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BIN LADEN’S RECKONING

How we pulled it off Tracking trusted courier provided a breakthrough

OREGONIANS REACT

By Mark Mazzetti and Helene Cooper New York Times News Service

After years of dead ends and promising leads gone cold, the big break came last August. A trusted courier of Osama bin Laden’s whom U.S. spies had been hunting for years was finally located in a compound 35 miles north of the Pakistani capital, close to one of the hubs of U.S. counterterrorism operations.

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

New York native Kathy Wax, who now lives in Bend, was inspired by the news of Osama bin Laden’s death to fill her yard with American flags. She said her first thoughts upon hearing of the killing of the al-Qaida leader were of the people who died on Sept. 11, 2001.

“I didn’t think we were ever getting (bin Laden). Props to Obama for saying, ‘Go.’” — Adam Beyer, of Bend

“I had a sense of relief (at the news) ... It was not a secret what he had been doing: killing people.” — Norma Miller, of Hillsboro

“It’s good he’s been brought to justice, and, for us, it’s business as usual (at the Army recruiting center).” — 1st Sgt. Bryan Zacher, station commander of the U.S. Army’s Bend recruiting center See Central Oregonians react / A4

OUR LAWMAKERS REACT

Wyden and colleagues see new hope for Middle East By Andrew Clevenger The Bulletin

U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden hopes that the death of Osama bin Laden will serve as a turning point for an embattled region that has seen a flurry of pro-democracy demonstrations in recent weeks. “I think that the death of bin Laden is a huge milestone for the Middle East,” said Wyden, D-Ore., on Monday. “All through the region, you see millions of people pushing for change in a peaceful manner.” The “Arab Spring,” as the uprisings in multiple countries in the Middle East has been called, indicates that bin Laden’s vision of violent conflict with the West, particularly America, has been discredited, he said. “The peaceful revolutions in the region have essentially unraveled bin Laden’s claim that violent terrorist acts are the only way to bring about change,” he said.

Wyden stressed that bin Laden’s death was not an act of revenge, but an act of war that was approved by a 2001 Senate vote authorizing the use of force against al Qaeda. As a senior member of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, Wyden is privy to the inner workings of the intelligence community, though he is barred from discussing operational details and other sensitive information. But based on what he knows, he is “filled with pride about the terrific job that our intelligence community did.” He was particularly struck by how quickly intelligence staffers moved on to the next task at hand, which is increased vigilance to protect against possible retaliation. “It’s hard to say enough that’s positive about the intelligence community today,” he said. See Lawmakers / A4

The property was so secure, so large, that U.S. officials guessed it was built to hide someone far more important than a mere courier. What followed was eight months of painstaking intelligence work, culminating in a helicopter assault by U.S. military and intelligence operatives that ended in the death of bin Laden on Sunday and concluded one of history’s most extensive and frustrating manhunts. American officials said that bin Laden was shot in the head after he tried to resist the assault force, and that one of his sons died with him. For nearly a decade, U.S. military and intelligence forces had chased the specter of bin Laden through Pakistan and Afghanistan, once coming agonizingly close and losing him in a pitched battle at Tora Bora, in the mountains of eastern Afghanistan. As administration officials described it, the real breakthrough came when they figured out the name and location of bin Laden’s most trusted courier, whom the alQaida chief appeared to rely on to maintain contacts with the outside world. See Bin Laden / A5

• 9/11 victims, military personnel in area residents’ thoughts, Page A4 Hunting down Os ama b • A closer look at how the raid played out, Page A5 The raid that killed

al-Qaida leader

First information

• Detainees repeatedly men tion one courier’s

By David Crary The Associated Press

The images are striking: Overweight boys and girls staring somberly from billboards and online videos, real-life embodiments of the blunt messages alongside. “Chubby kids may not outlive their parents,” for example. Or: “Big bones didn’t make me this way. Big meals did.” The ads — part of a new “Stop Child Obesity” campaign in Georgia — won some enthusiastic praise for their attention-grabbing tactics. But they also have out-

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raged parents, activists and academics who feel the result is more stigma for an already beleaguered and bullied group of children. “Billboards depicting fat kids are extraordinarily harmful to the very kids they are supposedly trying to help,” said the National Association to Advance Fat Acceptance, which called for the billboards’ removal. The Georgia Children’s Health Alliance, which created the ads, said they were necessary to jar parents of obese kids out of a state of denial that their children had a problem. See Obesity / A4

The website www.stop childhood obesity.com is part of a “Stop Child Obesity” campaign in Georgia that has been both praised and criticized for its attention-grabbing tactics. The Associated Press

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Osama bin Lad

Narrowing in • August 2010 Cou residence foun d: high-security com in Abbottabad, po Pakis September 2010 thinks bin Lade U.S n may hidin i

Redmond’s search for new airport chief may be over By Nick Grube The Bulletin

The city of Redmond has made a tentative offer to a Green Bay, Wis., official to head its airport. The city has offered the job to John Reed, said Redmond Assistant City Manager of Employee Services Sharon Harris on Monday. Officials may not know for a couple of weeks whether he’ll accept position, however. During that time, Harris said, the city will do its “due diligence” and perform background checks on Reed, who beat out nearly 20 applicants for the position. See Airport / A4

The city of Redmond has offered John Reed the job of airport manager.

TOP NEWS INSIDE

INDEX Abby

WASHINGTON — Even as the Navy SEALs slid down ropes from their hovering helicopters, there still was some uncertainty that the man they were after was inside the massive compound on the edge of the sleeping city in northeastern Pakistan. After all, Osama bin Laden was long thought to be hiding in a cave or other refuge in Pakistan’s rugged tribal area bordering Afghanistan. But one of the raiders thought he recognized the leader of al-Qaida, and dropped him with a shot to his left eye as the SEALs stormed the house during a nearly 40-minute firefight. The raider compared the dead man’s face to bin Laden’s picture. They seemed to match. Then one of the dead man’s wives positively identified him. Yet it wasn’t until later that DNA tests dispelled any lingering uncertainty. Bin Laden was dead. See Raid / A5

More on bin Laden’s reckoning inside

• After 9/11, CIA chases leads abou bin Laden’s inne t r circle

Amid ‘war on obesity,’ skeptics warn of stigma

Raid’s meticulous planning pays off

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LIBYA: Turkey closes its embassy in Tripoli after attacks, Page A3


A2 Tuesday, May 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn are:

7 12 24 26 27 44 Nobody won the jackpot Monday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $12.6 million for Wednesday’s drawing.

Dynamic pricing might work for movie tickets, too By David Lazarus Los Angeles Times

Ticketmaster is on to something with its plan to tie ticket prices to the popularity of an event. The company, a division of Live Nation Entertainment, said last month that it would introduce technology enabling artists and sports teams to raise or lower ticket prices depending on demand. In other words, if there’s huge demand for a Lady Gaga concert, prices could go up. If demand is weak for, say, an Osmond Brothers reunion tour, prices could go down. Economists call this “dynamic pricing.” The idea is to not leave any money on the table — to ensure that all seats are filled for an event. Airlines and hotels routinely do this when they lower prices for empty seats and rooms. “Efficient pricing is one of the most important and untapped opportunities to unlock value for fans, clients, artists and teams,” said Nathan Hubbard, chief executive of Ticketmaster, which is partnering with an analytics company called MarketShare on the new approach. So if dynamic pricing is good for concerts and sporting events, why not movies?

A benefit to clunkers? I don’t know about you, but I’d definitely see more movies if they weren’t priced at $10 or more per ticket, especially considering the quality of most of what gets released by studios each year. I recently saw “Sex and the City 2” on HBO. I feel sorry for anyone who paid top dollar to see that stinker at a theater. But would my wife and I have gone to see it on the big screen if the price had been lower? Maybe (we liked “Sex and the City” on TV). Just as we might see more movies starring Jennifer Aniston (we liked her on TV) if the price was right. “The question here is how many more people would see that Jennifer Aniston movie if it were $5 cheaper,” said Joseph Nunes, an associate professor of marketing at the University of Southern California’s Marshall School of Business. “How many if it were $6 cheaper?” In other words, does it make more sense economically to screen a movie to a half-empty theater if everyone pays $10, or to a full theater if everyone pays $5? Theater owners appear to be taking a wait-and-see approach to Ticketmaster’s move. A spokesman for AMC Theatres declined to discuss dynamic pricing. Representatives of other theater chains and the National Association of Theatre Owners didn’t return calls for comment. Movie pricing is complex. The studios take the lion’s share of the ticket’s cost, leaving theater owners to fall back on overpriced popcorn and soda. So it’s clear that any dynamic pricing model would require the cooperation of all concerned. But something needs to be done. It’s just not worth it for a family of four to drop as much as $60 on most new releases, not when a widescreen TV and a Netflix subscription can offer almost the same fun at a fraction of the cost. Here’s my proposal: If a movie is hot, the price could rise to whatever the market will bear. For example, I’d have paid $20 per ticket to see “Avatar” in 3-D when it first opened; maybe others would have been willing to pay even more. As demand becomes clear through lower ticket sales, prices would drop. So “Avatar” might cost $15 a few weeks after opening, gradually making its way to $10. A turkey like “Sex and the City 2” would go for $6 or $7 likely by its second weekend in release. Movies could even be dynamically priced on a per-show basis, with the best seats selling for more, other seats selling for less and on-the-spot bids being accepted right before showtime for any leftover seats.

Budget airlines attract fliers with new routes, low fares By Michelle Higgins New York Times News Service

Eva Pickens has made the six-hour drive between Huntsville, Ala., where her son lives, and her hometown near Destin, Fla., too many times to count. So when she saw that a carrier called Vision Airlines was advertising $49 one-way nonstop flights between the two places, she snapped up a ticket. By comparison, “filling up my gas tank now costs like $62,” said Pickens, a community association manager for a beachfront condo. As major carriers continue to raise rates and cut capacity, budget airlines with names such as Vision, Sun Country and Direct Air, which operate mainly out of small U.S. cities, are adding flights with low fares. Vision Airlines, based in Suwanee, Ga., started out as a charter service in 1994 and began flying scheduled service late last year between Atlanta and Louisville, Ky., and between Niagara Falls, N.Y., and northwestern Florida. It now flies prop planes and Boeing 737 jets from its hub in Destin to more than 20 cities in the Southeast with rates typically $89 to $109 each way. Direct Air, based in Myrtle Beach, S.C., provides nonstop service to more than 15 cities, including Newark, N.J., Pittsburgh and Columbus, Ohio, by chartering planes from other airlines. Later this year, it is adding flights to San Juan, Puerto Rico; the Bahamas; and Lakeland Linder Regional Airport in Florida, with rates as low as $79 each way when on sale. And Sun Country Airlines, which flies 737s from Minneapolis/St. Paul, where it is based, to more than 30 destinations throughout the United States, Mexico and the Caribbean, will begin flying to London Gatwick on May 27 with rates from $422 one way in the summer.

Under the radar Never heard of these airlines? That may be because of their low-profile business style, which typically focuses on linking small cities to vacation destinations, largely avoiding direct competition with bigger airlines, and relying more on word of mouth than costly marketing blitzes. Some, including Direct Air and Allegiant Air (which flies from Redmond to Las Vegas and Arizona), even refuse to pay to list fares at online agencies like Expedia or Travelocity, which means that travelers have to visit the carriers’ own websites to find their flights. All of this helps keep costs down and fares low. “We don’t have a massive overhead like we would if we were a legacy carrier,” said David Meers, chief operating officer at Vision Airlines. In addition, the budget carriers’ low-fare strategies involve selling not just airline seats, but also hotel rooms and car rentals. With packages, Meers explained, “there’s a little bit of a margin for the airline as well, which helps to defray increases in fuel prices.” One of the tradeoffs of flying a budget carrier used to be having to pay fees for things like checked bags and snacks, but now that most major airlines charge for the same things, such fees are almost expected. Allegiant, for example, charges for drinks and snacks, checked bags and seat assignments. Vision, on the other hand, offers free drinks, snacks and seating assignments. Another issue to be aware of is the age of the planes. Some of the budget carrier planes are on the older side. Allegiant, for example, flies MD88s, which are, on average, 21.5 years old. Vision’s fleet, as well as aircraft chartered by Direct Air, include some

Charlene Potts / New York Times News Service

As major carriers continue to raise rates and cut capacity, budget airlines with names such as Vision, Sun Country and Direct Air, which operate mainly out of small American cities, are adding flights with low fares. older-model Boeing 737s (which were not subject to airworthiness inspections in the wake of the depressurization incident on a Southwest Airlines Boeing 737-300 series aircraft on April 1). Each carrier is subject to the same safety and maintenance regulations as its larger competitors. “Safety is our first priority, and our aircraft are maintained in accordance with all FAA regulations,” said Jordan McGee, an Allegiant spokeswoman,

who also noted, referring to its MD-88 fleet, “because of our low frequency of flights, we only put about 1,000 cycles per year on them.” Passengers should be prepared for fewer routes and less frequent flights. While most flights are nonstop, few are offered on a daily basis. Small fleets and limited service mean a lack of backup options when flights are delayed. “When you get in trouble,” said Rick Seaney, chief executive of

Farecompare.com, “you may not get home for a while.” Budget carriers say they can’t afford to disappoint customers by canceling flights. Edward Warneck, president of Direct Air, said his carrier would land in a different airport if necessary (Boston instead of Worcester, Mass., for example) and shuttle passengers to their original destinations by bus. “Given the choice,” he said, most passengers “would rather be late than not get there at all.”


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 3, 2011 A3

T S Turkey closes its embassy in Libya, fearing violence By Kareem Fahim and C.J. Chivers New York Times News Service

BENGHAZI, Libya — Turkey closed its embassy in Tripoli, Libya, on Monday, apparently worried about the angry crowds that had attacked the missions of NATO countries after the airstrike that the Libyan government said killed a son of Moammar Gadhafi and three of his grandchildren. Since the bombing raid Saturday night, Gadhafi’s supporters have vandalized or set fire to the Italian, British and American embassies, which were already closed, and ransacked U.N. buildings, forcing the diplomats to flee. “In light of recent changes in the security conditions in Libya and emergence of the potential security risks, we took an important decision last night to temporarily evacuate our embassy in Tripoli,” Ahmet Davutoglu, the Turkish foreign minister, told reporters in a live broadcast from Ankara, Turkey. “Of course, this does not mean Turkey will cease its activity in this country,” he said. The announcement was considered a blow to the efforts to mediate an end to the conflict, and it reflected Turkey’s difficult position. With historic and business ties to Libya, Turkey has tried to act as an intermediary between Gadhafi’s government and the rebels. Each side has accused Turkey of favoring one or the other, or of hedging its bets.

W  B

Al-Jazeera reporter missing in Syria A reporter for Al-Jazeera’s English-language channel disappeared in Syria on Friday, the network announced Monday, saying it was demanding immediate information from the Syrian government about her whereabouts. The network said in a brief statement that it had not had contact with the journalist, Dorothy Parvaz, since she arrived in Damascus. Parvaz, who holds U.S., Canadian and Iranian citizenship, has been based in Doha, Qatar, for Al-Jazeera since August and was sent to Syria to report on anti-government demonstrations there. Her fiance said the U.S., Canadian and Iranian embassies in Damascus had all requested information about her whereabouts from the Syrian government. The Syrian government has not said if Parvaz was arrested, but Mohamed Abdel Dayem of the Committee to Protect Journalists said there was “strong evidence that she is almost certainly in the Syrian government’s hands.”

Israel delays funds in move against Palestinian unity deal JERUSALEM — Israel said on Sunday that it was delaying the transfer of almost $90 million in tax revenue owed to the Palestinian Authority in a move against the emerging reconciliation between Fatah and its Islamic rival, Hamas. The finance minister of Israel, Yuval Steinitz, suspended all money transfers and instructed his staff to postpone meetings with Palestinian Authority officials, his office said on Sunday, until there were guarantees that none of the money would end up in Hamas coffers. Steinitz’s advisers said that it was the finance minister’s prerogative to suspend the tax transfer, but the decision also appeared to have the backing of the Israeli leadership. Israel collects the equivalent of more than $1 billion annually in customs and other taxes on behalf of the Palestinian Authority and transfers the revenue to the Palestinian side under terms that were part of the Oslo accords. — From wire reports

Darko Bandic / The Associated Press

Supporters carry a poster of a Libyan army colonel who was killed in a NATO attack in April, during a funeral ceremony for members of Moammar Gadhafi’s family in Tripoli, Libya, on Monday. Turkish diplomats have also played a crucial role in negotiating the release of imprisoned journalists, including four from The New York Times who were captured by Gadhafi’s forces in March. The withdrawal of the Turkish diplomats Monday cast uncertainty on the fate of other imprisoned journalists, including four from the West who have been held by the Gadhafi government since early April. The NATO airstrike that led to Turkey’s announcement remained clouded in mystery. The Libyan government has said that one of Gadhafi’s sons, Seif al-Arab Gadhafi, 29, and three of the Libyan leader’s grand-

children — two boys and a girl — were killed in an attack on the son’s house Saturday. Gadhafi, the government said, narrowly escaped injured. NATO officials denied that they were trying to kill Gadhafi or any of his family members, and they said the house, which contained a bunker complex and basement command center, was a legitimate military target. Rebel leaders continued to insist that Gadhafi had lied about the deaths to undermine the NATO campaign and to garner international sympathy. Hundreds of people flocked to funerals for the four Gadhafis at a Tripoli cemetery on Monday.

Blagojevich’s second corruption trial begins By Monica Davey New York Times News Service

CHICAGO — Rod Blagojevich, the former governor of Illinois who is charged with trying to sell the U.S. Senate seat that once belonged to President Barack Obama, talked and talked and talked. But he never really sealed a deal, criminal or otherwise. So went the defense presented by Blagojevich’s lawyers as his second federal corruption trial opened Monday, more than eight months after a first trial ended with a jury divided on all but one in a thick tangle of criminal charges against him. Aaron Goldstein, Blagojevich’s lawyer, told this new set of jurors that federal authorities had never discovered a pot of money in Blagojevich’s possession after his arrest in 2008. They had never found a flush bank account. “They found nothing because there is nothing,” Goldstein said. “In the end, you will have nothing,” he said. In many ways, Blagojevich’s new trial felt like a muted, less circus-like replay of the last

one: same courtroom, same judge, same prosecutors, same hair. But this trial — with only a shrunken group of curious residents here to touch Blagojevich or seek his autograph — is expected to be more challenging for Blagojevich, not least of all because of the way prosecutors have scaled back and simplified their case. Prosecutors have dropped several of the most complicated charges — racketeering, in particular — and have reduced their case to 20 counts, including attempted extortion and bribery. Christopher Niewoehner, an assistant U.S. attorney, streamlined his message: Blagojevich had broken the law by using his authority as governor of the state to try to benefit personally. Prosecutors accuse Blagojevich of a string of efforts to get campaign money and other personal benefits in exchange for picking a senator to fill the remainder of Obama’s Senate term, for signing legislation that would help racetrack owners, for permitting state funds to be provided to a local school.

Alabama taking careful toll of casualties from storms By Campbell Robertson New York Times News Service

HAMILTON, Ala. — Nearly a week after the devastating outbreak of tornadoes began, it is still not clear what the wind wrought. While the names of the dead have started to come out, adding a specificity to the grim count, the death toll continues to fluctuate by the day. According to the Alabama Emergency Management Agency, the death toll here in Marion County dropped by 12, for a new total of 23; the state’s overall toll dropped to 236 from 250. The agency is verifying and double-checking the number of deaths county by county, said Yasamie August, an agency spokeswoman. August said the state would not release an official death toll until that review was completed later in the

week. Few are convinced that a final number has been reached or is even close at hand. “There are still people that ain’t been found,” said Doug Bryant, 38, of storm-ravaged Franklin County. Echoing a common sentiment here in Alabama, Bryant said of the death toll: “It’s low. It’s got to be.” Accurate information, like whether someone is missing, injured or dead, is still frustratingly difficult to come by in the worst-hit areas, which are affected with power failures. Thousands of utility workers are laboring to restore electricity to hundreds of thousands of customers. Alabama Power, which has more than 8,600 employees working on the problem, said it expected to restore power to 95 percent of its customers by Wednesday night.


A4 Tuesday, May 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

CENTRAL OREGONIANS REACT

Thoughts turn to victims of the war on terror — and those still fighting By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

Craig Wallace, a veteran of the first Gulf War, was watching “Fast Five” in a local movie theater when a text message arrived on his phone: Osama bin Laden was dead, a friend had written. Wallace believes, as President Barack Obama said Sunday night, that justice was served. Wallace also thought about the thousands of people who died not only on Sept. 11, but in the years since. He has known American soldiers who died in Afghanistan or Iraq. There are thousands others, he said, who have died during the wars in those countries, and Wallace thought of them, too. “People need to know they can’t attack our country,” Wallace, of Redmond, said as he waited for lunch in downtown Bend. “It’s a high price. It’s been a really high price.” “People need In Cento know they tral Oregon can’t attack on Monday, our country. people were ... It’s a high eager to disprice. It’s been cuss Sunday a really high night’s news price.” that Ameri— U.S. Army can troops veteran Craig had killed bin Wallace, of Laden in a raid Redmond in Abbottabad, Pakistan. The compound where bin Laden had holed up had 18-foot walls, no phone or Internet connections to the outside world and was about an hour’s drive away from the capital city of Islamabad, according to various reports. News of the raid broke shortly before Obama spoke to the nation from the White House late Sunday night. Eric Bush, chief of the Prineville Police Department, is the commander of the 41st infantry brigade combat team and was on active duty in Baghdad for 14 months, beginning in 2009. Bush considers bin Laden “a symbol of why we are fighting.” His death, he says, “is probably one of the most strategic victories

Courtesy Sam Carpenter

Bend resident Sam Carpenter, founder of the nonprofit Kashmir Family Aid, submitted this photo of a scene in Abbottabad, Pakistan, taken in 2005. American forces killed Osama bin Laden in a compound located in the northern Pakistani city. we’ve had in the global war on terrorism. I think it was very important for the American people to get this closure.” Bend resident Sam Carpenter, founder of Kashmir Family Aid, a nonprofit that worked with Pakistani schools after an earthquake struck the country in 2005, has made several trips to the area where bin Laden was killed. In 2005, he spent two days in Abbottabad and, a few years later, drove through the area. The dry, rugged hills and mountains nearby reminded Carpenter of Eastern Oregon. He remembers a lively city, with fruit stands along some of the streets. Carpenter also recalls Abbottabad as heavily militarized. Indeed, the compound where bin Laden was killed was less than a mile from the Pakistan Military Academy, according to The New York Times. Carpenter said he was touched by the immediate reaction of Americans to the news of bin Laden’s death. “Tears came to my eyes,” he said. “I haven’t seen a unified, flag-waving crowd since 2001.” Former Redmond City Councilor Irv Nygren spent three decades working in Pakistan, beginning in 1963. During that time, Nygren

worked most as a teacher but also as a church pastor. The Nygren family spent time in and around Abbottabad, and one of the Nygrens’ sons was born in a Christian hospital less than 10 miles north of the city. Abbottabad, Nygren said, not only was home to the elite military academy but also to an English-language boarding school that drew some of the brightest students in the area. Nygren has heard from some people he knows who work at the hospital near Abbottabad, and there is caution is their messages. “They’re just going to be careful, but they’re worried about retaliation,” Nygren said. Others thought of their family members in the military. Dave Rodgers lives with his wife in Bend for part of the year, and their son Matthew is in the U.S. Navy. Matthew has served three tours of duty in the Middle East, his father said. The parents were watching the game between the Philadelphia Phillies and New York Mets when they noticed a buzz from the crowd. The noise grew to a roar, with the crowd chanting, “USA, USA!” Soon, the Rodgerses were exchanging text messages about

the news with friends and family, many of whom also have children in the military. Through his son, Dave Rodgers knows many people in the military. Those friendships, he said, “made this news so incredible for us yesterday and today.” At the U.S. Army’s recruiting office in Bend on Monday, little appeared to have changed. There was no rush on the office by potential recruits, according to 1st Sgt. Bryan Zacher, the station commander. “It’s good he’s (bin Laden) been brought to justice, and, for us, it’s business as usual,” Zacher said. As Army recruiters took calls around the lunch hour, Yegor Moisseenko, a 19-year-old Deschutes River Woods resident, was walking in for a visit. Moisseenko enlisted in the Army about a month ago, he said, and the recent news did nothing to change how he feels about his decision. “ T here’s plenty of problems in the world, and this was just one of them,” Moisseenko said. Though he “There’s plenty worries that of problems in bin Laden’s the world, and death could this was just inspire retrione of them.” bution, Bush — New Army believes killing recruit Yegor the leader of alMoisseenko, Qaida was apof Bend propriate and that the action could harm support for the terrorist group. Bush also said it was key that American troops killed bin Laden in person, and not by using remote technology. “When we saw our friends and family dying in front of us on live TV (on Sept. 11), it was extremely personal,” Bush said. “I think he deserved to know that it was the United States that brought him to justice and not some blinding flash of light.” Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

Lawmakers Continued from A1 As Wyden and his colleagues returned to work Monday, the mood on Capitol Hill combined excitement at the news of bin Laden’s death and soberness about the challenges that lie ahead, he said. “Certainly, the Middle East presents a huge array of challenges,” as do other countries including North Korea and Iran, he said. “For example, I’m convinced that Syria represents a more direct threat to American security than Libya,” he said. “I hope to be able to convince my colleagues (on the Intelligence Committee) of that.” Other members of Oregon’s congressional delegation praised the daring raid that ended the life of al-Qaida’s founder and the public face of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. U.S. Rep. Greg Walden, RHood River, cautioned that America must remain vigilant to prevent any additional terrorist attacks. “This is an enormous day for Americans and peace-loving people all around the world, to have Osama bin Laden finally taken out after nearly a decade from the time he perpetrated his terrible attack on the United States and innocent civilians here, as well as attacks elsewhere around the world,” he said in a prepared statement. “We owe a great debt of thanks to the men and women who wear our nation’s uniform, who in some cases have paid the ultimate price, and in other cases continue to serve, as well our men and women who serve in our intelligence agencies.” In a prepared statement, Oregon’s junior senator, Democrat Jeff Merkley, commended the president and his “exceptional team” for bringing bin Laden to justice. “The president’s resolute determination and the hard work, perseverance and bravery of so many in the United States intelligence community and military ensured that attacks on Americans would not go unanswered,” he said. “We will never forget the more than 3,000 American lives that were lost on September 11, 2001 and in other al-Qaida attacks, and this is a welcome measure of justice for their families and our nation. As we continue the offensive against al-Qaida

“As we continue the offensive against alQaida and terrorist extremists ... this milestone will serve as a reminder that when America commits itself to a goal, it will prevail.” — U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley and terrorist extremists wherever in the world they may be, this milestone will serve as a reminder that when America commits itself to a goal, it will prevail.” Throughout the day Monday, additional details helped clarify the dramatic events, first announced by Obama late Sunday night in the East Wing of the White House. While the president noted that as the result of a “targeted operation,” a small team of Americans killed bin Laden and “took custody of his body,” subsequent reports revealed that the body was transported to the U.S.S. Carl Vinson, an aircraft carrier stationed in the North Arabian Sea. After bin Laden’s identity was confirmed through DNA testing, and following a brief ceremony in accordance with Islamic traditions, he was buried at sea. Some analysts saw this as an effort prevent his grave from becoming a shrine for his followers, although other news outlets reported that this option was chosen only after the U.S. could not find a country willing to accept possession of bin Laden’s body. Officials also revealed that they were able to discover bin Laden’s compound, built in 2005 apparently for the express purpose of providing a safe haven for a high-profile target, after detainees provided the nickname of a trusted courier who worked for high-level al-Qaida operatives. It took years to learn the courier’s real name, and even after months of surveillance, administration officials were not sure who was living in the Abbottabad compound until forces on the ground confirmed that they had found — and killed — bin Laden. Andrew Clevenger can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at aclevenger@bendbulletin.com.

Find It All Online www.bendbulletin.com

Obesity Continued from A1 The furor reflects a broader nationwide phenomenon as states, cities and the White House — led by first lady Michelle Obama — expand efforts to curb obesity. For all the public support of these efforts, there’s also a vocal corps of skeptics and critics worried that widespread discrimination toward the overweight and obese will only increase. “Stigma is not an effective motivator,” said Rebecca Puhl, a Yale University psychologist who is a leading expert on weight discrimination. “Whether children or adults, if they are teased or stigmatized, they’re much more likely to engage in unhealthy eating and avoidance of physical activity.” Research by Puhl and her colleagues at Yale’s Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity suggests that weight discrimination is pervasive — at schools, in the workplace, in the media, among health care providers. Yet efforts to combat it frequently founder:

Airport Continued from A1 If hired, Reed will replace Carrie Novak, who is retiring on June 30 after 21 years as manager. Novick’s successor will oversee the daily operations of the airport, from determining rates for hangar rentals and overnight parking to planning long-term capital improvements. Last week, Reed and another finalist for the job, Mike Clow, visited Redmond to meet residents and go through interviews with city officials. Clow, an Iowa native, is the airport planning, development, environmental and technical services manager at the Tallahassee Regional Airport in Florida. Reed was unavailable for comment Monday. He grew up in southern Missouri and received an aviation science degree from the College of the Ozarks. He later earned a master’s degree in aviation safety from Central Missouri State University. Since 2002 he has been the as-

Only one state, Michigan, outlaws weight discrimination, and the anti-bullying policies proliferating in schools often lack specific content related to teasing of overweight children. The spotlight on obesity intensified last year when Obama unveiled her national public awareness campaign, “Let’s Move.” Its goal, she said, was to eliminate childhood obesity within a generation by helping parents make better food choices, serving healthier food in schools, and encouraging children to exercise more. Many aspects of “Let’s Move” won near-universal praise. But activists in the fat-acceptance movement and experts who espouse a “health at every size” approach were upset that the campaign encouraged the monitoring of children’s body mass index, or BMI, and thus might contribute to stigmatization of heavier kids. “The idea of a BMI report card is horrible,” said Paul Ernsberger a professor in the nutrition department at Case Western Reserve University’s School of Medicine in Cleveland. “To declare we’re go-

sistant airport director at Austin Straubel International Airport in Green Bay, Wis., a city perhaps best known for being home to the current NFL Super Bowl champion Packers. Austin Straubel Airport has a $12.1 million operating budget and provides service from five major airlines. According to the Wisconsin Department of Transportation, the airport had 362,803 enplanements, which is the number of passengers boarding flights. City of Redmond records show its airport had 236,671 enplanements in 2010. Its total budget for fiscal year 2010-11 was about $18.6 million, with about half of that dedicated to terminal, airfield and general operations. It is the fourth-largest commercial airport in Oregon and provides service from Horizon Air, United, United Express, Delta Connection and Allegiant Air. Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

ing to eliminate childhood obesity — that’s actually a very stigmatizing thing to say. The overweight child hears that and thinks, ‘They wish I wasn’t here.’” Linda Bacon, a nutrition professor at City College of San Francisco, is the author of “Health At Every Size” — a manifesto for a movement stressing a healthy lifestyle rather than weight control. She said the focus by “Let’s Move” on BMI was of dubious medical value and posed potential problems for kids at all weight levels. Deb Lemire, president of the Association for Size Diversity and Health, credited Obama with good intentions and commended various nutrition-related aspects of “Let’s Move.” But she said the emphasis on weight risked worsening the problems of bullying. “The message that gets to the kids is, ‘There really is something wrong with me,’” said Lemire, of Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. “We’re saying we love you, we want you to have wonderful lives and be suc-

cessful, but right now you’re just not good enough.” The first lady’s press office declined to respond in detail to the criticism, but defended “Let’s Move.” “There will always be critics, but our approach is comprehensive, nurturing and working, with success already seen across the country,” the office said. There’s no question that “Let’s Move” has broad, high-powered backing, from groups such as the American Academy of Pediatrics. Its supporters note that one in three American children are overweight or obese, putting them at higher risk of serious health problems while billions of dollars are spent yearly treating obesityrelated conditions. Dr. Sandra Hassink, who chairs the pediatrics academy’s obesity work group, said she witnesses the toll of weight-based bullying on a daily basis at her clinic at the A.I. duPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, Del. However, she defended the use

of BMI. “We know that elevated BMI places you at elevated risk of health problems,” she said. “It’s a screening tool to start a conversation with a child and family about health behavior that will reduce that risk.”

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

CIA analysts spent the next several weeks examining satellite photos and intelligence reports to determine who might be living at the compound, and a senior administration official said that by September the CIA had determined there was a “strong possibility” that bin Laden himself was hiding there. It was hardly the spartan cave in the mountains where many had envisioned bin Laden to be hiding. Rather, it was a mansion on the outskirts of the town’s center, set on an imposing hilltop and ringed by 12-foot-high concrete walls topped with barbed wire. The property was valued at $1 million, but it had neither a telephone nor an Internet connection. Its residents were so concerned about security that they burned their trash rather putting it on the street for collection like their neighbors. U.S. officials believed that the compound, built in 2005, was designed for the specific purpose of hiding bin Laden. Months more of intelligence work would follow before U.S. spies felt highly confident that it was indeed bin Laden and his family who were hiding in there — and before President Barack Obama determined that the intelligence was solid enough to begin planning a mission to go after the al-Qaida leader. On March 14, Obama held the first of what would be five national security meetings in the course of the next six weeks to go over plans for the operation. The meetings, attended by only the president’s closest national security aides, took place as other White House officials scrambled to avert a possible government shutdown over the budget. Four more similar meetings would follow, until Obama gathered his aides one final time on Friday.

The green light At 8:20 that morning, Obama met with Thomas Donilon, the national security adviser; John Brennan, the counterterrorism adviser; and other senior aides in the Diplomatic Room at the White House. The president was traveling to Alabama later that morning to witness the damage from last week’s tornadoes. But first he had to sign off on the final plan to send intelligence operatives into the compound where the administration believed that bin Laden was hiding. Even after the president signed the formal orders authorizing the raid, Obama chose to keep Pakistan’s government in the dark about the operation. “We shared our intelligence on this compound with no other country, including Pakistan,” a senior administration official said. On Sunday, the small team of U.S. military and intelligence operatives poured out of helicopters for their attack on the heavily fortified compound. U.S. officials gave few details about the raid itself, other than to say that a firefight broke out shortly after the commandos arrived and that bin Laden had tried to “resist the assault force.” When the shooting had stopped, bin Laden and three other men lay dead. One woman, whom a U.S. official said had been used as a human shield by one of the alQaida operatives, was also killed. The Americans collected bin Laden’s body and loaded it onto one of the remaining helicopters, and the assault force hastily left the scene. Obama administration officials said that one of helicopters went down during the mission because of mechanical failure but that no Americans were injured. It was 3:50 on Sunday afternoon when Obama received the news that bin Laden had tentatively been identified after a series of DNA tests. The al-Qaida leader’s body was flown to Afghanistan, the country where he made his fame fighting and killing Soviet troops during the 1980s. From there, U.S. officials said, the body was buried at sea.

The raid that killed al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden took shape after detainees identified a bin Laden courier.

First information

Narrowing in

The operation

• After 9/11, CIA chases leads about bin Laden’s inner circle • Detainees repeatedly mention one courier’s pseudonym, identifying him as one of the few trusted by bin Laden; true name, location unknown • Courier’s true identity learned in 2007 • Two years later, locations where courier and his brother operate in Pakistan are learned

• August 2010 Courier’s residence found: high-security compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan • September 2010 U.S. thinks bin Laden may be hiding in compound • February 2011 U.S. thinks intelligence is strong enough to begin developing plan for going after bin Laden • March 2011 First of five National Security Council meetings on capturing or killing bin Laden; other meetings: March 29, April 12, April 19, April 28

• April 29, 2011, 8:20 a.m. EDT Obama authorizes operation • May 1, 1 p.m. Top advisers gather at White House • Around 3 p.m. (midnight in Pakistan) Helicopters heard over Abbottabad • Two dozen Navy SEALs drop into high-walled compound; inside for 40 minutes • Bin Laden killed in last five or 10 minutes of siege; shot twice in the head on third floor of main building

Inside the compound in Abbottabad

AFGHAN.

Kabul Peshawar

• Built in 2005; about 3,000 sq. ft. (279 sq. m) of space; but no telephone or Internet service to avoid detection • Two men lived on first floor • Exterior walls topped with barbed wire

Ghazi Air Base Additional forces fly from here

Abbottabad Al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden killed by U.S. forces

INDIA

PAKISTAN PA KISTA N

Gate

Wall 10 ft. (3 m) high

2005 aerial image of the compound

Privacy wall 7 ft. (2.1 m) high Where trash was burned Gate

Wall 18 ft. (5.5 m) high

Bin Laden and family lived on second and third floor; cleared last

Forces fought through first floor where two adult males lived

Outcome and aftermath • One U.S. helicopter lost because of mechanical failure; destroyed for security purposes

Wall 12 ft. (3.7 m) high

All times EDT

• Along with bin Laden, three adult males killed: bin Laden’s son and two al-Qaida facilitators

• Woman identified as bin Laden’s wife used as human shield, killed; two others injured

• 3:32 p.m. Obama returns for update

• 3:50 p.m. Obama told bin Laden appears to be one of those killed during raid

• 11:35 p.m. After confirmation, Obama announces in televised address that U.S. forces killed bin Laden and are in custody of his body

Sources: U.S. Government, The White House, AP, Reuters, ESRI, National Journal.com

Raid Continued from A1 “Justice has been done,” President Barack Obama declared on national television after he and close aides, who had monitored the operation as it unfolded on the other side of the world, were sure the leader of al-Qaida was killed before dawn on Monday, Pakistan time. “It was probably one of the most anxiety-filled periods of time, I think, in the lives of the people who were assembled here,” said John Brennan, Obama’s chief counterterrorism adviser, at a White House news conference. “The confidence was building, yet at what point do you feel confident that you have the person you were after?” No Americans were killed or injured. Four people other than bin Laden died: the trusted courier thought by U.S. officials to have harbored bin Laden and his family for several years; the courier’s brother; bin Laden’s son, Khaled; and one of the terrorist leader’s wives, shot as she shielded her husband. Details of one of the riskiest and meticulously planned covert operations ever pulled off by the CIA and the U.S. military emerged in briefings and interviews Monday with administration, intelligence and military officials after the raid outside the city of Abbottabad. All but Brennan requested anonymity as matter of policy. The helicopters, flying from Afghanistan in the dark, had to operate undetected in one of Pakistan’s densest air defense zones, evading radars and missile batteries protecting the capital, Islamabad, and the adjacent military headquarters city of Rawalpindi. One helicopter developed a mechanical failure and crashed outside the compound’s towering walls. It was blown up before the raiders departed so its top-secret equipment couldn’t be captured. Pakistani jets scrambled, but not until the SEALs were long gone with bin Laden’s corpse. “We weren’t detected coming in and going out. Even the helicopter crashed, and we blew it up,” said a U.S. official. “We did not encounter Pakistani forces at any time.” Two women in the compound were injured and treated at a military hospital, said two Pakistani officials, who asked not to be further identified. One was believed to be another bin Laden wife, the one who identified his body, and the other a daughter. Before leaving, the SEALs swept up computer hard drives and other materials that intelligence analysts are now scouring for the identities and whereabouts of other al-Qaida operatives, and other

There is a motto etched on a Navy SEAL training school building in California: “The only easy day was yesterday.” It captures the grit and willpower required to be a member of the Navy’s elite force. Sunday’s operation was one that two presidents have called America’s No. 1 priority: Bring Osama bin Laden to justice. It shoved the SEALs into the limelight. A spokeswoman for the group said Monday she could not say a word about the mission, even to confirm that the force was involved. Some major news organizations identified the group as SEALs

information that can be used to fight the terrorist network, U.S. officials said. Only bin Laden’s corpse was removed, flown to a U.S. aircraft carrier in the northern Arabian Sea. After samples were taken for DNA testing, it was washed in private by two Muslim members of the U.S. military, wrapped in a white sheet, placed in a weighted bag and slid into the water from the deck of the USS Carl Vinson to the recitation of “religious remarks” by a U.S. officer that were translated into Arabic, officials said. They insisted that all was in accordance with Islamic practice. The accounts left critical questions unanswered. Perhaps the

• Bin Laden’s body put aboard the USS Carl Vinson, then placed in the North Arabian Sea

© 2011 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Operation puts Navy SEALs in the spotlight while others were more circumspect, referring more broadly to special forces. Meanwhile, “Navy SEAL” was one of the top search terms on Twitter. The group’s official Facebook page was covered with thank-you notes. Former SEALs and military experts said the mission had the hallmarks of the Navy’s top fighting team. “It was a classic, textbook SEAL operation,” said Kurt Olsen, a former SEAL who based the comment on news accounts describing the way the American teams went into bin Laden’s compound. — The Baltimore Sun

most significant: Did anyone in the Pakistani army, which has ruled the country for more than half of its 64 years of independence, or the powerful spy agency linked to groups allied to al-Qaida, the Inter-Services Intelligence, help harbor bin Laden or know of his presence? “I think it is inconceivable that bin Laden did not have a support system in the country that allowed him to remain there for an extended period of time,” Brennan said. Pakistan’s premier military academy is a mile from the compound, and the area is home to numerous retired senior officers and two infantry regimental headquarters.

By Donald G. McNeil Jr. and Pam Belluck New York Times News Service

200 miles

Wall 11 ft. (3.4 m) high

Opaque windows (north side)

DNA match for bin Laden likely came from a parent or child

Islamabad

H

The compound

CHINA

Jalalabad U.S. helicopters fly on raid mission

RT

Continued from A1 Detainees at the prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, had given the courier’s pseudonym to U.S. interrogators and said that the man was a protege of Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, the confessed mastermind of the Sept. 11 attacks. U.S. intelligence officials said they finally learned the courier’s real name four years ago, but that it took another two years for them to learn the general region where he operated. Still, it was not until August when they tracked him to the compound in Abbottabad, a medium-sized city about an hour’s drive north of Islamabad, the capital.

Hunting down Osama bin Laden

NO

Bin Laden

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 3, 2011 A5

“There is no way that ISI couldn’t have known about this,” said Thomas Lynch, a retired U.S. army colonel who is now a research scholar at the National Defense University in Washington. — Jonathan S. Landay, McClatchy-Tribune News Service

While federal officials said that analysis of DNA from several relatives helped confirm that it was Osama bin Laden who was killed in the military raid on Monday, they have not yet disclosed the relationships of the family members whose DNA was used. Officials said they collected multiple DNA samples from bin Laden’s relatives in the years since the Sept. 11 attacks. And they said the analysis, which was performed the day bin Laden was killed but after his body was buried at sea, confirmed his identity with 99.9 percent accuracy. Some scientific experts said on Monday that if results really were so accurate, at least one of the sources was likely to have been a close relative, like a child or parent with whom he shared half his genes. “That would be most likely,” said Frederic Zenhausern, director of the Center for Applied NanoBioscience and Medicine at University of Arizona. A DNA analysis looks for patterns of two or more nucleotides, the chemicals that form DNA. These strings of nucleotides are called short tandem repeats. The closer the relative, the more the pattern of repeats matches. In an identical twin, they should be the same. A parent and child should share half the number of repeats.

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A6 Tuesday, May 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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B

Tech Focus People keep logging in despite data breaches, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 3, 2011

MARKET REPORT

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2,864.08 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE -9.46 -.33%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

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12,807.36 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE -3.18 -.02%

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1,361.22 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE -2.39 -.18%

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The U.S. Department of Labor announced Monday it would provide a $279,000 increment for a National Emergency Grant to help about 280 people who lost their jobs when Bend’s Cessna Aircraft Co. facility closed in 2009. That year, a grant totaling $1.4 million was announced. This week’s announcement marks the second increment for the grant. The money is going to the state’s Department of Community Colleges and Workforce Development and is meant to pay for training and re-employment services. “I am pleased that this funding will ensure workers who lost their jobs through no fault of their own can continue to receive training and other related services, which will help them in broadening their skill sets and securing employment in some of Oregon’s promising industries,” said Hilda Solis, the secretary of labor, according to a news release.

BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 3.28 treasury CHANGE -.30%

s

$1556.70 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$0.70

By David Kocieniewski New York Times News Service

The United States may soon wind up with a distinction that makes business leaders cringe — the highest corporate tax rate in the world. Topping out at 35 percent, America’s official corporate income tax rate trails that of only Japan, which has said it plans to lower its rate. It is nearly triple Ireland’s and 10 percentage points higher than those of Denmark, Austria or China. To help com-

panies here stay competitive, many executives say, Congress should lower it. But by taking advantage of myriad breaks and loopholes that other countries generally do not offer, U.S. corporations pay only slightly more on average than their counterparts in other industrial countries. And some U.S. corporations use aggressive strategies to pay less — often far less — than their competitors abroad and at home. A Government Accountability Office study released in 2008 found that 57

percent of U.S. companies paid no federal income taxes during a seven-year period it studied. The paradox of the U.S. tax code — high rates with a bounty of subsidies, shelters and special breaks — has made U.S. multinationals “world leaders in tax avoidance,” according to Edward Kleinbard, a professor at the University of Southern California who was head of the congressional joint committee on taxes. This has profound implications for businesses, the economy and the federal budget. See Taxes / B5

EXECUTIVE FILE

Inventive rancher trots out new ideas

Work to start on new Warm Springs casino The Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs have scheduled a groundbreaking ceremony at 2 p.m. today at the site of the future Indian Head Casino next to the Plaza at Warm Springs on U.S. Highway 26. In February, the Warm Springs Tribal Council approved plans to move the casino out of the Kah-Nee-Ta resort to a site across from the Warm Springs Museum, while still seeking approval to build a new casino at Cascade Locks in the Columbia River Gorge.

Southwest closes purchase of AirTran Southwest Airlines Co. closed its $1 billion purchase of AirTran on Monday, securing its spot as one of the biggest U.S. airlines and extending its reach beyond U.S. borders. For Southwest and AirTran customers, nothing much changes right away. There will be separate websites, frequentflier programs and bag-fee policies. AirTran charges for checked baggage, while Southwest allows two bags for free. — From staff and wire reports

$46.078 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE -$2.506

postpones debt crisis By Binyamin Appelbaum New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — A greaterthan-expected increase in tax revenue has extended by about a month, until early August, the federal government’s ability to pay its bills without an increase in the debt ceiling, the Treasury Department said Monday. The new estimate creates a significant grace period for Congress to consider an increase in the maximum amount the government can borrow, a step that House Republicans say they will not take without an agreement to curb spending. Federal borrowing is still likely to hit the legal limit on May 16, the Treasury said, so this week it will begin to take emergency steps to buy additional time under the cap. Those steps, plus the increase in tax receipts, which have reduced the need for borrowing, will delay a crisis by about a month — to August from July. “While this updated estimate in theory gives Congress additional time to complete work on increasing the debt limit, I caution strongly against delaying action,” Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner wrote Monday to lawmakers. See Debt / B2

Enforcing copyrights, for a profit

Deal to create a top global coal producer Arch Coal said Monday that it would buy the International Coal Group for $3.4 billion in cash, creating one of the world’s largest coal producers. The deal is largely a bet on steel: the combined company would be the second-biggest producer of metallurgical coal in the United States at a time when prices for such steelmaking coal are rising thanks to demand from China and India. The biggest producer of steel-making coal is Alpha Natural Resources, which outbid Arch Coal earlier this year to acquire Massey Energy for $7.1 billion in cash and stock.

t

U.S. has 2nd-highest corporate Extra tax tax rate — but most don’t pay revenue Code empowers ‘world leaders in tax avoidance’

Money for Cessna workers still flowing

B

By Dan Frosch New York Times News Service

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Shari Maguire, owner/instructor of Rolling M Ranch near Sisters, demonstrates the StoStic, a telescoping training tool, on her horse on Monday. The StoStic, which can also be used in dog and livestock training, can fit in a back pocket when collapsed. Made of graphite, the StoStic weighs 3.5 ounces, so it’s easy to handle but not strong enough to be used aggressively on a horse.

Shari Maguire has learned some tough lessons in creating products By Tim Doran The Bulletin

SISTERS — Shari Maguire’s horsetraining products stem directly from her experience running her Rolling M Ranch on Hinkle Butte Road. Watching students struggle to hold their horses and other equipment at the same time led Maguire to create the StoStic, a telescoping training tool that extends from 8.5 inches to 4 feet in length with a flick of the wrist. She also invented The Collar, which can be used for training and then converted into a breast collar, the part of the rigging that keeps the saddle in place. “I’ve always been pretty practical,” said Maguire, the owner/instructor of Rolling M Ranch. “If you don’t have a certain tool, make it.” But trying to have the StoStic manufactured in China became a money-los-

The basics What: Rolling M Ranch Where: 69516 Hinkle Butte Road, Sisters Employees: One Phone: 541-549-6962 Website: http://rollingmranch.com/

ing experience for Maguire, although she is still interested in having the product made. A horsewoman for more than 40 years, Maguire, 61, said she moved to Central Oregon in 2001 to escape Los Angeles, where she owned a women’s clothing store. “I traded in my stilettos for a Stetson,” she said, “my Porsche for a pickup.” The 5-acre Rolling M Ranch is Magu-

ire’s primary business. She trains horses and riders and offers workshops on trail riding. Rolling M has a cross-country course, where Maguire has placed logs, dug a trench and built up a hill to create hazards similar to those riders will likely encounter on Central Oregon trails. When she began to develop the StoStic, Maguire turned to the Internet, where her searches turned up a specialized type of telescoping pole used by Hawaiian anglers. The Chinese company that makes the poles said it could manufacture StoStics if Maguire transferred money to the company’s bank. “I had no idea what I was doing,” she said. “I was going to take this risk.” (My bank) wired the money to the Chinese, and I hear nothing for months. Then I e-mailed — nothing.” See Maguire / B5

DENVER — When Brian Hill, a 20-year-old blogger from North Carolina, posted on his website in December a photograph of an airport security officer conducting a pat-down, a legal battle was the last thing he imagined. A month later, Hill received an e-mail from a reporter for The Las Vegas Sun who was looking into a Nevada company that files copyright lawsuits for newspapers. The e-mail informed Hill that he was one of those the company, Righthaven, was suing. Though the airport photo had gone viral before Hill plucked it off the Web, it belonged to The Denver Post, where it first appeared Nov. 18. Hill took down the photo. He was too late. A summons was delivered to his house. The lawsuit sought statutory damages. It did not name a figure, but accused Hill of “willful” infringement, and under federal copyright law up to $150,000 can be awarded in such cases. See Copyright / B2

Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index readings of greater than 50 indicate growth in the manufacturing economy:

Chrysler turns first profit since bankruptcy

60.4

64 62

By Dee-Ann Durbin

60

The Associated Press

58

DETROIT — For the first time in nearly seven years, Detroit’s car companies are all making money. Chrysler, the last of the three to return to profitability, said Monday it earned $116 million in the first quarter on revenue of $13.1 billion. The company, which emerged from bankruptcy protection a little less than two years ago, hadn’t reported net income since 2006.

56 54 52 ’10

’11

Source: Institute for Supply Management AP

General Motors Co., which also went into bankruptcy in 2009 and took billions in government aid, has reported four profitable quarters and held an initial public offering in November to help repay its loans. Ford Motor Co., which didn’t take bailout money but nearly filed for bankruptcy five years ago, recorded its eighth consecutive quarterly profit last week. Ford’s 2010 profit of $6.6 billion was the highest in a decade.

“It’s kind of miraculous,” said Van Conway, a consultant and founder of turnaround firm Conway MacKenzie. “If all of us were to put ourselves back in 2009, could we imagine that GM could have done an IPO and these companies would be enjoying this level of profit? I don’t think so.” It’s the payoff for cutting staff, plants, car brands and wages during the recession and bankruptcy. See Chrysler / B5

Carly Calhoun / New York Times News Service

Brian Hill, a 20-year-old blogger in Mayodan, N.C., is being sued for copyright infringement charges by Righthaven.


B2 Tuesday, May 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

As airline alliances gain clout, industry consolidation debated By Su san Stellin New York Times News Service

Global airline alliances used to be little more than marketing agreements among carriers, and travelers had only a dim awareness of them. But over the past decade, three alliances — Star Alliance, Oneworld and SkyTeam — have carved up the globe into three teams of at least a dozen airlines each. These alliances offer passengers easier access to the world, but their growing power also positions them to dominate unaffiliated rivals and control prices. For passengers, alliances offer simpler ticketing and smoother connections on intercontinen-

tal trips, as well as the chance to earn and redeem frequent-flier miles on other member carriers. The main incentive for carriers to partner up is to bolster their international traffic, an increasingly important source of revenue. “The U.S. market is a mature market — we’ve seen the shakeout, we’ve had consolidation,” said Henry Harteveldt, a travel analyst with Forrester Research. “To continue to grow, airlines have to expand abroad, but it’s impractical and, in some cases, impossible for carriers to do much expansion on their own.” International treaties dictate where carriers are allowed to operate in another country, and

laws in the United States prohibit foreign ownership of a majority stake in an airline, so global alliances are also a way of expanding abroad without a buyout or a merger. But now that the dominant carriers in each alliance have been granted antitrust immunity by the U.S. government and the European Union, they are free to behave as if there had been a merger — coordinating schedules and fares and sharing revenue on trans-Atlantic routes. The alliances also help the airlines save money as members shift operations to a single terminal and move toward more joint lounges and services.

But for all the talk of the benefits that alliances offer travelers, there is a continuing debate about the downside of this trend: too much market concentration, leading to higher fares. That is particularly a concern across the Atlantic, where fares have risen disproportionately as competition has shrunk. “Something changed in the North Atlantic that allowed prices to rise three times faster than they did in any other market,” said Hubert Horan, an aviation consultant who has opposed alliance antitrust immunity. “That was due to the extreme consolidation of the industry. There is no other factor that could explain it.”

Rare earth prices soar as supplies stay tight By Keith Bradsher New York Times News Service

HONG KONG — Rare earth prices are reaching rarefied heights. World prices have doubled in the last four months for rare earths — metallic elements needed for many of the most sophisticated civilian and military technologies, whether smartphones or smart bombs. And this year’s increases come atop price gains of as much as fourfold during 2010. The reason is basic economics: Demand continues to outstrip efforts to expand supplies and break China’s chokehold on the market. Neodymium, a rare earth necessary for a range of products including headphones and hybrid electric cars, now fetches more than $283 a kilogram ($129 a pound) on the spot market. A year ago it sold for about $42 a kilogram ($19 a pound). Samarium, crucial to the manufacture of missiles, has climbed to more than $146 a kilogram, up from $18.50 a year earlier. While the price inflation is a concern to manufacturers, consumers in many cases will barely notice the soaring cost of rare earths. Even though the materials are crucial to the performance of everyday equipment like automotive catalytic converters and laptop computer display screens, rare earths are typically used only in trace quantities. The high prices for rare earths reflect turmoil in the global industry that mines and refines them. China, which controls more than 95 percent of the market, has further restricted exports so as to conserve supplies for its own high-tech and green energy industries. That is despite the World Trade Organization’s ban on most export restrictions. Meanwhile, an ambitious effort to open the world’s largest rare earth refinery in Malaysia, which had seemed certain to begin operating by this autumn, is tied up over regulatory reviews of the disposal plans for thousands of tons of low-level radioactive waste the plant would produce annually. Public opposition to the refinery is evident in the weekly protest demonstrations now being held. At the same time, Japanese companies are finding it harder

Debt Continued from B1 Geithner has warned repeatedly that failing to raise the ceiling would force the government to default on its debts and obligations. That, he wrote, “would have a catastrophic economic impact that would be felt by every American.” Many Republicans have publicly agreed that Congress must raise the ceiling, although they insist that the White House must first agree to some form of meaningful spending limits. A vocal minority of members, however, have said that they are reluctant to raise the limit, and that Geithner and others ringing alarm bells have overstated the possible consequences of leaving the limit in place. The debates have become a standard feature of Washington politics in the last two decades, cropping up when federal borrowing nears the limit while power is divided between the two parties. In 2006 and 2007, it was Democrats who inveighed against Republican arguments that debt increases were necessary.

Copyright Continued from B1 “I was shocked,” Hill said. “I thought maybe it was a joke or something to scare me. I didn’t know the picture was copyrighted.” Over the past year, as newspapers continue to grapple with how to protect their online content, Righthaven has filed more than 200 similar federal lawsuits in Colorado and Nevada over material posted without permission from The Denver Post or The Las Vegas Review-Journal. The company has business relationships with both newspapers. Like much of the industry, the papers see the appropriation of their work without permission as akin to theft and harmful to their business, and are frustrated by unsuccessful efforts to stem the common practice, whether it’s by a one-man operation like Hill’s, or an established one like Matt Drudge’s. Sara Glines, a vice president for the MediaNews Group, which owns The Denver Post, wrote in an e-mail that the patdown photo had been used on more than 300 websites with no credit to The Post or the photographer. “We have invested heavily in creating quality content in our markets,” Glines wrote. “To allow others who have not shared in that investment to reap the benefit ultimately hurts our ability to continue to fund that investment at the same level.”

Heavy-handed?

New York Times News Service ile photo

Workers from Bangladesh work at the construction site of the world’s largest rare earth refinery, built by Australian mining giant Lynas, near Kuantan, Malaysia, in February. than originally hoped to recycle rare earths from electronics and to begin rare earth mining and refining in Vietnam. Although rare earths are crucial to the supply chains of some of the world’s biggest manufacturers, the industry that mines and refines them has long been characterized by small, entrepreneurial companies. Lately, though, soaring prices have contributed to industry consolidation. Last month, for example, Solvay, a big Belgian chemical-industrial corporation, announced it would pay $4.8 billion to acquire Rhodia of France, a technological leader in making complex chemicals based on rare earths. That same day, April 4, Molycorp, the only U.S. company currently producing rare earths, said it had paid $89 million for a more than 90 percent stake in Silmet of Estonia, a much smaller company that is Rhodia’s only European rival in rare earth processing. All of this has left the world even more dependent on China. The Chinese government last autumn showed a willingness to use that near-monopoly as a trade

weapon, halting shipments to Japan from late September to midNovember, during a territorial dispute over islands in the East China Sea. Although Beijing has officially denied that it imposed a Japanese embargo last fall, China’s own trade data released since then show that its shipments to Japan suddenly fell to zero in October for rare earth metals, and to nearly zero for rare earth oxides — which are more processed chemical compounds. At the beginning of this year China reduced its rare earth export quotas to all countries, while raising export taxes on some rare earths to 25 percent, from 15 percent previously. Since April 1, China has also raised taxes on rare earth mining companies to the equivalent of $8 for each kilogram of refined product; rare earths were previously taxed like many other nonferrous minerals in China, at less than 50 cents a kilogram. One of the biggest questions hanging over the rare earths industry is whether the U.S., the European Union and Japan will file a broad WTO case against China,

In the past, Congress has always resolved its differences in time to avoid a debt crisis. Vice President Joe Biden plans to convene White House staff and congressional leaders Thursday to pursue an agreement on the terms of an increase. There is a growing consensus among Democrats that some restrictions on spending are reasonable and necessary to secure an agreement with Republicans. To clear as much time as possible for that political process, the Treasury said on Monday that it would take the first in a series of emergency steps authorized by law this Friday. It will suspend a program under which it borrows money from state and local governments to help those governments meet legal obligations to invest in tax-exempt bonds. The issuance of the State and Local Government Treasury securities, known as “slugs,” are largely a convenience for the governments. A senior Treasury official said the program’s suspension might not cost those governments any significant amount of money, but it would

require them to find alternative investments. The program has been suspended six times in the last two decades as the federal government bumped against the debt ceiling, most recently in 2007. The Treasury said it would begin to take additional steps on May 16, including suspending programs under which the government borrows money from pension funds for federal employees and then pays interest to those funds. By law, the Treasury must make up for the lost interest payments once Congress raises the debt ceiling. The ceiling is now set at $14.29 trillion. The government must constantly borrow more money because its commitments vastly exceed its revenue. The Treasury projected that the government would need to borrow $299 billion between April and June, and that it would hit the debt limit in early July. It now projects that the government will need to borrow $142 billion during that period, thanks to the increase in tax revenue. That leaves enough room for the government to keep borrowing until August.

challenging its export quotas and duties. James Bacchus, a former chairman of the WTO appeals tribunal in Geneva, said Chinese trade data shows a virtually complete halt in shipments to Japan last autumn that could be cited to buttress any WTO filing by rare earth-importing countries. China denies violating the WTO ban on export restrictions, saying that it qualified for an exception to the ban for environmental protection and conservation of natural resources. But China has done little to restrict its own industries’ consumption of rare earths, usually a prerequisite for invoking an environmental defense.

Some critics, however, contend that Righthaven’s tactics are draconian, and that the company hopes to extract swift settlements before it is clear that there is a violation of federal copyright law. Typically, the suits have been filed without warning. Righthaven rarely sends out notices telling websites to take down material that does not belong to them before seeking damages and demanding forfeiture of the Web domain name. Defendants in these cases run the gamut. They have included the white supremacist David Duke, the Democratic Party of Nevada and Drudge. But little-known websites, nonprofit groups and mom-and-pop bloggers — people who blog as a hobby — are not exempt from Righthaven’s legal actions. According to some Internet legal experts who have been watching the cases with growing interest, the way it works is

simple: Righthaven finds newspaper material that has been republished on the Web — usually an article, excerpts or a photograph — and obtains the copyrights. Then, the company sues. Whether the defendant credits the original author or removes the material after being sued matters little. None of the cases has gone to trial yet, and many have been settled out of court. In two instances, judges have ruled against Righthaven in pretrial motions. According to The Las Vegas Sun, which has tracked the cases, the only two publicly disclosed settlements were for $2,185 and $5,000.

Defining the rules In describing his company’s approach, Steve Gibson, Righthaven’s chief executive, said there has been “voluminous, almost incalculable infringement” since the advent of the Internet and that years of warning people to take down copyrighted content had not worked. Newspapers, he said, needed a new way to address the problem of people appropriating their material without permission. Eric Goldman, director of the high-tech law institute at the Santa Clara University School of Law, said reposting published material online could qualify as “fair use” if it didn’t diminish the market value of the original. Other critics of the suits contend that reposting material for the purposes of discussion does not constitute infringement. In an amicus brief filed on behalf of the Media Bloggers Association regarding a Righthaven suit in Nevada, Marc Randazza, a lawyer specializing in First Amendment issues, accused the company of acquiring copyrights for the sole purpose of going after defendants who could not afford legal help. “Nobody can seriously believe that Righthaven, which publishes nothing anywhere, has acquired the full ownership of the articles it sues upon,” wrote Randazza, whose legal group recently filed motions to dismiss two other Righthaven cases, accusing the company of making fraudulent copyright claims. Gibson denies that unwitting bloggers are a particular target and points to lawsuits like the one against Drudge. Righthaven accused Drudge of posting the airport pat-down photo on his Drudge Report website without permission. The suit was settled out of court, Gibson said.


B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 3, 2011 B3

T F People keep logging in despite data vulnerability

Video game systems are getting upgraded at a virtual snail’s pace

By Jordan Robertson

By Matt Richtel

The Associated Press

New York Times News Service

SAN FRANCISCO — Week after week, thieves break into corporate computer systems to steal customer lists, e-mail addresses and credit card numbers. Large data breaches get overshadowed by even larger ones. Yet people are turning over personal information to online retailers, social networks and other services in growing numbers. The point at which people lose trust in the websites they deal with appears further away than ever before, if it exists at all, as shopping, socializing and gaming online becomes deeply embedded in modern life. People have come to accept that sharing information is the price of a meaningful, connected life online — even if they don’t like it. “We are clearly schizophrenic about this technology,” said Jim Dempsey, an expert on Internet privacy at the Center for Democracy & Technology. “We love it, we use it, we expect it to work, and we’ve woven it into our daily lives, professionally, socially and personally. But we really don’t trust it, and we do get upset when our data is lost or stolen.” Companies collecting the personal details have little incentive to offer the best privacy protections. So far, people haven’t demanded that companies do better by walking away from their gadgets, online retailers or social networks. “I know I take the risk,” said Lance Locurto, 44. “It’s more convenient.” The South Florida banker said he buys almost everything online, despite the fact that hackers got into both his iTunes and Amazon accounts in the past few months. Jim Pachetti, 47, a laid-off carpenter looking at an iPhone at an Apple store outside Buffalo, N.Y., said he’s resigned to the fact that breaches happen. “I’ve accepted the fact that all my information is out there and someone has it, and that’s just the way it is,” he said. James McCartney, an identity theft expert, said his smartphone has become an integral part of his life and business, despite the security concerns. “The velocity of business precludes me from going without it,” he said. “It’s the rules of the game. It’s not something I can change.”

SAN FRANCISCO — So much technology seems to get upgraded at Internet speeds. Not video game consoles — at least not anymore. Traditionally, console makers have upgraded their machines every five or six years. Nintendo intends to keep to that schedule. It said it planned to sell a sequel to its 5-year-old Wii in 2012. But Microsoft, the maker of the Xbox 360, and Sony, maker of the PlayStation 3, are taking their time with updates. Video game industry analysts said they expected it would be 2014 before Microsoft sold a new Xbox and Sony upgraded its PlayStation. If that bears out — the two companies are not publicly discussing their plans — that will mean nine years between upgrades for Microsoft and eight for Sony. There are several reasons for extending the life spans of the consoles. But analysts said one reason predominates: cost. Microsoft and Sony invested hundreds of millions of dollars, the analysts said, to create their machines so that they could handle intensive graphics and complex gameplay and survive the furious pace of game development. “Eight or nine years is longer than usual between cycles, but I think the world is rapidly changing,” said Anita Frazier, an analyst with NPD, a market research firm. Evan Wilson, a video game

Being held accountable It may take government regulation to force companies to do better. The Federal Trade Commission is urging Web browser makers to build “Do Not Track” tools to let consumers stop advertisers from studying their online activity in order to target pitches. The Commerce Department has called on Congress to adopt ground rules for companies that collect consumer data online for marketing.

The Associated Press ile photo

Sony Computer Entertainment President and CEO Kazuo Hirai talks about the new PlayStation Portable “NGP” at PlayStation Meeting 2011 in Tokyo in January. A recent attack on Sony’s PlayStation Network and Qriocity music service exposed the personal information of 77 million customers. Several lawmakers have introduced privacy bills. “For many companies, it’s easier and cheaper to deal with the repercussions of a data breach that’s already occurred, rather than taking steps to prevent it,” said Ioana Rusu, regulatory counsel for Consumers Union, publisher of Consumer Reports. “Companies need to be held accountable so they protect your data upfront.” Information that distinguishes one faceless Internet surfer from another is so valuable that companies have been hurt when they limit what they collect. Yahoo Inc., for example, will soon keep logs on people’s searches for 18 months, the same amount of time as Google Inc. That’s a reversal of its vow in late 2008 to strip out personally identifiable details after 90 days. In making an industry-leading privacy pledge, Yahoo said it became less competitive in offering personalized services enabled by long-term tracking. Companies also face lawsuits and penalties by promising more than they can deliver. If companies are vague, their biggest risk is bad publicity when a hacking attack or a technical error exposes customers’ information. Businesses only have to be as good as their competitors. They know customers have nowhere else to go as long as everyone sets the bar low. “Choice becomes meaningless in this context,” said Ashkan Soltani, a security researcher.

Sharing more The number of records exposed in data breaches is staggering — more than half a bil-

Sony online gaming unit shut down after 2nd attack By Shan Li Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Less than a week after news of a major security breach sparked an uproar, Sony Corp. has shut down its online-gaming unit after a hacker infiltrated the network in the second such attack on the company in the last month. Sony Online Entertainment, known for creating massive multiplayer games such as “EverQuest” and “The Matrix Online,” suspended service Sunday night, according to a statement Monday. “In the course of our investigation into the intrusion into our systems we have discovered an issue that warrants enough concern for us to take the service down effective immediately,” the statement said. Two weeks ago, an attack on Sony’s PlayStation Network and Qriocity music service exposed the personal information of 77 million customers’ accounts. Sony apologized and disclosed Satur-

day that 10 million credit card accounts may have been compromised during the security breach. The company will give affected customers 30 days of free access to its Qriocity music-streaming service as well as 30 days of access to its PlayStation Plus online game service. The company will also provide credit card protection services to relevant customers, Kaz Hirai, Sony’s executive deputy president, said during a news conference this weekend. The company has drawn the ire of both customers and lawmakers since the initial attack. A congressional subcommittee last week demanded answers to a detailed list of questions regarding security concerns, including when the breach occurred, how much data was stolen and why Sony waited a week before it notified customers. Consumers have filed at least two lawsuits in California against Sony and are seeking federal class-action status.

lion in the past six years, according to the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse. At the same time, people are sharing more online. More than half a billion people are on Facebook, and billions of people search Google and Yahoo each month and accept tracking data files known as cookies. The Pew Internet & American Life Project found that 61 percent of adult Internet users in the U.S. have used social networks, up from less than a third in 2008. When they aren’t sharing on social networks, they are leaving their marks with online gaming services, shopping sites and retail loyalty programs. The dependence on technology explains why the reputations of technology companies are remarkably resilient, even after embarrassing breaches. For example, hackers last year uncovered a security hole on AT&T Inc.’s website and exposed the e-mail addresses of more than 100,000 iPad owners who had signed up for AT&T’s wireless Internet service. At that point, Apple had sold more than 2 million iPads. Despite the breach, the company has since sold some 17 million more iPads. Smartphones have added a new dimension to the debate about online privacy because they also record their owners’ locations. Apple CEO Steve Jobs emerged Thursday from medical leave to try to quash a controversy over secret recordings of location information by iPhones.

Apple denied directly tracking people, but said it is building a database of known Wi-Fi hot spots and cell towers to improve location-based services. Google Inc.’s Android phones do something similar. To quiet privacy critics, Apple is changing the iPhone’s software to keep data for a week instead of indefinitely. Google says its phones only store data for a short time. Apple’s disclosure came a day after Sony Corp. said a hacker may have stolen credit card numbers and other valuable information on the 77 million players using its PlayStation online gaming network. That would make it one of the biggest known credit card breaches. Consumers are at a disadvantage because companies often leave their privacy policies intentionally vague, yet lengthy with legalese. In any case, few people bother to read them at all. Carnegie Mellon University researchers found it would take the average person 40 minutes per day to read through all the privacy policies that person encounters online. “Sadly, the consumer can do absolutely nothing to protect themselves,” said Bruce Schneier, a prominent security blogger and chief security technology officer at the British telecommunications operator BT. “When you give your data to someone else, you are forced to trust them.” If you say no, he said, “that’ll mean living in a cave in the woods.”

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financial industry analyst with Pacific Crest Securities, said both Microsoft and Sony were still trying to recoup their investments. “It’s less of a surprise that Nintendo is sticking to the traditional upgrade cycle than the fact that Microsoft and Sony are not,” Wilson said. He added: “It speaks to the fact that Microsoft and Sony both lost so much money.” As those companies were making such big investments, the companies began facing steeply intensifying competition for attention and consumer dollars from casual games. Today, big competition comes from the likes of Zynga’s Farmville on Facebook or Angry Birds on smartphones and tablets. Nintendo’s Wii, with its motion-control sensor and more basic graphics, is aimed at a more casual gamer — younger children, women and seniors who had not played console games. It exploded in popularity after it was released in 2006. Nintendo has sold 86 million systems worldwide, 41 million in the United States. Microsoft has sold 50 million Xbox 360s since the console’s release in 2005, and it has sold 10 million Kinect sensors, its motion-control device. For its part, Sony has sold 50 million of the PlayStation 3, and 8 million of its Move motion controllers.

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B4 Tuesday, May 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

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4.08 +.03 1.12 26.94 -.55 1.32 66.80 -.45 13.19 -.05 1.20 56.15 -.04 58.13 +.55 1.80 41.45 -.06 0.20 15.72 -.53 1.12 36.36 -.04 5.95 +.08 20.73 +.35 0.58 41.03 -.73 1.72 31.21 +.09 17.16 -.62 8.11 +.01 1.81 +.02 6.67 -.32 0.05 28.66 -.13 2.84 +.13 1.92 52.59 +.55 0.70 71.06 +.26 0.42 7.30 -.04 26.76 +.04 4.99 -.09 39.99 -1.13 2.83 +.08 0.72 20.96 +.11 0.90 58.06 +.93 9.82 +.11 29.64 +1.40 8.87 -.02 5.35 -.23 78.18 -4.43 27.98 -.06 2.36 -.07 0.17 11.43 +.05 0.04 27.66 -.10 0.52 58.39 -.41 14.48 -.08 .96 -.06 33.55 0.36 41.52 +.25 0.25 5.91 +.03 0.24 65.44 -.02 1.76 +.05 13.51 -.64 9.03 -.07 0.06 5.89 -.01 8.35 -.17 2.65 +.07 27.32 +.06 0.04 8.54 -.10 7.96 14.36 +.04 25.26 -.27 29.15 +.50 2.34 -.02 0.60 42.07 +.69 108.60 -.48 6.48 -.06 5.66 +.26 .95 -.01 50.44 +.53 0.64 66.72 -2.86 0.11 90.34 -.09 27.67 +.07 2.32 94.77 -.75 8.10 -.08 0.40 12.69 +.23 1.16 68.71 -.74 7.43 -.08 34.23 -.20 6.54 -.08 0.86 9.51 -.16 0.66 69.96 -.59 0.34 37.37 +.03 6.54 0.12 17.22 +.22 37.52 +.38 1.80 81.75 -.40 8.97 -.62 97.61 +.74 1.63 +.02 24.60 +.46 14.57 +.15 0.72 70.27 -1.73 0.20 80.35 +.79 96.09 +1.09 3.91 -.08 0.48 7.66 1.31 21.90 -.30 1.70 39.47 -.07 3.25 -.24 40.30 -2.76 2.96 +.05 15.58 -.77 21.69 +.15 0.84 33.88 +.04 4.34 -.59 10.00 -.26 0.16 13.37 -.38 57.57 -.60 0.40 7.40 -.03 0.66 6.35 +.02 0.49 16.54 -.17 0.24 48.45 -.25 26.06 +.67 1.52 26.78 -.06 1.16 32.88 +.30 16.18 +.18 201.19 +5.38 30.44 -.31 34.08 +.76 1.54 29.54 +.23 68.50 +.20 0.52 56.56 -.64 1.45 12.20 -.60 1.35 35.01 -.14 5.60 29.20 +.09 10.35 +.08 0.44 15.46 -.10 1.84 36.54 +.06 0.10 12.58 -.28 0.72 49.65 +.57 0.60 23.70 -.90 8.65 -.33 30.85 -.30 29.56 +.06 11.70 -.15 51.54 -.77 0.88 29.51 +.13 16.80 -.25 0.92 61.73 -.33 0.40 41.17 +.53 0.24 45.55 -.49 57.38 +.53 6.61 -.09 0.06 56.01 +.10 13.64 +.34 0.36 80.35 +1.41 3.69 -.22 0.88 40.39 +.08 41.97 -3.73 0.20 50.39 -.59 1.16 63.93 -.04 3.25 74.67 -.47 30.55 -.66 2.62 17.85 +.01 .89 -.06 54.67 -.62 1.77 -.09 1.00 7.18 0.60 52.58 +.41 5.92 -.12 0.60 130.94 -2.43 0.48 26.61 -.35 18.19 +.11 40.76 +.73 1.12 11.64 -.21 346.28 -3.85 0.32 15.15 -.54 10.10 -.38 26.82 -2.62 5.37 -.24 0.62 22.71 +.16 0.40 39.75 +1.07 .12 -.01 0.75 36.65 -.42 0.44 33.53 -.77 0.64 37.00 -.02 22.50 +.47 1.33 -.07 1.40 17.36 -.35 8.62 +.07 33.78 -.99 0.12 22.60 -.41 0.09 31.60 +.14 1.44 7.46 +.03 13.74 47.00 +2.25 2.96 -.13 11.61 -.40 45.63 +.04 .58 -.02 34.54 -.79 34.50 -1.42 16.99 -.31 30.82 -.47 1.63 +.02 0.60 61.31 -.77 19.41 +.51 0.60 28.09 -.48 14.71 -.28 0.04 14.47 -.13 0.64 39.60 -.10 0.18 16.70 -.30 0.52 14.48 +.01 2.55 50.32 +.49 47.52 +1.31 44.83 -.03 2.98 +.17 0.28 26.44 -.22 1.60 36.75 -.21 15.03 -.27 43.31 -1.62 4.68 +.11 6.58 -.20 33.60 -.31 1.44 -.01 44.66 -.32 1.72 79.85 -.28 1.44 54.70 +.34 24.40 +.04 0.32 33.15 -.31 8.83 -.26 3.57 127.18 +.57 4.27 -.10 15.50 -.06 1.00 42.22 +.48 18.70 -.26 37.05 +.73 0.92 29.57 +.19 1.82 -.05 0.92 34.81 -.55 0.84 18.04 -.04 1.24 -.01 0.64 26.59 -.33 1.97 37.60 +.17 38.08 -.51

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D 0.56 9.62 -.04 1.82 100.16 -1.08 1.82 83.30 -.88 46.64 -.31 51.13 -.19 49.94 -.29 0.42 45.92 -.22 4.53 -.23 1.50 50.72 0.18 19.87 -.84 31.92 +.51 147.47 -1.05 0.60 74.30 -3.11 0.28 37.47 +.16 6.47 -.28 38.89 -.10 1.36 64.29 -1.96 0.56 12.88 +.07 0.81 20.02 -.21 0.79 12.34 -.06 0.70 11.48 -.12 0.04 13.47 -.08 0.12 3.85 -.24 0.04 12.34 +.06 6.91 +.07 1.20 +.22 1.80 49.07 +.28 1.04 1.94 -.06 2.80 65.09 -.54 0.52 28.81 -.15 2.08 61.38 +.34 0.56 28.09 0.04 2.76 +.01 3.64 +.04 52.47 -.64 29.80 -.18 55.13 -.04 45.74 -.32 8.83 0.35 18.98 -.07 23.88 +.72 51.97 +.66 0.72 107.58 +.83 10.72 -.27 0.32 24.54 -.20 0.48 49.65 -1.36 30.04 -.70 1.24 57.61 +.71 21.72 -.60 4.56 -.10 0.10 6.65 -.07 0.76 82.99 +.14 1.64 86.85 +.91 56.13 0.20 39.22 +1.19 0.20 8.15 -.30 0.96 31.27 -.07 17.00 +.10 0.28 32.22 -.39 81.92 -1.38 0.30 52.18 -.95 0.60 31.45 +.23 41.29 +.18 41.21 -.52 2.15 -.08 .72 -.01 98.67 +1.02 0.05 6.01 -.09 27.30 +.41 0.80 19.85 +.01 2.36 +.03 6.97 +.13 1.28 10.35 -.17 47.46 -.65 5.50 195.53 -.41 0.32 4.24 +.01 0.32 6.77 -.03 1.36 10.52 +.09 0.40 18.65 -.29 0.60 17.48 +.19 28.20 -.60 57.70 +.70 2.08 32.35 -1.12 23.62 -.56 1.68 79.53 -.25 0.80 8.88 -.54 1.59 -.55 76.72 -.52 0.04 6.86 -.13 2.00 104.10 -.43 7.72 +.23 8.92 -.02 0.72 38.19 +.48 0.60 12.67 -.03 1.66 28.17 -.03 28.54 -1.29 1.67 21.89 -.32 18.39 +.84 0.44 23.06 -.53 32.63 -.87 9.40 -.73 1.56 -.09 0.56 23.98 -.11 0.40 31.19 -1.82 1.32 28.45 +.35 0.36 35.22 +.03 0.60 23.25 +.01 43.98 -1.50 1.66 6.22 -.03 10.96 -.02 27.03 -.21 0.52 33.86 +.24 1.24 23.97 +.47 0.56 19.96 +.18 0.34 9.16 -.06 11.80 -.43 0.32 25.48 -.29 0.28 12.32 -.33 1.28 70.88 -.98 19.57 -.17 0.05 22.86 -.51 3.95 64.54 -.52 0.20 26.60 -1.56 0.80 45.13 -.36 0.10 91.39 -.07 0.49 41.14 -.53 61.50 +.40 0.92 75.26 -.18 0.16 24.42 -.17 27.03 +.32 0.84 18.41 -.16 0.20 25.65 +.43 3.04 -.16 0.40 139.41 -2.14 21.77 -.13 1.16 80.15 -.03 0.04 46.40 -.43 42.54 +.08 1.12 35.26 +.16 5.60 297.14 +1.37 0.84 19.87 +.07 47.79 -.51 8.04 -.02 0.26 14.61 -.07 21.34 +.11 1.04 78.66 -.03 0.34 9.52 -.22 21.18 -1.05 18.69 -.45 0.50 36.15 -.07 24.59 -.95 0.50 35.37 +.14 0.72 44.19 -.66 0.12 56.19 -.09 8.41 -.07 10.67 +.29 7.59 -.27 0.38 16.35 +.08 0.60 9.03 -.02 0.63 9.94 -.02 16.82 -.34 6.72 +.03 21.38 -.48 0.04 6.99 -.09 6.72 -.13 16.72 -.03 1.63 +.04 1.96 62.90 +.15 0.40 30.69 +1.21 52.48 -.24 1.16 33.80 +.21 1.30 78.05 +.62 0.36 46.32 -.64 1.08 66.42 +.18 10.40 -.40 .52 -.03 47.80 +.63 0.20 54.78 +.05 4.80 -.24 0.04 6.65 -.03 0.30 11.20 -.11 0.26 5.38 -.22 1.52 13.21 -.03 .28 -.00 1.91 -.02 0.80 154.56 -6.38 1.75 -.09 0.78 44.32 +.63 5.00 -.36 .33 -.01 20.44 -.81 29.51 +.14 21.89 +.08 0.68 49.82 +.28 34.26 -.44 1.00 38.05 -.02 0.72 50.66 -.60 39.16 -.68 29.70 -1.22 0.54 38.45 -.58 0.14 47.79 +.38 61.69 +2.16 1.76 114.37 -1.04 0.04 17.17 +.12 47.23 +.01 12.90 +.14 .67 -.02 0.24 49.53 -.39 7.95 +.04 11.09 +.03 59.78 +.90 .35 +.01 3.77 31.70 -.40 3.37 +.24 0.43 8.64 -.04 1.89 19.28 -.48 0.80 38.04 -.36 36.40 +.17 0.79 18.59 -.01 1.56 14.47 -.35 11.70 -.12 23.13 +.22 0.01 22.59 -1.96 19.86 -.12 2.90 40.68 -.10 6.53 +.05 80.11 +3.09 32.37 +.06 121.24 +1.06 2.80 -.16

Nm ChRvLab ChrmSh CharterCm ChkPoint Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemtura n CheniereEn ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinaBiot ChinaInfo ChinaLife ChinaMble ChinNEPet ChinaPet ChinaSecur ChinaShen ChinaTcF ChinaUni ChinaYuch ChiCache n Chipotle Chiquita ChrisBnk Chubb ChungTel n ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigp pfN Citigrp Citigrp pfQ CitzRepB h CitrixSys Clarcor ClaudeR g CleanEngy Clearwire ClickSft CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPeak CoStar Coach CobaltIEn CocaCola CocaCE Coeur CogdSpen CogentC Cognex CognizTech CohStInfra CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColonyFncl ColumLabs Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmwReit rs CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s CompDivHd CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComScore ComstkRs Con-Way ConAgra ConchoRes ConcurTch Conmed ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Cnvrgys ConvOrg h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopanoEn Copart Copel Corcept CoreLab s CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpExc CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CowenGp CrackerB Crane Credicp CSVS2xVxS CrSuisInco CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc CreXus Crocs Crossh g rs CrosstexE CrwnCstle CrownHold CrudeCarr Crystallx g Ctrip.com CubistPh CullenFr Cummins Curis CurEuro CurAstla CurrCda CurtisWrt Cyclacel Cymer CypSemi CypSharp CytRx h Cytec Cytokinet Cytori D Med n DCT Indl DHT Hldgs DPL DR Horton DST Sys DSW Inc DTE DanaHldg Danaher s DaqoNEn n Darden Darling Datalink DaVita DeVry DeanFds DeckOut s DeerConsu Deere DejourE g Delcath Dell Inc DelphiFn DeltaAir DeltaPtr h Deluxe DemMda n DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DB AgriDL DBGoldSh DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE Dex One DexCom Diageo DiamondF DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver Dillards Diodes DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DrSCBr rs DirFnBr rs DirLCBr rs DrxEMBll s DrTcBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DrxSOXBll DirEMBear DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear DrxREBll s DirxSCBull DirxLCBull

D 42.47 +.28 4.38 -.15 59.30 +.36 54.75 -.18 29.13 -.30 4.59 -.12 19.04 -.14 8.68 -.40 0.30 33.23 -.44 3.12 108.18 -1.26 0.05 40.18 -.36 0.20 14.44 -.18 52.10 -1.07 0.66 4.00 -.05 9.86 +.10 2.63 +.01 0.91 53.67 -.02 1.93 46.28 +.19 4.42 +.15 3.16 99.87 -.90 5.29 -.09 4.64 -.13 5.16 +.50 0.23 20.44 -.02 32.86 -.26 15.67 -1.14 267.08 +.29 15.81 -.11 0.24 6.06 -.09 1.56 65.24 +.05 31.59 +.04 1.36 81.98 -.50 5.69 -.03 27.62 -.62 0.40 108.40 -2.19 2.85 -.14 1.60 31.44 -.24 0.84 20.28 -.05 0.49 31.08 +.03 15.93 -.63 0.24 17.58 +.06 2.13 26.36 -.09 1.97 27.87 +.11 4.49 -.10 1.50 22.49 -.16 .90 -.02 82.56 -1.78 0.42 45.27 +.08 2.18 -.23 16.63 -.41 5.07 +.21 0.32 9.69 -.06 0.56 91.28 -2.44 2.20 69.99 +.33 20.81 -.01 67.90 -.11 0.60 59.14 -.67 14.20 +.20 1.88 67.72 +.26 0.52 28.89 +.48 29.88 -1.83 0.40 6.04 -.01 14.43 -.08 0.36 31.05 -.23 82.21 -.69 1.44 18.40 +.03 0.72 10.22 +.05 54.95 +.97 2.96 -.09 2.32 84.55 +.20 20.16 -.84 0.60 21.30 +.14 1.28 18.55 -.13 3.54 +.05 0.45 26.68 +.47 0.45 24.98 +.43 0.40 37.91 -.02 0.92 42.78 +.22 0.48 16.45 -.31 2.00 27.29 -.10 30.22 -.51 39.18 -.21 0.38 46.02 +.56 1.44 15.96 -.80 33.89 -.05 0.80 50.55 -.43 11.27 -.06 30.69 +.88 31.03 -1.03 0.40 38.87 -.05 0.92 24.68 +.23 104.20 -2.65 56.28 -1.59 28.45 +.37 2.64 77.47 -1.42 0.40 54.17 +.08 2.40 52.30 +.18 26.83 -.88 22.61 +.22 0.96 36.20 -.22 67.31 -1.37 14.20 -.30 .22 +.01 0.06 75.21 +.31 1.16 65.14 -.81 0.42 26.53 -.45 2.30 34.96 -.89 44.95 -.43 0.38 27.59 4.36 -.04 1.00 93.59 -2.39 18.46 +.05 4.44 -.01 0.56 56.14 +1.04 0.20 20.76 -.18 0.60 40.26 +.41 1.65 35.19 -.02 24.79 -.10 12.38 -.07 0.96 81.04 +.15 8.94 +.02 0.18 8.82 -.18 63.23 +.63 0.30 17.15 -.02 32.86 +.59 0.80 55.52 -.17 4.12 -.04 0.88 50.28 -.95 0.92 49.84 -.07 1.95 95.04 -1.48 23.65 +1.29 0.32 3.75 +.03 1.40 45.39 -.10 0.32 3.28 +.09 39.90 -.84 0.74 11.59 -.07 20.18 +.07 .84 -.01 0.36 10.65 +.10 42.43 -.43 37.73 +.33 1.00 12.97 -.03 .13 -.00 48.71 -.01 34.26 +.42 1.84 59.02 -.22 1.05 118.29 -1.89 3.85 -.31 0.05 147.74 +.24 3.65 109.46 -.20 0.06 104.56 -.53 0.32 33.28 +.03 1.40 -.04 46.70 -1.40 21.37 -.39 2.40 12.37 +.02 .86 -.04 0.50 59.19 +.51 1.45 -.04 7.16 -.35 5.31 +1.83 0.28 5.75 -.06 0.40 4.25 -.08 1.33 30.28 -.01 0.15 12.09 -.35 0.70 49.33 +.02 47.16 -.32 2.24 51.09 +.56 17.74 -.43 0.08 55.24 12.37 +.10 1.28 47.14 +.17 15.63 -.54 8.09 +.12 89.17 +1.08 0.24 53.03 +.13 11.11 -.08 84.01 -.85 0.20 10.29 +.15 1.40 97.39 -.11 .37 -.01 6.74 -.33 15.44 -.03 0.44 31.39 -.56 10.46 +.08 .84 +.00 1.00 27.33 +.25 15.20 -1.37 22.17 -.40 42.81 -.62 2.35 +.01 4.09 0.20 38.01 +.46 8.54 -.29 0.93 65.14 -.18 14.11 -.25 13.77 +.16 49.43 -1.27 6.52 +.16 0.16 14.66 -.08 0.68 89.37 -1.63 3.87 -.33 16.72 +.07 2.46 81.77 +.40 0.18 65.09 -.56 0.50 73.75 -2.12 0.32 11.85 -.19 11.33 +.07 18.27 -.06 40.61 -.32 1.12 33.27 -.53 2.72 60.85 +.51 32.01 -.53 0.16 47.04 -.98 33.69 -.53 48.80 +.21 1.35 50.47 -.81 33.19 +1.14 39.59 +.34 32.61 +.20 0.84 44.20 -.60 19.42 +.34 11.92 +.11 13.18 +.58 0.01 59.58 -1.92 16.19 +.09 30.40 -.28 40.26 -.27 0.39 78.44 +.14 91.36 -3.37 0.16 90.65 -.56

Nm

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DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscLab rs DishNetwk Disney DolbyLab DollarFn s DollarGen DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs DonlleyRR DoralFncl DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragonW g DrmWksA DresserR Drew Inds DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DuffPhelp DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DuncanEn DyaxCp Dynavax Dynegy rs DynexCap

0.05 88.36 -4.00 0.24 24.67 -.17 44.65 +.39 39.82 +.36 2.12 +.15 29.79 +4.75 0.40 43.27 +.17 50.47 +.41 22.87 -.11 33.06 +.47 68.91 -.02 58.02 +.52 1.97 46.54 +.12 18.56 -.01 1.00 95.25 +2.23 1.04 19.16 +.30 1.51 +.01 0.40 20.56 -.25 1.10 67.32 -.72 1.00 41.34 +.35 1.00 39.39 +.19 8.05 -.27 26.25 -.24 51.39 -1.15 1.50 23.05 -1.02 0.52 4.77 +.05 73.69 -2.87 3.77 4.65 -.05 1.64 56.19 -.60 0.48 24.68 +.22 0.32 15.21 -.18 0.98 18.80 +.15 0.68 15.51 +.26 1.44 82.87 +.69 1.83 42.21 -.93 1.94 -.06 2.70 -.08 6.40 +.06 1.08 9.92 +.04

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22.72 -.29 16.39 +.15 33.64 -.75 28.11 -.23 30.81 -.19 2.67 53.15 -.59 0.64 110.94 -2.11 0.88 52.68 +.06 153.34 -1.92 76.71 -2.24 184.50 -1.37 3.04 59.00 +.11 3.41 -.02 0.40 29.71 +.62 0.60 12.14 -.38 0.20 8.29 +.07 0.20 21.47 +.34 2.08 46.11 +.05 1.88 105.49 -1.76 2.78 1.36 53.13 -.43 0.72 33.84 +.07 1.25 16.17 +.09 1.28 12.46 +.02 1.16 11.28 +.01 1.14 11.03 +.02 1.21 12.46 -.01 22.60 -.25 34.99 -2.09 0.70 52.58 -.18 1.39 43.54 -.33 4.10 +.50 1.28 39.25 -.02 17.58 -.97 0.20 8.46 -.05 86.16 -.19 0.04 19.27 -.12 1.76 36.14 -.90 8.19 +.09 0.10 18.17 -.46 20.30 +.12 17.94 -.02 0.64 32.11 -.37 2.62 +.01 1.38 60.81 +.04 0.24 20.30 +.14 9.75 +.06 2.06 33.73 -.17 1.96 65.78 +.90 0.80 33.72 +.19 1.96 25.29 +.15 14.33 -.17 10.61 -.88 40.02 +.86 1.20 44.71 +.35 2.43 -.10 17.94 +.03 0.54 64.02 -.99 75.73 +.21 1.94 -.06 2.94 -.15 2.24 45.49 -.48 3.58 53.57 -.73 35.92 -.33 5.42 -.23 2.16 32.40 +.11 0.79 21.30 -.06 36.65 -1.24 1.40 57.99 -1.58 8.62 -.01 3.32 69.20 -.52 2.39 42.32 -.95 2.68 -.09 8.83 +.08 11.57 +.09 .74 +.08 12.48 -.02 0.64 38.36 +.83 98.75 -1.91 0.88 19.84 +.02 1.47 59.89 +.15 0.37 15.28 +.08 0.75 96.60 -.40 43.64 -4.12 0.72 35.96 +1.07 1.92 89.92 -1.20 2.65 +.06 1.36 -.09 8.06 +.05 6.34 +.23 4.00 -.01 0.16 20.86 -.09 11.82 -.44 2.10 41.79 -.38 5.14 -.13 .01 -.00 9.71 -.33 0.28 25.37 +.35 0.40 54.45 +.18 21.51 -.10 57.70 +.96 21.79 +.08 9.36 -.32 0.56 21.53 -.11 3.17 +.04 1.88 86.97 -1.01 31.07 -.42 100.19 -1.17 0.24 35.25 +.03 0.60 87.23 -1.05 46.52 +.04 0.48 10.93 -.02 .56 +.12 4.51 -.09 40.33 +.43 7.74 -.47 0.24 13.13 -.18 0.08 29.22 -.66 20.60 -.37 0.72 53.99 -.22 1.04 66.89 -.20 0.48 94.37 -1.30 2.68 87.67 +.11 0.24 6.76 +.01 0.96 25.70 -.08 6.26 -.10 2.00 26.27 -.09 14.40 -.60 1.21 -.14 15.66 -.49 0.48 15.35 -.09 0.20 32.94 -.17 1.28 13.10 -.23 0.24 13.05 -.22 27.22 -.87 0.20 21.41 -.08 0.24 15.47 -.13 0.12 6.20 0.04 10.86 -.09 12.46 -.06 18.71 -2.27 0.04 13.21 +.11 0.64 14.38 -.02 0.80 16.51 +.28 31.60 +.25 137.53 -2.04 0.09 21.93 -.06 0.05 23.32 -.21 2.20 39.62 -.34 0.64 17.23 -.24 61.85 +.54 8.27 -.11 1.48 -.08 0.16 8.29 -.12 6.99 +.02 9.23 -.35 0.80 30.47 -.09 1.28 127.50 +.88 0.50 68.06 -1.88 37.27 +2.12 1.16 63.31 +.41 0.66 21.43 -.09 4.50 +.01 15.45 -.02 6.62 -.05 19.24 +.03 34.74 +1.58 35.77 -.14 10.18 -.19 46.25 -2.45 6.26 +.09 0.76 64.53 -.55 91.54 -4.24 35.25 -.32 1.96 23.48 +.04 12.01 -.03 1.00 129.06 -.06 1.00 54.34 -.68 11.60 +1.32 40.39 -1.43 0.75 8.23 -.04 0.24 27.32 -.62 1.85 21.40 -.71 1.68 -.03 0.30 21.47 -.38 0.16 11.80 +.12 4.79 -.05 8.34 +.30 1.16 42.57 +.30

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D 0.20

4.85 -.26 26.20 +.24 6.02 +.14 29.26 -.01 8.40 -.50 11.02 -.15 4.75 +.49 0.52 6.20 +.01 0.29 11.75 -.32 1.32 29.35 -.43 25.78 +.10 10.49 -.42 0.16 15.58 +.52 0.45 22.96 -.28 0.20 86.01 -.40 34.01 -.22 42.30 -.61 .41 34.99 -.88 83.95 +1.03 8.45 +.06 6.45 -.08 47.90 -.60 1.88 73.59 +.77 0.60 20.48 +.03 0.40 16.68 -.02 2.17 +.03 1.12 38.93 +.35 4.62 -.50 32.18 +.09 23.20 +.03 17.68 -.12 2.16 -.10 61.96 -.02 8.00 +2.23 3.88 -.05 0.18 16.16 +.07 0.48 31.17 -.18 1.80 53.83 +.13 4.86 +.30 12.52 +.33 26.20 -.48 27.26 -1.76 39.11 -.27 0.25 11.98 -.10 4.85 +.05 0.18 8.62 -.23 1.47 -.09 0.30 36.69 -.48 40.67 +1.83 0.52 14.89 -.14 2.11 43.62 -.04 0.40 9.62 +.07 24.35 +.97 9.68 -.19 0.08 53.20 -.04 13.55 +.12 0.28 22.04 -.38 0.25 26.45 -1.96 0.15 22.17 -.34 3.86 -.13 0.12 14.02 -.23 0.75 31.74 -.82 0.19 17.46 -.38 1.77 0.31 29.30 -.85 0.41 52.71 -3.12 3.06 -.19 1.40 151.30 +.29 1.16 87.89 -.48 21.64 -.83 17.75 -.40 2.94 58.80 -.98 538.56 -5.54 44.38 -.98 0.84 49.72 -.31 22.57 -.63 23.00 2.64 149.80 -1.80 2.86 -.13 7.38 -.04 5.43 -.06 2.61 -.18 2.50 -.16 0.07 7.37 -.08 3.31 -.31 0.83 20.72 +.14 43.30 +.14 66.36 -.60 25.48 -1.59 1.80 58.88 -.12 1.68 62.46 +.36 0.44 41.73 -1.31 .71 -.02 23.72 0.80 42.65 -.34 0.44 30.09 -.05 0.15 19.82 -.06 0.03 8.60 -.20 3.20 +.07 32.85 -1.16 33.44 +.64 0.58 32.49 -.05 1.92 39.76 +.14 78.20 -.51 1.80 54.39 -.08 34.64 +1.46 68.86 -1.34 33.04 -.97 0.36 48.92 -1.56 6.50 -.13 0.96 32.21 -.45 31.97 -.54 26.63 -.54 1.30 -.02 1.10 42.25 +.03 3.38 -.22 65.11 -1.04 6.57 -.26 19.59 +.87 0.50 37.70 +.44 0.10 48.33 -.20 8.08 -.20 0.07 15.19 -.38 1.00 52.41 -.72 0.82 35.30 -.30 0.32 9.00 -.29 0.40 28.82 -.15 13.29 -.53 1.20 47.19 +.35 4.20 28.39 -.02 1.24 25.71 +.22 5.86 +.02 5.24 -.22 2.86 54.06 +.29 0.63 17.41 -.35 11.42 +.14 1.20 22.81 -.03 33.38 +.08 25.53 -.10 43.74 +2.25 16.53 -.39 0.08 17.07 -.18 6.15 -.15 8.87 -.54 1.80 51.30 +.07 18.09 -.84 0.24 63.15 -3.19 .53 +.03 74.08 +1.01 1.00 90.25 +.47 5.97 -.31 0.20 5.95 +.01 1.38 57.59 -.12 16.98 -.23 0.40 83.56 -2.40 0.32 40.08 -.29 21.02 -.51 13.04 +.68 37.59 -.19 13.72 -.37 1.70 36.92 +.02 0.41 45.41 +.40 0.60 56.89 -1.01 22.42 +.40 1.00 37.35 +.20 42.90 -.33 2.48 63.08 -.32 39.14 +.79 1.33 61.54 +.31 1.95 +.18 0.51 29.39 -.02 28.17 -1.06 15.89 +.12 57.00 +.27 1.80 23.99 -.16 0.08 17.52 -.27 0.28 6.54 -.17 3.04 -.17 0.32 9.54 +.01 0.50 14.98 28.76 -.71 1.00 76.48 +.36 0.52 47.17 -.51 0.04 6.77 -.02 40.98 +.98

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D 0.40 20.95 +.10 11.59 -.38 4.10 -.12

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36.45 +.34 20.44 -.31 49.30 -1.10 17.12 +.16 8.55 +.02 11.16 -.05 13.24 +.05 0.31 6.26 12.14 -.50 69.40 -.06 0.52 12.88 +.22 34.63 -.79 15.06 -.21 38.64 -.30 0.82 27.93 -.34 0.25 24.18 +.26 0.24 15.55 -.05 2.53 76.78 -.94 0.50 33.81 +.11 0.95 41.80 -.03 0.29 28.73 -.05 0.45 19.41 +.05 0.33 19.90 -.25 0.14 10.56 +.03 0.44 69.64 +.67 0.34 15.02 +.01 0.54 63.75 -.56 0.43 14.42 -.03 1.56 50.53 -.03 1.82 76.68 -.19 2.15 45.52 -.28 0.55 35.78 +.07 0.32 27.85 0.29 15.94 -.06 0.43 19.09 -.02 1.57 71.46 -.06 0.54 77.96 -.28 42.83 -4.05 1.09 60.83 -.12 1.75 53.65 -.01 3.35 110.75 +.19 0.63 45.07 -.14 1.05 99.62 -.20 2.46 136.73 -.21 3.88 106.20 +.06 0.64 50.01 +.01 5.15 110.30 +.26 1.35 45.85 -.04 5.59 107.45 -.09 1.20 70.94 -.03 0.64 46.48 -.65 1.18 53.58 -.59 1.27 64.71 -.17 3.99 93.64 +.15 3.22 94.20 -.02 0.80 84.05 -.01 1.42 63.87 +.41 0.91 49.19 -.08 0.59 62.89 -.19 1.59 111.95 -.29 1.00 100.80 -.59 7.54 92.23 -.04 0.51 108.12 +.67 1.90 74.47 +.17 1.25 70.40 -.05 0.60 113.41 -.57 0.76 62.34 -.12 1.18 75.92 -.13 1.24 75.83 -.76 2.76 104.76 -.01 0.53 97.47 -1.35 0.89 85.38 -1.01 2.90 39.78 -.07 0.72 24.43 -.11 1.98 62.16 -.01 0.07 13.34 -.18 0.61 59.37 -.17 0.74 74.85 -.64 0.93 83.52 -.43 0.92 41.93 +.09 0.24 65.30 -1.75 9.44 -.18 1.00 57.40 -.39 72.25 +.51 23.83 -.66 5.17 +.09 3.64 +.18 1.27 +.01 1.36 58.03 -.38 71.21 +.23 9.63 -.64 35.85 +.77 21.31 -.52 13.58 +.22 3.90 -.33 27.35 -.03 9.78 -.16 0.44 51.92 -.94 18.26 -.22 3.87 31.16 -.35 11.59 -.31 2.82 40.85 +.03 7.53 -.29 8.74 -.26 54.93 -1.08 1.35 65.42 +.24 0.48 50.45 -.05 18.94 +.21 4.18 +.03 0.57 9.81 +.04 21.67 +.09 2.00 7.17 -.18 25.02 -.29 4.98 -.01 21.52 +.03 8.00 -.14 2.72 52.48 +.12 0.72 22.91 -.24 0.40 17.52 -.02 118.20 -2.15 0.40 45.62 -.67 0.08 18.68 +.04 43.78 -.86 7.54 -.56 3.00 172.15 +1.57 14.43 +3.40 1.08 63.31 -.21 0.24 17.47 -.22 1.05 32.29 +1.41 34.29 -.27 9.09 -.63 61.83 -1.77 0.24 11.40 -.35 0.48 14.70 -.07 30.63 -1.13 33.83 -.43 55.12 -.44 354.18 +4.48 0.49 25.15 +.28 3.71 22.79 +.05 0.29 5.17 -.02 17.01 -.10 0.69 9.35 -.06 7.76 -.07 0.75 32.20 +.35 14.40 -.22 9.14 -.24 21.39 +1.57 0.67 23.52 -.22 54.16 -.27 2.75 -.07 1.48 26.16 -.12 16.20 -.14 6.68 -.17 32.58 -.19 20.83 -.01 1.00 45.18 -.45 1.78 38.65 -.55 0.28 20.29 +.45 0.42 33.70 -.27 20.30 -.35 .35 -.18 48.67 -.94 5.35 -.24 2.39 -.09 23.98 +.66 0.20 12.14 -.03 0.35 35.96 -.43 32.48 +.57 0.30 23.98 -.19 5.71 +.05 27.11 -.04 .98 -.00 2.28 66.21 +.49 0.64 40.69 -.31 0.20 13.27 -.36 0.30 101.32 -1.06 1.24 +.06 50.82 -1.60 0.70 100.88 -.07 37.59 -.74 0.08 0.53 0.15 0.54 1.20

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2.80 87.74 11.83 15.44 9.97 0.85 6.40 1.00 28.69 0.56 16.20 0.65 23.92 3.53 11.44 8.16 0.94 7.98 0.55 6.23 0.53 6.72 8.70 13.01 12.97 8.30 0.60 26.27 3.18 0.88 71.71 35.36 2.00 52.77 1.80 35.28 25.54 0.20 24.18 1.98 51.79 3.08 60.02 6.22 6.24 1.00 51.82 7.77 3.74 26.97 0.24 2.45 0.08 21.91 4.43 0.74 66.64 0.52 18.39 1.00 53.41 .58 0.40 60.12 0.18 40.78 2.93 39.74 0.33 56.34 0.27 31.75 0.19 50.85 0.36 22.67 2.68 50.18 0.35 35.50 0.84 30.60 0.04 8.14 3.61 1.60 90.92 15.29 0.30 13.51 0.75 34.37 0.24 67.71 21.93 0.60 275.29 0.92 26.70 0.84 27.15 2.85 1.12 49.08 23.19 2.44 78.64

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Nm McGrwH McKesson McMoRn MeadJohn MdbkIns MeadWvco Mechel MedAssets MedcoHlth MedProp MediCo Medicis Medifast Medivation Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn Mellanox MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck MercGn Meredith MergeHlth MeritMed Meritage Meritor Metalico Methanx MetLife MetroPCS MetroHlth MettlerT Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvisn MdwGold g MillerEnR Millicom MincoG g MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g MinesMgt MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileMini MobileTel s ModusLink Mohawk Molex MolsCoorB Molycorp n Momenta MoneyGrm MonPwSys Monotype MonroMf s Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MSEMDDbt MorgHtl Mosaic MotrlaSol n MotrlaMo n Motricity n Move Inc Mueller MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NIC Inc NICESys NII Hldg NN Inc NPS Phm NRG Egy NV Energy NXP Sem n NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NasdOMX NBkGreece NatFuGas NatInstr s NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NatResPtrs NavigCons Navios NaviosMar Navistar NektarTh NeoStem Neoprobe NetLogicM NetApp Netease Netflix NtScout NetSolTch NetSpend n NetSuite NetwkEng Neurcrine NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NewEnSys NwGold g NY&Co NY CmtyB NY Times Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes Newport NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NextEraEn NiSource Nicor NielsenH n NikeB 99 Cents NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura Noranda n NordicAm Nordion g Nordson s Nordstrm NorflkSo NA Pall g NoWestCp NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax Novlus NovoNord NSTAR NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NuPathe n NutriSyst NuvMuVal NvMulSI&G NvMSI&G2 Nvidia OCZ Tech OGE Engy

D 1.00 40.38 -.09 0.72 83.10 +.09 18.49 +.18 1.04 65.68 -1.20 0.16 10.24 1.00 33.92 +.23 28.14 -.43 16.05 +.03 60.20 +.87 0.80 12.32 -.02 15.43 -.27 0.32 36.60 +1.14 19.70 -.05 23.35 -1.35 71.75 +.83 0.90 42.37 +.62 10.78 +.04 28.50 -1.04 0.48 27.46 -.43 14.39 -.36 0.32 92.20 +.80 12.10 -.07 1.52 36.31 +.36 2.40 40.59 +.85 1.02 32.91 -.51 4.76 -.17 23.50 +.18 23.06 -.85 17.29 +.08 6.04 -.30 0.68 31.88 -.42 0.74 46.49 -.30 16.48 -.35 4.09 -.13 191.95 +4.55 0.14 12.60 -.21 1.38 40.63 -.41 6.80 +.04 11.24 -.08 51.86 -.16 23.65 +.05 0.64 25.66 -.26 1.61 +.05 1.99 -.10 5.56 -.21 6.00 108.91 +.57 2.41 -.15 0.30 27.50 +.77 8.73 -.29 15.69 -1.07 2.74 -.17 4.80 +.03 3.30 +.11 25.25 +.34 21.47 +.32 5.22 -.02 61.60 +1.56 0.70 26.48 -.52 1.12 48.40 -.35 71.52 -1.78 19.17 +.31 3.76 -.20 16.72 -.26 12.87 -.73 0.32 29.55 -.83 1.12 66.98 -1.06 16.77 +.36 0.40 18.20 +.11 0.56 38.98 -.16 0.20 26.03 -.12 1.20 17.48 +.08 8.52 -.13 0.20 73.51 -1.35 45.59 -.29 25.29 -.77 13.12 -.23 2.31 -.08 0.40 39.09 -.03 0.07 4.35 -.05 1.10 76.37 -1.11 24.84 -.08 21.52 +.08 19.56 -.25 40.77 -.98 1.80 18.80 +.12 0.25 12.70 -.16 37.12 -1.02 41.21 -.40 19.01 +1.48 10.45 +.08 24.12 -.08 0.48 15.23 +.04 33.04 -.36 1.20 40.40 +.35 29.86 -.78 0.14 29.17 -.04 15.84 -.33 27.14 +.02 0.29 1.55 -.04 1.38 72.25 -1.05 0.40 30.22 -.10 0.44 74.73 -1.96 0.04 7.97 -.24 1.52 26.34 0.40 24.12 1.92 44.35 +.55 2.16 34.09 -.32 11.30 -.35 0.24 5.31 +.02 1.72 21.14 -.16 69.00 -.52 10.36 -.02 1.94 -.04 4.94 +.09 43.28 +.15 51.70 -.41 49.73 +.45 237.19 +4.52 24.62 -.97 1.73 -.02 11.39 -.22 33.77 -.84 1.76 -.02 7.64 -.05 14.97 -.32 6.18 -.33 .05 -.00 3.51 -.16 10.83 -.41 5.89 -.25 1.00 16.58 -.02 8.05 -.08 6.21 -.10 0.20 18.66 -.40 70.08 -.72 0.80 57.57 -1.04 9.55 +.52 18.54 -.19 0.15 17.84 +.02 0.15 18.84 -.06 0.20 26.71 +.28 2.20 56.60 +.03 0.92 19.52 +.07 1.86 55.15 -.28 29.83 -.06 1.24 82.24 -.08 20.05 -.11 0.98 42.06 -.95 0.72 93.35 -2.92 0.55 9.24 +.01 5.13 +.03 17.43 +.44 1.70 23.07 +.09 12.11 +.39 0.42 55.43 -1.54 0.92 47.74 +.19 1.60 74.61 -.07 6.13 -.30 1.44 32.79 +.24 1.10 35.67 +.07 13.79 +.20 23.50 -.26 1.12 49.16 -.83 2.84 -.18 2.00 64.17 +.56 0.40 5.17 +.12 0.44 12.48 -.10 12.06 -.79 2.53 59.36 +.19 6.10 -.10 2.51 -.06 31.28 -.82 1.82 129.64 +2.25 1.70 46.43 +.13 0.54 32.58 +.49 30.39 -.50 20.42 -.28 1.45 45.65 -1.31 7.99 -.61 0.70 15.02 -.02 0.47 9.06 0.72 8.83 -.10 0.76 9.15 -.05 19.73 -.27 7.90 -.30 1.50 53.00 -.17

OReillyAu OasisPet n OcciPet Oceaneer OceanFr rs Och-Ziff Oclaro OcwenFn OdysMar OfficeDpt OfficeMax OilSvHT OilStates Oilsands g OldDomF s OldNBcp OldRepub Olin OmegaHlt Omncre Omnicom OmniVisn h Omnova OnAssign OnSmcnd Oncothyr ONEOK OnlineRes OnyxPh OpenTxt OpenTable OpnwvSy OpkoHlth Opnext OptimerPh optXprs Oracle OrbitalSci Orexigen OrientEH OriginAg Orthovta OshkoshCp OvShip OwensMin OwensCorn OwensIll Oxigne rsh PDL Bio PF Chng PG&E Cp PHH Corp PLX Tch PMC Sra PMI Grp PNC PNM Res POSCO PPG PPL Corp PSS Wrld Paccar PacerIntl PacBiosci n PacEth h PacSunwr PackAmer PaetecHld PainTher PallCorp PanASlv Panasonic PaneraBrd ParPharm ParagShip ParamTc h ParaG&S Parexel ParkDrl ParkerHan PrtnrCm PartnerRe PatriotCoal Patterson PattUTI Paychex PeabdyE Pebblebrk Pengrth g PnnNGm PennVa PennVaRs PennWst g PennantPk Penney PenRE Penske Pentair PeopUtdF PepBoy PepcoHold PepsiCo PeregrineP PerfectWld PerkElm Perrigo Petrohawk PetrbrsA Petrobras PtroqstE PetsMart Pfizer PhrmAth PhmHTr PharmPdt Pharmacyc Pharmasset Pharmerica PhilipMor PhilipsEl PhlVH PhnxCos PhotrIn PiedmOfc Pier 1 PilgrimsP PimcoHiI PinnclEnt PinnaclFn PinWst PionDrill PioNtrl PitnyBw PlainsAA PlainsEx Plantron PlatGpMet PlatUnd PlugPwr h PlumCrk PluristemT Polaris Polo RL Polycom PolyOne Polypore Pool Corp Popular PortGE PositvID h PostPrp Potash s PwrInteg Power-One PSCrudeDS PwshDB PS Engy PS PrcMet PS Silver PS Agri PS Oil PS BasMet PS USDBull PS USDBear PSAerDef PwSSemi PSFinPf PS US1K PSETecLd PS SC HCre PSHYCpBd PwShPfd PShEMSov PwShs QQQ Powrwav Praxair PrecCastpt PrecDrill PriceTR priceline PrideIntl Primerica PrinctnR h PrinFncl PrivateB ProShtDow ProShtQQQ ProShtS&P PrUShS&P ProUltDow PrUlShDow ProUltQQQ PrUShQQQ rs ProUltSP PrUShtFn rs ProUShL20 ProUltSEM ProUltSRE ProUltSOG ProUltSBM ProUltRE ProUltFin PrUPShQQQ ProUPShD30 ProUltO&G ProUBasM ProShtR2K PrUltPQQQ s ProUltR2K ProUSSP500 PrUltSP500 s ProSUltGold ProUSSlv rs PrUltCrde rs PrUShCrde rs ProUltSGld ProSUltSilv ProUltShYen ProUShEuro ProctGam ProgrssEn ProgrsSft s ProgsvCp ProLogis ProUSR2K rs ProspctCap ProtLife ProvEn g Prudentl PSEG PubStrg

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Maguire

A: Q: A:

With the reins threaded through the brass rings, The Collar, one of Shari Maguire’s inventions, can be used as a training aid.

Continued from B1 Finally, a broker she contacted found the company in China and persuaded it to send the shipment of 500 StoStics in 2008. But the company’s shipping method added $1,500 to the total cost, she said. When the StoStics arrived, half of them were broken. Many would not extend correctly, Maguire said. In the end, each cost her $14, which was $6 more than the manufacturer originally quoted. A first attempt to sell them for $40 each did not work. So she’s selling them for $10 each through the Rolling M Ranch website and taking the loss. Made out of graphite, each StoStic weighs 3.5 ounces. When collapsed, it fits in a back pocket. StoStics can also be used in dog and livestock training, Maguire said, or for security by people who like to stroll. Unlike the StoStic, The Collar was not designed from scratch. Maguire based it on an old horse-training tool she used years ago.

Q: A:

What was the biggest problem? Communications, to say the least, was difficult. Sometimes the e-mail would come back in Chinese. Every time the dollar would drop behind the yuan, they would change the price on the agreement.

Taxes Continued from B1 As Congress wrestles with how to get the deficit under control, one big point of contention is whether spending cuts will need to be accompanied by an increase in taxes on some individuals or businesses. Facing a full-court press from business leaders who say the tax system is outdated and onerous, President Barack Obama, Congress and business leaders have been warily negotiating various proposals, though mostly about whether to cut the top corporate rate and to tighten tax laws and not about whether to increase revenue. The United States is virtually alone in trying to tax its multinational corporations on their foreign earnings, but it allows companies to avoid those taxes indefinitely by keeping profits overseas. That encourages companies to use accounting maneuvers to shift profits to low-tax countries and to invest profits

Q: A:

How did you come up with the idea for the StoStic? When I first got started doing the trail clinics, I was watching some of the people who could not hold the stick, the horse and the lead rope at the same time. I thought of something I could put in my pocket. (After considering various products,) I just thought, ‘Oh yeah,’ a telescope, (like) a telescoping whip.

offshore, says David Miller, a partner at Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft in New York. In addition to being complex and uneven, the U.S. corporate tax code is inefficient and has become a diminishing source of revenue. Corporate taxes accounted for about 9 percent of all federal revenue in 2010. At $191 billion, they were equal to 1.3 percent of the nation’s gross domestic product. Most industrial countries collect more from companies, about 2.5 percent of output. Only a portion of that disparity can be explained by the many types of businesses in the United States that elect to be taxed at an individual rate. “Whether the test is fairness or efficiency, the U.S. system gets really low marks,” said Michelle Hanlon, an MIT professor who says the country needs to completely revamp the way it taxes corporations. Not all U.S. companies are willing or able to reduce their taxes drastically. Taxes vary more by industry here than abroad,

according to a study released in February by Kevin Markle of Dartmouth and Douglas Shackelford of the University of North Carolina. At the high end, U.S. retailers paid 31 percent in total income taxes, construction 30 percent and manufacturers 26 percent. Financial services companies paid an average of 20 percent, real estate 19 percent and mining 6 percent. (Measuring taxes paid by companies is imprecise because tax filings remain private. In many cases, the estimates reported in a company’s financial filings with regulators overstate taxes paid in a year because they include deferred taxes. Nonetheless, academics, economists and elected officials use the estimates for comparative purposes.) Because some companies are so effective at minimizing taxes, the average works out to far less than the official rate. U.S. companies pay about a quarter of their profits in federal income taxes, a few percentage points higher than the rate paid by companies

Q: A: Q:

Chrysler

In China.

But not completely? You could do it again? If I could find somebody to help me here, I probably could.

Rob Kerr The Bulletin

The horse’s reins are threaded through brass rings on The Collar, which prevents riders from jerking the horse’s head up in the air if they pull back too much. When The Collar is not in use as a training aid, the reins can be removed from the rings and The Collar becomes simply a “pretty, fashionable” breast collar, she said. An Amish harness maker in Pennsylvania made the prototypes, Maguire said, but he charges too much to make them in large quantities. So she plans to have them made to order, selling them for $85 each. They can be found at Riding in Style in Tumalo, Maguire said.

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 3, 2011 B5

Q: A:

Why did you have The Collar made in Pennsylvania? I couldn’t find anybody in Oregon who would manufacture it. I would rather keep the money and the product here in Oregon.

Q: A:

What did you think when they finally arrived from China? I was sick to my stomach. It was just sad.

How do you feel about selling the products? I like to make things. I really don’t like to market

them. Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@ bendbulletin.com.

So that soured you on manufacturing?

in most other major industrial countries, according to a number of studies and tax experts. Assorted proposals being discussed in Washington call for the rate to be lowered officially to about 25 percent and some tax breaks to be eliminated so that revenue remains unchanged. But some prominent business leaders, including the chief executive of Procter & Gamble, are pushing for the rate to be reduced without reining in tax shelters. That would make the United States virtually the only country to change corporate taxes in recent years in a way that ended up adding to its deficit. “One fact we know is that in all of the countries that have lowered their corporate rates in recent years, they still collected the same amount in revenues or more,” said Reuven Avi-Yonah, an international tax lawyer who teaches at the University of Michigan. “This means that they were broadening the base of the profits that corporations were actually taxed on.”

Continued from B1 At the same time, car sales are rising as the economy improves. Detroit is also taking away customers from Toyota Motor Corp., which was hurt by safety recalls last year and the recent Japanese earthquake. The results are a triumph for Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne, who bet that he could remake the company the same way he turned around Italian automaker Fiat SpA six years ago. But he remains wary of declaring victory. “Success is incredibly temporary. The first quarter is done, but we’ve got a lot of quarters to do,” he said. Marchionne said Chrysler expects to earn between $200 million and $500 million this year. That would help the company reach its goal of having a public offering later this year or early next. Investors want to see a string of profitable quarters before the IPO happens. Chrysler’s sales rose 18 percent worldwide in the first three months of 2011. New models are helping. U.S. sales of the revamped Jeep Grand Cherokee SUV jumped 64 percent in the latest quarter. Sales of the Chrysler 200 sedan more than quadrupled over those of its predecessor, the Sebring. The 200 has better materials, handling and fresher styling than the Sebring, which Consumer Reports rated the least reliable family car among 2009 models. Buyers also paid more for Chrysler’s vehicles. The average price paid per vehicle rose $1,000 to $28,300. Chrysler cut its spending on incentives and reduced the number of ve-

hicles going into low-profit rental fleets. Profit margins more than doubled to 3.6 percent. GM, Ford and Chrysler all reported profits in the last quarter of 2004, but GM and Ford were soon posting billions in losses. Chrysler last reported net income in the second quarter of 2006, one year before it was sold by Daimler AG to private-equity firm Cerberus Capital Management. Cerberus, which was looking for a quick turnaround, didn’t invest the cash needed to weather the worst auto sales decline in more than 25 years. As a result, Chrysler came close to running out of money at the end of 2008. The U.S. government stepped in, authorizing $10 billion in aid and appointing Marchionne to run the company after it emerged from bankruptcy protection in June 2009. The U.S. government remains a part owner of Chrysler, holding an 8.6 percent stake. Chrysler wants to sever those ties. The company will soon repay $7.5 billion of the bailout from the U.S. and Canadian governments using a new, $3.5 billion bank loan, a $1.5 billion credit facility and a $2.5 billion debt offering. By repaying the debt, Chrysler will save millions in interest payments. The U.S. government is also expected to recoup some of the bailout money when it sells its stock in the public offering. Marchionne said the company has improved fuel economy by a combined 40 percent on its 2011 models. It also plans a significant shift to more efficient engines over the next three years, using technology from its partner Fiat.

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... 1.10f .04 .36 1.68 ... .80f .88f .96f ... .24 .32 .22 .72 .04 .42 ... ... .65 ... .64

9 15 22 12 18 ... 23 28 26 91 23 10 ... 11 12 14 15 ... 18 65 6

65.41 -.46 +15.4 24.41 +.06 +8.4 12.34 +.06 -7.5 16.46 +.34 +5.9 79.53 -.25 +21.9 9.25 -.08 +9.5 44.29 -1.51 -6.3 66.97 -1.02 +11.1 81.04 +.15 +12.2 9.12 -.07 +23.4 35.25 +.03 +18.5 40.08 -.29 -4.8 11.70 -.45 -4.6 22.91 -.24 +8.9 8.71 +.04 -1.6 24.09 -.22 +7.7 6.92 +.13 +14.2 9.00 -.30 -4.9 23.92 +.03 +18.0 14.39 -.36 +19.9 25.66 -.26 -8.1

Name

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

1.24 .92f 1.74 ... .48a ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.46 .86f .52 ... .20 .50f .24 .48f ... .60

20 17 17 16 33 ... 42 23 15 16 18 10 26 12 40 13 13 12 36 ...

82.24 -.08 -3.7 47.74 +.19 +12.6 45.99 -.25 -1.0 10.00 +.04 -43.5 53.08 -.03 -7.4 2.55 +.09 +23.2 42.92 -.17 +14.6 153.91 -.61 +10.6 24.20 -.11 +7.6 60.30 -1.77 -9.2 82.97 +.68 -.9 42.83 -.27 -5.1 36.68 +.48 +14.2 13.40 -.36 +14.6 11.46 -.16 -5.9 25.68 -.14 -4.8 16.02 -.07 -5.3 29.13 +.02 -6.0 3.57 -.01 +26.6 22.60 -.41 +19.4

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1557.00 $1556.70 $46.078

Market recap

Pvs Day $1559.50 $1556.00 $48.584

Prime rate Time period

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

Citigrp iShSilver Intl Coal S&P500ETF BkofAm

2806634 1778219 1382338 1168200 855942

4.49 -.10 42.83 -4.05 14.43 +3.40 136.22 -.21 12.34 +.06

Gainers ($2 or more) Name Intl Coal ProUSSlv rs NL Inds DB BGSC iP SER2K

Last 14.43 15.90 15.99 14.10 22.76

Chg %Chg +3.40 +2.26 +1.75 +1.37 +2.11

+30.8 +16.6 +12.3 +10.8 +10.2

Losers ($2 or more) Name Goldcp wt ProSUltSilv FMajSilv g SprottSilv SilvrcpM g

Last

Indexes

Most Active ($1 or more) Name CFCda g NovaGld g KodiakO g GtPanSilv g MdwGold g

Last Chg

71572 22.59 -1.96 65389 12.06 -.79 46064 6.75 -.27 42174 3.31 -.31 33714 1.99 -.10

Gainers ($2 or more) Name Vringo n RobertsRlt RennGEnt HallwdGp ASpecRlt s

Last

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

SiriusXM Microsoft Intel PwShs QQQ Cisco

1454053 819987 712349 462084 460641

1.91 25.66 22.91 58.97 17.58

-.08 -.26 -.24 -.11 +.06

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

2.05 +.38 +22.8 2.05 +.18 +9.8 2.53 +.21 +9.1 24.01 +1.90 +8.6 18.24 +1.20 +7.0

Name

Last

Volcom DishNetwk FstUtdCp GenMark n Sonesta

Chg %Chg

24.40 +4.67 +23.7 29.79 +4.75 +19.0 4.00 +.52 +14.9 5.74 +.72 +14.3 21.93 +2.68 +13.9

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

-28.1 -17.4 -10.8 -10.4 -9.5

Quepasa AlmadnM g GenMoly ClaudeR g GtPanSilv g

7.45 -1.08 -12.7 4.34 -.59 -12.0 4.62 -.50 -9.8 2.18 -.23 -9.4 3.31 -.31 -8.6

1,251 1,778 126 3,155 337 11

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Vol (00)

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

5.45 -2.13 296.50 -62.46 18.71 -2.27 19.48 -2.25 12.30 -1.29

Nasdaq

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

Sky-mobi n SifyTech SynthEngy Rdiff.cm PacBiosci n

Diary

17.05 6.75 3.31 14.22 10.65

Chg %Chg -4.62 -1.50 -.70 -2.21 -1.65

-21.3 -18.2 -17.5 -13.5 -13.4

Diary 195 286 31 512 25 2

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

834 1,813 91 2,738 178 26

12,832.83 5,551.31 429.42 8,678.10 2,486.61 2,876.83 1,364.56 14,506.58 866.90

9,614.32 3,872.64 346.95 6,355.83 1,689.19 2,061.14 1,010.91 15.80 587.66

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

12,807.36 5,507.77 428.55 8,649.61 2,454.96 2,864.08 1,361.22 14,450.10 854.77

-3.18 -7.10 -.51 -21.80 -28.09 -9.46 -2.39 -45.33 -10.52

YTD %Chg %Chg -.02 -.13 -.12 -.25 -1.13 -.33 -.18 -.31 -1.22

52-wk %Chg

+10.62 +7.85 +5.82 +8.61 +11.17 +7.96 +8.24 +8.16 +9.08

+14.85 +14.60 +9.11 +14.67 +27.34 +14.62 +13.22 +14.23 +16.64

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Monday.

Key currency exchange rates Monday compared with late Friday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

361.56 2,768.25 4,108.77 6,069.90 7,527.64 23,720.81 36,592.61 22,397.70 3,497.86 10,004.20 2,228.96 3,179.86 4,896.20 6,019.20

+.45 s ... +.04 s +.03 s +.18 s -.36 t -1.00 t -.09 t -.61 t +1.57 s +1.67 s -.16 t -.06 t +.10 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

1.0958 1.6683 1.0530 .002165 .1540 1.4846 .1288 .012300 .086927 .0366 .000937 .1663 1.1572 .0348

1.0971 1.6711 1.0571 .002171 .1540 1.4839 .1288 .012330 .086940 .0365 .000937 .1659 1.1576 .0349

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 21.06 -0.03 +8.0 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 19.99 -0.03 +7.9 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.66 +6.6 GrowthI 27.96 -0.04 +8.2 Ultra 24.63 +8.7 American Funds A: AmcpA p 20.39 +8.3 AMutlA p 27.21 +0.01 +8.1 BalA p 19.07 +0.01 +6.9 BondA p 12.32 +0.01 +2.2 CapIBA p 53.07 +7.3 CapWGA p 38.88 +0.03 +9.3 CapWA p 21.19 +0.01 +4.7 EupacA p 45.12 +0.10 +9.1 FdInvA p 40.14 -0.02 +9.7 GovtA p 13.97 +0.01 +1.1 GwthA p 32.90 -0.03 +8.1 HI TrA p 11.60 +5.3 IncoA p 17.73 -0.01 +8.2 IntBdA p 13.48 +1.2 ICAA p 30.10 -0.02 +7.4 NEcoA p 27.48 +8.5 N PerA p 31.04 +0.04 +8.5 NwWrldA 57.43 +0.02 +5.2 SmCpA p 41.47 -0.14 +6.7 TxExA p 11.86 +1.7 WshA p 29.67 +0.01 +9.7 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 32.31 +0.07 +7.2 IntEqII I r 13.38 +0.04 +7.4 Artisan Funds: Intl 24.23 +11.7 IntlVal r 29.31 +0.05 +8.1 MidCap 37.16 -0.15 +10.5 MidCapVal 22.76 +0.01 +13.3 Baron Funds: Growth 56.89 -0.33 +11.0 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.89 +0.01 +2.5 DivMu 14.36 +1.8

TxMgdIntl 16.74 +0.02 +6.4 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 19.11 -0.01 +9.5 GlAlA r 20.71 -0.04 +6.6 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 19.30 -0.04 +6.4 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 19.14 -0.02 +9.5 GlbAlloc r 20.82 -0.04 +6.8 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 58.42 -0.28 +9.4 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 32.06 -0.24 +9.6 DivEqInc 10.93 -0.03 +8.5 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 33.13 -0.25 +9.7 AcornIntZ 43.74 -0.08 +6.9 ValRestr 53.93 -0.25 +6.9 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 10.13 -0.06 +8.5 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 12.31 -0.02 +9.6 USCorEq2 12.01 -0.06 +9.7 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 36.81 -0.09 +7.2 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 37.22 -0.10 +7.3 NYVen C 35.51 -0.09 +6.9 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.35 +0.01 +3.1 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 23.14 -0.03 +4.4 EmMktV 37.63 -0.09 +4.1 IntSmVa 18.91 -0.03 +9.9 LargeCo 10.75 -0.01 +8.9 USLgVa 22.45 -0.03 +11.9 US Micro 14.91 -0.22 +8.3 US Small 23.48 -0.28 +10.0 US SmVa 27.82 -0.35 +8.8 IntlSmCo 18.68 -0.05 +8.8 Fixd 10.35 +0.4 IntVa 20.21 +10.3 Glb5FxInc 11.05 +1.6 2YGlFxd 10.19 +0.4 Dodge&Cox:

Balanced 75.65 +0.08 +8.3 Income 13.44 +0.01 +2.7 IntlStk 38.80 +0.06 +8.7 Stock 118.20 +0.11 +10.1 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.02 +0.01 +3.6 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 19.24 -0.02 +5.8 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.10 +2.9 GblMacAbR 10.25 NA LgCapVal 19.30 -0.02 +5.9 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.93 +0.02 +8.5 FPA Funds: FPACres 28.71 +7.2 Fairholme 34.43 -0.18 -3.2 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 21.33 -0.07 +7.0 StrInA 12.72 +0.01 +4.6 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 21.55 -0.07 +7.2 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 14.40 -0.02 +6.0 FF2015 12.03 -0.02 +6.1 FF2020 14.73 -0.02 +6.8 FF2020K 14.09 -0.03 +6.8 FF2025 12.38 -0.02 +7.5 FF2030 14.83 -0.03 +7.7 FF2030K 14.65 -0.04 +7.7 FF2035 12.42 -0.03 +8.3 FF2040 8.68 -0.03 +8.4 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 13.48 -0.03 +9.0 AMgr50 16.25 -0.02 +5.7 Balanc 19.37 -0.03 +6.6 BalancedK 19.37 -0.02 +6.6 BlueChGr 49.42 -0.22 +9.0 Canada 62.76 -0.56 +7.9 CapAp 27.26 -0.07 +7.6 CpInc r 9.94 -0.01 +7.2 Contra 72.65 -0.26 +7.4 ContraK 72.65 -0.26 +7.4 DisEq 24.92 -0.04 +10.6 DivIntl 32.83 -0.02 +8.9

DivrsIntK r 32.82 DivGth 30.86 EmrMk 27.86 Eq Inc 48.02 EQII 19.80 Fidel 35.64 FltRateHi r 9.90 GNMA 11.57 GovtInc 10.49 GroCo 92.88 GroInc 19.72 GrowthCoK 92.87 HighInc r 9.24 Indepn 26.56 IntBd 10.66 IntlDisc 35.82 InvGrBd 11.53 InvGB 7.50 LgCapVal 12.52 LatAm 59.75 LevCoStk 31.52 LowP r 42.48 LowPriK r 42.48 Magelln 76.87 MidCap 31.62 MuniInc 12.35 NwMkt r 15.79 OTC 62.04 100Index 9.43 Ovrsea 35.52 Puritn 19.12 SCmdtyStrt 13.48 SrsIntGrw 12.24 SrsIntVal 11.02 SrInvGrdF 11.53 STBF 8.50 SmllCpS r 21.58 StratInc 11.38 StrReRt r 10.09 TotalBd 10.87 USBI 11.42 Value 75.56 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 51.29

-0.02 +9.0 -0.18 +8.5 +0.02 +5.7 -0.09 +8.8 -0.04 +8.8 -0.12 +10.9 +2.0 +2.0 +0.01 +1.3 -0.65 +11.7 -0.03 +8.0 -0.64 +11.8 +0.01 +5.4 -0.19 +9.1 +2.1 -0.01 +8.4 +0.01 +2.1 +2.5 -0.02 +9.2 -0.50 +1.2 -0.07 +10.9 -0.09 +10.7 -0.08 +10.7 -0.59 +7.3 -0.16 +9.6 +2.1 +0.02 +2.8 -0.26 +12.9 -0.02 +7.9 -0.04 +9.4 -0.06 +7.1 -0.14 +6.6 -0.02 +8.4 +0.01 +10.9 +2.1 +1.0 -0.12 +10.1 +0.01 +4.6 -0.02 +5.8 +2.6 +0.01 +1.8 -0.31 +10.0 -1.40 +0.4

Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 41.58 -0.29 +10.3 500IdxInv 48.22 -0.09 +8.8 IntlInxInv 38.58 +0.05 +10.1 TotMktInv 39.66 -0.11 +9.2 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 48.22 -0.09 +8.8 TotMktAd r 39.66 -0.11 +9.2 First Eagle: GlblA 49.61 +0.02 +7.0 OverseasA 24.05 +0.06 +6.1 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA px 11.43 -0.04 +2.5 FoundAl p 11.42 -0.01 +9.2 HYTFA p 9.65 +1.9 IncomA px 2.29 -0.01 +7.8 USGovA px 6.76 -0.02 +1.7 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 14.04 +0.01 +5.2 IncmeAd x 2.27 -0.02 +7.4 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC tx 2.31 -0.01 +7.5 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 22.25 +0.03 +7.8 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 7.89 +0.02 +13.0 GlBd A p 14.08 +0.01 +5.1 GrwthA p 20.04 +0.03 +12.6 WorldA p 16.39 +0.01 +10.4 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 14.10 +0.01 +4.9 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 43.36 -0.04 +7.8 GMO Trust III: Quality 21.78 +0.03 +8.9 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 15.81 +8.3 Quality 21.79 +0.04 +8.9 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 39.04 +0.09 +8.7 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.48 +0.01 +5.2 MidCapV 39.36 +0.08 +8.9 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.34 +2.8

CapApInst 39.95 -0.05 +8.8 IntlInv t 66.63 -0.11 +11.0 Intl r 67.32 -0.10 +11.2 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 36.45 -0.02 +5.3 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 36.48 -0.03 +5.3 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 45.62 -0.05 +7.7 Div&Gr 21.31 +0.01 +9.3 TotRetBd 11.17 +0.01 +2.5 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.12 +0.04 -1.4 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r 17.83 +0.02 +6.6 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 17.58 -0.02 +8.7 CmstkA 17.20 +9.7 EqIncA 9.17 +7.2 GrIncA p 20.84 -0.02 +8.7 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 26.14 -0.08 +10.2 AssetStA p 26.97 -0.08 +10.5 AssetStrI r 27.21 -0.08 +10.6 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.52 NA JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.52 NA HighYld 8.38 NA IntmTFBd 10.86 +2.0 ShtDurBd 10.99 NA USLCCrPls 22.09 -0.02 +6.9 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 50.97 +0.04 +0.7 PrkMCVal T 24.59 -0.07 +8.9 Twenty T 68.74 -0.25 +4.6 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.71 -0.02 +6.7 LSGrwth 13.82 -0.03 +7.6 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 22.42 +2.9 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 22.82 +2.8 Longleaf Partners: Partners 31.30 -0.01 +10.8

Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.98 -0.01 +6.8 StrInc C 15.65 -0.01 +6.9 LSBondR 14.93 +6.8 StrIncA 15.57 +7.2 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY x 12.51 -0.05 +4.9 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 12.38 -0.02 +7.1 BdDebA p 8.12 +0.01 +6.0 ShDurIncA p 4.62 +1.9 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.65 +1.6 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.84 -0.01 +6.0 ValueA 24.78 +0.01 +8.9 MFS Funds I: ValueI 24.89 +0.01 +9.0 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 9.61 -0.01 +11.6 Matthews Asian: PacTgrInv 24.40 +0.11 +4.1 MergerFd 16.27 +0.02 +3.1 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.50 +0.01 +2.6 TotRtBdI 10.49 +2.7 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 42.46 -0.21 +13.7 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 31.31 +0.03 +7.3 GlbDiscZ 31.71 +0.04 +7.4 QuestZ 18.91 +0.03 +6.9 SharesZ 22.43 +0.02 +7.9 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 51.34 -0.48 +11.7 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 53.17 -0.50 +11.6 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.54 +0.01 +5.7 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 29.68 +0.01 +7.0 Intl I r 21.01 +0.12 +8.2 Oakmark r 45.24 +9.5 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 8.32 +7.9

GlbSMdCap 16.93 -0.02 +9.4 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 37.36 -0.06 +2.4 GlobA p 67.40 -0.02 +11.6 GblStrIncA 4.45 +0.01 +5.9 IntBdA p 6.80 +5.0 MnStFdA 34.13 -0.08 +5.4 RisingDivA 16.87 -0.02 +9.1 S&MdCpVl 35.26 -0.07 +10.0 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 15.29 -0.02 +8.7 S&MdCpVl 30.17 -0.06 +9.7 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 15.23 -0.03 +8.7 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 36.98 -0.07 +2.5 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.03 +2.7 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 11.12 +5.9 AllAsset 12.71 +6.0 ComodRR 10.13 -0.07 +12.0 HiYld 9.53 +0.01 +4.9 InvGrCp 10.75 +0.01 +4.4 LowDu 10.52 +2.1 RealRtnI 11.74 +4.6 ShortT 9.92 +1.0 TotRt 11.03 +2.8 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.74 +4.4 TotRtA 11.03 +2.7 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.03 +2.4 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.03 +2.7 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.03 +2.8 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 49.53 -0.20 +8.1 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 43.83 -0.10 +7.2 Price Funds: BlChip 41.19 -0.04 +8.0 CapApp 21.79 +0.01 +7.3 EmMktS 36.78 -0.03 +4.3

EqInc 25.51 EqIndex 36.70 Growth 34.58 HlthSci 35.97 HiYield 6.99 IntlBond 10.49 IntlStk 15.35 MidCap 65.08 MCapVal 25.68 N Asia 20.12 New Era 56.95 N Horiz 38.00 N Inc 9.55 R2010 16.30 R2015 12.70 R2020 17.64 R2025 12.97 R2030 18.68 R2035 13.26 R2040 18.88 ShtBd 4.86 SmCpStk 38.30 SmCapVal 39.05 SpecIn 12.70 Value 25.59 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 14.68 VoyA p 24.92 Royce Funds: LwPrSkSv r 19.61 PennMuI r 12.86 PremierI r 22.68 TotRetI r 14.16 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 40.55 S&P Sel 21.30 Scout Funds: Intl 35.42 Selected Funds: AmShD 44.43 Sequoia 145.39 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 22.33 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 54.25

-0.02 +8.1 -0.07 +8.8 -0.09 +7.6 +0.07 +18.8 +0.01 +5.6 -0.01 +6.3 +0.01 +7.9 -0.27 +11.2 -0.03 +8.3 +0.13 +4.9 -0.62 +9.2 -0.26 +13.5 +1.8 -0.01 +6.3 -0.02 +6.8 -0.03 +7.3 -0.02 +7.7 -0.03 +8.1 -0.02 +8.4 -0.04 +8.4 +1.0 -0.37 +11.2 -0.48 +8.1 +4.1 -0.04 +9.6 NA -0.05 +5.1 -0.31 +7.5 -0.14 +10.4 -0.27 +11.4 -0.12 +7.7 -0.09 +9.1 -0.03 +8.8 +0.04 +9.4 -0.10 +7.3 -1.47 +12.5 +0.05 +11.4 +0.05 +4.8

Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 30.95 IntValue I 31.63 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 25.26 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 22.59 CAITAdm 10.82 CpOpAdl 82.83 EMAdmr r 41.93 Energy 140.26 ExtdAdm 45.70 500Adml 125.52 GNMA Ad 10.84 GrwAdm 34.04 HlthCr 58.41 HiYldCp 5.86 InfProAd 26.51 ITBdAdml 11.26 ITsryAdml 11.39 IntGrAdm 67.28 ITAdml 13.38 ITGrAdm 9.96 LtdTrAd 11.03 LTGrAdml 9.45 LT Adml 10.71 MCpAdml 102.15 MuHYAdm 10.10 PrmCap r 74.18 ReitAdm r 87.73 STsyAdml 10.72 STBdAdml 10.58 ShtTrAd 15.88 STIGrAd 10.78 SmCAdm 38.62 TtlBAdml 10.65 TStkAdm 34.34 WellslAdm 54.91 WelltnAdm 57.18 Windsor 49.48 WdsrIIAd 50.04 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 26.40 CapOpp 35.85

+0.12 +10.5 +0.11 +10.6 +0.09 +6.0 -0.03 +6.2 +2.4 -0.34 +7.9 -0.07 +5.2 -1.37 +16.0 -0.33 +10.7 -0.22 +8.9 +2.0 -0.07 +8.0 +0.49 +13.9 +5.3 +0.03 +4.5 +2.1 +1.4 -0.10 +9.4 -0.01 +2.1 +2.9 +1.1 +0.02 +3.1 -0.01 +1.8 -0.32 +10.8 +1.6 -0.16 +8.7 +0.07 +12.7 +0.7 +1.1 +0.6 +1.5 -0.35 +11.0 +1.6 -0.10 +9.2 +0.01 +5.4 +0.03 +7.2 -0.06 +8.5 -0.05 +9.8 -0.04 +8.0 -0.15 +7.9

DivdGro 15.66 Energy 74.69 EqInc 22.38 Explr 81.74 GNMA 10.84 GlobEq 19.57 HYCorp 5.86 HlthCre 138.40 InflaPro 13.50 IntlGr 21.14 IntlVal 34.50 ITIGrade 9.96 LifeCon 17.09 LifeGro 23.78 LifeMod 20.82 LTIGrade 9.45 Morg 19.69 MuInt 13.38 PrecMtls r 27.68 PrmcpCor 15.00 Prmcp r 71.48 SelValu r 20.55 STAR 20.34 STIGrade 10.78 StratEq 20.84 TgtRetInc 11.70 TgRe2010 23.52 TgtRe2015 13.16 TgRe2020 23.54 TgtRe2025 13.51 TgRe2030 23.33 TgtRe2035 14.15 TgtRe2040 23.26 TgtRe2045 14.61 USGro 19.95 Wellsly 22.66 Welltn 33.11 Wndsr 14.66 WndsII 28.19 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntAdm r 28.54 TotIntlInst r 114.18 500 125.50 Growth 34.04

+0.03 +8.9 -0.73 +15.9 -0.02 +10.5 -0.53 +12.1 +2.0 -0.01 +9.6 +5.3 +1.15 +13.9 +0.02 +4.5 -0.03 +9.3 +7.3 +2.9 -0.01 +4.9 -0.05 +7.8 -0.03 +6.4 +0.02 +3.1 -0.05 +9.2 -0.01 +2.1 -0.31 +3.7 -0.02 +8.9 -0.15 +8.6 -0.06 +9.5 -0.01 +6.6 +1.4 -0.12 +13.8 -0.01 +4.3 -0.02 +5.4 -0.02 +6.0 -0.03 +6.5 -0.02 +7.1 -0.04 +7.6 -0.03 +8.1 -0.05 +8.2 -0.03 +8.2 -0.05 +9.3 +5.3 +0.02 +7.1 -0.02 +8.5 -0.03 +9.8

MidCap

22.50 -0.07 +10.8

SmCap

38.57 -0.35 +11.0

-0.03 -0.13 -0.22 -0.06

Yacktman Funds:

+8.3 +8.3 +8.8 +8.0

SmlCpGth

24.83 -0.27 +13.3

SmlCpVl

17.39 -0.13 +8.6

STBnd

10.58

+1.0

TotBnd

10.65

+1.6

TotlIntl

17.06 -0.02 +8.2

TotStk

34.33 -0.10 +9.2

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst

10.94 -0.01 +9.6

ExtIn

45.70 -0.33 +10.8

FTAllWldI r GrwthIst InfProInst

101.83 -0.12 +8.5 34.04 -0.07 +8.0 10.80 +0.01 +4.5

InstIdx

124.64 -0.22 +8.9

InsPl

124.65 -0.22 +8.9

InsTStPlus

31.06 -0.08 +9.3

MidCpIst

22.56 -0.08 +10.8

SCInst

38.62 -0.35 +11.1

TBIst

10.65

TSInst

34.35 -0.09 +9.3

+1.6

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

103.68 -0.18 +8.8

STBdIdx

10.58

+1.1

TotBdSgl

10.65

+1.6

TotStkSgl

33.14 -0.10 +9.2

Western Asset: CorePlus I Fund p

10.94

+2.8

18.14 +0.02 +9.7


B USI N ESS

B6 Tuesday, May 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M   BUSINESS CALENDAR

OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. KNOW COMPUTERS FOR BEGINNERS: Introduction to computers, e-mail and the Internet. Reservations encouraged; free; 10:30 a.m.noon; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7080. OREGON CEO SUMMIT: Panelists Bill Chambers, Stahlbush Farms; Ryan Deckert, Oregon Business Association; Larry Mullins, Samaritan Health Services; Jim Piro, Portland General Electric; and Ananthan Thandri, Mentor Graphics, will discuss the role of innovation in creating jobs, growing new markets and developing leaders. Registration due by April 28; $50; noon-3 p.m.; The Governor Hotel, 614 S.W. 11th Ave., Portland; 503-2243400 or http://business.oregonstate .edu/CEOsummit. KNOW WORD FOR BEGINNERS: Reservations encouraged; free; 2-3:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7080. BEGINNING QUICKBOOKS PRO: Two-evening class. Registration required; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. ONLINE MARKETING WITH FACEBOOK AND TWITTER: Two-evening class. Registration required; $69; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. WINDOWS 7 AND OFFICE INFORMATION SESSION: Offered by the Crooked River Ranch-Terrebonne Chamber of Commerce; free; 7 p.m.; Home Federal Bank, 8222 N. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 2110, Terrebonne; 541-9232679 or www.crrchamber.com.

WEDNESDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: The meeting starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603. SUSTAINABLE BUILDING ADVISOR COURSE INFORMATIONAL MEETING: Learn about Central Oregon Community College’s nine-month program for building professionals looking for training to apply sustainable concepts; free; 4-5:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-

7270 or http://noncredit.cocc. edu/building/default.aspx. BUYING OR SELLING A BUSINESS: Registration required; $39; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

THURSDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: The meeting starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. GIVING DIRECTIONS, DELEGATING AND MOTIVATING: Registration required; $85; 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. TAKE CHARGE OF YOUR MONEY: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@ schwab.com or www.schwab.com. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Registration is required; $15; 6-9 p.m.; Maida Bailey Building, 151 N. Spruce St., Sisters; 541-383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

FRIDAY LANDSCAPERS, HOW SUSTAINABLE ARE YOU?: Registration required; $49; 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. MICROSOFT PROJECT BASICS: Two Friday morning classes. Registration required; $195; 8 a.m.-noon; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. INTERMEDIATE PHOTOSHOP: Twomorning class. Registration required; $69; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE & CVB COFFEE CLATTER: Free; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-923-5191 or www.visitredmondoregon.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www.facebook.com/Zoomtax.

obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

MONDAY POWERPOINT 2007: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

TUESDAY May 10 GETTING TRACTION: Good Grief America foreclosure workshop. Register for event location; $20 per household, but no one will be turned away due to money; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; 541-690-8334, nancie@realtimecrm. com or www.goodgriefamerica.ning .com. KNOW INTERNET FOR BEGINNERS: Reservations encouraged; free; 10:30 a.m.-noon; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7080. KNOW WORD II: Reservations encouraged; free; 2-3:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7080. SUCCESSFUL SEARCH ENGINE STRATEGIES: Three Tuesday evening classes. Registration required; $79; 6:30-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

RIM unveils new BlackBerrys, OS By Dan Gallagher MarketWatch

SAN FRANCISCO — Research In Motion Ltd. lifted the wraps on its new operating system and a pair of new BlackBerry smartphones Monday, as company executives faced questioning from analysts following a surprise earnings warning last week. The new devices — updates to the company’s flagship BlackBerry Bold line — are the beginning of what is expected to be a slew of new products from the company in the latter half of the year that will run on the new BlackBerry 7 operating system. RIM is giving a preview of the new platform at its annual developers conference taking place this week in Orlando, Fla.

WEDNESDAY May 11 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: The meeting starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603. BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL VISITORS DAY: Free; 7-9 a.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603. FINANCIAL PLANNING FOR BUSINESS SUCCESS: Learn essential aspects of planning for the short term and long term financial strength of your business; free; 7:30-9 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org.

GE Profile Laundry Set From Standard TV & Appliance Whittier Outdoor Furniture From M. Jacobs

May 12

OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to

BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: The meeting starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125.

Two $500 Gift Certificates Toward Blinds From Budget Blinds

May 6, 7, 8, 2011

THURSDAY

SATURDAY

Deschutes County

Wells Fargo Bank N.A. to Secretary of Housing & Urban Development, Winchester, Lot 33, Block 2, $191,073.35 Harrison Street Property Group LLC to Mikel Lomsky Co. Inc., NorthWest Crossing, Phase 1, Lots 59 and 60, $295,000 Pronghorn Investors LLC to H&S Signature Properties LLC, Estates at Pronghorn, Phase 6, Lot 355, $265,000 Jason A. Mendell and Jennifer M. Abernathy to Emily Bailet-Stoner and Travis Wiggins, Staats Addition to Bend, Lot 3, Block 14, $199,900 Fannie Mae aka Federal National Mortgage Association to Gregory L. Byrne and Elizabeth R. McKnight, RiverRim P.U.D., Phase 1, Lot 96, $300,000 Choice One Builders LLC to Pratt S. Rather trustee of Pratt S. Rather Trust, Renaissance at Shevlin Park, Lot 44, $463,000 Diane R. Lozito to Stephen S. Williams and Lisa Westbrook, Lower Bridge

Estates, Lot 5, Block 4, $164,375 Columbia State Bank successor in interest to Columbia River Bank to Gary W. and Patricia J. Sorenson, Ridge at Eagle Crest 27, Lot 80, $255,000 Nancy K. Cary to Wells Fargo Bank N.A., Pleasant Ridge, Lot 3, $272,890 Trust for Public Land to Bend Metropolitan Parks & Recreation District, Township 17, Range 12, Section 32, $1,187,796 Christopher L. Barth and Rebecca L. Barth trustees of the Christopher and Rebecca Barth Living Trust to Thomas W. MacDonald and Ruby D. MacDonald trustees of the MacDonald Family Trust, Township 17, Range 13, Section 12, $950,000 Fannie Mae aka Federal National Mortgage Association to Nancy E. Grulke, Awbrey Village, Phase 1, Lot 65, $265,000 Donald F. Harker and Nancy L. Knoble trustee of the Nancy Lee Knoble Revocable Trust to Colleen and Colin Russell, Park Addition to Bend, Lot 4, Block 11, $755,000 Neil H. and Beverly F. Forrest to Raymond G. Teller, Skyliner Summit at Broken Top, Phases 7 and 8, Lot 132 Joseph and Sarah Gardepy to

nounced that it was lowering its earnings guidance for the quarter ending in May, as the sales mix has shifted to more lowerend devices that is not being offset by more expensive products at the higher end. That warning caused the stock to slide more than 14 percent to a new six-month low — and drew several brokerage downgrades as more analysts questioned the company’s outlook. On Monday, Balsillie was optimistic on the company’s outlook, saying that carriers around the world are demanding new high-end devices built on the BlackBerry 7 platform. He also said there is strong enterprise demand for the company’s first tablet — the PlayBook — which went on sale two weeks ago.

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The company kicked off its BlackBerry World conference with an analyst meeting Monday morning. Jim Balsillie, RIM’s co-CEO, opened the meeting and took questions from analysts, who quizzed the company on its ability to regain momentum in the smartphone market as its aging base of handsets loses share to rival products such as Apple’s iPhone and Google Android devices. “We were delighted with the way the world was going in terms of grow, grow, grow. Then what happened is that the industry went into a very turbulent cycle of innovation,” Balsillie said at the meeting. “All that change happened faster than we expected.” Last Thursday, RIM an-

PRESENTED BY

TODAY

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Marla Polenz at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

SHOW HOURS: Robert and Elena Pressprich, Westerly, Lot 14, $175,000 Harry W. Campbell to Ronald L. Ray, Township 22, Range 10, Section 9, $369,500 Chesapeake Holdings OR-Wash LLC who acquired title as Chesapeake OR-Wash LLC to Evan S. and Linda F. Thomas, Shevlin Ridge, Phase 3, Lot 22, $398,000 Bend Area Habitat for Humanity to Juan A. and Lydia Cruz, Parkway Village, Phases 1, 2 and 3, Lot 15, $161,506 John P. and Susan E. Canavan to Robert F. and Joyce L. Balaski, Ridge at Eagle Crest 33, Lot 2, $485,000 High Cascade Properties LLC to Gerald R. and Jaci L. Scobie, Ridge at Eagle Crest 23, Lot 18, $347,500 Linda D. Weiford to West Coast Trust Co. Inc. trustee of the Martinson Family GST Exempt Trust FBO Christopher Martinson, $360,000 Choice One Builders LLC to Thomas D. and Angelina A. Bradley, NorthWest Crossing, Phase 14, Lot 595, $269,900 Crook County

Federal National Mortgage Association to Keith A. and Victoria L. Rivera, Brasada Ranch 2, Lot 209, $205,000

Friday 12-6, Saturday 10-6, Sunday 10-5

ADMISSION: $7 ADULTS, $6 SENIORS 55 & OVER, 16 & UNDER FREE SPONSORS

Subaru of Bend

for the latest show information visit: www.centraloregonshow.com

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Bring this coupon to the ticket box at the 2011 Spring Home & Garden Show and receive $2.00 off admission. Single admission is $7, and this coupon is good only for the day of purchase. Expires 5/8/2011. Cannot be combined with any other offers.

NEW THIS YEAR! This May 6 – 8, the Deschutes County Fairgrounds will be the home of a Central Oregon Lifestyle Expo.

Featuring: Fly fishing from Orvis Recreational Vehicles Sporting Vehicles by Subaru Presented by

Landscape Artist Motor Sports

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White Water Rafting Bicycling Workshops


L

Inside

C

OREGON Suspect in officer’s killing is delusional, her lawyers say, see Page C3. Medford police see rise in mental illness-related calls, see Page C3.

OBITUARIES Osama bin Laden fomented global terror, see Page C5. www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 3, 2011

REDMOND

Well sh t!

WORKSHOP: LANGUAGE ARTS

Last Tuesday, we asked readers to submit photos of letters occurring in nature and urban settings. Follow the series at www.bendbulletin.com/wellshoot Coming up: May 17: Virtual field trip to Badlands Wilderness Area • May 31: Capturing motion • June 14: Virtual field trip to a Cascades lake • And more ...

3 finalists picked for police chief By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Gimme a... We asked readers to look for ABCs in the world around them. We received almost every letter.

The city of Redmond has selected three finalists in its search for a new police chief. The three finalists are Redmond’s interim Police Chief Dave Tarbet, Hillsboro Police Commander Mark Bonnett and retired Roseville (Calif.) Police Capt. David Allison, Redmond’s assistant city manager, Sharon Harris, said Monday. City Manager David Brandt will choose Redmond’s new poSubmitted by user Caron Ann Thurston

lice chief following interviews next week. The three finalists were selected from approximately 20 applicants. The police chief job will pay between $84,000 and $103,000, Harris said. Redmond has scheduled a public “meet and greet” event with the candidates at 6 p.m. May 12 at Redmond City Hall. Final interviews are scheduled for May 13. See Redmond / C5

Submitted by user Jeff

Biomass bill requires fuel assessments By Lauren Dake

Submitted by user Caron Ann Thurston

IN THE LEGISLATURE

The Bulletin Submitted by user Jeff

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SALEM — In order to secure funding for a $75 million biomass power plant scheduled to break ground in La Pine this fall, Biogreen CEO Rob Broberg had to prove that he could supply enough woody debris. In fact, he says, fuel supply was “the biggest thing ... bar none. You would not be able to get financing without having a solid fuel supply.”

Because state leaders want to encourage plants like Biogreen’s, the Oregon Senate recently passed a bill directing the Oregon Department of Forestry to create an inventory of the state’s supply of woody biomass. See Biomass / C5

BEND Submitted by user jsj

Submitted by user Carolyn

Submitted by user Kristin Wolter

Cougar spotted near park

Bend beats developer’s $2.1M suit By Nick Grube The Bulletin

By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

Submitted by user Jeff

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Wildlife and law enforcement officials are waiting for further sightings of a cougar spotted recently near Farewell Bend Park before taking action. The cougar reports first popped up the week of April 18, said Steve George, wildlife biologist with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife in Bend. Two or three people reported seeing a cougar in the Broken Top subdivision, but a dark, unclear picture wasn’t enough to confirm that it was actually a cougar, he said. Then, on Wednesday, Bend City Councilor Jim Clinton saw and photographed a cougar in his yard near the River Rim subdivision. His cat was at the window and started “grrr-ing,” Clinton said. See Cougar / C5

A jury sided with the city of Bend last month on a $2.1 million lawsuit brought by a local man whose development was thwarted by planning officials. In 2003, Scott Dahlen bought property on the east side of Mt. Washington Drive between Simpson and Troon avenues that he intended to transform into an 18-lot subdivision. According to Dahlen’s original complaint, which was filed in Deschutes County Circuit Court in 2007, the city claimed the property was a “landscape buffer,” preventing him from doing any work. When Dahlen tried to develop the land, the suit claims, the city “engaged in a pattern of harassment” that included its refusal to accept applications for building permits. See Lawsuit / C5

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C2 Tuesday, May 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

L B  Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

La Pine man arraigned in assault on deputies La Pine resident Curtis Jack Berger, 69, was arraigned Monday, and his bail was set at $250,000, said Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office. A grand jury indicted Berger on three counts of attempted assault in the first degree, three counts of unlawful use of a weapon, assault in the fourth degree, coercion and robbery in the third degree stemming from an April 18 incident. Berger is accused of shooting marbles and steel shot at Deschutes County sheriff’s deputies with a slingshot in a standoff that lasted several hours. During that incident, a Deschutes County officer shot and injured Berger. Berger’s next court date is set for May 24. At that time, he is expected to enter a plea.

Hearing for ex-cop reset amid plea talks A hearing for Larry Prince, the former Redmond police officer accused of stealing from the departmental armory, has again been moved. Prince is now scheduled to enter a plea on 18 counts each of first-degree theft and official misconduct and one count of first-degree forgery at 8:30 a.m. on June 6. Prince previously set over his plea hearing in March. Deschutes County Chief Deputy District Attorney Traci Anderson said she expected a resolution to the case soon. Prince, 48, resigned in February after reaching the rank of lieutenant and serving with the department for 16 years and managing the armory for

a decade. Prince was charged with the crimes after an investigation found 27 firearms were missing.

Car, ambulance crash; 5 suffer minor injuries An ambulance collided with a car on U.S. Highway 97 on Monday afternoon, the Oregon State Police reported. At 1:15 p.m., a Jefferson County EMS ambulance was traveling south on Highway 97 to St. Charles Bend when a 1984 Volvo driven by Stephanie Triplett, 21, of Eugene, pulled out in front of it from a side road, police said. The ambulance driver, James Johnson, tried to steer around the Volvo, but was unable to avoid a crash. Johnson, Triplett and three passengers in the Volvo sustained minor injuries and were treated at the scene. The patient in Johnson’s ambulance was taken the rest of the way to St. Charles Bend by another ambulance.

Applicants sought for Bend planning panel The City of Bend is seeking applicants for a position on the city’s planning commission. Members of the committee make recommendations regarding land use matters, and are appointed by the City Council to four-year terms. Applications are due by 5 p.m. May 13. Only Bend residents are eligible for the position. For applications and more information, visit the city website at www.ci.bend.or.us or call 541388-5505. Those interested can also contact the city by mail at City of Bend, 710 N.W. Wall St., Bend, OR 97701.

Thatcher named Britain’s 1st female premier in ’79 Th e Associated Press Today is Tuesday, May 3, the 123rd day of 2011. There are 242 days left in the year.

T O D AY IN HISTORY

TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On May 3, 1911, Wisconsin Gov. Francis E. McGovern signed the first U.S. workers’ compensation law to withstand constitutional scrutiny. (Previous attempts in Maryland, Massachusetts, Montana and New York were struck down.)

92. Singer Frankie Valli is 77. Sports announcer Greg Gumbel is 65. Country musician John Hopkins (Zac Brown Band) is 40. Country-rock musician John Neff (Drive-By Truckers) is 40. Country singer Brad Martin is 38. Actor DulĂŠ Hill is 36. Country singer Eric Church is 34. Actress Jill Berard is 21.

ON THIS DATE In 1802, Washington, D.C., was incorporated as a city. In 1933, Nellie Ross became the first female director of the U.S. Mint. In 1971, the National Public Radio program “All Things Considered� made its debut. In 1979, Conservative Party leader Margaret Thatcher was chosen to become Britain’s first female prime minister as the Tories ousted the incumbent Labor government in parliamentary elections.

THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Hatred is gained as much by good works as by evil.� — Niccolo Machiavelli, Italian political philosopher (born this date in 1469, died 1527)

TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Folk singer Pete Seeger is

C C  How to submit notices: E-mail: news@bendbulletin.com. Please write “Civic Calendarâ€? in the subject line and include a contact name and daytime phone number. • Local legislators Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Dist. 27, Rep. Gene Whisnant, R-Dist. 53, Rep. Jason Conger, R-District 54, Rep. John Huffman, R-District 59, and Rep. Mike McLane, R-District 55, will speak at a televised town hall meeting; reservations required; 6:30 p.m. May 13; The Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-388-5814 or talk@ zolomedia.com for reservations. • Economist Joe Cortright and transportation expert John Robert Smith discuss how transportation investments can bolster economic growth; $10; 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Wednesday; St. Charles Bend, Conference Center, 2500 N.E. Neff Road, Bend; www.brown papertickets.com/event/171249 to register.

N  R PO LICE LO G The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 7:37 a.m. April 29, in the 700 block of Northwest Georgia Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:06 a.m. April 29, in the 2900 block of Northeast Marea Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:03 a.m. April 29, in the 1900 block of Northeast Third Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:18 a.m. April 29, in the 20900 block of Lava Flow Lane. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:03 a.m. April 29, in the 1500 block of Northwest Newport Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:33 a.m. April 29, in the 400 block of Southeast Third Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:41 a.m. April 29, in the 600 block of Northeast Third Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:15 p.m. April 29, in the 3300 block of Northeast Sandalwood Drive. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 1:36 p.m. April 29, in the 20800 block of Liberty Lane. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 3:24 p.m. April 29, in the 2500 block of Northeast Twin Knolls Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:48 p.m. April 29, in the 1400 block of Northwest Galveston Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:39 p.m. April 29, in the 2100 block of Northeast Division Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 5:15 p.m. April 29, in the 1700 block of Southeast Tempest Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:13 p.m. April 29, in the 600 block of Southwest Powerhouse Drive. DUII — Joseph Robert Larsen, 26, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:13 a.m. April 30, in the 700 block of Northwest Columbia Street. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 4:21 a.m. April 30, in the 100 block of Northwest Oregon Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8:12 a.m. April 30, in the 3000 block of Northeast Rainier Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:06 a.m. April 30, in the 62900 block of Nasu Park Loop. Theft — A theft was reported at 1:01 p.m. April 30, in the 100 block of

Northeast Bend River Mall Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:27 p.m. April 30, in the 19700 block of Chicory Avenue. DUII — Kim Dellar Chism, 39, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:35 p.m. April 30, in the area of Empire Avenue and U.S. Highway 97. DUII — Kolby Merle Callantine, 26, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:18 a.m. May 1, in the area of Northeast 27th Street and Northeast Neff Road. DUII — Russell Cameron Bauer, 52, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:27 a.m. May 1, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 and Southwest Reed Market Road. Theft — A theft was reported at 1:44 a.m. May 1, in the 900 block of Northwest Newport Avenue. DUII — Patrick William Kelley, 26, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 3:55 a.m. May 1, in the area of Northwest 14th Street and Northwest Cumberland Avenue. DUII — Jared Grubb, 23, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 7:23 a.m. May 1, in the area of U.S. Highway 20 and Robal Road. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:52 a.m. May 1, in the 100 block of Northwest Greenwood Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:51 a.m. May 1, in the 600 block of Southeast GlenGarry Place. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:27 p.m. May 1, in the 1900 block of Northeast Lotus Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:45 p.m. May 1, in the 2500 block of Northest Neff Road. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 3:26 p.m. May 1, in the 20600 block of Daisy Lane. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 3:39 p.m. May 1, in the 1000 block of Northeast Hobbs Court. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 5:34 p.m. May 1, in the 800 block of Northwest Bond Street. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 6:26 p.m. May 1, in the 1400 block of Northwest Elgin Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 7:30 p.m. May 1, in the 2900 block of Northeast Lotno Drive. DUII — Antonio Franklin Gugleilmelli, 21, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:14 a.m. May 2, in the 1100 block of Southeast Third Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:22 a.m. May 2, in the 200

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541-617-8840 www.wbu.com/bend

block of Northeast Irving Avenue. Redmond Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11 p.m. April 29, in the 2500 block of Northwest 19th Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:01 p.m. April 29, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:01 p.m. April 29, in the 900 block of Southwest Veterans Way. Theft — A theft was reported at 1:29 p.m. April 29, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:37 p.m. April 29, in the area of State Highway 126 and Southeast Veterans Way. DUII — James Abe Hudson Jr., 39, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:31 a.m. April 29, in the area of Southwest Fifth Street and Southwest Forest Avenue. Criminal mischief — Slashed tires were reported at 11:29 p.m. April 30, in the 200 block of Northwest Sixth Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:57 p.m. April 30, in the 3100 block of Southwest Peridot Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:17 p.m. April 30, in the 900 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:41 p.m. April 30, in the 900 block of Southwest Veterans Way. DUII — Kathleen Ann Nethercutt, 52, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 4:31 p.m. April 30, in the area of Southwest 36th Street and Southwest Wickiup Avenue. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 11:54 a.m. April 30, in the 500 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 10 a.m. April 30, in the area of Southwest Fifth Street and Southwest Highland Avenue. DUII — Scott Gunty, 38, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:32 a.m. April 30, in the area of Southwest Highland Avenue and Southwest Rimrock Way. Theft — A theft was reported at

3:54 p.m. May 1, in the 900 block of Southwest Veterans Way. DUII — Kyle Mandfred Vezie, 27, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:05 a.m. May 1, in the 200 block of Northwest Sixth Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 9:26 p.m. April 29, in the 20600 block of Bowery Lane in Bend. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 7:58 p.m. April 29, in the 52100 block of Dustan Road in La Pine. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:58 a.m. April 29, in the 51300 block of U.S. Highway 97 in La Pine. Theft — A theft was reported at 5:27 p.m. April 30, in the 52700 block of Sunrise Boulevard in La Pine. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:15 a.m. April 30, in the 3100 block of Northeast O’Neil Way in Redmond. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 6:56 a.m. April 30, in the 62200 block of Chickadee Lane in Bend. DUII — Nicole Ann Daggett, 24, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:18 p.m. May 1, in the 65200 block of Hunnell Road in Bend. DUII — Eric Lee Bond, 39, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 5:30 p.m. May 1, in the area of Northwest Harriman Street and Northwest Revere Avenue in Bend. DUII — Stevan Lyle Hemingway, 27, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:36 p.m. May 1, in the area of Pinebrook Boulevard and U.S. Highway 97 in Bend. Oregon State Police

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 10:22 p.m. April 28, in the area of South U.S. Highway 97 and milepost 174. DUII — Dean James Gibbons, 50, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:39 p.m. April 29, in the area of Gerking Market and Connarn roads in Tumalo. DUII — Karen A. Alexander, 53, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:06 a.m. April 27, in the area of Northwest Sixth Street and Northwest Elm Avenue in Redmond.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 3, 2011 C3

O Medford police say mentally ill contacts up Lawyers: Suspect The Associated Press MEDFORD — Medford police are dealing with a sharp increase in contacts with mentally ill people, in part because underfunding has led to a “broken” state mental health system, Police Chief Randy Schoen said. The Medford Police Department has placed 83 “protective holds” on city residents this year — up from 40 holds at this time in 2010. In addition, Medford police have made 155 mental health referrals, up from 85 at this time last year. Protective holds are when officers take people into custody to prevent them from harming themselves or others. They typically send people straight to a health care provider and do not involve jail, Schoen said. “It can be for a medical evaluation, mental health evaluation or

even medical treatment,” he said. Schoen called the increases “disturbing” and said there’s no easy way to deal with it. He said the lack of funding for mental health services during the recession has left more mentally ill people walking the streets with little access to care. There is little officers can do to combat the problem except place mentally ill suspects in protective custody when they show signs of harming themselves or others, Schoen said.

‘The system is broken’ “The state’s mental health system is broken,” he said. The issue is particularly disturbing for local police after the April 22 fatal shooting of a Eugene police officer by a suspect who reportedly suffered from

mental health problems. “Mentally ill people who have access to firearms is a dangerous problem for everyone,” Schoen said. “It puts police and the suspect in harm’s way.”

Training course Medford Master Police Officer Kerry Curtis recently attended a training course on dealing with people suffering from mental breakdowns such as delirium, extreme agitation, anxiety, hallucinations, disorientation, and violent and bizarre behavior. “It is important that police recognize these problems as medical issues and not only criminal issues,” Curtis said. But he added that officers are not trained psychologists or psychiatrists who can diagnose someone as mentally ill. “It is our

job to keep them from being a danger to themselves or others,” Curtis said. He said officers attempt to work with mentally ill people by trying to persuade them to voluntarily seek treatment at a mental health facility. But some are distrustful or even violent toward police, whom they see as a possible threat, Curtis said. Earlier this year, Curtis said, he and other officers were forced to subdue a man who suffered from schizophrenia. The man’s family reported that he had started acting bizarrely and at one point brandished a sword and made strange statements. “It was really sad because the man and his wife had been married for 32 years and there hadn’t been any problems like this until his mental health began to deteriorate,” Curtis said.

CELEBRATING BIN LADEN’S DEMISE IN EUGENE

in Eugene officer killing delusional

By Jonathan J. Cooper The Associated Press

SALEM — A woman charged in the fatal shooting of a Eugene police officer is delusional and believes the officer shot at her car and shattered the driver’s side window, her attorneys said Monday in a court filing. Defendant Cheryl Dawn Kidd, 56, was examined Friday by a psychiatrist who diagnosed her with schizophrenia, grossly disorganized thinking, extreme paranoid delusions and the inability to differentiate the past from the present. Her lawyers requested a further evaluation for up to 30 days at Oregon State Hospital in Salem to determine if Kidd is fit to stand trial. Authorities have said Officer Chris Kilcullen did not fire his gun before he was killed April 22 while trying to stop a Buick Skylark driven by Kidd in nearby Springfield. Police say Kidd led officers on a 35-mile chase that ended in a standoff on back roads southeast of town. Police used beanbag guns to take out the side mirrors of Kidd’s parked car so she

SOLAR & RADIANT HEATING SYSTEMS 541-389-7365 CCB# 18669

www.bobcatsun.com

Paul Carter / The (Eugene) Register-Guard

Brad Courtney shouts to passing motorists late Sunday in front of the federal courthouse in Eugene, with his son, Cam, celebrating the news of the death of Osama bin Laden.

O  B Senate votes to give day off to veterans SALEM — The state Senate has voted to give military veterans a day off from work on Veterans Day. Senators approved a bill Monday that would require employers to give workers a paid or unpaid day off on Nov. 11 if they previously served in the armed forces. The Senate’s 30-0 vote sends the measure to the House. Proponents say the day is already a holiday for government employees, and veterans who work in the private sector also deserve to have their service honored on that day. Opponents say the bill amounts to a mandate on private businesses. The measure allows managers to deny the day off if the employee’s absence would cause a significant disruption.

Man charged with murder in 2 killings CORVALLIS — A 20-year-old college student from Peru who is accused of fatally stabbing his ex-girlfriend and their year-old son has been charged with aggravated murder in the deaths. A Benton County Circuit Court judge entered not guilty pleas at Monday’s arraignment for Gustavo David Martinez Aquepucho. Judge Janet Holcomb ordered the man held without bail. His two court-appointed lawyers asked that the case be presented to a grand jury within 30 days. Prosecutors say 19-yearold Kelsey Rozetta Baker and the couple’s young son were

killed Friday at their home in Philomath. Court papers accuse Martinez of plotting to kill Baker, the baby and himself after she refused to get back together with him.

AAA: Average price of gas in Oregon $3.95 PORTLAND — The AAA auto club reports the average price of a gallon of gas in Oregon is $3.95. That’s the same as the national average and up 7 cents in a week, 18 cents in a month and 98 cents in a year. Some average metro prices around the state from Monday’s AAA survey: • Portland $3.92 • Salem $3.89 • Eugene-Springfield $3.98 • Medford-Ashland $4.01

old Oregon man has died after apparently suffering a heart attack while driving on a Portland freeway. Frank Talcott of Vernonia was driving east Saturday evening on U.S. Highway 26 near Hillsboro when he was stricken. The Oregon State Police said Talcott’s 65-year old wife jumped onto his lap to control the vehicle and bring it to a stop after she noticed him slumped against the steering wheel. A state trooper said she got out and flagged down a passing motorist who helped move the car to the right shoulder, where they started CPR. A North Plains police officer arrived and took over CPR before Talcott was taken by ambulance to a Portland hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

2-year-old boy dies Body identified as that in Roseburg house fire — A 2-year-old of Rogue River woman boyROSEBURG died in a Sunday afternoon

MEDFORD — Medford police have identified the body of a woman found Sunday in Bear Creek. The Mail Tribune reports that police identified the woman as 56-year-old Vicki Lee Elwood of Rogue River. A man walking on the Bear Creek Greenway spotted Elwood’s body Sunday afternoon and called 911. Emergency crews were unable to reach the body at first because of blackberry plants and fast-moving creek flows. An autopsy is scheduled later this week.

Man dies of heart attack while driving NORTH PLAINS — A 67-year-

house fire in Roseburg. His family was searching for him when firefighters arrived. After they put out the fire, firefighters searched the rubble and discovered a body believed to be that of the boy, Sirus Delia. Oregon State Police and the state fire marshal’s office are investigating.

TriMet investigating stranding incident PORTLAND — TriMet officials in Portland are checking surveillance video and MAX train records as they investigate how a train pulled away with a 2year-old girl on board while her father was still on the platform.

The driver didn’t notice the man Saturday was still trying to load a bike trailer. KGW reports he pressed the emergency stop buttons on the side of the train, but it kept going. The two were quickly reunited. TriMet spokeswoman Bekki Witt says riders shouldn’t try to board with bike trailers because they are too cumbersome. — From wire reports

couldn’t see officers, said Springfield police Sgt. David Lewis, who is investigating the shooting. Kidd’s statements about being shot at may be referring to the non-lethal beanbag rounds, Lewis said. No live bullets were fired at her, he said, and Kilcullen never took his weapon from its holster. The court filing said defense attorneys Gordon Mallon and Mark Rader had little medical information available about Kidd but found records from 1989 indicating a diagnosis of schizophrenia. In January, Kidd’s primary health care provider sent her to the emergency room for a mental health evaluation, the filing said. Case files from the Eugenebased Pearl Buck Center for people with disabilities indicate Kidd was demonstrating “out of control behaviors and was not using her psychiatric medications,” according to the court papers. Kidd has pleaded not guilty to aggravated murder.


C4 Tuesday, May 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA RICHARD COE

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

No time to rest

N

ine years, seven months and 20 days after 9/11, Osama bin Laden is dead. It is a time of triumph and relief. Congratulations and

thank yous are owed the U.S. military and intelligence community. However low the country’s morale may have sunk after 9/11, it was far, far from broken. Much is unfinished. Al-Qaida will be eager to show it was more than bin Laden. It and other terrorist groups will continue to thirst for distinction. They need fire to feed and blood to swim. They will continue their flimsy attempts to mystify and imbue with honor the slaughter of innocents. They celebrate that slaughter. Few things are more obscene.

Osama bin Laden’s death cannot be an excuse to rest. It is the death of one man and his leadership. There have been other foiled airliner attacks. There was the botched Times Square car bombing. The United States can’t just await the next attack. There will always be danger from individuals and groups willing to die to kill others. Let’s not make it easy for them.

Fines must have teeth

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regonians pay fines for a variety of things, among them, failing to get invasive species permits for their boats from the state Marine Board. Currently the fine for that failure is $149, an amount members of the state House of Representatives finds impossibly high. Last week, that body overwhelmingly approved a measure that would reduce fines to between $30 and $50. It’s not enough. Money raised by the permits supports the state’s program to manage aquatic invasive species, both plant and animal. Like their land-based counterparts, such things as the New Zealand mud snail and the aquatic plant hydrilla pose threats to native wildlife in a variety of ways. They destroy habitat, damage food supplies for marine animals and limit recreation. On a commercial level, they can pose a threat to everything from agriculture to hydroelectric power generation. They’re frequently spread by the same means as landbased species, hitch-hiking from

one waterway to the next on boats and trailers. If House Bill 3121 becomes law, the fine for failing to obtain a permit will drop dramatically, and that’s not necessarily a good thing. The fine must be high enough to persuade boaters that obtaining the permit is in their own best interest, and the bill’s $20 to $30 just doesn’t cut it. It might, if boaters were routinely asked to show their permits. Like speeding, however, boating without the permit is a game of chance that the boater is likely to win. Knowing that, many boaters no doubt skip the permit and gamble they won’t be caught. And that, in turn, cuts down on permit revenues that make control efforts possible. That leaves state senators with two choices. They can kill HB 3121 outright, or they can raise fines enough to make getting the permits the best choice for most people. Either way, law-abiding boaters won’t feel the pinch and the other folks might just decide obeying the law makes good financial sense.

The cutting calculus trap

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isters School District is another in the long, sad procession of Central Oregon districts having to announce cuts. Sadder still for students and parents is that this plan — like the plans of other districts — is trapped by cutting calculus. Districts bend toward cutting staff rather than cutting salaries to keep them. To save $1 million, the Sisters district plans to cut about 16 jobs — including 13 teachers — and cancel cost-of-living and automatic salary increases scheduled for next year. The plan still needs to be approved. Bend and Redmond schools have similar plans, with variations. They all cut jobs, rather than cutting salaries enough to keep all the existing teachers in the classroom. Sister Board Chairwoman Christine Jones told The Bulletin the Sisters cuts were depressing. “They’re not good, but I think they’re a very sound way to go forward in a very difficult time,” she said.

It is sound. Is it the best the board could do? School boards and administrators must balance cuts, weighing impact on students, parents and staff. But any plan must get the support of unions representing teachers and staff. Those groups care deeply about students. They also worry about making a living. And if they don’t support a district plan, the plan is dead. Going into arbitration with unions means an uncertain outcome for the district. So most districts don’t do that. They negotiate as best they can. They are impelled to pick something they believe will get union support. And what happens again and again is boards and district staff do not even propose across-the-board cuts in pay or benefits to preserve all the existing jobs. The employees who keep their salaries and benefits win. The loser may be education.

Finally, Osama bin Laden’s obituary WASHINGTON — n the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, with President Bush visiting Florida, I was working from home in Alexandria, Va., on some forgotten domestic speech the president never gave. As events unfolded in Manhattan, I left for the White House. Nearing the Pentagon, I saw a plane flying low over the highway — so low I could clearly see the windows. It was only later that I considered the fear behind them. What followed, for my part, was years of words. Words of comfort. Words of resolution. Words in cathedrals and before Congress and at military cemeteries. Now, finally, the words of Osama bin Laden’s obituary. 9/11 was the cruel and random suffering of an earthquake — but an earthquake with an author, well pleased by his work. Nothing was more obscene that day than his delight. On 9/11, however, America awakened to problems larger than one man’s evil and goals greater than his punishment. The main strategic consequence of 9/11 was to lower America’s threshold of acceptable risk. In a world of countless dangers, a president must choose which to confront and which to tolerate. A threat that germinated in Sudan and thrived in Afghan training camps had been considered worth monitoring but not ending. Following 9/11, this and similar threats would not be tolerated. Call this pre-emption or hide behind euphemism, but an American president could no longer allow dangers to fully form before acting. The Afghan war became inevitable. The Iraq war was wrong in diagnosis but not in theory — far fewer would have objected if weapons of mass destruction had been found. The

O

MICHAEL GERSON prospect of a nuclear Iran became less acceptable. Drone strikes and special operations raids against terrorist targets began and still expand. The result has been a global war of varied intensity and uncertain duration. By the measure of preventing terrorist attacks on America, it has been a success. By the measure of military casualties, it is a sad and continual burden. The rules of this unprecedented conflict have been improvised by generals, courts and lawyers, to almost no one’s satisfaction. Americans, to the extent they pay attention, seem weary of the whole enterprise. But even a president who campaigned as a peace candidate has been compelled by his daily intelligence briefings to intensify the war. And it does not end in Abbottabad. A return to innocence is not possible without an increase in danger. With terrorism increasingly empowered by technology, pre-9/11 calculations of acceptable risk are even less responsible. Since 9/11, however, the theory of pre-emption has been complicated by unequal development among the varieties of American power. The American military has demonstrated an unprecedented ability to decapitate a hostile regime. As President Bush put it following the fall of Baghdad, “For a hundred years of war, culminating in the nuclear age, military technology was designed and deployed to inflict casualties on an ever-growing scale. In defeating Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan, Allied forces destroyed entire

cities, while enemy leaders who started the conflict were safe until the final days. Military power was used to end a regime by breaking a nation. Today, we have the greater power to free a nation by breaking a dangerous and aggressive regime.” But it has proved much more difficult to reconstruct — or construct for the first time — a working society once a regime has fallen. The Army and Marines have adjusted quickly to the tasks of a counterinsurgency campaign. Development assistance has increased. Yet Americans are better at humbling tyrants than building nations. In Afghanistan there was no good alternative. But that continuing exertion has made alternatives essential in other places. So America is left with a strategic challenge: It must pre-empt violence that takes root in failed and outlaw states without occupying and restructuring those societies. The alternative to Afghan-style nation-building is not forgetfulness and passivity. It is the development of alternative forms of American power — working through proxies, striking with drones, promoting development, conducting covert operations. And sometimes this will mean, as President Obama has admirably demonstrated, the unilateral use of force against America’s enemies. A decade removed from 9/11, America is a sobered power but not a retreating one. Its determination reaches across administrations and to the farthest parts of the world. This continuity of American purpose is the reason bin Laden hid and the reason he died. And we can hope that, in the end, he felt the fear he loved to cause. Michael Gerson is a columnist for The Washington Post.

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Wewelcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

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Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Bin Laden: 10 years proved we didn’t need to fear him as we did

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or months after 9/11, people watched planes. They watched skyscrapers. They looked over their shoulders in crowded places — at baseball games, college graduations, New Year’s celebrations. They eyed bearded men on planes and trains, glanced nervously at suspicious packages in shopping malls, and listened for the lilt of Arabic in airports and bus stations. They profiled relentlessly and shamelessly, and waited for the next attack to come. I moved to Washington, D.C., a year after the twin towers fell, and there was a touch of London during the blitz in the way that people carried themselves in those days. My friends and neighbors rode the Metro with stiff upper lips, kept calm and carried on as they headed to work at the Pentagon or the State Department (or a minor think tank or political magazine, for that matter), and generally behaved as if even the most everyday activities were taking place in the valley of the shadow of death. We felt as if we were living with

targets on our backs. We assumed that it was only a matter of time until al-Qaida struck again. Ten years later, we’re still waiting. There have been many plots, certainly, foiled by good intelligence work or good police work or simple grace and luck. There have been shoe bombers and there have been underwear bombers and Times Square bombers — and others still, presumably, that were cut short before they reached the headlines. But the wave of further violence that seemed inevitable in those fraught months after 9/11 never materialized within our borders. And what seemed like the horrifying opening offensive in a new and terrifying war stands instead as an isolated case — a passing moment when al-Qaida seemed to rival fascism and communism as a potential threat to our civilization, and when Osama bin Laden inspired far more fear and trembling than his actual capabilities deserved. Now the man is dead.

ROSS DOUTHAT This is a triumph for the United States of America, for our soldiers and intelligence operatives, and for the president as well. But it is not quite the triumph that it would have seemed if bin Laden had been captured a decade ago, because those 10 years have taught us that we didn’t need to fear him and his rabble as much as we did, temporarily but intensely, in the weeks when ground zero still smoked. They’ve taught us, instead, that whatever blunders we make (and we have made many), however many advantages we squander (and there has been much squandering), and whatever quagmires we find ourselves lured into, our civilization is not fundamentally threatened by

the utopian fantasy politics embodied by groups like al-Qaida, or the mix of thugs, fools and pseudointellectuals who rally around their banner. They can strike us, they can wound us, they can kill us. They can goad us into tactical errors and strategic blunders. But they are not, and never will be, an existential threat. This was not clear immediately after 9/11. On that day, they took us by surprise. They took advantage of our society’s great strength — its openness and freedom, the welcome it gives to immigrants and the presumption of innocence it extends. And in the wake of their attack, we did not know what they were capable of, or how they might follow up their victory. Now we know. We know because bin Laden is finally dead and gone, but in a sense we knew already. We learned the lesson in every day that passed without an attack, in every year that turned, and in the way our eyes turned, gradually but permanently, from

the skies and the skyscrapers back to the ordinary things of life. We learned when the planes landed safely, when the malls stayed open, when the commencements came and went, when one baseball season gave way to another. Day after day, hour after hour, we learned that we were strong, and they were weak. One of bin Laden’s most famous quotations (there were not many in his oeuvre) compared the United States and al-Qaida to racing horses. “When people see a strong horse and a weak horse,” he told his acolytes over table talk, “by nature, they will like the strong horse.” In his cracked vision, America was the weak nag, and al-Qaida the strong destrier. But the last 10 years have taught us differently: In life as well as death, Osama bin Laden was always the weak horse. Ross Douthat is a columnist for The New York Times.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 3, 2011 C5

O Debbie Jean Nestle

D

N   Beverly Ann Craig, of Prineville Dec. 4, 1940 - May 1, 2011 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.com Services: At her request no services will be held.

Candy (Morris) Rodriguez, of La Pine May 27, 1961 - April 25, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel of La Pine, 541-536-5104 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A family gathering to say goodbye has already taken place. Contributions may be made to:

Humane Society of Central Oregon, 541-382-3537, www.hsco.org; National Breast Cancer Foundation, Inc., www.nationalbreatcancer.org, 2600 Network Blvd., Suite 300, Frisco, Texas 75034.

Edwin Leo Fisk, of Bend May 16, 1927 - May 1, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: No services are planned at this time. Contributions may be made to:

Partners in Care Hospice 2075 NE Wyatt Court Bend, Oregon 97701 www.partnersbend.org

Eula Lorraine Shrum, of Prineville Oct. 7, 1929 - April 30, 2011 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Services: At her request no public services will be held.

Marjorie Parsons, of Portland, OR May 30, 1915 - April 21, 2011 Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel, 541-548-3219 sign our guest book at redmondmemorial.com Services: 9:30 am 05/07/2011 Metolius Friends Church, Burial to follow at Mt. Jefferson Cemetery.

Nadine May Bartlett, of Prineville Feb. 4, 1923 - April 28, 2011 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Services: A visitation will be held on Tuesday May, 3, 2011 from 4-8 pm at Prineville Funeral Home. Funeral services will be held on Wednesday, May 4, 2011 at 2:00 p.m. at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Prineville. Burial to follow at Juniper Haven Cemetery. Family and friends are all welcome back to the church for a luncheon.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

October 30, 1951 - April 26, 2011 Debbie, age 59, passed away on Tuesday, April 26, 2011, surrounded by her loving family. She was born in Eugene, Oregon, to Claude and Margaret Nestle, and spent her childhood there. She then moved to Prineville, where she raised her family. Debbie was a loving mother and homemaker, and she volunteered her time at the Redmond Senior Center. She loved all animals, she also enjoyed camping, fishing, taking trips with her friends, and spending time with her granddaughter. She was preceded in death by her parents, and her siblings, Bill and Peggy Nestle. She is survived by her daughter, Stacy, son, James, and granddaughter, Kendal; her brother, Danny and two sisters, Marcella and Sharon, her nieces, Angie and Jennifer, all of Central Oregon. A celebration of life will be held at the Redmond Senior Center, 325 NW Dogwood Ave., Redmond OR, from 1 to 3 p.m. on Friday, May 6, 2011.

“There are lots of steps that go between the (assessments and job creation). The physical availability of material ... where it is economical to move, a lot of thought would have to go into that.” — David Morman, Department of Forestry

Biomass Continued from C1 The legislation, SB 862, defines woody biomass as the by-product of forest management, ecosystem restoration or hazardous fuel reduction. Identifying fuel supplies is only half the battle, Broberg points out. The other half, he says, is “solid access to that fuel supply.” Without that, “What’s the point?” Rep. Joanne Verger, D-Coos Bay, is the bill’s chief sponsor. She says SB 862 is designed to do both: identify supplies and ease access to them. The legislation requires the Forestry Department to act as a kind of information clearinghouse on woody biomass supplies that exist in forests throughout the state. The bill also authorizes the Forestry Department to enter into contracts to supply woody biomass from lands it manages. Verger hopes these measures will increase the viability of plants like Broberg’s and, ultimately, bring jobs to rural communities. She’s also hoping that the legislation could help free up supplies of woody biomass in federal forests, where access is now difficult. If the state can manage woody biomass supplies in its own forests, she believes, the federal government will be more willing to allow greater access to its forests. David Morman with the Department of Forestry is “tickled pink” that people are talking about forests, but he argues that taking stock of biomass won’t necessarily translate into jobs. “There are lots of steps that go between the two,” Morman said. “The physical availability of material ... where it is economical to move, a lot of thought would have to go into that. There’s the longterm viability of supply.” Moreover, he pointed out, the state is facing a revenue shortfall of approximately $3.5 billion, and the Department of Forestry has little money to take stock of biomass. But he did think a biomass assessment, rather than a more detailed inventory, would help private industries identify areas of abundant supply. He also said the bill needs to clarify whether its assessment would include only state-run forests or all forests. At the moment, he says, the bill is open to both interpretations. SB 862 is scheduled for a hearing in the House next week. Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

Bin Laden incited global terror By Kate Zernike and Michael T. Kaufman New York Times News Service

Osama bin Laden, who was killed in Pakistan on Sunday, was a son of the Saudi elite whose radical, violent campaign to re-create a seventh-century Muslim empire redefined the threat of terrorism for the 21st century. It took nearly a decade before the United States’ quest ended in Pakistan with the death of bin Laden in a firefight with American forces, who attacked a compound where officials said he had been hiding. The manhunt was punctuated in December 2001 by a battle at an Afghan mountain redoubt called Tora Bora, near the border with Pakistan, where bin Laden and his allies were hid-

Lawsuit Continued from C1 On April 19, a 12-person jury sided with the city. City Manger Eric King said the jury’s decision validates its planning procedures, which are “fair and open to those that want to apply for a permit here.” The city’s regulations, he said, are “applied equally and fairly to applicants and to developers and to builders.” Dahlen and his attorney, Charlie Ringo, disagree. They believe they have a good

ing. Despite days of pounding by American bombers, bin Laden escaped. For more than nine years afterward he remained an elusive, shadowy figure frustratingly beyond the grasp of his pursuers and thought to be holed up somewhere in Pakistan and plotting new attacks. Terrorism before bin Laden was often state-sponsored, but he was a terrorist who had sponsored a state. From 1996 to 2001, he bought the protection of the Taliban, then the rulers of Afghanistan, and used the time and the freedom to make al-Qaida. After the Sept. 11 attacks, the names al-Qaida and bin Laden spread to every corner of the globe. He waged holy war with modern methods. He sent fat-

was by fax and declared war on Americans in an e-mail message beamed by satellite around the world. Al-Qaida members kept bomb-making manuals on CD and communicated with encrypted memos on laptop computers. By accounts of people close to the family, Osama bin Muhammad bin Awad bin Laden was born in 1957, the seventh son and 17th child among 50 or more of his father’s children. His father, Muhammad bin Awad bin Laden, had immigrated to what would soon become Saudi Arabia in 1931 from the family’s ancestral village in a conservative province of southern Yemen. He found work in Jidda as a porter to the pilgrims on their way to Mecca; years later, when he owned the largest

construction company in Saudi Arabia, he displayed his porter’s bag in the main reception room of his palace as a reminder of his humble origins. His mother, the last of his father’s four wives, was from Syria, the only one of the wives not from Saudi Arabia. The elder bin Laden had met her on a vacation, and Osama was their only child. Within the family, she was said to be known as “the slave” and Osama, “the slave child.” According to one of his brothers, Osama was the only bin Laden child who never traveled abroad to study. A biography of bin Laden, provided to the PBS TV program “Frontline” by an unidentified family friend, asserts that bin Laden never traveled outside the Middle East.

chance of winning the case on appeal. The reason for this, according to Ringo, is that the jury’s 9-3 verdict was based on the belief that Dahlen did not own the property when he was trying to develop it. The title was not in his name. This is not an unusual practice for developers, says Ringo, and it doesn’t mean Dahlen had no ownership interest in the property. Because the jury determined that Dahlen did not own the land, it did not address the substantive issue, which is whether the city’s conduct was right or

wrong. Ringo hopes this issue will be addressed on appeal. “We just need to get past one hurdle that we didn’t clear this time,” Ringo said. “Hopefully at the next trial we will.” Dahlen, too, believes he’ll prevail on appeal, as he has challenged he city successfully on land use decisions in the past. On at least two occasions, he says, city decisions preventing him from developing his property have been overturned. In one case, a local hearings officer sided with him. In another, he says, the Land Use Board of Appeals took his side.

“Yes, at the local level we have lost or had an unfavorable ruling, but when we have gone up the ladder we have prevailed,” Dahlen said. “This time we lost at the circuit court level and plan to appeal at the state level.” Dahlen also has sued the city in federal court, citing many of the allegations included in the local lawsuit. That case, which seeks nearly $3 million in damages, is ongoing.

Cougar Continued from C1 Clinton came within about 20 feet of the animal before he saw it. He says it sat in his yard for about 10 minutes before trotting off. “It’s a great sort of privilege to see such an animal,” Clinton said, noting that it didn’t show any aggressive behavior. It is unfortunate when they come close to people and pets in town, he said. “Nothing good comes out of it when they’re around where too many people are,” he said, noting that he hopes the big cat will leave the populated area soon. It’s not unusual for people to encounter cougars, even within Bend’s city limits, said Steve Esselstyn, community liaison with the Bend Police Department. In previous years, people have spotted cougars in the Pilot Butte area, in the Mt. Washington and Awbrey Butte area as well as on Bend’s east side. “It’s not common, but it’s not a surprise when you do get these sightings,” he said. On Thursday, Fish and Wildlife got a report of a dead coyote, possibly killed by a cougar, near the river trail upstream from Farewell Bend

Redmond Continued from C1 The Redmond Police Department came under public scrutiny in February, when former Redmond Lt. Larry Prince was arrested and charged with numerous crimes, including theft and official misconduct, for allegedly stealing and selling firearms and other items from the department’s armory. Tarbet was a captain in 2009 when Prince sold him a scope and parts for an AR-15 rifle. Multiple Redmond officers allegedly bought items from Prince that have since been traced to the armory. Tarbet was appointed interim chief in December, shortly before Prince was put on administrative leave.

Applicants cite quality of life Bonnett, the Hillsboro Police Department commander, said he has worked for the department for more than 26 years. He has long been interested in living in Redmond because his family has visited the area while on vacation for

Courtesy Jim Clinton

A young cougar rests in Bend City Councilor Jim Clinton’s yard, north of the River Rim subdivision, last week. It sat for about 10 minutes, Clinton said, before wandering off. Park, George said. Then, on Saturday, someone else spotted a cougar in the area. The cat appears to be a young female, possibly 1 or 2 years old and wary of people. “In all the observations, the cat doesn’t want to be around people,” George said. “It tends to run off.” Wildlife biologists are waiting to see if additional sightings come in. “Just from the activity level this weekend, up and down the trail, that should have been enough to convince her to leave,” George said.

If people do continue to see the cougar in town, however, officials will call in the federal Wildlife Services agency to kill the animal. “Hopefully, she gets out of there. We don’t like one that close,” George said. “If it keeps hanging around, close to people, we don’t want it there.” It’s not surprising that a cougar would be drawn to the area, he said, since it has dense vegetation and deer. Cougars will sometimes disperse, looking for new habitats and a new territory. It’s migration time for many an-

“20 or 30 years.” “It’s just a place we’re going to end up ultimately, whether I’m police chief or retire there,” Bonnett said. The Redmond Police Department is also a well-functioning organization, thanks to the leadership of former Redmond Police Chief Ron Roberts, Bonnett said. “Based on what I hear, and how he has been as chief there, it sounds like he left the department in good shape.” Allison — who retired as captain from the Roseville Police Department at the end of March — also said he’s drawn to the recreational opportunities in Central Oregon. “This was a golden opportunity for us to move somewhere we like,” Allison said. Despite Allison’s decision to retire, he intended to return to work. “I had my years of service in and, frankly, with budget things and so on, it was just a good time to go,” Allison said. He worked for seven years at the Santa Monica Police Department, then for 22 years in Roseville. Now, Allison said he’s at a point in his career where he feels that he’s hit his stride.

Before joining the Redmond Police Department, Tarbet worked for the Logan Police Department in Utah for more than 16 years, retiring as a captain. Tarbet also worked for five years as a sheriff’s deputy in Utah. He has been with the Redmond Police Department for three years. “I’ve just fallen in love with the job,” Tarbet said. “I just like it. I just really, really enjoy it.” Tarbet also credited Roberts with leaving the department in good shape and said he wants to “keep the department in the direction it’s going.” As for the Prince incident, Tar-

Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

imals, Esselstyn said, and every year, officials warn people to just be aware and be careful. “This is their natural migration path before it was all built in,” he said. People should make sure to not leave cat or dog food outside or feed the deer, since the smaller animals can attract the big cats. If people spot a cougar, they should back away without running, look as big as possible and make noise. The Bend Park & Recreation District put up signs by entrances to the river trail, warning people of the cougar sightings in the area. “They’re around, and people really do need to be aware of that,” said Paul Stell, natural resources manager with Bend Park & Recreation District. “They’re living next to a wonderful, wild land, and where the deer go, the cougar go.” Usually, the cougars move along. A few years ago, one was hanging around Hillside Park, Stell said. Thinking that could cause a problem, parks officials cordoned off the area, but the cougar wasn’t seen again. “Just about the time everyone gets excited, they’re gone,” Stell said. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

bet called it a learning experience that caused introspection in the department. “We did the right thing by getting (the Oregon State Police) involved early on,” Tarbet said. “I feel good about the outcome of it overall. I think it’s really made us a better police department.” Though former Deschutes County District Attorney Mike Dugan expressed interest in Redmond’s top police job in February, he did not apply. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.


W E AT H ER

C6 Tuesday, May 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, MAY 3

WEDNESDAY

Today: Mainly sunny, mild, afternoon breezes.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

57

23

STATE Western



Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

LOW

56/33

54/31

62/34

40/24

Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

60/30

53/20

Mitchell

Madras

55/25

58/28

 Camp Sherman 52/20 Redmond Prineville 57/23 Cascadia 54/24 56/24 Sisters 55/22 Bend Post 57/23

Oakridge Elk Lake 54/22

45/11

Sunriver 53/20

48/13

Fort Rock

52/17

Seattle

City

57/43

58/34

Missoula Helena



58/35

Idaho Falls 83/52

55/22



54/29

Redding Christmas Valley

Silver Lake

52/33

Boise

57/23

66/38

Eastern

52/20

51/34



Bend

Grants Pass

Reno

72/40

55/28

Elko

San Francisco

Partly cloudy.

Crater Lake 46/28

63/30



66/50

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:54 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:11 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:53 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:12 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 5:49 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 9:07 p.m.

Salt Lake City 64/39



Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

HIGH

Moon phases First

LOW

Full

Last

New

May 10 May 17 May 24 June 1

Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 54/45/0.02 . . . . . 59/41/sh. . . . . . 64/44/pc Baker City . . . . . . 62/27/0.12 . . . . . 53/29/pc. . . . . . . 62/35/s Brookings . . . . . .54/42/trace . . . . . . 65/46/s. . . . . . . 60/41/s Burns. . . . . . . . . .63/32/trace . . . . . 58/30/pc. . . . . . . 66/33/s Eugene . . . . . . . . 60/45/0.03 . . . . . 58/34/pc. . . . . . . 69/38/s Klamath Falls . . . 64/34/0.00 . . . . . 59/29/pc. . . . . . . 71/33/s Lakeview. . . . . . . 64/34/0.00 . . . . . . 57/29/s. . . . . . . 68/34/s La Pine . . . . . . . . 55/35/0.00 . . . . . . 54/19/s. . . . . . . 69/32/s Medford . . . . . . . 64/44/0.00 . . . . . . 70/40/s. . . . . . . 80/45/s Newport . . . . . . . 54/43/0.05 . . . . . . 51/45/s. . . . . . . 55/47/s North Bend . . . . . 54/43/0.15 . . . . . . 55/42/s. . . . . . . 57/46/s Ontario . . . . . . . . 72/32/0.00 . . . . . 60/37/pc. . . . . . . 64/39/s Pendleton . . . . . . 59/40/0.09 . . . . . 61/33/pc. . . . . . . 71/40/s Portland . . . . . . . 61/50/0.01 . . . . . 58/41/sh. . . . . . . 69/45/s Prineville . . . . . . . 54/42/0.00 . . . . . . 54/24/s. . . . . . . 70/36/s Redmond. . . . . . .59/41/trace . . . . . 57/25/pc. . . . . . . 69/33/s Roseburg. . . . . . . 62/48/0.05 . . . . . 63/41/pc. . . . . . . 76/44/s Salem . . . . . . . . . 58/46/0.07 . . . . . 60/37/pc. . . . . . . 71/41/s Sisters . . . . . . . . . 54/38/0.00 . . . . . . 55/22/s. . . . . . . 68/29/s The Dalles . . . . . . 62/45/0.06 . . . . . 62/40/sh. . . . . . . 72/40/s

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . . . . . . . No restrictions Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57/45 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .85 in 1937 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 in 1964 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.04” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.28” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 4.55” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.25 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.36 in 1932 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .5:07 a.m. . . . . . .5:46 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .4:57 a.m. . . . . . .5:42 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .5:12 a.m. . . . . . .6:29 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .5:10 a.m. . . . . . .6:17 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .5:07 p.m. . . . . . .4:59 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .4:24 a.m. . . . . . .4:32 p.m.

3

LOW

61 35

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Wed. Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy, scattered rain showers. HIGH

64 39

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

Calgary 51/34

56/21

 Chemult

54/41

Eugene

54/21

Hampton

52/18

Vancouver

58/41

Burns

54/19

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 72° Ontario • 27° Baker City

Mostly cloudy, chance of evening showers.

66 35

BEND ALMANAC

Partly cloudy.

54/19

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Portland

Brothers

LOW

70 34

NORTHWEST

49/20

La Pine

HIGH

SATURDAY

Partly to mostly cloudy, cooler, breezy.

Cloudy to the north, partly cloudy to the south. Slight chance of showers near the Washington Coast.

Paulina

53/21

Crescent

Crescent Lake

Partly cloudy to the north, becoming sunny to the south. Central

59/29

FRIDAY

Mainly sunny and significantly warmer.

Tonight: Mainly clear and cold.

HIGH

THURSDAY

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 154-186 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . 157 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . 207 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0

. . . no report . . . . 140-250 . . . no report . . . . . . . 187 . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 54/41

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

Seattle 57/43

S Calgary 51/34

S Saskatoon 62/36

S

S Winnipeg 63/43

S

S

Thunder Bay 54/34

Billings 62/37

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 58/45 Halifax 58/43 Portland 54/48 Boston 63/55 New York 74/55 Philadelphia 80/55

Bismarck To ronto 66/40 St. Paul 52/41 Green Bay 58/38 52/33 Boise Rapid City Detroit 58/35 Buffalo 67/41 • 94° 50/39 50/39 Des Moines Santa Ana, Calif. Cheyenne Columbus 61/40 Chicago 61/35 50/40 49/39 • 5° Omaha Salt Lake 65/42 Washington, D. C. Berthoud Pass, Colo. San Francisco City Las Denver 82/53 Louisville 64/39 66/50 Kansas City Vegas • 2.59” 68/43 65/45 St. Louis Nashville 53/41 86/59 Paducah, Ky. 58/39 61/38 Charlotte 84/51 Los Angeles Atlanta Oklahoma City Little Rock 80/61 75/43 69/44 65/46 Phoenix Albuquerque 95/65 72/44 Honolulu Dallas Birmingham 85/74 Tijuana 70/48 67/41 90/57 New Orleans 72/54 Orlando Houston 91/68 Chihuahua 73/53 80/50 Miami 87/73 Monterrey La Paz 77/57 98/61 Mazatlan Anchorage 89/61 50/36 Juneau 51/40 (in the 48 contiguous states):

Portland 58/41

FRONTS

MEDFORD

Ginger Rogers’ gowns sold at fundraiser By Paris Achen (Medford) Mail Tribune

MEDFORD — Actress Ginger Rogers bought a ranch on the Rogue River in 1940 to serve as her sanctuary from the Hollywood madness. “The ranch was her hideaway and a place she could go and not wear makeup,” said Roberta Olden, Rogers’ former personal secretary. When Rogers visited Southern Oregon, she put away her gowns in favor of casual clothes she could wear fishing on the Rogue River or picking blackberries to make jam. Rogers’ presence at her Southern Oregon oasis on the 1,000acre ranch between Eagle Point and Shady Cove helped to build the region’s reputation as a tourist destination where visitors could be one with nature, Olden said. Rogers, who died in 1995, left her mark yet again Sunday when some of her most glamorous gowns and shoes were sold at a tea and fashion show to raise money for the Southern Oregon Historical Society, an organization dedicated to keeping Rogers and other characters in Southern Oregon’s history alive in the minds of the public. “It helps to show that history can be very glamorous,” said Allison Weiss, the historical society’s executive director. Since 1998, the historical society’s budget has withered from more than $2 million to $600,000 per year due to the loss of funding from Jackson County, as well as the economic downturn. The organization relies completely on donations, grants and interest earnings. The event Sunday was expected to raise about $15,000. Sharon Wesner Becker, wife of Jacksonville Mayor Paul Becker, came up with the idea about six years ago after seeing some of Rogers’ gowns in a closet at Olden’s home in Palm Desert, Calif. Paul Becker was a personal friend of Rogers for 20 years. The idea finally took form this

Denise Baratta / (Medford) Mail Tribune

Elizabeth Lambert models one of actress Ginger Rogers’ personal gowns on a catwalk at the Rogue Valley Country Club in Medford on Sunday. year in honor of the 100th anniversary of Rogers’ birth. “Ginger was history here,” Sharon Becker said. “She probably was one of our most famous residents.” Models on Sunday breathed life into 20 of Rogers’ personal gowns and paraded them down a catwalk set up before an audience of about 300 at the Rogue Valley Country Club. Five of the gowns were auctioned off at the end of the event, and 25 pairs of Rogers’ shoes were sold at a silent auction before the fashion show. Rogers bought her Rogue River ranch in 1940, the same year she starred in “Kitty Foyle,” for which she won the Academy Award for Best Actress.

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .64/42/0.17 . . .68/46/s . . . 77/54/s Akron . . . . . . . . .62/48/0.16 . .49/37/sh . . 54/37/sh Albany. . . . . . . . .62/48/0.00 . . .69/54/t . . 59/44/sh Albuquerque. . . .56/32/0.00 . . .72/44/s . . . 80/48/s Anchorage . . . . .49/32/0.00 . .50/36/sh . . 51/36/sh Atlanta . . . . . . . .81/61/0.00 . . .75/43/t . . . 70/49/s Atlantic City . . . .67/56/0.00 . . .76/55/c . . . 64/47/c Austin . . . . . . . . .56/50/0.04 . . .72/44/s . . . 82/51/s Baltimore . . . . . .74/54/0.00 . . .83/53/c . . 63/46/sh Billings. . . . . . . . .62/33/0.00 . . .62/37/c . . 59/36/sh Birmingham . . . .84/66/0.00 . .67/41/sh . . . 69/45/s Bismarck . . . . . . .54/22/0.00 . . .66/40/s . . 61/41/sh Boise . . . . . . . . . .72/41/0.00 . 58/35/pc . . . 63/38/s Boston. . . . . . . . .62/44/0.00 . . .63/55/c . . 63/46/sh Bridgeport, CT. . .57/44/0.00 . . .68/54/c . . 63/45/sh Buffalo . . . . . . . .59/46/0.33 . .50/39/sh . . 49/37/sh Burlington, VT. . .67/49/0.00 . .61/48/sh . . 56/39/sh Caribou, ME . . . .66/32/0.00 . .58/44/sh . . 57/41/sh Charleston, SC . .82/66/0.00 . 85/65/pc . . . 77/52/s Charlotte. . . . . . .82/59/0.00 . . .84/51/c . . 66/44/sh Chattanooga. . . .83/61/0.00 . .67/41/sh . . 67/44/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .47/23/0.03 . 61/35/pc . . 56/31/sh Chicago. . . . . . . .59/46/0.00 . 49/39/pc . . . 56/44/s Cincinnati . . . . . .59/51/0.49 . .50/40/sh . . 58/41/pc Cleveland . . . . . .61/49/0.28 . .46/39/sh . . 53/41/sh Colorado Springs 46/29/0.00 . 63/34/pc . . 68/36/pc Columbia, MO . .57/41/0.00 . 63/38/pc . . . 71/50/s Columbia, SC . . .84/59/0.00 . . .89/57/c . . 74/46/pc Columbus, GA. . .88/65/0.00 . . .80/46/t . . . 73/47/s Columbus, OH. . .63/50/0.30 . .50/40/sh . . 56/39/pc Concord, NH . . . .74/31/0.00 . .65/53/sh . . 60/41/sh Corpus Christi. . .77/62/0.00 . . .73/61/s . . . 80/64/s Dallas Ft Worth. .53/46/2.01 . . .70/48/s . . . 76/52/s Dayton . . . . . . . .54/48/0.50 . .48/39/sh . . 57/41/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .52/31/0.00 . 68/43/pc . . 68/43/pc Des Moines. . . . .60/38/0.00 . . .61/40/s . . . 70/49/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .60/49/0.01 . .50/39/sh . . 59/41/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . .40/27/0.00 . . .54/31/s . . 57/43/sh El Paso. . . . . . . . .68/43/0.00 . . .75/49/s . . . 85/56/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .45/30/0.00 . .50/29/sh . . 52/32/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . .53/31/0.00 . . .63/42/s . . 60/42/sh Flagstaff . . . . . . .56/29/0.00 . . .67/27/s . . . 72/29/s

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .54/47/0.00 . 55/31/pc . . . 60/42/s Green Bay. . . . . .44/37/0.00 . 52/33/pc . . . 61/39/s Greensboro. . . . .80/60/0.00 . . .85/50/c . . 65/43/sh Harrisburg. . . . . .73/53/0.01 . . .75/48/t . . 60/42/sh Hartford, CT . . . .65/40/0.00 . . .70/57/c . . 64/43/sh Helena. . . . . . . . .67/27/0.00 . . .52/33/c . . . 57/34/c Honolulu . . . . . . .85/73/0.03 . . .85/74/r . . 86/74/pc Houston . . . . . . .84/61/0.00 . . .73/53/s . . . 80/56/s Huntsville . . . . . .85/66/0.00 . .61/41/sh . . . 66/43/s Indianapolis . . . .54/46/0.42 . .54/39/sh . . 62/43/pc Jackson, MS . . . .88/67/0.00 . .63/45/sh . . . 73/48/s Madison, WI . . . .54/36/0.00 . 53/33/pc . . . 64/46/s Jacksonville. . . . .83/58/0.00 . 86/67/pc . . 79/60/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .53/39/0.04 . .51/40/sh . . 50/39/sh Kansas City. . . . .64/36/0.00 . . .65/45/s . . 70/50/pc Lansing . . . . . . . .56/46/0.00 . .53/33/sh . . . 59/41/s Las Vegas . . . . . .77/54/0.00 . . .86/59/s . . . 90/66/s Lexington . . . . . .73/55/0.25 . .51/40/sh . . 58/42/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .61/32/0.00 . . .66/44/s . . 74/47/pc Little Rock. . . . . .53/49/2.17 . 65/46/pc . . . 73/51/s Los Angeles. . . . .85/58/0.00 . . .80/61/s . . . 77/61/s Louisville . . . . . . .64/53/0.72 . .53/41/sh . . 64/45/pc Memphis. . . . . . .61/52/1.61 . 63/47/pc . . . 70/50/s Miami . . . . . . . . .87/76/0.00 . . .87/73/s . . . 84/74/s Milwaukee . . . . .57/42/0.00 . 47/37/pc . . . 54/41/s Minneapolis . . . .40/33/0.00 . . .58/38/s . . . 63/45/s Nashville . . . . . . .80/60/0.10 . .58/39/sh . . . 67/43/s New Orleans. . . .88/75/0.00 . .72/54/sh . . . 76/56/s New York . . . . . .63/51/0.00 . . .74/55/c . . 63/45/sh Newark, NJ . . . . .63/52/0.00 . . .76/54/c . . 63/43/sh Norfolk, VA . . . . .83/53/0.00 . 84/60/pc . . 62/49/sh Oklahoma City . .63/42/0.00 . . .69/44/s . . . 75/50/s Omaha . . . . . . . .60/32/0.00 . . .65/42/s . . 74/48/pc Orlando. . . . . . . .90/67/0.00 . . .91/68/s . . 87/66/pc Palm Springs. . . .87/57/0.00 . . .88/60/s . . . 97/63/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .59/43/0.00 . 56/36/pc . . . 66/46/s Philadelphia . . . .72/55/0.00 . . .80/55/c . . 62/44/sh Phoenix. . . . . . . .85/57/0.00 . . .95/65/s . . . 98/69/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .72/56/0.02 . .56/39/sh . . . 51/37/c Portland, ME. . . .57/35/0.00 . . .54/48/c . . 58/44/sh Providence . . . . .68/39/0.00 . . .66/57/c . . 63/45/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . .83/56/0.00 . 87/54/pc . . 66/42/sh

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .54/28/0.00 . 67/41/pc . . . 56/37/c Savannah . . . . . .83/61/0.00 . 86/62/pc . . . 77/51/s Reno . . . . . . . . . .74/42/0.00 . 72/40/pc . . . 77/44/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .52/45/0.18 . .57/43/sh . . 61/47/pc Richmond . . . . . .83/55/0.00 . 85/58/pc . . 65/45/sh Sioux Falls. . . . . .52/26/0.00 . . .63/42/s . . 64/42/sh Rochester, NY . . .63/51/0.10 . .52/43/sh . . 50/37/sh Spokane . . . . . . .61/37/0.03 . 56/34/pc . . . 61/36/s Sacramento. . . . .82/50/0.00 . . .80/52/s . . . 88/54/s Springfield, MO. .50/40/0.10 . 62/38/pc . . . 71/47/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .56/46/0.01 . 61/38/pc . . . 70/49/s Tampa . . . . . . . . .91/71/0.00 . . .88/70/s . . . 86/64/s Salt Lake City . . .61/34/0.00 . 64/39/pc . . . 60/42/s Tucson. . . . . . . . .80/47/0.00 . . .92/59/s . . . 97/62/s San Antonio . . . .60/52/0.00 . . .74/48/s . . . 82/57/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .55/39/0.00 . 69/44/pc . . 75/51/pc San Diego . . . . . .87/60/0.00 . . .92/56/s . . . 79/55/s Washington, DC .77/55/0.00 . . .82/53/c . . 64/46/sh San Francisco . . .65/50/0.00 . . .69/49/s . . . 77/52/s Wichita . . . . . . . .68/34/0.00 . 69/47/pc . . 75/50/pc San Jose . . . . . . .76/49/0.00 . . .76/53/s . . . 87/53/s Yakima . . . . . . . .64/37/0.08 . .62/32/sh . . . 69/43/s Santa Fe . . . . . . .50/24/0.00 . . .63/33/s . . . 70/39/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .89/58/0.00 . . .95/63/s . . . 99/64/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .57/46/0.00 . . .56/36/s . . 57/37/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .73/53/0.00 . .76/61/sh . . . .72/59/t Auckland. . . . . . .64/61/0.00 . . .71/59/t . . . .68/58/t Baghdad . . . . . . .86/66/0.00 . 90/72/pc . . 91/71/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . .92/79/t . . . .93/79/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .81/48/0.00 . . .77/55/s . . 75/55/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .88/61/0.00 . . .75/60/s . . 82/64/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . .50/39/0.00 . 55/37/pc . . 54/39/sh Bogota . . . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . . .63/52/r . . 64/52/sh Budapest. . . . . . .66/45/0.00 . .68/46/sh . . . 61/40/s Buenos Aires. . . .59/37/0.00 . . .67/45/s . . . 69/46/s Cabo San Lucas .90/66/0.00 . 91/65/pc . . 94/69/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . .100/72/0.00 . . .95/69/s . . 96/73/pc Calgary . . . . . . . .64/34/0.00 . . .51/34/t . . . 57/36/s Cancun . . . . . . . .86/77/0.00 . . .85/74/t . . 86/75/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .57/46/0.00 . 59/42/pc . . 59/44/pc Edinburgh . . . . . .61/34/0.00 . . .56/37/s . . . 57/39/s Geneva . . . . . . . .72/43/0.00 . . .69/46/t . . . 66/41/s Harare . . . . . . . . .72/55/0.00 . . .75/56/s . . . 76/55/s Hong Kong . . . . .84/79/0.00 . . .83/76/t . . 82/75/sh Istanbul. . . . . . . .70/57/0.00 . .75/54/sh . . 69/56/sh Jerusalem . . . . . .90/57/0.00 . . .77/54/s . . 94/67/pc Johannesburg . . .68/52/0.00 . 69/47/pc . . 70/50/pc Lima . . . . . . . . . .73/63/0.00 . 75/64/pc . . 74/64/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .72/61/0.00 . 69/55/pc . . . 69/54/s London . . . . . . . .63/45/0.00 . . .58/42/s . . . 60/43/s Madrid . . . . . . . .73/52/0.00 . .71/52/sh . . 73/50/sh Manila. . . . . . . . .93/81/0.00 . 94/77/pc . . . .92/77/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .104/75/0.00 . .101/77/s . . 103/78/s Mexico City. . . . .84/54/0.00 . 79/53/pc . . 79/54/sh Montreal. . . . . . .64/54/0.00 . .56/45/sh . . 51/42/sh Moscow . . . . . . .52/30/0.00 . .72/51/sh . . 74/52/sh Nairobi . . . . . . . .79/61/0.00 . . .80/61/t . . . .81/61/t Nassau . . . . . . . .86/68/0.00 . . .89/77/s . . . 87/75/s New Delhi. . . . .104/81/0.00 . .106/82/s . 106/83/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . .73/54/0.00 . 71/57/pc . . . 71/54/s Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .52/30/0.00 . .49/37/sh . . . 54/36/c Ottawa . . . . . . . .59/48/0.00 . .54/44/sh . . 51/41/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . .66/52/0.00 . . .64/40/s . . . 64/41/s Rio de Janeiro. . .90/75/0.00 . .81/70/sh . . 82/70/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . .68/55/0.00 . .71/55/sh . . 72/54/sh Santiago . . . . . . .79/39/0.00 . . .73/39/s . . . 73/38/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .72/61/0.00 . .73/59/sh . . . 75/58/s Sapporo. . . . . . . .46/39/0.00 . . .53/44/c . . 51/43/sh Seoul . . . . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 . . .65/49/s . . 66/48/pc Shanghai. . . . . . .72/61/0.00 . .64/56/sh . . 66/56/sh Singapore . . . . . .81/77/0.00 . . .90/78/t . . . .91/77/t Stockholm. . . . . .45/32/0.00 . .45/34/sh . . 47/35/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . .66/54/0.00 . .66/58/sh . . 69/58/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .81/72/0.00 . .85/74/sh . . 80/71/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .91/61/0.00 . . .78/61/s . . 92/68/pc Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .73/59/0.00 . .68/56/sh . . . 72/53/s Toronto . . . . . . . .59/43/0.00 . .52/41/sh . . 52/40/sh Vancouver. . . . . .52/45/0.00 . .54/41/sh . . . 55/46/c Vienna. . . . . . . . .63/45/0.00 . .57/42/sh . . . 58/40/s Warsaw. . . . . . . .52/34/0.00 . .50/35/sh . . . 54/33/s


S

D

NBA Inside Dallas takes early lead over Los Angeles in Western Conference semifinals, see Page D4.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 3, 2011

NBA

NFL

COMMUNITY SPORTS

Trauma found in former star’s brain

Kings staying in Sacramento for at least another season The Kings and the NBA gave Sacramento one last chance to prove it deserves to be an NBA city. Now it’s up to Mayor Kevin Johnson and the business community to come up with a viable plan for a new arena after so many failed attempts in the past. “This is one of the proudest moments of my life because the community believed when no one else did,” Johnson said Monday. “We kept believing. And if you believe, anything is possible.” The decision by the Maloof family to keep their team in Sacramento rather than apply for relocation to Anaheim, Calif., is only temporary. Coowner Joe Maloof and NBA Commissioner David Stern made clear that the team will leave after next season if an arena plan is not in place. “We spent 13 years and millions of dollars to try to get an arena built,” Maloof said. “We don’t have the answer. The mayor has the answers and we’re willing and able to listen. He’s got to have a plan. We never want to be untruthful to the fans of Sacramento. There is a sense of urgency, and that’s up to Mayor Johnson and his political team.” Stern praised Johnson, a former NBA All-Star, for his Herculean effort at mobilizing the community to keep the team. — The Associated Press

Hitting the top

AUTO RACING

Central Oregon club volleyball team advances to national tourney

Dave Duerson believed he developed disease due to concussions By Alan Schwarz New York Times News Service

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Laney Hayes (12) tries to sneak her shot around the block of teammates Makayla Lindburg (11) and Calli Prestwood (9) during a Rimrock/OVA 18 National club volleyball team practice Thursday night in the Sisters Christian Academy gymnasium. The team recently qualified for this summer’s USA Volleyball Girls’ Junior National Championships.

By Amanda Miles The Bulletin

IndyCar driver Will Power celebrates his victory in the Sao Paulo IndyCar 300 in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Monday.

Will Power wins postponed IndyCar Sao Paulo 300 SAO PAULO — Will Power of Australia overcame a damaged car and a wet track to win IndyCar’s Sao Paulo 300 on Monday, a day after the race was postponed because of heavy rain on the streets of South America’s biggest city. Graham Rahal was second and Ryan Briscoe third at the 2.5-mile, 11-turn Anhembi temporary street circuit. Power, who started from the pole position, drove to victory for Penske after Japan’s Takuma Sato had to pit for fuel with about 10 minutes left. Sato led for 23 laps but finished eighth after his gamble failed. Power finished 4.672 seconds ahead of Rahal and 7.904 in front of teammate Briscoe. It was his second win in four races this season, giving him the points lead going into the Indy 500 later this month. Power got his second consecutive win in Sao Paulo despite damage to his car. He lost control exiting a turn early in the race and touched the wall with his left-rear tire. — The Associated Press

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 Major League Baseball ..............D3 Prep sports ............................... D4 NBA .......................................... D4 Horse racing ............................. D4 Community Sports .............. D5, 6

In the fall, they played for four different high schools. In previous club seasons, they played for different organizations. This year, a dozen of the top girls volleyball players in Central Oregon did something unusual: They pooled their talents to form a single elite club team. And the results have been spectacular. Maybe even unprecedented. Last month, the Rimrock/Oregon Volleyball Academy 18 National team placed second at the Columbia Empire regional tournament and earned a bid to the USA Volleyball Girls’ Junior National Championships age-group tournament this summer in Atlanta. Team head coach Joel Kent, who has been involved in the Central Oregon club volleyball scene since 1998, believes the accomplishment to be a first for any club team in the region. See Volleyball / D6

The Rimrock/OVA squad is made up of 12 elite Central Oregon players who previously played for different volleyball clubs.

PREP SOFTBALL

BOSTON — The suicide of the former Chicago Bears star Dave Duerson became more alarming Monday, when Boston University researchers announced that Duerson’s brain had developed the same trauma-induced disease recently found in more than 20 deceased players. The diagnosis adds a new and perhaps pivotal chapter to football’s still-unfolding narrative sur roundi ng concussions. Duerson shot himself Feb. 17 in the chest rather than the head so his brain could be examined by Boston Univer- Dave Duerson sity’s Center committed for the Study suicide with of Traumatic a gunshot to Encephalopa- the chest on thy, which Feb. 17. announced its diagnosis Monday morning in Boston. About two dozen retired National Football League players have been found to have the disease, known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy, but none acted upon his own suspicion of it like Duerson, who privately complained of his deteriorating mental state during his final months. His death at age 50 immediately reminded the football community that for all the reform in the management of concussions and other on-field brain trauma in recent years, the damage to past players remains hauntingly irreversible. Although the precise motivations behind Duerson’s suicide remain unknown, he had complained of headaches, blurred vision and a deteriorating memory in the months before his death. See Duerson / D5

PREP BASEBALL

Madras rallies for Tri-Valley victory over N. Marion

Sisters pitcher Jordan Hodges struck out seven Monday in leading Sisters to a 13-6 victory over Cottage Grove.

Bulletin staff report

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

MADRAS — Trailing late in the game for the first time in league play this season, Madras rallied for an 8-6 Tri-Valley Conference softball victory over North Marion on Monday. The White Buffaloes, who have won 10 consecutive games, improved to 9-0 in league with the win and 15-4 overall. “I think it was good for them,” Madras coach Shawna McConnell said about her team having to come back from a 5-2 deficit. “We preach all the time, ‘We need a base hit, not a big hit.’ … Once we started hitting we were fine.” The normally sure-handed White Buffaloes committed five errors in the game, which led to five unearned runs. North Marion (7-2 TVC, 145) led 5-2 after three innings, in large part because of Madras’ multiple miscues. “We had some ding-dong errors and there were some weird infield hits,” McConnell said. “They definitely tried to short game us.” Norene Sampson sparked the Buff rally with her first career home run, a two-run shot in the bottom of the fourth inning that made the score 5-4. North Marion added a run in the fifth inning to go ahead 6-4, but Lauren Short, Maycee Abendschein and Sarah Brown all recorded RBIs in the bottom half of the inning to give Madras a 7-6 lead. The White Buffaloes added one more run in the sixth to secure the win. Abendschein earned the victory in the circle in addition to going two for four with a pair of doubles from the plate. Madras is at North Marion on Wednesday.

Outlaws stay perfect at 10-0 Bulletin staff report SISTERS — Jordan Hodges put Sisters on the right track from the start. After taking an early 10-0 lead, the Outlaws had no trouble with Cottage Grove, besting the Lions 13-6 to improve to 10-0 in the Sky-Em League baseball standings. Hodges pitched a one-hitter through four innings and the Out-

laws’ bats gave Sisters a 12-0 cushion when Erik Carlson relieved Hodges in the fifth. Cottage Grove scored six runs in the sixth inning — the Lions hit a two-out grand slam to give Sisters a bit of a late scare — but the Outlaws held on for the win. Hodges enjoyed a productive day at the plate as well as on the mound. The Sisters pitcher tallied seven

strikeouts and went three for five with a double at the plate. Jon Lahey also recorded a double for the Outlaws. Sisters, which is 16-3 overall, continues league play today with a home game against Elmira. “Sweep it out, go undefeated and go from there,” said Outlaw coach Steve Hodges about the remainder of the regular season.


D2 Tuesday, May 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

BASEBALL

Today Baseball: Grant at Redmond, 4:30 p.m.; Elmira at Sisters, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Sweet Home, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Grant at Redmond, 4:30 p.m.; Sisters at Elmira, 4:30 p.m.; Sweet Home at La Pine, 4:30 p.m.; Culver at Grant Union (DH), 3 p.m. Boys golf: Mountain View hosts Summit, Bend, Crook County, Madras at Awbrey Glen; Redmond at Central Valley Conference District meet at Quail Valley Golf Course in Banks, 8 a.m. Girls golf: Crook County hosts Mountain View, Madras at Meadow Lakes Golf Club, 11 a.m. Boys tennis: Mountain View at Bend, 4 p.m.; Summit at Crook County, 4 p.m.; Madras at Stayton, 4 p.m. Girls tennis: Bend at Mountain View, 4 p.m.; Crook County at Summit, 4 p.m.; Stayton at Madras, 4 p.m.

8 a.m. — Minor League, Durham Bulls at Indianapolis Indians, MLB Network. 4 p.m. — MLB, New York Yankees at Detroit Tigers or Washington Nationals at Philadelphia Phillies, MLB Network. 7 p.m. — MLB, Texas Rangers at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports. 7 p.m. — MLB, Chicago Cubs at Los Angeles Dodgers or Texas Rangers at Seattle Mariners, MLB Network.

HOCKEY 3:30 p.m. — NHL playoffs, Eastern Conference semifinals, Washington Capitals at Tampa Bay Lightning, Versus network. 6 p.m. — NHL playoffs, Western Conference semifinals, Vancouver Canucks at Nashville Predators, Versus network.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — NBA playoffs, Eastern Conference semifinals, Boston Celtics at Miami Heat, TNT. 6:30 p.m. — NBA playoffs, Western Conference semifinals, Memphis Grizzlies at Oklahoma City Thunder, TNT.

WEDNESDAY SOCCER 2:30 p.m. — UEFA Champions League, Manchester United vs. Schalke 04, FX. 4:30 p.m. — MLS, Seattle Sounders at D.C. United, Root Sports.

BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, Los Angeles Angels at Boston Red Sox, ESPN. 7 p.m. — MLB, Texas Rangers at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports.

HOCKEY 4 p.m. — NHL playoffs, Eastern Conference semifinals, Philadelphia Flyers at Boston Bruins, Versus network.

BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — NBA playoffs, Eastern Conference semifinals, Atlanta Hawks at Chicago Bulls, TNT. 7:30 p.m. — NBA playoffs, Western Conference semifinals, Dallas Mavericks at Los Angeles Lakers, TNT.

RADIO TODAY BASEBALL 5:30 p.m. — College, Oregon at Oregon State, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Football • Oregon suspends linebacker Kiko Alonso: Oregon has indefinitely suspended linebacker Kiko Alonso following his arrest on burglary and trespassing charges. Oregon football coach Chip Kelly announced the suspension Monday in a statement from the university that said there would be no further comment while the case was pending. The 20-year-old junior from Los Gatos, Calif., was arrested early Sunday after a Eugene woman called 911 to report a strange man pounding on her front door demanding to be let inside. Alonso was released later Sunday from the Lane County Jail after he was charged with burglary, trespassing and criminal mischief. He was suspended for the entire 2010 season after a driving while intoxicated citation last winter. • NFL back in court, asks for lockout to be upheld: With its players again barred from work, the NFL told a federal appeals court Monday the fight over whether the lockout is legal won’t get in the way of the 2011 season. The league filed an 18-page brief with the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in St. Louis, arguing that the lockout should remain in effect permanently while appeals play out. The appeals court put U.S. District Judge Susan Richard Nelson’s order lifting the 45-day lockout on hold temporarily last week. The owners reinstated the lockout a few hours later, and they want a more permanent stay of Nelson’s order so they can argue that it should be overturned altogether. A decision from the appeals court is expected soon.

Wednesday Track: Madras at La Salle Tri-Valley Meet in Milwaukie, 3:30 p.m. Baseball: Summit at Bend, 4:30 p.m.; North Marion at Madras, 5 p.m. Softball: Bend at Crook County (DH), 3 p.m.; Mountain View at Redmond (DH), 3 p.m.; Madras at North Marion, 4:30 p.m. Thursday Track: IMC Championships at Summit, 4 p.m. Girls golf: Sisters hosts Summit at Aspen Lakes Boys tennis: Bend at Summit, 4 p.m.; Mountain View at Redmond, 4 p.m.; Estacada at Madras, 4 p.m. Girls tennis: Summit at Bend, 4 p.m.; Redmond at Mountain View, 4 p.m.; Madras at Estacada, 4 p.m.

BASKETBALL NBA NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION Playoffs All Times PDT ——— CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7) EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlanta 1, Chicago 0 Monday, May 2: Atlanta 103, Chicago 95 Wednesday, May 4: Atlanta at Chicago, 5 p.m. Friday, May 6: Chicago at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Sunday, May 8: Chicago at Atlanta, 5 p.m. x-Tueseday, May 10: Atlanta at Chicago, TBA x-Thursday, May 12: Chicago at Atlanta, TBA x-Sunday, May 15: Atlanta at Chicago, TBA Miami 1, Boston 0 Sunday, May 1: Miami 99, Boston 90 Today, May 3: Boston at Miami, 4 p.m. Saturday, May 7: Miami at Boston, 5 p.m. Monday, May 9: Miami at Boston, 4 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 11: Boston at Miami, TBA x-Friday, May 13: Miami at Boston, TBA x-Monday, May 16: Boston at Miami, 5 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Dallas 1, L.A. Lakers 0 Monday, May 2: Dallas 96, L.A. Lakers 94 Wednesday, May 4: Dallas at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 6: L.A. Lakers at Dallas, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, May 8: L.A. Lakers at Dallas, 12:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, May 10: Dallas at L.A. Lakers, TBA x-Thursday, May 12: L.A. Lakers at Dallas, TBA x-Sunday, May 15: Dallas at L.A. Lakers, 12:30 p.m. Memphis 1, Oklahoma City 0 Sunday, May 1: Memphis 114, Oklahoma City 101 Today, May 3: Memphis at Oklahoma City, 6:30 p.m. Saturday, May 7: Oklahoma City at Memphis, 2 p.m. Monday, May 9: Oklahoma City at Memphis, 6:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 11: Memphis at Oklahoma City, TBA x-Friday, May 13: Oklahoma City at Memphis, TBA x-Sunday, May 15: Memphis at Oklahoma City, TBA Monday’s Summaries

Hawks 103, Bulls 95 ATLANTA (103) Williams 2-6 1-1 5, Smith 3-11 2-4 8, Horford 4-7 12 9, Teague 5-11 0-0 10, Johnson 12-18 5-5 34, Wilkins 2-4 0-0 4, Crawford 8-16 4-4 22, Pachulia 2-2 2-2 6, Collins 2-3 1-2 5. Totals 40-78 16-20 103. CHICAGO (95) Deng 8-12 5-6 21, Boozer 6-11 2-2 14, Noah 3-7 5-6 11, Rose 11-27 0-0 24, Bogans 1-4 0-0 3, Brewer 2-4 1-2 6, K.Thomas 0-0 0-0 0, Korver 3-7 0-0 9, Gibson 1-3 0-0 2, Watson 2-7 0-0 5, Asik 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 37-83 13-16 95. Atlanta 28 23 21 31 — 103 Chicago 18 32 21 24 — 95 3-Point Goals—Atlanta 7-13 (Johnson 5-5, Crawford 2-4, Teague 0-1, Smith 0-1, Williams 0-2), Chicago 8-18 (Korver 3-4, Rose 2-7, Brewer 1-1, Bogans 1-3, Watson 1-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Atlanta 45 (Horford 13), Chicago 46 (Noah 9). Assists—Atlanta 20 (Teague 5), Chicago 21 (Rose 10). Total Fouls—Atlanta 17, Chicago 16. Technicals—Noah, Chicago Coach Thibodeau, Chicago defensive three second. Flagrant Fouls—Smith. A—22,890 (20,917).

15, Blake 0-1 0-0 0, Brown 3-6 0-1 6, Barnes 2-6 0-0 4. Totals 36-84 17-20 94. Dallas 25 19 27 25 — 96 L.A. Lakers 23 30 25 16 — 94 3-Point Goals—Dallas 9-20 (Kidd 2-3, Stojakovic 2-3, Barea 2-4, Nowitzki 1-2, Brewer 1-2, Terry 1-4, Stevenson 0-2), L.A. Lakers 5-19 (Bryant 4-9, Fisher 1-2, Odom 0-1, Blake 0-1, Barnes 0-1, Brown 0-2, Artest 03). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Dallas 43 (Nowitzki 14), L.A. Lakers 50 (Odom 12). Assists—Dallas 30 (Kidd 11), L.A. Lakers 21 (Gasol 7). Total Fouls—Dallas 17, L.A. Lakers 12. Technicals—Chandler, Nowitzki, Gasol. A—18,997 (18,997).

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE Playoffs All Times PDT ——— CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Tampa Bay 2, Washington 0 Friday, April 29: Tampa Bay 4, Washington 2 Sunday, May 1: Tampa Bay 3, Washington 2 Today, May 3: Washington at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 4: Washington at Tampa Bay, 4 p.m. x-Saturday, May 7: Tampa Bay at Washington, 9:30 a.m. x-Monday, May 9; Washington at Tampa Bay, TBA x-Wednesday, May 11: Tampa Bay at Washington, TBA Boston 1, Philadelphia 0 Saturday, April 30: Boston 7, Philadelphia 3 Monday, May 2: Boston at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 4: Philadelphia at Boston, 4 p.m. Friday, May 6: Philadelphia at Boston, 5 p.m. x-Sunday, May 8: Boston at Philadelphia, noon x-Tuesday, May 10: Philadelphia at Boston, TBA x-Thursday, May 12: Boston at Philadelphia, TBA WESTERN CONFERENCE Vancouver 1, Nashville 1 Thursday, April 28: Vancouver 1, Nashville 0 Saturday, April 30: Nashville 2, Vancouver 1, 2OT Today, May 3: Vancouver at Nashville, 6 p.m. Thursday, May 5: Vancouver at Nashville, 5:30 p.m. Saturday, May 7: Nashville at Vancouver, 5 p.m. x-Monday, May 9: Vancouver at Nashville, TBA x-Wednesday, May 11: Nashville at Vancouver, TBA San Jose 2, Detroit 0 Friday, April 29: San Jose 2, Detroit 1, OT Sunday, May 1: San Jose 2, Detroit 1 Wednesday, May 4: San Jose at Detroit, 5 p.m. Friday, May 6: San Jose at Detroit, 4 p.m. x-Sunday, May 8: Detroit at San Jose, 5 p.m. x-Tuesday, May 10: San Jose at Detroit, TBA x-Thursday, May 12: Detroit at San Jose, TBA

TENNIS ATP Tour

Mavs 96, Lakers 94 DALLAS (96) Marion 5-13 0-0 10, Nowitzki 11-22 5-5 28, Chandler 5-8 1-2 11, Kidd 2-4 1-2 7, Stevenson 0-3 0-0 0, Stojakovic 4-8 0-0 10, Terry 6-10 2-2 15, Haywood 1-1 0-0 2, Barea 3-6 0-0 8, Brewer 2-4 0-0 5. Totals 39-79 9-11 96. L.A. LAKERS (94) Artest 1-8 0-0 2, Gasol 5-10 5-6 15, Bynum 3-8 2-2 8, Fisher 3-6 1-1 8, Bryant 14-29 4-5 36, Odom 5-10 5-5

Golf • ‘Bad rule’ that hurt Webb Simpson under review: Webb Simpson called it a “bad rule.” He was penalized a stroke because the ball moved as he was addressing it on the green, costing him one stroke and perhaps his first PGA Tour victory. The U.S. Golf Association appears to agree. Vice President Thomas O’Toole said Monday there will be talks to modify the rule, with any change taking place at the start of 2012. Simpson, leading by one shot, was less than a foot from the cup at the 15th hole on Sunday at the Zurich Classic of New Orleans when the ball moved. Simpson said it was probably caused by wind, combined with relatively dry and hard greens.

Hockey • U.S. rallies to beat Norway at ice hockey worlds: Nick Palmieri scored twice and the United States scored four third-period goals to beat Norway 4-2 in Slovakia Monday and advance to the second round of the ice hockey world championship. Norway took a 2-0 lead with goals 73 seconds apart from Ken Andre Climb and Anders Bastiansen in the first period. But Palmieri, who played for the New Jersey Devils, started the comeback and also scored the winner after Jack Skille tied it at 2. The U.S. outshot Norway 49-15 and will face Sweden in its final Group C match on Wednesday. —From wire reports

13 13 GA 9 2 7 8 10 13 6 14 10

BASEBALL College

ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— Mutua Madrilena Masters/Open Monday Madrid, Spain Singles Men First Round Gael Monfils (9), France def. Ivo Karlovic, Croatia,

Baseball • Oregon State’s Osich named Pac-10 pitcher of the week: Oregon State left-hander Josh Osich made history with the team’s fourth no-hitter on Saturday, and on Monday, made some history of his own with his first career Pacific-10 Conference Pitcher of the Week honor. The league bestowed it upon Osich just two days after he threw the team’s first complete-game no-hitter since 1947. He struck out a career-best 13 and was just one batter over the minimum in improving to 6-1 this season. Osich’s no-hitter was the first by a Pac-10 pitcher against a league opponent since Jason Middlebrook no-hit UCLA in 1994. It is the Beavers’ first since Mike Stutes, Jorge Reyes, Mark Grbavac and Josh Keller combined to no-hit Hawaii-Hilo in 2007, which also happened to be the last by a Pac-10 program. The Beavers host Oregon Tuesday night in a game slated to start at 5:35 p.m. at Goss Stadium. A short pre-game ceremony honoring Osich will begin approximately 10 minutes prior to the first pitch.

Chicago 1 3 3 6 10 Sporting Kansas City 1 4 1 4 10 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Los Angeles 4 2 3 15 11 Real Salt Lake 4 1 0 12 8 Seattle 3 2 3 12 10 Colorado 3 3 1 10 9 FC Dallas 3 3 1 10 10 Portland 3 3 1 10 10 Chivas USA 2 2 3 9 8 Vancouver 1 4 3 6 11 San Jose 1 4 2 5 6 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. Wednesday’s Games Seattle FC at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m. Colorado at Houston, 5:30 p.m. Friday’s Game Philadelphia at Portland, 7:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Chivas USA at Real Salt Lake, 1 p.m. Houston at Toronto FC, 4 p.m. FC Dallas at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m. Colorado at New England, 4:30 p.m. Seattle FC at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. Vancouver at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. New York at Los Angeles, 8 p.m.

IN THE BLEACHERS

6-3, 7-6 (6). Michael Llodra, France, def. Sam Querrey, United States, 6-2, 6-3. Pere Riba, Spain, def. Kei Nishikori, Japan, 6-2, 6-4. Adrian Mannarino, France, def. Juan Ignacio Chela, Argentina, 4-6, 6-4, 6-4. Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, def. Albert Montanes, Spain, 7-6 (6), 3-6, 7-6 (5). Marin Cilic, Croatia, def. Potito Starace, Italy, 7-6 (5), 6-4. Xavier Malisse, Belgium, def. Victor Hanescu, Romania, 3-6, 6-4, 7-5. John Isner, United States, def. Mardy Fish (11), United States, 7-6 (5), 4-6, 7-6 (3). Thiemo De Bakker, Netherlands, def. Juan Carlos Ferrero, Spain, 2-6, 7-5, 6-4. Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus, def. Alejandro Falla, Colombia, 6-3, 3-6, 7-6 (5). Flavio Cipolla, Italy, def. Andy Roddick (12), United States, 6-4, 6-7 (7), 6-3. Daniel Gimeno-Traver, Spain, def. Richard Gasquet, France, 3-6, 6-4, 6-3.

WTA Tour WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— Mutua Madrilena Masters/Open Monday Madrid, Spain Singles Women First Round Alisa Kleybanova, Russia, def. Shahar Peer (9), Israel, 6-3, 6-2. Iveta Benesova, Czech Republic, def. Barbora Zahlavova Strycova, Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-2. Roberta Vinci, Italy, def. Olga Govortsova, Belarus, 6-4, 6-0. Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic, def. Anabel Medina Garrigues, Spain, 6-2, 2-6, 7-6 (3). Li Na (6), China, def. Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez, Spain, 6-4, 7-6 (6). Dinara Safina, Russia, def. Nuria LLagostera Vives, Spain, 5-7, 6-4, 6-3. Second Round Maria Sharapova (8), Russia, def. Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, 6-3, 3-6, 6-1. Arantxa Parra Santonja, Spain, def. Andrea Petkovic (13), Germany, 6-2, 7-6 (5). Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakia, def. Agnes Szavay, Hungary, walkover. Victoria Azarenka (4), Belarus, def. Sofia Arvidsson, Sweden, 6-1, 6-1. Vera Zvonareva (2), Russia, def. Elena Vesnina, Russia, 0-6, 6-3, 6-3.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts New York 4 1 2 14 Philadelphia 4 1 1 13 Houston 3 1 3 12 Columbus 3 1 3 12 New England 2 3 3 9 D.C. 2 4 1 7 Toronto FC 1 3 4 7

GF 10 5 11 7 8 10 7

GA 2 2 6 5 12 16 13

Pacific-10 Conference All Times PDT ——— Conference Overall W L W L Oregon State 12 3 32 9 Arizona State 13 5 31 10 UCLA 11 7 23 16 California 11 7 26 14 Arizona 9 9 27 16 USC 8 10 18 25 Stanford 6 8 21 15 Oregon 5 10 22 20 Washington State 5 13 19 20 Washington 4 11 13 27 Monday’s Game x-Brigham Young at Arizona State, 6:30 p.m. Today’s Games x-Stanford at San Jose State, 1 p.m. x-UCLA at Pepperdine, 3 p.m. x-Oregon at Oregon State, 5:35 p.m. x-UC Riverside at USC, 6 p.m. x-California at Santa Clara, 6 p.m. x-Brigham Young at Arizona State, 6:30 p.m. x=nonleague POLLS Baseball America Top 25 The top 25 teams in the Baseball America poll with records through May 1 and previous ranking (voting by the staff of Baseball America): Record Pvs 1. Virginia 42-5 1 2. South Carolina 35-8 2 3. Oregon State 32-9 3 4. Vanderbilt 38-5 4 5. Florida 34-10 5 6. Texas 33-11 7 7. Arizona State 31-10 8 8. Florida State 33-11 9 9. Texas A&M 30-14 6 10. Cal State Fullerton 30-13 10 11. Texas Christian 31-13 11 12. Southern Mississippi 32-11 15 13. Georgia Tech 31-14 12 14. Oklahoma 31-13 14 15. Stetson 34-10 17 16. Oklahoma State 30-13 19 17. Miami 29-15 16 18. North Carolina 33-10 18 19. Fresno State 29-9 13 20. Connecticut 31-13 23 21. California 26-14 20 22. Clemson 29-15 NR 23. Gonzaga 25-13 NR 24. Rice 28-16 25 25. Texas State 28-16 NR Collegiate Baseball The Collegiate Baseball poll with records through May 1, points and previous rank. Voting is done by coaches, sports writers and sports information directors: Record Pts Pvs 1. South Carolina 35-8 496 2 2. Virginia 42-5 495 1 3. Vanderbilt 38-5 494 3 4. Oregon St. 32-9 493 6 5. Florida 34-10 492 5 6. Texas 33-11 489 4 7. Arizona St. 31-10 485 10 8. Texas Christian 31-13 479 7 9. Texas A&M 30-14 478 8 10. Georgia Tech 31-14 476 9 11. Florida St. 33-11 475 12 12. Cal St. Fullerton 30-13 472 11 13. UCLA 23-16 465 13 14. Miami, Fla. 29-15 462 14 15. Oklahoma 31-13 460 15 16. Connecticut 31-13-1 459 18 17. North Carolina 33-10 458 17 18. Fresno St. 29-9 454 16 19. Oklahoma St. 30-13 450 21 20. Southern Miss. 32-11 448 19 21. Clemson 29-15 447 25 22. Stetson 34-10 446 23 23. U.C. Irvine 28-12 443 20 24. California 26-14 440 24 25. Charlotte 34-10 439 26 26. Arizona 27-16 437 —

27. Arkansas 28. Kent St. 29. Rice 30. Coastal Carolina

29-13 30-12 28-16 30-15

435 434 433 430

22 29 28 —

AUTO RACING IRL Sao Paulo Indy 300 Results Monday At Sao Paulo Street Circuit Sao Paulo, Brazil Lap length: 2.536 miles (Starting position in parentheses) 1. (1) Will Power, Dallara-Honda, 55, Running. 2. (5) Graham Rahal, Dallara-Honda, 55, Running. 3. (4) Ryan Briscoe, Dallara-Honda, 55, Running. 4. (6) Dario Franchitti, Dallara-Honda, 55, Running. 5. (16) Oriol Servia, Dallara-Honda, 55, Running. 6. (9) Mike Conway, Dallara-Honda, 55, Running. 7. (8) Justin Wilson, Dallara-Honda, 55, Running. 8. (10) Takuma Sato, Dallara-Honda, 55, Running. 9. (11) James Hinchcliffe, Dallara-Honda, 55, Running. 10. (22) J.R. Hildebrand, Dallara-Honda, 55, Running. 11. (23) Sebastian Saavedra, Dallara-Honda, 55, Running. 12. (3) Scott Dixon, Dallara-Honda, 55, Running. 13. (26) E.J. Viso, Dallara-Honda, 55, Running. 14. (15) Marco Andretti, Dallara-Honda, 55, Running. 15. (24) James Jakes, Dallara-Honda, 55, Running. 16. (18) Charlie Kimball, Dallara-Honda, 54, Running. 17. (14) Vitor Meira, Dallara-Honda, 53, Running. 18. (2) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Dallara-Honda, 50, Running. 19. (20) Alex Tagliani, Dallara-Honda, 48, Running. 20. (13) Simona de Silvestro, Dallara-Honda, 46, Running. 21. (7) Helio Castroneves, Dallara-Honda, 46, Running. 22. (21) Tony Kanaan, Dallara-Honda, 46, Running. 23. (17) Danica Patrick, Dallara-Honda, 46, Running. 24. (25) Ana Beatriz, Dallara-Honda, 31, Mechanical. 25. (19) Raphael Matos, Dallara-Honda, 28, Contact. 26. (12) Sebastien Bourdais, Dallara-Honda, 20, Contact. ——— Race Statistics Winners average speed: 67.442. Time of Race: 2:04:05.2964. Margin of Victory: 4.6723 seconds. Cautions: 6 for 20 laps. Lead Changes: 2 among 2 drivers. Lap Leaders: Power 1-25, Sato 26-48, Power 49-55. Points: Power 168, Franchitti 154, Servia 110, Conway 102, Briscoe 101, Kanaan 99, Tagliani 85, Dixon 84, Rahal 82, Sato 80.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB—Suspended minor league RHP Andrew Doyle (Myrtle Beach-Carolina) 50 games for a second drug violation. American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Activated RHP Chris Jakubauskas from the 15-day DL and optioned him to Norfolk (IL). National League ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Placed 3B David Freese on the 15-day DL. Activated INF-OF Allen Craig from the 15-day DL. HOCKEY National Hockey League PHOENIX COYOTES—Announced the resignation of associate coach Ulf Samuelsson to become coach of MODO (Swedish Elite). COLLEGE ARIZONA STATE—Announced women’s basketball coach Charli Turner Thorne is taking a leaving of absence for the 2011-2012 season and plans to return in the spring of 2012. Named associate head coach Joseph Anders interim coach. CASTLETON STATE—Announced softball and men’s soccer coach John Werner has resigned as softball coach. EARLHAM—Named Melissa Johnson women’s basketball coach. ILLINOIS-CHICAGO—Named Stew Robinson men’s assistant basketball coach. KING (TENN.)—Named David Hicks athletic director. MARQUETTE—Named John Orsen men’s assistant lacrosse coach. OHIO STATE—Suspended sophomore LB Dorian Bell for the 2011 season for a violation of team rules. OREGON—Suspended junior LB Kiko Alonso indefinitely, following his arrest on burglary and trespassing charges. PRESBYTERIAN—Announced resignation of women’s lacrosse coach Kristina Llanes.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 15,766 373 72 19 The Dalles 5,235 72 10 4 John Day 2,377 64 27 17 McNary 402 11 25 18 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 50,518 934 3,793 1,547 The Dalles 13,583 250 1,108 651 John Day 5,136 161 2,423 1,580 McNary 1,064 33 2,308 1,450

N H L P L AYO F F R O U N D U P

Overtime win gives Bruins 2-0 lead over Flyers By Dan Gelston The Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — David Krejci scored 14:00 into overtime, Tim Thomas was phenomenal in net, and the Boston Bruins beat the Philadelphia Flyers 3-2 on Monday night to take a 2-0 lead in the Eastern Conference semifinal series. Thomas stopped 46 straight shots after the Flyers took a quick 2-0 lead. The series now shifts to Boston for the next two games on Wednesday and Friday. Krejci fired a one-timer from one knee that ricocheted off the back of the net and back onto the ice. Play continued until officials could review the call. But the goal was clearly good. “At first I thought it was in. Then they kept playing,” Krejci said. James van Riemsdyk had a breakout game for the Flyers. He scored two goals and was all over the ice trying to help the Flyers win at least one at home. Instead, they have to rally from another deficit. Chris Kelly and Brad Marchand also scored for the Bruins, who have taken a seemingly commanding lead on the Flyers for the second straight year. Boston led 3-0 in the East semis a year ago before the Flyers won four straight to advance — including a rally from a 3-0 hole in Game 7. Thomas was on the bench for that collapse. He is determined not to let that happen on his watch. Thomas, who

Matt Slocum / The Associated Press

Philadelphia Flyers’ Brian Boucher, left, clears the puck under pressure from Boston Bruins’ Brad Marchand during the third period in Game 2 of the Eastern Conference semifinal NHL Stanley Cup playoffs series, Monday in Philadelphia. finished with 52 saves Monday, was tested under pressure all game and shook off the slow start to stop everything fired his way. “By the third period, I was really starting to get into a rhythm, which was a good thing because they were really getting off shots,” Thomas said. Thomas stood strong when the Flyers outshot the Bruins 13-3 to open the third and took 22 overall in the period. It was the one they didn’t shoot that haunted them. Danny Briere,

who has seven goals this postseason, fanned on an easy look off a faceoff. Thomas was out of position after a blocked shot sent the puck to Briere, and the All-Star seemingly just had to connect. His second attempt was stopped by Thomas as the final seconds of regulation ticked off. “I never saw the puck,” Briere said. Brian Boucher couldn’t hold off the OT charge. Boucher won games this postseason as a starter and reliever. He mixed both in Game 2. Boucher

stopped 21 shots before he left the game in the middle of the second after he appeared to hurt his wrist. It was the fifth time in nine playoff games the Flyers made a goalie switch — the first because of injury rather than ineffectiveness. The score was 2-2 when Boucher left and when he returned. The crowd was rocking from the start after they heard the usual stirring rendition of “God Bless America,” live by Lauren Hart and on video by the late Kate Smith. Fans chanted “U-S-A! U-S-A!” after lineups were introduced, and again after the song was finished, a day after Osama bin Laden was killed. “That was pretty cool, as an American,” van Riemsdyk said. “And the fans are pretty passionate about sports and our country. That was pretty cool to be a part of.” Van Riemsdyk kept 20,000 orange-clad fans roaring when he scored only 29 seconds into the game. He beat Thomas again midway into the period, mixing the power play with a dose of pride and patriotism, for the fast lead. In these playoffs, a 2-0 lead almost seems like a 2-0 hole. The Flyers are forced to keep attacking because the goaltending has been so porous. Sure enough, Boucher and the Flyers blew it in a hurry. Kelly scored off a rebound, and Marchand’s wrister through Boucher’s legs gave Boston goals only 1:25 apart. After a four-goal first, the teams settled down until Krejci’s winner.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 3, 2011 D3

M A JOR L E AGUE BA SE BA L L AL BOXSCORES Yankees 5, Tigers 3 New York AB R H Jeter ss 5 0 2 Granderson cf 3 1 0 Teixeira 1b 3 2 1 Al.Rodriguez 3b 5 1 1 Swisher rf 4 0 2 Posada dh 5 0 2 Martin c 4 0 1 Gardner lf 1 1 1 E.Nunez 2b 4 0 1 Totals 34 5 11

BI 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 4

BB 0 2 2 0 1 0 1 2 0 8

SO 2 1 0 1 1 2 2 0 1 10

Avg. .250 .272 .258 .269 .231 .150 .291 .211 .333

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Jackson cf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .188 Santiago 2b 4 1 3 0 0 0 .289 Ordonez dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .151 Mi.Cabrera 1b 4 0 3 1 0 0 .350 Boesch rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .300 Raburn lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .243 Jh.Peralta ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .258 Avila c 4 2 2 2 0 1 .309 Inge 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .207 Totals 35 3 8 3 0 9 New York 210 000 002 — 5 11 0 Detroit 011 000 100 — 3 8 0 LOB—New York 11, Detroit 5. 2B—Swisher (3), Posada (2), E.Nunez (2), Santiago (2). HR—Avila 2 (5), off Colon 2. RBIs—Swisher (13), Posada 2 (14), E.Nunez (1), Mi.Cabrera (21), Avila 2 (21). SB—E.Nunez (3). CS—Jeter (2), Granderson (1). S—Gardner. Runners left in scoring position—New York 9 (Martin 3, Granderson 2, Jeter 2, Posada 2); Detroit 1 (Boesch). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Colon 7 7 3 3 0 7 97 3.00 Chmbrln W, 2-0 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 3.86 Rvra S, 11-13 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 1.84 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Verlander 6 8 3 3 4 8 127 3.75 Thomas 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 10.38 Perry 2-3 1 0 0 1 1 17 5.68 Alburquerque 1 0 0 0 1 0 14 1.93 Valverde L, 2-1 1 2 2 1 2 1 35 1.54 WP—Verlander, Alburquerque. PB—Avila. T—3:13. A—22,852 (41,255).

Athletics 5, Rangers 4 (10 innings) Texas Andrus ss Moreland 1b-rf Mi.Young 2b A.Beltre dh N.Cruz rf-lf Dav.Murphy lf-cf C.Davis 3b Teagarden c b-Torrealba ph-c Borbon cf a-Napoli ph-1b Totals

AB 4 5 3 3 5 3 4 3 1 2 1 34

R 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 4

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 3 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 8 4 6

SO 1 0 1 1 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 7

Avg. .257 .277 .342 .252 .225 .286 .235 .000 .288 .259 .240

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. M.Ellis 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .186 Barton 1b 4 1 0 0 1 1 .202 C.Jackson rf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .274 Willingham lf 4 1 2 1 1 2 .247 Matsui dh 5 1 1 2 0 0 .242 K.Suzuki c 4 1 2 1 0 0 .267 DeJesus cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .226 An.LaRoche 3b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .341 Pennington ss 3 0 2 1 1 0 .244 Totals 36 5 11 5 4 5 Texas 002 020 000 0 — 4 8 1 Oakland 010 110 010 1 — 5 11 2 No outs when winning run scored. a-grounded out for Borbon in the 9th. b-struck out for Teagarden in the 10th. E—Andrus (7), McCarthy 2 (3). LOB—Texas 10, Oakland 9. 2B—Mi.Young (13), Borbon (1), M.Ellis (8), Willingham (5). HR—K.Suzuki (3), off Holland; Willingham (5), off Rhodes; Matsui (3), off Oliver. RBIs— Mi.Young 3 (23), A.Beltre (23), Willingham (16), Matsui 2 (15), K.Suzuki (8), Pennington (8). CS—Pennington (4). S—Andrus, Borbon, M.Ellis. SF—Mi.Young, A.Beltre. Runners left in scoring position—Texas 5 (A.Beltre 2, N.Cruz, Torrealba 2); Oakland 5 (Matsui, Barton, M.Ellis, K.Suzuki, Willingham). Runners moved up—Barton, Matsui. GIDP—C.Davis, M.Ellis. DP—Texas 1 (C.Davis, Mi.Young, Moreland); Oakland 2 (M.Ellis, Barton), (Pennington, Barton). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Holland 7 8 3 2 2 4 103 4.66 Rhodes 1 2 1 1 0 0 17 3.24 Eppley 1 0 0 0 2 1 25 1.59 Oliver L, 1-3 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 3.18 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McCarthy 6 6 4 0 2 4 101 3.05 Breslow 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 12 3.72 Ziegler 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 7 0.00 Wuertz 1 1 0 0 0 1 18 0.00 Fuentes 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 3.60 Balfour W, 2-1 1 0 0 0 3 2 30 2.25 Oliver pitched to 1 batter in the 10th. Inherited runners-scored—Ziegler 1-0. IBB—off Eppley (Barton). T—3:08. A—9,193 (35,067).

White Sox 6, Orioles 2 Baltimore B.Roberts 2b Markakis rf 1-C.Izturis pr D.Lee 1b Guerrero dh Scott lf Ad.Jones cf Mar.Reynolds 3b Wieters c Andino ss Totals

AB 5 4 0 4 5 4 5 4 2 3 36

R H 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 11

Chicago Pierre lf Al.Ramirez ss A.Dunn dh Konerko 1b Quentin rf Pierzynski c Rios cf Teahen 3b Morel 3b Beckham 2b Totals Baltimore Chicago

AB 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 3 0 2 29 000 001

R 0 1 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 1 6 000 101

BI 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 1 5

SO 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 3 1 1 9

Avg. .250 .217 .200 .248 .274 .246 .228 .176 .241 .314

H BI BB SO Avg. 1 1 0 0 .250 1 0 1 0 .259 0 0 1 1 .165 2 4 0 0 .304 1 0 0 1 .288 1 0 0 0 .258 2 1 0 0 .168 0 0 0 2 .256 0 0 0 0 .194 1 0 0 0 .214 9 6 2 4 002 — 2 11 0 12x — 6 9 0

1-ran for Markakis in the 9th. LOB—Baltimore 13, Chicago 4. 2B—Ad.Jones (3), Mar.Reynolds (7). HR—D.Lee (2), off Sale; Konerko (7), off Guthrie; Rios (2), off Guthrie; Konerko (8), off Rupe. RBIs—D.Lee 2 (6), Pierre (8), Konerko 4 (24), Rios (7). SB—Ad.Jones (3), Rios (4). CS—Pierre (8), Beckham (1). S—Pierre. SF—Konerko. Runners left in scoring position—Baltimore 7 (Guerrero, Andino 2, Scott, B.Roberts, Wieters, Ad.Jones); Chicago 2 (Quentin, Rios). Runners moved up—Wieters. GIDP—D.Lee, Guerrero. DP—Chicago 2 (Al.Ramirez, Beckham, Konerko), (Al. Ramirez, Beckham, Konerko). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Guthrie L, 1-4 7 5 4 4 2 4 110 3.00 Rapada 2-3 1 1 1 0 0 10 16.20 Rupe 1-3 3 1 1 0 0 12 7.59 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Buehrle W, 2-3 6 2-3 8 0 0 4 4 107 4.37 Crain H, 3 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 3 25 1.26 Sale 2-3 2 2 2 1 1 34 7.15 S.Santos S, 3-3 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 0.00 Inherited runners-scored—Rupe 1-1, Crain 1-0, S.Santos 2-0. HBP—by Guthrie (Beckham), by Sale (Markakis). T—2:43. A—18,007 (40,615).

Red Sox 9, Angels 5 Los Angeles M.Izturis 2b Abreu dh H.Kendrick 1b Tor.Hunter rf Callaspo 3b V.Wells lf Aybar ss Mathis c Bourjos cf Totals

AB 4 5 5 4 4 4 4 3 4 37

R H 1 3 0 2 1 2 0 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 5 13

BI 1 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 5

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3

Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Weaver L, 6-1 6 6 3 3 1 6 118 1.39 Takahashi 1-3 2 2 2 0 0 9 4.97 F.Rodriguez 1 2-3 3 4 4 1 1 38 6.52 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA C.Bchlz W, 2-3 6 2-3 8 2 2 2 2 107 4.81 Bard H, 4 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 3.55 Wheeler 1 1-3 4 3 3 0 1 26 9.90 Okajima 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 12 6.23 Inherited runners-scored—F.Rodriguez 2-2, Bard 10, Okajima 1-1. WP—C.Buchholz. PB—Mathis. T—3:29. A—37,017 (37,493).

NL BOXSCORES Braves 6, Brewers 2 AB 4 3 4 4 4 4 3 0 0 4 2 0 0 1 33

R 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 2 1

SO 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 6

Avg. .300 .236 .352 .318 .257 .222 .265 --.264 .172 .200 .000 --.172

Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Prado lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .252 Heyward rf 2 1 0 0 2 2 .248 C.Jones 3b 3 1 2 0 1 1 .282 Uggla 2b 3 1 2 0 1 0 .209 Freeman 1b 1 1 0 1 2 0 .215 Ale.Gonzalez ss 4 1 2 3 0 0 .241 McLouth cf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .252 D.Ross c 4 1 2 1 0 0 .318 Jurrjens p 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 O’Flaherty p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Hinske ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Kimbrel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 29 6 10 6 6 7 Milwaukee 000 200 000 — 2 7 0 Atlanta 001 004 10x — 6 10 0 a-grounded out for O’Flaherty in the 8th. b-walked for Green in the 9th. LOB—Milwaukee 6, Atlanta 6. 2B—C.Jones (9), Ale. Gonzalez (6). 3B—Y.Betancourt (1). HR—D.Ross (3), off Gallardo. RBIs—Y.Betancourt 2 (12), Freeman (9), Ale. Gonzalez 3 (13), McLouth (8), D.Ross (8). SB—Braun (4). CS—Prado (2). S—C.Gomez. SF—Freeman. Runners left in scoring position—Milwaukee 4 (Fielder 3, Nieves); Atlanta 2 (Uggla, Ale.Gonzalez). Runners moved up—Braun, Fielder. GIDP—Freeman, Ale.Gonzalez, D.Ross. DP—Milwaukee 3 (Weeks, Y.Betancourt, Fielder), (Y.Betancourt, Weeks, Fielder), (Y.Betancourt, Weeks, Fielder). Milwaukee IP Gallardo L, 2-2 5 Kintzler 1 1-3 Braddock 1-3 Green 1 1-3 Atlanta IP Jurrjens W, 3-0 7 2-3 O’Flaherty H, 4 1-3 Kimbrel 1

H 9 0 1 0 H 7 0 0

R 5 0 1 0 R 2 0 0

ER 5 0 1 0 ER 2 0 0

BB 4 0 2 0 BB 0 0 1

SO 7 0 0 0 SO 4 0 2

NP 89 8 18 7 NP 101 3 18

AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division New York Tampa Bay Baltimore Boston Toronto Central Division Cleveland Kansas City Detroit Chicago Minnesota West Division Los Angeles Texas Oakland Seattle

W 17 15 13 13 13 W 19 15 12 11 9 W 16 16 15 13

L 9 13 14 15 15 L 8 13 17 19 18 L 13 13 14 16

Pct .654 .536 .481 .464 .464 Pct .704 .536 .414 .367 .333 Pct .552 .552 .517 .448

NATIONAL LEAGUE GB — 3 4½ 5 5 GB — 4½ 8 9½ 10 GB — — 1 3

Monday’s Games Oakland 5, Texas 4, 10 innings N.Y. Yankees 5, Detroit 3 Boston 9, L.A. Angels 5 Chicago White Sox 6, Baltimore 2

ERA 6.10 3.29 2.79 5.91 ERA 1.52 1.29 2.13

WCGB — ½ 2 2½ 2½ WCGB — ½ 4 5½ 6 WCGB — — 1 3

L10 7-3 6-4 5-5 6-4 5-5 L10 7-3 4-6 3-7 3-7 3-7 L10 4-6 4-6 6-4 7-3

Str W-3 L-1 L-1 W-2 L-2 Str W-6 W-3 L-7 W-1 L-6 Str L-1 L-2 W-2 L-1

Home Away 12-6 5-3 7-9 8-4 7-8 6-6 7-6 6-9 6-5 7-10 Home Away 13-2 6-6 12-5 3-8 6-7 6-10 5-9 6-10 4-6 5-12 Home Away 6-7 10-6 11-5 5-8 7-6 8-8 5-8 8-8

East Division Florida Philadelphia Atlanta Washington New York Central Division St. Louis Cincinnati Pittsburgh Milwaukee Chicago Houston West Division Colorado Los Angeles San Francisco Arizona San Diego

Today’s Games Toronto (Jo-.Reyes 0-2) at Tampa Bay (W.Davis 3-2), 3:40 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 2-1) at Detroit (Penny 1-3), 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Haren 4-1) at Boston (Lester 3-1), 4:10 p.m. Baltimore (Bergesen 0-3) at Kansas City (Francis 0-3), 5:10 p.m. Minnesota (Liriano 1-4) at Chicago White Sox (E.Jackson 2-3), 5:10 p.m. Cleveland (Carmona 2-3) at Oakland (T.Ross 1-2), 7:05 p.m. Texas (Ogando 3-0) at Seattle (Bedard 1-4), 7:10 p.m.

Avg. .333 .277 .304 .237 .289 .172 .322 .189 .297

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ellsbury cf 4 3 2 0 0 0 .275 D.McDonald cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .111 Pedroia 2b 4 1 1 2 1 1 .264 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 4 1 1 3 0 0 .310 Youkilis 3b 4 1 2 2 0 2 .232 Ortiz dh 4 1 2 2 0 0 .277 J.Drew rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .243 Lowrie ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .342 Crawford lf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .181 Varitek c 3 1 1 0 1 1 .128 Totals 36 9 11 9 2 7 Los Angeles 001 010 021 — 5 13 1 Boston 100 020 60x — 9 11 0 E—Bourjos (2). LOB—Los Angeles 7, Boston 5. 2B— M.Izturis 2 (9), Tor.Hunter (4), Ellsbury (8), Ad.Gonzalez (11), Youkilis (7), Crawford (5). HR—V.Wells (2), off Wheeler; Ortiz (3), off F.Rodriguez. RBIs—M.Izturis (10), Abreu 2 (11), V.Wells 2 (8), Pedroia 2 (10), Ad.Gonzalez 3 (18), Youkilis 2 (17), Ortiz 2 (15). SB—Abreu (4), Bourjos (3), Ellsbury 2 (7). Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 4 (H.Kendrick 3, Abreu); Boston 1 (Ortiz). Runners moved up—M.Izturis. GIDP—Tor.Hunter, Callaspo. DP—Boston 2 (Youkilis, Ad.Gonzalez), (Pedroia, Ad.Gonzalez).

Milwaukee Weeks 2b C.Gomez cf Braun lf Fielder 1b McGehee 3b C.Hart rf Y.Betancourt ss Green p b-Kotsay ph Nieves c Gallardo p Kintzler p Braddock p Counsell ss Totals

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES W 18 18 15 14 12 W 16 14 14 13 12 11 W 17 15 13 12 11

L 9 9 15 14 16 L 13 14 15 15 16 17 L 9 15 15 15 18

Pct .667 .667 .500 .500 .429 Pct .552 .500 .483 .464 .429 .393 Pct .654 .500 .464 .444 .379

Monday’s Games Washington 2, San Francisco 0 Atlanta 6, Milwaukee 2 Houston at Cincinnati, ppd., rain Florida 6, St. Louis 5 Pittsburgh 4, San Diego 3 L.A. Dodgers 5, Chicago Cubs 2

GB — — 4½ 4½ 6½ GB — 1½ 2 2½ 3½ 4½ GB — 4 5 5½ 7½

WCGB — — 4½ 4½ 6½ WCGB — 4½ 5 5½ 6½ 7½ WCGB — 4½ 5½ 6 8

L10 7-3 7-3 7-3 5-5 7-3 L10 6-4 5-5 6-4 4-6 3-7 4-6 L10 5-5 5-5 3-7 4-6 3-7

Str W-2 L-1 W-2 W-2 W-1 Str L-2 L-1 W-2 L-3 L-2 W-2 Str L-1 W-1 L-2 W-1 L-1

Home Away 10-5 8-4 9-5 9-4 6-7 9-8 9-7 5-7 5-8 7-8 Home Away 6-7 10-6 8-8 6-6 4-8 10-7 8-5 5-10 6-8 6-8 7-9 4-8 Home Away 7-6 10-3 9-7 6-8 4-5 9-10 8-8 4-7 4-12 7-6

Today’s Games Washington (L.Hernandez 3-2) at Philadelphia (Hamels 3-1), 4:05 p.m. Houston (Happ 1-4) at Cincinnati (Leake 3-0), 4:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Estrada 1-0) at Atlanta (Hanson 3-3), 4:10 p.m. San Francisco (Vogelsong 1-0) at N.Y. Mets (Dickey 1-3), 4:10 p.m. Florida (Ani.Sanchez 1-1) at St. Louis (McClellan 4-0), 5:15 p.m. Colorado (De La Rosa 4-0) at Arizona (J.Saunders 0-3), 6:40 p.m. Pittsburgh (Karstens 2-1) at San Diego (Latos 0-4), 7:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Dempster 1-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 2-1), 7:10 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Yankees 5, Tigers 3: DETROIT — Nick Swisher hit a tiebreaking single in the ninth inning off closer Jose Valverde and the New York Yankees beat Detroit, handing the Tigers their seventh straight defeat. The Tigers rallied from a 3-0 deficit, tying it in the seventh on Alex Avila’s second solo home run of the night, but the Yankees broke through in their last at-bat against Valverde (2-1). With runners on first and second and one out, Swisher singled up the middle and Mark Teixeira scored from second with a slide. • Red Sox 9, Angels 5: BOSTON — Dustin Pedroia fouled off nine pitches in a 13-pitch at-bat against Jered Weaver before lining a go-ahead, two-run single that helped Boston beat the Los Angeles Angels. The loss was Weaver’s first of the season. Weaver (6-1) gave up three runs, six hits, struck out six and walked one over six innings. He failed to become the first pitcher since 1891 to go 7-0 by May 2 or sooner. Adrian Gonzalez had a three-run double and Clay Buchholz (2-3) pitched 6 2 ⁄3 solid innings for the win. • Athletics 5, Rangers 4: OAKLAND, Calif. — Hideki Matsui hit the first pitch of the 10th inning from Darren Oliver into the right-field seats for a game-winning home run, lifting Oakland to victory over Texas. Grant Balfour (2-1) walked three batters in the top of the 10th to load the bases for pinchhitter Yorvit Torrealba, who struck out swinging on the right-hander’s 30th pitch. Josh Willingham hit a tying home run leading off the eighth against Texas reliever Arthur Rhodes, and the A’s took three of four from the reigning AL champions. • White Sox 6, Orioles 2: CHICAGO — Paul Konerko homered twice and Mark Buehrle pitched 6 2⁄3 scoreless innings to lead the Chicago White Sox to a win over Baltimore. Konerko hit a two-run home run and a solo shot for the White Sox, who ended a five-game skid with only their fourth win in 19 games. Chicago also avoided a four-game sweep by Baltimore. Juan Pierre had an RBI single along with a diving catch and Alex Rios added a solo homer to help the White Sox end a seven-game home skid with their first win at U.S. Cellular Field since April 12.

• Braves 6, Brewers 2: ATLANTA — Alex Gonzalez hit a three-run double to give Atlanta the lead and the Braves finally solved Yovani Gallardo, beating Milwaukee. David Ross hit a homer in the third inning before the Braves knocked Gallardo (2-2) out of the game in the sixth. Gonzalez cleared the bases with his double before scoring on a single by Nate McLouth. • Nationals 2, Giants 0: WASHINGTON — Tom Gorzelanny allowed only three hits in eight sharp innings against a struggling San Francisco lineup, and Michael Morse and Jerry Hairston Jr. drove in runs for Washington, helping the Nationals beat the Giants. Gorzelanny (1-2) hadn’t lasted eight innings in a game since Aug. 12, 2007, when he threw a shutout for the Pittsburgh Pirates against the Giants. • Marlins 6, Cardinals 5: ST. LOUIS — Mike Stanton hit a tying home run in the fifth inning and tripled and scored the go-ahead run in the eighth to lift Florida to victory over St. Louis. Gaby Sanchez ended Kyle Lohse’s 22-inning scoreless inning streak with his first grand slam, also Florida’s major league-leading third of the year. • Dodgers 5, Cubs 2: LOS ANGELES — Andre Ethier extended his hitting streak to 28 games with an infield single that capped a three-run fifth inning for Los Angeles. Clayton Kershaw (3-3) pitched seven innings, allowing two runs and eight hits, including Alfonso Soriano’s major league-leading 11th homer leading off the seventh. The 23-year-old left-hander struck out four and did not walk a batter for the first time in seven starts this season. • Pirates 4, Padres 3: SAN DIEGO — Garrett Jones and Chris Snyder each hit a two-run homer in the first inning to back James McDonald and help Pittsburgh snap a nine-game skid against San Diego. The Pirates, who hadn’t beaten the Padres since 2009, have won four of six overall — including consecutive games for the first time since April 17-18. The Padres, coming off two straight wins at Dodger Stadium, still haven’t won three straight games this season. San Diego had the tying run on third base with two outs in the ninth before Will Venable hit into a force.

Note: Monday’s game between the Houston Astros and Cincinnati Reds has been postponed because of rain. The game will be made up Thursday, May 5.

Gallardo pitched to 5 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored—Kintzler 1-0, Green 2-0, O’Flaherty 2-0. IBB—off Braddock (Uggla). T—2:37. A—14,126 (49,586).

Nationals 2, Giants 0 San Francisco Rowand cf F.Sanchez 2b Posey c Burrell lf Huff 1b Tejada 3b Fontenot ss

AB 4 3 3 4 3 3 3

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 1 0 0 0 0 1

Avg. .290 .264 .266 .226 .190 .211 .243

C.Ross rf Bumgarner p a-Whiteside ph Affeldt p Totals

3 2 1 0 29

0 0 0 0 0

1 0 0 0 3

0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 1

0 1 1 0 5

.189 .182 .200 .000

Washington Espinosa 2b Ankiel cf Werth rf W.Ramos c Desmond ss Morse 1b Ad.LaRoche 1b Hairston Jr. lf

AB 4 4 4 3 2 3 0 3

R 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0

SO 3 0 1 0 1 2 0 1

Avg. .217 .221 .233 .357 .245 .216 .189 .200

Bixler 3b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .000 Storen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Gorzelanny p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Cora 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .175 Totals 28 2 4 2 1 9 San Francisco 000 000 000 — 0 3 1 Washington 000 000 20x — 2 4 0 a-struck out for Bumgarner in the 8th. E—Tejada (5). LOB—San Francisco 4, Washington 4. 2B—Rowand (9), W.Ramos (5), Hairston Jr. (2). RBIs— Morse (10), Hairston Jr. (7). S—F.Sanchez, Desmond. Runners left in scoring position—San Francisco 1 (Burrell); Washington 3 (Hairston Jr., Gorzelanny 2). SF

IP

H R ER BB SO NP ERA

Bmgrnr L, 0-5 7 4 2 0 Affeldt 1 0 0 0 Washington IP H R ER Grzlny W, 1-2 8 3 0 0 Storen S, 6-6 1 0 0 0 IBB—off Bumgarner (Bixler). T—2:02. A—15,342 (41,506).

1 0 BB 0 1

7 2 SO 4 1

104 13 NP 95 16

4.75 3.75 ERA 2.93 0.56

SO 1 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 6

Avg. .282 .227 .191 .294 .260 .348 .220 .329 .222 .000 --.259 -----

Marlins 6, Cardinals 5 Florida Coghlan cf Infante 2b H.Ramirez ss G.Sanchez 1b Stanton rf Dobbs 3b J.Buck c Bonifacio lf Volstad p a-Petersen ph Mujica p c-Helms ph Hensley p L.Nunez p Totals

AB 4 5 4 5 5 3 3 4 2 1 0 1 0 0 37

R H 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 2 2 3 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 10

BI 0 0 0 4 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

St. Louis AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Theriot ss 5 1 3 0 0 0 .317 Rasmus cf 5 1 1 0 0 0 .295 Pujols 1b 2 1 0 0 2 0 .241 Holliday lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .410 Berkman rf 3 1 2 4 1 0 .406 Y.Molina c 3 0 1 1 1 0 .293 Descalso 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .214 Greene 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .219 Lohse p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .176 Salas p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Jay ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .219 M.Boggs p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Miller p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Batista p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Craig ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .303 Totals 33 5 8 5 5 1 Florida 004 010 010 — 6 10 0 St. Louis 203 000 000 — 5 8 1 a-popped out for Volstad in the 6th. b-grounded out for Salas in the 7th. c-struck out for Mujica in the 8th. d-struck out for Batista in the 9th. E—Theriot (8). LOB—Florida 8, St. Louis 6. 2B—Bonifacio (5). 3B—Stanton (1). HR—G.Sanchez (4), off Lohse; Stanton (4), off Lohse; Berkman (9), off Volstad. RBIs—G.Sanchez 4 (14), Stanton (11), Dobbs (9), Berkman 4 (27), Y.Molina (13). CS—Y.Molina (2). SF—Dobbs. Runners left in scoring position—Florida 3 (Infante, Coghlan, Stanton); St. Louis 2 (Descalso, Rasmus). GIDP—Holliday. DP—Florida 1 (Dobbs, Infante, G.Sanchez). Florida IP H R ER Volstad 5 7 5 5 Mujica W, 3-1 2 0 0 0 Hensley H, 7 1 0 0 0 L.Nnz S, 10-10 1 1 0 0 St. Louis IP H R ER Lohse 6 6 5 5 Salas 1 0 0 0 M.Boggs L, 0-2 1 2 1 1 Miller 1-3 0 0 0 Batista 2-3 2 0 0 WP—L.Nunez, Batista. T—2:57. A—32,635 (43,975).

BB 2 1 1 1 BB 3 0 0 0 0

SO 0 0 0 1 SO 2 2 1 0 1

NP 83 24 14 17 NP 102 10 19 4 15

ERA 6.00 5.11 2.38 2.45 ERA 2.44 0.87 2.30 3.86 0.71

SO 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 7

Avg. .217 .333 .280 .286 .225 .317 .206 .205 .100 .200 ----.280 ---

Pirates 4, Padres 3 Pittsburgh AB R A.McCutchen cf 4 0 Paul lf 4 1 G.Jones rf 3 1 Walker 2b 4 1 Overbay 1b 3 0 Snyder c 3 1 Alvarez 3b 3 0 Cedeno ss 3 0 Ja.McDonald p 2 0 b-Diaz ph 1 0 Veras p 0 0 Resop p 0 0 d-Pearce ph 1 0 Hanrahan p 0 0 Totals 31 4

H BI BB 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 4 6

San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Venable rf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .195 Bartlett ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .223 Ludwick lf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .210 Cantu 3b 3 1 1 2 1 1 .194 Frieri p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Gregerson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Maybin cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .245 O.Hudson 2b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .237 Hawpe 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .173 Hundley c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .272 1-Denorfia pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .282 Harang p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .100 a-E.Patterson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .071 Luebke p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-Headley ph-3b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .236 Totals 35 3 9 3 2 9 Pittsburgh 400 000 000 — 4 6 0 San Diego 000 002 010 — 3 9 1 a-flied out for Harang in the 5th. b-flied out for Ja.McDonald in the 7th. c-grounded out for Luebke in the 8th. d-struck out for Resop in the 9th. 1-ran for Hundley in the 9th. E—Harang (2). LOB—Pittsburgh 6, San Diego 7. 2B—Hawpe (4). HR—G.Jones (6), off Harang; Snyder (1), off Harang; Cantu (2), off Ja.McDonald. RBIs— G.Jones 2 (12), Snyder 2 (10), Ludwick (13), Cantu 2 (9). SB—A.McCutchen (5), Paul (2), Venable (9), O.Hudson (10). CS—Overbay (1), Cedeno (3). Runners left in scoring position—Pittsburgh 4 (Paul, Walker, A.McCutchen 2); San Diego 4 (Hawpe, O.Hudson, Maybin, Venable). Runners moved up—Hundley. DP—Pittsburgh 1 (G.Jones, G.Jones, Snyder). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McDnld W, 2-2 6 5 2 2 1 5 89 6.75 Veras H, 5 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 2.92 Resop H, 4 1 2 1 1 1 1 30 1.76 Hnrhn S, 9-9 1 2 0 0 0 1 16 1.69 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harang L, 4-2 5 5 4 4 2 4 98 4.37 Luebke 3 1 0 0 0 2 38 4.24 Frieri 1-3 0 0 0 3 0 21 1.69 Gregerson 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 13 1.35 Inherited runners-scored—Gregerson 2-0. WP— Resop. T—3:08. A—20,546 (42,691).

Dodgers 5, Cubs 2 Chicago

AB R

H BI BB SO Avg.

S.Castro ss Barney 2b Byrd cf Ar.Ramirez 3b Soto c A.Soriano lf C.Pena 1b Re.Johnson rf J.Russell p Berg p a-DeWitt ph Samardzija p Totals

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 0 1 0 35

0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

0 0 1 1 1 2 0 1 1 0 1 0 8

0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 6

.325 .320 .293 .291 .236 .267 .157 .357 .167 .000 .250 .000

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Carroll ss 4 1 0 0 0 1 .284 Sands 1b 4 1 1 2 0 0 .196 Padilla p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Broxton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ethier rf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .374 Kemp cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .368 Uribe 3b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .247 Thames lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .176 Gwynn Jr. lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Barajas c 2 0 1 0 0 0 .209 De Jesus 2b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .185 Miles 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .257 Kershaw p 2 1 0 0 0 1 .267 b-Loney ph-1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .202 Totals 31 5 7 5 0 6 Chicago 100 000 100 — 2 8 1 Los Angeles 020 030 00x — 5 7 0 a-singled for Berg in the 7th. b-flied out for Kershaw in the 7th. E—Byrd (1). LOB—Chicago 6, Los Angeles 3. 2B—Soto (7), Sands (6), Uribe (6), Barajas (2). HR— A.Soriano (11), off Kershaw. RBIs—Soto (8), A.Soriano (21), Sands 2 (7), Ethier (17), Uribe (15), De Jesus (1). SB—Kemp (9). Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 3 (A.Soriano 2, Barney). GIDP—Thames. DP—Chicago 1 (Barney, S.Castro, C.Pena). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Rssll L, 1-4 4 2-3 6 5 4 0 3 83 8.15 Berg 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 11 3.38 Samardzija 2 0 0 0 0 2 20 2.45 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kershaw W, 3-3 7 8 2 2 0 4 100 3.38 Padilla H, 4 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 1.80 Broxton S, 7-8 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 4.38 Inherited runners-scored—Berg 1-0. HBP—by Berg (Barajas). WP—J.Russell. T—2:30. A—30,239 (56,000).

LEADERS Through Monday’s Games AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—Bautista, Toronto, .357; Kubel, Minnesota, .354; MiCabrera, Detroit, .350; Joyce, Tampa Bay, .346; MiYoung, Texas, .342; Hafner, Cleveland, .342; Gordon, Kansas City, .339. RUNS—Bautista, Toronto, 25; MiCabrera, Detroit, 24; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 21; Andrus, Texas, 20; Ellsbury, Boston, 20; Gordon, Kansas City, 20; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 20. RBI—Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 25; Konerko, Chicago, 24; Beltre, Texas, 23; MiYoung, Texas, 23; Lind, Toronto, 22; Avila, Detroit, 21; Aviles, Kansas City, 21; MiCabrera, Detroit, 21; Cano, New York, 21; Francoeur, Kansas City, 21. HITS—MiYoung, Texas, 40; ISuzuki, Seattle, 39; Gordon, Kansas City, 38; MiCabrera, Detroit, 36; AdGonzalez, Boston, 35; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 35; MeCabrera, Kansas City, 34; Konerko, Chicago, 34; Kubel, Minnesota, 34. DOUBLES—Gordon, Kansas City, 13; Quentin, Chicago, 13; MiYoung, Texas, 13; AdGonzalez, Boston, 11; Barton, Oakland, 9; Boesch, Detroit, 9; Francoeur, Kansas City, 9; MIzturis, Los Angeles, 9; Kubel, Minnesota, 9; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 9. TRIPLES—Bourjos, Los Angeles, 4; Crisp, Oakland, 3; SRodriguez, Tampa Bay, 3; 11 tied at 2. HOME RUNS—Bautista, Toronto, 9; Cano, New York, 8; Granderson, New York, 8; Konerko, Chicago, 8; Beltre, Texas, 7; MiCabrera, Detroit, 7; NCruz, Texas, 7; Teixeira, New York, 7; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 7. STOLEN BASES—Fuld, Tampa Bay, 10; ISuzuki, Seattle, 10; Andrus, Texas, 8; Crisp, Oakland, 8; Dyson, Kansas City, 7; Ellsbury, Boston, 7; BUpton, Tampa Bay, 7. PITCHING—Weaver, Los Angeles, 6-1; Masterson, Cleveland, 5-0; Britton, Baltimore, 5-1; Tomlin, Cleveland, 4-0; Scherzer, Detroit, 4-0; Cahill, Oakland, 4-0; Pineda, Seattle, 4-1; Haren, Los Angeles, 4-1; AJBurnett, New York, 4-1. STRIKEOUTS—Weaver, Los Angeles, 55; Verlander, Detroit, 51; FHernandez, Seattle, 45; RRomero, Toronto, 41; Shields, Tampa Bay, 39; Haren, Los Angeles, 38; Floyd, Chicago, 38. SAVES—MRivera, New York, 11; League, Seattle, 7; Fuentes, Oakland, 7; CPerez, Cleveland, 7; Soria, Kansas City, 6; 7 tied at 5. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—Holliday, St. Louis, .410; Berkman, St. Louis, .406; Polanco, Philadelphia, .385; Wallace, Houston, .382; Ethier, Los Angeles, .374; Kemp, Los Angeles, .368; Votto, Cincinnati, .357. RUNS—Berkman, St. Louis, 24; Braun, Milwaukee, 24; Votto, Cincinnati, 24; Holliday, St. Louis, 22; Phillips, Cincinnati, 22; Pujols, St. Louis, 22; Kemp, Los Angeles, 21; Stubbs, Cincinnati, 21; Weeks, Milwaukee, 21. RBI—Howard, Philadelphia, 28; Berkman, St. Louis, 27; Fielder, Milwaukee, 26; Braun, Milwaukee, 23; SDrew, Arizona, 22; CJones, Atlanta, 21; Pence, Houston, 21; ASoriano, Chicago, 21; CYoung, Arizona, 21. HITS—Ethier, Los Angeles, 43; Kemp, Los Angeles, 42; Polanco, Philadelphia, 42; SCastro, Chicago, 40; Berkman, St. Louis, 39; JosReyes, New York, 38; Braun, Milwaukee, 37. DOUBLES—Ethier, Los Angeles, 10; Fowler, Colorado, 10; 9 tied at 9. TRIPLES—12 tied at 2. HOME RUNS—ASoriano, Chicago, 11; Braun, Milwaukee, 10; Berkman, St. Louis, 9; Heyward, Atlanta, 7; Pujols, St. Louis, 7; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 7; CYoung, Arizona, 7. STOLEN BASES—Bourn, Houston, 11; Desmond, Washington, 10; OHudson, San Diego, 10; JosReyes, New York, 10; Stubbs, Cincinnati, 10; Kemp, Los Angeles, 9; Tabata, Pittsburgh, 9; Venable, San Diego, 9. PITCHING—De La Rosa, Colorado, 4-0; McClellan, St. Louis, 4-0; Lohse, St. Louis, 4-1; Halladay, Philadelphia, 4-1; Harang, San Diego, 4-2; Correia, Pittsburgh, 4-2; 26 tied at 3. STRIKEOUTS—Garza, Chicago, 51; Halladay, Philadelphia, 47; Lincecum, San Francisco, 45; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 45; ClLee, Philadelphia, 44; Norris, Houston, 43; JSanchez, San Francisco, 40. SAVES—Street, Colorado, 10; LNunez, Florida, 10; Hanrahan, Pittsburgh, 9; BrWilson, San Francisco, 8; Broxton, Los Angeles, 7; Marmol, Chicago, 7; 5 tied at 6.

No reason to go wild with baseball’s playoff system By Kevin Baxter Los Angeles Times

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — ud Selig has been busy lately, what with trying to save the Los Angeles Dodgers and all. But that didn’t stop the baseball commissioner from making another pronouncement of note last month. “We’re moving to expanding the playoffs,” he said. “The more we’ve talked about it, I think we’re moving inexorably to that.” What the commissioner would like to do is add an additional wild-card team to the postseason in each league beginning next season, lengthening the playoffs by creating an additional round. And it’s not difficult to figure out why: More playoff games mean more lucrative national telecasts Selig can sell to the networks. Plus two more postseason berths figures to create playoff excitement in two more cities. More, however, isn’t always better, and in this case it could wind up being markedly worse. Baseball has the most elite playoff structure of any major professional sport with only eight of its 30 teams qualifying for the postseason. Compare that to the NBA and NHL, where more than half the teams make the playoffs. Or the NFL, where 12 of 32 teams advance. In each case, rewarding mediocrity hasn’t made

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BA S E BA L L C O M M E N TA RY the playoffs more exciting. But it has rendered much of the regular season meaningless while making the postseason intolerably long. And with the most demanding regular season in sports — a 162-game, six-month marathon — baseball would do well to make those games more important, not less so. Players on the past two World Series champions, as well as several managers, expressed skepticism about the new proposal, which probably would include a first-round wild-card matchup of no more than three games. The winners would advance to a second round featuring the three division winners in each league, followed by the league championship series and the World Series “It doesn’t seem very fair, and personally I don’t know where his head is at,” the San Francisco Giants’ Tim Lincecum told the Contra Costa Times. “Players like it the way it is. It’s dog eat dog. ... What if the (second) wild-card team is not deserving of getting in?” “For a team like us, I don’t like it,” the New York Yankees’ Mark Teixeira told The New York Daily News. “We battle all year long in a very tough division; if you win the division and have to have five or six days off before the start of the playoffs, or you win the wild card and still have to play another one-

or three-game series just to get into the playoffs, it doesn’t make much sense.” Nor does it make much sense to water down what have proven to be exciting pennant chases each fall. Consider last season’s National League race. The Atlanta Braves, Giants and San Diego Padres all entered the final day of the season unsure whether they’d be going to the playoffs or going home at the end of the day. And three times in the past four years the final games were determined in one-game playoffs the day after the regular season ended. That’s pretty exciting. Selig has floated an expanded playoff field before, but two factors have given the idea new momentum. The first was last year’s American League East race. With the Yankees and Tampa Bay Rays having already secured postseason berths, one as the division champion and the other as the league’s wild card, both teams used the final games of the regular season as a tuneup for the playoffs. But there’s nothing to prevent that from happening under an expanded format. In fact, with more postseason berths available, it’s almost certain more teams will clinch early, then coast into October. The second factor driving Selig’s proposal is his oft-repeated pledge to step down after the 2012 sea-

son. Although the commissioner has reigned over the most lucrative and progressive era in the sport’s history — one that has included the addition of teams in Florida, Colorado and Arizona; unrivaled labor peace; drug testing; a 500 percent growth in revenue to a record $7 billion since 1995; and an international expansion that has included the quadrennial World Baseball Classic and regular-season games being played in Japan, Mexico and Puerto Rico — he still seems concerned about burnishing his legacy. Expanded playoffs, Selig believes, could go a long way toward doing that by creating interest in new markets as well as an additional round of playoffs to offer to TBS, Fox and ESPN. There’s no guarantee that will happen, and recent evidence suggests it won’t. In 2008 and 2010, the World Series drew record-low ratings, although one featured the Rays’ first trip to the playoffs and the second ended with the Giants’ first title since moving west from New York. Despite all that, the players union says it is receptive to the idea of expanded playoffs, though union head Michael Weiner said the details would have to be negotiated as part of new collective bargaining agreement. The current CBA expires in December. With any luck, that won’t happen. Here’s hoping the Dodgers keep Selig occupied until his retirement party starts, leaving him no time to fix something that isn’t broken.


D4 Tuesday, May 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

N B A P L AYO F F R O U N D U P

PREP ROUNDUP

Mavericks take early series lead, beat Lakers in Game 1

Panther boys lead after first day at CVC district golf tourney

The Associated Press LOS ANGELES — Dirk Nowitzki scored 28 points and hit two go-ahead free throws with 19.5 seconds left before Pau Gasol and Kobe Bryant made a crucial turnover, and the Dallas Mavericks rallied for a 96-94 victory over the Los Angeles Lakers on Monday night in Game 1 of their second-round playoff series. Nowitzki had 14 rebounds for the Mavericks, who dramatically came back from a 16-point deficit in the second half of the perennial playoff teams’ first postseason meeting in 23 years. Bryant scored 21 of his 36 points in the second half for the Lakers, but he fell down while trying to get the ball from Gasol with five seconds to play. After one free throw by Jason Kidd, Bryant missed a three-pointer just before the buzzer. Game 2 is Wednesday night at Staples Center. Gasol had 15 points, 11 rebounds and seven assists for the second-seeded Lakers, who lost their second straight series opener. Their loss to New Orleans two weeks ago was much more surprising than this loss to the playoff-tested Mavs, but the Lakers’ lack of poise down the stretch should be scary to anybody anticipating a threepeat. The Mavericks trailed 92-87 with 3:32 to play, but finished on a 9-2 run — showing all the late-game poise that’s expected of Bryant and the two-time defending champions. Lamar Odom scored 15 points for Los Angeles, which nursed a small lead throughout the second half until Nowitzki scored in the lane with 40 seconds left to trim the deficit to 94-93. After Jason Terry swiped the ball from Bryant, Gasol fouled Nowitzki on the Mavericks’ inbound play, allowing the 7footer to give Dallas its first lead since the second quarter. Terry added 15 points for Dallas, which struggled on the boards and in the paint before the comeback. The Mavericks too often settled for jumpers early on, and they lost their cool with 90 seconds left in the first half after offsetting technical fouls for Gasol and Tyson Chandler, who jawed all the way down the court after jockeying for rebounding position. The Lakers leaped to a 53-44 halftime lead with four points in the final 0.7 seconds, thanks to an ill-advised foul by Terry and a technical foul on Nowitzki. Dallas made a 20-6 run shortly after falling behind 60-44 in the third quarter, but Bryant singlehandedly kept the Lakers ahead with 12 consecutive points. Both teams finished the regular season

Mark J. Terrill / The Associated Press

Los Angeles Lakers guard Kobe Bryant, left, puts up a shot as Dallas Mavericks guard DeShawn Stevenson defends in Game 1 of a second-round NBA playoff basketball series, Monday in Los Angeles. with 57 victories apiece, but Los Angeles won two of three in their series, including a blowout victory March 31 that was marred by several ejections. Matt Barnes was suspended for getting involved in a confrontation between Steve Blake and Terry, who appeared to shove Blake to the court after a foul. After a brief Twitter battle between Terry and Barnes, whose sportswear company made up T-shirts commemorating the clash, both teams put aside the ugliness of their last meeting while preparing for the franchises’ first postseason meeting since the 1988 Western Conference finals. Even Lakers coach Phil Jackson and Mavericks owner Mark Cuban declined to rekindle their history of mutual sniping in the media, instead praising each other in recent days. Jackson even said Cuban would be an excellent prospective owner for the troubled Los Angeles Dodgers, although Cuban declined to comment on the much-rumored prospect before Game 1. Both clubs finished off their first-round series in six games after splitting the first four. The Lakers blew their opener against

the Hornets before finally taking control despite an unimpressive series from Gasol, while the Mavericks bounced back admirably after blowing a 23-point lead in a Game 4 loss to Portland. Terry scored 13 points in the first half while hitting five of his first six shots, but the Lakers took a 53-44 halftime lead with a 14-2 run — including that productive final second. Also on Monday: Hawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Bulls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 CHICAGO — Joe Johnson scored 34 points and Atlanta beat Derrick Rose and the top-seeded Chicago in Game 1 of the Eastern Conference semifinals. As if the loss itself wasn’t bad enough, the Bulls got a major scare when Rose came up limping at the end of the game. Their MVP candidate stepped on Jamal Crawford’s foot as he dribbled out the final seconds and was helped off by teammates and a trainer. The Hawks went on a 15-2 run that bridged the third and fourth quarters to turn a 69-65 deficit into an 80-71 lead with 10:27 remaining.

HORSE RACING NOTEBOOK

Rain playing a big part at Churchill Downs leading to Kentucky Derby The Associated Press LOUISVILLE, Ky. — The weather forecast wouldn’t change, no matter how long Hall of Fame trainer Bob Baffert sat in front of the television. “The only time I got away from the Weather Channel was when Obama came on last night,” Baffert said, referring to President Barack Obama’s announcement that Osama bin Laden had been killed in Pakistan. Slop and all, Baffert had no choice but to send out Midnight Interlude on Monday for the final workout before Saturday’s Kentucky Derby. “I really can’t do anything about it,” Baffert said of the wet track after the upset winner of the Santa Anita Derby went five furlongs in 1:00.80 in the company of a stablemate. “We just have to deal with it. If it rains for the race, at least he’s been over a wet track.” That’s something the colt rarely encounters at Baffert’s home base in Southern California. “He was happy. He handled it very well. So far, so good,” he said. “When you work in the mud or the slop like this, the only thing you get out of it is that he went well. You can’t grade the work because it’s slop.” The biggest concern for Baffert, a three-time Derby winner, is the horse’s lack of overall experience evident in the workout. “Once he got in front of the workmate, he wanted to shut it down. He’s still figuring it out. He’s doing a little catch-up,” Baffert said. Midnight Interlude will be making only his fifth career start. He jumped up from his first win to capture the $1 million Santa Anita Derby by a head at 13-1 odds.

Ed Reinke / The Associated Press

Kentucky Derby hopeful Midnight Interlude gets his morning bath from Roman Trujillo at Churchill Downs on Monday in Louisville, Ky. Midnight Interlude is trained by Bob Baffert. Monday’s weather repeated the recent pattern of rainy days in Louisville. Another wet one is forecast for Tuesday before a clearing pattern is expected. “I should have brought a rain coat,” Baffert said. “I got them home in the closet with dust gathering on them.” Four more Four other Derby horses worked in the slop Monday morning. Blue Grass winner Brilliant Speed went five furlongs in 1:01.20, while Tampa Bay Derby winner Watch Me Go also went five furlongs in 1:02. Santiva and Nehro had halfmile drills. Santiva was clocked in 50.20 seconds over the track where he

won the Kentucky Jockey Club Stakes in November. Nehro, who missed by a neck in both the Louisiana and Arkansas derbys, went in 51.20. A chip visit Chip Woolley, the cowboy trainer from New Mexico who pulled off a stunning upset with Mine That Bird in the 2009 Derby, was a backstretch visitor at Churchill Downs on Monday. “I got Derby fever,” Woolley said of returning to the scene of his greatest triumph. “I came to watch everybody, and to see who is doing what.” Mine That Bird was a captivating story, as was his trainer. Despite a broken right leg broken from a motorcycle accident,

Woolley hitched a horse van to his pickup truck and towed the gelding more than 1,500 miles from New Mexico to Kentucky. Woolley hobbled around during the Triple Crown series on crutches. Following the Derby win, Mine That Bird was second to filly Rachel Alexandra in the Preakness and third in the Belmont Stakes. “It was quite a run,” he said. Mine That Bird has since retired and Woolley has faded from the national scene. He is 4 for 78 this year, racing at Sunland Park in New Mexico and at Prairie Meadows in Iowa. He keeps an eye out for the next Mine That Bird. “We haven’t seen anything since, with the talent that it takes to get here,” Woolley said. “We keep looking for the next one, going to the horse sales to see what we can up with.” Woolley is fully healed, no longer needing crutches to get around. “I’m good, I’m back,” he said. “I exercise a few of my horses.” No heat The $1 million Kentucky Oaks, the Derby’s companion event for fillies on Friday, lost a top contender when R Heat Lightning suffered a knee injury. “We detected heat in her right knee this morning and she was slightly off at the jog,” trainer Todd Pletcher said. “It’s unfortunate. She’s a very talented filly and has been training great.” She will be evaluated later this week at a clinic in Lexington. R Heat Lightning was a blowout winner in her last two stakes races in Florida. She was runner-up at Churchill in November in the Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Fillies.

Bulletin staff report

a 383.

BANKS — Playing at Quail Valley Golf Course, the site of the Class 6A state tournament, Redmond ended the first day of the Central Valley Conference boys district competition in first place with a 325, three strokes ahead of Sprague. Jared Lambert led the individual standings Monday with a 4over-par 76, posting a 38 on the front and a 38 on the back. “With the wind and the wet greens, the course played very long,” Panther coach Ron Buerger said. Mason Rodby added an 81 and Tim Messner and Riley Cron each carded an 84. The two-day CVC championship appears to be a two-team race as South Salem ended Monday’s round in third with a 341, 16 strokes back of Redmond and 13 behind Sprague. The top two teams from this week’s CVC tournament advance to the 6A state championships on May 16 and 17. The Panthers resume play today during the second and final round of the tournament at 10:24 a.m. In other prep events Monday: BOYS GOLF Lava Bears upset Storm at Crosswater SUNRIVER — Ryan Crownover shot a 76 and Jaired Rodmaker added an 81 as the two Bend High golfers finished first and second at the Bend Invitational at Crosswater Club, leading the Lava Bears to an eight-stroke victory over crosstown rival Summit. Bend ended the day with a score of 332, Summit placed second with a 340 and Marshfield of Coos Bay took third with a 389. Mountain View rounded out the fourteam event with a 456. Dylan Cramer paced the Storm with a third-place finish, carding an 83. Trevor Curtis led Mountain View with a 96. GIRLS GOLF Lava Bear leads area golfers at tourney CRESWELL — Bend High’s Heidi Froelich carded the second-best score of the day, an 82 at the Emerald Valley Golf Club tournament, to highlight area golfers. Madi Mansberger and Kristen Parr led Summit’s team, each posting an 85 on the par-72 course. Churchill’s Caroline Inglis won medalist honors with a 76. The Storm took the top spot in the four-team tournament with a 347. Churchill beat out Bend by a stroke to finish second with a 381 while the Lava Bears took third with a 382 and host Marist finished fourth with

SOFTBALL Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Cottage Grove . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 COTTAGE GROVE — The Outlaws set a new season high for runs scored in their Sky-Em League game against the Lions. Sisters, which has won four of its past five league games, is now 6-4 in Sky-Em play and 6-6 overall. The Outlaws are at Elmira today. BASEBALL Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 PRINEVILLE — Crook County outhit Bend 12-8 but walked three batters in the fourth inning and two in the sixth, all of whom scored. Bend’s Grant Newton helped put the Lava Bears on top early with a solo home run in the first inning. Justin Cleveland led Crook County offensively, finishing four for four with a solo home run and four runs batted in. The Cowboys (10-9 overall) host Summit on Monday. The Lava Bears (14-6 overall) entertain Summit on Wednesday. Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 North Marion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MADRAS — The White Buffaloes won their fifth consecutive game, scoring four runs in the first inning before holding on for the Tri-Valley Conference victory. Austin Moe went the distance for Madras on the mound, striking out five while scattering four hits and allowing two earned runs. The Buffs (7-11 overall) strung four hits together in the first inning to grab the early lead. Madras is at North Marion on Wednesday. BOYS TENNIS Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Mountain View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 The Storm swept the four singles matches at Mountain View en route to the Intermountain Hybrid victory. Parker Nichols led Summit in the No. 1 singles match with a 7-6 (4), 1-6, (10-2) victory over the Cougars’ Philip Atkinson. Mountain View’s top doubles team of Matt Larraneta and Matt VanHemelryck defeated the Storm duo of Bo and Liam Hall 6-4, 6-0 for the Cougars’ lone win. GIRLS TENNIS Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 PRINEVILLE — Redmond took all four singles matches as Monica Johnson, Genna Miller, Chloe Woodward and Ashlee Lemos each won in straight sets. Kayla Morgan and Catie Brown of Crook County defeated the Panthers’ Karli Christensen and Emmalee Cron 7-5, 6-1 in No. 1 doubles play to pace the Cowgirls.

PREP SCOREBOARD GOLF Boys Monday’s results ——— CENTRAL VALLEY CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS First of two days Quail Valley Golf Course, Banks Par 72 Team scores — Redmond 325, Sprague 328, South Salem 341 Day-one leader — Jared Lambert, Redmond, 76 REDMOND (325) — Jared Lambert 76; Mason Rodby 81; Tim Messner 84; Riley Cron 84; Ben Moore 92. ——— BEND INVITATIONAL Crosswater Club, Sunriver Par 72 Team scores — Bend 332, Summit 340, Marshfield 389, Mountain View 456 Medalist — Ryan Crownover, Bend, 76 BEND (332) — Ryan Crownover, 38-38— 76; Jaired Rodmaker 39-42— 81; Robbie Williams 44-43— 87; Carter McGowan 43-45— 88; Chapin Pedersen 48-46— 94. SUMMIT (340) — Dylan Cramer 38-45— 83; Ryan Blackwell 41-43— 84; T.K. Wasserman 43-42—85; Cole Ortega 46-42— 88; Kyle Wells 41-47— 88. MOUNTAIN VIEW (456) — Trevor Curtis 48-48— 96; Colton Bachman 57-54— 111; Dalton Shooks 62-51— 113; Gabriel Shelton 73-63— 136; Wyatt Imhof 99-60— 159.

Girls Monday’s Results ——— EMERALD VALLEY TOURNAMENT At Emerald Valley Golf Club, Creswell Par 72 Team scores — Summit 347, Churchill 381, Bend 382, Marist 383. Medalist — Caroline Inglis, Churchill, 36-40—76. SUMMIT (347) — Madi Mansberger 44-41— 85; Kristen Parr, 43-42— 85; Anna Schwab 43-47— 91; Megan Mitchell 5647— 103; Rebecca Kerry 42-44— 86. BEND (382) — Heidi Froelich 41-41— 82; Kayia Good 4245— 87; Lili Bornio 49-49— 98; Madeline Rice 56-59— 115; Alex Jordan 62-54— 116.

TENNIS Boys Monday’s results ——— CLASS 5A INTERMOUNTAIN HYBRID ——— SUMMIT 7, MOUNTAIN VIEW 1 At Mountain View Singles — Parker Nichols, S, def. Philip Atkinson, MV, 7-6 (4), 1-6 (10-2); Alec Virk, S, def. Dylan Wells, MV, 6-3, 6-3. William Dalquist, S, def. Bryce Tipton, MV, 6-4, 7-5. Wes Franco, S, def.

James Harper, MV, 6-3, 6-2. Doubles — Larraneta/VanHemelryck, MV, def. Bo Hall/Liam Hall, S, 6-4, 6-0; Dillingham/Parr, S, def. King/Martel, MV, 6-1, 6-1; Rowden/Eland, S, def. Chance/Watson, MV, 6-3, 6-4. Lowes/Peters, S, def. Hargons/Kihs, MV, 6-3, 6-1.

Girls Monday’s results ——— INTERMOUNTAIN HYBRID ——— REDMOND 6, CROOK COUNTY 2 At Prineville Singles — Monica Johnson, R, def. Erin Crofcheck, CC, 61, 7-5; Genna Miller, R, def. Natasha Wiersch, CC, 6-2, 6-1; Chloe Woodward, R, def. Lisa Pham, CC, 6-4, 6-2; Ashlee Lemos, R, def. Ali Apperson, CC, 6-2, 6-4. Doubles — Morgan/Brown, CC, def. Christensen/Cron, R, 7-5, 6-1; Kemper/Johnston, CC, def. Dollarhide/Wright, R, 6-7 (6-8), 7-5 (10-6); Hartford/Bentlage, R, def. Bowers/Fraser, CC, 6-0, 6-0; Brumbley/Murphy, R, def. Goertzen/Puckett, CC, 6-3, 6-1.

SOFTBALL Monday’s results ——— CLASS 4A TRI-VALLEY CONFERENCE ——— North Marion 005 010 0 — 6 5 4 Madras 101 231 x — 8 11 5 Lee and Breshears; Abendschein and Smith. W — Abendschein. L — Lee. 2B — Madras: Abendschein 2, Smith, Short. HR — Madras: Sampson.

BASEBALL Monday’s results ——— INTERMOUNTAIN HYBRID Bend 210 032 2 — 10 8 1 Crook County 010 050 2 — 8 12 4 Marshall, Degaetano (5) and Newton; Larimer, Benton (5) and Cleveland. W—Marshall. L—Larimer. 2B—Bend: Hirko, Goodlove; Crook County: Brown, Cleveland. 3B—Crook County: Larimer, Kreachbaum. HR—Bend: Newton; Crook County: Cleveland. ——— CLASS 4A SKY-EM LEAGUE ——— Cottage Grove 000 006 0 — 6 3 6 Sisters 541 201 x — 13 11 2 Bloom and Dunn; Hodges, Carlson (5), J. Lahey (6) and Morgan. W—Hodges. L—Bloom. 2B—Sisters: Hodges, J. Lahey. HR—Cottage Grove: Terriffe. ——— TRI-VALLEY CONFERENCE ——— North Marion 002 010 0 — 3 4 0 Madras 400 010 x — 5 11 4 Kippearson and Moore; Moe and Brown. W — Moe. L— Kippearson. 2B — North Marion: Hopper. 3B — North Marion: Hopper; Madras: Brown.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 3, 2011 D5

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BASEBALL

Stephan Savoia / The Associated Press

Tregg Duerson, left, son of Alicia, right, and Dave Duerson, addresses the Boston University Center that studies brain injuries to professional athletes, Monday in Boston. Taylor Duerson, daughter of Alicia and Dave Duerson, looks on at center.

Duerson Continued from D1 His final note to his family finished with a handwritten request: “Please, see that my brain is given to the NFL’s brain bank.� The NFL does not run the Boston University research group but did donate $1 million to its financing in late 2009, after the league acknowledged long-term effects of football brain trauma. CTE, a condition previously associated mostly with boxers and manifested in behavior commonly known as punch-drunk syndrome, is a degenerative and incurable disease that kills neurons and is linked to memory loss, depression and dementia. Although in vivo tests are being pursued at Boston University and elsewhere, the condition can be detected only after death by brain autopsy. Duerson’s death rattled players both active and retired, who after years of news media coverage now understand that the damage already done to their brains could be permanent. “We have to do everything in our power to not just make progressive changes to minimize risk of CTE in active players, but make sure there’s intervention strategies for those who are exhibiting early signs and symptoms, so that they have access to the services they need,� said Sean Morey, who retired as a player because of post-concussion syndrome last year and since has helped lead the play-

ers union’s pursuit of reform. Morey added: “We have to advocate for the former players who are experiencing cognitive decline and early-onset dementia. Their wives did not sign up to become full-time caregivers. We should adopt a model like the military’s — you break them, you own them. If we can’t find the money to take care of the guys who built our game into a $9 billion industry, then shame on us.� Duerson was a star defensive back at Notre Dame before spending most of his 11 NFL seasons with the Chicago Bears. He was part of the famed “46� defense that powered the Bears’ Super Bowl championship after the 1985 season, and he won the 1991 Super Bowl with the New York Giants. He retired after 1993 and became quite successful in the food-services industry before his businesses collapsed in the past several years. Duerson’s case is unique beyond the circumstances of his suicide. Since 2006 he had served on the six-member panel that considered claims for disability benefits filed by former NFL players. Although individual votes are kept closely confidential, that board has been notoriously sparing in awarding benefits, including those for neurological damage. Duerson himself told a Senate subcommittee in 2007 that he questioned whether players’ cognitive and emotional struggles were related to football.

SUMMER YOUTH BASEBALL/ SOFTBALL: Through Bend Park & Recreation Department; June 15-August 4; for boys and girls ages 6-12; $52 in-district, $70 otherwise; 541-389-7275; www.bendparksandrec.org. REDMOND PANTHERS BASEBALL CLUB TRYOUTS: For players ages 8-14; developmental program; players will receive custom gear and training in speed and agility, and arm strengthening and conditioning; to arrange a tryout call 541-548-5850 (daytime) or 541-788-8520 (evening), or e-mail dmerisman@united planners.com. PRIVATE LESSONS: With Ryan Jordan, a graduate of Bend High School and a former Bend Elk who played at Lane Community College and the University of La Verne; specifically for catching and hitting, but also for all positions; available after 3 p.m. on weekdays, open scheduling on weekends; at the Bend Fieldhouse or an agreed-upon location; $30 per half hour or $55 per hour; discounts for multiple players in a single session, referrals or booking multiple sessions; cash only; 541788-2722; rjordan@uoregon.edu.

BASKETBALL THREE-ON-THREE LEAGUE: For boys in grades three through eight who plan to attend Summit High School; Mondays and Wednesdays through May 25; 6-8 p.m.; will also include work in ballhandling, shooting and one-on-one moves: $135 through April 15, $150 otherwise (cost can be prorated based on availability for attendance); 541-322-3347; daniel.munson@bend.k12.or.us. SAGEBRUSH BASKETBALL CAMP: Monday, June 13-Thursday, June 16; 12:30-3:30 p.m.; Bend High School; for boys currently in grades three through eight; $50-$65; coaching by Bend High staff and past and present varsity players; don.hayes@bend.k12.or.us. LADY COUGAR BASKETBALL CAMP: Monday, June 20Thursday, June 23; 8:30 a.m. to noon; for girls entering grades four through nine; $60 ($50 if registered by May 24); steve.riper@ bend.k12.or.us; 541-322-5069; www.mvgirlsbasketball.net. HOT SHOT BASKETBALL CAMPS: Monday, July 11-Thursday, July 14; clinics, day camps and evening elite sessions for players in kindergarten through 12th grade (2011-12 school year); Summit High School, Bend; $115-$235; scholarships available; 208-720-7904; www.hsbcamps.com.

BIKING

Brief Continued from D6 The program is scheduled to begin Tuesday, May 31, and end Monday, Aug. 15. Practices will be held Tuesdays through Saturdays. A mix of morning and afternoon practices will focus on strength and agility, skate and classic roller skiing, late-season snow skiing and running. The academy also plans to hold three five-day camps throughout the summer. Program fee is $300 for three practices per week or $450 for five practices per week. The fee will be prorated for skiers who do not participate for the full length of the program. For more information, contact Ben Husaby at 541-678-3864 or at ben@bendenduranceacademy.org. Registration is available at www.bendenduranceacademy.org.

Soccer • Rush sends six teams to state finals: Six squads from the Bend-based Oregon Rush Soccer Club have advanced to the Oregon Youth Soccer Association State Cup finals in their respective age groups. The finals will take place this Saturday in Salem. The six finalists are the most in a single year for the club. Rush teams playing for state titles are the 1996 boys team and the 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996 and 1997 girls teams. The club advanced three teams to the state finals each of the past two years. The Oregon State Cup is an annual tournament held each spring for youth soccer teams from throughout the state. The winner of each age group will be eligible to represent Oregon at the Far West Regionals tournament, scheduled for June 20-26 in Boise, Idaho.

Swimming • Central Oregon swimmers win national titles: Two swimmers competing for Bend-based Central Oregon Masters Aquatics earned age-group titles at the U.S. Masters Swimming Spring

National Championships, held this past Thursday through Sunday in Mesa, Ariz. COMA’s Janet Gettling, competing in the women’s 60 to 64 age group, won the 50-yard breaststroke in 39.07 seconds and the 100 breast in 1:25.96. Both times were club age-group records. Also from COMA, George Thayer placed first in the 50 backstroke in 38.96. For results of the six swimmers representing COMA at the meet, see Community Sports Scoreboard on Page D6.

Tennis • Bend tournament accepting entries: Registration is now available for the 26th annual Spring Tennis Classic, which is scheduled to be held in Bend next month. The event is open to participants of all ages and abilities. Junior Challenger events are slated for Friday, June 3, through Sunday, June 5. The adult National Tennis Ratings Program events are scheduled for Friday, June 10, through Sunday, June 12. Entry fee is $25 for singles and $30 for doubles. Participants may register at the Bend Park & Recreation District office, 799 S.W. Columbia St. Members of the United States Tennis Association may also register at www. usta.com. For more information, contact park district sports coordinator Kevin Collier at 541-706-6123 or at kevin@bendparksandrec.org.

Triathlon • Former Bend resident wins at Wildflower: Jesse Thomas, a former standout runner at Bend’s Mountain View High School, surprised the men’s professional field with his first-place finish Saturday in the Wildflower Triathlon half-Ironman-distance race in Bradley, Calif. Thomas, 31, who now resides in Springfield, covered the 1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike ride and 13.1-mile run in 4 hours, 4 minutes, 45 seconds. He defeated runner-up Clayton Fettell, of Alstonville, New South Wales, Australia, by 26 seconds. Bend triathlete Matt Lieto, 33, placed fourth in 4:09:05. — Bulletin staff reports

MOUNTAIN AND ROAD BIKE RIDES: Join Trinity Bikes in Redmond Mondays or Wednesdays for evening rides; road bike ride from shop on Mondays and mountain bike ride at Peterson Ridge in Sisters or Phil’s Trail complex in Bend on Wednesdays; all riding levels welcome; bring own bike or rent from the shop; Trinity Bikes; 541923-5650; www.trinitybikes.com. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CYCLING PROGRAMS: Includes options in youth development, junior teams, U23/collegiate teams, and after-school programs; camps, races and shuttles; age 6 and older; mountain biking, road cycling, freeride mountain biking and cyclocross; info@bendenduranceacdemy.org; www.bendenduranceacdemy.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION CYCLING PROGRAM: Classes in both mountain and road biking are offered starting now through August; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org, www.mbsef.org. WEEKLY RIDE: Saturdays, noon; weekly group road rides starting at Nancy P’s Baking Co., 1054 Milwaukee Ave. in Bend; Glen Bates, glenbates@ bendcable.com, 541-382-4675.

MISCELLANEOUS FUN & FIT FRIENDS: For girls ages 11-14; Tuesdays through Fridays, noon-4 p.m.; three sessions: June 21-July 1, July 12-22, August 2-12; each day starts with a brown-bag lunch and discussion of how to make good nutritional choices; afternoon activities including swimming, Zumba, Nia, yoga and more; $50 for district residents, $68 otherwise; www. bendparksandrec.org; 541-389-7665. GUYS GET FIT: For middle school boys ages 11-14; Tuesdays through Fridays, noon-4 p.m.; two sessions: July 12-15, July 26-29; each day starts with a brown-bag lunch and discussion of how to make good nutritional choices; afternoon activities include weight training, sports conditioning, core training and outdoor boot camp; $25 for district residents; $34 otherwise; www.bendparksandrec. org; 541-389-7665. BOWL FOR KIDS’ SAKE: Saturday, May 14, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sun Mountain Fun Center in north Bend; annual fundraiser for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Oregon; registration required; agow@bbbsco. org; 541-312-6047; www.bbbsco.org. YOUTH TACKLE FOOTBALL LEAGUE: For boys and girls in grades four through six; Aug. 15-Oct. 23; $90 in district, $110 otherwise; registration

deadline Friday, June 3; 541-3897275; www.bendparksandrec.org. LULULEMON BOOT CAMP: Wednesdays at 10:30 a.m.; 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; focuses on sport-specific drills, cardiovascular training and core strength exercises; for all ability levels; free; bring water bottle and sweat towel; Megan Hill; 541-4805039 or Salt Fit on Facebook. SPRING FENCING: For fitness and competition; for youths 10 and older and adults; Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 5:30-7 p.m.; at High Desert Fencing in Bend; Randall, 541-389-4547; Jeff, 541-419-7087. TUMBLING/BEGINNING GYMNASTICS: Ages 5-11; Mondays and Wednesdays through May 25; 6:45-7:30 p.m.; basic exercises such as rolls, cartwheels, handstands and low balance beam; wear comfortable clothes and hair pulled back; RAPRD Activity Center; $35; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. PARENT AND ME TUMBLING: Ages 2-4; Thursdays through May 26; introduction to fundamental tumbling skills with parental assistance; 11-11:30 a.m.; $22; at the RAPRD Activity Center in Redmond; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. ARCHERY FOR YOUTH: Ages 8-13; includes proper safety, bow handling and archery etiquette; Thursdays through May 26; 5:30-7 p.m.; equipment provided; at CentWise, 533 S.W. 5th St., Redmond; $25; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. ACROVISION TAEKWONDO: For those age 6 and up; Tuesdays and Thursdays through May 26; 7-8 p.m. at the RAPRD Activity Center in Redmond; students will train in a complete martial arts system; uniforms are required and will be available for purchase; $69; 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org. DIANE’S RIDING CENTER: For ages 7-14; learn proper skills and care for horse, and how to ride; Saturdays through May 28, 1-2 p.m. at Diane’s Riding Center in Tumalo; $100; 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org. TRAIL RIDES WITH DIANE’S RIDING CENTER: Saturday, May 28; 3-4:30 p.m.; age 7 and older; at Diane’s Riding Center in Tumalo; $45; 541-548-7275 or raprd.org. FENCING: High Desert Fencing in Bend welcomes newcomers and former fencers; Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m.; free first session; Randall at 541-3894547 or Jeff at 541-419-7087. OPEN ROLLER SKATING: For all ages and ability levels; $5 per skater (includes skate rental); children under 5 are free; Tuesdays, 12:303:30 p.m.; Wednesdays, 1-4 p.m.; Fridays, 2-5 p.m. and 6-9 p.m.; Saturdays, 1-4 p.m. and 6-9 p.m.; Sundays, 1-4 p.m. 541-330-1183; callie@cascadeindoorsoccer.com; www.cascadeindoorsports.com. SHOOTERS CLINIC: Learn about and fire the six-shooters, lever action rifles and shotguns of Cowboy Action Shooting; Saturday, May 14, 1:304:40 p.m.; guns and ammo provided; at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20, milepost 24; free; 541385-6021; www.hrp-sass.com. BEND TABLE TENNIS CLUB: Evening play every Monday; 6-9 p.m. (setup a half hour before); beginner classes available, cost is $60; at Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; drop-in fee is $5 for adults, $3 for youths and seniors; Jeff at 541-480-2834; Don at 541-318-0890; Sean at 267-6146477; bendtabletennis@yahoo. com; www.bendtabletennis.com. AMERICAN POOLPLAYERS ASSOCIATION LEAGUE: Nine-ball play Monday and Wednesday nights; eight-ball on Thursdays; 7 p.m.; amateurs of all ability levels encouraged; Randee Lee at rlee973@comcast.net or Marshall Fox at Fox’s Billiard Lounge, 937 N.W. Newport Ave., 541-6471363; www.foxsbilliards.com.

MULTI-SPORT UP THE CROOKED RIVER DUATHLON: Saturday, May 14; 10 a.m.; 5K run-40K bike-5K run or 2-mile walk-10-mile bike-2-mile walk; $40-$80; individuals and teams; start/finish at Pioneer Park in Prineville; 541-416-0455; normsxtreme@bendbroadband. com; www.normsxtremefitness. com/duathalon.htm. POLE PEDAL PADDLE: Saturday, May 21; alpine and cross-country skiing, cycling, running and paddling from Mount Bachelor to Bend; individual, pair and team entries; $80-$180; www.pppbend.com. KIDS MINI POLE PEDAL PADDLE: Sunday, May 22; teams of six; for kids in grades one through six; includes running, cycling, obstacle course and river rafting; $132 per team; entry deadline May 17; www. mbsef.org/events/ppp_mini. OYSTER OFF ROAD ADVENTURE RACE: Saturday, June 25; Bend; teams of two to four individuals; full race, 8 a.m.; half race 10 a.m.; includes running and mountain biking; age 12 and older; $60-$70 per person; oysterracingseries.com/Bend.php. DESCHUTES DASH WEEKEND SPORTS FESTIVAL: Saturday and Sunday, July 16-17; Olympic triathlon and duathlon; sprint triathlon and duathlon; kids triathlon; kids splash ‘n’ dash; 10K and 5K runs; $15$105; www.deschutesdash.com.

PADDLING KAYAKING: For all ages; weekly classes and open pool; equipment provided to those who preregister, first come, first served otherwise; Sundays, 4-6 p.m., Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $3; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. KAYAK ROLL SESSIONS: At Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, Bend; Sundays through the end of May; indoor pool available Sundays, 4:15– 6 p.m.; space is limited to 12 boats; registration is available beginning the Monday before each roll session at https://register.bendparksandrec. org; boats must be clean and paddles padded and taped to prevent damage to the pool; no instruction is provided; $8-$10 per boat.

RUNNING LITTLE FOOT RUNNING GROUP: Mondays and Wednesdays through May 25; 4:30-5:30 p.m.; at Pine Nursery Park in Bend; for children in grades one through five (kindergartners welcome with parent); $10, includes membership in Central Oregon Running Klub (CORK), T-shirt and water bottle; promotes fitness, fun and the joy of running; all ability levels welcome; littlefootcork-youth.blogspot.com; cork.youth.running@gmail.com. COCC 6-MILE RELAY: Thursday; 5:30 p.m.; COCC track; day of race registration 4:30-5:15 p.m.; teams of two, three or four participants alternate every quarter-mile; entry forms available at local running stores and at COCC club sports office; $5 per person; Bill Douglass; bdouglass@cocc.edu. SALMON RUN: Saturday; 10K and 5K runs/walks and kids run; 9 a.m.; Riverbend Park, Bend; $5-$25; 541385-6908, ext. 10; envirocenter.org. TRIUMPH FOR AVREY 5K RUN/WALK: Saturday; 10 a.m.; Sam Johnson Park, Redmond; $25; proceeds will benefit Avrey Walker, who is battling leukemia; 541-350-5547; avrey@triumphfit.com; triumphfit. com/Triumph_for_Avery_5K.html. LA PINE HIGH SCHOOL CONGRATS GRADS RUN: Sunday; fundraiser for LPHS grad-night party; 5K run/walk; $20-$25; registration forms located at Sabai Wellness Center and Anytime Fitness in La Pine; Jennifer; 541-610-6355. COCC JUNGLE RUN/WALK: Thursday, May 12; 5:30 p.m.; at the COCC track; 4-mile run or 2-mile run/walk; course includes single-track trails, mud bogs, several steep ascents and descents and numerous log crossings; entry forms available at local running stores and at COCC club sports office; $5; Bill Douglass; bdouglass@cocc.edu. HERSHEYS TRACK & FIELD GAMES: For girls and boys born in years 1997-2002; Thursday, May 26; 5 p.m.; Bend High School; free; 541-389-7275; www.bendparksandrec.org. 16TH ANNUAL STORM THE STAIRS RUN/WALK: Thursday, May 26; 5:30 p.m.; starts at COCC track; day of race registration at COCC track, 4:30-5:15 p.m.; 2-mile course takes entrants through campus and over several hundred steps; entry forms available at local running stores and at COCC club sports office; $5; Bill Douglass, bdouglass@cocc.edu. HAPPY GIRLS HALF: Sunday, May 29; Bend; includes half-marathon and 5K; 9 a.m.; Happy Little Girls Run (May 28, ages 3-10); $20$90, depending on race distance; www.happygirlsrun.com. THREE SISTERS MARATHON: Saturday, June 4; starts and finishes at Eagle Crest Resort in Redmond; 7 a.m.; $75-$80; event also includes five-person marathon relay ($225-$275) and 5K ($25-$30); www. threesistersmarathon.com. HEAVEN CAN WAIT 5K RUN/WALK: Sunday, June 5; 9 a.m.; Drake Park, Bend; fundraiser for Sara’s Project; $20-$40; T-shirts, $10; 541-7067743; www.heavencanwait.org. PRINEVILLE HOTSHOT MEMORIAL RUN: Saturday, June 11; 8K and 5K runs/walks and kids 1K fun run; 8:30 a.m.; proceeds benefit Wildland Firefighter Foundation; starts at Ochoco Creek Park; $12-$23; www.time2race.com; www.runningwildfire.org. DIRTY HALF: Sunday, June 12; 8 a.m.; start and finish at Breedlove Guitars, 2843 N.W. Lolo Drive, Bend; USATF national championship for trail half-marathon; $30-$50; 541-3173568; superdave@footzonebend. com; www.footzonebend. com; www.time2race.com. DRY CANYON RUN: Saturday, June 18; 9 a.m.; 10K and 5K runs/walks; American Legion Park, Redmond; $20-$25; scott.brown@redmond. k12.or.us; www.drycanyonrun. com; www.time2race.com. CHARLIE’S CHALLENGE 15K: Sunday, June 19, 9:30 a.m.; starts and finishes at Sisters High School; single-track and dirt roads; sistersmultisport.com. FOURTH OF JULY FUN RUN: Monday, July 4; Sunriver; 5-mile run and 3-mile run/walk; 9 a.m.; $15 walkers, $20 runners ($30 day of race); 541-593-4603; www. sunriver-resort.com/recreation. 3THIRTY3 RUN/WALK: Saturday, July 9; 7 a.m.; Pilot Butte State Park, Bend: 541-306-9613; https://notalone.webconnex. com/3Thirty3?utm_source= Not+Alone+Newsletter&utm_ campaign=ee22aad280-Newsletter_ 11_04_11&utm_medium=email.

SMITH ROCK SUMMER SUNRISE CLASSIC: Saturday, July 9; half-marathon, 10K and 5K runs/ walks; 1-mile kids run (free); Terrebonne; 6:15 a.m.; $18-$33; www.smithrockrace.com. REDMOND OREGON RUNNING KLUB: 4-to-8-mile weekly run starting at 8 a.m.; runners of all ages and abilities welcome; follow “Redmond Oregon Running Klub� on Facebook for weekly meeting place or e-mail Dan Edwards; rundanorun1985@gmail.com. FOOTZONE WOMEN’S RUNNING GROUP: Mondays at 5:30 p.m.; distances and locations vary; paces between seven and 11 minutes per mile; free; no registration necessary; Jenny; 541-314-3568; jenny@footzonebend.com. GOOD FORM CLINIC: Tuesdays and Saturdays; learn the basics of good running form and what it can do to improve efficiency, reduce injury and make you faster; at FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St.; free; 541317-3568; shawn@footzonebend. com; footzonebend.com. LEARN TO RUN WORKSHOP: LTR Redmond starts Tuesday, practices held at 6 p.m. at American Legion Park; $50-$55; FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St.; 541317-3568; info@learntorunfun. com; shawn@footzone.com; www.footzonebend.com. PERFORMANCE RUNNING GROUP: 5:30 p.m. on Tuesdays at FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St.; local running standout Max King leads workout; mking@reboundspl.com. FOOTZONE NOON RUNS: Noon on Wednesdays at FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St.; run up to 7-mile loop with shorter options; free; 541-317-3568. WEEKLY RUNS: 6 p.m. on Wednesdays, at Fleet Feet Sports Bend, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave.; 3 to 5 miles; two groups, different paces; 541-389-1601. YOGA FOR RUNNERS: Wednesdays at 7 p.m.; at Fleet Feet Sports Bend, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave.; $5 per session or $50 for 12 sessions; focuses on strengthing and lengthening muscles and preventing running injuries; 541-389-1601. FUNCTIONAL FITNESS WORKOUT FOR RUNNERS: Thursdays starting at 6 p.m. at FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St.; personal trainer Kyle Will will help participants strengthen muscle groups to help avoid common injuries; $5; 541-330-0985. RUNS WITH CENTRAL OREGON RUNNING KLUB (CORK): 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Drake Park in Bend; runs of various lengths; free; runsmts@gmail.com.

SOCCER MEN’S SOCCER LEAGUE: Competitive outdoor league; season lasts until early October; Joe Oberto; 541-322-9686; joberto@bendcable.com. OREGON RUSH U10-U14 TRYOUTS: For 2011-2012 competitive soccer teams; May 9-12; Eagle Crest Resort soccer fields, Redmond; for times and dates for age groups and to register for tryouts online, go to www.oregonrush.com or call Eli Ulvi at 907-748-5075. OREGON RUSH BRAZILIAN SOCCER CAMP: July 11-15; for boys and girls ages 6-15; Big Sky Park, Bend; $155; includes free ball and T-shirt; www.oregonrush.com. YOUTH SOCCER LEAGUE: For boys and girls in grades one through eight; Aug. 22-Oct. 29; $54 indistrict, $73 otherwise; registration deadline Friday, June 10; 541-3897275; www.bendparksandrec.org. SOCCER OPEN PLAY (ADULT): Age 14 and older; no cleats, but shinguards required; $7; Friday nights; coed 7-8:30 p.m., men 8:30-10 p.m.; Cascade Indoor Soccer, Bend; 541-330-1183; callie@cascadeindoorsoccer.com; www.cascadeindoorsports.com.

SOFTBALL CASCADE ALLIANCE SOFTBALL: Forming teams at the 12-and-under, 14-and-under and 16-and-under levels for tournaments in the spring and summer of 2011; all girls living in the Bend-La Pine Schools boundaries are eligible; visit website for information on open gyms, clinics and tryouts; www.cascadealliance.org.

SWIMMING WATERBABIES: Basic water skills for infants and toddlers; ages 6 months through 3 years; games and challenges; Tuesdays and Thursdays through May 26; 6-6:30 p.m.; at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $28.50; 541548-7275; www.raprd.org. COSMIC SWIM: For middle school students only (student ID required); Saturday, May 14, 8-10 p.m.; Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $2.50; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT FAMILY SWIM NIGHT: 7:25 to 8:25 p.m., Tuesdays, Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; adult must accompany anyone under age 18; $10 per family, $3 per adult, $2 per child; RAPRD, 541-548-7275, www.raprd.org.

WALKING STEPPING OUT TO CURE SCLERODERMA WALK: Saturday, May 21; 10 a.m.; American Legion Park, Redmond; $20-$25; Ann Havelock; 541-480-1958; www. firstgiving.com/sclerodermaoregon/Event/redmond-walk.


C O M M U N I T Y S P ORT S

D6 Tuesday, May 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

COMMUNITY SCOREBOARD

Rimrock/OVA 18 National

RUNNING

The Rimrock/OVA 18 National team qualified for the USA Volleyball Girls’ Junior National Championships tournament, scheduled from Saturday, June 25 to Monday, July 4. The Rimrock/OVA squad’s 18-and-under National Division bracket is slated to play from June 30 through July 3. The players above, from left to right: Name Laney Hayes Sarah Roshak Kelsi Kemper Kaitlyn Douglass Braiden Johnston Karlee Markham Rachel Buehner Kirsti Kelso Hannah Harrer Makayla Lindburg Gabby Crowell Calli Prestwood

School Summit Mountain View Crook County Sisters Crook County Mountain View Mountain View Crook County Sisters Crook County Summit Summit

Volleyball Continued from D1 The squad was Kent’s brainchild. This past fall, he went to Rosie Honl, the director of Prineville-based Rimrock Volleyball Club, and Turner Waskom, director of the Bend-based Oregon Volleyball Academy, with an idea. He suggested holding open tryouts to field the best team possible made up of players from all over the area, and the players who did not make the select team could continue to play for their own clubs. “We have a great base of volleyball, very competitive, and if we’re working together to bring the best coaching that’s possible, the best opportunities, everybody benefits,” Kent explains. Honl and Waskom supported the idea, and tryouts were conducted this past fall after the high school season ended. The final roster was a blend of players who represent four of Central Oregon’s high school superpowers (and came from several different clubs). Four girls from Crook County High School in Prineville made the team, as did three each from Summit and Mountain View high schools in Bend and two from Sisters High School. Kent says he recognizes that — on a sports landscape where youth clubs often compete with each other for talent — such an arrangement is uncommon, adding that teams from the Portland area have asked him how he did it. “I don’t know how to describe it,” Kent says. “It’s recognizing the common good and sacrificing the individual. And that

Height 6-1 6-0 5-8 5-7 5-5 5-5 5-8 5-8 6-0 6-0 6-0 6-2

Position Outside hitter/middle blocker Outside hitter/right side Setter Setter Defensive specialist/libero Defensive specialist/libero Defensive specialist/libero Outside hitter Outside hitter/middle blocker Middle blocker Outside hitter Middle blocker

sounds very philosophical, but for that club sport, the Central Oregon community did that, and it is unusual.” Despite coming from different backgrounds, the chosen players jelled. “Our team is so close,” claims Karlee Markham, a senior at Mountain View High and a defensive specialist/libero. “We’re like sisters, best friends. Everybody gets along. I’ve never actually seen a team that bonds like we do.” Not only are the players friends and teammates, but they push each other to become more skilled as well. “We’re all really good in our specific positions, and so playing with everyone together just makes us all better,” explains Hannah Harrer, a junior outside hitter/middle blocker who attends Sisters High. “And our practices are really high-level because we compete with each other for spots, stats, everything.” That chemistry and intensity may well have helped the team qualify for nationals. To make the tournament, club teams from across the country must earn bids based on their results at selected tournaments. If a team earns a bid, it is invited to play in the tournament. Rimrock/OVA’s journey to nationals turned into a bit of a quest. Originally, the team targeted a bid for the national tournament’s 18-and-under Open Division at a Pacific Northwest qualifier in late March. But it finished ninth there, not high enough. The next opportunity came at the regional tournament, which was held in Corvallis in midApril and included teams from Oregon and southwest Washington. The winner would earn a bid

Year Sophomore Senior Junior Senior Junior Senior Sophomore Junior Junior Sophomore Junior Senior

to the national tournament’s 18and-under National Division. Again, Rimrock/OVA fell just short, taking second to a Portland-area club. But that team decided to decline the bid, which was then passed to Rimrock/OVA. “It was so exciting,” Harrer says of landing the invitation to nationals. “I couldn’t believe it.” Kent says the team will fundraise to partially offset the cost of the trip, which was not budgeted. “I don’t even talk about (qualifying for nationals) to the kids at the beginning of the season because it’s so improbable,” he explains. The national tournament will give the Rimrock/OVA players the opportunity to measure themselves against other topnotch teams and play in front of dozens of college coaches. Kent says he expects his squad to be seeded somewhere in the middle of the 48-team field, and he hopes for a top-10 finish. “You give them the attitude that they can beat anyone if they control the ball on their side, and then you hope for some good bounces,” he says. No matter the outcome, being on the squad has given the Rimrock/OVA players a wealth of opportunities. “I was just hoping to get to play at a high competitive level, really, and I’ve gotten so much more,” says Gabby Crowell, a junior outside hitter who attends Summit High. “Getting to go to Georgia for nationals is more than I ever expected.” Amanda Miles can be reached at 541-383-0393 or at amiles@ bendbulletin.com.

gymnastics team.

• Central Oregon residents fare well at regional event: Two gymnasts who compete for Bend-based Cascade All-Star Gymnastics placed high in their respective competitions at the Region 2 Championships for Levels 8-10, held April 14-17 in Pullman, Wash. Competing in the Level 9 Senior B age group, Courtney Miller placed eighth in the all-around. Her best placement in an individual event was a tie for fourth on the vault. With the top-12 finish, Miller advanced to the Western Championships, scheduled for this Thursday through Sunday in San Diego. Katelyn Ohlrich finished second in the all-around in the Level 10 Senior C age group, a placement that qualified her for the Women’s J.O. National Championships, scheduled for May 12-15 in Long Beach, Calif. Ohlrich also took second on the uneven parallel bars and balance beam. Cascade All-Star owner Lexy Archer said Ohlrich has accepted an offer from Oregon State to compete for the Beavers’

Rugby • Blues roll to lopsided victory: Using scoring from 10 different players, the Bend Blues boys rugby team defeated the Vancouver Rugby Club Sharks 68-0 on Saturday at Bend’s Ponderosa Park. Conner Crossely led the Blues with 16 points and Manny Preto Prebelo added 13. The Blues finished the regular season with a record of 5-2, good for third place in the Rugby Oregon Division I standings. State tournament play begins this Saturday at Delta Park in Portland.

Running • Central Oregon resident wins event in New York: For the second year in a row, Bend’s Max King has won the Mountain Goat Run, held Sunday in Syracuse, N.Y. King, 31, covered the 10-mile course in 49 minutes, 2 seconds, only 10 seconds slower than the course record set in 1992. King’s time was nearly two minutes faster than his winning mark from a year ago, 51:44. This year, in the 33rd annual

SKIING MAY DAY RACES Friday-Sunday Mt. Bachelor ski area Boys Cross-country J3, 2 kilometers: 1, Casey Shannon, 9:52. 2, Andrew McCarthy, 10:13. 3, Fedya Myagkov, 10:33. 4, Javier Colton, 10:37. 5, Thomas Wimberly, 11:21. 6, Andrew Osborne, 11:41. 7, Jack Botti, 12:58. 8, Riley Hunter, 13:58. 9, Lawrence Dickey, 15:19. 10, Andy Koefoed, 15:41. J4: 1, Minam Cravens, 12:21. 2, Ty Ellis, 14:38. 3, Spencer Wright, 15:34. 4, Ryan Griffiths, 15:43. 5, Ian Lafky, 16:02. 6, Otto VanDerhoef, 16:17. 7, Walter Lafky, 16:24. 8, Christopher Ireton, 16:43. 9, Benjamin Davidson, 17:31. 10, Cole Whritenour, 17:32. Giant Slalom 1 1, Tucker Scroggins. 1:00.90. 2, Kirill Myagkov, 1:02.40. 3, Jack Smith, 1:02.48. 4, Zach Simmons, 1:02.82. 5, Luke Musgrave, 1:02.87. 6, Carter Jendrezak, 1:03.51. 7, Sawyer Price, 1:04.58. 8, Joshua Sherbrooke, 1:07.46. 9, Laz Glickman, 1:08.50. 10, Magnus Schmidt, 1:09.41. Giant Slalom 2 1, Tucker Scroggins, 57.19. 2, Luke Musgrave, 58.10. 3, Carter Jendrezak, 58.16. 4, Zach Simmons, 58.44. 5, Kirill Myagkov, 58.99. 6, Sawyer Price, 59.26. 7, Jack Smith, 59.27. 8, Joshua Sherbrooke, 1:02.49. 9, Wyatt Kray, 1:02.58. 10, Tristan Thomson, 1:02.91. Jump J3: 1, Fedya Myagkov, 53. 2, Lawrence Dickey, 51. 3, Jack Botti, 48. 4, Austin Keillor, 47. 5, Andrew McCarthy, 46. 6, Andrew Osborne, 45. 7, Gunnar Stoltenow, 45. 8, Casey Shannon, 43. 9, Riley Hunter, 41. 10, Thomas Wimberly, 40. J4: 1, Minam Cravens, 46. 2, Michael Hayes, 45. 3, Cole Whritenour, 45. 4, Andrew Bristow, 45. 5, Ty Ellis, 44. 6, Christopher Ireton, 44. 7, Duncan Stoltenow, 43. 8, Benjamin Davidson, 42. 9, Devon Toribio, 40. 10, Nick Rasmussen, 40. J5-J7: 1, Tucker Scroggins. 44. 2, Luke Musgrave, 42. 3, Jack Smith, 42. 4, Jonathan Wimberly, 42. 5, Zach Simmons, 41.

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6, Morgan Tien, 36. 6, Kirill Myagkov, 36. 8, Carter Jendrezak, 34. 9, Laz Glickman, 32. 10, Aiden Donohue, 31. Super-G 1 J3: 1, Andrew Osborne, 1:10.62. 2, Riley Hunter, 1:11.52. 3, Tobias Macedo, 1:11.56. 4, Lawrence Dickey, 1:11.68. 5, Fedya Myagkov, 1:11.76. 6, Andrew McCarthy, 1:13.18. 7, Austin Keillor, 1:13.42. 8, Braydon Hall, 1:13.67. 9, Jack Botti, 1:14.61. 10, Gunnar Stoltenow, 1:14.93. J4: 1, Ty Ellis, 1:13.94. 2, Michael Hayes, 1:15.42. 3, Michel Macedo, 1:16.95. 4, Andrew Bristow, 1:16.98. 5, Nick Rasmussen, 1:17.31. 6, Cole Whritenour, 1:17.47. 7, Minam Cravens, 1:18.56. 8, Walter Lafky, 1:18.63. 9, Benjamin Davidson, 1:19.09. 10, Jake Klonsky, 1:19.12. Super-G 2 J3: 1, Andrew Osborne, 1:06.83. 2, Fedya Myagkov, 1:07.19. 3, Lawrence Dickey, 1:07.85. 4, Tobias Macedo, 1:08.08. 5, Riley Hunter, 1:08.56. 6, Andrew McCarthy, 1:08.95. 7, Austin Keillor, 1:09.04. 8, Braydon Hall, 1:09.15. 9, Jack Botti, 1:10.44. 10, Jeremy Wood, 1:11.31. J4: 1, Ty Ellis, 1:10.52. 2, Michel Macedo, 1:12.34. 3, Andrew Bristow, 1:13.23. 4, Michael Hayes, 1:13.37. 5, Charlie Stuermer, 1:13.61. 6, Cole Whritenour, 1:13.64. 7, Nick Rasmussen, 1:13.82. 8, Minam Cravens, 1:14.12. 9, Hayden Hall, 1:14.16. 10, Walter Lafky, 1:14.45. Overall J3: 1, Fedya Myagkov, 285. 2, Andrew Osborne, 280. 3, Lawrence Dickey, 219. 4, Andrew McCarthy, 205. 5, Riley Hunter, 186. 6, Casey Shannon, 166. 7, Jack Botti, 154. 8, Gunnar Stoltenow, 106. 9, Thomas Wimberly, 99. 10, Javier Colton, 94. J4: 1, Ty Ellis, 325. 2, Minam Cravens, 268. 3, Michael Hayes, 230. 4, Andrew Bristow, 178. 5, Cole Whritenour, 166. 6, Otto VanDerhoef, 112. 7, Christopher Ireton, 110. 8, Walter Lafky, 107. 9, Benjamin Davidson, 104. 10, Ryan Griffiths and Spencer Wright, 94. J5-J7: 1, Tucker Scroggins. 329. 2, Luke Musgrave, 265. 3, Jack Smith, 226. 4, Kirill Myagkov, 201. 5, Carter Jendrezak, 177. 6, Zach Simmons, 177. 7, Morgan Tien, 138. 8, Magnus Schmidt, 88. 9, Colt Musgrave, 79. 10, Wyatt Kray, 69. Girls Cross-country J3, 2 kilometers: 1, Makensie Forsyth, 15:37. 2, Jordan Harrison, 15:52. 3, Megan Wurden, 16:00. 4, Shannen Burton, 16:14. J4, 2 kilometers: 1, Alex Oseland, 12:47. 2, Taye Nakamura-Koyama, 13:07. 3, Madison Archuleta, 15:17. 4, Hailey Purtzer, 16:20. 5, Sophia Sahm, 16:39. 6, Anna Corff, 17:14. 7, Katie Hensien, 17:15. 8, Skylar Cooley, 17:31. 9, Lili Bouchard, 17:48. 10, Carina Bracy, 17:58. J5 and younger, 1 kilometer: 1, Gemma Munck, 6:26. 2, Addison Beasley, 7:12. 3, Kate Jendrezak, 7:33. 4, Michaela Gorman, 8:13. 5, Catherine Slovorg, 8:20. 6, Maggi McElrath, 8:39. 7, Dagney Donohue, 9:29. 8, Emma Ireton, 9:30. 9, Olivia Colton, 10:33. 10, Sayna Green, 10:39. Giant Slalom 1 1, Addison Beasley, 59.87. 2, Danielle Bracy, 1:03.77. 3, Maggi McElrath, 1:05.45. 4, Sami Woodring, 1:07.53. 5, Clara Macedo, 1:07.83. 6, Josie Knight, 1:08.23. 7, Sabrina Sutter, 1:08.66. 8, Kate Jendrezak, 1:08.92. 9, Emma Ireton, 1:09.99. 10, Bergen Schmidt, 1:10.36. Giant Slalom 2 1, Addison Beasley, 56.71. 2, Danielle Bracy, 59.74. 3, Isabella Hoffman, 1:01.51. 4, Maggi McElrath 1:01.68. 5, Sami Woodring, 1:03.26. 6, Emma Ireton, 1:04.37. 7, Josie Knight, 1:04.77. 8, Sabrina Sutter, 1:05.24. 9, Kate Jendrezak, 1:05.25. 10, Bergen Schmidt, 1:05.33. Jump J3: 1, Makensie Forsyth, 45. 2, Stephanie Frey, 42. 3, Meera Champawat, 40. 4, Chapelle Lauba, 39. 5, Jordan Harrison, 37. 6, Allison Frey, 33. 7, Shannen Burton, 25. 8, Megan Wurden, 13. J4: 1, Hailey Purtzer, 44. Ella Pepin, 41. 3, Sophia Sahm, 41. 4, Erin Smith, 40. 5, Alex Oseland, 40. 6, Carina Bracy, 39. 7, Madison Archuleta, 39. 8, Katie Hensien, 38. 9, Helen Maslen, 38. 10, Taye Nakamura-Koyama, 35. J5-J7: Addison Beasley, 42. 2, Maggi McElrath, 34. 3, Dagney Donohue, 32. 4, Isabella Hoffman, 30. 5, Camilla Morse, 29. 6, Emma Ireton, 25. 7, Alice Bouchard, 24. 8, Kiera Bertell, 24. 9, Josie Knight, 23. 10, Michaela Gorman, 22.

Super-G 1 J3: 1, Jenna Jansky, 1:12.62. 2, Jordan Harrison, 1:12.95. 3, Hannah Bodily, 1:14.14. 4, Elle Truax, 1:15.16. 5, Meera Champawat, 1:15.67. 6, Allison Frey, 1:16.07. 7, Stephanie Frey, 1:16.15. 8, Chapelle Lauba, 1:16.21. 9, Lucy McLean, 1:16.22. 10, Elinor Wilson, 1:16.35. J4: 1, Alex Oseland, 1:14.06. 2, Hannah West, 1:14.60. 3, Carina Bracy, 1:15.84. 4, Mackenzie Price, 1:17.19. 5, Madison Archuleta, 1:17.74. 6, Ella Pepin, 1:17.87. 7, Katie Hensien, 1:17.94. 8, Hailey Purtzer, 1:18.36. 9, Summer Church, 1:18.38. 10, Casey Molt, 1:19.87. Super-G 2 J3: 1, Jenna Jansky, 1:09.12. 2, Elle Truax, 1:09.62. 3, Jordan Harrison, 1:10.10. 4, Hannah Bodily, 1:10.19. 5, Shannen Burton, 1:11.12. 6, Brooke Kelley, 1:11.45. 7, Lucy McLean, 1:11.99. 8, Makensie Forsyth, 1:12.01. 9, Elinor Wilson, 1:12.72. 10, Allie Spadaro and Chapelle Lauba, 1:12.92. J4: 1, Alex Oseland, 1:09.90. 2, Carina Bracy, 1:10.06. 3, Ella Pepin, 1:13.37. 4, Katie Hensien, 1:13.51. 5, Casey Molt, 1:13.61. 6, Mackenzie Price, 1:13.72. 7, Hailey Purtzer, 1:13.73. 8, Madison Archuleta, 1:14.25. 9, Summer Church, 1:15.36. 10, Erin Smith, 1:17.67. Overall J3: 1, Jordan Harrison, 265. 2, Makensie Forsyth, 256. 3, Shannen Burton, 151. 4, Megan Wurden, 118. J4: 1, Alex Oseland, 345. 2, Hailey Purtzer, 218. 3, Carina Bracy, 206. 4, Ella Pepin, 195. 5, Madison Archuleta, 177. 6, Katie Hensien, 154. 7, Taye Nakamura-Koyama, 146. 8, Sophia Sahm, 145. 9, Erin Smith, 111. 10, Casey Molt, 110. J5-J7: 1, Addison Beasley, 380. 2, Maggi McElrath, 230. 3, Kate Jendrezak, 143. 4, Emma Ireton, 141. 5, Sami Woodring, 132. 6, Dagney Donohue, 127. 7, Josie Knight, 123. 8, Michaela Gorman, 108. 9, Sabrina Sutter, 100. 10, Camilla Morse, 95.

SNOWBOARDING Big Wave Challenge Saturday Mt. Bachelor ski area Men 1, Allister Schultz. 2, Jake Price. 3, Dave Reynolds. 4, Gabe Triplett. Women 1, Marissa Krawczak. 2, Ashley Thornton. 3, Meghan Moody. 4, Devon Schnake. Groms (14 and younger) Boys: Matthew Merzbach. Girls: Zoey Kern.

SWIMMING CENTRAL OREGON MASTERS AQUATICS USMS National Championship Thursday-Sunday Mesa, Ariz. COMA Results Women 60-64 Janet Gettling: 50 free, 30.58 (5th, COMA record); 100 free, 1:09.68 (8th); 100 fly, 1:23.79 (8th, COMA record); 200 fly, 3:17.61 (3rd, COMA record); 50 breast, 39.07 (1st, COMA record); 100 breast, 1:25.96 (1st, COMA record). Men 30-34 Seth Warren: 50 free, 26.40 (37th); 50 breast, 32,89 (18th); 100 breast, 1:12.83 (16th). Men 35-39 John Kinder: 50 breast, 31.19 (18th); 100 breast, 1:19.92 (20th). Christ Tujo: 200 free, 2:04.59 (29th); 100 breast, 1:11.30 (21st); 50 fly, 28.07 (32nd); 200 fly, 2:24.05 (10th). Men 60-64 Mike Carew: 500 free, 6:48.44 (11th); 1,650 free (23:09.95 (4th); 50 breast, 41.59 (24th); 100 breast, 1:32.37 (21st); 100 IM, 1:25.42 (25th). Men 75-79 George Thayer: 50 free, 31.34 (5th); 100 free, 1:14.82 (6th); 50 back, 38.96 (1st); 100 back, 1:25.82 (2nd); 200 back, 3:17.06 (2nd); 100 IM, 1:27.69 (4th, COMA record).

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CCHS KEEP ON TRACK FUND RUN Prineville Saturday 10 kilometers 1, Ron Wortman, 40:49. 2, Matt Ryan, 47:54. 3, Heather Allison, 51:47. 4, Krista Cooley, 55:15. 5, Connor Chaney, 58:40. 5 kilometers 1, Liam Pickhardt, 20:50. 2, James Blanchard, 21:06. 3, Randy McClellan, 21:59. 4, Dave Pickhardt, 22:59. 5, Stephen Dalton, 24:29. 6, John Foley, 24:49. 7, Scott Knoll, 24:56. 8, Rosie Honl, 26:29. 9, Andre McNary, 27:56. 10, Taylor Walker, 28:29. 11, Gwyneth Pyomey, 29:02. 12, Barbara Dalton, 29:08. 13, Amber Blanchard, 29:36. 14, Abby Nyman, 30:10. 15, Lynn Vigil, 30:30. 16, Chuck Hedges, 31:06. 17, Gordon Gillespie, 31:43. 18, Cheyenne Young, 31:44. 19, Walter, 32:16. 20, Walt Carlten, 32:16. 21, Kristy Knoll, 32:31. 22, Jamey Lambert, 33:30. 23, Christine Kasberger, 35:05. 24, Grace Carpenter, 35:20. 25, Jill Carpenter, 36:55. 26, Franny Bonanno, 37:09. 27, Bob Trautner, 37:21. 28, Rachel Wente-Chaney, 45:48. 29, Robert Broughton, 46;02. 30, Sharon Broughton, 47:54. 31, Teena Young, 48:44. 32, Cheryl Martucci, 55:51. 33, Phyllis Burge, 58:07. 34, Erik Rice, 58:08. 35, Jalin Rice, 58:38. 36, Sue Toupal, 59:29. 37, Dave Toupal, 59:29. 38, Amy Cooper, 59:29. 39, Linda Lambert, 59:33. 40, Lynette Tipton, 59:34. 41, Anna Pettis, 1:00:09. 42, Tara Sproat, 1:00:09. 43, Jeremiah Morrison, 1:01:09. 44, Tina Katzenberger, 1:01:48. 45, Judy Dunnaway, 1:02:51. 2 kilometers 1, Jonas Rice, 9:16. 2, Luke Flegel, 10:32. 3, Eliab Rice, 10:52. 4, Messina McClellan, 11:05. 5, Marah Binder, 11:06. 6, Elise Rice, 11:56. 7, C. Wilcox, 12:18. 8, Marli McClellan, 12:24. 9, Joel Rice, 14:29. 10, Shiloh Binder, 14:38. 11, Riley Struck, 15:00. 12, Bailey Jones, 15:32. 13, Dana Jones, 15:32.

edition of the event, King defeated runner-up Matthew Kiplagat, of New Rochelle, N.Y., by more than two minutes. Kiplagat finished in 51:10. More than 2,200 participants completed the race. • Bend runner records high finish at Eugene Marathon: Kami Semick, of Bend, raced to a thirdplace finish among women in Sunday’s Eugene Marathon. Semick, 44, who won the Portland Marathon last October, completed the 26.2-mile race in 2 hours, 45 minutes, 18 seconds. Katie Blackett, of Boulder, Colo., won the women’s division in 2:44:14 and Magdalena Donahue, of Albuquerque, N.M., took second in 2:44:41. Chase Parnell was the first Central Oregon finisher. Parnell, of Bend, finished 16th overall in 2:38:44.

Skiing • Local training academy seeks skiers: This summer, the Bend Endurance Academy plans to hold a summer nordic ski training program for collegiate skiers and older juniors. See Brief / D5

DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE THE DECEMBERISTS Make sure you buy a copy of The Bulletin on May 13, 20 and 27 for your chance to win! Golden Ticket for two concert tickets must be redeemed at the Ticket Mill in the Old Mill District. Original Golden Ticket must be presented. Golden Ticket is only good for the concert listed on the ticket. Golden Tickets can be found in home delivery and single copy newspapers. Golden Tickets have no cash value.

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FACES AND PLACES OF THE HIGH DESERT Inside Rob Lowe on Rob Lowe The 47-year-old actor discusses Hollywood and politics in his new memoir, Page E2

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 3, 2011

‘There’s no other place in the world I’d rather be’ Photos courtesy of Jill Rosell

Far left: Photo 306 (March 1) of Fred, who died of lymphoma soon after the photo was taken.

Bend photographer Jill Rosell discovers the everyday beauty of the city she loves

Middle: Photo 79 (July 17) of a Bend family sitting on the banks of the Deschutes River watching kayakers float in front of Les Schwab Amphitheater. Above: Photo 311 (March 6) of Kaze, a black Labrador, sitting in front of Thump Coffee in downtown Bend.

Photographer Jill Rosell takes photos at Veterans Memorial Bridge in Bend on April 22. Rosell takes a photo each day and shares it on the I Love Bend, OR Facebook page, which she created and maintains. Originally from Dunedin, New Zealand, Rosell moved to the United States in 1994 and has lived in Bend for 10 years.

Cat resorts offer playful atmosphere By Linda Weiford For The Bulletin

When it comes to catboarding facilities in Bend, meow is spoken here. Central Oregon boasts of several feline kennels where owners can leave man’s new best friend, replete with climbing shelves, scratching posts and bird-watching perches. “The cat is the No. 1 companion animal in the country now. With the increase in people who choose Andy Tullis / The Bulletin cats comes an Cats play on perches in increase in de- an outdoor play area at the mand,” said vet- Bend Kitty Lodge. erinarian Elizabeth Colleran, president of the American Association of Feline Practitioners based in Hillsborough, N.J. Roughly 93 million cats live with their owners in this country, compared with 77 million dogs, according to statistics cited by the American Veterinary Medical Association. The greater number of cats, combined with more humans traveling, has increased the need for cat boarding, Colleran said. See Cats / E3

YOUR PET To submit a photo for publication, e-mail a highresolution image along with your animal’s name, age and species or breed, your name, age, city of residence and contact information, and a few words about what makes your pet special. Send photos to pets@ bendbulletin. com, drop them off at 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. in Bend, or mail them to The Bulletin Pets section, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. Submitted photo

Charlie a beloved member of Redmond family Say hello to Charlie, a wonderful and loving 8-year-old golden retriever. He lives in Redmond with his family, Dorothy McPhetridge, and her mother, Mable Farlow. He also lives with Pixie Pocket, a Yorkie, and Paisley, a cat. He loves to get people playing and has helped his family through some hard times; the family loves him very much. Contact: 541-383-0358.

Dean Guernsey The Bulletin

By Megan Kehoe • The Bulletin

N

umber 79 shows a young girl sitting on the banks of the Deschutes River with her

ADOPT ME

mom and dad, the last lights of the dying summer sun turning the landscape into a hazy orange while the family watches kayakers drifting by.

Number 159 depicts a brown horse grazing in a field, the lone figure in a sea of golden grass. Number 267 shows the prickly fingers of a juniper branch emerging from under a dusting of crystallized snow. Number 311 displays a black Labrador sitting in front of a downtown coffee house. A tie around his neck, he gazes out glumly over a cup of coffee.

Just a glance through a year’s worth of Jill Rosell’s photography, and there would be no confusion as to the setting of these photos. “I just love Bend,” Rosell said. “I feel grateful to be here, and to wake up here every day. There’s no other place in the world I’d rather be.” See Bend / E6

Submitted photo

Fundraiser coincides with Triple Crown Healing Reins, a Central Oregon nonprofit that introduces disabled or at-risk people to horses as therapy, is seeking community support for its Triple Crownthemed fundraiser. The online fundraiser began Monday and continues through June 12, with dates coinciding with the three Triple Crown horse races: the Ken-

tucky Derby, the Preakness Stakes and the Belmont Stakes. Twelve Healing Reins horses are paired with volunteer “jockeys” to race online for donations. The horse- jockey team that raises the most funds wins. To view the horses and make donations, go to the Healing Reins website below and click on the Race Pages link. Contact: www.healingreins.com or 541-382-9410.

SPOTLIGHT

Painter’s prints to benefit Humane Society Central Oregon artist Jennifer Lake has offered to paint an original canvas celebrating the animals of the Humane Society of Redmond. The painting will be displayed with the release of prints at a special event to be held at the shelter this summer; details on the date are pending. The Humane Society will sell the original 30-by-40-inch canvas as well

as 16-by-20-inch signed and logo-embossed open-edition posters. The artwork will also appear as a special label on wine bottles from Avery’s Wine Bar and Bistro in Redmond, and be silk-screened on T-shirts, travel bags and other items. The Humane Society will use proceeds from sales of the items to support the shelter and its mission of helping animals in the community. Contact: www.redmondhumane .org or 541-923-0882.

Warm up to Shrek Shrek is a neutered male Louisiana Catahoula leopard dog mix who is looking for someone to call his own. He gets along well with everyone he meets, can be a bit shy at first but warms up quickly, and gets along well with other dogs. If you would like to visit Shrek, or any other pet available for adoption at the Humane Society of the Ochocos, call the shelter at 541-447-7178 or view animals at www.humanesocietyochocos.com.


T EL EV ISI ON

E2 Tuesday, May 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Woman in love needs coaching on what to do Dear Abby: I am a woman who is in love with my former high school coach. I don’t know if I should tell him. I first realized I loved him about a year and a half after I met him. We had an extremely close relationship, but it was not inappropriate. He is 13 years older than I am. After two years of getting to know him and forming a strong friendship, he moved across the country for work. Since then, I have entered college and we see each other only on holidays and in the summer. Every time I see him, we go back to our normal, wonderful relationship as though nothing has changed. I was in denial about my feelings for him. I told myself it was puppy love and couldn’t work out because of the age difference and the distance. But after four years of pining for him, and several failed romances with others, I realize I deeply love him. We have a unique connection, but he has a reputation as a “player,” so I can’t be sure he feels the same. I don’t want to ruin what we have, but I want more. Should I finally reveal my feelings? — Hurting Badly in New England Dear Hurting Badly: You and your former coach are both adults. I see no reason why you shouldn’t tell him how you feel. However, if he responds affirmatively, please be careful about how you proceed with this relationship. As you said — he has a reputation as a player, and men with a craving for variety can be very unreliable. Dear Abby: I am in my mid50s, divorced for many years, and have two grown children. I began seeing a delightful gentleman about three years ago. (I’ll call him Jack.) He was dating several women at the time, and after a few months, I made it clear that we would have to have an exclusive relationship or I could not go on seeing him. Jack reluctantly agreed and kept his promise.

DEAR ABBY Four months ago, I demanded a commitment from him. I knew I loved him and wanted to spend the rest of my life with him. He told me he loved me, but marriage is out of the question — and if that is the only way I’d stay with him, we have to say goodbye. I think I have made a terrible mistake, Abby. What are your thoughts on this? — Depressed in Des Moines Dear Depressed: Since marriage is important to you, you were right to lay it on the line to him. His unwillingness, regardless of how nicely put, to take your relationship to another level means he wasn’t as committed to you as you were to him. And once your self-esteem heals, you will realize that the person who made the terrible mistake was Jack. Dear Abby: May I offer a suggestion concerning elderly people? I know this from experience. When writing to an older adult, every so often include some labels bearing your name and address. This makes it easier for them to respond and for the post office to decipher your address. I have an elderly friend who has severe arthritis. When we correspond, it takes me at least 20 minutes to make out what she has written. The labels have helped us both. — Independence, Mo., Reader Dear Reader: I’m pleased to pass the word along. And because readers have complained that they get these labels along with solicitations from charities and don’t know what to do with them, this would be a good way to put them to use.

Rob Lowe takes high road with memoir By Mark Caro Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — By the end of Rob Lowe’s “Stories I Only Tell My Friends,” which on the surface traces the standard arc of a young actor who conquers demons and grows up, one might be struck by a certain impression: This guy is running for office at some point. “What made you wonder that, I wonder?” Lowe, whose gray around the temples doesn’t nullify the boyishness of his face and slim build, asked almost rhetorically over a double espresso in the open lobby restaurant of his downtown hotel. For one there’s the memoir’s comfortable, statesmanlike tone as he chronicles breaking into the ensemble of future stars in Francis Ford Coppola”s “The Outsiders” (1983), through his spotlight roles in “St. Elmo’s Fire” (1985) and “About Last Night ...” (1986), and onto his later career revival as White House policy wonk Sam Seaborn on “The West Wing” (1999-2003). He also had become increasingly visible in politics, campaigning actively for 1988 presidential candidate Michael Dukakis, before his ahead-of-the-curve sex tape scandal sent him into an extended period of lying low and rehabilitating both his image and himself, the latter for alcoholism. Then there’s that sepiatoned cover photo of the 47year-old actor, his perfectly sculpted chin boasting a day or two’s stubble as he peers at you from under cupped hands as if he’s Looking Into The Future.

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

“Here’s the thing,” Lowe said, weighing this evidence. “Not to be corny, I love my country, and in my bones the reason I love ‘The West Wing’ is they got that right. There are kooks on both sides, lots of them, but for the most part, people who serve their country are decent people aspiring to do great things for people. I know that sounds unbelievably golly-geewhiz square, but it really is what I believe, and if there was ever a way for me to fit into that, it would be something that I would really consider.” Asked whether he could see Lowe running for office, “West Wing” creator Aaron Sorkin answered by e-mail: “I’d vote for him twice.” Still, Lowe, a relaxed conversationalist with an easy smile and blue eyes that really pop in person, stressed he had no political goals in mind while writing “Stories I Only Tell My Friends” (which, if he’d had a strict copy editor at Henry Holt, would have been called “Stories I Tell

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Kind of Family,” turns out to be Janet Jackson. When he visits a warehouse filled with model spaceships, he discovers that work is being done for a movie called “Star Wars.” Among the many other cameos: the Penn brothers (Sean and Chris), the Sheen family (future “West Wing” co-star Martin and sons Charlie Sheen and Emilio Estevez), Cary Grant, Sarah Jessica Parker and “Class” supporting player John Cusack. Yet Lowe dishes almost no dirt. The most ire he expresses is toward the magazine writer who derisively coined the phrase “The Brat Pack” in what Lowe saw as a hatchet job, and the actor not only doesn’t mention his name but offers to discuss the conflict with him over dinner (as long as the writer pays).

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Celebrate Mother’s Day Weekend with

The Central Oregon Mastersingers

“All Things Bright & Beautiful” “All things bright and beautiful, all creatures great and small, all things wise and wonderful ...” We will celebrate them all!

Saturday May 7th, 7:30 pm, Church of the Nazerene in Bend Sunday May 8th, 3:00 pm, Crook County High School in Prineville Join our region’s premiere 40-voice choir directed by Clyde Thompson, on a joyous musical romp of spirituals, folk songs, classics, and a hilarious menagerie of Ogden Nash poems:

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Only My Friends” — and, really, is that “Only” even necessary?). He credited friend Mike Myers, who had him cast in “Wayne’s World” (1992) and the Austin Powers movies, with encouraging his move into authorhood, and said once he got started, he discovered his true motivation. “I learned the real reason I was doing it was sort of to have a manual for my (teenage) boys to understand dad, because I know I would love to find that document (from my own father) up in my attic somewhere,” Lowe said. “I don’t know if it’ll be helpful to my sons, but there was a lot of that — and that was triggered by the fact that at this moment they are the exact same ages that I was when I first started on this road.” Bold-faced names constantly pop up in Lowe’s narrative. That friendly, funny kid with “an almost robotic, bloodless focus” at “The Outsiders” auditions turns out to be Tom Cruise. The girl with famous brothers who was in his first failed sitcom, “A New

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Central Oregon’s renowned singer/songwriter, will join the Mastersingers in her own works and in arrangements created especially for these

Tickets: $15 for adults, $10 for children and students under 18; available online at www.co-mastersingers.com or by calling 541-385-7229. (Tickets also available at the door.) BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

TUESDAY PRIME TIME 5/3/11 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW # KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 173 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

5:00

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KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News The Nate Berkus Show (N) ‘PG’ America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! With Ruff News Nightly News King of Queens King of Queens Cooking Odyss Hubert Keller Travels-Edge Steves Europe

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KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News News (N) ABC World News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ‘PG’ The Office ’ ‘14’ This Old House Nightly Business News News That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Richard Bangs’ Adventures This Old House Nightly Business

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Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Victory Garden Woodwright PBS NewsHour ’ Å

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Dancing With the Stars (N) ’ ‘PG’ Dancing With the Stars ‘PG’ Å (10:01) Body of Proof (N) ‘14’ Å The Biggest Loser (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å The Voice Blind Auditions, Part 2 Vocalists perform for the judges. (N) ’ NCIS Baltimore (N) ’ ‘14’ NCIS: Los Angeles Plan B (N) ‘14’ The Good Wife In Sickness (N) ‘14’ Dancing With the Stars (N) ’ ‘PG’ Dancing With the Stars (N) ’ ‘PG’ (10:01) Body of Proof (N) ‘14’ Å Glee April comes back to Lima. ‘14’ Raising Hope (N) Traffic Light ‘14’ News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ News on PDX-TV Are You Smarter? Are You Smarter? Don’t Forget Don’t Forget The Buddha Richard Gere narrates the life of the Buddha. ’ ‘G’ Frontline Future of al-Qaida. (N) ’ The Biggest Loser (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å The Voice Blind Auditions, Part 2 Vocalists perform for the judges. (N) ’ One Tree Hill (N) ’ Å Hellcats Warped Sister (N) ’ ‘PG’ House of Payne Meet the Browns Woodsmith Shop Uncorked Watercolor Quest Joy/Painting Mexico Julia-Jacques The Buddha Richard Gere narrates the life of the Buddha. ’ ‘G’ Frontline Future of al-Qaida. (N) ’

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KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman News (N) (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens “Irena Sendler: In the Name” News Jay Leno Roseanne ’ ‘G’ Roseanne ’ ‘G’ Cooking Odyss Hubert Keller “Irena Sendler: In the Name”

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The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 Torn; Gun Crazy ‘14’ The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å 130 28 18 32 Dog the Bounty Hunter ‘PG’ Å ››› “The Sons of Katie Elder” (1965, Western) John Wayne, Dean Martin, Martha Hyer. Sons attend mother’s Texas funeral, (4:00) ››› “Scarface” (1983, Crime Drama) Al Pacino, Michelle Pfeiffer, Steven Bauer. A Cuban immigrant fights to the top of ››› “McLintock!” (1963) John Wayne, 102 40 39 Miami’s drug trade. Å avenge slain father. Maureen O’Hara. Å Operation Wild Whale Wars Ladies First ‘14’ Å Monsters Inside Me ’ ‘PG’ Å The Blue Planet Open Ocean ’ ‘G’ Blue Planet: Seas of Life ‘G’ Å Blue Planet: Seas of Life ‘G’ Å The Blue Planet Open Ocean ’ ‘G’ 68 50 26 38 Operation Wild Pregnant in Heels Clueless ‘14’ Housewives/OC Housewives/OC Housewives/OC Bethenny Ever After Pregnant in Heels (N) ‘14’ Pregnant in Heels ‘14’ 137 44 Trick My Truck Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Voisine Family The team rebuilds. ‘PG’ ›› “Quigley Down Under” (1990, Western) Tom Selleck, Laura San Giacomo. ’ Trick My Truck 190 32 42 53 (4:00) ›› “Quigley Down Under” (1990) Tom Selleck. 60 Minutes on CNBC 60 Minutes on CNBC (N) Mad Money 60 Minutes on CNBC 60 Minutes on CNBC Take It Off! Hair Free 51 36 40 52 One Nation, Overweight Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 In the Arena (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report Ron White: Behavioral Problems ‘14’ Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Sports Show Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 South Park ‘14’ COTV Blazer Profiles PM Edition Get Outdoors Redmond City Council Epic Conditions Word Travels ’ COTV Blazer Profiles Ride Guide ‘14’ HS Baseball 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 12 11 Tonight From Washington Wizards-Place Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie Suite/Deck Suite/Deck ›› “Wendy Wu: Homecoming Warrior” (2006) ‘PG’ Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Wizards-Place Wizards-Place 87 43 14 39 Wizards-Place Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Deadliest Catch ’ ‘14’ Å Deadliest Catch ’ ‘14’ Å Deadliest Catch Breaking Point ‘14’ American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. Deadliest Catch ’ ‘14’ Å 156 21 16 37 Deadliest Catch Sea Tested ’ ‘PG’ Audibles (N) (Live) Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 Year of the Quarterback (N) Football Live SportsNation Å Audibles (N) SportsNation Tribeca Film Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Å NBA Tonight (N) NFL Live (N) SportsNation Å 22 24 21 24 Tribeca Film Horse Racing Horse Racing Horse Racing Who’s Number 1? Å Can’t Blame Can’t Blame AWA Wrestling Å Boxing: 1998 Corrales vs. St. Clair Boxing: 1950 Brion vs. Louis 23 25 123 25 Horse Racing SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 “Another Cinderella Story” (2008) Selena Gomez, Drew Seeley. “Lemonade Mouth” (2011, Musical) Bridgit Mendler, Adam Hicks. ‘G’ America’s Funniest Home Videos The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Å Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å 5 Ingredient Fix Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Iron Chef America Flay vs. Sakai ‘G’ Cupcake Wars Walk of Fame Chopped The judges have concerns. Chopped Smoked turkey leg dishes. Challenge Ultimate Cookie Clash 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa Malcolm, Middle Malcolm, Middle Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ›› “Death Race” (2008, Action) Jason Statham, Tyrese Gibson, Ian McShane. ›› “Death Race” (2008, Action) Jason Statham. 131 Yard Crashers Hunters Int’l House Hunters My First Place My First Place Property Virgins Property Virgins House Hunters Hunters Int’l Property Virgins Property Virgins 176 49 33 43 Bang, Your Buck Bang, Your Buck Curb/Block How the States Got Their Shapes ‘PG’ Å Larry the Cable Guy Larry the Cable Guy How the States Got Their Shapes Modern Marvels Steam power. ‘PG’ 155 42 41 36 Larry the Cable Guy Intervention John ‘14’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ American Pickers ‘PG’ Å American Pickers ‘PG’ Å How I Met How I Met Steel Divas (N) ‘14’ Å 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘PG’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Ed Show (N) The Last Word The Rachel Maddow Show The Ed Show Hardball With Chris Matthews Å 56 59 128 51 The Last Word That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Silent Library (N) RJ Berger 16 and Pregnant Jordan ‘PG’ Å 16 and Pregnant Jennifer ‘14’ Å 16 and Pregnant Jamie (N) ’ ‘14’ My Life as Liz (N) 16 and Pregnant 192 22 38 57 The Seven ‘PG’ SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å BrainSurge ‘G’ SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Sports Stories Mariners Pre. MLB Baseball Texas Rangers at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. (N) (Live) Mariners Post. The Dan Patrick Show (N) MLB Baseball 20 45 28* 26 Ball Up Streetball Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Repo Games ’ Repo Games ’ Repo Games (N) Repo Games ’ Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Repo Games ’ Auction Hunters 132 31 34 46 Auction Hunters Stargate SG-1 Threat to Earth. ‘PG’ ›› “Star Trek V: The Final Frontier” (1989) William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy. Å ››› “Serenity” (2005) Nathan Fillion. A spaceship crew gets caught in a deadly conflict. Mutant Chron 133 35 133 45 Stargate SG-1 Behind Scenes Joyce Meyer John Hagee Hillsong ‘G’ Å Praise the Lord Å ACLJ This Week Dino ‘G’ Full Flame Å Changing-World Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 Friends ’ ‘14’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ Conan (N) ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘14’ ›› “The Story of Seabiscuit” (1949, Drama) Shirley Temple, (11:45) ›› “Glory” ››› “A Day at the Races” (1937) Groucho Marx, Chico Marx. Dr. Hugo Hackenbush ›› “Stablemates” (1938) Wallace Beery, Arthur Hohl. An aspir- (8:45) ›› “Fast Company” (1953, Musical Comedy) Howard 101 44 101 29 and friends upset a steeplechase and more. Å (DVS) ing young jockey finds a racetrack mentor. Keel, Polly Bergen, Marjorie Main. Å Barry Fitzgerald, Lon McAllister. Å (1956) Ultimate Cake Off 4th of July ‘PG’ What the Sell?! What the Sell?! World’s Strongest Toddler ’ ‘PG’ World’s Tallest Children ‘G’ Å Extreme Coupon Extreme Coupon World’s Strongest Toddler ’ ‘PG’ 178 34 32 34 Ultimate Cake Off ’ ‘PG’ Å NBA Basketball Memphis Grizzlies at Oklahoma City Thunder (N) (Live) Å Inside the NBA (N) (Live) Å Law & Order A riot at a rally. ’ ‘14’ Law & Order All New ’ ‘14’ 17 26 15 27 (4:00) NBA Basketball Boston Celtics at Miami Heat (N) Regular Show Codename: Kids Codename: Kids Total Drama Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Scooby-Doo Looney Tunes World of Gumball King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son All in the Family All in the Family All in the Family Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ’ ‘G’ 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Mob Wives ’ ‘14’ Å RuPaul’s Drag Race ’ ‘14’ RuPaul’s Drag Race Reunited! ‘14’ Love & Hip Hop ›› “Roll Bounce” (2005) Bow Wow. A roller-skater prepares for a big showdown. ’ 191 48 37 54 Saddle Ranch ’ Audrina ’ ‘PG’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:15) › “Up Close & Personal” 1996 Robert Redford. (6:20) ›› “Back to School” 1986 Rodney Dangerfield. › “Did You Hear About the Morgans?” 2009 ‘PG-13’ (9:45) ››› “The Missing” 2003, Western Tommy Lee Jones, Cate Blanchett. ’ ‘R’ Å ›› “Predator 2” 1990, Science Fiction Danny Glover. ‘R’ Å › “Only the Strong” 1993, Drama Mark Dacascos. ‘PG-13’ Å ›› “Predator 2” 1990 ‘R’ Å › “Only the Strong” 1993, Drama Mark Dacascos. ‘PG-13’ Å Danny & Dingo Danny & Dingo Danny & Dingo Danny & Dingo Danny & Dingo Ski & Snowbrd The Daily Habit Stealth Rider ‘14’ Built to Shred Built to Shred Danny & Dingo Firsthand ‘PG’ The Daily Habit Stealth Rider ‘14’ ›› “Caddyshack” (1980, Comedy) Chevy Chase, Rodney Dangerfield. School of Golf World of Golf Golf Central Inside PGA Tour ›› “Caddyshack” (1980, Comedy) Chevy Chase, Rodney Dangerfield. Golf Central Inside PGA Tour The Waltons The Intruders ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ‘G’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (6:45) ›› “Monsters vs. Aliens” 2009 Voices of Reese Witherspoon. Animated. A Too Big to Fail: ›› “A Nightmare on Elm Street” 2010, Horror Jackie Earle Max Kellerman Game of Thrones Ned learns of the ›› “Death Defying Acts” 2007, Drama Catherine Zeta-Jones, HBO 425 501 425 10 Guy Pearce. Premiere. ’ ‘PG’ Å ragtag group of monsters defends Earth from an alien. ‘PG’ Å Opening Haley, Rooney Mara, Kyle Gallner. ’ ‘R’ Å Face Off Crown’s profligacy. ’ ‘MA’ Å ›› “Turistas” 2006, Horror Josh Duhamel, Melissa George. ‘R’ (7:05) ››› “Requiem for a Dream” 2000, Drama Ellen Burstyn, Jared Leto. ‘R’ (9:20) ››› “A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints” 2006, Drama ‘R’ The Making Of IFC 105 105 (4:00) › “Repo Men” 2010, Science Fic- › “Catwoman” 2004, Action Halle Berry. A shy artist acquires (7:45) ›› “The Lovely Bones” 2009, Drama Mark Wahlberg, Rachel Weisz, Susan Sarandon. A young mur- ›› “Old School” 2003 Luke Wilson. Three men relive their wild (11:35) › “Repo MAX 400 508 7 tion Jude Law. ’ ‘R’ Å feline strength and agility. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å der victim watches over her family from heaven. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å past by starting a fraternity. ’ ‘R’ Å Men” 2010 ’ ‘R’ Tiger Man of Africa (N) ‘PG’ Tiger Man of Africa Fight for Life ‘G’ Explorer Megapiranha (N) ‘PG’ Tiger Man of Africa ‘PG’ Tiger Man of Africa Fight for Life ‘G’ Explorer Megapiranha ‘PG’ Alaska-Trooper Alaska-Trooper NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents Fanboy-Chum The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Rocko’s Rocko’s NTOON 89 115 189 Driven TV Off Rd. Overhaul Hunting, Country Truth Hunting Western Extreme Dream Season Hunting TV Wild Outdoors Truth Hunting Hunting, Country Bone Collector Steve’s Outdoor Whitetail Nation Management OUTD 37 307 43 (5:15) ››› “The Messenger” 2009, Drama Ben Foster, Woody Harrelson. iTV. A (7:15) ›› “Handsome Harry” 2009, Drama Jamey Sheridan. iTV Premiere. A former Nurse Jackie ’ United States of Nurse Jackie ’ United States of Secret Diary of a Kiss and Tail: HolSHO 500 500 soldier gets involved with a fallen comrade’s widow. ’ ‘R’ Å sailor carries out the wishes of a dying friend. ‘R’ ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å lywood Tara ‘MA’ Å Tara ‘MA’ Å Call Girl ’ ‘MA’ Auto Racing Ticket to Ride Barrett-Jackson Special Edition ‘G’ Speedmakers Electric Vehicles ‘G’ Auto Racing Ticket to Ride Barrett-Jackson Special Edition ‘G’ Speedmakers Electric Vehicles ‘G’ NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 (4:05) Frozen ‘R’ (5:45) ››› “Sunshine Cleaning” 2008 Amy Adams. ’ ‘R’ Å (7:20) ›› “Astro Boy” 2009, Action ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “2 Fast 2 Furious” 2003, Action Paul Walker, Tyrese. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ››› “An Education” 2009 Å STARZ 300 408 300 (4:05) ››› “The Glass Shield” 1994 ›› “Extraordinary Measures” 2010, Drama Brendan Fraser, Harrison Ford. Two men ››› “Agora” 2009, Adventure Rachel Weisz, Max Minghella, Oscar Isaac. Premiere. (10:10) ›› “Creation” 2009, Biography Paul Bettany. Premiere. Darwin grapples with TMC 525 525 Michael Boatman. ‘PG-13’ Å join forces to develop a life-saving drug. ’ ‘PG’ Å A slave falls in love with Hypatia of Alexandria. ’ ‘R’ Å issues of grief, science and faith. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å NHL Hockey: Capitals at Lightning NHL Hockey Vancouver Canucks at Nashville Predators (N) ’ (Live) Å Hockey Central World Extreme Cagefighting IndyCar Open Wheel Weekly VS. 27 58 30 Braxton Family Values ‘14’ Å Braxton Family Values (N) ‘PG’ Sinbad It’s Just Family (N) ‘PG’ Sinbad It’s Just Family ‘PG’ Å Braxton Family Values ‘PG’ Å Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å Sinbad It’s Just Family ‘PG’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 3, 2011 E3

CALENDAR

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Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

GENERAL TODAY GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “The Dark Side of Chocolate,” which explores child slaves in West African cocoa plantations, with a fair trade discussion and fair; free; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504. PUB QUIZ: Answer trivia on topics from pop culture to politics; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit the Kurera Foundation; $40 per team; 6:30-9:30 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541306-0864, vivien@kurerafund.org or www.kurerafund.org.

WEDNESDAY THE NORTHSTAR SESSION: The California-based roots-rock band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “DISTRACTED”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Lisa Loomer’s play about a boy with behavioral issues and his mother’s search for answers; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org.

THURSDAY GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Finding Nouf” by Zoe Ferraris; bring a lunch; free; noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. CINCO DE MAYO WITH OZOMATLI: Featuring a performance by the Los Angeles-based Latin hip-hop band, with Todd Haaby & Sola Via and Rubblebucket; with food, drinks and arts and crafts; free; 4:30-10 p.m.; downtown Bend; www.c3events. com/events/Cinco-de-Mayo. CINCO DE MAYO CELEBRATION: With a Mexican buffet, silent auction, live music and entertainment; proceeds benefit children’s programs at Sisters Park and Recreation District and Sisters Community Schools Initiative; $15, $10 ages 7-12, $7 ages 3-6 and free ages 2 and younger; 6-8:30 p.m.; FivePine Lodge & Conference Center, 1021 Desperado Trail, Sisters; 541-4800189. FIESTA FLAMENCA: Cinco de Mayo party features a flamenco performance; free; 6 p.m., 6:30 and 7:30 p.m. shows; Common Table, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-639-1056. “CAFE MURDER” AND “LARCENY AND OLD LACE”: The Prineville Theater Association presents a one-act mystery and a full-length comedy; $5, $3 ages 7-12, free ages 6 and younger; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Crook County High School, Eugene Southwell Auditorium, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-280-1115 or swimm_purple@yahoo.com. BRANDI CARLILE: The fast-rising, rootsy singer-songwriter performs, with Ivan & Alyosha; SOLD OUT; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org.

“DISTRACTED”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Lisa Loomer’s play about a boy with behavioral issues and his mother’s search for answers; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. CASH’D OUT: Johnny Cash tribute band performs, with Boxcar Stringband; $12 plus fees in advance, $15 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7882989 or www.randompresents.com.

FRIDAY FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend and the Old Mill; free; 5-9 p.m.; throughout Bend. POLICE CHAPLAINCY AUCTION AND DINNER: Dinner and auction benefit the Central Oregon Police Chaplaincy; registration requested; $25; 5 p.m.; Christian Life Center, 21720 E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-848-3152, john316@clearwire. net or www.copchaplain.com. LITTLE RASCALS DINNER AND AUCTION: A Mother’s Day buffet dinner, with live music and live and silent auctions; tickets available from Green Plow Coffee Roasters and D&D Realty; proceeds benefit the Redmond Learning Center; $40, $70 per couple; 5:30 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-923-8664 or www. redmondcommunitychildcare.com. TIGHT LINES AUCTION & BBQ DINNER: The Deschutes River Conservancy hosts an evening of food, fishing lore, an auction, drinks and more; registration requested; $50; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; Aspen Hall, 18920 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend; 541-382-4077, ext. 10, debbie@deschutesriver.org or www.deschutesriver.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Eileen Garvin reads from her book “How to Be a Sister”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. “CAFE MURDER” AND “LARCENY AND OLD LACE”: The Prineville Theater Association presents a one-act mystery and a full-length comedy; $5, $3 ages 7-12, free ages 6 and younger; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Crook County High School, Eugene Southwell Auditorium, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-280-1115 or swimm_purple@yahoo.com. BEND BICYCLE FILM FESTIVAL: A screening of local short films and presentations about cycling in Central Oregon; proceeds benefit Central Oregon Trail Alliance and Bend Endurance Academy; $12; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3351346 or www.towertheatre.org. “DISTRACTED”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Lisa Loomer’s play about a boy with behavioral issues and his mother’s search for answers; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org.

“THE KING’S SPEECH”: A screening of the R-rated 2010 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. BLAINE LARSEN: The country musician performs, with Ross Rogers; $15, $25 VIP; 8 p.m.; Coyote Ranch, 1368 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-548-7700.

SATURDAY AUTOMOTIVE SWAP MEET: Featuring car parts, tools and equipment for trade or sale; free admission; 7 a.m.-3 p.m.; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-536-6039. HIGH DESERT CRUISE-IN: The High Desert Mopars host a car show featuring classic cars, rods, trucks and bikes, a raffle, awards, barbecue, a DJ and more; free to the public, car entry $10; 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m.; Albertsons, 1655 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond; 541-350-8131. SALMON RUN: 5K and 10K run/walks, followed by a kids fun run; with vendors and awards; registration required; proceeds benefit The Environmental Center; $5-$20; 9 a.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-385-6908, info@envirocenter. org or www.envirocenter.org. RAKU POTTERY SHOW: The Raku Artists of Central Oregon host a sale of handcrafted pottery; free admission; 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-317-1952. CHICKEN COOP TOUR: Tour 35 chicken coops in Central Oregon; tour booklets act as tickets and will provide a map to the coops; proceeds benefit Together for Children, Healing Reins Therapeutic Riding Center and NeighborImpact; $10 or six items of nonperishable food per booklet; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; 541-241-2040, bendcooptour@gmail.com or www.bendchickens.com. LIVING HISTORY DAY: Meet buckaroos and pioneers, with interactive beading, spinning and Oregon Trail stations in a re-created 1880s settlement; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. MISSION — WOLF: Meet live wolves from Colorado’s Mission: Wolf refuge and learn about their role in the ecosystem; ages 7 and older; $20 plus admission ($10, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger), $10 members; 1 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. CELEBRATION OF EDUCATION: Dinner and dessert, with an auction; proceeds benefit Seven Peaks School; $75; 5 p.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend; 541-3827755 or auction@sevenpeaksschool. org.

M T

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16

1:40, 4:40, 7:50, 10:20 SOURCE CODE (PG-13) 3:15 TYLER PERRY’S MADEA’S BIG HAPPY FAMILY (DP — PG-13) 12:05, 3:25, 7:45, 10:35 WATER FOR ELEPHANTS (PG-13) 1:35, 4:30, 7:25, 10:10 EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies. EDITOR’S NOTE: Digitally projected shows (marked as DP) use one of several different technologies to provide maximum fidelity. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter. EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes.

680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL

For Tuesday, May 3

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

THE CONSPIRATOR (PG-13) 2, 4:35, 7:10 JANE EYRE (PG-13) 2:05, 4:40, 7:15 THE MUSIC NEVER STOPPED (PG) 2:20, 4:55, 7:30 POTICHE (R) 2:25, 5, 7:35 WATER FOR ELEPHANTS (PG-13) 2:10, 4:45, 7:20 WIN WIN (R) 2:15, 4:50, 7:25

AFRICAN CATS (G) 1:50, 4:20, 6:55, 9:45 ARTHUR (PG-13) 12:10, 4:55, 8:05, 10:50 DYLAN DOG: DEAD OF NIGHT (PG-13) 12:45, 3:30, 6:45, 9:50 FAST FIVE (DP — PG-13) 12:55, 3:05, 4, 6:10, 7:05, 9:10, 10 FAST FIVE (PG-13) 2, 5:05, 8, 10:55 HANNA (PG-13) 10:55 a.m., 1:25, 7:35, 10:15 HOODWINKED TOO! HOOD VS. EVIL (PG) 1:15 HOODWINKED TOO! HOOD VS. EVIL (3D - PG) 3:40, 7:15, 9:30 HOP (PG) 12:35, 4:10, 6:30, 9:25 LIMITLESS (PG-13) 12:20, 5, 8:10, 10:45 THE LINCOLN LAWYER (R) Noon PROM (PG) 1:05, 3:50, 6:35, 9:40 RIO (G) 12:25, 3:10, 6:15, 9:15 SCREAM 4 (R) 12:30 SOUL SURFER (PG)

MISSION — WOLF: Meet live wolves from Colorado’s Mission: Wolf refuge and learn about their role in the ecosystem; ages 7 and older; $20 plus admission ($10, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger), $10 members; 5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. CINCO DE MAYO CELEBRATION: Featuring Mexican food, folklore dancing, live music and games; proceeds benefit scholarships for Latino program students; $5 suggested donation; 6-11 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Campus Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-318-3726 or esandoval@cocc.edu. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Eileen Garvin reads from her book “How to Be a Sister”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. HIGH DESERT BOLLYWOOD: The High Desert Belly Dance Guild presents local and regional belly dancers, with headliner Samantha Riggs; $12 or $10 members in advance, $15 at the door; 7-10 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; www.highdesertbellydance.org. MANTRA CONCERT: Karl Anthony leads Sanskrit and English chants, performed to the accompaniment of laser lights; $20, $5 ages 11 and younger; 7-9 p.m.; High Desert Community Grange, 62855 Powell Butte Road, Bend; 541-410-8029 or www.unitycentraloregon.com. “DISTRACTED”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Lisa Loomer’s play about a boy with behavioral issues and his mother’s search for answers; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. THE CENTRAL OREGON MASTERSINGERS: The premier choir presents “All Things Bright and Beautiful,” under the direction of Clyde Thompson; with Lindy Gravelle; $15, $10 ages 17 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 N.E. 27th St.; 541-385-7229 or www.co-mastersingers.com. BETH WOOD: The Eugene-based folk musician performs; $15 suggested donation; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; HarmonyHouse, 17505 Kent Road, Sisters; 541-548-2209. AUDIOPHILIA: The Corvallis-based jam band performs; $7; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

SUNDAY MOTHER’S DAY LUNCHEON: A buffet luncheon for Mother’s Day; $8, $4 for mothers; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. MISSION — WOLF: Meet live wolves from Colorado’s Mission: Wolf refuge and learn about their role in the ecosystem; ages 4 and older; $20 plus admission ($10, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger), $10 members; noon; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org.

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU (PG-13) 6 PAUL (R) 9

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

FAST FIVE (PG-13) 3:45, 6:30 HOODWINKED TOO! HOOD VS. EVIL (PG) 4:30, 6:45 PROM (PG) 5, 7:15 RIO (PG) 4:45, 7

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

CEDAR RAPIDS (R) 7 RIO (G) 6:30

SOUL SURFER (PG) 6:45 WATER FOR ELEPHANTS (PG-13) 6:30

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

BATTLE: LOS ANGELES (PG-13) 4, 7 SOUL SURFER (UPSTAIRS - PG) 4:30, 7:15 EDITOR’S NOTE: Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

PET LOSS GROUP: Drop-in support group for anyone experiencing or anticipating the loss of a pet; free; 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays; Partners in Care, 2075 N.E. Wyatt Court, Bend; Sharon Myers at 541-382-5882.

DOGS BEHAVIORAL TRAINING: Private lessons to help with your dog’s manners and with problems; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Wednesdays; Lin’s School for Dogs, 63378 Nels Anderson Road, Suite 7, Bend; Lin Neumann at 541-536-1418 or www.linsschoolfordogs.com. AKC RING-READY COACHING: Private lessons to get your dog ready to show in AKC obedience trials; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Wednesdays; Lin’s School for Dogs, 63378 Nels Anderson Road, Suite 7, Bend; Lin Neumann at 541-536-1418 or www.linsschoolfordogs.com. CLICKER TRAINING: Solve behavior problems; 6 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays; Bend Pet Resort, 60909 S.E. 27th St.; Chris at 541-633-0446 or www.DeschutesRiverDogs.com. PUPPY 101: Puppies ages 8 to 13 weeks may join any week; teaches socialization, confidencebuilding skills, playtime, handling exercises and more; $85; 6-7 p.m. Thursdays; Dancin’ Woofs, 63027 N.E. Lower Meadow Drive, Suite D, Bend; Mare Shey at 541-3123766 or www.dancinwoofs.com. PUPPY KINDERGARTEN CLASSES: Ongoing training, behavior and socialization classes for puppies 10 to 16 weeks; $80 for four weeks; 6:30-7:30 p.m. Thursdays; Pawsitive Experience, 65111 High Ridge Drive, Tumalo; Meredith Gage, 541-318-8459, trainingdogs123@ bendbroadband.com or www. pawsitiveexperience.com. OBEDIENCE CLASSES: Six-week drop-in classes; $99.95; 9 and 10 a.m., and 7 and 8 p.m. Mondays, 9 and 10 a.m. Wednesdays, 9 and 10 a.m., and 7 and 8 p.m. Fridays, 1 and 2 p.m. Saturdays; Petco,

3197 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; Loel Jensen at 541-382-0510. OBEDIENCE FOR AGILITY: Agility is a great way to connect with your dog; $95; 4 p.m. Saturdays; Desert Sage Agility, 24035 Dodds Road, Bend; Stephanie Morris at 541-633-6774 or www.desertsageagility.com. “EXERBALL” FOR YOU AND YOUR DOG: Three-week beginner classes; $45; Fridays 6-7 p.m. or Saturdays 10-11 a.m.; call to register; Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 S.W. Deerhound Ave., Redmond; Dennis Fehling, 541-350-2869. PRIVATE BEHAVIORAL COUNSELING: Individual attention for you and your dog’s needs; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Dancin’ Woofs, 63027 Lower Meadow Drive, Suite D, Bend; Mare Shey, www. dancinwoofs.com or 541-312-3766. PUPPY MANNERS: Learn good social skills with people and other puppies, basic rules, and commands, two sets of vaccinations required; $85 for 6 weeks; starts 12:30 p.m. May 7; register by May 6; La Pine Training Center; Diann Hecht, 541-5362458 or diannshappytails@msn. com or www.oregondoglady.com. LOW-COST SHOT AND MICROCHIP CLINIC: Vaccines $15, microchips $25, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., May 14; reception@ bendsnip.org; Bend Pet ExpressWest, 133 S.W.Century Drive, Bend.

HORSES ROLLING RANCH IN SISTERS: Open for trail-course practice and shows with instructors available; $10 per horse; 69516 Hinkle Butte Drive, Sisters; Shari at 541-549-6962. LOOKING FOR VOLUNTEERS: Organizers of the 2011 Wild Trails Horse Expo are looking for volunteers to demonstrate various trail riding tips, techniques, and other topics of interest to the recreational trail rider during the 2011 Wild Trails Horse Expo at the Rimrock Event Center, Brasada Ranch, July 2224, a free event; for information contact Sandy Mayernik, sandy@ CentralOregonTrailCourse.com, http://WildTrailsHorseExpo.com.

Cats Continued from E1 The Bend Kitty Lodge, a catsonly facility, is a sprawling hostel in east Bend where occasional meows punctuate the harp music played on a CD player. On a recent sunny morning, a dozen cats snoozed, rolled about or batted at toys. In a room-sized “catio” — a term for securely enclosed outdoor areas that expose cats to the great outdoors — a wide-eyed Himalayan watched birds flit about. Owner Beckie Wilson took over the lodge in 1997. “I love cats and like business, so it seemed like a good fit,” said Wilson, who owns the facility with her husband, Ron. In the reception area, cat mobiles dangle from the ceiling, ceramic cats line the shelves and cat posters dot the walls. Extended vacations prompt owners to leave their cats here, but life’s expected twists and turns also contribute, said Kathy Jordan, a six-year employee of the lodge. For example, the owner of Snowshoe, a fluffy Siamese mix with gentle eyes, is a soldier suddenly sent to Afghanistan for a year, Jordan said. The owner of Norton, a black puffball who delights in human touch, recently moved to Bend and bought a house but the closing date was delayed. Also, “We get cats of owners who’ve gone into long-term rehabilitation after surgery or illness,” she said. Also in east Bend is the Bend Pet Resort, which caters mainly to dogs but offers separate “deluxe kitty condos,” each with climbing shelves and a large window that faces a busy bird bath and feeder. The resort’s feline residents that morning were Riffraff, a Siamese mix, and a black cat named Jazabelle, both from the same household. Each had its own condo, something a lot of cats prefer, said Kathy Granacki, who runs the facility with her husband, Ken. “We’ve found they prefer a quiet environment,” she said. When it comes to showing anxiety, cats don’t howl or chew on shoes like dogs. “They’re more subtle,” said Ken Granacki, who, besides owing the Pet Resort, professionally shows his dogs and cats. Instead, stressedout felines might stop eating or drinking. “We monitor their habits carefully,” he said, which includes changing the litter boxes once or even twice daily to see if — and how often — the cats are using them. At the Happy Tales Pet Resort between Bend and Redmond, cats are kept in an area adjacent to the office with a large window that overlooks what staff calls a “bird sanctuary,” said manager Andi Sillers. “They love to watch the activity of the birds, and we love that they can do it without

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Bailey relaxes at the Bend Kitty Lodge Tuesday afternoon.

Evaluating a kennel Does Fluffy care what color her enclosure is? No, says PetPlace .com, a veterinarian-run website dedicated to the health and wellness of pets. Instead, focus on safety, comfort and the staff’s friendliness and competence. Visit the kennel before you book a reservation, the website advises. Here is what PetPlace .com recommends you look for: • Ask questions about the staff. How many people work there and how long have they worked there? What kind of training have they received? • Kennel should be clean inside and out. Proper sanitation is one of the most important aspects of preventing the spread of contagious diseases. • Cats should not be boarded with dogs. • Cats should be provided with stimuli and opportunities for exercise. • Discuss how your cat will be cared for in the event of an illness. • If your cat is on medication, make sure the employees are trained to administer it. — Linda Weiford

being a threat to them.” The cats are housed near the office to keep them separate from dogs and to ensure that “they get lots of hands-on loving and petting,” Sillers said. Any reputable boarding facility will require proof that cats are updated on their vaccinations, which includes rabies and FVRCP (which covers some respiratory infections and distemper), along with Fel-leuk for outdoor cats, according to the website of the American Veterinary Medical Association. “Absolutely, no one should risk diseases getting spread among cats,” said Wilson of the Bend Kitty Lodge. Happy Tales and the Bend Pet Resort also have vaccine requirements. Additionally, staff at any of the three facilities administer medication. Insulin shots for diabetes in older cats are especially common, Wilson said. Linda Weiford can be reached at ldweiford@gmail.com.


E4 Tuesday, May 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 3, 2011 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Tuesday, May 3, 2011: This year, mental discipline and luck combine to make a new beginning in any part of your life you desire. You are also unusually magnetic. Others often respond to that energy. It is because of you that most of the important happenings occur. In 2012 you will be entering a new luck cycle. In the next few months, consider what isn’t working, and let go of that area of your life. If you are single, you could meet Mr. or Ms. Right, but there might be many other people interested in you, too. If you are attached, the two of you enter a new phase in your relationship that will make you happy. GEMINI helps give you another perspective on money. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH Avoid making major financial decisions right now. Later you could discover how far off you are in what you agreed to. Enjoy what is happening. Look at what you have to offer in a situation besides money. Be willing to take the lead if need be. Tonight: Pay bills. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH It might only be Tuesday, but the Bull enjoys a little frivolous play. Your light and airy style sets many people back who are used to the solid-thinking Taurus. Enjoy the moment, doing only what you have to do. Tonight: All smiles. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH You might be in a new

frame of mind, but hold back. Tomorrow you will be empowered and more energized. Still, you might make some changes to a project. Clear out as much as you can, knowing you could be very busy tomorrow. Tonight: Rest up. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Though you might reach an agreement in a meeting on how to proceed, it won’t hold. Agreements of that nature might need to be done over. Network and do what you must, but make time for key friends. Tonight: Where people are. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH Others look to you for answers. A meeting today might appear to be in line and it might seem like everyone knows what is going on. You could be surprised by what comes up out of the blue. Relax. You might have to finish up a job by yourself. Tonight: Could be a late one. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Keep reaching out for different people or experts. Some of you might decide to do your own research. Your way of handling a volatile matter could change dramatically. Know what you are aiming for. Do what is necessary. Tonight: Put some music on. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Work with others individually. You’ll get the results you desire and have reason to be content. Others ultimately respond to that personal touch. Avoid getting into a decisionmaking discussion. Time is your ally. Tonight: Chat and visit over dinner with a favorite person.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Defer. In fact, you might be distracted by something other than work or the norm. Whatever you are doing, make it a point to squeeze in an activity you enjoy. Visit with a favorite friend. Lighten your day. Tonight: The only answer is yes. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Get as much done as possible, especially things that you know won’t demand redoing if someone doesn’t agree. Clear your desk. Run as many errands as possible. Schedule a dentist’s or doctor’s appointment. Tonight: Squeeze in a walk. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH You might wonder what is the best way to discuss a problem. Brainstorm away a couple of ideas will come forth. It is simply a matter of choice ... yours. Make time for a child or loved one. Tonight: Choose a fun activity. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Open up to a new possibility, yet realize nothing is written in stone. Your personal or domestic situation could revise itself despite what you think. Maintain a sense of humor with others. Be willing to try another approach. You have nothing to lose. Tonight: Order in. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Keep conversations going. Ideas can float back and forth without any of them seeming righton. You might feel discouraged while trying to open up talks with a sibling or neighbor. The timing is off. Tonight: Return calls and emails. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


E6 Tuesday, May 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Bend Continued from E1 Rosell is a local photographer who also maintains the Facebook page I Love Bend, OR. With over 3,700 Facebook “likes,” and followers from all over the world, the site has gathered a substantial following since Rosell started it a year ago. The premise of the page is simple: Rosell photographs people, animals, businesses and landscapes that give Bend life, and posts one photo a day on the site. Most of her photos are taken outside in natural lighting. Most feature eye-catching colors, though some are in stark shades of black and white. There are no criteria for the photos other than to capture moments that offer glimpses into life in Central Oregon. “My problem is that I like to photograph everything,” said Rosell, smiling. “That’s my big problem.” Originally from Dunedin, New Zealand, Rosell has lived in Bend for 10 years. She moved to the United States in 1994 after meeting her husband, David, during a ski season she spent in Colorado. Until a few years ago, Rosell had been a stay-at-home mom with her two children, Sophie and Jack. With a previous background in teaching and tourism, Rosell had always had a fervent interest in photography and has traveled to many corners of the world, always carrying a camera at her side. But it wasn’t until four years ago that Rosell decided to pursue the art seriously, buying her first Canon camera. Two years later, she upgraded to a Canon 5d Mark 11 and opened her own photography business shooting family portraits, engagement photos and family pets, among other subjects. Rosell said being a photographer is what she wanted to do her whole life. She just didn’t know it until a few years ago. “I’m doing what I love,” said Rosell. “I feel like I’m getting so much back from it. I get to tap into my creativity every day. It’s a joy.” After initially advertising her business through more traditional means, Rosell soon turned to social media. The new business owner started a blog and began to share her photos on her own Facebook page. The idea for the I Love Bend, OR page evolved from Rosell’s enthusiasm for Bend, and her desire to share her photographs with like-minded people. “It was the thought of combining photography with Facebook that really interested me,” Rosell said. Now, a year later, Rosell has watched the site “likes” climb steadily, with people from all over the world, including countries like Morocco, Vietnam and Germany, seeing her photos daily. Though the photos are quintessential Bend, the images are easy to relate to, infused with a lightness and sense of humor that capture the spirit of the city. “Her pictures are way better than my eyes,” says Facebook follower and fellow Bendite Lenora James, 47. “Her eye for color is impeccable, and she can pull things off that others don’t.” James said she started following the page close to a year ago after one of her friends “liked” it, and the photos started popping up in her newsfeed. James, who owns her own dog-walking business in Bend, says there have been times when she’s missed events, like the recent Bend Spring Festival in NorthWest Crossing, and has seen a photo Rosell has taken of the event pop up in her news feed. James said these pictures make her feel as if she hasn’t missed anything. “She is powerful in how she represents the town,” said James. “She shows it as a fun, alive place to be.” Rosell says the site has evolved into a real community base, pulling people together through the power of photography and a mutual enthusiasm.

Courtesy of Jill Rosell

Photo 267 (Jan. 21) of a juniper branch appeared on Jill Rosell’s I Love Bend, OR Facebook page.

“Social media really makes the world smaller. It brings us all closer together,” said Rosell. “And I think the world needs that now.” Rosell has expanded on the I Love Bend, OR page by creating and manufacturing iconic green bumper-stickers, which are now sold at many local businesses for $2.50 each. With over 4,000 sold so far, Rosell says it brings a smile to her face every time she sees one attached to the back of a car. Reflecting on a full year of photos, Rosell said the photo that has been her favorite of the yearlong project was one that appeared March 1 as photo 306. The picture was of a terminally ill dog named Fred. Within a few days of the photo session, the boxer had died from lymphoma.

Courtesy of Jill Rosell

Jill Rosell designed this bumper sticker, which is sold around Bend. She has sold 4,000 so far. “He really rose to occasion for the shoot,” said Rosell, remembering the dog. “He was really amazing.” The photo depicts the dog trotting down a brick-laden street downtown, a striped scarf wrapped around his neck, snowflakes falling from the sky. Rosell described the session as powerful, saying she could feel the spirit of the dog through her camera.

With 365 days worth of Bend photography under her belt, Rosell plans to continue posting photos daily on the I Love Bend, OR site throughout the upcoming year. She plans to post a photo each week and ask followers to identify where it was taken. She will offer weekly giveaways such as dog portraits and bumper stickers.

She looks forward to capturing the city in summer again, watching the old familiar haunts of Bend blossom with vivid colors as the season changes. Rosell also hopes to capture more locals in her daily photographs in the coming year, displaying Bendites from all walks of life. “Everyone has a story in Bend,” she titled April 16’s photo

of the day, featuring a homeless woman pushing a grocery cart filled with trash bags down one of the city’s side streets. Followers posted comments beneath the photo, thanking Rosell for showing another face of the city. Rosell says she doesn’t necessarily think she can change the world, but she does want to make a difference in it through her photography. She sees herself as about halfway up the ladder of reaching her goal, though for now, she is content with making a difference at a local level. Day by day. Follower by follower. Photo by photo. Megan Kehoe can be reached at 541-383-0354 or at mkehoe@bendbulletin.com.


AH

HOMES, GARDENS AND FOOD IN CENTRAL OREGON

F

Pale perfection Martha Stewart shares her secrets for white blooms, Page F6

AT HOME

www.bendbulletin.com/athome

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 3, 2011

GARDEN FOOD

Straw bale wall quiets Bend yard from bustle

C

By Leon Pantenburg For The Bulletin

repe

The backyard wall between Ninth and 10th streets on Franklin Avenue in Bend gets a lot of second looks. From the street, the wall appears to be southwestern adobe in coloring, texture and style. In reality, the wall is made of straw bales, covered with a stucco cement finish and painted to look like adobe, say homeowners April Baynes and Ian Minsker. Initially, they were looking for an acoustic barrier to block out the car noise from Franklin Avenue, but Minsker, an artist and experienced home remodeler with a “go green” approach, wanted to try something different. “I’ve heard that 80 percent of the noise from a car comes from the tires,” Minsker said. “So, an acoustical wall didn’t have to be all that high to block the traffic noise.” He also didn’t want to build a conventional wooden fence. “We could have built a wooden fence, but everybody has one of those,” Minsker said. “Besides, a wooden fence would eliminate the view, but not that much of the noise.” So about two years ago, Baynes and Minsker started searching for “green” alternatives for their fence-building project. See Wall / F5

ookery

Dean Guernsey / The Bulletin

A straw bale wall at a house on Franklin Avenue in Bend helps muffle noise from the street.

HOME

Plumbing the depths of our do-it-yourself fears When it comes to cooking crepes, the more you make, the better you’ll get, and they’re a great way to say “I love you” on Mother’s Day.

By Bob Tedeschi New York Times News Service

Julie Johnson / The Bulletin

By Jan Roberts-Dominguez • For The Bulletin

M

y good friends Leo and Mary Miner are fairly new to the Northwest. But they’re the kind of folks we want up here. They’re helpful, for one thing. And if you have an ounce of humor in you, Leo will be a constant source of amusement. Plus, he can fix just about anything, and both he and Mary can throw a party with the proverbial hand tied be-

hind their backs.

Luckily, they’re also very talented cooks. But it’s the sort of talent that anyone could exhibit by simply applying an extra level of love and caring to the situation. I think for the Miners, cooking’s always been about love. Indeed, when it comes to expressing love, cooking for folks has always been one of the highest forms. When the Miners co-owned a cabin with my brother and his wife,

we could always count on

Leo’s crepes to knock the chill off those frosty high Sierra mornings. He even heated up the crepe pan for 60 of us on the last morning of our stay in Park City, Utah, for my niece’s wedding a while back. It was amazing, really, even for Leo. He just kept cranking out crepes, one at a time for two hours as folks ebbed and flowed through the kitchen. See Crepes / F2

Like a lot of kids, I memorized the forbidden vocabulary of grown-ups by standing within earshot of my dad on Saturdays when he was on his back, wrench in hand, raging at pieces of metal that refused to do what he wanted them to do. This sometimes involved the underside of a Volkswagen, but my most vivid memories are of his torso hidden beneath a sink cabinet, like some sort of perverse iron lung that spouted obscenities. Is this why I, a foolishly fearless home improvement amateur, have managed to avoid even the simplest plumbing projects my entire life? No comment. But if home projects are about anything, they’re about overcoming fear. So I set my sights on the two easiest home plumbing jobs — installing a new shower head and a new faucet — and called for help from Larry Rothman, the director of plumbing for Roto-Rooter; Thomas Mills, a professor at the Myers-Lawson School of Construction at Virginia Tech; and Anthony Lefeber, a former partner at an architectural restoration firm, Traditional Line. See Plumbing / F4

T O DAY ’ S R E C I P E S • LEO’S CREPES, F2 • CREAMY MUSTARD DRESSING, F3 • SESAME AND POPPY SEED DRESSING, F3 • HEARTY ITALIAN VINAIGRETTE, F3 • CURRY VINAIGRETTE, F3 • RASPBERRY VINAIGRETTE, F3 • THE PEPPERMILL’S OYSTER STEW, F6 • CHICKEN SCALOPPINE WITH GLAZED VEGETABLE TZIMMES, F6


F2 Tuesday, May 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

F

Next week: Evolving veggies Meat-free meals with big flavor.

With Mother’s Day this coming Sunday, consider starting the day with a batch of Leo’s crepes. Like I said, cooking for folks is a pretty great way to say “I love you!”

This is enough batter for 8 crepes using a 9-inch nonstick skillet. The recipe can easily be doubled or tripled or … well, you get the idea. This is a sweet batter, which works for sweet fillings. For savory fillings, you’ll want to omit the sugar in the batter and add just a pinch of salt.

Crepes

2 eggs 1 C milk ½ C flour 2 TBS sugar

Continued from F1 Which goes to show, practice makes perfect. So if you’ve never tackled crepes because you fear they’re just too difficult, then consider the Leo Method. Make enough of them and pretty soon you’ll be an expert. Leo would be the first to tell you crepes are a snap.

Crepe-making tips With Mother’s Day this coming Sunday, consider starting the day with a batch of Leo’s crepes. Like I said, cooking for folks is a pretty great way to say “I love you!” It’s perfectly legal to use a blender to make the batter. You’ll get a nice smooth batter if you do. Most recipes recommend making the batter 1 to 2 hours before you’re going to use it and then refrigerating it. This is a helpful step for crepe novices, because a chilled batter won’t set up quite as fast in the pan as a room-temperature one will, allowing you a few extra seconds to swirl the batter around in the pan before it sets. Use the right pan. A nonstick skillet with sloped sides, measuring 7 to 9 inches across its outer edges, produces an average-sized crepe. The heat should be on medium-high. However, keep in mind that different stoves and different pans will behave differently, meaning that your burner may

actually need to be set slightly higher or lower. The crepe should cook in just a minute or so. You’ll know you have the heat right by the appearance of the crepe — it should be a fairly even golden brown, with a slight mottled appearance. The crepe should be thin, but not “lacy” thin, and not thick like a pancake. A 9-inch skillet will use about 3 or 4 tablespoons of batter, or a scant quarter cup. Use a ladle or measuring cup and fill it to the same level each time for uniform crepes. Ladle the batter into the center of the pan all at once, then immediately lift the pan from the burner and tilt it to allow the batter to flow toward one edge and then continue tilting and twisting the pan so that the batter continues to flow around to all the edges. Then place the skillet back down on the burner to cook. Flipping the crepe really is easy. It just takes practice. When you’ve determined that the bottom side has browned, begin loosening the edges with a thin spatula or palette knife, then slip it under the crepe in the center and lift it so it hangs over the spatula sort of like a wet towel. Then, in one confident and fluid motion, roll your wrist and flip the uncooked side down into the pan. It may land sort of “wrinkled” and you can simply (and gently) adjust it to spread out flat. Jan Roberts-Dominguez is a Corvallis food writer, cookbook author and artist. Readers can contact her by e-mail at janrd@ proaxis.com.

LEO’S CREPES

Not so keen on quinoa?

Follow the steps — and you’ve got crepes

About 6 TBS of butter Prepared fruit fillings Whipped cream

By Kathleen Purvis McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Leo’s method: Beat eggs together in a medium bowl. Whisk in the milk and continue beating. Add the flour and sugar and continue beating until everything is thoroughly mixed. The batter will be very thin. Jan’s method: Place the eggs and milk into a blender and blend briefly just until smooth. Add flour and sugar and blend again, just until smooth. Pour and scrape the batter into a bowl. Procedure: At this point, consider chilling the batter for 1 to 2 hours. A chilled batter is slightly easier to work with if you are just learning how to make a crepe (it gives you a few more seconds to spread the batter in the pan before it sets up). Select a ladle or measuring cup that will hold 3 to 4 tablespoons of liquid. Heat the skillet over medium-high heat. Add about 2 teaspoons of butter to the pan, then remove it from the burner and tilt the pan all around so the butter gets distributed. Place the skillet back on the burner and ladle the batter into the center of the pan all at once. Immediately lift the pan from the burner and tilt and turn the pan so the batter flows around to all the edges. Then place the skillet back down on the burner to cook. When the edges turn a bit golden and get sort of “papery” crisp, gently lift an area to check out the color on the bottom of the crepe. If it’s a nice golden brown, then run a thin spatula or palette knife all around the edges to loosen the crepe. Scoot the spatula under the crepe at the midway point and lift it so it hangs over the spatula sort of like a wet towel. Then, in one confident and fluid motion, roll your wrist and flip the uncooked side over and down into the pan. If it isn’t completely flat upon landing, gently adjust it to spread out flat, then continue cooking until the crepe is browned on the second side. Right before you’re ready to remove the crepe from the pan, spoon a portion of the filling down the center and fold one side over the filling. Lift the pan from the burner and continue to roll the crepe out of the pan and onto a plate, by nudging the folded side over again, which will totally enclose the filling. Top with more fruit and a bit of whipped cream. Prepare the pan for the next crepe by wiping it clean with a paper towel, then repeat the process until you use all of the batter. Alternatively, you could make all of the crepes before serving, then fill and serve all at once. If you are making the crepes ahead of time, stack them flat, between layers of parchment or waxed paper. Prepared fruit fillings: Use what fruits are in season. Slice or mash them, depending on the fruit, and add a bit of sugar to taste to get the juices running. Other ways to serve beyond rolling in a tube: After spooning on your filling, you can fold them into an envelope; you can fold them in fourths, which creates a sort of triangle over the filling; or you can simply stack them in layers with filling between each crepe like a torte. Other fillings: • Melted butter and a sprinkling of sugar. • Chocolate sauce and whipped cream, with or without sliced strawberries or raspberries. • Fresh apple slices that have been sauteed in butter with brown sugar and perhaps a splash of rum. • Grand Marnier and chocolate sauce. • Caramel sauce and fresh peach slices. • Banana slices that have been sauteed in butter with brown sugar and rum or Grand Marnier. • Hazelnuts, chocolate sauce, raspberries or raspberry jam, and whipped cream. • Vanilla ice cream and fresh fruit.

Q:

Photos by Julie Johnson / The Bulletin

Blend crepe batter in blender, or whisk in a bowl.

A quinoa salad recipe called for rinsing the quinoa and then toasting it in a hot pan. I rinsed it, then put it in a tea towel to pat it dry. Those little seeds went everywhere. And I wasn’t sure how to dry it before I toasted it. Do you have any suggestions? Quinoa (keen-WAH) has become quite fashionable among nutritious eaters. Even though it’s known as one of the ancient grains, it’s actually an edible seed, not a true grain. It’s very high in protein, with balanced amino acids that make it a complete protein source. It’s also gluten-free and easy to digest, with a fluffy texture and nutty flavor that’s similar to couscous. Although the most common version is white, there also are black and red varieties. All of them look distinctive when cooked, with a white spiral on each seed. However, those tiny seeds do go everywhere. You need to wash quinoa before you cook it to remove a natural coating of saponins, which taste bitter. Most boxed or bagged quinoa already has been washed, so it just needs a quick rinse. Since the seeds are so small, they can escape even a fine-mesh sieve. An easy way to rinse it is in a bowl: Put the quinoa in a bowl and fill with cold water. Stir it around a little, then let the seeds settle. Pour the water off the top and add more, until the water doesn’t look foamy. Hold your hand or a plate against the bowl to pour off the remaining water. You don’t have to dry it thoroughly. To toast it before you cook it, pour the wet seeds into a dry pan over medium heat and spread them out with a wooden spoon. Heat the quinoa, stirring occasionally, to evaporate the water. Then add the cooking liquid—usually vegetable or chicken broth—and bring to a boil. Cover the pan, reduce the heat and simmer 15 to 20 minutes, until the water is absorbed. Like rice, a common ratio is 1 cup of quinoa to 2 cups of liquid.

A:

Melt butter in a nonstick skillet or crepe pan.

Pour the batter into the center of the pan all at once. Use 3 to 4 tablespoons, or a scant quarter cup.

Tilt and turn the pan to distribute the batter to the edges.

Slide the spatula under the edge of the crepe in the center, letting it drape like a wet towel over the spatula, then flip in one confident motion.

You’ll know you have the heat right by how the crepe looks — golden brown and slightly mottled.

Kathleen Purvis answers cooking questions at www. charlotteobserver.com/food.

Biscuits: Get out the butter knives The Washington Post You know that moment when the basket of hot biscuits hits the table? The meal is made. The same can said for “Southern Biscuits,” by Nathalie Dupree and Cynthia Graubart (Gibbs-Smith, May 2011; $21.99). It completes

the library of cookbooks that celebrate the South. Versatility wins the day. There are biscuits you can successfully make in advance; ones that contain yogurt; ones that approximate the biscuits made in certain fast-food restaurants (stand down;

not Popeyes) and others that are sweetened with Coca-Cola. The book includes suggestions for what to put between biscuit halves, and butters and gravies to slather on them. Usually sad affairs, even leftover biscuits can be turned into bread puddings and trifles.

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 3, 2011 F3

F CURRY VINAIGRETTE Makes 1 cup. ½ C vegetable oil ½ C white vinegar 1 clove garlic, minced 2 TBS packed light brown

sugar 2 TBS minced fresh chives 1 TBS curry powder 1 tsp soy sauce

Combine ingredients in a lidded jar. Shake well. Nutrition information per 2-tablespoon serving: 111 calories (89 percent from fat), 11 g total fat (1 g saturated), no cholesterol, 3 g carbohydrates, trace protein, 36 mg sodium, trace dietary fiber.

RASPBERRY VINAIGRETTE Makes about ¾ cup. 2 TBS raspberry vinegar 2 TBS raspberry jam

Combine vinegar and jam in blender or small bowl. Add oil in a thin stream, blending well. Nutrition information per 2-tablespoon serving: 124 calories (85 percent from fat), 12 g total fat (1 g saturated), no cholesterol, 5 g carbohydrates, trace protein, 3 mg sodium, trace dietary fiber.

Photos by Allison Long / Kansas City Star

From left: Raspberry Vinaigrette, Creamy Mustard Dressing, Curry Vinaigrette, Hearty Italian Vinaigrette, Sesame and Poppy Seed Dressing.

Shake up your salads with these 5 dressings By Jill Wen d h olt Silva McClatchy-Tribune News Service

I was weaned on bottled dressings poured over iceberg lettuce salads. There were three basic choices. When my two younger brothers dared to drizzle dressing on their salads — and most of the time they chose (shiver) dry lettuce — they adorned it with something called “Catalina,” a vivid orange, very sweet dressing. My personal favorite was blue cheese, or as we called it at my house, Roquefort. Our feisty Boston toy terrier, Pepi, loved both kinds of salad dressing, if not the lettuce that frequently fell off my brothers’ forks.

CREAMY MUSTARD DRESSING Makes 1¾ cups. I have no idea why the directions to this recipe are so resolute. Could I add the mustard after the heavy cream? Oh, who am I to argue with chemistry that works. This salad dressing is simply decadent.

Finally, there was Italian, but that was strictly for grown-ups. Even kids who weren’t weaned on soda pop craved sweet things. Clearly salad dressings had more hidden sugars than we knew. During the ’70s, salad bars were all the rage, but despite the addition of imitation bacon crumbles, fried chow mein noodles, broccoli tufts and showers of sunflower seeds, the dressings were less than imaginative and heavy enough to drown even the sturdiest romaine. In the ’80s, ranch was the rage, and the pickiest (or most weightconscious) of my college roommates started asking for dressing on the side. I didn’t need to watch my girlish figure back then, so I poured it on, figuring rationing salad dressing was absolutely no way to go through life. When I started buying my own groceries, I bought fancier jarred dressings in search of better flavors to adorn my boutique salad greens. But my taste buds eventually tired of the gloppy concoctions I brought home that usually

went to waste in the back of the fridge. As a newlywed, I received a copy of a cookbook by the Colorado Junior League titled “Creme de Colorado Cookbook.” After taking my first tentative steps at bringing salads to potlucks, I dutifully began to write down the responses to each salad and its respective dressing in the book. More recently I began to realize that it wasn’t the salads per se that were winning raves — it was the dressing. Sure, it helped that the underlying salad had evolved to a sophisticated spring mix of lettuces with richer colors and flavors. Today I still rely heavily on five go-to dressing recipes from the “Creme” cookbook. I have found these recipes work on just about any salad I whip up using ingredients I have pulled out of the refrigerator and pantry. If I were banished to a deserted island, I would add an Asian-inspired recipe as well, but otherwise these pretty much have me covered. I put the dressings into heavy

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rotation for two weeks at the holidays when we had family visiting from Brazil. At the end of their stay my nephew said the thing he would miss most about the meals I prepared were the nightly salads. To my taste buds, homemade vinaigrettes taste better than store-bought dressings with lots of emulsifiers and preservatives, sodium and sugar. Most of these homemade dressings will last three to five days in the refrigerator.

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SESAME AND POPPY SEED DRESSING

In a blender, combine sugar, sesame seeds, poppy seeds, onion, Worcestershire sauce, paprika and oil. Slowly add vinegar until dressing is moderately thick. Nutrition information per 2-tablespoon serving: 173 calories (77 percent from fat), 15 g total fat (2 g saturated), no cholesterol, 10 g carbohydrates, 1 g protein, 2 mg sodium, trace dietary fiber.

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One at a time and in order, thoroughly blend all other ingredients into mashed eggs. Do not substitute. When blended, whisk until smooth. Nutrition information per 2 tablespoon serving: 98 calories (91 percent from fat), 10 g total fat (2 g saturated), 34 mg cholesterol, 1 g carbohydrates, 1 g protein, 100 mg sodium, trace dietary fiber.

1 ⁄3 C sugar 2 TBS sesame seeds 1 TBS poppy seeds 1½ tsp grated onion ¼ tsp Worcestershire sauce ¼ tsp paprika ½ C vegetable oil ¼ C cider vinegar

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2 hard-cooked eggs, mashed with a fork while still warm ½ tsp salt 1½ tsp sugar 1 TBS coarsely ground black pepper 1 clove garlic, crushed ½ C virgin olive oil 1 TBS Dijon mustard 5 TBS heavy cream ¼ C red wine vinegar

Makes about 1 cup. This dressing is excellent on any type of spring lettuce salad starring fruit.

⁄3 C vegetable oil

1

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HEARTY ITALIAN VINAIGRETTE Makes about 1 cup. This vinaigrette is robust and works with a lettuce salad garnished with antipasto ingredients such as artichoke hearts, olives, chickpeas, red onion, pepperoncini and slices of pepperoni. 6 TBS virgin olive oil 2½ TBS red wine vinegar 2 TBS chili sauce 1½ tsp Worcestershire sauce 1 clove garlic, minced 1½ tsp minced fresh parsley 1 tsp Italian herb seasoning

½ tsp sugar ¼ tsp salt ½ tsp freshly ground black pepper 1 TBS freshly grated Parmesan cheese

In a blender, mix all ingredients until well combined. Nutrition information per 2-tablespoon serving: 97 calories (94 percent from fat), 10 g total fat (1 g saturated), trace cholesterol, 1 g carbohydrates, trace protein, 89 mg sodium, trace dietary fiber.

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F4 Tuesday, May 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

H Plumbing Continued from F1 The sum of their advice? Although plumbing projects have become easier, they still require careful preparation, some specialized tools and the occasional need to keep children out of earshot. “And no plumbing on Friday afternoon,” Lefeber added. “Plumbing is always hard, it’s always complicated, and it always leads to surprises.” Let’s start with shower head installation. For this project, you need four things — sliding-head pliers (Channellock’s cost about $16), an adjustable wrench (Crescent’s, about $25), a small piece of rubber or cloth and, perhaps, plumber’s tape (Hercules halfinch tape, about $1.40 a spool). This job is among the cheapest of plumbing tasks, but if you ignore the concept of “opposing pressure,” you could flood your home and drain your bank account.

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“Opposing pressure,” or “backing off,” is required for virtually any fixed and rigid pipe, but it is especially critical when working with older pipes and nuts that require some muscle to remove. The shower head arm is often one of those pipes. To remove the old shower head you need only unscrew it from this pipe, but while doing so, if you don’t hold the pipe in place with a wrench and apply slight pressure in the opposite direction, you could tear it from its moorings. Two other bits of knowledge are crucial before starting out — the location of your water supply valve, and how to turn it off. “You don’t want to be searching for it when water’s coming in at 40 psi,” said Rothman. “That’s when you start getting out your insurance policy.” Usually, the valve is near the water meter, or wherever the water enters your house. Rothman said you should not shut off the valve unless you actually run into problems, because sometimes the valves are so corroded or bonded from disuse that they won’t reopen. “You’re supposed to exercise the valves once a year,” he said. “But I never do it.” Finally, you’re ready for the shower head. Put a piece of thin rubber or duct tape over the pipe before you grab it with the pliers, to prevent scratches. Apply opposing pressure, without squeezing the pipe so hard that you might bend it, and unscrew the shower

Next week: Knock, knock See the many ways for visitors to make their presence known.

7 1 2 5

6

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Tony Cenicola / New York Times News Service

Although plumbing projects have become easier, they still require careful preparation, some specialized tools and the occasional need to keep children out of earshot. 1) An adjustable wrench; Crescent’s cost about $25. 2) A shower head; the Forte model from Kohler is $85. 3) Safety goggles; MSA Safety Works, about $3. 4) Basin wrench; BasinCraft, about $11. 5) Plumber’s tape; Hercules, about $1.40 a spool. 6) Bathroom faucet; Kohler’s Fortemodel, about $139. 7) Kitchen faucet; Kohler’s Evoke, about $833. 8) Plumber’s putty; Hercules Sta-Put, 14 ounces for about $2.30. 9) Sliding-head pliers; Channellock’s cost about $16. head with either your hand or the wrench. Next, clean off the threads on the shower head arm, and, if the directions on your new shower head so suggest, apply a few layers of plumber’s tape to the threads, in a clockwise

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direction. Then simply screw on Because faucets are designed to the new shower head (the Forte fit specific countertop configumodel from Kohler is $85). rations and shut-off valves. With Hand-tightening will usually those numbers in hand, you will be enough. But if the water leaks, save repeated trips to the store. use the wrench to rotate the Trust me, I know. head an additional one-eighth Next, return home with your or one-quarter turn, while ap- new faucet, read the directions plying opposing pressure. thoroughly and squeeze under Done. So, is it time to break the sink. Use the basin wrench out the bubbly? Yes — unless to remove the nuts that secure you still have a faucet job. Kitch- the old faucet to the underside of en faucets are more complex the cabinet. than bathroom faucets because If you’re like me, you’ll avoid they often include sprayers (al- safety goggles until this point, though Kohler’s Evoke, about because they’re uncomfortable $833, combines sprayer and and funny-looking. spigot in one). That is when But, in general, you are likely to faucet replace- “You don’t want dislodge a sharp ments involve to be searching fragment of some more thinking kind that drops and aggravation for (your water into your eye, than shower head supply valve) when causing you to jobs. flinch and lose You need the water’s coming in your grip on the same tools and at 40 psi. That’s wrench, which materials for faucauses you to cet work as for when you start jerk and scrape shower heads, getting out your your knuckles plus a towel, a on something, insurance policy.” basin wrench which causes ( B a s i n C r a f t ’ s — Larry Rothman, the your children’s costs about $11), director of plumbing for understanding screwdr ivers, of the English Roto-Rooter safety goggles, a language to shift ruler, a light and dramatically and some pillows. For irrevocably. my inaugural faucet chore — in Go with the safety goggles (a the bathroom — I used a head- pair from MSA Safety Works is lamp, and an old couch cushion about $3). Try not to look in the to protect my back when I lay mirror. down in the cabinet under the Remove the clip-on fastensink. ers for the drain plug’s push After clearing out the cabinet, rod. Keep those pieces if you’re squeeze in and find the hot and happy enough with the existing cold shut-off valves. Turn them plug. off, then turn on the faucet to Next, loosen the nuts that make sure they’re off. fasten the hoses to the shut-off Next, roughly measure the valves, and you can pull the old diameter of the water-supply faucet away. hoses where they connect to Drop the new faucet onto the the valves, as well as the size countertop, with the hoses danof — and the distance between gling. New faucets usually in— the holes for the sink in the clude gaskets, but if not, apply countertop. around each countertop hole a Only then should you go thin coat of plumber’s putty (14 shopping. ounces of Hercules Sta-Put is Why the preshop measuring? about $2.30).

My Kohler Forte bathroom faucet ($139) included a toggle bolt clamp, so I could secure the unit to the countertop by simply screwing it in from up top. The faucet was in place and nearly done. Except, of course, I forgot to do the preshop measuring when I bought my faucet. I soon learned that the faucet’s hoses were designed for one-eighthinch valves. My valves? Onehalf inch. I disassembled everything, grabbed the old hoses and took the entire mess to the hardware store, where an employee nodded empathetically and handed me some adapters. I got home at about 5:45. The hardware store closed at 6. I reassembled everything and turned on the cold water. Perfect. On the final step came the project’s evil surprise. I turned on the other knob. Hot water spouted from the connector. I tightened the connection. It didn’t work. I applied the plumber’s tape. No help. I reversed the hoses. The leaking continued. I was too defeated to curse. As a why-the-heck-not measure, I turned the connector a half-turn more, and tried the water again. No drips, no spurts. I put a paper towel beneath everything and checked periodically for drips. It was real. I let the water run a bit, then removed, cleaned and reinserted the aerator — the little screen inside the spigot — to dispose of any debris inside the new works. But what to do with the old faucet? “Put it in a box and take it to the flea market,” Mills, the Myers-Lawson professor, said. “Or give it to a Habitat for Humanities recycling store.” Great idea. Take your child, too. It’ll be a good counterbalance to all the cursing.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 3, 2011 F5

G IN BRIEF Free debris recycling offered by FireFree Dispose of yard debris for free during FireFree’s upcoming yard debris recycling event with collection sites in Deschutes and Jefferson counties. FireFree, a local group that encourages wildfire protection, encourages residents of Central Oregon to prepare for wildfire season by creating a defensible space and removing yard debris around residences, decks, patios and fences. “Residents are encouraged to prune trees that present a hazard and clear any flammable vegetation that encroaches on the 30-100 foot buffer zone around homes and other structures,” according to FireFree’s website. Especially vulnerable to wildfire are gutters and roof valleys with pine needles and leaves, overgrown shrubs and weeds or other combustible materials around trees and buildings, and debris on or under patios, decks or fencing. Woodpiles should be kept at least 20 feet from residences or other combustibles. During the event, pine needles, leaves, small branches and brush can be recycled for free at the following locations:

DESCHUTES COUNTY • Friday through May 14 (closed Sundays); 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Knott Landfill, 61050 S.E. 27th Street, Bend. • Friday and Saturday, and May 13-14; 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Westside Debris Collection Site, 1675 S.W. Simpson Avenue, Bend. • Saturday and Sunday; 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Sunriver Compost Site, Lake Penhollow at 18305 Cottonwood Road, Sunriver; for directions call 541-593-4197. • May 20-21; 4 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Negus Transfer Station, 2400 N.E. Maple, Redmond. • May 20-21; 4 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Fryrear Transfer Station, 68200 Fryrear Road, Sisters. • May 20-21; 4 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Southwest Transfer Station, 54580 U.S. Highway 97, La Pine. • May 20-21; 4 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Alfalfa Transfer Station; Walker Road, Alfalfa.

JEFFERSON COUNTY • Saturday and Sunday; 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Box Canyon Transfer Site, 1760 S.E. McTaggart Road, Madras. For more information about preparing your property for wildfire season visit: www.firefree.org or call Katie Lighthall at 541-322-7129. — Bulletin staff

Stripe your lawn just like the pros do By Kathy Van Mullekom Daily Press (Newport News, Va.)

Now, you can add professional-looking stripes and patterns to your grass — just like you see on golf courses, sports fields and commercial properties. All you do is attach Toro’s new Lawn Striping System to your walk-behind mower and away you go. All you need to use the striping system, which can be used with or without a bagger on most any mower, is a Phillips screwdriver and 16 to 20 pounds of dry sand. First, fill the system’s roller with dry sand. Next, attach the universal bracket system to your mower with the screwdriver. Then, start mowing and striping at the same time. Creating professional-looking stripes requires a bit of planning before you start — but it takes no more effort than simply mowing your lawn. To create a straight pattern, first cut around the perimeter of your yard, then, starting at a point that generates the greatest visual impression, mow all the way across. This creates the first stripe. Turn around and mow in the other direction, using your first stripe as a guide to create the next … and so on. The weighted roller simply bends the grass, reflecting the light differently — creating light or dark stripes as you mow. A pattern guide is included with each kit to help you create more advanced patterns.

Next week: Oh, deer Strategies to keep your garden from serving as Bambi’s buffet.

Wall Continued from F1 They looked at building a real adobe wall, Minsker said, but gave up on that idea because the clay wouldn’t last in the Central Oregon climate. “We researched the idea for a wall together, and we looked at several different options,” Baynes said. “I did all the research on the straw bale wall, and Ian did all the labor.” The wall was also a “practice run,” Minsker said, to see if building a straw bale house sometime in the future might be feasible. Nationwide, a small, but growing group of people is starting to look toward straw bales as a viable, green method of construction. Straw is the dry plant material, or stalk, left in the field after a plant has matured, been harvested for seed, and is no longer alive. Traditionally, straw is a waste product that farmers do not till under the soil but do sell as animal bedding or landscape supply due to its durable nature. Minsker and Baynes soon found that building a straw bale wall was not going to be easy. “The materials were a real challenge to find,” Baynes said. “Clean, dry straw must be used, and most local farmers grow alfalfa. We ended up finding

Dean Guernsey / The Bulletin

Ian Minsker, April Baynes, Loa D. Baynes, 3, and their dog Bubba stand in front of a straw bale wall that helps block the street noise from reaching their yard at their home in Bend. a farmer near Christmas Valley who has stored straw in a hay shed which would be dry enough.” All told, it took 60 straw bales to make the wall. Total materials cost of building the wall was about $1,500, Baynes said, which is much less than a comparable stone or concrete wall would have been. But any savings in materials would be offset by increased labor costs, Minsker said. “I do carpentry, remodels

and a lot of manual labor,” Minsker said. “I’m in good physical shape, but this was one of the hardest projects I’ve ever done.” The straw bale wall project started with laying out the outline of the proposed walls and making a foundation for the bales to be stacked upon. This was done by digging a trench, filling it with gravel, and tamping the material down to create a level foundation. The corners and pillars in the wall were

made of conventional concrete blocks, Minsker said, which helps keep the bales in place. A framework of pressure-treated wood was built between the corners and pillars to be a frame for the bales. Then, a layer of plastic was put between the straw and gravel foundation, and wrapped up onto the side of the wall. The wall ended up being about 48 inches tall, which is the height of two straw bales. When the bales were securely stacked, Minsker

pounded 6-foot pieces of steel reinforcing rod through the bales into the ground, molded chicken wire over the top and sides, and “sewed” the wire and bales together with more wire. Special care had to be taken, he said, because any place that moved would cause cracking in the finish. When all this was done, the stucco was applied. The material used was a standard masonry mixture of Portland cement, lime, water and sand, he said. “There had to be one person constantly mixing the mud,” he said. “I would pick up the mix, walk over and trowel it on. There would be enough to cover about 2 feet by 2 feet, then I’d have to do it all over again. We had to put on two coats of stucco.” When the stucco was dried, Minsker stained and sealed the concrete. The wall will need to be resealed annually, he said. The unique wall adds to the value of the house, Minsker said, and has forever satisfied his curiosity about building a straw bale house. “I won’t build a straw bale house, and personally, I’ll never do another straw bale wall for myself, even though I enjoyed the project,” he said. “The wall was a labor of love.” Leon Pantenburg can be reached at survivalsenselp@ gmail.com.

Find It All Online

Keep your garden and wallet happy By Holly E. Thomas The Washington Post

Praise for the art of gardening is abundant and broad: It’s therapeutic; it saves money at the grocery store; it’s good for the environment; it raises the value of your home. But if you’re making common — and costly — mistakes, things probably aren’t coming up roses. Below, landscaping experts talk about how to make your garden grow while keeping some green in your wallet.

On the Web To find local resources, check out the website for the American Society of Landscape Architects: www. asla.org. In addition, Oregon’s ASLA chapter has a website: www.aslaoregon.org.

ally beautiful in the garden,” Somerville says. Check out local resources: Many local nurseries employ horitculturalists and landscape Do’s architects. Take advantage of Do some research: Nancy gardening workshops hosted Somerville, chief executive of by local garden clubs and histhe American Society of Land- toric garden sites. The ASLA scape Architects, notes that (asla.org) website can help you opting for native species will find local resources. The U.S. result in the biggest cost sav- Fish and Wildlife Service also ings. “They’re great energy-, offers information on native time- and money-savers be- plants. cause they’re Check out fully adapted to deals: Sign up the conditions “Anything organic for a memberaround here,” that once was ship to the Arbor she says. Next, Day Foundation find out what alive will break — $10 for six kinds of insects down and give months, $15 for are attracted to one year — and the plants you’re up its nutrients get 10 free trees. considering and — even just grass The 6- to 12-inch whether those trees will arrive insects might clippings piled up at the best time be harmful to in a corner of the for planting. neighboring Members also yard that sit for a species. Before get discounts grouping plants, year.” on trees and ensure they have shrubs. similar require- — Travis Poore, sales ments for soil, associate and how-to Don’ts fertilizers, shade expert for Home Depot or sun levels and Don’t buy prewater, says Beth mium potting Palys, executive director for soil for all your garden needs: the region’s Landscape Con- “If you’re buying premium pottractors Association. ting soil and putting it around Consider composting: Mak- your mailbox, you’re just wasting your own compost adds up ing your money,” Poore says. to significant savings, consid- The Home Depot how-to expert ering a 1-cubic-foot bag of pre- notes that potting soil, planting pared compost costs roughly soil and soil amendments, such $5. “Anything organic that once as vermiculite or compost, are was alive will break down and designed for distinct purposes, give up its nutrients — even though homeowners often view just grass clippings piled up in them as interchangeable — a a corner of the yard that sit for costly mistake when it comes a year,” says Travis Poore, sales to name-brand products. associate and how-to expert for Don’t feel like you have to Home Depot. Homeowners can plant everything now: “Know easily make their own: Choose what your budget is and don’t an easily accessible spot in the try to do it all at once,” Palys yard and wrap chicken wire says. “Stage it — in one plantaround posts to create a com- ing bed, put in some of the big post area. items, like larger trees and Plant edibles: With food shrubs. The next year, put in prices on the rise, sales of ed- the next level down; the next ible plants and seeds have year, put in the seasonal color skyrocketed. Poore notes that items, the perennials.” he gets about 50 percent of his Don’t shy away from getting own produce from a 10-by-10- advice: You can get guidance foot garden and that a single without going broke. “If you packet of seeds, which costs don’t want to hire someone to about $1 or $2, can yield 40 to install or maintain the work, 50 plants. No room for a proper you can still invest in a landgarden? Not to worry. “Berry scape designer, who will look bushes are low-maintenance at the space and suggest plants perennials, and a lot of herbs that belong in certain places,” are perennial and can be re- Palys says. “Then if they want

to buy and plant themselves, at least they’ve been given some direction.”

The bottom line: You’ll save the most money — and time and energy — by choosing native plants. Work with a limited budget by creat-

ing a landscape design that you can implement over a few years. Take advantage of online and local information sources. If you need backup, hire a landscape professional to review your plans or create a design from scratch, then do the planting and maintenance yourself.

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F6 Tuesday, May 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Butter, heavy cream and oysters, too, in oyster stew By Julie Rothman The Baltimore Sun

Dave Coakley from Baltimore was looking for the recipe for the oyster stew that is served at the Peppermill restaurant in Towson, Md. He said it “is the best I’ve tasted.” I contacted the restaurant and spoke with Rick Ziegel, the owner of the Peppermill, and he graciously agreed to share his restaurant’s recipe. He says he frequently makes this at home himself and was kind enough to help me modify the recipe for the home cook. He told me that at the restaurant they make large quantities of the soup base and steam the oysters separately. They then add 10 oysters to each bowl of soup before serving. No wonder Coakley is such a fan of their stew. With 10 oysters in each serving and all that butter and heavy cream, how could it not be wonderful? This is very quick and easy to make; just be careful not to let the cream boil and watch that you don’t let the oysters overcook.

RECIPE REQUEST: Pat Carden from Aberdeen Proving Ground is looking for a recipe for peanut butter pie. She said about 40 years ago, her niece made this pie and it was like no other. It looked like pumpkin pie but had a much thicker consistency. She said that it was not fluffy like the whipped peanut butter pies you find today.

RECIPE FINDER

If you are looking for a recipe or can answer a request, write to Julie Rothman, Recipe Finder, The Baltimore Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278 or e-mail recipefinder@ baltsun.com. If you send in more than one recipe, please put each on a separate piece of paper and include your name, address and daytime phone number. Important: Name and hometown must accompany recipes in order to be published. Please list the ingredients in order of use, and note the number of servings each recipe makes. Please type or print contributions. Letter and recipes may be edited for clarity.

THE PEPPERMILL’S OYSTER STEW Makes 4-6 servings. ½ C unsalted butter (divided use) 1 med onion, diced 2 stalks celery, diced 2 TBS clam base (see note) 1 qt heavy cream

1 pint raw oysters with their liquid (jarred or freshly shucked) Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Melt 6 tablespoons of butter in a large skillet over medium heat, add the onions and celery and cook until tender. Reduce heat and add the heavy cream and clam base to pan. When the mixture is almost boiling, pour the oysters and their liquid into the pot. Stir continuously until the oysters begin to curl at the ends. When the oysters curl, the stew is finished cooking; turn off the heat, add the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter and stir until the butter is melted into the stew. Ladle into individual warmed bowls and season generously with freshly ground pepper. Note: Clam base is a clam-flavored bouillon paste that’s sold in a jar alongside other bouillon. (Better Than Bouillon is one national brand.) Check the company’s website at www.superiortouch. com/retail/products/better-than-bouillon.

The white stuff: Pale blooms can inspire the home grower garden and provide a darker background for the pale flowers. Two tall weeping katsuratrees (Cercidiphyllum japonicum “Pendulum”) flank the windows of my formal dining room. Two wisterias (Wisteria floribunda “Shiro Noda”) trained into tree form let me have the dramatic, fragrant flowers of this vigorous vine without having to build a structure to support its rampant growth.

MARTHA STEWART I am no Vita Sackville-West, nor am I the owner of an exquisite English country manor, such as her fantastic Sissinghurst. But I am an avid gardener, and I am an enthusiastic collector of many kinds of plants. Years ago, on my very first trip to England, I visited Sissinghurst and saw my very first white garden. Conceived by Sackville-West, the English novelist and poet, and now maintained by the National Trust, the White Garden has inspired many of us to think carefully about monotone themes and how to incorporate them into our own backyards and personal landscape designs. In Bedford, N.Y., right by my back steps, is a walled rectangular space that I have designated my white garden. Taking note of the white-blooming plants in other well-known gardens, such as those at Hidcote Manor Garden in England, and at various friends’ gardens in the United States, I began compiling lists of white-flowering perennials, grouping the plants according to their varying sizes, heights, scents and blooming times. Before putting anything in the bed, I planted two large weeping katsuratrees in the rear of the garden, flanking the four triple-hung windows in the dining room wall. In the front of the garden, I planted four tree-form white-blooming wisterias, hopeful that they would thrive and add a bit of mid-height interest to the garden. By the way, when the wisterias bloom in May and June, the driveway and entrance are perfumed with an extraordinary sweetness. A single pyramidal tuteur planted with a robust white clematis adds more height to the center of the garden. Because of the variety and different textures of the plants, and

Playing with scale Dozens of “White Giant” alliums hover over the huge leaves of Astilboides tabularis. The massive foliage helps to cover the alliums’ withering leaves when the flowers stop blooming. The astilboides produce white flowers that grow up to four feet high in early summer.

In training Clematis does well trained on an upright tuteur as long as you take into account its specific needs. In my garden, I sited the base of the vine among large-leafed perennials that can provide the shade and cool environment that the clematis roots require for proper growth.

Photo courtesy Ingalls Photography

You don’t have to have a grand manor in the English countryside to create your own white garden at home. the fact that the white flowers are visible by day and night, this garden has been a success, and it continues to inspire me as well as my guests.

Extending the bloom White flowers, including dahlias, “Honorine Jobert” Japanese anemones and frothy astilbes, brighten the garden and keep the plantings interesting after earlier bloomers fade away. With so many ephemeral

flowers, it is important to have shrubs to anchor the changing plantings; swamp azalea (Rhododendron viscosum) is a delightfully fragrant option. Single or semidouble flowered peonies also provide sturdy foliage all summer, and their golden pollen-encrusted stamens stand out very nicely in a sea of white blossoms.

Green structure Woody plants frame the white

Questions should be addressed to Ask Martha, c/o Letters Department, Martha Stewart Living, 601 W. 26th St., 9th floor, New York, NY 10001. Questions may also be sent by e-mail to: mslletters@marthastewart. com. Please include your name, address and daytime telephone number. Questions of general interest will be answered in this column; Martha Stewart regrets that unpublished letters cannot be answered individually.

856 NW Bond • Downtown Bend • 541-330-5999 www.havenhomestyle.com

Vegetables, fruit and spice — on top of something nice By Stephanie Witt Sedgwick Special to The Washington Post

Tzimmes is a traditional Jewish dish in which vegetables are braised with dried fruit and hon-

ey or brown sugar. Sometimes beef is included, which makes for pretty heavy fare. Here, I’ve transformed the tzimmes into a vegetable and fruit

topping for sauteed chicken cutlets. It’s light, quick and delicious. The recipe calls for dried apricots, but you can use your favorite dried fruits.

CHICKEN SCALOPPINE WITH GLAZED VEGETABLE TZIMMES Makes 6 servings. 6 thinly sliced skinless chicken breast cutlets (11⁄4 lbs total) Salt Freshly ground black pepper 2 TBS mild-flavored olive oil 1 sm onion, finely chopped (1⁄2 C) 2 med carrots, trimmed and cut into 1⁄4 -inch dice (1 C,

about 4 oz) 1 med sweet potato, peeled and cut into 1⁄3 -inch dice (about 8 oz, a generous 11⁄2 C) 1 med Granny Smith apple, peeled, cored and cut into 1 ⁄3 -inch dice (1 C) 8 dried apricots, cut into 1⁄4 inch dice (2 oz, 1⁄3 C; may

Season the chicken cutlets on both sides with salt and pepper to taste. Heat the oil in a large, shallow skillet over medium-high heat. Add as many of the cutlets as will fit comfortably. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes, until nicely browned on the first side; turn them over and cook for about 3 minutes, until lightly browned and cooked through. (Cooking time might vary depending on the thickness of the cutlets.) Transfer to a plate and loosely cover with aluminum foil to keep warm. Repeat to cook all of the cutlets. Add the onion to the skillet; cook for 3 to 4 minutes, until softened, then add the carrots, sweet potato, apple, apricots, nutmeg, cinnamon, ginger and salt to taste; stir to combine. Stir in the broth and the honey; bring to a boil, then cover and reduce the heat to medium or as needed to maintain a low boil. Cook for 8 to 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables are tender and most of the liquid has evaporated. Uncover and cook just until the liquid has reduced to a glaze. Divide the cutlets among individual plates. Spoon the vegetable mixture over each one. Serve hot. Nutrition information per serving: 240 calories, 23 g protein, 22 g carbohydrates, 6 g fat, 1 g saturated fat, 60 mg cholesterol, 170 mg sodium, 2 g dietary fiber, 15 g sugar

substitute your favorite dried fruit) 1 ⁄4 tsp freshly grated nutmeg 1 ⁄2 tsp ground cinnamon 1 ⁄2 tsp ground ginger 11⁄2 C homemade or no-saltadded chicken broth 2 TBS honey

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Vegetables and fruit simmered with spices for a tasty topping for chicken.

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Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

2 Free Female blue heelers, 1 yr, great with kids, no cats, no fowl. 4 free male ducks, black, 541-447-1090 or 541-647-3832 American Staffordshire Terriers born March 14th. Had first shots. Colors are Brindle, Blue, Red and White $200 Each 541-318-6997 AUSSIE'S Mini/Toy,AKC red tri's must see, family raised, 1st shots, wormed parents on site 788-7799/598-5264 Australian Shepherd, spayed female, 2yrs. old, very loveable, needs room to run, $150, 541-420-8975.

Baby kittens? Pregnant or unaltered cats? Yours or stray, let us help w/vet care incl. alter, shots, & homes if needed. 1 mom + babies = dozens by fall. We will work w/you to help them NOW. Volunteers at 815-7278, 3898420, 598-5488, 647-2181. Border Collie/New Zealand Huntaway puppies, working parents, wonderful dogs, $250. 541-546-6171

English Mastiff puppies. 1 Male & 2 females, all fawn, Shots, health guarantee, ready to go. $800 ea, 541-279-1437. FREE adult companion cats to seniors! Tame, fixed, ID chip, shots, more. Will always take back for any reason. Visit Sat/Sun 1-5, other days by appt, 647-2181. 65480 78th, Bend, 541-389-8420. Photos, more at www.craftcats.org.

Chihuahua pups (2) adorable, ready for their forever homes, $250 1st shots 541-280-1840 Cocker Spaniel, American, chocolate, 10-mos, neutered, housebroken & friendly to good child-free home. $300. 541-639-7703 DACHSHUND MINI AKC Chocolate long-hair female $600, 30% off if you spay. 541-598-7417

Pomeranians, purebred, 2 females, all shots, dewormed, born 9/13,$300, 541-977-2847 Poodle/Papillons mix pups 8 wks. Lots of color. Low shed $175. References avail. 541 504-9958 POODLE Pups, AKC Toy Lovable, happy tail-waggers! Call 541-475-3889

Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.wordpress.com/ Rottweiler, male pup, 5 mo., no papers, parents on site, $400, call 541-923-2437.

SCHNOODLE Pups, loyal & loving, 2 males, 1 female, 1st shot, $200 ea. 541-306-1807

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

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Antiques & Collectibles Antique crocks (5), most numbered, 1 with handles. From $50 $150. 541-317-8985, after 5 pm. Antiques Wanted: Tools, fishing, marbles, wood furniture, beer cans. 541-389-1578 Furniture

Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Fly Reel, Hardy Bros Princess, 4 wt/5wt. Retails $479; sell $200obo. 503-933-0814 local

Fly-Tube, North x NW, brand new, $75. Fly pole, CourtSponsors needed for vet costs land $50. 503-933-0814 for amputation. Sweet Oreo FREE rescued barn/shop cats, was found hobbling down 3rd fixed, shots. Some tame. We Gun Cases (2) heavy duty, St. late one nite. Has an old will deliver. 541-389-8420 composite shell w/liner, $40 Visit our HUGE home decor untreated injury & can't use each. 503-933-0814 local consignment store. New Free to good home, 8 mo. old one leg, which drags & items arrive daily! 930 SE spayed female golden shepcauses problems. He's young GUNS Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., herd mix. Up to date on & otherwise healthy. If you Buy, Sell, Trade Bend • 541-318-1501 shots. Seeking active and can help, call 541-389- 8420, 541-728-1036. www.redeuxbend.com mature home. Gets along or mail PO Box 6441, Bend Lease Hunt Avail. on Private well with other dogs. No 97708, or use PayPal thru Land for late season Cow Elk children. Call 541-350-3730. www.craftcats.org nonprofit Sterling Silver & Turquoise Zuni hunt, in Eastern Oregon, style women’s belt, 40”, rescue group, donations German Wirehair Pointers, AKC Northside unit, call Jeff, circa 1950, appraised $1800; tax-deductible. Once healed, Champion blood lines. Tails, 541-987-2194,541-620-2335 sell $900 OBO. 541-815-2042 Oreo will also need a good, shots, dewclaws. $600 Ready forever, inside home. The Bulletin reserves the right Mossberg 12 Ga Model 500 end of May. 541-460-3099 waterfowl series, $275, like to publish all ads from The GOLDEN RETRIEVER puppies Yorkshire Terrier Pups, 2 new, 541-815-5618. Bulletin newspaper onto The females, $350,2 males, $300, purebred, 5 males, 2 females, Bulletin Internet website. born 3/4/11, 541-604-5558 MOSSBERG 500C 20g shotgun, ready on 5/7/11, $400, pump action, w/Accu-set Redmond 541-290-4023. 210 chokes, $325. 541-728-1036 Golden Retriever Pups exc. Furniture & Appliances MOUFLON SHEEP HUNT quality, parents OFA, good 246 near Mitchell. hips, $650. 541-318-3396. !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty! Guns & Hunting Call 541-923-3490 for details. A-1 Washers & Dryers and Fishing $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355. 12g Remington 870 Express magnum pump shotgun, like DINING SET Glass top matchnew, $200. 541-647-8931 ing set, 4 chairs w/overFIND IT! Golden Retriever pups, Kidihanging lamp, $200. OBO, fied, AKC Reg., ready May 19. 541-306-4252. BUY IT! $500 & up 541-788-8877 SELL IT! Dining table, round, oak, claw The Bulletin Classiieds Kitten lovers! All volunteer, feet w/leaf and 4 chairs. no-kill rescue group needs $250. Call 541-548-7137 .380 I.O. HELL CAT handgun, reliable foster homes for 6+1, 2 clips, new in box, mom cats w/kittens & or- GENERATE SOME excitement in $285. 541-728-1036 your neighborhood! Plan a phaned kittens. We provide garage sale and don't forget 7.62x54 bolt-action French rifle, food, supplies & vet support; to advertise in classified! sporterized w/1000 rnds you provide a safe, nurturing 541-385-5809. PFLUEGER FISHING REEL, ammo, $375. 541-647-8931 home for them to thrive unauto-wind, new, $50. til adoptable. Home visit re7mm Mossberg $375. Keltec Liquidating Appliances, new & 503-933-0814 local quired. 389-8420, 815-7278, 32acp $275. Mossberg 12g, 18” reconditioned, guaranteed. www.craftcats.org. & 28” bbls, $275. 541-647-8931 Remington 12g 870 mag wood Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418 stock pump shotgun, like Kittens & cats thru local rescue AR-15,16", Flat-top, 6 pos. new, $200. 541-647-8931 group. 65480 78th, Bend, stock, 2x30rd mags, $1400. New beveled Mirror, 31” high x Sat/Sun 1-5, other days by call/text: 541-390-0219 38” long, 3½” frame, $50. Remington 22LR auto rifle, syn. appt, call 541-647-2181. 541-383-4231 stock, huge scope, like new, AYA 4/53 16GA SXS - BeautiBaby kittens in foster care, $200. 541-647-8931 ful shotgun $2500 call 541-815-7278. Shots, Sage microfiber sofa w/2 re406-439-0910 (Redmond) altered, ID chip, more. Low • SIG P228 9 mil., $500. cliners $250; mission king fees. Info: 389-8420. Photos •GLOCK 17 9 mil., $325. bed w/box and mattress CASH!! & more, www.craftcats.org. Call 541-480-8080. $800; oak dining table w/4 For Guns, Ammo & Reloading chairs $200; Maytag comm Supplies. 541-408-6900. Labradoodles, Australian Wanted: Collector seeks high washer $275; Whirlpool Imports - 541-504-2662 quality fishing items. Call electric dryer $175. Call Colt Python, .357, 6”, Blue, www.alpen-ridge.com like new, $1450 OBO, 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746 541-382-7528. 541-410-1153. Labrador Pups, AKC, ChocoWANTED: GUNS IN ANY lates & Yellows, $500; Blacks, Samsung Refrigerator, 3½ yrs, Custom AK47, extras, ammo CONDITION, please call 3-dr, 26cf, icemaker, white. $450. Dew claws, 1st shots & available for extra. $500 541-728-1036. $750 OBO. 541-330-4344 wormed. Call 541-536-5385 541-771-3222. www.welcomelabs.com

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call

Border Collies, 8 wks, shortcoat, $250. 541-948-7997 gallops4me@gmail.com Boxers AKC Reg, fawns, whites, & brindles, 1st shots, very social.$500-$650. 541-325-3376

Pomeranian Puppies CKC Reg, 1 female, 1 male; 1 rare gray, 1 fancy red sable. $500$600. 541-598-4443

541-598-4643. Lhasa Apso/Pug spring pups. Lhasa Apso mom, dad is reg. brindle Pug. Adorable, variety colors. Must see! you will fall in love. $350. Call for info 541-548-0747, 541-279-3588 Love kittens & cats? All volunteer, no-kill rescue group needs help at sanctuary, incl. medical care of cats under vet supervision. No experience necessary, just a good heart, free time & willingness to learn. Great opportunity if you are thinking of a career in animal care. Also need foster homes for moms & babies & orphaned kittens - we provide food, supplies, vet support, more. 389-8420, 815-7278. www.craftcats.org

Sofa and matching wide chair from M. Jacobs, nice, $200. 503-933-0814 local

We Service All Vacs! Free Estimates!

Bend’s Only Authorized Oreck Store.

In the Forum Center

541-330-0420

WILL BUY YOUR FLY FISHING GEAR AND EQUIPMENT! Rods, Reel, Waders, Boots, Fly Fishing Tackle & Access. Cash or Credit toward New product. Accepting Items Through May 6th Trout Bum FLY SWAP May 7th & 8th

Fly & Field Outfitters 35 SW Century, Bend 541-318-1616

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Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 541-312-6709 Open to the public .

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. BULK GARDEN MATERIALS Wholesale Peat Moss Sales

•Current treatments offering no relief? • Been told to “Live with it”? •Tired of taking drugs that don’t fix the problem or make it worse? There is Hope!

541-389-9663

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Call 866-700-1414 and find out how to get better today!

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Art, Jewelry and Furs

Free Organic horse manure, Prineville. 541-416-1319

Must sell diamond earrings VS1/ G, .35 carat each, $900 value, $650 OBO. 541-771-1811

Cabinet Refacing & Refinishing. Save Thousands!

GARDEN CART: tow behind tractor or car, 4x4 with sides, cute! $100. 503-933-0814

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Most jobs completed in 5 days or less. Best Pricing in the Industry.

For newspaper delivery , call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email classified@bendbulletin.com

30” TV bought in 2000. JVD D series, good condition, $200 OBO. 541-306-4252. RCA 26” console swivel TV, excellent picture, a bargain at $35! 541-593-8400

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Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

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Musical Instruments Fender Strat Guitar, Cherry Sunburst, immaculate, + accys, $200. 503-933-0814

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Misc. Items BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389 - 6 6 5 5 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. Fish Aquarium; 35 gal. + table stand and all extras, $100. Phone 541-322-6261 Pool Table, 8’, 1” slate, Oak cab., lthr pockets, all accys, nice! $1299. 541-408-2199 Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

Wedding Gown, Gorgeous Unique, Gold, Frilly, Feminine, fits Size 8-10, $250 OBO, 541-639-3222

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Tools Adrian Steel Rack modules (2), 42” wide, 46.5” high, 14” deep, designed to maximize use of Van’s Interior, $1400/ both, or $800 for (a), or $700 for (b), 541-480-7823 for info, can be seen at B & R Raingutters, 827 S Business Way. Air Compressor Mini Speed Aire 60 psi with hose, $40, 503-933-0814 local

Sporting Goods - Misc.

Grated steel Loading Ramp, 5’, for motorcycle or snowmobile, $60. 503-933-0814

Cabella’s backpacking pup tent, lightweight, like new, $60. 503-933-0814 local

JOBOX 4x2, secured locking for truck or storage, new $400, sell $75. 503-933-0814 local

REI 3-person Dome Tent, new, never used, $65. Call 503-933-0814 local

Sears Craftsman 10” Deluxe Flex drive table saw, $250. OBO 541-383-0854.

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

Call for FREE DVD Thyroid Health Secrets Revealed.

TV, Stereo and Video

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit

541-647-8261 Sisters Habitat ReStore Building Supply Resale Quality items. LOW PRICES! 150 N. Fir. 541 549-1621 Open to the public.

LAVA RIDGE ELEMENTARY SALE! Sat., May 7, 8 a.m.- 2 p.m. DONATE GOODS Fri., May 6, 3:30 - 8:00 p.m. 20805 NE Cooley Road, Bend

Farm Market

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The

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Hardwood Outlet

Farm Equipment and Machinery

Wood Floor Super Store

Hummingbirds Are Back!

KIOTI tractor LK20 HST, like new, only 158 hrs, very light use. Includes front loader bucket / rear blade / & 3 point finish mower. Call (541) 749-0699.

• Laminate from .79¢ sq.ft. • Hardwood from $2.99 sq.ft. 541-322-0496 266

Heating and Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove may be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

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Forum Center, Bend 541-617-8840 www.wbu.com/bend If you have a chipper, I have the branches. Apporx 50 Cu.yd. chip it, its all yours, 541-480-7823.

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

Angus Bulls, yearlings & older, range-raised proven blood lines, $1000 & up. 541-480-8096, Madras.

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NILSSON HOOF CARE. Certified natural hoof care practitioner with www.aanhcp.net and www.liberatedhorsemanship.com. 541-504-7764.

Lost and Found

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

Found Pocket Knife, 4/26, area Purcell & Paula, call to identify, 541-420-0834

To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection.

Lost Orange Cat, fluffy very friendly, ‘Tigger’, Tumalo area, Cline Falls Hwy 1 mi. N. of Tumalo store & High Ridge Dr., 4/15, Reward, 541-385-0194.

name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

All Year Dependable Firewood: Split/dry lodgepole, $90 for 1/2 cord; $160 for 1; or $300 for 2. Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484 Lodgepole Seasoned rounds: 1 cord $129; 2@$124ea; 3@ $119ea. Split: 1 cord $159; 2@$154 ea; 3@$149 ea. Bin price 4’x4’x4’, $59 ea. Cash. Delivery avail. 541-771-0800 SEASONED JUNIPER: $150/cord rounds, $170 per cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Since 1970, Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

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Horses and Equipment Mustangs: 1 Kiger Gelding; 1 Bailey Butte mare. Both dunn, have been ridden. Free to good home. 541-536-2695

FOUND bright yellow motor scooter “Sun C”, off Brosterhaus Rd. 541-410-2900

• Receipts should include,

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Barley Straw; Compost; 541-546-6171.

Pond Sweep MDL Skopje includes WGP-65 pump, up to 1200 gal., 50’ of 1-1.2” flex tubing, 10’x12’ liner, 5’x30’ liner. New, never installed. Retail $1100, sell $375. Call 541-388-0868.

Fuel and Wood

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

Hay, Grain and Feed

LOST Silver Medic Alert bracelet, approx 4/9, while walking on SW 3rd, Murphy, & Parrell Rd. 541-390-9087 Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

LOST White Pit Bull, 2-yr male, black patch on left eye, black spots on ears, last seen Redmond 4/14, needs meds, $100 reward! 541-977-5156 REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 Prineville, 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420.

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Livestock & Equipment

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Horseshoeing/ Farriers

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Farmers Column A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com


G2 Tuesday, May 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Employment

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Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

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Looking for Employment I provide housekeeping & caregiving svcs, & have 20+ yrs experience. 541-508-6403 Seeking a Ranch Job, full or part time, 15 years exp. at Willows Ranch. Call Miguel 541-390-5033. For references, call Judy 541-549-1248

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Employment Opportunities

CAREGIVERS NEEDED In-home care agency presently has openings for part/full-time caregivers in La Pine. Experience not required; we are willing to train. Must have ODL/Insurance, and pass criminal background check. Call Kim for more info, 541-923-4041, 9am3pm, Monday-Friday.

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Caregivers Visiting Angels seeks compassionate, reliable caregivers for all shifts incl. weekends. Experience req’d. Must pass background check & drug test. Apply at our office located within Whispering Winds, 2920 NW Conners, Bend. No phone calls, please. DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Firewood Vendors Needed: Please see www.neighborimpact.org link to Request For Proposal

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

GREAT LOCATION 2 bdrm, 1 bath townhouse in quiet 6-plex between Old Mill & downtown. W/D included, $585. 129 Adams Place (off Delaware). 541-647-4135

2 Bdrm. Starting at $525 1 Month FREE w/Lease or Month to Month Chaparral & Rimrock Apts Clean, energy efficient, w/patios,on-site laundry, storage avail. Near schools, pools, skateboard park & shopping. Large dog run, some large breeds OK w/mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

Houses for Rent SE Bend

Real Estate For Sale

A quiet 4 bdrm, 2 bath, 1748 sq.ft., living room w/wood stove, newer carpet & inside paint, pellet stove, big 1/2 acre fenced lot, dbl garage w/opener. $1195. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

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New Listings

Manufacturing Planner

Looking for an exciting new job? Microsemi is looking for an additional Manufacturing Planner. This position would help manage the planning and scheduling manufacturing functions within a high energy environment. Coordinates products and materials through various production phases. Implements production schedules while balancing capacity requirements. Reviews schedules to ensure material requirements match customer's expectations. This position is a full time position hired through a temporary agency. We are seeking an individual who has 6-8 years of progressive experience as a Planner/Scheduler within a manufacturing environment. Semiconductor experience is desired with exposure to off shore manufacturing a plus. Position requires proficient Microsoft skills with a emphasis on advanced Excel experience, excellent written and oral abilities, good organizational skills plus a desire to work within a team oriented organization. Must have high understanding of MRP systems with exposure to MS Dynamics a plus. Please submit a resume to cfischer@microsemi.com or apply in person to 405 SW Columbia St. Bend, OR. E OE

Medical – Partners In Care is seeking a Hospice Patient Care Coordinator for full-time employment (40 hours per week). Qualified candidates must possess a current State of Oregon RN license, strong clinical knowledge and management skills, prior hospice experience preferred. To apply, please send cover letter, resume, and references via email to HR@partnersbend.org or via regular mail to: Partners In Care / HR Department, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct, Bend OR 97701.

Mig Welder for Manufacturing in Minot, North Dakota. Year round, full-time inside work, wage DOE. Contact Butch at 701-838-6346.

On-Site Management Team & Handyperson for 14 unit mobile home park in La Pine. Please send resume to resumemanager@hotmail.com Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

CAUTION

Tele-Marketing: Small company seeking individuals to fundraise for well-known non-profit organizations. Great for seniors, homemakers, students & others, Permanent part-time, 19 hours weekly, Mon- Thur. 5-9 p.m & Fri. 4-7 p.m. $8.50 per hour plus bonuses. Some experience helpful, but will train those with great work ethic & ability to obtain contributions. 541-385-5371

Finance & Business

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

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Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION visit our website at www.oregonfreshstart.com

541-383-0386

Sprint by S Wireless is

Hairstylist - Fully licensed for hair, nails & waxing. Recent relevant experience necessary. Hourly/commission. Teresa, 541-382-8449

Irrigation Tech/Landscaper, 35-40 hr/week, seasonal, start NOW! Must haves: valid D.L., 2+ yrs experience. $12-$16/hour DOE. Deliver resume, references & cover letter at front desk: 60801 Brosterhous Rd. OR email info@crownvillarvresort.com Maintenance Tech Part-time position, variable schedule, drug free environment. Please apply at Worldmark Eagle Crest, 1522 Cline Falls Rd., Redmond (3rd. floor of Hotel).

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Want To Rent Shop space wanted 200 sq.ft., power, secure, central location in Bend. 541-350-8917.

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Rooms for Rent In Romaine Village $350 mo. 1st and last, ask for Jeff, 541-419-1702.

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Condo / Townhomes For Rent Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

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Apt./Multiplex General

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend !! Spring On In !! $150 off Upstairs Apts. Pet Friendly & No App. Fee! 2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps Lease Options Available

H Supplement Your Income H

A Cute, Clean 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath duplex, on quiet street near Country Club, nearly new carpet, dishwasher, fireplace, W/D hookup, private backyard, 20358 Fairway Dr., $660. Small pet neg. 541-306-1378.

640

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 2 BDRM., 1 BATH Apt. near Old Mill, laundry, parking, $595/month. Victoria L. Manahan Real Estate, 541-280-7240.

Deluxe 2 Bdrm 1½ Bath Townhouse apt. W/D hookup, fenced yd. NO PETS. Great location, starting at $565. 179 SW Hayes (past Mike’s Fence Center) Please call 541-382-0162; 541-420-0133

642

Fox Hollow Apts.

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 2 bdrm, 1 bath $550 mo.

Attractive 2 bdrm. in 4-plex, 1751 NE Wichita, W/S/G paid, on-site laundry, small pet on approval .$525/mo. 541-389-9901.

Great Location, by BMC & Costco, 2 bdrm., 2 bath duplex, 55+, 2342 NE Mary Rose Pl., #2 $795+dep, no pets/smoking, 541-390-7649

Independent Contractor

2 Bdrm., Apt on canal and outskirts city limits; $650 includes laundry, sat. TV, WSG, Unique setting. Pet allowed; dep. and firm references required. Avail. 6/1/2011. (541) 390-6250.

(541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

634

Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting. No pets/smoking. Near St. Charles.W/S/G pd; both w/d hkup + laundry facil. $595$625/mo. 541-385-6928.

541-382-3402

638

The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

looking for energetic Full/ Part Sales Reps AND a Part-time Cell Phone Repair Tech. Send resumes to applications@swirelessnw.com or fax to 866-611-3607.

Call for Specials! Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc. Pilot Butte Is Your Back Yard, 2/2.5, granite counters garage, W/D hookup, hardwood, sliding doors, deck, $675, 541-480-3666.

648

Houses for Rent General PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

650 OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS www.redmondrents.com Storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks and shopping. On-site laundry, non-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. ONE MONTH FREE w/6 mo. lease! 541-923-1907

SPRING BLAST! Studios $375 1 Bdrm $400 Free Move-in Rent! • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond Close to schools, shopping, and parks! 541-548-8735 Managed by

GSL Properties

Houses for Rent NE Bend 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1200 sq.ft., big wood stove, util. room, 1/2 acre lot, RV parking, dbl garage w/openers, $895. 541-480-3393 or 610-7803 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

General Locally owned and operated stoneyard looking for motivated individual for customer service and labor position. Forklift and sales exp. a plus. Application: 63265 Jamison, Bend, OR.

Rentals

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Redmond H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

1015 Roanoke Ave. - $590/ mo, $500 dep. W/S/G paid, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath townhouse, view of town, no smoking or pets. Norb, 541-420-9848.

A small studio, $385 + dep. No pets/smoking. Applications at 38 #2 NW Irving Ave., 3 blocks from downtown Bend. Call 541-389-4902 Beautiful updated, cozy, 1 bdrm, 2 bath Condo, A/C, 2 blocks from downtown, along banks of Deschutes, amenities incl., 1 parking spot, indoor pool, hot tub & sauna, serious renters only, credit & refs., check, minimum 1 yr. lease, no pets, reduced, now $625, utils incl., Kerrie, 541-480-0325.

“Lingering-Winter” SPECIAL! 1/ 2 OFF MOVE-IN RENTS w/ Lease Agreements

Houses for Rent Redmond 3 Bdrm, 1 bath, 1300 sq ft, new paint, pets OK, fenced yard, avail 5/12. 1st, last, security dep., 1406 SW 17th St. 541-420-7397; 541-385-5934

A Newer 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1168 sq.ft., newer paint & carpet, patio, large lot, RV parking, dbl. garage, w/opener, $850, 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803 Clean 4 Bdrm + den, 2 bath, 14920 SW Maverick Rd, CRR. No smoking; pets negotiable. $900/mo. + deposits. Call 541-504-8545; 541-350-1660 Crooked River Ranch, 4 acres, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1000 sq. ft., $695/mo. 1st, last. No inside pets. Mtn. views. 503-829-7252, 679-4495 Eagle Crest, single level, 3 bdrm., 2½ bath., 2700 sq.ft., 3-car garage, all Eagle Crest Amenities included, $1400, 714-388-2177.

661

Houses for Rent Prineville 3 Bdrm, 2 Bath, 2 Car Garage, Fenced Yard, RV Parking. $825 mo. $950 Dep. 2256 NE Timberwolf Loop 541-420-2485

Over 40 Years Experience in Carpet Upholstery & Rug Cleaning Call Now! 541-382-9498 CCB #72129 www.cleaningclinicinc.com Sunny, Warm So. Oregon! Trade your Bend area home for my 7-yr 4 Bdrm 2.5 Bath Central Point home, in planned development, with nice views. 541-941-6915

745

Homes for Sale

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days 746 $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days Northwest Bend Homes (Private Party ads only) 671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 2 Bedroom, 1 bath manufactured home in quiet park, fenced yard, W/S/G paid. $575/month, $250 deposit. Please call 541-382-8244. On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq. ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1095. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

675

RV Parking RV HOOKUP on .47 acre lot, private, minutes from Sunriver, 6 mo./year, $550/mo, cable extra, 541-385-8367 or 541-788-4714.

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease Office / Warehouse 1792 sq.ft. & 1680 sq.ft. spaces, 827 Business Way, Bend. 30¢/sq.ft.; 1st mo. + $300 dep. 541-678-1404

• 1 Bdrm/1 Bath, Cozy, clean end unit Central location. Fenced back yard. Off street parking. No Pets. $425 WST • Near Pioneer Park - 2 Bdrm/1 Bath upstairs units. Coin-op laundry on site. Private balconies. $495 WST •Newly Refurbished SE Unit - 2 Bdrm/1Bath. Private fenced patio. Coin-op laundry. Detached carport. Huge common yard. Ask about Pets. $550 WST • Near Costco - 2 Bdrm/1 Bath Duplex. Carport. Laundry room. Totally refurbished. No Pets. $585 WS • Furnished STUDIO apt. - Down by the riverside. $595 (includes all Utilities) • 3 Bdrm/1 Bath Close to Downtown - Small fenced courtyard + large community area. Pets considered. W/D Hook-ups. $595 WST. • Totally Furnished Mt. Bachelor Resort Units. 1 Bdrm/1 Bath + Murphy beds. $550-$645 WST • Charming Home Close In - 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath. Must See! Washer & dryer included. Large partially fenced yard. Pet considered. Fireplace, Gas Forced Air heat. $775 mo. • 3 Bdrm/1 Bath SE home. 1/3 acre. 2 Fireplaces. New carpet, paint, laminate. Carport. W/D Hook-ups. 1317 sq. ft. Must See. No Pets. $795 mo. • 3 Bdrm/1.5 Bath SE ranch-style home. Plus Bonus Room 1450 sq. ft. on large lot. Woodburning stove. Double garage. Pets considered. $825 mo. ***** FOR ADDITIONAL PROPERTIES ***** CALL 541-382-0053

730

Office/Warehouse located in SE Bend. Up to 30,000 sq.ft., competitive rate, 541-382-3678 The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Warehouse/Office space, 1235 sq ft, large roll-up door. 20685 Carmen Lp. No triple net; $600/mo, 1st + dep. 541-480-7546; 541-480-7541

693

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $200 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

BROKEN TOP bargain priced. 3 Bdrm, 3 bath, 2403 sq.ft., new slab granite countertops, hrdwd floors, gas fireplace, only $424,900. Randy Schoning, principal Broker, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393

748

Northeast Bend Homes Mtn. View Gated Park, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, many ammenities, open floor plan, living, dining & family room, w/view windows, looking east to large & private back area. Master bdrm. w/French doors to wrap-around covered porch, master bathroom w/soaking tub & seperate shower, $175,000, consider lease to buy contract, 2416 NE Crocus Way, Cell 480-357-6044.

762

Homes with Acreage 10 acres bordering BLM - 2520 sq ft 3 Bdrm, 2½ Bath. Large horse barn, extra large detached garage, all well-built. Extensive landscaping; 5 miles west of Redmond. $355,000. Call 541-923-7261

773

Acreages ***

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. R..E Deadlines are: Weekdays 11:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday and Monday. 541-385-5809 Thank you! The Bulletin Classified *** Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, septic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $114,900, 541-350-4684.


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 Boats & RV’s

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 3, 2011 G3

870

880

881

882

925

932

932

975

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Utility Trailers

Antique and Classic Autos

Antique and Classic Autos

Automobiles

Bounder 34’ 1994.

800

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

850

Snowmobiles

Last Chance Yamaha 600 Mtn. Max 1997 Now only $895! Sled plus trailer package $1650. Won’t Last Long! 541-548-3443.

860

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

One owner, low miles, generator, 2 roof airs, clean in and out, rear walk-round queen bed, 2 TV’s, leveling hydraulic jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, Motivated Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, seller. Just reduced and excellent condition, $16,900, priced to sell at $10,950, 541-390-2504 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

BROUGHAM 23½’ 1981, 2tone brown,perfect cond, 6 brand new tires. eng. perfect, runs great, inside perfect shape, great for hunting, fishing, etc., $5000 OBO! See to appreciate at 15847 WoodChip Ln off Day Rd. in La Pine.541-876-5106.

Starcraft 2008 Centennial 3612 tent trailer, like new, sleeps 6, slide-out, Arizona room, range w/oven, micro, toilet & shower, stereo system, heated mattresses, roof rack, new 6-ply tires, twin 6-volt batteries, outside shower, twin propane tanks, BBQ. $10,500. 541-312-9312

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, quality built, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more.$59,500. 541-317-9185

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

WILLYS JEEP 1956 New rebuilt motor, no miles, Power Take-off winch. Exc. tires.

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call Ladder Racks (2), custom, fits 8’ 541-420-5453. bed, fit 2 ladders on ea. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 side+enclosed overhead storengine, auto. trans, ps, air, age compartment, 8” high, 4’ frame on rebuild, repainted wide, 8’ long, $375 ea. or original blue, original blue $700/both, 541-480-7823 for interior, original hub caps, info, can be seen TradeNTool, exc. chrome, asking $9000 or 61406 S Hwy. 97. make offer. 541-385-9350.

Motorcycles And Accessories

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $9800 OBO. 541-383-1782

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, 15K mi, lots of upgrades, cstm exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage accessories, $15,500 OBO. 541-693-3975

GAS

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Canopy mount electric boat loader, in good shape $600 OBO. 541-548-3459 GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240. Flair 31S w/slide 1998, clean sleeps 6-8, 24K, newer tires, $27,500 OBO, 541-548-0876 Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

SAVER!

Honda Gold Wing GL 1100, 1980. 23,000 miles, full dress plus helmets, $3500 or best offer. Call 541-389-8410

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975 WANTED HARLEY full size bike 2000 or newer. Cash paid under $9,500. 541-408-7908 Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

865

ATVs

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

POLARIS RZRS 2010 Fast - Safe - Fun Call for info about many extras, then check internet for prices & make offer, 541-510-2330

870

Boats & Accessories

16.9’ Glastron 1973, open bow, Volvo inboard motor, new upholstery & E-Z loader trailer, $2400 OBO. 541-389-2329 17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

Houseboat 38x10, triple axle trailer incl. 20-ft cabin, 12-ft rear swim deck & 6-ft covered front deck. New Price!! $17,500. 541-788-4844.

Used out-drive parts Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

JAYCO SENECA 2008 36MS, fully loaded, 2 slides, gen., diesel, 8k miles, like new cond., $109,000 OBO. Call for details 1-541-556-8224.

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Cannondale Mountain Bike, single shock, $500, 541-383-8528

Sea Kayaks - His & Hers, Eddyline Wind Dancers, 17’, fiberglass boats, all equip incl., paddles, personal flotation devices, dry bags, spray skirts, roof rack w/towers & cradles -- Just add water, $1850/boat Firm. 541-504-8557.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $104,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com Safari Serengetti 2000, diesel, 57K mi., inverter, gen, convection over, W/D, oak cabinets, many extra, $77,000 OBO, 541-620-0452

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $395, 541-923-3490.

Winnebago Sightseer 30B Class A 2008 $79,500 OBO Top of the line! cell 805-368-1575

880

Travel Trailers

Motorhomes

881

ARE CANOPY fits new style Chevy 6.5, top of the line, Silver birch. New $1800 askextended overhead cab, stereo, ing $900. 541-383-2338. self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non We Buy Scrap Auto & smoker, $6900 541-815-1523. Truck Batteries, $10 each Also buying junk cars & trucks, (up to $500), & scrap metal! Call 541-912-1467

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $39,900, please call 541-330-9149.

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Dodge pickup 1962 D100 classic, original 318 wide block, push button trans, straight, runs good, $1250 firm. Bend, 831-295-4903

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

Autos & Transportation

900 908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information. Chevy Corvette 1980, yellow, glass removable top, 8 cyl., auto trans, radio, heat, A/C, new factory interior, black, 48K., exc. tires, factory aluminum wheels, asking $7500, will consider fair offer & possible trade, 541-385-9350.

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Ford 2 Door 1949, 99% Complete, $12,000, please call 541-408-7348.

Chevy Corvette 1984, 105K mi., runs strong, new tires & front end alignment, new battery, $8000 OBO, 541-706-1705

exc. cond., 4WD, new tires, shocks, interior seat cover, everything works, 121K orig. mi.,original operators manual and line setting ticket incl. $5000 OBO, 503-559-4401

916 Be Ready for summer vacations! 27’ 1995 Terry 5th wheel with BIG slide-out, generator and extras. $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $10,500. 541-589-0767, in Burns.

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

GMC Ventura 3500 1986, refrigerated, w/6’x6’x12’ box, has 2 sets tires w/rims., 1250 lb. lift gate, new engine, $5500, 541-389-6588, ask for Bob.

Chevy Corvette Coupe 2006, 8,471 orig miles, 1 owner, always garaged, red, 2 tops, auto/paddle shift, LS-2, Corsa exhaust, too many options to list, pristine car, $37,500. Serious only, call 541-504-9945

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

MUST SELL Make Fair offer. Monte Carlo ‘70, all original, death forces sale, 541-593-3072

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Pettibone Mercury fork lift, 8000 lb., 2-stage, propane, hard rubber tires. $4000 or Make offer. 541-389-5355.

Truck with Snow Plow!

CHEVROLET 1970, V-8 automatic 4X4 3/4 ton. Very good condition, lots of new parts and maintenance records. New tires, underdash air, electronic ignition and much more. Original paint, truck used very little. $5700, 541-575-3649

Chevy El Camino 1979, 350 auto, new studs, located in Sisters, $3000 OBO, 907-723-9086,907-723-9085

Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. $4800 OBO. Call 541-390-1466.

Chevy 3/4 Ton 1989, 4x4, 100K miles, 350 engine, Great cond. $3900. Call 541-815-9939

3/4 ton, diesel, 6 speed manual, crew cab, 4 door, spray-in bedliner, clearance lights, air bags, custom wheels and large tires, 87k. Looks like new inside & out!

Ford F-150 2006 LOOKS BRAND NEW! Supercab Lariat 5.4L V8 eng.,approx. 20K mi! 4 spd auto, rear wheel drive. Black w/lots of extras: Trailer tow pkg, Custom bedliner, Pickup bed extender, Tan leather trimmed captain chairs, only $18,000. 541-318-7395

Ford F-150 XLT 2010, 4X4, Super Crew, garaged, 4900 mi., red candy, mint, $27,500, 541-279-8976.

Ford Flatbed 1985, diesel, new tires, rims and glow plugs, gooseneck hitch and rear hitch, 4WD., great condition, $2500. 541-419-6593. or 541-419-6552. FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $3800. 541-350-1686

Plymouth 4-dr sedan, 1948, all orig., new tires, exlnt driver, all gauges work, 63,520 miles, $8500. 541-504-2878

Ford Ranger 2004 Super Cab, XLT, 4X4, V6, 5-spd, A/C bed liner, tow pkg, 120K Like New! KBB Retail: $10,000 OBO 360-990-3223

KOMFORT 27’ 2000 5th wheel, fiberglass with 12’ slide. In excellent condition, has been stored inside. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

6X12 Steel Flatbed trailer, 5’ tongue, 3500lb axle weight, ST205/75R15 tires, $1000 FIRM, 541-480-7823 for info, can be seen TradeNTool, 61406 S Hwy. 97.

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

• 4WD, 68,000 miles. • Great Shape. • Original Owner.

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at 140 (This special package is not available on our website)

$19,450! 541-389-5016 evenings.

fifi’s Hauling & More. Yard clean up, fuel reduction, con struction & misc. clean up, 10 yd. hyd. trailers, 20 ft. flatbed, 541-382-0811.

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 • Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling • Decks • Window/Door Replacement • Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179

"POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates . See Facebook Business page, search under M. Lewis Construction, LLC CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

Domestic Services Home Is Where The Dirt Is 10 Yrs Housekeeping Exp., References, Rates To Fit Your Needs Call Crecencia Today! Cell 541-306-7426 I Do Professional Housecleaning: 25 yrs. exp., licenced, exc refs., Senior discounts! 541-420-0366

I DO THAT! Home Repairs, Remodeling, Professional & Honest Work. Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768

Bend’s Reliable Handyman Lowest rates, quality work,clean -up, haul, dispose, repair, odd jobs, paint, fences, & more. CCB#180267 541-419-6077

Concrete Construction JJ&B Construction - Quality Concrete work, over 30 yrs experience. Sidewalks, RV Pads, Driveways.... Call Josh 541-279-3330 • CCB190612

Quality Builders Electric • Remodels • Home Improvement • Lighting Upgrades • Hot Tub Hook-ups 541-389-0621 www.qbelectric.net CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C BAXTER ELECTRIC Remodels / Design / Rentals All Small Jobs•Home Improve. All Work by Owner - Call Tom 541-318-1255 CCB 162723

Handyman

QB Digital Living

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

• Evaluating Seasonal Needs • Pruning Trees and Shrubs • Thinning Overgrown Areas • Removing Undesired Plants • Hauling Debris • Renovation • Fertilizer Programs • Organic Options EXPERIENCED Senior Discounts

541-390-3436

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Home Improvement Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

•Leaves •Cones and Needles •Broken Branches •Debris Hauling •Defensible Space •Aeration/Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing

ORGANIC

Handyman Service Repair & Remodel We Move Walls Small jobs welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085

SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching & Aeration Weekly Maintenance • Thatching • Aeration • Lawn Over-seeding Bark • Clean-ups Commercial / Residential Senior Discounts

FREE AERATION & FERTILIZATION with new seasonal Mowing Service!

“Because weekends WERE NOT made for yard work!”

541-382-3883

Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Edging •Pruning •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Thatching, aerating, spring cleanup, sprinkler turn-ons, weekly mows.

541-382-1655 LCB# 7990

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semi-retired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

Personal Services

Spring Clean Up! Aerating, thatching, lawn restoration, Vacation Care. Full Season Openings. Senior discounts. Call Mike Miller, 541-408-3364

D.L. Concepts Remodeling Specializing in all aspects of wood, drywall, metal & fiberglass finishes. Make your old cabinets, doors or windows new again! Also expert in faux finishing - interior/exterior, 30+ years experience. Call Dan - 541-420-4009 CCB #115437 RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. •Additions/Remodels/Garages •Replacement windows/doors remodelcentraloregon.com 541-480-8296 CCB189290

Call The Yard Doctor for Andrew Russell Construction, yard maint., thatching, sod, New construction, remodels, hydroseeding, sprinkler sys, siding, decks, fences & much water features, walls, more! more! FREE ESTIMATES. Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012 541-390-1005 CCB#164571 Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

V Spring Clean Up! V Thatch, Aerate, weeding, raking & monthly maint. 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Grand Laredo

Cherokee 1998, 6 cyl.,

Chysler La Baron Convertible 1990, Good condition, $3800, 541-416-9566

541-322-7253

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

FORD TAURUS LX 98 with 74K miles, gold color, one owner, non smoker, 27 mpg, V-6 motor, nice car and almost new! $3900 541-318-9999 or 541-815-3639

Infiniti J30 1993 118.6K miles. 1 owner. Great shape. 4 separate studded tires on wheels incl. $3200. 541-382-7451

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

MERCEDES C300 2008 New body style, 30,000 miles, heated seats, luxury sedan, CD, full factory warranty. $23,950.

Like buying a new car! 503-351-3976.

Mercedes GL450, 2007 All wheel drive, 1 owner, navigation, heated seats, DVD, 2 moonroofs. Immaculate and never abused. $27,950. Call 503-351-3976

Rooing AMERICAN ROOFING Quick, efficient, quality work New • Re-roofs • Repairs Free Estimates CCB #193018 Call Jorge - 541-497-3556

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

SUBARUS!!! Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Volvo C70-T5, 2010 Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $14,500. 541-408-2111

Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k mi. Immac,, Loaded, Dlr. maintained, $23k. 503-459-1580

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 38K mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $59,750 firm. 541-480-1884 Toyota Rav 4 2006, 4WD, V6, hwy mi, new tires, tow pkg, nice! $13,599. 541-408-2199

940

Vans

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $38,900. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

4L, 180K mi., new tires & battery, leather & alloy, ask $3450, Bill, 541-480-7930.

DJ - 50s to 80s Rock & Roll or Country music tailored to fit your party needs .... rates to fit your budget. Call Keith at 541-598-7220

Remodeling, Carpentry Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Specializing in Pavers. Up to 4 maintenance visits free. Call 541-385-0326

Bend Landscaping & Maint.

PROGRAMS

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

CCB#180420

LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Does your lawn have snow mold problems? We can help!

Weed free bark & flower beds

Fertilizer included with monthly program

All types remodeling/handyman Decks, Painting, Carpentry Randy Salveson, 541-306-7492

J. L. SCOTT

Providing full service maintenance for over 20 years!

Spring Clean Up

Electrical Services

Computer/Cabling Install •Computer Networking •Phone/Data/TV Jacks •Whole House Audio •Flat Screen TV & Installation 541-280-6771 www.qbdigitalliving.com CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

Landscape Management

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Painting, Wall Covering

Drywall ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

925

$

M. Lewis Construction, LLC

90k and 110k miles, silver and white colors, full size 4-door sedans, 30 mpg hwy, luxury cars, trouble-free, too! ask anyone that owns one! 541-318-9999

Utility Trailers

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005

Handyman

BUICKS ! LeSabre 1998 and 2000 $1900-$3900

Ford F250 4x4 1993. 5.8L engine, Auto, AC, shell, new brakes, tow package, 127K miles, $2800. 541-408-8330

935

Debris Removal

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Lincoln LS 2005 V6, exlnt cond, 43K miles, blue w/gray interior, $10,900. 541-923-5758

Sport Utility Vehicles

Barns

Audi A4 1999, dark blue, automatic sunroof, runs great, comes w/studded snow tires, $5,000. Jeff, 541-980-5943

$27,900 OBO. 541-433-2341 • 541-410-8173 Ford crew cab 1993, 7.3 Diesel, auto, PS, Rollalong package, deluxe interior & exterior, electric windows/door locks, dually, fifth wheel hitch, receiver hitch, 90% rubber, super maint. w/all records, new trans. rebuilt, 116K miles. $6500, Back on the market. 541-923-0411

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

International Travel All 1967,

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

933

Pickups

DODGE RAM 2004 4x4

(4) 235/75x15 tires on early Dodge pickup 6-hole alloy wheels, $150. 541-536-3889 (4) 245/75x16 tires on 6-hole chrome GM wheels; chrome lug nuts $175. 541-536-3889

HORNET By Keystone 2002 - 31’ Large slide, Queen bed, fridge, A/C, furnace, and TV. $8500. 541-848-7191

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

932

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $35,500. 541-815-4121

Wilderness 2-person open seat Kayak w/paddles, like new. $650 new; sell $375. 541-383-8528

931

Antique and Classic Autos

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 2000, A/C,

Arctic Fox 11.5’ 4KW generator, exc. cond., with slide, cover & TV incl., $9000 OBO, 541-948-5793.

541-389-5355

Sport,

Fifth Wheels

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944 Winnebago Access 31J 2008, Class C, Near Low Retail Price! One owner, nonsmoker, garaged, 7,400 miles, auto leveling jacks, (2) slides, upgraded queen bed, bunk beds, microwave, 3-burner range/oven, (3) TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, maintained, and very clean! Only $76,995! Extended warranty available! Call (541) 388-7179.

Cargo

12x6, side door, 2 back doors, shelves, exc. cond., $2750, call 541-815-1523.

882

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

Watercraft

Wells

Canopies and Campers

Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

875

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $2450 for all. Bill 541-480-7930.

MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler LR, Arctic insulation, all op28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc. tions $39,500. 541-420-3250 cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 885 541-389-9188.

Asking $3,999 or make offer.

Chevrolet 1-ton Express Cargo Van 1999, with tow package, good condition, $4800. Call 541-419-5693

Convertible Hardtop. 10,800mi. Celestial Blue w/Calcite Cream leather int. Premium & Climate pkgs. Warranty & Service to 10/2014. KBB SRP $33,540. Asking $31,900. 541-350-5437 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.


G4 Tuesday, May 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE Adoption? A childless married couple seeks to adopt. Love, laughter & opportunity. Financial security. Expenses paid. Lets help each other! Kelly & John 1-888-521-4003

May 3, 2011.

LEGAL NOTICE City of Bend Request for Proposals Engineering Services for Underpass Stormwater Improvements Franklin Underpass SR09BA/ Greenwood Underpass SR09CA

Scott P. Mendenhall Personal Representative PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Scott P. Mendenhall ETAK International Ltd. 20/F Methodist House 36 Hennessey Road Wanchai HONG KONG TEL: (852) 2526 2371 ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE:

The City of Bend requests KARNOPP PETERSEN LLP proposals from qualified Thomas J. Sayeg, firms to provide professional OSB #873805 surveying and engineering tjs@karnopp.com services for a stormwater 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300 improvement project. The Bend, Oregon 97701-1957 project includes two sepaTEL: (541) 382-3011 rate underpass locations. FAX: (541) 388-5410 Each underpass provides an Of Attorneys for unrestricted and grade sepaPersonal Representative rated crossing of US Highway 97 and the Burlington LEGAL NOTICE Northern Railroad. Both unIN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF derpass locations flood durTHE STATE OF OREGON ing rainfall events warrantFOR THE COUNTY OF ing intermittent road DESCHUTES closures. The scope of the project is to study and deIn the Matter of the Estate of sign stormwater solutions to THOMAS R. OVERBAY, mitigate flooding problems Deceased, and reduce the instance and duration of roadway closures. Case No. 11PB0057AB The work shall include the NOTICE TO INTERESTED preparation of a stormwater PERSONS study, alternatives analyses, pre-design report, calculaNOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN tions, permitting, topothat the undersigned have graphical survey, engineered been appointed Co-Adminisdesigns, specifications, protrators. All persons having visions, construction design claims against the estate are services and project manrequired to present them, agement for both locations. with vouchers attached, to the undersigned Co-AdminSealed proposals must be istrators at 747 SW Mill View submitted by June 2, 2011, Way, Bend OR 97702, within 3:00 PM, at City Hall, 710 four months after the date of NW Wall Street, 2nd Floor, first publication of this noBend, Oregon, 97701, Attn: tice, or the claims may be Gwen Chapman, Purchasing barred. Manager. Proposals will not be accepted after deadline. All persons whose rights may The outside of the package be affected by the proceedcontaining the proposal shall ings may obtain additional identify the project: Franklin information from the records Underpass Improvement of the court, the Co-AdminSR09BA and Greenwood Unistrators, or the lawyer for derpass Improvement the Co-Administrators, Daniel SR09CA. C. Re. A mandatory pre-submittal meeting will be held at City Hall Council Chambers, 710 NE Wall Street on: May 18, 2011, 10:00 AM. Proposals will only be accepted from attendees of this meeting. Solicitation packets may be obtained from Central Oregon Builder's Exchange (COBE) at www.plansonfile.com (click on Public Works) or 1902 NE 4th Street, Bend, Oregon. Proposers must register with COBE as a document holder to receive notice of addenda. This can be done on the COBE website or by phone at 541-389-0123. Proposers are responsible for checking the website for the issuance of any addenda prior to submitting a proposal. Proposal results are available from COBE. The City of Bend reserves the right to: 1) reject any or all proposal not in compliance with public solicitation procedures and requirements, 2) reject any or all proposals in accordance with ORS 279B.100, 3) select consultant on the basis of the proposals or to conduct interviews with the highest qualified proposers after scoring, 4) seek clarifications of any or all proposals, and 5) to select the proposal which appears to be in the best interest of the City. Dated: May 3, 2011 Gwen Chapman Purchasing Manager 541-385-6677 LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES PROBATE DEPARTMENT Estate of GEORGE A. MENDENHALL, Deceased. Case No. 11PB0065SF NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal representative. All persons having claims against the Estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned Personal Representative at Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300, Bend, Oregon 97701-1957, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the Personal Representative or the attorneys for the Personal Representative and Trustee, who are Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300, Bend, Oregon 97701-1957. DATED and first published

Dated and first published on April 26, 2011. INGA S. OVERBAY Co-Administrator CONNIE OVERBAY-WEISHOFF Co-Administrator HURLEY RE, P.C. Attorneys at Law 747 SW Mill View Way, Bend OR 97702 Phone: 541-317-5505 / Fax: 541-317-5507 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF BUDGET COMMITTEE MEETING Legal Notice Notice of Budget Committee Meeting A public meeting of the Budget Committee of the High Desert Education Service District, Deschutes County, State of Oregon, will be held at 145 SE Salmon Avenue., Suite A, Redmond, Oregon. The meeting will take place on the 17th day of May, 2011 at 5:30 P.M. The purpose of the meeting is to receive the budget message. A copy of the budget document may be inspected or obtained on or after April 21st at 145 SE Salmon Ave., Redmond, Oregon 97756 between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M. This is a public meeting where deliberation of the Budget Committee will take place. Any person may appear at this meeting and discuss the proposed programs with the Budget Committee. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF BUDGET COMMITTEE MEETING A public meeting of the Budget Committee of the Oregon Water Wonderland Unit II Sanitary District, Deschutes County State of Oregon to discuss the budget for the fiscal year July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012 will be held at the District's office, located at 55841 Swan Road. The meeting will take place on Thursday May 12th, 2011 at 6:30 p.m. This is a public meeting where deliberation of the Budget Committee will take place. LEGAL NOTICE Symbiotics LLC, on behalf of Wickiup Hydro Group, LLC (PO Box 535, Rigby, ID 83442), submitted a Final License Application with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for the Wickiup Dam Hydroelectric Project (FERC No. 12965) on March 25, 2011. The project would add a 7.15-MW run-of-river generation facility to the existing Wickiup Dam in Deschutes County, Oregon. A copy of the Final License Application is available for public viewing at the La Pine Public Library. The document can also be downloaded at http://www.ferc.gov/docs-fil ing/elibrary.asp by searching for the project number.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0103237442 T.S. No.: 11-00965-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of May 14. 2009 made by, ADAM J. CAMBRON and ALISON J. CAMBRON, Husband and Wife AKA Adam Cambron and Alison Cambron, was the original Grantor to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INS CO, was the original trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank N.A., was the original beneficiary, recorded on May 26, 2009, as Instrument No. 2009-21597 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust") to wit: APN: 254301 ALL THAT CERTAIN LAND SITUATED IN THE STATE OF OR, COUNTY OF DESCHUTES, CITY OF BEND, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: LOT FOUR (4), CANYON BREEZE, RECORDED AUGUST 31, 2006, IN CABINET H, PAGE 68, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 19589 SW HOLLYGRAPE ST., BEND, OR The current beneficiary is: Wells Fargo Bank N.A. Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the defaults) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $15,881.95 as of April 21, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $236,474.07 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.00000% per annum from August 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed trustee under the Deed of Trust will on August 26, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 26, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Ryan Bradford, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3980468 05/03/2011, 05/10/2011, 05/17/2011, 05/24/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031299308 T.S. No.: 11-01584-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of August 22, 2006 made by, DEE M. BRIDGES, AN INDIVIDUAL PERSON, was the original Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COM-

PANY OF OREGON, was the original trustee, in favor of MERS AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ACCEPTANCE. INC., was the original beneficiary, recorded on August 29, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-59191 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust") to wit: APN: 100123 LOT NINE (9) IN BLOCK THREE (3) OF CANYON PARK, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1721 NE CANYON PARK DR., BEND, OR The current beneficiary is: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company as Indenture Trustee for American Home Mortgage Investment Trust 2007-2, Mortgage-Backed Notes, Series 2007-2 Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $9,299.71 as of April 20, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $287,607.96 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.25000% per annum from November 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed trustee under the Deed of Trust will on August 25, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252Â-4900 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730-2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural,

the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 26, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Lisa Rohrbacker, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3980486 05/03/2011, 05/10/2011, 05/17/2011, 05/24/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0052213394 T.S. No.: 11-01277-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of March 21, 2005 made by, WILLIAM E. RYBICKI AND CONNIE L. RYBICKI, HUSBAND AND WIFE , was the original Grantor to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INS CO, was the original trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK NA, was the original beneficiary, recorded on March 23, 2005, as Instrument No. 2005-17104 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust") to wit: APN: 243188 LOT ONE HUNDRED FIVE (105), PARKS AT BROKEN TOP, PHASE 3, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 61507 CULTUS LAKE COURT, BEND, OR The current beneficiary is: US Bank National Association as successor Trustee to Wachovia Bank, National Association, as Trustee for Wells Fargo Asset Securities Corporation, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2005-AR16 Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $7,650,64 as of March 28, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $369,121.93 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.12500% per annum from November 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed trustee under the Deed of Trust will on August 8, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due

(other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252Â-4900 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730-2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 4, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3961241 04/19/2011, 04/26/2011, 05/03/2011, 05/10/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0210904298 T.S. No.: 10-10716-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of November 26, 2008 made by, CHAD R. LEWIS AND LYNENE E. LEWIS , was the original Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company of Oregon, was the original trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., was the original beneficiary, recorded on December 2, 2008, as Instrument No. 2008-47546 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust") to wit: APN: 140475 LOT FIFTEEN (15) IN BLOCK TWENTY-NINE (29) OF TALL PINES - FIFTH ADDITION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 53110 SUNRISE CT, LA PINE, OR The current beneficiary is: WELLS FARGO BANK NA Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $18,795.11 as of April 20, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $175,761.66 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.50000% per annum from May 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed trustee under the Deed of Trust will on August 25, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in

the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale.FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 26, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Ryan Bradford, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3980556 05/03/2011, 05/10/2011, 05/17/2011, 05/24/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: LORENA VARGAS. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: OREGON HOUSING AND COMMUNITY SERVICES DEPARTMENT, STATE OF OREGON, as assignee of BANK OF THE CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Nine (9), CARLY MEADOWS, PHASE 1, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: June 13, 2007. Recording No.: 2007-33370 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4.DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: A payment of $342.00 for the month of February 2010; plus regular monthly payments of $1,482.00 each, due the first of each month, for the months of March 2010 through February 2011; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the

amount of $207,269.58; plus interest at the rate of 5.7500% per annum from January 1, 2010; plus late charges of $62.58; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: July 14, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #07754.30368). DATED: February 17, 2011. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: JOHN W. WILLIS. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Eleven (11), Block One Hundred Fifty-six (156), SECOND ADDITION TO BEND PARK, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: 5/17/2004. Recording No.: 2004-28680. Re-Recorded 5/21/04. Recording No.: 2004-29830 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $726.65 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of April 2009 through February 2011; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $150,081.95; plus

interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from March 15, 2009; plus late charges of $781.58; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: July 14, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30218). DATED: February 24, 2011. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the Early Intervention Early Childhood Special Education programs in Deschutes, Jefferson, and Crook counties will destroy all special education student records that are no longer needed in regards to providing educational services. Records will be destroyed for children who received services anytime prior to the 1989-1990 school year. Please note that this does not include the student's permanent record, which must be maintained indefinitely by local school districts (OAR 581-22-717). The Early Intervention Early Childhood Special Education records include students from Deschutes County School Districts, Jefferson County School Districts, and Crook County School Districts. For purposes of claiming social security, or other benefits, parents may need special education records. If you wish to obtain the special education records mentioned above, please contact the High Desert Education Service District Office at 541-389-5437, before August 1, 2011. Unless otherwise requested, all special education student records noted will be destroyed on August 1, 2011. Publish: May 1, 2011

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-NC-107885

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-UM-107931

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, LANCE CAVAN KUYKENDALL, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW, as Trustee, in favor of NEW CENTURY MORTGAGE CORPORATION, as beneficiary, dated 5/18/2005, recorded 5/25/2005, under Instrument No. 2005-32218, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Indenture Trustee, for New Century Home Equity Loan Trust 2005-3. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 9, BLOCK B, DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 59625 NAVAJO CIRCLE BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of April 4, 2011 Delinquent Payments from April 01, 2010 10 payments at $ 1,237.34 each $ 12,373.40 3 payments at $ 1,152.80 each $ 3,458.40 (04-01-10 through 04-04-11) Late Charges: $ 667.94 Beneficiary Advances: $ 1,821.11 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 18,320.85 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $176,184.88, PLUS interest thereon at 6.5% per annum from 03/01/10 to 2/1/2011, 6.5% per annum from 2/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on August 5, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 4/4/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee KAREN JAMES AUTHORlZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, ERIC C. NANCE, as grantor, to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE COMPANY, INC., as Trustee, in favor of UMPQUA BANK, ITS SUCCESSORS AND/OR ASSIGNS, as beneficiary, dated 10/20/2003, recorded 10/27/2003, under Instrument No. 2003-74222, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by UMPQUA BANK, ITS SUCCESSORS AND/OR ASSIGNS. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 5 IN RESUBDIVISION OF TRACT 46 & 47 OF SOTHMAN'S ADDITION CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 232 NORTHWEST ELM AVENUE REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of April 15, 2011 Delinquent Payments from December 01, 2010 1 payments at $ 682.00 each $ 682.00 4 payments at $ 671.00 each $ 2,684.00 (12-01-10 through 04-15-11) Late Charges: $ 103.44 Beneficiary Advances: $ 15.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 3,484.44 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $72,278.57, PLUS interest thereon at 6.25% per annum from 11/01/10 to 1/1/2011, 6.25% per annum from 1/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on August 23, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at MAIN ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY JUSTICE CENTER, 1100 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 4/15/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee MELISSA HJORTEN, ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

ASAP# 3960091 04/12/2011, 04/19/2011, 04/26/2011, 05/03/2011

ASAP# 3973409 05/03/2011, 05/10/2011, 05/17/2011, 05/24/2011


CENTRAL OREGON MARKETPLACE

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THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

$100 OFF COMPLETE D E TA I L I N G SPECIAL

$50 OFF ANY SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE It’s the best thing you can do for your Audi, BMW, Volkswagen, or Porsche. Our trained techs will inspect, adjust and replace parts according to manufacture recommended specifications, time and mileage intervals. Includes labor, part & fluids.

Perfect for Ceramic, Porcelain, Slate, Granite and Travertine

20% OFF

4 BRANDS, A THOUSAND POSSIBILITIES 1045 SE 3rd St • Bend • OR 541-382-1711 www.carreramotors.com

Offer valid with coupon only. Not valid with other offers. Minimums apply. Payment due at time of service. Expiration date: April 30, 2011.

$10 OFF

Dinner for Two. Any two dinner entrees* and two beverages

Family & Cosmetic Dentistry Modern, State of the Art Facility

COUPON VALID FOR PARTIES UP TO 6, A $30 VALUE.

*Not valid with light side entrees or salads.

Jack R. Miller D.M.D. Branden Ferguson D.D.S.

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 5/31/11.

Schedule Online at www.stanleysteemer.com

Call for Free Estimate 541-706-9390 • 1-800-STEEMER ®

ES CARD IAL SERVIC FINANC

$

1 OFF Lunch

($795 minimum purchase required) Discount applies to entire party Offer expires 5/31/11

11erthsary

®

“Wizard of Comfort”

Rooms too hot or too cold?

A $250 Value

541-382-2222

3 Oil Changes (Gas)

Bend. d Street and Franklin in Right on the Corner of Thir Right on the Price.

S SERVICE HOUR 5:30pm M–F 7:30am to

Covers most vehicles. Diesels extra. Coupon expires 5/31/11.

Includes 5 QTS of oil, oil filter, inspection of belts, hoses, fluids, lights, tires, brakes The key tag includes three lube, oil & filters.

The cost is only $4596 per tag.

Special Oil Change Price!

$15.32 each

$ 50

1 OFF Dinner

Dine In, Take Out | 541-389-9888 61247 S. Hwy 97 • Bend • Next to Bend Wal Mart www.reddragonchineserestaurant.com

($950 minimum purchase required) Discount applies to entire party Offer expires 5/31/11

*Lower your utility over payment sale* Expires 5/16/11

Expires 5/16/11 Call Today!

Special Oil Change Price!

Free Bleach* with new patient exam, cleaning and x-rays if necessary *call for details

89,900

MINIMUM $ SAVINGS OF

WITHOUT GARAGE!

Anniv

SAVE $25

Premium Level 2-Speed Heat Pump

Expires 5/16/11

NEW PLAN–DESIGNED FOR CENTRAL OREGON VIEWS $ ONLY

“Pre-Season” Heat Pump/ AC Tune Up!

SAVE $500

FREE

Duct Video & Performance Test

CCB 191568

Special Oil Change Price!

32

murrayandholt.com

• SPOT TREATMENT & TOUGH STAIN REMOVAL • NO HIDDEN CHARGES • LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED

$ 00

902 SE Textron Dr • Bend • 541.382.7911

Allergy Relief Air Purification Systems

15 OIL CHANGES!

WE ALSO OFFER YOU PEACE OF MIND AT NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE THROUGH: • ARRIVAL TIMES SCHEDULED AT YOUR CONVENIENCE • SAME DAY SERVICE • CAREFUL MOVING OF FURNITURE

HIDDEN IN RED OAK SQUARE • 1230 NE 3RD • BEND

*Present coupon at time of service. Expires 5/31/2011

D S CAR VICE L SER FINANCIA

COUPON VALID FOR PARTIES UP TO 6 PEOPLE. Not valid with other offers or take-out. Please present coupon. Expires 6-30-11

541-382-3173

24.95

www.HomeHeatingBend.com

With choice of soup or salad and bread and choice of baked potato, French fries, Rice or Vegetables

Fish House

*

541-389-HOME

$18.95

LUNCH 11:30–2:30, MON–FRI | DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT

Special Oil Change Price!

Special Oil Change Price!

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 5/31/11.

www.stevesautomotiveofbend.com

OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 6/30/11.

123

ANY 3 AREAS CLEANED

ANY 2 AREAS & 1 HALL CLEANED

Serving regular menu and specialty omelets with dungeness crab, honey baked ham or fresh vegetable with cheese. Also serving corn bread muffins and zucchini bread

$

• Includes tire rotation if needed ALL FOR ...

STEAK, LOBSTER & PRAWNS COMBO

11:30-8:00

Starting at

Special Oil Change Price!

99

Not valid with other offers or take-out. Please present coupon. Expires 6-30-11

OPEN FOR MOTHER’S DAY

• Includes up to 5 quarts of Napa Oil and oil filter • Vehicle safety inspection

Tile, Stone & Grout Cleaning & Sealing 541-388-7374 Bend 541-923-3347 Redmond

$

LUBE, OIL & FILTER SERVICE

Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

ALPINE DENTAL

$

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

Chem-Dry of Bend

Interior: Clean carpets & trim Refresh fabric protection on seats (when applicable) & Deodorize Exterior: Wash, wax & buff & Detail wheels

*Please present offer at time of write up. Not to be combined with other offers. Not redeemable for advertised specials, previous purchases, or cash. Offer good through June 6, 2011.

M O T O R S

Tuesday, May 3, 2011

ONLY $95,900 with attached garage! Included features: • Split Bedrooms • 9’ Walls with Vault in Great Room • Large Front Porch with Timber Truss • See reverse side for loor plan

360

Gentle Dentistry Dr. Brandon L. Turley D.M.D., P.C.

Central Oregon (800) 970-0153

( 541) 548-5105

CCB#181069

SPRING ! l Specia

Interested in

ADVERTISING YOUR BUSINESS? Call your Bulletin Account Executive TODAY or call 541-382-1811 for more information about this and other opportunities!

Upholstery Cleaning

$

20OFF

($130 Minimum Upholstery cleaning purchase required) One Coupon per Customer. No Hidden Fees

of Central Oregon

Expires 6/30/11

BW0511

2 Rooms Cleaned

541-593-1799

$

74

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. No Hidden Fees Expires 6/30/11

BW0511

Whole House Cleaning

$

The World’s Greenest Carpet Cleaner®®

144

Up to 5 Rooms Cleaned

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. No Hidden Fees Expires 6/30/11

BW0511

SAVE UP TO

$

160

1. Subject to credit approval. Additional terms and conditions apply. See Store Associate for complete details and Rebate Form.

By Mail-In Rebate1 on Goodyear® Assurance® ComforTred® Touring tires. Hurry in! Offer valid April 30, 2011 through July 30, 2011.

FIRST-TIME OFFER!

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE • 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189


Tuesday, May 3, 2011

THE BULLETIN

C

C

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

$10

Free Bleach*

360

MINIMUM $ SAVINGS OF

Dinner for Two. Any two dinner entrees* and two beverages

Gentle Dentistry

COUPON VALID FOR PARTIES UP TO 6, A $30 VALUE.

*Not valid with light side entrees or salads.

(541 ) 548-5105

Dr. Brandon L. Turley D.M.D., P.C.

STEAK, LOBSTER & PRAWNS COMBO

11:30-8:00

OFF

with new patient exam, cleaning and x-rays if necessary *call for details

OPEN FOR MOTHER’S DAY

Not valid with other offers or take-out. Please present coupon. Expires 6-30-11

Serving regular menu and specialty omelets with dungeness crab, honey baked ham or fresh vegetable with cheese. Also serving corn bread muffins and zucchini bread

$18.95

LUNCH 11:30–2:30, MON–FRI | DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT

With choice of soup or salad and bread and choice of baked potato, French fries, Rice or Vegetables

Fish House 541-382-3173 HIDDEN IN RED OAK SQUARE • 1230 NE 3RD • BEND

COUPON VALID FOR PARTIES UP TO 6 PEOPLE. Not valid with other offers or take-out. Please present coupon. Expires 6-30-11

OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 6/30/11.

SPRING ! l Specia

Upholstery Cleaning

99

20OFF

($130 Minimum Upholstery cleaning purchase required) One Coupon per Customer. No Hidden Fees Expires 6/30/11

of Central Oregon

BW0511

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 5/31/11.

$

74

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. No Hidden Fees Expires 6/30/11

BW0511

Whole House Cleaning

$ ® ®

The World’s Greenest Carpet Cleaner

144

Up to 5 Rooms Cleaned

LUBE, OIL & FILTER SERVICE • Includes up to 5 quarts of Napa Oil and oil filter • Vehicle safety inspection

$

• Includes tire rotation if needed ALL FOR ... www.stevesautomotiveofbend.com

Starting at

Schedule Online at www.stanleysteemer.com

®

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. No Hidden Fees Expires 6/30/11

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 5/31/11.

Call for Free Estimate 541-706-9390 • 1-800-STEEMER ES CARD IAL SERVIC FINANC

WE ALSO OFFER YOU PEACE OF MIND AT NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE THROUGH: • ARRIVAL TIMES SCHEDULED AT YOUR CONVENIENCE • SAME DAY SERVICE • CAREFUL MOVING OF FURNITURE

BW0511

NEW PLAN–DESIGNED FOR CENTRAL OREGON VIEWS $ ONLY

SAVE UP TO

$

89,900

*

24.95

160

1. Subject to credit approval. Additional terms and conditions apply. See Store Associate for complete details and Rebate Form.

WITHOUT GARAGE!

ONLY $95,900 with attached garage!

Central Oregon (800) 970-0153

902 SE Textron Dr • Bend • 541.382.7911

• SPOT TREATMENT & TOUGH STAIN REMOVAL • NO HIDDEN CHARGES • LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED

By Mail-In Rebate1 on Goodyear® Assurance® ComforTred® Touring tires. Hurry in! Offer valid April 30, 2011 through July 30, 2011.

FIRST-TIME OFFER!

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE • 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189

CCB#181069

541-389-HOME

ALPINE DENTAL

www.HomeHeatingBend.com ®

D S CAR VICE L SER FINANCIA

“Wizard of Comfort”

Rooms too hot or too cold?

FREE

Duct Video & Performance Test

A $250 Value

CCB 191568

“Pre-Season” Heat Pump/ AC Tune Up!

SAVE $500

Family & Cosmetic Dentistry Modern, State of the Art Facility

SAVE $25

Premium Level 2-Speed Heat Pump

Expires 5/16/11

*Lower your utility over payment sale* Expires 5/16/11

Jack R. Miller D.M.D. Branden Ferguson D.D.S.

Expires 5/16/11 Call Today!

Allergy Relief Air Purification Systems

$

Special Oil Change Price!

32

15 OIL CHANGES!

murrayandholt.com

541-382-2222

3 Oil Changes (Gas)

Bend. d Street and Franklin in Right on the Corner of Thir Right on the Price.

S SERVICE HOUR 5:30pm M–F 7:30am to

Covers most vehicles. Diesels extra. Coupon expires 5/31/11.

Includes 5 QTS of oil, oil filter, inspection of belts, hoses, fluids, lights, tires, brakes The key tag includes three lube, oil & filters.

The cost is only $4596 per tag.

Special Oil Change Price!

$15.32 each

Special Oil Change Price!

Call your Bulletin Account Executive TODAY or call 541-382-1811 for more information about this and other opportunities!

Special Oil Change Price!

Special Oil Change Price!

ADVERTISING YOUR BUSINESS?

See back for more specials! ☛

Included features: • Split Bedrooms • 9’ Walls with Vault in Great Room • Large Front Porch with Timber Truss • See reverse side for loor plan

*Present coupon at time of service. Expires 5/31/2011

Interested in

164

ANY 4 AREAS CLEANED

ANY 2 AREAS & 1 HALL CLEANED

2 Rooms Cleaned

541-593-1799

$

$

$

Chem-Dry of Bend Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

Perfect for Ceramic, Porcelain, Slate, Granite and Travertine

20% OFF Tile, Stone & Grout Cleaning & Sealing 541-388-7374 Bend 541-923-3347 Redmond Offer valid with coupon only. Not valid with other offers. Minimums apply. Payment due at time of service. Expiration date: April 30, 2011.

Special Oil Change Price!

$50 OFF ANY SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE

$ 00

1 OFF Lunch

It’s the best thing you can do for your Audi, BMW, Volkswagen, or Porsche. Our trained techs will inspect, adjust and replace parts according to manufacture recommended specifications, time and mileage intervals. Includes labor, part & fluids.

($795 minimum purchase required) Discount applies to entire party Offer expires 5/31/11

11erthsary

Anniv

Dine In, Take Out | 541-389-9888 61247 S. Hwy 97 • Bend • Next to Bend Wal Mart www.reddragonchineserestaurant.com

$ 50

1 OFF Dinner

Interior: Clean carpets & trim Refresh fabric protection on seats (when applicable) & Deodorize Exterior: Wash, wax & buff & Detail wheels

*Please present offer at time of write up. Not to be combined with other offers. Not redeemable for advertised specials, previous purchases, or cash. Offer good through June 6, 2011.

($950 minimum purchase required) Discount applies to entire party Offer expires 5/31/11

$100 OFF COMPLETE D E TA I L I N G SPECIAL

M O T O R S

4 BRANDS, A THOUSAND POSSIBILITIES 1045 SE 3rd St • Bend • OR 541-382-1711 www.carreramotors.com


C

C

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

Your Trusted Source for Floor Care

Our Mission: To provide a growing number of people with top quality auto care in a trusting environment while developing the virtues of excellence, integrity, value and relationships.

Prolong the life of your carpet, stone and tile and keep them looking new with routine professional cleaning.

Trust ChemDry for a healthy home that is safe for kids and pets!

*Please present offer at time of write up. Not to be combined with other offers. Not redeemable for advertised specials, previous purchases, or cash. Offer good through June 6, 2011.

Chem-Dry of Bend

4 BRANDS, A THOUSAND POSSIBILITIES

M O T O R S

1045 SE 3rd St • Bend • OR • 541-382-1711 www.carreramotors.com

541-388-7374 Bend • 541-923-3347 Redmond

www.stevesautomot iveofbend.com

Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

Cleaner, Fresher, Healthier Indoor Air ... GUARANTEED! At Home Heating & Cooling, we may not be medical doctors, but we are air doctors. We know air. We know filtration. We know ventilation. And we know service. We can assemble an indoor air package that fits your family and budget. The food your family eats is regulated and inspected. The water your family drinks is tested and treated. When it comes to the air your family breathes, it’s all up to you. And when you can’t breathe, nothing else matters! Don’t wait. Call us today!

OFF

Dinner for Two. Any two dinner entrees* and two beverages COUPON VALID FOR PARTIES UP TO 6, A $30 VALUE.

murrayandholt.com

Loyalty Key Tag $122.96

541-382-2222

Bend d Street and Franklin in Right on the Corner of Thir Right on the Price.

Includes: 3 complete oil change services, 10 Qts of synthetic blend oil & filter, 21-point vehicle inspection

.

That’s just $40.98 per Oil Change Retail Value $239.85! Savings $116.89

S SERVICE HOUR 5:30pm M–F 7:30am to

We Cater to Cowards • Cosmetic: - Fillings - Crowns - Veneers - Dentures - Partials - Teeth Whitening • Extractions Including Wisdom Teeth

Friday Appointments Available

New Patients & Emergencies Welcome

541-548-5105

Call for FREE Information Package

(800) 970-0153

Alpine Dental

Offer expires 5/31/11

$

d.

Coupon expires 5/31/11

NE Neff Rd.

NE Pro

fession

al Ct.

$

195

27th St.

New customers only

OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 6/30/11.

DIESEL OIL CHANGE $40.98

(541) 382-2281

SAVE $120 with this coupon $170 value!

COUPON VALID FOR PARTIES UP TO 6 PEOPLE. Not valid with other offers or take-out. Please present coupon. Expires 6-30-11

SAVE! SAVE! SAVE!

49

2078 NE Professional Ct.

nR

CCB 191568

95

so

541-382-3173 HIDDEN IN RED OAK SQUARE • 1230 NE 3RD • BEND

$

ALPINE DENTAL

NE Williamson Blvd.

Fish House

With choice of soup or salad and bread and choice of baked potato, French fries, Rice or Vegetables

SPECIAL

Comprehensive Exam Includes: • X-rays • Oral Cancer Screening • Tooth and Gum Evaluation

am

Not valid with other offers or take-out. Please present coupon. Expires 6-30-11

LUNCH 11:30–2:30, MON–FRI | DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT

$18.95

NEW PATIENTS

illi

*Not valid with light side entrees or salads.

11:30-8:00

Serving regular menu and specialty omelets with dungeness crab, honey baked ham or LUNCH 11:30–2:30, | DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT fresh vegetableMON–FRI with cheese. Also serving corn bread muffins and zucchini bread

STEAK, LOBSTER & PRAWNS COMBO

W

www.HomeHeatingBend.com

$10

OPEN FOR MOTHER’S DAY

NE

541-389-HOME

Dr. Brandon L. Turley D.M.D., P.C.

We will visually inspect and report on: C.V. Joint Boots • Exhaust System • Fluid Levels • V-Belts Exterior Lights • Ball Joints & Tire Rods • Tire Wear & Air Pressure • Cooling System & Hoses FREE Estimate provided on needed Service & Parts

Our carpet cleaning equipment and solutions have received the Carpet & Rug Institute’s Seal of Approval. Our new Tile & Stone Clean and Seal Service is perfect for ceramic, porcelain, slate, granite and travertine.

P. 541.382.7911 902 SE Textron Dr • Bend, OR 97702

• Complete Family Dentistry • Insurance Billing • We Offer Nitrous Oxide • We Place & Restore Implants • Root Canals

FREE INSPECTION

Superior Carpet and Tile & Stone Cleaning

Full Service Auto Care Specialists Foreign & Domestic Mechanical Repair

15 OFF

ANY 5 AREAS CLEANED

UPHOLSTERY CLEANING

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 5/31/11.

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Sectional sofas may not be separated. Sofas over 7 feet and certain fabrics may incur additional charges. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 5/31/11.

Schedule Online at www.stanleysteemer.com Call for Free Estimate 541-706-9390 • 1-800-STEEMER WE ALSO OFFER YOU PEACE OF MIND AT NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE THROUGH: • ARRIVAL TIMES SCHEDULED AT YOUR CONVENIENCE • SAME DAY SERVICE • CAREFUL MOVING OF FURNITURE

• SPOT TREATMENT & TOUGH STAIN REMOVAL • NO HIDDEN CHARGES • LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED

The Phoenix Lounge New Plan Designed for Central Oregon Views!

5 14

W 4N

ple Ma

Rim

Full Service Bar Big Screen TVs • Bar Menu Drink Specials

Plan #1780

Ct.

Lunch Specials Include: Choice of select entrees Salad or Soup and Pork Fried Rice & Vegetable Low Mein Dine In, Take Out | 541-389-9888 61247 S. Hwy 97 • Bend • Next to Bend Wal Mart www.reddragonchineserestaurant.com

646 S.W. RIMROCK • REDMOND, OR

EVERY THURSDAY 6PM–CLOSE!

Interested in of Central Oregon

541-593-1799

MONEY-SAVING COUPONS! Lube, Oil, Filter & Tire Rotation We Use Synthetic Oil Blend Motor Oil

$

99

29

• Chassis Lube • Wash Exterior Front • New Oil Filter Window • Up to 5 Qts of 5W30 • Vacuum Front Kendall Synthetic Blend Floorboards • Tire Rotation • Top off most Fluids under the hood Most cars & light trucks. 3/4 & 1 Ton may require extra fee. Expires 5/31/11

BRAKE MAINTENANCE

Install new disc pads/shoes, resurface drums/rotors. Most cars per axle. Ceramic or carbon metallic pads extra if required. Starting at

$

99

119

Bearing Repack Extra

Most cars & light trucks. Expires 5/31/11

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE | 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189

IICRC Certiied Technician

ADVERTISING YOUR BUSINESS? Call your Bulletin Account Executive TODAY or call 541-382-1811 for more information about this and other opportunities!


C

C

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!! OPEN FOR MOTHER’S DAY

$10

11:30-8:00

OFF

Dinner for Two. Any two dinner entrees* and two beverages

Serving regular menu and specialty omelets with dungeness crab, honey baked ham or LUNCH 11:30–2:30, | DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT fresh vegetableMON–FRI with cheese. Also serving corn bread muffins and zucchini bread LUNCH 11:30–2:30, MON–FRI | DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT

Fish House

COUPON VALID FOR PARTIES UP TO 6, A $30 VALUE.

*Not valid with light side entrees or salads. Not valid with other offers or take-out. Please present coupon. Expires 6-30-11

541-382-3173 HIDDEN IN RED OAK SQUARE • 1230 NE 3RD • BEND

STEAK, LOBSTER & PRAWNS COMBO

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

We Cater to Cowards • Complete Family Dentistry • Insurance Billing • We Offer Nitrous Oxide • We Place & Restore Implants • Root Canals

$18.95 With choice of soup or salad and bread and choice of baked potato, French fries, Rice or Vegetables COUPON VALID FOR PARTIES UP TO 6 PEOPLE. Not valid with other offers or take-out. Please present coupon. Expires 6-30-11

• Cosmetic: - Fillings - Crowns - Veneers - Dentures - Partials - Teeth Whitening • Extractions Including Wisdom Teeth

Friday Appointments Available

New Patients & Emergencies Welcome

541-548-5105

Dr. Brandon L. Turley D.M.D., P.C.

646 S.W. RIMROCK • REDMOND, OR

OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 6/30/11.

$

15 OFF

$

195

ANY 5 AREAS CLEANED

UPHOLSTERY CLEANING

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 5/31/11.

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Sectional sofas may not be separated. Sofas over 7 feet and certain fabrics may incur additional charges. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 5/31/11.

of Central Oregon

541-593-1799

IICRC Certiied Technician

Schedule Online at www.stanleysteemer.com Call for Free Estimate 541-706-9390 • 1-800-STEEMER WE ALSO OFFER YOU PEACE OF MIND AT NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE THROUGH: • ARRIVAL TIMES SCHEDULED AT YOUR CONVENIENCE • SAME DAY SERVICE • CAREFUL MOVING OF FURNITURE

• SPOT TREATMENT & TOUGH STAIN REMOVAL • NO HIDDEN CHARGES • LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED

MONEY-SAVING COUPONS! Lube, Oil, Filter & Tire Rotation

$

99

29

We Use Synthetic Oil Blend Motor Oil

BRAKE MAINTENANCE

Call for FREE Information Package

$

(800) 970-0153

Install new disc pads/shoes, resurface drums/rotors. Most cars per axle. Ceramic or carbon metallic pads extra if required. Starting at

• Wash Exterior Front • Chassis Lube Window • New Oil Filter • Vacuum Front • Up to 5 Qts of 5W30 Kendall Synthetic Blend Floorboards • Top off most Fluids • Tire Rotation under the hood Most cars & light trucks. 3/4 & 1 Ton may require extra fee. Expires 5/31/11

11999 Bearing Repack Extra

New Plan Designed for Central Oregon Views!

5 14

W 4N

ple Ma

Rim

Plan #1780

Our Mission: To provide a growing number of people with top quality auto care in a trusting environment while developing the virtues of excellence, integrity, value and relationships.

Ct.

P. 541.382.7911 902 SE Textron Dr • Bend, OR 97702

Most cars & light trucks. Expires 5/31/11

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE | 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189

NEW PATIENTS

SPECIAL $

Comprehensive Exam Includes: • X-rays • Oral Cancer Screening • Tooth and Gum Evaluation

49

2078 NE Professional Ct.

(541) 382-2281

SAVE $120

NE Neff Rd.

am so

l Ct.

Cleaner, Fresher, Healthier Indoor Air ... GUARANTEED!

541-389-HOME

27th St.

illi

nR d.

Offer expires 5/31/11

a fession NE Pro

NE Williamson Blvd.

W

New customers only

Alpine Dental

NE

with this coupon $170 value!

www.stevesautomot iveofbend.com

At Home Heating & Cooling, we may not be medical doctors, but we are air doctors. We know air. We know filtration. We know ventilation. And we know service. We can assemble an indoor air package that fits your family and budget. The food your family eats is regulated and inspected. The water your family drinks is tested and treated. When it comes to the air your family breathes, it’s all up to you. And when you can’t breathe, nothing else matters! Don’t wait. Call us today!

ALPINE DENTAL

95

Superior Carpet and Tile & Stone Cleaning

Your Trusted Source for Floor Care Prolong the life of your carpet, stone and tile and keep them looking new with routine professional cleaning.

Trust ChemDry for a healthy home that is safe for kids and pets!

www.HomeHeatingBend.com CCB 191568

SAVE! SAVE! SAVE! DIESEL OIL CHANGE $40.98 Coupon expires 5/31/11

murrayandholt.com

541-382-2222

Our carpet cleaning equipment and solutions have received the Carpet & Rug Institute’s Seal of Approval. Our new Tile & Stone Clean and Seal Service is perfect for ceramic, porcelain, slate, granite and travertine.

Chem-Dry of Bend 541-388-7374 Bend • 541-923-3347 Redmond

Bend. d Street and Franklin in Right on the Corner of Thir Right on the Price.

S SERVICE HOUR 5:30pm M–F 7:30am to

Loyalty Key Tag $122.96 Includes: 3 complete oil change services, 10 Qts of synthetic blend oil & filter, 21-point vehicle inspection That’s just $40.98 per Oil Change Retail Value $239.85! Savings $116.89

Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

FREE INSPECTION W e will visually inspect and report on: C.V. Joint Boots • Exhaust System • Fluid Levels • V-Belts Exterior Lights • Ball Joints & Tire Rods • Tire Wear & Air Pressure • Cooling System & Hoses FREE Estimate provided on needed Service & Parts *Please present offer at time of write up. Not to be combined with other offers. Not redeemable for advertised specials, previous purchases, or cash. Offer good through June 6, 2011.

The Phoenix Lounge Full Service Bar Big Screen TVs • Bar Menu Drink Specials

Lunch Specials Include:

4 BRANDS, A THOUSAND POSSIBILITIES 1045 SE 3rd St • Bend • OR • 541-382-1711 www.carreramotors.com

61247 S. Hwy 97 • Bend • Next to Bend Wal Mart www.reddragonchineserestaurant.com

Interested in

ADVERTISING YOUR BUSINESS? Call your Bulletin Account Executive TODAY or call 541-382-1811 for more information about this and other opportunities!

Choice of select entrees Salad or Soup and Pork Fried Rice & Vegetable Low Mein Dine In, Take Out | 541-389-9888

M O T O R S

Full Service Auto Care Specialists Foreign & Domestic Mechanical Repair

EVERY THURSDAY 6PM–CLOSE!

Bulletin Daily Paper 05/03/11  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Tuesday May 3, 2011

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