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Driver More bike trails to ride? cellphone law could tighten CYCLING CENTRAL

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Abbey Carpenter, 17, has had to relearn many tasks since a bout of viral meningitis

Steps to recovery

By Nick Budnick The Bulletin

SALEM — A legislative push to tighten up Oregon’s hands-free cellphone-while-driving law appears headed toward passage despite some opposition. House Bill 3186 is driven by concerns that a 2009 law to curb the distraction of cell phones is both difficult to enforce and widely ignored. That’s because of an exemption the law contains for people who use their cellphones for work purposes while behind the wheel. The new bill, introduced by Rep. Vicki Berger, R-Salem, and IN THE Sen. Floyd Prozanski, D-Eugene, LEGISLATURE curbs the work-related exemption, specifying that it applies only to police and emergency personnel and to drivers engaged in • Highlights of House Bill towing, utility or farming work. 3186, Page The bill passed the House 39-17 last week, and Rep. Mike McLane, A4 R-Powell Butte, was one of 15 Republicans and two Democrats who opposed it. In an interview that he said was conducted using a hands-free headset on his trip home, McLane said he didn’t want to increase the burden on working people. He said his vote in part reflected a deep frustration that the Legislature is spending too much time on bills that don’t create jobs. “I don’t want to come across as cranky,” he said. “I don’t want to say it’s not an important bill. But we sure have a lot of challenges, and we sure are sending a lot of bills to the floor that don’t address these challenges.” See Driving / A4

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Abbey Carpenter, 17, shares a Mother’s Day hug and a laugh with her mom Ann Carpenter during a conversation about Abbey’s continuing recovery from a severe bout of viral meningitis. Abbey has had to relearn many daily activities, like reading and climbing stairs.

By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

ack in August, 17-year-old Abbey Carpenter wasn’t feeling so hot. She had just started volleyball practice but struggled with her asthma and a variety of flu-like symptoms. Soon she was so tired and sick that she struggled to get up and down the stairs. After countless calls to the Central Oregon Pediatric Associates’ nurse help line and a night at the emergency room, Abbey eventually was

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admitted to the pediatric wing of St. Charles Bend, where she spent 11 days recovering from a serious bout of viral meningitis. Now, more than eight months after the illness struck, Abbey is well on her way to full recovery. But she’s had to learn again how to do all kinds of things, from jumping to reading to climbing the stairs. Meningitis, which can be caused by viral or bacterial infections, involves the inflammation of the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord. Viral meningitis is usually less severe

than bacterial meningitis, and most with the illness recover on their own. But for Abbey, it took nearly two weeks in the hospital. Doctors and nurses struggled to control her pain and set her on a path to recovery. Her heart wasn’t beating right and would speed up and slow down. She had extremely high fevers. Doctors at first thought she was suffering from pneumonia. Up to the day she was admitted to the hospital, doctors thought she’d get better. See Meningitis / A7

In the Mississippi Delta, a new flood brings back old fears Inside • More evacuations in Memphis, Page A3

By Cain Burdeau The Associated Press

GREENVILLE, Miss. — As the crest in the Mississippi River rolls toward the heart of the Delta, the great flood of 1927 is on a lot of minds.

On April 21 of that year, an engorged Mississippi River broke through a levee a few miles north of Greenville, sending a wall of water down Main Street, forever changing this area’s landscape. Homes were crushed, sharecroppers’ farms were carried away,

TOP NEWS INSIDE SYRIA: Crackdown escalates as troops dig in, Page A3

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thousands were trapped on rooftops for days and hundreds died. Residents in Greenville believe they are safe this time, but 75 miles south in Vicksburg, people wonder if history will repeat itself. See Mississippi / A4

Obama’s advisers were sharply divided over bin Laden raid By Joby Warrick and Karin Brulliard The Washington Post

President Barack Obama faced sharply divided counsel and, to his mind, barely better-than-even odds of success when he ordered the May 1 commando raid that killed al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden, the president said in an interview broadcast Sunday. Obama acknowledged having only circumstantial evidence placing bin Laden at the Abbottabad Inside compound. There was not a single • Vengeance photograph or confirmed sighting and ‘closure,’ of the man, he said, and he worPage A4 ried that the Navy SEALs would find only a “prince from Dubai” instead of the terrorist mastermind responsible for the Sept. 11 attacks. “At the end of the day, this was still a 55-45 situation,” Obama told CBS’s “60 Minutes” in his first broadcast interview since bin Laden’s death. “I mean, we could not say definitively that bin Laden was there. Had he not been there, then there would have been some significant consequences.” See Bin Laden / A4

50 years later, can freedom ride again? Hezekiah Watkins was one of the youngest Freedom Riders. Now 63, Watkins, holding his grandson, says youths today have little connection to the struggles of the 1960s: “They’ll just look at me like, ‘It’s not relevant.’” Jahi Chikwendiu The Washington Post

By Krissah Thompson The Washington Post

JACKSON, Miss. — A half-dozen blacks and whites sat with boxed sandwiches and sweet tea in a community center on a recent afternoon, wrestling with what’s changed — and what hasn’t — since the Freedom Riders came to town 50 years ago. “We’re still trying to see each other as human,” said Albert Sykes, a 28-year-old black man. “We’re still struggling with this.” On Mother’s Day 1961, a bus full of young people was firebombed in Anniston, Ala. See Riders / A7


A2 Monday, May 9, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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motorists in the habit of texting or glancing at the GPS, the urge SAN FRANCISCO — It is to use the parking app is certhe urban driver’s most ago- tain to mount as the frustration nizing everyday experience: does. the search for an empty parkNathaniel Ford, executive diing place. rector of the San Francisco MuIt is part sleuthing and part nicipal Transportation Agency, blood sport: circling, nar- said safety could actually imrowly missing a spot, outma- prove if drivers quickly found a neuvering other motorists to spot instead of circling and getfinally ease into a space only ting frustrated. “I get you off the to discover that it is off limits streets as quickly as possible,” during working hours. he said. In this city, it is also a vexCity drivers can testify to the ing traffic problem. Drivers frustration. Soltami drives into cruising for the city several parking spots times a week, she generate 30 “We were praying said, and spends percent of all to the parking god 20 to 30 mindowntown utes searching c o n g e s t i o n , that we’d find a for a spot each city officials spot. If we had the time. “That’s at estimate. least an hour I Now San app, we would not lose every week Francisco pro- have to pray to the just looking for fesses to have parking. It’s very found a solu- parking god.” frustrating,” she tion — a phone — Monique Soltami, said. app for spotShe said she San Francisco seekers that had heard about displays inforthe new app, mation about but had not yet areas with available spaces. downloaded it. The system, introduced The $20 million parking last month, relies on wireless project here, called SFpark, is sensors embedded in streets backed by the Transportation and city garages that can tell Department and the Federal within seconds if a spot has Highway Administration, which opened up. are looking into how to ease Monique Soltami, a TV congestion and driver angst food and wine reporter, said by making the most of limited she and her sister spent 25 parking. minutes on Friday trying to San Francisco has put senpark. “We were praying to sors into 7,000 metered parking the parking god that we’d find spots and 12,250 spots in city a spot,” she said. “If we had garages. If spaces in an area the app, we would not have to open up, the sensors communipray to the parking god.” cate wirelessly with computers that in turn make the information available to app users Safety concerns within a minute, said Ford, the But the system could come Transportation Agency. On the with serious consequences. app, a map shows which blocks Safety advocates say that have lots of places (blue) and drivers on the prowl for which are full (red). parking could wind up foSan Francisco’s is by far the cusing on their phones, not most widespread approach that the road. several cities, universities and “It could be really distract- private parking garages are exing,” said Daniel Simons, a perimenting with. professor of psychology at In December, Los Angeles the University of Illinois, worked with a company called where he studies the science Streetline to introduce a system of attention. And, he said, covering spaces in West Hollyit could also be dangerous: wood, and it is expanding the “Most people are looking for program elsewhere. Streetline parking spaces in places that has since set up smaller projhave a lot of traffic and a lot ects on Roosevelt Island in New of pedestrians.” York City’s East River, as well City officials acknowledge as at the University of Maryland the potential problem. They and in Forth Worth, Texas. are urging drivers to pull over before they pull up the city’s iPhone app, or to do so before they leave home. get a room But the spots can disappear quickly, as any circling driver knows, and for plugged-in

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Brothers Ondrej and Marek Spanel co-created the VBS 2 simulator for the military. The latest version of the simulator can import detailed aerial and satellite imagery so Marines can rehearse in virtual 3-D copies of their places of deployment.

Using tech to teach, military aims to adapt By Andrew Martin and Thomas Lin New York Times News Service

ORLANDO, Fla. — Brig. Gen. Harold Greene only has to look around his house to realize the challenges the Army faces in engaging young soldiers. His children, he says, are always “buried in a cellphone or an iPad.” Greene, a senior official in the Army’s research and development engineering command, is among a cadre of high-ranking officials pushing for the military to embrace technologies that are already popular among consumers, like smartphones, video games and virtual worlds. The goal is to provide engaging training tools for soldiers who have grown up using sophisticated consumer electronics and are eager to incorporate them into their routine. At a time of shrinking budgets, these tools are viewed as relatively inexpensive supplements to larger, costlier training equipment while also providing a surprisingly realistic training experience. The military is already using some video games for recruitment and to train soldiers, and it has started experimenting with virtual worlds, as well. The tools are developed specifically for military use. In addition, the Army recently held a contest for soldiers to determine who could develop the best smartphone app. Among the apps now available on an Army website: bugle calls, body fat calculator, Army creeds, sniper awareness and capture avoidance. (Most apps are for both the iPhone and Android phones, but some are for just one system.) “We have to adapt to where they are,” Greene said, speaking of the need to appeal to young soldiers and teach them in ways, and on devices, they are accustomed to. “This is something we absolutely have to do.”

Many obstacles But efforts to vastly expand the use of virtual games and everyday electronics have run into a slew of obstacles, not the least of which is a military bureaucracy slow to embrace change. Security concerns about soldiers using wireless devices on the battlefield are one problem, because transmissions have to be encrypted. Another obstacle is the lingering belief among some high-level officials that games, gadgets and avatars simply have no place in the military. For now, the budget for video games and smartphones for military training is a relative pittance. For instance, the Army spends roughly $10 million to $20 million a year on licenses, modifications and development of Army games. “Budgets are always an issue,” said Frank DiGiovanni, director for training readiness and strategy at the Defense Department. “What I’m trying to do is demonstrate these are extremely effective.” DiGiovanni made his remarks at GameTech, a 5-year-old con-

vention that was held here in Orlando in March. It showcases the military’s expanding use of simulators, video games, virtual worlds and smartphones. Besides the video games that allow soldiers to rehearse for combat, vendors were offering devices that provide cultural and language lessons, medical training and shooting practice. While GameTech is tiny by convention standards, with just 775 participants and 29 vendors, several participants said they considered it major progress that such an event was being held, given the skepticism military leaders displayed toward video games a decade ago. The military is partly responsible for the growth of the video game industry. For decades, it has created increasingly sophisticated simulators and computerbased war games. Some of the people involved in the creation of those products went on to work for video game manufacturers, taking their expertise with them. Then, as commercial video games became more sophisticated, the military began borrowing ideas from them.

Virtual tools For instance, in the mid-1990s, some Marines tinkered with the popular “Doom” video game, replacing fantasy weapons with real ones and monsters with soldiers. A few years later, the military collaborated with academia and game developers to create Full Spectrum Warrior, which was designed to mimic combat. Virtual training will never replace the live training that is still so essential, military officials said. But it allows soldiers to practice many times without the expense of big equipment or the risk of using live ammunition. And the effectiveness of video games has improved drastically, officials said. An oft-cited example is VBS 2, which was first bought by the Marine Corps in 2001. The gamebased simulator, which runs on laptops, was created for the military by two Czech brothers and the leader of an Australian heavy metal band. “You can’t simulate the dust, dirt, heat and stresses that you inevitably feel in combat situations,” said 1st Lt. Roy Fish, 34, a platoon commander based in Camp Leatherneck, Afghanistan, “but I think the simulation gets as close as you’re ever going to get in North Carolina to Afghanistan.” Speaking by phone from Afghanistan, Fish, who first trained on VBS 2 in 2008 at Camp Lejeune, N.C., said the virtual simulator had saved lives in the field. Using the abbreviation for an improvised explosive device, he said, “Every time we go outside the wire and react to an IED or small-arms fire, it all translates to what we did in the simulator.” When his Marines are done with the simulation training, he said, they are “sweating from head to toe. It’s amazing how realistic it was. It’s literally the same exact terrain.” Fish emphasized that game-

based simulators like VBS are not video games like “Call of Duty.” “We try not to make training fun for Marines,” he said. “If you don’t take it seriously, someone will die.” Virtual worlds offer some of the same benefits, without the gaming aspects. For instance, virtual worlds could potentially allow instructors in Afghanistan to provide training to young soldiers in the United States, giving them an idea of the landscape and even introducing them to local officials, said Jeff Mills, project coordinator for virtual worlds at Katmai, a military contractor. While he is optimistic, Mills said the military had a long way to go before virtual worlds were routinely used in training. “We really have a poor track record at the moment of taking advantage of this,” he said. The military has also been slow to embrace smartphones, but they have a number of high-ranking advocates, including Lt. Gen. Michael Vane, from the Army’s training command. He said current training for soldiers often involved sitting in a classroom for 45 minutes watching a PowerPoint presentation. Smartphones, he said, would provide “content to a soldier at the point of need,” meaning that because soldiers would have the phones with them at all times, they could receive immediately useful information. The Army recently conducted a pilot project that provided some soldiers with smartphones. But because of security concerns, the phones’ wireless capability was shut off, and soldiers complained that they wanted them to be more interactive. “We’re not sure how it’s going to go,” said Mike Piercy, a senior management training adviser in the Army’s acquisition arm for simulation, who deals with smartphones. “But it’s going to go.”

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THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 9, 2011 A3

T S Troops dig in as crackdown grows in Syria Seeking business, New York Times News Service BEIRUT, Lebanon— A military crackdown on Syria’s seven-week uprising escalated Sunday, with reinforcements sent to two cities, more forces deployed in a southern town and nearly all communications severed to besieged locales, activists and human rights groups said. Fourteen people were killed in the city of Homs, they said, and

hundreds were arrested. The breadth of the assault — from the Mediterranean coast to the poor steppe of southern Syria — seemed to represent an important turn in an uprising that has posed the gravest challenge to the 11-year-long rule of President Bashar Assad. Though officials have continued to hint at reforms, and even gingerly reached out to

some dissidents last week, the escalation of the crackdown seemed to signal the government’s intent to end the uprising by force. Since the beginning of the uprising, Syria has barred most foreign journalists, and many news accounts have relied on human rights groups and networks of activists inside Syria. But in past days, those activists have com-

plained that they have been almost entirely unable to speak with people in Homs and Baniyas, the most besieged places. Even satellite phones that protest organizers had smuggled across Syria were not working. “It seems that they’ve gotten better in tracking satellite mobile phones,” said Wissam Tarif, executive director of Insan, a Syrian human rights group.

states loosen insurance rules By Mary Williams Walsh and Louise Story New York Times News Service

Companies looking to do business in secret once had to travel to places like the Cayman Islands or Bermuda. Today, all it takes is a trip to Vermont. Vermont, and a handful of other states including Utah, South Carolina, Delaware and Hawaii, are remaking themselves as destinations of choice for the kind of complex private insurance transactions once done almost exclusively offshore. Roughly 30 states have passed some type of law to allow companies to set up special insurance subsidiaries called captives, which can conduct Bermuda-style financial wizardry right in a policyholder’s own backyard. Captives provide insurance to their parent companies. The term originally referred to subsidiaries set up by any large company to insure the company’s own risks. Oil companies used them for years to gird for environmental claims related to infrequent but potentially high-cost events in overseas locations that of-

fered light regulation. Now some states make it just as easy, and they have broadened the definition of captives so that insurance companies can create them. This has given rise to concern that a shadow insurance industry is emerging, with less regulation and more leverage than policyholders know, raising the possibility that insurance companies might find themselves without enough money to pay claims. Aetna, for instance, recently used a subsidiary in Vermont to refinance a block of health insurance policies, reaping $150 million in savings. The main reason is that the insurer did not need to maintain conventional reserves at the same level as would have been required by insurance regulators in Aetna’s home state of Connecticut. In other big transactions, companies including MetLife, the Hartford Financial Services Group, Swiss Reinsurance, Genworth Financial and the American International Group, among others, have refinanced life, disability and long-termcare insurance policies, as well as annuities.

Khalil Hamra / The Associated Press

Egyptian Christians, one holding a Coptic Christian cross, demonstrate against the overnight sectarian violence Sunday in downtown Cairo. At least 11 people died, and about 220 were wounded.

Street clashes in Cairo leave 11 dead and 2 churches in flames By David D. Kirkpatrick New York Times News Service

CAIRO — A night of street fighting between Muslims and Christians left at least 11 people dead and two churches in flames Sunday in the latest outbreak of sectarian tensions since the revolution that ousted former President Hosni Mubarak on Feb. 11. Long-suppressed sectarian animosities have burst out with increasing frequency since the rebellion removed the heavy hand of the Mubarak police state, threatening the recovery of Egypt’s tourist economy and the stability of its hoped-for transition to democracy. Officials of the Interior Ministry said at

Mississippi rises; more evacuations in Memphis The Associated Press MEMPHIS, Tennessee — The swollen Mississippi River has swamped houses in Memphis and threatens to consume many more, but its rise has been slow enough that some people were clinging to their normal lives just a bit longer. That much was clear Sunday from an unexpected smell — barbecue — in a neighborhood that already lost three houses. With the river just feet from her single-story home, Shirley Woods had the grill going in the backyard, cooking ribs, pork chops, chicken and hot dogs. She was getting ready to make potato salad. When she woke up at first light, she was prepared to leave if the Mississippi had gotten high enough, but she decided she had time to at least celebrate Mother’s Day here with relatives. “I’ll give it another day, and if it comes up much higher, we’re getting out of here,” Woods said. Memphis residents have been abandoning low-lying homes for days as the dangerously surging river threatened to crest at 48 feet, just shy of the 48.7-foot record, set by a devastating 1937 flood. Officials went door to door Sunday, warning about 240 people to get out before the river reaches its expected peak Tuesday.

least six Christians and at least five Muslims died and about 220 people were wounded, including 65 who were struck by bullets. The Egyptian authorities vowed a swift response, announcing military trials for 190 people arrested in the violence, along with stepped up security at houses of worship and tougher laws against attacking religious institutions. The interim prime minister, Essam Sharaf, canceled a trip to the Persian Gulf states to preside over an emergency cabinet meeting, and Egypt’s most respected Muslim religious authority, the sheikh of Al-Azhar, denounced the violence. Members of Egypt’s Coptic

Christian minority, who make up about 10 percent of the national population, have lived side by side with Muslims in the area for decades, even though the neighborhood is also known for its affinity for militant Islamic politics. Witnesses and other residents said that no organized group appeared to have led the weekend’s clashes. Some Christians in the neighborhood said they had seen a vanguard of bearded Salafis — adherents of an ascetic form of Muslim fundamentalism that is increasingly used as a catchall term to describe Islamist militancy. But people on both sides said that the fighting pitted one group of young men from the

neighborhood against another, along tribal rather than ideological lines.

Afghan, Taliban forces continue fight The Washington Post KABUL, Afghanistan — For a second straight day, Afghan security forces fought with the Taliban in Kandahar on Sunday, focusing on a group of fighters holed up in a downtown hotel, according to Afghan officials. The fighters had taken up positions in the Kandahar Ho-

tel on Saturday and were firing at the intelligence agency office in southern Afghanistan’s largest city. The two-day death toll from the first bout of major fighting since the Taliban declared the start of its spring offensive rose to 23 Taliban fighters and two Afghan policemen.

Democrats’ plan: End oil’s tax breaks to ease deficit By Carl Hulse New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Senate Democrats say they will move forward this week with a plan that would eliminate tax breaks for big oil companies and divert the savings to offset the deficit. Senior Democrats believe that tying the two together will put pressure on Senate Republicans to support the measure or face a difficult time explaining their opposition to voters whose family budgets are being strained by fuel prices. President Barack Obama and some top congressional Democrats have said they want to take some of an estimated $21 billion in savings and steer it to clean energy projects. But the Senate’s Democratic leadership is calculating that using it to cut the deficit instead makes it a tougher issue politically. “Big oil certainly doesn’t need the collective money of taxpayers in this country,” said Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., one of the authors of the legislation that Democrats intend to showcase. “This is as good a time as any in terms of pain at the pump and in revenues needed for deficit reduction.” As part of the effort to build support for the measure, the Senate Finance Committee has invited multinational oil company executives to discuss the tax subsidies and other govern-

ment incentives at a hearing Thursday. Many Republicans are certain to oppose the proposal, making it hard for Democrats to assemble the 60 votes that will be needed to break a filibuster, given the resistance from energy-state senators in their own ranks. Republicans have characterized calls by Obama and congressional Democrats to close the loopholes as backdoor tax increases that will only increase gas prices. “Instead of returning again and again to tax hikes that increase consumers’ costs, the administration and its Democrat allies in Congress should open their eyes to the vast energy resources we have right here at home and to the hundreds of thousands of jobs that opening them up could create,” Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the Republican leader, said in a statement. Hoping to reinforce that point, House Republicans are set to approve legislation this week that would expand the coastal areas where energy companies can explore and produce oil and gas. Democrats say they tailored their bill to make it harder for Republicans to reject after Sen. Harry Reid, the majority leader, and Menendez wrote to colleagues last week that their goal was to “proceed with a bill that maximizes our chances of garnering bipartisan appeal.”

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A4 Monday, May 9, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

‘Closure’ from bin Laden’s death unlikely, research suggests By Melissa Healy Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Do we feel better now that U.S. forces have captured and killed Osama bin Laden? The pictures and video of spontaneous celebrations across the nation, of baseball fans chanting “USA, USA,” of bagpipes and fist pumps at ground zero: All declare the answer an unqualified yes. But researchers who probe the vengeful mind suggest that for some, bin Laden’s demise will reopen psychic wounds, lay bare persistent mental health problems and bring less satisfaction than is widely believed.

Bin Laden Continued from A1 Obama, in his most revelatory comments about his thinking in the days before the raid, said he weighed the risks and judged that he should proceed with what was, by all accounts, the most promising opportunity to capture or kill bin Laden in nearly a decade. In doing so, he rejected the advice of a substantial number of his national security advisers, who worried that the plan to send ground troops deep into Pakistan was too risky, he said. “I concluded it was worth it,” Obama said. “We have devoted enormous blood and treasure in fighting back against al-Qaida, ever since 2001. And I said to myself that if we have a good chance of not completely defeating but badly disabling al-Qaida, then it was worth both the political risks as well as the risks to our men, after a pursuit that cost billions of dollars and stretched for nearly a decade.” Earlier Sunday, the White House’s chief security officer said there was no evidence suggesting that Pakistan’s intelligence, military or political establishment knew anything of bin Laden’s se-

For all that some Americans may cheer, beneath the breast-beating and flag-waving, many of them are churning. “There is a strong assumption that this event will be especially beneficial for the loved ones of people killed or hurt in the events of 9/11, and that they will experience ‘closure,’” said Kevin Carlsmith, a professor of psychology at Colgate University, an expert in the psychology of retribution. “But there’s really no evidence one way or the other to suggest this is the case — at least, none that I’ve ever come across.” Evolution has deeply etched in our psyches the impulse to exact retribution

cret hideout in an army garrison town 35 miles from the capital. At the same time, several local officials in Abbottabad and elsewhere in Pakistan continued to express doubt that government authorities were unaware of bin Laden’s presence in the neighborhood. The president gave the order to strike on the morning of Friday, April 29, a day after his top security advisers hashed over the arguments and counter-arguments in a meeting in the White House Situation Room. Obama said his advisers expressed doubts — some of which he also shared — and security officials pored over possible scenarios and studied a model replica of bin Laden’s compound that had been brought to the White House. Over the following two days, Obama proceeded with previously scheduled duties, including a tour of tornado-ravaged Southern states and a televised appearance at the White House Correspondents’ Association dinner, while continuing to ponder the gravity of the events he had placed in motion. “The vast majority of my most senior aides did not know that we were doing this,” Obama said. “There were times where you

against those who do us harm, researchers say: The person who transgresses basic rules of social conduct threatens the coherence and safety of our group, and our need to see the offender punished may have helped us to survive as social animals. But that does not mean, in man’s modern incarnation, that vengefulness is a hallmark of good mental health. That point emerged strongly in a survey of Kosovo residents conducted in 2000. Scientists assessed the mental health and social functioning of 1,399 adults from 359 households in Kosovo roughly a year after a NATO air cam-

wanted to go around and talk this through with some more folks. And that just wasn’t an option. And during the course of the weekend, you know, there was no doubt that this was weighing on me.” Only after the SEAL team landed in Afghanistan were U.S. officials convinced that they had indeed succeeded, he said. Obama described walking out of the Situation Room and telling aides, “We got him.” The president acknowledged surprise at learning that bin Laden had managed to remain hidden in Pakistan since 2005 without being discovered by the country’s security officials. He said White House officials believed there had to be “some sort of support network for bin Laden inside of Pakistan,” though it was unclear who or what that support network was. “We don’t know whether there might have been some people inside of government, people outside of government,” he said, “and that’s something that we have to investigate, and more importantly the Pakistani government has to investigate.” National security adviser Thomas Donilon said Pakistan remains a critical partner in

Mississippi Continued from A1 Near the site where the Yazoo River empties into the Mississippi, forming a wishbone-like shape, predictions are the water will overtop the tributary levees by more than a foot. Even worse, the levees could fail. “All they done is put Visqueen (polyethylene sheet) there to stop the levee from being cut in two,” said Larry Fuller, a wiry 65-yearold farm manager swapping news with neighbors at Chuck’s Dairy Bar in Rolling Fork, which sits in between Greenville and Vicksburg and is expected to be hard-hit. “We could lose the whole Delta if that levee breaks.” The situation is grave, but Gerald Galloway, a University of Maryland civil engineer and former Army Corps officer, said residents should have confidence in the main levees that hold the bulk of the river. However, he issued a stern warning. “There is no such thing as never: it’s not a word when you’re dealing with the river. An old Army Corps of Engineers general said that the best preparation for a war is fighting the river, because it’s always looking for a place to defeat you and it’s 24-7 in its activity,” he said. John Barry, the author of “Rising Tide,” a definitive book on the 1927 flood and a board member of the levee authority in New Orleans, agreed that the levees would likely hold, but said any breach would be bad news. “Once a breach begins to occur, if you’re not totally on top of it immediately with enormous resources, you are in trouble,” Barry said. “There’s a lot of water in that river, and it’s going to keep coming for days, if not weeks. It’s not a hurricane where you have a few hours of storm surge.” The 1927 catastrophe occurred after relentless rain the previous year, followed by more precipitation in the spring. Levees were busted much farther upstream than Mississippi, but the breach at Mounds Landing was the most destructive. The nation vowed to never again see Americans suffer in a flood of that kind. During an era driven by racism, blacks built levees at gunpoint and starved in refugee camps, and many were left to fend for themselves during the flood, while whites were rescued. Following the disaster, Congress got the Army Corps of Engineers to build a 2,203-mile-long levee system on the river, but even that work has been called into question after Hurricane Katrina, when corps-built levees

paign ejected Serbian troops from the province. Kosovars, many of whom had fled or been harmed by Serbian troops, were asked about their feelings of hatred and revenge, their desire to act on those feelings, their history of trauma and their symptoms of mental illness and physical complaints. The 2003 report found that feelings of revenge and hatred were strongest among those with the clearest signs of psychological stress and illness. And those with evident psychiatric illness were twice as likely as those without it to tell researchers they wanted to act on their vengeful feelings.

battling al-Qaida, despite new strains in the relationship a week the raid in Abbottabad. But he acknowledged that Pakistani officials have not granted Americans access to critical information gathered since the raid or allowed interviews with bin Laden family members now in Pakistan’s custody. “We’ve asked for access, obviously, to those folks,” Donilon said on ABC’s “This Week with Christiane Amanpour,” one of four television news shows he visited Sunday. A Pakistani intelligence official said Sunday that his government needed permission from the wives’ home countries before Pakistan could allow U.S. officials to question them. One of the wives is from Yemen; the official said he did not know the other wives’ nationalities. Donilon also weighed in on whether senior Pakistani officials knew of bin Laden’s presence in Abbottabad or perhaps even supported the al-Qaida leader materially. “As I sit here with you, I don’t have any information that would indicate foreknowledge by the political military or intelligence leadership in Pakistan,” Donilon said.

Tony Neal sits on a friend’s porch surrounded by floodwater Sunday in Memphis, Tenn. Rising water is threatening more of the city and, in other parts of the South, is causing worries about the strength of the levees. Jeff Roberson The Associated Press

busted and water filled most of New Orleans, killing more than 1,600 people. “When you have a series of failures as you see with Katrina, and the interstate bridge in St. Paul, people are going to ask, ‘What’s happening?’” said Galloway, the civil engineer. “The thing to do is to modernize and upgrade our infrastructure.” At the 1927 levee break, families arrive night and day at the old riverfront to take pictures of the current flooding. The yacht club is underwater. So, too, is Archer Island, and the honky tonks and towns out in the basin. The third-floor of a casino boat, lifted by the swollen Mississippi, can be spotted from the stools at the Southern Nights Bar & Grill on Main Street. “I don’t think that levee will break,” said James Shoffner, the bar owner. “If it floods, I’ll try to get all the whiskey out.” On the other side of the downtown levee, water has reached higher than rooftops and is still rising. “The people living in the Delta are facing the biggest threat from flooding that they’ve ever faced in their lifetime,” said Cass Pennington, the president of the Delta Council, an economic development agency. “You’re talking about schools underwater, highways underwater.” The pending flood is grinding the Delta to a halt. “Right now, I’m short-staffed,” said Larry Jue, a 63-year-old storekeeper working the cash register at his family’s 70-yearold grocery store, the Sam Sing & Co. Store. The family cooperative has been on the town square in Rolling Fork for as long as anyone can remember. With no flood insurance and his relatives getting older, a flood could be the end. “I don’t want to leave,” he said. “I’ve been thinking about that. Would I come back or not? I may

not. Usually a flood like this, people leave and don’t come back.” Rolling Fork, home of the bluesman better known as Muddy Waters, is also in the area where Theodore Roosevelt came across a black bear on a hunt in 1902 and refused to shoot, earning him the nickname “Teddy Bear.” At the south end of the Delta, flooding is a regular event — it happened in 1973 and as recently as 2008 — but it’s always been contained to the swampland outside the levees. This is not your typical flood, though. The Army Corps of Engineers has already taken extraordinary

measures by blowing up a levee in Missouri, and it plans to unlock spillways in Louisiana that have rarely had to be opened. Last week, about 1,200 people at a meeting in Rolling Fork were advised to evacuate. That followed warnings by Gov. Haley Barbour that catastrophic flooding, a levee break, was possible. For the past week, workers have been fighting trouble spots on levees. “Our levees are going to hold. Greenville won’t see water. But our neighbors to the south are poised to get a lot of floodwater,” said Greenville Mayor Heather McTeer Hudson. At one of the most fortified

Other U.S. officials and congressional leaders in recent days have suggested that Pakistani officials must have known of bin Laden’s presence or else were grossly incompetent in failing to notice his nearly six-year presence in a town that is home to one of the country’s premier military academies. Donilon said questions about how bin Laden managed to live peacefully in Pakistan for so long “are being raised quite aggressively in Pakistan,” but he said Islamabad remains “an essential partner of ours in the war against al-Qaida” and other terrorist groups. “This is an important relationship with the United States, so we need to assess this … in a cool and calm way,” he told Amanpour. Others echoed Donilon’s efforts to cool the anti-Pakistan rhetoric in Washington. Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, said Pakistan was helpful in the capture of bin Laden, even though the White House chose not to notify Islamabad of the raid in Abbottabad until after it ended. “Even in the getting of Osama bin Laden, the Pakistanis were helpful,” Kerry said on CBS’s “Face the Nation.”

spots on the river, 68-yearold Ruby Taylor Miller talks about feeling safe, waving her hand at the levee built after the disaster. Her grandfather was a sharecropper on the Delta Pine & Land cotton plantation when the levee broke. He told her stories of saving his six grandchildren from the raging waters and surviving on rooftops for days. He watched cows frantically swim through the waters and rescuers arrive in boats. “Oh, my goodness, do I need to get more insurance? I asked myself that the other day,” the retired schoolteacher said, eking out a smile. She, like scores of others, doesn’t have flood insurance. “I feel like the levees are in better shape than they was in, and they’re watching it pretty close,” she said. “Unless the levee breaks, then all bets are off.”

IN THE LEGISLATURE House Bill 3186 The bill would tighten up Oregon’s hands-free cellphonewhile-driving law. • Chief co-sponsors: Rep. Vicki Berger, R-Salem; Sen. Floyd Prozanski, D-Eugene. • History: This bill would build on a law passed by the 2009 Legislature intended to increase driver safety. Police and judges say the law is too difficult to enforce. • What’s next: The bill is headed to the Senate Judiciary Committee but has not yet been scheduled for a hearing. • Read the bill: www.leg.state.or.us/11reg/ measures/hb3100.dir/hb3186. a.html ON THE WEB:

Politics & Policy The Bulletin’s blog on state government. Read updates from our Salem reporters at www.bendbulletin.com/politicsblog.

Driving Continued from A1 He said he was swayed by speeches on the House floor that pointed out that driving while distracted is already against the law. Meanwhile, he added, Rep. Tim Freeman, R-Roseburg, argued convincingly that “you can’t fix stupid.” “We don’t need another law on the books focusing on people that are working,” said McLane. “Now, besides everything else for people that work, if they forget their Bluetooth, then they have to know that they’re penalized if they’re making a call that’s necessary for work.” The bill is now headed to the Senate, where it is expected to be voted on by the Judiciary Committee. Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Bend, said she hasn’t read the bill or taken a final position on it. But she expects to support it based on the calls she’s received from constituents, as well as conversations she’s had with local judges about how difficult the current law is to enforce. She didn’t support the initial hands-free law two years ago, but thinks it makes sense that the law be changed to treat most people equally, without a “for business purposes” loophole that’s so easily exploited. “Since we have hands-free law, let’s level the playing field,” she said, “and give some definition to what is a business purpose.” Nick Budnick can be reached at 503-566-2839 or at nbudnick@bendbulletin.com.

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A6 Monday, May 9, 2011 • THE BULLETIN


C OV ER S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 9, 2011 A7

Japan committed to nuclear energy, prime minister says By Martin Fackler New York Times News Service

TOKYO — Japan remains committed to nuclear power despite the crisis at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station, Prime Minister Naoto Kan indicated Sunday, as workers moved closer to repairing the crippled plant by opening

the doors of a damaged reactor building. The move is intended to air out the building that houses Reactor No. 1 to ensure that radiation levels are low enough to allow workers to enter. The plant’s operator, the Tokyo Electric Power Co., said the procedure would release little radiation into the atmosphere because

an air filtering system installed last week had already removed most of the dangerous particles. Eight hours after the doors were opened, officials said, workers entered the building to test radiation levels. The next step is to begin replacing the reactor’s cooling system, which was de-

stroyed by the tsunami on March 11. The company has said it will take at least six months to stabilize the plant, in which three of the six reactors were damaged by a magnitude-9.0 earthquake and tsunami. Hydrogen explosions spewed radiation into the atmosphere, causing the worst nuclear disas-

Meningitis

Photos by Jahi Chikwendiu / The Washington Post

Hank Thomas, front, and Lew Zuchman, two of the 13 original Freedom Riders, back in Jackson, Miss., 50 years later. Thomas has been traveling to Jackson often to help plan this month’s big Freedom Rider reunion. He has been working with Zuchman, who now runs a large nonprofit group serving inner-city youths in New York.

Riders Continued from A1 The passengers were black and white, one of several groups that rode from Washington, D.C., to force the integration of interstate transportation on a reluctant South. In the following days, other Freedom Riders were arrested by segregationist city leaders here in Jackson and taken to the state penitentiary. Over the next four months, supporters from across the country descended on bus stations, train depots and airports across the South. One wave followed another, a total of 436 people who risked their lives to face down angry mobs and the volatile Ku Klux Klan. Most of the legal barriers the Riders confronted were toppled in the next few years by the passage of federal civil rights laws — and the willingness of a generation of activists to subject themselves to fire hoses and axe handles. But other, worrisome legacies endure. Many schools have effectively resegregated, and those who took risks to defeat segregation are disappointed that the current generation seems unwilling or unable to make similar sacrifices. Sykes is helping organize one of the many tributes this spring to the Freedom Riders, reminders that it was teenagers and young adults who were beaten with broken baseball bats, chains and steel pipes as they attempted to enter “white only” waiting rooms at bus stations. Some young people have been inspired by those stories. But in the minds of an older generation, they have not always seized the challenge as their elders did. “It makes me want to push myself to do better in life and get out of my comfort zone to talk to people of different races,” said Iasia Collins, 17, at the luncheon hosted by Jackson 2000, a group that has been bringing whites and blacks together for more than two decades. “It makes me want to do that more. People died for that.” But others who were gathered around the cafeteria tables with Collins blamed earlier generations for leaving them with few opportunities to interact. There are no movie theaters or shopping malls in the city — even a skateboard park that used to attract both black and white kids has shut down. Churches also tend to be either black or white. Since 1960, Jackson’s population has been transformed from roughly one-third black to threequarters black. City schools followed suit. The most integrated high school has a roster of 1,350 students, and only 13 are white. The steady climb to resegregation began in 1970 with whites pulling their children out of school to avoid integration. Anne Lovelady, a retired teacher who is black, spent her afternoon listening to the students, thinking they would try harder if they really understood the past. All of the documentaries, social studies lessons and talk of 50th anniversaries had not translated into an “emotional connection” to the movement, she said. “We have protected them,” Lovelady said. “My aunts and grandmother, we heard them talk about it. We heard the emotion with which they talked about it. It gave

Georgia Calhoun, 81, has been working to get the city of Anniston, Ala., to build a memorial formally recognizing events in its history such as the 1961 firebombing of a Freedom Riders bus. “It’s just history that needs to be told, as far as I am concerned,” Calhoun says. me an appreciation for the sacrifice that my parents went through so that … I knew that I too had to make a sacrifice.”

Generational debate One of the youngest of the riders, Hezekiah Watkins, is now 63 years old and lives across town from Lovelady in Jackson. He has found himself thinking the same thing when he looks at his 21-yearold daughter, Kristie. In recent weeks, as he has given interviews and speeches about his experience during the rides, he has juxtaposed his teenage years with hers. “A lot of times, she feels as though somebody owes her. I’m always asking, ‘What are you owed and by whom?’” Watkins said. “I talked to all of my kids about the ’60s and what we went through. They’ll just look at me like, ‘It’s not relevant.’ My thing has always been this: You’re standing on a banana peel, and any given day, you could slip.” For Hank Thomas, who was 19 when he joined the Freedom Riders, the contrast between his experiences and those of young people today could not be more stark. Fifty years ago, the sacrifice was unambiguous. Forcing integration on the South meant putting your body on the line. It meant buying a bus ticket down to Jackson after hearing about the bus firebombed in Anniston and the men and women beaten in Birmingham and Montgomery. “You never knew what was going to happen,” Thomas said, remembering the anxiety of the times. Thomas, a black businessman, lives outside Atlanta. He owns three McDonald’s franchises and three Marriott hotels. When he was in the first group of 13 riders, launched with little fanfare by the Congress of Racial Equity, they called themselves the “young eagles.” Thomas jokes now that they are the “bald eagles.” The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. considered that first ride a fool’s errand, and at one point he declined an invitation to board the bus with the students. The young felt haughty about going where the leader of the civil rights movement would not dare. Their protest, in retrospect, is credited with giving the nonviolent movement a template for future campaigns. Now, Thomas is traveling to Jackson often to help plan this month’s big Freedom Rider reunion. He has been working with Lew Zuchman, a fellow Freedom Rider who runs a large nonprofit group serving inner-city youths in

New York. Zuchman, who is white, and Thomas helped set the agenda for the reunion, which will include breakfast at the Governor’s Mansion, a tour of the penitentiary where they were held and a youth summit intended to inspire and challenge the next generation. Zuchman said he is frustrated at the lack of action by young adults to address present-day racism. “Things are demonstrably worse for young blacks. It is still shocking to see the numbers of young black men that are in jail today,” Zuchman said. But for some families with a connection to the Freedom Riders, it appears things have changed. Nineteen-year-old Austin Goetzman, who is white, says he has friends of both races at college. His black friends and his white friends dress alike, listen to the same music and have no second thoughts about dating across racial lines. Fifty years ago, a relative of Goetzman’s was indicted for the role he played in the firebombing of the bus carrying Thomas and six other Freedom Riders. The bus had its tires slashed and windows broken by an angry white mob in Anniston. Prosecutors said Jerome Couch, the father of Goetzman’s stepfather, Richard Couch, drove his car slowly in front of the disabled bus as it tried to flee town. The tires fell flat, and the bus stalled. Then someone in the crowd lobbed a bundle of flaming rags through a window. Smoke filled the bus, and the riders were trapped. Minutes later, the sound of an exploding fuel tank scared the mob away, and the Riders were able to escape with only minor injuries. Jerome Couch, who could not be reached for comment, was sentenced to one year of probation in 1962 after promising to sever his connections to the Klan. It has taken only one generation to see real change, said Richard Couch, who practices law in Anniston but describes himself as a San Francisco liberal. “You’ll see wide differences here between people who are 70 years old and 40 years old,” said Couch, who for years hasn’t spoken to his father, now 75. He said that the two have religious disagreements but that the older man’s views on race have moderated. “That’s the clearest way to look at this petri dish,” he said, referring to the South five decades after the Freedom Rides. “Just let the air hit the dirty laundry, and that will clean it up. It’s dying if you’ll let it die.”

Continued from A1 “She didn’t, and we called back and they said to bring her in. When we got there, things had gotten worse,” said Abbey’s mom, Ann Carpenter. “She was just slipping.” Abbey was conscious throughout her ordeal in the hospital, but said some of the days blend together. “I wasn’t very happy, and I remember not feeling good, but I don’t remember specifics,” she said. Her mother remembers many of the more frightening details. Abbey became severely sensitive to noise and light: even a person tiptoeing without shoes bothered her. Morphine and painkillers didn’t seem to work. “You don’t like it when your kid’s hurting. I kept thinking, I wish it could be me,” Carpenter said. The experience has made Carpenter more compassionate toward families with a permanently disabled or critically ill child. “Ours was temporary, and we knew Abbey would come through this,” she said. “We know whatever happens we’ll still have Abbey.” The family relied heavily on their faith and involvement with Trinity Lutheran Church. Groups held prayer vigils, and teacher Mark Lindow and student Nate Darlington threw a benefit that allowed Abbey’s physical therapy sessions to continue after the family’s insurance maxed out. One thing Abbey does remember? It took 12 needles to get her spinal tap completed. The fluid from the spinal tap was not yellow or brown, so doctors decided she was suffering from viral meningitis, which is generally considered less serious than

ter since the 1986 Chernobyl accident in Ukraine. There had been speculation that the government might seek to shut down more nuclear plants after Kan requested last week that the Hamaoka nuclear plant in central Japan be temporarily closed because of safety concerns.

bacterial meningitis. Deaths from viral meningitis are rare, but if left untreated, Abbey’s severe bout of illness could have killed her. In September, Abbey was discharged from the hospital. Her pain was under control and she’d begun to eat again. But recovery was just beginning. Abbey could walk, but discovered she couldn’t climb the stairs. It was the first in a number of skills she found she’d have to relearn. The way Carpenter describes it, during Abbey’s illness her brain built detours for certain skills, and the 17-year-old had to create new pathways for those skills to return. It’s the same for other people who suffer some sort of brain trauma. So for the next few months, Abbey made her bedroom in the first-floor living room. Family members helped her with various personal needs, like eating and showering. Abbey’s dad, Bill Carpenter, is self-employed and was able to stay home with her much of the time while Ann Carpenter went to work at Trinity Lutheran School, where she teaches. Her brother and sister also helped. There was more to relearn. She lacked various motor skills: she couldn’t skip or jump. She couldn’t read, and it pained her to watch television until about two months ago. Abbey worked with Dr. Gabby Marshall at Elemental Eye Care over a 13-week period to learn to read again. She continues to see a physical therapist and does a variety of exercises with a stationary bike, a plastic foam roller, a rowing machine and the Nintendo Wii. Just recently she developed her vertical jump again. Abbey’s first big step came in December, when she was able to attend Christmas Eve services at

her church. That month, she was also able to move back to her room, and at the beginning of January she went back to school. She goes four days a week for part of each day to Trinity Lutheran, where she is a junior. “For a long time I wasn’t up to doing anything. I was tired and just wanted to sleep,” Abbey said. “I think the hardest part is that one of the things I’m still working on is conversation.” In small groups or with friends at school, she can carry on a conversation. In a big group, though, she can’t quite form her ideas into sentences. “I’m still getting there,” she said. “I’m not 100 percent there, but I’m getting there.” “A lot of things just take time, and you have to be patient with this,” Carpenter said. “All her skills will come back, but she has to be patient. The more impatient you are, the more frustrated you’ll get.” But there are things that Abbey hasn’t gotten back yet. Before she got sick, she was learning to drive and getting ready to take her driver’s test. She hasn’t yet been able to get back behind the wheel. It’s just too exhausting, she said. Nevertheless, Abbey said she’s able to look forward “at what comes next.” She plans to go to college and hopes to return to an internship in the cancer care ward at St. Charles Bend. Over the past months, Carpenter said she’s encountered many people who know meningitis victims. Until Abbey’s experience, Carpenter says she didn’t realize how serious it could be. “Before, it was just something I saw on the news,” Carpenter said. “It just wasn’t on our radar.” Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

The roadways of Bend have reached a dire situation. Traffic congestion, unsafe intersections and deteriorating roadways are placing the citizens of Bend at risk and negatively impacting the desirability of our community. The recession has impacted cities across the country, and Bend has been especially hard hit. There is not enough money in the City of Bend’s budget to fix all of the urgent roadway issues. Measure 9-83 will generate $30 million to finance Bend’s priority road improvements and help create local jobs.

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B

Inside

OREGON Drone technology applied to agriculture, see Page B3. Lawmakers cross fingers as revenue forecast nears, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MAY 9, 2011

Best

of the

blog Excerpts of last week’s posts to Politics & Policy, The Bulletin’s Salem weblog on state government.

Freshmen legislators find help in mentors • Posted Thursday by Lauren Dake Every freshman lawmaker in the Legislature is assigned a mentor, someone to talk strategy and give advice on time management. Because many first-time lawmakers’ families are far from Salem, sometimes a mentor simply serves as a friendly face. Rep. Mike McLane, R-Powell Butte, was assigned Rep. Gene Whisnant, R-Sunriver, as his mentor. “Typically the (Whisnants) call and say, ‘Are you working late?’” McLane said. “Yeah.” “Have you eaten?” “No.” “OK, meet us at Outback.” Rep. Jason Conger, R-Bend, was given House Republican Leader Kevin Cameron. When Conger was putting together a bill he says will help school districts, he went to Cameron to find out if any part of the bill could be a liability — decreasing the chances of the entire bill passing. “The leadership viewpoint is equally important to the success and failure of some of the things I want to do here,” Conger said.

Senate Republicans’ 900-pound jobs gorilla • Posted Thursday by Lauren Dake The Senate Republican office has released a graphic to demonstrate how they think lawmakers are doing at creating jobs this session. “We were brainstorming, looking at the session and evaluating where we were at,” said Michael Gay, who is with Senate Republican Leader Ted Ferrioli’s office. Following is a supposed letter from the “Jobs Gorilla” to Gov. John Kitzhaber and legislative leaders comparing total bills passed in the Senate versus “job creation” bills: “Below is a widget I have created … to help you measure your progress against Oregon’s unemployment problem. Knowing you would never ignore such an obvious need, I am excited to track your ideas with you!”

Telfer has little hope for kicker tax bill • Posted Wednesday by Nick Budnick Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Bend, is one of four chief co-sponsors of a push to modify the state’s complex “kicker” tax refund law. But while she helped write the bill — and joined other members of the Senate Revenue Committee in passing it unanimously Wednesday — “my expectation is the bill is dead.” The kicker law says that if the state gets more revenue than projected, the excess is refunded to taxpayers. Kicker reform has long been a priority of Democrats, who want to use that surplus to fill a constitutionally protected rainy day fund. But Senate Joint Resolution 26, which carries the kicker reform, is being considered with three other bills that would phase in reductions to the state’s capital gains tax rate on investment returns. Telfer says the cuts to capital gains need to be deeper and faster, and that there also needs to be an overall cap on state spending. “There’s just a whole bunch of problems with it,” she said.

Watch for more blog updates at www .bendbulletin.com /politicsblog.

Abernethy: A familiar name on the ballot By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

Bruce Abernethy is not done yet. Yes, over the years he’s been a board member for the Bend Park & Recreation District and Bend-La Pine Schools, has served on the Bend City Council and been involved in a variety of other public service groups around town. But there are still a few seats he hasn’t held, and Deschutes County ballots fea-

Bruce Abernethy is running for the Central Oregon Community College board of directors. He’s already served on the school board, the parks board and the Bend City Council.

ture his name once again this month. He is running unopposed for a seat on the Central Oregon Community College board of directors. “I’ve been involved in a lot of regional efforts, and in those outlying communities, COCC is an incredibly vital cog in their community development,” he said. “It’s that blend of education and economic development.” See Abernethy / B5

ELECTION

Pete Erickson The Bulletin

High Desert shutterbug Middle school student’s photo snaps up award in national competition By Megan Kehoe The Bulletin

A photo of a stop sign is sending High Desert Middle School student Genevieve Smith all the way to New York this month. “It was totally unexpected,” said the 14-year-old. “I was definitely in shock when I found out I “Since I had won.” Genevieve is got the one of two winscholastic ners of a national award, I’ve Best in Grade Scholastic Art become Awards contest sure that I and will accept award May want to be her 31 at Carnegie an artist. Hall. The eighthwon for a It’s like my grader photograph she career has submitted of a stop sign on Feralready guson Road in started.” Bend. Because of the unusual angle — Genevieve from which the Smith, 14 picture was taken — from the base of the post looking up — the sign resembles a steel road disappearing into the horizon. Genevieve snapped the photo one day while she was out walking her dog. “I just saw the stop sign there, and thought that I wanted to make it look different,” said Genevieve. “I wanted to get a different angle of it.” See Smith / B5

Sunny weather expected Tuesday Sunny weather and warm temperatures will likely visit our region this week, if only for a short time. According to Douglas Weber, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service office in Pendleton, the unseasonably cool and wet weather that’s been hanging around Central Oregon will disappear for part of the week, then return later in the week. “What we’ve got, as far as a pattern, is an upper-level low pressure system that’s sitting over us right now,” Weber said. “We’ll have a brief ridge to bring up warmer, drier conditions for about two days, and then by Wednesday afternoon the next system starts to push in.” Today, there is a slight chance of rain showers in the morning and again in the late afternoon, with temperatures expected to reach about 59 degrees before dropping overnight to about 34 degrees. The good news starts on Tuesday, when a ridge is expected to build over the area, pushing temperatures up to about 69 degrees and keeping the area warm and dry. Overnight temperatures will likely drop to about 36 degrees before bumping back up on Wednesday to about 70 degrees. Thursday is expected to be a bit cooler, with a high of about 64 degrees and a cool-off overnight to about 33 degrees. Friday’s and Saturday’s temperatures are expected to stay in the low 60s before sinking on Sunday to the high 50s. Weber said the chance for rainy skies will return on Wednesday afternoon, perhaps bringing some thunder. Rain will remain a possibility through Sunday. — From staff reports

News of Record on Page B2.

ELECTION Special district election:

May 17 Ballots are in the mail.

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Genevieve Smith, 14, holds the photo that won her a Best in Grade Scholastic Art Award. Genevieve, who attends High Desert Middle School, was one of only two students in the country to be recognized for this award.

La Pine touts support for youth programs

Daily highs and lows DAY High temp.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 65 71 52 49 56 49 40 39 45 54 56 50 55 47 50 59 53 59 46 53 50 44 61 60 60 48 50 59 44 53

80 70 60

The Bulletin

50

Average temperature for April....39.9°

H

High temperatures averaged 52.6°F

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Civic Calendar notices: • E-mail: news@bendbulletin.com • Please write “Civic Calendar” in the subject line and include a contact name and daytime phone number.

20

L

10 0

Low temperatures averaged 27.2°F

32° F freezing point of water

Low temp.

39 32 20 20 35 32 24 23 24 36 24 19 20 30 31 37 30 30 20 20 29 20 22 39 21 31 29 31 27 22

DAY

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Precipitation total...0.52” (Average precipitation for the month.....0.65") .05

T T

.12 T

T .09

Total snowfall...0” (Average total snowfall for the month.....1.2")

.08 .15

T .03

T = Trace

T T

Highest temperature

71° April 2

Lowest temperature

19° April 12

Highest recorded maximum for the month ....86° (1987)

Lowest recorded minimum for the month .......9°(1936)

Average maximum 52.6°

Average minimum 27.2°

Dean Guernsey / The Bulletin

to provide programs for La Pine’s kids, and this seemed like a good time to act. See Youth / B5

Monthly average maximum through the years*.................57.9°

HOW TO SUBMIT Letters and submissions: • Mail: My Nickel’s Worth or In My View, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 • E-mail: bulletin@bendbulletin.com • More details inside this section.

40

Andy Ewing places a sign in the ground in support of youth programs in La Pine.

For more information, including locations to drop off ballots, visit these county clerk websites: • http://bit.ly/deschutesclerk • http://bit.ly/crookclerk • http://bit.ly/jeffersonclerk See The Bulletin’s full coverage at www.bendbulletin.com/may17.

April 2011 weather for Bend

By Leon Pantenburg LA PINE — Yard signs provide the first hint that La Pine youth programs are heading in a new direction. They proclaim, “La Pine Supports its Youth,” and people who buy them are doing just that. The signs cost $20 apiece, and the proceeds help pay for local sports programs. The signs also promote a larger effort to improve the community for young people. The idea, says La Pine Mayor Ken Mulenex, is to coordinate the work of a number of organizations for the benefit of kids. “This area is changing a lot, especially for our young people,” Mulenex said. “We want those young people to stay here and be part of this community.” This new, coordinated youth program doesn’t have a name yet, said Mary Fleishmann, community justice officer with Deschutes County. For a long time, Fleishmann had been thinking about new ways

IN BRIEF

Monthly average minimum through the years*..................29.7°

* Monthly averages calculated from 1928 through 2005, Western Regional Climate Center Sources: NOAA, Western Regional Climate Center, Bend Public Works Department Precipitation and snowfall data from Nick Norton Greg Cross / The Bulletin

School news and Teen Feats: • E-mail notices of general interest to smiller@bendbulletin.com. • E-mail announcements of a student’s academic achievements to youth@bendbulletin.com. • More details: The Bulletin’s Local Schools page publishes Wednesday in this section. Obituaries and death notices: • Mail: Obituaries, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 • E-mail: obits@bendbulletin.com • More details inside this section. Births, engagements, marriages and anniversaries: • Mail information to Milestones, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708, within one month of the celebration. • More details: Milestones publishes in Sunday’s Community Life section.


B2 Monday, May 9, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

A LONG DAY OF ROWING

N  R CIVIL SUITS Filed April 27

11CV0317MA: Ray Klein Inc. v. Leslie Hawkins and Glenn Hawkins, complaint, $12,883.46 11CV0318MA: Riverwalk Holdings LTD v. Shelly Osterhout, complaint, $18,807.66 11CV0319ST: Sarah Nelson v. State of Oregon by and through the Oregon Department of Transportation and City of Sisters, complaint, $910,547.45 Filed April 28

11CV0323AB: Ryan Richards v. 2 J.B. Inc. dba D & D Bar & Grill, complaint, $300,000 11CV0324SF: First Tennessee Bank v. Joshua L. Berggren, complaint, $66,663.56 11CV0325AB: Citibank v. Kevin Fritz, complaint, $28,017.93 Filed April 29

11CV0327ST: Citibank v. David J. Liberty, complaint, $16,528.66 11CV0328ST: GTS Interior Supply Co. v. Tumalo Creek Acoustics Inc., Matthew Freeman and Levi Miller, complaint, $130,218.12

Filed May 2

11CV0320MA: La Tortuga LLC v. N2 TDM Inc., Gwendolyn K. Felkins and David A. Cantwell, complaint, $57,619.83 11CV0330ST: Asset Acceptance LLC v. Jean Daly, complaint, $11,933.75 11CV0331SF: Stone Creek Financial Inc. v. Mary K. Shive, complaint, $14,270.87 11CV0332MA: Midland Funding LLC v. Troy Lindquist, complaint, $10,783.14 11CV0333MA: Citibank v. Matt J. Johnson, complaint, $11,600.66 11CV0334ST: Citibank v. Cindy J. Friend, complaint, $20,566.66 11CV0335MA: Citibank v. Olivia Servantes, complaint, $11,499.36 11CV0336AB: State of Oregon v. Lisa Suzanne Del Pozzo aka Lisa S. Turner, complaint, $4,154.12 11CV0337AB: Janet Bird v. Karah J. Herr, Stephen K. Herr and Nancy M. Herr, complaint, $149,000 Filed May 3

11CV0339MA: Stahancyk, Kent & Hook P.C. v. Michael Zielinski, complaint, $10,555.05

Nelson Mandela elected S. Africa’s first black president in ‘94 T O D AY IN HISTORY

The Associated Press Today is Monday, May 9, the 129th day of 2011. There are 236 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On May 9, 1961, in a speech to the National Association of Broadcasters, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Newton Minow decried the majority of television programming as a “vast wasteland” of “game shows, formula comedies about totally unbelievable families, blood and thunder, mayhem, violence, sadism, murder, Western bad men, Western good men, private eyes, gangsters, more violence, and cartoons.” ON THIS DATE In 1754, a cartoon in Benjamin Franklin’s Pennsylvania Gazette showed a snake cut in pieces, with each part representing an American colony; the caption read, “JOIN, or DIE.” In 1883, Spanish philosopher Jose Ortega y Gasset was born in Madrid. In 1936, Italy annexed Ethiopia. In 1945, U.S. officials announced that a midnight entertainment curfew was being lifted immediately. In 1951, the U.S. conducted its first thermonuclear experiment as part of Operation Greenhouse by detonating a 225-kiloton device on Enewetak Atoll in the Pacific, nicknamed “George.” In 1974, the House Judiciary Committee opened public hearings on whether to recommend the impeachment of President Richard Nixon. In 1978, the bullet-riddled body of former Italian prime minister Aldo Moro, who’d been abducted by the Red Brigades, was found in an automobile in the center of Rome. In 1980, 35 people were killed when a freighter rammed the Sunshine Skyway Bridge over Tampa Bay in Florida, causing a 1,400-foot section of the southbound span to collapse. In 1987, 183 people were killed when a New York-bound Polish jetliner crashed while attempting an emergency return to Warsaw. In 1994, South Africa’s newly elected parliament chose Nelson Mandela to be the country’s first black president. TEN YEARS AGO China sought U.S. understanding for its refusal to allow a damaged U.S. Navy spy plane to fly home, saying its public would be outraged if the aircraft flew again over Chinese territory. A stampede at a soccer match in Ghana killed at least 123 people.

FIVE YEARS AGO Freed by rescuers who had been drilling around the clock by hand, two men walked out of an Australian mine where they had been trapped for two weeks by an earthquake. (The jubilation over the survival of Brant Webb and Todd Russell was tempered by the loss of Larry Knight, who died in the same rock collapse.) ONE YEAR AGO Lena Horne, 92, the enchanting jazz singer known for her signature song, “Stormy Weather,” and for her triumph over bigotry that allowed her to entertain white audiences but not socialize with them, died in New York. Dallas Braden pitched the 19th perfect game in major league history, leading the Oakland Athletics in a 4-0 victory over the Tampa Bay Rays. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS CBS News correspondent Mike Wallace is 93. Actress Geraldine McEwan is 79. Actorwriter Alan Bennett is 77. Rock musician Nokie Edwards (The Ventures) is 76. Actor Albert Finney is 75. Actress-turnedpolitician Glenda Jackson is 75. Producer-director James L. Brooks is 74. Musician Sonny Curtis (Buddy Holly and the Crickets) is 74. Singer Tommy Roe is 69. Singer-musician Richie Furay (Buffalo Springfield and Poco) is 67. Actress Candice Bergen is 65. Pop singer Clint Holmes is 65. Actor Anthony Higgins is 64. Singer Billy Joel is 62. Blues singermusician Bob Margolin is 62. Rock singer-musician Tom Petersson (Cheap Trick) is 61. Actress Alley Mills is 60. Actress Amy Hill is 58. Actress Wendy Crewson is 55. Actor John Corbett is 50. Singer Dave Gahan (Depeche Mode) is 49. Actress Sonja Sohn is 47. Rapper Ghostface Killah is 41. Country musician Mike Myerson (Heartland) is 40. Rhythm-and-blues singer Tamia is 36. Rock musician Dan Regan (Reel Big Fish) is 34. Rock singer Pierre Bouvier (Simple Plan) is 32. Actress Rosario Dawson is 32. Actress Rachel Boston is 29. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Television has changed the American child from an irresistible force into an immovable object.” — Laurence J. Peter, Canadian-born educator (1919-90)

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Every Friday In

Alan Berner / The Seattle Times

Shells return through the Montlake Cut after the opening day of boating season in Seattle on Saturday.

Willamette moms spark school pride project By Mark Baker The (Eugene) Register-Guard

EUGENE — They are two moms with two big hearts. And if you think a little thing like being part of a school district facing an almost $6.5 million budget shortfall for the 2011-12 school year is going to get in their way, then you don’t know Brooke Cottle and Margaret Hansen. “They are amazing,” Bethel School District Superintendent Colt Gill said Friday morning as he took a break from pulling up shrubs in front of Willamette High School. “It’s just incredible. They never stop. They keep going.” A couple of months ago, Cottle and Hansen — who each have four children they say will one day soon be Willamette Wolverines — formed a group they call Willamette Pride. It’s a subcommittee of the Bethel Education Foundation in which Cottle serves as president and Hansen as secretary. It consists of volunteers, parents, students and district staff, who have taken it upon themselves to raise money and jump-start projects in these financially challenging times for school districts.

And the group’s first order of business? Sprucing up the 62-year-old high school that is the heart and soul of the Bethel area. The Bethel School Board voted in February against placing a $10 million bond measure for school repairs and upgrades on the May ballot, as the Eugene School District has done, because the district didn’t want Bethel voters to get confused with the city of Eugene income tax measure for schools. Enter Cottle and Hansen. “People will see that something’s going on, something’s happening at Willamette,” Cottle said Friday, as about 25 volunteers, including Gill and the high school’s vice principal, Andy Van Fleet, worked on the nearby landscaping project. Cottle and Hansen have been on the phone for weeks now, asking area businesses to contribute whatever they can to upgrade the high school. Forty brand-new desks are en route to the school from Cameron, Texas. Angell Flight Asphalt of Eugene has agreed to provide $7,100 worth of parking lot resurfacing this summer. This summer, group members plan to paint the inte-

rior of the high school with paint donated from local dealers for Benjamin Moore, Sherwin-Williams, Rodda Paint and Forrest Paint Co. “We tell people it’s the ‘Extreme Makeover: High School Edition,’” Hansen said.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 9, 2011 B3

O THE FUTURE OF FARMING

Drone tested for agricultural use By Eric Mortenson The Oregonian

BORING — It’s enough to bring out the inner radio-control geek in anyone who sees it. Buzzing like a swarm of bees, a six-rotor helicopter revs to life and vaults straight up, rising quickly above thousands of potted trees at J. Frank Schmidt & Son Nursery. It’s only about three feet across and its spindly legs make it look like a flying spider, but this is no toy. Loaded on board is sophisticated GPS technology that sends it to pre-programmed points and maintains a constant altitude of 25 meters, slightly more than 80 feet. Dangling from its abdomen is a digital camera. A swiveling housing keeps the camera level even if the craft pitches in the wind. Pilot Heather Stoven, an Oregon State University research assistant who learned to fly the machine three days ago, flips a switch and takes a series of photographs of the trees below. Now comes the compilation and analysis that’s drawn a team of university researchers from Florida, Arkansas and OSU to the nursery, one of the state’s largest. The aerial images are downloaded to software that, in its simplest application, identifies and counts the potted trees. Oregon’s nurseries raise millions of trees and bushes for landscaping, and inventory control is critical. Counting by hand, however, is labor-intensive and expensive. But the technology blossoms with promise. Equipped with a variety of sensors, the machine potentially can detect disease, look for irrigation or fertilizer problems, gauge plant height and diameter and predict crop yield — not to mention spot where the field fence needs repair. “(It has) an immense number

Thomas Boyd / The Oregonian

Jim Owen, an assistant professor at Oregon State University, carries a drone back to the car after a demonstration of the machine’s agricultural applications in Boring.

“Instead of walking down every row every three months, you can tell them to go check that tree in Row 5.” — Reza Ehsani, assistant professor, University of Florida of practical applications,” says James Robbins, a University of Arkansas agriculture extension service professor. “It’s a low-cost method of crop monitoring.” Robbins and other researchers flight-tested the craft Wednesday and Thursday at nurseries in Canby, Yamhill and Boring. Research will continue through the summer, but the early results look good, said Jim Owen, an assistant professor at OSU’s North Willamette Research and Extension Center. J. Frank Schmidt & Son provided initial grant funding that kick-started the project and brought together a team of collaborative agricultural researchers. Farmers have long known the value of aerial imagery, but photographing fields or orchards from planes was costly

and of uneven value. Sam Doane, production horticulturist at J. Frank Schmidt, experimented with mounting cameras on helium balloons, but found them impractical. The breakthrough came when Reza Ehsani, an assistant professor at the University of Florida, suggested modifying a multi-rotor craft available to radio control enthusiasts. The machines are exceptionally quick, nimble and far more stable than fixed-wing model airplanes. It’s powered by a lithium ion polymer battery, can stay aloft from nine to 40 minutes and can carry five pounds of camera gear. A basic unit costs from $7,000 to $10,000 — an expense within reach of many nursery or farm owners. Additional equipment, ranging from simple digi-

tal cameras to infrared sensors that can detect nutrient deficiencies, can add hundreds or thousands to the cost. Researchers are leery the public will associate the technology with armed Predator drone aircraft that monitor and attack enemies in Afghanistan. They carefully refer to it by the clunky acronym of MRRSS, or MultiRotor Remote Sensing System. Another worry? That paparazzi will use the craft to spy on and photograph celebrities. Nonetheless, farmers are intensely interested. In Florida, Ehsani said orange growers need help combating “citrus greening,” a bacterial disease that reduces production and can kill trees. The disease appears at the top of the tree canopy, requiring spotters to move through groves on bulky elevated platforms. The scouts miss 40 percent of the disease due to human error, Ehsani said. The MRRSS can be programmed to repeatedly visit, hover over and photograph points in the orchard, field or nursery yard, he said. The information can improve worker efficiency. “Instead of walking down every row every three months, you can tell them to go check that tree in Row 5,” he said. Arkansas corn and sorghum farmers could use that kind of information, said Dharmendra Saraswat, a University of Arkansas professor. The state’s soybean board approved funding for the project sight unseen, he said. In Oregon, inventory-dependent nurseries and Christmas tree farms may be among the first users in the coming years, said Owen, of OSU. “It’s going very well,” he said. “We’ve made great progress but there’s definitely a long summer of research ahead of us.”

Lawmakers crossing fingers as state revenue forecast looms The Associated Press SALEM — Power brokers in Salem are nearing the final stretch next week in their work on a state budget for the next two years. Gov. John Kitzhaber is meeting today with legislative leaders at Mahonia Hall, the governor’s mansion, to talk about the budget. And on Thursday state economists will release the quarterly revenue forecast giving budget writers a clearer picture of how much money they’ll have to spend. The revenue forecast is a final puzzle piece lawmakers need to finish up their work by a June 30 deadline. The co-chairmen of the Ways and Means Committee, which reviews all budget bills, based their spending framework on the last revenue forecast released in February. The May forecast is not expected to significantly change the state’s budget outlook, but any shifts in projected tax collections will have to be reflected in the final budget for 2011 through 2013. Throughout the state Capitol, fingers are crossed that economists will see signs of an improving economic outlook and a boost in tax collections over the next two years. At stake is funding for pub-

lic safety and for social safety net programs for seniors, the poor and people with disabilities. A rosy forecast would mean there’s unexpected money available to lessen the cuts proposed for those programs. But a dour forecast might mean the opposite: even deeper slashing from programs that are already reeling. With all the attention being paid to the upcoming revenue forecast, there’s no scenario that avoids the deep cuts to spending on all state services. The last revenue forecast showed a budget gap of well over $3.5 billion. “Nobody’s expecting the majority of our problems to be solved with this forecast,” said Sen. Peter Buckley, D-Tualatin, a budget committee co-chairman. Once they know the numbers they’re working with, budget writers will make a forceful push to get the document finished. Devlin said the goal is to have all budget bills finished in the Ways and Means Committee by the end of the month and on their way to votes in the full House and Senate.

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Goats enlisted to work on levees By Samantha Tipler East Oregonian

PENDLETON — Milton-Freewater is hosting about 240 hungry visitors this week. The Walla Walla Basin Watershed Council helped organize bringing 240 goats to gnaw down bushes and grasses on the levees along the Walla Walla River. Deciding exactly what to do about vegetation is a big speed bump for the Milton-Freewater Water Control District’s work to repair the levee system. Federal agencies disagree about how many, if any, bushes and trees should be on the levees. But one thing all the federal agencies could agree on: Goats. More than a year ago Brian Wolcott, WWBWC director, suggested goats as a simple way to take care of some of the overgrowth. People chuckled, but no one was against it. As it turns out, goats are an accepted way to keep vegetation at bay. Wolcott said it’s easier than cutting or burning the brush. And it’s

easier for goats to get in between rocks and under trees — places that aren’t so easy for humans and machinery to get to. Wolcott and Wendy Harris, WWBWC operations manager, worked with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife service to obtain a $7,000 grant. That grant is paying for the 240 goats to “work” on the levee for nine days. They will be there until Thursday. Craig Madsen, shepherd at Healing Hooves of Edwall, Wash., brought the goats to Milton-Freewater. His herd is made up of about 50 percent adult goats and 50 percent month-old kids. Even though the kids are young, they already are eating grass and brush. The goats, and Madsen, are staying on the levees 24/7. The goats eat about 10 hours a day, Madsen said. The rest of the time they chew their cud or sleep. Madsen pens them into each area and lets the goats clear it. Once they’re done, he makes an-

other pen for the next section. He moves them about once a day. On Friday, the goats already had covered about a half mile of levee. Madsen estimated they might munch up three or four miles worth of grass and shrubs by the end of next week. To document the goats’ work, Harris is taking before-and-after photos at specific GPS points. “We just have to gauge the effect based on what we see,” she said. One of the goals of this project is making sure there is room for inspectors to see the levee itself. That wasn’t always possible in the past. The areas the goats had covered by Friday looked as if they’d been trimmed by a machine. The Milton-Freewater Water Control District, after a hard-won $2.85 million bond election last fall, has the money to fix its levee system. Though the district is still waiting for the federal agencies to agree on the vegetation issue, it hopes to complete some work this summer.

O  B Group to develop plan for passenger rail

share with freight, or whether other tracks are needed.

EUGENE — An advisory group will begin work this summer on a plan for rapid passenger rail in Oregon. Eugene Mayor Kitty Piercy announced at a celebration of National Train Day on Saturday that she and Portland developer John Russell are leading a group to write a plan for Oregon’s 105mile segment of the 466-mile Amtrak Cascades line. The (Eugene) Register-Guard says Gov. John Kitzhaber is appointing the Oregon Rapid Passenger Rail Corridor committee to come up with a formal state plan. To be eligible for federal money, states must have a federally approved plan for their passenger rail systems. The committee may decide whether rapid passenger rail is best served on the current tracks, which the Amtrak trains

Portland school bond the largest in Oregon PORTLAND — Voters in Portland Public Schools will be asked on May 17 to approve the largest local government bond ever proposed in Oregon. The Oregonian newspaper says the $548 million bond will rebuild eight Portland schools and make smaller fixes to all 77 others. It asks voters to raise property taxes inside the state’s largest school district by 9 percent. Property owners would pay $2 for every $1,000 of assessed property value. Supporters include construction firms, labor unions and others that would benefit from the building boom. Some Portland parents have formed “Learn Now, Build Later” to oppose the bond. The group

favors a separate proposed property tax increase to help retain teachers.

Housing offered to Corvallis homeless CORVALLIS — The site of a Corvallis apartment complex that caught fire will soon host the city’s first permanent supportive housing for the chronically homeless. The (Corvallis) Gazette-Times reports the project, Partners Place, will be completed in June and could get its first tenants in July or August. The people who occupy the building’s eight apartments will have been living on the street for at least a year, or have experienced multiple bouts of homelessness. The Corvallis Homeless Shelter Coalition, which has been behind the project, has raised more than $1.1 million, enough to cover land, construction and startup costs. — From wire reports

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B4 Monday, May 9, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

E

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BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA RICHARD COE

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A Bend answer for redistricting

B

end must be split into more than one House district. The question for the Legislature is how. The answer should not be what’s best for Democrats or

Republicans. Judy Stiegler, a Democrat who used to represent Bend’s House District 54, doesn’t want the community split. “It would reduce the possibility of getting a Democrat elected,” she told this newspaper. But a party’s political advantage is not a good reason to set a boundary. In fact, it’s against state law for boundaries to be drawn for the purpose of favoring any political party, incumbent legislator or other person. What does the rest of the law say? Because of Oregon’s population, the law says that as near as is practical, each House district should include 63,581 people. That would equally divide Oregon’s population into 60 House districts. The law also lays out criteria for deciding on district boundaries. Each district, as near as is practical, shall: • Be contiguous; • Utilize existing geographic or political boundaries; • Not divide communities of common interest; and • Be connected by transportation links. Boundaries also can’t be drawn to dilute the voting strength of any language or ethnic minority group. Bend has more than 80,000 people. House District 54 currently has 17,958 people too many.

Having two representatives who each have some 40,000 Bend residents also does not weaken Bend’s voice in the Legislature. It strengthens it. That’s two votes for Bend. That means Bend must be split. It is going to have at least two districts represent the city’s residents. More than two wouldn’t make much sense. The existing House District 54 could be shrunk into a tighter and tighter circle until it struck the magic 63,581 number. But people who live farther from the city’s core aren’t necessarily less part of Bend. By drawing the district boundary with a tight circle, Bend residents get excluded from the Bend district. There are, though, commonly recognized boundaries that split the city. It’s easy to come up with east/west ones. Another split may make just as much sense. Having two representatives who each have some 40,000 Bend residents also does not weaken Bend’s voice in the Legislature. It strengthens it. That’s two votes for Bend. And it’s two votes for Bend that must take into account the surrounding community. A split Bend is still a Bend answer.

Recycling education must prove its worth D

eschutes County commissioners have decided to cut by one-third the amount they pay the Deschutes Environmental Center. While the reductions are no doubt painful for the center, the county could do little else. The county currently pays the center $150,000 per year to provide education and community outreach on the benefits of reducing waste and increasing recycling. Some of that money has been used to develop a curriculum for local schools. Though they can’t say just how, county officials believe that effort has helped increase recycling, presumably because kids come home and pressure parents to do what they have been taught. Some also goes to doing such things as manning booths at public events. The county’s payment will drop to $100,000 next year, however, as the Solid Waste Department works to trim its budget. Timm Schimke, the department head, told The Bulletin he is opting to protect his best programs at the expense of less effective ones. The problem is, there’s not a tittle of

real evidence about whether the Environmental Center’s efforts have actually done any good. There’s anecdotal evidence, county officials agree, but nothing more substantial than that. The county has to do something. State law obligates the county, and all communities with populations over 10,000, to provide programs aimed at reducing the amount of waste that goes into their landfills. Oregon law does not mandate how much governments must spend on these programs. Does the something the county does need to be $100,000 worth? If recycling levels drop off in Deschutes County, more spending on education might improve them. But if the county spends the $100,000 and recycling does not increase, maybe it should think about decreasing the money it spends, ask the Environmental Center for a new plan or see if another organization might do better. Many of the private businesses we’re familiar with are reluctant to continue to shell out money for a program of unproven worth, and the government should be equally reluctant, if not more so.

My Nickel’s Worth Grow up happy, safe Reading The Bulletin April 21, I became fixated by the pictures of the children on pages A2 and A3. I would stare at one for a few seconds, then the other, then back again. These pictures, more than the millions of words written in all the media, express the futility and hope which I see co-existing on our planet, which are often a product of geography and culture. They began as perfect creatures, dependent on the big people to teach them. It’s not their choice where they were born and who are their teachers. What will become of these two children? May they grow up happy and safe. Michael Scott Bend

The value of solar I have to admit a certain amount of enjoyment when you publish an article pointing out the total folly of so-called energy efficient solar voltaic systems. The latest is your April 23 description of a system installed on the roof of a food bank in Myrtle Point at a cost of $100,750. The food bank folks proudly proclaim that this 20.93 kilowatt system will save them about $1,820 a year and that they can use that money to buy about 13,000 more pounds of food. That all sounds great until you do a little math: 1) At $1,850 per year it will take 55.36 years to recover the cost of the system and that is allowing nothing for maintenance (such as keeping the panels clean) and repairs and assuming that the panels will not have to be replaced for at least 55 years. Will the food bank still be occupy-

ing the building then? Will the building even be there? 2) If the food bank had taken the $100,500 and invested it in something like Oregon municipal bonds, it could have generated more than the $1,850/year and still have had all of the money, and it would go with them if they moved. In addition, Oregon cities and towns would be able to build schools, bridges and other needed infrastructure. I wonder if the solar panels were made in Oregon, or even in the U.S. Jeff Keller Bend

Driving wrong As a 40-year commercial driver in the western United States, I have never seen so many drivers breaking driving laws and not being stopped for either a ticket or warning. Every time I travel to Bend I see as many as 15 violations: 1. Driving with items on the rearview mirror. (Handicap place cards, dice, etc.) 2. Driving out in front of oncoming traffic. 3. Following too close. 4. No signal for merging or turning. 5. Excess speed. 6. Passing over double lines. 7. Driving with fog lights on when there is no fog. (It blinds the other drivers.) 8. Parking in striped areas in shopping centers. (Striped areas are for emergency vehicles.) 9. Handicap place cards not on the mirror when parked in handicap parking spots. 10. Dogs in the back of pickups not secured. 11. Watch your speed in parking

lots. 12. Stopping too close to vehicles at traffic stop signs or signals. (You may have to back up if the vehicle in front of you stalls.) 13. Auto windshields with large cracks. (This may cause a visual problem.) 14. I see many autos with bad tires. (Could cause an accident.) 15. Drivers impeding other drivers. I notice on the back of sheriff cars it says “to serve and protect.” I wonder if they see these violations, and if people were cited, would this help prevent accidents? The state police seem to do a better job with fewer officers. I don’t want to say the deputies are not very alert to these problems, but it seems that way. Raymond Lewis La Pine

Tortoise is not a turtle In the April 24 Bulletin Community Life section, on the last page, you had a picture of a lady holding a baby desert tortoise named “Speedy.” In the line under the picture you called the tortoise a turtle. That was very incorrect. A tortoise is not a turtle. A turtle spends most of its life in the water. If a tortoise is put in water, it would drown, as they cannot swim. Look at its hind legs. They are flat like an elephant’s. I was licensed by the state of California to raise desert tortoises for 25 years. I feel that something like this should be correctly addressed so that young children are not given incorrect information. Harold D. Le Roy Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Don’t burn out your children trying to create Olympians By Kyle D. Will Bulletin guest columnist

I

n my 12 years as a personal trainer and strength and conditioning coach, I have noticed an alarming trend in youth sports toward burnout and injuries. More and more frequently, kids are being asked to choose “their sport” at an age when they should still be playing and doing whatever kinds of activities and sports they want. In my opinion, no kid in elementary or middle school should be forced to focus all of their time and energy on one sport, at the exclusion of others. However, with every parent looking to find that edge that might earn their future Olympian a college scholarship or a starting slot on the varsity team in high school, kids are often becoming one-sport stars way too soon. And in their quest to win local, regional and national tournaments and accolades,

coaches often are searching for the best athletes to create the most competitive teams. So kids are pressured to give up other sports in favor of one. It is rare anymore to find those threesport athletes. Soccer, baseball, track and more have become year-round commitments. In many cases, it is understood that if you do not play on traveling teams or club teams, your chances of earning a varsity letter, much less a shot at playing in college, are slim at best. As a result, we have 11- and 12-year-old sports specialists hoping to achieve all that and more. Coincidently (or not), we have seen an increase in injuries and burnout in these kids. What was once a passion and love becomes a job. A means to an end. Is it worth the sacrifice? Frequently, passion has been replaced with drudgery and debilitating stress and anxiety. Obviously, it isn’t the case across the board:

IN MY VIEW some kids choose baseball from the time they put on their first batting glove, and never want to try anything else. Or they discover they have a gift in one sport and they truly enjoy pushing themselves to be the absolute best in that sport. If they didn’t, I don’t think we would have Tiger Woods or LeBron James. For every Tiger Woods, there are hundreds of Todd Marinovichs, kids with enormous athletic prowess who burn out by pushing too hard in one sport only, or push so hard they get injuries that greatly impact their short-term and long-term abilities. When I was in high school (granted it was a few years ago), I can’t remember any of my teammates incurring injuries that are common today. I didn’t get home at 9 p.m. on school nights because I had

a track meet after school then two hours of soccer practice. I don’t remember my parents or any parents spending hundreds and thousands of dollars annually to pay for travel to baseball, soccer or other tournaments across the country. Nor do I remember dreading practice or games because I was exhausted. I understand times have changed. However, how far are we willing to push our young athletes? What is our ultimate goal, and who or what is it really about? Have we lost sight of what youth sports is supposed to be about? Imagine kids playing sports for health and for the love of the game. What if every coach worried more about teaching kids the skills of the game that translate to life, like sportsmanship, teamwork, respect and work ethic? If young athletes became well-rounded athletes, they would be healthier, well-conditioned athletes. Diversity in

mind and body would prevent repetitive use injuries or burnout, and would result in stronger muscles and tendons. Maybe the level of play would decrease. Maybe they wouldn’t have pitchers in high school throwing 90 mph fastballs and 80 mph curveballs. Maybe they shouldn’t be doing that anyway. Kids and sports together should be fun, not a job. Let’s not take the fun away from young athletes. Coaches and parents, please rethink why it is so important for your athletes to become one-sport stars at such young ages. Is it better for them, or better for us? Is it because society has become so competitive that we will do anything to be better than the Joneses? Maybe it is time to make some changes and let our kids be kids. Kyle D. Will is the owner of WillRace Performance Training Studio in Bend.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 9, 2011 B5

O Donna Jean (Casperson) Dahl Nov. 3, 1929 - May 5, 2011 On May 5, Donna Jean Dahl passed away from agerelated causes at her home in Redmond, surrounded be her family. Donna and her husband, Orlo, lived nineteen years in Redmond, but in her heart she was always a "Eugene girl." Donna Jean It was in EuDahl gene that she was born to Wanda and Charles Casperson on November 3, 1929. She graduated from Eugene High School and attended the University of Oregon. In 1948, she married Orlo Dahl. They were married for 62 years. They owned and operated Dahl's Pianos and Organs. Donna was a homemaker and mother of three children. She loved her time with family and friends, camping and waterskiing, dancing and playing cards, and traveling with her husband and cat Marmie in their Airstream. She was an active member of Zion Lutheran Church of Redmond, and in Eugene she was involved in Jaycettes and the Reach For Recovery Program for many years. Donna is survived by her husband, Orlo of Redmond; brother and wife, Robert and Marnie Casperson of Eugene; a special cousin, Shirley Paradiso of San Anselmo; children and spouses, Bruce and Ruth Dahl and Julie and Billy Lindros of Eugene, and Lori and Jerry Capps of Coos Bay; five grandchildren, Eric Dahl, Amber Chang and husband, Josh, Kyle Lindros, Shahne Lopez and husband, Landon, and Jessica Dahl; and many nieces and nephews. A memorial service will be held at Zion Lutheran Church, on Saturday, May 14, at 2:00 pm. Donations may be made to Zion Lutheran Church, Hospice, or charities of your choice. Redmond Memorial Chapel is in charge of arrangements.

Youth Continued from B1 “We’re always looking at educational components,” she said. “With all the new things going on in La Pine, the timing seemed to be right.” Fleishmann set up a first meeting in February and invited members of the community and representatives of the city, the La Pine Community Action Team, the Chamber of Commerce and area churches. “It made sense to pull in all agencies and hear what everybody thought the community could do,” Fleishmann said. “The first few meetings, we just brainstormed. We weren’t sure what the focus and purpose of this group might be.” Fleishmann has more insight about La Pine young people than just about anybody. She has been involved with area youth through the Deschutes County court system since the mid-1990s. Her clientele, she says, consists mostly of youngsters who have run afoul of the law for the first time. She supervises youth probation activities and makes sure her charges meet all probation requirements. “Some are as young as seven, who got caught for stealing,” Fleishmann said. “Some kids do stupid stuff and they have to be held accountable.” Fleishmann also coordinates the teen court program in La Pine, to which some first-time offenders can be referred. At teen court, an offender goes before a jury of his peers for judgment and sentencing. Generally speaking, Fleishmann said, La Pine young people behave no better or worse than other young people in Central Oregon. “Overall, our kids are great kids,” she said, “You don’t see graffiti downtown, and we haven’t had a gang problem.” However, “alcohol and drugs

Smith Continued from B1 To get that unique perspective, Genevieve lay down on the concrete beneath the sign and started snapping away. After posting the photo to a Facebook album, she received a lot of positive comments and decided to enter it in the 2011 Central Oregon Scholastic Art Awards contest with the help of her art teacher, Marcy Monte. At the awards in January, she won a Golden Key, which put her in the running for the national awards. Genevieve found out in April that she is one of the two students selected nationally for the Best in Grade category. The award comes with a $500 scholarship. “I’ve thought a lot about why they chose mine for the award, because I’ve seen some of the work that other students have done, and they’re just amazing,” said Genevieve. “It makes me think, ‘Wow, how did my photograph win over those?’”

Abernethy Continued from B1 “I’m intrigued to see how COCC will grow and how we can have that occur in the most effective way. It’s a cool challenge.” While Abernethy is something of a household name in Bend these days, this wasn’t always the case. During his first year in town, he applied to be a part of the inaugural class of Leadership Bend, a community leadership development program. He was one of 30 applicants for 25 positions; he didn’t get one. “Apparently, I had no leadership potential,” he said, laughing. Potential or not, Abernethy has certainly been heavily involved in the community since arriving in 1993. “Most people assume I must love politics, but that’s not really true,” Abernethy said. “I like policy. … Sure, I have opinions, but for me, what’s most important is being heard.” Abernethy comes by it honestly. His father was a political science professor at Stanford University, and Abernethy said he grew up in a family focused on public service.

frequently play a part in a kid getting into trouble. One of the things we decided to focus on was reducing that use.” To that end, Flieshmann intends to provide alternative activities. “When the kids get bored and there is nothing to do, then they start to get in trouble.” La Pine’s youth drug abuse statistics are similar to those elsewhere in Central Oregon. Unfortunately, Deschutes County exceeds state averages in some areas, according to the Oregon Department of Human Services. Thirty-four percent of county eighth-graders surveyed in 2006 said they had used alcohol within the past month, topping the statewide rate of 32 percent. Fifty-four percent of county 11th-graders participating in the same survey — the Oregon Healthy Teens Survey — said they had used alcohol within the past month, topping the statewide rate by 10 percentage points. Working in La Pine’s favor are “great social norms,” according to Julie Spackman, community project coordinator with the Deschutes County Children and Families Commission. For instance, she said, 92 percent of La Pine adults surveyed say it is never OK to offer alcohol to somebody else’s teenager. Even more — 95 percent — say that any teen alcohol use is not OK. The first La Pine Community Forum meeting was held last week at La Pine High School, where La Pine High and the La

Weekly Arts & Entertainment In

Every Friday

Genevieve Smith, 14, works on a painting in her art class at High Desert Middle School in Bend on Thursday. Andy Tullis The Bulletin

Though Genevieve isn’t sure why it happened, she believes her photo was selected because it is unusual. Monte, who now works at Marshall High School, also believes Genevieve’s photo was selected because of its singularity. “It’s just so, so different,” said

He earned a bachelor’s degree in economics and political science from Swarthmore College, then a master’s degree in public policy from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. “I realize how fortunate I have been with my education, with my teachers and mentors,” Abernethy said. “I have some skills and some talents, and I think it’s important to give back.” During his first years in Bend, he worked for Bend Area Habitat for Humanity and what is now NeighborImpact. A Deschutes County commissioner persuaded him to run for the Oregon Legislature, which he says he had no business doing. He lost, but the campaign familiarized voters with his name and face. Soon enough, he started winning, serving on the park board from 1995 to 1998 and the school board from 1997 to 1998. In 1998, he left his school board post early to work in Massachusetts for a short time. He now writes grants full time for Bend-La Pine Schools. From 2001 to 2008, Abernethy was a Bend City Council member, serving during a time of notable growth. He’s proud of much of the work the council

Pine Park and Recreation Department gave presentations and representatives of area youth groups manned information booths. The next meeting, to be held on Sept. 27, will involve a “call to action,” said Fleishmann. “After that, we’ll have another meeting sometime in the spring,” Fleishmann said. “By then, we hope to be at the point where we can work on advocacy.” Leon Pantenburg can be reached at 541-382-1811 or at lpantenburg@bendbulletin.com.

Monte. “It could be a picture of anything, really.” Genevieve has been taking photographs for only about a year, but says she has always been artistically inclined. She’s been drawing since a very young age and has recently become interested in oil

did during that time. “I think we did an incredible job of keeping up with the growth,” he said. “For the most part, we did a good job of keeping Bend livable. … One of the ironies was in Bend we had a lot of angry people who said we were a bunch of morons, and meanwhile we had people visiting and telling us this is the best city in the world.” Bend City Manager Eric King worked with Abernethy during his time on the council. “It’s in Bruce’s DNA to want to help the community. He really has this genuine interest of wanting to improve,” King said. “I haven’t seen an issue he’s not willing to take on. … Usually when I work with elected officials they’ve got a couple issues they care deeply about. Bruce has this broad interest in improving the community.” Although he’s been elected to three boards, Abernethy has done much more.

painting. “We’ve always really tried to encourage our kids to be involved in music and art,” said Gina Smith, Genevieve’s mom. “We’ve tried to foster creativity as part of our family culture.” Genevieve will be joined by both her parents and one of her

Among other things, he founded and co-chaired the Meth Action Coalition and served as chairman of the Substance Abuse Prevention Coalition. He is the president of Bend’s Community Center, a board member for Bend 2030 and sits on the board of directors for the Surdna Foundation, a private grantmaking foundation based in New York. In a word, he’s not bored. While he enjoys serving on boards and trying to make Bend better, he knows it can be a challenge for his family. “I think it’s a double-edged sword,” Abernethy said of his commitment to public service. Abernethy’s wife, Mary Meador, said although he’s busy, her husband makes time for the family, which includes his stepdaughters, Naomi, 19, and Aedin, 16. “I think sometimes people wonder if we resent it or feel neglected,” Meador said. “He has a

siblings during her four-day trip to New York at the end of this month, along with Monte. Since Genevieve found out that she had won the award, she has been working with Monte to raise money to pay for some of the trip expenses. It will cost about $1,600 for her trip to New York, and the two have been raising money by appealing to local rotary clubs and businesses. Genevieve also set up a booth at a recent fundraising event at Marshall High School, where she took pictures of attendees and drew their portraits for a fee. Genevieve said that receiving a national award and the recognition that goes along with it has made a big impact on her plans for the future. “Since I got the scholastic award, I’ve become sure that I want to be an artist,” said Genevieve. “It’s like my career has already started.” Megan Kehoe can be reached at 541-383-0354 or at mkehoe@bendbulletin.com.

really big heart, and he gives as much to us as he does to Bend.” Abernethy’s engagement in the community, Meador said, makes him a role model for the family as well. “It’s a gift to be so close and connected with someone who does care so much about our community,” she said. If elected, Abernethy will replace longtime board member Connie Lee. He said after his stint as mayor ended in 2008, he was eager to return to public office but not quite ready for the workload he had faced during his time on city council. And once he’s got a few years as a COCC board member under his belt, he’ll only need to serve on the Deschutes Public Library Board and score a seat on the county commission to round out his local public service. Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

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Obituary Policy

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Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

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W E AT H ER

B6 Monday, May 9, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, MAY 9

TUESDAY

Today: Mostly cloudy.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

LOW

59

34

STATE Western 57/37

64/42

43/26

Warm Springs

Marion Forks



61/35

54/35



61/30

Sunriver 55/25

55/24

56/24

Burns

54/23

56/26



Crescent

Hampton

Fort Rock

Vancouver 62/48

Seattle 60/48

53/25

Chemult 54/22



59/39 63/41

Missoula 52/38



Helena Bend

57/41





45/33

Boise

59/34

Redding

Idaho Falls Elko

72/50

Christmas Valley

47/37



51/33

57/27

Silver Lake

City

Eugene Grants Pass

Reno

55/30

Showers are possible in the eastern part of the region today.

Crater Lake 42/26

51/37

San Francisco

Salt Lake City

62/50

52/39



Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:46 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:18 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:45 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:19 p.m. Moonrise today . . . 11:20 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 1:11 a.m.

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

HIGH

Moon phases First

LOW

Full

Last

New

May 10 May 17 May 24 June 1

Monday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 55/43/0.18 . . . . . 57/43/pc. . . . . . 57/45/pc Baker City . . . . . . 52/38/0.02 . . . . . 55/34/pc. . . . . . 65/35/pc Brookings . . . . . . 54/44/0.07 . . . . . 65/46/pc. . . . . . 61/45/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . .52/38/trace . . . . . . 55/33/c. . . . . . 69/37/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 54/44/0.39 . . . . . 59/39/pc. . . . . . . 68/44/s Klamath Falls . . .50/34/trace . . . . . 55/34/pc. . . . . . . 66/36/s Lakeview. . . . . . . 54/37/0.00 . . . . . 52/34/pc. . . . . . . 65/36/s La Pine . . . . . . . . 54/29/0.06 . . . . . 56/24/pc. . . . . . . 66/35/s Medford . . . . . . . 60/43/0.00 . . . . . 63/42/pc. . . . . . . 75/46/s Newport . . . . . . . 54/43/0.09 . . . . . 54/43/pc. . . . . . 55/47/pc North Bend . . . . . 55/45/0.18 . . . . . 57/43/pc. . . . . . 57/44/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 59/45/0.04 . . . . . 61/44/sh. . . . . . 69/42/pc Pendleton . . . . . .59/40/trace . . . . . 66/42/pc. . . . . . . 73/44/s Portland . . . . . . . 59/44/0.59 . . . . . 61/44/pc. . . . . . 68/48/pc Prineville . . . . . . . 49/31/0.06 . . . . . 60/29/pc. . . . . . . 68/41/s Redmond. . . . . . . 50/35/0.07 . . . . . 60/33/pc. . . . . . . 70/36/s Roseburg. . . . . . . 55/45/0.19 . . . . . . 59/43/c. . . . . . . 70/46/s Salem . . . . . . . . . 57/46/0.11 . . . . . 60/43/pc. . . . . . 68/46/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 50/31/0.06 . . . . . 56/27/pc. . . . . . . 69/34/s The Dalles . . . . . .65/44/trace . . . . . 65/46/pc. . . . . . . 74/48/s

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47/29 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.05” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .88 in 1987 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.08” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 in 1930 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.21” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.36” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 4.72” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.83 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 1.65 in 1956 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .4:57 a.m. . . . . . .5:53 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .4:50 a.m. . . . . . .5:57 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .4:59 a.m. . . . . . .6:29 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .4:50 a.m. . . . . . .6:01 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .4:42 p.m. . . . . . .4:35 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .4:01 a.m. . . . . . .4:10 p.m.

3

LOW

62 32

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

Partly cloudy.

HIGH

64 33

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

Calgary 55/34

57/26

49/18

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 65° The Dalles • 29° Bend

FRIDAY Partly cloudy, chance of rain showers.

70 38

BEND ALMANAC

Portland

Look for partly cloudy skies across the region today. Eastern

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

61/44

Brothers

LOW

69 36

NORTHWEST

56/25

56/26

HIGH

THURSDAY

Partly cloudy.

Showers are possible across the eastern part of the region today. Dry in the west.

Paulina

La Pine

 Crescent Lake

Partly cloudy skies will be the rule across the region today. Central

Mitchell

Madras

59/34

46/16



60/34

Camp Sherman 53/25 Redmond Prineville 58/28 Cascadia 60/29 57/39 Sisters 56/27 Bend Post 55/37

59/40

Willowdale

59/33

Oakridge Elk Lake

Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

Mostly sunny.

Tonight: Partly cloudy.

HIGH

WEDNESDAY

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 145-180 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . . 144 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . . 201 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0

. . . no report . . . . 140-250 . . . no report . . . . . . . 155 . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

S

Vancouver 62/48

S

S

Calgary 55/34

S

Saskatoon 54/35

Seattle 60/48

S Winnipeg 57/48

S

S

Thunder Bay 59/41

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 59/43

Halifax 52/42 P ortland Billings To ronto (in the 48 62/44 Portland 52/40 62/46 St. Paul Green Bay contiguous states): 61/44 Boston 64/57 63/48 63/46 Buffalo Boise Detroit 60/43 New York Des Moines • 108° 57/41 67/49 Rapid City 73/51 81/67 Laredo, Texas 67/47 Philadelphia Cheyenne Chicago Columbus 73/51 69/40 • 21° San Francisco 67/57 74/52 Omaha Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 62/50 Angel Fire, N.M. 87/66 City 74/52 Las Denver Louisville 52/39 Kansas City Vegas • 0.69” 77/43 84/64 92/72 St. Louis 71/52 Beckley, W. Va. Charlotte 88/70 82/59 Los Angeles Oklahoma City Little Rock Nashville 62/54 Atlanta 93/72 88/67 88/69 Phoenix 88/65 Albuquerque 80/59 Honolulu 83/45 Birmingham 86/73 Dallas Tijuana 88/66 92/70 65/51 New Orleans 87/70 Orlando Houston 92/71 Chihuahua 93/74 93/58 Miami 87/73 Monterrey La Paz 104/72 95/61 Mazatlan Anchorage 88/61 52/37 Juneau 51/39 Bismarck 70/51

FRONTS

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . .102/72/0.00 . 99/71/pc . . 98/68/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .68/49/0.00 . 69/49/pc . . 74/57/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .67/44/0.00 . 68/42/pc . . 68/46/pc Albuquerque. . . .85/51/0.00 . 83/45/pc . . 74/45/pc Anchorage . . . . .52/36/0.00 . .52/37/sh . . 54/34/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . .77/58/0.00 . . .88/65/t . . 89/65/pc Atlantic City . . . .72/46/0.02 . 65/49/pc . . 64/49/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .97/72/0.00 . 94/71/pc . . 93/72/pc Baltimore . . . . . .75/47/0.00 . 73/52/pc . . 73/52/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .54/46/0.04 . .52/40/sh . . .49/35/rs Birmingham . . . .82/63/0.00 . 88/66/pc . . 92/67/pc Bismarck . . . . . . .77/49/0.00 . . .70/51/t . . 60/41/sh Boise . . . . . . . . . .57/45/0.16 . .57/41/sh . . . .65/40/t Boston. . . . . . . . .57/49/0.00 . .63/46/sh . . 58/48/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .67/52/0.00 . 68/49/pc . . 65/48/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .62/40/0.00 . 60/43/pc . . 66/49/pc Burlington, VT. . .62/46/0.00 . . .64/38/s . . 64/47/pc Caribou, ME . . . .61/36/0.00 . 54/40/pc . . 52/41/sh Charleston, SC . .88/57/0.00 . 80/67/pc . . . .81/65/t Charlotte. . . . . . .81/58/0.00 . 82/59/pc . . . .81/62/t Chattanooga. . . .84/58/0.00 . 89/65/pc . . 89/63/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .79/42/0.00 . . .69/40/t . . 60/34/sh Chicago. . . . . . . .68/39/0.00 . 67/57/pc . . 80/65/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .70/52/0.00 . 78/57/pc . . . .83/64/t Cleveland . . . . . .64/50/0.00 . 66/50/pc . . 72/58/pc Colorado Springs 82/52/0.00 . 77/38/pc . . 67/39/pc Columbia, MO . .84/50/0.00 . 90/70/pc . . . 92/68/s Columbia, SC . . .88/59/0.00 . 86/63/pc . . . .85/63/t Columbus, GA. . .79/57/0.00 . 93/66/pc . . . 93/65/s Columbus, OH. . .71/51/0.00 . 74/52/pc . . 77/62/pc Concord, NH . . . .71/47/0.08 . 68/41/pc . . 62/41/pc Corpus Christi. . .91/73/0.00 . 87/76/pc . . 86/77/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .91/70/0.00 . 92/70/pc . . 90/70/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 . 75/55/pc . . 78/63/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .86/50/0.00 . 77/43/pc . . 69/36/pc Des Moines. . . . .81/52/0.00 . . .81/67/t . . 89/66/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . .68/46/0.00 . 67/49/pc . . . 67/54/c Duluth . . . . . . . . .59/41/0.00 . .54/45/sh . . 55/46/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .92/63/0.00 . . .91/60/s . . 87/56/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . .50/26/0.00 . 54/30/pc . . . 50/30/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . .61/56/0.01 . . .68/55/t . . 70/52/sh Flagstaff . . . . . . .67/37/0.00 . 54/29/pc . . 53/29/pc

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .70/46/0.00 . 71/48/pc . . . .74/58/t Green Bay. . . . . .67/37/0.00 . 63/48/pc . . . .66/53/t Greensboro. . . . .74/53/0.11 . 78/58/pc . . . .80/59/t Harrisburg. . . . . .72/45/0.00 . 71/45/pc . . . 72/52/s Hartford, CT . . . .73/43/0.00 . 68/45/pc . . 66/47/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .55/41/0.01 . .45/33/sh . . . .58/33/t Honolulu . . . . . . .80/69/0.78 . . .86/73/r . . . .85/72/r Houston . . . . . . .93/73/0.00 . 93/74/pc . . 92/74/pc Huntsville . . . . . .84/56/0.00 . 88/65/pc . . 90/64/pc Indianapolis . . . .68/53/0.00 . 78/61/pc . . 84/67/pc Jackson, MS . . . .86/61/0.00 . 90/67/pc . . 89/67/pc Madison, WI . . . .70/36/0.00 . . .67/54/t . . 78/63/pc Jacksonville. . . . .90/51/0.00 . . .91/70/t . . 89/68/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .56/33/0.00 . .51/39/sh . . 49/39/sh Kansas City. . . . .85/62/0.00 . 92/72/pc . . 93/71/pc Lansing . . . . . . . .68/41/0.00 . 70/47/pc . . . .74/58/t Las Vegas . . . . . .80/70/0.00 . . .71/52/t . . 77/58/pc Lexington . . . . . .74/57/0.02 . 82/60/pc . . 84/64/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .87/59/0.00 . 90/65/pc . . 91/62/pc Little Rock. . . . . .83/61/0.00 . 88/69/pc . . 89/69/pc Los Angeles. . . . .65/59/0.00 . 62/54/pc . . . 66/54/s Louisville . . . . . . .80/59/0.15 . 84/64/pc . . 88/68/pc Memphis. . . . . . .86/65/0.00 . 89/71/pc . . 91/71/pc Miami . . . . . . . . .91/75/0.00 . 87/73/pc . . 88/75/pc Milwaukee . . . . .57/39/0.00 . . .59/48/c . . 61/53/pc Minneapolis . . . .65/53/0.18 . . .64/57/t . . . .78/59/t Nashville . . . . . . .86/58/0.00 . 88/67/pc . . 90/67/pc New Orleans. . . .88/70/0.00 . 87/70/pc . . 88/71/pc New York . . . . . .74/52/0.00 . 73/51/pc . . 70/50/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .73/50/0.00 . 72/49/pc . . 70/49/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .69/58/0.01 . 72/55/pc . . 71/56/pc Oklahoma City . .94/65/0.00 . . .93/72/s . . 92/68/pc Omaha . . . . . . . .86/58/0.00 . 87/66/pc . . 91/62/pc Orlando. . . . . . . .90/57/0.00 . 92/71/pc . . 93/72/pc Palm Springs. . . .83/63/0.00 . . .69/53/s . . . 76/55/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .74/48/0.00 . . .80/63/t . . 86/66/pc Philadelphia . . . .74/50/0.00 . 73/51/pc . . 71/50/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .95/69/0.00 . 80/59/pc . . 81/59/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .69/50/0.00 . 73/49/pc . . 76/56/pc Portland, ME. . . .61/45/0.00 . .62/44/sh . . 57/44/pc Providence . . . . .67/50/0.00 . .66/44/sh . . 60/47/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . .71/56/0.12 . 81/56/pc . . 79/58/pc

Yesterday Monday Tuesday Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .76/46/0.00 . . .67/47/t . . 60/39/sh Savannah . . . . . .83/58/0.00 . 85/66/pc . . . .85/66/t Reno . . . . . . . . . 62/48/trace . .51/37/sh . . 63/40/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .58/44/0.02 . 60/48/pc . . . 60/49/c Richmond . . . . . .73/57/0.00 . 77/51/pc . . 75/54/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . .79/54/0.66 . . .75/60/c . . 82/53/pc Rochester, NY . . .60/44/0.00 . 64/42/pc . . 66/49/pc Spokane . . . . . . .53/37/0.00 . .66/41/sh . . 70/42/pc Sacramento. . . . 67/50/trace . 73/50/pc . . 80/52/pc Springfield, MO. .85/59/0.00 . 88/66/pc . . . 89/67/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .81/60/0.00 . 88/70/pc . . 94/69/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .86/61/0.00 . 90/67/pc . . 92/68/pc Salt Lake City . . .66/46/0.27 . .52/39/sh . . . .53/42/t Tucson. . . . . . . . .93/61/0.00 . 83/56/pc . . . 80/55/s San Antonio . . . .97/73/0.00 . 93/71/pc . . 92/72/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .85/68/0.00 . 92/73/pc . . 91/71/pc San Diego . . . . . 66/61/trace . . .62/52/s . . . 67/53/s Washington, DC .74/54/0.00 . 74/52/pc . . 74/52/pc San Francisco . . .61/51/0.00 . 62/48/pc . . 66/48/pc Wichita . . . . . . . .94/67/0.00 . 96/68/pc . . 93/67/pc San Jose . . . . . . .62/52/0.00 . 67/48/pc . . 72/49/pc Yakima . . . . . . . 62/31/trace . 69/41/pc . . . 75/48/s Santa Fe . . . . . . .81/38/0.00 . . .73/36/s . . 65/27/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .92/63/0.00 . . .80/54/s . . . 83/56/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .79/57/0.00 . .64/52/sh . . 70/46/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .71/52/0.00 . . .70/55/s . . 66/54/pc Auckland. . . . . . .66/54/0.00 . . .66/58/s . . 65/57/pc Baghdad . . . . . . .93/70/0.00 . . .93/74/s . . 96/73/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . . .90/80/t . . . .92/79/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .72/54/0.00 . .78/59/sh . . 79/55/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .72/63/0.00 . 79/65/pc . . . 78/63/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .72/43/0.00 . 73/46/pc . . 79/52/pc Bogota . . . . . . . .66/52/0.00 . .70/54/sh . . 68/55/sh Budapest. . . . . . .57/43/0.00 . . .70/46/s . . 73/48/pc Buenos Aires. . . .61/48/0.00 . . .74/48/s . . . 71/52/s Cabo San Lucas .97/68/0.00 . . .94/69/s . . 90/67/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . .79/61/0.00 . . .85/68/s . . . 86/66/s Calgary . . . . . . . .50/39/0.00 . 55/34/pc . . . 60/35/s Cancun . . . . . . . .86/64/0.00 . 89/75/pc . . 87/74/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .59/52/0.00 . .61/47/sh . . 60/46/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .63/48/0.00 . . .63/52/t . . 61/48/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .79/55/0.00 . 79/52/pc . . . .72/50/t Harare . . . . . . . . .77/55/0.00 . . .73/52/s . . . 74/51/s Hong Kong . . . . .88/81/0.00 . . .84/78/t . . . .85/77/t Istanbul. . . . . . . .64/45/0.00 . 61/50/pc . . . 62/52/c Jerusalem . . . . . .75/52/0.01 . . .73/52/s . . . 72/51/s Johannesburg . . .68/46/0.00 . . .65/46/s . . . 64/45/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .75/64/0.00 . 71/63/pc . . . 72/62/s Lisbon . . . . . . . . .70/59/0.00 . . .78/59/s . . . 82/60/s London . . . . . . . .68/55/0.00 . 66/51/pc . . 70/48/sh Madrid . . . . . . . .70/46/0.00 . . .82/52/s . . . 81/54/s Manila. . . . . . . . .86/77/0.00 . . .86/77/t . . . .85/76/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .108/86/0.00 . .108/83/s . . 109/81/s Mexico City. . . . .88/57/0.00 . . .81/60/t . . . .85/59/t Montreal. . . . . . .61/48/0.00 . . .64/44/s . . 63/47/pc Moscow . . . . . . .68/48/0.00 . .61/43/sh . . 66/44/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . .77/61/sh . . . .76/62/t Nassau . . . . . . . .88/66/0.00 . 85/77/pc . . . .86/75/t New Delhi. . . . .100/77/0.00 . .106/81/s . . 107/82/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .79/66/0.00 . 77/64/pc . . . .72/63/r Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .68/39/0.00 . . .64/39/s . . 68/40/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .59/46/0.00 . . .66/43/s . . 65/47/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . .75/59/0.00 . . .77/55/s . . 76/52/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .84/70/0.00 . . .78/72/t . . 75/68/sh Rome. . . . . . . . . .68/46/0.00 . . .73/52/s . . . 79/55/s Santiago . . . . . . .73/30/0.00 . . .64/44/s . . . 62/43/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .81/59/0.00 . .70/62/sh . . . 67/61/c Sapporo. . . . . . . .52/45/0.00 . . .59/47/s . . 53/43/sh Seoul . . . . . . . . . .73/52/0.00 . . .65/59/r . . . .66/56/r Shanghai. . . . . . .90/72/0.00 . 84/71/pc . . . .86/68/t Singapore . . . . . .95/81/0.00 . . .94/79/t . . . .92/78/t Stockholm. . . . . .68/36/0.00 . 64/50/pc . . . 68/48/s Sydney. . . . . . . . .70/48/0.00 . .64/53/sh . . 65/54/sh Taipei. . . . . . . . . .91/75/0.00 . . .83/74/t . . . .84/73/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .73/61/0.00 . . .75/60/s . . . 76/59/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .75/59/0.00 . . .68/61/c . . . .75/60/r Toronto . . . . . . . .63/43/0.00 . . .62/46/s . . 58/45/pc Vancouver. . . . . .54/43/0.00 . 62/48/pc . . 61/49/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . .61/41/0.00 . . .68/48/s . . . 73/47/s Warsaw. . . . . . . .63/46/0.00 . . .72/50/s . . 70/43/pc

Old Mill Audiology Call 541-323-2858 to learn more.

642 NW Arizona Ave Bend, OR 97701 (541) 323-2858 Visit us on the web at www.oldmillaudiology.com


G

C

GREEN LIVING, TECHNOLOGY & SCIENCE IN OREGON

GREEN, ETC.

Inside

Just rumors “Harry Potter” star Emma Watson denies bullying ever occurred at Brown University, Page C3

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/greenetc

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MAY 9, 2011

“We’ve been doing green sustainable construction for years, passive-energy houses and off-grid houses for years. But when the recession hit, there wasn’t any work, so we had to switch gears and find something else to put food on the table.” — Andrew Kuperstein, owner of Spray Foam Insulation

Electricity monitor can help reduce use By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

When Glenn Willard installed a specialized electricity monitor in his house, he noticed that his photovoltaic solar panels weren’t producing power for significant chunks of time. “The inverter’s been shutting off, and I didn’t know that,” Willard, who lives in Tumalo, said. He also realized his boiler — which was marketed as an energy-efficient model — was using a lot more power than the manufacturer claimed, and appliances like his dishwasher were using power even when they weren’t running. “It’s really interesting,” he said. “It’s just surprising, things that you have in your house, you think they’re totally shut off but they’re not.” The power monitor he used is called the Fido Home Energy Monitoring System, made by EcoDog, a San Diego company. The monitor tracks electricity use from different circuits in the house and lets the homeowners know when something is amiss and how they could save money on power bills. It’s being distributed locally by EcoVentures NW, a Bend company that started last fall with the goal of giving people more control over their power use and monthly electric bills. Shawn Allen, founder of EcoVentures NW, said he and others involved in the company are builders and designers who had focused on energy-efficient buildings. They realized, however, that while they could build green houses, a lot depended on what people did once they moved in and how well systems in the homes actually functioned. “We were doing those (green) homes and those buildings. The one missing link was how was it really performing on the energy side,” Allen said. The Fido system has a relatively simple setup, he said, with a device slipped over each electrical line that comes out of a building’s circuit breaker box. It monitors the flow of electricity along each circuit, and through software can display the realtime power use information on a homeowner’s computer. “We can go in and look at our systems and, on a computer screen, be able to see exactly what each circuit is consuming,” he said. It can also be set up to send texts or e-mails to homeowners, notifying them if there is an unusual amount of electricity being used in one area or another. See Monitor / C8

TECH FOCUS

Submitted Photo

Teal Tanney, right, and Justin Goodman of Spray Foam Insulation install foam insulation April 22 as an Earth Day donation at the Melanie Grace family’s home in Northeast Bend.

A new focus Local businessman turns to energy-efficient spray-foam insulation to stay afloat By Ed Merriman • The Bulletin

W

hen Central Oregon’s housing market crashed in 2007, Andrew Kuperstein laid off eight workers from his Bend-based Alternative Construction Concepts business. But in the wake of the recession, Kuperstein switched gears and founded a subsidiary called Spray Foam Insulation. “We’ve been doing green sustainable construction for years, passive-energy houses and off-grid houses for years,” Kuperstein said. “But when the recession hit, there wasn’t any work, so we had to switch gears and find something else to put food on the table.” When business dropped off, Kuperstein said his construction company went from around 10 employees down to just him and his wife, Amy, who worked as a design consultant prior to the recession. Now she keeps the books, answers the phones and helps customers fill out forms for federal energy tax credits and cash incentives available through the Energy Trust of Oregon for energy-efficiency improvements. See Insulation / C8

GREEN

Ed Merriman / The Bulletin

Andrew and Amy Kuperstein, owners of Spray Foam Insulation in Bend, and their daughters Sadie, 5, and Coral, 16 months. The Kupersteins said switching from building homes to installing green spray-foam insulation in 2007 helped them survive the crash of Central Oregon’s housing market.

On the Web For more information about the cash incentives or contractors certified through the Energy Trust of Oregon, visit www.energytrust.org.

Palm Springs Calif.

Pacific Ocean

Salton Trough E AT PL IC CIF PA

San Diego

Ensenada 50 miles 50 km

Source: ESRI

© 2011 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

San Andreas fault

E AT PL AN RIC ME HA RT NO

Los Angeles

Az.

Salton Sea

Imperial fault

Researchers look inside San Andreas fault By Thomas Curwen Los Angeles Times

SALTON SEA, Calif. — Three days after the earthquake and tsunami devastated northeastern Japan on March 11, Gary Fuis walked across the San Andreas fault under a moonlit sky. The desert was quiet. A breeze fanned through the creosote. To the west, he could see the Salton Sea, and to the east, the headlamps of the night crew taking up their positions. In a little more than an hour, they would start detonating their explosives, generating seismic waves that would be recorded by seismometers buried throughout these sandy

hills and positioned on the floor of the Salton Sea. A geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey, Fuis is overseeing an ambitious project to create an underground image of one of the most seismically active and geologically complex regions of the country, a triangle of land extending from Palm Springs to the Mexico border. This work, he believes, will change current assumptions about the earthquakes that originate here, especially the Big One expected on the San Andreas fault. For nearly three weeks, his teams have worked night and day to cover hundreds of miles and position thou-

SCIENCE

Mexico

Cerro Prieto fault

Gulf of California Khang Nguyen / Los Angeles Times

Submitted photo

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sands of instruments. Fuis, 67, sat on the top of a ridge and took out his dinner, a ham and jalapeño sandwich. From here, he would be able to stay in touch with the crew by two-way radio and cellphone in case any problems or confusion arose during the night. A voice broke over the radio. “Train south.” A freight speeding along the shore of the lake would interfere with the readings from the detonations, and they’d have to wait until it passed. Fuis looked south toward Bombay Beach, a community of small homes and double-wide trailers on the edge of the Salton Sea. See San Andreas / C6


T EL EV ISION

C2 Monday, May 9, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Husband who kisses and tells upsets wife Dear Abby: My husband, “Derek,” confessed to me that while he was out with friends on a workrelated trip, he drank too much and danced with and kissed another woman. He didn’t tell me right away. He planned to tell me sometime in the future, but his conscience bothered him, so he told me five days later. I’m at a loss as to what to do. We have a small child. Derek is a good man, but he has violated my trust. I can’t forget and I don’t know if I can forgive. We’ve had our ups and downs, and the past year has been particularly stressful. When he returned from the trip, he was the perfect husband — loving, attentive, devoted — exactly what I had been missing. To find out that what was behind this change in his behavior was guilt is devastating. I’m not sure I want to be with him anymore. Am I overreacting? — Thrown in Maryland Dear Thrown: Yes — but that doesn’t mean you should ignore what happened. Before you throw away what could be a perfectly good marriage, it’s important you and Derek work through what caused those “ups and downs” that led to what was missing in your relationship. A marriage counselor could be very helpful right now. If Derek didn’t love you and want to make things right, he wouldn’t have told you about what he did. For that, I respect him, and so should you. Dear Abby: My husband and I are recently retired. We’ve happily settled into a morning routine of breakfast, reading the paper and exercising. Some days we don’t bother to shower and dress until late morning. A friend, “Herb,” who is also retired, frequently drops by unannounced between 8 a.m. and noon. You’d think that after catching me still in my robe and my husband in sweaty workout clothes, Herb would get the mes-

DEAR ABBY sage that it’s not convenient to visit, but he continues. I see no way of stopping this short of being blunt, but I don’t want to hurt his feelings. My question is, what’s the etiquette regarding calling ahead to let someone know you would like to stop by? — Frustrated in Birmingham, Ala. Dear Frustrated: There is nothing hurtful or rude about telling someone who drops by when you’re not presentable that you’re embarrassed to be “caught” that way, and to please call before coming over to ask if it’s convenient. Dear Abby: My daughter “Celia” is 32 and single. She’s beautiful, intelligent, hardworking and a great cook — but she can’t keep a boyfriend! Celia has dated a lot of men and has no problem attracting them, but she does have a problem keeping them. After a few dates, they don’t want to go out with her anymore. I don’t know why. Have you any ideas? — Concerned about My Girl in Kentucky Dear Concerned: Is Celia as anxious about her single status as you are? If so, few things chase a man off faster than a woman who’s looking for a commitment too quickly. However, having never met or spoken with your daughter, I can’t say what may be causing the men in her life to head for the door. Perhaps she should ask some of her friends for some honest feedback. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Ownership of TV sets falls in U.S. By Brian Stelter New York Times News Service

For the first time in nearly 20 years, the number of homes in the United States with television sets has dropped. The Nielsen Co., which takes TV set ownership into account when it produces ratings, will tell television networks and advertisers on Tuesday that 96.7 percent of American households now own sets, down from 98.9 percent previously. There are two reasons for the decline, according to Nielsen. One is poverty: Some low-income households no longer own TV sets, most likely because they cannot afford new digital sets and antennas. The other is technological wizardry: Young people who have grown up with laptops in their hands instead of remote controls are opting not to buy TV sets when they graduate from college or enter the workforce, at least not at first. Instead, they are subsisting on a diet of television shows and movies from the Internet. That second reason is prompting Nielsen to think about a redefinition of the term “television household” to include Internet video viewers. “We’ve been having conversations with clients,” said Pat McDonough, the senior vice president for insights and analysis at Nielsen. “That would be a big change for this industry, and we’d be doing it in consultation with clients if we do it.” Nielsen’s household figures suggest that while the TV set is still firmly at the center of the average American’s media life, a small minority of Americans are finding ways to live without it. The “persistently rocky economy” is “the driving factor,” the company says in the report to be

Illustration by New York Times News Service

The decline in television sets in American homes may in part be the result of new technology that exists to view Internet videos on computers. released Tuesday. Similarly, the economy was the reason cited by Nielsen when the percentage of homes with sets declined in 1992. That decline, the company’s report says, “also followed a prolonged recession and was reversed during the economic upswing of the mid-1990s.” If the current decline persists, it will have profound implications for the networks, studios and distributors that are wedded, at least in part, to the current television ecosystem. Nielsen’s estimates incorporate the results of the 2010 census as well as the behavior of the approximately 50,000 Americans in the national sample that the company relies upon to make ratings projections. “One thing we are seeing in the Nielsen sample are fewer people

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owning TVs,” McDonough said. It was first evident in the sample in late 2008, she said, during the worst of the financial crisis and the recession. Nielsen’s research into these newly TV-less households indicates that they generally have incomes under $20,000. “They are people at the bottom of the economic spectrum for whom,

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if the TV breaks, if the antenna blows off the roof, they have to think long and hard about what to do,” McDonough said. Most of these households do not have Internet access either. Many live in rural areas. The transition to digital broadcasting from analog in 2009 aggravated the hardship for some of these households. Some could not afford to upgrade, Nielsen surmised, though the government tried to provide subsidies in those situations. Then there are the tech-savvy Americans who once lived in a household with a television, but no longer do. These are either cord-cutters — a term that refers to people who stop paying for cable television — or people who never signed on for cable. McDonough suggested these were younger Americans who were moving into new residences and deciding not to buy a TV for themselves, especially if they “don’t have the financial means to get one immediately.” Nielsen has not yet assessed what proportion of the decline can be attributed to this behavior. But the decline in the percentage of homes with sets is sure to kick off another round of speculation about cord-cutting.

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BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW # KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 173 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

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5:30

KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News The Nate Berkus Show (N) ‘PG’ America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! With Ruff News Nightly News King of Queens King of Queens Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Caprial-John Burt Wolf Steves Europe

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KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News News (N) ABC World News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ‘PG’ The Office ’ ‘14’ This Old House Nightly Business News News That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Steves Europe Travelscope ‘G’ This Old House Nightly Business

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Garden Smart ‘G’ This Old House PBS NewsHour ’ Å

8:00

8:30

Dancing With the Stars ’ ‘PG’ Å Chuck (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å How I Met Mad Love ‘PG’ Dancing With the Stars (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å House The Fix (N) ’ (PA) ‘14’ Å News on PDX-TV Antiques Roadshow Biloxi (N) ‘G’ Chuck (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å 90210 (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Hometime ‘G’ Around-House Antiques Roadshow Biloxi (N) ‘G’

9:00

9:30

The Event (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Two/Half Men Mike & Molly ‘14’ The Chicago Code Black Sox ‘14’ Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ American Experience ’ ‘PG’ The Event (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Gossip Girl Shattered Bass (N) ‘14’ Martha-Sewing 1 Stroke Paint American Experience ’ ‘PG’

10:00

10:30

11:00

(10:01) Castle Pretty Dead (N) ‘PG’ KATU News at 11 Law & Order: LA (N) ’ ‘14’ Å News Hawaii Five-0 (N) ’ ‘14’ Å News (10:01) Castle Pretty Dead (N) ‘PG’ News (N) News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ King of Queens American Experience Freedom songs. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Law & Order: LA (N) ’ ‘14’ Å News House of Payne Meet the Browns Roseanne ‘PG’ Simply Ming ‘G’ Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ American Experience Freedom songs. (N) ’ ‘PG’

11:30 (11:35) Nightline Jay Leno Letterman (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens Jazz Cabaret ‘G’ Jay Leno Roseanne ‘PG’ Caprial-John Jazz Cabaret ‘G’

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Criminal Minds ’ ‘PG’ Å Criminal Minds Compulsion ’ ‘PG’ Criminal Minds Doubt ’ ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds ’ ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds Scared to Death ‘PG’ Criminal Minds ’ ‘14’ Å 130 28 18 32 Criminal Minds ’ ‘14’ Å ›› “Batman Returns” (1992, Action) Michael Keaton, Danny DeVito, Michelle Pfeiffer. The Catwoman and the Penguin join forces ››› “Rocky III” (1982, Drama) Sylvester Stallone, Mr. T, Talia Shire. A merciless contender forces Rocky ››› “Rocky III” (1982) Sylvester Stallone. A merciless con102 40 39 against Batman. Å into a title match. Å tender forces Rocky into a title match. Å Whale Wars ’ ‘14’ Å Your Worst Animal Nightmares ‘14’ Your Worst Animal Nightmares ‘14’ River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘14’ Your Worst Animal Nightmares ‘14’ 68 50 26 38 I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å Bethenny Ever After Bethenny Ever After ‘14’ Bethenny Ever After ‘14’ Bethenny Ever After Housewives/OC Bethenny Ever After (N) ‘14’ Pregnant in Heels ‘14’ 137 44 Teen Mom Not Again ’ ‘PG’ Å Teen Mom ’ ‘PG’ Å Teen Mom Valentine’s Day ’ ‘PG’ Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Widow’s home is made over. ‘PG’ Å Trick My Truck Trick My Truck 190 32 42 53 World’s Strictest Parents ‘14’ Å Biography on CNBC Home Depot Biography on CNBC Mad Money Biography on CNBC Home Depot Biography on CNBC Ck 3x Faster Profit-Town 51 36 40 52 Divorce Wars Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 In the Arena (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å › “Scary Movie 2” (2001, Comedy) Shawn Wayans, Marlon Wayans. Å Always Sunny Always Sunny Always Sunny Always Sunny Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 South Park ‘MA’ Journal Joy of Fishing PM Edition Visions of NW Talk of the Town Bend’s GO Bond Cooking Journal Desert Word Travels ’ Talk of the Town Local issues. Ride Guide ‘14’ HS Baseball 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 12 11 Tonight From Washington Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb › “College Road Trip” (2008) Martin Lawrence. Suite/Deck Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb Good-Charlie Good-Charlie 87 43 14 39 Shake It Up! ‘G’ FBI’s 10 Most Wanted ‘PG’ Å American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. Unleashed: K9 Unleashed: K9 American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. 156 21 16 37 FBI’s 10 Most Wanted ‘PG’ Å Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å Baseball Tonight NFL Live (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 (4:00) MLB Baseball Minnesota Twins at Boston Red Sox (N) (Live) Å Strongest Man Strongest Man Strongest Man Strongest Man Strongest Man Strongest Man SportsNation Å Football Live NBA Tonight (N) NASCAR Now Å 22 24 21 24 E:60 PBA Bowling AWA Wrestling Å College Basketball Quarterfinal. From March 11, 2011. (N) 23 25 123 25 College Football From Nov. 6, 2010. (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Still Standing ’ Still Standing ’ Secret Life of American Teen Secret Life of American Teen Make It or Break It (N) ‘14’ Å Secret Life of American Teen The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Å Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å 5 Ingredient Fix Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Iron Chef America Unwrapped Candy Store Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Meat- Potatoes Best Thing Ate Have Cake- Tr. Good Eats 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa (4:30) ›› “The Day the Earth Stood Still” (2008) Keanu Reeves. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ›› “The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor” (2008, Adventure) Brendan Fraser, Jet Li, Maria Bello. “Mummy: Dragon Emp.” 131 Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Property Virgins Property Virgins House Hunters Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l My First Place My First Place 176 49 33 43 Hunters Int’l Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Restoration Restoration Modern Marvels Bathroom Tech ‘G’ Restoration Restoration American Pickers Keep Out! ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ How the States Got Their Shapes 155 42 41 36 Pawn Stars ‘PG’ “Seventeen and Missing” (2007, Drama) Deedee Pfeiffer. ‘14’ Å “Justice for Natalee Holloway” (2011) Tracy Pollan. Premiere. ‘14’ Å Vanished With Beth Holloway ‘PG’ How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘PG’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Ed Show (N) The Last Word The Rachel Maddow Show The Ed Show Hardball With Chris Matthews Å 56 59 128 51 The Last Word RJ Berger That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Silent Library (N) Silent Library ’ True Life ’ True Life Tourette’s Syndrome. ’ RJ Berger Fantasy Factory RJ Berger Fantasy Factory 192 22 38 57 The Seven ‘PG’ SpongeBob iCarly iNevel ‘G’ iCarly iFence ‘G’ BrainSurge ‘G’ SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob World Poker Tour: Season 9 World Poker Tour: Season 9 Tennis Outback Champions Series: Arizona Action Sports World Tour The Dan Patrick Show (N) The Final Score 20 45 28* 26 Action Sports World Tour Jail ’ ‘14’ Å Jail ’ ‘14’ Å Jail ’ ‘14’ Å Jail (N) ‘14’ Å Jail (N) ‘14’ Å Jail (N) ‘14’ Å Jail (N) ‘14’ Å ›› “Bulletproof Monk” (2003, Action) Chow Yun-Fat, Seann William Scott, Jaime King. ’ Ways to Die 132 31 34 46 Jail ’ ‘14’ Å Star Trek: The Next Generation ‘PG’ Star Trek: The Next Generation ‘PG’ Stargate Universe Blockade Å Stargate Universe Gauntlet (N) Å Sanctuary Wingman (N) ’ Å Stargate Universe Gauntlet ’ Å 133 35 133 45 Stargate Universe Blockade Å Behind Scenes Mark Chironna J. Franklin Jesse Duplantis Praise the Lord Å Joel Osteen ‘PG’ Perry Stone ‘G’ Jack Van Impe Changing-World Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 Friends ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Conan (N) 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ ›››› “Lawrence of Arabia” (1962, Adventure) Peter O’Toole, Alec Guinness, Anthony Quinn. A controversial British officer unites Arab tribes against the Turks. Å ››› “The Killing Fields” (1984, Docudrama) Sam Waterston, Haing S. Ngor, John Malkovich. U.S. newsman ›› “Serenade” 101 44 101 29 loses Cambodian friend in 1975 fall of Phnom Penh. (1956, Musical) Fabulous Cakes ’ ‘G’ Å Fabulous Cakes ’ ‘G’ Å Extreme Coupon Extreme Coupon Fabulous Cakes Las Vegas. (N) ‘G’ Quints-Surprise Quints-Surprise Extreme Coupon Extreme Coupon 178 34 32 34 Fabulous Cakes Los Angeles ’ ‘G’ NBA Basketball Oklahoma City Thunder at Memphis Grizzlies (N) (Live) Å Inside the NBA (N) (Live) Å Law & Order ’ ‘14’ Å (DVS) Law & Order City Hall ’ ‘14’ 17 26 15 27 (4:00) NBA Basketball Miami Heat at Boston Celtics (N) MAD ‘PG’ Looney Tunes Codename: Kids Codename: Kids Johnny Test ‘Y7’ World of Gumball Adventure Time MAD (N) ‘PG’ King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Sanford & Son Sanford and Son All in the Family All in the Family › “Money Train” (1995, Action) Wesley Snipes, Woody Harrelson, Jennifer Lopez. The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons NCIS About Face ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS Agent Afloat ’ ‘14’ Å WWE Tough Enough (N) ’ Å WWE Monday Night RAW ’ Å (11:05) WWE Tough Enough Å 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Audrina ’ ‘PG’ Saddle Ranch ’ Mob Wives ’ ‘14’ Å Beverly Hills Behind the Music Nelly ‘PG’ Å Behind the Music Usher ‘PG’ Å Wedding Wars (N) ’ ‘PG’ 191 48 37 54 (4:30) 40 Funniest Fails ’ ‘PG’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:50) ›› “Child’s Play 2” 1990 Alex Vincent. ‘R’ Å (6:20) ››› “The Breakfast Club” 1985 ‘R’ Å ›› “Year One” 2009 Jack Black. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (9:40) ›› “Marked for Death” 1990 Steven Seagal. (11:15) ››› “Jackie Brown” 1997 ››› “The Fly” 1958, Science Fiction Al Hedison. ‘NR’ Å ›› “Vault of Horror” 1973, Horror Anna Massey. ‘PG’ ›› “Emperor of the North” 1973 Lee Marvin. ‘PG’ ››› “The Fly” 1958, Science Fiction Al Hedison. ‘NR’ Å Nike 6.0 HB BMX Pro The Daily Habit Insane Cinema ‘PG’ Bubba’s World Insane Cinema The Daily Habit The Daily Habit The Daily Habit Check 1, 2 ‘PG’ Stupidface ‘MA’ Amer. Misfits The Daily Habit Top 10 Frank Chirkinian World of Golf World Golf Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony (N) Learning Center World of Golf World Golf Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony Learning Center The Waltons The First Edition ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ The Golden Girls The Golden Girls “Night-Smithsonian” (5:45) ›› “Shallow Hal” 2001 Gwyneth Paltrow, Jack Black. A superficial man now Max Kellerman Real Time With Bill Maher Educator “Cinema Verite” 2011 Diane Lane. TV cameras follow the per- Too Big to Fail: Talking Funny ’ ‘MA’ Å HBO 425 501 425 10 sees only the inner beauty of a very fat woman. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Face Off Michael Eric Dyson. ’ ‘MA’ Å sonal lives of a couple in the 1970s. ‘NR’ Å Opening (5:05) ›››› “Pulp Fiction” 1994, Crime Drama John Travolta. Criminals cross paths in three interlocked tales of mayhem. ‘R’ ››› “Blood and Wine” 1996, Suspense Jack Nicholson. ‘R’ (10:45) ›› “Cursed” 2005 Christina Ricci. ‘PG-13’ IFC 105 105 (4:20) ›› “Old School” 2003, Comedy ›› “The Lovely Bones” 2009, Drama Mark Wahlberg, Rachel Weisz. A young murder (8:15) ›› “Land of the Dead” 2005, Horror Simon Baker, John Leguizamo. Flesh-eat- ›› “The Losers” 2010 Jeffrey Dean Morgan. Elite commandos Co-Ed ConfidenMAX 400 508 7 Luke Wilson. ’ ‘R’ Å tial 2 victim watches over her family from heaven. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ing zombies threaten a fortified city. ’ ‘R’ Å hunt the man who betrayed them. ‘PG-13’ Humanly Impossible: The GlassTaboo Beauty ‘14’ Taboo Addiction (N) ‘14’ Humanly Impossible: The GlassTaboo Beauty ‘14’ Taboo Addiction ‘14’ Alaska-Trooper Alaska-Trooper NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents Fanboy-Chum The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ CatDog ‘G’ Å CatDog ‘G’ Å NTOON 89 115 189 Destination Pol. Top Truck Chal Fisher’s ATV Fear No Evil Whitetail Nation Young Blood Hunt Adventure Best of West Off Rd. Overhaul Fisher’s ATV Destination Pol. Top Truck Chal Off Rd. Overhaul Western Extreme OUTD 37 307 43 The Borgias The invasion of France pro- Nurse Jackie (N) ’ United States of Nurse Jackie ’ (4:00) ››› “Two Lovers” 2008 Joaquin ›› “Remember Me” 2010, Romance Robert Pattinson. iTV. Love begins to heal the Weeds Boomerang The Big C BlueUnited States of SHO 500 500 ceeds. ’ ‘MA’ Å Phoenix. iTV. ’ ‘R’ Å troubled spirit of a rebellious young man. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ‘MA’ Å Eyed Iris ’ ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Å Tara (N) ’ ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Å Tara ‘MA’ Å The 10 ‘PG’ The 10 ‘PG’ Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Car Warriors Best of CW ’ Å The 10 ‘PG’ The 10 ‘PG’ Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Car Warriors Best of CW ’ Å NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 Julie & Julia 2009 (5:40) ›› “Reign of Fire” 2002, Fantasy Christian Bale. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (7:25) ›› “Daddy Day Care” 2003 Eddie Murphy. ‘PG’ ›› “Alice in Wonderland” 2010, Fantasy Johnny Depp. ’ ‘PG’ Å ››› “Julie & Julia” 2009 ‘PG-13’ STARZ 300 408 300 (4:00) ›› “Twilight” 2008, Romance Kris- (6:05) ›› “The Boys Are Back” 2009, Comedy-Drama Clive Owen. A grieving wid››› “A Single Man” 2009, Drama Colin Firth, Julianne Moore, Nicholas Hoult. A gay ›› “The Killer Inside Me” 2010, Crime Drama Casey Affleck. A Texas lawman’s homiTMC 525 525 ten Stewart. ’ ‘PG-13’ ower struggles to raise his two sons alone. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å man contemplates suicide after his lover’s death. ’ ‘R’ Å cidal tendencies rise to the surface. ’ ‘R’ Å (4:00) NHL Hockey Conference Semifinal: Teams TBA Hockey Central Adv. Sports Adv. Sports World Extreme Cagefighting World Extreme Cagefighting VS. 27 58 30 The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å The Locator ‘G’ The Locator ‘G’ WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 9, 2011 C3

CALENDAR TODAY CENTRAL OREGON SHOWCASE CHORUS: The parent chorus for Harmony for Women performs; donations accepted; 8 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-447-4756.

TUESDAY WOLVES IN OREGON!: Carter Niemeyer talks about wolves and his career as a wolf trapper; free; 7 p.m., 6:30 p.m. social; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-389-0785. PIGEON JOHN: The underground hiphop act performs, with Chicharones, Driftwood Insomnia and Your Birthday; $10 plus fees in advance, $13 at the door; 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-6868 or madhappylounge@ gmail.com.

WEDNESDAY “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, CAPRICCIO”: Starring Renee Fleming in an encore presentation of Strauss’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-3826347. MOVIE NIGHT AND POTLUCK: A screening of “Pressure Cooker,” with a spring potluck; free; 6:30 p.m.; Grandview Hall, Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; slowfoodhighdesert@gmail.com. CORNMEAL: The Chicago-based jam band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “DISTRACTED”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Lisa Loomer’s play about a boy with behavioral issues and his mother’s search for answers; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascadestheatrical. org.

THURSDAY “QUILTS — BEDDING TO BONNETS” EXHIBIT OPENS: New exhibit features the use of quilts from the 19th century through 1930; exhibit runs through July 24; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www .highdesertmuseum.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jean Nave reads her children’s book “Harry and Lola at the Sisters Rodeo”; free; 11:30 a.m.; A Joyful Noise Learning Center, 104 E. Adams St., Sisters; 541-5498755. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Strange Piece of Paradise” by Terri Jentz; bring a lunch; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: J.D. Kleinke reads from his book “Catching Babies”; free; 1 p.m.; Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 2690 E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-3187242 or www.catchingbabies.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: J.D. Kleinke reads from his book “Catching Babies”; free; 4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7412 or www.catchingbabies .com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Steven Adler talks about his book “My

Appetite for Destruction”; free; 5-7 p.m.; The Blacksmith Restaurant, 211 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-318-0588. CHAIR-IT-ABLE EVENT: Featuring music and entertainment, with an auction of hand-painted chairs; proceeds benefit St. Vincint de Paul’s Brown Bag Food Program in Prineville; free admission; 6-8 p.m.; Crook County High School, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-416-6900. ROCK CLIMBING SMITH ROCK STATE PARK: Alan Watts talks about climbing in the park, from the 1930s through the present; free; 6:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541312-1034 or www .deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. “ELENA UNDONE”: A screening of the unrated film about a married woman who has an affair; $10; 7-9:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837412 or www.elenaundone.com. CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY CHILDREN’S CONCERT: The Central Oregon Symphony performs a children’s concert of movie music, under the direction of Michael Gesme; preceded by an interactive session with musicians; free; 7 p.m., interactive session 6:15 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541317-3941, info@cosymphony.com or www.cosymphony.com. “DISTRACTED”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Lisa Loomer’s play about a boy with behavioral issues and his mother’s search for answers; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascadestheatrical .org. ADLER’S APPETITE: Featuring Steven Adler of Guns N’ Roses, with Willie Basse/Black Sheep and KleverKill; $10 plus fees in advance, $12 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7882989 or www.adlersappetiteonline .com.

FRIDAY PLANT SALE: The Redmond Garden Club hosts its annual plant sale of annuals, perennials, shrubs and vegetables; proceeds benefit community projects sponsored by the club; free admission; noon6 p.m.; 2614 S.W. Quartz Ave., Redmond; 541-548-3199. ART ON THE RIVER: Featuring art exhibits, sales and a reception; a portion of proceeds benefits the Redmond School District art programs; free; 5-8 p.m.; River Run Event Center, 1730 Blue Heron Drive, Redmond; 541-548-4244 or mhlkeldy@yahoo.com. “PRIDE AND PREJUDICE”: The Summit High School theater department presents an adaptation of Jane Austen’s tale of courtship and manners; $10, $7 students, seniors and children; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-322-3300 or https:touchbase .bend.k12.or.us. A NIGHT ON BROADWAY: Students present a song and dance revue from Broadway shows; $10; 7 p.m.; Trinity Lutheran Church & School, 2550 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend; 541382-1850, lorien.petersen@saints. org or www.saints.org. BALLROOM DANCE SHOWCASE: Featuring choreographed partner and group dances; $10 in advance, $20 at the door; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Dance With Travis, 1012 S.E. Cleveland Square Loop, Suite 1, Bend; 541-678-5592, info@ dancewithtravis.com or www .dancewithtravis.com. LITTLE OWLS: An evening of music, entertainment and dessert,

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

with an appearance by an owl; $20, $19 nature center members; 7-9 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4442. SISTERS SPRING CHORALE CONCERT: The Sisters Chorale performs Broadway, gospel and patriotic songs; followed by a reception; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; Sisters Community Church, 1300 W. McKenzie Highway; 541-549-1037, sisterschorale@ bendbroadband.com or www .sisterschorale.com. “DISTRACTED”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Lisa Loomer’s play about a boy with behavioral issues and his mother’s search for answers; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascadestheatrical .org. “MARTY”: A screening of the unrated 1955 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-4753351 or www.jcld .org. LAST BAND STANDING: A battle of the bands competition featuring local acts; tickets must be retrieved at participating venues; free; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; http://url.bb/LBS11. CICADA OMEGA: The Portlandbased trance-blues band performs; $6; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .silvermoonbrewing.com. MORE BARS IN MORE PLACES TOUR 2: Hip-hop show featuring Aplus, Opio, Knobody and more; $10 plus fees in advance, $14 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www .bendticket.com.

SATURDAY “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: DIE WALKURE”: Starring Bryn Terfel, Deborah Voigt, Jonas Kaufmann, Eva-Maria Westbroek and Stephanie Blythe in a presentation of Wagner’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 9 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. BEND GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY SPRING SEMINAR: Henry Jones Jr. presents four seminars on genealogy; with breakfast and lunch; registration required; $60-$85; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-317-8978 or541-317-9553 or www.orgenweb.org/ deschutes/bend-gs. PLANT SALE: The Redmond Garden Club hosts its annual plant sale of annuals, perennials, shrubs and vegetables; proceeds benefit community projects sponsored by the club; free admission; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 2614 S.W. Quartz Ave., Redmond; 541-5483199. PORSCHE CAR SHOW: The Porsche Club of America presents a show of Porsche cars; free; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Brookswood Meadow Plaza, 19530 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; www .highdesertpca.org. NATIVE THUNDER SHOW & SHINE AND POKER RUN: A motorcycle show featuring all makes and models, with a 110 mile poker run; registration required; proceeds benefit the Warm Springs Boys & Girls Club; free; 9:30 a.m.; Kah-NeeTa High Desert Resort & Casino, 100 Main St., Warm Springs; 541-4754293 or nwcycleonline@gmail.com. ART ON THE RIVER: Featuring art exhibits and sales; a portion of proceeds benefits the Redmond School District art programs;

free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; River Run Event Center, 1730 Blue Heron Drive, Redmond; 541-548-4244 or mhlkeldy@yahoo.com. MOTHERS APPRECIATION POKER RUN: Motorcycles and any other vehicles welcome in a poker run, with contests for beer bellies, bestlooking moms and more; proceeds benefit Central Oregon Veterans Outreach; $10 per hand, $15 for two hands; 10 a.m.; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-350-3802. WRITE NOW!: Brainstorm, play word games and more in a casual setting, to help creative writing; free; 1 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541312-1081 or www.deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. “PRIDE AND PREJUDICE”: The Summit High School theater department presents an adaptation of Jane Austen’s tale of courtship and manners; $10, $7 students, seniors and children; 2 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-322-3300 or https:touchbase .bend.k12.or.us. A NIGHT ON BROADWAY: Students present a song and dance revue from Broadway shows; $10; 2 p.m.; Trinity Lutheran Church & School, 2550 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend; 541-382-1850, lorien.petersen@saints.org or www .saints.org. SISTERS SPRING CHORALE CONCERT: The Sisters Chorale performs Broadway, gospel and patriotic songs; followed by a reception; donations accepted; 2 p.m.; Sisters Community Church, 1300 W. McKenzie Highway; 541-549-1037, sisterschorale@ bendbroadband.com or www .sisterschorale.com. AUCTION AND SPRING ROUNDUP: A silent auction, with food, music and dancing; registration required; proceeds benefit Three Rivers PTA; $20; 6-10 p.m.; Thousand Trails, 17480 S. Century Drive, Sunriver; 541-419-6355, threeriverspta@gmail. com or www.threeriverspta.org. SPRING GOSPEL CONCERT: A nondenominational gospel concert; free; 7 p.m.; First Baptist Church of Prineville, 450 S.E. Fairview St.; 541-233-8878. “DISTRACTED”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Lisa Loomer’s play about a boy with behavioral issues and his mother’s search for answers; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascadestheatrical .org. CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY SPRING CONCERT: The Central Oregon Symphony performs a pops concert, under the direction of Michael Gesme; featuring vocalist Michelle Van Handel; free but a ticket is required; 7:30 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541317-3941, info@cosymphony.com or www.cosymphony.com. MUMBO GUMBO: The genrebending California-based band performs; $22 or $26; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www .towertheatre.org. BLUSH: Cocktail party with live entertainment and hors d’oeuvres; followed by a dance party; registration requested for cocktails; proceeds benefit Planned Parenthood; $25, $10 for dance party only; 8 p.m., 10:30 p.m. dance party; Cafe Sintra, 1024 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-848-5930 or www .bendticket.com. TYLER FORTIER: The Eugenebased Americana artist performs; $7; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .silvermoonbrewing.com.

M T For Monday, May 9

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

ATLAS SHRUGGED (PG13) 2:25, 5, 7:35 THE CONSPIRATOR (PG13) 2, 4:35, 7:10 JANE EYRE (PG-13) 2:05, 4:40, 7:15 SOUL SURFER (PG) 2:20, 4:55, 7:30 WATER FOR ELEPHANTS (PG-13) 2:10, 4:45, 7:20 WIN WIN (R) 2:15, 4:50, 7:25

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

AFRICAN CATS (G) 1:15, 3:55, 6:15, 9:10 DYLAN DOG: DEAD OF NIGHT (PG-13) 9:30 FAST FIVE (DP — PG-13) 1:25, 4:35, 7:30, 10:25

FAST FIVE (PG-13) 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 9:40 HANNA (PG-13) 12:10, 3:10, 6:20, 9:45 HOODWINKED TOO! HOOD VS. EVIL (PG) 12:05 HOODWINKED TOO! HOOD VS. EVIL (3-D —PG) 3:05, 6 HOP (PG) 12:25, 4:15 JUMPING THE BROOM (PG13) 12:55, 3:35, 6:50, 9:35 LIMITLESS (PG-13) 1:55, 4:55, 8, 10:30 PROM (PG) 1:35, 4:25, 7 RIO (G) Noon, 3, 6:05, 9:05 SCREAM 4 (R) 10:20 SOMETHING BORROWED (PG-13) 2, 4:40, 7:20, 10 SOUL SURFER (PG) 1:40, 4:50, 7:40, 10:10 THOR (PG-13) 12:20, 3:20, 6:30, 9:15 THOR (3-D — PG-13) 1:05, 1:50, 4:05, 5, 7:10, 7:50, 9:55, 10:35 WATER FOR ELEPHANTS (PG13) 12:35, 3:25, 6:35, 9:20 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold

are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies. EDITOR’S NOTE: Digitally projected shows (marked as DP) use one of several different technologies to provide maximum fidelity. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter.

HOODWINKED TOO! HOOD VS. EVIL (PG) 4:30 PROM (PG) 7:15 RIO (G) 4:45, 7 THOR (PG-13) 3:30, 6:30

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU (PG-13) 6 PAUL (R) 9

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

FAST FIVE (PG-13) 3:45, 6:30

CONSPIRATOR (PG-13) 6:45 SOUL SURFER (PG) 7 THOR (PG-13) 6:30 WATER FOR ELEPHANTS (PG-13) 6:45

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

HANNA (Upstairs — PG-13) 6 THOR (PG-13) 4, 7 EDITOR’S NOTE: Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

The Associated Press

British actress Emma Watson, who plays Hermione in the “Harry Potter” film franchise, took a semester off from Brown University.

‘Harry Potter’ star says bullying not an issue at Brown By Ian MacDougall

rent and recent Brown students interviewed by The Associated PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Emma Press. Watson, the British actress who But, they said, it was viewed as plays Hermione Granger in the part of Brown folklore, and stu“Harry Potter” series, on Friday dents were, if anything, protecdenied reports that she was bul- tive of Watson. lied out of Brown University “We try to take care of our own — an assertion backed up by at Brown, and I think we try to fellow students who said that, if make sure she feels like anybody anything, she was shielded from else,” said Megan Estes, a Brown being singled out. junior who said she doesn’t know “The reason I took a semester Watson but worked on the prooff from Brown had nothing to duction of a campus theater prodo with bullying,” Watson wrote duction in which the “Harry Poton her website. “I have never ter” star acted. been bullied in my life and cerApart from the Gryffindor tainly never at Brown.” comment, there was little sense Watson said she is not sure on campus that Brown students what her plans are heckled or antagofor the fall semesnized Watson, said ter, the beginning “There was an Estes and other of her third year. awareness of students. Like many of her In class, students “fellow Brown stu- her, but in a were respectful of dents,” she wrote, protective way. Watson, said Bianca she is considering Dahl, a visiting proI can’t fathom studying abroad. fessor who teaches Brown has not that faculty or a course on global commented on humanitarian aid media reports this students would that Watson atmonth citing an allow bullying to tended briefly at the anonymous Brown start of the spring happen.” “insider” who 2010 semester. claimed Watson — Bianca Dahl, “There was an was bullied out of visiting professor at awareness of her, school. but in a protective Brown University A New York way,” Dahl said. Daily News article “I can’t fathom posted online April that faculty or stu21 claimed that when Watson re- dents would allow bullying to sponded correctly to questions in happen.” class, her classmates would shout, Some students went so far as to “Three points for Gryffindor!” approach Dahl to caution her that — a reference to the “Harry Pot- the actress was taking the course ter” films, in which students’ dor- after she made reference in lecmitory houses are awarded points tures to the “Harry Potter” books for questions they answer cor- and to a humanitarian fashion rectly. Watson’s character lives in line created by U2 singer Bono, Gryffindor. she said. Watson is involved with “This ‘10 points to Gryffindor’ a similar fashion line. incident never even happened,” Watson’s comments Friday wrote Watson, who has denied that come a week after Vanessa Darumor before. “Accusing Brown vies, her spokeswoman, told The students of something as serious Associated Press that the actress as bullying and this causing me to would transfer to another unileave seems beyond unfair.” versity in the fall because she The rumor that a student had “has decided to pursue a different once exclaimed “10 points for course which sadly Brown does Gryffindor” after Watson an- not offer.” swered a question correctly beStill, it’s “possible and likely came widespread on campus in she may return to Brown in her spring 2010, the semester during final year,” Davies told the AP. which it was alleged to have hapBrown declined to comment pened, according to several cur- on Watson’s plans. The Associated Press


C4 Monday, May 9, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 9, 2011 C5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO SATURDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY J A C Q U E L I N E BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, May 9, 2011: This year, you’ll have an opportunity to demonstrate your priorities. Family will always be close to your heart. You will open new doors, as you will be unusually fortunate later this year. Is there something you have wanted to do? This year might be the right time to manifest just that. You gain unusual insight into your background and a parent. If you are single, you will long for someone to nestle in with you. Just don’t jump into this arrangement because of your need for closeness. You want to have the right person, too. You will if you hold out. If you are attached, the two of you often can be found nestled in together. LEO sometimes presents another perspective. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH You are fiery and dynamic. The unexpected occurs out of the blue. Express your deeper feelings. You do a great job of expressing yourself, and others hear you loud and clear. Tonight: In the thick of things. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH Know when it is best to say less and just be yourself. Your ability to clear out a problem emerges. You have a seriousness that empowers you. As a result, others trust your suggestions. Tonight: Stay close to home. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH As a sign, you tend to

speak your mind as few can. You mean what you say, and others hear you loud and clear. Express yourself to friends or in a meeting. Some of the reactions you get could stun you. Tonight: Ever playful. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH Curb a need to get your way. Your need for control easily could swing into relationships. Unexpected developments force you to deal with responsibilities and perhaps update your community image. Tonight: Treat yourself well; you put in quite a day. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH How you handle an unanticipated piece of information can and will define your day. Many of you will focus on re-arranging your plans, whereas others will be pushed to the max to incorporate everything and get it done. Tonight: The only answer is yes. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HH Take much-needed time to do research or to push a project ahead. You could be overly exhausted or looking for a way around a situation. Just observe, and a lot more will become clear. Tonight: Say “yes” to living. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Focus on others, whether you are off playing or heading in a new direction. Though you might want or need to concentrate on certain aspects of an issue, you could have difficulty doing so. Others seek you out en masse. Tonight: Enjoy the moment. Forget that it is Monday. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH You have a way of

commanding attention. You won’t be a backseat driver today, in any segment of your life. Others count on you taking your place and acting responsibly. Could you be enabling someone? Tonight: Burning the candle at both ends. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Tame the desire to take off. Use this impulse in a more positive and gratifying manner — perhaps doing some research or becoming an armchair traveler. Recognize your restraints and move forward. Tonight: Try to move forward. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH You can only see and accomplish so much. Cut the idea that you can do it all — at least for now. You sometimes make demands that are very hard on you. Let others carry the ball right now. Tonight: Listen to what a partner shares. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH You might want to move forward and handle a certain issue. Truth be told, you might want to allow others to do their fair share. You carry too much of a burden on your shoulders; allow others to pitch in. Tonight: Go off and join a friend or visit with a roommate. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Focus, focus, focus and enhance your ability to get past an immediate problem. You want to get down to basics, though you can be gentle while doing so. Others are more likely to accept their role in this matter when approached with softness. Tonight: Work as a team. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C6 Monday, May 9, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T ORY

Companies gear up to help with energy regulation changes By Jennifer A. Dlouhy Hearst Newspapers

Photos by Don Bartlett / Los Angeles Times

Beneath a star-filled sky along an abandoned railroad near the San Andreas fault, U.S. Geological Survey geologist Mark Goldman monitors a pair of computers that will record explosions from 16 blast sites across the desert. The explosions are meant to mimic an actual earthquake.

San Andreas Continued from C1 It’s where the San Andreas fault begins its jagged 800-mile course toward the Mendocino coast. Three years ago, seismologists imagined the effect of a magnitude-7.8 earthquake with an epicenter less than a mile from where he sat. Their scenario had the full force of the temblor reaching the L.A. Basin in less than two minutes. The shaking would extend as far north as Ventura. The released energy would be approximately 30 times less than the Japanese earthquake. Still, landslides, fires, collapsed buildings and roadways, severed communication lines, cracked runways, derailed trains, broken aqueducts and dams were projected, along with nearly 2,000 deaths, 50,000 injuries and $200 billion in damage. The model was based on the last rupture of the San Andreas in this region, dated more than 300 years ago by recent geological studies. Because this stretch of the fault — from Bombay Beach to the Cajon Pass — has not moved since then, it is considered especially vulnerable to a major earthquake. Fuis describes the fault with dispassionate conviction. It is “near failure,” he says, though he believes the seismologists’ predictions may not be accurate. Whether the destruction will be worse or not, he’s not certain. He just knows that some conclusions have been drawn without enough information. “Neither the shape of the San Andreas fault nor the sedimentary basins that the cities have been built upon are well enough understood to provide accurate calculations of the shaking,” he said. The chatter on his radio picked up. He checked the time — 21:59:07 — less than a minute before the first blast.

Fresh fears Earlier that morning, just as the sun was rising, the day crew gathered at a warehouse in El Centro. John Hole paced with clipboard and pen in hand. Hole, 48, is an associate professor of geophysics at Virginia Tech and is managing the study along with Fuis and Joann Stock, 51, professor of geology and geophysics at Caltech. The Salton Seismic Imaging Project is funded with a $1.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation. Additional money comes from the U.S. Geological Survey. The first findings of the study will be released in September. Similar research in the 1990s looked at the Los Angeles Basin and the San Andreas north of the Cajon Pass. The results showed a number of faults lying deep beneath Los Angeles that are capable of producing dangerous earthquakes like the one that caused the Northridge earthquake in 1994. By detonating explosives and measuring the speed of the seismic waves as they move horizontally and vertically underground, seismologists can assemble images of the crust of the Earth, capturing structures like fault lines. The project was three years in the planning, and the field work got under way late February. During public hearings, Fuis had fielded concerns from residents and local officials who worried that the explosions might set off earthquakes. Rock quarries, he told them, conduct similar blasts without any consequence. Then less than 24 hours after the earthquake in Japan, the fears arose again. Residents worried about earthquakes, damaged buildings and tainted ground water. An aide to Rep. Mary Bono Mack, a Republican, whose district

U.S. Geological Survey geologists Coyn Criley, left, and Joe Svitek prepare one of 16 blast sites where explosives buried 10 feet underground will be detonated in the early morning hours. includes the Coachella and Imperi- North American plate. al valleys, called the U.S. GeologiThe implications for Southcal Survey for reassurance. ern California and especially the Hole wanted to make sure ev- Coachella and Imperial valleys eryone stayed focused. So far, are significant, whether assessing they had put out more than 4,000 building standards or establishing seismometers, and the night emergency preparedness procecrew had set off more than 100 dures. Past modeling of earthexplosions. quakes in the region has used a “This is huge,” he reminded vertical fault in most places, but them, “the largest project of its angled faults focus energy difkind.” ferently, with the On the wall beoverriding plate hind him was a map “Neither the sustaining most of of Southern Cali- shape of the San the damage. fornia, showing the But a greater precisely delineated Andreas fault nor threat, accordroutes that crews the sedimentary ing to Fuis, is the followed, traversing sedimentary strucwilderness areas, basins that the ture of the Salton military installa- cities have been Trough itself. Extions, Indian rescavate this basin of ervations, private built upon are the rocks and soil property and cities. well enough swept down over Scripps Institute of the millenniums understood to Oceanography set from the Rocky up its own equip- provide accurate Mountains and ment in the Salton calculations of you’d have a canSea. yon larger than the Penetrated by the shaking.” Grand Canyon. volcanoes and cut This formaby the San Andreas — Gary Fuis, tion — sediment and Imperial faults, geophysicist with the nearly nine miles the region is part of U.S. Geological Survey deep — can trap the Salton Trough, earthquake energy one of the few rift and amplify the valleys in the world not covered seismic waves, resulting in longer by an ocean, a place where geolo- and more intense shaking. No one gists can see the continent coming has measured the wave speeds apart and a new crust of the Earth throughout the basin until now. being formed. These processes are the result of the Pacific and North Ameri- Practice quake can plates sliding against each By midnight, Fuis was chilled. other for nearly 6 million years, Orion angled behind the Santa an action that triggers the earth- Rosa Mountains, and a cool breeze quakes in the region. came in from the east. For the last hour he had been following the progress of his exStructure of the fault plosives handlers as they moved Toting 40-pound packs in 80- from one blast site to the next. degree heat, the day crew covered Each team had to follow a rigorous a five-mile route. About every 50 schedule that kept them from firyards, they stopped at mapped lo- ing at the same time and distortcations, dug a trench about a foot ing the readings. deep and buried a seismometer Coyn Criley and Joe Svitek and geophone. were running late for their 1 a.m. By mid-afternoon, the night detonation. Their first blast had crew parked their SUVs, pickups taken longer than expected, and and an enclosed truck between the Svitek spooled out 200 feet of wire Union Pacific tracks and Califor- to the clearing where the explonia Highway 111, just north of the sives were buried. He and Criley Imperial County line. The 16 blast spliced it to the detonators, consites had already been dug; Fuis necting the circuit. and the crew needed to wire the With two minutes remaining, detonators to the explosives and they retreated to the shooting box, lower the explosives into the blast a small yellow briefcase that conholes, in most cases 15 feet deep. tained a clock and the battery that Standing roadside, Fuis talked would initiate the explosion. At 25 easily about “planar distributions seconds, Criley pushed the charge of hypocenters,” “sedimentary button. An orange light started velocities,” P waves and S waves. flashing. At 15 seconds, he pushed When he described the San An- the arm button. dreas fault and the motion of the “Five, four, three, two, one.” two tectonic plates, his hands took Whoomp. flight. A sharp jolt and a fast undula“The San Andreas fault actually tion raced through the sandy soil. appears to be propeller shaped,” he Fuis heard the blast from the said, drawing a pirouette in the air ridge. By then the seismic waves, and describing how the fault tilts racing at three miles a second, had to the northeast in this basin, then already passed beneath him and tilts in the opposite direction father were dissipating in the distance. north, past the Mojave Desert. The geophones had captured the Many seismologists, he said, ground motion; the seismometers assume the fault in this region is recorded the impulse; and soon largely vertical, a configuration the information would join the rest that places the Pacific plate square- of the data. ly up against the North American One day, Fuis knew, another plate. Fuis and a few colleagues, sort of wave would start from however, believe that the Pacific this place, and it wouldn’t fade so plate here is wedged beneath the quickly.

HOUSTON — When the federal government imposed broad new workplace and environmental safety requirements on offshore oil and gas operations last October, Lloyd’s Register saw an opportunity. The London-based risk management firm started pitching oil and gas companies on how it could help them create new safety and environmental management systems before the government’s Nov. 15, 2011, deadline. Lloyd’s and other companies are positioning themselves to offer products or services to help the industry meet new regulatory mandates — even as the rules themselves continue to evolve. Although other countries already require broad riskmanagement programs, the new U.S. requirement could be a high hurdle for smaller oil and gas companies that have focused exclusively on the Gulf of Mexico. And because the new safety regimen applies broadly to a range of offshore activities — not just drilling — some companies that work on pipelines or do other offshore well work have been caught off guard. “We’re seeing a lot of denial,” said Ian Hamilton a technical director with Lloyd’s Register. “Organizations are coming along and saying, ‘it’s not me, is it?’” The regulatory changes are prompting an array of companies to retrofit existing machinery with new sensors, develop more powerful emergency equipment and hone consulting services to help firms comply with new government requirements. As the four-day Offshore Technology Conference came to a close last week at Reliant Park in Houston, it was clear some firms see the new and

looming federal regulations as a growth business. Before the show, Lloyd’s was starting to get tentative inquiries from companies wondering if they would have to satisfy the government’s new safety and environmental management system requirement, Hamilton said. But as the deadline approaches, the pace of inquiries is accelerating. Lloyd’s Register is selling three services to help companies comply with the safety and environmental mandate, mainly by auditing their current systems, assessing their risks and developing a plan to fill any gaps. That might mean assessing how humans work with computer consoles on offshore rigs so the displays are more usable, or identifying situations where human error could be critical. “We can help them look at where the gaps are,” Hamilton said. Lloyd’s and its ModuSpec unit also are recertifying blowout preventers, the emergency devices used as last-ditch barriers to surging oil and gas. That service helps fulfill a new federal rule mandating those inspections. Among companies scrambling to read the regulatory tea leaves is Houston-based National Oilwell Varco, which is touting its new BlackBox systems recorder. The device logs pressure readings and other data from blowout preventers, then stores the information in a rugged capsule that can be retrieved after an accident. Although the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, which oversees offshore drilling, hasn’t mandated that kind of emergency data-logging equipment yet, regulators have signaled such a requirement could be coming. “We are looking at the regula-

tory bodies and everything they are drafting,” said Trey Mebane, National Oilwell Varco’s director of business development. Because NOV already offered services to archive drilling information, “this became a natural extension,” Mebane said. NOV is working to anticipate new federal mandates that the company’s technology could serve, Mebane said, so “when the bell rings and that stuff comes out, we’ve got something right away.” The ocean energy bureau has telegraphed interest in remotely monitoring what is happening offshore. Energy Secretary Steven Chu has stressed that he wants to see more instrumentation on essential sub-sea equipment, including blowout preventers. And Chu already has described one item on his wish list: sensors and gauges that will show the exact position of pipe-cutting components on the blowout preventers. That could be good news for GE Oil & Gas, which developed its RamTel system for monitoring the position of those pipecutting shear rams several years ago. Although initial demand was low, interest has jumped since last year’s deadly blowout and spill raised regulators’ desire for more sub-sea data, said product manager Bob Judge. “We had a bit of a head start in that we developed a BOP with position indicators, but it was expensive at the time,” Judge said. “The new systems take advantage of advances in measurement technology.”

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C8 Monday, May 9, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Insulation Continued from C1

Discovery Kuperstein got the idea for moving into the spray-foam insulation business when the owner of a home he remodeled in 2007 wanted the alternative to standard fiberglass rolled or blownin insulation. Kuperstein said spray-foam insulation costs about three times as much to install as standard insulation products. However, he said spray foam can be 30 percent more energy efficient. When Kuperstein went looking for a spray-foam installation company in 2007, the closest one he could find was in Portland. “We had to get somebody out of Portland to do the spray foam, but when we saw how well the spray foam sealed that house, we figured that is the answer,” Kuperstein said. “We put everything we had into buying spray-foam equipment and started a new business: Spray Foam Insulation.” Since Spray Foam Insulation began more than three years ago, the company has slowly grown from one to four employees: Kuperstein himself, Amy, and two insulation spray technicians. As an Earth Day promotion of the benefits of spray-foam insulation, the Kupersteins donated a green thermal spray and injection foam, using a product called Tripolymer wall insulation. “The goal of this project was to help a family save money — up to 30 percent per month on heating and electricity expenses,” Kuperstein said. He said many homes in the Bend area built before 1968 were constructed without insulation in the walls, and little insulation in the ceilings and floors. Typically a spray-foam retrofit costs from $3,000 to $4,000 for a 1,200- to 1,500-square-foot home with the injection foam technology, Kuperstein said. But prices can vary depending on the size of a home and other factors, he added. “We couldn’t be more excited to be selected for the foam insulation project,” said Melanie Grace, the homeowner receiving the insulation injection donated by the Kupersteins for Earth Day. “We have known for years

we needed to make this upgrade to our home, but it was not in the budget.” The Kupersteins use a variety of spray-foam products and application systems that vary depending on whether the project is a home or commercial building under construction, a newer home that might be insulated with conventional insulation, or older homes with little insulation. Kuperstein said he uses biobased foam insulation products, which are made from soybean oil, caster nut oil or industrial sucrose from sugar beets, instead of petroleum-based foam.

Saving energy But what really makes the technology green is the energy savings, Kuperstein said. “With the foam we are closing up the air leaks and closing up the house super tight,” Kuperstein said. “When you do that, you have to mechanically ventilate the building. That allows us to control how much ventilation you have.” The federal tax credit for insulation and other weatherization improvements is now $500. However, Oregon has several cash-incentive programs for insulation, said Marshall Johnson, residential section manager at Energy Trust of Oregon. “The good thing is, the Energy Trust (of Oregon) has cash incentives to help people who want to make energy-efficiency upgrades for weatherization,” Johnson said. “(The credits) can be for insulating the attic, walls and floors, or to seal up air leaks, cracks around windows and pipes, and sealing up duct leaks. “The nice thing about sprayfoam insulation is it works very well to seal up duct leaks, cracks around pipes and windows,” Johnson added. Energy Trust of Oregon credits for spray foam and other insulation enhancements include 25 cents per square foot for attic insulation and 30 cents per square foot for wall or floor insulation, Johnson said. “If you want to have your home tuned up to achieve peak energy efficiency, we have the home energy star program,” Johnson said. Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or emerriman@bendbulletin.com.

C OV ER S T OR I ES

SHARK REPRODUCTION

Scientists aim to solve a mystery By Susan Cocking McClatchy-Tribune News Service

JUPITER, Fla. — Shark scientist Steve Kessel was looking for the piscatorial equivalent of a needle in a haystack during a fishing expedition off Jupiter on March 6. Kessel, a researcher from Cardiff University in Wales, and his band of assistants were fishing for a pregnant lemon shark into which they could insert a satellite tag. Under the direction of commercial fisherman Mike Newman, captain of the Dykoke, the crew deployed four large buoys holding stout fishing lines baited with bonito slabs on circle hooks. Then they waited eagerly, hoping one of their study subjects would come along to help answer one of the questions that has been bugging shark scientists for decades: Where do lemon sharks go to give birth to their young? “We think they’re pupping up

Monitor Continued from C1 And, if people notice a lot of electricity flowing into one room or off of one circuit, they can try to unplug certain devices to see the instant impact of shutting something off and identify where they can save power. For example, when Allen and his family installed the system in their home, they noticed there was a large power load in the master bedroom — which was odd, he said, since nothing major was plugged in there. But they found that a clock radio was drawing 49 watts, even on standby mode. “Your standby power is a

in Georgia and South Carolina because we’ve shown through telemetry data the sharks move north in the summer months,” Kessel said. “But we have yet to prove this.”

Playing tag Sometime around 8 p.m., they struck gold when one of the buoys began moving erratically on the surface. Newman motored the Dykoke closer so that research assistants Easton White, Chelsea Lowndes and Stephanie Crawford could pull in the line and ease whatever was attached to it through a transom door onto the deck. After a brief struggle, a female lemon a little more than 8 feet long with a distended belly was lying on board with a wooden paddle inserted between her jaws. A wet rag was thrown over her eyes to help calm her, and a hose pumped seawater into her mouth to pre-

On the Web For more information on EcoVentures NW and the Fido Home Energy Monitoring System, visit www.ecoventuresnw.com.

vampire load; it’s always sucking energy,” Allen said. “About 20 percent of your energy consumption is through vampire loads.” And if homeowners know where those vampire loads are coming from, they can unplug or replace appliances accordingly. The system, which costs about $1,195 with the software for a 16-circuit system, can also be used to ensure that appliances and systems like heat pumps and water heaters are working

vent respiratory distress. The scientists drew blood, recorded the animal’s length and girth, took a tiny piece of fin for a DNA sample and inserted a small tag beneath the skin that can be read by a handheld electronic scanner. Then they added an external acoustic transmitter tag and produced a battery-operated drill to secure the SPOT tag to the dorsal fin. Every time the fin breaks the surface, the tag will beam its location to a satellite, with the data downloaded onto Kessel’s computer. The SPOT tag records only the shark’s location — not depth or water quality or temperature. The acoustic transmitter tag pings to an array of some 300 underwater listening posts installed by a host of research groups stretching from Florida to the Carolinas.

Testing a theory The female was one of more

as they should. One homeowner, for example, found that his heat pump didn’t shut off when it was supposed to and saw the power drain from the hot water heater, Allen said. “Once those two things got fixed, his electric bill went down $100 in one month,” he said. There are several tools available for monitoring electricity use, said M.L. Vidas, a Bend sustainable building consultant and owner of Sustainable Design Services, and those tools provide an important function for people trying to live green or simply save money. “It’s a very effective tool for us learning that what we do has an impact,” she said. While making changes like switching out traditional light bulbs for compact fluorescent

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than 40 lemon sharks tagged this winter off Jupiter by Kessel’s group. The lemons that flock to Jupiter each winter are important study subjects because they are scientists’ best hope of unlocking the mysteries of the species’ life history and biology. Kessel and Samuel “Doc” Gruber — professor emeritus at University of Miami who has been studying lemon sharks for more than 50 years — at first believed they were in the area to mate and that they might be giving birth in Florida’s Indian River Lagoon. But no mating activity ever was observed, and there was no evidence of pupping nearby. Tagging data revealed the animals that showed up in Jupiter “blasted out of there” in April and headed to the Carolinas, according to Gruber. He now believes that’s where the animals give birth, probably in shallow estuaries.

versions, or turning off lights more frequently, can save energy, it’s hard to tease out the exact impact on a monthly power bill. But if someone can turn off a light, and immediately see the power use drop for that circuit, it could help people understand the effects of their behavior. “You need to know how much you’re using, so then you can learn how to use less,” Vidas said. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.


S

D

NBA Inside Lakers’ playoffs end after being blown out by Mavericks, see Page D4.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MAY 9, 2011

CYCLING CENTRAL

TRACK & FIELD

BEAU EASTES

ASU women, UCLA men take early lead at Pac-10 championships TUCSON, Ariz. – On day two of the Pac-10 Championships combined events weekend, senior Samantha Henderson of Arizona State won the women’s seven-event heptathlon with 5,470 points, while junior Jeremy Taiwo of Washington won the men’s 10-event decathlon with 7,742 points. With only one event scored, the ASU women hold an early lead in the team race with 23 points. UCLA has an early lead in the men’s race with 15 points. Sun Devil student-athletes finished first, second and fourth on the women’s side. Over the two-day competition, Henderson picked up marks of 13.92 in the 100 hurdles, 5-7.75 in the high jump, 41-7.25 in the shot put, 25.71 in the 200 meters, 204 1⁄4 in the long jump, 113-1 in the javelin and 2:37.70 in the 800 meters. Taiwo recorded marks of 10.98 in the 100 meters, 2311 1⁄2 in the long jump, 42-11 in the shot put, 6-11 in the high jump, 48.49 in the 400 meters, 14.41 in the 110-meter hurdles, 118-10 in the discus, 15-9 3⁄4 in the pole vault, 107-9 in the javelin and 4:18.69 in the 1,500 meters. Senior David Klech of Oregon earned a runner-up finish with 7,581 points. Junior Trent Perez led a 3-4-5 finish for UCLA in the event with 7,315 points. Competition will resume at the Pac-10 Championships May 13-14 with the remainder of the track and field events. — From wire reports

INSIDE MLB NL

AL

Dodgers .........4 Mets...............2

Tigers ............5 Blue Jays .......2

Marlins ..........8 Nationals .......0

Rays ...............5 Orioles ...........3

Pirates ...........5 Astros ............4

Red Sox .........9 Twins .............5

Cardinals .......3 Brewers..........1

Yankees ....... 12 Rangers .........5

Reds...............2 Cubs ..............0

Athletics.........5 Royals ............2

Padres ...........4 D’backs ..........3

Angels ...........6 Indians ...........5

Giants ............3 Rockies ..........0

White Sox ......5 Mariners ........2

Braves............5 Phillies...........2

Area teams begin a busy week A Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

The Cat 2 Men and the Clydesdale divisions speed off from the starting line during the Cascade Chainbreaker mountain bike race in Skyline Forest near Shevlin Park west of Bend Sunday morning.

A real cool ride

Mountain bikers in annual Cascade Chainbreaker race brave the snow By Mark Morical The Bulletin

Normally a warm, dusty affair in early May, the Cascade Chainbreaker mountain race this year turned into a cold, snowy event as flurries drifted through the Skyline Forest west of Bend on Sunday. But the weather didn’t stop hundreds of riders from taking on the annual race contested on private timberland near Bend, just west of Shevlin Park. Bend’s Ryan Trebon won the men’s pro division, pedaling 38 miles in 2 hours, 40 minutes, 7 seconds. Immediately after crossing the finish line, Trebon made a beeline for the free food. The cold — temperatures were in the 30s — had sapped him of his energy. “It pretty much snowed the whole time,” Trebon said. “It’s just hard in the cold. You don’t realize how much more energy it takes to keep going.” The snow never really accumulated, but it did serve to quell some of the dust that riders typically face during the Chainbreaker. Still, some riders prefer warm and dusty to cold and snowy. “I’d rather it be 60 (degrees)

and dusty, than 30 or 40 and snowing,” said Trebon, 30. “(The snow) definitely made it a lot less dusty. It was nice and tacky and you could just ride fast. It was a good time.” Bend’s Brig Brandt finished second among pro men in 2:42:23, and Greg Oravetz, also of Bend, was third in 2:43:24. Brandt and Oravetz caught up to race-leader Trebon midway through the race, but the former mountain bike and cyclocross national champion was just too strong, pulling away to win by more than two minutes. It was Trebon’s third victory in the Chainbreaker after winning last year’s event and the 2008 race. The 2011 version of the Chainbreaker featured about 350 mountain bikers from all over the Northwest competing in various age and skill divisions. The Chainbreaker included a 3 1⁄2 -mile starter loop followed by an 11 1⁄2 -mile lap. Racers completed one to three laps, based on category. The course was a combination of singletrack, double track and dirt roads. See Ride / D5

The start of a system?

Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 College baseball ........................D2 Major League Baseball ..............D3 NBA .......................................... D4 Golf ........................................... D4 Cycling Central.................... D5, 6

Alice Pennington, of Portland, rides over a fallen tree branch on her way to winning the pro women’s class in the Chainbreaker mountain bike race Sunday morning.

126

126

To Redmond BLM land

20

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Skyline Forest

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Couch Market Road

Tumalo

32,957 acres

Tumalo Reservoir Road

20

Deschutes National Forest

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97

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97 Source: Deschutes Land Trust

• Class 5A Special District 1 tournament (Bend, Mountain View, Summit) at Bend Golf and Country Club, today (noon) and Tuesday (1 p.m.) • Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 5 tournament (La Pine and Sisters) at Quail Run Golf Course in La Pine, today (noon) and Tuesday (10 a.m.) • Class 5A Special District 1 tournament (Bend, Mountain View, Summit) at Bend High and Juniper Park, today and Tuesday, 8 a.m.

GIRLS TENNIS • Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 3 tournament (Sisters) at Black Butte Ranch on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, starting at 8 a.m. each day • Class 6A Central Valley Conference tournament (Redmond) at Sam Johnson Park in Redmond on Wednesday, TBA

TRACK & FIELD

Bend Tumalo Creek

GIRLS GOLF

BOYS TENNIS

ek Cre

d

INDEX

HEATHER CLARK

• Class 5A Special District 1 tournament (Bend, Mountain View, Summit) at Bend Golf and Country Club, today and Tuesday, 12:50 p.m. both days • Class 4A Tri-Valley Conference tournament (Madras) at Kah-Nee-Ta Resort & Casino, today (11 a.m.) and Tuesday (9:30 a.m.)

Roa

Florida settles for shutout over Nationals, see Page D3

BOYS GOLF

ore em

Marlin pitcher falls short of no-hitter

T

he 12 or so miles of trail that we knobbytire riders enjoy once a year for the Cascade Chainbreaker mountain bike race may soon enhance the area’s reputation as a world-class mountain biking destination. For the past 14 years, one of Oregon’s most popular and well-attended mountain bike races has been staged west of Bend’s Shevlin Park on private land historically known as the Bull Springs Tree Farm (the property has been a commercial tree farm for roughly 80 years). The spectator-friendly infield section near the finish line of the race course is the old site of a 1920s mill pond. In fact, evidence of the Pine Tree Mill logging operation still exists, including a stone furnace and the familiar piles of rusty tin cans that can been seen along the Chainbreaker route. See Trails / D5

District tournaments held in Central Oregon this week:

Sis

Florida Marlins’ Anibal Sanchez pitches against the Washington Nationals during Sunday’s game in Miami.

Chainbreaker trails could be the beginning of an extensive mountain bike network in Skyline Forest

Postseason time

Sisters

us ych h W 16

bout two months after the first contests of the spring, the current high school sports season is rapidly winding down. This week, the majority of Central Oregon’s prep golf, tennis and track teams will compete in their respective district tournaments. Area teams play in nine different boys and girls district golf championships and four separate district tennis competitions today and Tuesday. On Thursday, district track meets begin with local teams competing everywhere from Bend to Milton-Freewater. “It’s a very, very busy time,” says Mountain View athletic director and track coach Dave Hood. While the end of any prep season is typically busy, this spring’s mad scramble is unusually chaotic — but for a good reason. Traditionally, the Oregon School Activities Association schedules each sport’s state championship for a different weekend. It makes life easier on schools and fans and gives each sport its own moment in the sun. See Busy / D4

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

• Class 2A Tri-River Conference championships (Culver) at Summit High in Bend, Friday (3:45 p.m.) and Saturday (1 p.m.) • Class 4A Sky-Em League championships (La Pine and Sisters) in Sisters, Thursday and Saturday, 11 a.m. both days • Class 5A Special District 1 championships (Bend, Mountain View, Summit) at Summit High in Bend, Friday (3:45 p.m.) and Saturday (1 p.m.)


D2 Monday, May 9, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

SOCCER

Today Baseball: Culver at Santiam, 4:30 p.m.; Bend at Mountain View, 4:30 p.m.; Crook County at Summit, 4:30 p.m.; Madras at Gladstone, 5 p.m.; Sisters at Sweet Home, 4:30 p.m.; Junction City at La Pine, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Redmond at Summit (DH), 3 p.m.; Gladstone at Madras, 4:30 p.m.; Sweet Home at Sisters, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Junction City, 3:30 p.m. Boys golf: Bend, Mountain View and Summit at Class 5A Special District 1 championship at Bend Golf and Country Club, 12:50 p.m.; Crook County at Greater Oregon League championship at Buffalo Peak Golf Course in Union, TBA; Madras at Tri-Valley Conference championship at Kah-Nee-Ta Resort, 11 a.m.; La Pine and Sisters at Sky-Em League championship at Tokatee Golf Club in Blue River, TBA. Girls golf: Redmond at Central Valley Conference championship at Emerald Valley Golf Course in Creswell, TBA; Bend, Mountain View, Summit at Class 5A Special District 1 championship at Bend Golf and Country Club, noon; Madras at Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 2 championships at Arrowhead Golf Club in Molalla, TBA; La Pine, Sisters at Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 5 championship at Quail Run Golf Course in La Pine, noon; Crook County at Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 7 championship at Wildhorse Resort in Pendleton, TBA. Boys tennis: Bend, Mountain View, Summit at Class 5A Special District 1 championship in Bend, 8 a.m.; Sisters at Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 3 championship in Medford, TBA Girls tennis: Bend, Mountain View, Summit at Class 5A Special District 1 championship in Hermiston, TBA; Madras at Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 2 championship in Portland, TBA

11:55 a.m. — English Premier League, Fullham vs. Liverpool, ESPN2. 2 p.m. — English Premier League, Manchester United vs. Chelsea, Root sports.

BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, Minnesota Twins at Boston Red Sox, ESPN.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — NBA playoffs, Eastern Conference semifinals, Miami Heat at Boston Celtics, TNT. 6:30 p.m. — NBA playoffs, Western Conference semifinals, Oklahoma City Thunder at Memphis Grizzlies, TNT.

HOCKEY 5 p.m. — NHL playoffs, Western Conference semifinal, Vancouver Canucks at Nashville Predators, Versus network.

TUESDAY BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Baltimore Orioles, Root sports. 5 p.m. — MLB, St. Louis Cardinals at Chicago Cubs or Cincinnati Reds at Houston Astros, MLB Network.

BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — NBA playoffs, Eastern Conference semifinals, Atlanta Hawks at Chicago Bulls, TNT.

HOCKEY 5 p.m. — NHL playoffs, Western Conference semifinal, San Jose Sharks at Detroit Red Wings, Versus network.

RADIO TUESDAY BASEBALL 5:30 p.m. — College, Portland at Oregon State, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Cycling • Petacchi wins second stage of Giro after sprint: Alessandro Petacchi won a mass sprint Sunday in Parma, Italy, to take the second stage of the Giro d’Italia, with Mark Cavendish finishing second to take the overall lead. Lampre’s Petacchi captured the Giro’s longest stage, completing the 151-mile ride from Alba to Parma in 5 hours, 45 minutes, 40 seconds. Cavendish beat Manuel Belletti of Colnago for second place.

Hockey • Czech Republic beats Russia 3-2 at worlds: The Czech Republic overcame the arrival of Alex Ovechkin to beat Russia 3-2 Sunday and maintain a perfect record at the hockey world championship in Kosice, Slovakia. Jakub Voracek, Jaromir Jagr and Tomas Plekanec scored for the Czech Republic as Ovechkin couldn’t help Russia avenge a 2-1 loss to the Czechs in the final of last year’s worlds. Also Sunday, Mikael Backlund scored 7:47 into the third period and added an empty-net goal to give Sweden a hard-fought 2-0 victory over Switzerland to secure a place in the quarters. The result means that the United States also advanced.

Auto racing • Sebastian Vettel cruises to win Turkish Grand Prix: Red Bull driver Sebastian Vettel cruised to victory in the Turkish Grand Prix on Sunday in Istanbul, clinching his third win of the season ahead of teammate Mark Webber to extend his overall lead in the standings. The Formula One champion was never in trouble at Istanbul Park after starting from the pole position for the fourth consecutive race.

Tennis • Djokovic beats Nadal in Madrid Open final: Novak Djokovic defeated Rafael Nadal on clay for the first time in 10 tries, beating the top-ranked Spaniard 7-5, 6-4 to win the Madrid Open on Sunday and extend his unbeaten start to the season to 32 matches. The second-ranked Djokovic squandered a 4-0 lead in the first set, but recovered to end Nadal’s latest winning streak on clay at 37 matches and earn the Serb his third straight victory over Nadal in finals this season. Earlier, Petra Kvitova won her third title of the season by beating Victoria Azarenka 7-6 (3), 6-4 in the women’s final. The 18th-ranked Kvitova won the first set tiebreaker when Azarenka shot long, and secured her first Masters series trophy when Azarenka returned long on the first championship point.

Basketball • Butler junior Shelvin Mack leaving for NBA draft: Butler guard Shelvin Mack says he’s keeping his name in the June 23 NBA draft and won’t return for his senior season with the small Indiana school that made it to the NCAA basketball finals two years running. Mack is Butler’s all-time NCAA tournament scoring leader with 232 points in 13 games. — The Associated Press

Tuesday Boys golf: Bend, Mountain View and Summit at Class 5A Special District 1 championship at Bend Golf and Country Club, 12:50 p.m; Crook County at Greater Oregon League championship at Buffalo Peak Golf Course in Union, TBA; Madras at Tri-Valley Conference championship at Kah-Nee-Ta Resort, 9:30 a.m.; La Pine and Sisters at Sky-Em League championship at Tokatee Golf Club in Blue River, TBA. Girls golf: Redmond at Central Valley Conference championship at Emerald Valley Golf Course in Creswell, TBA; Bend, Mountain View, Summit at Class 5A Special District 1 championship at Bend Golf and Country Club, 1 p.m.; Madras at Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 2 championships at Arrowhead Golf Club in Molalla, TBA; La Pine, Sisters at Class 4A/3A/ 2A/1A Special District 5 championship at Quail Run Golf Course in La Pine, 10 a.m.; Crook County at Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 7 championship at Wildhorse Resort in Pendleton, TBA. Boys tennis: Bend, Mountain View, Summit at Class 5A Special District 1 championship in Bend, 8 a.m.; Madras at Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 2 championship in Portland, TBA; Sisters at Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 3 championship in Medford, TBA. Girls tennis: Bend, Mountain View, Summit at Class 5A Special District 1 championship in Hermiston, TBA. Softball: Culver at Perrydale, 4:30 p.m. Wednesday Baseball: Bend at Mountain View, 4:30 p.m.; Crook County at Summit, 4:30 p.m.; Madras at Estacada, 5 p.m.; La Pine at Sisters, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Bend at Mountain View, (DH), 3 p.m.; Crook County at Summit (DH), 3 p.m.; Madras at Estacada, 4:30 p.m.; Sisters at La Pine, 4:30 p.m. Boys lacrosse: Sisters at Summit, 8 p.m. Girls tennis: Redmond hosts first day of Central Valley Conference district tournament , TBA; Madras at Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 2 championship in Portland, TBA; Sisters at Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 3 championship in Black Butte Ranch, 8 a.m. Boys tennis: Redmond at Central Valley Conference district tournament in Salem, TBA; Madras at Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 2 championship in Portland, TBA Thursday Track: Redmond at Central Valley Conference championship in Salem, 3:30 p.m.; La Pine, Sisters at Sky-Em League championship in Sisters, 11 a.m.; Madras at Tri-Valley League championships in Gladstone, TBA Boys tennis: Crook County at Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 7 championship in Ontario, TBA; Madras at Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 2 championship in Portland, TBA Girls tennis: Crook County at Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 7 championship in Ontario, TBA; Sisters at Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 3 championship in Black Butte Ranch, 8 a.m.; Madras at Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 2 championship in Portland, TBA

BASKETBALL NBA NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION Playoffs All Times PDT ——— CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Chicago 2, Atlanta 2 Monday, May 2: Atlanta 103, Chicago 95 Wednesday, May 4: Chicago 86, Atlanta 73 Friday, May 6: Chicago 99, Atlanta 82 Sunday, May 8: Atlanta 100, Chicago 88 Tuesday, May 10: Atlanta at Chicago, 5 p.m. Thursday, May 12: Chicago at Atlanta, 5 p.m. x-Sunday, May 15: Atlanta at Chicago, TBA Miami 2, Boston 1 Sunday, May 1: Miami 99, Boston 90 Tuesday, May 3: Miami 102, Boston 91 Saturday, May 7: Boston 97, Miami 81 Today, May 9: Miami at Boston, 4 p.m. Wednesday, May 11: Boston at Miami, 4 p.m. x-Friday, May 13: Miami at Boston, 4 or 5 p.m. x-Monday, May 16: Boston at Miami, 5 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Dallas 4, L.A. Lakers 0 Monday, May 2: Dallas 96, L.A. Lakers 94 Wednesday, May 4: Dallas 93, L.A. Lakers 81 Friday, May 6: Dallas 98, L.A. Lakers 92 Sunday, May 8: Dallas 122, L.A. Lakers 86 Memphis 2, Oklahoma City 1 Sunday, May 1: Memphis 114, Oklahoma City 101 Tuesday, May 3: Oklahoma City 111, Memphis 102 Saturday, May 7: Memphis 101, Oklahoma City 93, OT Today, May 9: Oklahoma City at Memphis, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 11: Memphis at Oklahoma City, 6:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 13: Oklahoma City at Memphis, 6 or 6:30 p.m. x-Sunday, May 15: Memphis at Oklahoma City, TBA Sunday’s Summaries

Mavericks 122, Lakers 86 L.A. LAKERS (86)

IN THE BLEACHERS

Artest 3-7 4-5 11, Gasol 4-10 2-2 10, Bynum 2-7 2-2 6, Fisher 1-8 3-4 5, Bryant 7-18 3-4 17, Odom 4-5 2-5 10, Brown 5-10 2-3 15, Blake 1-4 0-0 3, Barnes 4-7 1-1 9, Smith 0-1 0-0 0, Johnson 0-3 0-0 0, Walton 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 31-82 19-26 86. DALLAS (122) Marion 3-7 2-2 8, Nowitzki 7-11 2-2 17, Chandler 2-4 1-1 5, Kidd 1-6 0-0 3, Stevenson 1-6 0-0 3, Stojakovic 7-7 1-2 21, Terry 11-14 1-2 32, Barea 9-14 3-3 22, Haywood 1-1 2-3 4, Brewer 1-2 0-0 2, Mahinmi 0-0 2-4 2, Cardinal 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 44-73 14-19 122. L.A. Lakers 23 16 23 24 — 86 Dallas 27 36 23 36 — 122 3-Point Goals—L.A. Lakers 5-24 (Brown 3-5, Artest 1-3, Blake 1-4, Johnson 0-1, Barnes 0-2, Fisher 0-2, Walton 0-2, Bryant 0-5), Dallas 20-32 (Terry 910, Stojakovic 6-6, Nowitzki 1-1, Cardinal 1-1, Barea 1-4, Stevenson 1-5, Kidd 1-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—L.A. Lakers 44 (Gasol 8), Dallas 48 (Chandler 9). Assists—L.A. Lakers 16 (Gasol 6), Dallas 32 (Barea 8). Total Fouls—L.A. Lakers 21, Dallas 23. Flagrant Fouls—Bynum, Odom. Ejected—Bynum, Odom. A—21,087 (19,200).

Hawks 100, Bulls 88 CHICAGO (88) Deng 5-14 2-2 13, Boozer 7-10 4-4 18, Noah 2-4 24 6, Rose 12-32 9-11 34, Bogans 1-2 0-0 3, Brewer 0-2 0-0 0, Gibson 3-3 3-4 9, Asik 1-2 1-2 3, Watson 0-1 0-0 0, Korver 1-8 0-0 2. Totals 32-78 21-27 88. ATLANTA (100) Smith 8-22 7-9 23, Horford 9-11 2-2 20, Collins 2-2 0-0 4, Teague 6-12 0-0 12, Johnson 9-14 3-3 24, Pachulia 1-3 3-4 5, Crawford 5-11 1-2 12, Williams 0-5 0-0 0, Wilkins 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 40-81 16-20 100. Chicago 26 20 23 19 — 88 Atlanta 28 19 20 33 — 100 3-Point Goals—Chicago 3-16 (Bogans 1-2, Rose 1-3, Deng 1-6, Korver 0-5), Atlanta 4-11 (Johnson 35, Crawford 1-5, Smith 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Chicago 48 (Noah 11), Atlanta 49 (Smith 16). Assists—Chicago 19 (Rose 10), Atlanta 23 (Smith 8). Total Fouls—Chicago 20, Atlanta 19. Technicals—Chicago Coach Thibodeau, Chicago defensive three second 2, Pachulia. A—19,263 (18,729).

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE Playoffs All Times PDT ——— CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Tampa Bay 4, Washington 0 Friday, April 29: Tampa Bay 4, Washington 2 Sunday, May 1: Tampa Bay 3, Washington 2, OT Tuesday, May 3: Tampa Bay 4, Washington 3 Wednesday, May 4: Tampa Bay 5, Washington 3 Boston 4, Philadelphia 0 Saturday, April 30: Boston 7, Philadelphia 3 Monday, May 2: Boston 3, Philadelphia 2, OT Wednesday, May 4: Boston 5, Philadelphia 1 Friday, May 6: Boston 5, Philadelphia 1 WESTERN CONFERENCE Vancouver 3, Nashville 2 Thursday, April 28: Vancouver 1, Nashville 0 Saturday, April 30: Nashville 2, Vancouver 1, 2OT Tuesday, May 3: Vancouver 3, Nashville 2, OT Thursday, May 5: Vancouver 4, Nashville 2 Saturday, May 7: Nashville 4, Vancouver 3 Today, May 9: Vancouver at Nashville, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 11: Nashville at Vancouver, TBA San Jose 3, Detroit 2 Friday, April 29: San Jose 2, Detroit 1, OT Sunday, May 1: San Jose 2, Detroit 1 Wednesday, May 4: San Jose 4, Detroit 3, OT Friday, May 6: Detroit 4, San Jose 3 Sunday, May 8: Detroit 4, San Jose 3 Tuesday, May 10: San Jose at Detroit, 5 p.m. x-Thursday, May 12: Detroit at San Jose, TBA

GOLF PGA Tour WELLS FARGO CHAMPIONSHIP Sunday At Quail Hollow Club Charlotte, N.C. Purse: $6.5 million Yardage: 7,469; Par 72 (36-36) Final Round (x-won on first playoff hole) x-Lucas Glover (500), $1,170,000 67-68-69-69—273 Jonathan Byrd (300), $702,000 66-68-67-72—273 Rory Sabbatini (190), $442,000 72-71-66-65—274 Bill Haas (135), $312,000 64-70-71-70—275 Kevin Na (110), $260,000 69-69-67-71—276 Zach Johnson (92), $217,750 73-69-67-68—277

Bobby Gates (92), $217,750 69-70-69-69—277 Pat Perez (92), $217,750 67-65-70-75—277 Phil Mickelson (66), $150,429 69-66-74-69—278 Padraig Harrington (66), $150,429 69-72-69-68—278 Vijay Singh (66), $150,429 68-68-73-69—278 Robert Garrigus (66), $150,429 72-67-70-69—278 Carl Pettersson (66), $150,429 68-68-72-70—278 J.B. Holmes (66), $150,429 70-72-65-71—278 Stewart Cink (66), $150,429 71-65-68-74—278 Hunter Mahan (53), $97,500 72-70-67-70—279 Rickie Fowler (53), $97,500 68-72-68-71—279 Davis Love III (53), $97,500 70-69-68-72—279 Brian Davis (53), $97,500 70-67-69-73—279 Andres Romero (53), $97,500 71-67-67-74—279 Webb Simpson (49), $72,800 70-67-74-69—280 Matt Jones (49), $72,800 70-69-69-72—280 Steve Marino (49), $72,800 70-67-71-72—280 Trevor Immelman (46), $55,413 73-70-71-67—281 Jim Furyk (46), $55,413 72-72-69-68—281 Tim Herron (46), $55,413 70-69-73-69—281 David Toms (46), $55,413 66-72-71-72—281 Edoardo Molinari (0), $44,200 72-71-71-68—282 Tag Ridings (41), $44,200 71-69-73-69—282 Justin Rose (41), $44,200 71-73-69-69—282 Sergio Garcia (41), $44,200 69-69-74-70—282 Steven Bowditch (41), $44,200 71-68-72-71—282 John Rollins (33), $30,171 73-68-74-68—283 J.J. Henry (33), $30,171 73-71-70-69—283 Jason Bohn (33), $30,171 71-67-75-70—283 D.J. Trahan (33), $30,171 70-73-70-70—283 Kent Jones (33), $30,171 72-70-71-70—283 Jeff Overton (33), $30,171 70-71-71-71—283 Billy Horschel (33), $30,171 73-66-73-71—283 Jim Herman (33), $30,171 68-74-70-71—283 Johnson Wagner (33), $30,171 73-71-68-71—283 John Senden (33), $30,171 74-64-72-73—283 Ryan Moore (33), $30,171 69-69-72-73—283 Bo Van Pelt (33), $30,171 71-67-72-73—283 Chez Reavie (25), $20,150 69-73-73-69—284 Boo Weekley (25), $20,150 71-72-71-70—284 Kyle Stanley (25), $20,150 72-71-69-72—284 Mathew Goggin (0), $16,157 70-74-72-69—285 Marc Leishman (20), $16,157 73-71-71-70—285 Brendon de Jonge (20), $16,157 75-68-71-71—285 Bubba Watson (20), $16,157 72-68-73-72—285 Charles Warren (20), $16,157 72-68-73-72—285 Robert Allenby (20), $16,157 72-71-69-73—285 Alex Cejka (20), $16,157 71-68-70-76—285 Billy Mayfair (15), $14,755 69-73-74-70—286 Brandt Jobe (15), $14,755 69-73-73-71—286 Brendan Steele (15), $14,755 77-66-72-71—286 James Driscoll (15), $14,755 74-69-71-72—286 Alex Prugh (11), $14,300 75-68-73-71—287 Charles Howell III (11), $14,300 73-71-71-72—287 Cameron Tringale (11), $14,300 70-72-72-73—287 Martin Kaymer (0), $13,975 70-71-73-74—288 Paul Stankowski (9), $13,975 75-69-70-74—288 Jarrod Lyle (6), $13,585 71-71-73-74—289 Joe Ogilvie (6), $13,585 72-71-71-75—289 Michael Thompson (6), $13,585 73-69-70-77—289 Chris Stroud (6), $13,585 72-71-69-77—289 Ryuji Imada (2), $13,130 69-70-76-75—290 Jimmy Walker (2), $13,130 75-69-71-75—290 Gary Woodland (2), $13,130 72-71-68-79—290 Richard S. Johnson (1), $12,870 74-69-73-77—293 Made cut did not finish Scott Stallings (1), $12,545 70-74-73—217 Bill Lunde (1), $12,545 73-71-73—217 Heath Slocum (1), $12,545 73-70-74—217 David Mathis (1), $12,545 73-69-75—217 Arjun Atwal (1), $12,220 72-71-75—218 Scott Gutschewski (1), $12,025 71-73-75—219 Bio Kim (1), $12,025 73-71-75—219 George McNeill (1), $11,830 73-71-76—220 Michael Putnam (1), $11,635 71-73-77—221 Hunter Haas (1), $11,635 72-72-77—221 Anthony Kim (1), $11,310 70-74-78—222 Nathan Green (1), $11,310 73-71-78—222 Chad Campbell (1), $11,310 71-71-80—222

Champions Tour REGIONS TRADITION Sunday At Shoal Creek Birmingham, Ala. Purse: $2.2 million Yardage: 7,234; Par: 72 Final Round (x-won on second playoff hole) x-Tom Lehman (660), $330,000 67-71-68-69—275 Peter Senior (387), $193,600 70-69-68-68—275 Loren Roberts (317), $158,400 70-69-73-65—277 Michael Allen (264), $132,000 70-67-72-69—278 Eduardo Romero (162), $80,960 75-67-70-67—279 Nick Price (162), $80,960 68-72-69-70—279 Kenny Perry (162), $80,960 71-65-71-72—279 Mark Calcavecchia (162), $80,960 68-65-71-75—279 Jay Haas (162), $80,960 69-68-68-74—279 Tom Pernice, Jr. (114), $57,200 72-66-68-74—280 David Frost, $52,800 70-71-72-68—281 Jeff Sluman, $44,733 73-73-70-66—282 Mark O’Meara, $44,733 74-69-69-70—282 Chien Soon Lu, $44,733 68-72-69-73—282 Tom Kite, $39,600 73-75-67-68—283

Scott Hoch, $36,300 Mark McNulty, $36,300 Brad Bryant, $29,172 Fred Funk, $29,172 Corey Pavin, $29,172 Mike Goodes, $29,172 Jay Don Blake, $29,172 Rod Spittle, $24,200 Tom Purtzer, $23,100 Keith Fergus, $20,973 John Cook, $20,973 Bruce Vaughan, $20,973 Chip Beck, $17,820 Mark Wiebe, $17,820 Ted Schulz, $17,820 Morris Hatalsky, $17,820 Steve Jones, $15,180 Tom Watson, $15,180 David Peoples, $15,180 Gary Hallberg, $12,430 J.L. Lewis, $12,430 Mike Reid, $12,430 Steve Lowery, $12,430 David Eger, $12,430 Andy Bean, $12,430 Mark Brooks, $10,560 D.A. Weibring, $10,560 Tom Jenkins, $9,680 Bobby Clampett, $9,680 Dana Quigley, $8,360 Denis Watson, $8,360 Hale Irwin, $8,360 Sandy Lyle, $8,360 Jim Thorpe, $6,600 Tim Simpson, $6,600 Wayne Levi, $6,600 Tommy Armour III, $6,600 Allen Doyle, $5,390 Dan Forsman, $5,390 Olin Browne, $4,950 Larry Nelson, $4,950 Bob Gilder, $4,620 Joe Ozaki, $4,290 Bill Glasson, $4,290 Curtis Strange, $3,740 Peter Jacobsen, $3,740 Gil Morgan, $3,740 Fred Couples, $3,190 Bob Tway, $3,190 Scott Simpson, $2,860 Hal Sutton, $2,640 Vicente Fernandez, $2,420 Ronnie Black, $2,200 Ben Crenshaw, $2,068 Doug Tewell, $1,936 Bruce Fleisher, $1,804 Wayne Grady, $1,672 Tom Wargo, $1,540 John Jacobs, $1,452 Fuzzy Zoeller, $1,364

71-71-74-68—284 75-72-69-68—284 72-74-70-69—285 75-72-69-69—285 71-71-69-74—285 76-66-67-76—285 72-69-68-76—285 74-71-70-71—286 74-70-72-71—287 74-71-73-70—288 75-68-73-72—288 77-71-68-72—288 78-69-71-71—289 76-70-71-72—289 70-72-75-72—289 73-73-70-73—289 75-71-73-71—290 73-77-69-71—290 73-75-71-71—290 77-74-68-72—291 71-75-72-73—291 77-72-69-73—291 71-70-75-75—291 74-74-69-74—291 72-73-69-77—291 76-73-72-71—292 70-74-75-73—292 70-77-71-75—293 74-73-70-76—293 76-73-74-71—294 72-74-76-72—294 74-74-73-73—294 75-72-72-75—294 71-76-76-72—295 82-71-70-72—295 68-76-76-75—295 73-74-70-78—295 77-74-76-69—296 72-76-73-75—296 74-76-76-71—297 76-77-70-74—297 78-78-69-73—298 75-74-77-73—299 77-75-75-72—299 74-76-77-73—300 78-74-75-73—300 77-71-73-79—300 72-75-77-77—301 76-73-74-78—301 76-75-74-77—302 77-77-75-74—303 75-78-76-75—304 83-71-75-76—305 77-78-76-75—306 77-78-78-75—308 77-78-78-76—309 80-75-78-77—310 78-82-79-76—315 80-78-81-77—316 80-77-76-86—319

TENNIS ATP Tour ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— Madrid Open Sunday Madrid, Spain Singles Championship Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def. Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, 7-5, 6-4. Internazionali BNL d’Italia Sunday Rome Singles First Round Richard Gasquet (16), France, def. Albert Montanes, Spain, 6-2, 6-3. Filippo Volandri, Italy, def. Thiemo De Bakker, Netherlands, 6-1, 6-2. Juan Monaco, Argentina, def. Andreas Seppi, Italy, 6-1, 4-6, 6-2. Fernando Verdasco, Spain, def. Milos Raonic, Canada, 6-4, 6-4. Florian Mayer, Germany, def. Andrey Golubev, Kazakhstan, 6-4, 6-3. Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany, def. Mikhail Youzhny (13), Russia, 6-4, 6-2.

WTA Tour WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— Madrid Open Sunday Madrid, Spain Singles Championship Petra Kvitova (16), Czech Republic, def. Victoria Azarenka (4), Belarus, 7-6 (3), 6-4.

BASEBALL College Pacific-10 Conference All Times PDT ——— Conference W L Oregon State 14 4 Arizona State 13 5 UCLA 13 7 California 12 9 Arizona 9 9 Stanford 9 9 USC 8 10 Oregon 5 13 Washington State 5 13 Washington 4 14 Sunday’s Games x-Arizona 15, Alcorn State 2 x-UNLV 6, Washington State 3 UCLA 4, Oregon 0 x-Arizona State 17, Long Beach State 9 Stanford 7, Washington 2 Oregon State 4, California 2 Today’s Games x-UNLV at Washington State, noon x-Stanford at Pacific, 6 p.m. x=nonleague

Overall W L 34 11 35 11 26 16 28 16 30 16 25 16 18 26 23 23 20 21 13 30

14 13 13 GA 10 2 13 9 10 10 7 14 10

AUTO RACING Formula 1 Turkish Grand Prix Sunday At Istanbul Park circuit Istanbul, Turkey Lap length: 3.32 miles 1. Sebastian Vettel, Germany, Red Bull, 58 laps, 1:30:17.558, 127.751 mph. 2. Mark Webber, Australia, Red Bull, 58, 1:326.365. 3. Fernando Alonso, Spain, Ferrari, 58, 1:327.633. 4. Lewis Hamilton, England, McLaren, 58, 1:357.790. 5. Nico Rosberg, Germany, Mercedes, 58, 1:31:05.097. 6. Jenson Button, England, McLaren, 58, 1:31:16.989. 7. Nick Heidfeld, Germany, Renault, 58, 1:31:18.415. 8. Vitaly Petrov, Russia, Renault, 58, 1:31:25.726. 9. Sebastien Buemi, Switzerland, Toro Rosso, 58, 1:31:26.952. 10. Kamui Kobayashi, Japan, Sauber, 58, 1:31:35.579. 11. Felipe Massa, Brazil, Ferrari, 58, 1:31:37.381. 12. Michael Schumacher, Germany, Mercedes, 58, 1:31:43.002. 13. Adrian Sutil, Germany, Force India, 57, +1 lap. 14. Sergio Perez, Mexico, Sauber, 57, +1 lap. 15. Rubens Barrichello, Brazil, Williams, 57, +1 lap. 16. Jaime Alguersuari, Spain, Toro Rosso, 57, +1 lap. 17. Pastor Maldonado, Venezuela, Williams, 57, +1 lap. 18. Jarno Trulli, Italy, Team Lotus, 57, +1 lap. 19. Heikki Kovalainen, Finland, Team Lotus, 56, +2 laps. 20. Jerome d’Ambrosio, Belgium, Virgin, 56, +2 laps. 21. Narain Karthikeyan, India, HRT, 55, +3 laps. 22. Vitantonio Liuzzi, Italy, HRT, 53, +5 laps. Not Classfied 23. Paul di Resta, Scotland, Force India, 44, Retired. 24. Timo Glock, Germany, Virgin, 0, Gearbox. ——— Drivers Standings (After 4 of 20 races) 1. Sebastian Vettel, Germany, Red Bull, 93 points. 2. Lewis Hamilton, England, McLaren, 59. 3. Mark Webber, Australia, Red Bull, 55. 4. Jenson Button, England, McLaren, 46. 5. Fernando Alonso, Spain, Ferrari, 41. 6. Felipe Massa, Brazil, Ferrari, 24. 7. Nick Heidfeld, Germany, Renault, 21. 8. Vitaly Petrov, Russia, Renault, 21. 9. Nico Rosberg, Germany, Mercedes, 20. 10. Kamui Kobayashi, Japan, Sauber, 8. 11. Michael Schumacher, Germany, Mercedes, 6. 12. Sebastien Buemi, Switzerland, Toro Rosso, 6. 13. Adrian Sutil, Germany, Force India, 2. 14. Paul di Resta, Scotland, Force India, 2.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX—Placed SS Marco Scutaro on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Joe Iglesias from Pawtucket (IL). KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Traded OF Gregor Blanco to Washington for a player to be named. TAMPA BAY RAYS—Optioned OF Brandon Guyer to Durham (IL). Recalled RHP Rob Delaney from Durham. National League CINCINNATI REDS—Activated RHP Johnny Cueto from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Carlos Fisher to Louisville (IL). HOUSTON ASTROS—Placed OF Jason Bourgeois on the 15-day DL. Selected the contract of INF Joe Inglett from Oklahoma City (PCL). NEW YORK METS—Placed RHP Chris Young on the 15-day DL. Selected the contract of LHP Pat Misch from Buffalo (IL). Transferred LHP Johan Santana from the 15day to the 60-day DL. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES—Placed C Carlos Ruiz on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 28. WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Assigned OF Gregor Blanco to Syracuse (IL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA—Fined Los Angeles Lakers coach Phil Jackson $35,000 for public comments about the officiating. HOCKEY National Hockey League PHOENIX COYOTES—Acquired C Ethan Werek from the N.Y. Rangers for C Oscar Lindberg. COLLEGE ARIZONA—Agreed to a contract extension with men’s basketball coach Sean Miller. DUKE—Named Jeff Capel men’s assistant basketball coach.

FISH COUNT

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts New York 4 1 3 15 Columbus 3 1 4 13 Philadelphia 4 2 1 13 Houston 3 3 3 12 D.C. 3 4 2 11 New England 2 3 4 10

Toronto FC 2 3 4 10 9 Chicago 1 3 4 7 10 Sporting Kansas City 1 4 1 4 10 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Los Angeles 4 2 4 16 12 Real Salt Lake 5 1 0 15 9 Portland 4 3 1 13 11 Colorado 4 3 2 14 11 Seattle 3 3 4 13 12 FC Dallas 3 3 2 11 10 Chivas USA 2 3 3 9 8 Vancouver 1 4 4 7 11 San Jose 1 4 2 5 6 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Wednesday’s Games Los Angeles at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. Toronto FC at FC Dallas, 6 p.m. San Jose at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Games Chicago at Toronto FC, 4 p.m. Colorado at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m. Vancouver at New England, 4:30 p.m. Philadelphia at FC Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Houston at Real Salt Lake, 6 p.m. Columbus at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Sporting Kansas City at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Portland at Seattle FC, 8 p.m. Sunday, May 15 Chivas USA at New York, 4 p.m.

GF 11 8 5 13 12 8

GA 3 6 3 10 17 12

Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Saturday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 9,193 1,323 58 13 The Dalles 6,709 530 23 5 John Day 5,078 441 26 18 McNary 5,786 262 21 12 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Saturday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 105,919 5,173 4,049 1,598 The Dalles 60,073 2,367 1,212 695 John Day 40,548 1,649 2,545 1,663 McNary 24,140 703 2,417 1,517

COLLEGE BASEBALL ROUNDUP

N H L P L AYO F F S

Beavers claim series over Bears

Red Wings still alive after taking 4-3 win over Sharks

From wire reports CORVALLIS — Brian Stamps tallied two hits and three runs and Ben Wetzler scattered one run over seven innings as the thirdranked Oregon State baseball team defeated No. 21 California, 4-2, Sunday afternoon at Goss Stadium. The win gave the Beavers the series victory after splitting a doubleheader on Saturday. Oregon State remains in first place in the Pacific-10 Conference, one game over Arizona State, with a 14-4 record. The Beavers are 3411 on the season. “I’m very happy with the way we came out today,” Oregon State head coach Pat Casey said. “Brian and Kavin (Keyes) were offensive catalysts today and Ben settled down and threw very well after the game-opening home run.” Wetzler allowed a solo home run to Tony Renda to open the game, but settled down

to allow just four hits on the day. He struck out seven and did not walk a batter and did not allow California to dent the scoreboard again in seven full innings to improve to 6-2 this season. Stamps scored three of the Beavers’ four runs, doubled in the seventh and stole bases in the first, second and seventh innings. His second run of the game, coming unearned, was scored on a wild pitch and served as the game-winning run. He gave the club breathing room in the seventh when he doubled to open the inning. After a short rain delay, he moved to third on a sacrifice bunt by Jared Norris, and later scored when Keyes singled through a drawnin infield. That gave the Beavers a 4-1 advantage, with the game ending on a two-run cushion when Cal scored a solo run in the eighth off reliever Matt Boyd. Renda’s home run gave Cal a quick 1-0

advantage, but the Beavers put two runs on the board on solo singles by both Norris and Keyes. Also on Sunday: UCLA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Oregon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 EUGENE — Adam Plutko’s completegame shutout gave the series sweep to UCLA as the Ducks fell at PK Park. With the loss, Oregon (23-23, 5-13) was swept for just the second time this season and falls back to .500 for the first time since April 9. Plutko (4-3), a freshman, held Oregon to a season low two hits in his nine innings on the mound, as the right-hander tossed the first complete game and shutout of his career. He issued just one walk while striking out seven. His counterpart, Alex Keudell, shut out UCLA on five hits and four walks over 6 2⁄3 innings, while fanning four.

The Associated Press SAN JOSE, Calif. — The Detroit Red Wings are coming home with a chance to take a step toward history. Suddenly, that seems well within reach. Tomas Holmstrom broke a tie with 6:08 remaining, and the Red Wings scored three thirdperiod goals to avoid elimination with a 4-3 victory over the San Jose Sharks on Sunday night. “There’s a lot of character on this team. There’s not any quit,” said Detroit goalie Jimmy Howard, who made 39 saves. “Our season was on the line there in

the third period, and we found a way.” Danny Cleary and Jonathan Ericsson also scored in the final period to send the series back to Detroit for Game 6 on Tuesday night. After winning the first three games, San Jose is clinging to a 3-2 lead. Logan Couture, Joe Pavelski and Devin Setoguchi scored to help the Sharks take a 3-1 lead early in the third period. Then the Red Wings scored two quick goals before Holmstrom redirected the winner past Antti Niemi, leaving a sellout crowd stunned and silent.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 9, 2011 D3

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL NL BOXSCORES Giants 3, Rockies 0 Colorado Fowler cf Herrera 2b C.Gonzalez lf Tulowitzki ss Giambi 1b S.Smith rf Iannetta c Stewart 3b De La Rosa p Belisle p a-Amezaga ph F.Morales p Totals

AB 4 4 3 4 3 3 3 3 1 0 1 0 29

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 1

SO 2 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 7

Avg. .258 .290 .241 .248 .130 .283 .230 .073 .250 --.333 ---

San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rowand cf 2 0 0 0 1 2 .271 F.Sanchez 2b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .272 Fontenot ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .250 Posey 1b 2 1 0 0 2 0 .241 Burrell lf 3 1 1 0 0 2 .239 Schierholtz rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .254 C.Ross rf-lf 3 1 2 3 1 0 .240 Tejada 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .195 Whiteside c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .150 Vogelsong p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .333 Ja.Lopez p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Br.Wilson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 26 3 5 3 6 8 Colorado 000 000 000 — 0 3 1 San Francisco 000 102 00x — 3 5 1 a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Belisle in the 8th. E—C.Gonzalez (1), Fontenot (3). LOB—Colorado 4, San Francisco 6. 2B—Burrell (4), Vogelsong (1). HR—C.Ross (1), off De La Rosa. RBIs—C.Ross 3 (4). CS—Rowand (2). S—De La Rosa. Runners left in scoring position—Colorado 2 (Fowler, Giambi); San Francisco 3 (Burrell, Fontenot, Whiteside). Runners moved up—F.Sanchez. GIDP—Giambi, Fontenot, Tejada. DP—Colorado 2 (Herrera, Giambi), (Herrera, Tulowitzki, Giambi); San Francisco 1 (Posey, Fontenot, Ja.Lopez). Colorado IP H R ER BB DL Rosa L, 4-1 6 4 3 3 5 Belisle 1 1 0 0 0 F.Morales 1 0 0 0 1 S. Francisco IP H R ER BB Voglsng W, 2-0 6 1-3 1 0 0 1 Ja.Lopez H, 5 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 Wilsn S, 11-12 1 1 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—Ja.Lopez Belisle (Rowand). WP—De La Rosa. T—2:52. A—42,132 (41,915).

SO 7 1 0 SO 4 1 2 2-0.

NP ERA 115 3.14 20 3.86 22 2.08 NP ERA 99 3.05 16 0.64 16 4.70 HBP—by

Padres 4, Diamondbacks 3 Arizona AB R H C.Young cf 4 0 0 R.Roberts 2b 4 0 0 J.Upton rf 4 1 1 Montero c 4 0 3 Nady 1b 3 0 0 Mora 3b 4 1 2 G.Parra lf 4 0 1 Jo.Wilson ss 3 1 1 c-K.Johnson ph 1 0 0 J.Saunders p 2 0 2 a-Miranda ph 1 0 0 J.Gutierrez p 0 0 0 Da.Hernandez p 0 0 0 d-Branyan ph 0 0 0 Totals 34 3 10

BI 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2

SO 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4

Avg. .213 .287 .260 .280 .244 .288 .276 .222 .175 .231 .228 ----.240

San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Denorfia rf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .333 Bartlett ss 4 1 1 1 0 0 .218 Ludwick lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .195 Headley 3b 2 1 0 0 2 0 .245 Cantu 1b 4 1 2 3 0 0 .200 Maybin cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .240 Ro.Johnson c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .265 Forsythe 2b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Harang p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .083 b-E.Patterson ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .146 Adams p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --H.Bell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 4 6 4 4 5 Arizona 020 000 010 — 3 10 1 San Diego 400 000 00x — 4 6 1 a-struck out for J.Saunders in the 7th. b-struck out for Harang in the 7th. c-lined out for Jo.Wilson in the 9th. d-walked for Da.Hernandez in the 9th. E—Montero (7), Forsythe (1). LOB—Arizona 7, San Diego 6. 2B—J.Upton (9), Jo.Wilson (1), Bartlett (1). HR—Cantu (3), off J.Saunders. RBIs—Nady (7), Jo.Wilson (1), J.Saunders (1), Bartlett (5), Cantu 3 (12). SB—Denorfia (2). CS—C.Young (2). SF—Nady. Runners left in scoring position—Arizona 1 (Montero); San Diego 2 (Ro.Johnson 2). Runners moved up—G.Parra, Ludwick. GIDP—Mora, G.Parra. DP—San Diego 2 (Harang, Bartlett, Cantu), (Bartlett, Forsythe, Cantu). Arizona IP H R ER Saunders L, 0-4 6 5 4 4 J.Gutierrez 1 0 0 0 Da.Hernandez 1 1 0 0 San Diego IP H R ER Harang W, 5-2 7 8 2 2 Adams H, 8 1 2 1 1 H.Bell S, 8-9 1 0 0 0 WP—Harang. T—2:32. A—21,490 (42,691).

BB 3 0 1 BB 1 0 1

SO 3 1 1 SO 2 1 1

NP 104 14 23 NP 94 13 12

ERA 5.72 4.40 1.65 ERA 4.07 1.06 1.29

Cardinals 3, Brewers 1 Milwaukee Weeks 2b Kotsay rf Braun lf Fielder 1b McGehee 3b Y.Betancourt ss Lucroy c C.Gomez cf Narveson p a-B.Boggs ph Hawkins p Mitre p b-Counsell ph Totals

AB 5 4 4 3 2 4 4 2 2 1 0 0 1 32

R 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 5 1 5

SO 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .286 .250 .307 .283 .260 .237 .281 .242 .077 .083 ----.243

St. Louis AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Theriot ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .287 Rasmus cf 4 0 1 2 0 0 .303 Pujols 1b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .248 Holliday lf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .398 Berkman rf 4 1 0 0 0 2 .374 Jay rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .229 Y.Molina c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Punto 3b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .209 Greene 2b 3 1 3 0 0 0 .250 McClellan p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .250 E.Sanchez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Salas p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 30 3 8 3 1 5 Milwaukee 000 000 001 — 1 5 1 St. Louis 000 021 00x — 3 8 1 a-grounded out for Narveson in the 7th. b-singled for Mitre in the 9th. E—McGehee (5), Greene (2). LOB—Milwaukee 9, St. Louis 7. 2B—C.Gomez (5), Rasmus (6), Pujols (2), Holliday (11). RBIs—Counsell (2), Rasmus 2 (14), Punto (6). S—Y.Molina, McClellan. SF—Punto. Runners left in scoring position—Milwaukee 5 (Y.Betancourt 2, Weeks 3); St. Louis 5 (Punto, Rasmus, Y.Molina, Holliday 2). Runners moved up—Narveson, Theriot 2, Y.Molina. DP—St. Louis 1 (Greene, Pujols, Pujols, Y.Molina). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Narveson L, 1-3 6 7 3 2 1 5 107 4.38 Hawkins 1 1 0 0 0 0 18 1.59 Mitre 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 2.25 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McCleln W, 5-0 8 4 1 1 3 3 106 3.30 E.Sanchez H, 4 2-3 1 0 0 2 1 29 2.77 Salas S, 3-3 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 3 1.42 McClellan pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—E.Sanchez 1-1, Salas 3-0. T—2:41. A—40,125 (43,975).

AB 4 3 4 4 3 3 0 4 3 2 0 0 1

R 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 31 2

0 0 5

0 0 2

0 0 1

0 --0 .245 6

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fukudome rf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .359 S.Castro ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .300 Byrd cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .299 Ar.Ramirez 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .273 Je.Baker 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .344 A.Soriano lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .250 C.Pena 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .198 Soto c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .226 Dempster p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .077 a-Re.Johnson ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .367 Samardzija p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Marmol p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-DeWitt ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .308 Totals 33 0 6 0 2 8 Cincinnati 010 010 000 — 2 5 1 Chicago 000 000 000 — 0 6 0 a-was hit by a pitch for Dempster in the 7th. b-flied out for LeCure in the 8th. c-flied out for Marmol in the 9th. E—Renteria (5). LOB—Cincinnati 5, Chicago 9. 2B—Stubbs (5). HR—Stubbs (6), off Dempster. RBIs— Stubbs (18), R.Hernandez (10). S—Renteria. Runners left in scoring position—Cincinnati 2 (B.Phillips, R.Hernandez); Chicago 6 (Ar.Ramirez 2, Soto, S.Castro 2, A.Soriano). Runners moved up—J.Gomes. GIDP—S.Castro. DP—Cincinnati 1 (Cairo, B.Phillips, Votto). Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cueto W, 1-0 6 5 0 0 1 4 102 0.00 Bray H, 4 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 0.73 LeCure H, 2 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 11 3.91 Masset H, 4 1 1 0 0 0 2 15 5.12 Cordero S, 6-7 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 2.30 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Dempster L, 1-4 7 5 2 2 0 4 81 7.20 Samardzija 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 2.33 Marmol 1 0 0 0 1 1 16 1.72 Cueto pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Bray 1-0, LeCure 1-0. HBP—by LeCure (Re.Johnson), by Marmol (J.Gomes). Balk—Cueto, Masset. T—2:32. A—31,931 (41,159).

Marlins 8, Nationals 0 Washington Bernadina cf-rf Desmond ss Coffey p Broderick p b-Stairs ph H.Rodriguez p L.Nix rf-cf Ad.LaRoche 1b Morse lf Hairston Jr. 3b I.Rodriguez c Espinosa 2b L.Hernandez p a-Cora ph-ss Totals

AB 4 3 0 0 1 0 4 4 4 4 4 2 0 1 31

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB SO 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 0 1 13

Avg. .364 .217 ----.056 --.259 .196 .241 .220 .214 .221 .091 .222

Florida AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bonifacio lf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .316 Coghlan cf 3 2 1 0 2 0 .252 H.Ramirez ss 5 1 1 1 0 1 .195 G.Sanchez 1b 4 3 4 3 1 0 .328 Stanton rf 5 0 1 1 0 2 .233 Badenhop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Dobbs 3b 3 0 3 2 1 0 .359 J.Buck c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .241 Infante 2b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .242 Ani.Sanchez p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 R.Webb p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Petersen ph-rf 0 1 0 0 1 0 .000 Totals 33 8 13 7 6 7 Washington 000 000 000 — 0 4 0 Florida 010 140 11x — 8 13 1 a-lined out for L.Hernandez in the 6th. b-struck out for Broderick in the 8th. c-walked for R.Webb in the 8th. E—Infante (1). LOB—Washington 7, Florida 9. 2B— Coghlan (9), G.Sanchez 2 (8), Dobbs (3). HR—G.Sanchez (5), off L.Hernandez. RBIs—H.Ramirez (13), G.Sanchez 3 (20), Stanton (14), Dobbs 2 (12). SB—H.Ramirez (7). S—L.Hernandez, Ani.Sanchez 2. Runners left in scoring position—Washington 4 (Desmond, I.Rodriguez 2, L.Nix); Florida 6 (Ani.Sanchez, Bonifacio 2, Infante 2, Stanton). Runners moved up—Bernadina, Hairston Jr., Bonifacio, Coghlan, Stanton. GIDP—J.Buck. DP—Washington 2 (Desmond, Espinosa), (Hairston Jr., Espinosa, Ad.LaRoche). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hernandz L, 3-4 5 8 6 6 2 2 86 4.29 Coffey 1 2 0 0 0 1 17 3.38 Broderick 1 3 1 1 1 2 22 6.35 H.Rodriguez 1 0 1 1 3 2 27 1.80 Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sanchez W, 2-1 7 2 0 0 0 11 117 3.46 R.Webb 1 1 0 0 1 1 22 3.31 Badenhop 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 0.00 HBP—by Ani.Sanchez (Espinosa). WP—H.Rodriguez 2. T—2:58. A—10,523 (38,560).

Pirates 5, Astros 4 Houston AB Bourn cf 5 Barmes ss 3 Pence rf 4 Ca.Lee lf 4 Bogusevic lf 0 Wallace 1b 3 C.Johnson 3b 4 Hall 2b 4 Quintero c 4 Happ p 1 a-Ang.Sanchez ph 1 Fulchino p 0 Abad p 0 W.Lopez p 0 c-Inglett ph 1 Totals 34

R 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 4 2

SO 1 2 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .258 .207 .297 .228 .375 .339 .194 .221 .256 .455 .278 ------.200

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.McCutchen cf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .228 Tabata lf 2 0 0 0 2 1 .231 Diaz rf 3 0 2 0 0 0 .242 Resop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Beimel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --D.McCutchen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-G.Jones ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .259 Overbay 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .228 Walker 2b 3 2 2 0 1 1 .295 Pearce 1b 2 1 1 1 1 0 .258 Hanrahan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Doumit c 3 1 1 3 1 0 .263 Br.Wood 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Cedeno ss 4 0 1 1 0 0 .211 Ja.McDonald p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .083 Paul rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .290 Totals 29 5 8 5 5 4 Houston 000 000 310 — 4 8 0 Pittsburgh 100 100 03x — 5 8 1 a-singled for Happ in the 7th. b-grounded out for D.McCutchen in the 8th. c-grounded out for W.Lopez in the 9th. E—D.McCutchen (1). LOB—Houston 6, Pittsburgh 6. 2B—Ca.Lee (5), Quintero (5). HR—C.Johnson (4), off Resop; Doumit (3), off Abad. RBIs—Wallace (11), C.Johnson (13), Quintero (7), Ang.Sanchez (16), Pearce (3), Doumit 3 (12), Cedeno (9). CS—Tabata (2). SF—Wallace, Pearce. Runners left in scoring position—Houston 2 (Wallace 2); Pittsburgh 4 (Doumit, Ja.McDonald 2, Pearce). Runners moved up—Bourn. GIDP—Ja.McDonald. DP—Houston 1 (Hall, Barmes, Wallace). Houston IP H R ER BB SO Happ 6 6 2 2 4 3 Fulchino H, 4 1 0 0 0 0 1 Abad L, 1-3 1-3 2 3 3 1 0 W.Lopez 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO Ja.McDonald 6 3 0 0 2 8 Resop BS, 2-2 0 3 3 3 0 0 Beimel 1 1 0 0 0 0 McCtchn W, 1-0 1 1 1 1 0 0 Hnrhn S, 10-10 1 0 0 0 0 0 Resop pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Beimel 1-1. T—2:45. A—17,946 (38,362).

NP 98 10 14 3 NP 96 15 13 14 8

ERA 5.75 2.81 7.50 5.14 ERA 5.65 4.41 3.12 0.64 1.50

Dodgers 4, Mets 2

Reds 2, Cubs 0 Cincinnati Stubbs cf Renteria ss Votto 1b B.Phillips 2b Bruce rf J.Gomes lf Cordero p R.Hernandez c Cairo 3b Cueto p Bray p LeCure p b-F.Lewis ph

Masset p Heisey lf Totals

H BI BB 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 1 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

Avg. .264 .308 .333 .305 .258 .184 --.303 .254 .000 --.200 .250

Los Angeles Carroll ss Miles 2b Ethier rf Kemp cf Uribe 3b Loney 1b Sands lf Guerrier p Padilla p Barajas c Kershaw p Jansen p Gwynn Jr. lf Totals

AB 5 4 4 3 4 4 3 0 0 4 2 0 1 34

R H 1 3 0 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 10

BI 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 5

Avg. .311 .256 .371 .338 .213 .227 .214 ----.216 .235 --.242

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division New York Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Baltimore Central Division Cleveland Kansas City Detroit Minnesota Chicago West Division Los Angeles Oakland Texas Seattle

W 19 20 16 15 14 W 22 18 17 12 13 W 20 18 18 16

L 13 14 18 19 19 L 11 16 18 20 22 L 15 17 17 19

Pct .594 .588 .471 .441 .424 Pct .667 .529 .486 .375 .371 Pct .571 .514 .514 .457

NATIONAL LEAGUE GB — — 4 5 5½ GB — 4½ 6 9½ 10 GB — 2 2 4

Sunday’s Games Detroit 5, Toronto 2 Boston 9, Minnesota 5 Tampa Bay 5, Baltimore 3 N.Y. Yankees 12, Texas 5 Oakland 5, Kansas City 2 L.A. Angels 6, Cleveland 5 Chicago White Sox 5, Seattle 2, 10 innings

WCGB — — 4 5 5½ WCGB — 2 3½ 7 7½ WCGB — 2½ 2½ 4½

L10 5-5 7-3 5-5 4-6 4-6 L10 7-3 6-4 5-5 3-7 3-7 L10 6-4 6-4 3-7 6-4

Str W-1 W-4 W-2 L-2 L-4 Str L-1 L-1 W-2 L-2 W-2 Str W-1 W-1 L-1 L-2

Home Away 12-6 7-7 9-10 11-4 10-9 6-9 7-7 8-12 7-11 7-8 Home Away 13-2 9-9 15-8 3-8 9-7 8-11 4-6 8-14 5-11 8-11 Home Away 8-8 12-7 8-8 10-9 12-7 6-10 8-11 8-8

East Division Philadelphia Florida Atlanta Washington New York Central Division St. Louis Cincinnati Pittsburgh Chicago Milwaukee Houston West Division Colorado San Francisco Los Angeles Arizona San Diego

Today’s Games Detroit (Scherzer 5-0) at Toronto (Morrow 1-1), 4:07 p.m. Minnesota (Blackburn 2-4) at Boston (Beckett 2-1), 4:10 p.m. Oakland (Cahill 5-0) at Texas (C.Wilson 4-1), 5:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (E.Jackson 2-4) at L.A. Angels (E.Santana 1-3), 7:05 p.m.

W 22 20 20 16 15 W 20 18 17 15 14 13 W 18 18 16 15 14

L 11 13 16 18 19 L 15 16 17 18 20 21 L 14 16 19 18 20

Pct .667 .606 .556 .471 .441 Pct .571 .529 .500 .455 .412 .382 Pct .563 .529 .457 .455 .412

GB — 2 3½ 6½ 7½ GB — 1½ 2½ 4 5½ 6½ GB — 1 3½ 3½ 5

Sunday’s Games L.A. Dodgers 4, N.Y. Mets 2 Florida 8, Washington 0 Pittsburgh 5, Houston 4 St. Louis 3, Milwaukee 1 Cincinnati 2, Chicago Cubs 0 San Diego 4, Arizona 3 San Francisco 3, Colorado 0 Atlanta 5, Philadelphia 2

WCGB — — 1½ 4½ 5½ WCGB — 2½ 3½ 5 6½ 7½ WCGB — 2½ 5 5 6½

L10 7-3 5-5 7-3 5-5 4-6 L10 6-4 6-4 6-4 5-5 2-8 4-6 L10 3-7 6-4 4-6 5-5 5-5

Str L-1 W-1 W-1 L-1 L-1 Str W-1 W-1 W-2 L-1 L-1 L-2 Str L-4 W-3 W-1 L-1 W-1

Home 13-7 11-7 9-7 9-7 8-11 Home 10-9 10-9 6-9 7-10 8-5 7-9 Home 7-6 7-5 9-9 10-9 7-14

Away 9-4 9-6 11-9 7-11 7-8 Away 10-6 8-7 11-8 8-8 6-15 6-12 Away 11-8 11-11 7-10 5-9 7-6

Today’s Games L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 2-1) at Pittsburgh (Karstens 2-1), 4:05 p.m. Philadelphia (Blanton 0-1) at Florida (Vazquez 2-2), 4:10 p.m. Cincinnati (T.Wood 1-3) at Houston (An. Rodriguez 0-0), 5:05 p.m. San Diego (Latos 0-4) at Milwaukee (Greinke 0-1), 5:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Capuano 2-3) at Colorado (Chacin 4-2), 5:40 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• White Sox 5, Mariners 2: SEATTLE — Paul Konerko returned to the White Sox lineup and tied his career high with five hits, including a single in the 10th inning, that helped Chicago beat Seattle. Alexei Ramirez drove in the go-ahead run with a double to the left-center field gap. • Yankees 12, Rangers 5: ARLINGTON, Texas — Derek Jeter homered twice after going 62 games without a long ball, Curtis Granderson went deep again and the New York Yankees beat Texas despite an erratic outing by CC Sabathia. Francisco Cervelli hit a grand slam and Mark Teixeira added a two-run shot in the eighth, a six-run outburst off rookie Cody Eppley. • Angels 6, Indians 5: ANAHEIM, Calif. — Peter Bourjos drove in the tying run in the eighth inning with an infield single, Erick Aybar followed with a two-run double and Los Angeles beat Cleveland to give Mike Scioscia his 1,000th victory as a major league manager. Angels reliever Fernando Rodney (2-1) got credit for the win, despite blowing a 3-2 lead for Dan Haren in the top of the eighth. Travis Hafner had an RBI infield hit and Orlando Cabrera a run-scoring fielder’s choice. • Red Sox 9, Twins 5: BOSTON — Adrian Gonzalez homered, Kevin Youkilis scored four runs and Daisuke Matsuzaka settled down to pitch six innings after a rough first, leading Boston over Minnesota. Jacoby Ellsbury, of Madras, had three hits and extended his hitting streak to 17 games. Gonzalez, J.D. Drew and Jed Lowrie each drove in two runs for the Red Sox. • Tigers 5, Blue Jays 2: TORONTO — Brad Penny pitched well into the eighth inning and Detroit followed Justin Verlander’s no-hitter by beating Toronto. Austin Jackson hit a tiebreaking home run, Jose Valverde struck out the side in the ninth for his seventh save and the 200th of his career, becoming the 41st player in major league history to reach the mark. • Rays 5, Orioles 3: BALTIMORE — B.J. Upton drove in four runs and Tampa Bay beat Baltimore for a three-game sweep. Matt Joyce hit two doubles and scored twice for the Rays, who set a single-season franchise record with their eighth consecutive road win. Tampa Bay is 20-8 overall since starting the season with six straight defeats, including three at home against the Orioles to open the season. • Athletics 5, Royals 2: KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Kevin Kouzmanoff and Kurt Suzuki each homered for Oakland and Conor Jackson collected three hits to help Tyson Ross win his first game in four starts. Ross (2-2), who moved into the rotation last month when Dallas Braden went on the disabled list, went six innings and gave up two runs on six hits, with three walks and four strikeouts. He has not allowed a home run in 28 2⁄3 innings.

• Marlins 8, Nationals 0: MIAMI — Anibal Sanchez took a no-hitter into the seventh inning and struck out a career-high 11 to help Florida salvage the final game of its series against Washington. Washington’s first hit came on the 101st pitch from Sanchez, when Laynce Nix led off the seventh with a line single to right, just beyond the reach of a diving Mike Stanton. • Reds 2, Cubs 0: CHICAGO — Johnny Cueto was strong in his season debut, allowing five hits and pitching into the seventh for Cincinnati. Drew Stubbs hit his sixth homer for the Reds and Cueto (1-0), who was activated off the disabled list before the game, won a pitcher’s duel with Ryan Dempster (1-4). • Giants 3, Rockies 0: SAN FRANCISCO — Ryan Vogelsong and two relievers combined on a threehitter and San Francisco completed its first series sweep of the season. Cody Ross homered and drove in all three runs to help the defending World Series champions beat the Rockies for the third straight day and pull within a game of the NL West leaders. • Cardinals 3, Brewers 1: ST. LOUIS — Unbeaten Kyle McClellan worked into the ninth inning to become the NL’s third five-game winner and the Cardinals’ bullpen labored to get the final three outs. Colby Rasmus had a two-run double and Tyler Greene matched his career best with three hits for the NL Central-leading Cardinals. • Dodgers 4, Mets 2: NEW YORK — Andre Ethier got back on track with a two-run homer, Clayton Kershaw struck out eight and struggling Los Angeles snapped a four-game losing streak. Ethier also singled after going zero for four on Saturday night to end his 30-game hitting streak. • Pirates 5, Astros 4: PITTSBURGH — Ryan Doumit hit a three-run homer in the eighth inning and the Pirates improved to .500 this late in a season for the first time in six years. Doumit’s drive to left off Fernando Abad (1-3) was his third homer of the season. The Pirates have won five of seven and are 17-17. • Padres 4, Diamondbacks 3: SAN DIEGO — Jorge Cantu hit a three-run homer and Aaron Harang pitched seven solid innings to lead the Padres. Cantu, hitting .184 coming into the game, homered in the first to cap a four-run burst. • Braves 5, Phillies 2: PHILADELPHIA — Jair Jurrjens pitched neatly into the seventh inning, Freddie Freeman, Alex Gonzalez and Eric Hinske homered, and Atlanta beat Philadelphia. Jurrjens (4-0) allowed one run and eight hits in 6 1⁄3 innings to outduel Cole Hamels. Jurrjens hasn’t allowed more than two earned runs in any start, and has a 1.50 ERA.

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jos.Reyes ss 5 0 2 1 0 1 .331 Turner 2b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .286 d-Beltran ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .295 D.Wright 3b 3 0 0 0 2 2 .240 Bay lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .241 R.Paulino c 4 0 2 1 0 0 .474 I.Davis 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .293 Hairston rf 3 0 2 0 0 0 .200 b-Harris ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .206 Pridie cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .279 Dickey p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .091 a-Hu ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .056 O’Connor p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Dan.Murphy ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .256 Totals 34 2 8 2 4 10 Los Angeles 001 100 200 — 4 10 0 New York 100 000 001 — 2 8 0 a-struck out for Dickey in the 7th. b-struck out for Hairston in the 8th. c-singled for O’Connor in the 9th. d-flied out for Turner in the 9th. LOB—Los Angeles 7, New York 10. 3B—Jos. Reyes (6). HR—Ethier (4), off Dickey. RBIs—Miles (6), Ethier 2 (19), Barajas (13), Jos.Reyes (12), R.Paulino (2). SB—Turner (1). S—Miles, Dickey. Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 3 (Kemp, Uribe 2); New York 6 (I.Davis, Jos.Reyes, R.Paulino, Bay 2, D.Wright). Runners moved up—Carroll, Miles, Bay. GIDP— Kemp. DP—New York 1 (Dickey, R.Paulino, I.Davis). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO Kershaw W, 4-3 6 2-3 6 1 1 3 8 Jansen H, 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 Guerrier H, 4 1 0 0 0 0 1 Padilla S, 2-2 1 2 1 1 0 1 New York IP H R ER BB SO Dickey L, 1-4 7 10 4 3 2 3 O’Connor 2 0 0 0 0 2 Inherited runners-scored—Jansen 2-0. Dickey (Kershaw). PB—R.Paulino. T—2:55. A—26,312 (41,800).

NP ERA 111 3.12 11 6.75 7 3.50 18 2.57 NP ERA 108 4.50 26 0.00 HBP—by

Braves 5, Phillies 2 Atlanta AB R Prado lf 4 0 Heyward rf 3 0 C.Jones 3b 4 0 McCann c 4 0 Uggla 2b 4 0 Freeman 1b 4 2 Ale.Gonzalez ss 3 1 Di.Hernandez ss 0 0 McLouth cf 2 1 Jurrjens p 2 0 O’Flaherty p 0 0 c-Hinske ph 1 1 Venters p 0 0 e-Conrad ph 0 0 Kimbrel p 0 0 Totals 31 5

H BI BB 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 8 5 5

Philadelphia Rollins ss Victorino cf

H BI BB SO Avg. 1 0 1 0 .285 2 0 0 1 .293

AB R 4 1 5 1

SO 0 2 2 2 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .268 .226 .272 .307 .207 .241 .252 --.267 .000 --.342 --.143 ---

Polanco 3b 5 0 2 2 0 0 .366 Howard 1b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .268 B.Francisco rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .232 Ibanez lf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .212 W.Valdez 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .247 d-Mayberry ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .289 M.Martinez 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .158 Sardinha c 2 0 1 0 0 0 .222 a-Schneider ph-c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .174 Hamels p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .294 b-Orr ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .268 Stutes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Mathieson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Baez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --f-Gload ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .316 Totals 36 2 12 2 2 4 Atlanta 020 010 020 — 5 8 0 Philadelphia 001 000 010 — 2 12 0 a-lined out for Sardinha in the 7th. b-singled for Hamels in the 7th. c-homered for O’Flaherty in the 8th. d-flied out for W.Valdez in the 8th. e-walked for Venters in the 9th. f-singled for Baez in the 9th. LOB—Atlanta 5, Philadelphia 10. 2B—Victorino (6), W.Valdez (4). 3B—Victorino (4). HR—Ale.Gonzalez (5), off Hamels; Freeman (4), off Hamels; Hinske (3), off Stutes. RBIs—Freeman (12), Ale.Gonzalez 2 (16), Hinske 2 (9), Polanco 2 (23). CS—Prado (3). S—Di.Hernandez, B.Francisco. Runners left in scoring position—Atlanta 3 (Uggla, Prado 2); Philadelphia 6 (Howard, Sardinha, B.Francisco, W.Valdez, Mayberry, Polanco). Runners moved up—Victorino, Polanco. GIDP—Prado, Jurrjens, Rollins, W.Valdez. DP—Atlanta 2 (Ale.Gonzalez, Uggla, Freeman), (Ale. Gonzalez, Uggla, Freeman); Philadelphia 3 (Sardinha, Sardinha, Rollins), (Hamels, Rollins, W.Valdez), (Rollins, Howard). Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jurrjens W, 4-0 6 1-3 8 1 1 1 2 91 1.50 O’Flaherty H, 6 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 1.02 Venters 1 3 1 1 0 0 24 0.96 Kimbrel S, 8-10 1 1 0 0 1 2 23 1.72 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hamels L, 4-2 7 5 3 3 1 9 92 2.83 Stutes 1-3 1 2 2 2 0 15 3.86 Mathieson 1 2 0 0 2 0 24 0.00 Baez 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 4.20 Inherited runners-scored—O’Flaherty 1-0, Mathieson 1-0, Baez 3-0. T—2:53. A—45,619 (43,651).

AL BOXSCORES White Sox 5, Mariners 2 (10 innings) Chicago Pierre lf Al.Ramirez ss A.Dunn dh Konerko 1b Rios cf Lillibridge rf a-Teahen ph-rf R.Castro c Beckham 2b

AB 3 3 5 5 5 3 2 5 4

R 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 1 1 1 2 1 1 0 5 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0

SO 1 2 2 0 0 2 1 3 1

Avg. .260 .244 .167 .323 .213 .290 .240 .219 .222

Morel 3b Totals

4 1 2 0 39 5 12 4

0 2 .229 3 14

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. I.Suzuki rf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .308 L.Rodriguez 3b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .196 Bradley lf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .218 Olivo c 4 0 2 0 0 0 .212 Smoak 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .293 Cust dh 3 1 1 0 1 1 .198 1-A.Kennedy pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .260 Ja.Wilson 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .244 M.Saunders cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .170 Ryan ss 4 0 2 1 0 1 .208 Totals 36 2 9 2 1 6 Chicago 000 200 000 3 — 5 12 0 Seattle 000 020 000 0 — 2 9 2 a-struck out for Lillibridge in the 9th. 1-ran for Cust in the 9th. E—J.Wright (1), Olivo (3). LOB—Chicago 8, Seattle 6. 2B—Al.Ramirez (3), A.Dunn (4), Konerko (4), Cust (5). RBIs—Al.Ramirez (11), A.Dunn (14), Rios (9), R.Castro (3), I.Suzuki (14), Ryan (8). SB—Lillibridge (4), Bradley (4). S—Pierre. SF—I.Suzuki. Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 5 (Al. Ramirez, Beckham, R.Castro 2, Rios); Seattle 2 (Smoak, Cust). GIDP—Rios 2, Smoak. DP—Chicago 1 (Al.Ramirez, Beckham, Konerko); Seattle 2 (L.Rodriguez, Ja.Wilson, Smoak), (Ryan, Ja.Wilson, Smoak). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO Buehrle 8 9 2 2 0 3 S.Santos W, 1-0 2 0 0 0 1 3 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO Bedard 5 5 2 1 2 9 Pauley 2 1 0 0 0 2 J.Wright 1 1 0 0 1 0 League L, 0-1 1 1-3 3 3 3 0 2 Laffey 2-3 2 0 0 0 1 Inherited runners-scored—Laffey 1-1. T—3:09. A—26,074 (47,878).

NP 99 23 NP 100 27 17 22 21

ERA 4.05 0.00 ERA 4.78 1.40 1.17 3.77 1.59

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 1 2 2 1 0 1 2 2 2 14

Avg. .288 .270 .225 .218 .347 .287 .276 .258 .159 .333

H BI BB 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 2 0 0 2 1 0

SO 1 0 0 1 1 0 2 2

Avg. .356 .264 .239 .330 .179 .291 .322 .300

Angels 6, Indians 5 Cleveland G.Sizemore cf A.Cabrera ss Choo rf C.Santana c Hafner dh 1-Brantley pr-dh O.Cabrera 2b LaPorta 1b Kearns lf Everett 3b Totals

AB 5 5 5 4 4 0 4 3 4 4 38

R H 2 3 1 2 0 1 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 5 11

Los Angeles Aybar ss Abreu rf Tor.Hunter rf M.Izturis dh V.Wells lf Callaspo 3b H.Kendrick 2b Conger c

AB 5 3 1 4 4 4 4 4

R 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0

BI 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 5

Trumbo 1b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .274 Bourjos cf 3 1 2 1 1 0 .303 Totals 36 6 12 6 1 8 Cleveland 010 010 021 — 5 11 1 Los Angeles 000 003 03x — 6 12 0 1-ran for Hafner in the 8th. E—Everett (2). LOB—Cleveland 8, Los Angeles 8. 2B—G.Sizemore (10), A.Cabrera (6), Aybar (7), Callaspo (6), H.Kendrick (9). HR—G.Sizemore (5), off Haren. RBIs—G.Sizemore (10), A.Cabrera (22), Hafner (14), O.Cabrera (20), Kearns (2), Aybar 2 (9), Callaspo 2 (13), Conger (11), Bourjos (10). SB—O.Cabrera (2). Runners left in scoring position—Cleveland 4 (Everett, Hafner, Kearns, C.Santana); Los Angeles 5 (Abreu, Bourjos, Trumbo, V.Wells, Tor.Hunter). Runners moved up—Aybar. Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Carmona 7 8 3 0 1 7 109 3.83 R.Perez H, 5 2-3 1 1 1 0 1 11 0.68 J.Smith L, 1-1 1-3 3 2 2 0 0 11 3.38 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Haren 6 2-3 6 2 2 1 10 106 1.87 S.Downs H, 2 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 0.00 Rodney W, 2-1 1 3 2 2 0 1 20 4.02 Walden S, 6-7 1 2 1 1 0 2 24 2.20 Inherited runners-scored—J.Smith 1-1, S.Downs 10. HBP—by Carmona (Abreu), by Rodney (LaPorta). T—2:50. A—40,124 (45,389).

Yankees 12, Rangers 5 New York Jeter ss Granderson cf Teixeira 1b Al.Rodriguez 3b Cano 2b Swisher rf Posada dh a-E.Nunez ph-dh Gardner lf Cervelli c Totals

AB 6 4 5 4 4 5 3 1 5 5 42

R 2 3 1 0 0 1 1 0 2 2 12

H 4 3 2 1 0 1 1 0 3 1 16

BI 3 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 12

BB 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 3

SO 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 3

Avg. .276 .283 .259 .263 .290 .217 .152 .357 .233 .200

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 4 1 0 0 1 0 .209 Andrus ss 5 1 3 1 0 1 .270 Mi.Young dh 3 1 0 0 2 0 .341 A.Beltre 3b 4 1 1 1 1 0 .239 Napoli 1b-c 5 0 1 2 0 1 .206 Dav.Murphy lf 3 0 1 1 0 1 .273 Torrealba c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .242 C.Davis 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Gentry rf-cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .333 Borbon cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .282 Moreland rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .289 Totals 35 5 8 5 5 4 New York 002 020 260 — 12 16 4 Texas 310 000 100 — 5 8 1 E—Al.Rodriguez (1), Sabathia 2 (3), Gardner (1), A.Beltre (2). LOB—New York 7, Texas 9. 2B—Teixeira (8). HR—Jeter (1), off Bush; Jeter (2), off Rhodes; Granderson (11), off Rhodes; Cervelli (1), off Eppley; Teixeira (9), off Eppley. RBIs—Jeter 3 (9), Granderson 2 (23), Teixeira 2 (21), Al.Rodriguez (19), Cervelli 4 (5), Andrus (13), A.Beltre (26), Napoli 2 (14), Dav.Murphy (12). SB— Jeter (1), Gardner (5), Kinsler (7), Andrus (10), Gentry (1), Borbon 2 (6). CS—Borbon (2). SF—Dav.Murphy. Runners left in scoring position—New York 5 (Al. Rodriguez, Swisher 3, Jeter); Texas 5 (Torrealba 2, Andrus 2, Napoli). Runners moved up—Granderson, Teixeira, Al.Rodriguez, Cano, Cervelli, Kinsler. GIDP—Cano, Cervelli, Borbon. DP—New York 1 (Cano, Jeter, Teixeira); Texas 2 (A.Beltre, Kinsler, Napoli), (Napoli, Andrus, Rhodes). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sabathia W, 3-2 6 5 5 3 4 2 109 2.89 Chamberlain 1 1 0 0 0 1 20 3.38 R.Soriano 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 5.79 Pendleton 1 1 0 0 1 1 27 0.00 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bush 4 5 3 2 0 2 67 2.20 Tucker 2 2 1 1 1 0 26 3.60 Rhodes L, 1-2 1 3 2 2 0 1 13 4.50 Eppley 1-3 5 6 6 1 0 24 9.00 M.Lowe 1 2-3 1 0 0 1 0 24 6.75 Bush pitched to 1 batter in the 5th. Sabathia pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Chamberlain 1-1. HBP— by Bush (Al.Rodriguez). WP—Chamberlain. T—3:36. A—48,057 (49,170).

Rays 5, Orioles 3 Tampa Bay Fuld lf Zobrist 2b Damon dh Longoria 3b Joyce rf B.Upton cf Kotchman 1b Brignac ss Jaso c Totals

AB 5 5 5 3 4 4 3 4 3 36

R H 0 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 2 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 5 11

BI 0 0 0 1 0 4 0 0 0 5

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 3

SO 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

Avg. .248 .289 .256 .269 .351 .260 .355 .195 .246

Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. B.Roberts 2b 3 0 0 0 2 0 .221 Markakis rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .227 D.Lee 1b 5 1 1 1 0 0 .233 Guerrero dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .267 Scott lf 3 1 1 0 1 1 .253 Ad.Jones cf 3 1 0 0 0 0 .250 Wieters c 4 0 2 2 0 1 .232 Mar.Reynolds 3b 2 0 0 0 2 1 .187 C.Izturis ss 2 0 0 0 0 2 .192 a-Pie ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .267 Totals 31 3 6 3 5 5 Tampa Bay 000 320 000 — 5 11 0 Baltimore 000 210 000 — 3 6 0 a-doubled for C.Izturis in the 9th. LOB—Tampa Bay 7, Baltimore 9. 2B—Fuld (9), Zobrist (12), Damon (5), Joyce 2 (10), Scott (5), Wieters (6), Pie (1). HR—D.Lee (4), off W.Davis. RBIs—Longoria (5), B.Upton 4 (22), D.Lee (9), Wieters 2 (19). CS—B.Roberts (1). S—C.Izturis. Runners left in scoring position—Tampa Bay 4 (Joyce, Fuld, Damon 2); Baltimore 4 (C.Izturis, Markakis 2, D.Lee). Runners moved up—Zobrist. GIDP—Jaso, D.Lee. DP—Tampa Bay 1 (Brignac, Zobrist, Kotchman); Baltimore 1 (C.Izturis, B.Roberts, D.Lee). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA W.Davis W, 4-2 5 4 3 3 5 3 100 3.07 Delaney H, 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 0.00 Jo.Peralta H, 4 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 16 2.76 Farnsworth 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 14 0.75 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bergesen L, 0-4 4 2-3 9 5 5 2 1 85 5.57 Rapada 1 1-3 1 0 0 1 2 22 11.12 Ji.Johnson 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 4.50 M.Gonzalez 1 1 0 0 0 0 7 6.75 Uehara 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 3.55 Inherited runners-scored—Farnsworth 1-0, Rapada 1-0. IBB—off Bergesen (Longoria). HBP—by Farnsworth (Markakis), by W.Davis (Ad.Jones). WP—W.Davis. T—2:49. A—16,359 (45,438).

Tigers 5, Blue Jays 2 Detroit A.Jackson cf S.Sizemore 2b Ordonez dh 1-Kelly pr-dh Mi.Cabrera 1b V.Martinez c Jh.Peralta ss Raburn lf C.Wells rf Inge 3b Totals

AB 5 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 38

R H 1 3 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 2 5 11

BI 2 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 5

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 4

Avg. .224 .261 .179 .229 .320 .269 .281 .229 .238 .209

Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Y.Escobar ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .254 C.Patterson cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .264 Bautista dh 4 1 1 2 0 1 .352 J.Rivera lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .224 A.Hill 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .242 Arencibia c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .247 Encarnacion 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .245 Cooper 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .125 R.Davis rf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .182 Totals 32 2 7 2 0 4 Detroit 000 200 210 — 5 11 0 Toronto 002 000 000 — 2 7 0 1-ran for Ordonez in the 8th. LOB—Detroit 7, Toronto 3. 2B—Ordonez (3), V.Martinez (5), Jh.Peralta (5), C.Patterson (7), Encarnacion (11). HR—A.Jackson (2), off Jo-.Reyes; Bautista (10), off Penny. RBIs—A.Jackson 2 (7), Mi.Cabrera (24), V.Martinez (12), Jh.Peralta (16), Bautista 2 (18). Runners left in scoring position—Detroit 5 (Mi.Cabrera, Raburn, Ordonez, C.Wells 2); Toronto 2 (J.Rivera, Cooper). Runners moved up—S.Sizemore 2, Bautista. GIDP— C.Patterson, Arencibia. DP—Detroit 2 (S.Sizemore, Jh.Peralta, Mi.Cabrera), (Inge, S.Sizemore, Mi.Cabrera). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Penny W, 3-3 7 2-3 7 2 2 0 1 94 4.78 Schlereth H, 4 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 2.08

Valverde S, 7-7 1 0 0 0 0 3 13 1.84 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Reyes L, 0-3 7 8 5 5 1 1 81 5.00 Frasor 1 2 0 0 0 1 17 1.76 Rzepczynski 1 1 0 0 0 2 20 2.30 Jo-.Reyes pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Schlereth 1-0, Frasor 1-1. WP—Jo-.Reyes. T—2:35. A—17,392 (49,260).

Athletics 5, Royals 2 Oakland Crisp cf Barton 1b C.Jackson lf Willingham dh K.Suzuki c DeJesus rf M.Ellis 2b Kouzmanoff 3b Pennington ss Totals

AB 5 5 5 5 4 5 4 4 3 40

R H 1 1 1 2 0 3 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 2 1 2 0 0 5 12

BI 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 5

BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 2

SO 0 1 2 1 0 2 1 1 0 8

Avg. .265 .205 .291 .225 .245 .222 .195 .209 .223

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Getz 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .225 Me.Cabrera dh 4 1 1 0 0 1 .283 Gordon lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .309 Francoeur rf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .302 Hosmer 1b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .333 Betemit 3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .309 Maier cf 2 0 1 1 1 0 .400 a-Aviles ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .266 B.Pena c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .220 A.Escobar ss 2 0 1 0 0 1 .238 Totals 29 2 6 2 5 6 Oakland 200 001 011 — 5 12 1 Kansas City 000 002 000 — 2 6 2 a-struck out for Maier in the 9th. E—T.Ross (1), Betemit (4), Hosmer (1). LOB—Oakland 10, Kansas City 6. 2B—Barton (10), Hosmer (1). HR—Kouzmanoff (3), off Francis; K.Suzuki (4), off L.Coleman. RBIs—Crisp (12), C.Jackson (11), Willingham (17), K.Suzuki (10), Kouzmanoff (11), Hosmer (1), Maier (2). CS—Barton (1). S—A.Escobar. Runners left in scoring position—Oakland 5 (M.Ellis, Crisp 2, K.Suzuki, Barton); Kansas City 2 (Betemit, Me.Cabrera). Runners moved up—Pennington, Getz, Gordon, Francoeur. GIDP—Hosmer. DP—Oakland 1 (M.Ellis, Pennington, Barton). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA T.Ross W, 2-2 6 6 2 2 3 4 89 2.51 Wuertz H, 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 19 0.00 Balfour H, 9 1 0 0 0 1 0 11 1.80 Fuentes S, 9-11 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 4.42 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Francis L, 0-4 6 1-3 8 3 2 1 2 106 5.09 Bl.Wood 1 1-3 2 1 1 1 2 32 3.75 Collins 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 8 3.86 L.Coleman 1 1 1 1 0 3 20 2.70 Inherited runners-scored—Bl.Wood 1-0, Collins 2-1. T—2:59. A—22,435 (37,903).

Red Sox 9, Twins 5 Minnesota Span cf Plouffe ss Tolbert ss Morneau 1b Kubel dh Cuddyer rf Valencia 3b Revere lf Butera c a-Tosoni ph A.Casilla 2b Totals

AB 3 3 0 4 4 4 4 4 3 1 4 34

R 1 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 5

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 8 5 2

SO 0 0 0 3 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 8

Avg. .291 .300 .180 .202 .351 .241 .230 .111 .115 .179 .177

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ellsbury cf 5 1 3 0 0 0 .295 Pedroia 2b 4 1 1 0 1 0 .236 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 5 2 3 2 0 1 .314 Youkilis 3b 4 4 2 1 0 0 .257 Ortiz dh 4 0 2 0 0 0 .292 J.Drew rf 4 0 1 2 0 0 .227 Lowrie ss 4 0 1 2 0 0 .333 Iglesias ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Crawford lf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .211 Varitek c 4 0 0 1 0 1 .128 Totals 38 9 14 8 1 3 Minnesota 300 100 010 — 5 8 3 Boston 014 020 20x — 9 14 0 a-struck out for Butera in the 9th. E—A.Casilla (5), Butera (2), Revere (1). LOB—Minnesota 4, Boston 6. 2B—Plouffe (1), Ellsbury (11), Youkilis (9), Lowrie (7). 3B—Crawford (1). HR—Valencia (3), off Matsuzaka; Ad.Gonzalez (4), off Pavano. RBIs—Kubel 2 (15), Valencia 3 (18), Ad.Gonzalez 2 (24), Youkilis (19), J.Drew 2 (8), Lowrie 2 (16), Varitek (2). SB—Span (3), Valencia (2), Ellsbury (10). Runners left in scoring position—Minnesota 1 (Revere); Boston 4 (Lowrie 2, Pedroia, Crawford). Runners moved up—Cuddyer, Ortiz, J.Drew, Varitek. GIDP—Span. DP—Boston 1 (Pedroia, Lowrie, Ad.Gonzalez). Minnesota IP H R ER Pavano L, 2-4 5 10 7 7 Al.Burnett 1 1 0 0 Mijares 1 2 2 0 Nathan 1 1 0 0 Boston IP H R ER Mtsuzka W, 3-3 6 5 4 4 Albers H, 2 2 3 1 1 Bard 1 0 0 0 WP—Pavano. T—2:53. A—37,526 (37,065).

BB 1 0 0 0 BB 2 0 0

SO 0 1 0 2 SO 4 3 1

NP 91 17 20 19 NP 101 33 12

ERA 6.64 5.68 3.86 8.18 ERA 4.64 1.42 2.55

LEADERS Through Sunday’s Games ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—Bautista, Toronto, .352; Kubel, Minnesota, .351; Joyce, Tampa Bay, .351; Hafner, Cleveland, .347; MiYoung, Texas, .341; MIzturis, Los Angeles, .330; Konerko, Chicago, .323. RUNS—Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 28; Bautista, Toronto, 26; MiCabrera, Detroit, 26; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 26; Granderson, New York, 24; Ellsbury, Boston, 23; Gordon, Kansas City, 23. RBI—Konerko, Chicago, 27; Lind, Toronto, 27; Beltre, Texas, 26; MiYoung, Texas, 26; Aviles, Kansas City, 25; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 25; 5 tied at 24. HITS—MiYoung, Texas, 47; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 46; ISuzuki, Seattle, 45; AdGonzalez, Boston, 43; Gordon, Kansas City, 42; MeCabrera, Kansas City, 41; Konerko, Chicago, 41. DOUBLES—Gordon, Kansas City, 13; Quentin, Chicago, 13; MiYoung, Texas, 13; AdGonzalez, Boston, 12; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 12; Betemit, Kansas City, 11; Ellsbury, Boston, 11; Encarnacion, Toronto, 11; MIzturis, Los Angeles, 11. TRIPLES—Bourjos, Los Angeles, 4; Borbon, Texas, 3; Crisp, Oakland, 3; SRodriguez, Tampa Bay, 3; 12 tied at 2. HOME RUNS—Granderson, New York, 11; Bautista, Toronto, 10; Teixeira, New York, 9; Cano, New York, 8; Francoeur, Kansas City, 8; Konerko, Chicago, 8; 6 tied at 7. STOLEN BASES—ISuzuki, Seattle, 11; Andrus, Texas, 10; Ellsbury, Boston, 10; Fuld, Tampa Bay, 10; Aviles, Kansas City, 8; Aybar, Los Angeles, 8; Crisp, Oakland, 8; Dyson, Kansas City, 8. PITCHING—Weaver, Los Angeles, 6-2; Masterson, Cleveland, 5-0; Cahill, Oakland, 5-0; Scherzer, Detroit, 5-0; Britton, Baltimore, 5-2; 13 tied at 4. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—Holliday, St. Louis, .398; Berkman, St. Louis, .374; Ethier, Los Angeles, .371; Polanco, Philadelphia, .366; Wallace, Houston, .339; Kemp, Los Angeles, .338; Votto, Cincinnati, .333. RUNS—Votto, Cincinnati, 27; Berkman, St. Louis, 26; Holliday, St. Louis, 26; Rasmus, St. Louis, 26; Pujols, St. Louis, 25; Bourn, Houston, 24; Braun, Milwaukee, 24; Stubbs, Cincinnati, 24; Walker, Pittsburgh, 24. RBI—Berkman, St. Louis, 32; Howard, Philadelphia, 30; Fielder, Milwaukee, 27; Pence, Houston, 27; Holliday, St. Louis, 24; CJones, Atlanta, 24; Braun, Milwaukee, 23; IDavis, New York, 23; SDrew, Arizona, 23; Polanco, Philadelphia, 23. HITS—Ethier, Los Angeles, 49; JosReyes, New York, 49; Polanco, Philadelphia, 48; Kemp, Los Angeles, 45; Holliday, St. Louis, 43; SCastro, Chicago, 42; Pence, Houston, 41; Prado, Atlanta, 41; GSanchez, Florida, 41. DOUBLES—Beltran, New York, 12; Fowler, Colorado, 11; Holliday, St. Louis, 11; CJones, Atlanta, 11; JosReyes, New York, 11; Ethier, Los Angeles, 10; Pence, Houston, 10; Prado, Atlanta, 10; Rowand, San Francisco, 10. TRIPLES—JosReyes, New York, 6; Victorino, Philadelphia, 4; Espinosa, Washington, 3; Rasmus, St. Louis, 3; 13 tied at 2. HOME RUNS—ASoriano, Chicago, 11; Berkman, St. Louis, 10; Braun, Milwaukee, 10; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 8; CYoung, Arizona, 8; 7 tied at 7. STOLEN BASES—Bourn, Houston, 13; Bourgeois, Houston, 12; JosReyes, New York, 12; Kemp, Los Angeles, 11; Stubbs, Cincinnati, 11; Desmond, Washington, 10; OHudson, San Diego, 10; Venable, San Diego, 10. PITCHING—McClellan, St. Louis, 5-0; Halladay, Philadelphia, 5-1; Harang, San Diego, 5-2; Correia, Pittsburgh, 5-2; 11 tied at 4.


D4 Monday, May 9, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

GOLF ROUNDUP

HORSE RACING

Glover wins PGA event in playoff

Animal Kingdom likely to run in Preakness By Beth Harris The Associated Press

The Associated Press CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Lucas Glover figures he has played more than 100 rounds with Jonathan Byrd, from junior golf when they were teenagers to their years together at Clemson and nearly a decade on the PGA Tour. The stakes were never as high as they were Sunday in the Wells Fargo Championship. Glover was never better. Clinging to a one-shot lead, Glover closed with three gutsy pars during the brutal finishing stretch at Quail Hollow, slamming his fist when he made the last one from 7 feet for a 3-under 69 and what looked to be a sure win. Then came Byrd, with two great pars of his own, followed by a shot into 15 feet that he made for birdie on the 18th for a 72 to force a playoff. Glover wound up a winner with a par on the first extra hole, ending a drought of 41 tournaments that stretched nearly two years back to his U.S. Open win at Bethpage Black in 2009. It was the eighth playoff this year on the PGA Tour, and the third in a row. “I’m elated,” Glover said. “Any time you win, you’re pleased. It means you beat everybody. You did what you set out to do on Thursday morning when the bell range. Against this field and on this golf course and in a tournament of this magnitude, I’m thrilled.” And against one of his best friends? That might have helped. Glover, in his first PGA Tour playoff, felt a sense of calmness playing against Byrd, who had won his last two tournaments in extra holes. In other Sunday events: Lehman wins Champions Tour’s first major BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — Tom Lehman won the Regions Tradition for his third victory in seven Champions Tour events this year, beating Peter Senior with a par on the second hole of a playoff. Senior, from Australia, missed a 5-foot par putt when it lipped out on No. 18. Lehman two-putted from about 20 feet, polishing off his second bogey-free day at the first Champions Tour major of the season. Bulldog wins Nationwide event on home course ATHENS, Ga. — University of Georgia senior Russell Henley became the second amateur winner in Nationwide Tour history, shooting a 3-under 68 for a two-stroke victory in the Stadion Classic on the Bulldogs’ home course. The three-time All-America selection finished at 12-under 272 on the University of Georgia Golf Course. South African takes Spanish Open TERRASSA, Spain — South Africa’s Thomas Aiken won the Spanish Open for his first European Tour title, a victory he dedicated to Spanish great Seve Ballesteros. Ballesteros died Saturday from complications of a cancerous brain tumor. Aiken shot a 2-under 70 at Real Golf Club El Prat for a 10-under 278 total. Denmark’s Anders Hansen (70) was second, two strokes back. Scotland’s Scott Jamieson (71) and Spain’s Pablo Larrazabal (71) were another stroke back.

Chuck Burton / The Associated Press

Lucas Glover reacts after making par on the first sudden-death playoff hole to win the Wells Fargo Championship golf tournament at Quail Hollow Club in Charlotte, N.C., Sunday.

Busy Continued from D1 For example, during the winter, state swimming is held the third weekend in February, state wrestling the last weekend of the month, the small-school state basketball championships are the first weekend of March, and the large-school basketball state tournaments are the following week. This spring season, though, is more compact than normal. When the University of Oregon was awarded the NCAA West Regional for track and field, to be held over Memorial Day weekend, the OSAA chose to move its large-school track and field state championships up a

Tony Gutierrez / The Associated Press

Dallas Mavericks’ Jason Terry reacts to shooting a three-point basket against the Los Angeles Lakers during the first half of Game 4 of a second-round NBA playoff basketball series, Sunday in Dallas.

Mavs eliminate Lakers’ chance at a three-peat The Associated Press DALLAS — So long, Phil. So long, chances for another Lakers three-peat. Hello, Western Conference finals for Dirk Nowitzki and the Dallas Mavericks. Jason Terry tied an NBA postseason record with nine three-pointers and the Mavericks matched a league playoff mark with 20 threes on their way to a 122-86 victory over the Lakers on Sunday and a sweep of their second-round series against the most successful coach in NBA history and the two-time defending champions. Terry made five threes in the second quarter, personally outscoring Los Angeles 20-16 in the period and helping Dallas lead by 24 at halftime. When Terry made threes on consecutive possessions early in the third quarter, he drained whatever comeback hopes the Lakers had left. Early in the fourth quarter, the Lakers were so devastated that Lamar Odom and Andrew Bynum resorted to throwing cheap shots. They were ejected 45 seconds apart, with Jackson sitting on the bench looking as if he’d already checked out. Kobe Bryant soon joined him on the sideline, with deep reserves playing out the final minutes of what turned out to be the second-widest margin of defeat in Lakers’ playoff history and in Jackson’s storied playoff career. Jackson left the court with a tight smile, accepting hugs and handshakes from Dallas coach Rick Carlisle, Jason Kidd and Mark Cuban. It was the first time he’d been swept in his 21 postseasons on the sideline. It hadn’t happened to Bryant and the Lakers since 1999, the year before the Zen Master arrived in Los Angeles. This is the fourth time any NBA champion defending multiple titles has been swept, according to STATS LLC. The last was the 1996 Houston Rockets. For Nowitzki and the Mavs, clearing this hurdle sets them up for a chance to redeem themselves for flopping during the 2006 NBA finals and for flaming out in every postseason since. Dallas will host either Oklahoma City or Memphis in the conference finals. The Grizzlies lead the Thunder 2-1 going into

week. (The OSAA traditionally holds its Class 6A, 5A and 4A state track meets at Oregon’s Hayward Field the last weekend of May.) In addition to making for a shorter track season, the move has made the week before state golf, tennis and track a very busy one. “The season started a week later than normal and ended a week early,” Hood says. “The effect it has on track and field, and especially the endurancebased events, is that it’s a big difference as far as your training window.” Couple the shorter season with another long and wet winter, and Hood says he expects area track marks to rapidly improve at this week’s district meets and next week’s state championships.

N B A P L AYO F F S ROUNDUP tonight’s Game 4. The next round likely won’t start before next Sunday, a layoff that could pay huge dividends for a roster filled with players in their 30s. Then again, they might want to keep playing the way they’re going. Terry made 11 of 14 shots for 32 points, missing more inside the arc than outside. He fell a few points shy of his most in a playoff game only because the game was such a blowout. J.J. Barea set a career playoff-best with 22 points and Peja Stojakovic added 21 points. All three of those guys come off the bench. Nowitzki scored 17 points — his fewest this postseason. Dallas was so good in this game it hardly needed its best player. He was still in during the fourth quarter and took the blindside blow that led to Odom’s ejection. Soon after, Barea took a Bynum elbow to the ‘M’ on his Mavericks jersey while up in the air after releasing the ball for a layup. Fans threw things toward the court and officials scrambled to keep the peace. Bynum took off his jersey and was escorted to the locker room by Ron Artest, of all people. Artest was suspended from Game 3 because of his shot on Barea in the closing seconds of Game 2. In another game on Sunday: Hawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Bulls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 ATLANTA — Josh Smith had 23 points, 16 rebounds and eight assists, and Jeff Teague came up with another big game to lead Atlanta past Chicago, evening the Eastern Conference semifinals at two games apiece. The Hawks snapped a nine-game home losing streak in the second round of the playoffs, their misery dating to a May 13, 1996, win against Orlando. Smith, frequently criticized by Atlanta fans for his inconsistent play, stayed away from the outside jumpers, dominated on the inside and found the open man with crisp passes. Teague has been an even bigger surprise filling in for injured Kirk Hinrich, scoring 12 points and dishing out four assists. Game 5 is Tuesday night in Chicago.

“Kids like to perform in warm weather,” says Hood, who adds that athletes are just now peaking in the short season. While track, tennis and golf will be competing for state berths this week, baseball and softball teams from the area are finish-

ing up league play. The diamond sports end league play this week before their respective play-in rounds start the week of May 15. Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@ bendbulletin.com.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Kentucky Derby winner Animal Kingdom will be heading back to his home turf to await a likely run in the second leg of the Triple Crown. He became the first horse in the 137-year history of the Derby to win in his debut on dirt, having run three times on synthetic surfaces and once on the turf in his four previous races. Animal Kingdom will return to Maryland on Tuesday to begin preparations for the 1 3⁄16 -mile Preakness on May 21 at Pimlico, about 60 miles from his home base at Fair Hill Training Center. Trainer Graham Motion wants to keep jockey John Velazquez on his colt for the Preakness, and it seems likely that will happen. Animal Kingdom’s regular rider, Robby Albarado, broke his nose and had facial cuts and abrasions after a spill Wednesday. He took himself off his mounts Thursday and Friday. That influenced the decision of Barry Irwin, who oversees the Team Valor partnership that owns Animal Kingdom. Irwin and Motion agreed to go with Velazquez, who was available after Uncle Mo was scratched Friday. Albarado said he took the days off to prepare for the Derby, a decision he said “backfired.” Uncle Mo’s trainer, Todd Pletcher, said Sunday the colt wouldn’t run in either of the final two Triple Crown races while the lingering ailment that is bothering him is diagnosed. That leaves Velazquez free to continue riding Animal Kingdom. “It would be a very hard decision from me to get off this horse to go to another one,” the jockey said after winning his first Derby in 13 tries. “That’s just the way it is.” Irwin said it’s likely but not yet certain Animal Kingdom will continue on the Triple Crown trail. “I’m pretty sure we’re going to do it, but I want to talk about it,” he said Sunday. “I’m a careful guy, so let’s see how he’s doing. If you’ve got a horse that’s amazing, you can go for the Preakness. But your regular, average Derby winner has a real tough time coming back.” Animal Kingdom proved his pedigree as a turf horse wrong in the Derby. “Some of the best horses were ones who were able to handle

541-322-CARE

both (turf and dirt),” Motion said. “He appears to be one of those great horses that can handle both.” There are 20 people in the Team Valor partnership that owns Animal Kingdom. Irwin said he sold a small interest in the colt two weeks before the Derby based on an estimated value of $2 million. “In order for him to really be worth a lot of money, he’s got to go on and do something more than just winning the Derby. I mean the Derby’s big. It’s the biggest race there is,” Irwin said. “But breeders are very picky, skeptical people and he doesn’t have a fashionable pedigree. So he’s got to become a phenomenal racehorse in order to become worth a whole lot of money. If he won the Triple Crown, then there’d be no question. But if he wins just the Preakness, would that make him an automatic hit as a stallion? I don’t know.” While Irwin mulls the Preakness, the 1½-mile Belmont Stakes is a strong option. “The Belmont is the kind of race that this horse is bred to win, let’s face it,” Irwin said. Derby runner-up Nehro is under consideration for the Preakness, but owner Ahmed Zayat said the Belmont Stakes on June 11 is a more likely spot for the colt’s next race. Mucho Macho Man, who finished third, will run in the Preakness “as long as everything is good,” trainer Kathy Ritvo said. Fourth-place Shackleford is likely to challenge Animal Kingdom in the Preakness, too. Derby favorite Dialed In was never a factor in finishing eighth. Trainer Nick Zito said the colt would try again in the Preakness, where, as the winner of the Holy Bull Stakes and Florida Derby, he’s eligible for a $5.5 million bonus if he wins at Pimlico. The newcomers who could challenge Animal Kingdom are: Concealed Identity, Dance City, Flashpoint, King Congie, Mr. Commons, Norman Asbjornson, Prime Cut, Saratoga Red and Sway Away, who was excluded from the Derby field for a lack of stakes earnings.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 9, 2011 D5

Trails Continued from D1 Currently, the 32,000-acre expanse now referred to as Skyline Forest is privately held by Fidelity National Timber, but that soon could change. The Deschutes Land Trust, a land conservation nonprofit based in Bend, is attempting to save the property from development and to preserve it as a public resource. The result for mountain bikers would be significant: the addition of miles and miles of singletrack to our trail systems. “It’s a huge recreational opportunity,” Brad Chalfant, executive director of the Deschutes Land Trust, told me last week. “It’s off the charts.” Imagine starting from Bend and riding singletrack on a developed trail system all the way to Sisters — or vice versa. If the deal to purchase Skyline Forest goes through in the next few years as land trust supporters hope, the reality of such a farreaching trail connection may not be far off, said Chalfant. For years, Skyline Forest landowners have allowed equestrians and other users recreational access to the property, and numerous unmarked trails and dirt roads already exist. Moving forward, Chalfant said, the 32,000-acre parcel — about four times the size of the lower area at Phil’s Trail, the popular trail network on Bend’s west side — is large enough that separate trails likely would be created to keep mountain bikers and equestrians from crossing paths. According to Chalfant, the topography of Skyline Forest terrain is more aerobically challenging than the relatively flat

Mountain bike in Skyline Forest What: Guided 10- to 15mile mountain bike ride on singletrack trails and dirt roads in Skyline Forest; led by the Deschutes Land Trust When: 9 a.m., Monday, May 25 (with more dates TBA this summer) Skill level: Intermediate- to advanced-level mountain bikers in good physical condition Register: The ride is free, but registration is required at www. deschuteslandtrust.org Contact: 541-330-0017 lower-elevation trails at Phil’s Trail. What’s more, additional riding trails at Skyline Forest should help ease the demand currently placed on heavily used trails in the Phil’s area. “We don’t own the property yet so it’s premature to plan trails, but I’ve been out there riding with COTA (Central Oregon Trail Alliance) and we’ve got concepts,” Chalfant explained. “It’s a site that can sustain a fair amount of seasonal use. There’s a lot more variation and much more elevation gain than Phil’s.” Chalfant went on to say that he hopes an option to buy the property will be made available by this summer, which would lead to its purchase by the Deschutes Land Trust in the next year or two. The Deschutes Land Trust’s motivation to get the transaction moving is relatively high. Already stockpiled in the bank is a $4 million grant from a federal Forest Legacy fund, which comes with

a use-it-or-lose-it expiration date that goes into effect next spring. When and if the 50-square-mile Skyline Forest is preserved for the public, it would be the largest community forest in the Northwest and the second-largest such forest in the country, said Chalfant. “(Building mountain bike trails) won’t happen overnight,” Chalfant conceded, “but there will be riding opportunities immediately and they’ll just get better with time.” Connecting communities by trail systems like the one envisioned between Sisters and Bend via the Skyline Forest is the kind of resource that makes the region an attractive place for outdoor enthusiasts to call home, the executive director said. “Studies clearly confirm that people move their small businesses to places like Central Oregon,” Chalfant noted, “because of the ability to wet a fly line or hop on the mountain bike from home.” “This,” he said, referring to the anticipated acquisition of the Skyline Forest, “is key to the long-term quality of life in Central Oregon.” Mountain bikers can explore some of the trails that currently exist in Skyline Forest and imagine a future singletrack network there by joining the Deschutes Land Trust for an organized tour. The Land Trust plans to lead at least four of these community trail rides this spring and summer, the first of which will take place on Wednesday, May 25. “We’re trying to get more people out there to experience it,” said Chalfant, “and to consider it their own.” Heather Clark can be reached at cyclingcentral@bendbulletin. com.

C C   Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

CAMPS/CLASSES/ CLINICS DIRT DIVA NIGHTS: Women-only event features presentation by guest speaker Tori Broughton, a mountain bike coach and sales representative for Trek bikes, and includes general information/open discussion for women about learning to mountain bike; Wednesday, May 11; 6:30 p.m.; Pine Mountain Sports, 255 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-385-8080. WOMEN’S GRIT CLINICS: Mountain bike coaching for beginner and intermediate women riders; four two-day clinics in Bend; May 14-15 (full), June 11-12, July 3031, Sept. 10-11; $100 for two-day clinic; register at Pine Mountain Sports, 255 S.W. Century Drive., Bend; www.gritclinics.com. BIKE YOGA: Yoga class geared toward cyclists; 7 p.m. Mondays; Sunnyside Sports, 930 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; no registration required; $7-$10 suggested donation; 541-382-8018. FIX-A-FLAT CLINIC: Learn how to repair a punctured mountain- or road-bike tire; 10 a.m. Sundays; Sunnyside Sports, 930 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; free; 541-382-8018.

JUNIOR DEVELOPMENT BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY: Open enrollment for numerous ongoing junior development programs in road cycling, cross-country mountain biking, and freeride mountain biking; ages 6 and older; www.bendenduranceacademy. org; 541-335-1346. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION: Recreational and racing programs in road and mountain biking for juniors ages 8 and older; multiple threeweek sessions and summerlong training programs offered; www. mbsef.org; 541-388-0002.

MISCELLAENOUS SISTERS TRAILS ALLIANCE: Volunteer to work on Sisters-area mountain bike trails; 8 a.m. Sunday, May 22; meet at Sisters Park and Recreation District, 1750 W. McKinney Butte Road; www.sisterstrails.com. CENTRAL OREGON TRAIL ALLIANCE: Monthly mountain bike trails meeting open to the public; Thursday, May 26; 7 p.m.; Central Oregon Environmental Center; 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; www.cotamtb.com. SPRING FLING: Twelfth annual volunteer trail work day with the Central Oregon Trail Alliance; 9 a.m. Saturday, June 4; meet at parking lot at corner of Simpson Avenue and Columbia Street, Bend; 2 p.m. barbecue and raffle; www.cotamtb.com.

RACES CENTRAL OREGON TIME TRIAL SERIES: Weeknight individual time trial series held on roads in southeast Bend; 6 p.m. Wednesdays starting May 11; registration available from 5:15 to 6 p.m. only at race site, corner of Rickard and Arnold Market roads; $10 for adults; $5 for students; 541-385-7413; www.centraloregonracing.net. BEND DON’T BRAKE: Road bike racing in southeast Bend with multiple racing divisions offered; Saturday, May 28; races start at 9 a.m. or 1 p.m., depending on division; $30; register at www.benddontbrake.com. SISTERS STAMPEDE: Cross-country mountain bike race on trails near Sisters; 10:30 a.m. Sunday, May 29; 13, 26 or 27 miles, depending on division; $20 for juniors, $35 for adults through May 28, $40 on race day; www.sistersstampede.com.

RIDES BPRD MOUNTAIN BIKE RIDE: Ride local mountain biking trails with a Bend Park & Recreation District guide; aimed at beginner to intermediate riders who want to ride for two to three hours while learning about local riding options; 9 a.m. to noon, Saturday, May 14, $14 for in-district residents; $19 otherwise; 541-3897275; www.bendparksandrec.org. BEND BELLA CYCLISTS: Womenonly group mountain bike ride includes spirited and conversational options; see website for meeting time, Saturday, May 15; meet at Pine Mountain Sports, 255 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www. bendbellacyclists.org. DIRT DIVAS GROUP RIDE: Womenonly guided group mountain bike ride leaves from Pine Mountain Sports in Bend at 5:30 p.m., Monday, May 16; free; rental and demo bikes available at no charge (be at the shop by 5 p.m.); 255 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-385-8080; www. pinemountainsports.com. PINE MOUNTAIN SPORTS BIKE RIDE: Twice-monthly guided mountain bike rides hosted by Pine Mountain Sports and open to all riders; 5:30 p.m. on the first and third Wednesday of the month starting May 18; free; rental and demo bikes available at no charge (be at the shop at 5 p.m.); meet at 255 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-385-8080; www. pinemountainsports.com. BPRD WOMEN’S MOUNTAIN BIKE RIDE: Join other women for these weekly mountain bike rides on local trails led by a Bend Park & Recreation District guide; 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Fridays through May 27; $16 for in-district residents; $22 otherwise; 541-389-7275; www.bendparksandrec.org. SOUTHSIDE RIDE: Sixty-mile noncompetitive group road bike ride

from Sunriver to Twin Lakes and back; 9 a.m. Sunday, May 29; Three Rivers Elementary School, Sunriver; $5, includes course markings, maps and one aid station; 541-3826248; www.hutchsbicycles.com. EUROSPORTS RIDE: Group road bike ride starting in Sisters from Eurosports, 182 E. Hood St.; at 10 a.m. on Saturdays; at 11 a.m. on Tuesdays, Thursdays; all riders welcome; 541-5492471; www.eurosports.us. HUTCH’S NOON RIDE: Group road bike ride starting in Bend from Hutch’s Bicycles east-side location, 820 N.E. Third St., at noon on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays; and from Hutch’s west-side location, 725 N.W. Columbia St., at noon on Tuesdays, Thursdays; pace varies; 541-382-6248; www.hutchsbicycles.com. HUTCH’S SATURDAY RIDE: Group road bike ride begins at 10 a.m. Saturdays in Bend from Hutch’s Bicycles east-side location, 820 N.E. Third St.; approximately 40 miles; vigorous pace; 541-3826248; www.hutchsbicycles.com. RIDE FOR TWO RIVERS: Supported bike rides of 51 and 25 miles in the Sisters area benefit stewardship of the Metolius River and Whychus Creek; Saturday, June 18; Black Butte Ranch; $100 for 51-miler; $50 for adults and $25 for youth in 25-miler; includes post-ride dinner; www.nationalforests.org; Deborah Snyder at 406-830-3355. TOUR DES CHUTES: Supported cancer fundraiser bike ride with ride options of 7, 25, 48, 72 and 100 miles; Saturday, July 16; High Lakes Elementary School, Bend; $40 adults, $15 youth (15 and younger), $100 families; entry limited to first 1,000 riders; www.tourdeschutes.org.

OUT OF TOWN BLAZING PEDALS: Supported fundraiser bike ride in Maupin benefits the Juniper Flat Rural Fire Protection District; Saturday, May 21; ride begins between 7 and 9 a.m.; ride options of 20, 43, 65 and 82 miles; $35; register at www. orbike.com; 541-328-6291. REACH THE BEACH: Supported fundraiser bike rides benefit the American Lung Association in Oregon; Saturday, May 21; start options are from Portland (100 miles), Newberg (80 miles), Amity (55 miles) or Grand Ronde (20 miles), and all finish in Pacific City; limited to 3,000 riders; $25 through April 10 with minimum $100 fundraising commitment; www.reachthebeach.org. STRAWBERRY CENTURY: Nineteenth annual supported bike ride starts from Lebanon High School and traverses rural and scenic roads in the central Willamette Valley; Saturday, June 11; ride begins between 7 and 10 a.m.; ride options of 13, 53, 72 and 101 miles; $20 if received before June 3; www.santiamspokes.org.

Ride Continued from D1 The pro men raced three laps for a total of 38 miles, while the pro women rode two laps for 26 1⁄2 miles. Alice Pennington, of Portland, won the women’s pro division in 2:03:58. Sue Butler, also of Portland, finished second in 2:07:28. Bend’s Serena BishopGordon placed third in 2:13:18. “It was hard to see for a little bit,” said Pennington, 29. “I kept taking my glasses on and off. I’d put them on, and they’d fog up and I couldn’t see. Then it would start snowing, and it was like I was skiing and I needed goggles.”

THE

Please e-mail sports event information to cyclingcentral@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin. com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

Ryan Trebon, of Bend, right, leads a racer in the men’s pro division during the Chainbreaker mountain bike race in Skyline Forest near Shevlin Park west of Bend Sunday morning. Trebon went on to win the race. Butler said she saw the black clouds before the race started, and had a feeling it might be one of those days. “I knew it was going to start getting cold,” Butler said. “And I actually couldn’t feel my hands and toes for a while. I chased Alice down for a while, and then I decided today was a good day for second.” Butler, a world-class cyclocross racer like Trebon, said she is still recovering from hip and back injuries suffered during a crash at the Cyclocross World Championships held in January in Germany. Kevin Gorman, owner of WebCyclery and a main organizer of the Chainbreaker, said he was satisfied with the turnout

Sunday but was worried that the snowfall on the mountain passes might have prevented some racers from traveling to the race from the Willamette Valley. “But I’m glad it wasn’t raining (at the race),” Gorman said. “I’d rather have snow than rain. It’s a good turnout ... about what we typically get.” Despite the snow, most racers crossed the finish line with smiles on their faces before making their way over to the free post-race food and beer. “When you see your breath in May,” Trebon said, chewing on a bagel, “it’s a little bit strange.” Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com.

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CYCLING SCOREBOARD ROAD CYCLING CENTRAL OREGON SHORT TRACK SERIES April 27 At Central Oregon Community College, Bend Race No. 3 of 3 Category B (30 minutes, plus 1 lap) — 1, Eric Birky. 2, Jack Mahler. 3, Justin Fitzpatrick. 4, Colin Dunlap. 5, Mark Backus.

6, Jason Barber. 7, Steve Kjobech. 8, Javier Colton. 9, Dave Keller. 10, Mario Fennerl. 11, Cory Tanler. 12, Steven Crozier. 13, Sean Kiger. 14, Mark Miskowiec. 15, Rob Kerr. 16, Ben Lewis. 17, Lance Haidet. 18, Vince Sikorsky. 19, Jake Perrin. 20, Cameron Carrick. 21, Eric Bradley. 22, Kelsey Kelley. 23, Veronica Vega. 24, Donovan Birky. 25, Dipesh. 26, Matt Kecker. 27, Kern Reynolds. 28, Keenan Reynolds. 29, Scott Brennan. 30, Aidan Whitelaw. Category A (40 minutes, plus 1 lap) — 1, Adam Craig. 2,

Brennan Wodtli. 3, Matt Russell. 4, Greg Overatz. 5, Scotty Carlile. 6, Timmy Evens. 7, Cody Peterson. 8, Tim Jones. 9, Connor McCutcheon. 10, Bart Bowen. 11, Matt Williams. 12, Bruce Rogers. 13, John Frey. 14, Tyler Miller. 15, Matt Engel. 16, Brian Jorgensen. 17, Cole Sprague. 18, Paul Thomasberg. 19, Phil Legault. 20, Larry Moulton. 21, Derek Faller. 22, Dan Wolnick. 23, Heidi Faller. 24, Sean Haidet. 25, Grant Carson. 26, Scott Brennan. 27, Todd Chance. 28, Heather Clark. 29, Angela Mart.

255 S.W. Century Drive, Bend • 541-385-8080 • www.pinemountainsports.com Coupon good 05/09/11. Original newsprint only. One coupon per visit. Coupon has no cash value. One entry per person. Winner will be notified by email.

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D6 Monday, May 9, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C YC L I NG C EN T R A L

CYCLING INSIDER | RIDER PROFILE

C  B

The Bulletin interviews a Central Oregon cyclist as part of our weekly “Cycling Insider” feature, whose rotating topics include cycling event updates, safety tips, local ride recommendations and gear reviews. Local rider spotlight: Joey Lochner Age: 49 Hometown: Redmond Occupation: Insurance agent Cycling preferences: Road biking Cycling background: In 1998, Joey Lochner moved his family of eight from Eagle River, Alaska, to Redmond. Focused on running his insurance business and being a father to six, Lochner didn’t take time to exercise and packed on weight. By late 2005 — at 240 pounds — he knew he needed to make a lifestyle change. “My buddy Allen Pearce says, ‘We’ve got to get you in a spin class,’ ” Lochner recalls. “I couldn’t make it through an hour spin class without cramping.” Not two months after that first indoor class on a spin bike, Lochner signed up to participate in the 2006 edition of Cycle Oregon — an annual 500-mile cycling tour that visits different regions of Oregon each year. “Once I committed, then I got motivated and started riding,” he says. “I put in 3,500 miles that year (on the bike). My goal was just to get through (Cycle Oregon), and I did.” He started out riding 20 miles a day on the bike and by summer’s end had worked up to 40 miles a day. By the time September of that year rolled around, Lochner says, he had shed some 60 pounds, which made riding the hilly terrain in northeastern Oregon slightly less painful. When asked what he remembers from his first attempt at Cycle Oregon, Lochner replies: “Hills, hills everywhere.” And, he adds: “Did I really pay money for this?” Training for Cycle Oregon: Training for Cycle Oregon each year is what motivates Lochner to continue riding his bike. It’s also an opportunity to re-connect with high school buddies from Alaska who join him for the weeklong cycling trip. This September will mark Lochner’s sixth consecutive ride in Cycle Oregon, which this year heads to the southern Oregon Coast. Cycle Oregon is limited to 2,200 riders and often reaches capacity within days of registration opening. Each February for the past three years, Lochner has attended the Cycle Oregon route unveiling that takes place in Portland. He then registers for the popular tour right on the spot. “(The attraction of Cycle Oregon) is seeing different parts of Oregon that I never would, even from a car,” he observes. “I love how these little towns and all these people come out and hook you up and take care of you. It’s a blast — everybody doing the same thing, feeling the same energy. We’re healthy, we’re riders, and we’re getting after it. The energy is just awesome.”

Mountain biking

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Redmond’s Joey Lochner has participated in five consecutive Cycle Oregon tours. Riding in Redmond: Lochner has come a long way since struggling through that first spin class in Redmond six years ago. Now, he says, “I can teach a spin class” — which he actually has done on occasion as a substitute instructor at the Redmond Athletic Club. He participates in weekly Tuesday evening group rides that leave from Trinity Bikes in Redmond. Lochner is also a devoted follower of Central Oregon CrossFit, and he rides with several other cycling enthusiasts who train there. He has performed the bike leg on a team that competed in the Redmond Area Triathlon, and he says that this summer he’d like to try completing a triathlon on his own. Riding to Sisters via Terrebonne on Lower Bridge Way and Holmes Road is his favorite Central Oregon ride, he says. Looking back, Lochner confirms that “no way, no how” does he envision returning to his sedentary, pre-cycling days. “(Cycling) is a lifestyle now and I’m not ever going back,” he says. “Not as long as I can walk, ride or swim.” — Heather Clark

•Intro for women at local bike shop: A Bend bike shop has launched a comprehensive, summerlong program aimed at introducing more women to mountain biking, and the kickoff event is this Wednesday. The Dirt Divas Mountain Bike Program is offered by Pine Mountain Sports and includes monthly events, including presentations from women in the cycling industry on “Dirt Divas Nights,” free organized group rides, bike repair and maintenance classes, and skills clinics. “Dirt Divas Nights: Mountain Biking 101” is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. this Wednesday at Pine Mountain Sports. The women-only event will offer general information about getting started in mountain biking, plus a guest presentation by Tori Broughton, a mountain biking coach as well as the women-specific rep for Trek bikes. Future guest speakers at the Dirt Divas Nights include professional mountain biker Lindsay Voreis, on June 1, and former professional downhill rider April Lawyer, on July 20. Admission to Dirt Divas Nights is free, but an RSVP is requested by calling 541-385-8080. To find out more about the Dirt Divas Mountain Bike Program, contact Leanna Taylor at 541-385-8080 or go to www.pinemountainsports. com. • Bend will host mountain bike championships qualifier: Central Oregon has been designated as the site of a USA Cycling-approved mountain bike national championship qualifying race. The race will be held Saturday, June 25, at the Wanoga Complex — on the same course where the Pickett’s Charge! mountain bike race will be staged the following day. Neighboring Idaho will host the 2011 Cross Country Mountain Bike National Championships this sum-

mer, and up until last week, when the Central Oregon qualifying race was confirmed, local mountain bikers interested in participating in the nearby championships were required to travel out of state to attend a qualifying race. Riders hoping to compete in the national championship mountain bike race must record a top-15 finish in their respective category and age class at a USA Cycling qualifying event. The June 25 qualifying race in Central Oregon — dubbed the USA Cycling State Cross-Country Mountain Bike State Championship — is intended only for those planning to attend the cross-country mountain bike national championships, slated for July 13-17 in Sun Valley, Idaho. Because multiple age categories and racing divisions will be offered, race organizer Bill Warburton said he expects that most, if not all, riders who participate in the Central Oregon qualifier will earn a spot in the Sun Valley championships the following month. Registration details and a race schedule have not yet been released. For the latest updates, go to www. bendenduranceacademy.org. • COTA announces weeknight trail work dates and partners: Mountain bike trail enthusiasts accustomed to volunteering in May for the Spring Fling trail work event organized by the Central Oregon Trail Alliance will have to wait a few more weeks. Originally scheduled for this Saturday, the date for the 12th annual Spring Fling has been moved to Saturday, June 4, to allow additional time for snow to melt on key upperelevation trails. In the meantime, COTA has partnered with several local shops to host weeknight volunteer trail work parties aimed at maintaining singletrack on lower-elevation trails in and around Bend. The Gear Peddler shop on

Wednesday, May 25, will host a volunteer trail work party that will focus on improvements to the Whoops Trail. Volunteers should meet at 5 p.m. at the shop, located at 184 N.E. Greenwood Ave., in Bend. The following day, WebCyclery in Bend will host a trail work party starting at 5 p.m. from the shop, located at 550 S.W. Industrial Way. On June 2, the FootZone running store will host a third COTA trail work event, starting at 5 p.m. from the downtown shop, located at 845 N.W. Wall St. COTA trail work events require all volunteers to wear the following protective clothing and gear: sturdy shoes or boots, gloves, eye protection and long pants. For more information, go to www. cotamtb.com.

Road cycling • Time trial series starts Wednesday: While the Wednesday night mountain bike short track series at Central Oregon Community College wrapped up last week, weeknight racing in Bend rolls on with the start of the Central Oregon Time Trial Series this Wednesday. The individual time trial races take place on the next two consecutive Wednesdays and then twice each in June and July before culminating with a time trial finale in August. Dates for the series are: May 11, May 18, June 1, June 15, July 6, July 27 and Aug. 17. The seven-mile loop course is staged in southeast Bend on Rickard, Gosney and Arnold Market roads. Registration begins at 5:15 p.m. (at the corner of Rickard and Arnold Market roads) and closes at 6 p.m. The first rider starts at 6 p.m. Entry fee is $10 for adults and $5 for juniors. For more information, or to arrange for a start time in advance, contact Matt Plummer at 541-3857413 or go to www.centraloregonracing.net. — Bulletin staff reports

Coming Friday: Mountain Bike Trail Guide Watch for Mountain Bike Trail Guide in The Bulletin sports section this Friday. The trail guide, by outdoor writer Mark Morical, features various trails in Central Oregon and beyond. The series appears in Adventure Sports on alternating Fridays through the riding season.

This week: Smith Rock/Gray Butte. The area is more than just a rock-climbing mecca. In the springtime, bikers flock there for high desert singletrack, thrilling side-hill trails, and unmatched views of Smith Rock State Park and the Cascade Range.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 9, 2011 E1

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AUSSIE'S Mini/Toy,AKC red tri's must see, family raised, 1st shots, wormed parents on site 788-7799/598-5264

Finnegan the cat is looking for a quiet home sweet and beautiful Russian Blue, 6 years old, loves adults, nice dogs, food provided for 1st 3 mo. call 541-948-2773 for an interview. Free Border Collie, 4 yr. male, to good home w/lots of room, 541-416-0102. Free Kittens, fixed, 1st shots, ready 5/13 for their forever homes! Donna 541-420-0097 German Wirehair Pointers, AKC Champion blood lines. Tails, shots, dewclaws. $600 Ready end of May. 541-460-3099 GOLDEN RETRIEVER puppies purebred, 4 males, ready to go! $400, Redmond 541-290-4023. Golden Retriever Pups exc. quality, parents OFA, good hips, $650. 541-318-3396.

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Barn cats for shop/barn/home. Free. Fixed, shots. We will deliver! 541 389 8420, lv msg

Golden Retriever pups, Kidified, AKC Reg., ready May 19. $500 & up 541-788-8877

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Border Collie/New Zealand Huntaway puppies, working parents, wonderful dogs, $250. 541-546-6171 Companion cats, free to seniors! Tame, fixed, ID chip, shots, more. Will always take back for any reason. Call 541-389-8420 or 647-2181, or visit www.craftcats.org for map, photos, hours, etc. DACHSHUND, Mini, AKC male. $350. Ready on 5/28. Prineville 541-633-3221 Dachshund Miniature puppies, black & tan, 1 male, 1 female, $250 ea. 541-647-9425 Dachshund, mini smooth female 5 mos all shots, potty trained, $300. 541-728-4367

Rottweiler, male pup, 5 mo., no papers, parents on site, $400, call 541-923-2437.

541-385-5809 Jack Russells, Reg., 7 weeks, 1st shots & wormed, ready to go! $350. 541-385-8934 Kittens & cats available thru rescue group. Cats/older kittens at sanctuary, call 541-389-8420; 647-2181. Baby kittens in foster care, 541-815-7278. Low adopt. fee. Fixed, shots, ID chip, vet exam incl. Hours, map, photos: www.craftcats.org

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DINING SET Glass top matching set, 4 chairs w/overhanging lamp, $200. OBO, 541-306-4252.

Prineville Habitat ReStore Building Supply Resale 1427 NW Murphy Ct. 541 447-6934 Open to the public.

22 cal Winchester 190 auto Collection of 6 original Warner For newspaper delivery , rifle, wood stock w/scope Brothers Cartoon paintings. call the Circulation Dept. like new,$200. 541-647-8931 Signed and dated; Foghorn, at 541-385-5800 Yosemite Sam, Daffy Duck, GENERATE SOME excitement in 32acp Kel Tec P-32 semi-auto To place an ad, call Tweety Bird, Sylvester, Bugs your neighborhood! Plan a pistol, very light, like new, 541-385-5809 or email Bunny. 24 1/2” x 30 1/2” garage sale and don't forget $200. 541-647-8931 The classified@bendbulletin.com cherry wood frames. to advertise in classified! Hardwood Outlet .380 I.O. HELL CAT handgun, $1300/all. 541-390-0267 or 541-385-5809. Wood Floor Super Store 6+1, 1 clip, new in box, 970-623-5804. Liquidating Appliances, new & $245. 541-728-1036 Must sell diamond earrings VS1/ reconditioned, guaranteed. 7.62x54 Mosin Nagant sporterG, .35 carat each, $900 value, Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, ized bolt-action, w/500 Rnds $650 OBO. 541-771-1811 541-385-5418 ammo, $275. 541-647-8931 253 METAL BED FRAME 9mm XD subcomp pistol, like fits twin or double, $10. TV, Stereo and Video new w/gear, leather conceal 541-383-4231 Hummingbirds holster, 450 rds ammo $575. 240 Watt surround sound sysAre Back! Moving Sale: 3-pc living room Oregon ID. 420-3315. • Laminate from tem, w/ 60+ 1 CD changer, set, royal blue w/gold thread AR-15,16", Flat-top, 6 pos. .79¢ sq.ft. $150 OBO. 541-728-0872 accents, very nice, $550. stock, 2x30rd mags, $1400. • Hardwood from Tower headboard, queen, 30” TV bought in 2000. JVD D call/text: 541-390-0219 solid oak w/cabinets & draw$2.99 sq.ft. series, good condition, $200 CASH!! ers, $350. 541-948-2204 OBO. 541-306-4252. For Guns, Ammo & Reloading 541-322-0496 Second Hand Supplies. 541-408-6900. 255 Mattresses, sets & COLT AR-15, Military issue, Computers singles, call 266 w/Leupold scope, new cond., Forum Center, Bend 541-598-4643. $2150 OBO, 541-728-1036. THE BULLETIN requires comHeating and Stoves 541-617-8840 puter advertisers with mulTubed Waterbed Matress only, tiple ad schedules or those Colt Match H-Bar, $900. www.wbu.com/bend NOTICE TO ADVERTISER queen size, $250, selling multiple systems/ SW5 9mm, $950. Since September 29, 1991, 541-390-7564. software, to disclose the AP9, 9mm, $400, advertising for used woodSUPER TOP SOIL name of the business or the plus others. Please call: stoves has been limited to www.hersheysoilandbark.com term "dealer" in their ads. 541-504-9469, ask for Bob. models which have been Private party advertisers are certified by the Oregon De- Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High defined as those who sell one partment of Environmental humus level, exc. for flower computer. DO YOU HAVE Quality (DEQ) and the fedWe Service All Vacs! beds, lawns, gardens, SOMETHING TO SELL eral Environmental ProtecFree Estimates! 257 straight screened top soil. FOR $500 OR LESS? tion Agency (EPA) as having Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you Musical Instruments Non-commercial met smoke emission stanhaul. 541-548-3949. advertisers may dards. A certified woodstove 208 ORGAN computer system by place an ad with our may be identified by its cer- Two lawn mowers one works Pets and Supplies Bend’s Only Hohner, 2 set headphones. tification label, which is per"QUICK CASH needs tune-up, other needs Authorized $1200 OBO. 541-504-2567. manently attached to the SPECIAL" repair. FREE. 541-504-1791. KITTEN SEASON IS UPON US!! Oreck Store. stove. The Bulletin will not Take advantage of our “Mom 1 week 3 lines 258 knowingly accept advertising 270 & kitten special.” We will al$12 or for the sale of uncertified Travel/Tickets 2 weeks $18! ter mama kitty and 4 kittens Lost and Found woodstoves. for $45. Each additional KitAd must DUCK TICKETS (2), for most ten $5. Call us today to make include price of single item Found Parakeet: 5/2, Forum games, variety of prices de- Woodstove, beautiful art deco, an appt. Bend Spay & Neuter In the Forum Center of $500 or less, or mulShopping center in Bend, call in good condition, must sell, pending on which game. Project 541-617-1010. 541-330-0420 tiple items whose total 541-546-3385. $75. 541-385-4940 $150/up. 541-573-1100. does not exceed $500. Labradoodles, Australian Lost Black Cat 14th St. RedImports - 541-504-2662 260 267 mond, $100 reward, name is The Bulletin Call Classifieds at www.alpen-ridge.com Misc. Items Fuel and Wood Matty, very big black cat recommends extra caution 541-385-5809 Labrador Pups, AKC, Chocowhite on all paws white on when purchasing products www.bendbulletin.com BUYING AND SELLING lates, Yellows, Blacks, sacrichest and some on face if or services from out of the All gold jewelry, silver and gold fice, $450. Dews, 1st shots & WHEN BUYING found or know any info conarea. Sending cash, checks, coins, bars, rounds, wedding wormed. 541-536-5385 Glock 23, in box, $500. tact Nicole Turner or credit information may FIREWOOD... sets, class rings, sterling silwww.welcomelabs.com 541-647-9117 541-419-3470 be subjected to F R A U D . To avoid fraud, The ver, coin collect, vintage For more information about Bulletin recommends GUNS watches, dental gold. Bill FIND IT! an advertiser, you may call payment for Firewood Buy, Sell, Trade Fleming, 541-382-9419. the Oregon State Attorney BUY IT! only upon delivery 541-728-1036. General’s Office Consumer Buying Diamonds and inspection. SELL IT! HANDGUN SAFETY CLASS for Protection hotline at /Gold for Cash The Bulletin Classiieds • A cord is 128 cu. ft. concealed license. NRA, 1-877-877-9392. SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS Police Firearms Instructor, 4’ x 4’ x 8’ Lhasa Apso/Pug spring pups. 541-389-6655 LOST: Mini Revolver Combo .22 Lt. Gary DeKorte Thur. May • Receipts should include, Lhasa Apso mom, dad is reg. Mag & Long Rifle, 5 shot, 12, 6:30-10:30 pm. Call BUYING name, phone, price and kind brindle Pug. Adorable, variREWARD, 541-977-2414. Kevin, Centwise, for reservaLionel/American Flyer trains, of wood purchased. ety colors. Must see! you will tions $40. 541-548-4422 accessories. 541-408-2191. • Firewood ads MUST infall in love. $295. Call for info 212 Lost Orange Cat, fluffy very clude species and cost per 541-548-0747, 541-279-3588 Mossberg 12g 500 pump, 28” GameBoy w/games, works gr8 friendly, ‘Tigger’, Tumalo Antiques & cord to better serve our barrel, syn. stock, chokes inarea, Cline Falls Hwy 1 mi. N. $50; Skateboard Long board customers. Collectibles cluded, $200. 541-647-8931 of Tumalo store & High Ridge Fisata, good cond. $100. Manx/Scottish fold kittens. feDr., 4/15, Reward, 503-933-0814 Bend. male Calico short tail but not MOUFLON SHEEP HUNT 12 Place, 155 pieces, solid 541-385-0194. bobbed; male black/silver near Mitchell. HOT TUB 9’x1’ 7x6 12 person brass dinner setting w/ gobbobtail, $150. Born 3-23-11 36 jets all brand new, panel lets. 81 Years old, never Call 541-923-3490 for details. litter box trained. and pumps recently put in. used, beautiful 3 drawer All Year Dependable S&W .357 Magnum Model 28 541-815-1629 $4000 OBO. 541-325-7043 wood case, $450. revolver, plus holster, belt & Firewood: Split/dry lodgepole, Mini Aussies, Adult & pup541-390-0267 or ammo, $600. 541-548-6629 $90 for 1/2 cord; $160 for 1; Meade LX10 8” SCT scope w/ pies, starting at $150, call 970-623-5804. or $300 for 2. Bend del. Cash Magellan I encoder, field triWanted: Collector seeks high 541-447-6191. Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484 pod, electric focus w/hand Antiques Wanted: Tools, fishquality fishing items. Call LOST White Pit Bull, 2-yr Plott Hound Mix, resuced male, box, 8” sun filter, lens tray, ing, marbles, wood furniture, 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746 male, black patch on left eye, 8 months, $75. Please call telrad finder, extra eye Lodgepole Seasoned rounds: 1 beer cans. 541-389-1578 cord $129; 2@$124ea; 3@ black spots on ears, last seen 541-576-3701;503-310-2514 pieces. great cond, w/books 247 $119ea. Split: 1 cord $159; Redmond 4/14, needs meds, Denver Broncos memorabilia etc. $450 firm. 541-598-7219 Pomeranians, purebred, 2 feSporting Goods 2@$154 ea; 3@$149 ea. Bin $100 reward! 541-977-5156 includes signed footballs by males, all shots, dewormed, price 4’x4’x4’, $59 ea. Cash. Pool Table, 8’, 1” slate, Oak John Elway and other playMisc. born 9/13,$300, 541-977-2847 Delivery avail. 541-771-0800 REMEMBER: If you have lost an cab., lthr pockets, all accys, ers. 541-390-0267 or animal, don't forget to check nice! $999. 541-408-2199 970-623-5804 Headwaters Bamboo Fly POODLE Pups, AKC Toy SEASONED JUNIPER: The Humane Society in Rod, custom built, model Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi Lovable, happy tail-waggers! The Bulletin reserves the right $150/cord rounds, $170 per Bend, 541-382-3537 Peerless, 5 weight, 7.2’, Ross Call 541-475-3889 audio & studio equip. McInto publish all ads from The cord split. Delivered in CenRedmond, 541-923-0882 reel, w/extra spool & line, tosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Bulletin newspaper onto The tral Oregon. Since 1970, Call Puppies (6), Medium size, Prineville, 541-447-7178; new never used, due to illHeathkit, Sansui, Carver, Bulletin Internet website. eves. 541-420-4379 msg. mother Tri-color Heeler, faOR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420. ness, must sell, paid $950, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808 ther Corgi/? mix, $75, asking $400, 541-884-6440 541-390-3404 269 286 265 Portable radios, 2 Midland, mini Queensland Heelers Gardening Supplies Sales Northeast Bend Building Materials palm 2-ways, $50 ea. Standards & mini,$150 & up. 241 & Equipment 503-933-0814 Bend. 541-280-1537 Bicycles and http://rightwayranch.wordpress.com/ HH FREE HH 248

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SCHNOODLE Pups, loyal & loving, 2 males, 1 female, 1st shot, $200 ea. 541-306-1807

Accessories

Cannondale Mountain Bike, single shock, $500, 541-383-8528

246

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

12g Mossberg 500 pump, syn. stock, 18” barrel, home proYorkshire Terrier Pups, 2 tection. $200. 541-647-8931 females, $350,2 males, $300, born 3/4/11, 541-604-5558 12g Remington 870mag, syn. stock, 18” barrel, home pro210 tection. $200. 541-647-8931

Furniture & Appliances 12g S&W, auto, $350. .22cal !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

Rem. 12 pump, $250. Ruger 22mag $325. 541-647-8931 20g Mossberg 500 classic, wood stock, pump, 28” bbl, chokes, $200. 541-647-8931

BarkTurfSoil.com

Health and Beauty Items

Instant Landscaping Co. BULK GARDEN MATERIALS Wholesale Peat Moss Sales

541-389-9663

Chronic Pain & Fatigue, insomnia, brain fog, anxiety, migraines? •Current treatments offering no relief? •Been told to ‘Live with it”? •Tired of taking drugs that don’t fix the problem or make it worse? There is Hope! Call For Your Free DVD Farewell to Fibromyalgia Call 866-700-2424 and find out how to get better today!

Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE!

JUNIPER TIES & BOARDS Full Measure Timbers “ Rot Resistant ” Raised Bed Garden Projects Instantlandscaping.com 541-389-9663

KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

541-647-8261

German Butterball Potato Seeds, $0.15/lb, 400 lb avail., call 541-382-0891

MADRAS Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 84 SW K. St. 541 475-9722 Open to the public.

Have Gravel Will Travel! Cinders, topsoil, fill material, etc. Excavation & septic systems. Call Abbas Construction CCB#78840, 541-548-6812.

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Cabinet Refacing & Refinishing. Save Thousands! Most jobs completed in 5 days or less. Best Pricing in the Industry.

9 7 7 0 2 Farm Market

300 308

Farm Equipment and Machinery Water Tanks, (7) 55 gallon tanks, $105 all together. 541-408-7358

341

Horses and Equipment 16” Newer saddle by Ralide. Great for your kids, $350. 541-390-0267 or 970-623-5804

7 yrs grade quarterhorse mare, has done it all, great family horse. $1200. 503-310-2514

Cutters, Penners, Barrel Racers. We have beautiful, well-bred young horses, brood mares & cutting school drop-outs. From $1500. 541-480-3096

345

Livestock & Equipment Angus Bulls, yearlings & older, range-raised proven blood lines, $1000 & up. 541-480-8096, Madras.

GOATS for sale: Nubians, Boers & mixed does, wethers & buck. 541-548-1857

350

Horseshoeing/ Farriers NILSSON HOOF CARE. Certified natural hoof care practitioner with www.aanhcp.net and www.liberatedhorsemanship.com. 541-504-7764.

358

Farmers Column A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com


E2 Monday, May 9, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Employment

400 421

Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

454

Looking for Employment I provide housekeeping & caregiving svcs, & have 20+ yrs experience. 541-508-6403 Looking for part-time driving job, sat. or sun. Class A lic., exc. record, drug and alcohol test no problem, ref. gladly . Clifford, 541-504-9210.

476

Employment Opportunities CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Kevin O’Connell Classified Department Manager The Bulletin

541-383-0398 Certified Teacher for 2011-12 school year with a 5-8 self-contained endorsement. Srong background in science preferred. Application deadline extended to noon, 5/31/11. Information & application available at www.powellbuttecharterschool.org or 541-548-1166.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today! DENTAL ASSISTANT Bend Dental Group is looking for an enthusiastic team player to join our busy practice and amazing staff. The ideal candidate would need to possess the following qualifications: EFDA cert., digital x-ray, Eaglesoft, treatment planning, sterilization, time management, and excellent communication/customer service skills. This is a full time position with benefits. Please e-mail cover letter and resume to pams@benddentalgroup.com

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Dental Assistant Full Time DA needed in our Bend office. Schedule is 4 10-hour days/ week. OR X-Ray/ EFDA required. 2+ years exp preferred. Come join our dedicated team! Competitive pay & excellent benefits! Apply Online:

Irrigation Tech/Landscaper, 35-40 hr/week, seasonal, start NOW! Must haves: valid D.L., 2+ yrs experience. $12-$16/hour DOE. Deliver resume, references & cover letter at front desk: 60801 Brosterhous Rd. OR email info@crownvillarvresort.com

Medical Assistant: Full-Time, Healthstat On-Site Chronic Disease Management Clinic. • Strong organization & communication skills. •Personable, professional, approachable, compassionate, listening, sensitive to diversity. www.willamettedental.com •Proficient in Phlebotomy • HS Diploma (or equivalent) & 3-5 years exp. as a MediDental Assistant cal Assistant Must be X-Ray certified, Tues.- • Basic Computer skills incl. Thurs. to start. Drop off reword processing, data entry, sume at 2078 NE Profestyping, internet use & other sional Ct., Bend. applications. 541-382-2281. Contact Melissa Parks at Jack Miller, DMD 704-529-6161 for more inBranden Ferguson, DDS formation. Fax your resume to 704-323-7931 or email to melissa.parks@healthstatinc.com DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before 11 Medical Receptionist a.m. and get an ad in to Bend, OR publish the next day! Seeking friendly, posi385-5809. tive receptionist for a VIEW the Classifieds at: multi-physician pracwww.bendbulletin.com

Hairstylist - Fully licensed for hair, nails & waxing. Recent relevant experience necessary. Hourly/commission. Teresa, 541-382-8449

HOUSE CLEANER - wanted for home cleaning service. Drivers license, no smoking, bondable, no weekends, no holidays. 541-815-0015. Installation EXPERIENCED GUTTER INSTALLER! If this is you, call 541-280-0146 and follow instructions. If you do not have recent and mega experience, let’s not waste each other’s time.

tice. Must have medical and reception experience and have knowledge of CPT and ICD-9 coding. Must be energetic, detail-oriented, self-motivated, type proficiently and have accurate filing skills. Starting wage depending on experience. Send resume to: achieve.success.302@ gmail.com

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Sales Associate

Tele-Marketing: Small company seeking individuals to fundraise for well-known non-profit organizations. Great for seniors, homemakers, students & others, Permanent part-time, 16 hours weekly, Mon-Thur. 5-9 p.m (Day hours available, too.) $8.50 per hour plus bonuses. Some experience helpful, but will train those with great work ethic & ability to obtain contributions. 541-385-5371

Mercedes Benz of Bend is seeking a motivated individual to join our team as a Sales Associate. No experience needed, will train. This is a great place to grow if you are a current sales professional. Apply in person, 61440 S Hwy 97, Bend. Shipping/Receiving

Looking for an exciting new job? Microsemi is looking for a Material Handler. This position would perform the physical and administrative tasks involved in the shipping and receiving of materials, parts, supplies and equipment. Unpacks and checks goods received against purchase orders or invoices, maintains records of received goods. Packs and ships customer products following Export regulations, prepares die/wafers shipments to subcons, receives incoming die/wafer shipments from subcons, foundries and intercompany transactions into MRP system. This position is a full time position hired through a temp agency. Requires 4-6 years of experience as a Material Handler in manufacturing and preferably in a semiconductor electronics components systems environment. Good Microsoft Office skills needed, good written and verbal communication skills a must. Prefer to have experience in Federal Express, UPS, and other shipping methods. Prefer to have MS Dynamics MRP system experience. Please submit a resume to Melissa.epperly@microsemi.com or apply in person to 405 SW Columbia St. Bend OR. EOE

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

by SWireless is looking for energetic FT/PT Sales Reps. 1st Year earning potential is $11K- $35K. Send resumes to applications@swirelessnw.com or fax to 866-611-3607.

500 528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Rentals FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION visit our website at

Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Redmond H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

600 616

Want To Rent

1, 2 and 3 bdrm apts. available starting at $625.

Alpine Meadows Townhomes 541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Rooms for Rent

541-382-3402

Mt. Bachelor Motel LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

New Business Development Account Executive

The Bulletin is looking for a person with the right mix of experience, enthusiasm and drive to manage our New Business Development territory. This position is responsible for helping new (call-in and walk-in) customers with developing newspaper advertising programs, and manages a small list of existing customers as well. To our advertising customers, we offer an expanding list of broad-reach and targeted products to help them meet their business objectives. To the right candidate, we offer a stable, energetic work environment and a commission-based compensation package with plenty of earning potential. A background in consultative sales, territory management and aggressive prospecting skills is preferable, but we will train the right candidate. Please send your resume, cover letter and salary history to: Sean L. Tate, Advertising Manager, state@bendbulletin.com

has rooms, starting at $150/wk. or $35/night. Includes guest laundry, cable & WiFi. Bend 541-382-6365

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

EOE / Drug Free Workplace

1751 NE Wichita, W/S/G paid, on-site laundry, small pet on approval .$525/mo. 541-389-9901. Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting. No pets/smoking. Near St. Charles.W/S/G pd; both w/d hkup + laundry facil. $595$625/mo. 541-385-6928. Great Location, by BMC & Costco, 2 bdrm., 2 bath duplex, 55+, 2342 NE Mary Rose Pl., #2 $795+dep, no pets/smoking, 541-390-7649 Pilot Butte Is Your Back Yard, 2/2.5, granite counters garage, W/D hookup, hardwood, sliding doors, deck, $675, 541-480-3666.

631

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

632

Apt./Multiplex General The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

Beautiful updated, cozy, 1 bdrm, 2 bath Condo, A/C, 2 blocks from downtown, along banks of Deschutes, amenities incl., 1 parking spot, indoor pool, hot tub & sauna, serious renters only, credit & refs., check, minimum 1 yr. lease, no pets, reduced, now $625, utils incl., Kerrie, 541-480-0325.

Deluxe 2 Bdrm 1½ Bath Townhouse apt. W/D hookup, fenced yd. NO PETS. Great location, starting at $565. 179 SW Hayes (past Mike’s Fence Center) Please call 541-382-0162; 541-420-0133

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 2 bdrm, 1 bath $550 mo.

OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS www.redmondrents.com Storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks and shopping. On-site laundry, non-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. ONE MONTH FREE w/6 mo. lease! 541-923-1907

SPRING BLAST! Studios $375 1 Bdrm $400 Free Move-in Rent! • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond Close to schools, shopping, and parks! 541-548-8735 Managed by

GSL Properties

541-322-7253

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend !! Spring On In !! $150 off Upstairs Apts. Pet Friendly & No App. Fee! 2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps Lease Options Available

Fox Hollow Apts.

You may also drop off your resume in person or mail it to: 1777 SW Chandler, Bend OR 97701. No phone inquiries please.

Attractive 2 bdrm. in 4-plex,

Condo / Townhomes For Rent Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

2 BDRM., 1 BATH Apt. near Old Mill, laundry, parking, $595/month. Victoria L. Manahan Real Estate, 541-280-7240.

541-385-5809

630 In Romaine Village $350 mo. 1st and last, ask for Jeff, 541-419-1702.

640

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend Apt./Multiplex SW Bend

Shop space wanted 200 sq.ft., power, secure, central location in Bend. 541-350-8917.

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

www.oregonfreshstart.com

is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

634

The Bulletin

to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Sprint

Finance & Business

(541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

GREAT LOCATION 2 bdrm, 1 bath townhouse in quiet 6-plex between Old Mill & downtown. W/D included, $585. 129 Adams Place (off Delaware). 541-647-4135

638

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend A Cute, Clean 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath duplex, on quiet street near Country Club, nearly new carpet, dishwasher, fireplace, W/D hookup, private backyard, 20358 Fairway Dr., $660. Small pet neg. 541-306-1378.

2 Bdrm. Starting at $525 1 Month FREE w/Lease or Month to Month Chaparral & Rimrock Apts Clean, energy efficient, w/patios,on-site laundry, storage avail. Near schools, pools, skateboard park & shopping. Large dog run, some large breeds OK w/mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 648

658

Houses for Rent General

Houses for Rent Redmond

PUBLISHER'S 3 Bdrm, 1 bath, 1300 sq ft, NOTICE new paint, pets OK, fenced All real estate advertising in yard, avail 5/12. 1st, last, sethis newspaper is subject to curity dep., 1406 SW 17th St. the Fair Housing Act which 541-420-7397; 541-385-5934 makes it illegal to advertise Clean 4 Bdrm + den, 2 bath, "any preference, limitation or 14920 SW Maverick Rd, CRR. discrimination based on race, No smoking; pets negotiable. color, religion, sex, handicap, $900/mo. + deposits. Call familial status, marital status 541-504-8545; 541-350-1660 or national origin, or an intention to make any such Eagle Crest, single level, 3 preference, limitation or disbdrm., 2½ bath., 2700 sq.ft., crimination." Familial status 3-car garage, all Eagle Crest includes children under the Amenities included, $1400, age of 18 living with parents 714-388-2177. or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing 661 custody of children under 18. Houses for Rent This newspaper will not knowingly accept any adverPrineville tising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our Prineville 3 Bdrm 2 Bath readers are hereby informed RV Parking that all dwellings advertised Pets Negotiable in this newspaper are avail825 + Security Deposit able on an equal opportunity 541-420-2485 basis. To complain of dis671 crimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll Mobile/Mfd. free telephone number for for Rent the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 The Bulletin is now offering a sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE wood stove, all new carpet & Rental rate! If you have a paint, + 1800 sq. ft. shop, home to rent, call a Bulletin fenced for horses, $1095. Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803 started ASAP! 541-385-5809

675

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin 650

Houses for Rent NE Bend 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1200 sq.ft., big wood stove, util. room, 1/2 acre lot, RV parking, dbl garage w/openers, $895. 541-480-3393 or 610-7803

RV Parking RV HOOKUP on .47 acre lot, private, minutes from Sunriver, 6 mo./year, $550/mo, cable extra, 541-385-8367 or 541-788-4714.

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease

Real Estate For Sale

Boats & RV’s

700 800 730

850

New Listings

Snowmobiles

Over 40 Years Experience in Carpet Upholstery & Rug Cleaning C a ll N o w ! 5 4 1-3 8 2-9 4 9 8 CCB #72129 www.cleaningclinicinc.com

N O TIC E:

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail Classic 2006, Vance-Hines pipes, crash bar w/foot pegs, Power Command, Stage 1 backrest w/luggage rack, Dyno-tune, all work performed by Jerry’s Custom Cycle, exclnt cond, $14,500 OBO. 541-549-3001

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike! $9300 OBO. 541-383-1782

541-385-5809

748

Office/Warehouse located in SE Bend. Up to 30,000 sq.ft., competitive rate, 541-382-3678 L o o kin g for y o ur n e x t e m plo y e e ? P l a c e a B u ll e t i n h e l p w a nte d a d to d a y a n d reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend 3 Bdrm, 2 bath avail 5/12. Gas fireplace/AC, fenced yd. 6 mo lease, $950 with W &D, $925 w/o W & D. 1st/last + deposit. No smkg. 541-388-3188

A quiet 4 bdrm, 2 bath, 1748 sq.ft., living room w/wood stove, newer carpet & inside paint, pellet stove, big 1/2 acre fenced lot, dbl garage w/opener. $1195. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

Office/Warehouse Space, 6400 sq.ft., (3) 12x14 doors, on Boyd Acres Rd, 541-382-8998.

Mtn. View Gated Park, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, many ammenities, open floor plan, living, dining & family room, w/view windows, looking east to large & private back area. Master bdrm. w/French doors to wrap-around covered porch, master bathroom w/soaking tub & seperate shower, $175,000, consider lease to buy contract, 2416 NE Crocus Way, Cell 480-357-6044.

773

Acreages

rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

746

Northeast Bend Homes

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, 15K mi, lots of upgrades, cstm exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage accessories, $15,500 OBO. 541-693-3975

GAS

SAVER!

Honda Gold Wing GL 1100, 1980. 23,000 miles, full dress plus helmets, $3500 or best offer. Call 541-389-8410

Rebates up to $1000 Plus 3.99% APR Financing on select models ATV's can be hazardous to operate. All riders under 16 should ride only with adult supervision. Always wear a helmet and be sure to take a safety training course. Financing on approval of credit. See dealer for details.

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Warehouse/Office space, 1235 sq ft, large roll-up door. 20685 Carmen Lp. No triple net; $500/mo, 1st + dep. 541-480-7546; 541-480-7541

693

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $200 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. R..E Deadlines are: KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like Weekdays 11:00 noon for new cond, low miles, street next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for legal, hvy duty receiver hitch Sunday and Monday. basket. $4500. 541-385-4975 541-385-5809 WANTED HARLEY full size bike Thank you! 2000 or newer. Cash paid The Bulletin Classified under $9,500. 541-408-7908 *** Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, septic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $114,900, 541-350-4684.

Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

875

880

881

Watercraft

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Houseboat 38x10, triple axle trailer incl. 20-ft cabin, 12-ft rear swim deck & 6-ft covered front deck. N e w P r i c e ! ! $ 1 7 , 5 0 0 . 541-788-4844.

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $395, 541-923-3490.

Hurricane 2007 35.5’ like new, 3 slides, generator, dark cabinets, Ford V10, 4,650 mi $79,900 OBO. 541-923-3510

McKenzie Medallion by Monaco Corp. 2001, 27’ like new all options, super slide, one owner, $12,995. 541-480-7239.

Midstate Power Products 541-548-6744

Redmond

JAYCO SENECA 2008 36MS, fully loaded, 2 slides, gen., diesel, 8k miles, like new cond., $109,000 OBO. Call for details 1-541-556-8224.

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

870

Boats & Accessories 16' 2000 Smoker Craft Lodge, 25 hp 4 stroke Yamaha w/ prop saver, galvanized trailer w/spare, Bimini top, fish finder, anchor roller, custom welded side rails. $5500 firm, 541-549-6629 eves & week-end

Used out-drive parts Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435 Watercraft

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $2450 for all. Bill 541-480-7930.

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds 20’ 2005 Ski Centurion, Storm Series, tower, custom stereo, only 6 hrs on boat. $36,000. 541-771-9922.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

880

Motorhomes

875

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

***

CHECK YOUR AD

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Last Chance

Northwest Bend Homes BROKEN TOP bargain priced. 3 Bdrm, 3 bath, 2403 sq.ft., new slab granite countertops, hrdwd floors, gas fireplace, only $424,900. Randy Schoning, principal Broker, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393

870

Boats & Accessories

Yamaha 600 Mtn. Max 1997 Now only $895! Sled plus trailer package $1650. Won’t Last Long! 541-548-3443.

Homes for Sale All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

865

ATVs

Communicator Transmitter/ Receiver for motorcycles or snowmobiles, $100. 503-933-0814 Bend.

745

Office / Warehouse 1792 sq.ft. & 1680 sq.ft. spaces, 827 Business Way, Bend. 30¢/sq.ft.; 1st mo. + $300 dep. 541-678-1404

THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 9, 2011 E3

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Inflatable Boat, 3-man, Sea Eagle SE-8, solid floor, seat & motor mount, carrying case, Minn Kota trolling motor, marine battery, pump & oars, $450, 541-923-8226. Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Sea Kayaks - His & Hers, Eddyline Wind Dancers, 17’, fiberglass boats, all equip incl., paddles, personal flotation devices, dry bags, spray skirts, roof rack w/towers & cradles -- Just add water, $1850/boat Firm. 541-504-8557.

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077 BROUGHAM 23½’ 1981, 2tone brown,perfect cond, 6 brand new tires. eng. perfect, runs great, inside perfect shape, great for hunting, fishing, etc., $5000 OBO! See to appreciate at 15847 WoodChip Ln off Day Rd. in La Pine.541-876-5106.

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $104,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2 slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $35,500. 541-815-4121

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504 Starcraft 2008 Centennial 3612 tent trailer, like new, sleeps 6, slide-out, Arizona room, range w/oven, micro, toilet & shower, stereo system, heated mattresses, roof rack, new 6-ply tires, twin 6-volt batteries, outside shower, twin propane tanks, BBQ. $10,500. 541-312-9312

Winnebago Sightseer 30B Class A 2008 $79,500 OBO Top of the line! cell 805-368-1575

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240. Flair 31S w/slide 1998, clean sleeps 6-8, 24K, newer tires, $27,500 OBO, 541-548-0876 Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

881

Travel Trailers HORNET By Keystone 2002 - 31’ Large slide, Queen bed, fridge, A/C, furnace, and TV. $8500. 541-848-7191

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Barns

Electrical Services

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

M. Lewis Construction, LLC

Quality Builders Electric

"POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates . See Facebook Business page, search under M. Lewis Construction, LLC CCB#188576•541-604-6411

• Remodels • Home Improvement • Lighting Upgrades • Hot Tub Hook-ups 541-389-0621 www.qbelectric.net CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C BAXTER ELECTRIC Remodels / Design / Rentals All Small Jobs•Home Improve. All Work by Owner - Call Tom 541-318-1255 CCB 162723

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Computer/Cabling Install QB Digital Living •Computer Networking •Phone/Data/TV Jacks •Whole House Audio •Flat Screen TV & Installation 541-280-6771 www.qbdigitalliving.com CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107 fifi’s Hauling & More. Yard clean up, fuel reduction, con struction & misc. clean up, 10 yd. hyd. trailers, 20 ft. flatbed, 541-382-0811.

Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 • Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling • Decks • Window/Door Replacement • Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179 I DO THAT! Home Repairs, Remodeling, Professional & Honest Work. Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768 Bend’s Reliable Handyman Lowest rates, quality work,clean -up, haul, dispose, repair, odd jobs, paint, fences, & more. CCB#180267 541-419-6077

Home Improvement Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

All types remodeling/handyman Decks, Painting, Carpentry Randy Salveson, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420

Drywall ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

Spring Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Broken Branches •Debris Hauling •Defensible Space •Aeration/Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds ORGANIC

PROGRAMS

Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Edging •Pruning •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments Fertilizer included with monthly program

Weekly, monthly or one time service. EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

Handyman Service Repair & Remodel We Move Walls Small jobs welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

J. L. SCOTT LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Does your lawn have snow mold problems? We can help!

4 Leaf Clover Lawn Service Spring clean-up time is here! Thatch & Aeration Special: 1 free mowing & fertilization with seasonal service! Edging, weed control, pruning, hedging, bark installation. Senior discounts. Knowledgable care with reasonable prices! 541-279-9174; 541-279-0746

D D D D D D D D D D D D D D

SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching & Aeration

Providing full service maintenance for over 20 years! FREE AERATION & FERTILIZATION with new seasonal Mowing Service!

“Because weekends WERE NOT made for yard work!”

541-382-3883

Thatch, Aerate, weeding, raking & monthly maint. 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com

Painting, Wall Covering WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semi-retired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

Specializing in all aspects of wood, drywall, metal & fiberglass finishes. Make your old cabinets, doors or windows new again! Also expert in faux finishing - interior/exterior, 30+ years experience. Call Dan - 541-420-4009 CCB #115437 RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. •Additions/Remodels/Garages •Replacement windows/doors remodelcentraloregon.com 541-480-8296 CCB189290 Andrew Russell Construction, New construction, remodels, siding, decks, fences & much more! FREE ESTIMATES. 541-390-1005 CCB#164571

Rooing AMERICAN ROOFING Quick, efficient, quality work New • Re-roofs • Repairs Free Estimates CCB #193018 Call Jorge - 541-497-3556

Tile, Ceramic Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Specializing in Pavers. Up to 4 maintenance visits free. Call 541-385-0326 Spring Clean Up! Aerating, thatching, lawn restoration, Vacation Care. Full Season Openings. Senior discounts. Call Mike Miller, 541-408-3364

Call The Yard Doctor for yard maint., thatching, sod, hydroseeding, sprinkler sys, water features, walls, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012

Central Oregon high

V Spring Clean Up! V

Nelson Landscape Remodeling, Carpentry D.L. Concepts Remodeling Maintenance

D D D D D D D D D D D D D D Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Weekly Maintenance • Thatching • Aeration • Lawn Over-seeding Bark • Clean-ups Commercial / Residential Senior Discounts

Domestic Services Home Is Where The Dirt Is 10 Yrs Housekeeping Exp., References, Rates To Fit Your Needs Call Crecencia Today! Cell 541-306-7426

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Every spring the

Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

list of graduates, salutatorian and Be a part of this well received keepsake

graduates.

Advertising Deadline: Wednesday, May 25, 2011 Publishes: Wednesday, June 8, 2011 Call your Bulletin Advertising Representative today

541-382-1811


E4 Monday, May 9, 2011 • THE BULLETIN 882

Fifth Wheels

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Autos & Transportation

900 916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

GMC Ventura 3500 1986, refrigerated, w/6’x6’x12’ box, has 2 sets tires w/rims., 1250 lb. lift gate, new engine, $5500, 541-389-6588, ask for Bob.

925

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

975

Automobiles

Audi A4 1999, dark blue, automatic sunroof, runs great, comes w/studded snow tires, $5,000. Jeff, 541-980-5943

Nissan Maxima 1991, auto, sunroof, $600 stereo sys, clean in/out, runs good, $1800 obo. 541-419-5060

International Travel All 1967,

exc. cond., 4WD, new tires, shocks, interior seat cover, everything works, 121K orig. mi.,original operators manual and line setting ticket incl. $5000 OBO, 503-559-4401

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

Plymouth 4-dr sedan, 1948, all orig., new tires, exlnt driver, all gauges work, 63,520 miles, $8500. 541-504-2878

Wells

Cargo

Sport,

931

ARE CANOPY fits new style Chevy 6.5, top of the line, Silver birch. New $1800 asking $900. 541-383-2338. We Buy Scrap Auto & Truck Batteries, $10 each Also buying junk cars & trucks, (up to $500), & scrap metal! Call 541-912-1467

FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $3800. 541-350-1686 Ford Ranger 2004 Super Cab, XLT, 4X4, V6, 5-spd, A/C bed liner, tow pkg, 120K Like New! KBB Retail: $10,000 OBO 360-990-3223

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

935

Sport Utility Vehicles CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

BUICKS ! LeSabre 1998 and 2000 $1900-$3900 90k and 110k miles, silver and white colors, full size 4-door sedans, 30 mpg hwy, luxury cars, trouble-free, too! ask anyone that owns one! 541-318-9999

• 4WD, 68,000 miles. • Great Shape. • Original Owner.

$19,450! 541-389-5016 evenings.

WILLYS JEEP 1956 New rebuilt motor, no miles, Power Take-off winch. Exc. tires.

Ford Explorer Eddie Bauer 2000, AWD, 146,500 mi., V-8, 5.0L, auto, fully loaded, extra set studs on rims, $5400, Mike 541-408-8330

Asking $3,999 or make offer. 541-389-5355

CHEVROLET 1970, V-8 automatic 4X4 3/4 ton. Very good condition, lots of new parts and maintenance records. New tires, underdash air, electronic ignition and much more. Original paint, truck used very little. $5700, 541-575-3649

Grand Laredo

Cherokee 1998, 6 cyl.,

4L, 180K mi., new tires & battery, leather & alloy, ask $3450, Bill, 541-480-7930.

FORD TAURUS LX 98 with 74K miles, gold color, one owner, non smoker, 27 mpg, V-6 motor, nice car and almost new! $3900 541-318-9999 or 541-815-3639

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

KOMFORT 27’ 2000 5th wheel, fiberglass with 12’ slide. In excellent condition, has been stored inside. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, quality built, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more.$59,500. 541-317-9185

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information. Chevy Corvette 1980, yellow, glass removable top, 8 cyl., auto trans, radio, heat, A/C, new factory interior, black, 48K., exc. tires, factory aluminum wheels, asking $7500, will consider fair offer & possible trade, 541-385-9350.

Chevy Corvette 1984, 105K mi., runs strong, new tires & front end alignment, new battery, $8000 OBO, 541-706-1705

DODGE RAM 2004 4x4

Jeep Grand Cherokee Special Edition, 2004, 4x4, V8, 91K, Auto, AC,541-598-5111 $8895

Jaguar SV6 2000 4-dr. Has new: tires, brakes, rotors, calipers, radio, battery. AC great! 84K mi, like new, $7500. 541-923-2595

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $14,500. 541-408-2111

Lincoln LS 2005 V6, exlnt cond, 43K miles, blue w/gray interior, $10,900. 541-923-5758

Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k mi. Immac,, Loaded, Dlr. maintained, $23k. 503-459-1580

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

3/4 ton, diesel, 6 speed manual, crew cab, 4 door, spray-in bedliner, clearance lights, air bags, custom wheels and large tires, 87k. Looks like new inside & out!

$27,900 OBO. 541-433-2341 • 541-410-8173 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

MERCEDES C300 2008

The Bulletin Classiieds

Ford crew cab 1993, 7.3 Diesel, auto, PS, Rollalong package, deluxe interior & exterior, electric windows/door locks, dually, fifth wheel hitch, receiver hitch, 90% rubber, super maint. w/all records, new trans. rebuilt, 116K miles. $6500, Back on the market. 541-923-0411

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 38K mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $59,750 firm. 541-480-1884

New body style, 30,000 miles, heated seats, luxury sedan, CD, full factory warranty. $23,950.

Like buying a new car! 503-351-3976.

940

Vans

Mercedes GL450, 2007

Ford Flatbed 1985, diesel, new tires, rims and glow plugs, gooseneck hitch and rear Chevy Corvette Coupe 2006, hitch, 4WD., great condition, 8,471 orig miles, 1 owner, al$2500. 541-419-6593. or ways garaged, red, 2 tops, 541-419-6552. auto/paddle shift, LS-2, Corsa exhaust, too many options to list, pristine car, $37,500. Serious only, call 541-504-9945

SUBARUS!!! Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Convertible Hardtop. 10,800mi. Celestial Blue w/Calcite Cream leather int. Premium & Climate pkgs. Warranty & Service to 10/2014. KBB SRP $33,540. Asking $31,900. 541-350-5437

Chevrolet 1-ton Express Cargo Van 1999, with tow package, good condition, $4800. Call 541-419-5693

All wheel drive, 1 owner, navigation, heated seats, DVD, 2 moonroofs. Immaculate and never abused. $27,950. Call 503-351-3976

VW Super Beetle 1971, $3600 OBO, great cond., with sunroof, 541-410-7679.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $39,500. 541-420-3250

Chevy El Camino 1979, 350 auto, new studs, located in Sisters, $3000 OBO, 907-723-9086,907-723-9085 Terry Fleetwood Fifth Wheel 2007, 295RL Great shape & ready to roll. $15,500 Open for tour during Yard Sale Sat. See Yard Sales. You can also see on Craigslist, or call 541-408-6908.

885

Canopies and Campers Arctic Fox 11.5’ 2000, A/C, 4KW generator, exc. cond., with slide, cover & TV incl., $9000 OBO, 541-948-5793.

Chevy

Wagon

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING A meeting of the Bend Metropolitan Planning Organization (BMPO) Policy Board will be held on May 19, 2011 at 4:00 p.m. in the DeArmond Room, Deschutes Services Center, 1300 NW Wall Street, Bend. The purpose of this meeting is to discuss the BMPO budget for the annual period July 1, 2011 through June 30, 2012, as approved by the BMPO Budget Committee on April 25, 2011. A copy of the budget may be inspected or obtained at the City of Bend Administration Office in City Hall, 710 NW Wall St., Bend, OR between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. or on the web at www.bendmpo.org/upwp.html. This is a public meeting. Any person may appear at the meeting and discuss the proposed programs with the BMPO Policy Board. This meeting event/location is accessible. Please contact Jovi Anderson at (541) 693-2122, janderson@ci.bend.or.us and/or TTY (541) 389-2245. Providing at least 3 days notice prior to the event will help ensure availability of services requested. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON

Infiniti J30 1993 118.6K miles. 1 owner. Great shape. 4 separate studded tires on wheels incl. $3200. 541-382-7451

Antique and Classic Autos Chevy 3/4 Ton 1989, 4x4, 100K miles, 350 engine, Great cond. $3900. Call 541-815-9939

541-322-7253

Honda CRV 2007 AWD 18mpg City/26 Hwy! 62k mi, MP3, multi-disc CD, sunroof, tow pkg, $17,500. 541-389-3319

932 Be Ready for summer vacations! 27’ 1995 Terry 5th wheel with BIG slide-out, generator and extras. $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Volvo C70-T5, 2010 Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Honda Civic Hybrid 2004, 88k auto, 40 miles mpg, exc. cond. 541-598-5111 $9395

Chevy 1/2-ton 1989, 4x, V-6, manual, exc. runner, too many new things to list, $2000 OBO, Please call 541-382-0421 or 541-390-2906.

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

Chysler La Baron Convertible 1990, Good condition, $3800, 541-416-9566

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597

Pickups

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

975

Automobiles

933

12x6, side door, 2 back doors, shelves, exc. cond., $2750, call 541-815-1523.

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

933

Pickups

Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. $4800 OBO. Call 541-390-1466.

Utility Trailers

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $39,900, please call 541-330-9149.

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Pettibone Mercury fork lift, 8000 lb., 2-stage, propane, hard rubber tires. $4000 or Make offer. 541-389-5355.

Truck with Snow Plow!

Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, frplc, 2 flat scrn TVs. $70,000. 760-644-4160

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

A public hearing regarding a proposed annexation, Baker-Donohue Annexation, to the Deschutes County Rural Fire Protection District #2, will be held on May 25, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. in the Board of County Commissioners' Hearing Room, First Floor, 1300 NW Wall Street, Bend, Oregon. To view the legal description of the boundaries of the proposed annexation, contact the Deschutes County Counsel's Office at 388-6623. The purpose of the proposed annexation is to provide fire protection services for the area proposed to be annexed. All interested persons may appear and be heard. Deschutes County conducts public meetings in locations which are wheelchair accessible. Deschutes County also provides reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities. For persons who are deaf, or who have hearing or speech impairments, dial 7-1-1 to access the State transfer relay service for TTY. At meetings of the Board of County Commissioners the county will provide an interpreter for hearing impaired persons who give at least 48 hours notice of the request. Written information will be made available in large print or audio format. To request these services, please call (541) 388-6571. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS FOR DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Tammy Baney, Chair LEGAL NOTICE PADDLEBOARDING PROSPECTUS The Bend Fort Rock Ranger District on the Deschutes National Forest is accepting applications for a temporary outfitter guide prospectus to provide paddleboarding instruction and/or guiding. The application packet is available by contacting Bend Fort Rock Ranger Station, 1230 NE 3rd, suite A262, Bend, OR 97701 or on the USDA Forest Service's web site for Central Oregon at: http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/cen traloregon/recreation/guides /paddleboard_prospectus/in dex.shtml . Responses to the prospectus must be complete and received by 4:30 PM on June 9, 2011. LEGAL NOTICE The regular meeting of the Board of Directors of the Deschutes County Rural Fire Protection District #2 scheduled for May 10, 2011 has been cancelled. Instead, a special meeting of the Board will be held on Wednesday, May 18, 2011 at 3:45 p.m. at the Administration Building of Bend Fire, 1212 SW Simpson, Bend, OR. Items on the agenda include: an update on Project Wildfire, and the fire department report. The meeting will be followed by a joint work session with the Bend City Council to receive the Deployment Plan from the Bend Fire Department.

1957,

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Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $6900 541-815-1523.

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting to: Tom Fay 541-318-0459. TTY 800-735-2900.

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

Northland 880 Grizzly, 2002, 8½’ cab-over camper, exclnt cond, garaged when not in use, $9500 obo. 541-549-4834

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Dodge pickup 1962 D100 classic, original 318 wide block, push button trans, straight, runs good, $1250 firm. Bend, 831-295-4903

Ford 2 Door 1949,

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Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or 541-385-5809

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0657143026 T.S. No.: OR-277504-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, BRIAN N. HAWORTH as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC DBA DITECH A RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE LENDER, as Beneficiary, dated 10/22/2008, recorded 11/5/2008, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. XX at page No. XX, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2008-44519 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 17 12 35BB 01901 / 195734 LOT ONE (1) OF VILLAGE, PHASE I, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1392 NE TUCSON WAY BEND, OR

97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $168,202.26; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 11/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,323.39 Monthly Late Charge $54.35 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $168,202.26 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.5% per annum from 10/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 7/13/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 2/22/2011 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marina Marin Authorized Signatory ASAP# FNMA3922493 04/18/2011, 04/25/2011, 05/02/2011, 05/09/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0656453886 T.S. No.: OR-277496-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, GEORGE H. MORTON AND STEPHANIE K. MORTON, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC DBA DITECH.COM A RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE LENDER, as Beneficiary, dated 12/13/2006, recorded 1/23/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. XX at page No. XX, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-04596 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 18 12 18DD 07000 / 121722 LOT ONE (1) IN BLOCK ONE (1) OF PLAT OF GOLDENRAIN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 60818 GRANITE DR BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $178,903.75; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 11/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,087.99 Monthly Late Charge $54.39 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $178,903.75 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.625% per annum from 10/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI

TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 7/13/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 2/22/2011 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marina Marin Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3922492 04/18/2011, 04/25/2011, 05/02/2011, 05/09/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx7431 T.S. No.: 1319862-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Kenton Lueck and Sheila M. Smith, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated October 09, 2007, recorded October 15, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-55094 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot Six, COUNTRY PARK PHASE I, Deschutes County, Oregon. TOGETHER WITH that portion of Lot Five, COUNTRY PARK PHASE I, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: Beginning at the Northwest corner of said Lot 6; thence North 01°05'53" East, 0.60 feet; thence South 88°51'33" East, 23.35 feet; thence South 89°39'32" East, 23.35 feet to the point of beginning and terminus of this description. EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion of Lot 6, COUTRYPARK PHASE I, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: Beginning at the Northeast corner of said Lot 6; thence South 01 deg 02' 52" East, 1.60 feet; thence South 88°51'33" West, 61.67 feet; thence North 89°39'32" East, 61.69 feet to the point of beginning and terminus of this description. Commonly known as: 2763 SW 28th St. "commonly known as 2749 shown on Deed of Trust as 2763" Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due October 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,119.23 Monthly Late Charge $44.77. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $160,675.99 together with interest thereon at 5.000% per annum from September 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 01, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and


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expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 24, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-375698 04/25/11, 05/02, 05/09, 05/16 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx4865 T.S. No.: 1317173-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Robert J. Collins, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated September 19, 2006, recorded September 28, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-65779 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 8, in block 10 of Woodside Ranch Phase III, Deschutes County Oregon. Commonly known as: 60385 Woodside Lp. Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due October 1, 2008 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,948.70 Monthly Late Charge $128.55. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $483,967.68 together with interest thereon at 6.375% per annum from September 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 01, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to

Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 23, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-375586 04/25, 05/02, 05/09, 05/16 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0428023097 T.S. No.: OR-272846-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, LES HAMILTON AND BARBARA L. HAMILTON, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC. A DELAWARE CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 3/23/2006, recorded 3/31/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. XX at page No. XX, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-22019 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 17 12 27AB 00100 / 155907 LOT 19, BLOCK 5, TAMARACK PARK, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2981 NORTHEAST PURCELL BOULVARD BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $198,134.84; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 9/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,524.40 Monthly Late Charge $64.65 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all

obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $198,134.84 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.25% per annum from 8/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 7/19/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 2/28/2011 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marina Marin Authorized Signatory ASAP# FNMA3928171 04/18/2011, 04/25/2011, 05/02/2011, 05/09/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1727 T.S. No.: 1305617-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Bruce W. Grove An Unmarried Man, as Grantor to First American Title Ins. Co. Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage Co. Dba Commonwealth United Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, dated October 29, 2004, recorded November 01, 2004, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2004-65519 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 15 of Northpointe-Phase 1, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 20695 Beaumont Dr. Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured

by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due August 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $768.94 Monthly Late Charge $38.40. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $122,009.33 together with interest thereon at 5.625% per annum from July 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 08, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 01, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-376855 05/02, 05/09, 05/16, 05/23 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7472828078 T.S. No.: OR-274992-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, LYRICA D. HUBBARD, AN UNMARRIED PERSON AND MOSE HARRIS, AN UNMARRIED PERSON as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC

(F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.) A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, as Beneficiary, dated 2/22/2007, recorded 2/23/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. XX at page No. XX, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-11183 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 15 13 17CA 00200 / 201862 LOT ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-SIX (126), HAYDEN VIEW PHASE THREE, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2823 SOUTHWEST LAVA AVENUE REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $169,200.00; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 9/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,114.14 Monthly Late Charge $44.94 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $169,200.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.375% per annum from 8/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 7/19/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and

‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 2/28/2011 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marina Marin Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3928440 04/18/2011, 04/25/2011, 05/02/2011, 05/09/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1067 T.S. No.: 1318412-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Pamela Armstrong, as Grantor to Western Title, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank A National Banking Association, as Beneficiary, dated August 09, 2007, recorded August 20, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-45732 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 55, Braeburn, Phase II, Deschutes County, Oregon Commonly known as: 19377 Brookside Way Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,994.46 Monthly Late Charge $72.39. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $403,298.51 together with interest thereon at 2.000% per annum from October 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on July 25, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other

default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 17, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-374904 04/18, 04/25, 05/02, 05/09 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0359186795 T.S. No.: OR-274310-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JEREMIAH R. WIGGINS as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR SIERRA PACIFIC MORTGAGE COMPANY, INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 8/1/2005, recorded 8/5/2005, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. XX at page No. XX, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2005-51455 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 247813/15 13 17BA 06700 LOT SIXTY-ONE (61), VILLAGE POINTE, PHASES 2 & 3 DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2942 SW DESCHUTES AVENUE REDMOND, Oregon 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $191,320.15; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 9/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $754.31 Monthly Late Charge $15.94 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $191,320.15 together with interest thereon at the rate of 2% per annum from 8/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 7/6/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of

the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 2/15/2011 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Suthon Pimmarleeja Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3915878 04/18/2011, 04/25/2011, 05/02/2011, 05/09/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7429034796 T.S. No.: OR-158841-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, WILLIAM CHAPEL as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 6/5/2006, recorded 6/12/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. - at page No. -, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-40219 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 111524 LOT ELEVEN (11), BLOCK YY, DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, RECORDED MARCH 22, 1962, IN PLAT BOOK 6, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 18891 CHOCTAW ROAD BEND, Oregon 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $224,415.16; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 2/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,585.43 Monthly Late Charge $68.96 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $224,415.16 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.375% per an-

num from 1/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 7/20/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 3/3/2011 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marina Marin Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3933355 05/02/2011, 05/09/2011, 05/16/2011, 05/23/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8390 T.S. No.: 1317806-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Brad H. Martell, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., As Nominee For American Home Mortgage Acceptance, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated July 14, 2005, recorded July 22, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-47408 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot sixteen (16) in block five (5), of Squaw Creek Canyon Recreational Estates, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 70117 Cayuse Drive Sisters OR 97759. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1,

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L522889 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000018614/SEXTON Investor No: 4004232229 AP #1: 235403 Title #: 110039668 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by DAVID L. SEXTON as Grantor, to AMERITITLE as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MRTG. CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated November 12, 2004, Recorded November 18, 2004 as Instr. No. 2004-69218 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT TWO (2), BILYEU HEIGHTS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 4 PYMTS FROM 10/01/10 TO 01/01/11 @ 1,069.57 $4,278.28 4 L/C FROM 10/16/10 TO 01/16/11 @ 37.53 $150.12 1 PYMT DUE 02/01/11 @ 1,041.64 $1,041.64 ACCRUED LATE CHARGES $75.06 RECOVERABLE BALANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $27.00 $27.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$5,572.10 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 62943 BILYEU WAY, BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $194,914.90, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 09/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on June 13, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 02/01/11 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 933925 PUB: 04/25/11, 05/02/11, 05/09/11, 05/16/11

LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L522873 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000021061/YOUNG Investor No: 4005549654 AP #1: 161841 Title #: 110039673 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by JOHN E. YOUNG, LISA L. YOUNG as Grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated August 24, 2007, Recorded August 31, 2007 as Instr. No. 2007-48084 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 8 VILLAGE SQUARE, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 5 PYMTS FROM 09/01/10 TO 01/01/11 @ 1,505.49 $7,527.45 5 L/C FROM 09/16/10 TO 01/16/11 @ 60.00 $300.00 RECOVERABLE BALANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $40.50 $40.50 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$7,867.95 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 2331 SW 20TH COURT, REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $178,651.70, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 08/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on June 10, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 01/31/11 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 933764 PUB: 04/25/11, 05/02/11, 05/09/11, 05/16/11

LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L523115 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000020751/SOUTHWARD/SOUTHWARD Investor No: 4004341281 AP #1: 194299 Title #: 110050467 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by JEREMY M. SOUTHWARD as Grantor, to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MRTG. CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated March 10, 2005, Recorded March 14, 2005 as Instr. No. 2005-14565 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 56, JUSTIN GLEN, PHASE III, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 4 PYMTS FROM 10/01/10 TO 01/01/11 @ 1,167.62 $4,670.48 4 L/C FROM 10/16/10 TO 01/16/11 @ 42.88 $171.52 1 PYMT DUE 02/01/11 @ 1,187.44 $1,187.44 RECOVERABLE BALANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $27.00 $27.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$6,056.44 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 912 NW POPLAR PLACE, REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $138,521.02, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 09/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on June 20, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 02/08/11 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 934686W PUB: 05/02/11, 05/09/11, 05/16/11, 05/23/11


E6 Monday, May 9, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $886.58 Monthly Late Charge $34.85. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $146,305.69 together with interest thereon at 3.000% per annum from October 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 01, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 23, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-375605 04/25, 05/02, 05/09, 05/16

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8445 T.S. No.: 1318881-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Charles E. Powell A Married Man, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., As Nominee For Utah Financial, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated October 14, 2004, recorded October 22, 2004, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2004-63649 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot twenty-nine (29), block four (4), Tamarack Park East, Phase III, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 1852 NE Hollow Tree Lane Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due August 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,016.40 Monthly Late Charge $39.74. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $126,977.25 together with interest thereon at 5.500% per annum from July 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 01, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well

as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 23, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-375590 04/25, 05/02, 05/09, 05/16 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0307717693 T.S. No.: OR-278279-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, RAFAEL MURGUIA as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 8/30/2006, recorded 9/11/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. - at page No. -, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-61768 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 18 12 08AD 00206 / 207804 LOT 12, SUGAR PINE SUBDIVISION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20364 SONATA WAY BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $236,783.13; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 11/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,175.04 Monthly Late Charge $49.82 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $236,783.13 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.625% per annum from 10/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 7/20/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by

payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 3/1/2011 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3930015 04/18/2011, 04/25/2011, 05/02/2011, 05/09/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0590995007 T.S. No.: OR-277726-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, DAMON MOORE AND CINDY MOORE, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 1/25/2006, recorded 1/31/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. XX at page No. XX, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-07037 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 18 12 09BC 00304 / 120365 LOT FIVE (5), BLOCK TWO (2), TRAP CLUB ROAD ESTATES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20416 CLAY PIGEON COURT BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Installment of Principal and Interest plus impounds and/or advances which became due on 11/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,430.12 Monthly Late Charge $61.29 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $178,121.16 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.75% per annum from 10/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 7/29/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of

the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 3/7/2011 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marina Marin Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3936638 04/25/2011, 05/02/2011, 05/09/2011, 05/16/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0187064605 T.S. No.: OR-273683-F Reference is made to that certain deed made by, TREVOR R. WILLIAMS as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC F/K/A GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 7/9/2008, recorded 7/11/2008, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. XX at page No. XX, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2008-29438 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 15 10 04DC 01800 / 134605 PARCEL 3 OF PARTITION PLAT NO. 2003-27, BEING A REPLAT OF LOT 10, BLOCK 3, EDGE O' THE PINES, CITY OF SISTERS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 415 N TAMARACK ST. SISTERS, OR 97759 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $188,439.60; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 9/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that

become payable. Monthly Payment $1,323.88 Monthly Late Charge $41.67 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $188,439.60 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.25% per annum from 8/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 7/19/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 2/28/2011 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Marina Marin Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3928409 04/18/2011, 04/25/2011, 05/02/2011, 05/09/2011

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-UM-107927 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JARON W. MCKERNAN AND MINDY M. MCKERNAN, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR UMPQUA BANK, ITS SUCCESSORS AND/OR ASSIGNS, as beneficiary, dated 10/1/2007, recorded 10/10/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-54417, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by UMPQUA BANK, ITS SUCCESSORS AND/OR ASSIGNS. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT TWELVE (12), JUNIPER MEADOWS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1965 SOUTHWEST 42ND STREET REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of May 2, 2011 Delinquent Payments from December 01, 2010 2 payments at $ 1,889.00 each $ 3,778.00 4 payments at $ 1,875.00 each $ 7,500.00 (12-01-10 through 05-02-11) Late Charges: $ 298.32 Beneficiary Advances: $ 150.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 11,726.32 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $227,544.68, PLUS interest thereon at 6.5% per annum from 11/01/10 to 2/1/2011, 6.5% per annum from 2/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on September 2, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at MAIN ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY JUSTICE CENTER, 1100 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 5/2/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: JEAN GREAGOR, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3985145 05/09/2011, 05/16/2011, 05/23/2011, 05/31/2011

LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L522973 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000018733/LOWERY Investor No: 4004803760 AP #1: 208612 Title #: 110041209 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by RODNEY K. LOWERY, LANA A. LOWERY as Grantor, to WESTERN TITLE as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES as Beneficiary. Dated February 28, 2006, Recorded March 14, 2006 as Instr. No. 2006-17579 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 19, MAREA 1, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 6 PYMTS FROM 08/01/10 TO 01/01/11 @ 1,835.40 $11,012.40 6 L/C FROM 08/16/10 TO 01/16/11 @ 73.74 $442.44 1 PYMT DUE 02/01/11 @ 1,777.01 $1,777.01 RECOVERABLE BALANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $54.00 $54.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$13,285.85 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 3337 NE CRYSTAL SPRINGS DRIVE, BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $231,595.53, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 07/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on June 13, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 02/01/11 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 933924 PUB: 04/25/11, 05/02/11, 05/09/11, 05/16/11

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0476963871 T.S. No.: OR-277481-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JEFFREY M. SHANDY, AN UNMARRIED MAN as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.) A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, as Beneficiary, dated 3/7/2008, recorded 3/12/2008, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. XX at page No. XX, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2008-11154 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 177710 LOT EIGHT (8) IN BLOCK TWO (2) OF RIVERS EDGE VILLAGE, PHASE II, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 3135 NW CLUBHOUSE DRIVE BEND, Oregon 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $304,416.57; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 11/1/2010 plus late

charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $2,215.89 Monthly Late Charge $91.91 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $304,416.57 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.75% per annum from 10/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 7/11/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a

reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 2/21/2011 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marina Marin Authorized Signatory ASAP# FNMA3921167 04/25/2011, 05/02/2011, 05/09/2011, 05/16/2011

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L522867 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000019692/TASTULA Investor No: 4005425792 AP #1: 244934 Title #: 110039671 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by WILLIAM M. TASTULA, JUDY R. TASTULA as Grantor, to AMERITITLE as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated May 31, 2007, Recorded June 6, 2007 as Instr. No. 2007-31952 in Book --Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT THIRTY FIVE (35), SUN MEADOW NO. 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 4 PYMTS FROM 10/01/10 TO 01/01/11 @ 1,951.82 $7,807.28 4 L/C FROM 10/16/10 TO 01/16/11 @ 97.59 $390.36 RECOVERABLE BALANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $28.50 $28.50 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$8,226.14 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 20584 JACKLIGHT LANE, BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $304,397.09, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 09/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on June 10, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 01/31/11 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 933765 PUB: 04/25/11, 05/02/11, 05/09/11, 05/16/11

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMG-108868 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, LAURIE INACY DOTSON AND JOHN A. DOTSON, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to TICOR TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR NOVASTAR HOME MORTGAGE, INC., as beneficiary, dated 4/1/2005, recorded 4/6/2005, under Instrument No. 2005-20572, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by The Bank of New York Mellon, as Successor Trustee under NovaStar Mortgage Funding Trust, Series 2005-2. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT NINE (9), BLOCK SIX (6), SADDLEBACK WEST, RECORDED JUNE 2, 1972, IN CABINET A, PAGE 549, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 63330 PINE KNOLL CIRCLE BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of April 22, 2011 Delinquent Payments from July 01, 2009 8 payments at $ 2,478.81 each $ 19,830.48 12 payments at $ 2,483.69 each $ 29,804.28 2 payments at $ 2,508.81 each $ 5,017.52 (07-01-09 through 04-22-11) Late Charges: $ 2,949.87 Beneficiary Advances: $ 4,539.80 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 62,142.05 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $245,961.00, PLUS interest thereon at 7.45% per annum from 06/01/09 to 3/1/2010, 7.45% per annum from 03/01/10 to 03/01/11, 7.45% per annum from 3/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on August 25, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 4/22/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3976725 05/02/2011, 05/09/2011, 05/16/2011, 05/23/2011

Bulletin Daily Paper 05/09/11  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Monday May 9, 2011

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