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CYCLING CENTRAL

Champ bids Bend goodbye

Also: Cycling calendar, profile

But first Barbara Buchan will compete in paracycling world championships • SPORTS, D1

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BENDITES LIKE THE OSCARS — THEY REALLY, REALLY LIKE THEM

Bend’s ‘grand dame of theater’ auditioned her 1st month in town

School transfers a disputed point in Redmond By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

REDMOND — The relationship has been cordial between the Redmond School District and the unions representing much of its staff as the groups begin working to cover a roughly $10 million budget shortfall. But during a recent Redmond School Board meeting, a potential bump appeared when the issue of inter-district transfers was discussed. The district plans to allow students to transfer, but the unions oppose that plan. The issue has become contentious over the last few years as the district, like many others, repeatedly has faced multimillion-dollar budget shortfalls. Redmond has made some of the most dramatic cuts in the region, including adopting a four-day school week for the 2009-10 academic year. This year, the district has gotten the earliest start in the region on its budget process and has tried to involve as many staffers as possible. The transfer issue puts the district’s traditional open policy up against the current fiscal crisis. Districts are largely funded by the state on a perstudent rate, and each student who transfers from Redmond costs the district about $6,000. The loss of this money worries the unions. Superintendent Shay Mikalson wants to continue allowing transfers, but with a tightened enforcement of the district’s transfer policy. That may include exit interviews for transferring families, though how that would work has not been finalized. Judy Newman, the Redmond Education Association president, warned that open transfers could become an issue during the budget discussions. “I believe it is going to impact (union members’) decision-making when they’re asked for concessions,” Newman said during the meeting. See Transfers / A4

By David Jasper The Bulletin

Carol Johnson Bryant, a key figure in the Bend theater community both on stage and off, died Friday afternoon after being hospitalized for pneumonia. She was 85. “It was several things,” said son Andy Hickman. “Somewhere in the last three or four weeks, she had a mild heart attack. Add to that emphysema and diabetes. … Add to that pneumonia, add to that 85 years old, poor nutrition and dehydration. Right up until the final seconds she was still baffling science.” Hickman, a comedian and actor in Portland, says he inherited an irreverent sense of humor from his mother, who is remembered by friends for her sharp wit and, of course, her love of theater. Co-founder of Community Theatre of the Cascades in 1978, Bryant was often referred to as “the grand dame of theater,” said Dee Torrey, retired executive and artistic director of CTC. The license plate of her red Chevy Monte Carlo, which read “THEATR,” announced it as well. See Bryant / A4

Andy Manis / The Associated Press Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Attendees watch the 83rd Academy Awards broadcast Sunday evening at the Tower Theatre. The event, with raffles, refreshments, movie polls and more, was a fundraiser for the Tower Theatre Foundation and BendFilm. For Oscars coverage and the winners in major categories, see Page A3. The Bulletin ile photo

Carol Johnson Bryant, pictured in 2008, moved to Bend in 1972. “She was involved in theater from the minute she arrived in Bend,” said Janis Sharpe, Bryant’s friend.

TOP NEWS INSIDE LIBYA: Rebels demonstrate increased strength, firepower, Page A3

Unions debate what ARIZONA SHOOTING they’re willing to give Recovering every day, Giffords to save bargaining and her circle struggle together By Michael Cooper and Steven Greenhouse New York Times News Service

By Sari Horwitz The Washington Post

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Vol. 108, No. 59, 28 pages, 5 sections

Damon Terrell speaks to protesters Sunday at the state Capitol in Madison, Wis. Protests to the governor’s bill to eliminate collective bargaining rights for many state workers have lasted two weeks.

The congresswoman wears a helmet designed with colors of the Arizona flag when she goes to therapy. With it off, her friends say, she looks like herself. Her hair is growing back; the wounds on her head are healing. She listens, smiles and frowns at appropriate moments. She speaks single words even though she cannot yet carry on a conversation. The friends who’ve come to Rep. Gabrielle Giffords’ room at TIRR Memorial Hermann Hospital in Houston say she’s getting better every day. They can tell that she recognizes them; her eyes brighten when they enter, and sometimes she tears up when they leave. Healing proceeds in small steps — not just in the hospital but also in Giffords’ office in Tucson. See Giffords / A6

Courtesy ofice of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords

The hospital-room bed of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords in Houston. The helmet on the stuffed animal is one Giffords wears during her therapy to protect the area where a piece of her skull was removed during surgery.

As Wisconsin’s governor and public employees square off in the biggest public-sector labor showdown since Ronald Reagan fired striking air traffic controllers in 1981, unions in a range of states are weighing whether to give ground on wages, benefits and work rules to preserve basic bargaining rights. It is not yet clear whether Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin will succeed in his quest to strip public employee unions of most of their bargaining rights. But by simply pressing the issue so hard, he has already won major concessions that would have been unthinkable just a month ago. Some of Wisconsin’s major public-sector unions, faced with what they see as a threat to their existence, have decided to accept concessions that they had been vigorously fighting: They said they would agree to have more money deducted from workers’ paychecks to go toward their pensions and health benefits. See Unions / A4


A2 Monday, February 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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The dinosaurs didn’t know it, but their world might have narrowly averted upheaval this month. For two years, all the denizens of Webosaurs, an online virtual world for children 5 to 12, could customize their dinosaur avatars with leather armor and other whimsical outfits. Recently, though, the Webosaurs founder, Jacques Panis, decided that leather armor should be available only to premium members, who pay about $6 a month. Players with free membership would be denied that attire. Then the Metaverse Mod Squad stepped in. The company employs moderators around the country who monitor the Webosaurs site to keep its users safe and happy. In this instance, it told Webosaurs that if the change were made, the free users might abandon the Webosaurs world or turn on one another. In the end, the dinosaurs kept their armor, and Webosaurs avoided the possibility of alienating some of its 1.5 million registered users. “I’m running a business, but Metaverse Mod Squad, as the moderators and community managers, is the voice of the kids,” Panis says. Since starting Metaverse in 2007, Amy Pritchard, its chief executive, has emerged as an industry expert in creating safe, engaging online communities for both children and grown-ups.

Handling kids with care Metaverse has a client list that includes the Cartoon Network, the National Football League, Nickelodeon and the State Department. It employs an army of workers — often stay-at-home moms — to monitor and moderate websites where children create their own characters, or avatars, and can interact with thousands of other users. Metaverse’s employees frequently create their own avatars to help maintain the peace. Pritchard says the stakes are higher in online worlds intended for children, like Webosaurs. In more adult-oriented sites like Second Life, users must be at least 16 and are presumably more equipped to deal with the threats of online interaction. She has found that keeping children safe has a lot to do with keeping them entertained. “If you just release kids into these online playgrounds with no one to monitor them and no rules, it’s ‘Lord of the Flies,’” she says. “But if you can balance safety with fun and engage the kids, I guarantee you’ll have a site with a great group of kids and no cyberbullying.” She stumbled onto a business idea while exploring the virtual world of Second Life with her husband, Ron, who had taken a job at Linden Lab, Second Life’s creator. Pritchard was taken with the breathtaking landscapes, elaborate buildings and whimsical avatars — from long-legged blond bombshells to blue giraffes — that users created for themselves. But she says she noticed that few users visited some of the elaborate environments created by major corporations because the companies offered nothing to do there. “Companies had no idea how to create relationships in 3-D,” she says. Pritchard, however, knew exactly how to make friends online. As a side job, she had moderated message boards for the WB television network and had struck up close friendships with several other moderators. After introducing them to Second Life, she persuaded five of her moderator friends to create avatars and join her regularly at a Second Life virtual sports bar called the Thirsty Tiger. There, Pritchard struck up a friendship with the bar’s creator, Mike Pinkerton, a real-life lawyer in New Orleans. One night in July 2007, she ran this idea past him: What about a virtual company, providing remote moderators to staff Second Life sites for corporations, and to moderate Web forums? Pinkerton signed on as

Jim Wilson / New York Times News Service

Amy Pritchard, the chief executive of Metaverse Mod Squad, a company that moderates traffic on websites, works on her computer with her daughter, Mary, 5, at the company’s headquarters in Sacramento, Calif. The company employs moderators around the country who monitor a variety of websites to keep their users safe, happy and free of cyberbullies. chief operating officer of the fledgling business. Pritchard soon had a chance to test the method against a far more demanding audience: children. While Second Life thrives on a free-wheeling, anything-goes culture, a different breed of virtual world began to proliferate soon after Pritchard started her company. The sudden growth of Club Penguin, acquired by the Walt Disney Co. in late 2007, spawned a galaxy of virtual worlds for children. Suddenly Barbie, Build-a-Bear, Webkinz and countless other toys, games and entertainment properties had their own mini-universes, where children could create avatars, play with one another, care for virtual pets and furnish virtual dream homes. The rise of social media, meanwhile, produced another explosion in social games like Zynga’s FarmVille, where players create characters and play cooperatively. Putting children into these social environments raises risks of predators, privacy breaches, inappropriate conversations and bullying. “Anybody can buy a profanity filter, but kids have all kinds of work-arounds,” says Anne Collier, co-director of connectsafely.org, which promotes the well-being of children. “There really is no substitute for human moderation.” But not all companies can afford, or have the expertise, to hire an in-house moderation team, and they prefer to outsource to Metaverse or a handful of similar firms, including LiveWorld and ICUC.

pigskins for waiting patiently. Still, outsourcing moderation does not work well for every company. Melissa Parrish, an analyst at Forrester Research specializing in interactive marketing, said a possible drawback of outsourced moderating was that “you have someone who’s not embedded in your company talking as if they are.” To avoid losing touch with their users, some clients, like Webosaurs, insist on having a Metaverse manager working in the clients’ own offices, rather than managing the moderation remotely. “The manager sits right here, and is involved in our ongoing development efforts,” said Panis of Webosaurs, which is based in Dallas and owned by Reel FX. Employing an entire team of its

own in-house moderators, he says, would not be cost-effective.

Many moderators To staff a project, Metaverse assigns a manager, one of the company’s 115 regular employees, to oversee it. Managers then draw on a pool of 500 prescreened moderators around the country, many of whom are stay-at-home parents, students and others with flexible schedules. The pool gives Metaverse quick access to moderators with expertise in a wide array of subjects, from the NFL to Harry Potter. For one project, the company had to find people to judge user-submitted rap videos for a contest sponsored by a major record label. “We needed people who knew specifi-

cally about East Coast and West Coast rap, and would recognize gang signs” so they would not be shown, Pritchard says. Because she started Metaverse as a way to spend more time with her daughter, the company endorses a family-friendly culture, and does not require specific hours, even for its regular employees. Until a year ago, the company didn’t even have an office. Instead, the staff met regularly in its swanky virtual headquarters in Second Life London. Now, 35 employees work out of Metaverse’s brickwalled studio in Sacramento or from a small office in New York. The rest work from home. In the last year, Pritchard has found that Metaverse’s approach to dealing with children also works for customer service, which companies increasingly provide via corporate Facebook pages, Twitter feeds or other social media forums. Companies including Kabam, the social game developer, and Horizon DataSys, the data recovery firm, have hired Metaverse to provide online customer service. For social media support, interactions between moderators and customers occur in text, via instant messages, Facebook or email. That makes these exchanges easy to monitor, says Charlene Li, founder of Altimeter, the technology research firm, and author of “Open Leadership: How Social Technology Can Transform the Way You Lead.” “With a call center, you can only monitor about 5 percent of your calls,” she says. “Here you can monitor every single one, and if the tone isn’t quite right, you can correct it immediately.” While customer service and children’s virtual play may seem worlds apart, both ultimately come down to respectful communication in a social environment. “They hire us,” Pritchard says, “because we know how to have conversations when millions of people may be listening.”

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Second chances Pritchard’s approach to child safety is more camp counselor than cop. When children misbehave, Metaverse moderators send a private message to the miscreant, with a warning. Repeat offenders may receive a five-minute muted timeout or can be ejected from a site. “Our policy is firm forgiveness,” Pritchard says. “Sometimes kids, and adults, too, come into a new environment and feel nervous or scared, and get attention by saying something inappropriate. By giving a warning or turning it into a joke and saying, ‘Come join us,’ you’ve given them a second chance to be part of the community.” Many companies have found Metaverse’s combination of surveillance and social direction appealing, both from a safety perspective and from a brand-management point of view. In the NFL Rush Zone, the league’s virtual world, Metaverse avatars in striped referee shirts greet children with high-fives and hand out pigskins, the game’s virtual currency. “For many of the kids, that conversation between their avatar and the referee is their first connection with the NFL,” says Peter O’Reilly, the league’s vice president for fan strategy and marketing. “We needed a safe space that promoted the values of the NFL and moderators who were passionate about the teams.” Recently, when a live chat with Drew Brees, the quarterback of the New Orleans Saints, was delayed by 45 minutes, Metaverse referees pacified some 10,000 restless children with trivia contests and games, then rewarded them with

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THE BULLETIN • Monday, February 28, 2011 A3

T S As regimes topple, al-Qaida sees history fly by By Scott Shane New York Times News Service

Chris Carlson / The Associated Press

From left: Emile Sherman, Gareth Unwin, Colin Firth and Iain Canning celebrate after winning the award for best picture for “The King’s Speech” at the 83rd Academy Awards.

For nearly two decades, the leaders of al-Qaida have denounced the Arab world’s dictators as heretics and puppets of the West and called for their downfall. Now, people in country after country have risen to topple their leaders — and al-Qaida has played absolutely no role. In fact, the motley opposition movements that have appeared so suddenly and proved so powerful have shunned the two central tenets of the al-Qaida credo: murderous violence and religious fanaticism. The demonstrators have used force defensively, treated Islam as an afterthought and embraced democracy, which

A N A LY S I S is anathema to Osama bin Laden and his followers. So for al-Qaida — and perhaps no less for American policies built around the threat it poses — the democratic revolutions that have gripped the world’s attention are a crossroads. Will the terrorist network shrivel slowly to irrelevance? Or will it find a way to exploit the chaos produced by political upheaval and the disappointment that will inevitably follow hopes now raised so high? For many specialists on terrorism and the Middle East, though not all, the past few weeks have the makings of an epochal di-

saster for al-Qaida, making the jihadists look like ineffectual bystanders to history while offering young Muslims an appealing alternative to terrorism. “So far — and I emphasize so far — the score card looks pretty terrible for al-Qaida,” said Paul Pillar, who studied terrorism and the Middle East for nearly three decades at the CIA and is now at Georgetown University. “Democracy is bad news for terrorists. The more peaceful channels people have to express grievances and pursue their goals, the less likely they are to turn to violence.” If the terrorists network’s leaders hope to seize the moment, they have been slow off the mark.

Bin Laden has been silent. His Egyptian deputy, Ayman al-Zawahri, has issued three rambling statements from his presumed hide-out in the Pakistan-Afghanistan border region that seemed oddly out of sync with the news, not noting the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt, whose government detained and tortured Zawahri in the 1980s. “Knocking off Mubarak has been Zawahri’s goal for more than 20 years, and he was unable to achieve it,” said Brian Fishman, a terrorism expert at the New America Foundation. “Now a nonviolent, nonreligious, prodemocracy movement got rid of him in a matter of weeks. It’s a major problem for al-Qaida.”

‘King’s Speech’ leads pack, and Rebel forces in Libya gain Leo gets bleeped firepower and defectors By David Germain The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — “The King’s Speech” was crowned best picture Sunday at an Academy Awards ceremony as precise as a state coronation. The monarchy drama won an expected four Oscars, and predictable favorites claimed acting honors. Colin Firth as stammering British ruler George VI in “The King’s Speech” earned the bestactor prize, while Natalie Portman won best actress as a delusional ballerina in “Black Swan.” The boxing drama “The Fighter” captured both supporting-acting honors, for Christian Bale as a boxer-turned-drug-abuser and Melissa Leo as a boxing clan’s domineering matriarch. “The King’s Speech” also won the directing prize for Tom Hooper and the original-screenplay Oscar for David Seidler, a boyhood stutterer himself. “I have a feeling my career has just peaked,” Firth said. “I’m afraid I have to warn you that I’m experiencing stirrings somewhere in the upper abdominals which are threatening to form themselves into dance moves.” Among those Portman beat was Annette Bening for “The Kids Are All Right.” Bening now has lost all four times she’s been nominated. “Thank you so much,” Portman said. “This is insane, and I truly, sincerely wish that the prize tonight was to get to work with my fellow nominees. I’m so in awe of you.” Network censors bleeped Leo for dropping the F-word during her speech, saying that “it looked so (expletive) easy” when she saw Kate Winslet accept her award at a previous show. Backstage, she jokingly conceded it was “probably a very inappropriate place to use that particular word.” “Those words, I apologize to anyone that they offend. There is a great deal of the English language that is in my vernacular,” Leo said. Bale joked that he was keeping his language clean. “I’m not going to drop the F-bomb like she did,” he said. “I’ve done that plenty of times before.” But the Oscars, being a global affair, were telecast elsewhere in the world with Leo’s words uncensored. Viewers who watched the show on Star Movies, a major channel available throughout Asia, heard the F-word loud and clear. The best-picture win for “The King’s Speech” was the first for

The Academy Awards The 83rd annual Academy Awards were broadcast Sunday night from Kodak Theater in Los Angeles. Here are the winners in major categories:

Motion Picture “The King’s Speech” Actor Colin Firth “The King’s Speech” Actress Natalie Portman “Black Swan” Supporting Actor Christian Bale “The Fighter” Supporting Actress Melissa Leo “The Fighter” Directing Tom Hooper “The King’s Speech” See a complete list of winners in all categories at oscars.org Source: The Associated Press

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its distributor, the Weinstein Co., founded by savvy awards campaigner Harvey Weinstein and his brother Bob after they left Miramax, their old outfit. At Miramax, Weinstein oversaw best-picture wins for “Chicago,” “Shakespeare in Love” and “The English Patient.” “The King’s Speech” had been the heir-apparent for Hollywood’s highest honor since late January, when it seized the awards momentum with a leading 12 Oscar nominations and a sweep of top prizes from influential actors, directors and producers guilds. McClatchy-Tribune News Service contributed to this report.

“Start Something New!” Just In Sublime Yarn

By David D. Kirkpatrick and Kareem Fahim New York Times News Service

ZAWIYAH, Libya — The Libyan rebels challenging Col. Moammar Gadhafi demonstrated their increasing military coordination and firepower Sunday, as defecting officers in the east took steps to establish a unified command while their followers in this rebel-held city, just outside the leader’s stronghold in the capital, displayed an array of tanks, Kalashnikovs and anti-aircraft guns. In a further sign of their strength, the rebels also talked about tapping revenue from the vast Libyan oil resources now under their control — estimated by some oil company officials to be about 80 percent of the country’s total. And in recognition of the insurrection’s growing power, Italy’s foreign minister suspended a nonaggression treaty with Libya on the grounds that the Libyan state “no longer exists.” Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said the United States was reaching out to the rebels to “offer any kind of assistance.” The most striking display of strength was seen here, 30 miles from Gadhafi’s Tripoli redoubt. Zawiyah is one of several cities near the capital controlled by rebels, who have repulsed repeated attempts by Gadhafi’s forces to retake them. And the arsenal they displayed helped to explain how the rebels held Zawiyah. The opposition’s display came as a global effort to isolate Gadhafi and possibly force his resignation gained momentum over the weekend, with the U.N. Security Council moving to impose punitive financial sanctions and NATO allies discussing steps that included a possible no-fly zone over Libya. The maneuverings by both sides suggested they were girding for a confrontation that could influence the shape of other protest movements and the responses of other

Ed Ou / New York Times News Service

A man waves a flag that represented Libya before Col. Moammar Gadhafi’s 1969 coup on Sunday in Benghazi, Libya. Though rebels are showing increased strength and are talking of tapping revenue from the country’s oil resources, leadership remains fractured, with top opposition figures debating who will lead a transitional government. rulers who feel threatened by insurrections. Despite Clinton’s offer of aid, the rebels still seemed far way from the kind of unity that might allow them to start serious talks with foreign governments or international agencies. Clinton herself said any talk of recognizing a provisional government was premature. On Saturday, the country’s former justice minister, Mustafa Mohamed Abd al-Jalil, said in an interview on Al-Jazeera that he would head a transitional government, with the aim of holding elections within three months. But on Sunday, another figure in the rebel movement, Abdel-Hafidh Ghoga, seemed to dismiss that claim, saying a national council had been formed to manage the “day to day living” of the “liberated” territories. The Gadhafi government implicitly acknowledged for the first time Sunday that it feared elements of its military falling into rebel hands, as Gadhafi’s son Seif said in the television in-

terview that the Libyan government had bombed its own ammunitions depots in the east. And Gen. Ahmed el-Gatrani, a former senior commander who now leads the rebel forces, said his troops were awaiting a call for support from the capital. “Our brothers in Tripoli say: ‘We are fine so far, we do not need help.’ If they ask for help we are ready to move,” he told Reuters. Many rebels in the west, howev-

er, said they believed el-Gatrani was trying to hide the true rebel plans. Ghoga, for his part, vowed Sunday that Tripoli and other Libyan cities would be liberated using “our national army.”

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A4 Monday, February 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Unions

Transfers

Continued from A1 But Walker is not settling for that. He said that those concessions were “an interesting development, because a week ago they said that’s not acceptable.” In Tennessee, where teachers are fighting a bill that would repeal the 1978 law that gave them the right to bargain collectively, they have already signaled that they would be willing to make some concessions on tenure, said Jerry Winters, the manager of government relations for the Tennessee Education Association, which represents 52,000 teachers. And he said that contract negotiations could be tough in the current atmosphere. “When you’re fighting to keep the very right to have collective bargaining, it’s going to have some impact on what you do in your bargaining,” Winters said.

Continued from A1 In an e-mail the following day, Newman expanded on her comments, writing, “While we may support giving people options that meet their individual needs, a $9.8 million shortage does not allow us this luxury without impacting the quality we have in Redmond.” The discussion that inspired Newman’s comment happened when the board said it supported Mikalson’s new approach. Under the district’s policy, transfers are allowed for six reasons, including overcrowding and particular academic needs. For Mikalson, the issue is a philosophical one: He believes the district should allow transfers because school choice should be a parent’s right. “I believe in and support parent choice as a critical component of the educational system,” he wrote in an e-mail to The Bulletin. “Choice empowers stakeholders and encourages competition for improvement.” Mikalson also argued the transfer cost is not as high as it appears because of a quirk in the state’s school funding formula. When a district projects a drop in enrollment, the state funds it on the previous year’s student population. That policy is designed to allow districts a year to prepare for reduced funding. Redmond expects to lose about 100 students next year, so, under the rule, it will be funded in 2011-12 as if it had not lost any students. For the district to see higher funding

GOP in control The sudden spate of bills seeking to eliminate or weaken collective bargaining — and the fierce protests by unions trying to preserve those rights — are largely a product of November’s elections. Those elections brought a new class of conservative Republican governors to power, including Walker and Gov. John Kasich of Ohio, who is also taking aim at collective bargaining rights. Republicans won control of both houses of 25 state legislatures, up from 14 before. Now some of those newly powerful Republicans have decided to check the power of public sector unions, saying that they have long used their political influence to win wages and benefits that the lawmakers believe are not affordable. Democrats, however, see the anti-union bills as an effort to weaken organized labor, which has long been one of their major sources of support. Several Republicans seeking to overhaul labor laws said that they felt strong constituent support for taking on public-sector unions. These unions have lost considerable popular support in recent years from private-sector workers, many of whom no longer enjoy the job protection, health benefits and, especially, pension plans that many state and local workers still have. Walker, who has called publicsector workers “haves” and private-sector workers “have-nots,” said in an interview last week that he was looking for a longterm solution to Wisconsin’s budget problems. “We’re asking for a reasonable amount from state and local workers,” he said, “and most people in the private sector will say what we’re asking for is pretty modest.” Robert Reich, who was secretary of labor in the Clinton administration, said that he sees the effort to curtail bargaining rights as a politically motivated act by

Bryant Continued from A1 Bryant was born Carol Johnson on May 8, 1925, in Eugene. As a child, she moved back and forth between Oregon and Minnesota, where she and friends would stage plays in the basement of her home. After graduating from high school in Medford in 1942, she spent time in Los Angeles and New York, where she was active in theater. She moved with her family to Bend in 1972, according to Hickman. “She was involved in theater from the minute she arrived in Bend,” said friend Janis Sharpe, a former chair at CTC. “The first month she was here, she went down to audition.” The first local production Bryant worked on was “Night of January 16th,” produced by Central Oregon Community College’s Magic Circle Theatre. In a 2008 feature about CTC’s 30th anniversary season, Bryant said that CTC began after a summer dinner theater production of Woody Allen’s “Don’t Drink the Water.” For the show, “I sat on the front stoop at Le Bistro, shooting off a gun. Of course it was blanks, but not even a pause as people whizzed down Third Street,” Bryant told The Bulletin. The production was a hit, and she soon hatched CTC with partner Gene Reinbold. Its first production was “Romanoff,” rehearsed without heat in a church basement and performed in a school gym. “It was,” Bryant said in 2008, “so much fun, and so much work, and so exciting.” She continued directing until 2006, when she broke her femur in a fall outside 2nd Street Theater in Bend. “You know, they say ‘break a leg’ all the time. I fi-

Laura Schmitt / The Marshield (Wis.) News-Herald

Scott Wallace, of Merrill, Wis., left, leads chants as about 600 demonstrators march down Central Avenue Sunday in Marshfield, Wis., to protest Wisconsin Gov. Walker’s proposed bill that will strip most public workers of their collective bargaining rights. Republican governors. “Wisconsin state workers have already signaled their willingness to give the governor what he wants in concessions — they just don’t want to give up the right to bargain,” said Reich, one of the more liberal voices in the Clinton White House. “We’re likely to see the same pattern across the country. This is exactly the pattern we’ve seen over the last 20 years in the private sector.” But some labor leaders said the governors are overreaching, and would create a measure of public sympathy for government employees’ unions by shifting the conversation from whether they earn overly generous benefits to whether they should have the right to negotiate at all. “I think it’s been a galvanizing force, a seminal moment for American labor,” said Gerald McEntee, the president of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees.

Wisconsin’s impact Art Pulaski, the chief officer of the California State Labor Federation, said he thought that Walker had simply gone too far. “For Republicans in other states, what’s happening in Wisconsin may encourage them to take a harsher stance in bargaining,” he said. “But for those with a more moderate stance, those not tied to the Republican strategy, I think they’re going to hold back, and say, ‘Wait a minute. The response is so vigorous and spontaneous and strong, we have to be careful how far we go on this.’” But focusing national attention on public employees’ benefits could put unions on the defensive in many states. Thomas Kochan, a professor of industrial relations at the Sloan School of Management at the Massachusetts Insti-

nally thought, ‘I’ll do it,’” she told The Bulletin in 2008. In all she directed some 58 plays at CTC, and remained active with the theater in later years, serving on the play selection committee and attending opening night of every production she could get to. “She loved to be house manager on opening night and welcome everyone to her theater,” Sharpe said. Bryant’s last night serving as house manager was at the start of the 2010-11 season, for the drama “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” According to Carole Hansen, Bryant’s friend and longtime assistant director, Bend’s grand dame of theater acquired a bijon frise about four years ago and rechristened it “Hamlet.” Bryant was also active in her church, founding the Family Kitchen meal program at Trinity Episcopal Church. As a cook during those dinners, Bryant always received compliments on her sloppy Joes and beef stew, says Hansen. Bryant is survived by two sons, Andy and Tim Hickman, and two grandchildren, Henry and Daisy Caldwell-Hickman. A service for Bryant will be held at Trinity Episcopal Church, 469 N.W. Wall St., Bend, at 2 p.m. Monday, March 7. That’s matinee time, notes her son. “That’s important. Mom said that,” he said, laughing. On Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m., CTC, at 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., will host an open house celebrating Bryant’s life. “If people want to come, if they’re to bring something: chocolate,” Hansen said. “She loved chocolate, and she loved red wine and Champagne, and we’re going to have all of those.” David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or at djasper@bendbulletin.com.

tute of Technology, says he thinks unions are recognizing reality. “There has to be a new bargain in the public sector on pension costs and health care costs, and to get out front on it,” he said. “That helps them take that issue off the table, and to focus on the issue of worker rights and the attack on unions.” Anti-union groups, seeing this as their moment, are urging governors not to settle for economic concessions, but to continue pushing to curb bargaining rights. Tim Phillips, the head of Americans for Prosperity — a conservative, free-market advocacy group that was created and financed in part by Charles and David Koch, billionaire brothers who support many conservative causes — said Walker should push for a “complete victory.” “If you just did the cuts to pension and benefits without the changes to collective bargaining,” Phillips said, “it helps in the short term, but over the long term, benefits will creep back up again.” Mayors — whose bargaining powers are often set by state law — have been watching the battle

closely. Several cities — including Newark and Camden, N.J. — were forced to lay off police officers when their unions failed to agree to concessions. In Toledo, Ohio, Mayor Michael P. Bell is watching the debate with added interest. As a young Toledo firefighter, Bell was laid off for a year before he was rehired, eventually rising to fire chief. When he took office last year as an independent, he faced a $48 million deficit. He closed part of it by winning concessions from the unions, after threatening to impose them unilaterally by invoking a little-used law that allows mayors to do so in cases of “exigent circumstances.” Now, he said, he supports collective bargaining rights, but wants to find a way to give the city the power to alter contracts in demonstrably hard times. “In local governments and even in our school system, there’s no ability to hit a reset button — the only option that a lot of cities have is to lay off a large amount of people,” Bell said. “Nobody’s going to come to your city if you don’t have police officers, or firefighters, or you’re not picking up your trash.”

than it projects, it would have to gain at least 101 students — or see a year-to-year enrollment jump. One way to gain those students back would be to shut off transfers. This year, the district lost about 170 more transfer students than it received. Considering the funding rule, if the district were able to bring all of those transfers back, Redmond schools would see an increase in funding for 70 students — not 170 — because of how state funding works. In that scenario, the district would gain 70 students over this year, an increase that would translate to about $400,000. Board member Cathy Miller has long raised concerns about the cost of transfers, but she backed Mikalson’s plans. Miller said that in the end, Mikalson’s approach matches the district’s belief that it should allow students as many options as possible. If the best option for a student is in a Bend-La Pine school, so be it. Still, the district must do a better job to understand why people are leaving and to hold those back without a valid reason, Miller said. Though she was not happy to hear it, Miller appreciated that Newman was open about the union members’ position on transfers. “I was disheartened, but I understand because, as she said, everybody is struggling,” Miller said. “I appreciate that she’s being totally honest. We won’t get blindsided; we know it’s an issue.” Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

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THE BULLETIN • Monday, February 28, 2011 A5

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A6 Monday, February 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T ORY

Giffords Continued from A1 Her staff tends to business while fitting in visits to therapists. The office of an aide slain in last month’s shootings sat vacant until recently, his colleagues too devastated to assign it to another staffer. Giffords’ staff believes she will fully recover. Each visitor brings back news of familiar gestures and words of recognition. “We are like a family, and this was uncharted territory,” said C.J. Karamargin, the congresswoman’s communications director. “In 200 years of representative government, no congressional staffer had ever been killed in the line of duty before. Never before had a female member of Congress been the target of an assassination attempt.” Giffords has not been told yet of her staff’s pain. Doctors advised shielding her from the larger trauma of the shootings, the deaths of six and all of the injuries. Inside Giffords’ hospital room this month, Rabbi Stephanie Aaron was stunned. Only weeks before, her friend had been shot through the head. Now, Giffords was singing verses of Don McLean’s “American Pie” with her family. Yet shortly afterward, Aaron noticed that Giffords struggled to say something and couldn’t find the right word. Aaron took her friend’s hand: “I said, ‘Gabby, it’s OK. Breathe. Just breathe.’ I wanted to let her know that this too shall pass and she will be OK.” Giffords’ ability to sing while still struggling to speak is one of the mysteries of traumatic brain injury. The brain function associated with singing centers on the right hemisphere; speaking comes largely from the left, where Giffords was shot. Therapists are working intensely to help Giffords regain her speech. Those who know Giffords best identify with her frustrations. The congresswoman has always been a talker. Rep. Adam Smith, D-Wash., remembers how she introduced herself: “She said, ‘My name is Gabby and there’s a reason for that.’” Smith said Giffords used her gift for gab last year to help him become the ranking Democrat on the House Armed Services Committee, on which they both sit as members. “I’ve been here 14 years, but she is a very social person who spoke

Courtesy ofice of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords

Images of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and her husband, astronaut Mark Kelly, are among the photos on the wall of her hospital room in Houston. to a lot of fellow members for me, and it made an enormous difference,” he said. When he came to see her in Houston this month, he brought a flag from a group of Navy SEALs that she and Smith had visited last year. After she was shot, the SEALs dedicated a combat mission in Afghanistan to her and sent the flag they carried. It now hangs in her room. During his visit, Smith found their traditional roles reversed — he did all talking now. He related committee news and assured Giffords that her staff was working hard. He told her how much she was missed on Capitol Hill. Giffords reached out and hugged Smith. “She teared up when I said that,” he said.

In the aftermath On the day after Giffords was shot, a group of about 25 people, including staffers and their spouses, gathered at a Tucson home with Kristin Welsh-Simpson, a counselor from the House of Representatives who flew in to help. They were shellshocked, some weeping openly. Giffords was fighting for her life. Their colleague and director of community outreach, Gabriel Zimmerman, was dead. Two other staffers were in intensive care: district director Ron Barber and community outreach coordinator Pamela Simon. Other staffers and interns had witnessed the shootings. Questions loomed over the group: Why them? Why now? Welsh-Simpson told them they

might never get an answer. Over the next weeks, she said, they would feel anger, confusion, sadness, but each would react differently. One staffer already was suffering survivor’s guilt. The group decided that Giffords would want them to open their Tucson office at 8 a.m. the next day, but they were unprepared for what faced them. “The crush of media was unprecedented,” Karamargin said. “One day we had 900 media requests come in.” Days later, President Barack Obama came to town, stopping by to see the wounded congresswoman and her staffers. And then the funerals began. “We were on an emotional roller coaster,” Karamargin said. Welsh-Simpson stayed two weeks, helping anyone who needed to talk. “It was comforting to be together,” Karamargin said.

Lighter moments On a recent morning, Michael McNulty, a Tucson lawyer and Giffords’ campaign chairman, arrived at her room as she was being wheeled in from speech therapy. She was wearing the blue, red and yellow helmet, which protects the area where a piece of her skull was removed during surgery. The helmet comes off when she’s sitting in her room. He bent over and kissed her. “Gabby, I will get in trouble if I didn’t tell you that my mother and my sisters send warm greetings,” McNulty said. “And Claire. And Stan. And Judy. And Cathy and

Katherine and Linda. And Bunny and Mark and Joan …” Giffords laughed. “The list of people insisting I say hello was ridiculously long,” McNulty said later. “And she got how funny that was.” McNulty and his wife, Linda, later brought in sushi and Ben & Jerry’s ice cream, and Giffords ate unassisted. McNulty set up a slide show. Giffords seemed captivated by the images on the computer screen. Photographs of the Sonoran Desert and snow-capped mountains in Tucson flashed by, accompanied by music from her favorite local band, Calexico. “Her eyes lit up, and she seemed so into it,” McNulty said. Leaving that night, McNulty felt buoyed. He was hopeful because she was recovering faster than anyone predicted, and he fully expects to see her back in Congress. But he knows an arduous road lies ahead.

Difficult return One afternoon three weeks after the shooting, a small group of Giffords’ staffers returned to the crime scene at the Safeway in Tucson. None of them had been back since the killings. “It was very, very difficult,” said Mark Kimble, a Giffords spokesman. He had been there the morning of the shootings, standing eight feet away from Giffords when the shooter started firing. He saw Giffords and Zimmerman go down. During the return visit, he walked with his colleagues, Barber and Karamargin, recounting who stood where as the horror unfolded. The Safeway manager came out to see them. Bystanders at the nearby memorial of candles and flowers walked over to comfort them. “I’m still very fragile,” Kimble said later. “But it felt good to go back … not like last time, when people were lying all around, injured and worse.” Karamargin had not been there the day of the shootings, but he needed to see the crime scene. “It was like a light switch being flipped for me,” he said. “I needed to have Ron and Mark explain it to me. I needed to know the details.” Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., knew the healing power of friendship when she visited her friend Giffords in Houston. Three years ago, Wasserman Schultz underwent seven surgeries for breast cancer.

“Having been through a healthcare crisis myself,” she said, “I knew what I wanted — not to talk about what I was going through. I wanted my girlfriends to catch me up.” So Wasserman Schultz avoided medical questions and briefed Giffords on proposed Republican budget cuts, her kids and “normal girlfriend stuff.” Visits from friends lift her spirits, said Giffords’ chief of staff, Pia Carusone. The visits “remind her that she’s strong enough to get through this and her life is waiting for her on the other side,” she said. Wasserman Schultz said Giffords looks “fantastic.”

Remembrance On Thursday, six riderless horses led the 86th annual Rodeo Parade in Tucson. The horses carried large photographs of each shooting victim. In the stirrups, boots faced backward — one had children’s cowboy boots commemorating Christina Taylor Green, the 9-year-old girl who died. Giffords for years has ridden in the parade, a celebration of frontier culture that dates from 1925. This year, two staffers injured in the shootings — Barber and Simon — rode in a horse-drawn buggy while other staffers walked alongside waving American flags. Barber, who has not returned to the office, has had a difficult recovery from his two gunshot wounds. Simon, a retired teacher, was shot in the chest, and the bullet that lodged in her hip became infected. Doctors removed it and gave it to the FBI. On the day of the shooting, Simon was there early and texted Giffords to bring a sweater to ward off the chilly air. Simon saw the gunman fire at Giffords. Seconds later, shot twice, Simon fell facedown. At the parade, the crowd cheered when they saw Simon and Barber. A banner on the side of the buggy said, “Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords’ staff.” “We were touched to see the community love and support for Gabby’s healing. And our healing,” Simon said. Last week, Simon returned to work at Giffords’ Tucson office. The counselor from Washington had gone, but Simon and most of her colleagues continue to seek help from private therapists. Friday would have been Zimmerman’s 31st birthday. At the office, other staffers are slowly beginning to use his desk.

South Korea, U.S. begin annual drills amid North’s threats The Associated Press SEOUL, South Korea — South Korean and U.S. troops began annual military drills Monday that rival North Korea warned could trigger a nuclear war on the divided peninsula. Despite North Korean threats to retaliate, South Korea and the United States went ahead with the drills, which are the allies’ first major combined military exercises since the North shelled a front-line South Korean island in November, killing four people. That barrage came eight months after 46 sailors were killed when a South Korean warship was sunk, an attack that a Seoul-led investigation blamed on a North Korean torpedo; Pyongyang denies involvement. Animosity over the bloodshed drove ties between the Koreas to one of their lowest levels in decades. About 12,800 U.S. troops and some 200,000 South Korean soldiers and reservists are to participate in the drills, which are aimed at defending South Korea and responding to any attack. The main part of the drills, which will involve computer war games and live-firing exercises, will last 11 days, while some field training will continue until late April, according to the South Korea-U.S. joint forces command in Seoul. Hours after the exercises started, North Korea warned of a nuclear war on the peninsula. “It’s an anti-national scheme aimed at prolonging the stage of confrontation and tension to realize a plot to start a northward invasion,” the North’s main Rodong Sinmun newspaper said in a commentary carried by the official Korean Central News Agency. “The danger of a nuclear war on the Korean peninsula is deepening.”

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Inside

OREGON Rep. Wu blames behavior on reaction to medication, see Page B3. OBITUARIES Dodgers Hall of Famer Duke Snider dies at 84, see Page B5.

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www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2011

Best

Supreme Court to hear Bend case

blog

“If the government can overcome the Bill of Rights by claiming it’s really inconvenient, then there are no civil rights.”

of the Excerpts of last week’s posts to Politics & Policy, The Bulletin’s Salem weblog on state government.

Veterans’ group fracas has Bend ties • Posted Wednesday by Nick Budnick Attorney General John Kroger last week filed a lawsuit against Greg Warnock, founder of the Oregon War Veterans Association and the Military Family Support Foundation, claiming he diverted about $690,000 for his own use. The case has Bend veterans mobilizing to Warnock’s defense — and it has potential state and national implications. Bend’s Dick Tobiason, a Vietnam War veteran, notes that Warnock was the only activist to help Tobiason and Bend’s Robert D. Maxwell, the only living Medal of Honor recipient in Oregon, with their longstanding crusade to designate U.S. Highway 97 a “World War Two Veterans Historic Highway.” That effort led to a bill supported by the Central Oregon delegation becoming law last session. Tobiason and Maxwell are members of Warnock’s association. Tobiason says Warnock’s support was crucial, adding that “thanks to Greg Warnock’s testimony, we succeeded.” Kroger alleges that Warnock has, in addition to diverting funds, made unreported political contributions. Warnock’s group, however, has said Kroger is engaged in political retribution for its support of conservative causes. The case could get more interesting. One of the issues is that the association is a 501c(19) nonprofit. The designation, reserved for veterans’ causes, is the only type of nonprofit allowed to make political contributions. However, its nonprofit status means the sources of its funding are confidential. Last year, Jim Bopp, a conservative attorney who is prominent nationally for his work striking down contribution limits on free speech grounds, filed a federal lawsuit on behalf of the association to block Kroger from releasing association records to The Oregonian and Willamette Week. As these cases develop, it would be interesting to see where the group gets its money. It’s not from memberships, which are free, according to Tobiason. Former lawmaker and attorney general candidate Kevin Mannix has been among the recipients of funds from the association. Asked about the case, Mannix — who has been the subject of attorney general scrutiny over the sources of his own funding in the past — declined to comment.

— Mikel Miller, Bend attorney

Ruling to decide whether government agents can question minors without parents’ consent By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

The United States Supreme Court is set to take up a local case this week dealing with the rights of government agents to interview juveniles without the consent of their parents.

Watch for more blog updates at www. bendbulletin.com /politicsblog.

told him her father began touching her inappropriately when she was age 3, often when he had been drinking, and that her mother was aware of the touching. In a statement for the court, the girl recalled telling Camreta about hugs, kisses and piggyback rides from her father, and being asked repeatedly about “bad touches.” See Consent / B5

RAPT FOR RAPTORS

Bend man arrested on suspicion of sex crimes By Nick Grube The Bulletin

Photos by Nick Grube / The Bulletin

Kim and Larry Pearcy, both 51 and of Terrebonne, search for eagles Sunday morning from a lookout point at Round Butte Overlook Park above Lake Billy Chinook.

An eye out for

eagles Binoculars in hand, enthusiasts gather at Lake Billy Chinook for annual event

School groups rally in Salem • Posted Tuesday by Lauren Dake One young student held up a sign that simply read, “Save me.” Hundreds of others helped fill out the picture, with painted signs urging lawmakers to protect education funding. Thousands of citizens, teachers, classified workers and students from around the state used their day off Monday to rally on the state Capitol’s steps. The annual event, organized by Stand for Children, an education advocacy organization, was called a “day to celebrate public education in Oregon” by one lawmaker. Such rallies are typical of budget season in Salem. This year, they may have a more desperate tone because the general fund budget is projected, by some measures, to have a roughly $3 billion shortfall. And although it was a “celebration” in some aspects, it took on some serious tones when it came to talk of increased class sizes and cutting school days. Educators said the governor’s proposed budget — $5.56 billion over the next two school years — will lead to more cuts. As in rallies occurring at state capitals throughout the nation, participants wore red to support public employees in Wisconsin, where lawmakers are threatening to cut compensation and collective bargaining rights.

The case, Camreta v. Greene, got its start in 2003, when a Bend man was arrested on suspicion of sexually abusing a 7-year-old boy. Upon receiving information suggesting the man also may have abused his two daughters,

a caseworker from the Oregon Department of Human Services and a Deschutes County Sheriff’s deputy interviewed one of the girls at her school. Investigators did not record the interview with the 9-year-old girl, and the girl and DHS caseworker, Bob Camreta, provided differing accounts of what took place. According to court documents, Camreta said the girl

By Nick Grube The Bulletin

S Aquila, a female golden eagle, went blind and suffered brain damage after being struck by a car. Because of her injuries, she sometimes tilts her head at odd angles.

tanding on a cliff above Lake Billy Chinook on Sunday, Terrebonne couple Kim and Larry Pearcy peered into the cloudy landscape above them. With hands gripped to binoculars hanging from their necks, they scanned the milky sky for tiny flutters of darkness they hoped would be a soaring eagle. Once they thought they spotted one of the giant raptors, the binoculars would come up to their faces and they’d race to see who could identify it first.

Is it bald eagle? Is it golden? Or is it simply just a raven or hawk? They weren’t the only ones playing this game. In fact, hundreds of people spent this past weekend at Round Butte Overlook Park looking for eagles. They were there as part of Oregon State Parks’ annual Eagle Watch event. “We like to come to this, and it’s always exciting,” said Kim Pearcy, 51. “I grew up in the Midwest. We don’t have stuff like this.” Pearcy and her husband, both of Terrebonne, are definitely eagle enthusiasts. See Eagles / B5

La Pine weighs cost of recycling By Leon Pantenburg The Bulletin

La Pine — Just about everybody agrees recycling trash items is a good idea. The longterm goal is to keep materials out of landfills and reuse paper, tin, glass and plastics. But recycling, in some instances, may not be cost effective. That is what Wilderness Garbage and Recycling Service in La Pine has discovered, according to Stu Martinez, general manager of the company. But Wilderness intends to expand its recycling efforts by offering curbside recyclable pickup in the city of La Pine, he says, and will continue its current recycling dropoff program

at the company headquarters at 51420 Russell Road in La Pine. But La Pine city residents must decide how much they are willing to pay for curbside recycling. A survey asking that question was sent to about 500 city customers Friday with their monthly bills, according to company operations manager Andy Ewing. The company currently serves about 500 to 600 households within the La Pine city limits, he said, and about 3,000 in south Deschutes County. “We’re guessing the cost will be somewhere be between $3 and $4 per month, for bimonthly curbside recyclables pickup,” Ewing said. See Recycling / B2

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Sheree Woods carries a container of recycling to a dumpster Friday at Wilderness Garbage and Recycling in La Pine. She said she drops recycling off monthly at the location.

A 37-year-old Bend man was arrested over the weekend on suspicion of raping a 23-year-old woman he had just met through an online dating site. Based on the arresting charges and i n fo r m a t io n provided by the Bend Police Depar tment, the alleged assault appears to have been Thomas Harry pa r t ic u la rly Bray brutal. According to police, the victim said she agreed to meet the suspect, Thomas Harry Bray, for a cocktail in downtown Bend on Friday night. The victim told police that after one drink she went with Bray back to his downtown apartment in the Franklin Crossing building. She told police that once they were inside the apartment, Bray forced her to perform sex acts with him over the course of a few hours. She told police she was physically assaulted. She received several non-life threatening injuries. Bend Police executed a search warrant at Bray’s apartment on Saturday and arrested him without incident. He is being held in the Deschutes County Jail on two counts each of firstdegree rape and first-degree sodomy. See Arrest / B5

Rain, snow to start off area’s week By Nick Grube The Bulletin

Central Oregonians can expect a dose of rain and snow early this week as a storm front passes through the area. Once the front moves through, the chance of further precipitation drops off significantly and temperatures are expected to rise. “As long as the folks dig in there for the beginning of the week, it looks to get progressively better the rest of the week,” said Rob Brooks, a forecaster with the National Weather Service in Pendleton. “You guys are looking at 45 degree temperatures through the mid-point of the week and 48 by the end of the week.” Today’s forecast calls for a 70 percent chance of rain or snow, with the snow level at 4,000 feet elevation. Winds are expected to be strong, coming in at 34 mph with gusts reaching nearly 50. Rain and snow are also likely Tuesday and into Wednesday, though temperatures are expected to increase from a 41-degree high Monday to 45 degrees Tuesday and Wednesday. See Weather / B5


C OV ER S T ORY

B2 Monday, February 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

SUN SETS ON THE HIGH DESERT

N  R CIVIL SUITS Filed Feb. 10

11CV0116ST: Tamara Kelly v. Julia Ann Isaacs, complaint, $49,638.50 Filed Feb. 16

11CV0119MA: Columbia State Bank v. Glenco Investments Inc., Fraley Construction Inc., Rod Fraley and Glennis L. Wolfe, complaint, $2,837,758.81 Filed Feb. 17

11CV0117MA: Susan Brown v. Marc Thalacker, complaint, $435,500

11CV0125MA: Wells Fargo Bank N.A. v. Carlton and Mary Geurts, complaint, $41,820.00

11CV0118AB: United Guaranty Residential Insurance Co. v. Katharine E. and Christen Chandler, complaint, $153,275.27

11CV0126ST: Justin Kuebler v. Skanska USA Building Inc., complaint, $8,501,154.20

Filed Feb. 18

Crews contain spill after train derails in Washington The Associated Press

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Birds fly above the Old Mill against a twilit sky in Bend on Sunday evening.

Recycling Continued from B1 The standard monthly trash pickup rate in south Deschutes County for residential homes right now, he added, is $17.75. Initially, Deschutes County funded the hauling fees of free recycling dropoff bins in La Pine and Sisters, says Timm Schimke, director of the Deschutes County Department of Solid Waste, but budget constraints caused a cut in that funding in October 2010. That leaves Wilderness Garbage with the challenge of funding the operational costs of recycling. So far, La Pine’s recycling efforts have been a losing proposition, financially. “We might make a profit on recycling newsprint and cardboard, but on the other materials, we lose,” Ewing said. “We’ve never made money on recycling.” A free recyclable collection bin has been available at the company headquarters since 2005. During business hours of between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m., anyone can drop recyclables at no charge. The drop-off bin is 5 feet wide by 22 feet long and can carry 30 cubic yards of materials, Ewing said. When the bin is full of commingled recyclables, it is hauled and sold to Mid Oregon Recycling in Bend, which is located at Bend

Garbage, at 20835 N.E. Montana Way in Bend. The cost of curbside recycling will probably be higher in La Pine than it is in Bend, Schimke says. The last time recycling costs were surveyed in Bend was in 1983, he said, and at the time the cost was $3 per month per household. “They have the same trucks and fuel costs we do in Bend, but the houses are further apart in La Pine, the drivers take longer to fill a truck, and they have to drive further to get a load,” Schimke said.

Fuel costs add up Deschutes County operates a transfer station one mile north of La Pine Recreation Road on U.S. Highway 97, Schimke said, where recyclables can be dropped off. The county hauls materials from the station to Mid Oregon Recycling, and it costs $14 per ton to move the materials. The company pays the going rate for recyclables, which varies with a fluctuating market. “Cardboard and newspapers may make money,” Schimke said. “But tin cans don’t, and the plastics vary in value. The price of recyclables varies just like the stock market.” But the big recycling expense in La Pine is diesel fuel, said

Martinez, and the cost of sending a truck and driver on the 60-mile round-trip from La Pine to Mid Oregon Recycling. Each load carries 30 cubic yards of materials, and hauling it costs the company about $165 per trip. “Sometimes, we burn up more fossil fuel hauling the recyclables than we save by recycling,” Martinez said. La Pine mayor Ken Mulenex says La Pine residents’ attitude toward recycling has been positive. “Everybody I have talked to about it, between 25 and 30 people, over the past year has been in favor of recycling,” Mulenex said. “I haven’t heard what people would be willing to pay for it, though.” The start-up costs of the curbside recycling program would be high, Ewing said. An additional 500 roll carts would have to be purchased at a cost of about $65 each. To cover the city’s recycling needs adequately, the company currently has enough personnel and trucks. At some point, said Ewing, additional workers and trucks would probably have to be added. “It will be years before we get the money back on the roll carts,” Ewing said. “At first, the recycling project will just be money out of our pockets. If enough people want a recycling option,

In 1993, gunfight erupts between ATF agents and Branch Davidians The Associated Press Today is Monday, Feb. 28, the 59th day of 2011. There are 306 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Feb. 28, 1911, President William Howard Taft nominated William H. Lewis to be the first black Assistant Attorney General of the United States. (Lewis took office in March 1911 and served until April 1913.) ON THIS DATE In 1844, a 12-inch gun aboard the USS Princeton exploded as the ship was sailing on the Potomac River, killing Secretary of State Abel P. Upshur, Navy Secretary Thomas W. Gilmer and several others. In 1849, the California gold rush began in earnest as regular steamship service started bringing gold-seekers to San Francisco. In 1861, the Territory of Colorado was organized. In 1951, the Senate committee headed by Estes Kefauver, DTenn., issued an interim report saying at least two major crime syndicates were operating in the U.S. In 1953, scientists James D. Watson and Francis H.C. Crick announced they had discovered the double-helix structure of DNA, the molecule that contains the human genes. In 1960, a day after defeating the Soviets at the Winter Games in Squaw Valley, Calif., the United States won its first Olympic hockey gold medal by defeating Czechoslovakia’s team, 9-4. In 1972, President Richard M. Nixon and Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai issued the Shanghai Communique at the conclusion of Nixon’s historic visit to China.

T O D AY IN HISTORY In 1975, more than 40 people were killed in London’s Underground when a subway train smashed into the end of a tunnel. In 1986, Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme was shot to death in central Stockholm. (The killing remains unsolved.) In 1993, a gun battle erupted at a compound near Waco, Texas, when Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms agents tried to serve warrants on the Branch Davidians; four agents and six Davidians were killed as a 51day standoff began.

Winter Olympics. The American silver was the 37th medal won by the United States at these games, also the most by any country at any Winter Olympics. (The U.S. won the medals race for the first time since 1932.)

FIVE YEARS AGO A 20-year-old legal fight over protests outside abortion clinics ended with the Supreme Court ruling 8-0 that federal extortion and racketeering laws could not be used against demonstrators. The first Mardi Gras since Hurricane Katrina drew a smallerthan-usual turnout.

TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Producer Saul Zaentz is 90. Actor Charles Durning is 88. Svetlana Alliluyeva, daughter of Josef Stalin, is 85. Architect Frank Gehry is 82. Actor Gavin MacLeod is 80. Actor Don Francks is 79. Actor-directordancer Tommy Tune is 72. Hall of Fame auto racer Mario Andretti is 71. Singer Joe South is 71. Actor Frank Bonner is 69. Actress Kelly Bishop is 67. College Football Hall of Famer and retired NFL player Bubba Smith is 66. Actress Stephanie Beacham is 64. Writer-director Mike Figgis is 63. Actress Mercedes Ruehl is 63. Actress Bernadette Peters is 63. Energy Secretary Steven Chu is 63. Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman is 58. Comedian Gilbert Gottfried is 56. Basketball Hall-of-Famer Adrian Dantley is 55. Actor John Turturro is 54. Rock singer Cindy Wilson is 54. Actress Rae Dawn Chong is 50. Actor Robert Sean Leonard is 42. Rock singer Pat Monahan is 42. Author Daniel Handler (AKA “Lemony Snicket”) is 41. Actress Maxine Bahns is 40. Actress Ali Larter is 35. Country singer Jason Aldean is 34. Actor Geoffrey Arend is 33. Actor Bobb’e J. Thompson is 15.

ONE YEAR AGO Sidney Crosby scored the winning goal in overtime to give Canada a 3-2 victory over the United States in the final event of the Vancouver Olympics. Canada earned its 14th gold medal, the most by any country at any

THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Who will give me back those days when life had wings and flew just like a skylark in the sky.” — Marceline DesbordesValmore, French actress and poet (1786-1859)

TEN YEARS AGO A powerful magnitude 6.8 earthquake rocked the Northwest, shattering windows, showering bricks onto sidewalks and sending frightened people running into the streets in places like Seattle and Portland, Ore. A train collision in northeast England killed ten people and injured more than 80.

we intend to make this a pilot program, so we get the kinks out before we take it country-wide.”

‘Larger picture’ While the cost versus benefit may not seem to add up right now, Schimke says he can “advocate for the larger picture.” “If I restrict my view to the immediate budget, it may not make sense to go to all this effort and money to recycle,” he said. “But if recycling gives the landfill another two to three years of life, that cost can be measured.” For Martinez, recycling is part of being a good corporate neighbor. “This company has always been community-oriented, and you can see how we’re impacting the environment,” he said. “We all have to live here. The kids want us to start a recycling program, and I think people will want to recycle. Bottom line is that it’s the right thing to do.” Leon Pantenburg can be reached at 541-382-1811 or at lpantenburg@bendbulletin.com.

SEATTLE — A railroad spokesman said Sunday it might take three weeks to remove all debris from the site where a freight train derailed and sideswiped another on the banks of Puget Sound, spilling a small amount of a hazardous chemical. Four of the 14 cars that derailed late Saturday were tankers that each contained 15,000 gallons of lye, a chemical used as a drain cleaner and for other purposes. About 50 gallons leaked, with some of it seeping into the sand and some being bagged in plastic by response teams, said BSNF Railway

spokesman Gus Melonas. None of the lye spilled directly into the water, but the derailment prompted a quick response from Coast Guard, as well as the state Ecology Department, because of concerns the chemical could harm aquatic species. Twelve cars from a train heading from Portland to Vancouver, British Columbia, derailed and struck rail cars from a train hauling garbage in the other direction.

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THE BULLETIN • Monday, February 28, 2011 B3

O Rep. Wu links his erratic behavior to reaction to mental health drug

COTTAGE GROVE

By Jonathan J. Cooper The Associated Press

Thomas Boyd / The Oregonian

One of the attendees of the Stove Camp uses a clean cookstove Jan. 25 in Cottage Grove. Distinguished visitors from Switzerland, Italy, Darfur, Sri Lanka and elsewhere came to study and debate ways to alleviate some of the globe’s most crushing health and environmental problems.

Changing the world — 1 stove at a time Nonprofit hopes cleaner cooking will solve global health issues By Katy Muldoon The Oregonian

COTTAGE GROVE — The Row River and the Willamette’s coast fork converge at this mossy town nestled between the Coast Range and the Cascades. Oregon’s old-time timber culture and its storied counterculture do, too. It’s a town where, not far from the natural-foods store sits a meat-cutting school, and taking cover across Main Street from the Victorian antiques shop is a purveyor of fine machine guns. So another unlikely convergence shouldn’t surprise. Here, at a funky little farm populated by an amiable black Labrador and a bossy flock of free-range chickens, a band of Oregon engineers and dreamers last week welcomed representatives of the World Food Programme and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. The distinguished visitors from Switzerland, Italy, Darfur, Sri Lanka and elsewhere came to study and debate ways to alleviate some of the globe’s most crushing health and environmental problems with one seemingly simple solution. To reduce lung-choking indoor air pollution and to stem deforestation and climate change, they want to equip nearly half the world with clean-burning, fuel-efficient, affordable cookstoves. An estimated 3 billion people don’t have that luxury. So, naturally, the delegation came to Cottage Grove, hotbed of cookstove innovation and technology, home of Aprovecho Research Center. The name may not ring a bell outside humanitarian circles or the Willamette Valley. But those behind the nonprofit — in Spanish, Aprovecho means “to make best use of” — have invented, developed, tested and tinkered with basic cookstoves for 35 years. Now, their cause is attracting global recognition and the sort of serious dollars that might help Aprovecho grow and make a sizeable dent in improving the health of the impoverished, and of the planet.

Big money Last August, the nonprofit X Prize Foundation, India’s government and the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi announced a global competition, with big prize money at stake, to develop and deploy clean, efficient stoves. In September, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton announced the United States would provide about $50 million to the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves; other governments, organizations and corporations promised to contribute another $10 million. The goal: 100 million cleanburning stoves for villagers in Africa, Asia and South America by 2020.

The U.S. Department of Energy plans to grant $12 million to develop stoves that use 90 percent less fuel than traditional cookstoves, emit 50 percent less pollution, and are within reach of people who live on a scant $1 a day. The World Bank intends to address alternatives to traditional biomass cookstoves in its 2011 energy strategy. And the World Food Programme, which feeds 18 million people daily, has made stoves a priority, prompting last week’s visit to Aprovecho’s Stove Camp. Fires burned in stoves as big as oil drums and as small as flowerpots. They crackled inside the hodgepodge of buildings and sizzled outside under an openair shed. Caldrons of water equipped with thermometers stood atop the stoves, and nearby, Stove Campers bearing clipboards, carbon-monoxide detectors and stopwatches noted the number of sticks required to fuel the flames, the emissions the fires gave off and the time it took water to boil. “I have the most boring job on Earth,” said Dean Still, 58, who may have used the line a time or 10 before. “I watch water boil.” Aprovecho’s jovial executive director chuckled at his own joke. Still holds court over Stove Camp, which typically attracts researchers, engineers, aid workers, students and those drawn to sustainable living.

Science of stoves For five days or more, they listen to lectures on combustion science and heat transfer. They discuss firewood, charcoal and burnable dung. They talk fuel metering, gas mixing and why hotter fires burn cleaner than cooler ones. “We figure out,” Still said, “how fire can serve humanity.” Fire, of course, has done that for hundreds of thousands of years — warming us, keeping predators at bay, clearing land for farming and making it possible to enjoy a nice pot of soup. But for much of the world, dinner involves far more than switching on a burner. Research shows that women, who do most of the world’s cooking and fire tending, and their children, who spend hours each day near the hearth, suffer fire’s woes inordinately. Indoor pollution from solid-fuel use causes pneumonia, chronic respiratory disease and lung cancer, killing 1.6 million annually. In some regions, gathering wood or other materials to burn is a dangerous requirement of daily life. Landmines threaten women and children searching for fuel in northern Sri Lanka. From Sudan to Kenya, women collect firewood in groups, hoping to avoid rape or other vio-

lence. In Uganda, according to the World Food Programme, attacks on women are part of a strategy to humiliate opposing tribes, so those searching for fuel avoid returning to the same places to lessen chances they’ll be victimized. Efficient stoves require less fuel, reducing the burdens and dangers, while clean-burning stoves cut health risks. Aprovecho workers have begun building 200 Institutional Stoves paid for by the World Food Programme and bound for Darfur. The barrel-sized stoves will be used in schools, hospitals and other settings where large numbers of people need feeding. Wednesday, Aprovecho landed a $7,500 contract to develop a fuelefficient injera stove for Ethiopia; injera, pancake-like bread, is an Ethiopian diet staple.

Training missions Last year, the center’s staff embarked on 10 training missions with governments and other agencies. They consulted with a German aid agency to establish stove factories in South America, helped the humanitarian organization CARE improve its Rwandan cookstove factory, and trained Ugandan engineering students and university faculty to use an Aprovecho-designed portable emissions-measuring system. This year, they expect to help improve stove factories in Laos and Bangladesh. And Aprovecho will nurture the center’s new forprofit arm, StoveTec, which manufactures clean burning stoves in China and aims to sell them around the world; with a factory cranking out thousands of quality stoves, Still and others have expanded their thinking on how far Aprovecho can reach. All of it adds up to a homegrown nonprofit packing an increasingly powerful humanitarian punch. In 2009, Still changed from his usual sooty jeans and grungy sneakers into a smart suit and tie for one auspicious event: Britain’s Prince Charles awarded him and China’s Shengzhou Stoves, StoveTec’s manufacturer, the International Energy Champion Ashden Award for stemming pollution and benefiting communities around the globe. Governments, aid groups, missionaries and others have long distributed stoves in the developing world. Some work well and endure. Others are so inappropriate for local cooks’ needs and traditions, or so incompatible with regional fuel sources that they end up being used as planters or displayed as art. Sometimes, when villagers modify stoves, efficiency drops or emissions increase. Often, education about the health consequences of smoke exposure is scarce.

PORTLAND — An Oregon congressman whose erratic behavior has recently prompted calls for his resignation said Sunday that some of his actions could be attributed to a reaction to a mental health drug. U.S. Rep. David Wu told The Associated Press, however, that it does not explain the behavior documented in reports over the past month, which included sending his staff photos of himself wearing a tiger costume. Wu said he was hospitalized after his 2008 campaign for symptoms that were later diagnosed as a reaction to a common mental health drug. He said he felt dizzy and confused on Election Day that year, when his staff and family reportedly were unable to locate him. “It came up that afternoon, and it knocked me off my can,” Wu said, referring to the symptoms. The AP interview in his Portland office was the most detailed public account yet of Wu’s psychiatric treatment since reports first surfaced last month. Six staff members quit after his 2010 re-election campaign during which the congressman gave angry speeches and talked his way inside the secure portion of Portland International Airport. The congressman said last year’s episodes were the culmination of a period of mental health challenges that began in 2008 as marital issues led toward his separation from his wife. He declined to detail the problems in his marriage but said they had nothing to

do with his health. In 2008, Wu was treated with a prescription mental health drug that he deU.S. Rep. clined to name David Wu but described as “very common.” Wu said he reacted to an enzyme in the drug, and that after the election he was hospitalized for two days. He said he continued to feel unwell until summer 2009, when doctors linked his

symptoms to his medication. The drug component he reacted to is common in many medications, he said. Still, despite his allergy, Wu acknowledged taking two tablets of an unknown painkiller from a campaign donor in 2010. “That is what a combination of pain and bad judgment will do, and I shouldn’t have done it,” Wu said. Wu said he would not step down, despite calls for his resignation from Republicans and from some Oregon newspapers. “I can do this job, and I can do this job well,” he said.

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B4 Monday, February 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Money managers need scrutiny

W

hen Ted Wheeler was appointed state treasurer in 2010, he was greeted with an investigation by The Oregonian that was not at all flattering for his

department.

State money managers were getting expenses paid for first class travel, expensive meals and golf rounds by the very investment companies angling for the $170 billion Oregon invests. Some managers were even routinely claiming they were owed the state’s meal reimbursement when they were getting meals for free. Business as usual at treasury was some bad business. Wheeler brought in auditors. He said there would be no more expenses except as they specifically relate to duties. Money managers would not be flying first class. Voters made Wheeler’s appointment permanent. We supported his election. But now in office, Wheeler and the Legislature are trying to draw up specific boundaries for the money managers. Senate bills 510 and 269 would require state investment officers and assistant investment officers to file statements of economic interest. Many other state officials are required to do so. The forms basically require disclosure of business ties and investments, sources of income, debts, honoraria and expenses provided in the course of state duties. Wheeler wants some changes. He doesn’t want his employees to be required to make the disclosures, The Oregonian reports, if those expenses are required to be paid as part of the contract with the investment firms. Many details of the contracts between the state and investment com-

panies are now confidential. That’s the way, the argument goes, that business is done in the investment world. But if employees were already acting with cartoonish disregard for concern about conflict of interest, Oregon’s money managers need more than an admonishment. They need to change the way they interact with firms wooing the state’s money. Another change Wheeler has asked for is to grant employees safe harbor from ethics investigations as long as they followed the state’s rules. The agency has had to pay $100,000 in legal fees to defend three employees against ethics violations. Wheeler’s amendment, though, goes too far. State agencies can already get such protection for their employees, if the ethics commission has approved the policies in question in advance. Wheeler wants the protection as long as the policies were clearly spelled out — without any review or approval by the ethics commission. The state’s money managers have proven they are entitled to one thing: more scrutiny, not special exemptions.

Education proposal changes very little W

e’re all for expecting more of Oregon’s high school students, so the news that the Oregon University System will guarantee college admission to kids who meet certain standards is good. Still, the standards being set hardly will ensure that state schools get the cream of the high school crop. Currently the state’s largest schools require a 3.0 grade point average on a 4.0 scale; that will rise to 3.4 on the same scale for guaranteed admission. And some students will continue to be admitted with GPAs lower than 3.4. Students also will have to prove proficiency in reading, writing, math and speaking. The first three can be accomplished by earning a 550 in each area on the SAT exams and equivalent score on similar tests. State universities now require the same exams, but they do not require a minimum score on them. Knowing that, you could argue than setting any minimum score on tests like the SAT is an improvement

from the current requirement. Still, Oregon students do relatively well on the exams already. Last year Oregon teens averaged 521 on the SAT reading exam, 523 on math and 496 on writing. Those are average scores, remember, meaning top students no doubt already are doing better. Admission aside, the new state guarantee offers little inducement for the best and brightest of Oregon’s kids. The guarantee comes with no money, for one thing, to attend school at home. Meanwhile, the state Board of Higher Education assures us the guaranteed admission standard will do nothing to lessen the chances that a student with a slightly less stellar record will also be admitted. “This new admissions process will not shut out any students,” said Joe Holliday, assistant vice chancellor for student success initiatives. If Holliday is right, we’re not sure why anyone should get very excited about the change. It sounds good, but, it’s likely to be business as usual.

My Nickel’s Worth Cancer care

Bogus research

Bad bill for south county

A Night of Hope benefiting the St. Charles Cancer Center was cancelled due to lack of sponsorship and financial support. Ninety days ago, this decision may have caught my passing interest; recognizing the financial pressure on all non-profits, I would have thought that understandable. However, that perspective changed when my wife recently became a member of a club no one wants to join: the cancer survivors club. We have since learned that cancer is epidemic and there is a good chance it will touch all of us in some way. We have also learned if you have this ugly disease, Bend is a great place to live. We are blessed with a cancer care community that rivals any in the United States. It starts first with highly skilled physicians, backed up by a compassionate nursing corps that is second to none. Supporting these medical experts is a cancer care support system that is extraordinary. For those who are impacted by cancer, this support system offers education, support and hope. A Night of Hope and similar fundraisers finance these programs, staffed by committed volunteers who are cancer survivors. Although it is disappointing that A Night of Hope was canceled, it would do us all well to support future fundraisers for the cancer care and support programs of St. Charles. We know personally that all of us may eventually rely on these extraordinary programs that offer hope and a chance to overcome cancer. Rick & Gayle Jacobson Bend

I was distressed by the article about the so-called “research” being done with Rhesus monkeys, supposedly to help humanity with its problems with obesity and diabetes. The article states that some of the monkeys (150 or so in one facility) are kept isolated in cages with nothing to stimulate their minds other than food. Because they have nothing better to do, they eat whatever comes their way, with the more than obvious result that they gain weight, especially since they are given no means to exercise it off. This treatment is both horrific and inhumane and can only produce bogus results. It’s a well-known fact that stress causes all sorts of physical aberrations in both humans and the rest of the animal kingdom. Keeping a communal animal such as a monkey in total isolation with no means of mental stimulation is abnormal and stressful and can only lead to suspect results. And at this point, with all the saturation the public is subjected to through the media, does anyone really think that no one is aware that a healthy diet and exercise are key to keeping the weight off and the blood-sugar levels normal? Not only is this kind of “research” cruel and unjust, but worthless as well, unless guaranteeing a job for the researchers — at taxpayers’ expense — is a priority. I feel my money would be better spent in researching the horrors the researchers, themselves, were exposed to in their formative years that would turn them into such inhumane and self-centered individuals. Kathleen Treese Powell Butte

I have just read the “emergency” House Bill 3347. I suggest everyone ask Representatives Whisnant, Conger, Huffman, McLane or Senator Atkinson where their brains were temporarily located when they sponsored this bill. If you have not read the summary and the bill, I suggest you do so. What is the emergency? This bill specifically begins relating to negating deed restrictions in order to build 925 units on forested lands directly adjacent to Caldera Springs south to Vandevert Road. The present housing economy is depressed, and the future may make it hard to sell 925 units. I’m sure everyone in Caldera Springs, and Crosswater, have noted their property values have plummeted, and it may be years before they see an increase in value to the level where they purchased their lots/homes. Section 4 of this bill is the most outrageous “emergency.” It outlines that within 180 days after finalization of the bill a “South County Sanitary Authority” will be created, which “will not allow a vote of the electors.” I understand at least one representative has now changed his mind about presenting this bill, but has included a possible future South County Sanitary Authority in his version. Section 5 claims this act is necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health and safety, and an emergency is declared to exist. The act would take effect on passage. Please, representatives, listen to more of your constituents. Karen Newcomb Sunriver

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Bend council made the right choice on surface water By Casey Roats Bulletin guest columnist

T

he Bend City Council made the correct decision to reinvest in the city’s surface water system. My thinking on the issue was much the same as the council’s, initially reluctant but confident in the final decision to move ahead. The depiction of this issue being a “Cadillac vs. Chevy” decision is not a valid example of one. A cash strapped water utility investing in an electronic, remotely read meter system rather than just reading the meters it has by hand would be one of those. The decision to continue to utilize the gravity fed surface water system while keeping the highly coveted and sought after second source of water (by other water purveyors) isn’t a Chevy vs. Cadillac decision, it’s the prudent long term water resource strategy for a growing community. The advantages of a gravity supplied water system are too numerous to list. Anyone who would seek to minimize

that fact hasn’t had to pay $100,000 to fix a line shaft turbine well because a $50 part failed. The rest of us water purveyors in the basin are all ground water systems because it’s our only option. I would much prefer to never drill another well again. They are expensive to develop, equip, maintain, operate and rehabilitate. Aside from cost and maintenance, our well fields are scattered all over our water systems. If, for some reason, a harmful substance were ever to be found in the basin’s water supply that required treatment, the costs of treating water at every entry point in the greater water system would be tremendous. At least the city of Bend would have half of their water coming from one point where the treatment will already be taking place. HDR Engineering has been wrongly criticized while using a 50-year basis for its cost analysis. HDR did this to be “fair” to the all ground water alternative. This was done to not over exaggerate the spread in costs between pump-

IN MY VIEW ing water and letting it run downhill. In private sector decision making, fairness is a distant second to objectivity in the analysis of data. Even if HDR’s power costs assumptions are off by a factor of 100 percent, cut them in half and extend the study to 150 years which is a realistic time frame for the proposed investment to be in service. Additionally, transferring those surface water rights to ground water rights require legislative action in Salem to amend the existing cap of 200 cubic feet per second in groundwater withdrawals in our basin. Relying on a political body disconnected from the reality of our basin is a risky water resource strategy. Beyond that, the very senior water right priority dates of 1909 and 1912 would be replaced by present day rights. If anytime in the future, the ground water table was to drop enough, the state would force those new wells to be shut off first.

Half of the City of Bend’s present day water supply would be useless. The solutions to addressing flow in the Deschutes River are larger than this project. The city could only contribute a very small percentage of water compared to the other options that are available. The major irrigation diversions divert hundreds of cubic feet per second in comparison to the City’s diversion. A full 50 percent of the irrigation water is lost to leaky canals and evaporation. If the community were to focus its river restoration efforts, it would come in the form of more efficient irrigation delivery. Why should users that divert only a small portion of the water while putting 100 percent of it to beneficial use shoulder the long term costs of repairing the Middle Deschutes, when piping the canals could completely fix the flows in the river and have no negative impact on deliveries or requirements of additional energy? Moving to ground water is hardly a greener option than continuing to use

a gravity fed major water source. Picture in your mind 10 very large diameter wells with large above ground 300 horsepower electric motors pumping water into the river forever. As laudable as finding ways to keep water in the river is, that is exactly what the ratepayers of Bend would be subsidizing in perpetuity. The surface water project also has the option of at some point in the future adding a hydropower plant that would generate revenue for the city and produce real “green” power. Fifty-eight million dollars is a large sum of money, but this is the first time in the city’s 100-year history that the ratepayers have been asked to include in their rate structure any meaningful reinvestments to its water system. The bill has come due on aging infrastructure. I commend the council for taking the long term view and selecting the most responsible water resource strategy of the two options. Casey Roats is vice president of Roats Water System of Bend.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Monday, February 28, 2011 B5

O Andy Jurinko, artist who memorialized ballparks By Dennis Hevesi New York Times News Service

There is the panoramic view toward the Green Monster, the towering left-field wall at Fenway Park, on June 8, 1950, as the Boston Red Sox are crushing the St. Louis Browns, 24-9. There is the Brooklyn Dodgers’ Duke Snider at bat in Ebbets Field in July 1955, with the Schaefer Beer sign — “A real hit! A real beer! — above the scoreboard and the Abe Stark clothing store sign below. There is Willie Mays making his incredible over-the-head catch in deep center at the Polo Grounds in Game 1 of the 1954 World Series between the Giants and the Cleveland Indians. Those are among the hundreds of vividly realistic oil paintings — in reds, blues, yellows and, of course, infield and outfield greens — that made Andy Jurinko one of the nation’s foremost baseball artists, known particularly for reprising the days when fans in fedoras and straw hats filled the stands. Jurinko, a Phillies fan, died of pancreatic cancer on Feb. 14 at his loft in Lower Manhattan, his wife, Pat Moore, said. He was 71. Citing what he called Jurinko’s “impeccably drawn” works, Ray Robinson, the author of 35 baseball books, said: “He was a nut on stats — the exact number of feet to right field, center field, left field; the exact color of those advertising signs. He was the top of the craftsmen who did this kind of stuff.” But Jurinko did far more than record vistas of ballparks, he also painted more than 400 portraits of star players and more than 150 action pieces.

Eagles Continued from B1 In between training his binoculars on the sky, Larry shows off the pictures he and his wife took of eagles they had spotted in the past. The one that elicits the most praise from other onlookers is one his wife took of a pair of bald eagles perched next to each other in a tree. “They’re just magnificent birds, and they’re majestic,” Larry Pearcy said. “I grew up here and remember years ago you never saw them. The other day we came through the John Day valley and we saw eight. It’s just real neat.” There are 10 pairs of bald eagles and 10 pairs of golden eagles that nest at Lake Billy Chinook year round. Between January and March dozens — and sometimes hundreds — more bald eagles come to the area, migrating from summer homes that can be as far away as Alaska. Eagle Watch showcases the birds, allowing anyone who is willing to make the drive a free opportunity to watch the raptors soar through the wild skies. The

Consent Continued from B1 “For over an hour, Bob Camreta kept asking me the same questions, just in different ways, trying to get me to change my answers,” the statement reads. “Finally, I just started saying ‘yes’ to whatever he said. And then, after a while, he said I could go.” Camreta and the girl dispute the length of the interview, with Camreta claiming it lasted about an hour, and the girl claiming two hours. The girl’s mother, contending her daughters were not abused, sued Camreta; the deputy, James Alford; and a Bend-La Pine Schools counselor, Terry Friesen. The suits claimed the interview was an illegal seizure because investigators did not have the mother’s permission, a warrant or evidence the girl was in danger. In 2006, a U.S. District Court judge ruled that officials had the

Duke Snider, baseball Hall of Famer By Ben Walker

Los Angeles Dodgers Hall of Fame outfielder Duke Snider, seen here in 1962, died early Sunday at age 84 in Escondido, Calif. Snider helped lead the Brooklyn Dodgers to its only World Series championship in 1955.

The Associated Press

To his mother, he was Ed. To everyone else, he was “The Duke of Flatbush” — revered by a borough of baseball fans and forever remembered in a song that romanticized a most golden era. Duke Snider, the Hall of Fame center fielder for the charmed “Boys of Summer” who helped the Dodgers bring their elusive and only World Series crown to Brooklyn, died Sunday. He was 84. Snider died at the Valle Vista Convalescent Hospital in Escondido, Calif., according to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, which announced the death on behalf of the family. Snider had been ill for months. His family said he died of natural causes. Snider hit .295 with 407 career home runs, played in the World Series six times and won two titles. But the eighttime All-Star was defined by much more than his stats — he was, after all, part of the love affair between Brooklyn and “Dem Bums” who lived in the local neighborhoods. Ebbets Field was filled with stars such as Pee Wee Reese, Roy Campanella and Gil Hodges during that 1955 championship season. Yet it is Snider’s name that refrains in “Talkin’ Baseball.” “Willie, Mickey, and the Duke,” goes the popular ballpark song, which marks its 30th anniversary this year. Snider wore No. 4 in Dodger blue and was often regarded as the third-best center fielder in New York — behind Willie Mays of the Giants and Mickey Mantle of the Yankees. “Duke was a fine man, a terrific hitter and a great friend, even though he was a Dodger,” Mays said in a statement. “It was great playing

The Associated Press ile photo

Inside • What made Snider special, Page D1 centerfield in New York in the 1950s, along with Mickey and Duke.” To Snider it was a made up rivalry. “The newspapers compared Willie, Mickey and I, and that was their thing,” Snider said several years ago. “As a team, we competed with the Giants, and we faced the Yankees in the World Series. So we had a rivalry as a team, that was it. It was an honor to be compared to them, they were both great players.” Mantle died in 1995 at age 63. Mays, now 79, threw out a ceremonial ball last fall before a playoff game in San Francisco.

“You can go to a zoo to see them, just like you can go to a zoo to see bison, but it’s just not the same thing as seeing them in the wild … It’s quite amazing.” — Bill Ennis, Eagle Watch participant event, in its sixteenth year, includes presentations by experts. Last weekend provided an upclose look at a captive golden eagle, named Aquila, that was blinded after being struck by a car. “It’s got a good following,” Oregon State Parks Interpretation Coordinator Paul Patton said of Eagle Watch. “We do it so we can help develop awareness and appreciation for the eagles of Central Oregon.” The area around Lake Billy Chinook has a lot of eagle activity, both bald and golden. The reason for this, according to eagle expert Frank Isaacs, is because it has environments that are desirable for both species. Generally, he said, bald eagles are attracted to large bodies of water where they can fish. The birds are also more prone to perching in trees. As for golden eagles, Isaacs said the birds

typically like to perch in cliffs and hunt in the desert where small mammals like jack rabbits live. “Lake Billy Chinook is pretty unique, being a huge lake in the high desert,” Isaacs said. “Eagles are a big part of the landscape in Oregon.” Bill Ennis, 69, said he hopes the eagles continue to remain part of the landscape. He and his wife, Debbie, 59, were attending the Eagle Watch event for the second time. “We appreciate nature a lot,” Ennis said as he looked out over Lake Billy Chinook in his search for eagles. “You can go to a zoo to see them, just like you can go to a zoo to see bison, but it’s just not the same thing as seeing them in the wild … It’s quite amazing.”

right to conduct the interview. Three years later, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals overturned the ruling. The girl’s father stood trial on charges of sexually abusing his daughter, but charges were ultimately dismissed. Deschutes County legal counsel Steve Griffin said Oregon Attorney General John Kroger will be arguing the case on behalf of both the county and the Oregon Department of Human Services. “The county believes that protecting children who may have been abused or neglected is something that everyone — parents, children, the public — has a strong interest in,” said Griffin. “The Fourth Amendment says that searches and seizures have to be reasonable, and going to a child’s school or someplace in public and briefly talking to her to see if reasonable suspicions of abuse are founded is something that we all should want the police to be able to do, And the Consti-

tution doesn’t prohibit that.” Mikel Miller, a Bend attorney who filed the suits on behalf of the girl’s mother, said investigators could have easily gotten around the issue of parental consent by asking a judge to sign a warrant authorizing the interview. “The Bill of Rights was designed to protect citizens from the government, and if the government can overcome the Bill of Rights by claiming it’s really inconvenient, then there are no civil rights,” Miller said. New York attorney Carolyn Kubitschek will be arguing the case on behalf of the family, Miller said. She said the family that brought the case is still together and is working to recover from the financial burden incurred by their legal fight. Arguments in the case are scheduled to begin Tuesday.

Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.

“Willie, Duke and Mickey. They were great players in one city, one town. Duke never got the credit of being the outfielder that Mays and Mantle were,” former teammate Don Zimmer said Sunday. “But Duke was a great outfielder. He was a great player.” Commissioner Bud Selig called Snider an “integral part of Dodger history” and part of an “unparalleled triumvirate of center fielders” in New York. “Then the Los Angeles native went home and helped usher in a new part of baseball history with great class,” Selig said in a statement. Said Giants manager Bruce Bochy: “There was even a song with Duke in it.” “I remember the first time I met him. It’s almost like you’re meeting a god, a baseball hero for all of us,” he said.

Snider hit at least 40 homers in five straight seasons and led the NL in total bases three times. He never won an MVP award, although a voting error may have cost him the prize in 1955. He lost to Campanella by a very narrow margin — it later turned out an ill voter left Snider off the ballot, supposedly by mistake. Snider is the Dodgers’ franchise leader in home runs (389) and RBIs (1,271). He led all major leaguers in the 1950s with 326 homers and 1,031 RBIs. Carl Erskine was Snider’s roommate for 10 years and the two shared a house at spring training in Vero Beach, Fla., with their families. “Duke played so great when I pitched,” he recalled. “He just made so many plays in the World Series for me, and he seemed to play his best when I pitched.” Snider hit .309 with 42 hom-

Weather

Arrest

Continued from B1 Daytime temperatures are forecast to hover around that 45 degree realm throughout much of the rest of the week, rising slightly higher starting Saturday. Evening temperatures, meanwhile, are expected to be in the mid 20s until Friday and low 30s by the weekend. Starting Wednesday night, and every day until Sunday, it’s expected to be mostly cloudy with a 20 to 30 percent chance of rain and snow. “Even though you have that chance of snow, those are all before-sun events,” Brooks said. “With it being mostly cloudy … you’ll still get some sunshine and general warming.”

Continued from B1 He is also being held on fourth-degree assault, menacing and strangulation. His bail is set at $407,500. Authorities are asking that anyone who has had similar contact or suspicious encounters with Bray to report them by calling Bend Police at 541322-2960 or the Deschutes County 911 nonemergency line at 541-693-6911. According to the Oregon Judicial Information Network, Bray lived in Portland as recently as January when he was cited for speeding. An arraignment in that matter is scheduled for March 9.

Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

ers and a career-high 136 RBIs in 1955. That October, he hit four homers, drove in seven runs and hit .320 as the Dodgers beat the Yankees in a sevengame Series. For a team that kept preaching “Wait till next year” after World Series losses to the Yankees in 1953, ’52, ’49, ’47 and ’41, it was indeed next year. A generation later, long after they’d all grown old, those Dodgers were lauded as the “Boys of Summer” in Roger Kahn’s book. “He was the true Dodger and represented the Dodgers to the highest degree of class, dignity and character,” Hall of Fame Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda said. Orlando Cepeda, a Hall of Famer with the Giants, said Snider provided one of his biggest thrills when he broke into the majors in 1958. “When I came to first base, the opening game, he said to me, ‘Orlando, good luck, good luck,’” Cepeda said. “He was one of my idols. I almost fainted.” Born Edwin Donald Snider, he got his nickname at an early age. Noticing his son return home from a game with somewhat of a strut, Snider’s dad said, “Here comes the Duke.” Even though his mom preferred Ed, the name stuck. So did Snider, once he played his first game in the majors in 1947, two days after Jackie Robinson’s historic debut. A durable slugger with a strong arm, good instincts on the bases and a regal style, Snider hit the last home run at Ebbets Field in 1957.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

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W E AT H ER

B6 Monday, February 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, FEBRUARY 28

TUESDAY

Today: Mostly cloudy, chance mixed showers.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL 

LOW

42

27

Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

42/30

38/27

46/27

27/22

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

46/33

39/33

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

46/28

44/31

Camp Sherman 38/23 Redmond Prineville 43/26 Cascadia 45/27 42/37 Sisters 41/25 Bend Post  42/27

Oakridge Elk Lake 40/35

31/14



40/23

40/22

41/24

41/22

Crescent Lake 34/16

39/21



38/23

Fort Rock

3/-16

Seattle 41/34

40/23

Bend

43/37

Elko

49/40

42/22

42/25



Idaho Falls

 Redding

Silver Lake



41/18

Boise

42/27

47/38

Christmas Valley

39/20

Missoula Helena

45/35

42/24

Chemult

City



Eugene Grants Pass

31/22



Reno

38/27

Expect rain and snow in the north, but it should remain dry in the south.

Crater Lake 26/26

45/24

San Francisco

Salt Lake City

55/46

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:44 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 5:52 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:42 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 5:53 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 4:28 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 2:06 p.m.

44/30



Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

HIGH

Moon phases New

Mar. 4

First

Full

Last

Mar. 12 Mar. 19 Mar. 26

Monday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

HIGH

Astoria . . . . . . . . 45/33/0.75 . . . . . 44/36/sh. . . . . . 45/37/sh Baker City . . . . . . . 36/9/0.00 . . . . . 38/30/sn. . . . . . 42/31/rs Brookings . . . . . . 45/29/0.03 . . . . . 50/44/sh. . . . . . 50/46/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 33/15/0.00 . . . . . 39/28/sn. . . . . . 42/28/rs Eugene . . . . . . . . 46/33/0.01 . . . . . 45/35/sh. . . . . . 46/36/sh Klamath Falls . . . . 32/5/0.00 . . . . . .36/29/rs. . . . . . 42/29/rs Lakeview. . . . . . . . 34/9/0.00 . . . . . 38/29/sn. . . . . . . 43/29/c La Pine . . . . . . . . 38/23/0.00 . . . . . .41/22/rs. . . . . . 38/25/sn Medford . . . . . . . 52/33/0.00 . . . . . 48/37/sh. . . . . . 50/37/sh Newport . . . . . . . 46/36/0.15 . . . . . 46/40/sh. . . . . . 47/40/sh North Bend . . . . . 48/34/0.03 . . . . . 48/41/sh. . . . . . 46/40/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 45/17/0.00 . . . . . . 45/37/r. . . . . . 49/35/sh Pendleton . . . . . . 47/25/0.00 . . . . . .48/30/rs. . . . . . 48/34/sh Portland . . . . . . .46/32/trace . . . . . 43/37/sh. . . . . . 44/38/sh Prineville . . . . . . . 45/25/0.00 . . . . . .45/27/rs. . . . . . 43/29/rs Redmond. . . . . . . 44/21/0.00 . . . . . .44/24/rs. . . . . . 43/31/rs Roseburg. . . . . . . 51/34/0.00 . . . . . 48/39/sh. . . . . . 48/38/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 48/36/0.01 . . . . . 44/37/sh. . . . . . 45/38/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 43/25/0.00 . . . . . .41/25/rs. . . . . . 39/27/rs The Dalles . . . . . .54/30/trace . . . . . 47/30/sh. . . . . . 45/32/rs

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41/23 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 in 1932 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.95” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . -13 in 1960 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 1.10” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.43” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 2.86” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.69 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.57 in 1940 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .7:00 a.m. . . . . . .6:11 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .4:51 a.m. . . . . . .2:19 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .6:37 a.m. . . . . . .5:20 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .7:48 a.m. . . . . . .8:10 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .8:42 p.m. . . . . . .8:21 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .7:28 a.m. . . . . . .7:26 p.m.

1

LOW

44 29

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy, mixed showers.

40 25

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

Calgary

39/28

Eastern

Hampton

Crescent

Vancouver

43/37

Burns

La Pine

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 54° The Dalles • 5° Klamath Falls

FRIDAY Mostly cloudy, mixed showers.

45 26

BEND ALMANAC

Portland

Snow will be likely today under mostly cloudy skies.

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

41/23

Brothers

LOW

42 30

NORTHWEST

Paulina

41/24

Sunriver

HIGH

THURSDAY

Mostly cloudy, mixed showers.

Snow and rain will continue to overspread the Northwest today.

Expect cloudy skies with rain along the coast and a wintry mix inland. Central

45/32

Mostly cloudy, mixed showers.

Tonight: Mostly cloudy, snow showers.

HIGH

STATE

WEDNESDAY

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . .2-0 . . . . . . 36-70 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 38-72 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . 71-120 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 116-123 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . . 4 . . . . . . . 103 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . .1-0 . . . . . . 53-67 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . 130 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 26-36 Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 46-94

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . .6-0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . .0-0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . .0-0 Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

. . . . . . 57-58 . . . . 145-230 . . . . . . . 121 . . . . . . . 185 . . . . . . 43-60 . . . . . . 52-59 . . . . . . . . 71

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

S

S

S

Vancouver 39/28

Calgary 3/-16

Saskatoon -1/-23

S

Boise 43/37

Winnipeg 23/-1

Rapid City 42/22

• -16° Emporia, Kan. Los Angeles 62/45

Salt Lake City 44/30 Las Vegas 61/41

Denver 57/29 Albuquerque 58/28

Phoenix 67/46

Honolulu 82/65

St. Paul 29/21

Juneau 14/7

S

S

S S

Quebec 35/21 Halifax 35/32 Boston Portland 44/25 47/29 New York 60/32

To ronto 38/19

Louisville 64/33

Atlanta Little Rock 74/48 64/35 Birmingham 77/44

Oklahoma City 56/32

Chihuahua 79/38

Mazatlan 81/49

Green Bay 30/14

St. Louis Nashville 43/26 68/35

Dallas 63/37

La Paz 79/53

S

Thunder Bay 25/11

Kansas City 43/27

Tijuana 62/43

Anchorage 20/5

S

Buffalo Chicago Detroit 48/20 38/22 Des Moines 34/23 W ashington, D. C. 36/24 Philadelphia 74/38 Omaha Columbus 67/34 39/24 58/25

Cheyenne 50/26 San Francisco 55/46

S

Bismarck 31/13

Billings 42/14

Portland 43/37

Laredo, Texas Maple Lake, Minn.

S

Seattle 41/34

• 103°

• 1.22”

S

New Orleans 79/52

Houston 75/48

Charlotte 77/46

Orlando 84/62 Miami 82/68

Monterrey 81/53

FRONTS

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .89/62/0.03 . . .64/34/s . . . 73/43/s Akron . . . . . . . . .48/31/0.00 . . .52/21/r . . . 41/29/s Albany. . . . . . . . .37/21/0.10 . . .44/20/r . . . 35/19/s Albuquerque. . . .48/34/0.00 . . .58/28/s . . . 62/29/s Anchorage . . . . .23/10/0.00 . . . .20/5/s . . . 26/13/s Atlanta . . . . . . . .76/52/0.00 . . .74/48/t . . . 64/40/s Atlantic City . . . .61/37/0.03 . . .65/36/t . . . 46/36/s Austin . . . . . . . . .85/67/0.00 . . .73/36/s . . . 72/38/s Baltimore . . . . . .60/32/0.00 . . .71/36/t . . . 51/32/s Billings. . . . . . . . .34/21/0.00 . 42/14/pc . . . 21/3/sn Birmingham . . . .78/59/0.00 . . .77/44/t . . . 65/42/s Bismarck . . . . . . . .24/8/0.01 . 31/13/pc . . . .18/-7/c Boise . . . . . . . . . .40/19/0.00 . . .43/37/c . . . 48/35/c Boston. . . . . . . . .32/25/0.31 . . .47/29/r . . . 40/29/s Bridgeport, CT. . .47/33/0.05 . . .49/31/t . . . 40/31/s Buffalo . . . . . . . .38/26/0.03 . . .48/20/r . . 38/29/pc Burlington, VT. . .29/12/0.12 . . . 37/18/i . . 26/20/pc Caribou, ME . . . 14/-10/0.00 . .31/14/sn . . . . 22/7/s Charleston, SC . .82/50/0.00 . 80/58/pc . . 66/45/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .82/43/0.00 . . .77/46/t . . . 62/33/s Chattanooga. . . .74/43/0.00 . . .72/42/t . . . 58/38/s Cheyenne . . . . . .44/28/0.00 . . .50/26/s . . 52/25/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .36/25/0.01 . 34/23/pc . . 43/29/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .62/38/0.36 . . .60/28/t . . . 48/34/s Cleveland . . . . . .45/32/0.00 . .49/23/sh . . 41/29/pc Colorado Springs 50/33/0.00 . . .53/26/s . . . 57/26/s Columbia, MO . .64/34/0.04 . . .38/26/s . . . 54/33/s Columbia, SC . . .82/40/0.00 . . .83/55/t . . . 65/39/s Columbus, GA. . .78/48/0.00 . . .79/51/t . . . 70/42/s Columbus, OH. . .60/35/0.00 . .58/25/sh . . . 44/33/s Concord, NH . . . .25/19/0.32 . . . 42/21/i . . . 35/16/s Corpus Christi. . .84/69/0.00 . . .78/45/s . . . 73/55/s Dallas Ft Worth. .77/66/0.00 . . .63/37/s . . . 69/44/s Dayton . . . . . . . .57/34/0.01 . .56/26/sh . . . 45/32/s Denver. . . . . . . . .50/23/0.00 . . .57/29/s . . . 59/30/s Des Moines. . . . .32/21/0.00 . . .36/24/s . . 49/21/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . .39/30/0.00 . 38/22/pc . . 39/28/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . . 21/-2/0.00 . . .27/17/c . . .29/-5/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .62/44/0.00 . . .59/33/s . . . 72/40/s Fairbanks. . . . . . -4/-30/0.00 . . -1/-29/s . . . .6/-6/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . . 19/-3/0.00 . 26/12/pc . . .22/-11/c Flagstaff . . . . . . .29/19/0.53 . . .43/17/s . . . 48/22/s

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .36/29/0.04 . 36/19/pc . . 37/24/pc Green Bay. . . . . . .24/3/0.00 . . .30/14/s . . 39/18/pc Greensboro. . . . .78/43/0.02 . . .78/42/t . . . 57/32/s Harrisburg. . . . . .54/32/0.00 . . .63/33/t . . . 48/32/s Hartford, CT . . . .42/32/0.15 . . .48/27/t . . . 41/26/s Helena. . . . . . . . .33/13/0.00 . . .41/18/c . . . 26/3/sn Honolulu . . . . . . .81/69/0.00 . . .82/65/s . . . 81/67/s Houston . . . . . . .83/67/0.00 . . .75/48/s . . . 71/47/s Huntsville . . . . . .75/59/0.00 . . .72/38/t . . . 61/37/s Indianapolis . . . .56/34/0.00 . .52/27/sh . . . 45/32/s Jackson, MS . . . .83/63/0.00 . . .77/41/t . . . 67/41/s Madison, WI . . . . .30/9/0.00 . . .30/19/s . . 40/22/pc Jacksonville. . . . .83/55/0.00 . 85/59/pc . . 69/50/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .16/10/0.00 . . . .14/7/s . . . . 17/4/s Kansas City. . . . .36/30/0.22 . . .43/27/s . . . 57/30/s Lansing . . . . . . . .36/30/0.01 . 37/19/pc . . 37/24/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .56/38/0.00 . . .61/41/s . . . 64/44/s Lexington . . . . . .63/39/0.11 . . .64/31/t . . . 52/34/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . .34/26/0.00 . . .40/26/s . . . 53/22/s Little Rock. . . . . .75/54/0.01 . . .64/35/s . . . 61/37/s Los Angeles. . . . .56/45/0.00 . . .62/45/s . . 63/48/pc Louisville . . . . . . .62/37/0.21 . . .64/33/t . . . 56/36/s Memphis. . . . . . .76/58/0.05 . . .66/36/t . . . 61/38/s Miami . . . . . . . . .83/69/0.00 . 82/68/pc . . . .85/67/t Milwaukee . . . . .33/21/0.00 . . .31/20/s . . 42/26/pc Minneapolis . . . . .28/2/0.00 . 29/21/pc . . . . 36/7/c Nashville . . . . . . .75/58/0.04 . . .68/35/t . . . 58/38/s New Orleans. . . .82/68/0.00 . . .79/52/t . . . 69/50/s New York . . . . . .50/38/0.00 . . .60/32/t . . . 44/35/s Newark, NJ . . . . .54/38/0.00 . . .63/33/t . . . 45/34/s Norfolk, VA . . . . .64/43/0.00 . . .80/40/t . . . 47/35/s Oklahoma City . .80/59/0.00 . . .56/32/s . . . 68/38/s Omaha . . . . . . . .34/25/0.00 . . .39/24/s . . . 49/22/s Orlando. . . . . . . .85/58/0.00 . 84/62/pc . . . .79/59/t Palm Springs. . . .63/36/0.00 . . .64/41/s . . . 70/47/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .38/30/0.11 . 36/22/pc . . . 47/29/s Philadelphia . . . .56/37/0.00 . . .67/34/t . . . 48/35/s Phoenix. . . . . . . .57/43/0.27 . . .67/46/s . . . 75/49/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .56/34/0.00 . . .62/26/t . . . 45/30/s Portland, ME. . . .24/15/0.12 . . .44/25/r . . . 39/24/s Providence . . . . .35/25/0.18 . . .49/29/t . . . 41/28/s Raleigh . . . . . . . .81/44/0.00 . . .80/46/t . . . 57/32/s

Yesterday Monday Tuesday Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . 27/-4/0.00 . 42/22/pc . . . .37/7/rs Savannah . . . . . .85/53/0.00 . 79/58/pc . . 68/46/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .37/11/0.00 . 45/24/pc . . 48/32/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .42/31/0.06 . . 41/34/rs . . .41/36/rs Richmond . . . . . .65/40/0.00 . . .80/36/t . . . 54/33/s Sioux Falls. . . . . . .29/1/0.00 . . .31/22/s . . 38/10/pc Rochester, NY . . .38/27/0.03 . . .44/22/r . . 38/29/pc Spokane . . . . . . 37/11/trace . .34/24/sn . . 34/29/sn Sacramento. . . . .55/29/0.00 . 57/41/pc . . . 60/44/c Springfield, MO. .71/33/0.04 . . .49/29/s . . . 63/34/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .65/35/0.00 . . .43/26/s . . . 54/35/s Tampa . . . . . . . . .81/62/0.00 . 79/63/pc . . . .77/61/t Salt Lake City . . .35/25/0.00 . . .44/30/s . . 48/34/pc Tucson. . . . . . . . .52/33/0.21 . . .63/37/s . . . 73/42/s San Antonio . . . .88/66/0.00 . . .77/40/s . . . 75/45/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .75/45/0.01 . . .54/31/s . . . 66/38/s San Diego . . . . . .59/44/0.07 . . .61/47/s . . 60/49/pc Washington, DC .60/36/0.00 . . .74/38/t . . . 52/34/s San Francisco . . .55/36/0.00 . 56/43/pc . . . 57/47/c Wichita . . . . . . . .50/35/0.73 . . .49/33/s . . . 64/34/s San Jose . . . . . . .59/32/0.00 . 58/40/pc . . . 61/44/c Yakima . . . . . . . .52/12/0.00 . .50/25/sh . . .45/30/rs Santa Fe . . . . . . 49/29/trace . . .49/27/s . . . 55/31/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .61/40/0.00 . . .68/46/s . . . 76/50/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .43/37/0.64 . .41/33/sh . . . 43/32/s Athens. . . . . . . . .49/42/0.00 . 53/38/pc . . 56/41/pc Auckland. . . . . . .72/61/0.00 . 72/64/pc . . 74/63/pc Baghdad . . . . . . .73/55/0.00 . . .75/55/s . . 71/53/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .91/77/0.00 . 92/78/pc . . 93/78/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .36/25/0.10 . 39/25/pc . . 42/24/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .63/57/2.18 . .62/53/sh . . 64/53/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . .41/23/0.00 . 38/25/pc . . . 40/25/s Bogota . . . . . . . .63/46/0.39 . .66/50/sh . . 64/49/sh Budapest. . . . . . .39/19/0.00 . 40/23/pc . . 37/22/pc Buenos Aires. . . .86/63/0.00 . . .83/59/s . . . 80/58/s Cabo San Lucas .72/59/0.00 . . .78/57/s . . . 81/59/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .70/54/0.00 . . .71/54/s . . . 74/56/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .25/7/0.04 . . 3/-16/sn . . . -2/-4/pc Cancun . . . . . . . .81/72/0.00 . 84/70/pc . . 83/70/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .48/32/0.02 . . .45/32/s . . 45/33/pc Edinburgh . . . . . .48/30/0.00 . . .44/32/s . . 45/34/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .46/37/0.07 . . 41/32/rs . . . 45/32/c Harare . . . . . . . . .75/61/1.88 . . .77/60/t . . . .78/59/t Hong Kong . . . . .75/64/0.00 . . .76/64/s . . 73/62/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . .39/34/0.00 . 41/28/pc . . 42/30/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .68/41/0.00 . .58/44/sh . . . 63/41/s Johannesburg . . .73/54/0.00 . 76/54/pc . . 76/55/pc Lima . . . . . . . . . .77/66/0.00 . 85/69/pc . . 84/69/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . . .61/45/s . . . 59/43/s London . . . . . . . .48/36/0.11 . 45/36/pc . . 45/37/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .54/43/0.00 . 48/28/pc . . 49/29/pc Manila. . . . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . 90/74/pc . . . .87/76/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .93/72/0.00 . . .94/72/s . . . 94/70/s Mexico City. . . . .81/48/0.00 . 83/51/pc . . 81/49/pc Montreal. . . . . . .23/10/0.06 . .35/19/sn . . . 27/20/c Moscow . . . . . . . .14/5/0.00 . . .20/5/pc . . . 18/3/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . .82/55/0.00 . 83/57/pc . . . 84/57/s Nassau . . . . . . . .82/70/0.00 . . .85/68/s . . 79/66/pc New Delhi. . . . . .73/55/0.00 . . .75/53/s . . 75/54/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . .64/37/0.00 . .58/42/sh . . 54/42/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .30/21/0.07 . 33/15/pc . . . 31/15/s Ottawa . . . . . . . .23/12/0.07 . .34/18/sn . . . 28/21/c Paris. . . . . . . . . . .48/34/0.04 . .40/34/sh . . 44/34/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .90/79/0.00 . . .88/74/t . . . .90/74/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .52/32/0.07 . .52/41/sh . . . .55/43/r Santiago . . . . . . .86/54/0.00 . . .88/55/s . . . 90/56/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .82/68/0.00 . . .82/68/t . . 78/67/sh Sapporo. . . . . . . .34/28/0.00 . . .30/17/s . . .31/24/rs Seoul . . . . . . . . . .43/36/0.00 . .45/25/sh . . 41/23/pc Shanghai. . . . . . .63/43/0.00 . .56/43/sh . . . 45/35/c Singapore . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . 90/76/pc . . . .89/75/t Stockholm. . . . . .30/27/0.00 . . .28/16/s . . . 30/18/s Sydney. . . . . . . . .90/70/0.00 . . .85/71/t . . . .87/71/t Taipei. . . . . . . . . .81/61/0.00 . .79/63/sh . . 75/60/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . .64/54/sh . . . 65/51/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .66/39/0.00 . . .50/45/r . . 51/44/sh Toronto . . . . . . . .36/25/0.17 . .38/19/sh . . 32/24/pc Vancouver. . . . . .39/30/0.28 . .39/28/sh . . .37/32/rs Vienna. . . . . . . . .37/23/0.00 . 41/26/pc . . 44/28/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . .28/19/0.00 . . .33/11/s . . . . 31/6/s

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G

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GREEN LIVING, TECHNOLOGY & SCIENCE IN OREGON

GREEN, ETC.

Inside

‘Frankenstein’ Mary Shelley’s monster is birthed onstage by Oscar-winning director Danny Boyle, Page C3

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/greenetc

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2011

GLASS BUTTES

Area east of Bend may hold geothermal energy potential

Central Oregon’s newest ‘friend’

By Tim Doran The Bulletin

About 80 miles east of Bend, researchers hope to combine high-tech imaging and scientific survey techniques in an innovative way to help identify new sources of geothermal energy. And if all goes well, they might even find enough geothermal energy to power homes and business. The work began at Glass Buttes, located west of the U.S. Highway 20-U.S. Highway 395 junction, last year, according to project summaries. It involves a professor from Oregon State University, the chief scientist at the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries and a staff geologist from Nevada-based Ormat Technologies, the geothermal power plant company paying about half the $8.5 million project costs. A grant from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act pays the rest. Ormat has leased the geothermal rights at Glass Buttes, but it’s not the first to explore the area. In the late 1970s, Phillips Petroleum conducted large-scale drilling that today would be too expensive, even if a company could get permits, according to a fourth-quarter 2010 project summary on the Recovery Act website. While the company did not find flowing water, its tests showed areas that deserved further testing. Since then, the technology for generating electricity from geothermal sources has improved, and Ormat, which has been in the industry since 1965, hopes the research will generate enough geothermal energy to sell to a utility. See Energy / C6

GREEN

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

ABOVE: Construction workers are busy on the roof at Facebook’s Prineville Data Center on Wednesday. BELOW: A customized construction safety helmet rests on a desk at the Prineville facility.

TECH FOCUS

Behemoth Facebook site takes shape in Prineville

Geothermal exploration Experts from Oregon and Nevada are testing new techniques to assess geothermal energy potential near Glass Buttes, east of Bend.

By Jordan Novet • The Bulletin PRINEVILLE —

F

Bend

rom the outside, surrounded as it is by concrete slabs, steel beams, tractors, cherry pickers, trailers and trucks, it looks like just another big commercial building. In a sense, it is. In a sense, it’s not. Inside, there are security guards and waffle makers, construction workers and video games, technicians and

servers, innumerable servers, slim and uniform, lined up in rows and columns, aisle upon aisle upon aisle of them, staying cool, humming, lighting up. All of it is there for a sole purpose: improving the experience of the online, multinational social network Facebook.

And there’s plenty more work to be done before the building is complete. The Prineville Data Center, Facebook’s first wholly owned property, has been under construction for about a year now. The first quarter of the center is completed and servers are being tested, and the rest of the building is coming “We’re now along to varying a piece of degrees. Prineville The data history,” says center’s manFacebook ager, Ken Patchdata center ett, said testmanager Ken ing should end Patchett. and user data should be flowing through the many servers by early spring. For now, though, the place is a small city, busy with activity all around, and Patchett, who considers himself its mayor, somehow makes sure everything goes as it should. Including security and facilitymanagement personnel, the tally of workers at the building who will stay on after construction ends stands at about 42, Patchett said, counting himself. Patchett would not reveal how much has already been spent on the facility, which has received attention from national media and trade publications for months. And numbers about the economic impact of the construction project are not yet available, said

Jason Carr, manager of the Prineville and Crook County economic development program for Economic Development for Central Oregon. But Carr has been made aware of several small-scale economic improvements in the area. One hotel in Prineville, for example, saw its best January in almost 20 years because of the Facebook project, Carr was told. As for Patchett, he has made himself comfortable in Prineville, having found a house for himself

CROOK COUNTY 20

Geothermal leases

97

Millican DESCHUTES N ATION A L FOREST

Brothers DESCHUTES COUNTY

LAKE COUNTY

Hampton Glass Buttes

Source: U.S. Bureau of Land Management

and his family to rent. Historical photographs of Prineville decorate walls in the waiting area and in other halls. “We’re now a piece of Prineville history as well,” Patchett said. “And we like that.” Depictions of communications technology through the centuries — cave etchings, a printing press, a typewriter, a television — adorn one wall near a server room, and altogether suggest Facebook has had a part in the evolution. With Facebook, Patchett said as he

walked backward down the hall, “You feel more complete. You feel more connected.” The building now spans 306,000 square feet, Patchett said. Walking around it can feel like exploring a maze. Even conceiving of its size can be overwhelming — setting it on one end could make it a Central Oregon skyscraper. Yet its purpose is singular, and it all comes across as integral and united with everything else. See Facebook / C6

20

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Swarms of wasps – if not investors By Amy Wallace New York Times News Service

The white paper by the Georgia scientists Glen C. Rains and W. Joe Lewis has a technical-sounding title that masks the exciting news within. “A Project to Bring Innovative New Technology Into the Market Place for Detecting Agents of Harm in Agriculture, Security, and Human Health/Safety Arenas,” it says blandly. Luckily, Prototype is here to translate: Move over, bloodhounds, there’s a new odor detector in town. The Wasp Hound, designed by the two scientists, is a hand-held device containing five parasitic wasps. These flying, stinger-less insects have outperformed dogs in tests that measure scent detection of cadavers, but research shows that they can be taught to sniff out any thing: explosives, drugs and even that Ezra Millstein / New York Times News Service newly resurThese wasps can be taught to gent scourge: sniff out most anything, includbedbugs. ing bedbugs. See Wasps / C6

SCIENCE

A worker walks through the office space inside Facebook’s Prineville Data Center on Wednesday. An open-air area featuring a water reclamation tank is visible through the windows.


T EL EV ISION

C2 Monday, February 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Woman won’t give approval Judge: Seinfeld can mock to friend’s destructive affairs cookbook author on TV Dear Abby: My best friend “Diane” and I have known each other since we were children. She has always had difficulty in her relationships with men. In the last three years, she has begun dating married men. She was sure the latest one was the man of her dreams, but it was short-lived and destroyed his marriage. Diane rationalizes what she’s doing by saying the men will cheat anyway, so why not with her? Diane is now in love with someone new. If he leaves his wife and children for her, this will be another home Diane has helped break up. She wants my blessings and for me to get along with her boyfriend. Being a married woman and a mother, I sympathize with the wives of these men. Why has my best friend become a home wrecker? What can I do to avoid being pulled into this affair without losing her friendship? — Morally Compromised in Michigan Dear Morally Compromised: There is no one-size-fits-all answer about why a woman dates married men. Some women do it because they fall in love; others because they don’t care whom they hurt to get what they want; while still others see it as a competition they “have” to win — again and again. You do not have to allow yourself to be drawn into this. Avoid it by making clear to Diane that as much as you care about her, you don’t approve, and want no contact with the

DEAR ABBY Diane is now in love with someone new. If he leaves his wife and children for her, this will be another home Diane has helped break up. She wants my blessings and for me to get along with her boyfriend. Being a married woman and a mother, I sympathize with the wives of these men. new man in her life. Dear Abby: Our son has not spoken to us in 21⁄2 years. This isn’t the first time it has happened. When we are asked how he and his family are doing and where they are living, we don’t know how to respond. What do we say when meeting someone new and they ask whether we have children? If we answer that we have one son, a number of questions are sure to follow for which we don’t have answers. Can you offer some appropriate responses to these questions that don’t require having to say, “We don’t know”? — Needs an Answer in Virginia Dear Needs an Answer: When someone asks how your son

and his family are doing and where they are living, say, “We are estranged.” And if you are asked by a stranger if you have any children, look the person in the eye and reply, “I’d rather not discuss it.” Dear Abby: I have a neighbor with a lovely family. While I enjoy talking to them, I don’t know how to politely tell her to stay home when I have company. She will send her children to my door selling school items when my adult children are here for dinner. She comes into my yard with her kids when I’m entertaining friends from out of town. I was brought up that if a neighbor has company, you should stay home unless you were invited. I just want some privacy when I have guests. — Nameless in the East Dear Nameless: You do have a problem, because it appears your neighbor is someone who never learned boundaries. Unless you tell the woman that when you’re entertaining guests, you want her to respect your privacy, she’ll continue inviting herself over. And if you prefer that your guests not be subjected to a sales pitch from her children, when they knock, tell them you have company, can’t talk to them right now and close your door. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet

By David B. Caruso The Associated Press

NEW YORK — A judge has thrown out a lawsuit by a cookbook author who accused Jerry Seinfeld of hurting her reputation by mocking her on national television. In a ruling filed with the court Friday, state Justice Marcy Friedman said it was clear the comedian was joking when he called author Missy Chase Lapine a “wacko” during an appearance on the “Late Show with David Letterman” in 2007. The judge said Seinfeld also has a constitutional right to express his opinion. The suit stemmed from a legal battle in which Lapine accused Seinfeld’s wife, Jessica, of stealing her idea for a book on how to get children to eat healthy. Both women had published their books that year. Lapine’s was called, “The Sneaky Chef: Simple Strategies for Hiding Healthy Foods in Kids’ Favorite Meals.” Jessica Seinfeld’s was titled “Deceptively Delicious: Simple Secrets to Get Your Kids Eating Good Food.” The case became tabloid fodder, and Seinfeld addressed it on Letterman with a heaping of ridicule. “One of the fun facts of celebrity life is wackos will wait in the woodwork to pop out at certain moments of your life to inject a little adrenaline into your life experience,” Seinfeld told Letterman. “So there’s another woman who had another cookbook,” he continued. “My wife never saw the book, read the book, used the

Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday

The Associated Press ile photo

Missy Chase Lapine, author of “The Sneaky Chef,” accused Jerry Seinfeld’s wife of stealing her idea for a cookbook. book. … But the books came out at the same time. So this woman says, ‘I sense this could be my wacko moment.’” Seinfeld said Lapine was accusing his wife of “vegetable plagiarism.” “She comes out and says, ‘You stole my mushed-up carrots. You can’t put mushed-up carrots in a casserole. I put mushed-up carrots in the casserole.’” A federal court eventually agreed with Seinfeld that the copyright suit was baseless and tossed it out last year. The judges said there was nothing original about the idea of “stockpiling vegetable purees for covert use in children’s food.” Friedman’s ruling, signed Wednesday but filed Friday, not-

ed that you can’t sue someone for libel in the U.S. merely for hurling an insult. You must show that a person lied about facts in order to damage a person’s reputation and did so in such a way that a reasonable person would have believed that those false statements were true. Given all of the hyperbole in his jokes — one of which implied that people who went by three names, like Lapin, were predisposed to become assassins — the judge said she found it “inconceivable” that a reasonable viewer thought he was serious about fearing for his safety. And as for Seinfeld’s suggestion that Lapine was an opportunist making up baseless plagiarism claims, the judge wrote that he was entitled to voice his opinion. “If the law were to the contrary, the protection of the First Amendment would be unacceptably denied to persons who publicly defend themselves against what they believe to be baseless charges or lawsuits,” she wrote. The judge also absolved “Deceptively Delicious” publisher HarperCollins of any wrongdoing. Lapine had accused the company of lifting ideas from a book proposal she sent the company in 2006. Lapine’s lawyer, Howard Miller, said he and his client were evaluating the opinion and would decide later whether to appeal. He had no other comment. Seinfeld’s attorney, Orin Snyder, called the decision “a complete victory for Jerry, and also a victory for the First Amendment and the right of comedians to tell jokes.”

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BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

MONDAY PRIME TIME 2/28/11 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW # KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 173 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

5:00

5:30

KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! With Ruff News Nightly News House of Payne House of Payne Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Caprial-John Wolf: Travels Steves Europe

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News News (N) ABC World News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ This Old House Nightly Business News News Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Steves’ Europe Travelscope ‘G’ This Old House Nightly Business

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Garden Smart ‘G’ This Old House PBS NewsHour ’ Å

8:00

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The Bachelor Brad and the women go to South Africa. (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Chuck (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å The Cape Razer (N) ’ ‘14’ Å How I Met Mad Love ‘PG’ Two/Half Men Mike & Molly ‘14’ The Bachelor Brad and the women go to South Africa. (N) ’ ‘14’ Å House Recession Proof (N) ’ ‘14’ The Chicago Code (N) ’ ‘14’ Å News on PDX-TV Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ Antiques Roadshow Des Moines ‘G’ Oregon Exper Oregon Exp Chuck (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å The Cape Razer (N) ’ ‘14’ Å 90210 Blue Naomi (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Gossip Girl Empire of the Son ‘14’ Rough Cut-Mac Crafting-Spot Martha-Sewing Dewberry Shw Antiques Roadshow Des Moines ‘G’ Oregon Exper Oregon Exp

10:00

10:30

(10:01) Castle Countdown (N) ‘PG’ Harry’s Law American Dreams ‘14’ Hawaii Five-0 Po’ipu ’ ‘14’ Å (10:01) Castle Countdown (N) ‘PG’ News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ American Experience (N) ’ ‘14’ Harry’s Law American Dreams ‘14’ Married... With Married... With Simply Ming ‘G’ Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ American Experience (N) ’ ‘14’

11:00

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KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman News (N) (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens History Detectives ’ ‘G’ Å News Jay Leno King of Queens King of Queens Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Caprial-John History Detectives ’ ‘G’ Å

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Bounty Hunter The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 One Heart ‘14’ Å Intervention Kristine ‘14’ Å Intervention Cassie ‘PG’ Å Heavy Jill; Johnny (N) ‘PG’ Å Heavy Ronnie; Debbie ‘PG’ Å 130 28 18 32 Bounty Hunter (3:00) ››› “The ›› “Demolition Man” (1993, Science Fiction) Sylvester Stallone, Wesley Snipes, Sandra Bullock. A frozen ››› “Bad Boys” (1995, Action) Martin Lawrence, Will Smith, Tea Leoni. Two Miami cops attempt to recover ››› “Bad Boys” (1995) Martin Lawrence. Two Miami cops at102 40 39 Terminator” cop is thawed out to capture an old nemesis. Å stolen police evidence. tempt to recover stolen police evidence. Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘14’ Å Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘G’ Å Operation Wild Operation Wild I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å Operation Wild Operation Wild 68 50 26 38 Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘14’ Å Bethenny Getting Married? ‘14’ Bethenny Getting Married? ‘14’ Bethenny Getting Married? ‘14’ Bethenny Getting Married? ‘14’ Bethenny Getting Married? ‘14’ Bethenny Ever After (N) Bethenny Ever After 137 44 Working Class The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ Å The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ Å ››› “Splash” (1984, Romance-Comedy) Tom Hanks, Daryl Hannah, John Candy. ’ Å Working Class 190 32 42 53 (4:00) ››› “Splash” (1984) Tom Hanks. ’ Å Biography on CNBC Home Depot Biography on CNBC Ron Popeil Mad Money Biography on CNBC Home Depot Biography on CNBC Ron Popeil Mel B Sexy Abs Sleep Number 51 36 40 52 Supermarkets Inc: Inside Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Å Anderson Cooper 360 Å 52 38 35 48 Parker Spitzer (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å (6:45) › “My Best Friend’s Girl” (2008, Romance-Comedy) Dane Cook, Kate Hudson. Å Always Sunny Always Sunny Always Sunny Always Sunny Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 South Park ‘14’ Outdoorsman Joy of Fishing PM Edition Visions of NW Talk of the Town Cooking Oregon Outdoorsman Desert Word Travels ’ Talk of the Town Ride Guide ‘14’ HS Basketball 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 12 11 Tonight From Washington Suite/Deck Good-Charlie Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie Good-Charlie “Legally Blondes” (2009) Milly Rosso, Becky Rosso. Suite/Deck Fish Hooks ‘G’ Fish Hooks ‘G’ Good-Charlie Good-Charlie 87 43 14 39 Suite/Deck Cash-Chicago American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. Gold Rush: Alaska: Full Disclosure American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. 156 21 16 37 Auction Kings ’ Auction Kings ’ Cash Cab ‘PG’ College Basketball Kansas State at Texas (Live) SportsCenter (Live) Å NFL Live (N) NBA Tonight SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 College Basketball Tennis 2011 BNP Paribas Showdown: Andre Agassi vs. Pete Sampras SportsNation Å Basketball Final SportsNation Å NASCAR Now Å NBA Basketball 22 24 21 24 Women’s College Basketball Bowling Å Bowling Å PBA Bowling Å AWA Wrestling Å College Basketball Big East final, played 3/9/85. Å 23 25 123 25 (4:00) College Football From Nov. 27, 2010. (N) SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Still Standing ’ Still Standing ’ Pretty Little Liars The Bad Seed ‘14’ Pretty Little Liars (N) ‘14’ Å Greek Agents for Change (N) ’ ‘14’ Pretty Little Liars ‘14’ Å The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Å Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Iron Chef America Flay vs. Ford Unwrapped Candy Store Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Best Thing Ate Best Thing Ate Good Eats Good Eats 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa College Basketball Cal State Bakersfield at Gonzaga (Live) Mariners Mondays From July 10, 2010. (N) The Final Score Bensinger The Final Score 20 45 28* 26 Action Sports World Championships ›› “Step Brothers” (2008, Comedy) Will Ferrell, John C. Reilly. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ››› “The Simpsons Movie” (2007, Comedy) Voices of Dan Castellaneta, Julie Kavner. ››› “The Simpsons Movie” (2007), Julie Kavner 131 My First Place My First Place My First Place Hunters Int’l House Hunters House Hunters Property Virgins Property Virgins Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l My First Place My First Place 176 49 33 43 My First Place Ancient Discoveries ‘PG’ Å American Pickers ‘PG’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ American Pickers ‘PG’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ American Pickers ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 Ancient Discoveries ‘PG’ Å Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å ›› “Vacancy” (2007, Suspense) Luke Wilson, Kate Beckinsale. Å “Vacancy 2: The First Cut” (2009, Horror) Agnes Bruckner. Premiere. Å How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Ed Show (N) The Last Word The Rachel Maddow Show The Ed Show Hardball With Chris Matthews Å 56 59 128 51 The Last Word My Life as Liz ’ That ’70s Show That ’70s Show When I Was 17 When I Was 17 True Life ’ Jersey Shore Kissing Cousins ‘14’ Skins Michelle (N) ’ ‘MA’ Skins Michelle ’ ‘MA’ 192 22 38 57 The Seven ‘PG’ SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å House of Anubis SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob (6:06) DEA Undercover missions. ’ ‘14’ (7:19) UFC Fight Night ’ ‘PG’ ››› “The Fugitive” (1993, Suspense) Harrison Ford, Tommy Lee Jones, Sela Ward. ’ 132 31 34 46 (4:52) DEA Deadly Chase ’ ‘14’ Being Human Å Being Human Å Being Human Being Human (N) (10:01) Warehouse 13 ’ Å (11:01) Being Human 133 35 133 45 (4:00) › “Skinwalkers” (2007) Spring Praise-A-Thon Spring Praise-A-Thon 205 60 130 Friends ’ ‘14’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Conan Fitz & the Tantrums perform. 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘14’ ››› “Days of Wine and Roses” (1962, Drama) Jack Lemmon, Lee Remick. A hus››› “Under the Volcano” (1984) Albert ›››› “The Lost Weekend” (1945, Drama) Ray Milland, Jane Wyman, Howard da ››› “Arthur” (1981, Comedy) Dudley Moore, John Gielgud, Liza Minnelli. A British 101 44 101 29 butler helps his drunken master choose love or money. Silva. A boozing writer lands in Bellevue. Å band and wife struggle to control their alcoholism. Å Finney, Jacqueline Bisset. Kitchen Boss (N) Ultimate Cake Off Pirates. ’ ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Outrageous Kid 19 Kids-Count 19 Kids-Count Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ 178 34 32 34 Cake Boss ‘PG’ Law & Order Hate ‘14’ Å (DVS) Bones The Girl With the Curl ’ ‘14’ Bones The Girl in Suite 2103 ’ ‘14’ Bones The Woman in the Sand ‘14’ The Closer The Big Bang ‘14’ Å HawthoRNe No Excuses ‘14’ Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Crashers ’ ‘14’ Garfield Show Codename: Kids Codename: Kids Total Drama Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Adventure Time Regular Show (N) King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son (10:04) Roseanne (10:36) Roseanne (11:09) Roseanne (11:40) Roseanne 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons NCIS Citywide blackout. ‘14’ Å NCIS Child’s Play ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Faith ’ ‘PG’ Å WWE Monday Night RAW ’ ‘PG’ Å (11:05) White Collar Payback ‘PG’ 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit You’re Cut Off ’ ‘14’ You’re Cut Off ’ ‘14’ You’re Cut Off (N) ’ ‘14’ You’re Cut Off ’ ‘14’ The X Life ‘14’ You’re Cut Off ’ ‘14’ The X Life ‘14’ 191 48 37 54 You’re Cut Off ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:50) ››› “Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs” ’ (6:20) ›› “Fletch” 1985 Chevy Chase. ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “Marked for Death” 1990 Steven Seagal. ‘R’ Å (9:35) ›› “Mo’ Money” 1992 Damon Wayans. ‘R’ Å (11:10) ›› “The Fly II” 1989 ‘R’ ››› “Raising Arizona” 1987, Comedy Nicolas Cage. ‘PG-13’ Å ››› “The War of the Roses” 1989, Comedy Michael Douglas. ‘R’ Å “In the Name of Love” ››› “The War of the Roses” 1989, Comedy Michael Douglas. ‘R’ Å Nike 6.0 HB BMX Pro The Daily Habit Insane Cinema ‘PG’ Bubba’s World Insane Cinema The Daily Habit The Daily Habit The Daily Habit Check 1, 2 ‘PG’ Stupidface ‘MA’ Amer. Misfits The Daily Habit Pipe Dream Haney Project World of Golf World of Golf The Golf Fix Golf Central Learning Center World of Golf World of Golf The Golf Fix Golf Central Learning Center Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Petkeeping Petkeeping Martha Bakes ‘G’ Mad Hungry The Martha Stewart Show ‘G’ Å The Martha Stewart Show ‘G’ Å Touched by an Angel ’ ‘G’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (3:30) ››› “Cast Away” 2000, Drama (11:35) The Ricky › “Couples Retreat” 2009, Comedy Vince Vaughn, Jason Bateman. Four Midwestern Real Time With Bill Maher TV host Ra- “The Sunset Limited” 2011, Drama Samuel L. Jackson, Tommy REAL Sports With Bryant Gumbel ’ HBO 425 501 425 10 Tom Hanks. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å couples descend on an island resort. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å chel Maddow. ’ ‘MA’ Å Lee Jones. ’ Å ‘PG’ Å Gervais Show ’ (4:45) ››› “The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert” 1994 ‘R’ Arrested Dev. Arrested Dev. Larry Sanders ›› “Made” 2001, Comedy-Drama Jon Favreau, Vince Vaughn. ‘R’ “The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert” ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (4:00) “Drag Me to (5:45) › “Our Family Wedding” 2010 America Ferrera. Two overbearing men wreak ›› “Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen” 2009, Science Fiction Shia LaBeouf, Megan Fox. Sam Witwicky ›› “Edge of Darkness” 2010, Suspense Mel Gibson, Ray Winstone. A Boston detecMAX 400 508 7 Hell” 2009 ’ havoc with their children’s wedding plans. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å holds the key to defeating an ancient Decepticon. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å tive investigates his daughter’s murder. ’ ‘R’ Å Lost Gold of the Dark Ages ‘PG’ Into the Lost Crystal Caves ‘G’ Explorer ‘PG’ Lost Gold of the Dark Ages ‘PG’ Into the Lost Crystal Caves ‘G’ Explorer ‘PG’ Monster Fish of Mongolia ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents Fanboy-Chum The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ CatDog ‘G’ Å CatDog ‘G’ Å NTOON 89 115 189 SnowTrax Å Destination ATV World Ride to Adv. Whitetail Nation Young Blood Hunt Adv Best of the West SnowTrax Å ATV World Destination Ride to Adv. Top Truck Chal Impossible Shots OUTD 37 307 43 (7:15) ›› “Transporter 3” 2008, Action Jason Statham. iTV. Frank Martin becomes Shameless It’s Time to Kill the Turtle (4:00) “The Janky “The Amateurs” 2005, Comedy Jeff Bridges. iTV. Small-town Californication ’ Californication ’ Episodes Episode Episodes Episode SHO 500 500 Frank gives up drinking. ’ Å Promoters” 2009 citizens make an amateur porn film. ’ ‘R’ involved with a Ukrainian woman. ’ ‘PG-13’ ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å 1’Å 2’Å Pinks - All Out (N) ‘PG’ The 10 The 10 Car Warriors Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ The 10 The 10 Car Warriors NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 (5:08) ››› “Hellboy” 2004, Fantasy Ron Perlman. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (7:10) ›› “The Last Song” 2010, Drama Miley Cyrus, Greg Kinnear. ‘PG’ ›› “Alice in Wonderland” 2010, Fantasy Johnny Depp. ‘PG’ Å (10:50) › “The Ugly Truth” 2009 ‘R’ STARZ 300 408 300 (4:15) ›› “Mean Machine” 2001, Com- ››› “Scream 3” 2000, Horror David Arquette, Neve Campbell. A copycat killer stalks ›› “Knowing” 2009, Science Fiction Nicolas Cage, Rose Byrne. A note found in a (10:05) ›› “Perrier’s Bounty” 2009, Crime Drama Cillian Mur- “A Good Day” TMC 525 525 edy-Drama Vinnie Jones. ’ ‘R’ actors on the set of “Stab 3.” ’ ‘R’ time capsule predicts disastrous events. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å phy, Brendan Gleeson. ’ ‘R’ Å NHL Hockey Chicago Blackhawks at Minnesota Wild (Live) Hockey Central NHL Overtime Bull Riding St. Louis Invitational From St. Louis. NHL Overtime VS. 27 58 30 The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer Dead Eye ’ ‘PG’ Little Miss Perfect ‘G’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Monday, February 28, 2011 C3

CALENDAR TODAY “GASLAND”: A screening of the documentary about natural gas extraction; free; 5 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-385-3226. “THE CARTEL”: A screening of the documentary about America’s public school crisis; free; 6:15 p.m.; Highland Baptist Church, 3100 S.W. Highland Ave., Redmond; rdmpatriot@gmail.com.

seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater .com. “THE SPIN CYCLE”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the comedy about a baby boomer who returns home for Thanksgiving; with an opportunity to ask questions of the cast and the director after the show; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or www. innovationtw.org.

TUESDAY GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “Beyond Belief” and “The Imam and the Pastor,” two stories about forgiveness; free; 6:30-8:45 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504.

WEDNESDAY “IT’S IN THE BAG” LECTURE SERIES: Mike Gassner presents the lecture “Special Use Permits for Public Lands: Are they Necessary for Everyone?” which will explore permits required to access public lands; free; noon-1 p.m.; OSUCascades Campus, Cascades Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-322-3100 or www.osucascades. edu/lunchtime-lectures. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, NIXON IN CHINA”: Starring Kathleen Kim, Janis Kelly and James Maddalena in an encore presentation of John Adams’ masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-3826347. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Sarahlee Lawrence talks about her book “River House”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. THE STAXX BROTHERS: The Seattle-based rock and soul group performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “THE RAINMAKER”: A romantic comedy about a stranger who changes the lives of a family struggling to keep their ranch during the Dust Bowl; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater .com. “THE SPIN CYCLE”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the comedy about a baby boomer who returns home for Thanksgiving; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or www. innovationtw.org. THE SUPERVILLIANS: The Floridabased ska band performs, with Necktie Killer; $10; 8 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-749-2440.

THURSDAY GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Animal, Vegetable, Miracle” by Barbara Kingsolver; free; noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1081 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/ calendar. 2012 — DOOMSDAY OR DISTORTION?: Kent Fairfield discusses scenarios related to Mayan end of the world predictions; donations accepted; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Redmond Proficiency Academy, 657 S.W. Glacier Ave.; 541-526-0882. JAMES FARETHEEWELL & THE FOOLHARDY: The urban folkrock act performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “THE RAINMAKER”: A romantic comedy about a stranger who changes the lives of a family struggling to keep their ranch during the Dust Bowl; $20, $18 students and

FRIDAY BACHELOR BUTTE DOG DERBY: A trophy race for sled dogs and skijoring, with more than 30 dog teams; free for spectators; 9 a.m.; Wanoga Sno-park, Century Drive, Bend; 541-280-0035 or www. psdsa.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jim Henson talks about his book “Pee Up A Tree: A Mental Health Memoir”; free; 4-7 p.m.; Newport Market, 1121 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-3823940. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Featuring readings from High Desert Journal authors, including Anna Roberts and Nathaniel Dunaway; free; 5 p.m.; The Nature of Words, 224 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-647-2233. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend and the Old Mill District; free; 5-9 p.m.; throughout Bend. TASTE OF THE TOWN: Featuring live music and food from Bend restaurants; proceeds benefit Central Oregon Community College scholarships; $30 in advance, $35 at the door; 6-10 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Mazama Gymnasium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-318-7400 or www. thetasteofthetown.org. BELLUS VOCIS AND CENTRAL SINGERS: The Central Oregon Community College choirs perform contemporary choral pieces, under the direction of James Knox; $6, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7510. “THE SOCIAL NETWORK”: A screening of the 2010 PG-13-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-4753351 or www.jcld .org. “THE RAINMAKER”: A romantic comedy about a stranger who changes the lives of a family struggling to keep their ranch during the Dust Bowl; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. “THE SPIN CYCLE”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the comedy about a baby boomer who returns home for Thanksgiving; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or www. innovationtw.org.

SATURDAY BACHELOR BUTTE DOG DERBY: A trophy race for sled dogs and skijoring, with more than 30 dog teams; free for spectators; 9 a.m.; Wanoga Sno-park, Century Drive, Bend; 541-280-0035 or www.psdsa .org. FAMILY FUN FAIR: Featuring face painting, games, activities, community resources and more for children ages 5 and younger and their families; $5 for children, free for adults; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Highland Magnet School, 701 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-389-9317 or www. together-for-children.org. BELLUS VOCIS AND CENTRAL SINGERS: The Central Oregon

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Community College choirs perform contemporary choral pieces, under the direction of James Knox; $6, $5 students and seniors; 3 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7510. MEAL OF THE YEAR: The black-tie event features a gourmet dinner, live music and an auction; $110; 5:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Mazama Gymnasium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3187400 or www.themealoftheyear.org. CELTIC PARTY: Featuring themed entertainment, dessert and a raffle; proceeds benefit the Sacred Art of Living Center; $25 in advance, $35 at the door; 7 p.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend; 541-3834179 or www.sacredartofliving.org. KELLY THIBODEAUX & THE ETOUFFEE BAND: The blues and swamp rock act performs; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 7 p.m.; Kelly D’s, 1012 S.E. Cleveland Ave., Bend. MICHAEL ALLEN HARRISON: The acclaimed composer and pianist performs; proceeds benefit the Crook County Foundation; $15, free ages 4 and younger; 7 p.m.; Crook County High School, Eugene Southwell Auditorium, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-447-6909 or www.mahconcert.eventbrite.com. MOUNTAIN COUNTRY IDOL: Central Oregon musicians compete in two semifinalist shows to see who is the best country artist; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital; $5; 7 p.m. and 9 p.m., doors open at 6; Coyote Ranch, 1368 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-548-7700 or www.mountain997.com. TRIAGE: Local improvisational comedy group will perform, with musical guest Jumpin’ Joyce Respess; $5; 7:30 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541389-0803 or www.bendimprov.com. “THE RAINMAKER”: A romantic comedy about a stranger who changes the lives of a family struggling to keep their ranch during the Dust Bowl; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater .com. “THE SPIN CYCLE”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the comedy about a baby boomer who returns home for Thanksgiving; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or www.innovationtw.org. WATER & BODIES: The Portlandbased rock act performs a CDrelease party, with Ex-Cowboys and Tango Alpha Tango; $7; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.silvermoonbrewing .com.

about a baby boomer who returns home for Thanksgiving; $20, $18 students and seniors; 2 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or www. innovationtw.org. CASCADE WINDS SYMPHONIC BAND: The band performs music by P.D.Q. Bach, William Schuman, Johan de Meij and more, under the direction of Dan Judd; donations accepted; 2 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-593-1635 or www. cascadewinds.org. PORTLAND OPERA TO GO: The opera presents “The Elixir of Love,” about a shy man in love with a beautiful woman; free; 2 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. MICHAEL ALLEN HARRISON: The acclaimed composer and pianist performs; proceeds benefit the Crook County Foundation; $15, free ages 4 and younger; 3 p.m.; Crook County High School, Eugene Southwell Auditorium, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-447-6909 or www.mahconcert.eventbrite.com.

SUNDAY

WEDNESDAY

BACHELOR BUTTE DOG DERBY: A trophy race for sled dogs and skijoring, with more than 30 dog teams; free for spectators; 9 a.m.; Wanoga Sno-park, Century Drive, Bend; 541-280-0035 or www.psdsa .org. FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-3 p.m.; Pine Forest Grange, 63214 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-447-5451. “THE RAINMAKER”: A romantic comedy about a stranger who changes the lives of a family struggling to keep their ranch during the Dust Bowl; $20, $18 students and seniors; 2 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater .com. “THE SPIN CYCLE”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the comedy

March 9

MONDAY March 7 GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Hunger Games” by Suzanne Collins; free; noon; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7089 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. BUNCO PARTY: Featuring games, prizes and refreshments; proceeds benefit Prineville Habitat for Humanity; $5; 2 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, 235 N.E. Fourth St., Prineville; 541-447-7659. VIVA VOCE: The Portland-based indie-rock band performs, with Damien Jurado and Loch Lomond; part of the PDXchange Program; $20 plus fees; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org.

TUESDAY March 8 SHROVE TUESDAY PANCAKE SUPPER: Featuring pancakes, sausage, applesauce and drinks; $4, $2 ages 4-12, free ages 3 and younger, $10 families; 5-7 p.m.; Episcopal Church of the Transfiguration, 68825 N. Brooks Camp Road, Sisters; 541-549-7087. KNOW DIRT: Gail Wells talks about allegiance to place and how it affects opinions about land use; free; 6:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1032 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/ calendar. “THE WORLD ACCORDING TO MONSANTO”: A screening of the documentary about food production, genetically modified foods and more; $2 suggested donation; 7 p.m., 6:30 p.m. social; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-389-0785.

KING PERKOFF BAND: The jazz and blues act performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “THE RAINMAKER”: A romantic comedy about a stranger who changes the lives of a family struggling to keep their ranch during the Dust Bowl; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater .com. MOONALICE: The Bay Area-based jam band performs; ages 21 and older; $10; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. randompresents.com.

M T For Monday, Feb. 28

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

BARNEY’S VERSION (R) 2:10, 6:55 BIUTIFUL (R) 2:05, 6:50 BLACK SWAN (R) 2:25, 4:45, 7:20 THE KING’S SPEECH (R) 2, 4:35, 7:10 RABBIT HOLE (PG-13) 2:30, 4:50, 7:05 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 2:15, 4:40, 7:15

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

BIG MOMMAS: LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON (PG-13) 12:35, 3:30, 6:45, 9:25 DRIVE ANGRY 3-D (R) 12:30, 4:10, 7:05, 9:45 THE EAGLE (PG-13) 1:40, 5, 7:55, 10:30

THE FIGHTER (R) 1:55, 5:15, 8:15 GNOMEO & JULIET (G) 12:45, 3:20, 6:20, 9:20 GNOMEO & JULIET 3-D (G) 1:15, 3:50, 6:50 THE GREEN HORNET (PG13) 7:45, 10:25 HALL PASS (R) 1:05, 4, 7:40, 10:15 I AM NUMBER FOUR (PG-13) 1:25, 4:20, 7:20, 10:10 I AM NUMBER FOUR (DP — PG13) 12:20, 3:15, 6:15, 9:15 JUST GO WITH IT (PG-13) 12:55, 2, 3:45, 4:45, 6:30, 7:30, 9:55 JUSTIN BIEBER: NEVER SAY NEVER 3-D (G) 12:05, 3:35, 6:35, 9:35 NO STRINGS ATTACHED (R) 1:45, 5:10, 8:10 SANCTUM 3-D (R) 9:40 TANGLED (PG) 12:15, 4:30 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 1:30, 4:40, 8 UNKNOWN (PG-13) Noon, 3:10, 6:40, 10 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold

are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies. EDITOR’S NOTE: Digitally projected shows (marked as DP) use one of several different technologies to provide maximum fidelity. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) THE TOURIST (PG-13) 9:15 TRON: LEGACY (PG) 6

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GNOMEO & JULIET (G) 4:30, 6:30 I AM NUMBER FOUR (PG-13) 3:45, 6:15 JUSTIN BIEBER: NEVER SAY NEVER (G) 4:15, 6:45 UNKNOWN (PG-13) 4, 6:30

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

I AM NUMBER FOUR (PG-13) 6:45 JUST GO WITH IT (PG-13) 6:45 THE KING’S SPEECH (R) 6:30 UNKNOWN (PG-13) 6:30

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

THE EAGLE (PG-13) 4 JUST GO WITH IT (PG-13) 7 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 5

Photos by Catherine Ashmore / via The New York Times

Benedict Cumberbatch as the screaming, writhing newborn Creature in the opening scene of “Frankenstein” directed by Danny Boyle. Mary Shelley’s monster is birthed onstage by the Oscarwinning director.

It’s (gasp!) alive, not to mention peeved By Ben Brantley New York Times News Service

LONDON — Bet you’ve never seen baby pictures like these. In the thrilling first moments of the National Theater production of “Frankenstein,” directed with rough magic by Danny Boyle, a newborn tumbles hard from the womb and straight into the struggle that is life. Oh, the muscle-clenching pain of it, as this still inchoate being tries out its lungs, its limbs, its voice. When it takes its first wobbling steps, it’s an act of exultation, and we want to roar with it. Even those allergic to step-bystep chronicles of other people’s babies are sure to be spellbound by the initial progress of the big little guy at the center of Nick Dear’s adaptation of Mary Shelley’s archetypal monster novel of 1818. Alternately portrayed by the British stars Benedict Cumberbatch and Jonny Lee Miller (who also take turns playing the monster’s creator, Victor Frankenstein), this man-size infant will grow up to be reviled and hunted for his terrifying otherness. But in the scene that introduces the character known only as the Creature, he embodies the universal condition of being thrust naked and unprepared into a world he did not ask to join. As a director of films like “Trainspotting,” “Slumdog Millionaire” and the current “127 Hours,” Boyle has specialized in compelling studies of people trying to spring themselves from physically excruciating traps. Here that trap is life itself, and I can’t think of a more wrenching stage portrait of the terror and wonder of being born than the one he provides in the production that opened here on Wednesday night. Terror and wonder segue into more pedestrian feelings — including annoyance and a sense of opportunities lost — as this two-hour, intermission-free production continues on its brutal course. Like many children this production of “Frankenstein” has more original things to say before it learns to speak like a grown-up. Though Dear’s script hews closer to Shelley’s work than most adaptations (and effectively erases the image of Boris Karloff’s bolt-necked galoot), it also simplifies and coarsens its fascinating source, which is a sustained tremolo of Romantic angst.

Jonny Lee Miller, top, and Benedict Cumberbatch appear onstage in “Frankenstein.” But the astonishment of the play’s first quarter is enough to justify the high-decibel buzz that “Frankenstein” has been generating. (It is already all but sold out.) While Boyle, once a director at the Royal Court Theater, hasn’t done stage work in years, his vision here has none of a filmmaker’s representational literalness. Working with lyrical, William Blake-ish sets by Mark Tildesley (a production designer on his films “28 Days Later” and “Millions”), Boyle has created a world in which visual metaphors assume visceral strength. Unfortunately the Creature is more compelling than his creator here. Though this play (like the novel) presents its man and superman as different sides of the same personality, only the monster persuasively grabs our empathy, and it’s fortunate that both Miller and Cumberbatch have been given a shot at him. That opening sequence, in which the bloodied and naked Creature pushes through a membrane and into existence, has been staged as a brilliant, lonely ballet. Watching each of these actors (whom I saw on succeeding nights) find their feet and test their body parts is such a dizzy high point that it can’t be topped. (And their approaches are just different enough to make you want to see both.) It’s in the physical relationship between the two actors (especially if you get to see them in both roles) that you sense the real, unbreakable connection between these characters.


C4 Monday, February 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Monday, February 28, 2011 C5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO SATURDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H By Jacqueline Bigar

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

Happy birthday for Monday, Feb. 28, 2011: This year, you find the ability to move through issues quickly and effectively. Often you hear information that makes you shake your head. Confirm facts more often than not. Sometimes people find you to be unpredictable. True friends will understand this side of you. If you are single, you develop a greater sense of self. Someone you might not have considered before enters your life. If you are attached, the two of you build a more rewarding life because of a decision you make together. CAPRICORN is really your friend. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Others look up to you. You might be hard-pressed to achieve your desired goals. Examine bottom lines and perhaps rethink your approach. Planning works far better than action right now. Tonight: A meeting or get-together with friends. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Take a negative and turn it into a positive as you attempt to get past the obvious issue. You open up to a new universe, making new possibilities happen. Listen well and understand where you might be restricting yourself. Tonight: Be willing to take a stand. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Work with a partner, but be willing to take a stand. Your discomfort marks a situation, but you can get past the issue. Pull back

and become more aware of your options. Try detaching, and you’ll find answers. Know what is working. Tonight: Walk through an open door. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Others seem to demand a lot, and in all likelihood, you will attempt to meet those requests. Be a good listener and remain open to new ideas. Schedule an important one-on-one discussion for late today or tomorrow. Tonight: Find your favorite person. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Clear as much off your plate as you can, as opportunities of a different type come forward. It would be a shame to have to say no. Much is gained with a gentle, perceptive attitude. If you cannot swallow what is going on, make it known. Tonight: Value an invitation. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Toss yourself into an activity, not halfway, but completely. When involved in this manner, all your different skills flow in one direction and don’t scatter. Do stop for a compliment on the way! Another person’s unanticipated action stops you in your tracks for a short while. Tonight: The only answer is “yes.” LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Once more, you could decide that a venture might not be a good idea. You put it on hold. Toss out the unnecessary in your life. Then decide what is of highest priority. Curb a tendency to procrastinate -- the best way? Get started. Tonight: Relax within the moment. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH Pressure with a situation will take your interest as well as some

self-discipline to handle. Don’t toss yourself into this mix until you have decided if this activity or choice is worth your effort. You can kindly say no. Your creativity sizzles; use it well. Tonight: Hanging out is fun. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You could be more direct and forthright than you have been in a while. Look at a tendency to be self-indulgent and touchy. You can also decide to be selfdisciplined. An unexpected development could force you to regroup. Tonight: Out and about. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH You smile and draw in many more people. Your ability to understand problems helps, though your actions could be very unexpected to many. Allow yourself the freedom of the unexpected. Kind words help a nervous person relax. Tonight: Your treat. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH Know when to do less. You actually might spend more time quietly on what you want. You might need some downtime to evaluate what is happening. Schedule a get-together as late as possible. Use care incorporating a new person into your life. Tonight: As you like it. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH Act quickly with a project. Also, clear out any misunderstandings right now. You might be surprised at how easy it could be to patch up a problem. Think twice before going off on a tangent, or at least warn others beforehand. Tonight: Take some personal time. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

C6 Monday, February 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Facebook

Energy

Continued from C1 There are rooms for holding meetings, taking breaks, doing computer work, shipping packages, processing water, cleaning water and, yes, housing servers. Several types of servers are operating, and they communicate with one another to provide an experience the end user should find seamless. There is also a room for destroying servers. “Of all rooms in the data center, this room, disc erase, is the most important room,” Patchett said, standing by devices that, with the push of a button, can drill a thick metal bit through a server and pulverize it. Most people don’t realize, he said, that Facebook protects its users’ personal information in many ways, including the ability to physically destroy servers that fail but still retain data. In the vast, cool, dark, sleek server rooms, servers light up with different colors, corresponding to their condition or their operations. A few rows keep separate certain servers that stay healthy in thick, hot air. In one area that is caged and yet to be filled, there will be servers containing information on financial transactions. Amid all the servers, which Patchett said will allow for the flow of “terabytes and terabytes of data,” a man sat on a stool in one aisle and fiddled with a single server. Two computer monitors on a bench next to him displayed code. “What are you doing, Chuck?” Patchett asked. “Fixing a machine,” the man replied. Patchett, who has managed data center sites around the world, including the one Google started in The Dalles in 2006, was keen on describing technical specs on the spaces for servers. “You want the ambient temperature to be the same everywhere,” Patchett said, referring to the majority of the server space, which stays cool because of the flow of brisk but cleaned air that

Continued from C1 “The project’s size has the potential to power a significant percentage of residential needs in Central Oregon,” according to project information from the U.S. Energy Department’s Geothermal Technologies Program. Geothermal exploration can be expensive, so the Recovery Act provided about $100 million for projects that use innovative techniques to help reduce the upfront risks. Funding for the geothermal testing being conducted outside Newberry National Volcanic Monument comes from the same program. Separately, the U.S. Department of Energy on Thursday OK’d a $96.8 million Recovery Act loan guarantee to build a 23-megawatt geothermal power plant at Neal Hot Springs in Malheur County. At Glass Buttes, the work is more research and development, said Patrick Walsh, Ormat staff geologist. Building a power plant remains years away, if at all. Researchers hope to combine data collected using different methods to create structural models to identify the most likely locations of the hot fluid below ground that may generate electricity. To get high-resolution images

Wasps Continued from C1 Yes, wasps can be taught to react to the whiff of bedbugs’ pheromones. All that Rains and Lewis say they need to get their company, SmartHound Technologies, on the road to addressing the nation’s outbreak of bloodsucking pests — among many other problems — is $200,000. But so far, raising capital for research and development has been a challenge. “If you suddenly discover a new chemical, there’s all kinds of chemical companies,” Lewis says. “All you have to do is plug it in to an existing infrastructure.” But when it comes to training bugs to swarm, no infrastructure exists. “So we’ve got this new tool with this big gap that we need to cross,” he adds. “At this point, that’s where we’re at: How can we get across that divide and take it to the marketplace?”

A marketable product The Wasp Hound provides a window into the difficult process of turning scientific research — especially groundbreaking research — into a marketable product. Rains, 45, an associate professor at the University of Georgia, and Lewis, 68, a retired research entomologist who worked for nearly 40 years for the Agricultural Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, have jointly patented the Wasp Hound with their respective institutions. They have teamed with the Georgia Centers of Innovation, a state economic development program, to begin attracting investors. But they know they face an uphill battle. “The term ‘wasp’ elicits a certain fear, though ours don’t sting people and are friendly,” Lewis says. Then there’s this problem: “We don’t know how to work with people who are venture capitalists. That’s not our thing; we’re scientists. I guess you’d say we’ve floundered a little bit.” The genesis of the Wasp Hound goes back to 1988, when Lewis and a colleague, J.H. Tumlinson, published a paper in the scientific journal Nature that demonstrated how the associative learning process used by insects rivals that of higher organisms. These findings, which spawned more published papers — and which Lewis says were so radical that “had we suggested them 25 years earlier, we would have been laughed out of our profession” — led to the idea that wasps, like dogs, could potentially be used to detect targets. First, Lewis and his colleagues had to answer an important ques-

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

A security worker enters Facebook’s Prineville Data Center on Wednesday.

Boxes full of computer hardware sit in a shipping and receiving bay. High-efficiency light panels, dangling above the space, abound throughout the building. originated outside and flowed through vents in the ceiling of the building. Facebook officials have said they were attracted to Prineville because, among other reasons, it offers naturally cold air through winter and on sum-

mer nights. “You want the air to come down the aisle,” and thus cool all the servers, Patchett said. He said the technicians’ and IT support employees’ responsibilities boil down to a single task.

“Our job is to keep all of these servers alive,” he said. Patchett said Facebook is determined to be “fiscally responsible” in expanding more, if it does. “We don’t go just build willy-nilly, just ’cause we can,” he said. He said Facebook could build another data center near the one being completed if sufficient need for it becomes apparent. Carr, of EDCO, said most feedback he has heard from Crook County residents has been positive, although he knows some people there — as in any other place — dislike change in any form. But he believes when people come to see how a more diversified industry lineup can weather economic storms, they could come around and appreciate the addition of Facebook. “The reality is, a housing market decline — Facebook is going to be unfazed by that,” he said. Jordan Novet can be reached at 541-633-2117 or at jnovet@bendbulletin.com.

of the surface, they gathered data using lidar, which stands for light detection and ranging, according to the Oregon Lidar Consortium. It’s similar to radar, radio detection and ranging, and to sonar, sound detection and ranging, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. But lidar uses an aircraftmounted laser, which bombards the surface with light pulses and generates enough data to generate images showing ground vegetation, stream channels and faults, which might indicate geothermal sources. The detail in lidar images is light years ahead of regular aerial photos. Researchers have combined lidar data with gravity and magnetic measurements, which provide information about the rock structure below ground, and aerial surveys of mineral layers, which might indicate geothermal, according to project summaries. They will bring all the data together to locate the best spot for Ormat to drill two 3,000- to 4,000-foot test wells in the summer. If those results look good, the company plans to evaluate the development potential, according to the summary. Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@bendbulletin.com.

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70 Years of Hearing Excellence tion. While their research showed that wasps were undeniably learning and responding to chemicals and stimuli within their natural context, it was less clear whether they could learn to track things not found in their habitats: incendiary devices, say, or the chemicals typically used in arson. The answer: “We found they could detect almost anything.”

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Harnessing skills Then it became an engineering problem: how to design a tool that harnessed this insect’s skills in a way that people could easily use? That’s where Rains came in. “We devised a way of detecting the change in behavior of the wasps that would tell us when they detected an odor,” he says. “Pavlov’s dog, when you rang the bell, would always salivate. Well, wasps don’t salivate, but we found some specific behaviors they did do.” When wasps have been trained to associate a particular odor with a reward — a good, long drink of sugar water — they get excited when they smell it. “They really move around,” Lewis says. “Like pigs to a trough.” But unlike pigs, these adult wasps live only about three weeks. Building the Wasp Hound was a process of trial and error. The first device designed by Rains required the wasps to head toward the odor source by crawling through an opening equipped with an infrared signal that, when interrupted, would alert researchers that the odor was present. But the system didn’t provide immediate results necessary to track an odor to its exact location. “You could tell well before the wasps actually went in the hole that they’d discovered the odor,” Rains says. That prototype was scrapped, and another was designed. This one was equipped with a fan that pulls air into it. If being used in a hotel room, say, it would be aimed at the headboard of the bed, a common spot for bedbugs. A cartridge that contains five wasps is popped into the device. A camera tracks the wasps’ movements, and those images are fed into a software program that measures food-searching behavior — what nonscientists would call swarming. “It tells us, usually within about 20 seconds, if they’ve detected the odor,” Rains said. While they hope to eventually use the product for all kinds of detection — from forensics to food safety — they are counting on the furor surrounding bedbugs to encourage people to give their wasps a chance. A market price for the product has not yet been determined.

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S

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Golf Inside Luke Donald gets rare win at Match Play Championship, see Page D4.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2011

INSIDE

P R E P S P O R T S C O M M E N TA RY

NBA

Summit High draws a line in the snow H BEAU

igh school coaches on the east side of the Cascades from Pendleton to La Pine should be sending Summit athletic director and boys basketball coach Dan Munson their thanks right about now. Last Wednesday, Munson, whose team’s season came to an end Friday night in a second-round state play-in loss at Corvallis, stood his ground and refused to move the Storm’s Class 5A first round play-in game against Springfield to a neutral site. Springfield Public Schools did not

Portland Trail Blazers’ Andre Miller (24) drives past Atlanta Hawks’ Jeff Teague, right, as he is screened by Trail Blazers’ LaMarcus Aldridge (12) in the first quarter of Sunday’s game in Portland.

allow the Springfield High boys basketball team to travel to Bend — on either Tuesday or Wednesday — because of concerns about the wintery weather and potentially hazardous driving conditions over the mountain passes. Tuesday, if you remember, was the same day Redmond’s girls traveled to Springfield to play Thurston in a Class 6A Special District 1 seeding game. And the Panther boys trekked over the Cascades that same day to play at South Eugene in a similar league seeding contest. See Summit / D4

SPRING CLEANING

EASTES

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Summit High School track and field athletes, from left, Garrett Hardie, Zack Weishaupt, Michael Brown and Sarah Frazier help coach Dave Turnbull, back middle, and Bill Hardy, back left, clear the track of snow Sunday afternoon. Prep spring sports begin today and Turnbull noted that this year’s season is two weeks shorter, “So we can’t waste a day,” he said about getting practice opportunities.

CYCLING CENTRAL

MLB

Snider should be No. 1 in Dodgers’ hearts

Blazers’ rally falls short against Hawks Jamal Crawford scores 23 points to lead Atlanta over Portland, see Page D3 Hawks ..........90 Blazers .........83

Magic.........100 Bobcats .......86

Suns .......... 110 Pacers........108

Mavericks .. 114 Raptors ........96

Lakers ..........90 Thunder .......87

Rockets ........91 Hornets ........89

76ers ...........95 Cavaliers......91

Spurs ...........95 Grizzlies .......88

T’wolves ....126 Warriors.....123

Knicks ..........91 Heat .............86

B y Bill Plaschke Los Angeles Times

I

SKIING Riesch takes World Cup super-G title German skier beats Lindsey Vonn by .01 seconds in Sweden, see Page D5

AUTO RACING

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Cyclist Barbara Buchan stands inside Rebound Sports Performance Lab in Bend on Thursday, in front of a framed New York Times story featuring her. A longtime Bend resident and gold-medal winning Paralympic cyclist, Buchan is moving to Boise, Idaho, after the paracycling track world championships.

Bye-bye, Barbara Central Oregon cycling star Barbara Buchan is off to the paracycling world championships, then bound for Boise HEATHER CLARK

Jeff Gordon celebrates his win in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race at Phoenix International Raceway on Sunday in Avondale, Ariz.

Gordon goes back to victory lane Jeff Gordon gets his first NASCAR victory in 66 tries, see Page D4

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 College baseball ........................D2 NBA ...........................................D3 College basketball .....................D3 Golf ........................................... D4 Auto racing ............................... D4 NHL ...........................................D5 Skiing ........................................D5 Cycling Central.................... D5, 6

LOS ANGELES — n the most memorable line in one of the most memorable of baseball songs, he was third. Willie, Mickey and the Duke. On most lists of the greatest Dodgers in franchise history, he is also third. Jackie, Sandy and the Duke. In the wake of his death by natural causes Sunday at age 84, shouldn’t it finally be time for Duke Snider to stand alone? “He played every day, he did the job he was supposed to do, and did Duke Snider it better than anyone,” said former Dodgers Inside teammate Don • Duke Snider’s Newcombe. complete “That’s enough, obituary, isn’t it?” Page B5 It was more than enough, Snider quietly carving a legacy as perhaps the greatest Dodgers position player ever, one of the team’s greatest ambassadors, and a star who helped carry the team from Brooklyn to Los Angeles. The Hall of Fame center fielder’s accomplishments might not fit neatly into a song, but they are indelibly etched into a Dodgers’ culture that he was still actively nurturing as recently as two winters ago. The team was holding a rookie seminar at Dodger Stadium, and Snider, although ailing and confined to a wheelchair, traveled from San Diego to talk to the kids. “You have to learn to hate Halloween,” he told the wide-eyed youngsters. One of them had the nerve to ask why. “Giants colors,” he said. Even though Snider spent his retirement in San Diego County, he was always happy to hang out at Chavez Ravine, his presence an important symbol of those days when the players really did play for the name on the front of their shirt. “You cannot underestimate the impact Duke Snider has had on Dodger history, from Brooklyn to Los Angeles,” said Dodgers’ historian Mark Langill. “He is one of the links that will live forever.” Snider probably will forever lead the franchise in home runs (389), RBIs (1,271) and extra-base hits (814), yet one of his greatest achievements was simply being in the lineup for the opening of Dodger Stadium in 1962. See Snider / D6

C

entral Oregon’s most decorated cyclist is waving goodbye. No, not to the sport to which she has dedicated her life over the past 30 years — setting world records and accumulating armfuls of bling, including two Paralympic gold medals. In fact, this 54-year-old has no plans to scale back from national and international competition anytime soon. What Barbara Buchan is bidding farewell to is Bend, the community she has called home for more than two decades. Thankfully, we can cheer for her one last time as one of our brightest hometown cycling stars. This week, Buchan heads to Italy with 10 other members of Team USA for the Paracycling Track World Championships. There, she will compete on March 12 in the 3,000-meter pursuit — the event in which she claimed gold at the 2008 Beijing Games and in which she is the

reigning world champion — and on March 13 in the 500-meter time trial. She competes in the C2 division for cyclists with brain injuries or similarly challenging disabilities. (Riders are grouped into categories from C1 to C5, based on their injuries.) But when she returns to Bend after the world championships, she is packing her bags and heading to Boise, Idaho, the city where she graduated from high school and college, and where her cycling career began. She wants to be closer to family — her mother and her two sisters live in Idaho — and she can afford to buy a house there without being saddled with a mortgage. She’ll continue to work part time for Home Depot. In 1982, Buchan was a promising young cyclist making a bid for a spot on the U.S. Cycling Team when she was involved in a horrific, life-changing bicycle accident that left her unconscious and severely injured. Buchan spent two months in a coma, awakened with her arms locked and elbows fused in position, and went on to undergo five brain surgeries and years of rehab. See Barbara / D5

Buchan competes on the track during the 2008 Paralympic Games in Beijing. She would go on to win the gold in the 3,000-meter pursuit (on the track) and then again in the individual time trial on the road. Joe Kusumoto Photography


D2 Monday, February 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY BASEBALL Noon — MLB Spring Training, Chicago White Sox at Los Angeles Dodgers, MLB Network. 6:30 p.m. — MLB Spring Training, Washington Nationals at New York Mets (same-day tape), MLB Network.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Villanova at Notre Dame, ESPN. 4 p.m. — Women’s college, St. John’s at West Virginia, ESPN2. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, Kansas State at Texas, ESPN. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, Cal State Bakersfield at Gonzaga, FSNW.

HOCKEY 5 p.m. — NHL, Chicago Blackhawks at Minnesota Wild, VS. network.

TENNIS 6 p.m. — Paribas Showdown, Andre Agassi vs. Pete Sampras, ESPN2.

TUESDAY BASEBALL Noon — MLB Spring Training, Cincinnati Reds at Los Angeles Angels, MLB Network. 5 p.m. — MLB Spring Training, Detroit Tigers at Philadelphia Phillies (same-day tape), MLB Network.

SOCCER 2:30 p.m. — UEFA Champions League, Olympique de Marselle vs. Manchester United (taped), FSNW.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Illinois at Purdue, ESPN. 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Baylor at Oklahoma, ESPN2. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, Vanderbilt at Kentucky, ESPN. 7 p.m. — NBA, Houston Rockets at Portland Trail Blazers, Comcast SportsNet Northwest.

HOCKEY 4 p.m. — NHL, Buffalo Sabres at New York Rangers, VS. network.

RADIO TODAY BASEBALL 10 a.m. — Men’s college, Oregon State vs. UT-San Antonio, KICE-AM 940.

TUESDAY BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — NBA, Houston Rockets at Portland Trail Blazers, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B

BASEBALL MLB MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL All Times PST ——— Spring Training ——— Sunday’s Games Detroit 1, Toronto 0 N.Y. Mets 5, Atlanta 4 Pittsburgh 10, Tampa Bay 3 N.Y. Yankees 7, Philadelphia 3 L.A. Dodgers 5, L.A. Angels 0 Oakland 15, Chicago Cubs 7 Kansas City 4, Texas 2 Seattle 13, San Diego 12, 10 innings Cincinnati 7, Cleveland 6 Arizona 4, San Francisco 3 Minnesota 8, Boston 4 Today’s Games Houston vs Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Florida vs St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Philadelphia vs Toronto at Dunedin, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Pittsburgh (ss) vs Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Baltimore vs Pittsburgh (ss) at Bradenton, Fla., 10:05 a.m. N.Y. Yankees vs Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Minnesota vs Boston at Fort Myers, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Washington vs N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, Fla., 10:10 a.m. Kansas City vs Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Oakland vs L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Seattle vs San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox vs L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. San Francisco vs Milwaukee (ss) at Phoenix, 12:05 p.m. Cleveland vs Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Milwaukee (ss) vs Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Colorado vs Arizona at Salt River Community, Ariz., 12:10 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Toronto vs Detroit (ss) at Lakeland, Fla., 10:05 a.m. St. Louis vs Florida at Jupiter, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Tampa Bay vs Baltimore at Sarasota, Fla., 10:05 a.m. N.Y. Mets vs Washington at Viera, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Detroit (ss) vs Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Boston vs Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla., 10:05 a.m. N.Y. Yankees vs Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Atlanta vs Houston at Kissimmee, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Texas vs Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Cincinnati (ss) vs Oakland at Phoenix, 12:05 p.m. San Diego vs Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers vs Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Milwaukee vs Chicago White Sox at Glendale, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Cincinnati (ss) vs L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Arizona vs Colorado at Salt River Community, Ariz., 12:10 p.m.

GOLF WGC WORLD GOLF CHAMPIONSHIPS ——— Match Play Championship Sunday At The Ritz-Carlton Golf Club at Dove Mountain Marana, Ariz. Purse: $8.5 million Yardage: 7,791; Par 72 Final Seeds in Parentheses Luke Donald (9), England, def. Martin Kaymer (2), Germany, 3 and 2. ——— Consolation Matt Kuchar (13), United States, def. Bubba Watson (19), United States, 2 and 1.

PGA Tour

Cycling • Austrian cyclist Knopf gets four-year doping ban: Austria’s anti-doping agency has banned cyclist Michael Knopf for four years for supplying other riders with banned substances. NADA says there was “not sufficient” evidence that Knopf purchased or used forbidden drugs. Knopf, who can appeal the ban in court, and his KTM teammates Hannes Gruendlinger and Josef Kugler were barred from last year’s Tour of Austria after NADA opened proceedings against them for alleged infringements over the past five years. Earlier, NADA banned Gruendlinger for six years for buying, possessing, selling and using doping products, while Kugler received a two-year suspension for attempted blood doping.

Tennis • Del Potro wins first title since 2009 U.S. Open: Juan Martin del Potro won his first title in his first final since capturing the 2009 U.S. Open with a 6-4, 6-4 victory over Janko Tipsarevic on Sunday in Delfray Beach, Fla. The 22-year-old Del Potro, on the comeback trail after missing most of last season with a right wrist injury, looked fatigued throughout the finals of the Delray Beach International Tennis Championships. But he willed himself to victory over the erratic Tipsarevic, then thrust his arms in the air and kept kissing his wrist — almost in thanks for healing. “Three months ago I was thinking I’ll be trying to play tournaments,” Del Potro said. “Now I won a tournament. It’s great to win a tournament after a year.” Del Potro should make a big move from No. 166 when the next ATP Tour rankings are released. But he knows there is still a long way to go before he contends with top players again. The Argentine, who has eight career wins, reached the semifinals of San Jose and Memphis in advance of playing Delray Beach.

Track and Field • Suhr sets American record in pole vault: Granted a rare fourth attempt in her American-record bid in the pole vault, 2008 Olympic silver medalist Jenn Suhr cleared 15-feet, 11¼-inches Sunday in the USA Indoor Track and Field Championships in Albuquerque, N.M. Officials determined the bar was improperly set on her unsuccessful her third try, so Suhr got another opportunity and made good, upping her own mark of two years ago by an inch. “You”ll always take another jump if you can,” she said. “I knew I could make it. I know I was over it. It’s just a matter of figuring out the standards and poles. That’s the way it’s been all year and I finally nailed it this time.” Suhr’s record was one of two in the meet, after shot putter Jillian Camarena-Williams went 65-feet, 2¼ inches to break Ramona Pagel’s distance from 1987 by two inches. “I’m shocked,” Camarena-Williams said. “I’ve been training well, but you never expect that. I knew I had a big throw coming, but I didn’t know how big.”

Auto Racing • Lucas beats Top Fuel teammate at Winternationals: Morgan Lucas defeated Shawn Langdon in a matchup of former high school classmates in the Top Fuel final Sunday at the season-opening NHRA Winternationals in Pomona, Calif. Robert Hight won the Funny Car final while Jason Line won in Pro Stock. Lucas powered to a run of 3.835 seconds at 316.38 mph, while Langdon lost traction for a moment and slowed to a 4.047 at 313.73. The two Lucas Oil Racing teammates graduated in 2001 from Jurupa Valley High School in nearby Mira Loma, Calif. “I’ve never been in the points lead in Top Fuel before, and I don’t really even know how to feel right now,” Lucas said. “Getting to race my teammate Shawn, who I went to high school with, this is just a dream come true, it really is.” -from wire reports

Mayakoba Golf Classic Sunday At Mayakoba Resort, El Camaleon Golf Club Playa Del Carmen, Mexico Purse: $3.7 million Yardage: 6,923; Par 71 Final Round Johnson Wagner (250), $666,000 69-66-65-67—267 Spencer Levin (150), $399,600 68-67-67-65—267 John Cook (95), $251,600 70-68-66-66—270 Chris Stroud (70), $177,600 68-63-70-70—271 Rory Sabbatini (45), $121,175 69-69-68-66—272 David Toms (45), $121,175 66-70-69-67—272 Brian Gay (45), $121,175 69-68-67-68—272 Briny Baird (45), $121,175 67-70-66-69—272 Jarrod Lyle (45), $121,175 69-66-67-70—272 Bobby Gates (45), $121,175 70-68-64-70—272 Kent Jones (35), $92,500 67-68-69-69—273 Cameron Beckman (33), $85,100 67-70-66-71—274 Brett Wetterich (28), $65,367 69-68-69-69—275 Tom Lehman (28), $65,367 70-70-66-69—275 Kyle Stanley (28), $65,367 66-71-69-69—275 Billy Horschel (28), $65,367 70-65-70-70—275 Charles Howell III (28), $65,367 68-69-67-71—275 Jeff Quinney (28), $65,367 71-67-65-72—275 Fredrik Jacobson (24), $37,777 68-67-70-71—276 Jhonattan Vegas (24), $37,777 74-65-70-67—276 Jason Bohn (24), $37,777 72-68-65-71—276 Scott McCarron (24), $37,777 69-68-68-71—276 J.J. Henry (24), $37,777 69-69-67-71—276 William McGirt (24), $37,777 68-67-69-72—276 Cameron Percy (24), $37,777 68-66-70-72—276 Tom Pernice, Jr. (24), $37,777 69-68-67-72—276 Tommy Gainey (24), $37,777 68-68-68-72—276 Sunghoon Kang (24), $37,777 67-67-69-73—276 Jose Manuel Lara (0), $23,526 72-70-64-71—277 Tim Herron (20), $23,526 71-71-65-70—277 Colt Knost (20), $23,526 71-68-67-71—277 Steve Lowery (20), $23,526 72-65-68-72—277 Scott Verplank (20), $23,526 74-67-64-72—277 Joe Ogilvie (20), $23,526 71-70-68-68—277 Mark Hensby (17), $17,469 66-70-70-72—278 Alejandro Canizares (0), $17,469 74-67-66-71—278 Boo Weekley (17), $17,469 72-66-70-70—278 David Hearn (17), $17,469 69-70-69-70—278 Nick O’Hern (17), $17,469 70-69-70-69—278 Scott Gutschewski (17), $17,469 70-68-67-73—278 Richard S. Johnson (17), $17,469 68-71-74-65—278 Chad Collins (14), $13,690 72-68-68-71—279 Chris Riley (14), $13,690 70-67-71-71—279 D.J. Brigman (14), $13,690 70-71-67-71—279 Zack Miller (12), $10,834 73-64-69-74—280 George McNeill (12), $10,834 73-67-66-74—280 Craig Barlow (12), $10,834 71-68-71-70—280 Jonathan Kaye (12), $10,834 72-68-70-70—280 John Merrick (12), $10,834 68-70-65-77—280 Robert Gamez (9), $8,855 69-68-71-73—281 Kirk Triplett (9), $8,855 69-73-67-72—281 Jerry Kelly (9), $8,855 69-69-67-76—281 Alexandre Rocha (9), $8,855 67-74-69-71—281

Vanderbilt 74, South Carolina 60, OT Virginia 73, Virginia Tech 71, OT Wake Forest 100, N.C. State 94, OT EAST Drexel 58, Towson 47 Georgia St. 57, Northeastern 44 Hofstra 75, James Madison 73 Manhattan 57, Iona 51 Marist 60, Fairfield 45 Maryland 78, Boston College 69 Penn St. 66, Northwestern 56 Rider 62, Niagara 56 Saint Joseph’s 64, George Washington 49 Siena 40, Canisius 32 St. Peter’s 60, Loyola, Md. 57 Xavier 73, Temple 66

IN THE BLEACHERS

HOCKEY NHL

Jim Herman (9), $8,855 Fabian Gomez (9), $8,855 Will MacKenzie (7), $8,399 Michael Allen (7), $8,399 David Mathis (6), $8,140 Andres Gonzales (6), $8,140 Billy Mayfair (6), $8,140 Shane Bertsch (6), $8,140 Jim Renner (6), $8,140 Rod Pampling (4), $7,881 Nate Smith (4), $7,881 Joseph Bramlett (3), $7,733 Steven Bowditch (3), $7,733 Scott Gordon (1), $7,511 Justin Hicks (1), $7,511 Chris Tidland (1), $7,511 Charles Warren (1), $7,511 Jason Gore (0), $7,252 Kevin Chappell (0), $7,252 Woody Austin (0), $7,252 Kevin Stadler (0), $7,067 Nathan Green (0), $7,067

71-71-69-70—281 69-71-72-69—281 71-69-69-73—282 71-69-70-72—282 68-70-69-76—283 66-72-67-78—283 73-66-72-72—283 70-70-71-72—283 72-69-71-71—283 70-70-72-72—284 69-73-70-72—284 69-69-72-75—285 71-68-73-73—285 73-66-71-76—286 72-69-70-75—286 67-74-71-74—286 73-68-72-73—286 70-71-70-76—287 72-69-72-74—287 71-70-72-74—287 68-66-71-83—288 73-69-71-75—288

LPGA Tour HSBC Champions Sunday At Tanah Merah Country Club Singapore Purse: $1.4 million Yardage: 6,547; Par: 72 Final Karrie Webb, $210,000 70-66-70-69—275 Chie Arimura, $132,846 68-66-71-71—276 Yani Tseng, $96,370 70-72-69-67—278 Sun Young Yoo, $74,550 70-68-73-69—280 Morgan Pressel, $60,004 73-69-71-68—281 Na Yeon Choi, $49,094 69-71-71-71—282 I.K. Kim, $41,094 72-73-67-72—284 Catriona Matthew, $36,003 73-73-69-70—285 Stacy Lewis, $30,911 72-72-72-70—286 Cristie Kerr, $30,911 74-67-73-72—286 Song-Hee Kim, $25,528 79-68-70-70—287 Amy Yang, $25,528 73-72-72-70—287 Jiyai Shin, $25,528 71-72-73-71—287 Brittany Lincicome, $21,747 75-69-71-73—288 Ai Miyazato, $21,747 74-70-70-74—288 Christina Kim, $18,183 76-72-71-70—289 Candie Kung, $18,183 74-70-74-71—289 Suzann Pettersen, $18,183 73-74-70-72—289 Meena Lee, $18,183 71-72-73-73—289 Mika Miyazato, $18,183 72-72-70-75—289 Katherine Hull, $15,565 74-71-76-69—290 Hee Kyung Seo, $15,565 72-75-72-71—290 Karine Icher, $15,565 77-69-69-75—290 Maria Hjorth, $13,128 75-74-72-70—291 Azahara Munoz, $13,128 76-73-71-71—291 Lindsey Wright, $13,128 72-73-75-71—291 Paula Creamer, $13,128 76-70-72-73—291 Natalie Gulbis, $13,128 71-75-71-74—291 Karen Stupples, $13,128 70-70-77-74—291 Amy Hung, $10,764 73-73-74-72—292 Shanshan Feng, $10,764 71-77-71-73—292 M.J. Hur, $10,764 71-70-78-73—292 Anna Nordqvist, $10,764 74-73-72-73—292 Eun-Hee Ji, $9,673 72-76-71-74—293 Vicky Hurst, $9,128 72-72-79-71—294 Beatriz Recari, $9,128 75-70-76-73—294 Kristy McPherson, $8,219 76-74-75-70—295 Hee Young Park, $8,219 75-74-74-72—295 Jimin Kang, $8,219 76-73-73-73—295 Inbee Park, $6,982 74-72-77-73—296 Wendy Ward, $6,982 72-74-77-73—296 Angela Stanford, $6,982 73-73-75-75—296 Michelle Wie, $6,982 73-71-77-75—296 Hee-Won Han, $6,982 71-73-76-76—296 Stacy Prammanasudh, $6,073 76-71-78-72—297 Jessica Korda, $6,073 73-75-71-78—297 Momoko Ueda, $5,746 73-71-77-77—298 Haeji Kang, $5,418 74-77-74-74—299 Se Ri Pak, $5,418 76-71-77-75—299 Alena Sharp, $5,019 80-76-74-70—300 Na On Min, $5,019 81-73-71-75—300 Pat Hurst, $4,800 76-76-76-73—301 Seon Hwa Lee, $4,654 74-73-80-75—302 Amanda Blumenherst, $4,364 75-75-76-77—303 Gwladys Nocera, $4,364 73-77-76-77—303 Sophie Gustafson, $4,364 74-76-73-80—303 Kyeong Bae, $4,000 77-76-75-76—304 Brittany Lang, $4,000 77-73-76-78—304 Juli Inkster, $3,783 76-78-77-77—308 Shi Hyun Ahn, $3,601 74-77-81-77—309 Nicole Castrale, $3,601 76-74-79-80—309 Meaghan Francella, $3,491 74-80-82-77—313 Christabel Goh, $3,418 82-79-81-80—322

BASKETBALL Men’s college Sunday’s Games ———

FAR WEST Washington St. 80, Washington 69 MIDWEST Connecticut 67, Cincinnati 59 Marquette 86, Providence 62 Ohio St. 82, Indiana 61 Purdue 67, Michigan St. 47 W. Michigan 87, E. Michigan 60 Wisconsin 78, Northwestern 63 Xavier 66, Dayton 62 SOUTHWEST Stephen F.Austin 75, Texas A&M-Corpus Christi 68 SOUTH Florida Atlantic 74, South Alabama 64 Louisville 62, Pittsburgh 59, OT North Carolina 87, Maryland 76 EAST Albany, N.Y. 81, Maine 77, OT Boston U. 66, Vermont 64, OT Canisius 75, Loyola, Md. 58 Hartford 62, New Hampshire 54 Iona 74, Fairfield 69 La Salle 72, Massachusetts 51 Niagara 66, Manhattan 59 Rider 75, St. Peter’s 72 Siena 81, Marist 73 Stony Brook 67, Binghamton 42 West Virginia 65, Rutgers 54 PAC-10 STANDINGS All Times PST ——— Conference All Games W L PCT W L PCT Arizona 12 4 .750 23 6 .793 UCLA 12 4 .750 21 8 .724 Washington 10 6 .625 19 9 .679 Southern Cal 9 7 .562 17 12 .586 California 9 8 .529 16 13 .551 Washington St. 8 8 .500 18 10 .643 Oregon 7 9 .437 14 14 .500 Stanford 7 10 .411 14 14 .500 Oregon St. 5 11 .312 10 17 .370 Arizona St. 2 14 .125 10 18 .357 ——— Sunday’s Game Washington State 80, Washington 69 Tuesday’s Game x-Seattle at Stanford, 7 p.m. Thursday’s Games Oregon at Arizona State, 5:30 p.m. Oregon State at Arizona, 6 p.m. UCLA at Washington, 6 p.m. USC at Washington State, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Games Oregon at Arizona, 11 a.m. Oregon State at Arizona State, 1 p.m. UCLA at Washington State, 2:30 p.m. Stanford at California, 4 p.m. USC at Washington, 7:30 p.m. x=nonconference

Women’s college Sunday’s Games ——— FAR WEST Fresno St. 83, Hawaii 70 MIDWEST Illinois St. 87, S. Illinois 62 Indiana St. 64, Evansville 50 Iowa 93, Indiana 79 Michigan 58, Illinois 55 Michigan St. 65, Minnesota 51 Missouri St. 73, Creighton 65 Ohio St. 80, Wisconsin 47 Wichita St. 72, Drake 58 SOUTHWEST Alabama 92, Arkansas 79 Baylor 82, Oklahoma 81 Houston 74, Rice 70 SMU 70, UTEP 64 Texas A&M 68, Texas 65 SOUTH Davidson 88, Wofford 57 Duke 66, North Carolina 58 East Carolina 48, Marshall 44 Florida 74, Georgia 71 Florida St. 67, Clemson 50 Kentucky 76, Auburn 62 Longwood 47, Savannah St. 37 Memphis 59, UAB 45 Miami 70, Georgia Tech 59 Middle Tennessee 64, W. Kentucky 56 Mississippi St. 65, Mississippi 55 Old Dominion 70, Delaware 61 South Alabama 53, Florida Atlantic 40 Tennessee 80, LSU 60 Tulane 73, Tulsa 62 UCF 72, Southern Miss. 65 UNC Wilmington 74, George Mason 56 Va. Commonwealth 62, William & Mary 56

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Philadelphia 62 40 16 6 86 203 159 Pittsburgh 64 37 21 6 80 187 159 N.Y. Rangers 64 33 27 4 70 179 157 New Jersey 62 27 31 4 58 132 164 N.Y. Islanders 63 23 32 8 54 172 205 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 62 36 19 7 79 194 148 Montreal 63 33 23 7 73 165 164 Buffalo 61 29 25 7 65 176 177 Toronto 63 27 27 9 63 164 193 Ottawa 62 21 32 9 51 143 200 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Tampa Bay 62 37 18 7 81 191 190 Washington 63 33 20 10 76 168 161 Carolina 63 29 25 9 67 184 193 Atlanta 63 26 26 11 63 178 205 Florida 62 26 29 7 59 159 171 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 62 38 18 6 82 206 179 Chicago 62 33 23 6 72 198 171 Nashville 63 32 23 8 72 161 151 Columbus 61 31 24 6 68 170 181 St. Louis 62 28 25 9 65 173 180 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 63 39 15 9 87 208 150 Calgary 64 32 23 9 73 190 182 Minnesota 62 33 23 6 72 163 162 Colorado 63 26 30 7 59 183 217 Edmonton 63 20 35 8 48 158 211 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA San Jose 63 36 21 6 78 178 162 Phoenix 64 33 21 10 76 184 186 Los Angeles 62 35 23 4 74 174 149 Dallas 62 33 23 6 72 171 175 Anaheim 63 33 25 5 71 176 186 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Sunday’s Games Chicago 4, Phoenix 3, SO Tampa Bay 2, N.Y. Rangers 1 Nashville 3, Columbus 2 Atlanta 3, Toronto 2, OT New Jersey 2, Florida 1 Calgary 1, St. Louis 0 Boston 3, Edmonton 2 Anaheim 3, Colorado 2 Today’s Games Chicago at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Detroit at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Buffalo at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Washington, 4 p.m. Florida at Carolina, 4 p.m. Montreal at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Boston at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m. Calgary at St. Louis, 5 p.m. Dallas at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Nashville at Edmonton, 6:30 p.m. Columbus at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Colorado at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.

AUTO RACING NASCAR Sprint Cup Subway Fresh Fit 500 Sunday At Phoenix International Raceway Avondale, Ariz. Lap length: 1 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (20) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 312 laps, 144.9 rating, 48 points, $235,586. 2. (4) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 312, 119.6, 43, $210,016. 3. (28) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 312, 112.6, 42, $175,961. 4. (17) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 312, 104.5, 41, $163,996. 5. (14) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 312, 109.8, 40, $144,400. 6. (3) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 312, 104.8, 38, $119,733. 7. (18) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 312, 122, 38, $127,608. 8. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 312, 110.6, 37, $126,025. 9. (15) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 312, 93.1, 35, $118,586. 10. (35) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 312, 79.8, 34, $93,950. 11. (12) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 312, 95.4, 34, $123,000. 12. (24) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 312, 89.5, 33, $114,986. 13. (23) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 312, 84.2, 31, $84,300. 14. (7) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 312, 91.6, 30, $82,025. 15. (9) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 311, 76.4, 29, $97,408. 16. (29) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 311, 76.9, 28, $103,141. 17. (13) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 311, 79.8, 27, $71,575. 18. (27) Casey Mears, Toyota, 311, 60.8, 26, $72,250. 19. (22) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 311, 63.5, 25, $108,483. 20. (10) Greg Biffle, Ford, 311, 78, 24, $87,050. 21. (21) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 310, 64.1, 23, $97,020. 22. (30) David Gilliland, Ford, 310, 58.1, 22, $84,908. 23. (39) Bill Elliott, Chevrolet, 309, 52.3, 21, $83,108. 24. (36) Mike Skinner, Ford, 308, 51.5, 0, $66,700. 25. (42) Tony Raines, Ford, 306, 41.6, 19, $75,300. 26. (25) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 276, 55.2, 18, $77,550. 27. (16) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 260, 66.2, 17, $111,483. 28. (1) Carl Edwards, Ford, 252, 73.2, 17, $117,991. 29. (26) David Reutimann, Toyota, 246, 45.5, 15, $96,983. 30. (19) Brian Vickers, Toyota, 238, 64.2, 14, $96,139. 31. (41) Andy Lally, Chevrolet, 237, 35.4, 14, $78,285. 32. (31) Robby Gordon, Dodge, 236, 35.4, 12, $76,147. 33. (6) Joey Logano, Toyota, engine, 213, 47.9, 11, $74,425. 34. (5) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 213, 60.4, 10, $91,695. 35. (8) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, accident, 126, 57.9,

9, $103,839. 36. (11) David Ragan, Ford, accident, 125, 50, 8, $73,075. 37. (38) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, electrical, 72, 35.9, 7, $64,950. 38. (37) Landon Cassill, Toyota, brakes, 68, 34, 0, $64,800. 39. (40) Travis Kvapil, Ford, accident, 66, 39.4, 0, $64,675. 40. (33) Trevor Bayne, Ford, accident, 49, 39.5, 0, $72,500. 41. (34) Michael McDowell, Toyota, brakes, 43, 31.6, 4, $64,350. 42. (43) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, electrical, 27, 28.3, 2, $64,225. 43. (32) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, electrical, 22, 29.1, 0, $64,597. ——— Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 102.961 mph. Time of Race: 3 hours, 1 minute, 49 seconds. Margin of Victory: 1.137 seconds. Caution Flags: 8 for 43 laps. Lead Changes: 28 among 12 drivers. Lap Leaders: Ku.Busch 1-5; Ky.Busch 6-15; C.Edwards 16-22; Ku.Busch 23-31; D.Hamlin 32-35; A.Lally 36; M.McDowell 37; C.Edwards 38-51; Ku.Busch 52-68; D.Hamlin 69-73; R.Newman 74-76; J.Gordon 7787; R.Newman 88-91; T.Stewart 92-123; J.Gordon 124-128; T.Stewart 129-140; J.Gordon 141-173; T.Stewart 174-182; J.Johnson 183-189; J.Gordon 190-191; M.Kenseth 192-193; J.Johnson 194-204; J.Gordon 205-282; K.Harvick 283; J.Johnson 284; T.Stewart 285-290; Ky.Busch 291-303; J.Gordon 304-312. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): J.Gordon, 6 times for 138 laps; T.Stewart, 4 times for 59 laps; Ku.Busch, 3 times for 31 laps; Ky.Busch, 2 times for 23 laps; C.Edwards, 2 times for 21 laps; J.Johnson, 3 times for 19 laps; D.Hamlin, 2 times for 9 laps; R.Newman, 2 times for 7 laps; M.Kenseth, 1 time for 2 laps; K.Harvick, 1 time for 1 lap; A.Lally, 1 time for 1 lap; M.McDowell, 1 time for 1 lap. Top 12 in Points: 1. Ky.Busch, 80; 2. Ku.Busch, 77; 3. T.Stewart, 69; 4. A.Allmendinger, 69; 5. J.Gordon, 65; 6. M.Martin, 65; 7. B.Labonte, 64; 8. R.Newman, 64; 9. J.Montoya, 64; 10. D.Gilliland, 63; 11. P.Menard, 63; 12. C.Edwards, 59.

TENNIS ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— Delray Beach Championships Sunday Delray Beach, Fla. Singles Championship Juan Martin del Potro, Argentina, def. Janko Tipsarevic (6), Serbia, 6-4, 6-4.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Agreed to terms with C Tyler Flowers, INF Gordon Beckham, INF Eduardo Escobar, INF Brent Lillibridge, INF Brent Morel, OF Alejandro De Aza, OF Stefan Gartrell, P Anthony Carter, P Kyle Cofield, P Freddy Dolsi, P Lucas Harrell, P Gregory Infante, P Nate Jones, P Jeff Marquez, P Jhonny Nunez, P Chris Sale and P Sergio Santos on one-year contracts. OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Agreed to terms with RHP Andrew Bailey, 1B Daric Barton, LHP Jerry Blevins, RHP Trevor Cahill, INF Adrian Cardenas, OF Chris Carter, LHP Bobby Cramer, RHP Fautino De Los Santos, C Josh Donaldson, INF Sean Doolittle, LHP Pedro Figueroa, LHP Gio Gonzalez, RHP Trystan Magnuson, RHP Guillermo Moscoso, LHP Josh Outman, SS Cliff Pennington, C Landon Powell, INF Adam Rosales, RHP Tyson Ross, INF Eric Sogard and OF Michael Taylor on one-year contracts. SEATTLE MARINERS—Announced the retirement of OF Jody Gerut. National League HOUSTON ASTROS—Agreed to terms with INF Angel Sanchez on a one-year contract. MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Agreed to terms with RHP Mark Rogers on a one-year contract. SAN DIEGO PADRES—Agreed to terms with RHP Simon Castro, RHP Samuel Deduno, RHP Ernesto Frieri, RHP Luke Gregerson, RHP Jeremy Hefner, RHP George Kontos, RHP Mat Latos, RHP Evan Scribner, LHP Wade LeBlanc, LHP Cory Luebke, LHP Aaron Poreda, LHP Clayton Richard, LHP Joe Thatcher, C Nick Hundley, C Rob Johnson, C Luis Martinez, INF Kyle Blanks, INF Everth Cabrera, INF Jarrett Hoffpauir, INF Jeudy Valdez, OF Mike Baxter, OF Aaron Cunningham, OF Luis Durango, OF Cedric Hunter, OF Cameron Maybin, OF Eric Patterson and OF Will Venable on one-year contracts. FOOTBALL National Football League MIAMI DOLPHINS—Signed NT Paul Soliai to a franchise-tag contract. HOCKEY National Hockey League BOSTON BRUINS—Agreed to terms with D Shane Hnidy on a one-year contract. Signed RW Kirk MacDonald. CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Agreed to terms with D Brent Seabrook on a five-year contract extension. OTTAWA SENATORS—Re-assigned F Colin Greening, F Corey Locke and F Roman Wick to Binghamton (AHL). WASHINGTON CAPITALS—Assigned G Todd Ford to Hershey (AHL). American Hockey League BINGHAMTON SENATORS—Returned G Alex Petizian to Elmira (ECHL). CONNECTICUT WHALE—Released F Francis Lemieux and F Alexandre Imbeault and announced the will rejoin Florida (ECHL). HAMILTON BULLDOGS—Recalled G Peter Delmas from Wheeling (ECHL). MANITOBA MOOSE—Recalled G David Shantz from Victoria (ECHL). Released G Mike Mole. ECHL ELMIRA JACKALS—Signed F Devin Guy and D Leland Fidler. Loaned F Brock McBride and D Patrick Coulombe to Milwaukee (AHL), F Michael Dubuc to Rochester (AHL) and G Garrett Zemlak to Binghamton (AHL). Central Hockey League QUAD CITY MALLARDS—Activated F Jake Riddle from league suspension. TEXAS BRAHMAS—Waived F Chris Brassard. COLLEGE GEORGIA STATE—Fired men’s basketball coach Rod Barnes. Named assistant men’s basketball coach Paul Graham interim coach. MONMOUTH, N.J.—Announced the resignation of men’s basketball coach Dave Calloway.

COLLEGE BASEBALL

OSU beats Indiana at Kleberg Oregon takes series From wire reports CORPUS CHRISTI, TEXAS — Danny Hayes’ pinch-hit double drove in two in the eighth inning and gave the Oregon State baseball team a 7-5 victory over Indiana Sunday in the Beavers’ finale at the Kleberg Bank Classic. Hayes, pinch hitting for Luke Acosta, drove a two-run double to left with no outs, scoring Ryan Dunn and Parker Berberet, giving the Beavers at 6-5 lead. Two batters later, and with the bases loaded, Tyler Smith walked, giving the Beavers their final 7-5 lead. Cole Baylis picked up the win after working 1 2⁄3 scoreless innings. He walked one and struck out two to pick up his first win of the season. The three runs in the eighth erased a one-run lead for Indiana, 5-4, after seven innings. The Bea-

vers held a 4-3 lead after five but the Hoosiers scored runs in both the sixth and seventh innings to take the lead. The Beavers were led offensively by Berberet and Andrew Susac, who tallied two hits apiece. Berberet tied Hayes for the team lead with two RBIs apiece. Cam Booser started for the Beavers and went three full innings; he did not get the decision. Booser, making his second career start, allowed four hits and a run while striking out one. The Beavers improved to 4-3 this season with the win while Indiana dropped to 3-3. Oregon State plays in its final game in Texas today when OSU takes on UT-San Antonio at Wolff Stadium. First pitch is scheduled for 10 a.m. PST.

over Saint Mary’s From wire reports EUGENE — Christian Jones struck out a career-high 12 and the Oregon Ducks took advantage of two second-inning errors to squeak past Saint Mary’s, 3-2, on Sunday in front of 1,405 fans at PK Park. Jones (1-0) tripled his pervious best effort for strikeouts in a game, tossing seven innings and allowing one run on five hits and two walks. The sophomore southpaw, in his first year as a starter, had never pitched more than four innings for the Ducks (4-3). Kellen Moen recorded the final six outs for his second save, allowing just one hit — a solo

home run to Patrick Wisdom in the top of the eighth. After falling 3-2 on Friday night, the Ducks won the home series two games to one. UO blanked Saint Mary’s on Saturday, 3-0. Freshman Aaron Jones extended his hitting streak to seven games with a two-for-three afternoon. He was the only player on either team with multiple hits in the game, although he was thrown out leading off the third, trying to stretch a single into a double. Oregon’s opening homestand continues with a nonconference game against Portland on Tuesday at 5 p.m.


B A SK ET BA L L

THE BULLETIN • Monday, February 28, 2011 D3

Quick start leads Hawks over Blazers By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

Next up • Houston Rockets at Portland Trail Blazers • When: Tuesday, 7 p.m. • TV: Comcast SportsNet Northwest • Radio: KBND-AM 1110, KRCOAM 690

PORTLAND — Jamal Crawford had 23 points, including a key threepointer with 1:36 left, and the Atlanta Hawks held off a late rally by the Portland Trail Blazers for a 90-83 victory on Sunday night. Joe Johnson added 22 points and Atlanta led by as many as 23 in the sixth of a seven-game road trip. The Hawks are 3-3 on the trip, which wraps up tonight in Denver. Johnson’s three-pointer gave the Hawks an 80-60 lead with 5:54 left in the game, but the Blazers narrowed it to 82-74 after layups from LaMarcus Aldridge and Gerald Wallace. Andre Miller’s layup closed the gap further, capping a 16-2 run, the comeback stalled when Crawford’s threepointer put the Hawks up 85-78. Miller’s short jumper with 1:29 left was off, and Crawford hit a pair of free throws that all but sealed it. Miller led the Blazers with 20 points,

while Aldridge had 19. Josh Smith added 14 points and 11 rebounds for the Hawks. Kirk Hinrich had eight points off the bench in his second game with the Hawks. He was acquired along with Hilton Armstrong from the Washington Wizards for guards Mike Bibby, Maurice Evans and Jordan Crawford before the NBA’s trade deadline this week. The Blazers saw the debut of Wallace, who was acquired from Charlotte seven minutes before Thursday’s trade deadline in exchange for Portland centers Joel Przybilla and Sean Marks, forward Dante Cunningham and two conditional first-round draft picks. A fan in the crowd held a sign that said “Welcome Crash,” Wallace’s nickname. He received a standing ovation when he came into the game with 4:44 left in the first half. He finished with nine points. The Blazers also saw the return of center Marcus Camby from arthroscop-

ic surgery on his left knee. He missed 16 games after he was in Portland’s victory over Minnesota on Jan. 17. The 6-foot-11, 15-year veteran was the Blazers’ only option at center following the trade with the Bobcats. Portland beat the Denver Nuggets 107-106 on Friday without him, sliding Aldridge to center to make do. The Blazers got a scare when Aldridge left the game with 1:58 to go in the first quarter and appeared to be limping. The team’s top scorer with 22.5 points per game returned with 5:46 left in the half. Atlanta went on an 15-0 run to go up 42-27 with 3:14 left in the first half, while Portland struggled in Aldridge’s temporary absence. The Hawks led by as many as 15 points en route to a 4836 first-half lead. Blazers fans were upset about what appeared to be a disparity of calls for the Hawks. Atlanta made 14-of-16 free throws in the first half, while Portland was one for three.

Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press

Portland Trail Blazers’ Gerald Wallace (3) defends against Atlanta Hawks’ Josh Smith (5) in the second quarter during Sunday’s game in Portland.

NBA ROUNDUP

NBA SCOREBOARD

Anthony, Stoudemire lead Knicks to victory over Heat The Associated Press MIAMI — With the game on the line, LeBron James got past Carmelo Anthony. Not Amare Stoudemire, however. And just like that, the New York Knicks — with defense, no less — knocked off the Miami Heat. Chauncey Billups made the go-ahead three-pointer with 1:01 left, Stoudemire blocked James’ layup try with seven seconds remaining to protect a one-point lead, and the Knicks beat the Heat 91-86 on Sunday night. Anthony scored 29 points and Stoudemire added 16 points and 10 rebounds. Billups had 16 points for the Knicks, who rallied from a 15-point, first-half deficit and improved to 2-1 since the megatrade with Denver that dramatically changed their roster. James scored 27 for Miami, which had won seven straight at home. Chris Bosh added 20 points and 12 rebounds, and Dwyane Wade finished with only 12 points for the Heat. James had a chance to tie it, but missed a three-pointer with 2 seconds remaining, and the Knicks leaped in celebration. Miami is now tied with Chicago in the loss column, each with 17 in the tight race in the East. The Heat do have three more wins, but fell a half-game behind Boston for the top spot in the conference. And it was there for the Heat’s taking, after holding an 82-76 lead with four minutes left. Billups was charged with a technical after the Knicks argued Wade knocked the ball out of bounds, and Mike Miller hit the free throw. On the same possession, James had the ball knocked away by Anthony as the shot clock was expiring but still managed to muscle an attempt to the rim. Bosh got the rebound, quickly tossed the ball to James for a layup and a six-point Miami lead. New York, as it had all night, came back quickly. A 9-2 run over the next three minutes, capped by Billups’ three-pointer over Wade’s outstretched arm with 1:01 left, gave the Knicks an 85-84 edge — and few people in the sellout crowd remained seated at that point. Billups added a steal on the next Miami possession and set up Shawne Williams for two free throws and an 87-84 lead.

Alan Diaz / The Associated Press

New York’s Carmelo Anthony (7) shoots over Miami Heat’s LeBron James (6) in the first quarter of Sunday’s game in Miami, Sunday. James answered with two free throws, getting the Heat within one again. Bill Walker turned the ball over with 12.7 seconds left when he was unable to handle an inbound pass, and with that, Miami had its chance. James drove on Anthony down the left side of the lane, but Stoudemire swatted the two-time reigning MVP’s try away. Miller scored 10 for Miami. Walker had 10 for the Knicks, who won despite shooting 39 percent. It was the fourth and final regular-season meeting for the Knicks and Heat, and Wade could only point to one reason why Sunday night seemed so different. “Melo,” he said before the game. True, but the scene was anything but mellow. Predictably, it was a doublefeature of sorts — part showdown, part show. Knicks superfan Spike Lee was having a conversation with Landry Fields during pregame warmups. Actor Michael Clarke Duncan and soccer star Thierry Henry had prime seats, tennis star Venus Williams appeared and Miami’s notoriously late-settling crowd was in place in plenty of time to lustily boo New York’s starters as they were introduced. Oh, there was a game, too. And from the get-go, James

was in big-game mode. Williams blocked Erick Dampier down low 2 minutes into the game. No problem — James simply knocked the ball away from Stoudemire, then threw a nolook, backward-over-his-head pass to Dampier for a dunk. A minute later, James dribbled behind his back to get clear of Billups, slapped the ball to Wade, then received an alley-oop pass back and slammed it with his left hand. Also on Sunday: Lakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Thunder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 OKLAHOMA CITY — Pau Gasol had 18 points and 11 rebounds, Kobe Bryant scored 17 points and Los Angeles extended its cushion over Oklahoma City in the Western Conference standings by beating the Thunder. Suns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110 Pacers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 INDIANAPOLIS — Steve Nash had 10 points and 12 assists for the Suns, who tied it 99-99 on a three-pointer by Grant Hill with 44.4 seconds remaining in regulation to send the game to OT. Timberwolves . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 Warriors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 MINNEAPOLIS — Kevin Love had 37 points and 23 rebounds to extend his NBA-leading double-double streak to 46 games, and Minnesota snapped a seven-game skid. Rockets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91 Hornets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 NEW ORLEANS — Kevin Martin scored 33 points and Houston won its fourth straight. 76ers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Cavaliers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91 CLEVELAND — Elton Brand and Lou Williams scored 16 points apiece, and Philadelphia moved above .500 for the first time this season. Mavericks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114 Raptors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 TORONTO — Dirk Nowitzki had 31 points and 13 rebounds, Shawn Marion scored 20 and Dallas won its sixth straight. Magic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Bobcats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 ORLANDO, Fla. — Dwight Howard had 20 points and 10 rebounds to lead Orlando past Charlotte. Spurs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Grizzlies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 SAN ANTONIO — Manu Ginobili scored 18 of his season-high 35 points in the fourth quarter to rally San Antonio past Memphis.

SUMMARIES

76ers 95, Cavaliers 91

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Sunday’s Games

Atlantic Division

Knicks 91, Heat 86 NEW YORK (91) C.Anthony 10-22 8-9 29, Sha.Williams 1-4 4-4 6, Stoudemire 8-14 0-0 16, Billups 5-11 34 16, Fields 1-8 2-2 5, Turiaf 0-0 0-0 0, Carter 2-6 0-0 4, Balkman 0-1 0-0 0, Douglas 1-5 2-2 5, Walker 3-7 2-2 10, She.Williams 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 31-80 21-23 91. MIAMI (86) James 10-20 6-8 27, Bosh 8-15 4-4 20, Dampier 2-3 1-2 5, Chalmers 2-7 1-2 7, Wade 5-15 2-3 12, Miller 3-6 1-1 10, J.Anthony 1-1 1-2 3, Jones 0-2 0-0 0, House 1-5 0-0 2. Totals 32-74 16-22 86. New York 23 29 13 26 — 91 Miami 34 17 15 20 — 86 3-Point Goals—New York 8-30 (Billups 3-7, Walker 2-6, C.Anthony 1-4, Fields 1-4, Douglas 1-4, She.Williams 0-1, Sha.Williams 0-2, Carter 0-2), Miami 6-22 (Miller 3-5, Chalmers 2-4, James 1-5, Jones 0-2, House 0-3, Wade 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—New York 48 (Stoudemire 10), Miami 51 (Bosh 12). Assists—New York 17 (Sha.Williams 4), Miami 20 (Wade 9). Total Fouls—New York 20, Miami 18. Technicals—Billups, Miami defensive three second. A—19,702 (19,600).

Boston New York Philadelphia New Jersey Toronto

W 42 30 30 17 16

Miami Orlando Atlanta Charlotte Washington

W 43 38 36 26 15

L 17 22 23 33 43

Chicago Indiana Milwaukee Detroit Cleveland

W 40 26 22 22 11

L 17 32 36 39 48

Rockets 91, Hornets 89 HOUSTON (91) Budinger 3-8 1-2 8, Scola 3-13 0-0 6, Hayes 2-5 2-3 6, Lowry 7-14 0-0 18, Martin 8-15 13-13 33, Lee 3-4 1-2 9, Patterson 1-4 0-0 2, Miller 2-6 1-1 5, Williams 2-5 0-0 4, Hill 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 31-74 18-21 91. NEW ORLEANS (89) Ariza 6-12 0-0 13, West 9-14 4-4 22, Okafor 3-6 0-2 6, Paul 2-12 2-2 6, Green 4-11 1-1 10, Jack 1-4 3-3 5, Landry 6-11 1-2 13, Smith 0-0 0-0 0, Belinelli 6-8 0-0 14, Pondexter 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-78 11-14 89. Houston 21 19 22 29 — 91 New Orleans 27 28 17 17 — 89 3-Point Goals—Houston 11-26 (Lowry 4-8, Martin 4-8, Lee 2-3, Budinger 1-4, Williams 01, Miller 0-2), New Orleans 4-13 (Belinelli 2-2, Green 1-4, Ariza 1-4, Jack 0-1, Paul 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Houston 45 (Hayes 11), New Orleans 45 (Okafor 14). Assists—Houston 17 (Hayes 5), New Orleans 25 (Paul 12). Total Fouls—Houston 18, New Orleans 19. Technicals—Paul. A—17,466 (17,188).

Magic 100, Bobcats 86 CHARLOTTE (86) Jackson 13-22 6-10 35, Diaw 5-11 0-0 11, Brown 3-6 1-2 7, Augustin 4-10 2-2 11, Henderson 2-13 0-0 4, Przybilla 0-2 0-0 0, Carroll 1-5 0-0 2, Najera 1-3 0-0 2, Cunningham 1-2 0-0 2, Livingston 3-8 2-2 8, White 1-3 2-2 4. Totals 34-85 13-18 86. ORLANDO (100) Turkoglu 4-6 0-1 9, Bass 5-8 7-8 17, Howard 7-12 6-13 20, Nelson 6-11 0-1 13, J.Richardson 4-11 2-2 11, Anderson 2-9 0-0 6, Arenas 5-7 2-3 16, Redick 1-2 3-4 6, Clark 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 35-68 20-32 100. Charlotte 28 23 18 17 — 86 Orlando 30 29 21 20 — 100 3-Point Goals—Charlotte 5-16 (Jackson 3-5, Diaw 1-3, Augustin 1-5, Carroll 0-1, Henderson 0-2), Orlando 10-28 (Arenas 4-6, Anderson 2-8, Redick 1-2, Turkoglu 1-2, Nelson 1-4, J.Richardson 1-6). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Charlotte 51 (Diaw 9), Orlando 50

Pct .737 .526 .508 .288 .267

GB — 12 13 26 27½

L10 6-4 5-5 7-3 2-8 3-7

Str W-1 W-1 W-4 L-5 L-2

Home 25-5 16-12 19-9 13-15 11-20

Away 17-10 14-15 11-20 4-27 5-24

Conf 29-7 20-12 19-20 9-25 10-27

Away 21-11 15-13 19-14 10-19 1-28

Conf 29-10 25-11 24-12 15-22 10-27

Away 14-13 10-18 8-22 7-23 3-27

Conf 23-10 18-18 14-17 14-21 8-28

Southeast Division Pct .717 .633 .610 .441 .259

GB — 5 6½ 16½ 27

L10 7-3 7-3 5-5 5-5 2-8

Str L-1 W-2 W-2 L-1 L-5

Home 22-6 23-9 17-9 16-14 14-15

Central Division Pct .702 .448 .379 .361 .186

GB — 14½ 18½ 20 30

L10 7-3 5-5 3-7 3-7 3-7

Str W-2 L-2 L-2 W-1 L-1

Home 26-4 16-14 14-14 15-16 8-21

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division

Spurs 95, Grizzlies 88 MEMPHIS (88) Young 3-7 0-0 6, Randolph 7-25 9-10 24, Gasol 1-7 4-4 6, Conley 9-17 0-0 19, Allen 5-10 0-1 10, Battier 2-6 2-2 8, Mayo 0-3 0-0 0, Arthur 5-10 2-2 12, Williams 1-3 0-0 3. Totals 33-88 17-19 88. SAN ANTONIO (95) Jefferson 1-3 2-2 5, Duncan 3-8 6-6 12, Blair 4-5 0-0 8, Parker 1-3 0-2 2, Ginobili 10-22 13-16 35, Hill 4-12 4-5 14, Bonner 5-7 0-0 14, Anderson 1-4 0-0 2, McDyess 1-1 1-2 3, Quinn 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 30-65 26-33 95. Memphis 16 19 28 25 — 88 San Antonio 26 17 16 36 — 95 3-Point Goals—Memphis 5-11 (Battier 2-4, Randolph 1-1, Williams 1-2, Conley 1-3, Allen 0-1), San Antonio 9-21 (Bonner 4-5, Hill 2-5, Ginobili 2-8, Jefferson 1-2, Anderson 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Memphis 48 (Randolph 17), San Antonio 51 (McDyess 9). Assists—Memphis 20 (Gasol 7), San Antonio 22 (Ginobili 8). Total Fouls—Memphis 26, San Antonio 20. Technicals—Gasol, Memphis Bench, San Antonio defensive three second. A—18,581 (18,797).

L 15 27 29 42 44

San Antonio Dallas New Orleans Memphis Houston

W 49 43 35 33 30

L 10 16 26 28 31

Oklahoma City Denver Portland Utah Minnesota

W 36 34 33 32 14

L 22 26 26 28 46

L.A. Lakers Phoenix Golden State L.A. Clippers Sacramento

W 42 30 26 21 14

L 19 27 32 39 43

Pct .831 .729 .574 .541 .492

GB — 6 15 17 20

L10 8-2 9-1 3-7 6-4 7-3

Str W-3 W-6 L-1 L-1 W-4

Home 28-2 22-8 21-9 20-8 16-13

Away 21-8 21-8 14-17 13-20 14-18

Conf 31-5 24-8 18-19 19-18 17-21

Away 16-13 10-19 13-17 15-15 4-25

Conf 22-16 20-18 21-16 16-20 6-32

Away 21-11 13-14 7-19 5-24 7-21

Conf 24-11 16-17 16-21 14-24 8-26

Northwest Division Pct .621 .567 .559 .533 .233

GB — 3 3½ 5 23

L10 5-5 5-5 7-3 3-7 3-7

Str L-3 L-1 L-1 L-1 W-1

Home 20-9 24-7 20-9 17-13 10-21

Paciic Division Pct .689 .526 .448 .350 .246

GB — 10 14½ 20½ 26

L10 Str 7-3 W-4 8-2 W-3 5-5 L-3 2-8 L-4 2-8 L-2 ——— Sunday’s Games

Home 21-8 17-13 19-13 16-15 7-22

Suns 110, Pacers 108

Mavs 114, Raptors 96

Hawks 90, Blazers 83

DALLAS (114) Stojakovic 2-7 0-0 5, Nowitzki 11-20 7-10 31, Chandler 1-6 1-2 3, Kidd 2-5 0-0 6, Beaubois 2-6 0-0 5, Marion 10-17 0-0 20, Terry 7-13 34 19, Mahinmi 4-7 5-6 13, Barea 6-10 0-0 12, Stevenson 0-2 0-0 0, Cardinal 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 45-93 16-22 114. TORONTO (96) J.Johnson 4-12 0-0 8, A.Johnson 10-13 12 21, Davis 4-6 0-0 8, Calderon 7-10 0-0 15, DeRozan 7-16 5-5 19, Ajinca 2-4 1-2 5, Barbosa 3-10 1-2 9, Weems 1-3 0-0 3, Bayless 2-8 1-1 6, Alabi 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 41-84 9-12 96. Dallas 24 26 25 39 — 114 Toronto 30 27 15 24 — 96 3-Point Goals—Dallas 8-24 (Terry 2-2, Nowitzki 2-4, Kidd 2-4, Beaubois 1-3, Stojakovic 1-5, Marion 0-1, Mahinmi 0-1, Stevenson 0-2, Barea 0-2), Toronto 5-14 (Barbosa 2-6, Calderon 1-2, Weems 1-2, Bayless 1-4). Fouled Out— A.Johnson. Rebounds—Dallas 54 (Nowitzki 13), Toronto 46 (Calderon 8). Assists—Dallas 28 (Barea 9), Toronto 28 (Calderon 8). Total Fouls— Dallas 11, Toronto 22. Technicals—DeRozan. A—16,827 (19,800).

ATLANTA (90) M.Williams 3-5 5-5 11, Smith 4-14 6-8 14, Horford 2-5 2-2 6, Teague 1-4 0-0 2, J.Johnson 9-16 2-2 22, Pachulia 1-2 0-0 2, Hinrich 3-7 00 8, Crawford 5-13 9-10 23, Wilkins 0-2 0-0 0, Powell 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 29-69 24-27 90. PORTLAND (83) Batum 4-9 0-0 9, Aldridge 6-14 7-10 19, Camby 0-2 0-2 0, Miller 9-17 2-3 20, Matthews 4-10 3-3 12, Wallace 4-12 0-0 9, Roy 3-9 0-0 6, Fernandez 1-7 3-3 5, Mills 1-2 0-0 3. Totals 32-82 15-21 83. Atlanta 19 29 20 22 — 90 Portland 18 18 13 34 — 83 3-Point Goals—Atlanta 8-21 (Crawford 4-9, J.Johnson 2-2, Hinrich 2-4, Teague 0-1, M.Williams 0-2, Smith 0-3), Portland 4-21 (Mills 1-1, Wallace 1-1, Matthews 1-4, Batum 1-6, Miller 0-1, Roy 0-3, Fernandez 0-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Atlanta 58 (Pachulia 12), Portland 41 (Aldridge 8). Assists—Atlanta 16 (Smith 4), Portland 14 (Miller 4). Total Fouls—Atlanta 22, Portland 22. Technicals—Crawford, Atlanta defensive three second 2, Portland Coach McMillan, Portland defensive three second. A—20,642 (19,980).

Today’s Games Phoenix at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Atlanta at Denver, 6 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Sacramento, 7 p.m.

Chicago at Washington, 4 p.m. Boston at Utah, 6 p.m. Tuesday’s Games

Golden State at Indiana, 4 p.m. Dallas at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. San Antonio at Memphis, 5 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Minnesota, 5 p.m.

New York at Orlando, 4 p.m. New Orleans at Toronto, 4 p.m. Detroit at Milwaukee, 5 p.m. Houston at Portland, 7 p.m. All Times PST

GOLDEN STATE (123) Wright 7-20 8-8 26, Lee 7-12 6-8 20, Biedrins 1-4 0-0 2, S.Curry 13-21 2-2 33, Ellis 7-19 6-6 20, Amundson 2-3 0-0 4, Williams 2-4 0-0 6, Udoh 0-2 0-0 0, Law 0-3 0-0 0, Radmanovic 5-8 0-0 12. Totals 44-96 22-24 123. MINNESOTA (126) Beasley 12-23 0-0 25, Love 8-13 18-23 37, Milicic 2-3 0-0 4, Ridnour 5-16 1-1 13, Johnson 6-14 1-2 17, Hayward 1-4 3-4 5, Pekovic 4-5 3-3 11, Ellington 0-2 0-0 0, Flynn 1-4 0-0 2, Randolph 0-2 0-0 0, Tolliver 3-8 4-4 12. Totals 42-94 30-37 126. Golden State 41 32 16 34 — 123 Minnesota 32 37 35 22 — 126 3-Point Goals—Golden State 13-32 (S.Curry 5-7, Wright 4-12, Williams 2-4, Radmanovic 2-5, Ellis 0-4), Minnesota 12-25 (Johnson 4-9, Love 3-4, Ridnour 2-2, Tolliver 2-3, Beasley 14, Hayward 0-1, Flynn 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Golden State 43 (S.Curry 11), Minnesota 70 (Love 23). Assists—Golden State 21 (Ellis 8), Minnesota 23 (Flynn 9). Total Fouls—

L.A. LAKERS (90) Artest 5-10 0-0 10, Gasol 7-13 4-6 18, Bynum 5-7 6-8 16, Fisher 3-8 0-0 6, Bryant 8-22 0-0 17, Odom 4-7 0-2 9, Blake 2-3 0-0 5, Brown 3-6 2-2 9, Walton 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-76 12-18 90. OKLAHOMA CITY (87) Durant 8-20 5-6 21, Collison 2-4 1-2 5, Ibaka 3-7 0-0 6, Westbrook 8-16 5-6 22, Sefolosha 4-6 0-0 10, Harden 6-11 2-2 14, Aldrich 0-0 0-0 0, Maynor 0-6 0-0 0, Cook 3-6 0-0 9. Totals 3476 13-16 87. L.A. Lakers 22 29 21 18 — 90 Oklahoma City 28 28 13 18 — 87 3-Point Goals—L.A. Lakers 4-15 (Blake 1-1, Brown 1-1, Odom 1-2, Bryant 1-6, Artest 0-2, Fisher 0-3), Oklahoma City 6-16 (Cook 36, Sefolosha 2-2, Westbrook 1-1, Maynor 0-1, Harden 0-3, Durant 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—L.A. Lakers 42 (Gasol 11), Oklahoma City 48 (Ibaka 13). Assists—L.A. Lakers 19 (Bryant 7), Oklahoma City 17 (Westbrook 6). Total Fouls—L.A. Lakers 13, Oklahoma City 15. Technicals—Bryant. A—18,203 (18,203).

Golden State 24, Minnesota 23. Technicals—Lee. A—16,021 (19,356).

.A. Lakers 90, Oklahoma City 87 Philadelphia 95, Cleveland 91 Dallas 114, Toronto 96 San Antonio 95, Memphis 88 Atlanta 90, Portland 83

Timberwolves 126, Warriors 123

Lakers 90, Thunder 87

PHOENIX (110) Hill 14-26 2-2 34, Frye 5-11 1-2 14, Lopez 3-6 2-2 8, Nash 5-14 0-0 10, Carter 3-14 0-1 7, Gortat 8-14 1-4 17, Dudley 6-9 1-3 15, Brooks 1-2 1-1 3, Pietrus 0-2 0-0 0, Warrick 0-4 2-2 2. Totals 45-102 10-17 110. INDIANA (108) Granger 8-17 6-7 25, McRoberts 2-4 1-1 6, Hibbert 4-8 0-0 8, Collison 3-5 1-1 7, Rush 39 4-6 11, George 3-7 0-0 7, Hansbrough 5-11 3-4 13, Foster 2-4 0-0 4, Stephenson 0-0 2-2 2, D.Jones 3-10 0-0 7, Price 6-12 2-2 18. Totals 39-87 19-23 108. Phoenix 33 27 22 17 11 — 110 Indiana 29 22 21 27 9 — 108 3-Point Goals—Phoenix 10-27 (Hill 4-7, Frye 3-7, Dudley 2-3, Carter 1-4, Pietrus 0-2, Nash 0-4), Indiana 11-23 (Price 4-6, Granger 3-7, McRoberts 1-1, D.Jones 1-2, Rush 1-3, George 1-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Phoenix 57 (Gortat 11), Indiana 59 (Foster 12). Assists—Phoenix 29 (Nash 13), Indiana 19 (Granger 6). Total Fouls—Phoenix 23, Indiana 15. Technicals—Pietrus, Phoenix defensive three second, Indiana defensive three second. A—14,168 (18,165).

Phoenix 110, Indiana 108, OT Minnesota 126, Golden State 123 Orlando 100, Charlotte 86 Houston 91, New Orleans 89 New York 91, Miami 86

(Howard 10). Assists—Charlotte 14 (Augustin 4), Orlando 26 (Nelson 7). Total Fouls—Charlotte 22, Orlando 15. A—18,846 (18,500).

PHILADELPHIA (95) Iguodala 2-10 2-2 6, Brand 7-13 2-3 16, Hawes 4-7 0-0 8, Holiday 5-12 2-2 13, Meeks 5-8 2-2 14, Turner 5-8 0-0 10, Speights 0-3 0-0 0, Young 6-8 0-3 12, Williams 4-8 6-8 16. Totals 38-77 14-20 95. CLEVELAND (91) Eyenga 0-4 0-0 0, Jamison 7-14 2-2 16, Hickson 9-15 4-7 22, Sessions 6-13 8-11 20, Parker 1-8 0-0 2, Gibson 3-12 1-1 9, Samuels 5-8 2-4 12, Gee 1-4 2-4 4, Harris 1-1 0-0 3, Hollins 0-0 3-4 3. Totals 33-79 22-33 91. Philadelphia 22 27 26 20 — 95 Cleveland 23 20 21 27 — 91 3-Point Goals—Philadelphia 5-11 (Meeks 2-3, Williams 2-3, Holiday 1-2, Turner 0-1, Iguodala 0-2), Cleveland 3-14 (Gibson 2-6, Harris 1-1, Hickson 0-1, Eyenga 0-1, Jamison 0-1, Gee 0-1, Parker 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Philadelphia 48 (Brand 8), Cleveland 54 (Hickson 16). Assists—Philadelphia 21 (Holiday 9), Cleveland 20 (Sessions 10). Total Fouls—Philadelphia 27, Cleveland 17. Technicals—Hollins. A—19,882 (20,562).

Washington State stuns rival Washington The Associated Press

Ted S. Warren / The Associated Press

Washington’s Matthew Bryan-Amaning (11) looks on as Washington State’s Abe Lodwick (31), of Bend, grabs a rebound in the first half of Sunday’s game in Seattle.

SEATTLE — Somewhere in a week of meetings and assessment, honest accountability and motivational speeches, the same Washington State team that looked lost a week earlier found a needed spark. The Cougars discovered it just in time to stun their rivals and keep their slim postseason hopes alive. “There is not a better feeling in basketball than winning in your rivals’ gym and seeing their fans file out early,” Washington State’s Klay Thompson said. Thompson overcame a sloppy first half to score 26 points, DeAngelo Casto added 20 on the inside and Washington State completed the season sweep of Washington with an 80-69 victory Sunday night. Thompson came up big against the Huskies for the second time after scoring 25 in an 87-80 win last month in Pullman that started Washington on a costly three-

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP game skid. Now it was the Cougars (18-10, 8-8 Pac10) ending Washington’s hopes — however slim — of a Pac-10 regular-season title. It was equally impressive and stunning for the guys in crimson, who heard their pockets of fans chanting “Let’s go, Cougars!” in the final minutes while those in purple quietly filed out. The same Washington State team that had stumbled at last-place Arizona State just eight days earlier became the first road team to win on Washington’s home floor in more than a year, snapping the Huskies’ 14-game home winning streak. Also on Sunday: No. 2 Ohio State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82 Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 COLUMBUS, Ohio — Deshaun Thom-

as, last year’s Indiana Mr. Basketball, came out of a slump with 22 points to lead Ohio State past Indiana. No. 8 Purdue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 Michigan St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 EAST LANSING, Mich. — JaJuan Johnson had 20 points, a career-high 17 rebounds and seven blocks, leading Purdue to a win over Michigan State. No. 12 Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78 Northwestern . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 MADISON, Wis. — Jon Leuer scored 26 points as Wisconsin beat Northwestern in its regular-season home finale. No. 14 Connecticut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 Cincinnati . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 CINCINNATI — Kemba Walker scored 11 of his 16 points in the second half and the Huskies pulled away late to snap a

two-game losing streak. No. 16 Louisville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62 Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Kyle Kuric scored 12 points, including two big baskets in overtime, to lead Louisville past Pittsburgh. No. 19 North Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87 Maryland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76 CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — Tyler Zeller scored 25 points while freshman Harrison Barnes had 21 to help North Carolina beat Maryland, pulling the Tar Heels into a tie with Duke atop the Atlantic Coast Conference. No. 25 Xavier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Dayton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62 DAYTON, Ohio — Tu Holloway scored 26 points, hitting the biggest shots down the stretch and helping Xavier beat Dayton to remain alone atop the Atlantic 10.


D4 Monday, February 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Summit

GOLF ROUNDUP

Matt York / The Associated Press

Luke Donald, of England, tosses his ball into the gallery after defeating Martin Kaymer, of Germany, 3 and 2 in the finals of the Match Play Championship golf tournament Sunday in Marana, Ariz.

Donald takes MPC title The Associated Press MARANA, Ariz. — Luke Donald had only two wins around the world in the last five years, so not many would have given him a snowball’s chance in Arizona of winning the Match Play Championship. Turns out be he was more unbeatable than anyone in the 13year history of the tournament. When he polished off Martin Kaymer on the 16th hole Sunday, Donald became the first player to go an entire week without trailing in any match. He played only 89 holes in six matches, another record, and led after 81 of them. And he was so dominant he became the first player to win any golf tournament without ever playing the 18th hole. Ultimately, all that mattered to Donald was simply winning. “To come here and beat the top 63 players in the world is very gratifying,” Donald said after his 3-and-2 victory. “It’s been an amazing week. I had a lot of good things happen — made a bunch of birdies, never trailed in a match. Kind of one of those weeks where a lot of things went my way.” On a bizarre day in the high desert, which began with snow covering the fairways and featured a 10-minute delay when sleet coated the fourth fairway, Donald spoiled Kaymer’s rise to No. 1 in the world with a victory that was a long time coming. It had been five years since he last won on American soil. A

year ago, Donald had 10 finishes in the top three with only one trophy to show for it, against a weak field at the Madrid Masters. But with a flawless short game that stacks up to anyone at the moment, Donald picked up his first World Golf Championship and moved to a career-best No. 3 in the world. “My goal every year is to win,” said Donald, who made 32 birdies this week. “It’s a long time since I’ve tried to play for money. I felt like I hadn’t won my fair share for as good a player as I felt I was and could be. It was frustrating to me. “To come here and compete against the best players in the world and win the trophy is very gratifying.” The consolation prize for Kaymer was going to No. 1, which he assured by reaching the championship match. The 26-year-old German becomes only the 14th player to reach the top. “It was a very good week for me,” Kaymer said. “Of course, I was hoping to win today. I was trying everything I could. I just didn’t play as good as the last few days. And the way Luke plays, even a decent round isn’t enough.” The match was all square going to the back nine when Donald made a marvelous up-anddown from the waste area short of the 10th green to avoid falling behind for the first time all week. He won the next two holes, and Kaymer couldn’t catch him. Matt Kuchar defeated Bubba Watson in the consolation match

and will go to No. 10 in the world. The next world ranking will be Kaymer, Lee Westwood, Donald and Graeme McDowell. It’s the first time since March 15, 1992, that the top four spots have been occupied by Europeans. “We’ve really had a purple patch on world golf,” Donald said. “Having Lee become No. 1 a few months ago, now Martin No. 1, obviously Graeme has been playing great, and to make a jump like this ... whether I deserve No. 3 in the world, I don’t know. But certainly in terms of my work ethic and wanting it, then I do deserve it.” Also on Sunday: Wagner wins PGA title in playoff PLAYA DEL CARMEN, Mexico — Johnson Wagner won the Mayakoba Golf Classic for his second PGA Tour title, beating Spencer Levin with a par on the first hole of a playoff. Wagner, also the 2008 Houston Open winner, closed with a 4-under 67 to match Levin at 17under 267 on the Greg Normandesigned El Camaleon course. Levin shot a 65. Late birdies lift Webb to win SINGAPORE — Karrie Webb surged ahead with four straight birdies on the back nine and held off Japan’s Chie Arimura for a one-shot victory at the HSBC Women’s Champions. The 36-year-old Webb, who earned $210,000 for the victory, was even on the front nine and bogeyed No. 10 before the string of birdies on Nos. 11-14 at Tanah Merah Country Club.

Continued from D1 Despite pleas from Springfield coach Grant McHill and the school’s athletic director, Audrea Shelley, the district chose to have the team forfeit rather than send it to Bend. “I feel horrible for the Springfield seniors,” Munson said Wednesday after the forfeit was official. “But tons of other teams at lower classifications traveled those days.” Springfield officials suggested moving the game to a neutral site — The Dalles or Sweet Home. One last-ditch idea was for Springfield and Summit to play in Corvallis on Friday night, with the winner of that game then playing Corvallis High on Saturday as the play-in plan dictated. Springfield even asked Summit to travel over the pass and play at Springfield High on Wednesday. Apparently, the road conditions were dangerous only for eastbound traffic. Must be something to do with La Nina. “I felt a little bad,” Munson said about not agreeing to move the game site. “But how can I get on a bus and tell the parents of my kids it’s not safe enough for them (Springfield) to come over, but it is for us?” The most ridiculous part about the forfeit was that Marshfield High out of Coos Bay came from the exact same direction as Springfield on Wednesday for a Class 5A girls play-in game at Bend High. The only difference was that Marshfield had to travel an additional 115 miles from the coast to get to Springfield, and then make its way over the mountains, via Santiam Pass. “For whatever reason, the higher-ups at Springfield were more conservative,” Munson said. “(Springfield) should have come Tuesday. They could have come (Wednesday) but they chose not to. … The way things lined up, there was no out for those guys.” When Springfield refused to travel for the second day, the matter went to representatives from Class 5A’s seven different leagues. The reps voted 7-0 to award Summit a victory by forfeit if Springfield did not travel to Bend on Wednesday. “We fought and we fought,” said McHill, Springfield’s firstyear coach. “My A.D. was on the phone for two straight days trying to figure out how to get there. It was a safety issue, and the district didn’t want to take a chance.” Was it really a safety issue, though? For years, Central Oregon teams have been expected to make travel concessions to Portland-area and Willamette Valley teams. When the Oregon School Activities Association placed Redmond in the Salembased Central Valley Confer-

Playoff lineup announced for eight area hoop teams E ight Central Oregon high school basketball teams will be in state playoff action this week, and seven of them are just one win away from securing a berth in their respective state tournaments. The Oregon School Activities Association on Sunday announced seedings and pairings for the upcoming playoffs. Following is a breakdown of the games involving Central Oregon teams, with seedings in parentheses. Game times are to be announced.

CLASS 6A GIRLS Wednesday • Redmond (No. 7) plays at Beaverton (No. 2); winner advances to second round of playoffs on Saturday. Second-round winners advance to state tournament. (6A girls state championship tournament March 10-12 at Rose Garden Arena, Portland.)

CLASS 5A GIRLS Saturday • Mountain View (No. 4) hosts Marist (No. 5) of Eugene; winner advances to state tournament. (5A girls state championship tournament March 10-12 at Matthew Knight Arena, Eugene.)

CLASS 4A GIRLS Saturday • Madras (No. 2) hosts Siuslaw (No. 7) of Florence; winner advances to state tournament. • Crook County (No. 7) plays at Central (No. 2) of Independence; winner advances to state tournament. (4A girls state championship tournament March 9-11 at Gill Coliseum, Corvallis.)

CLASS 5A BOYS Friday • Bend (No. 1) hosts Marist (No. 8) of Eugene; winner advances to state tournament. • Mountain View (No. 2) hosts Sherwood (No. 7); winner advances to state tournament. (5A boys state championship tournament March 9-12 at Matthew Knight Arena, Eugene.)

CLASS 4A BOYS Friday • Sisters (No. 6) plays at Tillamook (No. 3); winner advances to state tournament. • Madras (No. 7) plays at Cottage Grove (No. 2); winner advances to state tournament. (4A boys state championship tournament March 8-11 at Gill Coliseum, Corvallis.) ——— For complete OSAA state basketball playoff listings, go to osaa.org/ basketball.

ence five years ago, the move prompted a lawsuit filed by Salem schools who argued that they did not want to travel to Central Oregon. But Bend-area schools up until this school year were expected to regularly travel for league contests more than five hours to Pendleton and Hermiston on one of the state’s most dangerous roads, U.S. Highway 97. The logic seemed to be that because Central Oregon schools had historically gotten the short end of the stick, it was all right to give them the shaft again. Which brings us back to Munson. Summit’s fourth-year coach is a competitor who had no desire to win a game by forfeit. He wanted to play. But imagine the slippery slope that might have developed had he

gone along with Springfield’s request. How many teams in the future would play the “safety” card when scheduled to travel over the Cascades if a precedent had been set by Summit for moving contests because of questionable travel conditions? This was not an issue just for Summit or for Central Oregon high schools, but for any school in the eastern part of the state. “If I try and accommodate (Springfield),” Munson said, “then nothing is stopping people from not coming here to play.” Send letters of gratitude to Dan Munson, C/O Summit High. Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@ bendbulletin.com.

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AUTO RACING: NASCAR

Every Saturday

Jeff Gordon ends winless streak at 66 races set by Edwards in the fall. Conditions were a little different for Sunday’s race. A big storm came through the Valley of the Sun overnight, leaving a dusting of snow on the mountains above the track and washing away all the rubber that had built up on the track the previous two days. That meant a change in setups for all the

By John Marshall The Associated Press

AVONDALE, Ariz. — Just before peeling off what he called a lame burnout near the finish line, Jeff Gordon screamed into his radio, the emotion pouring out with his voice. “We just beat Kyle Busch!” he yelled. Gordon did much more than that. He was headed back to Victory Lane, the longest winless streak of his career finally in the rearview mirror. Overcoming a slew of potentially disastrous incidents, Gordon passed Kyle Busch with eight laps left and stretched his lead from there, ending his winless streak at 66 races Sunday at Phoenix International Raceway. “It feels so amazing. I can’t tell you how amazing this feels,” Gordon said. “It’s been a long time, I know, and I’m going to savor this one so much.” PIR has been the place to end long winless streaks lately. Ryan Newman halted a 77-race checkerless streak at PIR in the spring and Carl Edwards stopped his run at 70 races without a win in the fall. Gordon, a four-time series champion, was mired in a drought that seemed inexplicable for one of NASCAR’s most successful and popular drivers. Even in ending it, it wasn’t easy. Coming off a disappointing Daytona 500, Gordon struggled in qualifying and started 20th. Early in the race, he was knocked into the wall by Edwards and later had to avoid a massive wreck that led to a 14-minute red flag. He also had to pull behind another car to shake loose a piece

teams, more grip for the tires and, fitting for the way the weekend went, more speed.

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SAFEWAY GIFT CARD DRAWING! Ross D. Franklin / The Associated Press

Jeff Gordon celebrates his win in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race in Avondale, Ariz., on Sunday. of debris from his grill and fight his way back to the front after a slow pit stop late in the race. Gordon still managed to lead a race-high 138 laps and was able to pull alongside then bump Busch out of the way to win for the first time since April 2009 at Texas. It was his 83rd career victory, tying him with Cale Yarborough for fifth all-time. “He was on a mission today, that’s for sure,” said Busch, who held on for second to fall just short of winning all three NASCAR races in the same weekend for the second time in his career. “When Jeff Gordon has a good car and he’s got the opportunity to beat you, he’s going to beat you, there’s no doubt about that. He’s my hero and I’ve always watched him and what he’s been able to

accomplish over the years, so it’s no surprise that he beat us.” Jimmie Johnson, Kevin Harvick and Ryan Newman rounded out the top five in a 312-lap race around PIR’s mile oval, the last on the current surface. The quirky old track will undergo a $10 million repaving and reconfiguration project before the fall race, a move that isn’t popular with many of the drivers. The old bump-and-crack-filled surface held up well in its final weekend with a flurry of records. Clint Bowyer set the qualifying mark in trucks on Friday, then Busch did it in Nationwide on Saturday. Edwards set a new Sprint Cup qualifying record at the track, hitting 137.279 mph to barely edge Kurt Busch on a day when 15 drivers eclipsed the previous record

Our January Winner, Georgeann Berman Won A $250 Safeway Gift Card! Winner Georgeann with Safeway Store Manager Bart Scrivner at the Bend Safeway on Third Street.

Watch for The Bulletin Kiosk at your local Safeway to enter.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, February 28, 2011 D5

SKIING ROUNDUP

Riesch wins women’s World Cup super-G The Associated Press

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Barb Buchan is stabilized by her coach Bart Bowen during a training session on rollers Thursday at Rebound Sports Performance Lab in Bend.

Barbara Continued from D1 She returned to the world of elite sports and competed in the 1988 and 1992 Paralympic Summer Games as a runner. Cycling was added as a Paralympic event for the 2004 Athens Games, and Buchan placed fourth in the cycling time trial. Four years later, she became an international sports figure when she twice claimed gold at the Beijing Olympics. Throughout her cycling career, Buchan has collected countless national and world championship medals both on the track and on the road. “Going to Beijing was the highlight of my life,” says Buchan, who moved to Central Oregon in 1990. “Bringing back two gold medals to Bend was a moment that I will always cherish. I appreciate all the support and love from such a great community.” In preparation for the track world championships next week, Buchan has for several months made twice-monthly trips to Southern California to train with the national team on the Olympic-size indoor velodrome there. But recently she has encountered some challenges on the bike. She’s had difficulty keeping her balance on the track, and she loses control of her right arm, which slips off the handlebars unexpectedly — lasting effects of her 1982 injury. Consequently, she has experienced several hard falls. “She’s dealing with a disability, and with that comes challenges in everyday life, and riding a bicycle is one of them,” says Craig Griffin, high performance director for the U.S. Paracycling Team. “(Track events) start from a standstill and you have to accelerate. The velodrome is banked and she has balance issues, and she’s been slipping off the track.” Back at home in Bend, Buchan trains almost daily with her cycling coach, Bart Bow-

Alexander F. Yuan / The Associated Press ile

Barbara Buchan waves during the medal ceremony after winning the gold medal in the women’s individual pursuit in track cycling at the Beijing Paralympics on Wednesday. It was Buchan’s first gold in the five Paralympics in which she has competed after a horrific crash in 1982 changed her life forever. en of Rebound Sports Performance Lab, to improve her strength and balance. According to Bowen, even after 30 years on the bike, Buchan doesn’t appear to be losing her firepower. “Barb can always push hard; she’s definitely a competitor,” Bowen says. “But for her, it’s

not about how hard she can go. It’s about how hard she can go and still stay upright on the track. That’s her biggest hurdle.” To reclaim her title as world champion in the pursuit in Italy, the reigning world champ will need to post a top-four qualifying time to reach the finals. Despite the recent setbacks, Buchan remains both committed and motivated to compete on the world stage. She even has her sights set on reaching the London Paralympic Games in 2012. She also remains a role model, a source of inspiration and an influential leader of the U.S. Paracycling Team, says Griffin, who notes that Buchan is the oldest member of the team by 15 years. “She’s still in her prime,” he continues. “She’s kind of timeless in that her performance has been consistent over the eight years. We really haven’t seen a decline in her performance related to age.” After Buchan moves to Boise, she and Bowen plan to continue working together — via e-mail, internet training programs and phone calls. With a rigorous training schedule over the past few months and the world championships on the horizon, Buchan has had little time to stop and think about what it means to leave Central Oregon and her vast network of friends and supporters who live here. “I’m sure it’ll hit me,” she said. Though she’ll have a new address come spring, what is not likely to change is Buchan’s passion for cycling, and the unprecedented cycling legacy she developed during her time spent in Central Oregon. “She’ll probably always ride a bike,” Griffin maintains. “It’s her life, her passion, her lifestyle. Whether she’s on the (U.S. Paracycling) team or not, she’ll still be riding.” Heather Clark can be reached at cyclingcentral@bendbulletin.com.

ARE, Sweden — Maria Riesch of Germany beat Lindsey Vonn by one hundredth of a second to win a World Cup super-G race on Sunday and extend her overall lead over her American rival. Vonn watched at the bottom of the Olympia course in the Swedish resort of Are as Riesch flew over the final jump, then gave a wry smile as Riesch clinched victory. Riesch pumped her fist in delight and let out a loud yell. “I’m also really happy that I can be back on the top of the podium in super-G as well. My last win in super-G (was) three years ago,” Riesch said. “I was having a hard time inbetween in super-G. Finally I’m back and ready to win the speed events. That’s good.” Vonn won Saturday’s downhill for her 40th World Cup race win. “I thought I skied a good race. I was happy with my run and unfortunately I lost by one hundredth of a second, which is a snap of your finger,” Vonn said. “That’s life.” Riesch won in 1 minute, 13.24 seconds for her sixth race win of the season. It was her first of the season in super-G and the 26-year-old has now won races in four different disciplines this season. “It’s definitely frustrating, especially at this time of the year, with the overall World Cup so tight,” Vonn said. “One hundredth (costs you) twenty points. It would have been great if we could have just tied.” “I mean, one hundredth is nothing,” she added. “You can find it from any place, whether it’s pushing out from the start or reaching out for the finish line a bit more.” Julia Mancuso of the United

Janerik Henriksson / The Associated Press

U.S. skier Lindsey Vonn, left, speaks to winner Maria Riesch on the podium after the women’s World Cup super-G ski race in Are, Sweden, Sunday. States was .79 back in third place ahead of Austria’s Nicole Hosp, who was .81 behind Riesch. Also on Sunday: Matt wins World Cup slalom BANSKO, Bulgaria — Austrian veteran Mario Matt protected his lead from the first run to win a men’s slalom race for his first World Cup victory in nearly two years. Matt held a narrow lead over Reinfried Herbst after the first leg and clocked 1 minute, 50.35 seconds to hold off his fellow Austrian by 0.04 seconds. World champion Jean-Baptiste Grange of France climbed from seventh to third, finishing 0.48 back.

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Surging Blackhawks beat Coyotes in shootout The Associated Press CHICAGO — Jonathan Toews is on a roll, and so are the Chicago Blackhawks. Toews scored twice in regulation and had the lone goal in the shootout to lead the Chicago Blackhawks over the Phoenix Coyotes 4-3 on Sunday night for their fourth straight victory. Marian Hossa also scored for Chicago, which improved to 6-12 in its last nine games despite squandering a pair of two-goal leads. Toews, Chicago’s captain, has points in five straight games, with three goals and four assists during that span. The timing couldn’t be better as the defending Stanley Cup champions try to maneuver back into playoff position in the congested Western Conference standings. “We’ve come out with great starts the last couple of games,” Toews said. “It’s right there in front of us. We’ve got to carry that effort right through to the third.” After building 2-0 and 3-1 leads, the Blackhawks were caught in the second when Phoenix’s Adrian Aucoin, Keith Yandle and Martin Hanzal scored to tie the game at three after 40 minutes. The Blackhawks, however, regrouped in the scoreless third before Toews won it in the shootout. He converted Chicago’s first attempt against Ilya Bryzgalov, while Blackhawks goalie Corey Crawford stopped Scottie Upshall, Radim Vrbata and Kyle Turris. “We’ve had a lot of similar games,” Toews said. “You’ve got to be confident going into the third period. That’s what we’ve told ourselves.”

NHL ROUNDUP Crawford made 26 saves in regulation, while Bryzgalov stopped 38 shots for the Coyotes. “We had a great first period, a lot of momentum,” Chicago coach Joel Quenneville said. “We lost a little of it at the end of the second, but had a good third period. “Crow (Crawford) was solid in the shootout. A couple of goals, we screened him ourselves.” The Coyotes are 0-2-1 following an eight-game winning streak, but were happy to come up with a point as they finished a five-game road trip. “It was huge for us to get at least one point and give ourselves an opportunity to get two in the shootout,” Yandle said. “But they’ve got a pretty highskill team, and they’re tough to beat in the shootout. “Just for us to get one point out of that game, being down, it’s a big moral victory for us.” The Blackhawks agreed to a five-year contract extension with defenseman Brent Seabrook earlier in the day. The deal reportedly will pay $5.8 million annually to the 25-year-old, Chicago’s No. 2 defenseman behind Norris Trophy winner Duncan Keith. Toews scored twice in the first period as Chicago dominated the first 20 minutes. His shot from a sharp angle off the right wing boards slipped through several players and past Bryzgalov just 2:52 in to open the scoring. Also on Sunday: Lightning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Rangers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 NEW YORK — Martin St. Louis had a goal and an assist, and Vincent Lecavalier snapped

a third-period tie during a twoman power play to lift Tampa Bay to a 2-1 victory over New York in the Lightning’s first road game in more than a month. Predators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Blue Jackets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 NASHVILLE, Tenn. — David Legwand capped Nashville’s three-goal third period with the go-ahead score with 1:35 remaining to lead the Predators over Columbus. Thrashers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Maple Leafs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ATLANTA — Ron Hainsey scored from the edge of the left circle in overtime and Atlanta beat Toronto to snap a five-game winless streak. Devils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Panthers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 SUNRISE, Fla. — David Clarkson and Brian Rolston scored goals and Martin Bro-

deur stopped 25 shots in his return from injury as New Jersey beat Florida. Ducks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Avalanche . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Todd Marchant snapped a 70-game goal drought, Brandon McMillan got the go-ahead score during a four-minute power play with 8:37 remaining and Anaheim ended a five-game losing streak with a victory over Colorado. Bruins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Oilers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 EDMONTON, Alberta — Michael Ryder had a goal and an assist to send surging Boston to yet another win on the road, over Edmonton. Flames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Blues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 CALGARY, Alberta — Miikka Kiprusoff made 27 saves for his fifth shutout of the season and David Moss scored the only goal and Calgary defeated St. Louis.

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D6 Monday, February 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

CYCLING INSIDER | RIDER PROFILE

Snider Continued from D1 Driving to the ballpark that day, the tailpipe on his car fell off. He pulled over, picked it up, and promptly burned his hand. Worried that manager Walter Alston would bench him, he played that day with a batting glove covering the burned hand. Snider is also known for hitting four homers in two different World Series, including leading Brooklyn to its 1955 championship, yet he would openly scoff at those who would laud his simple ability to put a bat on a baseball. One of the more popular photos lining the walls of Dodger Stadium is a shot of Snider swinging, but every time he walked past the photo, Duke would flinch. “He would look at it, shake his head, and say, ‘That was a foul ball,’ ” Langill recalled. Growing up in Compton, near Los Angeles, Edwin Donald Snider was nicknamed “Duke” by his father because he strutted around as a child, but he acted like anything but royalty. When playing for Brooklyn from 1947 to 1957, he was considered only the third-best center fielder in New York behind Willie Mays and Mickey Mantle, yet he never complained. Coming to Los Angeles with the Dodgers in 1958, his lefthanded hitting stroke was handicapped by the distant right-field fence at the Coliseum, 440 feet from home plate, but he was never bitter. He should have been MVP in 1955, but lost in a close race with teammate Roy Campanella after a voter accidentally left Snider’s name off the ballot. Even when he was inducted into the Hall of Fame, it was a struggle, with voters electing him in his 11th season of eligibility. “Yet hanging around him, he always was the nicest, most unassuming of stars,” said Langill. “He was always truly just happy to be a Dodger.” When the Dodgers retired his number in Los Angeles in 1980, the guest of honor was more impressed with the honored guests. “Whenever we talked about that ceremony, all he could talk about was how Kareem Abdul-Jabbar asked for his autograph,” Langill said. “He was always amazed that people considered him something special.” In 1995, Snider pleaded guilty to federal tax charges for not claiming money from autograph shows, and was sentenced to two years’ probation and fined $5,000, but he kept coming to Dodger Stadium and never stopped supporting the franchise to which he felt eternally indebted. Snider’s Hall of Fame speech in 1980, which was barely nine minutes long, was more revealingly powerful than any Snider swing. He talked about how his wife, Beverly, loved Ted Williams. He introduced his family. He mentioned his high school coaches. He lauded his parents. He told stories about his teammates. He thanked the folks who drove down from Montreal, where Snider was a broadcaster. He pretty much talked about everyone but himself. “It’s a little tough even getting up here,” Snider said at the end of the speech. “I’d like to thank God for including me in his master plan ... being a Brooklyn Dodger and Los Angeles Dodger.” The baseball bond between the two cities is stretched even thinner today, one more link broken, one more landmark gone. The Dodgers will sorely miss the quietest Duke, the littlest prince, sometimes buried in history, but always second to none.

Local rider spotlight: James and Patty Cagney Ages: 54 and 59, respectively Hometown: Bend Occupation: James teaches computer courses; Patty advises nursing students at Central Oregon Community College Cycling preferences: Self-supported bicycle touring together on a recumbent tandem Cycling background: Patty bought James his first bicycle some 30 years ago, shortly after they were married, and he’s been an avid road cyclist ever since. James was a member of the Greater Eugene Area Riders club, and he is the founder and longtime organizer of a popular century ride in the Eugene area called the Blackberry Bramble. Patty did not begin riding until about 10 years ago, when she and James bought their first recumbent tandem bicycle. Before, she recalls, “I didn’t enjoy it, because I couldn’t keep up.” The Cagneys moved to Bend six years ago and both joined local road cycling clubs: James rides weekly with the Hot Sprockets, while Patty keeps pace with a group known as the Derailleur Divas. “A lot of the Sprockets’ wives are Divas,” she says. Finding the perfect ride: The Cagneys went searching for a tandem about 10 years ago, and they discovered that a recumbent-style ride offers a better view than a conventional tandem bike. “We happened to stumble upon a bicycle shop with a recumbent tandem,” Patty recalls. “When you’re riding a regular tandem, the person in the back is looking at the person in front’s bum all the time. We took it out for a test ride, and we were sold.” A few years later, when the Cagneys began long-distance touring with their bicycle, they traded in their standard-built model for a bike better suited to international traveling. Their current ride, made by Bike Friday, is a bicycle featuring wheels with a smaller diameter and a frame that can easily be taken apart and placed in airline-friendly suitcases. The Cagneys’ ride is eight feet long, with 20-inch wheels (similar to a child’s bike), and weighs 85 to 90 pounds. “It’s a tank,” says James. “It’s not fast.” “It’s like driving a semi,” Patty adds. Despite the weight of the bike,

AP ile

James Cagney / Submitted photo

Bend cyclists James Cagney, left, and Patty Cagney pose in 2006 with their tandem recumbent bicycle in front of a cathedral in Spain following a five-week, self-supported cycling tour across southern France and northern Spain. the Cagneys say its low center of gravity allows them to keep pedaling — and moving forward — even at walking speeds. “We’ve been up 19 percent grades, and we can go as slow as about four miles per hour,” says James. Curiosities when they roll through town: To be sure, a recumbent tandem is an unusuallooking bike, and one not commonly seen on the road. “It’s like being in a two-person parade,” James observes. “We’re always in the middle of nowhere, and you go through these little towns and they’ve never seen anything like it. “(Recumbent tandems) are pretty rare,” he adds. “And this is one that has little wheels on top of that, so it’s really a strange-looking thing coming through town.” Exploring the globe by bicycle: Every year since 2005, the Cagneys have embarked with their recumbent tandem on a self-supported cycling journey of at least a month’s duration. They pedal on average six hours a day and stay during their trek in hotels or hostels, or on farms. With room to carry only what can fit in one

pannier apiece, they pack lightly. The Cagneys have traversed southern and northern Italy, southern France and northern Spain, in addition to Germany, Switzerland, France and the Greek islands — all on separate cycling trips. This fall, they plan to journey across Sardinia and Corsica. Next spring, they are headed to Cuba. “There is a magical time warp that happens,” says Patty. “Remember when you were a little kid, you remember how long weekends were? Then you grew up and days go by so fast. When we’re gone for a month doing this, the days are so full, we meet so many people and there are so many unexpected surprises. It makes time so much longer … it’s just a magical experience.” —Heather Clark

Road cycling

Mountain biking

• Tour des Chutes registration opens: Online registration for the seventh annual Tour des Chutes cancer fundraiser bike ride opens Tuesday. This year’s event is scheduled for Saturday, July 16, and the rides will once again be staged from High Lakes Elementary School in Bend. Online registration is available at www. tourdeschutes.org. The Tour des Chutes includes five ride options ranging from seven to 100 miles. The fee to enter is $40 for adults, $15 for riders age 15 and younger and $100 for families (includes two adults and up to four youths). In 2010, the event donated $50,000 locally to the St. Charles Medical Center Cancer Survivorship Program and $30,000 to LIVESTRONG, a national cancer awareness and research foundation.

• Bend rider on 24-hour podium team: Mountain biker Ina McLean, of Bend, was part of a podium-reaching women’s team at 24 Hours in the Pueblo, a 24-hour mountain bike race held Feb. 19-20 on trails in the Sonoran Desert near Tucson, Ariz. In the Four-Person Women Open category, McLean’s team — Rivet Sports Garage of Boulder, Colo. — recorded a total of 16 laps on the 16-mile course to place third out of 18 teams. The winning women’s team completed 18 laps. Now in its 12th year, 24 Hours in the Old Pueblo is one of the most popular 24-hour mountain bike events in the world, with nearly 2,000 participants.

• Sisters-area ride benefiting local rivers scheduled for June: Registration is open for Ride for Two Rivers, a benefit bike ride scheduled for Saturday, June 18, in the Sisters area. The National Forest Foundation and Cycle Oregon are co-hosting the event, which offers two ride options: a 51-mile McKenzie Pass Ride, and a 25mile Family Ride. Ride for Two Rivers includes full support as well as a post-ride dinner at Black Butte Ranch. All proceeds from the ride go to support restoration efforts on the Metolius River and Whychus Creek. Entry fee is $100 for the McKenzie Pass Ride. For the Family Ride, entry fee is $50 for adults and $25 for ages 17 and younger. For more information or to register, go to www.nationalforests.org or call Deborah Snyder at 406-830-3355.

• Registration opens for 24 Hours of Bend: A new cycling event in Central Oregon — the High Cascades 24 Hours of Bend, a 24-hour endurance mountain bike race — is set for Sept. 10-11, and registration is now open. Registration is available at www.highcascades24.com; entry is limited to 200 teams. Individuals or teams of two or four riders may participate in the race, which will take place on a 16-mile course staged from Wanoga Sno-park southwest of Bend. Cost to enter is $250 for individual riders, $375 for teams of two and $480 for teams of four. The first 24 teams to contact race director Mike Ripley and provide a volunteer for the event receive a 24 percent discount on their entry fee. For more information, go to the event website or contact Ripley at 541-847-3030. — Bulletin staff reports

CYCLING SCOREBOARD CHERRY PIE ROAD RACE At Adair Village, Feb. 20 Central Oregon finishers Category 4/5 men, 40 and older — 11, Kevin English. 16, Chuck Kenlan. 24, Kyle Gorman. Category 1/2 men — 33, Erik Bergstrom. 40, Tim Jones. 43, Andrew Boone. Category 3 men — 11, T.J. Paskewich. 24, Matt Fox. 25, Marcus Biancucci. 53, Chris Winans. 54, Spencer Newell.

Category 4 men — 11, Todd Berger. 19, Eric Birky. 23, Darren Smith. 35, Steve Wursta. Men 40 and older — 3, Jurgen Fennerl. 13, Mickey McDonald. 15, Doug Smith. 16, Greg Miller. 26, Derek Stallings. Men 50 and older — 17, Pat Sagers. Tandem — 6, Henry Abel/Amy Mitchell. Category 3 women — 11, Mary Ramos. 18, Cary Schwarz. Category 4 women — 3, Tawnie McDonald. 4, Annika Johannesen.

C C    Please e-mail sports event information to cyclingcentral@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin. com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

CAMPS/CLASSES/ CLINICS

admission $10; 541-549-8800.

INDOOR CYCLING CLASSES: At Rebound Sports Performance & Pilates, 143 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; daily; limited to eight riders per class; sessions at noon Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays; at 6:30 a.m., 5 p.m. and 6:15 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and at 6:30 a.m. and 8 a.m. on Saturdays; $150 for 10 classes, $270 for 20 classes, or $480 for 40 classes; www. ReboundSPL.com, 541-585-1500. WOMEN-ONLY INDOOR CYCLING CLASSES: At Rebound Sports Performance & Pilates, 143 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays; limited to eight riders per class; led by a female instructor; $15 per class; www. ReboundSPL.com, 541-585-1500. CYCL’IN, POWER-BASED INDOOR CYCLING CLASSES: Instruction by Cherie Touchette in a private studio in west Bend on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Sundays; progressive classes offered in eight-week sessions run 60 to 90 minutes in length; cost is $92 to $196; drop-in fee is $14 to $17; 541-390-1633.

ROLLER RUMBLE SERIES: Racers go head-to-head for 400 meters on fork-mounted rollers; Tuesdays from March 8 and through April 12; Silver Moon Brewing, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; registration opens at 6:30 p.m., racing starts at 7 p.m.; $5 to race, $3 to watch; 541-382-2453.

MISCELLANOUS

In this May 10, 2006, photo, Former Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers center fielder Duke Snider waves to fans prior to the Dodgers’ baseball game in Los Angeles.

C  B

The Bulletin interviews a Central Oregon cyclist — or in this case, a pair of cyclists — as part of our weekly “Cycling Insider” feature, whose rotating topics include rider profiles, safety tips, local ride recommendations and gear reviews.

BIKE YOGA: Yoga class geared toward cyclists; 7 p.m. Mondays; Sunnyside Sports, 930 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; no registration required; $7-10 suggested donation; 541-382-8018. BICYCLE AND PEDESTRIAN ADVISORY COMMITTEE: Monthly meeting of the Deschutes County BPAC is open to the public; noon to 1 p.m., Thursday, March 3; Bend City Hall, 710 N.W. Wall St.; www.bikecentraloregon.org. BICYCLE DREAMS: Documentary film chronicles Race Across America (RAAM), followed by live Skype with producer Stephen Auerbach; 6:45 p.m., Thursday, March 10; Sisters Movie House, 720 Desperado Court, Sisters;

RACES

RIDES HUTCH’S NOON RIDE: Group road bike ride starting in Bend from Hutch’s Bicycles east-side location; 820 N.E. Third St.; at noon on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays; and from Hutch’s west-side location; 725 N.W. Columbia St.; at noon on Tuesdays, Thursdays; pace varies; www.hutchsbicycles.com; 541-3826248; www.hutchsbicycles.com. HUTCH’S SATURDAY RIDE: Group road bike ride begins at 10 a.m. Saturdays in Bend from Hutch’s Bicycles east-side location, 820 N.E. Third St.; approximately 40 miles; vigorous pace; 541-3826248; www.hutchsbicycles.com. WET ’N’ WINDY 50: Noncompetitive group road bike ride from Bend to Powell Butte and back begins at 9 a.m. from Hutch’s Bicycles east-side location, Sunday, March 20; 820 N.E. Third St.; approximately 50 miles; 541382-6248; www.hutchsbicycles.com.

OUT OF TOWN ECHO RED TO RED: First crosscountry mountain bike race of the season in Oregon; staged in Echo; Saturday, March 12; $25 for adults, $15 for juniors; www.obra.org. MOUNTAIN BIKE OREGON: Supported mountain bike riding and festival in Oakridge; July 15-17 and Aug. 19-21; $349 through April 30, includes meals, camping and ride shuttles; www.mtbikeoregon.com.

Hooker Creek Event Center Redmond, Oregon Show Starts at 7:30 pm Gates Open at 6:30 pm


THE BULLETIN • Monday, February 28, 2011 E1

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BUYING AND SELLING Kittens/cats, adopt thru rescue group. 65480 78th St., Bend, PHILCO RADIO Super Hetero- All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding Sat/Sun 1-4 PM, other days dyne 7, $75. Victrola Victor sets, class rings, sterling silby appt, call 541-647-2181 to talking machine, $150. ver, coin collect, vintage arrange. Kittens in foster 541-280-5202. watches, dental gold. Bill homes, call 541-815-7278 to Fleming, 541-382-9419. visit. Altered, shots, ID chip The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The & more. Fees reduced for 202 TURN THE PAGE Bulletin newspaper onto The Feb. only. www.craftcats.org Bulletin Internet website. Want to Buy or Rent for photos, map, etc. For More Ads 541-389-8420 for more info. FREE Dead Tree Removal The Bulletin Lab Puppies, chocolate & black Hi folks, I am after firewood. I mix, ready now, 6 weeks old, will remove your dead trees Buying Diamonds $100. 541-536-4609 215 for free, provided there is /Gold for Cash Labradoodles, Australian enough wood to make it Coins & Stamps SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS worthwhile. Thank you, Call Imports - 541-504-2662 541-389-6655 www.alpen-ridge.com Michael. 541-510-9668 Private collector buying postBUYING age stamp albums & collecMin-Pin, AKC, Red, 1 yr. old, Wanted: $Cash paid for vintage tions, world-wide and U.S. Lionel/American Flyer trains, docked & cropped, all accessocostume Jewelry. Top dollar accessories. 541-408-2191. 573-286-4343 (local, cell #) ries, $400 OBO, 541-306-8371 paid for Gold & Silver. I buy by the Estate, Honest Artist. Norwich Terriers, AKC,Rare, 240 DO YOU HAVE Elizabeth, 541-633-7006 del. avail,$2500,541-487-4511. SOMETHING TO SELL Crafts and Hobbies sharonm@peak.org FOR $500 OR LESS? 208 Alpaca Yarn, various colors/ Pets and Supplies Non-commercial blends/sparkle. 175yds/skein advertisers can $7.50-8.50 ea. 541-385-4989 place an ad for our The Bulletin recommends 246 extra caution when "Quick Cash Special" purchasing products or Guns & Hunting 1 week 3 lines services from out of the Pet miniature Zebu calf, feand Fishing $10 bucks area. Sending cash, checks, male, 10 mos old, 70 lbs, 28” or or credit information may tall. Adults are popular for 12 ga Mossberg 500 pump, syn 2 weeks $16 bucks! be subjected to fraud. For petting zoos & Peewee rostock, 18” barrel, ammo incl. more information about an deos. $500. 541-389-2636 $200. 541-647-8931 Ad must advertiser, you may call the include price of item POODLE Pups, AKC Toy 22LR Italy/USA-made revolver, Oregon State Attorney Black/white, chocolate & other single-action, holster & General’s Office Consumer www.bendbulletin.com colors, so loving! 541-475-3889 ammo, $200. 541-647-8931 Protection hotline at or 1-877-877-9392. Pug Puppies, 2 tiny fawn feCall Classifieds at males, shots, wormed, $400 .308 Ruger M-77 with 4X 541-385-5809 ea., 541-977-0034. Weaver Scope, $600 Excellent condition. Queensland Heelers Please call 541-389-5421. Standards & mini,$150 & up. 2/Ball Pythons 541-280-1537 exc. health, 3’ plus $85 each. http://rightwayranch.wordpress.com/ Beretta A-302 12 Ga., auto 541-728-1036 special trap, 30” barrell, exc. Aussie male puppies: Tri Shop Door, 36” x 80¾” with cond., $1100, 541-410-2819. large doggie door inset, $60. mini $450; red toy $500. Both 541-923-0442; 541-728-6421 high quality! 541-475-1166 CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Black Lab AKC male puppy, Supplies. 541-408-6900. raised in loving home environment. $150. 541-280-5292 Chronograph, Never used, Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi w/printer, tripod, soft case, BOSTON TERRIER AKC female audio & studio equip. McIn$165, 541-728-1036. 2½ yrs old, 15 lb#, $250. tosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Shots, papers, family-raised. Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, Small puppies, both 541-610-8525 NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808 male and female, Poodle cross, Shih-Malts, mini mutts, different prices. Delivery part way. 541-874-2901 charley2901@gmail.com

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WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... T o a v o i d fr a u d , T h e Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

DRY JUNIPER FIREWOOD $175 per cord, split. Immediate delivery available. Call 541-408-6193 DRY SEASONED RED FIR OR TAMARACK, $185 per cord, split & delivered. Please Call 541-977-2040. SEASONED JUNIPER: $150/cord rounds, $170 per cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Since 1970, Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

Boxer, AKC, 4-month old male. Potty trained, great with small children and other pets. $500. 541-678-3425 Boxer-Bulldog/yellow lab pups. Dad is reg. boxer-bulldog, mother reg. yellow lab, for sale $300 ea. Has all 3 shots, rabies shots, and dog license. Herbert Miller, Terrebonne, Oregon. 541-504-1330. BOXER-MIX puppies, beautiful! Born Jan. 24. Call Taylor at 541-788-4036. lve msg. Companion cats free to seniors! Tame, altered, shots, ID chip. 541-389-8420 • craftcats.org

TEDDI BEAR PUPPIES (ZUCHONS), 4 Males, CKC Reg., non-shedding, hypoallergenic, dewclaws rem., 1st shots/wormed, ready 3/3. $350. 541-460-1277 Yorkie Pups, 10 wks, 2 females, 1 male, vet check, will deliver to Central OR, $600, 541-792-0375, Mt. Vernon.

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Furniture & Appliances !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

Dachshund AKC Mini longhaired puppies, DOB 1/5/11. Unusual colors. $500 & up. 541-598-7417.

English Bulldog 10 mo male, non-reg purebred, brindle, microchipped, health cert, full shots. Handsome, loving. Asking $950. 541-571-6378 English Bulldog, CKC reg, 5 yr old stud. Red & white, nice markings, no health problems, needs loving home. $500/obo. 541-419-2056

Armoire, 2 curios with lights, lower storage cabinets, $500 for all 4 pieces, or will sell separately. 541-419-2244

COUCH, brown denim, 80” long, $200. 541-419-0613.

German Shepherd puppy, purebred. Sire is an AKC Longcoat. Intelligent and Gorgeous, parents on site. $250. 541-280-3050

Sat. March 5, 9-5 Sun. March 6th, 9-4 420 Tables - Admission $5 Sponsored by Albany Rifle and Pistol Club

541-491-3755 Take I-5 to exit 234

looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 Spring Chinook!

Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746

541-598-4643.

Thomasville American Oak dining set, 2 leaves, 6 chairs (2 captain’s) stable pedestal base, good cond, asking $350. 541-419-2056 The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

German Shepherd pups, 8 weeks, parents on site, $275. 541-390-8875

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Sporting Goods - Misc. Columbia 2-person tent, “Lost Lake,” never used, extra stakes/poles, $90. Portable sling hammock, $45. Call 541-771-9551

253

TV, Stereo and Video 2 TC audio speakers on stands, 20x20, sub-woofer, oak base. $300. 541-419-0613. Solid oak stereo cabinet, Denon CD player and big amp , dual cassette, 3 shelves behind glass doors, storage $500. 541-419-0613.

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Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

212

Golden Retriever AKC Pups health & intelligence, reduced to $1000, 541-756-3688. www.goldenpondkennels.net

Antiques & Collectibles

Golden Retriever pups, 1 male left! Born Jan. 25th. Call Kristi, 541-280-3278.

Coca Cola collectibles, excellent cond, $150 all, or best offer. 541-388-7555

Table Saw, Craftsman, w/50T & Carbide blade, $250 OBO, 541-546-7661.

classified@bendbulletin.com For newspaper delivery questions, call Circulation Dept. 541-385-5800

265

Building Materials

541-322-7253

Riding Garden Tractor, Scott’s (made by John Deere), 20hp, 48” cut, $900/best offer. Call 541-604-1808 SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS Cabinet Refacing & Refinishing. Save Thousands! 10 Year Finish Guarantee

Free Design Consultation Best Pricing in the Industry.

541-647-8261 CCB#191758

The Hardwood Outlet Wood Floor Super Store

270

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

266

Heating and Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com Bay Mare, 11 yr, lots of chrome, gentle for everyone, 14.1H tall, $800, 541-350-9487

Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Tina, Bay Quarter horse, 8 yrs. old, broke to ride, 541-382-7995

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com WANTED: Horse or utility trailers for consignment or purchase. KMR Trailer Sales, 541-389-7857 www.kigers.com

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Sales Northeast Bend

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE!

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses -

READERS:

Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

Auto collision repair shop seeks top-notch Collision Tech. Min. 15-20 years exp. $20/hr commission. Drug- free. Fax resume to: 541-549-4736 Auto Parts Positions available In Central Oregon. Inside and Outside sales professionals wanted. Great opportunities with benefits. Please send resumes to P.O. Box 6346, Bend, Oregon 97708 Caregiver Prineville senior care home looking for Care Manager for two 24-hour shifts per week. Must be mature and compassionate, and pass criminal background check. Ref. required. 541-447-5773.

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809.

The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

GROCERY STORE PERSONNEL NEEDED! Cashiers, freight crew, liquor store clerk, deli clerk, Backroom personnel, produce clerk - hours vary, open 7 days per week. Applications are available at either of the Sunriver Grocery Stores or resumes can be faxed to 541-598-8263! HVAC established Oregon Company seeking a DDC Controls Technician to perform start-up functions on controls systems and provide analysis of building controls. Must have knowledge of DDC Control Theory and Applications and HVAC equipment. FT, hourly. Email resumes to jobs@eccportland.com.

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Nursing Exp. Nurse Manager to share duties in Critical Access Hospital. Work in RN Management team to ensure professional, top quality care. Shared call duties with ability to provide hands on nursing care when necessary. Require strong EMR skills, great communication and supervisory techniques. Must have a min. of 4 years nursing experience, preferably in hospital setting, at least 3 years of supervisory exp. Bachelors degree in nursing or in active pursuit of degree. Prefer experience in a rural environment. Apply to drose@harneydh.com or use online form at www.harneydh.com. For questions call Denise Rose 541-573-5184

Part Time drug and alcohol counselor, Bend location CADC/Masters degree preCaregivers: Experienced ferred, please fax resume to needed for quadrapeligic. 541-383-4935 or send to 23 Hourly, call Christina, NW Greenwood, Bend 97701. 541-279-9492

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Delivery Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Farmers Column

UPCOMING AUCTIONS March thru May. Check our website after March 1 for photos, locations and item lists. www.dennisturmon.com or 541-923-6261

CAUTION

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly.

541-617-7825 READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

Found Jewelry, Bend Wal-Mart Parking lot, a.m. of 2/22, call to ID, 541-388-1004, 4-8 p.m.

Auction Sales

541-322-0496

Employment Opportunities

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

275

• Laminate from .79¢ sq.ft. • Hardwood from $2.99 sq.ft.

Clean Timothy Grass Hay, by the ton, $160. 541-408-6662 after 4pm.

Lost and Found

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

454

Looking for Employment

476

Echo Gas Leaf-blower, Model PB200, 135 mph, excellent cond, $100. 541-388-7555

To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email

TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

325

200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

476

Employment Opportunities

Schools and Training

Hay, Grain and Feed

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Barley Straw; Compost; 541-546-6171.

476

Employment Opportunities

421

I provide housekeeping & caregiving svcs, & have 20+ yrs experience. 541-508-6403

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Generator, Coleman, 3125W, new in box, $200, call 775-287-2164.

Ruger Vaquero 44 mag 5 1/2" barrel, polished stainless, belt, holster, loading dies +800 rounds ammo, $700 541-480-3018.

FUTON & matching chair. queen, dark cherry brazilian wood, $300. 541-419-0613.

Solid Dinette set with 6 chairs, $400. Leather sectional with 3 recliners, $600. Solid cherrywood Entertainment Ctr, $450; & more! 541-504-4284

Tools

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Mini 14, extra clips & ammo, Quality at LOW PRICES 6x18 scope, collapsible stock, 740 NE 1st 312-6709 $600. M1 carbine, 30 cal, Open to the public . extra clips, $400. Ithaca mag 10 auto, $350. 541-420-7773 BERBER CARPET, 15x14.9, new, tan. $145. Installation availRemington 700 Classic 221 able. 541-388-0871. Fireball, $475. Win Model 97 cowboy-action ready, $575. Win Model 97 original, $650. 541-410-9244.

Fish with Captain Greg, Portland area, March-May. $100 per person. 30-ft boat with cabin. Call 541-379-0362

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call

Free Basset Hound, purebred, family needed for 11 wk old male, to good home, call 541-788-9786 after 4 p.m.

SHOW

Ethan Allen butler’s table, brass hinges both sides, $300. Matching Ethan Allen end tables, 1 rnd, 1 square. $75 each. 541-419-0613.

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Free barn/shop cats. Fixed, shots, some friendly, others not so much. Natural rodent control in exchange for safe shelter, food, water. We'll deliver! 541-389-8420 lv msg.

GUN

Linn County Fairgrounds Albany, Oregon

CABIN-STYLE RECLINING CHAIRS, 2 @ $75 EACH. Shooting rests (3) Never used, $135 for all, please call 541-419-0613. 541-728-1036. Cast iron floor lamp, handmade, unique $100. 541-419-0613 What are you

DINING TABLE: solid fruit wood Queen Anne, 2 leaves, 6 ladder-back chairs, padded seats. $250. 541-419-0613

English Bulldogs AKC exc quality, big, beautiful males, 2 left! $1500 obo 541-290-0026

GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

John Deere Tractor Model 770 1990, with canopy; JD model 70 loader; JD 513 rotary cutter; Rankin box scraper & 1000-lb forks, excellent condition, 800 hrs, $9000 all. 541-318-6161

Horses and Equipment

Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

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Farm Equipment and Machinery

All Birdfood Now On Sale!!

BarkTurfSoil.com Front Shooting Rest, for competition, Never used, $150, 541-728-1036.

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269

Forum Center, Bend 541-617-8840 www.wbu.com/bend

Employment

300 400

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

541-385-5809

Boston Terriers, 4 females, 1 male, 1st shots, wormed, ready, $500, 541-536-5141.

Farm Market

358 10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1461 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

NOW TAKING BIDS for Contract Haulers, delivering bundles of newspapers from Bend to LaGrande, Oregon. There is a possibility of more runs in the future. Must have own vehicle with license and insurance and the capability to haul up to 8000 lbs. Candidates must also be able to lift up to 50 lbs. physically. Selected candidates will be independently contracted. For more info contact James Baisinger at jbaisinger@bendbulletin.com

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin Classifieds Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor

KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

&

Call Today &

H Redmond & Madras H 375 292

Meat & Animal Processing

Sales Other Areas

Angus Beef, 1/2 or whole,

DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

grain-fed, no hormones $3.10/lb., hanging weight, cut & wrap included. Please call 541-383-2523. Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com


E2 Monday, February 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Finance & Business

Rentals

500 600 507

605

Real Estate Contracts

Roommate Wanted

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

DRW, rent/utils in exchange for house/yard chores, no smoking, 916-798-3141.

528

616

Want To Rent

Loans and Mortgages 3 or 2 Bdrm, 1 or 2 Bath, rural WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

setting preferred. Can give refs; non-smoking adults, well-behaved pets. Need by April 1st. Call 505-455-7917

630

Rooms for Rent Awbrey Heights, furn., no smoking/drugs/pets. $350 +$100 dep. (541) 388-2710. Budget Inn, 1300 S. Hwy 97, Royal 541-389-1448; & Gateway Motel, 475 SE 3rd St., 541-382-5631, Furnished Rooms: 5 days/$150+tax

631

Condo / Townhomes For Rent

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION visit our website at www.oregonfreshstart.com

HOSPITAL AREA, NE BEND Clean quiet AWESOME townhouse. 2 Master Bdrms, 2½ baths, all kitchen appliances. Washer/dryer hookup, garage with opener, gas heat and A/C. $645 per mo. + deposit. S/W/G paid. NO DOGS. 541-382-2033.

Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

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Apt./Multiplex General The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend $99 MOVE-IN SPECIAL! 1 & 2 bdrm apts. avail. starting at $575.

541-382-3402

Alpine Meadows 541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting. No pets/smoking. Near St. Charles.W/S/G pd; both w/d hkup + laundry facil. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928.

!! Snowball of a Deal !!

573

Business Opportunities Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

$300 off Upstairs Apts. 2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps Lease Options Available Pet Friendly & No App. Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 1015 Roanoke Ave. - $575/ mo, $500 dep. W/S/G paid, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath townhouse, view of town, no smoking or pets. Norb, 541-420-9848.

642

652

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Houses for Rent NW Bend

4-plea SW Redmond 2 bdrm 2 bath, all appls, W/D hkup, garage, fenced, w/s/g pd. $650 mo + dep; pet neg. 541-480-7806 ASK ABOUT OUR New Year Special! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, non-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

Call about our $99 Special! Studios to 3 bedroom units from $415 to $575. • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 Managed by

GSL Properties

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

648

Houses for Rent General

Prestigious, fully furnished, 6 bdrm., 3 bath, NW Skyliner, 6 mo. minimum, incl. some utils., $2600/mo, please call 541-944-8638.

658

Houses for Rent Redmond

3/2 1385 sq. ft., family room, new carpet & paint, nice big yard, dbl. garage w/opener, quiet cul-de-sac. $995 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803 3 bedroom, 2 bath, fireplace, pantry, fenced, sprinklers. No smoking/pets. $875+deposits. 541-548-5684. 4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room with woodstove, new carpet, pad & paint, single garage w/opener. $895/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

Across from Library, Cute 2 bdrm, dwntwn Redmond. Fenced yard, basement has 4 small rms. $800/mo, 1st/last + deposit. 541-633-5759 Clean 4 Bdrm + den, 2 bath, 14920 SW Maverick Rd, CRR. No smoking. $900/mo. + deposits. Call 541-504-8545 or 541-350-1660.

659

Houses for Rent

for Rent

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq. ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1195. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft 827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to FIND IT! rent, call a Bulletin Classified BUY IT! Rep. to get the new rates and SELL IT! get your ad started ASAP! The Bulletin Classiieds 541-385-5809

A CLEAN 1 bdrm. in 4-plex next Yardley Estates 3Bdrm, 2 bath, + bonus room, slate & hardto Park, 2 decks, storage, wood floors, granite, 9’ ceillaundry on site, great locaings, 2-car garage. $1200, tion, W/S/G paid, no dogs, 1st/last + $500 security. No $550/mo. 541-318-1973 pets. 541-749-0967 A small 1 Bdrm/1 bath duplex, W/S/G paid, $420 + deposLooking for your next its. No smoking/pets, appliemployee? cations at: 38 #2 NW Irving Place a Bulletin help or call 541-389-4902. wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 640 readers each week. Your classified ad will Apt./Multiplex SW Bend also appear on bendbulletin.com which PARKS AT BROKEN TOP. Nice currently receives over studio above garage, sep. 1.5 million page views entry, views! No smoking/ every month at pets. $550/mo. + dep., incl. no extra cost. all util. + TV! 541-610-5242. Bulletin Classifieds Check out the Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place classiieds online your ad on-line at www.bendbulletin.com bendbulletin.com Updated daily

805

Real Estate Services

Misc. Items

Warehouse/Office space, 1235 sq ft, large roll-up door. 20685 Carmen Lp. No triple net; $600/mo, 1st + dep. 541-480-7546; 541-480-7541 Warehouse with Offices in Redmond,6400 sq.ft., zoned M2, overhead crane, plenty of parking, 919 SE Lake Rd., $0.40/sq.ft., 541-420-1772.

693

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent

875

880

Watercraft

Motorhomes

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

865 You’ve Taken Care of Your Car’s Body...What about Your Body?

Get Your FREE Insider’s Report & Discover...

Over 40 Years Experience in Carpet Upholstery & Rug Cleaning Call Now! 541-382-9498 CCB #72129 www.cleaningclinicinc.com

•How hidden car accident injuries can lead to arthritis. •How even low impact collisions can lead to long term injuries. •Why pain medications may make you worse. •What test should you have to document your injuries so you get the settlement you deserve. Call For Your Free Report.

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Sunriver 63150 Peale St., Yardley Estates. Available 3/6. 3200 sq ft, 4 Bdrm, 3 baths, 2 car ga- A newer 3/2 mfd. home, 1755 sq.ft., living room, family rage, fenced backyard. $1600 room, new paint, private .5 /mo. Call Tina, 541-330-6972 acre lot near Sunriver, $895. Clean & Cozy 3/1, w/carport, 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803. hardwood floors, efficient 671 wood stove, privacy fenced, W/D hookup, lease, avail 3/1, Mobile/Mfd. $750+dep., 541-390-8774.

NOTICE:

705

Find It in

4 Bdrm, 3 Bath home on culdesac, woodstove, gas & elec heat, park-like fenced backyd w/water feature. No smkg. $1150/mo. 541-639-3209

Boats & RV’s

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

700 800

1 Bdrm., 1 bath, charming cottage, large yard, quiet neighborhood, 4 minutes to airport, 2881 SW 32nd St., $650/mo, 541-350-8338.

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the Large luxury family home 3/2.5 3200 sq. ft., W/D, new rates and get your ad fridge, daylight basement, started ASAP! 541-385-5809 large lot, views, no pets. $1350. 503-720-7268. 650

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Real Estate For Sale

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

850

Snowmobiles Yamaha Snowmobiles & Trailer, 1997 700 Triple, 1996 600, Tilt Trailer, front off-load, covers for snowmobiles, clean & exc. cond., package price, $3800, 541-420-1772.

713

745

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010 Black on black, detachable windshield, backrest, and luggage rack. 2200 miles. $13,900. Please call Jack, 541-549-4949, or 619-203-4707

Homes for Sale PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras makes it illegal to advertise incl. pipes, lowering kit, "any preference, limitation or chrome pkg., $16,900 OBO. discrimination based on race, 541-944-9753 color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or disHarley Davidson Police Bike crimination." Familial status 2001, low mi., custom bike includes children under the very nice.Stage 1, new tires age of 18 living with parents & brakes, too much to list! or legal custodians, pregnant A Must See Bike $10,500 women, and people securing OBO. 541-383-1782 custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

748

Northeast Bend Homes WOW! 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1238 sq. ft., vaulted ceilings, 2 skylights, big yard, RV parking, new granite countertops, new tile backsplash, new carpet, vinyl & paint. $124,900. Randy Schoning, Princ. Broker. John L. Scott, 541-480-3393, 541-389-3354

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005,

Lots

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $200 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

Acreages

Downtown Redmond Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. $650/mo + utils; $650 security deposit. 425 SW Sixth St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848

10 Acres,7 mi. E. of Costco, quiet, secluded, at end of road, power at property line, water near by, $250,000 OWC 541-617-0613

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

4-wheeler, black in color, custom SS wheels/tires, accessories, exc. cond., 240 miles, $5,000. Call 541-680-8975, and leave message.

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

880

Motorhomes 881

Yamaha Grizzly 2008 660 - WARN Winch, Fender Protectors, new winch rope, recent 150/160 hr service, Hunter Green $5,495 541-549-6996 (Sisters).

870

Boats & Accessories 17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

Travel Trailers Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

19.5’ Gruman Aluminum Freight Canoe, 36” Beam,square stern, Yamaha 5.5 HP outboard, call eves, 541-382-7995

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

773 Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

ALPENLITE 1984. A Beauty! Extras, 5th wheel hitch, A/C, microwave, tires are good, large fridge, radio, propane tanks have been certified. Spare tire & wheels. $3000. 923-4174.

541-322-7253

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all BROUGHAM 23½’ 1981 motorhome, 2-tone brown, perfect cond, 6 brand new tires. engine perfect, runs great, inside perfect shape. See to appreciate at 15847 WoodChip Lane off Day Rd in La Pine. Asking $8000. 541-876-5106.

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240.

the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, exc. cond., $16,900, 541-390-2504

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $19,999 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

771 Bargain priced Pronghorn lot, $99,900, also incl. $115,000 golf membership & partially framed 6000 sq. ft. home, too! Randy Schoning, Princ. Broker, John L. Scott RE. 541-480-3393, 541-389-3354

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new

Polaris Sportsman 2008, 800 CC, AWD,

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $107,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

888--599-1717

860

Cash For West Side Homes: Fast Closings Call Pat Kelley, Kelley Realty 541-382-3099

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

(24 hr recorded message)

Motorcycles And Accessories Real Estate Wanted

ATVs

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $1995 for all. Bill 541-480-7930.

Houseboat 38x10, triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prineville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

882

Fifth Wheels

Hurricane 2007 35.5’ like new, 3 slides, generator, dark cabinets, Ford V10, 4,650 mi $69,500 OBO. 541-923-3510

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 882

Fifth Wheels Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $39,900, please call 541-330-9149.

Autos & Transportation

932

933

940

975

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Vans

Automobiles

900

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, reduced to $34,000 OBO 541-610-4472; 541-689-1351

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP,

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

GMC Ventura 3500 1986, refrigerated, w/6’x6’x12’ box, has 2 sets tires w/rims., 1250 lb. lift gate, new engine, $5500, 541-389-6588, ask for Bob.

Truck with Snow Plow! 925

Utility Trailers

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories We Buy Scrap Auto & Truck Batteries, $10 each Also buying junk cars & trucks, up to $500, and scrap metal! Call 541-912-1467

932

Antique and Classic Autos KOMFORT 27’ 2000 5th wheel trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide. In excellent condition, has been stored inside. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

C-10

Pickup

1969,

152K mi. on chassis, 4 spd. transmission, 250 6 cyl. engine w/60K, new brakes & master cylinder, $2500. Please call 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800.

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, quality built, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more.$54,000! 541-317-9185

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

885

Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $10,000,541-280-5677

Canopies and Campers

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523.

Lance 1071 Camper 2004, loaded, slide out, generator. a/c, very well maint. always garage, $14,999 OBO. 541-433-5892 or 541-771-6400.

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Chevy Corvette 1980, yellow, glass removable top, 8 cyl., auto trans, radio, heat, A/C, new factory interior, black, 48K., exc. tires, factory aluminum wheels, asking $12,000, will consider fair offer & possible trade, 541-385-9350.

Jeep Cherokee Limited, 2003, like new, low miles. Divorce forces sale, $10,500. Call 541-923-0718

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227 BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

Buick LeSabre, 1985, exclnt shape, always garaged, 93K mi, $1800 obo 541-318-6919

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

white, 115k, cloth interior, 80% tires, all factory conveniences okay, luxury ride, 30 mpg hwy, 3.8 litre V6 motor, used but not abused. Very dependable. and excellent buy at $5,400. Call Bob 541-318-9999 or Sam at 541-815-3639.

The Bulletin

Buick Jeep CJ7 1986 6-cyl, 4x4, 5-spd., exc. cond., consider trade, $7950, please call 541-593-4437.

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $3850, 541-410-3425. MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all original, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 1998, like new, low mi., just in time for the snow, great cond., $7000, 541-536-6223.

HHR

2006,

53K miles, exc. cond., set up for Road Master tow bar, 1 owner, very well maint., $8950, 541-480-0168.

4800 miles, AWD, loaded incl Nav, must sell. 541-610-3083

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

MERCEDES C300 2008 New body style, 30,000 miles, heated seats, luxury sedan, CD, full factory warranty. $23,950.

Like buying a new car! 503-351-3976.

Mercedes GL450, 2007 All wheel drive, 1 owner, navigation, heated seats, DVD, 2 moonroofs. Immaculate and never abused. $27,950. Call 503-351-3976

Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $18,900. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Pickups CHEVROLET 1970, V-8 automatic 4X4 3/4 ton. Very good condition, lots of new parts and maintenance records. New tires, underdash air, electronic ignition and much more. Original paint, truck used very little. $5700, 541-575-3649

Lincoln MKZ 2010

2004,

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

Chevy Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $14,500. 541-408-2111

LeSabre

933

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

Dodge 1500 XLT 4x4, 2007, 10K miles, running boards, many options, tow package, $18,500 OBO. 541-815-5000

DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2000. 541-322-6261

Subaru Forester XS 2003, leathr, auto clim cntrl, htd seats, prem audio, extra whls, 108K, all rec’s, $9500. 541-516-1165

Cute as a Bug! Black 1965 VW BUG in Excellent condition. Runs good. $6995. 541-416-0541.

Toyota Landcruiser, 2003, champagne in color, 90K miles, excellent cond, all options + GPS & Sirius radio, $20,000. 541-595-5363 Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Toyota Sequoia Limited 2001, auto, leather, sunroof, 6-CD, new tires, 107K miles, $11,500 firm. 541-420-8107

940

Vans

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT- Perfect, garaged, factory super charged, just 1623 miles $20,000. 541-923-3567

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, V6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, auto, reduced to $12,900 obo 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

FORD F150 4X4 1996 Chevy

Honda Pilot 2010 Like new, under 11K, goes great in all conditions. Blue Bk $30,680; asking $27,680. 541-350-3502

Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

Eddie Bauer pkg., auto. 5.8L, Super Cab, green, power everything, 156,000 miles. Fair condition. Only $3500 OBO. 541-408-7807.

mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $3500. 541-548-5302

SUBARUS!!! Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website) Barns

Domestic Services

Handyman

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Painting, Wall Covering

M. Lewis Construction, LLC

Dawn’s Cleaning: “Morning Fresh Clean!” Residential Cleaning, Senior Discounts Has openings now, CALL TODAY! 541-410-8222

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 • Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling • Decks • Window/Door Replacement • Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

"POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates . See Facebook Business page, search under M. Lewis Construction, LLC CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Electrical Services BAXTER ELECTRIC Remodels / Design / Rentals All Small Jobs•Home Improve. All Work by Owner - Call Tom 541-318-1255 CCB 162723

Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

Philip L. Chavez Contracting Services Specializing in Tile, Remodels & Home Repair, Flooring & Finish Work. CCB#168910 Phil, 541-279-0846

I DO THAT! Home Repairs, Remodeling, Professional & Honest Work. Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768 Mark’s Handyman Service • Fix • Replace • Install • Haul Free Est. - Reasonable Rates Mark Haidet•541-977-2780 License #11-00008985

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Home Improvement Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

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Remodeling, Carpentry RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. •Additions/Remodels/Garages •Replacement windows/doors remodelcentraloregon.com 541-480-8296 CCB189290

Rooing Affordable Roof Repair by licensed, bonded and insured specialist. 36 years’ experience. CCB #94309 Call Cary at 541-948-0865

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Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

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LEGAL NOTICE Estate of Joyce Pauline Osika NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS Case Number 10PB0142ST

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personals REDMOND 5. Local writer seeks info from anyone connected to R5 case. 541-480-2571

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THE BULLETIN • Monday, February 28, 2011 E3

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874. 388-7605, 410-6945

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Nicoletta Y. Jones has been appointed personal representative of the above estate by the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, Case No. 10PB0142ST. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present the same within four months after the date of first publication of this notice tot he personal representative at the office of Kelly R. O’Brien, Attorney at Law, 45 NW Park Place, Bend, OR 97701 or said claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by this proceeding may obtain additional information from the records of the Court, from the personal representative, or from the attorney for the personal representative. Dated and first published on February 28, 2011 PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE Nicoletta Y. Jones 17572 Plainview Court Bend, OR 97701 ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE Kelly O’Brien 45 NW Park Place Bend, OR 97701 Telephone: (541) 306-6941 Fax: (541) 550-2069 Email: kelly@kellyobrienlaw.com LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF SEIZURE FOR CIVIL FORFEITURE TO ALL POTENTIAL CLAIMANTS AND TO ALL UNKNOWN PERSONS READ THIS CAREFULLY If you have any interest in the seized property described below, you must claim that interest or you will automatically lose that interest. If you do not file a claim for the property, the property may be forfeited even if you are not convicted of any crime. To claim an interest, you must file a written claim with the forfeiture counsel named below, The written claim must be signed by you, sworn to under penalty of perjury before a notary public, and state: (a) Your true name; (b) The address at which you will accept future mailings from the court and forfeiture counsel; and (3) A statement that you have an interest in the seized property. Your deadline for filing the claim document with forfeiture counsel named below is 21 days from the last day of publication of this notice. Where to file a claim and for more information: Diana Vitolins, Crook County District Attorney Office, 300 NE Third Street, Prineville, OR 97754. Notice of reasons for Forfeiture: The property described below was seized for forfeiture because it: (1) Constitutes the proceeds of the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violates, the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution, or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter475); and/or (2) Was used or intended for use in committing or facilitating the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violate the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475). IN THE MATTER OF: #1 U.S. Currency in the amount of $5,190.00, Case #10-10-65910 seized 10/17/10 from Donald Ray Trotter IN THE MATTER OF: #2 U.S. Currency in the amount of $1,000.00, Case # 10-03-07014 seized 10/20/10 from Suzette Delancey IN THE MATTER OF : #3 U.S. Currency in the amount of $1,773.00, Case # 09-10-63701 from Clarice M. Rios IN THE MATTER OF: #4 U.S. Currency in the amount of $1,689.00, Case #10-10-66925 from Airelle D. Smith. Legal Notice State of Oregon, County of Deschutes Abandoned Mobile Home for Sale that belonged to: Terry M. Tracey Kasey K. Aikens 19920 Granite Drive, Space #217, Bend, OR 97702 Property is a : 1977 Bon Prix, 2 bdrm., 2 bath Plate #: X155419 Vin #: 6018 Sale is by public bidding with sealed bids accepted 10:00 am - 4:00 pm Mon. - Fri., until March 5, 2011, at the Romaine Village Country Estates Park office, 19940 Mahogany Street, Bend, OR 541-382-7045 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: PETER J. WILKINSON. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Three (3), Block One (1), RAMSAY ESTATES NO.3, recorded June 16,1967, in Cabinet A, Page 146, City of Bend, Deschutes County. Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows:

Date Recorded: February 23, 2007. Recording No. 2007-11016 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $968.44 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of June 2008 through October 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $235,161.17; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from May 15, 2008; plus late charges of $1,590.18; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: March 10, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30236). DATED: November 12, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx6970 T.S. No.: 1290005-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Linda Culpepper, A Married Woman, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of World Savings Bank, Fsb, Its Successors and/or Assignees, A Federal Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, dated September 20, 2005, recorded October 20, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-71762 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 17 of River's Edge Village, Phase IV, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2524 NW Upper Rim Place Bend OR 97701-3800. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due June 15, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,052.35 Monthly Late Charge $102.62. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $472,610.78 together with interest thereon at 6.340% per annum from May 15, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on May 16, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named

in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 06, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-363762 02/07, 02/14, 02/21, 02/28 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxx9747 T.S. No.: 1247436-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Timmy L. Dickey, An Unmarried Man, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, in favor of Bank of America, N.a., as Beneficiary, dated September 06, 2006, recorded September 27, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-65463 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot one hundred eighty-five (185), Ridge at Eagle Crest 57, Deschutes County, Oregon Commonly known as: 663 Sage Country Court Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due March 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; failure to pay escrow deficiency when due, said sums having been advanced by the beneficiary; failure to pay fc expenses when due, said sums having been advanced by the beneficiary; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,701.82 Monthly Late Charge $85.09. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $245,062.29 together with interest thereon at 6.000% per annum from February 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on May 31, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 20, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-366037 02/21, 02/28, 03/07, 03/14 Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily


E4 Monday, February 28, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxx0519 T.S. No.: 1211779-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Jose M. Calderon, Jr. and Malisa N. Woolstenhulme, Husband and Wife, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of First Franklin A Division of Nat. City Bank Of In, as Beneficiary, dated October 21, 2005, recorded October 25, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-72888 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 3 of Volcano Subdivision, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2825 S.W. 27th Court Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,139.93 Monthly Late Charge $46.78. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $160,398.00 together with interest thereon at 7.000% per annum from December 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on May 19, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" in-

cludes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 12, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-364570 02/14, 02/21, 02/28, 03/07

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxx4587 T.S. No.: 1257511-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by John Betz, A Married Man As His Sole & Separate Property, as Grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For First Franklin A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated October 11, 2006, recorded October 17, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-69370 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 212 of Riverrim P.UD., Phase 8, City of Bend, Deschutes, County Oregon. Commonly known as: 60883 Goldenwood Loop Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due August 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; failure to pay when due, said sums having been advanced by the beneficiary; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,681.13 Monthly Late Charge $134.06. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $412,386.86 together with interest thereon at 6.450% per annum from July 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on May 31, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described

real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 20, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-366046 02/21, 02/28, 03/07, 03/14

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx6334 T.S. No.: 1313811-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Robert T. Ludwick, as Grantor to Western Title and Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. ("mers") As Nominee For Greater Northwest Mortgage, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated March 07, 2007, recorded March 15, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-15546 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: UNIT 21, GREYMAWK CONDOMINIUMS, DESCHUTE COUNTY, OREGON, DESCRIBED IN AND SUBJECT TO THAT CERTAIN DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM OWNERSHIP FOR GREYHAWK CONDOMINIUMS RECORDED FEBRUARY 1, 2007 IN VOLUME 2007, PAGE 06945, DESCHUTES COUNTY OFFICIAL RECORDS TOGETHER WITH TEE LIMITED AND GENERAL COMMON ELEMENTS SET FORTH THEREIN APPERTAINING TO SAID UNIT. A.P.N.: 102534 Commonly known as: 1525 Northwest Juniper Street #21 Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice

has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due March 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $685.22 Monthly Late Charge $.00. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $76,362.65 together with interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from February 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on May 23, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 13, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-365065 02/14, 02/21, 02/28, 03/07

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxx8862 T.S. No.: 1260696-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Rick C. Upham, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Aspen Mortgage Group, as Beneficiary, dated January 27, 2005, recorded February 02, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-06596 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 39, block 30, Deschutes River Recreation Homesites, Inc, Unit 5, Deschutes County Oregon. Commonly known as: 56430 Celestial Drive Bend OR 97707. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due August 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $922.09 Monthly Late Charge $46.10. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $151,763.48 together with interest thereon at 5.500% per annum from July 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on May 31, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the

grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 20, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-366051 02/21/11, 02/28, 03/07, 03/14

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx7262 T.S. No.: 1314701-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Sharon Carrell, Sole & Separate Property, as Grantor to First American Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc As Nominee For Citimortgage, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated March 21, 2006, recorded March 22, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-19794 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 90 and 91 of Railway Addition, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon Commonly known as: 407 SE Jackson St. Redmond OR 97756-2412. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due October 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,001.69 Monthly Late Charge $50.08. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $151,484.20 together with interest thereon at 6.375% per annum from September 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L520152 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000018570/HAMMOND Investor No: 4004113518 AP #1: 241800 Title #: 100725425 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by CRAIG B. HAMMOND, VANESSA L. HAMMOND as Grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON - REDMOND as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MRTG. CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated August 10, 2004, Recorded August 12, 2004 as Instr. No. 2004-48079 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 85 OF WILLOW SPRINGS, PHASE 3, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 4 PYMTS FROM 06/01/10 TO 09/01/10 @ 1,226.90 $4,907.60 4 L/C FROM 06/16/10 TO 09/16/10 @ 45.38 $181.52 3 PYMTS FROM 10/01/10 TO 12/01/10 @ 1,210.08 $3,630.24 2 L/C FROM 10/16/10 TO 11/16/10 @ 45.38 $90.76 RECOVERABLE BALANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $52.50 $52.50 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$8,862.62 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 1104 SW 33RD STREET, REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $140,835.05, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 05/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on April 15, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 12/06/10 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 929091W PUB: 02/28/11, 03/07/11, 03/14/11, 03/21/11

LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L520153 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000018845/LATHAM Investor No: 4005638802 AP #1: 241383 Title #: 100725426 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by MARK S. LATHAM, KRISTEN E. LATHAM as Grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated October 19, 2007, Recorded October 31, 2007 as Instr. No. 2007-57668 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 83 OF CASCADE VIEW ESTATES PHASE 8, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 5 PYMTS FROM 05/01/10 TO 09/01/10 @ 2,608.09 $13,040.45 5 L/C FROM 05/16/10 TO 09/16/10 @ 111.50 $557.50 3 PYMTS FROM 10/01/10 TO 12/01/10 @ 2,681.11 $8,043.33 2 L/C FROM 10/16/10 TO 11/16/10 @ 111.50 $223.00 RECOVERABLE BALANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $191.00 $191.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$22,055.28 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 3633 SW 36TH PLACE, REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $355,812.76, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 04/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on April 15, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 12/06/10 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 929092W PUB: 02/28/11, 03/07/11, 03/14/11, 03/21/11

trustee will on May 31, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes

plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 21, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-366435 02/21, 02/28, 03/07, 03/14

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PUBLIC NOTICE The Bend Park & recreation District Board of Directors will meet in a regular meeting only beginning at 7:00 p.m., Tuesday, March 1, 2011, at the district administrative offices, 799 SW Columbia, Bend, Oregon. Agenda items include an update on the Volunteer Program, a property tax forecast report, consideration of adoption of Resolution No. 331, District Procurement Policy, and consideration of acceptance of a public art proposal for Farewell Bend Park. The board will not meet in a work session prior to the business meeting. The agenda supplementary reports may be viewed on the district’s web site www.bendparksandrec.org. For more information call 541-389-7275.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. OR-USB-1110081 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JONATHAN R. PAGE, (MARRIED), as grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as beneficiary, dated 11/20/2009, recorded 11/24/2009, under Instrument No. 2009-49804, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER (W1/2N1/2NE1/4SE1/4) OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 16 SOUTH, RANGE 12, EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, EXCEPT THE NORTH TEN (10) FEET THEREOF. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 65346 SWALLEY ROAD BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of February 22, 2011 Delinquent Payments from August 01, 2010 7 payments at $ 582.60 each $ 4,078.20 (08-01-10 through 02-22-11) Late Charges: $ 303.03 Foreclosure Fees and Costs $ 1,526.00 TOTAL: $ 5,907.23 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $106,109.30, PLUS interest thereon at 5.125% per annum from 7/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on June 22, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 2/22/2011 LSI TITLE OF OREGON, LLC Trustee By: Asset Foreclosure Services, Trustee By: Angela Barsamyan Foreclosure Assistant 5900 Canoga Avenue, Suite 220, Woodland Hills, CA 91361 Phone: (877) 237-7878 ASAP# 3922284 02/28/2011, 03/07/2011, 03/14/2011, 03/21/2011

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Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L520188 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000017559/PRICE Investor No: 4005087548 AP #1: 123331 Title #: 100732433 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by SUSAN E. PRICE as Grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated November 1, 2006, Recorded November 3, 2006 as Instr. No. 2006-73242 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: THE SOUTH HALF OF LOT 2 AND ALL OF LOT 3 AND THE NORTH 45 FEET OF LOT 4 IN BLOCK 7, TOWNSITE OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 13 PYMTS FROM 09/01/09 TO 09/01/10 @ 1,741.03 $22,633.39 13 L/C FROM 09/16/09 TO 09/16/10 @ 78.12 $1,015.56 3 PYMTS FROM 10/01/10 TO 12/01/10 @ 1,766.80 $5,300.40 2 L/C FROM 10/16/10 TO 11/16/10 @ 78.12 $156.24 RECOVERABLE CORP. ADVANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $79.50 $79.50 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$29,185.09 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 119 SW 7TH STREET, REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $236,487.73, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 08/01/09, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on April 15, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 12/06/10 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 929093W PUB: 02/28/11, 03/07/11, 03/14/11, 03/21/11

Bulletin Daily Paper 02/28/11  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Monday February 28, 2011

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