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COMING SUNDAY • IN SPORTS

Life-changing reversal

Boys basketball: Cougs

win, topping Storm

Bend High’s Kenny Dailey throws off troubled past to shine in football, wrestling

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BUSINESS, C3 $700 million Good economic news for Bend • DOWNTOWN: 8 new businesses • NORTHWEST CROSSING: Tate and Tate moving in in possible cuts found for Oregon

It’s official: BOTC is capitalized

By Nick Budnick The Bulletin

SALEM — While Oregon waits for Gov. John Kitzhaber’s proposed budget to be released, the Legislature’s budget analysts are not waiting. On Thursday the nonpartisan number-crunchers in the Legislative Fiscal Office released a report that lays out more than $700 million in possible cuts to the next two-year budget, mainly in IN THE state employee LEGISLATURE compensation. The possible cuts include a 5 percent across-the-board pay cut as well as rollbacks of previously negotiated pay increases and bonuses. “It is pretty aggressive,” said Rep. Peter Buckley, D-Ashland, co-chair of the budget-writing Joint Ways and Means Committee. The report, he added, “gives us the framework of the field we’re playing on.” The report represents a departure from past practice. Usually, the legislative fiscal office releases a lengthy analysis of the governor’s budget proposed in December. But since Kitzhaber didn’t take office until Jan. 10, his budget won’t be released until Feb. 1. To give lawmakers something to look at before then, the report foreshadows Kitzhaber’s budget by including, along with its list of possible cuts, a summary of cuts that various agencies have put forward for Kitzhaber’s consideration. The report focuses on the state’s general fund, which is derived from corporate and personal income taxes. It makes up about a fourth of the state’s overall budget that includes fees and federal revenue. See Budget / A8

On the Web The report, “Analysis of the 2011-13 Budget Level,” can be found at www.leg.state. or.us/comm/lfo/

Company shows 1st quarterly profit in 2 years By Tim Doran The Bulletin

Cascade Bancorp on Friday completed its previously announced stock sale, infusing Bank of the Cascades with about

$150 million and pushing its capital requirements above levels imposed by government regulators. Separately, Cascade Bancorp also announced its first quarterly net profit in two

years, of $2.6 million, compared with a net loss of $70.2 million in the fourth quarter of 2009. However, the parent company of Bank of the Cascades reported a net loss for 2010 of $12.4 million, according to a news release. In 2009, the company reported a net loss of $114.8 million. “I am pleased that the company has suc-

cessfully concluded its capital raise effort and achieved strong capital levels,” Patricia Moss, president and CEO, said in the release. “This capital raise underscores the confidence of our new investors in Cascade’s markets and our prospects for effectively banking the communities we serve.” See BOTC / A7

LAID TO REST WITH HONORS

Leon Pantenburg / For The Bulletin

Ted Kutch salutes a veteran’s casket at a funeral service in La Pine while, from left, Bob Hubbard, Tom Merrick, Al Wakefield and Dale Vincent present arms. Bugler Phyllis York sounds “Taps.” This ceremony is repeated about once a month at funerals in the La Pine area as veterans are laid to rest with military honors from the local, volunteer honor guard. To read about the honor guard program, see story, Page C1.

FATALITY NEAR CULVER

Criminal charges to be considered for Madras woman By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

Andrea Orozco, who allegedly caused the fatal crash near Culver on the night of Nov. 21, may still face criminal charges stemming from the incident. Jefferson County District Attorney Ste-

ven Leriche said he intends to assemble a Jefferson County grand jury in the coming week to consider charges against Orozco. Leriche isn’t releasing what charges are being considered but did confirm that a grand jury being involved means criminal charges are being discussed.

“The grand jury is seven citizens appointed by the court that objectively review circumstances to see if a case can go to a trial court,” Leriche said. “They decide whether or not there is a case. This is only done in instances where criminal matters are being considered, and usu-

ally only in felony cases.” Leriche originally stated he did not believe criminal charges would be filed against Orozco but said his office, along with Oregon State Police, continued to investigate the matter. See Fatality / A7

Protests test e-liberties, with U.S. in middle Once popular, carpools By Mary Beth Sheridan The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — The decision by Egyptian officials to virtually shut down Internet access to the country Friday marked an audacious escalation in the battle between authoritarian governments and tech-savvy protesters. It was also a direct challenge to the Obama administration’s attempts to promote Internet freedom. Internet access was cut off in Egypt shortly after midnight Friday, apparently after authorities ordered the country’s five service providers to block it, according to experts. Cell phone service was also severely disrupted. “The Egyptian government’s

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Inside • Coverage of the chaos in Cairo and beyond, Page A2

By Sabrina Tavernise and Robert Gebeloff New York Times News Service

actions … have essentially wiped their country from the global map,” James Cowie of Renesys, a New Hampshire-based company that monitors Internet data, said on the company’s website. The move came roughly a day after Secretary of State Hillary Clinton had publicly urged Egypt not to close off access to the technology and social media being used to organize demonstrations. See Protests / A7

Scott Nelson / New York Times News Service

Egyptian protesters demonstrate Friday in Cairo. Internet access was cut of Friday in Egypt as the country struggled with escalating protests.

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Vol. 108, No. 29, 66 pages, 6 sections

WOODBRIDGE, Va. — Remember the 1970s? Watergate, disco, oil embargoes and, of course, carpooling. Many big companies organized group rides for their employees, and roughly one in four Americans who drove to work shared a ride with others. But now, far more people are driving alone, as companies have spread out, Americans are wealthier and cars have become

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cheaper to own. The percentage of workers who carpool has dropped by almost half since 1980, the first time the Census Bureau started systematically tracking the numbers, according to new data from the bureau. The sharp decline has confounded efforts by urban planners, who over the years have tried to encourage the practice by setting aside highway lanes for car poolers, as well as offering incentives like discounted parking. See Carpools / A8

Sports

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‘DON’T ASK’: Military lays out plan to implement repeal, Page A3


A2 Saturday, January 29, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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T S / Anarchy sweeps Egypt Nobel winner: ‘It’s the people versus the thugs’

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Anti-government protesters roam next to burning buildings and a police truck on fire Friday night on the Corniche, an area of downtown Cairo taken over by anti-government protesters in defiance of a national 6 p.m. curfew.

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Mubarak fires ministers amid protests, won’t quit Associated Press CAIRO — In his first response to the unrest sweeping his nation, Egypt’s president fired his Cabinet early today and promised reforms but refused to step down, setting the stage for perhaps even heavier street battles with protesters calling for an end to his nearly 30 years in power. Four days of the largest antigovernment protests in decades exploded into chaos hours earlier. Tens of thousands of Egyptians fed up with crushing poverty, unemployment and corruption poured out of mosques after Friday’s noon prayers and battled police with stones and firebombs.

By nightfall, they had burned down and looted the ruling party’s headquarters along the banks of the Nile and set fire to many other buildings, roaming the streets of downtown Cairo in defiance of a night curfew enforced by the army. President Hosni Mubarak, confronted with the most dire threat to his three decades of authoritarian rule, faced his nation in a televised address at midnight, making vague promises of social reform in what is likely to be interpreted as an attempt to cling to power rather than a genuine pledge solve Egypt’s pressing problems.

He also defended his security forces and accused the protesters of plotting to destabilize Egypt and destroy the legitimacy of his regime, outraging those still in the streets well into the night. “We want Mubarak to go and instead he is digging in further,” protester Kamal Mohammad said. “He thinks it is calming down the situation but he is just angering people more.” A heavy police crackdown and other extreme measures by the government — including the shutting down of all Internet and mobile phone services in Cairo and other areas — did not stop the surging crowds. With police

beaten back in many places, the government called the army into the streets and imposed a nationwide dusk-to-dawn curfew. Egypt’s crackdown drew harsh criticism from the Obama administration and even a threat Friday to reduce a $1.5 billion foreign aid program if Washington’s most important Arab ally escalates the use of force. Stepping up the pressure, President Barack Obama told a news conference he called Mubarak immediately after his TV address and urged the Egyptian leader to take “concrete steps” to expand rights and refrain from violence against protesters.

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

MEGA MILLIONS The numbers drawn are:

14 33 48 49 50 18 x4 Nobody won the jackpot Friday night in the Mega Millions game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $91 million for Tuesday’s drawing.

By Matt Richtel New York Times News Service

Lefteris Pitarakis / The Associated Press

Anti-government protesters run around an Egyptian armored personnel carrier Friday near the Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo.

Crucial question: What of the military? By Neil MacFarquhar New York Times News Service

Even as armored military vehicles deployed around important Egyptian government institutions Friday for the first time in decades, it remained difficult to predict what role the armed forces might play in either quelling the disturbances or easing President Hosni Mubarak from power. “Are they on the side of the nation or are they on the side of the regime?” a former senior Western diplomat with long service in Cairo asked. “That distinction had been blurred. We are now seeing a modern test of whether there is a separation between the two.” The Egyptian military, the world’s 10th largest, is powerful, popular and largely opaque. The military carried out the 1952 coup that overthrew the monarchy and has considered itself the shepherd of the revolution ever since; all four presidents in the ensuing years have been military generals. But Mubarak, who led the Air Force before rising to promi-

nence when President Anwar Sadat appointed him vice president in 1975, worked hard to keep the army out of overt politics and under his control. In one famous incident, he dismissed Field Marshal AbdelHalim Abu Ghazala, a popular, charismatic war hero, from his post as defense minister in 1989. The general had been tied to a smuggling scandal, but most analysts thought he had been fired because his public profile was too high. No general has sought to curry public favor since. The current defense minister, Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi, an unpopular man in his late 70s, is considered unlikely to challenge Mubarak. The army commands broad respect in Egypt. Demonstrators cheered Friday as tanks deployed in front of government buildings like the Foreign Ministry and the main broadcast center. The demonstrators were partly inspired by the Tunisian example, analysts said, and some hoped that the military might play a similar role in Egypt.

Autocratic governments often limit phone and Internet access in tense times. But the Internet has never faced anything like what happened in Egypt on Friday, when the government of a country with 80 million people and a modernizing economy cut off nearly all access to the network and shut down cell phone service. The shutdown caused a 90 percent drop in data traffic to and from Egypt, crippling an important communications tool used by protesters and their supporters to organize and to spread their message. Vodafone, a cell phone provider based in London with 28 million subscribers in Egypt, said in a statement on its website that “all mobile operators in Egypt have been instructed to suspend services in selected areas.” The company said it was “obliged to comply” with the order. Egypt, to an unprecedented extent, pulled itself off the grid. “In a fundamental sense, it’s as if you rewrote the map and they are no longer a country,” said Jim Cowie, chief technology officer of Renesys, a company based in New Hampshire that tracks Internet traffic. “Almost nobody in Egypt has Internet connectivity,” Cowie added. “I’ve never seen it happen at this scale.” In the Internet era, governments have found many ways to control the flow of information — or at least to try to do so — by interfering with digital communications or limiting them. Few governments have cut

off access entirely; Myanmar did so in 2007, as did Nepal two years earlier. But at least 40 countries filter specific Internet sites or services, as China does by prohibiting access to some foreign news sources, said Ronald Deibert, a political scientist and director of the Citizen Lab at the University of Toronto, which tracks the intersection of technology and politics. But he added that the shutdown in Egypt was “unprecedented in scope and scale.”

CAIRO — Mohamed ElBaradei knelt in prayer, then rose and stepped toward a line of riot police. The Nobel Peace laureate moved closer, shrinking the gap between the demonstration he was attempting to lead and the power of the Egyptian state. The police lifted their batons. They swung. Water cannon streamed. Tear gas bloomed. The downtown Cairo street erupted, as thousands of protesters, hurling stones and throwing shoes, clashed with police. E l - Mohamed B a r a d e i , ElBaradei drenched, his eyes stinging, was hurried by friends into a nearby mosque. “I called for peaceful (change), but I think that opportunity is over,” the opposition leader said minutes later, sitting stunned, tear gas volleys exploding outside. “It’s the people versus the thugs.” The men around him, other opposition leaders and his bodyguards, were enraged. ElBaradei, who for months had been urged by activists to take his National Front for Change into the streets, held a medical mask over his mouth, his skin still bristling. Rocks and stones peppered the air beyond the courtyard. A man ran in saying another man had been killed near the overpass. ElBaradei was far from the polished offices of diplomats and scientists at the U.N. International Atomic Energy Agency, where for years in Vienna he once monitored the world’s nuclear programs. Egypt is his native home, but it had become a rougher, anxious country, marred by joblessness and poverty and the rage of those with little. He was back here now, uncorrupted, which is why many Egyptians want him to be their new leader, trying to topple the three-decadeold government of President Hosni Mubarak. But outside the mosque, activists, who over the years had gotten used to tear gas and beatings, wondered why ElBaradei was inside. Some thought him too timid. They asked one another: “Where is ElBaradei going?” “He’s a 68-year-old symbol,” answered Ibrahim Issa, a dissident editor and ElBaradei’s confidant. “He has never experienced something as harsh as this.”

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T OP S T OR I ES

Military lays out plan to implement repeal of ‘don’t ask’ The Associated Press WASHINGTON — Military training to apply the new law allowing gays to serve openly will begin in February and will move quickly, senior Pentagon leaders said Friday. They said there is no intent to delay but would not guarantee full implementation of the repeal this year. The hedge on scheduling came despite assertions by President Barack Obama in his State of the Union speech this week that the repeal of the 17-year-old ban will be finalized in 2011. Speaking to Pentagon reporters, Gen. James Cartwright said he expects the military services to move expeditiously to train the bulk of their units, and that a year for completion is “a good goal.” Still, he added, “there’s nothing that tells us that it’s not reachable, but we have to allow for the fact that we may discover something between now and then.” Cartwright, the vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said he expects the services will know within the first month of training how well they are doing and how quickly they will be able to proceed. Cartwright and Clifford Stanley, the defense undersecretary for personnel, said the military services will have a lot of latitude to determine their training process and schedule. Both men appeared unable to describe what would be unacceptable behavior from service members, such as those who might crack jokes about sexual orientation. Instead, they said it will be up to individual unit commanders to make sure their troops are professional and respectful. In fact, Stanley said, as a commander on the battlefield, he would be more concerned about ensuring that his troops are focused on their mission and that they come home alive. “I’m not sure I’m going to be too concerned with your orientation,” said Stanley, a retired two-star general in the Marine Corps.

Governors propose broad cuts to Medicaid New York Times News Service Hamstrung by federal prohibitions against lowering Medicaid eligibility, governors from both parties are exercising their remaining options in proposing cuts to the program during the fourth consecutive year of brutal economic conditions for state governments. Because states confront budget gaps estimated at $125 billion, few essential services — schools, roads, parks — are likely to escape the ax. But the election of tough-minded governors, the evaporation of federal aid, the relentless growth of Medicaid’s enrollment and the exhaustion of alternatives have made the program, which primarily covers low-income children and disabled adults, an outsize target. In Arizona, which last year ended Medicaid payments for some organ transplants, Gov. Jan Brewer, a Republican, is asking the Obama administration to waive a provision of the new health care law so that the state can remove 280,000 adults from the program’s rolls. In California, the newly elected governor, Jerry Brown, a Democrat, proposes cutting Medicaid by $1.7 billion, in part by limiting the beneficiaries to 10 doctor visits a year and six prescriptions a month. In the budget he will unveil Tuesday, Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York is expected to propose cutting even more — at least $2 billion from projected state spending on Medicaid, which totaled about $14 billion this year. Gov. Nathan Deal, the new Republican leader of Georgia, proposed this month to end Medicaid coverage of dental, vision and podiatry treatments for adults.

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, January 29, 2011 A3

Immigration bills face fiscal realities By Lois Romano The Washington Post

As state legislatures convene this month, lawmakers across the country who had vowed to copy Arizona’s strict measure cracking down on illegal immigrants are facing a new reality. State budget deficits, coupled with the political backlash triggered by Arizona’s law and potentially expensive legal challenges from the federal government, have made passage of such statutes uncertain. In the nine months since the Arizona measure was signed

into law, a number of similar bills have stalled or died, or are being reworked. Some have faced resistance from law enforcement officials who question how states or communities could afford the added cost of enforcing the laws. And some state legislators have backed away from the most controversial parts of the Arizona law, which has been challenged in court by the federal government. A federal judge has put on hold some provisions, including those that would require police to check immigration status if they stop someone while enforcing

other laws, allow for warrantless arrests of suspected illegal immigrants and criminalize the failure of immigrants to carry registration papers. The case is awaiting a ruling before the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit. “Obviously most places were not going to pass Arizona bills,” said Mark Krikorian, executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies, which advocates tighter immigration laws. “There’s always an initial flush of enthusiasm and then the reality of politics sets in. … These states are bankrupt — they need to decide

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what battles they want to fight.” But Krikorian also says that the Arizona bill has “done what it was supposed to do” by creating a national discussion on immigration reform in the absence of federal legislation. “I won’t be surprised to see more state task forces looking more fully at this issue,” says Ann Morse, program director of the Immigrant Policy Project at the National Conference of State Legislatures. “The interest level is still there, but states are looking at the implications.” Currently, Georgia, Mississippi,

W  B U.S. man may be tried for murder in Pakistan LAHORE, Pakistan — Pakistan will pursue murder charges against a U.S. consular employee suspected of shooting two armed men during a possible robbery attempt, a prosecutor said Friday as protesters called for the American to be severely punished. The killings in this bustling city on Thursday have attracted intense media coverage in Pakistan, and the government — already viewed by some critics as being subservient to the United States — will be under pressure to allow the law to run its course.

Envoy says talks must avert Ivory Coast war Rahmat Gul / The Associated Press

An injured woman is escorted out of a supermarket that was the target of a bomb Friday in central Kabul, Afghanistan. A Taliban suicide bomber blew himself up inside the supermarket, which is popular with Westerners, killing eight people — some of them foreigners — in an attack that showed insurgents can still strike forcibly in the capital despite tightened security. The Taliban said their target was an official with the U.S. security contractor formerly

known as Blackwater whom they followed into the store. Although the insurgent group regularly attacks those allied with NATO forces or the Afghan government, it was not clear why they specifically targeted the company, now known as Xe Services. It was the third deadly attack in Kabul in less than two months and the worst on a civilian target in the city since February 2010. — The Associated Press

Taco Bell takes its beef with lawsuit to the public By Sarah Skidmore and Bruce Schreiner The Associated Press

Taco Bell says a legal beef over the meat in its tacos is bull. The fast-food chain took out full-page ads in at least nine major newspapers and launched a YouTube campaign featuring its president Friday to proclaim its taco filling is 88 percent beef. A false-advertising lawsuit filed last week that caused an online stir alleges the company’s filling doesn’t have enough beef to be called that. The lawsuit seeks to make the company stop calling it “beef,” and pay the suing law firm’s bill. Taco Bell trumpeted “Thank you for suing us. Here’s the truth about our seasoned beef,” in the ads in Friday’s editions of the Wall Street Journal, USA Today and other papers. The ads go on to say the rest of the filling is a mixture of spices and common food additives. “It is unusual for a company to take this on and challenge the allegations so boldly,” said Gene Grabowski, chair of the crisis and litigation practice at Levick Strategic Communications in Washington. “A lot of companies are going to be watching how this turns out.” The tone and scope of the

The Associated Press ile photo

Taco Bell says its beef tacos are filled with 88 percent beef. A lawsuit says the filling is 35 percent beef. campaign indicates Taco Bell is confident in its facts, Grabowski said. Companies typically shy away from taking facts in a legal dispute public. The lawsuit, filed by the Alabama law firm Beasley, Allen, Crow, Methvin, Portis & Miles, doesn’t specify what percentage of the mixture is meat. The lawyer on the case, Dee Miles, said the firm had the filling tested and found it contained 35 percent beef. The firm would not say who tested the meat or give any other specifics of the analysis.

Obama likely to address gun law New York Times News Service WASHINGTON — Administration officials say that President Barack Obama, largely silent about gun control since the Tucson, Ariz., shooting carnage, will address the issue soon, potentially reopening a long-dormant debate on one of the nation’s most politically volatile issues. The officials did not indicate what measures, if any, Obama might support; with Republicans in control of the House and many Democrats fearful of the gun lobby’s power, any legislation faces long odds for pas-

sage. Among the skeptics is the Senate majority leader, Harry Reid, D-Nev. Still, Obama has come under increased pressure from guncontrol advocates, including urban Democrats in Congress and liberal activists and editorial writers, to speak out. They would like him to at least support a bill that would restore an expired federal ban on the sort of high-capacity ammunition magazine that was used in the Jan. 8 shootings in Tucson that killed six people and injured 13, including Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz.

Indiana, Florida, Nebraska, Kentucky, Utah, Pennsylvania, Texas and South Carolina are among the states where Arizona copycat bills have been drafted. In Utah, a state dominated by conservative Republicans, a couple of bills similar to Arizona’s statute are in the legislative pipeline. But in November, state leaders from business, law enforcement, education and the Mormon Church urged moderation. They drew up the “Utah Compact,” which declares immigration a federal issue and urges legislators to focus resources on local crime.

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — Ivory Coast’s political rivals must be forced into direct talks to find a solution to a crisis that has brought the nation to the brink of a civil war, the African Union’s mediator, Raila Odinga, told a meeting of the 53-nation bloc Friday. “This summit must send a strong and unequivocal message that the two parties must negotiate face-to-face,” the

Kenyan premier told a special meeting on Ivory Coast ahead of a heads-of-state summit in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa. “Given its (Ivory Coast’s) long history of strife and civil war, and with the preparations for armed conflict under way on both sides, a small spark could ignite a major conflagration which would also threaten the regions stability.”

Spain confirms prison terms in runway strike MADRID — Spain’s Supreme Court on Friday confirmed two-year prison sentences for 23 employees of the airline Iberia who blocked Barcelona runways in July 2006. The protest against a new baggage check arrangement was staged at the height of the holiday season. It affected about 600 flights, leaving 100,000 passengers stranded. The Iberia employees had seriously disturbed public order, the court said, pointing out that they could have used legal means of protest such as going on strike. The Supreme Court rejected their appeal against an earlier verdict. — From wire reports


A4 Saturday, January 29, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

R In a Haitian slum, Christian relief agency fights cholera, stands up to secular critics By Franco Ordonez McClatchy Tribune News Service

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — In one of the worst slums in one of the world’s poorest countries, Yolette Jocelin lies deathly still on a medical cot as nurses work to save her life. The 30-year-old nursing mother has cholera and is dangerously dehydrated. She watches as a nurse in this Samaritan’s Purse medical clinic inserts a needle into her arm to deliver a solution of water and salts that will save her, as it did her 8month-old baby boy. “We need to make sure she washes her hands before she breast-feeds,” nurse Terrie Wenman tells aid workers crowded around. “If she does not know how, teach her.” Wenman is a Canadian who volunteers for the Boone, N.C.based Christian relief agency Samaritan’s Purse. She and other volunteers work in the organization’s new 240-bed cholera clinic in Cite Soleil — a slum of 300,000 people stricken by poverty, unemployment and violence.

Franco Ordonez / Charlotte Observer

Nurse Rachel Doyle picks up Peterson Charmont, 1, a favorite patient at the Haitian clinic run by the Christian relief agency Samaritan’s Purse. Two weeks ago, a bloodied man lay dead in a nearby street for hours, his hands and body bound in thick green rope. Residents live in shanties with no running water along streets filled with garbage. While some relief groups have

avoided the area, Samaritan’s Purse chose Cite Soleil for fear the country’s cholera epidemic would grow worse if it penetrates deeply into Haiti’s slums. The clinic opened last November, at the height of the epidemic that has taken some 3,790 lives. Haiti is now the most significant relief effort for Samaritan’s Purse, a nonprofit led by the minister Franklin Graham, that works in more than 100 countries providing aid to victims of war, disease, disaster and famine. The organization operates two cholera clinics in Haiti, and is installing water filtration systems and building shelters for the homeless. It has spent about $38 million of the $51 million the group raised for Haiti relief in the last year. Along with its humanitarian aid comes a dose of evangelism. Chaplains with the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, which Franklin Graham also leads, have visited the medical clinic and other Samaritan’s Purse programs. They have ministered to the afflicted and handed out Bibles. While critics say religious zeal

has no place in humanitarian relief, Graham is unapologetic about ministering to victims spiritually as well as medically. “When it’s all said and done,” Graham told the Observer last week, “we want to do all that we can to prepare that person to stand before God one day.” Still, Samaritan’s Purse recently responded to criticism by asking the chaplains to stop preaching at the cholera clinics because the effort is partially funded by government grants. Graham, the son of Charlotte, N.C.-born evangelist Billy Graham, has gotten high marks for Samaritan’s Purse efforts in Haiti and elsewhere. But he has also been a frequent figure of controversy in recent years, drawing criticism for his condemnations of Islam, as well as his salary. Samaritan’s Purse was one of the first relief groups on the ground after the earthquake that killed an estimated 300,000 people and left 1.5 million homeless. Some 719 volunteers have helped provide medical aid as part of the Samaritan’s Purse effort.

From ‘the Daniel’ to just water, fasting for faith takes many forms By Mark Oppenheimer New York Times News Service

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — After a recent Sunday night’s service at Celebration Church, where a 10-piece band played Christian rock for 1,600 worshipers, Stovall Weems, the pastor, met me in his “green room” and offered nibbles from a tray of kiwi, pineapple and melon slices. In a showbiz green room, the fruit is for waist-conscious guests. But backstage at Jacksonville’s largest church, Weems — a muscular, friendly guy you desperately want to call “dude” — stocks fruit because it is all some of his staff members are eating right now. For the rest of January, the pastor will not eat even that. Weems has fasted periodically over the last 20 years, ever since, as a coke-snorting Theta Xi brother at Louisiana State University, he found Jesus and joined a group that encouraged fasting as a way to draw closer to God. Twelve years ago, believing that God called him to Jacksonville, Weems founded the evangelical, nondenominational Celebration Church. As it grew to more than 10,000 worshipers a week, at 12 campuses, he always preached a combination of fasting and prayer for spiritual growth. And two years ago he started Awakening, a three-week campaign that he invited other churches to join. The first year, nearly 400 churches participated, and for Awakening 2011, which runs through Jan. 30, there are more than 1,000 participating churches in the United States, Poland, Zimbabwe and elsewhere. For some pastors, participation in Awakening means simulcasting Weems’ services at their church; for others, buying bulk orders of “Awakening” (WaterBrook Press), his new book; and for all of them, at least some fasting. Weems, an avid weightlifter, talks about fasting as if it were an extreme sport. In the green room, he says that when he first fasted, in college, it was “an energy shot” in his relationship with God. In “Awakening,” the book — which contains sentences like “Fasting hits the reset button of your soul” and exclamations of “Wow!” — Weems argues that Christian fasting is different from Old Testament, or what one might call Jewish, fasting. In the Old Testament, Weems writes, fasting primarily “had to do with mourning or getting God to intervene in a crisis.” But “under the New Covenant,” he explains, “fasting is a way of celebrating the goodness of God and that because of Jesus we have already received God’s mercy,

Sarah Beth Glicksteen / New York Times News Service

Laura McElroy, who is subsisting on water for three weeks as part of a fasting recommended by her pastor, Stovall Weems, plays Candy Land with her daughter, Sydney, 19 months, left, and her son Colin, 3, in Jacksonville, Fla. Weems, the Florida pastor at Celebration Church, leads his flock in fasting as a way to draw closer to God.

“I have small children. Making their dinner, serving food, being around it — if I don’t drink enough water, I get kind of weak. And in those moments when I think, ‘OK, God, I can’t do this,’ I rely on his strength.” — Laura McElroy, 27 forgiveness and favor.” And such fasting, Weems believes, can take many forms. He writes of finding one’s “fast zone,” which is “the place where you feel light and spiritually true. Your mind is easily focused on God and spiritual things. You have an increased spiritual energy — you can feel the fast working.” In the green room, Weems says some people try a water fast, giving up all food, but maybe the next year “kind of back off and do a Daniel or mixture of juices.” The “Daniel fast” is based on Chapter 1 of the Book of Daniel, in the Old Testament, in which Daniel eats only vegetables and drinks only water. In past years, Weems has done the Daniel, but this year he is following a liquid diet that includes vegetable broth and smoothies. Lauren Winner, who teaches at Duke Divinity School and wrote about fasting in “Mudhouse Sabbath,” said early Christians fasted on Wednesdays and Fridays, as well as during Lent. That practice has risen and fallen over the ages, but it “saw an uptick among evangelicals in the late 1990s.” There are websites devoted

to the Daniel fast, and other preachers, like Jentezen Franklin of Gainesville, Ga., sponsor three-week fasts in January, a popular time for renewal. Winner agreed that fasting can be spiritually beneficial. But she said biblical fasting occurred in diverse contexts, from Hannah’s fasting and praying to get pregnant, in the Old Testament, to Jesus’ fasting in the wilderness, in the New. In other words, fasting is more complex than Weems’ book suggests. “It seems an oversimplification to say that fasting is mournful in the Hebrew Bible and celebratory in the New Testament,” Winner said. “I worry that such a description subtly plays into pernicious ideas about the Old Testament as burdensome and the New Testament as freeing. “In both testaments, fasting is ultimately about connecting

people with God.” Weems’ followers are drinking in his gospel. All 10 worshipers I met after Sunday’s service are fasting somehow. One put me in touch with a friend, Laura McElroy, who is subsisting for three weeks on just water. McElroy first did a water fast last year, after reading about it in “Celebration of Discipline,” by Richard Foster. “I knew the minute I read it, I knew that’s what God wanted me to do,” McElroy said. When we spoke, she was on Day 8. Saying the discipline of fasting helps clarify God’s intentions for her, she pointed to Matthew 17, where Jesus recommends prayer and fasting to his disciples. But she does not say fasting is easy. “I have small children,” said McElroy, 27, a preschool teacher and mother of two. “Making their dinner, serving food, being around it — if I don’t drink enough water, I get kind of weak. And in those moments when I think, ‘OK, God, I can’t do this,’ I rely on his strength. “I might suck on some hard candy if I need something in my mouth. But other than that, I have no temptation, because I know why I’m doing it.”

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R   B Ken Wytsma will share the message at the 9:30 a.m. service and lead the 11:15 Redux service Sunday at Antioch Church, held at Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend. • Pastor Dave Miller will share the message “A Novel Idea — The Local Church” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Bend Christian Fellowship, 19831 Rocking Horse Road. The 4twelve youth group meets Wednesdays at 7 p.m. • Pastor Virgil Askren will share the sermon titled “Oh, Baby” celebrating the Sanctity of Life at 10:15 a.m. Sunday at Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 N.E. 27th St. • The Laurelwood School Choir will share a special program at 9:15 a.m. today at Bend Seventh-day Adventist Church, 21610 N.E. Butler Market Road. • Elder Craig Perryman will share the message “How Beautiful Are Your Feet” at 11 a.m. Sunday following the 10:45 a.m. song service at Community of Christ, 23080 Cooley Road, Bend. • Senior Leader Debbie Borovec will share the message “Change by Choice” at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Celebration Church, 1245 S. Third St., Suite C-10, Bend. • Pastor Dean Catlett will share the message “The Long Road Home,” based on Ruth 1:1-22, at 10:45 a.m. Sunday at Church of Christ, 554 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. • January topic is “Finding the Simplicity of the Christ through Reading God’s Word with Understanding” at 1:30-3 p.m. Fridays at Christian Science Reading Room Resource Workshops, 115 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend. • Pastor Dave Drullinger will share the message “Looking for a Sign,” based on Matthew 16:1-4, at 10:45 a.m. Sunday at Discovery Christian Church, 334 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. • Pastor John Lodwick will share the message “The Spirit’s Work in the Believer” as part of the series “The Person and Work of the Holy Spirit” at 6 p.m. today and at 9 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Eastmont Church, 62425 Eagle Road, Bend. • Pastor Mike Johnson will share part three of the message “Going, Growing, Giving, Becoming” at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Faith Christian Center, 1049 N.E. 11th St., Bend. Fuel youth services are held Wednesdays at 7 p.m. • Pastor Randy Wills will begin a new series “Kingdom Worship” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Father’s House Church of God, 61690 Pettigrew Road, Bend. • The Uganda missions team will share about their recent trip and what God is doing in Africa at 10:15 a.m. Sunday at First Baptist Church, 60 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend. • The Rev. Dr. Steven Koski will speak on the topic “A New Year — Renewed Relationships: Forget the Golden Rule, Follow the Platinum Rule” at the 9 a.m. contemporary service, 10:45 a.m. traditional service and 5:01 p.m. evening service Sunday at First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend. • Pastor Thom Larson will share the message “Change the World,” based on Matthew 5:1-12 and Micah 6:1-8, at the 10 a.m. service Sunday at First

United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend. • The message will be “Is the Day of Miracles Past?” at 7 p.m. today at Home Church for Korean People, 1348 N.E. Thompson Drive, Bend. • Pastor Keith Kirkpatrick will share the message “Confessions of a Pastor” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Journey Church, held at Bend High School, 230 N.W. Sixth St., Bend. • Pastor Randy Myers will share the message “Make Prayer A Priority” as part of a new series “Revive” at 6 p.m. today and 9 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday at New Hope Church, 20080 Pinebrook Blvd., Bend. • Pastor George Bender will share the message “Yes! I Am …” at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Radiant Life Fellowship, 60670 Brookswood Blvd., Bend. • Sherry Ackerman, Ph.D., will share the message “Full Cardinal Grand Cross” at 9 a.m. Sunday at Spiritual Awareness Community of the Cascades, held at Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend. • Guest Pastor The Rev. Timothy Sternberg will share the message “What Does God Want?” based on Micah 6:8, at the 8 a.m. contemporary service and 11 a.m. traditional service Sunday at Trinity Lutheran Church & School, 2550 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend. • The Rev. Heather Starr will speak on the topic “Connected Beyond Walls” at 11 a.m. Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Central Oregon, held at Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend. • Corey Parnell will share the message “Worship” at 6:30 p.m. today and at 8, 9 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday at Westside Church, 2051 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend. and at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at the Westside South Campus, held at Elk Meadow Elementary School, 60880 Brookswood Blvd., Bend. • Cash Lowe will share the message “ANGER: One Letter From DANGER,” based on Proverbs 14:28, at the 9 and 10:30 a.m. services Sunday at Christian Church of Redmond, 536 S.W. 10th St. • Pastor Rob Anderson will share the message “Who Shall Receive Jesus’ Blessings?,” based on Matthew 5:1-12, at the 8:30 a.m. contemporary service and 11 a.m. traditional service Sunday at Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th St., Redmond. • Pastor Eric Burtness will share the message “Not the ‘Be Happy Attitudes’!,” based on Matthew 5:1-12, at the 8:30 a.m. contemporary service and the 11 a.m. traditional service Sunday at Zion Lutheran Church, 1113 Black Butte Blvd., Redmond. • Pastor Glen Schaumloeffel will share the message “Preparation for Deluge,” based on Genesis 7:11-8:19 and 2 Peter 3:20-21, as part of the series “Back to the Beginnings” at 9:30 a.m. Sunday at Community Bible Church at Sunriver, 1 Theater Drive. • The Rev. Willis Jenson will share the message “The Wisdom of God is to Save Men and Give Life Eternal through the Preaching of the Gospel of Christ–Crucified for the Sins of All Men,” based on 1 Corinthians 1:21, at 11 a.m. Sunday at Concordia Lutheran Mission held at Terrebonne Grange Hall, 8286 11th St., Terrebonne.

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THE BULLETIN • Saturday, January 29, 2011 A5 “The Wheel of Dharma” Buddhism

“Celtic Cross” Christianity

“Star of David” Judaism

You Are The Most Important Part of Our Services “Omkar” (Aum) Hinduism

“Yin/Yang” Taoist/Confucianism

“Star & Crescent” Islam

Assembly of God

Bible Church

FAITH CHRISTIAN CENTER 1049 NE 11th St. • 541-382-8274 SUNDAYS: 9:30 am Sunday Educational Classes 10:30 am Morning Worship

CROSSROADS CHURCH Come join us as one family of Believers, young and old, to worship our great God. You can expect a time of Christ-centered meaningful worship and verse by verse practical biblical teaching. We believe the gospel of Jesus Christ is the central theme of Scripture and speaks to every area of the Christian life.

This Sunday at FAITH CHRISTIAN CENTER Pastor Mike will be sharing his message titled “Going, Growing, Giving, Becoming” Part III beginning at 10:30 am On Wednesday “Fuel” youth service begins at 7:00 PM. Childcare is provided in our Sunday morning service. A number of Faith Journey Groups meet throughout the week in small groups, please contact the church for details and times. The church is located on the corner of Greenwood Avenue and NE 11th Street. www.bendfcc.com REDMOND ASSEMBLY OF GOD 1865 W Antler • Redmond • 541-548-4555 SUNDAYS Morning Worship 8:30 am and 10:30 am Life groups 9 am Kidz LIVE ages 3-11 10:30 am Evening Worship 6 pm WEDNESDAYS FAMILY NIGHT 7PM Adult Classes Celebrate Recovery Wednesday NITE Live Kids Youth Group Pastor Duane Pippitt www.redmondag.com

Baptist EASTMONT CHURCH NE Neff Rd., 1/2 mi. E. of St. Charles Medical Center Saturdays 6:00 pm (Contemporary) Sundays 9:00 am (Blended worship style) 10:30 am (Contemporary) Sundays 6:00 pm Hispanic Worship Service Weekly Bible Studies and Ministries for all ages Contact: 541-382-5822 Pastor John Lodwick www.eastmontchurch.com FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH CBA “A Heart for Bend in the Heart of Bend” 60 NW Oregon, 541-382-3862 Pastor Syd Brestel SUNDAY 9:00 AM Sunday School for everyone 10:15 AM Worship Service This Sunday at First Baptist Church , our Uganda Missions Team will share about their recent trip. Join us for a great look at what God is doing in Africa. For Kidztown, Middle School and High School activities Call 541-382-3862 www.bendchurch.org FIRST MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH Sundays Morning Worship 10:50 am Bible Study 6:00 pm Evening Worship 7:00 pm Wednesdays Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 pm Tom Counts, Senior Pastor Ernest Johnson, Pastor 21129 Reed Market Rd, Bend, OR 541-382-6081 HIGHLAND BAPTIST CHURCH, SBC 3100 SW Highland Ave., Redmond • 541-548-4161 SUNDAYS: Worship Services: 9:00 am & 6:00 pm Traditional 10:30 am Contemporary Sunday Bible fellowship groups 9:00 am & 10:30 am For other activities for children, youth & adults, call or go to website: www.hbcredmond.org Dr. Barry Campbell, Lead Pastor PARA LA COMUNIDAD LATINA Domingos: Servicio de Adoración y Escuela Dominical - 12:30 pm Miércoles: Estudios biblicos por edades - 6:30 pm

Bible Church BEREAN BIBLE CHURCH In Partnership with American Missionary Fellowship Near Highland and 23rd Ave. 2378 SW Glacier Pl. Redmond, OR 97756 We preach the good news of Jesus Christ, sing great hymns of faith, and search the Scriptures together. Sunday Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. Bible Study - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. Pastor Ed Nelson 541-777-0784 www.berean-bible-church.org COMMUNITY BIBLE CHURCH AND CHRISTIAN PRESCHOOL 541-593-8341 Beaver at Theater Drive, PO Box 4278, Sunriver, OR 97707 “Transforming Lives Through the Truth of the Word” All are Welcome! SUNDAY WORSHIP AND THE WORD - 9:30 AM. Coffee Fellowship - 10:45 am Bible Education Hour - 11:15 am Nursery Care available • Women’s Bible Study - Tuesdays, 10 am • Awana Kids Club (4 yrs - 6th gr.) Sept. - May • Youth Ministry (gr. 7-12) Wednesdays 6:15 pm • Men’s Bible Study - Thursdays 9 am • Home Bible Studies are also available Preschool for 3 & 4 year olds Call for information Senior Pastor: Glen Schaumloeffel Associate Pastor: Jake Schwarze visit our Web site www.cbchurchsr.org Listen to KNLR 97.5 FM at 9:00 am. each Sunday to hear “Transforming Truth” with Pastor Glen.

Sunday mornings at 9:30. Acts Series: Christ on the Crossroads. 1st Sunday of each month is HomeFront Sunday; we focus on scriptural truths in our roles and relationships in life. Extended fellowship time follows. www.crossroadschurchbend.com 63945 Old Bend-Redmond Hwy (On the corner of Old Bend-Redmond Hwy and Highway 20 on the NW side of Bend)

Calvary Chapel CALVARY CHAPEL BEND 20225 Cooley Rd. Bend Phone: (541) 383-5097 Web site: ccbend.org Sundays: 8:30 & 10:30 am Wednesday Night Study: 7 pm Youth Group: Wednesday 7 pm Child Care provided Women’s Ministry, Youth Ministry are available, call for days and times. “Teaching the Word of God, Book by Book”

Catholic HOLY REDEEMER CATHOLIC PARISH Fr. Jose Thomas Mudakodiyil, Pastor www.holyredeemerparish.net Parish Office: 541-536-3571 HOLY REDEEMER, LA PINE 16137 Burgess Rd Tuesday, Wednesday & Friday Mass 9:00 AM Sunday Mass — 10:00 AM Confessions: Saturdays — 3:00–4:00 PM HOLY TRINITY, SUNRIVER 18143 Cottonwood Rd. Thurs. Mass 9:30 AM; Sat. Vigil Mass 5:30 PM Sunday mass 8:00 AM Confessions: Thurs. 9:00 - 9:15 AM OUR LADY OF THE SNOWS, Gilchrist 120 Mississippi Dr Sunday Mass — 12:30 PM Confessions: Sundays 12:00 –12:15 PM HOLY FAMILY, near Christmas Valley 57255 Fort Rock Rd Sunday Mass — 3:30 PM Confessions: Sundays 3:00–3:15 PM ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI CATHOLIC CHURCH 541-382-3631 Pastor Fr. Francis X. Ekwugha Associate Pastor Fr. Joseph Levine Masses NEW CHURCH – CATHOLIC CENTER 2450 NE 27th Street Saturday - Vigil 5:00 PM Sunday - 7:30, 10:00 AM 12:30 PM Spanish & 5:00 PM Mon., Wed., Fri. - 7:00 AM & 12:15 PM St. Clare Chapel - Spanish Mass 1st, 3rd, 5th Thursdays 8:00 PM HISTORIC DOWNTOWN CHURCH Corner of NW Franklin & Lava Tues. & Thurs. 7:00 AM & 12:15 PM Sat., 8:00 AM Exposition & Benediction Tuesday 3:00 - 6:00 PM Liturgy of the Hours will be recited at 6:40 AM, before Mass each weekday, except Saturday: 7:40 AM Reconciliation Schedule* New Church at Catholic Center Wed: 7:30 - 8:00 AM & 6:00 - 7:00 PM Saturday 3:00 - 5:00 PM Historic Downtown Church Tues: 7:30 - 8:00 AM & 5:00 - 5:45 PM Saturday 9:00 - 10:00 AM *No confessions will be heard during Mass. ST. THOMAS CATHOLIC CHURCH 1720 NW 19th Street Redmond, Oregon 97756 541-923-3390 Father Todd Unger, Pastor Mass Schedule: Weekdays 8:00 a.m. (except Wednesday) Wednesday 6:00 p.m. Saturday Vigil 5:30 p.m. First Saturday 8:00 a.m. (English) Sunday 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. (English) 12:00 noon (Spanish) Confessions on Wednesdays from 5:00 to 5:45 p.m. and on Saturdays from 4:30 to 5:15 p.m.

Christian CHRISTIAN CHURCH OF REDMOND 536 SW 10th Redmond, OR 97756 541-548-2974 Fax: 541-548-5818 2 Worship Services 9:00 A.M. and 10:30 A.M. Sunday School-all ages Junior Church Kidmo Friday Night Service at 6:30 P.M. Pastors Myron Wells Greg Strubhar Darin Hollingsworth Sunday, January 30 Sermon Title: “ANGER: Just One Letter Short of Danger” from Proverbs 14:29 Speaker: Cash Lowe

Christian

Foursquare

\Lutheran

Presbyterian

POWELL BUTTE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Cowboy Fellowship Saturdays Potluck 6 pm Music and the Word 7 pm Sunday Worship Services 8:30 am - 10 am - 11 am Nursery & Children’s Church Pastors: Chris Blair, Glenn Bartnik & Ozzy Osbourne 13720 SW Hwy 126, Powell Butte 541-548-3066 www.powellbuttechurch.com

CITY CENTER A Foursquare Fellowship Senior Pastors Steve & Ginny McPherson 549 SW 8th St., P.O. Box 475, Redmond, OR 97756 • 541-548-7128

GRACE FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH 2265 NW Shevlin Park Road, Bend 541-382-6862

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 230 NE Ninth, Bend (Across Ninth St. from Bend High) All Are Welcome, Always!

REAL LIFE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Like Hymns? We've Got 'em! at the RLCC Church, 2880 NE 27th Sunday Services 8 am Traditional Service (No child care for 8 am service) 9:30 am Contemporary Service with full child care 11 am Service (Full child care) For information, please call ... Minister - Mike Yunker - 541-312-8844 Richard Belding, Associate Pastor “Loving people one at a time.” www.real-lifecc.org

Christian Schools CENTRAL CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Pre K - 12th Grade Christ Centered Academic Excellence Fully Accredited with ACSI & NAAS Comprehensive High School Educating Since 1992 15 minutes north of Target 2234 SE 6th St. Redmond, 541-548-7803 www.centralchristianschools.com EASTMONT COMMUNITY SCHOOL “Educating and Developing the Whole Child for the Glory of God” Pre K - 5th Grade 62425 Eagle Road, Bend • 541-382-2049 Principal Peggy Miller www.eastmontcommunityschool.com MORNING STAR CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Pre K - 12th Grade Serving Christian Families and local churches to develop Godly leaders by providing quality Christ centered education. Fully Accredited NAAS. Member A.C .S.I. Small Classes Emphasizing: Christian Values A-Beka Curriculum, High Academics. An interdenominational ministry located on our new 18 acre campus at 19741 Baker Rd. and S. Hwy 97 (2 miles south of Wal-Mart). Phone 541-382-5091 Bus Service: from Bend, La Pine & Sunriver. www.morningstarchristianschool.org SAINT FRANCIS OF ASSISI SCHOOL Preschool through Grade 8 “Experience academic excellence and Christian values every day.” Limited openings in all grades. 2450 NE 27th St. Bend •541-382-4701 www.saintfrancisschool.net

Christian Science FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 1551 NW First St. • 541-382-6100 (South of Portland Ave.) Church Service & Sunday School: 10 am Wed. Testimony Meeting: 7:30 pm Reading Room: 115 NW Minnesota Ave. Mon. through Fri.: 11 am - 4 pm Sat. 12 noon - 2 pm

Eckankar ECKANKAR Religion of the Light and Sound of God FREE discussion for people of all faiths: “Have you had a spiritual Experience”? Do you have a sense that you’ve lived before? Had an out-of-body, or a neardeath experience? Dreams of a departed one? An inner light, or inner sound? Discover what your experiences really mean. Connect with other like-minded people. Learn new and advanced ways for exploring your inner worlds. Saturday, February 19, 2:00 to 3:30PM. Held at the Redmond Public Library. 827 SW Deschutes Ave., Redmond. For more info: 541-728-6476 (message) www.eckankar.org www.eckankar-oregon.org

Episcopal ST. ALBANS - REDMOND 3277 NW 10th • 541-548-4212 www.saintalbansepis.org Sunday Schedule 9:00 am Adult Education Presider for Sunday, 1/30/11, is The Rev. Deacon. Ruth Brown. Morning Prayer Tuesday - 3 pm Bible Study Wednesday - 12:00 noon Holy Eucharist The Rev. Paul Morton The Rev. Dcn. Ruth Brown TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH 469 NW Wall St. • 541-382-5542 www.trinitybend.org Sunday Schedule 8 am Holy Eucharist 9:30 am Christian Education for all ages 10:30 am Holy Eucharist (w/nursery care) 5 pm Holy Eucharist The Rev. Christy Close Erskine, Pastor

Evangelical THE SALVATION ARMY 755 NE 2nd Street, Bend 541-389-8888 SUNDAY MORNING WORSHIP Sunday School 9:45 am Children & Adult Classes Worship Service – 11:00 am Major’s Robert & Miriam Keene NEW HOPE EVANGELICAL 20080 Pinebrook Blvd.• 541-389-3436 Celebrate New Life at New Hope Church! Saturday 6:00 pm Sunday 9:00, 10:45 am, Pastor Randy Myers www.newhopebend.com

Sunday Worship Services: Daybreak Café Service 7:30 am Celebration Services 9:00 am and 10:45 am Wednesday Services High Definition (Adult) 7:00 pm UTurn - Middle School 7:00 pm Children’s Ministries 7:00 pm Thursdays High School (Connection) 6:30 pm Home Bible Studies throughout the week City Care Clinic also available. Kidz Center School, Preschool www.citycenterchurch.org “Livin’ the Incredible Mission” DAYSPRING CHRISTIAN CENTER Terrebonne Foursquare Church enjoys a wonderful location that overlooks the majestic Cascade Range and Smith Rock. Our gatherings are refreshing, our relationships are encouraging, and family and friend oriented. Come Sunday, encounter God with us, we look forward to meeting you! Adult Bible Study, Sunday 9:30 AM Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 AM DYG (High School) & Trek (Middle School) Monday 6:30 PM

Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m. (Child Care Available) Sunday School 10:50 a.m. Education Hour 11:15 a.m. Women’s Bible Study Tuesday 9:15 a.m. Men’s Bible Study Wednesday 7:15 a.m. High School Youth Group Wednesday 6:00 p.m. Pastor Joel LiaBraaten Evangelical Lutheran Church in America www.gflcbend.org NATIVITY LUTHERAN CHURCH 60850 Brosterhous Road at Knott, 541-388-0765 SERVICE TIMES 9:00 AM Informal Service Children will be dismissed from service at 9:15 AM for the Junior Church for kids preschool to 5th grade 11:00 AM Formal Service This Sunday, January 30, 2011Pastor David C . Nagler will be preaching. Both the 9:00 AM and 11:00 AM services to be posted with the Junior Church at 9:15 AM.

Rev. Dr. Steven H. Koski Senior Pastor “A New Year- Renewed Relationships: Forget the Golden Rule, Follow the Platnum Rule” 9:00 am Contemporary 10:45 am Traditional 5:01 pm Come as you are Child care at all services Through the Week Youth Groups (See Youth Blog: http://bendfpyouth.wordpress.com) Choirs, music groups, Bible study, fellowship and ministries every week Wednesdays 6:00 pm Contemplative Worship 230 NE Ninth, Bend www.bendfp.org 541 382 4401

Come and meet our pastors, Mike and Joyce Woodman.

Come worship with us.

7801 N. 7th St. Terrebonne West on “B” Avenue off of Hwy. 97; South on 7th St. at the end of the road 541-548-1232 dayspringchristiancenter.org

Unitarian Universalist

(Child care provided on Sundays.) www.nativityinbend.com Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALISTS OF CENTRAL OREGON “Diverse Beliefs, One Fellowship” We are a Welcoming Congregation January 30, 2011 11:00 AM Rev. Heather Starr: “Connected Beyond Walls” “The United States has the highest documented incarceration rate in the world—on June 30, 2009, there were 748 inmates per 100,000 U.S. residents, or 0.75%.” How can we stay connected with people on the other side of the jail cell wall? We will hear stories, poems, and excerpts from letters of prisoners today as we consider this troubled aspect of our interdependent web. The recipient of this month’s Greater Community Collection is the Native American Club of Deer Ridge Prison in Madras. Childcare and Religious Education is provided! Everyone is Welcome! See our website for more information Meeting place: OLD STONE CHURCH 157 NW FRANKLIN AVE., BEND Mail: PO Box 428, Bend OR 97709 www.uufco.org (541) 385-3908

WESTSIDE CHURCH Worship Corey Parnell WEST CAMPUS 2051 NW Shevlin Park Road, Bend 97701 Saturday at 6:30pm Sunday at 8:00, 9:00 and 10:45am Kurios - 1st Wednesday of each month at 6:30pm Infants thru 3rd grade Saturday 6:30pm Sunday at 9:00 and10:45am Kurios - 1st Wednesday of each month at 6:30pm 4th Grade: Sat. 6:30pm, Sun. 9:00 and 10:45am 5th Grade: Wed. 6:45pm, Sat. 6:30pm, Sun. 9:00 and 10:45am 6th thru 8th Grades: Wednesday at 6:45pm Sat. 6:30pm, Sun. 9:00am 9th thru 12th Grades: Tues. at 6:45pm and Sun. at 10:45am College/Young Adults: Sun. 6:30 pm Adults: Bible Studies, Classes, Life Groups & Activities. Visit our website for more information SOUTH CAMPUS Worship Corey Parnell Elk Meadow Elementary School 60880 Brookswood Blvd, Bend 97702 Sunday at 10:30am Children’s Ministries for Infants thru 5th grade Sunday at 10:30am www.westsidechurch.org 541-382-7504

Jewish Synagogues JEWISH COMMUNITY OF CENTRAL OREGON Serving Central Oregon for 20 Years. We Are a Non-Denominational Egalitarian Jewish Community All are Welcome! Our Synagogue is located at 21555 Modoc Lane, Bend, Oregon 541-385-6421 - www.jcco.bend.com Resident Rabbi Jay Shupack Rebbetzin Judy Shupack Shabbat and High Holiday Services Religious Education Program Bar/Bat Mitzvah Training Weekly Torah Study Adult Education Adult Ed: Torah Study every Saturday 10-12 AM Doing vs. Being Feb 17th with Kit Hall, Chaplin 6:30 pm at Shalom Bayit Intro to Judaism and Jewish Roots of Christianity led by Rabbi Jay Wednesday evenings 4/6- 5/25 All denominations are encouraged. Sunday School – Feb 6 & 27 at 10 AM Friday Night Shabbat Service – Feb 4 & 25 - 7 PM Purim FUNraiser – March 5 TEMPLE BETH TIKVAH Temple Beth Tikvah is a member of the Union for Reform Judaism. Our members represent a wide range of Jewish backgrounds. We welcome interfaith families and Jews by choice. Our monthly activities include social functions, services, religious education, Hebrew school, Torah study, and adult education Rabbi Glenn Ettman Friday, February 11 at 6:00 pm – Musical Shabbat Service – Tribute to Debbie Friedman Melissa Bagwell, vocalist; Jo Booser, violin & flute; Lauren Olander, flute; Julie Geveshausen, piano Friday, February 11 at 6:00 pm – Shabbat Yeladim Service for kids

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH ELCA Worship in the Heart of Redmond Sunday Worship Service 8:30 am Contemporary 11:00 am Traditional Sunday School for all ages at 10:00 am Children’s Room available during services Come Experience a warm, friendly family of worshipers. Everyone Welcome - Always. A vibrant, inclusive community. A rich and diverse music program for all ages Coffee, snacks and fellowship after each service M-W-F Women’s Exercise 9:30 am Wed. Bible Study at noon 3rd Th. Women’s Circle/Bible Study 2:00 pm 4th Tues. Men’s Club 6:00 pm, dinner Youth and Family Programs Active Social Outreach 1113 SW Black Butte Blvd. Redmond, OR 97756 ~ 541-923-7466 Pastor Eric Burtness www.zionrdm.com

Nazarene BEND CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 1270 NE 27 St. • 541-382-5496 Senior Pastor Virgil Askren SUNDAY 9:00 am Sunday School for all ages 10:15 am Worship Service 5 pm Hispanic Worship Service Nursery Care & Children’s Church ages 4 yrs–4th grade during all Worship Services “Courageous Living” on KNLR 97.5 FM 8:30 am Sunday WEDNESDAY 6:30 pm Ladies Bible Study THURSDAY 10:00 am 50+ Bible Study WEEKLY Life Groups Please visit our website for a complete listing of activities for all ages. www.bendnaz.org

Non-Denominational CASCADE PRAISE CHRISTIAN CENTER For People Like You! NE Corner of Hwy 20 W. and Cooley Service Times: Sunday, 10 am Wednesday, 7 pm Youth: Wednesday, 7 pm Nursery and children's ministries Home fellowship groups Spirit Filled Changing lives through the Word of God 541-389-4462 • www.cascadepraise.org SOVEREIGN GRACE CHURCH Meeting at the Golden Age Club 40 SE 5th St., Bend Just 2 blocks SW of Bend High School Sunday Worship 10:00 am Sovereign Grace Church is dedicated to worshipping God and teaching the Bible truths recovered through the Reformation. Call for information about other meetings 541-420-1667 http://www.sovereigngracebend.com/

Open Bible Standard CHRISTIAN LIFE CENTER 21720 E. Hwy. 20 • 541-389-8241

Saturday, February 12 at 9:00 am - Torah Study Saturday, February 12 at 10:30 am - Torah Service

Sunday morning worship 8:45 AM & 10:45 AM

Saturday, February 12 at 7:00 pm Havdallah for members & guests

Wednesday Mid-Week Service & Youth Programs 7:00 PM

Sunday, February 13 at 11:00 am – Adult Education (call for information)

Nursery Care provided for all services.

Friday, February 25 at 6:30 pm – Plunge into Shabbat at Riverbend Park, Bend Join us in supporting Special Olympics Oregon at the annual Polar Plunge

Pastor Daniel N. LeLaCheur www.clcbend.com

All services are held at the First United Methodist Church 680 NW Bond Street

Presbyterian

Sunday School, Hebrew School and Bar/Bat Mitzvah Classes For more information about our education programs, please call: David Uri at 541-306-6000 For more information and complete schedule of services go online to www.bethtikvahbend.org or call 541-388-8826 \Lutheran

COMMUNITY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 529 NW 19th Street (3/4 mile north of High School) Redmond, OR 97756 (541) 548-3367 Rev. Rob Anderson, Pastor Rev. Heidi Bolt, Associate Pastor

The Rev. Willis C . Jenson, Pastor. 8286 11th St (Grange Hall), Terrebonne, OR

8:30 am - Contemporary Music & Worship 8:30 am - Church School for Children 9:45 am - Adult Christian Education 11:00 am - Traditional Music & Worship 12:15 pm - Middle School Youth 2:00 pm - Senior High Youth Wednesday: 4:30 pm - Elementary School Program Small Groups Meet Regularly

www.lutheransonline.com/ condordialutheranmission Phone: 541-325-6773

(Handicapped Accessible) www.redmondchurch.org

CONCORDIA LUTHERAN MISSION (LCMS) The mission of the Church is to forgive sins through the Gospel and thereby grant eternal life. (St. John 20:22-23, Augsburg Confession XXVIII.8, 10) 10 am Sunday School 11 am Divine Service

Unity Community UNITY COMMUNITY OF CENTRAL OREGON Join the Unity Community Sunday 10:00 am with Rev. Teri Hawkins Youth Program Provided The Unity Community meets at 62855 Powell Butte Hwy (near Bend Airport) Learn more about the Unity Community of Central Oregon at www.unitycentraloregon.com or by calling 541-388-1569 United Church of God

United Methodist FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH (In the Heart of Down Town Bend) 680 NW Bond St. / 541-382-1672 Pastor Thom Larson Sermon: “Change the World” Sunday Scripture: Matthew 5:1-12 & Micah 6:1-8 10:00 am - One Service Only Childcare provided on Sunday No Sunday School this Sunday *During the Week: *Financial Peace University begins the week of Jan 23rd. Womens Groups, Mens Groups, Youth Groups, Quilting, Crafting, Music & Fellowship Open Hearts. Open Minds. Open Doors. Rev. Thom Larson firstchurch@bendumc.org

CHURCH & SYNAGOGUE DIRECTORY LISTING 4 Saturdays and TMC:

$105 5 Saturdays and TMC:

$126 The Bulletin: Every Saturday on the church page. $21 Copy Changes: by 5 PM Tuesday CO Marketplace: The First Tuesday of each month. $21 Copy Changes: by Monday 1 week prior to publication

Call Pat Lynch 541-383-0396 plynch@bendbulletin.com

Directory of Central Oregon Churches and Synagogues


A6 Saturday, January 29, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Fatality Continued from A1 “There is still some more investigation being done,” Leriche said. “It’s safe to say that everything at this point is being looked at and then relooked at. Anytime a person dies, it is a serious situation, and we treat it that way.” According to Oregon State Police, Orozco was driving a Ford Expedition with eight passengers, six of whom were children ranging in age from 2 to 14, when she ran a stop sign and collided with a Toyota four-door near Culver. The Toyota was driven by Linda Ross, 61, of Metolius, with Leonard Franklin Ross, 71, in the passenger seat. Leonard Ross died of his injuries at St. Charles Redmond later that night. Police said three of the passengers were thrown from the Ford

in the collision. Everyone in the crash was hospitalized. Leonard Ross was the only one to die of his injuries. Police said they do not believe Orozco was intoxicated at the time of the crash. According to the Oregon Judicial Information Network, Orozco has been cited by police on eight occasions over the course of four years in Jefferson, Crook and Clackamas counties for offenses including speeding, failing to drive within her lane and failure to use a seat belt. She has been cited for driving with a suspended license four times. Her most recent conviction comes from driving with a suspended license and failing to carry proof of insurance on Oct. 2, 2010, just under two months before she allegedly caused the fatal crash. Oregon State Police Sgt. Paul

Collins said his office has completed a report and has delivered it to the district attorney but is continuing to investigate “minor details” of the case. Collins declined to comment further until the investigation becomes public record. Leriche also confirmed that his wife and Orozco both worked for the state at the Department of Human Services but in separate departments. “My wife works in child protection and (Andrea Orozco) works in another department completely,” he said. “My wife is uncertain if she even knows who (Orozco) is.” “I can say quite strongly there is no conflict of interest here in me prosecuting a case against her.” Erik Hidle can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at ehidle@bendbulletin.com.

Nice Weather?

Protests Continued from A1 On Friday, the administration denounced Egypt’s action — first by using Twitter. “Govt must respect the rights of Egyptian people & turn on social networking and internet,” White House spokesman Robert Gibbs warned in a tweet. U.S. officials concede that Twitter does not a revolution make. But they believe that such platforms have accelerated the pace of protest movements, citing the rapid coalescence of the Tunisian demonstrations that toppled that country’s longtime leader, Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali, and the Egyptian demonstrations that erupted this week. “From now on, any and all dissent movements will have technology as a core component,” said Alec Ross, Clinton’s senior adviser for innovation. The Obama administration has elevated Internet freedom in U.S. diplomacy, and Clinton gave a major speech on the issue last year. The State Department is currently working on plans to spend $30 million on Internet freedom projects, including software that enables activists to break through firewalls imposed by oppressive governments. The increased U.S. focus on Internet freedom, however, has gotten mixed reviews from bloggers and analysts.

Repercussions? Some warn that repressive governments will respond to the U.S. actions by intensifying their own technological assaults on bloggers and dissidents. Activists also worry that those receiving U.S. assistance could be tagged as Western puppets by oppressive governments. “Having the U.S. and other Western governments as major actors in the Internet freedom field could present a real threat to activists who accept their support and funding,” Sami Ben Gharbia, a prominent Tunisian Internet activist, wrote in an essay last fall. Social media and hand-held communication devices are growing so quickly that U.S. officials are struggling to keep up with their political repercussions. In the past two years, the number of cell phones worldwide grew from about 4.1 billion to over 5 billion. In Egypt this week, one self-described protest organizer in Cairo, 20-year-old university student Mohammed Hassan, described how he and like-minded friends broke up into cells of four or five that moved to different parts of the capital, and then used their mobile phones to communicate about the presence or lack of police. “The sites for the demonstration weren’t actually the ones announced on television,” he said. “We wanted to make sure they didn’t stop our protest before it even started.” Internet use in Egypt went from less than 1 percent to 21 percent

BOTC Continued from A1 Cascade Bancorp, which has been operating under federal and state orders to raise capital since August 2009, announced the agreement Nov. 16 with four lead investors to raise $177 million through a sale of common stock. The sale was completed Friday, bringing $166 million in new capital, after costs, according to the news release. Along with the contribution to the bank, about $15 million has been used to pay off debt and interest. With the new capital and debt reduction, Bank of the Cascades’ Tier 1 leverage ratio increased to 11.9 percent, above federal bank-

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, January 29, 2011 A7

Scott Nelson / New York Times News Service

Play Nicklaus at Pronghorn...

An Egyptian man shoots video with his phone Friday during demonstrations in Cairo. Technology has been a core component of the protests in Egypt and Tunisia. of the population in the past decade, according to U.N. statistics. Usage is particularly high among the young, educated and urban residents who have formed the core of this week’s anti-government protests. There are roughly 160,000 bloggers, who have been influential in raising once-taboo subjects like the military, according to a State Department cable published by WikiLeaks. But, if activists are recognizing the power of the new technology to help them challenge the status quo, so are governments. Cowie, the chief technology officer at Renesys, said the Egyptian shutdown was far more dramatic than the Tunisian government’s recent attacks on Internet sites used to coordinate demonstrations, or the Iranian government’s moves in 2009 to slow down Internet connectivity during protests. The Tunisian government’s actions, however, were also aggressive. According to the Atlantic magazine, Tunisian officials attempted to hack into Facebook and steal the passwords of every user in the country during the demonstrations. (About 19 percent of Tunisians use the website). Facebook made technical changes to frustrate the government’s efforts. As Ben Ali struggled to remain in power, Obama administration officials in Washington and the U.S. ambassador in Tunis met with Tunisian officials to complain about the attempts to prevent access to the websites with information about protests.

Taking on censors The State Department releases few details of its Internet freedom programs worldwide, saying it wants to protect those who use them. Clinton said last year that the United States was working in 40 countries to help Internet users censored by oppressive governments. This month, the State Department laid out plans to spend $30 million on such programs as training activists on how to avoid being censored or hacked, and providing Web-based technology to help people break through government firewalls. The money, appropriated by Congress in 2010,

ing regulators normal level of 5 percent and above the 10 percent level imposed on Bank of the Cascades in the regulatory order. As part of the deal, representatives of three of the four lead investors have been appointed to the board of directors. They are: Chris Casciato, representing the affiliate of Lightyear Fund II L.P; Michael Connolly, representing the affiliate of Leonard Green & Partners L.P.; and James Lockhart III, representing an affiliate of WL Ross & Co. LLC. The fourth lead investor, David Bolger, who merged his Farmers & Merchants State Bank in Boise, Idaho, into Cascade Bancorp in 2006, already had a board representative, Thomas Wells.

is a 600 percent increase from the previous year. The administration has also lifted restrictions on U.S. companies exporting instantmessaging and antifiltering software to countries such as Iran, Cuba and Sudan. Rebecca MacKinnon, an Internet policy specialist at the New America Foundation, said many activists in places like the Middle East used anti-censorship programs provided by the U.S. government or U.S.-funded groups. But at the same time, many bloggers worried that their governments could accuse them of being U.S. lackeys if they accept assistance, she said. Further complicating the situation: The American government has been especially eager to promote Internet freedom in countries with which it has tense relationships, notably Iran, MacKinnon said. “Despite the fact Tunisia had one of the most sophisticated censorship and surveillance systems in the world, Tunisia was not appearing on the Internet freedom agenda. Why? Because Ben Ali has basically received U.S. tacit support,” she said. U.S. officials say they’re not using the Internet freedom agenda to prompt regime change or focus on its enemies. Clinton criticized Tunisia and Egypt in her Internet speech last year, they note, and the U.S. government has run Internet freedom projects in both countries. Still, U.S. lawmakers have made it clear that the Islamic Republic and China are priorities for the Internet freedom projects. Ross acknowledged that U.S. officials had to be cautious that their aid didn’t endanger bloggers and Internet activists in closed societies. And, he said, “human rights organizations, activist organizations, have to make choices about what is in their best interests.” Of course, anti-filter technology is of no use if the government has blocked the entire Internet, as Egypt has attempted to do. But it is not clear such a shutdown can last long. “What happens when you disconnect a modern economy and 80,000,000 people from the Internet?” Cowie wrote. “This has never happened before, and the unknowns are piling up.”

As a result of the sale, Lightyear, Leonard Green and WL Ross will each own 24.4 percent of the company’s stock, and Bolger owns 14 percent. The company’s fourth-quarter profit was its first since the third quarter of 2008, according to company filings. Cascade Bancorp will include more detail on last year’s financial results in its 2010 annual report, which it expects to file by March 31. Cascade Bancorp shares closed Friday at $9.61, up 4 cents, or 0.42 percent, in Nasdaq trading. Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@bendbulletin.com.

Bring A Foursome & Pay Just...

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As carpooling has continued to decline, mass transit use has increased in the past decade. In the Washington, area, it represents about 14 percent of commuters, compared with 11 percent in 2000, according to the data. Another big change has been the number of people working from home at least one day a week, which has tripled since 1998, to about 600,000, according to Nicholas Ramfos, director of Commuter Connections, a network of agencies and local governments that coordinates ridesharing programs. Some car pool enthusiasts remain hopeful that the shared rides will grow more popular. For example, at the annual meeting of the National Transportation Research Board this week in Washington, the schedule of panels included “How We Double Ride-Sharing in 10 Years.” But Teal, who attended the meeting, said he has heard such bold claims before, but does not believe them. “The belief was that if you created the right incentives, it was something just waiting to happen,” he said. “Well, it didn’t.”

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“Painful,” said a 55-year-old accounting firm employee who tries to pick up other riders at designated places in Woodbridge so she can use the restricted, faster lanes. “Books on tape, music, it doesn’t help,” she said about the daily trip (most of the commuters interviewed here asked that their names not be used). “All I’m thinking is, ‘Oh, God, this is going to hurt.’” The grind of the drive provokes such frustration that commuters do odd things to stay calm. One commuter waiting for a ride at a meeting point here said that one driver had become infamous among the regulars — “the puppet guy,” who apparently used hand puppets to act out arguments to manage his anger over being stuck in traffic.

Carpooling first cropped up as a policy idea in the United States in the 1940s, when oil and rubber shortages limited the use of personal cars, according to Erik Ferguson, a professor of urban planning and the author of a 1997 article called, “The Rise and Fall of the American Carpool.” Carpooling was first seriously studied by academics and urban planners in the 1970s, the decade of the oil embargo, “a time of great hope for car pool enthusiasts,” Ferguson wrote. Lew Pratsch, who organized shared rides for federal workers while working for the Energy Department in the 1970s, remembers that decade as a golden era for carpooling, when big companies like Xerox and Chevron organized car pools for their employees. He picked up his future wife on their first date with a car pool van. But since then, profound demographic and economic shifts occurred. Companies spread out more, and the workday became less predictable. Women went to work in large numbers, raising the incomes of households as well as their ability to own a car. “It’s economic,” said Roger Teal, a former professor of civil engineering whose Illinois software company, DemandTrans Solutions, helps municipalities with transportation issues. “If people have a car available, they will use

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Daily grind

History of sharing

it.” With today’s high levels of car ownership, “the strongest motivation for people to car pool disappeared,” said Teal, who conducted one of the early comprehensive studies of carpooling. Car ownership has outstripped even population growth, as the number of cars parked in American driveways has risen by nearly 60 percent since 1980, while the number of Americans has grown by a third. What remains, of course, is traffic, and in places like Washington, where it adds hours to commutes, people carpool to take advantage of the fast-track carpooling lanes. People carpool here with strangers in a practice called “slugging” — the term comes from fake bus tokens, because bus drivers sometimes mistake car poolers, who often wait near bus stops, for bus riders. Each waiting spot has its own destination, like the Pentagon or L’Enfant Plaza, and drivers call them out as they drive up. The practice can bring surprises, some more welcome than others. One commuter said she picked up some great financial advice from her carmates. But another said she once had to defend a fellow passenger after the driver started lecturing her about Christianity. “It’s OK to spread the word of God, but technically he was holding her hostage,” she said.

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Continued from A1 They thought they were getting some help from amendments to the Clean Air Act in 1990 that would have required many companies to develop plans to increase carpooling and mass transit use. But Congress, after hearing from critics who said the proposal was unworkable, scrapped the idea in the mid-’90s. Today, advocates point to the increase in social networking tools that would make it easier to identify potential ride-sharing mates — yet the national carpooling rate continues to fall, and today it is below 12 percent of all drivers. The drop has occurred across the country. For example, the carpooling rate fell by more than half since 1980 in Rochester and its suburbs, as well as in Worcester County, Mass., and in the suburbs of Kansas City. Even in San Diego County, Calif., the state where modern carpooling began, the rate was down by more than a third. Here in the fast-growing suburbs of Washington, the number of people driving alone has more than doubled since 1980. That is a sharp contrast from a generation ago, when Washington had one of the highest carpooling rates in the nation, with one person carpooling for every two driving to work alone. Today, for every one car pooler, there are six solo drivers. This trend crawls to life every weekday morning before dawn, when a stretch of Interstate 95 turns into a glittering river of headlights moving so slowly that drivers need to leave up to two hours to cover a 30-mile trip.

The population of the Washington suburbs has exploded in recent years, up by more than 60 percent since 1980. Still, the congestion has not served as an impetus for car poolers, whose numbers, as a portion of all drivers, have fallen. In fast-growing Prince William County, where Woodbridge is located, the number of car poolers has actually grown, but not nearly as much as number of people driving alone, which has tripled since 1980. The census data also show that different races carpool at different rates. According to the census, black, Hispanic and Asian commuters carpool far more than white workers. In 2000, the carpool rate for Hispanic workers was 28 percent, double the rate for whites, partly because of new immigrants sharing rides to jobs at construction sites or factories. But even Hispanics are relying less on group rides: by 2009, the rate for Hispanics had fallen to 19 percent. “As cars became more affordable and life became easier, the big car pools broke up,” said Alan Pisarski, a consultant who studies transportation trends.

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Riders line up Friday to carpool to Washington, D.C., at the Potomac Mills Mall parking lot in Woodbridge, Va. According to the Census Bureau the percentage of workers who car-pool has dropped by almost half since 1980, and in the suburbs of Washington the number of people driving alone has more than doubled since 1980.

BUICK

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Nick Budnick can be reached at 503-566-2839 or at nbudnick@bendbulletin.com.

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current service levels — because that money is not available. Devlin said he expects major cuts in programs ranging from prisons to police. “I mean the reality of this is that it’s going to be a very difficult time,” he said. He noted that the $3.5 billion projected gap is different from the last budget in that federal funds that were available last session won’t be this time around. In 2009, when lawmakers closed a $4 billion budget gap, they were able to tap about $1 billion in reserves. This time, lawmakers have $110 million in reserves to work with, Devlin said. Not only that, but lawmakers in 2009 were able to use generalfund and lottery-backed bonds to issue more than $1 billion in debt spending, much of it to build roads under the Jobs and Transportation Act. This year, because the state’s long-term economic outlook is so bleak, “it is expected that very little, if any” debt will be issued by the 2011 Legislature, the LFO document said.

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Continued from A1 Overall, the state faces a $3.5 billion general-fund gap between projected costs and revenues in the next two-year budget. The LFO’s list of possible cuts mentioned in its introduction represent a fraction of that sum, but a significant one. The LFO report states that a 5 percent pay cut for all employees would save $120 million for the state. Eliminating scheduled merit increases would mean $53 million. The state also could reject recommendations to increase its contribution to the state retirement system, saving $127 million. The LFO’s possible cuts are not framed as recommendations. Rather, they are characterized as options that “may be considered” to close the state’s budget gap. However, the fact that major potential cuts to employee compensation figure so prominently in the LFO report — the list begins on the sixth page of a 271page document — is not necessarily a good sign for public employee unions hoping to protect their members’ interests. Heather Conroy, executive di-

rector of SEIU Local 503, which represents more than 50,000 public employees, downplayed the report, noting that the budget process won’t officially kick off until Kitzhaber’s proposed budget is released. She said the union will soon lay out some better alternatives for the Legislature to consider, as it recently sent surveys out to its members asking for input on how to fix the budget. The goal is “finding solutions that are less draconian than some of the ones we’re hearing about,” she said. “We’re really awaiting Governor Kitzhaber’s budget announcement this week, and we are looking forward to engaging our members.” Sen. Richard Devlin, D-Tualatin, said that any potential cuts mentioned in the LFO report should be taken seriously. Given the seriousness of the state’s budget situation, “I quite honestly expect that any (potential cut) you see in this report is possible,” he said. The report explains how budget analysts calculate the projected costs of programs for the coming budget cycle, a term known as “current service levels.” Echoing Republicans, Kitzhaber has said that his budget won’t be based on maintaining

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

A8 Saturday, January 29, 2011 • THE BULLETIN


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COMMUNITY LIFE

FACES AND PLACES OF THE HIGH DESERT Calling all ‘real’ people Looking to be the next Snooki? Then reality TV casting recruiters likely don’t want you, Page B3

SPOTLIGHT

JULIE JOHNSON

Radio tribute today for late PPP co-founder

Economics flawed for 8-year-old P

Julie Johnson can be reached at 541383-0308 or jjohnson@bendbulletin.com.

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THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, JANUARY 29, 2011

sst! Want some beef jerky? It’s really cheap. And by that I mean, possibly made of beef-flavored plastic. Just kidding. The beef jerky in question is not made of plastic (that I know of) and is not intended for resale. But apparently, it can be purchased in vast quantities by 8-year-old boys. Or, one 8-year-old boy, anyway. Here’s what happened: My son Harry’s elementary school planned a fundraiser wherein students were invited to buy beef jerky sticks for $1 each. I believe this was to help pay for an expensive but no doubt educational field trip. When news of the Great Beef Jerky Sale broke in my household, you’d think the next installment in the “Captain Underpants” series (an inexplicably popular, somewhat vulgar book series that’s a hit among boys who also enjoy fart jokes) had just been announced, or the president had just decreed that snow days now came with mandatory hot chocolate and hot air balloon rides. The reaction went something like this: Him: “BEEF JERKY?! I want to buy LOTS of beef jerky and have it EVERY DAY for lunch!” Me: “You can buy a piece or two of beef jerky.” Him: “I want to use ALL of my Christmas money to buy beef jerky! BEEF JERKY!” Me: “Well, you can’t do that, but you can buy a few pieces.” In the way of many parents, I soon lost track of when the actual beef jerky sale was taking place. This is understandable considering the number of school fundraisers, box top collections, food drives, coat drives, candy sales and whatnot that take place at your average public school in an average year. It feels like every other week, the school is sending home a flier about a fundraiser, or a catalog from which we can choose to buy products we don’t need, or a note in the weekly newsletter about ways to financially support the school when we grocery shop. Over the past several years, we’ve bought wrapping paper, cookie dough, greeting cards, chocolate bars and books in a confusing parade of sales and events meant to benefit the school. So, to be honest, amid all the other fundraising hoopla, the Great Beef Jerky Sale was not on my parental radar. But rest assured, Harry had not forgotten. I came home from work a few days after the discussion to discover a giant bundle of individually wrapped beef jerky strips sitting in the kitchen. Harry had bought $40 worth of beef jerky. $40. For beef jerky. The cheapskate in me was horrified. Unbeknownst to me or my husband, Harry raided his piggy bank before school that day. He abstracted his Christmas money, given to him by my grandmother, and his brother’s money, too (with said brother’s permission). He headed to school with no mention of the Great Beef Jerky Sale, but with every intention of squandering his hoarded cash (which I’m pretty sure Grandma intended to be spent on books) on as much beef jerky as he could buy. He had visions of some sort of beef jerky feast every day at lunch and snack time. Maybe he was going to be the beef jerky king at school, passing it out to favored friends. The whole incident proved to me that despite our best intentions, we have failed to teach our children about the value of a dollar — to whit, that a dollar is worth more than a piece of processed, extruded beef jerky product. As a result, further lessons were imposed. For example, since a meal out at Harry’s favorite restaurant costs $40, we canceled a planned sushi dinner. And the next week, while shopping at Costco, my husband spent 10 minutes lecturing Harry about why it’s much more cost-effective to buy the $11.99 bag of beef jerky than 40 individual pieces. While I don’t think he’s up to understanding economies of scale yet, he’s getting there. And in the meantime, if you need to buy some beef jerky …

Inside

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KPOV 106.7 FM will broadcast a special memorial tribute to Bend musician and community activist Dave Sheldon, who died in an accident in December, on The Psychedelic Protest today at noon. The twohour show, which will include tributes and conversations with friends of Shel- Dave Sheldon don as well as songs Sheldon recorded, will stream live at www.kpov.org and be rebroadcast at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 2. The show also will be available on www.kpov.org archives. Sheldon was the treasurer of the Central Oregon Environmental Center. He also founded Bend’s Pole Pedal Paddle race with his wife, Jenny, and was a band leader, musical arranger and performer.

What you write

Multicultural film fest is coming to COCC

Photo illustration / The Bulletin; photo from Thinkstock

Meet four prolific pontificators in The Bulletin

The ArchaeologyFest, an international film miniseries about human diversity, culture and environment, is showing in February at Central Oregon Community College, Room 0155, in the Boyle Education Center in Bend. The programs run from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Tickets cost $6 at the door; children 12 or younger get in free. • Friday, Feb. 4. “Chumpi’s Adventure” (Peru, 47 minutes) and “Lost Nation: The Ioway” (U.S., 57 minutes) • Saturday, Feb. 5. “Life in Limbo” (U.S., 40 minutes) and “Stone Age Artists: The Magdalenian Masters” (France, 52 minutes) • Friday Feb. 11. “Standing with Stones” (U.K., 135 minutes) • Saturday Feb. 12. “Herculaneum: Diaries of Darkness and Light” (Italy, 52 minutes) and “Paddle Ship ‘Patris’ Lost in 1868” (Greece, 63 minutes) To see descriptions and clips of the films, visit www.archaeology channel.org/content/BendSeries festival2010.shtml. Contact: Rick Pettigrew at 541-345-5538.

Listen up, trivia buffs: Fundraiser in February

By Heidi Hagemeier • The Bulletin

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hat’s on the minds of Central Oregonians? Plenty, if you consider The Bulletin’s letters to the editor and website comments. Within the last week alone, area residents have opined on the tragedy in Tucson, composting in the school cafeteria and FDA

approval of a new obesity-fighting drug. They have fretted about finance, from recreational fees to pay raises to the economy. Some may be newcomers to the print pulpit. Others submit letters as often as The

Bulletin’s once-every-30-day limit allows. Yet they are all involved in a time-honored tradition of speaking out on issues of the day to the community. The new foil to the world of public comment is the Web, which, unlike a conventional letter to the editor, offers rapid-fire response and relative anonymity. If letters to the editor are often reasoned and reflective, said University of Oregon School of Journalism senior instructor Mark Blaine, then Web feedback is live and organic. “Some stories become almost like a head to a long comment stream, with almost an organic narrative below it,” he said. “There would sort of be this back and forth with letters to the editor,” he continued, “but now it happens within a few hours.” But Blaine doesn’t foresee letters to the editor fading in favor of Web comments. “I’m speculating, but I think people believe there’s more weight to a letter to the editor,” he said. “They are

written to a limited space, and they take time. There’s an aspect of them that’s for the record.” And it’s this that some of The Bulletin’s most frequent letter writers seek to present — the well-constructed argument to possibly change the minds of others. Here we meet four of the most prolific contributors. All said they are concerned about the state of the world today. All said they believe there is the possibility they aren’t always right. And all said they write out of a sense of obligation to their society and their consciences. While there was nothing scientific about picking them, we did strive for balance across politics and geography. And if the pen truly is mightier than the sword, perhaps they qualify as warriors. See Letters / B6

The sixth annual Trivia Bee will be held Feb. 11 at 6 p.m. at the Tower Theatre. The event is an annual fundraiser for the Education Foundation for Bend-La Pine Schools. At the event, teams will compete to show off their trivia knowledge. Tickets to attend the event cost $20 and include appetizers from Zydeco. The event is also looking for teams to participate. Contact: 541-322-5493.

Greg Chaillé to retire from grant foundation Greg Chaillé, longtime president of The Oregon Community Foundation, will retire at the end of the year. For 23 years, Chaillé has served as leader of the foundation, which works to improve life in Oregon and unite its citizens through philanthropy. According to its website, www.oregoncf.org, the foundation awards more than $60 million annually in grants and scholarships. Willamette Industries founder William Swindells began the foundation in 1973 as an endowment for community improvement efforts around the state, according to the site. “I could not have had this tenure without help,” Chaillé wrote in a message sent to media and posted on the site. “We have been able to grow The Oregon Community Foundation into one of the top ten largest community foundations in the country, with more than $1 billion in assets. But most importantly, the generosity of our donors and the hard work of our grantees have truly made Oregon a better place.” — From staff reports


T EL EV ISION

B2 Saturday, January 29, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

A woman weary TV poised to celebrate black history of casual wear By Chuck Barney

legacy is in question because of accusations that Withers may have led a double life as a paid FBI “racial informant.” His children dispute the charges and are speaking out for the first time.

Contra Costa Times

Dear Abby: American society has become ultra-casual in dress and manners. When I look at old photographs, men and women used to dress better and seemed to take more pride in their appearance. Now they wear pajamas to shop, torn jeans to work and clothes that are too small for large bodies. I feel we are a nation of slobs. Are we doomed to be this way in the future? I work in an office of slobs, and everyone knows I dislike the “casual atmosphere,” so please don’t print my name. — Dressed for Success in Albuquerque Dear Dressed for Success: You are correct. People did dress differently in the 1950s, which took time, effort and money. Things started changing in the ’60s — when the next generation became the demographic that was being marketed to. After that, younger people began adopting the “grunge chic” they were seeing in music videos. Are we doomed to be this way forever? I think so, unless there’s a reactionary fashion revolution. Frankly, I don’t see it happening anytime soon. But before labeling your coworkers as slobs, please remember that they were hired looking the way they do, and if your employer didn’t approve of their appearance, there would be a dress code that is strictly enforced. Dear Abby: Tonight I came home to find three messages on my phone. One was from a doctor’s office; the other two were business calls. Each one asked me to call back. The callers spoke plainly — until they came to the phone number, which they rattled off so fast I had to replay the messages several times just to be able to write the numbers down. What’s the matter with people? This happens all the time at

DEAR ABBY work and at home. Callers, PLEASE slow down and speak clearly — as if you are picturing someone actually writing down your number. Abby, am I getting old, or what? — Say Wha ---? in Orange, Calif. Dear Say Wha ---?: What you’re experiencing usually happens when the caller is in a hurry or calling a list of people they’re trying to get through to. In a social context, it is inconsiderate. In a business context, it is unprofessional. People in the financial field are trained to repeat their phone numbers slowly, clearly and TWICE to prevent the problem you have described. And readers, if you are guilty of this, please slow down and take note. Dear Abby: I have four adult children. I was diagnosed with lung cancer three years ago, but it was detected early and my prognosis is excellent. They keep making comments about their “inheritance.” An example: “Take care of that painting — it’s my inheritance.” Dealing with the cancer is stressful, but their comments make me feel terrible. What can I say to shut them up? — Not Going Anywhere Yet Dear Not Going Anywhere Yet: Allow me to offer a few suggestions: 1. “Stop hanging crepe because I’m not dying”; 2. “Don’t count your chickens before they’re hatched”; and 3. “I will, because I’ve decided to donate it to a museum.”

Black History Month is right around the corner, and television, as usual, is planning to honor the occasion with programming that highlights the vast contributions made to society and culture by African-Americans. Here are some highlights: “Way Black When Primetime” 10 p.m. Monday, TV One An hourlong talk/variety program showcasing black pop culture icons from the 1970s through the ’90s. Hosted by Sinbad, Niecy Nash and Christopher “Kid” Reid. Premieres Monday and airs weeknights throughout February. “Independent Lens: When I Rise” 11 p.m. Feb 8, PBS A profile of Barbara Smith Conrad, a gifted music student who found herself at the epicenter of racial controversy but struggled against the odds to reach the heights of international opera. “Modern Black History Heroes” 6 p.m. Feb. 11, BET A series of “106 & Park” specials devoted to contemporary “unsung heroes.” Those profiled include Kevin Liles, an author, philanthropist and former president of Def Jam Music Group; Marvelyn Brown, an author and HIV/AIDS activist; Kenyon Farrow, a writer and community organizer; and Beverly Bond, founder of Black Girls Rock! Inc. Each Friday beginning Feb. 11 and airing through the month.

“Oprah Presents Master Class with Sidney Poitier” 9 p.m. Feb. 20, OWN The trailblazing actor, film director, author and diplomat is profiled in a special two-hour installment of the biography series.

The Associated Press ile photo

Oprah Winfrey’s new OWN network is at the forefront of commemorating Black History Month, with profiles on Condoleezza Rice and Sidney Poitier. Also coming soon to TV: specials on Martin Luther King’s lesser-known works and “The Cosby Show.” “Faubourg Treme: The Untold Story of Black New Orleans” 4 p.m. Feb. 12, PBS A tour of one of America’s oldest black neighborhoods and the birthplace of jazz. “Nick News with Linda Ellerbee: Beyond I Have a Dream” 9 p.m. Feb. 13, Nickelodeon Martin Luther King’s most famous speech focuses on his dream of racial equality. But King had other dreams as well. This special examines how some of his other words are still affecting kids today. “Oprah Presents Master Class with Condoleezza Rice” 10 p.m. Feb. 13, OWN The intimate biography series focuses on the life lessons of the Stanford professor and former secretary of state.

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.Dear Abby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

“Independent Lens: Adjust Your Color: The Truth of Petey Greene” 11 p.m. Feb. 15, PBS The story of America’s first shock-jock, a black man in a white man’s profession who became a leading activist on his uncensored radio and TV shows during the 1960s and ’70s. “Pictures Don’t Lie: A Black in America Special” 8 p.m. Feb. 20, CNN A look at photographer Ernest Withers, a man remembered as a hero who helped advance the civil rights movement with his stunningly intimate images. Now, his

“BET Honors 2011” 9 p.m. Feb. 21, BET Gabrielle Union hosts the fourth annual celebration of black achievement. Those being honored include entertainers Cicely Tyson, Jamie Foxx and Herbie Hancock, as well as supermodel-entrepreneur Iman, publishing mogul Linda Johnson Rice and historian-educator Lonnie Bunch. Also scheduled to appear are, among others, Ne-Yo, Keyshia Cole, Tyler Perry, Cedric the Entertainer and Anika Noni Rose. “The Cosby Show: A Look-Back Special” 8 p.m. Feb. 26, BET One of television’s most popular sitcoms is honored in this 2002 retrospective, which underscores the significance of the series to blacks and America at large. Featured: Memorable clips, bloopers and comments from series producers and stars, including Cosby.

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The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 Bad Call; Ricochet ‘14’ The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 One Heart ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å 130 28 18 32 The First 48 ‘14’ Å ››› “True Grit” (1969, Western) John Wayne, Glen Campbell, Kim Darby. A one-eyed marshal and a Texas Ranger aid a venge- ››› “Jeremiah Johnson” (1972, Adventure) Robert Redford, Will Geer, Stefan Gierasch. A 19th-century ››› “Jeremiah Johnson” (1972) Robert Redford. A 19th-century 102 40 39 ful teen. Å adventurer moves to the Rocky Mountains. Å adventurer moves to the Rocky Mountains. Pit Boss Great Balls of Fire ’ ‘14’ Pit Boss The Great Escape ’ ‘14’ It’s Me or the Dog (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Pit Boss So Long, Shorty ‘14’ Å Pit Boss Shorty Breaks In (N) ’ ‘14’ Pit Boss So Long, Shorty ‘14’ Å 68 50 26 38 Pit Boss Smackdown! ’ ‘14’ Å Real Housewives/Beverly House Broken House goes through detox. ’ ‘14’ Å House Epic Fail ’ ‘14’ Å House Instant Karma ’ ‘14’ Å House Brave Heart ’ ‘14’ Å House Broken ’ ‘14’ Å 137 44 Working Class Working Class ›› “Grumpy Old Men” (1993, Comedy) Jack Lemmon, Walter Matthau. ’ Å Working Class Working Class ›› “Ace Ventura: Pet Detective” (1994) Jim Carrey. 190 32 42 53 (3:00) Son-in-Law Red. Wedding The Suze Orman Show (N) Å Til Debt-Part Til Debt-Part American Greed Troy A. Titus The Suze Orman Show Å Til Debt-Part Til Debt-Part Get Hot! Profit-Town 51 36 40 52 American Greed Troy A. Titus Piers Morgan Tonight Newsroom Selling the Girl Next Door Piers Morgan Tonight Newsroom Selling the Girl Next Door 52 38 35 48 Selling the Girl Next Door Stand-Up Show Stand-Up Show Stand-Up Show Stand-Up Show Stand-Up Show Stand-Up Show Stand-Up Show Stand-Up Show Stand-Up Show Nick Kroll: Thank You Very Cool ‘14’ Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å 135 53 135 47 Stand-Up Show Redmond Starlight Parade Visions of NW Joy of Fishing Epic Conditions Outside Film Festival Outside Presents Paid Program Bend on the Run Ride Guide ‘14’ City Edition 11 American Perspectives C-SPAN Weekend 58 20 12 11 American Perspectives Wizards-Place Hannah Forever Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Phineas and Ferb Fish Hooks ‘G’ Hannah Montana Forever ‘G’ Å Hannah Forever Hannah Forever Suite/Deck Suite/Deck 87 43 14 39 Wizards-Place I (Almost) Got Away With It ’ ‘14’ I (Almost) Got Away With It ’ ‘14’ I (Almost) Got Away With It ’ ‘14’ I (Almost) Got Away With It ’ ‘14’ Kidnap & Rescue (N) ’ ‘14’ Å I (Almost) Got Away With It ’ ‘14’ 156 21 16 37 FBI’s 10 Most Wanted ‘PG’ Å Winter X Games From Aspen, Colo. (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å Basketball Final NBA Tonight SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 College Basketball Tennis Australian Open, Women’s Final Å X Center (Live) Winter X Games From Aspen, Colo. MMA Live (N) NBA Tonight (N) 22 24 21 24 College Basketball Pittsburgh at Rutgers (Live) Boxing: 1990 Baltazar vs. Camacho Boxing: 1988 Breland vs. Starling II 2005 U.S. Poker Championships 2005 U.S. Poker Championships 2005 U.S. Poker Championships 2005 U.S. Poker Championships 23 25 123 25 Boxing: 1991 Camacho vs. Haugen II ESPNEWS (Live) ESPNEWS (Live) ESPNEWS (Live) ESPNEWS (Live) ESPNEWS (Live) ESPNEWS (Live) Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 ›› “Snow Dogs” (2002, Comedy) Cuba Gooding Jr., James Coburn. ›› “The Game Plan” (2007, Comedy) Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, Madison Pettis. ››› “Remember the Titans” (2000), Will Patton 67 29 19 41 (3:30) ››› “Coming to America” Justice With Judge Jeanine (N) Geraldo at Large ’ ‘PG’ Å Jrnl Edit. Rpt Fox News Watch Justice With Judge Jeanine Geraldo at Large ’ ‘PG’ Å Red Eye 54 61 36 50 Huckabee Challenge Cakes that tell a joke. Tailgate Warriors With Guy Fieri ‘G’ Tailgate Warriors With Guy Fieri ‘G’ Tailgate Warriors With Guy Fieri ‘G’ Tailgate Warriors With Guy Fieri (N) Iron Chef America 177 62 98 44 Iron Chef America College Basketball Oregon State at Stanford (Live) College Basketball San Diego at Gonzaga College Basketball 20 45 28* 26 College Basketball San Diego at Gonzaga (Live) (3:30) ›› “Ghost Rider” (2007) ››› “Iron Man” (2008, Action) Robert Downey Jr. A billionaire dons an armored suit to fight criminals. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Archer ‘MA’ (11:31) Justified 131 Color Splash ‘G’ Designed to Sell Designed to Sell Hunters Int’l House Hunters Candice Tells All Color Splash ‘G’ Dear Genevieve Cash & Cari ‘G’ House Hunters House Hunters Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l 176 49 33 43 Dear Genevieve IRT Deadliest Roads ‘PG’ Å IRT Deadliest Roads ‘PG’ Å Prophets of Doom ‘PG’ Å Megaquake 10.0 ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 IRT Deadliest Roads ‘PG’ Å ››› “Friends With Money” (2006) Jennifer Aniston, Joan Cusack. Å › “Picture Perfect” (1997) Jennifer Aniston, Jay Mohr. Premiere. Å ›› “No Reservations” (2007) Å 138 39 20 31 ›› “She’s the One” (1996) Jennifer Aniston, Maxine Bahns. Å Lockup: Raw Never a Dull Moment Lockup: Raw Hardcore Lockup: Raw Dues and Don’ts Lockup Lockup Lockup 56 59 128 51 Lockup Tennessee Women’s Prison I Used to Be Fat Jordan ’ ‘PG’ Jersey Shore Drunk Punch Love ‘14’ Teen Mom 2 So Much to Lose ‘PG’ Teen Mom 2 Change of Heart ‘PG’ Jersey Shore Free Snooki ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore Drunk Punch Love ‘14’ 192 22 38 57 Made Football-obsessed father. ‘PG’ iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 iCarly iCook ‘G’ ›› “Rambo: First Blood Part II” (1985, Action) Sylvester Stallone. ’ ›› “Rambo” (2008, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Julie Benz. ’ ››› “First Blood” (1982) ’ 132 31 34 46 ››› “First Blood” (1982, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Richard Crenna. ’ “Mega Piranha” (2010, Science Fiction) Tiffany, Paul Logan. ‘14’ Å “Mega Python vs. Gatoroid” (2011) Debbie Gibson, Tiffany. Premiere. (11:04) “Lake Placid 2” (2007) ‘14’ 133 35 133 45 “Mega Shark vs. Giant Octopus” (2009) Deborah Gibson. Å In Touch With Dr. Charles Stanley Hour of Power ‘G’ Å Billy Graham Classic Crusades Thru History Travel the Road “Faith Like Potatoes” (2006, Drama) Frank Rautenbach, Jeanne Wilhelm. Virtual Memory Michael English 205 60 130 Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ ›› “Get Smart” (2008, Comedy) Steve Carell, Anne Hathaway. ›› “Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby” (2006) Will Ferrell. 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond ››› “Bad Day at Black Rock” (1955) Spencer Tracy. A town ››› “The Dirty Dozen” (1967, War) Lee Marvin, Ernest Borgnine, Charles Bronson. Major turns 12 GI felons (9:15) Private Screenings: Ernest (10:15) ›››› “Marty” (1955, Drama) Ernest Borgnine, Betsy Blair. A plain but friendly 101 44 101 29 with a dark secret receives a one-armed visitor. into commandos. Å (DVS) Bronx butcher finds his soul mate in a teacher. Å Borgnine Fabulous Cakes ’ ‘G’ Å Cake Boss: Next Great Baker ‘PG’ Cake Boss: Next Great Baker ‘PG’ Cake Boss: Next Great Baker The Big Finale! ’ ‘PG’ 19 Kids-Count Cake Boss: Next Great Baker ‘PG’ 178 34 32 34 Fabulous Cakes ’ ‘G’ Å ›› “Lethal Weapon 4” (1998, Action) Mel Gibson, Danny Glover, Joe Pesci. Å (DVS) ››› “Training Day” (2001) Denzel Washington. Premiere. Å (10:10) ››› “The Bourne Supremacy” (2004) Matt Damon. Å 17 26 15 27 Lethal Weapon 3 Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Adventure Time Total Drama Scooby-Doo ›› “Underdog” (2007, Adventure) Voices of Jason Lee, Jim Belushi. King of the Hill King of the Hill God, Devil-Bob Family Guy ‘14’ The Boondocks The Boondocks 84 Extreme Fast Food ‘PG’ Å Most Unique McDonald’s ‘G’ Å Ghost Adventures ‘14’ Å Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å When Vacations Attack ‘PG’ Å 179 51 45 42 Extreme Mega Factories ‘PG’ Å (5:45) Retired at 35 ‘PG’ Married... With Married... With Married... With Married... With Married... With Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond 65 47 29 35 Married... With (6:34) ›› “Crank” (2006, Action) Jason Statham, Amy Smart. Å ››› “The Bourne Ultimatum” (2007, Action) Matt Damon, Julia Stiles, Joan Allen. Å ›› “Crank” (2006) Jason Statham. 15 30 23 30 (4:32) ›› “War” (2007) Jet Li, Jason Statham. Å ››› “Ghostbusters” (1984, Comedy) Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, Harold Ramis. ’ ››› “Fight Club” (1999, Suspense) Brad Pitt. Men vent their rage by beating each other in a secret arena. ’ Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew ‘14’ 191 48 37 54 The X Life ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:35) ››› “Get Shorty” 1995 John Travolta. ‘R’ Å (6:20) ››› “Up” 2009 Voices of Ed Asner. ‘PG’ Å ››› “The Bourne Identity” 2002, Suspense Matt Damon. ’ ‘NR’ Å Spartacus: Gods of the Arena ‘MA’ ››› “The Bourne Identity” 2002 ›› “Bachelor Party” 1984, Comedy Tom Hanks, Tawny Kitaen. ‘R’ Å › “A Night in Heaven” 1983 Christopher Atkins. ‘R’ ›› “Bachelor Party” 1984, Comedy Tom Hanks, Tawny Kitaen. ‘R’ Å › “A Night in Heaven” 1983 Christopher Atkins. ‘R’ Insane Cinema -- Animal Chin Just Add Water (N) Bubba’s World Dirt Demons Insane Cinema -- Animal Chin Just Add Water College Exp. Cubed ‘14’ Amer. Misfits Amer. Misfits (4:00) Golf 2011 Champions Skins Game, Day 1 (Live) PGA Tour Golf Farmers Insurance Open, Third Round Golf Central Golf 2011 Champions Skins Game, Day 1 From Maui, Hawaii. Pipe Dream I Love Lucy ‘G’ I Love Lucy ‘G’ I Love Lucy ‘G’ I Love Lucy ‘G’ I Love Lucy ‘G’ I Love Lucy ‘G’ I Love Lucy ‘G’ I Love Lucy ‘G’ I Love Lucy ‘G’ I Love Lucy ‘G’ I Love Lucy ‘G’ I Love Lucy ‘G’ I Love Lucy ‘G’ I Love Lucy ‘G’ (4:45) ››› “Spider-Man 2” 2004, Action Tobey Maguire. Peter Parker fights a man Boxing Devon Alexander vs. Timothy Bradley, Junior Welter› “Repo Men” 2010, Science Fiction Jude Law, Forest Whitaker. Premiere. Agents ›› “Pride and Glory” 2008 Edward Norton. A detective probes a HBO 425 501 425 10 who has mechanical tentacles. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å weights ’ (Live) Å repossess transplanted organs for nonpayment. ’ ‘R’ Å fatal drug bust involving his brother. ‘R’ › “The Devil’s Rejects” 2005, Horror Sid Haig, Bill Moseley. ‘R’ (9:15) ›› “Hostel” 2006, Horror Jay Hernandez, Derek Richardson. ‘R’ (11:15) ›› “Hostel Part II” 2007 › “The Hills Have Eyes 2” 2007, Horror Michael McMillian. ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (4:45) ››› “Ocean’s Eleven” 2001 George Clooney. A suave (6:45) ›› “She’s Out of My League” 2010, Romance-Comedy Jay Baruchel, Alice ›› “The Lovely Bones” 2009, Drama Mark Wahlberg. Premiere. A young murder ›› “Malibu’s Most Wanted” 2003 Jamie Kennedy. A rapper MAX 400 508 7 ex-con assembles a team to rob a casino vault. Eve. An average Joe lands a gorgeous girlfriend. ’ ‘R’ Å jeopardizes his father’s bid to become governor. victim watches over her family from heaven. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Alaska Wing Men Deadly Skies ‘PG’ Alaska State Troopers Manhunt ‘14’ Alaska State Troopers ‘14’ Alaska Wing Men Deadly Skies ‘PG’ Alaska State Troopers Manhunt ‘14’ Alaska State Troopers ‘14’ Inside a Cult ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 T.U.F.F. Puppy T.U.F.F. Puppy Ren & Stimpy Ren & Stimpy ’ OddParents OddParents OddParents OddParents Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Glenn Martin Iron Man: Arm. Iron Man: Armor Iron Man: Armor NTOON 89 115 189 Trophy Hunt Best of West Outdoors Steve’s Outdoor Lethal Game Chasers Outdoors American Archer Ted Nugent Hunt Masters Fast and Furious Outdoor America Best of West Adv. Abroad OUTD 37 307 43 (4:50) ››› “The Hurt Locker” 2008, War Jeremy Renner. iTV. Members of an elite Inside the NFL (iTV) NFL news and high- Shameless Aunt Ginger Fiona turns her The Godfathers of Comedy (iTV) (N) Strikeforce: Diaz vs. Cyborg (iTV) Nick Diaz vs. Evangelista Santos; Robbie Lawler SHO 500 500 ’ ‘MA’ Å bomb squad pull hazardous duty in Iraq. ’ ‘R’ Å lights. ’ ‘PG’ Å attentions to a cop. ’ Å vs. Ronaldo Souza. From San Jose, Calif. Rolex Sports Car Series Racing 24 Hours at Daytona, Part 1 (Live) NASCAR Racing Toyota All-Star Showdown: Irwindale (Live) Race in 60 SPEED 35 303 125 (5:40) ›› “Blue Crush” 2002, Drama Kate Bosworth. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (7:25) › “When in Rome” 2010 Kristen Bell. ‘PG-13’ ›› “The Last Song” 2010, Drama Miley Cyrus. Premiere. ‘PG’ Å (10:50) ›› “The Proposal” 2009 ›› The Crazies STARZ 300 408 300 (4:30) ›› “Crush” 2009, Suspense Chris- (5:50) “Killshot” 2009, Drama Diane Lane. A couple flee a relent- ›› “Youth in Revolt” 2009 Michael Cera, Jean Smart. A teen › “Halloween II” 2009, Horror Malcolm McDowell, Tyler Mane. Unstoppable Michael “Naked Fear” 2007, Suspense Danielle De TMC 525 525 topher Egan. ’ ‘R’ Å less assassin and his young partner. ’ ‘R’ goes on a carnal quest to lose his virginity. ‘R’ Myers continues his murderous rampage. ’ ‘R’ Å Luca, Joe Montegna. ’ ‘R’ (4:00) NHL Hockey NHL All-Star SuperSkills (Live) Bull Riding Jack Daniel’s Invitational From Indianapolis. NBA D-League Basketball Boxing VS. 27 58 30 Joan & Melissa: Joan Knows Best? A Stand Up Mother ‘PG’ Å Joan & Melissa: Joan Knows Best? A Stand Up Mother ‘PG’ Å Joan & Melissa: Joan Knows Best? ›› “One Fine Day” 1996, Romance-Comedy Michelle Pfeiffer. ‘PG’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, January 29, 2011 B3

CALENDAR TODAY “YEAR OF THE RIVER” EXHIBIT OPENS: New exhibit features the geology and hydrology of the Deschutes River; exhibit runs through April 10; included in the price of admission; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. CASCADE HORIZON BAND: The senior band performs a concert featuring works by Aaron Copeland, marches, patriotic songs and more, under the direction of Sue Steiger; donations accepted; 2 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-389-5121, cascadehorizonband@ yahoo.com or http:// cascadehorizonband.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Lauren Kessler reads from her work “My Teenage Werewolf: A Mother, A Daughter, A Journey Through the Thicket of Adolescence”; free; 3 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. EVENING OF ART, WINE AND MUSIC: Featuring a silent art auction, raffle, crafts, wine, live music and more; proceeds benefit the Bpositiv Foundation for Children with Cancer; free; 5-11 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; www. bpositiv.org. SPAGHETTI FEED: With a silent auction and live entertainment; proceeds benefit Habitat for Humanity; $10, $6 children and seniors, $5 VFW members; 5-8 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-548-4108. DISCOMANIA: Featuring dinner, dancing and a silent auction; proceeds benefit the Crooked River Ranch-Terrebonne Chamber of Commerce; $25; 6 p.m.; Sandbagger Dinner House, 5165 Clubhouse Drive, Crooked River Ranch; 541-923-2679. FOUNDATION FUNDRAISER: Featuring live music, food and live and silent auctions; proceeds benefit the Bend Surgery Center Foundation; $40; 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. ROBERT BURNS EVENING AND DINNER: A tribute to the Scottish poet, with live music, dancing, poetry recitations and dinner; $45; 6:50 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-350-5652 or highdesertcelts@gmail.com. STUDENT-DIRECTED ONE-ACT PLAYS: The Crook County High School drama department presents three student-directed plays; $3; 7 p.m.; Crook County High School, Eugene Southwell Auditorium, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-4166900, ext. 3132 or anita.hoffman@ crookcounty.k12.or.us. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.beattickets.org. MOUNTAIN COUNTRY IDOL: Central Oregon musicians compete to see who is the best country artist; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital; $5; 8 p.m.; Coyote Ranch, 1368 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-548-7700 or www.mountain997.com. SATURDAY NIGHT JOKERS & JAMS: Local comics perform, with special musical guests; $10; 8 p.m., doors open 7:30 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-977-5677. BENEFIT CONCERT: Featuring a performance by Roses at Gunpoint;

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

proceeds benefit Tyler Eklund; $5 suggested donation; 8:30 p.m.; M & J Tavern, 102 N.W. Greenwood, Bend; 541-389-1410. BETH WOOD: The Eugene-based folk rocker performs, with Shireen Amini; ages 21 and older; $8 plus fees in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com. 80’S VIDEO DANCE ATTACK: The 80s dance act performs, with VJ Kittyrox; $5; 10 p.m., doors open 9 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www. randompresents.com.

SUNDAY CASCADE HORIZON BAND: The senior band performs a concert featuring works by Aaron Copeland, marches, patriotic songs and more, under the direction of Sue Steiger; proceeds benefit the Summit High School wind ensemble; donations accepted; 2 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-389-5121, cascadehorizonband@yahoo.com or http://cascadehorizonband.org.

TUESDAY AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Suzanne Schlosberg talks about her book “The Good Neighbor Cookbook”; 6:30 p.m.; Camalli Book Co., 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134. GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “GASLAND: Can You Light Your Water on Fire?” a documentary about naturalgas drilling technology; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504. PUB QUIZ: Answer trivia on topics from pop culture to politics; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit the Kurera Fund; $40 per team; 6:30-9:30 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-306-0864, vivien@kurerafund.org or www.kurerafund.org.

WEDNESDAY “IT’S IN THE BAG” LECTURE SERIES: Maureen Kelly presents the lecture “The Value of a Virtual Deschutes Basin,” which will explore a webbased natural resources library; free; noon-1 p.m.; OSU-Cascades Campus, Cascades Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-322-3100. DAY OF ZINN: Commemorate the life and works of Howard Zinn, with readings from his works, film clips, a dinner and more; registration required for dinner portion of event; free; noon, 6 p.m. dinner and film; OSU-Cascades Campus, Cascades Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-322-3140 or ndollar@osucascades.edu. FINDING FREMONT IN OREGON: Loren Irving talks about John Fremont and retracing the explorer’s two-year journey; free; 1:30 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; 541-617-4663. ANGELS ACROSS THE USA TOUR: Alan Pedersen performs, and speaks about grief and love; free; 7 p.m.; Partners in Care, 2075 N.E. Wyatt Court, Bend; 541-480-0667.

THURSDAY GRADUATION AUCTION: Silent auction to benefit Summit High School’s graduation party; free admission; 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; 541-610-9913 or

cindymckee@mac.com. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Oryx and Crake” by Margaret Atwood; bring a lunch; free; noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. BOOK DISCUSSION: Discuss “Go Tell It on the Mountain” by James Baldwin; free; 6:30 p.m.; Camalli Book Co., 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134. “TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD”: The Bend High School drama department presents a dramatization of Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning tale; $7, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-6290. EMMA HILL AND HER GENTLEMEN CALLERS: The Portland-based folk singer performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

FRIDAY FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend and the Old Mill District; free; 5-9 p.m.; throughout Bend. “TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD”: The Bend High School drama department presents a dramatization of Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning tale; $7, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-6290. SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL WINTER CONCERT SERIES: Featuring a performance by Tom Russell; $15, $10 students in advance, $20, $12 students at the door; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-4979 or www.sistersfolkfestival.org. “TETRO”: A screening of the 2009 R-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. BOB MARLEY CELEBRATION & TRIBUTE SHOW: Featuring performances of Marley songs by Sashamon, Chronicle, Alcyon Massive and Escort Service Band; ages 21 and older; $7 plus fees in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; The Annex, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www.actiondeniro productions.com. HILLSTOMP: Portland-based junkyard blues duo performs; ticket prices to be announced; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

and Cindy Holler; reservations requested; proceeds benefit college scholarships for Sisters High School graduates; $50; 6-10 p.m.; FivePine Lodge & Conference Center, 1021 Desperado Trail, Sisters; 503-5599788 or www.sistersgro.com. “TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD”: The Bend High School drama department presents a dramatization of Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning tale; $7, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-6290. MOUNTAIN COUNTRY IDOL: Central Oregon musicians compete to see who is the best country artist; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital; $5; 8 p.m.; Coyote Ranch, 1368 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-548-7700 or www.mountain997.com. SATURDAY NIGHT JOKERS & JAMS: Local comics perform, with special musical guests; $10; 8 p.m., doors open 7:30 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-977-5677. HILLSTOMP: Portland-based junkyard blues duo performs; ticket prices to be announced; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

SUNDAY Feb. 6 FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-3 p.m.; Pine Forest Grange, 63214 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-447-5451. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: James Foster talks about his book “Bong Hits 4 Jesus”; free; 2 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010. SUPER SUNDAY XLV: Watch the Superbowl, followed by an after party and music; proceeds benefit Icon City; donations accepted; 2:30-9 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.iconcity.us.

MONDAY Feb. 7 GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Into the Wild” by Jon Krakauer; free; noon; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7085 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. BUNCO PARTY: Featuring games, prizes and refreshments; proceeds benefit Prineville Habitat for Humanity; $5; 2 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, 235 N.E. Fourth St., Prineville; 541-447-7659.

WEDNESDAY Feb. 9

SATURDAY Feb. 5 CENTRAL OREGON SPELLING BEE: Students compete for a chance to participate in the Scripps National Spelling Bee; $5, free for students; 9 a.m.; Ponderosa Elementary School, 3790 N.E. Purcell Blvd., Bend; 541-323-6829. “TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD”: The Bend High School drama department presents a dramatization of Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning tale; $7, $5 students and seniors; 2 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-6290. CRAB FEED FUNDRAISER: Meal features crab, bread, an assortment of beverages and more; ages 21 and older only; proceeds benefit the student technology program at St. Thomas Academy of Redmond; $20; 4-8 p.m.; St. Thomas Parish Hall, 12th Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541-548-3785 or www.redmondacademy.com. RHINESTONE COWBOY AUCTION: With a dinner, live and silent auctions and live music by Reno

“9500 LIBERTY”: A screening of the documentary about an explosive immigration-policy battle in Virginia; free; 6:30 p.m.; Becky Johnson Center, 412 S.W. Eighth St., Redmond; 541-383-7412 or http://multicultural.cocc.edu/events. “TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD”: The Bend High School drama department presents a dramatization of Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning tale; $7, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-6290. SONNY HESS BAND: The rhythm and blues act performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

THURSDAY Feb. 10 GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Half Broke Horses” by Janette Walls; bring a lunch; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar.

M T For Saturday, Jan. 29

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

127 HOURS (R) Noon, 2:35, 4:45, 7:20, 10:05 BLACK SWAN (R) 11:50 a.m., 2:30, 5:05, 7:50, 10:20 BLUE VALENTINE (R) 11:40 a.m., 2:25, 5, 7:40, 10:15 THE FIGHTER (R) 7:25, 10 THE KING’S SPEECH (R) 11:35 a.m., 2:15, 4:55, 7:35, 10:10 MADE IN DAGENHAM (R) 11:45 a.m., 2:10, 4:40 THE WAY BACK (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 2:20, 5:10, 8

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) 12:20, 3:10, 6:25, 9:20 COUNTRY STRONG (PG-13) 1:10, 4:05, 7:40, 10:25 THE DILEMMA (PG-13) 12:55, 4:55, 7:50, 10:20 THE FIGHTER (R) 1:45, 5, 8, 10:35 THE GREEN HORNET (PG-13) 12:35, 3:45, 6:50, 9:35 THE GREEN HORNET 3-D (PG13) 1:25, 4:15, 7:20, 10:10

HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 12:05, 3:25, 6:55 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 12:45, 3:20, 6:20, 9:30 THE MECHANIC (DP — R) 1:40, 4:45, 7:35, 10:15 NO STRINGS ATTACHED (R) 1:30, 4:25, 7:10, 9:45 THE RITE (PG-13) 1:05, 3:55, 7:05, 9:50 TANGLED (PG) 1:15, 4, 6:40, 9:25 THE TOURIST (PG-13) 1:50 4:35, 8:05, 10:30 TRON: LEGACY 3-D (PG) Noon, 3:15, 6:15, 9:10 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 12:30, 3:30, 7:25, 10, 10:30 YOGI BEAR 3-D (PG) 12:15, 3:40, 6:35, 9:15 EDITOR’S NOTE: Digitally projected shows (marked as DP) use one of several different technologies to provide maximum fidelity. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies. EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) DUE DATE (R) 9

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? G o to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

GULLIVER’S TRAVELS (PG) Noon, 3 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG-13) 6

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

THE DILEMMA (PG-13) 10 a.m., 1:30, 4, 6:30, 9 THE MECHANIC (R) 10:30 a.m., 12:30, 2:30, 4:30, 6:30, 8:30 THE RITE (PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 10:45 a.m., 1:15, 3:45, 6:15, 9

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

BLACK SWAN (R) 2:45 COUNTRY STRONG (PG-13) 5:15, 7:45 THE FIGHTER (R) 5, 7:30 THE KING’S SPEECH (R) 2:30, 5, 7:30 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 2:45, 5:15, 7:45 YOGI BEAR (PG) 3

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

THE GREEN HORNET (PG-13) 1, 4, 7

Ca s t i n g a b o u t f o r r e a li t y T V h o p e f u l s By Harriet Ryan and Yvonne Villarreal Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Walking through the doors of a crowded San Francisco bar, Kristin Curtin was all business. Her eyes moved from face to face before coming to rest on a pretty young woman chatting up a male patron. “You could just tell the way she was interacting with him that he was mesmerized. There were hundreds of people in that pub, but she just captured my attention,” recalled Curtin, a freelance casting producer. She gave the woman her business card and a pitch about why she might want to try out for a new NBC reality show that combines love and adventure. The encounter, one of thousands Curtin and her colleagues initiated this winter in restaurants, nightclubs and shopping malls from Charleston, S.C., to Phoenix is the new order in the casting of reality television. Getting the right people for programs like “Survivor” and “America’s Next Top Model” used to be largely a matter of putting the word out and waiting for the audition tapes to roll in. But networks now increasingly rely on recruiters to find the love ’em and hate ’em personalities that captivate viewers. The trend reflects both the smashing popularity of reality TV and an industry consensus that, as casting director Robyn Kass put it, “Good TV is someone who doesn’t know that they are giving you good TV.”

Is there a camera watching? A decade into the genre’s dominance, the applicant pool is polluted with wannabe actors and fame seekers desperate to be the next Snooki or Kate Gosselin, and the personas they display in their video auditions are often transparent knockoffs of the archetypes viewers have come to know: America’s sweetheart, the hick, the witch, the dumb jock, the party girl. “Some girls will be blatant and say, ‘Well, I’m going to be this character for you,’ ” said Michelle Mock-Falcon, casting director for “America’s Next Top Model.” She said it’s not unusual for applicants to answer questions with a prepared monologue or claim to be just like Bristol Palin. “Everyone’s her friend. They played volleyball with her.” Recruiters spend most of their time ducking in and out of crowded places. For “Jersey Shore,” SallyAnn Salsano made a tour of the Garden State’s clubs. Dating show recruiters often prowl bars, but not exclusively. Curtin discovered Tessa Horst, who won “The Bachelor” in 2007, by waiting at the finish line of a marathon. For “Top Model,” recruiters favor amusement parks, gas stations and places where teens shop. “I always feel like Target is a gold mine,” Mock-Falcon said. Viewers love big personalities — the table flippers, hair-pullers, loudmouths and backstabbers — only if their outrageousness is honest. “I want people who are

Los Angeles Times

“Good TV is someone who doesn’t know that they are giving you good TV.” — Robyn Kass, Los Angeles casting director, Kassting Inc. going to … wear their heart on their sleeve and do something stupid and ridiculous and have real moments (rather than say) ‘I don’t care if I’m off first or second, I just want to say I was on the show and be a superstar,’ ” said Kass, who has cast “Big Brother” and “The Bachelor.” She estimated that half the contestants on those shows were recruited.

They’re all just models! Some hard-core followers of the shows — including many rejected applicants — have worried in online message forums that recruiting allows producers to fill casts with models rather than true fans. Steve Pickett, an Oklahoman who has tried out for “Survivor” 19 times, called the practice of recruiting “crazy.” “I’m sure they could find an antagonist in all those thousands of tapes they get,” said Pickett, 52. The video auditions he has shipped off to the show’s casting director, Lynne Spillman, of whom he speaks reverently, include footage of him eating raw fish, swimming, and wrestling with his dog. Two years ago, he flew to New York to take a class at an outfit called the New York Reality TV School. The 3-year-old school offers intensive one-day programs as well as private lessons, which run $85 for a 1½-hour session, founder Robert Galinsky said. About half his students are actors who see reality TV “as a viable way to build out their career,” he said. To find unique and genuine personalities, producers hire freelance casting directors or all-reality casting agencies like Kass’ firm. For the as-yet-unnamed NBC show — a “Bachelor” meets “Amazing Race” dating program — Kass’ company sent Curtin and other freelance recruiters to half a dozen cities this winter. Most often, finding a fresh face means leaving L.A., where, producers said, half the struggling actors are angling to get on a reality show and the other half are insulted by the idea. “If they are attractive in L.A., you’re not the first person who has approached them, and you won’t be the last,” casting producer Shannon McLaughlin said.


B4 Saturday, January 29, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, January 29, 2011 B5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Saturday, Jan. 29, 2011: This year, success comes to you, but often your normal approach will be thwarted. You could be delighted by the role friends and associates play in your life. They clearly want you to obtain a goal and support you in any way that feels appropriate. If you are single, a friendship could develop into more. The other possibility is that you could meet someone through a friend. If you are attached, think of your sweetie as a friend, too. That bonding will support you in difficult times. SAGITTARIUS adores spending time with you. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH An invitation is too appealing to say “no” to. Though a friend or roommate might want to be left out, go with your sense of adventure. You will particularly enjoy a new activity or place. Relax with the moment. Tonight: Be imaginative and original. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH Remain easygoing in the face of change and perhaps feeling a bit tired. You might not want to keep your plans, but do so for yourself. Someone close loves having you all to him- or herself. You might be happier with spontaneity. Tonight: Dinner for two. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Go along with plans. Enjoy being the passenger and not having to make every decision. The person in question is trying to speak through his or her actions. This

person’s caring is quite apparent. Meet new people; join friends. Tonight: Stay out of a competition. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Whether painting a room or reading a good book, you are comfortable following through on a task. Once it’s complete, you will feel great. Invite several friends over midafternoon. Your love of entertaining and people mix well. Tonight: Make it easy. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH You might not want to let your hair down, but you will. Others certainly support you in relaxing and having fun. No one is surprised to hear that you are tired. You have pushed and pushed. Give yourself permission to veg or do your thing. Tonight: A partner or friend is on the warpath. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Consider repainting or remodeling before you decide to move. You might want more space. Clearing out clutter could help. Others willingly pitch in, if that is OK with you. Note that not everything will be put away perfectly, but the feel will be great. Tonight: Order in, especially as you could have company and still have a mess. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Your ability to laugh and loosen up others falls flat. You might take others’ odd reactions personally, but actually their minds are on other matters. You have been a little serious of late. Find a friend, child or loved one who makes you smile. Tonight: You don’t have to go far. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Be aware of your tendency to go overboard and create a

lot of problems for yourself later. Still, you might be in the mood to overindulge. Whether spending, eating or imbibing, you simply perk up and have a good time. Tonight: Finally tell someone how you feel. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH A friend could be dragging his or her heels, creating a question in your mind. This person’s intentions will become clear without you having to ask any questions. An innate glow attracts many people. Don’t wonder why people are gravitating toward you. Tonight: Wish-upon-a-star time! CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH You might want some downtime. A parent, boss or another type of authority figure comes down very hard on you. Remember, you don’t always need to be available. Meet a special person in your life for the day. Go alone — you could meet someone intriguing. Tonight: Still not to be found. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH You could be a little taken aback by news and feel sad. Hook up with a friend who you always have a good time with. A new friend made today could change your life considerably. This relationship could develop into a long-term tie. Tonight: You are the party. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Stay sensitive to a somewhat depressed partner. You might wonder what is happening with an older friend or relative if you look at his or her demeanor. Learn more effective ways of expressing your anger. Tonight: Out and about. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


B6 Saturday, January 29, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Letters Continued from B1

Thiel Larson Thiel Larson writes letters to the editor to address what troubles her soul. She worries about how human beings treat each other. Why we spend so much money on war. And what sort of world we’re leaving our children. Speaking up, the devoted Christian says, is empowerment. “It’s an outcropping of my faith,” she said. The 67-year-old Bend resident has long felt it’s her responsibility to do something. She felt it first when attending college in the 1960s and being exposed to racial injustice. She married and moved to Bend 27 years ago, raising her three children here. Yet she felt she must help other children while working as an elementary school teacher who watched children from certain areas of the community struggle with poverty. “When you’re teaching, there’s only so much you can do,” she said. “So I’ve always been involved in outreach.” She helped start Friends of Jesus, a program in Bend to help mentor elementary-age children. She is now involved in another program in which high school girls mentor fourth- and fifthgrade girls. And she frequently writes let-

“We can’t write or speak from a holierthan-thou position. To write, you must really believe you might change something.” — Thiel Larson

At left, Thiel Larson helps Estrella Castaneda, 9, with her arithmetic during the After School Buddies program Wednesday at Grace Baptist Church in Bend. Larson volunteers for the program, in which high school-age girls help guide younger girls. She frequently writes letters to The Bulletin, hoping to create a dialogue with others. Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

ters, mainly about the environment, war and the financial investment in the military at the expense of other needs. “The federal budget is a statement of our nation’s moral character,” she wrote in 2008. “Nations, like people, spend money on the things they care

about. Since we all contribute to the federal budget, we should be concerned about how it is spent.” Larson said she is trying to make sure her letters strike the right tone. She wants a dialogue, not a fight. “We can’t write or speak from

a holier-than-thou position,” she said. “To write, you must really believe you might change something.” Not that she doesn’t speak plainly: Our nation needs to address its energy consumption and dramatically reduce its greenhouse gas emissions.

Randy J. Avery

Bill Bodden

PRINEVILLE — Randy J. Avery pens two or three drafts before he sends in a letter to the editor, and the finished product is always concise. His most recent letter, printed Jan. 13, contained about 50 words; The Bulletin’s limit is 250. “I believe in leaving off the window dressing,” he said. “Say what you mean and get out.” The longtime Crook County resident is a whole lot of no-nonsense. What’s his political philosophy? Conservative. What’s his main issue? Taxes. What did he think of the flap over a Nativity scene at Prineville City Hall? If you don’t like it, don’t look at it. Life hasn’t always been easy for Avery, 59. A lifelong bachelor, Avery lives with his Basset hound, Barney. He got laid off in October 2008 from a lumber mill and hasn’t landed a job since. His unemployment benefits have run out. So he buys the newspaper, watches TV, and once in a while gets stirred up about what he hears. And then it’s time to write a letter. He feels particularly irked about how the Willamette Valley dominates Oregon politics. While he knows it’s not practical to form a new state on the east side of the Cascades, he likes the idea. “That way, when they come over here to hunt, we can charge them for an out-of-state hunting license,” he said. “The state capital should not be Bend,” he continued. “It should be Canyon City or John Day, some-

REDMOND — As one of The Bulletin’s most frequent letter writers, Bill Bodden takes issue with actors across the political spectrum. Presidents Obama and Bush and Clinton. Israelis and Arabs. Tea party members. The U.S. Supreme Court. Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright is “contemptible,” and the American people, “like sheep, allow themselves to be led to the slaughter.” “Theoretically I’m a Democrat,” he said, “but they’re just as dishonest as the Republicans.” Yet for all that condemnation, Bodden, 78, is a mildmannered man. Sitting in his spacious, tidy Redmond home, Bodden described a career that took him around the world, exposing him to poverty and inequity. After high school, Bodden signed up with the Air Force. Three or four years after leaving the Air Force, he joined U.S. Merchant Marine, first serving in wartime supplying troops in Vietnam and afterward on missions of commerce. The poverty he saw in Vietnam unnerved him. He always kept the right denominations in his pocket to give money to the children selling magazines. He spent 30 years on the ocean as a Merchant Marine purser. He saw the Mediterranean and the South Pacific and the Far East. He married at 40, while still often out on the sea, and didn’t have children.

Randy J. Avery, 59, started writing letters years ago, but he has contributed more in the last two years since he was laid off from his job. The Prineville resident’s thoughts on letter writing? “I believe in leaving off the window dressing. Say what you mean and get out.”

where in the middle. I’m sure they have just as much access to the Internet there as in Bend.” Although he wouldn’t call himself a tea party member, he likes that it has “stirred things up a bit.” Yet Avery’s letters don’t always follow strict conservative lines. Avery thinks U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, a Democrat, has done a lot of good for the state but that he now feels entitled to the position, meaning it’s time to give someone else a chance. And Avery worries

about water resources drying up in the High Desert. He believes Oregon would benefit from legalizing marijuana, because it would be a profitable new crop. “The whole war on drugs has been a failure, so why not legalize them and reap the tax profits?” he wrote in 2009. The bottom line, Avery said, is he’s a man of the people, for the people. “And if you don’t like it,” he said of the U.S., “move to China.”

Bill Bodden relaxes in his Redmond home. Bodden has been consistently writing letters to the editor since he moved to Central Oregon about 15 years ago. “I try to be critical without being offensive because that’s counterproductive,” Bodden said. “Subtle is more effective than sledgehammer.” Then 15 years ago, he retired and moved to Central Oregon. “I’d seen enough of the sea,” he said, smiling about his now-landlocked life. All the travel, however, helped fuel an interest in history that continues to this day and influences his letters. His letters are sprinkled with references that may not register with some of the reading public, from the Third Reich to ancient Greece. “I think the ones that get me are the people who talk about history

and don’t know what they’re talking about,” he said. “Or ones that cause injustice to other people.” He hopes people come away from his letters with something to think about, more than something to fume about. And he hopes young people read the newspaper, including his letters. They are, after all, the future of our republic. “I try to be critical without being offensive because that’s counterproductive,” he said. “Subtle is more effective than sledgehammer.”

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Keith Sime Only recently did Sunriver resident Keith Sime begin writing letters to the editor. The retired Marine Corps colonel has a busy life: He runs marathons. He has a wife, five children and eight grandchildren. But soon after the 2008 election of a new president and a Democratic majority in Congress, Sime, 77, felt the duty to take up the pen. “We made a major turn when the current president was elected,” he said. “And this November there was a major change in the view of how this country is going.” As an aeronautics engineer, Sime said these letters are the first time he’s gone beyond science-oriented writing. He researches his subjects thoroughly, goes through several drafts and takes feedback from his wife before sending them in. Subjects on which he has opined within the past two years include the health care reform bills, U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden’s voting record and state tax hikes. Describing himself as a fiscal conservative with a restrictive view of interpreting the U.S. Constitution, Sime said he is particularly concerned about growth in government reach and government debt. Federal involvement in the auto industry, the banking industry and the college loan program is inappropriate intrusion into private enterprise. Government-mandated health insurance is constitutionally out of bounds, and anticipated spending connected with the

It needs to stop spending more than half the federal budget on the military. And people need to engage. Our time, she says, is a defining one for the nation’s future. “We’re at a critical point in our society and our world,” she said. “It’s time to be passionate.”

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Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend • www.highdesertbank.com EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

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Government action within the last two years spurred marathon runner Keith Sime, of Sunriver, pictured in 2009, to speak up in letters to the editor. “The next two years is going to show where our country is going to go,” he said. health care bills is out of control. “I just think we’re spending our grandkids into oblivion,” he said. Democrats of old, he said, didn’t spend so profusely. “John Kennedy would be rolling in his grave. The first thing he did when he got into office was cut taxes.” We stand poised at a critical moment, Sime said. And those who care about the country need to get involved in the public discussion. Newspaper editorial pages,

which Sime sees as the people’s page, are one way. But people also get involved in politics in other ways. “The next two years is going to show where our country is going to go,” he said. “Is it going to re-establish its eminence in the world? Or is it going to fade?” Heidi Hagemeier can be reached at 541-617-7828 or at hhagemeier@bendbulletin.com.

541-322-CARE


L

Inside

OREGON Prosecutors bar new evidence for Islamic charity case, see Page C2.

C

Police continue search for man who shot officer, see Page C8.

BUSINESS Redmond caterer sets up shop in Bend, see Page C3. www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, JANUARY 29, 2011

Police seeking witnesses Horse in 3rd Street hit-and-run owners

Veterans groups form honor guard for the fallen Officials looking for any information that will lead them to driver By Leon Pantenburg For The Bulletin

By Scott Hammers

LA PINE — Three volleys of rifle fire echo across the snowcovered cemetery in La Pine at the conclusion of a veteran’s funeral. Then, the honor guard from La Pine American Legion Post 45 “Present arms!” with their M-1 Garands as the bugle sounds “Taps.” At the conclusion of the ceremony, the men of the firing party, Honor average guard age about 70, shoulrequests der their To request weapons, an Honor lef t-face, Guard locally, and march contact briskly off. a funeral T h i s director or scene is reany veterans played,upon office, request, Brady said. whenever To contact a veteran is the main buried localscheduling ly, thanks to office of a group of the Military volunteers Funeral throughout Honors Central OrProgram, call egon. These 503-249p e o p l e 5158. make up 10 honor guard teams. The groups are sponsored by the American Legion, the Veterans of Foreign War, the Marine Corps League and the Vietnam Veterans Association, says Mark Brady, Oregon State Coordinator of the Salem-based Military Funeral Honors Program. All these unpaid Honor Guard teams are part of a larger, national effort. According to the Department of Defense: “A Funeral Honors detail shall, at a minimum, perform at the funeral a ceremony that includes the folding of a United States flag and presentation of the flag to the veteran’s family and the playing of Taps.” Furthermore, according to the Veterans Administration, any current or former members of the military on active duty or in the reserves are eligible for funeral honors. The program was funded nationwide by Congress after 2004, Brady said, and by 2010, the program was tasked to do any military honors ceremonies that were requested. In 2010 in Oregon, he added, 3,700 military honors funerals were performed. See Honor guard / C7

The Bulletin

Bend Police are working to track down the driver and vehicle involved in a hitand-run crash on Third Street that killed a Bend man late Wednesday night and are hoping two potential witnesses captured on surveillance video can help. Anthony “Tony” John Martin, 48, died after being struck by a southbound vehicle as he pushed his bicycle across Third Street, a short distance north of Revere Avenue, just before 11 p.m. Wednesday. Judging by debris left at the scene, police believe the vehicle involved was a

Where to call Anyone with information about the crash is encouraged to call the Bend Police Department at 541-322-2960.

GM pickup truck built between 2007 and 2010, said Lt. Ben Gregory. Gregory said police are not sure of the truck’s color but that still images from surveillance tapes police obtained from the Wagner Mall across Third Street show a blurry image of a grayish-colored vehicle that investi-

gators believe is the perpetrator’s vehicle about the moment of impact. Gregory said area law enforcement agencies are looking for the suspect vehicle but want to hear from anyone who may have seen a similar vehicle. “A neighbor calls in and says, ‘My neighbor has some damage that looks a little suspicious’ — it’s those kinds of things we’re hopeful for,” Gregory said. The surveillance tapes also show two people in the Albertsons parking lot, within seconds of the crash, that police would like to contact. See Hit-and-run / C7

Seeking witnesses Two images taken from surveillance video at the Albertsons grocery store across the street from the hit-and-run show individuals Bend Police believe may have been witnesses to the crash. The image on the left, from approximately nine seconds before Anthony Martin was struck by a passing vehicle, shows a bicyclist riding south near the entrance to the store. The image on the right is believed to show the suspect vehicle at or near the moment of impact, as well as a woman in dark clothing facing toward the crash site and walking toward a small black car.

Suspect truck Possible witness 2

Possible witness 1

Camera A — 10:56:43 p.m. — Just before crash

Camera B — 10:56:52 p.m. — Approximate time of crash

Approximate location of crash

Revere Avenue

Entrance

Third Street

Albertsons parking lot

Black car Possible witness 1

Possible witness 2

Camera

Camera

A

B Albertsons

Source: Bend Police Department

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

VINTAGE SKI GEAR, FROM GROOVY TO TUBULAR

By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

Lindy Minten wanted to start a discussion about how to best stop horse abuse. She thought a bill she proposed requiring horse owners to pay for an ownership certificate and regulating how the animals are transported would do that. She was right. Petition groups cropped up quickly. Facebook pages were created to fight the bill. One man suggested storming the state Capitol on IN THE horseback if LEGISLATURE the bill didn’t die in committee. Statewide, horse owners contacted their local lawmakers to stop Senate Bill 262. Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Bend, said this region was no exception. “Central Oregon is big horse country,” she said. Telfer said her staff had spent considerable time responding to e-mails regarding the bill. And, Telfer said, she heard that the bill would likely not make it out of committee. “What I’ve heard is the committee will probably not hear the bill, but that doesn’t mean things might change,” Telfer said.

Better regulations

Seward Avenue

White truck

fighting new bill

Minten said the goal was to put better regulations on the horse industry. She thought if horse owners had to register through the Oregon Department of Agriculture, it would make it harder for people to abuse or neglect the animals. The bill would require the owner of an equine that had been in the state for more than 30 days to apply through the Department of Agriculture for an ownership certificate. The cost of a certificate, the bill reads, would not exceed $100. The fine of being caught without a certificate would be up to $500. The bill also establishes transportation regulations on the animals. The Oregon Department of Agriculture would impose the fines and use the money to start a fund for abused horses. See Horse bill / C7

BEND

Burglary suspects arrested Traffic stops, home search lead to suspects in high school, jewelry store break-ins By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

Bend Police announced Friday they had arrested four people suspected in two recent burglaries, one at Summit High School a little over a week ago and one at a local jewelry store in late December. Matthew Allen Mollman, 19, and Ian Michael Flowerday, 35, both of Bend, were arrested Wednesday in connection with a Jan. 18 breakin at Summit High School.

3 computers stolen Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

LEFT: Nikki Roemmer, 35, shows off her vintage ski suit at Mountain’s Edge in Bend on Friday as part of the Vintage Ski Night put on by The Environmental Center. Roemmer said she got her Edelweiss bibs at a Prineville thrift shop, and that her Italian top and boots were from the Goodwill store in Bend.

RIGHT: Courtney Walton, 26, sports a Descente ski suit with Oakley goggles. Walton said he borrowed the suit from a friend for the event. The event featured prizes for best costume, a raffle and a screening of a Warren Miller ski film. The event was held to promote sustainability and support The Environmental Center.

In a news release, police said they believe Mollman and Flowerday broke an outside window to enter the school, then took three iMac desktop computers. Police served a search warrant at the Nasu Park Loop home shared by Moll-

man and Flowerday on Wednesday, where they located two of the three computers. The third computer was recovered at a separate address. Mollman and Flowerday were arrested and jailed on charges of second-degree burglary, conspiracy to commit second-degree burglary, first-degree theft and conspiracy to commit firstdegree theft. Both have since been released.

$30,000 worth of jewelry stolen Tuesday, Bend Police arrested Jeffrey Randall Short, 31, and Alicia Nicole Pierce, 25, both of Bend, suspects in a Dec. 28 burglary of The Jewelry Doctor on Southeast Third Street where more than $30,000 in jewelry was stolen. Over the last month, investigators had developed information suggesting Short and

Pierce had pawned several pieces of the stolen jewelry in California. On Tuesday, both suspects were stopped in separate traffic stops, arrested and jailed. Short was arrested on charges of first-degree aggravated theft, conspiracy to commit first-degree aggravated theft, second-degree burglary, criminal trespassing, second-degree criminal mischief and felon in possession of a restricted weapon. Pierce was arrested on charges of first-degree aggravated theft, conspiracy to commit aggravated theft and first-degree theft. Both have since been released from the Deschutes County Jail. After the traffic stops, officers executed a search warrant at the Southeast Craven Road home shared by Short and Pierce. Several pieces of stolen jewelry have been recovered. Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.


C2 Saturday, January 29, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Grounded barge sends oil sheen down Columbia

Prosecutors: No to new evidence in Seda case

WHEN A HAIRCUT IS AN INSPIRATION

The Associated Press VANCOUVER, Wash. — Washington state and federal officials are trying to determine how much oil remains in a barge grounded on the north bank of the Columbia River in southwest Washington. A 15-mile-long oil sheen drifted down the river Thursday. The Davy Crockett’s owner had been ordered to remove onboard oil and garbage after the vessel broke its mooring and went aground Jan. 20 between Vancouver and Camas. On Monday, the Coast Guard reported that task was completed and the vessel no longer posed a pollution risk. But now Coast Guard Petty Officer Kelly Parker says the agency suspects there’s some kind of compartment under the water that wasn’t found initially.

Woman arrested in mobile home park arsons TIGARD — The Washington County sheriff’s office says a 62-year-old woman has been arrested in a string of arsons at a mobile home park near Tigard. Sgt. David Thompson says Francisca Tyrrel was arrested Thursday at her home for investigation of two counts of first-degree arson and 10 counts of second-degree arson. She was booked into the Washington County Jail. — The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Elliot Njus / The Oregonian

Mike Horner gets a haircut at Project Homeless Connect on Thursday at the Vancouver Homeless Connect, a service fair for homeless people in Clark County, Wash. Horner said he’s been lucky to live in Clark County, where there are services like Project Homeless Connect and Share, a nonprofit for the homeless and hungry. He said it’s inspired him to do some volunteer and charity work of his own.

Oregon couple raising Navajo sheep By Lee Juillerat (Klamath Falls) Herald and News

KLAMATH FALLS — When Carole Fisher tells how it began, she tells the story with a special grin. She and husband, Bob, 72, who spent 38 years as a veterinarian in the Point Reyes area of Northern California, wanted to retire on a small ranch. A move to Modoc County’s bucolic Surprise Valley was the original plan, but they decided on the Juniper Ridge Ranch near Bonanza. Through a friendship with Surprise Valley ranchers John and Linda Hussa, the Fishers learned about Navajo churro sheep, which the Hussas now

raise after years of focusing on cattle. In 2005, shortly after the Fishers moved to their largerthan-planned , 250-acre ranch, “Linda showed up with three very pregnant ewes.” A few days later, the ewes and new lambs became the “Bonanza 7,” and, as Carole sheepishly grins, “off we went.” The Fishers have steadily grown the flock and now have about 60 ewes along with Ziggy and Noah, two rams with plenty of horn. Unlike the ewes, the rams’ horns curl and twist in strange, unpredictable patterns that might cut into their chins or cheeks if Bob didn’t cut them off.

The Fishers like the breed, but even more savor the meat, which they describe as sweeter and milder than most lamb. “We tasted the meat and knew how good it tastes,” Carole explains. Churros are a low-maintenance breed capable of handling weather variables. And, along with selling lambs for meat, the fleece is used in weaving and Navajo rug making. “They’re wonderful animals to have and be around,” Carole says, digging her hands into the thick fleece of Annie, one of the three original ewes. “If they become pets, they stay. They become bell ewes and they’re productive because they help us.”

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 6:36 a.m. Jan. 27, in the 2200 block of Northeast Doctors Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:58 p.m. Jan. 27, in the 200 block of Northeast Sixth Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 1:28 p.m. Jan. 27, in the 2600 block of U.S. Highway 20. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:38 p.m. Jan. 27, in the 20000 block of McClellan Road. DUII — Ian Scott Wilson, 19, was

admission by prosecutors three months after the trial that that they failed to disclose the FBI paid $14,500 to an informant in the case. Seda was never charged with terrorism, but the U.S. government has declared the U.S. chapter of the Al-Haramain Islamic Foundation a terrorist organization and seized its assets.

By Jeff Barnard

arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 4:04 p.m. Jan. 27, in the 600 block of Southeast Ninth Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:20 p.m. Jan. 27, in the 500 block of Southeast Fourth Street. DUII — Troy Kenneth Dahl, 25, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 9:53 p.m. Jan. 27, in the 2600 block of Northeast Forum Drive. Redmond Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 12:12 p.m. Jan. 27, in the 900 block of Southwest Veterans Way. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:01 a.m. Jan. 27, in the 400 block of Southeast Jackson Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at

9:35 a.m. Jan. 27, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Prineville Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 9:58 a.m. Jan. 27, in the area of Southeast Lynn Boulevard. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

DUII — Diedre Diane Jones, 42, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 8:44 p.m. Jan. 27, in the area of North Tam Rim Drive and West McKiney Butte Road in Sisters. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 6 p.m. Jan. 27, in the area of Southwest 83rd Street and Southwest Cline Falls Road in Redmond. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:22 p.m. Jan. 27, in

GRANTS PASS — Federal prosecutors don’t want to turn over new evidence sought by lawyers demanding a new trial for an Ashland man convicted of tax fraud and conspiracy to help smuggle money to Muslim fighters in Chechnya. The U.S. Attorney’s Office argued in papers filed Thursday that the request for internal documents, records and investigation guidelines by lawyers for Pete Seda amounted to a “fishing expedition,” and that prosecutors had already turned over all relevant information. Prosecutors added that they would explain in future filings why they failed to disclose to defense attorneys until after the trial that $14,500 was paid to an informant in the case. They also denied defense arguments that the failure denied Seda a fair trial by making it impossible to question the credibility of a key witness.

BEND FIRE RUNS Thursday 12:53 p.m. — Passenger vehicle fire, 1600 N.E. Eighth St. 22 — Medical aid calls.

Prosecutors are also trying to get Seda sentenced to the maximum eight years in prison on the tax and conspiracy convictions based on evidence he intended the money to go to Islamic terrorists fighting the Russian army in Chechnya. Richard Cabral, who worshipped at the Al-Haramain prayer house in Ashland and went with Seda on a pilgrimage to Mecca in 1999, died before trial. But his wife, Barbara Cabral, testified that during the pilgrimage, Seda asked them for contributions to mujahedin in Chechnya. Among the records sought by defense lawyers are bank records and tax returns of the Cabrals, which prosecutors said they did not possess. They also sought Department of Justice guidelines for paying informants, all documents relating to the Cabrals as informants, and all communications between prosecutors and FBI and Internal Revenue Service investigators about their use of the Cabrals as informants.

Co-founder of charity Seda is co-founder of the Oregon chapter of an Islamic charity declared a terrorist organization. He was convicted in September of helping to smuggle $150,000 to Saudi Arabia through the Ashland office of Al Haramain Islamic Foundation. Seda was released last week by U.S. District Judge Michael Hogan pending a ruling on the defense motion for a new trial. That motion was based on the

O  B  2010 third best year for Port of Portland

the area of Northwest Way and Northwest Euston Lane in Redmond. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 11:19 a.m. Jan. 27, in the 51300 block of Welch Road in La Pine. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:32 a.m. Jan. 27, in the 17400 block of Star Thistle Lane in Cloverdale. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:17 a.m. Jan. 27, in the 19700 block of Baker Road in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:10 a.m. Jan. 27, in the 60000 block of Cinder Butte Road in Bend.

Chechen terrorists

PORTLAND — The Port of Portland says last year was the third-best in its history for marine cargo tonnage. Port officials said more than 13.1 million tons were shipped through Portland in 2010, up 28 percent compared to 2009. A total of 575 ships called on the Port last year, an increase of 15 percent. Sam Ruda, director of marine and industrial development, said business has improved substantially, and the Port expects the recovery to continue through the fiscal year.

get quick medical aid for his father, who sliced his arm open with a woodworking tool. Keizer Fire District spokeswoman Anne-Marie Penge says little A.J. Hayes told the emergency operator “Hurry! Daddy needs help!” and then hung up Friday morning. A police officer was dispatched and a 911 operator called back, asking the boy if his father needed police or an ambulance. This time the little boy said “OK” and hung up again. Penge says the operator heard a second voice in the background “screaming in agony for help” so an ambulance and fire crew were dispatched. — From wire reports

Toddler calls 911 to help injured dad

Edgar Allan Poe’s ‘The Raven’ first published in 1845 The Associated Press Today is Saturday, Jan. 29, the 29th day of 2011. There are 336 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Jan. 29, 1861, Kansas became the 34th state of the Union. ON THIS DATE In 1820, Britain’s King George III died at Windsor Castle. In 1843, the 25th president of the United States, William McKinley, was born in Niles, Ohio. In 1845, Edgar Allan Poe’s poem “The Raven” was first published in the New York Evening Mirror. In 1856, Britain’s Queen Victoria introduced the Victoria Cross to reward military acts of valor during the Crimean War. In 1919, the ratification of the 18th Amendment to the Constitution, which launched Prohibition, was certified by Acting Secretary of State Frank Polk. In 1929, The Seeing Eye, a New Jersey-based school which trains guide dogs to assist the blind, was incorporated by Dorothy Harrison Eustis and Morris Frank. In 1936, the first members of baseball’s Hall of Fame, including Ty Cobb and Babe Ruth, were named in Cooperstown, N.Y.

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y In 1963, the first members of pro football’s Hall of Fame were named in Canton, Ohio. Poet Robert Frost died in Boston at age 88. In 1979, President Jimmy Carter formally welcomed Chinese Vice Premier Deng Xiaoping to the White House, following the establishment of diplomatic relations. In 1998, a bomb rocked an abortion clinic in Birmingham, Ala., killing security guard Robert Sanderson and critically injuring nurse Emily Lyons. (The bomber, Eric Rudolph, was captured in May 2003 and is serving a life sentence.) TEN YEARS AGO President George W. Bush promised to “act boldly and swiftly” to address the nation’s energy problems, and directed Vice President Dick Cheney to head a task force. DaimlerChrysler announced it was eliminating 26,000 jobs at its money-losing Chrysler division. FIVE YEARS AGO ABC “World News Tonight” co-anchor Bob Woodruff and a cameraman were seriously injured in a roadside bombing

in Iraq. Roger Federer won his seventh Grand Slam title, overcoming an early challenge from unseeded Marcos Baghdatis to win the Australian Open 5-7, 7-5, 6-0, 6-2. Avant-garde video artist Nam June Paik died in Miami at age 74. ONE YEAR AGO In a remarkably sharp face-toface confrontation in Baltimore, President Barack Obama chastised Republican lawmakers for opposing him on taxes, health care and the economic stimulus, while they accused him in turn of brushing off their ideas and driving up the national debt. A jury in Wichita, Kan., swiftly convicted abortion opponent Scott Roeder of murder in the shooting death of Dr. George Tiller, one of the only doctors to offer late-term abortions in the U.S. Haitian authorities detained 10 U.S. Baptist missionaries who were transporting 33 children to a Dominican Republic orphanage, though as it turned out, most of the children had living parents; all of the Americans were later released. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actor Noel Harrison is 77. Author Germaine Greer is 72. Ac-

tress Katharine Ross is 71. Actor Tom Selleck is 66. Rhythm-andblues singer Bettye LaVette is 65. Actor Marc Singer is 63. Actress Ann Jillian is 61. Rock musician Tommy Ramone (Ramones) is 59. Rock musician Louie Perez (Los Lobos) is 58. Rhythm-andblues/funk singer Charlie Wilson is 58. Talk show host Oprah Winfrey is 57. Country singer Irlene Mandrell is 55. Actress Diane Delano is 54. Actress Judy Norton Taylor (“The Waltons”) is 53. Rock musician Johnny Spampinato (NRBQ) is 52. Olympic gold-medal diver Greg Louganis is 51. Rock musician David Baynton-Power (James) is 50. Rock musician Eddie Jackson (Queensryche) is 50. Actor Nicholas Turturro is 49. Rock singer-musician Roddy Frame (Aztec Camera) is 47. Actor-director Edward Burns is 43. Actress Heather Graham is 41. Actor Sharif Atkins is 36. Actress Sara Gilbert is 36. Actor Sam Jaeger (TV: “Parenthood”) is 34. Actor Andrew Keegan is 32. Actor Jason James Richter is 31. Blues musician Jonny Lang is 30. Pop-rock singer Adam Lambert (“American Idol”) is 29.

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THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, JANUARY 29, 2011 2,686.89 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE -68.39 -2.48%

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Nampa, Idaho-based Home Federal Bancorp Inc., parent company of Home Federal Bank, on Friday reported a net loss of $1.3 million, or 8 cents per diluted share, in its first fiscal quarter, which ended Dec. 31, compared with a net loss of $0.3 million, or 2 cents per diluted share, for the same period the previous year. “The focus in our first quarter of fiscal year 2011 was on the integration of LibertyBank, which was acquired in an FDIC-assisted transaction in July 2010,” Len Williams, the company’s president and CEO, said in a news release. Home Federal also acquired Prineville-based Community First Bank in August 2009. On Thursday, Portlandbased Umpqua Holdings Corp., parent company of Umpqua Bank and Umpqua Investments Inc., announced fourth-quarter 2010 net earnings available to common shareholders of $8.1 million, or 7 cents per diluted common share, compared with a net loss available to common shareholders of $29.9 million, or 34 cents per diluted common share, for the same period in the previous year. For the full year 2010, the company reported net earnings available to common shareholders of $16.1 million, or 15 cents per diluted common share, compared with a net loss available to common shareholders of $166.3 million, or $2.36 per diluted common share for the prior year.

Goldman chief gets bonus despite woes

By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

The Downtown Bend Business Association has added to and subtracted from its lineup, managing to keep the occupancy rate above 90 percent for another quarter. The association announced Friday the openings of eight businesses in the downtown district and a 93 percent occupancy rate of leased restaurant and retail properties there in the fourth quarter of 2010, down slightly from 95 percent the previous quarter. With the coming of some businesses, others have moved elsewhere or closed. Although occupancy in the area has remained relatively consistent in recent years, downtown businesses continue to enter or return to the equation on a regular basis, with eight coming up on the radar in the past few months for Chuck Arnold, executive director of the association. Whenever a retail business or restaurant shuts down or moves, Arnold said, “there’s been someone wanting to step up and try something new in that location fairly quickly, which has (kept) the occupancy rate pretty high.” See Downtown / C5

The Downtown Bend Business Association has announced the opening of several businesses. Or

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Tate and Tate Catering opening Bend store Redmond company to open retail operation in space formerly occupied by Riley’s Market

Home sales rise Pending U.S. home sales index Seasonally adjusted annual rate 120 110 100

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Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Tate and Tate Catering’s retail store in NorthWest Crossing in Bend will offer both fresh and frozen grab-and-go food for lunch and dinner.

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“What has occurred is that we have a lot of people coming from Bend to Redmond, and it just seemed like there was a desire to have us be in Bend.” AP

Dalia and Emilia

Art, jewelry and home décor 933 Wall St.

WASHINGTON — A growing number of Americans consider the accelerating trend toward globalization a bad thing for the United States. At the same time, a majority now see being the world’s No. 1 economic power as an important national goal. Just over one-third of all Americans see the increasing interconnection of the global economy as a good thing, according to a new Washington Post poll. — From wire reports

Source: National Association of Realtors

Gatsby’s Brasserie

Vintage and new clothing 855 Wall St.

Let It Ride! E-Bikes

Electric bicycle sales 922 Bond St.

Giddy Up!

Restaurant 163 Minnesota Ave.

Antiquarian Book Shop

Scarce, antique and rare books 1002 Bond St.

Perspectives

Western-chic fashion 126 Minnesota Ave.

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RE/MAX Key Properties

Real estate marketing and sales 431 Franklin Ave., Suite 3

Americans leery of global economy

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Ten-year CLOSE 3.32 treasury CHANGE -1.78%

New businesses in downtown Bend

Lloyd Blankfein, chief executive of Goldman Sachs, had a rough 2010. But at least he got a raise: His bonus increased by $3.6 million, according to a regulatory filing. The firm’s board granted restricted stock valued at $12.6 million to Blankfein and other senior executives, including Gary Cohn, the firm’s president. The board also approved a new annual base salary of $2 million for its chief executive, up from $600,000. Cohn and others will see their base salaries increase to $1.85 million, according to the filing on Friday.

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BEND COMINGS AND GOINGS

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After forecast, local leaders form economic action teams By Ed Merriman The Bulletin

More than 150 people attending the Central Oregon Economic Forecast meeting in Bend on Thursday volunteered to work together on a 100day action plan for building a more diversified and globally competitive regional economy. Lawnae Hunter, owner of Hunter Properties in Bend and chairwoman of the Deschutes Economic Alliance, said Friday she began appointing community leaders who signed up during the economic forecast meeting to serve on action teams. Those teams are charged with getting the ball rolling on 10 strategies included in a “1,000-Day Road Map” to economic recovery and community transformation presented at the meeting by Delore Zimmerman. Hunter said Zimmerman, a principal with Grand Forks, N.D.-based Praxis Strategy Group, has developed successful economic development strategies for many regions, states and countries around the world. Under a $25,000 contract with the DEA, Zimmerman said he spent seven months since last May identifying the 10 strategies included in the “1,000-Day Road Map.” They can be accessed at www.clucerf.org/forecasts/2011/01/, with the password: Bend_Jan2011. See Economy / C5

U.S. economy grew at 3.2% rate in late 2010

By Jordan Novet

By Catherine Rampell

The Bulletin

New York Times News Service

Redmond’s Tate and Tate Catering confirmed Friday that it plans to open a retail store in the NorthWest Crossing development in Bend next month. Tate and Tate will occupy the space formerly occupied by Riley’s Market, at 2755 NorthWest Crossing Drive, No. 109. Tate and Tate will continue to operate its Redmond location. The satellite Tate and Tate will offer both fresh and frozen grab-and-go food for lunch and dinner. Offerings will include salads, sandwiches, soups and casseroles, according to a news release. Barbara Tate, who co-owns the business with her husband, George, said the decision to open a second location came from an observation of where their customers were coming from. “What has occurred is that we have a lot of people coming from Bend to Redmond, and it just seemed like there was a desire to have us be in Bend,” she said. The retail portion of the business began alongside the catering operation when the company moved to a new Redmond location two years ago, she said. “We like the NorthWest Crossing neighborhood. They happened to have a spot that was just perfect for us. They just had what we wanted and needed,” Tate said. According to the news release, the business is shooting for a mid-February opening. “Adding Tate and Tate to the NorthWest Crossing neighborhood center is one more way of providing extraordinary products and daily services to our residents and surrounding neighbors,” Romy Mortensen, a board member of the West Bend Property Co., NorthWest Crossing’s developer, said in the news release. “George and Barb manage a top-quality business and provide an excellent product. They are a great match for us. We are very excited to have them join us.”

With a little more money in their wallets and a little less fear in their hearts, American consumers helped pull the economy up by its bootstraps in the final months of last year. The gross domestic product, a broad measure of the goods and services produced in the country, grew at an annual rate of 3.2 percent in the fourth quarter, up from 2.6 percent in the previous period, according to a Commerce Department report released Friday. Because of this slightly speedier expansion, the nation’s overall economic output has finally matched its peak before the recession. Still, given the millions of jobless American workers, the economy has fallen far short of what it could be if it were healthy, economists said. See GDP / C5

Jordan Novet can be reached at 541-633-2117 or at jnovet@bendbulletin.com.

Erik S. Lesser / New York Times News Service

Jolynn Arway purchases Martha Stewart Living paint at a Home Depot store in Atlanta.

Home Depot hopes it has figured out what women want By Stephanie Clifford New York Times News Service

In the spring, Home Depot hopes to turn a woman’s fancy toward redecorating. So it is pushing curtains in the hues of “tilled soil” and paint in “cornbread,” delicate almond-colored benches with matching scalloped mirrors and rugs in colors like “Wilderstein brook trout,” all designed by Martha Stewart. To simplify shopping, almost all Martha Stewart Living products carry an icon, like a moon or a star, so a buyer can assemble a coordinating living room or match pieces for a Martha-approved bath by selecting from a single line of stickers. This year, Home Depot is recognizing that while women may be half of its customers, it has not catered to them in ways that translate into a larger market share. See Home Depot / C5


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C4 Saturday, January 29, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

The weekly market review New York Stock Exchange Name

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A-B-C ABB Ltd u23.73 ACE Ltd u61.17 AES Corp 12.37 AFLAC u56.99 AGCO 50.01 AK Steel 15.58 AMB Pr u32.93 AMR 7.20 AOL 23.82 AT&T Inc 27.49 AU Optron 9.58 AbtLab 45.49 AberFitc 48.36 AbitibiB n u27.68 Accenture u51.52 Actuant u26.92 Adecaog n ud12.00 AdvAuto 64.09 AMD 7.49 AdvSemi u6.10 AecomTch 28.81 Aegon u7.43 Aeropostl s 24.34 Aetna 32.95 Agilent 40.98 Agnico g 69.12 Agrium g 87.90 AirProd 85.77 Airgas 62.38 AirTran 7.37 Albemarle 55.58 AlbertoC n 37.17 AlcatelLuc 3.31 Alcoa 16.13 Alcon 162.95 AllgEngy u25.59 AllegTch u63.67 Allergan 69.08 AlliData 71.25 AlliBInco 7.78 AlliBern d20.98 AlliantEgy u36.94 AldIrish d.74 AllisChE u7.39 Allstate 31.15 AlphaNRs 57.88 AlpTotDiv 6.08 Altria 23.79 AmBev s 27.05 Amdocs 29.51 Ameren 28.40 Amerigrp u51.45 AMovilL 56.12 AmAxle 14.52 AEagleOut 14.56 AEP 35.86 AmExp 43.86 AIG wt d14.62 AmIntlGrp 40.26 AmTower 51.32 AmWtrWks u25.38 Ameriprise u60.31 AmeriBrgn u36.00 Ametek s u39.01 Amphenol u55.02 Anadarko 74.18 AnalogDev 38.30 Anglgld 13 d51.01 AnglogldA 43.13 ABInBev 55.07 AnnTaylr 21.85 Annaly 17.83 Anworth 6.88 Aon Corp 45.32 Apache 114.84 AptInv 24.91 ArcelorMit 36.08 ArchCoal 33.22 ArchDan 32.76 ArrowEl u36.70 ArvMerit u21.32 Ashland 57.95 AspenIns 30.02 Assurant 38.98 AssuredG 14.22 AstoriaF 14.44 AstraZen 48.26 AtwoodOcn u39.22 AutoNatn u28.70 Autoliv 77.39 AveryD 41.39 Avnet 35.01 Avon 28.06 AXIS Cap 35.60 BB&T Cp 27.26 BCE g u36.10 BHP BillLt 87.20 BHPBil plc 75.20 BJs Whls 43.50 BP PLC 46.21 BP Pru 114.15 BPZ Res 5.21 BRFBrasil s 16.51 BabckW n u28.67 BakrHu u67.29 Baldor 63.50 BallCp u70.92 BallyTech 40.53 BcBilVArg 11.97 BcoBrades 19.06 BcoSantand 11.92 BcoSBrasil 11.63 BcpSouth 15.70 BkofAm 13.60 BkAm wtA 7.49 BkAm wtB 2.59 BkIrelnd 2.12 BkMont g 57.76 BkNYMel 30.88 BkAtl A h 1.02 BankUtd n ud28.40 Barclay 18.69 Bar iPVix rs d32.10 BarVixMdT d58.65 BarrickG 47.30 Baxter 48.60 BeazerHm 5.33 BeckCoult 71.48 BectDck 82.56 Belo 6.72 Bemis 32.37 Berkley u28.24 BerkH B 81.56 BestBuy 34.11 BigLots 31.82 BioMedR 17.70 BlackRock 194.28 Blackstone u15.58 BlockHR 12.50 Boeing 69.23 Boise Inc u9.01 Boise wt u1.60 Borders .85 BorgWarn 67.63 BostProp u92.71 BostonSci 6.99 BoydGm 10.84 Brandyw 11.39

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Brinker u23.50 BrMySq 25.79 BroadrdgF 22.76 BrkfldAs g 32.35 BrkfldPrp 17.35 BrwnBrn u24.70 Brunswick 19.70 Buckeye 64.65 BuckTch u24.86 Buenavent 41.53 BungeLt 66.82 CB REllis u21.88 CBL Asc 16.80 CBS B u19.28 CF Inds 133.98 CIGNA u41.26 CIT Grp 46.77 CMS Eng u19.34 CNH Gbl 47.36 CNO Fincl 6.30 CRH 20.85 CSX u69.28 CVR Engy u16.57 CVS Care 34.80 Cabelas u24.45 CablvsnNY 34.05 Cabot u42.37 CabotO&G 39.77 Calgon 14.10 CallGolf 7.46 Calpine 14.05 Cameco g 39.79 Cameron u52.48 CampSp 34.45 CdnNRy g u67.76 CdnNRs gs 43.04 CapOne 48.24 CapitlSrce u7.71 CardnlHlth u41.07 CareFusion 25.22 CarMax 32.58 Carnival 44.61 CarpTech 40.78 Carters 27.23 Caterpillar u95.68 Celanese 40.36 Celestic g 9.86 Cemex 9.47 Cemig pf 16.39 CenovusE 33.35 CenterPnt 16.03 CnElBras lf 13.41 CenPacF 1.68 CntryLink 43.02 ChRvLab 38.31 Chemtura n 16.41 ChesEng u27.33 Chevron u93.37 ChicB&I 32.61 Chicos 11.04 Chimera 4.20 ChinaMble 49.21 ChNBorun n 14.00 ChinaSecur 4.97 ChinaUni u16.12 Chipotle 219.43 Chiquita 15.70 Chubb 57.97 Cimarex u100.23 CinciBell 2.85 Cinemark 16.82 Citigp pfJ 26.26 Citigp pfN 26.60 Citigrp 4.72 Citigp wtA ud.99 Citigp wtB ud.23 CliffsNRs 83.09 Clorox 63.79 CloudPeak 22.52 Coach 52.82 CobaltIEn 12.80 CocaCE 25.03 CocaCl 62.21 Coeur 23.62 ColgPal 76.99 CollctvBrd 20.24 Comerica 37.99 CmclMtls 16.51 CmtyHlt 34.96 CBD-Pao s 37.12 Compellent 27.69 CompPrdS 27.29 CompSci 52.45 ComstkRs 26.27 ConAgra 22.44 ConchoRes 91.25 ConocPhil u70.56 ConsolEngy 47.93 ConEd 50.07 ConstellA 19.14 ConstellEn 32.16 ContlRes 61.18 Cooper Ind u60.77 CooperTire 23.00 Corning u21.80 CorpOffP 36.12 Cosan Ltd 12.89 Cott Cp 7.95 Covance 56.75 CovantaH 16.86 CoventryH u29.51 Covidien 47.08 CredSuiss 45.12 CrwnCstle 43.05 CrownHold u33.17 CullenFr 58.22 Cummins 105.38 CurEuro 135.57 Cytec 53.87

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DrxTcBll s u49.83 DrxEMBll s 35.27 DrSCBear rs 15.83 DREBear rs d16.85 DrxEBear rs d19.66 DirEMBr rs 23.20 DirFnBear d8.79 DrxFBull s 29.22 Dir30TrBear 45.89 DrxREBll s u59.60 DirxSCBull 69.61 DirxLCBear d8.34 DirxLCBull u74.54 DirxEnBull u65.88 Discover u20.46 Disney 38.85 DrReddy 35.47 DolbyLab 60.50 DollarGen 28.40 DomRescs 43.39 Domtar grs u87.23 DoralFncl 1.26 DEmmett 18.11 Dover u62.15 DowChm 35.06 DrPepSnap 34.84 DuPont u50.29 DuPFabros 22.47 DukeEngy 17.96 DukeRlty 13.62 Dynegy rs 6.08 ECDang n 28.52 EMC Cp u24.48 ENI 47.01 EOG Res 102.53 EQT Corp u46.55 EastChm 91.85

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FordM wt 7.66 FordC pfS 52.04 ForestCA 16.55 ForestLab 31.99 ForestOil 37.24 Fortress 5.38 FortuneBr 61.03 FranceTel 21.53 FrankRes 120.84 FMCG 106.17 FrontierCm 9.07 FrontierOil u19.77 Frontline d27.12 FurnBrds 4.50

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G-H-I GFI Grp 5.13 -.17 +.36 GMX Rs 5.10 -.37 -.39 Gafisa s 12.54 -.30 -1.03 GameStop 20.98 -.09 +.08 GamGld g 7.58 +.22 +.31 Gannett 15.19 +.16 +.53 Gap 19.20 -.16 -.90 GencoShip d11.53 +.02 -1.76 GnCable 36.84 -.75 +.79 GenDynam 74.13 -2.07 +1.16 GenElec u20.20 -.08 +.46 GenGrPr n 14.57 -.43 +.22 GenMarit d3.22 +.30 +.24 GenMills s 34.94 -.45 -1.54 GenMot n 36.60 -2.07 -.64 GM cvpfB 54.07 -2.74 -1.43 GenOn En 4.09 -.20 -.16 Genpact 15.00 -.22 +.44 GenuPrt u51.43 -.45 +.94 Genworth 13.85 -.27 +.24 Gerdau 12.82 -.43 -.86

Name

How to Read the Market in Review Here are the 1,133 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 830 most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 255 most active on American Stock Exchange. Stocks in bold changed 10 percent or more in price. Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company’s full name (not its abbreviation). Company names made up of initials appear at the beginning of each letter’s list. Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day. Chg: Loss or gain for last day of week. No change indicated by “…” mark. Wkly: Loss or gain for the week. No change indicated by … Name: Name of mutual fund and family. Sell: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold, for last day of the week. Wkly: Weekly net change in the NAV. Stock Footnotes: cc – PE greater than 99. cld - Issue has been called for redemption by company. d - New 52week low. dd – Loss in last 12 mos. ec - Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's Emerging Company Marketplace. g - Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h - temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus listing qualification. n - Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low figures date only from the beginning of trading. pf - Preferred stock issue. pr - Preferences. pp - Holder owes installments of purchase price. q – Closed-end mutual fund; no PE calculated. rt - Right to buy security at a specified price. s - Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi - Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wd - When distributed. wt - Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u - New 52-week high. un - Unit,, including more than one security. vj - Company in bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name. Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. Mutual Fund Footnotes: e – Ex-capital gains distribution. f – Previous day’s quote. n - No-load fund. p – Fund assets used to pay distribution costs. r – Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. s – Stock dividend or split. t – Both p and r. x – Ex-cash dividend.

Source: The Associated Press and Lipper, Inc. Sales figures are unofficial.

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Monsanto 71.54 MonstrWw 15.95 Moodys 29.03 MorgStan 29.04 Mosaic 79.78 MotrlaSol n 37.96 MotrlaMo n 29.59 MuellerWat 4.05 MurphO 66.13 NCR Corp 16.35 NFJDvInt 17.49 NRG Egy 20.99 NV Energy 14.37 NYSE Eur 32.08 Nabors 23.84 NalcoHld 29.36 NBkGreece 1.84 NatGrid 44.00 NOilVarco u71.46 NatRetPrp 24.67 NatSemi 14.81 NatwHP 36.86 Navios 4.87 Navistar u63.52 NY CmtyB 18.27 NY Times 10.53 NewellRub u19.34 NewfldExp 69.04 NewmtM 55.00 NewpkRes 5.89 Nexen g 24.26 NextEraEn 54.03 NiSource u18.61 NielsenH n ud25.00 NikeB 81.46 NobleCorp 37.34 NobleEn 86.46

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PhilipMor 56.60 PhilipsEl 31.18 PhlVH 58.05 PhnxCos 2.53 Pier 1 9.43 PimCpOp u18.81 PinWst 40.94 PioNtrl 91.15 PitnyBw 24.06 PlainsEx 33.65 PlaybyB u6.13 PlumCrk 41.77 Polo RL 103.98 PolyOne 12.94 PortGE 22.39 Potash u174.16 PwshDB 28.09 PS Agri u33.92 PS USDBull 22.49 PwSFoodBv 17.54 PSETecLd 17.07 PSIndia 22.05 Praxair 90.87 PrecCastpt 140.98 PrecDrill u10.29 PrideIntl 32.21 PrinFncl 32.55 PrisaB n 11.20 ProShtS&P d43.16 PrUShS&P d23.01 ProUltDow u56.84 PrUlShDow d19.79 ProUltQQQ u85.05 PrUShQQQ d11.05 ProUltSP u49.43 ProUShL20 38.53 PrUSCh25 rs 31.16

Name

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DCT Indl u5.59 DPL 26.34 DR Horton 12.50 DTE 46.22 DanaHldg 17.50 Danaher s 46.05 Darden 45.18 Darling 13.70 DaVita u74.28 DeVry 51.69 DeanFds 10.03 Deere u88.91 DelMnte 18.91 DeltaAir 11.83 DemMda nud20.44 DenburyR 19.27 DeutschBk 58.90 DBGoldDL 37.57 DBGoldDS 8.97 DevelDiv 13.54 DevonE u85.13 Diageo 77.23 DiaOffs 70.19 DiamRk 11.91 DianaShip 11.72 DicksSptg 35.80 DigitalRlt 53.76 Dillards 40.21

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EKodak 3.64 Eaton u104.26 EatnVan 30.40 EVTxMGlo 10.61 Ecolab 49.26 EdisonInt 36.31 EdwLfSci s u83.18 ElPasoCp u15.46 Elan 6.92 EldorGld g 16.41 Embraer 32.76 EmersonEl u56.96 Emulex 11.13 EnCana g 31.88 EnergySol 5.89 Enerpls g 31.77 Enersis 20.60 ENSCO u54.04 Entergy 72.07 EntPrPt 43.14 EqtyRsd u52.89 EsteeLdr 80.08 EthanAl 22.22 EvergE rs 2.59 ExcelM d4.67 ExcoRes 20.13 Exelon 41.91 ExtraSpce u19.02 ExxonMbl u78.99 FMC Corp 75.01 FMC Tech u91.84 FNBCp PA 10.05 FairchldS u17.61 FamilyDlr 42.48 FedExCp 90.48 FedInvst u27.42 FelCor 7.01 Ferro u15.47 FibriaCelu 15.46 FidlNFin 13.94 FidNatInfo u30.28 FifthStFin 13.02 FstHorizon 11.25 FstInRT u9.98 FMajSilv g 12.20 FirstEngy 38.77 FlagstB rs 1.58 Flotek h u6.75 Flowserve u122.97 Fluor 68.33 FootLockr 17.77 FordM 16.27

Arris 12.35 ArubaNet 21.33 AscenaRtl 26.62 AscentSol 3.14 AsiaEntRs u11.01 AsiaInfoL 18.41 AspenTech u14.21 AsscdBanc 13.83 athenahlth 43.15 Atheros 44.54 AtlasAir 50.55 AtlasEngy 44.03 Atmel u13.86 AudCodes 6.95 Autodesk 39.97 AutoData u47.89 Auxilium 23.02 AvagoTch u28.05 AvanirPhm 3.99 AvisBudg 13.93 Axcelis 3.49 BCD Sem nud10.50 BE Aero 38.24 BGC Ptrs 7.83 BJsRest 35.07 BMC Sft 46.98 BMP Sunst u9.95 BSD Med 4.37 BallardPw 1.64 BannerCp 2.40 BeacnRfg 18.04 BebeStrs 5.60 BedBath 48.60 Biocryst d4.21 Biodel 2.15 BioFuelEn d1.24 BiogenIdc 65.08 BioMarin 25.45 BioSante 1.86 BioScrip 5.11 BlkRKelso 11.54 Blkboard 38.71 BlueCoat 28.09 BlueNile 57.07 BostPrv 6.72 BttmlnT u22.90 BrigExp u28.63 Brightpnt 8.97 Broadcom 44.32 BroadSft n 26.43 Broadwind 1.92 BrcdeCm 5.60 BrklneB 10.99 BrooksAuto u11.55 BrukerCp 17.50 Bucyrus u90.68 BuffaloWW 43.90 CA Inc u23.38 CH Robins 76.03 CKX Inc d3.06 CME Grp 304.89 CNinsure 17.07 CVB Fncl 8.47 CadencePh 7.29 Cadence 8.48 CdnSolar 13.71 CapProd 9.92 CapFdF rs 11.84 CpstnTrb h 1.14 Cardica 4.19 Cardiom g 6.64

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CareerEd 22.62 Carrizo 32.63 CasellaW u7.70 CathayGen u17.12 CaviumNet 39.65 Cbeyond 14.67 CeleraGrp 6.16 Celgene 51.18 CelldexTh 3.79 CenterFncl 7.24 CentEuro 22.46 CentAl 14.29 Cephln 58.33 Cepheid u23.91 CeragonN 13.00 Cerner u96.49 CerusCp 3.24 ChrmSh 3.06 ChartInds 35.73 CharterCm u42.04 ChkPoint 46.22 Cheesecake 29.49 ChildPlace 42.27 ChinAgri s 10.98 ChinaBAK 2.01 ChinaBiot 14.93 ChinaDir 1.39 ChinaMda u20.86 ChinaMed 12.25 ChinaNGas 5.60 ChinaRE d7.50 ChiValve 7.32 ChXDPlas 6.59 CienaCorp 23.50 CinnFin u32.16 Cintas u27.90 Cirrus u20.72 Cisco 20.93 CitrixSys 63.76 CleanEngy d11.97 Clearwire 5.29 ClinicData u27.36 Cognex u31.17 CognizTech 71.63 Coherent u53.44 Coinstar 41.49 ColdwtrCrk 2.93 ColumLabs 2.30 Colmbus 17.06 Comcast 22.84 Comc spcl 21.46 CmcBMO 41.06 CmclVehcl 16.00 CommVlt 29.90 Compuwre 10.48 Comtech 28.12 ConcurTch 50.04 Conexant 2.05 ConstantC 27.91 CopanoEn 33.92 Copart 39.11 CorinthC 5.44 Costco u71.93 CrackerB 50.31 Cree Inc 50.78 Crocs 16.31 Ctrip.com 40.65 CubistPh 22.24 Curis 2.86 Cyclacel 1.44 Cymer 48.05

D-E-F

Name

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CypSemi u21.15 Cytokinet 1.90 Cytori 5.42

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M-N-O M&T Bk MBIA MDU Res MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MGIC

86.35 10.75 20.92 11.00 8.10 8.25 8.27

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NokiaCp 10.57 NordicAm d24.87 Nordstrm 40.91 NorflkSo 60.38 NoestUt u32.77 NorthropG 67.58 Novartis 55.92 NuSkin 30.07 Nucor 45.10 OasisPet n u30.20 OcciPet 93.81 Oceaneer 74.87 OfficeDpt 5.12 OfficeMax 15.98 OilSvHT u150.41 OldRepub 12.48 Olin 19.27 OmegaHlt 22.06 Omncre 25.95 Omnicom 44.82 ONEOK u58.75 OrientEH 12.11 OshkoshCp 37.39 OvShip 34.40 OwensCorn 33.11 OwensIll 29.54

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P-Q-R PG&E Cp PHH Corp PMI Grp PNC PPG PPL Corp PackAmer ParagShip ParkDrl ParkerHan PatriotCoal PeabdyE Pengrth g PennWst g Penney Penske PepcoHold PepsiCo PerkElm Petrohawk PetrbrsA Petrobras PtroqstE Pfizer

46.24 23.65 2.91 60.11 u83.23 25.41 u28.02 d3.07 4.08 87.19 25.46 61.09 12.51 u26.74 32.29 u16.93 18.55 64.40 25.57 19.03 32.37 35.41 7.63 18.15

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Regis Cp 16.85 RelStlAl 52.19 ReneSola 10.18 Repsol u31.11 RepubSvc 30.69 ResMed s 31.08 ResoluteEn u17.43 Resolute wt u4.76 RetailHT u105.77 ReynAm s 31.81 RioTinto s 68.03 RiteAid h 1.22 RobtHalf u30.77 RockTen u66.14 RockwlAut u80.34 RockColl 63.81 RockwdH 39.52 RogCm gs 34.76 Roper 75.69 Rowan 34.31 RoyalBk g 53.33 RylCarb 45.55 RoyDShllB u69.67 RoyDShllA u70.28 Ryder 47.73 RdxSPEW u47.87 Ryland 17.78

Name

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Nasdaq National Market Name

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J-K-L j2Global JA Solar JDASoft JDS Uniph JackHenry JackInBox Jamba JamesRiv JazzPhrm JetBlue JoyGlbl KLA Tnc KandiTech Keynote Kforce KnightT KopinCp Kulicke

26.89 6.81 30.00 u16.92 29.44 21.76 2.15 22.24 22.32 5.88 85.35 u43.69 4.37 u17.44 17.59 23.48 4.00 u9.41

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P-Q-R

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RschMotn ResConn RexEnergy RosettaR RossStrs Rovi Corp RoyGld RubiconTc Rudolph RushEntA RuthsHosp Ryanair

60.15 19.86 11.56 37.66 u65.46 60.97 46.62 18.90 9.76 18.87 4.70 30.25

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-.46 -.79 -.48 +.22 -.34 -.62 -.33 +2.33 -1.51 -1.27 ... ... -.11 +.31 +.85 +1.54 -.47 +.39 -.38 -1.05 -.09 -.08 -.81 ... -.62 -.19 -.02 +.09 +2.53 +4.41 -.24 -.36 -.64 -.03 -.56 -.80 -.16 -.42 -.84 -.22 -.12 +.22 -.28 -.13 -.47 -.14 -1.12 -1.03 -.19 +.06 -.53 -.55 -1.28 +1.53 -.09 -.07 -.09 +.11 -.16 ... -.10 -.12 -.22 -.29 -1.52 -1.39 -.01 -.41 -.20 -.05 -.27 +.17 -1.01 -.39 -.29 -.12 -1.10 -1.50 -2.33 +2.14 -.37 -.07 -4.36 -1.44 -.09 -.25 -.30 -.26 -.66 +.91 -.19 -.18 -.22 +.44 -.37 -.14 -.07 -.39 -.05 +.72 -.07 -.04 -.33 -.88 -.20 -.13 -2.18 -1.04 -.57 -.42 -.30 +.67 -.88 -1.29


B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, January 29, 2011 C5

Home Depot

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE Stephen Hockman, Seth Anderson and Jeff Wellman have been promoted to senior associates with Steele Associates Architects in Bend, and Sara Laudenslayer has joined as a design professional. Hockman is a registered architect in Oregon and has more than 20 years of experience in commercial, industrial, government and medical projects. Anderson is a registered architect in Oregon and Washington and his experience includes commercial, retail, industrial, research and medical projects. Wellman has experience in educational, assisted living, entertainment, fire and safety facilities and commercial and industrial building projects. Laudenslayer has several years of experience with mixeduse, commercial and residential projects. Destiny Giannola and Zak Sundsten have been promoted to vice presidents with High Desert Bank in Bend. Giannola has more than 15 years of experience in lending and more than 10 years in banking. Sundsten has more than 14 years of experience in banking. Kelly Barker Koskela joins the Windermere Central Oregon real estate office in Bend as executive coordinator. Koskela has been a licensed real estate broker since 2001 and has more than 11 years of experience as an office manager and executive assistant. Susan Ronis has joined Cen-

Economy Continued from C3 “We are on Day 99. Today we began contacting the people who volunteered to see which ones were willing to serve as leaders of the action committees,” Hunter said. Over the next few days, Hunter said, her goal is to get volunteers assigned to 10 committees, one for each of the 10 strategies laid out by Zimmerman. During the first 100 days, members of the committees will be assessing the strategies and identifying short-term actions to implement right away, along with longer-term actions that can be put in motion within 1,000 days, Hunter said. “Team leaders will be coached on their responsibilities and expectations, and at the end of the 100 days, the team leaders will report to the community at large what they have researched, the initiatives they will follow through with, and the progress,” Hunter said. “We are planning a 100-day summit, which will be early May. By that time, we expect to have reports from all of the action teams.”

Sounding the alarm The meeting also included an

GDP Continued from C3 “Things are better, but they’re not anywhere near where they need to be to make major inroads into unemployment,” said John Ryding, chief economist at RDQ Economics. Thanks to modestly higher paychecks and swelled investment portfolios, Americans appeared more comfortable buying again and stashing away a little less in savings. Consumer spending grew at an annual rate of 4.4 percent in the October-De-

Stephen Hockman

Seth Anderson

Jeff Wellman

Sara Laudenslayer

Destiny Giannola

Zak Sundsten

Kelly Barker Koskela

Susan Ronis

Jason Oden

Mike Gainey

Kyle Wuepper

Kelly Charon

tury 21 Gold Country Bend as a broker. Ronis has 16 years of real estate experience, including a Graduate Realtor Institute designation. She hails from San Diego and is also licensed in California. The office also announced that broker Jason Oden has moved

his license to Century 21 Gold Country Bend. Born and raised in Oregon, Oden has been a real estate broker since 2004. The Pine Tavern Restaurant in Bend has announced its new management team: Justine Bennett, owner; Rob Ramaker, gen-

economic forecast for Central Oregon compiled by Bill Watkins, director of the Center for Economic Research and Forecasting at California Lutheran University in Thousand Oaks. Hunter said that besides high unemployment rates, ranging from 14.5 percent to more than 19 percent in Deschutes, Jefferson and Crook counties, Watkins reported that from December 2007 through December 2010, Crook County lost 26 percent of its nonfarm jobs, representing all the county’s gains since 1992; and Jefferson County lost 18 percent of its nonfarm jobs, or all its gains since 1994. Deschutes County fared a little better, losing about 14 percent of its nonfarm jobs, or all the county’s gains since 2004. Watkins also sounded the alarm about a shift from net domestic in-migration totaling 3,654 in 2007 to net domestic outmigration of 1,121 in 2009. “I attribute the out-migration to lack of opportunity,” Watkins said. “The 14 percent or higher unemployment and job losses for three years equates to loss of opportunity. Out-migration is what we call the canary in the coal mine. It’s the first sign something is fundamentally wrong, when you see net negative domestic migration.” He said his research indicated net out-migration is likely to con-

tinue in 2011 and into 2012 unless business, government, civic, environmental and tribal leaders work together and act soon to begin rebuilding and diversifying the regional economy. “Forecast is not destiny,” Watkins said. “It is what we expect to happen if life goes on and nobody makes any changes.”

cember period, its quickest pace in nearly five years and almost double the growth rate from the previous quarter. The payroll tax cut and the extension of the Bush-era tax cuts, both passed in December, are expected to further buoy consumer spending, which many economists predict will grow at an annual pace of about 3 or 3.5 percent this year. The shrinking trade deficit also helped the economy regain some momentum in the final months of the year. The overall economic growth rate came in slightly below ana-

lysts’ expectations, which was an annual pace of 3.5 percent in the fourth quarter. The preliminary number released by the Commerce Department on Friday was about apace with forecasts for the full year. The Congressional Budget Office forecast that the economy would grow 3.1 percent in 2011, a figure echoed by many Wall Street analysts. While that rate would be faster than last year’s, it is still probably not robust enough to make a significant dent in the unemployment rate, which stood at 9.4 percent in December. In the couple of years be-

Community effort Hunter said Thursday’s economic forecast meeting and the “1,000-Day Road Map” are intended to support the sound economic development activities carried out by Economic Development for Central Oregon, Visit Bend, the Central Oregon Visitors Association and other groups working on economic development in the region. “We as a community have to be pulling in the same direction,” Hunter said. “We understand there are no silver bullets to solving the hard problems facing Central Oregon, but we do know that we have had a paradigm shift and the economy we are operating in today requires innovative thinking, and a global understanding of the new rules.” In a letter dated Jan. 27 to the Deschutes Economic Alliance, Gov. John Kitzhaber said the “1,000-Day Road Map” and strategies for developing a unified

eral manager; Terri Klouda, manager; Skye Elder, executive chef; Seth Eppes, sous chef; and Saline Billow, office manager. Michael Gainey, lead special inspector at the Bend-based Wallace Group, has obtained his International Code Council structural welding certification, which allows him to perform special inspection services for field- and fabrication shop-welded structural steel elements. The inspections are required by building officials prior to occupancy. Gainey has been with the Wallace Group, a multidisciplinary science and engineering firm, since March and began his construction inspection career with Kleinfelder’s Bend office in 2006. Kyle Wuepper, a shareholder in the law firm of Bryant, Lovlien & Jarvis P.C. in Bend, has been recognized by Law & Politics magazine as a rising star. This distinction identifies up-andcoming attorneys who are 40 or younger or who have been practicing law for 10 or fewer years. Wuepper’s practice emphasizes business and real estate transactions, mergers and acquisitions, choice of entity and business formations, securities regulation and taxation. Kelly Charon, based in Bend, has been named a lia sophia top sales adviser for outstanding sales accomplishments. Through in-home demonstrations, lia sophia is a direct jewelry seller.

vision to revitalize Deschutes County and the surrounding area match his goals outlined in the Oregon Business Plan. That plan has a goal of creating an average of 25,000 jobs a year statewide through 2020, and increasing Oregon’s per capita personal income to a level above the national average. “I commend the Deschutes Economic Alliance and so many others in Central Oregon for their leadership and their willingness to come together to be part of this goal and to usher in a new era of prosperity. This is important and meaningful work that you are doing,” Kitzhaber said in his letter. “And we must work hard to increase jobs and incomes throughout the state and for all Oregonians. Rural incomes need to grow as fast as metro incomes.” Hunter said companies have many location options today. “Central Oregon can and will attract and grow companies if we move to understanding the importance of creating an environment that businesses can grow. We know Central Oregon is an attractive place to live, but in this economy, that is not enough,” Hunter said. Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or emerriman@ bendbulletin.com.

fore the recession, which began in December 2007, the American jobless rate was less than half that level. “We’re still very much below the output growth rate needed to absorb the slack in labor market,” said Prajakta Bhide, a research analyst for the U.S. economy at Roubini Global Economics. “We’re expecting to end the year with an unemployment rate of 9 percent.”

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday

Continued from C3 Without a housing recovery to revive sales of big items or major renovation supplies, Home Depot and its competitors are promoting smaller projects this spring, during what is the major selling season for home improvement stores. And that means sprucing up departments to get female customers excited about window treatments or new colors for makeovers of existing spaces. “People are starting to spend more money again, and we need to participate in that,” said Gordon Erickson, the senior vice president for merchandising and decor at the Home Depot. “For years, we’ve always had a bad — I don’t want to say a bad reputation, it’s more that people look at our business and think it is male-oriented, -dominated,” Erickson said. “Fifty percent of our customers are female. We need to offer her products that she wants.” Lowe’s, which says it has had a female focus since its beginnings, has added a line of decor products like mood lighting and chrome toilet-paper holders to appeal to women. True Value recently opened a corporate-owned store near Chicago that had wider aisles, better lighting and clear signs, part of an effort to attract women. Home Depot is trying to balance a decline in big-ticket sales, items that cost more than $900, which usually means a big project is under way. Those have been decreasing at Home Depot since the middle of 2006, as homeowners put off expensive renovations or new-home purchases. “I think they know that that piece of the business is going

Downtown Continued from C3 The Antiquarian Book Shop offers manuscripts and letters in addition to primarily older books. Building and business owner Ann Maroe said she had run the store in its current location from 2002 to 2005. She spent a few years in Arizona, where the original store was located, and she reopened with more books in August, replacing Oxygen Studios, a tattoo shop. “This is a good corner here,” she said, referring to her business’s location at the intersection of Bond Street and Oregon Avenue. According to the website http://tattooeddiary.com, the tattoo business was going to become “a mobile unit” and tour the West Coast for six months starting last fall. Let It Ride! E-Bikes is a new showroom for electric bicycles on Bond Street. It has been located inside the Bend Mapping and Blueprint store. Franklin Avenue now features a RE/MAX Key Properties real estate brokerage location, which previously operated as Taft Dire Real Estate, Arnold said. Yet another business, Mary Jane’s, a shoe store that Arnold said has been open on Wall Street for many years, is ex-

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pecting to move to a new spot on Franklin Avenue. Perspectives, a new art gallery on Minnesota Avenue, was formerly a jeweler, Diana’s Jewel Box, Arnold said. Giddy Up! is a new women’s clothing store, also on Minnesota. It takes the place of Volcano Vineyards Tasting Lounge, Arnold said. Volcano is now in the Century Center on Century Drive. Gatsby’s Brasserie, a restaurant from Gavin McMichael, will open in the place of Marz Bistro, also McMichael’s, on Minnesota, Arnold said. In the place of MicroSphere Computers on Wall Street, Arnold said, a clothing and goods store, Dalia & Emilia, has been established. MicroSphere has moved to Northeast Williamson Boulevard. And Très Jolie de Bend now sells home decor and jewelry on Wall Street where a Great Outdoor Clothing Co. store used to be, Arnold said. “While we’ve seen a small increase in vacancies, we remain optimistic about spaces filling up this quarter, as several yet-to-be-announced new businesses will be celebrating their openings in the coming weeks,” Arnold said in a news release.

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to be lackluster,” said Colin McGranahan, an analyst with Sanford C. Bernstein & Co. So they “look at the entire decor category as an area where they have some opportunities, they haven’t done as well there, their market share hasn’t been as strong, the assortment hasn’t been as good,” he said. And adding the Martha Stewart products appeals to a sector that is more stable, McGranahan said. This is not the first time that Home Depot has tried to figure out what women want. It has been running Do-It-Herself workshops for female customers since 2003. In the early 1990s, it opened Expo Design Centers, showrooms with fresh flowers and other feminine touches. (It closed those centers in 2009.) The Martha Stewart products are aimed at getting women who are already visiting the stores to buy more. “We’re basically taking categories and merchandise that are underperforming, and working with Martha and her design team to add Martha products, replacing things that aren’t working,” Erickson said. The Martha invasion started with patio furniture, expanded into cabinets, draperies, carpets and paint, and this spring will extend into lighting, vanity tables and bathroom decor. The icons on the pieces are meant to spur spending across different categories, so a woman can buy paint, rugs and countertops that coordinate, increasing how much she spends on each visit. “It doesn’t make sense if we can only do part of that room,” Erickson said. “If they just bought the vanity from us, I think we failed.” “We want the whole basket — we want the complete project,” Erickson said.

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The weekly market review American Stock Exchange Name ATS Corp AbdAsPac AbdAustEq AbdnChile AbdGlbInc AbdnIndo AdeonaPh AdvPhot Advntrx rs AlexcoR g AlldNevG AlmadnM g AlphaPro AmApparel AmDefense AmLorain Anooraq g AntaresP AoxingP rs ArcadiaRs ArmourRsd Augusta g Aurizon g AvalRare n BMB Munai Baldw Ballanty Banks.com Banro g BarcUBS36

Last u3.62 6.64 11.53 20.13 12.33 12.05 1.45 1.73 2.29 6.65 25.85 3.89 1.68 1.05 .17 2.75 1.46 1.56 2.09 .31 7.82 4.01 6.35 5.90 .87 1.45 7.24 .30 3.25 48.81

Chg Wkly -.07 -.04 -.19 -.59 -.13 -.40 -.34 -.06 -.08 +.15 +.49 +.21 -.02 -.05 -.00 +.01 +.01 -.05 -.10 -.01 +.05 -.01 -.07 +.11 +.01 -.07 -.41 -.00 +.08 +.60

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24.73 +1.14 +.08 34.48 +.66 +.15 65.53 -2.82 -4.12 6.56 +.09 +.63 7.51 -.62 -.70 12.79 -.12 +.13 9.00 +.01 -.01 1.60 -.02 -.06 73.40 -2.25 +.12 12.45 -.19 -.49 1.81 -.12 -.01 .38 +.02 -.01 4.74 +.09 +.07 4.81 -.07 -.06 1.82 -.05 -.01 .37 -.01 -.02 .71 -.01 -.03 18.86 +.80 +.53 49.60 +.96 -.01 6.34 -.28 -.13 22.45 +.02 +.08 3.34 ... -.10 1.82 +.01 -.18 2.65 -.04 -.28 d2.35 +.05 ... 4.06 -.13 -.36 u4.03 -.19 -.27 5.32 -.15 -.54 2.66 -.08 -.19 6.24 -.25 -.06 1.49 +.07 -.03 1.96 +.02 -.03

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14.88 13.26 57.27 7.81 8.41 9.39 3.56 3.01 1.86 .28 .93 .30 3.40 5.05 8.36 11.14 15.93 11.30 12.05 7.07 2.10 12.26 6.26 26.98 .35 2.81 u7.05 5.13 u2.92 10.39 6.40 14.79

-.24 -.20 -.74 +.03 -.07 -.10 -.01 +.01 ... ... +.00 -.01 -.06 -.12 -.11 +.14 -.03 +.04 +.13 -.15 +.04 -.46 +.33 -.27 -.01 ... -.04 +.07 -.05 -.16 -.32 -.18

-.04 -.07 -.93 +.08 +.51 +.38 -.01 +.03 ... -.01 -.18 -.03 -.01 +.02 +.08 +.67 +.06 +.36 +.58 -.24 ... +.40 +.54 -.14 ... +.11 +.17 -.16 +.09 -.13 -.13 +.18

FrTmpLtd Fronteer g FullHseR GSE Sy GabGldNR GascoEngy Gastar grs GenMoly GeoGloblR Geokinetics GeoPetro GoldRsv g GoldResrc GoldenMin GoldStr g GrahamCp GranTrra g GrtBasG g GpoSimec GugFront HQ SustM HSBC CTI HearUSA Hemisphrx HooperH HstnAEn Hyperdyn IEC Elec iBio ImpOil gs IndiaGC IndiaGC wt

13.12 +.02 +.32 9.84 +.41 +.57 u4.33 +.07 +.40 d3.21 -.01 +.01 18.52 +.16 +.16 .49 -.01 -.04 4.12 -.13 -.16 5.06 -.31 -.57 .71 -.04 -.07 8.59 -.26 -.57 .42 -.01 ... 1.71 +.04 +.01 23.40 +1.00 -1.64 19.83 -.12 -.43 3.76 +.03 +.08 22.48 -.33 +.09 8.55 +.20 +.36 2.69 +.01 +.16 8.19 -.28 -.06 22.13 -.50 -1.26 4.30 +.01 +.09 8.58 +.08 -.03 .50 -.05 -.08 .50 -.01 -.01 .80 -.02 +.01 15.23 -.08 -.27 3.91 -.22 -1.59 8.73 -.11 +.28 5.20 -.18 +.48 42.67 +.25 +.64 .81 -.01 -.02 .03 +.01 +.01

InovioPhm IntTower g InvVKAdv2 InvVKSelS IsoRay Iteris IvaxDiag KeeganR g KimberR g KodiakO g LadThalFn Lannett Libbey LongweiPI LucasEngy MAG Slv g MGT Cap MadCatz g Metalico Metalline MetroHlth MidsthBcp MdwGold g MincoG g Minefnd g MinesMgt NIVS IntT NTN Buzz NeoStem NeuB HYld NBIntMu NBRESec

1.24 9.36 10.94 10.84 1.29 1.76 u1.12 7.39 1.22 6.11 1.06 5.36 14.65 2.55 2.27 9.92 u.39 .86 5.37 1.07 4.60 13.47 u1.32 2.24 9.61 3.02 2.14 .42 1.40 14.17 13.69 3.97

-.09 +.51 -.07 +.09 -.02 -.01 -.14 +.03 -.02 +.31 -.09 -.10 -.79 +.01 +.03 +.22 -.02 +.01 -.25 +.03 -.20 -.67 +.12 +.13 -.05 +.07 -.04 ... -.08 +.04 -.07 -.05

-.06 +.99 +.15 +.31 +.03 +.05 +.22 -.12 +.04 +.49 -.10 -.01 -.37 -.03 +.01 +.12 +.04 +.03 +.20 +.08 +.06 +.56 +.37 +.14 -.09 -.03 -.03 -.01 -.03 +.41 -.07 +.03

Neuralstem 1.92 -.10 -.12 Nevsun g 5.96 +.25 +.15 NDragon .07 +.01 -.01 NewEnSys 6.57 -.29 -.14 NwGold g 8.17 +.38 +.61 NA Pall g 6.52 -.18 -.30 NDynMn g 18.30 -.29 +.41 NthnO&G 26.23 +.77 +.43 NthgtM g 2.62 +.07 -.03 NovaBayP 1.70 -.05 -.04 NovaGld g 13.67 +.47 +.74 NCADv3 11.83 -.07 +.18 NvDCmdty 26.18 +.19 +.45 NuvDiv2 12.86 +.06 +.25 NuvDiv3 12.95 -.14 +.24 NvInsDv 13.37 -.11 +.12 NuvInsTF 13.00 ... +.14 NMuHiOp 11.21 -.05 +.12 NuvREst 10.09 -.04 ... NvTxAdFlt 2.18 +.03 +.01 Oilsands g .57 +.03 +.01 OpkoHlth 3.85 -.17 +.37 OrientPap 5.27 -.17 -.35 OrionEngy 4.24 -.18 +.32 OrsusXel .18 ... +.00 PHC Inc u2.14 -.21 +.09 Pacholder 8.39 -.01 +.02 ParaG&S 3.39 +.22 +.26 ParkNatl 65.15 -1.80 -5.38 PernixTh u10.90 -.05 +.75 PhrmAth 3.22 -.05 -.20 PhxFoot .26 +.01 -.04

Biggest mutual funds PionDvrsHi 20.22 PionDrill 8.56 PlatGpMet 2.24 PolyMet g 2.09 ProceraNt .60 ProlorBio 5.99 Protalix 9.44 PudaCoal 12.18 PyramidOil 5.90 Quaterra g 1.81 Quepasa u14.22 RadientPh .67 RaeSyst 1.71 RareEle g 12.95 ReavesUtl 21.73 Rentech 1.23 RetractTc u1.88 RexahnPh 1.46 Richmnt g 4.43 Rubicon g 4.96 SamsO&G 2.18 SeabGld g 28.51 Senesco .30 SinoHub 2.71 Solitario 3.44 SondeR grs 3.95 SprottRL g 1.76 SulphCo .19 Talbots wt d.56 TanzRy g 6.49 Taseko 5.61 Tengsco .84

-.07 -.19 -.25 +.32 -.08 -.11 -.02 -.09 -.03 -.01 -.06 ... -.18 -.42 -.38 -.24 +.25 +.36 +.04 -.05 -.46 +1.96 -.00 -.20 -.01 ... -.34 ... -.17 -.17 -.07 ... -.11 +.09 -.05 +.16 +.01 -.08 +.11 +.14 -.07 +.04 +.60 +.70 -.00 -.01 -.04 -.02 ... -.04 +.07 +.04 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.01 -.05 -.08 +.15 +.26 -.08 +.10 +.01 -.01

TianyinPh d2.66 +.03 +.07 TimberlnR .95 +.03 +.03 TrnsatlPet 2.91 -.04 -.13 TravelCtrs 4.06 -.05 +.30 TriValley .43 -.01 +.02 TriangPet 7.16 +.02 -.51 Tucows g .74 +.02 -.01 TwoHrbInv 10.07 -.02 +.29 UQM Tech 2.81 -.02 -.08 US Geoth 1.21 -.05 -.14 Uluru .09 ... -.01 Univ Insur 5.42 -.18 +.08 Ur-Energy 3.05 +.16 +.25 Uranerz u4.44 -.78 -.33 UraniumEn 5.25 -.46 -.09 VangMega u43.63 -.80 -.29 VangTotW u48.02 -1.07 -.44 VantageDrl 1.85 -.07 -.04 Versar 3.40 -.07 +.02 VirnetX 12.48 -.60 -.21 VistaGold 2.56 +.04 +.16 WalterInv 18.19 -.47 +.08 WFAdvInco 9.81 -.06 +.10 WFAdMSec 15.02 -.14 +.03 WidePoint 1.21 -.10 -.14 WirelessT 1.02 -.03 -.10 WT DrfChn 25.32 -.07 -.02 WT Drf Bz 26.33 -.17 -.10 WizzardSft .26 -.02 -.00 Xfone 1.43 -.02 +.14 YM Bio g 2.45 +.09 +.31 ZBB Engy 1.04 -.03 -.11

Name

Total AssetsTotal Return/Rank Obj ($Mins) 4-wk

PIMCO Instl PIMS: TotRet n American Funds A: GwthFdA p Fidelity Invest: Contra n American Funds A: CapInBldA p Vanguard Idx Fds: TotStk n American Funds A: CapWGrA p Vanguard Instl Fds: InstIdx n American Funds A: IncoFdA p Vanguard Admiral: 500Adml n American Funds A: InvCoAA p Vanguard Admiral: TotStkAdm n Vanguard Idx Fds: TotlIntl n Dodge&Cox: Intl Stk Dodge&Cox: Stock American Funds A: EupacA p American Funds A: WshMutA p Frank/Temp Frnk A: IncoSerA p PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRetAd n Vanguard Instl Fds: InsPl n American Funds A: NewPerA p

IB LG LG BL XC GL SP BL SP LC XC IL IL LV IL LC BL IB SP GL

138,794 66,101 61,430 58,576 56,062 55,060 54,685 52,075 51,437 48,788 47,190 45,190 43,406 43,037 39,210 38,821 34,273 33,684 33,642 33,224

+0.7 +0.9 -0.1 +0.1 +1.3 +1.0 +1.6 +1.3 +1.6 +1.5 +1.3 +0.8 +0.5 +2.5 +0.5 +1.2 +2.4 +0.7 +1.6 +0.2

12-mo

Min 5-year

Init Invt

Percent Load

NAV

+7.6/B +17.1/D +21.4/C +11.3/E +21.8/B +14.1/E +20.0/A +15.4/B +20.0/A +15.9/D +21.9/B +16.3/C +17.8/B +17.7/C +15.2/D +17.3/C +16.0/B +7.3/B +20.1/A +17.7/C

+47.4/A +8.9/C +20.8/A +20.1/B +13.2/B +22.1/B +10.7/A +22.2/B +10.6/A +10.9/C +13.7/B +16.6/B +20.6/B -1.5/D +24.6/A +8.7/C +32.1/A +45.7/A +10.8/A +27.6/A

1,000,000 250 2,500 250 3,000 250 5,000,000 250 100,000 250 100,000 3,000 2,500 2,500 250 250 1,000 1,000,000 200,000,000 250

NL 5.75 NL 5.75 NL 5.75 NL 5.75 NL 5.75 NL NL NL NL 5.75 5.75 4.25 NL NL 5.75

10.86 30.70 67.74 49.90 32.01 36.02 116.84 16.75 117.67 28.58 32.02 15.79 35.78 110.41 41.44 27.52 2.22 10.86 116.84 28.64

G – Growth. GI – Growth & Income. SS – Single-state Muni. MP – Mixed Portfolio. GG – General US Govt. EI – Equity Income. SC – Small Co Growth. A – Cap Appreciation. IL – International. Total Return: Change in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Percent Load: Sales charge. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. NA – Not avail. NE – Data in question. NS – Fund not in existence.


C6 Saturday, January 29, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

E

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Wyden’s victory on secret holds

S

en. Ron Wyden’s victory in the U.S. Senate on Thursday won’t set that establishment on its collective ear. Rather, the Oregon Democrat’s accomplishment will make it a bit

easier for other senators and ordinary folks to see who is responsible when progress on a particular measure grinds to a halt. Wyden and Iowa Republican Charles Grassley have been working for more than a decade to rein in the practice of placing secret holds on legislation and nominations. They accomplished that task on Thursday. The vote on the binding resolution wasn’t even close — it was approved 92-4. It was a long time coming. Wyden was a sponsor of an amendment to a 1997 appropriations bill that would have ended holds, but that provision was removed during a reconciliation conference. A similar provision was included in a 2007 open government bill, but it was changed so much that it did little to shed light on holds in a timely fashion. Meanwhile, Wyden and Grassley practiced what they preached by announcing their own

holds in the Congressional Record. Thursday’s vote tightens the rules on holds approved in the 2007 bill. Now if a senator places a hold on a piece of the Senate’s business, he or she must go public within 48 hours of objecting. Moreover, a senator no longer can put a hold on a bill, then pass the hold and the secrecy that goes with it onto another senator. Senators still have enormous power to halt legislation and nominations, of course. They still may place holds on items they object to. Now, however, their colleagues and everyone else will know where the objection lies. The change will make the Senate’s business more transparent, no small thing in this era of distrust of all things political.

FROM THE ARCHIVES Editor’s Note: The following editorials, which do not necessarily reflect the views of The Bulletin’s editorial board today, appeared on Sept. 30, 1970, and April 15, 1974, respectively.

Back into Dick’s lap The President’s Commission on Campus Unrest has come out for motherhood and apple pie. Our President, the commission says, must be a moral leader. He must “bring us together.” Our policemen should be welltrained and well-equipped men ready to, in the words of the commission, “respond to civil disorders.” Our universities should bring out the strap, and use it, at times: “The universities should promulgate a code making clear the limits of permissible conduct and announce in advance what measure it is willing to employ in response to impermissible conduct.” Teachers should be good guys, too: “Faculty members who engage in or lead disruptive conduct have no place in the university community.” And students must behave: “Students must face the fact that giving moral support to those who are planning violent action is morally despicable. They must recognize that they are citizens too.” Public officials must hold their tongues and be fair: “We strongly urge public officials at all levels of government to recognize that their public statements can either heal or divide. We urge public officials to reject demands that entire universities be punished because of the ideas or excesses of some member.” And, of course, the commission, which released its report Saturday, deplores violence. Both trigger-happy police officers and student terrorists are labeled “criminals” in the report.

The commission ... has come up with nothing new. Instead, the commission threw that task back into the President’s lap: It recommended that Nixon take a lead in explaining to the American people the underlying causes of campus unrest. That’s the job the commission was saddled with in the first place.

Remember the figure Remember the figure, $118 billion. That’s the amount of personal income taxes the Internal Revenue Service expects to collect this year. ... If you haven’t already done so, get your return into the mail. The IRS will forgive you if the Postal Service takes a long time to deliver it, but it must be postmarked before midnight to avoid possible penalties. That figure, $118 billion, is of more interest ... than usual this year. Tax experts have been worrying for weeks that the figure will be lower than expected. One man and his tax advisers are responsible for almost all that worry. The man, of course, is Richard Nixon. If every American taxpayer stretches his deductions, exemptions, and write-offs as thoroughly as Mr. Nixon stretched his, the take will be considerably lower. Taxes were a big political issue two years ago. Every would-be candidate for President talked about getting the inequities out of the tax system. Most of those candidates are in the U.S. Senate at the present time. They showed precious little enthusiasm for tax reform since the end of the 1972 campaign. About all that has been done has been the granting of more tax breaks to favored groups. Don’t depend on elected officials, at least any of the present crop, for much real tax reform.

My Nickel’s Worth Fire curb ramp employees The Jan. 17 Bulletin reported Bend’s dilemma with the general fund deficit. I would strongly urge that the city start by eliminating from the city staff the person or persons responsible for approving thousands of curb ramps that did not meet ADA requirements. These public employees have cost Bend taxpayers millions of dollars, and yet we must assume that they continue to be responsible for spending additional millions of our limited tax dollars. It is extremely disappointing that The Bulletin has not seen fit to investigate and report exactly who is responsible for this travesty. Those public employees must be held accountable, removed from public employ, and not be presented with generous severance packages. Is it any wonder why so many voters oppose additional tax measures? John Larson Bend

Blame arbitration There have been quite a number of articles recently about cutting public employee labor costs, like the 6 percent pickup. Unfortunately, little has been said about the problems local governments face in trying to curtail wage and benefit increases. The biggest issue is the protection afforded labor unions by state law. It is not widely understood by the public that it is state law, not federal law, that governs collective bargaining at the state and local level. In fact, 12 states, including Virginia, ban collective bargaining altogether. Another 12

states, including Nevada, which bans it at the state level only, have a mixture. Local public entities should be lobbying the Legislature hard this year to change Oregon’s public employee labor laws. This would be far more effective than anything local public entities can do on their own during contract negotiations. The single most effective change would be the elimination of mandatory arbitration. The second would be to modify the onerous laws restricting the privatization of public services. In the private sector businesses can respond to union demands for higher pay, for example, by substituting capital for labor. Unfortunately, public-sector managers have little flexibility to make such changes. So don’t blame the city of Bend, for example, for the way its labor contracts stick it to us taxpayers with the 6 percent pickup — it’s mandatory arbitration, and sometimes just the threat of using it by the unions, that’s the root of that problem. The process is way out of balance in Oregon in favor of public employee labor unions and against the private sector taxpayers. Harold Shrader Bend

The real danger In 1950 through 1951, Sen. Estes Kefauver of Tennessee chaired what came to be known as the U.S. Senate’s Kefauver Committee. The purpose of that committee was to uncover and eliminate organized crime in the United States. Many of that committee’s 14 hearings were broadcast on live television. My mom, fascinated with the proceedings, watched many witnesses

testify before the committee. Mom was hopeful. She believed that if only we could stamp out organized crime, we honest folks would then live in safety, both in our homes and on our streets. Unfortunately, Mom was wrong. The danger to our safety wasn’t then, and isn’t today, organized crime. The vast majority of us honest folks can live our whole lives without ever having any direct contact with organized crime. The real danger to society was then, and is today, that isolated, crazed individual who is intent on destruction. Bill Birnbaum Sisters

Helping the people We, the people of the United States of America, elect our people to represent us in government, hoping they will do the right things for us. We, the people, pay taxes. Part of our taxes go to pay salaries to those we elect and all of their staff. It also pays for all of their perks, which are many. Our taxes also purchase a great health insurance package for our elected officials, no questions asked about precondition. They also pay the premiums for all of their family members. We have now elected a president who wants to use some of our tax money to purchase the same insurance package for we the people. He actually wants to do something good for us with some of our money. I say thanks, Mr. President, for thinking of the people. Dorothy Bourgo Redmond

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Bend should try to establish urban rail passenger service By Alistair Paterson Bulletin guest columnist

T

he year 2010 has come and gone and many will be well-pleased. It wasn’t the easiest of years, with foreclosures and bankruptcies continuing to be all too common. Inevitably this has spurred much debate about how best to cope with the numerous economic challenges towns and cities across America are facing. With so many of Bend’s concerned citizens in search of solutions, it’s not surprising that across town business groups are popping up or reinventing themselves. Just within the city limits we have the Chamber of Commerce, the City Club, Economic Development for Central Oregon, Bend 2030, Opportunity Knocks, The Deschutes Alliance, and Visit Bend, along with several Rotary clubs and other equally well-intended organizations. Some have spent plenty of money conducting surveys, and while many of our business sectors continue to languish, the consulting business — especially for consultants who don’t

actually live in Bend — is booming! Oftentimes when we seek counsel to solve personal issues, we’re told the answers lie within ourselves. The same holds true for Bend. Many of the answers to our problems require the re-examination of past choices, decisions and policies for which we now face the consequences. Having attended many of their forums and listened to their forecasters’ predictions, it’s apparent that while they offer some valid points, few are beyond the scope or imagination of our own very capable citizenry. Many are locked into the ideal that without continued growth and expansion, we’re essentially doomed. Some claim we simply don’t have the luxury of being selective when it comes to growth and new industry — that we must grab at every potential business lifeline regardless of the long-term consequences. I’m not convinced. I fear that any short-term benefits thus gained may come at the cost of the unique qualities that make Bend such a special place. Most, however, agree on the need for improved infrastructure, although how

IN MY VIEW we fund this is a matter of much debate. We have a well-recognized and muchrevered asset that flows right through the middle of town — our beloved Deschutes River. However, there is a second such asset that is mostly ignored, sometimes scorned and oftentimes resented — to wit, a functioning railway system. A look at a map of Bend confirms we have something cities elsewhere have paid millions of dollars to build — a railway running from one end of town to the other right through the city center. I know we don’t own it — the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad does — but it in turn is owned by the Berkshire Hathaway Corp., whose CEO is none other than Warren Buffet. By all indications, he would be open to an approach requesting the right for a town like Bend to run a small passenger train — three carriages and a light locomotive — on BNSF tracks on a schedule that would not conflict with existing freight traffic.

Furthermore, the federal government would be a prime source of funding, as this is exactly the type of infrastructure improvement it is actively promoting. I’d envisage the line starting at Deschutes River Woods with stops near Brosterhous, Reed Market, Colorado, Franklin, Greenwood, Norton, Revere, Butler Market, Empire, Robal and ending at Cooley. There is ample opportunity to create parking lots at both ends of the line, with the rest of the stops all located in existing population areas that wouldn’t require them. Franklin and Greenwood have existing pedestrian walkways under the parkway, and the balance could easily have covered pedestrian overpasses constructed. Near Norton the line passes within 200 yards of Wall Street, and from the Colorado stop it’s barely half a mile to the Old Mill. Additionally, the Butler Market and Robal stops would be right next to our two largest shopping centers. A combined BAT and train pass would further enhance the overall usability of the sys-

tem while the short length of the train would minimize traffic stops at train crossings. There are existing shunting lines en route that would allow the passenger train to “step aside” for freight lines on a scheduled basis. Five trips a day each way would provide commuters with a before- and after-work option, along with midmorning, midday and midafternoon. With $4-a-gallon gas looming and an already overcrowded parkway, the benefits are obvious. Winter storm driving could be avoided by many, while the promotional opportunities to our tourist market are endless. This is an opportunity of enormous proportions. Future expansion could see the line extended from Sunriver to Redmond, saving countless millions of dollars otherwise needed for highway expansion. The old adage of “never looking a gift horse in the mouth” must surely apply here. My advice is that we should grab it with wide-open arms. Alistair Paterson lives in Bend.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, January 29, 2011 C7

O D

N   Hazel Marie Maynard, of Madras Jan. 3, 1912 - Jan. 27, 2011 Arrangements: Bel-Air Funeral Home, 541-475-2241 Services: Graveside Committal: Monday January 31, 2011 at 10:30 am at Mount Jefferson Memorial Park. Memorial Services to follow at 11:00 am at Madras Christian Church. Contributions may be made to:

Mt. View Hospice or Jefferson County Senior Center.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Judy Ann Gibson Sept. 18, 1939 - Jan. 20, 2011 Judy passed away at her Redmond home on January 20, 2011, from complications of breast cancer. Judy was born to Charles and Nedra Boyer in Bremerton, Washington. She graduated from South Kitsap High School in Port Orchard, Washington, attended LinJudy Ann field College Gibson and University of Aix-Marseilles, France, graduated from San Fernando Valley State College and received a master's degree from Reed College. She married Hal Gibson March 5, 1965. Judy was a studio potter over 40 years, working in porcelain and mostly following the tradition of classical Chinese forms and glazes. A life-long traveler, she travelled extensively in Europe, South and Central America, the West Indies, Southeast Asia, Nepal, and the Near East. A short story writer, a collection of her works, Floating Free, was published in 2008. She taught at Pacific University, Forest Grove, OR, and Piedmont Schools, Piedmont, CA. She was a member of DAR. Judy was survived by her husband, Hal Gibson of Redmond and McMinnville, OR; mother, Nedra Wagner of Port Orchard, WA; sister, Toby Warren of Port Orchard, WA; nephew, Ron Jones of Gig Harbor, WA; niece, Rebecca Jones of Bremerton, WA; and nephew, Scott Jones of Port Orchard, WA. No service is planned. Memorial donations may be made to Linfield College, 900 SE Baker Street, McMinnville, OR 97128. Please sign our guest book at redmondmemorial.com.

Zany comedian Callas dies at 83

Troy William Vilhauer July 3, 1965 - January 22, 2011 Troy Vilhauer, 45, of Redmond, passed away on Jan. 22, 2011, in Redmond. Troy was born in Redmond to Robert Vilhauer and Gayle Cripe on July 3, 1965. He married Vicky Corbin on July 4, 1993, in Redmond. Troy is preceded in death by his grandson, Evan Teves. Troy is survived by wife, Vicky Vilhauer; daughters, Natasha Vilhauer, Nichole Hatchard and Melissa Pope; his brother, Rusty King; his sister, Trina Sampson; his mother, Gayle Cripe; his father, Robert Vilhauer and his wife, Candy Vilhauer. He also leaves behind three granddaughters and two grandsons. For information on memorial service please email Natasha at nvtasha21@yahoo.com. The family of Troy Vilhauer wishes to extend our sincere thanks to all of our friends and family for all the love and support. We would also like to thank the hospice organization. Please sign our guest book at www.redmondmemorial.com.

By Dennis Hevesi New York Times News Service

Joyce Louise Geving July 20, 1929 - January 24, 2011 Joyce Louise Geving passed away January 24th in Redmond of natural causes. Joyce was born in Clearwater, Nebraska to Lloyd and Olive Pick. She lived in several states and loved to travel. She moved to Central Oregon around 1958, and resided in Bend for several years. After moving to Seattle, she began a successful career clerking for Safeway. She retired after 25 years of clerking in Washington and California, and returned to Redmond, where she made her home. A member of St. Thomas Catholic Church, she volunteered at St. Vincent De Paul for many years. Most recently, Joyce had been a resident of Cougar Springs Retirement Community where she enjoyed Bible studies, listening to musical talents, and going on outings to places she hadn't seen before here in Central Oregon. Those who knew Joyce remember her spunky spirit, witty mind, and outgoing personality. She is survived by three brothers, George, Robert and David Pick; two sisters, Jolene Taylor and Claudelle West; three children, Terrie Meyers, Teddie Hubert, and Rick Geving; and many grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and great-greatgrandchildren. She will be missed. Please sign our guest book at www.redmondmemorial.com

Horse bill Continued from C1 “We (didn’t) want to impact someone that shouldn’t be impacted,” Minten said. “This is an outline. We can keep part of it. All of it. None of it. And we never had that opportunity because a few of the horse rescue groups started out the gate before we had an opportunity.” Joan Steelhammer, who runs

Honor guard Continued from C1 “We have two military Honor Guard teams, composed for the most part of active-duty service members. They are available for services all over the state,” Brady said. “But we rely heavily on the local volunteer teams to support us.” The La Pine Honor Guard has been active in Central Oregon since its founding in the early 1990s. The group came into existence, according to honor guard member Dale Vincent, because there was a need for some group to provide funeral honors in the area. “When the honor guard was

Los Angeles Times ile photo

Comedian Charlie Callas, who died Thursday at age 83, is seen on stage in 1982. Callas, who punctuated his comedy routines with a bizarre array of facial expressions and sound effects, was a resident of Las Vegas.

Charlie Callas, a rubber-faced comedian who cavorted on television and the nightclub circuit in the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s, often punctuating punch lines with sound effects emanating from his motor mouth, died Thursday in Las Vegas. He was 83. Michael Murphy, the coroner in Clark County in Nevada, confirmed the death. A string bean of a man with a Cyrano-size nose, Callas appeared on virtually every television variety and talk show in the days of Ed Sullivan, Jackie Gleason, Merv Griffin and Johnny Carson. He was a regular on “The Andy Williams Show” and “The ABC Comedy Hour,” a semi-regular on “The Flip Wilson Show” and a co-host of “The Joey Bishop Show.” Callas tried his hand at drama in 1975, opposite Eddie Albert and Robert Wagner, as a former con man and restaurant owner, Malcolm Argos, in the crime show “Switch.” But that was just a detour from the zany. Jerry Lewis was so taken by Callas that, while both were appearing on a talk show in 1965, he said, “You’ve got to be in my next movie.” He was — in the 1967 production “The Big Mouth.” Carson was also impressed by Callas, inviting him to appear on

Noted climate scientist dies at 88

the “The Tonight Show” nearly 50 times. Then came the night of Sept. 21, 1982. With Callas bombing, Carson made a whistling-buzzing sound — as if tracing a bomb’s trajectory. In comic desperation, Callas leaned over and shoved Carson. Carson, almost always amiable on the air, was so annoyed that on the spot, in front of his television audience, he told Callas that he’d never appear on the show again. Carson kept his word. It was not the end of Callas’ career, however. Besides nightclub gigs and guest spots on other talk shows, he went on to appear in several movies. Among them were the horror-film spoof “Hysterical” (1983), in which he played Dracula; “Amazon Women on the Moon” (1987), a bizarre take on low-budget movies in which he did his own stand-up shtick; and Mel Brooks’ “Dracula: Dead and Loving It” (1995), a parody of the Bram Stoker novel. In 1981, Callas played the soothsayer in Brooks’ dawn-of-man spoof, “History of the World — Part I.” In the 1977 live-action and animated film “Pete’s Dragon,” Callas provided the voice of the title character, a dragon named Elliot. Callas was born Charles Callias in Brooklyn on Dec. 20, 1927. He is survived by two sons, Mark and Larry. His wife, Evelyn, died in July.

Hit-and-run

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — James Knudson, known to many as “Jimboy” because of the famous taco chain he founded, died Wednesday at the age of 95. He remained active until be-

ing diagnosed with cancer a week ago and had “a mercifully quick end to what was quite a life,” said Tom Boalt, general manager of Jimboy’s Tacos and a longtime friend. Knudson was born in Alberta, Canada, and grew up amid hardship in Minnesota.

According to company lore, Knudson had his first taste of a taco while visiting a friend near Grass Valley. He was so impressed that he closed the restaurant — the 49er Cafe — developed a special Jimboy’s sauce and began selling tacos out of a trailer at Lake Tahoe.

a local nonprofit horse rescue group, Equine Outreach, said she thinks the bill had good intentions but isn’t feasible. “It’s an absolute mess,” Steelhammer said. “There is no way to make it practical or to apply it or to administer it or enforce it.” Noell Devenny, of Bend, who owns Desert Spirit Appaloosas, a small horse breeding operation, said the bill goes too far. She believes it would hurt the

people who follow the law, and that those it’s trying to target would continue to defy the rules. “The bottom line is, the people who break the law will continue to break it,” she said. “And to penalize everyone in the state that owns an equine, you’re not helping.” She said having to pay a fee for each of her horses would hurt her overall budget. “That’s money I could put into

hay, to pay the farrier, to vaccinate,” she said. And Devenny said, in the end, horse owners don’t like to feel like they are being punished. “It’s like walking into a classroom and one kid is throwing spit wads across the room and you tell the entire class they all miss recess,” she said.

Continued from C1 In one still image, a person in an orange sweatshirt wearing a dark backpack is seen riding a bicycle south through the parking lot an estimated nine seconds before the crash. In a second image, an individual police believe is a woman is seen wearing dark clothing while walking from the entrance of the grocery store toward a small black car. Gregory said a man who was walking with Martin when he was struck is the best witness police have identified so far. They’re hoping patrons at nearby businesses or the people seen on the surveillance tapes can provide additional clues. One man who says he knew Martin is David Crouse. Crouse met Martin in 2000 when they were neighbors in Deschutes River Woods. The two became acquainted when Martin helped Crouse fix his car, Crouse said, and they soon became friends. Martin was a funny, quick-witted and generous man who would “give you the shirt off his back,” Crouse said. Crouse said Martin was turning his life around after run-ins with the law. A journeyman carpenter, Martin was looking for work, Crouse said, and living with his girlfriend and their young daughter. “It’s just a super-tragic story,” Crouse said. “He was turning over a new leaf. He was clean and sober. He was doing the right thing. He was jumping through his probationary hoops and making his best effort to be a good father.”

Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.

started, we thought we’d end up doing about two or three funerals a year,” Vincent said. “We called ourselves the ‘Rag Tag’ outfit, and we did six that first year.”

Pat Cotton, and that is partially because of the large numbers of retirees in south Deschutes County. Nationwide, veterans make up about 10 percent of the population, according to VA statistics, and in Oregon, veterans make up about 13 percent of the population. To take care of these funerals reverently and effectively, the honor guard is set up like a regular American Legion organization, said Bob Hubbard, with a commander, secretary-treasurer and drill sergeant. The unit buys its own uniforms and equipment and pays its travel expenses. The average age of La Pine’s honor guard members, all volunteers, is about 70. The team currently has 10 members, Hub-

By Douglas Martin New York Times News Service

It is said that every breath we take contains molecules breathed by Socrates, Jesus and Abraham Lincoln — a notable exception being the ancient air that the Danish geophysicist Willi Dansgaard and his colleagues found trapped deep in the ice of Greenland. Drilling more than a mile through millennia of ice, Dansgaard, 88, and a team of researchers journeyed backward through time to analyze trapped bubbles of air containing molecules of oxygen so old they had never been breathed by a human. By analyzing samples, they could gauge the world’s

climate during various periods and determine how it had changed. They found, among other things, that temperatures have changed more suddenly and violently than had long been supposed; around 15,000 years ago, for example, Greenland abruptly warmed by 16 degrees within 50 years. It had been thought that major climate changes occurred over thousands of years. Perhaps more important, Dansgaard, who died Jan. 8 in Copenhagen, Denmark, perfected ways to date icebound gases as well as to analyze acidity, dust and other influences on climatic conditions. Ice-core analysis proved to be a major

advance in studying the climate history of the planet, providing evidence that predated other sources of measurement like tree rings, lake sediments and petrified organic matter. Dansgaard’s work had significant implications in measuring carbon dioxide concentrations over vast periods and understanding the dynamics of global warming. One finding was that temperatures and greenhouse gases, which trap heat, move in lockstep. In an interview, William Sweet, author of “Kicking the Carbon Habit” (2006), called this “the most compelling evidence we have of the relationship between greenhouse gases and global temperature.”

James ‘Jimboy’ Knudson, of Jimboy’s Tacos, dies at 95 By Bob Shallit McClatchy -Tribune News Service

Average about one ceremony per month Currently, the La Pine honor guard averages about one ceremony per month, said member Bob Hubbard, depending on the time of year. Cold, wet weather is not an issue with the team’s participation, he said, but noted that older veterans tend to die in the winter months. Post 45 in La Pine is the largest American Legion organization in Oregon, says post adjutant

bard said, but the number of participants available for providing honor guard services fluctuates as people come in and out of the unit and travel. In addition to the graveside services, there are regular practices, Hubbard said, and a scheduled fundraiser every fifth Friday at the La Pine Legion hall.

No charge to the families There is no charge to the family for providing funeral honors, he said, but a donation may be made to the unit to defray expenses. “We have never had to turn down a qualified veteran for funeral honors, and we don’t

intend to,” Hubbard said. “We practice frequently, dress well and do everything we can to honor the memory of the deceased veteran.” To request an Honor Guard locally, contact a funeral director or any veterans office, Brady said. To contact the main scheduling office of the Military Funeral Honors Program, call 503-249-5158. Leon Pantenburg can be reached at 541-382-1811 or at lpantenburg@bendbulletin.com.

Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday


W E AT H ER

C8 Saturday, January 29, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2011.

TODAY, JANUARY 29 Today: Mostly cloudy, very slight chance of evening showers, mild.

HIGH Ben Burkel

53

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

Western Ruggs

Condon

43/35

42/33

47/35

35/24

Willowdale

Warm Marion Springs Forks  53/33

49/23

Cloudy with a chance of rain today. Rain and mountain snow tonight. Central

55/32

 Mitchell

Madras

51/28

50/31

Camp Sherman 48/23 Redmond Prineville 53/26 Cascadia 52/27 Paulina 52/27 45/23 Sisters 50/25 Bend Post   53/26 49/24 Oakridge Elk Lake Brothers Sunriver 50/25

50/23

41/14

50/22



44/16



13/-6

44/36

Seattle



48/41

Missoula 38/25

Eugene 50/36

Boise

53/26

 59/39

Idaho Falls Elko



38/21



44/32

52/36

Redding

Helena 36/12

Bend

Grants Pass

Christmas Valley

Silver Lake

48/20

Calgary

Vancouver

30/18

48/25

Reno

47/23

San Francisco

Mostly cloudy today. Cloudy with a chance of rain and snow tonight.

Crater Lake 37/23

56/32

52/47

Salt Lake City



38/29

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:26 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 5:11 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:25 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 5:12 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 4:14 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 1:07 p.m.

New

First

Full

Last

Feb. 2

Feb. 10

Feb. 18

Feb. 24

OREGON CITIES City

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

HIGH

31

LOW

Astoria . . . . . . . . 51/40/0.13 . . . . . 48/40/sh. . . . . . 51/37/sh Baker City . . . . . . 34/32/0.00 . . . . . .40/27/rs. . . . . . 39/25/rs Brookings . . . . . . 50/47/0.00 . . . . . 52/45/sh. . . . . . 53/39/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 31/18/0.00 . . . . . .39/26/rs. . . . . . 39/22/rs Eugene . . . . . . . .55/35/trace . . . . . 50/36/sh. . . . . . 51/35/sh Klamath Falls . . . 54/25/0.00 . . . . . . 44/25/c. . . . . . 41/21/sn Lakeview. . . . . . . 52/21/0.00 . . . . . 46/27/sh. . . . . . 39/25/sn La Pine . . . . . . . . 54/28/0.00 . . . . . 50/22/sn. . . . . . 41/17/rs Medford . . . . . . . 58/29/0.00 . . . . . . 53/34/c. . . . . . 50/31/pc Newport . . . . . . . 52/46/0.09 . . . . . 52/43/sh. . . . . . 55/41/sh North Bend . . . . . 55/45/0.00 . . . . . 51/41/sh. . . . . . 51/37/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 38/31/0.00 . . . . . . 38/31/c. . . . . . . 41/27/c Pendleton . . . . . . 52/28/0.00 . . . . . .48/35/rs. . . . . . . 44/28/r Portland . . . . . . . 54/37/0.00 . . . . . 50/39/sh. . . . . . 49/37/sh Prineville . . . . . . . 56/31/0.00 . . . . . .52/27/rs. . . . . . 44/24/pc Redmond. . . . . . . 58/27/0.00 . . . . . .54/26/rs. . . . . . 47/22/pc Roseburg. . . . . . . 58/35/0.00 . . . . . 52/37/sh. . . . . . 51/34/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 56/35/0.00 . . . . . 50/39/sh. . . . . . 52/37/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 55/26/0.00 . . . . . .50/25/rs. . . . . . 44/19/pc The Dalles . . . . . . 57/34/0.00 . . . . . 54/36/sh. . . . . . 49/34/pc

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55/32 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 in 1931 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.48” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . -15 in 1980 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 1.61” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.48” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 1.61” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.94 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.66 in 1954 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .6:40 a.m. . . . . . .3:39 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .4:27 a.m. . . . . . .1:43 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .7:36 a.m. . . . . . .5:13 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .9:33 a.m. . . . . . .9:34 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . .10:46 p.m. . . . . .10:20 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .9:23 a.m. . . . . . .9:16 p.m.

1

LOW

34 11

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Sunday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly sunny and very cold. HIGH

6

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases

WEDNESDAY Mostly sunny and very cold.

38 10

BEND ALMANAC Yesterday’s regional extremes • 58° Roseburg • 18° Burns

TUESDAY

Mostly cloudy, very slight chance of snow LOW showers, colder.

HIGH

46 21

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE



52/24



Chemult

48/23

Fort Rock

Mostly cloudy, isolated mixed showers, LOW cooler.

NORTHWEST

Mostly cloudy today. Cloudy with a chance of rain and snow tonight. Eastern

Hampton

48/21

HIGH

26

50/39

36/18

50/22

Crescent

Crescent Lake

LOW

Portland

Burns

La Pine

Tonight: Mostly cloudy, chance of snow showers.

MONDAY

Low pressure off the coast will provide rain for western locations, with rain and snow northeast.

STATE

Maupin

Government Camp

SUNDAY

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 36-48 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 41 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 38-81 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 71-93 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 69 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 30-38 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 92 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 22 Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 22-58 Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0

. . . . . . . . 43 . . . . 110-200 . . . . . . . . 86 . . . . . . . 111 . . . . . . 45-62 . . . . . . 36-40 . . . . . . 45-59

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

S Calgary 13/-6

Vancouver 44/36

(in the 48 contiguous states):

S

S

Saskatoon 1/-16

Seattle 48/41

Rapid City 35/15

Santa Ana, Calif.

• -6° Gunnison, Colo.

San Francisco 52/47 Las Vegas 66/45 Los Angeles 62/49

• 0.77” Quillayute, Wash.

Salt Lake City 38/29

Cheyenne 45/25 Denver 56/25

Chihuahua 58/29

La Paz 74/51 Juneau 31/15

Mazatlan 75/49

S

S

S S

Quebec 12/-2

To ronto 24/15

Des Moines 31/12 Chicago 33/22 Omaha 31/14 St. Louis Kansas City 42/26 42/22

Portland 31/15 Boston 32/19

Halifax 30/17

Buffalo

Detroit 30/18

28/15

New York 35/24 Philadelphia 36/24 Washington, D. C. 40/28

Columbus 34/24 Louisville 44/28

Charlotte 59/34

Nashville 52/35

Oklahoma City Atlanta Little Rock 70/35 63/44 Birmingham Dallas 66/40 66/43 72/51 New Orleans 68/54 Houston 70/58

Tijuana 67/47

Anchorage 30/22

S

Green Bay 23/10

Albuquerque 55/29 Phoenix 70/44

Honolulu 82/66

S

Thunder Bay 10/-8

St. Paul 25/10

Boise 44/32

• 83°

Winnipeg 4/-15

S

Bismarck 10/-6

Billings 34/11

Portland 50/39

S

Orlando 70/45 Miami 72/55

Monterrey 75/54

FRONTS

SHOOTING OF LINCOLN CITY OFFICER

Kevin Clark / The (Eugene) Register-Guard

Bayshore Estates resident Elizabeth Walter Brown is seen at a police checkpoint in Waldport. More than 30 law enforcement agencies have been involved in the search for David Anthony Durham, who is suspected of shooting a Lincoln City police officer Sunday.

SWAT teams withdraw as search widens for suspect By Nigel Duara and Jeff Barnard The Associated Press

WALDPORT — Authorities on Friday began pulling out of a coastal Oregon town where they spent the week searching for a camouflage-dressed man who they say shot a police officer, hoping the suspect will come out from hiding if there are fewer police. One SWAT team stayed in case David Anthony Durham, 43, was still hiding among the vacation homes in a sleepy neighborhood in Waldport, about 147 miles southwest of Portland. Three other teams left the scene. “Either Mr. Durham is long gone and we are, in a way, wast-

ing resources with all the SWAT teams down there, or he is hunkered down in a house somewhere waiting for us to leave,” Newport Police Chief Mark Miranda told OPB Radio’s Think Out Loud. “If he sees we are leaving and don’t have that much presence any more, he’ll surface,” Miranda said. Police had been hunting for Durham since Sunday night, when an officer from Lincoln City was shot during a traffic stop. Police chased Durham’s vehicle down U.S. 101, and forced it to stop in Waldport with a spike strip. The driver fled on foot.

Family members describe Durham, of Portland, as an avid outdoorsman who designs his own camouflage clothing. They say he became delusional after taking pain medication for an injured shoulder. Miranda said Coast Guard helicopters are still flying the area at the mouth of Alsea Bay. They have not found any signs that Durham swam across the frigid waters to escape the peninsula where authorities say he fired on a crab fisherman on Monday. Officer Steven Dodds remained in a Portland hospital recovering from gunshot wounds to his pelvis and abdomen.

Lane pays $20,000 to settle coercion lawsuit The Associated Press SALEM — Lane County has paid $20,000 to settle a lawsuit that accused a sheriff’s deputy of coercing an 11-year-old Creswell boy to falsely confess to shooting a neighbor’s dog. Acting Lane County Adminis-

trator Liane Richardson said the county settled because it would have cost more to defend the case in court. The (Eugene) Register-Guard reports the school district settled its share of the case last month for $10,000 plus $12,000 in attor-

ney fees. Neither the county nor the school district admitted employees did anything wrong. A sheriff’s deputy, school principal and security officer questioned the Levi Dunn in 2008 until he falsely confessed to the shooting.

Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .73/31/0.00 . 70/38/pc . . 59/35/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .28/25/0.05 . .31/20/sn . . .27/13/sf Albany. . . . . . . . .30/15/0.00 . .32/13/sn . . 27/10/pc Albuquerque. . . .54/27/0.00 . . .55/29/s . . . 55/29/s Anchorage . . . . .23/15/0.00 . 30/22/pc . . . 30/24/c Atlanta . . . . . . . .58/36/0.00 . . .63/44/s . . 59/44/pc Atlantic City . . . .37/22/0.03 . . .38/22/c . . 38/25/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .76/29/0.00 . .70/50/sh . . 71/44/pc Baltimore . . . . . .36/28/0.06 . . .37/26/c . . 37/22/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .50/39/0.00 . .34/11/sn . . .21/-1/sn Birmingham . . . .61/34/0.00 . . .66/43/s . . 59/46/sh Bismarck . . . . . . .39/21/0.00 . . 10/-6/sf . . -1/-12/sn Boise . . . . . . . . . .45/27/0.00 . . .44/32/c . . 46/30/sh Boston. . . . . . . . .33/18/0.00 . .32/19/sn . . 28/15/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .33/16/0.02 . .33/22/sn . . 32/20/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .28/24/0.01 . .28/15/sn . . . 20/6/pc Burlington, VT. . .31/14/0.00 . . .29/9/sn . . . 25/4/sn Caribou, ME . . . . .25/6/0.00 . . 20/-6/sn . .12/-10/sn Charleston, SC . .64/32/0.00 . . .64/44/s . . 65/45/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .57/27/0.00 . . .59/34/s . . 59/36/pc Chattanooga. . . .56/34/0.00 . 57/33/pc . . 56/36/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .57/39/0.00 . . .45/25/s . . . 45/18/c Chicago. . . . . . . .31/19/0.00 . . .33/22/c . . . 29/20/c Cincinnati . . . . . .34/26/0.07 . 37/25/pc . . 37/22/pc Cleveland . . . . . .28/26/0.03 . .30/19/sn . . 28/13/pc Colorado Springs 66/26/0.00 . . .58/25/s . . . 48/25/s Columbia, MO . .44/18/0.00 . 40/26/pc . . 34/23/pc Columbia, SC . . .61/30/0.00 . . .62/39/s . . 60/37/pc Columbus, GA. . .64/32/0.00 . . .67/44/s . . 63/47/sh Columbus, OH. . .30/25/0.03 . .34/24/sn . . . 32/17/c Concord, NH . . . . .34/1/0.00 . . .30/7/sn . . . . 26/5/c Corpus Christi. . .73/41/0.00 . . .71/62/t . . 76/59/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .75/36/0.00 . 72/51/pc . . . 64/45/c Dayton . . . . . . . .30/22/0.01 . . .33/23/c . . . 31/17/c Denver. . . . . . . . .67/37/0.00 . . .56/25/s . . . 50/25/s Des Moines. . . . .40/21/0.00 . . .31/12/c . . . 18/10/c Detroit. . . . . . . . .31/23/0.02 . .30/18/sn . . 26/10/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . .22/18/0.15 . . . 22/6/sf . . . .9/-5/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .62/22/0.00 . 66/36/pc . . . 64/35/s Fairbanks. . . . . . . 2/-14/0.00 . . . 4/-15/s . . . .7/-11/s Fargo. . . . . . . . . .37/23/0.04 . . . 8/-7/sf . . . .1/-12/c Flagstaff . . . . . . .54/18/0.00 . . .49/15/s . . . 46/20/s

Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .30/25/0.06 . .29/14/sn . . . 25/8/sn Green Bay. . . . . .26/23/0.00 . . 23/10/sf . . . . 21/7/c Greensboro. . . . .54/29/0.00 . . .56/32/s . . 55/33/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .34/27/0.03 . .34/20/sn . . 34/17/pc Hartford, CT . . . . .31/9/0.00 . .32/14/sn . . 28/11/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .50/24/0.00 . .36/12/sn . . . 18/0/sn Honolulu . . . . . . .82/72/0.00 . . .82/66/s . . . 80/65/s Houston . . . . . . .75/45/0.00 . .70/58/sh . . . .70/59/t Huntsville . . . . . .54/35/0.00 . . .55/37/s . . . 53/35/c Indianapolis . . . .30/23/0.01 . 36/25/pc . . 34/21/pc Jackson, MS . . . .67/37/0.00 . . .68/48/s . . 63/49/sh Madison, WI . . . .29/19/0.01 . . 29/15/sf . . . 22/12/c Jacksonville. . . . .66/35/0.00 . . .68/44/s . . 66/45/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . 33/23/trace . . .31/15/s . . . 31/23/s Kansas City. . . . .48/21/0.00 . 42/22/pc . . . 32/20/c Lansing . . . . . . . .29/23/0.07 . .28/13/sn . . . . 23/7/c Las Vegas . . . . . .65/42/0.00 . . .66/45/s . . 62/42/pc Lexington . . . . . .36/30/0.03 . 44/26/pc . . 43/27/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .50/20/0.00 . 33/15/pc . . . 22/10/c Little Rock. . . . . .68/35/0.00 . . .66/40/s . . . .54/39/t Los Angeles. . . . .72/50/0.00 . . .62/49/s . . 59/46/pc Louisville . . . . . . .42/31/0.00 . 44/28/pc . . . 43/26/c Memphis. . . . . . .56/38/0.00 . . .65/43/s . . . .56/40/t Miami . . . . . . . . .66/51/0.00 . . .72/55/s . . 75/59/pc Milwaukee . . . . .31/24/0.00 . . 31/17/sf . . . 25/17/c Minneapolis . . . .29/23/0.00 . . 25/10/sf . . . . 16/5/c Nashville . . . . . . .50/35/0.00 . 52/35/pc . . 53/36/pc New Orleans. . . .72/44/0.00 . 68/54/pc . . 67/54/sh New York . . . . . .34/28/0.00 . .35/24/sn . . 34/20/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .35/23/0.00 . .34/24/sn . . 34/19/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .46/28/0.00 . . .56/36/s . . 48/33/pc Oklahoma City . .76/33/0.00 . . .70/35/s . . 44/33/pc Omaha . . . . . . . .49/21/0.00 . . .31/14/c . . . . 20/9/c Orlando. . . . . . . .67/48/0.00 . . .70/45/s . . 73/50/pc Palm Springs. . . .76/46/0.00 . . .72/48/s . . 70/46/pc Peoria . . . . . . . . .28/25/0.00 . 34/22/pc . . 29/18/pc Philadelphia . . . .36/27/0.23 . .36/24/sn . . 34/19/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .73/46/0.00 . . .70/44/s . . . 68/45/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .30/24/0.04 . .35/22/sn . . 32/15/pc Portland, ME. . . . .34/3/0.00 . .31/15/sn . . . 28/8/sn Providence . . . . .34/13/0.00 . .34/18/sn . . 30/14/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . .56/28/0.00 . . .58/32/s . . 57/34/pc

Yesterday Saturday Sunday Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .55/30/0.00 . . .35/15/c . . .18/-3/sn Savannah . . . . . .65/38/0.00 . . .67/43/s . . 66/45/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .64/24/0.00 . . .56/32/c . . 44/26/sh Seattle. . . . . . . . .52/39/0.07 . .48/41/sh . . 46/36/sh Richmond . . . . . .46/28/0.03 . . .52/33/s . . 50/30/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . .39/17/0.00 . . . 23/0/sf . . . 11/2/sn Rochester, NY . . .30/24/0.00 . .28/18/sn . . . 21/7/pc Spokane . . . . . . .44/33/0.00 . .39/29/sh . . 32/21/sn Sacramento. . . . .48/40/0.00 . . .55/43/c . . 52/37/sh Springfield, MO. .62/25/0.00 . 58/30/pc . . . 42/29/c St. Louis. . . . . . . .47/21/0.00 . 42/26/pc . . . 36/25/c Tampa . . . . . . . . .65/47/0.00 . . .68/50/s . . 69/53/pc Salt Lake City . . .38/28/0.00 . 38/29/pc . . . 41/25/c Tucson. . . . . . . . .73/36/0.00 . . .67/37/s . . . 68/40/s San Antonio . . . .73/39/0.00 . . .70/52/t . . 75/50/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .72/30/0.00 . . .71/34/s . . . 43/35/c San Diego . . . . . .78/49/0.00 . . .61/51/s . . 59/50/pc Washington, DC .37/30/0.07 . 40/28/pc . . 38/24/pc San Francisco . . .54/46/0.00 . . .52/45/c . . 54/43/sh Wichita . . . . . . . .72/26/0.00 . . .59/24/s . . 39/22/pc San Jose . . . . . . .53/40/0.00 . . .58/43/c . . 56/41/sh Yakima . . . . . . . .46/34/0.00 . .45/30/sh . . . 44/24/c Santa Fe . . . . . . .57/19/0.00 . . .51/23/s . . 50/26/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .77/46/0.00 . . .72/47/s . . . 72/49/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .34/27/0.00 . . .39/29/s . . . 39/30/s Athens. . . . . . . . .53/46/0.38 . .46/36/sh . . 50/40/sh Auckland. . . . . . .73/63/0.00 . 70/60/pc . . . 75/62/s Baghdad . . . . . . .61/48/0.00 . .62/51/sh . . 65/51/sh Bangkok . . . . . . .90/75/0.00 . 89/73/pc . . 89/70/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .30/14/0.00 . . . .27/9/s . . . 31/13/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .63/57/0.00 . . .67/58/t . . 61/54/sh Berlin. . . . . . . . . .34/23/0.00 . . .34/25/s . . . 33/25/s Bogota . . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 . .70/44/sh . . 74/45/pc Budapest. . . . . . .34/14/0.00 . . .32/18/s . . . 35/21/s Buenos Aires. . . .90/70/0.00 . . .86/65/s . . . .86/68/t Cabo San Lucas .73/64/0.00 . . .74/56/s . . . 75/56/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .75/52/0.00 . . .73/57/s . . 66/55/sh Calgary . . . . . . . .32/25/0.00 . . 13/-6/sn . . . .5/-8/sn Cancun . . . . . . . 73/NA/0.00 . 78/60/pc . . 82/64/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .37/28/0.00 . . .41/33/s . . . 44/34/s Edinburgh . . . . . .39/34/0.00 . 40/32/pc . . 40/31/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .39/28/0.00 . 42/31/pc . . 44/32/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .73/64/0.27 . . .73/63/t . . 75/61/sh Hong Kong . . . . .64/54/0.00 . 61/53/pc . . 60/51/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . .48/36/0.00 . . 34/26/sf . . . 34/25/s Jerusalem . . . . . .62/44/0.00 . 66/45/pc . . 56/47/sh Johannesburg . . .79/55/0.00 . 80/61/pc . . . .83/60/t Lima . . . . . . . . . .81/72/0.00 . .76/67/sh . . 77/66/sh Lisbon . . . . . . . . .57/46/0.00 . .51/41/sh . . 50/39/sh London . . . . . . . .36/32/0.00 . . .41/33/s . . . 43/34/s Madrid . . . . . . . .48/39/0.37 . .44/32/sh . . 42/29/sh Manila. . . . . . . . .86/73/0.00 . 86/74/pc . . 85/72/pc

Mecca . . . . . . . . .81/75/0.00 . . .87/70/s . . . 89/70/s Mexico City. . . . .73/43/0.00 . . .75/43/s . . . 78/44/s Montreal. . . . . . .28/19/0.00 . . .15/0/pc . . . . . 8/-5/c Moscow . . . . . . . .18/5/0.00 . . 27/22/sf . . .27/14/sf Nairobi . . . . . . . .82/54/0.00 . 82/58/pc . . 82/57/pc Nassau . . . . . . . .81/68/0.00 . . .74/62/s . . . 76/65/s New Delhi. . . . . .68/43/0.00 . 70/48/pc . . 68/48/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . .43/32/0.00 . .45/33/sh . . 42/27/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . 10/-2/0.00 . . .31/14/s . . 27/13/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .27/18/0.01 . . 13/-1/pc . . . . . 7/-5/c Paris. . . . . . . . . . .36/30/0.00 . . .39/26/s . . . 40/27/s Rio de Janeiro. .100/82/0.00 . . .98/76/s . . 96/77/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . .55/43/0.00 . .51/42/sh . . 54/44/sh Santiago . . . . . . .91/63/0.00 . . .89/61/s . . . 91/61/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .91/72/0.00 . . .89/71/t . . . .90/71/t Sapporo. . . . . . . .23/19/0.00 . 23/18/pc . . .24/20/sf Seoul . . . . . . . . . .23/12/0.00 . . .18/2/pc . . . . 17/0/s Shanghai. . . . . . .39/32/0.07 . 39/29/pc . . . 37/28/s Singapore . . . . . .82/77/0.59 . . .83/75/t . . . .82/74/t Stockholm. . . . . .32/19/0.00 . 33/22/pc . . 28/22/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . .75/72/0.00 . . .79/66/s . . 87/67/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .64/55/0.00 . .61/52/sh . . 58/50/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . 69/53/pc . . 63/53/sh Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .46/30/0.00 . .46/35/sh . . 44/32/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .30/23/0.00 . . 24/15/sf . . . 21/5/pc Vancouver. . . . . .46/34/0.06 . .44/36/sh . . . .44/33/r Vienna. . . . . . . . .27/19/0.00 . . .32/24/s . . . 34/21/s Warsaw. . . . . . . .25/19/0.00 . . .32/24/s . . . 31/19/s


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Golf Inside Daly, Woods, Mickelson all in striking distance at PGA Tour event, see Page D4.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, JANUARY 29, 2011

L O C A L LY

TRACK & FIELD

Bend track coach wins national honor

Bend’s Eaton triumphs at Millrose Games

RENO, Nev. — Longtime Bend High pole vault coach Fred Canfield has been named the 2010 National High School Pole Vault Coach of the Year at this year’s Pole Vault Summit, a national convention for pole vault coaches and athletes. Canfield, 67, spent 10 years coaching at Portland’s Jesuit High School before coming to Bend High in 1990. This will be his 21st season with the Lava Bears. — Bulletin staff report

C YCLING

From staff and wire reports NEW YORK — Bend’s Ashton Eaton placed first in two events and was the overall winner Friday in the Millrose Multi Challenge, a threeevent competition featured in the 104th Millrose Games at Madison Square Garden. Eaton, 23, cleared 6 feet 8 3⁄4 inches in the high jump and won the event on fewer misses over Curtis Beach to clinch the overall victory in a field of five of the top decathletes in the United States. “There was a lot of nervousness for this young man because of the competition, but there was also a lot

of fight from this young man,” Eaton said. “when it came down to the high jump, when I needed to clear a bar to win, that’s what I did.” After finishing fourth in the shot put with a toss of 46-8 (742 points), Eaton moved into third place in the overall scoring with a victory in the 60-meter hurdles (7.64 seconds, 1,074 points). His win in the high jump was worth 850 points, giving him a total of 2,666. Second overall was 2009 world decathlon champion Trey Hardee, of Austin, Texas. Hardee, 26, won the shot put and placed third in the hurdles, giving him the overall lead

through two events. He finished with 2,640 points. Bryan Clay, the 2008 Olympic decathlon gold medalist from Glendora, Calif., placed third overall. Clay, 31, finished with 2,609 points. Jake Arnold, 27 and of Santa Rosa, Calif., finished fourth with 2,491 points. And Beach, 20 and of Albuquerque, N.M., was fifth with 2,360 points. Eaton, a graduate of Bend’s Mountain View High School and the University of Oregon, is a three-time NCAA decathlon champion. He also owns the world record in the indoor heptathlon.

Also at the Millrose Games, Deresse Mekonnen won the Wanamaker Mile on Friday night, becoming the first runner other than Bernard Lagat to win the Millrose Games’ marquee event since 2004. The 23year-old from Ethiopia finished in 3 minutes, 58.58 seconds, holding off Lagat’s challenges in the final two laps. Jamacians Veronica CampbellBrown and Nesta Carter won the women’s and men’s 60-meter dashes. In the shot put, Ryan Whiting beat favorite and reigning world champion Christian Cantwell with a throw of 69 feet, 11 inches.

PREP BOYS BASKETBALL

PREP GIRLS BASKETBALL

Cougs survive, win Mountain View storms out to a big lead, then holds off Summit in IMC play Alberto Contador takes his seat to give a news conference in Spain on Friday.

Contador sees honor on line with doping suspension PUIGPUNYENT, Balearic Islands — Alberto Contador intends to fight a proposed doping suspension, saying he is a victim of a flawed system and insists it’s a “question of honor” to prove he did not cheat to win the Tour de France. An emotional Contador promised to defend his innocence “until the end” as he spoke publicly for the first time since learning of the proposed one-year ban from the Spanish cycling federation for a positive clenbuterol test that could cost him his Tour title. “In the next 10 days I’m going to work and do all I can to receive justice. It’s a question of honor, defending your pride and your innocence,” said the 28-year-old Spaniard, whose watery eyes were replaced by a rebellious glare at the end of the hour-long news conference in Mallorca. “This is about honor.” Contador blames his positive result on eating contaminated meat, and he characterized the Spanish federation’s decision Wednesday to accept his defense yet still sanction him as “shameful.” The reduced ban, instead of the standard two-year penalty, would still leave Contador stripped of the 2010 Tour title and off the starting line of this year’s race. “They are recognizing that I’m innocent and then they give me a one-year ban,” the three-time Tour winner said. “I can’t explain that.” — The Associated Press

Mountain View rallies for victory over Summit Bulletin staff report

By Beau Eastes The Bulletin

Playing well in spurts, Mountain View overcame 21 turnovers to post its eighth win in nine games Friday, topping Summit 68-57 in a Class 5A Intermountain Conference boys basketball contest. The Cougars (2-1 IMC, 11-5 overall) and the Storm combined for 44 turnovers at Mountain View High School in a sloppy game that the Cougs led by as many as 27 points. Mountain View grabbed a 12-0 lead in the opening period and never trailed, but played inconsistent defense and let the Storm rally to within seven points late in the intracity matchup. “We got that lead and lost our focus,” said Cougar point guard James Reid, who scored a gamehigh 27 points. “We actually did that twice.” Mountain View held a 32-19 advantage at halftime and appeared to put the game out of reach when the Cougars outscored Summit 23-11 in the third quarter. The Storm (04 IMC, 5-12) never gave up, though, and trailed 64-57 with 12 seconds left in the game before Reid hit four consecutive free throws to seal the victory for Mountain View. Reid also posted a game-high 11 rebounds and dished out four assists. In addition to Reid’s doubledouble, Conner Booster and Mitch Modin both provided sparks off the bench for the Cougars. Booster posted 11 points, five rebounds, five assists and five steals in the backcourt, and Modin added 10 points in the league win. See Cougars / D4

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Mountain View’s Mitch Modin drives the ball through Summit’s defense to score during the first half of Friday night’s game at Mountain View High School.

Summit tried to slow its game down against Mountain View on Friday night, and for the first half it worked. But the Cougars (2-1 IMC, 12-5 overall) rallied back and eventually toppled the visiting Storm 49-34 in Class 5A Intermountain Conference girls basketball action at Mountain View. From the opening tip, Summit ran a slow and deliberate offense, eating minutes off the clock with each possession. The Storm led 21-17 at halftime. “They came out with a stall on offense and really slowed the pace,” said Mountain View coach Steve Riper, who runs a more up-tempo style of offense. Summit’s Sarah Edwards scored 13 of her team-high 14 points in the second quarter to help push the Storm (1-3 IMC, 9-8) ahead in the first half. Mountain View, though, played like a different team in the second half and outscored the Storm 15-2 in the third quarter. Ball control helped the Cougars overcome Summit in the second half as Mountain View committed just three turnovers after the break, compared with 11 in the first half. Kersey Wilcox led the Cougars with 17 points, and Hopper Cashman added 13. Wilcox and Cashman hit three three-pointers apiece to help Mountain View shoot itself back into the game. Mountain View is at Bend on Tuesday, while Crook County hosts Summit the same day.

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SUPER BOWL

Titletown USA: Should Green Bay or Pittsburgh get the nickname?

CORRECTION

www.LesSchwab.com

By Barry Wilner The Associated Press

A story headlined “Ease of skis” that appeared in Friday’s Bulletin included an incorrect age for Bend skier Erick Ward. Ward is 38 years old. The Bulletin regrets the error.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 Basketball ..................................D3 Prep sports ............................... D4 Tennis ....................................... D4 Golf ........................................... D4 Football .....................................D5

Ashton Eaton won a three-event challenge at the Millrose Games in New York City on Friday.

Keith Srakocic / The Associated Press

Green Bay calls itself Titletown USA, but Pittsburgh has more Lombardi trophies — six in all.

Titletown USA. Green Bay claimed the nickname years ago. Pittsburgh, which already has a renowned nickname, Steel City, thinks Titletown is more appropriate for the Pennsylvania burg with three rivers. Next up The Super Bowl (on Sunday, Feb. • Super Bowl, 6) features the NFL’s dynasty of Green Bay the 1960s, the Packers, against the Packers vs. franchise that dominated the ’70s, Pittsburgh the Steelers. Never has a Super Steelers Bowl been so loaded with history. But since those lofty times, nei- • When: Sunday, ther team has been so dominant, Feb. 6, 3:30 p.m. although the Steelers are making quite the run for a second string of championships. Led by Ben Roethlisberger, Hines Ward and Troy Polamalu, they’re in their third Super Bowl in six years, and already own a record six rings. That, folks in Blitzburgh say, is worthy of the name Cheeseheads claim up in northeastern Wisconsin. See Titletown / D5

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D2 Saturday, January 29, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY TENNIS Midnight — Australian Open, women’s final, ESPN2 (replays at 6 a.m. and 7 p.m.).

GOLF 6:30 a.m. — PGA Europe, Volvo Golf Champions, third round, Golf Channel. 10 a.m. — PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance Open, third round, Golf Channel. Noon — PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance Open, third round, CBS. 4 p.m. — Champions Tour, Skins Game, day 1, Golf Channel.

BASKETBALL 9 a.m. — Men’s college, Georgetown at Villanova, ESPN. 9 a.m. — Men’s college, Xavier at Richmond, ESPN2. 10 a.m. — Men’s college, Minnesota at Purdue, CBS. 10 a.m. — Women’s college, Oklahoma at Oklahoma State, FSNW. 11 a.m. — Men’s college, North Carolina State at North Carolina, ESPN. 11 a.m. — Men’s college, Bradley at Wichita State, ESPN2. 12:30 p.m. — Men’s college, UCLA at Arizona State, FSNW. 1 p.m. — Men’s college, Georgia at Kentucky, ESPN. 1 p.m. — Men’s college, BYU at New Mexico, VS. network. 2:30 p.m. — Women’s college, Arizona State at USC, FSNW. 3 p.m. — Men’s college, Ohio State at Northwestern, ESPN2. 3 p.m. — Men’s college, Oregon at California, Comcast SportsNet Northwest. 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Kansas State at Kansas, ESPN. 5 p.m. — Men’s college, Pittsburgh at Rutgers, ESPN2. 5 p.m. — Men’s college, San Diego at Gonzaga, FSNW. 7 p.m. — Men’s college, Oregon State at Stanford, FSNW.

WINTER SPORTS 11 a.m. — Figure skating, U.S. Championships, pairs free skate and dance free, NBC. 11 a.m. — Skiing, USSA Nature Valley Freestyle FIS World Cup, NBC (taped). 1 p.m. — Winter X Games, ESPN2. 6 p.m. — Winter X Games, ESPN. 9 p.m. — Figure skating, U.S. Championships, ladies free skate, NBC (same-day tape).

HOCKEY 4 p.m. — NHL, All-Star Super Skills, VS. network.

SUNDAY TENNIS Midnight — Australian Open, men’s final, ESPN2 (replays at 7 a.m. and 4 p.m.).

GOLF 6:30 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Volvo Golf Champions, final round, Golf Channel. 10 a.m. — PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance Open, final round, Golf Channel. Noon — PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance Open, final round, CBS. 4 p.m. — Champions Tour, Skins Game, day 2, Golf Channel.

WINTER SPORTS 9:30 a.m. — Winter X Games, ESPN. 10:30 a.m. — Snowboarding, USSA Denver Big Air, NBC (taped). 1 p.m. — Figure skating, U.S. Championships, men’s free skate, NBC. 4 p.m. — Winter X Games, ESPN.

BASKETBALL 10 a.m. — NBA, Miami Heat at Oklahoma City Thunder, ABC. 10 a.m. — Men’s college, Duke at St. John’s, CBS. 10 a.m. — Women’s college, Baylor at Texas A&M, FSNW. Noon — Women’s college, Washington State at Washington, FSNW. 12:30 p.m. — NBA, Boston Celtics at Los Angeles Lakers, ABC. 2 p.m. — Women’s college, Georgia at LSU, ESPN2. 2:30 p.m. — Men’s college, Miami at Virginia Tech, FSNW. 4:30 p.m. — Men’s college, Maryland at Georgia Tech, FSNW. 7 p.m. — NBA, Utah Jazz at Golden State Warriors, ESPN. 7 p.m. — Men’s college, Washington at Washington State, FSNW.

ON DECK Today Girls basketball: Marshall at Crook County, 1:30 p.m.; Gilchrist at Paisley, 1:30 p.m.; Grant at Redmond, 3:45 p.m. Boys basketball: Marshall at Crook County, 3:15 p.m.; Grant at Redmond, 5:45 p.m.; Gilchrist at Paisley, 3 p.m. Wrestling: Redmond, Crook County, Culver at Resers Tournament at Liberty High in Hillsboro, TBA; Gilchrist vs. Chiloquin, TBA Swimming: Summit, Mountain View, Bend, Madras at Central Oregon Invitational in Bend, 1 p.m. Nordic skiing: OHSNO Skadi Cup classic race at Teacup, TBA; OISRA skate race at Willamette Pass, 11:30 a.m. Alpine skiing: OISRA GS race on Cliff Hanger at Mt. Bachelor, 9:30 a.m.

TEAM LIDSTROM Captain Nicklas Lidstrom, D, Detroit. Assistant Captains Patrick Kane, RW, Chicago; Martin St. Louis, RW, Tampa Bay. Selections 1. Steven Stamkos, C, Tampa Bay; 2. Duncan Keith, D, Chicago; 3. Henrik Sedin, C, Vancouver; 4. Shea Weber, D, Nashville; 5. Tim Thomas, G, Boston; 6. Daniel Briere, RW, Philadelphia; 7. Dustin Byfuglien, D, Atlanta; 8. Jonathan Toews, C, Chicago; 9. Marc-Andre Fleury, G, Pittsburgh; 10. Jonas Hiller, G, Anaheim. 11. Brad Richards, C, Dallas; 12. Keith Yandle, D, Phoenix; 13. Brent Burns, D, Minnesota; 14. Martin Havlat, RW, Minnesota; 15. Anze Kopitar, C, Los Angeles; 16. Matt Duchene, C, Colorado; 17. Loui Eriksson, RW, Dallas; 18. Phil Kessel, RW, Toronto. Coaches Peter Laviolette, Philadelphia; Alain Vigneault, Vancouver.

IN THE BLEACHERS

GOLF PGA Tour FARMERS INSURANCE OPEN Friday At Torrey Pines South Course; 7,698 yards; Par 72 At Torrey Pines North Course; 7,067 yards; Par 72 San Diego Purse: $5.8 million Second Round a-denotes amateur Bill Haas 67n-66s—133 Anthony Kim 68n-67s—135 Fredrik Jacobson 67n-69s—136 Bubba Watson 71s-65n—136 Rickie Fowler 65n-71s—136 Phil Mickelson 67s-69n—136 John Daly 67s-69n—136 Hunter Mahan 69s-67n—136 Ben Crane 70s-66n—136 Brian Davis 69s-68n—137 Chris Kirk 66n-71s—137 Dustin Johnson 69s-69n—138 Kevin Sutherland 69s-69n—138 Jhonattan Vegas 69n-69s—138 Tiger Woods 69n-69s—138 Brendan Steele 70s-68n—138 Tag Ridings 71n-68s—139 Billy Mayfair 70s-69n—139 Alex Prugh 65n-74s—139 Charles Howell III 71n-68s—139 Marc Leishman 67n-72s—139 Camilo Villegas 69n-70s—139 Pat Perez 69n-70s—139 J.B. Holmes 72s-67n—139 Blake Adams 71n-68s—139 Brandt Snedeker 70s-69n—139 Josh Teater 72s-67n—139 Jamie Lovemark 69s-70n—139 Michael Thompson 69s-70n—139 Bobby Gates 70s-69n—139 Richard S. Johnson 73s-67n—140 Jimmy Walker 71n-69s—140 Y.E. Yang 67n-73s—140 Lucas Glover 70s-70n—140 Stewart Cink 70s-70n—140 Kyle Stanley 68n-72s—140 Brandt Jobe 67n-73s—140 Zack Miller 69n-71s—140 Gary Woodland 71n-69s—140 David Duval 70s-70n—140 Matt Jones 68s-72n—140 Sunghoon Kang 64n-76s—140 Ben Martin 68n-72s—140 Hunter Haas 70n-70s—140 Joe Durant 72n-69s—141 D.A. Points 73s-68n—141 Paul Goydos 72s-69n—141 Rory Sabbatini 68n-73s—141 David Mathis 68n-73s—141 Scott Gutschewski 72n-69s—141 Chris Couch 70s-71n—141 Martin Piller 70n-71s—141 Steven Bowditch 70n-71s—141 a-Anthony Paolucci 70s-71n—141 K.J. Choi 72s-69n—141 Keegan Bradley 67n-74s—141 Fabian Gomez 67s-74n—141 Paul Stankowski 68s-74n—142 Spencer Levin 71n-71s—142 Tom Gillis 72s-70n—142 Mike Weir 72n-70s—142 Bill Lunde 71n-71s—142 Justin Rose 72s-70n—142 Cameron Tringale 71s-71n—142 Tim Herron 74s-68n—142 Troy Matteson 74s-68n—142 D.J. Brigman 72n-70s—142 Angel Cabrera 75s-68n—143 Vijay Singh 72s-71n—143 Jason Gore 70n-73s—143 Greg Chalmers 72n-71s—143 Garrett Willis 73n-70s—143 J.J. Henry 72s-71n—143 Nick Watney 70n-73s—143 Carl Pettersson 70n-73s—143 Stuart Appleby 72s-71n—143 Chez Reavie 74s-69n—143 Charlie Wi 71n-72s—143 Jarrod Lyle 71n-72s—143 Failed to qualify Michael Connell 71s-73n—144 Nathan Green 76s-68n—144 Kevin Chappell 75s-69n—144 Boo Weekley 74s-70n—144 Alex Cejka 74s-70n—144 Derek Lamely 71s-73n—144 Chad Campbell 73s-71n—144 Joseph Bramlett 71n-73s—144 Len Mattiace 71n-74s—145 Kevin Streelman 69s-76n—145 Jim Herman 77n-68s—145 Andres Gonzales 77s-68n—145 Ben Curtis 70n-75s—145 Arjun Atwal 73s-72n—145 Scott Stallings 71n-74s—145 Nate Smith 75s-70n—145 Chris Riley 72n-74s—146 Jim Renner 73n-73s—146 Alexandre Rocha 75s-71n—146 Chris DiMarco 71n-75s—146 Scott McCarron 69n-77s—146 Jesper Parnevik 75s-71n—146 Lee Janzen 73n-73s—146 Aaron Baddeley 76s-70n—146 Harrison Frazar 72s-74n—146 Robert Allenby 71s-75n—146 Brian Smock 73n-73s—146 Michael Putnam 76s-70n—146 Kevin Na 73n-74s—147 Matt Bettencourt 72n-75s—147

FOOTBALL NFL All Times PST Pro Bowl Sunday’s Game At Honolulu AFC vs. NFC, 4 p.m. (Fox) Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 6 At Arlington, Texas Pittsburgh vs. Green Bay, 3:30 p.m. (Fox)

Betting Line Favorite Packers

Daniel Summerhays Webb Simpson Kevin Kisner John Senden James Driscoll Rocco Mediate Andres Romero Robert Garrigus Bio Kim Justin Hicks Ryuji Imada Chad Collins John Rollins Martin Laird Scott Gordon Kent Jones Shane Bertsch Tommy Gainey Billy Horschel William McGirt Troy Merritt Steve Marino Davis Love III Chris Baryla Peter Tomasulo Kevin Stadler Duffy Waldorf David Hearn Colt Knost a-Josh Anderson Charley Hoffman Michael Bradley Stephen Ames Will Strickler Jeff Hart Michael Sim Kenny Perry Matt McQuillan Kris Blanks Nick O’Hern Shigeki Maruyama Rich Beem Joe Affrunti Jon Fiedler James Oh Dean Wilson

72n-75s—147 76s-71n—147 75s-72n—147 74n-73s—147 73n-74s—147 71n-76s—147 70n-77s—147 78s-69n—147 71n-76s—147 71n-76s—147 67n-81s—148 77s-71n—148 76n-72s—148 73s-75n—148 73n-75s—148 74s-74n—148 72s-76n—148 70n-78s—148 75s-73n—148 73s-75n—148 73n-76s—149 74n-75s—149 73s-76n—149 71n-78s—149 74s-75n—149 77s-72n—149 76n-73s—149 74n-75s—149 71s-78n—149 76s-73n—149 76n-74s—150 72n-78s—150 75s-75n—150 76n-74s—150 76s-74n—150 78s-73n—151 75n-76s—151 74n-77s—151 79s-73n—152 76s-76n—152 77s-76n—153 73n-81s—154 79n-76s—155 79n-78s—157 82s-76n—158 76-DQ

BASKETBALL Men’s college Friday’s Games ——— EAST Canisius 69, Niagara 54 Dartmouth 64, Cornell 57 Fairfield 61, Manhattan 59 Harvard 77, Columbia 66 Penn 66, Yale 58 Princeton 78, Brown 60 Siena 76, Loyola, Md. 59 SOUTH Belmont 89, Florida Gulf Coast 56 Lipscomb 82, Stetson 62 MIDWEST Wright St. 63, Wis.-Green Bay 61 PAC-10 STANDINGS All Times PST ——— Conference All Games W L PCT W L PCT Washington 7 1 .875 15 4 .789 Arizona 6 2 .750 17 4 .810 UCLA 5 3 .625 13 7 .650 Washington St. 4 4 .500 14 6 .700 Southern Cal 4 4 .500 12 9 .571 California 4 4 .500 11 9 .550 Stanford 3 5 .375 10 9 .526 Oregon 3 5 .375 10 10 .500 Oregon St. 3 5 .375 8 11 .421 Arizona St. 1 7 .125 9 11 .450 Today’s Games UCLA at Arizona State, 12:30 p.m. USC at Arizona, 4:30 p.m. Oregon at California, 3 p.m. Oregon State at Stanford, 7 p.m. Sunday’s Game Washington at Washington State, 7 p.m.

Women’s college Friday’s Games ———

SUPER BOWL Sunday, Feb. 6 Opening Current 2.5 2.5

Underdog Steelers

TENNIS Australian Open

EAST Cornell 66, Dartmouth 55 Fairfield 61, St. Peter’s 46 Harvard 69, Columbia 68 Iona 55, Siena 50, OT Loyola, Md. 55, Niagara 44 Manhattan 55, Canisius 30 Marist 70, Rider 41 Princeton 70, Brown 48 Yale 53, Penn 44 SOUTH Davidson 63, Longwood 53 North Carolina 64, Virginia 52

Friday At Melbourne Park Melbourne, Australia Purse: $24.7 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Men Semifinals Andy Murray (5), Britain, def. David Ferrer (7), Spain, 4-6, 7-6 (2), 6-1, 7-6 (2).

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Philadelphia 50 33 12 5 71 174 130 Pittsburgh 50 31 15 4 66 154 114 N.Y. Rangers 52 29 20 3 61 148 126 N.Y. Islanders 49 15 27 7 37 119 162 New Jersey 49 16 30 3 35 101 146 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 50 28 15 7 63 152 112 Montreal 50 27 18 5 59 130 123 Buffalo 49 23 21 5 51 137 144 Toronto 49 19 25 5 43 124 153 Ottawa 50 17 25 8 42 108 160 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Tampa Bay 51 31 15 5 67 154 154 Washington 51 27 15 9 63 140 129 Atlanta 52 24 19 9 57 152 166 Carolina 50 25 19 6 56 153 155 Florida 49 22 22 5 49 131 131 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 49 30 13 6 66 166 143 Nashville 50 27 17 6 60 134 119 Chicago 50 26 20 4 56 157 139 Columbus 49 23 21 5 51 130 152 St. Louis 49 22 20 7 51 130 146 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 50 31 10 9 71 165 121 Colorado 50 25 19 6 56 161 165 Minnesota 49 25 19 5 55 130 134 Calgary 51 24 21 6 54 144 152 Edmonton 49 15 26 8 38 122 168 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 50 30 15 5 65 147 137 Anaheim 52 28 20 4 60 140 146 Phoenix 51 25 17 9 59 149 145 San Jose 50 25 19 6 56 139 138 Los Angeles 50 27 22 1 55 143 124 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Friday’s Games No games scheduled Today’s Games No games scheduled 2010-11 ALL-STAR ROSTERS Sunday At Raleigh, N.C. ——— TEAM STAAL Captain Eric Staal, C, Carolina. Assistant Captains Mike Green, D, Washington; Ryan Kesler, C, Vancouver. Selections 1. Cam Ward, G, Carolina; 2. Alex Ovechkin, C, Washington; 3. Daniel Sedin, LW, Vancouver; 4. Zdeno Chara, D, Boston; 5. Rick Nash, RW, Columbus; 6. Henrik Lundqvist, G, N.Y. Rangers; 7. Marc Staal, D, N.Y. Rangers; 8. Patrick Sharp, C, Chicago; 9. Dan Boyle, D, San Jose; 10. Carey Price, G, Montreal. 11. Jeff Skinner, C, Carolina; 12. Chris Letang, D, Pittsburgh; 13. Claude Giroux, RW, Philadelphia; 14. Erik Karlsson, D, Ottawa; 15. Corey Perry, RW, Anaheim; 16. Patrik Elias, LW, New Jersey; 17. David Backes, RW, St. Louis; 18. Paul Stastny, C, Colorado. Coaches Joel Quenneville and Mike Haviland, Chicago.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Named Brad Komminsk hitting coach for Norfolk (IL); Gary Kendall manager, Denny Hocking and Einar Diaz field coaches and Aaron Scott trainer for Bowie (EL); Mike Devereaux field coach for Frederick (Carolina); Jose Hernandez field coach and Will Lawhorn trainer for Delmarva (SAL); Moe Hill field coach for Aberdeen (New York-Penn); Larry Jaster pitching coach for GCL Orioles; Alan Dunn minor league pitching coordinator and Dave Schmidt coordinator of Sarasota operations. LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Agreed to terms with RHP Ryan Brasier, C Anel de los Santos, INF Alexi Amarista, OF Tyson Auer, RHP Ryan Braun, C Jose Jimenez, INF Gabe Jacobo, OF Angel Castillo, RHP Ryan Chaffee, C Carlos Ramirez, INF Kevin Melillo, OF Mike Trout, RHP Tyler Chatwood, C Kevin Richardson, INF Efren Navarro, OF Travis Witherspoon, RHP Eric Junge, C Alberto Rosario, INF Darwin Perez, LHP Matt Meyer, INF Jean Segura, LHP Trevor Reckling, INF Gil Velazquez, LHP Garrett Richards and LHP Andrew Taylor on minor league contracts. OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Announced INF Steve Tolleson has cleared waivers and been sent outright to Sacramento (PCL). TAMPA BAY RAYS—Agreed to terms with 1B Casey Kotchman on a minor league contract. Claimed RHP Rob Delaney off waivers from Minnesota. TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Agreed to terms with RHP Jason Frasor on a one-year contract. National League CINCINNATI REDS—Agreed to terms with RHP Scott Carroll, RHP Jerry Gil, LHP Jeremy Horst, LHP Donnie Joseph, RHP Matt Klinker, RHP Justin Lehr, RHP Chad Reineke, LHP Dontrelle Willis, C Chris Denove, C Devin Mesoraco, C Corky Miller, OF Danny Dorn, OF Jeremy Hermida and OF Dave Sappelt on minor-league contracts. PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Agreed to terms with LHP Joe Beimel on a minor league contract. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS—Named Bobby Engram offensive assistant coach. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association ATLANTA HAWKS—Signed G-F Damien Wilkins for the rest of the season. FOOTBALL National Football League SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS—Named Bobby Engram offensive assistant coach. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Signed OT Paul McQuistan and TE Caz Piurowski to future contracts. HOCKEY National Hockey League ATLANTA THRASHERS—Reassigned LW Nigel Dawes and G Peter Mannino to Chicago (AHL). Recalled G Drew MacIntyre from Chicago. American Hockey League GRAND RAPIDS GRIFFINS—Announced F Evan Rankin, F Willie Coetzee and D Sebastien Piche were reassigned to Toledo (ECHL). SOCCER Major League Soccer COLORADO RAPIDS—Re-signed F Andre Akpan and MF Jamie Smith. COLUMBUS CREW—Signed F Jeff Cunningham to a multiyear contract. LA GALAXY—Signed MF Miguel Lopez. RED BULL NEW YORK—Signed F Luke Rodgers. SAN JOSE EARTHQUAKES—Signed A-MF Tony Donatelli. COLLEGE MONTANA—Named Mark Plakorus women’s soccer coach. WISCONSIN—Signed football coach Bret Bielema to a contract extension through Jan. 31, 2016.

BOWLING 11 a.m. — Professional Bowlers Association, Earl Anthony Memorial Classic, ESPN2.

RODEO 11:30 a.m. — Professional Bull Riders, Jack Daniels Invitational, NBC.

GYMNASTICS 12:30 p.m. — Women’s college, Auburn at Georgia, ESPN2 (taped).

HOCKEY 1 p.m. — NHL, All-Star Game, VS. network.

FOOTBALL 4 p.m. — NFL, Pro Bowl, Fox.

RADIO TODAY BASKETBALL 3 p.m. — Men’s college, Oregon at California, KBND-AM 1110. 7 p.m. — Men’s college, Oregon State at Stanford, KICEAM 940, KRCO-AM 690.

SUNDAY BASKETBALL 10 a.m. — NBA, Miami Heat at Oklahoma City Thunder, KICE-AM 940. 12:30 p.m. — NBA, Boston Celtics at Los Angeles Lakers, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

Goalkeeper Ward taken first in All-Star draft By Ira Podell The Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. — Nicklas Lidstrom’s first pick in the inaugural NHL All-Star fantasy draft was his only bad one — choosing the wrong side of a flipped puck with the No. 1 selection on the line. Eric Staal of the host Carolina Hurricanes quickly picked goalie Cam Ward — his teammate — first overall for Team Staal. “I was the best player available, I guess,” Ward quipped. The rest of the rosters for Sunday’s All-Star game — and tonight’s skills competition and — were filled out as 36 players were chosen in the unique draft where there was really no way to pick a bust. Staal was more matter of fact in explaining his decision to go with a goalie first in a game that usually abuses players at that position. “He is a tremendous goalie, and I won a Stanley Cup with him,” Staal said of the 2006 champion Hurricanes. Team Lidstrom was hardly hurt by the poor puck luck, as it was able to grab the league’s leader in goals,

N H L : A L L - S TA R G A M E Steven Stamkos of the Tampa Bay Lightning, with the second choice. Two-time NHL MVP Alex Ovechkin was taken No. 3 by Staal’s alternate captain Mike Green, who proudly announced the pick of his Washington Capitals teammate. Vancouver’s Ryan Kesler is Staal’s other assistant. Lidstrom received guidance from his alternates, Tampa Bay’s Martin St. Louis, and Patrick Kane from the defending Stanley Cup champion Chicago Blackhawks. After 30 players came off the board, it came down to Toronto’s Phil Kessel and Paul Stastny of the Colorado Avalanche to determine who would be hockey’s first “Mr. Irrelevant.” Kessel earned the dubious distinction of being the last pick when Stastny was chosen by Team Staal. “I’m just happy to be here,” said Kessel, who acknowledged that the wait was nerve-racking. He didn’t leave empty-handed, however. He was awarded with a

new car, and a donation will also be made to a charity of Kessel’s choice. The NHL invented this new AllStar format after five years of pitting the Eastern Conference against the Western Conference, following a run of North American All-Stars versus their World counterparts. There was no All-Star game last season because of the lengthy break for the Vancouver Olympics. While this draft was really about fun and games, it wasn’t without intrigue. Reigning Conn Smythe Trophy winner Jonathan Toews of the Blackhawks seemed to be annoyed and perplexed when he was shown on TV anxiously waiting to be rescued from the crowd. His ordeal ended when Kane called Toews’ name with the 16th pick for Team Lidstrom. Henrik and Daniel Sedin, identical twins with the Vancouver Canucks, will be apart for the first time. Daniel went No. 5 to Team Staal, and Henrik went right after him at six to Team Lidstrom.

Basketball • Blazers F Batum has clear MRI: The Portland Trail Blazers say an MRI on forward Nicolas Batum’s injured left knee is clear and he is dayto-day with a bone bruise. Batum hurt his knee in the second quarter of Thursday night’s 88-78 loss to the Boston Celtics. He had an MRI on Friday morning which showed no damage except for the contusion. Batum is averaging 11.8 points and 4.8 rebounds this season. It is the second time this week the injury-depleted Trail Blazers have gotten good news about a starter. Earlier this week, an MRI on forward LaMarcus Aldridge’s hip also was negative. Also on Friday, the Blazers assigned rookie Guard Armon Johnson to the NBA Development League’s Idaho Stampede. Johnson, selected in the second round of last year’s draft out of Nevada, is averaging 3.1 points, 1.1 rebounds and just over eight minutes in 28 games this season with the Blazers.

Soccer • Houston switches to MLS Eastern Conference: Houston is switching to Major League Soccer’s Eastern Conference this season as the league realigns to make room for expansion Portland and Vancouver. The league said Friday that with the Timbers and Whitecaps joining the Western Conference each conference will have nine teams. The 18-team MLS will have a balanced schedule, with each team playing all the others twice. All teams will play 17 home games and 17 road games. The league season starts March 15, with the Los Angeles Galaxy at Seattle.

Football • Coach says five Iowa players released from hospital: Iowa coach Kirk Ferentz said Friday that five of the 13 players hospitalized this week with a muscle disorder following grueling offseason workouts are being discharged. Ferentz said in a statement that he’s looking forward to the release of the eight remaining players “in the days ahead.” The coach hasn’t spoken to reporters since the school announced Tuesday that the players had been hospitalized with rhabdomyolysis, a stress-induced syndrome that can damage cells and cause kidney problems. University leaders announced Thursday that they’ve ordered an investigation into how the players wound up in the hospital, with Iowa Board of Regents President David Miles and school president Sally Mason saying the hospitalizations were “a cause for grave concern.” • NFLPA says injuries up in 2010: The NFL players union says the average number of injuries has risen during the 2010 season. In a report released Friday called “Dangers of the Game of Football,” the NFLPA says injuries increased from 3.2 to 3.7 per week per team and the share of players injured increased to 63 percent compared to a 2002-09 average of 59 percent. The report also shows that 13 percent of all injuries required being placed on injured reserve this season, compared to an average of 10 percent for 2002-09. The union says that indicates the injuries which are occurring are more serious than in past years.

Baseball • Twins to take down trees behind CF at Target Field: Target Field is losing a few of its trademark features. The Minnesota Twins will take down the pine trees behind the center field wall. Hitters complained the trees made it difficult for them to pick up the ball out of the pitcher’s hand. The 14 trees swaying in the wind, and the shadows they cast, led several hitters from the Twins and other teams to voice their displeasure. Twins President Dave St. Peter says the team is still trying to determine what to do with the trees. Relocating them inside the ballpark is a possibility. The team will also install a material on the batter’s backdrop that cuts down the glare during afternoon games.

Figure skating • Bradley gives fans a thrill, winning short program: Three months after deciding to put retirement on hold at the request of fans, Ryan Bradley won the short program at the U.S. Figure Skating Championships in Greensboro, N.C. Bradley’s flawless and fabulously entertaining program to “Bugle Boy from Company B” earned him 80.39 points, putting him exactly two points ahead of twotime defending champion Jeremy Abbott. Brandon Mroz is a distant third going into Sunday afternoon’s free skate. Bradley is a longtime audience favorite, and fans flooded his Facebook and Twitter accounts this summer, begging him not to call it quits. The 27-year-old decided in October to oblige. Now he’s just 4½ minutes from his first national title. — From wire reports


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, January 29, 2011 D3

NBA SCOREBOARD SUMMARIES

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Friday’s Games

Bulls 99, Magic 90 ORLANDO (90) Turkoglu 2-12 1-2 5, Bass 4-9 1-2 9, Howard 14-20 12-16 40, Nelson 0-1 0-0 0, J.Richardson 2-8 2-2 8, Arenas 5-13 1-1 11, Redick 3-6 1-2 8, Anderson 2-8 3-3 9, Duhon 0-1 0-0 0, Q.Richardson 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 32-78 21-28 90. CHICAGO (99) Deng 9-16 6-8 26, Boozer 8-17 0-1 16, Thomas 1-3 0-0 2, Rose 6-21 8-8 22, Bogans 3-4 0-0 8, Brewer 4-7 1-1 9, Gibson 3-4 1-2 7, Asik 1-3 0-2 2, Korver 2-7 1-1 7, Watson 0-5 0-0 0. Totals 37-87 17-23 99. Orlando 23 28 17 22 — 90 Chicago 24 22 34 19 — 99 3-Point Goals—Orlando 5-21 (J.Richardson 2-5, Anderson 2-7, Redick 1-2, Arenas 0-3, Turkoglu 0-4), Chicago 8-18 (Bogans 2-3, Korver 2-4, Deng 2-4, Rose 2-6, Watson 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Orlando 48 (Howard 15), Chicago 61 (Boozer 16). Assists—Orlando 19 (J.Richardson, Turkoglu 5), Chicago 25 (Rose 12). Total Fouls—Orlando 23, Chicago 23. Technicals—Orlando defensive three second. A—21,676 (20,917).

Nuggets 117, Cavs 103 DENVER (117) Anthony 9-22 15-18 33, Martin 4-6 0-2 8, Nene 2-3 3-5 7, Billups 3-9 2-2 11, Afflalo 9-15 1-1 23, Smith 4-8 0-0 10, Harrington 0-5 2-4 2, S.Williams 3-5 2-2 8, Lawson 7-13 0-1 15. Totals 41-86 25-35 117. CLEVELAND (103) Eyenga 3-9 0-0 6, Jamison 7-19 5-7 20, Hickson 10-12 4-8 24, Sessions 4-10 6-8 14, Gibson 5-14 0-0 15, Hollins 2-2 0-0 4, Graham 6-10 0-0 14, Parker 1-5 0-0 2, Samuels 1-2 0-0 2, Harris 1-4 0-0 2, Gee 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 40-88 15-23 103. Denver 31 39 23 24 — 117 Cleveland 24 26 33 20 — 103 3-Point Goals—Denver 10-23 (Afflalo 4-7, Billups 3-6, Smith 2-3, Lawson 1-1, Anthony 02, Harrington 0-4), Cleveland 8-26 (Gibson 5-11, Graham 2-4, Jamison 1-5, Eyenga 0-1, Harris 01, Parker 0-4). Fouled Out—Martin. Rebounds— Denver 55 (Martin 9), Cleveland 56 (Hickson 14). Assists—Denver 23 (Lawson, Anthony 5), Cleveland 27 (Sessions 13). Total Fouls—Denver 23, Cleveland 27. Technicals—Cleveland defensive three second. A—19,642 (20,562).

Heat 88, Pistons 87 DETROIT (87) Prince 3-13 2-2 8, Daye 7-17 2-2 19, Monroe 4-6 1-2 9, Gordon 8-16 2-2 21, McGrady 6-17 1-2 14, Wilcox 5-8 0-0 10, Villanueva 2-10 1-1 6, Bynum 0-5 0-0 0. Totals 35-92 9-11 87. MIAMI (88) Jones 1-6 2-2 5, James 15-25 7-10 39, Ilgauskas 2-8 1-2 5, Chalmers 3-9 1-1 8, Miller 4-12 4-5 12, Arroyo 0-1 0-0 0, Howard 1-1 0-0 2, Anthony 1-2 0-0 2, House 6-9 2-2 15. Totals 33-73 17-22 88. Detroit 22 20 26 19 — 87 Miami 19 20 25 24 — 88 3-Point Goals—Detroit 8-24 (Gordon 3-7, Daye 3-7, Villanueva 1-3, McGrady 1-4, Prince 03), Miami 5-24 (James 2-4, House 1-4, Chalmers 1-5, Jones 1-5, Miller 0-6). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Detroit 51 (Wilcox 10), Miami 53 (Miller 10). Assists—Detroit 22 (McGrady 10), Miami 18 (James 9). Total Fouls—Detroit 18, Miami 16. Technicals—Miami defensive three second 2. A—19,805 (19,600).

Bucks 116, Raptors 110 MILWAUKEE (116) Maggette 10-21 8-10 29, Ilyasova 9-10 5-5 25, Bogut 12-14 0-2 24, Dooling 3-6 3-6 10, Douglas-Roberts 3-6 4-4 11, Delfino 4-13 6-8 15, Mbah a Moute 0-0 0-0 0, Boykins 0-4 0-0 0, Temple 0-0 0-0 0, Sanders 0-0 0-0 0, Brockman 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 42-76 26-35 116. TORONTO (110) Wright 2-2 0-0 4, A.Johnson 8-11 8-9 24, Bargnani 9-23 5-6 23, Calderon 6-12 0-0 13, DeRozan 5-14 1-3 11, Weems 4-13 2-2 10, Bayless 3-8 3-4 9, Davis 2-3 2-2 6, T.Johnson 0-1 0-0 0, Ajinca 4-5 2-2 10. Totals 43-92 23-28 110. Milwaukee 32 23 26 23 12 — 116 Toronto 22 35 21 26 6 — 110 3-Point Goals—Milwaukee 6-15 (Ilyasova 2-2, Douglas-Roberts 1-2, Maggette 1-3, Dooling 1-3, Delfino 1-4, Boykins 0-1), Toronto 1-10 (Calderon 1-2, Bayless 0-1, Weems 0-2, Bargnani 0-5). Fouled Out—Ilyasova. Rebounds—Milwaukee 48 (Maggette 11), Toronto 49 (A.Johnson 12). Assists—Milwaukee 24 (Delfino 6), Toronto 27 (Calderon 10). Total Fouls—Milwaukee 28, Toronto 26. A—15,159 (19,800).

Grizzlies 99, 76ers 94 MEMPHIS (99) Gay 7-15 2-2 16, Randolph 6-11 10-11 22, Gasol 4-8 4-4 12, Conley 6-15 1-2 13, S.Young 5-9 1-1 12, Arthur 4-11 1-1 9, Allen 2-5 4-4 8, Vasquez 1-4 0-0 2, Henry 1-3 1-1 3, Thabeet 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 37-82 24-26 99. PHILADELPHIA (94) Iguodala 5-9 1-1 12, Brand 6-14 3-4 15, Hawes 1-3 0-0 2, Holiday 6-11 0-0 16, Meeks 5-10 1-1 16, Speights 2-5 1-2 5, Williams 2-9 3-4 9, T.Young 4-6 1-2 9, Turner 3-6 1-1 7, Battie 1-3 0-0 3. Totals 35-76 11-15 94. Memphis 21 19 17 42 — 99 Philadelphia 18 26 29 21 — 94 3-Point Goals—Memphis 1-5 (S.Young 1-2, Conley 0-1, Vasquez 0-2), Philadelphia 13-20 (Meeks 5-7, Holiday 4-5, Williams 2-3, Battie 1-1, Iguodala 1-4). Fouled Out—None.

Oklahoma City Thunder forward Kevin Durant dunks against the Washington Wizards in the third quarter of Friday’s game in Oklahoma City. The Thunder won 124-117 in double overtime.

Atlantic Division Boston New York Philadelphia New Jersey Toronto

W 35 24 20 14 13

Miami Atlanta Orlando Charlotte Washington

W 32 30 30 20 13

L 11 22 26 33 34

L 14 17 17 25 32

Chicago Milwaukee Indiana Detroit Cleveland

W 32 18 17 17 8

L 14 26 26 30 38

Pct .761 .522 .435 .298 .277

GB — 11 15 21½ 22½

L10 7-3 3-7 5-5 4-6 0-10

Str L-1 L-1 L-1 L-1 L-10

Home 22-3 12-9 14-8 11-11 8-15

Away 13-8 12-13 6-18 3-22 5-19

Conf 26-6 14-10 13-18 8-19 9-22

Away 15-9 15-10 13-11 8-14 0-22

Conf 21-7 21-9 20-9 11-17 8-21

Away 10-10 8-16 6-15 5-20 3-23

Conf 19-9 12-12 11-14 10-15 7-22

Southeast Division Pct .696 .638 .638 .444 .289

GB — 2½ 2½ 11½ 18½

L10 5-5 7-3 5-5 6-4 4-6

Str W-1 W-1 L-1 W-3 L-3

Home 17-5 15-7 17-6 12-11 13-10

Central Division Pct .696 .409 .395 .362 .174

GB — 13 13½ 15½ 24

L10 8-2 5-5 3-7 5-5 0-10

Str W-4 W-2 W-1 L-2 L-19

Home 22-4 10-10 11-11 12-10 5-15

Sue Ogrocki / The Associated Press

San Antonio Dallas New Orleans Memphis Houston

L 7 15 16 24 26

Oklahoma City Denver Utah Portland Minnesota

W 30 28 28 25 10

L 16 18 19 22 36

L.A. Lakers Phoenix Golden State L.A. Clippers Sacramento

W 33 21 19 17 11

L 14 24 27 28 33

Pct .848 .667 .660 .489 .458

GB — 8½ 8½ 16½ 18

L10 9-1 4-6 10-0 6-4 5-5

Str W-2 W-3 W-10 W-1 L-1

Home 24-2 17-8 19-5 13-7 13-10

Away 15-5 13-7 12-11 10-17 9-16

Conf 26-4 19-7 16-11 14-14 12-17

Away 13-10 8-13 12-11 9-15 2-22

Conf 16-12 16-12 14-13 17-14 3-26

Away 15-8 9-14 6-17 3-15 5-16

Conf 18-10 11-14 11-18 13-21 6-19

Northwest Division Pct .652 .609 .596 .532 .217

GB — 2 2½ 5½ 20

L10 7-3 8-2 4-6 5-5 1-9

Str W-2 W-4 W-1 L-2 L-6

Home 17-6 20-5 16-8 16-7 8-14

Paciic Division Pct .702 .467 .413 .378 .250

GB — 11 13½ 15 20½

L10 Str 7-3 L-1 6-4 W-1 4-6 L-4 6-4 L-2 3-7 W-1 ——— Friday’s Games

Indiana 124, New Jersey 92 Milwaukee 116, Toronto 110, OT Denver 117, Cleveland 103 Chicago 99, Orlando 90 Utah 108, Minnesota 100 Sacramento 100, L.A. Lakers 95

Home 18-6 12-10 13-10 14-13 6-17

Memphis 99, Philadelphia 94 Atlanta 111, New York 102 Miami 88, Detroit 87 Oklahoma City 124, Washington 117, 2OT Charlotte 121, Golden State 113, OT Phoenix 88, Boston 71 Today’s Games

Indiana at Chicago, 5 p.m. Toronto at Minnesota, 5 p.m. New Jersey at Milwaukee, 5:30 p.m. New Orleans at Sacramento, 7 p.m.

Washington at Memphis, 5 p.m. Atlanta at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Houston at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. Charlotte at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games

Miami at Oklahoma City, 10 a.m. Cleveland at Orlando, 3 p.m. Detroit at New York, 4:30 p.m. Utah at Golden State, 7 p.m.

Boston at L.A. Lakers, 12:30 p.m. Denver at Philadelphia, 3 p.m. New Orleans at Phoenix, 5 p.m. All Times PST

Rebounds—Memphis 48 (Randolph 12), Philadelphia 44 (Brand 9). Assists—Memphis 19 (Gasol 5), Philadelphia 22 (Iguodala 9). Total Fouls—Memphis 15, Philadelphia 24. A—14,289 (20,318).

Pacers 124, Nets 92 NEW JERSEY (92) Outlaw 4-10 3-3 12, Favors 4-9 1-2 9, Lopez 12-17 4-4 28, Harris 2-4 5-6 9, Graham 2-4 0-0 4, Humphries 0-2 0-0 0, Vujacic 3-7 0-0 7, Morrow 1-4 4-4 7, Uzoh 1-3 2-6 4, Petro 4-9 0-0 8, Ross 2-4 0-0 4. Totals 35-73 19-25 92. INDIANA (124) Granger 7-12 0-0 18, McRoberts 3-5 1-2 7, Hibbert 7-12 6-7 20, Collison 3-6 1-2 7, Dunleavy 12-16 0-0 30, George 6-7 2-4 15, Foster 3-4 0-1 6, Posey 1-3 2-2 5, Price 4-8 0-2 8, Ford 1-2 0-0 2, S.Jones 1-2 0-1 2, D.Jones 2-3 0-0 4. Totals 50-80 12-21 124. New Jersey 27 27 24 14 — 92 Indiana 32 36 36 20 — 124 3-Point Goals—New Jersey 3-7 (Vujacic 11, Morrow 1-2, Outlaw 1-3, Harris 0-1), Indiana 12-22 (Dunleavy 6-7, Granger 4-6, George 1-2, Posey 1-3, D.Jones 0-1, Collison 0-1, Price 02). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—New Jersey 45 (Outlaw 6), Indiana 38 (Hibbert, Foster 6). Assists—New Jersey 21 (Harris 9), Indiana 31 (Collison 8). Total Fouls—New Jersey 22, Indiana 25. A—11,337 (18,165).

Thunder 124, Wizards 117 WASHINGTON (117) Lewis 8-20 2-2 22, Booker 9-11 3-6 21, Blatche 6-12 1-1 13, Wall 5-19 2-4 13, Young 13-33 5-7 32, Yi 2-6 5-6 9, Thornton 3-5 0-0 6, Seraphin 0-2 1-2 1, Armstrong 0-0 0-0 0, Shakur 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 46-108 19-28 117. OKLAHOMA CITY (124) Durant 15-28 8-11 40, Green 5-8 3-4 13, Krstic 3-5 2-2 8, Westbrook 12-24 11-16 35, Harden 2-6 4-4 8, Ibaka 2-5 3-4 7, Cook 3-9 0-0 9, Collison 2-2 0-0 4, Maynor 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 44-89 31-41 124. Washington 29 23 28 23 7 7 — 117 Oklahoma City 21 35 19 28 7 14 — 124 3-Point Goals—Washington 6-18 (Lewis 410, Wall 1-4, Young 1-4), Oklahoma City 5-21 (Cook 3-7, Durant 2-8, Westbrook 0-1, Green 01, Harden 0-4). Fouled Out—Booker, Harden. Rebounds—Washington 59 (Booker 12), Oklahoma City 67 (Westbrook 13). Assists—Washington 18 (Wall 10), Oklahoma City 27 (Westbrook 13). Total Fouls—Washington 24, Oklahoma City 20. Technicals—Washington defensive three second. A—18,203 (18,203).

Jazz 108, T’wolves 100 MINNESOTA (100) Beasley 6-14 4-4 16, Love 6-11 10-11 22, Milicic 5-12 1-3 11, Ridnour 3-8 2-2 8, Brewer 1-7 0-0 3, Johnson 8-14 0-0 19, Webster 2-3 2-2 7, Tolliver 3-4 1-2 9, Flynn 2-4 0-0 5, Pekovic 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 36-77 20-24 100. UTAH (108) Kirilenko 10-13 6-8 27, Millsap 14-25 2-2 30, Jefferson 3-14 2-2 8, Watson 3-8 4-4 10, Bell 1-8 2-2 4, Miles 7-16 4-6 22, Okur 1-3 0-0 2, Price 1-2 0-2 3, G.Hayward 0-2 0-0 0, Elson 1-2 0-0 2, Evans 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-93 20-26 108. Minnesota 25 30 22 23 — 100 Utah 32 26 27 23 — 108 3-Point Goals—Minnesota 8-20 (Johnson 3-7, Tolliver 2-2, Webster 1-1, Flynn 1-2, Brewer 1-4, Love 0-1, Beasley 0-3), Utah 6-18 (Miles 48, Kirilenko 1-1, Price 1-1, Okur 0-1, G.Hayward 0-1, Millsap 0-1, Watson 0-2, Bell 0-3). Fouled Out—Jefferson. Rebounds—Minnesota 50 (Love 15), Utah 53 (Jefferson 14). Assists—Minnesota 21 (Flynn 6), Utah 29 (Watson 13). Total Fouls—Minnesota 22, Utah 18. A—19,911

(19,911).

Kings 100, Lakers 95 SACRAMENTO (100) Casspi 8-14 1-2 20, Thompson 0-3 0-0 0, Cousins 11-19 5-6 27, Udrih 3-8 0-0 6, Evans 5-13 2-3 13, Greene 0-0 0-0 0, Dalembert 8-12 2-3 18, Landry 5-9 2-4 12, Taylor 0-0 0-0 0, Jeter 2-4 0-0 4. Totals 42-82 12-18 100. L.A. LAKERS (95) Artest 1-4 2-2 4, Gasol 4-11 1-2 9, Bynum 4-8 4-4 12, Fisher 2-5 0-0 4, Bryant 13-27 1012 38, Odom 0-7 4-4 4, Blake 1-4 1-2 4, Brown 7-11 0-0 17, Walton 1-3 0-0 3. Totals 33-80 22-26 95. Sacramento 30 29 26 15 — 100 L.A. Lakers 33 22 16 24 — 95 3-Point Goals—Sacramento 4-11 (Casspi 3-7, Evans 1-1, Jeter 0-1, Udrih 0-2), L.A. Lakers 7-23 (Brown 3-5, Bryant 2-8, Walton 1-2, Blake 1-3, Odom 0-1, Fisher 0-2, Artest 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Sacramento 54 (Landry, Cousins 10), L.A. Lakers 43 (Gasol 11). Assists—Sacramento 21 (Udrih 7), L.A. Lakers 20 (Bryant 7). Total Fouls—Sacramento 19, L.A. Lakers 19. A—18,997 (18,997).

Suns 88, Celtics 71 BOSTON (71) Pierce 5-15 4-5 14, Garnett 7-13 4-4 18, S.O’Neal 2-4 1-2 5, Rondo 1-6 5-6 7, Allen 3-8 0-2 8, Perkins 1-2 0-2 2, Davis 1-5 0-0 2, Daniels 3-7 0-0 6, Erden 1-1 0-0 2, Robinson 2-8 0-0 4, Wafer 1-6 1-2 3, Harangody 0-4 0-0 0. Totals 27-79 15-23 71. PHOENIX (88) Hill 1-6 0-0 2, Frye 1-7 2-3 5, Lopez 4-8 3-6 11, Nash 4-8 4-5 13, Carter 5-10 5-6 17, Dudley 2-5 0-0 4, Gortat 8-13 2-4 19, Pietrus 4-9 2-2 11, Dragic 1-4 0-0 2, Warrick 2-4 0-0 4. Totals 32-74 18-26 88. Boston 16 19 23 13 — 71 Phoenix 30 19 26 13 — 88 3-Point Goals—Boston 2-18 (Allen 2-4, Garnett 0-1, Harangody 0-1, Pierce 0-2, Daniels 0-2, Wafer 0-4, Robinson 0-4), Phoenix 6-17 (Carter 2-4, Gortat 1-1, Nash 1-2, Pietrus 1-3, Frye 1-5, Dudley 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Boston 55 (Garnett 9), Phoenix 55 (Gortat 17). Assists—Boston 14 (Rondo 6), Phoenix 23 (Nash 10). Total Fouls—Boston 19, Phoenix 21. Technicals—Garnett 2, Perkins, Boston Coach Rivers 2, Robinson, Frye. Flagrant Fouls—Pietrus. Ejected—Garnett, Boston Coach Rivers. A—18,422 (18,422).

Bobcats 121, Warriors 113 CHARLOTTE (121) Wallace 3-7 0-0 7, Diaw 5-12 1-2 13, K.Brown 6-9 0-5 12, Augustin 7-13 9-10 27, Jackson 1324 3-6 31, Mohammed 5-7 3-4 13, Henderson 310 2-2 8, Livingston 2-5 1-1 5, D.Brown 1-1 0-1 2, Najera 1-2 0-0 3. Totals 46-90 19-31 121. GOLDEN STATE (113) D.Wright 7-16 4-4 21, Lee 6-8 0-0 12, Biedrins 5-8 0-0 10, Curry 8-12 7-7 27, Ellis 624 7-8 21, Radmanovic 0-2 0-0 0, Williams 3-6 0-0 8, Udoh 3-7 1-2 7, Law 3-5 1-2 7. Totals 41-88 20-23 113. Charlotte 22 22 27 30 20 — 121 Golden State 28 22 26 25 12 — 113 3-Point Goals—Charlotte 10-26 (Augustin 4-7, Diaw 2-4, Jackson 2-9, Najera 1-2, Wallace 1-3, Henderson 0-1), Golden State 11-25 (Curry 4-5, D.Wright 3-8, Williams 2-4, Ellis 2-6, Radmanovic 0-1, Law 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Charlotte 49 (Jackson 7), Golden State 57 (Biedrins 12). Assists—Charlotte 32 (Augustin 12), Golden State 26 (D.Wright, Ellis 6). Total Fouls—Charlotte 20, Golden State 24. Technicals—D.Wright, Golden State defensive three second 2. A—18,407 (19,596).

At 21-0, Buckeyes are still wary of all comers The Associated Press

Southwest Division W 39 30 31 23 22

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL

By Rusty Miller

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Hawks 111, Knicks 102 NEW YORK (102) Gallinari 4-8 2-2 12, S.Williams 5-13 0-0 12, Stoudemire 9-21 9-9 27, Felton 9-21 3-3 21, Fields 7-9 0-0 15, Douglas 2-8 0-0 4, Turiaf 4-5 0-0 8, Walker 1-2 0-0 3. Totals 41-87 14-14 102. ATLANTA (111) M.Williams 3-6 6-6 12, Smith 9-13 4-4 24, Horford 8-12 3-5 19, Bibby 2-4 0-0 5, Johnson 13-26 6-6 34, Ja.Crawford 5-16 0-0 11, Evans 1-2 0-0 3, Pachulia 0-2 1-2 1, Wilkins 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 42-82 20-23 111. New York 21 22 33 26 — 102 Atlanta 30 30 31 20 — 111 3-Point Goals—New York 6-22 (Gallinari 2-4, S.Williams 2-5, Fields 1-2, Walker 1-2, Stoudemire 0-2, Douglas 0-3, Felton 0-4), Atlanta 7-19 (Smith 2-3, Johnson 2-5, Evans 1-1, Bibby 1-3, Ja.Crawford 1-6, M.Williams 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—New York 38 (S.Williams 11), Atlanta 51 (Horford 14). Assists—New York 23 (Felton 13), Atlanta 22 (Johnson 7). Total Fouls—New York 19, Atlanta 20. Technicals—S.Williams, New York defensive three second 2, M.Williams 2. Ejected—S.Williams, M.Williams. A—19,069 (18,729).

NBA ROUNDUP

Wizards fall in double overtime to Thunder The Associated Press OKLAHOMA CITY — Even the Washington Wizards’ best performance on the road this season wasn’t enough to end a losing streak that’s nearing record length. Kevin Durant scored 10 of his 40 points in the second overtime, Russell Westbrook added his third triple-double of the season and the Oklahoma City Thunder kept the Wizards winless on the road with a 124-117 victory on Friday night. Durant ran off eight straight points on a three-point play, a tiebreaking 3-pointer from the right wing and a jumper from the top of the key as the Thunder finally took the lead for good after 55½ minutes. Washington fell to 0-22 on the road, matching the third-worst start in NBA history. “That’s the best game we have played on the road,” Washington’s Andray Blatche said. “We fought and we put ourselves in a position to win before overtime and before the second overtime. “Durant is a wonderful scorer. He created shots for himself and got his team the win.” Durant missed a 3-pointer at the end of regulation after Nick Young’s tying jumper with 13.1 seconds left. Both teams squandered chances in the first overtime after Young again tied it up on a jumper with 1:57 remaining. The Wizards had the last shot after James Harden used Oklahoma City’s foul to give with 5.5 seconds left. Young missed from the foul line, and Rashard Lewis’ tip wouldn’t fall. And that was as close as the Wizards would get to snapping their skid. Only Dallas (29) in 1992-93 and the New Orleans Jazz (28) in 1974-75 have started seasons with more losses in a row on the road. “It was a team that was scrappy, looking for a road win,” Durant said. “They’ve got a lot of talent. They fought hard.” Westbrook had 35 points, 13 rebounds and 13 assists, and Jeff Green added 13 points and 12 rebounds as Oklahoma City needed extra time to beat a last-place opponent for the second straight game. “That’s what this league is about,” Thunder coach Scott Brooks said. “You have to win your share of close games and continue to improve your record.” Also on Friday: Heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Pistons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 MIAMI — Eddie House hit two deciding free throws with 6.5 seconds left, LeBron James led all scorers with 39 points, and Miami rallied late to beat Detroit. Bulls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Magic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 CHICAGO — Derrick Rose scored 22

points despite two painful stomach ulcers, Luol Deng added 26, and Chicago beat Dwight Howard and Orlando. Nuggets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 Cavaliers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 CLEVELAND — Carmelo Anthony scored 33 points, Arron Afflalo added 23 and Denver avoided any embarrassment by handing the pathetic Cavaliers their team record-tying 19th straight loss. Hawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111 Knicks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 ATLANTA — Joe Johnson scored 34 points and Atlanta turned back New York’s late comeback. Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Timberwolves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 SALT LAKE CITY — Paul Millsap scored 30 points, Earl Watson had a season-high 13 assists in place of injured Deron Williams, and Utah beat Minnesota to halt a six-game losing streak. Pacers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Nets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 INDIANAPOLIS — Mike Dunleavy scored 30 points to help Indiana snap a sixgame losing streak. Grizzlies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 76ers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 PHILADELPHIA — Rudy Gay scored 16 points and put Memphis ahead for good with a 6-footer in traffic, helping Memphis rally from a 21-point deficit and beat Philadelphia. Bucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Raptors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 TORONTO — Corey Maggette hit a tiebreaking 3-pointer in the final minute of overtime and Milwaukee handed Toronto its 10th straight loss. Suns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Celtics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 PHOENIX — Marcin Gortat had career highs of 19 points and 17 rebounds, Vince Carter added 17 points and Phoenix ran over weary Boston in a game that turned ugly late. Kings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Lakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 LOS ANGELES — DeMarcus Cousins had 27 points and 10 rebounds, Omri Casspi added 20 points and Sacramento snapped an eight-game losing streak to the Los Angeles Lakers with a victory over the two-time defending champions. Bobcats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Warriors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 OAKLAND, Calif. — Stephen Jackson scored 31 points, including a tying 3-pointer in the final second of regulation, and Charlotte rallied for an overtime victory against Golden State.

COLUMBUS, Ohio — If anyone gets the idea that being unbeaten and No. 1 means life is all sunshine and lollipops for Ohio State coach Thad Matta, think again. Matta worries about everything. He worries about opponents, of course, but more about what’s going on in the heads and hearts of his own players. Oh, and he also worries about the weather, food, injuries, conditioning, academics, defense, offense and a thousand other things. Next up Whether • No. 1 Ohio a team is 21State at 0, as are the Northwestern Buckeyes, or 0-21, to • When: Matta there Today, 3 p.m. is always • TV: ESPN2. something lurking out there that can get in the way of winning the next game. That was evident by a recent exchange between the Ohio State basketball and football coaches. “Coach (Jim) Tressel and I were texting a week or so ago,” Matta said Friday. “I can’t remember what he said, but I said, ‘Be thankful you’ve only got 13 of these.’ ” For meticulous, micromanagers like Matta, there is never anything so small that it couldn’t screw up a game or season. He is constantly on the lookout for the next impediment to a win. “It’s ‘How much rest? Are they getting the right nutrition?’ ” Matta said of his players. “You’re trying everything that you can. I was nervous before the Illinois game because we ate bar food at Hoolihan’s. I’m looking over and saying, ‘This can’t be good.’ But I guess we were OK.” Yes, the Buckeyes (8-0 Big Ten), the last Division I unbeaten, have been OK, to say the least. They overcame the chili-cheese fries and chicken fingers to win at No. 23 Illinois, 73-68. They’ve won close games against not-sogood teams and then they’ve rolled past quality opponents such as No. 12 Purdue, which they routed 87-64 on Tuesday night. Next up is Northwestern. The Wildcats (13-7, 3-6) may not look imposing to a lot of fans, but they’re downright scary — particularly when playing at home — to Ohio State. After all, they’ve been told by Matta that every opponent is a contender, every player on the other team can embarrass you and every lackadaisical effort is an opportunity for a defeat. Freshman Deshaun Thomas, instant offense for the Buckeyes off the bench, has been taught to trust nothing but hard work and your teammates. “I learned from what coach Matta said, ‘Don’t worry about what everybody says that is good,’ ” he said. “We’re trying to win a national championship. We’ve got to get there. That’s our goal.”

Weighing W’s and L’s vs. numbers in All-Star votes By Jon Krawczynski The Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS — Kevin Love is putting up staggering numbers for the Minnesota Timberwolves. Rebounds — 15.7 per game, nearly 2½ better than the next closest NBA player. Points — 21.6, putting him on track to become the first player since Moses Malone in 1982-83 to average at least 20 points and 15 rebounds per game. Three-point percentage — 44.7, tied for seventh in the league. But there is one number that threatens to prevent him from making his first AllStar team. It’s 10, which is how many victories the Timberwolves have this season. “I feel like I’ve done the best I could to show I’m an All-Star type talent, but

I know that wins come at a premium in this league and a lot of coaches are going to look at that,” Love said. “But hopefully, maybe, they can get past that this year and make an exception.” Love isn’t alone in hoping coaches look past wins and make him a reserve for the All-Star game on Feb. 20 in Los Angeles. Golden State guard Monta Ellis, Clippers forward Blake Griffin and Memphis forward Zach Randolph are all putting up huge numbers this season while playing for losing teams. The performances are making it tough on Western Conference coaches who vote for the reserves. “There are going to be a lot of hard votes, hard decisions,” Dallas Mavericks coach Rick Carlisle said. Ellis is averaging 25.8 points per game,

fourth in the league. Griffin has been the breakout star of the first half with his ferocious dunks. Randolph is putting up a double-double nearly every night to help the improving Grizzlies (22-24) approach the .500 mark. Their numbers are creating a debate among the NBA’s coaches. Is there room in the All-Star game for losers? Love, Griffin, Ellis and Randolph aren’t losers, but their teams have a combined record of 68-113. Love’s Timberwolves (10-35) are tied for fewest wins in the West, Griffin’s Clippers (17-28) are still well under .500 despite a solid run of late and Ellis’s incredible scoring has done little to change the fortunes for the Warriors (19-26). “I don’t think there’s any formula for

it,” Spurs coach Gregg Popovich said. “I think that everything should be considered. I think it’s natural for a player on a team with a better record to probably get the attention first. But it does not preclude a player who has been outstanding on a team with a lesser record from being considered. “I think it’s a subjective thing. It depends what people think, how much they respect and value what a specific player has done.” Denver Nuggets coach George Karl, while complimentary of Love’s progression, was a little less diplomatic. “I think his numbers are impressive enough to be considered,” Karl said. “But I like taking guys off the teams that win games.”

Terry Gilliam / The Associated Press

Ohio State coach Thad Matta prepares the Buckeyes for Big-10 foe Northwestern today.


D4 Saturday, January 29, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

PREP SCOREBOARD

Mountain View’s James Reid (11) fires a shot over Summit’s Bradley Laubacher (4) and Austin Michalski (21) to score during the first half of Friday night’s game at Mountain View High School.

BASKETBALL Boys Friday’s results ——— CLASS 5A INTERMOUNTAIN CONFERENCE ——— SUMMIT (57) — Austin Peters 21, Wettig 16, Laubacher 9, Hester 7, Moore 4, Hamann, Michalski, Mouser, Menefee. Totals 18 18-28 57. MOUNTAIN VIEW (68) — James Reid 27, Booster 11, Modin 10, Larson 6, Harper 6, Bosch 4, J. Hollister 2, Carroll 2, Bachman, C. Hollister, Gentry, Lannin, Siefken, Thompson. Totals 20 22-29 68. Summit 4 15 11 27 — 57 Mountain View 15 17 23 13 — 68 Three-point goals — Summit: Peters 2, Laubacher; Mountain View: Reid 3, Harper 2, Booster. ——— CLASS 4A SKY-EM LEAGUE ——— SISTERS (57) — Eli Harrison 20, Erickson 13, Miller 6, Mickel 5, Goff 5, Boehm 4, Hodges 2, Gridley 2, O’Neal, Boswell, Cummings, Pollard. Totals 23 810 57. LA PINE (31) — Jaron Kuehn 9, Parsons 8, Manley 6, Lavine 4, Pierce 2, Pajunen 1, Smith 1, O’Casey, Steinebach, Boen, Ebner. Totals 11 6-11 31. Sisters 28 5 16 8 — 57 La Pine 6 3 8 14 — 31 Three-point goals — Sisters: Harrison 2, Erickson. La Pine: Parsons 2, Manley. ——— CLASS 4A TRI-VALLEY CONFERENCE ——— LA SALLE (45) — Ryan Olsen 10, Hayes 9, Stangle 7, Soberanis 6, Kain 6, Davis 3, Hannan 2, Becker 2, Colton, Peterson. Totals 18 11-19 45. MADRAS (48) — Bobby Ahern 15, Justin Queaphama-Mehlberg 15, Palmer 12, Yeahquo 4, Zacarias 2, Conner, Haugen, Borja. Totals 16 15-22 48. La Salle 7 14 9 15 — 45 Madras 11 18 9 10 — 48 Three-point goals — La Salle: Soberanis; Madras: Ahern. ——— CLASS 2A TRI-RIVER CONFERENCE ——— CENTRAL LINN (74) — Blake Nightengale 25, Leopard 10, Holoway 10, We. Smith 8, Hansen 8, Myer 4, Wa. Smith 3, Putney 2, Reese 2, Bishop 2, Walker, Cron, Reijnierse. Totals 28 14-24 74. CULVER (57) — Alex Hansen 20, Funk 6, Talbert 6, Gonzalez 6, Calderon 4, Sledge 4, Swagerty 3, Smoldt 3, Fritz 2, Gibson 2, Bolton 1, Slaght. Totals 22 4-7 57. Central Linn 15 29 16 14 — 74 Culver 11 12 13 21 — 57 Three-point goals — Central Linn: Holoway, Hansen, Wa. Smith, Nightengale. Culver: Talbert 2, Smoldt, Gonzalez, Swagerty. ——— CLASS 1A MOUNTAIN VALLEY LEAGUE ——— HOSANNA CHRISTIAN (61) — Mikey Janeke 21, Matt Shaw 11, Martin 11, Mike Shaw 1, Justman 2, Say 8, Drake 4, Crenshaw 2, Jones 1, Staunton, Moro. Totals 24 4-8 61. GILCHRIST (39) — Trinton Koch 19, Shuey 8, Taran Koch 4, Boone 4, Link 2, Martinez 2, Blacketer, Hanna, Getchell, Stine, Cox. Totals 16 5-12 39. Hosanna Christian 7 13 30 11 — 61 Gilchrist 8 11 9 11 — 39 Three-point goals — Hosanna Christian: Janeke 5, Matt Shaw 3, Martin; Gilchrist: Trinton Koch 2.

Girls CLASS 5A INTERMOUNTAIN CONFERENCE ——— SUMMIT (34) — Sarah Edwards 14, Char 11, Pierce 5, Phillips 4, Gieber, Par, Alhart, Benedikt. Totals 13 6-13 34. MOUNTAIN VIEW (49) — Kersey Wilcox 17, Cashman 13, Jordan 7, Seevers 7, Booster 3, Ridling 2, Abbey, Noel, J. Wilcox, Rogers, Durre. Totals 17 6-9 49. Summit 6 15 2 11 — 34 Mountain View 9 8 15 17 — 49 Three-point goals — Summit: Char, Edwards; Mountain View: K. Wilcox 3, Cashman 3, Booster. ——— CLASS 4A TRI-VALLEY CONFERENCE ——— LA SALLE (72) — Megan Hayes 24, Maughan 15, Niebergall 14, Chavez 7, Swift 7, Schlechter 2, Olarte 1. Totals 22 24-39 72. MADRAS (53) — Abby Scott 22, J. Smith 14, Spino 8, L. Suppah 3, R. Suppah 2, M. Smith 2, Wahnetah 2, Sampson. Totals 18 12-18 53. La Salle 20 7 25 20 — 72 Madras 10 12 17 14 — 53 Three-point goals — La Salle: Maughan 2, Erickson. Madras: Scott 3, J. Smith, L. Suppah. ——— CLASS 4A SKY-EM LEAGUE ——— SISTERS (67) — Taylor Nieri 19, Allen 11, Kaiser 8, Yozamp 7, Kernutt 6, McConville 6, Spear 3, Rowe 3, Petterson 2, Hansen 2, Herron 1. Totals 24 15-39 67. LA PINE (43) — Brittany Glenn 13, Wieber 11, Town 5, McReynolds 3, Ebner 5, Fogel 3, Foreman 3. Totals 12 18-32 43. Sisters 22 18 13 14 — 67 La Pine 8 10 8 17 — 43 Three-point goals — Sisters: Nieri 2, Allen 2, Rowe, Spear. La Pine: Foreman. ——— CLASS 2A TRI-RIVER CONFERENCE ——— CENTRAL LINN (22) — Baggs 12, Atterberry 5, Mayer 2, Maldermott 2, Macheants 1, Fisher, Fountain, Buckridge, Nielson, Widdens, Simon. Totals 9 3-6 22. CULVER (59) — Chantelle Seehawer 17, Anglen 11, Fulton 10, Donnelly 9, Wofford 8, Cleveland 4, Sandy, Badillo, Martinez, Fadence. Totals 23 13-19 59. Central Linn 7 10 1 4 — 22 Culver 9 8 19 23 — 59 Three-point goals — Central Linn: Atterberry.

WRESTLING Friday’s results ——— RESER’S TOURNAMENT OF CHAMPIONS First of two days Team scores — Roseburg 98.5, Hermiston 98, Redmond 81.5, Culver 81, Sprague 64, Burns 62, McNary 61, Newberg 61, Hillsboro 57, Sweet Home 56, Crook County 55, Eagle Point 55, Lowell 52, Oregon City 51.5, Crater 44, Reedsport 42.5, Glencoe 41.5, Canby 40, Aloha 39.5, North Medford 39.5, Tualatin 39, West Albany 38, Westview 35, Thurston 23.5 ——— Culver (individual records) 103 — Noe Gonzalez 2-1; 112 — Jared Kasch 2-0; 119 — Josue Gonzalez 2-0; 125 — Ryan Kasch 2-0; 135 — Kyle Belanger 0-1; 140 — Miguel Gutierrez 1-1; 145 — Jesus Retano 2-0; 160 — Ivan Galan 1-1; 171 — Austin Barany 1-1; 215 — Justin Hendrix 1-1; 285 — Blake Wilda 0-1. ——— Redmond (individual records) 103 — Brandon Short 0-1; 112 — Ryan Haney 2-0; 119 — Chance Lindquist 3-0; 125 — Levi Brinkley 1-1; 130 — Zack Rystedt 3-0; 135 — David Peebles 2-1; 140 — Boomer Fleming 1-1; 145 — Austin Alvarez 01; 152 — Brock Lash 1-1; 160 — Gunnar Sigado 0-1; 171 — Nick Jeldness 0-1; 285 — Jacob Breitling 1-1. ——— Crook County (individual records) 103 — Erik Martin 2-1; 112 — McKennan Buckner 2-0; 119 — John Crites 0-1; 125 — Dawson Barber 1-1; 130 — Andy Katzenberger 0-1; 140 — Cody Pfau 1-1; 145 — Jared George 1-1; 152 — Trevor Wilson 2-0; 160 — Jake Zeigler 1-1; 171 — Trevor Ough 11; 189 — Bryson Martin 1-1; 215 — Rhett Smith 0-1; 285 — Alex Pierce 0-1. ——— SHELDON INVITATIONAL At Sheldon High in Eugene Team scores — Grants Pass 290.5, Mountain View 282, South Eugene 218, Marshfield 198, Springfield 173.5, Willamette 164, Sheldon 77, Springfield JV 31, Siletz 25, North Eugene 25. ——— Mountain View results (individual records and place) 103 — Wyatt Slaght 2-2, fourth place; 112 — Jake McDonald 3-1, second place; 119 — Keelin Crew 4-1, third place; 125 — Kris Kirkpatrick 4-1, third place; 130 — Justin Weltman 3-2, fifth place; Anthony Oliver 2-2, fifth place; 135 — Kyler Ayers 3-1, second place; Jimmy Radaford 2-2, fifth place; 140 — Forrest Samples 4-0, first place; 145 — Jose Dominguez 2-1, second place; Devin Welch 2-2, fourth place; 152 — Andrew Bright 32, fifth place; 160 — Brandon Hosea 1-2, fourth, place; 171 — Matt Miller 3-1, third place; Uriahs Smith 0-3. 189 — Conner Wiese 3-0, first place; 215 — Trevor Roberts 3-2, fourth place; 285 — Dylan Johnson 2-2, fourth place; Brian Chapman 2-2 , fifth place.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Cougars Continued from D1 “He may be our best shooter,” Reid said about Booster, a senior who played junior varsity last season. “We’ve talked about him being more aggressive. With him on, it really spreads the floor.” Sophomore Austin Peters scored a career-high 21 points for the Storm, carrying the load offensively for Summit with senior Mitch Wettig sitting for most of the third quarter with four fouls. Wettig contributed 16 points and seven rebounds for the Storm, and Bradley Laubacher added nine points and five assists from the point guard position. “I’m proud of how we played,” Summit coach Dan Munson said. “We’re so young, but we’re improving. Who’s to say we can’t do what we did last year? (Summit went on a late winning streak last season that culminated with a berth at the 5A state

tournament.)” Mountain View helped itself with solid free throw shooting, converting 22 of 29 foul shots. Reid hit 14 of 19 free throws and went seven of eight from the line in the final quarter. “It was definitely sluggish,” Cougar coach Craig Reid said about the game. “The third quarter we came out with some energy. In the fourth, give them credit, they kept fighting.” The home victory marked Mountain View’s third consecutive win, its last defeat a 66-62 overtime loss to Bend High on Jan. 14. The Cougars and the Lava Bears (3-0 IMC, 15-2) play for the third time this season on Tuesday at Bend High. Summit, which has lost five of its last six, is at Crook County in an Intermountain Hybrid contest on the same day. Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@bendbulletin.com.

Redmond wrestling third at Reser’s Bulletin staff report HILLSBORO — After the start of the two-day Reser’s Tournament of Champions at Liberty High on Friday, Redmond sits in third place and Culver is in fourth in the 24team wrestling invitational. Four Culver wrestlers went undefeated on Friday. Jared Kasch (112 pounds), Josue Gonzalez (119), Ryan Kasch (125) and Jesus Retano (145) will all compete in semifinal matches today. Redmond had three wrestlers advance to today’s semifinal round: Ryan Haney (112), Chance Lindquist (119) and Zack Rystedt (130). Haney and Jared Kasch will battle today in an all-Central Oregon semifinal. Crook County also had a strong opening day at Reser’s. The Cowboys, who start today in 11th place, have a pair of wrestlers still in contention for an individual title in McKennan Buckner (112) and Trevor Wilson (152), both of whom will wrestle in today’s semifinal round. In other prep action Friday: WRESTLING Cougars second at Eugene tourney EUGENE — Forrest Samples and Conner Wiese were undefeated weight-class champions, leading Mountain View to a runner-up finish at the 10-team Sheldon Invitational. Samples went 4-0 in the 140-pound class, and Wiese ended the day 3-0 to claim first place at 189 pounds. Mountain View also got second-place performances from Jake McDonald (112 pounds), Kyler Ayers (135) and Jose Dominguez (145). The Class 5A Cougars tallied 282 points to finish behind only 6A Grants Pass (290 1⁄2). BOYS BASKETBALL Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 SISTERS — The Outlaws wasted no time in pulling away from the Hawks in a Class 4A SkyEm League game, outscoring La Pine 28-6 in the first quarter. “We played really well,” Sisters coach Rand Runco said. “Our defense was outstanding and we jumped on ’em early.” The duo of Eli Harrison and John Erickson led the Outlaws again, combining for 33 points. Jaron Kuehn posted a team-high nine points for the Hawks. Sisters (3-2 Sky-Em, 11-6 overall) hosts Sweet Home next Friday and La Pine (0-5, 4-15) plays at Cottage Grove on Tuesday.

PREP ROUNDUP Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 La Salle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 MADRAS — Kyle Palmer drained 10 of his 12 points in the first half to boost Madras to a 29-22 lead, but La Salle was not ready to roll over. After playing the White Buffaloes even in the third quarter, the visitors went on a run and with three minutes remaining brought the game to within two points. Fortunately for Madras, Jhaylen Yeahquo sank two free throws to give the home team a four-point cushion heading into the final two minutes. The White Buffaloes held on, despite committing a foul with seconds remaining. Bobby Ahern and Justin QueaphamaMehlberg both posted a team-high 15 points for Madras (3-1 Tri-Valley Conference, 6-11 overall), which is at Molalla on Tuesday. Central Linn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 CULVER — The Bulldogs could not keep up with Class 2A Tri-River Conference power Central Linn, a team that has now won 12 games in a row and has a perfect 10-0 league mark. The Cobras struck in the second quarter, outscoring Culver 29-12. Blake Nightengale recorded a game-high 25 points for Central Linn. The Bulldogs were led by Alex Hansen’s 20 points. Culver (0-10 Tri-River, 2-18 overall) hosts Scio next Tuesday. Hosanna Christian. . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Gilchrist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 GILCHRIST — After holding a slim one-point lead at halftime, Hosanna broke the Mountain Valley League game open in the third quarter with a 30-point scoring flurry. The visiting team sank five of its nine three-pointers in the third period and held Gilchrist to nine points in that same time span. Freshman point guard Trinton Koch contributed 19 points and seven rebounds to the Grizzly effort. Gilchrist (08 Mountain Valley League, 3-11 overall) is on the road at Paisley today. GIRLS BASKETBALL La Salle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72 Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 MILWAUKIE — A flurry of miscues to start each half doomed the White Buffaloes in their TriValley Conference road game at La Salle, one of the top teams in the state in Class 4A. “They’re a hard pressing team,” said Madras

coach Rory Oster. “Turnovers were the story of the game.” The Buffs wound up handing the ball to the undefeated Falcons 34 times. Megan Hayes had a gamehigh 24 points for La Salle. Abby Scott scored 22 points for Madras and JoElla Smith added 14. The loss snaps a four-game winning streak by the White Buffaloes (3-1 Tri-Valley, 11-6 overall), who play Tuesday at Molalla. Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 SISTERS — A Class 4A SkyEm game that included 54 fouls and 71 free-throw attempts went to the host Outlaws. Taylor Nieri recorded a game-high 19 points for Sisters and Marin Allen scored 11. Brittany Glenn led the way for the Hawks with 13 points and Hanna Wieber added 11. Sisters (4-1 Sky-Em, 7-10 overall) hosts Sweet Home next Friday, and La Pine (2-3, 5-14) travels to Cottage Grove on Tuesday. Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 Central Linn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 CULVER — Tied 17-17 at the half, Culver got hot after the break on both sides of the court. The Bulldogs (3-7 Tri-River Confer, 8-12 overall) amassed 19 points while holding Central Linn to only one point in the third period. The fourth was more of the same as Culver outscored the visiting team 23-4. Chantelle Seehawer scored a game-high 17 points and Kymber Wofford contributed eight points, seven rebounds, six assists and five steals in the home win. The Bulldogs host Scio on Tuesday in another league matchup. Hosanna Christian. . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Gilchrist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 GILCHRIST — The Grizzlies suffered through a cold-shooting night, hitting only eight of their 50 field goal attempts, and fell to Hosanna Christian in a Class 1A Mountain Valley game. Brenna Gravitt led Gilchrist with eight points and Jenny Scevers added a team-high eight rebounds. The Grizzlies (4-4 Mountain Valley, 6-7 overall) play at Paisley today. North Lake. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Rogue Valley Adventist. . . . . . . . .17 MEDFORD — Lesley Dark scored 21 points and grabbed 13 rebounds to lead North Lake to the Class 1A Mountain Valley League road victory. Cheyenne Strong scored 13 points and Paige Ward added 12 for North Lake (4-4 MVL), which plays at home today against Triad.

GOLF ROUNDUP

Haas takes the lead, Tiger rallies to get five back The Associated Press SAN DIEGO — A strong finish by Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson made them feel better about their rounds Friday on opposite ends of Torrey Pines, and better about their chances of catching Bill Haas. Haas, slowly turning into the player everyone thought he would be, made eight birdies on the South Course for a 6-under 66, giving him a two-shot lead over Anthony Kim going into the weekend at the Farmers Insurance Open. “A nice 36 (holes) on the weekend could turn this into a great week,” Haas said. It’s shaping up to be quite a show. Mickelson, with his wife mingling in the gallery this week for the first time since she was diagnosed with breast cancer in May 2009, turned an ordinary round into a decent one with back-to-back birdies for a 3-under 69 on the North Course. He was three shots behind along with defending champion Ben Crane, four of Mickelson’s Ryder Cup teammates, and John Daly. Yes, that John Daly. Winless since his surprise playoff victory seven years ago at Torrey Pines, Daly overcame a double bogey on the North Course for a 69 and found himself in the hunt for the first time since he slimmed down and started wearing the loudest clothes on tour. Could this be another out-of-nowhere win? “With me, you don’t know what to expect,” Daly said. Woods, who has won his last five starts on his jewel along with Pacific, managed to stay in the game. He had a 69 and was five shots behind, but with only 11 players ahead of him. Woods ran off four straight birdies early in his round and at one point was only three shots out of the lead. But he twice took two shots to get out of bunkers and was as many as eight shots behind until the final half-hour. He laced a 5-iron into 12 feet for birdie on the 16th, made a 20-foot par putt after a plugged lie in the face of a bunker on the 17th, then hit 5-wood from 248 yards over the water and onto the green on the par-5 18th, two-putting for birdie. “It was a round that easily could have slipped away,” Woods said. The finish left him optimistic about ending the longest drought of his career. It has

Gregory Bull / The Associated Press

Bill Haas tees off on the seventh hole of the South Course at Torrey Pines during the second round of the Farmers Insurance Open golf tournament in San Diego, Friday. been 14 months since his last victory, dating to the Australian Masters in November 2009 just before his Thanksgiving night car accident. In these pristine conditions, though, everyone was feeling good about their chances. Kim played alongside Woods and birdied his opening four holes. He was tied for the lead after a tap-in birdie at the 10th, but bogeyed the next hole and finished with seven pars, including a three-putt on the 18th. “I’m really close,” Kim said. “I know I’ve said it a million times. I’m not going to say it again. I’ve just got to make a couple of birdies and see what happens.” The lead belongs to Haas, who was at 11-under 133. The son of former PGA Tour player Jay Haas, he was a can’t-miss kid out of Wake Forest who plodded along until winning twice last year. He arrived in San Diego after a playoff loss last week at the Bob Hope Classic. Also on Friday: Four share lead at Volvo RIFFA, Bahrain — Miguel Angel Jimenez made three birdies putting with a lob wedge after breaking his putter to set up a four-way tie for the lead halfway through the Volvo Champions. Jimenez, Edoardo Molinari, of Italy, and Raphael Jacquelin, of France, shot 7-under-par 65s to join Peter Hanson (67), of Sweden, at 11-under 133 at Royal Golf Club. Stephen Gallacher (64), of Scotland, Paul Casey (67), Darren Clarke (65) and James Kingston (67) of South Africa, are anther stroke back.

TENNIS

Murray, Djokovic set for Australian Open final By John Pye The Associated Press

MELBOURNE, Australia — Andy Murray doesn’t have to worry about Roger Federer or Rafael Nadal this time. He is hardly in the clear, however, as he goes for his first major title. Murray won his Australian Open semifinal, defeating David Ferrer 4-6, 7-6 (2), 6-1, 7-6 (2). Next in line is 2008 champion and longtime friend Novak Djokovic in Sunday’s final. Of course, there’s that long British drought. Fred Perry was the last British man to win one of the four majors — way back in 1936. More than 270 Grand Slam tournaments have been contested in almost 75 years since Perry’s victory, when Britain had a King and an empire. “First of all, it’s more like a personal dream or a personal goal of mine,” Murray said. “The historical thing, it’s not something that I’ve thought about that much, but it’s something that obviously for me personally I want to try and win. But I also don’t want to get myself so amped up that I play a stinker of a match.” Murray is hoping two fresh faces in the final will be good for tennis. Federer and Nadal combined to win 21 of the previous 23 majors. Djokovic’s victory over Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in Australia in 2008 was

David Grosling / The Associated Press

Britain’s Andy Murray yells as he celebrates a point win against Spain’s David Ferrer in their men’s semifinal at the Australian Open tennis championships in Melbourne, Australia, Friday. the only final in that span that didn’t feature one of the top two players. Djokovic and Murray have known each other since their early teens — both are 23, their birthdays a week apart. But they have never met in a major. The top-ranked women’s team of Gisela Dulko of Argentina and Flavia Pennetta of Italy rallied from a set and 4-1 down to win the doubles final over Victoria Azarenka of Belarus and Maria Kirilenko of Russia 2-6, 7-5, 6-1.


FOO T BA L L

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, January 29, 2011 D5

U W ’ s Locker and Texans NFL is riding remarkable TV ratings into Super Bowl headline Senior Bowl QBs By John Zenor

The Associated Press

By Rachel Cohen The Associated Press

NEW YORK — To understand just how good the NFL’s ratings have been this season — the best in about 15 years — it helps to take a moment and compare the league to the rest of TV. Games on CBS, Fox and NBC averaged 20 million viewers. The average for the prime-time programming on the four major networks, the most coveted slots on the schedule? Around 8.2 million viewers. That means NFL ratings are 144 percent better than television’s top non-football lineups, and here’s the kicker. That difference was 61 percent just five years ago. Even CBS Sports president Sean McManus, whose network has committed billions of dollars to broadcast the NFL, is wowed by the figures. “I’m continually pleased and really amazed by the kind of ratings that are being generated by all the networks during the regular season and postseason,” McManus said on a recent conference call. “Go figure,” he added. “The NFL is just on fire this year. Fan interest seems to be at an all-time high.” Fox Sports chairman David Hill this week ticked off the many theories for the league’s success. More knowledgeable fans. The prevalence of high-definition television, which particularly benefits NFL games. The recession, which has kept more people at home. The ratings were already strong last season, then took another jump this year. Stars and story lines have lured in viewers, with a deep list of big-name quarterbacks playing well — or at least making news, in the case of Minnesota’s Brett Favre. Appropriately, two franchises whose traditions tend to draw big ratings — Green Bay and Pittsburgh — are in the Super Bowl. “The secret weapon is Howard Katz, the NFL’s scheduler,” Hill said. “If you’re not getting the right matchups in the right markets, then you are not putting the most appealing thing in front of people. If you look at the matchups he’s put together week in and week out and year in and

Titletown Continued from D1 So maybe more than a simple NFL championship will be on the line next weekend. “We can call it what you want, we just want to keep winning championships,” says Steelers receiver Antwaan Randle El, now in his second go-around in Pittsburgh. “We want to be the, I guess, the bully on the block, the team that everybody’s hunting for.” Adds nose tackle Casey Hampton, owner of two championships already: “Man, we’ll worry about that if we’re fortunate enough to get this one. I’m not going to take away from what guys have done because they’ve done it in the past and won their Super Bowl. I’m not going to compare us to them until we finish the job, and we haven’t finished the job yet.” The Packers won six championships before the merger. Green Bay took the first two Super Bowls under Vince Lombardi but didn’t return to it until 1997,

LM Otero / The Associated Press

Fans take pictures of and pose for photos in front of a Super Bowl XLV sign in Dallas on Thursday. The game is Sunday, Feb. 6. year out, his hard work is shining.” The soaring ratings stand in contrast to a rough year off-the-field for the NFL. That includes scandals involving two of those big-name quarterbacks — Favre, accused of sexting a Jets employee in 2008, and Super Bowl-bound Ben Roethlisberger, who was accused of sexually assaulting a college student in Georgia, though prosecutors declined to press charges. Both men were punished by the league. Roethlisberger had to sit out the first four games of the season and Favre was fined $50,000 at the end of the year. Clearly the negative attention hasn’t hurt, and maybe it even stokes interest. McManus believes the salacious stories do sometimes attract more viewers initially, but they won’t stick around if the on-field product isn’t good. And there’s the twist. Just when NFL fans seemingly can’t get enough of football, the Super Bowl may be all they’re getting for a while. Among the negative off-field dramas is the wrangling over a new contract between owners and players that might lead to a lockout. McManus predicted little lasting impact on ratings as long as a lockout didn’t

result in a large chunk of the 2011 season being canceled. Hill was more pessimistic. “With the sport reaching heights that Pete Rozelle would never dreamed of, we want to keep it that way,” he said. “We know what happens to sports after a strike or a lockout; people turn away and it takes a while for them to come back. It would be a great tragedy if both sides weren’t able to reach an agreement.” The union uses the record viewership as evidence the league is doing just fine financially and doesn’t need to redistribute revenue — and that the timing is risky for a work stoppage. Steve Solomon, a former ABC and NHL executive who works as a media consultant, said the amount of revenue a league can bring in from TV doesn’t affect the major debates of a labor negotiation. “Regardless of how much money there is in this pie, there’s the same issues that are going on in the NBA in their negotiations and what went on with the NHL in their negotiations,” he said. “Whatever the pie is, it is about whatever is the fairest way to split it up.”

when it won its only other title. Does that mean Pittsburgh deserves to be dubbed Titletown over the original version? Rocky Bleier, a key performer on the Steelers’ four championships in six seasons (1974-79), is a Pittsburgh icon. He also grew up in Appleton, Wis., just down the road from Lambeau Field. While he has no mixed emotions about the upcoming matchup at Dallas Cowboys Stadium — he’ll be there waving his Terrible Towel — Bleier concedes that Green Bay can keep the title of Titletown USA. “Being a Packers fan growing up and them winning the NFL championships and then the Super Bowls, it was a fact that they were Titletown,” Bleier says. “That’s a small market capturing the imaginations of their fan base and even of America. And they have worn that mantle for a long time and should be proud of it.” Yet, Paul Hornung, a hero on those vintage Packers, recognizes the reasoning by Steelers fans. “Well, if (Pittsburgh) wins you’ve got to hand it to them, it’s as simple as that,”

Hornung says. Hornung also thinks the current Packers could challenge what his teams did. “The Packers have had more championships if you add them all up,” he adds. “We won five, and if they can get on track they can win three or four in the next few years. They’re good enough to do that.” There’s something else that only Pack fans can revel in, according to former Packers receiver Antonio Freeman, who caught an 81-yard TD pass in the 1997 Super Bowl and scored two more TDs the next year, when Denver beat Green Bay. “Those first two Super Bowls, that was the start of it and made it all relevant,” he says. “That is why they named it the Vince Lombardi Trophy. I repeat, the Vince Lombardi Trophy.” The Steelers own a half-dozen of those, and even though the original Steel Curtain came down for the last time more than 30 years ago, its legacy is as strong as, well, steel in Pittsburgh — and among Steelers fans everywhere. A connection remains with those

MOBILE, Ala. — Jake Locker could easily have skipped the Senior Bowl, just as he might have bypassed being a senior altogether. The former Washington Huskies star is among the candidates to be the first quarterback selected in the NFL draft after an up-and-down senior season. Instead of weighing the risk-reward of a top-tier passer competing in an all-star game with scouts, coaches and team executives scrutinizing your every pass and move, Locker thought it was a nobrainer to play in today’s game for senior NFL prospects. “I just love playing football,” Locker said. “It’s an awesome game, and just the opportunity to come play against the best college players. It’s an awesome opportunity.” Regarded as a potential No. 1 overall pick after his junior season, Locker now is vying with underclassmen Cam Newton, Blaine Gabbert and Ryan Mallett to get the nod as the top quarterback taken in April. He has spent this week competing with fellow seniors who boast impressive resumes if not quite the lofty draft stock. The other two North team quarterbacks are Nevada’s Colin Kaepernick and Iowa’s Ricky Stanzi. The South is led by three Texans who faced each other in high school. Alabama’s Greg McElroy and TCU’s Andy Dalton both have led their teams to perfect seasons. Florida State’s Christian Ponder ranks among the Seminoles’ top five career leaders in passing yards, completions, total offense and completion percentage. Locker at least put a nice punctuation to his final season. He led Washington — which had to win its final three regular-season games to become bowl eligible — to a Holiday Bowl upset over No. 17 Nebraska. “That meant the world to me. That’s why I came back,” said Locker, who ran for 83 yards and a touchdown in the finale. “I made a commitment to that school and I wanted to honor that commitment. I had a great experience when

teams, and not just because Bleier and Franco Harris and other members of Chuck Noll’s championship squads are still so visible in Pittsburgh today. “They’re amazing,” safety Ryan Clark says. “I talked to Franco a couple weeks ago. It’s almost like a fraternity: once in, always in. I don’t know how much Terry Bradshaw likes us at times, if you watch us on TV, but the guys around here: Louis Lipps, Mel Blount. Mr. Greene, that’s what we call him — I don’t call him Joe — just seeing those guys and the love they still have and the respect they show when they see us. They don’t have to. They started all this, but for them to always be so excited about us and be so complimentary of the things we’re doing, it’s amazing.” Yes, but is it dynastic? If the Steelers win a third crown in six years, is it fair to list them with the Steel Curtain teams? Or with the Lombardi Packers? Is it worthy of moving Titletown 665 miles southeast? Packers coach Mike McCarthy has one sure way of blunting that conversa-

I was at Washington. I wouldn’t trade it for anything. I’m just happy that our football team was able to go out the way we did.” He completed 55.4 percent of his passes for 2,265 yards with 17 touchdowns and nine interceptions last season. Those numbers were down from his junior season but Locker said the extra year “made me a better person and player.” Plus he got his history degree in December. “I think I was able to mature as a person and as a player, in media situations, in the huddle, in the locker room,” Locker said. “Just being a leader overall.” The quarterback derby became muddied when fellow Pac-10 Conference standout Andrew Luck of Stanford opted to return for his senior season, too. Locker doesn’t hide his ambitions to go first among quarterbacks. “If you ask anybody, they’d want to be the first guy taken at their position,” he said. “That’s what you’re working toward, but it’s outside of all our control. The way I’m approaching it is I’m going to get better every day and I’m going to do my best to outwork the other guy every day. “If that’s enough, it’s enough.” The other Senior Bowl quarterbacks have different focuses. Ponder wants to put a better ending to his career after getting knocked out in the first half of the Chick-fil-A Bowl with a concussion. He and McElroy faced off in high school their senior seasons, while Ponder and Dalton met in a sevenon-seven game the previous summer. McElroy and Southlake Carroll team beat Dalton’s Katy team 34-20 in the state title game. Neither redhead was a prep starter until their senior season. Dalton led TCU to an unbeaten season and No. 2 final ranking as a senior, while McElroy and the Crimson Tide won the national title the year before. “He’s just a great guy,” McElroy said. “He’s a guy I always rooted for. He’s a guy I always knew would have immediate success just because of the way he applies himself, the way he works. I wasn’t the least bit surprised that he had the success he did at TCU.”

tion. If his team wins the Super Bowl, the Pittsburgh native will be lionized in Green Bay the way Mike Holmgren was 14 years ago. And, if only slightly, in the way Lombardi was while McCarthy was growing up — in the Steel City. “Pittsburgh is obviously a big part of who I am. And my family’s still back there,” McCarthy says. “This is going to be a very unique experience for everybody. Half my coaching staff has either played in Pittsburgh or is from Pittsburgh. “And I think the fact that I’m from back there, it’s neat. I’m a Pittsburgh Steelers’ fan growing up. They’re my second favorite team. I thought it was awesome to have Terry Bradshaw present the Halas Trophy in the locker room (to the Packers). Personally I got a charge out of that. Terry was obviously the quarterback in my youth during the ’70s when they won the four Super Bowls. “But trust me I’m a Green Bay Packer and it’s important for us to bring the Lombardi Trophy back home.” To Titletown USA.



Taco Del Mar advertised in The Bulletin and received 500 coupons in just one day. We’re The Bulletin, your local source for news, entertainment, information and savings. Each day 70,000 readers turn to the pages of our print edition for saving opportunities from local businesses. Plus, we deliver grocery and shopping inserts every week with additional ways to stretch your dollars - locally. The Bulletin ... there when you need it most.

Taco Del Mar was interested in reaching new customers. So they decided to spice things up and run a one-day-only coupon in The Bulletin. The response was HOT! They received 500 coupons and found a line of customers going out their door during the prime lunch and dinner hours. It was one promotion that left a good taste in everybody’s mouth.

THANK YOU FOR LETTING US TELL YOUR STORY

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800

To Advertise call 541-382-1811


D6 Saturday, January 29, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To see what’s new, go to

bendbulletin.com/b boocoo


For homes online

THE BULLETIN

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S AT U R D AY, J A N U A R Y 2 9 , 2 0 11

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www.bendhomes.com

ADVERTISING SECTION E

Privacy and Convenience

Hayden Homes Newest Community Welcome to Canyon Breeze, the newest community by Hayden Homes. Located in Southwest Bend, Canyon Breeze has a variety of well-appointed home plans available starting at only $209,990. Get your New Year off to a fantastic start in a new Hayden Home! For more information visit our model home in neighboring Aspen Rim or find us on the web at www.hayden-homes.com for more information. Directions: south on parkway, west on Powers Road, south on Brookswood Blvd., west on Montrose Pass.

This impressive 1.15 acre North Rim homesite offers commanding views of the Cascade mountains and access to the Deschutes River Trail. North Rim is located within Bend’s city limits and just minutes to downtown and the Old Mill District. The community of just 121 homesites encompasses more than 200 acres, includes native landscaping maintained by the HOA, paver sidewalk paths throughout, and a spectacular community lodge. $330,000. MLS# 201005760.

BROOKS RESOURCES REALTY 409 NW Franklin Ave., Bend Office (541) 382-1662 • Cell (541) 788-7769

Open House Checklist

Paid Advertisement

CANYON BREEZE — SW BEND WWW.HAYDEN-HOMES. COM 541-306-3085

Paid Advertisement

DESIGN STYLE: Repurposed Camp Car

Prepare your home for a successful open house with these low- and no-cost improvements. by CMS, for The Bulletin Advertising Department Despite low interest rates and declining sale prices, there is still a lot of home inventory available. That means homeowners must do whatever they can to set their homes apart from other available homes. Real estate experts call it staging, or presenting the home in its best light so that potential buyers can envision themselves moving in. If time is of the essence and your open house is just around the corner, just a few changes here and there can make your home even more inviting. • The nose knows. A house can be perfect inside and out, but if it smells bad, buyers will likely be put off. Make sure there is no noticeable odor, such as pet smells, garbage or stale smoke. • Clear out. Make sure the interior looks as spacious as possible. This could mean taking out some furniture and temporarily putting it in storage. Be sure countertops in bathrooms and kitchens are free of clutter. Pack away knick-knacks that can collect dust. • Do a deep cleaning. Whether a cleaning service is hired or the homeowner does it himself, tackling necessary cleaning projects can make the home shine. Now is the time to wash the windows, shampoo the carpets and tackle all of those messes that could compromise a sale. • Create happy spaces. Buyers don’t want to purchase a dark home that seems full of doom and gloom. Open the windows, turn on the lights, add lights to dark rooms and use light colors as room accents. Generally buyers want a bright and light home. Never underestimate the power of elbow grease. You may find that with some attention to the details of your home, buyers will see your home in a new light.

NW Riverfront Street, Bend The image that comes to mind when imagining historic homes along the shore of the Deschutes River, approaching downtown Bend, usually includes large colonial-style homes. But just north of the Old Mill District, a collection of smaller homes tell a different story from the past. One of those homes belongs to Ray and Jackie Haworth. In its past life, their home served as a mobile camp car that was used to house logging crews. Today, it is graced with cottage-style décor that celebrates outdoor lifestyles. Jackie enjoys decorating for the seasons. During winter, she creates a ski-lodge appearance, and in the warmer months, the home is reminiscent of a beach house. Year round, the skeleton of a wooden kayak remains situated above living room rafters. Boat paddles are used as railing along their loft space, and a pair of antique skis are hung above their kitchen.

This home is not currently listed for sale. Photos by Nicole Werner

Share your design inspiration Did you make your home look like a million bucks without spending a million bucks? Do you have a unique home that could inspire others? Contact Nicole Werner at nwerner@bendbulletin.com, and your home could be featured on High Desert HomeStyles. Find homes for sale in Central Oregon by visiting

www.bendhomes.com


E2 Saturday, January 29, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

634

642

648

650

656

664

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Houses for Rent General

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent SW Bend

Houses for Rent Furnished

Real Estate For Sale

BEND RENTALS • Starting at $450. Furnished also avail. For virtual tours & pics www.alpineprop.com 541-385-0844

4 Bdrm 2.5 bath, 1700 sq ft. appls, fenced yd, on culdesac. No smoking. Pets? 2400 NE Jeni Jo Ct., near hospital. $1050. 503-680-9590 Available 2/1: 21370 Starling. 3 Bdrm, 2 Bath, dbl garage w/opener, fenced yard, auto sprinklers. $900/mo. + security deposit. 541-549-1671

19946 S. Alderwood Circle Wood River Village 3 bdrm, 1.5 bath mobile home, all appliances, w/d hook-up, sun room, storage, Pet ok. $650 541-382-7727

RIVERFRONT: walls of windows with amazing 180 degree river view with dock, canoe, piano, bikes, covered BBQ, $1250. 541-593-1414

700

1426 NE Tucson #1 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath, all appl. + micro, w/d hook-up, garage, w/s pd., landscaping maintained, small pet ok. $725 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condominiums & Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space 682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condominiums & Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 631

Rentals

600

Condo / Townhomes For Rent

1754 NE Lotus 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, all appliances, bonus room, gas fireplace, garage, w/s paid, AVAIL NOW $795. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928.

2508 NE Conners "C" 2 bdrm, 1½ bath, all appliances, utility rm., 1300 sq. ft., garage, w/s paid. $650 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

2 Bdrm, lovely unit, private patio, small, quiet complex, W/S/G paid, no smoking, $525+ dep, 1000 NE Butler Mkt. Rd. 541-633-7533

2-story Townhouse/Duplex 2 bedroom, 2.5 bath, garage, all appliances, washer/dryer, WSG paid. No pets/smoking. $725 month + deposits. 541-389-7734. Across from St. Charles 2 Bedroom duplex, garage, huge fenced yard, RV parking, Pets. $725/mo. 541-480-9200. Beautiful 2 bdrm., 2.5 bath util., garage, gas fireplace, no smoking or pets. $675 1st+last+sec. Please Call 541-382-5570,541-420-0579 First Month’s Rent Free 130 NE 6th 1-2 bdrm/ 1 bath, W/S/G paid, onsite laundry, no pets, $450-$525+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414 First Month’s Rent Free 1761 NE Laredo Way 2 bdrm/ 1.5 bath, single garage, w/d hook-up, w/s/g pd. Small pet neg.$695+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414

!! Snowball of a Deal !! $300 off Upstairs Apts. 2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps Lease Options Available Pet Friendly & No App. Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

604

Storage Rentals

The Plaza in Bend Old Mill District

Secure 10x20 Storage, in SE Bend, insulated, 24-hr www.ThePlazainBend.com access, $95/month, Call Rob, 541-410-4255. OPEN HOUSE 627

Vacation Rentals and Exchanges Spring Break at Melia Cabo Real, anytime, 2 bdrm, 1 week, 541-350-6865.

$700,

Sat. & Sun 10am to 4pm Now Leasing Call 541-743-1890 Email; plazabendapts@prmc.com

630

Rooms for Rent Awbrey Heights, furn., no smoking/drugs/pets. $350 +$100 dep. (541) 388-2710.

632

Apt./Multiplex General

Budget Inn, 1300 S. Hwy 97, Royal 541-389-1448; & Gateway Motel, 475 SE 3rd St., 541-382-5631, Furnished Rooms: 5 days/$150+tax

The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

Room in CRR, $200/mo. incl. utils, rent reduction for housekeeping duties, small trained pet ok, 541-548-6635

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885 Tumalo - Country Setting Granny unit. 2 rooms + bath, partial kitchen, $395/mo. Call 541-389-6720, or cell, 541-550-0216.

631

Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc. Nice 2 bdrm., 2 bath duplex close to amenities, walk-in closet, gas fireplace, deck, garage, no smoking/pets. $825 mo. 402-957-7261

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend River Views! 2 bdrm., 1½ bath, W/D hook-up. W/S/G paid, $650/mo. $600 dep. small pets allowed. 930 NW Carlon, 541-280-7188.

Small studio close to downtown and Old Mill. $450 mo., dep. $425, all util. paid. no pets. 541-330-9769 or 541-480-7870.

The Bulletin Classifieds 634

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

1 & 2 bdrms Available starting at $575. Reserve Now! Limited Availability.

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

Alpine Meadows 541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

½ off first month rent 2 bdrm, all appliances, w/d hook-up, gas heat/fireplace, garage, landscaping included. Small pet ok. $675 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Family Housing Clean & attractive 1, 2, & 3 bedroom apartments. Rent based on income. •Crest Butte Apartments, 1695 NE Purcell Blvd., Bend. Newly remodeled 1 & 2 bedroom units available. Onsite laundry facilities & new playground. Close to hospital, 5 minutes to downtown & the Old Mill District. Call Krystal @ (541)389-9107. •Ridgemont Apartments, 2210 SW 19th St., Redmond. Accepting applications for 1 & 2 bedroom units in a centrally located area. Call Bobbie @ (541)548-7282. TDD 1-800-545-1833

Find It in TERREBONNE $950 4/2.5 $500 off 1st month w/ lease, fireplace, garage. 1425 Majestic Rock Dr

541-923-8222

541-923-8222

www.MarrManagement.com

www.MarrManagement.com

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

ASK ABOUT OUR New Year Special! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, non-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

Call about Our Specials! Studios to 3 bedroom units from $415 to $575 • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 Managed by

GSL Properties

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com Like New Duplex. Nice neighborhood. 2 Bdrm 2 bath, 1-car garage, fenced, central heat & AC. Fully landscaped, $700+dep. 541-545-1825.

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

SWEETHEART

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend 1050 NE Butler Market $900 – 2 Master suites each w/ own bathrooms, showers & soaker tubs. Master suites separated by loft entertainment or offc area. Large living space downstairs w/large eat-in kitchen & ½ bath. Nice upgraded appls. 2 car garage, access to clubhouse, pool & tennis. Great view of Pilot Butte for fireworks! ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT - 541-389-8558

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily When buying a home, 83% of Central Oregonians turn to

www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

1435 NE Boston 3 bdrm/ 2 bath, private yard, gas frplce, all kitchen appl incld small pet neg. $895+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414 Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

1743 NE Diablo $850 – 3 bedroom 2 bath, newly remodeled, new carpet, linoleum & fresh paint; large yard and garage. Heaters and wood stove. Available now! ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT - 541-389-8558

call Classified 385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

652

2 blocks from DT, 4 Bdrm, 1.5 bath, fenced yd. W/D, shed, new paint. Pets OK. Potential office. $1195 1st/last/security deposit. 541-948-4531

Houses for Rent NW Bend

3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1 level, lots of light, new carpet, kitchen, bath, paint, A/C, dbl. garage, near St. Charles, great neighborhood, $1095, 541-306-4404

SPECIAL

1/ 2 OFF ALL MOVE-IN RENTS w/ Lease Agreements COMPUTERIZED PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-0053 •Cute Apt. in Central Location - 1 Bdrm/1Bath with private fenced back yard and patio. No pets. $425 WSG. • Near Downtown. Large 2 Bdrm/1 Bath Apts. W/D Hookups. Small fenced yard. End Units. Pets ??? $495 WST. • Spacious 2 Bdrm/1 Bath apartments. Off-street parking. On-site laundry. Near hospital. Just $525 WST. • Good NE Location. 2 Bdrm/1 Bath Duplex. Carport/W/D Hook-ups. Unfenced yard. Pets?? $525 WS • Charming, cozy 2 Bdrm/1 Bath cottage in central location. New carpet. Fenced backyard. $595 per month. • 4 Bdrm/2 Bath in NE - Fenced back yard. RV parking. Sgl. level. Sgl. garage. Gas forced air heat. Pets ok. $895 per mo. •Beautiful 1990 sq. ft. NE Home Upscale subdivision. 3 bedroom, 2 bath. Master bedroom separation. Sgl. level. Triple garage. Extra RV parking $1100 per mo. ***** FOR ADD’L PROPERTIES ***** CALL 541-382-0053 or See Website www.computerizedpropertymanagement.com

1403 NW 7th, Newer, great Westside location, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, W/D & all appl. incl., gas heat, W/S/G paid., $750, Call 541-771-4824.

20744 Northstar 2 bdrm, 2 bath, all appl. + w/d, pellet stove, sunroom, decks, garage, 1112 sq. ft., near park. $850 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Country Home! 3 bdrm 3 bath 3500+ sq. ft. home, all appliances, family room, office, triple garage, 2 woodstoves, sunroom, lrg. utility room including w/d, pantry, pet OK. $2500 mo. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend 3 bdrm, 1 bath house with double and single garage. 20431 Clay Pigeon Ct., $800 mo. 1st/last, $400 refundable deposit. 541-388-2307.

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

2 bedroom, 2 bath manufactured home in quiet park, handicap ramp, carport, w/s/g paid., $600/mo. $250 deposit. 541-382-8244. 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, cul-de-sac, dbl. garage, no smoking, avail. 2/15, 19800 SW Wetland Ct., $850, 541-389-3594.

60153 Crater Road. DRW 1 bedroom w/office, appliances, woodstove, w/d hook-up, shop, 2 acres, pet ok. $725. 541-382-7727

671

705

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent

Real Estate Services

On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq. ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1195. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

682

Farms, Ranches and Acreage Horse/Cow facility for lease 35 acres with 14 acres irrigated. 50’x50’ old barn; corrals & arena area. $400/mo. Call 541-419-1917

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

687

60212 Cinder Butte

Commercial for Rent/Lease

DRW 2 bedroom, 2 bath, appliances, woodstove, w/d hook-up, RV parking, storage, pet ok. $795. 541-382-7727

ding w/3 rooms, between Redmond & Terrebonne. $250/mo. 541-419-1917

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

658

Houses for Rent Redmond

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft

1018 NW Birch Ave. 2 bdrm/ 1 bath, 720 sq ft. house,located on large lot, close to dwntwn. Pets neg. $550+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414

827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404

3/2 1385 sq. ft., family room, new carpet & paint, nice big yard, dbl. garage w/opener, quiet cul-de-sac. $995 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath+bonus, in Fieldstone Crossing, Redmond. Near schools. Community Pool. Furnished+all appl. avail 3/11. $1000+util. 907-738-1410. 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1031 sq.ft., fenced yard, dbl. garage, $850/mo., $700 dep., pets neg., drive by first at 1526 NE 4th St., call 541-280-6235

3 Bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. deep garage, fresh interior paint, new Pergo, carpeted bdrms. Fully fenced w/deck. 1st & dep., $800. 503-997-7870. 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, dbl garage, AC. Quiet neighborhood, Large fenced yard w/RV pad, deck, mature landscaping, close to schools/shopping. Avail 3/1. 634 NW 22nd St. $1000/mo, annual lease. 541-312-3796 4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room with woodstove, new carpet, pad & paint, single garage w/opener. $895/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 Adorable duplex in Canyon Rim Village, 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath. all appl., includes gardener. Reduced to $749/mo. 541-408-0877.

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver A newer 3/2 mfd. home, 1755 sq.ft., living room, family room, new paint, private .5 acre lot near Sunriver, $895. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803.

H I G H

713

Real Estate Wanted Cash For West Side Homes: Fast Closings Call Pat Kelley, Kelley Realty 541-382-3099

732

Commercial/Investment ATV - Snowmobile storage Properties for Sale etc. Shop 22’x36’ block buil-

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

VILLAGE PROPERTIES Sunriver, Three Rivers, La Pine. Great Selection. Prices range from $425 - $2000/mo. View our full inventory online at Village-Properties.com 1-866-931-1061

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

RV-Boat Storage, etc. 36’x42’ with 2 roll-up between Redmond, & bonne. $400/mo. 541-419-1917.

Shop doors, TerreCall

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Warehouse with Offices in Redmond,6400 sq.ft., zoned M2, overhead crane, plenty of parking, 919 SE Lake Rd., $0.40/sq.ft., 541-420-1772.

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Ofice/Retail Space for Rent 335 NE Greenwood Ave. Prime retail/office space, Greenwood frontage, 1147 sq. ft., ample parking, includes w/s. $1200 mo. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

347 NE Greenwood Ave. 400 sq. ft. office space, private entrance & restroom, 3 small offices + reception area, ample parking, includes water/sewer/ electric. $500! 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Business Opportunities in Chemult, OR. Restaurant and Lounge Restaurant features country cuisine & the Lounge offers lottery & keno. Steady tourist traffic. Includes a 924 sq.ft. manufactured home to occupy, rent or use for staff. Owner will carry. $295,000. MLS 201010596 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin Chemult Motel Established 16 unit Motel with separate home for the manager. Centrally located on Hwy 97 between Bend & Klamath Falls. $450,000 MLS 201010626 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393 • Commercially Zoned and Adjacent to Chemult Motel Updated 1,512 sq ft home on 1.2 acres. $125,000 MLS 201010650. • Home on 3.68 acres with pole barn. $150,000 MLS 201010653 Owner will carry on all the properties. Purchase separately or as a package! Juniper Realty 541-504-5393

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Multiplexes for Sale 8 UNITS ON THE WESTSIDE! Two 4-plexes in prime location. Each unit is 2 bedroom, 1 bath, 820 sq. ft. with gas fireplace and washer/ dryer. Priced to sell! $260,000 each. Call Dawn Ulrickson, Broker 541-610-9427. MLS: 201004943 Duke Warner Realty 541-382-8262 www.dukewarner.com

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

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455 Sq.ft. Office Space, high visibility on Highland Ave in Redmond, $400 per mo. incl. W/S/G, Please Call 541-419-1917.

Condo / Townhomes For Sale

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 Downtown Redmond Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. $650/mo + utils; $650 security deposit. 425 SW Sixth St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848

$49,900. 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath MLS#201008043 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $100,000. Brand new townhouse with fenced yard and to many amenities to list! MLS#2909950 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

D E S E R T

Westside Village Apts. 1459 NW Albany (1/2 off 1st month rent!) d 1 bdrm, $495 d d 3 bdrm, $610 d Coin-op laundry. W/S/G paid, cat or small dog OK with dep. 541-382-7727 or 388-3113.

1042 NE Rambling #2

Condo / Townhomes For Rent

$99 MOVES YOU IN !!!

$595 2/2 garage w/opener, w/d hookup, gas heat, yard maint. 1913 NW Elm Ave $625 3/2 w/d hookup, w/s/g paid, single garage. 1222 SW 18th St $695 2+/2 new carpet, garage w/opener, w/d hookup, gas heat, w/s/g paid. 554 NE Negus Lp $700 2/2 garage w/opener, w/d hookup, gas heat. 3673 SW Bobby Jones Ct

Healthy Living in Central Oregon

638 330 SE 15th St. #9 ½ off first month rent Close to schools & shopping 1 bdrm, appliances, on-site coin-op laundry, carport, w/s/g paid. $465. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Country Terrace 61550 Brosterhous Rd. 1 Bdrm $425 • 2 Bdrm $495 All appliances, storage, on-site coin-op laundry BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-7727 www.bendpropertymanagement.com

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A SLICK STOCK MAGAZINE CREATED TO HELP PROMOTE, ENCOURAGE, AND MAINTAIN AN ACTIVE, HEALTHY LIFESTYLE.

Central Oregon Business Owners: Reach Central Oregon with information about your health related retail products and services! Distributed quarterly in more than 33,000 copies of The Bulletin and at distribution points throughout the market area, this new glossy magazine will speak directly to the consumer focused on health and healthy living – and help you grow your business and market share. For more information, please contact Kristin Morris, Bulletin Health/Medical Account Executive at 541-617-7855, e-mail at kmorris@bendbulletin.com, or contact your assigned Bulletin Advertising Executive at 541-382-1811.

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 2 bedroom, 2 bath deluxe energy-efficient duplexes next to park. Appliances available. single garage. $650-$695 per month. 541-280-7781. 3 Bedroom 2.5 bath duplex in NE Redmond. Garage, fenced backyard. $825-$775 + deposit. Call 541-350-0256 or 503-200-0990 for more info.

LOOK FOR THE NEXT ISSUE COMING FEB. 14 • 541-382-1811 FULL CASCADE MOUNTAIN VIEWS SATURDAY 12:00 - 4:00 Quiet 9.81 acres in Tumalo. 1 acre irrigated. 1700 sq. ft., 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, like new home. Paved drive and 1440 65300 Concorde Lane sq. ft. pole barn/shop. Directions: Concorde Lane is a Breathtaking views. Easy private, paved road off Dayton Rd. to see, incredible buy! $399,900 MLS#2809508

Hosted & Listed by: VIRGINIA ROSS Broker, ABR, CRS, GRI

541-480-7501 info@virginiaross.com


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, January 29, 2011 E3

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Condo / Townhomes For Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Southwest Bend Homes

Custom Home with too many features to mention: Solar hot water w/electric backup, heat pump, propane stove w/battery back-up, glassedin sunroom w/electric shade, and ceiling fans. There is a ton of storage in this 3 bed, 2 bath home with den, computer room and large utility, 20x29 garage and 16x25 shop, complete w/220 overhead hoist, built-in compressor & overhead door. 1682 sq.ft. $224,900. MLS#2712181. Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

Majestic. 3 Bedroom, 2.5 bath in 1748 sq. ft. A gardener’s paradise (includes 20+ fruit trees), plenty of windows plenty of light. 3 bedrooms + a bonus room. Newer tile counters in kitchen & bathrooms. Main floor master, lily pond, and ceiling fans with lights. Handicap equipped w/grab bars throughout home & exterior. $179,000. MLS#201001304 or visit johnlscott. com/68701 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

WESTSIDE BUNGALOW. 3 bedroom, 1280 sq. ft. home on large lot with mature and gorgeous landscaping. The interior is full of charm with large bathroom with separate shower and claw foot tub. $270,000. Call Jane Flood, Broker. 541-350-9993. MLS: 201005639 Duke Warner Realty 541-382-8262 www.dukewarner.com

19659 Wild Water Ct., Bend. Inviting greatroom with fireplace, meticulous, fabulous residence or vacation home. Amenities include Clubhouse, Pool, Hot tub, Tennis, access to the Deschutes River Trail. 2032 sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, $395,000. Pattie Servus, Broker 541-390-5220 Laura Curry, Broker, CRS, GRI, ABR, 541-408-3464 Sotheby’s International Realty

Reverse living townhouse configuration duplex. Porter James Edition. Each unit is 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, 1,466ý sq. ft. Sits on 5,227ý sq. ft. lot. Great investment opportunity or live in one unit and rent the other (rent of $650). Walk-in master closet, easy-care landscaping, and close to Old Mill District, Deschutes River, Parks & Schools. $170,000 MLS#201009602 or visit johnlscott. com/54838 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

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Open Houses Price Reduced in Awbrey Village - 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2083 sq ft. 3016 Craftsman Drive, $274,900. Open Sat., 10-12. Cindy Whitecotton, 541-280-1138, R i v e r P a r k R e a l E s t a t e S e r vi c e s

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Bargain Priced Properties Affordable Opportunity! 3 Bdrm 1 bath, 1680 sq ft, needs some TLC. Only $89,900. 61140 Hamilton Lane

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Homes for Sale $129,500. 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1660 sq. ft. MLS#201010106 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $263,772. 3 bed, 2.5 bath, 2383 sq. ft. MLS#201007542 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $124,900. 3 bdrm, 3 bath MLS#201004065 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $154,900. 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath MLS#201004272 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

Manufactured Home on nicely wooded .48 acre lot in OWW2, partially updated, needs TLC, 3 Bdrm 2 bath, 1782 sq ft, only $64,900. 17365 Scaup Drive Great buy in Awbrey Village, 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath 2083 sq ft w/easterly views, $274,900. 3016 Craftsman Drive Bargain priced custom home in Brasada Ranch. 3 Bdrm, 3 bath, 3715 sq ft with top-end craftsmanship. $619,900. Call Kurt, 541-815-2182 River Park Real Estate Services BEAUTIFUL CRAFTSMAN. 4 bedroom, 3 bath, 2335 sq. ft. home with large vaulted living area, high end kitchen and stone fireplace with raised hearth. $299,000 Call Karolyn Dubois, Broker, 541-390-7863. MLS: 201005102 Duke Warner Realty 541-382-8262 www.dukewarner.com BEND’S MOST SOUGHT AFTER NEIGHBORHOODS. On the way to Mt. Bachelor. Approx. 3000 sq. ft., 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath. $739,900 Call Ted and Tammy Settlemier, Broker 541-480-9700. MLS: 201009086 Duke Warner Realty 541-382-8262 www.dukewarner.com

$142,500 - Crooked River Ranch. 3 Bdrm, 3 bath, 2176 sq. ft. MLS#201003888 TRAVIS HANNAN, Principal Broker 541-788-3480 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate $159,900. 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath MLS#201004271 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 16 Mugho • Sunriver Resort - $475,000 2338 Condor • Eagle Crest Resort - $475,000 Lots of homes have fine interiors, but few homes are also surrounded by natural environments amongst communities that value each other and the environment. Call me to assist you to find and live in simple elegance for less. Sometimes more actually costs less! I’ll work with your money diet! Ginny Kansas-Meszaros, Principal Broker 541-977-2710 Steve Scott Realtors $440,00! 4-car garage plus an exceptional 2974 sq. ft. home. Granite slab counters, knotty alder cabinets and trim, travetine floors, stainless steel appliances and slate entry. Huge bonus room with built-in TV, bar and views!. A/C, central vac, fully landscaped, and extensive stamped concrete. Heather Hockett, PC, Broker 541-420-9151 Century 21 Gold Country Realty $79,000. 3 bdrm, 1.5 bath, 1200 sq. ft. MLS#201010575 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $99,900. 3 bdrm, 1 bath, 1152 sq. ft. MLS#201010594 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

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CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified *** Clean as a Whistle! 1328 sq.ft. Sitting on over 1 acre. Mt. views from the master bedroom and living room. Open floor plan with vaulted ceilings. This home is a MUST SEE. Complete with all the amenities that Crooked River Ranch has to offer. $149,000. MLS#2905473. Linda Lou -Day Wright, Broker 541-771-2585 Crooked River Realty CROOKED RIVER RANCH. Great views, peace and quiet and a well built manufactured home on 1.3 acres and over 1500 sq.ft. plus garage. $159,900 Call Mark Rieger, Broker 541-480-7441. www.centraloregonliving.com MLS: 2904595 Duke Warner Realty 541-382-8262 www.dukewarner.com Custom Earth Advantage Home Upgraded, 2208 sq. ft. home on 1.1 acres located on a quiet paved cul-de-sac. 3 bedrooms, den, 2.75 baths, 9’ ceilings and a 240 sq. ft. bonus room. 3-car garage. $259,000. MLS# 201008895 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393

Cute little starter with huge 1/2 acre lot! Great location for county approved home business. Zoned for multi-family housing. Could also make a great rental. Zoning to allow high density residential. So much potential! Priced to sell at $64,900. MLS#201010160. Julie Fahlgren, Broker 541-550-0098 Crooked River Realty DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS. 1288 sq. ft. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, stick built, cabin feel on 1 acre. $220,000 Call Jennifer Warthen, Broker 541-410-4709. MLS: 201004831 Duke Warner Realty 541-382-8262 www.dukewarner.com DESIRABLE SUN MEADOW. 2085 sq. ft., 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath, very clean and well maintained. Neighborhood pool and parks. $175,000 Call Rob Eggers, Broker 541-815-9780. MLS: 201009607 Duke Warner Realty 541-382-8262 www.dukewarner.com DOWNSIZE HERE! Rustic pine slab siding highlights this 1772 sq. ft. 3 bedroom, 1.75 bath home on a large third of an acre lot. Broker owned. $325,000 BILL PANTON, Broker, 541-420-6545. MLS: 2907087 Duke Warner Realty 541-382-8262 www.dukewarner.com GREEN BUILT CUSTOM NW CROSSING HOME. Solar electric and hot water, radiant heat throughout. 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath with den, office and loft. $750,000 Call Terry Skjersaa, Broker 541-383-1426. MLS: 201004870 Duke Warner Realty 541-382-8262 www.dukewarner.com Hit the greens whenever you like!!! Only a short drive from this 1364 sf home on 1.14 acres, close to the Deschutes River. This traditional floor plan delivers 3 bdrm, 2 bath, casual living room with carpeting, conventional kitchen with breakfast bar for afternoon snacks, appliances included, gas range. $104,900 MLS#201008829. Melody Curry, Broker 541-771-1116 Crooked River Realty Lovely Home has been very well maintained, with many upgrades, including oversized garage, landscaping front & back, circular drive, breakfast bar, formal & informal dining. Just a block from park with playground & walking trail around 100 acre pasture. Close to public land for recreational use. 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1704 sq.ft. $164,900. MLS#201005643. Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

Where buyers meet sellers. Whether you’re looking for a hat or a place to hang it, your future is just a page away.

Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

MOVE IN READY. Nicely updated 1564 sq. ft. home with 3 bedroom, 2 bath, new paint, floors, tile counters and more. $134,900 Call Kris Warner, Broker 541-480-5365 MLS: 201008634 Duke Warner Realty 541-382-8262 www.dukewarner.com Near the Entrance of Crooked River Ranch, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1392 sq. ft., 2 story on 4.88 acres. New oak hardwood & tile floors. Large deck with hot tub. $219,900. MLS# 201008996 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393 NORTHWEST CROSSING GEM. 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, bonus room, over-sized garage, deck and abundant storage. $439,500 Call Jacquie Sebulsky, Broker 541-280-4449 OR Michele Anderson, Broker, 541-633-9760. MLS: 201006756 Duke Warner Realty 541-382-8262 www.dukewarner.com ONE OF A KIND. Hard to find ranch/recreation property. 160 acres in the heart of the Malheur National Forest. Timber, creeks, springs and irrigated meadows. Cozy cabin and easy access. Broker owned. $399,000. Call Shawna Williams, Broker 541-390-6716. MLS: 201002332. Duke Warner Realty 541-382-8262 www.dukewarner.com Opportunity knocks for your family. 3 Bdrm, 3 bath in 2116 sq. ft. on 4.54 acres. Beautiful mature trees, Russian Olive, aspen, ponderosa, juniper, poplar, maple & willow. Pond (clayed) with dock and water feature, fenced and cross-fenced. Work in progress inside. Kitchen and hall bath completely remodeled. $235,000 MLS# 201007475 or visit johnlscott.com/37531 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale Terrific value on this bank owned stick built home on 5 acres. Built in 1999 and features 2016 sf, 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, gorgeous mountain views, fencing for horses, shed, heat pump, formal dining & living room, spacious master suite, double garage wired for 220 and much more. $150,000 MLS#201001173. Melody Curry, Broker 541-771-1116 Crooked River Realty THIS HOME HAS IT ALL! Corner lot, high-end finishes, hardwood, granite and outstanding floor plan. 1704 sq. ft., Sun Forest Construction, miles of trails outside your front door. $229,900 MLS: 201010330 Call Carmen at 541-480-6491. Duke Warner Realty 541-382-8262 www.dukewarner.com TOP NOTCH MILL DISTRICT TOWN-HOMES. Quality townhome style duplex blocks from the Mill District. Features dual master suites, gas fireplaces, and finished garages. $254,900. Call Janette Haines, Broker 541-550-8121. MLS: 201009068 Duke Warner Realty 541-382-8262 www.dukewarner.com Tour Winning Home Only $85,400. Won 5 our of 8 Tour of Homes Awards including Best of Show. •Guaranteed Build Time •Price Lock Guarantee •Customized Floor Plans Call 541-647-1600 for FREE Information package. Virtual Tours online at HiLineHomes.com 541-617-1600

To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 548-2184

Will warm your heart! Try out the fireplace of this home in Crooked River Ranch. Features include 1.02 acres, 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, master suite with walk-in closet, slate entry, tile accents, welcoming living room, roomy kitchen with breakfast area, home office, fenced and cross-fenced for animals, easy care landscaping, garden area and greenhouse, RV hook-up, quiet neighborhood and appliances included. Shop has a woodstove to keep you warm while you work on your hobbies. $128,900 MLS#2908776. Melody Curry, Broker 541-771-1116 Crooked River Realty

363 SW Bluff Dr., Bend. Single level, private corner condo at The Plaza. Granite, Stainless appl., travertine counters and quality finishes. Close to entertainment with heated underground parking. 1793 sq.ft., 2 bdrm, 2.5 bath, $299,000. Sandy Kohlmoos, Broker 541-408-4309 John Kohlmoos, Broker 541-480-8131 Sotheby’s International Realty

www.dukewarner.com The Only Address to Remember for Central Oregon Real Estate

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Northwest Bend Homes Deschutes River Woods. 3 1193 NW Promontory Dr. 4 Bdrm, 3.5 bath, 4228 sq.ft., $1,095,000. The Garner Group 541-383-4360 www.thegarnergroup.com 19141 Park Commons Dr. 5 Bdrm, 3 bath, 3028 sq.ft., $469,900. The Garner Group 541-383-4360 www.thegarnergroup.com

Bdrm, 1.75 bath 1329 sq. ft. custom home on an acre. Great room floor plan w/vaulted ceiling. All kitchen appl., are incl. Both recessed & under cabinet lighting in kitchen. Laundry room w/skylite & large pantry. New interior paint. Garage is heated and finished w/work bench. Super fenced yard w/mature ponderosa, storage building, double canopy carport or storage structure. This home is move-in ready. $259,000. Call Bobbie at 541-480-1635 about MLS# 2802056 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

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Northeast Bend Homes 19989 JW Brown Rd., Bend. Stunning Cascade Mountain views designed by Rick Wright. Great room features, vaulted beamed ceilings, stone wood-burning fireplace, separate guest house, and sunken outdoor living space. Includes 16 acres of irrigation w/equipment. 5300 sq.ft., 5 Bdrm, 4.5 bath, $1,585,000. Deb Tebbs, Broker/Owner. 541-419-4553 debbie.tebbs@sothebysrealty.com

Sotheby’s International Realty 2483 NW Crossing Dr. 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1410 sq.ft., $317,000. The Garner Group 541-383-4360 www.thegarnergroup.com 2532 NW Shields Dr., Bend. This lovely craftsman style home has all the details you would expect to find in a traditional style home in Northwest Crossing. Private -no neighbor backyard and separate, large bonus room, 2700 sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, $471,700. CJ Neuman, Broker, CRS 541-410-3710 Lisa Lamberto, Broker, 541-610-9697 Sotheby’s International Realty 64775 Laidlaw Lane Custom riverfront home in Tumalo, single-level 3 bdrm, 3 bath, 3094 sq.ft., on just under an acre, 3 car garage, $646,000. Ellen Clough, ABR, CRS Broker, John L. Scott, Bend • 541-480-7180 814 NW John Fremont St., Bend. 3 Bdrm, 3 bath, 1784 sq.ft., $371,900. The Garner Group 541-383-4360 www.thegarnergroup.com AWBREY HEIGHTS. 5 Bdrm, 3.5 bath on 0.32 ý acre. Perfect for family, developers or investors looking for a flexible floor plan. Masterfully landscaped for privacy. Located on 2+ RS lots just 1 block from the Deschutes River. Opportunity abounds w/the current redevelopment of the neighborhood. Double garage & covered carport too. Come preview this property – it’s not a drive by! $395,000. MLS# 2803755 or visit johnlscott.com/23648. Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

Items under $500. Get 3 lines, 7 days for $10.00.

2724 NE Rosemary Dr. 4 Bdrm, 3 bath, 2213 sq.ft., $242,900. The Garner Group 541-383-4360 www.thegarnergroup.com Hunters Circle. 3 Bdrm, 1.5 bath on 1/4 acre lot with new trees, plants and fences2007-2009. New roof in 2009, shed in 2008, water heater, interior paint, and laminate in 2007, kitchen counters and backsplash in 2008, half bath in 2008, light fixtures in 2008, washing machine in 2009. $127,500. MLS#201005148 or visit johnlscott. com/89946 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 VILLAGE WIESTORIA. 4 Bdrm, 2.75 bath, 2129 sq.ft. A super floor plan in award winning, European-style. Alley access to garage, overlooks neighborhood park. Centrally located to schools, shopping, downtown, medical facilities & recreation. Downstairs is a great room floor plan. Upstairs has family room, 2 bdrm, 1 bathroom & could be a separate living area for a family member or friend. Home has had loving care! $240,000. MLS#2911387 or visit johnlscott.com/39616 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

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Southeast Bend Homes Charming retreat located in Woodside Ranch. 2 Bdrm + den (potential 3rd bdrm), 2 bath in 1408 sq.ft. on .78 acre. Beautiful flag stone hearth in living room ready for wood or gas stove. Kitchen has tile floor, counters & back splash plus Whirlpool Estate appliances in silvertone. Garage has huge bank of cabinets. Home completely refurbished. Nestled in the trees w/easy care natural landscaping & a tree house too. Tall vaulted ceilings, beams, natural wood and stone accents. Leaded beveled glass in living room & foyer. Newer 30 yr roof & ext paint. $275,000. MLS#2711853 or visit johnlscott.com/66140 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500


E4Saturday, January 29, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

Live. Work. Play. THE CENTRAL OREGON WAY

SALES ARE UP FROM 2009! Bend*: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . up 14% La Pine**: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . up 13% Redmond/Terrebonne**: . . . . . . up 18% Sisters**: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . up 58% Sunriver*: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . up 14% Three Rivers South*: . . . . . . . . . up 2.7% AVERAGE INCREASE OF SALES IN ALL OF CENTRAL OREGON: UP 19% *Residential

**All property types

INVENTORY IS DOWN! Homes in Tumalo sold faster in 2010. 2010 ended with a 9.2-month housing inventory compared to 2009’s 19-month inventory. During 2009, the number of residential properties with acreage on the market peaked at 104. At the end of 2010, there were only 52 on the market.

PRICES ARE STABILIZING! In Prineville, sellers received an average of 96% of their original asking prices during 2010. In 2009, the ratio averaged 93%. The average sales price jumped nearly 6% in Prineville from $119,000 to $126,000. Average days on the market has decreased by an average of 70 days from listing to closing!

COAR MEMBERS - REALTORS® AND AFFILIATES – ARE YOUR FRIENDS AND NEIGHBORS. We’re committed to helping people find their dream homes right here in Central Oregon. In terms of real estate activity, 2010 was a much better year economically than 2009. Although economic recovery is gradual, things continue to look better as time goes on, and we look forward to watching our community grow in 2011. Buying a home continues to be a smart investment choice for long term financial gain, and Central Oregon offers an impeccable lifestyle. REALTORS® will help you analyze your buying power and assess your needs to find the perfect home in Central Oregon. If you’re ready to move from your existing home, your REALTOR® will see to it that you get the best price for your home in its market. Our members believe that together we can build a better place to live, work and play. So when it’s time to invest in a home of your own, or sell a home, remember to contact a COAR member. You’ll be putting a professional, trained community member to work for you.

egon r O l a r t n e C t Curren istics t a t S e t a t s E Real

Sales are up!

2112 NE 4th St. Bend, Oregon 97701 541-382-6027 | E-mail: info@coar.com | www.coar.com WHAT ARE THESE SQUARES?

Introducing the mobile barcode. Now you can visit www.BendBulletin.com via your smartphone! The Bulletin is your gateway to the Web. Using your iPhone, Android, Blackberry or other smart phone device, download a current barcode reader App, (visit www.mobile-barcodes.com) then point your phone at one of the barcodes, scan it, and you will be directed to The Bulletin’s online edition.


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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KINGS FOREST. 4 Bdrm, 4 bath in 3660 sq. ft. on a 36,336 sq. ft. lot. Many wonderful features. Chef’s kitchen with maple cabinets, granite countertops, double ovens and much more. Slider off family room. Traditional dining room and formal living room, office, huge laundry, mud/work room, solid panel doors and maple hardwood flooring. Built-in desks, bookshelves, window seats in bedrooms. Large master bedroom and bathroom. Large weight & storage rooms. RV parking, kids play apparatus, tree house. Plenty of room for kids, pets and toys plus a triple garage. $425,000. MLS#2906169 or visit johnlscott.com/13379 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

$57,000 - Redmond Great Investment, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, huge yard MLS#201010780 Call TRAVIS HANNAN, Principal Broker 541-788-3480 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate

51937 Fordham Dr., La Pine. This home sits on a large corner lot. Fully landscaped with a water feature, yet easy to maintain. Upstairs bonus room with plenty of room for the whole family. 2633 sq.ft., 4 bdrm, 3 bath, $185,000. Jordan Haase, Broker 541-420-1559 Christie Glennon, Broker 541-788-1047 Sotheby’s International Realty

$350,000 - Log Home! 20+/- Irrigated acres! Between Bend & Redmond, barn, shop, gorgeous MLS#201006740 Call VIRGINIA, Principal Broker 541-350-3418 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate

Perfect RV Shop and Fantastic Views, 1710 sq.ft., 3 bedroom, 2 bath on 1.83 acre rim lot with Crooked River Canyon & Smith Rock views. 1560 sq. ft. RV shop with 14' doors on both ends to drive through. $238,900 MLS# 201008425 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393

Arizona BIG BEAUTIFUL LOTS. $99/mo., $0 down, $0 interest. Golf Course, National Parks. 1 hour from Tucson International Airport. Guaranteed financing. No Credit Checks! 1-800-631-8164 Code 4052. www.SunSitesLandRush.com (PNDC)

Price Reduction! Breathtaking Smith Rock view. This is a corner lot worth seeing. Build your new home on this 1/2 acre flat lot, power at property, Terrebonne water, septic approved, ready to go at $63,500. MLS#201008725. Julie Fahlgren, Broker 541-550-0098 Crooked River Realty

Endless opportunities at Evans Well. 2117 Deeded acres in 14 legal lots. Rated for 250 300 pair, this ranch operates with BLM and Forest Service leases covering approximately 60,000 acres. All parcels are surrounded by public lands. With views of the Paulina and Cascade Mountains as well as Horse Ridge and miles of open range, these parcels offer absolute privacy and seclusion, an easy, peaceful 30 minute drive to anywhere in Bend. Keep the property for yourself or use the established legal lots to create a compound for family and friends. $2,275,000 MLS#2709172 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

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Redmond Homes $100,000 Great Floorplan 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1465’ great floor plan, NW Redmond MLS#201010379 Call JEANNE SCHARLUND, Principal Broker 541-420-7978 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate $100,000 -Redmond 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1634 sq. ft. MLS#201000790 Call TRAVIS HANNAN, Principal Broker 541-788-3480 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate $102,000 - 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1523’ Super Neighborhood in NW Redmond MLS#201009978 JEANNE SCHARLUND, Principal Broker 541-420-7978 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate $102,000 - Mt. Views 4 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, Great NW Cul-de-sac. Large lot, 1864’ MLS#201010523 Call JEANNE SCHARLUND, Principal Broker 541-420-7978 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate $111,000 - Totally Perfect! On 1 acre! Unique & fun, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, gorgeous pine floors, private. MLS#201010317 Call VIRGINIA, Principal Broker 541-350-3418 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate $119,000 -Investment or Home Ownership! Well maintained duplex, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, end of road privacy. MLS#201009879 Call VIRGINIA, Principal Broker 541-350-3418 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate

$97,500 - Bend 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 1328 sq. ft. MLS#201010582 Call TRAVIS HANNAN, Principal Broker 541-788-3480 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate City limits, 4+ Acres, 1700 sq.ft. home, 3/2, possible subdivision, extreme price reduction. Call today. Keith 503-329-7053. Commercial property with 2/1 home, corner lot, priced right. A MUST SEE! Ask for Keith 503-329-7053. Eagle Crest Bungalow, Desert Sky neighborhood, 1908 sq.ft., 2 bdrm., 2.5 bath, garage, mtn. views from Bachelor to Hood, $279,900, 3% Courtesy to agents. 541-215-0112.

$69,900. 3 bdrm, 2 bath. MLS#201008044 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $119,000. 3 bedroom, 2 bath. MLS#201009021 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $349,900. 4 bdrm, 4 bath, swimming pool MLS#201010058 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $35,900. 2 bdrm, 1 bath MLS#201002495 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $49,900. 2 bdrm, 1 bath MLS#201009284 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $59,000, 3 bdrm, 1 bath MLS#201006639 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

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Crook County Homes

Investor Alert!

$149,900! Country living with 2449 SW 34th St., Redmond acreage and nice 1920 sq.ft., 4 Bed, 2 Bath, 1599 Sq Ft 4 bedroom, 2 bath young home, Built in 2001. Curhome w/mountain views and rently rented for $1,000 per small shed, fenced & more. month. $104,900 5487 Sioux Loop. Call Peter at 541-419-5391 Heather Hockett, PC, Broker, for more info. 541-420-9151 www.GorillaCapital.com Century 21 Gold Country Realty

Mountain Views 5

Acres, Eagle Crest area, very private, gated, 3+ bdrm., 2.75 bath, 3 car garage plus 1600 sq.ft. finished shop, in-ground pool, $795,000. 541-948-5832.

Reduced!!! $139,900. Almost new 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 2115 sq. ft. home located at end of cul-de-sac. Hickory cabinets, gas fireplace, large master suite and bonus room upstairs. Fenced yard, storage building and great mountain views. 2181 NW Kilnwood. Heather Hockett, PC, Broker 541-420-9151 Century 21 Gold Country Realty

Large 2/1 home, large bonus room, living room, new roof and garage. Price reduced. Call Keith at 503-329-7053. OCHOCO RESERVOIR AND MOUNTAIN VIEWS. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1552 sq. ft. home on 3 acres. Only 6.4 miles from Prineville. 24’ X 36’ detached garage with heated shop space. $299,000 Call Kim Warner, Broker, 541-410-2475. MLS: 201006612 Duke Warner Realty 541-382-8262 www.dukewarner.com

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Homes with Acreage Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

$275,000. 2 bdrm home on 14+ acres MLS#201004860 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $114,900. 1728 sq. ft. 1.19 acres. Great private setting property. MLS#201003041 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $149,000 3 bed, 2 bath, 1+ acre. MLS#20100813 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

$179,900. Incredible views and large home with new upgrades and located on 1.04 acres. MLS#2811654 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $225,000 3 bdrm, 3 bath 2+ acres MLS#2910110 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

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Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Ideal for large, foster or home school families. Room for Horses with Panoramic Mountain Views. 5 Bdrm + unfinished space for poss. 6th bdrm, 4 bath in 3300 sq. ft. on 2.8 acre. Plenty of space for family togetherness & privacy too. Country setting adjacent to public lands. Great room-kitchen, dining & family room plus large bonus/recreational room! $340,000 MLS#2900223 or visit johnlscott. com/93222 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 Ideal Horse Property in Sisters Custom 3436 sq. ft. home on 15.69 acres. 70' x 120' indoor riding arena, 30' x 80' pole building, 4-stall barn with heated tack room. $499,000 MLS# 201009686 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393 Irrigated Pasture, Bank owned home on acreage with irrigation. Approximate 1917 sq. ft. 4 bedroom, 2 bath home on 3 acres with 2.1 acres of irrigation. Nice terrain, views, new carpet, 3 storage buildings and located in a great area just north of Prineville. $84,900. MLS#2907536. Melody Curry, Broker 541-771-1116 Crooked River Realty LOOKING FOR UNIQUE? 5 Bedroom, 2 bath in 3262 sq.ft., on 3 acres. Large Kitchen with madrone floors, close to Shevlin Park. Interesting spaces for a multitude of family activities. Lots of natural light and incredible sunset views. Not just a house but a lifestyle, no close neighbors and no rules. It’s your property and home to enjoy your own way. Entertain young & old with ease in this home and on this property! $530,000. MLS# 201004851 or visit johnlscott. com/24593 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 PARADISE IN TUMALO. 4 bedroom, 4 bath, 4593 sq. ft. custom home on 6.2 acres with a 2000 sq. ft. shop with 3 bays, 800 sq. ft. of guest quarters. Panoramic mountain views. $1,999,000 Call Kim Warner, Broker 541-410-2475 OR Kitty Warner, Broker 541-330-2124. MLS: 201005699 Duke Warner Realty 541-382-8262 www.dukewarner.com Park-Like Setting. 1654 sq. ft. home on 2 lots totaling 2 acres. Attached 2-car garage plus a 24 x 36 shop. Wonderful mountain views. $184,000 MLS# 201010094 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393

Wonderful 4 Bdrm home. Close to Crooked River Ranch entrance on paved road. Home boasts family room, living room, large pantry, ceiling fans, newer tile/carpet, bedroom separation, large front deck in-ground sprinklers, heat pump, 2-car attached garage and a couple of generous size accessory buildings. 1620 sq.ft. on 2.65 acres. $178,000. MLS#2707953. Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

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Recreational Homes and Property North Fork John Day River Steelhead, Bass, 26� Catfish! Bear, Deer, Elk, Pheasants! 16 acres prime riverfront! 1000 sq. ft. cabin. $249,000. 541-934-2091.

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

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Farms and Ranches A beautiful building site & hay field too!!!! 3 bedroom, 1 bath, 1240 sq. ft. on 22.16 acres. Existing home is a charming old school house, extraordinary building site for replacement dwelling, with sweeping mtn. and ranch views. Huge barn with full meat packing facility & refrigeration. Pond lined, beautiful 15 acre hay field weed-free. Impressive mature trees & the potential to raise goats, horses, cattle with numerous outbuildings. $484,500. MLS#201006994 or visit johnlscott.com/14483 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 Historic farm home. 3 Bedroom, 1 bath in 1119 sq. ft. on 32.5 acres with 23 acres of COI irrigation has seen loving family life inside its walls. Could be lived in while you build your dream home or could be a modest home for a small family as is. Close to town, yet has that country feel, including mature barnyard, homestead, trees. $498,000. MLS#2809587 or visit johnlscott.com/87329 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

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Lots A real find. A 5500 sq. ft. in-fill lot with large mature ponderosas that is flat and ready to build on. City services in the street. Close to shopping, Pilot Butte & the amenities of Juniper Park. $75,000. MLS#2801608 or visit johnlscott.com/77447 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

Gorgeous Views of the Cascade Mountains., the De chutes River Canyon and the green farm fields below. This 2.05 acre lot has septic, power, and water installed. On a paved road and ready to build your dream home. Enjoy the amenities of Crooked River Ranch. $115,900. MLS#2813173. Linda Lou -Day Wright, Broker 541-771-2585 Crooked River Realty Horse Ridge East. Choose one of seven 10-acre parcels with mountain views. Your own piece of paradise where the deer, antelope and you can play. OWC for suitable buyer with 10% down. $25,000. Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 Land Listings •2 Acres near Prineville Reservoir. $34,900 MLS#201009032 •5 Acres on the river in Sumpter, OR. $50,000 MLS#201010258 •2.79 Acres walking distance to the Deschutes River. $85,000 MLS#201009429 • 4.78 Treed acres with mountain views. $70,000 MLS#201009997 • 3.2 Acres with historic watering hole. $60,000 MLS#201009996 • 6.9 Acres with river views. $225,000. MLS#201008671 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393

Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

Whispering Pines. Ready-tobuild 2.4 acres with easterly views on a paved road. Water & power to street and septic approval in place. $70,000 MLS#2802337 or go to johnlscott.com/83475 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

$5900, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, Fleetwood, will finance, w/ car port, shed, $500 down, $165 mo., $355 space rent, Carrell Sisters Park, 541-550-9838.

A Great Place to Build your Dream Home! Lots of big shady trees with lovely landscaping. Located in small country town of Terrebonne. There is a large storage building to the rear of the property and a large garden area. Manufactured home is very livable. New septic installed in 2006. $79,900. MLS#2810669. Linda Lou -Day Wright, Broker 541-771-2585 Crooked River Realty

Your new homesite. Ready for construction with great building site and all the utilities in the site. Great mature trees and fenced too. Romaine Village offers access to Clubhouse/ Rec room and a pool. A must preview. $49,900. MLS# 201007937 or visit johnlscott.com/8158 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

Huge Shop! First time buyers shouldn’t miss this low-maintenance 2 bdrm/ 2 bath traditional manufactured home on 1.65 acres. Offers an informal living room with carpeting, master suite, convenient laundry, user-friendly kitchen with breakfast bar, dishwasher, electric range, bonus room, and has been well maintained. Detached garage and over 3300 sq. ft. shop! $114,900. MLS#201005324. Melody Curry, Broker 541-771-1116 Crooked River Realty

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Acreages $69,000. 2 acres MLS#201006299 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

Near Steelhead Falls! Ready to show at all times. Great views of the Cascade Mts. 6 acres with 3 bdrm, 2 bath home. Hickory floors, wood stove, natural landscaping, private hot tub area off master, open kitchen. Priced to sell. $164,900. MLS#201005906. Linda Lou -Day Wright, Broker 541-771-2585 Crooked River Realty

$299,000! 42.5 acres close to town. Nice private and se cluded setting, well treed, and has canal running through property. Lots of possibilities and possible ir rigation. Heather Hockett, PC, Broker 541-420-9151 Century 21 Gold Country Realty

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Turn Key Clean, neat, and ready to move into. Located on a paved road with Mt. Jefferson views. Just a moment away from miles of public land, a public park and walking trails. Morning room windows allow lots of sunlight. Newer roof, flat property that is fenced and cross-fenced for horses. $99,000. MLS#201007467. Linda Lou -Day Wright, Broker 541-771-2585 Crooked River Realty Well Groomed, both inside and out. Living room & family room are open. Arrow wood stove & floor-to-ceiling windows. Morning room has loads of pantry cabinets, plus room for dining table. Kitchen is well equipped with cabinets, counter space & breakfast bar. Formal dining with built-in hutch. Roomy master with dbl. sinks & walk-in shower. U-shaped drive leads to oversized dbl.-garage. Fenced garden & lots of covered decking. 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1782 sq.ft. $139,900. MLS#2909894. Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty Your Credit Is Approved For Bank Foreclosures! www.JAndMHomes.com 541-350-1782

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 780

Mfd./Mobile Homes with Land Powell Butte Estates! 2.5 acres, 1232 sq.ft. spotless 3 bdrm, 2 bath. Very nicely landscaped, ideal for horses 4H/ FFA projects. Priced right! This is not a distress sale. Don’t miss your opportunity to own in beautiful Powell Butte. $133,600. MLS#201008812. Julie Fahlgren, Broker 541-550-0098 Crooked River Realty

When it’s time to buy, sell or enhance your home‌ please choose the following valued advertisers:

Hayden Homes HiLine Homes Crooked River Realty Juniper Realty The Garner Group JBOT 0SFHPO M B US O F  $ Duke Warner Realty UIBO GNPSF NFTP P I F I OUPU J E F JU *OW D&D Realty Group, LLC Bobbie Strome - John L. Scott Real Estate Heather Hocket - Century 21 Gold Country Realty LOOK FOR Redmond RE/MAX Land & Homes Real Estate PICTURE YOUR Budget Blinds of Central Oregon HOME Ginny Kansas-Meszaros - Steve Scott Realtors IN TODAY’S Cascade Sotheby’s International Realty BULLETIN! TUBUF

Where buyers meet sellers.

$179,900 4 bed, 2.5 bath, 2+ acres. MLS#201009070 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

Horse Property! 4.13 acres in Crooked River Ranch. 1890 sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 2 bath, fenced, cross-fenced, beautiful views. This home has a barn, shop, garage, everything you would need. A must see! $169,900. Julie Fahlgren, Broker 541-550-0098 Crooked River Realty

Set Up to Work From Home Custom 1539 sq. ft. 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on 5.5 level acres completely fenced near public land. Unobstructed views of the mountains. $225,000 MLS# 201009408 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393

Crooked River Ranch lot. Level lot with beautiful trees. CRR has: swimming pool, hiking trails, tennis courts, park & golf course as well as senior support group & other special interest groups. Men’s & Women’s golf with reduced green fees & cart rates plus a yearly golf package that is the best in Central Oregon & a course open for play when no other is during the winter. $41,500 MLS#201005890 or visit johnlscott.com/89314 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

SFBMF

$167,000 - Incredible Potential on 1.8 Acre! 7 Bdrm, 3 bath, 3642 sq. ft., possible OWC. MLS#201006271 Call Charlie, Principal Broker 541-350-3419 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate

Cascade mountain views. 1 bdrm, 1 bath, 884 sq.ft. on 2.07 acres. Super country location with peace & quiet & small cottage that is so cute. Irrigated pasture has had loving care. A big barn, shop, office awaits you with a loft fun room for parties, pool, ping pong. Easy to show. $250,000 MLS#2909664 or visit johnlscott. com/56207 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

Quiet Area in Crooked River Ranch. 1400 Sq.ft., 2 bdrm, 1 bath, home on a 5 acres. Property is completely fenced and gated. RV hookup. $140,000. MLS #201009085. Juniper Realty 541-504-5393

SFHPO

$52,000 3 bdrm, 1 bath, 1008 sq. ft. MLS#201010732 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

$94,900 -Adorable! Move-In Ready! 3 Bdrm, 1 bath, hardwood floors. MLS#201006307 Call VIRGINIA, Principal Broker 541-350-3418 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

$90,000 - Powell Butte Views! Close to Brasada Ranch, 5.73 aces, home. MLS#2812534 Call VIRGINIA, Principal Broker 541-350-3418 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate

Suntree, 3 bdrm,2 bath, w/car port & shed.$19,900. Suntree, 4 bdrm, 2 bath,w/carport & shed, $25,750, 541-350-1782 www.JAndMHomes.com

OUSBM0

4.22 acres inside city limits. Potential subdivision, contract terms, water rights, 3/2 ranch home, pond, barn. $559,950. 503-329-7053.

$89,500 -Privacy! Adorable! Bend, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, close to schools/hospital, landscaped. MLS#201008000 Call VIRGINIA, Principal Broker 541-350-3418 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate

$99,900. 3 bdrm, 1.75 bath, 1993 sq. ft. MLS#201010087 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

Remodeled Throughout, including new kitchen cabinetry and laminate flooring. 8x21 sunroom, wrap-around deck, landscaping, fencing, power & water for RV to connect to, turn around drive, a 20x20 shop and beautiful Cascade views. 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1200 sq. ft. $109,000. MLS#2909620. Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

PG$F

3533 SW 63rd, Redmond. Stunning private park like setting overlooking the Deschutes River with mountain views and river access. Attached triple garage and detached 1816 sq.ft. shop with studio/apartment. Underground irrigation with pond and water features. 5507 sq.ft., 4 bdrm, 4.5 bath, $1,300,000. Liz Shatterly, Broker 541-350-4136 Sotheby’s International Realty

Jefferson County Homes

OWN 20 Acres - Only $129/ month. $13,900 near growing El Paso, Texas. (America’s safest city) Low down, no credit checks, owner financing. Free Map/ Pictures. 800-343-9444. (PNDC)

Lot Models Delivered & Set Up Start at $29,900, www.JandMHomes.com 541-350-1782

BSJFUZ

$284,900. 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath MLS#201007771 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

$69,900 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1180 sq. ft. MLS#201010004 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

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$700,000 -Madras hay farm! 119.1 acres w/104 irrigation 3 bdrm, 2 bath, vintage home, barn, pond, grass airstrip MLS#201010009 Call Charlie, Principal Broker 541-350-3419 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate

Two neighboring lots in Ochoco West, each over 1/5th acre. Power and water in the street. Buy both and build your dream home or buy one for a great place to park your RV. Over 1,200 acres of recreation land, swimming pool, tennis courts, fishing lakes stocked with trout and bass, horse stables, riding trails & community center. Beautiful view of the Prineville Valley. $15,000 MLS #2806023 & 2806025 johnlscott.com/ 94130 & 94216 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

JOHBW

$123,900 -Redmond 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2038 sq. ft. MLS#201010472 Call TRAVIS HANNAN, Principal Broker 541-788-3480 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate

La Pine home on 1 acre. 4 bdrm., 2 bath, like new. All Offers Considered. www.odotproperty.com. 503-986-3638 Steve Eck.

BIG DESCHUTES RIVER FRONTAGE - RIVER PARADISE ! Former Bend Elks recreation property in Haner Park. 7-8Ă˝ useable acres in 2 separate tax lots. 1.5Ă˝ miles downstream from Wickiup Reservoir with 1/4Ă˝ miles of river frontage on the Big Deschutes River. Large, flat grassy area for gatherings and a shelter with fireplace. A boat landing and dock. $575,000. MLS# 2910706 or visit johnlscott.com/59391. Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

GFBUVS

$119,500 3 bdrm, 2 bath MLS#201005642 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

$69,900 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1100 sq. ft. MLS#201001414 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

Premier Rim View. Sit on the porch swing as you take in the awesome view from Smith Rock, down the Crooked River Canyon, ending at a picture perfect portrait of Mt. Hood and Mt. Jefferson. Across the canyon view the miles and miles of Culver farmlands. 2 Bdrm, 2 bath, like new home with large deck. This property is definitely all about the view! Nature at it’s finest. $199.000. MLS#201009485. Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

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TILLICUM VILLAGE. 4 Bedrooms, 3 baths, 2608 sq. ft. on 1.46 acre. Your own park that’s adjacent to common ground. The grounds will astound you with their beauty. 2 ponds and 2 waterfalls plus spacious garden and gardening area. Remodel includes new cabinets, new birch floors and tile floors, new windows and doors, 2 gas furnaces, new hot tub, new lighting and ceiling fans. 2 water heaters, new Trex deck and paver patio. This home and its grounds are a must preview. $399,900 MLS#2803287 or visit johnlscott. com/17418 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

541-322-7253

Beautiful Home On 2+ acres, 2454 sq ft, 4 Bdrm, 2.5 Bath, $266,900. 17365 Lodgepole Lane, Bend. Call Gay Klein, Broker, 541-771-1806 River Park Real Estate Services

$425,000 West Powell Butte Estates! 20+/-, AC, gorgeous 3472 sq. ft. home, barn, shop. MLS#201007077 Call VIRGINIA, Principal Broker 541-350-3418 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate

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E6 Saturday, January 29, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

COLDWELL BANKER www.bendproperty.com

MORRIS REAL ESTATE 486 SW Bluff Dr. IC

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REALTOR

Awbrey Village | $825,000 Perfect Condition | $520,000 Sunrise Village | $945,000 SA OPE T. N 1-4

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Bend, OR 97702 SA OPE T. N 1-4

SU OP N. EN 12 -4

NW Bend | $265,000

S A OP T. EN 11 -2

541-382-4123

SW Bend | $40,000

Sunriver | $39,900

RIVER RIM LOT

Single level golf course home. Close to Sawyer Park & river trails. MLS#201006724 Directions: Mt. Washington to Clubhouse, 5th house on the left side of the road. 3135 Clubhouse St.

Stunning contemporary home with fabulous city views and glorious sunrises. Open floor plan with the highest quality finishes on .54 of an acre. 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, 3722 sq. ft. MLS#201008007 1195 Remarkable Dr.

1 level home on 5 acres. Travertine counters, stainless appliances, upgraded baths & new fixtures. Landscaped, Trex decking, in-ground irrigation, fenced, barn, shop, canal. MLS#201008835 DIRECTIONS: Gerking Market Rd to Rudi Road to Smokey Butte Dr. 65288 Smokey Butte Dr.

Classic, contemporary home, breathtaking views of the Deschutes River & Canyon. Main level master with jetted tub & tile shower. 4 bedroom, 4 bath, 4173 sq. ft. MLS#201009509 DIRECTIONS: Century Dr. to Sunrise Village, left on Sunshine Way. 19713 Sunshine Way

Attention Builders and Investors! Lot in River Rim subdivision. All utilities in, flat and ready to build. Community has parks, trails and is close to river trail paths, school and shopping. MLS#201006829

1/2 acre pine treed lot near Sunriver, community boat ramp. Water/sewer/ power available, paved street. Close to High Lakes. Bank owned, special low interest financing available. MLS#201010704

SUSAN AGLI, Broker, SRES 541-383-4338 • 541-408-3773

NICHOLE BURKE, Broker 661-378-6487

JIM MORAN, P.C., Broker 541-948-0997

BONNIE SAVICKAS, Broker 541-408-7537

DON KELLEHER, Broker 541-383-4349

GREG FLOYD, P.C., Broker 541-390-5349

SE Bend | $75,000

No Hassle Ownership | $99,900

SE Bend | $99,900

La Pine | $120,000

2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1215 sq. ft. manufactured home. Move in ready, very clean. Open floor plan, spacious kitchen with dining area, large great room. Great outdoor living area. Call for more info. MLS#201100039

Updated/upgraded NE Bend condo. New appliances, carpet and stone. 2 master suites with A/C, 2.5 baths. Great room with fireplace, fans. Large 2-car garage. Pool, spa, clubhouse and tennis. All landscaping done for you! MLS#2808401

Excellent value. Close to restaurants & shopping. Features include: Great room concept with open floor plan. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1180 sq. ft. home. Bank owned. Call for more info. MLS#201006896

Pahlisch cottage - one level home. Great room with gas fireplace. Kitchen with alder cabinetry. 2-car attached garage. Clubhouse and trails. MLS#201002999 MOVE-IN READY!

Woodriver Village is the location of this lot which is .40 of an acre and you could sub-divide into 3 lots. Just south of Farewell Bend Park and the Deschutes River. Great location, close to the Old Mill. MLS#201005580

JOHN SNIPPEN, Broker, MBA, ABR, GRI 541-312-7273 • 541-948-9090

LESTER FRIEDMAN, P.C., Broker 541-330-8491 • 541-330-8495

JACKIE FRENCH, Broker 541-312-7260

VIRGINIA ROSS, Broker, ABR, CRS, GRI 541-383-4336

ROOKIE DICKENS, Broker, GRI, CRS, ABR MARK VALCESCHINI, P.C., Broker, CRS, GRI 541-383-4364 541-815-0436

SW Bend | $132,000

NE Bend | $139,000

Redmond | $143,900

NE Bend | $169,500

SW Bend | $184,900

Redmond | $192,900

LI NE ST W IN G

Pinewood Lot | $120,000 Providence | $125,000

G N I D N E P

G N I D N E P

Wonderful 3 bedroom home with a large bonus room that could be a 4th bedroom. .22 of an acre lot, mature trees, landscaping and hot tub. Gas fireplace. Quiet cul-de-sac. MLS#201003364

Immaculate & cozy single level home on quiet street near trails, shopping & theaters. Built in 2003, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths. Great room with lots of light, large kitchen & large fenced yard. NOT a short sale! MLS#201100380

Cozy single level on a quiet cul-de-sac. Open floor plan. 3 bedroom, 2 bath plus den. MLS#201010463

Be the first to live in this newly updated single story home in SW Redmond. Upgrades include beautiful hardwood floors, ledgestone gas fireplace, interior and exterior paint, solid wood front door. MLS#201100151

Nice, well maintained home on a quiet cul-de-sac. 1812 sq. ft., 3 bedrooms, master on main level plus a bonus room. Fully fenced yard. MLS#201009980

Outstanding 2-story home in River Rim with slate floors in the kitchen, baths and foyer. Master on main level, gas fireplace, water feature, fenced yard, close to elementary school & Brookswood shopping. MLS#201010827

3 bedroom, 2 bath home in Cascade View Estates. Very well maintained one owner single story. Light & open floor plan. Great neighborhood, .27 of an acre corner lot; nice landscaping. 3-car garage. MLS#201007994

LYNNE CONNELLEY, EcoBroker, ABR, CRS 541-408-6720

JANE STRELL, Broker 541-948-7998

PAT PALAZZI, Broker 541-771-6996

BILL PORTER, Broker 541-383-4342

DARRYL DOSER, Broker, CRS 541-383-4334

SYDNE ANDERSON, Broker, CRS, WCR 541-420-1111

SE Bend | $224,500

NE Bend Duplex | $225,000 Orion Estates | $239,900 Deschutes River Lot | $249,000

PRNEW IC E

Pronghorn | $195,000 West Powell Butte Estates | $200,000

G N I D N E P

Bare land in unusual subdivision of 20 acre parcels, CC&R’s, executive homes, gated community, paved streets. Developer’s own parcel. Overlooking lush Powell Butte Valley. Easy access to Redmond. MLS#201010033

Single level, lovely southern exposure, open vaulted living area, gas fireplace, gas forced air & central A/C. Convenient kitchen, separate utility room & under house storage. Landscaped .18 of an acre lot. MLS#201007013

View of Pilot Butte, large back decks. Quiet neighborhood on a cul-de-sac. Each unit is 2 bedrooms, 1.75 baths, 1058 sq. ft. and has washer/dryer hook up. Nice sized living rooms. Window coverings included. MLS#2900544

Single level home in SE Bend. .49 of an acre lot, fenced, landscaped, well maintained with large deck and many trees. Private setting on a cul-de-sac. Open floor plan, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1807 sq. ft. MLS#201009096

1.0 acre Bend Deschutes River view lot. Level building site amongst mature Ponderosas. River and surrounding forest vistas. Privacy. Wildlife. Nature’s finest water feature. You won’t want to leave. MLS#201002533

NANCY MELROSE, Broker 541-312-7263

SUE CONRAD, Broker, CRS 541-480-6621

SHERRY PERRIGAN, Broker 541-410-4938

DOROTHY OLSEN, Broker, CRS, GRI 541-330-8498

DAVE DUNN, Broker 541-390-8465

CRAIG SMITH, Broker 541-322-2417

RE PR DU ICE CE D

Opportunity to own a 1st Phase Founder’s lot behind the Nicklaus course’s 8th green overlooking the pond. Now available for only $195,000 including Premier Golf Membership! MLS#2808590

NW Crossing | $334,000 Wonderful West Hills Home | $389,000

Exquisite Building Lot | $284,900 Redmond | $324,900

NW Bend | $325,000

Beautiful building lot on the 13th fairway at Tetherow Golf Course Community. Possible mountain views, easy to build site, elevated from the street but very level. Seller will finance as you prepare for new home. MLS#201010607

Don’t miss the extra features of this quaint, older farmstead. Situated on 18 acres, this property has 15 acres of irrigation and fabulous Cascade Mountain views. MLS#201100258

Well maintained Westside 4 bedroom, 3.5 bath, 3000 sq. ft., close to parks & recreation trails. Spacious kitchen, tile counters, alder cabinets & pantry. Bonus room, nice private deck, plenty of storage. MLS#201007194

Unique Earth Advantage Craftsman with mountain views. Open floor plan, hardwood, slate & tile floors. Spacious main level master suite, upstairs loft with vaulted ceilings. Beautifully landscaped corner lot. MLS#201009588

3 bedroom, 1.75 bath, 1952 sq. ft. Large south facing .29 of an acre lot. Beautiful landscaping & decks. Great living spaces, vaulted ceilings & large windows. Location is Key! MLS#201006837

JUDY MEYERS, Broker, GRI 541-480-1922

JJ JONES, Broker 541-610-7318 • 541-788-3678

RAY BACHMAN, Broker, GRI 541-408-0696

SCOTT HUGGIN, Broker, GRI 541-322-1500

JOANNE MCKEE, Broker, ABR, GRI, CRS 541-480-5159

King’s Forest | $290,000

NW Bend | $424,000

Sunriver | $425,000

Nice 4 bedroom, 2.75 bath, 3200+ sq. ft. great room plan. Master bedroom on main level. Upstairs 20' x 30' bonus room, loft, bedroom, bath & office. 4-car tandem garage, RV parking, flat backyard, 1/2 acre. MLS#201008568

Wonderful 3 bedroom, 3 bath, 2059 sq. ft. craftsman style home in desirable Miller Heights neighborhood. Nice great room floor plan, hardwood floors, close to downtown Bend shopping and dining. MLS#201100458

2131 sq. ft. custom 3 bedroom, 2 bath with large deck & retractable awning. Wet bar, 2 dining areas, stone fireplace and large solarium entry. Oversized garage with office & shop area. MLS#201006729

GREG MILLER, P.C., Broker, CRS, GRI 541-322-2404

Easy & manageable 5 acres. Stone fireplace, master on main, game room, art studio. 3319 sq. ft. Extensive decks with pasture & mountain views. Barn, shop, in-ground irrigation, mature trees. Bend schools. MLS#201009531 63825 W Quail Haven

Beautiful remodeled home with incredible mountain views! New windows and trim, siding, paint, flooring, lighting and baths have been updated. 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, plus huge bonus room. Horse ready too! MLS#201009496

Private, one level on 9.45 acres. In-ground irrigation, barn, shop, vinyl fenced. 2946 sq. ft., 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, vaulted ceilings, generous room sizes. Brick house with tile roof. MLS#201100448 65115 Smokey Butte Dr

JACK JOHNS, Broker, GRI 541-480-9300

MARY STRONG, Broker, MBA 541-728-7905

MELANIE MAITRE, Broker 541-480-4186

CAROL OSGOOD, Broker 541-383-4366

MARGO DEGRAY, Broker, ABR, CRS 541-383-4347

SE Bend | $569,900

Rivers Edge | $595,000 NW Bend | $595,000

Incredible Cascade views. 40 acres designated Wildlife Habitat, 23 acres water, horse set-up, borders government land. Custom home, soaring ceilings and windows, floor to ceiling fireplace. Serene! MLS#201002767

Single level home on 4.71 acres. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2124 sq. ft. 5-stall barn, close to BLM land. Recently remodeled. MLS#201008335

Beautiful views across the 13th fairway. 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 3045 sq. ft., .48 of an acre lot. Family room, exercise room, remodeled, quality finishes. 4-car garage, decks, patio, water feature. MLS#201009824

DIANE ROBINSON, Broker, ABR 541-419-8165

SHELLY HUMMEL, Broker, CRS, GRI, CHMS JIM & ROXANNE CHENEY, Brokers 541-383-4361 541-390-4030 • 541-390-4050

DARRIN KELLEHER, Broker 541-788-0029

Tumalo | $529,500

Be Part of the Arts! | $669,000 Tetherow Crossing | $699,000 Broken Top | $798,000

2nd St. Theater! 4458 sq. ft. building. Large lobby, box office, rehearsal hall & classroom. Backstage dressing room, outside storage. Plenty of parking! Includes inventory, patron list and more! MLS#2907081

Pristine, very private, 18 Acres with 700 plus feet of Middle Deschutes River frontage. Buildable, wildlife galore, 12 minutes to downtown Redmond. MLS#201009447

Single level contemporary home overlooks the 3rd green at Broken Top. Canadian maple floors, all bedrooms are suites. Hot tub, water feature and 3 fireplaces. 4 bedrooms 3.75 baths 3285 sq. ft. MLS#201003659

LISA CAMPBELL, Broker 541-419-8900

GEOFF CHISHOLM, Broker 541-226-3599

NORMA DUBOIS, P.C., Broker 541-383-4348

Advantage Green

RE PR DU ICE CE D

Widgi Creek Golf Home | $799,000 26 Acres/NW Bend | $950,000 Mirror Pond Frontage | $1,100,000 Awbrey Butte | $1,179,000 Estate with Mountain Views | $1,799,900

G N I D N E P

Charming 4 bedroom, 3 bath, 2142 sq. ft. single level home on spacious, private .35 acre corner lot in quiet West Hills neighborhood. Park-like backyard with mature landscaping. Definitely a must see! MLS#201005432

LI NE ST W IN G

LI NE ST W IN G

Tumalo Small Acreage | $479,000 Remodel in Sisters | $495,900

NW Bend | $399,000

3807 sq. ft., luxury home on .49 of an Acre. 4 bedroom suites each with a deck that back to the course greens & trees. Master on main, floor to ceiling river rock fireplace. Steve Van Sant designed home. MLS#201005526

Big views, prime location, very private ... 1st time offering. Lupine Meadows Ranch, 20 acres Swalley Irrigation. 3440 sq. ft. home, deck facing mountains. 30’ x 60’ barn, 4 separate paddocks, 3 ponds. MLS#201005990

Home in Bend’s Historic District features timeless Tudor Style charm. 4 bedroom, 3 bath with beautiful wood work. Relax on the deck as you enjoy life on the river or launch your boat from the private dock. MLS#201009301

Cascade mountain views, beautiful custom built home. Vaulted great room, 2 fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, master on the main. Bonus room, office & wine room. Upgrades throughout. 4190 sq. ft. MLS#201100008

Live the Central Oregon dream in this exquisite 5831 sq. ft., 4 bedroom, 4.5 bath European-inspired estate. 56 acres, 46 irrigated. 1800 sq. ft. RV shop, guest quarters with kitchenette over garage. Sisters schools. MLS#2812770

This is the time of year that homes with energy saving options can really pay off and Central Oregon home prices are more affordable than ever. Quite a combination. What are you waiting for?

DIANE LOZITO, Broker 541-548-3598

CRAIG LONG, Broker 541-480-7647

BOB JEANS, Broker 541-728-4159

CATHY DEL NERO, Broker 541-410-5280

CAROLYN PRIBORSKY, P.C., Broker, ABR, CRS 541-383-4350

JOY HELFRICH, Broker, e-Pro, GRI, GREEN 541-480-6808


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, January 29, 2011 F1

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ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

General Merchandise

Pets and Supplies

200 202

Want to Buy or Rent PAYING CASH FOR WATCHES working or not, scrap, call 541-706-0891.

205

Items for Free

Chihuahua, absolutely tiniest teacups, rare colors, vet checked, $250, 541-977-4686

Chihuahua/Poodle Pups, 9 weeks, 1st shot, $120 Cash, Call 541-678-7599.

Carpet, 1970’s, Golden, brown, yellow, FREE, you haul, call 541-728-0482

208

Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

1-year-old male Lab mix, free to a good home. 541-306-9448.

Chihuahua pups (2), Adorable, ready for their forever homes, $250 1st shots 541-280-1840 Chihuahua Pups, Apple Head, well bred, small, $200. 541-420-4825.

FREE 4-yr-old female orange & white spayed tabby cat, small in size. Moving, must find good home. 541-548-2797. Free German Short Hair/Black Lab mix, male, 7 weeks, shots/wormed,541-593-2298 Free Lab, black, female, bird dog training, great buddy, active. 541-382-7506

Golden Retriever female Puppy $350. Home grown; cute; sweet! Born Thanksgiving AKC Yellow Labradors 3 Males Day. 541-728-3221. For more info please visit us at www.coldcreekfarms.com Golden Retriever Purebred 541-942-1059 Puppies ready on Valentines AUSSIE mini AKC red tri male Day. $600. Please call Kristi outgoing, playful, family at 541-280-3278. raised, 1st shots, wormed, must see! $400. 541788-7799, or 541-598-5314 Aussie Mini Litter, (4), shots, tails done, in-home raised, dbl reg. Ready now! $500. 541-409-0253, Redmond Gypsy is a rescued kitten, born with deformed back legs, but plays & gets around okay does not know any different. The legs are now in the way. We tried to find appropriate Australian Kelpie, 1 yr., all prosthetic legs & a veterishots, worming, spayed, small narian who could attach /medium, 28 lbs, great dog, to them, but surgery can no good home, prefer ranch/ longer wait. We are seeking a farm, $200, 541-678-2409. vet with a big heart who Blood Hound Pups: Purewould donate time & experbred, shots, wormed, ready tise for this surgery or give a now, $250, 541-771-1141. substantial discount, & sponsors to help with associated Can you help? Our family’s costs of surgery. After removing in 2 wks & we need covery, Gypsy will need a new homes! 2 sweet cats, special, caring forever home. fixed, healthy. 541-788-0151 Please contact nonprofit, all-volunteer Cat Rescue, Find It in Adoption & Foster Team, 389-8420 or 598-5488 if you The Bulletin Classifieds! can help. PO Box 6441, Bend 541-385-5809 97708, www.craftcats.org. AUSSIE PUPPIES, mini and toy, $250, 1 male/1 female left. 1st shots, tails docked. Ready to go! 541-420-9694.

1 7 7 7

S . W .

C h a n d l e r

A v e . ,

Siberian Husky pups, exceptional markings & temperaments, $650, 541-330-8627 or stones-siberians@live.com

Terrier mix, 7-mos, hsetrained, free to good home where she can run! 541-617-9132

O r e g o n

210

242

260

266

269

Exercise Equipment

Misc. Items

Heating and Stoves

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

2 large reclining Cabin-style chairs, need refinishing, $150 for both. 541-419-0613 2 matching recliners, medium blue, like new, just 4 mos old, $100 ea. 541-389-1042 !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers

Schwinn Recumbent bike 25% off Select Signature Window treatments. PLUS order SRB-1500, like new $100. 10 window coverings or more 541-382-6806 and get an additional 10% 246 off! Not valid with any other offers. Good thru 1/31/11 Guns & Hunting only. See ad in January issue and Fishing of Picture Your Home magazine. Budget Blinds 12g Mossberg 500A tactical 541-788-8444 pistol grip, $300/trade. Kimwww.BudgetBlinds.com ber 1911 S/S custom, 45 Binoculars, Pentax, 20X50, ACP $1000. 541-647-8931 new, $400, sell $100, 12g. Remington pump, 870 Ex503-933-0814, local. press, wood stock w/matching case. $200 541-647-8931

BEND’S HOMELESS NEED OUR HELP 240

Crafts and Hobbies Alpaca Yarn, various colors/ blends/sparkle. 175yds/skein $7.50-8.50 ea. 541-385-4989

242

Exercise Equipment

Toy/Mini Aussie pups, $450 +. High quality. Shots, vet, tails, etc. Call 541-475-1166

Ab Lounge 2, excellent condition, $50. Call 541-382-6806 Pups, 7 wks, 2 fe-

Yorkie males, 1 male, vet check, will deliver to Central OR, $600, 541-792-0375, Mt. Vernon

B e n d

Furniture & Appliances

$125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355. Bed, Queen size, $150. Local, please call 503-933-0814 for more info. Bed Set, Sealy Posturpedic, plush top, queen size, w/ 22 LR Remington M522, syn. metal stand, bed pad & sheet stock, semi-auto rifle, $200. set, $300, new cond., 541-647-8931 541-317-5156. A Collector Pays Ca$h, Chairs, Dining room, 4 matchhand guns, rifles, etc., ing, sturdy, black, $32 ea., 541-475-4275,503-781-8812 541-420-2220. Couch, full-length, brown/tan/ Brinkman Wood smoker, adj black print, $150/OBO. Call stack, $35. 22” Round Weber 541-549-1823 Kettle, $50. 541-419-0613 Dresser, nice, 2 night stands, BUYING AND SELLING French provincial, $65 ea., All gold jewelry, silver and gold 541-420-2220. coins, bars, rounds, wedding GENERATE SOME excitement in sets, class rings, sterling silyour neigborhood. Plan a gaver, coin collect, vintage rage sale and don't forget to watches, dental gold. Bill advertise in classified! Fleming, 541-382-9419. CASH!! 385-5809. For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Buying Diamonds Supplies. 541-408-6900. LOVESEAT, blue fabric, great /Gold for Cash shape, only $50. See on Fly Fishing Rods and gear, top SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS craigslist. 541-419-5060 quality brands, all for $200, 541-389-6655 503-933-0814, local. Loveseat/Hide-a-bed, single BUYING bed, tan, exc. cond., $100, 208 GUNS Lionel/American Flyer trains, 503-933-0814, local. Buy, Sell, Trade accessories. 541-408-2191. Pets and Supplies Queen Anne style dining table 541-728-1036. Cemetery Plots (2), Prinevw/2 leaves & 6 ladderback Kittens & cats for adoption! ille Juniper Haven, $1000 for Juniper Rim Game chairs, $175. 541-419-0613 Sat/Sun 1-4, other days by both, call 541-504-4276. Preserve - Brothers, OR appt (541-647-2181 to arSecond Hand Pheasants (both roosters/hens) range). Foster home also has & Chukars, all on special! Mattresses, sets & DO YOU HAVE small kittens, call 815-7278. 541-419-3923; 541-419-8963 SOMETHING TO SELL singles, call Altered, shots, ID chip, more. FOR $500 OR LESS? Support your local all-volun541-598-4643. Mossberg 12g Model #835 teer, no kill rescue! 65480 pump, camo’d, 28” barrel, 5 Non-commercial Two couches: ivory leather, 78th St., Bend, 389-8420, + 1, $200. 541-647-8931 advertisers can gray upholstered; king bed 598-5488, www.craftcats.org place an ad for our frame and mattress set; Spring Chinook! LAB PUPS AKC, titled parents, misc. 541-548-2797. Fish with Captain Greg, Port"Quick Cash Special" FC/AFC, Blackwater Rudy is land area, March-May. $100 1 week 3 lines grand sire. Deep pedigreed The Bulletin per person (discounts for $10 bucks performance/titles, OFA hips recommends extra caution children). Call 541-379-0362 or & elbows. 541-771-2330 when purchasing products 2 weeks $16 bucks! www.royalflushretrievers.com Walther P22, like new, with box or services from out of the and 2 magazines, $295, area. Sending cash, checks, Labradoodles, Australian Ad must 541-317-0116. or credit information may Imports - 541-504-2662 include price of item be subjected to F R A U D . www.alpen-ridge.com Wanted: Collector seeks high For more information about www.bendbulletin.com quality fishing items. Call Lhasa Apso/Shih Tzu pups an advertiser, you may call or 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746 adorable, $250. Linda the Oregon State Attorney Call Classifieds at 503-888-0800 Madras. General’s Office Consumer WIN 1885 45-70, 88 & 308, 541-385-5809 Protection hotline at 100 & 308, & 61 22 long rifle, Maremma Guard Dog pups, 1-877-877-9392. Browning BLR 243, Safari purebred, great dogs, $300 GENERATE SOME excitement 30-06, & A Bolt 300 WFM, each, 541-546-6171. in your neigborhood. Plan a Springfield M 1 Grand, 30-06, garage sale and don't forget & M 1 Carbine Henery 1860 Pomeranian puppies 3 females to advertise in classified! 45 Colt, various shot guns 1 male, 8 weeks old, sweet 385-5809. and hand guns. 212 personalities and adorable H & H FIREARMS faces. $350. (541) 480-3160 NEED TO CANCEL Antiques & 541-382-9352 OR PLACE YOUR AD? POODLE Pups, AKC Toy Collectibles The Bulletin Classifieds Winchester 37A 20ga youth Black/white, chocolate & other has an "After Hours" Line shotgun, good used cond., colors, so loveing, 541-475-3889 Dropleaf table w/china cabinet, Call 383-2371 24 hrs. works great, needs bead. Rosewood bedroom set, to cancel or place your ad! Pug Puppies for Valentine’s! $100. 541-318-3321 Friendly Village dishes, vinBorn 12/25 • Ready 2/12 The Bulletin Offers tage clothing/jewelry, more, 2 males $350, 1 female $400 Winchester Model 54, Bolt AcFree Private Party Ads for best offer. 541-480-9677 Call 541-550-8807 tion, .270, circa 1920’s, $400, • 3 lines - 3 days please call 541-317-0116. • Private Party Only Furniture Purebred-St. Bernard • Total of items advertised Puppies-Ready 2/10/11 253 must equal $200 or Less Our Saints gave us another TV, Stereo and Video • Limit one ad per month adorable litter! We have 3 • 3-ad limit for same item boys and 3 girls left. advertised within 3 months TV, 27”, JVC, works good, $75, $400/females - $450/males Visit our HUGE home decor 541-385-5809 • Fax please call 541-480-3122 for Contact: Holly McIntosh consignment store. New 541-385-5802 more info. hollym1469@gmail.com items arrive daily! 930 SE Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., 255 Queensland Heelers audio & studio equip. McInBend • 541-318-1501 Standards & mini,$150 & up. tosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Computers www.redeuxbend.com 541-280-1537 Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, http://rightwayranch.wordpress.com/ NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808 THE BULLETIN requires comHISTORIC REDMOND CHURCH puter advertisers with mulSHIH-POOs 2 adorable males, ANTIQUE SALE: oak pews, 265 tiple ad schedules or those bishop’s chairs, barleycorn family raised, don’t miss your selling multiple systems/ Building Materials furniture. 641 SW Cascade chance to own one of the software, to disclose the Ave., 2-4 p.m. Sat. & Sun. best! Price Reduced to $200 name of the business or the Bend Habitat RESTORE without shots. 541-744-1804 The Bulletin reserves the right term "dealer" in their ads. Building Supply Resale Private party advertisers are to publish all ads from The Quality at LOW PRICES Shih Tsu Pups, 2 males, 1 defined as those who sell one Bulletin newspaper onto The 740 NE 1st 312-6709 black/white, 1 white/brindle, computer. Bulletin Internet website. Open to the public . avail. 2/1, $350,541-280-2538 Shih Tzu pups, gold & white, gold w/ black mask, & black, $385-$750, 541-788-0090

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Pilates Machine, Aero,rebounder, cushion headreast, CD’s, like new, $150, 541-848-8230

The cold weather is upon us and sadly there are still over 2,000 folks in our community without permanent shelter, living in cars, makeshift camps, getting by as best they can. The following items are badly needed to help them get through the winter:

d CAMPING GEAR of any sort: d

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, SUPER TOP SOIL advertising for used wood- www.hersheysoilandbark.com stoves has been limited to Screened, soil & compost models which have been mixed, no rocks/clods. High certified by the Oregon Dehumus level, exc. for flower partment of Environmental beds, lawns, gardens, Quality (DEQ) and the fedstraight screened top soil. eral Environmental ProtecBark. Clean fill. Deliver/you tion Agency (EPA) as having haul. 541-548-3949. met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certiTo place an ad, call fication label, which is per541-385-5809 or email manently attached to the classified@bendbulletin.com stove. The Bulletin will not For newspaper delivery knowingly accept advertising questions, call Circulation for the sale of uncertified Dept. 541-385-5800 woodstoves.

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection.

• Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

Found Australian Shepherd cross? Young fem. Old Hwy 20 East of Bend, W of Horse Ridge Trail. 541-233-8011

FOUND Earring on Larkspur Trail, approx Jan 14th. Call to identify, 541-388-5488 FOUND Electronic Car Key at Wanoga Snow Park, Sat., 1/22. Call 541-788-4069 Found Mountain Bike, Overturf Butte Park, 1/24. Call to identify, 541-233-3648. Found set of Toyota keys 1/25, Drake Park; have been taken to Athletic Club of Bend.

DRY JUNIPER FIREWOOD $175 per cord, split. Immediate delivery available. Call 541-408-6193

HELP YOUR AD TO stand out from the rest! Have the top line in bold print for only $2.00 extra.

Dry Seasoned Red Fir $185 per cord, split and delivered, Please Call In Reply to Lost fishing equip. at Cline park on Thurs. 1/20. I 541-977-2040. Lodgepole scraps in Powell Butte, very short, solid, up to 16” & punky. Fill your pickup for $15. 541-420-3906 LODGEPOLE, SPLIT & DRIED. $150 per cord delivered, Bend or Redmond, Please call anytime, 541-408-8611,541-420-2323

SPLIT, DRY LODGEPOLE DELIVERY INCLUDED! $175/CORD. Call for half-cord prices! Leave message, 541-923-6987 WILL BUY FIREWOOD By the cord or by the load. Call 541-771-8534

saw ad in Sun. paper but the number listed is out of service. My # is 541-706-9361. Please call, will identify. Lost Toolbag, 1/25, 11 am, Reward, NE Bend, Around Empire, Montana, High Desert, Brinson or Boyd Acres, 541-788-0175. LOST WEDDING RING dropped at Cascade Village mall, 3rd & Revere or Butler Mkt & Boyd Acres. Size 6 white gold ring with band hollowed out on inside rim, 1 diamond a bit smaller than a karat flanked by strips of yellow gold. If found call 541-306-1002 REWARD Missing Bamboo Cane, dark finish, well worn, long time helper of senior lady. Vanished from Bimart shopping cart 1/24, a.m. When found, cane can be dropped off at Bimart front desk or call 541-389-1510. REWARD.

WINTER SPECIAL - Dry Seasoned Lodgepole Pine, guaranteed cords. Split delivered, stacked. Prompt delivery! $175/cord. 541-350-3393

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

269

275

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Auction Sales

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

Used tents, sleeping bags, tarps, blankets.

d WARM CLOTHING d Rain Gear, Boots Please drop off your donations at the BEND COMMUNITY CENTER 1036 NE 5th St., Bend (312-2069) For special pick-ups, call Ken Boyer 389-3296 or Don Auxier, 383-0448 PLEASE HELP. YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

270

Lost and Found

Found Children’s Sled, Overturf Butte, 1/23. Call to identify, 541-233-3648 All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT dry lodgepole, $160 for 1 cord or $300 for 2. Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484

BUSINESS LIQUIDATION AUCTION: Sun. Jan. 30th, Ruthie B’s Antiques & Tea House. 346 Main St., Springfield. Preview at 8 a.m. Restaurant Equip. to sell at 9 a.m., antiques at 10 a.m. See Photos & Details at www.mandjauction.com

Final Estate Auction

541-322-7253

Farm Market

300 325

Hay, Grain and Feed Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

341

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

267

Fuel and Wood

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

9 7 7 0 2

for Robert Ulrich Feb. 12, Crook County Fairgrounds. Check website for photos and list. www.dennisturmon.com Turmon Enterprises LLC

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com WANTED: Horse or utility trailers for consignment or purchase. KMR Trailer Sales, 541-389-7857 www.kigers.com

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 358

Farmers Column 10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1461 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

375

Meat & Animal Processing Angus Beef, 1/2 or whole, grain fed, no hormones $3.10/lb., hanging weight, cut & wrap included, please call 541-383-2523.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin 383

Produce and Food CentralOregonBeef.com 541-923-5076


F2 Saturday, January 29, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Employment

400 421

Schools and Training Advertise in 30 Daily newspapers! $525/25-words, 3days. Reach 3 million classified readers in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Washington & Utah. (916) 288-6019 email: elizabeth@cnpa.com for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC) AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance. 1-877-804-5293. (PNDC) Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-688-7078 www.CenturaOnline.com (PNDC) TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825

The Bulletin

454

is your Employment Marketplace Call

Looking for Employment

541-385-5809

Senior Caregiver, experienced, loving & capable for personal care, companionship, housekeeping, meal prep, med admin, pet care, transportation & more. References. Judy 541-550-9421

to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Account coordinator

Temporary Circulation Account Coordinator Temporary full-time position open in the Circulation department for a Circulation Account coordinator. Main responsibilities include data entry of new credit card or bank draft information on subscribers accounts. Processes all subscriber Auto Renew payments and maintains accurate spreadsheets for business office. Responsible for tracking and ordering Circulation office supplies. Performs monthly billing steps for several of our newspapers and acts as back up to the Customer Service rep. and billing staff. Assists with data entry of daily draw projections and returns and printing associated reports. Applicants must have excellent interpersonal skills and strong attention to detail. Must be able to work with others in a supportive team setting. Ideal candidate will have computer experience, basic accounting knowledge, proficient in data entry and strong communication and organizational skills. Please submit resumes to: The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 or by e-mail: ahusted@bendbulletin.com

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

476

476

476

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Finance & Business

Sous Chef

500

Advertise and Reach over 3 million readers in the Pacific Northwest! 30 daily newspapers, six states. 25-word classified $525 for a 3-day ad. Call (916) 288-6010; (916) 288-6019 or visit www.pnna.com/advertising_ pndc.cfm for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC)

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions.

MECHANIC McMurry Ready Mix Co. an Equal Opportunity Employer, is currently hiring a CRUSHER MECHANIC Must have 2 years Crusher Mechanic experience, with excellent Welding & Fabrication skills. Excellent pay & benefits. Contact Dave O. for more information at 307-259-3891.

Come join the Best Team Around! Pre-Employment Drug Screen required.

The Bulletin Classifieds

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

DRUG AND ALCOHOL COUNSELOR. Part/Full-time. Certified and experienced, for Bend, Madras, & La Pine, bi-lingual and Masters Level a plus. Salary DOE. Please fax resume to 541-383-4935, or mail to Pfeifer & Associates, 23 NW Greenwood Ave., Bend, OR 97701. Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809.

Medical Office Manager for 3 physicians, busy practice. HR, Billing, AR management. Cascade Internal Medicine, 541-318-0124. Office Specialist 2, Central Oregon Ag Research Center, Oregon State University. Full-time, salary range $2,138.00 $2,960.00 monthly + benefits. To review posting and apply go to http://oregonstate.edu/jobs. Refer to posting # 0006821. Closing Date: 2/11/2011. OSU is an AA/EOE.

CAUTION

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

READERS:

HAIRSTYLIST - Shag Salon has part-time hair station for lease. Call 541-617-7007 or 541-815-0819.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today! Logging - Yarder Crew, Choker Setter, Rigging Slinger, Hook Tender. Exp. & refs req. Central OR. positions. 541-409-1337

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help?

286

286

The Bulletin Classifieds

NOTICE

www.bendbulletin.com

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

ESTATE

SALE

Alice Ann Wirtz, last member of the pioneer Dobbs family. Wonderful antiques include: Oak lawyers bookcase, victorian dresser, kitchen/pie cupboard, commode, childs rocker, hanging oil lamp, mirrors, small furniture pieces, marble top tables, old farm primitive items, beautiful Victorian glassware & china, 3 silver tea sets, flatware set and misc. silver & sterling, wooden trunk, carved sofa, pictures, Louisville stoneware dishes, Wedgwood china set, regular household items, twin beds, jewelry, interesting small collectibles, ladies clothing, lots of misc! Friday ~ Saturday, 9-4 Crowd control numbers Friday 8:00 a.m. Mt View Park, take 27th to Rosemary, then left on Wintergreen to 2429, Please park carefully!

Heated Warehouse Moving Sale. Many household and business items. folding tables, shelves, office furniture, grow equip, tools, tools, and more tools, mattresses, CDs, clothes, lots of art!!! 63004 NE 18th #105 in the Vanguard Building. Sat. & Sun. 9-5

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

H Supplement Your Income H

Garage Sale At Sign Pro, Shop table, desks, bookshelves, chairs, misc. Fri. 1-4, Sat, 8-1, 615 SE Glenwood Dr., Ste. 105.

292

Sales Other Areas DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

Attic Estates & Appraisals 541-350-6822 for pics & info go to www.atticestatesandappraisals.com

Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor

288

Sales Southeast Bend

Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today &

The Bulletin Classiieds

Shipping & Receiving Clerk Looking for an exciting new job? Microsemi is looking for an additional Shipping & Receiving Clerk. This position would pack/ship product, distribute incoming packages, purchasing and shipping data entry and various other clerical duties as needed. This position is a full time position hired through a temporary agency. We are seeking an individual who have had relevant job experience preferably in a manufacturing environment. The job skills sought include shipping and receiving using Federal Express and other shipping methods including international shipping. All candidates must have a good work history, good attendance, and a willingness to learn new skills. Must be able to read and understand instructions. Must be proficient in Microsoft Office including Word, Excel and Outlook. Please submit a resume to cfischer@microsemi.com or apply in person to 405 SW Columbia St. Bend, OR. EOE

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

541-322-7253

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

A BEST-KEPT SECRET! Reach over 3 million Pacific Northwest readers with a $525/25-word classified ad in 30 daily newspapers for 3-days. Call (916) 288-6019 regarding the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection or email elizabeth@cnpa.com (PNDC) Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

H La Pine & Prineville H

FAST!

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours

528

Loans and Mortgages

573

Sell an Item

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

Business Opportunities

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

The Ranch is accepting applications for YRFT Sous Chefs. Need dedicated individuals who possess good supervisory and leadership skills and have an extensive knowledge of food preparation including catering and event experience. Duties include food preparation, production and control for all food outlets and banquet facilities. Create and implement new menus. Hire, train, supervise and schedule personnel in food service dept. Implement suggestions for improvement. Assist in estimating annual food budget. Shifts will include weekends and holidays. Benefits include med/dent/life, paid holidays and vacation. Employees of Black Butte Ranch may enjoy use of some of the facilities available to our guests. BBR employees can enjoy use of Ranch amenities. Employee discounts are available for themselves and their immediate family. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE.

541-385-5809

Sales Northwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Northeast Bend Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sale event is over! THANKS! From The Bulletin and your local Utility Companies

507

Real Estate Contracts

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

Advertise your open positions.

Independent Contractor

282

Looking for an exciting new job? Microsemi is looking for some new associates to work in our semiconductor area. We have openings on night shift (11 PM - 7 AM). We are seeking individuals who have had relevant job experience although not necessarily in the semiconductor industry. The job skills sought include microscope inspection, precision measurement, complex process equipment set-up and operation and accurate documentation of work performed. Familiarity with basic electronics, chemicals and cleanroom protocol is a plus. All candidates must have a good work history, good attendance, good hand-eye coordination and a willingness to learn new skills. Must be able to read and understand instructions. Please submit a resume to cfischer@microsemi.com or apply in person to 405 SW Columbia St. Bend, OR. EOE

541-383-0386

SALES Avon Representatives needed. Choose your hours, your income. Call Patty, Independent Sales Representative 541-330-1836

VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Semiconductor Production Associates

If it's under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for

$10 - 3 lines, 7 days $16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Garage Sales

Garage Sales

Garage Sales Find them in The Bulletin Classifieds!

541-385-5809 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, January 29, 2011 F3

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 Boats & RV’s

865

870

880

882

ATVs

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

Travel Queen 34’ 1987 65K miles, oak cabi-

800

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new

850

rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Snowmobiles

Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Cargo Plus Snowmobile/ ATV Trailer 1996, Single axel w/ spare,rear/side ramps, $650, Dave, 541-593-2247, 8-5.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) Yamaha Snowmobiles & Trailer, 1997 700 Triple, 1996 600, Tilt Trailer, front off-load, covers for snowmobiles, clean & exc. cond., package price, $3800, 541-420-1772.

860

Motorcycles And Accessories CRAMPED FOR CASH? Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 385-5809

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $16,900 OBO. 541-944-9753

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $19,999 OBO, please call 541-480-8080. Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

Polaris Sportsman 2008, 800 CC, AWD, 4-wheeler, black in color, custom SS wheels/tires, accessories, exc. cond., 240 miles, $5500, 541-680-8975, leave msg. YAMAHA 1998 230CC motor, 4WD, used as utility vehicle. excellent running condition. $2000 OBO. 541-923-4161 541-788-3896 Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

The Bulletin

875

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

881 Grumman AA-5 Traveler, 1/4 interest, beautiful, clean plane, $9500, 619-822-8036 www.carymathis.blogspot.com

870

880

Motorhomes

Reach thousands of readers!

12’ Navy fiberglass boat, $200 or trade for ??? 541-388-1533 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds 17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829 Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP,

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

925 Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Hurricane 2007 35.5’ like new, 3 slides, generator, dark cabinets, Ford V10, 4,650 mi $69,500 OBO. 541-923-3510

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $122,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

933

Pickups

Chevy Corvette 1980, yellow, glass removable top, 8 cyl., auto trans, radio, heat, A/C, new factory interior, black, 48K., exc. tires, factory aluminum wheels, asking $12,000, will consider fair offer & possible trade, 541-385-9350.

916

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $10,000,541-280-5677

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

1998 Winnebago Itasca Sundancer 31 ft. 42,500 miles. Excellent Condition! Price: $25,000 541.325.1971

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $5800. 541-330-0852.

Travel Trailers Forest River Sierra 1998, 26’, exc. cond, $6900, call 541-548-5886.

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

Watercraft

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $1995 for all. Bill 541-480-7930.

900

Boats & Accessories

Motorcycle Trailer

Looking for person, female, who was at Regal Cinema, Old Mill, on Monday October 11, 2010 for matinee who witnessed fall in theater. Call 702-468-5565, anytime.

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

Kendon stand-up motorcycle trailer, torsion bar suspension, easy load and unload, used seldom and only locally. $1700 OBO. Call 541-306-3010.

personals

nets, exc interior. Great extra bdrm! Reduced to $5000. 541-480-3286

Autos & Transportation

Utility Trailers

***

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Ford 2 Door 1949, 99% Complete, $14,000, please call 541-408-7348.

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, exc. cond., $16,900, 541-390-2504

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, reduced to $34,000 OBO 541-610-4472; 541-689-1351

Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

541-385-5809

clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

Chevy

931

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories Bench seat split-back, out of a ‘92 Ford F-250, gray, $400 OBO. 541-419-5060/pics People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu 1971 Factory Stock Rear-end, complete. Excellent cond, $150/OBO. 541-504-9693

Wagon

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

The Bulletin Classiieds

KOMFORT 27’ 2000 5th wheel trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide. In excellent condition, has been stored inside. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Mercedes-Benz 280c 1975 145k, good body & mechanical, fair interior, can email pics. $2950. 541-548-3628

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $3850, 541-410-3425.

Dodge 1500 XLT 4x4, 2007 w/ new hydraulic snow plow $6K new; 9,980 miles, many options, $19,900. 541-815-5000

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Collector Car Auction Salem, OR State Fairgrounds Sat., Feb. 5, 2011 Call now to Consign

541-689-6824

www.petersencollectorcars.com

932

MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all original, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2700. 541-322-6261

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

VW Super Beetle 1974 C-10

Pickup

1969, Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns.

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

1957,

Antique and Classic Autos 152K mi. on chassis, 4 spd. transmission, 250 6 cyl. engine w/60K, new brakes & master cylinder, $2500. Please call 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800.

(Private Party ads only) Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are mis understood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us: 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3750 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

Dodge Dakota 1989, 4x4, 5spd trans, 189K, new tires, straight body, 8' long bed. $1500 OBO. 541-815-9758 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

The Bulletin Classiieds

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information. Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Dodge Ram 2001, short bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

541-385-5809

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Barns

Handyman

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Domestic Services I Do Professional House cleaning: 25 yrs. exp., exc refs., Senior discounts! 541-420-0366

Drywall Complete Drywall Services Remodels & Repairs No Job Too Small. Free Exact Quotes. 541-408-6169 CAB# 177336

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 • Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling • Decks • Window/Door Re placement • Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179 Philip L. Chavez Contracting Services Specializing in Tile, Remodels & Home Repair, Flooring & Finish Work. CCB#168910 Phil, 541-279-0846 I DO THAT! Remodeling, Home Repairs, Professional & Honest Work. Commercial & Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 317-9768

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Snow Removal Reliable 24 Hour Service • Driveways • Walkways • Parking Lots • Roof Tops • De-Icing Have plow & shovel crew awaiting your call!

Landscape Management •Pruning Trees And Shrubs •Thinning Over Grown Areas •Removing Unwanted Shrubs •Hauling Debris Piles •Evaluate Seasonal Needs

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

MASONRY

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

Painting, Wall Covering

Same Day Response

Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

541.749. 4025 SMOLICH HYUNDAI 2250 NE Highway 20 visit us at: www.smolichhyundai.com

2010 HYUNDAI GENESIS COUPE

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

885

Canopies and Campers

Sale Price

Blowout Price

$13,214

PowertrainLimitedWarranty

VIN: 021138. Must finance through HMFC for sale price.

Closeout Sale Price

$12,214 + DMV

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

$26,999

HMFC Bonus Cash ..............$1,000

HMFC Bonus Cash ..............$1,000 VIN: 167964. Must finance through HMFC for sale price.

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523.

MSRP .................................$31,570 Smolich Discount .................$4,571

MSRP .................................$15,405 Smolich Discount .................$1,191 Factory Rebate ....................$1,000

Total Blowout

$25,999

+ DMV

HYUNDAI

LAST ONE!

2010 HYUNDAI VERACRUZ GLS AWD

MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC

541-388-2993

Snow Removal d SNOW REMOVAL! d

Home Improvement

2010 HYUNDAI ACCENT GS HATCHBACK

TERRY 27’ 1995 5th wheel with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great rig in great cond. $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874. 388-7605, 410-6945

541-390-1466

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more. Priced to sell at $59,500! 541-317-9185

d LARGE OR SMALL, d WE DO IT ALL! 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 d www.bblandscape.com d

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

...HYUNDAI HAS IT LAST ONE!

2010 HYUNDAI ELANTRA GLS MSRP .................................$31,330 Smolich Discount .................$1,831 Factory Rebate ....................$1,500

+ DMV+ DMV

MOS.

AND

$

MSRP .................................$18,935 Smolich Discount .................$1,000 Factory Rebate ....................$1,500

Closeout Price

$27,999

0% 60

FOR UP TO

VIN: 103653

0% Financing is subject to credit approval An Additional $1,000 HMFC Bonus Cash in lieu of 0%. Must finance with HMFC.

2500 OFF MSRP ON AL REMAINING 2010 ELANTRA GLS SEDANS VIN: 050794


F4 Saturday, January 29, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

933

933

935

935

935

935

935

975

975

Pickups

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Special Offer

Special Offer

Special Offer

Special Offer

Special Offer

Jeep Wrangler 4X4 2000 #P1814 • Vin #718190

Ford CrewCab 7.3 Diesel Flatbed 2001

Sale Price $9,999 940

Ford Ranger Super Cab 4x4 2003

4x4, Vin #C48713

Only $9,999

67K Miles! Vin #B22460

BMW X5 AWD 2003

Dodge Durango AWD 2008

VIN #P34718

48K Miles. VIN #124502

Now Only $10,988

Now Only $17,988

Ford Explorer 4X4 2010 Like NEW but cost effective! 13K Miles! Vin #A28369

Only $11,250

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com

1835 S. Hwy 97 • Redmond DLR 181 • 541-548-2138

366

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

541-749-4025 • DLR

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

366

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480. Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, auto, reduced to $14,500 obo 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

Chevy

Avalanche 2002

#1836A • Vin #352594

Special Offer

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

Nissan Armada AWD 2004

541-385-5809

88K Miles! Vin #705275

Now Only $18,250

Smolich Auto Mall

Jeep CJ7 1986 6-cyl, 4x4, 5-spd., exc. cond., consider trade, $7950, please call 541-593-4437.

VIN #644129

smolichmotors.com Ford F-350 Crew 4x4 2002. Triton V-10, 118k, new tires, wheels, brakes. Very nice. Just $14,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Nissan Titan CrewCab 4X4 2008

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

975

Jeep Compass Limited AWD 2007 36K Miles! Vin #396196

Only $15,988 smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Automobiles

Nissan Xterra 4X4 2004 55K Miles! Vin #631269

Now Only $16,595 HYUNDAI

Now Only $24,495

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com

NISSAN

Ford Ranger 2004 Super Cab, XLT, 4X4, V6, 5-spd, A/C bed liner, tow pkg, 120K Like New! KBB Retail: $10,000 OBO 360-990-3223

541-389-1178 • DLR

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

FORD EXPLORER 1992

Chrysler 2005 Pacifica AWD, leather, video system, 3.5 liter V6, loaded, 21,500 mi., $13,950. 541-382-3666

READY FOR SNOW! All Wheel Drive! 5 spd, loaded with all power equipment, sound system. All weather tires. Runs and drives good, Only $1800. 909-570-7067.

AWD, leather, video sys, 3.5 liter V6, loaded, 21,500 mi, $13,950. 541-382-3666

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

The Bulletin Classifieds

Smolich Auto Mall

BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

Special Offer

366

Chrysler PT Cruiser Touring Pkg 2009 BMW M3 COUPE E36 1998, mint condition, adult owned, low miles, needs nothing, $12,500. 541-419-2181

The Bulletin

custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $6000; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $2900. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer

Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

***

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

700 Miles, LIKE NEW! VIN #153773

Now Only $17,988

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

385-5809

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Audi A4 Avant Quattro 2003 3.0L., 92K mi, garaged, serviced, silver, fully loaded, $8900. 541-420-9478

Dodge Charger 2010

The Bulletin Classified ***

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

541-385-5809

Now Only $9,590

Buick LeSabre 2004,

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 1998, like new, low mi., just in time for the snow, great cond., $7000, 541-536-6223.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

40K Miles! Vin #567013

CHECK YOUR AD

The Bulletin

Special Offer

45K Miles! Vin #321377

FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr brks, plus mntd stud snows. $8500 obo. 541-330-0616

Smolich Auto Mall

Price Reduced Now Only $13,989

Now Only $9,999

366

Special Offer

36K Miles. VIN #195855

Chevy HHR LT 2006

Reach thousands of readers!

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Smolich Auto Mall

Dodge Journey 2009

Special Offer

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

NISSAN

Special Offer

Smolich Auto Mall

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer

Chrysler 2005 Pacifica

366

Sale Price $10,999

1835 S. Hwy 97 • Redmond DLR 181 • 541-548-2138

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

Only $23,988

smolichmotors.com

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

Vans

Smolich Auto Mall 541-749-4025 • DLR

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, V6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

541-322-7253 Toyota Tundra 2005, V-8, 4WD, AVR Canopy, 1-owner, 64K mi, asking $18,400, 541-389-9680.

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $14,500. 541-408-2111

New 2010 Subaru Impreza 2.5i Premium

Show Your Stuff.

HURRY IN LAST ONE!

$

Moonroof

18,188

Model AJD-11 MSRP $20,844

VIN: AH515391

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New 2011 Subaru Forester 2.5X base

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www.bendbulletin.com AT THE OLD DODGE LOT UNDER THE BIG AMERICAN FLAG Thank you for reading. All photos are for illustration purposes – not actual vehicles. All prices do not include dealer installed options, documentation, registration or title. All vehicles subject to prior sale. All lease payments based on 10,000 miles/year. Prices good through January 30, 2011.


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, January 29, 2011 F5

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Automobiles

Automobiles

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Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you. Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $3500. 541-548-5302

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PORSCHE CARRERA 4S 2003 - Wide body, 6

Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $27k. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

speed, all wheel drive, no adverse history, new tires. Seal gray with light gray leather interior. $32,950. 503-351-3976

Subaru Outback 2005 AWD, 4cyl, auto, lthr htd seats, 89K mi, reduced to $12,995 OBO 541-508-0214; 541-554-5212

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SUBARUS!!! Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Honda Accord EX V6 2001 62k auto leather seats studs 6 cd sunroof roof rack optional Runs great!$8500 OBO 541-420-0049

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Toyota Tercel 1997 exc. cond, one owner, 136,300 miles, $3800, Please Call 541-815-3281.

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VOLKSWAGEN BUG 1965 Black , Excellent condition. Runs good. $6995. 541-416-0541.

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LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS EUGENE T. DALE, JR., has been appointed Administrator of the Estate of Eugene Truman Dale, Deceased, by the Circuit Court, State of Oregon, Deschutes County, under Case Number 10PB0153MA. All persons having a claim against the estate must present the claim within four months of the first publication date of this notice to Hendrix, Brinich & Bertalan, LLP at 716 NW Harriman Street, Bend, Oregon 97701, ATTN.: Lisa N. Bertalan, or they may be barred. Additional information may be obtained from the court records, the Administrator or the followingnamed attorney for the Administrator. Date of first publication: January 22, 2011. LISA N. BERTALAN HENDRIX BRINICH & BERTALAN, LLP 716 NW HARRIMAN BEND, OR 97701 LEGAL NOTICE Public Auction Public Auction to be held on Saturday, February 19th, 2011 at 11:30 a.m. at A-1 Westside Storage, 317 SW Columbia St., Bend, Oregon 97701. (Unit G-083). Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031532153 T.S. No.: 10-11296-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JOSHUA D. LOVE as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on December 21, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-83112 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: APN: 17 12 15CB 00102 LOT FIFTEEN {15) OF QUAIL CROSSING PHASE 1, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20878 COVEY CT, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor{s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; defaulted amounts total:$9,542.52 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $530,872.61 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.46200% per annum from

June 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on May 2, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187,110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE SALE REFERENCE IS MADE to that certain Deed of Trust (the “Trust Deed”) Trust recorded in the records of Deschutes County, Oregon on September 21, 2007 as Document No. 2007-51314 by and among WHISTLER DEVELOPMENT, LLC as Grantor, FIRST AMERICAN TITLE CO. as the Trustee and BANK OF EASTERN OREGON, an Oregon corporation, as the Beneficiary, which Trust Deed was subsequently modified as disclosed by the real property records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The Trust Deed covers the real property legally described as: The Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (NW 1/4 NE 1/4) of Section 19, Township 15 South, Range 13 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion described in Deed recorded April 16, 2008 as Document No. 2008-16587, Deschutes County Official Records and by Deed recorded August 11, 2008 as Document No. 2008-33446, Deschutes County Official Records. The Real Property or its address is commonly known as 4250 SW OBSIDIAN AVENUE, REDMOND, OR 97756. The undersigned successor trustee, Bennett H. Goldstein, hereby certifies that (i) no assignments of the Trust Deed by the trustee or the beneficiary and no appointments of successor trustee have been made, except as recorded in the official records of the county or counties in which the above-referenced real property is situated, and including specifically the appointment of Bennett H. Goldstein, attorney, as successor trustee, and (ii) no action has been commenced or is pending to recover the debt or any part of it now remaining which is secured by the Trust Deed. The beneficiary has elected to sell the real property described above to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. Pursuant to ORS 86.735(3), a Notice of Default and Election to Sell was recorded on November 24, 2010 in the records of Deschutes County, Oregon as Document No. 2010-47020. There are presently one or more defaults by the grantor owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, with respect to provisions in the Trust Deed which authorize sale in the event of default under such provisions. The defaults for which foreclosure is made are grantor’s failure to pay the installments due under a promissory note, Loan No. 10575546, between grantor as debtor and beneficiary as creditor, from and after the date of maturity of the note, and grantor’s defaults under a forbearance agreement between the parties. By reason of such defaults, the beneficiary has declared and hereby does declare all sums owing on the obligations secured by the Trust Deed immediately due and payable. Such sums are as follows: Principal: $ 4,000,000.00; Interest to 11/17/10: $ 862,819.92; Late charges through 11/17/10: $ 210.00; Appraisal Fee $ 7,145.00; Foreclosure guarantee $ 2, 655.00; Per diem interest from and after 11/17/10: $ 1,315.07; Accrued attorneys’ fees and costs: $ 3,250.00; Additional attorneys’ fees, costs and other sums necessary to protect beneficiary’s interests as provided by law and contract. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned successor trustee will on April 6, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., in accordance with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, on the front steps of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the above-described real property which grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by the grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest grantor, or grantor’s successor in interest, acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed and the expenses of the sale, including the compensation due to the successor trustee as provided by law, and the reasonable fees of the attorneys for the successor trustee. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five (5) days before the date last set for the sale, to have the foreclosure proceeding terminated and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, and by curing any other default described herein if such default is capable of cure by tendering the performance required under the Trust Deed and the obligation secured by the Trust Deed, plus payment of all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the Trust Deed and the obligation it secures and all fees of the successor trustee and of attorneys as provided by ORS 86.753. Other than as shown of record, neither the beneficiary nor the successor trustee has any actual notice of (i) any person having or claiming to have any lien upon or interest in the real property described herein subsequent to the interest of the trustee, the grantor, or any successor in interest to either of them, or (ii) any lessee or person, other than grantor, in possession of or occupying the real property. All references herein to “grantor,” “trustee” and “beneficiary” shall be deemed to include their successors in interest, if any. Date: November 24, 2010. /s/ Bennett H. Goldstein. Bennett H. Goldstein, Successor Trustee. STATE OF OREGON ss. County of Multnomah, The undersigned hereby certifies that he is the successor trustee named above and that the foregoing is a duplicate original of the Trustee’s Notice of Sale. /s/ Bennett H. Goldstein. Bennett H. Goldstein, Successor Trustee. Direct inquires to: Bennett H. Goldstein, Successor Trustee, 1132 SW 19th Ave., No. 106, Portland, Oregon 97205; Email: bhgoldatty@aol.com; Telephone: (503) 294-0940; Telecopy: (503) 294-7918.

and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 3, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Lisa Rohrbacker, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3873574 01/08/2011, 01/15/2011, 01/22/2011, 01/29/2011

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 5491601 T.S. No.: 10-10671-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, TED A. GRISHAM AND DENISE A- GRISHAM as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES, as Beneficiary, recorded on November 20, 1998, as Instrument No. 98-52318 book and page 522-2729 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: APN: 121546 Lot Five (5), Block Seventeen (17), ROMAINE VILLAGE, UNIT 8, Deschutes County, Oregon. TOGETHER WITH the following portion of Lot Six (6), Block Seventeen (17), ROMAINE VILLAGE, UNIT 8, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: Commencing at the Southwest CORNER of said Lot 6; thence South 56º45'09" East, 93.05 feet; thence South 35º47'44" East, 40.19 feet to the Southeast corner of said Lot 6; thence along the South line of said Lot 6, North 50º28'14" West, 131.37 feet to the Point of Beginning. Commonly known as: 19686 MAHOGANY DRIVE, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said

real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; defaulted amounts total: $4,845.37 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $66,587.79 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.50000% per annum from May 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on April 29, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-OC-104789 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, NORMAN BRENT GOURLEY, as grantor, to PACIFIC NORTHWEST TITLE INS. CO., as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR DECISION ONE MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC, as beneficiary, dated 8/2/2006, recorded 8/9/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-54581, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDER OF MORGAN STANLEY ABS CAPITAL I INC. TRUST 2007-HE1 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES,SERIES 2007-HE1. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT TWENTY-SEVEN (27), WESTERLY SUBDIVISION, RECORDED APRIL 15, 2004, IN CABINET G, PAGE 243, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 20322 MARINER DRIVE BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of January 11, 2011 Delinquent Payments from September 01, 2008 1 payments at $ 1,822.62 each $ 1,822.62 6 payments at $ 2,268.87 each $ 13,613.22 6 payments at $ 2,058.87 each $ 12,353.22 6 payments at $ 1,848.87 each $ 11,093.22 10 payments at $ 1,822.62 each $ 18,226.20 (09-01-08 through 01-14-11) Late Charges: $ 0.00 Beneficiary Advances: $ 7,035.67 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 64,144.15ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $252,000.00, PLUS interest hereon at 7.25% per annum from 08/01/08 to 10/1/2008, 9.375% per annum from 10/01/08 to 04/01/09, 8.375% per annum from 04/01/09 to 10/01/09, 7.375% per annum from 10/01/09 to 04/01/10, 7.25% per annum from 4/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on May 16, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same.DATED: 1/11/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1 st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3880465 01/22/2011, 01/29/2011, 02/05/2011, 02/12/2011

at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees

and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words

"trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 3, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Lisa Rohrbacker, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3873582 01/08/2011, 01/15/2011, 01/22/2011, 01/29/2011

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing instrument shall constitute notice, pursuant to ORS 86.740, that the Grantor of the Trust Deed described below has defaulted on its obligations to beneficiary, and that the Beneficiary and Successor Trustee under the Trust Deed have elected to sell the property secured by the Trust Deed: TRUST DEED AND PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: This instrument makes reference to that certain Trust Deed dated March 24, 2006 and recorded on March 24, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-20536, in the real property records of Deschutes County, Oregon, wherein THOMAS BEATIE AND NANCY BEATIE, as tenants by the entirely, are the Grantor, and AMERITITLE is the original Trustee, and BROOKS RESOURCES CORPORATION, an Oregon corporation, is the Beneficiary (the "Trust Deed"). The aforementioned Trust Deed covers property (the "Property") described as: Lot Eighty-Six (86), NORTH RIM ON AWBREY BUTTE PHASE 4, recorded November 8, 2005, in Cabinet G, Page 926, Deschutes County, Oregon. Also commonly described as: 1563 NW Wild Rye Circle, Bend, OR 97701. The tax parcel number is: 250434. The undersigned hereby certifies that he has no knowledge of any assignments of the Trust Deed by the Trustee or by the Beneficiary or any appointments of a Successor Trustee other than the appointment of DAVID W. CRISWELL, ESQ., as Successor Trustee as recorded in the property records of the county in which the Property described above is situated. Further, the undersigned certifies that no action has been instituted to recover the debt, or any part thereof, now remaining secured by the Trust Deed. Or, if such action has been instituted, it has been dismissed except as permitted by ORS 86.735(4). The name and address of Successor Trustee are as follows: David W. Criswell, Successor Trustee, Ball Janik LLP, 101 SW Main Street, Suite 1100, Portland, Oregon 97204-3219. The Trust Deed is not a "Residential Trust Deed", as defined in ORS 86.705(3), thus the requirements of Chapter 19, Section 20, Oregon Laws 2008, and Chapter 864 [S.B. 628], Oregon Laws 2009, do not apply. DEFAULT BY BORROWER: There are continuing and uncured defaults by Thomas Beatie and Nancy Beatie (the "Borrower"), that based on the provisions of the Trust Deed and the written documents for Loan No. NR004001, including the promissory note dated and effective as of March 24, 2006 (the "Note"), authorize the foreclosure of the Trust Deed and the sale of the Property described above, which uncured and continuing defaults include but are not necessarily limited to the following: 1. Borrower's failure to pay to Beneficiary, when and in the full amounts due, monthly installments as set forth on the Note secured by said Trust Deed. Monthly installments in the approximate amount of $3,988.38, which includes principal and interest, are due for the months of April through October, 2010 and each and every month thereafter until paid. Late charges through and including October 28, 2010 total $1,196.51. Interest due as of (i.e., through and including) October 28, 2010 is in the amount of $10,166.02 and continues to accrue at the default rate of 12.0% per annum or $75.30 per diem. On account of Borrower's continuing and uncured defaults, and pursuant to the express terms of the Note secured by said Trust Deed, effective from and after October 18, 2010, the fully floating interest rate applicable to Loan No. NR004001 was increased to the default interest rate applicable to the Loan. ALL AMOUNTS are now due and payable along with all costs and fees associated with this foreclosure. 2. As to the defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of the Trust Deed, the Borrower must cure each such default. Listed below are the defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of the Trust Deed. Opposite each such listed default is a brief description of the action necessary to cure the default and a description of the documentation necessary to show that the default has been cured. The list does not exhaust all possible other defaults; any and all defaults identified by Beneficiary or the Successor Trustee that are not listed below must also be cured. OTHER DEFAULT/Description of Action Required to Cure and Documentation Necessary to Show Cure. Permitting liens and encumbrances to attach to the Property, including a $726.02 lien by the North Rim Homeowners' Association. Deliver to Successor Trustee written proof that all liens and encumbrances against the Real Property have been satisfied and released from the public record. TOTAL UNCURED MONETARY (PAYMENT) DEFAULT: By reason of said uncured and continuing defaults, the Beneficiary has accelerated and declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed and the Property immediately due and payable. The sums due and payable being the following: Unpaid principal amount owing pursuant to the Obligations, as of October 28, 2010: $229,050.12. Unpaid interest owing pursuant to the Obligations as of October 28, 2010: $10,166.02. Accrued and unpaid fees, costs and collection expenses, including attorneys fees and costs to October 28, 2010: $3,118.61. TOTAL DUE: $242,334.75. Accordingly, the sum owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed is $242,334.75, as of October 28, 2010, together with interest accruing on the principal portion of that amount, plus additional costs and expenses incurred by Beneficiary and/or the Successor Trustee (including their respective attorney's fees, costs, and expenses). ELECTION TO SELL: Notice is hereby given that the Beneficiary, by reason of the uncured and continuing defaults described above, has elected and does hereby elect to foreclose said Trust Deed by advertisement and sale pursuant to ORS 86.735 et seq., and to cause to be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the Grantor's interest in the subject Property, which the Grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time the Grantor executed the Trust Deed in favor of the Beneficiary, along with any interest the Grantor or the Grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed as well as the expenses of the sale, including compensation of the Trustee as provided by law, and the reasonable fees of Trustee's attorneys. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the sale will be held at the hour of 10:00 a.m., in accordance with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, on March 28, 2011, on the front steps of the main entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, at 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon 97701. RIGHT OF REINSTATEMENT: Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five (5) days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed satisfied by (A) payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, together with the costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the terms of the obligation, as well as Successor Trustee and attorney fees as prescribed by ORS 86.753); and (B) by curing all such other continuing and uncured defaults as noted in this Notice. DATED: November 1, 2010. By: David W. Criswell, OSB 925930, Successor Trustee, Ball Janik LLP, 101 SW Main Street, Suite 1100, Portland, Oregon 97204-3219. Telephone: (503) 228-2525. Facsimile: (503) 295-1058. Email: dcriswell@balljanik.com.


F6 Saturday, January 29, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Bulletin Daily Paper 01/29/11  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Saturday January 29, 2011

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