. 541-480-3393 or 610-7803

Crooked River Ranch, 5 acres horse property fenced, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, W/D hookup, $800 plus deps. 541-420-5197,209-402-3499

DELUXE 2 BEDROOM $495 per mo.

incl. storage room and carport, smoke free bldg., fenced dog run, on-site laundry, close to schools, park and shopping. O BSIDIAN APARTMENTS www.redmondrents.com 541-923-1907

visit our website at

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

www.oregonfreshstart.com

The Bulletin

541-382-3402

ALL LIKE NEW! 3 Bdrm 2.5 bath duplex. Garage, nice fenced yard, gas fireplace, tile, no pets, no smoking, W/S paid, $850 + dep. 541-382-2260 Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting. No pets/smoking. Near St. Charles.W/S/G pd; both w/d hkup + laundry facil. $595$625/mo. 541-385-6928.

Duplex, 2 Bdrm, 2 bath, Single garage, remodeled, fenced yard, no pets, no smoking, $775/mo. + deep. 541-382-6485

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

573

Business Opportunities Buy a Business. Private deals. Established Oregon businesses plus franchise opportunities. Some low down payment and sweat equity options. CrossPointeCapital.com 541-610-5799.

1550 NW Milwaukee W/D hookup. $615/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 541-382-3678 or

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz GREAT LOCATION 2 bdrm, 1 bath townhouse in quiet 6-plex between Old Mill & downtown. W/D included, $585. 129 Adams Place (off Delaware). 541-647-4135

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

642 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

SPRING BLAST! Studios $375 1 Bdrm $400 Free Move-in Rent! • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond Close to schools, shopping, and parks! 541-548-8735 Managed by

GSL Properties

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Alpine Meadows Townhomes

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION

Securitas USA is currently seeking a Full Time Security Control Center Operator at a high profile client site in Prineville, OR. Ideal candidate will have 1-2 years related experience. $14-15 DOQ. Benefits. Apply online at www.securitasjobs.com. EOE M/F/D/V

600

Bulletin is now offering a Loans and Mortgages The MORE AFFORDABLE Rental

Security

Home Delivery Advisor

P

Youth Instructor Oregon State University Extension Service is recruiting for a full-time (1.0 FTE), fixed-term, 4-H Youth Instructor position to provide the development and management of a diverse portfolio of programming that meets the needs of youth on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation. Salary is commensurate with education and experience. To review posting and apply, go to http://oregonstate.edu/jo bs/ Posting 0007393. Closing date: 6/06/11. OSU is an AA/EOE.

Rentals

2 Bdrm. Starting at $525 1 Month FREE w/Lease or Month to Month Chaparral & Rimrock Apts Clean, energy efficient, w/patios,on-site laundry, storage avail. Near schools, pools, skateboard park & shopping. Large dog run, some large breeds OK w/mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Remodeled - 1200 sq ft, 2 Bdrm 2 Bath on ½ acre lot. Great views & room for RV. $850. 541-923-6513 675

RV Parking RV Parking 30’X20’, outside of La Pine, secure area, $300/ month, hookups are possible, Please call 541-876-5106

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease 1792 sq.ft. & 1680 sq.ft. spaces, 827 Business Way, Bend. 30¢/sq.ft.; 1st mo. + $300 dep. 541-678-1404 Office/Warehouse located in SE Bend. Up to 30,000 sq.ft., competitive rate, 541-382-3678. Office/Warehouse Space, 6400 sq.ft., (3) 12x14 doors, on Boyd Acres Rd, 541-382-8998.

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Houses for Rent General

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

Newly

Office / Warehouse

Se habla espanol. Newer 4plex, $565/mo, $275 dep.NEW tile floor, carpet & dishwasher. Call Diana, 541-279-6605 or Raul, 541-279-8000

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

Eagle Crest gated 3 Bdrm 2½ bath home w/3-car garage & workshop. Reverse living, pvt hot tub, beautiful mountain views, 2200 sq ft. Pool, tennis & exercise facilities. $1400/mo + security dep and utils/maintenance. Lease w/option; owner may carry. Call 541-923-0908.

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend 3 Bdrm 1 bath w/attached single car garage; 24x36 shop w/220, fenced backyard w/patio & greenhouse, W/D hkups, appliances. Pets negotiable. $960/mo. 1st/ last + $150/dep. Available July 1st. 541-549-3523 A quiet 4 bdrm, 2 bath, 1748 sq.ft., living room w/wood stove, newer carpet & inside paint, pellet stove, big 1/2 acre fenced lot, dbl garage w/opener. $1195. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

658

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Warehouse/Office space, 1235 Houses for Rent sq ft, large roll-up door. Redmond 20685 Carmen Lp. No triple net; $500/mo, 1st + dep. 3 Bdrm. 2 bath, large fenced 541-480-7546; 541-480-7541 yard, no cats, dogs neg., no smoking, $775/mo., 3126 693 Pumice Ave, please call Ofice/Retail Space 541-480-2543.

for Rent Clean 4 Bdrm + den, 2 bath, 14920 SW Maverick Rd, CRR. An Office with bath, various No smoking; pets negotiable. sizes and locations from $900/mo. + deposits. Call $200 per month, including 541-504-8545; 541-350-1660 utilities. 541-317-8717


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 Real Estate For Sale

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Redmond Homes

ATVs

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

700 730

New Listings

Boats & RV’s

800 Snowmobiles

Summer Price Yamaha 600 Mtn. Max 1997 Now only $850! Sled plus trailer package $1550. Many Extras, call for info, 541-548-3443.

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Homes for Sale

3 Bdrm, 2 bath, built in ‘03; (2) ½-acre lots, 1 buildable w/well, S. of Sunriver. Price neg. Possible trade for Bend sgl. level of same value. 509-585-9050 Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

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Foreclosures For Sale All Central OR Avail. Buy on the Court steps w/Cashier’s Checks Oregon Group Realty, LLC 541-948-4397

Communicator, 2-way, for motorcycling in pairs, mic. & speakers, $80, 503-933-0814

Like Brand New Harley Davidson Heritage Softail, 2009. 682 miles, 7 yr extended warranty, upgraded parts, engine guard bar. Bike has been lowered; mint cond. Upgraded grips. $15,500. 541-420-5855

Farms and Ranches

35 Acre irrigated Farm, 6 miles to Prineville, 3 bdrm. mfd home & large shop, 22 acres leased for onions, 10 acres Golf Course Rim View, 3 for Cows & hay, nice pond, bdrm. 4 bath, large shop, offantastic private well. 76 Yr. Harley Davidson Heritage Softfice, bonus room, 1.7 acres, old Widower will sacrifice for ail Classic 2006, Vance-Hines Crooked River Ranch, pipes, crash bar w/foot pegs, $395,000, 541-410-3425 $399,999 OBO, 541-350-5425 Power Command, Stage 1 backrest w/luggage rack, 773 Dyno-tune, all work perNOTICE: Acreages formed by Jerry’s Custom All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Fed- 2 Adjacent 1-Acre Lots in Cycle, exc. cond, $13,900 OBO. 541-549-4834, 588-0068 eral Fair Housing Act, which Oregon Water Wondermakes it illegal to advertise Advertise your car! land off Century Dr., 55405 any preference, limitation or Add A Picture! Gross Dr. S., 1 lot w/septic, discrimination based on race, $49,000, 1 without, $39,000, Reach thousands of readers! color, religion, sex, handicap, Call 541-385-5809 will carry and/or build to familial status or national The Bulletin Classifieds suit, 541-698-7720. origin, or intention to make *** any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We CHECK YOUR AD will not knowingly accept any Please check your ad on the Harley Davidson Police Bike advertising for real estate first day it runs to make sure 2001, low mi., custom bike which is in violation of this it is correct. Sometimes invery nice.Stage 1, new tires law. All persons are hereby structions over the phone are & brakes, too much to list! informed that all dwellings misunderstood and an error A Must See Bike! $9300 advertised are available on can occur in your ad. If this OBO. 541-383-1782 an equal opportunity basis. happens to your ad, please The Bulletin Classified contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. R..E Deadlines are: Harley Davidson Ultra Weekdays 11:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Classic 2008, clean, 15K Sunday and Monday. mi, lots of upgrades, cstm exhaust, dual control 541-385-5809 heated gloves & vest, lugThank you! gage accessories, $15,500 The Bulletin Classified OBO. 541-693-3975 ***

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Northeast Bend Homes

Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, septic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $114,900, 541-350-4684.

Honda Elite Scooter 2001, 1398 Mi., 2 helmets, exc. cond., $1550, 541-420-0235.

Mtn. View Park (Gated) 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, many ammeni775 Honda Gold Wing GL ties, open floor plan, living, Manufactured/ dining & family room, w/view 1100, 1980. 23,000 Mobile Homes windows, looking east to miles, full dress plus large & private back area. helmets, $3500 or Master bdrm. w/French doors 14x50 2 bdrm, 2 bath sgl. wide best offer. in park. Super Good Cents to wrap-around covered porch, package, drywall, vaulted master bathroom w/soaking Call 541-389-8410 ceiling, good condition, tub & separate shower, $12,500. 541-306-7951. $173,500, consider lease to Honda SH150i scooter. buy contract, 2416 NE Crocus 2010. Less than 2100 mi. 91 1985 Ventura 14x56 2 bdrm 1 Way. Cell: 480-357-6044. mpg. Auto trans. Includes bath, A/C, woodstove, w/d helmet and luggage carrier. hookup, in a quiet RV park. 750 Original list over $5k. Asking $340 space rent incl. most $3700. 541-317-8306. util. $9850. 541-317-5034. Redmond Homes Eagle Crest ~ Owner will carry with down. Gated 3 bedroom, 2½ bath home with 3-car garage & workshop. Reverse living, private hot tub, beautiful mountain views, 2200 sq ft. Enjoy Eagle Crest’s pool, tennis & exercise facilities. $399,000. Call 541-923-0908.

personals Reward for info of whereabouts of Mark * ******, age approx 60, who resided in Bend area between 19721978. Was a songwriter/musician. Intent is to obtain copyright permission to produce a CD. All info is confidential. Contact highpointproductions@centurylink.net Seeking info or reports of suspicious activity involving blue GMC mini-pickup w/black lumber rack in area of Juniper Rd., 541-848-0288.

GAS

SAVER!

Honda Shadow 750, 2008. Original adult owner and only 6500 miles. Beautiful blue with silver flames. $4200 firm. 541-322-9334.

Find Your Future Home Here! Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

Houseboat 38 x10, triple axle trailer incl. 20’ cabin, 12’ rear swim deck plus 6’ covered front deck. Great price! $14,500. 541-788-4844

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Sunriver/La Pine Homes Motorcycles And Accessories Over 40 Years Experience in Carpet Upholstery & Rug Cleaning Call Now! 541-382-9498 CCB #72129 www.cleaningclinicinc.com

THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 30, 2011 E3

Rebates up to $1000 Plus 3.99% APR Financing on select models ATV's can be hazardous to operate. All riders under 16 should ride only with adult supervision. Always wear a helmet and be sure to take a safety training course. Financing on approval of credit. See dealer for details.

Midstate Power Products 541-548-6744

Redmond Yamaha YFZ450 Sport ATV 2008 Blue, Low hours very clean, freshly serviced. $4290. Will consider offers. See at JD Powersports, Redmond. 541-526-0757 • Richard 541-419-0712

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Boats & Accessories

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Watercraft

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $2450 for all. Bill 541-480-7930. Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Kayak, 18’ Necky, Tesla, white/ blue/red, 26” width, rudder, good cond., $2400 new; sell $825. 541-593-9771 Raft, 4-man, rubber (not plastic), oars, cushions, pump, no leaks/patches 503-933-0814.

880 12’ alum. Klamath, 9.8 Merc., 2 new seats, Calkins trailer, $1200 obo. 541-504-0874

12’ Duroboat with E-Z loader trailer, custom seats, oars, anchor, other extras. Used twice, stored inside, excellent condition, $2500. 541-306-6505

16’ Fiberform, 55HP Johnson Motor, elec. trolling motor, $2750, extras, 541-382-5805

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

25’ Catalina Sailboat 1983, w/trailer, swing keel, pop top, fully loaded, $11,000, call for details, 541-480-8060

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Winnebago Class C, 1999, 30’, tow pkg, Ford V10, garaged, non-smkr, excellent care, $22,500. 541-639-7510

Winnebago Class C 2003, 28’, tow pkg, gen, 2 slides, awning, V-10 Ford 450, one owner, non-smkg, exc care, see to appreciate! $34,000 541-815-4121 541-593-7257 Winnebago Sightseer 30B Class A 2008 $79,500 OBO Top of the line! cell 805-368-1575

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Travel Trailers

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

HOLIDAY RAMBLER IMPERIAL 35’ 1993, queen size walk around bed, full bath, FSC, solid oak interior, good condition, $6,750. 541-604-1349.

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LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING

landlord will accept sealed bids is June 10, 2011. Bids shall be mailed to: SunTree Village, Attn.: E. Thompson, 6860 SW Winding Way, Corvallis, OR 97333. (4) Contact Larry, manager of SunTree Village at (541)382-9031 to inspect the Property. (5) Winning bidder must remove the manufactured home from the park at their expense by June 30, 2011 or be pre-approved as a tenant by completing a rental agreement with the manager. (6) Monthly rent is $372.00. LEGAL NOTICE THE CONFEDERATED TRIBES OF THE WARM SPRINGS RESERVATION OF OREGON

A pubic meeting of the Oregon Water Wonderland Unit II Sanitary District, Deschutes County State of Oregon will be held at the District Office, located at 55841 Swan Rd., Bend OR 97707. This meeting will take place on June 2, 2011 at 9:00 a.m. AGENDA 1)Budget Hearing 2)First reading and consideration of Ordinance No. 11-01, An Ordinance Amending Section 11 of Ordinance 10-02, Regarding System Development Charges, for the Oregon Water Wonderland Unit II Sanitary District. 3)Executive Session ORS 192.660(2)(i) to review or evaluate employment related performance. A copy of the ordinance is available at the District Office located at 55841 Swan Rd., Bend OR 97707, and on the District's website, www.oww2sd.com. LEGAL NOTICE Notice Pursuant to ORS 90.675 (1) The personal property described as a manufactured dwelling (the “Property”) located at: 1001 SE 15th St., Space 65, Bend, OR 97702 is considered abandoned. (2) The Tenant’s name is Louis Hughet and Betty Millsap. (3) The sale will be by private bidding by sealed bid. All reasonable bids will be considered (minimum bid is $7,244.42). The last date the

Beaver Santiam 2002, 2 slides, 48K, immaculate, 330 Cummins diesel, $75,000. Call for details: 541-504-0874

Best Buy Hurricane 32’ 2007, 12K mi.,

Komfort 31’ 2006, Model, 271TS. Like new, only used 4x. 14’ slide-out, 27” TV, AM/FM/CD stereo, DVD player & surround sound. 21” awning, couch w/queen hideabed, AC, heavy duty hitch w/sway bars, daylight shades, pwr front jack, & more! $25,000. 541-382-6731

Cherry Wood, leather, queen, 2 slides, 2 tv’s 2 air, jacks, camera, like new, non smoker, $61,000, 541-548-5216. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504

Terry Ultralight 22’ 2003 NW Edition. Large bathroom, queen bed, microwave, frig/freezer, 3 burner stove/oven, good condition, $6800. La Pine area. Call 541-968-3130

Hurricane 2007 35.5’ like new, 3 slides, generator, dark cabinets, Ford V10, 4,650 mi $64,900 OBO. 541-923-3510 Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188. JAYCO SENECA 2008 36MS, fully loaded, 2 slides, gen., diesel, 8k miles, like new cond., $109,000 OBO. Call for details 1-541-556-8224.

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $97,400. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Psychiatrist Services Submittals due 4:30 p.m. June 23, 2011 REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS RFP #P9837-V01-3910 The Department of Human Services of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs through its Community Counseling Center is seeking proposals from qualified individual for part-time psychiatrist services for a 3 year period.

tification for Debarment and Suspensions. Project is also subject to consideration for Indian Preference. For further information or to request a proposal packet contact Raymond Shike, Contract Coordinator at (541) 553-3564, PO Box 1169, Warm Springs, OR 97761 or e-mail rshike@wstribes.org LEGAL NOTICE The following units will be sold at public auction on June 4, 2011 at 10:00 a.m. at North Empire Storage Center, 63048 Lower Meadow Dr., Bend, OR 97701 for non-payment of rent and other fees. Auction to be pursuant to auction rules and procedures to be posed at auction site. Shawna Holder #324, Dave Bartlett #347, Tim Kelly #941, Chris Fleming #1204, Dan Pena #212, SAC Enterprises #1023, Siri Roberts #208, Kyle Steinbaugh #443, Christine Friesner #938 & #920, Joel Gray #224, David Taylor #900, KC Hobbs #615. For more information call 541-330-1111.

Offerer must have a minimum of 2 years experience to provide professional clinical psychiatric services to Adults, Adolescents and Children in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of mental illness including substance abuse and addiction. Contractor is subject to Cer-

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JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

ATVs

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new

Winnebago Access 31J 2008, Class C, Near Low Retail Price! One owner, nonsmoker, garaged, 7,400 miles, auto leveling jacks, (2) slides, upgraded queen bed, bunk beds, microwave, 3-burner range/oven, (3) TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, maintained, and very clean! Only $76,995! Extended warranty available! Call (541) 388-7179.

Motorhomes

12’ Fold-A-Boat, with caddy & oars, $550, Sisters, 541-508-1055 zylius@q.com

26’ HOUSEBOAT, 7’ wide, fiberglas, in good shape, $3600. 541-388-2441.

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

Used out-drive parts Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

Winnebago 32VS 2000, Class A Adventurer. Super slide, 31K mi., new Toyo tires, 11 1/2 ft. overall height, perfect cond,$37,999. 541-312-8974

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-UM-107927 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JARON W. MCKERNAN AND MINDY M. MCKERNAN, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR UMPQUA BANK, ITS SUCCESSORS AND/OR ASSIGNS, as beneficiary, dated 10/1/2007, recorded 10/10/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-54417, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by UMPQUA BANK, ITS SUCCESSORS AND/OR ASSIGNS. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT TWELVE (12), JUNIPER MEADOWS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1965 SOUTHWEST 42ND STREET REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of May 2, 2011 Delinquent Payments from December 01, 2010 2 payments at $ 1,889.00 each $ 3,778.00 4 payments at $ 1,875.00 each $ 7,500.00 (12-01-10 through 05-02-11) Late Charges: $ 298.32 Beneficiary Advances: $ 150.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 11,726.32 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $227,544.68, PLUS interest thereon at 6.5% per annum from 11/01/10 to 2/1/2011, 6.5% per annum from 2/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on September 2, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at MAIN ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY JUSTICE CENTER, 1100 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 5/2/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: JEAN GREAGOR, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3985145 05/09/2011, 05/16/2011, 05/23/2011, 05/31/2011

$

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at 140 (This special package is not available on our website) Barns

Debris Removal

M. Lewis Construction, LLC

JUNK BE GONE

"POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates . See Facebook Business page, search under M. Lewis Construction, LLC CCB#188576•541-604-6411

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107 fifi’s Hauling & More. Yard clean up, fuel reduction, construction & misc. clean up, 10 yd. hyd. trailers, 20 ft. flatbed, 541-382-0811.

Building/Contracting

Concrete / Paving

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

Old World Cobblestone Inc. Paver Installation Specialists Ask about special Spring Prices! oldworldcobblestoneinc.com 541-408-6947 • CCB 82623

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Concrete Construction JJ&B Construction - Quality Concrete work, over 30 yrs experience. Sidewalks, RV Pads, Driveways.... Call Josh 541-279-3330 • CCB190612 K.A. Veltman Concrete L L C Custom Concrete Work Foundations and Flatwork No Job Too Big or Too Small! 541-923-2168 • CCB #191425

Computer/Cabling Install QB Digital Living •Computer Networking •Phone/Data/TV Jacks •Whole House Audio •Flat Screen TV & Installation 541-280-6771 www.qbdigitalliving.com CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

Drywall ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

Handyman

All types remodeling/handyman Decks, Painting, Carpentry Randy Salveson, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 • Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling • Decks • Window/Door Replacement • Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179 I DO THAT! Home Repairs, Remodeling, Professional & Honest Work. Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768

Home Improvement

Electrical Services Quality Builders Electric • Remodels • Home Improvement • Lighting Upgrades • Hot Tub Hook-ups 541-389-0621 www.qbelectric.net CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

Since 1978

YUCK I do not want to clean gutters again! Then Call B&R 541-389-8008 1-800-580-8008 and we will! ccb#103411

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Spring Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Broken Branches •Debris Hauling •Defensible Space •Aeration/Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds ORGANIC

PROGRAMS

Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Edging •Pruning •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments Fertilizer included with monthly program

Weekly, monthly or one time service. EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

Handyman Service Repair & Remodel We Move Walls Small jobs welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759 D D D D D D D D D D D D D D 4 Leaf Clover Lawn Service Spring clean-up time is here! Thatch & Aeration Special: 1 free mowing & fertilization with seasonal service! Edging, weed control, pruning, hedging, bark installation. Senior discounts. Knowledgable care with reasonable prices! 541-279-9174; 541-279-0746

D D D D D D D D D D D D D D Passionate about your yard? Retired Master Gardenier looking for some groundswork. Reasonable rates, a few spots avail. Bob Hanson, 541-633-9895 eves

Ferris Building & Landscape Maintenance Remodeling, Pole Barns, Landscape Maint., Tree Service & Haul Away. CCB #68496 Harry Ferris 541-408-2262 Call The Yard Doctor for yard maint., thatching, sod, hydroseeding, sprinkler sys, water features, walls, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012 Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

V Spring Clean Up! V Thatch, Aerate, weeding, raking & monthly maint. 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com

Painting, Wall Covering WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semi-retired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

Remodeling, Carpentry RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. •Additions/Remodels/Garages •Replacement windows/doors remodelcentraloregon.com 541-480-8296 CCB189290

Rooing AMERICAN ROOFING Quick, efficient, quality work New • Re-roofs • Repairs Free Estimates CCB #193018 Call Jorge - 541-497-3556

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

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LEGAL NOTICE Loan No: 1718020055 T.S. No.: 1104080OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, Darren Moore and Heather Moore husband and wife as Grantor to First American Title Company as trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc, solely as nominee for Provident Funding Associates, L.P., as beneficiary, dated 2/13/2008, recorded 2/20/2008, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No., fee/file/instrument/micro file/reception No. 2008-07522 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 244246 Lot One Hundred Twenty-nine, Cascade View Estates, Phase 9, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 3766 SW Xero Place Redmond, Oregon 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Installment of Principal and Interest plus impounds and/or advances which became due on 1/1/2011 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $2,148.03 Monthly Late Charge: $84.83 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $407,200.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5% per annum from 12/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that First American Title Company, the undersigned trustee will on 8/15/2011 at the hour of 10:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statue, at inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond. Bend OR 97701; County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person names in section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" included any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Date: 4/7/2011. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale.If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60 day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is 8/15/2011. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice Trustee: First American Title Insurance Company c/o Seaside Trustee Inc. P.O. Box 2676, Ventura Ca. 93002(805) 644-9300 Oregon State Bar Lawyer Referral Service: (503) 684-3763 or (800) 452-7636 http://www.osbar.org; http://www.osbar.org/public/ris/ris.html#referral Oregon Law Help: http://oregonlawhelp.org/OR/index.cfm Free Legal Assistance: http://www.oregonlawcenter.org/. Portland (503) 473-8329 Coos Bay (800) 303-3638 Ontario (888) 250-9877 Salem (503) 485-0696 Grants Pass (541) 476-1058 Woodbum (800) 973-9003 Hillsboro (877) 726-4381. First American Title Company c/o Seaside Trustee, Inc. P.O. Box 2676, Ventura, Ca 93001. Jessica M. Weber, Vice President. Trustee Sales Information (877) 317-8782 www.westcoastposting.com P.O Box 426, Oak View, CA. 93022 THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. WCPP23970 5/16, 5/23, 5/30, 6/6/2011


E4 Monday, May 30, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent 882

882

Fifth Wheels

Fifth Wheels

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417. Cardinal 34.5 JRL (40’) 2009, 4 slides, convection oven + micro., dual A/C, fireplace, extra ride insurance (3 yr. remaining incl. tires), air sleeper sofa + queen bed, $52,900 OBO, must see to appreciate, 406-980-1907, Terrebonne

Autos & Transportation

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, quality built, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more.$59,500. 541-317-9185

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

Be Ready for summer vacations! 27’ 1995 Terry 5th wheel with BIG slide-out, generator and extras. $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

900 908

Aircraft, Parts and Service Ultralight Airplane motor, w/ controlls and mount, $275. 503-830-6564

916 MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $39,500. 541-420-3250

Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, frplc, 2 flat scrn TVs. $70,000. 760-644-4160 Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $39,900, please call 541-330-9149.

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Chevrolet 3500 Service Truck, 1992, 4x4, automatic, 11-ft storage bed. Liftgate, compressor & generator shelf inside box, locked storage boxes both sides of bed, new tires, regular maintenance & service every 3K miles, set up for towing heavy equip. $4995 obo. 541-420-1846

931

932

933

935

975

975

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Tires, Studded, set of 4, fit ‘98 Corolla, P185/60R-14, 1 season, $125, 541-389-3469. We Buy Scrap Auto & Truck Batteries, $10 each Also buying junk cars & trucks, (up to $500), & scrap metal! Call 541-912-1467

932

Mazda Miata 1995, Ford 2 Door 1949, 99% Complete, $12,000, please call 541-408-7348.

Ford

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

MUST SELL

70 Monte Carlo All original, beautiful, car, completely new suspension and brake system, plus extras. $5000 obo. 541-593-3072 Chevy Corvette 1980, yellow, glass removable top, 8 cyl., auto trans, radio, heat, A/C, new factory interior, black, 48K., exc. tires, factory aluminum wheels, asking $7500, will consider fair offer & possible trade, 541-385-9350.

Bronco

1972,

all original, 302 V-8, 53,000 miles, $10,000, please call 541-536-3962. Ford Mustang 1969, Must Sell, 1 owner, car has been parked since 1972, very low mi., blue on blue with all parts complete & matching numbers, body work completed & in primer state, rebuilt trans, long block rebuilt, still at shop, add $2065, making total w/engine, $5565. 541-514-4228.

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833 Chevy Corvette Coupe 2006, 8,471 orig miles, 1 owner, always garaged, red, 2 tops, auto/paddle shift, LS-2, Corsa exhaust, too many options to list, pristine car, $37,500. Serious only, call 541-504-9945

Pettibone Mercury fork lift, 8000 lb., 2-stage, propane, hard rubber tires. $4000 or Make offer. 541-389-5355.

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yes., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

manual, crew cab, 4 door, spray in bedliner, clearance lights, air bags, custom wheels and large tires, 87k. Looks like new inside & out!

$26,000 OBO. 541-433-2341 • 541-410-8173

Ford F-150 2006 LOOKS BRAND NEW! Supercab Lariat 5.4L V8 eng.,approx. 20K mi! 4 spd auto, rear wheel drive. Black w/lots of extras: Trailer tow pkg, Custom bedliner, Pickup bed extender, Tan leather trimmed captain chairs, only $18,000. 541-318-7395 FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $3800. 541-350-1686

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

Terry Fleetwood Fifth Wheel 2007, 295RL Great shape & ready to roll. $15,500 For info call 888-583-1888 Code# 52184 or Taxt 52184 to 35620, or Call Scott at 541-408-6908

885

Canopies and Campers

Truck with Snow Plow! Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. $4800 OBO. Call 541-390-1466.

Northland 880 Grizzly 2002, 8½’ cabover camper, exc. cond, garaged when not in use, $9500 obo. 541-549-4834, 588-0068

925

Plymouth 4-dr sedan, 1948, all orig., new tires, exlnt driver, all gauges work, 63,520 miles, $8500. 541-504-2878

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005 • 4WD, 68,000 miles. • Great Shape. • Original Owner.

$19,450! 541-389-5016 evenings.

Chevy

Wagon

Utility Trailers

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597 Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

WILLYS JEEP 1956

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

KOMFORT 27’ 2000 5th wheel, fiberglass with 12’ slide. In excellent condition, has been stored inside. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

Asking $3,999 or make offer. 541-389-5355

933

Pickups Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Dodge pickup 1962 D100 classic, original 318 wide block, push button trans, straight, runs good, $1250 firm. Bend, 831-295-4903

Jeep Wrangler Sport 2000, red w/tan hard top, 113K, extra set near new studs on rims, $7600, 541-447-8904

CHEVROLET 1970, V-8 automatic 4X4 3/4 ton. Very good condition, lots of new parts and maintenance records. New tires, underdash air, electronic ignition and much more. Original paint, truck used very little. $5700, 541-575-3649

Buick Park Avenue 1996, loaded, 27 mpg,

MERCEDES C300 2008 New body style, 30,000 miles, heated seats, luxury sedan, CD, full factory warranty. $23,950.

Like buying a new car! 503-351-3976.

and 110k miles, silver and white colors, full size 4-door sedans, 30 mpg hwy, luxury cars, trouble-free, too! ask anyone that owns one! 541-318-9999

Mercury Mountaineer 1997 V8 5.0L Engine AWD Automatic 169K miles $3895, Peter 541.408.0877

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k, immac.,loaded, dealer maint, $19,500. 503-459-1580.

All wheel drive, 1 owner, navigation, heated seats, DVD, 2 moonroofs. Immaculate and never abused. $27,950. Call 503-351-3976

$2700, 541-419-5060.

BUICKS ! LeSabre 1998 and 2000,$3900/ea 90k

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 38K mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $59,750 firm. 541-480-1884 Toyota Sienna XLE AWD 2005, 58k mi., white/grey, all records, clean carfax, 60k service done. Super clean, non-smoking, garaged. $20,000 541-362-1031

Vans

Chevy Lumina 2001, 66,000 miles, exc. cond. $4000. 541-788-5047 eves.

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

FORD TAURUS LX 98 with 74K miles, gold color, one owner, non smoker, 27 mpg, V-6 motor, nice car and almost new! $3900 541-318-9999 or 541-815-3639 Honda Fit Sport 2010, under 2K mi., like new! 5-Spd auto, w/paddle shifters, great mpg., $18,500, 541-633-7783.

Ford Explorer 1999 XLT V6 4.0L 106K, 4WD,CD, tape deck, tow bar, auto, fully loaded $4995, Peter 541-408-0877

The Bulletin Classifieds

Chevrolet 1-ton Express Cargo Van 1999, with tow package, good condition, $4800. Call 541-419-5693

Ford Explorer Eddie Bauer 2000, AWD, 146,500 mi., V-8, 5.0L, auto, fully loaded, extra set studs on rims, $5400, Mike 541-408-8330

CHEVY ASTRO EXT 1993 All Wheel Drive mini van, 3 seats, rear barn doors, white, good tires and wheels. Pretty interior, clean, no rips or tears. Drives excellent!!!. Only $2500. (541) 318-9999 or (541) 815-3639

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

New rebuilt motor, no miles, Power Take-off winch. Exc. tires. 12 ft. Hydraulic dump trailer w/extra sides, dual axle, steel ramps, spare tire, tarp, excellent condition. $6500 firm. 541-419-6552

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $14,500. 541-408-2111

940

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $9000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

fully loaded, good cond., convertible, polished alloy wheels, $3150, Please call 541-385-5095.

MERCURY GRAND MARQUIS 1988, new tires, new breaks, runs great, GREAT M.P.G.! $1,650. 541-419-6552.

Mercury Grand Marquis 1992, 4-door, 130K miles, $1350, please call 541-388-4850

541-322-7253 Toyota Tundra 2008 4WD, 5.7L, V-8, awesome truck $27,995, 541-923-4995.

Sport Utility Vehicles

Chevy El Camino 1979, 350 auto, new studs, located in Sisters, $3000 OBO, 907-723-9086,907-723-9085

Audi A4 1999, dark blue, automatic sunroof, runs great, comes w/studded snow tires, $5,000. Jeff, 541-980-5943

Mercedes GL450, 2007

935 Towmaster Equipment Trailer, 14,000 lb capacity. Tandemn axle, 4-wheel brakes, 18’ bed, heavy duty ramps, spare tire mounted, side mounted fork pockets, all tires in good condition. $4795 or best offer. 541-420-1846.

Jeep Grand Cherokee Special Edition, 2004, 4x4, V8, 91K, Auto, AC,541-598-5111 $8895

DODGE RAM SLT HD 2004 4x4 3/4 ton, diesel, 6 speed

Antique and Classic Autos

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

Chevy 3/4 Ton 1989, 4x4, 100K miles, 350 engine, Great cond. $3900. Call 541-815-9939

Infiniti J30 1993 118.6K miles. 1 owner. Great shape. 4 separate studded tires on wheels incl. $3200. 541-382-7451

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

SUBARUS!!! Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Volvo Jaguar SV6 2000 4-dr. Has new: tires, brakes, rotors, calipers, radio, battery. AC great! 84K mi, like new, $7500. 541-923-2595

KIA Amanti 2005, silver, exc. condition, 57,500 mi., leather, sliding moonroof, heated seats, auto windows, locks, seats. Infinity 6 disc premium sound system, new tires, brakes last fall. Beautiful inside & out. $10,700. 541-977-5838.

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great Honda CRV 2007 AWD 18mpg City/26 Hwy! 62k mi, MP3, multi-disc CD, sunroof, tow pkg, $17,500. 541-389-3319

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $3950 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

C70-T5,

VW Super Beetle 1971, $3000, great cond., with sunroof, 541-410-7679.

Free Classified Ads! No Charge For Any Item Under

$

2010

Convertible Hardtop, 11,500 mi., Celestial Blue w/Calcite Cream leather int. Premium & Climate pkgs. Warranty & Service to 10/2014. KBB SRP $33,540. Reduced! Now $29,900 OBO. 541-350-5437

00

200

1 Item*/ 3 Lines*/ 3 Days* - FREE! and your ad appears in PRINT and ON-LINE at bendbulletin.com

CALL 541-385-5809 FOR YOUR FREE CLASSIFIED AD *Excludes all service, hay, wood, pets/animals, plants, tickets, weapons, rentals and employment advertising, and all commercial accounts. Must be an individual item under $200.00 and price of individual item must be included in the ad. Ask your Bulletin Sales Representative about special pricing, longer run schedules and additional features. Limit 1 ad per item per 30 days.

www.b end b ulletin.com

To receive this special offer, call 541-385-5809 Or visit The Bulletin office at: 1777 SW Chandler Ave.

Bulletin Daily Paper 05/30/11  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Monday May 30, 2011

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