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Oregon kids cavity-prone Dentists say state’s lack of fluoridated water is partly to blame

By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

With the Oregon Legislature set to consider whether to renew about 20 tax credits that offer companies and individuals a break on everything from making movies in the state to producing biomass, some in Central Oregon are expressing their support for programs that focus on energy efficiency and alternative energy. The Business Energy Tax Credit program, or BETC, is designed to help people invest in renewable energy, energy efficiency and recycling. In the next budget cycle, the cost of the credits is estimated to be $38 million. By the 2015 session, the credits are estimated to increase to $250 million. And the program has drawn criticism in the media and from lawmakers because of large subsidies to wind farms and other businesses. But the program has been key in helping some smaller builders across the state, including Central Oregon, adopt new energy-efficiency technologies, said Bruce Sullivan, a green building consultant with Earth Advantage in Bend. Renewable energy projects like installing solar hot water heaters can be economical over the life of the device, he said, when people compare the cost with what they save on energy bills over time. But often, that upfront cost is just too much of a barrier, Sullivan said. See Credits / A4

Egyptian people’s resentment finds a target in an insider New York Times News Service

CAIRO — As Egyptians turned their anger on symbols of the state late last month, torching police stations along with the headquarters of President Hosni Mubarak’s ruling party, they reserved a special hatred for a garish building with black tinted windows in an upscale Related neighborhood, setting fire to it • In a first three times. for Egypt, It belongs to a steel tycoon Mubarak’s and ruling party insider named aides meet Ahmed Ezz, a close friend and with the confidante of Mubarak’s son Gamal. For many years, Ezz opposition, has represented the intersecPage A4 tion of money, politics and power, controlling two-thirds of the steel market, leading the budget committee as a member of Parliament and serving as an officer and loyal lieutenant in the ruling party. Public resentment at the wealth acquired by the politically powerful helped propel the uprising already reshaping the contours of power along the Nile. See Egypt / A4

TOP NEWS INSIDE CRIME: Pharmacies under siege from robbers seeking drugs, Page A3

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Crossword C5, E2

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Oregon

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MON-SAT

The Bulletin We use recycled newsprint An Independent

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The Bulletin

O

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Dentist David Fuller, left, and dental assistant Raquel Cosher donate their time Friday to help Aaron Vazquez get several fillings done. They were participating in Give Kids A Smile day, an annual nationwide event held on the first Friday in February to provide free dental care for kids. Aaron, who’s 17, said it was only the second time he’d ever seen a dentist.

Cavity rates

By Kareem Fahim, Michael Slackman and David Rohde

Abby

By Markian Hawryluk

Newspaper

Vol. 108, No. 38, 28 pages, 5 sections

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, fluoridating the water supply is the single most effective public health intervention for preventing cavities in children. Oregon, which ranked seventh worst in the nation in terms of untreated cavities among third-graders, had the third lowest percentage of residents with access to fluoridated water.

Rates of third-graders with untreated cavities ≤19%

20% to 29%

30% to 39%

Rates of citizens with fluoridated water supply

≥40%

≤39%

No data

WA MT OR

MN ID

WY

SD NE

NV UT

CO

CA AZ

NM

KS OK

WI

IL IN OH WV VA MO KY NC TN AK SC MS AL GA

ID

LA HI

FL

WY

SD NE

NV MA RI CT NJ DE MD DC

VT NH ME

ND MN

NY

TX AK

MT

PA

IA

≥80%

No data

OR MI

60% to 79%

WA

VT NH ME

ND

40% to 59%

UT

CO

CA AZ

NM

KS OK

WI

NY

MI

PA

IA

IL IN OH WV VA MO KY NC TN AK SC MS AL GA

TX AK

LA

FL

HI

MA RI CT NJ DE MD DC

Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Pew Center on the States

regon has been one of the more progressive states in terms of securing medical care for its children. But when it comes to dental health, the state lags behind most of the nation. Oregon ranks seventh worst in terms of the percentage of thirdgraders with untreated tooth decay (at 35.4 percent) among 37 states that submitted data to the National Oral Health Surveillance Survey through 2008. The Oregon Smile Survey, last conducted in 2007, found that two-thirds of kids in third grade had had at least one cavity, a worse showing than all but six other states, including the neighboring states of Washington, Idaho, California and Alaska. “Oregon does have one of the highest decay rates in the nation, and part of it is just in general, we don’t have fluoride in our water,” said Dr. Rex Gibson, a pediatric dentist in Bend. “I realize that’s a controversial subject for a lot of people, but there are volumes of studies that show that it reduced cavities across the board by 60 percent.” Some 27 percent of Oregonians live in areas with fluoridated water. Only two states, Hawaii and New Jersey, have a lower percentage of residents with fluoridated water. Oregon has a long history of debating water fluoridation, but the last major push to fluoridate water failed in the state Legislature in 2007. With a sizable chunk of the population concerned about either the safety of fluoride or government-mandated health interventions, public health officials and dental experts have been forced to consider other ways to lower the high rate of cavities and the financial and emotional costs associated with them. See Cavities / A5

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Taliban’s shadow government Wealthy donors is yet another foe in Afghanistan want a bigger voice in Catholic schools By C.J. Chivers

U.S. soldiers question an Afghan elder during a raid in the village of Alu Khel, Afghanistan.

New York Times News Service

FORWARD OPERATING BASE ANDAR, Afghanistan — Midway through December, Afghan police officers arrested a man who had hidden a fake bomb near a government office in Miri, a village in eastern Afghanistan. The man, who gave the name Muhammad Mir, confessed, saying he wanted to gauge the security force’s reactions to a Taliban attack, according to U.S. intelligence officials. A paper found in his pocket, though, proved more significant than evidence of the Taliban’s reconnaissance. It was handwritten in Pashto, and when translated, it revealed a tax-collection

Tyler Hicks New York Times News Service

ledger of the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan — the resurgent Taliban. Muhammad Alnabi, it showed, had paid the Taliban 1,600 afghanis, or about $37.

Sergeant Akbar had paid 700 afghanis, and Abdulla Kaka had remitted 6,500 — funds for a shadow government to carry on its fight. See Afghanistan / A6

By Paul Vitello New York Times News Service

Private philanthropists have changed the face of public education over the last decade, underwriting the rise of charter schools and promoting remedies that rely heavily on student testing and teacher evaluation. But with much less fanfare, wealthy donors have begun playing a parallel role in the country’s next-largest educational network: Roman Catholic schools. In New York — as in Boston, Baltimore and Chicago — shrinking enrollment and rising school deficits in recent years have deepened the church’s dependence on its cadres of longtime benefactors. Donors have responded generously, but many who were once content to write checks and attend student pageants are now asking to see school budgets, student reading scores and principals’ job evaluations. See Donors / A4


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Kimimasa Mayama / Bloomberg News

Shinya Iwamatsu, president of Bookscan, from left, talks with Yusuke Ohki and Tsuyoshi Fujita, both company directors, at Bookscan’s headquarters in Tokyo. Japan’s cramped living conditions and the arrival of the iPad have created a brisk business in turning paper books into e-books.

Demand for e-books fuels rise in scanning companies By Pavel Alpeyev and Yoshinori Eki Bloomberg News

TOKYO — Yusuke Ohki’s 2,000 books were crowding out his Tokyo apartment, so he scanned them all into an Apple iPad. Six months later, the 28year-old is running a 120-person startup doing the same thing for customers. Japan’s cramped living conditions and the arrival of the iPad in May have spawned as many as 60 companies offering to turn paper books into e-books as publishers have been slow to provide content for new electronic readers. Japan has lagged behind the U.S. in introducing e-books because of a rigid pricing system, uncertainty over copyrights and early problems reproducing Japanese characters on screens, said Toshihiro Takagi, an analyst at market researcher Impress R&D in Tokyo. “People are taking matters in their own hands because the publishers are not meeting the market’s needs,” he said.

Tapping the demand Japan’s $24 billion market for books and magazines, the world’s largest, may see an explosion in e-books as Samsung Electronics’s Galaxy Tab tablet computer and readers by Sharp Corp. and Sony Corp. take on the iPad. Sales of e-books in the country will probably more than double in the next three years to $1.9 billion, according to Tokyobased Yano Research Institute. Ohki and rivals including Denshika.com and Scan Honpo are tapping that demand. Ohki founded Bookscan with childhood friend Shinya Iwamatsu in April, converting books into PDF files that can be read on the iPad, iPhone, Amazon’s Kindle and Barnes & Noble’s Nook. The company charges 100 yen per book for a service called “jisui,” or “cooking for oneself.” “The homemade e-book market will continue to exist as long as the copyright situation isn’t dealt with and people cannot find books they want in electronic format,” said Masashi Ueno, a researcher at Yano Research Institute. “In Japan, copyright agreements vary depending on the author, meaning a publisher could serialize a comic book but may or may not have the rights to

“People are taking matters in their own hands because the publishers are not meeting the market’s needs.” — Toshihiro Takagi, analyst at market researcher Impress R&D in Tokyo

publish it as a separate book.” Japan’s copyright laws permit users to digitize protected works for personal and family use, according to Seichi Higuchi, the secretary general of Japan Book Publishers Association. Reproduction of a purchased work by a third party requires publisher’s permission, Higuchi said. Bookscan requires customers to tick a box to say they have this permission. “There are more than 30 or 40 scanning companies and a huge amount of books are scanned every day, so I can hardly believe all the scanning is legal,” Higuchi said in an interview in Tokyo last month. “The pressure is building on the publishing industry to meet consumer needs before these homemade contents begin to circulate illegally,” said Nobuo Kurahashi, an analyst at Mizuho Financial Group in Tokyo. “This is a sign of latent demand.”

Impact of iPad Japanese will buy $815 million worth of e-books in the fiscal year ending March 31, most of it comics for mobile phones, Ueno said. Electronic books were equivalent to 8.7 percent of the $4 billion market for paper print in the U.S. in the first 10 months of 2010, Association of American Publishers said in December. Sales of e-books in the country are set to almost triple to $2.8 billion by 2015, according to Forrester Research Inc. in Cambridge, Mass. Sales of iPads and web-based document storage services such as Evernote and Dropbox have helped spur the cottage industry. “The iPad’s release is the biggest factor in making this business possible,” Ohki said. The Tokyo-based company in July

bought industrial scanners to reduce the four-month wait faced by its more than 12,000 customers, he said. Sales of consumer scanners at PFU rose 80 percent in June and more than doubled the following month because of the iPad’s release, according to Tadashi Oura, the head of marketing for imaging products at the company. The Tokyo-based subsidiary of Fujitsu chartered flights to rush the devices from its factories in China to meet the spike in demand, Oura said.

Lack of content, low demand Japanese buyers of Amazon’s Kindle reader are redirected to the company’s U.S. site since no Japanese-language titles are available. Lack of content and low demand forced Tokyo- based Sony to stop selling e-readers in its home market in 2007. Osakabased Panasonic gave up in 2008. Sony, which resumed Japan sales of its e-readers in December, formed a venture last year with mobile-phone operator KDDI Corp., Asahi Shimbun Publishing Corp. and Toppan Printing Co. to provide electronic publications. The group will take on an e-book alliance of NTT DoCoMo, Japan’s largest wireless carrier, and Dai Nippon Printing Co. “We are at year zero for ebooks in Japan,” Toshihiro Konno, who heads the venture between Sony, KDDI, Asahi and Toppan, said at a briefing in December. Konno estimates Japanese will buy about 780,000 e-readers and $1 billion worth of content in the year to March 31. Meanwhile, customers are turning to scanners to make room in a country where average living space per person is about 398 square feet, or almost half that in the U.S., according to real estate service provider Mitsui Fudosan Co. Satoshi Tagomori, 28, who works for a pharmaceutical company in Kyushu, southwestern Japan, had his books scanned to make room for his newborn child, cutting the space occupied by books in his 50-square meter apartment by about 75 percent. “There was just no more room for books when my son was born,” Satoshi said in a phone interview. “Plus, I was worried about the shelves falling over.”

Survey finds users take risks at Wi-Fi hot spots By Wailin Wong Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — U.S. consumers love Wi-Fi access but don’t always have safe habits when they visit hot spots, according to a new survey by industry group Wi-Fi Alliance. The survey polled 1,054 Americans over the age of 18 through online interviews. The results showed that 32 percent had tried to use a Wi-Fi network that wasn’t their own during the past 12 months, up from 18 percent in

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EBay spruces up its marketplace in a bid to win back users

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December 2008. But when asked whether sharing a Wi-Fi network password or a house key required more trust, 40 percent of survey participants chose the former. “We do feel like we’re at a point where ... people are using a lot of Wi-Fi and doing more with Wi-Fi, Kelly Davis-Felner, marketing director for Wi-Fi Alliance. “The average household might have a couple of notebooks, a tablet, a smart phone, gaming devices or advanced digital home (devices)

like set-top boxes all connecting via a Wi-Fi network.” According to Wi-Fi Alliance, about 201 million households use Wi-Fi networks, and there are about 750,000 hot spots worldwide. Davis-Felner said consumers should set strong passwords for their wireless networks by changing the default password. Web surfers should also take safeguards when they use public hot spots, most of which haven’t turned on security protections.

SAN FRANCISCO — EBay was growing so fast early in its history that Meg Whitman, its former chief executive, liked to joke that “a monkey could drive this train.” John Donahoe, her successor, still has the company on the track, but eBay’s competitors are moving a whole lot faster. Three years into the job, Donahoe has made only modest progress in improving growth at the online retailer. He has given the website a cosmetic makeover and recast it as an outlet mall where retailers can unload last season’s merchandise, instead of being an all-encompassing auction house. “I think we’re turning a corner,” he said last week. But while eBay’s marketplace revenue grew 8 percent to $5.7 billion last year, eBay is still losing market share to its rivals, as global e-commerce sales increased 18.9 percent in 2010. Amazon.com widened its lead last year while Groupon, the daily deal service, and a number of specialty retailing sites like Etsy began nipping at eBay’s heels.

‘On the offensive’ Donahoe said he plans to tell Wall Street securities analysts Thursday at the company’s analyst day that eBay can now “go on the offensive” by building on its early momentum with mobile shoppers and that it will better integrate sister products like PayPal. EBay’s troubles were a long time coming. The company managed to annoy many of the people who sold goods on eBay and those who bought them. Buyers complained of clutter, irrelevant search results and fraud. Sellers grumbled about what they saw as excessive fees

and eBay’s favoritism of big retailers over small merchants. Growth in sales volume, the value of merchandise that changed hands on the site, started to flatten in 2006. After the recession began, the volume declined — even though eBay used to brag that it thrived in tough times because users emptied their closets and attics for extra cash.

A custom look After countless tweaks, eBay’s marketplace website now has a noticeably cleaner design to keep buyers focused on the merchandise. Donahoe also invested in improving eBay’s search engine so users can better sort through its more than 200 million products. Giving various product categories a custom look, rather than a generic design, is another way eBay is trying to compete. EBay thinks users shop differently depending on the kind of product they are looking for, and catering to that translates into more sales. Despite all the effort going into sprucing up eBay’s marketplace, half a dozen buyers and sellers interviewed recently did not notice any cosmetic changes. But they cited a few other upgrades that they said made buying and selling easier. James Chen, owner of Audio Images, an audio equipment store in San Francisco, said he stopped selling on eBay because of excessive fees around three years ago. But in December, he returned to selling on eBay and discovered that it automatically suggested product descriptions — a feature introduced last year — so that he did not have to write them himself. “I’m very happy with things,” Chen said. “Buyers are just buying.”

John Donahoe, CEO of eBay, says the company can now “go on the offensive” after years of losing market share to its rivals. Jim Wilson New York Times News Service

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THE BULLETIN • Monday, February 7, 2011 A3

T S CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Obama aims to reconnect with U.S. businesses By Peter Wallsten and Zachary A. Goldfarb The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — The White House’s campaign to rebuild ties with corporate America gets the ultimate photo opportunity today when President Obama crosses Lafayette Park and steps into the imposing headquarters of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. The gesture may surprise Americans who recall that Obama, just four months ago, said the group may have used foreign money to air ads attacking Democrats, or that a senior aide called the Chamber’s political tactics a “threat to our democracy.” And the applause certain to fill the Chamber building might seem jarring given the tens of millions of dollars the group spent to fight Obama’s signature health care overhaul and deliver the House majority to the Republicans. Both sides are eager to show a new era of warm feelings, with the Chamber in need of bipartisan bona fides and Obama seeking credibility with centrist voters and corporate donors as he ramps up his reelection campaign. But today is also likely to show that tensions remain close to the surface. Obama, even as he calls for cooperation on issues such as revamping the corporate tax code, passing a South Korea free trade deal and fixing the nation’s schools, will reiterate his defense of the new restrictions on insurance companies that make up the core of the health care law that the Chamber wants repealed. And he will implore corporations to spend profits that many are stockpiling. Previewing his Chamber remarks in his Saturday radio address, Obama said he will tell company executives that they have an “obligation” to “hire our workers, and pay decent wages, and invest in the future of this nation.” Chamber officials, meanwhile, say that they still expect their campaign spending next year to exceed the group’s $50 million budget of 2010. They say their organization does not get involved in presidential politics. If spending follows the 2010 model, however, it will go almost entirely toward helping the GOP extend its House margin and possibly win control of the Senate. “The Chamber’s going to continue to make judgments on an issue-by-issue basis on what we think is best for the business community, and we’re not going to make trade-offs based on feel-good opportunities,” said Thomas Collamore, a Chamber spokesman.

Disney looks to the cradle in quest to expand business By Brooks Barnes New York Times News Service

LOS ANGELES — The Walt Disney Co. has started an ambitious and risky march toward the one corner of childhood it does not already dominate: newborns. Late last month, the company quietly began pressing its newest priority, Disney Baby, in 580 maternity hospitals in the United States. A representative visits a new mother and offers a free Disney Cuddly Bodysuit, a variation of the classic Onesie. In bedside demonstrations, the bilingual representatives extol

the product’s bells and whistles — extra soft! durable! better sizing! — and ask mothers to sign up for e-mail alerts from DisneyBaby .com. More than 200,000 bodysuits will be given away by May, when Amazon.com is set to begin selling 85 styles for a starting price of $9.99 for two; Nordstrom and Target will follow with more Disney Baby items, including hats. “If ever there was an opportunity for a trusted brand to enter a market and provide a better product and experience, it’s this,” said Robert Iger, chief executive of Disney.

The endeavor dances close to a flame. Disney has suffered harsh criticism in recent years over products directed at the very young. The fiercest battle has involved Baby Einstein, the Disneyowned maker of “developmental and entertainment” videos and toys for babies and toddlers. The Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood, a nonprofit organization, claimed victory in 2009 when Disney, apparently acknowledging that the products did not turn babies into geniuses after all, offered some Baby Einstein refunds.

But Disney has moved on. In this new venture, the company gains access to the maternity hospitals through a company called Our365, a business that sells bedside baby pictures. Our365 pays hospitals for exclusive access, and companies like Disney pay Our365 to promote their own products. Our365 also has Fisher-Price and Procter & Gamble as clients. It is unclear whether mothers know of Our365’s financial ties to these companies. Disney estimates the North American baby market, including staples like formula, to be

worth $36.3 billion annually. Its executives talk about tapping into that jackpot as if they were waging a war. “Apparel is only a beachhead,” said Andy Mooney, chairman of Disney Consumer Products.

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Matt McInnis / New York Times News Service

Chet Hibbard, owner of EW Moore and Son Pharmacy, in Bingham, Maine, stopped carrying the highly addictive painkiller OxyContin last July after two robbers in ski goggles demanded it at knifepoint. More than 1,800 pharmacy robberies have taken place across the U.S. over the last three years, usually by young white men seeking opiate painkillers, including OxyContin, Vicodin, Xanax and Percocet.

Pharmacies besieged by robbers seeking drugs By Abby Goodnough New York Times News Service

BINGHAM, Maine — The orange signs posted throughout Chet Hibbard’s pharmacy here relay a blunt warning: We Do Not Stock OxyContin. Hibbard stopped dispensing the highly addictive painkiller last July, when two robbers in ski goggles demanded it at knifepoint one afternoon as shocked customers looked on. It was one of a rash of armed robberies at Maine drug stores in 2010, a sharp increase that has rattled pharmacists and put the police on high alert. “I want people to know before they even get in the door that we don’t have it,” Hibbard said of OxyContin, which the authorities say is the most common target of pharmacy robberies here. “Outside of hiring an armed guard to be in here 24/7, I don’t know what else to do.”

Prevention tactics Maine’s problem is especially stark, but it is hardly the only state dealing with pharmacy robberies, one of the more jarring effects of the prescription drug abuse epidemic that has left drug stores borrowing some heist prevention tactics from the more traditional targets, banks. In at least one case,

“I want people to know before they even get in the door that we don’t have it (OxyContin). Outside of hiring an armed guard to be in here 24/7, I don’t know what else to do.” — Chet Hibbard, owner of EW Moore and Son Pharmacy

a tiny tracking device affixed to a bottle let the police easily track a thief after a robbery. More than 1,800 pharmacy robberies have taken place nationally over the last three years, typically conducted by young men seeking opioid painkillers and other drugs to sell or feed their own addictions. The most common targets are oxycodone (the main ingredient in OxyContin), hydrocodone (the main ingredient in Vicodin) and Xanax. The robbers are brazen and desperate. In Rockland, Maine, one wielded a machete as he leapt over a pharmacy counter to snatch the painkiller oxycodone. In Satellite Beach, Fla., a robber

threatened a pharmacist with a cordless drill last week, and in North Highlands, Calif., a holdup last summer led to a shootout that left a pharmacy worker dead.

Customers buzzed in The crime wave has spurred pharmacists to tighten security measures and add ones they may never have imagined in the past. Many have upgraded their surveillance cameras; some have installed bulletproof glass and counters high enough to keep would-be robbers from jumping them, giving these pharmacies the aesthetic of an urban liquor store. In Tulsa, Okla., where there was a steep increase in drug store robberies last year, at least one pharmacist now requires customers to be buzzed in the door. Meanwhile, the police are quietly experimenting with new tools. In Lewiston, Maine, last fall, a Rite Aid pharmacist handed a robber who threatened to shoot her five bottles of OxyContin, including one that contained a tracking device. According to court records, the device led the police to the suspect’s home on a rural road shortly after he fled the store. They gathered evidence, arrested the suspect a few days later and indicted him last month.

YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio — Two men angry over a dispute at an Ohio fraternity house party left the gathering and returned Sunday, spraying bullets into a crowd and killing a Youngstown State University student who was trying to separate two groups, authorities said. Eleven other people were injured, including a 17-year-old with a critical head wound. The men were arrested and charged later Sunday with aggravated murder, shooting into a house and 11 counts of felonious assault, Youngstown police Chief Jimmy Hughes said.

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Sri Lanka floods displace more than 1 million people McClatchy-Tribune News Service COLOMBO, Sri Lanka — More than a million people have been displaced by flooding in north-central and northeastern Sri Lanka, officials said Sunday, as monsoon rains fell for the sixth consecutive day. The floods were widespread and were affecting roads, agricultural land and town centers, the Disaster Management Center said. The center said Sunday that it had confirmed eight deaths and that two other people were missing. Many areas remained inaccessible, so the full extent of the damage was not yet known,

the center said. More than 250,000 displaced people were reported to be living in government camps. Others had been taken in by friends and relatives or had found refuge in other buildings, including temples. The government has mobilized navy boats and air force helicopters to help rescue marooned residents, mostly in the hard-hit north-central districts of Anuradhapura and Polonnaurwa and in Trincomalee, northeast of the capital, Colombo. Flooding in the same areas last month killed 43 and displaced 1.1 million people.


A4 Monday, February 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Egypt Continued from A1 Ezz’s world has come undone. He is treated as a liability by an old guard intent on saving itself from fed-up and furious protesters. He is under investigation on suspicion of corruption. His assets have been frozen and his right to travel taken away. He has denied allegations of corruption in the past, and his location was not known Sunday. Now his name is part of the derisive chants in Tahrir Square, a symbol of all that was wrong with Mubarak’s government.

“Ahmed Ezz sucks the blood of the people,” said Osama Mohamed Afifi, a student who joined the protesters in the square on Sunday. Hosni Mubarak’s Egypt has long functioned as a state where wealth bought political power and political power bought great wealth. While facts are difficult to come by, Egyptians watching the rise of a moneyed class widely believe that self-dealing, crony capitalism and corruption are endemic, represented by a group of rich businessmen aligned with Gamal Mubarak, the president’s son, as well as government ministers and ruling party members.

C OV ER S T OR I ES “The people around Gamal became the wealthiest group in the country,” said Hala Mustafa, a political scientist who had quit the ruling party years ago saying it was not committed to political reform. Now, Ezz and other officials “are being offered up to the public” as scapegoats, said Samer Shehata, an assistant professor of Arab politics at Georgetown who has interviewed Ezz. “The NDP is a group of individual and financial interests masquerading as a political organization,” he added. “There’s little difference between Ahmed Ezz and Gamal Mubarak.”

Donors Continued from A1 In the jargon of education reform, they want transparency and accountability; and though the church bureaucracy has resisted similar demands from other constituents in the past, the donors are getting pretty much what they want. To the delight of some educators and the discomfort of others, major contributors have won a voice in decisionmaking at every level, from the staffing of the schools to the frank financial self-examination that has nudged the Archdiocese of New York toward the most severe school consolidation in its history. Church officials announced last month that falling enrollments and rising deficits would force them to close 27 schools, one-tenth of their total, by the end of this academic year. “The relationship between the church and its contributors used to be basically, ‘Pray, pay and obey — give us money, we’ll take it from there,’” said Francis Butler, president of Foundations and Donors Interested in Catholic Activities, a national network of Catholic philanthropies. “But donors are much more proactive today. They are concerned about the quality of the schools, the leadership; they’re drilling down into these problems.”

$100,000 donation Emilio Morenatti / The Associated Press

An Egyptian protester sleeps on the wheels of a tank at Tahrir Square in Cairo on Sunday. Egypt’s vice president met with a broad representation of major opposition groups for the first time Sunday and agreed to allow freedom of the press and to release those detained since anti-government protests began.

In a first, Mubarak’s aides meet with the opposition By David D. Kirkpatrick and David E. Sanger New York Times News Service

CAIRO — Leaders of the Egyptian democracy movement vowed Sunday to escalate their pressure for the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak even as his government portrayed itself as already in the midst of U.S.-approved negotiations to end the uprising. The government announced that the transition had begun with a historic meeting between Vice President Omar Suleiman and two representatives of the Muslim Brotherhood, the outlawed Islamist group the Egyptian government has sought to repress for many years as a threat to stability. They met as part of a group of about 50 prominent Egyptians and opposition figures, including officials of the small, recognized opposition parties, as well as a handful of young people who helped start the protest movement. While both sides acknowledged the meeting as unprecedented, its significance became another skirmish in the battle between the president and the protesters. Suleiman released a statement — widely reported on state TV and instantly a focal point in Washington — declaring that the meeting had produced a “con-

Credits Continued from A1 “The tax credits make it possible for people to overcome that first cost obstacle,” he said. It helps builders he works with go beyond basic energy-efficiency standards, he said, and build highly energy-efficient homes. Builders are able to get up to $12,000 in tax credits for adding things like a renewable energy system and high insulation levels. “One of the key recipients of the BETC has been Bend Habitat for Humanity, who (is) using those credits to put solar systems on their Habitat homes,” Sullivan said. He noted that the homeowners are seeing $5 energy bills with the improvements. The purpose of the tax credits isn’t to pay for all of the energy-efficiency features of a home, he said, but to pay for enough to get people’s attention and provide an incentive for them to move forward. “The whole purpose of this is to get a few builders to adopt these things so all the builders will see what a great thing it is,” Sullivan said, “and it pulls them gently into the future.” While some critics might object to the cost of the tax credits,

Egyptians line up as banks reopen Hundreds of Egyptians queued outside banks to withdraw funds as lenders opened for the first time in more than a week Sunday amid protests demanding the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak. At a Cairo-based branch of Commercial International Bank Egypt, one man stood at the main door taking names of customers. “Banks need to open more branches,” said Mahmoud Eliwa, a 68-year-old retiree who left after learning he needed to wait for about 100 people before him. The central bank moved 5 billion pounds ($854 million) of cash into the financial system as depositors gained access to their savings. — Bloomberg News sensus” about a path to reform, including the promise to form a committee to recommend constitutional changes by early March. The other elements echoed pledges Mubarak had already made, including a limit on how many

he said, in the long run conserving energy means that fewer power plants need to be built to keep up with demand. Whether the programs and projects supported by the BETC are worth the tax dollars is something for the Legislature to wrestle with, said Mike Riley, executive director of the Environmental Center in Bend.

Part of Bend 2030 But energy efficiency and renewable energy are important issues to Central Oregon residents, he said, noting that those issues came up multiple times in the Bend 2030 planning process. “There’s clearly been problems with the program, but I don’t think you throw the baby out with the bath water,” he said. “We learn from that and go forward.” Michael Scannell, with Woodcraft Building in Bend, is applying for the High Performance Home program that is a part of the BETC. With the tax credits and other incentives, he would probably save around $10,000, he said, because he will include things like a double wall and dense insulation as well as a solar hot water heater. It’s a spec home, he said, so he’s

terms a president can serve. Leaders of the protest movement denounced Suleiman’s portrayal of the meeting as a political ploy intended to suggest that some in their ranks were collaborating. Though the movement has only a loose leadership, it has coalesced around a unified set of demands, centered on Mubarak’s resignation, but also including the dissolution of one-party rule and revamping the constitution that protected it, and Suleiman gave no ground on any of those demands. “We did not come out with results,” said Mohamed Morsy, a Brotherhood leader who attended, while others explained that the Brotherhood had attended only to reiterate its demands and show openness to dialogue. The standoff over the meeting underscored the conflicting narratives about the next chapter of the revolt that has shaken Egypt and the wider Arab world. More than 100,000 turned out again on Sunday in the capital’s central Tahrir Square — more than expected as the work week resumed here. And some of the movement’s young organizers, who were busy meeting to organize their many small groups into a unified structure, said they were considering more large-scale demonstrations in other cities.

hoping people will be willing to pay a little bit more for an energyefficient home. And the BETC helps pay for the energy upgrades, he said — he couldn’t afford to do them without the credits. “I think that’s the future, and if you’re not building that way, eventually I think you’re going to be falling behind,” Scannell said. At SolAire Homebuilders in Bend, the company was able to install a solar hot water heater and photovoltaic panels on its Bend headquarters, said Cindi O’Neil, vice president of sales and marketing. And because the major renewable energy additions were not part of the appraisal, the company could not get a loan for them, she said. “The incentives that we received from the Business Energy Tax Credit were very helpful in defraying the cost,” she said. Keeping the BETC would also help create green jobs, she said, for people who sell and install solar panels, wind turbines, highefficiency heating and cooling systems, and more. “These are great jobs, and they’re green jobs,” O’Neil said. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or at kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

At Our Lady Queen of Angels School in New York, a Wall Street financier, Charles Durkin, and a small group of fellow benefactors have donated a total of roughly $100,000 a year for about 15 years. Until about five years ago, the extent of their involvement was to visit several times each year and shake hands with grateful children, as Durkin, 72, did one recent morning. Yet the next day, Durkin followed up with a long working meeting, poring over test scores and talking with the principal about the progress she was making with the students.

Ruby Washington / New York Times News Service

Charles Durkin, a Wall Street financier, talks with Joanne Walsh, principal of Our Lady Queen of Angels School, during a school visit in New York City last month. When they were done, the two agreed that teachers might need some coaching in math instruction — and Durkin agreed to pay for it. The principal of Our Lady Queen of Angels, Joanne Walsh, has embraced what she calls the contributors’ “financial and moral support.” However, her predecessor, Roman Pitio, who contends he was replaced about five years ago at a benefactor’s urging “because our test scores weren’t going up,” described the relationship between donors and educators as “a bit of a Faustian bargain.” “I had these guys walk through the building once and tell me, ‘Get rid of this teacher,’” Pitio said. “I mean, maybe they mean well, but they’re from another world.” Durkin and several hundred other wealthy contributors, most of them from Wall Street, have long been a quiet but essential part of the New York archdiocesan schools. By various estimates, their donations and scholarships total $15 million to $20 million annually — nearly matching the $23 million the archdiocese provides in subsidies to all of its 270 schools. Russell Carson, a billionaire venture capitalist who has been a major contributor for more than a decade, said that donors’ demands for more information were based on an emerging desire to “make sure we were getting a good return” on a sizable investment.

‘Venture philanthropy’ Experts say the donors’ increasing assertiveness is partly a reflection of a new ethos in giving of all types. “The new thing is ‘venture philanthropy,’ where you apply the principles of venture capitalism to achieving the goals of philanthropy,” said Diane Ravitch, a New York University professor and author of “The Death and Life of the Great American School System.” “The mentality of Wall Street favors consolidation and downsizing,” she said. “The sense of the larger mission can get lost.” Catherine Hickey, who was superintendent of the archdiocesan school system from 1988 to 2007, said she was always grateful for donors’ financial help. “But at the same time,” she added, “these are very strong-willed people, used to making decisions and used to having their way. At times, the decisions they wanted us to make were based on good business judgment, but not necessarily on sound educational principles.”

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C OV ER S T ORY

Cavities Continued from A1 “That 2007 Smile Survey was a shocker and a sobering report for us in dentistry in Oregon,” said Dr. Gordon Empey, an oral health consultant with Oregon’s Department of Human Services. “It prompted us to do a number of things and pay attention to oral health.”

Late start Oregon didn’t even have a formal oral health program within its public health division until 2005, and Empey says that kept the state from implementing the type of community-based prevention programs that can reduce cavity rates. Most county health departments in the state lack the staffing and resources to tackle dental health issues, leaving large swaths of the state without the infrastructure to implement such programs. The state’s de facto dental health program has been an uncoordinated hodgepodge of state and community efforts that at best target only a small portion of children in the state. Children’s dental health is left to the responsibility of individual parents, who often themselves are unaware or unconcerned with how to prevent cavities and maintain good oral health. The state’s taxpayers end up footing the bill for many of those cavities and the expensive restorative work that follows, costs that could be reduced by investing in preventive care and dental hygiene education efforts. With no organized way to reach parents of younger children, most interventions have used the infrastructure of the school system, providing elementary school students with preventive measures such as sealants or fluoride tablets. Providing sealants — clear plastic coatings applied to back teeth to protect the pits and fissures where plaque is likely to grow but hard to remove — is the second highest-rated, evidencebased practice recognized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Task Force on Community Prevention. Last year in Oregon, dental hygienists visited 140 schools to apply sealants, and state officials are now trying to partner with communities to make sealants available in more schools. Many schools also participate in a fluoride tablet program in which students are given chewable tablets every morning. Those tablets can make up for a lack of water fluoridation but are not used universally, and there’s a lag time before they show any effect. “The fluoride tablets are not designed to prevent cavities in current teeth. They’re designed to add ingredients to teeth as they are growing and developing,” Gibson said. “Does it prevent cavities? Yes. But only in future teeth.” That means many kids will develop multiple cavities well before school age. Some children have so many cavities at an early age, dentists cannot treat them in a normal office setting. “There are 2-year-olds who have a cavity in every single tooth, and they’re not going to sit for treatment in the clinic, so we take them to the hospital and we put them under and fix all their teeth,” said Dr. Steve Christensen, a pediatric dentist in Bend. “And I extract a lot of them, too, because they’re just beyond repair.” It’s one of the reasons water fluoridation is such an effective tool for addressing dental issues across the entire population. Virtually everyone will get a dose from the water consumed or used in cooking. According to the American Dental Association, water fluoridation provides the highest bang for the buck, saving $38 for every $1 spent. Christensen said water fluoridation wouldn’t be necessary, however, if everybody took the proper preventive steps, adequately cleaning teeth and visiting a dentist for preventive care. “Eighty percent of the cavities are in 20 percent of the population, and that 20 percent of the population are the people who are on Medicaid and on welfare. They’re the lowest socioeconomic population because they’re not educated. That’s the population that’s going to benefit most from fluoride and sealants,” Christensen said. “Some days we have all the rich moms from Awbrey Butte bringing their kids in, and we won’t see a cavity all day. In La Pine and Prineville, they have all the cavities.” That income-based disparity was borne out in the 2007 Smile Survey. In schools where more than 75 percent of students qualified for free or reduced lunches, a proxy for low-income status, children were twice as likely to

have untreated decay as kids in schools with less than 25 percent qualifying, and significantly less likely to have seen a dentist in the past year. Dental health experts are trying to move interventions further upstream to help prevent cavities in younger children. The state recently implemented its First Tooth program, which aims to enlist pediatricians to help educate parents about dental health. Parents typically bring children in for well-child visits in the first year of life, but won’t bring them in to see a dentist until much later. Some children don’t see a dentists at all unless they’re experiencing a problem. “Just directing parents to come in for a dental checkup when their kid is around a year, a year and a half old is so empowering,” Gibson said. “Because I can start educating those parents so at least they know what’s going on. If we don’t see a kid until they’re 3 or older, there’s a high likelihood those kids are going to have cavities.” Area dentists are also reaching out to moms clubs in the region to help parents learn how to maximize their children’s dental health and teach them good hygiene. “I tell moms the best thing you can do for you child to be at low risk for cavities is take care of your own teeth,” Christensen said. Children are born with a fairly mild form of the bacteria that causes cavities. More aggressive forms of the bacteria are passed on from mother to child through direct contact, such as kissing children on the lips or cleaning off a pacifier by putting in it their mouths. Interventions that target pregnant women have proven successful in reducing cavities in their kids. Even simply educating new or expecting mothers on dental hygiene could pay huge dividends. Dr. Blair Struble, a Bend orthodontist, regularly visits elementary schools to teach kids about proper oral hygiene in kidfriendly language. “You’d be amazed at how many don’t know what a dentist is or have never been to the dentist,”

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“Eighty percent of the cavities are in 20 percent of the population, and that 20 percent of the population are the people who are on Medicaid and on welfare. ... That’s the population that’s going to benefit most from fluoride and sealants.” — Dr. Steve Christensen, pediatric dentist in Bend she said. “When you give them floss, they just go crazy.”

Concerns about access It’s likely that many have not seen dentists because they have no insurance and can’t afford the cost. The 2007 Smile Survey in Oregon found that only 59 percent of lower-income children had seen a dentist in the past year, compared with 85 percent of higher-income children. And nationwide, twice as many people lack dental insurance as health insurance. With last year’s expansion of the Oregon Health Plan as well as the addition of the Healthy Kids program that offers affordable coverage for children who don’t qualify for OHP, the state has extended medical and dental insurance to nearly all kids in Oregon. But there are concerns about whether the supply of dentists is sufficient to meet the new demand. “I’ve advocated since that was implemented that as a state, we need to come together and take a look at the issue of access to care,” Empey said. “If, in fact, we’re going to cover more and more children — or all the children, for that matter — and we are having trouble with access currently for dental services, what does that mean for going forward?” Gibson said he receives calls every week from parents with children that need immediate care, but their assigned OHP dentists can’t get them in for several weeks. Many dentists serving OHP kids will limit the number they can see each week because of the low rates paid by the program. “Everybody wants to see dentists as altruistic, and as a pediatric dentist my heart goes out to the kids,” Gibson said. “On the

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other side of it, I have employees that do want their paycheck. I have to be able to at least make enough on that side of it to cover expenses.” In 2008, OHP, which is Oregon’s Medicaid plan, reimbursed dentists at 46 percent of median fees charged by dentists. That could be why in the previous year, only 35 percent of kids on OHP received any dental care, compared with 58 percent of kids with private dental insurance. “It’s challenging because our reimbursement rates are very low,” said Christina Swartz, public and professional education coordinator for the Oregon Dental Association. “A lot of our dentists will actually accept OHP patients, and because of the paperwork and the problems they encounter, they end up giving free care instead of trying to go through the system to be reimbursed for a fourth of the overhead of what it actually costs to treat the patient.” Other states have turned to a new type of dental provider, sometimes called dental therapists, who can provide much of the primary care dental work under the supervision of a dentist. They’re akin to midlevel medical providers such as physician assistants or nurse practitioners. Oral health experts in Oregon are currently exploring that model of provider as well in hopes of improving access to care for OHP patients. “Organized dentistry is resisting that,” Empey said. “I think we’re going to have to go through a decade or so of having that discussion, similar to what medicine did with their midlevel provider situation a few years ago before they’re accepted and utilized in connection with improving access. That is a growing trend, and I don’t think we can stop it.”

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THE BULLETIN • Monday, February 7, 2011 A5 But dentists argue there’s sufficient provider capacity now to treat all the kids on OHP, particularly if OHP paid better rates and reduced the paperwork burden. “Putting a midlevel provider out there is not going to change a thing, because there are enough people out there who are willing to donate their time and do the work. It’s not a matter of providers, it’s a problem of educating families to make it a priority,” Struble said. “We can patch the filling, but if parents never see it as a priority, we’re still just chasing a moving target.” Other states have made a concerted effort to encourage dentists to take more Medicaid patients by raising rates and streamlining the administrative process. Tennessee and Alabama both doubled the rate of children being seen by dentists in just four years after overhauling their Medicaid programs.

“A losing battle” “As a dental community, we are doing what we can, but it would be great if we had more assistance from the county or the state or the federal level,” Gibson said. “We’re fighting a losing battle. It’s not something a group of dentists are going to be able to cure or solve.” Oregon officials are hoping the next Smile Survey in 2012 will show they’ve started to make some progress. The state scored worse on almost every measure in 2007 than it had in 2002. But it takes time to build stronger teeth, better hygiene habits and public awareness. It may take another generation of school kids before Oregon can rise above its dental doldrums. “In terms of the disease rates, I wouldn’t expect us to turn the corner on that for another five to 10 years as we implement more of these prevention programs and work on dental access,” Empey said. “If we can hold the line and stop the increase (in the 2012 survey), I think we can be optimistic.” Markian Hawryluk can be reached at 541-617-7814 or at mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com.

Missionary’s killing rattles nerves along Texas border By James C. McKinley Jr. New York Times News Service

PHARR, Texas — Mexico has always had a reputation here as a place where things can go wrong in a hurry. But the fatal shooting of a Texas missionary across the border late last month has reinforced the widely held belief in this region that the country has become a lawless war zone. The missionary, Nancy Davis, 59, who had worked in Mexico for decades, was shot in the back of the head by robbers in a pickup truck who had pursued her and her husband for miles in Tamaulipas state. Her husband, Samuel Davis, piloted his bullet-ridden truck across the two-mile international bridge here, driving pell-mell against traffic on the wrong side of the bridge to evade the pursuers and reach a U.S. hospital. He arrived on the U.S. side too late to save her. State Department officials say that 79 U.S. citizens were murdered in Mexico in 2009, and that at least 60 were killed last year from January to November, though an official annual figure has yet to be compiled. The numbers have been rising since 2007, when 38 U.S. citizens were murdered in Mexico, State Department records show. The heaviest toll is in El Paso, where many residents cross the border regularly to conduct business or visit family. In early November, for instance, four U.S. citizens were killed in separate crimes over one weekend. All were ambushed and shot to death while visiting Ciudad Juarez, which has become one of the most murderous cities in the world.


A6 Monday, February 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Afghanistan Continued from A1 The scrap in Mir’s pocket, hinting at both boldness and organization, became one part of a gradually expanding portrait of how the Taliban has organized and fought its guerrilla war in a corner of rural Afghanistan.

Underground network The picture is of an underground government by local fighters, organized under the Taliban’s banner, who have established the rudiments of a civilian administration to complement their shadowy combat force. They run schools, collect taxes and adjudicate civil disputes in Islamic courts. And when they fight, their gunmen and bomb makers are aided by an intelligence and support network that includes villagers, who signal for them and provide them shelter, and tunnels in which to elude capture or find medical care. As part of the Obama administration’s campaign to subdue a sprawling insurgency and create a durable Afghan government, the military sent thousands of soldiers last year into rural areas under the influence, if not outright control, of the Taliban. One of those task forces, the 3rd Battalion of the 187th Infantry Regiment, arrived in Miri in September to help establish a government presence in a place — though it is the official seat of the Ghazni province’s Andar District — where government had been sporadic for a decade. Almost five months later — through prisoner interrogations, informants’ reports, intercepted radio chatter, surveillance of fighters’ funerals, Taliban documents, nearly 200 gunfights, and captured photographs, equipment and bombs — the Americans have begun to understand how the latter-day Taliban functions here.

Shadow government The analysis outlines two distinct elements of Taliban structure: a quasi government and the military arm that empowers it. On one level, the Taliban has firmly re-established its hold over civilian life in rural Ghazni. Even with a U.S. battalion patrolling Andar and the neighboring Deh Yak District each day, the Taliban runs 28 known schools;

C OV ER S T ORY

Musician keeps a tradition alive By Borzou Daragahi Los Angeles Times

KABUL, Afghanistan — The master sits in a newly painted house on Kharabat Street, in the oldest quarter of this ancient city. He plies his craft with his fingers, palms and wrists, beating, tapping and scraping the oiled surface of his drums as if he were listening to the secret pulse of the universe. “Tabla has its own notes,” Asif Mahmoud says. “It speaks to us. It speaks from my heart. When I play tabla, I open my heart to listeners.” The 63-year-old Mahmoud keeps alive an ancient flame, an authentic Afghan culture that has managed to survive decades of war, grinding poverty and religious extremists.

Historic music quarter Few pay much attention to Mahmoud or to Kharabat Street, but it was once among the most storied places in Central Asia. More than a century and a half ago, the Afghan monarch Emir Sher Ali Khan established the area as Kabul’s music quarter. Artists, musicians, composers and instrument makers flocked here, living in mud-brick houses with courtyards. Indian tradesman lived nearby, giving the area a cosmopolitan atmosphere. Mahmoud began studying music when he was 8 and was quickly recognized as a prodigy. He won a scholarship to study in India, but returned to Kharabat just before Afghanistan’s major troubles began in the 1970s. The musicians back then tried hard to tone down Kharabat’s reputation to make it more palatable to pious Islamic tastes. circulates public statements by leaflets at night; adjudicates land, water rights and property disputes through religious courts; levies taxes on residents; and punishes Afghans labeled as collaborators. “There are tangible indicators that a shadow government does exist and has been strong for the past two or three years,” said 1st Lt. Michael Marietta, the

Borzou Daragahi / Los Angeles Times

Asif Mahmoud plays the tabla at his home in Kabul, Afghanistan. Then the 1980 Soviet invasion plunged much of the nation into a series of overlapping wars. But Moscow’s Communist elite were keen to be seen as promoters of Afghan culture. Mahmoud was flown several times to perform in Russia. After the Soviets left, the Moscow-backed government of President Najibullah was also kind to musicians, bestowing gifts of flutes to the people of Kharabat. But dark days were coming.

heading to Britain, where he lived for 18 years. In London, he performed concerts and was celebrated in newspapers such as the Guardian and the Evening Standard. When he finally returned to Kharabat in 2003, it lay in ruins. Homes had been looted, squatters lived in makeshift encampments and wild dogs roamed the alleys. But Mahmoud sought to rebuild his old life and began performing on radio and TV. He acknowledges that he could be earning a lot more money and living a more comfortable life closer to his family in London. But he feels extraordinary here. When he walks through the streets, people know him. And the dozen or so accomplished musicians and many more students trickling back to Kharabat acknowledge him deferentially as the “ustad,” the master of his trade, and kiss his hand out of respect.

Master of his trade Kharabat had long been viewed suspiciously by pious Afghans who forbade their children to study music. Najibullah’s fall unleashed the fury of the Islamists. Once the mujahedeen dislodged him, “we lost everything,” Mahmoud says. He fled to India, where he stayed for two years before task force’s assistant intelligence officer. On another level, the Taliban fights. Task force analysts estimate that the Taliban can field roughly 400 fighters in Andar and Deh Yak, which have a combined population of perhaps 150,000 people. The fighters harass Afghan and U.S. forces and pursue a campaign of intimidation against

residents who cooperate with, or even acknowledge, the central government. Dressing as civilians, they battle Western forces with a familiar script: using small ambushes and makeshift bombs with minimal risk and conducting the occasional rocket or mortar attack. They also have a support network, the officers said, of at least 4,000 civilians.

W  B Thai-Cambodian border clashes resume PHNOM PENH, Cambodia — Machine-gun and artillery fire echoed across the frontier between Thailand and Cambodia today as their troops clashed near an 11th-century temple in the fourth day of fighting that has killed at least five people. Cambodian government spokesman Phay Siphan said skirmishes began again early today after halting around midnight. The crumbling stone temple, several hundred feet from Thailand’s eastern border with Cambodia, has fueled nationalism on both sides of the disputed frontier for decades and conflict over it has sparked sporadic, brief battles in recent years. However, sustained fighting has been rare. Cambodian officials say Thai artillery collapsed part of a wall Sunday at the Preah Vihear temple, a U.N. World Heritage site, but Thai officials have dismissed that account as propaganda, and the extent of damage is unknown.

American hikers’ trial begins in Iran TEHRAN — The trial of the three American hikers accused of espionage and illegally entering Iran began behind closed doors on Sunday, and not guilty pleas were entered on their behalf, their lawyer said. The lawyer, Masoud Shafiee, said that no decisions were rendered in the case and that the trial would continue at a date to be determined. Only two of the Americans, Joshua Fattal and Shane Bauer, both 28, appeared in court Sunday. The third American, Sarah Shourd, 32, who is Bauer’s fiancee, was released on bail in September for medical reasons and returned to the United States. The three were arrested near the border with Iraqi Kurdistan in June 2009. All three have denied the charges.

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WikiLeaks workers are creating an alternative website for leaks to be governed by what they characterize as a revised vision of radical transparency. The new organization, OpenLeaks, will begin work in earnest this summer, said Herbert Snorrason, an Icelandic programmer who is involved. It aims, he said, to avoid the “influence of a single figurehead” by refusing to handle documents itself. Instead, it will act as a neutral conduit to connect leakers with media and human rights organizations.

Two candidates, but many worries for Haiti PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — Haitians are worried that the upcoming March 20 presidential election will share the problems of the first. The Nov. 28 election, marred by fraud and incompetence, was just the beginning of an opaque process that included delayed results, contentious protests and a review by international observers. Now many Haitians and experts worry that the second round between Mirlande Manigat and Michel Martelly will be just as rough. Observers worry it has become a race that has sowed more doubt than faith. — From wire reports

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Inside

OREGON Wildlife officials suggest killing one owl to save another, see Page B3.

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Kitzhaber proposes retrofitting schools to save energy, see Page B3.

OBITUARIES Milton Babbitt, composer who challenged listeners, see Page B5. www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2011

Bend conference Police capture runaway teen from Eugene discovered near to highlight justice, Minor local hotel after ditching stolen vehicle human rights issues By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

By Megan Kehoe The Bulletin

A conference discussing justice and human rights will be held at the Riverhouse Convention Center in Bend this Friday and Saturday. “We thought it would be a really good idea to motivate and hopefully inspire people to think about their neighbors,” said Matthew Smith, creative director with World Relief in Bend. “It’s really a great opportunity for education.” As many as 900 people are expected to attend the two-day conference sponsored by World Relief, with partners like Bend’s Kilns College, a theology school, and many other organizations. The conference will feature 12 speakers and will be attended by 55 organizations across the country.

Notable speakers Speakers at the conference will include Yale Professor Nicholas Wolterstorff, Berkeley professor and author Adam Hochschild, and World Relief Congo Church Mobilization Director Marcel Serubungo. Speakers will also include the president of Kilns College, Ken Wytsma. Speakers will discuss the history of human rights, poverty, human trafficking, AIDS, development and disaster response, among other issues, and how to get involved and help. “The crazy thing is that the ma-

On the Web Those interested in attending the conference can register by going to http://thejusticeconference.com.

A runaway teenager who lost his shoe while fleeing from police was apprehended after a brief chase Saturday night. Bend Police Lt. Brian Kindel said the male from Eugene, who is a minor that police are not identifying, crashed a stolen

jority of people who are registered are coming from out of state,” said Smith, who said there are people visiting from outside the country as well. “So the presence is really going way beyond Bend.”

vehicle into a building after police attempted to pull him over around 9 p.m. Saturday night along Southwest Mill View Way. A Bend police officer recognized the dark blue 1995 Chevrolet truck from a stolen vehicle report filed on Feb. 4. The truck was unique because it was raised and had aftermarket

bumpers, Kindel said. When the officer turned on his siren, the minor drove the vehicle into the parking lot of Bryant, Lovlien & Jarvis law firm. The minor then exited the vehicle while it was still running, resulting a low-speed crash. The truck crashed into a post supporting an awning at the law firm building and the teen ran toward the AmeriTel Inn with officers in pursuit. Kindel said it took “about 15 minutes” for police to find the

boy in a lot near the inn. “He lost his shoe during the chase and was found hiding near the AmeriTel building,” Kindel said. “He literally jumped out of the vehicle as it was running and let the vehicle roll into the building. We had a few dogs dispatched, but an officer quickly found him.” An unidentified passenger, who police were unable to apprehend, also fled the scene toward the river. See Chase / B2

LINING UP FOR ROLLER DERBY

Visitors from afar Smith added that the reason he thinks people are visiting from all over the country for the event is because it’s a unique event. “There’s not really a lot of conferences like it out there,” said Smith. “I’ve been doing relief and missionary work for seven years, and I’ve never actually come across a conference of this nature.” Tickets for the preconference session, which will feature four breakout sessions and three speakers, will cost $25 per ticket. For groups of six people or more, the tickets cost $15. For students, the preconference events cost $10. The main conference on Friday evening and Saturday will cost $119 if purchased in advance, or $129 at the door. See Conference / B2

CENTRAL OREGON WEATHER

More clear days on the way this week By E rik Hidl e The Bulletin

Few clouds over Central Oregon this week means warmer daytime temperatures and cooler nights. Rob Brooks, a National Weather Service forecaster in Pendleton, said people in the area can expect temperatures to remain similar to what they have been in recent weeks as daytime temperatures should remain in or near the 40s and nights fall into the 20s. “You’ll be looking at warmer daytime highs because there are

no clouds,” Brooks said. “But because those clouds aren’t there to trap in the heat, the lows will dip lower.” Today is expected to be a bit cooler with an expected high of 39 degrees and a nighttime low of 23. Strong winds are expected today and Tuesday reaching up to 20 mph with gusts up to 35 mph. There is also a small chance of snow today and Tuesday for folks looking to make it up to the mountain. See Weather / B2

80 70 60

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 30 29 30 32 36 44 52 34 33 34 34 40 47 44 49 53 53 53 45 37 46 51 50 55 57 53 55 62 54 49 54

Average temperature for January....35.2° H

High temperatures averaged 45°F

50 40 30 20

32° F freezing point of water

10 0

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Low temperatures averaged 25.5°F

-10 Low temp.

12 9 6 6 6 31 28 13 17 13 17 18 38 38 38 46 44 32 29 22 27 32 28 28 26 29 31 34 34 30 27

DAY

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Precipitation total...0.78” (Average precipitation for the month.....1.78") .04 .16 .22 .11

.05

.17

.03

Total snowfall...1.0” (Average total snowfall for the month.....10.6") 1.0

Highest temperature

62° Jan. 28

Lowest temperature

6° Jan. 3, 4, 5

Highest recorded maximum for the month ....67° (1971)

Lowest recorded minimum for the month .....-26°(1933)

Average maximum 45°

Average minimum 25.5°

Monthly average maximum through the years*.................40.6°

Monthly average minimum through the years*..................21.7°

* Monthly averages calculated from 1928 through 2005, Western Regional Climate Center Sources: NOAA, Western Regional Climate Center, Bend Public Works Department Precipitation and snowfall data from Nick Norton Greg Cross / The Bulletin

roll

Lava City Roller Dolls foster future of sport with their junior league The Bulletin

Daily highs and lows High temp.

Never too young to By Erik Hidle

January 2011 weather for Bend DAY

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Skaters line up at the Lava City Roller Dolls Junior Roller Derby League practice held at Cascade Indoor Sports in Bend on Sunday afternoon.

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very Sunday afternoon at Cascade Indoor Sports, nearly 50 girls ages 6 to 17 gather on roller skates to push, shove and block each other as part of Central Oregon’s Junior Roller Derby League. The girls and organizers admit the process can perplex outsiders. But beneath the stereotypes of roller derby are young girls growing up, learning to work as a team, communicating with each other and making new friends. The Lava City Roller Dolls, one of Bend’s two roller derby leagues, started the junior league just two months ago with the goal of developing young girls’ athleticism, teamwork and above all else, their confidence. Jana Washatka, 42, of Bend, who goes by “Toosh Come to Shove” in the Lava City Roller Dolls adult league, is director of the junior program. She said the program is crucial to the development of their league as well as to the development of the girls. “They are the future of the derby,” Washatka said. “We’re teaching them to skate smart, to work as a team, to develop skills that work beyond roller derby.” Last summer, the Roller Dolls started a series of youth camps to gauge the interest of young girls in the community. See Derby / B2

“It’s like a family out here. Just meeting all the people is the best part. You hip check someone one day and the next you are friends. — Aidan Washatka, aka “Scarlett Johanslam”

AT LEFT: Izabell King, 8, of Redmond, jumps a foam strip during a practice exercise with the Junior Roller Derby League on Sunday. BELOW: Jana Washatka, 42, director of the Lava City Roller Dolls’ junior program, helps Anya Katz, 10, both of Bend, with an adjustment of her skate during practice Sunday in Bend.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

B2 Monday, February 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

N  R CIVIL SUITS Filed Jan. 24

11CV0063SF: Columbia State Bank v. Douglas B. and Nancy L. Zimmerman, complaint, $507,133.96 11CV0064MA: Stahancyk, Kent & Hook P.C. v. Deborah C. Colker, complaint, $76,636.45 Filed Jan. 25

11CV0065SF: Atlas Limited Partnership v. Bargreen-Ellingson Inc., complaint, $52,405.00 Filed Jan. 26

11CV0061MA: Riverwalk Holdings Ltd. v. Greg Brooks, complaint, $10,751.84

Chase Continued from B1 Kindel said there was minor damage to the vehicle, but the awning to the building was noticeably lower as a result of damage to the support pole. According to Kindel, the vehicle has been returned to its owner, and the teen had been

11CV0062ST: Riverwalk Holdings Ltd. v. Janet Ceniga, complaint, $12,153.92 11CV0066SF: Cavalry Portfolio Services LLC as assignee of Cavalry SPV 1 LLC as assignee of Bank of America FIA Card Services N.A. v. John R. Martorano, complaint, $13,631.60 11CV0067ST: Riverwalk Holdings Ltd. v. Rose M. Demello, complaint, $18,950.05 Filed Jan. 28

11CV0071MA: Clay A. Matuska v. Tetherow Golf Course LLC and Tetherow Golf Club, complaint, $60,000

released into custody. The teen had been reported as a runaway on Jan. 25. “It was a stolen vehicle with stolen plates,” Kindel said. “Whoever stole the vehicle replaced the plates with plates that had also been reported stolen.” Erik Hidle can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at ehidle@bendbulletin.com.

“We really were motivated to bring people together so that they can learn about these issues.” — Matthew Smith, World Relief creative director in Bend

Conference Continued from B1 For groups of six people or more, tickets will cost $105 per person. For students, tickets will cost $75. Also, a special rate for Deschutes County residents will run through Wednesday, with tickets to the main conference

Weather Continued from B1 “About a 20 percent chance of snow in the area,” Brooks said. “Any of that would be seen up in the mountains as the highs in the low areas will reach above freezing. So there isn’t much expectation to see snow in (the cities).” Starting Wednesday the weather is expected to turn

costing $99. “We really were motivated to bring people together so that they can learn about these issues,” said Smith. “And I think a lot of people are intrigued by it, and really want the chance to wrestle with these ideas.” Megan Kehoe can be reached at 541-383-0354 or at mkehoe@bendbulletin.com.

mild as the wind dies down and the chance of precipitation disappears. Temperatures on Wednesday and Thursday are expected to rise to the high 40s and lows to be near 30 degrees. Forecasts for the weekend expect daytime highs to reach the 50s as early as Friday. Erik Hidle can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at ehidle@bendbulletin.com.

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Participants in the Lava City Roller Dolls Junior Roller Derby League speed around a corner at Cascade Indoor Sports in Bend on Sunday afternoon.

Derby Continued from B1 They had more than 50 girls come out for each event. The courses taught the girls to skate, the rules of the league and the culture of roller derby, which Washatka says is far more athletic and competitive than the theatrical roller derby of old. But beyond the sport is the development of the young skaters. Classes on nutrition and selfimage are introduced between drills on jumping in skates and positional blocking. “I notice that with roller derby a young woman’s self-image improves,” said Washatka. “We are a sport. We are competitive. But we are a positive group. No one out here says ‘I can’t’ because these girls can.” Washatka’s daughter, 16year-old Aidan, competes in the league and says her favorite part of the process is being part of a community. “It’s like a family out here,” said the younger Washatka, who goes by the name “Scarlett Johanslam” in the derby. “Just meeting all the people is the best part. You hip check someone one day and the next you are friends. Aidan Washatka said she is also meeting girls from outside of Bend High School, where she is a student. “I wouldn’t otherwise know some of these girls,” she said. “It’s really nice to meet new people out here. It’s really the best part.”

Selene Schafer, 13, of Bend, left, does her best to control her balance and deal with pushes from Savannah King, 13, of Redmond, during practice.

Samantha Bogue, 14 from Bend and going by the name “Briar Thorne” in the derby, said she considers the skating rink a place for her to be a little bit different than what people would expect. “I tell people I do this, and they say to me that it doesn’t seem like me at all,” Bogue said. “I’m proud of that.” Samantha Bogue’s mother, Monica Bogue, said she was grateful to the league for giving

her daughter a chance to grow. “She was shy before this,” Monica Bogue said. “She’s a straight-A student who is actually very quiet. When she saw this, she asked to get involved, and I thought it might be a good thing. It’s been a great thing.” Before she began skating, Samantha asked her grandmother if she could take the money her “nana” had promised her for violin lessons and, instead, use it for the derby.

Her grandmother said as long as she didn’t get a tattoo then she could take part. One of her first purchases was a pair of gold tights. “I would never wear that to school,” Samantha Bogue said. “It’s like having an alter ego here.” Her mother, inspired by her daughter’s interest, also joined the derby in the adult league. Monica Bogue, 41, of Bend, is known as “Dirty Jo” in the rink. She said the sport has made her more athletic and also, closer to her daughter. “We stay for each other’s practices, we can skate together and we go to the bouts together,” Monica Bogue said. “It’s something that she does, and when she talks to me about it, she knows that I get it. That’s a great part of this. Sharing it with her.” The league is accepting new girls as part of a rolling intake process in a few months. For more information, go the website at lavacityrollerdolls.com. Erik Hidle can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at ehidle@bendbulletin.com.

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Government begins shoe rationing in 1943 The Associated Press Today is Monday, Feb. 7, the 38th day of 2011. There are 327 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Feb. 7, 1936, President Franklin D. Roosevelt authorized a flag for the office of the vice president. ON THIS DATE In 1857, a French court acquitted author Gustave Flaubert of obscenity for his serialized novel “Madame Bovary.” In 1861, the general council of the Choctaw Indian nation adopted a resolution declaring allegiance with the South “in the event a permanent dissolution of the American Union takes place.” In 1904, a fire began in Baltimore that raged for about 30 hours and destroyed more than 1,500 buildings. In 1931, aviator Amelia Earhart married publisher George P. Putnam in Noank, Conn. In 1943, the government announced the start of shoe rationing, limiting consumers to buying three pairs per person for the remainder of the year. In 1948, Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower resigned as Army chief of staff; he was succeeded by Gen. Omar Bradley. In 1971, women in Switzerland gained the right to vote through a national referendum, 12 years after a previous attempt failed. In 1984, space shuttle Challenger astronauts Bruce McCandless II and Robert L. Stewart went on the first untethered space walk, which lasted nearly six hours. In 1991, Jean-Bertrand Aristide was inaugurated as the first democratically elected president of Haiti (however, he was overthrown by the military in Sept. 1991; he was restored in 1994). In 1999, Jordan’s King Hussein died of cancer at age 63; he was succeeded by his eldest son, Abdullah.

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y TEN YEARS AGO The Senate voted to release $582 million in dues owed the United Nations. The space shuttle Atlantis blasted off on a trip to the International Space Station. Jean-Bertrand Aristide was sworn in as Haiti’s president, five years after leaving office. Death claimed singer-actress Dale Evans at age 88 and author Anne Morrow Lindbergh, widow of aviator Charles Lindbergh, at age 94. FIVE YEARS AGO Some 10,000 mourners, including four U.S. presidents, said goodbye to Coretta Scott King during a service in Lithonia, Ga. Abu Hamza al-Masri, a radical Muslim cleric linked to 9/11 plotter Zacarias Moussaoui, was sentenced in London to seven years in prison for inciting followers to kill non-Muslims. Phoenix Coyotes assistant coach Rick Tocchet was charged with financing a nationwide gambling ring based out of New Jersey. (Tocchet later pleaded guilty to promoting gambling and conspiracy to promote gambling and was sentenced to two years’ probation.) ONE YEAR AGO A nearly completed Kleen Energy Systems power plant in Middletown, Conn., exploded,

Local schools For Web links to local schools, preschool through college, visit www.bend bulletin.com /schools.

The Bulletin

killing six people and injuring 50. Pro-Russian opposition leader Viktor Yanukovych declared victory in Ukraine’s presidential runoff, but his opponents rejected the claim, saying the vote was too close to call. (Yanukovych was inaugurated Feb. 25.) The New Orleans Saints rallied for a 31-17 Super Bowl victory over the Indianapolis Colts. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Country singer Wilma Lee Cooper is 90. Author Gay Talese is 79. Sen. Herb Kohl (D-Wis.)

is 76. Actor Miguel Ferrer is 56. Reggae musician Brian Travers (UB40) is 52. Comedy writer Robert Smigel is 51. Actor James Spader is 51. Country singer Garth Brooks is 49. Rock musician David Bryan (Bon Jovi) is 49. Actor-comedian Eddie Izzard is 49. Actor-comedian Chris Rock is 46. Actor Jason Gedrick is 44. Rock singer-musician Wes Borland is 36. Actor Ashton Kutcher is 33. Actress Tina Majorino is 26. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “The time on either side of ‘now’ stands fast.” — Maxine Kumin, American poet

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THE BULLETIN • Monday, February 7, 2011 B3

O Plan calls for owl ‘removal’ Officials propose culling barred owls in effort to save spotted owls The Associated Press PORTLAND — Federal wildlife officials looking to protect the spotted owl will likely recommend shooting the endangered species’ biggest threat — a larger, more aggressive type of owl — according to a newspaper report. Along with habitat loss, barred owls are the biggest threat to spotted owls, which are federally protected. That sets up a wrenching decision splitting wildlife biologists and environmentalists. “There’s no winner in that debate,” said Bob Sallinger, conservation director with the Portland Audubon Society. A draft environmental impact statement to be ready by summer most likely will recommend shooting the larger owls, according to The Oregonian. Over the next year, 1,200 to 1,500 barred owls in three or more study areas from Washington to Northern California might be killed under the plan. The 2010 spotted owl recovery plan, to be released in mid-February, concluded “barred owl removal should be initiated as soon as possible.” A Fish and Wildlife Service group was drafting a parallel environmental impact statement on killing barred owls. The plan has its opponents. “Population dynamics between two native species should not be artificially manipulated,” said Blake Murden, wildlife and fisheries director for Port Blakely Tree Farms in Tumwater, Wash. The company agreed in 2009 to manage 45,000 acres as spotted owl habitat in exchange for pro-

The Associated Press ile photo

A northern spotted owl sits in a tree in the Deschutes National Forest near Camp Sherman in 2003. Federal wildlife officials are considering a plan to kill the larger barred owl in an effort to save endangered spotted owls. tection from additional logging restrictions. Murden said the population of barred owls expanded rapidly because they adapt well to mixed habitat and eat a variety of prey. Spotted owls, on the other hand, prefer old-growth to nest and

mostly eat flying squirrels. The spotted owl is a conservation icon. Its 1990 listing as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act was the first to have such broad economic, social and environmental impact.

Lawmakers to consider proposal to make schools energy efficient By Jonathan J. Cooper The Associated Press

SALEM — One of Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber’s top environmental and economic priorities will get its first hearing in the Legislature today. The House Education Committee will take a first look at Kitzhaber’s plan to put people to work by retrofitting schools and other public buildings with modern energy-efficient technology. Supporters of his plan hope to protect the environment while helping schools save money on their energy costs. House Bill 2888 would authorize the state to sell bonds that would pay for loans and matching grants for school districts that want money to improve their facilities. The bill leaves many details to be decided, including the cost. The sponsor, Rep. Jefferson Smith, D-Portland, cautioned that the measure is merely a “placeholder bill” intended to begin work on the concept. The long-term goal, Smith said, is to retrofit every public school in Oregon along with other government buildings, but this year’s bill would not reach that far. “We spend a lot of dough on energy costs in Oregon,” Smith

IN THE LEGISLATURE said. “If we can save a little of that dough ... that seems really smart.” Smith said the weatherization concept is about more than just creating jobs or saving on energy costs. He said the bill would bring cleaner air and more light into schools, creating a healthier learning environment for students and workplace for teachers. Rep. John Huffman, a Republican from The Dalles and member of the Education Committee, said he’s an advocate of weatherization who has done it at his own properties. He said he’ll be looking for a proposal that produces enough savings to justify the expensive upfront cost of weatherizing a school. “I’m not an advocate of just throwing money at a project just to get some people to work,” Huffman said. “But if we can make fiscal sense of this ... I’ll go for it.” Kitzhaber last month directed the Department of Energy to use $2 million of leftover federal stimulus dollars to conduct energy audits on 500 schools. He said

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then that the money would create 20 new jobs and lay the foundation for his plan by determining what schools needed. Kitzhaber spokesman Tim Raphael said the governor wants lawmakers to come up with a plan in time for construction crews to work during the schools’ summer vacations. “We are excited to see the Legislature take this up so quickly and look forward to working with them on the best school retrofit bill possible,” Raphael said. Oregon’s unemployment rate was 10.6 percent in December, an improvement from the Great Recession’s bottom of 11.6 percent in May and June of 2009, but still 1.2 points worse than the national unemployment rate. Joblessness has been particularly acute in Central and Southern Oregon, where many rural communities have struggled with unemployment since the decline of the once-mighty timber industry. The committee will also consider a bill today that would require all new school construction and remodel projects to meet environmental standards equivalent to the LEED Silver designation from standards developed by Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design.

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Owl habitat and prey in Oregon and Washington are quite different, said Lowell Diller, a biologist with Green Diamond Resource Co., which owns 400,000 acres of timber adjacent to Redwood National Park. He said choosing to control barred owl population is one of the biggest conservation dilemmas the Northwest faces. “We have a huge amount of resources committed to protecting that species,” Diller said. “Then we have the barred owl show up.” Douglas County Commissioner Doug Robertson called the proposal to shoot barred owls an example of “dysfunctional” forest policy. Counties like his depend economically on federal timber, which Robertson said is managed to benefit a species that can’t be recovered. “When nature takes a turn, it’s going to prevail no matter what we try to do,” he said. “I’ve come to the conclusion that it’s nonsense to shoot one species to benefit another. I don’t think the public will accept it.” Logging reductions undoubtedly saved habitat, but the bird itself hasn’t shown signs of recovering. Spotted owl population estimates are vague, but studies indicated it declines 3 percent annually in much of its range. Some scientists estimate that a couple thousand mating pairs remain. “We certainly don’t want barred owls killed, but the highest priority has to be placed on not having spotted owls go extinct,” said Sallinger, with the Portland Audubon Society. He argued logging weakened spotted owls to the point barred owls could expand rapidly. Amending habitat loss is the first step in rebalancing the playing field, he said. “Going out and killing barred owls, if you haven’t taken the other necessary steps, would be really horrific.”

O  B 2 teens swept into ocean, drown

Homicide investigation in Salem man’s death

YACHATS — The Oregon State Police says two teens died after waves swept them off a rocky outcropping and into the ocean. Lt. Gregg Hastings said the body of 18-year-old Connor Gregory Ausland was found and that authorities have yet to find 17-year-old Jack Harnsongkram. Both were students at South Eugene High School. Hastings said the two boys were from Eugene and were with friends visiting the area near Smelt Sands State Park in Lincoln County when they were swept away Saturday afternoon. Police believe the two boys drowned.

SALEM — Marion County sheriff’s officers say they are interviewing a person of interest in a homicide at a home east of Salem. No arrests have been made, and the Salem Statesman Journal reports that deputies haven’t identified the victim. Sheriff’s Cmdr. Kevin Schultz said the case is being investigated as a homicide. A neighbor told the newspaper that he found the victim shortly before noon Saturday surrounded by blood in the living room of a mobile home. The paper quotes a neighbor as saying one deputy drew a gun and approached a nearby residence, and after that deputies took away a man.

Cottage Grove-area man shot to death COTTAGE GROVE — The Lane County Sheriff’s Office is investigating after a 50year-old man was fatally shot southeast of Cottage Grove. The Register-Guard reported deputies responded to a call of a shooting at a home at about 3:30 p.m. Saturday, and found the victim in the driveway. Authorities said the victim was David E. Kalal. Deputies said an initial investigation suggests an altercation between Kalal and another person led to the shooting. They say Kalal and the other person, whose name wasn’t released, have separate residences on the same property.

Man arrested in northeast Salem death SALEM — Marion County sheriff’s deputies say they are investigating the death of a man whose body was found on a road in northeast Salem. The body of 51-year-old Rickey Leonard Delepine, of Salem, was found on the road Saturday morning. The cause of his death has not yet been released. The Oregonian reports that 44-year-old Robert Bryan Darling, of Salem, was taken into custody shortly after midnight Sunday. No charges have been filed in the case. — From wire reports

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B4 Monday, February 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Bend-La Pine’s middle school conundrum

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Bend-La Pine School District committee has been tinkering with middle school attendance areas for a couple of months now, largely under the radar. But that’s

bound to change in a big way soon. Driving the process is the need to shrink the district’s biggest middle school, Cascade, which is more than 100 students over capacity. To that end, the attendance-area committee considered and rejected a number of options, including the transformation of the Westside Village facility into a satellite campus for Cascade sixth-graders. But the committee eventually gravitated toward a handful of possible boundary changes that would steer some elementary school kids in Cascade’s existing attendance area to another school when they reach middle school. Now comes the tough part: Deciding which kids should switch and which school or schools should take them. Though the committee continues to look for more options, the four front-runners at this point involve students at Pine Ridge Elementary School and High Lakes Elementary School. Under the first two scenarios, Pine Ridge students would go to Pilot Butte Middle School. Under the third, High Lakes students who live north of Portland Avenue would attend Pilot Butte. And under the fourth, High Lakes kids north of Portland would attend Sky View Middle School. The fact that three of these four scenarios involve Pilot Butte Middle School isn’t surprising. With roughly 620 students in a facility that can handle 850, Pilot Butte needs an influx of students as badly as Cascade needs an exodus. But Pilot Butte isn’t exactly the queen of the middle school prom. Bend-La Pine parents are allowed to request school transfers, regardless of where they actually live. As a result, most of the district’s middle schools serve students who live outside of their own attendance areas. While Cascade, High Desert and Sky View accept more out-of-area students than they lose, Pilot Butte loses significantly more students than it takes in, according to numbers provided at a January committee meeting. There are likely to be many reasons so many parents within Pilot Butte’s attendance area transfer their kids elsewhere, most of which may be beyond the district’s control. But whatever those reasons are, the district’s numbers speak for themselves. A strikingly large number of families in Pilot Butte’s area want to send their kids to a different school, even though there’s plenty of elbow room at home. And Cascade takes in more students than it loses, even though it’s bursting at the seams. None of this is going to be lost on Pine Ridge or High Lakes families designated for middle school reassignment. The district could cut Pilot Butte out of the equation entirely, as contemplated in the option that would send some High Lakes kids to Sky View. But the district’s estimates suggest that doing this will simply transfer the overcrowding problem to Sky

View within a few years and leave Pilot Butte just as conspicuously under capacity. Talk about ignoring the elephant in the room. What’s a well-intentioned school district to do? Assuming officials are determined to move a large chunk of would-be Cascade students to Pilot Butte, as seems inevitable at this point, the district ought to do two things: Create programs at Pilot Butte that will appeal to students who’ve transferred elsewhere and appeal to those on their way in, and — just as importantly — communicate its intention to do so clearly to everyone who’d be affected. Unfortunately, Pilot Butte is poised to take a step in the opposite direction. The district announced recently that a science and math block for TAG (talented and gifted) students will be scrapped next year. Too many ambitious, non-TAG kids have been signing up and, as the district explains it, effectively “tracking” the school. Meanwhile, Cascade has no problem allowing non-TAG kids to participate in its advanced humanities block. Given what this discrepancy suggests about the two schools’ relative commitment to academic achievement, why wouldn’t the parents of eager, non-TAG kids worry about a potential reassignment from Cascade to Pilot Butte? The district could simply flex its boundary-setting muscle and tell affected Pine Ridge or High Lakes families to live with its decision. But many unsatisfied families are likely to respond by taking advantage of the district’s open school-transfer policy. “Philosophically,” says Deputy Superintendent John Rexford, “we have tried to honor student and family choices as much as we can,” and that isn’t likely to change. In fact, Rexford pointed to this policy during last week’s boundary committee meeting as a mechanism that could even out school-attendance numbers in a way the district would like. One of the Pine Ridge-to-Pilot Butte options would send too many kids to Pilot Butte and too few to Cascade by 2013. This is theoretically a problem, said Rexford, but many of the kids at Pilot Butte will simply transfer right back to Cascade, leaving school populations more or less where the district would like them. This same phenomenon could just as easily shift school populations in a way the district doesn’t like. So, as long as the district allows families to move their kids to the schools of their choice — in other words, to engage in a kind of districtwide “tracking” — administrators should give people powerful incentives to stay put. Even if that means holding on to TAG classes that — gasp! — serve a large number of non-TAG students.

Uprisings and the quest for dignity

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wonder if sometime around 50 years ago a great mental tide began to sweep across the world. Before the tide, people saw themselves in certain fixed places in the social order. They accepted opinions from trusted authorities. As the tide swept through, they began to see themselves differently. They felt they should express their own views, and these views deserved respect. They mentally bumped themselves up to first class and had a different set of expectations of how they should be treated. Treatment that had once seemed normal now felt like an insult. They began to march for responsive government and democracy. I’ve covered some of these marches over the years in places like Russia, Ukraine and South Africa. While there are vast differences between nations, the marchers tend to echo certain themes — themes we are hearing once again in the interviews that reporters are doing in Cairo. Protesters invariably say that their government has insulted their dignity by ignoring their views. They have a certain template of what a “normal” country looks like — with democracy and openness — and they feel humiliated that their nation doesn’t measure up. Moreover, the protesters tend to feel enormous pride that they are finally speaking up, even in the face of danger. They feel a surge of patriotism as the people of their country make themselves heard. This quest for dignity has produced a remarkable democratic wave. More than 100 nations have seen democratic uprisings over the past few decades. More than 85 authoritarian governments have fallen. Somewhere around 62 countries have become democracies, loosely defined. The experiences of these years teach us a few lessons. First, the foreign policy

DAVID BROOKS realists who say they tolerate authoritarian government for the sake of stability are ill informed. Autocracies are more fragile than any other form of government, by far. Second, those who say that speeches by outsiders have no influence on places like Egypt have it backward. The climate of opinion is the very basis of the revolt. Third, for all the pessimism and nervousness that accompanies change, most countries that have experienced uprisings end up better off. We can all think of exceptions, such as Iran, but we should greet these events with eagerness and hope. Fourth, while the public hunger for dignity is unabated, the road from authoritarianism to democracy is rocky and perilous. Over the past few years, the world has experienced a “freedom recession” with more governments retreating from democracy than advancing toward it. For outside powers, the real work comes after the revolution — in helping build governments that work. The other thing we’ve learned is that the United States usually gets everything wrong. There have been dozens of democratic uprisings over the years, but the government always reacts like it’s the first one. There seem to be no protocols for these situations, no preset questions to be asked. Policymakers always underestimate the power of the bottom-up quest for dignity, so they are slow to understand what is happening. Last week, for example, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton declared that the Egyptian regime

was stable, just as it was falling apart. Then their instinct is to comfort the fellow members of the club of those in power. The Obama administration was very solicitous of President Hosni Mubarak during the first days of the protests and of other dictators who fear their regime may be next. Then, desperately recalibrating in an effort to keep up with events, they inevitably make a series of subtle distinctions no one else heeds. The Obama administration ended up absurdly calling on Mubarak to initiate a reform agenda. Surely there’s not a single person in the government who thinks he is actually capable of doing this. Meanwhile, the marchers heard this fudge as President Barack Obama supporting Mubarak and were outraged. The Obama administration’s reaction was tardy, but no worse than, say, the first Bush administration’s reaction to the uprisings in the Baltics and Ukraine. The point is, there’s no need to be continually wrong-footed. If you start with a healthy respect for the quest for dignity, if you see autocracies as fragile and democratic revolts as opportunities, then you’ll find it much easier to anticipate events. The Working Group on Egypt, co-led by Michele Dunne and Robert Kagan, has outperformed the U.S. government by miles. For months, they’ve been warning of Mubarak’s fragility. As the protests started, they issued a smart and concrete set of policy recommendations. Over the past decades, there has been a tide in the affairs of men and women. People in many places have risked their lives for recognition and respect. Governments may lag, and complications will arise, but still they will march. And, in the long run, we should be glad they do. David Brooks is a columnist for The New York Times.

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Create a rainy day fund without grabbing the ‘kicker’ By Rep. Kevin Cameron Bulletin guest columnist

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ost Oregonians recognize the need for a robust rainy day fund to protect essential services during economic downturns. However, not everyone agrees on the best way to save for a rainy day. Some argue that canceling kicker checks to taxpayers and businesses will solve all of our problems. However, any effort to undermine the kicker will fail as long as Oregonians believe that state spending is out of control. To regain their confidence, the Legislature must show that it’s capable of saving money just as families and businesses do every day. The idea of building a rainy day fund at the expense of the kicker isn’t new. In 2007, the Legislature suspended the corporate kicker and redirected the revenue into the newly created rainy day fund.

Some heralded this as a major achievement that would end the boom-or-bust nature of Oregon’s finances. After an initial estimated deposit of $309 million, the rainy day fund was depleted as the economy soured and the Legislature continued to spend beyond our long-term means. With the rainy day fund now close to empty, some are going back to the kicker as the ultimate solution for future shortfalls. I believe there is a better way to rebuild our rainy day fund. Legislative Republicans have proposed dedicating 1 to 3 percent of general fund revenue at the beginning of every biennium to the rainy day fund. Simply put, our proposal requires the Legislature to save money before it spends it all. If our proposal had been in place since the beginning of 2007, we would’ve set aside as much as $792 million without touching the kick-

IN MY VIEW er and without taking more money out of the economy. However, there is no single solution that will make Oregon’s budget sustainable over the long term. The kicker is not the cause of Oregon’s fiscal problems, and diverting Oregonians’ kicker checks will not save services in the future. Even our own proposal will only go so far to protect Oregon when it’s raining. To truly bring spending under control, aggressive savings must be complemented by major reforms to our budgeting process. Overall, state spending has increased 40 percent since 2005. This level of spending has created a $3.5 billion shortfall that everyone reads about in the news. This shortfall only describes the difference between revenues and

the cost of maintaining an unsustainable state budget. It includes roll-up costs from new government programs that taxpayers couldn’t afford; hundreds of millions in one-time federal bailout money; and hundreds of millions in state salary, benefits and PERS increases. In reality, the Legislature will have $1.2 billion more to spend in 2011-13 than it did in the previous biennium. This will make for an increase, not a reduction, in general fund spending. In addition to setting aside money for the future, true reform means developing a budget on existing revenues — not on what’s needed to maintain the status quo. We must determine what state government can do with what we have, and work to provide the best possible services at a cost taxpayers can afford. Government reform is not a Republican or Democratic issue. Gov. John

Kitzhaber’s recommended budget is based on available dollars, not tax increases, and establishes a reserve of $220 million. His budget demonstrates a real commitment to long-term spending reform, and offers a fiscally sound blueprint for the Legislature to follow. House Republicans are willing to put partisan politics aside and work with the Democratic governor to prevent yet another decade of deficits. The Legislature must answer this call for change. Kicker reform advocates should understand that as long as state government resists true spending reform, there will be little appetite among Oregonians to lessen or eliminate kicker refunds. Rep. Kevin Cameron, R-Salem, is the Oregon House Republican leader. He is CEO of Café Today Restaurants.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, February 7, 2011 B5

O Lena Nyman, star of ‘I Am Curious’ films, dies at 66

John Kendall, 93, music teacher who championed Suzuki style By Matt Schudel The Washington Post

By Dennis Hevesi New York Times News Service

Lena Nyman, the Swedish actress whose performance in the sexually explicit movie “I Am Curious (Yellow)” raised the hackles of censors in the 1960s and helped turn the film into a box office bonanza, died Friday in Stockholm. She was 66. She died after a long illness, Nyman’s manager, Mats Nilemar, told The Associated Press. Nyman went on to a distinguished career after “I Am Curious.” In all, she had roles in more than 50 Swedish films and television shows, notably Ingmar Bergman’s “Autumn Sonata” in 1978, in which she played the mentally impaired sister to Liv Ullmann’s accomplished pianist. But it was in “I Am Curious” that she made perhaps her most indelible mark. In the film, Nyman portrayed an intensely serious young woman, also named Lena, who wanders Stockholm as an amateur reporter, raising questions about mores that seem to her to have calcified Swedish life. She asks people if Sweden really is a classless society and badgers union officials about why the labor movement is so conservative. Searching for her own sexual identity, Lena has a stormy affair with Borje (played by Borje Ahlstedt), after she meets him in a store. They have sex in a tree and on a balustrade in front of the royal palace, among other places.

New York Times News Service ile photo

Milton Babbitt, seen here in 1982, was an influential composer, theorist and teacher who wrote music that was intensely rational and for many listeners impenetrably abstruse. He died Jan. 29 at the age of 94.

Milton Babbitt, composer who challenged listeners

Banned from U.S. in 1968

By Emma Brown

Produced for $160,000 by the Swedish filmmaker Vilgot Sjoman, “I Am Curious (Yellow)” alarmed the U.S. Customs Service, which in January 1968 banned it from the country as obscene. That November a federal appeals court ruled that the movie was protected by the First Amendment, resulting in its release in March 1969. The movie made $5 million in six months and remained the most financially successful foreign film in the United States for 23 years. If “the cavemen of the U.S. Customs office” hadn’t seized “I Am Curious (Yellow),” Newsweek wrote in March 1969, “there probably wouldn’t be thousands upon thousands of people standing on lines today for the privilege of paying $4.50 to see the movie.” Reviews were mixed. “Miss Nyman’s performance is monotonous, and her only redeeming vice is her anger, which seems genuine and illimitable,” Joseph Morgenstern wrote in Newsweek. In The New York Times, Vincent Canby wrote, “Lena Nyman and Borje Ahlstedt are good, in addition to being perfectly presentable, in the central roles.” He added that the sex scenes were “so unaffectedly frank as to be nonpornographic.” In Sweden some critics saw the film as offensive. Because of her full figure, others called Nyman fat. That did not deter her. In 1968 she again played Lena in “I Am Curious (Blue),” almost a reprise of “Yellow.” (The Swedish flag is blue and yellow.) Nyman, who was born on May 23, 1944, in Stockholm, had been a student at National Theater School of Sweden when Sjoman chose her for “I Am Curious.” Information on survivors was not available.

Milton Babbitt, a composer who used his knack for mathematics to create a modern musical language that was elegantly complex, fearlessly dissonant and so dense that even critics sometimes struggled to explain its importance, died Jan. 29 at a hospital in Princeton, N.J. He was 94. The cause of death was not reported. For six decades, Babbitt wrote orchestral pieces and music for chamber groups and vocalists, including pioneering arrangements for the electric synthesizer. His work, praised by New York Times music critic Anthony Tommasini for its “mercurial contrasts of mood, impishly jagged lines, constantly shifting surface motion, elegant colors and fine nuances of texture,” profoundly influenced younger musicians such as Philip Glass and Steve Reich. One of Babbitt’s early students was the future Broadway composer Stephen Sondheim. “I am his maverick, his one student who went into the popular arts armed with all his serious artillery,” Sondheim once said. Babbitt received a MacArthur Foundation grant and, in 1982, a special Pulitzer citation for his lifetime achievement as a “distinguished and seminal American composer.” His compositions built upon the groundbreaking work of Austrianborn composer Arnold Schoenberg, who had devised a new way to write music in the early 20th century. Schoenberg’s “serial” method — in which a composer arranges 12 notes in an order that is revisited and manipulated throughout the piece — marked a dramatic break with the musical theory that undergirds much of Western

Shocked by the shock Nyman was stunned by the reaction in her homeland to the “Curious” films, she told The Times in 1974. “You know,” she said, “some people get shocked about sex. I was shocked that everyone was so shocked. It was such a quarrel about that movie. Wow! “You could believe nobody in Sweden had ever seen a naked man or woman.”

The Washington Post

“The real arrogance comes not from composers, but from people in the audience who presume to know without having earned the right to know.” — Milton Babbitt, in 1982

classical music. Babbitt was among the first to extend Schoenberg’s serialism to elements including rhythm and timbre. The result was music guided by a set of rules that made for pieces both challenging to perform and difficult — for many listeners — to love. “It has long been fashionable to say that music like this grows in comprehensibility if we will only give it our time and attention, but I doubt it,” Times critic Bernard Holland wrote about the 1998 Carnegie Hall premiere of Babbitt’s “Second Piano Concerto.” Babbitt was unbothered by the fact that his music was, as he put it, “nonpopular.” In a controversial 1958 essay — “Who Cares If You Listen?” — he argued that audiences shouldn’t expect to enjoy or understand cutting-edge music, just as lay people don’t expect to comprehend physicists’ discussions about high-level science. The essay turned Babbitt into a symbol of what many thought was modern music’s cerebral snobbery. He was unapologetic. “The real arrogance comes not from composers, but from people in the audience who presume to know without having earned the right to know,”

he said in 1982. “Illiterate musical audiences,” he later said, “have no idea what music has been, so how can they have any idea of what music is or could be?” Milton Byron Babbitt was born May 10, 1916, in Philadelphia. He grew up in Jackson, Miss., where one of his childhood friends was novelist Eudora Welty, whose family lived a few doors down. Babbitt began studying violin at 4. “By the time I was 8,” he told the Jackson Clarion-Ledger, “I realized the violin had no social future, so I switched to sax and clarinet.” Within a few years, he was playing with touring New Orleans jazz bands and arranging pop songs. He studied math at the University of Pennsylvania until his uncle, a pianist, introduced him to Schoenberg’s compositions — “pieces that I couldn’t really believe were music,” Babbitt later said. He was fascinated and transferred to New York University to study music. Babbitt’s music was technically difficult to play, and he was drawn to synthesizers as a way to reduce his reliance on performers’ skills. In 1959, he became one of the first directors of the Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center, home to one of the most advanced synthesizers of the time. Among his best known pieces for the synthesizer is “Philomel,” written in 1964 for soprano Bethany Beardslee. Beardslee sang the part of a woman transformed into a nightingale, her live performance delivered against a backdrop of her own recorded voice. The synthesized sounds “served as a chorus to the soloist, commenting, repeating and giving breathing space,” wrote Times critic Howard Klein. “The effect of the work was startlingly original.”

Thin Lizzy guitarist Gary Moore dies at 58 The Associated Press

The Associated Press ile photo

Actress Lena Nyman, who starred in sexually explicit movies that defined Swedish cinema in the 1960s, has died. She was 66.

LONDON — Bandmates say rock guitarist Gary Moore, a former member of influential Irish band Thin Lizzy, has died. He was 58. Manager Adam Parsons told the BBC that Moore was found dead Sunday at a hotel on Spain’s Costa del Sol, where he was on holiday. The cause of death was not immediately known. Thin Lizzy drummer Brian Downey said Moore’s death was a “total shock,” and guitarist Scott Gorham said he was “a great player and a great guy.” Born in Belfast, Northern Ireland, in 1952, Moore was a member of Dublin band Skid Row before joining Thin Lizzy in 1973, playing on tracks for the “Nightlife” album. He left after four months, but rejoined four years later and played on the band’s “Black Rose” album before going solo once again. He had a successful solo career, and his accomplished, bluesy playing won plaudits from other musicians. Thin Lizzy had global hits in the 1970s with songs like “The Boys are Back in Town” and “Whiskey in the Jar.” Frontman Phil Lynott died in 1986, but with a different lineup the band continues to tour today.

The Associated Press ile photo

Irish musician Gary Moore performs on the Stravinski hall stage during the “ Rock’n Blues” at the opening night of the 35th Montreux Jazz Festival in Montreux, Switzerland, in 2006. Bandmates say Moore, a former member of influential Irish band Thin Lizzy, has died. He was 58.

John D. Kendall, a violin teacher who introduced the Suzuki method of music training to the United States in the early 1960s, prompting a near-revolution in how children learn to play musical instruments, died Jan. 6 at a hospice in Ann Arbor, Mich. He was 93 and had a stroke. In 1958, while attending a music conference in Ohio, Kendall saw a short film in which hundreds of Japanese children were playing the Bach Double Violin Concerto with surprising skill. Wanting to learn more, he made an extended visit to Japan in 1959 and met Shinichi Suzuki, the teacher who devised a new approach that had children learning the violin at an early age. Suzuki, who died in 1998 at 99, had the idea that students could learn music in the same way — and at the same age — that they learned to speak. By imitating sounds and repeating the proper techniques of playing the violin, children as young as 3 could make music. When Kendall entered a room filled with Suzuki’s young students, they immediately began playing the Vivaldi G-minor Concerto. “It was really amazing,” Kendall told a Time magazine correspondent in 1959. “I was so touched I could feel tears welling up in my eyes.” Kendall brought the Suzuki method back to the United States and became one of its first and most influential teachers.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com


W E AT H ER

B6 Monday, February 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2011.

TODAY, FEBRUARY 7

TUESDAY

Today: Mosly cloudy.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

LOW

47

27

STATE Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

43/27

42/28

50/29

29/21

 Warm Springs

Marion Forks

51/36

44/36

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

51/31

49/34

Camp Sherman 43/26 Redmond Prineville 49/29 Cascadia 50/30 47/40 Sisters 46/28 Bend Post 47/27

Oakridge Elk Lake 45/38

36/17

45/26

45/25

Burns 46/27

46/25

Hampton

Crescent

Crescent Lake

44/24

43/26

Fort Rock

Vancouver 46/32

44/23



Seattle Missoula  37/14 Helena

Eugene 51/32

Bend

53/31

23/-1

Boise

47/27

Grants Pass

42/26







Idaho Falls

Redding 

33/15

73/39

47/28





Mostly cloudy with rain and snow showers possible today.

Crater Lake 33/18

Reno

Elko

61/27

San Francisco

48/21



62/47

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:16 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 5:24 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:14 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 5:25 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 8:49 a.m. Moonset today . . . 10:25 p.m.

Salt Lake City 43/25

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

HIGH

Moon phases First

Full

Last

New

Feb. 10

Feb. 18

Feb. 24

Mar. 4

Monday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

HIGH

Astoria . . . . . . . . 50/46/0.27 . . . . . 48/37/sh. . . . . . 47/34/pc Baker City . . . . .not available . . . . . 36/24/sn. . . . . . 36/20/pc Brookings . . . . . . 56/41/0.00 . . . . . 58/44/pc. . . . . . 56/43/pc Burns. . . . . . . . .not available . . . . . 41/23/pc. . . . . . 36/14/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 53/41/0.00 . . . . . 51/32/sh. . . . . . 50/29/pc Klamath Falls . . . 57/24/0.00 . . . . . 47/22/pc. . . . . . 41/15/pc Lakeview. . . . . .not available . . . . . 53/18/pc. . . . . . 40/14/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 58/27/0.00 . . . . . 46/25/pc. . . . . . 41/13/pc Medford . . . . . . . 57/33/0.00 . . . . . 53/30/pc. . . . . . 52/25/pc Newport . . . . . . . 50/48/0.09 . . . . . 48/37/sh. . . . . . 50/34/pc North Bend . . . . . 52/46/0.00 . . . . . 51/42/pc. . . . . . 49/33/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 42/34/0.00 . . . . . 44/28/pc. . . . . . 41/22/pc Pendleton . . . . .not available . . . . . . 46/31/c. . . . . . 39/22/pc Portland . . . . . . . 55/44/0.07 . . . . . 49/36/sh. . . . . . 47/33/pc Prineville . . . . . . . 53/31/0.00 . . . . . 50/30/pc. . . . . . 41/20/pc Redmond. . . . . .not available . . . . . . 49/27/c. . . . . . 41/18/pc Roseburg. . . . . . . 62/41/0.00 . . . . . 54/35/pc. . . . . . 52/33/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 55/46/0.00 . . . . . 50/34/sh. . . . . . . 49/31/s Sisters . . . . . . . . . 56/33/0.00 . . . . . 46/28/pc. . . . . . 42/17/pc The Dalles . . . . .not available . . . . . . 49/32/c. . . . . . 44/27/pc

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57/38 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .62 in 1987 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . -16 in 1948 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.29” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.48” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 2.05” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.28 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.52 in 1939 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .6:53 a.m. . . . . . .4:15 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .4:37 a.m. . . . . . .1:49 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .7:20 a.m. . . . . . .5:15 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .9:01 a.m. . . . . . .9:08 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . .10:10 p.m. . . . . . .9:45 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .8:48 a.m. . . . . . .8:43 p.m.

1

LOW

49 25

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly sunny.

48 25

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES City

49/36

Christmas Valley

Silver Lake Chemult 50/20

Calgary 10/0

47/27

39/19

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 62° Roseburg • 24° Klamath Falls

FRIDAY Mostly sunny.

43 21

BEND ALMANAC

49/36

Partly to mostly cloudy with a slight chance of showers today. Eastern

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Portland

Brothers

LOW

37 18

NORTHWEST

46/26

46/27

Sunriver

HIGH

THURSDAY

Mostly sunny.

Rain and higher elevation snow will fall over western Washington and Oregon today.

Paulina

La Pine



Partly to mostly cloudy with a chance of showers north today. Central

50/35

Mostly cloudy.

Tonight: Partly cloudy.

HIGH

WEDNESDAY

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . . 36-50 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 38 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 38-80 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 71-91 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 68 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 27-34 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 94 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 22 Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 20-58 Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . . 1 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . .18-0

. . . . . . . . 49 . . . . 110-205 . . . . . . . . 84 . . . . . . . 111 . . . . . . 45-62 . . . . . . 42-50 . . . . . . . . 73

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 46/32

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

S

S

Calgary 10/0

Seattle 49/36 Billings 20/-7

Portland 49/36 Boise 42/26

• 85° San Francisco Yellowstone N. P., Wyo. 62/47

• 1.91” Grafton, N.D.

Las Vegas 68/47

Salt Lake City 43/25

Cheyenne 38/4 Denver 45/10 Albuquerque 39/23

Los Angeles 69/52 Phoenix 69/44

Honolulu 77/69

Tijuana 72/50

Juneau 27/16

Mazatlan 80/46

FRONTS

S

S

To ronto 30/10

Green Bay 21/0

Kansas City St. Louis 25/9 29/13 Oklahoma City 39/27

Little Rock 40/24

Monterrey 65/40

Detroit 30/9

Buffalo

34/15

Columbus 34/17

Louisville 39/21

S S

Halifax 34/28 Portland 35/25 Boston 38/31 New York 42/33 Philadelphia 44/34 Washington, D. C. 49/35

Charlotte 55/32

Nashville 45/24

Birmingham 50/28 New Orleans 53/35 Houston 54/35

S Quebec 22/17

Des Moines 16/0 Chicago 23/4 Omaha 15/-2

Dallas 43/30

La Paz 75/52

S

Thunder Bay 7/-15

St. Paul 13/-8

Chihuahua 66/31

Anchorage 26/22

S

Bismarck 0/-19 Rapid City 15/-12

San Leandro, Calif.

• -10°

S

Saskatoon -1/-13 Winnipeg -1/-6

Atlanta 50/32 Orlando 75/53 Miami 82/64

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .47/33/0.02 . 48/31/pc . . 52/20/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .32/26/0.00 . .34/12/sn . . . 21/5/sn Albany. . . . . . . . .35/30/0.01 . . 36/22/rs . . . 25/5/sn Albuquerque. . . .44/23/0.00 . 39/23/pc . . .43/15/rs Anchorage . . . . .20/13/0.00 . . .26/22/c . . 32/25/sn Atlanta . . . . . . . .54/30/0.00 . .50/32/sh . . . 49/30/s Atlantic City . . . .49/34/0.00 . 45/34/pc . . 39/20/sn Austin . . . . . . . . .76/25/0.00 . . .55/29/s . . 60/42/pc Baltimore . . . . . .47/34/0.00 . . .47/34/c . . 38/16/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .28/21/0.00 . . 20/-7/sn . . .11/-5/pc Birmingham . . . .54/24/0.00 . .50/28/sh . . . 45/26/s Bismarck . . . . . . . .29/9/0.06 . . . 0/-19/s . . . . . 5/-9/s Boise . . . . . . . . . .44/28/0.00 . . 42/26/rs . . . 42/23/c Boston. . . . . . . . .42/37/0.00 . . .38/31/c . . 33/12/sn Bridgeport, CT. . .46/35/0.00 . . .38/31/c . . 37/14/sn Buffalo . . . . . . . .29/25/0.01 . .34/15/sn . . . 18/7/sn Burlington, VT. . .34/26/0.02 . .34/17/sn . . .19/-1/sn Caribou, ME . . . .29/19/0.45 . .28/21/sn . . .27/-8/sn Charleston, SC . .62/43/0.02 . . .54/41/r . . . 56/35/s Charlotte. . . . . . .55/26/0.00 . .55/32/sh . . . 49/25/s Chattanooga. . . .54/32/0.00 . .52/29/sh . . 40/25/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .23/16/0.00 . . . .38/4/c . . .10/-6/sn Chicago. . . . . . . .32/24/0.20 . . . 23/4/sf . . . .11/-2/s Cincinnati . . . . . .42/32/0.00 . .35/17/sn . . . . 21/7/s Cleveland . . . . . .34/24/0.00 . .32/12/sn . . . . 20/5/s Colorado Springs 28/21/0.00 . . . .45/6/c . . .10/-6/sn Columbia, MO . .38/33/0.00 . . . .26/6/c . . . 17/5/sn Columbia, SC . . .60/31/0.00 . .56/35/sh . . . 55/28/s Columbus, GA. . .56/28/0.00 . .50/35/sh . . . 52/31/s Columbus, OH. . .34/30/0.00 . .34/17/sn . . . . 21/5/c Concord, NH . . . .37/32/0.04 . . .37/24/c . . . 31/1/sn Corpus Christi. . .76/37/0.00 . . .58/37/s . . 66/54/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .54/35/0.00 . 43/30/pc . . 52/37/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .34/28/0.00 . .31/13/sn . . . . 20/1/c Denver. . . . . . . . .30/23/0.03 . . .45/10/c . . .11/-5/sn Des Moines. . . . .34/25/0.09 . . .16/0/pc . . . .6/-2/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . .31/22/0.04 . . .30/9/sn . . . . 19/7/s Duluth . . . . . . . . .25/19/0.00 . . 7/-12/pc . . . . . 9/-9/s El Paso. . . . . . . . .57/27/0.00 . . .56/30/s . . . 63/34/s Fairbanks. . . . . . . 4/-18/0.00 . . . 3/-17/s . . . . . 9/-3/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .27/7/0.00 . . -3/-14/s . . . .3/-11/s Flagstaff . . . . . . .46/18/0.00 . 50/23/pc . . . 40/17/c

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .32/24/0.05 . . .26/7/sn . . . 17/7/sn Green Bay. . . . . .29/25/0.03 . . . 21/0/sf . . . .11/-4/s Greensboro. . . . .51/27/0.00 . . .55/33/c . . . 45/23/s Harrisburg. . . . . .41/33/0.00 . . 43/29/rs . . 34/14/pc Hartford, CT . . . .42/33/0.00 . . .38/29/c . . . 33/7/sn Helena. . . . . . . . .29/18/0.00 . . 23/-1/sn . . . . 8/2/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .79/71/0.08 . . .77/69/r . . 78/70/sh Houston . . . . . . .72/31/0.00 . . .54/35/s . . 59/48/pc Huntsville . . . . . .53/26/0.00 . .50/27/sh . . . 40/24/s Indianapolis . . . .36/28/0.00 . . 30/12/sf . . . 18/4/pc Jackson, MS . . . .61/28/0.00 . . .47/28/c . . . 49/29/s Madison, WI . . . .31/24/0.11 . . 19/-3/sf . . . . . 9/-7/s Jacksonville. . . . .57/48/0.03 . . .59/42/t . . . 57/38/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .36/24/0.00 . . .27/16/s . . 35/28/pc Kansas City. . . . .37/32/0.00 . . . .25/9/c . . . 11/4/sn Lansing . . . . . . . .31/24/0.05 . . .25/7/sn . . . 17/5/sn Las Vegas . . . . . .69/50/0.00 . . .68/47/s . . 57/37/pc Lexington . . . . . .46/30/0.00 . .42/20/sh . . .27/13/sf Lincoln. . . . . . . . .36/30/0.00 . . 19/-1/pc . . . . . 5/-2/c Little Rock. . . . . .54/29/0.00 . . .40/24/c . . 37/23/pc Los Angeles. . . . .68/50/0.00 . . .69/52/s . . . 64/48/s Louisville . . . . . . .50/32/0.00 . .39/21/sn . . 28/17/pc Memphis. . . . . . .55/30/0.00 . . 40/21/rs . . 38/23/pc Miami . . . . . . . . .82/65/0.00 . 82/64/pc . . 75/59/pc Milwaukee . . . . .31/24/0.11 . . . 22/6/sf . . . .12/-2/s Minneapolis . . . .29/25/0.00 . . 13/-8/pc . . . . . 7/-8/s Nashville . . . . . . .53/26/0.00 . .45/24/sh . . 35/21/pc New Orleans. . . .63/32/0.00 . .53/35/sh . . . 54/37/s New York . . . . . .45/37/0.00 . . .42/33/c . . 36/13/sn Newark, NJ . . . . .46/36/0.00 . . .41/33/c . . . 37/9/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .48/38/0.00 . . .54/40/c . . 48/24/pc Oklahoma City . .42/35/0.00 . 39/27/pc . . . .37/12/i Omaha . . . . . . . .34/28/0.05 . . 15/-2/pc . . . . . 5/-3/c Orlando. . . . . . . .64/57/0.07 . . .75/53/t . . . 68/46/s Palm Springs. . . .82/53/0.00 . . .72/48/s . . . 65/44/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .34/27/0.09 . . . 25/2/sf . . . 11/0/pc Philadelphia . . . .44/34/0.00 . . .44/34/c . . 37/15/sn Phoenix. . . . . . . .71/39/0.00 . . .69/44/s . . 68/42/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .32/28/0.00 . . 38/19/rs . . . 24/8/sn Portland, ME. . . .39/28/0.09 . . .35/25/c . . . 33/2/sn Providence . . . . .44/36/0.00 . . .39/31/c . . 35/11/sn Raleigh . . . . . . . .54/30/0.00 . . .57/34/c . . . 48/24/s

Yesterday Monday Tuesday Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .33/24/0.00 15/-12/sn . . .10/-8/pc Savannah . . . . . .63/41/0.00 . . .53/40/r . . . 55/37/s Reno . . . . . . . . . .60/32/0.00 . . .61/27/s . . 45/20/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .50/43/0.13 . .49/36/sh . . 45/34/pc Richmond . . . . . .51/29/0.00 . . .56/37/c . . 48/20/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . .29/26/0.03 . . 7/-12/pc . . . .0/-11/s Rochester, NY . . .32/27/0.00 . .36/18/sn . . . 21/8/sn Spokane . . . . . . .37/29/0.02 . . 37/23/rs . . 32/15/pc Sacramento. . . . .75/53/0.00 . . .65/39/s . . . 60/37/s Springfield, MO. .38/28/0.00 . . .28/12/c . . 27/13/sn St. Louis. . . . . . . .41/32/0.00 . .29/13/sn . . . 20/10/c Tampa . . . . . . . . .70/57/0.01 . . .73/52/t . . . 65/48/s Salt Lake City . . .41/28/0.00 . . 43/25/rs . . 32/17/sn Tucson. . . . . . . . .66/32/0.00 . . .69/40/s . . . 72/39/s San Antonio . . . .76/31/0.00 . . .59/34/s . . 63/47/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .42/25/0.00 . 35/19/pc . . 30/13/sn San Diego . . . . . .78/51/0.00 . . .70/52/s . . . 61/48/s Washington, DC .49/36/0.00 . . .49/35/c . . 40/19/pc San Francisco . . .72/59/0.00 . . .61/45/s . . . 60/44/s Wichita . . . . . . . .43/28/0.00 . . .34/15/c . . 19/10/sn San Jose . . . . . . .77/56/0.00 . . .67/44/s . . . 63/42/s Yakima . . . . . . not available . . .47/27/c . . 40/21/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .54/23/0.00 . 34/17/pc . . 36/10/sn Yuma. . . . . . . . . .79/44/0.00 . . .77/50/s . . . 73/49/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .52/48/0.00 . . .48/36/c . . 46/32/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .62/32/0.00 . . .59/50/s . . . 58/48/s Auckland. . . . . . .77/70/0.00 . 74/68/pc . . . 75/67/c Baghdad . . . . . . .55/36/0.00 . . .59/42/s . . 60/43/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .91/73/0.00 . 91/73/pc . . 90/70/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .52/21/0.00 . 39/28/pc . . 48/25/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .61/50/0.00 . . .66/51/s . . . 65/52/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .50/46/0.00 . . .48/37/c . . . 43/30/c Bogota . . . . . . . .64/52/0.23 . . .69/47/c . . 67/46/pc Budapest. . . . . . .54/30/0.00 . 46/32/pc . . . 45/30/s Buenos Aires. . . .77/54/0.00 . .84/66/sh . . 83/65/pc Cabo San Lucas .79/45/0.00 . . .76/55/s . . . 78/54/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .70/59/0.00 . . .71/59/s . . . 69/57/s Calgary . . . . . . . .12/10/0.00 . . .10/0/sn . . . . 14/1/s Cancun . . . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . 82/63/pc . . 78/65/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .54/43/0.64 . 46/32/pc . . 48/46/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .43/37/0.00 . . .41/30/c . . 40/36/sh Geneva . . . . . . . .52/25/0.00 . 52/30/pc . . 50/31/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .81/57/0.00 . . .81/62/t . . 80/61/sh Hong Kong . . . . .72/61/0.00 . . .70/57/s . . . 72/59/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .52/45/0.00 . . .50/39/s . . . 52/43/s Jerusalem . . . . . .52/36/0.00 . .56/43/sh . . 53/40/pc Johannesburg . . .75/59/0.00 . . .79/61/t . . . .76/59/t Lima . . . . . . . . . .82/73/0.00 . 81/69/pc . . 82/68/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .64/41/0.00 . 61/48/pc . . 57/47/pc London . . . . . . . .54/50/0.00 . . .54/37/c . . 50/41/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .66/30/0.00 . . .61/30/s . . . 59/31/s Manila. . . . . . . . .86/77/0.00 . 88/75/pc . . 90/73/pc

Mecca . . . . . . . . .97/75/0.00 . . .94/71/s . . . 93/69/s Mexico City. . . . .72/54/0.00 . 73/48/pc . . 77/46/pc Montreal. . . . . . .34/25/0.62 . .23/18/sn . . . 18/9/pc Moscow . . . . . . .32/25/0.10 . . .28/19/c . . 37/10/sn Nairobi . . . . . . . .84/57/0.00 . . .87/61/s . . . 88/58/s Nassau . . . . . . . .84/75/0.00 . 81/66/pc . . 75/63/pc New Delhi. . . . . .79/61/0.00 . .81/54/sh . . 75/48/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . .57/30/0.00 . . .50/28/s . . 57/34/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .34/21/0.00 . . .27/16/c . . . 25/10/s Ottawa . . . . . . . .34/28/0.02 . .23/10/sn . . . 12/1/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . .50/46/0.00 . . .52/43/c . . . 50/39/c Rio de Janeiro. .100/81/0.00 . . .98/76/s . . . 97/75/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .57/36/0.00 . . .63/39/s . . . 61/40/s Santiago . . . . . . .84/55/0.00 . . .87/63/s . . . 86/58/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .91/73/0.00 . . .84/70/s . . 88/71/pc Sapporo. . . . . . . .30/30/0.00 . 28/14/pc . . . 27/5/pc Seoul . . . . . . . . . .37/21/0.00 . . .41/28/c . . 43/25/pc Shanghai. . . . . . .63/41/0.00 . 54/48/pc . . 55/43/pc Singapore . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . 86/72/pc . . 88/73/pc Stockholm. . . . . .37/28/0.00 . . 32/27/sf . . . 28/23/s Sydney. . . . . . . . .93/64/0.00 . . .95/66/c . . . 98/67/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . .75/52/0.00 . . .70/57/s . . . 72/61/s Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .68/50/0.00 . .66/52/sh . . . 63/51/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .52/43/0.00 . . .57/41/s . . 50/45/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .32/27/0.38 . .30/10/sn . . 16/11/pc Vancouver. . . . . .43/41/0.27 . 46/32/pc . . . 43/32/s Vienna. . . . . . . . .55/34/0.00 . 48/32/pc . . 47/30/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . .43/37/0.30 . . .45/36/c . . . 41/32/c


G

C

GREEN LIVING, TECHNOLOGY & SCIENCE IN OREGON

GREEN, ETC.

Inside

‘Reagan’ 2 times TV’s two different takes on the former president’s legacy, Page C2

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/greenetc

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2011

OREGON’S GRAYWATER PLAN

A site to feed restaurants

Putting old water back to work By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

Water swirling down a kitchen sink or draining from a bathtub could eventually end up irrigating lawns and gardens under a proposed rule by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality. Graywater — or water already used in sinks, showers, bathtubs and washing machines — would be flushed not into the sewer system but to an irrigation system. The rule stems from legislation passed in 2009 that legalized using graywater outside of a home or other building, said Ron Doughten, water reuse program coordinator with the DEQ. It was promoted by a group of people including individual homeowners and people looking to reuse water from larger commercial buildings. “They said, ‘Hey, Oregon has limited water supplies and resources; we don’t need to be using our created potable water for irrigating,’” Doughten said. In Bend, about 60 percent of water use annually goes for outside uses like irrigation, said Ric Olson, water conservation program manager with the city. “It’s pretty staggering if you look at the outdoor to indoor water use,” Olson said.

GREEN

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

SocialEatia CEO Evan Julber, left, Collin Robinson, the company’s director of programming, and Lara Wettig, its director of sales and marketing, inside the SocialEatia conference room at the company’s office in Bend on Thursday.

and it’s

hungry for hits

Bend startup SocialEatia may be launching locally, but it plans to expand, reaching cities across America By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

T

he Bend startup SocialEatia is seeking to take its proprietary Web technology across the nation, to help restaurants get their message out online and direct eaters to all the latest deals. The SocialEatia office sits atop the Helly Hansen outdoor-apparel store in the Old Mill District and spans 8,300 square feet, CEO Evan Julber said. There is good reason to have so much space and only three employees — the expectation of expansion. For now, www.socialeatia.com will focus on Bend restaurants. In

OTECH the months to come, the site should accommodate cities all around the country, Julber said. The current iteration of SocialEatia can serve several functions. Primarily, Julber said, the site exists “to help merchants manage their Facebook and Twitter” presence. So how does it work? A restaurant staffer submits the post — on an upcoming or immedi-

ate bargain, or another event — to SocialEatia, which sends it to the restaurant’s Facebook and Twitter pages, as well as SocialEatia’s website and its Twitter page. A restaurant also can affix a coupon to a post and set an expiration date for the post. Meanwhile, SocialEatia is determined to drive traffic to its site and, thus, the restaurants’ posts, by taking out advertisements in traditional media outlets. A restaurant can submit as many posts to SocialEatia as it wants, so long as it has a subscription with the site. Subscribers also can control time and frequency of posts.

The site is offering a 60-day free trial, after which restaurants must pay a yet-to-be-announced monthly subscription rate. Julber said an algorithm built in-house by Web developer Collin Robinson determines which restaurant promotions top the list on socialeatia.com. The number of clicks a particular promotion receives and the frequency of posts a given restaurant submits are among the factors influencing the algorithm, Julber said. Generally speaking, he said, “the whole idea is to reward the more popular merchants.” See SocialEatia / C6

The approximate 60% amount each year of water use in Bend that goes to outside uses like irrigation.

Types of graywater Under the proposed rule, there are three types of graywater that could be used for different purposes, Doughten said. • The first type of graywater would be untreated. That water could be reused in subsurface irrigation systems, which are lines that release water underground. • The second type is treated in some way to filter out the organic matter and solids that could be washed down a drain. Once it’s treated, the graywater could be used in drip irrigation, which releases water around the base of plants, or for other garden uses like a landscape pond — but it couldn’t be sprayed, Doughten said. The concern, he said, is organisms like viruses or bacteria could remain in the graywater, which could cause health problems. • The third type, which is treated and disinfected, could be used in a spray irrigation system, as long as it wouldn’t land on things like a water fountain or a foodpreparation area, Doughten said. See Graywater / C6

Nourishing nests lift these birds to a higher perch Scientists study the New Caledonian crow, an avian savant By Natalie Angier New York Times News Service

Amid all the psychosocial caterwauling these days over the relative merits of tiger mothers and helicopter dads, allow me to make a pitch for the quietly dogged parenting style of the New Caledonian crow. New Caledonian crows are renowned for their toolmaking

skills. In the complexity, fluidity and sophistication of their tool use, their ability to manipulate and bird-handle sticks, leaves, wires, strings and any other natural or artificial object they can find into the perfect device for fishing out food, or fishing out second-, third- or higher-order tools, the crows have no peers in the nonhuman vivarium, and that

includes such textbook-dexterous smarties as elephants, macaques and chimpanzees. Videos of laboratory studies with the crows have gone viral, showing the birds doing things that look practically faked. In one famous example from Oxford University, a female named Betty methodically bends a straight piece of wire against the outside

SCIENCE of a plastic cylinder to form the shape of a hook, which she then inserts into the plastic cylinder to extract a handled plug from the bottom as deftly as one might pull a stopper from a drain. Talking-cat videos just don’t stand a chance.

So how do the birds get so crafty at crafting? New reports in the journals Animal Behaviour and Learning and Behavior by researchers at the University of Auckland suggest that the formula for crow success may not be terribly different from the nostrums commonly served up to people: Let your offspring have an extended childhood in a stable and loving home; lead by example; offer positive reinforcement; be patient and persistent;

indulge even a near-adult offspring by occasionally popping a fresh cockroach into its mouth; and realize that at any moment a goshawk might swoop down and put an end to the entire pedagogical program. Jennifer Holzhaider, the lead author on the two new reports, said that in one year of their three-year field study, the crows they were following gave birth to a total of eight chicks. See Crows / C6


T EL EV IS IO N

C2 Monday, February 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Old greeting cards: Treasure or toss ’em? Dear Abby: How long should I hold on to greeting cards from family and friends who send them on my birthday and holidays? I feel guilty throwing away something that someone spent time and money on for me, but they’re doing nothing more than taking up space in a drawer. — Cluttered with Cards in Connecticut Dear Cluttered: Don’t feel guilty. Contact a children’s hospital, nursery school, nursing home or senior center and ask whether they would like the greeting cards to use for craft projects. However, be sure to cut off identifying names and addresses before you donate them. Alternatively, consider taking them to a recycling center. Dear Abby: I have employed the same cleaning lady every week for nearly 20 years. She worked for my grandparents before me. “Dora” is 70 and shows no hint of retiring. In fact, she tells me from time to time she has no intention of ever stopping. Although I admire Dora’s spunk, the truth is she is becoming careless in her work. I often come home to find something broken, knocked over or spilled. I can see she has trouble managing the stairs and carrying the vacuum cleaner. I know she needs the income, and I can’t imagine letting her go. What can I do? — Housebroken in Buffalo Dear Housebroken: Point out the broken, spilled or knocked-over items and ask Dora what happened. Consider having Dora come to you every other week, and hire a cleaning crew to fill in and do the “heavy lifting” in the week she’s not there. That way, Dora will have her dignity, a lighter load to carry and some income. And you’ll have a house that’s spick-and-span, and no guilty conscience. Dear Abby: Two years ago, my boyfriend, “Dwight,” and I set a date for our wedding. He wanted to be married on his birthday. We happily announced the date to all

DEAR ABBY our family and friends. Six months ago, Dwight informed me that his divorce is taking longer than expected and the wedding date would have to be changed. I was very upset. I refused to set another one until after his divorce is final. Now, as the original date approaches, Dwight is mentioning things he’d like to do on his birthday. Abby, it was supposed to be my wedding day! I do not want to go to an action-adventure movie. I don’t know what to do with all the feelings of sadness associated with that missed date. Am I being childish? Should I just celebrate his birthday the way he wants? — Depressed in New Jersey Dear Depressed: Your sadness may be less about depression than anger — turned inward. While I sympathize with your disappointment, you need to accept that when you date a man who is still married, this goes with the territory. Because you are close enough that you had set a wedding date, you should also be close enough to discuss your feelings. It is understandable that you don’t feel like celebrating this birthday, and intelligent of you not to set another date until he is actually free to marry you. Do nothing that makes you uncomfortable. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.Dear Abby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

1 president, 2 different ‘Reagans’ B y Verne Gay He was “Ronnie” to Nancy, “the Gipper” to the rest of us, and for eight years an overwhelming presence in all our lives. Ronald Reagan was genially familiar to some, coldly remote and unknowable to others. No one was neutral when it came to the 40th president of the United States, who was born 100 years ago Sunday. But who was the real Reagan? To mark this anniversary, resolve the contradictions and — especially — celebrate the man, two major documentaries this week will explore his life and accomplishments. “Reagan” bows on HBO Monday, while History’s biography (also called “Reagan”) arrives Wednesday. The films are both admiring but sharply different. The former bends toward critical analysis; the latter is a straight-ahead narrative. Both offer evidence of a successful presidency, but little evidence in support of sainthood. Above all, they readily agree that the Great Communicator remains, nearly seven years after his death, a great communicator.

On HBO Reason to watch: Skillful analysis of the Reagan image What it’s about: Fascinated — if not outright preoccupied — with the iconography of Reagan, the film begins with a rush of pictures that spans a half-century of public life. These quick-cut snapshots of how others perceived him segue to how Reagan saw himself. He was born Feb. 6, 1911, in

The Associated Press ile photo

‘Reagan’ times 2 • “Reagan” airs at 9 tonight on HBO. • “Reagan” airs at 9 p.m. Wednesday on History.

Tampico, Ill. The formative experience of his early life, says his son Ron, was being a lifeguard: “He grew up seeing himself as someone who saved lives, and that carried to his movies. He wanted to play the hero and took this all the way to the presidency. He saw America drowning.” Divided by chapters that move through his life — his presidency of the Screen Actors Guild, the General Electric years that forged his conversion from FDR Democrat to Goldwater Republican, the California governorship, the presidency, Reaganomics, IranContra and so on — “Reagan” ends with a sharp quick blow at modern conservatives who want to turn the man into a myth. My say: This “Reagan” is far and away the superior of these two films, but that doesn’t mean it’s always the more evenhanded. The producer is Reagan admirer Eugene Jarecki — his critique of the U.S. war machine, “Why We

Fight,” was a Sundance grand prize winner some years ago — who argues that his legacy has been hijacked by tea party activists or neocons seeking to exploit their hero. This film — mostly successfully — works to establish Reagan as a real man with real world concerns, and more of a pragmatist than an ideologue. But there’s a bit of a juggling act going on as well. Jarecki wants to make this case while covering the whole record, and tends to overcorrect his course at times. There is a little too much emphasis on Iran-Contra, and too little on Reagan’s handling of defense or U.S.-Soviet relations. Bottom line: Thoughtful and well-produced

On History Reason to watch: A no-nonsense look at Reagan’s life and career What it’s about: History’s “Reagan” covers his life and career, with interviews from former ABC

Oregon

News chief White House correspondent Sam Donaldson, former Secretary of State Colin Powell and — most noteworthy of all — Jerry Parr. “Jerry who?” you say. Parr was the Secret Service agent who hustled Reagan into a waiting limousine after shots rang out outside a Washington hotel. The assassination attempt frames this film, which argues — often persuasively — that Reagan’s presidency was shaped by those few shocking seconds and the aftermath. “When a guy gets up and takes a bullet and walks away with a smile,” says David Gergen, CNN senior political analyst and former director of communications for Reagan, “people just think differently about him.” My say: Perhaps the first thing you should know about History’s “Reagan” is that it was produced by the man behind “Pitbulls and Parolees,” “Inked” and “WWII in HD.” This isn’t to suggest that Matthew Ginsburg is not a competent filmmaker, but he seems far more interested in telling a made-for-TV story than in exploring the legacy or trying to figure out who Reagan really was. This “Reagan” devotes about 30 seconds to Reaganomics, and even less to Iran-Contra. That’s not because this is a hagiography, though it drifts perilously close at times. It’s because these subjects don’t make for good TV. Bottom line: Largely — OK, completely — uncritical, this is still a lively and engaging stroll through Reagan’s life and times.

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KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News News (N) ABC World News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ‘14’ This Old House Nightly Business News News Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Steves Europe OpenRoad ’ ‘G’ This Old House Nightly Business

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Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Garden Smart ‘G’ This Old House PBS NewsHour ’ Å

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The Bachelor Brad and the women travel to Costa Rica. (N) ’ ‘14’ Å (10:01) Castle Lucky Stiff (N) ’ ‘PG’ Chuck (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å The Cape Goggles and Hicks (N) ‘14’ Harry’s Law Wheels of Justice ‘14’ How I Met Engagement Two/Half Men Mike & Molly ‘14’ Hawaii Five-0 E Malama (N) ’ ‘14’ The Bachelor Brad and the women travel to Costa Rica. (N) ’ ‘14’ Å (10:01) Castle Lucky Stiff (N) ’ ‘PG’ House Family Practice (N) ‘14’ Å The Chicago Code Pilot (N) ’ ‘14’ News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ News on PDX-TV Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ Antiques Roadshow San Diego ‘G’ American Experience Reagan: Lifeguard ‘PG’ Å (DVS) Chuck (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å The Cape Goggles and Hicks (N) ‘14’ Harry’s Law Wheels of Justice ‘14’ 90210 All About a Boy (N) ’ Å Gossip Girl Panic Roommate (N) ‘14’ Married... With Married... With Rough Cut-Mac Crafting-Spot Martha-Sewing Dewberry Shw Simply Ming ‘G’ Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Antiques Roadshow San Diego ‘G’ American Experience Reagan: Lifeguard ‘PG’ Å (DVS)

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KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman News (N) (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Nancy Reagan: Role-Lifetime News Jay Leno King of Queens King of Queens Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Caprial-John Nancy Reagan: Role-Lifetime

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Bounty Hunter The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 Gone ‘14’ Å Intervention Race team in Italy. ‘14’ Intervention Benny (N) Å Heavy Travis; Lindy (N) ‘PG’ Å Heavy Sharon; Ashley ‘14’ Å 130 28 18 32 Bounty Hunter (3:00) › “Money ››› “Bad Boys” (1995, Action) Martin Lawrence, Will Smith, Tea Leoni. Two Miami cops attempt to recover ›››› “Rocky” (1976, Drama) Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire, Burgess Meredith. A heavyweight champ ›››› “Rocky” (1976) Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire. A heavy102 40 39 Train” (1995) stolen police evidence. gives a club fighter a title shot. weight champ gives a club fighter a title shot. Animal Planet Heroes Phoenix ‘PG’ Bad Dog! Houdinis ’ ‘PG’ Å Operation Wild Operation Wild I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å Operation Wild Operation Wild 68 50 26 38 Animal Planet Heroes Phoenix ‘PG’ America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘14’ Inside the Actors Studio Jim Carrey Inside the Actors Studio Colin Firth The Real Housewives of Atlanta ‘14’ Tabatha’s Salon Takeover ‘14’ Tabatha’s Salon Takeover (N) ‘14’ Tabatha’s Salon Takeover ‘14’ 137 44 Trick My Truck Trick My Truck The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ Å The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ Å ›››› “Unforgiven” (1992) Clint Eastwood. Clint Eastwood’s Oscar-winning portrait of an aged gunman. ’ 190 32 42 53 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Biography on CNBC Sam Walton Biography on CNBC Å Mad Money Biography on CNBC Sam Walton Biography on CNBC Å Paid Program Profit-Town 51 36 40 52 The Facebook Obsession Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Å Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 ‘PG’ Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 Parker Spitzer (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å ›› “The Heartbreak Kid” (2007, Comedy) Ben Stiller, Michelle Monaghan, Jerry Stiller. Å Always Sunny Always Sunny Always Sunny Always Sunny Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 Bag Boy Outdoorsman Joy of Fishing PM Edition Visions of NW Talk of the Town Local issues. Cooking Outdoorsman Bend on the Run Outside Presents Outside Film Festival Ride Guide ‘14’ The Element 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 12 11 Tonight From Washington Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Suite/Deck ››› “Cars” (2006, Comedy) Voices of Owen Wilson, Paul Newman. Å Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Wizards-Place Wizards-Place Sonny-Chance Sonny-Chance 87 43 14 39 Suite/Deck American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. Gold Rush: Alaska ’ ‘PG’ Å American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. 156 21 16 37 American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. College Basketball Missouri at Kansas (Live) SportsCenter (Live) Å NFL Live (N) Basketball Final SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 College Basketball Women’s College Basketball Tennessee at Kentucky (Live) SportsNation Å SportsNation Å NBA Tonight NASCAR Now Year of the Quarterback 22 24 21 24 Women’s College Basketball Can’t Blame Can’t Blame Bowling Å Bowling Å College Basketball From March 2, 1997. (N) College Basketball 1998 North Carolina at Duke From Feb. 28, 1998. Å 23 25 123 25 Who’s Number 1? Å SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Still Standing ’ Still Standing ’ Pretty Little Liars ‘14’ Å Pretty Little Liars (N) ‘PG’ Å Greek Fumble (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Pretty Little Liars (N) ‘PG’ Å The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Bobby Flay Best Thing Ate Unwrapped Unwrapped Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Best Thing Ate Best Thing Ate Good Eats ‘G’ Good Eats 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa Mariners Mondays From June 2, 2010. (N) Bensinger The Game 365 The Final Score Profiles The Final Score 20 45 28* 26 Football Celebrity Beach Bowl From Dallas. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men › “Jumper” (2008, Science Fiction) Hayden Christensen, Jamie Bell, Samuel L. Jackson. › “Jumper” (2008) Hayden Christensen, Jamie Bell. ›› “Next” (2007, Science Fiction) Nicolas Cage, Julianne Moore. 131 Real Estate Income Property Designed to Sell Hunters Int’l House Hunters Property Virgins Property Virgins House Hunters Hunters Int’l Cash & Cari ‘G’ Hunters Int’l My First Place My First Place 176 49 33 43 Real Estate Modern Marvels ‘G’ Å American Pickers ‘PG’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ American Pickers Keep Out! (N) ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ American Pickers Trading Up ‘PG’ 155 42 41 36 Modern Marvels ‘G’ Å Old Christine Old Christine How I Met How I Met Reba As Is ‘PG’ Reba ‘PG’ Å ›› “In the Cut” (2003) Meg Ryan, Mark Ruffalo. Premiere. Å How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Ed Show (N) The Last Word The Rachel Maddow Show The Ed Show Hardball With Chris Matthews Å 56 59 128 51 The Last Word When I Was 17 That ’70s Show That ’70s Show True Life I’m a Jersey Shore Girl ’ Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å Teen Mom 2 ’ ‘PG’ Skins Cadie (N) ’ ‘MA’ Skins Cadie ’ ‘MA’ 192 22 38 57 The Seven ‘PG’ iCarly ‘G’ Å SpongeBob SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å SpongeBob Power Rangers My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez George Lopez The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 iCarly iKiss ‘G’ Knockout Sport UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ UFC Fight Night ’ ‘14’ › “Bangkok Dangerous” (2008, Action) Nicolas Cage. Premiere. ’ Jail ’ ‘14’ Å Jail ’ ‘14’ Å 132 31 34 46 Knockout Sport ››› “Serenity” (2005) Nathan Fillion. A spaceship crew gets caught in a deadly conflict. Being Human Being Human (N) Warehouse 13 Age Before Beauty Being Human Å 133 35 133 45 Mutant Chron Behind Scenes Mark Chironna J. Franklin Jesse Duplantis Praise the Lord Å Joel Osteen ‘PG’ Perry Stone ‘G’ Jack Van Impe Changing-World Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Conan (N) ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond ››› “Blossoms in the Dust” (1941) Greer Garson, Walter Pidgeon. Edna Gladney ›››› “Mrs. Miniver” (1942, Drama) Greer Garson, Walter Pidgeon, Dame May Whitty. An Englishwoman ››› “Madame Curie” (1943, Biography) Greer Garson, Walter Pidgeon. She and her (11:45) “Mrs. Park101 44 101 29 opens a home for orphans in Fort Worth, Texas. Å (DVS) leads her husband and family through World War II. Å (DVS) lab partner discover love and radium. Å (DVS) ington” (1944) Kitchen Boss (N) Ultimate Cake Off ’ ‘PG’ Å Cake Boss ’ ‘PG’ Å The Unpoppables The Unpoppables Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ 19 Kids-Count 19 Kids-Count The Unpoppables The Unpoppables 178 34 32 34 Cake Boss ‘PG’ Law & Order Crimebusters ’ ‘14’ Bones The Proof in the Pudding ‘14’ Bones ’ ‘14’ Å Bones The Man in the SUV ’ ‘14’ Rizzoli & Isles Born to Run ‘14’ Rizzoli & Isles I Kissed a Girl ‘14’ 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Disappeared ’ ‘PG’ Garfield Show Codename: Kids Codename: Kids Total Drama Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Adventure Time Regular Show (N) King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Carnivore Carnivore Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son AfriCobra (N) ›› “Trading Places” (1983, Comedy) Dan Aykroyd, Eddie Murphy, Ralph Bellamy. Premiere. Retired at 35 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons NCIS A distraught naval officer. ‘14’ NCIS Chimera ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS Requiem ’ ‘14’ Å WWE Monday Night RAW ’ Å (11:05) White Collar ‘PG’ Å 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore Back Into the Fold ‘14’ You’re Cut Off ’ ‘14’ You’re Cut Off ’ ‘14’ The X Life ‘14’ You’re Cut Off ’ ‘14’ The X Life ‘14’ 191 48 37 54 Jersey Shore Girls Like That ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:25) ›› “Sex Drive” 2008 Josh Zuckerman. ‘R’ Å (6:20) ››› “Mad Max” 1979 Mel Gibson. ’ ‘R’ Å ››› “Apollo 13” 1995, Historical Drama Tom Hanks, Bill Paxton. ’ ‘PG’ Å (10:20) ›› “All About the Benjamins” 2002 Ice Cube. ›› “The Adventures of Ford Fairlane” 1990 Andrew “Dice” Clay. ‘R’ ›› “Suspiria” 1977, Horror Jessica Harper. ‘R’ Å After Film School ›› “Zardoz” 1974, Science Fiction Sean Connery. ‘R’ Å ››› “The Fly” 1986 ‘R’ Å Nike 6.0 HB BMX Pro The Daily Habit Insane Cinema ‘PG’ Bubba’s World Insane Cinema The Daily Habit The Daily Habit The Daily Habit Check 1, 2 ‘PG’ Stupidface ‘MA’ Amer. Misfits The Daily Habit Pipe Dream Haney Project World of Golf World of Golf The Golf Fix Golf Central Learning Center World of Golf World of Golf The Golf Fix Golf Central Learning Center Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ “Backyard Wedding” (2010) Alicia Witt, Frances Fisher. ‘PG’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (4:45) ›› “A Cinderella Story” 2004 Hilary Duff. A teenager › “Anaconda” 1997 Jennifer Lopez. A huge snake stalks a film Real Time With Bill Maher Filmmaker “Reagan” 2011, Documentary Premiere. The life and legacy of President Ronald The Ricky Gervais (11:45) “Jennifer’s HBO 425 501 425 10 meets a high-school quarterback online. ‘PG’ crew in the Brazilian jungle. ‘PG-13’ Å Charles Ferguson. ‘MA’ Å Reagan. ’ ‘NR’ Å Show ‘MA’ Body” 2009 (4:45) ››› “Benny & Joon” 1993, Romance Johnny Depp. ‘PG’ Arrested Dev. Arrested Dev. Larry Sanders (8:35) ›› “Second Best” 2004, Comedy-Drama Joe Pantoliano. ‘R’ (10:35) ››› “Benny & Joon” 1993 Johnny Depp. IFC 105 105 › “Leap Year” 2010 Amy Adams. A woman travels to Ireland to (6:45) › “The Final Destination” 2009, Horror Bobby Campo, (8:15) ››› “The Hangover” 2009, Comedy Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms. Three pals › “Our Family Wedding” 2010, Romance-Comedy America Fer- (11:45) “The Sex MAX 400 508 7 propose to her boyfriend. ‘PG’ Å Shantel VanSanten, Nick Zano. ’ ‘R’ Å must find a missing groom after a wild bash. ’ ‘R’ Å rera, Forest Whitaker. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Spirit” 2009 ‘NR’ America Before Columbus ‘PG’ Explorer (N) ‘14’ America Before Columbus ‘PG’ Explorer ‘14’ Drugs, Inc. Marijuana ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents OddParents The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Iron Man: Armor Iron Man: Armor NTOON 89 115 189 SnowTrax Å Destination ATV World Ride to Adv. Whitetail Nation Young Blood Hunt Adv Best of the West SnowTrax Å ATV World Destination Ride to Adv. Top Truck Chal Impossible Shots OUTD 37 307 43 (5:15) ›› “Middle of Nowhere” 2008 Susan Sarandon. iTV. A troubled teen partners ›› “Quantum of Solace” 2008, Action Daniel Craig, Olga Kurylenko. iTV. James Bond Shameless Three Boys Frank gets bad Californication ’ Episodes Episode 5 Californication ’ Episodes Episode 5 SHO 500 500 medical news. ’ ‘MA’ Å ’ ‘MA’ ’ ‘MA’ with an aspiring doctor to sell marijuana. ’ ‘R’ Å seeks revenge for the death of Vesper Lynd. ’ ‘PG-13’ ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å Hot Rod TV ‘G’ Hot Rod TV ‘G’ Barrett-Jackson Special Edition ‘PG’ Battle-Supercars Battle-Supercars Hot Rod TV ‘G’ Hot Rod TV ‘G’ Barrett-Jackson Special Edition ‘PG’ Battle-Supercars Battle-Supercars NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 (5:05) › “Gigli” 2003, Romance-Comedy Ben Affleck. ’ ‘R’ Å (7:10) › “Obsessed” 2009, Suspense Idris Elba, Ali Larter. ‘PG-13’ Å ›› “The Stepfather” 2009 Dylan Walsh. ‘PG-13’ Å (10:45) › “Legion” 2010, Horror Paul Bettany. ‘R’ Å STARZ 300 408 300 (4:30) ›› “Fanboys” 2008 Sam Hunting- “Toe to Toe” 2009, Drama Louisa Krause, Sonequa Martin, Hina Abdullah. Two senior “Fatal Secrets” 2009, Suspense Dina Meyer. A woman seeks “Fifty Dead Men Walking” 2008, Action Ben Kingsley, Jim Sturgess. A young man ›› “The Octagon” TMC 525 525 ton. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å lacrosse players have a love/hate relationship. ’ ‘NR’ Å help after her lover becomes malicious. ‘R’ Å infiltrates the IRA until being exposed. ’ ‘R’ Å 1980 ‘R’ (4:30) NHL Hockey New York Rangers at Detroit Red Wings (Live) Hockey Central Sports Jobs NHL Overtime (Live) Boxing World Series: Mexico City at Memphis NHL Overtime VS. 27 58 30 The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å The Locator ‘G’ The Locator ‘G’ WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Monday, February 7, 2011 C3

CALENDAR TODAY GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Into the Wild” by Jon Krakauer; free; noon; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7085 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. BUNCO PARTY: Featuring games, prizes and refreshments; proceeds benefit Prineville Habitat for Humanity; $5; 2 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, 235 N.E. Fourth St., Prineville; 541-447-7659.

TUESDAY “EATING”: A screening of the documentary about the standard American diet; free; 6 p.m.; Common Table, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-480-3017.

WEDNESDAY FLY-FISHING FILM TOUR: A screening of fly-fishing films from independent outdoor filmmakers; $12 in advance, $15 at the door; 6 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.flyfishingfilmtour.com. “9500 LIBERTY”: A screening of the documentary about an explosive immigrationpolicy battle in Virginia; free; 6:30 p.m.; Becky Johnson Center, 412 S.W. Eighth St., Redmond; 541383-7412 or http:// multicultural.cocc .edu/events. “KING CORN”: A screening of the documentary about two friends and an acre of corn; with a potluck dinner; free; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Grandview Hall, Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; slowfoodhighdesert@gmail.com. “TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD”: The Bend High School drama department presents a dramatization of Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning tale; $7, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-6290. DINNER FUNDRAISER: A pizza and dessert dinner, with a raffle and a presentation by athlete Ravi Drugen; free; 7 p.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541419-3495. IGNITE BEND: A series of fiveminute presentations on a range of topics, each chosen by the presenter; SOLD OUT; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St.; 541-480-6492 or www.ignitebend.com. SONNY HESS BAND: The rhythm and blues act performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

THURSDAY BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “The Call of the Wild”; $15, $10 museum members, plus accompanying adult admission ($10, $9 seniors); 10 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Half Broke Horses” by Jeannette Walls; bring a lunch; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/ calendar. “I’M NOT YOUR INDIAN MASCOT ANYMORE”: Cornel Pewewardy talks about countering the assault of Native American mascots in schools; free; 3:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3183782 or http://multicultural.cocc .edu/events. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Kai Strand reads from her children’s book “The Weaver”; free; 6 p.m.; Camalli Book Co., 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541323-6134.

FLY-FISHING FILM TOUR: A screening of fly-fishing films from independent outdoor filmmakers; $12 in advance, $15 at the door; 6 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.flyfishingfilmtour.com. “TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD”: The Bend High School drama department presents a dramatization of Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning tale; $7, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-6290. BENEFIT CONCERT: Featuring performances by Five Pint Mary and Brent Alan, with comedy by Triage and Jumpin’ Joyce Respess; proceeds benefit The Loft; $30 minimum donation; 7-10 p.m.; The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-318-3436. BUDDY WAKEFIELD: The slam poet performs; free; 7 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7257 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. DEAD WINTER CARPENTERS: The California-based roots-rock band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “FOREVER PLAID”: Barter Theatre presents the musical about high school crooners who return from the afterlife for one last shot at glory; $37 or $42; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.tower theatre.org. “OLIVER!”: Preview night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of Lionel Bart’s musical about a lovable orphan who asks for more; $10; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org.

FRIDAY BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “The Call of the Wild”; $15, $10 museum members, plus accompanying adult admission ($10, $9 seniors); 10 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. “9500 LIBERTY”: A screening of the documentary about an explosive immigration-policy battle in Virginia; free; 6 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7412 or http://multicultural.cocc.edu/events. “TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD”: The Bend High School drama department presents a dramatization of Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prizewinning tale; $7, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-3836290. TRIVIA BEE: The Education Foundation for the Bend-La Pine Schools holds a trivia competition between three-person teams; with hors d’oeuvres; ages 21 and older only; proceeds benefit the foundation; $20; 7 p.m., live music and appetizers at 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. “OLIVER!”: Opening night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of Lionel Bart’s musical about a lovable orphan who asks for more; with champagne and dessert reception; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. “THE FALLEN IDOL”: A screening of the 1948 unrated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

475-3351 or www.jcld.org. ARCHAEOLOGYFEST FILM SERIES: The best films from the 2010 The Archaeology Channel International Film and Video Festival; $6, free ages 12 and younger; 7:30 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Boyle Education Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-345-5538, rpettigrew@ aol.com or www.archaeology channel.org. WILLIAMS AND REE: The comedy team performs; ages 21 and older; $15-$25; 9 p.m.; Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino, 100 Main St., Warm Springs; 541-553-1112 or http://kahneeta.com.

SATURDAY VFW VALENTINE BRUNCH: Community breakfast with breakfast foods, fruit, coffee and more; $7.50; 9-11 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, NIXON IN CHINA”: Starring Kathleen Kim, Janis Kelly and James Maddalena in a presentation of John Adams’ masterpiece; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 10 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jon Stewart talks about his book “Pilgrimage to the Edge: The Pacific Crest Trail and the U.S. Forest Service”; with a slide show; free; 3 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; 541-389-1813. “WOLVES OF THE AIR”: A screening of the documentary about Harris hawks; writer Jim Dawson will discuss his field research; $5, free museum members; 5:30 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754, ext. 241. “EAT, DRINK AND BE DEADLY!”: Buckboard Mysteries presents a Valentine’s Day dinner theater mystery; reservations recommended; $49, $45 seniors; 6-9 p.m.; Cafe 3456’, 63136 Powell Butte Highway, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. “FOR THE LOVE OF MUSIC”: Todd Haaby performs; proceeds benefit the Summit High School Friends of Music; $25, $18 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. “TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD”: The Bend High School drama department presents a dramatization of Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning tale; $7, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-6290. DANCING AND CHOCOLATE: An evening of line dancing and chocolate treats; proceeds benefit the Gospel Choir of the Cascades; $5 suggested donation; 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541390-2441. “OLIVER!”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Lionel Bart’s musical about a lovable orphan who asks for more; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. ARCHAEOLOGYFEST FILM SERIES: The best films from the 2010 The Archaeology Channel International Film and Video Festival; $6, free ages 12 and younger; 7:30 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Boyle Education Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541345-5538, rpettigrew@aol.com or www.archaeologychannel.org. MOUNTAIN COUNTRY IDOL: Central Oregon musicians compete to see who is the best country artist; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital;

$5; 8 p.m.; Coyote Ranch, 1368 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-5487700 or www.mountain997.com. SATURDAY NIGHT JOKERS & JAMS: Local comics perform, with a performance by Franchot Tone; $10; 8 p.m., doors open 7:30 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-977-5677. DEL THE FUNKY HOMOSAPIEN: The Oakland, Calif.-based hip-hop act performs, with Bukue One, Serendipity Project, Attribute and Tony G; $17 plus fees in advance, $20 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7882989 or www.randompresents.com. DUSU MALI BAND: The Portlandbased African-fusion band performs; $8 plus fees in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoon brewing.com.

SUNDAY “OLIVER!”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Lionel Bart’s musical about a lovable orphan who asks for more; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. “THE JACKET”: Nanda, a four-man circus-ninja-dance-comedy-action performing arts group, presents the story of a magical jacket that gives its wearer superhuman power; $12, $8 ages 12 and younger; 2 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. CHARITY BINGO: Event includes a baked-goods sale; proceeds benefit Prineville Habitat for Humanity; $5; 2 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, 235 N.E. Fourth St., Prineville; 541-447-7659. SECOND SUNDAY: Ellen Waterston reads from a selection of her works; followed by an open mic; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3121034 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/ calendar. BUNCO FOR CHARITY: Play the dice game; instructions provided; registration requested; proceeds benefit the service projects of Soroptimist International of Bend; $15; 2:30-5:30 p.m.; Suntree Village Mobile Home Park, Clubhouse, 1001 S.E. 15th St., Bend; 541-382-4580. BENEFIT CONCERT: Featuring students and local musicians; proceeds benefit the Sisters High School graduation party; $10 suggested donation; 7 p.m.; The Barn in Sisters, 68467 Three Creeks Road; 541-588-0083. BUSDRIVER: The underground hip-hop artist performs; free; 9 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868.

TUESDAY Feb. 15 “CREATING LEGACY OR HERITAGE ALBUMS”: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program by Lori Hill; free; 10 a.m.; Rock Arbor Villa, Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-3178978,541-317-9553 or www.orgen web.org/deschutes/bend-gs. “THE CARTEL”: A screening of the documentary about America’s public school crisis; free; 6:15 p.m.; Highland Baptist Church, 3100 S.W. Highland Ave., Redmond; rdmpatriot@gmail.com. “TWELVE ANGRY JURORS”: The Sisters High School drama department presents the story of a jury trying to decide the fate of a man charged with murder; $7, free students and staff with ID; 7 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-5494045, ext. 1020. KY-MANI MARLEY: The Grammynominated reggae and hip-hop musician performs; $30 or $35; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

M T For Monday, Feb. 7

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

127 HOURS (R) 2:20, 4:30, 7:10 ANOTHER YEAR (PG-13) 2, 4:40, 7:20 BLACK SWAN (R) 2:15, 4:55, 7:35 BLUE VALENTINE (R) 2:10, 4:50, 7:30 THE ILLUSIONIST (PG) 2:25, 4:35, 7 THE KING’S SPEECH (R) 2:05, 4:45, 7:25

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) 1:15, 4:40, 7:30 COUNTRY STRONG (PG-13) 3:35, 9:25

THE DILEMMA (PG-13) 1:05, 4:05, 7:55 THE FIGHTER (R) 1:35, 4:50, 8 THE GREEN HORNET (PG-13) 12:45, 3:25, 7:15, 9:55 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 12:30, 6:15 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 1, 3:35, 6:25, 9:05 THE MECHANIC (DP — R) 1:40, 4:35, 7:40, 10 NO STRINGS ATTACHED (R) 1:10, 3:50, 6:35, 9:10 THE RITE (PG-13) 12:55, 3:55, 7:10, 9:50 THE ROOMMATE (PG-13) 1:25, 4:25, 6:50, 9:20 SANCTUM 3-D (R) 1:20, 4:10, 7:25, 10 TANGLED (PG) 12:35, 3:10, 6:55 THE TOURIST (PG-13) 1:30, 4:55, 7:50 TRON: LEGACY 3-D (PG) 3:05, 6:10, 9

TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 12:50, 4:20, 7:05, 9:40 YOGI BEAR 3-D (PG) 12:40, 3:40, 6:40 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies. EDITOR’S NOTE: DLP technology uses an optical semiconductor to manipulate light digitally. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) HOW DO YOU KNOW (PG-13) 9 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG-13) 6

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

THE MECHANIC (R) 4:30, 6:30 NO STRINGS ATTACHED (R) 4, 6:30 THE RITE (PG-13) 4:15, 6:45 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 3:45, 6:15

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

COUNTRY STRONG (PG-13) 6:45 THE KING’S SPEECH (R) 6:30 NO STRINGS ATTACHED (R) 6:45 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 6:30

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

COUNTRY STRONG (PG-13) 7 THE DILEMMA (PG-13) 4

The White Stripes broke up with mix of style, mystery By Greg Kot Chicago Tribune

The news that the White Stripes broke up Wednesday really didn’t come as a shock to anyone. It had been four years since their last studio album and tour, but it still prompted an outpouring of social-media grief. The Stripes, of course, are a duo consisting of Jack and Meg White, once a married couple who carried on long after their divorce to make some of the best music of the last decade. They had been together for 13 years, released six acclaimed studio albums and put on consistently galvanizing live shows. The duo announced their breakup on the whitestripes.com website, saying they would make no more new recordings and no longer perform live. Fans hoping for a tipping-point motivation for the timing of this announcement were left hanging. There were no “artistic differences” or health problems, the duo wrote. “Mostly,” they said, they are breaking up now “to preserve what is beautiful and special about the band and have it stay that way.” My Twitter response Wednesday to the announcement was this: “Stinks White Stripes are gone, but love that they exited while on top, with no cash-in tour. Jack and Meg integrity meter trending upward.” And make no mistake, the White Stripes could’ve cashed in. Had they announced a reunion or farewell tour for this summer in a concert industry starved for bigname acts, they would’ve been lavished with offers and played to the largest audiences of their career. Instead, they simply walked away. So is that going out “on top”? More than a few people questioned my assertion. A few wondered why the duo hadn’t just broken up years ago. They speculated about why the White Stripes let things drag on this long, before finally declaring the inevitable. Wouldn’t going out on top mean making a great album, following it with a triumphant tour, and then marching off into the sunset immediately afterward? Indeed, nothing the duo did in the last few years suggested there was much of a future for the White Stripes. Meg White’s health issues had prompted the group to curtail what would be its final tour in 2007, and Jack White had occupied himself with other groups (the Raconteurs, the Dead Weather) and other projects (running his Third Man label out of Nashville and producing albums for the likes of Wanda Jackson) that strongly indicated the White Stripes were no longer a priority. But Jack and Meg White never once treated the White Stripes as an afterthought. Each of their albums was strong, and their last studio release, “Icky Thump,” was among their best. The tour that followed made for riveting theater. The old show-biz adage is to leave the audience wanting more, and the White Stripes did just that. Most fans’ last memo-

The Associated Press

Meg White, left, and Jack White announced they were breaking up the White Stripes in a post on their website Wednesday.

ries of the White Stripes will be of a band in peak form. It’s little wonder. The Stripes were meticulous about how they presented themselves and their music — from the red-and-white color schemes of their clothes to the two-against-the-world sound of the songs — even if it sometimes came across as loose, rough and spontaneous. And that careful approach survived through their breakup. Meg and Jack White never rushed into an artistic decision in their career, and they weren’t about to do it as they were ending their musical life together. We’ll probably never know much more about why the band splintered outside of those few paragraphs on their website. They’ve always been extremely guarded in interviews about their relationship. But Jack White once described “tension” as one of the band’s guiding principles, and once you accept that, this announcement makes sense. In concert, the interaction between Jack White’s vocals and guitar and the way Meg White answered him on drums was as snappy, witty and cutting as the dialogue in a Humphrey BogartLauren Bacall movie. Play out the scene a little further, and anything from a kiss to a gun could be produced. Meg White took a lot of heat for not being a particularly accomplished drummer, at least technically. But she was the perfect drummer for the White Stripes, listening to and playing off Jack White better than any other human being on the planet could have. The body language, the glances between the two, were a theater all their own. The music offered a glimpse of their relationship, but only a glimpse. In a rare private moment captured in “The White Stripes: Under Great Northern Lights” tour DVD released last year, Jack White sits backstage at a piano playing “White Moon,” a ghostly song of obsession. Meg sits silently next to him, head bowed, mouthing some of the words. There is a glance from Jack, and then Meg begins to cry. The song ends, but the tears do not, and the couple clings to one another, in no hurry to let go.


C4 Monday, February 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Monday, February 7, 2011 C5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO SATURDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

Bigar’s Stars is based on the degree of your sun at birth. The sign name is simply a label astrologers put on a set of degrees for convenience. For best results, readers should refer to the dates following each sign. HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Feb. 7, 2011: This year, you will communicate your issues and ideas in a dynamic manner so that others hear you loud and clear. This newfound strength funnels into your daily life, adding to your immediate relationships, from neighbors to loved ones. You find the right words. If you are single, you will need to sort through your many admirers with an eye to the type of bond you desire. If you are attached, the two of you discover a newfound appreciation for each other. Your differences become a strong point. ARIES brings out the best in you. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH Charging ahead is one of your innate, “I feel good” responses. You are able to communicate your needs in a manner that makes waves. Avoid someone who is determined to have it his or her way and will do nearly anything to assure that outcome. Tonight: You call the shots. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH Make it OK to withdraw and observe. Fatigue marks your decisions and actions. Make it OK to be low-key, and postpone any project that simply feels like too much to do. Change evolves because of your willingness to look within. Tonight: Get extra R and R.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Zero in on what you want. Meetings help you orchestrate a goal and gain support. Others easily could go to extremes. Decide to stay on your path. A partner clearly masters the control game. The only way to win is not to play. Tonight: Be with the one you want. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH A must appearance carries a lot of weight. Pressure builds because of a key group of associates and friends taking a stand. You might decide to go it alone. You have a decision to make. Honor your integrity. Tonight: Could be late. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH Keep stretching in order to grasp more of what others think and where they are coming from. Once you can empathize and walk in their shoes, discussions will become easier. An unexpected distraction could force you to deal with more mundane tasks. Tonight: Take in a new place. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Relate to others directly. You’ll gain unusual clarity and support. Understanding evolves between you and those you deal with directly. Your creativity emerges when you don’t like what occurs. You might veer in a different direction. Tonight: Gather your bills. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH You could be making situations far more difficult than need be. How you handle a partner could change, especially as you might feel strongly. Fatigue drains your energy and your good intentions. Pressure builds from out of left field. Tonight: Defer to another person’s desires.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Your pace could be a little more hectic than you originally visualized. Communication proves to be active, with personal aspects of your life intertwining with the professional side. Adjust your schedule accordingly, and if you must, screen your calls. Tonight: Get some exercise. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH Your enthusiasm activates even those who are lazy! You not only get the job done and are able to communicate your needs, but you also help others. Be careful with a money matter. There is an inherent risk with finances. Tonight: Acting as if there is no tomorrow. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH You know what to do, and you will do it. Unfortunately, the powers that be might not agree, implying a power struggle of some sort. The only way to win is not to play. Stress revolves around your schedule as well. Tonight: Head home. Stay peaceful. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH Keep conversations active and flowing. Don’t allow someone to seduce you into doing less than necessary. Express your ideas; represent who you are. An opinion about a situation could be changing, especially at the present moment. Tonight: Out and about. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Be careful with funds. You easily could make a mistake that costs you not only in funds, but also that doesn’t allow you to do something that you have long desired. Be careful of pushing a group of associates too far. Tonight: Don’t overindulge. © 2011 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

C6 Monday, February 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

When greener equals cheaper for your business By Jim Witkin New York Times News Service

While Joe Santana does not presume to understand all of the latest climate science, he has his own opinions about global warming. But as head of operations at Mi Rancho, a family-owned tortilla producer in San Leandro, Calif., he understands the importance of saving money. After attending a series of workshops on sustainable business practices, Santana recently put into action a number of energy-efficiency and waste-reduction measures that he estimates will save Mi Rancho about $100,000 a year and pay for themselves well within the first year. “And if that’s good for the planet,” he said, “all the better.” “Sustainability” and “going green” are buzzwords that get overused, but many business owners are discovering that looking at their operations through a green lens can help them reduce costs, rethink long-held business practices and open doors to new opportunities. Here are some tips on getting started.

Start at the top The commitment to make a business greener has to come from top management, said Dan Bramblett, an executive at Estes Heating and Air Conditioning, a contractor based in Atlanta: “There are many things employees can do to start the process, but driving this through the company culture must start at the top.” At the same time, he added, “engaging employees is key to getting everyone on board.” Santana advised setting up internal green teams, consisting of volunteers from management and staff who meet on a regular basis. At Mi Rancho, the sustainability group meets once a month to review strategy, check progress and identify energy-saving actions. Some of the best ideas come from the front lines.

Take inventory To begin, Bramblett said, analyze the business operations with an eye toward reducing energy consumption and waste: “Look at those places where you spend the most money.” Common areas to consider are lighting, powering your equipment, heating, air-conditioning, transportation and water use. For Estes, the company’s biggest expense after personnel costs was transportation and fleet maintenance. Look also at the waste produced by the business. Disposing of this material often incurs a cost. At the end of this planning process, establish a baseline of your energy use and costs, said Tom Bowman, president of Bowman Design Group, a design firm based in Signal Hill, Calif. Most utility companies will come to your property to perform an energy audit, or you can use the information from your utility bills. “Having a well-defined start-

SocialEatia Continued from C1 In addition, SocialEatia’s site will soon allow users to filter posts by type of restaurant, price point and other variables, Julber said. “We really want to encourage local businesses to jump on board,” said Lara Wettig, SocialEatia’s director of sales and marketing. Restaurant owners who have learned about the website have given “overwhelmingly positive” responses and expressed interest in signing up, Wettig said. They view it as an “additional medium to advertise,” she said. The two seeds for growing SocialEatia appeared at the intersection of food and social networking. The first came when a restaurant owner was telling Julber about how frustrating it was for her to try to get her message across on Facebook. The second appeared while Julber and his family were enjoying the alder-smoked prime ribs at Baldy’s Barbeque on Century Drive in Bend last August. Julber wondered: What had inspired his family to go there in the first

ing point allows you to track and measure your progress,” he said.

Do the easy stuff Find steps you can accomplish immediately, said Bowman, and then build from there with actions that cost nothing or very little to apply. As an example, you might shut down electronics at night, turn off overhead lights during daylight hours and open windows to get natural ventilation instead of running the air conditioning. These steps, he said, are “largely about educating employees and changing old habits.” Adam Prochaska, a partner at the law firm Harding & Shultz in Lincoln, Neb., is trying to change some old habits by getting his colleagues to reduce their paper use. Prochaska has calculated that his firm buys 1,600 reams of copy paper each year. A portion of that paper is used to print e-mails. He and a handful of other lawyers have started to store those e-mails electronically instead. He figures that if all of the lawyers in the firm did this, they could save at least $8,000 a year in printing and storage costs.

Crows

Graywater

Continued from C1 “We thought, yay, we’ll have eight juveniles we can watch,” she said. But the goshawks, the rats, the owls and the torrential rains took their toll, and only one of those eight chicks survived. “It’s a hard life in the jungle; that’s all there is to it,” said Holzhaider. By studying the social structure and behavior of the crows and the details of their difficult daily lives, the researchers hope to gain new insights into the evolution of intelligence, the interplay between physical and social skillfulness, and the relative importance of each selective force in promoting the need for a big animal brain. The researchers want to know why it is that, of the 700 or so species of crows, ravens, rooks, jays and magpies that make up the world’s generally clever panoply of corvids, the New Caledonian crow became such an outlier, an avian savant, a YouTube top of the line.

Continued from C1 Doughten said the DEQ also has proposed putting in some environmental safeguards as well, such as stating that a subsurface irrigation system could not be less than 4 feet above the groundwater table in order to make sure there’s enough soil to filter the graywater before it hits an aquifer. For some area irrigators, the proposed rule is welcome. “I think it’s a great direction to go, and it just makes sense,” said John Low, manager of Ewing Irrigation Products in Bend. “Clean water is such a precious resource for us to be using it for the things that we can be using graywater for.” But some protections are needed, he said — it wouldn’t be good to put Drano down a shower drain only to have it pumped into the garden. Still, most of the material that goes down a sink, like food waste, would be harmless, he said, especially if someone had a filter system to clean it up further. Low said he knows people in Portland who have installed rainwater-capture systems on roofs and said a certain segment of the population will be thrilled to have the option to reuse graywater. But others, looking at the economics of installing a system, which would have to include a reservoir to store the graywater as well as pumps to get it to the lawn, might shy away, Low said. An inexpensive retrofit could cost $1,000, he said, and a graywater system could easily get up to $5,000. And although it makes a

‘A big puzzle’

Once the easy stuff is done, the next step is investing in energy-efficient equipment: heating systems, air conditioners and other office gear. But before starting down this road, check out the incentive programs and rebates available through the utility and local city government, as well as state and federal agencies.

“It’s a big puzzle,” said Russell Gray, head of the Auckland lab. “Why them? Why is this species on a small island in the Pacific able to not just use but to manufacture a variety of tools, and in a flexible rather than a rote or programmatic way? Why are they able to do at least as well as chimpanzees on experiments of cognition that show an understanding of the physical properties of the world and an ability to generalize from one problem to the next?” If the birds learn to avoid holes and barriers in the experimental setting of a plastic tubed box, for example, they will avoid holes and barriers in the very different conditions of a wooden table. “Knowing their social structure,” Gray said, “is one part of the jigsaw.” New DNA studies suggest that corvids first arose at the end of the dinosaur era, roughly 65 million years ago, somewhere in the neighborhood of Australia, and radiated outward from there. The ancestors of the New Caledonian crow didn’t travel far before settling on the 220-mile-long land sprig from which the species derives its name. The modern New Caledonian crow is funereal of bill and feather and, at an average of 12 inches in length and 12 ounces in weight, a middling sort of corvid: much smaller than a common raven, slightly more compact than the ubiquitous American crow, but beefier than a jay or a jackdaw. Brain size is another matter. “All corvid brains are relatively big,” said Gray, “but preliminary evidence suggests that the New Caledonian brain is big even for corvids.” Moreover, the brain is preferentially enlarged, displaying impressive bulk in the avian equivalent of the cogitating forebrain, particularly structures involved in associative learning and fine motor skills.

Watch what you say

Natural toolmakers

After adopting a sustainability policy, many businesses are eager to start waving the green flag. But be wary of overstating or misrepresenting your efforts, thus earning the dreaded “greenwashing” label. “Be honest and clear about the steps you’ve taken ... and acknowledge it’s part of an ongoing process,” Bowman said. “The goal is to show that the company takes the challenge seriously and is working on

Their bills are also exceptional, “more like a human opposable thumb than the standard corvid beak,” said Gray. The bills “appear specialized to hold tools,” said Anne Clark, who studies American crows at the State University of New York at Binghamton but who also has observed New Caledonian crows in the field. “When I was watching them, they seemed to grab a stick whenever they appeared unable to figure something out,” she said,

place? Ah, he recalled, it was a tweet about the special going on then at the restaurant. “Putting those two together and realizing the power of social media and coming up with an idea about how to harness it” gave birth to SocialEatia, Julber said. Julber, 53, has led a diversified life thus far, having worked in mining and refining at surface mines in Colorado, preciousmetals trading in California and software programming in Washington state, among other jobs. In 2008, after living and working in Bend for 13 years, he established the website Fractional Exchange, on which vacation home owners can connect with others and temporarily swap their places worldwide. Now Julber has another website to run. “Bend, Oregon, is our proving ground for our concept,” Julber said of SocialEatia. In the coming months, the plan is to create SocialEatia pages for other cities, first in the Northwest, then nationwide, with at least one salesperson in each city. Many city offices should also have editors of posts on staff, too, Julber said. Six months from now, Julber said, SocialEatia is likely to be up

and running at least in Portland, in addition to Bend. And he hopes to fill up the vast Bend office in the months to come, too, with plenty of new employees, most of whom will focus on customer service. The company has already identified 230 cities where SocialEatia could operate, he said. For now, though, “we’re just starting it off,” Julber said. “The ball is starting to roll,” Wettig added. Scott Larson, venture catalyst manager at Economic Development for Central Oregon, has spoken with Julber about SocialEatia. Indeed, Larson said, “there is enormous potential within social media for this type of service and application to grow and flourish.” Such success would not surprise Larson, he said, because he has seen technology-oriented companies in the region, such as Manzama and G5, take on a national or international focus. Those firms and others have shown “it’s proven, it’s viable and companies are doing it, over and over again,” Larson said.

Track and report As with any business initiative, review your results periodically, said Sarah Kate Fishback, who is director of operations at the Institute for Sustainable Development. She suggested “measuring the things you can measure — energy, waste, water use — and then try to quantify the business impact of taking action on these fronts.” Showing positive financial gains, she said, will keep the process on track. Sharing the results with the staff also keeps everyone motivated, Deal said.

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Jordan Novet can be reached at 541-633-2117 or at jnovet@bendbulletin.com.

Science (journal) via The Associated Press

A wild New Caledonian crow is tagged with a video camera (the lens is protruding through the central tail feathers). After mounting tiny cameras to crows, researchers have discovered that the birds use a variety of tools, and even make their own, to seek food. rather as a mathematician has trouble solving a problem without a pencil in hand. The birds are indefatigable toolmakers out in the field. They find just the right twigs, crack them free of the branch, and then twist the twig ends into needle-sharp hooks. They tear strips from the saw-toothed borders of Pandanus leaves, and then shape the strips into elegant barbed spears. With their hooks and their spears they extract slugs, insects and other invertebrates from deep crevices in the ground or in trees. Through an arduous transisland survey of patterns left behind in Pandanus leaves by the edge-stripping crows, Gavin Hunt of the University of Auckland determined that toolmaking styles varied from spot to spot, and those styles remained stable over time. In sum, New Caledonian crows have their version of culture. Being cultured is hard work. In studying the birds’ social life, Holzhaider and her colleagues confirmed previous observations that New Caledonian crows are not group-living social butterflies, as many crows and ravens are, but instead adhere to a nuclear family arrangement. Males and females pair up and stay together year-round, reaffirming their bond with charming gestures like feeding and grooming each other, sitting close enough to touch, and not even minding when their partner plays with their tools. Young birds stay with their parents for two years or more — a very extended dependency, by bird standards — and they forage together as a family, chattering all the while. “They have this way of talking in a quiet voice, ‘Waak, waak, waak,’ that sounds really lovely,” Holzhaider said. The juveniles need their extended apprenticeship. “They’re incredibly persistent, wildly ripping and hacking at Pandanus leaves, trying to make it work,” she said, “but for six months or so, juveniles are no way able to make a tool.” The parents step into the breach, offering the trainee food they have secured with their own finely honed tools. “By seeing their parents get a slug out of a tree, they learn that there’s something down there worth searching for,” she said. “That keeps them going.” The carrot-on-a-stick approach: It works every time.

How to comment To comment on the proposed rule, write to Ron Doughten, Oregon DEQ, Water Quality Division, 811 S.W. Sixth Ave., Portland, OR 97204-1390; send a fax to 503-229-6037 or e-mail graywaterrules@deq.state.or.us before 5 p.m. March 11. A public meeting on the proposed rule will be held in Bend at 5 p.m., Feb. 24, at the DEQ’s Bend office at 475 N.E. Bellevue, Suite 110.

lot of sense, Low said, it could be cost-prohibitive for some people to convert to graywater capture. “I think some will, I think most won’t,” Low said. Allowing graywater reuse in irrigation is a good step, said Katy Bryce with the Environmental Center in Bend. It lets people who want to build green homes add another environmentally friendly element to the construction, she said — although having a couple of good demonstration sites would help encourage people to try it themselves. Homeowners have already started moving toward low-water irrigation systems, or xeriscaping, that require little water to begin with, she said, so this could be another step in that direction. “I think people are concerned about water use here,” Bryce said. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or at kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

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Golf Inside Mark Wilson take the lead heading into the finish of the final round of the Phoenix Open, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2011

SKIING

TRACK & FIELD

Bend’s Ford places 18th in giant slalom at World Cup event

Bend’s Ashton Eaton tops his own world record in heptathlon

HINTERSTODER, Austria — Alpine skier Tommy Ford, of Bend, followed up Saturday’s career day with another solid World Cup result on Sunday, when he finished 18th in giant slalom. Ford placed 11th in Super G on Saturday, the best World Cup Tommy Ford finish of his young career. In Sunday’s giant slalom, Ford, 21, was the third American behind ninth-place Bode Miller (2 minutes, 47.01 seconds) and 13th-place Ted Ligety (2:47.34). Ford’s time was 2:47.55. The 18th-place finish likely secures for Ford a spot in the 2011 Alpine Ski World Championships, which start Tuesday in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany. On Sunday, Ford finished ahead of two other U.S. skiers with whom he was battling for a start in the world championship giant slalom — Warner Nickerson finished 26th, and Tim Jitloff did not finish his first run. “It was a great day for Tommy Ford with his first time in the GS points this year,” said U.S. Ski Team men’s head coach Sasha Rearick. Philipp Schoerghofer of Austria won Sunday’s giant slalom with a time of 2:46.44. The men’s giant slalom races at the world championships are scheduled for Feb. 17-18. — From staff, wire reports

From staff and wire reports

School and a three-time colTALLIN, Estonia — He did it legiate national champion in again. the decathlon, amassed 3,578 Ashton Eaton, the points Saturday in the former University of first four events of the Oregon track standout seven-event heptathfrom Bend, bettered his lon — 60-meter dash, own indoor heptathlon long jump, shot put and world record with a high jump. His firstdazzling two-day perday total exceeded by formance that ended 17 points his first-day Sunday at the Interscore when he set the national Indoor Com- Ashton Eaton world record of 6,499 bined Events meet. points at the NCAA “I’m so happy!” Eaindoor championships ton said after Sunday’s com- last March in Fayetteville, Ark. petition. “I had a great day. I On Sunday, Eaton resumed think this was a great experi- his assault on the record with a ence. I am most proud of the time of 7.60 seconds in the 60way I competed; after some bad meter hurdles — a world-record events I was able to come back time for a combined-events and perform well today.” indoor race. That effort added Eaton, a 2006 graduate of 1,085 points to his total. Bend’s Mountain View High See Eaton / D5

BEAU EASTES

New postseason plans for wrestling and swim teams

CROSS-COUNTRY

Bend runner King just misses out on bid for worlds SAN DIEGO — Bend’s Max King finished seventh Saturday at the 2011 USA Cross Country Championships, one place away from qualifying for next month’s world championships. Seeking to qualify for his fourth Team USA crosscountry squad, King, 30, finished the 12-kilometer men’s race at Mission Bay Park in a time of 36 minutes, 11 seconds. He was just six seconds behind sixth-place finisher Brian Olinger, of Westerville, Ohio. The top six finishers qualified to represent Team USA at the International Association of Athletics Federations World Cross Country Championships, to be held March 20 in Punta Umbria, Spain. King raced for Team USA at the world championships in 2006, 2008 and 2009. Brent Vaughn, 26 and of Black Hawk, Colo., was the men’s champion Saturday with a time of 35:46. An Oregon runner, Portland’s Andrew Bumbalough, placed second (35:52), and Edward Moran, of Williamsburg, Va., finished third (35:54). Placing fourth was another Portlander, Matt Tegenkamp (36:01), and the other world championships qualifier was Benjamin True, of Hanover, N.H., who placed fifth (36:03). In the 8K women’s race, Olympic bronze medalist Shalane Flanagan, 29 and of Portland, was the winner with a time of 25:47. Second was Molly Huddle, of Providence, R.I., in 26:31, and third was Lisa Koll, of Portland, in 26:41. —From staff, wire reports

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 NBA ...........................................D3 Golf ............................................D3 College basketball .....................D3 NFL ........................................... D4

Ty Barbour / Chico Enterpirse Record

Riders leaving Paradise down Pentz Road reach speeds of up to 50 miles per hour during the Chico Wildflower Century near Chico, Calif., in April 2010.

Hitting the road Nearby early-season tours abound for the dedicated Central Oregon cyclist By Amanda Miles The Bulletin

The summer cycling season, with its races and tours, can seem awfully far away in February. And if you are a cyclocross die-hard, the wait for your favorite time of year is even longer. If you are the type of rider who needs some motivation to stay on your bike during these winter months, or an intermediate goal to break up your training while waiting for the main portion of your season, perhaps you should give some thought to an early-season tour. Cycling tours are, typically, noncompetitive, organized rides in which cyclists pay a fee to participate. A hallmark distance in these tours is the century ride — 100 miles — but tours can be shorter or longer, one day long or multiple days, and they often include routes of various distances from which riders can choose. “It’s great motivation to get out there and do an early ride with some decent mileage,” says Gary Klingler, 56. The Bend resident, a retired firefighter, has participated in numerous tours over the years, including the multiday Cycle Oregon event — which tours a different part of the state every September — about 15 times. While Central Oregon does not offer many tours during the spring months, that just means you can take the opportunity to explore someplace new. A number of tours are held within about a day’s drive or less from Central Oregon, starting as early as this month, and you can participate in a tour practically every weekend into the fall if you are so inclined. If you enjoy climbing, Klingler observes that the Grizzly Peak Century based out of Moraga, Calif. — just west of Oakland — offers a lot of hills on country roads. The longest of the event’s routes, 109 miles, provides more than 8,500 feet of incline. See Road / D6

CYCLING CENTRAL

If you go C H ICO WILDFLOWER CENTURY http://www.chicovelo.org/main/centuryseries/26-wildflower When: May 1 Where: Chico, Calif. Registration fee: $65 Noteworthy: Includes 100-mile, 65-mile, 60-mile and 30-mile options, and 15-mile family ride; field is limited to 4,000 riders

GRIZZLY PEAK CENTURY http://www.grizzlypeakcyclists.org/century/ When: May 1 Where: Moraga, Calif. Registration fee: $45-$70 Noteworthy: Includes 109-mile, 101-mile and 73-mile options; field is limited to 1,000 riders

AMERICA’S MOST BEAUTIFUL BIKE RIDE http://www.bikethewest.com/AMBBR.html When: June 5 Where: Circles around Lake Tahoe in California and Nevada Registration fee: $115-$130 Noteworthy: Includes 100-mile, 72-mile and 35mile options; field limited to 3,000 riders

STRAWBERRY CENTURY http://www.santiamspokes.org/ Strawberry%20Century.htm When: June 12 Where: Central Willamette Valley; starts in Lebanon Registration fee: $20-$25 Noteworthy: Includes 101-mile, 72-mile and 53mile options, and a 13-mile family ride Note: For more information on the Chilly Hilly, go to http://shop.cascade.org/content/events/chillyhilly. Useful resources for tours and other cycling events include www.bicyclepaper.com, www. orride.com and www.bikeride.com

Changes in the OSAA’s winter postseason format start this weekend

F

or years, Bend schools Mountain View, Bend High and, for the past decade, Summit, toiled in arguably the toughest wrestling league in Oregon. Hermiston, Redmond, Pendleton and Crook County dominated the old Intermountain Conference, making the league’s district meet one of the most challenging tournaments in the state. “A lot of good kids from the

PREP SPORTS C O M M E N TA RY IMC weren’t going to the state meet because they took fourth in league,” recalls Mountain View wrestling coach Les Combs, referring to how each league in the state’s largest classifications received three berths to state at each weight class, regardless of the strength of the league. “Some other leagues weren’t very competitive,” says Combs. “The PIL (Portland Interscholastic League) struggled to fill weights. If you showed up at the PIL district tournament and weighed 103 pounds, you were going to state.” See Postseason / D5

NFL: SUPER BOWL

Packers win first title in 14 years By Barry Wilner The Associated Press

ARLINGTON, Texas — Forget Lombardi on Broadway. Green Bay has the newest Super Bowl hit: Aaron Rodgers. Inside Capping • Super Bowl one of the Notebook, greatest postPage D4 seasons for any quarter• NFL’s back, Rodguncertain ers led the offseason, Packers to Page D4 their first NFL championship in 14 years Sunday, 31-25 over the Pittsburgh Steelers. The Packers reclaimed the Vince Lombardi Trophy, named for their legendary coach who won the first two Super Bowls and is making his own star turn in New York these days in the play named after him. Rodgers, the game’s MVP, thrilled his legion of Cheesehead fans with a spectacular sixgame string that should finally erase the bitterness of the Brett

Mark Humphrey / The Associated Press

Green Bay Packers’ Aaron Rodgers poses with the Vince Lombardi Trophy after Super Bowl XLV Sunday in Arlington, Texas. The Packers beat the Steelers 31-25. Favre separation in Green Bay. He’s now equal with Favre in Super Bowl wins, and he extended the Packers’ record of NFL titles to 13, nine before the Super Bowl era. See Packers / D5


D2 Monday, February 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

GOLF

Tuesday Girls basketball: Mountain View at Redmond, 7 p.m.; Sisters at Junction City, 5:45 p.m.; Elmira at La Pine, 5:45 p.m.; Madras at Gladstone, 7 p.m.; Bend at Crook County, 7 p.m.; Santiam at Culver, 5 p.m. Boys basketball: Redmond at Mountain View, 7 p.m.; Elmira at La Pine, 7;15 p.m.; Sisters at Junction City, 7:15 p.m.; Gladstone at Madras, 7 p.m.; Crook County at Bend, 7 p.m.; Santiam at Culver, 6:30 p.m.

11 a.m. — Phoenix Open, final round, Golf Channel.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Pittsburgh at West Virginia, ESPN. 4 p.m. — Women’s college, Duke at North Carolina, ESPN2. 6 p.m. — Women’s college, Tennessee at Kentucky, ESPN2. 7 p.m. — NBA, Chicago Bulls at Portland Trail Blazers, Comcast SportsNet Northwest.

HOCKEY 4:30 p.m. — NHL, New York Rangers at Detroit Red Wings, VS. network.

TUESDAY BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Indiana at Purdue, ESPN. 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Cincinnati at DePaul, ESPN2. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, Tennessee at Kentucky, ESPN. 7 p.m. — High school girls, Mountain View at Redmond, COTV (taped).

HOCKEY 4:30 p.m. — NHL, Buffalo Sabres at Tampa Bay Lightning, VS. network.

RADIO TODAY BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — NBA, Chicago Bulls at Portland Trail Blazers, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690.

TUESDAY BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — High school boys, Gladstone at Madras, KWSO-FM 91.9. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Tennis • Belgium takes unbeatable lead over U.S. in Fed Cup: Australian Open champion Kim Clijsters beat Bethanie Mattek-Sands 6-7 (10), 6-2, 6-1 in Antwerp, Belgium, to give Belgium an insurmountable 3-0 lead over the United States and a place in the Fed Cup semifinals. MattekSands gave the U.S. its first set of the weekend when she outlasted Clijsters in the tiebreaker, but the second-ranked Belgian dominated Mattek-Sands in the next two sets. • Robredo beats Giraldo in Santiago final: Tommy Robredo beat Santiago Giraldo 6-2, 2-6, 7-6 (5) on Sunday in Santiago, Chile, to win the Movistar Open clay-court tournament. The sixth-seeded Robredo won his 10th ATP title after failing to reach a final last year. The eighthseeded Giraldo let the third set slip away after he led 5-2. The Colombian was playing in his first ATP final and has reached the quarterfinals or better in three tournaments this season.

Colorado at Phoenix, 6:30 p.m. Ottawa at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Carolina at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Toronto at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m. Columbus at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. San Jose at Washington, 4 p.m. Buffalo at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. St. Louis at Florida, 4:30 p.m.

IN THE BLEACHERS

GOLF PGA Tour

Thursday Girls basketball: Culver at Kennedy, 5:30 p.m. Boys basketball: Culver at Kennedy, 7 p.m. Wrestling: Lakeview at La Pine, 5:30 p.m. Friday Girls basketball: La Pine at Junction City, 5:45 p.m.; Cottage Grove at Sisters, 5:45 p.m.; North Lake at Gilchrist, TBA; Madras at Estacada, 7 p.m.; Redmond at Crook County, 7 p.m.; Summit at Bend, 5:15 p.m. Boys basketball: La Pine at Junction City, 7:15 p.m.; Cottage Grove at Sisters, 7:15 p.m.; Estacada at Madras, 7 p.m.; Crook County at Redmond, 7 p.m.; Summit at Bend, 7 p.m.; North Lake at Gilchrist, TBA Wrestling: Bend, Mountain View and Summit at 5A regional tournament at Willamette High in Eugene, TBA; Redmond at 6A regional tournament in Roseburg Swimming: Summit, Bend, Mountain View at 5A Intermountain Conference district meet in Bend, 1 p.m.; Madras hosts 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 2 district meet, TBA; Sisters at 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 3 district meet in Albany, TBA Saturday Girls basketball: Gilchrist at Butte Falls, TBA Boys basketball: Gilchrist at Butte Falls, TBA Wrestling: Bend, Mountain View and Summit at 5A regional tournament at Willamette High in Eugene, TBA; Redmond at 6A regional tournaments in Roseburg Swimming: Summit, Bend, Mountain View at Intermountain Conference district meet in Bend, 10 a.m.; Madras hosts 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 2 district meet, TBA; Sisters at 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 3 district meet in Albany, TBA Nordic skiing: OHSNO skate and relay race at Teacup, TBA; OISRA classic race at Chemult, 11:30 a.m. Alpine skiing: OISRA SL race on Ed’s Garden at Mt. Bachelor, 10 a.m.

BASKETBALL Men’s college Sunday’s Games ——— EAST American U. 62, Lehigh 61 Canisius 59, St. Peter’s 45 Michigan 65, Penn St. 62 Niagara 77, Marist 60 Rider 96, Fairfield 87 UMBC 84, Maine 79 Vermont 65, Stony Brook 42 SOUTH Florida Gulf Coast 70, S.C.-Upstate 38 MIDWEST Notre Dame 76, Rutgers 69 Ohio St. 82, Minnesota 69 Wisconsin 82, Michigan St. 56 PAC-10 STANDINGS All Times PST ——— Conference All Games W L PCT W L PCT Arizona 9 2 .818 20 4 .833 UCLA 7 3 .700 16 7 .695 Washington 7 4 .636 15 7 .682 California 6 5 .545 13 10 .565 Washington St. 6 5 .545 16 7 .695 Stanford 5 6 .454 12 10 .545 Oregon 5 6 .454 12 11 .522 Southern Cal 4 6 .400 12 11 .522 Oregon St. 4 7 .363 9 13 .409 Arizona St. 1 10 .090 9 14 .391 Thursday’s Games California at Washington, 6 p.m. Stanford at Washington State, 7 p.m. Oregon at UCLA, 7:30 p.m. Oregon State at USC, 8 p.m. Saturday’s Games Oregon State at UCLA, 1 p.m. California at Washington State, 3 p.m. Stanford at Washington, 5:30 p.m. Oregon at USC, 7:30 p.m. Sunday’s Game Arizona at Arizona State, 6 p.m.

Women’s college Sunday’s Games ——— EAST Binghamton 59, New Hampshire 50 Boston College 78, Clemson 49 Delaware 53, Drexel 44 La Salle 69, Fordham 54 Louisville 64, Villanova 48 Loyola, Md. 69, St. Peter’s 60 Manhattan 54, Canisius 42 Marist 54, Fairfield 52 Providence 58, Seton Hall 55 Rider 93, Iona 87, 2OT Rutgers 54, Syracuse 47 Siena 57, Niagara 35 Towson 66, William & Mary 55 Va. Commonwealth 82, Northeastern 55 SOUTH Fla. International 60, Florida Atlantic 53 George Mason 76, Hofstra 70 Georgia 81, Alabama 54 Georgia St. 76, UNC Wilmington 67 Houston 85, Tulane 70 James Madison 67, Old Dominion 58 LSU 76, Mississippi 38 Marshall 57, Southern Miss. 48 Maryland 88, N.C. State 59 Memphis 83, East Carolina 70 Mississippi St. 57, Auburn 45 Vanderbilt 103, Florida 97, 2OT Wake Forest 60, Virginia Tech 55 MIDWEST Michigan 69, Illinois 59 Michigan St. 76, Purdue 57 N. Iowa 67, Missouri St. 59 Penn St. 82, Iowa 75 Wisconsin 75, Indiana 49 SOUTHWEST Baylor 84, Oklahoma St. 57 Cent. Arkansas 63, Texas-Arlington 37 UCF 61, Tulsa 48

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE

Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Philadelphia 53 35 13 5 75 180 137 Pittsburgh 54 34 16 4 72 164 122 N.Y. Rangers 55 29 22 4 62 153 135 New Jersey 53 19 30 4 42 113 154 N.Y. Islanders 52 17 28 7 41 128 169 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 53 30 16 7 67 161 119 Montreal 54 30 19 5 65 139 131 Buffalo 51 24 22 5 53 145 149 Toronto 52 21 26 5 47 133 162 Ottawa 53 17 28 8 42 117 174 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Tampa Bay 54 33 16 5 71 164 162 Washington 54 29 15 10 68 150 134 Carolina 53 26 21 6 58 159 164 Atlanta 55 24 21 10 58 158 178 Florida 52 23 23 6 52 140 141 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 52 31 15 6 68 173 154 Nashville 53 28 18 7 63 141 125 Chicago 52 27 21 4 58 167 147 Columbus 52 25 22 5 55 141 162 St. Louis 51 23 20 8 54 138 153 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 53 34 10 9 77 179 125 Minnesota 52 27 20 5 59 135 138 Calgary 54 26 21 7 59 154 160 Colorado 52 25 21 6 56 164 172 Edmonton 52 15 29 8 38 129 180 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 53 30 18 5 65 152 150 San Jose 53 28 19 6 62 150 144 Anaheim 54 29 21 4 62 146 150 Phoenix 54 26 19 9 61 153 156 Los Angeles 53 29 22 2 60 150 129 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Sunday’s Games Washington 3, Pittsburgh 0 New Jersey 4, Montreal 1 Tampa Bay 4, St. Louis 3, OT Today’s Games Atlanta at Toronto, 4 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Edmonton at Nashville, 5 p.m. Chicago at Calgary, 6:30 p.m.

Phoenix Open Sunday At TPC Scottsdale Scottsdale, Ariz. Purse: $6.1 million Yardage: 7,216; Par: 71 Partial Fourth Round Vijay Singh 69-65-68-66—268 Nick Watney 70-66-65-68—269 J.B. Holmes 65-70-67-67—269 Brandt Snedeker 69-68-66-67—270 Webb Simpson 70-66-67-67—270 Ryuji Imada 68-67-69-67—271 Cameron Beckman 65-70-67-69—271 Brian Gay 69-68-65-70—272 D.A. Points 68-66-69-69—272 Frank Lickliter II 72-64-65-72—273 Rory Sabbatini 70-66-68-69—273 Pat Perez 69-67-67-70—273 Alex Prugh 70-67-66-70—273 William McGirt 70-65-68-70—273 Brendon de Jonge 67-72-68-66—273 Dustin Johnson 64-73-70-67—274 Charley Hoffman 65-71-68-70—274 Hunter Mahan 68-68-68-70—274 Bubba Watson 70-68-66-70—274 Lucas Glover 66-68-69-71—274 Matt Bettencourt 67-67-68-72—274 Tom Lehman 65-72-69-69—275 Charlie Wi 68-68-67-72—275 Hunter Haas 74-63-70-69—276 Justin Leonard 70-66-69-71—276 Fred Couples 67-71-67-71—276 Marc Leishman 67-69-69-71—276 Chris Kirk 66-72-73-65—276 Jimmy Walker 69-68-71-69—277 Brian Davis 70-68-69-70—277 Brendan Steele 72-65-71-70—278 John Rollins 73-65-73-67—278 Martin Piller 72-66-68-72—278 Jeff Maggert 70-66-73-70—279 Bill Lunde 69-68-70-73—280 Jarrod Lyle 70-67-73-71—281 Bryce Molder 70-68-70-73—281 Robert Allenby 68-67-71-75—281 Jason Bohn 65-73-70-73—281 Stephen Ames 70-68-68-75—281 Tom Gillis 65-71-72-74—282 Michael Putnam 71-67-70-74—282 Andres Romero 72-66-67-78—283 Brett Wetterich 68-70-71-74—283 Ryan Moore 69-68-69-79—285 Leaderboard SCORE THRU 1. Mark Wilson -18 12 2. Vijay Singh -16 17 2. Jason Dufner -16 14 2. Tommy Gainey -16 12 5. Nick Watney -15 F 5. J.B. Holmes -15 F 5. Martin Laird -15 16 5. Chris Couch -15 13 9. Brandt Snedeker -14 F 9. Webb Simpson -14 F 9. Y.E. Yang -14 15 9. Gary Woodland -14 15 9. Geoff Ogilvy -14 14

TENNIS ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS Movistar Open Sunday Santiago, Chile Singles Championship Tommy Robredo (6), Spain, def. Santiago Giraldo (8), Colombia, 6-2, 2-6, 7-6 (5). Zagreb Indoors Sunday Zagreb, Croatia Singles Championship

Ivan Dodig, Croatia, def. Michael Berrer (8), Germany, 6-3, 6-4. SA Open Sunday Johannesburg Singles Championship Kevin Anderson (4), South Africa, def. Somdev Devvarman, India, 4-6, 6-3, 6-2.

Fed Cup WORLD GROUP First Round Winners to semifinals, losers to WG Playoffs (April 16-17) At Sportpaleis Antwerp Antwerp, Belgium Surface: Hard-Indoor Belgium 4, United States 1 Singles Yanina Wickmayer, Belgium, def. Bethanie MattekSands, United States, 6-1, 7-6 (6). Kim Clijsters, Belgium, def. Melanie Oudin, United States, 6-0, 6-4. Reverse Singles Kim Clijsters, Belgium, def. Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States, 6-7 (10), 6-2, 6-1. Yanina Wickmayer, Belgium, def. Melanie Oudin, United States, 6-2, 6-0. Doubles Liezel Huber and Vania King, United States, def. Kirsten Flipkens and An-Sophie Mestach, Belgium, 6-3, 7-5. At Domain Tennis Centre Hobart, Australia Surface: Hard-Outdoor Italy 4, Australia 1 Singles Jarmila Groth, Australia, def. Francesca Schiavone, Italy, 6-7 (4), 6-3, 6-3. Flavia Pennetta, Italy, def. Sam Stosur, Australia, 7-6 (5), 6-7 (5), 6-4. Reverse Singles Francesca Schiavone, Italy, def. Sam Stosur, Australia, 7-6 (1), 3-6, 7-5. Flavia Pennetta, Italy, def. Jarmila Groth, Australia, 6-3, 6-2. Doubles Roberta Vinci and Sara Errani, Italy, def. Anastasia Rodionova and Rennae Stubbs, Australia, 2-6, 7-6 (1), 6-4. At Olympic Stadium Moscow Surface: Hard-Indoor Russia 3, France 2 Singles Alize Cornet, France, def. Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4. Virginie Razzano, France, def. Maria Sharapova, Russia, 6-3, 6-4. Reverse Singles Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, Russia, def. Alize Cornet, France, 3-6, 6-3, 6-2. Svetlana Kuznetsova, Russia, def. Virginie Razzano, France, 6-4, 6-4. Doubles Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova and Dinara Safina, Russia, def. Julie Coin and Pauline Parmentier, France, 7-6 (4), 6-0. At Sibamac Arena Bratislava, Slovakia Surface: Hard-Indoor Czech Republic 3, Slovakia 2 Singles Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic, def. Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, 7-5, 6-1. Petra Kvitova, Czech Republic, def. Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakia, 6-2, 6-3. Reverse Singles Petra Kvitova, Czech Republic, def. Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, 6-4, 6-2. Jana Cepelova, Slovakia, def. Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic, 4-6, 7-6 (5), retired. Doubles Jana Cepelova and Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia, def. Kveta Peschke and Barbora Zahlavova Strycova, Czech Republic, 6-1, 4-6, 7-6 (4).

DEALS Transactions HOCKEY National Hockey League COLORADO AVALANCHE — Signed C Peter Forsberg. COLLEGE CALIFORNIA — Named Jim Michalczik offensive coordinator and offensive line coach and Marcus Arroyo quarterbacks coach. Promoted Ron Gould to run-game coordinator and Eric Kiesau to passing-game coordinator.

Winter sports • Germany’s Rebensburg wins women’s giant slalom: Olympic champion Viktoria Rebensburg of Germany won a women’s World Cup giant slalom race Sunday in Zwiesel, Germany, and World Cup leader Maria Riesch extended her lead on defending champion Lindsey Vonn. Rebensburg had a comfortable lead after the first run and held on to earn her second career World Cup victory, clocking a combined time of 1 minute, 36.96 seconds on the Arberg course. Federica Brignone of Italy earned her best career result in taking second in 1:37.49 and Kathrin Zettel of Austria was third in 1:37.85. • Austria’s Schoerghofer wins World Cup giant slalom: Philipp Schoerghofer of Austria won Sunday’s World Cup giant slalom in Hinterstoder, Austria, earning his first career victory in the final men’s race before the world championships. Schoerghofer finished in an aggregate time of 2 minutes, 46.44 seconds, and Bode Miller of the United States posted the fastest second-run time to take ninth place. Kjetil Jansrud of Norway led after the opening run and finished 0.17 behind Schoerghofer. Carlo Janka of Switzerland was another 0.03 back in third. • Austria’s Hirscher to miss worlds with broken foot: Austrian skier Marcel Hirscher is out of the world championships after breaking a bone in his left foot in a World Cup giant slalom race. The Austrian ski federation says Hirscher might need surgery and could be sidelined at least six weeks. Hirscher fell and lost his left ski after catching a bump in his opening run Sunday on the icy Hannes Trinkl course.

Football • Patriots’ Brady unanimous MVP choice: Tom Brady has become the first unanimous choice of The Associated Press NFL Most Valuable Player Award. In winning his second MVP honor, Brady collects all 50 votes from a nationwide panel of media members who cover the league. In 2007, when the Patriots’ quarterback won his first MVP, he got 49 votes; one voter went to Brett Favre. Although he didn’t set nearly as many passing marks as in ’07, Brady by far was the league’s top performer in leading New England to a 14-2 record, best in the NFL. He had a record streak of 355 throws without being intercepted and passed for 36 touchdowns while being picked off only four times. • Cal hires new offensive coordinator: Jeff Tedford is following up his first losing season at California with some sweeping changes to his coaching staff. Cal announced Saturday night that Jim Michalczik was hired as offensive coordinator, replacing Andy Ludwig after a disappointing 5-7 season. Marcus Arroyo also was hired as quarterbacks coach, associate head coach Ron Gould was promoted to the run-game coordinator and Eric Kiesau will be the passing-game coordinator.

Basketball • Celtics G Daniels fully functional after injury: Boston Celtics guard Marquis Daniels bruised his spinal cord in a collision Sunday and is expected to be sidelined at least a month. Daniels was hurt with 11:01 left in the second quarter of the Celtics’ 91-80 win over the Orlando Magic after he began driving to the basket from the right side of the lane and collided with Gilbert Arenas, who was covering him. Daniels fell to the court and lay motionless for a few minutes with his head facing down while surrounded by coaches and teammates near his bench. — The Associated Press

NHL ROUNDUP

Capitals snap Penguins’ win streak The Associated Press WASHINGTON — The goalie who got dissed turned shaky into a shutout. Alex Ovechkin took a hit to the knee so nasty he wasn’t penalized when he retaliated with a punch to the face. That was just a taste of the animosity from the Washington Capitals’ 3-0 win over the Pittsburgh Penguins, two rivals who put on a Super Sunday show for the second straight year and again left no doubt they wouldn’t be hanging out together afterward to watch the NFL’s big game. “They don’t like us. We don’t like them,” Washington coach Bruce Boudreau said. “That’s the way it should be.” Boudreau was particularly feisty after the Capitals’ eighth straight Super Bowl matinee win, a game in which David Steckel was targeted because of a hit on Sidney Crosby on New Year’s Day. Washington snapped the five-game winning streak of the star-starved Penguins, who are dealing with a likely season-ending knee injury to Evgeni Malkin and are awaiting Crosby’s return from a concussion. Michal Neuvirth, who was called “shaky” by Pittsburgh coach Dan Bylsma during the HBO series that shadowed these two teams during the build-up to the Winter Classic, made 22 saves for his second career shutout. Neuvirth got his first start since Jan. 18 because expected starter Semyon Varlamov was feeling ill. The young Czech wasn’t short on motivation. “Before the game, I remembered when he said that,” Neuvirth said, “and I kind of looked at him during the warm-up and told myself that I got to shut these guys out tonight.” Brooks Laich scored a blue-collar goal in the first period, Marcus Johansson got a flashy short-handed one in the second period, and Mike Knuble added an empty-netter in the third for the Capitals, who picked up some needed momentum with their second solid win a row, following the 5-2 win over Tampa Bay on Friday that snapped a three-game losing streak. At first, there seemed no way Sunday’s game could recapture the magic of two of the teams’ most recent high-profile meetings. It was a year ago on Super Sunday that the Capitals rode Ovechkin’s hat trick to overcome a three-goal deficit in a rough, name-calling win in overtime while the rest of the nation’s capital was digging out from a massive blizzard. Then, on New Year’s Day, the teams met at Heinz Field — home of the Super Bowl’s Steelers — where Washington took a 3-1 win in the first prime-time Winter Classic. Sunday was the first chance for the Penguins to

Jacquelyn Martin / The Associated Press

Pittsburgh Penguins right wing Tim Wallace (22) fights with Washington Capitals left wing David Steckel (39) in the third period of Sunday’s game in Washington. The Capitals won 3-0. retaliate for the hit Crosby took to the head from David Steckel in the Jan. 1 game. Crosby took another hit in the head from Tampa Bay’s Victor Hedman on Jan. 5 and has since missed 13 games. It seemed right on cue, then, when Pittsburgh’s Tim Wallace, recalled on Saturday night from Wilkes-Barre/Scranton of the AHL, goaded Steckel into dropping the gloves after a faceoff in the third period. “I certainly thought he did a good job of stepping up and fighting Steckel,” Bylsma said. Boudreau was not pleased. He stated passionately that the Steckel hit on Crosby has been overblown because it wasn’t intentional. “I’ve coached him for eight years and he’s never done it once,” Boudreau said. “So if they want to use it as a motivating tool, go ahead. But they send out a guy they called up (to fight). And Mike Rupp, who’s a fighter, knowing Dave never fought, challenging him. To me, it was (rubbish).” Then, with 3:42 to play, Matt Cooke tripped Ovechkin knee-to-knee in the open ice. Ovechkin got up, and he and Nicklas Backstrom immediately charged Cooke, both landing punches to the face. Cooke was given 2 minutes for tripping;

neither Ovechkin nor Backstrom was penalized. “I didn’t think much contact was made,” Bylsma said. “Maybe their skates get wound up together.” In other games on Sunday: Lightning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Blues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 TAMPA, Fla. — Vincent Lecavalier had a power-play goal at 4:53 in overtime, Steven Stamkos scored his NHL-leading 40th goal and Tampa Bay beat St. Louis. St. Louis defenseman Eric Brewer was called for a holding penalty 3:40 into the extra session, and Lecavalier converted a rebound backhander for his ninth goal of the season, giving Tampa Bay the victory. Devils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Canadiens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 MONTREAL — Dainius Zubrus and Ilya Kovalchuk scored 2:52 apart early in the first for New Jersey. Martin Brodeur got his 615th career win despite leaving after the first period because of a bruised right leg. Brodeur stopped all 11 shots he faced before he was replaced in the second by Johan Hedberg, who made 14 saves over the final two periods.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, February 7, 2011 D3

GOLF ROUNDUP

Wilson takes lead at frosty Phoenix Open The Associated Press SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — Mark Wilson had a two-stroke lead in the Phoenix Open when play was suspended Sunday because of darkness. Wearing a yellow visor and green shirt in support of his beloved Packers, the Wisconsin player broke a tie with Tommy Gainey with a 15-foot birdie putt on the par-3 12th. Gainey threeputted the hole for a bogey. “I birdied some tough holes,” Wilson said. “The 4-iron I hit on 12 was the best swing of the day and I rolled in that putt. Just felt good. “Been a long ride. I mean, four holes the first day, 28 holes the next day and then four holes and now 31 holes, and we’ll do five more tomorrow and see what happens.” Wilson and Gainey were facing 20-foot birdie putts on the par-5 13th when they decided it was too dark to finish the hole. “I was thinking about putting it, but it’s hard to read and it’s a goofy little putt,” Wilson said. “It’ll be a lot easier tomorrow morning. “Someone was screaming in my head saying, ‘Don’t putt this tonight!’ So, when I heard that voice, I said, ‘Let’s mark it.’ ” Wilson was 18 under. Gainey was tied for second with Vijay Singh and Jason Dufner. Singh shot a 5-under 66, while Dufner had four holes left.

The start Sunday was delayed a half-hour because of frost. About nine hours of playing time has been lost to frost and frozen turf, forcing today’s finish. Wilson completed a 68 in the third round Sunday and was 2 under through 12 holes in the final round. On the amphitheater 16th in the third round, Wilson and caddie Chris Jones donned cheeseheads and led the rowdy fans in Packers chants. “The saddest thing is I couldn’t watch the first half of the Super Bowl,” said Wilson, who got scoring updates from the on-course announcers. “That’s about it. But the Packers carried through in the first half, so I’ll watch the second half.” Gainey was 1 over in the final round after shooting a 68 in the third round to take a one-stroke lead over Wilson. “I’m not too happy in my position right now, two back, but I’ve just got to come out tomorrow and just get it done,” Gainey said. “Just start making some putts.” He matched Wilson with a bogey on the par-4 11th after driving into the water on the left, then dropped another stroke on 12 when he three-putted from 90 feet. “I made a couple bogeys the last few holes, and you know, I didn’t think I really hit that many bad shots to be honest with you,” Gainey said. “The drive on No. 11, I thought was good. I hit it in

Ross D. Franklin / The Associated Press

Mark Wilson, right, gets the crowd going as he and his caddie Chris P. Jones arrive at the 16th green wearing Green Bay Packers cheeseheads during the third round of the Phoenix Open PGA golf tournament Sunday in Scottsdale, Ariz. the middle of the fairway and it just happened to go in the water. That’s just how it goes.” Singh, winless since 2008, was the last player off the course,

putting out on the par-4 18th in the dark more than 10 minutes after Wilson and Gainey stopped playing. “I’ve got no chance,” Singh

NBA ROUNDUP

BOSTON — Rajon Rondo kept scoring inside while the Orlando Magic continued missing from outside. Boston’s pass-first point guard drove aggressively to the hoop and scored 26 points to lead the Celtics to a 91-80 win on Sunday. “He totally dominated us,” Magic coach Stan Van Gundy said, “got where he wanted to go anytime he wanted to go.” With Rondo scoring 11 points, the Celtics extended a 46-43 halftime lead to 70-61 after the third quarter. They led by eight to 16 points the rest of the way. Paul Pierce had 18 points and Kevin Garnett scored 16 for the Celtics, who improved to 23-4 at home. Dwight Howard had 28 points — only six in the second half — and 13 rebounds for the Magic, who lost for the fifth time in eight games despite playing tight defense on Pierce and Ray Allen. “They didn’t leave Ray or Paul’s body. I tried to be aggressive,” Rondo said. “The lane just opened up a lot more even though Dwight was down there.” The Celtics rallied after a scary injury to backup guard Marquis Daniels with 11:01 left in the second quarter. He was taken off the court on a stretcher after a collision with Gilbert Arenas and Orlando ahead 24-

Elise Amendola / The Associated Press

Boston Celtics forward Paul Pierce (34) looks to pass against the defense of Orlando Magic forward Malik Allen (35) during the first half of Sunday’s game in Boston. 17 (For a related story, see Page D2). Boston led by three at halftime and stretched that to 70-55 with 3:36 left in the third quarter. At that point, the Celtics had made nine of their 10 shots in the period while the Magic had hit just four of 18. “I just could not find anything for us to run to get a decent shot,” Van Gundy said. Orlando scored the last six points of the third quarter, cutting the lead to 70-61, but the

Celtics came right back with a 7-2 run to go ahead 77-63. “I thought Rondo took the third over,” Garnett said. “In the second half, we had a lot more energy emotionally.” Allen made two of four 3-point attempts and moved within three of the NBA record of 2,560 made 3-pointers held by Reggie Miller. In other games on Sunday: Heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Clippers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 MIAMI — Dwyane Wade had 28 points, eight rebounds and eight assists, and the Heat stretched their winning streak to six games. Chris Bosh scored 16, Eddie House added 15 and LeBron James had 12 points for Miami. The Heat started the fourth quarter on an 18-4 burst to pull away. Knicks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117 76ers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 NEW YORK — Amare Stoudemire matched his season high with 41 points, and the Knicks beat the 76ers to split a homeand-home series. Rookie Landry Fields added a career-high 25 points and grabbed 10 rebounds. Pacers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Nets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 NEWARK, N.J. — Dahntay Jones scored a season-high 18 points and Indiana remained unbeaten in four games under interim coach Frank Vogel. Mike Dunleavy added 17 points and hit a 3-pointer to ignite an early 10-point run that put the Pacers ahead for good.

SUMMARIES Sunday’s Games

Knicks 117, 76ers 103 PHILADELPHIA (103) Iguodala 3-8 8-12 14, Brand 10-14 8-10 28, Hawes 4-6 0-0 8, Holiday 1-8 0-0 2, Meeks 2-4 1-1 6, Turner 4-7 0-0 8, L.Williams 6-12 5-5 19, Young 8-12 0-1 16, Battie 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 3972 22-29 103. NEW YORK (117) Gallinari 3-6 4-6 10, Stoudemire 17-21 7-7 41, Mozgov 1-3 1-2 3, Felton 5-12 2-2 13, Fields 10-13 0-0 25, Douglas 4-8 0-0 10, Chandler 512 0-0 12, S.Williams 1-2 0-0 3. Totals 46-77 14-17 117. Philadelphia 24 27 29 23 — 103 New York 31 24 31 31 — 117 3-Point Goals—Philadelphia 3-10 (L.Williams 2-3, Meeks 1-3, Turner 0-1, Holiday 0-1, Iguodala 0-1, Young 0-1), New York 11-27 (Fields 5-7, Douglas 2-3, Chandler 2-6, S.Williams 1-2, Felton 1-6, Gallinari 0-3). Fouled Out—Mozgov. Rebounds—Philadelphia 31 (Brand, Iguodala, Young, Hawes 5), New York 43 (Fields 10). Assists—Philadelphia 21 (Iguodala 8), New York 27 (Felton 13). Total Fouls—Philadelphia 13, New York 19. Technicals—Philadelphia defensive three second 2, Stoudemire. A—19,763 (19,763).

Heat 97, Clippers 79 L.A. CLIPPERS (79) Gomes 4-8 2-2 12, Griffin 7-17 7-13 21, Jordan 1-3 1-2 3, Davis 5-12 3-3 14, Foye 516 3-4 15, Bledsoe 0-5 4-4 4, Diogu 2-4 0-1 4, Aminu 0-7 2-2 2, Cook 1-5 1-2 4. Totals 25-77 23-33 79. MIAMI (97) James 6-15 0-2 12, Bosh 5-9 6-11 16, Ilgauskas 2-4 0-0 4, Chalmers 2-7 0-0 4, Wade 8-14 9-10 28, Jones 2-5 0-0 6, Miller 2-7 2-2 8, Anthony 1-3 2-3 4, House 6-11 0-0 15, Howard 0-1 0-0 0, Arroyo 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 34-77 19-28 97. L.A. Clippers 19 17 25 18 — 79 Miami 20 27 23 27 — 97 3-Point Goals—L.A. Clippers 6-24 (Gomes 2-3, Foye 2-8, Cook 1-3, Davis 1-4, Bledsoe 0-1, Aminu 0-5), Miami 10-28 (Wade 3-4, House 3-7, Jones 2-5, Miller 2-6, James 0-2, Chalmers 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—L.A. Clippers 59 (Griffin 16), Miami 55 (Wade 8). Assists—L.A. Clippers 12 (Davis 6), Miami 19 (Wade 8). Total Fouls—L.A. Clippers 21, Miami 24. Technicals—Davis, House, Miami Coach Spoelstra. Flagrant Fouls—House. A—19,702 (19,600).

Pacers 105, Nets 86 INDIANA (105) Granger 4-13 2-2 11, McRoberts 3-7 2-2 8, Hibbert 5-10 1-1 11, Collison 4-8 0-0 10, Dunleavy 6-8 0-0 17, Hansbrough 2-6 4-4 8, George 5-12 4-5 14, Foster 2-5 1-2 5, D.Jones 7-10 4-6 18, Price 1-4 0-0 3. Totals 39-83 18-22 105. NEW JERSEY (86) Outlaw 4-9 0-0 9, Favors 1-4 0-2 2, Lopez 5-

13 3-4 13, Harris 4-13 5-8 13, Morrow 5-12 0-0 11, Uzoh 3-8 2-4 8, Petro 4-7 0-0 8, Humphries 3-7 0-0 6, Vujacic 3-7 1-1 9, Ross 3-3 0-0 6, Graham 0-1 0-0 0, Greene 0-0 1-2 1. Totals 3584 12-21 86. Indiana 33 23 25 24 — 105 New Jersey 24 19 24 19 — 86 3-Point Goals—Indiana 9-22 (Dunleavy 5-6, Collison 2-4, Price 1-3, Granger 1-5, D.Jones 0-1, McRoberts 0-1, George 0-2), New Jersey 4-16 (Vujacic 2-5, Outlaw 1-3, Morrow 1-5, Uzoh 0-1, Harris 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Indiana 58 (McRoberts 9), New Jersey 48 (Humphries 9). Assists—Indiana 18 (Hibbert, Collison, Granger 4), New Jersey 24 (Harris 7). Total Fouls—Indiana 15, New Jersey 25. Technicals—D.Jones, Indiana defensive three second. A—13,167 (18,500).

MINNEAPOLIS — Jared Sullinger and still-unbeaten Ohio State didn’t back down or let up. Another unflappable performance by the 6-foot-9, 280-pound freshman left Minnesota coach Tubby Smith wondering what happened to his big men — and planning more time for his team in the weight room. David Lighty scored 19 points, Sullinger had 18 points and 13 rebounds, William Buford and Jon Diebler made three 3-pointers apiece and the top-ranked Buckeyes beat No. 18 Minnesota 82-69 on Sunday. “You can see the difference in experienced, physical players: They just kind of shoved us out of the way,” Smith said. Every starter for Ohio State (24-0, 11-0 Big Ten) scored 10 or more points to help stretch the second-longest winning streak in school history, creeping toward the record of 32. Buford added 15 points, four

though, and had four turnovers. “We were just careless with the ball. Those are the kind of mistakes we can’t have in a game like this, or in any game,” said Austin Hollins, who started in place of Colton Iverson and finished with eight points. Smith praised the performance of freshmen Hollins, Chip Armelin and Maverick Ahanmisi, but Iverson, Ralph Sampson III and Trevor Mbakwe combined for 12 turnovers in and around the paint. Iverson didn’t score and had four fouls in 14 minutes. “If our post men are going to turn the ball over 12 times, and that’s where our strength was, I don’t know what to do,” Smith said. Armelin had a career-high 14 points in 23 minutes, but Sampson went scoreless after a 14point first half and five of Mbakwe’s seven rebounds came before

Atlantic Division Boston New York Philadelphia New Jersey Toronto

W 38 26 23 15 14

L 12 24 27 37 37

Miami Atlanta Orlando Charlotte Washington

W 37 33 32 21 13

L 14 18 20 29 37

Chicago Indiana Milwaukee Detroit Cleveland

W 34 21 19 19 8

L 15 27 30 32 43

halftime. After losing at Indiana on Wednesday, the Gophers will probably fall out of the national rankings. Also on Sunday: No. 9 Notre Dame . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Rutgers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 SOUTH BEND, Ind. — Ben Hansbrough scored 25 points and Carleton Scott had 12 points and 11 rebounds to lead Notre Dame to its fifth straight win. No. 19 Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Michigan State. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 MADISON, Wis. — Jordan Taylor scored 30 points and Wisconsin handed Michigan State its fifth loss in six games. No. 23 North Carolina. . . . . . . . 89 Florida State. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 CHAPEL HILL, N.C. — Freshman Kendall Marshall had nine points and a season-high 16 assists for North Carolina, while classmate Harrison Barnes scored 17 points.

GB — 12 15 24 24½

L10 7-3 4-6 6-4 4-6 1-9

Str W-1 W-1 L-1 L-3 W-1

Home 23-4 14-10 16-8 12-13 9-15

Away 15-8 12-14 7-19 3-24 5-22

Conf 27-6 16-11 15-19 8-23 9-24

Away 18-9 16-11 14-13 9-16 0-25

Conf 24-7 23-9 22-11 12-18 8-23

Away 11-11 8-16 8-19 6-21 3-26

Conf 20-9 14-15 13-13 12-17 7-25

Southeast Division Pct .725 .647 .615 .420 .260

GB — 4 5½ 15½ 23½

L10 7-3 7-3 5-5 5-5 1-9

Str W-6 W-3 L-1 L-2 L-8

Home 19-5 17-7 18-7 12-13 13-12

Pct .694 .438 .388 .373 .157

GB — 12½ 15 16 27

L10 8-2 5-5 4-6 4-6 0-10

Str L-1 W-4 L-4 W-2 L-24

Home 23-4 13-11 11-11 13-11 5-17

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division San Antonio Dallas New Orleans Memphis Houston

W 42 35 32 27 24

L 8 15 20 25 28

Oklahoma City Denver Utah Portland Minnesota

W 33 30 30 27 11

L 17 21 22 24 39

L.A. Lakers Phoenix Golden State L.A. Clippers Sacramento

W 35 23 22 19 12

L 16 25 27 31 35

Pct .840 .700 .615 .519 .462

GB — 7 11 16 19

L10 8-2 9-1 6-4 8-2 5-5

Str W-2 W-8 L-2 L-1 W-2

Home 25-2 19-8 20-6 16-7 14-10

Away 17-6 16-7 12-14 11-18 10-18

Conf 29-5 19-7 16-15 15-15 14-19

Away 15-10 9-15 13-12 10-17 2-23

Conf 19-12 18-13 15-16 18-15 3-28

Away 16-8 9-14 6-17 3-17 5-16

Conf 20-11 12-15 12-18 13-21 7-20

Northwest Division

LEADERS Through Saturday’s Games SCORING G FG FT PTS Durant, OKC 46 438 371 1332 James, MIA 48 432 338 1267 Stoudemire, NYK 49 477 310 1273 Bryant, LAL 51 460 316 1303 Wade, MIA 46 410 307 1166 Ellis, GOL 49 463 235 1239 Rose, CHI 48 426 241 1170 Gordon, LAC 41 333 242 988 Anthony, DEN 44 363 299 1056 Nowitzki, DAL 41 347 221 959 Martin, HOU 50 334 385 1164 Griffin, LAC 49 430 257 1123 Westbrook, OKC 50 380 349 1126 Howard, ORL 49 387 318 1092 Williams, UTA 48 340 285 1049 Love, MIN 50 354 288 1064 Aldridge, POR 51 430 217 1080 Bargnani, TOR 45 359 181 951 Granger, IND 46 328 217 971 Randolph, MEM 48 392 184 972

Pct .760 .520 .460 .288 .275

Central Division

ORLANDO (80) Turkoglu 1-10 2-2 4, Anderson 5-10 1-2 12, Howard 10-20 8-10 28, Nelson 5-12 0-0 10, J.Richardson 4-11 0-0 10, Redick 3-10 2-2 8, Arenas 0-7 0-0 0, Clark 4-10 0-0 8, M.Allen 0-0 0-0 0, Duhon 0-0 0-0 0, Q.Richardson 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 32-93 13-16 80. BOSTON (91) Pierce 4-11 10-12 18, Garnett 5-8 6-6 16, Perkins 0-5 0-0 0, Rondo 9-15 7-9 26, R.Allen 4-9 1-2 11, Robinson 1-3 3-3 5, Davis 5-9 1-2 11, Erden 1-1 0-0 2, Daniels 0-0 0-0 0, Wafer 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 30-63 28-34 91. Orlando 22 21 18 19 — 80 Boston 17 29 24 21 — 91 3-Point Goals—Orlando 3-24 (J.Richardson 2-5, Anderson 1-3, Arenas 0-2, Nelson 0-3, Q.Richardson 0-3, Turkoglu 0-4, Redick 0-4), Boston 3-9 (R.Allen 2-4, Rondo 1-2, Robinson 0-1, Pierce 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Orlando 56 (Howard 13), Boston 47 (Perkins 13). Assists—Orlando 13 (Turkoglu 4), Boston 21 (Rondo 7). Total Fouls—Orlando 26, Boston 22. Technicals—Clark, Howard, Nelson. A—18,624 (18,624).

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP assists, four rebounds and two steals, and the Buckeyes checked another opponent off the list in this most-challenging month. Up next is a trip to No. 19 Wisconsin on Saturday, and after a home game against Michigan State the Buckeyes travel to play No. 11 Purdue. They have won 12 straight conference road games, dating to last season. “We’re never scared,” Sullinger said. “Even on the road, or at home, we just keep playing basketball. That’s what we do.” The Gophers are sorely lacking those floor leaders, particularly while senior point guard Al Nolen is out with a broken foot. Blake Hoffarber led Minnesota (16-7, 56) with 16 points, playing the second half with a limp and a brace on his left knee after bumping it on the court and hurting the bursa sac. He is playing out of position,

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Celtics 91, Magic 80

No. 1 Ohio State tops No. 18 Minnesota The Associated Press

said. “They’re going to come back tomorrow and I think the leaders have two par 5s to go and 17, and they’re good enough players.”

NBA SCOREBOARD

Rondo scores 26 points to help lead Celtics over Magic The Associated Press

Singh has been slowed by right knee problems. “Considering all, this is the first time that I’ve actually felt good, and coming back to the way I know how to play golf,” he said. “Whatever happens, I’m very satisfied with my result this week.” J.B. Holmes (67) and Nick Watney (68) finished at 15 under. Martin Laird and Chris Couch also were 15 under. Laird had two holes left, and Couch had five. Fan favorites Phil Mickelson and Rickie Fowler, paired together in the second-to-last group, dropped out of contention. Also on Sunday: Bjorn wins Qatar by 4 strokes DOHA, Qatar — Thomas Bjorn of Denmark won the Qatar Masters, shooting a bogey-free 3-under 69 to beat Alvaro Quiros of Spain by four shots. Bjorn led overnight and finished at 14-under 279 to win his first tournament since the Estoril Open in Portugal last year. The Dane had three birdies in the final round, including one on the 18th. Tseng wins Women’s Australian MELBOURNE, Australia — Taiwan’s Yani Tseng successfully defended her Women’s Australian Open title, shooting a final-round 2-under 71 to win by seven strokes. Tseng finished with a fourround total of 16-under-par 276 on the par-73 Commonwealth Golf Club course.

Pct .660 .588 .577 .529 .220

GB — 3½ 4 6½ 22

L10 6-4 6-4 3-7 6-4 1-9

Str W-3 W-1 L-1 W-1 L-3

Home 18-7 21-6 17-10 17-7 9-16

Paciic Division AVG 29.0 26.4 26.0 25.5 25.3 25.3 24.4 24.1 24.0 23.4 23.3 22.9 22.5 22.3 21.9 21.3 21.2 21.1 21.1 20.3

Pct .686 .479 .449 .380 .255

GB — 10½ 12 15½ 21

L10 Str 5-5 W-1 6-4 L-1 6-4 W-3 4-6 L-3 3-7 L-2 ——— Sunday’s Games

Miami 97, L.A. Clippers 79 New York 117, Philadelphia 103

Home 19-8 14-11 16-10 16-14 7-19

Indiana 105, New Jersey 86 Boston 91, Orlando 80 Today’s Games

Boston at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Minnesota at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Houston at Denver, 6 p.m. Utah at Sacramento, 7 p.m.

L.A. Lakers at Memphis, 5 p.m. Cleveland at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Chicago at Portland, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday’s Games

Philadelphia at Atlanta, 4 p.m. San Antonio at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Toronto at Milwaukee, 5 p.m. Minnesota at Houston, 5:30 p.m.

L.A. Clippers at Orlando, 4 p.m. Indiana at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Memphis at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. All Times PST

Ohio State forward David Lighty, front, drives inside against Minnesota guard Chip Armelin during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday in Minneapolis. Ohio State won 82-69. Paul Battaglia / The Associated Press


N F L : S U PER B OW L X LV

D4 Monday, February 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

NFL headed to offseason of uncertainty

SUPER BOWL NOTEBOOK

NFL SCOREBOARD NFL PLAYOFFS WILD-CARD PLAYOFFS Saturday, Jan. 8 Seattle 41, New Orleans 36 N.Y. Jets 17, Indianapolis 16 Sunday, Jan. 9 Baltimore 30, Kansas City 7 Green Bay 21, Philadelphia 16

By Eddie Pells

DIVISIONAL PLAYOFFS Saturday, Jan. 15 Pittsburgh 31, Baltimore 24 Green Bay 48, Atlanta 21 Sunday, Jan. 16 Chicago 35, Seattle 24 N.Y. Jets 28, New England 21

The Associated Press

ARLINGTON, Texas — The Pack is back. NFL football? Well, nobody’s quite sure when that’s going to return. Led by quarterback Aaron Rodgers, the Green Bay Packers returned to the top of the football world Sunday with a 31-25 victory over the Pittsburgh Steelers in the Super Bowl. It was yet another thrilling capper to the NFL’s season, but this time, when they turned out the lights on the championship game, there was no guarantee they’d be back next fall. A labor war that pits rich athletes against richer owners could shut down the game. The collective bargaining agreement that led to unprecedented success for the NFL expires at the end of the day on March 3, and barring an agreement before then, owners are threatening to lock out players. They are pondering the unthinkable: The first play stoppage since 1987. The shutdown of the only form of entertainment that, as the sky-high TV ratings this year have shown, consistently brings people together in a tweeting, texting, TiVo-ing country where viewing habits get more fragmented by the day. “For a sport at the height of its popularity to selfdestruct by lacking the will and creativity to solve economic problems would be the height of folly,” agent Leigh Steinberg said. “Who wants to be the person to kill this golden goose?” Sunday’s spectacle offered up yet another example of why America loves this game so much. Led by Rodgers’ pinpoint passing, the Packers hurried to a 21-3 lead and looked like they were ready to run away. But the Steelers, the NFL’s most successful franchise with six Lombardi trophies, refused to quit. They pulled within 28-25 midway through the fourth quarter and had the ball, trailing by six and needing to go 87 yards to win the game. Only when Ben Roethlisberger threw three straight incompletions in the final minute were the Steelers’ hopes over. Green Bay brought its fourth Lombardi Trophy back to the Frozen Tundra and its first since 1997, when Brett Favre was every cheesehead’s favorite quarterback. “Vince Lombardi is coming home to Green Bay,” NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said, when he handed the trophy, named after the legendary Green Bay coach, to the Packers. Will we see this kind of celebration again next February? In all the pregame hyperbole, each side insisted they wanted that. But they are far apart on how to get it done. Owners say it’s time to pocket more money for a league that hasn’t started a stadium project in more than five years. They want a bigger slice of the roughly $9 billion in revenue, a rookie wage scale and to increase the regular season by two games to 18. The players think those two extra games will cause an exponential rise in injuries and don’t want to give back any percentage of the revenue pool, a massive slice of which comes from the networks, which combine to pay around $4 billion a year to televise the NFL. In an interview on Fox on Sunday, Goodell said the owners are committed to finding a solution and that a negotiating session between the owners and players the day before was “beneficial.” “My focus is on the next three or four weeks,” Goodell said. “I’ve often said, our agreement expires on March 4th. We have to use that period of time to reach an agreement that’s fair for the players, fair for the clubs, and allows our great game to grow for our fans.” Not doing so could stop the show after another tight, exciting Super Bowl that closed one of the most riveting seasons in recent memory. It was a rough week for Dallas, where back-toback snowstorms wreaked havoc and led to six injuries from ice that fell from Cowboys Stadium, which led to the seating debacle. Flights into Big D were canceled, traffic was snarled and some of the pregame parties were scrapped. Still, there were 103,219 fans on hand and maybe 100 million-plus watching on TV — where 30-second commercials went for as much as $3 million — as they saw the closing chapter to a heck of a season. It began with the eminently watchable TV program, “Hard Knocks,” that documented the New York Jets and their foul-mouthed coach, Rex Ryan, as they made their way through training camp. It continued with a contentious debate about player safety, a result of the NFL’s early season decision to ramp up enforcement of rules that restrict helmet-to-helmet hits and other “illegal” tackles on defenseless receivers coming over the middle. Much as the NFL tries to rein it in, though, the violence certainly draws a lot of fans to the game. But it’s more than that. In 2010, there were scandals (the Broncos were caught videotaping an opponent’s practice), soap operas and sad endings (See, anything related to Favre). There were feuds (Ryan vs. the Patriots), flareups (a brawl between Andre Johnson and Cortland Finnegan) and firings (Broncos, 49ers, Cowboys and Vikings). There were great performances (Michael Vick and Tom Brady) and great endings (Philly beating the Giants on DeSean Jackson’s last-play punt return for a touchdown) and, finally, a Super Bowl pitting two of the great franchises in NFL history that lived up to the billing. “This is a great day to be great, baby,” Packers wide receiver Greg Jennings said. But this could be the last uplifting day the NFL sees for a while. There’s no getting away from the labor strife that looms. “Given the success of the game, given the money available, it doesn’t make sense to me that a compromise solution can’t be found,” said the NFL’s outside labor lawyer, Bob Batterman. In a recent poll by The Associated Press, people who identified themselves as NFL fans were asked which side they sympathized with. Eleven percent said the owners, 25 percent said the players and 64 percent said neither. The takeaway message: They simply want their football. On Sunday, it was easy to see why.

CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS Sunday, Jan. 23 Green Bay 21, Chicago 14 Pittsburgh 24, N.Y. Jets 19 PRO BOWL Sunday, Jan. 30 At Honolulu NFC 55, AFC 41 SUPER BOWL Sunday, Feb. 6 At Arlington, Texas Green Bay 31, Pittsburgh 25 Sunday’s Result

Packers 31, Steelers 25 Pittsburgh Green Bay

Charlie Krupa / The Associated Press

Green Bay Packers’ Jordy Nelson (87) tries to avoid a tackle by Pittsburgh Steelers’ Ryan Clark (25) during the second half of the Super Bowl Sunday in Arlington, Texas. Nelson caught nine passes for 140 yards.

Packers’ backup Nelson steps up in Super Bowl By Richards Rosenblatt The Associated Press

ARLINGTON, Texas — Jordy Nelson sure didn’t play like a backup. The third-year pro had the game of a lifetime in the Super Bowl, catching nine passes for 140 yards and a touchdown in the Green Bay Packers 31-25 win over the Pittsburgh Steelers in Sunday’s Super Bowl. The kid from Kansas State was all over the field, snaring passes from Aaron Rodgers and catching a 29yarder in the right corner of the end zone to give the Packers a 7-0 lead. He also caught a 38-yarder from Rodgers to the Steelers’ 3 to set up the TD that put the Packers ahead 28-17 early in the fourth quarter. When all was done, he had set a Packers’ record for receiving yards in a Super Bowl set by Max McGee, who had 138 yards in the first Super Bowl. Nelson and James Jones are the backup for Greg Jennings and Donald Driver, but Nelson was the go-to guy in the biggest game of all. The 6-foot-2, 217-pound Nelson had 55 catches and four TDs his first two years, but had 45 this season and another 12 in the playoffs coming into the Super Bowl. On his TD catch, he said, “Aaron gave me a little signal if it was press (coverage). It was actually a screen play but he checked to go to a route. That’s what we did.” And winning it all? “It’s unbelievable,” he said. “It’s incredible.” Vince, here comes the trophy There was no shortage of the Vince Lombardi Trophy coming back to Green Bay lines after the Packers’ 31-25 win over the Steelers in the Super Bowl. Holding the trophy named for the great Packers’ coach, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell told club president Mark Murphy: “And now, the smallest city in the league has won the biggest game. ... Vince Lombardi is coming home to Green Bay.” Murphy saluted the fans, gave a thumbs up and said as he held the trophy: “The Vince Lombardi Trophy is coming back to Green Bay.” Added Packers coach Mike McCarthy: “We had some bumps in the third quarter, but it was just a tremendous effort and the Vince Lombardi Trophy is coming back to Green Bay.” The Packers won their fourth Super Bowl, and first since beating the Patriots in 1997. The first two Super Bowl wins came under Lombardi in the first two games, in 1967 and 1968. Rooney reaction It’s rare that the Rooney family returns from these Super Bowl trips without a little extra something in their suitcases — specifically, the Lombardi Trophy. On their team’s eighth trip to the Super Bowl, the Rooneys came up short for only the second time. They still hold the record with six championships. “Just said, ‘thanks,’ ” Steelers president Art Rooney II said when asked what he told the players. “You know, they worked hard, we appreciated the effort they put in all year. They got us close to winning a seventh championship and that’s pretty impressive.” By doing things “The Steeler Way,” the Rooneys have built what is argu-

Cowboys Stadium drops ball on temporary seats ARLINGTON, Texas — In their zeal to set a Super Bowl attendance record, the NFL and Jerry Jones overlooked one important detail: Making sure all the temporary seats inside mammoth Cowboys Stadium had been inspected and were ready for the fans. A week plagued by poor weather took an embarrassing turn Sunday when the league had to find replacement seats for 850 fans. The NFL also scrambled to find a place for another 400 people to sit inside Jones’ $1.2 billion palace and couldn’t find any with a view of the field. “This is absolutely ridiculous,” said Glen Long, a Pittsburgh Steelers season-ticket holder who flew in for the game from Baltimore. “That would be fraud anywhere in the world if you sold tickets to an event that you knew you didn’t have. That’s just wrong.” Actually, the seats had been installed in six temporary sections, but they went up so late that the fire marshal didn’t have time to inspect them, according to a police officer standing near an affected area who wouldn’t give his name and an explanation of the situation provided to several fans. The officer said the winter storms that struck Dallas earlier had set back work on the temporary seats. That didn’t matter to fans who felt they had been deceived by the league and Jones, the Dallas Cowboys owner who had hoped some 105,000 people would watch the game inside and outside the stadium. To bolster the crowd, there were $200 tickets that provided nothing more than a chance to watch the game on video screens set up in outdoor plazas. That didn’t work out, either: Attendance was announced at 103,219, just short of the record 103,985 who turned out at the Rose Bowl for the 1980 Super Bowl. As for those 400 fans, not even a hefty refund offer from the NFL was enough to satisfy them for losing their seats. The league said it would pay back triple the face value — $2,400 for the $800 tickets. “We don’t want that,” said Odett Karam, a Green Bay Packers fan who flew in from California. “We just want to get into the game. We just want to see the game.” — The Associated Press

ably the most stable franchise in the NFL over the past four decades. A win Sunday would have given the Steelers three titles in six years and would have put them close to cementing another dynasty — one to pair with the one that captured four titles in six years in the 1970s. Could still happen. “I feel good about our organization,” Rooney said. “We lost to a good team and a great franchise. My hat’s off to those guys for what they accomplished this year. We just fell a little bit short.” Super Packers With Super Bowl win No. 4, the Packers moved into fourth place for most wins in the championship game that began in 1967. The Steelers hold the record with six Super Bowl wins, and have now lost twice in the NFL title game. Green Bay has a total of 12 championships with the eight they won before the Super Bowl era. The Bears are next with nine overall NFL titles. Also, Green Bay becomes the second No. 6 seed to win the Super Bowl, joining the Steelers who won in 2006. Win, win for Wynn Even before his Packers won the Super Bowl, defensive lineman Jarius Wynn had reason to celebrate: He was present for the birth of his son at a Dallas-area hospital Sunday morning, just hours before the game. Wynn, a sixth-round draft pick in 2009, was released Sept. 4 before the start of this season. But he was resigned Sept. 14 after a season-ending knee injury to defensive lineman Justin Harrell. Wynn has played sporadically in a reserve role since rejoining the Packers. He played in the Packers’ first two playoff games, but was inactive for the NFC championship game at Chicago. Meet the Steelers...and Packers A few hours before the Super Bowl inside cavernous Cowboys Stadium, actor Owen Wilson displayed a few nifty moves, eluding

a “defender” and catching a pass in the end zone, then spiking the ball over his shoulder. Asked who he was picking, Wilson said he liked the Steelers: “I have the Steelers in my pool,” he said to cheers, followed by some boos from the sparse crowd beginning to fill the stadium. “But I can see the Packers winning, too.” Singer Sheila E was mostly booed for picking the Packers. Towels or cheese Brothers Charles and Steven Friedman had a bit of a social experiment going on outside Cowboys Stadium before kickoff. The souvenir sellers were hawking Terrible Towels at one side of the table, foam cheeseheads on the other. Which are the hotter items? “Terrible Towels, by far,” Charles said. “I stopped counting the cases a while ago.” But maybe this wasn’t a fair fight. The towels — easy to carry, fold into a suitcase and wave in the stands — were going for $15 a piece. The cheeseheads — bulky foam that must be worn on the head for best effect — were double that price. The brothers were donating part of the proceeds to charity. You’re the man Vikings safety Madieu Williams is the Walter Payton Man of the Year. The award recognizes a player’s off-the-field community service as well as play on the field. Williams currently is in the Persian Gulf on a goodwill tour with U.S. service members. The announcement was made Sunday at Cowboys Stadium before the Super Bowl. “It is a tremendous honor to win this award named after Walter Payton, one of the greatest men to ever play in the National Football League,” said Williams, surrounded by service members in Iraq. “I’m sorry I couldn’t be there to accept the award, but it’s an even greater honor to be here with the 4th Infantry Division and Task Force Iron Horse.”

0 10 7 8 — 25 14 7 0 10 — 31 First Quarter GB—Nelson 29 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick), 3:44. GB—Collins 37 interception return (Crosby kick), 3:20. Second Quarter Pit—FG Suisham 33, 11:08. GB—Jennings 21 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick), 2:24. Pit—Ward 8 pass from Roethlisberger (Suisham kick), :39. Third Quarter Pit—Mendenhall 8 run (Suisham kick), 10:19. Fourth Quarter GB—Jennings 8 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick), 11:57. Pit—Wallace 25 pass from Roethlisberger (Randle El run), 7:34. GB—FG Crosby 23, 2:07. A—103,219. ——— Pit GB First downs 19 15 Total Net Yards 387 338 Rushes-yards 23-126 13-50 Passing 261 288 Punt Returns 4-5 1-0 Kickoff Returns 6-111 3-63 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 2-38 Comp-Att-Int 25-40-2 24-39-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-2 3-16 Punts 3-51.0 6-40.5 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 1-0 Penalties-Yards 6-55 7-67 Time of Possession 33:25 26:35 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Pittsburgh: Mendenhall 14-63, Roethlisberger 4-31, Redman 2-19, Moore 3-13. Green Bay: Starks 11-52, Rodgers 2-(minus 2). PASSING—Pittsburgh: Roethlisberger 25-40-2-263. Green Bay: Rodgers 24-39-0-304. RECEIVING—Pittsburgh: Wallace 9-89, Ward 7-78, Randle El 2-50, Sanders 2-17, Miller 2-12, Spaeth 1-9, Mendenhall 1-7, Brown 1-1. Green Bay: Nelson 9-140, J.Jones 5-50, Jennings 4-64, Driver 2-28, Jackson 1-14, Quarless 1-5, Hall 1-2, Crabtree 1-1. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Pittsburgh: Suisham 52 (WL). SUPER BOWL CHAMPIONS 2011—Green Bay (NFC) 31, Pittsburgh (AFC) 25 2010—New Orleans (NFC) 31, Indianapolis (AFC) 17 2009—Pittsburgh (AFC) 27, Arizona (NFC) 23 2008—N.Y. Giants (NFC) 17, New England (AFC) 14 2007—Indianapolis (AFC) 29, Chicago (NFC) 17 2006—Pittsburgh (AFC) 21, Seattle (NFC) 10 2005—New England (AFC) 24, Philadelphia (NFC) 21 2004—New England (AFC) 32, Carolina (NFC) 29 2003—Tampa Bay (NFC) 48, Oakland (AFC) 21 2002—New England (AFC) 20, St. Louis (NFC) 17 2001—Baltimore Ravens (AFC) 34, N.Y. Giants (NFC) 7 2000—St. Louis (NFC) 23, Tennessee (AFC) 16 1999—Denver (AFC) 34, Atlanta (NFC) 19 1998—Denver (AFC) 31, Green Bay (NFC) 24 1997—Green Bay (NFC) 35, New England (AFC) 21 1996—Dallas (NFC) 27, Pittsburgh (AFC) 17 1995—San Francisco (NFC) 49, San Diego (AFC) 26 1994—Dallas (NFC) 30, Buffalo (AFC) 13 1993—Dallas (NFC) 52, Buffalo (AFC) 17 1992—Washington (NFC) 37, Buffalo (AFC) 24 1991—N.Y. Giants (NFC) 20, Buffalo (AFC) 19 1990—San Francisco (NFC) 55, Denver (AFC) 10 1989—San Francisco (NFC) 20, Cincinnati (AFC) 16 1988—Washington (NFC) 42, Denver (AFC) 10 1987—N.Y. Giants (NFC) 39, Denver (AFC) 20 1986—Chicago (NFC) 46, New England (AFC) 10 1985—San Francisco (NFC) 38, Miami (AFC) 16 1984—L.A. Raiders (AFC) 38, Washington (NFC) 9 1983—Washington (NFC) 27, Miami (AFC) 17 1982—San Francisco (NFC) 26, Cincinnati (AFC) 21 1981—Oakland (AFC) 27, Philadelphia (NFC) 10 1980—Pittsburgh (AFC) 31, L.A. Rams (NFC) 19 1979—Pittsburgh (AFC) 35, Dallas (NFC) 31 1978—Dallas (NFC) 27, Denver (AFC) 10 1977—Oakland (AFC) 32, Minnesota (NFC) 14 1976—Pittsburgh (AFC) 21, Dallas (NFC) 17 1975—Pittsburgh (AFC) 16, Minnesota (NFC) 6 1974—Miami (AFC) 24, Minnesota (NFC) 7 1973—Miami (AFC) 14, Washington (NFC) 7 1972—Dallas (NFC) 24, Miami (AFC) 3 1971—Baltimore Colts (AFC) 16, Dallas (NFC) 13 1970—Kansas City (AFL) 23, Minnesota (NFL) 7 1969—N.Y. Jets (AFL) 16, Baltimore Colts (NFL) 7 1968—Green Bay (NFL) 33, Oakland (AFL) 14 1967—Green Bay (NFL) 35, Kansas City (AFL) 10 SUPER BOWL MVPS 2011—Aaron Rodgers, QB, Green Bay 2010—Drew Brees, QB, New Orleans 2009—Santonio Holmes, WR, Pittsburgh 2008—Eli Manning, QB, N.Y. Giants 2007—Peyton Manning, QB, Indianapolis 2006—Hines Ward, WR, Pittsburgh 2005—Deion Branch, WR, New England 2004—Tom Brady, QB, New England 2003—Dexter Jackson, FS, Tampa Bay 2002—Tom Brady, QB, New England 2001—Ray Lewis, LB, Baltimore 2000—Kurt Warner, QB, St. Louis 1999—John Elway, QB, Denver 1998—Terrell Davis, RB, Denver 1997—Desmond Howard, KR, Green Bay 1996—Larry Brown, CB, Dallas 1995—Steve Young, QB, San Francisco 1994—Emmitt Smith, RB, Dallas 1993—Troy Aikman, QB, Dallas 1992—Mark Rypien, QB, Washington 1991—Ottis Anderson, RB, N.Y. Giants 1990—Joe Montana, QB, San Francisco 1989—Jerry Rice, WR, San Francisco 1988—Doug Williams, QB, Washington 1987—Phil Simms, QB, N.Y. Giants 1986—Richard Dent, DE, Chicago 1985—Joe Montana, QB, San Francisco 1984—Marcus Allen, RB, L.A. Raiders 1983—John Riggins, RB, Washington 1982—Joe Montana, QB, San Francisco 1981—Jim Plunkett, QB, Oakland 1980—Terry Bradshaw, QB, Pittsburgh 1979—Terry Bradshaw, QB, Pittsburgh 1978—Randy White, DT and Harvey Martin, DE, Dallas 1977—Fred Biletnikoff, WR, Oakland 1976—Lynn Swann, WR, Pittsburgh 1975—Franco Harris, RB, Pittsburgh 1974—Larry Csonka, RB, Miami 1973—Jake Scott, S, Miami 1972—Roger Staubach, QB, Dallas 1971—Chuck Howley, LB, Dallas 1970—Len Dawson, QB, Kansas City 1969—Joe Namath, QB, N.Y. Jets 1968—Bart Starr, QB, Green Bay 1967—Bart Starr, QB, Green Bay


THE BULLETIN • Monday, February 7, 2011 D5

Packers Continued from D1 “It’s what I dreamt about as a little kid watching Joe Montana and Steve Young,� Rodgers said, “and we just won the Super Bowl.� The Packers QB threw for three touchdowns, two to Greg Jennings, and the Packers (146) overcame even more injuries, building a 21-3 lead, then hanging on to become the second No. 6 seed to win the championship. Coincidentally, the 2005 Steelers were the other. Rodgers threw for 304 yards, including a 29-yard touchdown to Jordy Nelson, who had nine catches for 140 yards to make up for three big drops. Rodgers found Jennings, normally his favorite target, for 21- and 8-yard scores. “Wow! It’s a great day to be great, baby,� Jennings said. Then the favored Packers held on as Pittsburgh (14-5) stormed back. “We’ve been a team that’s overcome adversity all year,� Jennings said, who noted injuries to Charles Woodson and Donald Driver. “Our head captain goes down, emotional in the locker room. Our No. 1 receiver goes down, more emotions are going, flying in the locker room. But we find a way to bottle it up and exert it all out here on the field.� Few teams have been as resourceful as these Packers, who couldn’t wait to touch the trophy honoring their greatest coach — and their title. Several of them kissed it as Cowboys great Roger Staubach walked through a line of green and gold. “Vince Lombardi is coming back to Green Bay,� NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said as the silver prize was handed to the team. After sitting for three seasons, Rodgers took the Packers to two late-season victories just to make the playoffs as a wild card. Then he guided them to wins at Philadelphia, Atlanta and archrival Chicago before his biggest achievement — against a Pittsburgh team ranked second in defense. They barely survived a sensa-

Postseason Continued from D1 So forgive Combs if he is not shedding any tears over the Oregon School Activities Association’s new postseason wrestling format, which actually decreases the number of wrestlers who will advance to state championship tournaments. Gone are league tournaments at the Class 6A, 5A and 4A levels, replaced by four regional competitions in each classification. While more wrestlers will advance from each state-qualifying tournament — four wrestlers from each weight class at the regional meet will move on to state — fewer wrestlers overall will compete at the state championships in the new format. In the past, some brackets included more than 20 wrestlers in each weight class. Now, with the four-regional format, each bracket will be made up of exactly 16 wrestlers. “In some way it opens some doors for us,â€? says Combs, whose team will wrestle in the Class 5A Special District 4 regional this weekend at Willamette High in Eugene. The regional tournament for Mountain View, Bend High and Summit will be made up of teams from Ashland, Eagle Point, Marshfield of Coos Bay, Springfield, and Eugene schools Churchill, Marist, Willamette and North Eugene. With the smaller brackets, the OSAA’s five state championship tournaments — 6A, 5A, 4A, 3A, and 2A/1A — will be shortened from three days to two. The 2011 state championships are scheduled for Feb. 25 and 26 at Portland’s Memorial Coliseum. “We were trying to protect the integrity of the sport,â€? Combs says about Oregon high school wrestling coaches’ decision last offseason to reconfigure the state meet. “In the past couple of years, with the old way, the state tournament was really watered down. ‌ With only four regions, the best kids will be there.â€? Also this weekend, Redmond

Eaton Continued from D1 Next, Eaton matched his personal best when he cleared 17 feet, 3â „4 inches in the pole vault, good for another 972 points. He eclipsed his old world record in the seventh and final event, covering the final 30 meters of the 1,000-meter run with his right

Paul Sancya / The Associated Press

Green Bay Packers’ Aaron Rodgers, right, and his teammate Jordy Nelson, left, celebrate after Nelson scored a touchdown during the first half of Sunday’s game in Arlington, Texas. tional rally by the Steelers, who still own the most Super Bowl rings — six in eight tries. But Pittsburgh failed to get its third championship in six years with quarterback Ben Roethlisberger. Roethlisberger’s season began with a four-game suspension for violating the NFL’s personal conduct policy. It ended with Roethlisberger standing on the sideline, his head down, hands on his hips, feeling something he never experienced: defeat in a Super Bowl. “I feel like I let the city of Pittsburgh down, the fans, my coaches and my teammates,� Roethlisberger said, “and it’s not a good feeling.� Not even a decidedly blackand-gold crowd, with Terrible Towels swirling throughout the $1.2 billion stadium, could make a difference for the mistakeprone Steelers. Their two biggest defensive stars — Defensive Player of the Year safety Troy Polamalu and outside linebacker James Harrison — were virtually invisible. The offense didn’t seem to miss outstanding rookie center Maurkice Pouncey, who was out with an ankle injury, but Roeth-

Coming next week Next Monday, we’ll review the state’s new postseason format for boys and girls basketball.

lisberger only occasionally made key plays until the second half. The biggest plays were left to Rodgers, Nick Collins with a 37-yard interception return for a TD, Jennings, Nelson, and the rest of the guys in green and gold. In the end, they gave coach Mike McCarthy his first Super Bowl victory against the team he rooted for while growing up in Pittsburgh. Besides Lombardi, Mike Holmgren won a title in 1997 with Favre. “This is a great group of men here, a lot of character,� Rodgers said. “We went through a lot together.� Even on Sunday, they did. Woodson went out late in the first half with a collarbone injury, a few plays after Driver was sidelined with an ankle problem. “It was very difficult to watch,� Woodson said, “but it feels good now.� Woodson saw the Steelers, who rallied from a 21-7 halftime hole against Baltimore three weeks ago, show the same resilience. A 37-yard catch and run by Antwaan Randle El — an almost forgotten figure during his return season with just 22 receptions — sparked a quick 77-yard drive. Hines Ward, the 2006 Super Bowl MVP, had 39 yards on three catches during the series, including an 8-yard TD when he completely fooled Jarrett Bush. A quick defensive stop and a 50-yard drive to Rashard Mendenhall’s 8-yard touchdown run made it 21-17. But with Pittsburgh driving for perhaps its first lead of the game, Mendenhall was stripped at the Green Bay 33 by Clay Matthews — one of the few plays the All-Pro linebacker made. The Packers recovered, and Rodgers hit Jennings for 8 yards and the winning points. Pittsburgh’s last gasp was on a 25-yard touchdown pass to Mike Wallace and a brilliant pitchout by Roethlisberger to Randle El for a 2-point conversion. Mason Crosby added a 23-yard field goal for the Packers and the Steelers had no more comebacks in them. “You play to be world champions,� Matthews said, “and that’s what we are today.�

made up of 16-wrestler brackets, the 2A/1A state meet will use brackets of eight wrestlers.

C C  E  C 

Please e-mail sports event information to cyclingcentral@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

CAMPS/CLASSES /CLINICS INDOOR CYCLING CLASSES: At Rebound Sports Performance & Pilates, 143 S.W. Century Drive, Bend, Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays; limited to eight riders per class; sessions at 6:30 a.m., noon, 5 p.m. and 6:15 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and at 6:30 a.m. and 8 a.m. on Saturdays; $150 for 10 classes, $270 for 20 classes, or $480 for 40 classes; www.ReboundSPL. com, 541-585-1500. WOMEN-ONLY INDOOR CYCLING CLASSES: At Rebound Sports Performance & Pilates, 143 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays; limited to eight riders per class; led by a female instructor; $15 per class; www. ReboundSPL.com, 541-585-1500. CYCL’IN, POWER-BASED INDOOR CYCLING CLASSES: Instruction by Cherie Touchette in a private studio in west Bend on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Sundays; progressive classes offered in eightweek sessions run 60 to 90 minutes in length; cost is $92 to $196; dropin fee is $14 to $17; 541-390-1633. CALIFORNIA TRAINING CAMP:

will compete in the Class 6A Special District 4 regional in Roseburg, along with Crater of Central Point, Grants Pass, North Medford, Sheldon of Eugene, South Eugene, South Medford, Thurston of Springfield, and the host Indians. “It will be a little bit more equitable,� Redmond coach Nathan Stanley says about the new regional format. “Before, only three kids qualified at each weight and we had seven teams in the Central Valley Conference. Now we’ve got four spots (at each weight class) and nine teams.� While moving to a regional that includes powerhouse Roseburg may not seem like the best situation for Redmond, Stanley says the new setup for the state championships will benefit wrestling fans. “There was so much fat in the tournament before,� explains Stanley, who says college coaches have told him in the past that the first day of the tournament was a waste of their time in terms of evaluating talent because of so many early mismatches. “Now in the first round,� says Stanley, “you’ll have some real tough matches.� Looking at the rest of Central Oregon’s wrestling teams, all of the area’s Class 4A teams will be at the same regional meet this year. Crook County, Madras, Sisters and La Pine are scheduled to compete at the Class 4A Special District 2 regional in Ontario against Baker, McLoughlin of Milton-Freewater, La Grande and the host Tigers on Feb. 18 and 19. Culver and Gilchrist will wrestle Feb. 19 in Chiloquin at the Class 2A/1A Special District 3 regional, from which the top two placers at each weight will advance to state. While the 6A, 5A and 4A state championships are

Qualifications for competing at the OSAA’s state swim meet are the same as for the last four years — district winners automatically advance to state and at-large bids are awarded to the next-fastest times — but some Central Oregon teams will face different opponents than in years past. In Class 6A, Redmond will swim at a district meet in Salem with its old Central Valley Conference rivals. No change there. But in Class 5A, Bend’s Juniper Swim & Fitness Center will host the 5A Special District 1 meet, which will be made up of teams from Bend High, Mountain View, Summit and Ashland. Gone from the old IMC is traditionally strong Pendleton, as well as Hermiston. Central Oregon teams Sisters and Madras, both of which are in Class 4A, are scheduled to compete at two different 4A/3A/2A/ 1A district meets. The Outlaws will swim at the Class 4A/3A/ 2A/1A Special District 3 meet in Albany against Blanchet Catholic of Salem, Cascade of Turner, Central from Independence, Creswell, Jefferson, Junction City, Philomath, Stayton and Sweet Home. The White Buffaloes are set to host Baker, Corbett, Gladstone, La Grande, Milwaukie’s La Salle, Molalla, North Marion, Portland Lutheran, Riverdale, Portland’s Roosevelt and Marshall, and Beaverton’s Valley Catholic at the Madras Aquatic Center for the Class 4A/3A/2A/ 1A Special District 2 meet. All of the OSAA’s swimming district meets are scheduled for this Friday and Saturday, and the state championships are set for Feb. 18 and 19 at Gresham’s Mt. Hood Community College.

fist raised as he clocked in at 2 minutes, 34.74 seconds. That gave him another 933 points for his new record total: 6,568 points. “I made some bars in the pole vault on my third attempt when I really needed them,� said the 23year-old Eaton, who the previous week defeated reigning Olympic decathlon champion Bryan Clay and 2009 world decathlon cham-

pion Trey Hardee in the Millrose Multi Challenge at the Millrose Games in New York. “I also think this shows that I have a lot of room to improve,� Eaton said. “I had a bad high jump, I took off way behind the board in the long jump, I could have run better in the 1,000 meters, and although the shot put was a big personal best (47-5), I know I can keep getting better.�

Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@ bendbulletin.com.

MISC. BIKE YOGA: Yoga class geared toward cyclists; 7 p.m. Mondays; Sunnyside Sports, 930 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; no registration required; $7-10 suggested donation; 541-382-8018. CENTRAL OREGON TRAIL ALLIANCE: Monthly mountain bike trails meeting open to the public; Thursday, Feb. 24; 7 p.m.; Central Oregon Environmental Center; 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; www.cotamtb.com.

RIDES HUTCH’S NOON RIDE: Group road bike ride starting in Bend from Hutch’s Bicycles east-side location; 820 N.E. Third St.; at noon on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays; and from Hutch’s west-side location; 725 N.W. Columbia St.; at noon on Tuesdays, Thursdays; pace varies; www.hutchsbicycles.com; 541-382-

OUT OF TOWN WORST DAY OF THE YEAR RIDE: Road bicycling tour of 18 or 45 miles with multiple food stops in and around Portland; Sunday, Feb. 13; 915 S.E. Hawthorne Ave.; $35 for adults, $10 for children; www.worstdayride.com. CHERRY PIE ROAD RACE: Popular first road race of the season in Oregon staged near Corvallis; Sunday, Feb. 19; numerous racing divisions offered; online registration through SportsBaseOnline; www. willamettevalleycycling.com; Jim Fischer, 541-990-8979. MOUNTAIN BIKE OREGON: Supported mountain bike riding and festival in Oakridge; July 15-17 and Aug. 19-21; $349 through April 30, includes meals, camping and ride shuttles; www.mtbikeoregon.com.

C  B  Cycling • 2011 Cycle Oregon route, registration announced Tuesday: The route for the 2011 Cycle Oregon event is scheduled to be announced Tuesday, and registration for the popular annual weeklong September bike tour of Oregon will also open Tuesday. The location for the 2011 Cycle Oregon weekend ride, which will be held over two days in July, will also be announced on Tuesday. Official announcement of the

2011 routes will take place at a kickoff party at 7 p.m. at the Tiger Woods Center on the Nike Campus in Beaverton. Online registration for the event opens at 7:45 p.m. The week ride is slated for Sept. 10-17, and the weekend ride is on tap for July 15-17. The weeklong ride is limited to 2,200 riders, and the weekend ride is limited to 2,000 riders. In 2010, the fields for both events reached capacity well in advance of the rides. According to organizers, the 24th edition of Cycle Oregon

will feature routes and host towns that have never before been included in the supported bike tour. For more information or to register, go to www.cycleoregon. com. — Bulletin staff report

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday In

Bend schools in new swim district

Multiple-day riding camp near Paso Robles, Calif., supported by Rebound coaching staff of Bend; April 3-9; aimed at intermediate to advanced cyclists; $1,649, includes meals and lodging; limited to 10 riders; www. ReboundSPL.com; 541-585-1500.

6248; www.hutchsbicycles.com. HUTCH’S SATURDAY RIDE: Group road bike ride begins at 10 a.m. Saturdays in Bend from Hutch’s Bicycles east-side location, 820 N.E. Third St.; approximately 40 miles; vigorous pace; 541-3826248; www.hutchsbicycles.com. WET ’N’ WINDY 50: Noncompetitive group road bike ride from Bend to Powell Butte and back begins at 9 a.m. from Hutch’s Bicycles east-side location, Sunday, March 20; 820 N.E. Third St.; approximately 50 miles; 541-3826248; www.hutchsbicycles.com.

541-388-4418


D6 Monday, February 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Road Continued from D1 “It’s really pretty … and you go up and you go down,” Klingler says. This year’s Grizzly Peak Century, to be held May 1, also offers routes of 101 and 73 miles. For your registration fee of $45 to $70, depending on when you sign up, you also get access to multiple rest stops stocked with food and drink, along with mechanical support, sag vehicles that can provide assistance, and still more food at the finish. “They really put on a show with the food,” Klingler says. A century ride held the same day in Chico, Calif. — the Chico Wildflower Century — is another tour that offers some exotic views to the Central Oregon cyclist’s eye. “It’s a beautiful ride, and if someone’s not feeling like they’re in great shape, they can do the 65(-mile route),” says Barb Becker, 61, a mechanic at Sunnyside Sports in Bend. Becker has ridden the Chico Wildflower about five times. If you are interested in the Chico Wildflower, don’t be confused: The similarly named Wildflower Century tour takes place the day before the Chico ride farther south in San Luis Obispo County, but that tour has already sold out for 2011. Becker, who describes herself as a serious but recreational rider, says the Chico Wildflower has “enough hills that you have to take it seriously,” including one steep climb. Klingler, who has also ridden the Chico tour, says riders get to traverse “really cool, little skinny country roads” with no traffic. The registration fee for the Chico Wildflower is $65 and in-

cludes all-you-can-eat rest stops and a post-ride dinner. For those who might like to stay closer to home and tour Oregon’s Willamette Valley in all its springtime splendor, check out the Strawberry Century. The annual tour, popular with Central Oregon cyclists, is based out of Lebanon and will take place June 12 this year. Byron Oberst, 61 and of Bend, cycled the Strawberry Century’s 72-mile route last year and says the ride is scenic, well marked and supported, and provides rolling, rural terrain. “You go through these wonderful grass fields,” recalls Oberst, a retired anesthesiologist, “and at that time of the year, the camas lilies are out, and some of the western buttercups, and so there were these fields of wildflowers that were pretty spectacular.” The Strawberry Century also offers a full century route and a 35-mile option. Another Willamette Valley possibility for those who might not be ready for a full century is the Monster Cookie Metric Century, a 62-mile ride that takes participants from the State Capitol Mall area in Salem out to Champoeg State Park and back. Oberst says the ride is flat and well supported. Normally, the Monster Cookie Metric Century is held the last Sunday in April, but will take place May 1 this year to avoid falling on Easter. (For more information on the Monster Cookie Metric Century, go to http://www.salembicycleclub.org/ and click on “Event Rides.”) If you are willing to drive a few hours more for some spectacular scenery, consider America’s Most Beautiful Bike Ride. This tour, which circles Lake Tahoe on June 5 — allows riders to traverse parts of both California

C YC L ING C EN T R A L and Nevada in a single ride for $115. Jessica Williams, 39 and of Bend, rode America’s Most Beautiful Bike Ride about five years ago and says it “absolutely” lived up to its name. At the route’s higher elevations, which reach about 7,100 feet, snow can linger on the roads, she says, and riders also pass right along the lake shore during one stretch. Williams, who owns and operates the Pine Ridge Inn, offers proof that winter weather should be no deterrent to preparing for this kind of event: She lived in Minnesota while training for America’s Most Beautiful Bike Ride and still prepped outside. “Anyone can do it as long as you train and prepare,” she explains. “That’s definitely a beautiful ride to do. Sometimes views like that, that are so beautiful, are actually inspiring, too. You kind of forget that you’re not feeling that great, because it’s so pretty, to have that distraction.” Besides doing the proper training, Klingler urges interested riders to sign up as soon as possible. Many of these tours cap their fields and often sell out. “You can’t wait until a month before the ride,” he says. “You won’t get in.” If these tours have whetted your appetite for some organized riding and you can’t wait until the spring, there’s always the Chilly Hilly, a ride around Bainbridge Island near Seattle that packs 2,635 feet of climbing into 33 miles. The Chilly Hilly takes place Feb. 27, giving you exactly 20 days of saddle time remaining. Time to get going. Amanda Miles can be reached at 5 4 1 -3 8 3 -0 3 9 3 or at amiles@ bendbulletin.com.

Mark Ylen / Albany Democrat-Herald

Riders pedal along Quartzville Road during the Strawberry Century near Lebanon.

CYCLING INSIDER | GEAR REVIEW The Bulletin interviews a Central Oregon cyclist as part of our weekly “Cycling Central” feature, whose rotating topics include rider profiles, safety tips, local ride recommendations and gear reviews. The bike lock has yet to be made that could be considered impenetrable. Yet local experts say you can secure your bike in such a way that it deters all but the most determined would-be thieves. According to the Bend Police Department, more than 220 bikes with a total value of nearly $190,000 were reported stolen in 2010, which marked an increase in stolen bikes of nearly 30 percent over 2009. The number of bicycle thefts may actually be much higher, says Steve Esselstyn, community liaison for the Bend PD, who believes that the majority of bike thefts go unreported. I asked Bend resident and REI bike shop employee Rob Hartsock — a longtime bike rider, racer and commuter who has had his share of bikes stolen while attending college in Eugene — for tips on how to keep a bicycle safe from theft. A lock, he pointed out, is a deterrent, not a fail-safe device. “You’re buying time,” said Hartsock, an action-sports specialist for REI, which sells numerous types of bike locks ranging in price from $5 to $95. “You’re making it harder for the criminal to make the effort to get your bike.” Therefore, the greater the time commitment to snag the bicycle, the less risk of theft. U-locks and cable locks are

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

A four-inch U-lock, left, and a 6-inch U-lock, right, surround a 3⁄8 inch cable, center left, and a 5mm cable. the two most common types of bicycle locks. U-locks are sturdier and more difficult for a wouldbe thief to sever. They also tend to be heavier to tote around and pricier to purchase, and they are only long enough to secure a bike’s frame to a rack or other stationary object. They come in varying lengths and widths. A beefier “U” can weigh up to four pounds, but is also more difficult to cut. A cable lock is lighter and less expensive but offers less protection against theft. Cables also come in different lengths and widths. Longer is better for those who want to thread the cable through both wheels, and thicker (3⁄8 -inch versus 5 millimeter) offers better protection from theft. “The beefier cable is more steel to cut through and you’re buying time,” Hartsock explained. “It takes a long time and (a lot of) effort and the right tools

to cut through that cable.” Locking mechanisms are operated by either keys or combination. Hartsock said he believes key locks offer better protection from tampering. “That said,” he continued, “if you lose your key it could be a problem.” Some locks allow the owner to set the combination, while others feature combinations of letters rather than numerals. “It’s easier to remember the name of your son than a random fourdigit number,” Hartsock said. Hartsock offered these tips for lowering your risk of bicycle theft: • Always secure a bicycle to an immovable object, such as a bike rack or a metal pole. Merely locking the bike to itself or to other bikes invites thieves to put the bike in the truck “and do the dirty work at home,” said Hartsock. • After the bike is locked, take

with you any items that can be stolen, such as a saddlebag, water bottles, or even the seatpost and saddle if they are secured by quick release. If possible, remove the front wheel if it is not secured by a cable lock. “Not everyone can bring their bike inside their workplace,” Hartsock observed. “But if you can just bring your front wheel, toss it underneath your desk, then it makes that ‘grabbing-and-going’ part of theft so much harder to pull off.” • Buy an inexpensive bike at a garage sale or thrift store for commuting around town, and leave valuable bikes at home. And remember that most bike thefts take place during the summer. • Use a combination of a Ulock (a good model from the OnGuard or Kryptonite brands runs $30, Hartsock said) along with a six- or seven-foot-long

3 ⁄8 -inch cable, which retails for $10. “Loop the cable through the frame and the rear and front wheel and … to the U-lock, which is secured to a post or some other type of stationary object,” he explained. “That six-foot length gives me a lot of flexibility to anchor everything together.” The Bend Police Department urges bicycle owners to register their bikes at no charge with the Bend PD. “You get a sticker that goes on your bike, and that helps us get people’s property back,” records supervisor Dixi Angus told me. She went on to say that the

BendSpineandPain.com (541) 647-1646

bike’s serial number goes into a nationwide database, “so if your bike is stolen in Bend and it’s taken to Eugene, we can get your bike back.” Angus recommends that, at the very least, cyclists keep records of the serial numbers on their bikes, which helps authorities to locate bikes and reunite them with the rightful owner. —Heather Clark


THE BULLETIN • Monday, February 7, 2011 E1

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Computer Desks (2), glass tops, new cond., $40 each, 541-317-5156. Dishwasher, Maytag portable, white, approx. 2 years old, $200 OBO. 541-603-3465 Dryer, Amana, 5 yrs old, all new parts, $150. 503-933-0814 local

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German Shorhair Pointers 3 male pups, 4 mos old, $400 212 each. 1 Female solid liver, 6 Antiques & mos, $600. 1 Female liver & white, 8 mos, $800. 1 male, 4 Collectibles yrs, $800. All shots/wormed. 541-923-8377 541-419-6638 Looking for appraiser to look at my die-cast collection, and Kittens & cats for adoption! possibly to buy Coke, Texaco, Sat/Sun 1-4. Other days by and misc. 541-504-9210. appt (call 647-2181). Foster home also has small kittens The Bulletin reserves the right (815-7278). Altered, shots, to publish all ads from The ID chip, more. Support your Bulletin newspaper onto The local all-volunteer, no-kill Bulletin Internet website. rescue group. Sanctuary at 65480 78th, Bend, 389-8420, 598-5488, www.craftcats.org for photos/map/much more!

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Newfoundland, male black, 6 mo. old. Rehome. Great dog, moving out of state. AKC but for this price I won't sell with Chihuahua, absolutely tinipapers. Sell for $400 paid est teacups, rare colors, vet $1500. 541-316-0638. checked, $250, 541-977-4686 Olde English Bulldogge puppies. Ready 2/18. Exceptional color, great lines. 2 males left. See at www.legendarybulldog.com call or text 208-571-5360 Chihuahua Male, 6 mos, 4.5 Pomeranian puppies 3 females lbs. shots. $150, or $200 CKC 1 male, 8 weeks old, sweet Reg., cash. 541-610-4414 personalities and adorable faces. $350. (541) 480-3160 Chihuahua Pups, Apple Head, well bred, small, Pomeranian Pups, purebred, $200. 541-420-4825. weaned, born 12/25, 1 male, 1 female, $300, 541-923-0495. Check out the classiieds online POODLE Pups, AKC Toy Black/white, chocolate & other www.bendbulletin.com colors, so loving! 541-475-3889 Updated daily CHI-POM PUPPIES born PUG PUPS: Purebred, fawn, ready Feb. 20, $250, 12/17/10. Two females @ 541-771-1141. $175 one male @ $150. First shot available. Queensland Heelers 541-480-2824 Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 DACHSHUND MICRO-MINI http://rightwayranch.wordpress.com/ just turned 2, registered female intact. Beautiful little Shih Tzu pups, gold & white, dog, house-trained, $350. gold w/ black mask, & black, 541-604-4333. $385-$750, 541-788-0090 English Bulldog puppies! An all white female and a dark brindle & white female left. $1,500 obo. 541.588.6490 English Springer Spaniel AKC Puppies Champion Bloodlines Black and white and liver tri-color females. Ready to go to their new homes Feb. 10th. 541-388-8256 European German Shepherd Pups, AKC,grandfather is World Trade Center hero ‘Uno’, black/red, guaranteed health, shots, 541-767-3392. shepherd4@q.com

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C h a n d l e r

Pets and Supplies

Free Schnauzer/Cocker Spaniel GENERATE SOME excitement in PAYING CASH FOR WATCHES mix pups, 8 wks, 3 left, to apyour neigborhood. Plan a gaworking or not, scrap, call proved homes, 541-416-1739. rage sale and don't forget to 541-706-0891. advertise in classified! Free Shih Tzus, 2 beautiful feWanted: $Cash paid for vintage 385-5809. males, 2 mos., 1 brown, 1 costume Jewelry. Top dollar black, 2 booster shot, to King-size Bed, in great condipaid for Gold & Silver. I buy good home, 541-317-5169. tion, $200. by the Estate, Honest Artist. Call 503-933-0814, local. Free to good homes 2 female Elizabeth, 541-633-7006 cats, both good mousers & in Mini Loveseat/Twin Hideabed, good health, looking for a tan, 48” wide, w/new matWANTED: SAIGA 12 barn to call home. tress $125. 503-933-0814 GAUGE AND 2 STAINLESS 541-382-0707. RUGER 10/22 CASH IN Second Hand HAND. CALL 541 633 3489 German Shepherd pups, born Mattresses, sets & on Christmas, parents on singles, call site, $400. 541-390-8875

Pets and Supplies

S . W .

Siberian Husky/Lab mix, 9 wks, 1st 2 shots, wormed. Beautiful markings; 2 have blue eyes. Socialized with kids /dogs. $100 ea. 541-279-4250 Siberian Husky pups, exceptional markings & temperaments, $650, 541-330-8627 or stones-siberians@live.com Toy/Mini Aussie pups, $450 +. High quality. Shots, vet, tails, etc. Call 541-475-1166

210

Snowboards SP Base Girls Snowboard boots, Size 7. Black/grey. Like new! Used once. $75. 541-382-6806 SP Snowboard Bindings (girls) Black/Pink. Size M-L. $100. Never used! 541-382-6806

246

Guns & Hunting and Fishing (2) Binoculars: 20x50 Pentax 20x50; Leupold 10x50, $100 each. 503-933-0814, local (2) Fenwick fly fishing poles w/reels vest & gear, all $200. 503-933-0814, local.

(2) Ruger M77’s, both walnut w/scopes: 1 300 win, $725; 1 30-06, $625. 541-647-8931 40cal Taurus, SS compact, like new, $400. Mossberg 12g P-grip, $325. 541-647-8931 A Collector Pays Ca$h, hand guns, rifles, etc., 541-475-4275,503-781-8812 CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Connecticut Valley Arms, Hawkins Style, black powder rifle, exc. $210 OBO, 541-420-3474. Deluxe Taurus PT22 w/leather holster $200. Weatherproof 6 latch hard gun travel case $100. 541-610-3287 Gun safe & guns: (2) Winchester 30-30 rifles; (2) 7.6x54 foreign rifles; 22 single rifle; 3 handguns. 541-815-7072 GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

HANDGUN SAFETY CLASS for concealed license. NRA, Police Firearms Instructor, Lt. Gary DeKorte Sat. Feb. 12, 6:30-10:30 pm. Call Kevin, Centwise, for reservations $40. 541-548-4422

Furniture & Appliances Ruger 10/22, 40th Anniv Edi!Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

tion, walnut stock w/original box, $200. 541-647-8931 Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746

WTB:

Kodiak/Anaconda .44 mag. Ruger SS Mini-30 or 6.8. Kimber or Gold Cup .45. WSM .300 or .270. Tanker Garand or SOCOM .308. Call: 541-788-0132

247

Sporting Goods - Misc. Olhausen 8' Pool Table, oak, accessories/chairs. Excellent cond. $1995. 541-408-3392.

248

Health and Beauty Items NO EXERCISE. $50 off 1st order. Eat all day! 40 lbs in 8 weeks. Ron 541-728-1945.

Motorized Wheelchair, 2 batteries w/charger, air cushion seat, excellent condition, $800. 541-280-0663.

263

Tools Shop Heater, John Deere Turbo, 150,000 BTUs, $125. 503-933-0814, local

270 Table Saw, Craftsman 10”, Computer control; Radial Arm Saw, Lost and Found 10”, Craftsman, $900 both OBO, 541-546-8724 leave Found 2 chrome rails for hosp. msg. or 541-390-3707. bed, Cooley/18th St. roundabout, 1/30. 541-389-0826 265

Building Materials Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

266

249

Heating and Stoves

Art, Jewelry and Furs

Osburn woodstove, 3yrs old, 1600 model w/fan, $350 OBO. 541-382-6310 aft 4pm

1 Ct beautiful blue diamond, w/small channel set diamonds. $200. 503-933-0814 Valentine’s Gift? ½ Ct diamond on wide band, was $2500; sell $200. 503-933-0814

253

TV, Stereo and Video Complete Surround Sound System. Still in Box, never been used. $300. Ron 541-728-1945 TV, 55” Mitsubishi Projection HDTV, $475, Call 541-420-0794.

255

Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

257

Musical Instruments

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

267

Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection.

FOUND around NE Purcell and Wells Acres, Calico cat, female, about 1 yr old, peach/ pink collar. 480-322-4272.

Find It in Found cell phone, top of mailbox 1/27 on Business Way; battery dead. 541-389-8008

260

Misc. Items BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash

Found women’s watch, public parking lot behind Foot Zone 2/2. Call 805-245-0757 to ID In Reply to Lost fishing equip. at Cline park on Thurs. 1/20. I saw ad in Sun. paper but the number listed is out of service. My # is 541-706-9361. Please call, will identify.

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. Entry door security Video Phone, new in box, $50. 503-933-0814, local. New queen size 7pc quilt set, seamist green/embroidered flowers, $60. 503-933-0814 Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

325

DRY JUNIPER FIREWOOD $175 per cord, split. Immediate delivery available. Call 541-408-6193

SPLIT, DRY LODGEPOLE DELIVERY INCLUDED! $175/CORD. Call for half-cord prices! Leave message, 541-923-6987

Schools and Training

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Barley Straw; Compost; 541-546-6171.

TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

341

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

LOST Woman’s Wallet, dark brown leather, western-style looking, with crystal cross on front Between La Pine & Bend. Reward! Please call 541-536-3383, 536-3344 or 771-4107, ask for MaryAnn.

923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

541-322-7253

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

Sales Northeast Bend

BarkTurfSoil.com

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

d CAMPING GEAR of any sort: d

292

Used tents, sleeping bags, tarps, blankets.

Sales Other Areas

d WARM CLOTHING d Rain Gear, Boots Please drop off your donations at the BEND COMMUNITY CENTER 1036 NE 5th St., Bend (312-2069) For special pick-ups, call Ken Boyer 389-3296 or Don Auxier, 383-0448 PLEASE HELP. YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

541-385-5809 358

Farmers Column

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

The cold weather is upon us and sadly there are still over 2,000 folks in our community without permanent shelter, living in cars, makeshift camps, getting by as best they can. The following items are badly needed to help them get through the winter:

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1461 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net

286

BEND’S HOMELESS NEED OUR HELP

WANTED: Horse or utility trailers for consignment or purchase. KMR Trailer Sales, 541-389-7857 www.kigers.com

275

269

classified@bendbulletin.com For newspaper delivery questions, call Circulation Dept. 541-385-5800

The Bulletin 476

Employment Opportunities

Auction Sales www.MadrasEventsCenter.com 180 NW ‘B’ St., Madras. Public Auction: Sat. 2/26, Viewing begins at 9 a.m., 541-604-4106

To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320

WINTER SPECIAL - Dry Seasoned Lodgepole Pine, guaranteed cords. Split delivered, stacked. Prompt delivery! $175/cord. 541-350-3393

Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

421

Hay, Grain and Feed

name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT dry lodgepole, $160 for 1 cord or $300 for 2. Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484

Employment

300 400

• Receipts should include,

LOST German Shorthair Male, has orange training collar, dragging cable. 19th & Larch in Redmond, Jan. 31. Call 541-390-8766 541-923-2424

DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

9 7 7 0 2 476

Farm Market

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655

O r e g o n

Found single key on keyring, to vehicle? SW Roosevelt, Feb. 3. Call to I.D. 541-390-0040

Dry Seasoned Red Fir $185 REMEMBER: If you have lost an per cord, split and delivanimal don't forget to check ered, Please Call The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 541-977-2040. Full drum set, Ross, with cym$200.

B e n d

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Electric Guitar, BC Rich “Bich”, hot pink. Great cond. $200. 503-933-0814, local bals, nice set, 503-933-0814, local.

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Free barn cats, fixed & shots, natural rodent control in exchange for safe shelter, food & water. We will deliver. 541-389-8420, leave msg. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

375

Meat & Animal Processing Angus Beef, 1/2 or whole, grain fed, no hormones $3.10/lb., hanging weight, cut & wrap included, please call 541-383-2523.

For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Assistant Superintendent - We are currently seeking an experienced, qualified construction supervisor to join our project team in Sunriver, Oregon. For complete job description go to www.lcgpence.com/ careers.asp. E-mail resume to employment@lcgpence.com. Caregiver Prineville senior care home looking for Care Manager for two 24-hour shifts per week. Must be mature and compassionate, and pass criminal background check. Ref. required. 541-447-5773. Clerical/Research Assistant Qualifications Include: • Highly Self-Motivated • Organized • Flexible Schedule (Mon.Fri.) • Exc. Interpersonal and Communication Skills • Comfortable Learning new computer programs • Keen Attention to detail • College degree or previous office experience preferred This position is full-time and is mostly clerical in nature. Pre-employment drug screening required. To apply submit a resume and letter of interest to: Box 16325434, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

Employment Opportunities Cochenour Consulting, inc is seeking integration architects, developers and interns to assist with the development and deployment of an enterprise scale integration solution on the Microsoft platform. Experience with BizTalk Server or Sharepoint Server a bonus. Wage based on experience level. Some travel required. Please submit resume's to careers@cochenourconsulting.com or visit our website at www.cochenourconsulting.com.

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Computer Engineer Embedded Firmware and Win dows Software Engineers: 2 full-time positions with lo cal high-tech manufacturer of over 20 years. BS in Com puter Science, Computer En gineering or Electrical Engi neering. 5+ years exp. Programming in C for em bedded processors, C++ and MFC for Windows appli cations. Competitive salary + benefits. Send Resume to: jobs@DENTInstruments.com

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Diesel Mechanic Arlington, OR Walsh Trucking, a 50+ year old family-owned company is currently accepting resumes for a swing shift Lead Mechanic at our Arlington, OR terminal. This position is responsible for the maintenance of class 8 tractors and trailers and requires 5+ years experience. Send resume to hr@walshtruckingco.com. Please put "Arlington Mechanic" in subject line. General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com


E2 Monday, February 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

OPERATIONS McMurry Ready Mix Co. An Equal Opportunity Employer, is currently hiring a Ready Mix Operations Supervisor For Casper, WY Must have 5 years experience and be proficient on computers. Job Duties include: Supervision of all aspects of Ready Mix operations including Sales,Batching, Delivery, Quality Control, & Cost Control. Will be accountable for profitability of Ready Mix Operations. Excellent Pay & Benefits

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state.

For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

Come join the Best Team Around! Drug Free Workplace.

Technician

Full or part time, experience preferred, in Madras. 541-325-1059.

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Rentals

500 600

READERS:

We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320

Submit resume to: PO Box 2488, Casper WY 82602 Or fax (307) 235-0144 Contact Ron McMurry @ (307) 473-9581

Pharmacy

CAUTION

Finance & Business

507

627

Real Estate Contracts

Vacation Rentals and Exchanges

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Earn 8-10% interest on well-secured first trust deeds. Private party. 541-815-2986

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION visit our website at www.oregonfreshstart.com

656

Houses for Rent SW Bend

Beautiful 1 bdrm, 2 bath fully furnished Condo, $695, $400 dep., near downtown & college, completely renovated, 2 verandas, no pets/smoking, all amenities, pics avail. by request. W/S/G/elec./A/C & cable included, Available now. call 541-279-0590 or cheritowery@yahoo.com

642

Cabo San Lucas Playa Grande Apt./Multiplex Redmond Resort, 2 Bed/3 Bath 2 story Penthouse Suite on the 1815 SW 21st - Spacious 2 Bdrm 2 Bath, gorgeous beach !! 3/6 - 3/13. Sleeps fenced duplex with garage. 6. $ 1800. 541-350-2974 Mint cond! W/S/G paid; pet OK. $695. 541- 549-2228 Spring Break at Melia Cabo Real, anytime, 2 3 Bedroom 2.5 bath duplex in bdrm, 1 week, $700, NE Redmond. Garage, fenced 541-350-6865. backyard. $800-$750 + deposit. Call 541-350-0256 or 630 503-200-0990 for more info.

Rooms for Rent Awbrey Heights, furn., no smoking/drugs/pets. $350 +$100 dep. (541) 388-2710. Budget Inn, 1300 S. Hwy 97, Royal 541-389-1448; & Gateway Motel, 475 SE 3rd St., 541-382-5631, Furnished Rooms: 5 days/$150+tax

Room in CRR, $200/mo. incl. utils, rent reduction for housekeeping duties, small trained pet ok, 541-548-6635 STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

Condo / Townhomes For Rent Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755. Two-story, 3/2.5 Townhouse for rent. Large fenced yard, all appliances, single garage. $775/mo. 2752 Juniper Avenue. 541-389-9851

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend $99 MOVE-IN SPECIAL! 1 & 2 bdrm apts. avail. starting at $575.

Alpine Meadows 541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

ASK ABOUT OUR New Year Special! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, non-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

Call about our $99 Special! Studios to 3 bedroom units from $415 to $575. • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 Managed by

GSL Properties

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

648

Houses for Rent General

Attractive 2 bdrm. in 4-plex,

541-385-5809

541-382-3402

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H La Pine & Prineville H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

1751 NE Wichita, W/S/G paid, on-site laundry, small pet on approval .$525/mo. 541-389-9901. Beautiful 2 bdrm., 2.5 bath util., garage, gas fireplace, no smoking or pets. $675 1st+last+sec. Please Call 541-382-5570,541-420-0579 Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting. No pets/smoking. Near St. Charles.W/S/G pd; both w/d hkup + laundry facil. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928.

!! Snowball of a Deal !! $300 off Upstairs Apts. 2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps Lease Options Available Pet Friendly & No App. Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

Nice 2 bdrm., 2 bath duplex close to amenities, walk-in closet, gas fireplace, deck, garage, no smoking/pets. $825 mo. 402-957-7261

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 1015 Roanoke Ave. - $575/ mo, $500 dep. W/S/G paid, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath townhouse, view of town, no smoking or pets. Norb, 541-420-9848.

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwauke hookup, $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us a t541-382-3678 or

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz

3 Bdrm 2 bath, 1.15 ac. 800 sq ft shop/4-car garage, utilities furnished except elec. $995/mo + $750 sec dep. 541-228-5131; 541 517-4345 PARKS AT BROKEN TOP. Nice studio above garage, sep. entry, views! No smoking/ pets. $550/mo. + dep., incl. all util. + TV! 541-610-5242.

658

Houses for Rent Redmond 2 bdrm house with full basement, close to downtown, $800 mo. 1st last + dep. lawn maintenance required. 541-420-2980. 3/2 1385 sq. ft., family room, new carpet & paint, nice big yard, dbl. garage w/opener, quiet cul-de-sac. $995 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath+bonus, in Fieldstone Crossing, Redmond. Near schools. Community Pool. Furnished+all appl. avail 3/11. $1000+util. 907-738-1410.

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver

664

Houses for Rent Furnished RIVERFRONT: walls of windows with amazing 180 degree river view with dock, canoe, piano, bikes, covered BBQ, $1250. 541-593-1414

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq. ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1195. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend

860

Homes for Sale

Motorcycles And Accessories

***

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $16,900 OBO. 541-944-9753

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $19,999 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error Shadow Deluxe can occur in your ad. If this Honda American Classic Edition. happens to your ad, please 2002, black, perfect, gacontact us the first day your raged, 5,200 mi. $3495. ad appears and we will be 541-610-5799. happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

687

750

Commercial for Rent/Lease

Redmond Homes

Motorcycle Trailer Kendon stand-up motorcycle trailer, torsion bar suspension, easy load and unload, used seldom and only locally. $1700 OBO. Call 541-306-3010.

space • 1792 sq ft

755

827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404

Sunriver/La Pine Homes

ATVs

Warehouse with Offices in Redmond,6400 sq.ft., zoned M2, overhead crane, plenty of parking, 919 SE Lake Rd., $0.40/sq.ft., 541-420-1772.

693

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

La Pine home on 1 acre. 4 bdrm., 2 bath, like new. All Offers Considered. www.odotproperty.com. 503-986-3638 Steve Eck.

763

Recreational Homes and Property 10 ACRES $34,000. Pines & meadow, power & phone avail. good drilled well, zoned for residence. 3 mi. east of town of Sprague River. 541-783-2829.

773

Acreages 10 Acres,7 mi. E. of Costco, quiet, secluded, at end of road, power at property line, water near by, $250,000 OWC 541-617-0613

ATVs YAMAHA 1998 230CC motor, 4WD, used as utility vehicle. excellent running condition. $2000 OBO. 541-923-4161 541-788-3896

870

Boats & Accessories 17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

875

Watercraft

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $1995 for all. Bill 541-480-7930.

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

Eagle Crest Bungalow, Desert Sky neighborhood, 1908 sq.ft., 2 bdrm., 2.5 bath, garage, mtn. views from Bachelor to Hood, $279,900, 3% Courtesy to agents. 541-215-0112.

1 Bdrm., 1 bath, great room w/ Ofice/Retail Space hardwood floors, granite for Rent counter tops, tile bath, appl. + W/D, single garage, An Office with bath, various HEATED DRIVEWAY, 455 NW sizes and locations from Saginaw, $795/mo.+$795 $250 per month, including dep., avail. now, utilities. 541-317-8717 541-280-5633,541-410-0671 Downtown Redmond 654 Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. $650/mo + utils; $650 secuHouses for Rent rity deposit. 425 SW Sixth SE Bend St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848

A CLEAN 1 bdrm. in 4-plex next 3 bdrm, 1 bath house with to Park, 2 decks, storage, double and single garage. laundry on site, great loca20431 Clay Pigeon Ct., $800 tion, W/S/G paid, no dogs, mo. 1st/last, $400 refund$550/mo. 541-318-1973 able deposit. 541-388-2307.

850

Snowmobiles

745

Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room with woodstove, new carpet, pad & paint, single garage w/opener. $895/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

Boats & RV’s

Polaris Trail Deluxe 1991, * Real Estate Agents * matching pair, exc cond, un* Appraisers * der 2500 mi, elec start, cov* Home Inspectors * ers. $650 ea. 541-430-5444 Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to Yamaha Snowmoreach prospective B U Y E R S biles & Trailer, 1997 AND SELLERS of real es700 Triple, 1996 600, Tilt tate in Central Oregon. To Trailer, front off-load, covplace an ad call 385-5809 ers for snowmobiles, clean & exc. cond., package price, $3800, 541-420-1772.

A newer 3/2 mfd. home, 1755 sq.ft., living room, family room, new paint, private .5 acre lot near Sunriver, $895. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803.

3 bedroom, 2 bath, fireplace, pantry, fenced, sprinklers. No smoking/pets. $875+deposits. 541-548-5684.

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from 2 blocks from DT, 4 Bdrm, 1.5 $400/mo. 541-317-8717 bath, large fenced yd. W/D, finished basement, shed, new paint. Pets OK. $1195, 1st Office / Warehouse + security. 541-948-4531 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1 level, lots of light, new carpet, kitchen, bath, paint, A/C, dbl. garage, near St. Charles, great neighborhood, $995, 541-306-4404

705

Real Estate Services

2 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1/2 acre, fenced, $650 per mo., 1st., last, $600 dep., $400 pet dep., 17134 Oxnard Rd., 541-593-1477, 805-479-7550

3 Bdrm, 2 bath, dbl garage, AC. Quiet neighborhood, Large fenced yard w/RV pad, deck, mature landscaping, close to schools/shopping. Avail 3/1. 634 NW 22nd St. $995/mo, annual lease. 541-312-3796

865

700 800

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

671 2-STORY 3 BDRM/2 BATH 2 car garage, newer well-built quiet 1600+ sq.ft., yard, vaulted ceiling, NE Bend washer/dryer dishwasher. GO SEE! 20812 Liberty Ln. please do not disturb tenants. $995/mo $1000 dep. monthly or lease possible. Call (530) 307-1137 Karrie karreyn@gmail.com

Real Estate For Sale

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

880

Motorhomes

865

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Polaris Sportsman 2008, 800 CC, AWD, 4-wheeler, black in color, custom SS wheels/tires, accessories, exc. cond., 240 miles, $5,000. Call 541-680-8975, and leave message. Polaris Sportsman X2 2009 800 CC, AWD, “21 Miles New”, sage green, extras, $6500, 541-815-0747.

Suzuki Quad Runner 1995 4x4, 1850 miles, excellent cond, $1500 firm. 541-480-2765.

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202 BROUGHAM 23½’ 1981 motorhome, 2-tone brown, perfect cond, 6 brand new tires. engine perfect, runs great, inside perfect shape. See to appreciate at 15847 WoodChip Lane off Day Rd in La Pine. Asking $8000. 541-876-5106.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, February 7, 2011 E3

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 880

882

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417. Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

Houseboat 38x10, triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prineville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Autos & Transportation

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

Grumman AA-5 Traveler, 1/4 interest, beautiful, clean plane, $9500, 619-822-8036 www.carymathis.blogspot.com

933

935

975

975

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199 Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $5800. 541-330-0852. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, mi., glass t-top, runs & looks upholstery, rechromed, nice! great, $10,000,541-280-5677 $32,000. 541-912-1833 Chevy Corvette 1980, Mercedes 380SL 1983, yellow, glass removable top, Convertible, blue color, new 8 cyl., auto trans, radio, tires, cloth top & fuel pump, heat, A/C, new factory intecall for details 541-536-3962 rior, black, 48K., exc. tires, factory aluminum wheels, asking $12,000, will consider fair offer & possible trade, 541-385-9350. Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $3850, 541-410-3425.

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, reduced to $34,000 OBO 541-610-4472; 541-689-1351

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2 slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

TERRY 27’ 1995 5th wheel with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great rig in great cond. $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all original, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Pickups

Travel Trailers ALPENLITE 1984. A Beauty! Extras, 5th wheel hitch, A/C, microwave, tires are good, large fridge, radio, propane tanks have been certified. Spare tire & wheels. $3000. 923-4174. Forest River Sierra 1998, 26’, exc. cond, $6900, call 541-548-5886.

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

Chevy Silverado 1/2 ton 4WD 1998, X-Cab. V-8. Auto. A/C. Canopy. 172K mi. Just updated. $5995. 541-480-3265. DLR 8308. VIN-232339. FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105

Chevy

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, exc. cond., $16,900, 541-390-2504

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more. Priced to sell at $59,500! 541-317-9185

885

Canopies and Campers

Wagon

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds

personals Classic January 1941 Model One of a kind and irreplaceable. High mileage but all parts are original. Warranty long expired. Very reliable and good working condition. Backfires occasionally. Ignition activates after 9 a.m. only. Asking Price: Not for Sale: SHE’S PRICELESS! Happy 70th Dana!

Impala SS 1964 rear seat & set of hub caps, excellent, $400 both, OBO. 541-480-2765

Antique and Classic Autos extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523. Leer Camper Shell, fiberglass 6½’, fits old body style Tacoma from ‘95-’05. $700 OBO 541-382-6310 after 4pm

C-10

Pickup

Classic January 1941 Model One of a kind and irreplaceable. High mileage but all parts are original. Warranty long expired. Very reliable and good working condition. Backfires occasionally. Ignition activates after 9 a.m. only. Asking Price: Not for Sale: SHE’S PRICELESS! Happy 70th Dana!

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

935 Dodge 1500 XLT 4x4, 2007, 10K miles, running boards, many options, tow package, $18,500 OBO. 541-815-5000

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

$19,450! 541-389-5016 evenings.

Chrysler 2005 Pacifica AWD, leather, video system, 3.5 liter V6, loaded, 21,500 mi., $13,950. 541-382-3666

FORD EXPLORER 1992 READY FOR SNOW! All Wheel Drive! 5 spd, loaded with all power equipment, sound system. All weather tires. Runs and drives good, Only $1800. 909-570-7067.

DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2700. 541-322-6261 Honda Pilot 2010 Like new, under 11K, goes great in all conditions. Blue Bk $30,680; asking $26,680. 541-350-3502

DODGE DAKOTA 1989 4x4, 5 speed transmission, 189,000 miles, new tires, straight body, 8’ long bed. $1500 OBO. 541-815-9758.

Jeep CJ7 1986 6-cyl, 4x4, 5-spd., exc. cond., consider trade, $7950, please call 541-593-4437.

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 1998, like new, low mi., just in time for the snow, great cond., $7000, 541-536-6223.

Ford crew cab 1993, 7.3 Diesel, auto, PS, Rollalong package, deluxe interior & exterior, electric windows/door locks, dually, fifth wheel hitch, receiver hitch, 90% rubber, super maint. w/all records, new trans. rebuilt, 116K miles. $6500, Back on the market. 541-923-0411

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $14,500. 541-408-2111

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, auto, reduced to $13,900 obo 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

99% Complete, $14,000, please call 541-408-7348. Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website) Barns

Domestic Services

Handyman

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Painting, Wall Covering

M. Lewis Construction, LLC

Dawn’s Cleaning: “Morning Fresh Clean!” Residential Cleaning, Senior Discounts Has openings now, CALL TODAY! 541-410-8222

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 • Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling • Decks • Window/Door Replacement • Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179

Drywall

Philip L. Chavez Contracting Services Specializing in Tile, Remodels & Home Repair, Flooring & Finish Work. CCB#168910 Phil, 541-279-0846

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

"POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates . See Facebook Business page, search under M. Lewis Construction, LLC CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

Complete Drywall Services Remodels & Repairs No Job Too Small. Free Exact Quotes. 541-408-6169 CAB# 177336

Electrical Services BAXTER ELECTRIC Remodels / Design / Rentals All Small Jobs•Home Improve. All Work by Owner - Call Tom 541-318-1255 CCB 162723

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Handyman

I DO THAT! Home Repairs, Remodeling, Professional & Honest Work. Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768 Mark’s Handyman Service • Fix • Replace • Install • Haul Free Est. - Reasonable Rates Mark Haidet•541-977-2780 License #11-00008985

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Home Improvement

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Snow Removal Reliable 24 Hour Service • Driveways • Walkways • Parking Lots • Roof Tops • De-Icing Have plow & shovel crew awaiting your call!

Landscape Management •Pruning Trees And Shrubs •Thinning Over Grown Areas •Removing Unwanted Shrubs •Hauling Debris Piles •Evaluate Seasonal Needs EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

V Spring Clean Up! V Thatch, Aerate, weeding, raking & monthly maint. 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com

MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC

541-815-2888

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Remodeling, Carpentry RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. •Additions/Remodels/Garages •Replacement windows/doors remodelcentraloregon.com 541-480-8296 CCB189290

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

Masonry

Tile, Ceramic

541-390-1466

Chad L. Elliott Construction

Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

Same Day Response

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874. 388-7605, 410-6945

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

PORSCHE CARRERA 4S 2003 - Wide body, 6

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT- Perfect, garaged, factory super charged, just 1623 miles $20,000. 541-923-3567

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

speed, all wheel drive, no adverse history, new tires. Seal gray with light gray leather interior. $32,950. 503-351-3976

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

Audi A4 Avant Quattro 2003 3.0L., 92K mi, garaged, serviced, silver, fully loaded, $8900. 541-420-9478

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227 BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, V6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $3500. 541-548-5302 Honda Accord EX V6 2001 62k auto leather seats studs 6 cd sunroof roof rack optional Runs great!$8500 OBO 541-420-0049 Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

Buick LeSabre, 1985, excellent shape, always garaged, 93K orig mi, $2200 541-318-6919

custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $6000; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $2900. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999. Chevy Cavalier , rare 2001. 120K miles, 38mpg, 4-dr, AM/FM CD, summer/winter on rims, tilt, tags good to 2012, garaged. Slight deer damage to hood. $2000 OBO. 541-604-4494

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin SUBARUS!!!

Buick LeSabre 2004,

bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

Cute as a Bug! Black 1965 VW BUG in Excellent condition. Runs good. $6995. 541-416-0541.

975

• 4WD, 68,000 miles. • Great Shape. • Original Owner.

Ford 2 Door 1949, When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr brks, plus mntd stud snows. $8500 obo. 541-330-0616

541-322-7253

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

1969,

152K mi. on chassis, 4 spd. transmission, 250 6 cyl. engine w/60K, new brakes & master cylinder, $2500. Please call 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800.

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $27k. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Sport Utility Vehicles

Dodge Ram 2001, short Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Automobiles

1957,

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

932

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Bench seat split-back, out of a ‘92 Ford F-250, gray, $400 OBO. 541-419-5060/pics

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

(4) Lexus/Toyota RX300 factory wheels, 1999-2003, $100 all. 541-815-5000

KOMFORT 27’ 2000 5th wheel trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide. In excellent condition, has been stored inside. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

The Bulletin Classiieds

(Private Party ads only)

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all

Ford Ranger 2004 Super Cab, XLT, 4X4, V6, 5-spd, A/C bed liner, tow pkg, 120K Like New! KBB Retail: $10,000 OBO 360-990-3223

Chevy Silverado Z71 2005 Extra cab 4x4, auto, tow pkg, matching canopy. $14,950. 541-548-6057 503-951-0228

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns.

FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

Like buying a new car! 503-351-3976.

AWD, leather, video sys, 3.5 liter V6, loaded, 21,500 mi, $13,950. 541-382-3666

Vans Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great

New body style, 30,000 miles, heated seats, luxury sedan, CD, full factory warranty. $23,950.

Chrysler 2005 Pacifica

933

1964 327 Camel Hump, 461 heads, new valve job, resurfaced bore guides. New parts have receipts. Excellent cond. $450 firm. 541-480-2765 1988 FORD RANGER XLT tailgate with all hardware, $200; grill N.I.B. $200. 541-593-6156

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

940 Ford F-350 Crew 4x4 2002. Triton V-10, 118k, new tires, wheels, brakes. Very nice. Just $14,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Utility Trailers

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

MERCEDES C300 2008

Find It in

90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

931

control, heated seats, Premium audio, rubber floor mats, 2 sets wheels, (1 winter), 108,000 miles, all records. Good condition. $10,500. Call Bruce 541-516-1165. Toyota 4-Runner 1994 4x4, V6, 4-dr PS, PB, PW, PDL, am/fm /cd, great shape, good tires, tinted windows, 176K mi, $5100.Call/text 541-419-9057

Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP,

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean

881

FORD F150 4X4 1996 Eddie Bauer pkg., auto. 5.8L, Super Cab, green, power everything, 156,000 miles. Fair condition. Only $3500 OBO. 541-408-7807.

350 auto, new studs, located in Sisters, $3000 OBO, 907-723-9086,907-723-9085

925

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $122,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

SUBARU FORESTER 2003 XS leather, auto climate

Chevy El Camino 1979,

Trucks and Heavy Equipment COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

932

Antique and Classic Autos

900

916

Hurricane 2007 35.5’ like new, 3 slides, generator, dark cabinets, Ford V10, 4,650 mi $69,500 OBO. 541-923-3510

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Toyota Tercel 1997 exc. cond, one owner, 136,300 miles, $3800, Please Call 541-815-3281.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L518616 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000019334/HARDWICK Investor No: 4004637354 AP #1: 197326 Title #: 100665125 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by JANET HARDWICK as Grantor, to AMERITITLE as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MRTG. CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated November 7, 2005, Recorded November 14, 2005 as Instr. No. 2005-78033 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT TEN (10) OF GLACIER RIGDE, PHASE I, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 5 PYMTS FROM 07/01/10 TO 11/01/10 @ 1,073.06 $5,365.30 TOTAL LATE CHARGES $160.95 RECOVERABLE BALANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $25.50 $25.50 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$5,551.75 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 3359 NE COLLIER COURT, BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $162,066.62, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 06/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on March 18, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 11/08/10 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 926468 PUB: 01/31/11, 02/07/11, 02/14/11, 02/22/11


E4 Monday, February 7, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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Legal Notices

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LEGAL NOTICE Estate of Kathleen Marie Weaks NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS Case Number: 11PB0003MA Notice: The Circuit Court of the State of Oregon, for the County of Deschutes, has appointed the undersigned as Personal Representative of the Estate of Kathleen Marie Weaks, deceased. All persons having claims against said estate are required to present the same, with proper vouchers to the Personal Representative, c/o Neil R. Bryant, 591 SW Mill View Way, Bend, Oregon 97702, within four months from the date of first publication of this notice as stated below, or they may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by this proceeding may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the Personal Representative, or the Attorney for the Personal Representative.

stances (ORS Chapter475); and/or (2) Was used or intended for use in committing or facilitating the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violate the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475). IN THE MATTER OF: #1 U.S. Currency in the amount of $5,190.00, Case #10-10-65910 seized 10/17/10 from Donald Ray Trotter IN THE MATTER OF: #2 U.S. Currency in the amount of $1,000.00, Case # 10-03-07014 seized 10/20/10 from Suzette Delancey IN THE MATTER OF : #3 U.S. Currency in the amount of $1,773.00, Case # 09-10-63701 from Clarice M. Rios IN THE MATTER OF: #4 U.S. Currency in the amount of $1,689.00, Case #10-10-66925 from Airelle D. Smith.

Trust Deed reinstated by payment of the entire amount then due, other than such portion as would not then be due had no default occurred, together with costs, trustee and attorney’s fees, and by curing any other default complained of in this Notice, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. 9. In construing this notice and whenever the context hereof so requires, the singular includes the plural, the word “grantor” includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and their successors in interest, the word “trustee” includes any successor trustee and the word “beneficiary” includes any successor in interest of the beneficiary named in the Trust Deed, and any collateral beneficiary, and their successors in interest.

Dated and first published: February 7, 2011.

DATED this 3rd day of December 2010.

Personal Representative: Stacey Weaks 218 East Yvon Drive Tucson, Arizona 85704

HORNECKER, COWLING, HASSEN & HEYSELL, L.L.P.

Attorney for Personal Representative: Neil R. Bryant, #OSB730417 Bryant, Lovlien & Jarvis, P.C. 591 SW Mill View Way Bend, Oregon 97709-0880 Telephone: (541) 382-4331 Fax: (541) 389-3386 Email: bryant@bljlawyers.com

By: Joseph E. Kellerman, Successor Trustee

LEGAL NOTICE Project: Central Oregon Community College Science Building Skanska Contact: Todd Predmore, phone #503-641-2500, e-mail: todd.predmore@skanska.com BID DATE and Time: Feb. 10th, 2011 at 2:00pm Prevailing wage/BOLI requirements apply. For information on how to obtain Bonding, Insurance, or lines of credit, contact Allied Insurance at (510) 578-2000 or Skanska USA Building, Inc. Skanska is an equal opportunity employer and actively requests bids from all DBE, MBE, WBE, and ESB firms as well as all SBA recognized firms including VOSB, HUBzone, SDB, WOSB, and SDVB.

Ad Run Date(s): Jan. 28, Feb. 1, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9 and 10 LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE Estate of NORMA M. JACKSON NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS Case Number: 11PB0013MS

The Board of Directors of Arnold Irrigation District will hold their monthly board meeting on Wednesday, February 9, 2011 at 3:00 pm at 19604 Buck Canyon Rd.

Notice: The Circuit Court of the State of Oregon, for the County of Deschutes, has appointed JANIS L. ROBERTSON as Personal Representative of the Estate of Norma M. Jackson, deceased. All persons having claims against said estate are required to present the same, with proper vouchers to the Personal Representative, c/o David E. Petersen, Merrill O'Sullivan, LLP, 805 SW Industrial Way, Suite 5, Bend, Oregon 97702, within four months from the date of first publication of this notice as stated below, or they may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by this proceeding may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the Personal Representative, or the Attorney for the Personal Representative.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

Dated and first published February 7, 2011 Personal Representative: Janis L. Robertson 15379 NW Decatur Way Portland, Oregon 97229 Attorney for Personal Representative: David E. Petersen, OSB #82104 Merrill O'Sullivan, LLP 805 SW Industrial Way, Suite 5 Bend, Oregon 97702 Office: (541) 389-1770 Facsimile: (541) 389-1777 Email: redside@merrill-osullivan.com LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF SEIZURE FOR CIVIL FORFEITURE TO ALL POTENTIAL CLAIMANTS AND TO ALL UNKNOWN PERSONS READ THIS CAREFULLY If you have any interest in the seized property described below, you must claim that interest or you will automatically lose that interest. If you do not file a claim for the property, the property may be forfeited even if you are not convicted of any crime. To claim an interest, you must file a written claim with the forfeiture counsel named below, The written claim must be signed by you, sworn to under penalty of perjury before a notary public, and state: (a) Your true name; (b) The address at which you will accept future mailings from the court and forfeiture counsel; and (3) A statement that you have an interest in the seized property. Your deadline for filing the claim document with forfeiture counsel named below is 21 days from the last day of publication of this notice. Where to file a claim and for more information: Diana Vitolins, Crook County District Attorney Office, 300 NE Third Street, Prineville, OR 97754. Notice of reasons for Forfeiture: The property described below was seized for forfeiture because it: (1) Constitutes the proceeds of the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violates, the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution, or possession of controlled sub-

NOTICE is hereby given that the obligation secured by the Trust Deed described below is in default, and that the beneficiary has elected to foreclose the Trust Deed pursuant to ORS 86.705 to 86.795. No action is now pending to recover any part of the debt secured by the Trust Deed. Information required by ORS 86.735 and ORS 86.745 is as follows: 1. Grantor: River Run Properties, LLC, an Oregon limited liability company Trustee: First American Title Insurance Company of Oregon Successor Trustee: Joseph E. Kellerman 717 Murphy Road Medford, OR 97504 Beneficiary: PremierWest Bank 2. Property covered by the Trust Deed: Lot Twelve (12), Block Five (5), EAGLE CREST, recorded June 24, 1985, in Cabinet C, Page 145, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. Trust Deed was recorded on February 7, 2006, as instrument number 2006-08925 of the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. Default for which foreclosure is made is 1) is failure of Grantor to make required monthly payments for the month of September and each month thereafter; 2) failure of Grantor to pay real property taxes assessed against the premises; and 3) conveyance of an interest in the realty in violation of the terms of the trust deed. 5. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed is $795,822.22 in principal plus accrued but unpaid interest as of November 24, 2010 of $16,470.53, plus late fees in the amount of $317.35 for each monthly payment missed, plus back taxes, plus attorneys' fees, trustee's fees and such sums as the Beneficiary may advance for the benefit of Grantor (i.e., real property taxes, insurance premiums, etc.) plus interest on the outstanding principal balance at prime plus 3 with a floor minimum of 7.375%. By virtue of Grantor's defaults, Beneficiary has accelerated the entire balance as immediately due and owing. 6. The Beneficiary has and does elect to sell the property to satisfy the obligation. 7. The property will be sold in the manner prescribed by law on the 13th day of April 2011, at 10:00 a.m. standard time as established by ORS 187.110, at the front steps of the Deschutes County Justice Building, 1100 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon 97701, Deschutes County, Oregon. 8. Interested persons are notified of the right under ORS 86.753 to have this proceeding dismissed and the

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: KIMBERLY A. MCLEAN AND BRIAN J. MCLEAN. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: OREGON HOUSING AND COMMUNITY SERVICES DEPARTMENT, STATE OF OREGON as assignee of BANK OF THE CASCADES MRTG. CENTER. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Three (3), SOUTH VILLAGE, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: August 5, 2005. Recording No.: 2005-51521 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: A payment of $310.18 for the month of May 2010; plus regular monthly payments of $812.00 each, due the first of each month, for the months of June 2010 through November 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $108,231.85; plus interest at the rate of 5.4500% per annum from April 1, 2010; plus late charges of $1,149.48; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: April 14, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #07754.30337). DATED: November 15, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No; 0031020977 T.S. No.: 10-11376-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, ELYSE S. DOUGLAS, STEVEN J. DOUGLAS as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on March 15, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-17844 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: APN: 121137 LOT THREE (3), BLOCK ONE (1), OF CHUCKANUT ESTATES EAST, PHASE I, RECORDED JULY 27, 1997, IN CABINET B, PAGE 251, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 61150

BENHAM ROAD, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; failed to pay advances made by the Beneficiary; defaulted amounts total:$13,731.55 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $289,310.21 together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.71000% per annum from May 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on May 16, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 10, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3880430 01/17/2011, 01/24/2011, 01/31/2011, 02/07/2011

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx6970 T.S. No.: 1290005-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Linda Culpepper, A Married Woman, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of World Savings Bank, Fsb, Its Successors and/or Assignees, A Federal Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, dated September 20, 2005, recorded October 20, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-71762 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 17 of River's Edge Village, Phase IV, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2524 NW Upper Rim Place Bend OR 97701-3800. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due June 15, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,052.35 Monthly Late Charge $102.62. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $472,610.78 together with

interest thereon at 6.340% per annum from May 15, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on May 16, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 06, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-363762 02/07, 02/14, 02/21, 02/28

tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30848). DATED: November 17, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx9772 T.S. No.: 1311541-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Rosa A. Rivera and Ezequiel Rivera, Wife And Husband, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of World Savings Bank, Fsb, Its Successors and/or Assignees, as Beneficiary, dated May 01, 2007, recorded May 07, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-25959 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 24 in block CC of Deschutes River Woods, Deschutes County, Oregon Commonly known as: 19660 Apache Rd. Bend OR 97702-8975. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due July 15, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,038.89 Monthly Late Charge $51.94. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $277,017.26 together with interest thereon at 4.940% per annum from June 15, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on May 06, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: December 29, 2010. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-362417 01/17, 01/24, 01/31, 02/07

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: CARMEN TILLENBURG AND GERDA H. TILLENBURG. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, also known as WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, a division of WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, formerly known as WACHOVIA MORTGAGE, FSB, formerly known as WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Seventeen (17), WOODCREST PHASES 1 and 2, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: June 15, 2007. Recording No.: 2007-33881 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,150.80 each, due the first of each month, for the months of August 2010 through November 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $261,167.77; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from July 1, 2010; plus late charges of $230.16; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: April 14, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal FIND IT! as would not then be due had BUY IT! no default occurred, by curSELL IT! ing any other default that is The Bulletin Classiieds capable of being cured by

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705, et seq. and O.R.S. 79-5010, et seq. Trustee No.: fc26534-5 Loan No.: 0205380934 Title No.: 4537861 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by Carey L. Palm, as Grantor, to Pacific Northwest Title, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Lender, as Beneficiary, dated 04/10/2007, recorded on 04/26/2007 as Instrument No. 2007-24041, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by SunTrust Mortgage, Inc.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: Lot twelve (12), Falcon Ridge, Deschutes County, Oregon. Account No.: 188644 The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1420 Northeast Marble Court, Bend OR 97701. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735 (3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: monthly payments of $1,529.36 beginning 05/01/2010, together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Deed of Trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: Principal balance of $236,188.70 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.250% per annum from 04/01/2010, together with any late charge(s), delinquent taxes, insurance premiums, impounds and advances; senior liens and encumbrances which are delinquent or become delinquent together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and any attorney's' fees and court costs, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, First American Title Insurance Company c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., the undersigned trustee will, on 03/28/2001, at the hour of 11:00AM in accord with the standard of time established by O.R.S. 187.110, At the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S. 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For Trustee Sale Information please call (925) 603-7342. Dated: 11-10-10 First American Title Insurance Company, Inc., Trustee By: Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., Agent Lauren Meyer, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer Direct Inquiries To: SunTrust Mortgage, Inc., c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., 4401 Hazel Avenue, Suite 225, Fair Oaks, CA 95628 (916) 962-3453 Mortgage Lender Services, Inc. may be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. (RSVP# 204618)(01/31/11, 02/07/11, 02/14/11, 02/21/11)

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705, et seq. and O.R.S. 79-5010, et seq. Trustee No.: fc26652-5 Loan No.: 0143873008 Title No.: 4560369 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by Daniel W.E. Tigner, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for lender, as Beneficiary, dated 08/30/2005, recorded on 09/06/2005 as Document No. 2005-59814, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor-in-interest for Wachovia Bank N.A., as Trustee for BAFC Salt 2005-1F. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: Lot 2 in Block 11 of Valhalla Heights, Phase III, Deschutes County, Oregon. Account No.: 160375 The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2634 NW Nordic Avenue, Bend, OR 97701. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735 (3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: monthly payments of $1,624.06 beginning 02/01/2009, together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Deed of Trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: Principal balance of $299,825.57 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.500% per annum from 01/01/2009, together with any late charge(s), delinquent taxes, insurance premiums, impounds and advances; senior liens and encumbrances which are delinquent or become delinquent together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and any attorney's' fees and court costs, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, First American Title Insurance Company c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., the undersigned trustee will, on 03/28/2011, at the hour of 11:00AM in accord with the standard of time established by O.R.S. 187.110, At the Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S. 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For Trustee Sale Information please call (925) 603-7342. Dated: 11-8-10 First American Title Insurance Company, Trustee By: Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., Agent Lauren Meyer, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer Direct Inquiries To: SunTrust Mortgage, Inc., c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., 4401 Hazel Avenue, Suite 225, Fair Oaks, CA 95628 (916) 962-3453 Mortgage Lender Services, Inc. May be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. (RSVP# 204625, 01/31/11, 02/07/11, 02/14/11, 02/21/11 )

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L518613 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000018652/MCKELVIE Investor No: 4004375513 AP #1: 209591 Title #: 100665124 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by MICHAEL W. MCKELVIE, SHEILA E. MCKELVIE, FRITZIA I. LA RUE as Grantor, to AMERITITLE as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MRTG. CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated April 13, 2005, Recorded April 15, 2005 as Instr. No. 2005-22954 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: PARCEL TWO (2) OF PARTITION PLAT NO. 2003-17, BEING A PORTION OF LOTS FIVE (5) AND SIX (6), BLOCK ONE FORTY-THREE (143), SECOND ADDITION TO BEND PARK, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 3 PYMTS FROM 07/01/10 TO 09/01/10 @ 1,278.15 $3,834.45 2 PYMTS FROM 10/01/10 TO 11/01/10 @ 1,304.23 $2,608.46 TOTAL LATE CHARGES $153.24 RECOVERABLE BALANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $25.50 $25.50 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$6,621.65 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 712 SE PELTON PLACE, BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $158,196.38, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 06/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on March 18, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 11/08/10 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 926469 PUB: 01/31/11, 02/07/11, 02/14/11, 02/22/11


Bulletin Daily Paper 02/07/11