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Wyden: Bend may profit off Juniper Ridge Require City could pocket $7.5M if land sales, investments go through warrants for GPS Dogs at sno-parks: Residents respond tracking Bid probe: By Nick Grube The Bulletin

New estimates show the city of Bend can make a $7.5 million profit on its 1,500-acre Juniper Ridge development by June 2021,

if it can sell the first 75 acres of available land that was recently zoned for industrial use. That profit, however, is based on several assumptions that have made some city councilors un-

easy. It requires putting millions of dollars on the line at a time when Bend doesn’t have extra money to spare on speculative land deals, much less meet its basic needs for services, such as public safety

and street maintenance. For one, the $7.5 million revenue is based on the city selling an average of 7.5 acres per year in a down market over the next 11 years based on an escalating pricing scale that starts at $6 per square foot, or about two times the amount charged for industri-

Hayes’ firm got special treatment

By Keith Chu The Bulletin

WASHINGTON — When cell phones, laptops and car navigation systems can all double as GPS trackers, where should courts draw the line between letting cops secretly track bad guys and violating citizens’ right to privacy? The question has divided the nation’s federal courts in recent years and left law enforcement agencies uncertain about what the rules are. That uncertainty, and potential for abuse, prompted U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., to argue that it’s time for a new, stra ightforward law governing GPS tracking, in a speech before a libertarian think tank on “If you put this Wednesday. question to “This lack most members of clarity is enof the public, dangering the they would privacy of the consider it a American peono-brainer.” ple and mak— Sen. Ron ing it harder Wyden, D-Ore. for law enforcement officials to do their jobs,” Wyden said. In a speech at the Washington, D.C., headquarters of the libertarian Cato Institute, Wyden said he’s crafting a bill that doesn’t distinguish between following a cell phone signal or attaching a GPS tracker to someone’s car. Both should be allowed only if a law enforcement agency obtains a warrant, Wyden said. Without a warrant, neither is OK. Wyden argued that’s the commonsense interpretation of the Fourth Amendment’s protections against unreasonable search and seizure. “If you put this question to most members of the public, they would consider it a nobrainer,” he said. “(Law enforcement) should meet the requirements that are spelled out in the Fourth Amendment and go get probable cause and a warrant.” Wyden said he’s working with U.S. Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, to write a bipartisan bill addressing the issue. It will likely be ready within the next few months, said spokeswoman Jennifer Hoelzer. In a memo reviewing current laws about cell phone tracking, the Congressional Research Service found that most courts require probable cause for most cell phone tracking, but that the question is far from settled. See GPS / A3

Records show effort to steer business to Kitzhaber’s girlfriend The Associated Press

IN CONGRESS

Andy Tullis/The Bulletin

Cloudy, a Weimaraner, runs down a trail ahead of her owner, Marika Smiley, 42, as Shadow, a springer spaniel, runs beside his owner, Becky Smallwood, 47, all of Bend, at the Wanoga Sno-park Wednesday morning.

Wide range of comments, but most favor status quo By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

In a six-month period last year, the Deschutes National Forest was flooded with more than 300 e-mails, letters, questionnaires and comments about what place dogs should have in the national forest. The comments ranged from people stating that all dogs should be on a leash outside of their owners’ backyards, to people who felt there needed to be more ski trails open, free of snowmobiles, for dogs to romp on. But most of the comments during that period stated either that the Deschutes National Forest already had adequate access for dogs or that restrictions such as leash laws should be tightened and enforced. In July, the Forest Service announced that it had been asked by a group of dog owners to open an area near Swampy Sno-park, along the Cascade Lakes Highway, to people skiing with their dogs. The federal agency asked the public to write in with thoughts about the idea, as well as ideas and opinions about off-leash dogs in the Deschutes National Forest in general. The Bulletin requested copies of all comments sent electronically or by mail

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Breakdown of opinions comments received by the 200 Deschutes National Forest about winter recreation with dogs. Of those: favored keeping 130 (approximately) the current dog rules in place. favored more 50 (approximately) dog-accessible ski trails.

Winter dog restrictions DOGS NOT ALLOWED: North of the Cascade Lakes Highway, including Meissner, Swampy, Vista Butte, Dutchman Flat sno-parks, and the Todd Lake area.

DOGS ALLOWED: Everywhere else, including Wanoga, Edison and Skyliner sno-parks, Newberry National Volcanic Monument and the Three Creeks area.

between June 1 and Dec. 6, 2010, as well as comments received at an open house the Forest Service held on Nov. 18. About 330 comments were in the documents released. Some letters could be duplicates,

Correction

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al lands in other parts of the city. There’s also the need to ease traffic congestion on U.S. Highway 97 at Cooley Road, which will require multimillion dollar funding commitments from both the Oregon Department of Transportation and the city. See Juniper Ridge / A5

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In a story headlined “A driving record turned lethal,” which appeared Wednesday, Jan. 26, on Page A1, information about the vehicle Andrea Orozco was driving Nov. 21 appeared incorrectly in the timeline. According to an Oregon State Police news release, it was a Ford Expedition, and it was her car that was carrying eight passengers; there were two people in the other vehicle, including the man who died. The Bulletin regrets the errors.

and some people could have written in multiple times. In the winter, dogs are not allowed north of the Cascade Lakes Highway, including the stretch from Meissner Snopark up to the Todd Lake area. Dogs are allowed elsewhere, said Amy Tinderholt with the Deschutes National Forest, including Wanoga, Edison and Skyliner sno-parks, Newberry National Volcanic Monument and the Three Creeks area. Of approximately 200 comments addressing winter recreation, about 130 proposed keeping that rule in place, and not opening the Swampy area to dogs. Some of those stated the Forest Service should tighten the existing regulations. “If the responsible dog owners are allowed to use this area, the irresponsible dog owners will follow,” one Redmond resident wrote about the Swampy proposal. “Meissner and Swampy Lakes are great places to introduce skiers to cross-country skiing (both young and older people) and it’s tough enough to help a new skier along without someone’s dog ‘being friendly.’ ” The Forest Service redacted names and organizations in the documents released, because of privacy concerns. See Dogs / A5

TOP NEWS INSIDE EGYPT: Efforts intensify to crush protests, Page A3 OBAMA: Optimistic president heads to Wisconsin, Page A3

PORTLAND — Confidential records from an Oregon Department of Justice investigation suggest state Energy Department officials went out of their way to steer business to a firm owned by the girlfriend of Gov. John Kitzhaber. The Oregonian reported Wednesday it reviewed the stillconfidential records that also show Cylvia Hayes is not the target of the investigation. Four state employees have been cleared of criminal wrongdoing but still face a state personnel investigation for the way they dealt with the $200,000 renewable energy contract. A Seattle company got the contract but about $60,000 of it was later awarded to Hayes’ firm in Bend. The Energy Department’s interim director, Mark Long, denied any favoritism and said he never asked department officials to help Hayes, an energy consultant. See Contract / A5

Report: Army trauma units still struggling Staffing, prescription abuse plague program By James Dao New York Times News Service

The Army units created to provide special care for wounded soldiers after the Walter Reed Army Medical Center scandal continue to struggle with short staffing, inadequate training and an overabundance of prescription medications, a report by the Army inspector general’s office said. The easy access to medications in the so-called Warrior Transition Units has meant that about one-quarter to one-third of all the soldiers in the units are “overmedicated, abuse prescriptions and have access to illegal drugs,” the report said, based on estimates provided by the staff at the units. The report, released this week, said that overall the program was working. But it suggested that too many soldiers were staying longer than was necessary, either trying to “game” the system to improve their disability benefits or because treatment was delayed. See Army / A3


A2 Thursday, January 27, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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By Charles Wilson New York Times News Service

NEW ORLEANS — For an embattled former New York public school teacher and six young African-American men, a wrecked grocery store here has become a place of second chances. Five years after the levees broke in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, the Lower 9th Ward remains largely a place where time has stood still. Lots where shotgun houses once stood are empty and overgrown with tall grasses. Gutted homes with smashed Nat Turner, windows list to founder of one side. Our School Nat Turner, at Blair Groa former hiscery in New tory teacher in Orleans. Manhattan, arrived here two years ago. He soon became a familiar and curious sight, driving a blue biodiesel-powered school bus emblazoned with the logo “NY2NO”— for “New York to New Orleans” — and offering his tutoring services in the bus for free. At his new farm of less than an acre on the corner of Benton and Roman streets, he spoke recently of the reasons that brought him here. “Louisiana has a 63 percent high school graduation rate,” Turner said. “It has roughly a 60 percent adult literacy rate. We know that wealthy white people Uptown can read, right? But no one really cares if the public school system works because rich people’s kids are going to private schools.” Turner, 39, is the founder of Our School at Blair Grocery, a fledgling educational venture and commercial urban farm in the heart of the Lower 9th Ward. Operating out of a former blackowned grocery store wrecked by 14 feet of water and on two empty lots, the enterprise is an unusual hybrid of GED training and farm academy. With its emphasis on experiential learning, the school is also a clear rejection of the test-heavy emphasis of No Child Left Behind.

Self-empowerment Our School at Blair Grocery has six students, all of them young men from the area who had left or dropped out of their public high schools. With the support of volunteers, interns, visiting students, and 17 local youths in an afterschool program — as well as a staff of seven from as far away as Berkeley, Calif. — the students grow $2,500 worth of vegetables weekly. They sell the produce at a Sunday farmers’ market on site (at a discount) and at two dozen high-end restaurants in the New Orleans area (at a premium).

Jennifer Zdon / New York Times News Service

Ryan Meador harvests herbs at Our School at Blair Grocery, an unusual hybrid of GED training and farm academy in New Orleans, on Dec. 9. The project is a test as to whether agriculture can be an effective tool of self-empowerment for black youths. An October 2010 report by the Council of Great City Schools found that the reforms of No Child Left Behind had done nothing to enhance the performance of black males, who continue to perform lower than their peers nationally on every major indicator. This disparity is especially stark in New Orleans, which is deeply segregated and has one of the highest murder rates in the country. The average 16-year-old sent to a juvenile justice facility in Louisiana reads on a fifth-grade level. “The Blair Grocery idea is to stabilize students’ lives by providing them a safe place to be and a community to do good work,” says Brian Dassler, the principal of the KIPP Renaissance School in the nearby Upper 9th Ward, who has students who participate in the project. The farming part of the school’s curriculum includes up to eight hours of minimum-wage work a week. Using intensive growing techniques Turner and his staff learned from Will Allen, an urban farmer in Milwaukee, the students turn food waste into compost, raise worms to make organic fertilizer and grow, among other things, root vegetables, herbs, okra and sprouts. They also market and deliver their handiwork to restaurants, most of them in the French Quarter and Uptown. Jimmy Corwell, the master chef at the French-inspired restaurant Le Foret, said roughly half of every plate he served was now made up of food from Blair Grocery. When the students deliver their produce, he said, it also provides lessons in accounting and customer relations.

“These 9th Ward kids come in, and I say I need a quarterpound of mustard greens at $1.50 an ounce,” Corwell said. “They work the fractions and make up the invoice.”

Outside the classroom Much of the academic program — besides direct tutoring for the GED — also takes place outside the classroom. Qasim Davis, who left Harlem to become the school’s dean of students, is shaping a set of courses with the other staff that is Afrocentric and free-form. “Learning doesn’t happen behind walls,” Davis said. When the students studied the landmark Plessy v. Ferguson segregation case, the class drove to where Homer Plessy was pulled off the whites-only section of a first-class train car in 1892. A current events class in early November took the students to a blighted house near the St. Claude Avenue Bridge where days before a teenage woman had been raped. Outside, the young men read news articles about the incident and engaged in a conversation about misogyny and violence against women. It remains an open question to what degree the Blair Grocery project can stabilize the students’ lives. Most of the young men at the school come from backgrounds of entrenched poverty, crime or dysfunctional family life. The only classroom has a bare concrete floor and an upside-down map of the world on the wall, the curriculum is still a work in progress, and the school is not accredited. Even with six students, the director of educational programs, Kyle Meador, said, “It’s not uncommon that we appear in court with them.”

Yet there are reasons to hope for the success of the project — not least because the young people consistently show up. Josh Jones, a soft-spoken student who is a talented tattoo artist, designed the school’s logo: a black-power fist clutching a tender sprig. He said growing and selling food had given him an improved sense of self-dependence. Jones dropped out of his former public school; he felt his classes before focused only on the state standards’ tests, and he felt no connection to the material. “They put the people out who have the low grades on the tests just to maintain the high-grade look,” Jones said. “Here, we all share and learn from each other.” This year, Turner intends to reopen the grocery store and to build relationships with other area farmers to secure more fresh food to residents of the Lower 9th Ward. The school’s work has received support from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, and last fall the U.S. Department of Agriculture awarded a Community Foods Project Grant that will provide $300,000 over three years. Turner has larger hopes of bringing more jobs to the neighborhood through expanding the work of the school. Driving in his pickup down North Claiborne Avenue near the school one late afternoon, he spotted a group of older men sitting in a circle by the edge of the road, drinking beer. “All those dudes can roof houses, they can sheetrock, they can do plumbing, they can do stuff,” Turner said. “And I’m not in a position where I can hire them. Yet.”

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

POWERBALL

The numbers drawn Wednesday night are:

4

5 36 47 58 6

Power Play: 3. The estimated jackpot is $20 million.

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn are:

4

8

9 15 23 35

Nobody won the jackpot Wednesday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $4.4 million for Saturday’s drawing.

Record level of stress found in college freshmen By Tamar Lewin New York Times News Service

The emotional health of college freshman — who feel buffeted by the recession and stressed by the pressures of high school — has declined to the lowest level since an annual survey of incoming students started collecting data 25 years ago. In the survey, “American Freshman: National Norms Fall 2010,” involving more than 200,000 incoming full-time students at four-year colleges, the percentage of students rating themselves as “below average” in emotional health rose. Meanwhile, the percentage of students who said their emotional health was above average fell to 52 percent. It was 64 percent in 1985. Every year, women had a less positive view of their emotional health than men, and that gap has widened. Campus counselors say the survey results are the latest evidence of what they see every day in their offices — students who are depressed, under stress and

are using psychiatric medication, prescribed even before they came to college. The economy has only added to the stress, not just because of financial pressures on their parents but also because the students are worried about their own college debt and job prospects when they graduate. The annual survey of freshmen is considered the most comprehensive because of its size and longevity. At the same time, the question asking students to rate their own emotional health compared with that of others is hard to assess, since it requires them to come up with their own definition of emotional health and to make judgments of how they compare to their peers. To some extent, students’ decline in emotional health may result from pressures they put on themselves. While first-year students’ assessments of their emotional health was declining, their ratings of their own drive to achieve, and academic ability, have been going up, and reached

a record high in 2010, with about three-quarters saying they were above average. “Students know their generation is likely to be less successful than their parents’, so they feel more pressure to succeed than in the past,” said Jason Ebbeling, director of residential education

at Southern Oregon University. “These days, students worry that even with a college degree they won’t find a job that pays more than minimum wage, so even at 15 or 16 they’re thinking they’ll need to get into an MBA program or PhD program.”

Recent grads give back as peer mentors By Connie Llanos Los Angeles Daily News

LOS ANGELES — Arpi Karapetyan’s day starts before sunrise and ends just after sundown — not exactly the way most recent college graduates spend their time when taking a year off after earning their degrees. Karapetyan is among some 200 recent high school and college graduates who are giving a year of service to City Year, a nonprofit that recruits young adults to work as peer mentors to students at risk of dropping out. “The opportunity to shadow, tutor and mentor students all day is a lot of fun and very powerful,” Karapetyan said. Working as a peer mentor at the NOW Academy, a middle school campus housed within the Robert F. Kennedy complex of schools in Koreatown, Karapetyan gets ready for work at 5 a.m. By 7, she’s leading a breakfast tutoring session for students and her day ends at about 6 p.m., after an afternoon mentoring meeting. “I’m busy all the time, but it’s worth it,” she said. “I can already see the difference I’m making for the students I work with.” Founded in 1988 in Boston, City Year has expanded to over 20 sites, including one in Seattle, and has two international affiliates.

Struggling students The nonprofit focuses on having near-peers help get struggling students back on track academically at urban schools, a key way to fight the nation’s alarming dropout rate. The organization also enlists its army of volunteers to complete beautification projects in the communities they serve. City Year started operating in Los Angeles in 2007, and is now serving 14 schools, primarily in the downtown and South Los Angeles areas. Allison Graff-Weisner, executive director of City Year’s Los Angeles program, said it was created exactly to prove the power that young adults like Karapetyan can have on their communities. “City Year alumni are very different after they’ve completed our program. They are more likely to continue giving back to their communities and to volunteer on a regular basis,” she said. Graff-Weisner also said the program has shown great improvements in student performance at the schools where City Year sends its volunteers. She said demand has continued to increase and the organization is hoping to expand in the next couple of years to serve more schools in local communities, including the Valley. “So far every year we’ve had more demand than we can handle and more young people applying every year,” Graff-Weisner said. Karapetyan was a good student who attended schools in the San Fernando Valley before leaving for Grinnell College in Iowa. After she graduated in May with a degree in psychology, she decided to sign up with City Year. Karapetyan said she wanted to give herself a break before pursuing an advanced degree in clinical psychology, but also wanted to feel productive. City Year participants not only get unique work experience, but Los Angeles volunteers also get a stipend of about $1,100 a month for completing 1,700 hours of service. At the completion of the program, volunteers receive a $5,550 scholarship to go toward tuition or unpaid student loans.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, January 27, 2011 A3

T S N 

 B Deficit projected to hit nearly $1.5 trillion WASHINGTON — The government’s budget deficit will soar to nearly $1.5 trillion this year, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office said Wednesday, an anticipated but politically galvanizing calculation that further intensified the partisan battle over the nation’s fiscal future. The $1.5 trillion deficit projection is $414 billion higher than its previous estimate, in August, and reflects in part the tax cut deal last month between President Barack Obama and Republicans. The deficit was $1.4 trillion in 2009 and $1.3 trillion in 2010. The new figures highlighted the need for action to raise the government’s debt ceiling in coming months, by a sum of up to 13 figures, and the different approaches being taken by the two parties to address the problem.

Loughner researched assassins, official says TUCSON, Ariz. — Jared Loughner, the man accused of opening fire outside a Tucson supermarket Jan. 8 in what authorities consider an attempted assassination of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, researched famous assassins, the death penalty and solitary confinement on the Internet before the shootings, an official close to the investigation said Wednesday. Loughner, 22, pleaded not guilty Monday to three federal counts of attempted murder in connection with the shootings, which left six people dead and 13 injured.

Possible link between breast implants, cancer WASHINGTON — Federal health officials announced Wednesday that they were investigating a possible link between saline and silicone gel-filled breast implants and very rare form of cancer known as anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). In a statement released in advance of a briefing for reporters, the FDA said it had found a “a very small but significant risk of ALCL in the scar capsule adjacent to the implant” after reviewing data worldwide.

Tiny galaxy is earliest, most distant yet found Leapfrogging into the past with the refurbished Hubble Space Telescope, a team of astronomers says it has detected what may be the most distant and earliest galaxy yet found. It is a smudge of light only a tiny fraction of the size of our own Milky Way galaxy, and it existed when the universe was only 480 million years old. Its light has been on its way to us for 13.2 billion years, making it the long-distance champion in an expanding universe.

Another snowstorm blankets East Coast NEW YORK — Schools closed, governments sent workers home early and planes were grounded Wednesday in an all-too-familiar routine along the East Coast as another snowstorm swept over a region already beaten down by a winter not even half over. Millions of people got that ohno-not-again feeling as the wet, sloppy storm engulfed the Northeast, where some snowbanks were already so high that drivers couldn’t see around corners. In Washington, D.C., hundreds of thousands lost electricity, as heavy snow toppled power lines. — Wire reports

Army Continued from A1 As a result of those delays, deserving soldiers are being prevented from rejoining their regular units or from getting out of the military altogether, while less deserving soldiers may be taking resources away from troops who need care more. “The inspection team noted a ‘sense of entitlement’ among some warriors in transition,” the report said. The report was a result of growing complaints from the soldiers about the quality of care

Egypt increases efforts to suppress protesters By Kareem Fahim and Liam Stack New York Times News Service

CAIRO — The Egyptian government intensified efforts to crush a fresh wave of protests Wednesday, banning public gatherings, detaining hundreds of people and sending police officers to scatter protesters who defied the ban and demanded an end to the government of President Hosni Mubarak. The skirmishes started early in the afternoon, and soon, small fires illuminated large clashes under an overpass. Riot police officers using batons, tear gas and rubber-coated bullets cleared busy avenues; other officers set upon fleeing protesters, beating them with bamboo staves. Egypt has an extensive and widely feared security apparatus, and it deployed its might in an effort to crush the protests. But it was not clear whether the security forces were succeeding in intimidating protesters or rather inciting them to further defiance. In contrast to the thousands who marched through Cairo and other cities on Tuesday, the groups of protesters were relatively small. Armored troop carriers rumbled throughout Cairo’s downtown on Wednesday to the thud of tear-gas guns. There were signs that the crackdown was being carefully calibrated, with security forces using their cudgels and sometimes throwing rocks, rather than opening fire. But again and again, despite the efforts of the police, the protesters in Cairo regrouped and at one point even forced security officers, sitting in the safety of two troop carriers, to retreat.

Hossam Khalil / The Associated Press

An Egyptian activist shouts anti-government slogans during a protest in Cairo on Wednesday.

After months of turmoil, Karzai opens parliament By Ray Rivera New York Times News Service

KABUL, Afghanistan — In a victory for lawmakers, President Hamid Karzai inaugurated the National Assembly on Wednesday, ending months of delays but only partly settling the controversy and recriminations over the September parliamentary elections, which were fraught with charges of fraud.

GPS Continued from A1 “Further litigation, particularly in the Court of Appeals,” the memo said, “may clarify the issue.” While the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals decided that tracking someone’s movements with an electronic device requires a warrant, other top federal courts have disagreed. The U.S. Court of Appeals of the Ninth Circuit, which covers Oregon, Washington and California, ruled last year that putting a tracking device on a suspect’s car was essentially the same as tailing the vehicle: “The only information the agents obtained from the tracking devices was a log of the locations where (the defendant’s) car traveled, information the agents could have obtained by following the car,” the opinion read. In Oregon, the use of tracking devices without a warrant isn’t allowed, under the 1993 Oregon Supreme Court ruling in State v. Campbell, according to the state Justice Department’s Search and Seizure Manual. That case doesn’t apply to tracking a person’s mobile phone or other portable electronic devices, but state laws generally require “probable cause” for a court to issue an order to obtain that information. Because of the legal uncertainty, the Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team

they were receiving as well as from their commanders about the discipline problems posed by some soldiers. The New York Times described complaints from soldiers about overmedication, a lack of therapists and long waits for medical discharges in an article last year about the Warrior Transition Unit at Fort Carson, Colo. The units were created in 2007 after articles in The Washington Post exposed serious shortcomings in care for wounded soldiers at Walter Reed, the Army’s flagship hospital, in Washington. Soldiers assigned to the units are expected to get healthy and return

With the swearing in of the 249 members of the lower house, Afghanistan once again has three working branches of government. It also means that for the first time since the elections, the president has a check on his power — albeit a limited one since Afghanistan’s Constitution and political system favor the executive branch. The president had ruled by decree since the elections with the judiciary as the only check, although

— which includes officials from the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, Bend Police Department and other agencies — is playing it safe, said Stephen Gunnels, the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office prosecutor assigned to the CODE team. “It’s kind of unclear what the federal standard is until the U.S. Supreme Court decides it,” Gunnels said. “Our practice would be to assume we need a court order because legally that’s the safest approach.” That means the CODE team seeks a court order, usually a warrant, to obtain most electronic tracking data, Gunnels said. “We would present to a judge an affidavit that establishes probable cause to believe the data will reveal evidence of a crime,” Gunnels said. “The only exception to that is if it is an emergency situation, like an abduction or something along those lines.” After Wyden’s speech, spokeswoman Jennifer Hoelzer agreed that GPS tracking issues — sometimes called “geolocation” — will likely come to the U.S. Supreme Court before long, but said legislation to clarify the rules is still worth passing. “The Supreme Court will undoubtedly have cases like this coming to their docket,” Hoelzer said. “Whether they would settle the question of what does the Fourth Amendment actually say about geolocation is much less certain.” Keith Chu can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at kchu@bendbulletin.com.

to regular duty, or transition out of the Army. Specialized health care services are provided to them during their recovery periods and they are given more limited duties. More than 26,000 soldiers have passed through the units. There are about 9,500 soldiers in several dozen transition units across the Army, including at all major Army posts and in communitybased programs for reservists. In a statement, the Army said it had accepted the findings of the inspector general and already tried to fix some of the problems, including by improving training for overseeing the care of soldiers with mental health problems.

it is a largely theoretical one, since many national and foreign analysts view the judiciary as weak and the Supreme Court as heavily influenced by the president. That has left it up to the international community, mainly the United States and United Nations, to act as a safeguard against unbridled presidential power, while trying not to appear to wield undue influence on the fledgling government.

Obama, in Wisconsin, picks up address’ refrain By Jackie Calmes New York Times News Service

MANITOWOC, Wis. — President Barack Obama loves sports metaphors, and they were flying Wednesday when he came to Green Bay Packers country to tour three factories and expand on the “winning the future” theme of his State of the Union address the night before. In that spirit, Obama seemed to be taking something of a victory lap as he strode each plant floor in turn, joking with employees and extolling their companies’ successes — after two years spent reassuring fearful Americans that recession and high unemployment did not portend a nation in decline. If Tuesday’s speech was meant to sound a new more optimistic note, Obama came to Wisconsin, a swing state in presidential elections, not only to repeat his message but to illustrate it. While unemployment remains above 9 percent nationwide, in this town it is under 8 percent — 4 percentage points lower than a year ago — partly because of hiring at the three factories, all of which have taken advantage of federal loans and tax incentives to retool, innovate and expand. “When America is facing tougher competition from countries around the world than ever before, we’ve got to up our game,” Obama told several hundred enthusiastic employees at Orion Energy Systems, which makes solar power and other energy-effi-

J. Scott Applewhite / The Associated Press

President Barack Obama visits Orion Energy Systems in Manitowoc, Wis., on Wednesday. cient technology for commercial customers, at a site once occupied by a company that relocated overseas. Obama, a fan of his hometown Chicago Bears, was even game about the fact that his remarks about playing to win had a special resonance in this town 40 miles from Green Bay, just days after the Packers defeated his Bears to secure a spot in the Super Bowl. He accepted three green-andgold Packers jerseys, including one that said “Obama 1,” and at Orion quoted the late Packers coach Vince Lombardi, for whom the Super Bowl trophy is named, saying, “There is only one place in my game, and that’s first place.”

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A4 Thursday, January 27, 2011 • THE BULLETIN


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Juniper Ridge Continued from A1 In addition to that, the city must spend about $7.3 million on infrastructure, such as roads, simply to serve the properties in Juniper Ridge that are expected to be placed on the market. Much of this investment will need to come before the land sales occur. Similar investments will need to take place in the future to open up the remaining land, including an estimated $15 million upgrade to the sewer collection system. As long as the land sells as assumed in the city’s financial model, the $7.5 million profit will be realized. But if snags hit and the land languishes, Bend could be put in a somewhat precarious position, mostly because the city has a $6 million line of credit it must start paying back in the next several years. And if there’s no money, that means the city’s general fund — which is now facing a five-year $17 million to $27 million shortfall — could be on the hook. “There’s definitely some risk involved,” Mayor Jeff Eager said. “I would prefer there to be no risk, but that’s not the reality.”

Contract Continued from A1 In July 2009, Hayes was lobbying Long to push for federal stimulus funding for energy development. She had access to the agency director because she co-chaired a state task force on renewable energy. The records reviewed by the newspaper showed that some Energy Department staffers told investigators they believe Hayes’ prominence was a factor in her firm getting a piece of the contract, and that some balked at signing off on the deal because of the unusual way it came together. The records also showed investigators couldn’t prove criminal violations but they told Hayes that Energy Department officials violated state contracting laws to steer some of the contract to her firm. There is no evidence that Kitzhaber did anything to help her. The Department of Justice, after announcing in December it wouldn’t file criminal charges, has refused to release the investigative file while personnel reviews are under way. Hayes declined to answer questions about her actions or the investigation until the personnel review is over and the state releases the official record. “I’m choosing not to comment out of respect for the process and all of the people involved,” she said. Long told The Oregonian in an interview Tuesday he barely noticed the contract involving Hayes as he tried to fix an agency with deep management problems. He said that he was concerned that federal money intended to create jobs in Oregon would go to the winning bidder outside the state. Long said Hayes’ relationship with Kitzhaber — who was then running for the Democratic nom-

While Eager doesn’t like the fact that the city has taken on the role of a master developer and understands there are a number of variables that need to come together to make a profit, he said there’s a “tremendous amount of potential at Juniper Ridge” for future job growth and economic development. “The city’s going to have to keep a really close eye on it,” Eager said. “If the sales are not meeting expectations, and if the projections are not holding, then the city is going to have to be aggressive about changing its projections to meet reality.” New City Councilor Scott Ramsay expressed similar apprehensions about the project, and said he wanted to continue revisiting the assumptions if land sales don’t live up to expectations. At that point, he said the city might have to consider a fire sale just to cut its losses. He also said he doesn’t want the city to make the same mistake it did when spent about $5 million on property on the corner of Olney Avenue and Wall Street for a future city hall. That property now sits vacant, and is a continual drain on the general fund since the city must pay

back the loan it used to buy it in the first place. “I really don’t like the fact that we’re using public money to speculate,” Ramsay said. “I just don’t think that’s the business the city should be in.” City Councilors Kathie Eckman, Tom Greene, Mark Capell and Jim Clinton all expressed their support for the Juniper Ridge project at last week’s budget workshop. Among other things, they said it seems like the short-term risk is worth the longterm rewards. “I think it’d be a huge mistake to just jump out of it,” Clinton said at that meeting. “If we don’t believe in it, I don’t think other people will believe in it either.” Deschutes County essentially gifted Juniper Ridge to Bend in 1990. The plan was to turn the 1,500 acres of land, located in northeast Bend, into a planned, mixed-use community that would include businesses, housing, parks, a town center and even a four-year university. Some city officials have described Juniper Ridge as being a city within a city. The closest comparison in Bend today would be something like the NorthWest Crossing development on Bend’s

ination for governor — played no role in his decisions. “I asked, ‘Do we have an Oregon presence?’ or something to that effect,” Long said when he learned that an out-of-state company had won the bidding. “It was pretty straightforward. I wanted staff to think about an Oregon presence and go look into it and see what the options are.” Long, a veteran state administrator, came in as interim director of the Energy Department in May 2009, when the agency’s Business Energy Tax Credit program had spurred tens of millions of dollars of green energy investment in the state, but many of those investments were under intense scrutiny. The documents indicate that Long was reluctant to even apply for the federal stimulus money, in large part, because his plate was full with other issues. But he said Hayes and then-Gov. Ted Kulongoski’s staff pushed him to do so. The $200,000 contract in question was intended to study energy security issues in Oregon. Energy Department officials had considered giving the contract to Hayes’ firm without a bid, but later decided for an open competition. The department issued the request for proposals Feb. 12. Four companies submitted bids, including Hayes’ Toward Energy Efficient Municipalities, or TEEM. Staffers completed their evaluation April 23, unanimously ranking R.W. Beck of Seattle as the top choice. TEEM came in last. Shelli Honeywell, an Energy Department employee working on the bid, told her co-workers to hold off notifying R.W. Beck while she gave Long the news. Honeywell told investigators Long wasn’t happy. “When I shared that with Mr. Long, he said, ‘What the hell happened?’ ” Honeywell told investigators. She said she told Long

that R.W. Beck’s proposal was clearly the best and Hayes’ firm didn’t send in a strong proposal. Honeywell told investigators Long was angry that an Oregon company wouldn’t be included in the deal. “He said, that wouldn’t do and that I was going to have to fix it,” she told investigators. Honeywell, through her attorneys, declined to comment. In a subsequent meeting, Long expressed the same concern about the lack of an Oregon company, said Joan Fraser, another Energy Department official. She told investigators that Long pointed out Hayes’ connection to Kitzhaber. “Maybe I should’ve asked more questions,” Fraser told investigators. “I should have asked, ‘Mark, are you asking me to get this contract to Kitzhaber’s girlfriend? Is that what you want me to do?’ ” Fraser told investigators that she doesn’t believe that was the case. “He’s not that stupid to think that he’s going to make a positive impact on John Kitzhaber by throwing her a little bit of work,” Fraser told investigators. “That doesn’t make sense to me.” Fraser’s attorney could not be reached for comment. R.W. Beck ultimately agreed to hire Hayes’ firm for some of the data gathering required in the contract and to pay it $60,000. Energy Department staffers had suggested a range of $50,000 to $70,000. “We consider any customer’s requests,” Robert Kinsella of R.W. Beck told investigators. “You know, we’re in the consulting world. I guess I live by this. My answer is yes until I’m forced to say no. And so, if a customer asks, then we consider it and we try to say yes or we give them options to keep work.” R.W. Beck then asked to have the contract’s value increased from $186,500 to $200,000. State officials agreed.

west side. Since 2005, the city has spent almost $18 million trying to realize its vision for Juniper Ridge. During that time it has earned about $9.5 million from land sales. The three businesses that bought land are Les Schwab, Suterra, LLC and PacifiCorp. Juniper Ridge Development Manager David Ditz, who has a consulting contract with the city, said he’s a believer in the overall idea of the project and its potential to make the city a lot of money over the long-term. He also acknowledged the potential pitfalls associated with developing the first 75 acres of Juniper Ridge, and said the city has to determine if it has the “political will” to finance a project that won’t see any returns on investment until several years from now. He added that is an especially important decision considering fiscal challenges Bend faces today. “That’s what’s going to take some nerves,” Ditz said. “My view is that the ship has left the port. It’s pretty hard to cut the power to the engine room now.” While he called the recent financial outlook, or pro forma, nothing more than a projection, he did say the estimates outlined

Dogs Continued from A1 And about 50 people wrote in to advocate for more ski trails to be dog accessible, some mentioning that they would like access to the backcountry north of the highway with their dogs as well. “Winter access and general off-leash access needs to be expanded vastly!” one person wrote on a comment form at the open house. “Our dogs are not destroying the forest to the extent of other users.” Other commenters didn’t take a strong position for either more or less access. An additional 100 or so comments did not address winter issues, but wrote with opinions on general off-leash issues. Most of those people — about 70 — favored sticking with or tightening existing rules. For summer recreation, dogs can be off-leash in most areas of the Deschutes National Forest, but have to be leashed on some of the most popular trails during busy months. Some commenters said that dogs should be on a leash at all times. “I feel that the cities of Central Oregon have provided an area for dogs to be ‘off leash’ and socialize with other dogs,” one person wrote in. “The Forest should be safe for all animals, both domestic and wild, and loose dogs in the woods creates potential conflicts with other users as well as wildlife.” Several letter-writers told of being bitten or charged by

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, January 27, 2011 A5 within it are relatively conservative and were vetted by the city’s Juniper Ridge Management Board. The projection doesn’t estimate anything more than two land transactions a year, Ditz said. And the reason pricing starts at $6 per square foot is because Juniper Ridge is a unique project in that it is the only master-planned, mixed-use project of its kind in Central Oregon. Les Schwab, Suterra and PacifiCorp all paid $7 per square foot. Some parcels of land will also be available to go up for sale before the city has to do any infrastructure improvements because of existing roads or sewer lines that serve the other property owners already in Juniper Ridge. But Ditz added that the only way the project will thrive is if the city gets behind it. “You have to spend the money before you can sell the land,” he said. “The pain doesn’t last for too much longer, but for the next four to five years the city needs to take a deep breath and say, ‘Hey, we’re going to commit to this.’” One person who isn’t so sure the estimates in the Juniper Ridge projections are conservative, is Jade Mayer, the chief finan-

cial officer of Brooks Resources Company, which is a partner in developing Northwest Crossing. Mayer, who also sits on the city’s budget committee, said he believes the assumptions are aggressive considering the down economy and noted that it will be hard for the city to get its $6 per square foot asking price when other industrial lots are selling for much cheaper. He also cautioned about the idea of issuing debt to build new infrastructure for future development because of the economic uncertainty associated with selling that land, saying it’s something his company is “very cautious” about. For the city that situation is even more tricky considering that whatever debt it issues is invariably tied to its general fund. “You can see the pothole that’s coming if we’re not planning carefully,” Mayer said. “If you’re going to put money in the ground it should be in cash, not debt, because debt is going to have to find a payoff somewhere down the line.”

dogs, with one letter-writer saying their young children were jumped on and chased on different occasions, and are now scared of dogs. “I strongly support keeping all leash laws as strong as possible,” another person, from Bend, wrote. “Over my 40 years of trail running, I have been harassed, nipped at, and witnessed attacks by unleashed dogs.” Within the general comments, about 20 were in favor of more access for dogs off-leash, with some mentioning programs that would allow well-behaved dogs to be offleash, or more access to water. “I believe that most individuals act responsibly when they take their pets on the trail with them, and I have never had a bad experience on the local trails,” one dog-owner wrote. People also wrote in with suggestions, such as alternating days when dogs are allowed offleash on popular trails, or creating a new area for dog-friendly ski trails. The Forest Service is currently going through the comments, as well as input the agency has received in the past about the issue, said Shane Jeffries, Bend-Fort Rock District Ranger. Staff are grouping similar comments, he said, and looking for ideas and suggestions that could be helpful in the future, he said. “Having had the opportunity to look at, read and review everything that we’ve heard from various members of the community is going to put us in a much better position,” he said. Staff are hoping to come up with some way of presenting the results of the comment analysis to the community, Tinderholt said, but have not yet determined

how or exactly when that would happen. The agency is also looking for areas where most people agree on what to do, Jeffries said — such as including dog-friendly ski trails at a proposed new snopark south of the Cascade Lakes Highway. “Generally speaking, there’s not great opposition, and (there is) general support, for the type of dog off-leash-type opportunities in the area we’ve identified for Kapka,” Jeffries said. “So we’re optimistic about that.” The number of comments the Deschutes National Forest receives advocating for one position or another are not as important, he said, as whether the agency is able to address the different concerns that people are raising. “It’s not so much we heard it from 10 people or 20 people or one person, it’s have we considered that issue,” he said. Kreg Lindberg, president of DogPAC and an advocate for dog-friendly trails north of the Cascade Lakes Highway, said that many people who do want to see more winter trail access for dogs wrote in before June 2010, when the set of comments requested started. Dog owners do have legitimate concerns about access, he said, and should have trails north of the highway that are free of snowmobiles. “I do think that’s the solution we need to head to, but we also need to recognize and address the concerns of the people opposed to that,” he said. “And I think that’s possible.”

Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or at kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

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A6 Thursday, January 27, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2011

MARKET REPORT

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2,739.50 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +20.25 +.74%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B2-3

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Fed votes to continue bond program WASHINGTON — Federal Reserve policymakers voted unanimously Wednesday to continue the central bank’s $600 billion plan to spur the recovery by buying government bonds. They took note of a rise in commodity prices, but reiterated their view that long-term inflation expectations had been stable and inflation had trended downward. The Fed’s preferred measure of inflation excludes food and energy, which tend to have volatile prices. The mention of rising commodity prices was a slight but notable acknowledgment of concerns that the bond-buying plan could eventually touch off inflation — concerns that the Fed deems unwarranted for now. As expected, the Fed left its benchmark short-term interest rate — the federal funds rate, at which banks borrow from each other overnight — at a range of 0 to 0.25 percent, unchanged since December 2008.

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Moody’s ratings of states to factor in pension plans Unfunded entitlements will alter debt burden calculation By Mary Williams Walsh New York Times News Service

Moody’s Investors Service has begun to recalculate the states’ debt burdens in a way that includes unfunded pensions, something states and others have ardently resisted until now. States do not now show their pension obligations — funded or not — on their audited financial statements. The board that issues accounting rules does not require them to. And while it has been working on possible changes to the pension accounting

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rules, investors have grown increasingly nervous about municipal bonds. Moody’s new approach may now turn the tide in favor of more disclosure. The ratings agency said that in the future, it will add states’ unfunded pension obligations together with the value of their bonds and consider the totals when rating their credit. The new approach will be more comparable to how the agency rates corporate debt and sovereign debt. Moody’s did not indicate whether states’ credit ratings may rise or fall.

Under its new method, Moody’s found that the states with the biggest total indebtedness included Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Jersey and Rhode Island. Puerto Rico also ranked high on the scale because its pension fund for public workers is so depleted that it has virtually become a pay-as-you-go plan, meaning each year’s payments to retirees are essentially coming out of the budget each year. Other big states that have had trouble balancing their budgets lately, like New York and California, tended to fare better in the new rankings. See Ratings / B3

THE OTHER BEND MARKET

Boeing forecasts lower profit for 2011 Boeing predicted that its profit in 2011 would fall below analysts’ estimates, mainly because of higher pension expenses and delays in finishing the 787 Dreamliner, setting off a 3 percent decline in its share price. The company said it expected to deliver 25 to 40 of the 787s and the new 747-8 freighter before the year’s end. During a conference call with analysts, the chief executive, W. James McNerney Jr., said about half of those planes would be Dreamliners.

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$27.132 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.321

AGRICULTURE

Hay seminar will address high costs, poor market By Ed Merriman The Bulletin

Helping farmers cope with high fertilizer costs, deteriorating soil health and a declining local hay market due to the depressed economy and shrinking horse population top the agenda for Saturday’s Central Oregon Forage Seminar. Hay is Central Oregon’s top crop, grown on 90,000 acres, 40,000 to 50,000 of which are alfalfa hay and the rest grass hay, according to Mylen Bohle, a hay and grain crops specialist with the Oregon State University Extension Service in Crook County, who is an organizer of the forage seminar. “Fertilizer costs are high, and our soils have been farmed long enough that the soils don’t have much organic matter, so some kind of fertilizer has to be put on, whether it is organic or nonorganic, to grow a good crop,” Bohle said. “We have a lot of fields around here that have soils testing low in potassium and some testing low in phosphorus,” Bohle said. See Hay / B3

If you go What: Central Oregon Forage Seminar When: Saturday, registration begins at 8:30 a.m., program runs from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Where: 4-H Clover Club Building, 502 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville Cost: Free Contact: Crook County Extension Service in Prineville, 541-447-6228; Central Oregon Agricultural Research Center in Madras, 541-475-7107

New-home sales down in 2010 Buyers purchased the fewest number of new homes last year on records going back 47 years. Sales for all of 2010 totaled 321,000, a drop of 14.4 percent from the 375,000 homes sold in 2009, the Commerce Department said Wednesday. It was the fifth consecutive year that sales have declined after hitting record highs for the five previous years when the housing market was booming. The year ended on a stronger note. Buyers purchased new homes at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 329,000 units in December, a 17.5 percent increase from the November pace. — From wire reports

Dean Guernsey / The Bulletin

Venders and customers interact at the Indoor Saturday Swap in Bend on Saturday. The market is located in the old St. Vincent de Paul building next to the Bi-Mart at 351 N.E. Second Street in Bend. It is open Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Indoor Saturday Swap owner says small vendors have a place to go if other popular bazaar closes; another market could open soon

Correction

By Jordan Novet • The Bulletin

In an item in the Business Calendar that appeared Wednesday, Jan. 26, on Page B4, the start date for tax-preparation sessions that begin next week was incorrect. The sessions begin Wednesday. Also, qualifying for the Earned Income Tax Credit is not a requirement for participating in the sessions. The Bulletin regrets the error.

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egardless of the fate of the Bend Indoor Markets, there is at least one other venue where small-scale vendors can operate. And another could start in the next few weeks.

Carol Jacobs, owner of the Indoor Saturday Swap, has run her market for three years, she said. It operates in the old St. Vincent de Paul building next to the BiMart store on Northeast Second Street in Bend from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays. “It’s wonderful,” she said of the atmosphere at the current location of her mar-

ket, where records, books, wood crafts, furniture and other new and used items are sold. There are “probably about, I don’t know, 500 people coming through on a Saturday,” she said. Unlike the warehouse where the Bend Indoor Markets have run, the Indoor Saturday Swap building is zoned commer-

cial limited, which permits retail sales. The Bend Indoor Markets warehouse and surrounding land is zoned light industrial. Jacobs said she decided to speak up about her market because articles in The Bulletin have suggested that if the Bend Indoor Markets did not exist, small-scale vendors might not have a place to sell their wares in cold-weather months. “My deal is, the vendors have somewhere else to go,” Jacobs said. Twice now, the Bend City Council has publicly discussed options for Bend Indoor Markets, most recently on Jan. 19. See Markets / B3

New-home sales Sales of new single-family homes, in thousands: 500

Lowe’s cutting middle management force

329K 400

By Ed Merriman

300

The Bulletin

200 ’09 ’10 Note: All figures are seasonally adjusted SOURCE: Department of Commerce AP

Lowe’s home improvement centers in Bend and Redmond are expected to eliminate one middle management position each, and begin taking applications next week for four to eight part-time weekend sales positions per store to better serve weekend do-it-yourself customers, a Lowe’s spokeswoman said Wednesday.

“Since 2003, when we were in a time of rapid growth and opening 100-plus stores a year, we implemented a store staffing model that added zone (area), operations, sales and administrative managers to each store — reporting to the store manager,” said Karen Cobb, a Lowe’s spokeswoman based at the company’s headquarters in Mooresville, N.C. “We’re streamlining our store management team, creating assistant manager posi-

tions. This translates into a loss of approximately one full-time position per store.” At the same time Lowe’s is cutting middle-management positions, the company will begin hiring between 8,000 and 10,0000 part-time salespeople who will work Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays to increase the sales team available to help customers during those peak days. See Lowe’s / B3

Consumers get easier access to credit scores By Eileen Ambrose The Baltimore Sun

For years, if consumers wanted to know their credit scores, they had to pay. But starting this year, potentially millions will be able to get that information for free thanks to new federal regulations. Moreover, the score will be the actual one used to determine a consumer’s creditworthiness — not one of the knockoffs offered online, which can be off by dozens of points. “Knowledge is power,” said Ed Rice, general counsel for Zoot Enterpriswhich proPERSONAL es, vides software FINANCE to help financial institutions make credit decisions. “If you know what your score is, you have the ability to affect that score and put yourself in a better position. That can only be good for the consumer.” Credit scores have taken on enormous importance because lenders, insurers, retailers, utilities and others use them to make quick decisions about doing business with us and under what terms. Two regulations that take effect at different times this year will provide free scores for those who are negatively affected by their number. See Credit score / B3


B USI N ESS

B2 Thursday, January 27, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

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A-B-C-D A-Power ABB Ltd ABM ACE Ltd AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGL Res AK Steel AMB Pr AMR AOL ARYxTh h ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATMI Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AVX Cp AXT Inc Aastrom rs AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac AbitibiB n Abraxas AcadiaPh AcadiaRlt Accenture AccoBrds AccretvH n Accuride n AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivePwr ActivsBliz Actuant Acuity Acxiom AdeonaPh AdobeSy Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs Advntrx rs AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon Aegon cap AerCap Aeropostl s AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix Agenus AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon Alere AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion Alexza AlignTech Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlliantTch AldIrish AlldNevG AlldWldA AllisChE AllosThera AllscriptH Allstate AlmadnM g AlnylamP AlphaNRs AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AlteraCp lf AlterraCap AltraHldgs Altria AlumChina AmBev s Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmApparel AmAssets n AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AIG wt AmIntlGrp AmerMed AmOriBio AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Ameriprise AmeriBrgn Ametek s Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnadysPh AnalogDev Ancestry AnchBWA n AnglogldA ABInBev Anixter AnnTaylr Annaly Ansys AntaresP Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache Apache pfD AptInv ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldIndlT ApldMatl AMCC ApldSig Apricus rs AquaAm ArQule ArcadiaRs ArcelorMit ArchCoal ArchDan ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArmHld ArmourRsd Arris ArrowEl ArubaNet ArvMerit AscenaRtl AscentSol AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfoL AspenIns AspenTech AspenBio h AsscdBanc Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen Atheros AtlasAir AtlasEngy AtlasPplH AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn AudCodes Augusta g Aurizon g AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch AvalRare n AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AvisBudg Avnet Avon Axcelis

6.04 0.48 23.99 +.19 0.56 26.11 +.78 1.30 62.45 +.32 12.63 -.20 1.20 58.36 -.05 52.29 +.98 1.76 36.35 -.04 0.20 16.38 +.81 1.12 32.86 -.32 7.39 +.18 23.87 -.26 .35 +.02 0.54 41.86 +.82 1.72 28.73 -.03 20.47 +.76 17.21 +.16 10.00 +.14 2.23 +.02 0.18 15.81 +.38 11.29 +.20 2.76 -.05 1.76 46.75 -1.21 0.70 49.59 +.31 0.42 6.71 +.03 29.27 +.28 4.66 +.40 1.75 +.04 0.72 18.42 -.07 0.90 52.35 +.63 8.59 +.28 18.78 +.34 15.09 +.38 51.51 +1.52 22.76 -.23 2.22 +.04 0.15 11.35 -.08 0.04 27.75 +.09 0.52 55.51 +.65 17.19 -.43 1.75 +.31 33.52 -.04 0.36 42.50 +1.17 0.25 6.13 +.26 0.24 64.25 +.23 3.81 +.03 15.16 +.34 7.49 +.01 0.06 6.44 +.19 7.29 +.19 2.36 +.17 29.86 +.50 0.04 11.12 -.01 7.30 1.59 21.39 -.02 15.44 +.55 24.27 -.16 1.66 +.07 0.04 33.48 -.02 101.37 +1.74 7.23 +.32 4.99 .95 2.59 +.05 42.57 -.12 0.64 70.26 +2.82 0.11 88.69 +1.85 1.96 86.92 +.24 0.40 10.73 +.13 1.16 61.97 -.06 7.43 -.04 0.18 43.00 +2.08 48.02 +.20 5.21 -.04 61.06 -.07 0.86 9.40 +.06 0.56 57.11 +.11 0.34 37.21 -.03 3.40 +.09 0.12 16.60 +.36 3.95 163.59 -.11 39.36 +.26 1.80 77.36 -.49 6.66 +.56 85.50 +.26 1.37 +.02 20.51 +.59 13.02 +.05 0.60 25.68 -.04 0.72 65.29 +6.89 0.20 70.72 -1.36 72.96 -.04 0.48 7.76 -.04 1.51 21.10 -.16 1.70 37.47 -.16 0.80 75.14 -.61 .78 +.02 26.30 +1.82 0.80 61.29 +.62 7.80 +.32 3.74 +.11 20.25 +.21 0.80 31.68 -.11 3.80 +.24 10.95 -.01 57.88 +1.90 0.40 7.08 -.02 0.66 6.13 +.01 0.25 16.26 +.11 0.24 36.77 -1.14 0.48 22.27 +.06 20.47 +1.05 1.52 24.27 -.03 24.66 +.72 0.99 28.27 +.49 8.56 -.13 175.39 -1.31 29.27 +.44 33.30 +.34 1.54 28.84 -.18 51.56 +2.07 0.52 58.00 -.02 1.15 -.01 21.27 15.17 +.41 1.35 31.89 +.34 5.60 28.66 +.12 8.24 +.17 0.44 14.49 +.05 1.84 36.41 -.25 0.10 13.06 +.07 0.72 44.46 -.34 0.65 33.14 +.07 15.30 +.04 41.61 +.25 19.30 +.45 2.37 -.03 27.64 +.08 51.94 +.57 0.88 26.15 +.20 0.72 61.07 -.04 0.40 36.39 +.44 0.24 40.77 +.22 56.48 -.68 8.04 +.24 0.06 55.33 +.24 15.27 +.22 0.36 76.79 +1.09 7.24 -.01 1.36 +.08 0.88 38.89 +.11 35.37 +.86 10.00 0.18 44.67 +1.31 0.49 57.46 -.08 3.25 63.12 +.73 22.06 +.55 2.65 17.82 +.05 52.97 +1.15 1.61 +.04 0.88 6.92 0.60 45.77 +.21 9.60 +.18 0.60 122.10 -.54 3.00 66.34 -.16 0.40 25.54 +.19 42.07 +.35 1.12 11.92 +.27 343.85 +2.45 0.68 32.37 +.68 0.28 15.46 +.09 10.40 +.04 0.50 37.92 -.01 3.85 -.01 0.62 23.61 -.04 6.36 -.02 .32 -.00 0.75 38.22 +.34 0.40 33.08 +.90 0.60 33.42 +.08 2.03 +.05 1.40 16.59 +.07 6.69 +.12 24.90 +1.51 0.12 25.69 +.53 1.44 7.75 +.10 12.58 +.10 38.14 +.49 21.89 +.82 22.07 +.89 27.54 +.13 3.37 +.02 9.96 +.09 0.60 58.19 +.70 17.51 -.36 0.60 30.08 +.04 14.45 +.19 .62 -.01 0.04 14.02 -.24 0.64 39.38 +.56 0.18 14.63 -.43 0.52 13.91 -.24 2.41 48.59 +.44 44.57 -.03 53.54 +1.96 44.11 +.27 0.28 13.84 +.01 1.40 24.08 -.10 13.81 +.15 1.36 33.02 -.01 38.01 +1.06 7.40 +.51 4.01 +.30 6.53 +.37 29.63 +.18 40.88 +.55 1.60 80.24 +2.55 1.44 48.47 -1.22 250.07 +1.37 23.15 +.09 0.07 28.25 +.24 5.62 +.19 3.57 115.54 +.89 4.22 -.01 0.80 42.33 +.32 14.39 +.45 35.75 +.13 0.88 29.11 -.47 3.42 +.29

Nm AXIS Cap B&G Foods BB&T Cp BBVABFrn BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJs Whls BMC Sft BMP Sunst BP PLC BP Pru BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s BSD Med BabckW n Baidu s BakrHu Baldor BallCp BallyTech BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcoSBrasil BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm pfH BkAm wtB BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BkAtl A h BannerCp BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BrcIndiaTR BarcBk prD Barclay Bar iPVix rs BarVixMdT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belden Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett Biocryst Biodel BioFuelEn BiogenIdc BioLase BioMarin BioMedR BioSante BlkRKelso BlackRock BlkCrAll4 BlkDebtStr BlkEnDiv BlkrkHigh BlkIntlG&I BlkSenHgh Blackstone BlockHR BlueCoat BlueNile BdwlkPpl Boeing Boise Inc Boise wt Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci BoydGm Brandyw BrasilTele Braskem BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker Brinks BrMySq BristowGp Broadcom BroadrdgF BroadSft n Broadwind BrcdeCm BroncoDrl Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrukerCp Brunswick Buckeye BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BungeLt CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBOE n CBS B CF Inds CGI g CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNinsure CRH CSG Sys CSX CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotMic CabotO&G CadencePh Cadence CalDive CalaCvOp CalaStrTR Calgon CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CAMAC En CamdnP Cameco g Cameron CampSp CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar CanoPet Canon CapellaEd CapOne CapitlSrce CaptlBcp h CapFdF rs CapsteadM CpstnTrb h CarboCer Cardero g CardnlHlth CardiumTh Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters CascadeF h CasellaW CashAm CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen Cavico CaviumNet CelSci Celadon Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE Centene CenterFncl CenterPnt CnElBras pf CnElBras lf CentEuro CFCda g CenPacF CentAl CntryLink Cephln Cepheid

D 0.92 0.68 0.60 0.68 1.97

36.19 +.15 14.02 +.31 27.36 -.54 11.55 +.10 36.32 +.59 39.55 +.65 0.48 8.11 +.23 1.74 90.63 +2.23 1.74 78.45 +2.27 44.33 +.19 48.44 +.28 9.96 +.04 46.76 -.45 8.80 113.44 +3.63 4.86 +.02 1.50 44.12 +.36 0.10 17.48 +.20 4.41 +.11 28.90 +.06 107.95 +2.06 0.60 65.99 +3.67 0.68 63.47 0.56 71.67 +1.62 40.70 -1.41 1.34 60.03 -.76 0.55 12.02 -.07 0.82 19.56 -.07 0.78 11.88 -.17 0.45 12.24 -.14 0.88 14.85 -.21 0.04 13.55 -.08 2.05 25.33 -.02 2.59 +.04 1.80 45.80 -.53 1.04 2.29 -.06 2.80 59.55 -.09 0.36 31.71 +.04 1.96 56.47 +.15 .91 -.01 0.04 2.21 +.10 48.73 +.86 24.20 +.38 69.28 +.28 2.03 25.84 +.22 0.28 18.87 -.11 30.24 -.95 57.68 -1.35 0.72 93.57 +.57 1.00 16.50 +.01 0.32 20.55 +.58 0.48 47.80 +1.67 17.21 +.80 1.24 50.90 -.08 .30 -.03 18.79 +.29 5.65 +.15 0.10 5.77 -.01 0.76 72.31 +.22 1.64 84.13 -.48 49.52 +.21 0.20 35.85 +.56 7.05 +.26 0.92 32.92 +.27 19.86 +.79 0.28 28.58 -.12 83.07 -.18 0.30 44.31 +1.03 0.60 34.99 -.15 32.38 +.06 40.87 +1.35 4.36 +.11 2.37 -.09 1.30 +.25 67.50 +.66 3.03 +.16 25.86 +.21 0.68 18.04 -.65 1.94 -.03 1.28 11.66 4.00 199.96 +1.95 0.83 12.13 +.05 0.32 3.90 +.01 0.98 8.50 +.03 0.17 2.11 +.01 1.36 10.27 +.02 0.30 3.92 +.02 0.40 15.81 +.05 0.60 13.07 28.50 +.44 59.19 +1.99 2.06 31.88 +.08 1.68 70.02 -2.22 0.40 9.03 +.33 1.64 +.35 .84 +.00 70.42 +2.30 0.04 6.41 -.21 2.00 92.33 +1.07 7.15 +.12 11.48 -.07 0.60 11.50 -.16 23.23 -.53 0.02 25.45 +.68 19.07 +.24 0.44 21.13 +.12 26.90 +1.35 9.40 +.27 1.72 +.07 0.56 22.96 -.29 0.40 27.91 +.42 1.32 25.93 -.10 50.00 +2.14 0.32 45.36 +.17 0.60 22.78 -.24 27.47 +2.17 2.03 +.05 5.76 +.23 6.95 +.51 22.17 +.33 0.52 33.59 +.57 0.56 17.51 -.18 0.34 11.14 +.04 11.85 +.53 0.32 24.99 +.01 0.28 13.36 -.01 17.54 +.37 0.05 21.11 +1.18 3.90 66.86 -.93 0.20 25.11 +4.00 0.80 36.59 +.23 0.10 90.67 -.01 0.46 43.01 +2.50 43.05 -.87 0.92 69.00 +.52 0.16 23.44 -1.92 21.80 +.05 0.80 17.09 +.14 0.40 23.19 +.25 0.20 20.58 -.03 0.40 134.56 +3.83 19.74 +.94 1.16 78.12 +.29 0.04 42.06 +.44 46.91 -.03 1.00 31.51 +.06 4.60 305.58 -1.32 0.84 19.52 -.02 51.20 +1.01 6.55 -.03 0.26 17.79 -.15 0.83 22.14 +.06 19.50 +.74 1.04 71.02 +.77 0.34 8.46 +.06 16.42 +.35 0.50 35.60 +.44 24.10 +.33 0.50 34.48 +.04 0.72 43.95 +2.41 45.57 +1.06 0.12 40.69 +1.18 7.73 +.44 8.56 +.06 6.19 +.17 1.14 13.19 +.06 0.63 9.44 +.03 14.70 +.30 0.04 7.33 -.34 7.49 +.22 14.20 -.01 1.95 +.04 1.80 55.25 -.12 0.40 39.18 +.90 53.35 +3.03 1.16 35.06 +.05 1.30 68.73 +.81 0.30 42.80 +1.32 1.08 68.49 +2.07 14.09 -.23 .38 50.07 +.01 58.05 +1.05 0.20 48.28 +.07 0.04 7.71 -.07 .28 -.07 0.30 11.92 -.01 1.51 12.89 +.08 1.21 +.06 0.80 103.76 +3.59 1.95 +.13 0.78 41.82 +.51 .38 -.01 17.30 +.14 26.17 -.03 23.22 +1.09 0.68 39.00 -.43 32.20 +.14 1.00 47.29 +1.07 0.72 42.59 +.10 33.21 +1.65 28.34 +.25 .56 -.15 8.13 +.09 0.14 40.81 +1.15 43.25 +.35 1.76 95.75 +1.36 0.04 17.76 +.27 2.37 -.28 40.99 +1.39 .76 -.01 15.90 +1.00 0.20 41.02 +.58 6.37 +.09 9.49 +.16 56.19 +.12 .36 -.00 0.43 10.38 -.18 1.19 16.79 +.21 0.80 32.82 +1.23 27.70 +1.05 7.46 +.03 0.79 16.11 -.04 0.03 16.68 +.30 1.56 13.61 +.05 24.82 -.04 0.01 18.58 +.48 1.56 -.01 15.00 +.76 2.90 43.83 +1.63 59.81 +.57 24.29 +.81

Nm CeragonN Cerner CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh CharterCm ChkPoint Checkpnt Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemtura n CheniereEn ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAgri s ChinaBiot ChinaEd ChiGengM ChinaGreen ChinaIntEn ChinaLife ChiMarFd ChinaMda ChinaMed ChiMYWd n ChinaMble ChinaNGas ChNBorun n ChinNEPet ChinaPet ChinaSecur ChinaShen ChinaUni ChiValve ChiXFash n ChinaYuch Chipotle Chiquita Chubb ChungTel wi CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco CitiTrends Citigp pfJ Citigp pfN Citigrp Citigp wtA Citigp wtB CitzRepB h CitrixSys CityNC ClaudeR g CleanEngy CleanH Clearwire CliffsNRs ClinicData Clorox CloudPeak Coach CobaltIEn CocaCE CocaCl Coeur CogdSpen Cognex CognizTech CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColumLabs Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmwReit rs CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s Compellent CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Comtech Con-Way ConAgra ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant ConocPhil Conolog h ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Cnvrgys ConvOrg h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopanoEn Copart Copel Corcept CoreLab s CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd CostPlus Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CrackerB Crane Credicp CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc Crocs Crossh g rs CrwnCstle CrownHold Crystallx g Ctrip.com CubicEngy CubistPh CullenFr Cummins CumMed Curis CurEuro CushTRet Cyclacel Cymer CypSemi CypSharp CytRx Cytec Cytori DCT Indl DG FastCh DHT Hldgs DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DTE DanaHldg Danaher s DanversBc DaqoNEn n Darden Darling Datalink DaVita DeVry DeanFds DeckOut s Deere DejourE g DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DeltaAir DeltaPtr h Deluxe DemMda n DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DeutBCT5 pf DB AgriDL DBGoldSh DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE Dex One n DexCom Diageo DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver Dillards DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DrxEMBll s DrTcBear rs DrSCBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DrxSOXBr DrxSOXBll DirEMBr rs DirFnBear DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear Dir30TrBull

D 13.09 -.13 96.39 +.09 3.49 37.55 -.17 3.10 -.07 42.26 +.60 45.61 -.11 21.96 +.22 30.54 -.64 6.35 +.15 16.38 +.40 6.57 +.28 0.30 28.05 +.62 2.88 94.64 +.56 34.12 +.81 0.16 10.87 -.01 43.33 -.84 0.69 4.18 +.02 11.16 -.09 14.46 -1.02 2.28 -.02 2.75 -.10 8.40 +.03 5.89 +.01 1.54 59.39 -.14 4.14 -.04 19.56 +.56 12.03 +.04 9.51 -.27 1.85 49.30 -.08 5.56 -.31 13.91 -.09 5.45 -.20 2.79 104.40 +3.17 4.75 -.20 6.32 +.13 0.23 15.98 +.43 7.50 +.13 6.48 -.88 0.25 28.75 +1.06 217.74 -4.25 16.23 -.14 1.48 59.02 -.02 30.16 -.41 4.91 +.06 23.31 -.88 0.32 100.81 +3.76 2.88 +.20 1.60 32.41 -.09 0.84 17.21 -.07 0.49 29.28 +.30 17.92 +.14 21.42 -.12 23.60 -.24 2.13 26.25 -.03 1.97 26.60 +.11 4.81 -.01 .95 .22 .67 63.51 +1.56 0.80 58.61 +.03 2.10 +.14 12.85 -.52 90.85 +6.57 5.30 +.01 0.56 87.71 +5.97 25.37 -1.40 2.20 63.58 +.21 22.86 +1.49 0.60 54.04 +.95 12.95 +.50 0.48 25.23 +.07 1.76 62.96 24.03 +1.57 0.40 6.12 +.03 0.32 32.06 +1.54 73.22 -.13 0.72 9.11 +.02 41.06 +.15 2.95 +.09 2.12 80.00 -.12 21.03 +.31 0.60 19.11 +.03 2.54 +.01 0.38 23.32 -.02 0.38 21.87 -.02 0.40 38.44 -.66 0.94 41.08 -.64 0.48 17.31 +.58 2.00 26.16 +.10 35.86 +.62 30.01 +1.08 0.36 39.66 -.99 27.70 +.03 26.99 +.37 0.80 53.70 -.10 11.71 +.25 26.33 +1.47 1.00 28.91 +2.42 0.40 34.34 +.54 0.92 23.29 -.29 90.32 +3.34 51.30 +.30 2.10 +.01 2.20 69.25 +1.77 .37 +.01 0.40 51.52 +1.36 2.40 50.50 -.15 29.11 +1.76 19.25 +.33 0.96 32.34 +.34 59.71 +1.83 14.45 +.03 .42 +.00 0.06 57.94 +.34 1.08 61.73 +.86 0.42 23.16 +.04 2.30 34.72 +.73 40.38 +.85 0.72 26.19 -.14 4.28 +.14 1.00 86.74 +2.26 20.47 +.22 5.67 +.27 0.56 47.95 +.11 0.20 21.78 +.57 1.65 35.92 +.07 25.07 +.02 13.11 -.19 8.71 +.41 0.82 72.62 +.16 7.79 -.06 0.18 8.60 +.02 56.63 +1.25 1.50 17.03 +.16 30.06 +.54 0.80 47.84 +.50 0.88 51.62 -.82 0.92 45.11 +.17 1.70 109.53 -1.71 1.85 45.39 -.60 0.32 3.03 +.04 52.35 +.48 16.45 +.53 1.98 +.17 43.64 +.71 33.98 +.49 .26 -.00 44.58 +1.12 .96 -.08 23.32 +.58 1.80 58.92 -2.88 1.05 109.61 +2.54 4.01 +.14 2.96 +.05 0.01 136.35 +.07 0.90 10.86 -.03 1.49 -.02 48.22 +1.11 20.41 +.09 2.40 13.05 +.13 .81 0.05 51.49 +.76 5.84 -.01 0.28 5.67 28.70 +.70 0.40 5.01 +.01 0.78 9.62 +.09 1.33 26.46 -.08 0.15 13.24 +.23 2.24 46.53 -.36 18.19 +.33 0.08 47.30 +.12 0.16 21.84 +.07 13.17 +.55 1.28 45.75 -1.58 12.93 +.28 6.72 -.08 73.51 +.08 0.24 53.36 +5.98 10.29 -.24 75.74 +1.61 1.40 90.99 +1.60 .31 0.36 18.91 +.03 9.39 +.46 13.77 +.03 11.98 +.35 .75 +.01 1.00 24.57 +.24 22.65 18.80 +.22 36.09 +.95 3.50 +.16 3.78 +.05 0.20 35.96 +.02 6.21 -.08 0.93 59.30 -.73 2.01 25.93 -.22 15.61 +.62 16.00 -.10 38.06 +.62 8.88 -.12 0.16 13.80 +.01 0.64 85.76 +1.23 6.07 +.03 14.50 2.38 79.74 +1.05 0.50 73.96 +1.64 12.13 +.08 11.87 +.28 34.78 -.04 1.08 31.02 +.37 2.12 53.21 -.85 35.51 +1.01 0.16 40.38 +.50 42.66 -.22 0.51 52.53 +.95 0.19 39.15 +.88 20.45 -.37 14.90 -.74 16.78 -.14 19.23 -1.40 0.71 12.31 -.35 0.01 61.55 +1.66 20.98 -.58 8.57 30.10 -.07 47.23 +1.97 0.62 31.05 -1.43

Nm

D

DrxREBll s DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DishNetwk Disney DrReddy DolbyLab DoleFood DollarGen DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs DonlleyRR DoralFncl DotHill h DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragonW g DrmWksA DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DuoyGWat DurectCp Dycom Dynavax Dynegy rs DynexCap

0.39 60.04 +.41 0.11 74.41 +3.36 7.98 -.12 1.55 77.97 +1.11 0.41 67.61 +4.33 0.08 20.73 +.28 39.38 -.09 34.24 +.05 21.30 -.39 0.40 39.44 -.42 0.24 34.78 +.09 62.09 +2.10 14.19 +.21 28.75 +.05 51.75 -.38 1.97 43.55 -.02 16.64 -.18 1.00 86.55 -.05 1.04 18.01 +.02 1.36 +.05 3.00 +.04 0.40 17.82 +.17 1.10 59.39 +1.91 0.60 35.31 +.03 1.00 35.37 -.05 7.19 -.04 28.70 -.07 45.07 +1.00 0.52 4.50 -.03 75.14 +2.35 1.90 -.03 4.91 +.15 1.64 50.32 +1.28 0.48 22.00 +.53 0.98 18.10 -.03 0.68 13.04 -.15 1.40 85.97 -.48 11.64 -.27 3.31 +.09 16.62 +.12 3.12 +.14 5.89 +.16 1.08 10.80 +.06

E-F-G-H ECDang n E-House ETrade rs eBay eHealth EMC Cp EMCOR ENGlobal ENI EOG Res EQT Corp EXFO g EagleBulk EagleMat ErthLink EstWstBcp EastChm EKodak Eaton EatnVan EV LtdDur EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW EVTxBWOp Ebix Inc Ecolab EdisonInt EducMgmt EducRlty EdwLfSci s 8x8 Inc ElPasoCp ElPasoPpl Elan EldorGld g ElectArts EFII Embraer Emcore lf EMS EmergBio EmersonEl EmmisCm Emulex EnbrEPtrs EnCana g EndvSilv g EndoPhrm Ener1 Energen Energizer EngyConv EngyTEq EngyTsfr EgyXXI rs EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis EnerSys ENSCO Entegris Entergy EntPrPt EnterPT EntropCom EnzonPhar EpicorSft Equifax Equinix EqtyOne EqtyRsd EricsnTel EsteeLdr EthanAl EverestRe EvergE rs EvrgrSlr rs ExactSci h Exar ExcelM ExcoRes Exelixis Exelon ExeterR gs ExideTc Expedia ExpdIntl Express n ExpScrip s Express-1 ExterranH ExtraSpce ExtrmNet ExxonMbl EZchip Ezcorp F5 Netwks FEI Co FLIR Sys FMC Corp FMC Tech FNBCp PA FSI Intl FTI Cnslt FX Ener FairIsaac FairchldS FamilyDlr Fastenal FedExCp FedRlty FedSignl FedInvst FelCor Ferro FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FifthStFin FifthThird FinEngin n Finisar FinLine FstAFin n FstBcPR rs FstBusey FstCashFn FstCwlth FstHorizon FstInRT FMajSilv g FMidBc FstNiagara FstSolar FTNDXTc FT ConDis FT Fincl FT Matls FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FlagstB rs Flextrn Flotek h FlowrsFds Flowserve Fluor FocusMda FEMSA FootLockr ForcePro FordM FordM wt FordC pfS ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil FormFac Fortinet Fortress FortuneBr Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel FrankRes FrkStPrp FMCG FresKabi rt Fronteer g FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline FuelSysSol FuelCell FullerHB FultonFncl Fuqi Intl lf FurnBrds FushiCopp GATX GFI Grp GMX Rs GSI Cmmrc GT Solar GabDvInc

29.25 +.31 0.25 15.23 -.85 15.79 +.26 31.06 +.15 12.66 +.44 24.73 +.34 30.24 +1.07 4.86 +.40 2.51 48.53 +.08 0.62 102.28 +2.41 0.88 45.88 +.73 9.90 +.26 4.18 +.17 0.40 28.98 +.15 0.20 8.58 +.04 0.04 21.83 +1.28 1.88 93.89 +3.56 3.71 -.81 2.32 104.61 +1.37 0.72 30.87 -.21 1.39 15.93 +.11 1.16 11.41 +.04 1.14 10.70 +.08 1.56 12.41 +.11 1.60 13.13 +.09 23.50 +.53 0.70 50.45 +.47 1.28 37.30 -.20 17.74 +1.52 0.20 7.67 84.82 +1.34 2.82 +.02 0.04 14.45 +.11 1.76 34.86 +.52 7.11 +.17 0.10 16.56 +.40 15.34 -.04 15.65 +.34 0.64 31.94 -.15 1.43 +.07 65.90 +.31 22.04 +.61 1.38 59.08 +.90 .99 +.02 11.47 +.67 4.11 62.32 +.20 0.80 32.40 +.17 6.29 +.45 34.00 +.08 4.17 +.19 0.54 54.99 +.59 75.40 +.40 4.29 +.08 2.16 38.80 +.33 3.58 53.74 +.85 28.05 +.99 5.66 +.20 2.16 31.83 +.24 0.61 21.30 +.05 33.57 +.92 1.40 54.32 +2.46 7.23 +.07 3.32 73.13 -.37 2.36 43.81 +.78 2.60 45.86 +.27 11.24 -.32 11.80 +.19 10.39 +.37 0.64 36.40 +.18 87.55 -.39 0.88 18.85 -.03 1.47 52.95 +.35 0.28 12.49 +.30 0.75 81.45 +.32 0.20 22.82 -.27 1.92 85.79 +.04 2.41 -.09 2.68 +.15 5.73 +.15 6.32 -.31 4.89 +.24 0.16 19.85 +.07 8.81 +.88 2.10 43.03 -.17 5.24 +.19 10.19 +.57 0.28 25.34 -.42 0.40 53.58 +.85 17.60 57.63 +.29 2.95 24.01 +.77 0.40 19.18 +.18 3.41 +.10 1.76 79.66 +.98 30.99 -.54 28.04 +1.48 108.81 +1.28 27.98 +.45 30.50 +.56 0.50 76.39 -.47 92.28 +5.02 0.48 10.22 -.02 4.19 +.29 37.97 +.95 8.94 +.61 0.08 24.77 +.75 18.17 +.69 0.72 42.93 +.06 1.00 59.47 +.23 0.48 94.31 +.32 2.68 79.41 +.18 0.24 7.44 +.34 0.96 27.22 +.09 7.27 +.27 15.64 +.33 16.13 -.41 0.72 14.03 +.11 0.20 30.79 +.11 1.28 13.19 +.65 0.04 14.57 +.14 23.64 +.15 31.41 +1.40 0.20 15.74 -.21 0.24 16.46 +.71 5.10 +.08 0.16 5.02 +.33 33.50 +3.76 0.12 6.81 -.08 0.04 11.30 -.11 9.72 -.51 11.86 +1.37 0.04 11.97 -.63 0.60 14.02 -.03 151.86 +1.24 0.10 26.92 +.15 0.09 19.79 +.15 0.19 15.01 +.02 0.38 24.57 +.60 2.20 38.93 -.05 0.64 18.42 -.54 62.89 1.63 -.02 8.28 +.10 6.60 +.30 0.80 26.04 -.41 1.16 121.19 +3.67 0.50 72.01 +1.57 24.47 +.31 0.64 55.59 +.76 0.60 17.43 -.79 5.66 +.15 18.37 +.48 9.49 +.43 3.25 54.67 +.89 16.98 +.09 32.62 +.27 37.38 +.75 9.08 +.17 39.65 +5.73 5.53 +.16 0.76 61.58 +.29 69.42 +1.56 37.49 +1.50 1.77 22.13 -.22 1.00 120.34 +.40 0.76 14.69 -.40 2.00 110.32 +3.89 .05 +.00 9.59 +.56 0.75 9.15 -.02 18.89 +1.17 2.00 25.22 +.05 27.23 -.75 1.91 +.09 0.28 23.58 +.56 0.12 10.33 -.16 5.31 +.03 4.82 +.02 9.64 +.30 1.12 33.61 +1.33 0.20 5.22 +.28 5.36 23.35 +.01 11.39 +.37 0.84 15.63 +.01

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D 0.68 5.98 +.01 1.68 18.72 +.51 0.14 13.39 -.29 1.28 29.67 +.22 21.04 -.02 7.64 +.44 0.16 15.00 +.16 0.40 20.02 -.14 0.20 72.66 +1.74 1.50 31.54 -.18 35.13 +.84 .52 +.02 34.78 +.58 62.69 +.01 12.26 +.35 5.36 +.07 37.21 +1.15 1.68 74.64 +.47 0.56 19.92 -.06 14.88 +.03 0.04 2.97 -.05 1.12 35.67 -.32 5.61 +.21 37.89 -.51 2.38 55.90 -.61 53.15 +1.78 23.24 +.66 4.20 +.02 24.89 +.01 0.18 15.60 +.44 0.44 30.88 +.04 1.64 51.42 +.27 .58 -.03 13.77 -.03 71.43 +.42 24.05 +.45 26.90 +.67 27.71 +.57 0.32 13.54 -.10 4.89 -.00 1.92 28.01 +.05 1.24 -.12 0.30 28.61 +.82 39.66 +1.50 0.52 15.04 0.36 12.02 +.21 2.00 37.50 +.14 2.29 +.02 0.40 8.85 3.28 +.09 7.52 +.35 0.40 20.69 +.53 0.25 22.30 +1.30 1.26 +.10 0.15 18.42 +.42 2.67 -.13 0.40 15.67 +.08 0.68 17.42 +.15 0.16 16.37 +.46 0.18 23.66 +.08 0.36 41.39 +1.45 3.83 +.23 1.53 24.32 +.10 1.40 161.31 -.67 1.16 91.36 +.37 20.72 +.88 12.50 +.34 616.50 -3.41 1.64 26.40 -.12 36.19 +.46 0.84 41.85 +.23 21.09 +.83 17.62 +.82 2.16 132.18 -.38 3.55 +.12 8.49 +.29 0.52 26.70 -.16 4.78 +.27 2.68 +.23 0.07 8.27 +.09 0.83 19.86 -.09 64.29 +1.09 35.37 +.57 24.05 +1.13 11.98 +.46 0.40 39.30 +.88 23.92 -.33 0.80 42.99 +.10 0.13 22.93 -.01 0.03 8.03 -.06 0.79 15.35 +.03 37.21 +2.12 0.58 30.48 -.07 1.86 36.49 -.01 12.50 +.33 1.70 55.29 -.07 2.00 27.60 28.51 +.30 27.26 -.16 0.36 43.40 +3.20 7.08 +.09 22.82 -.18 1.17 +.04 56.00 +.70 18.93 +.85 0.40 39.36 -.07 44.36 -.05 8.43 +.25 0.07 10.82 +.26 5.28 +.13 1.00 48.78 +.17 0.82 32.53 +.54 0.30 13.48 +.06 0.20 28.08 +.23 11.37 +.75 1.00 44.85 +.42 4.40 28.77 +.03 7.76 +.18 0.80 48.26 +4.42 5.41 +.04 2.76 48.57 +.07 0.62 16.18 +.28 9.10 +.10 1.20 21.00 +.17 29.23 +.75 23.03 +.11 31.00 +1.45 12.25 +.68 0.08 16.32 +.17 5.03 +.09 9.07 +.66 1.80 48.54 -.69 11.90 +.60 0.24 51.81 +1.96 65.56 -.68 1.00 66.16 +.48 3.26 +.04 0.20 6.70 +.14 1.28 48.52 -1.08 14.58 +.38 0.40 79.35 +2.18 0.32 46.88 -.20 19.16 +.34 18.44 -.20 33.31 +.02 1.70 32.66 -.14 0.41 41.05 -.34 0.25 2.53 +.02 29.97 +.37 0.60 44.90 +2.45 19.82 +.19 0.95 37.42 +.26 38.82 +1.87 2.32 54.28 -.19 42.34 +.44 1.33 55.77 +.39 1.02 50.79 +.48 21.37 +.69 56.25 +.65 1.80 24.89 -.37 0.04 18.11 -.02 0.28 5.62 +.12 4.80 +.34 36.75 +2.34 1.44 60.15 -.36 0.60 10.99 -.07 25.03 +.50 58.60 +.61 0.48 42.23 +.53 0.04 7.07 +.17 0.40 17.22 +.22 3.41 +.20 49.05 +1.25 9.23 +.13 4.25 -.13

I-J-K-L IAC Inter IAMGld g ICICI Bk IdexxLabs iGateCorp IHS Inc ING GRE ING GlbDv ING

28.44 -.05 0.08 19.61 +1.26 0.53 45.80 -.30 73.07 +1.01 0.26 15.34 -.09 83.20 +.98 0.54 8.08 +.21 1.20 11.16 +.09 11.05 -.02

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D 0.31

6.00 9.12 +.17 13.14 +.11 34.25 +.74 0.82 25.10 +.19 2.53 75.27 +.02 0.50 31.24 +.52 0.66 26.23 +.10 0.29 25.33 +.27 0.45 19.59 +.04 0.33 18.14 +.06 0.14 11.10 -.02 0.39 62.90 +1.24 0.34 14.38 -.03 0.54 62.38 +.53 0.43 13.93 +.21 1.56 46.89 +.33 2.15 41.02 -.19 0.55 32.75 +.73 0.29 15.78 +.17 0.43 17.70 +.19 26.89 +.66 1.08 58.61 +.16 1.70 50.30 +.06 2.55 107.17 -.18 0.97 62.84 +.53 0.63 43.09 +.26 1.06 92.15 +1.08 2.36 130.21 +.62 3.94 105.53 -.35 0.64 46.97 +.42 5.26 108.46 -.61 0.81 47.83 +.21 1.35 43.06 +.35 0.15 26.86 +.78 1.16 67.31 +.35 0.58 42.63 +1.14 1.18 52.72 +.32 1.24 61.81 +.17 3.75 99.46 +.74 3.86 91.03 -1.40 3.35 93.39 -.57 0.86 84.00 -.02 1.42 60.13 +.38 0.86 46.16 +.36 0.57 58.08 +.62 1.48 104.22 +.97 0.97 92.91 +.75 7.85 91.72 +.19 1.90 67.52 +.13 1.29 66.70 +.21 0.73 59.24 +.40 1.13 72.02 +.33 1.16 72.27 +.99 4.51 105.88 -.18 3.04 104.66 -.08 0.58 88.01 +1.59 0.89 79.12 +1.24 2.86 39.08 +.02 28.08 +.63 1.97 57.39 +.16 0.07 14.03 +.19 0.59 58.93 -.03 0.49 41.12 +.91 0.74 69.39 +1.06 0.87 77.54 +1.86 0.89 46.69 +.85 0.27 58.74 +2.60 0.18 66.06 +1.25 0.98 41.22 +.22 8.06 +.12 1.34 66.40 +.86 1.00 59.41 +.25 71.08 +.36 1.36 57.92 -1.67 5.25 +.08 3.14 +.52 22.78 -.05 20.42 +.40 2.94 +.59 0.60 39.67 +.48 3.75 +.12 1.35 +.08 1.36 55.43 +.52 70.64 +.87 26.25 -.01 20.82 +.42 8.83 +.22 3.37 +.03 23.66 +.88 0.44 42.68 +.84 15.09 +.37 3.17 -.02 3.87 30.83 -.15 .76 +.00 1.26 34.34 -.02 9.19 +.15 43.79 +1.39 0.90 70.41 +.41 0.28 46.79 +.55 19.87 +.28 0.57 9.41 +.06 1.32 +.01 28.17 +1.02 .58 -.01 4.05 +.02 17.06 +.20 6.50 -.05 9.93 +.27 2.72 48.30 +.13 0.72 21.75 +.20 1.79 16.70 -.10 114.97 -.43 0.40 48.66 +1.38 0.08 16.54 +.22 22.08 +.17 37.35 +.46 6.88 +.19 2.60 161.04 -.40 8.78 +.46 1.08 57.41 +.57 0.24 17.49 -.60 0.75 28.92 +.29 31.03 +.18 9.01 +.55 12.40 +.97 70.75 +2.73 10.98 +.09 0.48 14.53 -.01 3.82 +.24 20.00 -.02 36.94 +1.47 47.12 +.62 338.06 +7.13 0.05 28.76 -.32 0.44 23.77 -.13 3.49 22.69 +.17 0.29 4.98 +.02 18.44 +.33 13.30 +.09 0.69 9.19 +.01 0.75 25.31 +.42 9.59 +.33 9.72 +.01 0.65 22.33 -.15 59.36 +.98 3.36 +.15 1.48 28.74 +.36 15.55 +.30 43.44 +.05 28.48 +.18 7.04 -.31 16.53 +.39 0.20 44.98 +.11 1.81 37.07 +.25 2.00 26.76 -.13 1.68 25.39 -.05 0.28 19.85 +.09 0.38 30.20 +.05 22.87 -.01 1.63 -.07 53.01 +3.52 6.32 +.38 2.24 +.03 22.40 +.99 0.04 13.00 +.02 0.33 34.07 -.01 22.50 +.72 0.30 25.71 +.04 6.48 +.13 26.62 -1.34 60.36 -.12 1.61 +.05 2.16 60.60 -.48 0.64 38.84 +.23 0.20 13.21 +.44 1.38 +.01 43.00 +.39 0.70 88.26 +3.17 37.05 +2.23 28.71 -.29 52.52 +1.04 0.25 15.54 +.29 0.20 32.67 +.72 0.23 14.96 +.13 0.56 9.54 -.02

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D 1.00 44.53 +.86 19.90 +.05 1.50 +.23 4.43 -.16 48.42 +1.13 1.62 51.50 -.23 14.97 +.66 0.48 42.80 +.34 4.00 +.03 12.77 +.61 0.04 8.89 -.02 0.24 19.20 +4.22 18.05 +.69 1.40 37.76 -.04 2.80 65.13 -.48 0.72 17.98 +.11 4.52 72.87 +.28 4.52 64.73 +.04 18.93 +.19 46.75 +.31 14.23 +.01 3.15 +.07 0.10 17.15 +.83 14.02 +.36 0.24 19.07 -.34 0.24 17.13 +.14 5.90 +.36 52.17 -.38 12.84 +.07 23.61 +.93 1.16 31.03 -.15 31.39 +.18 6.69 +.11 0.42 21.61 -.04 9.47 +.58 8.83 +.50 11.95 +.02 1.60 77.35 -1.47 0.46 29.97 +.14 13.02 -.35 17.91 +.28 24.29 -.03 5.86 -.05 8.41 +.28 8.55 +.14 92.55 +1.59 53.55 +3.12 54.05 +1.35 38.19 -.08 0.20 41.80 +.34 46.03 +.99 0.44 27.84 5.81 +.14 9.66 +.04 0.50 42.45 -.03 13.45 +.60 13.67 +.46 4.06 -.03 106.65 -.23 3.09 +.09 0.24 33.75 -1.86 1.08 22.98 +.30 0.40 32.63 +.08 0.16 20.38 +.61 0.60 48.18 +.36 0.25 31.63 +.21 1.26 +.03 1.89 +.16 0.46 8.45 +.01 36.75 +.17 0.31 5.08 +.03 41.39 +.54 38.97 +.49 15.82 -.03 64.51 +.63 65.93 +.82 1.90 34.06 +.02 54.29 -.20 41.08 +.62 35.55 +.20 10.27 +.05 1.96 34.95 +.22 6.20 +.12 0.60 28.70 +.28 0.80 27.43 +.32 1.00 15.54 +.53 0.20 29.39 +.23 0.96 34.93 +.08 2.64 39.03 +.58 6.19 +.08 10.70 +.06 5.17 +.18 3.97 4.15 +.12 3.00 78.39 -.68 3.50 +.12 0.25 40.39 -.31 19.40 +.26 40.33 +1.33 32.22 +.28 2.53 -.11 4.50 75.18 +.77 10.38 -.09 0.44 25.85 +.29 1.44 108.70 +1.24 0.50 63.74 +2.95 68.11 +1.03 27.29 +1.01 0.43 30.59 -.43 36.00 +.30

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D 6.32 +.52 19.48 +.06 62.63 -.90 8.61 0.80 10.99 +.09 16.39 +.46 0.24 26.00 +.39 11.92 -.03 66.70 +.81 0.90 37.88 -.26 7.64 +.57 26.08 -.27 0.48 26.40 +.21 12.70 +.30 69.92 +.45 1.52 33.20 -.16 19.94 +2.10 0.92 33.50 +.13 4.52 +.16 0.76 22.38 +.21 2.49 35.65 +1.46 9.24 +.46 5.61 +.11 1.11 +.17 0.62 30.00 +.71 0.74 46.56 +.18 13.57 +.08 0.14 13.36 +.19 1.38 37.43 +.11 6.83 +.08 9.95 -.03 45.49 +.41 24.28 +.59 0.64 28.78 +.33 105.02+12.01 2.01 -.04 2.51 62.51 -.28 0.28 14.21 +1.03 1.09 +.14 0.09 25.07 +.53 7.24 96.99 +1.70 2.27 +.22 0.20 26.04 -.22 7.07 +.05 9.87 +.18 0.60 6.90 5.42 -.07 4.03 -.05 21.00 +.49 19.90 +.16 58.96 +.53 0.70 26.65 +1.31 0.70 22.30 +1.07 31.30 +2.27 1.12 48.51 +.43 45.85 -1.04 13.26 +.76 2.28 +.95 2.70 +.08 15.08 +.07 33.04 +.57 1.12 73.54 +1.36 21.33 +.21 0.40 20.60 +.39 0.46 29.24 +.23 0.20 29.01 -.33 1.20 16.25 +.18 9.58 +.25 0.20 78.81 +3.10 39.24 +.54 34.83 +.69 19.07 +1.45 2.12 -.08 0.07 4.21 +.13 1.10 73.23 +2.19 23.96 +.16 21.88 +.34 13.30 +.58 16.52 -.01 35.30 +1.09 1.80 17.66 +.06 .59 +.03 0.55 10.26 +.03 34.33 +.12 43.76 +.82 7.58 +.21 21.07 +.22 0.48 14.39 -.04 25.99 +1.71 1.20 32.50 +.21 23.39 +1.14 0.14 30.38 +.35 17.63 +1.14 9.82 +.05 24.51 +.21 0.29 1.79 0.80 18.22 +.14 1.66 25.05 12.89 +.13 1.38 68.38 +.24 7.04 44.07 +.03 0.60 44.75 +5.27 0.44 71.52 +3.39 0.04 8.66 -.02 1.52 25.33 +.12 0.40 14.56 -.07 1.88 37.27 +.08 2.16 35.50 +.56 3.67 +.42 10.29 +.26 .43 -.22 0.24 5.04 +.24 1.72 19.01 +.36 64.93 +1.84 11.47 -.02 34.42 +.59 55.17 +1.47 41.15 +.42 183.03 -3.71 23.45 +.62 2.20 +.08 14.05 +.07 2.05 .59 +.01 7.57 -.01 15.60 +.17 5.85 +.31 .06 -.00 8.01 +.31 1.44 43.13 +.09 5.75 -.07 1.00 18.15 -.53 10.66 +.17 0.28 15.04 -.14 7.08 +.09 0.20 18.25 +.28 69.90 +2.23 0.60 57.05 +1.17 5.81 +.19 0.15 15.54 -.11 0.15 17.23 -.07 0.20 24.66 +.28 2.00 54.21 -.36 0.92 18.80 -.02 1.86 50.20 -.01 25.00 1.24 84.00 +1.12 15.42 +.02 23.27 -.08 0.90 37.87 +.81 0.72 86.53 +1.18 0.56 10.73 +.14 1.70 24.22 -.16 10.56 +.03 0.80 41.53 -.03 1.60 62.73 -.19 11.71 +.51 6.89 +.36 1.03 32.64 -.40 18.66 +.56 25.29 +1.11 1.12 52.55 -.04 2.68 +.19 1.88 68.81 -.70 0.40 5.08 +.19 0.40 11.98 10.00 +.19 13.78 +.90 1.99 57.94 +.14 7.46 +.16 2.31 +.05 5.98 +.04 36.17 +.56 1.32 -.04 1.70 43.14 -.22 0.50 30.74 +.42 27.95 +.53 19.88 +.08 1.45 46.50 +1.56 0.86 13.30 +.08 0.47 9.03 -.04 0.70 8.88 +.04 24.54 +.57 24.39 -.09 6.74 +.01 7.86 +.14

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13.74 +.16 Penske 17.32 +.36 Pentair 0.80 36.66 +.22 PeopUtdF 0.62 13.32 -.04 PepBoy 0.12 14.22 +.11 PepcoHold 1.08 18.69 -.01 PepsiCo 1.92 65.86 +.09 PeregrineP 2.38 -.06 PerfectWld 23.21 +.21 PerkElm 0.28 25.58 +.44 Prmian 1.38 21.04 +.14 Perrigo 0.28 73.68 +.22 PetMed 0.50 15.29 +.38 Petrohawk 18.99 +.78 PetrbrsA 1.20 32.84 +.29 Petrobras 1.20 36.06 +.04 PtroqstE 7.91 +.19 PetsMart 0.50 40.14 -.29 Pfizer 0.80 18.36 -.11 PhrmAth 3.25 -.05 PhmHTr 2.42 64.88 -.33 PharmPdt 0.60 30.02 -.04 Pharmerica 11.50 +.20 PhilipMor 2.56 57.38 -.15 PhilipsEl 0.95 31.63 -.38 PhlVH 0.15 59.58 +1.02 PhnxCos 2.76 +.15 PhotrIn 6.59 +.08 PiedNG 1.12 28.91 +.19 PiedmOfc n 1.26 19.67 -.17 Pier 1 10.00 +.43 PimCpOp 1.38 18.72 +.47 PimcIncStr 0.90 12.22 +.22 PimIncStr2 0.78 10.28 +.08 PimcoHiI 1.46 13.05 -.01 PinnclEnt 15.13 +.27 PinWst 2.10 41.88 -.23 PionDrill 8.50 +.18 PioNtrl 0.08 91.36 +2.91 PiperJaf 41.93 +5.87 PitnyBw 1.46 24.13 +.09 PlainsAA 3.83 64.54 +.68 PlainsEx 34.63 +1.31 Plantron 0.20 36.21 +.96 PlatGpMet 2.34 +.07 PlaybyB 6.13 +.02 Plexus 27.73 +.33 PlugPwr h .74 +.03 PlumCrk 1.68 42.07 +.29 PluristemT 4.20 +.24 Polaris 1.80 77.71 +1.77 Polo RL 0.40 106.08 +1.63 Polycom 44.11 +.90 PolyMet g 2.12 +.02 PolyOne 13.12 +.24 Polypore 47.49 +2.62 Poniard h .54 -.01 Pool Corp 0.52 24.61 +.44 Popular 3.29 +.09 PortGE 1.04 22.37 +.09 PositvID h .75 PostPrp 0.80 37.09 +.41 Potash 0.40 168.62 +5.69 Potlatch 2.04 37.22 +1.01 Power-One 10.88 +.14 PSCrudeDS 58.99 -1.58 PwshDB 27.98 +.61 PS Agri 33.98 +.64 PS Oil 28.07 +.65 PS USDBull 22.39 -.04 PwSLgCG 0.10 16.57 +.08 PS OilSv 0.08 22.59 +.84 PwSWtr 0.11 19.41 +.31 PSPrivEq 0.37 11.10 +.08 PSFinPf 1.27 17.68 -.02 PSETecLd 0.06 17.62 +.17 PSBldABd 1.48 25.00 -.16 PwShPfd 0.97 14.11 +.01 PShEMSov 1.57 26.43 +.01 PSIndia 0.24 23.20 +.20 PwShs QQQ 0.33 56.83 +.30 Powrwav 3.52 +.11 Praxair 2.00 91.49 +.25 PrecCastpt 0.12 144.65 +.86 PrecDrill 10.40 +.26 PrmWBc h .34 +.01 PriceTR 1.08 67.29 +.46 priceline 422.70 -6.16 PrideIntl 33.42 +.89 PrinFncl 0.55 33.11 +.50 PrisaA n 10.43 +.16 PrisaB n 10.95 +.12 PrivateB 0.04 15.29 +.10 ProShtQQQ 33.19 -.15 ProShtS&P 42.51 -.20 PrUShS&P 22.32 -.21 ProUltDow 0.37 58.40 +.11 PrUlShDow 19.28 -.01 ProUltMC 0.04 66.71 +1.13 ProUltQQQ 88.54 +1.02 PrUShQQQ 10.66 -.10 ProUltSP 0.43 50.94 +.39 ProUShL20 39.23 +1.07 PrUSCh25 rs 29.86 -.29 ProUSEM rs 32.47 -.56 ProUSRE rs 17.11 -.14 ProUSOG rs 33.47 -1.59 ProUSBM rs 19.02 -.97 ProUltRE rs 0.41 53.10 +.37 ProUShtFn 14.84 +.01 ProUFin rs 0.07 69.48 -.10 PrUPShQQQ 27.28 -.46 PrUPShR2K 21.95 -1.09 ProUltO&G 0.23 50.79 +2.18 ProUBasM 0.04 50.65 +2.34 ProUPR2K 162.67 +7.35 ProShtR2K 31.71 -.51 ProUltPQQQ 167.01 +2.55 ProUSR2K 12.18 -.40 ProUltR2K 0.01 43.61 +1.34 ProSht20Tr 45.34 +.62 ProUSSP500 17.65 -.24 ProUltSP500 0.38 223.99 +2.67 ProUltCrude 11.25 +.33 ProSUltGold 62.97 +.97 ProUSGld rs 30.94 -.50 ProUSSlv rs 11.99 -.63 ProUShCrude 11.14 -.37 ProSUltSilv 124.38 +6.02 ProUShEuro 19.27 -.03 ProceraNt .62 +.01 ProctGam 1.93 66.11 -.59 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0.44 14.61 +.12 1.15 62.56 +1.15 1.37 32.57 +.07 3.20 107.00 +.26 12.62 +.63 8.43 +.10 0.52 5.87 +.03 0.71 6.40 -.04

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0.08 39.29 +.50 18.78 +.01 21.72 +.32 2.48 22.86 -.01 17.69 +.38 42.50 -.57 0.76 51.86 +.34 1.20 75.00 +1.09 0.16 20.35 +.55 23.58 +.52 3.59 -.24 .45 -.00 12.70 +.73 0.40 57.70 +1.42 25.96 +.63 0.56 17.51 -.06 16.23 +.50 5.92 +.03 14.99 +.29 13.76 +.18 4.71 +.25 0.32 7.24 +.29 0.03 2.72 -.04 6.91 -.75 0.28 17.08 -.31 0.84 23.07 -.05 12.39 +.45 2.74 -.06 28.66 +2.21 1.98 +.05 31.87 +.93 3.37 +.02 0.01 7.40 -.08 18.46 +.28 .75 -.05 0.25 15.57 -.31 35.76 +1.48 62.26 -.27 20.63 -.01 0.65 12.75 -.36 2.66 -.08 5.42 +.45 0.17 76.96 +.66 0.16 47.90 +1.36 12.67 +.25 0.52 35.94 +.06 2.16 59.96 +1.10 1.50 51.60 -.72 24.93 -.39 1.73 34.81 +.09 42.19 +2.19 6.88 -.72 1.00 15.19 -.03 0.68 68.52 +1.46 0.84 12.21 -.14 1.85 42.10 -.24 1.78 27.37 +.55 34.47 +.80 0.59 87.44 -.25 0.04 6.97 -.05 0.16 17.13 -.46 0.48 58.43 -.36 0.40 53.79 +1.77 1.00 65.80 +.32 10.12 -.22 0.24 30.61 +.66 1.28 +.04 2.64 -.07 1.20 31.07 +.63 6.34 +.03 0.80 31.00 +.29 62.00 +.60 32.01 +.09 17.32 +.36 4.73 +.19 1.00 7.22 +.15 0.16 20.87 +.33 1.71 107.79 +.26 12.39 +.07 1.49 -.05 1.96 32.39 +.30 0.90 71.10 +2.53 0.42 25.17 +.33 1.10 +.04 34.29 +1.90 0.18 40.91 +1.39 0.52 33.69 -.14 0.80 66.69 +3.18 1.40 81.31 +6.62 0.96 64.27 -.09 40.50 +.37 1.28 34.89 -.41 0.28 19.69 +.39 0.44 75.99 +1.06 36.81 +2.73 0.64 66.52 +.46 62.70 -.06 34.79 +1.71 2.00 53.17 -.33 13.74 -.05 49.50 +1.92 3.36 69.72 +.56 3.36 69.69 +.61 0.44 47.46 +.82 0.12 14.66 +.08 5.09 +.39 19.21 -.56 13.72 -.26 9.85 +.29 2.29 30.40 +.29 1.08 49.46 +.54 0.63 48.61 +.36 0.12 18.24 +.38 16.69 +.17 0.67 56.46 +1.30 40.89 +.25 1.90 42.25 -.25 0.20 23.35 -1.08 10.01 +.40 17.66 +.12 0.40 70.79 +.05 14.31 +.13 0.10 59.02 +2.98 2.92 119.61 +.12 131.16 +1.06 1.73 55.42 +.28 3.39 39.23 +.13 1.51 169.05 +1.43 2.37 129.67 +.50 1.74 52.60 +.14 0.33 18.31 +.35 0.13 26.16 -.15 0.67 44.01 +.15 1.79 62.37 +.12 4.68 40.43 +.12 0.49 23.56 -.05 0.35 26.48 -.18 0.49 46.79 +.04 0.20 54.69 +1.52 0.38 69.68 +3.02 1.00 77.29 +.67 27.13 +.24 21.62 +.75 0.28 11.71 +.44 18.72 +.39 52.70 -.40 46.62 +.98 2.55 50.15 +1.55 0.48 20.74 -.24 29.50 +1.75 42.15 -.47 11.81 +.20 128.29 +4.32 42.01 +.05 13.06 +.05 2.29 +.30 0.60 41.64 +.84 49.97 +1.42 7.28 +.13 7.89 +.49 15.34 +.57 1.63 35.19 +.51 0.35 12.58 +.22 0.46 18.52 -1.12 1.46 50.51 +.07 5.06 +.02 10.11 -.05 26.60 +.17 1.00 87.45 +4.20 0.07 63.30 +1.53 0.62 21.94 +.50 0.44 31.30 +.18 0.47 28.51 +.16 0.24 18.04 -.04 10.77 +.11 1.00 53.52 +.70 0.30 46.43 +.04 28.96 +.94 2.41 33.10 +1.02 13.69 +.19 0.52 27.24 +.42 76.61 -.96 16.76 +.54 10.64 +.16 7.00 -.04 0.56 34.46 +.21 1.56 52.45 -.13 22.13 +.15 .31 +.01 1.48 22.19 -.05 0.84 35.18 -.01 6.90 +.12 0.16 8.69 +.08 5.96 -.01 3.89 -.05 38.26 +.36 1.44 84.87 -1.22 1.44 20.45 -.02 0.34 80.48 +.69 8.49 +.22 0.58 17.56 +.09 3.72 129.28 +3.97 2.60 -.06 12.30 +.38 0.64 64.34 +.52 53.55 -.22 42.16 +.34 0.42 37.66 +.63 10.56 +.63 7.23 +.15 44.20 -3.42 0.41 6.89 +.33 23.27 +.89 31.04 +1.80 0.08 10.48 +.81 3.20 100.71 +.15 81.31 +.01 0.43 8.65 +.43 12.22 +.46 4.69 -.08

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D 1.60 +.02 21.03 -.12 6.57 -.10 0.16 15.96 +.62 31.49 +1.48 4.00 -.16 6.79 +.20 5.06 +.01 3.62 0.56 43.21 +1.17 12.96 +.68 20.40 +.25 1.60 62.34 -.77 37.86 +1.48 0.73 54.05 +.75 39.53 +.14 71.01 +3.16 8.84 -.18 19.12 +.16 2.90 +.23 24.02 +.47 2.88 +.02 0.10 12.77 +.10 10.04 -.07 14.67 -.05 1.12 36.26 +.34 2.84 +.04 0.14 34.93 -.22 0.20 40.19 +.77 23.90 +.74 1.82 38.16 -.30 1.68 45.61 +1.76 7.85 +.25 0.60 26.47 +.06 0.02 12.46 -.04 39.82 +1.34 1.04 25.93 +.34 6.25 -.05 23.63 -.30 20.18 +1.07 4.50 +.14 12.07 +.37 11.73 +.22 0.86 48.45 +1.17 1.17 38.73 +.80 0.57 32.11 -.04 0.78 29.56 -.08 0.49 38.05 +.06 0.99 71.84 +1.68 0.16 16.40 -.01 0.60 36.41 +.22 0.32 26.35 +.15 1.27 31.96 -.12 4.67 +.10 1.36 66.95 +.57 0.36 22.72 -.72 0.20 2.66 +.02 1.72 +.04 0.52 33.07 -.58 0.30 61.78 +.34 1.60 22.38 +.18 0.04 47.41 -.28 1.02 24.49 +.29 0.30 19.03 +.71 0.16 10.99 +.31 0.50 7.95 -.14 .98 +.01 79.34 -.56 0.60 36.32 +.51 0.06 8.96 -.15 0.08 15.67 +.22 39.52 +1.39 0.12 6.62 +.17 0.05 12.28 +.47 65.86 +1.95 22.12 +.79 23.27 +.94 15.30 +.21 5.69 +.19 4.00 119.71 +.89 0.72 57.35 -1.02 29.64 +1.04 .19 +.00 1.44 31.45 +.30 0.40 39.25 +1.54 .40 -.01 0.60 42.35 +.29 7.49 +.08 13.70 -.53 13.48 -.47 7.72 +.41 9.94 -.02 8.63 -.24 0.04 29.31 +.13 13.64 +.61 3.04 +.10 34.23 +.55 0.35 7.23 -.02 0.04 9.70 -.18 11.27 +.25 9.28 +.16 40.38 +1.18 14.75 +.30 17.80 -.03 0.20 13.01 -.04 28.55 +.15 28.60 +.81 4.96 +.15 1.13 65.43 +.21 26.88 +.13 0.04 2.74 -.06 1.04 29.69 +.03 12.35 -.69 1.60 32.03 +.52 0.92 24.86 +.17 0.20 15.33 -.37 0.20 20.29 +.16 0.82 18.15 -.07 9.60 -.17 5.78 +.07 0.96 12.00 +.27 0.71 39.12 +.76 0.60 48.59 +.03 59.66 +2.20 16.52 +.19 16.97 -.02 0.47 13.24 +.02 12.41 +.19 6.13 -.08 24.27 +.26 29.98 +.27 0.25 22.68 +.65 0.78 26.09 +.41 6.29 +.28 2.19 33.20 +.02 1.00 55.59 -.36 5.65 +.30 4.15 -.05 0.32 26.34 +.11 1.75 51.35 -.28 47.57 +.67 0.60 61.25 +1.95 1.27 32.10 +.09 1.28 11.73 +.05 11.79 +.06 1.65 16.15 +.14 0.77 8.84 +.06 0.68 14.72 -.02 1.75 25.23 +.01 0.77 17.23 +.25 8.45 +.40 21.55 +1.26 0.08 5.58 -.11 0.44 24.14 +.34 0.54 10.40 +.01 44.26 +.87 0.68 46.97 +1.08 6.75 -.05 .85 +.06 43.45 +1.44 44.33 +.71 14.63 +.49 32.52 +.89 0.50 41.78 +.13 13.70 +.13 24.75 +.07 18.67 +.69 20.77 -.19 24.13 +.30 11.49 +.32 0.75 56.29 +1.72 22.93 +.47 0.30 41.47 +1.43 0.52 34.32 +.34 17.07 -.92 0.08 26.67 -.40 0.10 3.13 +.17 23.80 +2.05 57.57 +.66 48.33 -.73 13.94 +.53 1.16 40.19 +.66 0.40 36.77 +.46 25.84 +.01 2.10 89.57 +1.07 21.33 +.28 1.00 56.53 +2.85 1.00 59.11 +.51 3.46 +.14 27.76 +.92 .93 +.05 1.60 68.08 +.18 0.85 32.30 -.22 0.72 52.10 +1.07 0.02 19.52 +.76 19.30 +1.41 9.75 -.12 20.78 +.28 0.64 62.78 +.52 0.20 61.95 +.05 2.44 75.38 -.41 3.13 59.00 +.31 0.28 17.95 +.42 1.44 0.30 54.64 +.87 1.05 82.29 -1.57 0.28 48.55 +.19 1.60 37.05 0.84 52.45 +.25 3.00 +.01 77.88 +.79 14.09 +.05 80.01 +1.76 1.44 56.20 -.03 .44 +.03 1.57 +.08 44.32 +1.12 27.08 -.94 0.32 29.03 +.87 13.24 +.24 18.49 +.10 0.92 24.81 -.59 5.00 +.12 1.20 46.64 +.44 0.66 16.10 -.20 1.00 23.48 -.07 1.48 10.03 +.06 0.64 37.05 -.01 0.86 44.63 +.12 0.16 17.07 +.30

Nm

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9.59 +.16 17.90 -.12 0.74 23.45 -.01 1.00 33.07 +.38 1.73 30.63 +.15 44.43 +.37 10.80 +.67 1.25 6.56 +.50 1.86 +.06 5.62 +.14 17.25 +1.23 0.06 22.20 +.32 2.15 +.10 36.65 +.60 13.07 +.88 46.38 +.77 .09 +.00 0.20 12.06 -.03 53.88 +.88 1.11 30.41 -.18 1.11 29.74 -.14 1.52 94.12 +1.10 28.58 +.58 50.40 +1.48 1.68 -.03 25.79 +1.70 0.08 3.23 -.03 37.57 +1.48 0.40 7.24 +.25 1.88 72.87 +.04 27.37 +1.20 0.20 26.60 -.16 6.09 +.00 36.85 +.58 0.20 59.48 +2.18 1.70 81.41 -.32 68.13 +1.04 0.50 40.25 -.37 2.00 20.54 +.05 33.46 +1.26 0.20 43.50 +.62 6.97 +.15 0.37 25.63 +.22 2.90 +.11 5.49 +.47 5.63 -.09 2.89 +.37 34.27 +.13 23.31 -.13 2.52 82.68 +1.34 50.36 +1.72 31.07 +.18 0.76 36.19 +.69 0.76 31.87 +.48 0.38 36.21 +1.01 1.48 -.04 0.20 25.30 +.98 0.88 30.69 -.21 0.72 14.04 -.15 0.72 37.20 +.14 6.95 +.34 14.20 -.10 35.37 +.93 8.18 +.43


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Markets

Credit score

Meanwhile, the establishment of an additional indoor market is in the works. Martin Morris, a painter who kept a stand at White’s market for about eight weeks last year, said he is in contact with about 60 vendors who are interested in setting up shop in a new indoor market, which he is tentatively calling the Merchants’ Market. He envisions setting up 100 10-by-10-foot spaces, a third of which would be reserved for people to sell their goods on consignment every day of the week. And the sellers wouldn’t necessarily have to be on site, Morris said, because a fulltime market staffer could run things in the consignment area. The rest of the spots would go to vendors interested in being open only on weekends, he said. He wants to start the market “as soon as possible,” he said, although he has not yet found the right building for the business, with correct zoning and sufficient space. “All I’m trying to do is get another space for the crafters,” Morris said. Barb Peters, a Terrebonne woman who has run a booth at the Bend Indoor Markets to sell her hand-spun yarn, scarves, shawls, hats and other products, said she plans to keep her business, Baabaara’s Homespun, there for now. “I’m a little loath to do a big jump,” she said, adding later, “I want to make sure that it’s going to be a good venue.”

Continued from B1 City officials have argued that it conducts retail business in a zone that does not permit such uses. The city continues to offer owner Steve White and other businesses in similar situations the opportunity to pay $12,000 for a process that could lead to a text amendment to the development code to permit retail use in an industrial zone on weekends and holidays. White won’t pay that and disputes the city’s determination of a code violation. The City Council has not voted to use its own discretionary funds to finance the text amendment, although Councilors Jim Clinton and Scott Ramsay and Mayor Jeff Eager said at last week’s council meeting that they supported the idea. At that meeting, the council voted to revisit the matter at its Feb. 16 meeting so councilors would have more time to gather information on the situation. White and others are still welcome to initiate a text amendment, and code-violation procedures will not go into effect for now. The Bend Indoor Markets will continue to operate on the weekends leading up to the Feb. 16 council meeting, White said. At the same time, there is the Indoor Saturday Swap, which Jacobs said has 50 10by-10-foot spaces for vendors, a handful of which are vacant, and she said she could expand her market if necessary. But White said his market and Jacobs’ are not one and the same in terms of who the vendors are and what they sell.

Lowe’s

Ratings

Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or emerriman@ bendbulletin.com.

If you receive a free score this year, it will be because a creditor is offering you less favorable terms or even denying you a loan. To improve a score: • Pay bills on time. Payment history accounts for about one-third of a FICO credit score. • Maintain low credit card balances. FICO recommends keeping balances below 10 percent of credit limits. • Don’t open credit cards that you don’t need. • Review credit reports annually to make sure they’re correct. Scores are derived from information in reports, and errors can drag down a score.

ers. Many lenders are expected to take this easier path. The second regulation, a provision in last year’s financial reform law, takes effect July 21 and goes further. Anyone using a credit score and taking adverse action against you — denying credit or giving less favorable terms — must provide the number to you. This is expected to apply to a variety of score users, from credit card is-

Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

suers to utilities. Some consumers are already getting free scores and benefiting from it. Peter Kitzmiller, president of the Maryland Automobile Dealers Association, said auto dealers that arrange financing have been providing free scores to applicants. Most people with bad credit know that and expect to pay more for a loan, Kitzmiller said.

Hay

collecting more taxes. But some states that are heavily indebted, like New Jersey, also have among the highest tax rates, suggesting other types of action may be needed to reduce their debt burdens. Moody’s also ranked total indebtedness on the basis of each state’s total economic output and its population. It did not factor state promises for retiree health care into its analysis, on the thinking that pensions are a fixed debt like bonds, but retiree health plans can usually be renegotiated. Kurtter said Moody’s was not suggesting that any state was in such serious trouble that it was about to default on its bonds, something considered extremely unlikely by many analysts. Some state officials have complained about a recent tendency to focus on total pension obligations, calling it a scare tactic by union opponents who want to abolish traditional pensions and make all state workers save for their own retirements. Kurtter said Moody’s had decided it was important to consider total unfunded pension obligations because they could contribute to current budget woes.

Continued from B1 That is because Moody’s counted only the unfunded portion of states’ pension obligations. New York and California have tended to put more money into their state pension funds over the years, so they have somewhat smaller shortfalls. In the past, Moody’s looked at a state’s level of bonded debt alone when assessing its creditworthiness. Pensions were considered “soft debt” and were considered separately from the bonds, using a different method. “A more standard analysis would view both of these as liabilities that need to be paid and put stress on your operating budgets,” said Robert Kurtter, managing director for public finance at Moody’s. After adding up the values of each state’s bonds and its unfunded pensions, Moody’s compared the totals to each state’s available resources, something it did in the past only for each state’s bonds. It found that some relatively low-tax states, like Colorado and Illinois, had very high total debts compared with their revenue, suggesting that their finances could be improved by

in sales to the weekend do-ityourselfer, Cobb said. “We continually evaluate our staffing model, and believe this new structure — and the addition of employees on the weekend, when many of our stores are the busiest — will help us better provide the outstanding service our customers expect from Lowe’s,” Cobb said.

Continued from B1 “These moves are about realigning our management structure to better serve our customers,” said Cobb. “We have not announced any additional plans for layoffs at this time.” During the three years since the housing market crashed, Lowe’s has seen a decline in sales related to new construction, along with an increase

Improving your credit score

Continued from B1 The first regulation, part of the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act of 2003, kicked in Jan. 1. It applies to lenders such as banks and auto finance companies that extend consumer credit and base their decisions on information in credit reports, or so-called riskbased pricing. If consumers don’t receive the best terms available, the lender must send them a notice of this and tell them where they can get a free copy of their credit report, a rundown of your credit history but not your score. The formula to determine who receives these notices is complex. Alternatively, lenders can just provide free scores to everyone applying for credit along with information on how they compare to other consum-

Jordan Novet can be reached at 541-633-2117 or at jnovet@ bendbulletin.com.

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, January 27, 2011 B3

Continued from B1 The seminar will include information on how to determine the best timing and minimum amount of potassium and phosphorus needed, based on soil tests and crop requirements, Bohle said. “The more potassium you put on the soil, the more the plant will take up, so you really need to wait until the potassium gets down to a critical level before you start adding it,” he said, adding that any excess potassium applied to the soil would be wasted because the excess won’t improve the crop quality or yield. “The high cost of fertilizer and pesticides is a major issue for hay growers,” Bohle said. During the forage seminar, Bohle said, experts will discuss a variety of things farmers can do to target and minimize fertilizer and pesticide applications to get what he called “the most bang for the buck.” Laurie Gordon of the Oregon Department of Agriculture’s Central Oregon office will open the meeting at 9 a.m. with a discussion of new ODA regulations and legislative issues. At 10 a.m., a weed- and pestcontrol panel including Mike

But a couple of dealers reported cases where customers discovered they had lower scores than they thought because of errors on their credit reports, he says. Ever since scores became available for purchase a decade ago, companies have pitched all sorts of scores and related products. You can buy a score for around $20, or pay $15 or more a month for scores, credit reports and other services. Sometimes these scores are for educational purposes only, and not the ones used by creditors. Critics argue some of those scores can be misleading because they can differ significantly from the one used by a lender. That’s why credit experts applaud the new regulations. “This is huge to get a peek ... of the score that lenders are actually using,” said Gerri Detweiler, personal finance expert with Credit.com.

Knepp of Wilbur Ellis Co., Scott Simmons of Round Butte Seed and Rod Fessler of Cennex Harvest States will discuss new pesticides available this year and other weed- and pest-control matters. Other topics are designed to educate hay growers about the varying hay requirements for horses, dairy and beef cattle, Bohle said. While the regional market for hay has been shrinking across Central Oregon because so many people have sold their horses for economic reasons, Bohle said the Central Oregon Hay Growers Association will offer a presentation on a website it developed, www.hayfinder.org, to help the region’s hay growers market their hay to potential customers worldwide. The seminar is being held in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Central Oregon Hay Growers Association. Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or emerriman@ bendbulletin.com.

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YTD Last Chg %Chg

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeB rs CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.00 .04 .36f 1.68 ... .40 .80a .82 ... ... .32 .22 .72f .04 .42 ... ... .65f ... .64

9 15 21 24 15 ... ... 28 24 53 20 12 ... 11 19 13 14 ... 17 ... 7

61.06 -.07 +7.7 23.26 +.10 +3.3 13.55 -.08 +1.6 14.90 +.54 -4.2 70.02 -2.22 +7.3 9.76 +.85 +15.5 48.45 +.39 +2.5 61.78 +1.31 +2.5 72.62 +.16 +.6 7.37 -.05 -.3 30.50 +.56 +2.5 46.88 -.20 +11.4 11.52 +.03 -6.1 21.75 +.20 +3.4 8.89 -.02 +.5 21.61 -.04 -3.4 5.81 +.14 -4.2 10.38 -.09 +9.7 21.25 -.04 +4.8 12.70 +.30 +5.8 28.78 +.33 +3.1

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1341.00 $1333.00 $27.132

Pvs Day $1332.00 $1332.30 $26.811

Div

PE

1.24f .80 1.74 ... .48a ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.44 .86f .52 ... .20 .20 .24f .20 ... .60f

20 17 16 24 61 ... 39 22 ... 19 20 11 27 13 ... 17 14 15 ... ...

Market recap 84.00 41.53 45.61 17.21 56.32 2.44 42.07 144.65 20.74 63.30 84.87 48.45 33.07 13.24 12.06 26.60 17.18 32.45 3.30 22.83

+1.12 -.03 +.31 -.51 +.49 +.03 +.29 +.86 -.24 +1.53 -1.22 +1.17 -.58 +.24 -.03 -.16 -.24 -.25 +.04 -.17

-1.7 -2.0 -1.9 -2.8 -1.8 +17.9 +12.3 +3.9 -7.8 -4.7 +1.3 +7.3 +2.9 +13.3 -1.0 -1.4 +1.5 +4.7 +17.0 +20.6

Prime rate Time period

NYSE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

Most Active ($1 or more) Vol (00)

Last Chg

Citigrp BkofAm S&P500ETF EKodak GenElec

4192944 4.81 -.01 1407364 13.55 -.08 1238459 129.67 +.50 692013 3.71 -.81 670289 19.92 -.06

Gainers ($2 or more) Goldcp wt BuckTch PiperJaf FMajSilv g Natuzzi

Last

Chg %Chg

2.11 +.42 +24.9 25.11 +4.00 +18.9 41.93 +5.87 +16.3 11.86 +1.37 +13.1 3.67 +.42 +12.9

Losers ($2 or more) Name EKodak ChiXFash n C-TrCVOL DirDGldBr iP SER2K

Last

Chg %Chg

3.71 -.81 -17.9 6.48 -.88 -12.0 46.85 -4.72 -9.2 49.13 -4.24 -7.9 36.80 -3.17 -7.9

3.25 3.25 3.25

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

NthgtM g NovaGld g SamsO&G Hyperdyn NA Pall g

Last Chg

69828 2.68 +.19 62445 13.78 +.90 47465 2.29 +.30 44176 4.25 -.13 44127 6.89 +.36

Vol (00)

Microsoft Cisco Intel PwShs QQQ Yahoo

Gainers ($2 or more)

2,111 922 114 3,147 240 11

Chg %Chg

Name

SamsO&G Tofutti MincoG g MinesMgt Uranerz

2.29 2.45 2.27 3.10 5.49

+.30 +15.1 +.25 +11.4 +.22 +10.6 +.27 +9.5 +.47 +9.4

Keynote Identive MarshE rsh Icagen rs AnimalHlth

Losers ($2 or more)

Last

Last Chg 28.78 21.42 21.75 56.83 15.57

+.33 -.12 +.20 +.30 -.45

Chg %Chg

19.20 +4.22 +28.2 2.94 +.59 +25.1 2.66 +.50 +23.1 3.14 +.52 +19.9 2.97 +.43 +16.9

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

B&HO EstnLtCap LongweiPI OrionEngy ChinaNutri

3.92 4.18 2.53 4.50 2.78

-.29 -.22 -.11 -.17 -.10

-6.9 -5.0 -4.2 -3.6 -3.5

WSB Hldgs MIPS Tech HSW Int rs RF MicD Rdiff.cm

364 123 34 521 11 3

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

716048 647736 563247 546023 463492

Gainers ($2 or more)

Last

Last

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Name

Diary

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

Amex

Name

Name

Indexes

Chg %Chg

2.38 -.55 -18.8 13.23 -1.90 -12.6 3.30 -.39 -10.6 6.91 -.75 -9.8 6.88 -.72 -9.5

Diary 2,010 647 105 2,762 158 13

11,985.97 9,614.32 Dow Jones Industrials 5,256.80 3,742.01 Dow Jones Transportation 416.47 346.95 Dow Jones Utilities 8,200.24 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 2,225.48 1,689.19 Amex Index 2,766.17 2,061.14 Nasdaq Composite 1,296.06 1,010.91 S&P 500 13,770.32 10,596.20 Wilshire 5000 807.89 580.49 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

11,985.44 5,106.75 413.39 8,193.64 2,174.86 2,739.50 1,296.63 13,737.29 793.72

+8.25 +56.16 -1.19 +52.51 +32.63 +20.25 +5.45 +84.41 +13.76

YTD %Chg %Chg +.07 +1.11 -.29 +.65 +1.52 +.74 +.42 +.62 +1.76

52-wk %Chg

+3.52 ... +2.07 +2.88 -1.52 +3.27 +3.10 +2.82 +1.28

+17.09 +26.58 +7.25 +16.46 +19.45 +23.32 +18.14 +20.51 +28.35

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Wednesday.

Key currency exchange rates Wednesday compared with late Tuesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

362.05 2,669.54 4,049.07 5,969.21 7,127.35 23,843.24 37,585.40 22,007.00 3,354.72 10,401.90 2,110.46 3,220.78 4,909.00 5,899.17

+.92 s +.33 s +.73 s +.87 s +.97 s +.23 s +.31 s +.30 s -.13 t -.60 t +1.14 s +1.25 s +.43 s +.29 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

.9959 1.5885 1.0045 .002045 .1519 1.3687 .1284 .012129 .083063 .0336 .000894 .1542 1.0596 .0344

.9930 1.5798 1.0006 .002030 .1518 1.3675 .1284 .012174 .082747 .0336 .000894 .1530 1.0612 .0344

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 20.18 +0.04 +3.5 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 19.18 +0.04 +3.5 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.33 +0.01 +1.7 GrowthI 26.61 +0.25 +3.0 Ultra 23.37 +0.21 +3.2 American Funds A: AmcpA p 19.43 +0.08 +3.2 AMutlA p 25.95 +0.08 +2.5 BalA p 18.33 +0.01 +2.2 BondA p 12.16 -0.04 CapIBA p 50.40 +0.08 +1.0 CapWGA p 36.62 +0.16 +2.5 CapWA p 20.49 -0.03 +0.3 EupacA p 42.14 +0.30 +1.9 FdInvA p 37.71 +0.27 +2.8 GovtA p 13.84 -0.06 -0.5 GwthA p 31.19 +0.21 +2.5 HI TrA p 11.46 +0.01 +2.0 IncoA p 16.89 +0.04 +2.1 IntBdA p 13.42 -0.02 +0.1 ICAA p 28.99 +0.12 +2.9 NEcoA p 26.14 +0.13 +3.2 N PerA p 29.10 +0.20 +1.7 NwWrldA 54.14 +0.22 -0.8 SmCpA p 39.11 +0.30 +0.6 TxExA p 11.64 +0.01 -1.2 WshA p 27.89 +0.07 +2.5 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 30.37 +0.34 +0.8 IntlEqA 29.63 +0.33 +0.7 IntEqII I r 12.54 +0.15 +0.6 Artisan Funds: Intl 22.40 +0.18 +3.2 MidCap 34.12 +0.46 +1.5 MidCapVal 20.93 +0.18 +4.2 Baron Funds: Growth 51.81 +0.76 +1.1 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.71 -0.06 +0.2 DivMu 14.17 -0.4

TxMgdIntl 16.13 +0.10 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 17.92 +0.09 GlAlA r 19.70 +0.06 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.40 +0.06 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 17.95 +0.09 GlbAlloc r 19.79 +0.07 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 54.44 +0.44 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 29.40 +0.36 DivEqInc 10.38 +0.09 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 30.36 +0.38 AcornIntZ 41.01 +0.22 ValRestr 51.13 +0.61 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.28 +0.14 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 11.64 +0.08 USCorEq2 11.28 +0.10 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 35.07 +0.16 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 35.44 +0.17 NYVen C 33.90 +0.16 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.20 -0.02 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 21.93 +0.15 EmMktV 35.78 +0.24 IntSmVa 17.71 +0.14 LargeCo 10.22 +0.04 USLgVa 20.88 +0.15 US Small 21.74 +0.39 US SmVa 26.08 +0.48 IntlSmCo 17.52 +0.14 Fixd 10.33 IntVa 19.32 +0.09 Glb5FxInc 10.88 -0.02 2YGlFxd 10.15 -0.01 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 72.58 +0.08

+2.5 +2.3 +1.4 +1.4 +2.3 +1.5 +2.0 +0.5 +2.8 +0.6 +0.2 +1.2 -0.6 +3.4 +2.8 +2.1 +2.2 +2.1 +0.2 -1.0 -1.1 +3.0 +3.2 +3.8 +1.8 +2.0 +2.0 +0.1 +5.1

+3.4

Income 13.26 IntlStk 36.52 Stock 112.51 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.59 Eaton Vance I: GblMacAbR 10.24 LgCapVal 18.64 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.20 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.89 FPACres 27.34 Fairholme 35.48 Federated Instl: KaufmnR 5.57 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 20.30 StrInA 12.50 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 20.49 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.78 FF2015 11.51 FF2020 14.03 FF2020K 13.42 FF2025 11.74 FF2030 14.06 FF2030K 13.88 FF2035 11.73 FF2040 8.20 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 13.08 AMgr50 15.66 Balanc 18.61 BalancedK 18.61 BlueChGr 46.66 Canada 58.46 CapAp 26.06 CpInc r 9.69 Contra 68.92 ContraK 68.89 DisEq 23.47 DivIntl 30.73 DivrsIntK r 30.71

-0.03 +0.2 +0.18 +2.3 +0.25 +4.4 +0.06 +2.0 +0.01 +0.06 +2.0 +0.05 +3.8 +0.4 +0.14 +2.1 +0.04 -0.3 +0.04 +1.3 +0.14 +1.7 +1.2 +0.13 +1.7 +0.05 +0.04 +0.07 +0.07 +0.07 +0.09 +0.08 +0.08 +0.06 +0.09 +0.05 +0.06 +0.06 +0.45 +1.29 +0.44 +0.06 +0.47 +0.47 +0.21 +0.28 +0.29

+1.4 +1.5 +1.7 +1.7 +1.9 +2.1 +2.1 +2.3 +2.4 +3.2 +1.6 +2.1 +2.1 +2.9 +0.5 +2.8 +3.1 +1.8 +1.8 +4.2 +1.9 +2.0

DivGth 29.31 EmrMk 26.18 Eq Inc 45.85 EQII 18.92 Fidel 33.19 FltRateHi r 9.90 GNMA 11.44 GovtInc 10.39 GroCo 85.65 GroInc 18.89 GrowthCoK 85.61 HighInc r 9.11 Indepn 24.89 IntBd 10.55 IntmMu 9.95 IntlDisc 33.54 InvGrBd 11.37 InvGB 7.38 LgCapVal 12.20 LatAm 57.69 LevCoStk 29.22 LowP r 39.20 LowPriK r 39.19 Magelln 73.82 MidCap 29.33 MuniInc 12.09 NwMkt r 15.61 OTC 57.72 100Index 9.04 Ovrsea 33.31 Puritn 18.28 SCmdtyStrt 12.52 SrsIntGrw 11.29 SrsIntVal 10.47 STBF 8.46 SmllCpS r 20.41 StratInc 11.19 StrReRt r 9.63 TotalBd 10.73 USBI 11.30 Value 71.19 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 48.20 Fidelity Spartan:

+0.27 +0.26 +0.21 +0.08 +0.26 +0.01 -0.03 -0.03 +0.97 +0.11 +0.98 +0.01 +0.40 -0.03 +0.01 +0.28 -0.04 -0.03 +0.06 +0.34 +0.38 +0.32 +0.33 +0.73 +0.40 +0.01 -0.02 +0.66 +0.02 +0.27 +0.07 +0.21 +0.12 +0.05 -0.01 +0.27 +0.04 -0.02 -0.03 +0.61

+3.1 -0.6 +3.6 +3.7 +3.2 +1.3 -0.2 +3.0 +3.2 +3.0 +2.3 +2.2 +0.2 -0.5 +1.5 -0.1 +0.1 +3.1 -2.3 +2.8 +2.1 +2.2 +3.0 +1.7 -1.2 +0.1 +5.1 +3.4 +2.6 +2.1 -0.9 +5.3 +0.1 +4.1 +1.2 +0.5 +0.3 -0.1 +3.6

+1.48 -9.2

ExtMkIn 39.02 +0.51 500IdxInv 45.91 +0.20 IntlInxInv 36.39 +0.20 TotMktInv 37.53 +0.23 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 45.91 +0.20 TotMktAd r 37.53 +0.23 First Eagle: GlblA 46.83 +0.17 OverseasA 22.70 +0.05 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.19 +0.01 FoundAl p 10.77 HYTFA p 9.47 +0.01 IncomA p 2.23 +0.01 USGovA p 6.73 -0.02 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p IncmeAd 2.22 +0.01 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.25 +0.01 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 21.23 +0.04 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 7.36 +0.06 GlBd A p 13.50 +0.04 GrwthA p 18.61 +0.15 WorldA p 15.49 +0.12 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.53 +0.04 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 41.71 +0.40 GMO Trust III: Quality 20.60 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 14.76 +0.11 Quality 20.60 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.40 +0.01 MidCapV 37.22 +0.31 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.13 -0.02 CapApInst 37.50 +0.21 IntlInv t 61.56 +0.48 Intl r 62.14 +0.49

+2.2 +3.2 +3.5 +3.0 +3.2 +3.0 +1.0 +0.2 -1.2 NA -1.4 +2.9 -0.1 -0.3 +2.9 +2.8 +2.9 +5.4 -0.3 +4.6 +4.4 -0.3 +3.7 +2.4 +1.1 +2.4 +1.9 +3.0 +0.2 +2.1 +2.6 +2.6

Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 36.10 +0.32 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 36.11 +0.32 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 44.09 +0.35 Div&Gr 20.22 +0.06 TotRetBd 10.91 -0.04 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 11.96 -0.08 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r 16.97 +0.01 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 16.80 +0.09 CmstkA 16.30 +0.05 EqIncA 8.84 +0.02 GrIncA p 19.93 +0.04 HYMuA 8.74 +0.01 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 23.87 +0.35 AssetStA p 24.57 +0.36 AssetStrI r 24.78 +0.36 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.48 -0.04 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.48 -0.03 HighYld 8.35 +0.02 IntmTFBd 10.71 +0.01 ShtDurBd 10.98 USLCCrPls 21.18 +0.07 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 52.53 +0.29 PrkMCVal T 23.15 +0.14 Twenty T 67.42 +0.11 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.15 +0.06 LSGrwth 13.12 +0.08 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.32 +0.13 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 21.71 +0.13 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 14.75 +0.01 Longleaf Partners: Partners 29.06 +0.04

+4.2 +4.2 +4.1 +3.7 +0.1 -2.7 +1.5 +3.9 +3.6 +2.9 +3.7 -2.3 +0.6 +0.7 +0.7 +0.1 +0.2 +2.5 -0.5 +0.1 +2.5 +3.7 +2.6 +2.6 +1.9 +2.2 -2.1 -2.2 -2.0 +2.8

Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.40 StrInc C 15.03 LSBondR 14.35 StrIncA 14.95 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.19 -0.03 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.92 +0.08 BdDebA p 7.94 +0.01 ShDurIncA p 4.61 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.64 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.34 -0.01 ValueA 23.48 +0.01 MFS Funds I: ValueI 23.59 +0.02 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.84 +0.08 Matthews Asian: AsianGIInv 18.04 +0.06 PacTgrInv 23.01 +0.25 MergerFd 15.92 +0.02 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.40 -0.03 TotRtBdI 10.40 -0.03 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 38.17 +0.34 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 29.92 +0.07 GlbDiscZ 30.27 +0.06 QuestZ 18.10 +0.01 SharesZ 21.39 +0.04 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 46.54 +0.59 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 48.22 +0.60 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.41 +0.01 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.29 +0.14 Intl I r 20.13 +0.05 Oakmark r 42.82 +0.03 Old Westbury Fds:

+1.4 +1.5 +1.3 +1.5 +0.5 +2.9 +2.1 +0.5 +0.4 +1.7 +2.9 +3.0 +2.7 -1.8 +0.9 +0.5 +0.6 +2.2 +2.5 +2.5 +2.3 +2.9 +1.3 +1.2 +2.0 +2.0 +3.7 +3.7

GlobOpp 7.87 +0.04 GlbSMdCap 15.66 +0.09 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 44.38 +0.33 DvMktA p 35.39 +0.13 GlobA p 62.53 +0.33 GblStrIncA 4.31 Gold p 44.68 +1.75 IntBdA p 6.49 MnStFdA 33.18 +0.06 RisingDivA 15.92 +0.09 S&MdCpVl 32.79 +0.36 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.43 +0.07 S&MdCpVl 28.12 +0.31 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 14.38 +0.07 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 6.38 +0.03 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 35.01 +0.13 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.84 -0.02 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.55 +0.01 AllAsset 12.11 +0.02 ComodRR 9.24 +0.12 HiYld 9.43 +0.01 InvGrCp 10.50 -0.03 LowDu 10.40 -0.02 RealRtnI 11.31 -0.03 ShortT 9.88 TotRt 10.84 -0.02 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.31 -0.03 TotRtA 10.84 -0.02 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.84 -0.02 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.84 -0.02 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.84 -0.02 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 45.34 +0.16 Pioneer Funds A:

+2.1 +1.2 +1.8 -3.0 +3.6 +0.9 -10.4 -0.8 +2.4 +2.6 +2.3 +2.5 +2.3 +2.5 -3.7 -2.9 +0.1 -0.2 +0.5 -0.5 +1.9 +0.6 +0.3 -0.3 +0.3 +0.1 -0.4 +0.1 +0.1 +0.1 +0.1 -1.0

PionFdA p 42.00 Price Funds: BlChip 39.21 CapApp 20.78 EmMktS 34.79 EqInc 24.48 EqIndex 34.94 Growth 32.98 HlthSci 31.64 HiYield 6.90 IntlBond 9.93 IntlStk 14.44 MidCap 60.17 MCapVal 24.31 N Asia 18.82 New Era 53.47 N Horiz 34.03 N Inc 9.46 R2010 15.60 R2015 12.12 R2020 16.78 R2025 12.31 R2030 17.70 R2035 12.54 R2040 17.86 ShtBd 4.85 SmCpStk 34.97 SmCapVal 36.63 SpecIn 12.44 Value 24.23 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.99 VoyA p 24.63 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.89 PremierI r 20.66 TotRetI r 13.34 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 38.35 S&P Sel 20.19 Scout Funds: Intl 33.07 Selected Funds: AmShD 42.26 Templeton Instit:

+0.24 +2.5 +0.32 +0.01 +0.27 +0.09 +0.15 +0.30 +0.38 +0.01

+2.8 +2.3 -1.4 +3.3 +3.2 +2.6 +4.5 +2.2

+0.09 +0.58 +0.14 +0.13 +1.37 +0.55 -0.03 +0.05 +0.05 +0.07 +0.06 +0.11 +0.08 +0.12

+1.5 +2.8 +2.5 -1.9 +2.5 +1.6 -0.1 +1.7 +1.9 +2.1 +2.2 +2.4 +2.5 +2.5 +0.2 +1.6 +1.4 +0.9 +3.8

+0.56 +0.67 -0.01 +0.10

+0.05 +3.3 +0.18 +3.9 +0.20 +2.1 +0.36 +1.5 +0.13 +1.3 +0.19 +3.1 +0.08 +3.2 +0.30 +2.1 +0.21 +2.1

ForEqS 20.94 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 53.42 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 28.59 IntValue I 29.22 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 24.23 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 21.76 CAITAdm 10.58 CpOpAdl 79.46 EMAdmr r 39.59 Energy 127.56 ExtdAdm 42.27 500Adml 119.53 GNMA Ad 10.70 GrwAdm 32.54 HlthCr 52.94 HiYldCp 5.77 InfProAd 25.45 ITBdAdml 11.18 ITsryAdml 11.30 IntGrAdm 62.26 ITAdml 13.13 ITGrAdm 9.91 LtdTrAd 10.96 LTGrAdml 9.15 LT Adml 10.51 MCpAdml 94.64 MuHYAdm 9.93 PrmCap r 70.67 ReitAdm r 80.17 STsyAdml 10.68 STBdAdml 10.55 ShtTrAd 15.85 STIGrAd 10.78 SmCAdm 35.45 TtlBAdml 10.56 TStkAdm 32.53 WellslAdm 52.97 WelltnAdm 55.07 Windsor 47.39 WdsrIIAd 47.35

+0.15 +4.4 +0.42 +3.2 +0.31 +2.0 +0.31 +2.0 +0.12 +1.7 +0.05 +1.8 -0.9 +0.70 +3.5 +0.30 -0.7 +2.51 +4.7 +0.57 +2.4 +0.51 +3.2 -0.03 -0.1 +0.22 +3.0 +0.10 +2.5 +1.7 -0.07 -0.4 -0.05 -0.04 -0.1 +0.65 +1.2 -0.8 -0.03 +0.3 -0.2 -0.11 -1.6 +0.01 -1.3 +0.98 +2.7 +0.01 -1.4 +0.52 +3.5 +0.19 +2.2 -0.01 +0.1 -0.01 +0.1 -0.01 +0.53 -0.03 +0.20 -0.07 +0.07 +0.31 +0.16

+0.3 +1.9 -0.2 +3.0 +0.8 +2.5 +3.9 +3.9

Vanguard Fds: AssetA 24.99 CapOpp 34.40 DivdGro 14.79 Energy 67.94 EqInc 20.94 Explr 74.39 GNMA 10.70 GlobEq 18.34 HYCorp 5.77 HlthCre 125.45 InflaPro 12.96 IntlGr 19.57 IntlVal 33.11 ITIGrade 9.91 LifeCon 16.55 LifeGro 22.55 LifeMod 19.89 LTIGrade 9.15 Morg 18.59 MuInt 13.13 PrecMtls r 24.75 PrmcpCor 14.13 Prmcp r 68.11 SelValu r 19.27 STAR 19.41 STIGrade 10.78 StratEq 18.85 TgtRetInc 11.35 TgRe2010 22.58 TgtRe2015 12.61 TgRe2020 22.49 TgtRe2025 12.87 TgRe2030 22.16 TgtRe2035 13.40 TgtRe2040 22.02 TgtRe2045 13.83 USGro 18.82 Wellsly 21.86 Welltn 31.88 Wndsr 14.05 WndsII 26.68 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntlInst r

500 +0.02 +0.30 +0.03 +1.34 +0.08 +1.06 -0.03 +0.12 +0.22 -0.03 +0.21 +0.21 -0.03 +0.01 +0.10 +0.04 -0.11 +0.15 +0.47 +0.11 +0.50 +0.14 +0.05 -0.01 +0.27 +0.04 +0.03 +0.08 +0.05 +0.11 +0.07 +0.12 +0.07 +0.13 -0.03 +0.04 +0.10 +0.09

+2.2 +3.5 +2.9 +4.7 +2.7 +2.0 -0.1 +2.7 +1.7 +2.5 -0.3 +1.2 +3.0 +0.3 +1.2 +2.2 +1.6 -1.7 +3.1 -0.8 -7.5 +2.6 +3.5 +2.7 +1.7 +0.3 +2.9 +0.6 +1.2 +1.5 +1.8 +2.0 +2.2 +2.4 +2.4 +2.4 +3.1 +0.7 +2.5 +4.0 +3.9 +1.9

119.52 +0.51 +3.2

Growth

32.54 +0.22 +3.0

MidCap

20.85 +0.22 +2.7

SmCap

35.42 +0.53 +1.9

SmlCpGth

22.32 +0.40 +1.8

SmlCpVl

16.33 +0.19 +2.0

STBnd

10.55 -0.01 +0.1

TotBnd

10.56 -0.03 -0.2

TotlIntl

16.06 +0.11 +1.9

TotStk

32.52 +0.20 +3.0

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst

10.30 +0.05 +3.2

ExtIn

42.27 +0.57 +2.4

FTAllWldI r

95.76 +0.63 +2.1

GrwthIst

32.55 +0.23 +3.0

InfProInst

10.37 -0.02 -0.3

InstIdx

118.69 +0.51 +3.2

InsPl

118.69 +0.50 +3.2

InsTStPlus

29.41 +0.18 +3.0

MidCpIst

20.90 +0.21 +2.7

SCInst

35.45 +0.53 +2.0

TBIst

10.56 -0.03 -0.1

TSInst

32.54 +0.20 +3.1

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

98.74 +0.42 +3.2

STBdIdx

10.55 -0.01 +0.1

TotBdSgl

10.56 -0.03 -0.2

TotStkSgl

31.40 +0.19 +3.1

Western Asset: CorePlus I

10.80 -0.04 +0.5


B USI N ESS

B4 Thursday, January 27, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M   BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY CENTRAL OREGON ECONOMIC FORECAST: Produced by the Center for Economic Research and Forecasting, the program will feature an economic forecast for the U.S., the state and Central Oregon in particular, including comments on the political landscape. Tickets available at clucerf.org. For additional information or to purchase a table, contact Lawnae Hunter 541-3897910; 7:30-11:30 a.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend. HOW TO GET 5 MILLION PEOPLE TO VISIT YOUR WEBSITE: Offered by the Advertising Federation of Central Oregon, this AdBite is a presentation by “The Oatmeal,” aka Matthew Inman, about his journey and how social media played a role in his past business success and now his current blogging success with his website www. theoatmeal.com. Register at adfedco. org by noon Jan. 25; $15 for members; $35 for nonmembers; 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-385-1992. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: An overview on how to research investments and place online orders. Presented by Luiz Soutomaior. Register by Jan. 25; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794. FIRST-TIME HOMEBUYER: Learn the financial advantages of buying versus renting and how to prepare financially for a home purchase. To register, call 541-382-1795; 6 p.m.; Mid Oregon Credit Union, 202 N.E. Olney Ave., Bend. LIVE CONTRACTOR EDUCATION: Taught by Central Oregon Contractor Training, this live course is approved by the Oregon Construction Contractors Board and satisfies the educational requirement to take the test to become a licensed contractor in Oregon. Registration fee includes the Oregon Contractor’s Reference Manual. Prepayment is required. To register, go to http://noncredit.cocc.edu or call 541-383-7290. Class continues Jan. 28 and 29; $275; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700. WEB DESIGN SERIES: Three Hours to a Better Website, Jan. 27; Make Money with a Web Affiliate, Feb 3; Photoshop for the Web, Feb. 10. Sign up for individual classes or the series. Registration required at http:// noncredit.cocc.edu; $55 per class or $145 for the series; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270.

FRIDAY REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: Sponsored by Dana Signs; free for chamber members; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Dana Signs, 615 S.W. Umatilla Ave.; 541-548-7226. CONVERSATIONS FOR SUCCESS: Greg Ferrera will share thoughts and ideas on the changing real estate industry and how to be successful. RSVP by Jan. 25 to katella@ katellab.com; $15 for Women’s Council of Realtors members; $20 for nonmembers; 9-10:30 a.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-977-4861. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541617-8861.

SATURDAY CENTRAL OREGON FORAGE SEMINAR: RSVP to OSU Crook County Extension Service at 541447-6228; free; 8:30 a.m.; 4-H Clover Club Building, 502 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www. happyhourtraining.com. CROOKED RIVER RANCHTERREBONNE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE GALA/ANNUAL MEETING: A social evening with dinner and a silent auction at the Sandbagger Saloon in Crooked River Ranch. RSVP required to 541-9232679. Must be a chamber member to attend; $25; 6 p.m.

SUNDAY FINANCIAL PEACE UNIVERSITY: This 13-week course taught by Dave Ramsey teaches families and individuals how to manage their money. Ramsey is a personal money

management expert, author and host of a national radio program. Contact Briauna Widmer at 541-389-8241 for more information and to register; 6 p.m.; Christian Life Center, 21720 E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-389-8241.

MONDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www. happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY FROM HERE TO NET ZERO: Discover strategies for building highly efficient homes and powering them through renewable energy. Learn about incentives and tax credits available to those who build to high efficiency standards. Register at www. earthadvantage.org; free; 5:30-7 p.m.; Earth Advantage Institute, 345 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-306-3814. IS BECOMING A REAL ESTATE AGENT THE RIGHT CAREER FOR YOU?: Jim Mazziotti, a principal broker with Exit Bend Realty, presents this live, online program about whether being a real estate agent is the career for you. View the program at www.exitrealtybend.com and select the real estate show icon; free; 7 p.m.; 541-480-8835.

WEDNESDAY FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment call 541-388-1133 or visit www. yourmoneyback.org; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. Spanish translators will be available Feb. 9 and 19 and March 9 and 19; to schedule with an interpreter, call 541-382-4366. For more information and to schedule an appointment call 541-504-1389 or visit www.yourmoneyback.org; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. CURRENT MARKETING TRENDS, SOCIAL MEDIA, SEO AND REALWORLD RESULTS: Sponsored by BendBroadband, this Opportunity Knocks best-practices seminar will discuss how social media is changing customer interaction with businesses and how to maximize website traffic. Register at www.opp-knocks.org/ OK_Events/; $30 for OK members and $45 for nonmembers; 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541-317-9292.

SMALL-BUSINESS RETIREMENT SOLUTIONS: Learn about smallbusiness retirement plan choices and factors to consider when choosing a plan. Presented by Luiz Soutomaior. Register by Feb. 1; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794. CENTRAL OREGON BUILDERS ASSOCIATION MEET AND GREET: Learn more about the Earth Advantage Institute and network with Central Oregon builders; free; 5:307:30 p.m.; Earth Advantage Institute, 345 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541306-3814.

FRIDAY Feb. 4 BUILD A HIGH-PERFORMING TEAM: This Central Oregon Community College course is designed to help business managers build a cohesive team. Registration required. Call 541-383-7270 or visit http:// noncredit.cocc.edu; 8:30 a.m.-noon; County Conference Room in Madras, 66 S.E. D St. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment call 541-388-1133 or visit www. yourmoneyback.org; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Registration required; $15; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-3837290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

Feb. 3 COACHING SKILLS AND GIVING AND RECEIVING FEEDBACK: Learn how to improve workplace coaching and feedback skills. Register at http:// noncredit.cocc.edu; $85; 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7290. LEADERSHIP SKILLS SERIES: Central Oregon Community College’s Small Business Development Center will offer a nine-month series designed to give managers and team leaders the skills they need to succeed in their organizations; entire series costs $645, individual seminars are $85; 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700 or www.cocc.edu. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment call 541-388-1133 or visit www. yourmoneyback.org; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www. happyhourtraining.com.

City of Bend

Marken Heights Development, 2685 N.W. Nordeen, $197,572

Pahlisch Homes Inc., 19134 N.W. Park Commons, $270,923 Deschutes Landing LLC, 853 S.W. Crestline, $254,327

Scott R. Dahlen, 2023 S.W. Troon, $173,525

Deschutes Landing LLC, 857 S.W. Crestline, $254,327

Pettigrew Lots LLC, 61760 Bridgecliff, $188,886

Deschutes Landing LLC, 861 S.W. Crestline, $254,327

By Hiroko Tabuchi New York Times News Service

TOKYO — Toyota will fix about 1.7 million vehicles globally in two separate recalls over defective fuel pipes and highpressure fuel pumps, the Japanese automaker said Wednesday, drawing renewed attention to the quality of the company’s products. The decision to call back the vehicles follows promises by Toyota to be swifter in addressing problems in its products after it was criticized as being slow to react to previous defects.

The recall over faulty fuel pipes affects about 1.2 million units of the RAV4, Noah, Voxy and other models in Japan and about 140,000 units of the Avensis model in Europe, manufactured from 2000 to 2008, said Shiori Hashimoto, a spokeswoman for Toyota in Tokyo. A design flaw meant cracks could appear in the pipes, leading to fuel leaks, Hashimoto said. A loose valve in some of the affected cars’ high-pressure fuel pumps could also cause fuel to leak. The second recall includes

280,000 units across several models of the luxury Lexus brand overseas, mostly in the United States, as well as 75,000 units of the Crown, Mark X and Lexus brands in Japan. The pressure sensor attached to the engine’s fuel delivery pipe could come loose, causing the fuel to leak, Hashimoto said. Affected vehicles were made from 2006 to 2009. Toyota received complaints from customers about the defects but was not aware of any accidents linked to either defect, Hashimoto said.

Feb. 5 INTERMEDIATE QUICKBOOKS PRO: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. Spanish translators will be available Feb. 9 and 19 and March 9 and 19; to schedule with an interpreter call 541-382-4366. For more information and to schedule an appointment call 541-504-1389 or visit www.yourmoneyback.org; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment call 541447-3260 or visit www.yourmoney back.org; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Prineville COIC Office, 2321 N.E. Third St.; 541-447-3119.

Feb. 7 FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide access to free tax preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance with tax preparation. For more information and to schedule an appointment call 541-536-6237 or visit www.yourmoneyback.org; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-504-1389. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment call 541-388-1133 or visit www. yourmoneyback.org; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133.

TUESDAY Feb. 8 FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment call 541-388-1133 or visit www. yourmoneyback.org; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133.

NEWS OF RECORD PERMITS

Toyota recalls 1.7 million vehicles in Japan, Europe

SATURDAY

MONDAY THURSDAY

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Marla Polenz at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

Deschutes County

Boyd and Beverly Wilson, 10211 Sundance Ridge Loop, Redmond, $288,741.48 Tetherow Glen 58 LLC, 19473 Stafford Loop, Bend, $320,499.77 Crook County

Facebook, 735 S.W. Connect Way, Prineville, $682,500

New York Times News Service ile photo

Stephen Burke, left, the new chief executive of NBC Universal, will be introduced to company employees in a closed-circuit presentation today. He is tasked with reviving NBC’s flagging prime-time schedule. With him is Brian Roberts, chairman of NBC Universal’s new owner, Comcast.

New NBC boss tasked with revitalizing network Observers expect open, direct leadership By Tim Arango and Bill Carter New York Times News Service

Today, from Studio 6B in Rockefeller Center, home of “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon,” NBC anchor Brian Williams will officially introduce the network’s newest boss, Stephen Burke, in a close-circuit presentation to the entire company. Every one of the company’s 27,000 employees will also be given a coffee table book “NBCUniversal and Comcast: A Century in the Making” that interweaves the companies’ histories. Yet Burke’s real welcometo-NBC moment came six days ago with the ouster of the MSNBC anchor Keith Olbermann, a classic NBC episode of infighting, secret negotiations and the splashing of internal gossip across the press. After years in which NBC’s own internal dramas were often more compelling than anything it offered viewers — from the Jay Leno and Conan O’Brien fiasco to Olbermann’s famous temper to the hard-partying antics of the former entertainment boss, Ben Silverman, to the prime-time travails of Burke’s predecessor, Jeff Zucker. It now falls to Burke, a slightly patrician Republican, Harvard MBA who for 12 years has been far from the media glare as the trusted No. 2 executive at Comcast in Philadelphia, to revitalize the ailing network as the new chief executive of NBC Universal. His experience and personality are the antithesis to what NBC represents: He is not a programmer, has no experience in news, avoids playing corporate feuds in the press, and is so averse to playing internal politics that he has held meetings recently with executives at a Midtown Manhattan coffee shop rather than his temporary office in Rockefeller Center to avoid sparking office gossip. Can someone who relishes none of the forces that have defined NBC’s culture, and who

displays no desire to push his own agenda in the media, succeed at the helm of one of America’s biggest media companies?

Under pressure Overall, the company is doing well — its last quarter under General Electric’s ownership was its most profitable, thanks to its big cable channels like USA Network and Bravo — but Burke will have his hands full trying to revive NBC’s moribund prime-time schedule, particularly since his new employees regard him with suspicion, and many consider him reserved to the point of coldness. Longtime associates say Burke simply takes time to warm up to others. “He’s not shy, he’s not reticent, he’s just not voluble like me,” is how Warren Buffett, a longtime friend of Burke’s family, put it. “He’s going to be under more pressure than he should be because of the broadcast network,” said Bob Wright, the former chief executive of NBC Universal who met with Burke several times over the last year. Burke, 52, declined to speak on the record for this article. But in numerous interviews with executives who know him well and with several longtime NBC executives who spoke anonymously because they did not want to jeopardize future relations with the new boss, a portrait of Burke’s personality, style as an executive and how NBC Universal’s culture may change under his leadership, emerges. For nearly a decade Burke and the Comcast chief executive, Brian Roberts, annually had dinner in New York City with Jeffrey Immelt, the chief executive of General Electric, and at each meal Burke pressed him to sell NBC Universal. Immelt’s answer was always no, until the financial crisis came in 2008, and then the answer was yes. In the wake of the resignation of Olbermann, the left-leaning face of MSNBC, some critics

have speculated in the press that the move was a politically motivated decision by Comcast. While most of Burke’s political donations have been to Republicans, Burke describes himself to associates as a “soft Republican,” and said he had voted for Barack Obama for president, even though he contributed to John McCain’s campaign, in 2008. “My expectation is, if there were to be a change, there would be a much more open environment with the free flow of information,” said Michael Lynton, the chairman and chief executive of Sony Pictures Entertainment, who worked for Burke in the 1990s at Disney. “He’s very direct. There’s very little beating around the bush.”

The task ahead Burke rented an apartment in New York near Lincoln Center, but his family will stay in Philadelphia so his younger children can continue in their schools. His chief challenge will be revitalizing the broadcast network — an American cultural institution that nonetheless is now the bottom-rated network in prime time, losing more than $500 million a year, according to Comcast executives. “Your job as a media executive is to run all your businesses well,” said Peter Chernin, the former president of News Corp. who now runs his own firm, The Chernin Group, and is a close friend of Burke’s. “He won’t shy away from the difficult decisions.” If Burke stays true to form, those decisions will be made privately, a break from NBC’s last few years of leaks and public humiliation. “That may be a good thing, because NBC has been overexposed for years,” said one NBC Universal executive. “We probably need to get away from that. But Steve may have to recognize that there is huge public interest in NBC. It’s a national institution. He’s going to have to talk about it sometimes.”


L

Inside

C OREGON Suspect in police shooting called an avid outdoorsman, see Page C3. OBITUARIES Influential country singer Charlie Louvin dies at 83, see Page C5.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2011

Jefferson $1M added to school renovation plans County hopes to extend jail levy REDMOND

Board OKs use of savings from bond-related projects

By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

REDMOND — The Redmond School Board on Wednesday approved spending an extra $1 million on planned renovations at two elementary schools and Tumalo Community School, work that will be paid for with savings from bond-related projects. The extra money became available after more bond projects were completed below budget. The district had previously projected it would save about $15 million on bond projects, which include Sage Elementary, the new high school and various building renovations. The expansion plans and extra money exemplify the current fiscal conundrum in which the district finds itself. On one

hand, the district is now deciding how to spend about $16 million in bond savings, which includes the extra money approved Wednesday. Because the money comes from a bond, the district cannot spend it on things like salaries or new teachers. On the other hand, the district faces a shortfall that could range between about $6 million and more than $10 million, a situation that makes cuts likely. The district’s annual budget is about $50 million. During its Wednesday meeting, the board discussed how some of the savings will be spent on the three schools. More than $9 million of the bond savings will go to Redmond High School renovations, but those fixes have not been finalized yet. See Schools / C2

Recommendations for new high school Redmond School District staff also made two recommendations regarding the new high school, which is set to open in time for the 2012-13 school year. Jon Bullock, the district’s director of strategic planning, recommended high school boundaries follow the existing middle-school boundaries. Under that plan, students from Tumalo Community School and Obsidian Middle School would attend the new high school. Students at Elton Gregory Middle School and Terrebonne Community School would attend Redmond High.

Under Bullock’s proposal, the district would establish a transfer policy to allow students to choose a different school. Bullock also recommended the school open with freshmen, sophomores and juniors who already live in the proposed boundaries. Those students, he suggested, should be allowed to transfer to Redmond High if they want. In its first year, the new, unnamed school would have about 650 students, Bullock estimated. The board took no action on the recommendations, and several staff and public meetings will be scheduled to discuss the proposals.

‘ It’ sthefi rstrose ofmyl i fe’ On the eve of a regional homeless count, one couple celebrates a special occasion

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

ammie and Dave Downer share a soda and a cigarette to celebrate Jammie’s 32nd birthday at a homeless

J

camp in Bend on Wednesday. Dave, 38, also gave her a $1.29 rose. “It’s the first rose of my life,” Jammie said. They’ve been together for three years, they said, and have been homeless the entire time. Today, the Central

Oregon Homeless Leadership Coalition is conducting a one-day count of people who are homeless or in transi-

tional housing in Deschutes, Crook and Jefferson counties. The count is part of a national effort to identify and assist those who are struggling to find adequate housing.

WARM SPRINGS

School’s dilemma: the money or the principal? Eligibility for millions in federal funds requires transition, firing of Dawn Smith By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

Warm Springs Elementary School could receive millions in federal stimulus money to bolster educational efforts, but the district would have to make a difficult decision to receive the money, including replacing the elementary school’s principal. It’s a decision the Jefferson County School District has faced before: go after millions but let go of educators district officials believe in.

In 2010, Madras High School received a similar grant. Over a threeyear period the school will receive about $3.7 million. Marshall High School, a Bend-La Pine alternative school, will receive $2 million over a three-year period under the same federal program. Warm Springs Elementary School could receive anywhere from $1 million to $2 million a year if the district’s grant proposal is accepted. On Tuesday, the district sent a letter of intent to apply for the grant.

“The one part about this grant that we as a community disagree on, it focuses the attention on one person, when we know it’s a systemic concern,” said Jefferson County Superintendent Rick Molitor. If the district receives the grant, it has to choose from one of four options laid out by the federal government. All options include replacing the principal. District officials chose the “transformational model” for the high school and will likely choose the same if they receive

money for the Warm Springs Elementary School. It would require the district to restructure the elementary school and includes extending time kids spend in class and planning time for teaching. One of the reasons the Warm Springs Elementary School qualifies for the money is that it did not meet it’s Adequate Yearly Progress reports for five years in a row. The AYP report measures academic and attendance benchmarks that students must meet each year under the federal No Child Left Behind Act. See Funds / C5

Commissioners hope voters will agree to keep 99-cent property tax By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

MADRAS — Jefferson County will again ask its voters for a levy to support operations at the jail but isn’t asking for an increase. Commissioners voted unanimously Wednesday afternoon to place on the ballot an extension of the current levy of 99 cents per $1,000 of assessed valuation for three years. The levy extension will appear on the May 17 ballot. Under the current levy, which expires in June, as well as the proposed levy, the owner of a home assessed at $200,000 pays $198 in taxes to fund operations at the jail. Voters rejected a proposed levy of $1.19 per $1,000 of assessed valuation in the November election. County Commission Chair Mike Ahern said he thinks the November levy failed because voters wish to see government find ways to stretch the budget. “I’m not saying these are easy changes, but I think the public expects us to make some changes,” Ahern said. “(Economic struggles are) real for the people. Are they going to feel sorry for the county when property values are currently terrible?” “I’m emphatic on the 99 cents,” Ahern said. “We got a good thing going (at the jail), and I think we can keep it going at 99 cents, considering the public is hurting so bad.” By asking to keep the levy steady, the county will have to make changes by cutting the jail’s operational budget to make up for rising costs, according to Sheriff Jim Adkins. Adkins spoke to commissioners before the vote and urged them to again ask voters for a levy at the $1.19 rate. “During my campaign, I said I would go for $1.19 because that what it costs to operate the jail,” Adkins said. “If we go to 99 cents, we won’t be able to house 95 inmates as planned, but we will try to stay at 70 inmates, as we have now. We will have times where only two (corrections officers) are on the floor, and we will change the way we do vacation for the jail.” See Levy / C6

Bend man enters guilty pleas in courtroom scuffle Caleb Goodpasture struggled with sheriff’s deputies while trying to flee By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

A Bend man who fought with corrections deputies in a Deschutes County courtroom in August pleaded guilty on Wednesday to charges stemming from the incident. Caleb Goodpasture, 20, entered Alford pleas to charges of assaulting a public safety officer and two counts of fourth-degree assault. The Alford plea is a form of guilty plea in which the accused does not admit to wrongdoing, but pleads guilty to avoid trial. On Aug. 17., Goodpasture was in Deschutes County Circuit Court to plead guilty to a variety of charges resulting from incidents in April and May. Caleb Goodpasture had been in jail Goodpasture since May 22, when police arrested him after an incident during which he held his estranged wife, their 9-month-old son, and two females ages 17 and 19 at knifepoint for roughly 3½ hours in a west-side Bend apartment. As Goodpasture’s plea hearing drew to a close and deputies attempted to escort him from the courtroom, he refused, telling the deputies he wanted to speak to his family before going back to jail. Goodpasture struggled with the deputies, and attempted to run for the door of the courtroom. Goodpasture was later sentenced to 7½ years in prison and 336 months of post-prison supervision for the incidents in April and May. See Goodpasture / C5


C2 Thursday, January 27, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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N  R

Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Children’s PPP logo contest under way Submissions for U.S. Bank Kid’s Mini Pole Pedal Paddle logo contest are due by Feb. 18, according to a news release. The winning art submission will be featured as the official

logo for the children’s race to take place May 22. Entries should be submitted on white paper with colored designs, and can represent any of the race activities. To be considered, the design must feature several words, including “U.S. Bank Kid’s Mini

Pole Pedal Paddle,� “Bend, Oregon,� “2011,� and “MBSEF,� and must display the artist’s signature. On the back of the design, information about the name, age, grade level, teacher, school, and phone number of the child should be provided.

POLICE LOG Entries can be delivered or mailed to Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation, 563 SW 13th Street, Suite 201, Bend, OR 97702 before 5 p.m. on Feb. 18. For more information about the contest and race, call 541388-0002, or e-mail molly@mbsef.org.

NOT MEANT FOR OFF-ROADING

The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Redmond Police Department

DUII — Ronald Alan Lusk, 54, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 9:45 p.m. Jan. 25, in the area of South U.S. Highway 97 and Southwest Veterans Way. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:40 p.m. Jan. 25, in the 2800 block of Southwest Indian Circle. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 7:38 p.m. Jan. 25, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Theft — A scooter was reported stolen at 5:40 p.m. Jan. 25, in the 2600 block of Northwest Cedar Avenue. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 11:12 a.m. Jan. 25, in the area of Southwest Ninth Street and Southwest Black Butte Boulevard. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:48 a.m. Jan. 25, in the 300 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 1:07 a.m. Jan. 25, in the 1400 block of Northeast Seventh Street. Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 8:10 a.m. Jan. 25, in the area of

Schools David Patton / Albany Democrat-Herald

A Freightliner truck sits in the Calapooia River on Wednesday, after the driver lost control while traveling southbound on Interstate 5 and crashing in between freeway lanes north of Brownsville. The driver was treated for minor injuries. Oregon State Police are investigating the accident.

I-5 may get more animal-friendly By Mark Freeman Mail Tribune

WOLF CREEK — A stretch of Interstate 5 near Wolf Creek could become Southern Oregon’s first highway project designed with wildlife in mind. An Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife biologist is working with the Oregon Department of Transportation to help incorporate animal-friendly features into an upcoming widening project so critters and cars can steer clear of each other in this area known for collisions with animals. Innovations include guard rails that migrating deer and elk can see through more easily; roadside brush clearing to keep deer and foxes from dashing into the paths

of vehicles; even culverts adapted slightly so snails are more apt to wiggle through, along with others built strictly as animal tunnels. These little tweaks could improve the free-flow of animals of all kinds past a roadway that can disrupt animal migrations and create dangerous interactions for motorists. “It makes the highway more permeable, and improving the permeability of a highway just a little can make a difference,� says Simon Wray, ODFW’s liaison with ODOT on the project. The impacts could be dramatic. Statistics show that the average animal-vehicle collision costs between $2,500 and $3,000 to fix. And major highways not only

cause animal deaths via collisions, they also can lock animals out of suitable habitat, and over time alter the genetics of migratory animals all because some animals become chicken while crossing the road. “We’re not just talking deer here,� Wray says. “From snails to elk. These help animals of all different stripes.� While other states have seen massive and expensive land bridges or underpasses designed to aid in the free-flow of wildlife, Oregon has had few wildlifefriendly highway projects. Unlike fish-passage requirements for roads crossing streams, Oregon has no law requiring critter-friendly passage for roads

except when there’s potential for impacts on threatened or endangered animals. Oregon’s only projects to date are a stretch of U.S. Highway 97 near Bend altered to improve mule-deer migration and a piece of Highway 244 near Elgin altered for lynx passage, Wray says. Then along came the Jumpoff Joe to Glendale Paving and Climbing Lanes, ODOT’s upcoming project to repave 14 miles of freeway between Glendale and Hugo. The $49.5 million project, which is scheduled for 2013, includes the planned addition of a climbing lane a slow lane about two miles long for trucks ascending one of the three passes on this stretch.

Auschwitz, Birkenau death camps liberated by Soviet troops in 1945 The Associated Press Today is Thursday, Jan. 27, the 27th day of 2011. There are 338 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY In 1981, President Ronald Reagan greeted the 52 former American hostages released by Iran at the White House. ON THIS DATE In 1756, composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was born in Salzburg, Austria. In 1880, Thomas Edison received a patent for his electric incandescent lamp. In 1901, opera composer Giuseppe Verdi died in Milan, Italy, at age 87. In 1943, some 50 bombers struck Wilhelmshaven in the first all-American air raid against Germany during World War II. In 1944, the Soviet Union announced the complete end of the deadly German siege of Leningrad, which had lasted for more than two years. In 1945, Soviet troops liberated the Nazi concentration camps Auschwitz and Birkenau in Poland. In 1951, an era of atomic testing in the Nevada desert began as an Air Force plane dropped a one-kiloton bomb on Frenchman Flat.

T O D AY IN HISTORY In 1967, astronauts Virgil “Gus� Grissom, Edward White and Roger Chaffee died in a flash fire during a test aboard their Apollo spacecraft. More than 60 nations signed a treaty banning the orbiting of nuclear weapons. In 1973, the Vietnam peace accords were signed in Paris. In 1977, the Vatican issued a declaration reaffirming the Roman Catholic Church’s ban on female priests. TEN YEARS AGO Two Darmouth College professors, Half and Susanne Zantop, were murdered at their home in Hanover, N.H., by two teenagers. (Robert Tulloch later pleaded guilty to murder and conspiracy and is serving a sentence of life without parole; James Parker pleaded guilty to being an accomplice to second-degree murder and is serving a sentence of 25 years to life.) Ten people were killed when a plane that was bringing people home from Oklahoma State University’s basketball game against Colorado crashed in a field outside Denver. Lynn Swann and Ron Yary were both elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in their 14th year of eligibility.

FIVE YEARS AGO Salzburg, Austria, held an exuberant 250th birthday party for its native son, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Western Union delivered its last telegram. The first inhalable version of insulin, Exubera, won federal approval. ONE YEAR AGO Acknowledging that “change has not come fast enough,� President Barack Obama vowed in his State of the Union address to get jobless millions back to work while fighting for ambitious overhauls of health care, energy and education. Apple CEO Steve Jobs unveiled the iPad tablet computer during a presentation in San Francisco. J.D. Salinger, the reclusive author of “The Catcher in the Rye,� died in Cornish, N.H., at age 91. Actress Zelda Rubinstein died in Los Angeles at age 76. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Singer Bobby “Blue� Bland is 81. Actor James Cromwell is 71. Actor John Witherspoon is 69. Rock musician Nick Mason (Pink Floyd) is 66. Rhythm-

and-blues singer Nedra Talley (The Ronettes) is 65. Ballet star Mikhail Baryshnikov is 63. Chief U.S. Justice John Roberts is 56. Country singer Cheryl White is 56. Country singer-musician Richard Young (The Kentucky Headhunters) is 56. Actress Mimi Rogers is 55. Rock musician Janick Gers (Iron Maiden) is 54. Commentator Keith Olbermann is 52. Rock singer Margo Timmins (Cowboy Junkies) is 50. Rock musician Gillian Gilbert is 50. Actress Bridget Fonda is 47. Actor Alan Cumming is 46. Country singer Tracy Lawrence is 43. Rock singer Mike Patton is 43. Rapper Tricky is 43. Rock musician Michael Kulas (James) is 42. Actor-comedian Patton Oswalt is 42. Actor Josh Randall is 39. Country singer Kevin Denney is 35. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “When a true genius appears, you can know him by this sign: that all the dunces are in a confederacy against him.� — Jonathan Swift, Anglo-Irish satirist (1667-1745)

Continued from C1 Doug Snyder, the district’s chief operations officer, said spending the extra savings on renovations was consistent with the bond’s original goals. “In (the bond campaign) we said we were going to spend $10 million on repairs and renovations,� Snyder said. “From my chair, the goal is to spend every dollar we have.� At three of the schools slated for improvements funded by bond savings, renovations include making upgrades required by the Americans with Disabilities Act. But all three schools will undergo other upgrades. For $1.8 million, the district expects to complete several projects at M.A. Lynch Elementary, including constructing a new four-classroom wing, renovating classrooms, upgrading bathrooms and some electrical and heating units. At Tumalo, the district will spend $1.6 million on various projects that include a new special education suite, and some renovations to classrooms and bathrooms. The $2.5 million budget for work at John Tuck Elementary will, among other things, cover a new boiler, upgraded heating and electrical systems, energy-efficient windows, renovated bathrooms and two new classrooms. Staff from each of the buildings helped decide what projects were most important.

Southeast Algonquian Court. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 11:08 a.m. Jan. 25, in the area of Northwest Harwood Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

DUII — Will Francis Fackler, 31, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:59 p.m. Jan. 25, in the area of Southwest Sixth Street and Southwest Forest Avenue in Redmond. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:44 p.m. Jan. 25, in the 1500 block of Southwest Cline Falls Road in Redmond. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 3:34 p.m. Jan. 25, in the area of Hunnell and Tumalo roads in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:58 p.m. Jan. 25, in the 63300 block of Britta Street in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:54 p.m. Jan. 25, in the 8000 block of North U.S. Highway 97 in Terrebonne. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:33 p.m. Jan. 25, in the 19700 block of Baker Road in Bend. Theft — Bicycles were reported stolen at 9:26 a.m. Jan. 25, in the 60300 block of Cheyenne Road in Bend.

BEND FIRE RUNS Monday 18 — Medical aid calls. Tuesday 16 — Medical aid calls.

Tumalo Principal Michelle Herron said she was impressed by how far the money would go at her school. “I feel like we’re getting a lot for our money,� Herron told the board. No schedule has been set for when the work will begin. Despite excitement about the work at the district’s oldest buildings, school officials know more difficult times are not far away. For several months, the district has described its projected 2011-12 budget shortfall as more than $5 million. As the announcement of Gov. John Kitzhaber’s biennial budget nears, the district has revised that estimate. The projected shortfall now ranges as high as $10 million, a worst-case scenario, according to the district’s Director of Operations Mike McIntosh. That number reflects what would happen if the governor’s budget is around $5.4 billion and there are no staff concessions made. If the district makes no changes this year to salary or schedules and the state budget is set at $5.75 billion, the district’s shortfall will be about $6.1 million, McIntosh said. Whatever the shortfall is, the cuts will likely come from people, programs or salaries, McIntosh said. “The solution will be a combination of those things,� he said. Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

Salem man sentenced to 40 years for sex abuse The Associated Press SALEM — A 46-year-old man convicted of sexually abusing a 13-year-old girl was sentenced in Salem to 40 years in prison. Marion County Deputy District Attorney Jodie Bureta told the Statesman Journal her goal in recommending the term was to ensure that Roland J. “RJ� Brumbaugh Jr. will be a very

old man by the time he is even eligible for release. Brumbaugh represented himself at the trial earlier this month in which he also was convicted of tampering with a witness. The victim, now 14, attended the trial. Brumbaugh volunteered last year at Sprague High School but knew the victim outside of school.

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O New head of forestry department has 24 years’ experience By Jeff Barnard The Associated Press

GRANTS PASS— The new director of the Oregon Department of Forestry is a 24-year veteran of the agency who started as a spokesman during battles over the northern spotted owl and rose through the ranks to confront budget cuts that threaten to undermine state logging controls. The state Board of Forestry voted 4-2 in Salem on Wednesday to name Doug Decker to lead the department. Decker replaces Marvin Brown, who resigned last October after the board decided it wanted a new leader who could forge better relationships with various interest groups while the department deals with tough budget cuts. “Doug is an excellent communicator and understands the challenges facing the Oregon Department of Forestry,” board chairman John Blackwell said in a statement. The department manages state forests, regulates logging on private timberlands, fights wildfires on 16 million acres of state, private and federal lands, and advises cities on their urban forests as well as owners of small woodlands. Decker faces the tough task of trying to satisfy counties, mills and loggers who want more timber out of the Clatsop and Tillamook state forests without running afoul of conservation groups demanding habitat preservation for salmon and the spotted owl.

POLICE OFFICER SHOOTING

Suspect who fled into woods described as an outdoorsman But he may be holed up in an empty vacation home, authorities say By Nigel Duara and Jeff Barnard The Associated Press

WALDPORT — A man who fled into the wilderness along the Oregon Coast after allegedly shooting a police officer is an avid outdoorsman who designs his own camouflage clothing, his brother said Wednesday as police searched for the suspect on a small peninsula. David Anthony Durham has evaded capture since Sunday, when police say he shot and critically wounded Lincoln City police officer Steven Dodds during a traffic stop. A threeday manhunt has turned up few clues, other than Durham’s dog Huckleberry, who was found Wednesday.

‘We’re not leaving’ Newport Police Chief Mark Miranda says it’s possible Durham is holed up in a vacant coastal vacation home. Police have searched more than 250 homes, but aren’t searching those that are locked without the owner’s permission. “He’s probably waiting for us to leave, but we’re not leaving,” Miranda said. “Even if he is a survivalist, he can only survive for so long. He may like to eat bugs and stuff, but that gets old.” Durham’s brother, Michael, said his brother liked to camp but wasn’t a survivalist. He had no military background. “He wasn’t some anti-government nut expecting a collapse,” said his brother Michael Dur-

Rick Bowmer /The Associated Press

A member of the Oregon State Police SWAT team trains his gun on a door during a search in the Bayview community of Waldport on Wednesday. Police are searching for 43-year-old David Anthony Durham, who is suspected of shooting and critically wounding an officer on the Oregon Coast. ham. “He had the outdoorsman skills like anybody who spends time outdoors should have.” Michael Durham says his brother lost touch with reality several months ago after taking pain medication for an injured shoulder. David Durham seemed especially struck by a recently released movie about aliens invading a remote Alaskan town, making its residents disappear. “David, my brother, had thought it was a documentary,” Michael said. “It made us do a double-take.” Police issued a warrant on Tuesday for Durham, 43, on charges including attempted aggravated murder. The search has focused on a neighborhood and the woods in a peninsula in Waldport, where residents have said most of the houses are rentals or vacation homes, unoccupied during Oregon’s blustery coastal winter.

Troubling signs Durham’s acquaintances knew him as a friendly neighbor on rural Sauvie Island in Portland and avid landscaper who was also a volunteer firefighter. But six months ago, he was moved to “inactive service” within the Sauvie Island Fire District for unspecified emotional problems. He started slipping deeper into a depression after a breakup, friends said, and entertained paranoid fantasies about being pursued by police. On Sunday night, Dodds pulled over a 1984 Dodge truck driven by a man police believe to be Durham on a coastal highway. At some point during the encounter, Dodds, 45, was shot more than once. Dodds managed to call in the shooting to dispatchers despite his wounds, and Durham sped away south on Highway 101.

O  B Big rig will carry giant Bus passengers picture of missing boy restrain fractious man PORTLAND — A tractortrailer rig with a giant picture of Kyron Horman is heading for the road in a renewed effort to find the boy who vanished from his Portland school in June. The Oregonian reports the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office announced this week that it has partnered with the Washington State Patrol to include the boy in WSP’s Homeward Bound Program. As part of that program, Kyron’s image has been affixed to the side of a truck operated by Gordon Trucking Inc., which runs routes nationwide. Despite a massive search and an extensive criminal investigation, no sign of the boy has ever been found.

Astoria school will close after 113 years ASTORIA — Parents of children attending a 113-year-old Catholic school in Astoria have been told it will close at the end of the school year because of escalating budget deficits. Principal Tom Rogozinski and the Rev. Ken Sampson told parents Wednesday in a letter that the decision to close St. Mary, Star of the Sea was made by the Archdiocese of Portland. They say the school has faced serious financial challenges for several decades and those have escalated in recent years with budget deficits between $100,000 and $250,000. The Oregonian reports the letter says the closure is not tied to any impropriety or mismanagement by current or previous leadership. The two men cited what they called “the profoundly challenging nature of funding Catholic schools in the 21st century.”

MILWAUKIE — Several passengers on a Portland-area transit bus helped restrain a man accusing of roughing up the bus driver. Milwaukie Police Officer Ulli Neitch says witnesses describe a man who was screaming while waiting for a TriMet bus Wednesday afternoon. He began barking orders once on the bus, stormed to the front and began harassing and shoving the driver as the bus traveled along a busy street. Former Marine Derek Kamahoahoa tells the Oregonian he had just moved up near the driver when the agitated man turned and grabbed him. Kamahoahoa says he grabbed and held the man. Fellow passengers Gerald Menefee and Malcolm Vancouvering helped hold the man until police arrived. No passengers were injured. Milwaukie police arrested Jeffrey Todd Pavey for investigation of disorderly conduct, harassment and reckless endangerment.

Rabies found in foxes in Cave Junction area CAVE JUNCTION — The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife says tests have confirmed two new cases of rabies in the Cave Junction area. The department says there have been a total of nine cases of rabies in foxes in Josephine County — eight from Cave Junction and one from Merlin — since the beginning of 2010. Veterinarians are recommending that all pets in the area, including cats, be vaccinated. Horse owners are urged to consider vaccinating their animals. And, residents are urged not to feed or attempt to handle wild animals. — From wire reports

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C4 Thursday, January 27, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Our ‘profound misunderstanding’

T

he Bend-La Pine administrator in charge of pre-high school curriculum didn’t much like our recent editorial on Pilot Butte Middle School’s doomed TAG class. Accord-

ing to Lora Nordquist, Ed.D., we’re guilty of feeding our readers “misleading and incorrect points” and laboring under a “profound misunderstanding” of the district’s instructional programs. We’d be much better informed, she wrote in an op-ed piece on Wednesday’s page, if we spent more time “doing the research and engaging in discourse with those in the field.” Actually, not one, but two, editorial writers engaged in discourse with Nordquist prior to the editorial’s appearance. But those conversations simply failed to produce agreement, which we suspect is the real problem. That hasn’t changed. We continue to disagree with the district notwithstanding Nordquist’s criticism. So, we’ll repeat the facts here and ask readers who agree with us a rhetorical question: Is your opinion based upon profound misunderstanding and a reluctance to become more knowledgeable, or are you — as a taxpayer and parent — smart enough to recognize a bad decision when you see one? The Pilot Butte program we discussed on Jan. 16 is one of two such “block” classes districtwide intended to serve middle schoolers who’ve been deemed “talented and gifted” (TAG). Pilot Butte’s TAG class focuses on science and math, and its sister program at Cascade Middle School focuses on humanities. The two programs are open to TAG students throughout the district, but the Pilot Butte program has generated less interest. Fewer than a dozen TAG students are now enrolled in Pilot Butte’s class, Nordquist told us earlier this month, yet its actual enrollment is twice that number. How could such a thing be? Ambitious Pilot Butte students who don’t carry the TAG label also may take advantage of the advanced curriculum the class offers. And that’s what has the district’s knickers in a twist. By allowing non-TAG middle schoolers to share a classroom with TAG students, administrators fear that Pilot Butte Middle School is becoming “tracked,” or separated according to academic ability. So, naturally, the class must be killed. We fail to see the problem with Pilot Butte’s advanced science and math program. Those TAG students who want to be there are, and the modest TAG enrollment has given other students an opportunity to stretch themselves. Zapping the class might not be a big deal to TAG students, as they’re entitled by law to special treatment anyway. But it represents a significant lost opportunity for ambitious students who haven’t been tapped by the magic TAG wand. Does anyone really believe they’ll be pushed as hard in a standard classroom as they are now? Meanwhile, suppose for a second that Pilot Butte’s advanced class were so popular among TAG kids that no seats were available for nonTAG kids. Nordquist could hardly argue that the class suffered from “lack of interest,” as she did Wednesday. Presumably, the class would be in

no danger. But if separating a bunch of TAG kids from the general student population isn’t “tracking,” then what is? Oh, well, perhaps we’d have a better understanding of the kind of equity policies Bend-La Pine is pursuing if we read a book called “The Flat World and Education,” as Nordquist urged this week. From its pages, we might have learned that “In countries such as Finland, Japan and South Korea, whose students’ scores on internationally benchmarked assessments are among the highest in the world, students are not routinely ability grouped until high school, if at all.” Of course, the relevance of this book to Pilot Butte’s TAG class is a little murky, as preserving a single mixed class hardly constitutes routine grouping by ability. But we did pick up the book this week and read the chapter dedicated to Finland, Singapore and South Korea. The relevance is still murky. After all, there are vast differences between the U.S. and all of these nations, and blithely holding them up as educational role models is a risky exercise. While South Korea may or may not be able to teach the U.S. a thing or two about early grade equity, the country’s educational system has its own set of problems. The book notes that “Koreans worry about the narrowing of the curriculum that they attribute to the nation’s college entrance examination,” which some have characterized as “a national obsession.” This obsession has “given rise to an extensive private tutoring industry ... that is bemoaned in virtually every government report over the last decade.” Oh, well. Nobody’s perfect. Even Bend-La Pine. While administrators bemoan the mixed nature of Pilot Butte’s TAG-level class, Cascade Middle School’s advanced humanities block employs a very similar open-door policy. Of the 91 seventhgraders taking advanced humanities, 13 aren’t TAG students. Ditto for 31 of the 85 eighth-graders in the program. Is there an uproar at Cascade about de facto tracking? Um. Nope. Nordquist told us earlier this month that “they have not expressed any difficulties” at Cascade. This double standard puts the district’s self-congratulatory pursuit of equity in an entirely different light. If we were the parents of intellectually curious, non-TAG students at Pilot Butte, we’d wonder why the mixed classrooms that flourish at Cascade Middle School are simply intolerable at our own. And we doubt any degree of discourse would make us feel better about the district’s solution.

My Nickel’s Worth Merkley’s partisanship As stated in a Jan. 11 Bulletin article, Sen. Jeff Merkley’s doltish remarks pertaining to the tragic Tucson incident reflect his inability to think for himself, or to ascertain that he needs to take his own repetitive advice as to toning down “political rhetoric.” Putting the “cross hairs,” as his own hypocritical diatribe did, on any other individual than the demented shooter demeans the victims, his constituents and the people of our great nation. Merkley’s highly partisan elucidations commit an embarrassing disservice and raise concerns as to his own ability to properly and fairly represent our state, much less do what is best to heal our nation during traumatic times. As individuals, as a state and as a nation, our focus and prayers are on the wounded and the families of the dead, not on taking a regurgitated political opportunity to promote a selfish, unstable circus of political insanity! Mary Silcox Bend

Worms and math I read with interest the informative and positive article “Composting in the Cafeteria” in the Jan. 14 Bulletin. It was especially interesting when contrasted with the draconian editorials of Jan. 4 and 8. It is ironic that a number of the editorial arguments against extending funding are answered in the Jan. 14 story by Bulletin reporter Sheila G. Miller. The editorials state that the grant is used to “lecture children about recycling,” that “math and … other core

Since most of this great nation lies in between the liberal borders of Manhattan and Malibu, an overwhelming majority of people do not subscribe to the far-left agenda being pushed upon us by the current administration.

subjects are better uses of classroom time,” and that “most of us, especially schoolchildren, get it: Recycling is good.” These points are contradicted in the Miller article, which describes creative, interactive learning environments that focus on raising awareness and incorporating mathematics in a real-life context. Having taught mathematics for over 20 years at COCC, I can attest to the clear advantage of teaching mathematics within a relevant framework. The article further points out that focusing on recycling and composting may actually cut costs and delay the date when the landfill must close. I suspect that many adults are learning a great deal from their children who participate in the educational programs. As 9-year-old Araceli Vasquez put it, “We put all this food in a pile and pay to have it go into a landfill. It’s better to make dirt.” Out of the mouths of babes. … I sincerely hope the commissioners listen to the wisdom of their youngest constituents and read more than the

poorly argued editorial comments of The Bulletin. Mike Sequeira Bend

Don’t apologize In the current political climate, emotions and opinions are running high. Most of the letters printed are solid and insightful. But some are so extreme as to require a reply, such as Ray Powell’s “Rush to blame.” He blames the conservative voices for the seething anger among the people. Since most of this great nation lies in between the liberal borders of Manhattan and Malibu, an overwhelming majority of people do not subscribe to the far-left agenda being pushed upon us by the current administration. They have had the keys to the car for the last four years in Congress, and two years in the office of the president. The deficit has tripled in that time. Every man, woman, and child owes taxes to the tune of $45,000 to these unbelievably fiscally irresponsible “representatives of the people.” Closed-door, dubious backroom deals and absolute total disregard to the voice of the people. But, with the rise of the tea party, that voice is ignored no longer. We the people will be heard. The abject failure of the liberal agenda has infuriated the lamestream media and all the “intellectuals.” The time has come for commonsense constitutional conservatives to reinstate to this wonderful nation the foundation of honor, strength and dignity we have built over 236 years. We need not bow or apologize to anyone for being the land of the free and home of the brave. Bob Van Dell La Pine

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We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

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Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Baby boomers shouldn’t worry about entitlements A

few years ago, baby boomers needed 3-D glasses to take in the gorgeous vision of their decades to come. Books and articles foresaw baby boomers skipping off into a “second adolescence” of self-fulfillment. No longer chained to the 9-to-5 and still healthy, the newly “retired” would follow their muse. The future was theirs, despite all that gray hair (or gray roots). Certain economic realities have since intervened, forcing boomers to hang onto their jobs with all 20 digits. House prices collapsed, taking away their home-equity bag of gold. Their IRAs and 401(k)s may be moth-eaten by bad investment decisions, such as selling stocks after the crash and not holding on for the recovery. Or perhaps they didn’t put enough into the investments to begin with. Meanwhile, their “safe” savings vehicles deliver about zero interest. And Medicare and

Social Security are in deep trouble, or so we’ve been told. But let’s linger a bit on the golden dream. In her 2004 book, “My Time: Making the Most of the Rest of Your Life,” Abigail Trafford writes about fit 50-plus Americans turning “the bonus decades into a personal renaissance.” They could “give back” to their communities, spend time with grandchildren, nurture intellectual interests, start a new career and get married again — or at least shack up. Sadly, hopes of reinventing one’s aging self as a filmmaker or landscape architect have been put on hold for all but the reasonably rich. The good news is that, contrary to rumors, the government-run benefits will survive, if in a less cushy form. First off, Social Security is just fine. The money in the program’s trust fund will keep promised benefits flowing for

FROMA HARROP about 28 years. Those who argue that the trust fund is empty are just trying to con American workers out of the benefits they earned through the payroll tax — a tax that was hiked 25 years ago specifically to cover the boomers’ retirement. The trust fund was invested in Treasury securities. They can’t be defaulted without approval by Congress. Now name me one member of Congress who would vote to stiff the workers. Medicare is another matter. As of Jan. 1, the oldest baby boomers started turning 65, the eligibility age for this govern-

ment health insurance plan. The rising costs of Medicare will accelerate as the huge boomer generation partakes of the benefits. Medicare is not a self-funding program, like Social Security. General revenues, mainly income taxes, pay for 39 percent of it. That makes Medicare, to use tea party language, a redistributionist scheme and a form of socialized medicine. The economics of Medicare and the politics of taxation should concern would-be retirees. A recent Associated Press/Washington Post poll showed that only 20 percent of those born between 1946 and 1964 think their Medicare will be secure. (On the plus side, the same poll has American adults of all ages saying they would sacrifice to preserve Medicare benefits.) How do you stop the program from

bankrupting America? First off, wring the enormous waste out of its care-delivery system. Next, raise taxes. Next, ask beneficiaries to pay more for their medical services. The junior generations will help pay for these benefits, if only to encourage frightened boomers to remove their big rear ends from the jobs that younger people want. (More positions will free up as the new health care law helps workers who want to start businesses, but are afraid of losing their company medical coverage, go forth.) Concerning the rest of the financial picture — the real estate, the savings, the investments — would-be retirees are on their own. A second adolescence? At least the sex will be free. Froma Harrop is a columnist for The Providence Journal.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, January 27, 2011 C5

O D

N   Clara Faye Karpinecz, of Bend Mar. 1, 1930 - Jan. 24, 2011 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.com Services: Memorial Mass, St. Francis Catholic Church, Friday, January 28, 2011, 10:30 A.M., 2450 N.E. 27th Street, Bend, Oregon 97701. Contributions may be made to:

Mountain Star Family Relief Nursery, 2125 N.E. Daggett Lane, Bend, Oregon 97701.

Donald Wayne White, of La Pine June 12, 1924 - Jan. 24, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine, 541-536-5104, www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A private gathering of the family will occur at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Humane Society of Central Oregon, 61170 SE 27th Street, Bend, Oregon 97702; 541-382-3537.

Gueorgui Ivanaov Velikov, of Bend Mar. 21, 1984 - Jan. 23, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: Funeral Services will be held on Saturday, January 29, 2011 at 10:00 AM at The Orthodox Mission of Bend located at 1900 NE Division Street, Suite 109, Bend, Oregon 97701. A public viewing will be held immediately following. Contributions may be made to:

Partners in Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, OR, 97701; www.partnersbend.org

Joyce Louise Geving, of Redmond July 20, 1929 - Jan. 24, 2011 Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel, 541-548-3219 Services: Pending.

Patrick James Richardson, of Bend Jan. 18, 1975 - Jan. 25, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: Memorial Services will be held on Friday, January 28, 2011 at 2:00 PM at St. Augustine Catholic Church, located at 905 E. Front Street, Merrill, Oregon 97633. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, OR, 97701, www.partnersbend.org or St. Charles Foundation, 2500 NE Neff Road, Bend, OR 97701, (541) 706-6996.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Wanda M. Hulett Prociw

Country singer Charlie Louvin dies at 83

Oct. 10, 1923 - Jan. 23, 2011 Wanda was born in Braddock, N. Dakota, to Grant and Mae Hulett. She moved to Central Oregon in 1989, from Gilroy, CA, where she had resided for 24 years. While living in CA, she earned the title of Woman Bowler of the Year for Santa Clara, Wanda Prociw CA in 1986. She had been a lifetime member of the W.I.B.C. (Women's International Bowling Congress). She found much enjoyment in bowling, horses, gardening and salmon fishing. Her formal career was being a bowling instructor. Wanda had been a member of the Lutheran Church. Wanda is survived by Nina J. Edwards; daughter, Sandi Plunkett (Joe); granddaughter, Michelle McDaniel (Dan); great-granddaughter, Mia Kuzens; brother, Cliff Hulett (Stella) and the extended Edwards family. Visitation Thursday, Jan. 27, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Friday, Jan. 28, 8-10 a.m.. Graveside services Friday, January 28, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. Deschutes Memorial Gardens, Bend, OR. Contributions may be made to Central Oregon Humane Society, 1355 NE Hemlock, Redmond, OR 97756. Condolences may be extended to the family at our website www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Funds Continued from C1 Superintendent Molitor said the first two years were due to attendance, which had cultural implications. For American Indian students, school was often missed because funerals last more than one day. After the elementary school worked hard to adjust that, Molitor said, testing standards changed and the school did not meet the reading or math goals. The current principal of the school, Dawn Smith, has worked at Warm Springs Elementary School for more than 30 years, about 20 of them as principal, according to Molitor. Smith did not return calls for comment. Molitor said several years ago she was named Oregon principal of the year. If the school gets the grant, it’s unclear what Smith’s role would be. “Once again, we’re looking at this grant and we want to say no, but it’s potentially not in the best interest of our kids,” Molitor said. “So, we’ll have to see how to make it a win-win for everyone.” At the high school level, Molitor said the district is already seeing initial academic improvements. Gary Carlton, the Madras principal, is still principal this year but the district is looking for his replacement, as required by the grant. Carlton will remain on district staff. The Jefferson County School District said it should hear by the end of this school year whether it received the grant for Warm Springs. Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

Goodpasture Continued from C1 Prosecutors are recommending Goodpasture serve a 30-month sentence for the incident in the courtroom in August. In discussions with Goodpasture and his attorney during Wednesday’s plea hearing, Judge Michael Adler noted that the charges he pleaded guilty to carry a maximum sentence of seven years and fines of $137,000. Goodpasture’s sentencing has been set for Feb. 8. Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.

By Randy Lewis Los Angeles Times

Charlie Louvin, the country singer whose scintillating harmonizing with his brother Ira created a distinctive template for duet singing that strongly influenced the Everly Brothers, the Beatles, the Byrds and successive generations of singers including Gram Parsons, Emmylou Harris, Beck and Jack White, died Wednesday in Nashville, Tenn., of complications from pancreatic cancer. He was 83. The Louvin Brothers’ sound, with Ira’s pure high tenor typically floating atop Charlie’s strong tenor-baritone melodies but often switching midsong, derived from churchbased “shape-note” singing, an a cappella style they picked up while growing up in their musically inclined family in rural Alabama. They became arguably the most influential harmony team in the history of country music, and thus made their influence on countless country and bluegrass singers as well as a broad spectrum of rock and pop acts. They were a key influence on the Everly Brothers, the country act that made the biggest pop crossover of all the sibling country groups. By extension, they helped shaped the sound of the Beatles, who were huge fans of the Everlys. “They influenced everybody by the quality of their music,” Phil Everly said Wednesday through his son, Jason. “Harmony just got a lot better in heaven.” In addition to their signature harmonizing, the Louvins wrote numerous songs that have become classics in country and bluegrass music, among them “If I Could Only Win Your Love,” which gave Harris her first Top 10 country hit; “When I Stop Dreaming,” “Every Time You Leave,” “The Christian Life,” covered in the ’60s by the Byrds and more recently by the Raconteurs; and “The Great Atomic Power,” which Jeff Tweedy’s alt-country band Uncle Tupelo recorded in the 1990s. “Whether you’re just a fan or a working artist who was influenced by them, I think we owe them a huge debt — both of them,” Chris Hillman, a founding member of the Byrds and the Flying Burrito Brothers, told the Los Angeles Times on Wednesday. “Charlie did not just fade away into the woodwork after Ira died, even though he was the dominant member of the group. Charlie had hits of his own, and had a great career, and he was vital all the way up until he got this pancreatic cancer. He had

Mark Humphrey / The Associated Press

Country Music Hall of Famer Charlie Louvin sits in his home in Manchester, Tenn., in 2009. Louvin died Wednesday at 83. plans to do another album, and we wanted to do (the Burrito Brothers’ song) ‘Sin City’ together.” Said Harris: “He really changed the world of music, Charlie did. I know that, for me, hearing the Louvin Brothers brought me that fierce love of harmony.” In a statement, Dolly Parton called him “one of my truly good friends, someone I loved like a brother. The Louvin Brothers were my favorite when I was young and growing up in the business.” Added Garth Brooks, through a spokeswoman: “Charlie Louvin was (one) of the pioneers that not only led the way in traditional music and entertainment, but was influential in lending a hand to the next generation coming up with the dream of continuing the tradition of the (Grand Ole) Opry and what it represents. Truly, a good man.” Charlie Eizer Loudermilk was born July 7, 1927, one of seven children who grew up on the family’s 23-acre farm in Sand Mountain, Ala. His brother Lonnie Ira, who was three years older, got a mandolin when he was 19 and urged his 16-year-old brother to learn guitar so they could play music

Daniel Bell, a social scientist who preferred analysis to polemics By Mark Feeney The Boston Globe

Daniel Bell, the Henry Ford II Professor of Social Sciences emeritus at Harvard University and one of America’s most dynamic thinkers, died Tuesday after a short illness at his Cambridge home, said his daughter, Jordy. He was 91. In a 1992 Globe interview, Dr. Bell attributed his singular intellectual exuberance to his youth in Depression-era New York. “I grew up on the Lower East Side ... and I always had curiosity,” he said. “Why was I this way? It began with the Depression: ‘Why was there a Depression? Why are people hungry? It’s supposed to be a great country.’ Once you get that tick of curiosity, it stays with you.” It was a mark of Dr. Bell’s eminence that the titles of his three best-known books — “The End of Ideology,” “The Coming of Post-Industrial Society,” and “The Cultural Contradictions of Capitalism” — went on to assume a life of their own as discrete phrases in the intellectual vocabulary. While a graduate student in sociology at Columbia, Dr. Bell was asked to describe his specialty. “I specialize in generalizations,” he replied. In an academic world of in-

creasing specialization and evernarrowing scope, Dr. Bell was a proud anachronism: displaying a rare intellectual ambition, assimilative power, and range of interests. As Peter Steinfels notes in his book “The Neoconservatives,” Dr. Bell’s work embodies “an amassment and mobilization of data reminiscent of the great figures of Victorian social science.” Dr. Bell earned his place in a book of that title because he founded The Public Interest quarterly with Irving Kristol in 1965, then edited the journal with Kristol until 1973. The aim of The Public Interest, as Dr. Bell wrote in 1984, “was to transcend ideology through reasoned public debate and the inquiry into knowledge.” Yet its analyses and critiques of social policy did much to foster ideology, and The Public Interest proved to be the foremost organ of neoconservatism. It was Dr. Bell’s growing ideological differences with Kristol, the celebrated “godfather of neoconservatism,” that led him to leave the publication. Dr. Bell described himself as “a socialist in economics, a liberal in politics, and a conservative in culture.” The book that largely established Dr. Bell’s reputation, “The End of Ideology” (1960), had famously made plain his preference for analysis over polemic.

together. Their father played a banjo but believed that music should be properly used for recreation, not as a career. But after the Louvin boys earned $3 each for playing music all day at a Fourth of July celebration in Flat Rock, Ala. — more than six times the 50 cents their father was paid for laboring from dawn till dusk on the farm — Ira and Charlie started viewing music as an escape route. They changed their name for the stage, and later legally, because “we got tired of being called ‘Ira and Charlie Buttermilk’ or ‘Ira and Charlie Sourmilk,’” Charlie said later. The brothers played whatever shows they could, performing on radio when the opportunity arose, and, after each brother’s brief military service, started making records in the late 1940s for a succession of labels, without great success. After being dropped by MGM Records, Hank Williams’ label, they landed a contract with Capitol Records, singing gospel music. “They didn’t need us as a country duet,” Charlie recalled later, “but they would hire us as gospel duet. They had Jim and Jess (McReynolds) and, in the old

days, a label wouldn’t have more than one country duet. We said, ‘OK, we’ll take that. Anything.’” But their gospel records didn’t connect in a big way either. In 1955, they decided to try their luck with a secular song they’d written, “When I Stop Dreaming.” It became their first top 10 hit, thanks to their harmonies that used unconventional intervals drawn from the shape-note tradition and poetically bittersweet lyrics of a broken love affair. You can teach the flowers to bloom in the snow You may take a pebble and teach it to grow You can teach all the raindrops to return to the clouds But you can’t teach my heart to forget That was followed quickly by their only No. 1 single, “I Don’t Believe You’ve Met My Baby.” “What’s so impressive to me,” said John Rumble, senior historian at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville, “is that they broke through with a style that was essentially a throwback to the 1930s brother duet style in an era in which honky-tonk and country pop were the sound of the day, and their biggest hits came in 1955 and ‘56, just as rock ‘n’ roll was exploding. That was no mean feat.” Ira’s erratic, alcohol-fueled behavior made him an increasingly unpredictable quantity that rattled nervous concert promoters, and the Louvins’ bookings began tailing off in the early ‘60s. It also affected the brothers’ creative partnership. “I gave ideas and helped on lines,” Charlie once said. “He definitely was the stronger part of the writing team. But he was a drinking man. He’d get to drinking and write something and just bring the words over and say ‘Get your guitar. I want to try this song.’ I was supposed to know what tune he had in mind just looking at the words. A lot of times the tune was made up as we went. But if I screwed up, he’d wad it up and throw it in the trash can, saying it probably wasn’t worth a damn anyway.” Charlie decided to go it alone and proceeded to score hits through the late ’60s and into the ’70s. Barely two years after the brothers parted ways professionally, Ira was killed in 1965 while on his way home from a solo show in Kansas City, Mo., when his car was struck by a drunken driver. Years later, although Charlie never sounded as though he regretted his decision, he did believe that had Ira lived, “We would’ve gotten back together, I’m sure,” he told the Cleveland Plain Dealer in 2007. “But it wasn’t meant to be. I didn’t know if I could make it as a solo artist, but music was the only thing I knew. So I gave it a try. Thanks goodness, it worked.”

MORRIS ROBERT CLARK 1920 - 2011 A memorial was held at the Four Square Church in Toledo, Oregon on Saturday January 22, for Morris Robert Clark, who passed away January 16, 2011, after 90 years of life. Morris had resided in Eugene, OR since 2004, in Newport, OR from 1988-2004, and Bend, OR from 1944 to 1988. Born in 1920 in Atlanta, Georgia, and completing his associate degree, he joined the U.S. Army Air Corps. in 1942. Morris, a crew instructor for the U.S. Army Air Corps in Newport News, Virginia was transferred to Foggia, Italy. As a member of the model crew 772nd Squadron, he completed 50 flight missions over the next two years. Morris tells the story of one mission, when “The radio operator was hit. He left his position as tail gunner to administer first aid. Upon returning to his position saw that it had been hit and the tail had a large hole right where his head had been just moments earlier”. Toward the end of his missions, a German plane came so close that he could see the pilot’s wrist watch. “The German did not fire at the U.S. plane. He was just there to demoralize them,” he stated. Morris was awarded the U.S. Air medal and Purple Heart and Certificate of Valor. He met and married Marian Isted of Portland, and they settled in Bend. While in Bend, he was employed by the U.S. Postal service, retiring in 1975. He was an active member of the First Baptist Church, an avid bowler, enjoyed golfing, wood working, fishing, stamp and coin collecting, and people (no one was a stranger). Upon Marian’s passing, he met and married Nelda Day of Newport, Oregon, in 1988. They lived at Pacific Shores Mobile Park, were active members of the Newport Nazarene Church and enjoyed friends, traveling, family and life! Survivors include three daughters, Barbara Lane of Eugene, Phyllis Park of Alamo, California and Cheryl Clark of Bend; eight grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren; two step-daughters, Bethel Fogarty of Sacramento, California and Darlene Smith of Toledo; five grandchildren, eight greatgrandchildren and 13 great-great-grandchildren. Memorial Contributions may be made to your local V.F.W. Bateman Funeral Home is serving the family, 541-265-2751.


W E AT H ER

C6 Thursday, January 27, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2011.

TODAY, JANUARY 27

HIGH Ben Burkel

57

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

40/30

41/31

47/32

48/31

Warm Springs

Marion Forks



52/31

53/21



Willowdale 58/30

Mitchell

Madras

55/26

50/29

Camp Sherman 50/21 Redmond Prineville 57/24 Cascadia 52/25 56/25 Sisters 52/23 Bend Post 57/24

Oakridge Elk Lake 54/23

53/21

45/12

54/20



34/18

53/20

Hampton

Crescent

Crescent Lake

51/19

Fort Rock

52/21



Chemult 51/18

Vancouver 51/39

Seattle

Crater Lake 53/30





53/41

Missoula 36/29

50/35

Helena 46/28

Boise

57/24

41/28

55/34

Idaho Falls

36/20





Bend

Grants Pass

69/37

Partly cloudy and mild conditions today. Partly cloudy tonight.



Eugene



Elko

30/15

48/23



Reno

57/29

San Francisco

Salt Lake City

66/51

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:28 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 5:08 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:27 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 5:10 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 2:06 a.m. Moonset today . . . 11:28 a.m.

Moon phases New

First

Full

Last

Feb. 2

Feb. 10

Feb. 18

Feb. 24

39/24

City

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

MONDAY

Mostly cloudy, slight chance of showers LOW before lunchtime, cool.

46 21

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

Calgary 46/25

Christmas Valley 50/22

50 24

BEND ALMANAC Yesterday’s regional extremes • 73° Brookings • 12° Burns

SUNDAY

Mostly cloudy, slight chance of showers LOW after sunHIGH set, cooling.

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Redding

Silver Lake

LOW

55 23

NORTHWEST

56/22

48/14

HIGH

24

53/39

Burns

La Pine

LOW

Portland

Partly cloudy and mild conditions today. Partly cloudy tonight. Eastern

Partly cloudy and remaining mild.

Dry weather will continue over the area today as high pressure remains in control.

49/21

Brothers

SATURDAY

Tonight: Mostly clear and cool.

Today: Mostly sunny to partly cloudy skies, unseasonably mild.

Paulina

53/22

Sunriver

Partly cloudy and mild conditions today. Partly to mostly cloudy tonight. Central

FRIDAY

TEMPERATURE

Astoria . . . . . . . . 51/37/0.00 . . . . . 57/41/pc. . . . . . 51/42/sh Baker City . . . . . . 35/23/0.01 . . . . . 40/21/pc. . . . . . 39/21/pc Brookings . . . . . . 73/47/0.00 . . . . . . 59/45/s. . . . . . 54/46/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 36/12/0.00 . . . . . . 40/19/f. . . . . . . 37/21/s Eugene . . . . . . . .45/32/trace . . . . . 50/35/pc. . . . . . 51/37/pc Klamath Falls . . . 50/22/0.00 . . . . . . 52/22/s. . . . . . 47/25/pc Lakeview. . . . . . . 52/25/0.00 . . . . . 48/20/pc. . . . . . . 44/25/s La Pine . . . . . . . . 52/20/0.00 . . . . . 53/20/pc. . . . . . 46/24/pc Medford . . . . . . . 51/28/0.00 . . . . . . 57/33/s. . . . . . 56/33/pc Newport . . . . . . . 61/45/0.00 . . . . . 58/43/pc. . . . . . 52/43/pc North Bend . . . . . 70/39/0.00 . . . . . 57/42/pc. . . . . . 53/42/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 34/25/0.00 . . . . . . 35/24/f. . . . . . 37/24/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 46/34/0.00 . . . . . 40/31/pc. . . . . . . 42/33/f Portland . . . . . . . 53/35/0.00 . . . . . 53/39/pc. . . . . . . 52/40/r Prineville . . . . . . . 51/29/0.00 . . . . . . 52/25/c. . . . . . . 49/26/c Redmond. . . . . . . 55/23/0.00 . . . . . 53/27/pc. . . . . . 56/28/pc Roseburg. . . . . . . 54/32/0.00 . . . . . 61/40/pc. . . . . . 58/40/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 45/36/0.00 . . . . . 53/36/pc. . . . . . 52/40/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 50/24/0.00 . . . . . . 52/23/c. . . . . . . 47/26/c The Dalles . . . . . . 48/34/0.00 . . . . . 50/34/pc. . . . . . . 49/37/f

0

2 2

MEDIUM 4

HIGH 6

LOW

47 20

PRECIPITATION

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW

HIGH

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54/27 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 in 1934 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.48” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . -23 in 1957 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 1.51” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.48” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 1.51” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.30 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.72 in 1997 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .6:37 a.m. . . . . . .3:33 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .4:24 a.m. . . . . . .1:43 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .7:39 a.m. . . . . . .5:13 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .9:40 a.m. . . . . . .9:40 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . .10:54 p.m. . . . . .10:28 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .9:31 a.m. . . . . . .9:23 p.m.

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Friday Hi/Lo/W

Partly cloudy.

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 36-49 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 43 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 35-82 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 72-94 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . . . 70 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 34-42 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 93 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

. . . . . . 43-44 . . . . 110-200 . . . . . . . . 88 . . . . . . . 111 . . . . . . 45-62 . . . . . . 36-40 . . . . . . 45-60

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

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Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

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Vancouver 51/39

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Calgary 46/25

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Saskatoon 35/24

Seattle 53/41

S Winnipeg 25/22

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Thunder Bay 18/7

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Quebec 17/4

Halifax 32/21 Portland Billings To ronto Portland Green Bay (in the 48 32/10 53/35 St. Paul 23/14 53/39 25/13 contiguous states): 30/22 Boston Boise 41/28 31/18 Rapid City Detroit Buffalo New York 48/28 • 82° 28/17 27/20 37/25 Des Moines Anaheim, Calif. Cheyenne Philadelphia 33/27 Chicago 46/32 Columbus 35/23 29/22 • -17° Omaha 29/23 San Francisco Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 37/24 66/51 Presque Isle, Maine City 34/25 Las Denver Louisville 39/24 Kansas City • 1.72” Vegas 54/29 35/27 41/28 St. Louis 63/42 Lakeland, Fla. Charlotte 38/29 48/28 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 50/26 75/51 62/31 43/33 52/33 Phoenix Atlanta 72/43 Honolulu 48/34 Birmingham 80/65 Dallas Tijuana 51/34 61/37 73/46 New Orleans 57/40 Orlando Houston 63/41 Chihuahua 63/38 59/27 Miami 70/49 Monterrey La Paz 66/45 71/53 Mazatlan Anchorage 77/52 31/14 Juneau 34/21 Bismarck 38/22

FRONTS

Crabber and his rescuers recall harrowing ordeal Coast Guard team plucked Eric Petit from waters off Washington By Deeda Schroeder Daily Astorian

ASTORIA — Eric Petit was trying to loosen a stuck crab pot when it happened. He was on his 32-foot fishing boat, Ella Ann, hauling in crab pots in “the sink,” just inside the Willapa bar in Washington, when the wave came. “The wave rolled the boat instantly upside down,” said Petit, of South Bend, Wash. Petit and his deck hand Luis Perez found themselves trapped underneath the boat. Petit came up, swam to the side of the boat and scrambled on top of it. He scanned the water for Perez — and saw him about 40 feet away. “I was hollering at him to swim to me, but he kept saying, ‘I can’t make it,’ ” Petit said. Two waves washed over him, and the second swept him off the hull. Petit managed to grab three buoys floating nearby. He didn’t see Perez again. Petit grabbed for his cell phone, still in the left front pocket of his jeans, and dialed 911. An operator picked up and Petit gave his location just before the phone died. He took deep breaths as wave after wave washed over his head, submerging him. And he waited. In the air, a U.S. Coast Guard

Levy Continued from C1 If the 99-cent levy is approved, Adkins said his office would still look at eliminating a work crew supervisor position and cutting a maintenance worker position to half time. A corrections officer position that is currently open will not be filled, but Adkins said that position would likely be unfilled in any instance. Adkins also introduced a third

Alex Pajunas / Daily Astorian

Crabber Eric Petit, of South Bend, Wash., shakes hands with one of his rescuers, Petty Officer 3rd Class Christopher Austin, on Thursday at the USCG Air Station Astoria in Warrenton. helicopter crew had finished delivering Christmas presents with Santa and gone out for a training run when the call came in. Onboard was Petty Officer 3rd Class Christopher Austin, a 22year-old rescue swimmer who was working his very first shift. He was shocked to hear they’d be responding to a call for help. “I couldn’t believe it was right off the bat,” Austin said. They headed toward Willapa Bay, not knowing exactly where “the sink” was, said Lt. j.g. Leo Lake, one of the pilots on the crew. Fortunately, the Warrenton command center was able to work with Station Grays Harbor and,

after a few passes, the crew was circling a debris field. While the other pilot, Lt. Ben Schluckebier, hovered above the spot, Lake watched buckets, water bottles and a door float on the surface, but no people were visible. Then, he looked forward. “I saw him waving with his hands,” Lake said. And Austin sprang into action, outfitting himself in fins, helmet and gloves as fast as he could. Petit had probably spent over an hour in the water before the Coast Guard helicopter arrived. He said he kept himself motivated to keep kicking by picturing the faces of his daughters, Ella, 6, and MaKenzie, 14, and his wife, Kara.

scenario to commissioners: if the levy fails. Under that plan, the jail could see corrections staff reduced from 20 positions to eight. The jail would also need to cut a maintenance worker and nurse to half-time. Adkins added that without a levy, there would be no way to house 70 inmates. “If we have no levy, then we will need to cut down to 32 inmates with eight (corrections officers),” he said. Commissioner Wayne Fording said he hopes the voters see the need for the jail and that the

county is trying to cut its costs. “Everybody is doing more with less,” Fording said. “Do our constituents expect us to do that? We might be looking at no levy, which isn’t pretty to look at.” Fording added that a jail bond of 89 cents per $1,000 of assessed valuation ends in 2014, and it might be easier to persuade voters to support a larger levy once the bond expires. Erik Hidle can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at ehidle@bendbulletin.com.

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .55/28/0.00 . . .64/32/s . . . 70/37/s Akron . . . . . . . . .30/26/0.00 . . .28/22/c . . 30/25/sn Albany. . . . . . . . .32/17/0.00 . 29/13/pc . . 29/10/sn Albuquerque. . . .48/26/0.00 . . .50/26/s . . . 52/29/s Anchorage . . . . .37/25/0.01 . . .31/14/c . . 28/20/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . .43/36/0.20 . 48/34/pc . . 52/36/pc Atlantic City . . . .38/34/0.62 . 36/23/pc . . 37/25/sn Austin . . . . . . . . .63/24/0.00 . . .64/29/s . . . 69/39/s Baltimore . . . . . .36/32/1.21 . 32/23/pc . . 35/17/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .44/29/0.00 . 53/35/pc . . 40/23/pc Birmingham . . . .47/36/0.00 . . .51/34/s . . . 56/36/s Bismarck . . . . . . . .37/7/0.02 . . .38/22/c . . . . 33/6/c Boise . . . . . . . . . .42/30/0.00 . 41/28/pc . . 42/28/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .34/15/0.02 . .31/18/sn . . . 29/19/c Bridgeport, CT. . .32/15/0.24 . 35/23/pc . . 34/23/sn Buffalo . . . . . . . .31/27/0.00 . .28/17/sn . . 28/18/sn Burlington, VT. . .33/20/0.00 . .26/12/sn . . . 26/6/sn Caribou, ME . . . 15/-15/0.01 . . .22/2/pc . . .17/-3/sn Charleston, SC . .61/48/0.02 . . .55/34/s . . 57/36/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .48/38/0.29 . . .48/28/s . . 54/29/pc Chattanooga. . . .42/33/0.29 . 45/30/pc . . 51/31/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .41/26/0.00 . 46/32/pc . . 55/30/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .28/19/0.00 . .29/22/sn . . . 32/26/c Cincinnati . . . . . .32/27/0.00 . . 32/25/sf . . . 37/26/c Cleveland . . . . . .29/27/0.00 . .29/22/sn . . 29/25/sn Colorado Springs 44/31/0.00 . 53/24/pc . . . 60/25/s Columbia, MO . .34/13/0.00 . 40/27/pc . . 44/27/pc Columbia, SC . . .51/44/0.06 . . .52/30/s . . 58/33/pc Columbus, GA. . .50/42/0.02 . . .54/33/s . . . 58/37/s Columbus, OH. . .29/27/0.00 . . 29/23/sf . . 33/25/sn Concord, NH . . . . 27/-6/0.00 . . .29/4/sn . . . . 26/5/c Corpus Christi. . .60/37/0.00 . 67/38/pc . . . 70/52/s Dallas Ft Worth. .61/28/0.00 . . .61/37/s . . . 68/39/s Dayton . . . . . . . .27/23/0.00 . . 29/22/sf . . 33/24/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .46/30/0.00 . 54/29/pc . . . 58/27/s Des Moines. . . . .21/15/0.00 . . .33/27/c . . 40/23/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . .30/26/0.00 . .27/20/sn . . . 29/25/c Duluth . . . . . . . . .22/17/0.00 . . .26/16/c . . 23/17/sn El Paso. . . . . . . . .58/28/0.00 . . .57/26/s . . 61/29/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . -2/-11/0.00 . . . . 4/-7/c . . .10/-5/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .23/7/0.00 . .29/22/sn . . . 29/7/sn Flagstaff . . . . . . .39/28/0.00 . . .45/14/s . . . 50/13/s

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .30/28/0.00 . .26/21/sn . . 30/23/sn Green Bay. . . . . .26/22/0.00 . .25/13/sn . . 28/19/sn Greensboro. . . . .39/35/0.37 . . .46/28/s . . 49/28/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .34/26/0.30 . 34/20/pc . . . 33/19/c Hartford, CT . . . .30/13/0.00 . .32/17/sn . . . 31/14/c Helena. . . . . . . . .45/34/0.00 . 46/28/pc . . 42/24/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .82/65/0.00 . . .80/65/s . . . 81/66/s Houston . . . . . . .61/35/0.00 . . .63/38/s . . . 66/44/s Huntsville . . . . . .43/33/0.00 . 42/28/pc . . . 47/33/s Indianapolis . . . .31/24/0.00 . . 29/25/sf . . . 34/25/c Jackson, MS . . . .51/31/0.00 . . .58/35/s . . . 61/40/s Madison, WI . . . .22/16/0.00 . .28/16/sn . . . 32/25/c Jacksonville. . . . .63/50/0.00 . . .58/33/s . . . 63/38/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .43/39/0.14 . . 34/21/rs . . . 34/22/s Kansas City. . . . .28/16/0.00 . 41/28/pc . . . 49/27/s Lansing . . . . . . . .29/26/0.00 . .25/19/sn . . 28/23/sn Las Vegas . . . . . .63/44/0.00 . . .63/42/s . . . 65/43/s Lexington . . . . . .34/26/0.35 . . .33/26/c . . . 36/28/c Lincoln. . . . . . . . .31/13/0.00 . . .38/24/c . . 43/23/pc Little Rock. . . . . .57/26/0.00 . . .52/33/s . . . 60/36/s Los Angeles. . . . .76/48/0.00 . . .75/51/s . . . 73/51/s Louisville . . . . . . .31/28/0.09 . . .35/27/c . . . 39/29/c Memphis. . . . . . .49/29/0.00 . 50/35/pc . . . 56/40/s Miami . . . . . . . . .77/63/0.12 . . .70/49/s . . . 72/51/s Milwaukee . . . . .25/19/0.00 . .27/19/sn . . 32/27/sn Minneapolis . . . .25/15/0.00 . . .30/22/c . . 33/22/sn Nashville . . . . . . .35/28/0.14 . 43/33/pc . . 44/31/pc New Orleans. . . .56/38/0.00 . . .57/40/s . . . 65/45/s New York . . . . . .35/30/0.44 . 37/25/pc . . 31/19/sn Newark, NJ . . . . .34/27/0.32 . 37/24/pc . . . 32/19/c Norfolk, VA . . . . .43/36/1.08 . . .41/27/s . . . 48/29/c Oklahoma City . .52/26/0.00 . . .62/31/s . . . 70/33/s Omaha . . . . . . . .23/13/0.00 . . .37/24/c . . 40/22/pc Orlando. . . . . . . .69/56/0.00 . . .63/41/s . . . 66/44/s Palm Springs. . . .76/50/0.00 . . .74/48/s . . . 75/49/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .27/20/0.00 . . 31/23/sf . . . 36/24/c Philadelphia . . . .34/30/1.04 . 35/23/pc . . 35/16/sn Phoenix. . . . . . . .72/43/0.00 . . .72/43/s . . . 72/44/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .34/27/0.02 . .28/24/sn . . 34/24/sn Portland, ME. . . . 24/-2/0.01 . .32/10/sn . . . . 27/8/c Providence . . . . .31/12/0.17 . .34/17/sn . . . 32/19/c Raleigh . . . . . . . .43/38/0.38 . . .48/30/s . . 51/29/pc

Yesterday Thursday Friday Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .51/20/0.00 . 48/28/pc . . . 50/20/c Savannah . . . . . .59/48/0.01 . . .55/32/s . . 59/36/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .54/26/0.00 . . .57/29/s . . . 58/26/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .54/39/0.00 . 53/41/pc . . . .50/44/r Richmond . . . . . .39/33/1.38 . . .40/24/s . . 46/25/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . . .23/3/0.00 . . .32/23/c . . 35/15/pc Rochester, NY . . .33/27/0.00 . .30/19/sn . . 29/17/sn Spokane . . . . . . .44/29/0.00 . . .38/30/c . . . 38/30/c Sacramento. . . . .53/43/0.00 . . .64/40/s . . . 63/41/s Springfield, MO. .47/20/0.00 . 48/28/pc . . 53/26/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .32/24/0.00 . . .38/29/c . . 43/29/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .64/53/0.02 . . .61/44/s . . . 65/49/s Salt Lake City . . .39/28/0.00 . 39/24/pc . . 41/24/pc Tucson. . . . . . . . .67/33/0.00 . . .68/36/s . . . 70/37/s San Antonio . . . .62/30/0.00 . . .66/35/s . . . 72/46/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .49/26/0.00 . . .59/35/s . . . 65/32/s San Diego . . . . . .75/50/0.00 . . .75/49/s . . . 71/51/s Washington, DC .37/33/1.22 . 34/25/pc . . 36/16/pc San Francisco . . .65/46/0.00 . . .64/49/s . . . 58/44/s Wichita . . . . . . . .42/25/0.00 . 55/27/pc . . . 64/29/s San Jose . . . . . . .70/42/0.00 . . .70/45/s . . . 65/43/s Yakima . . . . . . . .42/27/0.00 . 43/32/pc . . . .43/31/f Santa Fe . . . . . . .47/17/0.00 . . .45/18/s . . . 49/20/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .74/43/0.00 . . .75/46/s . . . 76/47/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .39/32/0.00 . . .37/28/s . . . 36/27/s Athens. . . . . . . . .48/32/0.00 . .53/44/sh . . . .53/45/r Auckland. . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . 78/66/pc . . 77/67/sh Baghdad . . . . . . .57/50/0.00 . . .63/45/c . . . 66/44/s Bangkok . . . . . . .90/72/0.00 . 88/73/pc . . 90/73/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . . .32/9/0.00 . 31/14/pc . . . 27/11/c Beirut. . . . . . . . . .64/57/0.06 . .65/56/sh . . 65/54/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . .36/30/0.00 . 29/19/pc . . . 28/19/s Bogota . . . . . . . .73/39/0.00 . . .69/44/t . . . .66/49/t Budapest. . . . . . .28/25/0.08 . 32/20/pc . . 31/17/pc Buenos Aires. . . .88/70/0.00 . . .90/69/s . . . .90/66/t Cabo San Lucas .75/50/0.00 . 75/56/pc . . 74/55/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . .70/54/0.00 . 69/52/pc . . . 72/53/s Calgary . . . . . . . .52/28/0.00 . 46/25/pc . . .28/13/sf Cancun . . . . . . . .73/66/0.00 . .74/60/sh . . 76/59/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .45/41/0.00 . . .40/29/s . . . 41/28/s Edinburgh . . . . . .43/37/0.00 . 42/32/pc . . 41/30/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .41/28/0.00 . 40/27/pc . . 38/27/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .79/64/0.00 . . .77/62/t . . . .75/62/t Hong Kong . . . . .63/54/0.00 . . .60/52/s . . 62/53/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . .45/36/0.10 . . .35/23/s . . .38/32/rs Jerusalem . . . . . .59/33/0.00 . 62/41/pc . . 61/40/pc Johannesburg . . .73/63/0.54 . . .77/62/t . . . .80/61/t Lima . . . . . . . . . .79/68/0.00 . 78/64/pc . . 79/64/sh Lisbon . . . . . . . . .57/45/0.00 . .54/46/sh . . 54/43/sh London . . . . . . . .45/36/0.00 . 39/32/pc . . . 39/31/s Madrid . . . . . . . .46/23/0.00 . .45/33/sh . . 45/34/sh Manila. . . . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . 87/74/pc . . 86/73/pc

Mecca . . . . . . . . .82/72/0.00 . 88/69/pc . . . 90/69/s Mexico City. . . . .73/39/0.00 . 74/46/pc . . . 75/44/s Montreal. . . . . . . .16/3/0.04 . . .19/6/pc . . . . 17/2/c Moscow . . . . . . . .16/7/0.00 . . . 16/7/sf . . . 17/5/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . .81/54/0.00 . . .81/57/s . . 81/56/pc Nassau . . . . . . . .81/70/0.90 . 75/60/pc . . 74/59/pc New Delhi. . . . . .55/43/0.00 . . .68/43/s . . . 71/46/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .45/30/0.00 . 44/30/pc . . . 45/33/c Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . 12/-2/0.00 . 27/16/pc . . 31/18/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . . .19/7/0.01 . . .18/4/pc . . . . 16/1/c Paris. . . . . . . . . . .43/39/0.42 . 39/27/pc . . . 35/25/s Rio de Janeiro. . .93/73/0.00 . 94/75/pc . . 96/75/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . .48/32/0.34 . 52/36/pc . . 54/41/sh Santiago . . . . . . .88/63/0.00 . . .90/61/s . . . 89/59/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .88/70/0.00 . . .87/70/t . . . .86/71/t Sapporo. . . . . . . .23/23/0.07 . . .34/25/c . . 26/21/sn Seoul . . . . . . . . . . .23/5/0.00 . . .29/10/s . . . . 28/8/s Shanghai. . . . . . .41/36/0.00 . .40/35/sh . . 40/36/sh Singapore . . . . . .84/75/1.37 . . .87/76/t . . . .85/76/t Stockholm. . . . . . .25/9/0.00 . 23/18/pc . . . 29/23/c Sydney. . . . . . . . .88/72/0.00 . 89/70/pc . . 74/66/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .64/59/0.00 . .65/56/sh . . 65/57/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .64/52/0.66 . 65/48/pc . . 64/48/pc Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .48/36/0.00 . 45/34/pc . . 45/35/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .30/27/0.00 . . .23/14/c . . .24/15/sf Vancouver. . . . . .54/45/0.03 . . .51/39/c . . . .46/41/r Vienna. . . . . . . . .36/27/0.11 . 33/22/pc . . . 32/23/c Warsaw. . . . . . . .37/28/0.00 . . .28/19/c . . 28/17/pc


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College Basketball Inside No. 9 BYU drops No. 4 San Diego State, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2011

The tour de fish

AUTO RACING Bend driver set for Rolex 24 At Daytona Bend’s Jon Fogarty is set to compete once again in the Rolex 24 At Daytona. This weekend in Daytona, Fla., Fogarty will race with two other members of the GAINSCO/ Bob StallJon Fogarty ings Racing Team. Those teammates include five-time NASCAR Sprint Cup champion Jimmie Johnson and Alex Gurney. Fogarty, 35, races with partner Gurney, of Irvine, Calif., in the Grand-Am Rolex Sports Car Series. Typical events in the series are three-hour sprint races with teams of two drivers. But the Rolex 24 At Daytona, the first major auto race of the year in the United States, is much different. Teams of three or four drivers race for 24 hours straight, taking turns in the team car, in the sports car endurance race. The Rolex 24 is staged on the 3.56-mile Daytona International Speedway road course. A five-year Bend resident, Fogarty finished 21st at last year’s Rolex 24 with teammates Gurney, Johnson and Jimmy Vasser. GAINSCO/Bob Stallings finished seventh at the Rolex 24 in 2009 but went on to win the Grand-Am Rolex Sports Car Series Championship. The team also claimed the season title in 2007 and finished second in 2008. Practice and qualifying for the 2011 Rolex 24 will be staged today and Friday, and the daylong classic is scheduled to start at 12:30 p.m. on Saturday. Live coverage of the race on SPEED channel begins at noon on race day, and the majority of the race will air live on SPEED. —Bulletin staff report

NASCAR scraps points system for simpler version CHARLOTTE, N.C. — NASCAR is replacing the complicated scoring system it has used since 1975 with a more straightforward format. None of the changes for the 2011 season announced by chairman Brian France at the NASCAR Hall of Fame on Wednesday came as much of a surprise. NASCAR officials had been briefing teams for almost two weeks on the changes in an effort to give competitors feedback on the direction being taken. A race winner will receive 43 points under the new system, and the points will decrease down to 1 for the 43rd-place driver. There will be three bonus points for the winner, one bonus point for every driver who leads a lap, and one bonus point to the driver that leads the most laps. The maximum points available now will be 48. “We (had) a point system that’s hard to describe for ourselves. We just thought this was the perfect time … (to) simplify it so people can follow,” France said. NASCAR also tweaked the eligibility requirements for the 12-driver Chase for the Sprint Cup championship field. The top 10 in points after the 26th race of the season will make the Chase field, while the final two spots will be “wild cards” designated for the highest race winners not already eligible. — The Associated Press

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 Tennis ........................................D2 NBA ...........................................D3 College basketball .....................D3 Prep sports ................................D3 Hunting & Fishing .................... D4

D

HUNTING & FISHING

The crew from Motiv Fishing reels in a marlin from the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Mexico while filming “Oile.” The film is featured in the Fly Fishing Film Tour, which comes to Bend Feb. 9-10.

Popular Fly Fishing Film Tour returning to Bend

By Mark Morical The Bulletin

Thad Robison and his partners have made a career out of the Fly Fishing Film Tour, which this February through April will make stops at 90 cities across the country — including Bend. But the success has not come without a few hiccups along the way, like getting robbed at knife point while on a filming trip in Mexico. The thieves relieved them of a video camera, a microphone and some camping equipment. “Luckily, we were in a Walmart parking lot,” Robison recalls. “So we just went in and got more sleeping bags and pads.”

The experience occurred while Robison and his crew were making the film “Oile,” which documents the travels of four fishing bums through Mexico last October in a pickup truck fueled by recycled vegetable oil. The film is one of eight to be screened at stops along the tour, coming Feb. 9-10 to the theater at Bend’s McMenamins Old St. Francis School. The film crew drove from Portland some 3,000 miles — down the coastline of Baja California before taking a ferry across the Sea of Cortez and then driving southeast across Mexico to the Yucatan Peninsula. See Film / D4

Submitted photo

PREP WRESTLING

SKIING

Bend’s Ford named to U.S. squad Bulletin staff report

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Mountain View’s Keelin Crew, top, fights to get control of Summit’s Gabe Thompson during the 125-pound match on Wednesday night at Summit High School. Crew went on to win the match.

Cougars beat Storm Mountain View gets off to a fast start en route to a 44-19 Intermountain Conference win over Summit Bulletin staff report Riding the high of winning the opening three matches — and taking the first in dramatic fashion — Mountain View went on to hand Summit a 44-19 loss in Intermountain Conference wrestling action at Summit High School on Wednesday night. In what appeared to be one of the most evenly matched contests of the dual, Mountain View’s Matt Miller took on Summit’s Sean Seefeldt in the 171-

pound weight class — the first match of the evening. After three periods of battle the two had managed a 1-1 draw. But in overtime, Miller eventually got the best of Seefeldt and emerged victorious with a score of 6-1. Thanks to pins by Connor Weiss (189 pounds) and Trevor Roberts (215), the Cougars held an early 12-3 lead. “It really set the tone for us,” said Mountain View coach Les Combs of

winning the first three contests. Mountain View’s Dylan Johnson then came out and topped James Zacha in the heavyweight match. Wyatt Slaght followed with a win at 103 pounds. “It was the best we’ve wrestled as a team all season,” Combs said. Summit’s Erick Nazario broke the Cougars’ streak with a win at 112 pounds. Hayes Joyner (145) recorded the Storm’s only pin. Wyatt Bloom (160) ended the dual with another pin for the Cougs. Mountain View is on the road at the Sheldon Invitational on Friday, while Summit travels to meet La Pine on Thursday.

PARK CITY, Utah — Bend’s Tommy Ford was one of 10 male skiers named to the U.S. Ski Team’s 2011 Alpine World Championships squad, which was announced Wednesday. The 21-year-old Ford, who finished 26th in giant slalom at the Vancouver Winter Olympics last February, will be joined on the team by former world champions Tommy Ford Bode Miller and Ted Ligety. The biennial world championships are scheduled for Feb. 8-20 in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany. Miller is a four-time world champion and two-time World Cup overall champion. Ligety, a two-time World Cup giant slalom champion, enters Garmisch after winning the first three giant slalom races of the season. He captured the 2010 World Cup giant slalom title at the World Cup Finals, held in Garmisch. Nine women were named to the Alpine World Championships U.S. team including Lindsey Vonn. A three-time World Cup overall champion, Vonn is seeking to defend the double gold she captured in downhill and super G in 2009. She is currently leading the World Cup standings for downhill, super G and super combined. Julia Mancuso, who claimed two silver medals at the Vancouver Olympics, was also selected to the team. Joining Ford as the only other skier from Oregon on the team is Laurenne Ross, of Klamath Falls. Like Ford, the 22-year-old Ross is a former racer for the Bend-based Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation.

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TRACK & FIELD

U.S. decathletes, including Bend’s Eaton, are bringing sport back into the spotlight

www.LesSchwab.com

By Rachel Cohen The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Two decades after Dan and Dave, how does Clay and Trey sound? One American is the reigning Olympic decathlon champion, another the defending world champ. An event that once produced household names in the United States has faded from the forefront in recent years. But as the 2012 London Games near, the success and storylines have returned to again add cachet to the title of “world’s greatest athlete.” Bryan Clay won gold at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, the first American to win Olympic gold in the decathlon since Dan O’Brien in 1996. Then Trey Hardee won worlds the following year, when an injury kept Clay from competing. It doesn’t hurt that the names rhyme — though young Oregonian Ashton Eaton, a 23-year-old rising star from Bend and the University of Oregon, threw in a wrinkle when he set the heptathlon world record at last year’s NCAA Indoor championships. See Decathlon / D3

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The Associated Press ile photo

Bryan Clay, left, celebrates with Trey Hardee after they won the gold and silver medals, respectively, in the men’s heptathlon at the IAAF World Indoor Athletics Championships in Doha, Qatar, in March 2010.

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D2 Thursday, January 27, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD GOLF

TELEVISION TODAY TENNIS 12:30 a.m. — Australian Open, men’s first semifinal, ESPN2.

6:30 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Volvo Golf Champions, second round, Golf Channel. Noon — PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance Open, second round, Golf Channel.

WINTER SPORTS

Noon — Australian Open, men’s first semifinal, ESPN2 (taped).

4 p.m. — Winter X Games, ESPN.

8 p.m. — Australian Open, Tennis Channel.

5 p.m. — Millrose Games, ESPN2.

TRACK & FIELD

GOLF 6:30 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Volvo Golf Champions, first round, Golf Channel. Noon — PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance Open, first round, Golf Channel.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Michigan at Michigan State, ESPN. 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Vanderbilt at Mississippi State, ESPN2. 5 p.m. — NBA, Miami Heat at New York Knicks, TNT.

HOCKEY 5 p.m. — NHL, All-Star Fantasy Draft, VS. network. 7 p.m. — Western Hockey League, Portland Winter Hawks at Tri-City Americans, FSNW.

BOXING 7 p.m. — Friday Night Fights, heavyweights, Joey Abell vs. Chris Arreola, ESPN2.

BASKETBALL 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Boston Celtics at Phoenix Suns, ESPN.

6 p.m. — Men’s college, UCLA at Arizona, ESPN2. 6 p.m. — Women’s college, Stanford at Oregon, FSNW.

RADIO TODAY

7:30 p.m. — NBA, Boston Celtics at Portland Trail Blazers, TNT. 8 p.m. — Men’s college, Oregon State at Cal, FSNW. 8 p.m. — Men’s college, St. Mary’s at Gonzaga, ESPN2.

WINTER SPORTS

BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — Men’s college, Oregon at Stanford, KBNDAM 1110. 8 p.m. — Men’s college, Oregon State at Cal, KICEAM 940.

6 p.m. — Winter X Games, ESPN.

FRIDAY FRIDAY TENNIS 12:30 a.m. — Australian Open, men’s second semifinal, ESPN2. Noon — Australian Open, men’s second semifinal, ESPN2 (taped).

BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — Prep boys, La Salle at Madras, KWSO-FM 91.9. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Tennis • Henin retires again: Former No. 1 Justine Henin retired from tennis for a second time Wednesday, citing a lingering right elbow injury that cut short her comeback from a glittering career that included seven Grand Slam titles. “I have undergone several tests the past few days, confirming that my elbow has sustained a lot more damage during my adventure in Australia,” the 28-year-old Belgian said on her website. She made the announcement five days after losing to Svetlana Kuznetsova 6-4, 7-6 (8) in the third round of the Australian Open. “The past few weeks, there was a little bit more pain every day, but I thought my willpower would prevail. Today, the tests and my doctors are adamant,” Henin said.

Cycling • Spanish cycling wants one-year ban for Contador: Spanish cycling officials want three-time Tour de France winner Alberto Contador banned for one year for failing a 2010 Tour doping test. Contador confirmed the proposed sanction Wednesday in a statement released by his spokesman. He said the Spanish federation’s disciplinary committee informed him of the decision. If banned, Contador would lose his third Tour title because of the positive clenbuterol result he blames on contaminated meat. The Spanish cyclist also would be ineligible to compete in this year’s Tour. Contador has 10 days to challenge the one-year proposal by presenting new evidence or material, according to Spanish federation rules. After that, the four-person disciplinary committee will reconvene to decide whether to uphold or change the proposed sanction.

Basketball • Knicks pass Lakers in Forbes value rankings: The New York Knicks have overtaken the Los Angeles Lakers as the NBA’s most valuable franchise, and 17 of the 30 teams are estimated to have lost money last season, according to Forbes. The Knicks’ value rose 12 percent from $586 million to $655 million, the magazine said Wednesday in its annual evaluation. The rise was attributed to increased ticket sales and sponsorships at Madison Square Garden. The Lakers went up 6 percent from $607 million to $643 million. Chicago was third at $511 million, followed by Boston ($452 million), Houston ($443 million) and Dallas ($438 million). After signing LeBron James, the Miami Heat had the biggest percentage rise, a 17 percent increase to $425 million, good for seventh place. Following the loss of James, Cleveland dropped a league-high 26 percent to $355 million. • Izzo dismisses Michigan State guard: Korie Lucious made one too many mistakes at Michigan State. The junior guard was suspended for the rest of the season, another blow for the slumping Spartans. Lucious helped the Spartans reach the Final Four in each of the past two years. “Unfortunately, Korie Lucious displayed conduct detrimental to the program,” Izzo said in a statement issued by the school. “My focus is on this team for the remainder of the season.” The 5-foot-11 Lucious averaged 6.5 points in 18 games this season for 25th-ranked Michigan State, which started the season ranked No. 2 in The Associated Press poll.

Football • 13 Iowa players have muscle disorder: The University of Iowa confirmed Wednesday that 13 football players were hospitalized this week with an unusual muscle disorder following grueling offsea-

son workouts. The players have rhabdomyolysis, a stress-induced syndrome that can damage cells and cause kidney failure in severe cases, school spokesman Tom Moore said at a news conference two days after the players were hospitalized in a Iowa City. The school has said the players, whom they would not identify, were “in safe and stable condition” and responding well to treatment. Moore said the cause of the disorder has not yet been determined. University of Iowa physician John Stokes said the common denominator is they had all participated in strenuous exercise, which commonly brings on the disorder in otherwise healthy young people. • Goodell: $1 salary if work stoppage: NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell will cut his salary to $1 if there is a work stoppage after the collective bargaining agreement expires in March. Goodell, who makes about $10 million a year including bonuses, said in a memo to his staff Wednesday that chief negotiator Jeff Pash will do the same. Pash makes nearly $5 million a year. Goodell also has asked the league’s compensation committee to delay any bonus payments to him until after a deal is reached with the NFL Players Association. “Let me emphasize that we are fully committed to doing everything possible to reach a new collective bargaining agreement without any disruption to our business,” Goodell said.

Hockey • Hockey player sues Ducks alleging anti-Semitism: A Jewish hockey player is suing the Anaheim Ducks alleging that his coaches made anti-Semitic remarks and discriminated against him because of his religion. Attorneys for Jason Bailey, who has since been traded to the Ottawa Senators, filed the lawsuit Tuesday in Orange County Superior Court. The suit alleges that coaches for the Bakersfield Condors, then a minor league affiliate of the Ducks, repeatedly made anti-Semitic remarks and denied Bailey ice time because he is Jewish. Bailey was assigned to play for the Condors under the contract he signed with the Ducks in 2008.

Horse racing • Zenyatta has date with Preakness winner: Horse of the Year Zenyatta is heading to the breeding shed. Lane’s End Farm announced Wednesday the superstar mare will be bred to 2006 Preakness Stakes winner Bernardini. The son of prominent sire A.P. Indy stands for $75,000 at Darley. Bernardini was the 3-year-old champion in 2006 when he won six times in eight starts, including the Preakness and the Jockey Club Gold Cup. Zenyatta was retired in November after a spectacular career in which she won 19 times in 20 starts, the 7-year-old’s only defeat coming by a head to Blame in the Breeders’ Cup Classic. She edged Blame to win the Eclipse Award for Horse of the Year last week.

Track and field • Double-amputee beaten for first time in 7 years: Double-amputee sprinter Oscar Pistorius lost a 100-meter paralympic race for the first time in seven years in a photo finish at the world championships on Wednesday. Jerome Singleton, a single-leg amputee from the United States, ended the South African’s streak when both finished in 11.34 seconds at the International Paralympic Committee track and field world championships. Pistorius, nicknamed “Blade Runner” because of his prosthetic racing blades, beat Singleton by 0.3 seconds to win the gold medal at the 2008 Paralympic Games in Beijing. — The Associated Press

ON DECK Today Girls basketball: Redmond at Bend, 7 p.m. Boys basketball: Bend at Redmond, 7 p.m. Wrestling: La Pine, Sisters, Molalla at Madras, 6 p.m.

Edmonton

49 15 26 8 38 122 168 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 50 30 15 5 65 147 137 Anaheim 52 28 20 4 60 140 146 Phoenix 51 25 17 9 59 149 145 San Jose 50 25 19 6 56 139 138 Los Angeles 50 27 22 1 55 143 124 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Wednesday’s Games Los Angeles 3, San Jose 2, SO Boston 2, Florida 1 Carolina 4, N.Y. Islanders 2 Atlanta 1, Washington 0 Detroit 3, New Jersey 1 Dallas 3, Edmonton 1 Phoenix 5, Colorado 2 Calgary 4, St. Louis 1 Vancouver 2, Nashville 1 Today’s Games No games scheduled

IN THE BLEACHERS

Friday Girls basketball: Summit at Mountain View, 5:15 p.m..; La Pine at Sisters, 7:15 p.m.; Hosanna at Gilchrist, TBA; Madras at La Salle, 7 p.m.; Central Linn at Culver, 5 p.m. Boys basketball: Summit at Mountain View, 7:15 p.m.; La Pine at Sisters, 5:45 p.m.; La Salle at Madras, 7 p.m.; Hosanna at Gilchrist, TBA; Central Linn at Culver, 6:30 p.m. Wrestling: Redmond, Crook County, Culver at Resers Tournament at Liberty High in Hillsboro, TBA; Mountain View at Sheldon Invitational, 9 a.m. Swimming: Redmond at Thurston, 4 p.m.

PREP SPORTS Wrestling Wednesday’s results INTERMOUNTAIN CONFERENCE ——— MOUNTAIN VIEW 44, SUMMIT 19 ——— At Summit 103 — Wyatt Slaght, MV, won by forfeit. 112 — Erick Nazario, S, def. Tracy Pitcher, MV, 6-2. 119 — Brian Pechan, S, def. Jake McDonald, MV, 9-3. 125 — Keelin Crew, MV, def. Gabe Thompson, S, 12-1. 130 — Anthony Oliver, MV, def. Brandon Katter, S, 10-8. 135 — Kyler Ayers, MV, def. Ryan Leiphart, S, 9-0. 140 — Forrest Samples, MV, pinned Eric Thomspon, S, 44:50. 145 — Hayes Joyner, S, pinned Devan Welch, MV, 3:05. 152 — Conner Rueth, S, def. Andrew Bright, MV, 16-3. 160 — Wyatt Bloom, MV, pinned Conner Collins, S, 3:13. 171 — Matt Miller, MV, def. Sean Seefeldt, S, 1-1 (6-1 OT). 189 — Connor Weiss, MV, pinned Kaden Olson, S, 3:25. 215 — Trevor Roberts, MV, pinned Keaton White, S, 5:58. 285 — Dylan Johnson, MV, def. James Zacha, S, 6-1. ——— NONCONFERENCE ——— REDMOND 48, BEND 23 ——— At Redmond 103 — Brandon Short, R, def. Noah Haines, B, 6-4. 112 — Allen Jeppsen, R, pinned Sam Prescott, B, :43. 119 — Ty George, R, def. Nico Spring, B, 10-2. 125 — Chance Lindquist, R, pinned, Evan Chinadle, B, :52. 130 — Levi Brinkley, R, pinned Greg Prescott, B, 1:23. 135 — David Peebles, R, pinned, Diego Rincon, B, 1:32. 140 — Colby Fultz, R, def. Issac Simar, B, 17-2. 145 — Boomer Fleming, R, pinned, Jason Vinton, B, :37. 152 — Gunner Crawford, B, Austin Alvarez, R, 3-2. 160 — Willy Abt, B, def. Sarek Shields, R, 15-3. 171 — Gavin Gerdes, B, def. Gunner Sigado, R, 10-1. 189 — Kenny Dailey, B, pinned Casey Gates, 3:07. 215 — Shane Buck, B, pinned Nick Jeldness, R, 1:12. 285 — Jacob Breitling, R, pinned, Mitchell Berry, B, 3:50.

BASKETBALL Men’s college Wednesday’s Games ——— FAR WEST BYU 71, San Diego St. 58 Colorado St. 69, Air Force 66 Long Beach St. 67, Pacific 66 New Mexico 71, TCU 46 SOUTHWEST Cent. Arkansas 62, SE Louisiana 59 Northwestern St. 79, Lamar 69 Rice 79, Houston 71, OT SMU 59, Tulsa 58 Stephen F.Austin 63, Sam Houston St. 49 Texas 61, Oklahoma St. 46 Texas St. 73, Texas A&M-Corpus Christi 62 UTEP 69, Tulane 65 MIDWEST Cincinnati 72, Rutgers 56 Evansville 66, Indiana St. 63 Illinois St. 79, Bradley 78, OT Minnesota 81, Northwestern 70 Murray St. 67, SIU-Edwardsville 61 N. Illinois 83, Akron 74 N. Iowa 71, Creighton 66 N.C. Central 66, W. Illinois 58 Ohio 79, E. Michigan 65 Rhode Island 59, Saint Louis 57 Texas Tech 92, Iowa St. 83 Wichita St. 74, S. Illinois 64 Xavier 81, George Washington 74 SOUTH Coll. of Charleston 65, Georgia Southern 61 Delaware 59, William & Mary 55 Jacksonville 63, North Florida 62, OT James Madison 60, Drexel 52 Louisville 55, West Virginia 54 McNeese St. 66, Nicholls St. 65 Memphis 77, UCF 61 North Carolina 74, Miami 71 Northeastern 70, UNC Wilmington 66 Old Dominion 51, Georgia St. 48 Southern Miss. 84, East Carolina 77 Tennessee 75, LSU 53 The Citadel 85, Davidson 75 UAB 60, Marshall 56 EAST Albany, N.Y. 66, UMBC 63 Boston U. 71, Binghamton 66

TENNIS Australian Open At Melbourne Park Melbourne, Australia Purse: $24.7 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Men Wednesday Quarterfinals David Ferrer (7), Spain, def. Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, 6-4, 6-2, 6-3.

Bucknell 81, Lehigh 68 Duquesne 91, Fordham 72 Georgetown 77, St. John’s 52 Lafayette 83, Army 60 Massachusetts 78, St. Bonaventure 69 Navy 72, American U. 53 Penn St. 65, Iowa 51 Providence 83, Villanova 68 Temple 76, Charlotte 67 PAC-10 STANDINGS All Times PST ——— Conference All Games W L PCT W L PCT Washington 7 1 .857 15 4 .778 Arizona 5 2 .714 16 4 .800 UCLA 5 2 .714 13 6 .684 Washington St. 4 4 .500 14 6 .700 Stanford 3 4 .428 10 8 .555 Southern Cal 3 4 .428 11 9 .526 Oregon St. 3 4 .428 8 10 .444 California 3 4 .428 10 9 .526 Oregon 2 5 .285 9 10 .473 Arizona St. 1 6 .142 9 10 .473 Today’s Games USC at Arizona State, 5:30 p.m. UCLA at Arizona, 6 p.m. Oregon at Stanford, 7 p.m. Oregon State at California, 8 p.m.

Women’s college Wednesday’s Games ——— FAR WEST BYU 65, San Diego St. 55 CS Bakersfield 71, Cal St.-Fullerton 66 Kansas St. 72, Colorado 59 Wyoming 69, UNLV 61 SOUTHWEST Louisiana-Monroe 61, Arkansas St. 45 New Mexico 65, TCU 54 Stephen F.Austin 70, Sam Houston St. 63 Texas 75, Texas Tech 67 Texas A&M 80, Oklahoma 78 Texas St. 78, Texas A&M-Corpus Christi 76, OT MIDWEST Akron 77, W. Michigan 66 Ball St. 66, Miami (Ohio) 49 Buffalo 92, Cent. Michigan 89 Dayton 85, La Salle 51 E. Michigan 85, Ohio 40 Iowa St. 85, Nebraska 66 Kent St. 56, N. Illinois 54, OT Marquette 76, Louisville 65 Missouri 66, Kansas 52 Toledo 66, Bowling Green 65 SOUTH Cent. Arkansas 69, SE Louisiana 65 Charlotte 73, Richmond 62 Duke 92, Clemson 37 ETSU 64, S.C.-Upstate 42 Fla. International 69, W. Kentucky 54 Kennesaw St. 79, Mercer 56 Lamar 90, Northwestern St. 61 Louisiana-Lafayette 71, North Texas 69 McNeese St. 72, Nicholls St. 71 Middle Tennessee 85, Florida Atlantic 53 Troy 66, South Alabama 41 EAST Boston U. 65, Binghamton 60 Connecticut 63, Rutgers 44 Duquesne 61, George Washington 53 Hartford 67, Stony Brook 57 Holy Cross 62, Colgate 51

Women Today Semifinals Li Na (9), China, def. Caroline Wozniacki (1), Denmark, 3-6, 7-5, 6-3. Kim Clijsters (3), Belgium, def. Vera Zvonareva (2), Russia, 6-3, 6-3.

Lafayette 54, Army 43 Lehigh 64, Bucknell 48 Navy 57, American U. 46 New Hampshire 67, Maine 47 St. Bonaventure 51, Saint Joseph’s 40 Syracuse 69, Pittsburgh 60 Temple 76, Massachusetts 48 UMBC 59, Albany, N.Y. 53

DEALS Transactions

FOOTBALL NFL All Times PST Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 30 At Honolulu AFC vs. NFC, 4 p.m. (Fox) Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 6 At Arlington, Texas Pittsburgh vs. Green Bay, 3:30 p.m. (Fox)

Betting Line Favorite Packers

SUPER BOWL Sunday, Feb. 6 Opening Current 2.5 2.5

Underdog Steelers

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF Philadelphia 50 33 12 5 71 174 Pittsburgh 50 31 15 4 66 154 N.Y. Rangers 52 29 20 3 61 148 N.Y. Islanders 49 15 27 7 37 119 New Jersey 49 16 30 3 35 101 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF Boston 50 28 15 7 63 152 Montreal 50 27 18 5 59 130 Buffalo 49 23 21 5 51 137 Toronto 49 19 25 5 43 124 Ottawa 50 17 25 8 42 108 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF Tampa Bay 51 31 15 5 67 154 Washington 51 27 15 9 63 140 Atlanta 52 24 19 9 57 152 Carolina 50 25 19 6 56 153 Florida 49 22 22 5 49 131 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF Detroit 49 30 13 6 66 166 Nashville 50 27 17 6 60 134 Chicago 50 26 20 4 56 157 Columbus 49 23 21 5 51 130 St. Louis 49 22 20 7 51 130 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF Vancouver 50 31 10 9 71 165 Colorado 50 25 19 6 56 161 Minnesota 49 25 19 5 55 130 Calgary 51 24 21 6 54 144

NHL ROUNDUP

GA 130 114 126 162 146 GA 112 123 144 153 160 GA 154 129 166 155 131 GA 143 119 139 152 146 GA 121 165 134 152

BASEBALL American League MINNESOTA TWINS—Claimed LHP Dusty Hughes off waivers from Kansas City. Designated RHP Rob Delaney for assignment NEW YORK YANKEES—Agreed to terms with RHP Bartolo Colon on a minor league contract. TAMPA BAY RAYS—Announced the retirement of OF Rocco Baldelli, who accepted a position as a special assistant with the team. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Agreed to terms with C Miguel Montero on a one-year contract. CINCINNATI REDS—Agreed to terms with RHP Johnny Cueto on a four-year contract. SAN DIEGO PADRES—Agreed to terms with INF Jorge Cantu on a one-year contract and RHP Greg Burke on a minor league contract. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS—Agreed to terms with RHP Marc Kroon on a minor league contract. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association ORLANDO MAGIC—Waived G Jason Williams. TORONTO RAPTORS—Signed G Trey Johnson to a 10-day contract. Released G Sundiata Gaines. FOOTBALL National Football League MIAMI DOLPHINS—Named Ike Hilliard assistant wide receivers coach, Tony Sparano Jr. offensive quality control coach and Dave Fipp assistant special teams coach. Promoted receivers coach Karl Dorrell to quarterbacks coach, offensive quality control coach Steve Bush to receivers coach and assistant special teams coach Darren Rizzi to special teams coordinator. NEW YORK JETS—Signed DB Will Billingsley, RB Carlos Brown, LB Cody Brown, P T.J. Conley, G Marlon Davis, C Robby Felix, RB Chris Jennings, DL Matt Kroul, G Dennis Landolt, CB Ellis Lankster, LB Joey LaRocque, WR Logan Payne, DT Carlton Powell, LB Brashton Satele, DB Richard Taylor, LB Brian Toal, DE Lorenzo Washington and QB Drew Willy to reserve/futures contracts. HOCKEY National Hockey League CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Assigned D Nick Leddy to Rockford (AHL). COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS—Assigned LW Matt Calvert to Springfield (AHL). DALLAS STARS—Recalled C Aaron Gagnon and C Travis Morin from Texas (AHL). MINNESOTA WILD—Reassigned F Cody Almond to Houston (AHL). MONTREAL CANADIENS—Assigned C Ryan White to Hamilton (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS—Re-assigned G Mike Brodeur and F Bobby Butler to Binghamton (AHL). SOCCER Major League Soccer CHICAGO FIRE—Re-signed D Dasan Robinson. PORTLAND TIMBERS—Signed G Adin Brown and D Steve Purdy. SAN JOSE EARTHQUAKES—Have won a lottery for rights to G David Bingham. COLLEGE MICHIGAN STATE—Suspended G Korie Lucious from the men’s basketball team for the remainder of the season for conduct detrimental to the program. UCLA—Announced T Sean Sheller has been granted a sixth year of eligibility by the NCAA.

TENNIS

Thrashers shut down Caps Clijsters and The Associated Press ATLANTA — Ondrej Pavelec made 36 saves for his third shutout of the season and Nik Antropov scored the only goal as the Atlanta Thrashers won for only the fifth time in 17 games, blanking Alex Ovechkin and the Washington Capitals 1-0 on Wednesday night. Pavelec stifled the Capitals with several huge saves, sending the Thrashers into the AllStar break with a good feeling after their toughest stretch of the season. Atlanta, coming off an embarrassing 7-1 rout at Tampa Bay, snapped a threegame losing streak. Antropov scored at 11:21 of the second period after Washington defenseman Jeff Schultz lost control of a bouncing puck backing into his own zone. Freddy Modin gobbled it up and found Antropov breaking in all alone on Semyon Varlamov. The Atlanta center beat the goalie to the glove side for his ninth goal. Also on Wednesday night: Canucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Predators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 VANCOUVER, British Columbia — Lee Sweatt scored the winning goal with 7:29 left in his first NHL game, and Vancouver rallied to beat Nashville. Kings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Sharks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 LOS ANGELES — Jarret Stoll scored the only shootout goal in the fourth round and Los Angeles headed into the

All-Star break with its third straight victory. Bruins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Panthers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 BOSTON — All-Star Tim Thomas stopped 34 shots and Boston headed into the break in first place in the Northeast Division. Stars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Oilers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 DALLAS — Brenden Morrow scored twice and Kari Lehtonen made 34 saves for Dallas to rebound from a poor performance in his previous start. Red Wings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Devils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 DETROIT — Valtteri Filppula scored 5:32 into the third period, putting Detroit ahead to stay. Hurricanes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Islanders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 UNIONDALE, N.Y. — Eric Staal scored goals in a 1:38 span in the second period and also had an assist to help Carolina beat New York in front of an announced crowd of 4,976 on snowy Long Island. Flames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Blues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 CALGARY, Alberta — David Moss had two power-play goals and added an assist for Calgary. Coyotes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Avalanche. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DENVER — Ilya Bryzgalov made 29 saves and Eric Belanger scored twice for Phoenix.

Li set to meet in Aussie final The Associated Press MELBOURNE, Australia — Kim Clijsters advanced to the Australian Open final with a comfortable win over Vera Zvonareva and will play for the title against Li Na, who saved a match point en route to becoming the first Chinese player to reach a Grand Slam championship final. Li rallied to win the first of the women’s semifinals 3-6, 7-5, 6-3 today after top-ranked Caroline Wozniacki served for the match with a 5-4 lead in the second set. U.S. Open champion Clijsters dictated play from the start against No. 2-ranked Zvonareva and won it 6-3, 6-3 — repeating the result of their U.S. Open final. Li is into her first major final, but is growing in confidence after coming off a comeback win over the No. 1-ranked player and her victory over Clijsters in the final of the tuneup event at Sydney, where she came back from 5-0 down in the first set to win it in straight sets. Wozniacki, playing at a major for the first time with the No. 1 ranking, had match point at 5-4 and 40-30 in the second set before Li rallied. Another 66 minutes later, Li served and won on her first match point. Late Wednesday, Rafael Nadal’s bid to be the first man since 1969 to hold all four major titles at once ended in a 6-4, 6-2, 6-3 quarterfinal loss to David Ferrer. Nadal struggled with a left thigh injury and needed treatment throughout the match, but was determined not to withdraw because he had had to retire in his previous quarterfinal here against Andy Murray in 2010 and said he hated the feeling.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, January 27, 2011 D3

GOING FOR THE PIN

NBA SCOREBOARD SUMMARIES

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Nuggets 109, Pistons 100

Atlantic Division

DENVER (109) Anthony 5-16 8-8 18, Harrington 4-13 0-0 10, Williams 4-5 5-6 13, Billups 9-16 2-2 26, Afflalo 6-11 2-2 17, Ely 2-2 0-0 4, Smith 4-8 0-2 8, Forbes 3-5 3-4 9, Lawson 1-4 2-3 4. Totals 38-80 22-27 109. DETROIT (100) Prince 5-14 0-0 10, Wilcox 2-6 0-0 4, Monroe 4-6 6-8 14, McGrady 4-9 5-6 14, Stuckey 3-5 1-1 7, Daye 1-6 4-4 6, Gordon 4-10 6-7 15, Wallace 0-2 0-2 0, Villanueva 4-9 0-0 11, Bynum 8-12 3-4 19, Summers 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 35-79 25-32 100. Denver 29 27 24 29 — 109 Detroit 24 26 24 26 — 100 3-Point Goals—Denver 11-27 (Billups 6-9, Afflalo 3-4, Harrington 2-9, Lawson 0-1, Smith 0-2, Anthony 0-2), Detroit 5-15 (Villanueva 35, McGrady 1-2, Gordon 1-4, Daye 0-2, Prince 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Denver 46 (Anthony 10), Detroit 52 (Wallace 10). Assists—Denver 20 (Anthony 7), Detroit 19 (McGrady 8). Total Fouls—Denver 18, Detroit 28. Technicals—Smith, Denver defensive three second. A—16,212 (22,076).

Wednesday’s Games

Hornets 112, Warriors 103 NEW ORLEANS (112) Ariza 7-11 3-4 19, West 8-12 6-6 22, Okafor 6-8 1-1 13, Paul 7-9 4-4 18, Belinelli 5-8 0-0 11, Smith 2-3 0-0 4, Thornton 4-10 0-0 8, Green 3-5 0-0 8, Mbenga 0-0 0-0 0, Jack 2-3 0-0 4, Pondexter 0-0 0-0 0, Andersen 2-5 1-4 5. Totals 46-74 15-19 112. GOLDEN STATE (103) D.Wright 10-15 3-3 25, Lee 7-15 2-3 16, Biedrins 0-1 2-2 2, Curry 8-13 3-3 20, Ellis 8-13 9-11 26, Udoh 1-3 2-2 4, Williams 1-4 0-0 2, Amundson 0-3 0-0 0, Radmanovic 1-5 0-0 2, Law 2-3 2-2 6. Totals 38-75 23-26 103. New Orleans 34 27 32 19 — 112 Golden State 21 28 27 27 — 103 3-Point Goals—New Orleans 5-13 (Green 22, Ariza 2-3, Belinelli 1-3, Andersen 0-1, Thornton 0-2, Paul 0-2), Golden State 4-13 (D.Wright 2-4, Curry 1-3, Ellis 1-4, Law 0-1, Radmanovic 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—New Orleans 41 (Ariza, Okafor 7), Golden State 31 (Lee 10). Assists—New Orleans 32 (Paul 17), Golden State 19 (Curry 6). Total Fouls—New Orleans 27, Golden State 17. Technicals—New Orleans defensive three second, Lee, Golden State defensive three second. A—18,108 (19,596).

Nets 93, Grizzlies 88 MEMPHIS (88) Gay 10-18 1-2 22, Randolph 8-22 4-4 20, Gasol 3-11 6-7 12, Conley 7-13 1-2 16, Young 2-4 2-2 6, Arthur 3-6 2-2 8, Mayo 0-4 0-0 0, Vasquez 0-0 0-0 0, Allen 2-2 0-2 4, Thabeet 0-0 0-0 0, Haddadi 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 35-80 16-21 88. NEW JERSEY (93) Outlaw 2-6 0-0 5, Favors 1-5 0-0 2, Lopez 6-16 5-6 17, Harris 4-12 4-4 13, Graham 0-1 0-0 0, Vujacic 5-10 1-2 14, Farmar 1-6 0-0 3, Morrow 8-12 0-0 19, Humphries 6-9 2-2 14, Petro 3-5 0-0 6. Totals 36-82 12-14 93. Memphis 32 21 13 22 — 88 New Jersey 16 26 18 33 — 93 3-Point Goals—Memphis 2-12 (Gay 1-3, Conley 1-4, Young 0-1, Randolph 0-2, Mayo 0-2), New Jersey 9-17 (Morrow 3-4, Vujacic 3-5, Harris 1-2, Farmar 1-3, Outlaw 1-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Memphis 49 (Randolph 16), New Jersey 49 (Favors 9). Assists—Memphis 19 (Conley, Gasol 5), New Jersey 26 (Harris 9). Total Fouls—Memphis 16, New Jersey 18. A—8,866 (18,500).

76ers 107, Raptors 94 PHILADELPHIA (107) Iguodala 7-11 0-0 15, Brand 6-10 2-2 14, Hawes 1-7 1-2 3, Holiday 6-16 3-4 15, Meeks 0-5 2-2 2, Williams 6-10 0-0 15, Turner 3-8 4-4 10, Young 5-10 0-0 10, Speights 10-12 3-3 23. Totals 44-89 15-17 107. TORONTO (94) Wright 4-11 0-0 8, A.Johnson 7-10 1-2 15, Bargnani 6-10 4-4 17, Calderon 3-8 2-4 8, DeRozan 9-18 11-12 29, Davis 2-3 0-0 4, Bayless 1-3 0-0 2, Weems 3-7 0-0 6, T.Johnson 1-4 0-0 3, Ajinca 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 37-76 18-22 94. Philadelphia 20 30 34 23 — 107 Toronto 29 21 27 17 — 94 3-Point Goals—Philadelphia 4-15 (Williams 3-5, Iguodala 1-2, Turner 0-1, Speights 0-1, Holiday 0-3, Meeks 0-3), Toronto 2-8 (T.Johnson 1-2, Bargnani 1-2, Calderon 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Philadelphia 53 (Speights 9), Toronto 37 (A.Johnson 6). Assists—Philadelphia 28 (Holiday 11), Toronto 19 (Calderon 13). Total Fouls—Philadelphia 17, Toronto 15. A—14,552 (19,800).

Magic 111, Pacers 96 ORLANDO (111) Bass 4-7 0-0 8, Turkoglu 7-10 3-3 18, Howard 8-16 3-8 19, Nelson 5-11 0-0 12, J.Richardson 5-14 5-6 19, Anderson 5-10 0-0 14, Redick 4-8 0-0 10, Arenas 2-5 2-2 8, Q.Richardson 1-1 0-0 3, Duhon 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-82 13-19 111. INDIANA (96) Granger 6-19 12-13 27, Hansbrough 4-8 00 8, Hibbert 2-6 0-2 4, Collison 10-18 1-3 21, Dunleavy 4-7 0-0 10, Foster 2-4 0-2 4, George 3-9 4-4 10, Posey 1-4 0-0 3, Price 1-5 1-2 4, Rush 1-2 0-0 3, S.Jones 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 3585 18-26 96. Orlando 24 38 24 25 — 111 Indiana 21 27 24 24 — 96 3-Point Goals—Orlando 16-34 (Anderson 4-7, J.Richardson 4-9, Nelson 2-4, Arenas 2-5,

Boston New York Philadelphia New Jersey Toronto

W 34 23 20 14 13

L 10 21 25 32 33

Miami Orlando Atlanta Charlotte Washington

W 31 30 29 19 13

L 13 16 17 25 31

Chicago Milwaukee Indiana Detroit Cleveland

W 31 17 16 17 8

L 14 26 26 29 37

Pct .773 .523 .444 .304 .283

GB — 11 14½ 21 22

L10 7-3 3-7 6-4 4-6 1-9

Str W-1 W-1 W-3 W-2 L-9

Home 22-3 11-9 14-7 11-11 8-14

Away 12-7 12-12 6-18 3-21 5-19

Conf 26-6 13-9 13-18 8-18 9-21

Away 15-8 13-10 15-10 7-14 0-21

Conf 20-6 20-8 20-9 11-17 8-21

Away 10-10 7-16 6-15 5-19 3-23

Conf 18-9 11-12 10-14 10-14 7-22

Southeast Division Pct .705 .652 .630 .432 .295

GB — 2 3 12 18

L10 6-4 6-4 7-3 6-4 4-6

Str W-1 W-1 L-1 W-2 L-2

Home 16-5 17-6 14-7 12-11 13-10

Central Division Pct .689 .395 .381 .370 .178

GB — 13 13½ 14½ 23

L10 8-2 4-6 2-8 5-5 0-10

Str W-3 W-1 L-6 L-1 L-18

Home 21-4 10-10 10-11 12-10 5-14

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Rockets 96, Clippers 83

Southwest Division San Antonio New Orleans Dallas Memphis Houston

W 39 31 29 22 22

Oklahoma City Denver Utah Portland Minnesota

W 29 27 27 25 10

L 7 16 15 24 25

Pct .848 .660 .659 .478 .468

GB — 8½ 9 17 17½

L10 9-1 10-0 3-7 5-5 6-4

Str W-2 W-10 W-2 L-1 W-2

Home 24-2 19-5 16-8 13-7 13-10

Away 15-5 12-11 13-7 9-17 9-15

Conf 26-4 16-11 18-7 14-14 12-16

Away 13-10 7-13 12-11 9-15 2-21

Conf 16-12 16-12 13-13 17-14 3-25

Away 15-8 9-14 6-17 3-15 4-16

Conf 18-9 11-14 11-18 13-21 5-19

Northwest Division L 16 18 19 21 35

Pct .644 .600 .587 .543 .222

GB — 2 2½ 4½ 19

L10 6-4 7-3 3-7 6-4 1-9

Str W-1 W-3 L-6 L-1 L-5

Home 16-6 20-5 15-8 16-6 8-14

Paciic Division L.A. Lakers Phoenix Golden State L.A. Clippers Sacramento

W 33 20 19 17 10

L 13 24 26 28 33

Pct .717 .455 .422 .378 .233

GB — 12 13½ 15½ 21½

L10 Str 8-2 W-2 6-4 L-3 5-5 L-3 6-4 L-2 2-8 L-1 ——— Wednesday’s Games

Orlando 111, Indiana 96 Philadelphia 107, Toronto 94 Milwaukee 98, Atlanta 90 Houston 96, L.A. Clippers 83 San Antonio 112, Utah 105

Home 18-5 11-10 13-9 14-13 6-17

New Jersey 93, Memphis 88 Denver 109, Detroit 100 Oklahoma City 118, Minnesota 117, OT Charlotte 114, Phoenix 107 New Orleans 112, Golden State 103 Today’s Games

Miami at New York, 5 p.m. Boston at Portland, 7:30 p.m.

Houston at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Friday’s Games

New Jersey at Indiana, 4 p.m. Milwaukee at Toronto, 4 p.m. Denver at Cleveland, 4:30 p.m. Orlando at Chicago, 5 p.m. Minnesota at Utah, 6 p.m. Sacramento at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m.

Memphis at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. New York at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. Detroit at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Washington at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Charlotte at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. Boston at Phoenix, 7:30 p.m. All Times PST

Redick 2-5, Q.Richardson 1-1, Turkoglu 1-3), Indiana 8-30 (Granger 3-11, Dunleavy 2-4, Price 1-2, Rush 1-2, Posey 1-4, Collison 0-3, George 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Orlando 51 (Howard 16), Indiana 54 (Foster 8). Assists— Orlando 20 (Turkoglu, Nelson 4), Indiana 15 (Collison 4). Total Fouls—Orlando 23, Indiana 19. A—12,164 (18,165).

lanta 19 (Horford 5), Milwaukee 22 (Dooling 5). Total Fouls—Atlanta 20, Milwaukee 24. Technicals—Bibby, Milwaukee Coach Skiles. A—13,274 (18,717).

Bucks 98, Hawks 90

OKLAHOMA CITY (118) Durant 15-28 13-14 47, Green 7-16 4-4 19, Krstic 4-9 0-0 8, Westbrook 7-19 2-2 16, Sefolosha 2-2 1-1 5, Harden 3-8 4-4 13, Ibaka 2-6 0-0 4, Collison 0-1 2-2 2, Maynor 2-4 0-0 4. Totals 42-93 26-27 118. MINNESOTA (117) Beasley 13-25 2-2 30, Love 13-23 2-3 31, Milicic 3-8 1-3 7, Ridnour 4-13 4-6 12, Brewer 5-10 1-2 11, Johnson 5-10 1-2 13, Pekovic 1-5 2-2 4, Flynn 1-2 0-0 2, Tolliver 1-3 5-5 7, Webster 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 46-99 18-25 117. Okla. City 25 29 29 27 8 — 118 Minnesota 28 28 23 31 7 — 117 3-Point Goals—Oklahoma City 8-21 (Durant 4-8, Harden 3-6, Green 1-5, Maynor 0-2), Minnesota 7-19 (Love 3-3, Johnson 2-5, Beasley 25, Flynn 0-1, Tolliver 0-1, Ridnour 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Oklahoma City 50 (Durant 18), Minnesota 62 (Love 21). Assists— Oklahoma City 21 (Westbrook 8), Minnesota 26 (Ridnour 8). Total Fouls—Oklahoma City 27, Minnesota 21. Technicals—Oklahoma City defensive three second, Pekovic. A—14,979 (19,356).

ATLANTA (90) Smith 6-20 1-3 14, Horford 7-9 3-3 17, Collins 1-1 0-0 2, Bibby 4-7 0-0 8, Johnson 6-13 14 15, Ja.Crawford 4-11 9-9 20, Pachulia 0-4 1-2 1, Williams 2-6 2-2 7, Evans 2-3 0-0 4, Teague 1-5 0-0 2. Totals 33-79 17-23 90. MILWAUKEE (98) Maggette 8-12 3-4 22, Ilyasova 3-6 2-2 8, Bogut 3-12 2-2 8, Dooling 0-4 3-3 3, DouglasRoberts 1-8 2-2 4, Boykins 7-11 6-8 20, Mbah a Moute 1-5 0-0 2, Delfino 5-11 0-0 15, Sanders 4-7 0-0 8, Temple 3-5 0-2 8. Totals 35-81 18-23 98. Atlanta 23 24 28 15 — 90 Milwaukee 22 22 20 34 — 98 3-Point Goals—Atlanta 7-19 (Ja.Crawford 3-6, Johnson 2-4, Williams 1-1, Smith 1-5, Evans 0-1, Bibby 0-2), Milwaukee 10-20 (Delfino 5-9, Maggette 3-4, Temple 2-3, DouglasRoberts 0-1, Ilyasova 0-1, Dooling 0-2). Fouled Out—Maggette. Rebounds—Atlanta 50 (Smith 11), Milwaukee 53 (Bogut 14). Assists—At-

Thunder 118, Timberwolves 117

L.A. CLIPPERS (83) Gomes 3-10 0-0 7, Griffin 5-16 4-5 14, Jordan 4-7 0-2 8, Davis 5-17 4-5 14, Foye 7-17 4-4 20, Bledsoe 2-7 1-1 5, Aminu 1-1 3-4 5, Butler 1-5 0-0 2, Diogu 3-5 0-1 6, Cook 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 32-88 16-22 83. HOUSTON (96) Battier 3-6 3-4 10, Scola 8-18 0-0 16, Hayes 2-4 1-2 5, Lowry 7-13 4-5 20, Martin 3-11 0-0 8, Brooks 5-14 5-5 16, Budinger 2-9 0-0 4, Patterson 2-3 2-2 6, Lee 3-7 2-2 9, Hill 1-2 0-0 2, I.Smith 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 36-87 17-20 96. L.A. Clippers 22 30 21 10 — 83 Houston 27 28 15 26 — 96 3-Point Goals—L.A. Clippers 3-18 (Foye 25, Gomes 1-6, Cook 0-1, Bledsoe 0-2, Butler 02, Davis 0-2), Houston 7-25 (Lowry 2-5, Martin 2-6, Lee 1-2, Battier 1-3, Brooks 1-4, Budinger 0-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—L.A. Clippers 56 (Jordan 12), Houston 60 (Hayes 11). Assists—L.A. Clippers 13 (Bledsoe 6), Houston 22 (Lowry 8). Total Fouls—L.A. Clippers 20, Houston 18. A—18,147 (18,043).

Bobcats 114, Suns 107 CHARLOTTE (114) Wallace 8-13 6-8 22, Diaw 7-10 2-2 18, K.Brown 4-5 4-4 12, Augustin 5-11 2-2 15, Jackson 7-20 5-6 23, Henderson 6-12 3-4 15, Mohammed 2-3 1-1 5, Livingston 1-4 2-2 4, Najera 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 40-79 25-29 114. PHOENIX (107) Hill 3-11 1-1 8, Frye 4-9 0-0 12, Lopez 2-4 0-0 4, Nash 11-15 1-1 27, Carter 8-17 1-2 22, Dudley 5-13 2-2 13, Gortat 6-10 4-4 16, Dragic 2-8 0-0 5, Warrick 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 41-89 9-10 107. Charlotte 31 28 33 22 — 114 Phoenix 26 31 30 20 — 107 3-Point Goals—Charlotte 9-17 (Jackson 4-6, Augustin 3-6, Diaw 2-3, Wallace 0-1, Henderson 0-1), Phoenix 16-32 (Carter 5-8, Nash 4-4, Frye 4-7, Hill 1-3, Dragic 1-5, Dudley 1-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Charlotte 50 (Wallace, K.Brown 10), Phoenix 42 (Gortat 7). Assists—Charlotte 26 (Augustin 10), Phoenix 23 (Nash 15). Total Fouls—Charlotte 12, Phoenix 21. Technicals—Jackson. A—16,986 (18,422).

Spurs 112, Jazz 105 SAN ANTONIO (112) R.Jefferson 6-12 0-0 14, Duncan 6-13 1-3 13, Blair 2-5 0-0 4, Parker 9-15 4-4 23, Ginobili 8-15 8-9 26, Hill 3-6 3-3 10, Splitter 0-1 0-0 0, McDyess 4-8 1-3 9, Neal 3-5 6-7 13. Totals 41-80 23-29 112. UTAH (105) Kirilenko 2-6 6-9 10, Millsap 4-7 0-0 8, A.Jefferson 10-15 2-3 22, Williams 16-24 7-8 39, Bell 0-3 0-0 0, Miles 5-8 1-1 13, Elson 1-2 0-0 2, Price 0-0 0-0 0, Okur 0-4 3-4 3, Watson 0-2 1-2 1, Hayward 0-0 0-0 0, Evans 3-4 1-1 7. Totals 41-75 21-28 105. San Antonio 29 29 30 24 — 112 Utah 25 24 29 27 — 105 3-Point Goals—San Antonio 7-20 (Ginobili 2-5, R.Jefferson 2-6, Neal 1-2, Hill 1-3, Parker 1-3, McDyess 0-1), Utah 2-12 (Miles 2-4, Okur 0-1, Kirilenko 0-1, Watson 0-1, Williams 0-5). Fouled Out—Bell. Rebounds—San Antonio 44 (Blair 9), Utah 42 (A.Jefferson 9). Assists—San Antonio 23 (Ginobili 7), Utah 21 (Williams 9). Total Fouls—San Antonio 20, Utah 29. Technicals—Ginobili, Bell. A—19,911 (19,911).

NBA ROUNDUP

Durant tops career high with 47 in Thunder’s win The Associated Press MINNEAPOLIS — The Minnesota Timberwolves threw everything they had at Kevin Durant. They put hands in his face. They bodied him on the block. They knocked him down in the paint. It was almost enough. Almost. Durant had career highs of 47 points and 18 rebounds, and the Oklahoma City Thunder overcame a 31-point, 21-rebound night from Kevin Love to beat the Timberwolves, 118-117, in overtime on Wednesday night. Jeff Green had 19 points and eight rebounds for the Thunder, who beat Minnesota for the eighth straight time. But it was Durant who carried the load, scoring 16 straight points for the Thunder in the fourth quarter of a thrilling back-and-forth game. “All I can say is Durant is incredible,” Love said, a glazed look in his eye. “He’s incredible.” Durant’s 47 points tied Clippers star Blake Griffin for the highest total in the NBA this season and came from every spot on the floor. He hit four 3-pointers, 13-of-14 free throws and drilled a 15-foot, step-back jumper over Corey Brewer with 28 seconds left in overtime that held up as the game winner. “I hope I don’t ever take it for granted because that’s pretty impressive,” Thunder center Nick Collison said. “To be able to kind of carry us like that, we needed every one of those.” Michael Beasley had 30 points, nine rebounds and seven assists for the Timberwolves, who had a chance to win the game in the final seven seconds. But Luke Ridnour rushed a three-pointer after a missed free throw by Brewer,

Jim Mone / The Associated Press

Oklahoma City Thunder’s Kevin Durant, left, drives by Minnesota Timberwolves’ Wesley Johnson in the second half of Wednesday’s game in Minneapolis. The Thunder won 118-117 in overtime. and the Thunder tracked down the loose ball to seal it. Also on Wednesday: Spurs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112 Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 SALT LAKE CITY — Manu Ginobili scored 26 points, Tony Parker had 23 and San Antonio earned its 10th win the last 11 games. Bucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 Hawks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90 MILWAUKEE — Earl Boykins scored 11 of his 20 points in the fourth quarter, and Milwaukee rallied from an 11-point deficit to start the period and beat Atlanta. Hornets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112 Warriors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103 OAKLAND, Calif. — Chris

Paul had 18 points and 17 assists, and the Hornets matched a franchise record with their 10th consecutive victory. Nuggets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109 Pistons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100 AUBURN HILLS, Mich. — Chauncey Billups scored 26 points, including a trio of threepointers late in the game, and Denver beat Detroit. Carmelo Anthony had 18 points, 10 rebounds and seven assists. Nets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93 Grizzlies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88 NEWARK, N.J. — Devin Harris scored nine of his 13 points in the fourth quarter, and New Jersey rallied to beat Memphis. Magic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111 Pacers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96 INDIANAPOLIS — Dwight Howard had 19 points and 16 rebounds, powering Orlando to the victory. Jason Richardson had 19 points and nine rebounds and Hedo Turkoglu scored 18 points for the Magic. 76ers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107 Raptors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94 TORONTO — Marreese Speights scored 17 of his season-high 23 points in the second quarter, and the 76ers won their third straight, matching a season high. Rockets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96 Clippers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 HOUSTON — Kyle Lowry scored 20 points, Chuck Hayes grabbed 11 rebounds and led Houston’s stingy defense on rookie star Blake Griffin, and Houston beat Los Angeles. Bobcats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114 Suns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107 PHOENIX — Stephen Jackson scored 16 of his 23 points in the second half, and Charlotte won for the fourth time in five games, beating Phoenix.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Summit’s Erick Nazario attempts to pin Mountain View’s Tracy Pitcher during the 112-pound match on Wednesday night at Summit High School. Nazario won the match, but Mountain View won the team contest. See story, Page D1.

Panthers take care of Bears Bulletin staff report REDMOND — The Panthers dominated the lighter weights — winning the first eight matches — en route to a 48-32 victory over Bend in a nonconference wrestling matchup at Redmond Wednesday. Redmond’s Brandon Short kicked off the dual with a 6-4 win in the 103-pound weight class. The Panthers then swept every match from 112 pounds to 145 pounds. “They were really strong, especially in the 119 to 125-pound matches,” said Bend coach Luke Larwin. It was not until the 152-pound match that Bend earned a win. Gunner Crawford broke Redmond’s momentum and scored a 3-2 win over Austin

PREP WRESTLING Alvarez. The next four matches were all Bend, as some of the visiting team’s most successful wrestlers stepped up and tallied wins. Willy Abt kept Bend rolling with a win at 160 pounds and Gavin Gerdes (171), Kenny Dailey (189), and Shane Buck (215) all followed suit. Despite the strong showing, it was not enough to overcome Redmond’s early lead. The Panthers return to action Friday at the Resers Tournament in Hillsboro, while Bend travels across town to meet Mountain View on Thursday.

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

Fredette, BYU, hand SDSU its first loss The Associated Press PROVO, Utah — The handpainted sign by a BYU fan told San Diego State players to “FredetteAboutIt.” But the biggest showdown in Mountain West Conference history was about more than Jimmer Fredette and the 43 points he scored. The ninth-ranked Cougars showed they also have plenty of talented big men in Wednesday night’s 71-58 victory over No. 4 San Diego State that left No. 1 Ohio State as the only unbeaten team in the nation. “It was a physical game and we stayed with them for about 35 minutes, but we just couldn’t hang for 40,” San Diego State coach Steve Fisher said. “This team is really good and our team is really good. I think we are both capable of beating any team anywhere at any time.” BYU (20-1, 6-0) has won 10 straight, and six in a row at home against San Diego State (20-1, 5-1). While Fredette led the way on 14-of-24 shooting, reserve center James Anderson helped break open a close game with a careerhigh five blocks in 14 minutes.

Decathlon Continued from D1 “I feel like I’m coming into the decathlon, or just the multievents in general, that is getting a lot of hype,” Eaton said Wednesday. “I feel very fortunate to be a part of that, because maybe decathlon didn’t have so much hype awhile ago.” The three Americans will square off in a three-event competition Friday at the Millrose Games, taking on the 60-meter dash, high jump and shot put at the storied indoor meet at Madison Square Garden. Clearly comfortable in the spotlight, the trio joked about how advertisers could combine their names, a la “Brangelina.” Somebody suggested “Clay, Trey and A” would work just fine. All three are sponsored by Nike, and they share the same agent, seemingly clearing the way for joint endorsements. Clay has proposed that they train together, though he concedes the logistics probably are not feasible for now. Occasionally working together for a week or two might be more likely. And when the 31-year-old Clay retires — perhaps as soon as after the London Games — he’d like to coach his two younger countrymen. “I think we’re the strongest

BYU forward Brandon Davies also kept the Cougars in it early with eight points in the first 10 minutes. “I feel like our guys really battled,” coach Dave Rose said. It helped to have a frenzied, sellout crowd of 22,700 cheering them on in the first Mountain West matchup between top-10 basketball teams. Though two dozen NBA scouts descended on Provo, they caught more than just Fredette. They saw sophomore Kawhi Leonard record another doubledouble for the Aztecs with 22 points and 15 rebounds. And they also saw Anderson, an unheralded junior. “James did a great job,” Davies said of the 6-foot-10 Anderson, who added three rebounds. “They have great bigs and that’s one of the things we emphasized. ... He came in and played them one-on-one and did a great job.” Also on Wednesday: No. 7 Texas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 Oklahoma State . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 STILLWATER, Okla. — Tristan Thompson scored all 14 of his points in the second half, Jordan Hamilton added 12 points and 11 rebounds and Texas beat

Oklahoma State. Providence. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 No. 8 Villanova . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Marshon Brooks scored 20 points and Providence upset a ranked team for the second time in five days with a win over Villanova. The Friars had gone 51 weeks and 17 games without a Big East victory before beating No. 19 Louisville 72-67 on Saturday. No. 16 Minnesota . . . . . . . . . . . .81 Northwestern . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70 MINNEAPOLIS — Blake Hoffarber scored 20 points while playing point guard in place of Al Nolen, Trevor Mbakwe rammed his way to 18 points and 14 rebounds, and Minnesota beat Northwestern. No. 21 Georgetown . . . . . . . . . .77 St. John’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 WASHINGTON — Hollis Thompson responded to his benching with 15 points and six rebounds, and Georgetown rolled. No. 23 Louisville . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 West Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Peyton Siva hit a twisting shot with 4.5 seconds remaining to lift Louisville over undermanned West Virginia.

team in the world and I’m standing up here with two of the best athletes in the world,” Hardee said. “It’s just going to, over the next two years, bring out really, really amazing things from each of us. “We’re just going to push each other to score higher and higher and hopefully come away with a couple medals at the next couple world championships and Olympic Games.” With their varied backgrounds, ages and builds, the three would be easy to tell apart in an ad campaign. Clay is listed at 5 feet 11, 185 pounds. Eaton is 6-1, 185. Hardee, who is about to turn 27, is 6-5, 210. Of the three, only Clay is old enough to remember those “Dan and Dave” commercials. Before the 1992 Barcelona Games, Reebok revved up the hype machine to promote the rivalry between champion American decathletes O’Brien and Dave Johnson. The only problem was that O’Brien failed to make the Olympic team. Johnson won bronze, then O’Brien came back to capture gold four years later. Clay would have no reservations if Nike tried to create another made-for-TV American decathlon rivalry. “We all thought it was great,” he said. “But on a corporate level and on a marketing level, there’s a lot of companies that

to this day still look at that (the “Dan and Dave” campaign) as a gigantic failure. In my mind, I’m like, why is it a failure? You sold millions of shoes. You had the entire country tuning in to this one thing. And it was real life. It was true.” A year and a half before the Olympics, it’s still too early to know who will be deemed the pre-games darlings. “With London 2012 ahead, we expect that consumers will see more of them and our other top Nike athletes featured in future campaigns,” Nike spokesman Derek Kent wrote in an e-mail. Clay has talked to Bruce Jenner, famous for his 1976 Olympic decathlon gold medal long before becoming a reality TV star, about how timing is everything. Maybe the time will be right in 2012. Clay notes it will be the 20-year anniversary of “Dan and Dave” and the 100-year anniversary of the king of Sweden proclaiming Jim Thorpe the world’s greatest athlete. “If anybody can create a superstar, Nike can,” Clay said. First, the Americans need to perform like superstars at this summer’s world championships. “We’ll be well on our way to 2012,” Clay said, “and hopefully doing some pretty amazing things and come back with maybe setting some historical things there, with possibly a 12-3 — who knows?”


D4 Thursday, January 27, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Fly Fishing Film Tour What: A 90-city tour featuring eight fly-fishing films set on waters around the world. When: Coming to Bend Wednesday, Feb. 9, and Thursday, Feb. 10, from 6 to 8 o’clock each night. Doors open at 5:30. Where: McMenamins Old St. Francis School. Tickets: $12 in advance at Bend’s Fly & Field Outfitters; $15 at the door on the night of the show. For more information, visit www.flyfishingfilmtour.com.

Film Continued from D1 “I loved it, but it was hell,” Robison says with a laugh. Robison, of Salt Lake City, started the film tour in 2006 — with just six stops, including one in Bend — to provide both an avenue for up-andcoming filmmakers to showcase their work and an alternative to the instructional fly-fishing videos that have become commonplace. This will mark the seventh straight year of the tour, which has come to Bend each year. After the final tour stop in 2006, Robison quit his job as a computer programmer for an airline company. “We took a leap of faith,” says Robison, 42. “We’ve hit a few rapids in between. But it’s exciting to watch how much it’s grown.” In “Oile,” the crew catches enormous marlin in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Mexico, then travels across the country to fish bass lakes. “Heart of the Marsh,” another film being presented on the tour, details the effects of the recent oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico on redfish populations and Louisiana marshlands. Other featured film segments of the tour include fishing for permit in the Florida Keys, and for billfish in Guatemala. As stated in a tour press release, the films offer “a blend of inspiring cinematography, hilarious comedy, poignant commentary and tons of amazing fish.” This year’s Fly Fishing Film Tour, which opens Feb. 3 in Ventura, Calif., received 35 submissions, according to Robison. “Six years ago, there were only three filmmakers,” Robison says. “It’s really kicked off a whole subculture for independent fly-fishing filmmakers. We can actually pay the filmmakers now.” The filmmakers receive a percentage of the sales on the tour, according to Robison. Last year, the tour doled out more than $20,000 to filmmakers, he says.

Conservation And the tour also raised more than $60,000 for conservation efforts in 2010, Robison adds. Each stop on the film tour features a live emcee, door prizes, special offers from local outfitters, and an opportunity to win a grand-prize fishing trip. Much like the annual fall ski and snowboard film tour by Warren Miller Entertainment gets snowriders fired up for the winter alpine season, the Fly Fishing Film Tour is billed as a chance for anglers to get excited for the upcoming fly-fishing season. In fact, two producers from Warren Miller Entertainment are producing films for the flyfishing tour. “They’re heavy hitters in outdoor adventure filmmaking,” Robison says. “They’ve brought a lot to the tour.” Robison notes that with technological advances in cameras, filmmakers now find it more affordable to shoot in high definition. And because of that, he adds, films on the tour will be screened on a high-definition projector. Robison says Bend remains one of his favorite stops along the tour. “You guys live in a great town, with such fishy waters — the Metolius and the Deschutes,” he says. “Bend’s honestly one of our favorite shows. We see such a good turnout. We’ll sell out this year for sure.” Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@bendbulletin.com.

H U N T I N G & F ISH I N G

Vegas expo showcases latest sportsman gear

FLY-TYING CORNER

GARY LEWIS

I

f what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas, they can have it — the flu, I mean. My big gamble was that I could get on an airplane and not catch it. I threw the dice and lost. But I did manage to make it to day one of the main event. Last week’s Shooting, Hunting, Outdoor Trade Show attracted 31,769 company buyers and guests and 2,074 members of the sporting press to the Sands Expo and Convention Center. There, all facets of the $4 billion industry were captured under one roof, with 1,600 exhibitors and 630,000 square feet of booth space. The state of Oregon was well represented. Pat Mundy, of Beaverton-based Leupold, showed me the Mark 8, a 1.1-8-by-24mm rifle scope, the newest model in its line. This unit is built on a 34mm main tube with “pinch and turn” locking knobs for windage and elevation and a third turret on the left, which is a rheostat that controls the brightness of the M-TMR reticle. A rugged scope, built to military standards, it is available to civilians at a retail price of something like $3,500. Mike Shantie and Mark Thomas from Kruger Optical, of Sisters, showed me the second generation 1-8-by-40 Dual Tactical Sight. Designed for a complex battle environment, the carbon fiber DTS can be instantly switched — with no head movement — from a close quarter reflex to a 2-8-bymil-dot sight with independently adjustable windage and elevation systems. Bob Nosler and Mike Lake let me handle the latest Nosler rifle, the Legacy Model 48, a tribute to John Nosler, who passed away last October. With a hand-oiled black walnut stock, a Rifle Basix trigger and its graceful lines, I knew this was a rifle Big John would have carried. Nosler has also entered the world of air-powered projectiles with the eXTREME Ballistic Tip, engineered to feed the new Benjamin 357 caliber Rogue air rifle. I’ve watched Tualatin-based Warne Scope Mounts carve out a place in the industry with their rugged scope mounts under the direction of Charlie Lake. Their latest product is a 65in/lb torque wrench used for mounting optics. Wilsonville’s Crimson Trace Corporation has expanded its offerings from the world of laser lights into gun-mounted white lights that work in tandem with its famous grip-mounted laser systems. Speaking of handguns, I ran into Travis Noteboom and Brad Thomas with Diamondback Firearms. The product is an American-made micro-compact 380 semi-automatic pistol that can be ordered with Crimson Trace grips. Another handgun that caught my eye was the Kimber Solo, a micro-compact with 9mm power in a 17-ounce platform and all the features of a full-size handgun, including an ambidextrous safety. There was no shortage of black guns, the so-called modern sporting rifles, which are very often not black anymore. A new

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Darwin Beetle, tied by Joyce Norman.

By Gary Lewis For The Bulletin

Darwin’s Beetle, Chiasognathus granti, is a treedwelling creature that makes its home in Chile and Argentina. Those large jaws? They use them for fighting. They put them under the wings of their opponent and hurl them to the ground. Or to the water. Those legendary trout of Patagonia have been known to make a meal out of many an unlucky Darwin Beetle. Forget about trying to set this fly down softly. You need a heavy tippet to get this one to turn over on a cast. And when the bug hits

Photo courtesy Nosler Inc.

At the SHOT Show in Las Vegas last week, Nosler Inc., of Bend, announced its new Legacy rifle, a tribute to founder and longtime Bend resident John Nosler.

One of thousands of new products introduced at last week’s SHOT Show was the new SOL Origin, a survival kit. Photo courtesy Adventure Medical Kits

rifle that caught my eye was neither black nor modern. A scaleddown single-shot Sharps, the Lyman Ideal Model is fitted with a rear tang sight and is chambered in 22 Hornet and 38-55. With a stream-lined lock and double set triggers, this would make a fine varmint rifle for those days when the spring wind blows soft over the growing alfalfa. Mark Lipari’s Oilfield Camo caught me by surprise. A hunting camo pattern that doesn’t look like camouflage, it is made up of patterns of helicopters, derricks, cranes, pumps and other implements from the working man’s world. “We’re working men. It’s who we are, it’s what we do,” Mark said. You could put this camo on a tie and blend right in at the office. If you wore a tie. If you had an office. I ran into Dale Mitchell from Redmond, who pointed me toward Hunten Outdoors. One of the features I liked in their higher-end trail cameras was the ability to scroll through the pictures without removing the card from the unit. I’ve used trail cameras enough to know that I want to use them more in the future. At the SOG Specialty Knives booth, Chris Cashbaugh and Bill Daddi introduced me to the Trident Mini folding knife. It

opens easily with spring assist. A unique groove in the handle allows the user to cut paracord, fishing line or whatever without opening the knife. For Irish Setter Boots, Kim Emery showed me the latest rubber Rutmaster for treestand hunters. Seventeen inches high, with 800 grams of Thinsulate, an ExoFlex fit system and aggressive treads, these are not your father’s rubber boots. But I’d bet he’d like a pair. At the Adventure Medical Kits booth, they showed me the SOL (Survive Outdoors Longer) Origin kit. About the size of a baseball, but more appropriate in an emergency, the unit includes a knife, fire starter, rescue flash, LED light, compass, rescue howler and a fishing gear. With the industry shows wrapping up, the consumer shows are underway and all the new gear is going to get its real test, in the marketplace. Closest to home is the O’Loughlin Sportsman’s Show, which returns to the Deschutes County Fairgrounds, March 10-13. See you there. Gary Lewis is the host of “High Desert Outdoorsman” and author of “John Nosler — Going Ballistic,” “Black Bear Hunting,” “Hunting Oregon” and other titles. Contact Lewis at www. GaryLewisOutdoors.com.

FISHING REPORT

Here is the weekly fishing report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by fisheries biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife: CENTRAL ZONE CROOKED RIVER BELOW BOWMAN DAM: Flows have been hovering around 2,000 cfs; please exercise caution when wading. Anglers are reminded that angling methods are restricted to artificial flies and lures from Oct. 31, 2010, to May 28, 2011. According to recent angler reports, the trout seem to be larger this year than in recent years. DESCHUTES RIVER (Mouth to the Northern Boundary of the Warm Springs Reservation): The river reached flood stage during recent rains, making fishing an adventure. Fishing will

improve as flows recede. Some anglers report success in high water conditions by fishing close to the bank with egg and San Juan worm patterns. HAYSTACK RESERVOIR: The water is clear and fishing is fair. If you’ve fished Haystack Reservoir recently, please send a report to ODFW Fishing Reports. HOOD RIVER: The river reached flood stage during recent rains, making fishing an adventure. Fishing will improve as flows recede. Anglers are reporting decent early success on bright winter steelhead in the lower river. Steelhead anglers should expect fish numbers to increase throughout the month and February, with a peak in March and April. METOLIUS RIVER: Trout fishing has been good. Insect hatches should offer opportunities for good dry-fly fishing. OCHOCO RESERVOIR: Opportunities for

E C 

Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin. com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin. com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

FISHING FLY-FISHING FILM TOUR: Returns to Bend on Wednesday, Feb. 9, and Thursday, Feb. 10, from 5:30 to 8 p.m.; the show will take place at McMenamins Old St. Francis School; includes films from around the world; discount tickets are available at Fly & Field Outfitters in Bend for $12, tickets will be sold for $15 at the door the night of the show; www.thef3t.com or www.flyfishingfilmtour.com. MASTERING WESTERN RIVERS AND LAKES: Seminar with Rick Hafele and Skip Morris, hosted by Central Oregon Flyfishers; Feb. 12-13, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day; at Aspen Hall, Bend; workshop brings together entomology, pattern selection, presentation and fly tying; cost for the two days is $65 for Central Oregon Flyfishers and Sunriver Angler members, $75 for non-members; registration is required by Jan. 28; 541-6330934; education@coflyfishers. org; www.coflyfishers.org. DESCHUTES CHAPTER OF TROUT UNLIMITED: Meets on the first Monday of each month at the Environmental Center in Bend; meeting starts at 6:45 p.m. for members to meet and greet, and discuss what the chapter is up to; 541-306-4509; communications@deschutestu. org; www.deschutestu.org. BEND CASTING CLUB: The Bend Casting Club is a group of local fly anglers from around Central Oregon who are trying to improve their casting technique; club meets on the fourth Wednesday of each month from 6 to 8 p.m., at the Orvis Casting Course in Bend’s Old Mill District; 541-306-4509 or bendcastingclub@gmail.com. THE SUNRIVER ANGLERS CLUB: Meets on the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Sunriver Fire Station; contact: www.sunriveranglers.org. THE CENTRAL OREGON FLYFISHERS CLUB: Meets on the third Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Bend Senior Center, 1600 SE Reed Market Road; contact: www.coflyfishers.org.

HUNTING

Deschutes, Hood rivers reach flood stage 12- to 20-inch rainbow trout should improve with the warmer weather. PRINEVILLE YOUTH FISHING POND: Young anglers are catching rainbow trout and an occasional largemouth bass. SHEVLIN YOUTH FISHING POND: The pond is open to children 17 years old and younger, with a bag limit of two fish. TAYLOR LAKE: Taylor Lake should offer anglers a good opportunity to catch trout this winter. The lake has been stocked with legal and trophy trout. Access is currently good, with no ice or snow.

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend • www.highdesertbank.com EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

the surface, those rubber legs and antenna are moving. Tie it big and take it to Patagonia or size it down and use it here at home. Start with a stout 1/0 hook and a chunk of closed cell foam. Thread the middle of the foam over the hook, then build a body of green and red sparkle chenille. Lay the first layer of foam over the body to begin forming the case. At the thorax, tie in three segmented rubber legs then tie in the jaws, made of black rubber. To complete the shell, tie down the second layer of foam and cap it with a chunk of purple foam for visibility.

ANNUAL MULE DEER CLASSIC BANQUET: For the Bend Chapter of the Oregon Hunters Association; at Bend’s Seventh Mountain Resort on Saturday, Feb. 19; event is for all ages; funds raised support youth scholarships and a variety of wildlife projects; contact Vicki Ramming at 541-382-7229. ROCKY MOUNTAIN ELK FOUNDATION BANQUET: The Central Oregon Chapter of the

Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation will celebrate its 25th anniversary with the annual banquet on April 9 from 4 to 10 p.m., at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center in Redmond; highlights include the John Nosler Memorial Rifle Raffle, Les Schwab Rifle Raffle, Oregon State Wide Elk Tag, dozens of guns, archery packages and more; cost is $75, which includes dinner and annual membership; contact 541-383-8518 or www.rmef.org. THE BEND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the King Buffet at the north end of the Wagner Mall, across from Robberson Ford in Bend; contact: Bendchapter_oha@yahoo.com. THE OCHOCO CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Prineville Fire Hall, 405 N. Belknap St. Contact: 447-5029. THE REDMOND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Redmond VFW Hall.

SHOOTING BEND TRAP CLUB: Five-stand and skeet shooting Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m; trap shooting on Thursdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.; located east of Bend, at Milepost 30 off U.S. Highway 20; contact Marc Rich at 541-3881737 or visit www.bendtrapclub.com. CENTRAL OREGON SPORTING CLAYS AND HUNTING PRESERVE: 13-station, 100-target course and 5-stand open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to dusk, and Sunday from 9 a.m. to dusk; located at 9020 South U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; www. birdandclay.com or 541-383-0001. REDMOND ROD & GUN CLUB: Rifle and Pistol are Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; skeet is Tuesdays and Sundays beginning at 10 a.m.; trap is Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. to closing, and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; 2011 Family Memberships now available for $50; non-members are welcome; www.rrandgc.com. PINE MOUNTAIN POSSE: Cowboy action shooting club that shoots at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 24; second Sunday of each month; 541-318-8199 or www.pinemountainposse.com. HORSE RIDGE PISTOLEROS: Cowboy action shooting with pistols, rifles and shotguns at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at Milepost 24; first and third Sunday of each month at 10 a.m.; 541-4087027 or www.hrp-sass.com.

Bend High Baseball Camp Bend Field House Friday, Jan. 28 • 5 - 7pm Saturday, Jan. 29 • 9 - 11am Sunday, Jan. 30 • 9 - 11 am Open to kids age 7-14 Cost is $65

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ADVENTURES IN THE CENTRAL OREGON OUTDOORS Inside

Breaking her rules Tiffani Thiessen is glad she scuttled her nodating-actors rule and married one, Page E2

OUTING

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/outing

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2011

Springlike conditions put damper on winter fun at sno-parks By Betsy Q. Cliff The Bulletin

It’s April come early on the trails this week. Warm temperatures and recent rains have melted away much of the snow, said Chris Sabo, trails specialist for the Deschutes National Forest. “It’s spring conditions.” For those who were looking forward to more winter sports, this could make the weekend a challenge, Sabo said. Some sno-parks, including Six Mile (near Newberry Crater) and Lower Three Creek (near Sisters) do not have enough snow for play. Others, including Skyliner Sno-park near Tumalo Creek, have bare spots, so users should be cautious. In general, Sabo said, the snow line is at about 4,500 feet near Bend. Even in areas above the snow line, such as at Wanoga Snoplay Area, conditions are not ideal, Sabo said. He recommended people not use the sledding hill right now, particularly in the morning when it is likely to be very icy. See Trails / E3

TRAIL UPDATE

decision point Life lessons in the breathtaking backcountry of the Cascades By Markian Hawryluk The Bulletin

ne of the things I love about trips into the backcountry is how much they are metaphors for life. You set out with a goal in mind, experience hurdles or obstacles along the way, and handle the twists and turns of your path, all while taking time to enjoy the scenery around you. And the decisions you make early on impact the rest of your journey. So there I stood on Saturday at a fork in the trail. One path would lead me to my goal, the summit of Maxwell Butte, a 6,229-foot mound just on the other side of Santiam Pass. The other trail would lead somewhere I didn’t want to be. But I had no idea which was which. Under a couple of feet of snow, neither seemed like the obvious choice. The chances of actually getting lost were probably pretty slim. After all, I could just follow the track of snowshoed footprints back to the start. I just wasn’t going to get the big payoff of reaching the summit. My map was no help. There

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If you go Getting there: From Sisters, take U.S. Highway 20 west past Santiam Pass. At the Santiam Junction, bear right onto state Highway 22. Turn right at the sign for Maxwell Sno-Park. Cost: Sno-park permit required Nov. 15 through April 30, Northwest Forest Pass or day pass required at other times Difficulty: Strenuous Contact: Detroit Ranger District, 503-854-3366 was no fork in the trail marked in this area. For all I knew, one of the paths might be simply a construct of a thinning forest and not really a trail at all. I stood for a moment paralyzed by indecision. It’s like any decision in life, I guess. Choosing one way over another will have obvious ramifications and unforeseen consequences. Opting for one path eliminates a range of possible outcomes and increases the chances for others. See Outing / E6

SPOTLIGHT St. Thomas Academy to host crab feed

Photos by Markian Hawryluk / The Bulletin

Enjoy lunch with the view of Mount Jefferson and Mount Hood, pictured at top, in the distance from the summit of Maxwell Butte.

The St. Thomas Academy of Redmond will hold its third annual crab feed fundraiser Feb. 5 at the Parish Hall at Southwest 12th Street and Southwest Evergreen Avenue. For $20 per person, attendees will get Dungeness crab from the coast, fresh bread, salad and more. There will also be a cash bar featuring beer from Deschutes Brewery and an assortment of wines. The event will run from 4-8 p.m. and is open only to those 21 and older. Tickets are available at CL Printing (541-504-9334), the Redmond Chamber of Commerce (541-923-5191) and St. Thomas Academy of Redmond (541-548-3785). Proceeds benefit the academy’s student technology program. Contact: www.redmondacademy .com.

Redmond Kiwanis Club plans dinner, auction

The ridge up Maxwell Butte offers a spectacular view of Mount Washington, North Sister and Middle Sister.

The Kiwanis Club of Redmond will present its seventh annual Vintner’s Dinner and Auction on Feb. 19. The dinner, called “Grape Expectations,” will feature a choice of two entrees in a five-course meal. Noble Estates Vineyard of Eugene will pair a wine with each course. Vintner Mark Jurasevich will talk about each of the wines. The event will begin at 6 p.m. at Chloe’s North Redmond Station, at 1857 N.W. Sixth St. Tickets cost $65 per person or $650 for a corporate table of eight. The event is a major fundraiser for the Kiwanis Club’s youth projects. Tickets are available at Chloe’s (541-316-2029), Trout Realty (541548-8158) and Kiwanis members, or at www.redmondkiwanis.org. Reservations are requested by Feb. 12. Contact: Carl Vertrees at 541-548-5935. — From staff reports


T EL EV ISION

E2 Thursday, January 27, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Gifting alcohol can have disastrous consequences Dear Abby: You advised “Susan in Southern Oregon” (Dec. 1), who asked about the appropriateness of giving alcohol as a gift at an office party, that “the only time that alcohol would be an inappropriate gift is when the giver knows the recipient doesn’t use it.” As a former psychiatric social worker, I would say that the only time alcohol would be an APPROPRIATE gift is when the giver knows the recipient would use it, and do so responsibly. People aren’t always forthcoming about their views and experiences regarding alcohol, so it’s best to play it safe. Many people abstain from alcohol because they are recovering alcoholics or have seen the devastating results that alcoholism has had on a loved one’s life. Others have religious reasons for not imbibing. Giving alcohol as a gift may not only dismay the recipient, it could also lead to worse results if the giftee is someone who is struggling to stay sober. — Amy in Dover, Del. Dear Amy: You have raised many valid points. Most of my readers disagreed with my answer, and their reasons have made me reconsider my advice to Susan. I was wrong. (Mea culpa.) Read on: Dear Abby: Many alcoholics choose not to reveal their disease. It is called Alcoholics ANONYMOUS for a reason. A person may have been in recovery for many years and may not wish to tell anyone except close family and longtime friends. A gift of alcohol would be a temptation to any recovering alcoholic, one that is hard to resist. The mind can easily rationalize: “It was a gift. I might as well get rid of it. I can share it with others, so it’s not so bad.” The slope grows steeper from there. — Anonymous in San Antonio Dear Abby: Have you any idea

DEAR ABBY what it is like to get knocked across a room because you asked your daddy to play with you? Have you seen your Christmas tree knocked over because your mother and father were having a fistfight? My father owned one of the largest businesses in our town. We belonged to the country club. Yet my parents died in poverty because of alcohol. Of the four siblings, I am the only one who doesn’t have an alcohol abuse problem. I am frequently asked to attend functions so I can be the designated driver. I think the slogan “Friends don’t let friends drink and drive” should be changed to “Real friends don’t try to shift their responsibility.” — A Survivor in Las Vegas Dear Abby: Twenty years ago, I would have agreed with your answer. I am the president of a construction company, and it was standard practice for us to give alcohol at Christmas to a number of our customers. Then one day, I received a call from a tearful woman who asked if we had given alcohol to her husband. When I answered yes, she said that in the future, she would appreciate it if we wouldn’t do that anymore. Her husband, an alcoholic, had consumed the entire bottle, gone home and beaten her up. We discontinued the practice immediately. I would not advise people to gift alcohol unless they know the recipient very well and know it will not cause harm to him or her, or those around them. — Safer in Tennessee Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Thiessen tells how she collared her husband By Luaine Lee

Tiffani Thiessen plays Elizabeth Burke on “White Collar” on USA Network.

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

STUDIO CITY, Calif. — For a time, Tiffani Thiessen refused to date actors. After all, the beauty, who’d played the vixen Valerie Malone on “Beverly Hills, 90210,” had been linked with several during her career. But seven years ago she was coaxed into a blind date. And voila! She fell for another actor. “When I met him, I knew he was going to be the father of my children,” she said. “I’d never ever been on a blind date before, that’s what’s so funny. It was set up by a friend. She was an actor as well, and had met him when they were doing a TV show together. “I’d made that rule a year before that. I said, ‘No more actors!’ We got married in July 2005 and had our first baby the summer of 2010.” Thiessen had countermanded her rule for actor Brady Smith (“Castle,” “Harry’s Law”), who pops in the door of the restaurant, pushing a stroller with chubbycheeked, 7-month-old Harper in tow. Smith slides into the next table, and loosens the blanket around Harper, who smiles when she sees her mother. “What made it a little different with him, he was also a painter,” said Thiessen. “So I thought he wasn’t the typical actor and only an actor; he had other aspirations in his life. That’s why I was open to it.” The couple live only a few blocks away and make a go of their relationship by encouraging and supporting each other in whatever they want to do. Thiessen recently started a baby furniture and bedding company with an interior designer partner. Smith said he was all for it.

USA Network via McClatchy-Tribune News Service

“I have full and complete confidence in my wife just because I know she’s smart and she wouldn’t tackle anything that she didn’t think she could handle,” he said. While others might still see Thiessen as the doe-eyed ingenue, she’s all grown up now. And as the wife of FBI agent Peter Burke on USA’s “White Collar,” she proves it. Laughing, she said, “The whole first half of the season last year, I wasn’t in it that much and it was because I was pregnant, and I was here in Los Angeles (they film in New York) and they only shot me in one scene each episode. And they shot me from my boobs up. Most people knew from the news, but they never showed it on the show. “I’ve been doing this for a very, very long time — almost 26, 27 years now, and it’s truly one of

‘White Collar’ When: 10 p.m. Tuesdays Where: USA Network

my most favorite jobs that I’ve had in a really long time. I truly say that because I adore everybody that’s on that show — all the guys — we get along very well. I feel very blessed, I have to say.” At 37, Thiessen has been acting most of her life. She started in kiddie commercials and moved to TV and film. At one point she thought she’d had enough. “In my mid-20s I went through a phase where I had a break in work and wasn’t working a little bit there. I’d spent a lot of time in Montana, and I fell in love with the mountains and the simple life and nature and wanting to be

away from Los Angeles. “And here was a point that I almost was: ‘I’m kind of over it.’ But I didn’t quit. I’d gone to Montana for a friend’s wedding and fell in love with the area and the mountains. I almost bought a place. I almost moved. It would’ve been a huge step,” she said with a sigh. Instead, she stuck it out and eventually met her husband. Thiessen says that she and Smith are never competitive about work. “Ups and downs are common to every marriage,” she said. “Sometimes my mom’s very busy and maybe my dad’s not so much or maybe vice versa. I think that’s marriage. We’re very good about making sure that WE are the priority. And it doesn’t matter about the other stuff. “He came with me last year when we were in New York. He didn’t want to be without Harper. But he’s an actor, he can work in New York, which he did. He shot two movies while we were there. “Sticking together is very important to us,” she adds, “because we have very good role models, and a lot of people give up too easily. It’s one of the hardest relationships, I think. You’re living with somebody (of) the opposite sex who couldn’t be more different from you. “So the give-and-take that we have to give to each other is extremely important. Brady’s taught me to be much more vulnerable. I don’t think I was vulnerable when I met him. I was a pretty tough cookie, because I was on my own for a long time and I traveled a lot, and he showed me that part of a marriage is showing each other your vulnerable side. I think I ease him a little. The bigger picture is important, and the messy little things don’t matter.”

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BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

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BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW # KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 173 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

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KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! With Ruff News Nightly News House of Payne House of Payne Hidden China Avec Eric ’ ‘G’ Travels-Edge Steves Europe

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KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News News (N) ABC World News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ Burt Wolf Nightly Business News News Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Steves Europe Wolf: Travels Burt Wolf Nightly Business

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Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Victory Garden Woodwright PBS NewsHour ’ Å

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Wipeout (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Community ‘PG’ Perfect Couples Big Bang Theory $..! My Dad Says Wipeout (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å American Idol Auditions No. 4 ‘PG’ News on PDX-TV Oregon Art Beat Field Guide Community ‘PG’ Perfect Couples The Vampire Diaries (N) ‘14’ Å Woodsmith Shop Glass-Vicki Oregon Art Beat Field Guide

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Grey’s Anatomy ’ ‘14’ Å The Office ‘PG’ Parks/Recreat CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ Grey’s Anatomy ’ ‘14’ Å Bones The Bullet in the Brain ‘14’ Without a Trace Shadows ’ ‘PG’ Doc Martin The Portwenn Effect ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ Parks/Recreat Nikita Nikita reveals a secret. (N) ‘14’ Art Workshop Joy/Painting Doc Martin The Portwenn Effect ‘PG’

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(10:01) Private Practice ‘14’ Å 30 Rock (N) ‘14’ Outsourced ‘14’ The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Å (10:01) Private Practice ‘14’ Å News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Without a Trace Two Families ‘PG’ Pioneers of Television Westerns ‘G’ 30 Rock (N) ‘14’ Outsourced ‘14’ Married... With Married... With Gourmet’s Adven Jacques Pepin Pioneers of Television Westerns ‘G’

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KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman News (N) (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Faces of America w/ Henry Louis News Jay Leno King of Queens King of Queens Hidden China Avec Eric ’ ‘G’ Faces of America w/ Henry Louis

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Bounty Hunter The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 Å The First 48 (N) Å Beyond Scared Straight (N) ‘14’ Beyond Scared Straight Jessup ‘14’ 130 28 18 32 Bounty Hunter (3:30) ››› “Moonstruck” (1987) Cher, ›› “Nanny McPhee” (2005, Comedy) Emma Thompson, Colin Firth. A woman uses ››› “Mrs. Doubtfire” (1993, Comedy) Robin Williams, Sally Field, Pierce Brosnan. An estranged dad poses as a nanny to be with ››› “Mrs. Doubtfire” (1993, Comedy) 102 40 39 Nicolas Cage. magic to control a widower’s unruly children. Å his children. Robin Williams, Sally Field. Wild Russia Arctic ’ ‘PG’ Å I, Predator Polar Bear vs. Seal ‘PG’ Planet Earth Fresh Water ‘G’ Å Planet Earth Deserts ’ ‘G’ Å Planet Earth Caves ’ ‘G’ Å Planet Earth Fresh Water ‘G’ Å 68 50 26 38 Wild Russia Caucasus ’ ‘PG’ Å Million Dollar Listing Epiphanies ‘14’ Real Housewives/Beverly Real Housewives/Beverly Real Housewives/Beverly Real Housewives/Beverly Real Housewives/Beverly Love Calling (N) Real Housewives 137 44 Red. Wedding (6:45) CMT Music The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘PG’ Movie CMT Music ‘PG’ Movie 190 32 42 53 (4:00) ›› “Swing Vote” (2008) ’ Supermarkets Inc: Inside Supermarkets Inc: Inside Mad Money Supermarkets Inc: Inside Supermarkets Inc: Inside Sexier-90 Days! Ninja Kitchen 51 36 40 52 Target: Inside the Bullseye Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 Parker Spitzer (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report Futurama ’ ‘PG’ Futurama ’ ‘PG’ Futurama ’ ‘14’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 Wayne’s World 2 Bend La Pine U of O Today PM Edition Cooking City Club of Central Oregon The Buzz Epic Conditions Outside Presents Paid Program Visions of NW Ride Guide ‘14’ The Element 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 12 11 Tonight From Washington Fish Hooks ‘G’ Sonny-Chance Sonny-Chance Suite/Deck Suite/Deck ››› “The Incredibles” (2004) Voices of Craig T. Nelson. Å Hannah Montana Hannah Montana Suite/Deck Suite/Deck 87 43 14 39 Fish Hooks ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Man vs. Wild Castaway ‘PG’ Å Dual Survival Out of Air ‘PG’ Å Masters of Survival (N) ‘PG’ Å Auction Kings ’ Auction Kings ’ Dual Survival Out of Air ‘PG’ Å 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Winter X Games From Aspen, Colo. (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å NFL Live (N) Basketball Final SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 College Basketball College Basketball UCLA at Arizona (Live) Å College Basketball St. Mary’s at Gonzaga (Live) Å X Center (Live) Winter X Games From Aspen, Colo. 22 24 21 24 College Basketball Can’t Blame Up Close Å SportsCentury 30 for 30 Å AWA Wrestling Å College Football From Sept. 11, 2010. (N) 23 25 123 25 Firestone Chats SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Still Standing ’ Still Standing ’ Still Standing ’ ›› “Practical Magic” (1998, Comedy-Drama) Sandra Bullock, Nicole Kidman, Dianne Wiest. America’s Funniest Home Videos The 700 Club ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Paula’s Best 30-Minute Meals Bobby Flay Best Thing Ate Iron Chef America Unique Eats Unique Eats Ace of Cakes (N) Unwrapped Chopped Flower Power 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa Runnin’ With PAC Women’s College Basketball Stanford at Oregon (Live) College Basketball Oregon State at California (Live) Beavers College Basketball Oregon State at California 20 45 28* 26 Beavers (4:00) “My Super Ex-Girlfriend” ›› “Hancock” (2008, Action) Will Smith, Charlize Theron. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Archer (N) ‘MA’ (10:32) Archer (11:02) Archer Me, Myself 131 Designed to Sell Hunters Int’l House Hunters My First Place My First Place Selling New York Selling New York House Hunters Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l 176 49 33 43 Bang, Your Buck Bang, Your Buck Cash & Cari ‘G’ Gates of Hell ‘PG’ Å Modern Marvels ‘G’ Å Swamp People ‘PG’ Å Brad Meltzer’s Decoded (N) ‘PG’ Stan Lee’s Superhumans ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 How the Earth Was Made ‘PG’ Old Christine Old Christine How I Met How I Met Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å “The Memory Keeper’s Daughter” (2008) Dermot Mulroney. ‘PG’ Å How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Ed Show (N) The Last Word The Rachel Maddow Show The Ed Show Hardball With Chris Matthews Å 56 59 128 51 The Last Word That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Silent Library ’ Silent Library ’ Teen Mom 2 Change of Heart ‘PG’ Jersey Shore Free Snooki ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore Drunk Punch Love ‘14’ Jersey Shore Drunk Punch Love ‘14’ 192 22 38 57 The Seven ‘PG’ SpongeBob iCarly iKiss ‘G’ iCarly ‘G’ Å House of Anubis SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Gangland Hunt and Kill ‘14’ Å Gangland American Gangster ‘PG’ Gangland Basic Training ‘14’ Å TNA Wrestling (N) ’ Å MANswers ‘MA’ MANswers ‘MA’ 132 31 34 46 Gangland Evil Breed ’ ‘14’ Å Star Trek: Enterprise ’ ‘PG’ Å › “Ghost Ship” (2002, Horror) Julianna Margulies, Ron Eldard. ››› “Identity” (2003, Suspense) John Cusack, Ray Liotta. ›› “Toolbox Murders” (2004) Å 133 35 133 45 Stargate SG-1 Learning Curve ‘PG’ Behind Scenes David Jeremiah Win.-Wisdom This Is Your Day Praise the Lord (Live) Å Live-Holy Land Best of Praise Grant Jeffrey Changing-World Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ › “Rush Hour 3” (2007, Action) Jackie Chan, Chris Tucker. Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Conan Jane Lynch; Joe Buck. (N) 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond ›››› “Dr. Strangelove Or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying (10:45) ››› “Lolita” (1962) James Mason. A middle-aged pro››› “Man in a Cocked Hat” (1959) Terry-Thomas. A bungling (6:45) ››› “Being There” (1979, Comedy) Peter Sellers, Shirley MacLaine, Jack Warden. President and 101 44 101 29 clerk becomes ambassador to a British colony. D.C. power broker heed gardener’s utterings. and Love the Bomb” (1964) Peter Sellers. fessor becomes smitten with a 12-year-old. Kitchen Boss (N) Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ County Jail Las Vegas ’ ‘14’ Å Police Women of Cincinnati ’ ‘14’ Police Women of Cincinnati (N) ‘14’ Cellblock 6: Female Lock Up ‘PG’ Police Women of Cincinnati ’ ‘14’ 178 34 32 34 Cake Boss ‘PG’ NBA Basketball Boston Celtics at Portland Trail Blazers (Live) Å Inside the NBA (Live) Å Law & Order Internet. ’ ‘14’ 17 26 15 27 NBA Basketball Miami Heat at New York Knicks From Madison Square Garden in New York. Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ 6TEEN ‘G’ Total Drama Scooby-Doo Adventure Time Regular Show MAD ‘PG’ King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man-Carnivore Man-Carnivore Carnivore Carnivore Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Pasta Paradise ‘G’ Å 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ (5:44) The Jeffersons ‘PG’ Å NCIS Sharif Returns ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Blowback ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Faith ’ ‘PG’ Å Royal Pains Pit Stop (N) ‘PG’ Å (10:01) Fairly Legal Priceless ‘PG’ White Collar Forging Bonds ‘PG’ 15 30 23 30 House Larger Than Life ‘14’ Å Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew Reunion ’ ‘14’ Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å 191 48 37 54 Basketball Wives Basketball Wives ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(3:35) ››› “Starship Troopers” (5:50) ›› “Revenge of the Nerds” 1984 ‘R’ Å In the House ›› “XXX” 2002, Action Vin Diesel, Asia Argento. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (10:10) ››› “The Rock” 1996, Action Sean Connery. ’ ‘R’ Å ›› “11 Harrowhouse” 1974, Comedy Charles Grodin. ‘PG’ Å ›››› “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” 1969 Paul Newman. ››› “Deadfall” 1968 ‘R’ Å ›››› “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” 1969 Paul Newman. Crusty’s Dirt Demons ’ ‘14’ Dirt Demons The Daily Habit Bubba’s World Dirt Demons Bondi Rescue The Daily Habit College Exp. The Daily Habit Bubba’s World Dirt Demons Bondi Rescue The Daily Habit Pipe Dream PGA Tour Golf Farmers Insurance Open, First Round From Torrey Pines Golf Club in San Diego. Golf Central PGA Tour Golf Farmers Insurance Open, First Round From Torrey Pines Golf Club in San Diego. Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ “The King and Queen of Moonlight Bay” (2003) Tim Matheson. ‘PG’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls REAL Sports With Bryant Gumbel ’ “War Games: The Dead Code” 2008 Matt Lanter. Government The Dilemma: HBO Big Love A Seat at the Table Bill attempts ›› “Edge of Darkness” 2010, Suspense Mel Gibson, Ray Winstone. A Boston detec- Taxicab Confessions 2001: All’s Fare in HBO 425 501 425 10 ‘PG’ Å officials track a teenage computer whiz. ‘PG-13’ First Look to stage a meeting. ‘14’ Å tive investigates his daughter’s murder. ’ ‘R’ Å Love and Vegas ‘MA’ Å Larry Sanders Larry Sanders Larry Sanders Larry Sanders Larry Sanders Larry Sanders (8:15) ››› “Gangs of New York” 2002 Leonardo DiCaprio. A man vows vengeance on the gangster who killed his father. ‘R’ My Own Idaho IFC 105 105 (4:00) ››› “Unfaithful” 2002, Drama Rich- (6:05) ›› “Charlie’s Angels: Full Throttle” 2003, Action Cameron Diaz, Lucy Liu. Pri- ››› “Marley & Me” 2008, Comedy-Drama Owen Wilson. A couple’s new puppy grows ›› “The Jackal” 1997, Suspense Bruce Willis, Richard Gere. An imprisoned Irishman MAX 400 508 7 ard Gere. ’ ‘R’ Å vate detectives try to retrieve cryptic information. ’ ‘NR’ Å up to become an incorrigible handful. ’ ‘PG’ Å accepts an offer to nab an assassin. ’ ‘R’ Å Naked Science Dinomorphosis ‘G’ The Real Sanctum (N) World’s Biggest Cave ‘G’ Naked Science Dinomorphosis ‘G’ The Real Sanctum World’s Biggest Cave ‘G’ Wild Justice ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents OddParents The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Fantastic Four Fantastic Four NTOON 89 115 189 Beyond the Hunt Whitetail Nation Magnum TV Wardens Bow Madness Ult. Adventures Wild and Raw Whitetail Pro Lethal Beyond the Hunt Wild Outdoors Outdoors Speargun Hunter Driven TV OUTD 37 307 43 Laugh Out Loud “Adopted” 2009 Pauly Shore. iTV. Pauly Shore travels to Africa › “Push” 2009, Suspense Chris Evans, Dakota Fanning, Camilla Belle. iTV. Rogue (8:25) ››› “Inglourious Basterds” 2009, War Brad Pitt, Mélanie Laurent, Christoph Waltz. iTV. JewishLaugh Out Loud SHO 500 500 to try to adopt a child. ’ ‘R’ Å psychics battle a covert government agency. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å American soldiers seek Nazi scalps in German-occupied France. ’ ‘R’ Comedy Festival Comedy Festival Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Dangerous Drives ‘PG’ Battle-Supercars Battle-Supercars Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Dangerous Drives ‘PG’ Battle-Supercars Battle-Supercars NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 (5:10) ›› “The Fast and the Furious” 2001 Vin Diesel. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (7:05) › “Did You Hear About the Morgans?” 2009 Hugh Grant. ‘PG-13’ ››› “Zombieland” 2009 Woody Harrelson. ‘R’ Å (10:35) ›› “The Scorpion King” 2002 The Rock. Å STARZ 300 408 300 (4:35) ›› “Religulous” 2008, Documentary Comic Bill Maher (6:20) ›› “Pilgrim” 1999 Ray Liotta. An amnesiac’s past may be ›› “Flawless” 2007, Crime Drama Michael Caine. A janitor convinces a frustrated ›› “The Girlfriend Experience” 2008, Drama Sasha Grey, Chris ›› “Marigold” 2007 TMC 525 525 turns a skeptical eye on religion. ’ ‘R’ more shady than he realized. ’ ‘R’ executive to help him steal diamonds. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Santos, Mark Jacobson. ’ ‘R’ Å Ali Larter. NHL Hockey From Jan. 25, 2009 in Montreal. NHL Overtime (Live) World Extreme Cagefighting Jose Aldo vs. Manny Gamburyan NHL Overtime VS. 27 58 30 My Fair Wedding With David Tutera My Fair Wedding With David Tutera My Fair Wedding With David Tutera Rich Bride, Poor Bride ’ ‘G’ Å Rich Bride, Poor Bride ’ ‘G’ Å Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å A Stand Up Mother ‘PG’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, January 27, 2011 E3

CALENDAR TODAY BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “Snow!”; $15, $10 museum members, plus accompanying adult admission ($10, $9 seniors); 10 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www .highdesertmuseum.org. ADVENTURE AROUND AMERICA: Carolyn and Jim Hammond present stories and images from their RV trip through the United States; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-617-4663. LADIES NIGHT OF INDULGENCE: A night of fun, shopping and pampering for women; proceeds benefit Grandma’s House; donations of nonperishable food requested; 4:309 p.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend; 541-389-3111, ladiesnight2010@gmail.com or www.ladiesnightbenefit.com. THE PIMPS OF JOYTIME: The funk band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www. beattickets.org. THE MELODRAMATICS: The Northern California-based reggaerock band performs; free; 10 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868 or madhappylounge@gmail.com.

FRIDAY BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “Snow!”; $15, $10 museum members, plus accompanying adult admission ($10, $9 seniors); 10 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. VFW DINNER: A dinner of roast beef, mashed potatoes, vegetables and a roll; proceeds benefit a veterans relief fund; $7; 5-7 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. “DESPICABLE ME”: A screening of the 2010 PG-rated film; with pizza and refreshments; free; 6-9 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351. DRAMA SHOWCASE: Summit High School advanced drama students perform selections that they will take to a regional acting competition; proceeds benefit a scholarship fund to attend a state competition; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-322-3300. STUDENT-DIRECTED ONE-ACT PLAYS: The Crook County High School drama department presents three student-directed plays; $3; 7 p.m.; Crook County High School, Eugene Southwell Auditorium, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-4166900, ext. 3132 or anita.hoffman@ crookcounty.k12.or.us. VINTAGE SKI NIGHT: Watch vintage ski films, with a costume contest and more; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit The Environmental Center; $5; 7-9 p.m.; Mountain’s Edge Sports Bar and Grill, 61303 U.S. Highway 97, Unit 115, Bend; 541-385-6908, info@ envirocenter.org or http://envirocenter. org/calendar/vintage-ski-night. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www. beattickets.org. ADVENTURE GALLEY: The Eugenebased indie rock band performs, with Elliot, Cadence and Lyible; $7; 8 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive,

Bend; www.riseupclothing.com. THAT’S SO GAY: Featuring performances by hip-hop soul duo God-Des & She, with CJ and the Dolls and True Holland; followed by a dance party; $8 in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-383-7595. WINTER RESIDENCY: The Seattlebased eccentric rock band X-Ray Press performs, with Empty Space Orchestra; $5 plus fees in advance, $7 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.silver moonbrewing.com.

SATURDAY “YEAR OF THE RIVER” EXHIBIT OPENS: New exhibit features the geology and hydrology of the Deschutes River; exhibit runs through April 10; included in the price of admission; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. CASCADE HORIZON BAND: The senior band performs a concert featuring works by Aaron Copeland, marches, patriotic songs and more, under the direction of Sue Steiger; donations accepted; 2 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-389-5121, cascadehorizonband@yahoo.com or http://cascadehorizonband.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Lauren Kessler reads from her work “My Teenage Werewolf: A Mother, A Daughter, A Journey Through the Thicket of Adolescence”; free; 3 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. EVENING OF ART, WINE AND MUSIC: Featuring a silent art auction, raffle, crafts, wine, live music and more; proceeds benefit the Bpositiv Foundation for Children with Cancer; free; 5-11 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; www. bpositiv.org. SPAGHETTI FEED: With a silent auction and live entertainment; proceeds benefit Habitat for Humanity; $10, $6 children and seniors, $5 VFW members; 5-8 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-548-4108. DISCOMANIA: Featuring dinner, dancing and a silent auction; proceeds benefit the Crooked River Ranch-Terrebonne Chamber of Commerce; $25; 6 p.m.; Sandbagger Dinner House, 5165 Clubhouse Drive, Crooked River Ranch; 541-923-2679. FOUNDATION FUNDRAISER: Featuring live music, food and live and silent auctions; proceeds benefit the Bend Surgery Center Foundation; $40; 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. ROBERT BURNS EVENING AND DINNER: A tribute to the Scottish poet, with live music, dancing, poetry recitations and dinner; $45; 6:50 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-350-5652 or highdesertcelts@gmail.com. STUDENT-DIRECTED ONE-ACT PLAYS: The Crook County High School drama department presents three student-directed plays; $3; 7 p.m.; Crook County High School, Eugene Southwell Auditorium, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-4166900, ext. 3132 or anita .hoffman@crookcounty. k12.or.us. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.beattickets.org. MOUNTAIN COUNTRY IDOL: Central Oregon musicians compete to see who is the best country artist; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit St.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Jude Children’s Research Hospital; $5; 8 p.m.; Coyote Ranch, 1368 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-5487700 or www.mountain997.com. SATURDAY NIGHT JOKERS & JAMS: Local comics perform, with special musical guests; $10; 8 p.m., doors open 7:30 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-977-5677. BENEFIT CONCERT: Featuring a performance by Roses at Gunpoint; proceeds benefit Tyler Eklund; $5 suggested donation; 8:30 p.m.; M & J Tavern, 102 N.W. Greenwood, Bend; 541-389-1410. BETH WOOD: The Eugene-based folk rocker performs, with Shireen Amini; ages 21 and older; $8 plus fees in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com. 80’S VIDEO DANCE ATTACK: The 80s dance act performs, with VJ Kittyrox; $5; 10 p.m., doors open 9 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7882989 or www.randompresents.com.

SUNDAY CASCADE HORIZON BAND: The senior band performs a concert featuring works by Aaron Copeland, marches, patriotic songs and more, under the direction of Sue Steiger; proceeds benefit the Summit High School wind ensemble; donations accepted; 2 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-389-5121, cascadehorizonband@yahoo.com or http://cascadehorizonband.org.

TUESDAY AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Suzanne Schlosberg talks about her book “The Good Neighbor Cookbook”; 6:30 p.m.; Camalli Book Co., 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134. GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “GASLAND: Can You Light Your Water on Fire?” a documentary about natural-gas drilling technology; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504. PUB QUIZ: Answer trivia on topics from pop culture to politics; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit the Kurera Fund; $40 per team; 6:30-9:30 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-306-0864, vivien@kurerafund. org or www.kurerafund.org.

WEDNESDAY “IT’S IN THE BAG” LECTURE SERIES: Maureen Kelly presents the lecture “The Value of a Virtual Deschutes Basin,” which will explore a web-based natural resources library; free; noon-1 p.m.; OSUCascades Campus, Cascades Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-322-3100. DAY OF ZINN: Commemorate the life and works of Howard Zinn, with readings from his works, film clips, a dinner and more; registration required for dinner portion of event; free; noon, 6 p.m. dinner and film; OSU-Cascades Campus, Cascades Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3223140 or ndollar@ osucascades.edu. FINDING FREMONT IN OREGON: Loren Irving talks about John Fremont and retracing the explorer’s twoyear journey; free; 1:30 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; 541-617-4663. ANGELS ACROSS THE USA TOUR: Alan Pedersen performs, and speaks about grief and love; free; 7 p.m.; Partners in Care, 2075 N.E. Wyatt Court, Bend; 541-480-0667.

THURSDAY Feb. 3 GRADUATION AUCTION: Silent auction to benefit Summit High School’s graduation party; free admission; 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; 541-610-9913 or cindymckee@mac.com. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Oryx and Crake” by Margaret Atwood; bring a lunch; free; noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/ calendar. BOOK DISCUSSION: Discuss “Go Tell It on the Mountain” by James Baldwin; free; 6:30 p.m.; Camalli Book Co., 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134. “TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD”: The Bend High School drama department presents a dramatization of Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning tale; $7, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-6290. EMMA HILL AND HER GENTLEMEN CALLERS: The Portland-based folk singer performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

FRIDAY Feb. 4 FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend and the Old Mill District; free; 5-9 p.m.; throughout Bend. “TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD”: The Bend High School drama department presents a dramatization of Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning tale; $7, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-6290. SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL WINTER CONCERT SERIES: Featuring a performance by Tom Russell; $15, $10 students in advance, $20, $12 students at the door; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-4979 or www. sistersfolkfestival.org. “TETRO”: A screening of the 2009 R-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. BOB MARLEY CELEBRATION & TRIBUTE SHOW: Featuring performances of Marley songs by Sashamon, Chronicle, Alcyon Massive and Escort Service Band; ages 21 and older; $7 plus fees in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; The Annex, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www. actiondeniroproductions.com. HILLSTOMP: Portland-based junkyard blues duo performs; ticket prices to be announced; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com.

SATURDAY Feb. 5 CENTRAL OREGON SPELLING BEE: Students compete for a chance to participate in the Scripps National Spelling Bee; $5, free for students; 9 a.m.; Ponderosa Elementary School, 3790 N.E. Purcell Blvd., Bend; 541-323-6829. “TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD”: The Bend High School drama department presents a dramatization of Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning tale; $7, $5 students and seniors; 2 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-6290. CRAB FEED FUNDRAISER: Meal features crab, bread, an assortment of beverages and more; ages 21 and older only; proceeds benefit the student technology program at St. Thomas Academy of Redmond; $20; 4-8 p.m.; St. Thomas Parish Hall, 12th Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541-548-3785 or www .redmondacademy.com.

M T For Thursday, Jan. 27

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

BLACK SWAN (R) 2:20, 4:50, 7:15 THE FIGHTER (R) 2:05, 4:35, 7:05 I LOVE YOU PHILLIP MORRIS (R) 2:15, 4:30, 7:30 THE KING’S SPEECH (R) 2, 4:40, 7:20 MADE IN DAGENHAM (R) 2:10, 4:45, 7:10 THE WAY BACK (PG-13) 2:30, 7

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) 1, 3:50, 7:15, 9:50 COUNTRY STRONG (PG-

13) 1:10, 4:05, 7, 9:45 THE DILEMMA (PG-13) 12:55, 4:55, 7:45, 10:20 THE FIGHTER (R) 1:45, 5, 8, 10:35 THE GREEN HORNET 3-D (PG13) 12:20, 1:25, 3:40, 4:45, 6:35, 7:40, 9:30, 10:30 THE GREEN HORNET (PG13) 12:45, 4:10, 7:10, 10 GULLIVER’S TRAVELS 3-D (PG) 9:25 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 12:05, 3:25, 6:55 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 12:40, 3:20, 6:20, 9:20 NO STRINGS ATTACHED (R) 1:30, 4:25, 7:30, 10:05 SEASON OF THE WITCH (PG-13) 10:15 TANGLED (PG) 1:15, 4, 6:45, 9:35 THE TOURIST (PG-13) 1:50, 4:50, 7:55, 10:25 TRON: LEGACY 3-D (PG)

Noon, 3:15, 6:15, 9:10 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 12:30, 1:40, 3:30, 4:35, 6:25, 7:25, 9:15, 10:10 YOGI BEAR 3-D (PG) 12:15, 4:20, 6:40 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) DUE DATE (R) 6 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG-13) 9

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road,

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

Redmond, 541-548-8777

THE DILEMMA (PG-13) 4, 6:30 THE FIGHTER (R) 6:45 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 3:30, 6 SEASON OF THE WITCH (PG-13) 4:30 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 3:45, 6:15

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

BLACK SWAN (R) 4:45, 7 THE FIGHTER (R) 4:15, 6:45 GREEN HORNET (PG-13) 4:30, 7 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 4:15, 6:45

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

GULLIVER’S TRAVELS (PG) 7 SEASON OF THE WITCH (PG-13) 4

T  B 

CBS via The Associated Press

Eleven teams that competed in previous editions of “The Amazing Race” are shown at a wind farm in Palm Springs, Calif. The teams are returning for the latest edition of the reality competition series, “The Amazing Race: Unfinished Business,” premiering Feb. 20 on CBS.

Cowboys, Globetrotters return to ‘Amazing Race’ LOS ANGELES — Cord and Jet McCoy are saddling up for another season of “The Amazing Race.” The bull-riding brothers are among the 11 veteran teams competing on the 18th edition of CBS’ around-the-world competition (premiering 8 p.m. Feb. 20), the network announced Wednesday. Other returning duos include Goth dating couple Kent Kaliber and Vyxsin Fiala, and Harlem Globetrotters teammates Nathaniel “Big Easy” Lofton and Herbert “Flight Time” Lang. “We’re not intimidated by anyone,” Jet McCoy said before setting off in November. “That’s the thing about this race: Even in the season that we were on, we sized up the competition, but it wasn’t the same people that were in the finals or that went out first. When it comes to this race, even though we’ve seen people on previous seasons, it’s too hard to tell.” The McCoy brothers from Tupelo, Okla., came in second place on the 16th season show, narrowly losing to Daniel and Jordan Pious after the distinctly different siblings skipped the McCoys in line at an airport and slipped to the front of the plane. Cord warned that he isn’t going to let other teams sneak by him on the “Unfinished Business” edition. Other racers are sisters Kisha and Jen Hoffman, former cheerleaders Jaime Edmondson and Cara Rosenthal, engaged couple Amanda Blackledge and Kris Klicka, friends Justin Kanew and Zev Glassenberg, mother-andson Margie and Luke Adams,

Trails Continued from E1 Other trails near Dutchman Flat and Virginia Meissner snoparks are likely to be icy in the morning and soften up around noon, he said. Snowmobilers need to take extra care, Sabo said, as grooming has been limited by poor conditions. The good news is that those who have been yearning to get out their bicycles and hiking shoes are in luck. “There’s some hiking and biking to be done at lower elevations,” Sabo said. He said people

father-and-son Mel and Mike White, and fathers-and-daughters Gary and Mallory Erwin and Ron and Christina Hsu.

Aguilera to sing anthem at Super Bowl LOS ANGELES — Christina Aguilera will sing the national anthem at Super Bowl XLV, the NFL and Fox announced Monday. “I have been per for ming the anthem since I was 7 years old, and I must say the Super Bowl is a dream come true,” Aguilera Christina said. Aguilera Country star Martina McBride did the honors in Pittsburgh on Sunday, where the Steelers beat the New York Jets, while fan favorite Jim Cornelison sang before the contest betweten the Packers and Bears in Chicago — bumping “American Idol” winner Lee DeWyze. Cornelison regularly sings “The Star Spangled Banner” before Chicago Blackhawks games. The gig comes in the wake of Aguilera’s star treatment on Hollywood’s Walk of Fame in November, not to mention the five-time Grammy winner’s acting debut in “Burlesque.” The Packers and Steelers will meet Feb. 6 at Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas, with the Black-Eyed Peas headlining the halftime show. More than 153 million people watched last year’s Super Bowl. — From wire reports

at Smith Rock State Park were climbing in T-shirts this week. Phil’s Trail and the Deschutes River Trail are also clear, though muddy in spots, Sabo said. With high temperatures ranging from the low to mid-50s this weekend, there should be ample opportunity to dust off the summer gear. Sabo said he recently got out his road bike. “I was in my bike shorts; you don’t get that opportunity frequently” during the Central Oregon winter, he said. “You go with the flow.” Betsy Q. Cliff can be reached at 541-383-0375 or bcliff@bendbulletin.com.


E4 Thursday, January 27, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, January 27, 2011 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011: This year, keep your eye on the big picture. Your professional or civic role will be more important than in the past. Don’t deceive yourself; do a reality check. The more realistic you are, the less disappointment you will experience. Your instincts serve you well when dealing with those in power. If you are single, you could meet someone who is very interesting but not necessarily available. Take your time. You will want to get to know him or her before even thinking about a relationship. If you are attached, a vacation as a couple enhances your relationship. SCORPIO pushes you into the limelight. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH A partner counts on your sense of direction. It seems no one will let you veer off track. Try to explain that sometimes you need to spin a tale or try out different ways to proceed in your head. That process helps you conceive even tighter plans. Tonight: Chat over dinner. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Others want to hear more of what you think. A brainstorming session begins when you walk through the door. Someone you need to respect seems off or confused. Say little, and understand what is happening. Tonight: Go with a friend’s spontaneity. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH You must stay focused if you are to achieve what you want. A key person has a strong opinion. You must listen,

and you might need to incorporate this person’s thinking. A boss or parent does the unexpected, delighting you in some way. Tonight: Don’t push. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH Others seem to be an endless source of information. You might find yourself locked in, but not necessarily against your will. One person intrigues you with different opinions. You might wonder which way is the best path. Tonight: Opt for the unique. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH You might want to stay home, but you might need to go out. Accomplishing a project could be an even bigger priority than kicking back. Stop the interference of others. A friend or loved one demonstrates once more his or her expertise in distraction. Tonight: Finally, time to do your thing. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Rethink a conversation. You might want to approach this person again. You have gained a deeper understanding, and with a bit of creativity, you might be able to encourage a meeting of the minds. Confusion emanates like a fog at the ocean. Verify as much as possible. Tonight: Join a friend. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH Realize the cost of putting someone on a pedestal and/or continuing with a creative venture. You might be focused on one thing and only that. Pull back and gain a new perspective. You might surprise yourself with what you decide to do. Tonight: Treat yourself. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Discipline your mind to stay present in the moment. It might be

tempting to return to a personal problem, at least mentally. There is nothing you can do until later. You might see events differently by then. Tonight: Respond to another person’s spontaneity in the same vein. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Deal with your feelings. Your perspective might not be the same in a few days. Avoid taking statements personally. Don’t take on another’s “stuff” and upset yourself. Work on being less reactive. Tonight: Follow through on a wild idea. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH Your communication skills help attract what you want. A meeting provides an excellent opportunity to gain supporters. Be aware of the cost of manifesting. When you decide that everything is just as you like it, get ready for a little surprise! Tonight: Where you want to be. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH Making a point could be difficult. Whether it is your word choice, expression and/or contradictory action, others cannot hear you. Ask for feedback from several trusted individuals. You could be taken aback by what they say. Tonight: Burning the candle at both ends. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Others encourage you to take a step or do something that makes you uncomfortable. Truth be told, you feel uncomfortable no matter what you do. Ask yourself and others what would be the best possible end result, then determine the route. Tonight: Put on a favorite piece of music.

© 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T ORY

E6 Thursday, January 27, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C D  

ORGANIZATIONS TODAY ASSOCIATION OF NAVAL AVIATION: 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-815-9932. BACHELOR BEAUTS SQUARE DANCE CLUB: $4; 7-9 p.m.; Pine Forest Grange, Bend; 503-931-0413. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; see website for location; www.bendhabitat. org, 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BINGO: 6 p.m.; Elks Lodge, Bend; 541-382-1371. CENTRAL OREGON RESOURCES FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING: 10:30 a.m.; 20436 S.E. Clay Pigeon Court, Bend; 541-388-8103. COMMUNICATORS PLUS TOASTMASTERS: 6:30 p.m.; IHOP Restaurant, Bend; 541-480-1871. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HARMONEERS MEN’S CHORUS: 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, Bend; 541382-3392 or www.harmoneers.net. KIWANIS INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Meadow Lakes Restaurant, Prineville; 541-416-2191. REDMOND DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-322-9453. ROTARY CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon; Juniper Golf Course, Redmond; 541-419-1889 or www .redmondoregonrotary.com. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL

OF BEND: Noon; Black Bear Diner, Bend; 541-815-4173. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15-3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507.

FRIDAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; see website for location; www.bendhabitat.org, 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING PLAY GROUP: 10 a.m.-noon; www .bendap.org or 541-504-6929. BEND KNIT UP: 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Bend; http://groups.yahoo.com/ group/bendknitup. BINGO: 5:45 p.m.; Redmond VFW; 541-526-0812. BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. GAME NIGHT: 7 p.m.; DRRH Community Center, Sunriver; 541-598-7502. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. NORTH MOPS: 9-11:30 a.m.; Church of the Nazarene, Bend; 541-383-3464. PEACE VIGIL: 4-5:30 p.m.; Brandis Square, Bend; 541-388-1793. PINOCHLE: The Vintage of Bend; 541-388-4286.

SWINGING MOUNTAINEERS PLUS SQUARE DANCE CLUB: 7 p.m.; Pine Forest Grange, Bend.

SATURDAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; see website for location; www.bendhabitat. org, 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. COMPANEROS FRIENDS SPANISH/ ENGLISH GROUP: 9:30-11:30 a.m.; Green Plow Coffee Roasters, Redmond; 541-382-4366 or www .latinocommunityassociation.org. REDMOND CHESS CLUB: 10 a.m.; Brookside Manor, Redmond; 541-410-6363.

SUNDAY

BEND GO CLUB: 6-9 p.m.; Whole Foods Market, Bend; 541-385-9198 or www.usgo.org. BEND KIWANIS CLUB: Noon; King Buffet, Bend; 541-389-3678. BEND ZEN: 7-9 p.m.; Old Stone Church, Bend; 541-382-6122. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. CENTRAL OREGON SWEET ADELINES: 6:30-9 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-322-0265. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE: 7-9 p.m.; Sons of Norway Hall, Bend; 541549-7511 or 541-410-5784. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15-3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507.

TUESDAY

A COURSE IN MIRACLES: 10 a.m. study group; 1012 N.W. Wall St., Suite 210, Bend; 541-390-5373. BEND DRUM CIRCLE: 3 p.m.; Tulen Center, Bend; 541-389-1419. BINGO: 12:30 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688.

MONDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Coffee and crafting; 10 a.m.; Romaine Village Recreation Hall, Bend; 541-389-7292. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63144 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org.

ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Walk; 9 a.m.; Farewell Bend Park; 541-610-4164. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63144 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND ELKS LODGE #1371: 7:30 p.m.; 63120 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-389-7438 or 541-382-1371. BEND GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY: 10 a.m. beginning genealogy, 11:45 a.m. research methods; Williamson Hall at Rock Arbor Villa, Bend; 541-317-8978, 317-9553 or www. orgenweb.org/deschutes/bend-gs. BEND HIGHNOONERS TOASTMASTER CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; New Hope Church, Classroom D,

Datebook is a weekly calendar of regularly scheduled nonprofit events and meetings. Listings are free, but must be updated monthly to continue to publish. Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Bend; 541-350-6980. BINGO: 6 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, Prineville; 541-447-7659. CASCADE HORIZON SENIOR BAND: 3:45-6 p.m.; High Desert Middle School band room, Bend; 541-382-2712. CENTRAL OREGON CHESS CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; Aspen Ridge Retirement Home, Bend; www.bendchess.com. CENTRAL OREGON SHRINE CLUB: 6 p.m. social, 7 p.m. dinner; Juniper Golf Course, Redmond; 541-318-8647. CIVIL AIR PATROL: The High Desert Squadron senior members and youth aerospace education cadet meetings; 7 p.m.; Marshall High School, Bend; 541-923-3499. CRIBBAGE CLUB: 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-317-9022. HIGH DESERT RUG HOOKERS: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541 382-5337. LA PINE LIONS CLUB: Noon; John C. Johnson Center, La Pine; 541-536-9235. MODERN QUILT GUILD INTEREST GROUP: 5-8 p.m.; QuiltWorks, Bend; kayla.traver@vandals.uidaho.edu. OREGON EQUESTRIAN TRAILS: 6-9 p.m.; Deschutes County Posse Building, Bend; 541-420-9398 or www.oregonequestriantrails.org. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF REDMOND: Noon; Izzy’s, Redmond; 541-306-7062. TUESDAY KNITTERS: 1-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-399-1133.

WEDNESDAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY:

9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63144 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; Environmental Center, Bend; 541-420-4517. BEND KNITUP: 5:30-8 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-728-0050. BEND/SUNRISE LIONS CLUB: 7-8 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-389-8678. BINGO: 5:45 p.m.; Redmond VFW; 541-526-0812. BINGO: 6-8 p.m.; Timbers East, Bend; 541-383-3502. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 and 7 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-788-7077. EASTERN CASCADES MODEL RAILROAD CLUB: 7 p.m.; 21520 S.E. Modoc Lane, Bend; 541-317-1545. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. KIWANIS CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon1 p.m.; Izzy’s, Redmond; 541-5485935 or www.redmondkiwanis.org. PRIME TIME TOASTMASTERS: 12:051:05 p.m.; 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-416-6549. REDMOND AREA TOASTMASTER CLUB: 11:50 a.m.-1 p.m.; City Center Church, Redmond; 541383-0396 or 541-410-1758. RICE ITALIAN CONVERSATION GROUP: 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-447-0732. WEDNESDAY MORNING BIRDERS: 8 a.m.; Nancy P’s Baking Co., Bend; 541-383-4039.

Photos by Markian Hawryluk / The Bulletin

The rewarding view of Three Finger Jack from the Maxwell Butte summit.

Maxwell Butte

To Salem

Twin Lakes, covered in snow, below Maxwell Butte.

Outing Continued from E1 Sure, you can double back and start over if you go the wrong way. But often, it’s simply too late to do so. The success of my journey hinged on a simple decision: Go right or go left. It’s not that the kind folks at the Oregon Department of Transportation and the U.S. Forest Service hadn’t tried to make life easy for me. The Maxwell Butte Trail starts at the Maxwell Sno-park. For the first couple of miles, the nordic skiing and snowshoe trails are well marked. From the far end of the parking lot, I just followed what is normally a dirt road due east until I saw the trailhead with the standard Forest Service bulletin board and permit area off to the left. In the summer, it’s a two- to three-hour hike to the summit. In wintertime, with snow cover and snowshoes, the round trip can take a full day. Despite the snow cover, it was pretty easy at first to follow Trail 3391 through a narrow corridor in the forest. Even Mother Nature was cooperating. It was a beautiful, unseasonably warm day. And after the melt-freeze cycles of the previous week, the snow was solid. I was moving along at a rapid clip, my snowshoes snapping up to meet my boot heels with every step. According to my guidebook, I would hit a marked intersection

Trail

22

in the trail at the two-mile mark. But this fork had come too early. And there were no markings of any kind. I’d have to trust my instincts. The left fork of the trail seemed maybe just a bit more defined than the right. I turned left and hoped for the best. Another 20 minutes later, I reached validation. A set of signs nailed to a tree marked the intersection between the Maxwell Butte Trail and the path to Eight Lakes Basin. I reveled in the glory of a choice well made, and I continued on toward my goal. But when I reached Twin Lakes, only a couple of hundred feet past the intersection, any semblance of a trail had vanished under a blanket of snow. Beyond the lakes, I could see the top of Maxwell Butte looming over the trees. I turned and made a bee line toward it. The Maxwell Butte Trail climbs gently from the trailhead, but now my route was climbing in earnest to complete the 2,500 feet of elevation gain needed to reach the summit in a mere 4.2 miles. If not for the metal claws of my snowshoe crampons, I’m not sure I would have been able to get up the slope. Even so, I had to make sure of every step, lest I take an involuntary toboggan ride back to Twin Lakes. Eager to find a gentler ascent, I angled toward the southern end of the butte, hoping the route up the ridge would be a little less extreme.

The farther I climbed, the steeper the incline became, until finally I could see the sun illuminating the rounded line of the ridge. As I crested the snowbank, the views opened up before me: Mount Washington, North Sister, Middle Sister all lined up as silhouettes against a bluebird Oregon sky. The ridge, however, presented challenges of its own. The southern exposure had softened the snow on the far side of the ridge. If it were to give way under my weight, it would be a long slide down. I stopped and contemplated turning back. I’d made it to the ridge, and was probably within 300 vertical feet of the summit. The view of Three Finger Jack on the horizon seemed reward enough for my efforts. But as I scrambled over some exposed rocks, I noticed a long line of staccato tracks in the snow — perhaps those of a fox — extending up the ridge line. I followed the tracks of what I hoped

was a wild Cascadian butte-bagger. Sure enough, every time the tracks would veer off from the ridge line, they would return just a handful of steps later. I followed the footprints around trees and shrubs almost to the summit proper. Perhaps 20 feet below the summit, the tracks ended their ascent and traversed around the summit mound. From the summit, I had a highdef view of Three-Fingered Jack, and farther to the northeast, Mount Jefferson and Mount Hood. After a brief rest, I opted against returning down the ridge and headed directly down the steep slope toward Twin Lakes. As the incline flattened out, I intersected the Hansel and Gretel-style, bread-crumb trail of snowshoe tracks I had left on the way up. No more forks in the road to ponder.

Maxwell Lake Twin Lakes

Maxwell Sno-park

Mt.Jefferson Wilderness Santiam Junction 22

To Corvallis, Eugene 20 126

To Sisters, Bend

MILES 20 126

0

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Markian Hawryluk can be reached at 541-617-7814 or mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com.

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H

F

IM P R O V IN G Y O U R H E A L T H A N D W E L L -B E IN G Fitness Feeling under the weather? Take it easy on the workouts, Page F3

H E A LT H

www.bendbulletin.com/health

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 2011

NUTRITION

Exercise. Sweat. Refuel. For an effective boost during a long workout, sports gels and chomps are high in carbohydrate energy

By Anne Aurand The Bulletin

any endurance athletes have discovered — sometimes the hard way — that eating good, old-fashioned food can be a bad idea during a difficult workout. Food doesn’t digest well when the body is busy running or cycling. It sits in the stomach like a brick, and the overall effect can be pretty unpleasant. But avoiding calories will starve a body of the energy it needs to exercise for much more than an hour. Without replenishing, an athlete will “bonk,” a notorious term describing what happens when a body runs out of fuel and

M

hits the proverbial wall. Sports-nutrition science has in recent years resulted in an array of products designed to power an endurance athlete efficiently for many hours without intestinal discomfort. Gels and chomps, for example, are mainly sugar, intended to keep the body energized. Gels generally come in one-serving packets, small enough to tuck into a key pocket or the palm of your hand. They are typically sweet, gooey substances that you squeeze into your mouth and swallow. Chomps are chewable bites of the same ingredients in a different form, reminiscent of a gummy bear candy.

Carbohydrates are the best way to reenergize, said Kelly Hunt Harrington, a local registered dietitian who specializes in sports nutrition. Those packaged gels and chomps, sold in most sporting goods stores, combine the right carbohydrates to maximize digestion. Different sugars consumed — fructose or sucrose for example — turn into glucose in the body. Some glucose is converted to glycogen, a form that is stored in the muscles to be used as fuel later, Hunt Harrington explained. It is a finite resource. During intense exercise, glycogen reserves run out and the body gets tired. It needs fuel. See Energy / F5

What your body needs during an extended workout Kelly Hunt Harrington, a registered dietitian, offers suggestions on how to rebuild energy during a workout.

LESS THAN ONE HOUR

1 HOUR+ 30-60 grams of carbohydrates per hour

Plenty of water

2 HOURS+ 60-90 grams of carbohydrates per hour

Plenty of water Plenty of water

3 HOURS: END OF WORKOUT

Recovery recommendations: Eat within 3060 minutes post exercise and consume 0.5 to 0.7 grams of carbohydrate per pound of body weight, plus about 10 grams protein. Continue eating every 2 hours for up to 4 to 6 hours. To replace fluids, gradually drink 16 to 24 ounces of fluid for every pound of body weight lost, or until your urine is pale yellow in color. Plenty of water

About 16 oz of sports drink and a gel packet About 16 oz of sports drink and a sports chew

Sports chomp or peanut butter and jelly sandwich, banana

Source: Suggestions from Kelly Hunt Harrington, a local registered dietitian who specializes in sports performance

Ryan Brennecke, Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin, Thinkstock

MEDICINE

INSIDE

Warfarin faces new drug competition N U T R IT ION

However, cost of new blood thinners is high

Good for you

By Markian Hawryluk

Have you taken your probiotics today? Should you? Page F5

“We’ll see you next Friday,” the nurse at the anticoagulation clinic told Marc Nordstrom. He had just been in three weeks earlier when the monitoring device showed his four drops of blood were somewhat too thin, leaving him at risk for excessive bleeding. This time, his four drops were too thick, posing an increased risk of a blood clot or stroke. The 41-year-old Bend dentist, who came to Bend Memorial Clinic last week with his daughter in tow, would have to come back again a week later to make sure the clotting tendency of his blood was in the safe range. It’s standard practice for patients who take warfarin, also known by the brand name Coumadin, a blood thinner that is notori-

MON E Y Medical cost shifting The cost of local health care may not be as low as once thought, data shows, Page F6

The Bulletin

ously difficult to manage. “You just have to monitor it. I have to leave work and then come over here. It’s just part of what you have to do,” Nordstrom said. “But definitely, if there was something more convenient, that’d be awesome.” He may soon get his wish. Several new drugs are being developed that perform the same blood thinning function as warfarin, but with fewer difficulties and a lower rate of side effects. Considered much more patient-friendly than warfarin, they could eventually eliminate the need for ongoing monitoring of patients and make life just a little bit less complicated. “I think they’re a huge step forward,” said Dr. Bill Martin, an oncologist who runs the anticoagulation clinic at the Cancer Center of the Cascades. See Warfarin / F4

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F2 Thursday, January 27, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

H D

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

SUPPORT GROUPS AIDS EDUCATION FOR PREVENTION, TREATMENT, COMMUNITY RESOURCES AND SUPPORT (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7402. AIDS HOT LINE: 800-342-AIDS. AL-ANON: 541-728-3707 or www.centraloregonal-anon.org. AL-ANON PRINEVILLE: 541-416-0604. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS (AA): 541-548-0440 or www.coigaa.org. ALS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-977-7502. ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION: 541-548-7074. ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP: 541-948-7214. AUTISM RESOURCE GROUP OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-788-0339. BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING: 541-385-1787. BEND S-ANON FAMILY GROUP: 888-285-3742. BEND ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 541-382-6122 or 541-382-6651. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUPS: 541-382-5882. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP/ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 541-383-3910. BRAIN TUMOR SUPPORT GROUP: 541-350-7243 BREAST CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-7743. BREAST-FEEDING SUPPORT GROUP: 541-385-1787. CANCER INFORMATION LINE: 541-706-7743. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-536-7399. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. CELEBRATE RECOVERY: New Hope Church, Bend, 541-480-5276; Faith Christian Center, Bend, 541-3828274; Redmond Assembly of God Church, 541-548-4555; Westside Church, Bend, 541-382-7504, ext. 201; Metolius Friends Community Church, 541-546-4974. CENTRAL OREGON ALZHEIMER’S/ DEMENTIA CAREGIVERS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-504-0571 CENTRAL OREGON AUTISM ASPERGER’S SUPPORT TEAM: 541-633-8293. CENTRAL OREGON AUTISM SPECTRUM RESOURCE AND FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-279-9040. CENTRAL OREGON COALITION FOR ACCESS (WORKING TO CREATE ACCESSIBLE COMMUNITIES): 541-385-3320. CENTRAL OREGON DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY GROUP: 541-420-2759 CENTRAL OREGON DOWN SYNDROME NETWORK: 541548-8559 or www.codsn.org. CENTRAL OREGON FAMILIES WITH MULTIPLES: 541-3305832 or 541-388-2220. CENTRAL OREGON LEAGUE OF AMPUTEES SUPPORT GROUP (COLA): 541-480-7420 or www.ourcola.org. CENTRAL OREGON RIGHT TO LIFE: 541-383-1593. CHILD CAR SEAT CLINIC (PROPER INSTALLATION INFORMATION FOR SEAT AND CHILD): 541-504-5016. CHILDREN’S VISION FOUNDATION: 541-330-3907. CHRONIC PAIN SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-7730. CLARE BRIDGE OF BEND (ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP): 541-385-4717 or rnorton1@brookdaleliving.com. COMPASSIONATE FRIENDS (FOR THOSE GRIEVING THE LOSS OF A CHILD): 541-3300301 or 541-388-1146. CREATIVITY & WELLNESS — MOOD GROUP: 541-647-0865. CROOKED RIVER RANCH ADULT GRIEF SUPPORT: 541-548-7483. DEFEATCANCER: 541-706-7743. DESCHUTES COUNTY MENTAL HEALTH 24-HOUR CRISIS LINE: 541-322-7500. DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE: 541-5499622 or 541-771-1620. DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP: 541-617-0543. DIABETIC SUPPORT GROUP: 541-598-4483. DISABILITY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-388-8103. DIVORCE CARE: 541-410-4201. DOUBLE TROUBLE RECOVERY: Addiction and mental illness group; 541-317-0050. DYSTONIA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-388-2577. EATING DISORDER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-322-2755. ENCOPRESIS (SOILING): 541-5482814 or encopresis@gmail.com.

Chelsea Knight leads a kids yoga class at Play Outdoors in November. See the Classes listing for details on Tami Hatfield’s class.

Submitted photo

EVENING BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-460-4030 FAMILY PLANNING SERVICES (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER: 541-389-5468. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS: Redmond 541-280-7249, Bend 541-390-4365. GAMBLING HOT LINE: 800-233-8479. GLUTEN INTOLERANCE GROUP (CELIAC): 541-389-1731. GRANDMA’S HOUSE: Support for pregnant teens and teen moms; 541-383-3515. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 541306-6633, 541-318-0384 or mullinski@bendbroadband.com. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 541-548-7483. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUPS: For the bereaved; 541-771-3247. GRIEFSHARE (FAITH-BASED) RECOVERY CLASS: 541-389-8780. HEALING ENCOURAGEMENT FOR ABORTION-RELATED TRAUMA (H.E.A.R.T.): 541-318-1949. HEALTHY BEGINNINGS: Free screenings ages 0-5; 541-383-6357. HEALTHY FAMILIES OF THE HIGH DESERT (FORMERLY READY SET GO): Home visits for families with newborns; 541-749-2133 HEARING LOSS ASSOCIATION: 541-848-2806 or hlaco2@gmx.com. IMPROVE YOUR STRESS LIFE: 541-706-2904. JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER: 541-389-7665. LA LECHE LEAGUE OF BEND: 541-317-5912. LIVING WELL (CHRONIC CONDITIONS): 541-322-7430. LIVING WELL WITH CANCER FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. LIVING WITH CHRONIC ILLNESSES SUPPORT GROUP: 541-536-7399. LUPUS & FIBROMYALGIA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-526-1375. MADRAS NICOTINE ANONYMOUS GROUP: 541-993-0609. MAN-TO-MAN PROSTATE CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. MATERNAL/CHILD HEALTH PROGRAM (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. MEN’S CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-5864. MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. NARCONON: 800-468-6933. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS (NA): 541-416-2146. NATIONAL ALLIANCE ON MENTAL ILLNESS OF CENTRAL OREGON (NAMI): 541-408-7779 or 541-504-1431. NEWBERRY HOSPICE OF LA PINE: 541-536-7399. OREGON COMMISSION FOR THE BLIND: 541-447-4915. OREGON CURE: 541-475-2164. OREGON LYME DISEASE NETWORK: 541-312-3081 or www.oregonlyme.org. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS: 541-306-6844. PARENTS OF MURDERED CHILDREN (POMC) SUPPORT GROUP: 541-410-7395. PARISH NURSES AND HEALTH MINISTRIES: 541-383-6861. PARKINSON’S SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. PARTNERS IN CARE: Home health and hospice services; 541-382-5882.

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Every Friday In

PFLAG CENTRAL OREGON: For parents, families and friends of lesbians and gays; 541-317-2334 or www.pflagcentraloregon.org. PLAN LOVING ADOPTIONS NOW (PLAN): 541-389-9239. PLANNED PARENTHOOD: 888-875-7820. PMS ACCESS LINE: 800-222-4767. PREGNANCY RESOURCE CENTERS: Bend, 541-385-5334; Madras, 541-475-5338; Prineville, 541-4472420; Redmond, 541-504-8919. PULMONARY HYPERTENSION SUPPORT GROUP: 541-548-7489. RECOVERING COUPLES ANONYMOUS (RCA): 541-389-0969 or www.recovering-couples.org. SAVING GRACE SUPPORT GROUPS: Bend, 541-382-4420; Redmond, 541-504-2550, ext. 1; Madras, 541-475-1880. SCLERODERMA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-480-1958. SELF-ESTEEM GROUP FOR WOMEN: 541-389-7960. SEXAHOLICS ANONYMOUS: 541-595-8780. SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASE TESTING (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. SOUP AND SUPPORT: For mourners; 541-548-7483. SUPPORT GROUP FOR FAMILIES WITH DIABETIC CHILDREN: 541-526-6690. TOBACCO FREE ALLIANCE: 541322-7481. TOPS OR: Bend, 541388-5634; Culver, 541-546-4012; Redmond, 541-923-0878. VETERANS HOTLINE: 541-408-5594 or 818-634-0735. VISION NW: Peer support group; 541-330-0715. VOLUNTEERS IN MEDICINE: 541-330-9001. WINTER BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-475-3882, ext. 4030, or www.mvhd.org. WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-385-0747 WOMEN’S SELF-ESTEEM GROUP: 541-389-7960. WOMEN’S SUPPORT GROUP FOR ANGER, ANXIETY, OR DEPRESSION: 541-389-7960. WOMEN SURVIVING WITH CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 541-388-3179.

CLASSES AGING ISN’T FOR SISSIES: Learn to manage changing health challenges; each week features a different topic; $49 in-district residents, $66 out-of-district residents, $10 drop-in fee; 9:30 a.m. every other Saturday, Feb. 5 through April 16; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed

Market Road; www.bendparksandrec. org or 541-388-1133. MOVING WELL TO AGE WELL: Doris Lilly and Lindy Mount demonstrate and lead healthy exercises; for ages 55 and older; $10; 10-11:30 a.m. Friday; First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-419-9912 or desertvillage@ gmail.com to register. “NO PAIN, LIFE GAIN” WORKSHOPS: Learn to use your brain to combat pain, learn how stress increases pain, good food choices and how to sleep despite pain; free; 5:30 p.m. Thursdays in February; Healing Bridge Physical Therapy, 404 N.E. Penn St., Bend; 541-318-7041. PILATES MAT CLASS: A reintroduction to exercise for cancer survivors; RSVP required; free; 9:30 a.m. Fridays, Feb. 4 through March 11; St. Charles Bend, heart center conference room, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-706-7743. YOGA TEACHER TRAINING: A 200-hour certification program for hatha yoga; $2,500 or $2,375 for athletic club members; 5-9 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays and 8 a.m.-5 p.m. one Saturday per month, Feb. 8-June 25; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; 541-639-2618 to register. YOGA WITH TAMI: Kid’s yoga focusing on breath and silliness; free; 10:30 a.m. Saturday; Play Outdoors, 701 N.W. Arizona Ave., Bend; 541-678-5398. • ACTIVE LIFE FITNESS: Tai Chi; 541-389-7536 or 541-788-7537. • ADVENTURE BOOT CAMP: Bend Boot Camp, www.bendbootcamp. com; 541-350-5343. • AFTERNOON FIT KIDS: Ages 5-12; 541-389-7665. • ANITA ELSEY: Feldenkrais; 541-408-3731. • ARTICULATION THERAPY CLASSES: 541-550-9424 or www.ashtangayogabend.com. • ASMI YOGA: 541-385-1140 or www.asmiyoga.com. • BABY BOOMERS & BEYOND: Yoga instruction; 541-948-9770. • BABY BOOT CAMP: Strollerfitness program; 541-617-6142 or www.babybootcamp.com. • BAKESTARR: Support for type 1 diabetics ages 18-24; 541-5984483 or www.bakestarr.com. • BALANCE YOGA CLASSES & RETREATS: Hilloah Rohr, 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • BEND FELDENKRAIS CENTER: 541-788-9232. • BEND SENIOR CENTER: Dance, Tai Chi, Feldenkrais Awareness Movement, Middle Eastern Belly Dance and more; 541-388-1133. • BEND YOGA: 503-998-8902. • BIKRAM’S YOGA COLLEGE OF INDIA: 541-389-8599 or www.bikramyogabend.com.

Get Back to Your Life

S A C R O I L L I A C PA I N H E R N I AT E D D I S C S C I AT I C A N E U R O PAT H Y ARTHRITIS B A C K PA I N FA I L E D B A C K S U R G E RY TRIGGER POINT R A D I C U L O PAT H Y D E G E N E R AT I V E D I S C D I S E A S E N E C K PA I N D A I LY H E A D A C H E M U S C L E S PA S M R E F L E X S Y M PAT H E T I C D Y S T R O P H Y SPINE ARTHRITIS

Bend Spine & Pain Specialists Theodore Ford, MD Board Certified Anesthesiologist Board Certified Pain Specialist Non-surgical Pain Management

(541) 647 - 1646 2041 NE Williamson Court, Suite B • Bend

www.BendSpineandPain.com

• THE BODHI TREE, YOGA & HEALING ARTS: 541-390-2827. • BOOT CAMP FITNESS FOR WOMEN: 541-815-3783. • BOOST FAMILY FITNESS: 541-3905286 or www.boostfam.com. • BREEMA’S NINE PRINCIPLES OF HARMONY: 541-593-8812. • BRINGING THE BUDDHIST 8 FOLD PATH TO MINDFUL DAILY PRACTICE: Hilloah Rohr, 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE: 541-383-7290 or www.cocc.edu. • CENTRAL OREGON GYMNASTICS ACADEMY: 541-385-1163 or www.cogymnastics.com. • CHICKS RIDE SKI CONDITIONING CLINICS: Elizabeth Goodheart at elizabethgoodheart2@gmail .com or 541-593-1095. • CHRONIC PAIN CLASSES: 541-3187041 or www.healingbridge.com. • CLASSIC HATHA YOGA/ANANDA INSPIRED: Lorette Simonet; 541-3859465 or www.wellnessbend.com. • COMPASSIONATE COMMUNICATION CLASSES: Peace Center, www. pcoco.org or 541-325-3174. • CORE: Yoga; 541-389-6595 or www.coreconditioning.info. • FIT FOR THE KING EXERCISE MINISTRY: 541-923-3925 or www.fitfortheking.info. • FITNESS GUIDE SERVICE: 541-388-1685 or www.fitness guideservice.com. • FOCUS PHYSICAL THERAPY: Yoga, feldenkrais; 541-385-3344 or www.focusphysio.com. • FUNCTIONAL FITNESS TRAINING: PEAK Training Studio, 541-647-1346. • GOLF FITNESS AND PERFORMANCE: Chris Cooper, 541-350-1631 or ccooper@taiweb.com. • GOLF FITNESS CLASSES: WillRace Performance Training Studio, 541-419-9699. • HEALING BRIDGE PHYSICAL THERAPY: Feldenkrais, back classes, screenings, 541-318-7041 or www.healingbridge.com. • HEALTHY HAPPENINGS: St. Charles Health Systems; smoking cessation, parenting preparation; 541-706-6390 or www.stcharleshealthcare.org. • HULA HOOP CLASSES: www.hoop dazzle.com or 541-312-6910. • IMAGINE HEALTH NOW: QiGong classes; 541-318-4630, maggie@ imaginehealthnow.com or www .imaginehealthnow.com. • INNERGYSTICS: Yoga, cardio, weight

lifting and meditation; 541-388-7395. • IYENGAR YOGA OF BEND: Nadine Sims; 541-318-1186 or www.yogaofbend.com. • IYENGAR YOGA CLASSES: 541-948-9770 or robyncastano@ bendbroadband.com. • JAZZERCISE: www.jazzercise.com or 541-280-5653. • JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER: 541-389-7665. • KIDS YOGA: 541-385-5437. • LAUGHTER YOGA: 541-420-2204. • LAUGHTER YOGA CLUB: 541389-0831 or www.pcoco.org. • LIVING FITNESS: Personal training; 541-382-2332. • MOVEMENT THAT MATTERS: Redmond Senior Center; 541-548-6067. • NAMASPA: Baptiste Power Vinyasa Yoga; Suzie Harris; 541-550-8550 or www.namaspa.com. • NORTHWEST CROSSING: Yoga; 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • PILATES CENTER OF BEND: 541-389-2900 or www.pilatescenter ofbend.com. • PILATES CONNECTION: Mat, chair and equipment classes; 541-420-2927 or www.bendpilates connection.com. • PILATES FOR CANCER RECOVERY: 541-647-1900 or www.shelleybpilates.com. • PILATES MAT AND EQUIPMENT INSTRUCTION: FreshAirSports.com/ pilates or 541-318-7388. • PLAY OUTDOORS: Kids yoga; 541-678-5398. • QIGONG CLASSES: Michelle Wood, 541-330-8894. • REBOUND PILATES: 541-585-1500 or www.reboundpilates.com. • REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT: 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org. • REDMOND RUNNING GROUP: dedwards@bendbroadband.com. • SALLY’S HATHA YOGA: 541-3900927 or www.sallyshathayoga.com. • SILVER STRIDERS: 541-383-8077 or www.silverstriders.com. • SPIRIT OF PILATES INC.: 541-3301373 or www.spiritofpilates.com. • STROLLER STRIDES: Strollerfitness; 541-598-5231 or www.strollerstrides.com. • SUNDANCE FOOTCARE LLC: Marguerite Saslow conducts nail clinics; 541-815-8131 or canyonwren2646@yahoo.com. • TERPSICHOREAN DANCE STUDIO: Yoga; 541-388-8497. • THERAPEUTIC YOGA PROGRAM: 541-350-1617. • TUESDAY PERFORMANCE GROUP: 541-317-3568. • TULEN CENTER FOR MARTIAL ARTS AND WELLNESS: 541-550-8550. • WILLRACE PERFORMANCE TRAINING STUDIO: 541-350-3938 or runkdwrun@msn.com. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: Dynamic Group Fitness: 541-350-0064. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: Seven Peaks Elementary School; 541-419-9699. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: WRP Training Studio; 541-788-5743. • YOGA FOR 55 +: 541-948-9770. • YOGA FOR PEAK PERFORMANCE: 541-322-9642 or info@ bend-yoga.com. • YOGA HEART OF REDMOND: 541633-0530 or www.ericamason.net. • YOGA JOURNEY: 541-419-6778. • YOGA TO GO: robyncastano@ bendbroadband.com or 541-948-9770. • ZUMBA: Dance-based fitness classes; Davon Cabraloff; 541-383-1994.

Find Your Dream Home Every Saturday In Real Estate


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, January 27, 2011 F3

F

Next week New program aims to get inactive people to start exercising.

EXERCISE TIPS CORE WORKOUT

Opposite arm and leg on ball

1

2

No more sit-ups, said Cherie Touchette, a personal trainer at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center who teaches a functional core class there. Instead, Touchette emphasizes moves that teach people to keep their spines correctly aligned while strengthening the abdominal muscles. “It’s all about posture, posture, posture,” she said. This exercise and all of those in this series work the muscles in the abdomen and the back. It can be done individually or you can combine all nine; this is the last in

a series that ran in The Bulletin every other week. How to do it: Lie on your stomach over the exercise ball, with abdominal muscles resting on the ball. Place hands and feet on the ground (1). Slowly lift your left arm and right leg off the floor. Lower down slowly and alternate with right arm and left leg (2). The ball adds instability, Touchette said, and if you do not tighten and engage your core muscles, you will likely have trouble balancing. — Betsy Q. Cliff, The Bulletin

GYM ETIQUETTE

When you’re working out, know the rules of the road Greg Cross / The Bulletin

By Ellen Warren

Not feeling so good? Exercising during a head cold can make you feel better, but you’re better off in bed if it’s something more serious By Anne Aurand

From the experts

The Bulletin

Some people believe exercising when they’re sick makes them feel better. Others embrace an excuse to skip a workout. How hard and whether you should work out depends on what’s ailing you. Experts say the ubiquitous head cold does not warrant much time on the couch. A fever, respiratory illness or stomach bug, however, can be a free pass from the gym. Charlotte Lin, a Bend Memorial Clinic family practice doctor and acupuncturist, said her general rule is: “If you’re going to work or to school, it’s probably OK to work out. If you’re taking the day off (work), then you really need to allow your body to rest.” Anything that drives a person to a doctor’s office — perhaps a need for antibiotics — means the illness is severe enough to skip exercising, she said. With typical colds, people need to judge their own comfort. Lin said aggravating a cough on a vigorous winter bike ride probably won’t prolong the illness. But if it’s difficult to breathe, it’s a good idea to slow down, maybe walk instead of run, she suggested. “Some people feel better, more energized” if they exercise, she said. “But if it’s more severe, it’s more important to allow your body to use the energy to heal itself.” For example, if Lin gets a cold she might modify her preferred outdoor mountain bike ride or cross-country ski workout to a gentler, indoor yoga class, she said. Regular exercise is a preventive measure against the common cold because regular exercise strengthens overall health, including the immune system, Lin said. And when her clients come

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Dr. Charlotte Lin, a family practice doctor at Bend Memorial Clinic, said that exercising when you have a head cold can be beneficial to recovering. down with something, it often can be connected to a vacation from their normal workout routines. Dr. David C. Nieman, an American College of Sports Medicine researcher, said moderate exercise — a half hour most days of the week — can lower the risk for respiratory infections. But prolonged, intense exercise like running a marathon can weaken the immune system and temporarily make a person more susceptible to viruses. Nieman also said there is no data that shows exercising during an illness will cure it, but some exercise devotees swear it helps. Kyle Will, owner of WillRace Performance Training Studio in Bend, personal trainer and exercise junkie, said he usually pushes through most illnesses because it makes him feel better. He said he not only exercises for fitness but also for mental wellbeing, so he has to be seriously sick to take a day off. He’ll slow down if it’s more than a head cold, such as a fever or a chest or stomach ailment. He tells his cli-

Feeling ill? Not sure if you should go for a run? Here’s what experts say about when to work out. OK to exercise with: head colds, congestion, runny nose, sore throat. Better to rest with: fevers, body aches, swollen glands, prescriptions for medication. Gradually ease back into regular levels of exercise after recovery. Allow at least two weeks of rest when recovering from something serious, like the flu. Source: American College of Sports Medicine researcher David C. Nieman

ents: If you’re sick, “your body’s working extra hard to recover already,” so extra attention should be paid to hydration, rest and nutrition. Lauri Powers has figured this out through her own experience, and after years of being more obsessive about exercise, she has grown to appreciate a sick day off of her almost-daily workouts from skate skiing, cycling, yoga or tennis. She said pushing through used to extend or worsen her illnesses. “I’ve really learned the art of moderation and listening to my body,” said 42-year-old Powers, an educator with the Bend-La Pine school district. “I’m an avid athlete, but when I feel a sore throat or sinus pressure, it’s my body telling me to slow down. I take up to three days off.” She enjoys the change of pace: “I have a lot of space to read, watch a movie, things I don’t normally have much time to do.”

Chicago Tribune

In the gym — as in life — there are dos and don’ts. Some are pretty obvious. Don’t go to the gym with your wife, then ogle the hottie working out next to her. Don’t spit in the water fountain. Don’t pee in the shower like George Costanza in a “Seinfeld” episode. These are just a few examples of really bad gym behavior cited by trainers and fitness center managers when asked for outstanding examples of how not to behave when you’re working out. But in other cases, the line between good and bad gym etiquette might not be so obvious. Let’s hear what the experts have seen, what they wish they hadn’t and what they’d like to see going forward.

Noise “I had a lady in my Pilates class talking on her cell phone. Her assistant was also in the class, and she was talking on her cell phone!” said Washington, D.C., Pilates instructor Chauna Bryant. “I was really upset. I said to them, ‘Is everything OK?’ and they both put their phones down and looked at me like I was out of line. I was so close to kicking them out.” Even gyms that don’t enforce bans on cell phones in the workout areas often prohibit them in the locker room out of privacy concerns. “It seems every phone has a camera,” said Dick Snyder, owner of LifeSport Fitness, downtown Philadelphia’s oldest gym. Blasting a TV at top volume when headphones aren’t available is inconsiderate of those who don’t share your program preferences. So is cranking up your iPod so loud that people around you can sing along. Sometimes weight lifting leads to loud grunting, which some gyms discourage — or prohibit. At the Planet Fitness

national chain, noisy members are given one warning. But when a client grunts, groans or drops weights a second time, managers set off an actual alarm. Hardly subtle but highly effective, “it’s called the lunk alarm, and it’s a blue flashing light, and sounds like an air-raid siren,” says Glenn Stuart, general manager of the Planet Fitness in Meriden, Conn.

Hygiene “The main thing that bugs me is when people show up sick. You infect everybody else,” said Melody Schoenfeld, trainer at and owner of Flawless Fitness in Pasadena, Calif. “Whenever my clients come in coughing, sneezing, stuff like that, I send them home.” And there’s the basic issue of cleanliness. “I actually turned down a client (for training) because he had on a knee brace he hadn’t washed in a year. He smelled so bad. And there was a guy where I used to train who I don’t think bathed. He smelled so bad that, literally, any place that he was there was an empty radius around him. Use common sense. Take a shower,” said Schoenfeld. “Make sure you wipe the machines off. A lot of times people leave them all sweaty and gross,” said personal trainer Bryant. Dr. Douglas Robins, vice president of the Florida Society of Dermatology & Dermatologic Surgery, recommends wearing shower shoes in the locker room and the shower to prevent fungal infections like athlete’s foot.

The rules • Limit cell phone talking • No loud groans or grunting • Don’t slam down weights • Wipe down equipment after use • Don’t work out when you’re sick, contagious • Wear flip-flops in shower/ locker room • No public spitting • Don’t share towels, soap • Cover cuts, scrapes • Sit on towel in steam/sauna • Clean body, clean clothes • Don’t hog equipment when others are waiting • Keep conversation to a minimum • No revealing workout clothes • Don’t stroll or chat naked in locker room • Return equipment to its original location • Don’t correct others’ form • Respect personal space come in contact with it.” Another pet peeve of hers? “People who try to correct your form — unless you’ve asked for their help.” Planet Fitness’ Stuart has had to ask clients who show up to work out in greasy work jeans, boots or sandals to go home and change to gym wear. Speaking of attire, instead of conversing while naked in the locker room, Bryant said, “put on a towel and have the convo.”

Common sense and common courtesy “People should not wear loose, wide-leg shorts. You can see all their business,” said Bryant. Underwear and support garments are a must if there’s even a remote chance that “you’ll be flashing your stuff,” said Schoenfeld, who also decries people who spit in the water fountains. “If you feel like you need to spit, do it where people aren’t going to

Anne Aurand can be reached at 541-383-0304 or at aaurand@ bendbulletin.com.

Anita Henderson, MD

Try a new wave for a workout By Jeannine Stein Los Angeles Times

Surfing may not be the sport of choice in the High Desert, but make no mistake, it is physically and mentally challenging. The pros just make it look easy. Catching a wave may be harder than it seems, but after a class or two even the most challenged surfer can maneuver on a board. “The most important thing is somebody’s will — if they want to do it,” said Patrick Murphy, owner of Venice-based Learn to Surf

L.A. “The oldest person we’ve had here was 72, and he stood up on his board.” In addition to providing a good cardio workout (paddling over waves will get your heart pounding), surfing is a whole-body workout. Murphy said that paddling mostly works the upper back muscles and the deltoids (shoulder muscles). Then comes the pushup from a lying position to a squat before standing, which employs the pectorals (chest muscles) and the triceps (muscles on the back

of the upper arm). Staying upright on the board challenges core muscles that stabilize the body as the board glides over the water. “I work out all the time, and nothing fatigues me more than paddling a surfboard,” said Majid Ali, who surfs every summer with his 10- and 12-year-old sons. Surfing provides a great workout for them as well. “It’s great for their balance and is a good adjunct for the other sports they do, like martial arts, baseball, basketball and skateboarding.”

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Dr. Anita Henderson graduated from Oregon Health Sciences University. She is board certified in Family Medicine. Dr. Henderson’s interests include wellness care, women’s health, mental health, and management of chronic disease. She enjoys working with patients of all ages. Dr. Henderson practices at our downtown Bend clinic. Dr. Henderson enjoys her life in Bend, having followed her sister’s family here from her native Portland, Oregon. She relishes time spent with her young niece and nephew. Other interests are reading and writing, listening to music, playing guitar, snowboarding, yoga and jogging. High Lakes Health Care is a preferred provider for most major insurance plans. New patients are now being accepted at all locations. We are now open to new Medicare patients.


F4 Thursday, January 27, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M

Next week New Medicare rules may make home dialysis a more popular option.

Researchers use tiny particles to mimic blood

CEL EB RIT Y M EDICINE Bone marrow cancer can refer to several distinct types of illness British actress Susannah York, who was nominated for an Oscar for her role in “They Shoot Horses, Don’t They” and played Superman’s birth mother in the Christopher Reeves series of movies, died from bone marrow cancer at the age of 72. Bone marrow cancer is a generic term that can reflect a number of different cancers that affect the bones. According to the Cancer Treatment Centers of America, most cases of bone marrow cancer are secondary cancers, meaning the cancer spread to the bone from another organ. In such cases, the cancer resembles the type of tissue where it originated, such as breast tissue or lung tissue. Primary bone marrow cancers originate in the cells of the bone itself, including osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, Ewing’s sarcoma and malignant fibrous histiocytoma. Other kinds of bone marrow cancer originate in the cells of the bone marrow that will eventually become blood cells. Leukemia occurs when the bone marrow creates abnormal white blood cells, and multiple myeloma develops from the plasma cells. Lymphomas typically start in

lymph nodes but can also originate in bone marrow. Bone marrow cancer typically forms in the shafts of long bones, and symptoms are often so subtle it’s not detected until it spreads to another organ. Symptoms can include fever, fatigue, pain, hard lumps on the bone, poor appetite and weight loss. Treatments can include surgery, radiation, chemotherapy and bone marrow transplants. — Markian Hawryluk, The Bulletin

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Warfarin

The Associated Press ile photo

COAXING NEW HAIR

Scientists work on perking up dormant follicles The Philadelphia Inquirer

When a man’s hair stops growing back, it would be logical to assume his scalp has suffered a loss of stem cells, those versatile dynamos that have the ability to regenerate hair, blood, and other parts of the body. Not so, according to new research from the University of Pennsylvania. Bald men have just as many stem cells in their hair follicles as any magnificently tressed Samson. The cells may just need to be woken up. It is not clear yet how to do this, but the researchers say their findings, published online last week in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, give them hope that male baldness is reversible. “The stem cells are still present, which to me was quite surprising,” said senior author George Cotsarelis, chair of the dermatology department at Penn’s medical school. “We should be able to figure out a way of stimulating them.” Such a treatment would find a large audience. Various estimates have placed the number of men with male-pattern baldness at more than 35 million in the United States. While many opt for hair transplants, the pharmaceutical industry would dearly like to capture some of that market. It has stumbled upon two drugs thus far by accident, Rogaine and Propecia, but these are successful primarily in maintaining existing hair, not in stimulating growth on a bald scalp. In the new research, the kinds of stem cells in question are the adult variety, not the more versatile embryonic stem cells that have stirred controversy. Still, many scientists think these adult cells are a promising area of study, holding the potential to regenerate certain organs or heal wounds without scars. And what better laboratory to study them than the scalp, where hair stem cells are accessible and plentiful? “Many of us think we can gain clues about how to regenerate other organs by understanding how to regenerate the hair,” says Stanford University dermatologist Anthony Oro. Oro, who was not involved with the new research, said it provided “one additional step along the way to better understanding the disease” of male baldness. Andrzej Dlugosz, a University of Michigan dermatologist who also was not involved with the

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Belinda Fischer, a registered nurse who directs the anticoagulation clinic at Bend Memorial Clinic, takes a blood sample from the finger of Marc Nordstrom to check his coagulation levels last week. Patients like Nordstrom who take warfarin must have their blood regularly tested to ensure they are in a safe clotting range.

British actress Susannah York, pictured in 1986, died from bone marrow cancer Jan. 15.

By Tom Avril

By Sarah Avery

study, said it was promising but cautioned “there is no guarantee that the stem cells in this setting would still be responsive to stimuli that effectively activate normal follicle stem cells.” Luis Garza, the paper’s lead author, agreed that more work was needed, adding that for some, the wait would be hard. Eager for treatment, bald people have been known to scour patent websites for promising treatments before coming in to Penn for an appointment, Garza said. “It’s a big part of people’s selfimage,” said Garza, who is now at Johns Hopkins University. “It’s a big part of who people think they are.” For the new study, Garza, Cotsarelis, and colleagues studied scalp samples left over from men who underwent hair transplants. Bald scalp was found to have just as many stem cells as scalp with hair. Where the scalp samples differed, however, was in their levels of two other kinds of so-called progenitor cells that appear to be descendants of follicle stem cells. Samples of bald scalp contained one-tenth as many of these progenitor cells, on average, when compared to “haired” scalp. Progenitor cells are created by the division of stem cells; the progenitors then divide further to produce hair and other kinds of cells. So in bald men, stem cells seem to have slowed way down in the process of dividing to form progenitor cells, and the answer may be simply to reactivate this process, the researchers wrote. To further test their theory, the scientists transplanted progenitor cells from one mouse to another, where the cells led to the creation of new hair follicles. This experiment could not be done in people because such donor cells would be rejected; the mice that received donated cells were immunodeficient. Cotsarelis said he now wants to determine the chemical signal that tells stem cells to divide into progenitors, in hopes that someday such an agent could be put in a product and applied to the scalp. He also plans to look for the chemical signals that drive hair loss in women, which are likely to be different. Instead of a topical treatment, another possible solution for baldness would be to remove some of a person’s hair-generating cells, grow them outside the body, and reimplant them, the authors said.

Continued from F1 “All we’ve had is warfarin for decades, and it’s a really tough drug to take. It’s highly affected by your diet and other medications. It’s got a really narrow therapeutic window, and with that narrow therapeutic window, it requires really close monitoring,” he continued. As a result, even patients who are able to achieve a stable dose must come in for testing every 4 to 6 weeks. But more than a third of patients will have scores outside the desired therapeutic range, bringing them back to the clinic at least every week until they can get the dosing right. “It’s really labor intensive for those patients and it can have an impact on their quality of life,” Martin said. “These new drugs, because of their predictable pharmacokinetics, they don’t require that monitoring.” The first such warfarin alternative, dabigatran, was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in October for the prevention of stroke and blood clots in patients with atrial fibrillation. Clinical trials showed the drug was more effective than warfarin at preventing blood clots or strokes, while cutting the risk of bleeding in half. It will be sold under the brand name Pradaxa. A second drug, rivaroxaban, was shown to be at least as effective as warfarin. That drug, manufactured by Bayer and Johnson & Johnson, is currently under review by the FDA and could be available later this year. “The studies are really good. They have lower stroke rates, probably less bleeding. A lot of the greater efficacy is because people are consistently therapeutic. This is like aspirin; you take your dose and you’re covered,” said Dr. Bruce McLellan, a cardiologist with Heart Center Cardiology in Bend. “And who among our patients on warfarin wouldn’t love giving up the blood tests?” While many experts have speculated that the new drugs may signal the end of warfarin use, the switch may not be instantaneous. For one, the drug has been approved only for one class of patients, those with atrial fibrillation. That represents the single largest

Alternatives to warfarin Medication

Manufacturer

FDA approval date

Cost

warfarin (Coumadin)

Bristol Myers Squibb*

1954

<$1 per day

dabigatran (Pradaxa)

Boehringer Ingelheim

2010

$6.75 per day

rivaroxaban (Xarelto)

Bayer HealthCare and Johnson & Johnson

under review

N/A

apixaban

Pfizer and BristolMyers Squibb

under review

N/A

Source: Manufacturer websites and other industry sources *Warfarin is now available as a generic as well.

OTHER BLOOD THINNERS IN DEVELOPMENT Medication

Manufacturer

betrixaban

Merck and Portola Pharmaceuticals

edoxaban

Daiichi-Sankyo

TAK-442

Takeda

darexaban

Astellas

category of patients taking warfarin, but not everyone. Eventually, drug companies will have to pursue FDA approval for the use of such drugs for patients with mechanical heart valves, deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. And in the short term, the biggest barrier may be price. The wholesale price of the drug has been set at $6.75 per day, and patients may wind up paying even more than that in retail settings. For those without drug coverage, that could be a prohibitive amount. “The cost of Coumadin is pennies a day,” said Dr. Theodore Braich, an oncologist who oversees the anticoagulation clinic at BMC. There are other associated costs with warfarin, such as the cost of monitoring patients through anticoagulation clinics and helping them manage the dose. And patients bear the cost of traveling to clinics and the time off work. It’s still unclear whether the new drug may provide enough savings in other areas of the health care system — including reducing the number of strokes or other adverse events caused by warfarin — to offset its higher price tag. And much of the burden of helping patients manage the new medications may fall back on physicians. “Right now, anticoagulation for a doctor is pretty automated, because everybody is enrolled in a Coumadin clinic. When patients are calling and asking, ‘Do I have

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to deal with drug interactions and can I take this drug with it?’ that changes behavior,” he said. “If you start burdening physicians and (their staff) with more work, they’re not going to perceive this drug as their friend.” Those barriers could keep physicians from switching patients to these new drugs, especially if they’re doing well on warfarin and don’t mind the extra trips to the clinic. “Does the drug work so well and is it so safe that it’s a slam dunk?” Braich asked of the new drug, dabigatran. “I don’t think that’s clear yet.” McLellan said he believes momentum will build around the new drugs, particularly as more alternatives come to market. And that could make warfarin a drug of the past. “Economics do sometimes work in medicine, so when the next ones do come out, if there’s a little price pressure that will help,” he said. “Ten years from now, I expect everybody will be (prescribing them) because it’s better medicine. For those that can afford it, it’s a great thing.” Markian Hawryluk can be reached at 541-617-7814 or mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com.

RALEIGH, N.C. — The quest to develop synthetic blood is advancing through the work of University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill researchers using tiny particles that are not only the same shape, but the same flexibility as vital red blood cells. The team, led by chemistry professor Joseph DeSimone, who invented a technology to mass produce uniquely shaped nanoparticles, builds on the observation that red blood cells are more pliant when they’re in the youth of their 120-day life cycle. New, supple red blood cells are able to squeeze through tiny pores and carry oxygen throughout the body. So by mimicking their shape and flexibility, DeSimone hopes to infuse his man-made microdots with oxygen-carrying hemoglobin to create a synthetic lifeline. “Mechanics are important, and now we have a vehicle that has the same mechanics as red blood cells when young, and that’s the first big step,” DeSimone said. The research, which is being tested in mice, was reported this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Developing synthetic blood has long been the pursuit of scientists searching for an abundant and versatile alternative to use in traumas and battlefields. Whole blood has a limited shelf life, needs refrigeration and must be matched to the recipient. But efforts to develop viable alternatives have been fraught with pitfalls. The artificial product PolyHeme was tested several years ago, including a brief time in the trauma center at Duke University Medical Center. But it and similar treatments drew controversy over patient consent and safety. In 2008, a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that PolyHeme and four other synthetic blood products put patients at higher risk of death and heart attacks. The approach taken by DeSimone and his colleagues is different. It capitalizes on the potential of nanoparticles, which are microscopic vehicles that he and other scientists hope can deliver therapies, scavenge harmful particles such as cholesterol or even serve as surrogates for cells in the body. DeSimone said the secret to the success of red blood cells is their ability to squish and squirt through minute portals. Recreating that quality, he said, could produce a particle that encases the hemoglobin to safely deliver oxygen. “We’re able to do it in a synthetic carrier,” he said.

Winter Allergies GivingYou the Blues? See a Board Certified Allergist/Immunologist. Sniffles and sneezes are common during the winter months, yet they’re not always due to colds and flu. Although people with pollen allergies may find a reprieve when the weather cools, those with other allergy triggers — such as mold, dust mites and pet dander — can be just as miserable in winter. Symptoms Of Winter Allergies?

Coughing, dark circles under eyes, itchy, watery eyes and nose, runny nose, sneezing. Healthy Tips:

• Your allergist can help you identify things in your home, workplace or school that may be making your asthma or allergies worse. • Keep your home clean and dry to help make it “allergen-free.” • Focus on sites where allergens accumulate-bedding, carpet and upholstered furniture. • Weekly vacuuming can help. Use a vacuum with a HEPA filter or double bags. The right care can make the difference between suffering with an allergic disease and feeling better. By visiting an experienced allergist, you can expect an accurate diagnosis, a treatment plan that works and educational information to help you manage your disease. We accept Medicare and most insurances

Allergy, Asthma Associates

Dr. David B. Coutin M.D. • (541) 382-1221 Board Certified Allergy/Immunology 2239 Doctors Drive, Suite 100, Bend


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, January 27, 2011 F5

N GOOD FOR YOU

Energy

For the most benefit, probiotics are best consumed in foods

Continued from F1

Studies have shown that probiotics — healthy bacteria found in some foods and supplements — can boost the immune system and aid digestion. But truly comprehensive and conclusive research is still to come, said Annie Williamson, a registered dietitian from Bend Memorial Clinic. Many of the studies about the benefits of probiotics — such as one 2009 study that concluded probiotics reduced the incidence and duration of cold and flu symptoms in children — have been funded by product manufacturers, she said. “They’re the big new thing right now, so a lot of manufacturers are adding them to their products,” Williamson said. “More research is coming.” Williamson is not discounting their benefits. They have been found to improve digestion, diarrhea, constipation, irritable bowel syndrome and more, said Williamson. But there is much more to

learn. For example, she said, there are so many strains of bacteria, some companies might not be using strains that can live until the product gets off the shelf and into your body. Probiotics come in powders, pills and real foods. Williamson said supplements are generally recognized as safe, but the best form in which to take them is through foods; the bacteria are more likely to stay alive in your stomach. She cautioned that people with compromised immune systems should talk to their physicians before taking probiotic supplements. — Anne Aurand, The Bulletin

Probiotics come in many forms. They’re sold as supplements in capsules, powders and liquids, and found in health sections of grocery stores. They’re also added to many foods, such as yogurt.

When food becomes a consuming addiction By Jennifer LaRue Huget Sitting across a Starbucks table from Michael Prager a few weeks ago, I’d never have guessed that he once weighed 365 pounds. Or that he’s an addict. I met with Prager, a 53-yearold author, journalist, blogger and stay-at-home dad who lives in Arlington, Mass., to talk about his self-published book, “Fat Boy, Thin Man” (2010). It’s a clearheaded exposition of a life in which 12-inch roast beef Subway sandwiches with onions and mayonnaise once played a central and controlling role. Prager is thin, even angular, nowadays. But his 160-pound weight loss some 20 years ago came only after he accepted a discomfiting idea: He was addicted to food. The notion of food addiction remains controversial, but there’s growing belief that it’s a real phenomenon, a stance that’s increasingly supported by science. Recent research found that people with a family history of alcoholism had increased risk of obesity, suggesting that both conditions might be driven by the same tendency toward addictive behavior. In fact, some experts think food addiction might be one of the prime causes of America’s obesity epidemic, especially as potentially addictive ingredients such as fat, sugar and salt have played a larger role in our nation’s diet. When Prager was in his early 30s, he reluctantly came to understand that both his obesity and his inability to get along with other people derived from the same root cause: his lifelong obsession with cramming food into his maw. As with other addicts, he explains, his emotional development stalled the moment he became addicted; for him, that was at age 12, in the midst of a troubled childhood. Prager’s book is peppered with accounts of unsettling behaviors: leaving a family dinner early to ensure he’d get to the McDonald’s drive-through before it closed, loading his car with enough sub sandwiches so he would, he writes, “have something for the ride home without running out once I’d got there.” Some of those sound scarily familiar to me. Rather than consign the rest of his life to his addiction, the adult Prager sought treatment at the urging of others. And, after decades of gaining and losing the same 100 pounds, he finally shed his extra weight. It seems the pounds might be gone for good: The 5-foot-10 Prager has weighed about 210 pounds for the past 20 years. Food addiction does not have an entry in the Diagnostic and

Why not food? Here’s why taking energy gels is better than eating a turkey sandwich: Cardiovascular endurance occurs when the heart, blood and lungs work together to carry oxygen and energy to the muscles to run, cycle or swim for an extended period of time. The process of food digestion also requires blood. While a person is exercising hard, the body is busy fueling muscles, and digestion becomes a low priority. Eating something like a peanut butter and jelly sandwich would be a bad idea because proteins and fats take longer to digest than carbohydrates, she said. “If there’s not enough blood to digest it, food sits in your stomach and is not going anywhere,” said Hunt Harrington, who is also an athlete and fitness instructor. That results in “intestinal distress,” she said.

— Kelly Hunt Harrington

Learning from experience Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Special to The Washington Post

“If there’s not enough blood to digest it, food sits in your stomach and is not going anywhere.”

Pinpointing addiction If you think you might be addicted to food, consult your doctor, who might refer you to a specialist. A physician or therapist might ask questions to help pin down signs of substance abuse. Michael Prager outlines those questions (adapted from the American Psychiatric Association’s DSMIV) in his book. Here’s a sample: • Do you increase the amount you eat over time to achieve the same effect? • Do you spend lots of time and effort to obtain food and recover from overeating? • Do you sacrifice other activities to accommodate your overeating?

GETTING HELP Overeaters Anonymous: 505-891-2664, www.oa.org Food Addicts Anonymous: 561-967-3871, www. foodaddictsanonymous.org American Psychological Association: locator.apa.org

Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), the American Psychiatric Association’s bible of accepted psychological diagnoses. Inclusion in the DSM lends legitimacy to conditions and paves the way for insurance to cover treatment. But many psychologists recognize and treat food addiction anyway. Marilyn Mertzl, a psychoanalyst practicing in Kansas City, Mo., said, “Addiction to food operates on the same neurobiological highway as addiction to drugs, sex, gambling or alcohol.” As with any addiction, Mertzl says, “the source of all pleasure has become the source of all pain.” “With food addicts, they eat all day, and they eat all night. The turnoff valve is broken. They don’t have the ‘physical’ signal of fullness. Usually by the time they come to me, they’ve tried a variety of unsuccessful interventions.” Mertzl works with patients to identify and address the causes of their compulsion. For many, those include childhood experience of sexual abuse or parental controls over food, such as using it as a reward or requiring children to clean their plates. Mertzl also advises on such practical tasks as learning to eat more slowly and to eat while sitting down, with a nicely set place at the table, instead of gorging in front of an open fridge.

One local, elite athlete figured this out the hard way. Brennan Wodtli, a 22-yearold amateur bike racer and Hutch’s Bicycles employee, clearly remembers his first long-distance race: the 2009 High Cascades 100, a 100mile endurance mountain bike race on forest trails connected to Wanoga Sno-park, west of Bend. “I did everything wrong,” he recalled with chagrin. “I drank too much water the night before. I packed my jersey full of chomps, was eating like crazy during the race. Halfway … the race offered Subway sandwiches and watermelon. I ate two small sandwiches and some other food.” Somewhere along the Swampy Lakes trails, after an intense hill climb, “I felt like I wanted to throw up. I should have made myself throw up. I would have felt better. I made it a little farther. My stomach bulged. I was delirious. I slowed down just hoping to finish.” He didn’t make it to the final checkpoint in time, and was “time cut,” which means he was forced to quit. “I was shaking, felt awful, probably the worst I’ve ever felt on a bike,” he said. The next day he reviewed the whole scenario and decided his nutrition was probably wrong. He figured, “There’s gotta be some sort of science behind it, some strategy.” He was right. He started researching online, namely on Hammer Gel’s website, www.hammernutrition.com, and started experimenting with products on training rides. “I have not had one of those experiences since,” he said. “It was a character-building experience.” Now he’s got it dialed. For the first hour and a half of a vigorous bike ride, he only sips a Heed energy drink. That’s a powder dissolved in water that has carbohydrates and a combination of potassium, sodium and oth-

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Brennan Wodtli, 22, an avid cyclist and racer, has researched energy products and learned through trial and error what best keeps him fueled during long rides.

Sugar sources The science behind sports-nutrition products has come a long way since Gatorade was first manufactured in 1965, after a University of Florida assistant coach and a team of university physicians discovered a way to help Gator football players keep from wilting during hot-weather workouts. The carbohydrate-electrolyte drink Gatorade replenished fluids and energy — and improved performance. Newer science has found that different sugars break down at different speeds. And studies suggest that combining certain sugars may increase the absorption of carbohydrates, providing more fuel for a body during exercise. Here are some examples of effective combinations, often found in sports energy products: • Glucose with fructose • Maltodextrins and fructose • Glucose with sucrose and fructose Here are types of sugars found in sports energy foods and where

er vitamins and minerals that replenish a sweating, active body. After two hours of riding, he might swallow a Hammer gel, which can be taken hourly. And for a ride that lasts up to eight hours, Wodtli eventually starts sipping a densely-mixed recovery drink that includes some protein. In addition to all this, he carries several water bottles and sips plain water continuously. He and others say fine-tuning the nutrition routine takes trial and error. Everyone agrees the exact recipe for gels ver-

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they come from: Rapidly digested carbohydrates: (processed at about 60 grams/hour) • Sucrose (found in table sugar) • Maltose (found in barley) • Amylopectin (from breakdown of starches such as potatoes, rice, wheat or corn) • Maltodextrins (from starch breakdown) • Glucose (from starch breakdown) Slowly digested carbohydrates: (processed at about 30 grams/hour) • Fructose (found in honey and fruits) • Amylose (from starch breakdown) • Galactose (found in sugar beets and dairy products) • Isomaltulose (found in honey and sugarcane) Don’t forget to read nutrition labels to find out which carbohydrates are in the product.

Source: Kelly Hunt Harrington, registered dietitian, sports performance

sus chomps versus enhanced drinks is purely personal. Some people prefer swallowing a gooey gel. Some would rather chew a chomp. Gels come from a number of different companies and in a variety of flavors, from coffee or chocolate to citrus and berry.

Advice from experts Those experienced with energy foods advise against trying anything new during a race.

Different bodies react to products in different ways. Experts emphasize that water cannot be replaced by energy products; hydration is crucial for endurance exercise. Read the nutrition labels, Hunt Harrington advised. Examine how many carbohydrates the product contains, and from which sources (see “Sugar sources”). And, even though they contain rapidly digesting carbohydrates, measure carbohydrate consumption over the duration of exercise. Too much can cause stomach discomfort and is also stored as fat, she said. Sometimes traditional foods are acceptable in addition to sports-performance products, she said, speaking from experience as a distance mountain cyclist. Partway through a long ride, she’ll stop and take a lunch break. When her blood is not actively flowing to the muscles and heart, it can help her digest a small sandwich or banana or crackers, and then she’ll get back on her bike. Eris Craven, a distance runner and registered dietitian at Bend Memorial Clinic, has trained for long runs using only Gatorade, a drink that combines carbohydrates and electrolytes. She sips her Gatorade every five to 10 minutes during her runs. “Sports drinks can also help athletes do a better job with hydration because it has a sweet taste and can increase an athlete’s desire to drink,” she said. She cites American Dietetic Association and American College of Sports Medicine recommendations that athletes drink six to 12 ounces of fluid every 15 to 20 minutes, depending on tolerance. If a person is going to exercise more than one hour, he or she also needs 0.5 to 0.7 grams of sodium per liter of fluid, often found in sports performance drinks and gels. When choosing a sport drink, she recommends those containing no more than 14 grams of carbohydrates per eight ounces of liquid. A higher ratio of carbohydrates can actually decrease water absorption, she said. Craven, like many experienced sports-nutrition users, knows better than to try something new during a race. So, when she attended a 20-mile run in Sisters that had promised to serve Gatorade, she didn’t bring her hand-held water bottle full of Gatorade. Along the course she discovered race volunteers were offering Heed to runners, and she didn’t want to risk gastrointestinal discomfort from a new product during that long of a run. But without any supplements, she completely bonked and had a miserable race, she said. Anne Aurand can be reached at 541-383-0304 or aaurand@ bendbulletin.com.

LEGAL PLANNING, MEDICAID AND ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE Free Seminar Funded through a generous grant from the Recil & Violet Watson Center.

New enrichment classes available at the Bend Senior Center Saturdays in Larkspur Park Writing Your Life Story Instructor: Suzy Beal February 5-March 12 10:00am-11:30am Fee: $49 ID $66 OD

Beginning Billiards for Women February 12-February 26 10:00am-11:00am Fee: $15 ID $20 OD

CLASS SERIES “Medical Makeover” Aging Isn’t for Sissies Classes Hosted by Liz Ueland. Fee: $49 ID $66 OD for all 6 classes $10 drop in fee per class

1) Sex after 50, it’s a whole new game, learn how to win! Speaker: Dr. Mary Ellen Coulter, MD February 5, 9:30am-10:30am

2) Pain and Inflammation, learn the alternatives Speakers: Allison Suran, PT, GCRP & Carol Delmonico, RN and Professional Life Coach February 19, 9:30am-10:30am

Prior registration is required. Please contact Bend Senior Center 541-388-1133 or www.bendparksandrec.org

February 11, 2011 – 8:30-Noon Continental Breakfast Served 8:30 - 9:00 AM AmeriTel Inn Hotel, 425 SW Bluff Drive Bend, OR 97702 Registration Required at 1.800.272.3900 or 503.416.0201 Continuing Education Credits (CEU) available for Assisted Living, Residential Care Facilities, and Memory Care Communities: 3 hours, $30.

LEGAL AND FINANCIAL PLANNING FOR ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE Many people are unprepared to deal with the legal and financial consequences of a serious illness such as Alzheimer’s disease. This seminar will address some of the fundamental elements of legal and financial planning. Some of the topics covered are: • Health Care Advanced Directives • Health Care Representatives • Durable Power of Attorney for Financial and Estate Management • Living Will and Living Trust • Clarification of legal terms, such as Assets, Beneficiary, Conservator, Guardian, Legal Capacity, and Trustee • Medicaid and the meaning of “Spend Down”: When to Apply, Qualifications and Exemptions


F6 Thursday, January 27, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M

Next week Health care reform will decrease the number of uninsured adults in Oregon.

Bend more costly for commercially insured Negotiations with providers favor local hospitals

Study: Surgeons with suicidal thoughts unlikely to seek help By Kelly Brewington The Baltimore Sun

By Betsy Q. Cliff The Bulletin

Spending time at St. Charles? Going to visit a physician? If you live in the Bend area and have commercial health insurance, you and your insurance company will likely pay more than the national average for these services, according to a report released last year. That report, published by the actuarial firm Milliman Inc., found that insurers paid about 25 percent more than the national average in Bend for inpatient services and about 40 percent more for physician services. (The cost to patients is tied to the price negotiated by their insurance company — directly if they pay a percent of the price as co-insurance, and indirectly through their premiums.) The report counters a longheld belief that Bend is a low-cost area for medical services. That notion, based largely on Medicare costs, may have been based on incomplete information, the new report suggests. “The basic message is that commercial and Medicare aren’t the same,” said Michael Chernew, a professor of health policy at Harvard Medical School who was not associated with the current report but who does study disparities in health care costs. “And that difference has to do with price.”

Cost-shifting At a local level, those involved with pricing argue that prices for people with commercial insurance are higher because of low reimbursement from government programs, particularly Medicare. “We get less on average for Medicare so we get more on average for commercial,” said Karen Shepard, chief financial officer at St. Charles Health System. Medicare does, in fact, pay less for services in Oregon than in areas it deems higher cost, such as large cities on the East Coast. In addition, people living in Central Oregon appear to use less health care than in highercost areas, particularly when it comes to end-of-life care. That, too, drives down total cost, particularly for Medicare patients who use the vast majority of endof-life services. “What Medicare doesn’t pay, commercial insurance must,” wrote Marvin Lein, CEO at Bend Memorial Clinic in a lengthy blog post on the subject last week. “This cost-shifting by Medicare (and Medicaid) is the number one reason why commercial insurance is becoming so very, very expensive.” But research suggests that the relationship between Medicare reimbursements and commercial prices is not that clear cut. There is little correlation between Medicare reimbursements in a specific geographic area and commercial insurance costs, a separate Milliman report found. In other words, the authors conclude, cost-shifting is not inevitable. “What I’d say overall is we see that cost-shifting seems to be a business decision on the part of the hospitals or the health care community as opposed to a law of nature,” said Bruce Pyenson, an actuary and author of that report. “Just because Medicare may be paying low cost does not automatically mean that hospitals have to increase the charges to commercial.” A separate study, published last year in the journal Health Affairs, found that hospitals react differently when faced with low Medicare reimbursements. Some make their businesses

Variations in medical costs A report found that the prices that commercial insurers pay for inpatient services and physician care varies across the country. In Bend, insurers tend to spend more than average, which can impact everything from how much you pay out of pocket for medical care to the cost of your monthly insurance premium. REGION

Co st per service for inpatient hospital use compared to national average

Cost per service for physician care compared to national average

Bend

25 percent higher

40 percent higher

Portland

3 percent lower

44 percent higher

Seattle

5 percent higher

27 percent higher

McAllen, Texas

10 percent lower

14 percent lower

Green Bay, Wis.

30 percent higher

28 percent higher

Chicago

18 percent lower

12 percent higher

Grand Junction, Colo.

55 percent higher

11 percent higher

Sacramento, Calif.

80 percent higher

3 percent higher

Asheville, N.C.

4 percent lower

8 percent lower

Roanoke, Va.

12 percent lower

5 percent lower

Source: Milliman Inc.

About 6 percent of surgeons reported having suicidal thoughts in the last year, but many are reluctant to seek help because they feared it would affect their medical license, according to a new study in the Archives of Surgery. The study, based on an anonymous survey of nearly 8,000 surgeons, found suicidal thoughts were tied to doctors’ worries about making an error, a history of depression and burnout on the job. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic found that of the 6 percent who reported having suicidal thoughts in the previous year, 26 percent sought help. Concerns about the effect on a license is real; 80 percent of state medical boards ask about prior mental illness and 47 percent ask about it during application renewal, the study said.

shop for coverage. As a stopgap, the law esAre there other health in- tablished state “pre-existing surance options besides high- condition insurance plans” risk pools for people who can’t to provide coverage to people get coverage in the individual with medical conditions who market because of a preexist- can’t get insurance elsewhere. ing condition? These PCIPs generally offer Under the current coverage that is more health insurance sysaffordable and comtem, people who have prehensive than the to buy coverage on high-risk pools that their own rather than already operate in through an employer more than 30 states. HEALTH often find themselves There is a hitch, howCARE in a tough spot. Inever: You have to surers often charge REFORM have been uninsured high rates for individfor six months in orual coverage if people der to qualify. have even minor health probThe federal Department of lems, or they refuse to cover Health and Human Services them at all. runs the PCIPs in 23 states, inStarting in 2014, under the cluding Virginia. Other states health care overhaul passed run their own plans. Starting last year, insurance compa- this month, the federally run nies will no longer be able to plans began offering three deny coverage because of pre- choices instead of one, with existing health conditions, nor different premiums and decharge higher rates. (Imple- ductibles, to meet a greater vamentation of the new health riety of needs. law is going forward despite But there are other possible court and congressional chal- options. A few states, for examlenges.) State-based health ple, require some commercial insurance exchanges will pro- carriers to offer guaranteed vide “marketplaces” where in- coverage during a specified dividuals and small businesses open enrollment period every with up to 100 employees can year. Unfortunately, programs

Special to The Washington Post

— Bruce Pyenson, an actuary and author

more efficient. Others try to pull more money from other sources. “Hospitals exercise a degree of control over their costs,” the authors concluded. To reign in national health care costs, they wrote, commercial “payers will need to set rates so that hospitals will feel financial pressure to constrain costs.”

Market power In the Health Affairs study, the hospitals that worked to reign in their costs when faced with low reimbursements were those in competitive markets. Those that shifted costs to commercial payers tended to be in stronger positions in their markets. “In markets that were smaller and less competitive, (studies show) higher commercial spending but not higher Medicare spending,” said Chernew, who did a study on the subject. “Higher prices are being charged.” The reason is simple economics. Here in Central Oregon, an insurer who wants to contract in Bend cannot afford to leave St. Charles Health System off its list of providers. If it did, who would sign up? BMC is in somewhat the same position, though it has only a few specialities that cannot be found elsewhere in the region. That market position gives those two providers huge negotiating power.

In his experience, said Lein, “smaller organizations that have fewer patients who rely upon them for care, don’t have as much negotiating power with insurance providers who wish to make that an issue.” Lein said that not all insurers play that bargaining chip during the annual price negotiations that take place between health care providers and the insurance companies. Here in Bend, he said, “we have had excellent relationships with payers over the last few years.” Lein also said that prices were higher for organizations that did high-quality work. That view was echoed by Peter McGarry, vice president of provider and network for PacificSource Health Plans, who does much of the negotiating for prices. “It could be that in Central Oregon, the provider community and variation in how much we pay them isn’t the real story. The real story is the kind of care people are getting and the aggregate of the good job they are doing.” McGarry said in his experience negotiating with providers in Oregon and Idaho, Bend did not stand out as a particularly expensive area. Unfortunately, the quality of care that people are getting is hard to measure. There are some measures of hospital quality publicly available but far fewer measures for physician offices. And, even for hospitals, the measures tend to be outdated or so general it’s hard to glean anything useful. A number of government and private organizations have efforts under way to change that, but for now, even the most diligent patients have a difficult time figuring out the quality of care they are getting or, in other words, what exactly they are paying for. “We need an open dialogue about what’s the quality of a particular service and what’s the price. Right now we don’t have either,” said Sean Kolmer, deputy administrator at the Oregon Office of Health Policy and Research. “We don’t have a transparent market right now to have that discussion.” Betsy Q. Cliff can be reached at 541-383-0375 or bcliff@ bendbulletin.com.

PEOPLE Please send information about people involved in health issues to communitylife@bendbulletin.com. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Robin Henderson, the director of behavioral health services and health integration projects for St. Charles Health System, has been elected the chair of the American Hospital Association’s Section for Psychiatric and Substance Abuse

Services for 2011. The section provides perspective on behavioral health issues and promotes the creation and execution of behavioral health policies. Henderson manages two psychiatric facilities and several behavioral clinics.

Robin Henderson

Uncompensated health care care Uncompensated Oregon hospitals vary greatly in the amount of care they write off because patients can’t or don’t pay. As a percentage of the amount of care billed to all patients, hospitals in Oregon write off anywhere from 3 to 14 percent of the health care they provide.

Percentage of patient revenue written off to uncompensated care 0

3%

6%

9%

12%

15%

Oregon average

7.8% St. Charles Bend 7.3% St. Charles Redmond 10.5% Pioneer Memorial Hospital 8.9% Mountain View Hospital 8.2% Oregon Health & Science University 6.1% Wallowa Memorial Hospital (lowest) 2.9% Cottage Grove Community Hospital (highest) 14% Source: Oregon Department of Human Services Greg Cross / The Bulletin

New options for those at high risk By Michelle Andrews

“What I’d say overall is we see that cost shifting seems to be a business decision on the part of the hospitals or the health care community as opposed to a law of nature. Just because Medicare may be paying low cost does not automatically mean that hospitals have to increase the charges to commercial.”

Older surgeons were more likely to contemplate suicide — those 45 and older had one and a half to three times the rate as the general population. Being married and having kids were associated with lower rates, the study said. The grim study also mentions that doctors in general have a higher rate of suicide than the general population. But they tend to have the same rate of depression as the population at large. “This observation suggests that other factors may contribute to the increased risk of suicide among physicians,” the authors write in a statement. “Access to lethal medications and knowledge of how to use them has been suggested as one factor; however, the influence of professional characteristics and forms of distress other than depression (e.g., burnout) are largely unexplored.”

V ITA L STATS

like these generally aren’t well advertised, and people often find out about them only if they stumble upon them by accident. There’s another potential drawback: cost. Even if coverage is guaranteed, applicants typically must allow insurers to evaluate their medical history, and premiums may be steep. States don’t necessarily have the muscle to keep a tight rein on how much guaranteed coverage will cost. “Access and affordability are totally different issues,” said Deborah Chollet, a health insurance expert at Mathematica Policy Research. A good starting point to find out about health insurance programs in your area is www .healthcare.gov. This column is produced through a collaboration between The Washington Post and Kaiser Health News. KHN, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy organization that is not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente.

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Every Friday In


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, January 27, 2011 G1

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208

Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

AKC Yellow Labradors 3 Males For more info please visit us at www.coldcreekfarms.com 541-942-1059 Aussie Mini Litter, (4), shots, tails done, in-home raised, dbl reg. Ready now! $500. 541-409-0253, Redmond AUSSIE PUPPIES, mini and toy, $250, 1 male/1 female left. 1st shots, tails docked. Ready to go! 541-420-9694. Australian Cattle Dogs, 4 males, 3 reds, 1 blue, 541-279-4133. Basset Hound puppies, purebred, party and lemon colored $400. 541.550.6470

Bengal mix cat, Exotic, 2 years old. To approved home only. Neutered, all shots, harness trained. Very loving. $100. 541-548-0747 Blood Hound Pups: Purebred, shots, wormed, ready now, $250, 541-771-1141.

Carpet, 1970’s, Golden, brown, yellow, FREE, you haul, call 541-728-0482

Chihuahua/Poodle Pups, 9 weeks, 1st shot, $120 Cash, Call 541-678-7599.

263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

C h a n d l e r

A v e . ,

B e n d

O r e g o n

9 7 7 0 2

210

246

263

267

270

341

Furniture & Appliances

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Tools

Fuel and Wood

Lost and Found

Horses and Equipment

Paint sprayer - Graco 695, new seals, good unit, $800. KNAACK job-site tool box 48x30, 32" deep $150. Call 541-480-3110

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT dry lodgepole, $160 for 1 cord or $300 for 2. Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484

Found Mountain Bike, Overturf Butte Park, 1/24. Call to identify, 541-233-3648.

Dresser, nice, 2 night stands, French provincial, $65 ea., 541-420-2220.

ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

9mm Taurus compact stainless w/3 mags, ammo, access. $375/trade. 541-647-8931 A

Collector Pays Ca$h, hand guns, rifles, etc., 541-475-4275,503-781-8812

LOVESEAT, blue fabric, great shape, only $50. See on craigslist. 541-419-5060

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call

GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

541-598-4643. The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Two couches: ivory leather, gray upholstered; king bed frame and mattress set; misc. 541-548-2797.

212

Antiques & Collectibles

Mossberg 12g Model #835 pump, camo’d, 28” barrel, 5 + 1, $200. 541-647-8931 Remington 870, with rifle slug barrel, $300. 541-610-3287. Ruger Ranch Rifle Mini-14. Hogue stock. Tasco red/ green dot scope. Sling. 3 mags. 2 boxes ammo. $625. 541-317-0730 Ruger SP101 357 grey SS, $375 S&W 329 lightweight 44, $700 Kimber 45 Classic SS, $525. 541-604-0380 Savage 110 Rifle - 25-06, good shape w/ Bushnell 3 x 9 $350 OBO - (541) 610-8518 Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746 Winchester Model 54, Bolt Action, .270, circa 1920’s, $400, please call 541-317-0116.

Kittens & cats for adoption! Dropleaf table w/china cabinet, 255 Thurs, Sat & Sun 1-4, other Rosewood bedroom set, Computers days by appt. Foster home Friendly Village dishes, vinalso has small kittens, tage clothing/jewelry, more, THE BULLETIN requires com541-815-7278 to visit. Alfor best offer. 541-480-9677 puter advertisers with multered, shots, ID chip, more. tiple ad schedules or those Support your local no-kill, Chihuahua pups (2), Adorable, Furniture selling multiple systems/ all-volunteer rescue group. ready for their forever homes, software, to disclose the 65480 78th St, Bend, $250 1st shots 541-280-1840 name of the business or the 541-389-8420 541-598-5488 Chihuahua Pups, Apple term "dealer" in their ads. visit www.craftcats.org Head, well bred, small, $200 Private party advertisers are Lab Pups A K C , 6 Chocolate, & up. 541-420-4825. defined as those who sell one Visit our HUGE home decor 1 yellow, $650; written guarcomputer. consignment store. New Chihuahuas (2), Long hair, antee hips & eyes. Tidewaitems arrive daily! 930 SE ter Retrievers, 541-266-9894 shots & wormed, $250, 260 Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., 541-977-0034. LAB PUPS AKC, titled parents, Bend • 541-318-1501 Misc. Items FC/AFC, Blackwater Rudy is English Bulldogs AKC, 2 males www.redeuxbend.com grand sire. Deep pedigreed left! Home raised, excellent BUYING AND SELLING performance/titles, OFA hips health, $1300. 541-290-0026 The Bulletin reserves the right All gold jewelry, silver and gold & elbows. 541-771-2330 coins, bars, rounds, wedding to publish all ads from The Female Lab/Pitbull, 10 weeks www.royalflushretrievers.com sets, class rings, sterling silBulletin newspaper onto The old, ready for a good home. ver, coin collect, vintage Labradoodles, Australian Bulletin Internet website. Call 541-848-0110. watches, dental gold. Bill Imports - 541-504-2662 Fleming, 541-382-9419. www.alpen-ridge.com FREE 4-yr-old female orange & white spayed tabby cat, small Maremma Guard Dog pups, Buying Diamonds in size. Moving, must find purebred, great dogs, $300 /Gold for Cash 240 good home. 541-548-2797. each, 541-546-6171. SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS Crafts and Hobbies POODLE Pups, AKC Toy Free companion cats for se541-389-6655 niors! Altered, shots, ID chip, Black/white, chocolate & other more. We'll always take back colors, so loveing, 541-475-3889 Alpaca Yarn, various colors/ BUYING blends/sparkle. 175yds/skein for any reason. Visit Thurs/ Poodle, Toy, Male, 10 mo., Lionel/American Flyer trains, $7.50-8.50 ea. 541-385-4989 Sat/Sun 1-4 PM, other days accessories. 541-408-2191. parti colored, black & white, by appt. 65480 78th St Bend. 242 $300, 541-480-8372. 541-389-8420 541-598-5488 DO YOU HAVE Exercise Equipment Queensland Heelers visit www.craftcats.org SOMETHING TO SELL Standards & mini,$150 & up. FOR $500 OR LESS? Free Lab, black, female, bird 541-280-1537 Pro-From 755 Crosstrainer dog training, great buddy, http://rightwayranch.wordpress.com/ Treadmill, excellent condiNon-commercial active. 541-382-7506 Schnoodle, Male, Rescued, 5 tion. Used maybe 10X. advertisers can German Shorhair Pointers 3 mo., fixed, groomed, $150, Folds up and packs away. place an ad for our male pups, 4 mos old, $400 541-576-2188 541-576-3701 $175 CASH, you pick up. each. 1 Female solid liver, 6 SHIH-POOs 2 adorable males, "Quick Cash Special" Awbrey Butte area. mos, $600. 1 Female liver & 1 week 3 lines Call 541-633-7307. family raised, don’t miss your white, 8 mos, $800. 1 male, 4 $10 bucks chance to own one of the or yrs, $800. All shots/wormed. best! Price Reduced to $200 246 2 weeks $16 bucks! 541-923-8377 541-419-6638 without shots. 541-744-1804 Guns & Hunting Golden Retriever Purebred Shih Tsu Pups, 2 males, 1 Ad must and Fishing Puppies ready on Valentines include price of item black/white, 1 white/brindle, Day. $600. Please call Kristi avail. 2/1, $350,541-280-2538 12 g Charles Daily pump, synat 541-280-3278. www.bendbulletin.com Shih Tzu Puppy - 16 wks thetic stock, 18” barrel, like or Red/Black male, $275 OBO new, $200. 541-647-8931 Call Classifieds at (360) 936-9226 Redmond 541-385-5809 12g Mossberg 500A tactical Shih Tzu pups, gold & white, pistol grip, $350/trade. Kimgold w/ black mask, & black, ber 1911 S/S custom, 45 Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi $385-$750, 541-788-0090 ACP $1125. 541-647-8931 audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Gypsy is a rescued kitten, born Siamese Kittens (4) pure- 12g Mossberg Westernfield bred, M/F, Seal Point, $125 Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, with deformed back legs, but pump, 26” barrel, wood each. 541-318-3396. NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808 plays & gets around okay stock, $200. 541-647-8931 does not know any different. Siberian Husky pups, excepThe legs are now in the way. tional markings & temperaBEND’S HOMELESS NEED OUR HELP We tried to find appropriate ments, $650, 541-330-8627 The cold weather is upon us and sadly there are still over prosthetic legs & a veterior stones-siberians@live.com 2,000 folks in our community without permanent shelter, livnarian who could attach ing in cars, makeshift camps, getting by as best they can. them, but surgery can no Toy/Mini Aussie pups, $450 longer wait. We are seeking a +. High quality. Shots, vet, The following items are badly needed to vet with a big heart who tails, etc. Call 541-475-1166 help them get through the winter: would donate time & experd CAMPING GEAR of any sort: d 210 tise for this surgery or give a Used tents, sleeping bags, tarps, blankets. substantial discount, & spon- Furniture & Appliances sors to help with associated d WARM CLOTHING d costs of surgery. After re- !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty! Rain Gear, Boots covery, Gypsy will need a A-1 Washers & Dryers Please drop off your donations at the special, caring forever home. $125 each. Full Warranty. BEND COMMUNITY CENTER Please contact nonprofit, Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s 1036 NE 5th St., Bend (312-2069) all-volunteer Cat Rescue, dead or alive. 541-280-7355. Adoption & Foster Team, For special pick-ups, 389-8420 or 598-5488 if you Chairs, Dining room, 4 matchcall Ken Boyer 389-3296 or Don Auxier, 383-0448 can help. PO Box 6441, Bend ing, sturdy, black, $32 ea., PLEASE HELP. YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE. 97708, www.craftcats.org. 541-420-2220.

SEARS Craftsman 10” table saw, 3 HP, saw with legs, cast iron table extensions, extra blades, $485 OBO. 541-383-7150.

265

Building Materials Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

266

Heating and Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves. PELLET STOVE: Heats 1200 Sq Ft. Good Condition, Ind.controls. $300. 541 480 4185

267

Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

DRY JUNIPER FIREWOOD $175 per cord, split. Immediate delivery available. Call 541-408-6193

Found set of Toyota keys 1/25, Drake Park; have been taken to Athletic Club of Bend. In Reply to Lost fishing equip. at Cline park on Thurs. 1/20. I saw ad in Sun. paper but the number listed is out of service. My # is 541-706-9361. Please call, will identify.

Dry Seasoned Red Fir $185 per cord, split and deliv- Lost orange tabby, yellow eyes, W. Hills area Jan 11. Anered, Please Call swers to Libby. 541-389-7736 541-977-2040. Lodgepole scraps in Powell Butte, very short, solid, up to 16” & punky. Fill your pickup for $15. 541-420-3906 SPLIT, DRY LODGEPOLE DELIVERY INCLUDED! $175/CORD. Call for half-cord prices! Leave message, 541-923-6987 WILL BUY FIREWOOD By the cord or by the load. Call 541-771-8534 WINTER SPECIAL - Dry Seasoned Lodgepole Pine, guaranteed cords. Split delivered, stacked. Prompt delivery! $175/cord. 541-350-3393

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663 SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

270

Lost and Found CAR KEYS found in Drake Park, near west end of bridge on 1/21. Call 541-382-3322.

Found Australian Shepherd cross? Young fem. Old Hwy 20 East of Bend, W of Horse Ridge Trail. 541-233-8011 Found Children’s Sled, Overturf Butte, 1/23. Call to identify, 541-233-3648

Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers. Thank you.

FOUND: Nikon camera, Cool Pix E4300. Call to identity 541-385-3313.

FOUND Electronic Car Key at Wanoga Snow Park, Sat., 1/22. Call 541-788-4069 FOUND: Fishing Gear, Cline Falls on Thurs, 1/20. Call to identify. 937-917-6264

Consigned Farm Machinery & Equipment Auction 2 Day Sale Saturday & Sunday January 29th & 30th 2011 At: 9:00 AM Sharp

Woodburn Auction Yard 1/2 mile south of Woodburn, Oregon on HWY 99E

Saturday, January 29th Small amounts of miscellaneous tools, approximately 50 tractors, forklifts, & of various sizes. Approximately 70 cars, trucks, pick ups & trailers. Customers purchasing vehicles must have current proof of insurance before the purchase of a vehicle - no exceptions!!! All titled vehicles need to be checked in by 4:00PM on Friday, January 28th, with the titles in the consignors name. Dealers need updated certificates.

Sunday, January 30th Misc. farm equipment Everything sold on an as is basis Loading facilities & hauling available. Some items may have a reserved bid Consignments accepted until 5:00pm on Friday, Jan. 28th NO RECEIVING OR LOADING OUT ON TUESDAYS PLEASE NOTICE: There is a 5% buyers fee added to all purchases. Terms of sale are cash,credit card, debit card (not over $500.00) No credit card checks, or credit union checks. All personal checks will be direct deposited with ID. Note: 9% buyers fee on Visa, Mastercard, Discover, with ID on the day of the sale. All bills must be pd for the day of the sale. Lunch on Grounds • Not Responsible for Accidents No children under the age of 13 please. Children 13 and older are welcome but must be accompanied by a parent at all times. Auctioneers:

Skip Morin, Emery Alderman, Chuck Boyce Sale Conducted by:

Woodburn Auction Yard Inc. Phone: (503) 981-8185 ext. 1 Fax: (503) 982-7640 WOODBURNAUCTION.COM woodburnauction@aol.com

Lost Toolbag, 1/25, 11 am, Reward, NE Bend, Around Empire, Montana, High Desert, Brinson or Boyd Acres, 541-788-0175. LOST WEDDING RING dropped at Cascade Village mall, 3rd & Revere or Butler Mkt & Boyd Acres. Size 6 white gold ring with band hollowed out on inside rim, 1 diamond a bit smaller than a karat flanked by strips of yellow gold. If found call 541-306-1002 REWARD REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

Farm Market

300 325

Hay, Grain and Feed Bluegrass Straw mid-size 3x3, $25/bale; Volume discounts; delivery available. Please call 541-480-8648 for more info. Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

341

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com WANTED: Horse or utility trailers for consignment or purchase. KMR Trailer Sales, 541-389-7857 www.kigers.com

358

Farmers Column 10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1461 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

375

Meat & Animal Processing Angus Beef, 1/2 or whole, grain fed, no hormones $3.10/lb., hanging weight, cut & wrap included, please call 541-383-2523. Butcher Lambs, Suffolk, 6-8 mos., $1.12 per pound, live weight, please call 541-934-2056.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

383

Produce and Food CentralOregonBeef.com 541-923-5076


G2 Thursday, January 27, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Employment

400 421

Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

454

Looking for Employment Caregiver/Housekeeper position wanted, 15 yrs. exp.,exc. skills & refs, 541-977-2450

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825

Account coordinator

Temporary Circulation Account Coordinator

Temporary full-time position open in the Circulation department for a Circulation Account coordinator. Main responsibilities include data entry of new credit card or bank draft information on subscribers accounts. Processes all subscriber Auto Renew payments and maintains accurate spreadsheets for business office. Responsible for tracking and ordering Circulation office supplies. Performs monthly billing steps for several of our newspapers and acts as back up to the Customer Service rep. and billing staff. Assists with data entry of daily draw projections and returns and printing associated reports. Applicants must have excellent interpersonal skills and strong attention to detail. Must be able to work with others in a supportive team setting. Ideal candidate will have computer experience, basic accounting knowledge, proficient in data entry and strong communication and organizational skills. Please submit resumes to: The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 or by e-mail: ahusted@bendbulletin.com

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

282

286

Sales Northwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend

NOTICE Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sale event is over! THANKS! From The Bulletin and your local Utility Companies

www.bendbulletin.com

286

Sales Northeast Bend

ESTATE

SALE

Alice Ann Wirtz, last member of the pioneer Dobbs family. Wonderful antiques include: Oak lawyers bookcase, victorian dresser, kitchen/pie cupboard, commode, childs rocker, hanging oil lamp, mirrors, small furniture pieces, marble top tables, old farm primitive items, beautiful Victorian glassware & china, 3 silver tea sets, flatware set and misc. silver & sterling, wooden trunk, carved sofa, pictures, Louisville stoneware dishes, Wedgwood china set, regular household items, twin beds, jewelry, interesting small collectibles, ladies clothing, lots of misc! Friday ~ Saturday, 9-4 Crowd control numbers Friday 8:00 a.m. Mt View Park, take 27th to Rosemary, then left on Wintergreen to 2429, Please park carefully!

Attic Estates & Appraisals 541-350-6822 for pics & info go to www.atticestatesandappraisals.com

H H FREE H H Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

The Bulletin Classiieds

Garage Sale At Sign Pro, Shop table, desks, bookshelves, chairs, misc. Fri. 1-4, Sat, 8-1, 615 SE Glenwood Dr., Ste. 105.

292

Sales Other Areas DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

476

Employment Opportunities

DRUG AND ALCOHOL COUN- Remember.... SELOR. Part/Full-time. CertiAdd your web address to fied and experienced, for your ad and readers on Bend and Madras, bi-lingual The Bulletin's web site will and Masters Level a plus. be able to click through auSalary DOE. Please fax retomatically to your site. sume to 541-383-4935, or Avon Representamail to Pfeifer & Associates, SALES tives needed. Choose your 23 NW Greenwood Ave., hours, your income. Call Bend, OR 97701. Patty, Independent Sales Representative 541-330-1836 General DO YOU NEED A Need Help? GREAT EMPLOYEE We Can Help! RIGHT NOW? REACH THOUSANDS OF Call The Bulletin before POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! EVERY DAY! 385-5809. Call the Classified Department for more information: VIEW the Classifieds at: 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

HAIRSTYLIST - Shag Salon has part-time hair station for lease. Call 541-617-7007 or 541-815-0819. Logging - Yarder Crew, Choker Setter, Rigging Slinger, Hook Tender. Exp. & refs req. Central OR. positions. 541-409-1337 Medical Office Manager for 3 physicians, busy practice. HR, Billing, AR management. Cascade Internal Medicine, 541-318-0124.

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses -

The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Semiconductor Production Associates

Looking for an exciting new job? Microsemi is looking for some new associates to work in our semiconductor area. We have openings on night shift (11 PM - 7 AM). We are seeking individuals who have had relevant job experience although not necessarily in the semiconductor industry. The job skills sought include microscope inspection, precision measurement, complex process equipment set-up and operation and accurate documentation of work performed. Familiarity with basic electronics, chemicals and cleanroom protocol is a plus. All candidates must have a good work history, good attendance, good hand-eye coordination and a willingness to learn new skills. Must be able to read and understand instructions. Please submit a resume to cfischer@microsemi.com or apply in person to 405 SW Columbia St. Bend, OR. EOE Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

H

Sous Chef

The Ranch is accepting applications for YRFT Sous Chefs. Need dedicated individuals who possess good supervisory and leadership skills and have an extensive knowledge of food preparation including catering and event experience. Duties include food preparation, production and control for all food outlets and banquet facilities. Create and implement new menus. Hire, train, supervise and schedule personnel in food service dept. Implement suggestions for improvement. Assist in estimating annual food budget. Shifts will include weekends and holidays. Benefits include med/dent/life, paid holidays and vacation. Employees of Black Butte Ranch may enjoy use of some of the facilities available to our guests. BBR employees can enjoy use of Ranch amenities. Employee discounts are available for themselves and their immediate family. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE. The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor

Finance & Business

500 507

Real Estate Contracts

528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

access, $95/month, Call Rob, 541-410-4255.

Budget Inn, 1300 S. Hwy 97, Royal 541-389-1448; & Gateway Motel, 475 SE 3rd St., 541-382-5631, Furnished Rooms: 5 days/$150+tax

Room in CRR, $200/mo. incl. utils, rent reduction for housekeeping duties, small trained pet ok, 541-548-6635 Tumalo - Country Setting Granny unit. 2 rooms + bath, partial kitchen, $395/mo. Call 541-389-6720, or cell, 541-550-0216.

631

Condo / Townhomes For Rent Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

632

Apt./Multiplex General

Avail. Now 2-story townhouse 1407 sq. ft., 2 bdrm, 2.5 bath, garage, all appliances, washer/dryer, WSG paid. No pets/smoking. $750 mo + deposits. 541-389-7734.

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments

!! Snowball of a Deal !! $300 off Upstairs Apts. 2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps Lease Options Available Pet Friendly & No App. Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend River Views! 2 bdrm., 1½ bath, W/D hook-up. W/S/G paid, $650/mo. $600 dep. small pets allowed. 930 NW Carlon, 541-280-7188.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

642 The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental Apt./Multiplex Redmond rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin 2 bedroom, 2 bath deluxe enClassified Rep. to get the ergy-efficient duplexes next new rates and get your ad to park. Appliances available. started ASAP! 541-385-5809 single garage. $650-$695 per month. 541-280-7781.

541-330-0719

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Beautiful 2 bdrm., 2.5 bath util., garage, gas fireplace, no smoking or pets. $675 1st+last+sec. Please Call Secure 10x20 Storage, in 541-382-5570,541-420-0579 SE Bend, insulated, 24-hr

Alpine Meadows

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

604

1 & 2 bdrms Available starting at $575. Reserve Now! Limited Availability.

La Pine & Prineville H

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

Storage Rentals

634

Call Today &

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

600

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H

Rentals

Rooms for Rent

Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

&

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

630

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

Independent Contractor

288

Sales Southeast Bend

476

Employment Opportunities

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

476

Employment Opportunities

1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928. 2 Bdrm, lovely unit, private patio, small, quiet complex, W/S/G paid, no smoking, $525+ dep, 1000 NE Butler Mkt. Rd. 541-633-7533

Across from St. Charles 2 Bedroom duplex, garage, huge fenced yard, RV parking, Pets. $725/mo. 541-480-9200.

ASK ABOUT OUR New Year Special! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, non-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

Call about Our Specials! Studios to 3 bedroom units from $415 to $575 • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 Managed by

GSL Properties

Like New Duplex. Nice neighborhood. 2 Bdrm 2 bath, 1-car garage, fenced, central heat & AC. Fully landscaped, $700+dep. 541-545-1825.

Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

648

Houses for Rent General The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend 2 blocks from DT, 4 Bdrm, 1.5 bath, fenced yd. W/D, shed, new paint. Pets OK. Potential office. $1195 1st/last/security deposit. 541-948-4531 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1 level, lots of light, new carpet, kitchen, bath, paint, A/C, dbl. garage, near St. Charles, great neighborhood, $1095, 541-306-4404

4 Bdrm 2.5 bath, 1700 sq ft. appls, fenced yd, on culdesac. No smoking. Pets? 2400 NE Jeni Jo Ct., near hospital. $1050. 503-680-9590 Available 2/1: 21370 Starling. 3 Bdrm, 2 Bath, dbl garage w/opener, fenced yard, auto sprinklers. $900/mo. + security deposit. 541-549-1671 Newer 3 Bdrm, 2 bath home for rent in NE Bend. Fireplace, 2 car garage. No smoking, no pets. $790 per month. Lv msg at 541-441-8254

656

Houses for Rent SW Bend 2 bedroom, 2 bath manufactured home in quiet park, handicap ramp, carport, w/s/g paid., $600/mo. $250 deposit. 541-382-8244. 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, cul-de-sac, dbl. garage, no smoking, avail. 2/15, 19800 SW Wetland Ct., $850, 541-389-3594.


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

3/2 1385 sq. ft., family room, new carpet & paint, nice big yard, dbl. garage w/opener, quiet cul-de-sac. $995 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath+bonus, in Fieldstone Crossing, Redmond. Near schools. Community Pool. Furnished+all appl. avail 3/11. $1000+util. 907-738-1410. 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1031 sq.ft., fenced yard, dbl. garage, $850/mo., $700 dep., pets neg., drive by first at 1526 NE 4th St., call 541-280-6235 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 2-car garage, Terrebonne, newer home, good subdivision, taking appl., $895+dep., call Bill at 541-548-5036, 541-408-2000 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. deep garage, fresh interior paint, new Pergo, carpeted bdrms. Fully fenced w/deck. 1st & dep., $800. 503-997-7870. 4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room with woodstove, new carpet, pad & paint, single garage w/opener. $895/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 Adorable duplex in Canyon Rim Village, 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath. all appl., includes gardener. Reduced to $749/mo. 541-408-0877.

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver

Real Estate For Sale

700 800 705

Real Estate Services

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq. ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1195. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

850

Snowmobiles

Cargo Plus Snowmobile/ ATV Trailer 1996, Single axel w/ spare,rear/side ramps, $650, Dave, 541-593-2247, 8-5.

713

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Real Estate Wanted Cash For West Side Homes: Fast Closings Call Pat Kelley, Kelley Realty 541-382-3099

745

Homes for Sale $99,900. 3 bdrm, 1 bath, 1152 sq. ft. MLS#201010594 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

880

882

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

Polaris Sportsman 2008, 800 CC, AWD,

1998 Winnebago Itasca Sundancer 31 ft. 42,500 miles. Excellent Condition! Price: $25,000 541.325.1971

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

4-wheeler, black in color, custom SS wheels/tires, accessories, exc. cond., 240 miles, $5500, 541-680-8975, leave msg. YAMAHA 1998 230CC motor, 4WD, used as utility vehicle. excellent running condition. $2000 OBO. 541-923-4161 541-788-3896

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

Yamaha Snowmobiles & Trailer, 1997 700 Triple, 1996 600, Tilt Trailer, front off-load, covers for snowmobiles, clean & exc. cond., package price, $3800, 541-420-1772.

870

Boats & Accessories 12’ Navy fiberglass boat, $200 or trade for ??? 541-388-1533 17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

750

A newer 3/2 mfd. home, 1755 Redmond Homes sq.ft., living room, family room, new paint, private .5 Reduced!!! $139,900. Almost acre lot near Sunriver, $895. new 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 2115 sq. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803. ft. home located at end of cul-de-sac. Hickory cabinets, 664 gas fireplace, large master Houses for Rent suite and bonus room upstairs. Fenced yard, storage Furnished building and great mountain views. 2181 NW Kilnwood. RIVERFRONT: walls of winHeather Hockett, PC, Broker dows with amazing 180 de541-420-9151 gree river view with dock, canoe, piano, bikes, covered Century 21 Gold Country Realty BBQ, $1250. 541-593-1414

671

Boats & RV’s

865

ATVs

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $16,900 OBO. 541-944-9753

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

755

Sunriver/La Pine Homes La Pine home on 1 acre. 4 bdrm., 2 bath, like new. All Offers Considered. www.odotproperty.com. 503-986-3638 Steve Eck.

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $19,999 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

756

Jefferson County Homes $119,000. 3 bedroom, 2 bath. MLS#201009021 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft 827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404 The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Warehouse with Offices in Redmond,6400 sq.ft., zoned M2, overhead crane, plenty of parking, 919 SE Lake Rd., $0.40/sq.ft., 541-420-1772.

693

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 Downtown Redmond Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. $650/mo + utils; $650 security deposit. 425 SW Sixth St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848

personals Thank you St. Jude & Sacred Heart of Jesus. j.d.

763

Recreational Homes and Property 10 ACRES pines and meadow, power and phone available. good drilled well, zoned for residence. 3 miles east of town of Sprague River, $34,000. Terms: owner. 541-783-2829.

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes NEW & USED HOMES: Lot Models Delivered & Set Up Start at $29,900, www.JandMHomes.com 541-350-1782 Suntree, 3 bdrm,2 bath, w/car port & shed.$19,900. Suntree, 4 bdrm, 2 bath,w/carport & shed, $25,750, 541-350-1782 www.JAndMHomes.com

Your Credit Is Approved For Bank Foreclosures! www.JAndMHomes.com 541-350-1782

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

865

ATVs

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Houseboat 38x10, triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prineville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns.

KOMFORT 27’ 2000 5th wheel trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide. In excellent condition, has been stored inside. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

Hurricane 2007 35.5’ like new, 3 slides, generator, dark cabinets, Ford V10, 4,650 mi $69,500 OBO. 541-923-3510

Watercraft

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $1995 for all. Bill 541-480-7930. Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $122,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Travel Queen 34’ 1987 65K miles, oak cabinets, exc interior. Great extra bdrm! Reduced to $5000. 541-480-3286

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more. Priced to sell at $59,500! 541-317-9185

885

Canopies and Campers

66 orig. mi., Lots of accessories $4500 541-408-7348. Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Handyman

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 • Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling • Decks • Window/Door Re placement • Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179 Philip L. Chavez Contracting Services Specializing in Tile, Remodels & Home Repair, Flooring & Finish Work. CCB#168910 Phil, 541-279-0846 I DO THAT! Remodeling, Home Repairs, Professional & Honest Work. Commercial & Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 317-9768

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Landscape Management •Pruning Trees And Shrubs •Thinning Over Grown Areas •Removing Unwanted Shrubs •Hauling Debris Piles •Evaluate Seasonal Needs

Autos & Transportation

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

Aircraft, Parts and Service

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874. 388-7605, 410-6945

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

Painting, Wall Covering

Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792. DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2700. 541-322-6261

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

d LARGE OR SMALL, d WE DO IT ALL! 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 d www.bblandscape.com d

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105

Grumman AA-5 Traveler, 1/4 interest, beautiful, clean plane, $9500, 619-822-8036 www.carymathis.blogspot.com

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all

Mercedes-Benz 280c 1975 145k, good body & mechanical, fair interior, can email pics. $2950. 541-548-3628

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, exc. cond., $16,900, 541-390-2504

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

882

Fifth Wheels

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, reduced to $34,000 OBO 541-610-4472; 541-689-1351

MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all original, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256

925

VW Super Beetle 1974

Utility Trailers

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

931

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories Bench seat split-back, out of a ‘92 Ford F-250, gray, $400 OBO. 541-419-5060/pics

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $3850, 541-410-3425.

916

Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu 1971 Factory Stock Rear-end, complete. Excellent cond, $150/OBO. 541-504-9693

932

Antique and Classic Autos C-10

Pickup

1969,

152K mi. on chassis, 4 spd. transmission, 250 6 cyl. engine w/60K, new brakes & master cylinder, $2500. Please call 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800.

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

67K Miles! Vin #B22460

Only $11,250

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 366

Dodge Ram 2001, short bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

Ford 2 Door 1949, 99% Complete, $14,000, please call 541-408-7348 for more information.

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

Smolich Auto Mall

541-385-5809

Special Offer

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer

Ford CrewCab 7.3 Diesel Flatbed 2001 4x4, Vin #C48713

Only $9,999

Nissan Titan CrewCab 4X4 2008 45K Miles! Vin #321377

Now Only $24,495 HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

NISSAN

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, auto, reduced to $14,500 obo 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

MARTIN JAMES

d SNOW REMOVAL! d

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

Ford Ranger Super Cab 4x4 2003

541-749-4025 • DLR

881

European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist

Snow Removal

Special Offer Dodge 1500 XLT 4x4, 2007 w/ new hydraulic snow plow $6K new; 9,980 miles, many options, $19,900. 541-815-5000

908

541-388-2993

Home Improvement

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160 hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

900

Oregon License #186147 LLC

Domestic Services

Drywall

Snow Removal Reliable 24 Hour Service • Driveways • Walkways • Parking Lots • Roof Tops • De-Icing Have plow & shovel crew awaiting your call!

Same Day Response

JUNK BE GONE

Complete Drywall Services Remodels & Repairs No Job Too Small. Free Exact Quotes. 541-408-6169 CAB# 177336

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

541-390-1466

Debris Removal

I Do Professional House cleaning: 25 yrs. exp., exc refs., Senior discounts! 541-420-0366

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Smolich Auto Mall

Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $10,000,541-280-5677

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP,

Barns

933

Pickups

extended overhead cab, stereo, FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door self-contained,outdoor shower, panels w/flowers & humTV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non mingbirds, white soft top & smoker, $8900 541-815-1523. hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

Forest River Sierra 1998, 26’, exc. cond, $6900, call 541-548-5886.

Polaris 500 2004

rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

933

Pickups

Dodge Dakota 1989, 4x4, 5spd trans, 189K, new tires, Chevy Wagon 1957, straight body, 8' long bed. 4-dr., complete, $15,000 $1500 OBO. 541-815-9758 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

Travel Trailers

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Kwik Slide 5th whl hitch bought to fit Tundra 6½’ box. mat incl. $700 obo. 541-416-1810

TERRY 27’ 1995 5th wheel with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great rig in great cond. $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

875

Motorcycle Trailer Kendon stand-up motorcycle trailer, torsion bar suspension, easy load and unload, used seldom and only locally. $1700 OBO. Call 541-306-3010.

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $5800. 541-330-0852.

New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3750 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

Check out OCANs online at classifieds.oregon.com!

658

Houses for Rent Redmond

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, January 27, 2011 G3

Oregon Classified Advertising Network

Smolich Auto Mall Ford F-350 Crew 4x4 2002. Triton V-10, 118k, new tires, wheels, brakes. Very nice. Just $14,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

Special Offer

BMW X5 AWD 2003 VIN #P34718

Now Only $10,988

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Ford Ranger 2004 Super Cab, XLT, 4X4, V6, 5-spd, A/C bed liner, tow pkg, 120K Like New! KBB Retail: $10,000 OBO 360-990-3223

541-322-7253

YOUR AD WILL RECEIVE CLOSE TO 2,000,000 EXPOSURES FOR ONLY $250! Oregon Classified Advertising Network is a service of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association.

Week of January 24, 2011

Employment

Real Estate

DRIVERS- COMPANY drivers up to 40k first year. New team pay! Up to .48cents/ mile CDL training available. Regional locations. (877) 369-7104. www. centraldrivingjobs.net.

Miscellaneous

5 BEDROOM/3 BATH mfg homes. Starting at $44,900. Possible Owner Financing. Too Many Upgrades Too List. Great Family or Foster Care. Includes SetUp. Call Today. 541-928-1471 jandmhomes.com.

SAWMILLS- BAND/ chainsaw. Cut lumber and dimensions, anytime. Build anything from furniture to homes. In stock ready to ship. From $4090.00 www. NorwoodSawmills.com/300N. 1-800-661-7747.

OWN 20 ACRES. Only $129/ mo. $13,900. Near growing El Paso, Texas (America’s safest city). Low down, no credit checks, owner financing. Free Map/ pictures. 800-343-9444.


G4 Thursday, January 27, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

935

935

975

975

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Special Offer

Special Offer

Special Offer Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

Chevy HHR LT 2006 VIN #644129

Now Only $9,999

Nissan Armada AWD 2004 88K Miles! Vin #705275

Now Only $18,250

Chrysler PT Cruiser Touring Pkg 2009 40K Miles! Vin #567013

Now Only $9,590

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

MERCEDES C300 2008

smolichmotors.com

NISSAN

NISSAN

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

smolichmotors.com

smolichmotors.com

541-389-1178 • DLR

541-389-1178 • DLR

366

366

Chrysler 2005 Pacifica AWD, leather, video system, 3.5 liter V6, loaded, 21,500 mi., $13,950. 541-382-3666

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

Special Offer

The Bulletin Classifieds

Smolich Auto Mall

Special Offer

New body style, 30,000 miles, heated seats, luxury sedan, CD, full factory warranty. $23,950.

Like buying a new car! 503-351-3976.

Mercedes S 430 - 4Matic, 2003, All wheel drive, silver, loaded & pampered. Exc in snow! $14,800. 541-390-3596

Special Offer

Nissan Xterra 4X4 2004

Dodge Durango AWD 2008

55K Miles! Vin #631269

Now Only $16,595 Dodge Charger 2010

48K Miles. VIN #124502

Now Only $17,988

700 Miles, LIKE NEW! VIN #153773

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

Now Only $17,988

366

Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $27k. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366 Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

S m o li c h Auto Mall Special Offer

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

940

Vans

Dodge Journey 2009

36K Miles. VIN #195855

Price Reduced Now Only $13,989

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

FORD EXPLORER 1992

READY FOR SNOW! All Wheel Drive! 5 spd, loaded with all power equipment, sound system. All weather tires. Runs and drives good, Only $1800. 909-570-7067.

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer

VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr brks, plus mntd stud snows. $8500 obo. 541-330-0616

975

Automobiles

Ford Explorer 4X4 2010

Like NEW but cost effective! 13K Miles! Vin #A28369

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, V6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $3500. 541-548-5302 Honda Accord EX V6 2001 62k auto leather seats studs 6 cd sunroof roof rack optional Runs great!$8500 OBO 541-420-0049

Nissan Sentra SE-R Spec V 2007

Very COOL! 25K Miles! Vin #715185

Now Only $14,777

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

PORSCHE CARRERA 4S 2003 - Wide body, 6

speed, all wheel drive, no adverse history, new tires. Seal gray with light gray leather interior. $32,950. 503-351-3976

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

Only $23,988 Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Jeep CJ5 1974, 304 cu. in., 3 spd manual, Warn electric. winch, tow bar, dual mount gas cans, game rack on rear. Very clean. $4,000. 541-419-7884 Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Jeep CJ7 1986 6-cyl, 4x4, 5-spd., exc. cond., consider trade, $7950, please call 541-593-4437.

Smolich Auto Mall

Audi A4 Avant Quattro 2003 3.0L., 92K mi, garaged, serviced, silver, fully loaded, $8900. 541-420-9478

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227 BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

BMW M3 COUPE E36 1998, mint condition, adult owned, low miles, needs nothing, $12,500. 541-419-2181

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 53K miles, automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $11,680. Please call 541-419-4018.

Subaru Outback 2005 AWD, 4cyl, auto, lthr htd seats, 89K mi, reduced to $12,995 OBO 541-508-0214; 541-554-5212

SUBARUS!!!

541-385-5809 Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer

Honda CR-V 2003 Vin #049531

Only $8,999

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Special Offer HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

Jeep Compass Limited AWD 2007 36K Miles! Vin #396196

Only $15,988

Buick LeSabre 2004, custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $6000; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $2900. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 1998, like new, low mi., just in time for the snow, great cond., $7000, 541-536-6223.

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $14,500. 541-408-2111

366

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you.

Chrysler 2005 Pacifica

Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

AWD, leather, video sys, 3.5 liter V6, loaded, 21,500 mi, $13,950. 541-382-3666

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

Toyota Tercel 1997 exc. cond, one owner, 136,300 miles, $3800, Please Call 541-815-3281.

VOLKSWAGEN BUG 1965 Black , Excellent condition. Runs good. $6995. 541-416-0541. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE AMENDED TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7428924377 T.S- No.: OR-220493-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, DAVID W. SWENSON AND JENNIFER A. SWENSON, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS SOLELY NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 5/25/2006, recorded 5/31/2006, in official records of Deschutes county, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No., fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-37620 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 200636 LOT TWELVE (12), IN GLACIER RIDGE, PHASE ill, RECORDED JUNE 6, 2000 IN CABINET E-444, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 3333 NORTHEAST PALMER DRIVE BEND, Oregon 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statues: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $204,837.51; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 5/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,397.23 Monthly Late Charge $57.80 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The Notice of Default and original Notice of Sale given pursuant thereto stated that the property would be sold on 1/5/2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, at Front entrance of the Courthouse. 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend. Oregon, however, subsequent to the recorded of said Notice of default the original sale proceedings were stayed by order of the Court or by proceedings under the National Bankruptcy Act or for other lawful reason, The beneficiary did not participate in obtaining such stay. Said stay was terminated on 1/3/2011.Whereof, notice hereby is given that, LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC the undersigned trustee will on 3/4/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187,110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon , County of Deschutes, Slate of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statues has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 1/13/2011 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 3 First American Way Santa Ana, CA 92707 (714) 730-2727 Signature By Marina Marin Assistant Secretary ASAP# 3883486 01/20/2011, 01/27/2011, 02/03/2011, 02/10/2011 LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES In the Matter of the Estate of Henry Gray Turner, Jr., Deceased. Case No. 10PB0151MS NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned Personal Representative’s attorney at Widmer Mensing Law Group, LLP. 339 SW Century Drive, Suite 101, Bend, Oregon 97701, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may

be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the Court, the Personal Representative, or the lawyers for the Personal Representative, Widmer Mensing Law Group, LLP. Dated and first published on January 20, 2011. Jeffrey S. Patterson, Attorney for Personal Representative Personal Representative: Jones B. Turner 2207 E. 56th Ave. #4 Anchorage, AK 99507 (360) 989-4165 Attorney for Personal Representative: Jeffrey S. Patterson, OSB #024193 339 SW Century Drive, Suite 101 Bend, Oregon 97702 Ph.: (541) 318-3330 Fax: (541) 323-1030 e-mail: jeff@bendlawgroup.com LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS RANDALL L. BAGGETT has been appointed personal representative of the Estate of CLARA C. VOLK, Deceased, by the Circuit Court, State of Oregon, Deschutes County, Probate No. 10 PB 0148BH. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them with proper vouchers attached, to the personal representative c/o Richard E. Forcum, Attorney at Law, 141 NW Greenwood Ave. Ste. 101, Bend, OR 97701, within four months from the date of first publication of this notice as stated below, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by this proceeding may obtain additional information from the court records, the personal representative, or the attorney for the personal representative. DATED and first published: January 13, 2011. RICHARD E. FORCUM, OSB #640340 Attorney for Personal Representative 141 NW Greenwood Ave. Ste. 101 Bend, OR 97701 Tel: 541-389-6964 Fax: 541-389-6969 E-mail: info@forcumlaw.com LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx5929 T.S. No.: 1270697-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by John J. Yackley, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Summit Mortgage Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated February 11, 2009, recorded February 17, 2009, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2009-06571 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot twenty-eight of Mason Estates First Addition, Phase II, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 3210 NE Hampton Lane Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due December 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,116.49 Monthly Late Charge $43.92. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $164,343.69 together with interest thereon at 4.875% per annum from November 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on May 05, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days

before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: December 28, 2010. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-362372 01/27, 02/03, 02/10, 02/17 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx7003 T.S. No.: 1311321-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Lloyd J. Mcgriff and Peggy M. Mcgriff, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. As Nominee For Loancity, A California Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated February 15, 2007, recorded February 26, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-11363 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 158, Elkhorn Estates Phases 11, 12 and 13, Deschutes County, Oregon Commonly known as: 61342 Rock Bluff Lane Bend Or 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due June 1, 2010 of interest only and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,646.32 Monthly Late Charge $66.94. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $252,000.00 together with interest thereon at 6.375% per annum from May 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on April 29, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: December 21, 2010. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-361528 01/20, 01/27, 02/03, 02/10 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0210063962 T.S. No : 10-10852-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, DAVID S. COX as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on September 25, 2008, as Instrument No. 2008-39353 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: APN: 171136 AC 03000 LOT FOUR HUNDRED FIFTY-NINE {459), NORTHWEST CROSSING, PHASES 9 AND 10, RECORDED NOVEMBER 29, 2005, IN CABINET G, PAGE 937, DESCHUTES COUNTY. OREGON. Commonly known as: 2463 N.W. HIGH LAKES LOOP, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said

Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3} of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; defaulted amounts total: $29,190.72 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $444,329.05 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.12500% per annum from May 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on May 19, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due {other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714Â508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 12, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3882011 01/20/2011, 01/27/2011, 02/03/2011, 02/10/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0030832033 T.SNo.: 11-00032-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, THOMAS E. GREEN as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MERS AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, as Beneficiary, recorded on December 16, 2005, as Instrument No, 2005-86662 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit; APN: 191461 LOT TWELVE (12), VOLCANO SUBDIVISION, RECORDED SEPTEMBER 13, 1996, IN CABINET D, PAGE 262, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2817 SW 26TH COURT, REDMOND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; defaulted amounts total: $5,469.13 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $186,695.30 together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.00000% per annum from August 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon: and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY; the undersigned trustee will on May 19, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable

charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714-508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730-2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 12, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature State of California County of Orange I, the undersigned, certify that I am the Trustee Sale Officer and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original Trustee's Notice of Sale. Juan Enriques, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3882034 01/20/2011, 01/27/2011, 02/03/2011, 02/10/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx5307 T.S. No.: 1311287-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Robert Hopper and Debra F. Hopper, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Western Title and Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. As Nominee For Greater Northwest Mortgage, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated March 09, 2007, recorded March 15, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-15539 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Unit 12, Greyhawk Condominiums, Deschutes County, Oregon, described in and subject to that certain declaration of condominium ownership for Greyhawk Condominiums recorded February 1, 2007 in volume 2007, page 06945, Deschutes County Official Records, together with the limited and general common elements set forth therein appertaining to said unit Commonly known as: 1445 Northwest Juniper Street #12 Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due September 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $515.69 Monthly Late Charge $25.78. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $75,544.72 together with interest thereon at 6.875% per annum from August 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on April 27, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the


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feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: December 23, 2010. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-361527 01/20, 01/27, 02/03, 02/10 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxx7385 T.S. No.: 1310755-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Deanna Sison, and Andrew Olsen, as Grantor to Northwest Trustee Services, as Trustee, in favor of Union Federal Bank of Indianapolis, as Beneficiary, dated June 13, 2005, recorded June 17, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-38086 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: The north 42 feet of lot 8, block 12, Townsite of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon Commonly known as: 238 SW 10th Street Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due September 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $664.08 Monthly Late Charge $28.38. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $92,014.62 together with interest thereon at 5.500% per annum from August 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on April 21, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not

then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: December 14, 2010. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-360643 01/13/11, 01/20, 01/27, 02/03 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8954 T.S. No.: 1310419-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Rollo H. Millette and Patricia M. Millette, As Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. As Nominee For Netmore America, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated September 17, 2008, recorded September 24, 2008, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2008-39056 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 41, Village Wiestoria, Phase II, Deschutes County, Oregon Commonly known as: 1011 NE Wiest Way Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2009 of interest only and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,318.58 Monthly Late Charge $102.08. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $350,000.00 together with interest thereon at 7.000% per annum from October 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on April 21, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of

said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: December 14, 2010. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-360639 01/13/11, 01/20, 01/27, 02/03 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 1000329670 T.S. No.: 10-10908-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, FRANK CONTINO AND MICHAEL STEINER as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW, as trustee, in favor of SILVER FALLS BANK, as Beneficiary, recorded on February 22, 2005, as Instrument No. 2005-09960 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: "The terms and conditions of said deed of trust were modified by Loan Modification Agreement recorded 9/13/2006 as Instrument No. 2006-62244; and also modified by Loan Modification Agreement recorded 7/28/2007 as Instrument No. 2010-29238 and are subject to all of the terms and conditions contained herein. APN: 242360 LOT ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-TWO (162), ESTATES AT PRONGHORN, PHASE 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 23063 CANYON VIEW LOOP, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3} of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; defaulted amounts total:$229,777.67 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $1,575,145.64 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.25000% per annum from August 14, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on April 22, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L518238 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000019581/SMITH Investor No: 4005828669 AP #1: 142172 Title #: 100649560 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by DONALD A. SMITH as Grantor, to TICOR TITLE as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated March 3, 2008, Recorded March 6, 2008 as Instr. No. 2008-10157 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 2, BLOCK 3, RIO LAND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 4 PYMTS FROM 07/01/10 TO 10/01/10 @ 834.51 $3,338.04 TOTAL LATE CHARGES $125.19 RECOVERABLE BALANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $12.00 $12.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$3,475.23 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 15659 SHERRIE WAY, LAPINE, OR 97739 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $138,876.48, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 06/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on March 8, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 10/29/10 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 925792 PUB: 01/20/11, 01/27/11, 02/03/11, 02/10/11

the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: December 28, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3867847 01/06/2011, 01/13/2011, 01/20/2011, 01/27/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0199521402 T.S. No.: 10-12451-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, BRAD FRANK REID as Grantor to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on October 13, 2005, as Instrument No. 2005-69721 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: APN: 107310 LOTS THIRTEEN (13) AND FOURTEEN (14) IN BLOCK JJ, OF DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 60489 UMATILLA CIRCLE, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; defaulted amounts total:$7,120.89 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $155,981.52 together with interest thereon at the rate of

5.00000% per annum from July 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on May 20, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714Â508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 12, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3882693 01/20/2011, 01/27/2011, 02/03/2011, 02/10/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0999458003 T.S. No.: 10-11066-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JOHN A. CARROL AND LESLIE J. CARROL, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL OREGON, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on July 23, 2007, as Instrument No. 2007-40488 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: APN: 121023 THE LAND REFERRED TO HEREIN BELOW IS SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES, STATE OF OREGON, AND IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: Lot Six (6), Block Three (3) of TIMBER RIDGE, Deschutes County, Oregon. EXCEPTING THEREFROM; Beginning at the Southwest corner of said Lot 6; thence South 88º00'00" East, 10.00 feet; thence North 14º42'21 East,

129.07 feet to the Northwest corner of said lot; thence South 18º57'18" West, 131.63 feet to the point of beginning. ALSO EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion of said Lot 6, Block 3 which is South 88º00'00" East, 10.00 feet from the Southwest corner of said Lot 6; thence North 14º42'21" East, 64.55 feet; thence South 01º16'00 West, 62.97 feet to the South line of said Lot 6; thence North 88º00'00 West, 15.00 feet to the point of beginning. TOGETHER WITH those portions of Lots Five (5) and Six (6), Block Three (3), TIMBER RIDGE, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: Beginning at the Northeast corner of said Lot 5; thence North 86º49'13" West, 15.00 feet along the North line of said Lot 5; thence South 01º16'08 West, 63.25 feet; thence North 14º42'21 East, 64.52 feet to the point of beginning. Commonly known as: 20448 BULLBLOCK ROAD, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; defaulted amounts total:$29,513.65 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $252,486.09 together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.00000% per annum from May 23, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on May 13, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714Â508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE ATwww.lpsasap.com

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: F517909 OR Unit Code: F Loan No: 0060366507/BEND ASSET AP #1: 103673 Title #: 4644906 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by BEND ASSET MANAGEMENT LLC as Grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY as Trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. as Beneficiary. Dated November 8, 2005, Recorded November 8, 2005 as Instr. No. 2005-77006 in Book --Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: THE SOUTHERLY 51 FEET OF LOTS 17, 18, 19, AND 20, BLOCK 4, KENWOOD, DESCHUTES COUNTY OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 5 PYMTS FROM 06/01/10 TO 10/01/10 @ 1,903.09 $9,515.45 5 L/C FROM 06/01/10 TO 10/01/10 @ 68.04 $340.20 MISCELLANEOUS FEES $30.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$9,885.65 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 1455 NORTHWEST 8TH STREET, BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $284,000.00, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 05/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on February 22, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 10/15/10 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 923861 PUB: 01/06/11, 01/13/11, 01/20/11, 01/27/11

AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 6, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3877021 01/13/2011, 01/20/2011, 01/27/2011, 02/03/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEES NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0061257002 T.S. No.: 10-11898-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, CANDICE BURNS, A SINGLE PERSON as Grantor to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INS CO., as trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK NA, as Beneficiary, recorded on December 23, 2005, as Instrument No. 2005-88220 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: APN: 241008 LOT EIGHTEEN (18), FORREST COMMONS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1315 NW 18TH STREET, REDMOND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86735(3) of Oregon Re-

vised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; defaulted amounts total:$5,687.82 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $163,200.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.62500% per annum from May 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on April 25, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice

is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: December 28, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3867430 01/06/2011, 01/13/2011, 01/20/2011, 01/27/2011

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-10-389468-NH Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JOEL D. JENSEN, AS HIS SEPARATE PROPERTY as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FRONTIER INVESTMENT CO. DBA. RAINLAND MORTGAGE COMPANY A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 06/23/2006, recorded 06/28/2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. XXX at page No. XXX, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-44434 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: LOT SIXTEEN (16) BLOCK TWO (2) BOONES BOROUGH NO. 2 DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as 64517 Joe Neil R.D Bend, OR 97701 APN 166990. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Installment of principal and interest plus impounds and/or advances which became due on 03/01/2010 plus amounts that are due or may become due for the following: late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustees fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising form or associated with beneficiaries effort to protect and preserve its security must be cured as a condition of reinstatement. Monthly Payment $1,292.74 Monthly Late Charge $64.64 By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: $411.759.85, with interest thereon at the rate of 2.0000 percent per annum beginning 2/01/2010; plus late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 02/25/2011 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187,110, Oregon Revised Statutes, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. Bond Street Bend, OR County of DESCHUTES, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or login to: www.fidelityasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligations, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include the respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitle only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 2/25/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this properly at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until alter the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out dale, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six- month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you al least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this properly as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading 'TRUSTEE.' You must mail or deliver your proof not later than January 26, 2011 (30 days before the dale first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you lo move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to slay. Under slate law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifics in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon Stale Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Date: 10/19/2010 By: LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee 3320 El Camino Real Irivne, CA 92602 Signature By: Angelica Castillo, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp, of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder's rights against the real property only. This office is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# 3783893 01/13/2011, 01/20/2011, 01/27/2011, 02/03/2011


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How would you describe the Central Oregon lifestyle? Are we professionals, artists, athletes, homemakers ... some of each? How do we view ourselves, our family life, health or professional and personal relationships? What inspires us? There’s simply no right answer. Central Oregonians are as diverse as they

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are inspiring. This environment allows us to create and experience a lifestyle that is as unique as our individual personalities. U Magazine was created to celebrate this lifestyle. From health, style, and professional success to personal goals and relationships, U Magazine will provide readers with stories and information that educate, empower, and inspire.

Sales deadline: Monday, January 31 Publishes: Saturday, February 19

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THE BULLETIN ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT

Thursday, January 27, 2011

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT INTRODUCTORY OFFERS AND

MAKE YOUR APPOINTMENT TODAY!

S P A

(541) 306 - 3445

Introductory 1-hour customized

Massage Session

$

39

Massage therapy benefits:

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Call for an appt. (541) 306 - 3445

Valentine’s Day Special Add to your Session for only $10* - First-time guests & members

*Indicates additional charges to massage therapy session. Prices subject to change. Rates and services may vary by location. Additional local taxes and fees may apply. ©2010 Massage Envy Franchising, LLC

Targeted Tension Relief with Deep Heat Relief Muscle Therapy

Couples Massage Session

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Massage therapy benefits:

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Choose 1 of 3 targeted areas: Back & Neck / Legs & Feet / Arms & Hands Add to your next session for only $12* *Indicates additional charges to massage therapy session. Prices subject to change. Rates and services may vary by location. Additional local taxes and fees may apply. ©2010 Massage Envy Franchising, LLC

S PA

63455 N Highway 97, #11 Bend, OR 97701-6764 (541) 306 - 3445 ™

www.massageenvy.com

In BEND!

In Cascade Village Shopping Center, between Sportclips and Feingold Home. Professional, Convenient and Affordable Massage herapy and spa treatments are available in Bend. Massage Envy now has clinics open in 42 states and has awarded 814 clinics nationwide.

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(541) 306 - 3445


Introductory

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I n tr oduc t or y 1- h ou r H e alth y

Skin Facial Session Call for an appt. (541) 306 - 3445

$

Murad®: The new face of Massage Envy Spa

49

$

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Massage therapy relaxes muscles, easing and soothing your aches and pains. It rejuvenates - restoring balance to our body and being, making us better for all the things life throws our way. Massage Envy believes every body deserves a great customized massage, so we’ve made relaxation convenient. We offer flexible appointment times to fit the busiest of schedules, hundreds of locations nationwide and professional Massage herapists to customize the perfect massage designed to fit your life. Oh, and did we mention the great price? It’s what’s made us the leading provider of massage therapy in the U.S. And with so many options, a great massage is always within your reach.

Massage Envy Spa’s new Murad Healthy Skin facials feature specially formulated products from world-renowned Murad, Inc. Founder and CEO Dr. Howard Murad has devoted his life to making beautiful, healthy skincare products. Founded in 1989, the Murad skincare line is based on science-driven he Cellular Water Principle®, which concludes that our cells lose the ability to retain water as we age. Murad products are designed to repair cell membranes while attracting water and nutrients to the cells. his unmatched Murad approach makes Massage Envy Spa’s Murad Healthy Skin facials the most effective way to achieve balanced, more youthful-looking skin.

Benefits of facials * Moisturizes skin * Increases entire body’s circulation * Reverses visible signs of aging * Improves skin tone and texture * Alleviates redness and sensitivity * Reduces fine lines and wrinkles * Reduces blemishes and breakouts

Introductory 1½-hour Hot Stone

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$

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1 -hour m a ssag e 1-h ou r f acia l

Melt Away the Day

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Other Massage Envy Spa services:

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* Swedish Massage * Deep-tissue Massage * Sports Massage * Pre-natal Massage * Reflexology * Murad Healthy Skin Facials

Hot Stone herapy melts away tension, eases muscle stiffness, and increases circulation and metabolism. Each 90 minute Hot Stone session features the placement of smooth, water-heated stones at key points on the body to allow for deeper relaxation of the muscles. Our professional massage therapists then incorporate a customized massage, with the use of hot stones, to create a healing and relaxing experience.

FREE

1 Hour Massage Session** With purchase of 1 Year Membership • Covers your first one-hour massage session each month • Or for $10 more, a Murad Signature facial session • Save nearly 25% off our regular massage rates • Family add-on discounts • Guest privileges • Retail discounts • Membership accepted nationwide • Earn free massages with referrals

$

49

Monthly Membership

Bulletin Daily Paper 01/27/11  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Thursday January 27, 2011