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Lawmakers’ top priorities survive bill deadline Bend By Nick Budnick The Bulletin

IN THE LEGISLATURE

SALEM — Late last week, hundreds of bills fell victim to political inertia in Salem, causing Central Oregon lawmakers to take stock of where they are making progress, and where they are not. Friday marked a significant deadline in the process by which the Legislature winnows down the 3,000-plus bills that lawmakers, agencies and other elected officials intro-

duced at the start of the legislative session. Other than a small number of exceptions, every bill that had not been scheduled for a legislative committee vote died on April 8. The run-up to the deadline for many lawmakers meant vigorously lobbying their colleagues and others to try to get their bills a committee vote. The passing of the deadline means the Legislature has gotten one step closer to finishing its work. Lawmakers hope to shut down the Legislature by the end of June.

Tallying up the casualties and survivors among his bills, Rep. Gene Whisnant, RSunriver, says his top priority has garnered specific support. That’s his legislation to renew the Deschutes River basin groundwater mitigation program, which allows development despite water rights limitations in the Deschutes basin. He has shifted the language into a different bill to fold in amendments to deal with opponents’ concerns. See Bills / A6

CLEARING CASCADE LAKES HIGHWAY

may owe millions to utility Appeals court orders city to pay condemned Juniper Utility Co. By Nick Grube The Bulletin

A ruling by the Oregon Court of Appeals could mean the city of Bend will still be forced to pay millions of dollars for a private utility it condemned in 2002. It’s unclear exactly how much money might be at stake, but an attorney representing the former utility’s owner estimated the total cost to the municipality to be between $12 million and $14 million when factoring in legal fees and interest. Bend officials still have the opportunity to appeal the ruling to the Oregon Supreme Court, though as of Monday there was no decision on whether they would do so. “We’re still in an analytical stage,” City Manager Eric King said. “We’re looking at the ruling and what it might mean for our overall bottom line from a financial standpoint.” He said the City Council will decide whether to petition the Supreme Court to consider the case. The council is expected to discuss the matter at its April 20 meeting. The nearly 10-year-old case involves the condemnation of the Juniper Utility Co., which provided sewer and water services to about 1,125 customers in several neighborhoods in southeast Bend. See Juniper / A4

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Oregon Department of Transportation maintenance worker Dan Price clears the southbound lane of Cascade Lakes Highway near Forest Road 40 on Monday afternoon. Price said the goal is to reach Elk and Lava lakes by the opening weekend for fishing season.

County, state team up to plow route to popular fishing areas By Devo’n Williams The Bulletin

Deschutes County and the Oregon Department of Transportation have turned their plows and snowblowers loose on Cascade Lakes Highway, hoping to clear a path to popular fishing lakes before the season officially opens April 23. The county started clearing snow March 15 at Forest Road 40 near Crane Prairie Reservoir, moving north, said Roger Olson, operations manager with the county road department. But the county’s snowblower broke down, prompting a call for assistance to ODOT. The county

TOP NEWS INSIDE JAPAN: Nuclear threat level is raised, equating crisis to Chernobyl, Page A3

has contracted with the state agency to provide a snowblower and operator, which began work Monday near Lava Lake. A county bulldozer was breaking up snow near Elk Lake a few miles ahead, said Olson. The road might be clear all the way to Elk Lake by the beginning of the season, said Tom Blust, director of the county road department. When conditions are suitable, the snowblower is “chewing up and spitting out the snow” and moving it off to the side, said Peter Murphy, public information officer for ODOT. But this section of road is a popular route for snowmobiles, which pack the snow into ice. When the

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By David E. Sanger New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Three weeks ago, President Barack Obama ordered U.S. troops into the first “humanitarian war” on his watch, vowing to stop the forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi from massacring their A N A L Y S I S own people. Obama’s hope was that a quick application of power from the air would tip the balance, and the Libyan rebels would do the rest. Now with the Gadhafi forces weathering episodic attacks, and sometimes even gaining, the question in Washington has boiled down to this: Can Obama live with a stalemate? Asked Monday whether the United States could accept a cease-fire proposed by the African Union that would effectively leave Gadhafi in control of part of the country, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton hedged. See Libya / A4

The tactics of teaching the Civil War a roomful of suburban fourth-graders, 150 years after the nation’s deadliest WASHINGTON — Take an empty armed conflict began. Agner’s reenhalf-pint milk carton. Glue 12 Popsicle • Fourth-grade actment of the landmark naval Battle teacher sticks onto the sides and hold them in of Hampton Roads drew her class into holds mock place with a rubber band. Pretend it is a chapter of American history that has a wooden warship. slave auction, long provoked education debate. Now make another, and wrap both The war’s sesquicentennial, starting Page A4 vessels in aluminum foil. Float your today with the anniversary of the attwo “ironclads” in a plastic tub of watack on Fort Sumter in South Carolina, ter. Bombard them with blue marbles. Pretend provides a teachable moment for schools everythey are the Monitor and the Merrimack. where. But how and when students learn about “Guess who won this battle?” teacher Cindy slavery and secession, Ulysses S. Grant and Agner asks. Robert E. Lee, Bull Run (or Manassas) and Ap“No one,” the kids chorus. pomattox varies enormously from state to state, “This is what they call a draw.” school to school and even teacher to teacher. And this is how the Civil War comes to life for See Civil War / A6

By Nick Anderson

The Washington Post

Abby

snow becomes too hard for the snowblower, officials bring in a bulldozer to break it up. So far, says Murphy, the blower has been moving through the snow quickly. The goal, he says, is to leave nothing except a fine lawyer of snow on the road and let the sun finish it off. Meanwhile, heading to the south, a county grader is clearing the road toward Davis Lake. The county usually tries to clear the road all the way to Mount Bachelor by Memorial Day.

As Libyan conflict nears stalemate, U.S. policy strains

Inside

Evy Mages / The Washington Post

Virginia fourth-graders act out the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation. Fort Sumter, S.C., was attacked 150 years ago today, sparking the Civil War. Even today, teachers and school boards across the nation differ on how to teach the conflict.


A2 Tuesday, April 12, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn are:

6 17 19 25 36 44 Nobody won the jackpot Monday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $10.8 million for Wednesday’s drawing.

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Finding a case that suits you By Holly E. Thomas The Washington Post

Whether your wanderlust is satisfied by a worldwide jaunt or a quick getaway, odds are you’ve had a few struggles with luggage: deciding between a high-end set or a bargain bag, struggling with an unwieldy wheelie, or trying to determine which black suitcase is yours among the 50 at baggage claim. With prices all over the map and quality dependent on everything from small details to overall design, choosing a bag can be nearly as daunting as choosing a destination. We asked travel experts, including Wendy Perrin of Conde Nast Traveler magazine to divulge their tips for finding the best bags. Here are 10 things to know before you buy. 1. Globe-trotting vs. day-tripping If most of your trips are short, domestic jaunts, your best bet is a 22-inch carry-on. But if you’re taking a carry-on to far-flung locales — and more important, jetting between said locales — play it safe with a 20-inch bag, the maximum carry-on size allowed on many international flights. 2. Material matters “A material that’s waterproof is important, because you just never know when your wheelie is going to be in the rain,” says Perrin, who swears by the durability of ballistic nylon as opposed to polyester, leather or canvas. 3. Wheels up Wheels are a literal breaking point between poorly constructed bags and their high-end counterparts. Steve Cohen, owner of Lane’s Luggage in Washington, recommends ball-bearing wheels made of hard rubber. “On a cheap suitcase, [you get wheels] without ball bearings,” Cohen says. 4. What works in theory ... With luggage, form follows function, so don’t overlook the importance of design and construction. “When it comes to getting through an airport, what’s important to me — especially as a woman — is that my shoulder bag stays on my shoulder,” Perrin says. Look for rubber or nonslip straps for shoulder bags. 5. The warranty question Each expert noted the importance of a warranty. Although most moderate- to high-priced bags come with a warranty, not all are created equal: Briggs & Riley’s warranty covers all damage, including that caused by airlines; Tumi offers a five-year sliding warranty that covers airline damage for the first year. 6. Color clues “Look for the ‘off’ colors,” says Chris McGinnis, travel consultant and business travel editor at YouMustBeTrippin.com. “The other benefit is that other people won’t have that color, so you can find yours easily in a sea of black bags.” Neutral bags camouflage the grease and grime that come with regular travel. 7. Handle helpers “You want a handle that you can depress or pull up with only one hand,” Perrin says. Beyond ease, consider ergonomics. 8. First stop: a luggage store Visit a luggage store to see these crucial elements. “I think you should go test out bags in person, the same way [as] if you were buying a camera,” Perrin says. “See how it feels in your hand, see how it maneuvers.” 9. What to skip If you need to maximize your carry-on space, avoid bags that are highly compartmentalized. “In a carry-on wheelie bag, it’s best for me to have vast open space that I can fill however I want,” Perrin says. Also skip bags you can run through X-ray machines without removing your laptop. The TSA personnel may still ask you to take out your computer. 10. How to save Luggage stores often wind up with extra product they need to move. That translates to significant sales and promotions. The bottom line: Buying luggage is like buying real estate — you want the cheapest house in the most expensive neighborhood. It’s better to invest in one quality bag than two or three cheaper ones, so test-drive a few brands, then choose the least expensive model that suits you. Pay attention to details such as stitching and zippers, and make sure you understand the warranty.

Photo courtesy of Jenny Henry Designs

The resurgence in needlepoint is due in part to big names in the design world embracing it. This Jenny Henry Designs personalized pillow retails for $44.

A Renaissance in needlepoint By Terri Sapienza Photos courtesy of Amana, GE and KitchenAid

Paul Walterhoefer, of the appliance chain Bray & Scarff, recommends fridges at three price levels: Amana, 18.5 cubic feet, $1,399; GE Profile, 22 cubic feet, $1,999; KitchenAid, 27 cubic feet, $2,799.

Refrigerators get cool By Jura Koncius The Washington Post

The refrigerator, once the hulking white box of the kitchen, has morphed into much more than just a place to keep milk cold. With the rise of the trophy kitchen, the fridge is a more stylish, often stainless steel, status appliance. “It had a lot to do with MTV’s show ‘Cribs,’” says Jill Notini, spokeswoman for the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers, referring to the program featuring celebrity homes. “When they showed the kitchens, it was all about the fridge.”

Fridge figures Percentage of 50 refrigerators sold that are white; 28 percent are stainless steel and 18 percent black. (A limited selection is available in “beige tones.”) Percentage of U.S. households that own a refrigerator. Percentage of U.S. households that own two or more refrigerators. Average life expectancy of a refrigerator in years.

98 21 11-14

What’s new? Freezer placement. Although half the refrigerators manufactured still reflect the traditional top-freezer design, more and more consumers are choosing the bottom-freezer style that makes fresh food easier to reach. Design. The French door, or armoire style, is today’s go-to model. It works well in smaller kitchens because the doors aren’t as wide. Water. Many filtered-water dispensers are moving from outside the fridge door to inside. Most filters need to be replaced every six months; in some models, a red light tells you it’s time for a filter change. Saving energy. Most new average-size Energy Star refrigerators cost $50 to $60 a year to operate. If you have an old model in the basement, garage or any-

where else (sometimes called the “beer fridge”), you could be shelling out hundreds of dollars a year running it full-time. Bigger size. Consumers now need space for larger quantities of food and drink, says Ellis Mass, spokesman for LG Electronics: “Refrigerators over the past few years are carving out more capacity while taking up the same footprint.”

Operating tips Check for leaks. To make sure your door shuts tightly, close it on a dollar bill. Household columnist Heloise explains: “When you pull out the bill, there should be a little resistance. But if the dollar falls to the floor by itself, it’s time for you to get a new gas-

ket or realign the door.” Fill it up. Keeping your refrigerator full makes it more energy efficient; food absorbs the cold and helps keep surrounding items chilled. “If all you have in there is some mustard and a six-pack of beer, you are using a lot of energy to keep just a couple of things really cold,” says Mass. Keep it clean. Clean regularly under and behind your refrigerator, especially around the coils, to keep it working efficiently.

Shop smart Prices range from about $400 for a bare-bones, fullsize model to more than $13,000 for a built-in professional-style unit. Models are generally manufactured in widths from 30 to 36 inches. 1. Shop with measurements of your current fridge and your available space: height, width and depth. If space is tight, determine whether your door can open from the right, left or both. 2. If you are going stainless, consider whether the unit is full stainless or has only a stainless front. If it’s the latter, check what color the sides are painted and whether they’ll show after it’s installed. 3. If you’re buying a unit with a water or ice dispenser, make sure your favorite glass will fit under it.

The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — It wasn’t long ago that the word “needlepoint” conjured up thoughts of dusty cushions with fusty florals. But in recent years, thanks to a handful of retailers, designers and enthusiasts, the craft has become cool again. “There’s been a new look for needlepoint in the last five years,” says Susan Battle, owner of the Point of It All needlepoint shop. “There are more graphics, brighter colors, cleaner designs. ... It’s not an old, stuffy hobby anymore.” Needlepoint is a form of embroidery done by stitching fibers through an open-mesh canvas. It can be bought as a finished product (such as a pillow), or as a do-it-yourself project with a hand-painted canvas or a computer-generated kit. The resurgence of needlepoint is due in part to big names in the design world embracing it. Designer and potter Jonathan Adler and clothing and textile designer Trina Turk both sell premade needlepoint items in their shops, helping to introduce the craft to new demographics. At her full-service store, Battle, 32, sells hand-painted canvases that she can finish into just about anything after the stitching is done, including doorstops, pillows, purses, rugs, belts, Christmas ornaments and custom house portraits. Needlepoint can be a pricey hobby (Battle’s canvases run from $30 to $800), but the handmade results are often future heirlooms. Essentially, says Battle of her artistically rendered offerings, “You’re buying a work of art, and you’re adding to it.”

Gas prices a drag for summer road-trippers By Nancy Trejos The Washington Post

Prep work

Shanna and Kevin Kurpe had plotted out an ambitious RV road trip that would have taken them to 48 states in 48 weeks. That was before the Middle East turmoil drove the average price of a gallon of regular gas above $3.50 nationwide. The Kurpes crunched the numbers and reached a sad conclusion: $200 a month for gas wouldn’t take them very far. So the Florida couple gave up on their dream and hatched a new plan. They’d leave their trip to chance and see where 300 miles a month would get them. “We’re just going to have to play it by ear and see how it goes,” said Shanna. America’s love affair with the road could be running out of gas. The road trip was once the cheapest way for families, college students and frugal travelers to vacation. Now, these road warriors are feeling the pain at the pump. And it could get worse. The U.S. Energy Information Administration says that the average price of gas could surpass $4 per gallon this summer. In 2008, the last time there was such a dramatic spike, fewer travelers took to the roads, according to AAA. You don’t need to give up so easily, though, road-trippers. With a few cost-saving strategies, you can still make it to Disney World. Here’s some expert advice on the best strategies for hitting the road.

Tap into technology. The smart road-tripper uses a smart phone to find out where to get cheap gas, using apps such as Gas Buddy and AAA’s TripTik Mobile. If you don’t have a smart phone, just log on to Web sites such as GasPriceWatch.com, GasBuddy. com, FuelMeUp.com, BillShrink. com and Gasprices.Mapquest. com from any computer. Planning your route carefully is the best way to save money, says AAA Mid-Atlantic spokesman John Townsend. Log onto AAA’s Fuelcostcalculator.com to get an estimate of how much you’ll spend on gas, then use it to plan the most direct route to your destination. Choose your vehicle carefully. Leave the gas-guzzling SUV at home. Renting a car might be cheaper. But not just any car. “Sacrificing an amenity like power-adjustable seats may be worth it if the car has a higher miles-per-gallon rating,” said Carrie Meo, director of fixed operations for Darling’s, a chain of automotive dealerships. Consider a membership with a pay-as-you-go car company. The daily rate at Zipcar and Connect by Hertz, for instance, entitles you to 180 miles without paying for gas or insurance. Time for a tuneup. If you take your own car, tune it up, change the oil, top off the fluids and inflate the tires. The U.S. Department of Energy estimates that fixing a car that’s out of tune or has failed an emissions test can improve its gas mileage by an average of 4 percent. Keeping your tires prop-

erly inflated boosts your mileage by 3.3 percent. And using the manufacturer’s recommended grade of motor oil will cause a 1 to 2 percent jump. Pack light. Overpacking is a drag, literally, on your car. Don’t even think about putting up that roof rack. A loaded rack can decrease your fuel economy by 5 percent, the Energy Department estimates. An extra 100 pounds reduces fuel economy by 1 to 2 percent.

On the road Watch the speed limit. You’re on the road. You’ve got miles of highway ahead of you. You want to go as fast as you can. Don’t. Gas mileage tends to decrease at speed limits above 60 mph. Every 5 mph above 60 is like paying an additional 24 cents per gallon, according to the Energy Department. Aggressive driving in general wreaks havoc on gas mileage. Rapid acceleration and braking can lower mileage by 33 percent on highways and 5 percent on city streets. “A smoother driving,

less aggressive style will often pay dividends, even in a highperformance car,” said Robert Hills, education program manager for the Universal Technical Institute, which specializes in automotive technology education. Using cruise control on highways to maintain a constant speed could also save gas. And using overdrive gears keeps your engine speed down, preserving fuel and also reducing engine wear. Turn off the engine. Hills advises against idling the engine for long periods of time while stationary. “Switch it off if you can,” he said. “Your engine will generally use more fuel doing this than in normal driving situations.” Drive at off-peak hours. This can help you avoid getting stuck in traffic. And consider getting a GPS so you’re not driving around aimlessly trying to find your way.

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T S Japan equates accident with Chernobyl By Hiroko Tabuchi and Keith Bradsher New York Times News Service

TOKYO — Japan has decided to raise its assessment of the accident at the crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant to the worst rating on an international scale, putting the disaster on par with the 1986 Chernobyl explosion, the Japanese nuclear regulatory agency said Tuesday. The decision to raise the alert level to 7 from 5 on the scale amounts to an admission that the accident at the nuclear facility, brought on by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, is likely

Pakistan pushes for drastic cuts in CIA activities By Jane Perlez and Ismail Khan New York Times News Service

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — Pakistan has demanded that the United States steeply reduce the number of CIA operatives and Special Operations forces working in Pakistan, and that it put on hold CIA drone strikes aimed at militants in northwest Pakistan. The request was a sign of the near collapse of cooperation between the two testy allies. Pakistani and U.S. officials said in interviews that the demand that the United States scale back its presence was the immediate fallout from the arrest in Pakistan of Raymond Davis, a CIA security officer who killed two men in January during what he said was an attempt to rob him. In all, about 335 U.S. personnel — CIA officers and contractors and Special Operations forces — were being asked to leave the country, said a Pakistani official closely involved in the decision. It was not clear how many CIA personnel that would leave behind; the total number in Pakistan has not been disclosed. But the cuts demanded by the Pakistanis amounted to 25 to 40 percent of U.S. Special Operations forces in the country, the officials said. The number also included the removal of all the U.S. contractors used by the CIA in Pakistan. The demands appeared severe enough to badly hamper U.S. efforts — either through drone strikes or Pakistani military training — to combat militants who use Pakistan as a base to fight U.S. forces in Afghanistan and plot terrorist attacks abroad. The reductions were demanded by the chief of the Pakistani army, Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, said Pakistani and U.S. officials, who requested anonymity. The scale of the Pakistani demands emerged as Lt. Gen. Ahmed Shuja Pasha, the head of Pakistan’s chief spy agency, the Inter-Services Intelligence Directorate, or the ISI, arrived in Washington on Monday for nearly four hours of meetings with the CIA director, Leon Panetta, and Adm. Mike Mullen, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

to have substantial and long-lasting consequences for health and for the environment. Some in the nuclear industry have been saying for weeks that the accident released large amounts of radiation, but Japanese officials had played down this possibility. The new estimates by Japanese authorities suggest that the total amount of radioactive materials released so far is equal to about 10 percent of that released in the Chernobyl accident, said Hidehiko Nishiyama, deputy director general of Japan’s nuclear regulator, the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency.

Nishiyama stressed that unlike at Chernobyl, where the reactor itself exploded and fire fanned the release of radioactive material, the containments at the four troubled reactors at Fukushima remained intact over all. But at a separate news conference, an official from the plant’s operator, Tokyo Electric and Power, said, “The radiation leak has not stopped completely and our concern is that it could eventually exceed Chernobyl.” On the International Nuclear Event Scale, a Level 7 nuclear accident involves “widespread health and environmental ef-

fects” and the “external release of a significant fraction of the reactor core inventory.” Japan’s previous rating of 5 placed the Fukushima accident at the same level as the Three Mile Island accident Pennsylvania in 1979. Level 7 has been applied only to the disaster at Chernobyl in the former Soviet Union. Also on Monday, tens of thousands of people bowed their heads in silence at 2:46 p.m., exactly one month since the 9.0-magnitude earthquake and ensuing tsunami brought widespread destruction to Japan’s northeast coast. The mourning was punctuated

by another strong aftershock near Japan’s Pacific coast, which briefly set off a tsunami warning, killed a 16-year-old girl and knocked out cooling at the severely damaged Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station for almost an hour, underscoring the vulnerability of the plant’s reactors to continuing seismic activity. This morning, there was another strong aftershock, which shook Tokyo. The authorities have already ordered people living within a 12-mile radius of the plant to evacuate, and recommended that people remain indoors or avoid an area within a radius of 18 miles.

IVORY COAST

Gbagbo’s arrest ends deadly standoff By Adam Nossiter, Scott Sayare and Dan Bilefsky New York Times News Service

ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast — The strongman of Ivory Coast, Laurent Gbagbo, was captured and taken into custody by his rival Monday, ending a four-month standoff that left hundreds dead in this once-prosperous West African nation, put international diplomacy to a severe test and ultimately dragged the country back into civil war. With French helicopters in the skies nearby, Gbagbo surrendered to his rival’s forces as they stormed his residence, sending his chief of staff outside to signal his defeat. For months, African diplomats and heads of state had shuttled back and forth to Abidjan, pleading with Gbagbo to step down after losing a presidential election last year. The United Nations, the United States and the European Union demanded his resignation, imposing severe economic sanctions that crippled the economy — but failed to push Gbagbo from power. Instead, it took devastating airstrikes by French and U.N. helicopters to help end Gbagbo’s gamble to defy the international community, fight off his rival, Alassane Ouattara, and extend his 10-year rule. U.N. and French officials, wary of being seen as exceed-

Rebecca Blackwell / The Associated Press

Residents take to the street to celebrate the capture of Laurent Gbagbo, in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, on Monday. Gbagbo was captured Monday by the forces of elected leader Alassane Ouattara. ing their mandate by enforcing regime change, insisted that their actions were solely intended to protect civilians, entirely independent of the final push to capture Gbagbo by his rival’s forces. President Barack Obama commended the French and the United Nations, saying Gbagbo’s “illegitimate claim to power has

finally come to an end.” But the arrest did not spell the end of the crisis, analysts warned. The airstrikes are expected to infuriate the many Gbagbo supporters who embraced his anti-Western fervor. Even though Ouattara is recognized internationally as the winner of last year’s election, Gbagbo supporters may now have

even more reason to see him as illegitimate, forced upon them by outside intervention. Ouattara’s standing overseas will be also be tested by accusations that forces loyal to him killed hundreds of civilians as they swept across the country, weakening his reputation as the one with the higher moral ground in the standoff.

LIBYA

Rebels reject African Union’s cease-fire plan By Kareem Fahim New York Times News Service

BENGHAZI, Libya — Rebel leaders here rejected a plan presented Monday by the African Union for a cease-fire and an end to the eight-weekold conflict in Libya, saying it did not meet their basic demand that Moammar Gadhafi, his sons and his inner circle leave immediately. The rebels also faulted the proposal for calling for reform within the current Libyan political system. “We will not negotiate with the blood of our martyrs,” said the rebel national council chairman, Mustafa Abdul Jalil. “We will die with them or be victorious.” The visit by the African Union negotiators came hours after the delegation had left meetings in Tripoli with Gadhafi, who said he accepted what they called a “road map” for a political settlement involving a cease-fire and the suspension of NATO airstrikes. But as the delegates arrived in Benghazi, they faced a chilly reception, as hundreds of protesters implored the rebel leadership not to accept anything less than the departure of Gadhafi and his family. Foreign governments, perhaps reacting to the rebels’ repeated messages, seem less likely to press them into negotiations with Gadhafi. In Washington, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton reiterated the Obama administration’s call for Gadhafi to leave power and exit the country. “We believe, too, that there needs to be a transition that reflects the will of the Libyan people and the departure of Gadhafi from power and from Libya,” Clinton said. She said the United States would welcome a cease-fire, but she insisted on clear conditions.

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New translation of Roman Missal is unclear, many Catholics say By Laurie Goodstein New York Times News Service

Throughout much of the English-speaking world, the Roman Catholic Church is preparing its priests and parishes for the most significant changes to the Mass in the more than 40 years since the church permitted English in place of the Latin. The changes are included in a new English-language translation of the Roman Missal, a translation produced after almost 30 years of labor, intrigue and infighting. The new missal, the book of texts and prayers used in the Mass,

is intended to be closer to the liturgical Latin that was used for centuries than the current version. The church officials promoting it say it will bring an elevated reverence and authenticity to the Mass. Many Catholics who prefer a more traditional liturgy are eagerly anticipating the change. But after getting a glimpse of the texts in recent months, thousands of priests in the United States, Ireland and Australia have objected that the translation is awkward, archaic and inaccessible. Although most are resigned to adopting the new missal, some have mounted campaigns to prevent it from being introduced.

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U.S. Catholics will first encounter the new missal Nov. 27, the first Sunday of Advent, the start of the liturgical year and the season leading up to Christmas. “The first time I saw some of the texts, I was shocked,” said the Rev. Richard Hilgartner, who as executive director of the U.S. bishops’ Secretariat of Divine Worship is overseeing the introduction of the new missal in the United States. “But the more time I’ve spent with it, the more comfortable I became with it,” he said. “The new translation tries to be more faithful to the Scriptures, and a little more poetic and evocative in terms of imagery and metaphor.”

Tornado damage heavy in Iowa and Wisconsin By A.G. Sulzberger New York Times News Service

Fred Standa, the mayor of Mapleton, Iowa, was sitting on his porch Saturday watching the black cloud boiling up from the horizon when storm sirens blared a warning through town. Suddenly the cloud spit out a tornado funnel into the empty farmland. “Like everyone says, it sounds like a freight train coming towards you,” he said. “But I didn’t wait around to listen.” The tornado, which hit at 7:20 p.m. and was later identified as a Category 3 tornado with winds as high as 165 miles an hour, was the largest of 27 reported in Iowa on Saturday, said

a spokesman for the National Weather Service. There were no fatalities. The following day, seven tornadoes were reported in Wisconsin. One tore through a section of Merrill, destroying 50 to 60 buildings and scattering debris for miles, said Bob Odegard, the fire chief. “We had to dig quite a few people out of their homes,” Odegard said. There were no serious injuries, he said. But the damage was severe in Mapleton, a town of about 1,200 people in western Iowa. About 100 homes and many businesses were destroyed. Some of the old trees that gave the town its name were uprooted like weeds.

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Va. teacher holds mock slave auction Trying to bring a Civil War history lesson to life, teacher Jessica Boyle turned her fourth grade Norfolk, Va. classroom into a slave auction: She ordered black and mixed race students to one side of the classroom. Then, the white students took turns buying them. Parent complaints began rolling in shortly after the April 1 les-

son, and the principal at Sewells Point Elementary School, Mary Wrushen, wrote to parents last week that Boyle had gone too far. “The lesson could have been thought through more carefully, as to not offend her students or put them in an uncomfortable situation,” Wrushen wrote. Lessons on the Civil War have long been among the most sensitive topics in Virginia classrooms, many located near the grounds

of the Confederacy’s bloodiest battles. And the role that slavery played in the conflict’s origins has been particularly controversial. Boyle’s attempt to drive home the connection between slavery and war took place in an elementary school named for one of Virginia’s earliest Civil War skirmishes, the Battle of Sewells Point, which was fought within sight of campus grounds, near the mouth of Hampton Roads.

Boyle taught her lesson less than two weeks before the 150th anniversary of the conflict. “She had not conducted a mock slave auction in class before,” Norfolk public schools spokeswoman Elizabeth Thiel Mather wrote in a statement. She added that “appropriate personnel action is being taken” but would not discuss the details. Boyle has been teaching in Norfolk for six years.

company, he said. The results showed that the oil had not just been diluted with water but that it had largely been eaten by naturally occurring bacteria. Researchers worried early on that such bacteria might not exist thousands of feet down or that the process of digestion might be particularly slow because of colder temperatures at these depths. But Hazen’s group found bacteria that specialized in oil eating in frigid temperatures. Another byproduct of the spill was roughly 200,000 metric tons of methane gas. In June 2010 there was as much as 100,000 times as much methane dissolved gas in the gulf as normal. Scientists worried that it could remain dissolved in the water column, depleting oxygen levels, for years. But by fall, researchers from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and Texas A&M took water samples from 207 sites near the spill and found that methane proportions were back to normal. John Kessler, an oceanographer at Texas A&M, said: “It appeared that the methane would be present in the gulf for years to come. Instead, methane respiration rates increased to levels higher than have ever been recorded.” To read the full version of this New York Times story, visit www.nytimes.com.

Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

Sewells Point’s fourth grade class is about 40 percent black and 40 percent white. Calls made to Boyle through the school’s communications department were not returned. Last month, an Ohio television station reported that a teacher at an elementary school near Columbus divided a fourth grade class into slaves and masters.

Nearly a year after spill, Gulf studies yield more than damage A sea turtle swims through oxidizing oil mingling with chemical dispersants used by BP to break up oil in the Gulf of Mexico on May 5, 2010.

New York Times News Service

In the year since the wellhead beneath the Deepwater Horizon rig began spewing rust-colored crude into the northern Gulf of Mexico, scientists have been working frantically to figure out what environmental harm really came of the largest oil spill in U.S. history. What has emerged in studies so far is not a final tally of damage, but a new window on the complexities of the gulf, and the vulnerabilities and capacities of biological systems in the face of environmental insults. There is no doubt that gulf water, wildlife and wetlands sustained injury when, beginning on April 20 last year, some 4.9 million barrels of oil and 1.84 million gallons of dispersants poured into the waters off Louisiana. But the ecosystem was not passive in the face of this assault. The gulf, which experiences a natural seepage of millions of gallons of oil a year, had the innate capacity to digest some of crude and the methane gas mixed with it. Almost as soon as the well was capped, the deep became cleaner to the eye. By the same token, dozens of miles of marsh still remain blackened by heavy oil, government crews are still grooming away tar balls that wash up ceaselessly on beaches and traces of the dispersants are still found floating in the currents. Biologists are nervously monitoring as yet unexplained dolphin strandings this year, trying to come up with a realistic count of birds and mammals killed during the spill and working to understand what happens when the gulf floor is covered with the remains of oil-eating bacteria. “It is really kind of hard to get a grasp of the big picture, and it is not for a lack of trying,” said Christopher Reddy, a senior scientist at the Woods Hole Ocean-

Libya Continued from A1 First, she said, the Libyan government would have to allow food, water and electricity into cities it has cut off and allow in humanitarian assistance. Then, she added, “These terms are non-negotiable.” But she immediately reiterated that ultimately nothing could be resolved without “the departure of Gadhafi from power, and from Libya.” The statement seemed to underscore the limbo the administration finds itself in, with the rebels unable to achieve regime change on their own, and Washington and its NATO allies hesitant to leap deeper into a civil war. Obama’s decision to join the military intervention in Libya may well be judged a failure if the initial result is a muddle or a partition of the country, an outcome that his own defense secretary, Robert Gates, declared less than a month ago would be a “a real formula for insecurity.” If the country’s civil war drags on, Obama will almost certainly have to answer a rising chorus of critics that he entered the battle too late, began to exit too early, and overestimated a very inexperienced, disorganized rebel movement. Sen. John McCain, the Arizona senator who ran for president against Obama in 2008, has been the chief critic, arguing that a stalemate was baked into the strategy. “If we had declared a no-fly zone early on, three or four weeks ago, Gadhafi would not be in power today,” McCain said last week. “So now the Libyan people are paying a very high price in blood because of our failure to act, and because of this overwhelming priority of having to act multilaterally.” In interviews, senior administration officials urge patience. The first NATO strikes, they note, were only 23 days ago.

Nicole Bengiveno New York Times News Service

ographic Institution who studies long-term consequences of oil spills. “Hundreds of scientists are working day and night trying to carve out a piece of that giant puzzle, but it is an entire region and it is complicated.” How the regional ecosystem has responded, its strengths and weaknesses, will keep scientists busy analyzing data for years and help them in understanding the effects of environmental disasters.

After an oil spill, the government is responsible for toting up the ecological damages in something called a Natural Resource Damage Assessment. The document, which requires battalions of researchers, makes the case for damages that the companies responsible for the spill should pay to restore the ecosystem to its pre-spill health. The companies hire their own teams of assessors, who might paint a very different picture. The two sides settle or go to court. At of the end of January, the government said its scientists alone had taken 35,000 images, walked more than 4,000 miles of shoreline and culled more than 40,000 samples of water, sediment and tissue. The scientists are also testing how to estimate what they

can’t count precisely, like animal deaths. One group of evaluators is scattering bird carcasses offshore and measuring how many sink and how many wash ashore. Those numbers will be used to calculate how many birds may have died in addition to the ones that were found and counted. For all this effort, it will take time for some of the consequences to manifest themselves. It was three years after the Exxon Valdez spill in Prince William Sound in Alaska, for example, that the herring fishery suddenly collapsed. During the Deepwater Horizon disaster, as the slick was spreading, the federal Fish and Wildlife Service moved about 28,000 eggs from turtles’ nests on at-risk beaches in Alabama to the coast of Florida. While 51 percent of the eggs hatched — roughly consistent with normal survival rates — it will be another two decades or so before the hatchlings that survive come back to Florida as adults to lay eggs. Only then will anyone know how successful the rescue effort really was. Many of the results that have been gained so far, by government or private industry, are not yet public; they are awaiting rigorous review before eventual release. Moreover, in some key cases, scientists must keep their findings confidential because of

Gadhafi, they say, has been badly wounded by the rebellion and is still reeling from the defection of a few key allies and the loss of billions in revenue that he used buy loyalty. Tommy Vietor, the spokesman for the National Security Council, argues that the key to ultimate success is “continued messaging to Gadhafi’s inner circle that the writing is on the wall.” But, Vietor added: “Unilateral, open-ended military action to pursue regime change isn’t good strategy, and wouldn’t advance American credibility anywhere. Stopping a massacre, building an international coalition, and tightening the squeeze on Gadhafi as a part of an international coalition is in our interest, and that’s what we’re going to do.” Over time, that strategy might yet work. But clearly the administration is gambling on catching a break — perhaps an army uprising, the gradual starvation of a regime addicted to cash, maybe a stray bullet or lucky missile strike that ends a dictator’s 40year rule. But as Obama frequently noted when he was in the Senate criticizing the U.S. approach to Iraq and Afghanistan, hope is not a strategy. Gary Bass, a Princeton professor who ranks among the foremost scholars of humanitarian interventions, noted recently that Obama’s caution about those two wars applies equally to brief interventions to save lives. “Humanitarian wars, like all wars, tend to escalate,” Bass said. He expressed sympathy for Obama’s position, he said, because “all the criticism he gets now is from a world that didn’t see a massacre in Benghazi,” he said, referring to the city that appeared on the brink of slaughter when the no-fly zone was enforced on March 19. “We’ll never know what that might have looked like.” But Bass added that the risks were high. “Modern civil wars

last years,” he said, “and this could go on for a very long time. And when you intervene, people tend to say you have to intervene more.” The longer Gadhafi remains in power, others note, the greater the chance that he will lash out with some attempt at retaliation, perhaps a terrorist attack outside the country that would have echoes of Libya’s bombing of Pan Am 103 more than 22 years ago. One senior counterterrorism official said “this is a scenario that clearly has us concerned.” Part of Obama’s difficulty has its roots in the fact that the U.S. goal in dealing with Libya is at odds with the U.N. goal. Though this White House steers clear of the words “regime change,” officials make clear that is what they want. “There needs to be a transition that reflects the will of the Libyan people and the departure of Gadhafi from power and from Libya,” Clinton said Monday. That is also France’s avowed goal. Other key members of the coalition also stood firm Monday. “The future of Libya should include the departure of Gadhafi,” Foreign Minister Franco Frattini of Italy said in London, where he was meeting with Foreign Secretary William Hague. But while it may want Gadhafi out, the White House insists that the military action in Libya is intended solely to protect civilians, noting that the United Nations did not authorize anyone to overthrow Gadhafi. And that leaves Obama with a vexing choice, between living with a civil war that may drag on for weeks, months or years, at a gradually rising human cost, and becoming more deeply involved, either directly or through NATO, in a third war in a Muslim nation. “We’re not in a good place,” an Obama adviser acknowledged last week, on a day when rebel forces seemed particularly hapless and disorganized.

An army in hot pursuit

continuing legal actions. “We have a real responsibility to make sure that we come out of this process with as much compensation as is appropriate for the damages,” said Bob Haddad, chief of the assessment and restoration division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which is taking the lead in coordinating the damage assessment. “I don’t want to get tripped on issues like inadmissibility of evidence.”

Oil and water do mix Still, there has been some independent scientific work done in the gulf, and it has produced some good news. Because the spill occurred at very high pressure a mile beneath the ocean’s surface, some of the oil was reduced to tiny droplets that remained suspended thousands of feet deep in a fine mist. Terry Hazen, who leads the ecology department at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, took 170 samples from around the Deepwater Horizon between July 27 and Aug. 26 last year, just weeks after the wellhead was capped. Hazen was looking to track the fate of the underwater oil as it spread and instead found it to be entirely gone. “We can detect down to two parts per billion,” he said, “but nothing was there.” His work was financed by a grant his lab won from BP, the owner of the well, long before the spill, and it was not in any way reviewed or influenced by the

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Continued from A1 After receiving complaints from residents about poor service, the city acted in 2002 to take over the utility. But because the city and the utility’s owner, Jan Ward, could not agree on a fair price, the matter was taken to Deschutes County Circuit Court, where Judge Stephen Tiktin determined the value of the company’s assets to be about $6.9 million. Tiktin’s ruling, made in 2007, also included orders for the city to pay Ward’s nearly $2 million in legal fees as well as $3 million on interest on the judgment that accrued since the municipality took over the utility. City officials, however, disagreed with Tiktin’s valuation of the utility plant — essentially believing he should have calculated the worth to be $0 — and challenged his decision, taking the case to the Court of Appeals. Last week the court sided with Tiktin’s method of calculation. “We’re certainly pleased that the Court of Appeals adopted the trial court’s valuation methodology,” said Bill Buchanan, the attorney representing Ward. “We look forward to resolving the case with the city so that both parties can move forward.” While the Court of Appeals ruled that the calculation of how much the utility was worth was valid, it remanded portions of Tiktin’s original ruling back to the circuit court for additional consideration. Some of the determinations that must be made involve the accrual of interest, attorneys’ fees and how much a nine-hole golf course that dried up from a lack of water is worth. The city has already paid Ward about $3.5 million as part of the condemnation case. The city has an additional $6.9 million set aside from its sewer and water fund to help cover additional costs. As of 2007, the city had spent more than $2.2 million on its long-standing legal battle over the condemnation. It’s also estimated that at that time the city had spent nearly $2 million on improving the utility infrastructure.

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A4 Tuesday, April 12, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 12, 2011 A5

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XIAFLEX® is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with Dupuytren’s contracture when a “cord” can be felt. Over time, the thickening of this cord in your hand can cause one or more fingers to bend toward your palm, so that you cannot straighten them. XIAFLEX should be injected into the cord by a healthcare provider who is experienced in injection procedures of the hand and treating people with Dupuytren’s contracture. XIAFLEX helps to break down the cord that is causing the finger to be bent.

Before receiving XIAFLEX, tell your healthcare provider if you have had an allergic reaction to a previous XIAFLEX injection, or have a bleeding problem or any other medical conditions. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Be sure to tell them if you use blood thinners such as aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix®), prasugrel hydrochloride (Effient®), or warfarin sodium (Coumadin®).

If you have Dupuytren’s contracture, the rope-like cord you feel in the palm of your hand will continue to cause your fingers to bend toward your palm, and may worsen over time.

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Common side effects with XIAFLEX include: swelling of the injection site or the hand, bleeding or bruising at the injection site; and pain or tenderness of the injection site or the hand, swelling of the lymph nodes (glands) in the elbow or underarm, itching, breaks in the skin, redness or warmth of the skin, and pain in the underarm.


A6 Tuesday, April 12, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Student loan debt mounts, shifting graduates’ options By Tamar Lewin New York Times News Service

Dayna Smith / The Washington Post

Fourth-graders Anish Kapur, June Kwak and Alyssa Johnson take part in a lesson at their Lorton, Va., school on the Civil War, a chapter of American history that has long provoked education debate.

Civil War Continued from A1 This year, Virginia learned anew the sensitivity of Civil War education when the state Board of Education withdrew approval of a fourth-grade textbook, “Our Virginia: Past and Present,” that asserted thousands of African Americans fought for the South. Most historians reject that claim. Last year, the Texas State Board of Education voted to require eighth-graders to study the inaugural address of Confederate President Jefferson Davis alongside President Abraham Lincoln’s first and second inaugurals and his Gettysburg Address. That was one of many controversial revisions to Texas standards. Jeremy Stern, a historian who reviewed state academic standards this year for the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, said differences in the timing and scope of Civil War education nationwide are dramatic. Often, he said, the war is not taught systematically until middle school. The big question: Why? For elementary teachers, a central challenge is to explain why the war happened. Edward Ayers, president of the University of Richmond and a historian who has written about the Civil War and the South, recalled one day when his 11-year-old daughter walked into his study with a textbook and asked, “Daddy, what caused the Civil War?” “I paused a moment,” Ayers said, “calculated the costs and benefits of trying to explain historic complexity to a young person, and said, ‘Slavery, honey.’ “ As Ayers elaborated in an e-mail: “That’s the bedrock of everything else that happened, even though white people at the time, especially in the North, might not have felt it so directly. They would have said they fought to maintain the federal government and the Union. But Americans would not have been arguing about that in the first place without the challenges slavery presented.” The bottom line for young students, agreed William Davis, a Virginia Tech historian: “Slavery led to secession, and secession led to the war. But even that so oversimplifies it.”

“The Union didn’t like slavery because they thought it’s wrong. I agree with them. And it’s not nice to make people do things they don’t want to do.” — Dominique Pham, 10, fourth-grader learning about the American Civil War South Carolina, where the war started, asks third-graders to “summarize the institution of slavery prior to the Civil War”; explain the reasons for the state’s secession, “including the abolitionist movement, states’ rights and the desire to defend South Carolina’s way of life”; and outline the course of the war and the state’s role in it. Arizona asks third-graders to “recognize that there were issues (e.g., slavery, states’ rights, South seceded from the Union) associated with the Civil War.” Maryland calls for fourth-graders to “analyze regional differences in the Civil War” and “explain why loyalties to the North and South were divided” in the state. D.C. schools teach about the Emancipation Proclamation and the end of slavery in the nation’s capital to fifth-graders. In Virginia, scene of so many crucial battles, schools capitalize on their location to teach fourthgraders about a war that literally split the state. Agner’s school, Laurel Hill Elementary in Fairfax County, Va., is about 20 miles southeast of the battlefield where a Confederate general named Thomas Jackson earned the nickname “Stonewall” in July 1861. The school represents an ethnic mosaic that 19th-century Virginians scarcely could have imagined: Sixty languages are spoken in the homes of its students, the most common being Korean, Vietnamese and Spanish. Through 45-minute lessons over six weeks in February and March, Agner, 31, immersed students in the war that she usually calls the Civil War, though she also tells students it is sometimes called the War Between the States, often identified with proConfederate views.

Her students read aloud from the play “Mary Chesnut and her Diary,” dramatizing Virginians’ torn feelings about secession in early 1861. They studied a map with states colored blue for most of the Union, gray for the Confederacy, green for slave states that stayed in the Union and yellow for the Union-loyalist state carved out of the Old Dominion in 1863 — West Virginia. They learned about the industrializing North and agricultural South, the fallout from Abraham Lincoln’s election in 1860 and Lee’s 1862 victory at Fredericksburg, Va. Their Smart Board flickered with short video clips on key events and maps showing the evolving demographics of the slave population — a group that Virginia history standards ask schools to call “enslaved African Americans.” One afternoon, during a lesson on the First Battle of Bull Run, Agner sensed her students were getting antsy. She had read to them about civilian spectators whose day turned from picnics to panic, talked about the high toll of dead and wounded, recounted how Southern forces rallied around Jackson when another Confederate commander cried out that he was standing “like a stone wall.” Now she improvised. “Cavin,” Agner said. “Come and stand and show us what he might have looked like.” Cavin Loh, 10, popped up, puffed his chest, stuck out his chin, stared sternly ahead. “Can I blink?” he asked. “No, you’re a stone wall,” Agner said. Then she asked others to strike poses. One stood and saluted. Another put her foot on a chair and leaned forward. “I see him on a horse,” Agner said. “I see him ready to shout. I see no fear.” In March, the class capped its Civil War unit with a field trip to the Decatur House in Washington. Students donned costumes as soldiers and politicians from the period and produced a video about the Emancipation Proclamation. Dominique Pham, 10, said: “We learned about the two sides and what they liked and what they didn’t like. The Union didn’t like slavery because they thought it’s wrong. I agree with them. And it’s not nice to make people do things they don’t want to do.”

NASA to announce homes for retired shuttles By Mark K. Matthews The Orlando Sentinel

WASHINGTON — NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden on Tuesday will end years of speculation — and no small amount of lobbying — when he announces which U.S. museums and tourist attractions will get a space shuttle once the space agency retires the fleet this summer.

Because Bolden plans to pick the four winners at Kennedy Space Center, where he’ll be attending a 30th anniversary celebration of the shuttle’s first mission, it’s expected Florida will get one — likely Atlantis or Endeavour. With the Smithsonian Institution slated to land Discovery, and in return give up Enterprise (a

test model that never reached orbit), that leaves just two shuttles for 19 remaining applicants. The choices will likely come down to Los Angeles, New York City, Seattle and Dayton, Ohio, according to congressional, industry and administration sources who say a location’s ability to draw tourists will be a key criterion.

Student loan debt outpaced credit card debt for the first time last year and is likely to top $1 trillion this year as more students go to college and a growing share borrow money to do so. While many economists say student debt should be seen in a more favorable light, the rising loan bills nevertheless mean that many graduates will be paying them for a longer time. “In the coming years, a lot of people will still be paying off their student loans when it’s time for their kids to go to college,” said Mark Kantrowitz, the publisher of FinAid.

Bills Continued from A1 “You know, it’s a process of trying to get everyone happy,” he said. He’s pleasantly surprised that another bill he spearheaded, which targets vacant job positions for elimination as a money-saving tactic, appears to be winning bipartisan support. The legislation that’s caused him the most heartache — a push to help the Sunriver Resort partnership provide limited septic funding to the state in exchange for a cheaper, streamlined process letting it develop the Pine Forest tract — is still alive, albeit barely. Whisnant has transferred the language of that bill to another bill, HB 3623, while hoping to win support from Gov. John Kitzhaber. Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Bend, said most of her main priorities are alive, though some of them have been transferred into other bills. “I’m feeling very confident that a lot of my good stuff is

Important Product Information XIAFLEX® (Zï a flex) (collagenase clostridium histolyticum) What is the most important information I should know about XIAFLEX? XIAFLEX can cause serious side effects, including: • Tendon or ligament damage. Receiving an injection of XIAFLEX may cause damage to a tendon or ligament in your hand and cause it to break or weaken. This could require surgery to fix the damaged tendon or ligament. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have trouble bending your injected finger (towards the wrist) after the swelling goes down or you have problems using your treated hand after your follow-up visit. • Nerve injury or other serious injury of the hand. Call your healthcare provider if you get numbness, tingling, or increased pain in your treated finger or hand after your injection or after your follow-up visit. • Allergic Reactions. Allergic reactions can happen in people who take XIAFLEX because it contains foreign proteins. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms of an allergic reaction after an injection of XIAFLEX: • hives • swollen face • breathing trouble • chest pain What is XIAFLEX? XIAFLEX is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with Dupuytren’s contracture when a “cord” can be felt. In people with Dupuytren’s contracture, there is thickening of the skin and tissue in the palm of your hand that is not normal. Overtime, this thickened tissue can form a cord in your palm. This causes one or more of your fingers to bend toward the palm, so you cannot straighten them. XIAFLEX should be injected into a cord by a healthcare provider who is skilled in injection procedures of the hand and treating people with Dupuytren’s contracture. The proteins in XIAFLEX help to “break” the cord of tissue that is causing the finger to be bent. It is not known if XIAFLEX is safe and effective in children under the age of 18.

org and Fastweb.com, who has compiled the estimates of student debt, including federal and private loans. Two-thirds of bachelor’s degree recipients graduated with debt in 2008, compared with less than half in 1993. Last year, graduates who took out loans left college with an average of $24,000 in debt. Default rates are rising, especially among those who attended for-profit colleges. The mountain of debt is likely to grow more quickly with the coming round of budget-slashing. Pell grants for low-income students are expected to be cut, and tuition at public universities will probably increase. Some education policy experts say the mounting debt has broad

implications for the current generation of students. “If you have a lot of people finishing or leaving school with a lot of debt, their choices may be very different than the generation before them,” said Lauren Asher, president of the Institute for Student Access and Success. “Things like buying a home, starting a family, starting a business, saving for their own kids’ education may not be options for people who are paying off a lot of student debt.” To be sure, many economists and policy experts see student debt as a healthy investment — unlike high-interest credit card debt, which is simply a burden on consumers’ budgets and has been declining in recent years.

going to pass,” she said. For instance, Senate Bill 792 would authorize local governments to plan cooperatively for regional economic development and designate special sites for job creation. It’s been scheduled for a hearing today. Other Telfer bills are no longer necessary. SB 796 was inspired by controversy over the Department of Motor Vehicles’ plan last year to possibly move to Brookswood Meadow Plaza. But those plans are now dead. Rep. Jason Conger, R-Bend, is happy that his push to renew an enterprise zone program that lets cities give tax exemptions to some companies has made its way to the Senate. And he feels optimistic about a bill he introduced — and which is backed by the rest of the region’s delegation — that would authorize state bond funds for OSU-Cascades to buy a building to house its graduate programs. “Both of those are still very much alive,” he said of the bills. Rep. John Huffman, R-The Dalles, is reluctant to say which of his bills he’s happiest about. “They’re kind of like my eight kids: I love them all equally,” he

said with a laugh. “You don’t put one of them above another.” But he’s disappointed that one of his bills, which would increase the penalty for murdering a reserve police officer, went nowhere, because of opposition by Gov. John Kitzhaber, who has taken a firm stand against increasing the number of crimes that are eligible for the death penalty. While Central Oregon lawmakers are reveling in their successes, they say some of their hopes from the start of the session have not been fulfilled. Conger, Whisnant and Telfer had pushed a variety of bills that called for more privatization and pushed for reducing the cost of the state Public Employees Retirement System. But for the most part, those efforts have come to naught. “I thought that we would be able to agree on some reforms that would help to (curb) cost increases,” Conger said. “That has not happened at any level, certainly not any meaningful level.”

What should I tell my healthcare provider before starting treatment with XIAFLEX? XIAFLEX may not be right for you. Before receiving XIAFLEX, tell your healthcare provider if you: • have had an allergic reaction to a previous XIAFLEX injection. • have a bleeding problem. • have any other medical conditions. • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if XIAFLEX will harm your unborn baby. • are breastfeeding. It is not known if XIAFLEX passes into your breast-milk. Talk to your healthcare provider about the best way to feed your baby if you receive XIAFLEX. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Especially tell your healthcare provider if you use: a blood thinner medicine such as aspirin, clopidogrel (PLAVIX®), prasugrel hydrochloride (EFFIENT®), or warfarin sodium (COUMADIN®). If you are told to stop taking a blood thinner before your XIAFLEX injection, your healthcare provider should tell you when to restart the blood thinner. How will I receive XIAFLEX? Your healthcare provider will inject XIAFLEX into the cord that is causing your finger to bend. After an injection of XIAFLEX, your affected hand will be wrapped with a bandage. You should limit moving and using the treated finger after the injection. Do not bend or straighten the fingers of the injected hand until your healthcare provider says it is okay. This will help prevent the medicine from leaking out of the cord. Do not try to straighten the treated finger yourself. Keep the injected hand elevated until bedtime. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have: • signs of infection after your injection, such as fever, chills, increased redness, or swelling • numbness or tingling in the treated finger • trouble bending the injected finger after the swelling goes down Return to your healthcare provider’s office as directed on the day after your injection. During this first follow-up visit, if you still have the cord, your

Nick Budnick can be reached at 503-566-2839 or at nbudnick@bendbulletin.com.

healthcare provider may try to extend the treated finger to “break” the cord and try to straighten your finger. Your healthcare provider will provide you with a splint to wear on the treated finger. Wear the splint as instructed by your healthcare provider at bedtime to keep your finger straight. Do finger exercises each day, as instructed by your healthcare provider. Follow your healthcare provider’s instructions about when you can start doing your normal activities with the injected hand. What are the possible side effects of XIAFLEX? XIAFLEX can cause serious side effects. See “What is the most important information I should know about XIAFLEX?”. Common side effects with XIAFLEX include: • swelling of the injection site or the hand • bleeding or bruising at the injection site • pain or tenderness of the injection site or the hand • swelling of the lymphnodes (glands) in the elbow or underarm • itching • breaks in the skin • redness or warmth of the skin • pain in the underarm These are not all of the possible side effects with XIAFLEX. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effect that bothers you or does not go away. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. General information about XIAFLEX Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed here. This is a summary of the most important information about XIAFLEX. If you would like more information, talk to your healthcare provider. You can ask your healthcare provider for information about XIAFLEX that is written for health professionals. For more information visit www.XIAFLEX.com or call 1-877-663-0412. © 2011 Auxilium Pharmaceuticals, Inc. For US residents only. 40 Valley Stream Parkway Malvern, PA 19355 www.auxilium.com


B 

Tech Focus Maker of BlackBerry fights to stay relevant, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, APRIL 12, 2011

MARKET REPORT

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2,771.51 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE -8.91 -.32%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

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12,381.11 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE +1.06 +.01%

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1,324.46 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE -3.71 -.28%

t

Contractors have received the OK to start building Oregon’s first utility-scale geothermal power plant and construct the 10-mile transmission line to deliver the electricity, according to a news release issued Monday by U.S. Geothermal, of Boise, Idaho. The company issued the startup notices after receiving a key approval from the U.S. Department of Energy, which guaranteed a $96.7 million loan guarantee for the 23megawatt power plant at Neal Hot Springs, west of Vale. Idaho Power has agreed to purchase up to 25 megawatts of electricity from the plant. Construction is expected to take 18 months, according to the news release.

Redmond boardings up from last year

BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 3.56 treasury CHANGE -.28%

t

$1467.40 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE -$6.00

Region’s home sales climbing closer to pre-recession levels First-quarter data show rising number of short sales

Geothermal plant construction to start

sold in the first quarter of 2007. The first quarter of the following year, the number dropped to 222. In the first quarter of 2009, it went up to 224, and in the first quarter of 2010 it jumped to 357. Now, in the first quarter of 2011, the number is at 394, roughly equal to the figure before the real estate bubble burst. All the while, though, short sales and foreclosures were a bigger and bigger part of those numbers, and average and median sale prices fell, said Kathy Ragsdale, CEO

By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

The number of home sales in some Central Oregon cities and counties continued to climb closer to pre-recession heights, according to figures the Central Oregon Association of Realtors released Monday. But more and more transactions are distressed: short sales or bank-owned. And as the number of distressed sales rises, average and median home prices fall lower. In Bend, for example, 396 homes were

of the Realtors association. In the first quarter of 2007, the median sales price in Bend was $347,750; in the first quarter of this year, it was $175,600. In the first quarter last year, the median sales price was $190,000. As for other Central Oregon cities and counties, they, too, saw a down-and-up trajectory for total sales, according to the data. Home sales in Sisters have gone beyond recovery, the data show. In the first quarter of 2007, 15 homes were sold, and in the first quarter of this year, that number was 26. See Homes / B5

EXECUTIVE FILE

BEND STORE HAS ONE MISSION:

MOBILITY

Passenger boardings at Redmond Airport in March rose 7 percent over March 2010 figures and increased 6 percent for the first quarter over the first quarter last year, according to statistics released Monday by the airport. In March, 20,231 people flew out of Redmond, 1,344 more than took off from the airport during March 2010. For the first three months of the year, 57,215 passengers have boarded flights out of Redmond, 3,280 more than during the same period last year, according to the statistics.

SAN FRANCISCO — Amazon is shaving another $25 off the price of its Kindle e-reader, this time with the help of advertisers. The newest Kindle is $114. Amazon will sell its e-book reader at the lower price by showing ads as screen savers and at the bottom of the home screen, and by selling special offers, similar to Groupon and other daily deal sites.

Wholesale inventories Total estimates of monthly sales and inventories held by wholesalers: $470 billion

$40.604 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.004

Natural gas not so clean after all, studies say By Tom Zeller Jr. New York Times News Service

Natural gas, with its reputation as a crucial linchpin in the effort to wean the nation off of dirtier fossil fuels and reduce global warming, may not be as clean overall as its proponents say. Even as natural gas production in the United States increases and Washington gives it a warm embrace as a crucial component of America’s energy future, two coming studies try to poke holes in the clean-and-green reputation of natural gas. They suggest that the rush to develop the nation’s vast, unconventional sources of natural gas is logistically impractical and likely to do more to heat up the planet than mining and burning coal. The problem, the studies suggest, is that planet-warming methane, the chief component of natural gas, is escaping into the atmosphere in far larger quantities than previously thought, with as much as 7.9 percent of it puffing out from shale gas wells, intentionally vented or flared, or seeping from loose pipe fittings along gas distribution lines. This offsets natural gas’s most important advantage as an energy source: it burns cleaner than other fossil fuels and releases lower carbon dioxide emissions. See Gas / B5

By Barry Meier and Duff Wilson New York Times News Service Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Dan and Lisa Cummins, owners of Advanced Mobility of Bend, say service is a priority at their store. “I will come to your house, and I can give them an honest quote,” Dan Cummins said.

More than a decade after the dot-com bust, two fallen Internet stars hope to regain some of their glory, with a $3 billion deal that could prompt similar transactions. On Monday, Level 3 Communications announced that it would buy the Internet services provider Global Crossing for $23.04 a share — a 56 percent premium to the stock’s closing price Friday, before the acquisition was announced. As part of the deal, Level 3 will also assume $1.1 billion of debt. — From staff and wire reports

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Medtronic division faces scrutiny over bone growth products

Ads reduce price of Amazon Kindle

Level 3 to pay $3B for Global Crossing

B

Business offers variety of products, services to improve accessibility By Tim Doran The Bulletin

t first glance, motorists traveling on Third near Northeast Greenwood Avenue might see the vans in front of 1045 N.E. Third St. and think the business is a car dealership. Or if they spot the scooters sometimes lined up in front, they might think it’s a scooter store. They would be right on both counts. Advanced Mobility of Bend sells vans converted for wheelchair access and several models of electric scooters, along with stair lifts, adjustable beds, walk-in bathtubs, wheelchairs, canes, walkers and other supplies to make homes and vehicles more accessible. But what the business really offers is service, said Dan Cummins, 43, and Lisa Cummins, 40, who own and run the business, along with Dan’s father, Dewey.

A

The basics What: Advanced Mobility of Bend Where: 1045 N.E. Third St., Bend Employees: Three Phone: 541-382-6016 Website: www.advancedmobilityofbend.com

“When you come in here, you get service,” Dan Cummins said. “I will come to your house, and I can give them an honest quote.” Advanced Mobility goes beyond equipment sales, repair and rentals. It also provides the remodeling work needed to accommodate accessibility features. Dan Cummins is a licensed general contractor and licensed mechanical elevator contractor, which allows him to install stair lifts.

“We do overhead track systems that will take you from your bed to the bathroom and the shower,” he said. Because it sells vans, Advanced Mobility also holds a vehicle dealer license. Being in the health care industry, the couple also had to become accredited by Medicare and learn Veterans Affairs rules. And as baby boomers reach retirement age, it’s an industry poised for growth. “It’s a service that is needed, that is not going away,” Dan Cummins said. “Business is increasing because of the demographics.” The service at Advanced Mobility also includes the knowledge gained by Dan and Lisa Cummins. If someone needs hand controls on a vehicle, Dan Cummins can tell them the name of the person to see at St. Charles Bend for the requirements. See Mobility / B2

Total inventory $438 billion

One of Medtronic’s most profitable divisions — selling bone growth products used in spinal fusion procedures — faces growing pressure amid a widening criminal investigation into the company’s marketing of one product and a rejection by federal regulators of another. Recently, the Food and Drug Administration turned down the company’s application to sell a new spinal fusion device that is essentially a high-strength version of an approved one called Infuse. An agency review of clinical studies raised questions about a higher rate of cancers in patients treated with the new product, which is called Amplify, compared with those who did not get it. Meanwhile, a long-running investigation by the Justice Department into the marketing of Infuse is apparently widening. In recent years, a number of physicians were contacted by prosecutors in connection with that inquiry, but just a few weeks ago, another doctor said he had also been contacted by Justice Department officials. He asked not to be identified because the inquiry is under way. See Medtronic / B2

442 414

Total sales $379 billion

386 358

Stressed about looming tax deadline? Here are some tips By Claudia Buck McClatchy-Tribune News Service

330 2010

2011

Note: All figures seasonally adjusted Source: Department of Commerce AP

Psst. Not that you need reminding, but the tax filing deadline is just days away. Whether you’ve already filed and are happily awaiting a refund or if you’re just getting started with the annual chore, here are some last-minute tax tips.

Good news: extra time

Need help?

Thanks to a local holiday in Washington, D.C., the normal April 15 tax filing deadline got moved by three days. This year only, state and federal taxes are due on Monday, April 18. Which means you get an extra weekend to get all that paperwork completed.

Free tax preparation help is still available for low- and moderate-income individuals and the elderly. Those with annual incomes below $49,000 can get free help at Volunteer Income Tax Assistance sites, some of which are open through April 18.

Free IRS tax help is also available to seniors over 60 through the Tax Counseling for the Elderly program. To find the nearest site for either program, call the IRS help line at 800-9069887 or go to www.irs.gov. The help line is answered by a live IRS staffer, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. See Taxes / B5


B USI N ESS

B2 Tuesday, April 12, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M  BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541388-1133 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-548-6325 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-553-3148 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Madras Senior Center, 860 S.W. Madison; 541-475-6494. BEGINNING PHOTOSHOP: Two evening class. Registration required; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. DREAMWEAVER, BEGINNING: Three Tuesday evening classes. Registration required; $89; 6-9 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. WEB DESIGN SERIES: 3 Hours to a Better Website April 12; Make Money with a Web Affiliate April 19; Photoshop for the Web April 26. Sign up for individual classes or the series. Registration required at http:// noncredit.cocc.edu; $55 per class or $145 for the series; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY BUSINESS PLANNING BEST PRACTICES, DON’T LEAVE SUCCESS TO CHANCE: Presented by Jim Wilcox with Central Oregon Community College. Learn about developing a business plan and continually maintaining it. Register by April 12; free; 7:30 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-388-1133 or visit www.aarp. org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-548-6325 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax-preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. Spanish interpreters will be available Feb. 9 and 19 and March 9 and 19; to schedule time with an interpreter, call 541-382-4366. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-504-1389 or visit www.yourmoneyback.org; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with

Medtronic Continued from B1 Prosecutors have also sought records from U.S. Army researchers involved in studies of Infuse, a bioengineered bone growth product that has also been used to treat severely wounded U.S. soldiers, according to people who have been contacted as part of the inquiry. Medtronic has said it plans to discuss the rejection of Amplify with regulators to try to allay their concerns, and the company has not been charged with any wrongdoing in the criminal inquiry. But the developments could pose significant future problems for Medtronic, a medical device giant whose other products include heart pacemakers and defibrillators. A Wall Street analyst, Larry Biegelsen of Wells Fargo Securities, said Infuse accounts for

certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-553-3148 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Madras Senior Center, 860 S.W. Madison; 541-475-6494. DEATH OF A BORROWER OR GUARANTOR: Presented by attorney Christopher Hatfield and hosted by the Risk Management Association East Cascades Chapter. Lunch included. RSVP requested; $30 for RMA members; $35 for others; 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-3229233 or bbritt@columbiabank.com. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE YOUNG PROFESSIONALS NETWORK: Free; 6 p.m.; Red Dog Depot, 3716 S.W. 21st Place; 541-923-5191 or www.redmondchamber.org.

THURSDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: The meeting is upstairs and starts promptly at 7:00 am; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. CENTRAL OREGON CHRISTIAN BUSINESS ASSOCIATION MONTHLY BREAKFAST MEETING: Bob Schuster, co-founder of Dynamic Coaching, will share what he has learned during his 45 years in business. Breakfast included. RSVP requested; $10; 6:307:45 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, 2210 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-788-5301 or info@cocba.org. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-388-1133 or visit www.aarp. org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-548-6325 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. HOW TO RAISE BACKYARD CHICKENS: Free; noon; Cowgirl Cash, 924 Brooks St., Bend; 541-815-8996. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-553-3148 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 1-5 p.m.; Warm Springs Community Center, 2200 Hollywood Blvd.; 541-553-3243. SOCIAL SECURITY 101: RSVP requested; free; 4-5:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. GENERATING GREAT ADVERTISING CONCEPTS: Registration required; $49; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. MICROSOFT CERTIFICATION PREP, EXCEL 2007: Four-session course. Registration required; $149; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

FRIDAY

members, $40 at the door; 7:15-9 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-3823221 or www.bendchamber.org. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE & CVB COFFEE CLATTER: Hosted by American Family Insurance; free; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Redmond Fire & Rescue, 341 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-923-5191 or www.visitredmondoregon.com. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541536-6237 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-504-1389. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-388-1133 or visit www.aarp. org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-548-6325 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. WORK ZONE FLAGGER CLASS: Covers the fundamental principles of traffic safety and meets the requirements of the Oregon Department of Transportation’s construction specifications. Registration required; $79; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. SOCIAL CULTURE & THE SOCIAL MEDIA POLICY: Part three of The Social Nonprofit workshop nine-part series. Explore ways to promote an internal social culture and create a social media policy that will enhance and support online social activity; free; 11 a.m.; Deschutes Library Administration Building, 507 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-7198880, chevypham@gmail.com or http://host5.evanced.info/deschutes/ evanced/eventcalendar.asp. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY AFFORDABLE HOUSING ORIENTATION: An orientation for families interested in home ownership; free; 6 p.m.; Crook County Library, 175 N.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-508-8681, rcooper@bendhabitat. org or www.bendhabitat.org.

SATURDAY FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax-preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. Spanish interpreters will be available Feb. 9 and 19 and March 9 and 19; to schedule time with an interpreter, call 541-382-4366. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-504-1389 or visit www.yourmoneyback.org; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY AFFORDABLE HOUSING ORIENTATION: An orientation for families interested in home ownership; free; 11 a.m.; Crook County Library, 175 N.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-5088681, rcooper@bendhabitat.org or www.bendhabitat.org.

MONDAY

INSIDE MAY’S GENERAL OBLIGATION BOND: Review the proposed project recommendations for $30 million worth of road improvements with Bend City Manager Eric King, Transportation Engineering Manager Nick Arnis and Better Roads for Bend Co-Chair Amy Tykeson. Reservations encouraged; $30 for Bend Chamber of Commerce

OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 4-8 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

the vast majority of Medtronic’s sales of biologic products, which he projected would reach $897 million in the company’s current fiscal year. Biegelsen said the continuing federal investigation of Infuse, along with the FDA’s rejection of Amplify, could lead to a slowdown of Infuse sales over the next year. He estimated that off-label use by doctors of the bone-growth protein made up 70 percent to 80 percent of Infuse sales. The extent of the federal criminal inquiry involving Infuse is not clear. But the doctor who was recently contacted by Justice Department officials also said that it was his understanding that prosecutors had contacted other physicians in recent months. One military surgeon testified before a federal grand jury in Boston investigating the Infuse issue about a year ago, said peo-

ple with knowledge of the inquiry who also requested anonymity because it was continuing. In 2002, the FDA approved the use of Infuse for a certain type of spinal fusion procedure, in which problem spinal vertebrae are joined in an effort to stop severe back pain. Doctors are free to use an approved product in any way they choose, and many surgeons began using Infuse for other types of spinal fusion operations. Some of the doctors who performed research studies into such so-called off-label uses of Infuse received millions of dollars in consulting fees from Medtronic, congressional investigations have found. In 2008, the FDA issued a warning about the use of bonegrowth proteins like Infuse in one off-label fusion procedure used to treat neck pain, citing reports of life-threatening injuries.

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Marla Polenz at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

Mobility Continued from B1 He and his wife also get to know the customers, referring to them by name when they call. Many of them become repeat clients. “What we didn’t think about in this industry, is they keep coming back,” Dan Cummins said. “First they come in for a cane or a walker. Then it’s a lift, or a (wheelchair) or to remodel a bathroom.” Both graduated from the University of Oregon. Before entering the medical equipment and supply industry, Dan Cummins worked as a contractor, building bridges, roadways and other large projects. But work took him away from home for long periods, he said, and he could not see himself continuing in the industry after age 50. The idea to go into the business stemmed from visits to his father’s welding shop, Triangle T Welding, in Bend, where Dan Cummins saw his father installing vehicle lifts. In 2003, the family opened the store on Third Street. They bought and renovated a building previously occupied by

Bend Cleaners, a laundry and dry cleaner damaged in a fire in the late 1990s, according to the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality. A few years ago, they said, servicing equipment made up about 50 percent of the business, but that’s tapered off, possibly as customers hit by the economic downturn defer maintenance. Advanced Mobility has customers all over the region, out to Burns and John Day, Dan Cummins said — “basically the east side of the mountains.” But some clients still express surprise when they find the business, even though it has operated for about eight years near one of Bend’s major intersections. “Even people who’ve lived in Bend for a long time don’t know we are here,” Dan Cummins said, “until they need us.”

welding shop. We thought we were just going to do the lifts and cars. But it went beyond that. It just evolved. I knew nothing about the medical industry. I wasn’t sure I wanted to do it. Eventually we became the experts.

Q: A:

What surprised you about the medical equipment and supply business? When (the customers) start with something, and (then) they need something else. It’s the progression, from wheelchair to patient lift to (adjustable) bed.

Q: A:

Some of your repeat customers eventually die? Lisa Cummins: We lose our customers. It’s heartbreaking, too. (It makes us) very thankful for our health. Dan Cummins: We have a lot of empathy. Lisa Cummins: We’ve also learned to treat everyone the same (to take time with customers, speak to the person needing the equipment and find out what he or she needs). Dan’s very good about that.

Q: A:

What prompted you to start the business? Dan Cummins: It was the idea that I didn’t want to be 50 years old and wearing nail bags and pouring concrete. Why don’t we go into business? Why don’t we open a store? Lisa Cummins: The basic idea came from his dad and the

Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@ bendbulletin.com.

NEWS OF RECORD DEEDS Deschutes County

Mark R. and Gail M. Greaney to Steven J. and Deborah W. Lee, Sundance East, Phase 3, Lot 2, Block 10, $346,000 Peter M. Scharff to Brian W. Lawrence, Broken Top Phase HH, Lots 2, 8, 9, 208 and 209, $2,250,000 Tim R. and Diane E. Kutcher to Andrew and Michele Higgins, Lava Ridges, Phase 3, Lot 65, $343,000 Sharon E. Bommer to David B. Lindemann and Stephanie Charnay, Gardenside PUD, Phase 1, Lot 21, $150,000 Thayne A. and Kyrie K. Guymon to Amber J. Taylor, Bear Creek Estates PUD, Lot 2, $230,200 Fannie Mae, aka Federal National Mortgage Association to Thomas D. and Karen S. Smelser, Tetherow Crossing, Phase 7, Lot 21, Block 4, $288,000 LSI Title Co. of Oregon LLC to GMAC Mortgage LLC, fka GMAC Mortgage Corp., Six Peaks, Phase 4, Lot 17, $222,692.99 Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Eco Terre LLC, Crossroads Third Addition, Lot 134, $153,000 Kathleen A. Elliott to Martin Birch, Skyewest Townhomes, Unit 7, $200,000 Frank C. Rote III to SOFCU Community Credit Union, Sixth Addition to Woodland Park Homesites, Lot 14, Block 7, $230,815 Sterling Savings Bank to Eric K. and Jerri L. Bohard and Paul F. and Joanne M. Trese, River Meadows Second Addition, Lot 72, $165,000 Cascade Funding Group LLC to Prestige RV Storage LLC, Toy House Condominium, Units 1 and 3-16, $250,000 JDV Corp. to David H. Baker

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

and Sherril L. Barr Baker, First Addition to Whispering Pines Estates, Lot 1, Block 2, $179,000 Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Jonathan Oris, Fairhaven, Phase 10, Lot 17, $178,000 Robert H. and Sandy K. Blankenship to Elmer and Josephine Dueno, Mt. Vista , Lot 1, Block 1, $180,000 Greg Welch Construction Inc. to Nancy H. and Charles B. Chaffee, NorthWest Crossing, Phase 13, Lot 624, $419,500 Jefferson County

Wells Fargo Bank N.A. to James L. and Melissa R. Hershberger, Crooked River Ranch No. 3, Lot 56, $180,453.42 Wayne Leavitt and Shirley A. Leavitt, trustees of the Wayne Leavitt and Shirley A. Leavitt Revocable Trust to Bill L. and Carol L. Blew , Crooked River Ranch No. 3, Lot 274, $198,800 Steven L. and Susan L. Rask to Poland Organic Land LLC, Forties Corner, Lots 2 and 3, $335,000 Robert L. Frazier and Frazier’s Shopping Center LLC to Christian A. and Elvira I. Avila, Lots 2-6, Block 33, Culver, $420,000 Evan K. and Amy M. Brown to Kelley Sibert, Canyon View Subdivision, $255,000 Juan M. Ruiz Silva to David A. Kubat, Lot 3 and south half of Lot 2, Block

7, map of Palmain, $154,815.36 Patricia M. Gibson, trustee of the Milton James Gibson and Patricia M. Gibson Joint Revocable Living Trust to John R. Harris, Section 16 and 21, Township 13 South, Range 13 East, $200,000 Ben E. Grant and Carol E. Grant to Myron J. Atwood and Karen E. Atwood, Crooked River Ranch No. 8, Lot 299, $199,000 Alexander E. McDonald to J & L Livestock, northeast quarter of Section 9 and the northwest quarter of Section 10, Township 10 South, Range 17 East, $230,000 LSI Title Company of Oregon LLC to GMAC Mortgage LLC, fka GMAC Mortgage Corp., Section 27, Township 13 South, Range 12 East, $177,828.94 Robert N. Peasley and Donna R. Peasley, trustees of The Peasley Family Trust to David R. Chapanar and Catherine D. Chapanar, Lot 12 and the north 10 feet of Lot 11 and Lot 3 and the north 10 feet of Lot 4, Block 3, $165,000 Regional Trustee Services Corp. to Federal National Mortgage Asociation, The Pines at Madras, Phase 1, Lot 13, $154,404.97

Self Referrals Welcome

541-706-6900

541-388-4418

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION Available on our website at

www.oregonfreshstart.com 541-382-3402 Dale L. Smith, Attorney 622 NE 4th St., Bend, OR 97701 We are a debt relief agency. We proudly help people file for bankruptcy relief under the Bankruptcy Code.


B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 12, 2011 B3

T F BlackBerry maker RIM hopes Appeals court upholds new tablet will revive brand Facebook settlement with Zuckerberg rivals

Despite company’s robust growth, analysts say it has lost momentum

By Carol J. Williams Los Angeles Times

By Ian Austen New York Times News Service

WATERLOO, Ontario — In a rare interview last week, Mike Lazaridis, one of Research In Motion’s two chief executives, was the one asking questions: “Why is it that people don’t appreciate our profits? Why is it that people don’t appreciate our growth? Why is it that people don’t appreciate the fact that we spent the last four years going global? Why is it that people don’t appreciate that we have 500 carriers in 170 countries with products in almost 30 languages?” He wrapped up with “I don’t fully understand why there’s this negative sentiment, and I just don’t have the time to battle it. Because in the end, what I’ve learned is you’ve just got to prove it over and over and over.” Lazaridis can point to numbers that back up his frustrated defense of RIM, maker of the BlackBerry, the phone of choice in the White House and a global totem of connectedness. During its last fiscal year, the company, which is based here, shipped a record 52.3 million phones — a 43 percent increase over the previous year — and its fourthquarter income of $924 million exceeded forecasts. Nevertheless, as RIM prepares to introduce its first tablet computer on April 19, doubts about its future have arguably never been greater. Some analysts suggest that RIM has lost its momentum and may now be heading downward, much like Palm, which in better days was expected to rub out the then-fledgling RIM. Current BlackBerrys are hobbled with an aging operating system, and the company’s market growth last year seems less impressive when contrasted with Apple’s 93 percent rise in iPhone shipments.

‘Caught flat-footed’ In a world where applications have become a major selling point for mobile devices, the number of apps available for BlackBerry phones is in the tens of thousands, compared with the hundreds of thousands for Android and Apple devices. BlackBerrys are still prized for their e-mail capabilities, particularly among government and corporate customers who rely on the devices’ tight security. But it is increasingly common to find people who carry a BlackBerry for e-mail and an iPhone for everything else. That has led several analysts

Illustration by Minh Uong / New York Times News Service

Some analysts suggest that Research In Motion has lost its momentum and may now be heading downward, but the company’s executives say it’s too soon to write them off. and investors to question RIM’s tech companies go to die.” Balsillie says the PlayBook ability to hold its own in a market dominated by devices run- will show that RIM has joined ning Google’s Android software, Apple in making that move. The as well as iPhones and iPads. tablet is important in part be“They’ve been caught flat-foot- cause it will be running RIM’s ed,” said Jean-Louis Gassee, first all-new operating system a former Apple executive, the since the introduction of the former chairman of Palm’s soft- BlackBerry more than a decade ware spinoff and a partner at ago. That software will also be on new phones Allegis Capital in that the company Palo Alto, Calif. will release in the “They’ve built a “No other coming months. tremendous com- technology pany; they are people with dis- company other Banking on tinguished back- than Apple has the tablet grounds. They are not idiots, but successfully The PlayBook they’ve behaved transitioned has a 7-inch dislike idiots.” play and weighs Jim Balsillie, their platform. less than a RIM’s other chief It’s almost never pound. Its powexecutive, vigorerful dual-core done, and it’s ously rejected processor helps suggestions that way harder than it run several RIM was ill-pre- you realize. This applications at pared for the once and, when changes in its transition is where combined with markets. But he tech companies software develac k nowle dge d oped with Adothat if it had go to die.” be, play Flashmoved earlier based video at a — Jim Balsillie, to introduce its crisp resolution, tablet, the Black- co-CEO, RIM even on a large Berry PlayBook, television screen. it could have imApple mobile proved perceptions of the com- devices cannot display Flash pany. And he agreed with critics content, in part because Apple on one thing: Many companies says it strains batteries. Lazariwill struggle to adapt as the in- dis said the QNX system takes dustry makes the huge shift a low-power approach; accordto a world of powerful mobile ing to RIM, the PlayBook has a computers. battery life of eight to 10 hours, “No other technology com- while Apple says the iPad 2 lasts pany other than Apple has 10 hours. successfully transitioned their But what the PlayBook does platform,” Balsillie said in an in- not have is the many applicaterview. “It’s almost never done, tions to make use of that power. and it’s way harder than you Apps from outside developers realize. This transition is where are crucial to the success of an

operating system, but some developers say they find it difficult and expensive to create apps for RIM products. Even if RIM does a lot of things right, it could still fail to replicate Apple’s success with tablets. Motorola’s Android-based Xoom tablet was well received by reviewers, but Deutsche Bank estimates that Motorola has sold only about 100,000 units since February. By comparison, Apple sold about 1 million iPad 2s during the first weekend it was available. The Xoom, however, is more expensive than the iPad. By contrast, the PlayBook is the first prominent tablet to match the iPad’s price: It will start at $499. RIM does have something that Android phone makers and Apple lack: access to the corporations and governments that have been buying fleets of BlackBerrys for years. As on the BlackBerry, RIM will give companies control over the features and data on employees’ PlayBooks, and the devices will have access to a company’s high-security global data network. Balsillie did suggest that RIM might no longer aspire to rule the mobile world — an unusual admission for someone who has long been an aggressive competitor. He hinted that having a piece of a fast-growing pie would be enough. “To be pretty blunt about this: How many people in the world have computing devices in phones, and how many do we have to sell to ensure that we’re a rip-roaring success over the next five years?” he asked, without providing an answer. “You’ll find that you don’t have to be all things to all people.”

Google, Microsoft spar over software claims By John Letzing MarketWatch

SAN FRANCISCO — Microsoft Corp. and Google Inc. traded barbs on Monday as part of a growing battle between the two technology giants to grow their respective government businesses. In a sharply worded posting on a company website, a Microsoft lawyer pounced on what he said is an inconsistency in Google Inc.’s presentation of its Apps software to government buyers, while Google countered that the software giant’s new volleys over security certification are beside the point. Microsoft deputy general counsel David Howard wrote that court documents have revealed that the U.S. Justice Department had rejected Google’s claim that its Google Apps for Government suite of software has been certified under the Federal Information Security Management Act, or FISMA — contrary to Google’s assertions. “Given the number of times that Google has touted this claim, this was no small development,”

Howard wrote. “FISMA-certification suggests that a particular solution has proven that it has met an adequate level of security for a specific need,” he added, while asserting that the Justice Department’s claim, recently unsealed, came as a surprise. The court documents that came to light are related to a lawsuit filed by Google against the U.S. Interior Department in November, alleging that the government agency shut it out of bidding for a contract, due to a preference for Microsoft’s technology. The dispute highlights a particularly active theater of combat between the technology giants, who have sought to have their respective software installed by as many government agencies as possible. While Microsoft has historically dominated sales of productivity software such as email and word-processing tools, Google has gained significant ground with its Apps software, which is hosted online and generally costs $50 per user, per year.

Though the competition generally serves as background noise to the companies’ resource-intensive battle over the Internet search and advertising market, it’s nonetheless a significant tug-of-war. A Google spokesman said Monday that despite Microsoft’s new claims about FISMA certification, the “big picture” is that the Mountain View, Calif.-based company won an injunction in January, barring the Interior Department from opting for Redmond, Wash.-based Microsoft’s technology without first considering Google’s products as well. Google said in a statement that Microsoft’s jabs over FISMA certification are “unrelated to our request that (the Interior Department) allow for a true competition when selecting its technology providers.” “This case is about the Department of Interior limiting its proposal to one (Microsoft) product that isn’t even FISMA certified,” Google said. “Even so, we did not mislead the court or our customers.”

The company said that “Google Apps received a FISMA security authorization from the General Services Administration in July 2010,” adding that it is working with the GSA to document related enhancements for Google Apps for Government. In a Justice Department brief filed with the court and highlighted by Microsoft, the agency notes that, “Notwithstanding Google’s representations to the public at large ... it appears that Google’s Google Apps for Government does not have FISMA certification.” The Justice Department adds in the brief that while Google Apps Premier received FISMA certification last summer, “Google intends to offer Google Apps for Government as a more restrictive version of its product and Google is currently in the process of finishing its application for FISMA certification for its Google Apps for Government.” A Justice Department representative was unable to immediately respond to a request for comment.

LOS ANGELES — A federal appeals court panel ruled Monday that a 2008 deal between Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and three former Harvard colleagues is valid and enforceable. The decision upheld a negotiated agreement between Zuckerberg and the founders of a rival social-networking site, ConnectU, in their dispute over who came up with the Facebook idea by giving Divya Narendra and Olympic rowing twins Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss a share of the privately held company, deemed to be worth about $65 million at the time of the settlement three years ago. Because of Facebook’s soaring value, that share is now worth in excess of $160 million. In the opinion from Chief Judge Alex Kozinski, who wrote for the three-judge panel, he said: “The Winklevosses are not the first parties bested by a competitor who then seek to gain through litigation what they were unable to achieve in the marketplace. And the courts might have obliged,

had the Winklevosses not settled their dispute and signed a release of all claims against Facebook.” He concluded: “At some point, litigation must come to an end. That point has now been reached.” Lawyers for the ConnectU company, which Facebook acquires through the settlement, had argued that the twins and Narendra were fraudulently misled about the value of Facebook and that crucial details were omitted from the settlement, rendering it invalid. Facebook, now estimated to be worth more than $50 billion, is the world’s largest social-networking site with 500 million members. Facebook’s legal team argued at the January hearing in San Francisco that it was the responsibility of the ConnectU owners to determine what Facebook was worth. In a statement Monday, Facebook’s deputy general counsel, Colin Stretch, said: “We appreciate the 9th Circuit’s careful consideration of this case and are pleased the court has ruled in Facebook’s favor.”

Michael L. Weasner via New York Times News Service

This photo of the moon was made with an Apple iPhone 4 mounted on a Meade 8” LX200-ACF telescope using the Magnilux MX-1 telescope adapter for Apple iPhone.

If you can’t name a star, try asking your telescope By Anne Eisenberg New York Times News Service

Longtime stargazers learned the basics of the night sky the hard way — with pencils, star charts and lots of patience with their telescopes. Now high-tech equipment and smartphone apps are making the task a lot less daunting for beginners. New point-and-shoot telescopes, for example, require only the push of a button to go into action: Plunk one down in the driveway and the device gets its own bearings, aligning itself with the stars above so it can tell you that the twinkling light in the eyepiece is Betelgeuse. Three models of these new, selfaligning telescopes, costing about $700 to $800, will be offered this July by Celestron. The company’s new line, called SkyProdigy, is intended for amateurs who don’t have in-depth knowledge of the night sky, or may not even have a clue of how to set up a telescope, said Danyal Medley, a principal engineer at the company in Torrance, Calif. Even seasoned astronomy experts are heralding such automation. “I think the telescope that sets itself up, so anyone can easily use it, is great,” said Jay Pasachoff, chairman of the astronomy department and director of the Hopkins Observatory at Williams College in Williamstown, Mass. “This kind of telescope makes it possible for people to be out in their backyards and look at the most interesting astronomical objects within minutes.” To find its position and then recognize the stars above, the telescope has a digital camera that takes pictures of the sky. It then

compares them with its computerized database of stored images, Medley said. The process typically takes less than three minutes. Amateur stargazers are also finding a wealth of data via lowcost technology like smartphone apps. Smartphones, with their cameras and abundant processing power, offer novel features that telescopes cannot. For example, United Soft Media offers the app Redshift for iPhone and iPad ($11.99 at iTunes) that identifies bright stars or planets you can see in the night sky. It can also simulate a ride on a spacecraft taking you on a tour of distant planets. Smartphone apps and accessories for stargazing are so popular that they will have a separate block of vendors at the Northeast Astronomy Forum and Telescope Show, to be held April 16 and 17 in Suffern, N.Y., said Alan Traino, chairman of the show. The apps can lead to more telescope sales, said Kovach of Astronomics.com. “People come in with their phones,” he said, on which they have looked at labeled versions of the night sky. “They say, ‘I want to get a telescope to see this for real.’ ” For those who want to meld the benefits of telescopes with smartphones, attachments are available. A simple adapter, the MX-1 from Magnilux ($45 at magnilux. com), clamps an iPhone directly onto the telescope eyepiece, said Robert Buchanan, president of the company, based in West Melbourne, Fla. With that, users can take snapshots of Saturn, the moon, Jupiter and other bright objects via the telescope. “You won’t get distant galaxies,” he said, “but it will get you started.”


B USI N ESS

B4 Tuesday, April 12, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

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A-B-C-D A-Power AAR ABB Ltd ACE Ltd ADA-ES AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGIC Cv AGIC Cv2 AGL Res AK Steel AMB Pr AMN Hlth AMR AOL ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AVX Cp AXT Inc Aarons s Aastrom AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac Abiomed AboveNet Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaPh AcadiaRlt Accenture AccretvH n Accuray Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivePwr ActivsBliz Actuant Acxiom AdeonaPh AdobeSy Adtran AdvAuto AdvATech AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvPhot AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeropostl AeroViron AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix Agenus AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd AirTrnsp Aircastle Airgas AirTran AkamaiT Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alere AlexBld AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion Alexza AlignTech Alkerm AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliancOne AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlldHlthcr AldIrish rs AlldNevG AlldWldA AllosThera AllscriptH Allstate AllyFn pfB AlmadnM g AlnylamP AlonUSA AlphaNRs Alphatec AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AltairN rs AlteraCp lf AlterraCap Altria Alumina AlumChina AmBev s Amarin Amazon AmbasInt rs Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AIG wt AmIntlGrp AmerMed AmOriBio AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Ameriprise AmeriBrgn Ametek s Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amtech Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnadysPh AnalogDev Ancestry AnglogldA ABInBev Anixter Ann Inc Annaly Anooraq g Ansys AntaresP Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache Apache pfD AptInv ApogeeE ApolloGM n ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldMatl AMCC Approach Apricus rs AquaAm ArcadiaRs ArcelorMit ArchCoal ArchDan ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArmHld ArmourRsd ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArtioGInv ArubaNet AscenaRtl AscentSol AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfoL AspenIns AspenTech AsscdBanc AsdEstat Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth Atheros AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel AtwoodOcn Augusta g Aurizon g Authentdt h AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch AvalRare n

4.27 -.09 25.97 -.29 1.12 24.38 -.19 1.32 66.62 +.83 11.75-10.30 12.88 -.38 1.20 53.83 +.17 52.36 -.65 1.08 10.58 -.19 1.02 9.83 -.16 1.80 39.32 -.15 0.20 15.26 -.52 1.12 35.24 +.18 8.30 -.16 5.78 +.01 19.80 -.27 0.54 42.90 +.54 1.72 30.66 -.05 16.76 -.79 8.82 -.09 1.61 -.01 0.22 15.28 +.30 6.19 -.34 0.05 26.10 -.16 2.66 -.01 1.92 50.91 +.42 0.70 69.45 +1.99 0.42 6.95 -.03 16.07 +.92 5.00 66.15 +.50 5.24 -.38 34.20 -1.07 1.81 +.08 0.72 18.66 -.06 0.90 56.00 +.90 26.61 +.44 9.33 -.16 6.95 -.03 71.50 -.88 21.30 -.74 2.59 -.07 0.17 11.13 -.01 0.04 27.34 -.44 15.04 +.15 1.87 +.08 34.38 +.23 0.36 41.92 +.09 0.24 65.65 -.81 4.03 +.09 2.13 -.17 14.89 -.29 8.42 -.05 1.69 -.04 0.06 5.49 -.11 8.64 -.32 26.37 -.39 0.04 8.35 -.48 7.96 -.02 14.34 +.15 25.59 -.03 28.31 -.86 1.88 0.60 36.89 +.14 105.75 -3.99 6.47 -.13 5.73 +.42 .96 +.02 1.85 44.99 +.10 0.64 65.54 -1.10 0.11 90.67 -1.43 2.32 91.19 -.82 7.82 -.15 0.40 12.54 -.17 1.16 66.68 -.30 7.38 +.06 36.46 -.89 5.77 -.12 60.01 -.11 0.86 10.39 -.02 0.66 59.13 -.92 0.34 37.30 +.04 5.60 -.13 0.12 17.77 -.15 39.12 -.10 1.26 52.57 -.45 1.80 75.89 +.09 9.05 -.73 98.86 -3.52 1.63 -.03 21.04 -.16 13.46 +.39 0.72 63.31 -.29 0.20 75.22 +.45 84.49 -.51 4.08 +.01 0.48 7.59 -.02 1.31 21.93 -.53 1.70 38.79 -.82 2.45 3.50 -.40 38.58 -1.98 0.80 64.76 +.52 3.01 -.21 20.57 -.06 0.84 31.75 +.35 2.13 25.53 +.11 4.35 -.34 9.74 -.10 0.16 13.12 -.66 56.07 -1.03 3.00 +.08 0.40 7.10 0.66 6.24 0.49 16.40 -.04 1.54 -.04 0.24 42.55 -.26 0.48 23.25 +.02 1.52 26.52 +.28 0.24 11.14 -.12 24.53 +.14 1.16 29.27 -.12 8.50 +.06 184.04 -.67 .41 -.05 28.94 +.09 32.46 +.04 1.54 28.12 -.35 62.20 +.49 0.52 58.76 +.29 .78 -.03 11.63 -.23 1.35 32.63 +.27 5.60 28.18 -.13 9.66 -.23 0.44 15.79 -.12 1.84 34.78 -.53 0.10 13.06 -.05 0.72 46.38 +.10 0.65 35.48 -.35 10.80 -.10 34.22 -.27 29.50 +7.17 1.73 -.09 13.31 -.46 50.13 -.15 0.88 28.36 -.16 0.72 62.41 -.52 0.40 40.14 -.06 0.24 42.84 -.54 54.31 +.41 6.62 -.09 0.06 52.21 -.39 22.52 -.63 11.24 +.22 0.36 81.11 -3.60 4.01 -.10 1.16 0.88 38.44 -.62 33.77 -.57 0.20 49.25 -1.84 0.49 59.42 +.39 3.25 72.51 +.49 30.64 -.03 2.62 17.39 +.16 1.16 -.19 53.36 +.18 1.58 -.10 1.00 6.97 +.01 0.60 53.37 +.10 5.56 +.01 0.60 126.25 -3.91 3.00 68.17 -2.98 0.48 24.81 -.22 0.33 13.59 -.08 18.06 +.06 42.01 -.10 1.12 11.79 -.21 330.80 -4.26 0.32 15.33 +.02 10.18 +.04 28.90 -2.19 4.48 +.13 0.62 22.30 -.18 .14 -.01 0.75 36.52 -.34 0.40 33.68 -.85 0.64 35.57 +.30 1.32 -.04 1.40 17.31 -.07 7.76 -.33 31.55 +.03 0.09 28.62 +.10 1.44 7.25 +.09 3.09 -.07 12.70 -.04 43.80 +.68 0.24 17.01 -.01 30.24 -.11 32.58 -.16 1.61 -.01 0.40 11.10 -.08 0.60 57.53 -1.15 20.65 -.73 0.60 28.23 +.08 14.89 +.22 0.04 14.64 -.04 0.68 16.00 +.05 0.64 38.06 +.08 0.18 14.76 -.17 0.52 14.91 +.04 2.55 48.67 +.41 44.36 -.59 44.71 +.06 0.28 22.49 -.24 1.48 32.65 -1.09 13.11 -.49 43.95 -.88 4.97 -.17 6.90 -.35 .89 +.17 33.95 -.90 42.85 +.06 1.72 70.78 -.66 1.44 52.42 -.03 272.93 -3.33 21.08 -.42 0.32 32.23 -.34 9.65 +.37

Nm AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AviatNetw AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap B&G Foods B2B Inet BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJsRest BJs Whls BMC Sft BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil BabckW n Baidu s BakrHu BallCp s BallardPw BallyTech BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantSA BcoSBrasil BcpSouth BkofAm BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BannerCp BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BiPCop BiP Softs BrcIndiaTR BiPGrain Barclay Bar iPVix rs BarVixMdT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BaytexE g BeaconP rs BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett Biodel BioFuelEn BiogenIdc BioLase BioMarin BioMedR BioSante BioScrip BlkRKelso BlackRock BlkDebtStr BlkEnDiv BlkrkHigh BlkIntlG&I Blackstone BlockHR BlueCoat BluDolp rs Boeing Boise Inc Boise wt BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci BoydGm BradyCp Brandyw Braskem BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker BrMySq BritATob Broadcom BroadrdgF BroadSft n Broadwind BrcdeCm BroncoDrl Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfInfra BrkfldPrp BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrownFB BrukerCp Brunswick Buckeye BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BldrFstSrc BungeLt CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBOE n CBS B CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp CKX Inc CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNOOC CNinsure CSX CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVR Ptrs n CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G CadencePh Cadence CalDive CalaCvHi CalaStrTR Calgon CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CAMAC En CamdenPT Cameco g Cameron CampSp CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar CanoPet Canon CapOne CapSenL CaptlTr CapitlSrce CapFdF rs Caplease CapsteadM CpstnTrb h CarboCer CardnlHlth CareFusion CareerEd CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caseys CashAm CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet CelSci Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE Centene CenterPnt CnElBras lf CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g CentAl CntryLink Cephln Cepheid Cerner ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds

D 3.57 118.42 +.41 3.95 1.00 41.94 -.11 5.17 +.02 18.09 -.28 1.10 23.25 -.27 33.92 -.34 0.92 28.01 +.03 2.25 -.08 0.92 36.16 -.08 0.84 18.27 -.21 1.19 -.02 0.64 27.29 +.06 1.97 37.09 -.01 36.95 -.28 0.56 9.22 -.13 1.82 102.68 +1.36 1.82 85.47 +.95 38.61 -.02 50.10 -.15 50.72 -.19 0.42 46.67 -.07 4.98 -.15 1.50 46.83 +.10 0.18 19.26 -.07 32.16 +.12 145.68 +3.80 0.60 69.31 -2.26 0.28 36.28 +.27 2.24 38.57 -.01 1.36 64.11 -.58 0.56 12.60 -.05 0.82 20.65 -.28 0.79 12.38 -.04 0.70 11.57 -.25 0.44 15.81 -.03 0.04 13.49 +.01 1.80 47.60 +.32 1.04 2.05 -.26 2.80 64.93 -.38 0.52 30.14 -.08 2.08 60.63 -.20 0.04 2.31 +.01 52.10 -.61 28.88 -1.10 59.10 -.71 88.24 +.15 71.95 -1.19 55.91 -.37 0.35 19.90 +.48 28.65 -.27 55.97 +.21 0.72 100.36 +.48 9.38 +.14 0.32 20.95 +.04 0.48 53.08 -1.29 25.39 -.68 1.24 54.28 +.55 2.40 59.97 -1.10 1.74 +.13 21.60 +.15 4.50 +.04 0.10 6.33 -.02 0.76 83.01 1.64 81.50 +.74 54.01 +.19 8.30 -.08 0.96 32.20 -.21 17.21 -1.20 0.28 31.86 +.06 82.26 +.46 0.30 51.00 -1.12 0.60 30.51 +.81 43.45 -.28 41.18 -.81 2.27 +.12 .72 -.05 78.55 +5.26 0.05 6.16 +.40 25.18 +.25 0.80 18.27 -.01 2.01 -.05 4.70 +.10 1.28 10.07 -.08 5.50 195.95 -.15 0.32 4.08 -.01 0.98 8.78 -.09 0.17 2.18 +.01 1.36 10.44 +.01 0.40 18.00 -.49 0.60 17.40 -.02 27.31 -.28 7.32 -.88 1.68 73.76 +.29 0.40 8.70 -.24 1.31 -.20 74.31 -1.06 0.04 7.01 -.05 2.00 94.77 +.86 7.22 -.13 9.10 +.02 0.72 36.75 -.26 0.60 11.87 +.05 0.02 29.10 +.19 16.45 -.51 0.44 22.60 -.14 33.82 -1.74 10.54 -.08 1.57 -.09 0.56 23.49 -.42 1.32 27.40 -.11 3.66 81.99 -.81 0.36 39.31 -.59 0.60 22.88 +.06 42.80 -.76 1.33 +.02 5.86 -.06 10.50 +.10 26.47 -.03 0.52 32.06 -.35 1.24 22.90 +.24 0.56 18.54 0.34 10.35 +.08 12.93 +.05 0.32 26.48 -.05 0.28 12.70 -.34 1.28 67.77 -.39 20.06 +.08 0.05 24.71 -.51 3.95 62.25 -.79 0.20 25.58 -1.16 0.80 44.19 +.54 0.10 91.45 0.49 41.77 -1.36 53.92 -1.22 3.26 +.01 0.92 72.62 +.64 0.16 24.16 +.11 27.43 -.04 0.84 17.16 -.29 0.40 26.89 +.01 0.20 24.44 +.17 0.40 135.43 -3.11 1.16 73.91 -.37 0.04 43.98 +.85 40.25 -.28 4.47 -.03 1.00 34.56 -.46 5.60 304.00 -1.36 0.84 18.90 -.36 46.40 -1.58 7.81 -.02 5.91 258.51 -7.46 0.26 13.41 -.11 1.04 76.21 -.71 0.34 9.47 +.07 22.12 -.87 17.28 -.27 0.50 36.04 -.19 24.87 +.08 0.50 33.69 +.38 0.72 45.50 -.94 0.12 52.37 -.76 8.98 9.76 -.10 7.26 -.12 1.02 13.50 -.14 0.63 9.67 -.07 16.40 +.27 0.04 6.87 -.18 6.94 -.49 16.19 -.44 1.50 +.03 1.96 56.47 +.07 0.40 28.95 -.90 53.54 -1.95 1.16 33.33 +.06 1.30 73.75 -.13 0.36 47.59 -1.84 1.08 62.83 -.30 10.32 -.20 .53 -.06 42.22 -.41 0.20 51.50 -.15 9.69 -.64 3.83 +.62 0.04 7.04 -.01 0.30 11.22 0.26 5.30 +.03 1.52 12.87 +.06 1.85 -.08 0.80 132.12 -2.75 0.78 41.98 -.20 27.60 -.24 23.99 -.58 31.83 -.49 1.00 37.85 +.45 0.72 40.98 -.99 36.26 -.99 28.99 -.04 0.54 39.09 +.09 0.14 43.39 +.04 56.00 +.06 1.76 109.07 -.75 0.04 17.25 +.06 43.25 -1.10 .68 +.03 0.20 45.36 -.82 8.04 -.07 10.85 -.11 55.36 -.56 .40 +.01 3.77 32.37 +.21 0.43 8.68 -.16 1.19 19.95 -.35 0.80 39.10 -1.14 32.15 +.04 0.79 17.32 -.18 1.56 15.90 -.34 10.90 -.47 21.70 -.15 0.01 22.68 -.32 19.65 -.33 2.90 40.28 -.18 76.39 -.31 29.20 -.05 109.51 +.44 41.57 +.54 4.39 -.03 50.63 -3.62

Nm CharterCm ChkPoint Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemtura n CheniereEn ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChiArmM ChinAuto lf ChinaBiot ChinaCEd ChinaDir ChinaEd ChiFnOnl ChiGengM ChinGerui ChinaGreen ChHousLd ChinaInfo ChinaIntEn ChinaLife ChinaLodg ChinaMble ChinaNGas ChinNEPet ChinaPet ChinaPhH ChinaPStl ChinaSecur ChinaShen ChinaSky ChinaUni ChiValve ChXDPlas ChinaYuch Chipotle Chiquita Chubb ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Circor Cirrus Cisco Citigrp CitzRepB h CitrixSys CityNC ClaudeR g CleanEngy ClearChOut Clearwire h ClevBioL h CliffsNRs ClinicData Clorox CloudPeak Coach CobaltIEn CocaCola CocaCE Coeur CogdSpen CogentC Cognex CognizTech CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColonyFncl ColumLabs Comcast Comc spcl Comerica ComfrtS CmcBMO CmclMtls CmwReit rs CmtyBkSy CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s CompPrdS CompCrd h CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Comtech Con-Way ConAgra ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant Conns ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConsolCm ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Cnvrgys ConvOrg h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopaHold Copart Copel CoreLab s CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CowenGp CrackerB Crane Credicp CSVS2xVxS CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc CreXus CrimsnExp Crocs Crossh g rs CrosstexE CrwnCstle CrownHold Crystallx g Ctrip.com CubistPh CullenFr Cummins Curis CurEuro Cyclacel CypSemi CypSharp CytRx h Cytec Cytokinet Cytori DARA rs DCT Indl DDi Corp DHT Hldgs DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DST Sys DSW Inc DTE DUSA DanaHldg Danaher s Darden Darling DaVita DeVry DeanFds DeckOut s DeerConsu Deere DejourE g Delcath Dell Inc DeltaAir DeltaPtr h DemMda n DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DB AgriDL DBGoldSh DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE Dex One Diageo DiamondF DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg DigitalRlt DigRiver DigitalGlb Dillards DineEquity DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DrSCBr rs DirFnBr rs DirLCBr rs DrxEMBll s DrTcBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DrxSOXBll DirEMBear

D 54.25 -.56 51.62 +.27 28.60 -.23 4.06 -.02 17.10 -.32 8.01 -.64 0.30 33.34 -.68 2.88 107.78 -1.88 0.05 40.78 +.77 0.20 14.99 -.12 52.44 -.18 0.66 3.93 +.01 2.20 -.19 10.68 -.11 7.56 -.45 5.92 -.16 1.30 1.22 -.13 5.06 +.60 3.20 +.15 5.20 +.10 7.12 -.19 2.34 +.24 2.67 +.03 2.15 -.03 0.91 57.67 -.43 20.70 +.84 1.93 46.84 -.31 5.95 -.07 4.07 -.38 3.16 104.66 -.36 2.38 -.13 1.58 -.07 4.70 -.10 6.22 +.51 3.21 -.13 0.23 18.71 +.37 4.00 -.24 4.57 -.38 30.31 -.61 268.41 -.83 15.08 -.31 1.56 62.23 +.11 1.36 79.57 +.54 6.78 +.02 25.31 -.83 0.40 113.15 -3.97 2.75 +.01 1.60 33.00 +.08 0.84 19.97 -.61 0.49 30.04 -.15 0.15 46.78 -.58 18.51 -.52 0.24 17.47 -.18 4.53 -.03 .85 -.02 74.86 +1.44 0.80 57.87 +.24 2.40 -.18 16.13 -1.24 14.03 +.37 5.95 -.03 7.92 +.01 0.56 97.00 -1.70 30.55 +.13 2.20 69.94 +.52 21.57 -.18 0.60 50.93 +.17 14.20 -1.19 1.88 67.40 +.13 0.48 27.62 +.13 35.58 -1.11 0.40 5.76 -.16 14.72 +.20 0.32 28.53 -.27 80.50 +.24 0.72 9.68 -.10 49.10 +.68 2.65 +.01 2.32 81.61 +.33 21.77 -.25 0.60 19.00 1.28 18.35 -.13 3.53 -.12 0.45 24.55 -.13 0.45 23.14 -.11 0.40 38.19 +.36 0.20 13.19 -.65 0.92 41.25 +.32 0.48 16.48 -.50 2.00 26.19 +.79 0.96 24.69 +.06 25.89-14.41 39.05 +.86 0.41 42.53 -.22 28.93 -1.08 6.62 +.11 0.80 49.19 -.36 11.09 -.06 29.48 -.68 1.00 29.11 -.34 0.40 37.66 -.03 0.92 23.83 +.18 103.08 -3.11 55.04 +.17 2.38 6.13 +.15 2.64 80.12 -.67 0.40 50.34 -2.18 1.55 18.71 -.03 2.40 50.22 -.68 35.04 -.14 21.52 -.01 0.96 33.18 +.09 67.89 -2.98 14.04 -.08 .25 -.01 0.06 72.58 -.09 1.16 66.59 +.16 0.42 24.28 -.38 1.09 53.37 +.45 44.39 +.43 0.46 28.46 -.43 1.00 96.89 -3.03 17.92 -.05 4.59 -.42 0.56 50.86 -1.01 0.20 19.60 +.02 1.65 34.52 -.07 24.01 +.07 12.00 +.02 0.82 76.20 -.21 8.65 +.03 0.18 8.38 +.20 60.60 +1.47 0.30 17.26 -.24 31.63 -.15 0.80 52.95 +.53 4.07 +.03 0.88 47.47 -.26 0.92 47.33 -.64 1.95 100.92 -2.68 34.40 -.63 1.40 44.78 -.03 0.32 3.14 43.61 -.25 0.74 10.89 -.21 3.99 -.05 18.60 +.32 1.11 -.09 0.32 9.66 -.25 42.85 +.18 38.04 -.26 .13 -.01 45.25 -.45 29.78 -.22 1.80 59.98 +.32 1.05 107.42 -1.47 3.93 -.12 0.01 143.71 -.29 1.36 -.02 18.71 -.39 2.40 12.04 .82 -.02 0.50 54.80 -1.42 1.55 +.11 7.64 -.16 3.34 +.24 0.28 5.40 +.04 0.40 9.42 -.74 0.40 4.72 -.14 0.78 9.56 +.03 1.33 27.42 -.34 0.15 11.71 +.10 0.70 55.12 +1.01 43.45 +.48 2.24 48.73 -.48 5.75 +.23 17.28 -.29 0.08 51.73 +.18 1.28 46.69 -.20 15.23 -.15 86.63 -.04 0.24 54.01 -.75 10.27 -.05 88.48 -1.00 0.20 7.07 +.18 1.40 94.99 -.94 .43 -.02 7.18 -.35 14.60 +.03 9.43 +.39 .88 -.02 22.33 -.47 23.32 -1.22 38.48 -.79 2.42 -.07 4.06 0.20 36.60 +.11 8.58 -.22 0.93 61.40 -.22 15.22 -.22 14.62 +.13 44.75 -.67 7.39 +.10 0.16 13.38 -.11 0.68 89.24 -2.16 4.14 -.21 2.46 77.97 -.53 0.18 60.09 -1.52 0.50 78.75 +.26 0.32 10.77 -.05 11.79 -.22 15.52 -.34 40.98 -.09 2.72 56.74 +.08 36.50 -.76 28.28 -.02 0.16 42.70 +.08 50.47 -1.30 46.53 +.05 1.35 45.99 -.32 36.18 +.97 39.57 +.08 35.71 +.36 0.84 43.33 -1.54 21.61 +.19 14.94 +.01 13.99 +.67 0.01 56.44 -1.56 16.96 +.56

Nm

D

DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear DrxREBll s DirxSCBull DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscLab rs DishNetwk Disney DolbyLab DollarFn s DollarGen DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs Donldson DonlleyRR DoralFncl DotHillSy DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragonW g DrmWksA DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DuoyGWat DyaxCp Dynavax Dynegy rs DynexCap

0.39 0.16 0.05 0.24

0.40

1.97 1.00 0.52 1.04 0.40 1.10 0.60 1.00

0.52

1.64 0.48 0.98 0.68 1.44

1.08

Nm 30.67 46.26 63.39 85.18 83.37 84.81 24.12 40.22 35.69 1.89 23.47 41.89 50.75 20.45 31.63 68.00 56.07 43.98 17.88 85.86 60.69 19.47 1.11 2.88 18.83 65.00 37.76 38.15 8.07 27.41 52.35 4.64 75.15 3.83 4.85 54.85 23.04 18.16 13.67 81.05 3.11 1.70 2.66 5.74 9.98

+.05 -.10 +.13 -2.39 -.76 -5.12 +.27 +.15 +.23 +.10 -.32 +.13 -.29 -.58 -.19 -.82 +.38 -.84 -.17 -2.63 -.62 -.03 +.02 +.02 -.09 -.76 +.69 -.32 -.96 -.02 -2.52 -.02 -.18 -.55 -.36 -.25 +.07 +.32 -.11 -.06 -.06 +.01 -.05

E-F-G-H ECDang n 19.96 -.38 E-House 0.25 13.07 -.08 ETrade rs 15.89 -.12 eBay 31.19 +.05 EMC Cp 26.38 +.25 EMCOR 30.20 -.54 ENI 2.67 50.75 -.49 EOG Res 0.64 112.67 -1.99 EQT Corp 0.88 48.53 -.88 EV Engy 3.04 54.64 -1.60 EagleBulk 3.77 +.02 EaglRkEn 0.60 10.26 -.18 ErthLink 0.20 8.06 +.08 EstWstBcp 0.04 22.47 -.19 EastChm 1.88 97.72 -2.27 EKodak 3.30 -.13 Eaton s 1.36 53.58 -.68 EatnVan 0.72 32.90 -.13 EV LtdDur 1.25 15.77 -.08 EVRiskMgd 1.28 12.68 -.13 EV TxDiver 1.16 11.04 -.04 EVTxMGlo 1.14 10.64 -.05 EVTxGBW 1.21 12.16 -.05 Ebix Inc 22.39 -.27 EchelonC 8.89 -.10 EchoStar 35.31 -1.16 Ecolab 0.70 51.30 -.22 Ecopetrol 1.16 40.47 -1.02 EdisonInt 1.28 36.79 -.48 EducMgmt 20.54 -1.42 EducRlty 0.20 8.03 +.04 EdwLfSci s 83.35 +.29 8x8 Inc 3.01 +.08 ElPasoCp 0.04 17.35 -.37 ElPasoPpl 1.76 36.58 -.13 Elan 7.62 -.25 EldorGld g 0.10 17.59 -.46 ElectArts 19.85 -.01 EFII 16.55 +1.56 ElsterGp n 15.15 +.13 eMagin 8.63 +.15 Embraer 0.64 33.41 -.05 Emcore lf 2.25 -.14 EMS 63.57 -.08 EmersonEl 1.38 57.64 -.11 EmmisCm 1.04 EmpIca 9.51 +.09 Emulex 10.18 -.19 Enbridge 1.96 62.13 -.34 EnCana g 0.80 33.31 -1.08 EndvrInt rs 14.55 -.29 EndvSilv g 11.40 -.97 EndoPhrm 41.06 +.21 Endocyte n 9.44 -.06 EndurSpec 1.20 48.06 +.09 Ener1 2.87 +.02 EnerNOC 18.14 -.32 Energen 0.54 62.19 -1.20 Energizer 70.19 -1.67 EngyConv 2.08 -.04 EngyTEq 2.16 44.77 -.69 EngyTsfr 3.58 52.64 -.25 EngyXXI 34.70 -1.82 EnergySol 5.46 -.10 Enerpls g 2.16 31.69 -.64 Enersis 0.61 20.87 -.27 EnerSys 37.71 -.89 ENSCO 1.40 57.50 -.21 EnsignGp 0.22 31.81 -1.87 Entegris 8.03 -.21 Entergy 3.32 65.44 -.86 EntPrPt 2.36 42.89 -.16 EntropCom 7.73 -.20 EnzoBio 3.83 +.06 EnzonPhar 11.00 -.05 EpicorSft 12.62 +.09 Equifax 0.64 37.98 -.15 Equinix 92.72 -.54 EqtyOne 0.88 18.60 -.02 EqtyRsd 1.47 55.55 -.02 EricsnTel 0.35 13.20 -.17 EssexPT 4.16 124.96 -.10 EsteeLdr 0.75 95.05 -.01 EtfSilver 39.95 -.68 Euronet 17.74 -.34 EverestRe 1.92 92.23 -.35 EvergE rs 2.97 -.03 EvrgrSlr rs 1.33 -.02 ExactSci h 7.01 -.05 ExcelM 4.40 -.16 ExcoRes 0.16 20.91 -.01 Exelixis 11.05 -.04 Exelon 2.10 39.87 -.57 ExeterR gs 5.23 -.27 ExideTc wt .01 +.01 ExideTc 10.15 -.30 Expedia 0.28 24.52 -.78 ExpdIntl 0.40 50.32 -.12 Express n 20.87 -.13 ExpScrip s 55.95 -.20 ExterranH 22.25 +.01 ExtorreG g 7.26 -.40 ExtraSpce 0.56 19.50 -.02 ExtrmNet 3.39 ExxonMbl 1.76 85.16 -.79 Ezcorp 28.94 -.40 F5 Netwks 94.50 -.68 FEI Co 31.85 -.36 FLIR Sys 0.24 33.55 -.13 FMC Corp 0.60 84.34 -.88 FMC Tch s 47.13 -.88 FNBCp PA 0.48 10.53 +.02 FSI Intl 4.19 -.22 FTI Cnslt 38.95 -.40 FX Ener 8.27 -.75 Fabrinet n 21.05 -.98 FairIsaac 0.08 29.94 -.40 FairchldS 19.00 -.02 FamilyDlr 0.72 52.00 +.25 Fastenal 1.00 67.50 +.17 FedExCp 0.48 92.53 +1.37 FedRlty 2.68 81.45 +.73 FedSignl 0.24 6.48 -.01 FedInvst 0.96 26.74 +.29 Feihe Intl 7.10 +.17 FelCor 6.30 -.09 Ferrellgs 2.00 25.80 -.20 Ferro 15.85 -.23 FiberTwr 1.64 +.02 FibriaCelu 16.14 -.28 FidlNFin 0.48 14.85 +.12 FidNatInfo 0.20 33.03 +.21 FifthStFin 1.28 13.03 FifthThird 0.24 13.73 +.03 Finisar 24.60 -1.16 FinLine 0.20 20.55 +.16 FstAFin n 0.24 15.49 -.39 FstCwlth 0.12 6.58 -.09 FstHorizon 0.04 11.45 -.01 FstInRT 11.93 -.11 FMajSilv g 22.62 -1.92 FMidBc 0.04 12.22 -.03 FstNiagara 0.64 13.85 +.22 FstSolar 144.40 -2.92 FT Fincl 0.19 15.51 -.03 FT Tech 0.01 24.08 -.17 FT RNG 0.05 22.80 -.60 FirstEngy 2.20 36.76 -.37 FstMerit 0.64 17.23 -.11 Fiserv 62.67 +.31 FiveStar 8.42 -.04 FlagstB rs 1.43 -.02 Flagstone 0.16 8.89 -.01 Flextrn 7.09 -.19 Flotek 9.10 -.09 FlowrsFds 0.80 28.18 +.52 Flowserve 1.28 131.46 -3.53 Fluor 0.50 70.26 -.44 FocusMda 31.28 -.05 FEMSA 0.64 61.88 +.93 FootLockr 0.66 20.45 -.32 ForcePro 4.71 -.13 FordM 14.86 -.47 FordM wt 6.29 -.42 ForestCA 17.94 -.06 ForestLab 34.22 +1.37 ForestOil 35.90 -.50 FormFac 9.59 -.28 Fortinet 39.06 -.50 Fortress 5.93 +.06 FortuneBr 0.76 63.61 +.41 Fossil Inc 93.32 +.32 FosterWhl 35.84 -.79 FranceTel 1.77 22.90 +.04 FrankRes 1.00 124.00 -.60 FrkStPrp 0.76 13.76 -.04 FMCG s 1.00 55.44 -1.79 FrontierCm 0.75 8.01 +.02 FrontierOil 0.24 29.19 -.05 Frontline 1.85 23.58 +.03 FuelSysSol 26.97 -2.15 FuelCell 1.91 +.05 FullerHB 0.28 21.46 +.03 FultonFncl 0.16 11.13 -.05

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Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm FurnBrds FushiCopp GATX GFI Grp GMAC CpT GMX Rs GNC n GSI Cmmrc GT Solar GabelliET GabGldNR GabGM rt GabHltW rt Gafisa SA GainCap n Gallaghr GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin Gartner GascoEngy Gastar grs GaylrdEnt GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec GenGrPr n GenMarit GenMills s GenMoly GenMot n GM cvpfB GenSteel GenOn En Genpact Gentex GenuPrt GenVec h Genworth GeoGrp GeoGloblR GeoMet Geores GaGulf Gerdau GeronCp GigaMed Gildan GileadSci GlaxoSKln GlimchRt GlobalCash GlobCrsg GloblInd GlobPay GblX Uran GlbXSilvM Globalstar GlbSpcMet GluMobile GolLinhas GolarLNG GolarLNG n GoldFLtd GoldRsv g Goldcrp g GoldenMin GoldStr g GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google vjGrace GrafTech GrahamPk Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GraniteC GraphPkg GrayTelev GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPanSilv g GtPlainEn GrtPlns un GrWlfRes GreenMtC s GreenPlns GrnHCmdty GreenbCos Group1 GpTelevisa Guess GugCdnEn GugChinSC GugBullt17 GugSolar GulfRes GulfportE HCA Hld n HCC Ins HCP Inc HSBC Hallibrtn Halozyme Hanesbrds HangrOrth HanmiFncl HanoverIns HansenMed HansenNat HanwhaSol HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp HWinstn g Harsco HartfdFn HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HlthCr pfI HlthCSvc s HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HeartWare Heckmann Heckmn wt HeclaM Heinz HelixEn HelmPayne HSchein Herbalife HercOffsh HercTGC Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg Hibbett HighOne n HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HillenInc HollyCp Hollysys Hologic HomeDp Home Inns Honda HonwllIntl HorizLns Hormel s Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HovnanE HHughes n HudsCity HugotnR HumGen Humana

D 4.80 -.11 8.02 -.34 1.16 39.28 -.25 0.20 4.91 +.07 26.14 +.06 5.93 -.21 17.43 -.12 29.29 -.10 9.95 -.05 0.52 6.16 -.10 1.68 19.19 -.11 .25 .32 +.02 0.14 13.81 -.45 6.63 -.27 1.32 30.67 -.12 23.75 -.06 10.37 -.13 0.16 14.96 +.14 0.45 22.17 -.08 0.20 77.49 -1.34 1.50 34.01 +.26 40.60 -.07 .45 -.02 4.49 -.22 33.29 +.11 10.48 6.81 -.08 45.06 +.56 1.88 73.75 -.76 0.56 20.18 -.01 0.40 14.94 -.07 0.04 2.37 1.12 36.50 +.29 5.37 -.27 30.77 -.75 2.38 47.66 -.93 2.26 -.03 3.76 -.18 0.18 15.80 +.10 0.48 26.70 -1.60 1.80 54.24 +.98 .36 -.01 12.74 -.25 26.75 -.02 .51 -.02 1.50 -.05 29.04 -1.56 38.38 -.21 0.25 12.77 -.02 5.04 -.03 1.23 -.03 0.30 32.02 -.35 41.23 -.02 2.04 40.02 +.10 0.40 8.82 -.09 3.19 24.97+10.17 9.76 -.09 0.08 52.58 +.17 0.40 15.07 -.38 0.25 29.39 -1.48 1.25 -.05 0.15 22.39 -.31 3.65 -.13 0.40 13.29 -.21 0.75 27.20 +.25 25.16 +.31 0.19 18.14 -.41 1.78 +.02 0.41 53.44 -1.00 23.13 -1.02 2.99 -.11 1.40 161.47 +.51 1.16 84.51 -.28 21.47 -.64 14.61 -.39 577.37 -.79 38.50 +.09 19.77 -.22 16.79 +.04 2.16 143.52 +.35 4.03 -.02 7.56 -.42 0.52 26.76 -.39 5.31 -.12 2.17 -.21 2.59 -.13 0.07 7.58 -.06 4.20 -.10 0.83 20.29 -.24 6.00 65.20 -.32 2.12 -.17 65.08 +.34 12.39 +.09 35.74 -.21 25.16 -1.06 0.44 41.84 -.31 22.98 -.06 0.80 39.47 +.01 0.51 23.06 -.56 0.44 30.12 -.24 0.59 20.86 -.15 0.03 8.43 -.03 5.12 -.54 33.03 -1.60 32.12 -1.05 0.58 32.10 +.09 1.92 37.04 -.14 1.80 54.02 -.33 0.36 46.93 -1.20 6.77 -.08 27.30 +.15 26.84 -1.13 1.24 -.09 1.10 45.99 +.16 2.76 -.08 62.26 +.28 7.34 -.04 19.62 +.44 0.40 39.33 -.23 0.10 45.15 -.73 9.35 -.25 0.07 15.08 -.48 1.00 50.56 -.24 16.97 -.62 0.82 35.36 -.30 0.40 27.30 +.13 14.56 -.25 1.20 46.93 +.09 4.20 27.70 +.10 1.24 24.66 -.30 5.61 +.06 5.69 -.27 2.76 52.00 +.05 3.25 52.10 -.85 0.62 18.05 +.11 10.17 -.49 1.20 22.52 -.16 31.63 +.25 24.64 -.03 39.00 +.40 77.66 -4.64 6.39 +.06 .81 +.03 9.13 -.63 1.80 49.68 +.46 16.71 -.36 0.24 66.85 -2.09 69.18 +.04 1.00 83.86 +.40 5.44 -.22 0.88 10.34 -.67 0.20 5.70 -.20 1.38 56.10 +.39 16.01 -.01 0.40 81.78 -2.46 0.32 41.05 +.35 19.30 -.14 13.77 -.08 35.49 +.11 13.85 +.14 1.70 33.74 -.18 0.41 38.70 -.15 0.76 22.75 +.83 0.60 60.04 -.05 13.30 -.15 21.65 -.08 1.00 37.60 +.14 42.22 -1.12 34.04 -.61 1.33 58.26 -.04 1.98 +.23 0.51 27.60 -.13 28.64 -.33 16.51 -.22 55.85 +.11 1.80 23.12 +.04 0.08 16.50 -.20 0.28 6.01 +.01 3.31 +.05 60.59 -3.91 0.60 9.87 1.28 24.02 +.03 28.59 -.15 69.35 -.78

Nm HuntJB HuntBnk HuntIng n Huntsmn Hyatt Hypercom Hyperdyn

D 0.52 44.65 +.39 0.04 6.63 -.10 38.32 -.18 0.40 19.00 -.13 41.12 -.70 11.37 -.01 4.23 -.38

I-J-K-L IAC Inter IAMGld g ICF Intl ICICI Bk ICO Glb A IDT Corp IESI-BFC g iGateCorp ING GRE ING GlbDv ING INGPrRTr ION Geoph IPG Photon iPass IQ AgriSC iRobot iShGold s iShGSCI iSAstla iShBraz iSCan iShGer iSh HK iShItaly iShJapn iSh Kor iSMalas iShMex iShSing iSPacxJpn iShSoAfr iSTaiwn iSh UK iShTurkey iShSilver iShS&P100 iShDJDv iShBTips iShAsiaexJ iShChina25 iShDJTr iSSP500 iShBAgB iShEMkts iShiBxB iSh ACWI iSSPGth iShNatRes iShSPLatA iSSPVal iShB20 T iShB7-10T iShB1-3T iS Eafe iSRusMCV iSRusMCG iShRsMd iSSPMid iShiBxHYB iShNsdqBio iShC&SRl iSR1KV iShPolnd n iSR1KG iSRus1K iSR2KV iShBarIntC iShBarc1-3 iSR2KG iShR2K iShUSPfd iShREst iShDJHm iShFnSc iShUSEngy iShSPSm iShDJHlt iShBasM iShPeru iShDJOE iShDJOG iStar ITT Corp ITT Ed Icon PLC IconixBr IdenixPh IDEX ITW Illumina Imax Corp Immucor ImunoGn Imunmd ImpaxLabs ImpOil gs Incyte IndiaFd Inergy Infinera Informat InfosysT IngerRd IngrmM Inhibitex InlandRE InovioPhm Inphi n InspPhar Insulet IntgDv IntegrysE Intel InterXion n InteractBrk interClick IntcntlEx InterDig Intermec InterMune InterNAP IBM Intl Coal IntFlav IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif IntlSpdw IntTower g InterOil g Intphse Interpublic Intersil IntraLks n IntPotash Intuit IntSurg Invesco InvMtgCap InVKSrInc InvTech IridiumCm IronMtn Isis IstaPh ItauUnibH Itron IvanhoeEn IvanhM g IvaxDiag Ixia JA Solar JDS Uniph JPMorgCh JPMAlerian Jabil JackHenry JackInBox JacksnHw h JacobsEng Jaguar g Jamba JamesRiv JanusCap Jarden JazzPhrm Jefferies JetBlue JinkoSol n JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesGrp JosABnk s JoyGlbl JnprNtwk

30.72 -.25 0.08 22.57 -.53 23.50 +.07 0.53 48.89 -.41 2.83 +.04 0.88 28.14 -1.47 0.50 25.77 -.34 0.15 18.13 -.10 0.54 8.08 -.08 1.20 11.02 -.02 13.19 -.07 0.31 6.12 -.05 13.12 -.19 57.10 -1.14 0.07 1.47 -.01 27.21 -.01 31.86 -.59 14.30 -.09 38.51 -.83 0.82 27.62 +.06 2.53 78.47 -1.14 0.50 33.76 -.53 0.29 26.80 -.07 0.45 19.34 -.25 0.33 19.26 -.04 0.14 9.91 -.07 0.44 64.41 -.56 0.34 14.77 -.16 0.54 64.11 +.24 0.43 13.87 -.12 1.56 49.85 -.16 1.82 74.30 -1.32 0.29 15.30 -.14 0.43 18.58 +.04 1.28 68.11 -.55 39.21 -.65 1.09 59.41 -.12 1.75 52.05 -.18 2.92 108.90 -.08 0.97 63.85 -.70 0.63 45.57 -.45 1.05 94.48 -.17 2.46 132.91 -.39 3.88 104.66 +.10 0.64 49.45 -.59 5.18 108.03 +.01 0.81 48.83 -.22 1.20 68.46 -.17 0.64 46.19 -1.05 1.18 54.15 -.61 1.27 63.41 -.22 3.91 89.96 +.08 3.25 92.16 +.12 0.81 83.70 -.01 1.42 61.16 -.12 0.91 47.80 -.28 0.59 60.68 -.26 1.59 108.44 -.56 1.00 97.89 -.71 7.61 91.94 -.09 0.51 102.26 +.06 1.90 68.97 +.04 1.25 68.62 -.25 0.36 37.96 -.25 0.76 60.33 -.22 1.18 73.77 -.23 1.24 74.36 -.77 4.41 105.02 -.11 2.85 104.11 -.06 0.53 94.46 -.85 0.89 83.23 -.75 2.94 39.48 -.10 1.98 58.39 -.06 0.07 13.27 -.05 0.61 59.40 -.02 0.50 44.70 -.87 0.74 72.74 -.46 0.10 61.15 -.60 0.93 81.21 -1.38 0.92 42.85 -1.29 0.24 65.12 -1.57 0.29 71.93 -2.13 8.49 -.06 1.00 59.10 +.30 73.37 -3.67 22.77 -.19 21.23 -.21 3.19 +.29 0.68 43.78 -.55 1.36 54.32 -.01 68.74 +.40 30.43 -.57 21.08 +.12 11.97 -.15 3.89 -.03 27.69 +.17 0.44 53.17 -1.81 17.43 +.20 3.87 32.38 -.61 2.82 39.79 -.18 8.13 -.57 51.20 -.60 0.90 72.85 +.80 0.48 48.13 +.15 20.94 -.15 4.25 -.02 0.57 9.29 +.15 1.11 -.03 19.04 -1.33 4.96 -.02 20.58 +.13 7.30 -.24 2.72 49.77 -.65 0.72 20.12 +.10 13.74 +.15 1.79 16.04 -.04 7.21 -.03 120.55 0.40 46.39 -.77 10.52 -.03 47.08 +.02 6.95 +.02 2.60 163.95 -.10 10.62 -.36 1.08 63.07 -.31 0.24 15.89 -.16 1.05 28.97 -.93 32.90 -.28 0.18 30.78 -.58 9.86 -.34 69.21 -3.98 6.20 -.56 0.24 11.97 -.13 0.48 13.99 -.23 27.98 -.04 33.98 -.49 53.56 +.42 371.16 +3.49 0.44 25.47 -.46 3.71 21.05 -.15 0.29 5.14 +.01 17.55 -.51 8.21 0.75 32.98 -.39 8.82 -.25 10.54 -.17 0.67 23.87 -.34 54.75 +.25 2.78 -.05 1.48 27.52 -.59 .76 +.13 15.12 +.10 6.59 -.11 18.91 -.39 1.00 46.86 +.02 1.78 37.91 -.23 0.28 19.27 -.52 0.42 33.50 -.16 21.12 -1.05 .59 -.03 49.68 -.91 5.37 -.20 2.14 -.09 22.74 -1.05 0.04 12.67 +.20 0.35 35.54 +.28 33.75 -.38 0.30 24.72 +.12 5.88 +.02 24.29 -.95 1.13 2.16 59.86 +.40 0.64 39.95 -.35 0.20 14.48 -.07 50.72 +.38 0.70 95.96 -2.96 38.58 +.26

nc Sa es gu es a e uno c a

Nm KAR Auct KB Home KBR Inc KEYW n KIT Digitl KKR n KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KV PhmA KC Southn KapStone KA MLP Kellogg Kemet rs Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp Keynote KilroyR KimberR g KimbClk Kimco KindME KindMor n KindredHlt KineticC Kinross g KnghtCap KnightTr Knoll Inc KodiakO g Kohls KongZhg KoreaElc Kraft KratonPP KrispKrm Kroger Kulicke L&L Engy L-1 Ident L-3 Com LAN Air LDK Solar LECG h LG Display LKQ Corp LML Pay LSI Corp LaZBoy Laboph gh LabCp LaBrnch LamResrch LamarAdv LVSands LaSalleH Lattice LawsnSft Layne Lazard LeapWirlss LeapFrog LearCorp s LeeEnt LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LbtyASE LibGlobA LibGlobC LibtyMIntA LibMCapA LibtProp LifeTech LifePtH Lihua Intl LillyEli LimelghtN Limited Lincare s LincNat LinearTch LinnEngy Lionbrdg LionsGt g LiveNatn LivePrsn LizClaib LloydBkg Local.com LockhdM Loews Logitech LongtopFn LongweiPI Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol LucasEngy lululemn g LyonBas A

D 17.04 +.44 0.25 11.49 -.12 0.20 37.01 -.35 12.25 +.12 11.53 +.02 0.52 17.40 +.01 0.60 10.07 +.06 1.00 43.42 -.28 19.65 -.40 4.85 -.18 51.53 -.48 16.31 -.63 1.96 30.40 -.07 1.62 54.71 +.77 14.72 -.23 0.48 38.73 -.29 5.00 -.13 15.20 -.09 0.04 8.83 -.04 0.24 20.37 -1.06 1.40 39.46 +.24 1.95 -.04 2.80 65.43 0.72 17.58 +.04 4.52 73.96 +.01 29.25 -.08 23.96 -.33 54.91 -.23 0.10 16.10 -.50 13.19 -.23 0.24 18.97 +.11 0.24 20.09 +.33 6.21 -.41 1.00 54.20 9.73 -.03 12.06 -.32 1.16 32.03 +.36 38.50 -.93 5.59 +.20 0.42 24.23 +.23 8.64 -.18 5.33 -.48 11.78 +.08 1.80 79.34 -.18 0.62 25.93 -.01 11.54 -.17 .17 -.01 16.84 -.27 23.77 +.29 2.90 +.19 6.56 -.07 10.53 -.12 .43 -.01 93.40 +.58 4.03 +.05 52.92 +.50 33.31 -.04 43.90 -.72 0.44 25.99 -.21 6.03 -.12 12.36 -.01 30.05 -1.05 0.50 42.25 -.56 16.51 +.15 4.39 +.02 0.50 47.50 -.55 3.12 +.15 0.24 36.03 +.02 1.08 23.19 -.01 0.40 31.47 -.31 0.16 18.20 -.17 0.72 52.51 +.45 0.25 37.10 +.30 1.70 +.26 1.75 -.04 0.46 9.36 +.15 38.22 +1.56 0.32 5.25 -.02 42.74 -.11 41.18 -.12 16.81 -.04 75.75 +.69 1.90 33.12 +.65 53.19 +.46 38.54 -.75 7.35 -.65 1.96 35.87 +.18 7.05 -.26 0.80 37.45 +.28 0.80 30.39 -.25 0.20 29.76 -.03 0.96 32.98 -.40 2.64 38.82 -.38 3.72 +.19 6.51 -.07 10.08 -.22 13.10 -.14 5.46 -.08 4.03 +.05 3.85 -.27 3.00 80.51 +.01 0.25 43.02 +.02 14.40 -.15 31.05 -.80 1.64 -.16 5.20 96.71 +.46 9.39 -.20 0.44 26.78 -.04 1.44 134.04 +.09 3.74 -.31 88.71 -1.57 42.49 -.09

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-.02 PlumCrk 1.68 42.70 -.04 PluristemT 3.06 +.13 Polaris 1.80 90.88 -.81 Polo RL 0.80 124.48 +.88 Polycom 46.09 -.84 PolyMet g 2.04 -.07 PolyOne 0.16 13.79 -.77 Polypore 57.87 +1.10 Poniard h .41 Popular 3.10 +.07 PortGE 1.04 23.79 -.28 PostPrp 0.80 38.21 -.29 PostRockE 7.72 +.25 Potash s 0.28 57.13 -.93 Power-One 7.84 -.31 PSCrudeDS 40.70 +3.08 PwshDB 31.33 -.59 PS Agri 34.25 -.15 PS Oil 33.09 -1.17 PS BasMet 25.37 -.22 PS USDBull 21.53 +.03 PwSClnEn 10.25 -.11 PwShDiv 0.31 14.81 -.03 PSPrivEq 0.37 11.69 -.07 PSFinPf 1.27 18.21 -.01 PSDvTecLd 0.10 22.70 -.30 PS EmgInf 0.44 54.91 -.49 PS SrLoan 25.31 +.02 PSHYCpBd 1.38 18.60 +.04 PwShPfd 0.97 14.34 -.04 PShEMSov 1.55 26.56 -.03 PSIndia 0.24 23.70 -.42 PowerSec 6.94 -.30 PwShs QQQ 0.39 56.76 -.19 Powrwav 4.31 -.08 PranaBio 2.50 +.10 Praxair 2.00 101.37 -.92 PrecCastpt 0.12 145.87 -.38 PrecDrill 14.96 -.10 PriceTR 1.24 67.30 -.55 priceline 512.45 +5.63 PrideIntl 42.77 -.14 Primoris 0.10 11.36 +.02 PrinctnR h .39 -.02 PrinFncl 0.55 31.90 +.18 PrivateB 0.04 14.48 -.23 ProShtQQQ 32.91 +.10 ProShtS&P 41.21 +.13 PrUShS&P 20.94 +.11 ProUltDow 0.32 62.54 -.03 PrUlShDow 17.64 -.02 ProUltQQQ 87.88 -.59 PrUShQQQ rs 52.15 +.33 ProUltSP 0.39 53.18 -.29 PrUShtFn rs 56.83 +.04 ProUShL20 38.93 -.02 PrUSCh25 rs 25.61 +.44 ProUSEM rs 28.37 +.63 ProUSRE rs 15.92 +.04 ProUSOG rs 27.33 +.98 ProUSBM rs 16.76 +.54 ProUltRE rs 0.43 55.40 -.09 ProUFin rs 0.05 70.42 -.08 PrUPShQQQ 26.28 +.23 PrUPShR2K 17.80 +.51 ProUltO&G 0.21 59.75 -2.32 ProUBasM 0.03 55.20 -1.95 PrUPR2K s 93.25 -2.70 ProShtR2K 29.79 +.27 PrUltPQQQ s 82.11 -.75 ProUltR2K 0.01 48.13 -.87 ProSht20Tr 45.17 -.01 ProUSSP500 15.97 +.15 PrUltSP500 s 0.11 79.45 -.77 ProSUltGold 73.95 -1.12 ProUSSlv rs 20.21 +.56 PrUltCrde rs 59.64 -4.43 PrUShCrde rs 39.18 +2.59 ProSUltSilv 254.30 -8.86 ProUltShYen 16.82 -.09 ProUShEuro 17.19 +.07 ProctGam 2.10 62.19 +.29 ProgrssEn 2.48 45.54 -.61 ProgrsSft s 29.73 -.44 ProgsvCp 1.40 21.52 +.26 ProLogis 0.45 15.72 +.01 ProlorBio 6.12 +.14 ProUSR2K rs 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0.08 39.18 -.75 20.13 -.02 2.12 +.01 24.80 -.68 26.73 -.27 17.34 -.31 42.04 -.13 0.86 53.40 -.23 22.58 +.06 2.76 -.04 3.49 +.18 5.94 -.14 0.40 57.78 -.21 24.27 +.07 0.61 17.21 -.23 19.01 +.41 4.00 -.87 13.52 -.20 4.24 -.04 19.93 -.35 0.03 2.28 -.15 1.47 15.94 +.38 1.52 15.94 +.46 27.85 -.05 6.10 -.11 0.28 22.75 -.90 0.84 23.41 -.48 13.79 -.11 30.27 -.35 1.34 +.03 42.62 -.36 0.01 6.50 -.04 17.81 -.17 .39 -.04 2.10 -.07 0.25 16.02 +.11 17.02 +.34 68.38 +.20 2.04 -.07 19.52 +.17 85.85 -1.35 0.16 56.36 -.97 15.11 +.69 0.52 37.78 +.14 2.16 61.50 -.31 1.72 50.72 -.07 29.80 +1.51 3.50 -.05 26.69 -.31 1.73 34.59 -.05 45.04 -.16 26.22 -.13 7.35 -.37 1.00 15.47 -.09 0.84 13.84 -.13 1.85 42.49 -.06 1.78 27.93 +.09 43.91 +1.21 0.70 87.14 -.19 0.04 7.26 -.01 0.24 18.27 -.23 36.99 -.14 0.48 60.74 +.23 0.48 56.48 -.93 1.04 72.11 +.98 9.49 -.30 0.24 34.92 -.16 1.15 -.08 4.93 -.19 5.77 -.10 0.80 29.85 -.06 54.65 -.14 31.41 +.12 17.74 -.25 1.00 6.35 +.02 0.16 15.09 -.31 2.04 108.29 +.32 0.32 10.38 -.12 18.78 +.22 11.60 -.09 1.22 2.12 36.07 +.36 7.78 +.29 33.16 +.56 1.08 73.82 -.11 0.42 27.50 -.06 1.03 -.02 33.07 +.64 0.18 40.00 -1.16 0.56 30.09 -.28 0.80 67.09 -.80 1.40 92.41 +.03 0.96 64.12 +.49 48.49 -.83 1.42 36.18 +.11 0.44 85.20 -.24 45.54 -.81 13.66 -.39 0.88 71.25 +.65 50.89 -.48 41.25 -1.31 2.00 62.98 -.19 14.48 +.36 18.65 -.14 39.70 +1.14 3.36 74.41 -.65 3.36 74.48 -.54 0.44 53.11 -.89 5.17 -.35 5.39 -.36 26.00 10.66 +.03 17.04 -.01 1.08 49.97 +.25 0.70 50.35 -.20 0.12 16.28 -.06 17.44 +.19 0.82 63.87 +.24 38.76 -.23 1.94 38.94 -.28 0.20 23.38 -.20 14.13 -.31 18.38 -.33 0.40 75.54 +.05 15.10 -.13 0.10 71.79 -3.07 2.98 123.64 -.01 142.64 -1.02 2.56 61.36 +.09 3.41 39.28 -.29 1.55 177.98 -1.25 2.34 132.46 -.40 1.74 54.05 -.06 0.31 18.44 -.05 0.15 26.03 -.06 0.71 44.42 -.01 1.88 63.53 +.08 0.07 31.91 +.24 4.44 40.46 -.05 1.25 61.38 -.01 45.85 0.36 26.71 -.05 0.50 51.96 -.01 0.49 62.14 -1.85 0.41 73.37 -1.70 1.00 80.55 +.84 31.00 -.02 18.71 -1.30 0.40 12.33 -.12 17.17 -.10 57.37 -.47 54.06 +.17 0.48 23.82 -.05 26.73 -.32 0.84 52.54 +.28 11.67 -.12 134.62 -.03 36.29 -.50 14.25 +.19 3.71 -.14 25.63 -.35 0.68 43.72 -.17 46.43 -.34 12.22 -.72 7.46 -.16 11.03 -.02 1.63 37.12 +.66 2.40 +.08 3.20 -.04 12.05 -.01 0.46 18.45 +.10 1.53 58.08 -1.97 3.23 -.06 10.48 +.06 35.81 +.36 1.00 88.80 -2.05 0.07 61.35 -1.91 0.62 24.93 -.07 0.49 31.58 -.11 0.23 29.73 -.33 0.47 29.31 -.07 0.24 18.35 4.65 +.11 8.95 -.18 1.00 58.77 +.15 0.30 50.15 -.40 9.63 +.11 32.48 -1.75 1.83 2.74 35.07 -1.19 0.72 15.74 -.10 0.52 26.02 -.17 2.42 -.04 78.27 +.05 0.50 19.17 +.04 15.86 +.10 12.47 -.09 26.79 -.47 0.55 34.63 -.25 1.92 53.00 -.46 25.97 -.06 .27 -.00 1.48 23.38 +.03 34.40 -.16 0.84 36.35 -.13 6.85 -.03 0.20 11.40 -.08 12.55 -.23 22.50 -.46 34.97 -.48 2.96 -.19 1.46 84.66 -.32 1.52 20.19 -.44 0.39 90.45 +1.25 9.00 -.08 11.06 +.05 0.58 16.56 -.27 3.72 137.44 -1.06 4.52 +.30 13.06 -.28 0.72 64.36 -.46 45.60 -.16 20.23 +.24 7.58 -.12 9.81 +.72 0.41 6.22 -.05 34.01 -1.07

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D 0.12 44.11 -2.80 0.08 14.92 -1.07 3.20 105.75 +.10 116.27 -3.08 0.48 11.26 -.37 3.93 -.48 5.79 -.23 1.64 -.02 1.78 +.02 51.80 +.32 20.22 -.42 14.02 -.82 12.55 -.83 0.16 15.90 +.10 27.13 -.42 8.18 -.29 9.41 -.39 3.18 -.04 8.97 -.11 23.34 -.06 1.76 73.03 -.04 37.83 -.19 0.73 58.17 -1.14 41.15 -.86 94.74 -1.61 2.40 24.46 +.10 24.20 +.48 0.30 50.88 -.06 3.09 -.39 24.65 -.34 2.85 -.06 0.10 13.23 -.58 8.96 -.33 1.12 35.12 -.29 3.52 -.04 0.28 30.24 -.34 0.20 49.80 -1.33 21.14 +.52 24.97 -.20 1.82 37.78 -.62 1.83 38.78 -1.04 0.60 27.91 -.43 0.02 11.78 +.10 39.60 -.95 1.04 27.19 +.03 8.67 -.36 24.18 +.15 20.35 4.71 -.02 18.05 -.83 12.63 -.11 0.30 19.30 -.01 1.23 39.75 -.45 0.61 33.51 +.19 0.81 30.41 +.16 0.56 39.07 +.01 1.05 78.15 -1.57 0.16 16.46 0.64 37.39 -.03 0.33 25.89 -.04 1.31 31.56 -.42 24.88 -.28 3.70 -.02 1.64 74.84 +.13 0.40 20.25 3.41 -.62 0.52 35.49 -.28 0.30 56.42 -.01 1.68 21.56 -.24 0.72 46.19 +.13 1.10 28.86 -.72 0.40 18.42 -.31 0.24 11.49 0.50 10.29 .78 -.01 90.35 +.65 0.06 8.94 +.09 0.08 15.19 -.51 0.12 7.96 -.09 22.49 -1.03 32.89 -1.70 48.31 -1.46 6.18 -.04 0.72 60.00 +.29 37.83 -.17 .13 -.00 5.97 -.03 10.22 -.10 3.63 +.03 1.44 31.51 +.04 0.40 45.53 -1.12 2.29 +.15 0.60 44.15 -.41 7.73 -.16 16.39 -.46 16.02 -.33 9.52 -.49 9.69 -.09 9.27 -.15 0.04 29.51 -.14 3.14 -.13 2.79 -.04 38.86 -.15 0.35 9.20 -.22 0.04 9.41 -.06 11.43 -.01 10.35 -.15 41.03 -1.19 14.29 -.31 8.35 +.27 18.42 +.21 25.91 +.71 13.92 +.60 1.13 67.17 +.07 32.26 -.69 27.32 +.07 0.04 2.73 +.04 0.24 56.30 +1.11 3.31 +.06 2.00 -.09 1.04 28.39 +.32 1.80 36.55 +.76 0.72 19.68 +.16 0.20 15.17 -.26 0.20 21.61 +.34 0.64 33.69 -.23 0.85 18.69 -.28 0.21 7.36 -.29 4.54 -.13 0.96 11.09 +.11 0.71 45.99 +.01 0.76 51.09 +.39 39.26 +1.78 51.54 -1.42 17.29 -.76 19.78 +.47 0.47 12.51 -.14 15.46 -.10 6.49 -.01 27.40 +.25 34.37 +.13 0.25 24.10 -.56 0.80 25.05 -.23 6.38 -.06 2.23 34.19 -.74 1.00 49.26 -.27 5.82 -.13 3.90 +.01 0.20 3.97 +2.36 0.32 27.16 -.73 1.75 53.15 +.08 19.12 -.13 51.90 -.39 0.60 56.34 -1.01 1.27 35.97 -.72 2.52 37.97 -.73 1.24 10.42 -.19 7.88 -.27 18.71 +.36 0.72 7.70 -.04 0.81 15.48 -.17 3.03 26.49 +.36 1.75 26.22 -.14 0.83 18.62 +.02 0.47 33.22 +.01 1.90 25.12 5.82 -.42 20.52 +.09 0.08 5.11 -.08 0.52 22.21 -.80 0.54 10.63 +.01 56.23 -.94 0.68 50.50 -.09 6.44 -1.11 1.02 -.13 39.66 -1.67 50.19 -.12 17.67 -.28 34.05 -.30 0.50 34.57 -.72 25.27 -1.22 25.65 -.14 17.85 -.66 14.50 -.36 46.44 +.22 0.78 48.98 -1.48 25.50 -.06 0.52 34.93 -.24 0.32 16.24 -.14 0.08 27.18 +.01 26.12 +.09 55.98 +.17 57.89 -.37 12.86 -.34 1.24 39.72 -.16 0.40 31.78 -.70 27.25 -.10 50.99 -5.53 2.20 93.80 +.58 26.99 +.15 1.00 57.69 -1.55 1.00 62.05 +.62 42.02 +.02 1.00 -.04 1.92 72.80 -.05 0.94 35.15 -.32 0.72 50.54 -.37 0.02 26.04 -.26 18.46 +.06 8.42 -.21 20.41 +.13 4.66 +.01 0.64 67.08 +.42 9.20 -.94 2.64 88.27 -.39 3.16 61.84 -.34 0.28 18.42 +.03 0.50 23.03 -.35 1.35 -.03 0.58 76.50 -1.38 0.28 63.00 +.16 11.88 +.28 1.68 41.24 -.06 0.84 49.86 -.17 3.03 -.04 80.23 -.27 0.79 80.76 +1.16 5.50 +.53 1.44 60.42 +.84 73.48 -3.22 .72 -.08

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0.28 10.07 +.02 18.66 +.10 0.74 23.69 -.01 1.00 32.14 -.51 1.73 30.12 -.38 45.43 +.36 8.24 +.30 1.05 +.01 9.06 -.52 0.32 21.95 -.07 2.12 -.12 4.29 -.13 16.12 -.21 0.06 20.41 -.12 2.64 -.17 51.12 +.43 49.05 -.62 0.47 18.12 -.34 .07 -.00 0.20 11.30 +.12 73.29 +1.89 1.12 32.13 +.11 1.12 31.32 +.22 11.02 +.70 1.52 95.35 -.31 30.65 +.08 2.39 -.01 20.52 +.73 0.08 2.78 -.05 0.40 6.31 +.02 2.08 73.21 -.04 31.88 -.40 0.50 26.09 -.09 10.78 +.20 43.64 -1.51 0.20 51.72 -1.08 1.70 84.98 +.17 66.10 +.29 0.50 44.32 -.06 2.00 22.76 -.12 56.65 +.06 0.20 46.99 -1.77 3.96 -.19 0.37 26.40 +.09 1.68 -.06 3.07 -.22 4.08 -.11 2.06 -.11 31.30 +.39 24.15 -.33 2.52 99.29 +2.02 7.04 -.30 29.77 -.17 0.90 33.96 +.03 0.90 30.29 -.11 0.38 53.24 -.81 1.60 +.06 0.20 27.56 -.63 1.00 34.17 +


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Gas

tings and other equipment.

Continued from B1 “The old dogma of natural gas being better than coal in terms of greenhouse gas emissions gets stated over and over without qualification,” said Robert Howarth, a professor of ecology and environmental biology at Cornell University and the lead author of one of the studies. Howarth said his analysis, which looked specifically at methane leakage rates in unconventional shale gas development, was among the first of its kind and that much more research was needed. “I don’t think this is the end of the story,” said Howarth, who is an opponent of growing gas development in western New York. “I think this is just the beginning of the story, and before governments and the industry push ahead on gas development, at the very least we ought to do a better job of making measurements.” The findings, which will be published this week, are certain to stir debate. For much of the last decade, the natural gas industry has carefully cultivated a green reputation, often with the help of environmental groups who embrace the resource as a clean-burning “bridge fuel” to a renewable energy future. The industry argues that it has vastly reduced the amount of fugitive methane with new technologies and upgraded pipe fit-

Taxes

associated with flow-back and drillout processes in hydraulic fracturing and other unconventional gas drilling techniques. The study combined these emissions with studies of other methane losses along the processing and distribution cycle to arrive at an estimated total methane loss range from 3.6 to 7.9 percent for the shale gas industry. The researchers also include a recent study from the Goddard Institute for Space Studies at NASA suggesting that an interaction of methane with certain aerosol particles significantly amplifies methane’s already potent greenhouse gas effects, particularly over a 20-year time horizon. When all is factored together, Howarth and his colleagues conclude that the greenhouse gas footprint of shale gas can be as much as 20 percent greater than, and perhaps twice as high as, coal per unit of energy.

Unconventional methods The ability to pull natural gas economically from previously inaccessible formations deep underground has made huge quantities of the resource available in wide areas of the country, from Texas, Louisiana, Pennsylvania, New York, Wyoming and Colorado. Such unconventional gas production accounts for roughly nearly a quarter of total production in the United States, according to the latest figures from the Energy Information Administration. That is expected to reach 45 percent by 2035. But the cleanliness of natural gas is largely based on its lower carbon dioxide emissions when burned. It emits roughly half the amount of carbon dioxide as coal and about 30 percent that of oil. Chris Tucker, a spokesman for Energy in Depth, a coalition of independent oil and natural gas producers, dismissed Howarth as an advocate who is opposed to hydraulic-fracturing or “fracking,” a practice associated with unconventional gas development involving the high-pressure injection of water, sand and chemicals deep underground to break up shale formations and release gas deposits. Howarth said his credentials as a scientist spoke for themselves. Howarth included methane losses

Practical concerns David Hughes, a geoscientist and research fellow at the Post Carbon Institute, an energy and climate research organization in California, used Howarth’s research as part of a broader look at natural gas as a substitute for coal in electricity generation and oil in transportation. Hughes’ full report is scheduled to be released in May, but in a draft

States get an automatic two-month extension to file and pay their federal taxes.

lies are urged to file for the Earned Income Tax Credit. It’s a federal refund, up to a maximum of $5,666, depending on family size. The refund phases out at various income levels; for married couples filing jointly, with three or more kids, the maximum is roughly $48,360. Even if you don’t owe taxes, you need to file a return to claim an EITC refund. To see if you qualify, click on the “Web Connector EZ” tool on www. weconnect.net. You can also use the “EITC Assistant” on the IRS website or contact a VITA site for free help.

Continued from B1

Faster refunds

How to pay

The fastest refund route is to electronically file your tax return and request that refunds be direct-deposited to your bank account. Taxpayers who do so can expect their refund in seven to 10 days; those mailing a paper return can expect a refund by mail in eight weeks. To check the status of your IRS refund, call the refund hotline at 800829-1954 or check online “Where’s My Refund?” at www.irs.gov. There’s also a new smartphone application, IRS2Go, that lets you check your refund status and get IRS tax updates. The app is available for Android or Apple devices.

Never, ever send cash. If you’re paying by check, make it payable to: “U.S. Treasury.” On the front, include the tax year, tax form number and the first Social Security number shown on your tax form. Do not staple your check to the return. If you’re paying by credit or debit card, the IRS offers several options through private providers on its website. The IRS does not charge a fee, but the providers do. Generally, the minimum “convenience fee” is about $3.95.

Need an extension? If you can’t gather your paperwork in time, get a tax-filing extension. But note: You still must pay what you owe by Monday, April 18, or face interest fees and possible penalties. For IRS taxes, an extension is not automatic but requires filing a Form 4868. The extension form is easily filed online using the irs.gov “FreeFile” program. Those working overseas or serving in the military outside the United

Can’t pay? Taxpayers who owe but don’t have the funds to pay should contact the IRS to request an “alternative payment” plan. It can be a one-time short-term extension or a longer installment plan. Generally, installment plans are offered if the tax debt is $25,000 or less and can be repaid within five years. Penalties and interest are charged.

Don’t miss out Low-income individuals and fami-

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 12, 2011 B5

Homes

version shared with The New York Times, Hughes suggested that while natural gas would play an important role in the nation’s energy mix, both cases were practical impossibilities. “I think it’s going to be very challenging, to put it mildly, to ramp up shale gas production by fourfold, which is the federal government’s projection for 2035,” Hughes said. “I’m not saying it can’t be done, but if it was done, the amount of drilling you’re looking at to make that happen is staggering.” David Hawkins, the director of climate programs with the Natural Resources Defense Council, said that much could be done by regulators to nudge drillers to capture more of the fugitive methane, but that it’s often more economical for industry to simply let it escape. Hawkins also said that too little was known about just how much methane was being lost and vented, and that studies like Howarth’s, while needed, relied on too slim a data set to be considered the final word. “This is a huge and growing industry, and we just don’t have the information we need to make sure that this resource is being developed as cleanly as it can be,” Hawkins said. “We view his shining a flashlight into this dark closet to be a service,” Hawkins added, “but the flashlight is still a dim one, and we still can’t see everything in the closet.”

Continued from B1 Another bright side of the data, Ragsdale said, is the shorter and shorter time homes spent on the market in some places in the past few years. In the first quarter of 2007, for instance, a La Pine home took 223 days to sell, on average. The number rose, fell and rose again, and now the average is 150 days. Ragsdale also took comfort in the more general idea of more homes selling at all. “I think that what we’re seeing is a trend here — I think that it’s looking better,” she said. “(The total number of homes sold is) not going down any more.” What’s more, it’s an even better buyers’ market than it’s been in recent years, she added. Ragsdale said banks have taken off the market some previously foreclosed properties. Such homes will eventually go back on the market, she said. Valerie Hunter, principal broker at H&H Preferred Real Estate, which operates in Redmond and the Portland area, agreed with Ragsdale. Hunter said bigger banks have put a hold on many foreclosures in order to review them and, in many cases, foreclose on certain properties a second time because of problems the first time around. Ragsdale said she was not sure how the review of foreclosures would affect home sale prices. Jordan Novet can be reached at 541-633-2117 or at jnovet@bendbulletin.com.

Home sales up Data gleaned from the Multiple Listing Service of Central Oregon and presented by the Central Oregon Association of Realtors show residential home sales in cities and counties in the region bouncing back. But the numbers of short sales and bank-owned sales are increasing, which has an inverse effect on home sale prices, said Kathy Ragsdale, CEO of the association. Numbers only apply to the first quarter of each year.

tion credit is now refundable, meaning you can collect it even if you don’t owe taxes. • Federal tax credits from the economic recovery program still exist or are expanded this year, including: up to $2,500 for certain higher education costs, such as tuition, books and fees; up to $1,500 for certain energysaving home improvements; $400 for singles and $800 for couples under the Making Work Pay tax credit; and up to $8,000 for first-time homebuyers who entered a purchase contract by April 30, 2010. For details, contact the IRS or a local tax preparer.

E-filing options

A final note

More taxpayers than ever — roughly 70 percent — are electronically filing their taxes, according to the IRS. Go online to www.IRS.gov to check out various e-filing and Web-payment options. In some cases, there are income limits. For federal returns, the IRS offers “Free File” for incomes up to $58,000 or “Free File Fillable Forms” for any income. Some 2010 changes: • Standard mileage rates for business vehicles have dropped — to 50 cents a mile. • Child adoption expenses (travel, court costs, attorneys’ fees, etc.) qualify for a bigger tax credit — up to $13,170 per child. Also, the adop-

Some are wondering how a possible federal government shutdown over the current budget mess would affect the IRS. Rest assured, you still have to pay. “In the event there is a government shutdown, the tax filing deadline will still be April 18,” said IRS spokesman Jesse Weller. The IRS would not be able to process paper tax returns, but “those filed electronically will still be processed and money owed to the government will still be collected.” Typically, the IRS says about 20 percent to 25 percent of taxpayers file their taxes in the last two weeks before the April deadline. If that’s you, we hope it goes well. Happy figuring.

2007

2011

2010

Bend Total sold 396 357 394 Distressed sold* — 227 248 Median price $347,750 $190,000 $175,600

Redmond Total sold Distressed sold Median price

132 171 161 — 122 124 $255,950 $125,730 $119,500

Sisters Total sold Distressed sold Median price

15 18 26 — 8 8 $415,000 $296,300 $172,798

La Pine Total sold Distressed sold Median price

14 12 — 9 $264,000 $120,900

17 11 $75,000

Crook County (Prineville) Total sold Distressed sold Median price

35 — $198,000

40 30 $95,000

50 36 $70,500

Jefferson County (Madras) Total sold Distressed sold Median price

36 — $175,950

21 20 $87,000

25 18 $72,500

* Distressed sales are short sales or sales of bank-owned properties Note: Short or bank-owned property sales not tracked until 2009 Source: Central Oregon Association of Realtors

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Market update Northwest stocks Name AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeB rs CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div

PE

... 1.10f .04 .36 1.68 ... .80f .80a .82 ... .24 .32 .22 .72 .04 .42 ... ... .65 ... .64

9 14 20 22 17 ... 24 27 24 86 22 10 ... 10 19 14 13 ... 17 65 7

YTD Last Chg %Chg 60.01 23.25 13.49 15.74 73.76 7.69 46.17 60.70 76.20 8.56 33.55 41.05 11.14 20.12 8.83 24.23 6.03 9.39 23.10 14.30 25.98

-.11 -.27 +.01 -.13 +.29 -.06 +.17 +.70 -.21 +.01 -.13 +.35 -.22 +.10 -.04 +.23 -.12 -.20 -.15 -.16 -.09

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

+5.9 +3.2 +1.1 +1.2 +13.0 -9.0 -2.3 +.7 +5.5 +15.8 +12.8 -2.5 -9.2 -4.3 -.2 +8.4 -.5 -.7 +14.0 +19.2 -6.9

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1464.00 $1467.40 $40.604

Pvs Day $1473.00 $1473.40 $40.600

Market recap

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

1.24 .92f 1.74 ... .48a ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.46f .86f .52 ... .20 .50f .24 .20a ... .60f

19 17 17 16 41 ... 34 21 15 16 20 11 26 10 75 15 14 14 88 6

78.13 +.74 -8.5 45.96 -.26 +8.4 45.18 -.26 -2.8 12.98 -.48 -26.7 50.72 -.56 -11.5 2.25 -.09 +8.7 42.70 -.04 +14.0 145.87 -.38 +4.8 23.82 -.05 +5.9 61.35 -1.91 -7.6 84.66 -.32 +1.1 46.62 +.13 +3.3 35.49 -.28 +10.5 11.96 -.41 +2.3 11.30 +.12 -7.2 26.09 -.09 -3.3 16.81 -.25 -.7 31.40 -.22 +1.3 3.50 -.10 +24.1 23.10 -.51 +22.0

Prime rate Time period

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

Citigrp S&P500ETF TenetHlth FordM iShSilver

2287222 4.53 -.03 1102888 132.46 -.40 851534 6.44 -1.11 842859 14.86 -.47 751464 39.21 -.65

Gainers ($2 or more) Name CaptlTr FutureFuel PSCrudeDS PrUShCrde rs Molycorp n

Last

Chg %Chg

3.83 12.61 40.70 39.18 71.88

+.62 +19.3 +1.05 +9.0 +3.08 +8.2 +2.59 +7.1 +4.69 +7.0

Losers ($2 or more) Name CmtyHlt TenetHlth BkIrelnd AldIrish rs Goldcp wt

Last

RareEle g AvalRare n ParaG&S ChinaShen KodiakO g

3.25 3.25 3.25

Vol (00)

Last Chg

116887 15.11 +.69 103759 9.65 +.37 76211 3.55 -.43 52207 6.22 +.51 48623 6.21 -.41

Gainers ($2 or more) Name SearchMed PernixTh ChinaShen SunLink SuprmInd

Last

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Level3 Cisco SiriusXM Intel AmerMed

3838193 1.70 +.26 549888 17.47 -.18 511115 1.78 +.02 424905 20.12 +.10 412191 29.50 +7.17

2.12 +.28 +15.2 11.44 +1.00 +9.6 6.22 +.51 +8.9 2.09 +.17 +8.9 2.55 +.18 +7.6

Name

Last

TastyBak GlobCrsg AmerMed ChiFnOnl EFII

Last Chg

Chg %Chg

3.97 +2.36 +146.6 24.97 +10.17 +68.7 29.50 +7.17 +32.1 5.06 +.60 +13.5 16.55 +1.56 +10.4

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

-35.8 -14.7 -11.3 -10.3 -10.0

ChiMetRur Solitario ParaG&S ChinNEPet Hyperdyn

4.10 3.09 3.55 4.07 4.23

-.54 -11.6 -.39 -11.2 -.43 -10.8 -.38 -8.5 -.38 -8.2

QuickLog StarScient Servidyne TibetPhm n OssenInno n

4.00 3.41 2.26 3.59 2.40

-.87 -.62 -.39 -.56 -.37

902 2,130 124 3,156 109 15

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

52-Week High Low Name

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

25.89 -14.41 6.44 -1.11 2.05 -.26 3.50 -.40 6.12 -.68

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Diary

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

NYSE

Indexes

-17.9 -15.4 -14.7 -13.5 -13.4

Diary 135 335 34 504 12 7

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

893 1,716 137 2,746 61 38

12,450.93 5,404.33 422.43 8,545.78 2,453.68 2,840.51 1,344.07 14,276.94 859.08

9,614.32 3,872.64 346.95 6,355.83 1,689.19 2,061.14 1,010.91 15.80 587.66

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

12,381.11 5,223.27 408.51 8,445.77 2,402.51 2,771.51 1,324.46 14,063.96 833.86

+1.06 -5.03 -5.94 -38.17 -45.38 -8.91 -3.71 -53.75 -7.03

YTD %Chg %Chg +.01 -.10 -1.43 -.45 -1.85 -.32 -.28 -.38 -.84

52-wk %Chg

+6.94 +2.28 +.87 +6.05 +8.79 +4.47 +5.31 +5.27 +6.41

+12.49 +15.54 +5.79 +10.52 +21.34 +12.76 +10.70 +12.14 +18.27

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Monday.

Key currency exchange rates Monday compared with late Friday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

366.47 2,721.23 4,038.70 6,053.44 7,204.86 24,303.07 37,590.67 22,365.93 3,461.32 9,719.70 2,122.39 3,160.44 5,064.90 5,874.37

-.13 t -.04 t -.57 t -.04 t -.17 t -.38 t +.32 s -.10 t +.47 s -.50 t -.26 t -.84 t +.56 s -.26 t

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

1.0500 1.6345 1.0452 .002123 .1529 1.4429 .1287 .011800 .085161 .0356 .000919 .1599 1.1030 .0344

1.0523 1.6352 1.0442 .002123 .1529 1.4435 .1287 .011780 .085180 .0357 .000924 .1607 1.0992 .0344

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 20.66 -0.03 +5.9 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 19.62 -0.03 +5.9 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.48 +4.1 GrowthI 27.25 -0.08 +5.5 Ultra 23.86 -0.13 +5.3 American Funds A: AmcpA p 19.83 -0.01 +5.3 AMutlA p 26.46 -0.08 +5.1 BalA p 18.64 -0.03 +4.5 BondA p 12.16 +0.6 CapIBA p 51.61 -0.10 +4.4 CapWGA p 37.44 -0.16 +5.3 CapWA p 20.67 -0.01 +2.1 EupacA p 43.45 -0.25 +5.0 FdInvA p 39.09 -0.23 +6.8 GovtA p 13.77 -0.5 GwthA p 32.00 -0.16 +5.1 HI TrA p 11.57 +4.5 IncoA p 17.31 -0.03 +5.6 IntBdA p 13.36 +0.1 ICAA p 29.33 -0.09 +4.6 NEcoA p 26.65 -0.02 +5.2 N PerA p 30.03 -0.12 +4.9 NwWrldA 56.06 -0.29 +2.7 SmCpA p 40.54 -0.20 +4.3 TxExA p 11.69 WshA p 28.82 -0.09 +6.5 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 31.56 -0.10 +4.7 IntEqII I r 13.04 -0.05 +4.7 Artisan Funds: Intl 23.01 -0.14 +6.0 IntlVal r 28.13 -0.08 +3.8 MidCap 35.84 -0.11 +6.6 MidCapVal 22.44 -0.02 +11.8 Baron Funds: Growth 55.35 -0.64 +8.0 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.69 +0.8 DivMu 14.19 +0.4

TxMgdIntl 16.08 -0.08 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 18.75 -0.05 GlAlA r 20.31 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.93 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 18.79 -0.06 GlbAlloc r 20.41 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 56.74 -0.40 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 30.87 -0.20 DivEqInc 10.69 -0.04 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 31.90 -0.20 AcornIntZ 42.01 -0.22 ValRestr 52.89 -0.47 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 10.02 -0.06 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 11.87 -0.07 USCorEq2 11.75 -0.07 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 36.21 -0.15 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 36.61 -0.15 NYVen C 34.95 -0.14 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.22 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 22.86 -0.15 EmMktV 37.42 -0.25 IntSmVa 18.30 -0.08 LargeCo 10.45 -0.03 USLgVa 21.89 -0.12 US Micro 14.69 -0.14 US Small 22.99 -0.19 US SmVa 27.48 -0.30 IntlSmCo 18.03 -0.09 Fixd 10.33 IntVa 19.49 -0.13 Glb5FxInc 10.88 2YGlFxd 10.16 Dodge&Cox:

+2.2 +7.0 NA NA +7.1 NA +6.3 +5.6 +6.2 +5.7 +2.7 +4.9 +7.3 +5.7 +7.3 +5.4 +5.5 +5.2 +1.4 +3.2 +3.5 +6.4 +5.9 +9.1 +6.7 +7.7 +7.5 +5.0 +0.2 +6.3 +0.1

Balanced 73.39 -0.13 Income 13.28 +0.01 IntlStk 37.29 -0.17 Stock 113.94 -0.29 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 10.94 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.79 -0.06 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.10 +0.01 GblMacAbR 10.21 -0.02 LgCapVal 18.84 -0.06 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.44 +0.04 FPA Funds: FPACres 28.20 -0.03 Fairholme 34.54 -0.08 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 20.78 -0.10 StrInA 12.56 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 20.99 -0.10 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 14.12 -0.03 FF2015 11.80 -0.02 FF2020 14.41 -0.04 FF2020K 13.79 -0.04 FF2025 12.09 -0.05 FF2030 14.49 -0.05 FF2030K 14.31 -0.05 FF2035 12.12 -0.05 FF2040 8.47 -0.04 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 13.08 -0.06 AMgr50 15.92 -0.04 Balanc 18.90 -0.05 BalancedK 18.90 -0.05 BlueChGr 47.66 -0.25 Canada 62.81 -0.96 CapAp 26.25 -0.08 CpInc r 9.83 -0.02 Contra 70.73 -0.33 ContraK 70.72 -0.33 DisEq 24.16 -0.06 DivIntl 31.66 -0.16

+5.0 +1.4 +4.4 +6.1 NA +3.4 +2.7 +0.7 +3.4 +5.3 +5.3 -2.9 +4.3 +3.1 +4.4 +3.9 +4.1 +4.5 +4.5 +4.9 +5.2 +5.2 +5.7 +5.7 +5.8 +3.5 +4.0 +4.0 +5.1 +8.0 +3.6 +5.7 +4.6 +4.6 +7.2 +5.0

DivrsIntK r 31.64 DivGth 30.22 EmrMk 27.40 Eq Inc 47.16 EQII 19.45 Fidel 34.39 FltRateHi r 9.90 GNMA 11.41 GovtInc 10.34 GroCo 89.67 GroInc 19.24 GrowthCoK 89.65 HighInc r 9.21 Indepn 25.73 IntBd 10.53 IntlDisc 34.22 InvGrBd 11.36 InvGB 7.40 LgCapVal 12.26 LatAm 59.73 LevCoStk 30.41 LowP r 41.07 LowPriK r 41.06 Magelln 74.87 MidCap 30.83 MuniInc 12.15 NwMkt r 15.71 OTC 59.52 100Index 9.21 Ovrsea 34.15 Puritn 18.69 SCmdtyStrt 13.41 SrsIntGrw 11.80 SrsIntVal 10.69 SrInvGrdF 11.36 STBF 8.46 SmllCpS r 20.67 StratInc 11.24 StrReRt r 9.93 TotalBd 10.73 USBI 11.25 Value 73.89 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 54.08

-0.17 -0.20 -0.22 -0.20 -0.08 -0.13 +0.01 +0.01 +0.01 -0.40 -0.04 -0.40 -0.19 -0.20 +0.01 -0.06 -0.53 -0.44 -0.09 -0.10 -0.41 -0.13 -0.02 -0.16 -0.02 -0.17 -0.05 -0.12 -0.04 -0.07

-0.07 -0.01

-0.48

+5.0 +6.3 +4.0 +6.8 +6.8 +7.0 +1.8 +0.4 -0.3 +7.8 +5.4 +7.9 +4.7 +5.7 +0.7 +3.6 +0.4 +0.9 +6.9 +1.2 +7.0 +7.0 +7.0 +4.5 +6.9 +0.2 +1.9 +8.4 +5.4 +5.1 +4.7 +6.1 +4.5 +7.5 +0.4 +0.4 +5.5 +3.1 +4.1 +1.1 +0.1 +7.6

-1.20 +1.8

Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 40.84 -0.30 500IdxInv 46.90 -0.13 IntlInxInv 37.10 -0.14 TotMktInv 38.65 -0.15 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 46.90 -0.13 TotMktAd r 38.66 -0.14 First Eagle: GlblA 48.11 -0.07 OverseasA 23.18 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.22 FoundAl p 11.13 -0.05 HYTFA p 9.49 IncomA p 2.26 -0.01 USGovA p 6.68 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p 13.88 -0.05 IncmeAd 2.25 -0.01 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.28 -0.01 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 21.71 -0.14 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 7.64 -0.03 GlBd A p 13.92 -0.05 GrwthA p 19.27 -0.04 WorldA p 15.88 -0.06 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.94 -0.05 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 42.44 -0.14 GMO Trust III: Quality 20.96 +0.05 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 15.69 -0.10 Quality 20.96 +0.05 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 37.61 -0.28 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.45 MidCapV 37.92 -0.28 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.18

+7.0 +5.9 +5.5 +6.1 +5.9 +6.1 +3.8 +2.3 +0.2 +6.4 -0.1 +5.8 +0.1 +3.6 +5.9 +5.6 +5.2 +9.5 +3.6 +8.3 +7.0 +3.4 +5.5 +4.8 +7.5 +4.8 +4.8 +4.3 +4.9 NA

CapApInst 38.21 -0.06 IntlInv t 63.91 -0.51 Intl r 64.56 -0.51 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 35.54 -0.21 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 35.57 -0.21 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 44.47 -0.23 Div&Gr 20.77 -0.08 TotRetBd 11.00 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.05 +0.06 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r 17.38 -0.02 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 17.14 -0.04 CmstkA 16.73 -0.05 EqIncA 8.96 -0.03 GrIncA p 20.30 -0.09 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 24.87 -0.17 AssetStA p 25.64 -0.18 AssetStrI r 25.87 -0.18 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.42 +0.01 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.41 HighYld 8.38 +0.01 IntmTFBd 10.73 ShtDurBd 10.95 USLCCrPls 21.48 -0.08 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 51.24 -0.37 PrkMCVal T 24.02 -0.02 Twenty T 66.80 -0.30 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.42 -0.03 LSGrwth 13.49 -0.05 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 22.22 -0.16 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 22.61 -0.16 Longleaf Partners: Partners 30.77 +0.11

+4.1 +6.5 +6.6 +2.6 +2.7 +5.0 +6.5 +1.0 -2.0 +3.9 +6.0 +6.7 +4.8 +5.9 +4.8 +5.0 +5.1 +0.5 +0.5 +4.6 +0.5 +0.2 +3.9 +1.2 +6.4 +1.6 +4.4 +5.1 +2.0 +1.9 +8.9

Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.71 +4.5 StrInc C 15.36 +4.5 LSBondR 14.65 -0.01 +4.3 StrIncA 15.28 +4.7 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.31 +2.8 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 12.17 -0.07 +5.3 BdDebA p 8.04 -0.01 +4.6 ShDurIncA p 4.60 +1.2 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.63 +1.0 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.58 +4.0 ValueA 24.28 +0.01 +6.7 MFS Funds I: ValueI 24.39 +0.01 +6.8 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 9.14 -0.05 +6.2 Matthews Asian: PacTgrInv 23.81 -0.12 +1.6 MergerFd 16.20 +2.7 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.39 +1.3 TotRtBdI 10.39 +1.5 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 41.09 -0.16 +10.0 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 30.65 -0.04 +5.0 GlbDiscZ 31.03 -0.05 +5.1 QuestZ 18.53 -0.04 +4.7 SharesZ 21.88 -0.15 +5.2 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 50.08 -0.17 +9.0 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 51.86 -0.18 +8.9 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.50 +0.01 +4.8 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 29.14 -0.13 +5.0 Intl I r 20.23 -0.13 +4.2 Oakmark r 43.83 +0.05 +6.1 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 8.15 -0.02 +5.7

GlbSMdCap 16.33 -0.08 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 37.19 -0.01 GlobA p 64.33 -0.08 GblStrIncA 4.38 IntBdA p 6.62 -0.01 MnStFdA 33.27 -0.13 RisingDivA 16.36 -0.04 S&MdCpVl 34.04 -0.19 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.83 -0.04 S&MdCpVl 29.14 -0.16 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 14.78 -0.03 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 36.81 -0.01 IntlBdY 6.62 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.91 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.91 -0.02 AllAsset 12.51 ComodRR 9.90 -0.06 HiYld 9.50 InvGrCp 10.60 LowDu 10.46 RealRtnI 11.53 ShortT 9.90 TotRt 10.91 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.53 TotRtA 10.91 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.91 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.91 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.91 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 47.76 -0.10 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 42.88 -0.19 Price Funds: BlChip 39.97 -0.13 CapApp 21.27

+5.6 +2.0 +6.6 +3.8 +2.0 +2.7 +5.8 +6.2 +5.4 +6.0 +5.5 +2.1 +2.0 +1.4 +3.9 NA +9.5 +4.2 +2.6 +1.4 +2.4 +0.7 +1.5 +2.3 +1.4 +1.2 +1.4 +1.5 +4.3 +4.9 +4.8 +4.7

EmMktS 36.48 EqInc 25.01 EqIndex 35.70 Growth 33.62 HlthSci 34.20 HiYield 6.95 IntlBond 10.12 IntlStk 14.86 MidCap 63.21 MCapVal 24.96 N Asia 19.46 New Era 56.75 N Horiz 36.78 N Inc 9.43 R2010 15.94 R2015 12.41 R2020 17.21 R2025 12.64 R2030 18.19 R2035 12.90 R2040 18.38 ShtBd 4.84 SmCpStk 37.28 SmCapVal 38.50 SpecIn 12.52 Value 24.94 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 14.35 VoyA p 24.40 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 12.66 PremierI r 22.39 TotRetI r 13.95 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 39.41 S&P Sel 20.71 Scout Funds: Intl 33.97 Selected Funds: AmShD 43.71 Sequoia 144.76 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 21.63 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 54.30

-0.20 +3.4 -0.08 +6.0 -0.10 +5.8 -0.13 +4.6 -0.26 +12.9 +4.5 +2.4 -0.07 +4.4 -0.55 +8.0 -0.14 +5.3 -0.12 +1.5 -0.91 +8.8 -0.22 +9.8 +0.3 -0.04 +3.9 -0.03 +4.4 -0.06 +4.7 -0.05 +5.0 -0.08 +5.3 -0.06 +5.5 -0.07 +5.5 +0.5 -0.29 +8.3 -0.36 +6.6 +2.4 -0.11 +6.9 -0.05 +6.2 -0.12 +2.9 -0.09 +8.7 -0.21 +10.0 -0.07 +6.1 -0.13 +6.0 -0.06 +5.8 -0.16 +4.9 -0.18 +5.6 -0.29 +12.0 -0.10 +7.9 -0.51 +4.9

Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 29.75 IntValue I 30.40 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 24.54 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 22.05 CAITAdm 10.67 CpOpAdl 80.10 EMAdmr r 41.51 Energy 138.23 ExtdAdm 44.36 500Adml 122.07 GNMA Ad 10.69 GrwAdm 32.96 HlthCr 55.33 HiYldCp 5.83 InfProAd 25.96 ITBdAdml 11.04 ITsryAdml 11.19 IntGrAdm 64.76 ITAdml 13.19 ITGrAdm 9.80 LtdTrAd 10.98 LTGrAdml 9.14 LT Adml 10.55 MCpAdml 99.04 MuHYAdm 9.95 PrmCap r 71.53 ReitAdm r 81.57 STsyAdml 10.65 STBdAdml 10.50 ShtTrAd 15.86 STIGrAd 10.73 SmCAdm 37.50 TtlBAdml 10.50 TStkAdm 33.37 WellslAdm 53.63 WelltnAdm 55.83 Windsor 48.45 WdsrIIAd 48.78 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 25.65 CapOpp 34.67

-0.13 +6.2 -0.14 +6.3 -0.07 +3.0 -0.05 +3.7 +0.7 +0.05 +4.3 -0.29 +4.1 -2.29 +14.3 -0.34 +7.5 -0.34 +5.9 +0.01 +0.4 -0.10 +4.6 +0.23 +7.9 +4.4 +0.01 +2.3 -0.1 +0.01 -0.5 -0.47 +5.3 +0.5 +0.01 +1.0 +0.5 +0.01 -0.6 -0.62 +7.5 -0.2 +0.06 +4.8 +0.08 +4.7 +0.2 +0.4 +0.01 +0.8 -0.30 +7.8 -0.12 -0.01 -0.14 -0.13 -0.07

+6.1 +2.9 +4.6 +6.3 +7.1

-0.06 +4.9 +0.02 +4.3

DivdGro 15.23 Energy 73.61 EqInc 21.72 Explr 78.97 GNMA 10.69 GlobEq 18.95 HYCorp 5.83 HlthCre 131.12 InflaPro 13.22 IntlGr 20.35 IntlVal 33.34 ITIGrade 9.80 LifeCon 16.74 LifeGro 23.13 LifeMod 20.30 LTIGrade 9.14 Morg 18.97 MuInt 13.19 PrecMtls r 28.08 PrmcpCor 14.43 Prmcp r 68.93 SelValu r 20.05 STAR 19.79 STIGrade 10.73 StratEq 20.13 TgtRetInc 11.47 TgRe2010 22.99 TgtRe2015 12.85 TgRe2020 22.95 TgtRe2025 13.16 TgRe2030 22.70 TgtRe2035 13.76 TgtRe2040 22.62 TgtRe2045 14.20 USGro 19.25 Wellsly 22.13 Welltn 32.33 Wndsr 14.36 WndsII 27.48 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntAdm r 27.65 TotIntlInst r 110.61 500 122.06 Growth 32.96

+5.9 -1.22 +14.3 -0.04 +7.3 -0.56 +8.3 +0.01 +0.4 -0.04 +6.1 +4.3 +0.56 +7.9 +0.01 +2.3 -0.15 +5.2 -0.17 +3.7 +0.01 +1.0 -0.02 +2.8 -0.08 +4.9 -0.05 +3.7 +0.01 -0.6 -0.09 +5.2 +0.4 -0.27 +5.2 -0.01 +4.8 +0.06 +4.8 -0.07 +6.9 -0.03 +3.7 +0.01 +0.8 -0.14 +9.9 +2.2 -0.03 +3.0 -0.03 +3.5 -0.06 +3.8 -0.04 +4.3 -0.08 +4.7 -0.06 +5.1 -0.09 +5.2 -0.06 +5.2 -0.05 +5.5 -0.01 +2.9 -0.08 +4.6 -0.04 +6.3 -0.04 +7.1

MidCap

21.81 -0.14 +7.4

SmCap

37.46 -0.30 +7.8

-0.17 -0.67 -0.34 -0.10

Yacktman Funds:

+4.9 +4.9 +5.8 +4.5

SmlCpGth

24.00 -0.20 +9.5

SmlCpVl

16.97 -0.14 +6.0

STBnd

10.50

TotBnd

10.50

+0.1

TotlIntl

16.53 -0.10 +4.9

TotStk

33.36 -0.13 +6.1

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst

10.49 -0.05 +5.1

ExtIn

44.36 -0.33 +7.5

FTAllWldI r

98.71 -0.61 +5.2

GrwthIst

32.96 -0.10 +4.6

InfProInst

10.57

+2.3

InstIdx

121.22 -0.34 +5.9

InsPl

121.23 -0.33 +5.9

InsTStPlus

30.18 -0.11 +6.2

MidCpIst

21.88 -0.14 +7.5

SCInst

37.50 -0.30 +7.9

TBIst

10.50

TSInst

33.37 -0.13 +6.1

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

100.83 -0.29 +5.9

STBdIdx

10.50

TotBdSgl

10.50

+0.2

TotStkSgl

32.21 -0.12 +6.2

Western Asset: CorePlus I Fund p

10.82

+1.5

17.65 +0.04 +6.7


B6 Tuesday, April 12, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

B USI N ESS

In San Francisco, a terminal that reflects a city’s values By Todd Woody New York Times News Service

SAN FRANCISCO — If the prospect of flying holds all the appeal of a cross-country bus trip, the $6,500, lipstick-red leather Egg chairs at San Francisco International Airport’s Terminal 2 are intended to return some long-lost glamour to air travel. More Standard Hotel than standard airport gateway, T2, as it is known here, is one of the few terminals renovated top to bottom since the 9/11 terrorist attacks and represents an ambitious attempt by the airport and airlines to take both stress and carbon out of air travel. The $383 million renovation gutted a drab 1950sera building that last served as the international terminal before being shuttered more than a decade ago. Even compared with more contemporary terminals at San Francisco International, T2 represents a new approach to airport design. It opens Thursday. “It’s about the intersection between passenger delight and bringing back the joy of flying with the high-performance building aspects,” said Melissa Mizell, a senior associate with Gensler, the San Francisco firm that designed the renovation. “That really guided a lot of our decisions, even with sustainability.” The words delight, joy and flying do not usually appear in the same sentence. But airport officials, airlines and architects said that they put as much emphasis on redefining the travel experience as on lessening its environmental impact. “We wanted this to feel like a San Francisco terminal and not a terminal anywhere else in the world,” Raymond Quesada, an airport project manager, said as he stood in the soaring, light- and artfilled ticket lobby shared by Virgin America and American Airlines, the terminal’s two tenants. Those San Francisco values include a city mandate to achieve at least LEED Silver status for the renovation. LEED — Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design — is a rating system administrated by the U.S. Green Build-

Peter DaSilva / New York Times News Service

The renovation of Terminal 2 at the San Francisco International Airport features elaborate ceiling sculptures. ing Council that ranks structures according to points earned for energy efficiency, water conservation and other environmentally beneficial attributes. Airport officials intend to apply for LEED Gold certification, and if it is awarded, T2 will be the first airport terminal in the United States to achieve such a ranking, according to Ashley Katz, a spokeswoman for the building council. Drivers of hybrid and electric cars get preferential parking in the nearby garage, and there are

vehicle-charging stations for the electric cars. Cool air seeps from perforated white wall panels in the terminal rather than being forced down from the ceiling. The system, called displacement ventilation, cuts energy use by 20 percent because the air does not need to be cooled as much since it displaces the rising warmer air, Quesada said. Reclaimed water is pumped into the restrooms, reducing water consumption by 40 percent. The abundant natural light through walls of windows makes

most daytime artificial lighting unnecessary. Passengers are encouraged to carry reusable bottles and fill them at blue “hydration stations” in the terminal rather than buy throwaway bottled water. “Originally, we were considering banning the sale of bottled water, but we got a lot of pushback from the concessionaires,” Quesada said. “But they are required to sell more environmentally friendly plastic bottles. But again, we’re hoping they won’t have to do that and people will bring their own bottles to the airport.” Under their leases, food sellers must use utensils and packaging that can be composted, and compost bins are prominently displayed in the terminal. The airport scores more LEED points for making the green experience educational through signs and even a mobile phone tour. But passengers will probably pay most attention to the terminal’s food, fashion and flow, all of which reflects the esthetic of Virgin America, which has its headquarters in San Francisco. The neon mood lighting found on Virgin planes is mirrored in the lobby-like ticketing area, where pods of those high-backed, Danish-designed Egg chairs are clustered around sculptures and paintings by local artists. The security checkpoint has six lanes to expedite screening and passengers exit into an airy “recompose area” that features colorful ottomans, installed with the Transportation Security Administration dispensation in place of the government’s usual utilitarian benches. That area opens into a food hall modeled after the one in San Francisco’s Ferry Building and offers some of the same upscale Bay Area restaurants, including Cowgirl Creamery, Acme Bread, Napa Farms Market and Lark Creek Grill. Travelers hungering for a Burger King or Dunkin’ Donuts are out of luck. “The whole idea is that you feel like you’re in San Francisco, with an emphasis on local, organic produce,” Quesada said.

Adobe to introduce pay-as-you-go model for its Creative Suite By Aaron Ricadela Bloomberg News

SAN FRANCISCO — Adobe Systems Inc., seeking more sales of its flagship product to thrifty graphics and Web designers, will introduce an update to its Creative Suite software in May that lets users pay for the product as they go. Creative Suite 5.5 will be a collection of Adobe’s Photoshop, Dreamweaver, InDesign and other software that lets users pay for the products monthly or yearly at prices much lower than for unlimited use of the full suite. The cheaper rental cost may keep people buying even if they’re unwilling to purchase a comprehensive package, company executives said. Creative Suite brings in more than half of the revenue for Adobe, the largest maker of graphic design software that creates products for professional designers. The programs can prove expensive for less regular users, said Dave Burkett, a vice president in Adobe’s Creative Suite group.

“It creates a barrier for many of our customers,” Burkett said last week in a presentation to reporters. Adobe’s Creative Suite products include Photoshop, the software for photo editing; Dreamweaver, the tool for website design; and InDesign, the software for publishing. Many Adobe consumers who work as freelance designers and move among jobs can’t afford the full Creative Suite, Adobe Chief Financial Officer Mark Garrett said last month in an interview. Customers will be able to download subscription-priced versions of Photoshop for $49 a month or $420 a year, and Dreamweaver for $29 a month or $228 a year, according to a price list provided by Adobe. Buyers can rent the full Creative Suite Design Premium edition for $139 a month or $1,140 a year. By contrast, an unlimited-use license for Design Premium 5.5 will sell for $1,899, Adobe said Monday in a statement.

Shake-up at Renault over ‘chain of failures’ By David Jolly New York Times News Service

PARIS — The French automaker Renault dismissed its chief operating officer and six others after internal and external audits showed a “chain of failures” in the events that led to the unjust accusations of spying against three of its employees. In particular, the audits faulted “the supervision and control of the activities of the management of the company’s security department.” The company said it had accepted the resignation of Patrick

Pelata, the chief operating officer. It did not say when Pelata would leave or who would succeed him. The shake-up was perhaps inevitable after the fiasco embarrassed both the company and President Nicolas Sarkozy’s government and led to a chilling of relations with Beijing after unfounded talk of a Chinese connection to the affair. The French government, which owns about 15 percent of Renault’s stock, has long indicated its unhappiness with how the company has handled the case.


L

Inside

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OREGON Kitzhaber kicks off Cool Schools initiative, see Page C3. OBITUARIES John McCracken, sculptor with focus on geometry, see Page C5. THE WEST Tribes cite old law in claim for water rights, see Page C6.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, APRIL 12, 2011

METOLIUS RIVER BASIN

Well, sh ot! FIELD TRIP Join Bulletin photographers here every other Tuesday for a lesson in photographic fundamentals. Follow the series at www.bendbulletin.com/wellshoot Coming up: April 26: Letters in the environment • May 10: Virtual field trip to the Badlands • May 24: Motion • June 7: Virtual field trip to Cascades lakes • And more ...

House OKs bill aiding shut-out resort planners Law would allow more time to build elsewhere By Lauren Dake

On Monday, lawmakers approached Huffman to ask, “ ‘Are SALEM — When some of Rep. you for it or against it?’ ” he said. John Huffman’s colleagues saw “That’s why I stood up and let the word “Metolius” on Mon- people know (this bill) is OK. day’s House agenda, they headed It’s not an attack on Jefferson straight his way, says the Repub- County. It has nothing to do lican from The Dalles. with Jefferson County at this The area was “a big point.” issue in 2009,” Huffman While the 2009 legispoints out, and lawmaklation barred developers wonder what might ers from moving forbe happening in the ward with their plans, area now. House Bill 3572 exTwo years ago, thentends the period during IN THE Gov. Ted Kulongoski which those developers LEGISLATURE may claim a consolabanned all large-scale development in the tion prize. Metolius River basin, The House passed the where a pair of destination re- bill Monday with a 53-4 vote with sorts had been proposed. little discussion and no evidence Lawmakers — including of controversy. two whose families have long It would give the developers owned vacation property along shut out of the Metolius basin the Metolius River — approved another three years to build enthe controversial ban over the vironmentally sensitive resorts objections of Jefferson County elsewhere in Oregon. officials. See Metolius / C2 The Bulletin

I made this picture of two Bend icons on the last day of March this year. I used a 300/2.8 lens on a Canon 5D Mark II DSLR camera body, held the camera manually and set the exposure at 100 ISO at 1/640 at F8.

A photo op in your backyard Pilot Butte offers a bird’s-eye view of Central Oregon

Bethany Briles, of Bend, basks in the golden evening light at the top of Pilot Butte in 2008. “I had the afternoon off from work, so I decided to come up for the sunset,” she said.

By Rob Kerr The Bulletin

I love Pilot Butte, the crumbly pile of lava that was once a volcano. It is 100 acres of parkland inside city limits. If Bend were a house, Pilot Butte would be its porch, its garden or maybe its living room. As it is, it’s one of Bend’s best places to play, exercise or meditate. For those who live and work in its shadow, it is a lookout for watching summer storms or showing visitors the majesty of the Cascade Range. It feels good to crest the summit by bike or foot. In a car or on a motorcycle, the road’s spiraling ascent is a challenge of peripheral distractions. So how do you capture all of that in a picture? Do you photograph it from far away, from its middle or from its summit? What happens on its slopes throughout the different seasons? What big events happen there? What can you see from the summit? Do you see St. Charles Bend, the airport or the track at Bend High? Is there a hidden cellphone tower on its slopes? What habitat does it offer for wildlife, and what kinds of wildlife inhabit it? Answer these questions using your camera. We’ll present the best of the pictures you send us in this space next week.

Bend man charged with 2 DUIIs within 4 hours By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

A 40-year-old Bend man was arrested twice in less than four hours Sunday, and both times the charges involved a DUII. Police arrested Richard William Sander the first time just before 3 p.m. After he was released from Deschutes County jail, police found Sander driving again and arrested him at about 6:25 p.m. Sander was first arrested on

suspicion of a hit-and-run, resisting arrest and DUII. He was again arrested on suspicion of DUII, police said. It is unusual for one person to be arrested twice on the same day, let alone on similar charges, said Bend Police Sgt. Nick Parker, who has been a police officer for a dozen years. “I’ve seen it a few times, but it doesn’t generally happen,” Parker said. See DUII / C2

Deschutes may ease rules on wind turbines By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

For residents frustrated with Deschutes County’s limits on wind turbines, change could be blowing in. The County Commission is scheduled to discuss a proposed wind energy ordinance to expand options for noncommercial turbines at a 1:30 p.m. Wednesday meeting.

John Scarborough has been lobbying county officials since 2009 for changes to allow taller, noncommercial turbines, and said the ordinance sounds promising. “We just had one of the windiest winters we had on record, so it’s just another year of wasted energy we had go by,” said Scarborough, who lives northeast of Bend on 10 acres. See Turbines / C2

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Among the many things Pilot Butte is known for is catching fire during the annual Fourth of July fireworks show. I made this picture of the fireworks show in 2009 with a tripod and a 70200/2.8 lens set to 70 mm on a Canon 5D Mark II DSLR camera. The exposure was set manually on ISO 100, 1/12 second at F8.

People exercise on Pilot Butte in a variety of weather conditions. I made this picture in 2004 of Nancy Kingman using an umbrella to protect herself from a late-season snow.

Attention, photographers! Submit your own photos at www.bendbulletin.com/wellshoot and we’ll pick the best Pilot Butte shots for publication next week in this space. No doctored photos, please!

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

C2 Tuesday, April 12, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Redmond Police Department

Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 10:29 p.m. April 8, in the 700 block of Northwest Birch Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:55 p.m. April 8, in the 2300 block of Southwest Glacier Place. Theft — A cell phone was reported stolen at 2:27 p.m. April 8, in the 500 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 1:59 p.m. April 8, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:19 p.m. April 8, in the area of Northwest Fifth Street and Northwest Birch Avenue. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 10:29 a.m. April 8, in the area of Southwest Second Street and Southwest Cascade Avenue. DUII — James Marshall Cooley, 28, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:44 p.m. April 9, in the area of Northeast 15th Street and Northeast Kingwood Avenue. DUII — Hollister Lee Starr, 45, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 8:49 p.m. April 9, in the 900 block of Southwest 14th Street. Theft — A sign was reported stolen at 7:28 p.m. April 9, in the 2500 block of Southwest Xero Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 12:52 p.m. April 9, in the area of Northwest 10th Street and West Antler Avenue. Theft — A car battery and gasoline were reported stolen at 11:29 a.m. April 9, in the 700 block of Southwest 26th Street. DUII — Douglas E. Lyle, 39, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:33 a.m. April 9, in the area of Southwest Canal Boulevard and Southwest Veterans Way. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 9:44 p.m. April 10, in the 1900 block of Southwest Canyon Drive. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 9:05 p.m. April 10, in the 2800 block of Northwest Canyon Drive. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 8:11 p.m. April 10, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Criminal mischief — Damage to a fence was reported at 5:04 p.m. April 10, in the 4900 block of Southwest Umatilla Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 3:28 p.m. April 10, in the 800 block of State Highway 126. Theft — A bike was reported stolen at 2:30 p.m. April 10, in the 2400 block of Southwest 26th Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:51 a.m. April 10, in the 1200 block of Southwest Highland Avenue. DUII — Christopher Michael Wolfe, 33, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:44 a.m. April 10, in the 500 block of Southwest Fifth Street. Prineville Police Department

Criminal mischief — Damage estimated at $5,085 was reported at 3:11 p.m. April 8, in the area of Southeast Second Street. Theft — Items valued at $2,000 were reported stolen from a vehicle at

10:40 a.m. April 9, in Prineville. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:36 p.m. April 10, in the area of Southeast Second Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 11:17 p.m. April 8, in the 20500 block of Swalley Road in Bend. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 3:34 p.m. April 8, in the 62400 block of Eagle Road in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:54 p.m. April 8, in the area of Fifth Street and Sparks Drive in La Pine. Criminal mischief — Damage to a mail box was reported at 11:51 a.m. April 8, in the area of Lowe Lane and Hunnell Road in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 9:02 a.m. April 8, in the 51500 block of U.S. Highway 97 in La Pine. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:27 a.m. April 8, in the 60200 block of Crater Road in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:20 a.m. April 8, in the area of South Century Drive near milepost 1 in Sunriver. Theft — A theft was reported at 6:40 a.m. April 8, in the 64900 block of Graystone Lane in Bend. DUII — David John Houser, 25, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 3:42 a.m. April 8, in the area of South Century Drive and Vandevert Road in La Pine. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 1:36 p.m. April 9, in the 17000 block of Jacinto Road in La Pine. Criminal mischief — Damage to a gate was reported at 6:28 a.m. April 9, in the 21600 block of Neff Road in Bend. DUII — Joseph S. Irvin, 39, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:20 a.m. April 9, in the area of Bear Creek Road and Skyline View Drive in Bend. DUII — Starla Linda McMullin, 32, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:50 a.m. April 9, in the area of Southwest 61st Street and Southwest Canal Boulevard in Redmond. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 6:42 p.m. April 10, in the 63800 block of Johnson Road in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 4:23 a.m. April 10, in the 61100 block of Ward Road in Bend. DUII — Hugh Charles Plankenhorn, 53, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:47 a.m. April 10, in the area of Northwest 31st Street and Northwest Sedgewick Avenue in Terrebonne. Oregon State Police

DUII — Scott Douglas Coles, 46, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:25 a.m. April 9, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 115. DUII — Rodelio Aben Mendoza, 39, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 3:15 a.m. April 9, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 135. DUII — Joshua Bryan Chaney, 23, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:37 p.m. April 9, in the area of Finley Butte Road near milepost 1 in La Pine. DUII — Randal Charles Harper, 49, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:25 a.m. April 11, in the area of Southwest Highland Avenue and Southwest Eighth Street in Redmond.

L B   Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Stop yields 2 arrests, 5 pounds of pot Two California men were arrested and five pounds of marijuana seized during a traffic stop south of Redmond Friday. The Oregon State Police said a trooper stopped a 1991 Honda on U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 127 for a traffic violation. The two drivers were identified as Kenneth Jones, 54, and Randall Long, 54, both of Eureka, Calif. Police said they found about five pounds of marijuana,

Metolius Continued from C1 Even as it banned large projects near the Metolius, the 2009 bill allowed the two affected development groups — Ponderosa Land and Cattle Co. and wouldbe developers of The Metolian — build environmentally sensitive resorts in counties with histories of high unemployment. But that bill gave the groups only three years to build in the midst of a historic economic slump. And because unemployment rates fluctuate, it hasn’t been clear which counties the developers

DUII Continued from C1 Sander’s trouble began sometime around 2:30 p.m., when a black Jeep Grand Cherokee he was allegedly driving was involved in a hit-and-run crash at the intersection of Southeast Third Street and Reed Market Road, police said. Police responded to the crash scene, where they found the driver in the other vehicle was uninjured. Within 20 minutes, police responded to a report that during

Turbines Continued from C1 Scarborough also continues to be concerned that wind energy tax credits could be phased out before the county changes its rules to allow taller wind turbines. Residents can already install wind turbines under current county rules. However, the county’s height restrictions limit turbines and other structures to 30 feet. That is “impractical because the turbines cannot access faster and better-quality winds,� according to a county presentation. Dean Abney, of Abney Solar Electrix in Redmond, said he installs wind turbines with minimum heights of 70 feet. “We really need this legislation to go through because there’s a lot of eligible sites east of town,� Abney said. “I have a

worth about $10,000, and small amounts of methamphetamine in the car.

Bend parks director Wayne Smith retiring Bend Park and Recreation Director Wayne Smith will retire July 1 after 31 years with the district. Smith became director in 1994. He will be replaced by Matt Mercer, the manager of the Juniper Swim and Fitness Center.

Today is Tuesday, April 12, the 102nd day of 2011. There are 263 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On April 12, 1861, the American Civil War began as Confederate forces opened fire on Fort Sumter in South Carolina. (The Union troops holding the fort surrendered the following day.) ON THIS DATE In 1606, England’s King James I decreed the design of the original Union Flag, which combined the flags of England and Scotland. In 1811, fur traders employed by John Jacob Astor began building Fort Astoria in presentday Oregon. In 1945, President Franklin D. Roosevelt died of a cerebral hemorrhage in Warm Springs, Ga., at age 63; he was succeeded by Vice President Harry S. Truman. In 1955, the Salk vaccine against polio was declared safe and effective. In 1961, Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first man to fly in space, orbiting Earth once

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y before making a safe landing. In 1981, the space shuttle Columbia blasted off from Cape Canaveral on its first test flight. Former world heavyweight boxing champion Joe Louis died in Las Vegas, Nev., at age 66. TEN YEARS AGO The 24 crew members of a U.S. spy plane arrived in Hawaii after being held for 11 days in China. The Philippine military rescued U.S. hostage Jeffrey Schilling from Muslim rebels who had threatened to behead him.

TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Country singer Ned Miller is 86. Actress Jane Withers is 85. Actor Charles Napier is 75. Jazz musician Herbie Hancock is 71. Actor Frank Bank (“Leave It to Beaver�) is 69. Rock singer John Kay (Steppenwolf) is 67. Actor Ed O’Neill is 65. Author Tom Clancy is 64. Talk show host David Letterman is 64. Actor Andy Garcia is 55. Movie director Walter Salles is 55. Country singer Vince Gill is 54. Actress Suzzanne Douglas is 54. Folkpop singer Amy Ray (Indigo Girls) is 47. Rock singer Nicholas

FIVE YEARS AGO Jurors in the Zacarias Moussaoui trial listened to a recording of shouts and cries in the cockpit as desperate passengers twice charged panicked hijackers during the final half hour of doomed United Flight 93 on 9/11. ONE YEAR AGO President Barack Obama opened a 47-nation nuclear summit in Washington, boosted by Ukraine’s announcement that it would give up its weapons-grade uranium.

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TILLAMOOK — The fish and wildlife departments of Oregon and Washington are cooperating in an effort to re-establish chum salmon on the Oregon side of the lower Columbia River, where the species began to decline more than 50 years ago. The Oregon department recently released more than 100,000 juvenile chum salmon into lower Big Creek. The adults that produced the youngsters at an Oregon hatchery were donated by the Washington

Department of Fish and Wildlife. The adult chum came from Grays River, a tributary of the lower Columbia River. Oregon Fish and Wildlife biologist Chris Knutsen says those adults are likely the most genetically similar to the fish that once occupied Big Creek and other Oregon lower Columbia tributaries. Habitat degradation is believed to have been a key factor in the chum’s decline. Now biologists say habitat improvements in the region are well under way.

Would-be Metolian developer Jim Kean and his group have identified Lincoln and Wasco counties for their next project. The Ponderosa Land Cattle Co. has no intentions of building an eco-resort at this time. Rep. Tobias Read, D-Beaverton, said he voted against the bill Monday because he doesn’t like the fact that the two counties are set in stone. The goal, he said, was to encourage growth in depressed economies. “We should use the most upto-date information we can, not limit it to a list that is two years old,� he said. But the developers had wor-

ried that rising employment rates would render previously eligible counties ineligible before their projects took off. The bill would freeze the list of eligible counties, ensuring that months of negotiations don’t go to waste. Jim Kean did not return a call or e-mail for comment. “It’s an agreement made for the business folks that got the rug pulled out under them,� Huffman said. The bill now moves to the Senate.

an incident on Poplar Street, a man pulled a handgun before fleeing in a black Grand Cherokee. The description of both the vehicle and suspect at Poplar matched those from the hit-andrun. After further investigation, this incident did not lead to charges. Police found the Grand Cherokee driving near Pinebrook Boulevard and the Bend Parkway. The SUV pulled into the nearby Albertson’s, stopping immediately in front of the store. Worried about the safety of shoppers, officers told the

grocery store’s staff to secure entrances and officers blocked drivers from entering the parking lot. Sander was arrested at the scene after trying to pull away while police officers were handcuffing him. Police found an airsoft handgun and a BB gun in the SUV.

down Third Street toward the Albertson’s lot where the Grand Cherokee had been left. Parker said police never made it to the grocery store because they spotted the SUV heading north on Third Street. Police are not certain how Sander got to the parking lot. Sander’s second arrest was a smoother operation, Parker said. “I think it’s fair to say he was cooperative with the process,� Parker said.

couple of customers that want it as soon as they allow it.� It’s easier to install small, noncommercial wind turbines in other counties, Abney said. The proposed wind energy ordinance would allow property owners outside cities to install turbines up to 36 feet tall that generate up to 100 kilowatthours of electricity simply by obtaining electrical and structural building permits. Turbines above 36 feet could also be installed with only the building permits if they generate up to 15 kwh, according to the county presentation. Abney said these permits — one of which is based on the project valuation — typically cost $200 to $300. Tom Anderson, director of the county’s Community Development Department, gives a higher estimate. If a wind turbine were valued at $35,000, the permits could cost approxi-

Police receive tip Police took Sander to jail; he was released at 6:25 p.m. After receiving a tip that Sander might soon try to drive his vehicle again, three police cars headed

mately $900, Anderson wrote in an e-mail. The ordinance would also make it possible for people to install turbines that generate more electricity — from 15 kwh to 100 kwh — as long as they install the turbines at a distance from all property lines equal to at least the structure’s height. These more powerful turbines would have to go through a county site plan review, which would cost approximately $785, said Peter Gutowsky, the county’s principal planner. Under the proposed ordinance, noise from the turbines would be limited to 60 decibels, which Gutowsky described as similar to a conversation taking place three feet away. Scarborough wants to install a 50-kwh wind turbine. The county ordinance would also require turbines to be painted neutral colors, and no

THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Future years will never know the seething hell and the black infernal background of countless minor scenes and interiors, (not the official surface courteousness of the Generals, not the few great battles) of the Secession war; and it is best they should not — the real war will never get in the books.� — Walt Whitman, American author and poet (1819-1892)

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lighting would be allowed unless the turbine is near a runway, Gutowsky said. Merle Irvine, chair of the Planning Commission, said many people imagine that all wind turbines are gigantic, like commercial projects in the Columbia Gorge. The Planning Commission worked on the language the County Commission will consider. “Of course that automatically puts you on the defensive,� Irvine said. “As we learned more about the kind of systems we were talking about, it relieved some of those concerns.� Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

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were free to work with. The Metolian group hoped to build an approximately 675acre “eco-resortâ€? without a golf course, and The Ponderosa Land and Cattle Co. intended to build a larger destination resort featuring a golf course. “This bill changes two things in the statute we passed last session,â€? said Rep. Brian Clem, DSalem. “It gives more time to find and build another project elsewhere ‌ (and) it locks in place the counties they can work in.â€? Clem was instrumental two years ago in stopping the development in the area. Huffman opposed the ban.

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 12, 2011 C3

O I B More public workers quit to secure benefits PORTLAND — More public employees in Oregon are retiring early, apparently to lock in medical coverage before state lawmakers tighten benefits. The Oregonian reported nearly 1,700 public employees retired in the first three months of the year — a 50 percent increase over the average. At this pace, the Public Employees Retirement System is likely to have its highest level of retirements since 2003, when the Legislature changed the retirement plan. The system covers more than 200,000 public employees. A state human resources administrator, Diana Foster, said workers don’t want to risk possible changes. And Ed Hershey with the Service Employees International Union said workers are saying, “I’m going to get out before they take it away from me.”

CAPE PERPETUA

2 bodies undetected for a year or longer Police say remains found off coastal trail are likely not of campers The Associated Press YACHATS — The remains of a man and woman found off a hiking trail at Cape Perpetua on the Oregon Coast may have gone undetected for a year or more in the brush that lines a route from a campground to the crest of the popular tourist site. The bodies found Saturday by a hiker were well off the trail at

about the midpoint on the route to the campground and may be been there as long as two years, KCST in Florence reported. Investigators were pursuing leads on the remains, which were sent to the Oregon medical examiner’s office, said Lt. Gregg Hastings, an Oregon State Police spokesman. He declined to give any details

other than to say investigators did not believe they were campers. The Cape Perpetua Scenic Area is managed by the U.S. Forest Service and is a popular tourist site, said its visitor center director, Lori Robertson. “We’re getting lots of questions here at our visitor center but we don’t know much,” Robertson said.

Dick Mason, a volunteer ranger for Cape Perpetua, told KEZI in Eugene the bodies must have been far from the trail if he and other rangers had not noticed them. “I was a little surprised that I hadn’t found it or at least smelled, you know, when the bodies decompose, because I’m out there quite a bit,” Mason said. Area residents were concerned when they saw police in the area,

Springfield man disputes need for a license to ride electric bike

Searchers probe caves for missing girl’s body PORTLAND — Searchers still looking for the body of a 14-yearold Portland girl probed caves Sunday in the Rocky Butte park area. Police believe Yashanee Vaughn was killed last month at a house in that area of northeast Portland. Last week a grand jury returned a murder indictment against her 16-year-old boyfriend, Parrish Bennette. KGW reported Vaughn’s family and friends held an emotional vigil for her Saturday night near Madison High School. The family is distributing fliers in the area, asking anyone with information about the case to call police. There’s a $1,000 Crime Stoppers reward for useful information.

State tells customers to avoid Frontier cable PORTLAND — Oregon regulators say new customers should stay away from Frontier Communications as the company prepares to jack up installation fees and subscription rates for its FiOS cable TV service in the Portland area. The Oregonian reported that if Frontier tries to drop cable TV altogether, the Metropolitan Area Communications Commission may act to block the company. In January, Frontier said it planned a whopping 46 percent cable TV rate hike but then suspended it. Last month, Frontier raised its cable installation fee from $79 to $500, signaling it wanted no new customers. It also said it would pull out of cable franchises in four small Oregon cities, and possibly other service areas.

2 accused of firing at cars, buildings LA GRANDE — Two 19-yearold La Grande men are facing various charges after cars and buildings were damaged by gunshots, including La Grande High School. The Observer newspaper in La Grande reported that Kyle Dalton and Jacob Johnson were arrested last Friday after shots were fired at parked cars and at windows at Veterans Memorial Pool. The 911 dispatch center also received a call about people driving around the high school, shooting at windows and at vehicles. Dalton and Johnson are were each charged with seven counts each of criminal mischief, six counts each of unlawful use of a weapon, four counts of reckless endangering and two counts of possession of a firearm discharged at public buildings. Dalton was also charged with driving under the influence of intoxicants and reckless driving.

Salem may add dog barking to noise law SALEM — The Salem City Council is considering changes to the noise ordinance. One of the proposed changes would add barking dogs to the list of noises that could bring a citation from police. And a violation could occur at any time of the day, not just during sleeping hours at night. Another change could create a downtown entertainment zone that would permit loud music. — From wire reports

said Wes Morrill of Yachats. “At first, we always think that somebody got lost. There’s quite a few people wandering around and get lost in the woods. But this was clearly something more than that,” Morrill told KEZI. Kyleen Rowley told the TV station that residents are accustomed to bodies occasionally being recovered from the ocean but not in the scenic area. “I just find it kind of sad,” Rowley said.

By Jack Moran The (Eugene) Register-Guard

SPRINGFIELD — If there’s one thing Paul McClain and the Springfield Police Department agree on, it’s this: A court will have to decide if McClain needs to get his driver’s license back before he may legally power up his electric bicycle and ride it along Springfield’s streets. Since March 24, police have stopped and cited McClain five times for driving with a suspended license. In each instance, police told McClain that he can’t use the electric bicycle he recently purchased for $1,000 unless he first gets his driving privileges reinstated. Jeff Barnard / The Associated Press

Gov. John Kitzhaber speaks about his Cool Schools jobs and energy-efficiency initiative Monday at Helman Elementary School in Ashland. Kitzhaber was at the school to see the location of the first of 500 school energy audits that will be done with federal stimulus money in coming months. Schools will go on to tap $39 million in bonds to upgrade their energy efficiency.

Kitzhaber visits Ashland for Cool Schools kickoff Project designed to create more jobs, reduce energy costs

their backs, this kind economic investment can be huge,” Kitzhaber said afterward. “Five jobs here is the equivalent of 500 jobs in the Portland area.”

By Jeff Barnard

As he left, Kitzhaber heard an emotional plea from Ashland School Board member Heidi Parker, who said the district had cut 65 jobs, programs and operating costs, and was still facing a $1.5 million reduction in funding this year. “I just feel really frustrated,” she said. Kitzhaber responded that with a $3 billion deficit, the state faces a per capita debt rate higher than California’s or Washington’s. “There’s no easy ways out,” he said. “I wish I could tell you I knew where there was a pot of money to get us whole here in the next couple years. I don’t.” The governor added that job creation was improving and that in the next biennium Oregon could begin reinvesting in schools. The audits are expected to be done by this summer, when schools can start drawing on $39 million in federal energy bonds. The Legislature is also considering House Bill 2960 to create as much as $100 million in revenue bonds. Kitzhaber said. He said studies have shown each $1

The Associated Press

ASHLAND — Gov. John Kitzhaber on Monday visited the first of 500 schools receiving energy audits as part of his Cool Schools initiative, which is designed to create jobs while giving schools energy savings that will allow them to spend more on education. Standing in a classroom at Helman Elementary School, the governor and companion Cylvia Hayes listened as Oregon Department of Energy analyst J.P. Batmale said the 45-year-old school has upgraded its lighting with the help of parents, but still needs improvements to wall and ceiling insulation. Spending $103,500 will give the school $11,600 in annual savings, Batmale said. Batmale also demonstrated a touchpad computer that auditors use, allowing them to instantly download the information to state servers, where it can be analyzed. The audits do not include an analysis of boiler upgrades. “There is a school in every community in Oregon, so some of these smaller communities that are flat on

Plea from board member

million invested in energy upgrades at schools will produce 15 jobs, from local contractors to window manufacturers. That would work out to 525 jobs from the existing bonds, and 1,500 more if the new bonding is approved. After singing along with schoolchildren to an adaptation of “Puff the Magic Dragon,” Kitzhaber said investing in energy efficiency in schools will improve the health of teachers and students, as well as the learning environment. He cited a Carnegie Mellon University report from 2005 that found Washington state showed a 15 percent drop in absenteeism and a 5 percent increase in test scores after energy upgrades.

35 percent savings Schools that have already done energy-efficiency upgrades have seen a 35 percent decrease in annual energy spending, allowing them to spend more on teachers, books and computers, he added. The audits will be done at 500 schools in communities that get power from independent utilities and Idaho Power. They range from Eugene to Adel. Schools drawing power from Portland General Electric and PacifiCorp are not included, because they get audits from those utilities.

Bill would kill Independent Party’s name By Nigel Duara The Associated Press

PORTLAND — The Independent Party of Oregon, the state’s third-largest party, has pledged a court fight should legislators approve a bill that would strip the party of its name. The bill, proposed without a sponsor in a state House interim committee, says the use of the word “Independent” in the party’s name confuses voters and creates a legislative emergency. A public hearing

on the measure is scheduled for Wednesday. The Independent Party has been controversial since its inception in 2006. Before a rules change, the phrase “independent” referred to a candidate without a party. Now, it means something else: a growing group of 66,000 led by a pair of progressive Portland lawyers who aren’t entirely sure each of their members knows he or she is an Independent Party voter.

The bill, proposed by the House Interim Committee on Rules, would enforce a Jan. 1, 2012, deadline. A failure to meet that deadline means the party couldn’t keep its members on its party rolls. “They’ve said, change your name or die, but if you change your name before the deadline, you can keep your members,” said party co-founder Linda Williams. A similar bill has been introduced in the Oregon Senate.

License suspended McClain — who said his license was suspended several years ago for driving a car without insurance — begs to differ. He contends that under state law, there’s no difference between riding a regular bicycle and one that’s powered by a motor that allows it to travel up to 20 mph. “I did meticulous research before I bought it, and I know it’s legal,” said McClain, a 41-yearold Springfield resident who frequently tangles with Springfield police over assorted issues. Last year, the medical marijuana user argued that a police officer improperly cited him on a drug possession charge after he carried a bag of pot into the Springfield Justice Center. The charge was ultimately dismissed by a Springfield Municipal Court judge, and McClain later agreed to a $7,500 settlement in the case that allowed the city to deny any wrongdoing. McClain returned to municipal court on Thursday, when he pleaded not guilty to driving with a suspended license in four recent cases involving Springfield police and his electric bike, which more closely resembles a moped than a 10-speed. In a fifth case, a Lane County sheriff’s deputy ticketed McClain for the same offense, then impounded his bicycle. McClain said he paid $365 to get it back. That case will be handled in Lane County Justice Court.

Illegal to start motor, police say Springfield police officer Shawn Monson said McClain may pedal his electric bicycle without penalty, but that it’s illegal for him to ride it after turning on the motor because he is ineligible for a driver’s license. Still, Monson acknowledged that the law McClain cites in making his case — the one that states an “electric-assisted bicycle shall be considered a bicycle, rather than a motor vehicle ... except when otherwise specifically provided by statute” — raises an issue that needs to be reviewed by a judge or a jury. “When (McClain) goes to court, that’s where it will be decided,” Monson said. State officials feel similarly. “It is one of the legal gray areas, and that’s the bottom line,” said David House, a spokesman for Driver and Motor Vehicle Services. House said the law McClain is depending on may seem clear to some people, but that other laws seem to contradict it — a situation that isn’t all that unusual in the world of lawmaking.

Independent Party of Oregon chairwoman Linda Williams, right, and Dan Meek, who both founded the Party in 2006, work together in Portland in August 2010. The Associated Press ile photo


C4 Tuesday, April 12, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Less lawmaking, more representing

T

he legislative session must be more than a time to find a way to balance the budget. It should be a time to assess the state’s programs.

It matters as much to figure out how well Oregon’s programs work as it does to decide on how much money schools should get. Some of that program analysis happens. There are state audit reports. Departments do internal audits. As the Legislature holds hearings on new legislation, it also holds occasional hearings on spending and programs. But some programs drift along only to grab attention when they are in crisis. The state’s Disabled and Senior Property Tax Deferral program is one of those. It’s about to run out of money, as The Oregonian reported. The Legislature established the program in 1963 to basically allow qualifying people to borrow from the state to pay their property taxes. Homeowners have to be at least 62 and their annual taxable income can’t be more than $39,500. There are 10,700 people in the program. Eventually, the state gets the money back plus 6 percent interest when the home is sold, through a lien placed on the home. Lawmakers dipped into the fund in 2008 and took $14.2 million to pay for other programs. That turned out not to be a good idea. At the end of 2008, the economy tanked. The program grew by about 25 percent as more people applied. And when the property tax bills came due in November, the state was short. It paid a portion of what was owed and has to make the final payment May 15. Estimates are that the fund will be short $27 million through the next biennium. There’s more than the shortfall to

compound this program’s problems. The focus of The Oregonian’s story was that the state pays the property taxes for nearly 200 residents whose homes are valued at more than $500,000. There are even eight homes worth more than $1 million. The state also stops considering how much tax-exempt income a homeowner has after the first year in the program. And the state is calculating the money it is owed using 6 percent simple interest. Simple interest computes yearly against the deferred tax amounts. That’s more beneficial to the homeowners than using compound interest, which means interest is computed on previous interest in addition to the deferred tax amounts. You could argue that simple interest shorts the state on the money it gets back. Legislators, including state Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Bend, say the state should re-evaluate the program. The state may consider a test on assets, a higher interest rate and a limit on the property value. The deeper question is: How can this program cruise along for so long and not be more careful with the state’s money? Most legislative hearings on any given day so far this session are devoted to new proposed laws or fluff like making the last week of April Oregon Dance Week. But the mission of a legislator is not to be a lawmaker. It is to be a representative. State government runs billions in programs. Oregon needs more hearings on what the state does and spends and fewer on new things for the state to do and spend on.

Legislative deadline nears

T

hough the current session of the Oregon Legislature won’t wind down until the end of June, some of what has been introduced there may die in the next few days. Generally bills that are not already scheduled by April 8 to move out of the house in which they originated will disappear from the legislative agenda. But in the Oregon Legislature, a deadline is not really a deadline. New proposed laws can still come up. Ones that were presumed dead can be reborn. It’s rare that a session goes by when a bill that has made it past the official “deadline” is not gutted and stuffed with completely new content. One that should be reborn is a proposal by Rep. Gene Whisnant, R-Sunriver. It would roll back the state’s requirement that most gasoline sold here contain at least 10 percent ethanol. That’s a shame on many levels, not the least of which is clear evidence that ethanol production has scant benefits and impacts on the environment its supporters never like to

talk about. Still alive, at least for now, is House Bill 3047, which would make dog training activities a farm use under Oregon law. If the Legislature is going to take it up, there’s good reason for the proposed change. Training herding dogs, as one example, requires land and animals. Training tracking dogs, meanwhile, requires far more space than one might think. The measure might be scheduled for a work session Wednesday. At least one bill that was no longer getting much buzz isn’t dead yet. That’s the proposed ban on plastic bags at grocery stores and elsewhere. Grocers would be allowed to charge for paper bags. According to The Oregonian, if it lives it’s likely to be dramatically changed by amendments. So right now it’s hard to know what to think of it. We’d prefer more attention to Oregon’s economy and the state’s shortfall to an amendment battle over paper or plastic.

My Nickel’s Worth Cut managers’ pay

in.” Perhaps the most dangerous potential feedback would be the release of carbon dioxide and methane from thawing arctic permafrost. This may have already begun. 2. Secondary effects — These are the effects of warming on things like storm and precipitation patterns (think drought and flooding), ocean currents and sea level rise. Many people assume that increased carbon dioxide is favorable for plant growth. However, when crops don’t receive the correct amount of water, yields decline. A recent article in Business Week documents evidence that this, too, may have already begun, and indeed one of the biggest concerns about the consequences of global warming is the concern about food shortages. The time for an acceptable energy plan is now! Eric Holcomb Bend

Since everyone seems to think that teachers and county workers get paid too much, how about cutting the pay of the superintendent, the county commissioners, the city manager, the police chief and all other managers? Anyone earning their wages from tax dollars, especially in Central Oregon, should not make more than $65,000 to $75,000. Remember, these top people get PERS as well. At the very least, they should take the same amount of pay cut. It is not the bottom that is causing us to go broke. It is the overpaid top! Thomas D. Gates Sisters

Fight carbon emissions John Broder’s analysis of Obama’s energy plan — from The New York Times and reprinted in The Bulletin — appears fair and balanced; however, the fact that the “pillars of the plan came crashing down” does not reduce the urgency of devising an acceptable plan to reduce carbon emissions by increasing alternative energy sources and energy conservation. Greenhouse gases continue to absorb heat radiation in accordance with well-established laws of quantum physics. Last year was tied for the warmest year on record (globally) according to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Well-funded organizations would have us believe all of climate science is uncertain; however, the true uncertainties fall into two categories, both of which should be cause for concern: 1. Feedbacks — These can mitigate warming to some extent, but can also make it worse. Some warming must take place before a feedback can “kick

Library cuts are unfair My husband and I are very unhappy with the unfair cuts in libraries other than the two in Bend. We are users of the Sisters Library and feel that cutting its hours at night and Friday and Saturday is a very bad idea. The library is an educational and cultural center for our area, which, by the way, has a much larger population than just Sisters. I would venture to say the percentage of people in Sisters and environs who use the library is higher than the percentage of community members using the Bend libraries. If opening a new library for Bend cuts the support for outlying libraries, the new library should not have been opened — or, at the least, Bend should have been subjected to cuts in hours on an equal basis with the Sisters, La Pine and Sun-

river branches. We think the library board needs to re-evaluate its decision. Marianne Straumfjord Sisters

Strength in Japan Sometimes the distractions of daily life are peeled away. We catch a glimpse of something extraordinary. Such is the case as we witness the strength, beauty and resilience of the human spirit amid the tragic devastation in Japan, among those who are enduring it all, and in the caring help from all over the world. Heartwarming stories emerge about people sharing what little they have left, including food, water and homes; about elderly men checking door to door to see if everyone is all right; about doors left open at night with no fear because it is safer with the continuing aftershocks; about no looting or pushing in lines; and the calm resignation of the Japanese to rebuild amid such enormous loss. A woman in Sendai describes how, returning to check on what is left of her house, finds food and water on her doorstep, from whom she knows not. She talks about how quiet it is with no traffic, how the stars, once rarely visible, now shine brightly from the night sky, and the mountains are silhouetted magnificently against a clear horizon. She hears people saying, “This is how it was in the old days when everyone helped each other.” I am thankful for this reminder that we are all connected in the web of life on this planet. What happens to one, happens to all; the healing of the world and the sacredness of the human spirit rest in simple, everyday kindness and compassion. Pat Porter Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Prejudice against Pilot Butte Middle School unwarranted By Susan Pierce Bulletin guest columnist

H

aving grown up and gone to school in Bend, I have certainly seen a lot of change in what used to be a small town. Upon my return after a short time away, I like to think that Bend still had that “small town” feel, even though it has grown to a population far greater than any traditional small town. I like to think that Bend is successful in maintaining a wonderful community spirit and sense of belonging, despite our growing size. To my surprise, I had a real awakening after participating on the Middle School Boundary Advisory Committee. I agreed to volunteer on the committee to try to find a solution to the difficult issue of overcrowding at Cascade Middle School. Living on the east side, I do not have children who attend Cascade or one of the potentially affected west-side elementary schools. I feel I was a neutral and objective party without a personal stake in whatever recommendation our

committee would ultimately propose. I learned many things serving on this committee for three months. Primarily I learned that school prejudice is running rampant in our quaint, supposedly sophisticated and open-minded little town. “Prej-u-dice: 1) an unfavorable opinion or feeling formed beforehand or without knowledge, thought or reason. 2) any preconceived opinion or feeling, either favorable or unfavorable. 3) Unreasonable feelings, opinions, or attitudes, especially of a hostile nature, regarding a racial, religious or other group.” The prejudice running rampant is against Pilot Butte Middle School. The feedback that I continually heard firsthand, and read in hard copy, was filled with such vitriol and hostility about Pilot Butte, and even Bend’s east side, that I could hardly believe what I was hearing and reading. It was even harder to understand considering most of those making the comments have little basis for their beliefs. Unfortunately, upon repeatedly hearing the rumor-mongering,

IN MY VIEW it became obvious to me that the perception about Pilot Butte was indeed reality for many of these parents. Thankfully, there were some potentially affected parents who shared their concerns without participating in the public degradation of one of our community schools. Sadly, there was a very large and vocal group of parents who loudly participated in this degradation. I challenge those parents who have concerns regarding the caliber of Pilot Butte to educate yourselves with firsthand information. I welcome you to take a tour of the school, talk with teachers, staff, parents, meet with the principal and discuss your concerns. Pilot Butte is a truly great school with a lot to offer. In addition to the wonderful teachers, staff and students, Pilot Butte boasts the Oregon Art Educator of The Year (2009/2010), Oregon District Librarian of the Year (2009/2010), a unique

technology curriculum supported by a new, state-of-the-art computer lab, and offers Media Studies, Jazz Band, Drama Club, Art Club and so much more. Please, take the time to seek information before drawing a conclusion. Don’t let fear, rumors and ignorance create prejudice. Surely we are beyond that. The one thing I think everyone agrees on is that change is hard, and no one wants to change. I understand families want to go to their neighborhood school, they want to keep their kids together with their friends, and they don’t want more commute time. No one wants disruption. I believe everyone on the committee was sympathetic to these issues. There was no easy, slam-dunk solution to this problem. The committee comprised administrators from several elementary and middle schools, representatives from district departments, and parents and community members from various geographic areas in Bend. All volunteered their time and all worked hard to be objective, open-minded and solution-orient-

ed. Unfortunately, there was no answer to the overcrowding at Cascade that didn’t involve change. While change is not always welcome or invited, we all know it is a part of life. Change can even be good if you let it. Pilot Butte is filled with outstanding teachers, staff, students and families. I am one of many who know this firsthand. Ultimately, it will be up to the families affected by the boundary change to embrace this change and be a part of the solution, or fight it and be a part of the problem. Whatever road you choose, I surely hope that the prejudice, degradation and hostility toward Pilot Butte ceases. What message are you sending to the dedicated staff, the students and their families who are all proud to be a part of PBMS? What message are you sending to your own children? Our community needs to be above prejudice and rumor-mongering, and we need to lead by example for all our children. Susan Pierce lives in Bend.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 12, 2011 C5

O Joyce M. Niles

D

N   Bette Gail Clayton, of Bend, Oregon (Formerly of Beaverton, OR) April 4, 1939 - April 9, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A private urn committal service will take place at Portland Memorial sometime in the future. Contributions may be made to:

Partners in Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, Oregon 97701, www.partnersbend.org

Donald E. Smith, of Redmond Jan. 21, 1927 - April 10, 2011 Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel, 541-548-3219 sign our guest book at redmondmemorial.com Services: Pending.

Howard Monroe Garrison, of Redmond Mar. 17, 1957 - April 8, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A private gathering of family and friends will take place at a later date.

Aug. 19, 1930 - April 7, 2011 Joyce M. Niles of Redmond, formerly of Eugene, passed away at the age of 80, on April 7, 2011, after a two year battle with lung cancer. Joyce was born August 19, 1930, in Ringling, OK. She married Clyde Niles June 12, 1947, in Kelso, WA. He preceded her in death in 2001. Joyce Niles She was a bus driver for the Eugene school district for 20 years before moving to Redmond, where she worked at Redmond Health Care Center for 10 years. She was a member of the Ladies Auxiliary of the VFW. Joyce leaves behind three children, Delma Stuck of Eugene, Gary Niles of Redmond, and Leonard Niles of Bend; a son, George, preceded her in death in 1954. She has seven grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. A memorial will be held April 23, 2011, at the Redmond VFW from 1-4 pm. Her family would like to thank Redmond Hospice for all their support and kindness. Inurnment will be at Willamette National Cemetery at a later date. Donations may be made to Redmond Hospice in lieu of flowers.

Gil Robbins, folk musician, dies at 80 By William Grimes

Gil Robbins, center, a member of the 1960s folk group The Highwaymen in an undated photo. Robbins, a singer, guitarist, songwriter and a fixture on the folkmusic scene, died April 5 at his home in Esteban Cantú, Mexico. He was 80.

New York Times News Service

Gil Robbins, a singer, guitarist and songwriter with the folk group the Highwaymen and a fixture on the folk-music scene, died Tuesday at his home in Esteban Cantú, Mexico. He was 80. The cause was prostate cancer, said his wife, Mary. Robbins, who was a singer and bass guitarist with the Cumberland Three and the Belafonte Singers and a performing partner with Tom Paxton, joined the Highwaymen in 1962. The group, formed in 1958 at Wesleyan College in Connecticut, had become one of the top collegiate-style folk groups, scoring hits with “Michael” (“Michael, Row the Boat Ashore”) and the Leadbelly song “Cotton Fields.” With Robbins aboard, singing baritone and playing the guitarron, an oversize Mexican six-string guitar, the group maintained its popularity while continuing a transition to more socially conscious music. Robbins performed on the five albums that the group recorded for United Artists before disbanding in 1964, including the live albums “Hootenanny With the Highwaymen,” “One More Time” and “Homecoming.” Gilbert Lee Robbins, the father of the actor Tim Robbins, was born on April 3, 1931, in Spokane, Wash., and grew up in Los Angeles.

New York Times News Service

After playing percussion with the Long Beach Symphony Orchestra while still in high school, he won a music scholarship to the University of California at Los Angeles, where he was the drum major of the marching band. He left school before graduating and enlisted in the Air Force, where he was the drum major and band conductor for the 542nd Division, based in Selma, Ala. In 1960 he joined the Cumberland Three, which was formed at the behest of Roulette Records by John Stewart, a singer

and guitarist who later replaced Dave Guard in the Kingston Trio. The label sent the trio to New York, where Robbins quickly became active in the Greenwich Village folk-music scene and befriended musicians like Dave Van Ronk and Ronnie Gilbert of the Weavers. After recording three albums, two of them devoted to Civil War songs, with the Cumberland Three, he joined the Belafonte Singers, a 12-man group of singers and musicians that toured with Harry Belafonte. After the Highwaymen broke up, Robbins managed the Gas-

light Club, on Macdougal Street, in the late 1960s. He directed the choir at the Church of St. Joseph in Greenwich Village and founded a choral group, the Occasional Singers, that performed avant-garde works. He also acted in off-Broadway productions and in the ill-fated Broadway musical “Rainbow Jones,” which closed after one performance at the Music Box Theater in 1974. He later appeared in small roles in the films “Bob Roberts” (which stars Tim Robbins), “Dead Man Walking,” “Cradle Will Rock” and “Wide Awake.”

Contributions may be made to:

Partners in Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, Oregon 97701, www.partnersbend.org

“Liftoff,” a stainless steel column by John McCracken, is shown at “Art 40 Basel” in Basel, Switzerland. McCracken, a sculptor whose style was defined by simple geometric shapes, died Friday at 76.

William “Bill” Marion Frazor of Gilchrist April 25, 1935 - April 5, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel of La Pine, 541-536-5104 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: Funeral service will be held at the First Baptist Church of Crescent, 136463 Main St., Crescent, OR, 9:00 a.m. Wednesday, April 13, 2011. Graveside service to follow, 2:00 p.m., at Eagle Point National Cemetery. Contributions may be made to:

Contributions to help the family with burial expenses would be appreciated, through the South Valley Bank and Trust.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

The Associated Press ile photo

John McCracken, L.A. artist, dies at 76 By Christopher Knight Los Angeles Times

John McCracken, an artist whose fusion of painting with geometric sculpture in the mid1960s embodied an aesthetic distinctive to postwar Los Angeles, died Friday in New York. He was 76. McCracken had lived in Santa Fe, N.M., since 1994 and, according to a spokesman for his Manhattan gallery, had been in ill health. McCracken was one of a group of artists whose work was variously described as representing the L.A. Cool School, thanks to its rejection of emotionally expressive gestures; Finish Fetish, in recognition of its pristine color and high-tech surfaces; and Minimalism, because of its reliance on simple geometric forms. The difficulty in naming his practice or easily linking it to a school attests to the success of his artistic ambition. The geometric forms McCracken employed were typically built from straight lines: cubes, rectangular slabs and rods, stepped or quadrilateral pyramids, postand-lintel structures and, most memorably, tall planks that lean against the wall. Usually, the form is painted in sprayed lacquer, which does not reveal the artist’s hand. An industrial look is belied by sensuous color. His palette included bubblegum pink, lemon yellow, deep

sapphire and ebony, usually applied as a monochrome. Sometimes an application of multiple colors marbleizes or runs down the sculpture’s surface, like a molten lava flow. He also made objects of softly stained wood or, in recent years, highly polished bronze and reflective stainless steel. McCracken was bedeviled by Stanley Kubrick’s science-fiction epic, “2001: A Space Odyssey,” with its iconic image of an ancient monolith floating in space. The 1968 blockbuster was released two years after the artist made his first plank. “At the time, some people thought I had designed the monolith or that it had been derived from my work,” he said in a 1998 interview. McCracken was born Dec. 9, 1934, in Berkeley and studied at the California College of Arts and Crafts. After his first solo show at L.A.’s adventurous Nicholas Wilder Gallery in 1965, he moved south. He taught for many years at schools in Los Angeles and Santa Barbara before moving to Santa Fe. His work is in most major American museum collections, including those of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, L.A.’s Museum of Contemporary Art and New York’s Museum of Modern Art. His last solo show was at David Zwirner Gallery in New York in September.

Autumn Funerals CARING • DIGNIFIED • PROFESSIONAL

Local schools For Web links to local schools, preschool through college, visit www.bend bulletin.com /schools.

The Bulletin

BURIAL & CREMATION SERVICES Services at the Most Affordable Prices Serving all Central Oregon communities including La Pine, Fort Rock, Gilchrist, and Christmas Valley Bend 541-318-0842 | Redmond 541-504-9485 Terrebonne & Tumalo Cemeteries Locally Owned & Operated by the Daniel Family

Campbell, Zimbabwean who challenged government seizure of lands, dies at 78 By Robyn Dixon Los Angeles Times

JOHANNESBURG — Mike Campbell, the white Zimbabwean farmer who won a landmark case in southern Africa’s highest court challenging the seizure of his farm by President Robert Mugabe’s government, died Wednesday. He was 78. Campbell, whose family said he died of complications from a savage beating by Mugabe loyalists in 2008, called himself a white African. “We’re not British or Scottish or anything. We’re African,” he said stoutly in a 2007 interview with The Los Angeles Times. But he died homeless in the Zimbabwean capital, Harare, after his farm was seized and his house burned by thugs from the ruling Zimbabwe African National Union-Patriotic Front. That wasn’t all he lost. The 2008 beating cost him his health. Afterward, he found he couldn’t solve easy sums, like calculating how much fertilizer to put on a mango tree. His fam-

ily said he never recovered. Campbell was famous for his stubbornness and his refusal to compromise with the Mugabe government, which began seizing white farms in 2000. The agriculture-based economy collapsed as farm production plummeted; Mugabe, who came to power as a black liberation hero, had handed out farms to judges, generals, family members, top ruling party officials and others with little interest in farming the land. After holding out for years against threats to seize his citrus and mango farm, Mount Carmel, Campbell and his wife, Angela, were driven from their home in 2009, and the family’s ancient pet horse, Ginger, who lived in the garden, ran away into the bush. Months later, the house was burned to the ground. At the time, Campbell clung to hope he might get the land back. But asked about rebuilding the place, the tough old farmer fought tears. “I don’t know, quite honestly,”

he said at the time. “I’ll have to look at it. I just don’t know.” It wasn’t to be. “He knew he was going to die yesterday,” his son-in-law, Ben Freeth, said in a phone interview. “He woke up in the morning and said, ‘I’m going to die today,’ and by 2:15 in the afternoon he was dead.” Campbell is survived by his wife and his three children, Bruce, Cathy and Laura. He was a feisty, gruff fellow who did not suffer fools gladly — including the ZANU-PF politicians arriving at his door to beg for donations. He’d send them away with contempt. Campbell kept his vulnerable side well hidden, lest his enemies see a weak spot. “He stood for justice, for all of us,” Freeth said. “For me, he was the most tenacious and courageous man I have ever had the privilege to know.” Campbell’s life story was told in the film “Mugabe and the White African,” inspired by a series of articles on Campbell in the Los Angeles Times.

Donnamae Klotz June 20, 1927 - April 04, 2011 Donnamae Klotz, 83 of Bend, Oregon passed away on Monday, April 4, 2011. She lived a life of devotion to her music, her church, and most of all her family. She was born on June 20, 1927, to Alva Frederick Hoffman and Edna Sophie Wilhelmina Berndt Hoffman in Melrose Park, Illinois. She attended St. John’s Evangelical Lutheran School and had her Confirmation in the Lutheran Church on April 6, 1941. She attended the Luther Institute, where she met her future husband, and spent two years at Valparaiso University, where she was a member of the Alpha Phi Delta sorority. She married Harlan G. Klotz on June 12, 1948, and the two moved to Bensenville, Illinois, where they raised five children. Donnamae was very active in Zion Lutheran Church, organizing and directing the first children’s choir, teaching Sunday School, and singing in the adult choir. Vacationing with the family in northern Wisconsin, she developed a lifelong love of the North Woods and the family cottages in Oneida County, the first on Flannery Lake and then later on Two Sisters Lake. Harlan’s work with the M&M Mars Company took them to live in New Jersey and California, and extensive travel around the world. Harlan passed away in March, 1986, and she married Richard L. “Dick” Rost of Barrington, Illinois, on May 16, 1992, and the two resided near Lake Tomahawk, Wisconsin. She continued to travel, honed her genealogy skills, and learned to play the harp while directing the handbell choir at Rock of Ages Lutheran Church in Minocqua. Donnamae had been to all seven continents, including Antarctica, yet she was always a little fearful of flying. Eventually, she declared that her traveling days were over, yet she took special joy in making exceptions for the weddings of three of her granddaughters. For health reasons, she moved to Bend, Oregon, near her son Paul, in 2009. She is predeceased by both husbands. Dick Rost passed away in June of 2010. She is survived by her five children from her first marriage, Jack (Jill) Klotz of Douglasville, Georgia, Paul (Deb) Klotz of Bend, Oregon, Thom (Holly) Klotz of Janesville, Wisconsin, Dr. Beth Klotz von Seggern of El Morro, New Mexico, and Nancy (Steve) Klotz Bennett of Lindsay, California; nine grandchildren, Heidi (Todd) Klotz Hall, James Klotz, Erin (Matt) Klotz Wherry, Gretchen Klotz, Jenny (Brad) Klotz Brod, Hillary Klotz, Heather Klotz, Megan Bennett, and Ashley Bennett; three children from her second marriage, Rita (Tom) Howley of Mt. Prospect, Illinois, Philip (Eleanor) Rost of Great Falls, Virginia, and Eldrie Stone of Ventura, Iowa; and grandchildren, David Stone and Daniel Stone. A memorial service will be held on Sunday, April 17th at 1:00 p.m. at Trinity Lutheran Church, 2550 N.E. Butler Market Rd., Bend, Oregon 97701. Interment will take place in Newbold Cemetery in New Bold, Wisconsin. In lieu of flowers, a memorial has been established with the American Cancer Society (www.cancer.org/ mosiac or 1-800-277-2345) or the Lutheran Hour Ministries (www.lhmgift.org or 1-800-944-3450).


W E AT H ER

C6 Tuesday, April 12, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, APRIL 12 Today: Mostly sunny start, mostly cloudy finish, warmer.

HIGH Ben Burkel

FORECASTS: LOCAL

Western Ruggs

Condon

55/35

51/32

59/38

43/27

Warm Springs 58/36

51/26

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

 Camp Sherman 50/26 Redmond Prineville 55/29 Cascadia 53/30 54/30 Sisters 53/28 Bend Post  55/29

52/28

43/17

Partly cloudy to the north, mostly sunny to the south. Winds will be light. Central

57/35 56/34

Oakridge Elk Lake

53/31

50/26

52/25

46/19

50/24

48/44

Hampton 50/26

Seattle

51/28



Bend

51/29



55/37



Idaho Falls Elko

68/44



Helena Boise

55/29

53/29

55/30

53/28

Silver Lake

50/23

Missoula

Redding Christmas Valley

Chemult

City

54/42

54/27



Reno

50/30

Partly cloudy with light winds.

Crater Lake 39/25

63/35

San Francisco



58/46

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:27 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:46 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:26 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:47 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 1:30 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 3:10 a.m.

Moon phases Full

Salt Lake City 54/38



Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

HIGH

LOW

Last

New

April 17 April 24 May 2

First

May 10

Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

HIGH

51 32

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

Calgary 47/26

Eugene Partly cloudy with a 58/40 chance of scattered showGrants Pass ers south. 58/37 Eastern

51/27

Fort Rock

Vancouver

59/43

Burns

La Pine

Crescent

BEND ALMANAC

SATURDAY Mostly cloudy, rain showers.

49 29

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 61° Ontario • 29° Sexton Summit

FRIDAY

Mostly cloudy, mixed showers, cool, LOW breezy.

HIGH

48 25

Portland

Brothers

Mostly cloudy, mixed showers, cool, LOW breezy.

NORTHWEST

47/26

51/27

Sunriver

HIGH

THURSDAY

Partly sunny across the region today. There will be a chance of showers over south-central Oregon.

Paulina

51/25

Crescent Lake

LOW

29

STATE

Maupin

Marion Forks

Tonight: Mostly cloudy, snow showers developing.

55

Bob Shaw

Government Camp

WEDNESDAY

57 32

TEMPERATURE

Astoria . . . . . . . . 52/40/0.27 . . . . . 51/43/pc. . . . . . 49/39/sh Baker City . . . . . . 54/37/0.02 . . . . . 52/32/pc. . . . . . 48/25/rs Brookings . . . . . . 51/38/0.68 . . . . . 53/43/sh. . . . . . 50/44/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . .52/37/trace . . . . . 53/32/pc. . . . . . 48/26/rs Eugene . . . . . . . . 54/39/0.10 . . . . . . 58/40/s. . . . . . 51/38/sh Klamath Falls . . .49/35/trace . . . . . 51/31/sh. . . . . . 46/29/rs Lakeview. . . . . . . 50/36/0.00 . . . . . 51/29/pc. . . . . . 48/28/sn La Pine . . . . . . . . 48/32/0.00 . . . . . 51/25/pc. . . . . . 43/25/rs Medford . . . . . . .56/43/trace . . . . . . 58/38/s. . . . . . 53/38/sh Newport . . . . . . . 50/43/0.73 . . . . . . 50/44/s. . . . . . 48/41/sh North Bend . . . . . 52/43/0.61 . . . . . . 53/42/s. . . . . . 51/43/sh Ontario . . . . . . . .61/39/trace . . . . . 57/37/pc. . . . . . 54/35/sh Pendleton . . . . . . 55/43/0.08 . . . . . 60/36/pc. . . . . . 58/37/sh Portland . . . . . . . 54/43/0.18 . . . . . 59/43/pc. . . . . . 50/39/sh Prineville . . . . . . . 48/36/0.00 . . . . . 53/30/pc. . . . . . 51/28/sh Redmond. . . . . . .50/37/trace . . . . . 55/30/sh. . . . . . 49/26/rs Roseburg. . . . . . . 52/40/0.04 . . . . . 58/39/pc. . . . . . 52/40/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 52/42/0.21 . . . . . 57/41/pc. . . . . . 52/38/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 44/35/0.00 . . . . . 53/28/sn. . . . . . 48/25/rs The Dalles . . . . . .57/44/trace . . . . . 60/36/pc. . . . . . 57/37/sh

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

5

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48/36 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .80 in 1978 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.17” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 in 1997 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.25” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.93” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 4.06” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.19 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.28 in 1956 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .6:05 a.m. . . . . . .7:09 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .5:24 a.m. . . . . . .4:53 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .6:00 a.m. . . . . . .6:27 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .6:21 a.m. . . . . . .7:14 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .6:37 p.m. . . . . . .6:25 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .5:44 a.m. . . . . . .5:49 p.m.

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Wed. Hi/Lo/W

Partly to mostly cloudy, slight chance LOW of rain showers, warmer.

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . 38-107 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 103-166 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . 152-172 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . . . 142 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 82-98 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . . . 188 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . 50-132 Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

. . . no report . . . . 175-270 . . . . . . . 128 . . . . . . . 225 . . . . . . 46-86 . . . no report . . . . . . . . 81

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

• 2.85”

Calgary 47/26

Boise 55/37

San Francisco 58/46

Salt Lake City 54/38

Saskatoon 46/20

S

Bismarck 56/33 St. Paul 66/45 Rapid City 55/33 Cheyenne 58/32

Las Albuquerque Los Angeles Vegas 74/44 63/54 78/51 Phoenix 83/57 Tijuana 65/50

La Paz 89/58 Juneau 45/32

Mazatlan 85/55

S

S

Thunder Bay 56/37

Green Bay 59/38

Des Moines 66/48 Chicago 57/40

Omaha 70/47 Kansas City 70/50

S

Oklahoma City 79/50 Little Rock 73/49

Houston 82/57

S S

Halifax 55/35 Boston Portland To ronto 59/44 59/36 57/37 New York Detroit 58/44 Buffalo 54/38 52/34 Philadelphia 60/46 Washington, D. C. 63/50

Columbus 54/36

Charlotte 71/41

Nashville 65/44 Birmingham 70/45

Dallas 81/56

S

Quebec 57/35

Louisville 65/45

St. Louis 68/48

Chihuahua 91/54

Anchorage 42/22

S

Winnipeg 58/30

Denver 66/37

Henderson, Ky.

Honolulu 85/70

S

Billings 52/32

Portland 59/43

McAllen, Texas Leadville, Colo.

S

Seattle 54/42

• 95° • 10°

S

Vancouver 48/44

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

S

New Orleans 80/58

Atlanta 70/46 Orlando 86/60 Miami 85/71

Monterrey 91/64

FRONTS

WATCHING IN THE RAIN

New York Times News Service

TUSKAHOMA, Okla. — Sardis Lake, a reservoir in southeastern Oklahoma young enough to have drowned saplings still poking through its surface and old enough to have become a renowned bass fishery, is not wanting for suitors. Oklahoma City and fastgrowing suburbs like Edmond want to see the water flowing through their shower heads someday. So do the water masters of Tarrant County, Texas, 200 miles to the south, who are looking to supply new subdivi-

Larry Steagall / Kitsap Sun

Contact your public officials Find an easily searchable list of contact information for federal, state, legislative, county and city officials at www.bendbulletin.com/officials.

The Bulletin

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .76/53/0.00 . . .59/36/s . . 64/42/pc Green Bay. . . . . .57/49/0.00 . . .59/38/s . . 63/35/pc Greensboro. . . . .84/60/0.00 . .71/42/sh . . . 67/44/s Harrisburg. . . . . .84/50/0.22 . . .57/43/r . . 55/41/sh Hartford, CT . . . .67/50/0.00 . . .60/43/r . . . .50/38/r Helena. . . . . . . . .61/31/0.00 . 51/29/pc . . . 55/34/c Honolulu . . . . . . .84/74/0.01 . 85/70/pc . . . .83/69/r Houston . . . . . . .88/71/0.09 . . .82/57/s . . 81/68/pc Huntsville . . . . . .82/66/0.55 . 66/42/pc . . . 75/52/s Indianapolis . . . .77/60/0.21 . . .61/42/s . . 68/47/pc Jackson, MS . . . .86/64/0.35 . . .77/50/s . . . 79/57/s Madison, WI . . . .63/50/0.00 . . .62/42/s . . 66/40/sh Jacksonville. . . . .91/60/0.00 . .77/52/sh . . . 78/53/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .39/32/0.18 . . .45/32/r . . . .46/31/r Kansas City. . . . .67/46/0.00 . . .70/50/s . . . 74/52/c Lansing . . . . . . . .73/53/0.30 . 55/35/pc . . 64/42/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .71/48/0.00 . 78/51/pc . . 78/47/pc Lexington . . . . . .76/59/0.46 . .60/41/sh . . 70/48/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .67/43/0.00 . . .71/48/s . . 64/40/sh Little Rock. . . . . .77/63/0.37 . . .73/49/s . . . 76/58/s Los Angeles. . . . .66/53/0.00 . 63/54/pc . . . 62/53/s Louisville . . . . . . .77/61/1.41 . 65/45/pc . . 74/50/pc Memphis. . . . . . .77/64/0.66 . . .71/52/s . . . 77/57/s Miami . . . . . . . . .87/71/0.00 . 85/71/pc . . . 85/72/s Milwaukee . . . . .64/52/0.00 . . .52/40/s . . 61/39/sh Minneapolis . . . .63/43/0.00 . 66/45/pc . . 57/37/pc Nashville . . . . . . .79/62/1.42 . 65/44/pc . . . 74/52/s New Orleans. . . .85/75/0.00 . . .80/58/s . . . 80/64/s New York . . . . . .81/50/0.00 . . .58/44/r . . . .51/42/r Newark, NJ . . . . .87/50/0.00 . . .58/46/r . . . .52/42/r Norfolk, VA . . . . .82/62/0.00 . . .73/50/t . . 60/45/sh Oklahoma City . .75/52/0.00 . . .79/50/s . . 80/52/pc Omaha . . . . . . . .67/40/0.00 . 70/47/pc . . 64/40/sh Orlando. . . . . . . .91/69/0.00 . 86/60/pc . . . 84/59/s Palm Springs. . . .82/54/0.00 . 78/52/pc . . . 76/54/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .67/50/0.00 . . .66/44/s . . . 69/50/s Philadelphia . . . .83/52/0.00 . . .60/46/r . . 56/45/sh Phoenix. . . . . . . .82/50/0.00 . . .83/57/s . . 84/59/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .76/60/0.00 . . .52/35/r . . 62/41/sh Portland, ME. . . .62/43/0.62 . 59/36/pc . . . .46/37/r Providence . . . . .62/47/0.00 . . .60/42/r . . . .51/39/r Raleigh . . . . . . . .84/60/0.00 . .72/41/sh . . . 68/45/s

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .66/31/0.00 . . .55/33/c . . 49/33/pc Savannah . . . . . .90/66/0.00 . .78/52/sh . . . 76/52/s Reno . . . . . . . . . .62/40/0.00 . 63/35/pc . . 55/32/sh Seattle. . . . . . . . .51/41/0.00 . 54/42/pc . . 51/41/sh Richmond . . . . . .84/56/0.00 . . .75/47/t . . 66/45/sh Sioux Falls. . . . . .62/35/0.00 . . .68/44/s . . 51/35/sh Rochester, NY . . .80/60/0.00 . 55/36/pc . . 54/37/sh Spokane . . . . . . .53/42/0.08 . 51/35/pc . . 50/33/sh Sacramento. . . . .68/47/0.00 . .68/44/sh . . 61/44/sh Springfield, MO. .64/55/0.09 . . .68/45/s . . . 72/52/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .69/60/0.30 . . .68/48/s . . 72/53/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .86/70/0.00 . 82/63/pc . . . 83/65/s Salt Lake City . . .58/38/0.00 . .54/38/sh . . 63/39/sh Tucson. . . . . . . . .84/39/0.00 . . .82/51/s . . . 82/50/s San Antonio . . . .84/64/0.02 . . .84/57/s . . 85/69/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .74/55/0.04 . . .76/50/s . . 82/55/pc San Diego . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . 62/53/pc . . . 61/51/s Washington, DC .84/56/0.00 . . .63/50/r . . 61/44/sh San Francisco . . .62/50/0.00 . . .59/45/s . . 58/47/sh Wichita . . . . . . . .71/45/0.00 . . .74/50/s . . 74/50/pc San Jose . . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . . .64/44/s . . 63/46/sh Yakima . . . . . . . .57/43/0.00 . 56/31/pc . . 56/33/sh Santa Fe . . . . . . .62/26/0.00 . . .68/38/s . . 67/35/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .81/51/0.00 . . .86/56/s . . . 86/58/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .68/45/0.00 . .49/37/sh . . 50/40/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .64/48/0.00 . 64/53/pc . . 66/52/pc Auckland. . . . . . .70/55/0.00 . . .71/56/s . . . 69/56/s Baghdad . . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . 89/62/pc . . . 75/52/s Bangkok . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . .91/76/t . . . .92/77/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .72/43/0.00 . . .77/50/s . . . 81/48/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .70/61/0.00 . .63/56/sh . . 66/54/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . .68/41/0.00 . .51/41/sh . . 48/38/sh Bogota . . . . . . . .66/52/0.07 . .61/51/sh . . 65/52/sh Budapest. . . . . . .59/34/0.00 . .65/43/sh . . 54/36/pc Buenos Aires. . . .81/55/0.00 . 77/58/pc . . 78/55/sh Cabo San Lucas .75/57/0.00 . . .86/62/s . . . 89/65/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .84/63/0.00 . . .77/60/s . . . 79/61/s Calgary . . . . . . . .57/34/0.00 . 47/26/pc . . . 47/32/c Cancun . . . . . . . .84/73/0.00 . . .86/72/s . . . 85/73/s Dublin . . . . . . . . .55/39/0.02 . .53/41/sh . . 53/45/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .57/39/0.00 . .54/41/sh . . . 54/40/c Geneva . . . . . . . .73/45/0.00 . .54/37/sh . . . 56/35/s Harare . . . . . . . . .77/52/0.00 . . .77/55/s . . 79/56/pc Hong Kong . . . . .84/68/0.00 . 77/68/pc . . 75/67/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . .50/39/0.00 . .54/47/sh . . . 59/46/c Jerusalem . . . . . .73/53/0.00 . . .58/42/s . . . 62/44/s Johannesburg . . .72/50/0.11 . 74/53/pc . . . .73/52/t Lima . . . . . . . . . .75/64/0.00 . 76/63/pc . . 77/63/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .79/57/0.00 . . .77/60/s . . . 78/59/s London . . . . . . . .68/43/0.00 . 59/44/pc . . . 53/45/c Madrid . . . . . . . .73/48/0.00 . . .74/45/s . . . 75/47/s Manila. . . . . . . . .90/75/0.00 . 87/73/pc . . . 89/73/s

Mecca . . . . . . . . .97/73/0.00 . 91/74/pc . . . 95/75/s Mexico City. . . . .90/57/0.00 . 86/56/pc . . 88/58/pc Montreal. . . . . . .70/48/0.66 . . .57/36/s . . 54/39/sh Moscow . . . . . . .36/32/0.02 . . 38/32/rs . . .40/32/rs Nairobi . . . . . . . .81/61/0.00 . 82/61/pc . . 81/59/pc Nassau . . . . . . . .84/68/0.00 . . .84/71/s . . 84/72/sh New Delhi. . . . . .93/73/0.00 . . .92/74/c . . 93/72/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . .66/46/0.00 . . .59/42/s . . . 63/44/s Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .64/39/0.00 . .44/35/sh . . 45/35/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . .73/50/1.82 . . .58/36/s . . 55/40/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . .70/48/0.00 . . .53/37/s . . 56/40/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .91/77/0.00 . 88/74/pc . . . .88/75/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .72/46/0.00 . 72/53/pc . . 64/48/sh Santiago . . . . . . .75/54/0.00 . 72/48/pc . . 65/49/sh Sao Paulo . . . . . .81/63/0.00 . .81/66/sh . . . .82/66/t Sapporo. . . . . . . .48/38/0.03 . 47/33/pc . . 53/35/pc Seoul . . . . . . . . . .61/39/0.00 . . .61/39/s . . . 65/40/s Shanghai. . . . . . .63/50/0.00 . . .68/49/s . . 73/52/pc Singapore . . . . . .82/77/0.90 . . .87/76/t . . . .86/75/t Stockholm. . . . . .59/41/0.00 . 51/35/pc . . . 42/31/c Sydney. . . . . . . . .72/55/0.00 . . .70/57/s . . 73/54/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .75/64/0.00 . 79/66/pc . . . 78/68/c Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .72/57/0.00 . . .64/50/s . . . 66/51/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .64/48/0.00 . . .58/44/s . . . 65/45/s Toronto . . . . . . . .73/48/0.00 . 57/37/pc . . 60/40/pc Vancouver. . . . . .50/45/0.18 . .48/44/sh . . 50/42/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . .64/43/sh . . 50/37/sh Warsaw. . . . . . . .48/30/0.21 . 60/38/pc . . 48/37/sh

Tribes cite century-old law to claim reservoir By Felicity Barringer

Krishawn Mann, 6, center, and his sister Soulunique Sanders, 20 months, wait with their grandmother at a coffee stand at Sixth Street and Veneta Avenue in Bremerton, Wash., on Saturday.

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .77/54/0.00 . . .80/53/s . . . 87/55/s Akron . . . . . . . . .73/59/0.10 . . .53/35/r . . 65/46/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .82/52/0.00 . 60/38/pc . . . .50/33/r Albuquerque. . . .66/31/0.00 . . .74/44/s . . . 75/41/s Anchorage . . . . .43/26/0.00 . .42/22/sh . . 40/23/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . 70/46/pc . . . 74/48/s Atlantic City . . . .78/52/0.02 . . .59/46/t . . 52/40/sh Austin . . . . . . . . .84/64/0.01 . . .84/51/s . . 84/66/pc Baltimore . . . . . .85/55/0.00 . . .61/48/r . . 58/42/sh Billings. . . . . . . . .67/36/0.00 . .52/32/sh . . 57/37/sn Birmingham . . . .86/69/0.00 . 70/45/pc . . . 76/48/s Bismarck . . . . . . .69/27/0.00 . . .56/33/c . . . 49/29/s Boise . . . . . . . . . .60/48/0.00 . 55/37/pc . . 53/33/sh Boston. . . . . . . . .72/46/0.01 . . .59/44/r . . . .50/40/r Bridgeport, CT. . .63/46/0.01 . . .56/44/r . . . .46/39/r Buffalo . . . . . . . .74/44/0.00 . 52/34/pc . . 54/37/sh Burlington, VT. . .73/50/0.21 . . .56/34/s . . . .48/34/r Caribou, ME . . . .45/38/0.01 . . .52/28/s . . . .47/37/r Charleston, SC . .89/62/0.00 . .78/53/sh . . . 74/54/s Charlotte. . . . . . .86/64/0.00 . .71/41/sh . . . 72/46/s Chattanooga. . . .83/64/0.00 . 67/43/pc . . . 74/48/s Cheyenne . . . . . .58/29/0.00 . .58/32/sh . . . 48/31/c Chicago. . . . . . . .67/50/0.00 . . .57/40/s . . . 65/45/c Cincinnati . . . . . .75/59/0.95 . . .59/39/c . . . 72/53/s Cleveland . . . . . .75/57/0.11 . . .50/37/r . . . 64/46/s Colorado Springs 60/28/0.00 . 69/35/pc . . . 53/34/c Columbia, MO . .66/53/0.00 . . .69/45/s . . . 73/52/s Columbia, SC . . .89/64/0.00 . .77/44/sh . . . 74/47/s Columbus, GA. . .86/67/0.00 . . .74/48/s . . . 79/51/s Columbus, OH. . .74/60/0.30 . .54/36/sh . . 69/50/pc Concord, NH . . . .76/44/0.00 . 63/36/pc . . . .46/34/r Corpus Christi. . .93/70/0.01 . . .81/62/s . . 83/71/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .76/59/0.32 . . .81/56/s . . . 80/65/s Dayton . . . . . . . .73/58/0.41 . . .56/38/c . . 70/51/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .63/26/0.00 . 66/37/pc . . . 53/33/c Des Moines. . . . .67/44/0.00 . 66/48/pc . . 69/51/sh Detroit. . . . . . . . .72/55/0.08 . 54/38/pc . . 59/41/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . .58/41/0.06 . . .61/42/c . . 51/29/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .72/39/0.00 . . .84/55/s . . . 83/51/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .41/15/0.00 . . .30/3/pc . . . 31/7/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . .61/37/0.00 . . .58/35/c . . 47/31/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .54/15/0.00 . . .56/24/s . . 57/26/pc

sions around Fort Worth and are suing for access. Now another rival has arrived: the Choctaw and Chickasaw tribes, which were exiled to southeastern Oklahoma 175 years ago and given land in the area. Gregory Pyle, chief of the Choctaw nation, said his tribe would sue to win some of the water if necessary. “All this water was controlled originally by the Indian tribes in this area,” Pyle said. “It is all Choctaw and Chickasaw water.” The tribes want the state to recognize them as joint owners.

The issue has been increasingly on the minds of city planners in fast-developing cities as they contemplate the prospect of tapping other existing water sources. Turning theoretical rights into what is widely termed “wet water” under the terms of longago court rulings can take decades. Each case involves other local water users, the state government, the Interior Department, the local congressional delegation and the federal court system. A 103-year-old Supreme Court decision effectively put

tribes in Western states at the head of the line in times of water shortage, or if a water basin is oversubscribed. But Interior Department officials want to be certain there are no big losers when a tribe’s rights are recognized. If the Choctaw and Chickasaw were to gain water rights under that old court ruling, legal experts say, it could prompt a new push for similar rights across Oklahoma, which has 39 federally recognized tribes. It could also encourage more tribes in the West to start claiming their reserved rights.


S

Golf Inside Rory McIlroy shows great poise after loss at Masters, see Page D4.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, APRIL 12, 2011

LOCAL

PREP BASEBALL

Annual climbing gear swap on tap Wednesday in Bend

Walk-off single leads Storm

The Cascades Mountaineers Climbing Club has scheduled its annual gear swap for Wednesday in Bend. The sale will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. at the C.O. Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas St. Item check-in will begin at 5 p.m. The swap will accept any climbing or mountaineering gear item, including — but not limited to — shoes, crampons, axes, tents, cookware, backcountry skis, hiking poles, GPS units, jackets, base layers and helmets. Individuals selling items will receive 80 percent of the sale price. The remaining 20 percent will go to the club. For more information, call 541-408-3500 or go to www. cascadesmountaineers.com. — Bulletin staff report

D

Bulletin staff report Summit right-hander Kevin Hamann pitched a gem Monday, outdueling Bend’s Michael Hirko to lead the Storm to a 3-2 Intermountain Conference baseball victory over the Lava Bears. Hamann went the distance at Summit High, striking out eight while scattering five hits, none of which went for extra bases. The Storm junior’s teammates rewarded his effort with three runs in the final two innings, including a walkoff single by Nick Sweet that won the game in the bottom of the seventh. With the victory, Summit is now 2-1 in Class 5A IMC play and 4-8 overall.

“He was money all game,” Storm coach C.J. Colt said about Hamann. The Lava Bears (0-1 IMC, 10-3 overall), who entered Monday’s contest on a four-game winning streak, scored a run in the first and fourth innings and led for most of the game. Bend senior Michael Hirko kept Summit off balance early, shutting the Storm out for the first five innings. Summit tied the game in the bottom of the sixth when Konner Reddick led off with a triple. Kruze Mingus singled Reddick home to make the score 2-1, and Mingus scored later in the inning off a Brennen Rooks double. See Storm / D5

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Summit High players celebrate after their game-winning run crosses home plate during the seventh inning of Monday’s game against Bend High at Summit High School.

INSIDE NBA Heat .............98 Hawks ..........90

Bucks ...........93 Raptors ........86

Bobcats .....105 Nets ...........103

Mavericks ....98 Rockets ........91

Magic...........95 76ers ...........85

Nuggets .....134 Warriors..... 111

Wizards........95 Celtics .........94

Suns ..........135 T’wolves .... 127

Cavaliers.... 110 Pistons.......101

Thunder .....120 Kings ......... 112

Jazz..............90 Hornets ........78

Wizards beat Celtics For complete results, see Page D4 Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Martial arts students warm up together during a Friday afternoon class at High Desert Martial Arts in northeast Bend. The school offers classes in taekwondo, judo and Brazilian jiujitsu.

Martial arts houses Central Oregon schools offer a multitude of disciplines By Amanda Miles The Bulletin

Boston Celtics Jermaine O’Neal (7) blocks a shot by Washington Wizards’ Maurice Evans during the second half of Monday’s game in Washington.

NHL Teams prepare for 2011 NHL playoffs Detroit returns to the playoffs for the 21st straight season, see Page D2

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Robyn France, left, practices a move on D’Ann Johnson during a martial arts class Friday at High Desert Martial Arts.

Thinking about adding martial arts to your sports repertoire? You’ll find plenty of options in Central Oregon. Taekwondo, karate, Brazilian jiujitsu, mixed martial arts — various schools in the region offer all of these disciplines and more — something for every martial artist. With about a dozen schools operating in the area (most of them in Bend), deciding on a discipline and a school might seem overwhelming. “Like most of the other things in Bend, it’s pretty broad and deep,” Brian Sortor says of the region’s martial arts scene. “It’s pretty varied.” Sortor owns and operates Sortor Bushido Kai Karate with his wife, Kristina Knittel. But by doing a little homework, aspiring martial artists can settle on the right school and a suitable discipline. Dan Graff opened High Desert Martial Arts last

NBA

Next up Detroit defenseman Nicklas Lidstrom will lead the Red Wings into the 2011 playoffs.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 Major League Baseball ..............D3 NBA .......................................... D4 Golf ........................................... D4 Prep sports ............................... D4 Community Sports .............. D5, 6

• Memphis Grizzlies at Portland Trail Blazers • When: Today, 7 p.m. • TV: Comcast SportsNet Northwest • Radio: KBND-AM 1110, KRCOAM 690

Gerald Wallace is becoming more comfortable in Portland Former Bobcat finds a new home with Blazers By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

PORTLAND — While living in a hotel is getting a bit old, at least Gerald Wallace is feeling right at home on the court with the Portland Trail Blazers. Wallace was traded to the Blazers just minutes before the NBA deadline in February, and many wondered how the forward known as Crash would fit in as Portland made the fi-

nal push for the playoffs. Turns out he’s getting along just fine. “His name is no longer Gerald Wallace. He’s MVP,” said Blazers forward LaMarcus Aldridge. “He’s been big for us: taking charges, blocking shots, he rebounds well, making big threes. He’s been huge for us. “People told me how tough he was but you don’t know how really tough he is until you see him play.” Wallace is averaging 15.9 points, 7.8 rebounds and 2.5 assists in 22 games as a Blazer this season. See Wallace / D4

September in northeast Bend, where he teaches taekwondo and Brazilian jiujitsu. He recommends using two criteria for making those decisions: deciding which style fits, and checking out the instructor. “A lot of people only start schools because they’re down the street,” Graff observes. “They don’t check into who’s instructing the school.” Certain disciplines might attract some individuals because of their style. For instance, taekwondo is primarily a kicking art, while jiujitsu is a grappling art whose action primarily takes place on the mat. Knittel advises prospective students to examine their motivation for taking up martial arts, which can help point them in the right direction. For example, she says, an individual who is recovering from back surgery might choose tai chi, which is essentially a low-impact discipline that focuses on stabilization, core strength and balance. See Arts / D6

COMMUNITY SPORTS

Portland Trail Blazers’ Gerald Wallace, center, has averaged 15.9 points, 7.8 rebounds and 2.5 assists in 22 games for the Blazers this season. Eric Gay / The Associated Press


D2 Tuesday, April 12, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

SOCCER

Today Track: La Pine at Sisters, 4 p.m. Softball: Burns at Culver (DH), 1 p.m.; Cottage Grove at Sisters, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Elmira, 4:30 p.m. Baseball: Sisters at Cottage Grove, 4:30 p.m.; Elmira at La Pine, 4:30 p.m. Boys golf: Bend, Summit, Redmond at Pronghorn, 10 a.m.; Mountain View at Crook County, 1 p.m.; Girls golf: Summit, Bend, Redmond, Crook County at Pronghorn, 10 a.m. Boys tennis: Mountain View at Summit, 4 p.m.; Redmond at Crook County, 4 p.m. Girls tennis: Summit at Mountain View, 4 p.m.; Crook County at Redmond, 4 p.m.; Sisters at Junction City, 4 p.m. Boys lacrosse: Redmond at Harney County, 5 p.m..

11:30 a.m. — UEFA Champions League, quarterfinal, Shakhtar Donetsk vs. Barcelona or Manchester United vs. Chelsea, Root Sports.

BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — NBA, Chicago Bulls at New York Knicks, TNT. 7 p.m. — NBA, Memphis Grizzlies at Portland Trail Blazers, Comcast SportsNet Northwest. 7:30 p.m. — NBA, San Antonio Spurs at Los Angeles Lakers, TNT.

BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, Minnesota Twins at New York Yankees or Boston Red Sox at Cleveland Indians, MLB network. 7 p.m. — MLB, Toronto Blue Jays at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports.

WEDNESDAY BASEBALL 10 a.m. — MLB, Kansas City Royals at Minnesota Twins or Texas Rangers at Detroit Tigers, MLB Network. 12:30 p.m. — MLB, Toronto Blue Jays at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports. 4 p.m. — MLB, Philadelphia Phillies at Washington Nationals, ESPN2.

HOCKEY 4 p.m. — NHL, conference quarterfinals, Phoenix Coyotes at Detroit Red Wings, VS. network. 7 p.m. — NHL, conference quarterfinals, Chicago Blackhawks at Vancouver Canucks, VS. network.

BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — NBA, New Orleans Hornets at Dallas Mavericks, ESPN. 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Memphis Grizzlies at Los Angeles Clippers, ESPN. 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Golden State Warriors, Comcast SportsNet Northwest.

RADIO TODAY BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — NBA, Memphis Grizzlies at Portland Trail Blazers, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690.

Wednesday Track: Crook County at Bend, TBA; Mountain View at Summit 4 p.m. Baseball: Bend at Summit, 4:30 p.m.; Redmond at Mountain View (DH), 1 p.m. Softball: Mountain View at Summit (DH), 3 p.m.; Redmond at Crook County (DH), 3 p.m. Boys tennis: Madras at North Marion, 4 p.m. Girls tennis: Madras at North Marion, 4 p.m. Boys lacrosse: Summit at Mountain View, 5 p.m.; Bend at Sisters, 5 p.m. Thursday Track: Culver at Scio, 4 p.m. Boys tennis: Bend at Mountain View, 4 p.m.; Crook County at Summit, 4 p.m. Girls tennis: Mountain View at Bend, 4 p.m.; Summit at Crook County, 4 p.m. Boys lacrosse: Redmond at Bend, 5 p.m. Friday Baseball: Regis at Culver, 4:30 p.m.; Mountain View at Bend, 4:30 p.m.; Summit at Crook County, 4:30 p.m.; Gladstone at Madras, 5 p.m.; Sisters at Elmira, 4:30 p.m.; Sweet Home at La Pine, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Madras at Gladstone, 4:30 p.m. Regis at Culver, 4:30 p.m.; Crook County at Bend (DH), 3 p.m.; Summit at Redmond (DH), 3 p.m.; Elimra at Sisters, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Sweet Home, 4:30 p.m. Boys golf: Redmond hosts Bend, Crook County, Madras at Eagle Crest, Ridge Course, 9 a.m. Girls golf: Summit hosts Bend, Mountain View, Redmond at Broken Top, noon Boys tennis: Summit at Jesuit, 4 p.m. Girls tennis: Mountain View, Redmond, Summit, Crook County at Bend Invitational, TBA Girls lacrosse: Bend United at Crescent Valley, TBA; Bend United at West Salem, TBA Boys lacrosse: Hermiston at Summit, 8 p.m.

WEDNESDAY

ALPINE SKIING

BASKETBALL

PACIFIC NORTHWEST SKI ASSOCIATION Master Championships At Mt. Bachelor, Cliffhanger Saturday’s Results Giant Slalom (First run; second run; total time) Men Class 1 (age 21-29) — 1, Nicolas Yopp, 1:00.25; 58.99; 1:59.24. Class 2 (age 30-34) — 1, Alex Zavadsky, 1:04.03; 1:02.90; 2:06.93. Class 4 (age 40-44) — 1, Griffith Williams, 1:03.24; 1:02.06; 2:05.30. 2, Rob Beasley, 1:16.20; 1:09.73; 2:25.93. Class 5 (age 45-49) — 1, Timothy Hill, 58.59; 58.19; 1:56.78. 2, Robert Cravens, 1:01.85; 1:00.06; 2:01.91. 3, Rob Von Rohr, 1:02.80; 1:02.60; 2:05.40. 4, Tim Aid, 1:10.31; 1:08.67; 2:18.98. Class 6 (age 50-54) — 1, Jesse Scroggins, 1:00.92; 59.97; 2:00.89. 2, Dave Kornish, 1:03.17; 1:02.04; 2:05.21. 3, Richard Lindsay, 1:03.92; 1:02.34; 2:06.26. 4, Hugh Mitchell, 1:06.62; 1:04.35; 2:10.97. 5, Michael Kvietkus, 1:09.82; 1:06.58; 2:16.40. 6, Mark Crawford, 1:09.93; 1:09.88; 2:19.81. 7, Kurt Wold, 1:11.29; 1:09.27; 2:20.56. 8, Marty Bolin, 1:34.73; 1:33.95; 3:08.68. Class 7 (age 55-59) — 1, William Zimmerman, 1:01.46; 1:00.66; 2:02.12. 2, Jim Doudna, 1:02.26; 1:01.36; 2:03.62. 3, David Russell, 1:03.44; 1:02.87; 2:06.31. 4, Edward Sickels, 1:04.73; 1:03.21; 2:07.94. 5, Bradley Scott, 1:05.00; 1:03.66; 2:08.66. 6, Thomas Mathews, 1:04.84; 1:04.92; 2:09.76. 7, William Vernon, 1:05.78; 1:05.53; 2:11.31. 8, John Bouchard, 1:06.89; 1:04.75; 2:11.64. 9, Ladislav Konstacky, 1:07.12; 1:06.11; 2:13.23. 10, Jim Bickler, 1:07.62; 1:06.43; 2:14.05. 11, Roger Johanson, 1:18.74; 1:05.58; 2:24.32. Class 8 (age 60-64) — 1, James Ragan, 1:03.00; 1:03.31; 2:06.31. 2, George Dorris, 1:04.99; 1:03.57; 2:08.56. 3, Rauli Karjalainen, 1:05.58; 1:03.20; 2:08.78. 4, Joseph Neal, 1:06.93; 1:07.65; 2:14.58. 5, Christian Schuster, 1:08.62; 1:07.10; 2:15.72. 6, Gregory Dilger, 1:07.90; 1:08.01; 2:15.91. 7, Gerry Pruss, 1:11.78; 1:06.54; 2:18.32. 8, Jeff Stier, 1:09.73; 1:09.83; 2:19.56. Class 9 (age 65-69) — 1, Bob Sarchett, 1:03.98; 1:03.37; 2:07.35. 2, David Stonington, 1:08.16; 1:07.25; 2:15.41. 3, Michael Bansmer, 1:09.27; 1:09.59; 2:18.86. Class 10 (age 70-74) — 1, Rich Robertson, 1:05.98; 1:06.83; 2:12.81. 2, Jim Phillips, 1:10.60; 1:09.38; 2:19.98. 3, Albert Pierce, 1:15.46; 1:15.75; 2:31.21. 4, Oliver Lajoie, 1:21.19; 1:21.15; 2:42.34. Class 11 (age 75-79) — 1, Charles Evans, 1:20:14; 1:18.76; 3:38.90. Women Class 1 (age 21-29) — 1, Melissa Dettmer, 1:23.88; 1:18.45; 2:42.33. Class 3 (age 35-39) — 1, Lori Fruci, 1:10.54; 1:11.45; 2:22.00. Class 4 (age 40-44) — 1, Jennifer Aspaas, 1:16.99; 1:12.30; 2:29.29. Class 5 (age 45-49) — 1, Linda Shallow, 1:16.45; 1:14.61; 2:31.06. Class 6 (age 50-54) — 1, Nancy Riley, 1:09.91; 1:07.45; 2:17.36. 2, Karen Kilian, 1:12.04; 1:10.37; 2:22.41. 3, Teresa Cravens, 1:12.66; 1:10.69; 2:23.35. 4, Nancy Bouchard, 1:17.34; 1:14.61; 2:31.95. 5, Beth Paraskeva, 1:16.63; 1:18.47; 2:35.10. Class 7 (age 55-59) — 1, Debbie Coleman, 1:13.26; 1:11.97; 2:25.23. 2, Jill Trulsen, 1:21.57; 1:19.60; 2:41.17. Class 8 (age 60-64) — 1, Ann Ozuna, 1:22.41; 1:21.04; 2:43.45. Class 10 (age 70-74) — 1, Carolyn Phillips, 1:21.17; 1:19.34; 2:40.51.

7:30 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Golden State Warriors, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Football • Judge orders NFL, players to try fresh talks: The NFL and its locked-out players have been ordered to start talking again. The federal judge handling the lawsuit against the league told both sides Monday they will participate in court-supervised mediation, saying she still is considering whether to grant the players’ request to lift the lockout that’s been in place for a month. The players got their wish, with the talks held in the federal courts in Minnesota rather than the collective bargaining setting where the two sides unsuccessfully met last month. U.S. District Judge Susan Richard Nelson said formal mediation will begin Thursday before U.S. Magistrate Judge Arthur Boylan at his office in the Minneapolis federal courthouse.

Baseball • Bonds’ jury rehears personal shopper’s testimony: The Barry Bonds jury renewed its deliberations Monday, with the eight-woman, four-man panel listening to a clerk read back the testimony of Bonds’ former personal shopper, Kathy Hoskins. Hoskins testified that she witnessed the home run king’s personal trainer, Greg Anderson, inject the player in the navel at Bond’s house before a road trip during the 2002 season. She is the only person with eyewitness testimony to an injection. One of the four perjury-related counts Bonds is charged with alleges he lied to a federal grand jury when he said no one but his doctor ever injected him with anything. Monday was the second day of deliberations and marked three weeks since the trial began. The other counts against Bonds accuse him of lying to the grand jury in 2003 when he denied knowingly taking performance-enhancing drugs, and of obstructing justice. • Giants boost security for post-attack Los Angeles games: The San Francisco Giants beefed up security Monday for a three-game series against the Los Angeles Dodgers after an attack at Dodger Stadium left a Giants fan in a medically induced coma. Monday’s game at AT&T Park marks the first time the two teams have played in San Francisco since Bryan Stow was severely beaten by two men in Dodgers gear in a stadium parking lot on the opening day of the season.

Basketball • Ex-USD star figures in sports bribery indictment: A former University of San Diego star basketball player, another former player and a former assistant coach were charged with running a sports betting business to affect the outcome of games, federal authorities said Monday. The indictment names Brandon Johnson, the school’s all-time leading scorer who finished his college career last year, Thaddeus Brown, an assistant coach at the school in the 2006-07 season, and Brandon Dowdy, who played at USD in the 2006-07 season and at the University of California, Riverside, from 2008 to 2010. Seven other people were also charged. The indictment alleges that Johnson, 24, took a bribe to influence a USD game in February 2010 and solicited someone else this January to affect the outcome of USD basketball games while playing for the Dakota Wizards, a development team for the NBA’s Memphis Grizzlies. The indictment, handed up Friday by a federal grand jury in San Diego and unsealed Monday, also alleges that Brown, 32, of El Cajon, and Dowdy, 22, of San Diego, solicited someone to affect the outcome of a game in February. • Moore taken No. 1 by Minnesota in WNBA draft: Maya Moore’s WNBA career will begin in Minnesota. The UConn star was drafted first overall Monday by the Lynx. She helped UConn win a record 90 straight games over the past two seasons and led the school to two national championships. The four-time All-American averaged 22.8 points this season and 19.6 during her career. She was the only collegian to play on the U.S. women’s national team that won the gold medal at the world championship last October. For a complete listing of Monday’s draft, see Scoreboard, above. —From wire reports

Columbus 1 1 2 5 3 Chicago 1 1 1 4 5 Sporting Kansas City 1 1 1 4 8 D.C. 1 2 1 4 6 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Real Salt Lake 3 0 0 9 7 Colorado 3 1 0 9 8 Los Angeles 2 1 2 8 5 Vancouver 1 2 2 5 9 San Jose 1 1 2 5 5 Seattle 1 2 2 5 5 FC Dallas 1 2 1 4 4 Chivas USA 0 2 2 2 3 Portland 0 2 1 1 2 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Wednesday’s Games Los Angeles at Toronto FC, 5 p.m. Colorado at Real Salt Lake, 6 p.m. Thursday’s Game Chicago at Portland, 8 p.m. Saturday’s Games Seattle FC at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. D.C. United at Toronto FC, 4 p.m. Chivas USA at Vancouver, 4 p.m. Sporting Kansas City at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. San Jose at New York, 4:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Los Angeles at Chicago, 1 p.m. FC Dallas at Portland, 3 p.m. New England at Houston, 4 p.m.

IN THE BLEACHERS

3 5 8 8 GA 1 5 6 10 4 6 5 5 6

BASEBALL College

Class 11 (age 75-79) — 1, Sheila Leewens, 1:30.23; 1:31.66; 3:01.89. ——— Sunday’s Results Slalom (First run; second run; total time) Men Class 3 (age 35-39) — 1, Beni Ambauen, 51.96; 53.19; 1:45.15. Class 5 (age 45-49) — 1, Timothy Hill, 46.91; 48.28; 1:35.19. 2, Tim Aid, 1:00.22; 1:03.82; 2:04.04. Class 6 (age 50-54) — 1, Jesse Scroggins, 49.55, 49.47; 1:39.02. 2, Dave Kornish, 54.82; 54.94; 1:49.76. 3, Hugh Mitchell, 56.44; 59.35; 1:55.79. 4, Mark Crawford, 1:02.92; 1:02.57; 2:05.49. Class 7 (age 55-59) — 1, Bradley Scott, 52.93; 52.23; 1:45.16. 2, Thomas Mathews, 55.87; 55.89; 1:51.76. 3, Jim Bickler, 56.36; 56.19; 1:52.55. 4, Jim Doudna, 54.85; 1:14.32; 2:09.17. 5, Robert Galasso, 1:06.95; 1:06.92; 2:13.87. 6, William Vernon, 58.60; 1:15.57; 2:14.17. Class 8 (age 60-64) — 1, James Ragan, 52.46; 51.29; 1:43.75. 2, Rauli Karjalainen, 57.97; 58.07; 1:56.04. 3, Joseph Neal, 1:04.02; 1:00.84; 2:04.86. Class 9 (age 65-69) — 1, Bob Sarchett, 55.24; 54.67; 1:49.91. 2, Michael Bansmer, 1:01.78; 1:00.69; 2:02.47. Class 10 (age 70-74) — 1, Jim Phillips, 1:04.69; 1:03.25; 2:07.94. 2, Albert Pierce, 1:43.85; 1:21.88; 3:05.73. Class 11 (age 75-79) — 1, Charles Evans, 1:18.06; 1:16.77; 2:34.83. Women Class 5 (age 45-49) — 1, Linda Shallow, 1:14.00; 1:12.83; 2:26.83. Class 6 (age 50-54) — 1, Karen Kilian, 1:08.26; 1:07.30; 2:15.56. 2, Beth Paraskeva, 1:16.48; 1:19.20; 2:35.68. 3, Nancy Riley, 1:00.20; 1:35.85; 2:36.05. Class 7 (age 55-59) — 1, Cheryl Puddy, 54.97; 54.52; 1:49.49. 2, Debbie Coleman, 1:06.76; 1:03.25; 2:10.01. 3, Jill Trulsen, 1:18.81; 1:14.97; 2:33.78. Class 8 (age 60-64) — 1, Ann Ozuna, 1:22.58; 1:18.94; 2:41.52. Class 10 (age 70-74) — 1, Carolyn Phillips, 1:14.34; 1:13.96; 2:28.30. Class 11 (age 75-79) — 1, Sheila Leewens, 1:20.70; 1:27.27; 2:47.97.

HOCKEY NHL NHL PLAYOFFS All Times PDT ——— FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Washington vs. New York Rangers Wednesday, April 13: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 4:30 p.m. Friday, April 15: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 4:30 p.m. Sunday, April 17: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, noon Wednesday, April 20: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, noon x-Monday, April 25: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, TBD Philadelphia vs. Buffalo Thursday, April 14: Buffalo at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. Saturday, April 16: Buffalo at Philadelphia, 2 p.m. Monday, April 18: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 4:30 p.m. x-Friday, April 22: Buffalo at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Philadelphia at Buffalo, noon x-Tuesday, April 26: Buffalo at Philadelphia, TBD Boston vs. Montreal Thursday, April 14: Montreal at Boston, 4 p.m. Saturday, April 16: Montreal at Boston, 4 p.m. Monday, April 18: Boston at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21: Boston at Montreal, 4 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Montreal at Boston, 4 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Boston at Montreal, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Montreal at Boston TBD Pittsburgh vs. Tampa Bay Wednesday, April 13: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Friday, April 15: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Monday, April 18: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m.

Wednesday, April 20: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, TBD x-Monday, April 25: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, TBD WESTERN CONFERENCE Vancouver vs. Chicago Wednesday, April 13: Chicago at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Friday, April 15: Chicago at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Sunday, April 17: Vancouver at Chicago, 5 p.m. Tuesday, April 19: Vancouver at Chicago, 5 p.m. x-Thursday, April 21: Chicago at Vancouver, 7 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Vancouver at Chicago, 5 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Chicago at Vancouver, TBD San Jose vs. Los Angeles Thursday, April 14: Los Angeles at San Jose, 7 p.m. Saturday, April 16: Los Angeles at San Jose, 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 19: San Jose at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21: San Jose at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Los Angeles at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. x-Monday, April 25: San Jose at Los Angeles, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Los Angeles at San Jose, TBD Detroit vs. Phoenix Wednesday, April 13: Phoenix at Detroit, 4 p.m. Saturday, April 16: Phoenix at Detroit, 10 a.m. Monday, April 18: Detroit at Phoenix, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Detroit at Phoenix, 7:30 p.m. x-Friday, April 22: Phoenix at Detroit, 4 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Detroit at Phoenix, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Phoenix at Detroit, TBD Anaheim vs. Nashville Wednesday, April 13: Nashville at Anaheim, 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 15: Nashville at Anaheim, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, April 17: Anaheim at Nashville, TBD Wednesday, April 20: Anaheim at Nashville, TBD x-Friday, April 22: Nashville at Anaheim, 7 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Anaheim at Nashville, TBD x-Tuesday, April 26: Nashville at Anaheim, TBD

TENNIS ATP Tour ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters Monday Monte Carlo, Monaco Singles First Round Florian Mayer, Germany, def. Mikhail Youzhny (10), Russia, 6-3, 2-6, 6-3. Viktor Troicki (11), Serbia, def. Jean-Rene Lisnard, Monaco, 7-6 (4), 6-1. Daniel Gimeno-Traver, Spain, def. Santiago Giraldo, Colombia, 7-6 (4), 7-5. Olivier Rochus, Belgium, def. Juan Ignacio Chela, Argentina, 6-4, 5-7, 7-5. Richard Gasquet (13), France, def. Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, 5-7, 6-3, 6-4. Nicolas Almagro (9), Spain, def. Marcel Granollers, Spain, 6-3, 6-3. Tommy Robredo, Spain, def. Ivan Dodig, Croatia, 6-4, 6-2. Frederico Gil, Portugal, def. Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, 6-1, 6-3. Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic, def. Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus, 3-6, 6-1, 7-6 (7). Robin Haase, Netherlands, def. Nikolay Davydenko, Russia, 7-5, 4-6, 6-4. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (12), France, def. Juan Monaco, Argentina, 4-6, 6-3, 6-2. Marin Cilic (15), Croatia, def. Filippo Volandri, Italy, 6-2, 6-1. Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, def. Julien Benneteau, France, 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (3).

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Philadelphia 3 1 0 9 3 New England 1 1 3 6 5 Houston 1 1 2 5 5 New York 1 1 2 5 2 Toronto FC 1 1 2 5 6

GA 1 6 4 2 6

Pacific-10 Conference ——— Today’s Games x-USC at Pepperdine, 3 p.m. x-Pacific at Stanford, 5:30 p.m. x-Gonzaga at Washington State, 5:30 p.m. x-Long Beach State at UCLA, 6 p.m. x-Washington at Seattle, 6 p.m. Wednesday’s Game x-Oregon at Portland, 3 p.m. x=nonleague

11. Washington, Victoria Dunlap, F, Kentucky. 12. Seattle, Jasmine Thomas, G, Duke. Second Round 13. x-Minnesota (from Tulsa), Jessica Breland, F, North Carolina. 14. Minnesota, Felicia Chester, F, DePaul. 15. Chicago, Carolyn Swords, C, Boston College. 16. y-Connecticut, Sydney Colson, G, Texas A&M. 17. Chicago (from Los Angeles), Angie Bjorkland, G-F, Tennessee. 18. Atlanta (from San Antonio), Rachel Jarry, F, Australia. 19. Phoenix, Brittany Spears, F, Colorado. 20. San Antonio (from Atlanta), Danielle Adams, F-C, Texas A&M. 21. Tulsa (from Indiana), Italee Lucas, G, North Carolina. 22. x-New York, Angel Robinson, G, Marquette. 23. Washington, Karima Christmas, G-F, Duke. 24. Seattle, Ify Ibekwe, F, Arizona. Third Round 25. Tulsa, Chastity Reed, F, Arkansas-Little Rock. 26. Minnesota, Kachine Alexander, G, Iowa. 27. Chicago, Amy Jaeschke, C, Northwestern. 28. Connecticut, Adrienne Johnson, F, Louisiana Tech. 29. Los Angeles, Elina Babkina, Latvia. 30. San Antonio, Porsha Phillips, F, Georgia. 31. z-Phoenix, Tahnee Robinson, G, Nevada. 32. Atlanta, Kelsey Bolte, G, Iowa State. 33. Indiana, Jori Davis, G, Indiana. 34. New York, Mekia Valentine, F-C, UC Santa Barbara. 35. Washington, Sarah Krnjic, C, Serbia. 36. Seattle, Krystal Thomas, C, Duke. x-Traded to New York for Angel Robinson and a 2012 second-round pick. y-Traded to New York for F Kalana Greene. z-Traded to Connecticut for a 2012 third-round pick.

DEALS Transactions

POLLS Baseball America Top 25 DURHAM, N.C. — The top 25 teams in the Baseball America poll with records through April 10 and previous ranking (voting by the staff of Baseball America): Record Pvs 1. Vanderbilt 30-3 1 2. Virginia 31-3 2 3. South Carolina 26-5 3 4. Florida 26-7 4 5. Texas A&M 24-8 6 6. Texas 24-8 8 7. North Carolina 29-5 16 8. Cal State Fullerton 23-9 12 9. Oregon State 24-7 19 10. Arizona State 22-9 5 11. Florida State 23-9 7 12. TCU 22-10 15 13. Fresno State 22-5 9 14. Oklahoma 24-8 10 15. Georgia Tech 24-9 14 16. California 20-9 13 17. Stanford 15-9 11 18. Troy 25-6 20 19. Oklahoma State 24-8 23 20. Arizona 22-11 22 21. Stetson 25-7 25 22. Southern Miss. 23-8 18 23. UCLA 16-11 24 24. Alabama 21-13 21 25. Arkansas 23-8 — Collegiate Baseball Poll TUCSON, Ariz. — The Collegiate Baseball poll with records through April 10, points and previous rank. Voting is done by coaches, sports writers and sports information directors: Record Pts Pvs 1. Virginia 31-3 495 1 2. Vanderbilt 30-3 494 2 3. South Carolina 26-5 493 3 4. Texas 24-8 491 6 5. Florida 26-7 489 4 6. North Carolina 29-5 486 9 7. Cal State Fullerton 23-9 484 10 8. Texas A&M 24-8 482 7 9. Georgia Tech 24-9 479 8 10. Oregon State 24-7 475 20 11. TCU 22-10 472 15 12. UCLA 16-11 469 16 13. Arizona State 22-9 467 5 14. Fresno State 22-5 466 11 15. Florida State 23-9 464 12 16. Oklahoma 24-8 462 13 17. Arkansas 23-8 459 25 18. Oklahoma State 24-8 457 — 19. Miami 21-11 454 — 20. California 20-9 452 17 21. Stanford 15-9 450 18 22. Arizona 22-11 448 21 23. Troy 25-6 445 22 24. Gonzaga 19-9-1 444 24 25. Southern Miss. 23-8 442 14 26. Rice 23-13 441 23 27. Connecticut 17-11-1 439 29 28. Georgia 18-15 437 30 29. Stetson 25-7 436 — 30. Charlotte 26-6 434 —

BASKETBALL WNBA 2011 WNBA Draft At Bristol, Conn. Monday First Round 1. Minnesota, Maya Moore, F, Connecticut. 2. Tulsa, Elizabeth Cambage, C, Australia. 3. Chicago, Courtney Vandersloote, G, Gonzaga. 4. Minnesota (from Connecticut), Amber Harris, F, Xavier. 5. Los Angeles, Jantel Lavender, C, Ohio State. 6. San Antonio, Danielle Robinson, G, Oklahoma. 7. Tulsa (from Phoenix), Kayla Pedersen, F, Stanford. 8. Atlanta, Ta’Shia Phillips, C, Xavier. 9. Indiana, Jeanette Pohlen, G, Stanford. 10. New York, Alex Montgomery, G-F, Georgia Tech.

BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB—Suspended Philadelphia minor league LHP Ryan Sasaki (GCL) 50 games for an elevated testosterone/epitestosterone ratio. Suspended Kansas City minor league 2B Justin Trapp (Kane County-MWL) 50 games after testing positive for phentermine. Suspended minor league free agent RHP Robinson Fabian 25 games for a violation of the minor league drug prevention and treatment program. American League OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Agreed to terms with RHP Trevor Cahill on a five-year contract. National League LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Recalled OF Jamie Hoffmann from Albuquerque (PCL). Optioned RHP John Ely to Albuquerque. MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Activated C Jonathan Lucroy from the 15-day DL. Designated OF Jeremy Reed for assignment. Placed RHP Takashi Saito on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 5. Recalled RHP Brandon Kintzler from Nashville (PCL). NEW YORK METS—Optioned OF Lucas Duda to Buffalo (IL). Designated RHP Blaine Boyer for assignment. Selected the contracts of RHP Jason Isringhausen from Port St. Lucie (FSL) and RHP Ryota Igarashi from Buffalo. SAN DIEGO PADRES—Activated RHP Mat Latos from the 15-day DL. Optioned LHP Wade LeBlanc to Tucson (PCL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association HOUSTON ROCKETS—Signed C Marcus Cousin and assigned him to Rio Grande Valley (NBADL). Recalled C Hasheem Thabeet from Rio Grande Valley. Waived F DeMarre Carroll. FOOTBALL National Football League TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS—Agreed to terms with general manager Mark Dominik on a four-year contract extension. HOCKEY National Hockey League CAROLINA HURRICANES—Reassigned F Drayson Bowman to Charlotte (AHL). CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Signed D Joe Lavin to a two-year contract. Recalled F Jeff Taffe, D Jassen Cullimore, D Garnet Exelby and G Hannu Toivonen from Rockford (AHL). DALLAS STARS—Assigned F Tomas Vincour and D Brad Lukowich to Texas (AHL). MINNESOTA WILD—Fired coach Todd Richards. VANCOUVER CANUCKS—Called up F Cody Hodgson and F Victor Oreskovich from Manitoba (AHL). WASHINGTON CAPITALS—Signed RW Mike Knuble to a one-year contract extension. COLLEGE ARIZONA—Named Eric Hansen swimming and diving coach. DAYTON—Named Kevin Kuwik men’s assistant basketball coach. FLORIDA—Suspended men’s basketball F Erik Murphy and F Cody Larson following their arrest on felony burglary charges. MANHATTAN—Named Steve Masiello men’s basketball coach. MISSOURI—Signed women’s basketball coach Robin Pingeton to a one-year contract extension through 2016. MOUNT UNION—Named Mike Fuline men’s basketball coach. PFEIFFER—Announced volleyball coach Ben Guiliano has accepted the same position at Keuka. Named Steve Bintz men’s and women’s volleyball coach. WISCONSIN—Named Bobbie Kelsey women’s basketball coach.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 72 0 29 12 The Dalles 14 0 25 20 John Day 5 0 61 20 McNary 7 0 102 54 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 660 1 2,954 1,694 The Dalles 108 0 766 312 John Day 82 0 1,595 609 McNary 55 1 1,411 559

N H L P L AYO F F P R E V I E W

April brings rain and Red Wings in NHL playoffs By Ira Podell The Associated Press

NEW YORK — As familiar as warm weather and rain is an appearance by the Detroit Red Wings in the Stanley Cup playoffs. For the past 13 seasons they have been joined by the New Jersey Devils, but that has changed because the one constant team in the Eastern Conference didn’t measure up this year. Detroit’s dominance dates even further: Not since 1990 have the Red Wings sat out the race for the Cup. Captain Nicklas Lidstrom, in his 19th NHL season, has seen it all. Throughout his surely Hall of Fame career, Lidstrom has only worn a winged wheel sweater and has never missed the playoffs. He got a bit of a scare last year when Detroit qualified as only the No. 5 seed. But Lidstrom and the Red Wings still managed to reach the second round with a tough, seven-game series win over the Phoenix Coyotes — their first-round opponent again. “Having been with such a good organization for 20 years, and be-

ing part of a winning tradition here, you almost take it for granted,” Lidstrom said of being a playoff staple. “Last year was the hardest one where we really had to focus and get some wins and had our backs up against the wall for pretty much the whole season. “It’s always been fun going into the playoffs. People are always waiting for April to come around for the playoffs.” And why not? Not only have the Red Wings made it a habit to be in the playoffs, they are always a threat to win it all. During this 20-season run, Detroit has captured the Cup four times and been to the finals in two other years. The Central Division champions own the No. 3 seed this time. If they advance past Phoenix again they could pose a serious threat to the Presidents’ Trophy-winning Vancouver Canucks and the second-seeded San Jose Sharks, who despite being a dominant regularseason team in recent years are still seeking their first trip to the finals. The Canucks, who topped the

NHL with a team-record 117 points, have been knocked out in the second round by Chicago in two consecutive years. The Blackhawks rode last season’s win all the way to the Stanley Cup title and will likely have confidence again when they take on Vancouver in the first round. Don’t think the Canucks haven’t taken notice. “We took a very hard look at the end of the playoffs organizationally about where we were, and we analyzed every element of this team from training staff, medical staff, coaching staff, players, how we handled things as managers,” Vancouver general manager Mike Gillis said. “The experience of losing two years in a row to the same team was one that was very difficult for a lot of people to accept. However, we did it with a team that we don’t think is as competitive as the team we have this year. Overall, we feel more confident this year.” The Blackhawks might be sensing a new lease on life, too, given their fortunate road to the playoffs. Chica-

go could’ve made it an easy Sunday for the team and its fans by beating the Red Wings at home, but Detroit showed why it is so good this time of year and left with a 4-3 victory. That opened the door for the Dallas Stars to sneak in at No. 8, but with their season on the line they were beaten by already-eliminated Minnesota. The Wild won one more for their home fans and for coach Todd Richards, who was fired Monday. So, what does this second chance mean for the Blackhawks? The Canucks certainly would like to make their title defense end early. “They definitely got in not the traditional way, but at the end of the day they got in,” said Montreal defenseman Brent Sopel, a member of the Blackhawks last season. “It doesn’t matter how you get in. Good for them. Now you’ve got 16 great teams that are battling, and it’s anybody’s ballgame.” In the other Western matchups, the Sharks will take on the Los Angeles Kings in a rare all-California series, and the Anaheim Ducks will face the Nashville Predators.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 12, 2011 D3

M A JOR L E AGUE BA SE BA L L AL BOXSCORES Mariners 8, Blue Jays 7 Toronto AB R H Y.Escobar ss 3 0 1 C.Patterson cf 5 1 2 Bautista rf 3 1 2 Lind 1b 5 0 0 A.Hill 2b 5 1 1 Arencibia c 5 0 2 Snider lf 4 1 0 Encarnacion dh 4 1 3 J.Nix 3b 4 2 3 Totals 38 7 14

BI 1 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 6

BB 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 4

SO 1 0 1 3 1 1 2 0 0 9

Avg. .458 .400 .400 .273 .186 .375 .147 .235 .333

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. I.Suzuki rf 4 2 2 0 2 0 .275 Figgins 3b 1 0 1 0 1 0 .158 L.Rodriguez 3b 3 1 1 3 1 1 .167 Bradley lf 4 2 2 2 1 1 .278 Cust dh 3 0 0 1 2 1 .171 1-Langerhans pr-dh0 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Smoak 1b 3 0 2 2 2 1 .265 Olivo c 5 0 0 0 0 2 .207 M.Saunders cf 4 2 2 0 1 0 .263 Ryan ss 3 1 1 0 1 1 .167 J.Wilson 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .273 a-A.Kennedy ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .294 Totals 35 8 11 8 11 7 Toronto 012 202 000 — 7 14 1 Seattle 000 000 152 — 8 11 1 Two outs when winning run scored. a-grounded out for J.Wilson in the 9th. 1-ran for Cust in the 8th. E—Arencibia (1), Smoak (1). LOB—Toronto 9, Seattle 13. 2B—A.Hill (2), Encarnacion (2), J.Nix (1), Smoak (5), M.Saunders (1). HR—C.Patterson (1), off F.Hernandez; Bradley (1), off Villanueva. RBIs—Y.Escobar (5), C.Patterson 2 (2), A.Hill (7), Snider (8), J.Nix (4), L.Rodriguez 3 (3), Bradley 2 (3), Cust (4), Smoak 2 (4). SB—Bautista (1), I.Suzuki (4), M.Saunders (1), Ryan (1). CS—Snider (1). S—Ryan. SF—Y.Escobar. Runners left in scoring position—Toronto 5 (A.Hill, C.Patterson, Lind 3); Seattle 8 (Olivo 6, L.Rodriguez, I.Suzuki). Runners moved up—J.Wilson. GIDP—Lind, Olivo. DP—Toronto 1 (J.Nix, A.Hill, Lind); Seattle 1 (J.Wilson, Ryan, Smoak). Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Litsch 5 5 0 0 4 4 111 2.38 Frasor 1 0 0 0 1 1 20 3.38 Villanueva 1 1 1 1 1 2 23 1.35 Purcey 1-3 2 3 3 1 0 16 11.57 Dotel 0 0 2 2 2 0 12 9.00 Rzepczynski 0 1 0 0 1 0 10 0.00 Camp L, 0-1 1 1-3 2 2 2 1 0 22 2.57 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA F.Hernandez 6 12 7 7 2 6 111 4.50 Laffey 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 0.00 Wilhelmsen 1 1 0 0 2 1 21 9.82 Lueke W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 9.82 Dotel pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Rzepczynski pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Dotel 3-2, Rzepczynski 3-3, Camp 2-0. IBB—off Camp (I.Suzuki). WP— F.Hernandez 2. T—3:46. A—13,056 (47,878).

Rangers 2, Tigers 0 Texas Kinsler 2b Andrus ss Hamilton lf A.Beltre 3b Mi.Young dh N.Cruz rf Moreland 1b Torrealba c Borbon cf Totals

AB 4 4 3 4 4 4 3 3 3 32

R 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 2 1

SO 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 4

Avg. .250 .188 .316 .195 .293 .273 .304 .241 .190

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rhymes 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .182 Boesch lf-rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .276 Ordonez rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .208 Raburn lf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .261 Mi.Cabrera 1b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .382 V.Martinez dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .225 Kelly cf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .182 a-A.Jackson ph-cf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .205 Jh.Peralta ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .344 Avila c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Inge 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .242 Totals 30 0 4 0 2 6 Texas 000 000 200 — 2 6 0 Detroit 000 000 000 — 0 4 0 a-singled for Kelly in the 8th. LOB—Texas 4, Detroit 5. 2B—Mi.Young (4), Moreland (3), Raburn (3), Mi.Cabrera (2). RBIs—Mi.Young (3), Moreland (3). Runners left in scoring position—Texas 2 (Torrealba 2); Detroit 2 (V.Martinez 2). GIDP—Andrus. DP—Texas 1 (Andrus, Kinsler); Detroit 1 (Inge, Rhymes, Mi.Cabrera). Texas IP H R ER Ogando W, 2-0 7 2 0 0 Oliver H, 4 1 1 0 0 Feliz S, 4-4 1 1 0 0 Detroit IP H R ER Verlander L, 1-1 9 6 2 2 IBB—off Feliz (Mi.Cabrera). T—2:19. A—18,724 (41,255).

BB 1 0 1 BB 1

SO 4 1 1 SO 4

NP 79 13 24 NP 119

ERA 0.00 1.59 0.00 ERA 3.13

SO 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 4

Avg. .306 .317 .184 .237 .355 .361 .176 .241 .250

Indians 4, Angels 0 Cleveland Brantley cf A.Cabrera ss Choo rf C.Santana c Hafner dh O.Cabrera 2b Kearns lf LaPorta 1b Hannahan 3b Totals

AB 3 3 3 4 4 4 3 3 4 31

R 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 4

Los Angeles M.Izturis ss H.Kendrick 2b

AB R 4 0 4 0

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 3 1 0 0 0 6 4 5

H BI BB SO Avg. 0 0 0 0 .325 1 0 0 2 .375

Abreu dh 2 0 1 0 2 0 .378 Tor.Hunter rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .289 V.Wells lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .091 Callaspo 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .353 Trumbo 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .278 Conger c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .250 Bourjos cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .212 Totals 31 0 5 0 2 5 Cleveland 130 000 000 — 4 6 0 Los Angeles 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 LOB—Cleveland 5, Los Angeles 6. 2B—Kearns (2), Abreu (2). HR—A.Cabrera (4), off Chatwood; LaPorta (2), off Chatwood. RBIs—A.Cabrera (10), LaPorta 3 (6). SB—Brantley (2). CS—Choo (1). Runners left in scoring position—Cleveland 4 (Choo 3, LaPorta); Los Angeles 2 (H.Kendrick, Callaspo). Runners moved up—A.Cabrera, O.Cabrera, Bourjos. GIDP—Choo, Tor.Hunter. DP—Cleveland 1 (O.Cabrera, A.Cabrera, LaPorta); Los Angeles 1 (H.Kendrick, M.Izturis, Trumbo). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO Talbot W, 1-0 8 5 0 0 2 4 Pestano 1 0 0 0 0 1 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO Chatwd L, 0-1 5 4 4 4 4 3 F.Rodriguez 2 2 0 0 1 0 S.Downs 1 0 0 0 0 0 Thompson 1 0 0 0 0 1 Talbot pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—Pestano 1-0. T—2:25. A—32,864 (45,389).

NP 112 9 NP 90 30 8 11

ERA 1.46 0.00 ERA 7.20 0.00 0.00 1.59

SO 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 4

Avg. .237 .200 .231 .243 .182 .182 .226 .182 .417 .160

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division Baltimore New York Toronto Boston Tampa Bay Central Division Cleveland Kansas City Chicago Minnesota Detroit West Division Texas Los Angeles Oakland Seattle

W 6 5 5 2 2 W 8 6 6 3 3 W 9 5 5 3

L 3 4 5 8 8 L 2 3 4 6 7 L 1 5 5 7

Pct .667 .556 .500 .200 .200 Pct .800 .667 .600 .333 .300 Pct .900 .500 .500 .300

NATIONAL LEAGUE GB WCGB — — 1 1 1½ 1½ 4½ 4½ 4½ 4½ GB WCGB — — 1½ — 2 ½ 4½ 3 5 3½ GB WCGB — — 4 1½ 4 1½ 6 3½

Monday’s Games Texas 2, Detroit 0 Tampa Bay 16, Boston 5 Oakland 2, Chicago White Sox 1 (10 innings) Cleveland 4, L.A. Angels 0

Athletics 2, White Sox 1 (10 innings) Oakland AB Crisp cf 4 Barton 1b 3 C.Jackson rf 4 Willingham lf 4 M.Ellis 2b 4 Matsui dh 4 K.Suzuki c 4 Kouzmanoff 3b 4 An.LaRoche ss 3 1-Pennington pr-ss 1 Totals 35

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 2

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 1

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pierre lf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .267 Beckham 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .302 Rios cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .209 Konerko 1b 3 0 2 0 1 0 .421 2-Teahen pr-1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .429 Quentin dh 3 0 1 0 1 2 .351 Al.Ramirez ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Morel 3b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .263 R.Castro c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .222 Lillibridge rf 3 1 1 1 1 2 .333 Totals 34 1 6 1 3 13 Oakland 000 000 001 1 — 2 5 0 Chicago 000 010 000 0 — 1 6 1 1-ran for An.LaRoche in the 9th. 2-ran for Konerko in the 9th. E—Pierre (2). LOB—Oakland 4, Chicago 6. 2B—Kouzmanoff (2), An.LaRoche (3), Quentin (7). HR—K.Suzuki (1), off Crain; Lillibridge (1), off Braden. RBIs—K.Suzuki (2), Lillibridge (2). CS—Pierre (2), Konerko (1). Runners left in scoring position—Oakland 2 (Willingham, Pennington); Chicago 4 (Al.Ramirez 2, Morel 2). Runners moved up—Al.Ramirez. GIDP—C.Jackson. DP—Oakland 1 (K.Suzuki, K.Suzuki, M.Ellis); Chicago 1 (Buehrle, Al.Ramirez, Konerko). Oakland IP H R ER BB Braden 6 5 1 1 2 T.Ross W, 1-0 3 1 0 0 1 Fuentes S, 4-4 1 0 0 0 0 Chicago IP H R ER BB Buehrle 8 2 0 0 1 Thrntn BS, 3-3 1-3 1 1 0 0 Crain L, 0-1 1 2-3 2 1 1 0 Inherited runners-scored—Crain 1-0. T—2:37. A—20,057 (40,615).

SO 7 4 2 SO 1 0 3

NP 95 41 15 NP 99 10 23

ERA 4.15 0.00 3.18 ERA 4.26 2.45 3.00

SO 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

Avg. .321 .189 .138 .079 .235 .205 .343 .267 .167 .150 .227

Rays 16, Red Sox 5 Tampa Bay Fuld lf Damon dh Joyce rf D.Johnson 1b S.Rodriguez 3b Zobrist 2b B.Upton cf F.Lopez 3b Kotchman 1b Jaso c Brignac ss Totals

AB 6 5 6 4 1 5 4 3 1 5 5 45

R 3 2 1 0 0 2 3 1 1 1 2 16

H 4 3 1 0 0 3 3 1 1 2 2 20

BI 3 3 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 3 3 15

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 3

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Crawford lf 5 1 2 0 0 0 .163 Pedroia 2b 3 1 0 0 2 0 .368 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 2 0 1 1 1 0 .297 Lowrie 1b 1 1 1 0 1 0 .417 Youkilis 3b 3 0 1 0 2 0 .167 Ortiz dh 4 1 2 2 0 0 .282 J.Drew rf 3 0 1 1 0 0 .308 D.McDonald rf 2 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Saltalamacchia c 4 0 0 0 1 2 .154 Ellsbury cf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .194 Scutaro ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .185 Totals 35 5 10 5 7 4 Tampa Bay 160 113 004 — 16 20 1 Boston 001 100 111 — 5 10 1 E—Brignac (1), Scutaro (1). LOB—Tampa Bay 5, Boston 11. 2B—Fuld 2 (4), Zobrist 2 (4), Jaso 2 (2), Crawford (1), Youkilis (3). 3B—Fuld (1), Ad.Gonzalez (1), Ortiz (1). HR—Damon (2), off Matsuzaka; Fuld (1), off Matsuzaka; Ellsbury (2), off Jo.Peralta. RBIs—Fuld 3 (3), Damon 3 (5), Zobrist 2 (4), Kotchman (1), Jaso 3 (3), Brignac 3 (4), Ad.Gonzalez (7), Ortiz 2 (8), J.Drew (3), Ellsbury (5). SF—Ortiz. Runners left in scoring position—Tampa Bay 4 (Zobrist, Brignac, F.Lopez, Joyce); Boston 6 (Ortiz 2, Youkilis, Scutaro, D.McDonald, Saltalamacchia). Runners moved up—Damon, Joyce, D.Johnson, Ad.Gonzalez. GIDP—Jaso, Scutaro. DP—Tampa Bay 2 (Zobrist, Brignac, Kotchman), (Zobrist, Brignac); Boston 1 (Pedroia, Scutaro, Ad.Gonzalez). Tampa Bay

IP

H R ER BB SO NP ERA

L10 6-3 5-4 5-5 2-8 2-8 L10 8-2 6-3 6-4 3-6 3-7 L10 9-1 5-5 5-5 3-7

Str Home Away L-2 3-3 3-0 L-1 4-2 1-2 L-3 4-2 1-3 L-1 2-2 0-6 W-1 0-5 2-3 Str Home Away W-8 4-2 4-0 W-2 4-2 2-1 L-1 3-2 3-2 L-2 1-2 2-4 L-3 1-3 2-4 Str Home Away W-3 6-0 3-1 L-1 2-2 3-3 W-3 1-2 4-3 W-1 1-3 2-4

East Division Philadelphia Florida Washington Atlanta New York Central Division Cincinnati Chicago Milwaukee Pittsburgh St. Louis Houston West Division Colorado Los Angeles Arizona San Diego San Francisco

Today’s Games Texas (C.Wilson 1-0) at Detroit (Penny 0-1), 10:05 a.m. Baltimore (Tillman 0-0) at N.Y. Yankees (A.J.Burnett 2-0), 4:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Price 0-2) at Boston (Lester 0-0), 4:10 p.m. Kansas City (Francis 0-0) at Minnesota (Duensing 0-0), 5:10 p.m. Oakland (Cahill 1-0) at Chicago White Sox (E.Jackson 2-0), 5:10 p.m. Cleveland (Carmona 0-1) at L.A. Angels (Haren 2-0), 7:05 p.m. Toronto (R.Romero 1-0) at Seattle (Pineda 0-1), 7:10 p.m.

W 7 5 4 4 4 W 7 5 5 5 4 2 W 7 6 4 4 4

L 2 4 5 6 6 L 3 5 5 5 6 8 L 2 4 5 5 6

Pct .778 .556 .444 .400 .400 Pct .700 .500 .500 .500 .400 .200 Pct .778 .600 .444 .444 .400

GB WCGB — — 2 ½ 3 1½ 3½ 2 3½ 2 GB WCGB — — 2 1 2 1 2 1 3 2 5 4 GB WCGB — — 1½ — 3 1½ 3 1½ 3½ 2

Monday’s Games Colorado 7, N.Y. Mets 6 Chicago Cubs 5, Houston 4 St. Louis 8, Arizona 2 Cincinnati 3, San Diego 2 L.A. Dodgers 6, San Francisco 1

L10 7-2 5-4 4-5 4-6 4-6 L10 7-3 5-5 5-5 5-5 4-6 2-8 L10 7-2 6-4 4-5 4-5 4-6

Str Home Away W-2 5-1 2-1 L-1 3-3 2-1 W-1 1-2 3-3 L-2 1-2 3-4 L-2 1-3 3-3 Str Home Away W-1 5-1 2-2 W-1 3-3 2-2 W-2 5-2 0-3 L-2 1-3 4-2 W-2 2-4 2-2 L-1 1-3 1-5 Str Home Away W-3 3-1 4-1 W-1 3-1 3-3 L-1 2-2 2-3 L-1 2-4 2-1 L-2 2-2 2-4

Today’s Games Milwaukee (Marcum 1-1) at Pittsburgh (Correia 2-0), 4:05 p.m. Philadelphia (Blanton 0-0) at Washington (L.Hernandez 0-1), 4:05 p.m. Colorado (Rogers 1-0) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 0-1), 4:10 p.m. Florida (Volstad 0-0) at Atlanta (Hanson 0-2), 4:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (J.Russell 1-0) at Houston (Myers 0-0), 5:05 p.m. St. Louis (Carpenter 0-1) at Arizona (Galarraga 1-0), 6:40 p.m. Cincinnati (LeCure 0-0) at San Diego (Richard 1-0), 7:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 1-1) at San Francisco (Lincecum 1-1), 7:15 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Mariners 8, Blue Jays 7: SEATTLE — Luis Rodriguez fought off nine pitches from Shawn Camp before delivering a game-winning single, and Seattle rallied from a seven-run deficit in the final three innings to stun Toronto. Camp (0-1) played only a part in Toronto’s bullpen collapse. • Rangers 2, Tigers 0: DETROIT — Alexi Ogando outpitched Justin Verlander before leaving with a finger problem and Texas won with a bold strategy, beating Detroit. The AL champions improved to 9-1, the top record in the majors and matching the best 10-game start in team history. • Rays 16, Red Sox 5: BOSTON — Sam Fuld went four for six with a two-run homer, drove in three runs and fell a single shy of the cycle to lead Tampa Bay. Johnny Damon had three hits, including a solo homer, and three RBIs, and John Jaso and Reid Brignac also drove in three runs apiece for the Rays. • Athletics 2, White Sox 1: CHICAGO — Kurt Suzuki hit a go-ahead home run in the 10th inning, and Oakland capitalized on Juan Pierre’s dropped fly ball in the ninth to tie it. The White Sox wasted a dominant pitching performance by Mark Buehrle with their second ninth-inning implosion of the season. • Indians 4, Angels 0: ANAHEIM, Calif. — Mitch Talbot took a shutout into the ninth inning and Cleveland got home runs from Asdrubal Cabrera and Matt LaPorta to beat the Los Angeles Angels for its eighth straight win. The winning streak is Cleveland’s longest since a 10-game stretch in August 2008. The Indians, coming off a sweep at Seattle, have started out 4-0 on the road for the first time since 1998 (6-0). Their 8-2 start overall is their best since 2002, when they won 12 of their first 13.

• Dodgers 6, Giants 1: SAN FRANCISCO — Clayton Kershaw shut down the Giants again with his big-breaking curveball, Rod Barajas homered and the Los Angeles Dodgers beat San Francisco while players from both teams denounced violence in the rivalry (related story below). Kershaw (2-1) struck out seven, walked two and gave up six hits in 6 2⁄3 innings, and he hasn’t allowed a run over his last 23 2⁄3 innings against the Giants. That includes seven scoreless innings on opening day and a complete game last Sept. 14 at AT&T Park. • Reds 3, Padres 2: SAN DIEGO — Chris Heisey hit a two-run homer and Jonny Gomes added a solo shot, and Cincinnati spoiled the season debut of San Diego ace Mat Latos. Latos had been on the disabled list with a sore right shoulder. He lost his sixth straight start dating to September. • Cardinals 8, Diamondbacks 2: PHOENIX — Kyle McClellan got his first major-league win as a starter and drove in two runs with a pair of hits. Lance Berkman hit two home runs and Jon Jay added a pinch-hit homer for St. Louis. • Cubs 5, Astros 4: HOUSTON — Starlin Castro, Darwin Barney and Marlon Byrd combined for seven hits, five runs and three RBIs. Castro had three hits and scored three runs, Byrd drove in a pair of runs and Barney hit an RBI triple as the Chicago Cubs jumped on Houston early, building a 5-0 lead by the fourth inning. • Rockies 7, Mets 6: NEW YORK — Troy Tulowitzki homered and drove in three runs, and Carlos Gonzalez also had three RBIs. Tulowitzki made a terrific jump throw from shortstop to preserve a seventh-inning tie and Seth Smith reached base four times, including on a triple and a double. Colorado improved to 7-2, with the only two losses coming in extra innings, to match the best nine-game start in franchise history.

Hllicksn W, 1-1 5 1-3 5 2 2 5 1 98 4.09 A.Russell 1 1-3 0 1 0 2 0 18 1.93 C.Ramos 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 7 3.38 Jo.Peralta 1 2 1 1 0 1 20 3.60 Farnsworth 1 2 1 1 0 1 22 2.70 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mtsuzka L, 0-2 2 8 7 7 2 2 47 12.86 Wakefield 3 1-3 7 5 5 1 0 64 6.75 Aceves 2 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 35 3.18 Wheeler 1 5 4 4 0 0 26 18.90 Matsuzaka pitched to 2 batters in the 3rd. Inherited runners-scored—A.Russell 2-0, C.Ramos 2-1, Wakefield 2-0, Aceves 1-0. PB—Saltalamacchia. T—3:29. A—37,568 (37,493).

NL BOXSCORES Reds 3, Padres 2 Cincinnati Heisey cf-lf Phillips 2b Votto 1b Rolen 3b Gomes lf Bray p Cordero p Bruce rf R.Hernandez c

AB 4 3 3 3 4 0 0 4 4

R 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 1 2 0 2 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 0 1 2 1 0 0 1 2

Avg. .267 .410 .444 .265 .231 ----.211 .217

Janish ss Volquez p a-Cairo ph Jor.Smith p Stubbs cf Totals

3 2 1 0 0 31

1 0 0 0 0 3

0 0 0 0 0 5

0 0 0 0 0 3

1 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 12

.400 .000 .286 .000 .237

San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Venable rf 3 1 2 0 0 0 .179 c-Cantu ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .211 Neshek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --O.Hudson 2b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .313 Headley 3b 2 0 0 0 2 1 .250 Ludwick lf 3 0 0 1 0 1 .107 Hawpe 1b 3 0 0 1 0 1 .154 Hundley c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .393 Maybin cf 2 0 0 0 1 2 .258 Alb.Gonzalez ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .300 Latos p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Frieri p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Qualls p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Denorfia ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Totals 27 2 5 2 3 8 Cincinnati 000 120 000 — 3 5 0 San Diego 200 000 000 — 2 5 0 a-grounded out for Volquez in the 7th. b-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Qualls in the 8th. c-struck out for Venable in the 8th. LOB—Cincinnati 5, San Diego 3. 2B—Alb.Gonzalez (1). HR—Gomes (3), off Latos; Heisey (1), off Latos. RBIs—Heisey 2 (7), Gomes (9), Ludwick (4), Hawpe (1).

SB—Phillips (2), O.Hudson 2 (4). CS—Votto (1), Venable (2), Denorfia (1). SF—Hawpe. Runners left in scoring position—Cincinnati 2 (Gomes 2); San Diego 2 (Hundley, Hawpe). GIDP—Hundley, Alb.Gonzalez. DP—Cincinnati 3 (Janish, Phillips, Votto), (Janish, Phillips, Votto), (R.Hernandez, R.Hernandez, Phillips). Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Volquez W, 2-0 6 3 2 2 3 5 88 5.82 Jor.Smith H, 1 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 18 1.42 Bray H, 2 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 11 0.00 Cordero S, 2-2 1 1 0 0 0 1 21 2.25 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Latos L, 0-1 6 4 3 3 2 7 94 4.50 Frieri 1 1-3 1 0 0 1 3 28 3.60 Qualls 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 0.00 Neshek 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 3.38 Inherited runners-scored—Bray 1-0, Qualls 2-0. HBP—by Volquez (Ludwick), by Latos (Rolen). T—2:53. A—18,022 (42,691).

AB 2 2 5 4 2 4

R 1 1 1 1 1 0

4 3 1 3 3 0 1 0 34

0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 11

1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 5

0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4

2 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 9

.154 .143 .333 .233 .143 --.000 ---

San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Tejada ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .270 F.Sanchez 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .282 Huff rf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .250 Posey c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Burrell lf 2 1 2 1 2 0 .222 Rowand cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .318 Belt 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .143 P.Sandoval 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .382 Bumgarner p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .667 R.Ramirez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Schierholtz ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Runzler p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ja.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 33 1 7 1 2 7 Los Angeles 010 040 100 — 6 11 0 San Francisco 000 000 001 — 1 7 1 a-singled for Furcal in the 7th. b-lined out for R.Ramirez in the 7th. c-grounded out for Guerrier in the 9th. E—Burrell (2). LOB—Los Angeles 5, San Francisco 7. HR—Barajas (2), off Bumgarner; Burrell (4), off MacDougal. RBIs—Ethier 2 (7), Kemp (5), Loney (4), Barajas (2), Burrell (4). SB—Furcal (1), Kemp (7). Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 3 (Kershaw, Thames, Uribe); San Francisco 3 (F.Sanchez, Belt, Rowand). Runners moved up—Uribe. GIDP—Ethier, Uribe, F.Sanchez. DP—Los Angeles 1 (Carroll, Furcal, Loney); San Francisco 2 (F.Sanchez, Tejada, Belt), (P.Sandoval, F.Sanchez, Belt). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB Kershaw W, 2-1 6 2-3 6 0 0 2 Guerrier 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 MacDougal 1 1 1 1 0 S. Francisco IP H R ER BB Bmgrnr L, 0-2 5 8 5 5 4 R.Ramirez 2 3 1 1 0 Runzler 1 0 0 0 0 Ja.Lopez 1 0 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—Guerrier Bumgarner (Barajas). T—2:37. A—40,870 (41,915).

SO NP ERA 7 117 1.37 0 12 0.00 0 11 3.00 SO NP ERA 3 85 9.00 3 27 1.35 2 12 6.75 1 9 0.00 1-0. IBB—off

Cardinals 8, Diamondbacks 2 St. Louis Theriot ss Rasmus cf Pujols 1b Holliday lf Berkman rf Boggs p Freese 3b Motte p b-Jay ph-rf Schumaker 2b Y.Molina c McClellan p Augenstein p Miller p Descalso 3b Totals

AB 4 5 5 4 5 0 4 0 1 5 3 3 0 0 1 40

R H 0 1 0 2 0 1 2 1 2 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 14

BI 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 8

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .250 .361 .150 .455 .242 .000 .286 --.333 .270 .179 .400 ----.200

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bloomquist lf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .368 K.Johnson 2b 4 1 1 0 0 3 .205 J.Upton rf 3 0 2 0 1 0 .297 S.Drew ss 4 0 0 1 0 0 .375 C.Young cf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .256 Montero c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .448 Mora 3b 4 0 2 1 0 1 .238 Miranda 1b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .200 Enright p 1 0 0 0 1 0 .000 a-Branyan ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .364 Demel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Paterson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --J.Gutierrez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-R.Roberts ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .267 Totals 33 2 8 2 4 7 St. Louis 001 300 103 — 8 14 0 Arizona 000 100 100 — 2 8 1 a-grounded out for Enright in the 6th. b-homered for Motte in the 9th. c-struck out for J.Gutierrez in the 9th. E—S.Drew (1). LOB—St. Louis 8, Arizona 9. 2B— Schumaker (3), McClellan (1), K.Johnson (3), J.Upton (2), C.Young (3). HR—Berkman (1), off Demel; Berkman (2), off J.Gutierrez; Jay (1), off J.Gutierrez. RBIs—Theriot (4), Berkman 3 (4), Jay (1), Schumaker (3), McClellan 2 (2), S.Drew (5), Mora (3). S—Theriot. Runners left in scoring position—St. Louis 3 (Pujols 3); Arizona 5 (S.Drew 2, Enright, Branyan, C.Young). Runners moved up—Berkman, S.Drew, Montero. GIDP—Pujols, Enright. DP—St. Louis 1 (Freese, Schumaker, Pujols); Arizona 1 (Mora, K.Johnson, Miranda). St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McCllln W, 1-0 6 7 1 1 4 4 94 2.25 Augenstein 1-3 1 1 1 0 0 12 4.50 Miller H, 2 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 0.00 Motte H, 1 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 10 3.86 Boggs 1 0 0 0 0 3 17 3.00 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Enright L, 0-1 6 9 4 4 1 4 85 6.00 Demel 2 2 1 1 0 2 29 5.79 Paterson 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 0.00 J.Gutierrez 2-3 3 3 3 0 0 14 14.73 Inherited runners-scored—Miller 2-1, Motte 1-0. IBB—off Enright (Y.Molina). HBP—by Augenstein (K.Johnson), by Enright (Holliday). WP—Enright. T—2:55. A—15,746 (48,633).

Cubs 5, Astros 4

Dodgers 6, Giants 1 Los Angeles Furcal ss a-Miles ph-2b Carroll 2b-ss Ethier rf Kemp cf Uribe 3b

Loney 1b Thames lf Gwynn lf Barajas c Kershaw p Guerrier p c-Hoffmann ph MacDougal p Totals

H BI BB 0 0 1 1 0 0 3 0 0 2 2 0 1 1 2 1 0 0

SO 0 1 1 0 1 1

Avg. .192 .188 .393 .368 .441 .129

Chicago S.Castro ss Barney 2b Byrd cf Ar.Ramirez 3b C.Pena 1b A.Soriano lf Colvin rf

AB 5 3 5 4 2 4 3

R 3 2 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 3 0 0 2 1 2 2 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 2 0 0 0 1

SO 2 0 1 1 0 0 1

Avg. .364 .381 .349 .289 .174 .278 .115

Soto c Dempster p Grabow p c-DeWitt ph Marshall p Marmol p Totals

4 3 0 1 0 0 34

0 0 0 0 0 0 5

0 0 0 0 0 0 8

0 0 0 0 0 0 5

0 0 0 0 0 0 6

1 .182 1 .000 0 --0 .143 0 --0 --7

Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bourn cf 5 1 1 0 0 3 .250 Ang.Sanchez ss 5 1 1 2 0 2 .342 Pence rf 4 0 0 0 1 2 .293 Ca.Lee lf 5 0 2 0 0 2 .225 Wallace 1b 3 0 1 0 2 0 .250 1-Bourgeois pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .333 C.Johnson 3b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .212 Melancon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Lyon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Michaels ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .000 Inglett 2b-3b 5 0 1 0 0 2 .100 Quintero c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .190 Figueroa p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .500 Del Rosario p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-M.Downs ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .333 W.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Abad p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Hall ph-2b 2 1 2 1 0 0 .235 Totals 37 4 10 4 5 13 Chicago 220 100 000 — 5 8 1 Houston 000 010 300 — 4 10 0 a-singled for Del Rosario in the 5th. b-homered for Abad in the 7th. c-grounded out for Grabow in the 8th. d-walked for Lyon in the 9th. 1-ran for Wallace in the 9th. E—Ar.Ramirez (1). LOB—Chicago 8, Houston 12. 2B—A.Soriano (1), Bourn (5). 3B—Barney (1). HR—Hall (1), off Dempster; Ang.Sanchez (1), off Dempster. RBIs—Barney (3), Byrd 2 (4), A.Soriano 2 (7), Ang. Sanchez 2 (6), M.Downs (3), Hall (2). SB—S.Castro (1), Bourgeois (3). S—Quintero. Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 4 (Colvin 2, Ar.Ramirez 2); Houston 7 (Quintero 2, Inglett 3, C.Johnson, Ang.Sanchez). Runners moved up—C.Johnson, Quintero. DP—Houston 1 (C.Johnson, Inglett). Chicago IP H R ER BB Dmpstr W, 1-2 6 1-3 6 4 4 3 Grabow H, 2 2-3 1 0 0 1 Marshall H, 4 2-3 2 0 0 0 Marmol S, 4-5 1 1-3 1 0 0 1 Houston IP H R ER BB Figueroa L, 0-2 4 8 5 5 2 Del Rosario 1 0 0 0 2 W.Lopez 1 0 0 0 1 Abad 1 0 0 0 1 Melancon 1 0 0 0 0 Lyon 1 0 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—Marmol Figueroa. T—3:15. A—20,175 (40,963).

SO NP ERA 9 116 6.30 0 17 2.70 1 12 1.80 3 31 3.38 SO NP ERA 3 88 10.61 0 13 3.18 2 26 4.15 0 18 4.15 1 11 0.00 1 15 8.10 2-0. WP—

Rockies 7, Mets 6 Colorado AB R H Fowler cf 4 2 1 Herrera 2b 4 1 2 C.Gonzalez lf 5 1 1 Tulowitzki ss 4 1 2 S.Smith rf 4 0 3 Wigginton 1b 4 0 0 Stewart 3b 5 0 1 Iannetta c 2 1 0 Hammel p 3 1 1 a-Helton ph 1 0 0 F.Morales p 0 0 0 Belisle p 0 0 0 R.Betancourt p 0 0 0 c-Spilborghs ph 1 0 0 Street p 0 0 0 Totals 37 7 11

BI 1 0 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

BB 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

SO 1 0 1 0 0 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .256 .467 .306 .250 .367 .200 .059 .200 .250 .263 ------.188 .000

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jos.Reyes ss 5 1 2 0 0 1 .340 Dan.Murphy 2b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .222 D.Wright 3b 3 1 2 2 0 1 .325 Beltran rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .233 I.Davis 1b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .351 Pagan cf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .179 Harris lf 3 0 1 2 1 0 .296 Thole c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .276 Pelfrey p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Igarashi p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Byrdak p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Isringhausen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Emaus ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Parnell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Beato p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Hairston ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .067 Totals 36 6 10 5 1 7 Colorado 001 102 030 — 7 11 2 New York 101 200 020 — 6 10 2 a-flied out for Hammel in the 7th. b-struck out for Isringhausen in the 7th. c-fouled out for R.Betancourt in the 9th. d-struck out for Beato in the 9th. E—Stewart (1), Tulowitzki (1), Jos.Reyes (1), Parnell (1). LOB—Colorado 12, New York 5. 2B—Herrera (2), S.Smith (4), Beltran (3), Harris (3). 3B—S.Smith (1), Jos.Reyes 2 (2). HR—Tulowitzki (4), off Parnell; D.Wright (2), off R.Betancourt. RBIs—Fowler (3), C.Gonzalez 3 (7), Tulowitzki 3 (9), D.Wright 2 (8), I.Davis (11), Harris 2 (6). SB—Herrera (2), S.Smith (1), Stewart (1), Dan.Murphy (1). S—Herrera. SF—Fowler, D.Wright. Runners left in scoring position—Colorado 8 (Tulowitzki 2, Hammel, Wigginton 2, Herrera, Helton, Stewart); New York 3 (Pelfrey, Jos.Reyes, Dan.Murphy). Runners moved up—C.Gonzalez, S.Smith, Pelfrey. GIDP—Beltran. DP—Colorado 1 (Wigginton, Tulowitzki, Wigginton). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hammel 6 6 4 2 1 3 92 4.91 F.Morales 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 3.00 Belisle W, 2-0 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 11 1.69 R.Betancrt H, 4 1 3 2 2 0 1 18 4.50 Street S, 5-5 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 1.00 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pelfrey 5 1-3 6 4 3 4 3 113 10.80 Igarashi BS, 1-1 2-3 1 0 0 1 0 15 0.00 Byrdak 1-3 1 0 0 1 1 18 9.00 Isringhausen 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 0.00 Parnell L, 0-1 1 3 3 3 0 2 27 8.31 Beato 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 0.00 Inherited runners-scored—Igarashi 2-2, Isringhausen 2-0. HBP—by Pelfrey (Iannetta). WP—Parnell. T—3:29. A—24,865 (41,800).

Fans set aside rivalry, drop off donations for beating victim By Gale Holland Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — A slow but steady stream of drivers made their way to Dodger Stadium on Monday as part of a drive-through fundraiser for Bryan Stow, the San Francisco Giants fan who was severely beaten in a stadium parking lot on opening day. Santa Monica resident Victoria Caldwell, 40, a bookkeeper for an entertainment accounting firm, said she saw news of the fund drive on morning television and came down with her miniature pinscher, Minnie. A Dodger fan since childhood, she said she was shocked by the violence but believed it was important “to stick together and show our commitment” by helping with Stow’s medical costs. She said she believed the March 31 attack was an isolated incident. Stow, wearing Giants apparel, was in the stadium parking lot after the game when two young men began taunting him. According to police, one of the men blindsided him with blows to the back and head. Both men repeatedly kicked and punched Stow on the ground before fleeing in

a car driven by a woman. Police said it appeared a 10-year-old boy was also in the car. Stow suffered a fractured skull and damage to his frontal lobe. He remained in critical condition Monday in a medically induced coma at Los Angeles CountyUSC Medical Center. He is undergoing further testing, but no improvement has been reported since his admission, a hospital spokeswoman said. An emotional Tommy Lasorda was among the many who turned out with a donation. Lasorda teared up as he handed volunteers a $5,000 check for Stow’s relief fund. “I shed a lot of tears. He didn’t deserve it; he was a nice young man,” Lasorda said later in a phone interview. “This guy is in a coma in the hospital — I mean, come on, over a baseball game?” The former Dodgers manager said it’s important that fans come together to support Stow. “It could have happened in any ballpark in America ... I think it was very good for Dodger fans to come together to show their respect and sorrow for this young man.” Brothers Matt and Noah Glaz-

Damian Dovarganes / The Associated Press

Mia Ochoa, 6, drops off cash as a donation for paramedic Giants fan Bryan Stow at Dodger Stadium Monday in Los Angeles. Stow was brutally beaten in the parking lot of Dodgers Stadium following the season opener against the Giants. He remains in critical condition. er bicycled in from their home in L.A.’s Highland Park neighborhood with a check. Noah, 27, a production assistant, tugging on

the brim of his Lakers cap, said he worried that a police crackdown with uncertain standards in the wake of the Stow beating would

squelch the normal fun-loving rivalry between the two California National League teams. “I have a lot of friends in the Bay Area. I go to games in San Francisco and heckling is part of the game,” Noah Glazer said. “That doesn’t mean I’m going to stab someone in the parking lot.” At the same time he said he hoped that participating in the benefit would help stop the violence from escalating to the point where security would become overwhelming. “Hopefully some goodwill comes of it and some of the fringe element learns regular fans aren’t going to tolerate it,” he said. Patrick Odell, 38, of West Los Angeles, a “die-hard Dodgers fan,” arrived in his Dodgers’ Hawaiian shirt. “Hearing what happened just killed me,” the paralegal at a downtown law firm said. “I don’t think that’s what Dodger fans are about.” Already, he said his friends were saying there’s no way they’d bring their kids to Dodger Stadium, which he said he believed was wrongheaded. He came with a check to show “it wasn’t real baseball fans who were responsible. It was people who came

apparently for no reason but to savagely attack someone.” Andrea Murphy, 33, a Giants fan, said her heart went out to Stow, his family and fellow Giants fans. Murphy, an aspiring real estate agent from Modesto, Calif., now living in Santa Monica, said she had attended Dodgers games in Giants regalia, most recently a preseason game where she wore a black Giants shirt, with no trepidation. But she worried the Stow beating would make the rivalry turn ugly. “Let’s hopefully never let this happen again,” she said. “It’s so sad that something like this would happen at a baseball game of all places.” Giants and Dodgers players took part in a pregame ceremony when the teams faced off again at AT&T Park in San Francisco. The ceremony will honored Stow and was designed to “encourage civility in the rivalry,” Dodgers spokesman Josh Rawitch said. The money collected Monday will go to a trust fund established by Stow’s mother at the San Francisco Police Credit Union, and will benefit him and his two children.


D4 Tuesday, April 12, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

NBA ROUNDUP

G O L F C O M M E N TA RY

Wizards take down Celtics

McIlroy learns from greatest teacher: Failure

The Associated Press WASHINGTON — Even in a game that went to overtime, the most interesting spectacle was the quartet of Kevin Garnett, Ray Allen, Paul Pierce and Rajon Rondo sitting on the Boston Celtics’ bench. The Celtics were making a statement: The Miami Heat can have second place. It wasn’t worth fighting for anymore. Coach Doc Rivers decreed that a few days of rest for his veteran starters would be a bigger priority than trying to climb one rung in the standings in the season’s final days. Boston’s leftovers made a game of it, losing 95-94 Monday night to the lottery-bound Washington Wizards. The result, along with Miami’s 98-90 win over the Atlanta Hawks, guaranteed that the Heat will be the No. 2 seed in the Eastern Conference while the Celtics will be No. 3, drawing a first-round playoff matchup with the sixth-seeded New York Knicks. Rivers called it a difficult decision to sit his stars, one that involved everyone from general manager Danny Ainge on down, and one that surely will leave him open to second-guessing if the results fall a certain way. “I usually don’t seek out — it comes from me all the time — but this was one where I asked a lot of questions to some players, all our coaches, to Danny, so this was a tough one, but this was the right one,” Rivers said. “At the end of the day for us, it’s got to be right for our team and whatever’s best for our team, even over seeding.” Rivers said his mind was made up after the Celtics were blown out 10077 by the Heat on Sunday, a loss that put Boston behind Miami in the race for second. The coach will also sit the bulk of his top players in Wednesday’s regular season finale against the Knicks, giving his veterans a three-day mental break to set them up for three good days of practices Thursday through Saturday before the playoffs start. He said his message will be: “Just reset yourself. Reset the team.” “Mostly it’s mental, all the time,

Manuel Balce Ceneta / The Associated Press

Washington Wizards’ Jordan Crawford (15) passes the ball while Boston Celtics’ Jermaine O’Neal (7) defends during the second half of Monday’s game. The Wizards won 95-94 in overtime. with anybody on any team,” Rivers said. “They’re the best-conditioned athletes in the world, so I don’t believe in the whole getting-tired theory unless you’re allowing yourself to get tired. They just need the rest. And the break. The whole reason is it allows us to have practice with energy, and we need that more than anything.” The beneficiaries were the Wizards, who were able to claim a successful home finale in another losing season. John Wall led the way with 24 points, nine rebounds and three assists. “We kind of took it as that they was trying to disrespect us and not trying to play the other guys,” Wall said, “so we wanted to come out and fight.” Jordan Crawford scored 17 points, including the jumper that sent the

game to overtime and the three-pointer that gave Washington the lead for good in the extra period. Also on Monday: Magic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95 76ers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85 PHILADELPHIA — Dwight Howard returned from suspension to score 19 points, grab 13 rebounds and lead Orlando to a win over Philadelphia. Heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 Hawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90 ATLANTA — LeBron James scored 34 points and Miami held on for a win over Atlanta, which nearly rallied from a 20-point deficit while playing its backups against the Big Three in the fourth quarter. Bobcats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105 Nets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103 NEWARK, N.J. — D.J. Augustin

hit a jumper with 1.1 seconds remaining, leading Charlotte to a victory over New Jersey. Cavaliers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110 Pistons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101 AUBURN HILLS, Mich. — Daniel Gibson scored 17 points, including a five-point play late in the third quarter, and Cleveland won a testy game in which Ryan Hollins and Detroit’s Charlie Villanueva were ejected after a skirmish. Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90 Hornets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78 NEW ORLEANS — C.J. Miles and Devin Harris each scored 18 points, Paul Millsap added 16 and Utah won for only the second time in 12 games. Bucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93 Raptors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86 MILWAUKEE — Brandon Jennings broke free for three straight fast-break scores to give Milwaukee the lead in the fourth quarter, and the Bucks held on to beat undermanned Toronto. Mavericks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 Rockets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91 HOUSTON — Dirk Nowitzki had 23 points and 12 rebounds, and Dallas moved a half game ahead of Los Angeles for the No. 2 seed in the Western Conference. Nuggets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .134 Warriors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111 DENVER — J.R. Smith’s 22 points led nine Nuggets in double figures and Kosta Koufos tied his career high with 18 points in Denver’s win over Golden State. Suns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .135 Timberwolves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .127 PHOENIX — Channing Frye scored a game-high 33 points and hit a three-pointer with 2:05 left in overtime and Phoenix rallied to beat Minnesota for the Timberwolves’ 14th consecutive loss. Thunder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120 Kings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112 SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Kevin Durant scored 32 points and Russell Westbrook had 30 points and nine assists for Oklahoma, which beat Sacramento for its fifth straight win.

NBA SCOREBOARD SUMMARIES Monday’s Games

Bobcats 105, Nets 103 CHARLOTTE (105) Diaw 8-11 2-2 20, Cunningham 10-16 1-1 21, Brown 4-8 3-4 11, Augustin 8-17 2-2 19, Henderson 6-14 2-3 14, White 3-5 1-4 7, Temple 3-4 0-0 7, Carroll 0-0 0-0 0, McGuire 3-4 0-0 6. Totals 45-79 11-16 105. NEW JERSEY (103) Graham 1-6 0-0 2, Gadzuric 1-2 0-0 2, Lopez 12-23 7-8 31, Farmar 8-12 4-4 20, Vujacic 7-13 2-2 19, Outlaw 4-10 0-0 9, Uzoh 4-7 0-0 8, Wright 5-5 0-0 10, Petro 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 43-79 13-14 103. Charlotte 25 24 30 26 — 105 New Jersey 29 24 20 30 — 103 3-Point Goals—Charlotte 4-13 (Diaw 2-5, Temple 1-2, Augustin 1-5, Henderson 0-1), New Jersey 4-10 (Vujacic 3-5, Outlaw 1-3, Graham 01, Farmar 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Charlotte 39 (Brown 7), New Jersey 37 (Gadzuric 8). Assists—Charlotte 27 (Augustin 11), New Jersey 23 (Farmar 9). Total Fouls—Charlotte 15, New Jersey 18. Technicals—New Jersey defensive three second. A—13,853 (18,500).

Magic 95, 76ers 85 ORLANDO (95) Turkoglu 3-6 0-0 7, Bass 4-11 0-0 8, Howard 6-13 7-9 19, Nelson 6-13 2-2 19, J.Richardson 5-11 0-2 12, Anderson 7-11 1-2 18, Duhon 2-7 1-2 5, Clark 2-7 3-4 7, Allen 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 35-80 14-21 95. PHILADELPHIA (85) Turner 2-7 3-3 7, Brand 9-15 4-4 22, Hawes 2-8 0-0 4, Holiday 7-16 0-0 15, Meeks 3-8 0-0 7, Young 4-12 1-2 9, Nocioni 5-11 0-0 13, Daniels 1-2 0-0 2, Speights 2-3 2-2 6. Totals 35-82 10-11 85. Orlando 34 16 26 19 — 95 Philadelphia 25 22 15 23 — 85 3-Point Goals—Orlando 11-25 (Nelson 5-8, Anderson 3-5, J.Richardson 2-5, Turkoglu 1-4, Howard 0-1, Duhon 0-2), Philadelphia 5-17 (Nocioni 3-7, Holiday 1-2, Meeks 1-5, Hawes 01, Daniels 0-1, Young 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Orlando 64 (Anderson 14), Philadelphia 36 (Nocioni 6). Assists—Orlando 24 (Nelson 7), Philadelphia 22 (Holiday 11). Total Fouls—Orlando 13, Philadelphia 14. A—19,139 (20,318).

Heat 98, Hawks 90 MIAMI (98) James 10-21 12-14 34, Bosh 7-10 1-1 15, Ilgauskas 1-3 2-2 4, Bibby 4-8 1-3 10, Wade 915 3-3 21, Anthony 2-2 0-0 4, Miller 0-2 0-0 0, Jones 2-5 1-1 7, Chalmers 1-2 0-0 3, Howard 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 36-69 20-24 98. ATLANTA (90) Williams 5-8 0-0 11, Smith 8-13 0-3 17, Horford 3-6 1-2 7, Hinrich 0-6 1-1 1, Johnson 3-10

4-4 10, Crawford 5-12 1-1 13, Pachulia 3-4 3-6 9, Wilkins 3-7 2-4 8, Teague 5-11 0-0 10, Powell 2-6 0-0 4. Totals 37-83 12-21 90. Miami 28 34 17 19 — 98 Atlanta 23 23 21 23 — 90 3-Point Goals—Miami 6-17 (James 2-4, Jones 2-5, Chalmers 1-2, Bibby 1-3, Miller 0-1, Wade 0-2), Atlanta 4-12 (Crawford 2-6, Smith 1-1, Williams 1-2, Teague 0-1, Hinrich 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Miami 43 (James 10), Atlanta 49 (Horford, Smith 6). Assists—Miami 24 (James 7), Atlanta 25 (Johnson 5). Total Fouls—Miami 19, Atlanta 21. Technicals—Ilgauskas, Miami defensive three second. Ejected—Ilgauskas. A—18,529 (18,729).

Nuggets 134, Warriors 111 GOLDEN STATE (111) Wright 8-23 7-7 27, Lee 5-10 0-0 10, Udoh 3-5 2-4 8, Curry 10-13 4-4 27, Williams 7-16 00 17, Amundson 3-5 1-2 7, Thornton 1-5 0-0 2, Radmanovic 3-6 0-0 9, Lin 0-5 4-4 4, Adrien 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 40-90 18-21 111. DENVER (134) Forbes 7-15 0-0 15, Martin 6-13 2-2 14, Nene 4-7 4-6 12, Lawson 6-10 1-2 14, Afflalo 4-6 1-1 10, Felton 5-7 2-4 15, Andersen 6-10 2-5 14, Smith 6-17 6-8 22, Koufos 6-8 6-7 18, Ely 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 50-94 24-35 134. Golden State 32 22 37 20 — 111 Denver 31 23 44 36 — 134 3-Point Goals—Golden State 13-25 (Wright 4-11, Williams 3-4, Curry 3-4, Radmanovic 34, Lee 0-1, Lin 0-1), Denver 10-23 (Smith 4-9, Felton 3-4, Afflalo 1-2, Forbes 1-4, Lawson 1-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Golden State 45 (Amundson 6), Denver 63 (Andersen 12). Assists—Golden State 20 (Lee, Curry 5), Denver 31 (Felton 10). Total Fouls—Golden State 24, Denver 18. Technicals—Amundson, Radmanovic, Wright, Golden State defensive three second 2, Nene. A—19,155 (19,155).

Mavs 98, Rockets 91 DALLAS (98) Marion 10-14 1-1 21, Nowitzki 8-22 7-8 23, Chandler 3-4 2-2 8, Kidd 1-7 2-2 4, Beaubois 2-5 2-2 6, Stojakovic 1-4 0-0 3, Terry 9-15 3-4 21, Mahinmi 1-2 1-1 3, Barea 2-5 0-0 6, Brewer 0-3 0-0 0, Cardinal 1-2 0-0 3. Totals 38-83 18-20 98. HOUSTON (91) Budinger 2-11 2-2 6, Patterson 3-8 2-3 8, Hayes 5-12 0-0 10, Dragic 6-16 1-2 15, Martin 10-24 5-6 28, Lee 4-12 3-3 12, Miller 5-13 0-0 12. Totals 35-96 13-16 91. Dallas 20 23 24 19 12 — 98 Houston 23 24 24 15 5 — 91 3-Point Goals—Dallas 4-17 (Barea 2-2, Stojakovic 1-1, Cardinal 1-2, Nowitzki 0-1, Terry 0-1, Beaubois 0-2, Brewer 0-3, Kidd 0-5), Houston 8-27 (Martin 3-7, Miller 2-5, Dragic 2-6, Lee 1-4, Budinger 0-5). Fouled Out—Martin. Rebounds—Dallas 56 (Nowitzki, Chandler 12), Houston 55 (Hayes 12). Assists—Dallas

Wallace Continued from D1 He’s had four double-doubles in Portland and 18 overall, and he has scored in double figures in 10 straight games. “He just makes plays, on both ends of the floor,” Blazers coach Nate McMillan said. “He plays fearless.” But not so long ago, the trade to the Blazers caught Wallace completely off guard. An All-Star last season, Wallace was acquired from Charlotte in a deadline deal that sent Joel Przybilla, Sean Marks and Dante Cunningham along with two first-round draft picks to the Bobcats. He was the last original member of the 7-yearold Bobcats, joining the team via the 2004 expansion draft. Wallace lamented when he got here that he took a nap after practice in Charlotte on Feb. 24 and when he woke up he was a Blazer. Today, he’s over it.

EASTERN CONFERENCE z-Chicago y-Miami y-Boston x-Orlando x-Atlanta x-New York x-Philadelphia x-Indiana Milwaukee Charlotte Detroit New Jersey Washington Toronto Cleveland

W 60 57 55 51 44 42 41 37 34 33 29 24 23 22 18

L 20 24 26 30 37 38 40 44 47 48 52 57 58 59 63

Pct .750 .704 .679 .630 .543 .525 .506 .457 .420 .407 .358 .296 .284 .272 .222

GB — 3½ 5½ 9½ 16½ 18 19½ 23½ 26½ 27½ 31½ 36½ 37½ 38½ 42½

L10 9-1 8-2 5-5 6-4 4-6 7-3 4-6 6-4 5-5 5-5 3-7 1-9 6-4 1-9 4-6

Str W-7 W-3 L-2 W-1 L-5 W-7 L-1 L-1 W-2 W-1 L-1 L-4 W-2 L-1 W-1

Home 35-5 30-11 32-8 28-12 24-17 23-17 26-14 24-17 22-19 20-20 21-20 17-22 20-21 16-24 11-29

Away 25-15 27-13 23-18 23-18 20-20 19-21 15-26 13-27 12-28 13-28 8-32 5-35 3-37 6-33 7-34

Conf 37-13 37-14 36-15 35-16 31-20 28-22 25-26 28-23 26-26 21-30 21-30 13-38 16-35 14-37 14-37

WESTERN CONFERENCE W z-San Antonio 61 x-Dallas 56 y-L.A. Lakers 55 y-Oklahoma City 55 x-Denver 50 x-Portland 47 x-Memphis 46 x-New Orleans 46 Houston 42 Phoenix 39 Utah 38 Golden State 35 L.A. Clippers 31 Sacramento 24 Minnesota 17 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference

L 19 25 25 26 31 33 34 35 39 42 43 46 50 57 64

Pct .763 .691 .688 .679 .617 .588 .575 .568 .519 .481 .469 .432 .383 .296 .210

GB — 5½ 6 6½ 11½ 14 15 15½ 19½ 22½ 23½ 26½ 30½ 37½ 44½

L10 4-6 6-4 5-5 8-2 8-2 7-3 8-2 6-4 5-5 3-7 2-8 5-5 4-6 5-5 0-10

Str W-4 W-3 L-5 W-5 W-2 W-2 W-2 L-2 L-1 W-1 W-1 L-2 L-3 L-1 L-14

Home 36-5 28-12 29-11 30-10 33-8 29-11 30-11 28-13 25-16 22-18 20-20 25-15 22-18 11-29 12-28

Away 25-14 28-13 26-14 25-16 17-23 18-22 16-23 18-22 17-23 17-24 18-23 10-31 9-32 13-28 5-36

Conf 38-12 34-17 34-16 33-19 30-21 29-21 30-20 27-24 24-27 22-29 20-31 20-31 18-33 15-36 7-44

——— Monday’s Games Miami 98, Atlanta 90 Orlando 95, Philadelphia 85 Cleveland 110, Detroit 101 Utah 90, New Orleans 78 Denver 134, Golden State 111 Oklahoma City 120, Sacramento 112

Charlotte 105, New Jersey 103 Washington 95, Boston 94, OT Milwaukee 93, Toronto 86 Dallas 98, Houston 91, OT Phoenix 135, Minnesota 127, OT Today’s Games

Chicago at New York, 5 p.m. San Antonio at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m.

Memphis at Portland, 7 p.m. All Times PDT

21 (Kidd, Marion, Barea, Terry 4), Houston 24 (Dragic 7). Total Fouls—Dallas 20, Houston 19. A—14,898 (18,043).

Bucks 93, Raptors 86 TORONTO (86) J.Johnson 5-10 2-2 12, Dorsey 3-12 4-6 10, Davis 6-11 3-5 15, Bayless 7-20 4-6 20, DeRozan 4-14 9-10 17, Wright 1-3 1-2 3, Ajinca 3-9 0-0 7, Alabi 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 30-81 23-31 86. MILWAUKEE (93) Delfino 2-5 0-0 5, Mbah a Moute 2-5 0-0 4, Gooden 6-14 7-7 19, Jennings 7-16 6-6 21, Salmons 9-14 5-7 24, Sanders 1-1 1-2 3, Ilyas-

ova 1-5 4-4 6, Dooling 0-3 0-0 0, Redd 1-6 0-0 2, Douglas-Roberts 1-2 0-0 2, Boykins 1-2 2-2 4, Maggette 1-3 1-2 3. Totals 32-76 26-30 93. Toronto 33 18 20 15 — 86 Milwaukee 25 21 23 24 — 93 3-Point Goals—Toronto 3-12 (Bayless 2-7, Ajinca 1-2, DeRozan 0-1, J.Johnson 0-2), Milwaukee 3-17 (Salmons 1-1, Jennings 1-3, Delfino 1-3, Douglas-Roberts 0-1, Maggette 0-1, Dooling 0-2, Redd 0-3, Ilyasova 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Toronto 57 (Dorsey 20), Milwaukee 50 (Gooden 11). Assists—Toronto 16 (Bayless 5), Milwaukee 20 (Gooden 5). Total Fouls—Toronto 21, Milwaukee 20. Technicals—Milwaukee defensive three second. A—13,279 (18,717).

“I’m good,” he said recently. “I think the team and the organization did a good job of making me feel welcome, making me feel at home.” His arrival caused a bit of a stir because Wallace has a penchant for headbands — something coach McMillan had previously outlawed. McMillan broke the ice by wearing a headband to practice, and giving it to Wallace as his blessing. There were also questions about forward Nicolas Batum’s starting role once Wallace got acclimated in Portland. But Batum has responded well when he has come off the bench. “I don’t think about myself, I think about the team,” Batum said. “I want to win.” Wallace, with his easygoing personality and subdued deep-baritone voice, made friends among his teammate quickly — evident in his banter with Aldridge after last week’s victory at home over the defending champion Los Angeles Lakers. Aldridge joked that the Rose Garden crowd was chanting Wallace’s name so loud he felt compelled to join in. “They never chanted my name here,” Aldridge

Cavs 110, Pistons 101 CLEVELAND (110) Gee 6-8 4-5 16, Hickson 8-16 4-7 20, Erden 1-5 3-4 5, Davis 1-5 1-1 4, Harris 1-5 2-4 4, Gibson 4-10 5-5 17, Sessions 6-13 5-5 17, Hollins 5-5 2-3 12, Harangody 1-6 0-0 2, Eyenga 6-11 0-0 13. Totals 39-84 26-34 110. DETROIT (101) Prince 3-6 0-0 6, Wilcox 6-7 4-7 16, Monroe 5-6 0-0 10, Stuckey 8-14 13-13 29, Hamilton 610 0-0 13, Maxiell 1-7 2-4 4, Daye 2-7 2-4 6, Villanueva 3-9 0-0 8, Gordon 4-8 0-0 9. Totals 38-74 21-28 101. Cleveland 23 33 30 24 — 110 Detroit 33 24 18 26 — 101 3-Point Goals—Cleveland 6-19 (Gibson 4-7, Eyenga 1-5, Davis 1-5, Harangody 0-2), Detroit 4-9 (Villanueva 2-2, Hamilton 1-2, Gordon 1-3, Daye 0-1, Stuckey 0-1). Fouled Out—Gibson. Rebounds—Cleveland 46 (Hickson 11), Detroit 50 (Maxiell 14). Assists—Cleveland 28 (Sessions 9), Detroit 22 (Stuckey 14). Total Fouls— Cleveland 25, Detroit 27. Technicals—Hollins, Hamilton, Detroit Coach Kuester, Villanueva, Detroit defensive three second 2. Ejected—Hollins, Villanueva. A—15,589 (22,076).

Jazz 90, Hornets 78 UTAH (90) Hayward 6-8 1-2 14, Millsap 8-13 0-1 16, Jefferson 4-10 0-0 8, Harris 6-13 4-4 18, Miles 6-9 3-4 18, Watson 2-8 0-0 4, Favors 2-3 2-4 6, Elson 3-3 0-0 6, Evans 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-67 10-15 90. NEW ORLEANS (78) Ariza 0-4 5-8 5, Landry 2-5 1-2 5, Okafor 27 1-2 5, Paul 6-13 3-4 15, Belinelli 5-8 2-2 13, Green 4-10 2-2 12, Pondexter 1-4 1-2 4, Smith 610 0-0 12, Gray 1-5 1-2 3, Jack 1-8 2-2 4, Ewing Jr. 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 28-74 18-26 78. Utah 29 18 23 20 — 90 New Orleans 21 16 20 21 — 78 3-Point Goals—Utah 6-16 (Miles 3-5, Harris 2-6, Hayward 1-1, Watson 0-4), New Orleans 411 (Green 2-4, Pondexter 1-1, Belinelli 1-2, Jack 0-1, Paul 0-1, Ariza 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Utah 36 (Millsap, Jefferson 6), New Orleans 53 (Gray 9). Assists—Utah 25 (Jefferson, Miles, Harris 5), New Orleans 16 (Jack 6). Total Fouls—Utah 18, New Orleans 17. A—12,558 (17,188).

Wizards 95, Celtics 94 BOSTON (94) Green 8-20 4-5 20, Davis 6-13 8-8 20, J.O’Neal 6-15 3-7 15, West 4-9 2-2 11, Wafer 4-12 3-4 11, Krstic 1-2 2-2 4, Murphy 1-5 2-2 4, Bradley 0-1 0-0 0, Arroyo 1-5 4-4 7, Pavlovic 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 32-84 28-34 94. WASHINGTON (95) Evans 1-6 0-0 2, Blatche 7-12 2-4 16, McGee 4-12 5-6 13, Wall 5-17 14-15 24, Crawford 8-19 0-0 17, Seraphin 1-2 0-0 2, Jeffers 3-6 2-2 8, Owens 2-3 2-5 7, Yi 3-8 0-0 6. Totals 34-85

25-32 95. Boston 23 21 16 24 10 — 94 Washington 19 18 23 24 11 — 95 3-Point Goals—Boston 2-7 (West 1-1, Arroyo 1-1, Murphy 0-1, Wafer 0-4), Washington 25 (Owens 1-2, Crawford 1-2, Evans 0-1). Fouled Out—McGee, Blatche. Rebounds—Boston 59 (Green 15), Washington 57 (Yi 10). Assists— Boston 20 (West 5), Washington 14 (Crawford 6). Total Fouls—Boston 25, Washington 31. Technicals—Washington defensive three second. A—17,787 (20,173).

Suns 135, T’wolves 127 MINNESOTA (127) Beasley 11-20 2-3 26, Tolliver 8-12 6-8 22, Pekovic 4-6 2-2 10, Ridnour 10-13 0-0 21, Johnson 5-11 2-2 14, Randolph 10-20 4-5 24, Ellington 0-1 0-0 0, Webster 3-8 0-0 7, Flynn 0-2 0-0 0, Hayward 1-2 0-0 3. Totals 52-95 16-20 127. PHOENIX (135) Hill 8-16 4-4 21, Frye 12-18 0-0 33, Gortat 711 3-3 17, Nash 2-4 3-3 8, Dudley 10-15 1-4 26, Childress 2-4 0-0 4, Dowdell 2-9 3-3 8, Brooks 2-6 0-0 5, Warrick 4-5 3-6 11, Siler 1-4 0-0 2. Totals 50-92 17-23 135. Minnesota 33 32 27 29 6 — 127 Phoenix 24 34 34 29 14 — 135 3-Point Goals—Minnesota 7-16 (Johnson 2-4, Beasley 2-6, Hayward 1-1, Ridnour 1-1, Webster 1-2, Flynn 0-2), Phoenix 18-29 (Frye 9-14, Dudley 5-5, Nash 1-1, Brooks 1-2, Dowdell 1-2, Hill 1-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Minnesota 49 (Tolliver, Randolph 10), Phoenix 46 (Dudley, Gortat 8). Assists—Minnesota 21 (Ridnour 9), Phoenix 40 (Nash 16). Total Fouls—Minnesota 16, Phoenix 20. Technicals—Randolph, Minnesota defensive three second. A—17,485 (18,422).

Thunder 120, Kings 112 OKLAHOMA CITY (120) Durant 8-16 15-17 32, Ibaka 5-9 4-5 14, Perkins 2-4 2-3 6, Westbrook 12-22 6-7 30, Sefolosha 3-4 0-0 6, Collison 2-3 0-0 4, Harden 3-7 5-5 12, Mohammed 5-5 0-0 10, Maynor 3-4 0-0 6, Cook 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 43-75 32-37 120. SACRAMENTO (112) Garcia 4-9 0-0 11, Cousins 6-13 18-21 30, Dalembert 1-6 5-6 7, Udrih 8-15 5-5 21, Thornton 8-23 4-4 21, Greene 2-6 0-0 4, Thompson 6-11 44 16, Jeter 0-2 2-2 2. Totals 35-85 38-42 112. Oklahoma City 24 27 36 33 — 120 Sacramento 20 37 26 29 — 112 3-Point Goals—Oklahoma City 2-10 (Durant 1-3, Harden 1-3, Cook 0-1, Sefolosha 0-1, Westbrook 0-2), Sacramento 4-20 (Garcia 3-5, Thornton 1-8, Jeter 0-1, Cousins 0-1, Greene 0-2, Udrih 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Oklahoma City 46 (Ibaka, Durant 8), Sacramento 45 (Dalembert, Thornton, Cousins 9). Assists—Oklahoma City 20 (Westbrook 9), Sacramento 21 (Udrih 7). Total Fouls—Oklahoma City 26, Sacramento 25. Technicals—Cousins, Greene, Thompson, Sacramento defensive three second. A—15,683 (17,317).

laughed. Wallace countered that he heard fans calling out “M-V-P” when Aldridge was at the free-throw line. “Two people!” Aldridge exclaimed. About the only drawback that Wallace can see is living out of a hotel. “This would be so much better if I knew I was going home and laying in my own bed and watching direct TV, or something like that,” Wallace joked. “It would be better if they had room service, but they don’t even have that.” The Blazers have two games remaining in the regular season. They host Memphis today before visiting Golden State for the finale on Wednesday. It is anyone’s guess who Portland will face in the playoffs, as teams continue to jockey for seeding. If the Blazers win their final two games, they will secure the sixth spot in the Western Conference. After the playoffs, Wallace plans to find a new place to live in Portland. Aldridge has some advice. “Go ahead and buy that big house because you’re gonna be here for a while,” he joked.

By Sally Jenkins The Washington Post

Rory McIlroy never got a grip on his golf swing or his putter in the final round of the Masters, but he controlled the one thing he could beautifully: his attitude. Ever heard an athlete deal with total personal failure more forthrightly? The best young player anyone has seen in a long time came apart on the back nine of Augusta, but the way he pulled himself together when it was over was one of the more promising things he has done in his short career. McIlroy is only 21, so it’s hard to predict how many major championships he has ahead of him. But we all know this much: When we hear a lot of talk from a guy who just lost big about how unfair life is and how he could never get a break, we can be pretty sure he won’t win the next one, either. The real champions don’t complain they got sand kicked in their face. They man up, admit a weakness — and join Charles Atlas. “I’ll get over it,” McIlroy said. “I led this golf tournament for 63 holes. Hopefully it will build a little character in me as well.” McIlroy came off the course a wreck, his shirttail un-tucked and his young pudding face flushed and damp from the heat and embarrassment of shooting 80 to blow a four-stroke lead entering the final round. He might have been pardoned for marching straight to the parking lot and refusing to take questions, or for whining about that ungodly bad ricochet off a tree on the 10th that Rory McIlroy landed his ball in the uncharted residential landscaping of the cabin area, leading to a triple-bogey. Instead he wiped his face and answered every question put to him, and had a very candid talk with himself along the way. “I totally unraveled,” he said. After listening to him, you wanted to seize the nearest child prodigy with a behavior issue by the collar and say, “Listen up. That’s what a future champion sounds like.” Golf archivists will spend a lot of time comparing McIlroy’s breakdown to others of historical proportions — it wasn’t quite as bad as Greg Norman’s six-stroke dissolution in the 1996 Masters, or Arnold Palmer’s seven-stroke collapse in the 1966 U.S. Open — and arguing over what it means. It certainly can’t be encouraging to McIlroy that twice now he has shot 80 after seizing the lead in majors, in the British Open at St. Andrews last year after opening with a 63, and now at Augusta. But he’s a 21-year-old who has now threatened in three consecutive majors, and already has victories on both the PGA and European Tours. If it were another player, using another tone, we might question his future. Instead, the player whom McIlroy has a chance to most resemble, and whom he should study closely, is not a folding Norman or aging Palmer, but a young Tom Watson. Watson once famously said, “I learned how to win by losing and not liking it.” In 1974, Watson led the U.S. Open at Winged Foot after three rounds, only to fall apart with a 79 after a threeputt at the 10th hole Sunday. Byron Nelson, who was working as a broadcaster at the tournament, approached Watson in the locker room and asked to speak to him for five minutes. “I like the way you handled yourself,” Nelson told him. “I think I can help you.” He told Watson he had played a little fast, and lost his rhythm. What happened to McIlroy was actually fairly predictable: He was entirely too confident entering the final round after committing just three bogeys, and then got slammed by pressure. “I’ve been saying it all week: I feel comfortable,” he said. “It’s natural to get nervous, if I wasn’t nervous on the first tee tomorrow, there’d be something wrong.” They were the statements of someone completely unprepared for what he was about to feel. Holding up in the final round of a major, especially on the slidey greens of Augusta, is a skill learned through the bitterest experiences. And playing with the lead — and under the accompanying scrutiny — is entirely different from what Charl Schwartzel experienced in birdying his final four holes to win the tournament while others wilted. As early as Friday, Watson suspected that McIlroy would have his share of struggles over the closing holes, in fact. “That’s something you can only deal with by putting yourself in the water and learning how to swim,” Watson told the Wall Street Journal. “The pressure was always there for me. I couldn’t relieve it.” Just listen to some other former greats on how pressure affected them: “Everybody has their choking point,” Johnny Miller recently told golf blogger Stephanie Wei. At the 1971 Bing Crosby at Pebble Beach, Miller was paired with Jack Nicklaus in the final round and lost after badly cold-shanking a 7-iron on the 16th hole. “I won like 35 tournaments around the world after that and never once did I not think about it on Sunday afternoon, ‘You’re not going to shank it like you did at the Bing Crosby, are you?’ ” Miller said. “That shows how powerful failure under pressure is.” Nicklaus recently told of listening to Bobby Jones explain how it had taken him seven years and some hard lessons before he could correct himself in mid-round, instead of being nursed by his coach, Stewart Maiden. “Until I learned — and he taught me how not to run back to him, when I did that — then I became a golfer,” Jones told Nicklaus. No doubt some of these thoughts will help guide McIlroy through the difficult stage he’s in — that horribly impatient time when a player can hardly wait to win that first big title. McIlroy seems destined to win. He’s an explosive player who swings the club at 120 miles per hour, which makes him at just 5-feet-9 one of the longest players in the world, and he’s clearly a blazing talent. All he needs now is some good sense and sound decision-making, a little painfully-acquired know-how. He already has the attitude.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 12, 2011 D5

Culver rallies for win over Perrydale Bulletin staff report CULVER — One big inning was all Culver needed. The Bulldogs won their ninth game of the softball season with a 5-4 Class 2A/1A Special District 3 victory over Perrydale on Monday afternoon. Trailing the Pirates 1-0 entering the bottom of the sixth inning, Culver’s bats came alive when the top of its lineup came to the plate. With a runner on, senior Megan McKinney gave the Bulldogs the lead with a single swing, blasting a two-run home run to put Culver ahead 2-1. Kymber Wofford and Samantha Donnelly then hit back-to-back doubles and later in the inning, sophomore Jahnie Cleveland added a double of her own. Culver scored five runs in the sixth inning, and after allowing three runs by Perrydale in the seventh to make it 5-4, Bulldog pitcher McKinney finally slammed the door shut on the Pirates and secured the win. Culver (3-2 SD3, 9-3 overall) hosts Burns in a doubleheader today, making it seven games in seven days for the Bulldogs. In other prep events Monday: BASEBALL Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Gladstone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 GLADSTONE — Austin Moe held the Gladiators to two runs and Bob Fine went three for four with two runs batted in to lead the White Buffaloes (2-10 overall) to their first Tri-Valley Conference victory of the season. Moe also added two RBIs at the plate. Madras hosts Gladstone on Friday. BOYS TENNIS Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Cascade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MADRAS — The White Buffaloes won two of four singles matches, with Carlos Garcia beating Truman Clark (7-5, 6-3) and Nieman Adams cruising by Hussein Ali (6-0, 6-2). Madras took three of the four doubles matches, including a win from Caleb Freshour and Alexsis Penaloza at No. 1 doubles. Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 REDMOND — The Panthers swept all four doubles matches to beat the Lava Bears. Bend’s top singles player, Jeff Windsor, had no problem with Carlo Gangan of Redmond (6-0, 6-0), but the

PREP ROUNDUP Panthers won five of the meet’s other seven matches. GIRLS TENNIS Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Monica Johnson took the top singles match for the Panthers, a 6-3, 6-4 victory over the Lava Bears’ Kaylee Tornay, as Redmond defeated longtime rival Bend. Cassidy Taylor posted the only singles victory for the home team, a 6-3, 6-2 win over the Panthers’ Genna Miller. Redmond won three of the four doubles matches. GIRLS GOLF Hawks finish second in Cottage Grove event COTTAGE GROVE — Samantha McPherson shot a team-low 98 for La Pine and the Hawks finished second in the Cottage Grove Invitational at the Middlefield Golf Course. La Pine’s team score of 447 was 18 strokes higher than winner Sutherlin. The host Lions finished third. Sutherlin’s Brooke Spencer claimed medalist honors with a 92 on the par-67 course. Haley Clark shot a 101 for the Hawks and Taylor Tavares posted a 122. BOYS LACROSSE Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 SISTERS — Beau Fitzke and Sebastian Boehm each scored two goals for the Outlaws in a High Desert League win over the Storm. Defenseman Connor Morgan also found the back of the net for Sisters. Summit was led by Dylan Smith who tallied two goals, but Outlaw goaltender Brennan Layne made several key saves to help Sisters post the victory. SOFTBALL Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Gladstone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 MADRAS — JoElla Smith and Maycee Abendschein each went two for four with a double and a home run in leading the White Buffaloes to a Tri-Valley Conference victory over the Gladiators. Jamie Moe was four for four with an RBI, Alex Holcomb contributed a triple and Lauren Short added two hits and two stolen bases. The Buffs (3-0 TVC, 9-4 overall) are at Gladstone on Friday.

PREP SCOREBOARD BASEBALL Monday’s results ——— CLASS 5A INTERMOUNTAIN CONFERENCE ——— Bend 100 100 0 — 2 5 1 Summit 000 002 1 — 3 9 0 Hirko and Newton; Hamann and Mingus. W — Hamann. L — Hirko. 2B — Summit: Sweet, Rooks. 3B — Summit: Reddick. ——— CLASS 4A TRI-VALLEY CONFERENCE ——— Madras 001 313 0 — 8 13 2 Gladstone 100 000 1 — 2 7 3 Moe and Brown; Baker, Braun (4), Potrociano (7) and Simoc. W — Moe. L— Baker. 2B — Madras: Brown; Gladstone: Campos.

SOFTBALL Monday’s Results ——— CLASS 4A TRI-VALLEY CONFERENCE ——— Gladstone 200 002 0 — 4 6 4 Madras 004 125 X — 12 14 1 Abendschein and Smith; Jarrett, Dudley (5) and Miller. W— Abendschein. L—Jarrett. 2B—Gladstone: Miller, Ward; Madras: J. Smith, Abendschein. 3B—Gladstone: Dean; Madras: Holcomb. HR—Madras: J. Smith, Abendschein. ——— CLASS 2A/1A SPECIAL DISTRICT 3 Perrydale 000 010 3 — 4 6 1 Culver 000 005 x — 5 7 3 Baucen and Carmon; McKinney and Donnelly. W—McKinney. L—Baucen. 2B—Culver: Wofford, Donnelly, Cleveland. 3B—Perrydale: Carmon. HR—Culver: McKinney.

TENNIS Boys Monday’s Results ——— MADRAS 5, CASCADE 3 At Madras Singles — Dennis Reutov, Cascade, def. Ryan Fine, Madras, 61, 6-0; Carlos Garcia, Madras, def. Truman Clark, Cascade, 7-5, 6-3; Matthias Hawkins, Cascade, def. Colby Jack Parks, Madras, 6-2, 7-6 (9-7); Nieman Adams, Madras, def. Hussein Ali, Cascade, 6-0, 6-2. Doubles — Penaloza/Freshour, Madras, def. Teubner/Farr, Cascade, 6-4, 6-1; Garcia/Gemelas, Madras, def. Ali/Lippold, Cascade, 6-3, 7-5; Wood/Welty, Cascade, def. Hernandez/Van Pelt, Madras, 3-6, 6-1, 6-1; Giron/Miller, Madras, def. Schaeffer/Usselman, Cascade, 6-4, 6-4. ———

Storm Continued from D1 Hamann then retired Bend’s eighth, ninth and leadoff hitters in order in the top of the seventh, leaving the game in the hands of the Storm’s offense. Colton Bellandi opened the bottom of the seventh with a single and moved to second on Duncan Macdougall’s walk. With runners on first and second and no outs, Colt let Sweet swing away. “Percentages tell you to move the runners over and you’ve got a better chance of scoring,” Colt said. “But the way this kid

REDMOND 5, BEND 3 At Redmond Singles — Jeff Windsor, Bend, def. Carlo Gangan, Redmond, 6-0, 6-0; Joel Johnson, Bend, def. Alex Bruno, Redmond, 3-6, 62, 10-6; Cole Anderson, Bend, def. Kyle Jackson, Redmond, 6-3, 6-4; Miguel Hidalgo, Redmond, def. Cameron Tuiave, Bend, 6-3, 1-6, 10-3. Doubles — Chris/Jackson, Redmond, def. Simning/Tuttle, Bend, 2-6, 6-4, 10-5; Maxwell/Powell, Redmond, def. Ralmand/Friere, Bend, NA; Huff/Hamilton, Redmond, def. Alligan/Sigmal, Bend, 7-6 (7-3), 6-1; Wilcox/Jorgensen, Redmond, def. Klimash/Davis, Bend, 6-3, 6-3.

TENNIS Girls Monday’s results ——— REDMOND 6, BEND 2 At Bend Singles — Monica Johnson, Redmond, def. Kaylee Tornay, Bend, 6-3, 6-4; Cassidy Taylor, Bend, def. Genna Miller, Redmond, 6-3, 6-2; Chloe Woodward, Redmond, def. Claire Nichols, Bend, 6-3, 3-6, 10-6; Ashlee Lemus, Redmond, def. Melissa Watkins, Bend, 6-0, 6-1. Doubles — Oliveira/Palcic, Bend, def. Christensen/Cron, Redmond, 6-4, 6-1; Dollarhide/Wright, Redmond, def. Daley/ Fowlds, Bend, 7-5, 7-5; Hartford/Bentlage, Redmond, def. Peterson/ Palcic, Bend, 6-2, 6-0; McCall/Marshall, Redmond, def. Zachem/ Taunton, Bend, 6-3, 6-3.

GOLF Girls Monday’s Results ——— COTTAGE GROVE INVITATIONAL Middlefield Golf Course, Cottage Grove Par 67 Team scores — Sutherlin 429, La Pine 447, Cottage Grove 515, McKenzie DNF, Sweet Home DNF. Medalist — Brooke Spencer, Sutherlin, 92. LA PINE (447) — Samantha McPherson 46-52—98, Haley Clark 49-52—101, Taylor Tavares 51-61—122, Bridget McDonald 65-61—126, Ashley Ferns 68-75—143. SUTHERLIN (429) — Brooke Spencer 45-47—92, Karly Powell 49-50—99, Jessica Reeves 59-60—119, Emily Ott 5762—119, Bethany Spellgatti 85-72—137, Jadyn Baird DNF. COTTAGE GROVE (515) — Demi Maus 49-51—100, Rachel Meyers 63-59—122, Kaitlyn Erner 61-69—130, Caitlyn Harris 76-87—163.

LACROSSE Boys Sisters 6, Summit 4

(Sweet) has been swinging the bat, you had to let him hit.” Sweet responded to the challenge and pounded a gamewinning single up the middle, scoring Bellandi from second base. “Sweet, Reddick, Rooks, they all had great games,” said Colt, whose team hosts Bend again on Wednesday. “Kevin (Hamann) set the tone on the mound and they all kind of followed him.” Hirko, who pitched a complete game as well, took the loss for the Lava Bears. Bend High, which recorded no extra-base hits, was led at the plate by Lucas Degaetano’s RBI sacrifice fly.

Calendar Continued from D6

HIKING HIKING CENTRAL OREGON RIVERS: Central Oregon Community College course; classroom session Tuesday, April 19, 3-5 p.m.; field sessions Thursdays, April 21-May 12, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; field trips will explore the streamsides of the Metolius, Deschutes, McKenzie and Fall rivers; distances 5-8 miles in length; fit beginner to moderate hiking; return times vary and field sessions held in all weather conditions; $85; 541-3837270; http://noncredit.cocc.edu/. HIKING THE CENTRAL OREGON DESERT: Central Oregon Community College course; classroom session Monday, April 18, 3-5 p.m.; four field sessions Wednesdays, April 20-May 11, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; field trips will visit different trails in the area; distances 5-8 miles in length; fit beginner to moderate hiking; return times vary and field sessions held in all weather conditions; $85; 541-3837270; http://noncredit.cocc.edu/.

MISCELLANEOUS FREE CLIMBING DAY: Sunday, noon8 p.m.; Bend Rock Gym; check out the remodel and feed the hungry by bringing two canned or nonperishable food items for admission; 541388-6764; info@bendrockgym. com; www.bendrockgym.com. CASCADES MOUNTAINEERS ANNUAL GEAR SWAP: Wednesday; climbing and moutaineering gear; gear check-in at 5 p.m., sale 6-8 p.m.; C.O. Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas St., Bend; 541-408-3500; www.cascadesmountaineers.com. OPEN TUMBLING: Saturday; 3-4 p.m.; ages 5-11; instructor will be on duty to help with beginning rolls, somersaults, handstands and cartwheels; $3; RAPRD Activity Center; 541548-7275; www.raprd.org. BOWL FOR KIDS’ SAKE: Saturday, May 14, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sun Mountain Fun Center in north Bend; annual fundraiser for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Oregon; registration required; agow@bbbsco. org; 541-312-6047; www.bbbsco.org. LULULEMON BOOT CAMP: Wednesdays at 10:30 a.m.; 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; focuses on sportspecific drills, cardiovascular training and core strength exercises; for all ability levels; free; bring water bottle and sweat towel; Megan Hill; 541480-5039 or Salt Fit on Facebook. SPRING FENCING: For fitness and competition; for youths 10 and older, and adults; Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 5:30-7 p.m.; at High Desert Fencing in Bend; Randall, 541-389-4547; Jeff, 541-419-7087. BABY BOOTCAMP: Wednesdays at 10 a.m. at Fleet Feet Sports Bend, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave; bridget. cook@babybootcamp.com. FITNESS 101: Classes in yoga, Pilates, cardio, weight training and indoor cycling at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center in Bend; four-week series of progressive classes that begins with the basics and helps build fitness and confidence to participate in group exercise classes; program fee includes facility pass and access to fitness classes; $55 for district residents, $74 otherwise; 541-389-7665. TUMBLING/BEGINNING GYMNASTICS: Ages 5-11; Mondays and Wednesdays, May 2-25; 6:457:30 p.m.; basic exercises such as rolls, cartwheels, handstands and low balance beam; wear comfortable clothes and hair pulled back; RAPRD Activity Center; $35; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. ARCHERY FOR YOUTH: Ages 8-13; includes proper safety, bow handling, archery etiquette; Thursdays, April 7-28; 5:30-7 p.m.; equipment provided; at CentWise, 533 S.W. 5th St., Redmond; $25; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. ACROVISION TAEKWONDO: For those ages 6 and up; Tuesdays and Thursdays, May 3-26; 7-8 p.m. at the RAPRD Activity Center in Redmond; students will train in a complete martial arts system; uniforms are required and will be available for purchase; $69; 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org. DIANE’S RIDING CENTER: For ages 7-14; learn proper skills and care for horse, and how to ride; Saturdays, April 2-23, 1-2 p.m. at Diane’s Riding Center in Tumalo; $100; 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org. FENCING: High Desert Fencing in Bend welcomes newcomers and former fencers; Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m.; free first session; Randall at 541-3894547 or Jeff at 541-419-7087. OPEN ROLLER SKATING: For all ages and ability levels; $5 per skater (includes skate rental), children under 5 are free; Tuesdays, 12:303:30 p.m.; Wednesdays, 1-4 p.m.; Fridays, 2-5 p.m. and 6-9 p.m.; Saturdays, 1-4 p.m. and 6-9 p.m.; Sundays, 1-4 p.m. 541-330-1183; callie@cascadeindoorsoccer.com; www.cascadeindoorsports.com. SHOOTERS CLINIC: Learn about and fire the six-shooters, lever action rifles and shotguns of Cowboy Action Shooting; Saturday, May 14, 1:30-4:40 p.m.; guns and ammo provided; at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20, milepost 24; free; 541-3856021; www.hrp-sass.com. BEND TABLE TENNIS CLUB: Evening play every Monday; 6-9 p.m. (setup a half hour before); beginner classes available, cost is $60; at Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; drop-in fee, $5 for adults, $3 for youths and

seniors; Jeff at 541-480-2834; Don at 541-318-0890; Sean at 267-6146477; bendtabletennis@yahoo. com; www.bendtabletennis.com. AMERICAN POOLPLAYERS ASSOCIATION LEAGUE: Nine-ball play Monday and Wednesday nights; eight-ball on Thursdays; 7 p.m.; amateurs of all ability levels encouraged; Randee Lee at rlee973@comcast.net or Marshall Fox at Fox’s Billiard Lounge, 937 N.W. Newport Ave., 541-6471363; www.foxsbilliards.com.

MULTI-SPORT UP THE CROOKED RIVER DUATHLON: Saturday, May 14; 10 a.m.; 5K run-40K bike-5K run or 2-mile walk-10-mile bike-2-mile walk; $40-$80; individuals and teams; start/finish at Pioneer Park in Prineville; 541-416-0455; normsxtreme@bendbroadband. com; www.normsxtremefitness. com/duathalon.htm.

PADDLING KAYAKING: For all ages; weekly classes and open pool; equipment provided to those who preregister, first come, first served otherwise; Sundays, 4-6 p.m., Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $3; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. KAYAK ROLL SESSIONS: At Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, Bend; Sundays through the end of May; indoor pool available Sundays, 4:15– 6 p.m.; space is limited to 12 boats; registration is available beginning the Monday before each roll session at https://register.bendparksandrec. org; boats must be clean and paddles padded and taped to prevent damage to the pool; no instruction is provided; $8-$10 per boat.

RUNNING BAREFOOT RUNNING CLINIC: Today and Thursday; 6 p.m. both days; $20; includes classroom session on techniques, video analysis, discussion of minimalist footwear and outdoor practice session; first session at Rebound Physical Therapy, second session at Sawyer Park; space limited; rod@fleetfeetbend.com. LITTLE FOOT RUNNING GROUP: Mondays and Wednesdays, April 4-May 25; 4:30-5:30 p.m.; at Pine Nursery Park in Bend; for children in grades one through five (kindergartners welcome with parent); $10, includes membership in Central Oregon Running Klub (CORK), T-shirt and water bottle; promotes fitness, fun and the joy of running; all ability levels welcome; littlefootcork-youth.blogspot.com; cork.youth.running@gmail.com. CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE MAY RACE SERIES: 6 Mile Relay, Thursday, May 5, 5:30 p.m.; Jungle Run, Thursday, May 12, 5:30 p.m.; 16th Annual Storm the Stairs; Thursday, May 26, 5:30 p.m.; Bill Douglass; 541-3837794; bdouglass@cocc.edu. NO BOUNDARIES 5K TRAINING PROGRAM: Seven-week training program for local 5K races; starts Saturday at 8:30 a.m.; includes coaching, training program, Tshirt and group runs; $75; sign up online or at Fleet Feet Sports Bend; www.fleetfeetbend.com. LIGHT OF HOPE: Sunday; at Riverbend Park, Bend; 9 a.m.; 10K, 5K and 1K runs/walks; $10-$35; proceeds benefit CASA of Central Oregon; 541-3891618; www.casaofcentraloregon.org. RYSA 5K RUN/WALK: Saturday, April 30; 10 a.m.; supports Redmond Youth Soccer Association; $10-$20, children 12 and under participate for free; http://redmondsoccer. org/page/rysa-fun-runwalk-canyon; www.footzonebend.com. SALMON RUN: Saturday, May 7; 10K and 5K runs/walks and kids run; 9 a.m.; Riverbend Park, Bend; $5-$25; 541385-6908, ext. 10; envirocenter.org. TRIUMPH FOR AVREY 5K RUN/ WALK: Saturday, May 7; 10 a.m.; Sam Johnson Park, Redmond; $25; proceeds will benefit Avrey Walker, who is battling leukemia; 541-350-5547; avrey@ triumphfit.com; http://triumphfit. com/Triumph_for_Avery_5K.html. LA PINE HIGH SCHOOL CONGRATS GRADS RUN: Sunday, May 8; fundraiser for LPHS grad-night party; 5K run/walk; $20-$25; registration forms located at Sabai Wellness Center and Anytime Fitness in La Pine; Jennifer; 541-610-6355. HAPPY GIRLS HALF: Saturday, May 29; Bend; includes half-marathon and 5K; 9 a.m.; Happy Little Girls Run (May 28, ages 3-10); $20-$90, depending on race distance; www.happygirlsrun.com. HIGH PERFORMANCE TRAINING: The Art and Science of Distance Running: today-June 4, 5:30 p.m. on Tuesdays and Saturdays; eight-week program designed to improve performance in half-marathon, 10K or 5K; scientific approach including monitoring of heart rate and blood lactate; $325; 541385-3062; timothypgibbons@yahoo. com; www.athleticclubofbend.com. REDMOND OREGON RUNNING KLUB: 4-to-8-mile weekly run starting at 8 a.m.; runners of all ages and abilities welcome; follow “Redmond Oregon Running Klub” on Facebook for weekly meeting place or email Dan Edwards; rundanorun1985@gmail.com.

FOOTZONE WOMEN’S RUNNING GROUP: Sundays at 9 a.m.; distances and locations vary; paces between seven and 11 minutes per mile; free; no registration necessary; Jenny; 541-314-3568; jenny@footzonebend.com. GOOD FORM CLINIC: Tuesdays and Saturdays; learn the basics of good running form and what it can do to improve efficiency, reduce injury and make you faster; at FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St.; RSVP; free; 541-3173568; shawn@footzonebend.

com; footzonebend.com. LEARN TO RUN WORKSHOPS: Program for Heaven Can Wait 5K run/walk starts Wednesday, April 27; LTR Redmond starts Tuesday, May 3, practices held at 6 p.m. at American Legion Park; $50 early registration; FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St.; 541-317-3568; info@ learntorunfun.com; shawn@footzone. com; www.footzonebend.com. STRENGTH TRAINING FOR ATHLETES: 6:30 p.m. on Mondays at Fleet Feet Sports Bend, 1320 Galveston Ave.; Cynthia Ratzman from Accelerated Fitness leads workout; $5; 541-389-1601. DIRTY HALF TRAINING RUNS: Sunday, 7-mile run; Sunday, May 1, 9-10 miles; Sunday, May 8, 11 miles; Sunday, May 22, full-course preview; 8 a.m.; Phil’s Trailhead; FootZone of Bend; free; 541-3173568; shawn@footzone.com. PERFORMANCE RUNNING GROUP: 5:30 p.m. on Tuesdays at FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St.; local running standout Max King leads workout; mking@reboundspl.com. FOOTZONE NOON RUNS: Noon on Wednesdays at FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St.; run up to 7-mile loop with shorter options; free; 541-317-3568. WEEKLY RUNS: 6 p.m. on Wednesdays, at Fleet Feet Sports Bend, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave.; 3 to 5 miles; two groups, different paces; 541-389-1601. DISCOUNT SIGN-UP DAY: For Sunriver Marathon for a Cause in September; Saturday, April 23; discount off registration fee and entry for raffle; FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3173568; shawn@footzone.com. FUNCTIONAL FITNESS WORKOUT FOR RUNNERS: Thursdays starting at 6 p.m. at FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St.; personal trainer Kyle Will will help participants strengthen muscle groups to help avoid common injuries; $5; 541-330-0985. RUNS WITH CENTRAL OREGON RUNNING KLUB (CORK): 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Drake Park in Bend; runs of various lengths; free; runsmts@gmail.com. FOAM ROLLER CLINIC: Sunday, 10 a.m.; FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St.; learn basic myofacial routine using foam roller for pain relief, relaxation and recovery; $5; 541317-3568; shawn@footzone.com.

are eligible; visit website for information on open gyms, clinics and tryouts; www.cascadealliance.org.

SWIMMING BEND WAVES WATER POLO CLUB GARAGE SALE: Fundraiser for club, a nonprofit organization open to youth players ages 13-18 for recreational and competitive water polo; Saturday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; 1861 S.E. Autumnwood Court; includes clothing, household goods, toys and more; 541-815-7927; http:// bendwaves.clubspaces.com. SWIM-A-THON: Saturday; 9-11 a.m.; fundraiser for Cascade Aquatic Club; donations accepted beginning Friday; at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; free for spectators; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. WATERBABIES: Basic water skills for infants and toddlers; ages 6 months through 3 years; games and challenges; Tuesdays and Thursdays, May 3-26; 6-6:30 p.m.; at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $28.50; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. AQUA KIDS SWIM LESSONS: Ages 3-11; variety of days and times; next session begins May 2; at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. ADULT SWIM-STROKE CLINIC: For those age 18 and older; some swimming experience required; meets Mondays and Wednesdays, April 11-May 4, 6-6:30 p.m.; Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $28.50; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. SPRINGBOARD DIVING: For all ages; must be able to swim one length of the pool; Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, April 11-29, 7:25-8:25 p.m. at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $32; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. COSMIC SWIM: For middle school students only (student ID required); Saturday and April 30, 8-10 p.m.; Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $2.50; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org.

WALKING WALK MS CENTRAL OREGON WALK 2011: Saturday; 10 a.m.; Riverbend Park, Bend; 5 kilometers; no entry fee, but minimum of $100 in fundraising suggested; http:// walkorc.nationalmssociety.org/ site/TR/Walk/ORCWalkEvents?fr_ id=16551&pg=entry.

SCUBA DIVING BASIC BEGINNER SCUBA CLASSES: Central Oregon Scuba Academy at Cascade Swim Center in Redmond, ongoing. Scuba certification available for adults and kids age 12 and older; refresher and dive industry career classes for certified divers; cost varies; Rick Conners, 541-312-2727 or 541-287-2727.

SNOW SPORTS WESTERN REGION ELITE FIS SPRING SERIES DH: FridayApril 20; at Mt. Bachelor ski area; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MAY DAY RACE: April 29-May 1; at Mt. Bachelor ski area; for children 7-14; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. YOUTH ICE HOCKEY: Sundays through April; 5:30-7 p.m.; Sunriver Village Ice Rink; all youth players ages 6-14 are welcome for skating, drills and scrimmaging; bring own equipment; Scott Wallace; 541.480.6721. NORDIC SKI LESSONS: Central Oregon Nordic Club and Pine Mountain Sports provide a free personal lesson and free ski rental to those who wish to learn to nordic ski; highly experienced CONC volunteers from CONC will teach the basics; e-mail bendskibuddy@ gmail.com to set up a lesson. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC SKIING: Programs conducted at Virginia Meissner Snopark on Century Drive southwest of Bend; transportation provided from Bend; Development Team for ages 11-18; Youth Club for ages 7-11; times vary; www.bendenduranceacademy. org; 541-678-3865.

SOCCER MEN’S SOCCER LEAGUE: Registration now available for Cascade Area Soccer Association men’s competitive outdoor league; season lasts from mid-April until early October; Joe Oberto; 541-3229686; joberto@bendcable.com. PEE-WEE SOCCER: Ages 3-5: Fridays, April 8-22, 11-11:30 a.m.; dribbling, passing, trapping and games; shin guards and gym shoes recommended (cleats not permitted indoors); $15; RAPRD Activity Center; 541548-7275; www.raprd.org. SOCCER OPEN PLAY (ADULT): Age 14 and older; no cleats, but shinguards required; $7; Friday nights; coed 7-8:30 p.m., men 8:30-10 p.m.; Cascade Indoor Soccer, Bend; 541-330-1183; callie@cascadeindoorsoccer.com; www.cascadeindoorsports.com.

SOFTBALL RECREATIONAL SOFTBALL LEAGUES: For those age 18 and older, Redmond men’s competitive softball league and coed recreational softball league; season runs MayJuly; games will be played at High Desert Sports Complex; registration deadline is Tuesday, April 19; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. CASCADE ALLIANCE SOFTBALL: Forming teams at the 12-and-under, 14-and-under, and 16-and-under levels for tournaments in the spring and summer of 2011; all girls living in the Bend-La Pine Schools boundaries

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C OM M U N I T Y S P ORT S

D6 Tuesday, April 12, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Arts Continued from D1 Echoing Graff, Knittel also believes finding the right instructor is paramount. “Regardless of what style you’re going to be in, if the instructor is not someone that you personally respect or not very skilled in their martial art or not a very good teacher, then you just don’t want to bother with that,� Knittel says. “The martial arts journey is a long-term thing, and it’s something that affects multiple areas of your life, and you want to be with somebody that you trust.� To help determine an instructor’s competence, Graff recommends researching whether that instructor (or school) is associated with any of their discipline’s governing bodies or federations, or possesses any relevant certifications. Judo and taekwondo, for example, are both Olympic sports and require certain certifications to compete at those elite levels — and such certifications can be indicators of competency. Knittel adds that observing classes at prospective schools can also be useful, to see instructors in action. She suggests aspiring martial artists take a week to attend class at a different school each day to get a feel for the instructor at each school. She also recommends asking potential instructors to demonstrate high-level skills and answer questions such as how long they have been training and how long it took them to earn their black belt, all of which can be indicators of proficiency. And taking up one discipline does not mean that martial artists cannot pursue others. Gaining experience in different disciplines can yield a more well-rounded martial artist. “We really believe in that,� says Knittel, who also trains in mixed martial arts at Smith Martial Arts in Bend. (Sortor also trains in jiujitsu at Bend’s Roy Dean Academy.) “Actually, it’s part of our curriculum that when you’re a red belt, you have to go out and train either at another school or with another instructor or find some other way to broaden your training outside of what we teach here, just so that you can enhance your martial arts on your own, making the journey your own.� The martial arts “journey� can be a fulfilling one. Both Knittel and Graff point out the holistic nature of the sport that extends beyond the physical into an individual’s mental, spiritual and emotional makeup. The journey can also be lifelong. Some schools offer classes to students as young as 3 or 4 years old, and martial artists can continue to practice their chosen disciplines well into adulthood. By and large, the sport is also affordable. Prices vary by school, but an Internet search of some area schools yielded prices between $30 and $70 per month, per student. Another cost factor is that students do not have to invest in lots of equipment year after year. Besides a uniform, students may purchase sparring gear and weapons, when necessary, but those are not regular purchases. Martial arts can also be an activity in which the entire family can participate. Dyana Wurth’s children started taking taekwondo classes at High Desert Martial Arts about two years ago. Her husband soon joined them, and Wurth herself picked up the sport this past December. Wurth appreciates the self-defense skills she is learning, along with the fitness benefits. She has also noticed improvements in physical flexibility in her three kids, who range in age from 4 to 9. Plus, she notes, the

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BASEBALL

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

D’Ann Johnson hits through a plastic board that simulates the strength of a wooden board during a martial arts class Friday at High Desert Martial Arts.

If you go The following is a selection of martial arts schools in Central Oregon.

BEND Acrovision Sports Center 63255 Jamison St. 541-388-5555 www.acrovisionsportscenter. com What: taekwondo, judo and jiujitsu Bend Aiki Martial Arts 63076 N.E. 18th St. No. 200 541-317-9696 www.bendaikido.com What: aikido, aikijujutsu and qigong Bend Karate Club 502 N.E. Revere Ave. 541-382-3892 www.bendkarateclub.com What: shotokan karate Bend Martial Arts Club 222 S.E. Reed Market Road No. 400 541-617-3949 www.bendmartialartsclub.com What: taekwondo, tai chi, kung fu, kickboxing

Desert Dogs MMA-Fitness 20 N.E. Greenwood 541-306-0949 What: MMA, Brazilian jiujitsu, kickboxing High Desert Martial Arts 2535 N.E. Studio Road 541-647-1220 www. bendhighdesertmartialarts.com What: taekwondo, Brazilian jiujitsu Roy Dean Academy 1620 N.E. Third St. 541-390-1745 www.roydeanacademy.com What: Brazilian jiujitsu Smith Martial Arts 222 S.E. Reed Market Road No. 400 (located in Bend Martial Arts Club) 541-610-2366 smithmartialartsbend.com/ What: MMA, self-defense arts Sortor Bushido Kai Karate 63056 Lower Meadow Drive No. 120 541-385-4985 www.sortorkarate.com

school offers classes that the entire family can attend. “We can come here all together as a family and do something together,� Wurth says. Jarod Gatley, 11, a student at Sortor Karate, noticed some practical benefits from his karate training when his family recently moved from Bend to Redmond. “If I wouldn’t have taken karate, I wouldn’t have been able to move those boxes,� he says. Knittel, 27, calls her own martial arts ex-

What: karate Tang Soo Do University 924 S.E. Wilson Ave. Suite B 541-678-3767 www.tsdubend.com What: tang soo do Victor Submission Fighting Academy 490 Butler Market Road, No. 170 541-974-8116 www.erikvictor.com What: MMA, jiujitsu, kickboxing, wrestling

REDMOND Kobukan Karate & Kung Fu 915 S.W. Rimrock Way, Suite 100 541-923-9865 www.cranekarate.com

TINY TOTS BASEBALL: Through the Bend Park & Recreation District; for boys and girls ages 4-6; noncompetitive program, and focus is on motor skill development and skills such as listening and following directions; April 6-27 on Wednesday afternoons: $36 for district residents, $49 otherwise; Greg Brady, 541-7066124; Greg@bendparksandrec.org. BEND FIELDHOUSE NIGHT WORKOUTS: Friday and April 22; for players 12 and younger; work on defense, hitting and throwing; $15 per session; 541-385-5583; www.bendelks.com. BASEBALL TRYOUTS: For Deschutes National Adult Baseball Association; Sunday, May 1, at noon; at Big Sky Park and Sports Complex in northeast Bend; open to players 18 and older; $150 for season, which runs June through August; 541-410-2265; mclain@bendbaseball. com; www.bendbaseball.com. REDMOND PANTHERS BASEBALL CLUB TRYOUTS: For players ages 8-14; developmental program; players will receive custom gear and training in speed and agility, and arm strengthening and conditioning; to arrange a tryout call 541-548-5850 (daytime) or 541-788-8520 (evening), or e-mail dmerisman@united planners.com. PRIVATE LESSONS: With Ryan Jordan, a graduate of Bend High School and a former Bend Elk who played at Lane Community College and the University of La Verne; specifically for catching and hitting, but also for all positions; available after 3 p.m. on weekdays, open scheduling on weekends; at the Bend Fieldhouse or an agreed upon location; $30 per half hour or $55 per hour; discounts for multiple players in a single session, referrals or booking multiple sessions; cash only; 541-788-2722; ryan. jordan@bend.k12.or.us.

BASKETBALL THREE-ON-THREE LEAGUE: For

SISTERS Outlaw Martial Arts 1751 West McKinney Butte Road 541-719-8531 taekwondotkd.com What: taekwondo

perience “the single most important thing I’ve ever done with my life.� “It changes you into a much stronger, much different person,� she adds. “It takes all the best parts of you and enhances those. It helps you recognize your weaknesses and work on those. It allows you to really clearly see your weaknesses so that you can turn them into strengths.� Amanda Miles can be reached at 541-3830393 or at amiles@bendbulletin.com.

boys in grades three through eight who plan to attend Summit High School; Mondays and Wednesdays, April 18-May 25; 6-8 p.m.; will also include work in ballhandling, shooting and one-on-one moves: $135 through April 15, $150 otherwise (cost can be prorated based on availability for attendance); 541-322-3347; daniel.munson@bend.k12.or.us.

BIKING ROLLER RUMBLE BIKE RACE: today, 6:30 p.m.; Silver Moon tap room; $5 for racers, $3 for spectators; 541-6107460; info@bendvelo.com. MOUNTAIN AND ROAD BIKE RIDES: Join Trinity Bikes in Redmond Mondays or Wednesdays for evening rides; road bike ride from shop on Mondays and mountain bike ride at Peterson Ridge in Sisters or Phil’s Trail complex in Bend on Wednesdays; all riding levels welcome; bring own bike or rent from the shop; Trinity Bikes; 541-923-5650; www.trinitybikes.com. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CYCLING PROGRAMS: Includes options in youth development, junior teams, U23/collegiate teams, after-school programs; camps, races and shuttles; age 6 and older; mountain biking, road cycling, freeride mountain biking and cyclocross; info@ bendenduranceacdemy.org; www. bendenduranceacdemy.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION CYCLING PROGRAM: Classes in both mountain and road biking are offered starting end of April through August; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org, www.mbsef.org. WEEKLY RIDE: Saturdays, noon; weekly group road rides starting from Nancy P’s Baking Co., 1054 Milwaukee Ave. in Bend; Glen Bates, glenbates@ bendcable.com, 541-382-4675.

See Calendar / D5

COMMUNITY SCOREBOARD GYMNASTICS REDMOND GYMNASTICS ACADEMY Optional State Eugene March 26 RGA Individual Results (Vault, bars, beam, floor and allaround; scores and places) Level 7 Lydia Bourne, Jr 11-12C: 8.95 (9th); 9.25 (2nd); 9.125 (7th); 9.125 (T5th); 36.45 (4th). Oregon Compulsory Invitational Eugene March 27th Level 4 Maddisen Olmeda, Ch 6-7: 9.05 (T8th); 9.375 (1st); 8.9 (2nd); 9.225 (3rd); 36.55 (1st). Gabriella Weeks, Ch 6-7: 9.3 (4th); 7.4 (10th); 7.35 (10th); 8.7 (5th); 32.75 (9th). Rachel Weeks, Jr 8-9: 9.4 (4th); 9.55 (2nd); 8.9 (5th); 9.05 (T6th); 36.9 (3rd). Maelynn Phanco, Jr 8-9: 9.5 (2nd); 8.75 (8th); 8.0 (11th); 8.8 (10th); 35.05 (9th).

Mindy McArdle, Sr 10-12: 9.4 (5th); 9.35 (3rd); 9.05 (4th); 9.225 (7th); 37.025 (2nd). Eliza Jacobson, Sr 10-12: 8.9 (13th); 9.05 (9th); 8.425 (8th); 8.65 (12th); 35.025 (12th). Level 5 Myranda Hill, Ch 7-9: 8.65 (3rd); 8.45 (T8th); 8.9 (5th); 9.375 (3rd); 35.375 (6th). Myka Delamarter, Ch 7-9: 8.15 (7th); 8.2 (11th); 7.95 (11th); 8.55 (11th); 32.85 (10th). Shelby Brooks, Jr 10-11: 7.7 (11th); 8.85 (10th); 8.225 (10th); 8.7 (10th); 33.475 (10th). Beth Fisher, Sr 12-13: 7.75 (6th); 8.6 (6th); 8.55 (7th); 8.65 (6th); 33.6 (6th).

TABLE TENNIS BEND TABLE TENNIS Giant Round Robin Tournament Bend, March 19 Championship: Michael bunker def. Kelly Pedrick Consolation winner: Steve McIntyre Women’s champion: Darlene Paterson Junior champion: Toby Pedrick Senior champion: Jim Zupancic

I B Baseball • Youth camp on tap: A youth baseball camp for T-ball players through eighth-graders is scheduled for Saturday at Redmond High School. The camp, being hosted by the Redmond High baseball program, will focus on skill sets and fundamentals. Players will receive instruction from Redmond High baseball head coach Marc Horner and members of the varsity squad. Registration will be held at 10:30 a.m., and the camp will run from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Redmond High varsity baseball field. Cost is $20 per player or $30 total for families with two or more siblings attending. Funds raised will be used for field maintenance. For more information, contact Horner at 541-480-8573. • Redmond youth team nabs second place in tournament: The Redmond Panthers Baseball Club 12U team placed second over the weekend in The Dalles Cherry

Festival baseball tournament. After losing to Hood River in their second game of the tournament and dropping into the losers bracket, the Panthers won an elimination game against McMinnville to advance to the final. In the final, the Panthers needed to defeat Hood River twice. They won the first game 12-2 before losing 2-1 and settling for second place.

Rugby • Blues back on winning track: The Bend Blues boys rugby club bounced back Saturday from its first loss of the season by thumping the Linn Benton Lions 57-0 at Big Sky Park in Bend. The win improved the Blues’ record to 3-1 for the season, good for second place in the current Rugby Oregon Division I standings. Connor Crossley led the Blues with 17 points, scoring on three tries and a conversion. Manny Pueblo, Willie Abt, Emory Babb,

Cory Babb, Colton Nye and Dre Golden all added one try apiece, and Pueblo also tacked on five conversions. The Blues’ next game is scheduled for 1 p.m. Saturday, when the club takes on the Barbarians of Beaverton at Big Sky Park.

Water Polo • Bend Waves club fundraiser scheduled: The Bend Waves Water Polo Club is planning a garage sale fundraiser Saturday. The garage sale is scheduled to run from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 1861 S.E. Autumnwood Court in Bend. Expected sale items include household goods, clothing and toys. The Bend Waves Water Polo Club is a nonprofit organization open to youth players ages 13-18 for recreational and competitive water polo. For more information about the Bend Waves, call 541-815-7927 or go to bendwaves.clubspaces.com. — Bulletin staff reports

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COMMUNITY LIFE

FACES AND PLACES OF THE HIGH DESERT Inside

‘Game of Thrones’

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

HBO to debut a heroic fantasy for skeptics, Page E2

www.bendbulletin.com/communitylife

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, APRIL 12, 2011

Schwab adds Pink Martini, Krauss, Bentley to series lineup

E

WORDS WITHOUT WALLS

Paulina Elementary School, home of the Buckaroos, employs a handful of staff to work with the few dozen students who attend the school.

Speaking figuratively

By Ben Salmon The Bulletin

The Nature of Words program teaches writing to Paulina youth

Alison Krauss & Union Station, Pink Martini and Dierks Bentley have been added to the summer concert lineup at Bend’s Les Schwab Amphitheater, the venue announced over the weekend. Tickets to all three shows go on sale at 10 a.m. Friday, available at the Schwab’s website, www. bendconcerts.com, or at The Ticket Mill (541-3185457) in Bend’s Old Mill District. The website will also hold a presale on Thursday, when buyers must enter a password — rockchucks — to purchase. Here are the dates and ticket prices for each show: • Krauss, a bluegrass superstar touring behind her new album “Paper Airplane,” will play the amphitheater July 9. Ticket prices range from $39 to $62, plus fees. • Portland’s cosmopolitan mini-orchestra Pink Martini will return to Schwab on July 23. Tickets cost $33 (general) and $63 (reserved), plus fees. • Country star Bentley will make his first appearance in Bend on Aug. 10. Tickets cost $37 (general) and $59 (reserved), plus fees. Those shows join dates by Death Cab for Cutie (May 27), The Decemberists (May 29) and Ween (July 2) on the amphitheater’s summer slate. More shows are expected to be announced. For more information, visit www.bendconcerts. com or call 541-318-5457.

By David Jasper The Bulletin

O

Ben Salmon can be reached at 541-383-0377 or bsalmon@bendbulletin.com.

Courtesy Danny Clinch

Country star Dierks Bentley will perform Aug. 10 at Les Schwab Amphitheater in Bend. Summer concert season kicks off Memorial Day weekend with Death Cab for Cutie.

Third-grader Wyatt Waliser assists first-grader Jesse Luttrell as he reads his essay about his favorite spot in the mountains.

SPOTLIGHT Genealogy group plans seminar Bend Genealogical Society’s spring seminar will feature genealogist and entertainer Henry Z. “Hank” Jones Jr., who is a Fellow of the American Society of Genealogists and a National Genealogy Society award winner. He has written books on the Palatine immigration to the United States and has been featured in Walt Disney films and appeared on TV shows such as “Mork & Mindy” and “The Jeffersons.” Jones will present four sessions: “When the Sources are Wrong,” “Tracing the Origins of Early 18th Century Palatine & Other Emigrants,” “Family Tradition: How to Separate Fact from Fiction in Genealogical Research” and “How Psychic Roots Became an ‘Unsolved Mystery.’ ” The Bend Genealogical Society is “an Oregon nonprofit dedicated to providing resources for researching, teaching, exchanging and preserving the records of family history,” according to the group’s website. The seminar will be held at the Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 14. Registration is required. Seminar fee $70 ($60 for society members) through May 7. After May 7, the fee is $85 for all registrants. Registration includes continental breakfast, lunch and all seminar materials. A reception for seminar registrants will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. May 13 at Williamson Hall at Rock Arbor Villa, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend. The evening will include hors d’oeuvres and an opportunity to meet Jones. To register call 541-317-9553, 541-317-8979 or visit www.orgenweb.org/deschutes/bend-gs. — From staff reports

PAULINA — n the sunny last day of March, 39 students filed into the gym at Paulina Elementary School in eastern Crook County to do a very brave thing. The students, in kindergarten through eighth grade, stood up — some a head shorter than the microphone, others towering over it — to read personal essays to peers and parents. Several of the kids told The Bulletin their fathers are cowboys, and at least one camcorder-wielding dad in the crowd sported a cowboy hat and handlebar mustache. Several mothers sat holding babies or trying to corral toddlers, eventually moving to the rear of the gym with their restless young ones. For those who could listen closely during the one-hour program, the essays’ themes of horseback riding, tree climbing and hunting pointed to the close ties people living in Paulina — a rural community 56 miles east of Prineville — have with nature. Mindy Rice, 27, mother to first-grader Matti Rice, said before the program began that she didn’t think her daughter would be nervous reading to an audience: “She loves people. She’s not very shy. She’ll do great.” When Matti did take the stage about 20 minutes later, she told the audience she’d written about her favorite place: school. “I like to eat yummy burritos,” she read, adding that riding down the school’s “big slide, shiny silver slide” feels like flying. Matti and the other students had written their essays a couple of weeks earlier with instruction provided by writer-in-residence Neil Browne, an Oregon State University-Cascades associate professor of English who’d spent a week working in the school. See Paulina / E6

Parents, students and siblings listen to readings at Paulina Elementary School on March 31. As part of The Nature of Words’ Words Without Walls program, students spent a week working with writer-inresidence Neil Browne.

Big Summit Prairie

22 26

Prineville Pau

lina

Hig

42

Ochoco National Forest hwa y

Post Crooked River

Paulina

Ochoco National Forest

Photos by David Jasper / The Bulletin

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Neil Browne speaks before the student readings March 31 at Paulina Elementary School.


T EL EV ISION

E2 Tuesday, April 12, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Open minds are useful when discussing God with children

‘Thrones’ a heroic fantasy for skeptics By Dave Itzkoff

‘Game of Thrones’

New York Times News Service

Dear Abby: I would like to respond to “Agnostic Dad in South Carolina” (Feb. 16), who wondered about how to answer the inevitable “Is there a God?” question his children will ask. My parents had strong but differing Christian faiths. They compromised when bringing us up, and we went to the church nearest our home (another denomination). Further, when we were teens, they allowed us to “sample” other religious traditions to determine what would suit us best. I became agnostic, and like “Dad in S.C.,” was unsure what to tell my son. My husband and I do not belong to any organized religion and didn’t take him to church as a youngster. Instead, we introduced stories from the Bible at bedtime, and allowed him to attend his friends’ churches when he asked to. More important, we showed him that all people are to be valued and that differences are to be respected. Our son is now in his late 20s. He’s a gentle, caring person with an interest in people from other cultures, religions and circumstances. Whether he is agnostic, religious or an atheist is a personal matter to him. He’s comfortable with his beliefs and doesn’t impose them on anyone else. As a parent, I couldn’t ask for more. — Free-thinking Mom In Washington Dear Mom: Thank you for writing. Many readers were eager to offer guidance on this subject to a fellow parent. Read on: Dear Abby: Despite eight years of Catholic education, I’m an atheist. My wife is a Lutheran. We’ve never argued about it because we feel everyone has a right to religious freedom. We have three sons, whom she took to church and Sunday school regularly with my complete support. We discussed in advance

541-322-CARE

DEAR ABBY what our answer should be when the God question came up. Our response was: “Some people believe there is a God and others do not. You will get a sound religious education, and when the time comes, you will decide for yourself.” Our sons are now adults with families. Two are religious; one is not. At family meals we join hands and say grace. Some recite it — some just listen — and everybody’s happy. — Harmonious in Illinois Dear Abby: There is no problem for “Agnostic” and his wife to “handle.” If his children ask if there’s a God, he should model honesty for them and say what he thinks. So should his wife. If the kids get two different answers, they will learn that not everyone shares the same opinion. Suggesting that “Dad” not express his view plainly, without input from his wife, amounts to recommending that they collude in providing a dishonest answer. — Emeritus Professor of Philosophy in Iowa Dear Abby: My husband and I are agnostic parents of two adult children, both of whom are tolerant, open-minded and decent people. My advice to “Dad” is to read some of the excellent books that are available about discussing God and religion with children. He should also look into the Unitarian Universalist church, which does not push any one creed but encourages people to find their own beliefs in a supportive environment. — Nancy H. in Texas Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

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Before he published “A Game of Thrones,” the first in his series of best-selling novels set on the mythical continent of Westeros, George R.R. Martin spent about a decade in an all-too-real place called Hollywood. For five years, he happily wrote for television shows with supernatural themes, like “The Twilight Zone” and “Beauty and the Beast”; and for five more he toiled discontentedly on television pilots and movie scripts that never made it, usually because an executive or producer decided they were too ambitious. “The reaction was inevitably, ‘George, this is great,’” Martin, 62, recalled, speaking by phone from his home in Santa Fe, N.M. “‘It’s terrific, it’s a wonderful read, thanks. But it’s three times our budget. We can’t possibly make it.’” But Martin did not give up his epic dreams, and packed “A Game of Thrones” and the novels that followed (a series known collectively as “A Song of Ice and Fire”) with seven kingdoms’ worth of feuding feudal families, complex genealogies, deceptions and betrayals, dragons and mysterious, violent creatures called the Others. Bantam Books, which publishes Martin’s “Song of Ice and Fire” novels, said there are more than 4.5 million copies of these books in print in the U.S. Naturally he takes some satisfaction that, some 15 years after spurning the entertainment industry for its lack of imagination, a “Game of Thrones” television series is now days away from its debut. As Martin put it, “The project that I thought most unlikely to ever be filmed — the project that was actually unfilmable — is now going to be this big show on HBO.” “Game of Thrones,” whose

When: 9 p.m. Sunday Where: HBO

Robert Yager / New York Times News Service

David Benioff, left, and D.B. Weiss, writers for the series, “Game of Throne,” based on the novels by George R.R. Martin, in Los Angeles on March 28. Recognizing that the novels couldn’t be condensed into films, Benioff and Weiss sought to adapt them as a television series for HBO. first episode will be shown Sunday, is not only a prominent opportunity for Martin’s work to be introduced to a wider audience, but also a bold rejoinder to its creator’s skepticism. It is also a crucial and potentially costly test for HBO. The network has built its originalprogramming brand on the verisimilitude of shows from “The Sopranos” to “Boardwalk Empire,” and is about to learn if viewers will embrace a series whose veneer of medieval drama conceals more fanciful and mystical layers. “You put a crab in hot water, he’ll jump right out,” Martin said. “But you put him in cold water and you gradually heat it up — the hot water is fantasy and magic, and the crab is the audience.” In 2006 Martin’s books were sent to the writer-producer David Benioff (screenwriter of “Troy” and “25th Hour”), who enlisted his friend and fellow writer D.B. Weiss to see if they might be adaptable for film or television. Though the writers were initially put off by the heft of the novels (which run about 800 pages each), they were won

over by characters like Eddard Stark, a lord torn between loyalty to his family and his loutish king, and Tyrion Lannister, a high-born dwarf with a fondness for brothels. Benioff, who described himself as a lapsed fantasy reader, said he had become tired of a field crowded with J.R.R. Tolkien rip-offs. “Whenever you have the epic conflict of good and evil,” he said, “it becomes the most predictable story line ever, because we all know who’s going to win.” But Martin’s novels, he said, were “adult fantasy, and not in the ‘Heavy Metal,’ giant-breasted Valkyrie way.” Weiss added: “Nobody’s doing something because they’re evil or they’re good. Everybody’s doing something because they’re following their own very realistic and complex self-interests.” Recognizing the novels couldn’t be condensed into films, Benioff

and Weiss sought to adapt them as a television series for HBO, but had to pass several trials along the way. The first was winning over Martin in a lunchtime meeting that was mostly collegial, but where Weiss and Benioff were quizzed about the parents of Jon Snow, a “Game of Thrones” character of mysterious lineage. (“We had a whole conversation about it,” Benioff said, “and George was pleased that we got the answer right.”) HBO executives seemed more skeptical in a later pitch session (“They were kind of like: ‘What the hell are you talking about? Dragons?’” Weiss said) but commissioned a pilot script. In 2007 HBO underwent a change in creative leadership, and the “Game of Thrones” team feared the project could be lost in the shuffle, particularly Martin, who was having flashbacks to his screenwriting career. “I did have a few days there where I went, ‘Oh my God, it’s happening again,’” he said. The network’s new management was also uncertain about “Game of Thrones.” “The books had what I’ll call fantasy elements,” Michael Lombardo, HBO’s president for programming, said. “I will tell you that my initial predisposition was, ‘Uhhhh, is that really HBO?’ Whatever that means.” But Lombardo said his doubts were dispelled by Benioff and Weiss’ pilot script. “The story was so captivating,” he said. “I couldn’t wait for the second episode.”

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BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

TUESDAY PRIME TIME 4/12/11 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW # KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 173 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

5:00

5:30

KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! With Ruff News Nightly News King of Queens King of Queens Hidden China Avec Eric ’ ‘G’ Travels-Edge Steves’ Europe

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News News (N) ABC World News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ This Old House Nightly Business News News That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Richard Bangs’ Adventures This Old House Nightly Business

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘G’ Victory Garden Woodwright PBS NewsHour ’ Å

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution ‘PG’ Dancing With the Stars ‘PG’ Å The Biggest Loser The contestants travel to New Zealand. (N) ‘PG’ Å NCIS Dead Reflection (N) ’ ‘PG’ NCIS: Los Angeles Rocket Man ‘14’ Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution ‘PG’ Dancing With the Stars ‘PG’ Å Glee Duets ’ ‘14’ Å Raising Hope ’ Traffic Light ‘PG’ News on PDX-TV Are You Smarter? Are You Smarter? The President’s Photographer History Detectives ’ ‘G’ Å The Biggest Loser The contestants travel to New Zealand. (N) ‘PG’ Å One Tree Hill ’ ‘PG’ Å Hellcats ’ ‘14’ Å Woodsmith Shop The Winemakers Watercolor Quest Joy/Painting The President’s Photographer History Detectives ’ ‘G’ Å

10:00

10:30

(10:01) Body of Proof (N) ‘14’ Å Parenthood Amber quits her job. ‘14’ The Good Wife Foreign Affairs ‘14’ (10:01) Body of Proof (N) ‘14’ Å News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Frontline Football High (N) ’ Å Parenthood Amber quits her job. ‘14’ House of Payne Meet the Browns Food Trip-Todd Julia-Jacques Frontline Football High (N) ’ Å

11:00 KATU News at 11 News News News (N) Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens In the Life ‘PG’ News Roseanne ’ ‘G’ Hidden China In the Life ‘PG’

11:30 (11:35) Nightline Jay Leno Letterman (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens In the Life ‘PG’ Jay Leno Roseanne ’ ‘G’ Avec Eric ’ ‘G’ In the Life ‘PG’

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK ROOT SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Bounty Hunter The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 Last Wish ‘14’ Å The First 48 Å The First 48 Waterworld ‘PG’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 Update: Last Fare ‘PG’ 130 28 18 32 Bounty Hunter ››› “Tombstone” (1993, Western) Kurt Russell, Val Kilmer, Michael Biehn. Doc Holliday joins Wyatt Earp for the OK Corral ››› “Tombstone” (1993, Western) Kurt (2:30) ››› “Maver- ›› “The Quick and the Dead” (1995, Western) Sharon Stone, Gene Hackman, Russell Crowe. Cowgirl 102 40 39 ick” Å seeks revenge on outlaw in Redemption. Å showdown. Å Russell, Val Kilmer. Å I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å Blue Planet: Seas of Life Coasts ‘G’ Blue Planet: Seas of Life Deep ‘G’ Blue Planet: Seas of Life ‘G’ Å Blue Planet: Seas of Life Coasts ‘G’ 68 50 26 38 I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å Housewives/OC Housewives/OC Housewives/OC Bethenny Ever After Housewives/NYC Pregnant in Heels (N) ‘14’ Housewives/NYC 137 44 Cribs ‘PG’ Å The Dukes of Hazzard ‘PG’ Å The Dukes of Hazzard ‘PG’ Å ›››› “Driving Miss Daisy” (1989) Morgan Freeman, Jessica Tandy, Dan Aykroyd. ’ Å The Singing Bee ’ ‘PG’ Å Cribs ‘PG’ Å 190 32 42 53 Driving-Daisy 60 Minutes on CNBC 60 Minutes on CNBC (N) Mad Money 60 Minutes on CNBC 60 Minutes on CNBC Wealth-Risk Hair Free 51 36 40 52 Mexico’s Drug War Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 In the Arena (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ’ ‘PG’ Scrubs ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report Norm Macdonald Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Sports Show Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 South Park ‘14’ COTV Blazer Profiles PM Edition Get Outdoors Redmond City Council (N) (Live) Epic Conditions Word Travels ’ COTV Blazer Profiles Ride Guide ‘14’ Outside Presents 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 12 11 Tonight From Washington Suite/Deck Shake It Up! ‘Y’ Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Good-Charlie “16 Wishes” (2010) Debby Ryan, Jean-Luc Bilodeau. ‘G’ Shake it Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie Good-Charlie 87 43 14 39 Wizards of Waverly Place ‘G’ Å Deadliest Catch Endless ‘14’ Å Deadliest Catch: Best of Season 6 Deadliest Catch: Best of Season 6 Deadliest Catch New Blood Fresh blood join the crab fleet. (N) ‘14’ Å Deadliest Catch New Blood ’ ‘14’ 156 21 16 37 Deadliest Catch Valhalla ‘14’ Å SportsCenter Special: On the Clock Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å Baseball Tonight NFL Live (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 Year of the Quarterback (N) NFL Live Å SportsNation Å Year of the Quarterback (N) E:60 (N) SportsNation Å NBA Tonight NASCAR Now NBA Tonight Draft Special 22 24 21 24 Football Live Year of the Quarterback (N) Who’s Number 1? Å Can’t Blame Can’t Blame Yes Sir: Jack Nicklaus/’86 Masters SportsCentury College Football (N) 23 25 123 25 Year of the Quarterback Å SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Still Standing ’ Still Standing ’ America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls Merry Fisticuffs ‘PG’ Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Å Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å 5 Ingredient Fix Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Iron Chef America Cupcake Wars Survival of the Fittest Cupcake Wars Rose Parade Chopped Victory on the Brain ‘G’ Challenge Donut Champions 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa (4:00) ›› “Made of Honor” (2008) Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men › “What Happens in Vegas” (2008) Cameron Diaz, Ashton Kutcher. › “What Happens in Vegas” (2008) Cameron Diaz, Ashton Kutcher. 131 Yard Crashers Hunters Int’l House Hunters My First Place My First Place Property Virgins Property Virgins House Hunters Hunters Int’l Property Virgins Property Virgins 176 49 33 43 Bang, Your Buck Bang, Your Buck Curb/Block Battlefield Detectives ‘PG’ Å Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Å Larry the Cable Guy Larry the Cable Guy Top Shot The Shakedown (N) ‘PG’ Mounted in Al. Mounted in Al. 155 42 41 36 (4:00) April 1865 ‘PG’ Å Intervention Travis and Matt ‘14’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ American Pickers ‘PG’ Å American Pickers Playdates (N) ‘G’ Cheer! Mini All-Stars (N) ‘PG’ Å How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Ed Show (N) The Last Word The Rachel Maddow Show The Ed Show Hardball With Chris Matthews Å 56 59 128 51 The Last Word That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Silent Library (N) RJ Berger Teen Mom 2 Check Up With Dr. Drew The cast reflects. ’ ‘PG’ Teen Mom 2 Unseen Moments ‘PG’ My Life as Liz (N) Teen Mom 2 ‘PG’ 192 22 38 57 The Seven ‘PG’ SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Mariners Mariners Pre. MLB Baseball Toronto Blue Jays at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. (N) (Live) Mariners Post. The Dan Patrick Show (N) MLB Baseball 20 45 28* 26 Ball Up Streetball Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Coal A failing power supply. ’ ‘PG’ 132 31 34 46 Auction Hunters Star Trek: Enterprise ’ ‘PG’ Å Destination Truth ’ Å Destination Truth ’ Å Destination Truth (N) ’ Å Marcel’s Quantum Kitchen (N) Destination Truth ’ Å 133 35 133 45 (4:00) “Pumpkinhead: Blood Feud” Behind Scenes Joyce Meyer John Hagee Hillsong ‘G’ Å Praise the Lord (N) Å ACLJ This Week Dino ‘G’ Full Flame Å Changing-World Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 Friends ’ ‘14’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ Conan (N) 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ ››› “So Evil My Love” (1948, Suspense) Ray Milland, Ann Todd, Geraldine Fitzger- ››› “Dial M for Murder” (1954, Mystery) Ray Milland, Grace Kelly, Robert Cummings. ››› “The Safecracker” (1958, Drama) Ray Milland, Barry Jones, Victor Madden. Brit- ››› “Ministry of Fear” (1944) Ray Mil101 44 101 29 ald. British widow joins con man in Victorian crime and passion. A money-hungry man’s plot to kill his wife goes awry. Å ish Intelligence parachutes a locksmith into Belgium. land, Marjorie Reynolds. Kitchen Boss (N) Ultimate Cake Off Ballet cake. ‘PG’ Kate Plus 8 Australia Zoo Visit ‘PG’ What Not to Wear Lizzie ‘PG’ Å What Not to Wear Becca (N) ’ ‘PG’ Extreme Coupon Extreme Coupon What Not to Wear Lizzie ‘PG’ Å 178 34 32 34 Cake Boss ‘PG’ NBA Basketball San Antonio Spurs at Los Angeles Lakers (Live) Å Inside the NBA (Live) Å Bones The End in the Beginning ‘14’ 17 26 15 27 NBA Basketball Chicago Bulls at New York Knicks (Live) Å Regular Show Codename: Kids Codename: Kids Total Drama Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Scooby-Doo Hole in the Wall Adventure Time King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son All in the Family All in the Family All in the Family Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond (11:08) Roseanne (11:42) Roseanne 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Beverly Hills Love & Hip Hop Behind the Music Lil Wayne ’ ‘14’ Behind the Music Nelly ‘PG’ Å RuPaul’s Drag Race ’ ‘14’ ›› “ATL” (2006) Tip Harris. Four Atlanta teens face challenges. ’ 191 48 37 54 Undateable Hour 5 ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:15) ››› “Father of the Bride” (6:05) ››› “8 Mile” 2002, Drama Eminem, Kim Basinger. ’ ‘R’ Å ›› “Year One” 2009 Jack Black. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (9:45) ››› “Get Shorty” 1995, Comedy John Travolta. ‘R’ Å Fire Down Below ›› “Suspiria” 1977, Horror Jessica Harper, Stefania Casini. ‘R’ Å ›› “The Name of the Rose” 1986, Mystery Sean Connery. ‘R’ Å (11:15) ›› “The Fly II” 1989 ‘R’ ›› “Eyewitness” 1981, Suspense William Hurt. ‘R’ Å Danny & Dingo Danny & Dingo Vans Triple Crown (N) Å Danny & Dingo Snowboard The Daily Habit College Exp. The Daily Habit College Exp. Danny & Dingo Snowboard The Daily Habit College Exp. ›› “Caddyshack” (1980, Comedy) Chevy Chase, Rodney Dangerfield. School of Golf World of Golf Golf Central Inside PGA Tour ›› “Caddyshack” (1980, Comedy) Chevy Chase, Rodney Dangerfield. GolfNow Inside PGA Tour The Waltons The Heritage ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ‘G’ Å Frasier ‘14’ Å Frasier ’ ‘PG’ The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (4:00) ›› “Aliens in ››› “Minority Report” 2002, Science Fiction Tom Cruise, Colin Farrell, Samantha Morton. A cop tries to Making Game of › “Jonah Hex” 2010, Action Josh Brolin. A supernatural gunMildred Pierce Mildred expands her Glendale eatery; Mildred and Veda have an emoHBO 425 501 425 10 the Attic” establish his innocence in a future crime. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Thrones ’ ‘14’ slinger faces an old enemy. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å tional argument. ’ (Part 3 of 3) ‘MA’ Å (4:00) › “Maximum Overdrive” ‘R’ Onion News Portlandia ‘14’ Freaks and Geeks ’ ‘PG’ Å Whitest Kids ››› “What Alice Found” 2003, Drama Judith Ivey, Bill Raymond. ‘R’ Larry Sanders Larry Sanders Larry Sanders IFC 105 105 (4:30) ››› “Up in the Air” 2009 George Clooney. A frequent (6:20) › “Mr. Deeds” 2002 Adam Sandler. A pizza maker inher- › “Couples Retreat” 2009, Comedy Vince Vaughn, Jason Bateman. Four Midwestern ›› “Bad Boys II” 2003, Action Martin Lawrence, Will Smith, Jordi Mollà. Two detecMAX 400 508 7 flyer reaches a life-and-career crossroads. ‘R’ its a fortune from a distant relative. ‘PG-13’ couples descend on an island resort. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å tives battle a drug kingpin in Miami. ’ ‘R’ Å The Real Abraham Lincoln ‘PG’ The Conspirator The Real George Washington ‘PG’ The Real Abraham Lincoln ‘PG’ The Conspirator The Real George Washington ‘PG’ Border Wars Dirty Money ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents Fanboy-Chum The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Rocko’s Rocko’s Life NTOON 89 115 189 Driven TV Ted Nugent Hunting, Country Truth Hunting Western Extreme Dream Season Hunting TV Wild Outdoors Truth Hunting Hunting, Country Bone Collector Steve’s Outdoor Whitetail Nation Management OUTD 37 307 43 (3:45) ›› “The (5:25) ›› “Twilight” 2008, Romance Kristen Stewart, Billy Burke. iTV. A teen is caught “Make Believe” 2010 iTV Premiere. Six magicians battle for the Nurse Jackie Play United States of Nurse Jackie Play United States of Secret Diary of a “Crazy” 2008 WaySHO 500 500 title of Teen World Champion. ‘NR’ Me ’ ‘MA’ lon Payne. Joneses” 2009 up in an unorthodox romance with a vampire. ’ ‘PG-13’ Me ’ ‘MA’ Tara ‘MA’ Å Tara ‘MA’ Å Call Girl ’ ‘MA’ American Trucker Ticket to Ride (N) Barrett-Jackson Special Edition ‘PG’ Speedmakers Aston Martin ‘PG’ American Trucker Ticket to Ride Barrett-Jackson Special Edition ‘PG’ Speedmakers Aston Martin ‘PG’ NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 (5:10) ›› “The Last Song” 2010, Drama Miley Cyrus. ’ ‘PG’ Å (7:05) › “Did You Hear About the Morgans?” 2009 Hugh Grant. ‘PG-13’ ›› “The Scorpion King” 2002 The Rock. ‘PG-13’ Å (10:35) ›› “XXX” 2002 Vin Diesel. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å STARZ 300 408 300 (4:30) ››› “The Times of Harvey Milk” ›› “Nine” 2009, Musical Daniel Day-Lewis, Marion Cotillard. A famous director en›› “The Infidel” 2010, Comedy Omid Djalili, Richard Schiff, Archie Panjabi. A Muslim ›› “War, Inc.” 2008, Comedy John Cusack, Hilary Duff, Marisa Tomei. An undercover TMC 525 525 1984 Harvey Milk. ’ ‘NR’ dures creative and personal crises. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å learns that he is Jewish and an adoptee. ’ ‘NR’ Å hit man must organize a pop star’s wedding. ’ ‘R’ NHL Draft Lottery Adv. Sports World Extreme Cagefighting NHL Playoff Preview Show NHL Draft Lottery Adv. Sports World Extreme Cagefighting Brian Bowles vs. Dominick Cruz VS. 27 58 30 Bridezillas Where Are They Now? Braxton Family Values (N) ‘PG’ Sinbad It’s Just Family (N) ‘PG’ Braxton Family Values ‘PG’ Å Sinbad It’s Just Family ‘PG’ Å Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å Braxton Family Values ‘PG’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 12, 2011 E3

CALENDAR TODAY “SISSY”: A screening of the film about a girl who faces abuse from a family friend; followed by a discussion of the film; free; 6 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7412 or kroth1@cocc.edu. SIERRA CLUB HIKE PREVIEW: A preview of scenic hikes offered by the club, with slides; donations accepted; 7 p.m., 6:30 p.m. social; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-389-0785. ROLLER RUMBLE RACE SERIES: Competitors race 400 meters on bikes attached to fork-mounted rollers; $5 to race, $3 spectators; 7:30 p.m., 6:30 p.m. sign-up; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-610-7460 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com.

WEDNESDAY DINNER & A MOVIE: Featuring a nutrient-dense meal, followed by a film selected by attendees; registration requested; $17, $8 children; 5:30 p.m.; Common Table, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-639-5546 or www. centraloregonlocavore.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jane Kirkpatrick reads from her book “The Daughter’s Walk”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. MOVIE NIGHT AND POTLUCK: A screening of “The Real Dirt on Farmer John,” with a soup potluck; free; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Grandview Hall, Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; slowfoodhighdesert@gmail.com. YONDER MOUNTAIN STRING BAND: The newgrass band performs; $20 plus fees in advance, $25 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www. randompresents.com.

THURSDAY RV, BOAT SHOW AND ATV SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2011; free; 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-322-2184. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Kapitoil” by Teddy Wayne; bring a lunch; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. FAMOUS/INFAMOUS TRIALS — LIZZIE BORDEN: Carolyn Hill talks about the facts of the Lizzie Borden murders, the investigation and its outcome; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-617-4663, wwick@uoregon.edu or http://osher.uoregon.edu. STEP INTO SPRING FASHION SHOW: A fashion show, with live and silent auctions and food; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit the Bend Area Habitat for Humanity’s women’s build; $30 in advance, $35 at the door; 5:30 p.m. auction, 6:30 p.m. show; St. Charles Bend conference center, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541948-0447, pmageau@remax.net or www.centraloregonwcr.org. MANY BORDERS TO CROSS: Elaine Replogle provides historical perspective for immigration admissions and rights; free; 6:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. THE B FOUNDATION: The Los Angeles-based reggae-rock band performs, with Katastro; $10 plus fees in advance, $12 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com.

FRIDAY MY OWN TWO HANDS: Art event, themed “In the Current,” features a

parade and art stroll, and a performing arts evening at Bronco Billy’s Ranch Grill and Saloon; proceeds benefit the Sisters Americana Project; chili feed is $10 with chili, $5 without chili; 4 p.m. parade, 4:30 p.m. art stroll, 6:30 p.m. performing arts; downtown Sisters; 541-549-4979, info@sistersfolkfestival.org or www. sistersfolkfestival.org. RV, BOAT SHOW AND ATV SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2011; free; 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-322-2184. BEND SPRING FESTIVAL: A celebration of the new season with art, live music and food and drinks; free; 4-10 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives; valerie@brooksresources.com or www.nwxevents.com. EAT, PLAY, LOVE!: Dinner, play and learning activities and live music for families with young children; donations of nonperishable food encouraged; 4:30-7 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-410-1974 or www.deschutescountykids.com. VFW DINNER: A dinner of spaghetti and meatballs; proceeds benefit local veterans; $7; 5-7 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. WALK THE ART BEAT YOUTH SHOW: A spring showcase of local youth art and music at participating businesses; free; 5-8 p.m.; downtown Redmond; 541-923-2411. “CRASH”: A screening of the 2004 R-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541475-3351 or www.jcld.org.

SATURDAY GOAT JAMBOREE: Featuring classes, shopping and a raffle; $5 or $15 per family before April 11, $7 or $20 per family after April 11; 8 a.m.3:15 p.m.; Wind Ridge Farms, 60535 Bobcat Road, Bend; 541-548-2226 or COGA2010@aol.com. EARTH DAY CELEBRATION AND GARDEN WORK PARTY: Help prepare the Common Table Community Garden, located behind the church; bring a dish to share and a shovel; free; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Nativity Lutheran Church, 60850 S.E. Brosterhous Road, Bend; 541-598-6029. GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit Bend Waves Water Polo Club; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; 1861 S.E. Autumnwood Court, Bend; 541-815-7927. RV, BOAT SHOW AND ATV SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2011; free; 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-322-2184. BEND SPRING FESTIVAL: A celebration of the new season with art, live music and food and drinks; free; 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives; valerie@brooksresources. com or www.nwxevents.com. COW PIE BINGO: Watch cows wander a grid set on the school’s soccer field, marking squares with droppings; with face painting, a petting zoo and more; proceeds benefit the Bend FFA Alumni; $5 per square; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-318-5778. OREGON OLD TIME FIDDLERS: Listen to fiddle music; a portion of proceeds benefits the community center; $5 suggested donation; 1-3 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-312-2069. DINNER FUNDRAISER: Spaghetti dinner, with an auction; followed by dancing and live music; registration recommended; proceeds benefit the Ladies Auxiliary fund for Cancer Aid & Research; $8 dinner, $6 or $4 for members for dance; 5:30 p.m., 7 p.m. dance; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-548-4108.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

“HOT FLASHES”: A presentation of the musical comedy about a five-woman band in their 40s to 70s; proceeds benefit the American Cancer Society and Bend Relay for Life; $35 or $40; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org. COMEDYCORE UNDERGROUND: Central Oregon comedians perform; ages 21 and older; $10; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; ryan@thewhitebull.com or www. bendticket.com. TRIAGE: Local improvisational comedy group performs, with musical guest Jumpin’ Joyce Respess; $5; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. bendimprov.com. ANDRE NICKATINA: The San Francisco-based hip-hop artist performs, with Mumbls, Endr Won, Maintain and Logy B; $23 plus fees in advance, $28 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7882989 or www.randompresents.com. GREGORY ALAN ISAKOV: The Colorado-based folk musician performs; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit PoetHouse Art; $10 plus fees in advance, $12 at the door; 9 p.m.; PoetHouse Art, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; www. bendticket.com.

SUNDAY LIGHT OF HOPE: Court Appointed Special Advocates of Central Oregon hosts a 10K, 5K and 1K run/walk; proceeds benefit CASA; $30 or $20 for the 10K and 5K races, $10 for the 1K; 9 a.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-389-1618 or www. casaofcentraloregon.org. RV, BOAT SHOW AND ATV SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2011; free; 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-322-2184. BEND SPRING FESTIVAL: A celebration of the new season with art, live music and food and drinks; free; 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives; valerie@ brooksresources.com or www. nwxevents.com. ECONOMIC MORALITY AND “KAPITOIL”: Timothy Duy talks about economic morality in “Kapitoil,” by Teddy Wayne, using the works of Adam Smith; part of “A Novel Idea ... Read Together”; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. REDMOND COMMUNITY CONCERT ASSOCIATION PERFORMANCE: Il Voce performs a vocal popera concert; $50 season ticket, $105 family ticket; 2 and 6:30 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-350-7222 or http://redmondcca.org. SAPIENT: The Northwest-based hip-hop artist performs, with IAMe and Northern Lights; free; 9 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868.

MONDAY SPOKEN WORD SHOWCASE: Students from Pilot Butte Middle School perform poetry, emceed by Jason Graham; free; 7 p.m.; Common Table, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-647-2233 or www. thenatureofwords.org. THE SWINGLE SINGERS: The pop a cappella group performs; $30 or $35; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. THE PRESERVATION: The Austin, Texas-based roots-rock act performs; free; 9 p.m.; MadHappy

Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868.

TUESDAY April 19 “HATCH, MATCH & DISPATCH — A CLOSER LOOK AT VITAL RECORDS RESEARCH”: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program by Nancy Noble; free; 10 a.m.; Rock Arbor Villa, Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541317-8978,541-317-9553 or www. orgenweb.org/deschutes/bend-gs. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: River Jordan talks about her book “Praying for Strangers”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Camalli Book Co., 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134.

WEDNESDAY April 20 MOUNTAINSTAR 10-YEAR CELEBRATION: Featuring facility tours, a bounce house, face painting, food and more; free; 4:30-6 p.m.; MountainStar Family Relief Nursery, 2125 N.E. Daggett Lane, Bend; 541-322-6820 or www.mountainstarfamily.org. PALEFACE: The acoustic anti-folk act performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins. com. “THE GRATEFUL DEAD MOVIE EVENT”: A screening of the documentary featuring legendary Grateful Dead concerts from 1974; $12.50; 7:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541382-6347. THE ENVELOPE PEASANT: The indie folk act performs; free; 9 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868.

THURSDAY April 21 BOOK DISCUSSION: Discuss “Kapitoil” by Teddy Wayne; part of “A Novel Idea ... Read Together”; free; noon; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-536-0515 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. HOME AND BELONGING: Reshmi Dutt-Ballerstad talks about identity and belonging, and how migration affects immigrants’ relationships with former homes; free; 6:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. FLAMENCO EN LAS AMERICAS: Savannah Fuentes performs traditional flamenco; $18 in advance, $23 at the door, $10 students, $7 children; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. G. LOVE & SPECIAL SAUCE: The Philadelphia-based hip-hop band performs, with Belle Brigade; $20 plus fees in advance, $25 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www. randompresents.com.

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU (PG-13) 2:25, 5, 7:35 ARTHUR (PG-13) 2:15, 4:50, 7:25 I AM (no MPAA rating) 2:30, 5:05, 7:40 THE KING’S SPEECH (PG13) 2:10, 4:45, 7:20 THE LINCOLN LAWYER (R) 2, 4:35, 7:10 SOURCE CODE (PG-13) 2:40, 5:10, 7:50

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU (PG13) 1:50, 4:50, 7:40, 10:15 ARTHUR (PG-13) 1:25, 4:25, 7:25, 10:05

BATTLE: LOS ANGELES (PG-13) 12:25, 6:55 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: RODRICK RULES (DP — PG) 1:40, 4:40, 7:15, 9:35 HANNA (PG-13) 12:55, 3:55, 6:25, 9:25 HOP (DP — PG) 1:05, 4:05, 7:05, 9:50 HOP (PG) Noon, 3, 6, 9 INSIDIOUS (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 7:35, 10 LIMITLESS (PG-13) 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 9:15 THE LINCOLN LAWYER (DP — R) 12:20, 3:20, 6:20, 9:55 PAUL (DP — R) 1:55, 4:55, 7:50, 10:25 RANGO (PG) 12:35, 3:35, 6:35, 9:05 RED RIDING HOOD (PG-13) 3:25, 9:40 SOUL SURFER (PG) 12:10, 3:10, 6:10, 9:10 SOURCE CODE (PG-13) 2, 5, 8, 10:20 SUCKER PUNCH (PG-13) 12:05, 3:05, 6:05, 9:30 YOUR HIGHNESS (R) 1:35,

4:35, 7:55, 10:30 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: Digitally projected shows (marked as DP) use one of several different technologies to provide maximum fidelity. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) BLACK SWAN (R) 9:15 UNKNOWN (PG-13) 6

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

Catch Season 7 launch of ‘Deadliest’ tonight By Diane Werts Newsday

Reason to Watch: Manly men on the Bering Sea, doing the dirtiest jobs of all: fishing for crab in frigid waters — and trying to get along with their shipmates. What it’s About: The flagship series of male-reality production kingpin Thom Beers heads out for 2010 crab season, still looking and sounding epic. Drums crash dramatically on the soundtrack as waves crash dangerously over the hundred-foot crab boats. “Battle-tested skippers” face “the fleet’s rising stars” to see who can score the season’s most serious haul from dozens of crab pots sent baited overboard in staked-out waters. “The red crab quota’s getting smaller every year,” grouses a veteran, “and so’s the men on the boats that are fishing here.” Familiar boats and faces return — Capt. Sid, the Hillstrands, and the sons of Capt. Phil Harris, whose on-duty death powered last season’s emotional roller coaster. These guys look yet more grizzled. And two new boat captains come off super-cocky — a 36-year-old second-generationer touting his “horsepower,” and a 28-year-old with a crew of young yahoos proudly detailing a history of punctured lungs and

‘Deadliest Catch’ When: 9 p.m. Tuesday Where: Discovery Channel

over-rail tumbles. Older guys like Capt. Phil successor Derrick Roy know the real deal of leadership lives in less-thrilling moments — like making sure your workers pass their drug tests. My Say: Weird thing in this season premiere is, the most riveting moments have absolutely nothing to do with the captains we know or their deckhands we meet. It’s the hour-ending cliffhanger of a Coast Guard chopper crew desperately trying to save a severely injured worker from a nearby container ship, battling roiling seas to hoist him up for a medical evaluation. What’s this massive floating warehouse got to do with “Deadliest Catch”? Not explained. But after six seasons of testosterone docusoap reliability, this show gets a long leash. Bottom Line: Feels like a rebuilding year here. Veterans trying to hold their spots, rookies working to make the team. Whether a winning lineup coalesces remains to be seen.

FRIDAY April 22 HOME AND BELONGING: Reshmi Dutt-Ballerstad talks about identity and belonging, and how migration affects immigrants’ relationships with former homes; free; noon; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. “TWO FACES OF THE ALPS — FRENCH AND ITALIAN”: Hilloah Rohr talks about two different areas of the Alps, with photos; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. ‘80S PROM WITH RADICAL REVOLUTION: The band performs 1980s high-school hits during the dance; with a costume contest; ages 21 and older; $15; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

M T For Tuesday, April 12

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

ARTHUR (PG-13) 5, 7:15 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: RODRICK RULES (PG) 4:45 HOP (PG) 3:45, 6:15 RANGO (PG) 7 YOUR HIGHNESS (R) 4, 6:30

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

ARTHUR (PG-13) 6:45 HANNA (PG-13) 6:45 HOP (PG) 6:30 LINCOLN LAWYER (R) 6:30

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

ARTHUR (PG-13) 4, 7 HOP (UPSTAIRS — PG) 5 EDITOR’S NOTE: Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

Anti-war icon Bob Dylan plays in placid Vietnam By Margie Mason The Associated Press

HO CHI MINH CITY, Vietnam — Bob Dylan, whose anti-war anthems made him the face of protest against a war that continues to haunt a generation of Americans, finally got his chance to see Vietnam — at peace. The 69-year-old Dylan took to the stage in the former Saigon on Sunday, singing such favorites as “A Hard Rain’s a-Gonna Fall” and “Highway 61 Revisited.” Only about half of the 8,000 seats were sold to a mix of Vietnamese and foreigners who danced on the grass in the warm evening air as Dylan jammed on guitar, harmonica and the keyboard at RMIT University. With more than 60 percent of the country’s 86 million people born after the war, many young people here are more familiar with pop stars like Justin Bieber. Still, Dylan’s music during the tumultuous 1960s touched thousands of people in both nations. “Bob Dylan’s music opened up a path where music was used as a weapon to oppose the war in Vietnam” and fight injustice and racism, said Tran Long An, 67, vice president of the Vietnam Composers’ Association. “That was the big thing that he has done for music.” An was a student in Saigon, now called Ho Chi Minh City, during the war and took to the streets with other Communist sympathizers calling for the killing to stop. He remains a big Dylan fan and has a large collection of the singer’s records. For some who were fighting in Vietnam’s jungles, Dylan’s music

Le Quang Nhat / The Associated Press

Bob Dylan performs with his band in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, on Sunday. was a source of hope. “We listened to anything that spoke of peace. We called him the peace poet,” said Stan Karber, 60, of Fort Smith, Arkansas, who served in Vietnam from 1969 to 1971 and has lived in Ho Chi Minh City for the past 15 years. “I’ll be dancing here in a minute.” The fighting ended on April 30, 1975, when northern Communist forces seized the U.S.-backed capital of South Vietnam, reunifying the country. About 58,000 Americans were killed along with some 3 million Vietnamese. Sunday’s concert coincided with the 10th anniversary of the death of anti-war Vietnamese folk singer Trinh Cong Son, known as the “Bob Dylan of Vietnam.” The opening Vietnamese acts played a tribute to Son, who remains highly popular.


E4 Tuesday, April 12, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 12, 2011 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Tuesday, April 12, 2011: This year, opportunities tend to tumble into your path. You are probably one of your best resources, as your creativity pinnacles whenever you need it to. Others, though serious, chip right in, brainstorming away or finding an easier path. This month you are christening a new 11-year luck cycle. Let go of what doesn’t work, and make an opening for something better. If you are single and ready, you could meet Mr. or Ms. Right. If you are attached, share some of your inner happiness with your sweetie. Count on LEO being fun. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH Your creativity continues to come forth and save the day. Your high energy mixed with the cooperation of others makes you close to unstoppable. Bridge a gap between you and another key person in your life. Tonight: Allow in more childlike moments. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH You might want to handle a personal matter more directly. If you understand what is behind another person’s actions, you can create a better liaison or interaction. Know that you don’t need to agree with him or her. Tonight: Make it easy; order in. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH You are more than likely to say exactly what you think, with little thought to the ramifications. How you handle a child or loved one who has been difficult can

determine your interactions for the next few months. Tonight: Let your hair down. Make a talk possible. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH You might want to create a greater sense of security for yourself. Eye real estate and other financial investments with care. What you believe is an easy return just might not be. Think like a cynic. Tonight: Pay your bills. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH A particular situation that revolves around an idea or a creative person keeps coming back up. You have been unusually serious, and people need to see your old spontaneity return. You might wonder which way to go with a child or loved one. Tonight: As you like it. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH You might be feeling as if you cannot accomplish everything that you want to. Closing your door might be a smart move. An associate or partner might suddenly become very energetic, to the point of being irritating. You might wonder what is happening. Tonight: Go for what you need. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Don’t hesitate to zero in on what you want. You might feel pushed by others, but what is the difference if you have the same goal? Don’t allow details to hold you back unnecessarily. The time is now. You also have the support of many people. Tonight: Celebrate living! SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Realize it isn’t just you who feels they are under pressure, but many people around you. Ask for important feedback, knowing

other people’s responses might not always be right-on, but they could give you guidance. Tonight: Out late, whether working or having fun. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH Step back from an immediate issue, and you’ll see a whole different perspective. This point of view also might be applicable to other challenging matters. Just don’t trigger, as you eye success coming around the corner. Tonight: Let your imagination go. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH How you handle someone and the decisions you make could have a great deal of impact. This person might not be comfortable with the fact that you have so much experience and self-discipline. Tonight: Have a long-overdue chat. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Let go of having to have everything go exactly the way you want it to go. You don’t have that type of control over any situation. Be more forthright yet open to others’ ideas. You have the quality of being an avant-garde thinker, but you still can learn from others. Tonight: Just don’t be alone. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Dive into your work, and keep an eye on your major priorities. You also might inadvertently spend much more money than you realize. One-on-one relating draws more information. Be careful with any commitments. Tonight: Go for easy.

© 2010 by King Features Syndicate


E6 Tuesday, April 12, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T ORY

The Tolkien professor

Testing your Tolkien knowledge Washington College professor Corey Olsen, host of the Tolkien Professor website, is one of the most popular medievalists in America. Test your “Lord of the Rings” knowledge with this quiz, created by Olsen: the Maiar, a race of beings who are Q: DO BALROGS somewhat like angels (or demons) HAVE WINGS? A. Yes; they are big and impressive. in stature. Gandalf, the Balrogs, and Sauron himself also belong to this B. Yes; their wings are small same category of creatures. Tom and vestigial. Bombadil is also a character whom C. No; they are basically Tolkien imports from a poem that he human-shaped. had written long before the “Lord of the Rings.” D. Not anymore, though they once did.

Scholar turns his ‘Lord of the Rings’ knowledge into a podcast, website By Danielde Vise The Washington Post

CHESTERTOWN, Md. — Corey Olsen had a lot to say about J.R.R. Tolkien. But it seemed a pity to consign his thoughts to a scholarly journal, to be read by a few hundred fellow academics who already knew more than enough about the author of “The Lord of the Rings.” So in spring 2007, the Washington College professor took his scholarship public, with a podcast called “How to Read Tolkien and Why” and a website called the Tolkien Professor. A million downloads later, Olsen is one of the most popular medievalists in America. His unusual path to success — a smartly branded website and a legion of iTunes listeners — marks an alternative to the publish-or-perish tradition of scholarship on the tenure track. “Instead of spending all my time doing scholarly publishing, which we’re told to do — which most people will never read — I basically decided to put myself out to the public,” Olsen said. It remains to be seen whether academia will reward Olsen or punish him for breaking out of his scholarly track. When it comes to building résumés and courting full professorships, podcasts don’t typically count. Olsen is a new breed of public intellectual, the latest in a long line of scholars who have leveraged mass media to reach a broader audience. Traditional public scholars — Umberto Eco, Noam Chomsky, Stephen Jay Gould — spoke mainly through books, magazines and op-ed pieces. Today’s populist profs tap potent new platforms: blogs and podcasts, tweets and Facebook fan pages. Podcast celebrities include Harvard government professor Michael Sandel, whose “Justice” course explores right and wrong. Yale philosophy professor Shelly Kagan has a course called simply “Death.” At 36, Olsen represents a new generation of professors who grew up around computers and knows its way around an iPhone.

Paulina Continued from E1 “We mostly focused on their sense of place. We describe the place, and then build the experience around the place,” said Browne, who’d returned to the school that morning to help the kids practice their readings. A nonfiction author, Browne, of Bend, visited the school under the auspices of The Nature of Words’ “Words Without Walls” program. Words Without Walls, one segment of the literary arts organization’s educational efforts, puts writers in schools. The Nature of Words first held “mini-workshops” for students in 2007, and began placing writers in schools for residencies in fall 2008, says Jamie Houghton, program coordinator. She herself did a residency at Paulina Elementary last year, teaching poetry. “I think that they really enjoy having a visitor, someone different (with) a different perspective than their regular teacher,” Houghton said of the residency program. “I think the teachers really enjoy having us, too. … They love having someone who is actually an expert on poetry come and teach figurative language.” According to Houghton, Nature of Words will have writers at about 12 sites during the course of the year, including Sisters High School, Pilot Butte Middle School, Deer Ridge Correctional Institution and Bend High School’s Teen Parent Program. Eighth-graders at Pilot Butte recently completed a creative writing residency with wordsmith and musician Jason Graham (also known as Mosley Wotta). As at Paulina and other schools, the residency concludes with a student reading. Pilot Butte will hold a program at the school, as well as a spoken word showcase at Common Table in Bend on April 18 (see “If you go”). There are plans to grow Words Without Walls. This summer, a writer will also work with residents at The Shepherd’s House,

“Lord of the Rings” movies and toys, such as this stuffed Gandalf, have sold well.

Photos by Matt McClain / The Washington Post

Washington College’s Corey Olsen uses new-media tools to share his scholarship about J.R.R. Tolkien, author of “Lord of the Rings.” Olsen talks about hobbits, elves and more on podcasts and takes questions via Skype conferences. The bookish son of a New Hampshire construction worker, Olsen read “The Hobbit” at age 8 and was a self-professed expert on “The Lord of the Rings” by seventh grade. He took up a sort of permanent spiritual residence within Tolkien’s imagined Middle-earth. As an undergraduate at Williams College in Massachusetts, Olsen took “every medieval thing that they offered” and later earned a doctorate in medieval literature at Columbia. The young medievalist proved an immediate hit at Washington College, a small liberal arts school tucked behind the Chester River in the colonial hamlet of Chestertown on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. He won the school’s top teaching award in 2007. Some current seniors have taken five or six of his courses. “You go to class, and he has all these new insights that you didn’t even think of,” said Elizabeth Hurlbut, 21, a junior from Keller, Texas. Olsen published an article and a review in the scholarly jour-

If you go What: Spoken Word showcase Pilot Butte Middle School students When: 7 p.m. April 18 Where: Common Table, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend Cost: Free Contact: www.thenature ofwords.org

a Bend emergency homeless shelter. “We want to focus on quality, so we’ll probably keep it at 12 (sites) next year,” Houghton said. “What I’d like to do is work with more than one class in the school, like we’re doing at Pilot Butte, and expand that way first. Like at Paulina … the whole school is infused with the spirit of the residency.” The Nature of Words is probably best known for the annual literary festival it holds each fall in Bend. Nevertheless, education has always been part of the festival’s aim, according to founder and executive director Ellen Waterston. “The mission of The Nature of Words has always been to increase awareness and appreciation of the literary arts,” Waterston said. “The festival was sort of the anchor tenant of the whole concept. And then, as we got courage and support from donations, to expand to younger audiences, that was the obvious next step. “And it is, definitely, the next step: to bring up that next phalanx of appreciators of the literary arts, consumers of the literary arts, but also young people who are conversant, who really understand the magnificence of the language.” The Nature of Words also offers the Rising Star Creative Writing Competition, with awards in fiction, literary nonfiction, nature essay and poetry for writers ages 15-18, 19-25 and 25 and up. The deadline is June 10; see www.thenatureofwords.org for more information. Through its Storefront Project,

nal Tolkien Studies in 2008 and 2009, but he sensed an opportunity squandered. More than 100 million copies of “The Lord of the Rings” have been sold. The Peter Jackson movies of the past decade earned roughly a billion dollars each. Tolkien is not as popular among academics. Though Tolkien was a language scholar at Oxford, he is not generally counted among the great fiction writers of his century, nor is “The Lord of the Rings” counted among its great books. Yet, Tolkien scholars and Tolkien classes have multiplied over the years, and Middle-earth fanzines have evolved into academic journals. “If something isn’t going away, that tells you something,” said Verlyn Flieger, a Tolkien scholar at the University of Maryland. Olsen’s website generated little traffic until summer 2009, when he uploaded his 28-minute introductory lecture to iTunes. He’s put up 78 more podcasts, with such titles as “On Dragons and Orcs” and “Tolkien and Food.”

middle and high school students can participate in workshops and receive tutoring at NOW’s office, 224 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend. When schools can’t accommodate an author-in-residence, classes can make field trips to NOW’s literary arts center. Waterston made the two-hour drive from Bend to hear the March 31 readings. “I think it was ambitious, because every single kid had their moment in the sun, but I think that’s important,” Waterston said. “It required an accomplishment on the part of each student. And it was wonderful to see the progression from the very little ones who participated up to the eighth-graders. It was a tall order for our instructor, Neil Browne, but he was certainly equal to it.” So were his students. Amid the din that kicked up at the end of the program, Browne said to Jack Goodwin — who’d read an essay called “People Screaming” — “Jack, good job!” “Thank you,” Jack said. Third-grader Aspen Hamlin read about a barn she loves at her family ranch. “When I’m feeling bad, that’s where I go, to my favorite, special place,” the essay read. “In my heart, I feel an urge to capture a wild dream that runs through my head every time I go in that barn. That urge is like fire in my heart, burning with desire. Also, like the low beating of a drum; the low beating tells me that I’m calming down.” Aspen, who wants to be a cowgirl when she grows up, said she worked hard on the piece. She’s an avid reader, but was still “a little nervous” to read in front of a crowd. “(A friend) says I read a little bit too much. … Reading too much would be reading every second of your life,” Aspen said. “I know I don’t read every second of my life.” She enjoyed Browne’s visit to her school. “He was really fun,” she said. David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@bendbulletin.com.

His lectures have ranked as high as third among top university course downloads. “Within two months, I had 5,000 subscribers,” he recalled in an interview in his office on campus. “And then the people who were listening wanted to talk.” Olsen communes with his growing fan base in periodic Skype call-in sessions and on his Facebook page, answering urgent queries about Tolkien taxonomy. He hosts discussion boards on his website and, this winter, is running an online seminar on the posthumous collection “The Silmarillion” for 15 lucky followers. “He’s like a Tolkien evangelist,” said John DiBartolo, a Long Island musician, graphic designer and amateur Tolkien scholar. The questions never cease: Do elves farm? What do orcs eat? Could any living author write a worthy sequel? What does Olsen think of the upcoming “Hobbit” movie? Has he played “The Lord of the Rings” computer game online? Naturally, Olsen knows all sorts of arcana about Tolkien and hobbits. He likes to note, for instance, that the One Ring of power and its corruptive influence were absent from the first edition of “The Hobbit” in 1937. “Gollum and Bilbo end up shaking hands and waving,” he said with a chuckle.



Answer: C The idea of the winged Balrog comes from Tolkien’s description of the Balrog Gandalf confronts in Moria. A shadow surrounds the Balrog, and Tolkien compares that shadow to wings, first through a simile (“the shadow about it reached out like two vast wings”) and then again through a metaphor (“its wings were spread from wall to wall”). These are just ways for us to visualize the darkness which surrounds the Balrog, however; they are not actual wings. This fact receives experimental confirmation almost immediately when Gandalf shatters the bridge under the Balrog’s feet and sends it plummeting into the abyss, which would be a pretty short-sighted stratagem to use against a winged enemy.

Q. WHAT IS TOM BOMBADIL? A. A Human descended from the ancient kings of Arnor. B. An angelic spirit who has inhabited his forest since the dawn of time. C. An Elf who has lived in his forest since the First Age. D. A hobbit who was banished from the Shire because he wouldn’t stop singing about his own boots.

ANSWER: B Based on what Tom Bombadil tells the hobbits, he cannot possibly be a human or an elf. He claims to have been operating in the world, indeed to have been skipping merrily around that one particular plot of ground, since long before elves, humans, hobbits or dwarves had awakened on Earth. He says that he has been there since the primeval shaping of the planet. Within Tolkien’s mythological framework, therefore, Tom Bombadil certainly must be one of

Q: WHO IS GOLDBERRY? A. Tom Bombadil’s wife B. Frodo’s cousin C. Sauron’s nemesis

Answer: A Goldberry is called the “daughter of the River.” She too would therefore to be one of the Maiar, a minor spirit associated with the life and growth, and especially the water, of that countryside. She is Tom Bombadil’s wife, and she too is a character from Tolkien’s earlier poetry. In that earlier poem, she and Tom first meet when she grabs him from under the surface of the water and attempts to drown him; they hit it off and get married soon afterwards. Tom tactfully doesn’t mention the attempted drowning when he tells Frodo and his friends how he and Goldberry met.

Q: WHERE ARE THE ENTWIVES? A. In Mordor B. In Harad C. Probably dead

ANSWER: C Tolkien was very cagey about this when people asked him this question in letters, sometimes flatly responding: “I don’t know.” The estrangement of the Ents from the Entwives and the Ents’ long and fruitless search for their lost mates is a very moving and evocative story, and the uncertainty of its ending is a big part of its power. However, if pushed very hard, I would say that they are probably dead. The best evidence we get about this in the story is the semi-prophetic song that the Elves made about this, and which Treebeard sings to Merry and Pippin. This song suggests that the reunion of the Ents and Entwives will probably not happen until after death, or possibly even the end of the world.



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A H

HOME S, GA RDE NS A ND FOOD IN C E NTRA L ORE GON

F

Mushroom hunting How can you tell this fun guy won’t make you ill? Martha Stewart gets you started, Page F6

AT HOME

www.bendbulletin.com/athome

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, APRIL 12, 2011

GARDEN HOME

Tips and tricks to getting started indoors

Bring back the

By Liz Douville For The Bulletin

Gardeners see three blades of something green sprouting (no matter that it might be cheat grass or noxious weeds) and try to convince themselves that surely this is the harbinger of spring. I checked my journal from 2010 and found that on April 7, the temperature registered a warm 63 degrees. Two days later, the temperature was back to the usual 35-40 degree range with nighttime temperatures in a chilly 20-degree range. This is exactly why we don’t plant petunias or any annual at this time of the year. If you made a graph of the temperatures over a period of two weeks, it would probably resemble a roller coaster. What we should do is start some seeds indoors that will give us a head start to planting to the garden when the time is right.

Understanding your jewelry’s metals and stones is key to cleaning it and keeping it looking its best

Why and how Learning the process of seed starting reaps many benefits. You can select seeds that will produce in our short growing season of 65 to 75 days. You can lengthen that growing season by several weeks by starting the seeds indoors. Seed starting allows you to realize an earlier bloom and harvest as compared to direct seeding to the garden. You will control the quality of your seedlings and, best of all, you will raise more plants for less money. Plus, there is a great deal of creative satisfaction and enjoyment in making another step toward being self-sufficient. Seeds started indoors should be germinated in a seed-starting mix, not potting soil or garden soil. There are many types of seed-starting equipment available, but you can also recycle plastic clamshell containers or other household discards. See Starting / F5 Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

AT TOP: A silver ring before and after it is cleaned. LEFT: Heather Hanst uses a polishing cloth to clean a piece of jewelry at Silverado Jewelry Galley in downtown Bend. ABOVE RIGHT: Ron Henderson polishes a ring while working at Saxton’s Fine Jewelers in Bend. BOTTOM RIGHT: Ways to clean jewelry vary depending on the material. Among the options: ultrasonic cleaner, polishing papers, polishing cloth, and baking soda and a toothbrush.

By Alison Highberger • For The Bulletin pring cleaning isn’t just for houses. It’s a good

jewelry experts: Ron Henderson, a partner at Saxon’s Fine

time of year to spiff up your jewelry, too — from

Jewelers in the Old Mill District (www.saxonsfinejewelers

expensive gemstones and antiques, to watches

.com), and Heather Hanst, owner of Silverado Jewelry

and favorite pieces of inexpensive costume

Gallery in downtown Bend (www.silveradogallery.com).

jewelry.

Both said it’s important to know what you’ve got in or-

For tips and guidelines about how to clean and care for

der to know how to keep it well cared for and clean.

jewelry at home, we checked in with two Central Oregon

See Jewelry / F4

FOOD

For The Bulletin

Eating french fries at home usually involves scattering store-bought frozen potatoes from a plastic bag onto a baking sheet and popping them into the oven. Opening a fast-food takeout bag is the other popular option. They both do the trick when you want a french fry fix. But it’s surprisingly easy to make outstanding french fries from scratch at home with fresh potatoes.

All that’s required is a heavy-bottomed pot, two quarts of vegetable oil and a thermometer. Add salt and ketchup or your favorite flavoring at the end, and you’ve got an impressive side of fries. “Making french fries at home is neither difficult nor especially messy,” Mark Bittman writes in “How to Cook Everything: Simple Recipes for Great Food,” and he boasts that his recipe (see Page F2) makes what are “likely to be the best fries you’ve ever had.” See Fries / F2

To determine when to plant your seedlings, se e the planting schedule on Page F5. Favorite warm-weather veggies to start indoors: • Any of the OSU-developed tomatoes: Legend, Oregon Spring, Gold Nugget and Willamette • Beans: Straight & Narrow, Nickel, Maxibel • Corn: Early Sunglow, Bodacious • Cucumbers: Diva, Lemon • Parsley: Flat leaf is best for drying • Peppers: North Star, Golden Star • Chives: Plant it to aid in pollination (it attracts pollinating insects) — Liz Douville

T O DAY ’ S R E C I P E S

Ditch the takeout for delicious fries made at home By Alison Highberger

Give ’em a start

Homemade french fries served in a newspaper cone. Julie Johnson The Bulletin

• MARK BITTMAN’S FRENCH FRIES, F2 • LES HALLES FRIES, F2 • DORIE GREENSPAN’S “LES FRITES,” F2 • GREEN TEA-LACQUERED SALMON WITH SWEET POTATOES AND SPINACH, F3 • TEA-MARBLED EGGS, F3 • SMOKY BLACK LENTILS, F3 • MATCHA TEA LEAF COOKIES, F3 • HURRY-UP CARAMEL CAKE, F6 • TRIPLE-MUSTARD SALMON, F6


F2 Tuesday, April 12, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

F Fries Continued from F1 Skinny shoestrings, classic french fries and thick steakhouse fries are all made the same way — cooked twice — according to New York Times columnist and best-selling author Bittman; celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain, host of The Travel Channel show “No Reservations”; and Dorie Greenspan, author of “Around My French Table: More Than 300 Recipes from My Home to Yours.” To make french fries, all three cooks blanch cut potatoes in oil first, and then fry them a second time to doneness at a slightly higher temperature. Bourdain swears by peanut oil. Greenspan says any oil that can stand high heat works well, such as canola or peanut (not olive oil). You can use any kind of potato you like, but our experts strongly recommend basic Idaho baking potatoes (russets) for the best results. Sweet potatoes work well, too. Bourdain and Greenspan say one of the keys to perfect fries is not crowding the potatoes in the oil, so fry in small batches, allowing them to float around with some elbow room. In “Anthony Bourdain’s Les Halles Cookbook: Strategies, Recipes, and Techniques of Classic Bistro Cooking,” Bourdain writes that if you’ve ever made fries at home, they probably weren’t very good because “you put too many potatoes in the oil at one time, and they became greasy, limp and inadequately caramelized.” Dorie Greenspan parts from the other cooks by never letting the cut potatoes sit in water. Instead, she suggests peeling them right before cooking. “Rinse them if you want to,” she writes in “Around My French Table,” “but make certain that they’re completely dry for the fry.” If you’ve ever made mediocre fries at home, or never fried up a batch, the good news is there’s not much to cooking delicious homemade french fries. The bad news is, once you get good at this simple technique, you’ll be tempted to make french fries more often. Worse

Next week: Artichokes How to cook and enjoy this one-of-a-kind vegetable.

Dispose of cooking oil responsibly Never pour cooking oil or grease down a house drain, toilet or outdoor storm drain. It will eventually cause clogs or pollution. It is illegal to dump anything in storm drains. Knott Landfill in Bend will not accept large amounts of liquids of any kind. To dispose of oil: • Allow oil to cool completely. • Reuse oil for deep-frying several times before disposing. Strain it into a clean, sealable container. • When done with the oil, recycle it for free by contacting Jeff Rola at Go Bio (gobioco@ gmail.com or 541-410-6707). He sells it for biofuel. Call to arrange drop-off or pickup of used cooking oil, no charge. • To throw it away, “solidify” the oil by putting it in a strong, sealable container, such as an old plastic jar with a lid. Add an absorbent material like sawdust, Kitty Litter, shredded newspaper, paper towels or napkins, then throw the container in the trash.

Photos by Julie Johnson / The Bulletin

French fry wedges are a classic accompaniment to a burger.

5 flavorings for french fries

LES HALLES FRIES

If you are bored with ketchup and repelled by mayonnaise (the most frequently used condiment for fries in Europe), you might try any of the following. To thoroughly coat fries with a dry condiment such as chili powder, toss them together in a paper bag while the fries are still hot. 1. Spicy mustard 2. Chili powder 3. Five-spice powder 4. Malt or other vinegar 5. Three kinds of ground pepper: black, Sichuan and a pinch of cayenne

Makes 4 servings. We’re famous for our fries at Les Halles. Many have said that we make the best fries in New York. Naturally I agree. — Anthony Bourdain 4 Idaho potatoes — big, long ones 2 qts peanut oil to fill fryer (or pot) Table salt EQUIPMENT: 2 lg bowls

— From: “How to Cook Everything: Simple Recipes for Great Food,” by Mark Bittman, Macmillan Publishing USA, 1998.

things could happen. Alison Highberger can be reached at ahighberger@mac.com.

MARK BITTMAN’S FRENCH FRIES Makes 4 servings. 4 lg or 6 med baking potatoes, such as russets, peeled

Vegetable oil as needed Salt to taste

Cut the potatoes into any shape you like, such as wedges, sticks or even discs. Rinse in a few changes of water, then soak in ice water while you heat the oil. Place the vegetable oil to a depth of at least 3 inches in a large, deep saucepan or Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Heat it to 325 degrees, measuring with a candy/deep fry thermometer. Drain the potatoes and dry them well; drop them by small handfuls into the oil. After the first addition, turn the heat up to high. Once they are all in, turn the heat to medium. Fry the potatoes in one batch (if your pot is large enough), stirring occasionally, for about 10 minutes, or until the majority of them have begun to brown. Turn the heat to low (or turn it off if you’re going to wait to fry them again) and drain the potatoes on paper towels or a paper bag; they will be pale and soggy. You can allow them to rest here for up to 1 hour before proceeding. Raise the heat to high and bring the oil to 375 degrees. Put the potatoes back in the oil and cook, stirring now and then, until brown and crisp, just a couple of minutes. Drain on paper towels or paper bags, season with salt, and serve immediately. — Adapted from “How to Cook Everything: Simple Recipes for Great Food” by Mark Bittman, Macmillan Publishing 856 NW Bond • Downtown Bend • 541-330-5999 USA, 1998 www.havenhomestyle.com

No matter the shape of your fries, cooking them twice is key, starting at a lower temperature and finishing them in hotter oil to crisp them up.

Deep fryer or heavybottomed pot Skimmer or wire basket (if using a pot) Baking sheet Towel

Fill a large bowl with ice water. Peel the potatoes and cut them into ½-inch thick sticks. Put them immediately into the bowl of ice water to keep them from oxidizing. Leave them in the water anywhere from 30 minutes to overnight, then rinse well in cold water to take out much of the starch. In a deep fryer or heavy-bottomed pot, heat the oil to 280 degrees. Cook the potatoes in batches, about 6 to 8 minutes for each batch, until they are soft and their color has paled from opaque white to a semi-translucent white. Do not get impatient and yank them out early. Remove them from the oil with the skimmer or wire basket and spread evenly on the baking sheet. Let them rest at least 15 minutes. Bring the oil up to 375 degrees. Fry the blanched potatoes in batches for 2 to 3 minutes each, or until they are crispy and golden brown. Remove from the oil with the skimmer or wire basket, shake off the excess oil, and serve immediately. To serve, immediately drop the fries into the other large bowl, which has been lined with a clean, dry towel. Add salt to taste and remove the towel. Toss the fries around in the bowl and serve while still hot. — Adapted from “Anthony Bourdain’s Les Halles Cookbook: Strategies, Recipes, and Techniques of Classic Bistro Cooking” by Anthony Bourdain with Jose de Meirelles & Philippe Lajaunie, Bloomsbury, 2004

DORIE GREENSPAN’S “LES FRITES”

Sweet potato fries are a delicious alternative to those made from plain russet potatoes.

Fry them for the first time in oil that’s 325 degrees so that they cook almost completely (they should be the potato equivalent of al dente pasta) but don’t color — in other words, they’re blanched in the oil. Drain them very well, and allow them to cool. You can do this up to a few hours before you’re ready to give them their final fry. At serving time, heat the oil to 375 degrees and fry the (dry) blanched potatoes until they are cooked through, beautifully browned and crisp. Greenspan’s French colleague, Chef Bertrand Auboyneau of Bistro Paul Bert, added, “After that, put them in a bowl with paper to dry them, add salt, and serve.” — From “Around My French Table: More Than 300 Recipes from My Home to Yours” by Dorie Greenspan, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Co., 2010

Low-cal cocktails can be a sweet deal By Laura Casey Contra Costa Times

WALNUT CREEK, Calif. — For years, dieters have had to swear off minty mojitos and tequila-kissed margaritas. Sure, they could swill light beers or mix their rum and cokes with diet colas, but the holy grail of cocktails — fabulous mixed

drinks with little umbrellas — were taboo. That’s changing. Pre-mixed “skinny” cocktails are popping up on store shelves, thanks in part to reality television star Bethenny Frankel’s line of Skinnygirl spirits. Now major restaurant chains, including Applebee’s, Chili’s, TGI Friday’s and

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Cheesecake Factory, have begun offering reduced-calorie cocktails for those who like a drink or two but don’t want to pour 250 or more calories down their gullets at once. With the U.S. diet industry topping $68 billion in 2010, it’s a smart marketing move. But the real question is, how do these cocktails compare to the real thing? The first major restaurant chain to offer low-calorie cocktails was Applebee’s, which offers a 90-calorie mojito, a 100-calorie margarita and a 110-calorie Long Island iced tea. Applebee’s spokeswoman Stacy Griffis says the SkinnyBee drinks were introduced in January 2010, along with a series of entrees that were 550 calories or less. Earlier this month, the Cheesecake Factory began offering its

own lower-calorie Skinny-Style drinks and cocktails, including margaritas, mojitos, Long Island iced tea, cosmopolitans and red sangria. Each has 150 calories or less. The restaurant’s traditional drinks run about 300 calories. The bottom line is that typically, low-calorie mixes impart an undeniable, artificial sweetness. Like many low-calorie sodas, the sweetness of these cocktails lingers on the palate much longer than their sugary counterparts. This is not necessarily a terrible thing. Many of us know die-hard Diet Coke fans who swear that their low-calorie cola tastes and finishes better than regular Coke. It comes down to personal taste and, in the end, how much having a half-the-calorie cocktail matters to you when you’re out for dinner and drinks with friends.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 12, 2011 F3

F Surprise! This beverage fits food to a tea By Bill Daley

TEA-MARBLED EGGS

Chicago Tribune

Tea is for drinking to be sure, but what about tea for eating? Many of us know the marbleized tea eggs and tea-smoked duck of Chinese kitchens or the green tea ice cream found in many Asian restaurants, but how often have we encountered oolong-brined turkey, salmon lacquered in green tea or “smoky” black lentils cooked in lapsang souchong tea? These are just some of the 150 recipes “steeped in tradition from around the world” to be found in a new book, “Culinary Tea,” (Running Press, $22.95). The authors are Cynthia Gold, tea sommelier at The Boston Park Plaza Hotel & Towers, one of the first chefs to explore the uses of “culinary” tea, and Lise Stern, a writer and author based in Cambridge, Mass. “My goal is ... to open people’s eyes to the exploration of an ingredient that belongs in all our kitchens,” Gold said. Gold’s mission of “showing what tea can do” began about 14 years ago when she opened a new restaurant. She insisted on developing a strong tea program and went out of her way to find and purchase the best teas. “Once I had the teas in-house, I started to be tempted to play with them, simply because they were there,” she recalled. As she experimented, Gold learned tea was more than a beautiful beverage to be savored but a “flexible botanical” worthy of respect. “The more I played, the more I realized how underutilized and underappreciated tea was, and what an asset it could be in the kitchen,” she said. Tea styles range from the elegant freshness of barely processed white tea to the complex layering of flavor found in partially oxidized oolong tea to the full-throttle taste of black teas like that lapsang souchong. There’s the earthy, aged pu-erh tea, (POOH-air) blended teas, scented and flavored teas. All can find a spot in the kitchen and on the table. “Tea can do many things for you,” Gold added. “The tannins in tea can be used to balance sweetness or richness in other ingredients. Tea can add depth of flavor to a dish, complexity or brightness. It can be used to tease flavors out, to bridge between different disparate ingredients or highlight certain aspects of a dish.” Cooking with tea goes beyond using the hot water-infused beverage. As Gold points out, tea can be steeped in cold water, oils, dairy products, vinegars, juices

Makes 12 eggs. Cracking the shells of hard-cooked eggs and steeping them in tea makes for a lovely marbleized look. Adapted from Cynthia Gold and Lise Stern’s “Culinary Tea.” 12 eggs 5 C water ¾ C soy sauce 2 TBS packed dark brown sugar

Put the eggs in a saucepan large enough to hold them in a single layer. Cover with cold water; heat to a rolling boil over high heat, partially covered. As soon as the water boils, remove from heat. Let stand, covered, 10 minutes. Transfer the eggs with a slotted spoon to a bowl of ice water. Cool until you can handle the eggs. Gently crack the shells all over with the back of a spoon. Do not peel. Do not tap too hard or tea liquid will seep into the shell instead of staining the crack. Empty hot water from saucepan. Refill with the 5 cups water, soy sauce and brown sugar. Heat to a boil over high heat, stirring until the sugar is dissolved; add the tea, anise and cinnamon. Reduce the heat, add the eggs. If the eggs are not covered by liquid, add additional water until they are just covered. Simmer, covered, 10 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat; let eggs stand in the liquid, uncovered, until cool. Chill in the liquid, 2 hours to 2 days. When ready to serve, remove the eggs from the liquid; peel. Serve eggs as they are, halved, or devil them. Nutrition information per serving: 77 calories, 64 percent of calories from fat, 5 g fat, 2 g saturated fat, 212 mg cholesterol, 0 g carbohydrates, 6 g protein, 62 mg sodium, 0 g fiber.

SMOKY BLACK LENTILS Makes 8 servings. 4 C boiling water 4½ tsp loose-leaf lapsang souchong tea leaves 2 C black lentils, picked over, rinsed 1 can (28 oz) diced tomatoes,

Photos by Bill Hogan / Chicago Tribune

Matcha, or finely powdered green tea leaves, imparts its flavor to these leaf-shaped cookies from “Culinary Tea,” by Cynthia Gold and Lise Stern. and even alcohol. She’s working on a book of tea-based cocktails. “You can even liquefy a solid ingredient, for instance butter. Infuse the tea leaves, then strain and solidify it again and continue with your recipe,” she said. Powdered teas, of which the green matcha (MAH-tchah) is most famous for its role in the Japanese tea ceremony, can be stirred into recipes. Dried tea leaves can be used in rubs or marinades or burned to season a food in savory smoke.

If the dried leaves are to be eaten, it’s often best to grind or chop them to create the desired mouth feel, Gold added. What matters most is using quality tea, she said, purchased in small quantities so it won’t go stale. Keep it away from light, heat, air or any moisture. “My hope is there will eventually be no such thing as ‘tea cuisine.’ It will be such a natural part of our repertoire, no one will think of it as anything odd,” Gold said.

GREEN TEA-LACQUERED SALMON WITH SWEET POTATOES AND SPINACH Makes 4 servings. Note: This recipe in “Culinary Tea” was created by Christoph Leu, the corporate chef of Starwood Hotels, and Julia Tolstunova, also with Starwood. ½ C steaming water (about 175 degrees) 4 tsp loose-leaf green tea leaves, such as Dragonwell or sencha 4 tsp honey 4 fillets salmon, 6 oz each,

3 TBS loose-leaf lapsang souchong tea leaves 4 whole star anise 1 cinnamon stick

skin on 4 TBS extra-virgin olive oil 4 sweet potatoes, peeled, diced 8 C baby spinach 1 TBS minced garlic ½ tsp salt

Pour the steaming water over the tea leaves in a small bowl; add honey. Steep, covered, for 2½ minutes, strain, discard the leaves. Place salmon in a nonreactive pan. Brush with honey tea; pour any remaining tea around the fish. Marinate in the refrigerator, covered, 1 hour or up to 2 days. Heat 3 tablespoons of the olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the sweet potatoes; cook, stirring, until golden, 6-10 minutes. Transfer to a bowl; cover to keep warm. Add the spinach and garlic to the skillet. Cook, stirring, until the spinach is just wilted, less than 1 minute. Transfer to a shallow serving bowl; cover to keep warm. Meanwhile, heat broiler. Line a broiler pan with foil; spray with vegetable oil cooking spray. Place the salmon in the pan skin side-down; season with ¼ teaspoon of the salt. Broil just until golden, about 2 minutes. Lower the heat to 350 degrees; bake salmon until just cooked through, 5-10 minutes. Pour remaining 1 tablespoon of the oil into the skillet. Heat over medium heat; add shallots and shiitakes. Cook, stirring, until the shallots are translucent and the mushrooms have begun to release some of their juices, 3-4 minutes. Add wine and lemon juice, stirring to scrape up browned bits. Heat over medium-high heat until reduced by half, about 3 minutes; add the chicken stock. Reduce by half, 3 minutes. Add thyme, remaining ¼ teaspoon of the salt and pepper to taste. Pour mushroom and shallot mixture over spinach; top with salmon. Serve with sweet potatoes. Nutrition information per serving: 562 calories, 42 percent of calories from fat, 26 g fat, 4 g saturated fat, 107 mg cholesterol, 38 g carbohydrates, 44 g protein, 563 mg sodium, 6 g fiber.

1 shallot, minced 4 oz shiitake mushrooms, stems removed, halved ½ C dry white wine 2 TBS fresh lemon juice 1 C chicken or vegetable broth 1 tsp fresh thyme leaves

“Tea can add depth of flavor to a dish, complexity or brightness,” says Cynthia Gold, co-author of the book “Culinary Tea.”

preferably fire roasted 2 TBS minced fresh cilantro or parsley, plus sprigs for garnish ½ tsp black pepper ¼ tsp salt

Pour boiling water over tea leaves in a medium bowl. Steep, covered, 4 minutes; strain into a large saucepan, discarding tea leaves. Add the lentils and tomatoes; heat to a boil over high heat. Lower the heat; simmer, uncovered, until most of the liquid is absorbed and the lentils are firm but tender, 30-40 minutes. Let rest, covered, until liquid is absorbed, about 10 minutes. Stir in the cilantro, pepper and salt. Garnish with cilantro sprigs. Serve warm or at room temperature. Nutrition information per serving: 184 calories, 3 percent of calories from fat, 0.5 g fat, 0 g saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 33 g carbohydrates, 13 g protein, 297 mg sodium, 12 g fiber.

MATCHA TEA LEAF COOKIES Makes about 3 dozen cookies. 2 sticks (8 oz each) unsalted butter, chilled ½ C granulated sugar 1 tsp orange brandy, such as

Grand Marnier 2 C flour 2 tsp matcha green tea powder

Cream together butter and sugar until smooth using a mixer on medium speed. Blend in the liqueur; add the flour, matcha, 5-spice powder and salt. Mix until the dough just comes together. Flatten dough into a disk; place between two sheets of parchment or waxed paper. Roll out to 1 ⁄8 -inch thick; chill in the refrigerator on a baking sheet until firm enough to lift it cleanly without stretching, at least 20 minutes. Heat oven to 300 degrees. With a knife, cut dough into leaf shapes about 1 by 2 inches, or use a leaf-shaped cookie cutter. Transfer to baking sheets lined with parchment paper, or sprayed

½ tsp Chinese 5-spice powder ¼ tsp salt

with cooking spray, leaving ½ inch between them. Very lightly score a center vein into each tea leaf, if desired. Work quickly; if the dough becomes too soft, return to the refrigerator to chill. Bake until the cookies take on a dry powdery look and are firm, about 15 minutes per batch. Cool on the baking sheets, 2 minutes; transfer to a cooling rack to cool completely. Store in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 1 week or freeze. Nutrition information per serving: 81 calories, 57 percent of calories from fat, 5 g fat, 3 g saturated fat, 13 mg cholesterol, 8 g carbohydrates, 1 g protein, 17 mg sodium, 0 g fiber.


F4 Tuesday, April 12, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

H

Next week: At Home With ... Nordic skiers Nils and Dagmar Eriksson.

Jewelry Continued from F1

Understand the jewels After you understand your jewelry’s metals and stones, some simple homemade cleaning solutions or store-bought items can help to keep them dazzling. All you need is water, dish soap, nonsudsing ammonia, Mr. Clean liquid cleaner, baking soda, toothpaste and an old toothbrush. Hard stones like diamonds, rubies and sapphires should be cleaned much differently from porous and more delicate pearls, emeralds, tanzanite, lapis lazuli, coral, opals, malachite, jade, amber or ivory, for example. The durable stones can take a scrubbing with an old toothbrush and some toothpaste for a quick shine, but porous and delicate stones need to avoid water, chemicals and abrasive substances. Henderson and Hanst share a favorite cleaning solution that can easily be made at home (see right), and express their views on commercial cleaning products. Hanst opened her Silverado Jewelry Galley in Bend in 2002. The store carries a wide variety of jewelry, not just silver. “We sell as much gold as silver, and have leather, gemstones, every medium,” she said. Hanst calls herself the “jewelry police.” She sees her customers all over town, and isn’t shy about commenting on their jewelry. “Bring it in, I tell them — I need to clean that or refinish it!” she said with a laugh. “Hair spray is the big evil on jewelry, and perfume, too — they both eat metals,” she added, so regular cleaning is important.

Wear it but watch it Our experts want you to enjoy your jewelry, wear it a lot, and know how to best care for it. Ron Henderson, who opened Saxon’s Fine Jewelers in Bend in 1983, said he’s sad when he finds out people aren’t wearing their fine jewelry. “I’ve made $50,000 rings and I run into the person later and ask, ‘How are you enjoying it?’ and I hear, ‘Oh, I love it, but I keep it in the safe deposit box.’ They’re either afraid to wear it, or they aren’t going out a lot. It doesn’t matter if it’s inexpensive or expensive, the thing about jewelry is to wear it, enjoy it, and accessorize your life,” Henderson said. He says it’s important to keep jewelry clean and understands why people often neglect to do so. “It’s vital because people buy jewelry as an accessory to put a little sparkle in their lives, so if your jewelry isn’t clean, it won’t sparkle, and won’t perform in the way you want it to,” he said. “In our hectic lives, it’s very easy to forget about the oil change, the tuneup and to clean your jewelry, and then all of a sudden you realize it’s long overdue and you go in (to a jeweler) because either you lost an important stone, or you have something snagging. But if you come

get a room

541.526.1590

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

ABOVE: Ron Henderson inspects a ring under a microscope at Saxton’s Fine Jewelers. RIGHT: Heather Hanst uses a toothbrush and baking soda to clean a piece of jewelry at Silverado Jewelry Gallery. Both experts say jewelry is meant to be worn and enjoyed, and knowing how to care for it is important. in on a regular maintenance basis — a minimum of six months is what most jewelers in the country recommend — we really can keep your jewelry clean and pretty, and hopefully avoid some pitfalls,” Henderson said. He acknowledged that some people are concerned about having a sentimental piece of family jewelry cleaned by a jeweler, fearing a stone might be switched or replaced. Henderson said there’s an easy way to avoid that. “This is one more reason to get to know your jeweler. If they’re well established and have been there year in and year out, they’re your advocate and your friend. We’ve all heard horror stories, but that often occurs in very large cities with transient populations that can do bad things and leave the area. “When a customer comes to me and they have that concern, we take time with them in the microscope to show them identifying characteristics that only their jewelry has. Then you’re able to document details and can always ask to see it again. So, to know your jewelry is to know your jeweler,” Henderson said. Use the tips below for home remedies to keep your jewelry sparkling, but don’t neglect to get your favorite pieces examined by an expert. The checkup and cleaning are usually free, and will give you peace of mind as well as sparkle.

Diamonds, rubies, sapphires Both Saxon’s and Silverado recommend a mixture of onethird nonsudsing ammonia, onethird Mr. Clean liquid cleaner and one-third water. “It’s a really efficient, good cleaner for the majority of your jewelry. If you have hard, durable stones like diamond, ruby, sapphire, have a little jar of this and leave it in your bathroom. When getting ready to go out, let your jewelry soak for a while, scrub it a little with a toothbrush, rinse it and it’ll look good. Rub it dry with a soft polishing cloth,” said Henderson, adding that you can do this daily. This cleaner is not appropriate for pearls, emeralds, malachite, turquoise, lapis lazuli, coral and other sensitive or porous stones.

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Use a toothbrush or wooden toothpick to clean behind stones, but use a light hand. “A toothpick is not a bad thing, since the wood is soft, but sometimes if we get into those habits, we end up with a paperclip and can do some damage or push the stone out,” Henderson said.

Silver, gold and platinum Silver jewelry with a shiny finish should be cleaned with a treated polishing cloth to remove tarnish and add shine, Hanst said. For matte, sandblasted or brushed finishes, she recommends mixing baking soda and water into a “muddy paste” to use as a polish. “It’s a little bit abrasive, so it’s only for the matte finishes,“ Hanst said. Henderson said the jars of silver polish cream found on grocery store shelves “work great” on silver jewelry. Hanst doesn’t recommend them, since she said they can be harsh and rough on jewelry. She prefers a polishing cloth. As for jars of jewelry cleaning liquids found in the grocery store cleaning aisle, Henderson said they do an efficient job. Clean jewelry according to its stones or jewels, not its metal. “For example, in cleaning silver that is set with turquoise, or gold that is set with pearls, you must carefully polish or clean around the stones and avoid immersing the piece in water or cleaning solution,” writes Cheryl Mendelson in “Home Comforts: The Art and Science of Keeping House.” You can also buy gloves impregnated with polish (designed for big jobs like flatware, tea services, etc.) to polish silver jewelry. Whatever you choose, Henderson warns that some silver jewelry is rhodium-plated, and if you’re constantly cleaning and polishing it, you’ll work your way through the plating, and your jewelry will tarnish more easily. Be gentle on plated items. Consider storing silver jewelry in a box or drawer with commercial strips you can buy that draw the oxidation to them first, not to the silver, said Henderson, and he recommends silver storage bags that are impregnated with an anti-tarnish material. Hanst suggests keeping ster-

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This cleaner is for hard, durable gemstones like diamonds, rubies and sapphires only. Do not use it on soft, porous jewelry like pearls, turquoise, emerald, lapis lazuli, malachite and other colored, natural stones. 1 ⁄3 nonsudsing ammonia 1 ⁄3 Mr. Clean liquid cleaner 1 ⁄3 water Mix together and put in a small jar. Suggestion from Ron Henderson of Saxon’s Jewelers: Leave it in your bathroom and while getting ready to go out, let your jewelry soak for a few minutes, then scrub it with a soft toothbrush, rinse and rub it with a soft polishing cloth. You may do this every day without harming the jewelry.

DURABLE GEMSTONES Use home-cleaning solution (see above), a mild dish soap and water mixture or toothpaste on a toothbrush. Ultrasonic cleaners are generally suitable. • Diamonds • Rubies ling silver in plastic bags to prevent tarnishing. “Some old-school people will put real clean pennies surrounding silver because copper will oxidize before the silver,” Henderson said. Avoid wearing silver jewelry in hot springs (sulfur turns it black, but it can be refinished, said Hanst) and hot tubs (chlorine may have the same effect). Remove all jewelry while using harsh household cleaners. Gold and platinum do not tarnish, but will get dirty. Use a mild dish soap and water solution to clean them, and then simply dry the item with a soft cloth. Dents and scratches may be polished out by a jeweler, but keep in mind that polishing takes away tiny pieces of metal, so it’s not always advisable, said Henderson.

Colored natural stones Wipe with a cloth dampened with water to clean off hair spray, perfume, skin oils, perspiration and dirt. Don’t clean soft, porous or sensitive stones ultrasonically or with steam.

DELICATE GEMS Do not immerse in water or cleaning solutions. Wipe with a damp cloth (use water, never chemicals), and pat dry. Ultrasonic cleaners are not recommended. • Emeralds • Pearls • Mother-of-pearl • Jade • Opals • Amber • Coral • Lapis lazuli • Turquoise • Malachite • Carnelian • Chalcedony • Ivory • Bone • Shells — Alison Highberger Rings with large carnelians or chalcedony stones are trendy right now. “Keep colored natural stones out of the sun. They can burn,” said Hanst. Talk to your jeweler about care instructions when you make a purchase. “Gemstones are delicate. They have to be cared for appropriately. For instance, an $800, big, chunky, beautiful stone ring with a hand finish on the stone: If you shower with it on every day and whack it on the door, it’s going to compromise the stone. You shouldn’t swim, shower and do sports with that piece, but there’s plenty of other jewelry that you can wear all the time and do anything in,” Hanst said.

Watches and bracelets Both watches and bracelets have a lot of moving parts that can collect dirt, grime and skin oils. Ron Henderson said people often wear their watches and bracelets into the shower, thinking they’re helping to keep them clean. “To a certain degree that’s true, but the other thing that happens

is a lot of soap film builds up, and it tends to be a nice vehicle for more dirt and particles to stick to, and we consequently find a lot of wear and tear on watches and bracelets because people don’t clean them as much as they should,” he said. Don’t shower with them, but wipe watches and bracelets with a damp cloth, or use the homemade cleaning solution and get a toothbrush into metal bands or chain links, rinse, dry and polish with a soft cloth.

Antiques and filigree Old jewelry and ornamental metal work, or filigree, may be cleaned with a toothbrush and mild cleaning solution, said Henderson, but he cautions that you need to know what you’ve got before you start scrubbing. “I can’t stress enough to have your jewelry checked first by a jeweler, and once you know, you can clean it from a point of knowledge instead of ‘I hope this is OK,’” he said.

Costume jewelry Henderson said that inexpensive costume jewelry often needs a softer touch regarding cleaning than expensive jewelry. “It’s usually manufactured with base metals that aren’t able to be repaired, so be very careful with cleaning. Gemstones are often glued in the settings and could be loosened by cleaning with liquid products. It doesn’t matter if it’s jewelry cleaner or soap and water or the homemade concoction — they’ll all eventually break down the glues. “At the same time, jewelry is all about making you feel good, or making a statement, or accessorizing a great outfit or a special evening, so it doesn’t matter if something is $5 or $5,000 — if it’s meaningful to you, then you should probably have it checked and cleaned to make sure that you get maximum life,” he said. Saxon’s is happy to clean costume jewelry. “A lot of times, people come in and are embarrassed about asking, but it’s probably better if we do it than doing it the wrong way at home,” he said. Alison Highberger can be reached at ahighberger@mac .com.

How to properly paint pressure-treated wood By Al Heavens

Peace of mind may not be as elusive as you think.

Home cleaning solution for jewelry

• Sapphires • Garnets • Amethysts • Topaz And all other transparent gemstones, except emeralds

Q:

I live in a condo development. The association is requiring owners to paint their patio fences. The fences were made of pretreated wood and were painted gray. The paint has never stayed on very well, and the color has changed from gray to white. What can be done to the wood to properly prepare it for painting and a color change? Will the paint ever stay on? Will it require two coats? Would priming help? The paint probably never adhered properly because the wood wasn’t allowed enough time to dry thoroughly before the work was done. Oddly, I found some useful

A:

information on how to determine dryness on the website of the Burlington, Vt., planning commission: “There are differing opinions on how long pressure-treated wood should sit before painting — some say a year, others six months. It depends on how dry the wood was when it was installed. “One test is to sprinkle some water on it — if the water is absorbed, it’s ready to be painted. If time is an issue, use wood marked KDAT (kiln-dried after treatment).” I have neither painted nor stained pressure-treated wood because I don’t like the look. I prefer to let the wood weather to a grayish color. Then I clean it and coat it with a clear water repellent.

I used this technique on the deck of a former house, and on the stairs leading from my kitchen to the patio at the present one. There are both oil and latex paints and stains for pressuretreated lumber. I always prime new anything before I paint, and I usually apply two coats — making sure to allow enough time for the primer and first coats to set up and dry before adding topcoats.

Q:

My sister’s house sustained damage from a roof leak and it needs a lot of work to repair it. The roof has been replaced, but she still needs work done in her kitchen. My question is how to either refinish cabinets or paint over the stain. Are the cabinets wood or laminate? How much dam-

A:

age was done? Did they warp? Didn’t the homeowners’ insurance cover replacement of the damaged cabinets? I have in the past written about painting wood cabinets as a lowcost alternative to replacing them. There have been do-it-yourself programs on TV that have demonstrated this technique. But from what I have seen up close, this cosmetic treatment doesn’t last or, in many cases, doesn’t look very good, no matter what the hosts or the makers of the paint designed for this job say. I’d go back to the insurance company about replacing the cabinets. Questions? E-mail Al Heavens at aheavens@phillynews.com. Volume prohibits individual replies.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 12, 2011 F5

G Seed-starting schedule This chart will help you determine when to start seeds indoors. Write the average frost-free date in Column 1 — we’ve used Bend’s norm of May 31, but if you live south of Bend, you may need a later frost-free date and if you live north of Bend, you may need an earlier date. To determine when to sow seeds indoors, use Column 2 to count forward or backward by weeks, writing the resulting date in Column 3. Then subtract the number of weeks in Column 4 to determine when to plant seeds indoors. Crop

Col. 1 Frost-free date

Col. 2 Weeks to set out

Col. 3 Outdoor planting date

Col. 4 Weeks to grow indoors

Sow date

Beans Cauliflower Corn Cucumbers Lettuce Melons Peas Peppers Squash Tomatoes

5/31 5/31 5/31 5/31 5/31 5/31 5/31 5/31 5/31 5/31

+1 -2 0 +1 -2 +2 -4 +2 +2 0

6/7 5/17 5/31 6/7 5/17 6/14 5/3 6/14 6/14 5/31

-4 -6 -4 -3 -5 -3 -4 -8 -3 -8

5/10 4/5 5/3 5/17 4/12 5/24 4/5 4/19 5/24 4/5

With permission from National Gardening Magazine, 180 Flyn Ave., Burlington, VT 05401 Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Starting Continued from F1 Whatever you use, you must provide for drainage. I use a nail to punch a series of holes in the bottom of the container to ensure good drainage. Everything you need to know is printed on the seed packet: the soil temperature needed to germinate, the soil depth needed to cover the seeds or directions to press the seeds into the mix and not cover. There will be an expected germination time listed in days, which will be followed by when to transplant. The process starts by premoistening your seed-starting mix. Fill your container with the mix, and set it either in the sink or in a pan filled with several inches of water. The water will be drawn up to the surface, which is more efficient and easier than surface watering. Plant the seeds according to the information provided on the packet. Moisture has already been provided from the presoaking, but it is important to gently mist the seeds to help them settle in. Cover the seeds with a dome or plastic wrap and set in a warm place. Continue to monitor the moisture level daily; the mix should be moist but not wet. The most favorable germinating temperature will occur at a soil temperature range of 75 to 90 degrees. Remember, that’s soil temperature not air temperature. Possibilities to attain that range of temperatures include near (but not on) a floor register, the top of the refrigerator, the hearth of a gas fireplace that is used daily, or you might want to consider the heat mats that are available for that purpose. Once the seeds have germinated, they should be moved to a light source either from fluorescent tubes or from the sun. At this point, the light is more critical than the temperature.

Ongoing care Unless you have been able to space your seeds in the flat with mathematical precision (and even then they don’t stay in place), you will probably have to do some thinning. Instead of yanking out the extra seedlings and risking root injury to the neighboring seedlings, use a pair

of embroidery or nail scissors to snip the plant at soil level. The time to start a fertilizing program is when the seedling starts to develop the true leaves. The first leaves are the rounded cotyledon leaves followed by the true leaves that make the plant recognizable as to the variety. Seedlings should only receive half-strength rather than a fullstrength fertilizer. Instead of 1 tablespoon per gallon of water, for example, the portion should be 1½ teaspoons per gallon. The most common and discouraging problem occurring in indoor seed starting is called dampening off. Everything seems to be going along just fine, and then one morning you discover half the seedlings bent over and wilted at the soil level. The cause is usually overwatering combined with poor air circulation. To avoid the disease, make sure the level of the seeding mix is high enough so as not to create a cavern of dead air space. Create air flow either with a small fan or by physically fanning the seedlings several times a day. No fancy Victorian or Oriental fan is needed; just use a square piece of cardboard cut from the side of a cereal box. Hardening off is the term used to gradually introduce seedlings to the great outdoors before planting to the garden or a container. The object is to slow down the growth for about a week before you expose them to the more extreme outside weather. Water less often and don’t fertilize during that last week indoors. Set them outside in a protected area that receives filtered sun for a few hours a day. Gradually increase the amount of sun and the time spent outdoors for a week or 10 days. The new environment will cause the plants to dry out faster, so be sure to check daily. Finally, the long-awaited planting day arrives. Contrary to what you might prefer, planting should be done on a cloudy day or early in the day before the sun and wind can cause damage. The garden soil should be moist, so schedule an irrigation day before you plant so the soil is saturated and schedule time after planting to give everyone a nice drink to send them on their way to production. Liz Douville can be reached at douville@bendbroadband.com.

Next week: Deck care What you should know before pressure washing the surface.

Peace, quiet, exercise: Alternatives to power tools get a body moving By Joel M. Lerner Special to The Washington Post

If you are anything like me, you have a love-hate relationship with power tools. They are among the greatest laborsaving devices available, but they also are the bane of our existence, especially when we hear our neighbors fire up their state-of-the-art lawn equipment on a beautiful weekend morning. If you have the time to get some exercise — and you have a shovel — then dig your soil and mix in organic material by hand. It is a rewarding activity. Once you loosen the soil, it’s easy to dig the holes and install your plants, and this can be done with no increase to our carbon footprint or use of fossil fuel. It is a good idea to rake leaves by hand because of the low impact on the environment. The rhythm of using a hand rake can be picked up after a short time, and if you wear gardening gloves, you will get a good upper-body workout without hand blisters. I have found that a sturdy rake can move almost the same amount of leaves as quickly as a leaf blower. When all of the leaves have been collected onto a tarp and taken to the compost pile, that’s the time to get out the leaf blower to clean out areas around shrubs or sweep walks and smooth the beds. You can use the blower as needed, but there is no reason to unleash more noise or particulate pollution into a neighborhood than necessary. It isn’t only the noise — it’s a sign that you are gardening too cleanly. If the yard and beds are emptied of the all-important leaf

Thinkstock

mold and compost that help aerate and drain the soil, you will also have fewer organisms to decay organic material and produce nutrient-rich soil. Although power equipment can be necessary, I still think

that the best way to clean up your yard and garden is to weed and rake it by hand. When the debris has been loosened, that is the best time to use the blower for a final cleanup. Leave lawn clippings. They

Advice for newbies ... and others By Adrian Higgins The Washington Post

Here’s an edited excerpt from an online Q&A recently hosted by Washington Post gardening columnist Adrian Higgins.

Q:

I’m creating a garden for the first time on my lawn. Should I add commercial fertilizer or just start with compost? I would like to create an organic garden, or as organic as practicality allows. Fertilizer is the last thing you need to worry about. First, the site must be in full sun. Second, it must be in a free-draining area. Then you can start to dismantle the lawn and create growing beds. Skim off the turf and create raised beds with lots of good organic matter that will mitigate the poor soil that you probably have. Hurry, the planting season is upon us.

A:

Q:

I’ve had a tomato and basil garden for a few years. Last spring, I planted some heirlooms of the Fiorentina type. They all got hit by the wilt and produced only stunted fruit. Is there anything I can do this year, or do the harmful elements that cause wilt stay in the soil forever? First, the season last year for tomatoes was dreadful, not just because of late blight disease. We just have to hope that this year the temperatures will be a bit more manageable, and that we’ll have more rainfall. Don’t put tomato plants out too early; they really get set back by cold soil. I am only starting my seeds now, for planting in May. Also, I would plant some fail-safe cherry tomatoes such as Sun Gold, Black Cherry and Super Sweet 100. Whatever the season throws at those guys, they seem to be able to take it. My general rule with tomatoes is: The bigger it is, the harder it is to raise a good fruit to maturity.

A:

Seed starting indoors allows for an earlier bloom and harvest. This helps with Central Oregon’s 65- to 75-day growing season.

Sandra Leavitt Lerner / For The Washington Post

If you have the time to get some exercise — and you have a shovel — then dig your soil and mix in organic material by hand.

will decompose quickly and add organic matter to the soil. For cutting tools, I prefer hand shears to power tools. Pruning selectively by hand is better for plants than using power shears. Reel-type push mowers are a more environmentally responsible method for grooming your lawn than using gasolinepowered mowers. Reel mowers use no fuel, but the grass must be cut when it needs it. A great deal has been said against lawns as a ground cover. They have gotten a bad rap. It’s not that lawns have no value. Being green, grass does photosynthesize, taking in carbon dioxide and emitting oxygen. A well-maintained lawn can reduce weeds, such as ragweed, that produce allergens. And it’s better than underbrush at discouraging rodents and other unwanted wildlife. In areas where fire is a danger, a well-kept lawn can act as a firebreak. But keeping a lawn healthy can require using power equipment such as core aerators, leaf blowers, string trimmers and, of course, mowers. Instead of bagging and taking leaves to a landfill, rake or blow them into the woods, where they create compost and keep down weeds and underbrush. There are also mulching mowers that will shred the grass as it’s mowed. Gardeners who don’t have shady areas would do better to use a mulching device on a mower and leave the leaf bits on the lawn. A chipper or shredder can grind large accumulations of branches, leaves and other debris for the compost pile.

Q:

For the past two summers, we have been plagued by both early and late

tomato blight. I even planted last year’s tomatoes in half-barrels of brand-new soil. Is our only option to spray the vines constantly with Daconil? We really can’t live without our Brandywines. I don’t think any veggie is worth growing if you have to spray it with synthetic pesticides. If you are using the same containers, I would get rid of all the soil (and obviously any of last year’s vegetation) and grow less-demanding varieties, including hybrids with disease resistance. I think Brandywine is overrated and difficult to grow.

A:

Q:

I’ve heard a lot of different opinions about when or whether to mulch around vegetables. Mulch is valuable for keeping weeds down and conserving soil moisture. Chopped straw is perfect for this; I would just be careful not to lay it too thick. Don’t use shredded bark or wood.

A:

Q:

My husband and I are attempting a small garden (4-by-4-feet) on our back patio. We’ve never grown anything before, so I’m a little worried about how to start. We want tomatoes, a variety of herbs, onions, maybe squash and/or peas. Is that too much? Your ambitions exceed your real estate. I would just grow some lettuce or mesclun mix now and then plan to grow stuff vertically in the summer: a couple of tomato plants and some pole beans.

A:

Q:

I’d love to have a vegetable garden but have deer that traipse through my yard each evening. I know a fence is the only solution, but I’d like to do something that’s aesthetically pleasing. Yes, there are many beautiful fences. I have friends who have enclosed theirs with a striking fence made of cedar poles and twigs. In my community garden video (washington post.com/home), you can see

A:

the fence I made from (sounds awful but it works) half-inch gas piping. Another option is black netting fence that recedes. Fencing is the best way to keep deer away, though a friend told me a squirting hose, activated by motion, does a good job.

Q:

How does one figure out what areas in a very treeladen yard get six hours of full sunlight a day? First, wait for the leaves to fill out, which takes the

A:

Central Oregon Chapter

whole month of April. Observe the light patterns between 11 a.m. and 5 p.m. The sunniest spots are what you’re going for. It will require some presence, though not continuously.

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F6 Tuesday, April 12, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Caramel cake in a snap Nancy Hannah, of Baltimore, was looking for a recipe for a quick and simple single-layer cake with a caramel icing. She thought the cake might have been called Caramel Frosted Picnic cake and was made with the one-bowl method. She said the cake was ideal for taking to picnics because it held up well and was easy to transport. Gladys Wilt. of Lothian, Md., sent in a recipe from her copy of “The Joy of Cooking,” 1953 edition, for Hurry-Up Caramel Cake that she thought might be close to what Hannah was looking for. The name of this cake speaks for itself. It is a cinch to make and is best as a flat cake, iced and cut into squares. Wilt did not include the recipe for the recommended caramel icing, but I found a very tasty and quick caramel frosting in “The Cake Mix Doctor” cookbook by Anne Byrn that worked perfectly with this cake. I decided to test the recipe without any of the optional ingredients. The result was not fancy but simple and surprisingly good, and a cake almost everyone is likely to enjoy, whether it’s served at home or packed up and taken along on the next picnic.

RECIPE FINDER

HURRY-UP CARAMEL CAKE Makes 12-15 servings. 1¾ C cake flour (sifted before measuring) 1 C packed brown sugar ¾ C chopped nuts (optional) ¾ C chopped dates (optional) ½ C soft butter 2 eggs ½ C milk ½ tsp salt 1¾ tsp double-acting baking

powder 1 tsp pure vanilla extract FROSTING: 8 TBS butter ½ C light brown sugar ½ C dark brown sugar ¼ C milk 2 C confectioners’ sugar 1 tsp pure vanilla extract

Be sure to have all ingredients at room temperature. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Whisk sifted cake flour and brown sugar together. Add the rest of the ingredients and beat vigorously with a wire whisk or rotary beater for 2 to 3 minutes. Bake in a greased and floured 9-by-13inch pan for about half an hour. Cool. To make frosting: Place butter and brown sugars in a medium sized heavy-duty saucepan over medium heat. Stir and cook until the mixture comes to a boil, about 2 minutes. Add the milk, stir and bring the mixture back to a boil, then remove the pan from the heat. Add the confectioners’ sugar and vanilla. Beat with a wooden spoon or wire whisk until the frosting is smooth (it will be thin). Pour frosting, while still warm, over the cooled cake. Cut into squares and serve. RECIPE REQUEST: Jareene Bardoll, of Baltimore, recently had a Southwesternstyle quiche that was topped with black beans and an avocado salsa at the Severn Inn in Annapolis, Md. She would love to have the recipe or something similar.

If you are looking for a recipe or can answer a request, write to Julie Rothman, Recipe Finder, The Baltimore Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore 21278 or e-

mail recipefinderbaltsun.com. If you send in more than one recipe, please put each on a separate piece of paper and include your name, address and daytime phone number. Important: Name and hometown must accompany recipes in order to be published. Please list the ingredients in order of use, and note the number of servings each recipe makes. Please type or print contributions. Letters and recipes may be edited for clarity.

Sandwiches Hearty fish makes with a side a tasty dinner dish of history By Susan M. Selasky Detroit Free Press

“The Encyclopedia of Sandwiches” by Susan Russo (Quirk Books, 320 pgs., $18.95)

By Tish Wells McClatchy-Tribune News Service

The humble sandwich has a history as lively as its makings and is defined only by the limits of the human imagination. Susan Russo’s “The Encyclopedia of Sandwiches” can be viewed as just a cookbook, but it can also be enjoyed as a thoughtprovoking history lesson. And your mouth will water at the photographs by Matt Armendariz. The term “sandwich” dates to the 1760s, when the British Earl of Sandwich first demanded a snack of putting meat between two slices of bread, and ate it then and there. He probably wasn’t the first human to come up with the idea but is generally credited with popularizing the term. The trend spread to America. In the 1830s, a cookbook came out with a recipe for a ham sandwich. The concept had obviously blossomed, since other fillings, such as sardines, cheese, nuts and jelly, were also listed. Every ethnic group that came to America brought a new quirk to the humble sandwich. Liverwurst from Germany, the Cubano from Cuba, the Caprese from Italy. The “classic club” started in a gentleman’s club in the 1890s. If you overstuff it, Russo notes, you have a “Dagwood” named for the “Blondie” comic strip character — a multilevel sandwich taller than most human mouths can bite. Sandwiches come as openfaced, bagel, pouched, wrapped, unleavened, in sugary doughnuts and even as dessert, like in ice cream sandwiches. Explore exotics like Lobster Roll or Croque-Monsieur or stick with the homespun pleasure of a BLT — bacon, lettuce and tomato. One thing becomes clear as you go through the book. Between 1890 and the 1920s, there was an explosion of new sandwiches. The well-loved Fluffernutter — white bread, peanut butter and a thick layer of marshmallow fluff — first started appearing after World War I. There are trends in sandwiches. The sandwich loaf of stacked bread slices with layers of garnishes and then frosted like a cake with unsweetened cream cheese was popular in the 1950s but by the 1970s was scarcely seen. “The Encyclopedia of Sandwiches” might even get your child interested in the history behind a PB&J.

Salmon is my go-to fish because it’s tasty, easy to prepare and takes to many flavors. It’s also a firm, hearty fish that holds up well to all cooking methods, from grilling to broiling to oven baking. And you can toss in that it’s a good source of omega-3 fatty acids — a good fat. Steelhead trout closely resembles salmon — it’s often referred to as a cousin — and is widely available. Kevin Dean, co-owner of Superior Fish in Royal Oak, Mich., said steelhead trout are in the salmon family. “They have a nice vibrant color like that of a wild salmon,” he said, and their flavor is mild like that of farm-raised salmon, “so it’s the best of both worlds.” Today’s recipe is adapted from one in the March issue of

Food & Wine magazine. You can use salmon or steelhead. I like that it calls for toasted wheat germ (a whole-grain source) for a slightly crunchy coating. The recipe was paired with a Food & Wine story on testing new nonstick pans (www .foodandwine.com). Nonstick skillets are not just a must-have for healthy cooking, but also for cooking things like eggs, crepes, potato pancakes and more. The trouble is finding one that works well and doesn’t put a huge dent in your pocketbook. Food & Wine tested the newest ones on the market and recommended six. Some are pricey, ranging from $240 for an 8-inch Control Induc from Demeyere to $225 for Calphalon’s 4-quart Unison all the way down to $23 for Lodge’s preseasoned nonstick cast-iron 10¼-inch pan.

MARTHA STEWART

Q:

Can you tell me about mushroom hunting? I’m interested in trying it but don’t know where to begin. Although mushrooms pop up year-round, spring is the unofficial start of mushroom season for many hunters. Warmer temperatures and rain create ideal growing conditions for a wide variety of fungi. And while there are few things as satisfying as discovering a patch of gorgeous and delicious mushrooms to harvest and enjoy, a search must be undertaken judiciously. An array of wild mushrooms is edible, but many others are mildly poisonous, causing violent stomach upset; some are deadly. Recognizing the difference is not easy, particularly for a beginner. For safety, identify every mushroom you collect. If you have any doubt about a particular fungus, discard it. Consulting reliable field guides and taking classes are good steps in learning to identify mushrooms, but it’s best and safest to apprentice with an expert. In the U.S., you can find a mycology club in your area through the North American Mycological Association (www .namyco.org/clubs), and attend meetings to acquaint yourself with enthusiasts, both amateur and professional. The biggest challenge will be convincing mushroom hunters to let you tag along when they forage, because their favorite spots are likely closely guarded secrets. Once you are invited, take plenty of notes so that you will know what to look for when you’re ready to find your own patch.

A:

Q: A:

Some of my favorite perfumes have darkened. Are they still usable? If you keep perfume in a cool spot, out of direct sunlight, it will smell much

Michelle V. Agins / New York Times News Service

It’s essential to identify every mushroom you forage: Many varieties are perfectly edible, but others are poisonous — and it’s not always easy to tell the difference. the same two years after its purchase. Warm temperatures (high 70s and 80s) and sunlight break down the oils in perfume, shortening its life span, says Olivier Gillotin, who creates perfumes at Givaudin. Using your perfume regularly also has an effect: Letting air into the bottle causes the liquid to oxidize. Over time, this alters the odor and may change the color. (Sunlight can also affect the color.) But just because a fragrance is more than a couple of years old or has a new shade doesn’t mean you should toss it. Often, even if the top notes (the initial aroma, which lasts 10 to 20 minutes after spritzing) smell “off,” the scent may be as lovely as ever after that. In this case, you could enjoy your fragrance for another five years or more. When purchasing perfume, choose a small bottle with a spray dispenser to let less air in. To truly prolong the life of a perfume, store it in the refrigerator; the low temperature and darkness can preserve it for 10 or more years.

Q:

Soaking and cooking dried beans takes a long time. Is there a way to speed up the process? You can cut the preparation time significantly. To reduce the soaking period from as long as a day to about an hour, place beans in a saucepan, cover them with cold water, and bring to a boil. Turn off the heat, and let the beans sit, covered, for an hour. Drain and rinse the beans before cooking. To reduce the cooking time by half — or even more — use a pressure cooker. Follow the device’s instruction manual.

A:

Questions should be addressed to Ask Martha, c/o Letters Department, Martha Stewart Living, 601 W. 26th St., 9th floor, New York, NY 10001. Questions may also be sent by e-mail to: mslletters@ marthastewart.com. Please include your name, address and daytime telephone number. Questions of general interest will be answered in this column; Martha Stewart regrets that unpublished letters cannot be answered individually.

REDMOND SMOKEHOUSE ORDER EARLY FOR YOUR

Easter Dinner

Susan M. Selasky / Detroit Free Press

Salmon is a hearty fish that takes to many flavors like TripleMustard Salmon.

TRIPLE-MUSTARD SALMON

Simply the highest quality, most delicious meats in Central Oregon. Quality Guaranteed.

Makes 4 servings. 3 TBS toasted wheat germ 1 TBS yellow mustard seeds, crushed 4 skinless salmon or steelhead fillets (about 56 oz each)

Old Fashion Hickory & Alder Smoked Bone-in and Boneless Hams

Salt and freshly ground pepper or favorite allpurpose seasoning 2½ TBS Dijon mustard 1½ tsp dry mustard 1 TBS canola oil

In a shallow dish, combine the wheat germ and mustard seeds. Season the salmon fillets with salt and pepper. In a bowl, blend the Dijon mustard with the dry mustard and spread it over the skinned side of the fillets. Dip the mustard side of the fillets in the wheat germ mixture until thickly coated. In a nonstick skillet, heat the oil until shimmering. Add the fillets, crust-side down, and cook over moderately high heat until browned and crisp, 3 minutes. Turn the fillets and cook over moderate heat until just cooked in the center, about 3 minutes longer. Transfer the salmon to plates and serve crust-side up. Nutrition information: 331 calories (46 percent from fat), 16 g fat (2 g saturated fat ), 4 g carbohydrates, 38 g protein, 298 mg sodium, 101 mg cholesterol, 1 g fiber. — Adapted from Food & Wine magazine, March 2011 issue

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 12, 2011 G1

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208

Pets and Supplies 125 Gallon Saltwater aquarium w/oak stand, skimmer, power compact lighting, live rock, large fish, much more. $1000 obo. (541) 548-7947. The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Dog Crate & Carrier, small, like new, $75 for both, Redmond 541-526-0897. DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $18! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500. Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com English Mastiff puppies. Males & females, Fawns & 1 Brindle. Shots, health guarantee, ready to go. $1000ea; $1500 for the Brindle. 541-279-1437

Lhasa Apso/Pug Spring Pups. Lhasa Apso mother, dad is reg. brinde Pug. Adorable variety colors. Must see. You will fall in love. $400. Taking $75 dep. now. Call for info. 541-548-0747,541-279-3588 Malti-Poos: phone correction made. 2 females, born 9/9/10. All puppy & rabies shots, dewormed & health checked, $375, no shipping. 541-350-5106, no AM calls.

MINIATURE SCHNAUZERS two males, 8 weeks old, $300 each. 541-416-3677 Parti Pomeranian Male puppy ready for a new home! No papers. First 2 sets of shots done. $350. Call Jamie at 541-416-0175 541-390-6053 Pomeranian Puppies CKC Reg, 2 fem’s, 3 males; 2 rare gray, 2 fancy red sables, 1 black. $500-600. 541-598-4443

FREE adult companion cats to seniors. Friendly, fixed, ID chip, shots, more. Will alPOODLE Pups, AKC Toy ways take back for any reaLovable, happy tail-waggers! son. Sat/Sun 1-5. Other days Call 541-475-3889 by appt, call 541-647-2181 to schedule. 65480 78th, Bend, 541-389-8420. Photos, map, more at www.craftcats.org. Professional Training for Obedience, Upland & Waterfowl for FREE rescued barn/shop cats, all breeds. Labrador & Pufixed, shots. Some tame. We Aussies, AKC Mini's, Toy's pardelpointer pups & started dogs will deliver. 541-389-8420. ents on site family raised as well, 541-680-0009. shots/wormed must see Free Shih Tsus (2), older, to Queensland Heelers 541-598-6264/788-7799 good home, must stay toStandards & mini,$150 & up. gether, 1 female, 1 male-has Border Collie/New Zealand 541-280-1537 been neutered, 541-604-6111 Huntaway puppies, 8 wks, working parents, wonderful German Shepherd Pups, AKC. http://rightwayranch.wordpress.com/ dogs, $300. 541-546-6171 Health guarantee. $850 Saint Bernard Rescue 509-406-3717 Now Adopting! Border Collie Puppies (10), 10 saintrescue.org/oregon.htm wks, 1st shots, well socialGolden Retriever Pups exc. Males & Females. Large breed ized, $50 ea. 541-477-3327 quality, parents OFA, good exper. req’d. Foster homes hips, $650. 541-318-3396. Border Collies, black/white, tri, desperately needed, too! smooth coat, shots/wormed, Call Jeff: 541-390-1353 7 weeks $250. 541-948-7997 Kelpie/Red Heeler Mix, neutered with shots, $100, Yellow Lab Pups, males, Boxer Mix, 1 male, 1 female 541-576-3701,503-310-2514 $250, females $300, ready brindle color, 12 wks. Asking now, 541-447-1323. Kittens & cats thru local rescue $75 each. 541-410-9928 group. 65480 78th, Bend. Boxers AKC Reg, fawns, whites, 210 Sat/Sun 1-5. Other days by & brindles, 1st shots, very soappt, 541-647-2181. Altered, Furniture & Appliances cial.$500-$650. 541-325-3376 shots, ID chip, more. Small kittens also, 541-815-7278. !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty! Dachshund, AKC 2-yr old male, Info: 541-389-8420; Photos, A-1 Washers & Dryers $375. DNA, pedigree, red & map at www.craftcats.org $125 each. Full Warranty. white piebald. 541-420-6044 Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s Labradoodles, Australian dead or alive. 541-280-7355. Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com FIND IT! Labrador Pups, AKC, ChocoBUY IT! lates & Yellows, $500; Blacks, SELL IT! $450. Dew claws, 1st shots & The Bulletin Classiieds DACHSHUND MINI Longwormed. Call 541-536-5385 haired puppies AKC. $500+ www.welcomelabs.com Beautiful gaming/dining table; up. 30% off if you spay or overstuffed loveseat (new); Check out the neuter. 541-598-7417 lamp table w/ball &claw feet; classiieds online Dachshund Puppies, miniature, mannequin; primitive cabiwww.bendbulletin.com 3 females, 1 male, asking nets; contemporary metal Updated daily $200. 541-536-5037 chandelier. 541-389-5408

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O r e g o n

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246

256

267

286

Furniture & Appliances

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Photography

Fuel and Wood

Sales Northeast Bend

CANON AE1, with 2 lenses, and accessories, $100. 541-389-3511.

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit

Furniture

ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

A v e . ,

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neighborhood! Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 541-385-5809.

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $18! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500.

KENMORE White 30” freestanding gas range, new $1,699. Asking $450. 541-549-8626.

Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

Liquidating Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418

GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 541-318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com

Loveseat with sofa, new, light blue and beige, $400. 541-549-8626. Off-white leather couch, 82” excellent condition, $100. Call 541-548-7137 Queen size Flexsteel hideabed, dark taupe, lightly used, $95. 541-419-0613

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call

541-598-4643. The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

212

Antiques & Collectibles The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

Tower of London Castle, (Lenox porcelain 1995) mint cond. 541-848-8230.

215

Coins & Stamps Private collector buying postage stamp albums & collections, world-wide and U.S. 573-286-4343 (local, cell #)

240

Crafts and Hobbies Alpaca Yarn, various colors/ blends/sparkle. 175yds/skein $7.50-8.50 ea. 541-385-4989

245

Golf Equipment 2003 Club Car, full curtains, 2 yr-old batteries, very good cond. $3800. 541-382-3275

HANDGUN SAFETY CLASS for concealed license. NRA, Police Firearms Instructor, Lt. Gary DeKorte Thur. April 14, 6:30-10:30 pm. Call Kevin, Centwise, for reservations $40. 541-548-4422 H&R 20g youth single shot shotgun, wood stock, Ltd Edition. $200. 541-647-8931 Lyman .50 cal Plains Pistol w/ black powder supplies. Pics: http://jalbum.net/a/941951 $300/offer 541-410-8029 OR + UTAH CCW: Required class Oregon and Utah Concealed License. Saturday April 16 9:30 a.m. at Madras Range. $100 includes Photo required by Utah, Call Paul Sumner (541)475-7277 for preregistration and info Remington 12g Express 870 Magnum, wood stock, pump shotgun, $200 541-647-8931 SIG 226 9MM NIB, $595. Remington 7600 pump 30-06, $385, 541-815-4901.

260

Misc. Items BBQ, electric, with Rotisserie, for patio, clean, $50 OBO, Redmond, 541-526-0897. BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. Crypt-Lawn, dbl depth for 2 full caskets at Deschutes Memorial Gardens, Bend, Meadow Pond Garden. Lot 2C, space 2, Deed #3664. $1300. 541-848-7600; 541-848-7599 Metal shelving in great shape, 20-30 units @ $30 each (assembled). 541-408-7358 Towable BBQ, restaurant grade, made in Texas, cost $12,000, sell $1500, 541-419-0613. Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

262

Commercial / Ofice Equipment &Fixtures

265

Building Materials

Health and Beauty Items

Cabinet Refacing & Refinishing. Save Thousands!

GOT THYROID PROBLEMS?

Most jobs completed in 5 days or less. Best Pricing in the Industry.

REDMOND Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 1242 S. Hwy 97 541-548-1406 Open to the public .

The Hardwood Outlet Wood Floor Super Store

866-700-1414

• Laminate from .79¢ sq.ft. • Hardwood from $2.99 sq.ft.

253

246

Guns & Hunting and Fishing 1957 Marlin lever action 336 SC, 35 REM, mint cond. $450. 541-508-6301 22Mag Rohn RG63 8-shot DA/SA revolver, leather holster, $200. 541-647-8931 CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

TV, Stereo and Video

541-322-0496

Stereo set in solid Oak cabinet, CD, amplifier, dual cassette, $225. 541-419-0613

Heating and Stoves

TC audio speakers (2), solid oak, on pedestals, $150 & Audio Super Bass, on rollers, in solid oak cabinet, $150. 541-419-0613.

255

Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

All Year Dependable Firewood: Split/dry lodgepole, $90 for 1/2 cord; $160 for 1; or $300 for 2. Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment Alpaca Manure - FREE - Great for your garden. You load & haul. 541-977-8013

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. BULK GARDEN MATERIALS Wholesale Peat Moss Sales

541-389-9663

For newspaper delivery , call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email classified@bendbulletin.com

KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

266 NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove may be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

Employment

400 421

Schools and Training Oregon Medical Training PCS

Phlebotomy classes begin May 2nd. Registration now open: www.oregonmedicaltraining.com 541-343-3100 TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

292

Sales Other Areas 400 GARAGE SALES! Portland’s LARGEST Garage Sale. Sat., April 16, 8 to 5 at Portland Expo Center. www.portlandgsale.com

Farm Market

300 308

Farm Equipment and Machinery

454

Looking for Employment I provide housekeeping & caregiving svcs, & have 20+ yrs experience. 541-508-6403 Seeking a Ranch Job, full or part time, 15 years exp. at Willows Ranch. Call Miguel 541-390-5033. For references, call Judy 541-549-1248

470 SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

Your Backyard Birdfeeding Specialists!

541-647-8261

(24 hr recorded message)

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE!

1979 IBM Selectric II, with correcting feature, perfect condition, $225. 541-617-6103

Winchesters, Model 1876,1886, 1894, 1892, 64, & more sights & guns, 541-815-4901

Call For Free DVD: Thyroid Secrets: What to do when the medication doesn’t work.

• Receipts should include,

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

Winchester 20g 1200 shotgun, wood stock, pump, 28” barrel, $200. 541-647-8931

Discover why 90% of women on thyroid replacement hormones are guaranteed to continue suffering with thyroid symptoms.....and what you can do to finally end suffering once and for all!

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash

Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746

248

T o a v o i d fr a u d , T h e Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection.

9 7 7 0 2

Forum Center, Bend 541-617-8840 www.wbu.com/bend 270

Lost and Found Camera parts, misc jewelry found here at Redmond Airport Terminal Building. Call to identify: 541-504-3499

Domestic & In-Home Positions Caregiver for 2:

Special Low 0% APR Financing New Kubota BX 2360 With Loader, 4X4, 23.5 HP, R-4 Industrial Tires, Power Steering.

Sale Price $11,999 Financing on approved credit.

MIDSTATE POWER PRODUCTS 541-548-6744 Redmond Water Tanks, 1500 gallon capacity and less, 4 tanks in all, $400. 541-408-7358

325

Hay, Grain and Feed

Custom No-till Seeding Grass, Alfalfa & Grain Crops All of Central Oregon.

Call 541-419-2713 Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Barley Straw; Compost; 541-546-6171.

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Farmers Column

Found LADDER that attaches to horse trailer? Apr. 4, Smith Rock Way. 541-548-4674

10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1461 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net

FOUND Toyota keys + 3 additional, on Brookswood 4/6. Call to identify 541-389-1629

Diabetic man, woman & man memory care. Need compassionate, dedicated, friendly RN or (?): background check, license, current status, dedicated woman. 15-20/hr. (541) 921-1100

358

A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant Lost: Heirloom Ring, large oval new/older fields, haying serblack Onyx, sterling silver, vices, cut, rake, bale, Gopher 3/28 or 29?, Tumalo State control. 541-419-4516 park or area near Costco? REWARD, 503-829-6208. Looking for your next employee? Lost Mini Dash-Pinchcher, Place a Bulletin help R E W A R D , female, chocowanted ad today and late & tan, brown collar, reach over 60,000 “Paris”, 4/10, near 6th & Olreaders each week. ney, scared but comes to Your classified ad will food, 503-422-2320 also appear on bendbulletin.com which Maglite, found in Terrebonne currently receives over area. Call to identify. 1.5 million page views 541-548-0175 every month at REMEMBER: If you have lost an no extra cost. animal, don't forget to check Bulletin Classifieds The Humane Society in Get Results! Bend, 541-382-3537 Call 385-5809 or place Redmond, 541-923-0882 your ad on-line at Prineville, 541-447-7178; bendbulletin.com OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420.

476

Employment Opportunities CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Kevin O’Connell Classified Department Manager The Bulletin

541-383-0398 Barber or Beautician wanted, for established salon, lots of walk-ins, lease only. 541-280-4376.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!


G2 Tuesday, April 12, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 634

Finance & Business

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

500 600

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Pharmacist

position. Need friendly, organized, motivated pharmacist to take care of our patients. Independent central Oregon community pharmacy, full or part-time, no Sundays, no nights. Competitive wage and benefits. Call Leah 541-419-4688.

Responsible for the company’s networks, servers, network security, telephone and email systems. Responsibilities will include: Windows servers, network servers, firewall, PC setup, IT security and support for over 45 internal users and budgeting and forecasting of IT needs. Monitor Remember.... Add your web address to and maintain the company’s your ad and readers on web site, online sales, and The Bulletin's web site will social networks. Provide supbe able to click through auport at six locations in north tomatically to your site. Central Oregon. Knowledge of IBM iSeries a plus. Skills should include hands-on READERS: knowledge of installation, re- CAUTION pair and modification of IT Ads published in "Employment hardware including wireless, Opportunities" include emand software. Working ployee and independent poknowledge of Microsoft sitions. Ads for positions that Server and related products. require a fee or upfront inWorking knowledge of comvestment must be stated. ponents and the ability to With any independent job configure new systems. opportunity, please investiCompetitive wage, plus exgate thoroughly. cellent benefit package, DOE. Call 541-989-8221 for appliUse extra caution when cation, or mail resume to applying for jobs online and MCGG Box 367, Lexington, never provide personal OR 97839. information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. DO YOU NEED A Use extreme caution when reGREAT EMPLOYEE sponding to ANY online emRIGHT NOW? ployment ad from Call The Bulletin before 11 out-of-state. a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day! We suggest you call the State 385-5809. of Oregon Consumer Hotline VIEW the Classifieds at: at 1-503-378-4320 www.bendbulletin.com

Hairstylist - Fully licensed for hair, nails & waxing. Recent relevant experience necessary. Hourly/commission. Teresa, 541-382-8449 Mig Welder for Manufacturing in Minot, North Dakota. Year round, full-time inside work, wage DOE. Contact Butch at 701-838-6346.

NEWSPAPER

The Oregonian Independent Dealer

For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386 Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

As an independent dealer you would be responsible for promotion, delivery and cus- Sales - Jewelry We are looking for a bright, tomer service of The Orenergetic and motivated peregonian for the Sisters, son to join our team as a part Redmond, Madras, and to full time Sales Associate. Prineville area. Prior newsIf you are dependable and paper experience is helpful, have a good work attitude, but not a requirement. If inplease leave your resume at terested, please call Saxon’s in the Old Mill Dis1-888-569-7006. trict, Bend.

Advertising Account Executive

630

528

476

Computer - IT and Network Administrator

Rentals

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Loans and Mortgages

Rooms for Rent

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

No smoking, male preferred, $270/mo. +$50 dep. Kitchen facilities. 541-420-6625.

Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Room w/private bath, kitchen privileges, laundry facilities. In Tumalo on acreage. Dog or horse???. $500+utils in winter months.541-389-8142 STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

Condo / Townhomes For Rent

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

2 Bdrm townhouse, 2.5 bath, office, fenced yard w/deck, garage. 1244 “B” NE Dawson. $750 dep. $775/mo., W/S/G paid, pets possible. 541-617-8643,541-598-4932

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION

Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

visit our website at www.oregonfreshstart.com

632

Apt./Multiplex General The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634 541-382-3402

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend !! Spring On In !!

Office Specialist 2/OS2 Oregon State University - Cascades, Bend has a full time employment opportunity. The ideal applicant functions as member of the OSU-Cascades Enrollment Services team and duties include customer service, prospective student support, admissions processing, clerical support and communication with students, faculty, staff and the general public. Preferred qualifications include a demonstrated commitment to promoting and enhancing diversity. To review complete position description and apply on-line, go to http://oregonstate.edu/jobs and use posting number 0007173. The closing date is 4/18/11. OSU is an AA/EOE.

$150 off Upstairs Apts. Pet Friendly & No App. Fee! 2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps Lease Options Available

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting. No pets/smoking. Near St. Charles.W/S/G pd; both w/d hkup + laundry facil. $595$625/mo. 541-385-6928.

Call for Specials! Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 1015 Roanoke Ave. - $590/ mo, $500 dep. W/S/G paid, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath townhouse, view of town, no smoking or pets. Norb, 541-420-9848.

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee W/D hookup. $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 541-382-3678 or

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz A block from the river! Clean, spacious 3 Bdrm 1½ bath in 4-plex w/large deck, w/d hkups, storage room; w/s/g pd. $750+deps.541-318-1973 Beautiful updated, cozy, 1 bdrm, 2 bath Condo, A/C, 2 blocks from downtown, along banks of Deschutes, amenities incl., 1 parking spot, indoor pool, hot tub & sauna, serious renters only, credit & refs., check, minimum 1 yr. lease, $675/mo., utils incl., call Kerrie, 541-480-0325.

on Wall Street in Bend. All utilities paid and parking. Call 541-389-2389 for appt. SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Near COCC! Newer 2 Bdrm 1 Bath, granite, wood floors, underground parking/storage area, laundry on site, $675/mo. 541-480-3666 Studio above garage, dishwasher, W/D, nice. $610 incl. gas fireplace, heater, hot water, W/S/G; renter pays elec, 1 small pet OK. 541-382-4868

638

(541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

1, 2 and 3 bdrm apts. available starting at $575.

SE Duplex, 3 bdrm., 1 bath, garage, small fenced yard, W/D hookup, kitchen appl., $725/ mo., 541-990-0426 or 541-258-5973.

541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business

642

648

652

Houses for Rent General

Houses for Rent NW Bend

ONE MONTH FREE with 6 month lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, non-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. 541-923-1907 OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS www.redmondrents.com

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit 640 Chaparral & Apt./Multiplex SW Bend Rimrock Apartments

2 BDRM., 1 BATH flat near Old Mill, laundry, parking, $600/month. Victoria L. Manahan Real Estate, 541-280-7240.

Deluxe 2 Bdrm 1½ Bath Townhouse apt. W/D hookup, fenced yd. NO PETS. Great location, starting at $565. 179 SW Hayes (past Mike’s Fence Center) Please call 541-382-0162; 541-420-0133

SPRING

Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

SPECIAL

1/ 2 OFF SOME MOVE-IN RENTS w/ Lease Agreements

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF The Bulletin is looking for a professional sales and marketing person to help our local customers grow their businesses with an expanding list of broad-reach and targeted products. This full time position requires a demonstrable background in consultative sales, territory management and aggressive prospecting. 2-4 years of outside advertising sales experience is preferable however we will train the right candidate. The position offers a competitive compensation package including benefits, and rewards an aggressive, customer focused salesperson with unlimited earning potential.

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Redmond & Madras H

Please send your resume, cover letter and salary history to: Sean L. Tate Advertising Manager state@bendbulletin.com

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

You may also drop off your resume in person or mail it to: The Bulletin, Attn: Sean Tate, 1777 SW Chandler, Bend, OR 97701.

apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

No phone inquiries please. EOE / Drug Free Workplace

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours

• 1 Bdrm/1 Bath, Cozy, clean end unit Central location. Fenced back yard. Off street parking. No Pets. $425 WST • Near Pioneer Park - 2 Bdrm/1 Bath upstairs units. Coin-op laundry on site. Private balconies. $495 WST • Near Costco - 2 Bdrm/1 Bath duplex. Carport. laundry room. Pets considered. $550 WS. Also here: 1 Totally refurbished Unit @ $585 W/S - No Pets. • Newly Refurbished SE Unit - 2 Bdrm/1Bath. Private fenced patio. Coin-op laundry. Detached carport. Huge common yard. Ask about Pets. $595 WST • Charming Home Close In - 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Lots of fun touches. Washer & dryer included. Large partially fenced yard. Pet considered. Fireplace, GFA. $775. • NW TOWNHOME - Lovely 2 Bdrm/2.5 Bath with Laundry room. Single garage. Vaulted ceilings. Great location. GFA. Fireplace. $775 WS • Large 2 Bdrm/1.5 Bath Home in Central Location. W/D Included. Single garage. Large yard. Garden area. Small pets considered. $775 • Great SW Location - Older ranch-style 3 Bdrm/2 Bath home with Double Garage. Huge corner lot. Fenced back yard. Pets considered. $795 per mo. • 3 Bdrm/2.5 Bath Plus bonus room - NE Home. 1812 sq. ft. Master on main floor. RV parking. Double garage. Pets considered. $975 mo. *****

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Fully furnished loft apt.

Fox Hollow Apts.

Alpine Meadows Townhomes

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

FOR ADDITIONAL PROPERTIES ***** CALL 541-382-0053

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Crooked River Ranch - 1350 sq ft custom built ranch, 2 bdrm 2 bath, double garage. Patio, Mtn views, no smoking. $750. 541-548-4225

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

650

Prestigious, fully furnished, 6 bdrm., 3 bath, NW Skyliner, 6 mo. minimum, incl. some utils., $2600/mo, please call 541-951-3058.

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend Non-smoking 3 bdrm 2 bath, 1800 sq ft home with gas heat & large yard. $925 + deposits. 541-382-8900

656

Houses for Rent SW Bend 2 Bdrm 2 bath, in Westridge Subdivision. Newly remodeled, on ½ acre, near Ath. Club of Bend. No smoking. $1195. Call 541-388-8198 2 Bedroom, 1 bath manufactured home in quiet park, W/S/G paid. $575/month, $250 deposit. Please call 541-382-8244.

658

Houses for Rent Redmond 3/2 1385 sq. ft., family room, new carpet & paint, nice big yard, dbl. garage w/opener, quiet cul-de-sac. $995 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803 4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room with woodstove, new carpet, pad & paint, single garage w/opener. $895/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

$695/mo, 3 bdrm 2 bath. New paint inside/outside, new carpet and vinyl. Dbl garage w/ opener. Nice neighbor3 Bdrm, 1800 sq ft. Very clean! hood. 541-388-8503 New bathroom, lrg fam rm, sprinklers, attch garage. No smkg; pets poss. 1150 NE 6th St. Avail now! $950/mo, $600 refundable. 541-389-4985

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Where buyers meet sellers. Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 12, 2011 G3

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 658

Real Estate For Sale

Houses for Rent Redmond A nice 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1008 sq.ft., vaulted ceiling, fenced yard, coverd deck, RV parking, dbl garage w/ opener. $795. 480-3393 or 610-7803. Clean 4 Bdrm + den, 2 bath, 14920 SW Maverick Rd, CRR. No smoking; pets negotiable. $900/mo. + deposits. Call 541-504-8545; 541-350-1660

Boats & RV’s

700 800 730

New Listings

850

Snowmobiles

Last Chance

Crooked River Ranch, 4 acres, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1000 sq. ft., $695/mo. 1st, last. No inside pets. Mtn. views. 503-829-7252, 679-4495

Yamaha 600 Mtn. Max 1997 Now only $895! Sled plus trailer package $1650. Won’t Last Long! 541-548-3443.

660

Houses for Rent La Pine

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

2 Bdrm, 1.5 Bath, gas appls & fireplace. Crescent Creek subdivision, w/Fitness Ctr. No smoking; pets neg. $675/ mo.$775/dep. 541-815-5494

Over 40 Years Experience in Carpet Upholstery & Rug Cleaning Call Now! 541-382-9498 CCB #72129 www.cleaningclinicinc.com Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily Sunny, Warm So. Oregon! Trade your Bend area home for my 7-yr 4 Bdrm 2.5 Bath Central Point home, in planned development, with nice views. 541-941-6915

671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq. ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1095. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

675

RV Parking Hookup for RV in quiet Tumalo area. Dog or cat ok. Beautiful view. $550/mo. Electricity extra in winter. 541-389-8142

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease Office / Warehouse 1792 sq.ft. & 1680 sq.ft. spaces, 827 Business Way, Bend. 30¢/sq.ft.; 1st mo. + $300 dep. 541-678-1404 Office/Warehouse Space, 6400 sq.ft., (3) 12x14 doors, on Boyd Acres Rd, 541-382-8998.

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

745

693

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $200 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $9800 OBO. 541-383-1782

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $19,999 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

746

Northwest Bend Homes BROKEN TOP bargain priced. 3 Bdrm, 3 bath, 2403 sq.ft., new slab granite countertops, hrdwd floors, gas fireplace, only $424,900. Randy Schoning, principal Broker, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

880

Motorhomes

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829 17.5’ Bayliner, 2005, 3.0 Merc, like new, low hrs, $7500 obo. Will consider partial trades. 541-279-1862 after 5 pm. 18’ Hewes 180 Sportsman 2007 Yamaha 115 & 8hp kicker, downriggers Excel cond, low hrs, $22,900. 541-815-3383 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

Recreational Homes and Property

Cabin for sale on the Metolius River Arm of Lake Billy Chinook. Go to: Lakehouse.com for specs. Ad#230071 or check under Oregon listings.

771

Lots

(Private Party ads only)

road), power at road, $15,000 or trade for ??? 541-728-1036.

773

Acreages 20 Acres, Christmas Valley, off Oil Dry (paved

Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, septic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $114,900, 541-350-4684.

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

Wilderness 2-person Kayak w/ paddles, like new. $650 new; sell $375. 541-383-8528

880

Motorhomes Beaver Lexington 1994, Anniversary model, Cummins Diesel, 38’, nice, full factory paint, $35,900,541-617-1249

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Bounder 34’ 1994.

One owner, low miles, generator, 2 roof airs, clean in and out, rear walk-round queen bed, 2 TV’s, leveling hydraulic jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, Motivated seller. Just reduced and priced to sell at $10,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2 slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2 slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

Harley Ultra Classic 2001, Best of everything. Garage kept. Madras. $9000 call 541-475-7459.

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

881

881

Travel Trailers

Travel Trailers

2009 T@da (Tada) Travel Trailer Excellent condition! 2 refrigerators, Cool Cat AC/Heat Pump, 15" LCD TV/DVD. Too many extras to list. $19,500 OBO Call 541-548-8770

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

20' Calabria 1998 tournament ski boat / 237 hours. 350ci/ 300hp F.I. GM engine. Nice, too many extras to list. $13,500. Call 541-736-3067 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Boat Loader, electric, for pickup, with extras, $350 OBO, 541-548-3711.

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Starcraft 2008 Centennial 3612 tent trailer, like new, sleeps 6, slide-out, Arizona room, range w/oven, micro, toilet & shower, stereo system, heated mattresses, roof rack, new 6-ply tires, twin 6-volt batteries, outside shower, twin propane tanks, BBQ. $10,500. 541-312-9312

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Hurricane 2007 35.5’ like new, 3 slides, generator, dark cabinets, Ford V10, 4,650 mi $79,900 OBO. 541-923-3510

Domestic Services

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates . See Facebook Business page, search under M. Lewis Construction, LLC CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Concrete Construction JJ&B Construction - Quality Concrete work, over 30 yrs experience. Sidewalks, RV Pads, Driveways.... Call Josh 541-279-3330 • CCB190612

Computer/Cabling Install QB Digital Living •Computer Networking •Phone/Data/TV Jacks •Whole House Audio •Flat Screen TV & Installation 541-280-6771 www.qbdigitalliving.com CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

DMH & Co. Clean Up/Yard Debris, Hauling. Wild Fire Fuel Reduction. Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds

Electrical Services Quality Builders Electric • Remodels • Home Improvement • Lighting Upgrades • Hot Tub Hook-ups 541-389-0621 www.qbelectric.net CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

865

ATVs

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Yamaha Grizzly 2008 660 - WARN Winch, Fender Protectors, new winch rope, recent 150/160 hr service, Hunter Green $5,495 541-549-6996 (Sisters).

Home Improvement

Houseboat 38x10, triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prineville resort. New Price!!!!! $19,500. 541-788-4844.

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417. Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $39,900, please call 541-330-9149.

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 • Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling • Decks • Window/Door Replacement • Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179 I DO THAT! Home Repairs, Remodeling, Professional & Honest Work. Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768

Home Improvement Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

GMC Ventura 3500 1986, refrigerated, w/6’x6’x12’ box, has 2 sets tires w/rims., 1250 lb. lift gate, new engine, $5500, 541-389-6588, ask for Bob. Pettibone Mercury fork lift, 8000 lb., 2-stage, propane, hard rubber tires. $4000 or Make offer. 541-389-5355.

Truck with Snow Plow! Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. $4800 OBO. Call 541-390-1466.

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, reduced to $34,000 OBO 541-610-4472; 541-689-1351

925

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Ford 2 Door 1949, 99% Complete, $12,000, please call 541-408-7348. Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Utility Trailers

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

875

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $104,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

Watercraft

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $2450 for all. Bill 541-480-7930. Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Winnebago Access 31J 2008, Class C, Near Low Retail Price! One owner, nonsmoker, garaged, 7,400 miles, auto leveling jacks, (2) slides, upgraded queen bed, bunk beds, microwave, 3-burner range/oven, (3) TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, maintained, and very clean! Only $76,995! Extended warranty available! Call (541) 388-7179.

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that • Evaluating Seasonal Needs advertise to perform Land • Pruning Trees and Shrubs scape Construction which in • Thinning Overgrown Areas cludes: planting, decks, • Removing Undesired Plants fences, arbors, water-fea • Hauling Debris tures, and installation, repair • Renovation of irrigation systems to be li • Fertilizer Programs censed with the Landscape • Organic Options Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in EXPERIENCED cluded in all advertisements Senior Discounts which indicate the business 541-390-3436 has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape Get 1 FREE maintenance do not require a Maintenance Service or LCB license. Aeration ($40+ value) when you sign up for a full season of maintenance! Nelson Landscape

All types remodeling/handyman Decks, Painting, Carpentry Randy Salveson, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420

“Pihl Bilt” Since 1981 S.E. Pihl Construction Remodeling specialist, addons, kitchen & bath, faux wall finishes, tile & stone, Energy Trust of Oregon Trade Ally, Window & door upgrades, no job to small. Call for Spring Specials, Call Scott, 541-815-1990, CCB#110370

Landscaping, Yard Care

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Spring Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Broken Branches •Debris Hauling •Defensible Space •Aeration/Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds ORGANIC

PROGRAMS

Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Edging •Pruning •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments Fertilizer included with monthly program

Weekly, monthly or one time service. EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

We offer: • Residential & Commercial • Organic Products (kid and pet safe!) • Aerations & Thatching • Mulch, Hedging, Pruning • Irrigation Management • Spring & Fall Clean-ups • Fertilization • Weed Control

Licensed / Bonded / Insured FREE Estimates! Call today: (541) 617.TURF [8873] www.turflandscapes.com

Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759 CURTIS SESLAR’S

J. L. SCOTT LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Does your lawn have snow mold problems? We can help! SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching & Aeration

TOTAL LAWN CARE LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Serving Redmond since 1980. FREE THATCHING WITH AERATING SERVICE Mowing , Edging, Fertilizing, Hauling. Senior Discounts. Don’t delay, call today for Free estimate 541-279-1821

Weekly Maintenance • Thatching • Aeration • Lawn Over-seeding Bark • Clean-ups Commercial / Residential Senior Discounts

Providing full service maintenance for over 20 years! FREE AERATION & FERTILIZATION with new seasonal Mowing Service!

“Because weekends WERE NOT made for yard work!”

541-382-3883

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Specializing in Pavers. Up to 4 maintenance visits free. Call 541-385-0326

SAVE THIS AD!! Rototilling Backyard Gardens $25/hour • Min. 1 hour Call Jim, 541-633-7941 8am-6pm for appt; leave msg

Cargo Trailer HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $7200. 541-639-1031.

TERRY 27’ 1995 5th wheel with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great rig in great cond. $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days. Ford F-250 XLT Super Duty 2008, 4WD, 6.4 Diesel, supercab, long bed, 24K mi., many extras, like new $35,000, 541-923-5754.

Wells

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

541-382-1655 LCB# 7990 Mary’s Lawn Care is seeking New Customers for •Lawn Maint. • Spring clean-up • Aerating • Thatching 541-350-1097 541-410-2953 Call The Yard Doctor for yard maint., thatching, sod, hydroseeding, sprinkler sys, water features, walls, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $10,500. 541-589-0767, in Burns.

KOMFORT 27’ 2000 5th wheel, fiberglass with 12’ slide. In excellent condition, has been stored inside. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

Painting, Wall Covering WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semi-retired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $39,500. 541-420-3250

Remodeling, Carpentry RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. •Additions/Remodels/Garages •Replacement windows/doors remodelcentraloregon.com 541-480-8296 CCB189290

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

541-322-7253

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

Monte Carlo 1970, all original, many extras. MUST SELL due to death. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072 OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

We Buy Scrap Auto & Truck Batteries, $10 each Also buying junk cars & trucks, (up to $500), & scrap metal! Call 541-912-1467

Plymouth 4-dr sedan, 1948, all orig., new tires, exlnt driver, all gauges work, 63,520 miles, $8500. 541-504-2878

Wheels, 2-Sets Mini Cooper, 8x18” Custom “Star”, 1 set $300 no tires, 1 set $550 w/tires, 541-382-8762.

WILLYS JEEP 1956 New rebuilt motor, no miles, Power Take-off winch. Exc. tires.

Asking $3,999 or make offer.

Antique and Classic Autos

541-389-5355

933 C-10

Pickup

1969,

152K mi. on chassis, 4 spd. transmission, 250 6 cyl. engine w/60K, new brakes & master cylinder, $2500. Please call 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800.

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, quality built, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more.$59,500. 541-317-9185

Thatch, Aerate, weeding, raking & monthly maint. 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com

exc. cond., 4WD, new tires, shocks, interior seat cover, everything works, 121K orig. mi.,original operators manual and line setting ticket incl. $5000 OBO, 503-559-4401

Uro M&S 185/70R13, 100%, on four hole rims, $170. 541-508-6301

932

Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

V Spring Clean Up! V

Sport,

931

Bend Landscaping & Maint. Thatching, aerating, spring cleanup, sprinkler turn-ons, weekly mows.

Cargo

12x6, side door, 2 back doors, shelves, exc. cond., $2750, call 541-815-1523.

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Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Landscape Management

BAXTER ELECTRIC Remodels / Design / Rentals All Small Jobs•Home Improve. All Work by Owner - Call Tom 541-318-1255 CCB 162723

Handyman

916

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

International Travel All 1967,

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

Drywall ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

I Do Professional Housecleaning: 25 yrs. exp., licenced, exc refs., Senior discounts! 541-420-0366

900

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $9000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean

Barns

Antique and Classic Autos

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

A-Liner pop-up 15-ft 2010, 2-burner stove, frig, freshwater tank, furnace, fantastic fan, $9950. 541-923-3021

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240.

932

Autos & Transportation

908

Fifth Wheels

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

Aircraft, Parts and Service

882 BROUGHAM 23½’ 1981, 2tone brown,perfect cond, 6 brand new tires. eng. perfect, runs great, inside perfect shape, great for hunting, fishing, etc., see to appreciate at 15847 WoodChip Ln off Day Rd in La Pine. $8000. OBO 541-876-5106.

Canopy mount electric boat loader, in good shape $600 OBO. 541-548-3459

763

Bargain priced Pronghorn lot, $89,999, also incl. $115,000 golf membership & partially framed 6000 sq. ft. home, too! Randy Schoning, Princ. Broker, John L. Scott RE. 541-480-3393, 541-389-3354

Thank you St. Jude & Sacred Heart of Jesus. j.d.

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $15,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

NOTICE:

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

personals

Black on black, detachable windshield, backrest, and luggage rack. 2200 miles. $13,900. Please call Jack, 541-549-4949, or 619-203-4707

875

Watercraft

Homes for Sale

Warehouse/Office space, 1235 sq ft, large roll-up door. 20685 Carmen Lp. No triple net; $600/mo, 1st + dep. 541-480-7546; 541-480-7541

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010

870

Boats & Accessories

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $10,000,541-280-5677 Chevy Corvette 1980, yellow, glass removable top, 8 cyl., auto trans, radio, heat, A/C, new factory interior, black, 48K., exc. tires, factory aluminum wheels, asking $7500, will consider fair offer & possible trade, 541-385-9350.

Pickups CHEVROLET 1970, V-8 automatic 4X4 3/4 ton. Very good condition, lots of new parts and maintenance records. New tires, underdash air, electronic ignition and much more. Original paint, truck used very little. $5700, 541-575-3649 Chevrolet Scottsdale 20, 1987. 4WD, 3/4-ton, A/C, Reese 15,000-lb Fifth wheel pin hitch, tilt wheel, deer guard, excellent 10-ply tires, hubs. $3000. For more details & equip, call John Keseley 541-932-4338 Ford crew cab 1993, 7.3 Diesel, auto, PS, Rollalong package, deluxe interior & exterior, electric windows/door locks, dually, fifth wheel hitch, receiver hitch, 90% rubber, super maint. w/all records, new trans. rebuilt, 116K miles. $6500, Back on the market. 541-923-0411

885

Canopies and Campers Chevy El Camino 1979, 350 auto, new studs, located in Sisters, $3000 OBO, 907-723-9086,907-723-9085 Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $7900 541-815-1523.

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. Wagon 1957, 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Chevy Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 4-dr., complete, $15,000 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as OBO, trades, please call unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160 541-420-5453.

Ford F-150 2006 LOOKS BRAND NEW! Supercab Lariat 5.4L V8 eng.,approx. 20K mi! 4 spd auto, rear wheel drive. Black w/lots of extras: Trailer tow pkg, Custom bedliner, Pickup bed extender, Tan leather trimmed captain chairs, only $18,000. 541-318-7395


G4 Tuesday, April 12, 2011 • THE BULLETIN 933

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Pickups

Vans

Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, tow pkg., V-8, bedliner CD, air, 8 tires, $12,900 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr brks, plus mntd stud snows. $7500 obo. 541-330-0616

975

Automobiles Ford F250 4x4 1993. 5.8L eng, auto, AC, CC, shell, 2nd gas tank, trlr hitch w/conn. 127K, $2800. 541-408-8330

FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $3800. 541-350-1686

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Ford Ranger 2004 Super Cab, XLT, 4X4, V6, 5-spd, A/C bed liner, tow pkg, 120K Like New! KBB Retail: $10,000 OBO 360-990-3223

BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

Find It in

BUICKS ! LeSabres 1998 and 2004 $3900-$5900.

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

Mazda X-Cab

B2300 SE 2003, Great

cond. exc. mpg of 28-30 hwy - has all options 88K $7000 OBO 541-350-5715

Toyota 2009 Double Cab Prerunner. 26,500 miles SR5-TRD package---tow SHARP - AND RED!! #081331

90 and 115k miles, silver and white colors, full size 4-door sedans, 30 mpg hwy, luxury cars, trouble-free, too! ask anyone that owns one! 541-318-9999

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188. Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

$26,995 541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

West of Hwy 97 & Empire, Bend

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

Buick Rendezvous 2004, clean & low mileage, $11,000 OBO. 541-410-7829;541-389-4506

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005 • 4WD, 68,000 miles. • Great Shape. • Original Owner.

$19,450!

541-389-5016 evenings. Infiniti EX35 2010 Immaculate, only 4000 miles. 297-hp, V6 engine. Journey edition, premium pkg, AWD. Nav system, Blue tooth, Bose stereo w/USB port. Silver exterior, black leather interior. $38,500. 541-306-6564. Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 2007 4x4 19,280 miles, stability control absolutely like new condition #688914. $19,977 541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

West of Hwy 97 & Empire, Bend

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $14,500. 541-408-2111

Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k mi. Immac,, Loaded, Dlr. maintained, $23k. 503-459-1580

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

940

Vans Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Ford E350 12-pass., 1993, 5L V8, 166K, runs/drives great. $2300 OBO. 541-410-4757

Ford Windstar GL1998.

35,000 miles, 3 door, 3 seats, white, $4900 for an almost new van! 541-318-9999.

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

Mercedes-Benz S550 2007 This is a beautiful car w/only 40K mi. Pristine in & out. Leather interior looks showroom new. $42,000, 541-388-7944.

MERCEDES C300 2008

New body style, 30,000 miles, heated seats, luxury sedan, CD, full factory warranty. $23,950.

Like buying a new car! 503-351-3976.

Mercedes GL450, 2007

All wheel drive, 1 owner, navigation, heated seats, DVD, 2 moonroofs. Immaculate and never abused. $27,950. Call 503-351-3976

Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $38,900. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

SUBARUS!!! Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Volvo C70-T5, 2010

Convertible Hardtop. 10,800mi. Celestial Blue w/Calcite Cream leather int. Premium & Climate pkgs. Warranty & Service to 10/2014. KBB SRP $33,540. Asking $31,900. 541-350-5437 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

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Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE Application for Allocation of Conserved Water The Department has received an application for an Allocation of Conserved Water pursuant to ORS 537.455 to 537.500 and OAR Chapter 690, Division 18. The Department's review will consider whether the diversion for the uses allowed under the original water right will be reduced by the conservation project; whether existing water rights will be protected from injury and whether the project is in compliance with local comprehensive land use plans. Notice of Application for Allocation of Conserved Water CW-69 On March 28, 2011, the Deschutes River Conservancy (DRC), in conjunction with Three Sisters Irrigation District, and the following landowners, Ralph Affatati, Ed and Barbara Carollo, Brian Conner, Susan Conner, Doug Duey, Kristine Falco, John Gloeckner, Jerry and Sharon Hakes, Donna Harris, David Hurtley, Carl and Shelly Johnson, Mark and Sheila Kelley, Sandy Kennedy, Phillip Krohn, Gary and Angie Larson, Kara Lin Mickaelson, David and Christine Nelson, Peter Small, Ken and Rae Swearingen, Barbara Temple and Melissa Ward filed an Application for Allocation of Conserved Water under ORS 537.470. The Department designated the application as CW-69. The Applicants propose to conserve water by replacing approximately 6,450 feet of the TSID Hurtley Lateral water conveyance system with, high density polyethelyne (HPDE) pipe. Replacement of the existing, inefficient, damaged and leaky portions of the delivery system will completely eliminate water losses through this irrigation delivery system. The Hurtley Lateral serves approximately 102 acres, of which, 85.6 acres will be involved in this project. The project is expected to yield approximately 0.419 cfs of conserved water from Whychus Creek under Water Right Certificate 74135 with a priority date of 1895. It is proposed that 100% of the conserved water will be protected instream from the point of diversion (at approximately River Mile 23.5) to the confluence with the Deschutes River and then to River Mile 120 on the Deschutes River (near Lake Billy Chinook). Any interested person may comment in writing, on CW-69. Comments must be received by May 23, 2011 or within 20 days of the last date of publication in the newspaper, whichever is later. Comments should be sent to Kody Thurgood, Water Resources Department, 725 Summer Street NE, Suite A, Salem, OR 97301-1266. Comments may be faxed to 503-986-0903. The Department will review all comments received when determining whether to approve the proposed allocation of conserved water. A copy of the application and other information on the allocation and use of conserved water may be obtained from the Department by contacting Kody Thurgood at 503-986-0892 or thurgokj@wrd.state.or.us. LEGAL NOTICE Symbiotics LLC, on behalf of Wickiup Hydro Group, LLC (PO Box 535, Rigby, ID 83442), submitted a Final License Application with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for the Wickiup Dam Hydroelectric Project (FERC No. 12965) on March 25, 2011. The project would add a 7.15-MW run-of-river generation facility to the existing Wickiup Dam in Deschutes County, Oregon. A copy of the Final License Application is available for public viewing at the La Pine Public Library. The document can also be downloaded at http://www.ferc.gov/docs-fil ing/elibrary.asp by searching for the project number. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: TIMOTHY M. NAFZIGER AND REBEKAH C. NAFZIGER. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: OREGON HOUSING AND COMMUNITY SERVICES DEPARTMENT, STATE OF OREGON, as assignee of BANK OF THE CASCADES. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Twenty-two (22), SISTERS PARK PLACE, recorded October 7, 2003, in Cabinet G, Page 57, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: March 31, 2006. Recording No.: 2006-022390 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,618.00 each, due the first of each month, for the months of October 2010

through January 2011; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $241,966.50; plus interest at the rate of 5.2500% per annum from September 1, 2010; plus late charges of $296.24; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: June 16, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #07754.30357). DATED: January 26, 2011. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEES NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031392426 T.S. No.: 11-00970-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of October 2, 2006 made by, WILLIAM H. WATSON was the original Grantor to AMERITITLE, was the original trustee, in favor of MERS AS NOMINEE AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, was the original beneficiary, recorded on October 5, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-67175 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust") to wit: APN: 103074 LOTS EIGHTEEN (18) AND NINETEEN (19) IN BLOCK EIGHT (8) OF HIGHLAND ADDITION. RECORDED MARCH 3, 1916 IN CABINET A, PAGE 211, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 356 NW COLUMBIA STREET. BEND, OR The current beneficiary is: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for American Home Mortgage Assets Trust 2006-6, Mortgage-Backed Pass-Through Certificates Series 2006-6 Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total:$111,444,06 as of March 9, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $1,305,854 56 together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.90400% per annum from April 1, 2009 until paid, plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed trustee under the Deed of Trust will on July 27, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder

for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252Â4900 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word 'grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 29, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature State of California County of Orange I, the undersigned, certify that I am the Trustee Sale Officer and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original Trustee's Notice of Sale. Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3955632 04/05/2011, 04/12/2011, 04/19/2011, 04/26/2011 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-CM-107387 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, SERGIO SANDOVAL AND REBECCA SANDOVAL, JOINTLY AND SEVERALLY, as grantor, to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of THE HANSON GROUP, LLC, as beneficiary, dated 3/31/2006, recorded 4/14/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-25720, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by THE HANSON GROUP, LLC. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real and personal property situated in said county and state, to-wit: Parcel One of PARTITION PLAT NUMBER 2001-34, Deschutes County, Oregon. TOGETHER WITH all interests, estates, and rights that Grantor now has or may acquire in (1) the Property; (2) any and all options, agreements, and contracts for the purchase or sale of all or any part or parts of the Property or interests in the Property; (3) all easements, rights-of- way, and rights used in connection with the Property or as a means of access to the Property; and (4) all tenements, hereditaments, and appurtenances in any manner belonging, relating, or appertaining to the Property; and TOGETHER WITH all interests, estates, and rights of Grantor, now owned or hereafter acquired, in and to any land lying within any streets, sidewalks, alleys, strips, and gores adjacent to or used in connection therewith; and TOGETHER WITH all rights, titles, and interests of Grantor, now owned or hereafter acquired, in and to any and all buildings and other improvements of every nature now or hereafter located on the Property, all fixtures located on the Property, and all appurtenances and additions to and substitutions and replacements of the Property, all equipment and inventory on the Property used in connection with the truck wash business operated on the Property including, but not limited to, the items listed in Exhibit C attached hereto (all of the foregoing being collectively referred to below as the "Improvements"); and TOGETHER WITH any and all mineral, oil and gas rights, air rights, development rights, water rights, water stock, and water service contracts, drainage rights, zoning rights, and other similar rights or interests that benefit or are appurtenant to the Property or the Improvements or both, and any of their proceeds; and TOGETHER WITH all present and future rights in and to the trade name by which all or any portion of the Property and the Improvements are known; all books and records relating to the use and operation of all or any portion of the Property and Improvements; all right, title, and interest of Grantor in, to, and under all present and future plans, specifications, and contracts relating to the design, construction, management, or inspection of any Improvements; all rights, titles, and interests of Grantor in and to all present and future.licenses, permits, approvals, and agreements with or from any municipal corporation, county, state, or other governmental or quasi-governmental entity or agency relating to the development, improvement, division, or use of all or any portion of the Property to the extent such trade names, licenses, permits, approvals, and agreements are assignable by law; and all other general intangibles relating to the Property, the Improvements, or their use and operation; and TOGETHER WITH all rights of Grantor in and to any escrow or withhold agreements, title insurance, surety bonds, warranties, management contracts, leasing and sales agreements, and service contracts that are in any way relevant to the ownership, development, improvement, management, sale, or use of all or any portion of the Property or any of the Improvements; and TOGETHER WITH Grantor's rights under any payment, performance, or other bond in connection with construction of any Improvements, and all construction materials, supplies, and equipment delivered to the Property and intended to be used in connection with the construction of any Improvements; and TOGETHER WITH all rights, interests, and claims that Grantor now has or may acquire with respect to any damage to or taking of all or any part of the Property or the Improvements, including without limitation any and all proceeds of insurance in effect with respect to the Improvements, any and all awards made for taking by eminent domain or by any proceeding or purchase in lieu thereof, of the whole or any part of the Property or the Improvements, and any and all awards resulting from any other damage to the Property or the Improvements, all of which are assigned to Beneficiary, and, subject to the terms of this Trust Deed, Beneficiary is authorized to collect and receive such proceeds, to give proper receipts and acquittances for the proceeds, and to apply them to the Obligations secured by this Trust Deed. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 17071 TRACY ROAD LA PINE, OR 97739 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of March 29, 2011 Delinquent Payments from September 01, 2010 7 payments at $ 2,735.19 each $ 19,146.33 (09-01-10 through 03-29-11) Late Charges: $ 6,974.73 Beneficiary Advances: $ 0.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 26,121.06 *** LOAN WILL MATURE ON JULY 1, 2011*** ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances,property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $316,070.09, PLUS interest thereon at 7.000% per annum from 8/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust THIS LOAN WILL MATURE ON JULY 1, 2011. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on July 29, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at MAIN ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY JUSTICE CENTER, 1100 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to June 30, 2011 (day before the maturity date), to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 85.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same.DATED: 3/29/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By DEBORAH KAUFMAN; VICE PRESIDENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3956680 04/05/2011, 04/12/2011, 04/19/2011, 04/26/2011

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031125362 T.S. No.: 11-00869-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of April 21, 2006 made by, LARRY W. PRINCE, SHELLEY L. PRINCE, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY was the original Grantor to AMERITITLE, was the original trustee, in favor of MERS AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, was the original beneficiary, recorded on April 27, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-29003 Book N/A Page N/A of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust") to wit: APN: 194263 LOT FIFTY-SEVEN (57), HAYDEN ACRES PHASE 2, RECORDED OCTOBER 1, 1997, IN CABINET D, PAGE 201, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 836 NW QUINCE PLACE, REDMOND, OR The current beneficiary is: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for HarborView Mortgage Loan Trust, Mortgage Loan Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-7 Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total:$6,178.00 as of March 12, 2011. By this reason of said default the

Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $245,370.11 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.57000% per annum from September 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed trustee under the Deed of Trust will on July 25, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by

payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-2524900 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 29, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3955614 04/05/2011, 04/12/2011, 04/19/2011, 04/26/2011

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-NC-107885 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, LANCE CAVAN KUYKENDALL, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW, as Trustee, in favor of NEW CENTURY MORTGAGE CORPORATION, as beneficiary, dated 5/18/2005, recorded 5/25/2005, under Instrument No. 2005-32218, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Indenture Trustee, for New Century Home Equity Loan Trust 2005-3. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 9, BLOCK B, DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 59625 NAVAJO CIRCLE BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of April 4, 2011 Delinquent Payments from April 01, 2010 10 payments at $ 1,237.34 each $ 12,373.40 3 payments at $ 1,152.80 each $ 3,458.40 (04-01-10 through 04-04-11) Late Charges: $ 667.94 Beneficiary Advances: $ 1,821.11 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 18,320.85 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $176,184.88, PLUS interest thereon at 6.5% per annum from 03/01/10 to 2/1/2011, 6.5% per annum from 2/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on August 5, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 4/4/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee KAREN JAMES AUTHORlZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3960091 04/12/2011, 04/19/2011, 04/26/2011, 05/03/2011

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031037559 T.S. No.: 11-00918-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of April 12, 2006 made by, WALLY ROTH, VICTORIA ROTH was the original Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, was the original trustee, in favor of MERS AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, was the original beneficiary, recorded on April 26, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-28691 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust") to wit: APN: 108811 THE LAND REFERRED TO HEREIN BELOW IS SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES, STATE OF OREGON, AND IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A 1/2 INCH IRON ROD ON THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF THE DESCHUTES MARKET ROAD, WHENCE THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION FOURTEEN (14), TOWNSHIP SEVENTEEN (17) SOUTH, RANGE TWELVE (12), EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, BEARS SOUTH 21º55" WEST, 3924.49 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89º56' EAST 646.20 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 21º10'30" WEST, 60.65 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89º56' EAST, 560.70 FEET; THENCE NORTH 0º01' 15" WEST, 384.70 FEET TO THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF THE HAMEHOOK ROAD AS NOW BUILT; THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY NORTH 89º59' WEST, 578.85 FEET; THENCE AROUND A CURVE TO THE LEFT SUBTENED BY A CHORD BEARING SOUTH 73º51" WEST, 341.83 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 48º31' WEST, 369.42 FEET ALONG THE RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF THE DESCHUTES MARKET ROAD TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. EXCEPTING THEREFROM IN TOWNSHIP SEVENTEEN (17) SOUTH, RANGE TWELVE(12), EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, SECTION FOURTEEN (14): A PORTION OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER (SE1/4NW1/4), DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A 1/2 INCH IRON ROD WHENCE THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 14 BEARS SOUTH 33º42' WEST, 4773.04 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89º59" WEST, 326.40 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 31º35'30" WEST, 395.85 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 21º10 30' WEST, 60.65 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89º51" IS" EAST, 560.70 FEET; THENCE NORTH 0º01' 15" WEST, 382.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Commonly known as: 63480 DESCHUTES MARKET ROAD, BEND, OR The current beneficiary is: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for HarborView Mortgage Loan Trust, Mortgage Loan Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-7 Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts totai:$12.171.11 as of March 14, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $580,685.47 together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.95300% per annum from October 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed trustee under the Deed of Trust will on July 26, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 29, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3955622 04/05/2011, 04/12/2011, 04/19/2011, 04/26/2011


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35900

Not valid with any other offer. Bring this coupon with you. Good through 4/30/11.

At the Corner of Empire and Lower Meadow 63056 Lower Meadow Drive • 541-388-1580 • Fax 541-388-1597 Expires 5/9/11. Limit 4 per customer per coupon. Good only at above location. Not valid with any other offer or coupon.

SERVICING ALL MAKES & MODELS, DOMESTIC & FOREIGN WITH ASE CERTIFIED MECHANICS

Recommended Regular Maintenance Service 30,000/60,000/90,000/120,000 To promote a long life and eliminate unexpected repairs. We will perform the services as described in your Warranty & Maintenance booklet or per dealer recommendation. • Includes a multi-point vehicle inspection • Includes complimentary car wash *Additional charges for Timing Belt replacement or platinum spark plugs may apply.

10% Off

Must present coupon. Good through 4/30/11.

541-389-3031 • www.SubaruofBend.com • 2060 NE Hwy 20

NEW OWNERSHIP ! Starter Package 200 Minutes, Full Size Lotion and Eyewear. Only $6999 (a $90 value) HOT NEW OR S! BULBBuy Any Package and Get 2 High Performance Tans FREE (a $23 value!)

GEAR UP FOR SPRING BREAK!!!

Now carrying LA Idol Jeans

Any Bo tt of Lotio le n

25% OF F!

Coupon Expires 5/31/11

142 E. Main • Sisters • 541-549-6900 • Mon. - Sat. 9am - 7pm

Garden & Bloome Soil Building Compost

“WHAT A GREAT STORE!” BEND 63353 Nels Anderson, Bend, OR (541) 385-7001 PRINEVILLE 1225 NW Gardner Rd., Prineville, OR Be Our Friend On Facebook (541) 447-5609 CULVER 603 1st St., Culver, OR (541) 546-6603

6

$ 99 3 CUBIC FEET Expires on 4/18/11. Not good with any other offer.

CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING

541-549-9090 ANTI-ALLERGENS & GREEN PRODUCTS • Most advanced truck mount extraction system • Recommended by carpet manufacturers • FAST Drying

Family owned and operated since 1986

SEE MORE OFFERS ON BACK

ANY 3 AREAS

$109 95

(UP TO 350 SQ. FT.)

INCLUDES PRE-TREATMENT & SPOT REMOVAL PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 6/15/11. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.


Tuesday, April 12, 2011

THE BULLETIN

C

C

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

5.00 SANDWICH

All Water is NOT created Equal...

$ DELI & PUB

REUBEN, FRENCH DIP, BBQ BEEF, PULLED PORK, BLT, SUB SANDWICH & MORE

913 NE 3RD STREET • BEND, OR CORNER OF GREENWOOD & 3RD STREET (ACROSS FROM WELLS FARGO)

541.383.1694

OPEN BREAKFAST, LUNCH & DINNER

$6 = BOGWICH, 3 DECK CLUB + PHILLY

Health Products, USA

(541) 389-8715 The Next Generation of water ionization systems has arrived!

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!! $

Insist on chemical-free Tyent Water for you and your family that can help naturally restore the body’s PH balance, invigorate with energy, super hydrate the body, and provide powerful antioxidants.

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 4/18/11.

®

ES CARD IAL SERVIC FINANC

WE ALSO OFFER YOU PEACE OF MIND AT NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE THROUGH: • ARRIVAL TIMES SCHEDULED AT YOUR CONVENIENCE • SAME DAY SERVICE • CAREFUL MOVING OF FURNITURE

$

99

Expires 5/31/11

Guaranteed Everyday Lowest Prices!

74

• Replace front or rear brake pads • Add brake fluid (as needed) • Inspect front & rear discs & calipers (or rear drums & wheel cylinders), brake likes, hoses, & master cylinder • Rotor turning or replacement extra *Price per axle. *Some models may be higher

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. No Hidden Fees Expires 5/31/11

BW0411

Whole House Special

$

144

Up to 5 Rooms Cleaned

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. No Hidden Fees Expires 5/31/11

BW0411

At the Corner of Empire and Lower Meadow 63056 Lower Meadow Drive • 541-388-1580 • Fax 541-388-1597 Expires 5/9/11. Limit 4 per customer per coupon. Good only at above location. Not valid with any other offer or coupon.

NEW OWNERSHIP !

Garden & Bloome Soil Building Compost

6

$ 99

BEND 63353 Nels Anderson, Bend, OR (541) 385-7001 PRINEVILLE 1225 NW Gardner Rd., Prineville, OR Be Our Friend On Facebook (541) 447-5609 CULVER 603 1st St., Culver, OR (541) 546-6603

THAI O RESTAURANT Tel. 541.548.4883

By Osathanon’s Family

Lunch Special FREE SOUP Dine-in only. Open ’til 3:00 pm daily

974 veterans way #1 redmond, OR 97756

541.548.4883 (fred meyer shopping center)

3 CUBIC FEET Expires on 4/18/11. Not good with any other offer.

Buy Two entrees get Third entree

free One per customer

With purchase of any menu item of equal or greater value.

Coupon Required | Expires 5-9-11 | Cannot be combined with other offers.

Starter Package 200 Minutes, Full Size Lotion and Eyewear. Only $6999 (a $90 value) W E N T O H OR S! BULBBuy Any Package and Get 2 High Performance Tans FREE (a $23 value!)

GEAR UP FOR SPRING BREAK!!!

$

$

Expires 4/30/11

Independently Owned & Operated

20% OFF

541-388-7374 Bend 541-923-3347 Redmond

541-389-6714

Offer valid with coupon only. Not including RVs & stairs. Not valid with other offers. Minimums apply. Payment due at time of service. Expiration date: 4-30-2011

J.L. Scott

SUET

WITHOUT GARAGE!

ONLY $95,900 with attached garage!

CENTRAL OREGON RANCH SUPPLY 3457 SW HIGHWAY 97 • Madras, OR 1726 SOUTH HIGHWAY 97 • REDMOND, OR

BOX OF 12 $ 60

9

WITH COUPON Reg. $1200

Expires 4/30/11. Not good with any other offer.

CCB#181069

25% Off Select Signature Series® Window Treatments PLUS Order 10 Window Coverings or More & Get An Additional 10% Off

25% OFF

At participating franchises only. Valid on select Signature Series ® Window Treatments only. Offer valid at time of initial estimate only. Offer not valid with any other offers. Some restrictions may apply. Offer available for a limited time only. ©2010 Budget Blinds, Inc. All rights reserved. Each franchise is independently owned & operated. Budget Blinds is a registered trademark of Budget Blinds, Inc.

Chem-Dry of Bend Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties

Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning

89,900

541-788-8444

off any

Vietnamese Sandwich

Only Chem-Dry uses

Coupon Required | Expires 5-9-11 | Cannot be combined with other offers. One per coupon.

Find us online at www.BudgetBlinds.com

00

1

You would not add soaps, detergents, phosphates or other harsh chemicals to our air, lakes, streams or forests, so why add them to your carpet?

All DayDine In or Take Out

Call today for your complimentary in-home consultation

10% Off

Must present coupon. Good through 4/30/11.

OPEN at 9:30am y! every da

Coupon Expires 5/31/11

Chicken or Tofu Pad Thai or Chicken or Tofu Thai Fried Rice

Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Budget Blinds is a registered trademark of Budget Blinds, Inc. and a home franchise Concept Brand. Offer valid through 5/31/11.

*Additional charges for Timing Belt replacement or platinum spark plugs may apply.

541-389-3031 • www.SubaruofBend.com • 2060 NE Hwy 20

25% OF F!

5

Select Signature Series ® Window Treatments by Budget Blinds ®

35900

Not valid with any other offer. Bring this coupon with you. Good through 4/30/11.

Not valid with any other offer. Bring this coupon with you. Good through 4/30/11.

Any Bo tt of Lotio le n

$ 00

Central Oregon (800) 970-0153

$

15995

30,000/60,000/90,000/120,000 To promote a long life and eliminate unexpected repairs. We will perform the services as described in your Warranty & Maintenance booklet or per dealer recommendation. • Includes a multi-point vehicle inspection • Includes complimentary car wash

Now carrying LA Idol Jeans

Only

Included features: • Split Bedrooms • 9’ Walls with Vault in Great Room • Large Front Porch with Timber Truss • See reverse side for loor plan

• Keep both hands on the wheel for safety • Uses your car’s audio system • Connects you to the world with a touch of a button

Recommended Regular Maintenance Service

142 E. Main • Sisters • 541-549-6900 • Mon. - Sat. 9am - 7pm

NEW PLAN–DESIGNED FOR CENTRAL OREGON VIEWS $ ONLY

Blue Tooth Hands Free Car Kit

BRAKE SERVICE

$

“WHAT A GREAT STORE!”

SERVICING ALL MAKES & MODELS, DOMESTIC & FOREIGN WITH ASE CERTIFIED MECHANICS

BW0411

2 Rooms Cleaned

The World’s Greenest Carpet Cleaner

• SPOT TREATMENT & TOUGH STAIN REMOVAL • NO HIDDEN CHARGES • LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED

LONGER LIFE THROUGH REGULAR MAINTENANCE

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. No Hidden Fees

® ®

Schedule Online at www.stanleysteemer.com

3 Rooms Cleaned

Spring ! l Specia

541-593-1799

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 4/18/11.

Call for Free Estimate 541-706-9390 • 1-800-STEEMER

Expires May 31, 2011

Call today for your FREE 3-Day In-Home Trial-No Obligation

123

ANY 3 AREAS CLEANED

ANY 2 AREAS & 1 HALL CLEANED

541-389-8715 | LICENSED • BONDED • INSURED • www.masterstouchhealthproducts.com

of Central Oregon

$

99

CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING

541-549-9090 ANTI-ALLERGENS & GREEN PRODUCTS • Most advanced truck mount extraction system • Recommended by carpet manufacturers • FAST Drying

Family owned and operated since 1986

SEE MORE OFFERS ON BACK

ANY 3 AREAS

$109 95

(UP TO 350 SQ. FT.)

INCLUDES PRE-TREATMENT & SPOT REMOVAL PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 6/15/11. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.

Lawn & Landscape Maintenance

20% OFF

FREE Fertilization

Dethatching & Aeration Plus FREE Fertilizing

with New Seasonal Mowing Service Serving Central Oregon for Over 20 Years

541-382-3883

“Because weekends WERE NOT made for yard work!”


C

C

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!! Bulk Chix Ground turkey Bulk Chix Turkey Sausage Bulk Mexican Chorizo Bulk Maple Pork Bulk Sage Pork Bulk X Mild Pork Beef Thuringer Chub Teriyaki #1 Chub Beef Cheddar 1# Chub Pepper 1# Chub Summer 1# Tenderloin Buffalo Top Sirloin Buffalo Smoked Andouilles Smoked Beef Hot Link Smoked Bratwurst Smoked Apple Chicken Smoked Chorizo

Smoked Garlic Frank Smoked Bird Dog Frank Smoked German Smoked LA Hot Bacon Tray Uncooked BBQ Link Uncooked Beerwurst Uncured Bockwurst Uncured Boudin Blanc Uncured British Banger Uncured Chicken Blueberry Uncured Italian Meatball Whole Bologna Whole Ham Bone In Whole Ham Pit Whole Smoked Turkey Whole Boneless Smoked Turkey Breast

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

SAUSAGE DELI CASE

50¢ OFF PER LB. w/coupon NO LIMIT EXPIRES 4-30-11

THISTLE

SUNFLOWER

10#

40#

LANDJEAGER

5

$

19

99 $

13

$

OFF per lb

EXPIRES 4-30-11

99

913 NE 3RD ST., BEND 541-383-1694

Using Chem-Dry resists re-soiling so your carpet fibers stay cleaner, longer! Don’t forget your area rugs & upholstery too! Reg. $15 99 WITH COUPON Expires 4/30/11

3457 SW HIGHWAY 97 • MADRAS, OR

CORNER OF GREENWOOD & 3RD ST.

541-460-5100

ACROSS THE STREET FROM WELLS FARGO BANK

1726 SOUTH HIGHWAY 97 • REDMOND, OR

WITH COUPON Expires 4/30/11

541-548-5195

RESTAURANT

RESTAURANT By Osathanon’s Family

of Central Oregon

974 veterans way #1 redmond, OR 97756

541-593-1799

IICRC Certiied Technician

Chem-Dry of Bend 541-388-7374 Bend • 541-923-3347 Redmond Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

THAI O THAI O THAI O Tel. 541.548.4883

Our Hot Carbonating Truck Mount Extraction cleans deep!We use one-fifth the amount of water compared to steam cleaners so carpet dries in 1 to 2 hours. Our cleaner, The Natural®, is green certified, non-toxic, so it’s safe for your family and pets who are allergy sensitive! Leaves no sticky residue!

CENTRAL OREGON RANCH SUPPLY

DELI & PUB

Superior Carpet and Tile & Stone Cleaning

RESTAURANT Tel. 541.548.4883

By Osathanon’s Family

Tel. 541.548.4883

By Osathanon’s Family

974 veterans way #1 redmond, OR 97756

541.548.4883

541.548.4883

(fred meyer shopping center)

(fred meyer shopping center)

Now Featuring Dish TV While you Eat

Now Featuring Dish TV While you Eat

Coupon Required | Expires 5-9-11 Cannot be combined with other offers.

Coupon Required | Expires 5-9-11 Cannot be combined with other offers. With purchase of any menu item of equal or greater value.

Lunch Special

FREE SOUP Dine-in only. Open ’til 3:00 pm daily

Call for FREE Information Package

(800) 970-0153

New Plan Designed for Central Oregon Views!

974 veterans way #1 redmond, OR 97756

54 14

NW

Rim ple Ma

Plan #1780

Ct.

541.548.4883 (fred meyer shopping center)

BREATHe Better AIR!

25% OFF

Save $20 On

DRYER VENT CLEANING – AND –

SAVE AN ADDITIONAL $5 OFF WHEN YOU HAVE A CHIMNEY & A DRYER VENT CLEANED AT THE SAME TIME

FOR A TOTAL SAVINGS OF $45.00! (See reverse side of coupon)

DID YOU KNOW? Poor Indoor Air Quality can: Result in Illness • Including Nausea Eye & Skin Irritation • Headaches • Allergic Reactions • Respiratory Problems

EXPIRES May 31, 2011

(541) 389-8715

Save UP TO $50 on Air Duct Cleaning!

Call today for your FREE ESTIMATE! *Video Inspection Available 541-389-8715 | LICENSED • BONDED • INSURED | www.masterstouchblend.com

Selected Signature Series® Window Treatments by Budget Blinds®

We fit your style and your budget! Shop-at-home convenience Personal Style Consultants Thousands of window coverings Professional measuring & installation

Selected Signature Series® Window Treatments by Budget Blinds®

We bring you the best brands including:

a style for every point of view®

PROFESSIONAL INSTALLATION Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of initial estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Offer valid through 5/31/11

® by Budget Blinds ®

Call 1-541-788-8444 or visit us online at www.budgetblinds.com

J.L. Scott

25% OFF

a style for every point of view®

a style for every point of view®

PROFESSIONAL INSTALLATION Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of initial estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Offer valid through 5/31/11

Lawn & Landscape Maintenance

Complete Landscape Maintenance Commercial & Residential * Mowing Services * Lawn Reseeding * De-thatching

*Aeration *Fertilization * Spring & Fall Clean Up * Edging & Bed Reshaping

* Trimming *Bark Installation * Top Dressing

If it has to do with landscape maintenance, give us a call.

WE DO IT ALL!

541-382-3883

Serving Central Oregon for Over 20 Years

$

15 OFF

$

195

ANY 5 AREAS CLEANED

UPHOLSTERY CLEANING

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 4/18/11.

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Sectional sofas may not be separated. Sofas over 7 feet and certain fabrics may incur additional charges. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 4/18/11.

Schedule Online at www.stanleysteemer.com

NOW is the time to trade in that old energy-guzzling home heating and cooling system for a new energyefficient upgraded model AND get paid for it! Mountain View Heating, with utility rebates plus state and federal tax credits, is making it happen! Cash for Clunkers is coming to your home. Right now, Mountain View Heating is offering you a $500 rebate*, . as well as or possible rebates from your utility company, plus government tax credits. There’s never been a better time to upgrade to an energy efficient heating and cooling system from Mountain View. We’ll even take out that old energy sucking model from 1999 or before, recycle what’s usable and crush the rest! Don’t miss this locals only, cash for clunkers opportunity from Mountain View Heating. We’ll even fill out the tax credit and rebate forms!

Call for Free Estimate 541-706-9390 • 1-800-STEEMER

• 541-388-1580

WE ALSO OFFER YOU PEACE OF MIND AT NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE THROUGH: • ARRIVAL TIMES SCHEDULED AT YOUR CONVENIENCE • SAME DAY SERVICE • CAREFUL MOVING OF FURNITURE

Bonus Discount Special

Save $$$ Save now on any Parts or Service!

NEW OWNERSHIP! Brand Name Clothes at Affordable Prices

arry We C

Clothing, Shoes, Jackets, Handbags, Swimwear, Formal Gowns Gear up for Spring Break!!!

If you spend: $50 - $100 $101 - $200 $201 - $300 $301 - $400 $401 - $500 $501 - $700 $701 - $900 $901 or more

You Save: $10 Off $20 Off $30 Off $40 Off $50 Off $70 Off $90 Off $110 Of

Must present coupon. Expires 4/30/11

• SPOT TREATMENT & TOUGH STAIN REMOVAL • NO HIDDEN CHARGES • LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED

541-389-6714

FREE BRAKE INSPECTION Good brakes save lives! Take advantage of this FREE brake inspection to ensure your brakes are working properly. • Inspect brake pads &/or shoes, rotors/drums, calipers & wheel cylinders • Add brake fluid as needed • Road test

FREE

Must present coupon. Expires 4/30/11

$4599 with coupon.

100s of Items Now on Sale

Limit 2 per person. Expires 5/31/11

$5 or Less!!!

142 E. Main • Sisters • 541-549-6900 • Mon. - Sat. 9am - 7pm M&J CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING • 541-549-9090

ANY 5 AREAS $

149 95

(UP TO 500 SQ. FT.)

SOFA CLEANING

$

99 95

INCLUDES PRE-TREATMENT & SPOT REMOVAL

STANDARD SIZE CUSTOM FABRIC EXTRA

PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 6/15/11. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.

PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 6/15/11. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.

ANY 7 AREAS ALL ORIENTAL & AREA RUG CLEANING $ 95

179

(UP TO 650 SQ. FT.)

INCLUDES PRE-TREATMENT & SPOT REMOVAL PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 6/15/11. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.

We have a new Coupon tab on our Facebook page!

20% OFF

PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 6/15/11. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.

This is where we will put our printable coupons and website coupon codes. If you “Like” our page, you will have access to these coupons. If you haven’t “Liked” us, this tab is invisible to you. So “Like” us and see what the coupon is this week! http://www.facebook.com/roundbutteseed

ROUND BUTTE SEED

BEND

PRINEVILLE

CULVER

63353 Nels Anderson Bend, OR 97701

1225 NW Gardner Rd. Prineville, OR 97754

603 1st St. Culver, OR 97734

(541) 385-7001

(541) 447-5609

(541) 546-6603

Visit us on facebook • www.rbseed.com


C

C THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!! BREATHe Better AIR!

$

15 OFF

$

195

ANY 5 AREAS CLEANED

UPHOLSTERY CLEANING

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 4/18/11.

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Sectional sofas may not be separated. Sofas over 7 feet and certain fabrics may incur additional charges. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 4/18/11.

Schedule Online at www.stanleysteemer.com Call for Free Estimate 541-706-9390 • 1-800-STEEMER WE ALSO OFFER YOU PEACE OF MIND AT NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE THROUGH: • ARRIVAL TIMES SCHEDULED AT YOUR CONVENIENCE • SAME DAY SERVICE • CAREFUL MOVING OF FURNITURE

Bonus Discount Special

Save $$$ Save now on any Parts or Service! If you spend: $50 - $100 $101 - $200 $201 - $300 $301 - $400 $401 - $500 $501 - $700 $701 - $900 $901 or more

You Save: $10 Off $20 Off $30 Off $40 Off $50 Off $70 Off $90 Off $110 Of

• SPOT TREATMENT & TOUGH STAIN REMOVAL • NO HIDDEN CHARGES • LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED

(541) 389-8715

Save UP TO $50 on Air Duct Cleaning!

Save $20 On

DRYER VENT CLEANING – AND –

SAVE AN ADDITIONAL $5 OFF WHEN YOU HAVE A CHIMNEY & A DRYER VENT CLEANED AT THE SAME TIME

FOR A TOTAL SAVINGS OF $45.00! (See reverse side of coupon)

DID YOU KNOW? Poor Indoor Air Quality can: Result in Illness • Including Nausea Eye & Skin Irritation • Headaches • Allergic Reactions • Respiratory Problems

EXPIRES May 31, 2011

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

Call today for your FREE ESTIMATE! *Video Inspection Available 541-389-8715 | LICENSED • BONDED • INSURED | www.masterstouchblend.com

Bulk Chix Ground turkey Bulk Chix Turkey Sausage Bulk Mexican Chorizo Bulk Maple Pork Bulk Sage Pork Bulk X Mild Pork Beef Thuringer Chub Teriyaki #1 Chub Beef Cheddar 1# Chub Pepper 1# Chub Summer 1# Tenderloin Buffalo Top Sirloin Buffalo Smoked Andouilles Smoked Beef Hot Link Smoked Bratwurst Smoked Apple Chicken Smoked Chorizo

Smoked Garlic Frank Smoked Bird Dog Frank Smoked German Smoked LA Hot Bacon Tray Uncooked BBQ Link Uncooked Beerwurst Uncured Bockwurst Uncured Boudin Blanc Uncured British Banger Uncured Chicken Blueberry Uncured Italian Meatball Whole Bologna Whole Ham Bone In Whole Ham Pit Whole Smoked Turkey Whole Boneless Smoked Turkey Breast

SAUSAGE DELI CASE

50¢ OFF PER LB. w/coupon NO LIMIT

LANDJEAGER

5

$

EXPIRES 4-30-11

OFF per lb

EXPIRES 4-30-11

DELI & PUB 913 NE 3RD ST., BEND 541-383-1694

CORNER OF GREENWOOD & 3RD ST. ACROSS THE STREET FROM WELLS FARGO BANK

FREE BRAKE INSPECTION Good brakes save lives! Take advantage of this FREE brake inspection to ensure your brakes are working properly. • Inspect brake pads &/or shoes, rotors/drums, calipers & wheel cylinders • Add brake fluid as needed • Road test

Must present coupon. Expires 4/30/11

of Central Oregon

541-593-1799

FREE

IICRC Certiied Technician

Must present coupon. Expires 4/30/11

• 541-388-1580

We have a new Coupon tab on our Facebook page! This is where we will put our printable coupons and website coupon codes. If you “Like” our page, you will have access to these coupons. If you haven’t “Liked” us, this tab is invisible to you. So “Like” us and see what the coupon is this week! http://www.facebook.com/roundbutteseed

NEW OWNERSHIP! Brand Name Clothes at Affordable Prices

arry We C

Clothing, Shoes, Jackets, Handbags, Swimwear, Formal Gowns Gear up for Spring Break!!!

ROUND BUTTE SEED

$4599 with coupon.

100s of Items Now on Sale

Limit 2 per person. Expires 5/31/11

$5 or Less!!!

142 E. Main • Sisters • 541-549-6900 • Mon. - Sat. 9am - 7pm

Our cleaner, The Natural®, is green certified, non-toxic, so it’s safe for your family and pets who are allergy sensitive! Leaves no sticky residue! Using Chem-Dry resists re-soiling so your carpet fibers stay cleaner, longer! Don’t forget your area rugs & upholstery too!

NOW is the time to trade in that old energy-guzzling home heating and cooling system for a new energyefficient upgraded model AND get paid for it! Mountain View Heating, with utility rebates plus state and federal tax credits, is making it happen! Cash for Clunkers is coming to your home. Right now, Mountain View Heating is offering you a $500 rebate*, . as well as or possible rebates from your utility company, plus government tax credits. There’s never been a better time to upgrade to an energy efficient heating and cooling system from Mountain View. We’ll even take out that old energy sucking model from 1999 or before, recycle what’s usable and crush the rest! Don’t miss this locals only, cash for clunkers opportunity from Mountain View Heating. We’ll even fill out the tax credit and rebate forms!

541-388-7374 Bend • 541-923-3347 Redmond

Lawn & Landscape Maintenance

WE DO IT ALL!

541-382-3883

Serving Central Oregon for Over 20 Years

THISTLE

SUNFLOWER

10#

40#

13

19

99 $

$

Complete Landscape Maintenance Commercial & Residential

If it has to do with landscape maintenance, give us a call.

(541) 447-5609

(541) 546-6603

Visit us on facebook • www.rbseed.com

RESTAURANT Tel. 541.548.4883

RESTAURANT

By Osathanon’s Family

Tel. 541.548.4883

974 veterans way #1 redmond, OR 97756

Tel. 541.548.4883

By Osathanon’s Family

By Osathanon’s Family

974 veterans way #1 redmond, OR 97756

541.548.4883

541.548.4883

(fred meyer shopping center)

(fred meyer shopping center)

Now Featuring Dish TV While you Eat

Now Featuring Dish TV While you Eat

Coupon Required | Expires 5-9-11 Cannot be combined with other offers.

Coupon Required | Expires 5-9-11 Cannot be combined with other offers. With purchase of any menu item of equal or greater value.

Lunch Special

FREE SOUP Dine-in only. Open ’til 3:00 pm daily

974 veterans way #1 redmond, OR 97756

541.548.4883 (fred meyer shopping center)

J.L. Scott

* Trimming *Bark Installation * Top Dressing

(541) 385-7001

541-389-6714

Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

*Aeration *Fertilization * Spring & Fall Clean Up * Edging & Bed Reshaping

CULVER 603 1st St. Culver, OR 97734

RESTAURANT

Chem-Dry of Bend

* Mowing Services * Lawn Reseeding * De-thatching

PRINEVILLE 1225 NW Gardner Rd. Prineville, OR 97754

THAI O THAI O THAI O

Superior Carpet and Tile & Stone Cleaning

Our Hot Carbonating Truck Mount Extraction cleans deep! We use one-fifth the amount of water compared to steam cleaners so carpet dries in 1 to 2 hours.

BEND 63353 Nels Anderson Bend, OR 97701

99

CENTRAL OREGON RANCH SUPPLY 3457 SW HIGHWAY 97 • MADRAS, OR

541-460-5100 1726 SOUTH HIGHWAY 97 • REDMOND, OR

$

Call for FREE Information Package

(800) 970-0153

New Plan Designed for Central Oregon Views!

99

Reg. 15 WITH COUPON Expires 4/30/11

5 14

WITH COUPON Expires 4/30/11

W 4N

Rim ple Ma

Plan #1780

Ct.

541-548-5195

M&J CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING • 541-549-9090

ANY 5 AREAS $

149 95

(UP TO 500 SQ. FT.)

SOFA CLEANING

$

99 95

INCLUDES PRE-TREATMENT & SPOT REMOVAL

STANDARD SIZE CUSTOM FABRIC EXTRA

PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 6/15/11. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.

PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 6/15/11. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.

ANY 7 AREAS ALL ORIENTAL & AREA RUG CLEANING $ 95

179

(UP TO 650 SQ. FT.)

INCLUDES PRE-TREATMENT & SPOT REMOVAL PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 6/15/11. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.

20% OFF

PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 6/15/11. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.

25% OFF Selected Signature Series® Window Treatments by Budget Blinds®

25% OFF

a style for every point of view® We fit your style and your budget! Shop-at-home convenience Personal Style Consultants Thousands of window coverings Professional measuring & installation

Selected Signature Series® Window Treatments by Budget Blinds®

We bring you the best brands including:

a style for every point of view®

PROFESSIONAL INSTALLATION Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of initial estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Offer valid through 5/31/11

® by Budget Blinds ®

Call 1-541-788-8444 or visit us online at www.budgetblinds.com

a style for every point of view®

PROFESSIONAL INSTALLATION Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of initial estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Offer valid through 5/31/11

Bulletin Daily Paper 04/12/11  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Tuesday April 12, 2011

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