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A driving record turned lethal Madras woman’s relatively minor yet numerous offenses ...

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / The Associated Press

“Sustaining the American dream has never been about standing pat,” President Barack Obama said Tuesday night. “It has required each generation to sacrifice, and struggle, and meet the demands of a new age. Now it’s our turn.”

‘Our generation’s Sputnik moment’ By Anne E. Kornblut and Scott Wilson The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama sought to rouse the nation from complacency in his State of the Union address Tuesday, urging innovation and budget reforms that he said are vital to keep the United States a leader in an increasingly competitive world. “Sustaining the American dream has never been about standing pat,” Obama said. “It has required each generation to sacrifice, and struggle, and meet the demands of a new age. Now it’s our turn.” Obama repeatedly declared the imperative to “win the future,” comparing the current need for innovation to the space race against the Soviet Union in the 1950s and ’60s. Calling for more dedication to research and technology as he raised the specter of a rapidly growing China and India, Obama declared: “This is our generation’s Sputnik moment.” Coming less than three months after his party’s defeat in the midterm elections, Obama struck notes of optimism and conciliation in a speech that spanned 62 minutes and was interrupted at least 75 times for applause. The president spoke to a House chamber where traditionally segregated Republicans and Democrats mingled. See Union / A4

Inside • Analysis: A challenges to the nation — and the opposition, Page A4

Oregon’s delegates respond By Keith Chu The Bulletin

WASHINGTON — Oregon’s U.S. lawmakers gave good reviews to President Barack Obama’s calls to make the U.S. more competitive and streamline the tax code, but some members were more critical of his plans to trim the federal budget, they said Tuesday night. Generally, Oregon’s delegation split along party lines, with Democratic Sens. Jeff Merkley and Ron Wyden praising the president’s priorities, while Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River, said Obama didn’t go far enough to stop the federal budget from leaking red ink. Walden said a five-year spending freeze was a good start, but still fell short of the spending cuts that Republicans have offered. See Oregon / A4

• July 19, 2007: Andrea Orozco is cited for violation of basic rule in Jefferson County. • Feb. 8, 2008: Charges on violation of basic rule are dropped after she completes a diversion program including traffic safety school. • Feb. 11, 2008: Three days after charges are dropped, she is cited for violation of basic rule in a safety corridor in Clackamas County. She is convicted of the charge. • April 15, 2009: Cited for failure to drive within lane in Jefferson County. She is convicted of the charge and her license is suspended. • Aug. 24, 2009: Cited for violation of basic rule, failure to use a seat belt and driving while license is suspended in Jefferson County. She is convicted on all charges. • Sept. 11, 2009: Cited for violation of the speed limit and failure to use a seat belt in Jefferson County. She is convicted on all charges. • May 28, 2010: Cited for violation of basic rule and driving while license is suspended in Crook County. She is convicted on all charges. • Oct. 2, 2010: Cited for driving while license is suspended and failure to carry proof of financial responsibility. She is convicted on all charges.

... culminate in tragedy • Nov. 21, 2010: With her license still suspended, Orozco allegedly runs a stop sign in Culver and hits a vehicle carrying nine people. All are injured, and one, Leonard Ross, is killed. (Orozco’s overturned Ford Explorer is pictured.) The Jefferson County DA says she faces no charges at this time but has not yet received any information from OSP. Courtesy Oregon State Police Source: Oregon Judicial Information Network

By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

T

he Jefferson County District Attorney’s Office say it doesn’t expect to file criminal charges against 28-year-old Andrea Orozco, who allegedly caused the fatal crash on the night of Nov. 21, despite her extensive history of traffic violations. According to the Oregon Judicial Information Network, Orozco has been cited by police on eight occasions over the course of four years in Jefferson, Crook and Clackamas counties for offenses including speeding, failing to drive within her lane and failure to use a seat belt. She has been cited for driving with a suspended license four times.

TOP NEWS INSIDE OSCARS: “The King’s Speech” tops the list with 12 nominations, Page A3 ECONOMIC CRISIS: U.S. financial meltdown could have been avoided, federal panel concludes, Page A3

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Her most recent conviction comes from driving with a suspended license and failing to carry proof of insurance on Oct. 2, 2010, just under two months before she allegedly caused the fatal crash. According to a news release from Nov. 21, Orozco was driving a Ford Expedition with eight passengers, six of whom were children ranging in age from 14 to 2, when she ran a stop sign and collided with a Toyota four-door near Culver. The Toyota was driven by Linda Ross, 61, of Metolius, with Leonard Franklin Ross, 71, in the passenger seat. Leonard Ross died from his injuries at St. Charles Redmond later that

night. Police said three of the passengers were thrown from the Ford in the collision and everyone in the crash was hospitalized. Leonard Ross was the only one to die of his injuries. Police also said they do not believe Orozco was intoxicated at the time of the crash. Oregon State Police have yet to charge Orozco with a crime or a violation from the November crash and no updates have been released from police regarding the investigation. Phone messages left for the Oregon State Police information officer were unreturned as of Tuesday night. See Crash / A4

In Britain’s House of Lords, a bill becomes a test of stamina

Corrections

By Sarah Lyall

In a story headlined “Hear ye! The Bard is coming to Bend,” which appeared Tuesday, Jan. 25, on Page A1, the dates of Shakespeare in the Park were incorrect. The event is Aug. 26 and 27. A map of Columbia Park that appeared Tuesday, Jan. 25, on Page A1 incorrectly labeled the Gilchrist footbridge. The Bulletin regrets the errors.

LONDON — It was nearly midnight on Day 12 of the most grueling debate in recent House of Lords memory, and not all the Lords present were, strictly speaking, awake. But the Right Honorable Lord Davies of Oldham was warming to the question of the hour: a proposal to change “may” to “should” on Page 10, Line 7 of the Parliamentary Voting System

New York Times News Service

and Constituencies Bill. “If you have a criterion that says that you ‘may’ do something, that is not a positive criterion,” observed Lord Davies, a Labour peer who once worked as a schoolteacher. “It is the absence of a negative criterion. The phrase ‘may take into account’ means that, if you are minded to do so, if you really want to do so, we do not prevent you from doing so.” Give him points for enthusiasm,

at least. With the coalition government and the Labour opposition both refusing to compromise on a measure that has severely divided them, the debate had already ground on for 98 hours across several weeks. The peers are not the youngest group of people ever to populate a legislature, and after several all-nighters, some Lords were reaching the outer limits of coherence, patience and stamina. See Lords / A5

“These are old men and women who are pretty irritated at being here when normally they’d be tucked up in bed.” — Lord Hart, a Labour Party peer


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New York Times News Service ile photo

Electrical contacts are printed on silicon wafers for making solar panels at Hunan Sunzone Optoelectronics in Changsha, China. Investment in clean energy in China rose 30 percent last year, to $51.1 billion — the largest figure for a single country, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance.

China picking up steam as a clean-energy force By James Kanter New York Times News Service

For years, China was seen as a major obstacle to global efforts to combat climate change because of its refusal to reduce emissions under the Kyoto Protocol. Now, for some, the concern is not that China is moving too slowly but that it is rushing ahead so fast that clean-energy companies in the West will be left in the dust.

New optimism Demands on China for verifiable monitoring of emissions have been a long-running source of tension in climate negotiations. They helped to sour the mood at the United Nations climate meeting in Copenhagen a year ago, which broke up in acrimony after poorer countries balked at accepting limits on their emissions. Heading into 2011, however, there were some surprising signs of renewed movement in efforts to control greenhouse gas emissions. A U.N. climate meeting in December in Mexico pleased many environmentalists by putting global talks back on track. And this month, Bloomberg New Energy Finance, a research group, reported that investors had injected a record $243 billion into cleaner sources of energy in 2010. With the gloomy atmosphere dissipating, organizers at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, said this week they expected business leaders were ready to pay attention again to climate issues. The meeting in Mexico showed an “enhanced spirit of cooperation” on cutting emissions, said Deutsche Bank Group vice chairman Caio Koch-Weser, who leads sustainability initiatives for the forum. The clean-energy sector “has never been more dynamic than it is today,” he said.

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’A huge challenge’ But along with such optimism, there is also mounting anxiety about which countries — and companies — will benefit from the clean-energy boom. As financially struggling governments in Europe and the U.S. trim support for clean-energy development, emerging countries, led by China, have been pouring state resources into the sector. China represents “a huge challenge” for established cleanenergy businesses, said Connie Hedegaard, the European Union’s commissioner for climate action. “We can never subsidize it as much as they would do in China.” She said China was preparing a five-year plan that would be the clearest indication yet of its determination to become a cleanenergy powerhouse. European nations would need to “pool our efforts better” to remain competitive, said Hedegaard. Investment in clean energy in China rose 30 percent last year, to $51.1 billion — by far the largest figure for a single country — and represented more than 20 percent of the total global investment of $243 billion, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance. At the same time, the issue of

Citing concerns about jobs, GOP targets Clean Air Act McClatchy-Tribune News Service

As listed by The Associated Press

— Jonathan Lash, president, World Resources Institute

clean-energy subsidies in China is at the heart of an investigation the Obama administration started in December. The administration is looking at bringing a case against China, including accusations about manufacturing subsidies for wind turbines, before the World Trade Organization. And the European Commission has raised concerns with China about access to rare earth minerals and other elements used in clean-energy industries, including electric car manufacturing.

Opportunities Not everyone sees China’s drive to dominate the clean-energy sector as worrisome. “China is moving so far into the lead” on a number of clean-energy technologies “that we don’t have to worry as much about whether they’ll really keep their commitments because they have a commercial drive to do it,” said Jonathan Lash, president of the World Resources Institute, an environmental research group in Washington. The surge of investment in climate-related industries, as well as growing concerns about extreme weather, should deliver significant business opportunities in 2011, and not just in China. Vincent Mages, a director for climate change initiatives at Lafarge, the giant cement company based in France, said flooding in Australia and Pakistan and a summer heat wave in Russia should be good for businesses like his. But, he added, Europe and the U.S. could do more to support domestic industries by adopting tougher rules for new buildings and retrofittings now, rather than setting goals that are decades away for cutting emissions or adopting renewable power. “China talks about programs and policies rather than focusing on targets,” Mages said. “We focus on targets too much.”

Q. A.

What are some of the hypotheses floating out there to explain CCD? There are three approaches. Some people have seriously considered climate change, others have focused on an accumulation of pesticides. The third approach was, maybe we’ve got a new disease we haven’t identified before. We fell into that category. Does the virus or the parasite hit the bees first? We don’t know which is first yet. What we think is unique is the parasite and the virus hitting the bees at the same time. That’s causing the collapse. You emphasize that this study did not prove that these two infections are to blame.

Q. A.

WASHINGTON — Now that the House of Representatives has voted to repeal the health care law, Republicans say they’re likely to move soon to another target — a rewrite of the Clean Air Act so that it can’t be used to fight climate change. The Environmental Protection Agency in December said it would draw up performance standards that would help cut heat-trapping gases produced by refineries and coal-fired power plants. The EPA hasn’t proposed the specifics yet, and existing plants wouldn’t be affected until the later years of the decade, but opponents of regulation aren’t waiting. The new chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee said he’d have hearings about the impact of the EPA’s emission reduction plan

on jobs. “Standing up for American workers and addressing EPA’s rampant regulations is a top priority, Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., said last week. “We will be active and aggressive, using every tool in the toolbox to protect American jobs and our economy by rolling back the job-destroying (greenhouse gas) regulations.” Like the health care repeal, though, it’s largely a symbolic effort since the Senate retains its Democratic majority and President Barack Obama wields his veto pen. The American climate debate has been focused on economic interests — whether actions to reduce fossil fuel use would create or eliminate jobs. Meanwhile, an increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, driven mainly by fossil fuel use, poses a rising risk of climate disruptions around the globe.

The first research was just finding a pattern. We collected bees in different colony collapse events and sent them off for analysis, and these two popped up 100 percent of the time. But that’s not proof, that’s just association. What’s your next step?

Q. A.

Our next step is to isolate them and purify (the virus and the parasite) so we can infect a colony on our own, experimentally, and watch that colony die. That’s what proves it. Why does it matter if honeybees die? When this hits a honeybee operation, it can take out 60 to 70 percent of bee colonies in the operation. It just drives the commercial beekeepers under. Besides financial losses, it reduces the number of bee colonies available for pollination services nationwide. Since we rely on bees to pollinate about one-third of our food base, the loss would reduce availability of those foods and increase prices. How did you get interested in honeybees? I had this broad background in animal behavior, but it was all small mammals: squirrels and mice and hares. Jerry Bromenshenk, here at the university, had been doing a lot of honeybee research, and we started working together in ’99 or 2000. I’ve developed a new appreciation for honeybees. They’re really a complex and interesting animal. You see a lot of problemsolving and really fun behavioral ecology in honeybees that I probably didn’t ever appreciate when I was a student. It’s neat stuff. How many times have you been stung? In a good year, like this year, I’ve only been stung half a dozen times. But there are seasons where we’re moving bee colonies around at night and doing experiments where I’m stung 40 or 50 times in a season. You get the initial burn when the venom goes in, but after 10 minutes, I don’t notice anymore. Do your research bee colonies produce honey? They do. I have used it in good old peanut butter and honey sandwiches or to make sauces and salad dressings. It makes a mean vinaigrette.

Q. A.

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Q.

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“China is moving so far into the lead (on clean energy) that we don’t have to worry as much about whether they’ll really keep their commitments because they have a commercial drive to do it.”

Ecologist Colin Henderson co-authored a study that may have identified the cause of the honeybee illness that has plagued U.S. bees since 2006. Henderson, 59, is an associate professor of biology at the University of Montana. He and colleagues there found a correlation between colony collapse disorder (CCD) and a lethal combination of a parasite and a virus. The study, on which Army scientists at the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center near Baltimore also collaborated, has been called groundbreaking (though also controversial because one of the study’s lead authors previously received funding from a maker of pesticides that some blame for CCD). The honeybee die-off strikes about 20 to 40 percent of commercial beekeepers in a good year, Henderson says, and up to 60 percent in a bad one. When it hits a beekeeping operation, it can take out up to 70 percent of its colonies. How many bees have died since 2006? Some estimates suggest the total is in the billions. And it’s not just U.S. honeybees that are affected: CCD has shown up in parts of Europe and elsewhere. According to a study released this month, U.S. bumblebees — which also are important pollinators — are facing a sharp decline, too. Henderson talked about his research and career in a recent interview:

A.

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, January 26, 2011 A3

TS  Oscar nominees The Oscar race turned into a wild scramble Tuesday as “The King’s Speech” moved out front with 12 nods when nominations for the 83rd Academy Awards were announced. “True Grit” surged into second position, and “The Social Network,” which had seemed a frontrunner, was matched by “Inception.” Among the major nominations: Best Motion Picture • “127 Hours” • “Black Swan” • “The Fighter” • “Inception” • “The Kid’s Are All Right” • “The King’s Speech” • “The Social Network” • “Toy Story 3” • “True Grit” • “Winter’s Bone” Best Actor • Javier Bardem, “Biutiful” • Jeff Bridges, “True Grit” • Jesse Eisenberg, “The Social Network” • Colin Firth, “The King’s Speech” • James Franco, “127 Hours” Best Actress • Annette Bening, “The Kids Are All Right” • Nicole Kidman, “Rabbit Hole” • Jennifer Lawrence, “Winter’s Bone” • Natalie Portman, “Black Swan” • Michelle Williams, “Blue Valentine” Best Director • Darren Aronofsky, “Black Swan” • David Fincher, “The Social Network” • Tom Hooper, “The King’s Speech” • David O. Russell, “The Fighter” • Joel and Ethan Coen, “True Grit” See a complete list of the nominations at oscars.org

Razzie nominees Vampires, werewolves and airbenders lead the pack at the Razzies, an Academy Awards spoof that hands out prizes for the year’s worst films. The blockbuster supernatural tale “The Twilight Saga: Eclipse” and the action fantasy “The Last Airbender” tied for the most nominations Monday with nine each, including worst picture. Here are the major nominations: Worst Picture • “The Bounty Hunter” • “The Last Airbender” • “Sex and the City 2” • “Twilight Saga: Eclipse” • “Vampires Suck” Worst Actor • Jack Black “Gulliver’s Travels” • Gerard Butler “The Bounty Hunter” • Ashton Kutcher “Killers” and “Valentine’s Day” • Taylor Lautner “Twilight Saga: Eclipse” and “Valentine’s Day” • Robert Pattinson “Remember Me” and “Twilight Saga: Eclipse” Worst Actress • Jennifer Aniston “The Bounty Hunter” and “The Switch” • Mylie Cyrus “The Last Song” • Sarah Jessica Parker, Kim Cattrall, Kristin Davis and Cynthia Nixon “Sex & the City 2” • Megan Fox “Jonah Hex” • Kristen Stewart “Twilight Saga: Eclipse” See updates and a complete list of the nominations at www.razzies.com Sources: AP, Oscars.org, www.razzies.com

The Bulletin

Financial crisis ‘avoidable,’ federal inquiry concludes Two administrations, the Fed and other regulators blamed By Sewell Chan New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The 2008 financial crisis was an “avoidable” disaster caused by widespread failures in government regulation, corporate mismanagement and heedless risk-taking by Wall Street, according to the conclusions of a federal inquiry. The government commission that investigated the financial crisis casts a wide net of blame, faulting two administrations, the Federal Reserve and other regulators for permitting a calamitous concoction: shoddy mortgage lending, the excessive packaging

and sale of loans to investors, and risky bets on securities backed by the loans. “The greatest tragedy would be to accept the refrain that no one could have seen this coming and thus nothing could have been done,” the panel wrote in the report’s conclusions. While the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission accuses several financial institutions of greed, ineptitude or both, some of its gravest conclusions concern government failings, with embarrassing implications for both political parties. But the panel was itself divided along partisan

lines. Of the 10 commission members, only the six appointed by Democrats endorsed the final report. Three Republican members have prepared a dissent focusing on a narrower set of causes; a fourth, Peter Wallison, has written a dissent calling government policies to promote homeownership the primary culprit. The panel was hobbled repeatedly by internal divisions and staff turnover. The majority report finds fault with two Fed chairmen: Alan Greenspan, a skeptic of regulation who led the central bank as the housing bubble expanded,

and his successor, Ben Bernanke, who did not foresee the crisis but then played a crucial role in the response. It also criticizes the Bush administration’s “inconsistent response” to the crisis — allowing Lehman Brothers to go bankrupt in September 2008, for example, after earlier bailing out Bear Stearns — saying it “added to the uncertainty and panic in the financial markets.” Democrats also come under fire. The 2000 decision to shield over-the-counter derivatives from regulation, made during the last year of President Bill Clinton’s term, is called “a key turning point in the march toward the financial crisis.”

Attention turns to the dangers of distracted joggers, pedestrians Lawmakers consider restrictions on devices like iPods and cell phones

A woman jogs across Fifth Avenue into Central Park while adjusting her headphones in New York City on Thursday. Legislation in multiple states aims to restrict joggers and bicyclists from using headphones, since they may distract pedestrians and cyclists and put them in danger from oncoming traffic.

By Susan Saulny and Matt Richtel New York Times News Service

Many joggers don earbuds and listen to music to distract themselves from the rigors of running. But might the Black Eyed Peas or Rihanna distract them so much that they jog into traffic? That is the theory of several lawmakers pushing the latest generation of legislation dealing with how devices like iPods and cell phones affect traffic safety. The ubiquity of interactive devices has propelled the science of distraction — and now efforts to legislate against it — out of the car and into the exercise routine. In New York, a bill is pending in the legislature’s transportation committee that would ban the use of mobile phones, iPods or other electronic devices while crossing streets — runners and other exercisers included. Legislation pending in Oregon would restrict bicyclists from using mobile phones and music players, and a Virginia bill would keep such riders from using a “hand-held communication device.” In California, State Sen. Joe Simitian, who led a successful fight to ban motorists from sending text messages and using hand-held phones, has reintroduced a bill that failed last year to fine bicyclists $20 for similar multitasking. “The big thing has been distracted driving, but now it’s moving into other ways technology

Richard Perry New York Times News Service

can distract you, into everyday things,” said Anne Teigen, a policy specialist for the National Conference of State Legislatures, which tracks legislative developments.

Dangerous devices? Exercising in Central Park in Manhattan on Tuesday, Marie Wickham, 56, said she understood what all the fuss was about: “They’re zigging, they’re zagging, they don’t know what’s around them. It can definitely be dangerous.” But Wickham added that she would be opposed to any ban of such devices. “I think it’s an infringement on personal rights,” she said.

Embassy bomber gets life sentence By Benjamin Weiser New York Times News Service

NEW YORK — Ahmed Khalfan Ghailani, the first former detainee at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to be tried in the civilian court system, was sentenced to life in prison Tuesday for his role in the 1998 bombings of two U.S. embassies in East Africa. The nearly simultaneous attacks in Nairobi, Kenya, and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, killed 224 people and wounded thousands. The defense had asked the judge for a lesser sentence, citing the extraordinary circumstances of Ghailani’s case, like the years he spent in detention in a so-called black site run by the CIA, where his lawyers say he was tortured. But the judge, Lewis Kaplan of U.S. District Court in Manhattan, said that no matter how Ghailani was treated while in

detention, “the impact on him pales in comparison to the suffering and the horror that he and his confederates caused. “It was a cold-blooded killing and maiming of innocent people on an enormous scale,” Kaplan said. “The very purpose of the crime was to create terror by causing death and destruction.” Kaplan made clear that Ghailani’s treatment while in detention, or statements made before he was brought into the civilian system, were not factors in his deciding on a sentence. In the end, Ghailani received the same maximum sentence that he would have faced had he been convicted of all counts. And it seems likely he will be sent to the so-called Supermax federal prison in Florence, Colo., where other defendants convicted in the same plot are being held.

“At some point, we need to take responsibility for our own stupidity.” Pedestrian fatalities increased slightly for the first time in four years in the first six months of 2010, according to a report released last week by the Governors Highway Safety Association, an organization based in Washington that represents state highway safety agencies. Among the states, Arizona and Florida had the largest increases in pedestrian fatalities, followed by North Carolina, Oregon and Oklahoma. Nationally, pedestrian traffic fatalities had dropped to 4,091 in 2009 from 4,892 in 2005, the report stated. “One of the reasons we think the trend may be turning nega-

tively is because of distracted pedestrians,” said Jonathan Adkins, spokesman for the safety group. The New York bill was proposed by State Sen. Carl Kruger, a Brooklyn Democrat who said he has grown alarmed by the amount of distraction he sees on the streets in his neighborhood and across New York City. Since September, Kruger wrote in the bill, three pedestrians have been killed and one was critically injured while crossing streets and listening to music through headphones. “We’re taught from knee-high to look in both directions, wait, listen and then cross,” he said. “You can perform none of those functions if you are engaged in some kind of wired activity.”

CHICAGO

High court orders Emanuel’s name back on ballot By Monica Davey and John Schwartz New York Times News Service

CHICAGO — The Illinois Supreme Court puffed life back into Rahm Emanuel’s mayoral campaign Tuesday when it restored his name to the city’s ballots, at least for now, and agreed to decide whether he should be allowed to run for mayor. The decisions arrived at a dizzying pace, only a day after a panel of the Illinois Appellate Court had ordered Ema nuel’s name stricken from the ballot, saying his time in Washington as White House chief of staff meant he Rahm failed to Emanuel meet a requirement of residing in Chicago for a year before the Feb. 22 election. The Supreme Court’s orders were seen as a positive sign for Emanuel (the court could have chosen to skip the case altogether), but the justices still have to consider the merits of the case itself. The Supreme Court will study briefs already submitted to the lower court, rather than wait for new ones, and will entertain no oral arguments. It is uncertain how quickly a decision will emerge, but deadlines are looming; early voting, for instance, begins Monday. City elections officials, too, found themselves trapped in the tangle of the legal fight. With absentee ballots due to be mailed out as early as Friday, officials had begun printing ballots — without Emanuel’s name, per the appellate court’s Monday ruling — at 7 a.m. Tuesday. By noon, with 300,000 ballots done, the Supreme Court said no ballots should be printed without Emanuel’s name. “We absolutely called the printers and said, ‘stop the presses,’” Jim Allen, a spokesman for Chicago’s Board of Election Commissioners, recounted not long after. And by 2 p.m., election officials started all over, this time printing ballots with all the names.

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A4 Wednesday, January 26, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Obama challenges the nation — and the opposition

President Barack Obama shakes hands with House pages after delivering the State of the Union address on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday.

By Dan Balz Charles Dharapak The Associated Press

Union Continued from A1 He acknowledged the unusual seating arrangement at the outset of his speech. But, Obama said: “What comes of this moment will be determined not by whether we can sit together tonight, but whether we can work together tomorrow.” Facing steep budget deficits, Obama did not call for massive new programs, instead proposing a five-year freeze in most discretionary spending and tens of billions of dollars in defense cuts. Those and other budgetary proposals were intended to give the president the upper hand in a debate over spending and the broader role of government that is likely to define the legislative year ahead and the presidential election to come.

The Washington Post

The GOP’s response The crosscurrents inside the Republican Party were on fresh display Tuesday evening with the unusual sight of two lawmakers delivering responses to the State of the Union address. In the party’s official reply, Rep. Paul D. Ryan of Wisconsin, chairman of the House Budget Committee, said the country faced “a crushing burden of debt.” He vowed that Republicans, after assuming control of the House this year, would honor their pledge to provide Americans “a better choice and a different vision.” “Americans are skeptical of both political parties, and that skepticism is justified — especially when it comes to spending,” Ryan said, striking a conciliatory tone as he vowed to work with the president to

find cuts. “So hold all of us accountable.” But Ryan did not have the last word. Rep. Michele Bachmann of Minnesota, who founded the Tea Party Caucus last year, gave a response of her own in a message to the Tea Party Express, one of the movement’s largest groups of activists. “For two years,” Bachmann said, “President Obama made promises, just like the ones we heard him make this evening, yet still we have high unemployment, devalued housing prices and the cost of gasoline is skyrocketing.” She stood in front of a chart, which she used to illustrate how federal spending has increased in the Obama administration. — New York Times News Service

Economic angle But Obama also used the primetime stage to combine a number of policy proposals into a blueprint for confronting growing threats to U.S. economic dominance. While he has emphasized innovation in his travels to battery factories and solar panel plants over the past year, he has never done so as explicitly as he did Tuesday before a national audience and after a year when the unemployment rate remained stuck above 9 percent. He sought to sway his audience with rhetoric rather than specifics. He declared the country “poised for progress” with the stock mar-

kets and corporate profits on the rebound. Acknowledging the agony of workers who have seen jobs sent overseas, he admitted the “rules have changed” — and must be reckoned with through innovation and education. “Half a century ago, when the Soviets beat us into space with the launch of a satellite called Sputnik, we had no idea how we’d beat them to the moon. The science wasn’t even there yet. NASA didn’t exist,” he said. “But after investing in better research and education, we didn’t just surpass the Soviets; we unleashed a wave

of innovation that created new industries and millions of new jobs.” Obama’s proposals — some of them left over from last year’s address — included increasing math and science teacher training and investing more in developing clean-energy technology. Behind his words loomed the rising economies of Asia that present both promising new markets for American exports and sharper competition to U.S. industry in areas where the economy is likely to grow most in the coming decades.

Oregon

“I really appreciated the bipartisan tone of coming together to build a stronger America,” Merkley said. “Also his specific goal of educating 100,000 teachers in science and technology, I think, is a tremendous way to push ourselves to go forward.” Sen. Ron Wyden praised Obama’s attention to two of Wyden’s top priorities: reforming the U.S. tax code and increasing U.S. exports. Wyden said the president outlined a vision of tax reform — reducing the number of tax deductions and cutting overall rates — that closely tracks with a bill Wyden introduced last year. “I thought the president gave a very large boost to the cause for tax reform tonight, by laying out the case for taking away tax breaks for companies that are doing business overseas and using those dollars to cut rates for those doing business in the U.S.” Wyden said. “He hit a note that will resonate at every dining room table in the country.” Other Oregon Democrats, Reps. Earl Blumenauer, of Portland, and Peter DeFazio, of Springfield, said the speech hit on several key issues, although Blumenauer rated it higher than DeFazio. DeFazio said Obama failed to provide details about how he plans to rebuild the nation’s infrastructure. “It was good on vision, very, very short on a concrete plan to deliver in those areas,” DeFazio said. “I’ve been hearing for two years this administration’s support for transportation infrastruc-

ture, but no specifics.” Blumenauer, who said he liked the speech overall, said the president’s budget will be the real signal about where he stands on investing in U.S. infrastructure. “It might be a bit of a stretch to fund it,” Blumenauer said. “The budget will tell us a lot more.” While the speech was the main event, the sideshow was the scramble by members to find “dates” from the opposite party as a sign of renewed bipartisanship and collegiality, following the shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., in Tuscon earlier this month, Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa., revealed in a tweet on Sunday that he would be escorting Wyden to the State of the Union. “My date for State of Union is Sen Wyden. My partner in fight agst secret holds. He invited,” (sic) wrote Grassley, a prolific Twitter poster. Walden ended up sitting next to Merkley on the right side of the chamber, although he kept the identity of his potential bipartisan friend under wraps until Tuesday night. Asked on Tuesday afternoon if Walden would be sitting with a Democrat, spokesman Andrew Whelan replied in an e-mail that Walden was “playing it by ear.” “He’s had many asks,” Whelan wrote.

Continued from A1 “We look forward to working with him where we can on growing private sector jobs and reducing the deficit, I don’t think a five-year freeze gets you there though,” Walden said. “It locks in the enormous ramp-up in domestic spending that’s occurred prior to this time.” Asked what he liked in the speech, Walden spotlighted Obama’s focus on reforming the education and tax systems. “Clearly the more we can do to educate our kids and make our country more productive the better,” Walden said. “I’m glad to see the recognition that came about relative to the uncompetitive nature of our tax code.” Merkley made it clear ahead of the speech that he hoped Obama would prominently feature solutions to the housing crisis Tuesday night, only to see the topic go unmentioned. Merkley sent Obama a letter last week and traveled Oregon promoting his own plan to help distressed homeowners. Following the speech, Merkley said he was disappointed Obama didn’t focus on housing issues. “I think when there are 300,000 foreclosure filings a month, it’s a huge factor for families, it’s a huge factor for the economy,” Merkley said. “I would like him to have highlighted that tonight.” Overall, however, Merkley gave the speech a good grade.

Crash Continued from A1 Jefferson County District Attorney Steven Leriche said if charges are eventually filed, he does not believe there will be any criminal charges. “From what we know about the case we don’t think it’s a violation of criminal law,” Leriche said. “We don’t think it’s criminal negligence or manslaughter. There are several violations of traffic laws here, but as of this very moment they appear to only be violations.” Leriche said it appears to him that Orozco ran the stop sign by accident and that is not a criminal offense.

Leriche also said while Orozco may have an extensive record of driving offenses, she has not committed any criminal offenses in the past. “Her suspended license is a violation, not a crime,” Leriche said. “There are three levels of suspension in Oregon. There is a violation, a misdemeanor and felony. Her level is violation.” “Our job is to see if a law has been broken,” he said. “If it’s not a violation of the law, we have an obligation not to prosecute even if that is an unpopular decision. The deceased in this case, I believe, was a beloved member of the community. The driver (of the Ford Expedition), well, you know she has a driving record. This would be very open and

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shut if she had intoxicants in her system or she was speed racing, but she wasn’t.” Leriche said it is possible things could change as the Oregon State Police investigation continues. “To say she’s going to get off scot-free is premature at this point,” he said. Leriche said his office will not take action until the investigation is completed and charges are sent to him from investigators. Attempts to reach the family of Ross were unsuccessful as of Tuesday night. Messages left for Orozco were also not returned. Erik Hidle can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at ehidle@bendbulletin.com.

Other issues Obama did not call for new gun legislation, as some expected he might in the wake of the deadly shootings in Tucson. Instead he referred to the massacre, which left six dead and Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., severely wounded, as an incident that gave the nation pause because it “reminded us that no matter who we are or where we come from, each of us is a part of something greater — something more consequential than party or political preference.” As Obama mentioned Giffords, cameras panned to an empty chair where she would have sat. Obama touched glancingly on immigration, saying it is time to allow students in the country illegally to remain. “Let’s stop expelling talented, responsible young people who can be staffing our research labs, starting new businesses, who could be further enriching this nation,” he said. He vigorously defended his health care overhaul. While he said he would accept minor corrections, he drew a line against big changes favored by Republicans, saying “what I’m not willing to do is go back to the days when insurance companies could deny someone coverage because of a preexisting condition.” And, referring to the passage of the repeal of “don’t ask, don’t tell” — the military’s ban on openly gay service members — Obama called on universities to allow military recruiters on campuses. “It is time to leave behind the divisive battles of the past,” he said.

WASHINGTON — President Obama and his party may have suffered a historic defeat in November’s midterm elections, but in his State of the Union address on Tuesday night, Obama was anything but on the defensive. His speech was most notable not for the nods he made to the changed political balance or the issues that cost the Democrats their majority in the House and that shaved their majority in the Senate — although he did do that. More striking was his effort to frame the coming debates over spending and the role of government in ways that are designed to put Republicans on the defense as the fights begin. Although this was a speech long on policy and big ideas, it was a political argument as well. Obama’s address, a call for the nation to win the future, was an effort to move the debates that framed the election to a different place. It was a defense of the active use of government to prepare the country for the long-term challenge of global competitiveness, but without calls for a national health-care plan or an enormous economic stimulus package that so inflamed the political environment over the past two years. Obama said that dealing with the deficit is crucial to ensuring the country’s competitive might. But he warned that the goal of cutting spending alone should not eclipse the assurance that the U.S. economy remains the strongest in the world. Much has changed since Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

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A N A LY S I S the November elections, and the president took advantage of those changes. His success in the lame-duck session of Congress helped restore some of his political balance and boost his standing. His well-received speech at a memorial service in Tucson after the shootings there put him in an even stronger position. After two years of hard partisan debate, Obama argued that the voters’ decision to produce divided government means there can be progress only through cooperation and compromise. “We will move forward together, or not at all,” he said. The president’s words will not head off a difficult discussions, particularly about government spending and health care. Republicans are not buying his calls for new investment, which they consider government spending by another name. But it was clearly his goal Tuesday to try to put the onus on Republicans to defend the spending cuts they are pledging to pursue. On health care, Obama devoted only two paragraphs. He said he is open to improvements but vowed to resist any GOP efforts to undo the benefits included in the new law. In another challenge for the parties to work together, he said, “So instead of re-fighting the battles of the last two years, let’s fix what needs fixing and move forward.”

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, January 26, 2011 A5 Delivery date

Shuttle

2011: Space shuttle’s last odyssey By the late 1960s, plans were under way at NASA to build a reusable space shuttle capable of carrying astronauts and cargo to and from a permanently manned space station. How the shuttle developed: Current configuration

Design concepts

Enterprise September 1976 Originally named Constitution; used for landing tests but not flown in space

March 1979

Columbia

First shuttle to fly into Earth orbit, 1981; lost Feb. 1, 2003, during re-entry

July 1982

Challenger Mid 1971

Nov. 1972

May 1972

1976

Named after 1870s British ship HMS Challenger; exploded shortly after launch Jan. 28, 1986

Discovery

Nov. 1983

Carried Hubble Space Telescope into orbit in 1990; has flown the most shuttle missions

April 1985

Atlantis USA

Deployed Arthur Holley Compton Gamma Ray Observatory in 1991

May 1991

Endeavour • Manned, reusable booster and orbiter

• Reusable orbiter, two reusable solid-fuel boosters, expendable fuel tank Columbia

Shuttle launches, by year

Challenger replacement; scheduled to make the last shuttle flight in April 2011

Challenger

Discovery

Atlantis

Endeavour

135th shuttle mission

Lords Continued from A1 “These are old men and women who are pretty irritated at being here when normally they’d be tucked up in bed,” said a Labour peer, Lord Hart. Fury is more like it. The situation has provoked so much resentment here that Lordly decorum has all but flown out of the chamber’s Pugin-designed stained glass windows. Things are so bad that when the government tried to buoy its members one night by offering a program of midnight entertainment that included talks by the “Gosford Park” writer Julian Fellowes and the former Olympian Sebastian Coe, members of the Labour Party were strictly uninvited. “It’s never been like this before, with such a palpable sense of anger,” said Baroness d’Souza, convener of the cross-bench peers, who have no party affiliation. “I believe that if this isn’t resolved quickly, what we’re seeing is the beginning of the unraveling of the House of Lords.”

Delaying tactics ’81 ’82 ’83 ’84 ’85 ’86 ’87 ’88 ’89 ’90 ’91 ’92 ’93 ’94 ’95 ’96 ’97 ’98 ’99 Source: NASA

’00 ’01 ’02 ’03 ’04 ’05 ’06 ’07 ’08 ’09 ’10 ’11

Graphic: Lee Hulteng

© 2011 MCT

Challenger disaster still haunts NASA 25 years later Deadly explosion in ’86 shook Americans’ faith in space program By Mark K. Matthews The Orlando Sentinel

WASHINGTON — Two days before the space shuttle Challenger made its final flight, Carl McNair spoke to his brother Ron McNair on the telephone. It was mostly small talk: Super Bowl XX being played that day, William “Refrigerator” Perry, the weather. “He said, ‘The weather is not looking good and things are icing up and I don’t think we are going to launch,’” recalled Carl McNair, who had come to Florida to watch his brother and six crew members launch into orbit. So he headed home to Atlanta with his wife and father, expecting to return in a week to see his brother’s second spaceflight. Instead, on a cold Tuesday morning 25 years ago, he turned on the television and “there it was, taking off. I couldn’t believe it.” Surprise turned to horror just over a minute later. “As it got higher and higher, the solid rocket booster started to veer off, and I didn’t know how I knew. But I knew they were gone,” McNair said. “I stood there with tears streaming down my eyes, saying ‘Oh my God, oh my God’ — what so many people were saying in unison around the world.”

A scar on the national psyche That moment on Jan. 28, 1986, replayed again and again by news networks, left a scar on the national psyche that haunts the country, and NASA, to this day. The loss of seven astronauts — including New Hampshire teacher Christa McAuliffe —

traumatized a nation that was fiercely proud of a program that had sent men to the moon. It also shattered the illusion that NASA was infallible — or at least close to it — as a subsequent investigation proved that the disaster could have been prevented. A select commission led by former Secretary of State William Rogers concluded that the cause of the accident was a faulty O-ring in one of two solidfuel rocket boosters. A breach in the O-ring allowed hot gases to escape and burn a hole in the shuttle’s 15-story external fuel tank, causing it to explode. But there was more. The frigid weather — it was 36 degrees at the time of the launch — caused the O-ring to shrink and give hot gases a pathway to escape. Worse, NASA managers had known about, and dismissed, partial failures of Orings in previous launches and also ignored prelaunch warnings about the rings’ vulnerability in cold weather.

The Columbia tragedy But it would take 17 years and the loss of another shuttle before NASA finally got the message. A report after the 2003 Columbia disaster noted that — Challenger notwithstanding — NASA had failed to change a culture that often rewarded ambition over safety. Columbia was doomed when a briefcase-sized chunk of insulating foam peeled off the shuttle’s fuel tank during launch and punched a hole in the heat-resistant tiles on the leading edge of the orbiter’s left wing. Columbia was cleared to return to Earth on the morning of

Feb. 1. When searing gases generated by re-entry entered the orbiter through the hole in the wing, Columbia disintegrated over Texas, killing the seven crew members. Foam had been falling off the fuel tank for years, gouging chunks out of the orbiters’ heatresistant tiles and, once before, allowing re-entry heat to almost burn a hole in a shuttle’s belly. But NASA engineers, lacking a solution that would keep the foam in place, elected to ignore the issue. “By the eve of the Columbia accident, institutional practices that were in effect at the time of the Challenger accident — such as inadequate concern over deviations from expected performance, a silent safety program, and schedule pressure — had returned to NASA,” investigators wrote.

’They felt they had truly fixed things’ Diane Vaughan, a Columbia University professor who researched the agency’s culture after both Challenger and Columbia, said the loss of Columbia was especially painful to employees who had lived through Challenger. “They had felt they had truly fixed things,” she said. Vaughan said that post-Columbia NASA has a far different approach to safety. “Look at the recent attempts

to launch Discovery and how long they’ve stood down for that,” she said. “It doesn’t mean they (NASA engineers) are doing poorly. It means they identified a flaw and are taking safety seriously.” Discovery’s next flight, now set for Feb. 24, has been delayed since early November by cracks in five support rods in the center of the external fuel tank. Engineers have worked carefully to figure out the cause, even pulling the shuttle back from the launchpad to the Vehicle Assembly Building for X-rays and other tests. Outside NASA, the Challenger disaster has morphed into one of those shared traumas — like the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks or President John Kennedy’s assassination — that serve as touchstones across generations.

Taking risks President Ronald Reagan tried to act as a surrogate father to the nation’s students in an address on the night of Jan. 28, 1986. “I want to say something to the schoolchildren of America who were watching the live coverage of the shuttle’s takeoff. I know it’s hard to understand, but sometimes painful things like this happen,” Reagan said. “It’s all part of the process of exploration and discovery. It’s all part of taking a chance and expanding man’s horizon.”

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Los Angeles Times LOS ANGELES — There’s a new forecast of the cost to treat heart disease in the U.S. over the next 20 years — and it isn’t pretty. According to a study in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association, the annual cost to treat heart disease — including high blood pressure, coronary heart disease, heart failure, stroke and other conditions — will triple by 2030, from $273 billion to $818 billion (in 2008 dollars). U.S. medical expenditures are already the highest in the world, hitting 15 percent of gross domestic product in 2008, the authors reported. To generate the forecast, researchers took current disease rates and applied them to population estimates suggested by census data. They assumed no major changes in treatment.

— Baroness d’Souza, convener of the cross-bench peers

tional change in this ramshackle way, without experts, without scrutiny, without study, then this is what you get,” Lord Hart said.

A House divided The debates have been marked by breathtaking insults and accusations on both sides, with much debate focusing on the issue of whether or not the Labour members are in fact conducting a filibuster or merely robustly scrutinizing the bill. “He must think that we are a bunch of idiots if he thinks that those of us who have been watching what has been happening are not aware that there has been a filibuster,” said Lord Lester of Herne Hill, a Liberal Democrat, speaking of Lord Falconer, a Labour peer. “In the 16 years that I have been here, I have never seen conduct like this.” On Monday night, the deputy leader of the house, Lord McNally, a Liberal Democrat, grew so annoyed by repeated niggling questions from Labour that he began ostentatiously ripping up what looked to be the evening’s order paper. Soon afterward, he fell ill and left the chamber. At one point during last Monday’s all-night session, Lord Trefgarne, a Conservative, drew gasps from other Lords when, saying he was fed up with the “abuse of the procedures of this house,” set in motion a procedural tool to bring an end to debate on the amendment in question — the first time such a tool has been used in 40 years, and only the sixth or seventh time since 1900. At one point there was a long discussion about how the government had chosen 600 as the proposed new number of parliamentary seats, with Labour peers accusing the government of plucking the figure from nowhere. Some peers suggested other, random numbers, and one mathematically inclined Labour member mused on how the various figures could be expressed in terms of prime numbers. “Perhaps I could postulate another figure, given the nature of the debate,” said Baroness Liddell of Coatdyke. “Could we maybe go for 666?” She also said, speaking of the written transcript of parliamentary proceedings: “I will have to show my husband Hansard tomorrow to prove that at 2 o’clock in the morning I was listening to a debate about prime numbers, because he will not believe me. He will be sending for the men in white coats to cart me away.”

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Cardiovascular disease costs may triple by 2030

The bill would trigger a referendum May 5 on whether to change the way election votes are calculated, and it would redraw Britain’s parliamentary boundaries, reducing the number of seats in the House of Commons to 600, from 650. The coalition government wants it, because it would fulfill the Liberal Democrats’ pledge to enact voting reform, and because the Conservatives would benefit from the boundary changes. Labour is resisting because, while it supports voting reform, it vehemently opposes the redistricting proposal. The measure must become law by Feb. 16 in order for the May 5 referendum to proceed, and Labour is determined to delay the bill so that it misses the deadline. Normally, opposition parties adopt a spirit of compromise and bonhomie in the House of Lords. Not this time. The government seems unwilling to budge, and Labour has resorted to virtually unprecedented delaying tactics. These include proposing picayune amendments — more than 270 so far — discussing them for hours, and then, because they have no chance of passage, withdrawing them. While the Lords may not filibuster in the grand tradition of the U.S. Senate, they can debate until the cows come home, as long as the topic is relatively germane to the bill. With each amendment, multiple Labour Lords rise to add their remarks to those of their companions. They reminisce about their experiences as young members of the House of Commons, discuss the rivers of Scotland, expound on how hard it is to drive around Wales when there is no cell phone coverage, talk about the demographic diversity of London and enumerate the communication problems faced by impoverished constituents without cars or computers who want to contact their legislators. The government says that Labour is upending centuries of convention, but Labour says it has no choice. “If you try to enact a constitu-

“It’s never been like this before, with such a palpable sense of anger. I believe that if this isn’t resolved quickly, what we’re seeing is the beginning of the unraveling of the House of Lords.”

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W OR L D

A6 Wednesday, January 26, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

W  B Railway apologizes to Holocaust victims PARIS — The head of France’s national railway company, SNCF, on Tuesday made the company’s first formal public apology directly to Holocaust victims. A few months earlier, U.S. lawmakers, survivors and their descendants moved to block the SNCF from getting contracts in the U.S. if it did not admit its role in shipping Jews to Nazi death camps. “In the name of the SNCF, I bow down before the victims, the survivors, the children of those deported, and before the suffering that still lives,” said Guillaume Pepy, the company’s chairman, during a ceremony at a railway station in Bobigny, a Paris suburb. The company is handing the station to local authorities to create a memorial to the 20,000 Jews shipped from there to Nazi camps.

Petraeus upbeat on state of Afghan war KABUL, Afghanistan — Just hours before President Barack Obama was to give his State of the Union address, his commander in Afghanistan, Gen. David Petraeus, offered what amounted to his own “state of the war” address, one noticeably more upbeat than a White House assessment issued late last year. The general’s assessment, in a letter to troops posted on the NATO website, outlined a fight in which troops and the military machine had gained the edge — or was on the cusp of doing so — on every front. He said the troops had “halted a downward security spiral in much of the country” and pointed specifically to Kabul province, where there have been few violent events over the past year. He also lauded military victories in the southern provinces of Helmand and Kandahar.

TURMOIL IN THE ARAB WORLD

Across Egypt, demonstrators direct their fury at Mubarak By Sherine Bayoumi and Leila Fadel The Washington Post

CAIRO — In the largest protest in Egypt in years, thousands of anti-government demonstrators on Tuesday called for the end of President Hosni Mubarak’s 30-year rule, a cry inspired by the fall of an Arab dictator in Tunisia. By late Tuesday night, some 15,000 protesters were encamped in Cairo’s Tahrir Square, saying they had no plans to leave, as supporters brought blankets, food and water to sustain them. Among their demands, posted online and circulated by activists on Twitter, were a call for Mubarak’s immediate “abdication of power.��� According to the Associated Press, a large security force moved in around 1 a.m. Wednesday, arresting people, beating some, chasing others into side streets and filling the square with clouds of tear gas in an effort to clear the area. Many of the protesters said they were publicly denouncing Mubarak’s rule for the first time, inspired by the images of young people in Tunisia effecting change in a region where most Arab countries are led by autocratic rulers and freedom of speech is limited. The day’s protests began downtown and spread to the port city of Alexandria and on to the northeastern city of Suez, where violent clashes with police left two demonstrators dead. An Egyptian policeman was killed in Cairo, where Arabic satellite news channels broadcast images of police dragging demonstrators through the streets.

By Mark Landler New York Times News Service

Scott Nelson / New York Times News Service

A protester holds up a sign against President Hosni Mubarak during massive demonstrations in Cairo on Tuesday. The clashes came on Police Day, a national holiday that protesters sought to turn into a “day of revolution,” echoing frustrations that led to the ouster of Tunisia’s Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali. For much of the day, Egyptian authorities demonstrated unusual tolerance in allowing the demonstrations to take place. Organizers said they were seeking to emulate the events in Tunisia, where a popular revolt over unemployment, lack of opportunity and hopelessness in young people ended the rule of Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali. Similar discontent has long pervaded Egypt, a country of 86 million, where a small, wealthy elite has thrived under the autocratic government headed by Mubarak since 1981, but where nearly half the population lives at or under the United Nations poverty line.

Bombers target Shiites in Pakistan, killing 12 LAHORE, Pakistan — Suicide bombers attacked police protecting marches by minority Shiite Muslims in Pakistan’s two largest cities Tuesday, killing 12 people and wounding dozens, officials said. The first attack occurred in Lahore, where the bomber detonated his explosives as police tried to search him, killing 10 people. About an hour later, a second bomber struck in Karachi, killing at least two people. The attacks laid bare the challenges facing Pakistani officials trying to secure cities far from the northwest, where militants fighting Pakistan’s U.S.-allied government and American forces in neighboring Afghanistan have long thrived. Many recent attacks have targeted minority Muslim and other religious groups.

Russian leaders blame airport for bombing MOSCOW — Assigning blame in the wake of the bombing at Domodedovo Airport, Russian leaders Tuesday drew a clear line between those responsible for airport security and those whose job it is to fight terrorism nationally. President Dmitry Medvedev described airport security as “chaos,” and a criminal investigation was launched. But when he later met with leaders of the Federal Security Service, Medvedev made no mention of the agency’s inability to stop Monday’s attack. Instead, he praised its record. Thirty-five people were killed and dozens were injured at the airport when a suicide bomber detonated explosives in a reception area where drivers and others wait for incoming passengers on international flights. — From wire reports

BEND BEND

Sergey Ponomarev / The Associated Press

People lay flowers at the site of Monday’s suicide bombing at Domodedovo Airport near Moscow on Tuesday.

U.S. struggles to respond constructively to uprisings in region

RIVER PROMENADE, • 5 41 . 317. 6 0 0 0

Lebanese protest premier’s appointment A Sunni leader backed by Hezbollah and its allies was officially appointed prime minister of Lebanon on Tuesday, amid angry protests by groups of Sunnis in swaths of Beirut and northern Lebanon. Protesters burned tires and threw rocks at vehicles and passers-by, cursing what they saw as the Shiite consolidation of power in Lebanon. Some begged for the United States to arm them against Hezbollah and its Iranian backers.

The bitter rhetoric suggested that the political crisis has hardened sectarian divisions here and could lead to largescale civil unrest and, possibly, violence. At a news conference after the announcement, newly appointed Prime Minister Najib Mikati tried to appeal for calm. “I open my hand to all parties and to end divisions in a framework of trust through honest national dialogue,” Mikati said. — The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — As the Obama administration confronts the spectacle of angry protesters and baton-wielding riot police officers from Tunisia to Egypt to Lebanon, it is groping for a plan to deal with a vexing region now spinning in dangerous directions. In interviews in recent days, officials acknowledged that the U.S. had limited influence over many actors in the region, and that the upheaval in Egypt, in particular, could scramble its foreign-policy agenda. So it is proceeding gingerly, balancing the democratic aspirations of young Arabs with cold-eyed strategic and commercial interests. That sometimes involves supporting autocratic and unpopular governments — which has turned many of those young people against the United States. Some critics say bottom-up efforts have failed to open up political space in Arab countries. Despite the push for monitors in Egypt, for example, its recent parliamentary elections were judged to be far less honest than the previous elections, in 2005. Steven Heydemann, a vice president at the United States Institute of Peace, argued in a blog this week that the time had come for the U.S. to confront Arab leaders more forcefully, demanding that they repeal emergency laws and scrap state security courts, which they use to exercise arbitrary power.


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Housing woes New wave of falling prices hits Northwest cities, see Page B4.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2011

MARKET REPORT

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2,719.25 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +1.70 +.06%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B2-3

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

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11,977.19 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE -3.33 -.03%

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1,291.18 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +.34 +.03%

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By Tim Doran The Bulletin

SALEM — State Treasurer Ted Wheeler on Tuesday made it easier for banks to lend out deposits they take in from government agencies, eliminating a requirement that they hold $1 in collateral for every government dollar they take in. Wheeler said the change opens up $600 million that banks can lend to individuals or small businesses looking to expand. It takes effect immediately. “This will have a direct, significant and immediate impact on communities in Oregon,” said Wheeler, who cautioned that the additional money is likely to flow only to wellqualified borrowers, not those requesting risky loans for unstable businesses.

BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 3.31 treasury CHANGE -2.65%

t

$1332.30 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE -$12.20

High Desert Bank to get new majority shareholder Customers won’t see any changes, president says

Oregon eases rules for bank lending

The majority shareholder of Bend-based High Desert Bank has agreed to sell its stake to a California lender that works primarily with the U.S. Small Business Administration, the bank announced Tuesday. Capitol Bancorp Ltd., a Michigan-based bank holding company that owns about 55 percent of High Desert’s stock, will sell its

interest to Investors Prime Fund LLC, of Los Altos, Calif., said Larry Snyder, High Desert president and CEO. Regulators must approve the deal, which Snyder expects will take between 90 and 120 days. Customers will see no changes at the bank, he said. Terms of the sale were not disclosed. The stock sale will allow High Desert Bank to separate from its holding company,

which has been selling some banks and consolidating others regionally to deal with financial problems caused by the real estate crash. “If they have any financial problems, they aren’t going to drag us with them,” Snyder said. In 2008, Capitol Bancorp had 64 banks operating in 17 states, according to its 2008 annual report, and 47 at the end of 2009. It went from a reported $42.3 million in net income in 2006 to a $28.6 million net loss in 2008. See High Desert / B3

Bulletin staff report Horizon Air, the airline that flies daily from Redmond Airport to Portland and Seattle, will be adopting the look of its sister airline, Alaska Airlines, their parent company announced Tuesday. Next month, Horizon expects to unveil its first newly branded Bombardier Q400 turboprop, which will have the Alaska logo painted on the fuselage next to Horizon’s logo and Alaska Airlines’ trademark Eskimo on the tail, according to a news release. The Horizon logo will be painted in the dark blue color adopted by Alaska. The rebranding will take some time, the airline said, so some brand-new Q400s may fly before they get painted.

WASHINGTON — Consumer confidence hit an eightmonth high in January. The increase suggests the rising spirits that fueled a holiday shopping boom are carrying over into the new year as people feel better about the job market. The Conference Board said Tuesday its Consumer Confidence Index climbed to 60.6 this month from 53.3 in December. — From wire reports

Passengers also will see the changes on the company’s airport signs and advertising, but Horizon said it will not change the uniforms worn by flight crews and other employees, and will offer the same services. While Horizon will continue to operate as a separate airline, the branding comes on the heels of a new business arrangement with Alaska called a capacity purchase agreement. Under the arrangement, Horizon operates and maintains its aircraft while Alaska handles scheduling, marketing and pricing of all flights. Founded in Seattle in 1981, Horizon was purchased by Alaska Air Group in 1986. On average, it operates 350

flights daily in 45 cities in seven Western states, along with locations in Mexico and Canada, according to the company’s website. Also on Tuesday, Alaska Airlines announced an order for 15 new Boeing 737 jets, 13 of them extended range B737-900ER planes for longer flights. Alaska expects delivery between 2012 and 2014, according to a news release, and the new models should have 21 to 27 more seats than the existing aircraft, depending on how they’re configured. In financial information released Tuesday, Alaska Air Group, the parent company, reported $241.1 million in net income in 2010, compared with $121.6 million for 2009.

65

Horizon Air’s Bombardier Q400 turboprops will be getting new paint jobs to reflect the airline’s adoption of the Alaska Airlines’ logo and tail image.

By Bill Glauber Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

60 55 50 45

BIG BEND, Wis. — Cheri Schober has been here before, between jobs, waking up in the middle of the night and worrying about the future. Yet Schober, 60, has never faced a job market like this one, so rough, so tight and so unforgiving, especially for older workers like her. Schober has gotten just three job interviews since she became unemployed in October 2009. Despite all the networking and the hundreds of résumés she has sent out, this electrical engineer fears that time and age may be working against her.

“I don’t expect people to think about age, to think if I’m a girl or a guy,” she said. “I’m an engineer. I work hard. I don’t ever plan on retiring.” Schober’s plight is hardly unique. The Great Recession has dealt a harsh blow to job veterans. Although older workers still have unemployment rates lower than the national average, they often remain without jobs for longer periods than younger workers. They’re trying to cling to a middle-class way of life that often hangs by a thread as unemployment lingers for weeks, and then months, and sometimes even years. See Job hunt / B3

AT WORK

40 ’10

By Ed Merriman Submitted photo

Older workers lean on each other in job hunt

Jan. 60.6

’11

Note: All figures are seasonally adjusted Source: The Conference Board

AP

Lottery would fund $50,000 challenge

Economic forecast to include ‘1,000-Day Road Map’

Correction

1985 = 100

Venture conference could earn boost to its award Future winners of the Bend Venture Conference could reap an additional $50,000 in state Lottery funds to be distributed by the Oregon Growth Account as part of an investment strategy announced Monday by Treasurer Ted Wheeler. At a meeting Monday, the OGA board, created in 1995 by the Oregon Legislature, voted to commit as much as $175,000 in matching funds to boost investments in five angel conferences this year, including the Bend Venture Conference and four other venture conferences in Portland, the southern Willamette Valley, Southern Oregon and the Columbia Gorge. “This creates a unique opportunity to receive Lottery funds based on the amount that is raised from private investors for the Bend Venture Conference,” said Scott Larson, venture catalyst manager for Economic Development for Central Oregon, which puts on the conference in October. Larson said the OGA board authorized a maximum of $50,000 each for 2011 venture conferences held in Bend and Portland, contingent on each of those organizations collecting at least $200,000 from other sources. The Oregon Entrepreneurial Network puts on the Angel Oregon venture conference annually in Portland. Larson said the Bend and Portland venture conferences are eligible for a higher level of OGA funds because they have existed seven years and 11 years, respectively, and have good track records of investing in companies that went on to become very successful. See Venture / B3

HORIZON’S NEW LOOK

Consumer confidence hits 8-month high

The Consumer Confidence Index from a survey of 5,000 U.S. households:

$26.811 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE -$0.507

The Bulletin

SAN FRANCISCO — Google Inc. plans to hire more than 6,200 workers this year in the biggest expansion yet by the Internet’s most profitable company. The hiring spree will likely be welcomed by President Barack Obama, who emphasized the need for the private sector to create more jobs during his State of the Union address Tuesday night. Google CEO Eric Schmidt was among a group of business leaders who met with Obama last month to discuss ways to bolster the listless economy.

Confidence jumps

t

By Ed Merriman

Google to hire more than 6,200 this year

In a story headlined “Lowprofile contractor gains local attention,” which appeared Monday, Jan. 24, on Page C1, a government agency’s relationship with the Bend-based firm n-Link was reported incorrectly. Through the Network Operations and Security Center that n-Link ran for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Portland, Federal Emergency Management Agency officials were able to talk over the Internet with emergency response organizations after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. The company had no formal contract with FEMA. The Bulletin regrets the error.

B

Mike De Sisti / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Like other older job seekers, Cheri Schober, 60, is struggling to get back into the workplace. The engineer has been out of work since October 2009.

The Bulletin

The national economic recovery is expected to pick up steam in 2011, and while prospects for the new year are not as rosy for the state and Central Oregon, speakers at Thursday’s third annual Central Oregon Economic Forecast will offer a “1,000-Day Road Map” to economic recovery and community transformation. “Three years after the recession started, Bend is still losing jobs. That is not a good sign for area businesses,” said Bill Watkins, director of the Central Oregon Economic Forecast Project and Cal Lutheran University Center for Economic Research and Forecasting. Watkins said his presentation at Thursday’s meeting will focus on what 2011 looks like for business owners, and what level of economic recovery he is projecting for the United States, Oregon and Central Oregon economies. The conference, titled “Answers for the Hard Questions,” will be held Thursday morning at The Riverhouse Convention Center in Bend. See Forecast / B3


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B2 Wednesday, January 26, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

D

A-B-C-D A-Power ABB Ltd ABM ACE Ltd AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGL Res AK Steel AMB Pr AMN Hlth AMR AOL ARYxTh h ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AXT Inc Aarons s Aastrom rs AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac AbitibiB n Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaPh h Accenture Accuride n AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivePwr ActivsBliz Actuant Acuity Acxiom AdobeSy Adtran AdvAuto AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs Advntrx rs AdvisBd AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeropostl s AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd Aircastle Airgas AirTran AkamaiT AkeenaS h Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon Alere AlexBld AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion Alexza AlignTech Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliancOne AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlliantTch AldIrish AlldNevG AlldWldA AllisChE AllosThera AllotComm AllscriptH Allstate AlmadnM g AlnylamP AlphaNRs AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AlteraCp lf AlterraCap AltraHldgs Altria AmBev s Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmApparel AmAssets n AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AIG wt AmIntlGrp AmerMed AmOriBio AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Ameriprise AmeriBrgn AmCasino Ametek s Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnalogDev Anglgld 13 AnglogldA ABInBev AnnTaylr Annaly Anooraq g Ansys Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache AptInv ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldIndlT ApldMatl AMCC ApldSig Apricus rs AquaAm ArQule Arbitron ArcadiaRs ArcelorMit ArchCap ArchCoal ArchDan ArchD pfA ArdeaBio ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArmHld ArmourRsd ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArubaNet ArvMerit AscenaRtl AscentSol AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfoL AspenIns AspenTech AsscdBanc AsdEstat Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth Atheros AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn Aurizon g AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch AvalRare n AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap B&G Foods BB&T Cp

6.04 -.12 0.48 23.80 +.45 0.56 25.33 -.28 1.30 62.13 +1.43 12.83 -.11 1.20 58.41 -.23 51.31 -.70 1.76 36.39 -.14 0.20 15.57 +1.11 1.12 33.18 -.12 6.20 -.04 7.21 -.20 24.13 +.22 .33 +.00 0.54 41.04 +1.34 1.72 28.76 +.28 17.05 -.19 9.86 +.02 2.21 -.09 11.09 +.07 0.05 20.67 +.30 2.81 +.17 1.76 47.96 -.21 0.70 49.28 -1.31 0.42 6.68 +.05 28.99 +.09 4.26 -.03 25.91 -.95 1.71 -.03 0.90 51.72 +.25 14.71 +.57 49.99 -1.82 22.99 -.61 2.18 -.12 0.15 11.43 +.06 0.04 27.66 +.25 0.52 54.86 -.56 17.62 -.40 33.56 -.47 0.36 41.33 -.07 0.24 64.02 +.58 3.78 -.05 14.82 +.04 7.48 -.20 0.06 6.25 -.02 7.10 -.20 2.19 -.06 48.68 +.36 29.36 +.15 0.04 11.13 -.34 7.30 -.03 14.89 -.04 24.43 -.76 1.59 +.02 0.04 33.50 +.46 99.63 -1.33 6.91 -.23 4.99 -.09 2.54 -.02 42.69 -.08 0.64 67.44 -.29 0.11 86.84 -1.21 1.96 86.68 +.18 0.40 10.60 +.08 1.16 62.03 -1.24 7.47 -.06 47.82 -1.61 .58 -.01 5.25 -.13 61.13 +.37 0.86 9.34 +.13 0.56 57.00 -.70 0.34 37.24 +.08 3.31 +.05 0.12 16.24 -.19 3.95 163.70 +.31 39.10 -.16 1.26 40.30 -.22 1.80 77.85 +1.62 6.10 +.07 85.24 +.64 1.35 +.02 19.92 -.03 12.97 +.31 0.60 25.72 -.34 0.72 58.40 -.47 0.20 72.08 +.53 73.00 -.10 3.86 0.48 7.80 -.01 1.51 21.26 -.09 1.70 37.63 +.03 0.80 75.75 +.85 .76 -.04 24.48 -.44 0.80 60.67 +.22 7.48 -.20 3.63 -.06 12.09 -.36 20.04 -.20 0.80 31.79 +.51 3.56 -.15 10.97 +.39 55.98 -.68 0.40 7.10 +.01 0.66 6.12 0.25 16.15 -.01 0.24 37.91 -.37 0.48 22.21 +.04 19.42 -.13 1.52 24.29 -.13 0.99 27.78 +.33 8.69 -.34 176.70 -.15 28.83 +.13 32.96 +.90 1.54 29.02 49.49 +2.51 0.52 58.02 -.87 1.16 +.16 21.27 -.03 14.76 -.29 1.35 31.55 +.48 5.60 28.54 -.01 8.07 +.02 0.44 14.44 1.84 36.66 -.09 0.10 12.99 +.02 0.72 44.80 -.99 0.65 33.07 +.41 15.26 -.73 41.36 -.59 18.85 -.04 2.40 +.02 27.56 +.11 51.37 +.36 0.88 25.95 +.05 0.72 61.11 +.11 0.40 35.95 -.34 0.42 15.07 -.33 0.24 40.55 +.23 57.16 -.13 7.80 -.01 0.06 55.09 +.36 15.05 +.05 0.36 75.70 -1.56 7.25 +.04 0.88 38.78 -.57 3.00 50.75 -.91 0.18 43.36 -1.00 0.49 57.54 +.92 21.51 -.25 2.65 17.77 -.01 1.43 -.01 51.82 -1.49 0.88 6.92 -.01 0.60 45.56 +.55 9.43 -.06 0.60 122.64 -1.28 0.40 25.35 +.32 41.72 -.15 1.12 11.65 -.20 341.40 +3.95 0.68 31.69 +.36 0.28 15.37 +.01 10.36 -.03 0.50 37.93 3.86 -.04 0.62 23.65 +.27 6.38 -.32 0.40 40.32 -.91 .33 -.01 0.75 37.88 +.47 89.56 +.22 0.40 32.18 -.66 0.60 33.34 -.08 3.13 42.37 -.32 28.09 +1.85 1.98 -.01 1.40 16.52 +.17 6.57 -.11 23.39 -.36 0.12 25.16 +.08 1.44 7.65 -.03 2.95 -.04 12.48 +.28 37.65 21.07 -.21 21.18 +.11 27.41 +.05 3.35 -.09 9.87 +.05 0.60 57.49 +4.23 17.87 -.10 0.60 30.04 +.05 14.26 +.15 0.04 14.26 +.05 0.68 14.88 +.31 0.64 38.82 +.45 0.18 15.06 -1.01 0.52 14.15 -.16 2.41 48.15 -.64 43.44 +.16 44.60 +.08 43.84 -.22 1.40 24.18 -.19 13.66 -.30 1.36 33.03 +.03 36.95 -.50 6.16 -.07 29.45 +.27 40.33 -.72 1.60 77.69 +.17 1.44 49.69 +.17 248.70 -2.79 23.06 +.14 0.07 28.02 -.08 5.43 -.16 3.57 114.65 +1.59 4.23 -.06 0.80 42.01 +.13 13.94 -.07 1.00 23.16 +.11 35.62 -.05 0.88 29.58 +.40 3.13 -.11 0.92 36.04 +.44 0.68 13.71 -.07 0.60 27.90 +.11

Nm BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJs Whls BMC Sft BMP Sunst BP PLC BP Pru BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s BSD Med BabckW n Baidu s BakrHu Baldor BallCp BallardPw BallyTech BalticTr n BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcoSBrasil BcpSouth BkofAm BkAML pfI BkAML pfJ BkAm pfH BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkAML pfQ BkAML pfL BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BkAtl A h BannerCp Banro g BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BiPCop BrcIndiaTR BarcBk prD Barclay Bar iPVix rs BarVixMdT Bard BarnesNob BarrickG Baxter BaytexE g BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett Biocryst Biodel BioFuelEn BiogenIdc BioLase BioMarin BioMedR Bionovo rs BioSante BioScrip BioTime BlackDiam BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkBldA n BlkCpHY VI BlkCrAll4 BlkDebtStr BlkEnhC&I BlkEnDiv BlkIntlG&I Blackstone BlockHR BlueCoat Boeing Boise Inc Boise wt BonaFilm n Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci BoydGm Brandyw BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker Brinks BrMySq BristowGp Broadcom BroadrdgF BroadSft n Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrukerCp Brunswick BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BungeLt CA Inc CB REllis CBIZ Inc CBL Asc CBS B CF Inds CGI g CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp CKX Inc CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNinsure CRH CSX CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G Cadence CalDive CalaStrTR Calgon CalifPizza CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CAMAC En CamdnP Cameco g Cameron CampSp CampCC n CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar CanoPet CapOne CapProd CapitlSrce CaptlBcp h CapFdF rs CapsteadM CpstnTrb h CarboCer CardnlHlth CardiumTh CareFusion CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters CasellaW CashAm Caterpillar CathayGen Cavico CaviumNet CelSci Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE Centene CenterFncl CenterPnt CnElBras pf CnElBras lf CentEuro CFCda g CenPacF CentAl CntryLink Cephln Cerner CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh

D 1.97 35.73 -.11 38.90 +.12 0.48 7.88 -.35 1.74 88.40 -1.64 1.74 76.18 -2.06 44.14 -.26 48.16 -.11 9.92 47.21 -.87 8.80 109.81-10.85 4.84 -.06 1.50 43.76 +1.00 0.10 17.28 -.06 4.30 -.33 28.84 -.57 105.89 -.47 0.60 62.32 +3.82 0.68 63.47 0.40 70.05 -.18 1.63 +.03 42.11 -.06 0.32 9.24 -.31 1.34 60.79 +1.53 0.55 12.09 -.26 0.82 19.63 -.10 0.78 12.05 -.29 0.45 12.38 -.24 0.88 15.06 +.09 0.04 13.63 -.29 1.59 22.14 -.07 1.02 18.67 -.14 2.05 25.35 +.02 7.30 -.47 2.55 -.18 2.16 26.00 -.05 1.02 18.35 +.04 1.80 46.33 -1.16 1.04 2.35 -.02 2.80 59.64 +.03 0.36 31.67 +.03 1.96 56.32 +.08 .93 -.05 0.04 2.11 +.04 3.26 -.07 47.87 -.73 23.82 -.45 56.45 -1.29 69.00 -1.56 2.03 25.62 +.12 0.28 18.98 -.39 31.19 -.39 59.03 -.42 0.72 93.00 +.68 1.00 16.49 +.27 0.48 46.13 -.24 1.24 50.98 +1.31 2.40 46.99 -.59 .33 18.50 +.04 5.50 -.13 0.10 5.78 -.12 0.76 72.09 +1.02 1.64 84.61 +.95 49.31 +.53 6.79 +.13 0.92 32.65 -.02 19.07 -.02 0.28 28.70 +.73 83.25 +.31 0.30 43.28 -.39 0.60 35.14 -.13 32.32 -.28 39.52 +.03 4.25 +.01 2.46 +.27 1.05 -.04 66.84 -.30 2.87 -.15 25.65 +.03 0.68 18.69 +.28 1.15 -.05 1.97 +.10 4.96 -.05 7.83 -.28 7.05 -.02 1.28 11.66 +.15 39.30 +.05 4.00 198.01 +4.43 1.42 17.48 -.24 0.99 11.69 +.14 0.83 12.08 +.05 0.32 3.89 -.02 1.94 14.65 -.31 0.98 8.47 -.22 1.36 10.25 +.02 0.40 15.76 -.18 0.60 13.07 -.14 28.06 -.01 1.68 72.24 -.49 0.40 8.70 +.19 1.29 +.18 7.17 -.05 .84 -.01 68.12 -.85 0.04 6.62 -.17 2.00 91.26 +.74 7.03 -.11 11.55 -.32 0.60 11.66 +.27 18.83 +.70 0.44 21.01 +.07 25.55 +.22 9.13 -.05 1.65 -.03 0.56 23.25 +2.36 0.40 27.49 -.08 1.32 26.03 +.03 47.86 +.22 0.32 45.19 -.51 0.60 23.02 -.06 25.30 +.24 1.98 -.01 5.53 -.06 21.84 +.20 0.52 33.02 -.24 0.56 17.69 +.20 0.34 11.10 +.20 11.32 -.03 0.32 24.98 +.54 0.28 13.37 +.02 17.17 -.09 0.05 19.93 -.02 0.16 21.11 +.55 0.80 36.36 -.39 0.10 90.68 +.07 0.46 40.51 -.90 43.92 +1.14 0.92 68.48 -.79 0.16 25.36 -.21 21.75 -.18 7.16 +.05 0.80 16.95 +.05 0.20 20.61 -.17 0.40 130.73 -1.54 18.80 +.06 1.16 77.83 +.08 0.04 41.62 +1.11 46.94 +.78 3.53 -.05 1.00 31.45 +.36 4.60 306.90 -2.65 0.84 19.54 +.16 50.19 -.32 6.58 -.14 0.26 17.94 -.08 0.83 22.08 +.59 1.04 70.25 +2.54 0.34 8.40 -.08 16.07 -.14 0.50 35.16 +.17 23.77 -.02 0.50 34.44 -.01 0.72 41.54 +.56 0.12 39.54 -.49 8.50 -.03 6.02 +.02 0.63 9.41 +.02 14.40 +.15 16.60 +.37 0.04 7.67 -.06 7.27 -.05 14.21 -.25 1.91 +.14 1.80 55.37 +.48 0.40 38.28 -.67 50.32 -.95 1.16 35.01 -.05 0.64 12.89 +.12 1.30 67.92 -.80 0.30 41.48 -.84 1.08 66.42 -.73 14.32 -.83 .38 -.01 0.20 48.21 -.26 0.93 9.60 -.36 0.04 7.78 +.12 .35 -.04 0.30 11.93 +.15 1.51 12.81 +.05 1.16 +.01 0.80 100.17 -1.20 0.78 41.31 -.16 .39 -.00 26.20 -.22 22.13 -.04 0.68 39.43 -.31 32.06 -.18 1.00 46.22 +.01 0.72 42.49 -.36 31.56 -1.06 28.09 -.27 8.04 +.50 0.14 39.66 -.21 1.76 94.39 -.18 0.04 17.49 +1.28 2.65 +.95 39.60 +.18 .77 +.03 0.20 40.44 -.32 6.28 +.12 9.33 -.11 56.07 -.56 .36 -.00 0.43 10.56 -.08 1.19 16.58 -.07 0.80 31.59 -.84 26.65 +1.01 7.43 +.29 0.79 16.15 +.06 0.03 16.38 -.05 1.56 13.56 -.13 24.86 -.70 0.01 18.10 -.12 1.57 -.05 14.24 -.32 2.90 42.20 +.21 59.25 +.06 96.30 -.90 3.49 -.07 37.72 +.04 3.17 -.08

Nm ChartInds ChkPoint Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemtura n CheniereEn ChesEng ChesMid n Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAgri s ChinaBiot ChinaDir ChiGengM ChinaGreen ChinaIntEn ChinaLife ChinaMda ChinaMed ChiMYWd n ChinaMble ChinaNepst ChNBorun n ChinNEPet ChiNuokng ChinaPStl ChinaSecur ChinaShen ChinaSky ChinaUni ChiValve ChinaYuch Chipotle Chiquita ChrisBnk Chubb ChungTel wi ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigp pfN Citigrp CitzRepB h CitrixSys CityNC ClaudeR g CleanEngy ClearEFd n Clearwire ClevBioL h CliffsNRs ClinicData Clorox CloudPeak Coach CobaltIEn CocaCE CocaCl Coeur CogdSpen CognizTech CohStInfra CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColumLabs ColSprtw Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmclVehcl CmwReit rs CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s CompssMn Compellent CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Comtech Con-Way ConAgra ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant ConocPhil Conolog h ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Cnvrgys ConvOrg h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopanoEn Copart Copel Corcept CoreLab s CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costamre n Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CrackerB Crane Credicp CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc CrimsnExp Crocs Crossh g rs CrwnCstle CrownHold Crystallx g Ctrip.com CubicEngy CubistPh CullenFr Cummins Curis CurEuro CurJpn Cyclacel Cymer CypSemi CypSharp CytRx Cytec Cytokinet Cytomed Cytori DCT Indl DG FastCh DHT Hldgs DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DSW Inc DTE DanaHldg Danaher s DanversBc DaqoNEn n Darden Darling Datalink DaVita DayStr rsh DeVry DeanFds DeckOut s DeerConsu Deere DejourE g DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DeltaAir DeltaPtr h Deluxe DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DermaSci n DeutschBk DB AgriDL DBGoldSh DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE Dex One n Diageo DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver Dillards DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DrxEMBll s DrTcBear rs DrSCBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DrxSOXBr DirEMBr rs DirFnBear DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear

D 36.49 -1.26 45.72 -.11 31.18 +1.17 6.20 +.01 15.98 +.48 6.29 -.16 0.30 27.43 -.72 1.35 27.00 -.16 2.88 94.08 -.02 33.31 -.22 0.16 10.88 -.20 44.17 -.49 0.69 4.16 -.06 11.25 -.30 15.48 -.45 1.51 +.01 2.85 -.22 8.37 5.88 -.09 1.54 59.53 -.71 19.00 -.16 11.99 -.42 9.78 -.20 1.85 49.38 -.48 0.58 4.43 -.22 14.00 -.29 5.65 -.09 3.60 +.06 1.75 -.01 4.95 6.19 -.26 5.49 -.14 0.23 15.55 +.03 7.37 -.04 0.25 27.69 +.88 221.99 +1.53 16.37 +.10 0.24 5.99 -.02 1.48 59.04 +.81 30.57 +1.00 0.68 71.11 +.51 4.85 -.11 24.19 -.54 0.32 97.05 -.71 2.68 -.01 1.60 32.50 +.21 0.84 17.28 +.21 0.49 28.98 +.27 17.78 -.16 21.54 +.37 2.13 26.28 -.11 1.97 27.12 -.08 4.82 -.04 .67 -.01 61.95 -2.75 0.80 58.58 +.06 1.96 -.05 13.37 +.10 1.40 21.59 -.06 5.30 -.11 7.40 +.20 0.56 81.74 -1.22 26.77 +1.60 2.20 63.37 +.14 21.37 -.04 0.60 53.09 -.28 12.45 -.25 0.48 25.16 +.04 1.76 62.96 -.29 22.46 -.17 0.40 6.09 +.07 73.35 -.92 0.96 17.03 +.03 0.72 9.09 -.06 40.91 -.25 2.86 2.12 80.12 +.28 20.72 +.13 0.60 19.08 +.15 2.53 -.02 0.80 60.47 -.32 0.38 23.34 -.26 0.38 21.89 -.25 0.40 39.10 -.08 0.94 41.72 +.18 0.48 16.73 +.06 17.37 +.82 2.00 26.06 +.23 35.24 +.30 28.93 -.56 0.36 40.65 -.29 1.56 87.90 +.95 27.67 -.01 26.62 +.06 0.80 53.80 +.30 11.46 -.12 24.86 +.31 1.00 26.49 -.03 0.40 33.80 +.11 0.92 23.58 +.08 86.98 -2.13 51.00 +.37 2.09 -.01 2.20 67.48 -.62 .36 -.01 0.40 50.16 -.42 2.40 50.65 +.10 27.35 -.92 18.92 -.22 0.96 32.00 -.14 57.88 -1.42 14.42 +.10 .42 -.01 0.06 57.60 +.45 1.08 60.87 -.25 0.42 23.12 +.36 2.30 33.99 -.09 39.53 -.41 0.72 26.33 +.04 4.14 -.01 1.00 84.48 +.50 20.25 -.16 5.40 +.10 0.56 47.84 -.88 0.20 21.21 +1.57 1.65 35.85 +.82 25.05 +.15 13.30 -.25 0.25 15.02 +.05 0.82 72.46 -.16 7.85 +.01 0.18 8.58 +.04 55.38 -.64 1.50 16.87 -.01 29.52 +.01 0.80 47.34 +.14 0.88 52.44 +.08 0.92 44.94 +1.22 1.70 111.24 +.94 1.85 45.99 -.19 0.32 2.99 -.01 51.87 +.42 3.99 -.18 15.92 +.47 1.81 -.02 42.93 +.44 33.49 -.02 .26 -.01 43.46 +.70 1.04 -.11 22.74 +.30 1.80 61.80 +.50 1.05 107.07 +.94 2.91 -.04 0.01 136.28 +.36 120.16 +.33 1.51 +.01 47.11 +.13 20.32 -.74 2.40 12.92 +.05 .81 -.01 0.05 50.73 +.07 1.88 -.04 .49 +.04 5.85 +.17 0.28 5.67 +.08 28.00 +.70 0.40 5.00 -.03 0.78 9.53 +.07 1.33 26.54 +.06 0.15 13.01 +.07 34.76 -.37 2.24 46.89 -.01 17.86 -.05 0.08 47.18 -.19 0.16 21.77 +.14 12.62 -.28 1.28 47.33 +.99 12.65 -.04 6.80 +.02 73.43 +2.76 1.57 0.24 47.38 -.83 10.53 +.16 74.13 +1.75 11.03 -.17 1.40 89.39 -.73 .31 -.00 0.36 18.88 8.93 +.10 13.74 +.02 11.63 -.39 .74 -.01 1.00 24.33 +.12 18.58 -.07 35.14 -.42 3.34 -.06 3.73 +.03 0.20 35.94 +.04 6.29 +.09 6.98 +.35 0.93 60.03 -.67 14.99 -.28 16.10 +.01 37.44 -.14 9.00 +.02 0.16 13.79 +.18 0.64 84.53 -1.17 6.04 -.11 2.38 78.69 -.04 0.50 72.32 -.06 12.05 -.09 11.59 -.18 13.94 +.39 34.82 -.19 1.08 30.65 +.16 2.12 54.06 +1.69 34.50 +.09 0.16 39.88 -.99 42.88 +.07 0.51 51.58 +.53 0.19 38.27 -.68 20.82 -.23 15.64 -.08 16.92 -.58 20.63 +.23 0.71 12.66 +.32 21.56 +.39 8.57 +.02 30.17 +.02 45.26 -1.27

Nm

D

DrxREBll s DirxDMBear DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DishNetwk Disney DrReddy DolbyLab DoleFood DollrFn DollarGen DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs DonlleyRR DoralFncl DotHill h DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragonW g DrmWksA DresserR DryHYSt drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DyaxCp Dycom Dynamex Dynavax Dynegy rs

0.39 59.63 +1.94 7.56 +.03 0.11 71.05 +.31 8.10 1.55 76.86 +.05 0.41 63.28 -.80 0.08 20.45 +.03 39.47 -.61 34.19 -.47 21.69 -.03 0.40 39.86 -.08 0.24 34.69 -1.87 59.99 -.07 13.98 -.52 29.28 +.28 28.70 -.30 47.91 -.15 52.13 -.22 1.97 43.57 -.01 16.82 +.27 1.00 86.60 +1.98 1.04 18.25 +.14 1.31 -.07 2.96 -.01 0.40 17.65 +.12 1.10 57.48 +.52 0.60 35.28 +.29 1.00 35.42 +.48 7.23 -.21 28.77 +.13 44.07 -.12 0.52 4.53 +.04 1.93 -.01 4.76 -.15 1.64 49.04 +.15 0.48 21.47 +.42 0.98 18.13 -.04 0.68 13.19 -.10 1.99 -.02 16.50 -.29 24.89 -.03 2.98 -.10 5.73 -.15

E-F-G-H ECDang n 28.94 -1.20 E-House 0.25 16.08 -.06 ETrade rs 15.53 -.22 eBay 30.91 +.40 EDAP TMS 4.26 +.12 EMC Cp 24.39 +.56 EMCOR 29.17 -.54 ENI 2.51 48.45 -.01 EOG Res 0.62 99.87 -1.86 EQT Corp 0.88 45.15 -.68 ETF Pall 77.71 -3.14 EagleBulk 4.01 -.51 EaglRkEn 0.10 9.16 -.09 ErthLink 0.20 8.54 -.05 EstWstBcp 0.04 20.55 +.24 EastChm 1.88 90.33 -1.52 EKodak 4.52 -.70 Eaton 2.32 103.24 +.54 EatnVan 0.72 31.08 -.31 EV EEq2 1.11 12.10 -.06 EV LtdDur 1.39 15.82 -.13 EVMuniBd 0.92 11.27 +.11 EVRiskMgd 1.28 13.10 +.09 EV TxDiver 1.16 11.37 -.01 EVTxMGlo 1.14 10.62 EVTxGBW 1.56 12.30 +.02 EVTxBWOp 1.60 13.04 Ebix Inc 22.97 +.20 EchoStar 27.03 -.26 Ecolab 0.70 49.98 -.39 EdisonInt 1.28 37.50 -.21 EducRlty 0.20 7.67 +.11 EdwLfSci s 83.48 +.12 8x8 Inc 2.80 +.05 ElPasoCp 0.04 14.34 -.50 ElPasoPpl 1.76 34.34 +.20 Elan 6.94 +.38 EldorGld g 0.10 16.16 +.38 ElectArts 15.38 +.09 Embraer 0.64 32.09 -.25 Emcore lf 1.36 -.04 EMS 65.59 +.08 EmersonEl 1.38 58.18 +.16 EmmisCm .97 -.07 Emulex 10.80 +.08 EnbrEPtrs 4.11 62.12 -.09 EnCana g 0.80 32.23 -.34 EndvSilv g 5.84 +.15 EndoPhrm 33.92 +.01 Ener1 3.98 -.07 Energen 0.52 54.40 +.21 Energizer 75.00 +.20 EngyConv 4.21 -.11 EnrgyRec 3.49 -.08 EngyTEq 2.16 38.47 -.01 EngyTsfr 3.58 52.89 +.09 EgyXXI rs 27.06 +.43 EnergySol 5.46 +.04 Enerpls g 2.16 31.59 -.62 Enersis 0.61 21.25 -.05 EnerSys 32.65 +.28 Ennis Inc 0.62 16.18 +.28 ENSCO 1.40 51.86 -.15 Entegris 7.16 -.29 Entergy 3.32 73.50 -.27 EntPrPt 2.36 43.03 +.03 EnterPT 2.60 45.59 +.49 Entravisn 2.22 +.05 EntreeGold 2.72 -.05 EntropCom 11.56 -.19 Envestnt n 14.08 -1.20 EnzonPhar 11.61 +.03 EpicorSft 10.02 Equifax 0.64 36.22 +.11 Equinix 87.94 -.86 EqtyOne 0.88 18.88 +.31 EqtyRsd 1.47 52.60 +.86 EricsnTel 0.28 12.19 +.46 EssexPT 4.13 115.46 +2.10 EsteeLdr 0.75 81.13 -2.33 EtfSilver 26.73 -.12 EthanAl 0.20 23.09 +2.23 Eurand 11.96 -.02 EverestRe 1.92 85.75 +1.06 EvergE rs 2.50 +.20 EvrgrSlr rs 2.53 -.10 ExactSci h 5.58 -.15 ExcelM 4.65 -.26 ExcelTr n 0.48 12.87 -.28 ExcoRes 0.16 19.78 +.08 Exelixis 7.93 +.13 Exelon 2.10 43.20 -.20 ExeterR gs 5.05 -.09 ExideTc 9.62 +.07 Expedia 0.28 25.76 -.22 ExpdIntl 0.40 52.73 -.95 Express n 17.60 ExpScrip s 57.34 -1.01 ExterranH 23.24 -.25 ExtraSpce 0.40 19.00 +.17 ExtrmNet 3.31 -.09 ExxonMbl 1.76 78.68 +.09 EZchip 31.53 -.21 Ezcorp 26.56 -.28 F5 Netwks 107.53 +.97 FEI Co 27.53 -.03 FLIR Sys 29.94 +.25 FMC Corp 0.50 76.86 FMC Tech 87.26 -.14 FNBCp PA 0.48 10.24 +.04 FSI Intl 3.90 -.06 FTI Cnslt 37.02 +.56 FX Ener 8.33 +.28 FairIsaac 0.08 24.02 +.37 FairchldS 17.48 -.12 FairptCm n 24.50 FamilyDlr 0.72 42.87 -.57 Fastenal 1.00 59.24 -.76 FedExCp 0.48 93.99 -.38 FedRlty 2.68 79.23 +1.46 FedSignl 0.24 7.10 +.09 FedInvst 0.96 27.13 +.53 FelCor 7.00 -.12 Ferro 15.31 +.07 FibriaCelu 16.54 FidlNFin 0.72 13.92 +.09 FidNatInfo 0.20 30.68 +.07 FifthStFin 1.28 12.54 +.01 FifthThird 0.04 14.43 +.09 FinEngin n 23.49 -.06 Finisar 30.01 -1.47 FinLine 0.20 15.95 +.03 FstAFin n 0.24 15.75 +.41 FstBcPR rs 5.02 -.15 FstCwlth 0.12 6.89 +.04 FstHorizon 0.04 11.41 +.02 FstInRT 10.23 +.08 FMajSilv g 10.49 -.40 FMidBc 0.04 12.60 +.10 FstNiagara 0.60 14.05 +.26 FstPotom 0.80 16.41 +.18 FstSolar 150.62 -5.78 FTNDXTc 0.10 26.77 -.22 FTDJInet 0.04 34.36 -.19 FT ConDis 0.09 19.64 -.06 FT Fincl 0.19 14.99 +.06 FT Matls 0.38 23.97 +.06 FT RNG 0.05 19.94 -.25 FirstEngy 2.20 38.98 -.45 FstMerit 0.64 18.96 +.08 Fiserv 62.89 -.02 FlagstB rs 1.65 +.02 Flextrn 8.18 -.14 Flotek h 6.30 +.10 FlowrsFds 0.80 26.45 +.07 Flowserve 1.16 117.52 -.46 Fluor 0.50 70.44 -1.09 FocusMda 24.16 +.23 FEMSA 0.64 54.83 FootLockr 0.60 18.22 -.21 ForcePro 5.51 +.05 FordM 17.89 -.04 FordM wt 9.06 -.03 ForestCA 16.89 +.25 ForestLab 32.35 +.24 ForestOil 36.63 -.97 FormFac 8.91 +.08 Fortinet 33.92 -.57 Fortress 5.37 -.16 FortuneBr 0.76 61.29 -.13 Fossil Inc 67.86 -1.80 FosterWhl 35.99 -.85 FranceTel 1.77 22.35 +.03 FrankRes 1.00 119.94 +.29 FrkStPrp 0.76 15.09 +.25 FredsInc 0.16 13.52 +.19 FMCG 2.00 106.43 -2.04 FresKabi rt .04 -.00 Fronteer g 9.03 +.17 FrontierCm 0.75 9.17 -.05 FrontierOil 17.72 +.04 Frontline 2.00 25.17 +.23 FuelCell 1.82 -.06 FullerHB 0.28 23.02 +.11 FultonFncl 0.12 10.49 Fuqi Intl lf 5.28 -.26

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Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm FurnBrds GATX GFI Grp GMX Rs GSI Cmmrc GT Solar GabelliET GabGldNR Gafisa s GainCap n Gallaghr GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin Gartner GascoEngy Gastar grs GaylrdEnt GenProbe GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec GenGrPr n GenMarit GenMills s GenMoly GenMot n GM cvpfB GenSteel Gensco GenesWyo GeneticT h GenOn En Genoptix Genpact Gentex Gentiva h GenuPrt GenVec h Genworth Genzyme GeoGrp Geores GaGulf Gerdau GeronCp GettyRlty GiantIntac GigaMed Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc GladstInv Glatfelter GlaxoSKln Gleacher GlimchRt GlobalCash GloblInd GlobPay GblXChCon GblX Uran GlbXSilvM Globalstr h GlbSpcMet GluMobile GolLinhas GolarLNG GoldFLtd GoldResrc Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldS60 n GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google GovPrpIT vjGrace Graco GrafTech GrahamP n Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GraniteC GraphPkg GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPlainEn GreenMtC s GreenPlns GrnHCmdty GreenbCos Group1 GAeroPac GrpoFin GpoTMM GpTelevisa Guess GugSolar GulfMrkA HCC Ins HCP Inc HFF Inc HSBC HSBC Cap2 HSN Inc HainCel Hallibrtn Halozyme HancHld Hanesbrds HanmiFncl HansenNat HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarisHa HarrisCorp HWinstn g Harsco HartfdFn HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HlthCSvc s HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg Healthwys HrtlndEx Heckmann HeclaM Heinz HelixEn HelmPayne Hemisphrx HSchein Herbalife HercOffsh HercTGC Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HollyCp Hollysys Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomeProp Honda HonwllIntl HooperH HorizLns Hormel Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HstnAEn HovnanE HudsCity HugotnR HumGen

D 4.80 +.11 1.12 32.28 -.23 0.20 4.94 +.09 5.36 -.03 23.34 +.05 11.02 -.47 0.68 5.97 +.04 1.68 18.21 -.17 0.14 13.68 +.01 9.65 -.33 1.28 29.45 +.51 21.06 -.03 7.20 -.04 0.16 14.84 -.02 0.40 20.16 -.05 0.20 70.92 -.36 1.50 31.72 +.20 34.29 -.20 .50 -.04 4.20 -.05 34.20 +.02 62.68 +.48 11.91 -1.08 5.29 +.16 36.06 -.55 1.68 74.17 +1.43 0.56 19.98 -.06 14.85 +.18 0.04 3.02 -.15 1.12 35.99 -.39 5.40 -.36 38.40 +.76 2.38 56.51 +.86 2.55 +.03 36.63 -.74 51.37 -.76 3.10 -.53 4.18 -.09 24.88 +.02 0.18 15.16 +.38 0.44 30.84 +.30 23.90 +.02 1.64 51.15 -.02 .61 -.02 13.80 +.15 71.01 -.34 23.60 +.29 26.23 -.13 27.14 +.94 0.32 13.64 4.89 +.06 1.92 27.96 +.35 0.18 6.95 -.04 1.36 -.03 0.30 27.79 -.15 38.16 -.15 0.52 15.04 -.03 0.48 7.22 -.46 0.36 11.81 -.10 2.00 37.36 -.49 2.27 -.02 0.40 8.85 +.02 3.19 +.05 7.17 +.04 0.08 47.52 +.33 0.19 17.44 -.05 0.40 20.16 -.32 0.25 21.01 -.41 1.16 -.10 0.15 18.00 -.20 2.80 +.49 0.40 15.59 -.08 0.68 17.27 +.31 0.16 15.91 -.30 0.18 23.58 -.77 0.36 39.94 +.25 3.60 +.04 1.53 24.22 +.05 1.40 161.98 -4.32 1.16 90.99 +.06 19.84 -.14 12.16 +.34 619.91 +8.83 1.64 26.52 -.14 35.73 0.84 41.62 +.05 20.26 +.28 16.80 +.75 2.16 132.56 -6.60 3.43 -.07 8.20 +.03 0.52 26.86 -.18 4.51 +.01 2.45 -.02 0.07 8.18 +.07 0.83 19.95 -.07 34.80 -.37 11.28 -.18 33.12 -.28 22.92 +.56 0.40 38.42 -.08 1.75 39.85 -.45 15.86 -.17 2.52 -.01 24.25 -.69 0.80 42.89 +.01 0.03 8.09 -.31 35.09 +.01 0.58 30.55 +.35 1.86 36.50 +.45 12.17 +1.20 1.70 55.36 -.39 2.00 27.60 +.03 28.21 +.36 27.42 +.60 0.36 40.20 +.65 6.99 -.05 0.96 33.59 -.05 23.00 -.98 1.13 -.01 55.30 +.46 18.08 -.21 0.40 39.43 +2.94 44.41 -.69 8.18 +.24 0.07 10.56 -.31 5.15 +.34 1.00 48.61 +.67 10.58 -.40 0.82 31.99 +.20 0.20 27.85 +.14 10.62 +.03 1.00 44.43 -.06 4.40 28.74 +.21 7.58 +.07 5.37 2.76 48.50 +.65 0.62 15.90 +.07 9.00 +.02 1.20 20.83 +.40 28.48 +.23 22.92 +.10 29.55 +.64 11.57 +.10 0.08 16.15 +.26 4.94 +.07 8.41 -.12 1.80 49.23 -.04 11.30 -.20 0.24 49.85 -.72 .50 +.00 66.24 -.03 1.00 65.68 +1.33 3.22 +.01 0.80 10.78 +.17 0.20 6.56 +.07 1.28 49.60 +.81 14.20 -.20 0.40 77.17 -1.77 0.32 47.08 -.47 18.82 +.07 18.64 -.22 1.70 32.80 +.60 0.41 41.39 +1.64 0.60 42.45 -.02 15.68 +.18 19.63 +.24 0.95 37.16 +.51 36.95 -.41 2.32 54.47 +.38 41.90 +.60 1.33 55.38 +.01 .79 -.05 0.20 4.88 -.18 1.02 50.31 -.47 20.68 -.17 12.65 -.19 55.60 +.31 1.80 25.71 +.47 0.04 18.13 +.06 0.28 5.50 -.16 0.02 15.55 +.09 4.46 -.14 0.60 11.06 +.03 1.33 20.81 -.68 24.53 -.07

Nm Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn HutchT Hypercom Hyperdyn

D 57.99 +.19 0.48 41.70 +.33 0.04 6.90 -.01 0.40 17.00 +.59 3.21 -.17 9.10 -.11 4.38 -1.35

I-J-K-L IAC Inter IAMGld g ICICI Bk iGateCorp ING GRE ING GlbDv ING INGPrRTr ION Geoph iPass iShGold s iShGSCI iSAstla iShBraz iSCan iSFrnce iShGer iSh HK iShItaly iShJapn iSh Kor iSMalas iShMex iShSing iSPacxJpn iShSoAfr iSSpain iSTaiwn iSh UK iShThai iShChile iShTurkey iShSilver iShS&P100 iShDJDv iShBTips iShAsiaexJ iShChina25 iShDJTr iSSP500 iShBAgB iShEMkts iShiBxB iSEafeSC iShEMBd iShIndones iSSPGth iSSPGlbEn iShNatRes iShSPLatA iSSPVal iShNMuBd iShB20 T iShB7-10T iShB1-3T iS Eafe iSRusMCV iSRusMCG iShRsMd iSSPMid iShiBxHYB iShSft iShNetw iShNsdqBio iShC&SRl iSSPGlb iSR1KV iSR1KG iSRus1K iSR2KV iShBarIntC iShBarc1-3 iSR2KG iShR2K iShUSPfd iSRus3K iShDJTel iShDJTch iShREst iShDJHm iShFnSc iShUSEngy iShSPSm iShBasM iShPeru iShDJOG iShEur350 iSRsMic iStar ITT Corp ITT Ed Icagen rs IconixBr iGo Inc Ikanos ITW Illumina Imax Corp Immucor ImunoGn Imunmd ImpaxLabs Incyte IndBkMI rs IndiaFd IndiaGC IndoTel Inergy Infinera Informat InfosysT IngerRd IngrmM InlandRE InspPhar IntgDv ISSI IntegrysE Intel InteractBrk IntcntlEx InterDig Intrface Intermec InterMune InterNAP IBM Intl Coal IntFlav IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif IntTower g InterntCap InterOil g Interpublic Intersil IntPotash Intuit IntSurg Invacare Invesco InvMtgCap InVKSrInc InvTech InvRlEst IronMtn Isis IsleCapri iSoftStn n IstaPh ItauUnibH Itron IvanhoeEn IvanhM g Ivanhoe rt Ixia JCrew j2Global JA Solar JDASoft JDS Uniph JPMorgCh JPMAlerian JPMCh pfZ JPMCh pfC Jabil JackHenry JackInBox JacksnHw h JacobsEng Jaguar g Jamba JamesRiv JanusCap Jarden JazzPhrm

28.49 -.01 18.35 -.15 46.10 -1.06 15.43 -.26 7.87 -.11 11.07 +.02 11.07 -.15 0.31 6.00 +.05 8.95 +.43 0.07 1.52 -.10 13.03 -.02 33.51 -.48 0.82 24.91 -.12 2.53 75.25 -.74 0.50 30.72 -.28 0.66 26.13 +.01 0.29 25.06 +.03 0.45 19.55 -.07 0.33 18.08 -.18 0.14 11.12 +.10 0.39 61.66 -.32 0.34 14.41 -.23 0.54 61.85 -.42 0.43 13.72 -.05 1.56 46.56 -.20 1.82 67.54 -1.21 2.15 41.21 -.54 0.29 15.61 +.04 0.43 17.51 -.23 1.57 57.78 +.19 0.54 73.32 -.48 1.28 63.28 -.63 26.23 -.13 1.08 58.45 +.01 1.70 50.24 +.10 2.55 107.35 +.42 0.97 62.31 -.07 0.63 42.83 -.24 1.06 91.07 -.61 2.36 129.59 -.02 3.94 105.88 +.33 0.64 46.56 -.29 5.26 109.07 +.54 1.35 42.71 -.03 5.71 107.03 -.08 0.15 26.08 +.87 1.16 66.96 +.03 0.72 40.08 -.32 0.58 41.50 -.26 1.18 52.40 -.50 1.24 61.64 +.01 3.75 98.72 -.11 3.86 92.43 +.87 3.35 93.96 +.47 0.86 84.02 +.06 1.42 59.75 -.12 0.86 45.80 +.05 0.57 57.46 -.14 1.48 103.25 -.09 0.97 92.16 +.15 7.85 91.53 +.14 58.65 -.57 0.03 34.05 -.47 0.51 94.94 +.12 1.90 67.39 +.75 1.37 64.69 -.22 1.29 66.49 -.02 0.73 58.84 +.05 1.13 71.69 1.16 71.28 +.40 4.51 106.06 +.15 3.04 104.74 +.24 0.58 86.42 -.30 0.89 77.88 +.12 2.86 39.06 +.06 1.20 76.69 +.01 0.70 23.09 +.15 0.28 67.24 +.20 1.97 57.23 +.60 0.07 13.84 +.10 0.59 58.96 +.01 0.49 40.21 -.16 0.74 68.33 +.17 0.87 75.68 -.04 0.89 45.84 -.31 0.18 64.81 -.78 0.98 41.00 -.11 0.40 49.52 +.06 7.94 -.06 1.00 59.16 +.45 70.72 -1.79 2.62 +.24 20.02 +.02 3.63 1.27 1.36 54.91 -.59 69.77 +.02 26.26 -.39 20.40 -.09 8.61 -.06 3.34 -.15 22.78 +.42 14.72 +.30 3.19 +.15 3.87 30.98 -.42 .75 -.05 1.26 34.36 +.28 2.82 40.16 -.22 9.04 -.31 42.40 -.29 0.90 70.00 -.92 0.28 46.24 +.10 19.59 -.09 0.57 9.35 +.15 4.03 -.01 6.54 +.08 9.66 +.15 2.72 48.17 +.09 0.72 21.55 +.31 1.79 16.80 +.08 115.40 -1.41 0.40 47.28 -.40 0.08 16.32 -.03 11.37 -.13 36.89 -.21 6.69 -.15 2.60 161.44 +1.81 8.32 -.11 1.08 56.84 +.51 0.24 18.09 -.25 0.75 28.63 -.18 30.85 +.03 8.46 +.14 11.43 -.74 68.02 -.42 10.89 -.04 0.48 14.54 -.18 35.47 -.42 46.50 -.62 330.93 +2.94 0.05 29.08 -.31 0.44 23.90 -.21 3.49 22.52 +.14 0.29 4.96 +.03 18.11 -.02 0.69 9.18 +.07 0.75 24.89 +.06 9.26 -.07 9.71 +.15 19.70 -.01 5.81 +.29 0.65 22.48 -.24 58.38 -.83 3.21 +.01 1.48 28.38 +.89 2.17 +.12 15.25 +.08 43.39 -.01 28.30 -.05 7.35 -.44 29.99 -.21 16.14 -.35 0.20 44.87 -.15 1.81 36.82 -.01 2.00 26.89 +.04 1.68 25.44 +.12 0.28 19.76 -.41 0.38 30.15 -.04 22.88 +.17 1.70 +.16 49.49 -.83 5.94 -.16 2.21 -.08 21.41 -.37 0.04 12.98 -.09 0.33 34.08 +.80 21.78 -.15 0.08 0.53 0.26 0.54 1.20

nc Sa es gu es a e uno c a

Nm Jefferies JetBlue JinkoSol n JoAnnStrs JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesGrp JonesLL JonesSoda JosABnk s JoyGlbl JnprNtwk K12 KB Home KBR Inc KIT Digitl KKR n KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KV PhmA KC Southn KapStone Kellogg KellySA Kemet rs Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp Kforce KilroyR KimbClk Kimco KindME KindMM KindredHlt KineticC KingPhrm KingldJ rs Kinross g KirbyCp KnghtCap KnightTr KnightT KodiakO g Kohls KoreaElc KornFer Kraft KratonPP KrispKrm Kroger Kulicke L&L Egy n L-1 Ident L-3 Com LAN Air LDK Solar LECG LG Display LKQ Corp LPL Inv n LSI Corp LTXCrd rs LaZBoy Laboph gh LabCp LaBrnch LamResrch LamarAdv Landstar LVSands LaSalleH LasrCard Lattice LawsnSft Lazard LeapWirlss LeapFrog LearCorp LeeEnt LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LbtyASE LibGlobA LibGlobC LibtyMIntA LibStarzA LibtProp LifeTech LifeTFit LifePtH LillyEli LimelghtN Limited Lincare s LincNat LinearTch LinnEngy LionsGt g LiveNatn LivePrsn LizClaib LloydBkg Local.com LockhdM LodgeNet Loews Logitech LogMeIn LongtopFn Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol Lufkin s lululemn g LumberLiq LyonBas A

D 0.30 25.67 -.28 6.35 -.04 27.96 -3.66 60.48 +.10 1.56 -.02 2.16 61.08 -1.14 0.64 38.61 -.36 0.20 12.77 +.51 0.20 88.40 +.29 1.37 -.06 42.61 -.03 0.70 85.09 -.92 34.82 -.06 29.00 -.81 0.25 15.25 -.03 0.20 31.95 -.39 14.24 +.21 0.23 14.83 -.24 0.56 9.56 -.22 1.00 43.67 +.56 19.85 +.19 1.27 -.26 47.29 -.77 16.76 +.28 1.62 51.73 -.12 19.28 +.87 14.31 -.20 0.48 42.46 +.01 3.97 -.03 12.16 -.33 0.04 8.91 +.30 17.36 +.26 1.40 37.80 +.10 2.80 65.61 +1.64 0.72 17.87 +.02 4.52 72.59 -.11 4.52 64.69 -.36 18.74 -.17 46.44 -.35 14.22 -.01 3.08 +.09 0.10 16.32 -.29 43.96 +.13 13.66 +.02 0.24 19.41 +.40 1.70 23.27 -.38 5.54 -.19 52.55 +.52 12.77 -.05 22.68 +.43 1.16 31.18 -.25 31.21 -1.98 6.58 -.27 0.42 21.65 -.05 8.89 -.36 8.33 +.43 11.93 +.03 1.60 78.82 +1.66 0.46 29.83 -.05 13.37 -1.07 1.51 -.08 17.63 +.46 24.32 +.26 32.66 -1.34 5.91 +.07 8.13 -.04 8.41 +.23 .90 -.01 90.96 +1.28 3.61 -.10 52.70 +.47 38.27 -.55 0.20 41.46 -.34 45.04 -.79 0.44 27.84 -.24 6.26 +.01 5.67 +.01 9.62 +.45 0.50 42.48 -.55 13.21 -.10 4.09 106.88 -.24 3.00 -.07 0.24 35.61 +.24 1.08 22.68 +.12 0.40 32.55 +.14 0.16 19.77 -.11 0.60 47.82 -.11 0.25 31.42 -.63 1.23 1.73 -.09 0.46 8.44 +.23 36.58 -.04 0.31 5.05 -.01 40.85 +.16 38.48 +.19 15.85 -.14 65.11 +.29 1.90 34.04 -.05 54.49 +.49 40.46 -.40 35.35 +.23 1.96 34.73 -.05 6.08 -.10 0.60 28.42 -.39 0.80 27.11 +.30 0.20 29.16 +.16 0.96 34.85 -.23 2.64 38.45 -.05 6.11 -.05 10.64 -.32 10.81 -.15 4.99 +.29 3.97 -.17 4.03 -.19 3.00 79.07 +1.04 3.38 +.03 0.25 40.70 +.21 19.14 +.01 39.00 -2.65 31.94 -.54 4.50 74.41 +.16 10.47 +.43 0.44 25.56 +.49 1.44 107.46 +4.38 0.50 60.79 -.75 67.08 -.89 26.28 +.30 35.70 +.05

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MB Fncl MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDU Res MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MCR MIN h MGIC MGM Rsts MIPS Tech MKS Inst MPG OffTr MPG pfA MSC Ind MSCI Inc MV OilTr Macerich MackCali Macys MadCatz g MagelnHl MagelMPtr MagicSft Magma MagnaI gs MagHRes MahangrT Majesco h MAKO Srg Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarinaB rs MktVGold MkVStrMet MktVRus MkVEMBd MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktVCoal MarIntA MarshM MarshIls Martek MStewrt MartMM MarvellT Masco

2.80 86.98 +.61 0.04 17.99 -.05 11.37 -.90 0.37 7.01 -.01 1.00 31.36 +.17 0.65 21.29 -.06 11.45 -.07 8.49 -.03 0.94 8.23 +.09 0.68 9.27 +.04 0.56 6.30 +.02 8.94 -.05 14.58 -.52 15.13 +.24 27.55 +.25 3.29 -.15 19.20 +.40 0.88 59.34 -.49 35.15 -.35 2.93 35.54 -1.19 2.00 47.00 +.66 1.80 33.95 +.23 0.20 23.33 -.13 .85 +.00 48.75 -.05 2.98 55.00 -.07 0.50 8.32 -.25 5.35 -.09 0.72 57.01 -1.31 7.00 -.19 2.38 +.04 1.29 +.09 16.00 -.44 0.08 13.31 +.02 5.41 -.02 0.74 67.37 +3.48 0.52 17.57 -.02 1.00 43.55 +1.40 1.12 -.07 0.40 53.12 -.31 23.08 -.36 0.18 39.18 -.18 0.49 26.29 -.08 2.93 33.31 -.19 0.33 54.35 -.30 3.58 55.70 -.95 0.19 46.08 -.02 0.35 39.87 -.39 0.84 28.00 +.34 0.04 7.17 -.01 31.45 4.01 -.05 1.60 84.54 -.38 19.79 -.18 0.30 13.38 +.02

Nm Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg McClatchy McCorm McDrmInt s McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MeadWvco Mechel Mechel pf MecoxL n MedAssets MedcoHlth MedProp Medicis Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck Meredith MergeHlth Mesab Metalico Metalline Methanx MetLife MetroPCS Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvisn MidAApt MdwGold g MillerHer Millicom MincoG g MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s Modine Mohawk Molex MolexA MolsCoorB Molycorp n Momenta MoneyGrm MonroMf s Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MS China Mosaic MotrlaSol n MotrlaMo n Motricity n Move Inc MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NGAS Rs h NII Hldg NIVS IntT NPS Phm NRG Egy NV Energy NXP Sem n NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NaraBncp NasdOMX NBkGreece NatFnPrt NatFuGas NatGrid NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NatusMed NavigCons Navios NaviosMar Navistar NektarTh Neogen Net1UEPS NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netflix NtScout NetSolTch NetSuite NetwkEng Neuralstem NeurMtrx Neurcrine NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NwGold g NY&Co NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NextEraEn NiSource Nicor NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordion g Nordstrm NorflkSo NoAmEn g NA Pall g NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaMeas NovaMd rs NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax Novell Novlus NovoNord Novogen h NSTAR NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NvIMO NuvMuVal NvMulSI&G NvMSI&G2

D 2.75 28.40 +.50 0.24 54.06 -.07 15.59 -.15 0.60 241.54 +2.54 0.83 23.74 +.09 2.33 -.09 0.84 26.42 -.56 5.18 1.12 46.32 +.32 19.68 -.47 2.44 75.48 +.10 1.00 38.41 -.12 0.72 74.57 +.32 15.36 -.17 47.72 0.90 60.71 -.89 1.00 28.04 -.45 31.07 -.44 9.82 -.18 5.80 +.33 19.43 -.48 63.53 +.06 0.80 10.90 +.11 0.24 25.61 +.15 65.89 +.59 0.90 38.14 +.56 7.07 -.27 0.48 26.19 -.36 12.40 +.11 69.47 -1.87 8.47 +.10 1.52 33.36 -.44 0.92 33.37 -2.11 4.36 +.10 2.49 34.84 -.93 5.50 -.01 .94 -.00 0.62 29.29 -.52 0.74 46.38 +.31 13.49 +.64 0.14 13.17 -.01 1.38 37.32 +.14 6.75 +.06 9.98 -.08 45.08 -.16 23.69 +.27 0.64 28.45 +.07 2.05 -.05 2.51 62.79 +1.11 .95 +.01 0.09 24.54 -.29 7.24 95.29 -.39 2.05 -.05 0.20 26.26 +.15 7.02 +.02 9.69 +.07 5.49 +.15 4.08 +.05 19.74 -.01 17.17 +.35 58.43 +.43 0.70 25.34 +.07 0.70 21.23 +.08 1.12 48.08 -.39 46.89 +.07 12.50 -3.30 2.62 +.04 32.47 +.42 1.12 72.18 +1.06 21.12 -.45 0.40 20.21 +.22 0.46 29.01 -.10 0.20 29.34 -.41 2.44 25.57 -.33 0.20 75.71 -.32 38.70 +.04 34.14 -.53 17.62 +1.06 2.20 -.01 0.07 4.08 -.01 1.10 71.04 -1.04 23.80 +.28 21.54 +.34 16.53 +.10 34.21 -.16 1.80 17.60 -.05 .56 -.02 42.94 +.21 2.15 -.03 7.38 -.23 20.85 +.14 0.48 14.43 -.06 24.28 +1.63 1.20 32.29 -.63 22.25 -.21 0.14 30.03 +.46 16.49 -.05 9.77 +.48 24.30 -.26 0.29 1.79 -.12 12.76 -.01 1.38 68.14 -.19 7.04 44.04 -.57 0.44 68.13 -.12 0.04 8.68 -.01 1.52 25.21 +.55 0.40 14.63 -.12 1.88 37.19 +.64 15.26 10.03 +.13 0.24 4.80 -.33 1.72 18.65 -.80 63.09 +3.26 11.49 +.05 35.66 +.03 11.61 -.49 33.83 -.08 53.70 -1.85 40.73 -.33 186.74 +2.78 22.83 -.02 2.12 -.03 25.90 -.36 2.05 -.14 1.97 -.07 .58 -.05 7.58 +.28 15.43 +.07 5.54 +.09 .07 -.01 7.70 +.08 5.82 1.00 18.68 +.35 10.49 -.14 0.28 15.18 +.30 6.99 -.05 0.20 17.97 +.11 67.67 -.55 0.60 55.88 +.71 5.62 -.04 0.15 15.65 -.12 0.15 17.30 -.07 0.20 24.38 -.66 2.00 54.57 +.43 0.92 18.82 +.06 1.86 50.21 -.17 1.24 82.88 +.22 15.40 +.12 23.35 +.27 0.90 37.06 -.57 0.72 85.35 -1.76 0.56 10.59 -.32 6.31 +.08 1.70 24.38 -.06 10.53 -.34 0.80 41.56 -.62 1.60 62.92 -1.39 11.20 -.22 6.53 -.25 1.03 33.04 +.22 18.10 -.11 24.18 -.87 1.12 52.59 +.03 2.49 +.02 1.88 69.51 +.60 0.40 4.89 +.05 0.40 11.98 +.04 9.81 +.19 13.14 12.88 -.25 1.99 57.80 +.30 7.30 +.22 2.26 -.03 5.94 -.02 35.61 +.07 1.41 113.99 +1.41 1.36 -.09 1.70 43.36 +.32 0.50 30.32 -.30 27.42 -.49 19.80 -.13 1.45 44.94 -.13 0.86 13.22 +.24 0.47 9.07 +.03 0.68 8.39 -.01 0.70 8.84 -.01

NuvQPf2 Nvidia NxStageMd O2Micro OCZ Tech OGE Engy OReillyAu OSI Sys OasisPet n OcciPet Oceaneer OceanFr rs Och-Ziff Oclaro rs OcwenFn OfficeDpt OfficeMax OilSvHT OilStates Oilsands g OldNBcp OldRepub Olin OmegaHlt Omncre Omnicom OmniVisn Omnova OnSmcnd OnTrack Oncolyt g ONEOK OnlineRes OnyxPh OpenTable OpnwvSy OpexaTher OpkoHlth optXprs Oracle OraSure OrbitalSci Orexigen OrientEH OrientFn OrionEngy OshkoshCp OvShip OwensM s OwensCorn OwensIll Oxigene h PDL Bio PF Chng PG&E Cp PHH Corp PLX Tch PMC Sra PMI Grp PNC PNM Res PPG PPL Corp PRGX Glbl Paccar PacerIntl PacEth h PacSunwr PackAmer PallCorp PanASlv PaneraBrd ParagShip ParamTch ParaG&S Parexel ParkDrl ParkerHan Parkrvsn h PartnerRe PatriotCoal Patterson PattUTI Paychex PeabdyE Pearson Pengrth g PnnNGm PennVa PennWst g Penney PenRE Penske Pentair PeopUtdF PepBoy PepcoHold PepsiCo PeregrineP PerfectWld PerkElm Prmian Perrigo PetMed Petrohawk PetrbrsA Petrobras PetroDev PtroqstE PetsMart Pfizer PhrmAth PhmHTr PharmPdt Pharmacyc Pharmasset Pharmerica PhilipMor PhilipsEl PhlVH PhnxCos PhotrIn PiedNG PiedmOfc n Pier 1 PilgrimsP PimCpOp PimcoHiI PimcoMu2 PinnclEnt PinWst PionDrill PioNtrl PitnyBw PlainsAA PlainsEx PlatGpMet PlatUnd PlaybyB Plexus PlugPwr h PlumCrk PluristemT Polaris Polo RL Polycom PolyMet g PolyOne Polypore Poniard h Pool Corp Popular PortGE PostPrp Potash Potlatch PwrInteg Power-One PSCrudeDS PwshDB PwShCurH PS Agri PS Oil PS USDBull PwSClnEn PwSFoodBv PSPrivEq PSFinPf PSETecLd PSBldABd PS SC Util PShNatMu PSHYCpBd PwShPfd PShEMSov PSIndia PwShs QQQ PSS&PBW Powrwav Praxair PrecCastpt PrecDrill PrmWBc h PriceTR priceline PrideIntl PrinFncl PrisaA n PrisaB n PrivateB ProShtDow ProShtQQQ ProShtS&P PrUShS&P ProUltDow PrUlShDow ProUltMC ProUltQQQ PrUShQQQ ProUltSP ProUShL20 ProUSL7-10T PrUSCh25 rs ProUSEM rs ProUSRE rs ProUSOG rs ProUSBM rs ProUltRE rs ProUShtFn ProUFin rs PrUPShQQQ ProUltUtil ProUltO&G ProUBasM ProUPR2K ProShtR2K ProUltPQQQ ProUSR2K ProUltR2K ProSht20Tr ProUSSP500 ProUltSP500 ProUltCrude ProSUltGold ProUSGld rs ProUSSlv rs ProUShCrude ProSUltSilv ProUltShYen ProUShEuro ProceraNt

D 0.66

7.95 +.04 23.97 -.76 24.48 -.08 6.73 +.43 7.73 +.34 1.50 45.96 +.22 56.29 -.96 37.25 +1.30 26.87 -.91 1.52 97.15 -.03 70.84 -.13 .83 -.03 0.88 15.79 -.12 12.60 -.51 10.17 -.07 5.34 -.25 17.72 -.05 2.40 143.62 +.51 62.89 -.11 .52 -.03 0.28 11.45 -.02 0.69 12.85 -.01 0.80 19.55 -.24 1.48 22.09 +.30 0.13 25.76 +.19 0.80 45.91 +.18 25.93 -.22 7.49 -.03 11.23 -.04 3.69 -.04 6.55 +.26 2.08 58.53 -.46 6.65 +.28 35.34 +.03 76.80 +2.15 2.13 +.15 2.69 -.11 3.83 +.18 4.50 14.24 -.17 0.20 32.29 -.11 6.73 -.01 17.37 -.01 9.07 +.08 12.73 +.03 0.20 11.71 -.17 4.67 +.61 36.73 +.15 1.75 32.67 -.23 0.71 29.76 -.19 32.34 -.40 32.36 +.56 .20 -.00 1.00 4.84 -.08 0.63 47.70 +.75 1.82 47.00 -.46 24.77 +.34 3.51 -.04 8.88 -.12 3.04 +.03 0.40 60.88 +.40 0.50 13.34 -.07 2.20 83.58 +.27 1.40 25.83 -.04 6.05 -.16 0.48 55.83 +.30 6.83 -.01 .84 +.01 4.50 +.16 0.60 27.92 -.97 0.70 49.05 -.19 0.10 31.91 +.63 97.62 +.66 0.20 3.05 -.10 24.03 -.05 3.09 -.07 21.92 +.30 4.12 +.06 1.16 86.49 -.58 .55 -.13 2.20 82.77 +.59 23.52 -.41 0.40 32.80 +1.20 0.20 20.75 +.35 1.24 33.02 -.11 0.34 60.50 +1.21 0.55 16.77 -.11 0.84 12.69 -.35 36.26 -.20 0.23 17.08 +.17 1.08 25.91 -.16 0.80 32.13 -.39 0.60 13.58 +.31 16.96 -.05 0.80 36.64 +.19 0.62 13.36 +.16 0.12 14.11 -.02 1.08 18.70 1.92 65.77 -.41 2.44 -.06 23.00 -1.00 0.28 25.14 +.19 1.38 20.90 -.97 0.28 73.46 +2.68 0.50 14.91 18.21 -.49 1.20 32.55 -.70 1.20 36.02 -.71 41.73 +.31 7.72 +.19 0.50 40.56 +.22 0.80 18.47 +.02 3.30 -.12 2.42 65.21 -.50 0.60 30.06 +.57 5.20 -.12 49.03 -1.01 11.30 +.02 2.56 57.53 +.43 0.95 32.01 +.37 0.15 58.56 -.04 2.61 +.09 6.51 -.04 1.12 28.72 +.24 1.26 19.84 +.03 9.57 -.07 7.30 -.20 1.38 18.25 +.22 1.46 13.06 +.06 0.78 9.95 +.10 14.86 -.32 2.10 42.11 +.08 8.32 0.08 88.45 -2.06 1.46 24.04 +.05 3.83 63.86 -.19 33.32 -.07 2.27 -.12 0.32 45.18 +.44 6.11 27.40 +.13 .71 -.04 1.68 41.78 +.38 3.96 +.71 1.80 75.94 +.07 0.40 104.45 -.30 43.21 -.41 2.10 -.07 12.88 +.19 44.87 +.42 .55 -.03 0.52 24.17 +.29 3.20 -.02 1.04 22.28 +.06 0.80 36.68 +.50 0.40 162.93 -2.19 2.04 36.21 +.36 0.20 36.81 -.36 10.74 -.53 60.57 +1.79 27.37 -.35 23.71 -.01 33.34 -.16 27.42 -.42 22.43 -.01 10.56 -.19 0.21 17.96 -.08 0.37 11.02 -.07 1.27 17.70 +.02 0.06 17.45 -.01 1.48 25.16 +.12 0.23 28.45 +.10 1.12 22.12 +.08 1.42 18.38 +.01 0.97 14.10 +.04 1.57 26.42 -.05 0.24 23.00 -.59 0.33 56.53 +.08 0.29 21.05 +.02 3.41 -.12 1.80 91.24 -.20 0.12 143.79 +1.62 10.14 -.16 .33 -.02 1.08 66.83 +.31 428.86 +5.06 32.53 -.02 0.55 32.61 +.24 10.27 -.10 10.83 -.20 0.04 15.19 +.19 42.83 +.05 33.34 -.06 42.70 +.01 22.53 -.01 0.37 58.29 -.04 19.29 -.02 0.04 65.58 +.22 87.52 +.19 10.76 -.04 0.43 50.55 -.02 38.16 -.74 42.12 -.46 30.15 +.35 33.03 +.38 17.25 -.35 35.06 +.27 19.99 -.01 0.41 52.73 +1.03 14.83 +.02 0.07 69.58 +.07 27.74 -.12 1.11 44.01 -.22 0.23 48.61 -.39 0.04 48.31 +.05 155.32 +.26 32.22 -.08 164.46 +.57 12.58 -.04 0.01 42.27 +.13 44.72 -.43 17.89 -.01 0.38 221.32 +.29 10.92 -.40 62.00 -.23 31.44 +.06 12.62 +.06 11.51 +.41 118.36 -1.13 16.04 -.09 19.30 -.10 .61 -.01

Nm

D

ProctGam ProgrssEn ProgrsSoft ProgsvCp ProLogis ProspctCap ProspBcsh ProtLife ProvEn g ProvidFS Prudentl PSEG PubStrg PudaCoal PulteGrp PMIIT PPrIT

1.93 66.70 +.12 2.48 45.39 +.13 42.36 -.43 1.40 19.85 -.02 0.45 14.64 +.41 1.21 11.60 +.18 0.70 41.68 +.05 0.56 28.11 +.10 0.54 7.91 -.10 0.44 14.49 +.16 1.15 61.41 +.10 1.37 32.50 -.20 3.20 106.74 +1.62 11.99 -.25 8.33 -.10 0.52 5.84 +.04 0.71 6.44 +.06

Q-R-S-T QEP Res n QIAGEN QLT QR Eng n QiaoXing QlikTech n Qlogic Qualcom QuantaSvc QntmDSS QuantFu h Quaterra g QstDiag QuestSft Questar s Questcor QuickLog QksilvRes Quiksilvr QwestCm RAIT Fin RF MicD RLI Cp RPC s RPM RSC Hldgs RTI Biolog RXi Phrm Rackspace RadianGrp RadntSys RadientPh RadOneD RadioShk Radware Ralcorp Rambus RamcoG Randgold RangeRs RareEle g RJamesFn Rayonier Raytheon RealD n RealNwk RltyInco RedHat Reddy Ice Rdiff.cm RedwdTr RegalBel RegalEnt RgcyCtrs RegncyEn Regenrn RegBkHT RegionsFn Regis Cp ReinsGrp RelStlAl RenaisRe ReneSola RentACt Rentech Repsol RepubAir RepubSvc RschMotn ResMed s ResoluteEn Resolute wt ResrceCap ResConn RetailHT RexEnergy RexahnPh ReynAm s RigNet n RioTinto s RitchieBr RiteAid h Riverbed s RobbMyer RobtHalf RockTen RockwlAut RockColl RockwdH RogCm gs Roper RosettaR RossStrs Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g RBScotlnd RBSct prM RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA RoyGld Royce Rubicon g RubiconTc RubyTues Ruddick Rudolph RushEntA Ryanair Ryder RdxSPEW Ryland SAIC SAP AG SBA Com SCANA SEI Inv SFN Grp SK Tlcm SLGreen SLGrn pfC SLM Cp SM Energy SpdrDJIA SpdrGold SpdrIntRE SP Mid S&P500ETF Spdr Div SpdrHome SpdrKbwBk SpdrKbwIns SpdrWilRE SpdrLehHY SpdrNuBST SPLeIntTB SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrKbw RB SpdrRetl SpdrOGEx SpdrMetM SPX Cp SRA Intl STEC STMicro STR Hldgs SVB FnGp SWS Grp SABESP Safeway StJoe StJude Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty SamsO&G SJuanB SanderFm SanDisk SandRdge SangBio Sanmina Sanofi SantFn pfC Santarus Sapient SaraLee Sasol Satcon h SavientPh Savvis Schlmbrg Schnitzer Schulmn SchwUSLgC Schwab SciGames Scotts ScrippsNet SeabGld g SeadrillLtd SeagateT SealAir Sealy SearsHldgs Seaspan SeattGen SelCmfrt SelMedHld SemiHTr SemiLeds n SempraEn Semtech Senesco SenHous Sensata n Sensient Sequenom ServiceCp ShandaGm ShawGrp Sherwin ShipFin Shire ShoreTel Shutterfly SiderNac s Siemens SifyTech SigaTech h

0.08 38.79 +.18 18.77 7.02 -.09 21.40 +.42 2.48 -.12 22.87 17.31 -.30 0.76 51.52 +.03 23.06 -.34 3.83 -.10 .45 -.02 1.83 -.13 0.40 56.28 +2.11 25.33 -.12 0.56 17.57 -.27 15.73 +.11 5.89 +.45 14.70 -.27 4.46 +.09 0.32 6.95 +.02 0.03 2.76 7.66 -.24 1.16 53.04 +2.06 0.19 17.39 +.49 0.84 23.12 +.27 11.94 +.01 2.80 +.16 1.93 -.18 30.94 -.38 0.01 7.48 -.22 18.18 +.04 .79 -.03 1.27 -.07 0.25 15.88 +.26 34.28 -.99 62.53 +.50 20.64 -.06 0.65 13.11 +.06 0.17 76.30 -2.99 0.16 46.54 -.18 12.42 +.05 0.52 35.88 -.58 2.16 58.86 +1.13 1.50 52.32 +.50 25.32 +.67 3.86 1.73 34.72 +.53 40.00 -2.08 3.69 -.06 7.60 +.16 1.00 15.22 +.05 0.68 67.06 +.48 0.84 12.35 +.17 1.85 42.34 +.55 1.78 26.82 +.16 33.67 +.30 0.59 87.69 -.16 0.04 7.02 -.28 0.16 17.59 0.48 58.79 -.29 0.40 52.02 +.21 1.00 65.48 +.41 10.34 -.49 0.24 29.95 +.40 1.24 -.01 1.20 30.44 -.23 6.31 +.07 0.80 30.71 +.19 61.40 -1.29 31.92 -.31 16.96 -.21 4.54 -.02 1.00 7.07 +.02 0.16 20.54 -.18 1.71 107.53 +.76 12.32 +.11 1.54 -.05 1.96 32.09 -.08 13.22 -.49 0.90 68.57 -1.96 0.42 24.84 -.11 1.06 +.03 32.39 -1.92 0.18 39.52 -.31 0.52 33.83 +.50 0.80 63.51 +4.20 1.40 74.69 -.04 0.96 64.36 +.76 40.13 +.32 1.28 35.30 -.36 0.44 74.93 +.17 34.08 -.89 0.64 66.06 +.53 62.76 -1.02 33.08 -.02 2.00 53.50 -.17 13.79 -.33 16.26 -.03 47.58 -.18 3.36 69.16 -.76 3.36 69.08 -.45 0.44 46.64 +.78 0.12 14.58 -.01 4.70 -.06 19.77 -.35 13.98 +.15 0.52 34.33 -.08 9.56 -.16 20.02 +.44 2.29 30.11 -.49 1.08 48.92 -.71 0.63 48.25 -.03 0.12 17.86 +.10 16.52 +.01 0.67 55.16 -.37 40.64 +.37 1.90 42.50 +.23 0.20 24.43 +.23 9.61 +.29 17.54 0.40 70.74 -.76 1.91 25.00 14.18 +.14 0.10 56.04 -.28 2.92 119.49 -.07 130.10 -.26 3.39 39.10 +.21 1.51 167.62 +.27 2.37 129.17 +.07 1.74 52.46 +.16 0.33 17.96 +.03 0.13 26.31 -.03 0.67 43.86 +.18 1.79 62.25 +.72 4.68 40.31 0.49 23.61 -.02 0.28 58.74 -.08 45.86 +.01 0.35 26.66 +.13 0.49 46.75 -.08 0.20 53.17 -.56 0.38 66.66 -.09 1.00 76.62 -.59 26.89 +1.33 20.87 -.11 0.28 11.27 -.58 18.33 +.02 53.10 +.38 0.04 4.48 +.11 2.55 48.60 -.44 0.48 20.98 -.12 27.75 +.05 42.62 +.46 11.61 -.08 123.97 -3.86 41.96 +.30 13.01 +.13 1.99 -.06 1.78 23.47 -.99 0.60 40.80 -.18 48.55 -2.13 7.15 -.23 7.40 +.07 14.77 +.70 1.63 34.68 -.10 1.63 21.30 -.03 3.23 0.35 12.36 -.10 0.46 19.64 +1.28 1.46 50.44 -1.21 5.04 +.19 10.16 +.26 26.43 -.55 1.00 83.25 -1.00 0.07 61.77 +.13 0.62 21.44 -.01 0.46 30.74 0.24 18.08 -.22 10.67 -.01 1.00 52.82 +.22 0.30 46.39 -.71 28.02 +.03 2.41 32.08 -.13 13.50 -.02 0.52 26.82 -.01 2.60 -.11 77.57 +2.42 0.50 13.77 -.23 16.22 -.04 10.48 +.09 7.04 -.01 0.56 34.25 -.19 17.81 -.67 1.56 52.58 -.04 21.98 -.30 .30 -.02 1.48 22.24 +.44 29.79 -.04 0.84 35.19 -.16 6.78 -.04 0.16 8.61 -.08 5.97 -.15 37.90 -1.48 1.44 86.09 +2.79 1.44 20.47 -.73 0.34 79.79 +.69 8.27 +.05 32.54 -.71 0.58 17.47 -.10 3.72 125.31 +.54 2.66 11.92 -.06

Nm SigmaAld SignatBk SignetJwlrs SilicGrIn SilicnImg SilcnLab Slcnware SilvStd g SilvWhtn g SilvrcpM g SimonProp Sina Sinclair SinoCkg n SiriusXM SironaDent Skechers SkilldHcre Sky-mobi n SkywksSol SmartM SmartHeat SmithWes SmithAO s SmithMicro SmithfF Smucker SmurfStn n SocQ&M SodaStrm n Sohu.cm Solarfun SolarWinds Solera Solutia Somaxon SonicAut SonicCorp SonicSolu SonocoP Sonus SonyCp Sothebys Sourcefire SouthnCo SthnCopper SoUnCo SwstAirl SwstnEngy Spansion n SpectraEn SpectPh Spherix h SpiritAero Spreadtrm SprintNex SprottSilv SprottGld n StageStrs SP Matls SP HlthC SP CnSt SP Consum SP Engy SPDR Fncl SP Inds SP Tech SP Util StdPac StanBlkDk Staples StarScient Starbucks StarwdHtl StarwdPT StateBcp StateStr Statoil ASA StlDynam Steelcse StemCells Stericycle SterlBcsh Sterlite SMadden s StewEnt StifelFn StillwtrM StoneEngy Stonerdg StratHotels Stryker SuccessF SulphCo SumitMitsu SunHlth n SunLfFn g Suncor gs SunesisP h Sunoco SunOpta SunPowerA SunPwr B SunriseSen SunstnHtl Suntech SunTrst SuperGen SupEnrgy SuperMda Supvalu SusqBnc SwRCmATR SwERCmTR SwftEng SwiftTrns n Symantec SymetraF Synaptics Syngenta Synopsys Synovus Synovus pf Sysco TAL Ed n TAM SA TCF Fncl TD Ameritr TECO TFS Fncl THQ TIM Partic TJX TRWAuto TTM Tch tw telecom TaiwSemi TakeTwo Talbots TalecrisBio Taleo A TalismE g Tanger s TanzRy g TargaRsLP Target Taseko TASER TataMotors Taubmn TechData TeckRes g Teekay TeekayTnk Tekelec TlCmSys TelNorL TelcmNZ TelItalia Teledyne Teleflex TelefEsp s TelMexL Telestone Tellabs TempleInld TmpGlb TempurP Tenaris TenetHlth Tengsco Tenneco Teradata Teradyn Terex Terremk TeslaMot n Tesoro TesseraT TetraTc TetraTech TevaPhrm TxCapBsh TexInst TexRdhse Textron TheStreet Theravnce ThermoFis ThmBet ThomCrk g ThomsonR Thor Inds Thoratec 3M Co TibcoSft Tidwtr Tiffany Timberlnd TimberlnR TW Cable TimeWarn Timken Titan Intl TitanMet TiVo Inc TollBros Trchmrk TorDBk g Total SA TotalSys TowerSemi TowersWat Toyota TractSup s TradeStatn TrCda g TransAtlH TrnsatlPet TransGlb Transocn Travelers Travelzoo TriValley TridentM h TrimbleN TrinaSolar Trinity TriQuint Triumph Trustmk

D 0.64 63.82 +.27 53.77 +3.76 41.82 -.34 9.93 -.25 7.08 -.03 47.62 -.14 0.41 6.56 -.03 22.38 +.03 29.24 -1.33 0.08 9.67 +.01 3.20 100.56 +.81 81.30 -2.20 0.43 8.22 +.23 11.76 -.42 1.58 44.38 +.31 21.15 -.01 10.59 +.44 6.67 -.24 30.01 +.82 6.59 +.32 5.05 -.02 3.62 -.04 0.56 42.04 +2.24 12.28 -.89 20.15 +.06 1.60 63.11 -.64 36.38 +1.38 0.73 53.30 -.39 39.39 +1.51 67.85 +1.04 9.02 -.65 18.96 -.52 0.30 51.99 +.04 23.55 -.10 2.86 -.07 0.10 12.67 +.14 10.11 -.08 14.71 -.09 1.12 35.92 +.12 2.80 -.07 0.14 35.15 +.30 0.20 39.42 -1.21 23.16 -.40 1.82 38.46 +.06 1.68 43.85 -.80 0.60 26.41 -.05 0.02 12.50 -.26 38.48 -.57 20.89 +.38 1.04 25.59 -.18 6.30 -.03 .53 -.03 23.93 +.24 19.12 -.46 4.36 -.01 11.70 -.14 11.51 -.11 0.30 16.55 +.09 1.17 37.93 +.05 0.57 32.15 0.78 29.64 +.10 0.49 37.99 +.02 0.99 70.16 -.20 0.16 16.41 -.03 0.60 36.20 -.05 0.32 26.20 +.12 1.27 32.08 -.05 4.57 +.02 1.36 66.38 +.31 0.36 23.44 -.09 1.68 -.03 0.52 33.65 +.16 0.30 61.44 -1.26 1.60 22.20 +.44 0.20 9.70 +.59 0.04 47.69 -.12 1.02 24.20 -.45 0.30 18.32 +.24 0.16 10.68 -.18 .97 -.01 79.90 -.37 0.06 9.13 -.01 0.08 15.45 -.12 38.13 -.89 0.12 6.45 +.05 63.91 +.22 21.33 -.36 22.33 -.32 15.09 +.15 5.50 +.08 0.72 58.37 +.77 28.60 -.40 .19 -.01 7.09 +.06 12.01 -.24 1.44 31.15 -.17 0.40 37.71 -.77 .41 -.02 0.60 42.06 +.69 7.41 -.16 14.23 -.24 13.95 -.06 7.31 +.15 9.96 +.06 8.87 -.49 0.04 29.18 +.12 2.94 +.02 33.68 -.71 8.11 -.13 0.35 7.25 +.02 0.04 9.88 -.11 11.02 -.14 9.12 -.10 39.20 -.06 14.45 +.66 17.83 -.09 0.20 13.05 -.15 28.40 +.41 1.13 65.22 +2.71 26.75 0.04 2.80 -.10 2.06 26.00 -.46 1.04 29.66 -.09 13.04 -2.20 0.92 24.69 -.22 0.20 15.75 +.16 0.20 20.13 -.31 0.82 18.22 -.01 9.77 +.11 5.72 +.04 0.71 38.36 -.48 0.60 48.56 +1.01 57.46 -.09 16.33 +.14 16.99 -.04 0.47 13.22 -.23 12.22 -.07 6.21 -.06 24.01 +.01 29.71 +.67 0.25 22.03 -.22 0.78 25.68 +.54 6.01 -.15 2.19 33.18 -.01 1.00 55.95 +.15 5.35 -.14 4.20 -.40 0.32 26.23 -.16 1.75 51.63 +.74 46.90 +.30 0.60 59.30 -.75 1.27 32.01 -.30 1.28 11.68 +.48 11.73 -.91 4.21 -.12 1.65 16.01 -.07 0.77 8.78 -.05 0.68 14.74 +.01 46.86 +.17 1.36 57.49 +.26 1.75 25.22 -.06 0.77 16.98 -.07 8.05 -.43 0.08 5.69 -1.35 0.44 23.80 -.13 0.54 10.39 +.06 43.39 -.87 0.68 45.89 +.20 6.80 -.02 .79 -.03 42.01 -.55 43.62 -2.18 14.14 -.16 31.63 -.07 13.57 +.07 24.68 +.19 17.98 -.12 20.96 -.50 23.83 -.16 11.17 -.11 0.75 54.57 +1.90 22.46 +.35 0.52 33.98 -.67 17.99 +.60 0.08 27.07 -.07 0.10 2.96 +.12 21.75 -.34 56.91 +.67 49.06 -.15 13.41 -.32 1.16 39.53 +.10 0.40 36.31 -.15 25.83 +.12 2.10 88.50 -1.82 21.05 -.41 1.00 53.68 -.61 1.00 58.60 +.47 26.84 -.19 .88 -.02 1.60 67.90 +.20 0.85 32.52 -.23 0.72 51.03 +.87 0.02 18.76 +.15 17.89 -.18 9.88 -.01 20.50 -.03 0.64 62.26 +.56 2.44 75.79 -.62 3.13 58.69 -.10 0.28 17.53 +.15 1.44 -.02 0.30 53.77 +.39 1.05 83.86 +.36 0.28 48.36 +.74 6.99 +.05 1.60 37.05 -.42 0.84 52.20 +.29 2.99 +.01 14.04 -.25 78.25 -.59 1.44 56.23 +.61 45.05 +.47 .41 -.00 1.49 -.04 43.20 +.46 28.02 -1.84 0.32 28.16 +.45 13.00 -.17 0.16 96.11 +.99 0.92 25.40 +.33

Nm

D

TuesMrn Tuppwre Turkcell TutorPerini TwinDisc TwoHrbInv TycoElec TycoIntl Tyson

1.20 0.66 1.00 0.32 1.48 0.64 0.86 0.16

4.88 +.86 46.20 -.78 16.30 +.07 23.55 +.23 31.44 +2.14 9.97 +.04 37.06 -.08 44.72 -.02 16.77 -.24

U-V-W-X-Y-Z U-Store-It 0.28 9.43 +.04 UBS AG 18.02 -.01 UDR 0.74 23.46 +.19 UGI Corp 1.00 32.69 +.05 UIL Hold 1.73 30.48 +.10 URS 44.06 -.32 US Airwy 10.13 +.03 US Geoth 1.25 -.04 US Gold 6.06 -.25 USA Tech h 1.80 +.27 USEC 5.48 -.10 USG 16.02 -.24 UTiWrldwd 0.06 21.88 +.17 UTStrcm 2.05 -.06 UltaSalon 36.05 -.04 UltraPt g 45.61 -.80 Uluru .09 -.01 Umpqua 0.20 12.09 +.17 UndrArmr 53.00 -.52 UnilevNV 1.11 30.59 -.76 Unilever 1.11 29.88 -.86 UnionPac 1.52 93.02 -1.18 Unisys 28.00 +.11 UtdCBksGa 1.71 UtdContl 24.09 -.03 UtdMicro 0.08 3.26 UtdNtrlF 36.09 -.14 UtdOnln 0.40 6.99 -.09 UPS B 1.88 72.83 -.38 UtdRentals 26.17 +.05 US Bancrp 0.20 26.76 -.08 US NGsFd 6.09 -.15 US OilFd 36.27 -.66 USSteel 0.20 57.30 +2.86 UtdTech 1.70 81.73 +.21 UtdTherap 67.09 +.49 UtdhlthGp 0.50 40.62 +.81 UnivDisp 32.20 -.28 UnivHlthS 0.20 42.88 +.58 UnumGrp 0.37 25.41 +.22 Ur-Energy 2.79 -.03 Uranerz 5.02 +.13 UraniumEn 5.72 +.28 UranmRs 2.52 -.15 UrbanOut 34.14 -.09 VCA Ant 23.44 +.08 VF Cp 2.52 81.34 -1.20 VaalcoE 7.20 -.04 VailRsrt 48.64 -1.05 Valassis 30.89 -.20 Vale SA 0.76 35.50 -.54 Vale SA pf 0.76 31.39 -.60 ValeantPh 0.38 35.20 -.12 ValenceT h 1.52 -.03 ValeroE 0.20 24.32 -.09 Validus 0.88 30.90 +.54 VlyNBcp 0.72 14.19 +.04 Valspar 0.72 37.06 +.02 ValVis A 6.61 -.10 ValueClick 14.30 -.32 VanceInfo 34.44 -.66 VandaPhm 7.75 -.29 VangSTBd 2.31 80.54 +.05 VangTotBd G M m M & R D W m

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Forecast Continued from B1 The agenda begins with breakfast from 7 to 8 a.m., followed by the program from 8 to 11:30 a.m., featuring presentations by Watkins, along with Jim Moore, professor of political science at Pacific University in Forest Grove; Delore Zimmerman, a principal with Grand Forks, N.D.-based Praxis Strategy Group; and Scott Cooper, a former Crook County judge, who will speak on the face of poverty in Central Oregon. The cost to attend the conference is $75. Moore is scheduled to discuss

Job hunt Continued from B1 For those who have been in the work force for decades, and who are suddenly without work, the journey is difficult as they try to regain jobs in factories and offices. They have to market themselves in a virtual world of online résumés and job boards, while also retaining work skills and trying, however they can, to maintain their self-esteem. “It’s like a roller coaster,” Schober said. “You get pumped up, and then you go down.” She is a mother of three and grandmother of eight. She and her husband, Jim, built their dream home 13 years ago. She designed it and then watched it go up, log by log. During the 1982 recession, when Schober’s husband was on extended layoff, she decided she would never go through something like that again. Her children were young, but she returned to school. “I could do anything, anything if I wanted to,” she said. Six years later, she emerged from Marquette University with a degree in electrical engineering. She knows her way around nuclear generators, jets and mining equipment. Her last job was as a process improvement engineer with P&H Mining Equipment. Her father and uncle worked at the company for 40 years. Her husband has been there for decades and is still on the job, trying to get as much overtime as he can so the couple can keep afloat financially. In 2009, three weeks after the death of her mother, Schober was laid off. “I’ve had a year of healing,”

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, January 26, 2011 B3

what to expect from the Oregon Legislature and state agencies in 2011. Zimmerman will present his “1,000-Day Road Map: A Plan for Long-Term Regional and Community Transformation and Economic Stability.” The plan culminates seven months of research by Zimmerman on the local economy and his ideas for improving it. “We came out here in May and did a series of focus groups and interviews,” Zimmerman said, adding that he returned to Bend a couple of times over the summer to follow up and gather additional information for his $25,000 study, which is funded by the Deschutes Economic Alliance.

Zimmerman’s report includes 10 strategies he is recommending to strengthen the economy in Bend and Central Oregon. Lawnae Hunter, owner of Hunter Properties in Bend and DEA chairwoman, said the conference, the economic forecast prepared by Watkins, and Zimmerman’s “1,000-Day Road Map” study have been funded mostly with private donations, along with proceeds from the annual conference. “I think it is the biggest thing to happen in the Bend community in a long while,” Hunter said. As of Tuesday, she said 365 people had signed up to attend the economic forecast, exceed-

ing her projected attendance of 300. “This is a great cross section of individuals, business leaders, elected officials, people in financial services and others,” Hunter said. “It’s the old guard and many of the new business leaders coming together to look at solutions.” Hunter said the goal is to foster communitywide support for working together on solutions to economic and social problems such as homelessness in Bend and other communities of Central Oregon.

she said of losing her mother and her job. “It was a big shock.” She had to start over again, going from earning a good wage to collecting a weekly unemployment check. The unemployment runs out in April. “That big pendulum hangs over your head. It’s always there,” she said of the pressure to find another job. Here’s what relieves the pressure, tells her she’s not in this alone: networking.

economy. The job seekers come from all walks of life, salespeople, secretaries, engineers, software professionals, even a former school principal. “All of the (political) discussions about the joblessness and the unemployed are statistic-oriented,” Katisch said. “We sometimes lose track of the psychological side of it, families, people spending down savings, people close to losing their homes, the fear factor. What happens in a marriage when one person who has always been the breadwinner hasn’t had a job for a year or two?”

résumés and gotten a handful of interviews. “We can’t look like we’re desperate,” Marrari said. “I’m out of work. I’m a job seeker. There’s something down the road for me.”

Vital support In churches, shopping malls and community centers, older job seekers have long banded together to provide one another guidance as they try to find work. Part informational and part inspirational, job networking support groups provide a vital link for those who need to fight their way back into the work force. Interfaith Older Adult Programs serving Milwaukee County has an array of programs for older adults seeking jobs. Schober has gained friendships and job tips at Pewaukee Opportunities Networking Group, or PONG, which meets Monday mornings. In the past year, the group has catered to around 200 people. At least 40 have found jobs. Finding work “is probably the hardest job you’ll ever have,” said Pat Katisch, the volunteer who leads PONG. Katisch, in her 60s, has wide experience in marketing and continuing education. She, too, is looking for work. Newcomers to the group, Katisch said, often feel “alone and isolated.” But then they hear the stories of others, and realize they’re part of a larger community dealing with a troubled

Venture Continued from B1 “We are the second-oldest venture conference in the state of Oregon,” Larson said. The three newer venture conferences can receive as much as $25,000 each, provided organizers collect at least $100,000 from other sources, according to the press release. Larson pointed to Bend-based Manzama, the 2010 winner of the Bend Venture Conference and the $200,000 investment prize, and other past winners, including PV Powered and Clear Catheter Systems, both of Bend, and Elemental Technologies and Jama Software, both of Portland, which have grown, created more jobs and used their prizes from the Bend Venture Conference to leverage millions of dollars in additional investment. Larson, a founding partner in Seattle-based Vashon Partners investment fund, said he believes providing funding to help launch startup companies “is the key to economic development.” “We are excited about the opportunity to receive these supplemental and matching funds from the Oregon Growth Account,” Larson said. “This would be the first time for money to be offered to the Bend Venture Conference from the state of Oregon or the Oregon Growth Account,” Larson said. Since 1995, the Oregon Growth

Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or emerriman@ bendbulletin.com.

‘Survival mode’ Linda Kleven, 51, of Waukesha, also tries to keep her hopes up. She was laid off from her job as an employment research specialist in June 2009. She lives in a small apartment. Her unemployment benefits are due to expire this spring. She clips coupons. For Christmas, she brought herself a pair of slippers. “I’m in survival mode,” she said. “I’ll look under every rock until I find a job.” But she says she’s up against a tough market. “They want to hire someone younger, someone cheaper,” she said of prospective employers. Others in the PONG group try to help Kleven with her résumé and her online skills. The group has only one rule: no whining. Members pull for one another. Schober said that a few weeks ago, she looked around the room at PONG, saw the talented people, and thought to herself, “What a corporation this would be.” She thinks back to her work life, the one she had, the one she wants to continue. “Engineer, you’re the knight in shining armor who saves the day. You get the line moving,” she said. The other day, she went on an interview. It was wonderful. For hours, she talked engineering. “My whole psyche perked up,” she said. Schober knows she’s going to get a job. She has to. Any day now, any week now, it’s “going to pop,” she said.

A new reality The PONG group is tight-knit, friendly and warm. Among those looking for work is Pete Marrari, 54, of Milwaukee, a certified electronics technician. Laid off in March 2009 from the Gordon Flesch Co., where he had a steady middle-class job, Marrari’s unemployment benefits are nearly exhausted. His wife has a good job. But he misses driving around town, fixing copiers and faxes, interacting with customers. “I’ve been working since I was 12 years old and had a paper route,” he said. His business card reads “Like Ferrari — it’s Marrari” and features a photo of a tool kit. He has a binder filled with his résumé, letters of reference and transcripts of training courses he has completed for several lines of business machines. He is coping with the new way of gaining employment. “This isn’t the 1980s anymore where you could just walk into an office to get a job,” he said. “You have to get online, network.” He has sent out hundreds of

High Desert Continued from B1 And on Jan. 19, the New York Stock Exchange announced the delisting of Capitol Bancorp’s stock. The company now trades over the counter. In a news release issued Tuesday, Joseph Reid, Capitol’s chairman and CEO, called High Desert Bank “a developing institution with strong community ties. The bank has established a reliable banking platform to continue serving the Bend community under the leadership of Larry Snyder.” Capitol provided High Desert Bank, which was founded in 2007, accounting, computer and other back-office help, Snyder said. High Desert, which has eight employees, has grown, however,

Account has invested $100 million in Lottery proceeds to earn returns for the benefit of schools and to spur economic development, according to the treasurer’s news release. At angel venture conferences, entrepreneurs pitch their ideas and business plans for startup companies to private-sector investors and compete to win startup capital. The early-stage investors then share the profits if those companies become successful, according to Wheeler’s news release. “We want to put this money to work for Oregon, and all across Oregon,” said Wheeler, who chairs the OGA board. “We frequently hear about business startups in the Portland metro area, yet there are tremendous innovative opportunities all over the state.” Voters established the Oregon Lottery in 1984, when the state economy was struggling, to fund economic development, but lawmakers shifted the focus and today more than 60 percent of Lottery funds go to education. In 1998, voters approved a ballot measure earmarking 15 percent for state parks and watershed enhancement projects, with 23 percent currently allocated for economic development, according to details posted on the Lottery website. Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or emerriman@ bendbulletin.com.

and Snyder said the bank can provide those services on its own. As of Sept. 30, High Desert Bank reported assets of about $37 million. Investors Prime Fund is a nonbank licensed lender with the U.S. Small Business Administration, Snyder said, so it will complement High Desert Bank, which also makes business loans. High Desert has received scrutiny from federal regulators. It’s been operating under a regulatory order since Dec. 29, 2009, and had to submit a business plan that would be effective through the end of this year. Snyder said the bank is moving forward “to get out from under that order.” Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@ bendbulletin.com.

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday In

Market update Northwest stocks Name

Div

PE

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeB rs CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.00 .04 .36f 1.68 ... .40 .80a .82 ... ... .32 .22 .72f .04 .42 ... ... .65f ... .64

11 14 21 23 16 ... ... 28 24 53 20 12 ... 11 ... 13 14 ... 17 ... 7

YTD Last Chg %Chg 61.13 23.16 13.63 14.36 72.24 8.91 48.06 60.47 72.46 7.42 29.94 47.08 11.49 21.55 8.91 21.65 5.67 10.47 21.29 12.40 28.45

Name

+.37 +7.8 +.11 +2.8 -.29 +2.2 +.04 -7.7 -.49 +10.7 +.51 +5.4 +.54 +1.6 -.32 +.3 -.16 +.3 -.09 +.4 +.25 +.6 -.47 +11.8 -.13 -6.4 +.31 +2.5 +.30 +.7 -.05 -3.2 +.01 -6.4 +.43 +10.7 -.06 +5.0 +.11 +3.3 +.07 +1.9

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1332.00 $1332.30 $26.811

Pvs Day $1337.00 $1344.50 $27.318

Market recap

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

1.24f .80 1.74 ... .48a ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.44 .86f .52 ... .20 .20 .24f .20 ... .60f

20 17 16 24 61 ... 39 22 ... 19 20 10 27 13 ... 17 15 15 ... ...

82.88 +.22 -3.0 41.56 -.62 -1.9 45.30 +.01 -2.5 17.72 -.05 +.1 55.83 +.30 -2.6 2.41 ... +16.4 41.78 +.38 +11.6 143.79 +1.62 +3.3 20.98 -.12 -6.7 61.77 +.13 -7.0 86.09 +2.79 +2.8 47.28 +.35 +4.7 33.65 +.16 +4.7 13.00 -.17 +11.2 12.09 +.17 -.7 26.76 -.08 -.8 17.42 +.11 +2.9 32.70 ... +5.5 3.26 +.08 +15.6 23.00 +.22 +21.5

Prime rate Time period

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Citigrp BkofAm S&P500ETF GenElec SPDR Fncl

4142363 2967427 1541658 957884 663609

Last Chg 4.82 13.63 129.17 19.98 16.41

-.04 -.29 +.07 -.06 -.03

Gainers ($2 or more) Name Brinker HFF Inc EthanAl EvergE rs HarleyD

Last

Chg %Chg

23.25 12.17 23.09 2.50 39.43

+2.36 +11.3 +1.20 +10.9 +2.23 +10.7 +.20 +8.7 +2.94 +8.1

Losers ($2 or more) Name TAL Ed n EKodak JinkoSol n BP Pru GencoShip

Last

Indexes

Chg %Chg

13.04 -2.20 -14.4 4.52 -.70 -13.4 27.96 -3.66 -11.6 109.81 -10.85 -9.0 11.91 -1.08 -8.3

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Hyperdyn NthgtM g NovaGld g GoldStr g NwGold g

Last Chg

96004 4.38 -1.35 75741 2.49 +.02 55338 12.88 -.25 49848 3.60 +.04 47461 7.70 +.08

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Engex OrionEngy Barnwell CCA Inds SagaComm

Last

4.54 +.68 +17.6 4.67 +.61 +15.0 7.25 +.90 +14.2 5.60 +.36 +6.9 26.63 +1.48 +5.9

Name

Last

JeffersnB TuesMrn GluMobile AmrSvFin FFBcArk

4.50 +1.14 +33.9 4.88 +.86 +21.4 2.80 +.49 +21.2 2.14 +.34 +18.9 2.91 +.41 +16.4

1,623 1,392 119 3,134 108 17

Name

Last

Hyperdyn HMG ChiMetRur Aerosonic ChiGengM

4.38 -1.35 -23.6 4.83 -1.05 -17.9 4.50 -.72 -13.8 3.35 -.30 -8.2 2.85 -.22 -7.2

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

MarshE rsh Momenta Tellabs Iridium un PrincNtl

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last Chg

713713 21.54 +.37 702667 21.55 +.31 525393 56.53 +.08 510873 9.98 -.08 415847 5.69 -1.35

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Diary

Vol (00)

Cisco Intel PwShs QQQ MicronT Tellabs

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

52-Week High Low Name

Chg %Chg

2.16 -.64 -22.9 12.50 -3.30 -20.9 5.69 -1.35 -19.2 9.62 -1.64 -14.6 5.40 -.84 -13.5

Diary 201 286 33 520 6 ...

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,210 1,428 123 2,761 62 22

11,982.94 9,614.32 Dow Jones Industrials 5,256.80 3,742.01 Dow Jones Transportation 416.47 346.95 Dow Jones Utilities 8,200.24 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 2,225.48 1,689.19 Amex Index 2,766.17 2,061.14 Nasdaq Composite 1,296.06 1,010.91 S&P 500 13,770.32 10,596.20 Wilshire 5000 807.89 580.49 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

11,977.19 5,050.59 414.58 8,141.13 2,142.23 2,719.25 1,291.18 13,652.88 779.96

-3.33 -25.93 -1.01 -16.29 -15.39 +1.70 +.34 +2.72 +.68

YTD %Chg %Chg -.03 -.51 -.24 -.20 -.71 +.06 +.03 +.02 +.09

52-wk %Chg

+3.45 -1.10 +2.37 +2.22 -3.00 +2.50 +2.67 +2.19 -.47

+17.49 +25.81 +6.96 +15.83 +18.03 +23.39 +18.22 +20.36 +27.41

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Tuesday.

Key currency exchange rates Tuesday compared with late Monday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

358.76 2,660.88 4,019.62 5,917.71 7,059.01 23,788.83 37,470.76 21,940.13 3,359.07 10,464.42 2,086.67 3,181.15 4,909.00 5,881.97

-.62 t -.06 t -.34 t -.44 t -.12 t -.05 t -.52 t -.98 t +.19 s +1.15 s +.22 s -.14 t +.43 s -.31 t

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

.9930 1.5798 1.0006 .002030 .1518 1.3675 .1284 .012174 .082747 .0336 .000894 .1530 1.0612 .0344

.9983 1.5995 1.0051 .002032 .1519 1.3638 .1282 .012123 .083029 .0335 .000894 .1520 1.0531 .0344

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 20.14 -0.02 +3.3 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 19.14 -0.02 +3.3 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.32 +0.01 +1.5 GrowthI 26.36 -0.03 +2.0 Ultra 23.16 +0.05 +2.3 American Funds A: AmcpA p 19.35 +0.06 +2.8 AMutlA p 25.87 +0.03 +2.2 BalA p 18.32 +0.02 +2.2 BondA p 12.20 +0.03 +0.3 CapIBA p 50.32 -0.01 +0.8 CapWGA p 36.46 +2.1 CapWA p 20.52 +0.06 +0.5 EupacA p 41.84 +0.01 +1.1 FdInvA p 37.44 +0.04 +2.0 GovtA p 13.90 +0.05 -0.1 GwthA p 30.98 +0.03 +1.8 HI TrA p 11.45 +0.01 +1.9 IncoA p 16.85 +0.02 +1.8 IntBdA p 13.44 +0.02 +0.2 ICAA p 28.87 +0.04 +2.5 NEcoA p 26.01 -0.03 +2.7 N PerA p 28.90 +0.04 +1.0 NwWrldA 53.92 +0.05 -1.2 SmCpA p 38.81 -0.08 -0.1 TxExA p 11.63 +0.03 -1.3 WshA p 27.82 +0.01 +2.2 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 30.03 -0.02 -0.4 IntlEqA 29.30 -0.03 -0.4 IntEqII I r 12.39 -0.01 -0.6 Artisan Funds: Intl 22.22 +0.05 +2.4 MidCap 33.66 -0.20 +0.1 MidCapVal 20.75 +0.06 +3.3 Baron Funds: Growth 51.05 -0.07 -0.4 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.77 +0.05 +0.6 DivMu 14.17 +0.02 -0.4

TxMgdIntl 16.03 -0.04 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 17.83 -0.02 GlAlA r 19.64 +0.01 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.34 +0.01 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 17.86 -0.03 GlbAlloc r 19.72 +0.01 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 54.00 -0.16 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 29.04 -0.03 DivEqInc 10.29 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 29.98 -0.04 AcornIntZ 40.79 -0.04 ValRestr 50.52 -0.25 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.14 -0.16 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 11.56 -0.01 USCorEq2 11.18 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 34.91 -0.10 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 35.27 -0.11 NYVen C 33.74 -0.11 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.22 +0.02 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 21.78 -0.07 EmMktV 35.54 -0.10 IntSmVa 17.57 -0.02 LargeCo 10.18 +0.01 USLgVa 20.73 -0.04 US Small 21.35 +0.01 US SmVa 25.60 +0.06 IntlSmCo 17.38 -0.01 Fixd 10.33 IntVa 19.23 -0.02 Glb5FxInc 10.90 +0.02 2YGlFxd 10.16 +0.01 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 72.50 -0.03

+1.9 +1.8 +1.1 +1.1 +1.8 +1.1 +1.2 -0.7 +1.9 -0.7 -0.3 -2.1 +2.7 +1.9 +1.7 +1.7 +1.6 +0.4 -1.7 -1.7 +2.2 +2.8 +3.0 +0.1 +1.2 +0.1 +4.6 +0.2 +0.1 +3.2

Income 13.29 IntlStk 36.34 Stock 112.26 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.53 Eaton Vance I: GblMacAbR 10.23 LgCapVal 18.58 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.15 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.89 FPACres 27.20 Fairholme 35.44 Federated Instl: KaufmnR 5.53 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 20.16 StrInA 12.50 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 20.36 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.73 FF2015 11.47 FF2020 13.96 FF2020K 13.35 FF2025 11.67 FF2030 13.97 FF2030K 13.80 FF2035 11.65 FF2040 8.14 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.99 AMgr50 15.61 Balanc 18.55 BalancedK 18.55 BlueChGr 46.21 Canada 57.17 CapAp 25.62 CpInc r 9.63 Contra 68.45 ContraK 68.42 DisEq 23.26 DivIntl 30.45 DivrsIntK r 30.42

+0.03 +0.5 -0.01 +1.8 -0.10 +4.2 -0.01 +1.7 -0.01 -0.1 -0.01 +1.7 +3.5 +0.01 +0.4 +0.05 +1.5 -0.20 -0.4 +0.5 -0.01 +1.0 +0.02 +1.2 +1.1 -0.01 +1.0 +1.1 -0.01 +1.2 -0.01 +1.2 -0.02 +1.3 -0.02 +1.5 -0.01 +1.5 -0.02 +1.6 -0.02 +1.6 -0.01 +0.01 +0.01 +0.01 -0.05 -0.54 -0.04 +0.01 -0.01 -0.02 +0.02 -0.04 -0.05

+2.5 +1.2 +1.8 +1.8 +1.9 -1.7 +1.1 +2.4 +1.1 +1.1 +3.2 +1.0 +1.0

DivGth 29.04 EmrMk 25.92 Eq Inc 45.64 EQII 18.84 Fidel 32.93 FltRateHi r 9.89 GNMA 11.47 GovtInc 10.42 GroCo 84.68 GroInc 18.78 GrowthCoK 84.63 HighInc r 9.10 Indepn 24.49 IntBd 10.58 IntmMu 9.94 IntlDisc 33.26 InvGrBd 11.41 InvGB 7.41 LgCapVal 12.14 LatAm 57.35 LevCoStk 28.84 LowP r 38.88 LowPriK r 38.86 Magelln 73.09 MidCap 28.93 MuniInc 12.08 NwMkt r 15.63 OTC 57.06 100Index 9.02 Ovrsea 33.04 Puritn 18.21 SCmdtyStrt 12.31 SrsIntGrw 11.17 SrsIntVal 10.42 STBF 8.47 SmllCpS r 20.14 StratInc 11.19 StrReRt r 9.59 TotalBd 10.75 USBI 11.33 Value 70.58 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 46.72 Fidelity Spartan:

+0.02 -0.08 +0.03 +0.01 +0.03

+2.1 -1.6 +3.1 +3.2 +2.4 +1.2 +0.02 +0.2 +0.02 -0.42 +1.8 +2.6 -0.43 +1.8 +0.01 +2.2 -0.04 +0.6 +0.03 +0.5 +0.01 -0.7 -0.03 +0.7 +0.03 +0.3 +0.02 +0.4 -0.01 +2.6 -0.39 -2.8 -0.06 +1.5 +0.08 +1.3 +0.07 +1.3 +0.29 +2.0 -0.14 +0.3 +0.04 -1.3 +0.2 -0.24 +3.9 +0.01 +3.2 -0.06 +1.7 +0.02 +1.7 -0.20 -2.6 -1.1 -0.02 +4.8 +0.01 +0.2 -0.12 +2.8 +0.02 +1.2 -0.01 +0.1 +0.02 +0.5 +0.03 +0.2 +0.23 +2.8 -0.28 -12.0

ExtMkIn 38.51 +0.02 500IdxInv 45.71 +0.01 IntlInxInv 36.19 -0.02 TotMktInv 37.30 +0.01 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 45.71 +0.01 TotMktAd r 37.30 +0.01 First Eagle: GlblA 46.66 +0.11 OverseasA 22.65 +0.09 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.18 +0.06 FoundAl p 10.77 HYTFA p 9.46 +0.05 IncomA p 2.22 USGovA p 6.75 +0.02 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p IncmeAd 2.21 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.24 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 21.19 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 7.30 -0.02 GlBd A p 13.46 -0.01 GrwthA p 18.46 -0.01 WorldA p 15.37 -0.01 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.49 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 41.31 -0.05 GMO Trust III: Quality 20.60 +0.02 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 14.65 -0.03 Quality 20.60 +0.02 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.39 +0.01 MidCapV 36.91 +0.04 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.15 +0.02 CapApInst 37.29 -0.08 IntlInv t 61.08 +0.12 Intl r 61.65 +0.12

+0.9 +2.8 +2.9 +2.4 +2.8 +2.4 +0.6 -1.3 +3.0 -1.5 +2.4 +0.2 -0.6 +2.4 +2.3 +2.7 +4.6 -0.6 +3.8 +3.6 -0.6 +2.7 +2.4 +0.3 +2.4 +1.7 +2.1 +0.4 +1.6 +1.8 +1.8

Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 35.78 +0.11 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 35.79 +0.10 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 43.74 +0.05 Div&Gr 20.16 +0.03 TotRetBd 10.95 +0.03 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.04 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r 16.96 +0.04 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 16.71 +0.04 CmstkA 16.25 -0.01 EqIncA 8.82 GrIncA p 19.89 -0.01 HYMuA 8.73 +0.02 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 23.52 -0.05 AssetStA p 24.21 -0.06 AssetStrI r 24.42 -0.05 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.52 +0.03 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.51 +0.03 HighYld 8.33 +0.01 IntmTFBd 10.70 +0.02 ShtDurBd 10.98 USLCCrPls 21.11 -0.05 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 52.24 -0.31 PrkMCVal T 23.01 +0.03 Twenty T 67.31 +0.09 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.09 LSGrwth 13.04 -0.01 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.19 -0.02 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 21.58 -0.02 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 14.74 +0.04 Longleaf Partners: Partners 29.02 -0.04

+3.3 +3.3 +3.3 +3.4 +0.5 -2.0 +1.4 +3.3 +3.3 +2.7 +3.5 -2.4 -0.9 -0.8 -0.8 +0.4 +0.4 +2.2 -0.6 +0.1 +2.1 +3.2 +1.9 +2.4 +1.5 +1.6 -2.7 -2.7 -2.1 +2.7

Loomis Sayles: LSBondI x 14.40 -0.01 StrInc C x 15.03 LSBondR x 14.35 -0.01 StrIncA x 14.95 -0.01 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.22 +0.05 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.84 -0.03 BdDebA p 7.93 +0.01 ShDurIncA p 4.61 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.64 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.35 +0.02 ValueA 23.47 +0.02 MFS Funds I: ValueI 23.57 +0.02 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.76 -0.02 Matthews Asian: AsianGIInv 17.98 PacTgrInv 22.76 MergerFd 15.90 +0.01 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.43 +0.03 TotRtBdI 10.43 +0.03 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 37.83 -0.18 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 29.85 -0.01 GlbDiscZ 30.21 -0.01 QuestZ 18.09 -0.01 SharesZ 21.35 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 45.95 +0.01 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 47.62 +0.02 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.39 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.15 +0.09 Intl I r 20.08 -0.01 Oakmark r 42.79 +0.01 Old Westbury Fds:

+1.4 +1.5 +1.3 +1.5 +0.7 +2.2 +1.9 +0.5 +0.4 +1.8 +2.9 +2.9 +1.7 -0.3 -2.9 +0.8 +0.8 +0.9 +1.3 +2.3 +2.3 +2.3 +2.7

NA +1.5 +3.5 +3.6

GlobOpp 7.83 -0.01 GlbSMdCap 15.57 -0.01 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 44.05 +0.03 DvMktA p 35.26 -0.16 GlobA p 62.20 +0.28 GblStrIncA x 4.31 +0.01 Gold p 42.93 -0.66 IntBdA p 6.49 MnStFdA 33.12 +0.02 RisingDivA 15.83 +0.01 S&MdCpVl 32.43 +0.15 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.36 +0.01 S&MdCpVl 27.81 +0.13 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 14.31 +0.01 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA x 6.35 +0.03 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 34.88 -0.16 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.86 +0.02 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.54 AllAsset 12.09 ComodRR 9.12 -0.13 HiYld 9.42 +0.01 InvGrCp 10.53 +0.03 LowDu 10.42 +0.01 RealRtnI 11.34 +0.03 ShortT 9.88 TotRt 10.86 +0.02 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.34 +0.03 TotRtA 10.86 +0.02 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.86 +0.02 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.86 +0.02 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.86 +0.02 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 45.18 -0.05 Pioneer Funds A:

+1.6 +0.6 +1.1 -3.3 +3.0 +0.9 -13.9 -0.8 +2.3 +2.1 +1.2 +2.0 +1.2 +2.0 -4.1 -3.3 +0.3 -0.3 +0.3 -1.8 +1.8 +0.8 +0.5 -0.1 +0.3 +0.3 -0.1 +0.3 +0.2 +0.3 +0.3 -1.4

PionFdA p 41.76 Price Funds: BlChip 38.89 CapApp 20.77 EmMktS 34.52 EqInc 24.39 EqIndex 34.79 Growth 32.68 HlthSci 31.26 HiYield 6.89 IntlBond 9.93 IntlStk 14.35 MidCap 59.59 MCapVal 24.17 N Asia 18.69 New Era 52.10 N Horiz 33.48 N Inc 9.49 R2010 15.55 R2015 12.07 R2020 16.71 R2025 12.25 R2030 17.59 R2035 12.46 R2040 17.74 ShtBd 4.85 SmCpStk 34.41 SmCapVal 35.96 SpecIn 12.45 Value 24.13 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.94 VoyA p 24.45 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.69 PremierI r 20.30 TotRetI r 13.21 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 38.16 S&P Sel 20.11 Scout Funds: Intl 32.77 Selected Funds: AmShD 42.05 Templeton Instit:

-0.08 +2.0 -0.01 +2.0 +2.3 -0.14 -2.2 -0.02 +3.0 +0.01 +2.7 -0.01 +1.6 +0.13 +3.2 +0.01 +2.1 +0.01 -0.01 +0.8 -0.22 +1.8 +1.9 -0.01 -2.6 -0.40 -0.1 -0.06 +0.02 +0.2 +1.4 +1.5 +1.6 -0.01 +1.7 -0.02 +1.8 -0.01 +1.9 -0.02 +1.8 +0.2 +0.05 -0.1 +0.04 -0.5 +0.02 +1.0 -0.05 +3.4 -0.01 +3.0 -0.05 +3.1 +0.01 +0.3 -0.02 -0.2 +0.02 +0.3 +0.01 +2.6 +0.01 +2.8 +0.05 +1.2 -0.12 +1.5

ForEqS 20.79 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 53.00 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 28.28 IntValue I 28.91 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 24.11 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 21.71 CAITAdm 10.58 CpOpAdl 78.76 EMAdmr r 39.29 Energy 125.05 ExtdAdm 41.70 500Adml 119.02 GNMA Ad 10.73 GrwAdm 32.32 HlthCr 52.84 HiYldCp 5.77 InfProAd 25.52 ITBdAdml 11.23 ITsryAdml 11.34 IntGrAdm 61.61 ITAdml 13.13 ITGrAdm 9.94 LtdTrAd 10.96 LTGrAdml 9.26 LT Adml 10.50 MCpAdml 93.66 MuHYAdm 9.92 PrmCap r 70.15 ReitAdm r 79.98 STsyAdml 10.69 STBdAdml 10.56 ShtTrAd 15.85 STIGrAd 10.79 SmCAdm 34.92 TtlBAdml 10.59 TStkAdm 32.33 WellslAdm 53.04 WelltnAdm 55.00 Windsor 47.08 WdsrIIAd 47.19

-0.09 +3.7 +2.4 +0.01 +0.9 +0.02 +0.9 +0.02 +1.2 +0.03 +0.03 -0.03 -0.12 -0.62 +0.02 +0.03 +0.01 +0.01 +0.19 +0.01 +0.08 +0.05 +0.04 -0.07 +0.04 +0.03 +0.07 +0.03 -0.08 +0.03 -0.06 +0.91 +0.01 +0.01 +0.01 +0.01 +0.01 +0.03 +0.01 +0.09 +0.12 +0.07

+1.5 -1.0 +2.6 -1.4 +2.6 +1.0 +2.8 +0.1 +2.3 +2.3 +1.7 -0.1 +0.4 +0.3 +0.1 -0.8 +0.6 -0.2 -0.5 -1.4 +1.6 -1.5 +2.8 +2.0 +0.2 +0.2 +0.4 +0.4 +0.1 +2.4 +0.9 +2.4 +3.3 +3.6

Vanguard Fds: AssetA 24.97 CapOpp 34.10 DivdGro 14.76 Energy 66.60 EqInc 20.86 Explr 73.33 GNMA 10.73 GlobEq 18.22 HYCorp 5.77 HlthCre 125.23 InflaPro 12.99 IntlGr 19.36 IntlVal 32.90 ITIGrade 9.94 LifeCon 16.54 LifeGro 22.45 LifeMod 19.85 LTIGrade 9.26 Morg 18.44 MuInt 13.13 PrecMtls r 24.28 PrmcpCor 14.02 Prmcp r 67.61 SelValu r 19.13 STAR 19.36 STIGrade 10.79 StratEq 18.58 TgtRetInc 11.35 TgRe2010 22.54 TgtRe2015 12.58 TgRe2020 22.41 TgtRe2025 12.82 TgRe2030 22.05 TgtRe2035 13.33 TgtRe2040 21.90 TgtRe2045 13.76 USGro 18.69 Wellsly 21.89 Welltn 31.84 Wndsr 13.95 WndsII 26.59 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntlInst r

500 +0.06 -0.01 +0.04 -0.33 +0.02 -0.08 +0.01 -0.02 +0.01 +0.47 +0.04 -0.02 -0.09 +0.03 +0.03 +0.01 +0.03 +0.07 -0.03 +0.04 -0.23 -0.02 -0.05 +0.02 +0.01 +0.01 +0.02 +0.02 +0.03 +0.01 +0.01 +0.01

-0.01 +0.03 +0.06 +0.02

+2.1 +2.6 +2.6 +2.6 +2.4 +0.6 +0.1 +2.0 +1.7 +2.3 -0.1 +0.1 +2.3 +0.6 +1.1 +1.8 +1.4 -0.5 +2.3 -0.8 -9.2 +1.8 +2.8 +2.0 +1.5 +0.4 +1.4 +0.6 +1.0 +1.3 +1.4 +1.6 +1.7 +1.8 +1.9 +1.9 +2.4 +0.9 +2.4 +3.3 +3.6 +1.2

119.01 +0.03 +2.8

Growth

32.32 +0.02 +2.3

MidCap

20.63 -0.02 +1.6

SmCap

34.89 +0.01 +0.4

SmlCpGth

21.92 -0.05

SmlCpVl

16.14 +0.05 +0.8

STBnd

10.56 +0.01 +0.2

TotBnd

10.59 +0.03 +0.1

TotlIntl

15.95 -0.03 +1.2

TotStk

32.32 +0.01 +2.4

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst

10.25 -0.01 +2.7

ExtIn

41.70 +0.02 +1.0

FTAllWldI r

95.13 -0.18 +1.4

GrwthIst

32.32 +0.01 +2.3

InfProInst

10.39 +0.03 -0.1

InstIdx

118.18 +0.03 +2.8

InsPl

118.19 +0.04 +2.8

InsTStPlus

29.23 +0.01 +2.4

MidCpIst

20.69 -0.02 +1.6

SCInst

34.92 +0.02 +0.4

TBIst

10.59 +0.03 +0.1

TSInst

32.34 +0.01 +2.4

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

98.32 +0.03 +2.8

STBdIdx

10.56 +0.01 +0.2

TotBdSgl

10.59 +0.03 +0.1

TotStkSgl

31.21 +0.02 +2.4

Western Asset: CorePlus I

10.84 +0.03 +0.8


B USI N ESS

B4 Wednesday, January 26, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M  FDA, dairy industry spar over milk tests By William Neuman New York Times News Service

Each year, federal inspectors find illegal levels of antibiotics in hundreds of older dairy cows bound for the slaughterhouse. Concerned that those antibiotics might also be contaminating the milk Americans drink, the Food and Drug Administration intended to begin tests this month on the milk from farms that had repeatedly sold cows tainted by drug residue. But the testing plan met with fierce protest from the dairy industry, which said that it could force farmers to needlessly dump millions of gallons of milk while they waited for test results. Industry officials and state regulators said the testing program was poorly conceived and could lead to costly recalls. In response, the FDA postponed the testing, and now the two sides are sparring over how much danger the antibiotics pose and the best way to ensure that the drugs do not end up in the nation’s milk supply. “What has been served up, up to this point, by Food and Drug has been potentially very damaging to innocent dairy farmers,” said John Wilson, a senior vice president for Dairy Farmers of America, the nation’s largest dairy cooperative. He said that the nation’s milk was safe and that there was little reason to think that the slaughterhouse findings would be replicated in tests of the milk supply. But food safety advocates said that the FDA’s preliminary findings raised issues about the possible overuse of antibiotics in livestock. The FDA said that it would confer with the industry before deciding how to proceed. Today, every truckload of milk is tested for four to six antibiotics that are commonly used on dairy farms. Each year, only a small number of truckloads are found to be “hot milk,” containing trace amounts of antibiotics. In those cases, the milk is destroyed. But dairy farmers use many more drugs that are not regularly tested for in milk. Regulators are concerned because some of those other drugs have been showing up in the slaughterhouse testing.

IMF raises 2011 GDP estimates By Sandrine Rastello Bloomberg News

WASHINGTON — The International Monetary Fund is raising its forecast for global economic growth this year, reflecting stronger U.S. output based on tax-cut extensions, while emerging nations lead the recovery. The world economy will grow 4.4 percent, more than the 4.2 percent expected in October. Expansion next year is projected to reach 4.5 percent, unchanged from October, the IMF said Tuesday in an update to its World Economic Outlook report. “The world economy is recovering, but it is a two-speed recovery,” IMF chief economist Olivier Blanchard said in comments posted on the fund’s website. “Our forecast is that next year growth will be roughly the same as this year. That’s not going to be able to make a big dent to unemployment.” While a faster-than-expected second half of 2010 helped put the world on a stronger foothold this year, the IMF warned that risks to its predictions remain “elevated.” It pressed euro-region governments to build a comprehensive plan to prevent sovereign-debt “financial stresses” from spreading out to other countries and urged emerging countries to closely watch the rise of asset price bubbles as inflation risks increase.

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Marla Polenz at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY GREEN PROFESSIONALS CONFERENCE: The one-day event will feature three speaker tracks on energy efficiency, renewable technologies and sustainability. There also will be an exhibit hall of companies, organizations and educational institutions offering career opportunities and ways to get involved in the green business community; $195; discounts available to nonprofits and students; 7:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m.; Oregon Convention Center, 777 NE Martin Luther King Blvd., Portland. DEVELOPING YOUR ANNUAL FUNDRAISING PLAN: Explore the elements of a fundraising plan and strategies for implementation. For more information and to register, visit www.nonprofitoregon. org/training_convening/workshops; $135 for nonprofit association members and $150 for nonmembers; 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-382-4321. IMPLEMENTING LEAN OFFICE: Five-session online course providing tools, resources and skill development to implement Lean Office protocols. Lean Office is a work-improvement method focused on eliminating waste, reducing costs and improving efficiency. Register at www.simplicated.com/component/ option,com_dtregister/Itemid,9/. Course dates: Jan. 26, Feb. 9, Feb. 23 and Mar. 9; $199; 9 a.m.; 541788-7001. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Abby’s Pizza, 1938 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

THURSDAY CENTRAL OREGON ECONOMIC FORECAST: Produced by the Center for Economic Research and Forecasting, the program will feature an economic forecast for the U.S., the state and Central Oregon in particular, including comments on the political landscape. Tickets available at clucerf.org. For additional information or to purchase a table, contact Lawnae Hunter 541-389-7910; 7:30-11:30 a.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend. HOW TO GET 5 MILLION PEOPLE TO VISIT YOUR WEBSITE: Offered by the Advertising Federation of Central Oregon, this AdBite is a presentation by “The Oatmeal,” aka Matthew Inman, about his journey and how social media played a role in his past business success and now his current blogging success with his website, www.theoatmeal. com. Register at adfedco.org by noon Jan. 25; $15 for members; $35 for nonmembers; 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-385-1992. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: An overview on how to research investments and place online orders. Presented by Luiz Soutomaior. Register by Jan. 25; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794. FIRST-TIME HOMEBUYER: Learn the financial advantages of buying versus renting and how to prepare financially for a home purchase. To register, call 541-382-1795; 6 p.m.; Mid Oregon Credit Union, 202 N.E. Olney Ave., Bend. LIVE CONTRACTOR EDUCATION: Taught by Central Oregon Contractor Training, this live course is approved by the Oregon Construction Contractors Board and satisfies the

educational requirement to take the test to become a licensed contractor in Oregon. Registration fee includes the Oregon Contractor’s Reference Manual. Prepayment is required. To register, go to http://noncredit.cocc. edu or call 541-383-7290. Class continues Jan. 28 and 29; $275; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700. WEB DESIGN SERIES: Three Hours to a Better Website, Jan. 27; Make Money with a Web Affiliate, Feb 3; Photoshop for the Web, Feb. 10. Sign up for individual classes or the series. Registration required at http://noncredit.cocc.edu; $55 per class or $145 for the series; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270.

FRIDAY REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: Sponsored by Dana Signs; free for chamber members; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Dana Signs, 615 S.W. Umatilla Ave.; 541-548-7226. CONVERSATIONS FOR SUCCESS: Greg Ferrera will share thoughts and ideas on the changing real estate industry and how to be successful. RSVP by Jan. 25 to katella@ katellab.com; $15 for Women’s Council of Realtors members; $20 for nonmembers; 9-10:30 a.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-977-4861. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541617-8861.

SATURDAY CENTRAL OREGON FORAGE SEMINAR: RSVP to OSU Crook County Extension Service at 541447-6228; free; 8:30 a.m.; 4-H Clover Club Building, 502 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. CROOKED RIVER RANCHTERREBONNE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE GALA/ANNUAL MEETING: A social evening with dinner and a silent auction at the Sandbagger Saloon in Crooked River Ranch. RSVP required to 541-9232679. Must be a chamber member to attend; $25; 6 p.m.

SUNDAY FINANCIAL PEACE UNIVERSITY: This 13-week course taught by Dave Ramsey teaches families and individuals how to manage their money. Ramsey is a personal money management expert, author and host of a national radio program. Contact Briauna Widmer at 541-389-8241 for more information and to register; 6 p.m.; Christian Life Center, 21720 E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-3898241.

MONDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY EARNED INCOME TAX CREDITS (EITC) TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For families at or below about $58,000 in gross income and who qualify for the EITC, these sessions provide access to free taxpreparation services, online tools and the opportunity to learn about the EITC. Call 541-536-6237 for more information and to schedule an appointment. Appointments begin Feb. 7 and are available MondayFriday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m; free; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-504-1389. FROM HERE TO NET ZERO: Discover strategies for building highly efficient homes and powering them through renewable energy. Learn about incentives and tax credits available to those who build to high efficiency standards. Register at www.earth advantage.org; free; 5:30-7 p.m.; Earth Advantage Institute, 345 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-306-3814. IS BECOMING A REAL ESTATE AGENT THE RIGHT CAREER FOR YOU?: Jim Mazziotti, a principal broker with Exit Bend Realty, presents this live, online program about whether being a real estate agent is the career for you. View the program at www.exitrealtybend.com and select the real estate show icon in the left menu column; free; 7 p.m.; 541-480-8835.

WEDNESDAY Feb. 2 FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax-preparation services and online tools. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. Spanish translators will be available Feb. 9 and 19 and Mar. 9 and 19. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-504-1389 or visit www.yourmoneyback.org; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. CURRENT MARKETING TRENDS, SOCIAL MEDIA, SEO AND REALWORLD RESULTS: Sponsored by BendBroadband, this Opportunity Knocks best-practices seminar will discuss how social media is changing customer interaction with businesses and how to maximize website traffic. Register at www.opp-knocks.org/ OK_Events/; $30 for OK members and $45 for nonmembers; 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541-317-9292.

THURSDAY Feb. 3 COACHING SKILLS AND GIVING AND RECEIVING FEEDBACK: Learn how to improve workplace coaching and feedback skills. Register at http://noncredit.cocc.edu; $85; 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290. LEADERSHIP SKILLS SERIES: Central Oregon Community College’s Small Business Development Center will offer a nine-month series designed to give managers and team leaders the skills they need to succeed in their organizations; entire series costs $645, individual seminars are $85; 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7700 or www.cocc.edu. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

NEWS OF RECORD BANKRUPTCIES Chapter 7 Filed Jan. 18

Tamara A. Reynolds, P.O. Box 2178, La Pine Jason R. Clark, 1759 N.E. Providence Drive, Bend Raymond Kard Jr., 61106 Geary Drive, Bend Katy M. Irwin, 61703 Bridge Creek Drive, Bend Filed Jan. 19

Jack L. and Shannon K. Lawson, 23041 Bronco Court, Bend Bradley J. and Tara B. Estes, P.O. Box 4912, Bend Alvin R. Bowles, 1833 S.W. Canal Blvd. #26, Redmond Paul J. Morris, 21255 E. U.S. Highway 20 #93, Bend Scott W. and Debra S. Houck, 63086 Dakota Drive, Bend Gregory L. Overton, 62971 Desert Sage Court, Bend Monty G. and Amy A. Bernard, 1130 N.E. Allen Ave., Prineville Filed Jan. 20

Cynthia M. McKenney, 2032 N.W. Greenwood Place, Redmond Donald M. and Hayley M. Bowerman,

61028 Borden Drive, Bend Monique M. Lowder, 16279 Leona Lane, La Pine Virgil T. and Norma F. Treash, 651 N.W. Green Forest Circle, Redmond Terri S. Enger, 2142 N.E. Monterey Ave., Bend Richard H. and Nichole Roberts Jr., 635 N.W. 32nd St., Redmond Dawn M. Lewis, 1929 S.E. Waco Drive, Bend Stanley C. and Marlo H. Paroz, 2263 S.W. Timber Ave., Redmond Royal H. Maul, 185 N.W. Harwood Ave. #66, Prineville Kathryn J. Hogan, 502 S.E. Douglas, Bend Filed Jan. 21

Eric D. Nelson, P.O. Box 8686, Bend Karen D. Langshaw, 3042 N.E. Christina Lane, Bend Michelle M. Rear, 1214 S.W. Wheeler Place, Bend Gail L. Russell, 1615 N.W. Newport Ave. #1, Bend Levi F. Howe, 244 S.E. Scott St., Bend Michael J. and Dana G. Heath, 63560 Ranch Village Drive, Bend CGF LLC, 19555 Pinehurst Road, Bend Filed Jan. 24

Landon L. and Irene M. Lightle,

Portland, Seattle hit in 2nd wave of housing bust By Alex Veiga and Christopher S. Rugaber The Associated Press

A second wave of falling home prices is battering some cities that had escaped the worst of the housing market bust. Prices in Seattle, Portland and Charlotte, N.C., have hit their lowest points since peaking in 2006 and 2007. Denver and Minneapolis are nearing new lows. High unemployment and rising foreclosures are taking a toll even on markets that never overheated during the boom years. Home values are dwindling in nearly every American market. Prices fell in November in all but one of the 20 cities in the Standard & Poor’s/CaseShiller index released Tuesday. Eight of those markets hit their lowest point since the housing bubble burst. The damage from the real estate bubble has spread well beyond Las Vegas, Phoenix

and Miami, which built frantically during the mid-2000s, and is sapping prices from coast to coast. In many places, prices are expected to keep falling for at least the next six months. In Seattle and Portland, the two largest cities in the Pacific Northwest, prices peaked in the summer of 2007 and have fallen back to 2005 levels. Foreclosures were uncommon in Seattle until about a year ago. Now they’re dragging prices down, says Jim Conlan, branch manager for Century 21 North Homes Realty Inc. Home prices in Seattle were down nearly 5 percent in November from a year earlier. “They’re the anchor on the market here that’s keeping it from starting to appreciate,” Conlan said. Portland home prices have suffered from historically low timber yields and deep cuts within so-called Silicon Forest high-tech companies.

Elaine Thompson / The Associated Press

A new home is advertised for sale Tuesday in Seattle. Home prices are falling across most of America’s largest cities, and prices in Seattle, Portland and Charlotte, N.C., have hit their lowest points since prices peaked in 2006 and 2007.

SEC adopts rule giving shareholders ‘say on pay’ By Ronald D. Orol MarketWatch

WASHINGTON — The Securities and Exchange Commission on Tuesday in a split vote adopted controversial rules that give investors a vote on the pay packages of top executives at U.S. corporations. The commission approved the measure, which was introduced Oct. 18, by a vote of 3 to 2. A “say on pay” vote is required at least once every three years, starting this year. While the vote is nonbind-

ing and corporations are not required to follow the wishes of shareholders, the provision is expected to have a transformative impact on the relationship between executives and investors — in part because of the embarrassment a company could experience if investors turn out strongly against its executive compensation. The measure is expected to give investors more power in behindthe-scenes discussions with corporate executives on a wide variety of issues.

541-322-CARE

YOUR BUSINESS SHOULD BE HERE 20625 Bemis Lane, Bend Melanie A. Wilkinson, P.O. Box 4361, Sunriver Michael D. Crouch, P.O. Box 2292, Bend Peter J. and Tiffany P. Nelson, 20194 Murphy Road, Bend Filed Jan. 25

Rhiana L. Adkisson, 22899 Alfalfa Market Road, Bend David W. Hervey, 65271 85th St., Bend Richard and Rhonda Vernon, 61290 Columbine Lane, Bend

CALL TODAY

Chapter 11 Filed Jan. 18

4 DE LLC, P.O. Box 410, La Pine Filed Jan. 20

Wildhorse Meadows LLC, 16900 Aspen Lakes Drive, Sisters Chapter 13 Filed Jan. 19

Ronald J. and Bette J. Claycamp, 4496 S.W. Briar Lane, Powell Butte Filed Jan. 20

Gregory J. Muensterman, 63360 Pine Knoll Circle, Bend Filed Jan. 21

Becky J. Howie, 61535 S. U.S. Highway 97 #9-477, Bend

20655 Carmen Loop

• For Sale Industrial with office and showroom • Priced far below construction cost • Perfect for specialty auto, fabrication, manufacturing • Corner Location, secure paved yard area • 7 roll up doors front and back for drive through • 400 and 800 amp three phase power • New in 2005. 9,995 +/- SF total. • Currently two suites, 6740 +/- SF and 3225 +/-SF Price reduced $100,000, Now $599,000 Dan Steelhammer

541-550-4797 dansteelhammer@windermere.com Windermere Central Oregon Real Estate 61510 Hwy 97, Bend


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Inside

OREGON Treasurer opens public lending to banks, see Page C2. EDUCATION Bend elementary students publish magazine, see Page C3. OBITUARIES Co-creator of ant farm toys dies at 97, see Page C5.

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www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2011

BEND

Jefferson County may hire deputy treasurer City Council By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

Jefferson County commissioners meet today to discuss the possible hiring of a deputy treasurer to ensure the office continues to run during the extended absence of Treasurer Deena Goss. Goss, who was recently the subject of a Department of Justice investigation into funds missing from an account administered by the county, has been out of the office on sick leave since Jan. 10, according to commission Chairman Mike Ahern. “We expect her to be out until at least the first of February,” Ahern said. “She’s currently in her second week off, and we need to complete the tasks of the office.”

“(Karen Vigil) is competent and capable, and considering the problems with the books we have had, we hope to keep her on for a while to assist the office.” — Mike Ahern, commissioner, Jefferson County The commissioners are considering hiring Karen Vigil, a former Jefferson County tax collector, for the position. The position may pay $21.83 an hour, according to county documents. “We will discuss Karen taking over the duties of the treasurer for now,” Ahern said. “She is competent

and capable, and considering the problems with the books we have had, we hope to keep her on for a while to assist the office.” Last August, an inmate trust account administered by Goss was found to be missing a sum of $7,993 over the course of three years. The Department of Justice found there was not enough evidence to

charge Goss with a crime. However, its final report stated: “It is highly suspicious that accounting problems arise exclusively when Goss handles cash.” The final determination of the investigation was that the missing money could be due to accounting errors. Ahern said the bookkeeping was so poor that the county may never account for the money. Goss has not returned calls for comment. The commissioners meet at 9 a.m. today at 66 SE D St., Madras. Erik Hidle can be reached at 541617-7837 or at ehidle@bendbulletin. com.

Sunny, partly smoky

investing in cost-saving water study By Nick Grube The Bulletin

City of Bend officials hope an $82,000 investment they make today will result in some cost savings in the future on a $58 million to $73 million reconstruction of the Bridge Creek water system. The money will be spent on a study in which an independent engineering firm will analyze the various components of city’s surface water project, including a 10-mile-long pipeline, a new treatment plant and a possible hydropower facility, to determine if there is a more cost-effective and practical way to design and build it. Whether the firm actually finds any cost savings remains to be seen. If it does, those would likely be passed along to ratepayers who, as of today, can expect to see their monthly water bill increase by as much as 8.5 percent to 9.1 percent a year over the next five years to help pay for the Bridge Creek project. “One of the hopes here is that there are some substantial cost savings,” Bend City Councilor Mark Capell said. “The goal here is to go through every assumption and make sure it’s correct and look at all the options with an independent set of eyes.” See Study / C5

Social services resource network reports more use By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

“I

t’s all a little bit wet,” said Victor Vernon, 73, as he

The Bend Fire Department encourages property own-

stacked weeds onto a burn pile under sunny skies

ers who plan to burn yard debris to visit its website at www

at his Tumalo ranch Tuesday morning. Victor and

.ci.bend.or.us/depts/fire to review safety regulations, and to

his wife, Nancy, were taking advantage of the nice weather to

call the daily burning information phone line at (541) 322-

clean up and burn noxious weeds on their property.

6335, for guidelines before starting to burn.

The Bulletin

Studying the source of nitrates in the groundwater of southern Deschutes County and northern Klamath County will be one of the first efforts of the Groundwater Protection Project committee, a group of residents the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality created last year. The group, which will meet on Feb. 1, started tackling the issue in September, said John Blakinger, the committee’s chairman. Its members have been working on approving a charter and determining how to address the topic of nitrates in groundwater. The eventual goal, he said, is to come up with a recommendation for what the DEQ can do about nitrate contamination in the area’s groundwater. “You can’t jump right into solving things until you figure all that stuff out,” Blakinger said.

Meeting The South Deschutes and North Klamath County Groundwater Protection Project committee will meet at 6 p.m., Feb. 1, at the Midstate Electric Community Meeting Room, 16755 Finley Butte Rd., in La Pine. For more information, visit www.deq.state.or.us/wq/onsite/ sdesch-nklam.htm.

“We’ve done a pretty good job of getting the foundation in place.” The nitrate issue stems from a U.S. Geological Survey study, which found that 10 percent of drinking water wells sampled in the La Pine area contained elevated levels of nitrates. The study projected that the contamination would increase over time. In 2008, Deschutes County passed an ordinance that would

require some residents to upgrade their septic systems to help stop this increase from happening, but the ordinance was repealed the following year. Now, the DEQ is leading the effort to find a solution. In addition to adopting a charter, the La Pine group has mapped out a geographic boundary for the project, Blakinger said. And the committee members decided to approach the nitrate problem by looking at four areas — the sources of nitrate in the groundwater, the environment of the area, the impact of nitrate and possible solutions. The first step, Blakinger said, is to study all the different possible nitrate sources, from septic systems to golf courses to agricultural uses. See Nitrates / C1

By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

REDMOND — Cascades East Transit, the regional bus system, is set to open a transit hub in downtown Redmond after the Redmond City Council approved the move during its Tuesday meeting. The bus system, operated by Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council, began in 2008 and merged with Bend Area Transit last year. The growth of Cascades East Transit has helped make the current transit hub at the Redmond Campus of Central Oregon Community College untenable. COCC’s growth has also made the school’s parking lot too busy of an area for the transit buses, according to Karen Friend, deputy director of COIC. The new hub is expected to open by the fall, though it could open sooner. There will be four bus shelters at the hub, which will be located on Southwest Deschutes Avenue, in front of the Redmond Library. The city

New transit hub Cascades East Transit is planning a new transit hub in downtown Redmond, with four bus shelters, security cameras and bike racks.

126

Ninth Ave.

By Kate Ramsayer

Redmond to get new bus hub

35th St.

La Pine group investigating potential nitrate sources

97

Deschutes Ave. 126

Quartz Ave. Wickiup Ave.

Ca na lB lvd .

GROUNDWATER PROTECTION PROJECT

The Family Access Network has seen about a 30 percent increase in requests for help this year. According to numbers provided by FAN advocates around the county, over the first half of the 2010-11 school year, FAN advocates helped 6,355 people countyInformation wide. At this time last For more information year, that number was on the Family Access 4,910 people. Network or to donate, FAN, which opergo to www ates in Redmond, Sis.familyaccessnetwork. ters and Bend-La Pine org, call 541-693school districts, serves 5675 or send a as a clearinghouse for donation to FAN families, working with Foundation at 2125 schools to identify chilN.E. Daggett Lane, dren and family memBend, OR 97701. bers who need help. The network sends families to government and nonprofit agencies that can provide winter clothing, housing, rental assistance and other help. It also provides discretionary funds — all donated or from the FAN Foundation — to help out families with bills and other issues. Over the past two years, the top requests for help have been for clothing, school supplies and food. See FAN / C5

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Redmond Airport Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

may pay about $1,000 for new signs and road striping, and COIC has applied for a grant to cover the rest of the $158,000 project. The project also includes security cameras at the shelters, a measure encouraged by the

Federal Transit Administration. Cascades East dispatch staff will be able to view the camera feed, which will also be recorded. “We see this as a really nice opportunity for riders because of the access to downtown business, City Hall ... the library,” Friend said. Bus riders will still be able to take a local bus to the COCC campus, Friend said. Though council approved the project in a 5-0 vote — Councilors Ed Onimus and Jay Patrick were not present for the vote — councilors did express some reservations. By installing the shelters and converting much of that block to no parking, about seven parking spots will be eliminated. Mayor George Endicott asked Public Works Director Chris Doty whether it would be possible to allow parking in front of the Evergreen Elementary building now that it is no longer a school. Doty said he would look into it. See Transit hub / C5


C2 Wednesday, January 26, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Brother of shooting suspect urges surrender State’s collection of child support less than U.S. average The Associated Press

PORTLAND — A brother of the man sought in the shooting of a Lincoln City police officer is asking David Durham to turn himself in. Michael Durham tells the Oregonian that his entire family is in shock. Oregon State Police Lt. Gregg Hastings says police have an

arrest warrant for 43-year-old David Durham on charges of attempted aggravated murder, attempted murder, first-degree assault and eluding police officers. He is sought in Sunday night’s wounding of Officer Steven Dodds, who is hospitalized in Portland. Michael Durham says his family wishes the best for Dodds.

The brother says David Durham has always been kindhearted and quick to make friends. But about six months ago, he injured a shoulder and began taking doctor-prescribed pain medication. At that point, the brother says David Durham started having trouble “with perceiving what was real and what was not.�

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Redmond Police Department

DUII — William Hays Langley, 21, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 8:56 p.m. Jan. 24, in the 1400 block of Northeast Seventh Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 12:16 p.m. Jan. 24, in the 3300 block of Southwest Juniper Avenue. Prineville Police Department

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 3:02 p.m. Jan. 21, in the area of Northeast Knowledge Street. DUII — Roberta M. Woodward, 49, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 4:37 p.m. Jan. 21, in the area of Northwest Third Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:13 a.m. Jan. 22, in the area of Northwest Ninth Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:08 p.m. Jan. 22, in the

area of North Main Street. DUII — Kelli Johnson, 23, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:25 a.m. Jan. 23, in the area of Southeast Knowledge Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:45 p.m. Jan. 23, in the area of North Main Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Theft — A theft was reported at 2:46 p.m. Jan. 24, in the 52500 block of Antler Lane in La Pine. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 2:34 p.m. Jan. 24, in the 61200 block of Skyline Ranch Road in Bend. Theft — A purse and cell phone were reported stolen from a vehicle at 2 p.m. Jan. 24, in the 10000 block of Northeast Crooked River Drive in Terrebonne. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:28 p.m. Jan. 24, in the 17200 block of Merganser Drive in La Pine. DUII — Charles Douglas Morrison, 30, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:37 a.m. Jan. 24, in the area of Camelot Place and Guinevere Court in Bend.

Oregon State Police

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5:30 p.m. Jan. 24, in the area of Cline Falls Road near milepost 2. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:55 p.m. Jan. 24, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 153.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the website at www. humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541-923-0882 — or refer to the website at www. redmondhumane.org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

English Bull Dog — Adult male, beige and white; found near Southwest Mustang Road in Crooked River Ranch. Chihuahua and Miniature Australian Shepherd mix — Young male, black and white, with collar; found near Northwest 19th Street.

The Associated Press PORTLAND — Oregon’s child support collection program brings in less than 60 cents of every dollar owed by parents — less than the national average. State and county workers collected $264 million for families last year, but an additional $181 million went uncollected, partly because of antiquated computers, the recession and not enough collectors, The Oregonian reported. Compared with 2009, the Oregon Department of Justice slipped last year in three of the five measures used by federal authorities: the percent of current child support collected, the percent of pastdue support collected, and the cost-effectiveness of the state’s program. The latest audit by the secretary of state’s office shows that delinquent child support payments now exceed $1 billion. Oregon Attorney General John Kroger recently announced that the state Depart-

The Associated Press Today is Wednesday, Jan. 26, the 26th day of 2011. There are 339 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Jan. 26, 1861, Louisiana passed an Ordinance of Secession, 113-17, at the state capitol in Baton Rouge, becoming the sixth state to break free from the United States. ON THIS DATE In 1788, the first European settlers in Australia, led by Capt. Arthur Phillip, landed in present-day Sydney. In 1837, Michigan became the 26th state. In 1841, Britain formally occupied Hong Kong, which the Chinese had ceded to the British. In 1870, Virginia rejoined the Union. In 1942, the first American expeditionary force to go to Europe during World War II went ashore in Northern Ireland. In 1950, India officially proclaimed itself a republic as Rajendra Prasad took the oath of office as president. In 1961, President John F. Kennedy appointed Dr. Janet Travell to be his personal physician; she was the first woman to

T O D AY I N HISTORY hold the job. In 1996, first lady Hillary Clinton testified before a grand jury connected to the Whitewater probe. TEN YEARS AGO Lacrosse coach Diane Whipple, 33, was attacked and killed by two huge dogs belonging to neighbors outside her apartment in San Francisco. (One of the dogs’ owners, Marjorie Knoller, is serving 15 years to life in prison for second-degree murder; her husband, Robert Noel, served just over two years for involuntary manslaughter.) FIVE YEARS AGO Saudi Arabia recalled its ambassador from Denmark to protest caricatures of the prophet Muhammad published in a Danish newspaper. (Protests spread across the Muslim world for weeks, and dozens of people were killed.) ONE YEAR AGO Toyota suspended U.S. sales of several popular vehicle models to fix sticking accelerator pedals; the suspension was on top

of a recall of 23 million vehicles. Louis Auchincloss, 92, a prolific author of fiction and nonfiction, died in New York. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actress Anne Jeffreys is 88. Actress Joan Leslie is 86. Cartoonist Jules Feiffer is 82. Sportscaster-actor Bob Uecker is 76. Actor Scott Glenn is 72. Singer Jean Knight is 68. Activist Angela Davis is 67. Actor David Strathairn is 62. Alt-country singer-songwriter Lucinda Williams is 58. Rock singer-musician Eddie Van Halen is 56. Actress-comedian-talk show host Ellen DeGeneres is 53. Hockey Hall-of-Famer Wayne Gretzky is 50. Musician Andrew Ridgeley is 48. Rhythm-and-blues singer Jazzie B. (Soul II Soul) is 48. Actor Paul Johansson is 47. Gospel singer Kirk Franklin is 41. Actress Jennifer Crystal is 38. Rock musician Chris Hesse (Hoobastank) is 37. Actor Gilles Marini is 35. NBA player Vince Carter is 34. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “My experience of the world is that things left to themselves don’t get right.� — T.H. Huxley, English biologist and author (1825-1895)

Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

KIDS Center receives $64,750 in grants The local nonprofit organization KIDS Center has received $64,750 in grants, according to a news release. The center, which is dedicated to the prevention and treatment of child abuse, received the money through three separate grants. A grant of $50,000 provided through The Meyer Memorial Trust will be used by the KIDS Center to maintain medical staff hours and to see more children in the community. A second grant of $10,000 was awarded through the Cow Creek Umpqua Indian Foundation and will help the center continue to offer family support services. The final grant of $4,750 was awarded through Sage, an organization that provides software packages to businesses. The Sage grant money was provided to the center through an online contest, according to the news release.

St. Charles group picks new medical director

State treasurer opens more money for loans By Jonathan J. Cooper The Associated Press

Michigan becomes 26th state in 1837

ment of Justice, the agency that oversees the collections, earned the state a bonus check from the federal government in 2010. The agency listed “total children in caseload� at 236,281 for last year, but the number is misleading. Parents in onefourth of those cases are not under orders to make payments because legal paperwork isn’t done. In 11,000 of those cases, the state has yet to establish paternity. Kroger shook up the state’s child-support program after taking office two years ago, tasking veteran state attorney Jean Fogarty to improve results. She is now director of the Oregon Child Support Program. Fogarty said in an interview that she wants to get the state collecting at least 65 percent of child support by 2012, amounting to an extra $13 million for Oregon children. But the recession, state funding challenges and weak laws pose a challenge.

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SALEM — Oregon Treasurer Ted Wheeler is making it easier for banks to lend out deposits they take in from government agencies. Wheeler lowered the minimum collateral requirements on Tuesday to 75 percent. Now, financially sound banks can lend out 25 cents from every public dollar deposited. They used to have to hold $1 in collateral for each govern-

ment dollar they took in. The change takes effect immediately. Wheeler says it will open up $600 million that banks could lend to individuals or small businesses looking to expand. Ryan Deckert of the Oregon Business Association says access to loans is critical for businesses to expand. He says some small and medium-sized businesses are struggling to get loans even if they’re financially sound.

The St. Charles Medical Group has announced that Dr. Jeff Absalon will be the organization’s new medical director starting Feb. 1, according to a news release. Absalon is an internist who has been at Cascade Internal Medicine Specialists since 2006, and has practiced in Bend for nearly a decade. As medical director, Absalon will work with physicians on quality and efficiency initiatives, as well as operational and clinical issues regarding their practices. The St. Charles Medical Group is an organization made up of both employed and affiliated physicians dedicated to improving community health, patients’ experiences and controlling health care costs.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, January 26, 2011 C3

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A special section featuring news from schools in Deschutes, Jefferson and Crook counties

An educational edition

Most U.S. students lack science proficiency, report says By John Hechinger Bloomberg News

Hailie Bishop, 10, and her classmates look over the magazine “Life Just Got Better” after its unveiling Thursday evening at Buckingham Elementary. Photos by Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin

Buckingham Elementary fifth-graders publish literary magazine By Megan Kehoe

Life Just Got Better

The Bulletin

To Angel Hernandez, 10, green is much more than just a color. As the fifth-grader shared with a room full of peers and parents Thursday evening, green is a feeling he associates with cool summer breezes, carefree days of play, and his favorite football team. “Green is a leaf,” Angel said nervously, his cheeks flushing bright red. “Green smells like my shampoo. Green sounds like Oregon Ducks. Green feels like a trampoline. Green is very joyful.” On Thursday, students in Laurie Walsh’s fifth-grade class at Buckingham Elementary School unveiled a student-produced magazine and recited some of their poems to an audience of their parents and peers. The magazine, which students named “Life Just Got Better,” features poetry and photographs compiled over several months. The publication features three of each student’s poems and photos. Each student had the opportunity to recite his or her work at the evening event.

The poetry and photo magazine made by Laurie Walsh’s fifth-graders can be viewed at www.magcloud. com/browse/Issue/22602

“The kids were writing for a purpose, rather than just writing for a grade, and the project ended up being a very authentic experience for them.” — Laurie Walsh, teacher, Buckingham Elementary

Taylor Makela, 10, recites a poem she wrote for “Life Just Got Better” magazine for the crowd Thursday evening at Buckingham Elementary.

Megan Kehoe can be reached at 541-383-0354 or at mkehoe@bendbulletin.com

Confident poetry “We started with poetry because it’s an easier form to start with than other types of writing,” Walsh said of the process. “It’s shorter to edit, and the students have more confidence about their writing when it comes to poems.” The magazine project was part of a larger “Storylines” lesson, in which students pretended to be writers in a publishing house. Students even created paper cubicles and elected magazine editors as part of the four-monthlong project. The class learned about poetry formats, pho to g r aphy, and — as Walsh pointed out — responsibility. “A camera was forgotten during one of our sessions and we found it hanging on a tree at the bus stop,” said Walsh. “I nearly had a heart attack!” After writing eight poems and taking eight photos, students were presented with the challenge of choosing their best three. Walsh said the selection process was a crucial part of the project, as students learned how to edit their own work. After the audience was given a quick overview of the publish-

pose, rather than just writing for a grade, and the project ended up being a very authentic experience for them.”

ing process, students took the stage to perform their poems. Some of the young poets decided to recite haiku, strategically avoiding their longer poems to cut down on embarrassing stage time. Others opted to recite more detailed work. Colors, pet hamsters and friends were popular poem subjects. Anya Katz, 10, recited a poem about her best friend, Katrina. “You are a speaker box,” Anya said, in a strong, clear voice. “You dream of being on ‘American Idol,’ but now is not the time.” Anya said she wrote about Katrina because they are best friends, and because Katrina loves to sing. “I really liked the whole project — it was really interesting,” Anya said. “It’s really exciting to see the magazine finished tonight.”

Stage jitters Standing onstage in front of a packed room was enough to make some students forget their lines. After taking the stage, Carlin Triplette, 10, realized that the poem she had memorized had slipped her mind. “I was really shy,” Carlin later

said of the experience. Carlin rushed out of the library to retrieve her poem. After about five minutes, she came back and bravely took the stage again to recite the poem. “The project was really imaginative, and it was really fun,” Carlin said. “We took really good pictures, and I just think it turned out really good.” Tyler Buxton, 10, recited a poem about his favorite things — which included Christmas and his pets. “It was really fun going around the house taking weird pictures,” said Tyler, who took a photo of his pet lizard to accompany his “favorite things” poem.

‘All the things I love’ Julia Waggoner, 10, chose to perform an autobiographical poem. “I just thought of all the things I love, and put it in the poem,” said Julia. “And I thought of the things that I don’t love too, like huge spiders.” “I thought it was really great to see them take pride in their work,” said Katie Waggoner, Julia’s mom. “And everyone did such a good job in their delivery.” The evening ended with the unveiling of the magazine, which the class had not seen yet. Students then showed their work to their parents. Walsh said that, after going through the process, her students

Fewer than half of U.S. students are proficient in science, renewing questions about the country’s global competitiveness, the Education Department said Tuesday. A third of the nation’s fourthgraders, 30 percent of eighthgraders and 21 percent of 12thgraders are performing at or above the proficient level in science, according to the 2009 National Assessment of Educational Progress. Known as the Nation’s Report Card, the government considers the test the most influential view of U.S. educational achievement. U.S. 15-year-olds ranked 25th among peers from 34 countries on a math test and scored in the middle in science and reading, while China’s Shanghai topped the charts on an international assessment released Dec. 7. “The results released today show that our nation’s students aren’t learning at a rate that will maintain America’s role as an international leader in the sciences,” Education Secretary Arne Duncan said in a statement. “When 1 or 2 percent of children score at the advanced levels on NAEP, the next generation will not be ready to be world-class inventors, doctors and engineers.” The assessment was given to 156,500 fourth-graders, 151,100 eighth-graders and 11,100 12thgraders. The science test was changed in 2009, so it can’t be compared with past results, the government said. Fourth-graders considered proficient are able to recognize that gravitational force constantly affects an object, while advanced students can design an investigation comparing two types of bird food. Proficient 12th-graders are able to evaluate two methods to control an invasive animal species; advanced students can recognize a nuclear fission reaction. Male students scored higher than females in all three grades, according to the assessment. Black and Hispanic students underperformed white students, while Asian-American students outperformed those in the 12th grade. Thirty-eight percent of 12thgraders performed at or above the proficient level in reading on the 2009 NAEP reading test, the Education Department said Nov. 18. About a quarter scored at or above proficient in math. In both subjects, students showed improvement since 2005.

came away with much more confidence in their writing. “We pretend in the storyline process, but we’ve created something real from it,” Walsh said. “The kids were writing for a pur-

C O N TAC T U S SCHOOL BRIEFS: Items and announcements of general interest. Please include details and contact information. Phone: 541-617-7831 E-mail: smiller@bendbulletin. com TEEN FEATS: The Bulletin wants to recognize high school students’ achievements off the playing fields. Do you know of teens who have been recognized recently for their academic achievements or who have won an award or certificate for their participation in clubs, choirs or volunteer groups? If so, please submit the information and a photo. Phone: 541-383-0358 Mail: P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 E-mail: youth@bendbulletin. com

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C4 Wednesday, January 26, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

E Your pain is the Energy Trust’s gain

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

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acific Power customers scrambling to work this year’s double-digit rate increase into their electricity budgets should be sure to set aside a little extra for the tax man, better

known as the Energy Trust of Oregon. Their pain is the Energy Trust’s gain. Most people know the Energy Trust as the government-created nonprofit that conducts free homeenergy audits. Of course, nothing the Energy Trust does is really free. But many of the people footing the bill know little about the trust or, we suspect, its claim on their hard-earned money. So here’s a little history. Back in 1999, the Legislature told the state’s two big utilities (Portland General Electric and PacifiCorp, which operates in Oregon as Pacific Power) to apply a 3 percent charge to all retail electricity sales. This charge is merely a tax by another name, and the money it generates is used for a variety of purposes. Some goes to education service districts to make schools more energy-efficient. Some pays to weatherize low-income housing. But most, almost 75 percent, of the so-called “public purpose charge” goes to the Energy Trust, which uses the electricity tax revenue to fund energy conservation programs and subsidize renewable energy projects. The tax revenue that flows through the Energy Trust’s hands is significant. During the 18-month period from January 2009 through June 2010, the trust’s portion of the electricity tax amounted to nearly $86 million, or roughly $57 million per year. Among the projects subsidized with that money, according to a December 2010 Energy Trust report, are numerous wind generation facilities, solar installations and, last but not least, a project that collects methane percolating through the Douglas County landfill. The trust’s funding mechanism ensures that Oregonians will continue to pay for more of the same — lots more. When you receive a fixed percentage of an ever-rising number, as the trust and its electricity-tax partners do, you collect more and more money whether you need it or not. Thus, while Pacific Power had to make a case to the Public Utility Commission for the rate increases that kicked in last month, the Energy Trust automatically capitalizes on Pacific Power’s work. You know, kind of like a parasite. PUC spokesman Bob Valdez acknowledges that “as retail bills go up, the share that goes to the Energy Trust for energy conservation ... goes up as well.” But he says the “Legislature did that so it would keep track

with inflation and also accommodate a growing number of customers and ... be there for any emerging technology that might come up.” Maybe so. But it’s hard to believe lawmakers back in 1999 supported the weirdness at work today. One of the justifications for Pacific Power’s recent hikes is the cost of “green” power, which Oregon’s renewable portfolio standards require utilities to provide. Thus is the high cost of Oregon’s renewable energy mandate forcing Oregonians to pay more money to a nonprofit that subsidizes ... renewable energy. But it gets crazier still. Last September, the PUC allowed Pacific Power to apply a 1.7 percent surcharge to electricity bills in order to pay for the removal of several dams. The electricity tax applies to that portion of Oregonians’ electricity bills, too, says the PUC’s Valdez. Thus, must Oregonians pay the Trust more simply because they have to cough up money to help fish. One environmental tax begets another. Fortunately, the burden imposed by Oregon’s electricity tax can also be a great opportunity. It all depends on the willingness of lawmakers to help taxpayers despite the certain objections of environmentalists and organizations that feed on electricity tax revenue. Lawmakers who do respect taxpayers should ask, first, whether the Energy Trust has become obsolete. It seems to us that the proliferation of subsidies and mandates supporting efficiency and renewable energy are quickly making it so. Moreover, the trust’s funding mechanism forces Oregonians to pay an environmental tax on other environmental taxes. They must pay twice, for instance, for the state’s renewable portfolio standard. They pay once in the form of higher electricity costs and once again in the form of increased electricity-tax contributions. Well, here’s an opportunity for lawmakers to prove that they can cut expensive programs that have outlived their usefulness. Better yet, by doing so they can pat themselves on the back — with justification — for doing something to moderate electricity costs that their own policies are driving skyward.

My Nickel’s Worth Blame the shooter I’m curious as to why Ray Powell feels compelled to join other irresponsible people by not allowing a good crisis go to waste. He should be ashamed for using the Tucson tragedy to make political points and vilify those he disagrees with. In doing so he has become that which he criticizes. Powell’s letter (Jan. 16) attempting to link the shootings to commentary by Rush Limbaugh, Ann Coulter and Glenn Beck is imprudent. It is also a classic example of selective memory loss. He must have conveniently forgotten the malicious rhetoric spewed by liberal pundits over the years against George Bush, Dick Cheney, Sarah Palin and the tea party. A recent loathsome cartoon in The Bulletin regarding Palin’s daughter is but one example. Most of us agree the level of public discourse should be more civil all across the political spectrum. Hateful comments such as those by Powell do not help. At the end of the day, responsibility for the shootings in Tucson belongs squarely on the shoulders of a single deranged individual. It belongs nowhere else. To pretend otherwise is foolish and disrespectful to the victims. Greg Franklin Bend

Mental illness How much does it matter whether we agree that the tragic shootings in Tucson were caused by political vitriol, the failure of the mental health system; violence depicted in the media, including movies and TV; or the need for tighter gun control laws? Let’s hope this is not turning out to be another opportunity for the reds and the blues to attack each other. Our country is in mourning for

the six people who were killed and all those who were injured. It does matter that the shooter is a person with a mental illness, a disorder of the brain, who needed medical treatment to calm his mind and hopefully avoid such a show of violence. At this writing, the public knows little about his medical history. If he is diagnosed as having paranoid schizophrenia, his delusional mind could have reacted to any single one or combination of the above causes. Voices no one else hears could have prompted him to shoot and kill. It is also a tragedy that this young man did not, and so many others do not, get desperately needed medical treatment. If you have someone in your family or know someone in need of such help, talk to your family doctor or call the county Mental Health Department (541322-7500). You can also call the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) for information on community resources and for emotional support. The contact number for NAMI of Central Oregon in Bend is 541-408-7779 and in Redmond 541-504-1431. Marge Kocher Co-founder, NAMI Redmond

New WPA Having just read Doris Kearns Goodwin’s award-winning book about Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Great Depression preceding World War II, I am amazed at the similar need in our time for similar circumstances. FDR initiated the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., Securities and Exchange Commission, Home Owners’ Loan Corp., Works Progress Administration, National Recovery Administration and the Civilian Conservation Corps — some of which still exist. In the case of SEC, which was

created to monitor bank transactions, does that indicate that the banking system was one of the root causes of the Depression as it is of the Great Recession? HOLC was created to stabilize foreclosures — sound familiar? WPA and CCC were job creations. The well-publicized deterioration of our highway and bridge systems due to lack of money cries out for a new WPA. The hand-in-glove relationship between big timber and the U.S. Forest Service similarly cries out for a new CCC! Even Robert Reich, nationally known economist, stresses the need for a new WPA. Are the current administration and President Obama so afraid of borrowing good ideas that they will commit $600 billion to military preparedness while 15 percent of America goes jobless and hungry? FDR had the guts — where are ours? How about it, Congress? You can create your own names! Russell Williams Sisters

What about OHVs? In response to yet another area that off-highway vehicles users are getting shut out of in the Redmond area, seems that if you are and OHV user and live in the High Desert, places to ride are constantly being taken away and given to mountain bikers and hikers. OHV users are taxpayers and live here. Thank you, Councilor Ed Boero, who at least recognizes that we do live here and should be treated fairly. OHV users support a large number of small businesses. We also have to pay OHV fees to ride. How about the mountain bikers also paying for land use? The same fee as OHV registration would be fair. Stephen Newell Tumalo

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Research proves that classroom equity helps all students By Lora Nordquist Bulletin guest columnist

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he Bulletin’s editorial staff recently took Bend-La Pine schools to task for the decision to eliminate a district program for talented and gifted (TAG) students at Pilot Butte Middle School. The editorial contained several misleading and incorrect points, which I would like to address. First and perhaps most important, district patrons should know that we provide services to TAG students at all schools in Bend-La Pine. Our district programs are limited to two classes at a single elementary school and two block programs at two middle schools, which will be reduced to one program in the 2011-12 school year due to lack of interest. More than two-thirds of our identified TAG students are served in their neighborhood schools, through a variety of models. The editorial also suggests students can access advanced instruction only if they are in ability-grouped classes. It claims Pilot Butte’s recommendation to end the district program stems from

a misdirected goal to treat all students equally: “When academic achievement and even the appearance of inequality come into conflict, academic achievement almost always loses.” This view has been successfully challenged in classrooms not just across our district, but also across the nation and the world. Speaking of classrooms across the world, the editorial stated the district’s decision flies in the face of our desire to be a “world class” school system. I recommend to the editors Linda DarlingHammond’s “Flat World and Education,” required reading for all Bend-La Pine administrators last summer. DarlingHammond, a Stanford professor and one of the nation’s leading thinkers on educational policy, examines the strategies nations around the world have used to raise dramatically the achievement levels of all students. One of these is a commitment to equity. In countries such as Finland, Japan and South Korea, whose students’ scores on internationally benchmarked assessments are among the highest in the world, stu-

IN MY VIEW dents are not routinely ability-grouped until high school, if at all. Instead, they establish high standards for all students and provide additional support and resources for those who struggle. In support of its stance, the Bulletin editorial provided numerous examples of what it perceived to be “tracking” in the district. These purported examples reveal a profound misunderstanding of the programs themselves, the laws governing them, and the whole notion of “tracking.” First, the editorial claims districts are required by law to provide “educational enrichment” for TAG students, thus “tracking” them. In fact, Oregon’s law is silent on enrichment for students. Instead, it requires schools to address the “rate and level” of TAG students’ learning. Individual plans to accomplish this goal are most often carried out within the regular classroom setting, especially at the elementary and middle school levels. The second example cited in the edi-

torial concerns students who receive special education services and individual plans developed by school teams. This is a particularly ironic choice as an example of “tracking” because the law requires the plans to create the “least restrictive environment” for students. In other words, the goal is to have the student grouped with his or her age-group peers as much as possible. In our elementary schools, services are at times provided in brief “pull out” sessions (approximately 30 minutes in a six-hour day); in other circumstances specialists come into the classroom and work with small groups of students who need support, even those not identified as needing special education services. Finally, the editorial uses the example of English language learners (ELLs), stating the separate services provided for these students “tracks” them. Again, this is a non-example. The law requires that ELL students not miss any core instruction when they attend English language development classes. In our elementary schools, elementary ELL students generally attend these classes

during 30-minute blocks of time set aside for all students to receive support or enrichment, or during times when all students are practicing language development in some form. In our secondary schools, these students take a single language development class. Our ELL students spend the vast majority of their day in their regular classes with students of varying skills and interests. I have worked as an administrator in Central Oregon for over a decade. During that time, I have been impressed with The Bulletin’s news staff assigned to education issues. The men and women in those roles have worked hard to become knowledgeable about topics before writing stories. I believe this is due to time spent doing the research and engaging in discourse with those in the field. I encourage the editorial staff to use this model as it continues to explore educational issues. Lora Nordquist, Ed.D., is the Bend-La Pine school district’s chief academic officer for elementary programs and curriculum.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, January 26, 2011 C5

O Doramae Littrell

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N   Danny Reust, of Sunriver Feb. 23, 1949 - Jan. 23, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine, 541-536-5104, www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: Private family services will be held at a later time in Salem, Oregon. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, Oregon, 541-382-5882.

Dora Margaret Littrell, of Bend Feb. 12, 1928 - Jan. 23, 2011 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.com Services: At her request no services will be held. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care 2075, N.E. Wyatt Court, Bend, Oregon 97701.

Faye Marie Wolfe, of Bend Sept. 11, 1911 - Jan. 17, 2011 Arrangements: National Cremation Society, 503-286-0965 Services: Services in Rozet, Wyoming, at a later date. Internment with son, Lester.

Faye Marie Wolfe, of longtime resident of Bend Sept. 11, 1911 - Jan. 17, 2011 Services: Services in Rozet, Wyoming, internment with son Lester.

Janna Louise Vance, of Prineville June 20, 1954 - Jan. 23, 2011 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Services: Graveside services and celebration of life will be held at 1:00 p.m. Thursday, January 27 at Juniper Haven Cemetery in Prineville, OR.

Robert “Bob” Lee McCollum, of Prineville July 2, 1931 - Jan. 21, 2011 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Services: At his request no public services will be held at this time.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Transit hub Continued from C1 Other councilors expressed concern that the area could become clogged with bus traffic. Councilor Ed Boero, for instance, wondered what the city and COIC would do if the transit hub overwhelmed area parking.

Feb. 12, 1928 - Jan. 23, 2011 Dora passed away Sunday, after a long illness, at Hospice House in Bend. Dora loved traveling with her friends, making quilts, needle work, and her job as a demonstrator at Costco for 10 years. She is survived by her loving husband, Darwin of 51 years, of Bend; chilDoramae Littrell dren, Steve Market, (wife, Rosemary) of San Jose, CA; Lynn Wolfe, (husband, Chuck) of Rathdrum, ID; Shelley Gonzales, (husband, Philip) of San Jose, CA; grandchildren, Jennifer Roberson, Brian Market, Stacey Market, Josh Wolfe, Cameron Gonzales, and Brittany Gonzales; great-grandchildren, Brynn and Mia Roberson and Kaylina Market; brothers, Robert Macedo and Richard Macedo. Per Dora's request, no services will be held. Donations may be made to Partners In Care - Hospice House in Bend.

Louisa Imogene (Jean) May Jan. 23, 1933 - Jan. 21, 2011 Louisa Imogene (Jean) May of Redmond, Oregon, went to be with the Lord on January, 21, 2011, surrounded by her loving family, she was 77. A loving sister, mother, grandmother and great-grand mother she was born Louisa Imogene Jan. 23, 1933, in East Bea(Jean) May ver Tillamook, Oregon, to Hazel and Ormie (Grimes) Parker. The family moved to Dallas, Oregon, in 1946, where she later graduated from High school in 1951, and worked for the State of Oregon until she met and married Clinton D. May on November 25, 1955. A viewing will be held from noon to 5:00 PM, on Wednesday, January 26, at Autumn Funeral Home, 485 NW Larch Avenue, Redmond. A funeral service will be held at noon, Thursday, Jan. 27, 2011, at Dayspring Christian Center in Terrebonne, Oregon, 7801 N. 7th Street. Graveside service will be held at Terrebonne Pioneer cemetery. Her hobbies included gardening, camping, traveling, cooking and baking. Her greatest joy was her children and grandchildren. She is survived by her husband of 55 years, her son, Steven May and wife, Connie Friedman-May of Coeur d'Alene, Idaho; daughter-in-law, Kathy May; and grandson, Tyler May of Bend, Oregon; daughter, Lynn and husband, John Burress of Terrebonne; grandchildren, John, Beth, Ally, and great-granddaughter, Aveyah Jeneba-Lynn; brothers, Merrill and James Parker of Dallas, Oregon, and Warren Parker of Salem, Oregon. She was preceded in death by her parents, two sisters, eight brothers including her twin brother, Roy Parker, and her son, Kenneth Wayne May. The family would like to extend their heart felt thanks and appreciation for the kind and compassionate care and assistance Hospice of Central Oregon and the staff of Brookside Assisted Living Facility provided.

“If we had a lot of activity, I don’t think we do have enough parking,” Boero said.

Overwhelmed lot Councilor concerns, though, seemed alleviated when Friend described how people use the bus system. The hub at COCC has overwhelmed the parking lot, but that should not happen

Mexican bishop who championed rights of Maya Indians dies at 86 By Tracy Wilkinson Los Angeles Times

MEXICO CITY — For 40 years as a bishop in Mexico’s impoverished Chiapas state, Samuel Ruiz championed the rights of the long-suffering Maya Indians who dominate the lush region. He learned their languages and adopted their customs into Roman Catholic practice. He also made powerful enemies among rich landowners, Mexican governments and even the Vatican. He mediated the Zapatista peasant revolt of the 1990s and was both praised for helping to avoid wider bloodshed and criticized for supposedly inciting the rebels in the first place. Ruiz died Monday in Mexico

Study Continued from C1 Bend must upgrade its Bridge Creek water treatment system by 2012 in order to meet a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency requirement to treat for Cryptosporidium, a microorganism that can cause human illness. It also must replace about 10 miles of aging pipeline that delivers water from Bridge Creek, near Tumalo Falls west of Bend, to a current treatment facility before it’s distributed to town. Together, the new pipeline and treatment plant that would meet the federal mandate are estimated to cost $58 million. There’s also the possibility the city will add a hydropower facility that would bring the total project cost to about $73 million. Capell, who has been one of the most vocal council supporters of the project, said these numbers are only preliminary projections and have a built-in 35 percent cost contingency. He also said the bids that have been coming in for city projects have been lower than engineering estimates, in part due to the current state of the economy.

FAN Continued from C1 This year, the fourth most popular request is for housing: more than 1,100 people have asked for assistance either finding it or help paying the rent or mortgage so families don’t lose it. Bend-La Pine Schools’ Federal Services Director Dana Arntson said FAN routinely sees a jump in requests for services after the holiday break. “The things we know are that income tax comes due for folks, and that power bills are at their highest typically in Central Oregon in January and February,” Arntson said. “On top of the holidays, like it or not, it’s the holiday and they have children living in the home and you want to have a special time for them, so we do see an increase in requests for basic needs, especially when it comes to heating and utility costs.” Kathi Gonzales is a FAN advocate at Mountain View High School. She’s seeing more families in need and more families with greater needs than before. “Before, we would get phone calls saying, ‘We need $60 to pay our electric bill.’ Now it’s, ‘We need $300 to pay our electric bill,’ or ‘We need help with electricity and rent,’ ” Gonzales said. “It’s people needing help with mortgage, not just rent. We have people who have said typically (they are) able to donate and now they need help.” While families continue to

in downtown because traffic flows through the area. And tickets cover an entire day of travel, so riders tend to get picked up at home rather than driving to the station. Friend assumes that as long as that price structure is in place, people will continue to ride from home. The downtown station, she said, would be used primarily as a transfer station.

City after a long illness and complications from diabetes, church officials announced. He was 86.

Indigenous influence Samuel Ruiz Garcia was born Nov. 3, 1924, in the conservative silver-mining Mexican state of Guanajuato. He was ordained as a priest in 1949, at the age of 24, in Rome, where he studied at the Jesuit-run Pontifical Gregorian University. Eleven years later he was made a bishop and sent to Chiapas, in southernmost Mexico. Initially, his plan was to change the ways of the indigenous communities. But, Ruiz recalled in 1999 at a ceremony marking his retirement, they

He said he didn’t know where the best opportunity for costsavings was, but added that he was optimistic about the engineering firm developing creative solutions no one has thought of yet. “You never know what they’ll come up with,” Capell said. “Hopefully they’ll come up with something pretty cool.” The city hired Robinson, Stafford & Rude Inc., of Gulfport, Fla., to perform the value engineering study. It beat out two other firms that submitted bids for the project. It does not have any other connections to the project.

Validating estimates According to the city’s contract with Robinson, Stafford & Rude, the firm will begin by validating the current cost estimates. After that, it will perform a 40-hour value engineering workshop to come up with new ideas to improve the Bridge Creek water project and then prepare a report of its findings. Public Works Director Paul Rheault said that report won’t be completed until sometime in March. He also said it’s too soon to tell what parts of the upgrade might be the most likely for de-

need basics like food or school supplies, she’s seen more families request serious help. “I see more of an increase in people needing help with housing and utilities than before,” she said. “A lot of the time they ask for help and what we can help them with is school supplies and clothing. Some of those things are more easily accessed.” While Gonzales is often able to provide some sort of help, she said it can be frustrating. “Sometimes it feels like we’re sending them to the community for resources that aren’t there,” she said. “They run out so quickly, it’s tough.”

Utility assistance Between July and December of 2009, FAN provided about $4,000 in utilities assistance. Over the same period of time in 2010, FAN provided more than $7,000 in utilities assistance. The amount of money given out for each request is typically pretty small; the FAN funds are combined with help from NeighborImpact or other groups. Between January and June of 2010, FAN helped families pay their utilities bills to the tune of more than $10,000. Arntson expects that amount to increase in 2011. This year, Arntson said, 26 FAN advocates are operating around Deschutes County. The Deschutes County Public Health Department received a grant, part of which funds a

“The plan is to not create a parking issue,” Friend said. “We can avoid it by encouraging people to ride through.”

More business traffic Having the transit hub downtown could draw more traffic to the shops and businesses in the area, several councilors said. Community Development Di-

changed him. It was also a period of great change in the Roman Catholic Church. Reformers inspired by the Second Vatican Council that ended in 1965 sought to make the church more accessible to native populations, a trend especially strong in Latin America where “liberation theology,” which favors political activism on behalf of the poor, took root (before being reined in by Pope John Paul II). Embracing that movement, Ruiz organized a network of rural catechists, or lay Bible teachers, who fanned out across Chiapas to even the most remote hamlets, allowing Indians to participate in church worship in ways never before possible to them.

sign changes. “They’ll evaluate everything,” Rheault said. “They may come back and say, ‘You’re proposing a 36-inch pipe and one of the alternatives you might want to look at is a 34-inch pipe.’ They’ll give you the pros and cons on all these different types of things.”

Report will not abandon current plan He added that the value engineering study will not suggest the city should abandon its surface water upgrade in favor of another alternative, such as groundwater. “They will work with what’s before them now,” he said. “And in that context they will evaluate everything that’s been approved.” The last time the city had an independent firm perform a value engineering study was during the planning stages for an ongoing $34 million upgrade to the wastewater treatment plant. Bend Project Engineer Jim Wodrich said that study found the city could change the way it planned to update the plant and still increase capacity by adding peanut-sized pieces of plastic —

full-time FAN advocate at each of the school-based health clinics in the county. At the start of 2009 FAN had 21 advocates, according to previously published reports in The Bulletin. That means a FAN advocate is on hand at Lynch Elementary in Redmond, Ensworth Elementary in Bend and La Pine Elementary in La Pine. “The increase in requests for services could be due to the fact that there are more folks on the ground,” Arntson said. “That’s another 120 hours of staff time each week.”

New needs But families are approaching FAN with other needs as well. For example, Arntson said a month ago a parent came in who needed to renew the tags on her car. That isn’t a service the program offers, so instead FAN offered funds to help with other expenses, like utilities or rent or food, that would then allow the family to save money needed to renew the vehicle registration. “We’re breaking down barriers so kids can stay in school,” Arntson said. “Clothing, school supplies, food, those are kid issues. Yes, we’re helping with health services and rent because if a child is homeless or not able to get to school we can’t do our job.” Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

rector Heather Richards agreed the transit hub could help downtown, which the city continues to work on revitalizing. “There could be some initial congestion, but there is an opportunity to really build this asset into downtown,” Richards said. Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

Co-creator of popular ant farm toys dies at 97 Los Angeles Times LOS ANGELES — While gazing at the industrious insects in 1956, novelty-toy entrepreneur Milton Levine was transported back to childhood and his uncle’s farm, where he collected ants in jars and watched them “cavort,” Levine told the Los Angeles Times in 2002. With his brother-in-law, Levine soon devised what was eventually named Uncle Milton’s Ant Farm, which was an instant hit in the fad-crazy 1950s. Levine died of natural causes Jan. 16 at a Thousand Oaks, Calif., assisted-care facility, said his son, Steven. He was 97.

sometimes called “doohickeys” or “bug condos” by city staff — to the system to help process waste. The idea was the plastic would provide more surface area for microorganisms that consume the organic materials in the waste. While this change in the city’s plans didn’t necessarily result in immediate cost savings, Wodrich said it allowed the city to delay building more tanks for processing waste because all treatment plant operators needed to do was add more of the plastic “bug condos” to the system. He said this prevented the city from overbuilding its infrastructure before population increases would have demanded that extra capacity. “The goal is to try and see where you can cut costs or make a project less expensive from an operation standpoint or a capital standpoint,” Wodrich said of value engineering. “In this day and age you just can’t afford to have a stranded investment. What can we do so we can only build what we need to meet future demands and not get overextended?” Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

Nitrates Continued from C1 The group also has to determine what questions to ask about potential nitrate sources, and put together a complete picture of the problem’s causes. “If we don’t have a full story like that, we’ll have little success with achieving our charter, which is to come up with a recommendation that’s acceptable to all parties,” Blakinger said. The Groundwater Protection Project committee will start that process next week, when a speaker will address the impact of agricultural uses on nitrates in the groundwater. In the coming meetings, members will talk about how to get the community more involved and work toward developing recommendations, Blakinger said. The group has made progress, said Eric Nigg, eastern region water quality manager with DEQ. When the group formed, the goal was for it to provide nonbinding recommendations to the DEQ after a year, Nigg said, but it will probably take longer than that. The committee has also asked DEQ do additional sampling of the groundwater wells to test for nitrate concentrations, he said — something recommended in the original study that raised concerns about the area’s groundwater to help track the rate of change and test the original model. Nigg said he is working on finding out the cost to retest the wells, but does not know if the DEQ or any other group will have the funds to pay for the work. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or kramsayer@bendbulletin. com.


W E AT H ER

C6 Wednesday, January 26, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2011.

TODAY, JANUARY 26

HIGH Ben Burkel

53

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

46/29

45/27

53/27

47/39

 Willowdale Warm Springs  55/31 Mitchell 53/32 Madras

Marion Forks 49/22



51/27

51/30

Camp Sherman 50/22 Redmond Prineville 53/25 Cascadia 51/26 52/26 Sisters 52/24 Bend  Post 53/25

Oakridge Elk Lake 50/24

52/21

Crescent

Crescent Lake

50/21

49/20

34/23



Hampton

Fort Rock

48/22

Chemult 49/19

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 63° North Bend • 16° Burns

Vancouver

Seattle

City

51/39

Missoula  39/27

Helena

Eugene 49/35

Bend 53/25

53/34

 Boise



 

Partly cloudy and mild conditions today. Partly cloudy tonight.



50/32

44/27



Idaho Falls Elko

72/36

35/24

40/25

27/14



44/21

Reno

53/28

San Francisco

Salt Lake City



65/51



41/23

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

HIGH

Last

New

First

Full

Jan. 26

Feb. 2

Feb. 10

Feb. 18

Wednesday Hi/Lo/W

50 26

Astoria . . . . . . . . 51/44/0.10 . . . . . 53/41/pc. . . . . . 55/41/pc Baker City . . . . . . 41/24/0.04 . . . . . 39/21/pc. . . . . . 39/22/pc Brookings . . . . . . .NA/40/NA . . . . . . 66/46/s. . . . . . 58/45/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 38/16/0.00 . . . . . . 37/18/s. . . . . . 40/20/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 52/35/0.00 . . . . . 49/35/pc. . . . . . 50/36/pc Klamath Falls . . . 50/21/0.00 . . . . . 48/23/pc. . . . . . . 49/20/s Lakeview. . . . . . . . 48/21/NA . . . . . . 45/21/s. . . . . . . 48/18/s La Pine . . . . . . . . 53/20/0.00 . . . . . . 52/21/s. . . . . . 48/22/pc Medford . . . . . . . 52/28/0.00 . . . . . 54/32/pc. . . . . . 54/31/pc Newport . . . . . . . 54/45/0.03 . . . . . 59/43/pc. . . . . . . 57/43/s North Bend . . . . . 63/41/0.00 . . . . . 62/40/pc. . . . . . 56/40/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 42/24/0.00 . . . . . . 34/22/s. . . . . . 37/23/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 54/41/0.02 . . . . . 48/32/pc. . . . . . . 45/29/f Portland . . . . . . .52/42/trace . . . . . 53/37/pc. . . . . . 53/39/pc Prineville . . . . . . . 51/27/0.00 . . . . . . 51/26/s. . . . . . . 47/24/f Redmond. . . . . . . 54/24/0.00 . . . . . 55/26/pc. . . . . . . 51/24/f Roseburg. . . . . . . 54/32/0.00 . . . . . 57/39/pc. . . . . . 58/38/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 55/38/0.00 . . . . . 51/37/pc. . . . . . 56/39/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 53/26/0.00 . . . . . . 52/24/s. . . . . . . 47/25/f The Dalles . . . . . . 59/42/0.00 . . . . . 50/36/pc. . . . . . . 52/32/f

LOW 0

2

MEDIUM 4

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

PRECIPITATION

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

2

45 24

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52/28 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .62 in 1968 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.48” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . -13 in 1949 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 1.46” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.48” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 1.46” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.31 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.53 in 1987 *Melted liquid equivalent

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Thursday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy, very slight chance of showers, LOW cooling.

HIGH

TEMPERATURE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .6:35 a.m. . . . . . .3:30 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .4:23 a.m. . . . . . .1:42 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .7:41 a.m. . . . . . .5:12 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .9:44 a.m. . . . . . .9:43 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . .10:58 p.m. . . . . .10:32 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .9:35 a.m. . . . . . .9:27 p.m.

Moon phases

SUNDAY

Mostly cloudy, very slight chance of showers, LOW cooler.

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

Calgary 46/31

Grants Pass 

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:29 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 5:07 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:28 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 5:08 p.m. Moonrise today . . . 12:54 a.m. Moonset today . . . 10:49 a.m.

LOW

55 26

BEND ALMANAC

Redding

48/21

Crater Lake

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Christmas Valley Silver Lake

LOW

56 28

NORTHWEST



52/23

44/15

HIGH

25

53/37

Burns

La Pine

LOW

49/40

SATURDAY Mostly sunny and pleasant.

High pressure will be in control of the weather and will provide dry and quiet conditions.

45/22

Partly cloudy and mild conditions today. Partly cloudy tonight. Eastern

FRIDAY Mostly sunny and pleasant.

Tonight: Mainly clear and cool.

Portland

Brothers

51/22

Today: Mostly sunny, patchy AM fog in areas far north, remaining mild.

Paulina

49/23

Sunriver

41/13

Morning clouds, then partly cloudy today. Partly cloudy tonight. Central

THURSDAY

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 36-49 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 43 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 35-82 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 72-94 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . 70 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 34-42 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . 94 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

. . . . . . 43-44 . . . . 110-200 . . . . . . . . 87 . . . . . . . 111 . . . . . . 45-62 . . . . . . 36-40 . . . . . . 45-61

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

S

Vancouver 49/40

S

S

Calgary 46/31

S

Saskatoon 32/27

S

Winnipeg 16/12

S

S

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 23/13 Halifax 31/25 Bismarck Portland Billings 34/16 (in the 48 Portland 32/22 45/33 To ronto 53/37 contiguous states): Boston St. Paul 28/20 Boise 22/15 34/26 Green Bay Rapid City Detroit 40/25 23/9 New York • 82° Buffalo 44/24 31/18 37/28 30/19 Des Moines Naples, Fla. Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus 25/14 Chicago 40/29 Omaha 32/19 37/28 • -23° 27/15 25/14 San Francisco Salt Lake W ashington, D. C. Houlton, Maine 65/51 City 37/29 Las Denver Louisville 41/23 • 2.99” Kansas City Vegas 45/25 33/24 31/17 St. Louis 62/41 Cross City, Fla. Charlotte 30/18 42/28 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 46/25 76/54 49/21 36/23 47/27 Phoenix Atlanta 70/45 Honolulu 44/27 Birmingham 81/66 Dallas Tijuana 43/26 59/33 73/48 New Orleans 55/36 Orlando 68/42 Chihuahua Houston 63/27 59/37 Miami 77/51 Monterrey La Paz 66/41 73/51 Mazatlan Anchorage 75/48 24/15 Juneau 40/32 Seattle 51/39

Thunder Bay 12/8

FRONTS

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .49/35/0.03 . . .56/26/s . . . 62/31/s Akron . . . . . . . . .33/30/0.00 . .30/17/sn . . 28/17/sn Albany. . . . . . . . . .23/1/0.05 . . .32/20/c . . 31/13/pc Albuquerque. . . .45/22/0.00 . 46/25/pc . . . 50/24/s Anchorage . . . . .32/26/0.00 . .24/15/sn . . 27/20/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . .42/37/0.48 . .44/27/sh . . . 47/31/s Atlantic City . . . .46/26/0.00 . . .42/32/r . . 37/20/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .60/36/0.00 . . .62/30/s . . . 63/33/s Baltimore . . . . . .45/25/0.00 . . .36/29/r . . 35/20/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .39/31/0.00 . 45/33/pc . . . 52/32/s Birmingham . . . .51/39/0.31 . . 43/26/rs . . . 46/32/s Bismarck . . . . . . .32/16/0.00 . . .34/16/c . . . 37/21/c Boise . . . . . . . . . .44/27/0.02 . 40/25/pc . . 44/27/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .32/12/0.05 . . .34/26/c . . 32/15/sn Bridgeport, CT. . .32/19/0.14 . . .36/29/r . . 34/19/sn Buffalo . . . . . . . .32/27/0.01 . . .30/19/c . . 28/16/sn Burlington, VT. . . .24/3/0.02 . . .29/15/c . . . 26/6/sn Caribou, ME . . . . 3/-14/0.01 . . .22/10/c . . .21/-2/pc Charleston, SC . .53/45/0.44 . .60/35/sh . . . 55/32/s Charlotte. . . . . . .45/24/0.07 . . .42/28/r . . . 46/27/s Chattanooga. . . .45/39/0.25 . . 44/26/rs . . 41/28/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .36/13/0.00 . 40/29/pc . . 48/31/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .29/21/0.00 . 27/15/pc . . 27/22/sn Cincinnati . . . . . .40/30/0.15 . . 34/20/sf . . . 31/20/c Cleveland . . . . . .33/27/0.00 . . .29/19/c . . 27/19/sn Colorado Springs 44/10/0.00 . 42/21/pc . . 57/26/pc Columbia, MO . .35/12/0.00 . 31/18/pc . . 37/23/pc Columbia, SC . . .49/35/0.26 . . .46/30/r . . . 50/28/s Columbus, GA. . .45/42/0.20 . 47/28/pc . . . 49/31/s Columbus, OH. . .36/32/0.00 . . .32/19/c . . . 28/18/c Concord, NH . . . . 17/-2/0.05 . . .31/19/c . . . 31/9/sn Corpus Christi. . .62/46/0.00 . . .63/37/s . . . 66/36/s Dallas Ft Worth. .53/38/0.00 . . .59/33/s . . . 60/36/s Dayton . . . . . . . .34/26/0.00 . . .29/18/c . . . 28/18/c Denver. . . . . . . . .45/14/0.00 . 45/25/pc . . 54/30/pc Des Moines. . . . .31/22/0.00 . 25/14/pc . . 32/21/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . .31/27/0.00 . 31/18/pc . . 26/18/sn Duluth . . . . . . . . .19/14/0.00 . 19/12/pc . . 24/21/sn El Paso. . . . . . . . .52/27/0.00 . . .57/28/s . . . 57/28/s Fairbanks. . . . . . -8/-20/0.00 . . -2/-12/c . . . .2/-16/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . .22/11/0.01 . . .21/13/c . . . 30/22/c Flagstaff . . . . . . .48/20/0.00 . . .41/15/s . . . 44/15/s

Yesterday WednesdayThursday Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .31/27/0.02 . 30/16/pc . . 27/15/pc Rapid City . . . . . .40/11/0.00 . . .44/24/c . . 49/27/pc Green Bay. . . . . .26/21/0.00 . . .23/9/pc . . 24/14/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .56/26/0.00 . . .53/28/s . . . 55/28/s Greensboro. . . . .48/24/0.02 . . .42/26/r . . . 44/25/s Richmond . . . . . .53/24/0.00 . . .44/29/r . . . 43/25/s Harrisburg. . . . . .37/24/0.00 . .35/27/sn . . 35/19/pc Rochester, NY . . .34/23/0.03 . . .30/19/c . . 31/16/sn Hartford, CT . . . .31/10/0.05 . .33/24/sn . . 32/12/sn Sacramento. . . . .63/38/0.00 . . .63/39/s . . . 64/39/s Helena. . . . . . . . .47/28/0.00 . 44/27/pc . . . 45/30/c St. Louis. . . . . . . .36/20/0.00 . 30/18/pc . . 35/21/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .79/65/0.00 . 81/66/pc . . . 80/65/s Salt Lake City . . .36/30/0.08 . 41/23/pc . . 43/27/pc Houston . . . . . . .58/46/0.03 . . .59/37/s . . . 61/40/s San Antonio . . . .62/41/0.00 . . .62/33/s . . . 65/35/s Huntsville . . . . . .45/39/0.54 . . 42/24/rs . . 42/28/pc San Diego . . . . . .72/50/0.00 . . .74/48/s . . . 72/49/s Indianapolis . . . .32/18/0.00 . 29/17/pc . . . 29/17/c San Francisco . . .68/44/0.00 . . .63/49/s . . . 63/47/s Jackson, MS . . . .52/45/1.62 . . .50/30/s . . . 54/35/s San Jose . . . . . . .70/42/0.00 . . .68/47/s . . . 69/44/s Madison, WI . . . .28/21/0.00 . 24/12/pc . . 25/18/sn Santa Fe . . . . . . .43/14/0.00 . 41/13/pc . . . 45/15/s Jacksonville. . . . .63/39/2.62 . .63/34/sh . . . 59/33/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .41/38/0.22 . . .40/32/r . . . .36/24/r Kansas City. . . . .36/20/0.00 . 31/17/pc . . 38/24/pc Amsterdam. . . . .43/36/0.11 . .38/30/sh . . . 37/28/s Lansing . . . . . . . .29/23/0.01 . 30/14/pc . . 26/15/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .46/39/0.22 . 51/34/pc . . 53/42/sh Las Vegas . . . . . .64/42/0.00 . . .62/41/s . . . 64/42/s Auckland. . . . . . .73/64/0.00 . . .79/67/s . . 77/65/pc Lexington . . . . . .43/34/0.00 . .33/21/sn . . . 31/23/c Baghdad . . . . . . .57/43/0.00 . .61/44/sh . . 63/42/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .34/8/0.00 . 27/15/pc . . 40/22/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .90/75/0.00 . 88/71/pc . . 87/71/pc Little Rock. . . . . .47/33/0.00 . . .47/27/s . . . 46/28/s Beijing. . . . . . . . .32/12/0.00 . . .34/11/s . . 32/12/pc Los Angeles. . . . .72/49/0.00 . . .76/54/s . . . 77/50/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .64/55/0.00 . .64/56/sh . . 64/54/sh Louisville . . . . . . .43/35/0.00 . . 33/24/sf . . . 35/22/c Berlin. . . . . . . . . .39/34/0.00 . . 33/26/sf . . 29/19/pc Memphis. . . . . . .43/33/0.37 . 40/25/pc . . 42/29/pc Bogota . . . . . . . .66/39/0.00 . 71/45/pc . . 71/48/sh Miami . . . . . . . . .76/70/0.00 . . .77/51/t . . . 71/49/s Budapest. . . . . . .30/12/0.00 . .30/24/sn . . 31/21/pc Milwaukee . . . . .30/21/0.00 . 27/15/pc . . 27/19/sn Buenos Aires. . . .95/73/0.00 . . .85/70/t . . 88/69/pc Minneapolis . . . .20/13/0.00 . 22/15/pc . . 30/23/sn Cabo San Lucas .79/57/0.00 . . .75/56/s . . 75/57/pc Nashville . . . . . . .45/38/0.28 . .36/23/sn . . 36/27/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . .66/50/0.00 . 67/51/pc . . 69/53/pc New Orleans. . . .65/51/0.31 . . .55/36/s . . . 56/40/s Calgary . . . . . . . .48/28/0.00 . 46/31/pc . . . 44/23/s New York . . . . . .37/25/0.05 . . .37/28/r . . 36/20/pc Cancun . . . . . . . .82/73/0.00 . . .77/60/t . . 75/57/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .37/24/0.03 . . .37/28/r . . 36/20/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .48/41/0.07 . . .41/31/s . . . 40/29/s Norfolk, VA . . . . .49/30/0.00 . . .50/34/r . . . 45/29/s Edinburgh . . . . . .48/39/0.00 . 40/31/pc . . . 41/32/s Oklahoma City . .51/31/0.00 . 49/21/pc . . . 50/30/s Geneva . . . . . . . .39/23/0.00 . . .38/29/c . . . 39/30/c Omaha . . . . . . . .32/18/0.00 . 25/14/pc . . 37/20/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .77/63/0.23 . . .79/62/t . . . .77/62/t Orlando. . . . . . . .80/61/0.13 . .68/42/sh . . . 63/39/s Hong Kong . . . . .61/54/0.00 . . .61/53/s . . . 60/52/s Palm Springs. . . .71/47/0.00 . . .76/49/s . . . 76/47/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .43/36/0.84 . 35/24/pc . . . 34/23/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .29/20/0.00 . 26/14/pc . . .28/21/sf Jerusalem . . . . . .59/39/0.00 . .57/45/sh . . 60/42/pc Philadelphia . . . .39/26/0.00 . .37/28/sn . . 36/20/pc Johannesburg . . .75/63/0.27 . .74/61/sh . . . .77/62/t Phoenix. . . . . . . .69/43/0.00 . . .70/45/s . . . 71/44/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .79/66/0.00 . 78/65/pc . . 78/64/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .36/33/0.03 . .35/20/sn . . 28/17/sn Lisbon . . . . . . . . .54/45/0.00 . .53/45/sh . . 54/45/sh Portland, ME. . . . .17/2/0.05 . . .32/22/c . . 31/11/sn London . . . . . . . .46/37/0.00 . .43/35/sh . . 39/32/pc Providence . . . . .33/11/0.14 . . .37/27/r . . 32/15/sn Madrid . . . . . . . .48/21/0.00 . 48/29/pc . . 45/32/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . .51/30/0.00 . . .45/28/r . . . 45/27/s Manila. . . . . . . . .86/75/0.23 . .86/76/sh . . 87/74/pc

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . .55/46/1.20 . .60/34/sh . . . 55/34/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .49/45/0.05 . 51/39/pc . . 52/41/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . . .25/3/0.00 . 22/16/pc . . 32/21/pc Spokane . . . . . . .37/32/0.24 . . .39/27/c . . 38/29/pc Springfield, MO. .37/20/0.00 . 40/19/pc . . 43/26/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .79/61/1.26 . .66/44/sh . . . 61/45/s Tucson. . . . . . . . .66/35/0.00 . . .67/38/s . . . 68/39/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .49/25/0.00 . 45/22/pc . . . 53/33/s Washington, DC .46/29/0.00 . . .37/29/r . . 37/22/pc Wichita . . . . . . . .49/17/0.00 . 39/23/pc . . 52/26/pc Yakima . . . . . . . .55/28/0.00 . 44/30/pc . . . .45/28/f Yuma. . . . . . . . . .74/47/0.00 . . .75/49/s . . . 76/48/s

INTERNATIONAL Mecca . . . . . . . . .88/70/0.11 . .88/68/sh . . 88/69/pc Mexico City. . . . .73/48/0.00 . 75/44/pc . . 74/43/pc Montreal. . . . . . . . .9/0/0.06 . . .26/15/c . . . 19/1/pc Moscow . . . . . . .16/10/0.00 . . . 18/8/sf . . . . 14/3/sf Nairobi . . . . . . . .81/54/0.00 . . .82/58/s . . . 81/57/s Nassau . . . . . . . .79/70/0.00 . . .76/63/t . . 75/60/pc New Delhi. . . . . .59/52/0.00 . . .67/41/s . . . 70/44/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .45/32/0.00 . 43/27/pc . . 44/29/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .28/7/0.00 . . . .16/6/s . . 26/17/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . . . 9/-4/0.04 . . .25/14/c . . . 17/0/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . .45/34/0.00 . .40/35/sh . . 39/29/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .93/72/0.00 . 93/77/pc . . 93/76/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . .50/28/0.00 . .48/37/sh . . 51/38/pc Santiago . . . . . . .88/61/0.00 . 91/61/pc . . . 90/59/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .88/72/0.00 . . .89/69/t . . . .86/69/t Sapporo. . . . . . . .32/21/0.00 . . .28/23/c . . . 29/25/c Seoul . . . . . . . . . . .25/3/0.00 . . . .25/6/s . . . . 29/9/s Shanghai. . . . . . .43/27/0.00 . . .40/32/s . . 39/35/sh Singapore . . . . . .86/77/0.25 . . .87/76/t . . . .87/75/t Stockholm. . . . . .30/23/0.00 . . . .20/8/s . . 24/18/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . .84/72/0.00 . 95/71/pc . . 93/69/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .59/54/0.00 . .64/56/sh . . 65/57/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . .63/52/sh . . 64/49/pc Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .48/37/0.00 . 46/35/pc . . 45/34/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .30/21/0.07 . 28/20/pc . . . 22/14/c Vancouver. . . . . .48/45/0.45 . .49/40/dr . . . 50/39/c Vienna. . . . . . . . .32/21/0.00 . . 36/27/sf . . 34/24/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . .30/19/0.06 . . 32/23/sf . . 29/19/pc

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S

D

Golf Inside Can Tiger be the best in golf once again? See Page D4.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2011

PREP BOYS BASKETBALL

NBA

PREP GIRLS BASKETBALL

Blazers’ Aldridge has clear MRI, likely to play vs. Celtics

Bend rolls to seventh straight win Bears’ defense stifles

PORTLAND — Portland Trail Blazers forward LaMarcus Aldridge has had an MRI on his right hip that shows no damage. Aldridge, the NBA’s reigning Western Conference Player of the week, had the MRI on Tuesday, a day after Portland’s 96-81 loss to the Sacramento Kings. Aldridge has a hip contusion and is probable for Thursday night’s game against the Boston Celtics. Aldridge scored a careerhigh 37 points last week against Minnesota. He is the only player in the NBA averaging at least 26 points, 10 rebounds and 0.67 blocks in January. — The Associated Press

With Hayden Crook scoring from the outside and Joey Apodaca contributing in the post, Bend High improved to 5-0 in Class 5A Intermountain Conference play Tuesday, topping crosstown rival Summit 64-37 at Summit High. Crook, a junior guard, recorded a game-high 17 points and Apodaca, a senior post, added 14 for the Lava Bears (14-2 overall), who have won their last seven games. “There is a reason they’re the second-ranked team in the state in 5A right now,” Summit coach Dan Munson said. Bend increased its lead in each quarter, going ahead 19-6 after the first period before holding a 34-16 advantage at halftime. The Bears led by as many as 34 in the third quarter. “Our guys didn’t bring it, but Bend also played very well,” said Munson, whose team fell to 1-4 in 5A IMC play and 5-11 overall. Taylor Raterman added seven

Storm in IMC contest

Bulletin staff report

Bulletin staff report

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Bend’s Joey Apodaca scores two of his 14 points on Tuesday night in a boys basketball game against Summit at Summit High School. point for the Bears. Eleven different players scored for Summit, but no one had more than six points.

The Storm play at Mountain View on Friday. Bend is at Redmond on Thursday night.

Bend High avenged its only girls basketball loss of 2011 on Tuesday, shutting down Summit 30-18 in a Class 5A Intermountain Conference matchup. The Lava Bears (2-1 IMC, 13-3 overall), who lost to the Storm 44-35 at Bend High on Jan. 7, held Summit’s offense in check this time around, limiting the host Storm to just six field goals. Leading 12-10 at halftime, Bend outscored the Storm 18-8 in the second half to win its fourth consecutive game. “We felt like we played good defense, holding them to 30 points,” Summit coach Ryan Cruz said. “But it’s hard to win a game when you only score eight points in the second half.” Lava Bear senior Kenzi Boehme led all scorers with 10 points. Ally McConnell added seven points for Bend, and Molly Maloney contributed four. Karleigh Phillips paced the Storm with eight points. No other player for Summit scored more than four points. The Storm (1-2 IMC, 9-7) continue Class 5A IMC action on Friday with a road game at Mountain View. The Lava Bears entertain Redmond in an Intermountain Hybrid contest on Thursday.

TEE TO GREEN

Back to school Bend’s Tiffany Schoning leads several local players into the spring collegiate season By Zack Hall Portland’s LaMarcus Aldridge, right, was hurt on Monday night, but it appears he won’t miss a game.

L O C A L LY Little League sign-ups slated for Redmond REDMOND — Registration for 2011 Redmond Little League programs is taking place this week, starting this evening with the first of three in-person sign-up sessions. Redmond Little League offers programs for boys and girls ages 5 to 18, including T-ball for younger players, and baseball and softball through Seniors and Big Leagues. Cost is $60 per child to a maximum of $130 per family. Registration is being held in the commons area at the Redmond High School-Hartman Campus, 2015 W. Antler Ave. Tonight’s session will be from 5:30 to 8 o’clock. On Thursday, registration will also be from 5:30 to 8 p.m. On Saturday, registration will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Upon registration, participants must provide a state-issued birth certificate as well as proof of residence in Redmond, Tumalo, Terrebonne or Crooked River Ranch (such as a parent’s driver’s license or car registration card or a utility bill). Online registration is also available at an added cost of $5 per child; the family discount rate does not apply to online registration. Visa and MasterCard are acceptable forms of payment for online registration, which is available at the Redmond Little League website: redmondlittleleague.com. Late registration will be accepted. For more information about registration or for other questions about Redmond Little League, call Scot Cole, league president, at 541-4200846. — Bulletin staff report

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 College basketball .....................D2 NBA ...........................................D3 Prep sports ................................D3 Tee to Green.............................. D4

Inside

The Bulletin

Bend’s Tiffany Schoning felt that her golf game was finally sharp enough to win. Beginning last summer, each result for Schoning, a junior golfer at Portland State University and a former Summit High School standout, seemed better than the one before. In June, she advanced to the semifinals of the 101st Women’s Oregon Amateur Championship before being eliminated. And in her first collegiate tournament of the fall season, she shot a career-best 69. “I felt like I was right there ready to start playing really well,” Schoning, 22, recalls. “I think this summer I started to get up a lot of confidence and shooting some scores around even (par). “I definitely knew I was right there and that it was coming, but I didn’t know how soon.” It turns out that no Central Oregonian would perform better during college golf’s 2010 fall season. In October at the Oregon State/Washington Tri-

• A look at Central Oregon golfers who are playing at the collegiate level, Page D4

angle, an 18-hole tournament between PSU, Oregon State and the University of Washington, Schoning tied for first place with a 2-over-par 74. But a more important victory would come in November in Hawaii at the Turtle Bay Collegiate Invitational. With winds whipping on the northern shore of Oahu, Schoning notched six birdies at Turtle Bay and shot a 3-under-par 69 in the last of three rounds. Schoning came back from a five-stroke deficit to beat UC Irvine’s Ronnie Valerio by two strokes at 2 over par. “I think maybe just because it was more getting down to the basics because of the conditions, maybe that helped me out,” Schoning says, trying to ex-

plain her terrific final round in Hawaii. “But I played really well.” The field at Turtle Bay was relatively small with seven teams — including tournament winner Princeton. But winning a college golf tournament of any size is a rare opportunity for the vast majority of college golfers. It certainly seemed a long way off just two years ago for Schoning. She transferred from the University of Oregon in 2008 after playing sparingly in her freshman season, and she sat out a season playing little golf. In summer 2009, Schoning decided to play at Portland State, where she quickly become one of the top players on a PSU women’s golf team that ranked among the strongest in the Big Sky Conference. “I was able to get my confidence up and really get my passion back again,” Schoning reflects. “And that’s what I needed. I’m back to absolutely loving the game and excited for what’s to come after school.” See School / D4

University of Wyoming athletic department

From left, Oregon’s Andrew Vijarro, Wyoming’s Molly Black, and Portland State’s Tiffany Schoning all hope to make some noise at the Division I level this season in collegiate golf. All three are from Bend.

Geoff Thurner / University of Oregon athletics

Portland State athletic department

Despite knee injury, Vonn still aiming for overall title By Pat Graham The Associated Press

WORLD CUP SKIING

Lindsey Vonn won’t allow a possible sprained MCL in her left knee to sack her season. The three-time overall World Cup champion has competed in pain plenty of times before, winning the downhill at the Vancouver Olympics last winter on a badly bruised shin.

So dealing with this injury will hardly be new for the U.S. skier. Trailing in the standings? Now that’s a foreign concept. Vonn is 145 points behind her friend and top rival Maria Riesch of Germany, a gap Vonn’s convinced she can still overcome.

“Don’t count me out. I’ve won this title three times. I have experience,” Vonn said in a teleconference Tuesday after being selected as the U.S. Olympic Committee’s sportswoman of the year for 2010. “I’m still very positive and still very much in the hunt.” There’s still time, too, with the women’s circuit completing 22 of the 39 races scheduled at the start of the season. Not

only that but a good portion of the remaining events involve the downhill or super-G — Vonn’s specialties. “The reason I think it’s so lopsided right now in the points is that it’s been mostly slalom and giant slalom so far,” said Vonn, who’s never finished on the podium in a World Cup GS event. “I’m definitely really positive in where I stand.” See Vonn / D3


D2 Wednesday, January 26, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

TENNIS

Today Wrestling: Bend at Redmond, 7 p.m.; Mountain View at Summit, 6 p.m. Swimming: Sisters at Sweet Home, 3 p.m.

Midnight — Australian Open, men’s and women’s quarterfinals, ESPN2. Noon — Australian Open, men’s and women’s quarterfinals (taped), ESPN2. 4 p.m. — Australian Open, Tennis Channel. 6:30 p.m. — Australian Open, women’s semifinals, ESPN2.

BASKETBALL 4:30 p.m. — Men’s college, Texas at Oklahoma State, ESPN. 4:30 p.m. — Men’s college, North Carolina at Miami (Fla.), ESPN2. 6:30 p.m. — NBA, San Antonio Spurs at Utah Jazz, ESPN. 7 p.m. — Men’s college, Western Washington at Seattle Pacific, FSNW.

HOCKEY 4:30 p.m. — NHL, New Jersey Devils at Detroit Red Wings, VS. network.

THURSDAY TENNIS 12:30 a.m. — Australian Open, men’s first semifinal, ESPN2. Noon — Australian Open, men’s first semifinal, ESPN2 (taped). 8 p.m. — Australian Open, Tennis Channel.

GOLF 6:30 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Volvo Golf Champions, first round, Golf Channel. Noon — PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance Open, first round, Golf Channel.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Michigan at Michigan State, ESPN. 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Vanderbilt at Mississippi State, ESPN2. 5 p.m. — NBA, Miami Heat at New York Knicks, TNT. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, UCLA at Arizona, ESPN2. 6 p.m. — Women’s college, Stanford at Oregon, FSNW. 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Boston Celtics at Portland Trail Blazers, TNT. 8 p.m. — Men’s college, Oregon State at Cal, FSNW. 8 p.m. — Men’s college, St. Mary’s at Gonzaga, ESPN2.

WINTER SPORTS 6 p.m. — Winter X Games, ESPN.

RADIO THURSDAY BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — Men’s college, Oregon at Stanford, KBND-AM 1110. 8 p.m. — Men’s college, Oregon State at Cal, KICE-AM 940.

Thursday Girls basketball: Redmond at Bend, 7 p.m. Boys basketball: Bend at Redmond, 7 p.m. Wrestling: La Pine, Sisters, Molalla at Madras, 6 p.m. Friday Girls basketball: Summit at Mountain View, 5:15 p.m..; La Pine at Sisters, 7:15 p.m.; Hosanna at Gilchrist, TBA; Madras at La Salle, 7 p.m.; Central Linn at Culver, 5 p.m. Boys basketball: Summit at Mountain View, 7:15 p.m.; La Pine at Sisters, 5:45 p.m.; La Salle at Madras, 7 p.m.; Hosanna at Gilchrist, TBA; Central Linn at Culver, 6:30 p.m. Wrestling: Redmond, Crook County, Culver at Resers Tournament at Liberty High in Hillsboro, TBA; Mountain View at Sheldon Invitational, 9 a.m. Swimming: Redmond at Thurston, 4 p.m. Saturday Girls basketball: Marshall at Crook County, 1:30 p.m.; Gilchrist at Paisley, TBA; Grant at Redmond, 3:45 p.m. Boys basketball: Marshall at Crook County, 3:15 p.m.; Grant at Redmond, 5:45 p.m.; Gilchrist at Paisley, TBA Wrestling: Redmond, Crook County, Culver at Resers Tournament at Liberty High in Hillsboro, TBA; Gilchrist vs. Chiloquin, TBA Swimming: Summit, Mountain View, Bend, Madras at Central Oregon Invitational in Bend, 1 p.m. Nordic skiing: OHSNO Skadi Cup classic race at Teacup, TBA; OISRA skate race at Willamette Pass, 11:30 a.m. Alpine skiing: OISRA GS race on Cliff Hanger at Mt. Bachelor, 9:30 a.m.

BASKETBALL Men’s college Tuesday’s Games ——— FAR WEST CS Bakersfield 77, CS-Fullerton 75 Kansas 82, Colorado 78 UNLV 74, Wyoming 65 SOUTHWEST Arkansas 73, Auburn 64 MIDWEST Bowling Green 70, Toledo 64 Buffalo 79, W. Michigan 68 Connecticut 76, Marquette 68 Missouri St. 73, Drake 70 Ohio St. 87, Purdue 64 Richmond 70, Dayton 61 SOUTH Clemson 60, N.C. State 50 ETSU 67, S.C.-Upstate 52 Florida 104, Georgia 91, 2OT Florida Gulf Coast 111, Stetson 103, 3OT Georgia Tech 72, Virginia Tech 57 Lipscomb 73, Belmont 64 Longwood 72, Campbell 62 Mercer 78, Kennesaw St. 70 EAST Maine 64, New Hampshire 50 Seton Hall 90, Syracuse 68 Vermont 72, Hartford 51

Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations. Washington

S   B Football • Ochocinco again saying he’ll change name: Bengals wide receiver Chad Ochocinco is putting his unusual name back in the news. Ochocinco suggested at the end of an interview with ESPN on Tuesday that he’s planning to change his name back to Johnson. He didn’t give a specific reason, other than saying he’s “done enough with the Ocho thing.” He has talked about changing his name several times. Leading up to a game against the Jets during the 2009 season, he insisted that he would change his name back to Johnson if cornerback Darrelle Revis shut him down. Ochocinco failed to catch a pass, but kept his name. He later said his comments were made in fun and he was never serious about a name change. • Vick signs first endorsement contract since arrest: Michael Vick has signed his first endorsement contract since his release from prison. The Philadelphia Eagles’ Pro Bowl quarterback inked a two-year contract with Unequal Technologies, a provider of the football pads Vick wore last season. The deal will be announced Thursday.

Golf • Finchem asks USGA for review of rules: PGA Tour Commissioner Tim Finchem is asking the USGA to review the Rules of Golf after two prominent players were disqualified for incorrect scorecards. Camilo Villegas in Hawaii and Padraig Harrington in Abu Dhabi were disqualified from tournaments this year because the rules violation was reported after signing their cards. Players are disqualified if the score is wrong, and the cards did not reflect the twoshot penalty they should have taken. Finchem didn’t say it was time to change the rule. He only wants a thorough review to determine if it needs to be changed.

Tennis • Venus Williams’ Fed Cup spot goes to Vania King: Vania King is taking the U.S. Fed Cup roster spot originally expected to be filled by Venus Williams at next month’s quarterfinal against Belgium. U.S. captain Mary Joe Fernandez announced King’s addition to the team Tuesday, along with the rest of her squad. Williams told Fernandez she couldn’t participate after injuring her hip at the Australian Open last week. King is 4-6 in Fed Cup play, 3-2 in doubles. She won two Grand Slam doubles titles with Yaroslava Shvedova of Kazakhstan in 2010, at Wimbledon and the U.S. Open.

Skiing • Jean-Baptiste Grange of France wins night slalom: Jean-Baptiste Grange of France won a World Cup night slalom Tuesday, giving him his second victory in three days and a big boost leading to next month’s world championships. Grange, who also captured Sunday’s slalom in Kitzbuehel, won by 0.04 seconds and was followed by two Swedes — Andre Myhrer and Mattias Hargin. Bode Miller was a late withdrawal. The U.S. team said he plans to miss this weekend’s downhill and super-combined in Chamonix, France to rest for next month’s worlds. The top American was Nolan Kasper, who finished 13th after the second-fastest time in the final run.

Basketball • UNC, Michigan State close to aircraft carrier game: North Carolina and Michigan State are closing in on a deal to play a basketball game on an aircraft carrier next season. Tar Heels coach Roy Williams said on his radio show Monday night that the teams hope to play on Veteran’s Day in San Diego on a carrier. Larry Gallo, a senior associate athletic director at UNC, said Tuesday that a contract isn’t in place yet. Gallo said discussions also involve the U.S. government and a promoter. — From wire reports

IN THE BLEACHERS

PAC-10 STANDINGS All Times PST ——— Conference All Games W L PCT W L PCT 7 1 .857 15 4 .778

Arizona UCLA Washington St. Stanford Southern Cal Oregon St. California Oregon Arizona St.

5 2 .714 16 5 2 .714 13 4 4 .500 14 3 4 .428 10 3 4 .428 11 3 4 .428 8 3 4 .428 10 2 5 .285 9 1 6 .142 9 Thursday’s Games USC at Arizona State, 5:30 p.m. UCLA at Arizona, 6 p.m. Oregon at Stanford, 7 p.m. Oregon State at California, 8 p.m. Saturday’s Games UCLA at Arizona State, 12:30 p.m. USC at Arizona, 4:30 p.m. Oregon at California, 3 p.m. Oregon State at Stanford, 7 p.m. Sunday’s Game Washington at Washington State, 7 p.m.

4 6 6 8 9 10 9 10 10

.800 .684 .700 .555 .526 .444 .526 .473 .473

Women’s college Tuesday’s Games ——— EAST Georgetown 65, West Virginia 60 SOUTH Davidson 53, UNC-Greensboro 52 New Orleans 64, Auburn-Montgomery 58 South Florida 68, Seton Hall 64

MIDWEST DePaul 67, Cincinnati 48 SIU-Edwardsville 70, Murray St. 56

FOOTBALL NFL All Times PST Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 30 At Honolulu AFC vs. NFC, 4 p.m. (Fox) Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 6 At Arlington, Texas Pittsburgh vs. Green Bay, 3:30 p.m. (Fox)

Betting Line Favorite Packers

SUPER BOWL Sunday, Feb. 6 Opening Current 2.5 2.5

Underdog Steelers

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Philadelphia 50 33 12 5 71 174 130 Pittsburgh 50 31 15 4 66 154 114 N.Y. Rangers 52 29 20 3 61 148 126 N.Y. Islanders 48 15 26 7 37 117 158 New Jersey 48 16 29 3 35 100 143 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 49 27 15 7 61 150 111 Montreal 50 27 18 5 59 130 123 Buffalo 49 23 21 5 51 137 144 Toronto 49 19 25 5 43 124 153 Ottawa 50 17 25 8 42 108 160 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Tampa Bay 51 31 15 5 67 154 154 Washington 50 27 14 9 63 140 128 Atlanta 51 23 19 9 55 151 166 Carolina 49 24 19 6 54 149 153 Florida 48 22 21 5 49 130 129 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 48 29 13 6 64 163 142 Nashville 49 27 16 6 60 133 117 Chicago 50 26 20 4 56 157 139 St. Louis 48 22 19 7 51 129 142 Columbus 49 23 21 5 51 130 152 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 49 30 10 9 69 163 120 Colorado 49 25 18 6 56 159 160 Minnesota 49 25 19 5 55 130 134 Calgary 50 23 21 6 52 140 151 Edmonton 48 15 25 8 38 121 165 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 49 29 15 5 63 144 136 Anaheim 52 28 20 4 60 140 146 Phoenix 50 24 17 9 57 144 143 San Jose 49 25 19 5 55 137 135 Los Angeles 49 26 22 1 53 140 122 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Tuesday’s Games Florida 4, N.Y. Rangers 3 Pittsburgh 1, N.Y. Islanders 0 Anaheim 3, Columbus 2 Philadelphia 5, Montreal 2 Buffalo 3, Ottawa 2, OT Tampa Bay 2, Toronto 0 Minnesota 4, Chicago 2 Edmonton 4, Phoenix 3 Today’s Games Florida at Boston, 7 p.m. Carolina at N.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m. Washington at Atlanta, 7 p.m. New Jersey at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Edmonton at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. Phoenix at Colorado, 9 p.m. St. Louis at Calgary, 10 p.m. Nashville at Vancouver, 10 p.m. San Jose at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.

TENNIS Australian Open At Melbourne Park Melbourne, Australia Purse: $24.7 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Men Today Quarterfinals Andy Murray (5), Britain, def. Alexandr Dolgopolov, Ukraine, 7-5, 6-3, 6-7 (3), 6-3. Tuesday

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

Seton Hall upsets No. 9 Syracuse The Associated Press SYRACUSE, N.Y. — Jim Boeheim just stared at the Carrier Dome court that bears his name. Another game was slipping away from his Syracuse Orange and he was out of answers. Jeremy Hazell led a long-range Seton Hall barrage with 28 points and the suddenly hot-shooting Pirates stunned No. 9 Syracuse 90-68 on Tuesday night, the Orange’s third straight loss. “We have not played well the last three games,” Boeheim said. “I think when you lose a couple of games, you lose a little confidence.” Hazell, who was five of 10 from beyond the arc, set the tone early by swishing a three from the right wing on Seton Hall’s first possession of the game. The Pirates (9-12, 3-6 Big East), who had lost three straight, torched Syracuse’s zone defense for seven threes in the first half, four by

Hazell, and built a 13-point halftime lead. “Jeremy gave us a lot of confidence,” Seton Hall coach Kevin Willard said. “He hit a couple of deep ones early and really loosened everything up. That was a big part of everyone else getting some confidence.” Jordan Theodore, who missed all seven threes he attempted in a fivepoint loss to Syracuse 17 days ago, was three for three from long range and had 19 points on seven-of-10 shooting while Fuquan Edwin had 13 points, Jeff Robinson 12 and Herb Pope 10. Also on Tuesday: No. 1 Ohio St. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 No. 12 Purdue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 COLUMBUS, Ohio — William Buford had 19 points, Jared Sullinger added 17 and Ohio State (21-0, 8-0 Big Ten) played almost flawlessly in rolling past Purdue.

No. 5 Connecticut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76 Marquette. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 MILWAUKEE — Freshman Jeremy Lamb had a career-best 24 points and Connecticut overcame a tough shooting game from Kemba Walker with a 13-0 run late in the second half. No. 6 Kansas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82 Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78 BOULDER, Colo. — Freshman Josh Selby scored 17 points and Kansas scored its last nine points from the free throw line to hold off Colorado. No. 24 Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Georgia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91 ATHENS, Ga. — Chandler Parsons scored half of his 18 points in the second overtime for Florida. Trey Thompkins put back a missed shot just ahead of the buzzer at the end of regulation, capping Georgia’s rally from an eight-point deficit in the final three minutes.

NHL ROUNDUP

Without star players, Penguins win with defense The Associated Press PITTSBURGH — Without superstars Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin, the Pittsburgh Penguins are learning to win games by focusing on defense. The latest evidence came in a 29save shutout by Marc-Andre Fleury in a 1-0 win over the New York Islanders on Tuesday night. It was Pittsburgh’s fifth win in its past six games — all without Crosby — and second in three games with both Crosby and Malkin out due to injury. Long known for their offense, the Penguins have allowed only nine goals in this six-game hot stretch as they head into the All-Star break, having not allowed more than two in any one of those games. Pittsburgh insists it isn’t approaching these tight, low-scoring games any differently than it had even when its offense was stocked with all-world talent. “I don’t think we’ve really changed much, to be honest,” defenseman Brooks Orpik said. “Some guys are maybe getting more ice time and playing different roles like power play and whatnot, but we’re playing the exact same way. “We’re not playing any more defensive, but I think guys are just maybe buckled down a little more and their focus is a little better.”

Fourth-liner Craig Adams ended the scoreless drought with his third goal of the season at 8:35 of the third period off a rebound of an Arron Asham shot for the Penguins, who have won 10 consecutive home games against New York. Also on Tuesday: Flyers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Canadiens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 PHILADELPHIA — Jeff Carter, Claude Giroux and Kimmo Timonen scored power-play goals and Philadelphia headed into the All-Star break leading the NHL in wins after a victory over Montreal Canadiens. Lightning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Maple Leafs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 TAMPA, Fla. — Dwayne Roloson made 26 saves in his third shutout in 10 games this month, Teddy Purcell had a goal and an assist, and Tampa Bay beat Toronto for its fifth straight victory. Ducks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Blue Jackets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 COLUMBUS, Ohio — Teemu Selanne had a goal and an assist, and All-Star goalie Jonas Hiller made 35 saves for his NHL-leading 25th win as surging Anaheim held on to beat Columbus. Sabres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Senators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 OTTAWA — Shaone Morrisonn scored 1:59 into overtime to give Buffalo a victory over Ottawa. Ryan

Miller stopped 27 shots for Buffalo, which has won four of five. The Sabres are on a 9-3-1 run that has moved them within four points of a playoff spot. Wild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Blackhawks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 CHICAGO — Antti Miettinen scored the go-ahead goal, Niklas Backstrom made 31 saves and Minnesota beat Chicago. The Wild have four wins in five games after the comeback victory. Chicago lost its second straight after a 5-0-1 stretch. Oilers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Coyotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 PHOENIX — Dustin Penner scored with 21 seconds left in regulation and Edmonton got a rare power-play goal to beat Phoenix to end a five-game losing streak. Taylor Hall scored early in the third period, Edmonton’s second goal in 54 power-play chances, and Linus Omark scored 72 seconds later to put the Oilers up 3-2. Panthers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Rangers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NEW YORK — Defenseman Mike Weaver’s first goal in 42 games, scored off the back of Rangers forward Artem Anisimov, broke a third-period tie and lifted Florida over New York. Weaver flipped a shot from the right side that hit Anisimov in front and bounded past surprised goalie Henrik Lundqvist with 8:19 remaining.

Quarterfinals Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def. Stanislas Wawrinka (19), Switzerland, 6-1, 6-3, 6-3. Novak Djokovic (3), Serbia, def. Tomas Berdych (6), Czech Republic, 6-1, 7-6 (5), 6-1. Women Today Quarterfinals Vera Zvonareva (2), Russia, def. Petra Kvitova (25), Czech Republic, 6-2, 6-4. Kim Clijsters (3), Belgium, def. Agnieszka Radwanska (12), Poland, 6-3, 7-6 (4). Tuesday Quarterfinals Li Na (9), China, def. Andrea Petkovic (30), Germany, 6-2, 6-4. Caroline Wozniacki (1), Denmark, def. Francesca Schiavone (6), Italy, 3-6, 6-3, 6-3.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League MINNESOTA TWINS—Agreed to terms with RHP Kevin Slowey on a one-year contract. OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Agreed to terms with LHP Craig Breslow on a one-year contract. SEATTLE MARINERS—Agreed to terms with RHP Chris Ray on a minor league contract. TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Acquired RHP Frank Francisco and cash considerations from Texas for C Mike Napoli. National League CHICAGO CUBS—Agreed to terms with RHP Todd Wellemeyer on a minor league contract. HOUSTON ASTROS—Agreed to terms with LHP Wandy Rodriguez on a three-year contract. NEW YORK METS—Announced OF Jason Pridie and RHP Tobi Stoner cleared waivers and were assigned outright to Buffalo (IL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association MILWAUKEE BUCKS—Signed G Garrett Temple to a 10-day contract. FOOTBALL National Football League ATLANTA FALCONS—Agreed to terms with LB Robert James on a two-year contract. CAROLINA PANTHERS—Named Ray Brown assistant offensive line coach. CLEVELAND BROWNS—Named Chris Tabor special teams coordinator. DENVER BRONCOS—Named Ron Milus secondary coach and Richard Smith linebackers coach. OAKLAND RAIDERS—Named Al Saunders offensive coordinator. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS—Named Brad Seely assistant head coach/special teams coordinator and Kevin Tolbert assistant strength and conditioning coach. HOCKEY National Hockey League NEW YORK ISLANDERS—Suspended G Evgeni Nabokov for not reporting to the team after being claimed off waivers from Detroit. OTTAWA SENATORS—Recalled G Mike Brodeur from Binghamton (AHL). SAN JOSE SHARKS—Recalled G Alex Stalock from Worcester (AHL). SOCCER Major League Soccer PHILADELPHIA UNION—Waived G Brad Knighton. RED BULL NEW YORK—Signed MF Matt Kassel. COLLEGE SAN DIEGO STATE—Named Jeff Horton assistant head coach/running backs coach, Daniel Gonzales safeties coach, Osia Lewis defensive line coach and Kevin McGarry linebackers coach.

TENNIS: AUSTRALIAN OPEN

Clijsters and Zvonareva reach semis The Associated Press MELBOURNE, Australia — Kim Clijsters moved into an Australian Open semifinal showdown with secondranked Vera Zvonareva, beating Agnieszka Radwanska 6-3, 7-6 (4) today as air force planes flew overhead as part of celebrations for the national holiday. Cannons went off earlier when Zvonareva started the Australia Day proceedings at Rod Laver Arena with a 6-2, 64 win over Petra Kvitova. Thursday’s semifinal will be a rematch of the last U.S. Open final, where Clijsters collected her third Grand Slam title. Clijsters is the only Grand Slam winner into the women’s semis, although she’s still seeking her first major title outside of America. No. 1-ranked Caroline Wozniacki and China’s Li Na meet in the other half of the draw. “I hope the experience can help me a little bit,” Clijsters said. “But there are some tough players out there, we have Nos. 1, 2, 3 still in and Li Na has been playing really well. So it is going to be really tough. “I lost to Vera at Wimbledon last year, I beat her in finals of U.S. Open.” Clijsters has a 6-3 lead in head-to-heads against Zvonareva, while Li has won two of her three matches against Wozniacki. Zvonareva has lost the last two Grand Slam finals, to Clijsters in New York and Serena Williams at Wimbledon. Also today, Andy Murray became the third man to reach the semifinals, beating Alexandr Dolgopolov 7-5, 6-3, 6-7 (3), 6-3. Murray will face the winner of a match between Rafael Nadal and David Ferrer. In a late Tuesday quarterfinal match, Novak Djokovic eliminated Wimbledon finalist Tomas Berdych 6-1, 7-6 (5), 6-1. He will face Roger Federer in the semifinals.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, January 26, 2011 D3

NBA SCOREBOARD SUMMARIES

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Tuesday’s Summaries

Celtics 112, Cavaliers 95 CLEVELAND (95) Eyenga 6-15 2-2 15, Jamison 5-14 1-2 11, Hickson 6-10 0-2 12, Sessions 4-8 6-8 14, Gibson 1-3 2-2 4, Graham 4-5 0-0 10, Hollins 1-1 0-2 2, Parker 1-5 0-0 3, Samuels 4-10 2-3 10, Harris 5-9 3-4 14. Totals 37-80 16-25 95. BOSTON (112) Pierce 8-15 6-7 24, Garnett 4-9 2-2 10, Erden 1-2 0-0 2, Rondo 5-8 0-0 11, Allen 6-13 3-4 18, Perkins 3-5 1-4 7, Davis 5-9 1-3 11, Robinson 4-10 0-0 11, Harangody 3-6 2-3 8, Wafer 3-7 2-2 10. Totals 42-84 17-25 112. Cleveland 26 19 24 26 — 95 Boston 34 33 24 21 — 112 3-Point Goals—Cleveland 5-11 (Graham 23, Parker 1-2, Harris 1-2, Eyenga 1-3, Gibson 0-1), Boston 11-24 (Allen 3-6, Robinson 3-8, Wafer 2-3, Pierce 2-5, Rondo 1-1, Davis 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Cleveland 51 (Hickson 17), Boston 51 (Erden 8). Assists—Cleveland 25 (Sessions 7), Boston 29 (Rondo 10). Total Fouls—Cleveland 22, Boston 24. Technicals—Cleveland defensive three second, Davis, Boston defensive three second. A—18,624 (18,624).

Nuggets 120, Wizards 109 DENVER (120) Anthony 8-20 6-7 23, K.Martin 2-2 0-0 4, Nene 8-9 5-7 21, Billups 4-11 5-5 15, Afflalo 614 4-4 18, Lawson 6-10 4-5 17, Harrington 7-12 1-2 21, Forbes 0-3 0-0 0, Ely 0-0 1-2 1. Totals 41-81 26-32 120. WASHINGTON (109) Lewis 3-6 0-0 8, Blatche 8-14 9-9 25, McGee 5-9 1-1 11, Wall 4-8 2-3 10, Young 10-19 6-8 26, Seraphin 0-2 0-0 0, Armstrong 1-1 0-0 2, Thornton 2-5 4-4 8, C.Martin 1-3 0-0 2, Shakur 1-3 1-2 3, Booker 2-3 0-0 4, Yi 5-9 0-0 10. Totals 42-82 23-27 109. Denver 33 35 28 24 — 120 Washington 26 30 23 30 — 109 3-Point Goals—Denver 12-23 (Harrington 6-8, Billups 2-4, Afflalo 2-5, Lawson 1-2, Anthony 1-3, Forbes 0-1), Washington 2-13 (Lewis 2-4, C.Martin 0-1, Wall 0-1, Yi 0-2, Young 0-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Denver 49 (Nene 9), Washington 41 (Blatche 9). Assists—Denver 23 (Billups 6), Washington 23 (Wall 13). Total Fouls—Denver 21, Washington 23. Technicals—Billups, K.Martin, Washington defensive three second 2. Flagrant Fouls—Afflalo. A—16,121 (20,173).

Mavericks 112, Clippers 105 L.A. CLIPPERS (105) Gomes 6-8 0-0 14, Griffin 7-16 8-14 22, Jordan 2-3 1-3 5, Davis 8-15 1-2 21, Foye 5-9 3-3 15, Bledsoe 1-2 1-3 3, Aminu 2-3 1-1 6, R.Butler 1-4 0-0 2, Diogu 3-4 2-2 8, Cook 4-6 0-0 9. Totals 39-70 17-28 105. DALLAS (112) Pavlovic 0-1 0-0 0, Nowitzki 6-15 6-8 20, Chandler 5-5 11-11 21, Kidd 0-4 1-1 1, Stevenson 2-6 2-2 7, Terry 11-22 2-2 28, Marion 4-7 2-2 10, Barea 9-12 4-4 25, Haywood 0-1 0-0 0, Mahinmi 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 37-74 28-30 112. L.A. Clippers 33 29 16 27 — 105 Dallas 25 29 27 31 — 112 3-Point Goals—L.A. Clippers 10-20 (Davis 4-5, Gomes 2-4, Foye 2-5, Aminu 1-1, Cook 1-3, R.Butler 0-2), Dallas 10-24 (Terry 4-7, Barea 3-4, Nowitzki 2-5, Stevenson 1-5, Kidd 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—L.A. Clippers 46 (Griffin 11), Dallas 35 (Marion 10). Assists—L.A. Clippers 22 (Davis 6), Dallas 18 (Kidd 7). Total Fouls—L.A. Clippers 22, Dallas 24. Technicals—Davis, L.A. Clippers defensive three second, Dallas Coach Carlisle, Dallas defensive three second 2. Flagrant Fouls—Haywood. A—20,335 (19,200).

Bobcats 94, Kings 89 CHARLOTTE (94) Wallace 6-12 7-10 19, Diaw 2-5 1-2 6, K.Brown 3-8 7-10 13, Augustin 7-14 2-2 16, S.Jackson 7-15 6-6 21, Najera 1-2 2-2 5, Mc-

PREP ROUNDUP

Atlantic Division Boston New York Philadelphia New Jersey Toronto

W 34 23 19 13 13

L 10 21 25 32 32

Pct .773 .523 .432 .289 .289

GB — 11 15 21½ 21½

L10 7-3 3-7 6-4 3-7 1-9

Str W-1 W-1 W-2 W-1 L-8

Home 22-3 11-9 14-7 10-11 8-13

Away 12-7 12-12 5-18 3-21 5-19

Conf 26-6 13-9 12-18 8-18 9-20

Away 15-8 15-9 12-10 6-14 0-21

Conf 20-6 20-8 19-8 11-17 8-21

Away 10-10 6-15 7-16 5-19 3-23

Conf 18-9 10-13 10-12 10-14 7-22

Southeast Division Miami Atlanta Orlando Charlotte Washington

W 31 29 29 18 13

L 13 16 16 25 31

Chicago Indiana Milwaukee Detroit Cleveland

W 31 16 16 17 8

L 14 25 26 28 37

Pct .705 .644 .644 .419 .295

GB — 2½ 2½ 12½ 18

L10 6-4 8-2 6-4 6-4 4-6

Str W-1 W-1 L-1 W-1 L-2

Home 16-5 14-7 17-6 12-11 13-10

Central Division Pct .689 .390 .381 .378 .178

GB — 13 13½ 14 23

L10 8-2 2-8 3-7 6-4 0-10

Str W-3 L-5 L-2 W-2 L-18

Home 21-4 10-10 9-10 12-9 5-14

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division San Antonio Dallas New Orleans Memphis Houston

W 38 29 30 22 21

L 7 15 16 23 25

Oklahoma City Utah Denver Portland Minnesota

W 28 27 26 25 10

L 16 18 18 21 34

L.A. Lakers Phoenix Golden State L.A. Clippers Sacramento

W 33 20 19 17 10

L 13 23 25 27 33

Pct .844 .659 .652 .489 .457

GB — 8½ 8½ 16 17½

L10 9-1 3-7 9-1 6-4 5-5

Str W-1 W-2 W-9 W-3 W-1

Home 24-2 16-8 19-5 13-7 12-10

Away 14-5 13-7 11-11 9-16 9-15

Conf 25-4 18-7 15-11 14-14 11-16

Away 12-10 12-11 6-13 9-15 2-21

Conf 15-12 13-12 16-12 17-14 3-24

Away 15-8 9-14 6-17 3-14 4-16

Conf 18-9 11-14 11-17 13-20 5-19

Northwest Division Pct .636 .600 .591 .543 .227

GB — 1½ 2 4 18

L10 5-5 3-7 6-4 6-4 1-9

Str L-1 L-5 W-2 L-1 L-4

Home 16-6 15-7 20-5 16-6 8-13

Paciic Division Pct .717 .465 .432 .386 .233

GB — 11½ 13 15 21½

L10 Str 8-2 W-2 6-4 L-2 6-4 L-2 7-3 L-1 2-8 L-1 ——— Tuesday’s Games

Denver 120, Washington 109 Dallas 112, L.A. Clippers 105 L.A. Lakers 120, Utah 91

Home 18-5 11-9 13-8 14-13 6-17

Boston 112, Cleveland 95 Charlotte 94, Sacramento 89 Today’s Games

Orlando at Indiana, 4 p.m. Philadelphia at Toronto, 4 p.m. Atlanta at Milwaukee, 5 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Houston, 5:30 p.m. San Antonio at Utah, 6:30 p.m.

Memphis at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Denver at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Charlotte at Phoenix, 6 p.m. New Orleans at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games

Miami at New York, 5 p.m. Boston at Portland, 7:30 p.m.

Houston at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. All Times PST

Guire 1-1 0-0 2, Henderson 2-6 0-0 4, Mohammed 1-4 2-4 4, Livingston 2-4 0-0 4, Carroll 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 32-71 27-36 94. SACRAMENTO (89) Casspi 3-5 0-0 6, Thompson 5-12 4-5 14, Cousins 2-8 5-8 9, Udrih 3-13 0-0 6, Evans 6-18 6-6 19, Dalembert 2-6 0-0 4, Landry 6-12 7-7 19, Greene 3-10 2-3 8, Jeter 2-4 0-0 4, D.Jackson 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 32-89 24-29 89. Charlotte 21 31 24 18 — 94 Sacramento 19 23 25 22 — 89 3-Point Goals—Charlotte 3-8 (Najera 1-1, Diaw 1-2, S.Jackson 1-3, Augustin 0-2), Sacramento 1-12 (Evans 1-4, Casspi 0-2, Udrih 0-3, Greene 0-3). Fouled Out—Cousins. Rebounds—Charlotte 60 (K.Brown 18), Sacramento 50 (Thompson, Casspi, Evans 8). Assists—Charlotte 12 (Livingston 3), Sacramento 16 (Evans 5). Total Fouls—Charlotte 29, Sacramento 30. A—13,984 (17,317).

Lakers 120, Jazz 91 UTAH (91)

Miles 5-11 2-2 14, Millsap 4-10 3-4 11, Jefferson 5-11 0-0 10, Williams 8-13 0-1 17, Bell 1-7 0-0 2, Okur 1-4 0-0 3, Kirilenko 3-10 2-2 9, Watson 1-5 0-0 3, Price 0-3 4-4 4, Hayward 2-5 1-2 5, Elson 1-1 1-2 3, Evans 5-6 0-0 10. Totals 36-86 13-17 91. L.A. LAKERS (120) Artest 2-5 2-2 7, Gasol 9-13 2-4 20, Bynum 6-9 7-8 19, Fisher 2-3 2-2 8, Bryant 7-11 7-8 21, Odom 7-8 1-1 17, Blake 2-4 0-0 5, Brown 4-10 1-2 9, Walton 4-4 0-0 9, Ebanks 1-3 2-2 5, Caracter 0-0 0-0 0, Smith 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 44-71 24-29 120. Utah 22 16 27 26 — 91 L.A. Lakers 37 29 27 27 — 120 3-Point Goals—Utah 6-16 (Miles 2-4, Watson 1-1, Okur 1-1, Williams 1-2, Kirilenko 1-2, Hayward 0-1, Price 0-1, Bell 0-4), L.A. Lakers 8-18 (Fisher 2-2, Odom 2-3, Walton 1-1, Blake 1-2, Ebanks 1-2, Artest 1-4, Brown 0-2, Bryant 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Utah 38 (Jefferson 9), L.A. Lakers 48 (Bynum 11). Assists—Utah 29 (Williams 8), L.A. Lakers 34 (Bryant 6). Total Fouls—Utah 22, L.A. Lakers 17. Technicals— Bell, Williams, Utah Bench. A—18,997 (18,997).

NBA ROUNDUP

Celtics hand Cavaliers 18th consecutive loss The Associated Press BOSTON — Kendrick Perkins spent the last seven months coming back from a knee injury, and on the day he was set to return to the floor he showed up in the trainer’s office with a sore neck. He was so excited he couldn’t sleep. Playing for the first time since injuring his knee in Game 6 of the NBA finals, Perkins had seven points and six rebounds in 16 minutes as the Boston Celtics beat Cleveland 112-95 on Tuesday night, sending the Cavaliers to their 18th straight loss. “It felt good to be on the floor,” said Perkins, who missed 43 games in all recovering from a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his right knee. “I know I can do better. I can do more. … I was a little winded and a little off-key. I can get better.” Paul Pierce scored all 24 of his points in the first half, and Ray Allen added 18 to help the Celtics bounce back from a loss to the struggling Washington Wizards. It was the Cavs’ first time back in Boston since losing Game 6 of the Eastern Conference semifinals — the second time in three years the Celtics knocked them out of the playoffs. Cleveland has gone from the best record in the NBA to the worst, losing 27 of their last 28 games since Thanksgiving weekend. “We’ll have a breakthrough. I’m not looking at the number of losses and things like that. I’m looking at it gameby-game and seeing if we’re improving on both ends of the floor,” Cleveland

Vonn Continued from D1 Riesch has gained points on Vonn in the technical events and remains hopeful the giant slalom and slalom races that were wiped out due to warm weather in Maribor, Slovenia, earlier this month, will be rescheduled after the world championships. The International Ski Federation has yet to reschedule the races. “I think it would not be fair to cancel it totally,” Riesch said over the weekend in

coach Byron Scott said. Also on Tuesday: Nuggets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120 Wizards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109 WASHINGTON — Carmelo Anthony scored 23 points, Nene and Al Harrington each scored 21 and Denver beat Washington. Denver put together a 17-2 run to take a 24-10 lead with 4:26 remaining in the first quarter and led 68-56 at halftime. Mavericks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112 Clippers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105 DALLAS — Jason Terry scored a season-high 28 points and J.J. Barea added 25, lifting Dallas to a victory over suddenly Eric Gordon-less Los Angeles. Tyson Chandler had a season-high 21 points and Dirk Nowitzki added 20 for the Mavericks. Bobcats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94 Kings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89 SACRAMENTO, Calif — Stephen Jackson scored 21 points and Kwame Brown had a season-high 18 rebounds to lead Charlotte to a win over Sacramento. The win was the third in four games for the Bobcats, who are 9-6 since Paul Silas was named interim head coach on Dec. 22. Lakers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .120 Jazz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91 LOS ANGELES — Kobe Bryant scored 21 points in three quarters and Los Angeles led all the way in defeating Utah, handing the Jazz their fifth straight loss overall and on the road. Pau Gasol added 20 points, Andrew Bynum had 19 points and 11 rebounds, and Lamar Odom scored 17 off the bench for the Lakers.

Cortina d’Ampezzo, Italy. “I hope they do it in Spindleruv Mlyn (Czech Republic) or somewhere.” Vonn injured her knee on Saturday as she attempted to recover from a big mistake in a downhill race, losing control and nearly performing the splits at 75 mph. “Honestly, it shocked me quite a bit,” said Vonn, who recovered to finish third. “I was actually pretty scared and thought I was going to T-bone the fence.” The next day, sore and on pain medication, she won a super-G event.

Cowgirls knock off Panthers PASSING STORM

Bulletin staff report REDMOND — Crook County put a stop to its three-game losing streak Tuesday with a 61-53 win over Redmond in an Intermountain Hybrid girls basketball contest. The Cowgirls (8-8 overall) held a slim 15-12 lead after the first quarter and used consistent three-point shooting to stretch their lead to 11 by halftime. In all, Crook County spread eight three-pointers throughout the game to defeat Redmond. But the Cowgirls were hot from the foul line too, shooting 75 percent. “(Danni) Severance had an excellent game,” Crook County coach David Johnson said. “She rebounded well and was the key to our fast break. And she made foul shots down the stretch.” Severance finished with a game-high 19 points. Paige Buswell, who scored eight points for the Cowgirls, contributed “two big threes at the end of the game,” Johnson added. “Every time we’d get close, they’d hit another three and get up again,” said Redmond assistant coach Bayley Coblentz. Karlee Nordstrom led the Panthers (413 overall) with 14 points and six steals. Jesslyn Albrecht posted nine points and 10 rebounds for the home team. Crook County comes to Bend Thursday to take on the Lava Bears, while Redmond hosts Marshall High of Portland on Saturday. In other prep action Tuesday: GIRLS BASKETBALL Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 North Marion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 MADRAS — Five players scored nine or more points for the White Buffaloes, who used a 27-point fourth quarter to improve to 3-0 in Tri-Valley Conference play. JoElla Smith, Abby Scott and Lucy Suppah scored 11 points each and Rosey Suppah and Cheyenne Wahnetah added 10 and nine points, respectively. Scott also recorded five points and five steals in the victory, and Smith led Madras with six rebounds. The White Buffaloes (11-5 overall) continue league play on Friday with a road game at La Salle in Milwaukie. Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Elmira . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 ELMIRA — Chelsie McConville and Taylor Nieri scored 17 points apiece to catapult Sisters to a commanding win over its Sky-Em League host. The Outlaws (3-1 Sky-Em League, 6-10 overall) led early and held a six-point halftime lead before piling on 26 points in the third quarter. Sisters returns to league play Friday, hosting La Pine. La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Sweet Home. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 LA PINE — Brittany Glenn and Katie Ebner both scored 18 points in an easy Class 4A Sky-Em victory for the Hawks over the Huskies. La Pine, which led 223 after the first quarter, had four players reach double digits in scoring. Meagan McReynolds scored 11 points and Kirstin Town added 10. The Hawks (2-2 Sky-Em, 5-13 overall) play at Sisters on Friday. East Linn Christian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 CULVER — Junior forward Sam Donnelly fought her way to the hoop time and again to keep the Bulldogs close, ac-

Summit’s Mitch Wettig unloads a pass from the top of the key during Tuesday night’s boys basketball game against Bend High. Bend won the game, 64-37. See story, Page D1. Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

cording to Culver coach Scott Fritz. But in the third quarter, East Linn Christian — which outscored Culver every quarter — began to pull away for good, posting 16 points to Culver’s 10. For all Donnelly’s efforts, she was unable to draw fouls and finished with 10 points on the night, as did teammate Cassandra Fulton. The Bulldogs (2-7 Tri-River Conference, 7-12 overall) host Central Linn Friday. BOYS BASKETBALL Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Crook County. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 PRINEVILLE — Tanner Manselle scored eight of his 11 points in the fourth quarter to lead the Panthers to an Intermountain Hybrid victory on the road over the Cowboys. Redmond held a slim two-point advantage entering the final period but executed its offense late in the game and overcame a 17-point performance by Crook County’s Travis Bartels, who drained five three-point shots in the contest. Brad Carter led Redmond with 14 points. The Panthers (6-9 overall) snapped a seven-game losing streak with the win w will host Bend on Thursday night. The Cowboys (8-8) entertain Marshall High of Portland in a Class 4A Special District 1 game on Saturday. North Marion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 MADRAS — The visiting Huskies hit all five of their three-pointers and shot 50 percent from the field, outscoring the White Buffaloes 20-4 in the third quarter of an easy Class 4A Tri-Valley Conference victory. Sawyer Dady led the Huskies with 28 points. Junior Justin Queaphama-Mehlberg scored 10 points

but was the only White Buffalo to reach double digits. Bobby Ahern and Edward Zacarias each added eight points. Madras (2-1 Tri-Valley, 5-11 overall) hosts La Salle of Milwaukie on Friday. Sweet Home. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 LA PINE — The Hawks found themselves down 38-34 at the half after holding a three-point lead through the first quarter. Then, senior center Jaron Kuehn found himself in foul trouble and sat out the majority of the third quarter and half of the fourth. Sweet Home took advantage, and behind Gavin Kauffman — who posted 29 points on the night — the Huskies recorded a 21-point third quarter to take the lead for good. Austin Pierce recorded nine of La Pine’s 23 offensive boards and Austin Manley finished with 15 points for the Hawks (0-4 Sky-Em League, 4-15 overall). La Pine plays at Sisters on Friday. Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Elmira . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 ELMIRA — John Erickson scored 26 points and Jordan Hodges added 10 as the Outlaws evened their Sky-Em League record to 2-2. Sisters (10-6 overall) hosts La Pine on Friday. East Linn Christian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 CULVER — The Bulldogs struggled to create shots early, scoring just nine points in the first half, and fell to 0-9 in Tri-River Conference play. Eddie Calderon led Culver (2-17 overall) with seven points. The Bulldogs, who are in the midst of an 11-game skid, host Central Linn on Friday.

PREP SCOREBOARD BASKETBALL Boys Tuesday’s results ——— INTERMOUNTAIN HYBRID ——— REDMOND (50) — Brad Carter 14, Manselle 11, Ma. Dahlen 7, Pies 6, Lau 4, Gerdes 3, Mi. Dahlen 2, Genz 2, Larkin. Totals 19 9-17 50. CROOK COUNTY (41) — Travis Bartels 17, Seaquist 11, Gomes 5, Reeher 5, Mooney 3, Morales, Simpson. Totals 15 4-6 41. Redmond 11 12 10 17 — 50 Crook County 13 7 11 10 — 41 Three-point goals — Redmond: Pies 2, Lau. Crook County: Bartels 5, Mooney, Gomes. ——— CLASS 5A INTERMOUNTAIN CONFERENCE ——— BEND (64) — Hayden Crook 17, Apodaca 14, Grim 12, Raterman 7, Scott 6, Platsman 4, Friesen 4, Torkelson, Wetzell, Connell, Teitgen, Steelhammer. Totals 25 11-14 64. SUMMIT (37) — JB Menefee 6, Brandon Hamann 6, Hester 5, Wettig 4, Moore 4, Laubacher 3, Cattell 2, Peters 2, Michalski 2, Mouser 2, Soto 1. Totals 17 2-8 37. Bend 19 15 20 10 — 64 Redmond 6 10 4 17 — 37 Three-point goals — Bend: Crook 3. Summit: Laubacher. ——— CLASS 4A TRI-VALLEY CONFERENCE ——— NORTH MARION (73) — Sawyer Dady 28, Goldsby 16, Summers 11, Magana 7, Hayden 5, Parkinson 3, Wilcuts 3, Christensen, Williamson, Oliver, Pippert, McLaren. Totals 29 10-15 73. MADRAS (48) — Justin Queaphama-Mehlberg 10, Ahern 8, Zacarias 8, Haugen 7, Yeahquo 6, Quintana 3, Palmer 2, Borja 2, McConnell 2, Conner. Totals 15 18-31 48. North Marion 15 17 20 21 — 73 Madras 14 15 4 15 — 48 Three-point goals — North Marion: Dady 3, Magana, Wilcuts. ——— CLASS 4A

Vonn has been living on the edge all season, averting wipeouts and still finding a way to finish on the podium. Not exactly her game plan, but hard to argue with the results. “I’m not pushing past my capabilities,” Vonn said. “I’m definitely skiing within myself. “I’m a lot more agile and quick on my feet than I ever have been. That’s the reason why I’m able to finish and still be on the podium even though I’m making really big mistakes.” Vonn had a doctor examine her knee and conclude it was a sprained MCL.

SKY-EM LEAGUE ——— SWEET HOME (72) — Gavin Kauffman 29, Felkins 16, Mauch 8, Morgan 6, White 5, Winslow 4, Webb 2, Rudioux 2, Kim, Vandenburg. Totals 29 12-22 72. LA PINE (59) — Austin Manley 15, Kuhn 11, Pierce 9, LaVine 8, Parsons 5, Steinebach 4, O’Casey 3, Boen, Ebner, Pajunen. Totals 16-53 15-26 59. Sweet Home 18 20 21 13 — 72 La Pine 21 13 13 12 — 59 Three-point goals — Sweet Home: Kauffman 2; La Pine: Manley 2, Kuhn, Parsons ——— CLASS 2A TRI-RIVER CONFERENCE ——— EAST LINN CHRISTIAN (52) —Hill 9, Hooley 14, Cummins 6, J. Bates 12, A. Bates 11. Totals 21 8-11 52. CULVER (33) — Swagerty 4, Talbert 6, Eddie Calderon 7, Gonzalez 4, Sledge 2, Gibson 2, Funk 4, Hansen 4. Totals 13 4-7 33. East Linn Christ. 15 7 15 15 — 52 Culver 3 6 9 15 — 33 Three-point goals — East Linn Christian: Hill 2; Culver: Calderon 2, Talbert.

Girls Tuesday’s results ——— INTERMOUNTAIN HYBRID ——— CROOK COUNTY (61) — Danni Severance 19, Morgan 12, Fulton 10, P. Buswell 8, Walker 8, Crofcheck 2, Pope 2. Totals 16 21-28 61. REDMOND (53) — Karlee Nordstom 14, Johnson 11, Albrecht 9, Quackernack 8, Baca 5, Wilson 2, Stroup 2, Capps 2, Edwards. Totals 18 14-20 53. Crook County 15 18 10 18 — 61 Redmond 12 10 12 19 — 53 Three-point goals — Crook County: Fulton 2, Morgan 2, P. Buswell 2, Severance, Walker; Redmond: Baca, Johnson, Nordstrom ——— CLASS 5A INTERMOUNTAIN CONFERENCE ——— BEND (30) — Kenzi Boehme 10, McConnell 7, Maloney 4, Isaak 3, Froelich 2, Rhine 2, Tolentino 2, Jones, Crook. Totals 12 5-9 30. SUMMIT (18) — Karleigh Phillips 8, Parr 4, Char 2, Edwards 2, Pierce 2, Alhart, Gieber. Totals 6 6-10 18.

She has yet to undergo an MRI. Her MCL sprain isn’t the most famous of the week. That honor belongs to Chicago quarterback Jay Cutler, whose inability to finish the NFC championship game has subjected him to criticism and questions about his toughness. Vonn’s tenacity can hardly be questioned. She’s come back from a litany of injuries over her career, such as capturing one of her three straight World Cup titles after slicing her thumb on a champagne bottle in a victory celebration.

Bend 6 6 11 7 — 30 Summit 8 2 4 4 — 18 Three-point goals — Bend: Boehme; Summit: none. ——— CLASS 4A SKY-EM LEAGUE ——— LA PINE (65) — Brittany Glenn 18, Katie Ebner 18, McReynolds 11, Town 10, Fogel 6, Weber 2, Michael, Foreman, E. Glenn. Totals 24 13-24 65. SWEET HOME (31) — Sarah Wyatt 8, Graville 7, Rubidoux 5, R. Muir 3, Cole 3, Bell 2, Anderson 1, Wald 1, C. Muir 1, Davis, Virtue. Totals 11 8-24 31. La Pine 22 16 12 15 — 65 Sweet Home 3 13 6 9 — 31 Three-point goals — La Pine: Ebner. Sweet Home: Rubidoux. ——— SISTERS (69) — Chelsie McConville 17, Taylor Nieri 17, Allen 10, Kaiser 6, Kernutt 6, Herron 4, Hanson 4, Rowe 3. Totals 26 15-20 69. ELMIRA (38) — Smith 3, Gabica 4, Hubbard 2, Boyts 10, Boern 10, Lay 2, Stolle 4, Ingram 1, Kesling 3. Totals 12 12-20 38. Sisters 11 12 26 20 — 69 Elmira 9 8 8 13 — 38 Three-point goals — Sisters: Allen, Rowe; Elmira: Smith, Boern ——— TRI-VALLEY CONFERENCE ——— NORTH MARION (32) — Pyatt 8, Melcher 8, Garlinger 7, Lee 1, Johnson 2, Nichols 6. Totals 15 2-6 32. MADRAS (58) — JoElla Smith 11, Abby Scott 11, Lucy Suppah 11, R. Suppah 10, Wahnetah 9, M. Smith 4, Spino 2, Sampson. Totals 22 10-18 58. North Marion 9 8 6 9 — 32 Madras 10 15 6 27 — 58 Three-point goals — North Marion: none; Madras: L. Suppah 3, Scott. ——— CLASS 2A TRI-RIVER CONFERENCE ——— EAST LINN CHRISTIAN (53) — Warren 21, Garber 10, Rediger 8, Horner 6, Shull 5, Sommers 3, Lehm. Totals 18 14-20 53. CULVER (40) — Sam Donnelly 10, Chantelle Fulton 10, Wofford 7, Seehawer 6, Anglen 5, Daugherty 2, Jones. Totals 18 3-3 40. East Linn Christ. 12 9 16 16 — 53 Culver 9 8 10 13 — 40 Three-point goals — East Linn Christian: Warren 2, Shull

Even more notable was the severe shin bruise that became the talk of the Winter Olympics last February and introduced the world to topfen cheese as a home remedy. Vonn smeared the semisoft cheese over her wounded leg and went on to win gold in the downhill and bronze in the super-G. “I’ve had a lot of injuries in my career. So maybe I’m just used to it and maybe it makes me more determined,” Vonn said. “When I get injured or make mistakes, I want to fight back and prove to myself and everyone that I’m capable of winning races.”


T

D4 Wednesday, January 26, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

CENTRAL OREGON COURSE UPDATE

A look back at Tetherow Golf Club in 2010 By Zack Hall The Bulletin

The Bulletin continues a weekly Tee To Green feature in which we check in via e-mail with golf professionals at Central Oregon courses for an offseason update. This week we contacted Martin Chuck, director of golf at Tetherow Golf Club in Bend.

Q: A: Q: A:

How was business in 2010? Business was up marginally in 2010.

Were any changes of note made to the facility this past year? Like any brand-new facility, we made modifications to areas that were not working well for players and will continue to do so until we feel we have the right amount of challenge and playability. We added some square footage to the third green and removed some waste area on the sixth and seventh holes.

Q: A:

Are any changes and/or improvements to the facility scheduled for 2011? We plan on making subtle changes to the greens on holes No. 2 and 9 during 2011 and thin out some of the native areas surrounding greens and prominent landing areas.

Q:

Do you expect to see any fresh ideas that will help Central Oregon golf facilities fight through economic challenges? We are planning on having moms and kids clinics in 2011. We’ll entertain the kids while the moms enjoy learning how to play golf. In 2010, we instituted the largest free junior program (allowing junior golfers 12 or older to play free all summer) the area has ever seen, and we’ll continue to support the area and try and build the game of golf.

A:

Zack Hall can be reached at 541-617-7868 or at zhall@bendbulletin.com.

Tetherow Golf Club Number of holes: 18 Status: Open seasonally Location: 61240 Skyline Ranch Road, Bend Tee times: 541-388-2582 How to play: Available to members and their guests, with limited play for general public Course stats: Par 72, 7,298 yards Director of golf: Martin Chuck Head golf professional: Caleb Anderson Course designer: David McLay Kidd (2008) Extras: Driving range (with short-game course), putting green, clubhouse, restaurant Website: www.tetherow.com

EE T O

G R EEN

Can Tiger regain his glory? As the world’s former top player starts a new season, questions abound about what’s in store for this year By Doug Ferguson The Associated Press

SAN DIEGO — Tiger Woods can’t start a new year without being reminded of the last one. And the last one wasn’t very good. Some of his peers couldn’t help but chuckle when the pro-am tee times for the Farmers Insurance Open were posted in the locker room. For more than a decade, Woods had the first available tee time, a perk for being the best player on the PGA Tour, or not far from it. Those pro-am times are determined by the previous year’s money list. Woods was No. 68 on the money list. He tees off at 11 a.m., which is about the time he used to finish. “I can’t imagine he’ll be too thrilled with that,” Pat Perez said. And then there’s the world ranking. Woods lost his No. 1 spot nearly three months ago to Lee Westwood, so that’s old news. He dropped yet another spot to No. 3 this week when Martin Kaymer won the Abu Dhabi Championship by eight shots. And if Woods doesn’t return to his former self quickly, it won’t be long before he slips even farther. The last time he was not in the top three was May 11, 1997. What’s more noteworthy about the world ranking, however, is it’s the first time Woods has been ranked behind someone younger than him. He turned 35 over the holidays. Woods has known this day was coming, even when his game appeared untouchable. In time, there would be a player — or players, in this case — younger than him and not as intimidated. Sure, there was a brief challenge from Ser-

The Associated Press ile photo

Tiger Woods cringes after missing a birdie putt on a sudden death hole following an 18-hole playoff round for the U.S. Open championship at Torrey Pines Golf Course in San Diego in June 2008. After falling from No. 1, questions linger if the once untouchable golfer can turn his game around. gio Garcia. Adam Scott reached as high as No. 3, and Paul Casey did the same a year later. Now, the youth brigade is coming in bunches. Ahead of him in the ranking is Kaymer, the 26-year-old German who won the PGA Championship last year to become the youngest major champion since Woods. Kaymer also won the European Tour money title, and started the year with an eight-

shot victory over what will be one of the strongest fields the European Tour will see all year. “He’s probably the most formidable player in the world when he is leading,” Padraig Harrington said. That’s what they used to say about Woods. But in his most recent tournament, the Chevron World Challenge, Woods blew a four-shot lead in the final round to U.S. Open champion Graeme McDowell. It was the first time Woods had lost a lead that large. McDowell is 31, and right behind Woods in the world ranking at No. 4. Woods also has to contend with younger players like Rory McIlroy, Paul Casey and perhaps even Luke Donald from Europe, not to mention Dustin Johnson and Anthony Kim from the American side. So many talented, young players will not make Woods’ task any easier. The bigger question is whether Woods is equipped for the fight. Some of the answers might arrive this week at Torrey Pines, a public course along the Pacific bluffs that Woods has owned like no other. His epic U.S. Open title in 2008 was the seventh time he had won as pro on Torrey Pines. He has not lost on this golf course since 2004, although he missed the past two years. He has never finished out of the top 10. But just like last year, no one is quite sure what to expect. His new swing coach, Sean Foley, said he spent about four hours a week with Woods on the practice range at Isleworth the last few months, and he liked what he saw. How will that translate with a scorecard in hand? “If you want to anticipate what happens in the future, look to the past,” Foley suggested. “What people lose touch of, because we’re such a bandwagon society, is that for a decade there, it might have been one of the greatest 10-year runs in the history of athletics. Obviously, he struggled last year. But I look forward to watching him compete.”

School

Locals playing college golf

Continued from D1 Schoning’s recent strong play has her thinking of a pro golf career. “I know that it is going to take a lot of work, and I know that I am not quite there,” Schoning concedes. “I still have another year and half (at PSU), but I am starting to focus on it.” Schoning, who leads the Vikings after the fall season with a 74.76 strokes-per-round average, still has a junior season to think about. She has her eyes on a Big Sky Conference individual title, and she wants to lead her team into the NCAA Regional Championships. She is hopeful that from there she can advance to the NCAA Women’s Golf Championships in June. All of Schoning’s goals would seem attainable after the results she produced last fall. “I’m excited,” Schoning says. “It’s going to be a good spring.” Here’s a look at two of the other Central Oregon college golfers preparing for the spring season.

Say goodbye, Wyoming Bend’s Molly Black, a senior at the University of Wyoming, wants to make her last college golf season a memorable one. “I want to end on a really high note, where I can look back and be SO proud of all the effort that I put into it,” says Black, who was a teammate of Schoning’s at Summit High. “And (I want to) just be happy with what I have accomplished, because it has been one heck of a ride.” Currently, Black leads the

LOCAL

Calendar

The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf results listings and events calendar. Clearly legible items should be faxed to the sports department, 541-385-0831, e-mailed to sports@bendbulletin.com, or mailed to P.O. Box 6020; Bend, OR 97708.

The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf events calendar. Items should be mailed to P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708; faxed to the sports department at 541-385-0831; or e-mailed to sports@bendbulletin.com. ——— TOURNAMENTS Feb. 4 — Central Oregon Winter Series tournament at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. Tournament is a two-person scramble. No more than one professional allowed per team. Cost is $25 for professionals, $45 for amateurs. Cart and optional gross skins competition cost extra. All players must sign up by noon on the Thursday before the event. To register or for more information, call Pat Huffer, head pro at Crooked River Ranch, at 541-923-6343 or e-mail him at crrpat@crookedriverranch.com. Feb. 12 — Post-Super Bowl Scramble at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. Four-person scramble begins with a 10 a.m. shotgun start. PGA professionals welcome, but teams are limited to one pro. Prizes for gross and net score as well as competitions for closest to the pin and longest putts. For more information or to enter, call Meadow Lakes at 541-447-7113. Feb. 18 — Central Oregon Winter Series tournament at Crooked River Ranch. Tournament is a two-person better ball. No more than one professional allowed per team. Cost is $25 for professionals, $45 for amateurs. Cart and optional gross skins competition cost extra. All players must sign up by noon on the Thursday before the event. To register or for more information, call Pat Huffer, head pro at Crooked River Ranch, at 541-923-6343 or e-mail him at crrpat@ crookedriverranch.com. March 11 — Central Oregon Winter Series tournament at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. Tournament is a two-person scramble. No more than one professional allowed per team. Cost is $25 for professionals, $45 for amateurs. Cart and optional gross skins competition cost extra. All players must sign up by noon on the Thursday before the event. To register or for more information, call Pat Huffer, head pro at Crooked River Ranch, at 541-923-6343 or e-mail him at crrpat@crookedriverranch.com. March 12-13 — The Kah-Nee-Ta Spring Invitational at KahNee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation is presented by the Oregon Chapter of the PGA. Admission is free to spectators. For more information, call 541-553-4971

CROOKED RIVER RANCH Men’s Club, Jan. 18 Stroke Play A Flight (0-14 handicaps) — Gross: 1, Dennis Glender, 74. 2, Jay Snavely, 76. 3, Jim Martin, 77. Net: 1, Gary Olds, 63. 2, Ron White, 64. 3, Darrell Wells, 66. B Flight (15 and up) — Gross: 1, Bob Holloway, 81. 2, Vene Dunham, 85. 3, Terry Hunter, 86. Net: 1 (tie), Jay Sheldon, 65; Tom Vasche, 65. 3, Ken Nored, 71. DESERT PEAKS Thursday Men’s Club, Jan. 20 Net Stroke Play 1, Wes Graves, 73. 2, George Jones, 75. 3, Val Paterson, 82. KP — Wes Graves. Long Drive — Dean Ditmore. Sunday Group Play, Jan. 23 Stroke Play Gross: 1, Brian Ringering, 71. 2, Ed McDaniel, 73. 3, Francisco Morales, 78. Net: 1, Denny Story, 68. 2, Mike Gardner, 70. 3 (tie), Tina Gruner, 72; Bob Vigil, 72; Dean Hunt, 72; Jim Wyzard, 72; Spud Gephart, 72. KP — Brian Ringering.

Hole-In-One Report Jan. 22 JUNIPER Art Samson, Bend No. 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-wood

PGA TOUR FARMERS INSURANCE OPEN Site: San Diego. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Courses: Torrey Pines, South Course (7,568 yards, par 72) and North Course (6,874 yards, par 72). Purse: $5.8 million. Winner’s share: $1,044,000. Television: Golf Channel (ThursdayFriday, noon-3 p.m.; SaturdaySunday 10 a.m.-11:30 a.m.) and CBS (Saturday, noon-3 p.m.; Sunday, noon-3:30 p.m.). Last year: Ben Crane beat Michael Sim, Brandt Snedeker and Marc Leishman by a stroke. Last week: Jhonattan Vegas became the first Venezuelan winner in PGA Tour history, beating Gary Woodland with a par on the second hole of a playoff in the Bob Hope Classic. Notes: Tiger Woods is making his first start at Torrey Pines since beating Rocco Mediate in a playoff in the 2008 U.S. Open for his sixth victory at the course. Winless last year and down to No. 3 in the world, Woods has won the last five times he has played at Torrey Pines. He missed the 2009 tournament while recovering from knee surgery and sat out last year while dealing with personal problems related to his extramarital affairs. ... Phil Mickelson, the 1993, 2000 and 2001 winner, is making his 21st consecutive appearance in his hometown event. He tied for 37th last week in Abu Dhabi in his season debut.

PGA EUROPE

Below is a list of Central Oregonians currently playing college golf, and how each performed during the 2010 fall golf season:

SMALL-SCHOOL GOLFERS

DIVISION I GOLFERS Molly Black (Summit), sr., Wyoming — Leads team in scoring average at 77. Tied for 14th place in 60-player Colorado tournament. Chelsey Lind (Mountain View), so., Oregon State — Played four tournaments and finished 13th at three-team Washington National Individual Championship, scoring average 81.5. Lindsay Reeve (Redmond High), so., New Mexico State — Did not play in fall 2010. Cory Schmidt (Bend High), jr., Portland — Did not play in fall 2010. Tiffany Schoning (Summit), jr., Portland State — Won Turtle Bay Collegiate Invitational and leads team with 74.76 scoring average. Andrew Vijarro (Bend High), jr., Oregon — 73.67 scoring average in three tournaments. Alister MacKenzie Invitational tied for 24th out of 80 golfers.

Alex Fitch (Redmond, Sisters), jr., Linfield — Leads team with 74.4 scoring average; won one tournament and finished no worse than third place in six events. Jesse Heinly (Summit), fr., Concordia — Second on team with 72.9 scoring average; finished in third place at Cavalier Classic in September. Jennifer Hilts (Bend High), jr., Mesa State (Grand Junction, Colo.) — Won Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference tournament at 7 over par; leads team with 77.75 scoring average. Marissa Hopper (Redmond High), fr., Concordia — Did not play in fall 2010. Michael Reeve (jr., Redmond High), Mesa State — Did not play in fall 2010. Andy Rodby (Redmond High), fr., Hawaii Pacific University — Played in one tournament, finished outside top 20.

Cowgirls with a scoring average of 77, and she registered her team’s best finish during the fall with a tie for 14th place at Colorado’s CU/Heather Farr Memorial. But Black, who is scheduled to graduate this spring, wants to win a collegiate golf tournament before she leaves Laramie. “It’s time,” says Black. “But it is hard to do.” Though Wyoming’s spring season does not begin until March, Black says she is spending about 45 minutes each day

chipping and putting before hitting balls off a mat until she can swing no longer. “I just really want to give myself the best opportunity to win (the Mountain West Conference Championship),” Black says. “That’s my biggest goal. Whether it happens or not, we’ll see.” Black has no ambition to turn pro after college, though she does plan to continue competing in golf as an amateur. But that’s the future, and for now, Black is focused on getting

one more great season under way. “It’s just crazy to think that it went by so quickly,” Black says of her college career. “I was talking to mom the other day about how I feel like I just came to school.”

Ready for spring Bend’s Andrew Vijarro spent this past fall trying to find a more consistent golf swing in his junior season for the University of Oregon. And that change took a toll on Vijarro’s game, as he finished no better than 24th place in three tournaments played during the fall season. But Vijarro, a former Bend High golfer, says he thinks the rough patch could pay off this spring. “I’m hitting the ball probably better than I have ever hit it,” says Vijarro, who will open the spring season with the Ducks in Hawaii next week at The Amer Ari Invitational, a tournament he nearly won last year. “I look forward to going out and competing again and getting more consistent and lowering that scoring average to where I know it can be and should be,” adds Vijarro, whose 73.09 scoring average in the fall was nearly a full stroke higher than his average for the 2009-10 season. The Ducks struggled as a team during the fall. But Vijarro says it is nothing to be concerned about, “If you lay an egg in the fall and play amazing in the spring, no one is going to remember the fall,” Vijarro says. “The spring is when you get the Pac-10 (Championship), regionals, nationals and those type of events.” Zack Hall can be reached at 541-617-7868 or at zhall@ bendbulletin.com.

GOLF SCOREBOARD

Club Results

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or visit www.orpga.com. March 25 — Central Oregon Winter Series tournament at the Club at Brasada Ranch on Powell Butte. Tournament is a two-person shamble. No more than one professional allowed per team. Cost is $25 for professionals, $45 for amateurs. Cart and optional gross skins competition cost extra. All players must sign up by noon on the Thursday before the event. To register or for more information, call Pat Huffer, head pro at Crooked River Ranch, at 541-923-6343 or e-mail him at crrpat@crookedriverranch.com. April 1 — Central Oregon Winter Series tournament at Lost Tracks Golf Club in Bend. Tournament is a two-person triple six. No more than one professional allowed per team. Cost is $25 for professionals, $45 for amateurs. Cart and optional gross skins competition cost extra. All players must sign up by noon on the Thursday before the event. To register or for more information, call Pat Huffer, head pro at Crooked River Ranch, at 541-923-6343 or e-mail him at crrpat@crookedriverranch.com. April 4 — Central Oregon Seniors Golf Organization event at Eagle Crest Resort’s Challenge Course in Redmond. The format is individual gross and net best ball, as well as team best ball. Cash prizes awarded at each event. Tournament series is open to men’s club members at host sites, and participants must have an Oregon Golf Association handicap. Cost is $110 for the season plus a $5 per-event fee. For more information, call Ron Meisner at 541-5483307. April 8 — Central Oregon Winter Series tournament at Prong-

horn Club’s Nicklaus Course in Bend. Tournament is a two-person shamble. No more than one professional allowed per team. Cost is $25 for professionals, $45 for amateurs. Cart and optional gross skins competition cost extra. All players must sign up by noon on the Thursday before the event. To register or for more information, call Pat Huffer, head pro at Crooked River Ranch, at 541-923-6343 or e-mail him at crrpat@crookedriverranch.com. April 25 — Central Oregon Seniors Golf Organization event at Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino near Warm Springs. The format is individual gross and net best ball, as well as team best ball. Cash prizes awarded at each event. Tournament series is open to men’s club members at host sites, and participants must have an Oregon Golf Association handicap. Cost is $110 for the season plus a $5 per-event fee. For more information, call Ron Meisner at 541-548-3307. April 28-May 1 — The Central Oregon Shootout is a twoperson team event held at Aspen Lakes Golf Course in Sisters, Black Butte Ranch and Eagle Crest Resort in Redmond. The tournament will feature scramble, best ball and Chapman formats. Cost is $550 per team and includes greens fees, carts, range balls, tee gift, con-

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VOLVO GOLF CHAMPIONS Site: Riffa, Bahrain. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: The Royal Golf Club, Montgomerie Course (7,243 yards, par 72). Purse: $2.28 million. Winner’s share: $380,000. Television: Golf Channel (ThursdayFriday, 6:30-10:30 a.m.; SaturdaySunday, 6:30-9:30 a.m.). Last year: Inaugural event. Last week: Martin Kaymer overtook Tiger Woods for the No. 2 ranking in the world, winning the Abu Dhabi Golf Championship by eight strokes. The German star successfully defended his title, winning the event for the third time in four years. Notes: Padraig Harrington, Ian Poulter and Sergio Garcia are in the field along with course designer Colin Montgomerie, Paul Casey, Miguel Angel Jimenez, Eduardo and Francesco Molinari, Todd Hamilton and 2012 European Ryder Cup captain Jose Maria Olazabal.

CHAMPIONS CHAMPIONS SKINS GAME Site: Lahaini, Hawaii. Schedule: Saturday-Sunday. Course: Royal Kaanapali Golf Course (6,700 yards, par 71). Purse: $770,000 (Nos. 1-6, $30,000 each; Nos. 7-12, $40,000 each; Nos. 13-17, $50,000 each; No. 18, $100,000). Television: Golf Channel (SaturdaySunday, 4-6:30 p.m.). Format: Skins game. Two-man teams, alternate shot. Teams: Jack Nicklaus-Tom Watson, Ben Crenshaw-Fuzzy Zoeller, Fred Couples-Nick Price, Bernhard Langer-Mark O’Meara. Last year: Nicklaus and Watson held off 2009 champions Zoeller and Crenshaw, finishing with 10 skins and $350,000 for their second victory in four years. Last week: John Cook won the season-opening Mitsubishi Electric Championship at Hualalai, closing with consecutive 64s for a twostroke victory over Tom Lehman. Cook won his second straight event after finishing last season with a successful title defense in the Charles Schwab Cup Championship. Notes: The teams will play nine holes each day. ... The tour is off next week. Play will resume Feb. 11-13 with the Allianz Championship in Boca Raton, Fla. All Times PST


S

Inside

Olbermann’s adieu

SAVVY SHOPPER

With the popular host leaving, MSNBC loses its most prized asset, Page E2

IN SID E Dear Abby ‘Nice guy’ wants some control over his explosions of anger, Page E2

SHOPPING IN BRIEF Shopping fundraiser for Grandma’s House

a

singular sensation

Single-coffee machines offer convenience, but some criticize taste and waste By Heidi Hagemeier The Bulletin

rinking her morning coffee, Marilee Westfall feels spoiled. The Bend resident just before Christmas bought two single-serving coffee machines from QVC, one as a present and one for herself and her husband. When hers broke, she shipped it back to the manufacturer and went to Macy’s to buy another one. In just a matter of weeks, the machine that produces one cup at a time has become an appliance she doesn’t want to live without. “It’s just nice having it when you want it and having it hot,” Westfall said. “A lot of people I know got these for Christmas,” she continued. “I’d say 10 percent of the people I know on Facebook did.” Westfall has joined the fastest-growing segment of the U.S. coffee market: single-use coffee pods and their brewing systems. These machines use small capsules filled with grounds to brew a lone cup of joe. And while they have their detractors — who cite cost, environmental concerns and coffee quality as downsides — experts in the coffee field expect single-serving machines to continue to become more popular. Consumers will fall for their convenience, ease of use and ability to satisfy multiple tastes in a household. See Pods / E6

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541 Threads shirt sales go to NeighborImpact Buy a local T-shirt and contribute to a local cause, through new area business 541 Threads. 541 Threads launched in January. Its T-shirts are available online, although they will soon be displayed at a number of Bend boutiques and fitness clubs. They cost $25, and through June a portion of Submitted photo proceeds for every one sold will be given to NeighborImpact, a nonprofit providing social services throughout Central Oregon. They come in black and gray for both men and women. Women’s shirts are v-necks and men’s shirts are crewnecks. Contact: http://541threads.com or 541-350-2856.

Cost of a cup

Nonprofits offering free help for tax filing Free tax preparation for low- to moderate-income filers will be available at locations throughout Central Oregon from Tuesday through April 15, courtesy of the nonprofit organizations Partnership to End Poverty and the AARP. Certified volunteers will provide the aid. The services will be available in Bend, Redmond, La Pine, Prineville, Madras and Warm Springs. There are also specific days dedicated to Spanish speakers. Appointments are preferred although walk-ins are welcome. Generally, free tax preparation is offered to individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in annual gross income. Dates, times and locations, as well as information on what material to bring to the appointments, is available at the website and the phone numbers below. Contact: • www.takecredit.org • 541-388-1133 or 541-5041389 in Bend • 541-536-6237 in La Pine • 541-447-3260 in Prineville • 541-548-6325 in Redmond • 541-533-3148 in Madras and Warm Springs. — Heidi Hagemeier, The Bulletin

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/savvyshopper

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2011

Shop for clothing, beauty products and services Thursday at the Ladies Night of Indulgence, an event benefiting local nonprofit Grandma’s House. The event will take place from 4:30 to 9 p.m. at The Riverhouse, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, in Bend. Admission is free, although nonperishable food items are requested. Dinner fare, drinks and dessert will be available at three no-host bars. A drawing will also take place during the event. As for shopping, myriad vendors will be on hand to show off their wares, including jewelers, greeting card designers and handbag makers. Others will be offering services, from massages to manicures. The event helps Grandma’s House by amassing food items for its facility. Last year, it brought in more than 1,200 pounds of food. The nonprofit houses and educates homeless, pregnant teenagers and young mothers. Other cash proceeds from the event, like the coat check and buffet table, will also go to Grandma’s House. Contact: www.ladiesnight benefit.com or 541-389-3111.

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HELPING YOU MAKE GOOD BUYING DECISIONS

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Single-serving coffee machines like this Keurig model are the fastest growing segment of the U.S. coffee market.

The cost of K-Cups varies, from $47.99 for 108 K-Cups at Costco to $14.99 for 18 at Macy’s. At other Bend retailers, like Bed Bath & Beyond or Kitchen Collection, a pack of 18 costs $9.99. So at $9.99, a cup of coffee New York Times News Service ile photo from a Tully’s K-Cup costs 55 cents. A cup of coffee from a Tully’s 12-ounce bag of ground coffee (not whole beans), when made per the instructions on the bag, costs 28 cents when purchased at the regular Safeway price of $8.99 per bag. The bag of Tully’s coffee, when made to the directions, produces 32 cups. The 18-pack makes, according to the directions, 18 cups.

Lunch tote has acquired a sense of taste By Austin Considine New York Times News Service

Conceptually, the lunch tote is nothing new: Reusable versions of the brown paper bag have been around for several years, often insulated and made with spill-resistant material for easy cleanup. But the lunch tote is evolving, and a few have emerged recently that seem to cater to a more discriminating sense of taste, eschewing the sometimes flimsy (and often garish) tote in favor of a more stylish, legitimate fashion accessory. “Going green, not using a brown paper bag, is the big story, and consumers will want alternatives that are not the bright, vinyl lunch totes of yesteryear,” said Pamela Pekerman, accessory stylist and independent fashion consultant. “It’s about getting an adult-appropriate lunch tote that you can continue to reuse.” See Totes / E6

Fashionable leftovers Built’s Verve lunch bag ($30), which is machine-washable, is aimed at adults who want a lunch bag that is also a stylish accessory.

New York Times News Service

Shopping apps help you save By Kristi L. Gustafson Albany Times Union

Whether fashion, electronics, hiking equipment or pet supplies is your retail drug of choice, listen up. There is something you should have with you every time you head out of the house for a little retail therapy, and it’s not your limitless AmEx. You need your smart phone. You are not packing your Droid or your iPhone or your BlackBerry to chat with your friends while weaving between racks (please don’t do that), but to find the best deals possible on just about every item on the mainstream market. There are a slew of low- and nocost apps for your smart phone. Some are operating-system-specific (aka, they work only on your Droid, your iPhone, etc.), but all can leave you with enough money left over to enjoy another kind of app — an appetizer — and more with your post-shopping dinner. Check them out.

CouponSherpa This app helps you find the best online coupons by acting as an aggregator for discounts at stores such JCPenney, Quiznos, Gap, Finish Line and thousands of others. See Apps / E6


T EL EV ISION

E2 Wednesday, January 26, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

‘Nice guy’ wants control over explosions of anger Dear Abby: I have an issue that has me concerned, and I need some expertise. I have a problem with anger. I don’t know what triggers it. It happens out of the blue sometimes. I have never struck out in anger toward another person, but people have witnessed my outbursts and seemed taken aback by the behavior. The instances occur every month or two. I’m a nice guy. I would bend over backward to help someone if I could. My verbal explosions contradict who I am inside. Do you have any suggestions on what I can do to control my temper in these situations? — Hothead in New Jersey Dear Hothead: Anger is a normal emotion. Everyone has experienced it at one time or another. When primitive men and women were faced with a potential threat, they reacted instinctively with either fear or anger. It was nature’s way of enabling us to run away or fight back. Even infants display anger by screaming or holding their breath until they turn red. And we’ve all seen older children throw tantrums, holler and throw things. Whatever is causing your angry outbursts, it is important to analyze what has been triggering them. Being out of work, unable to pay one’s bills or feeling unfairly treated can arouse feelings of anger. Being hurt emotionally by someone can cause it, too. People have been known to become angry if their beliefs or values are questioned or threatened. Low self-esteem can also cause people to feel easily threatened. Many people who suffer from chronic low self-esteem feel they must continually prove themselves. To compensate for their feelings of inadequacy, they are driven to “win every battle,” whether at sports or in an argument. People who are overly tired

DEAR ABBY have been known to lash out without real provocation. Being physically ill can have the same effect. (You can break that cycle by simply explaining that you’re not feeling well and ask for patience because your temper is short at such times.) Depression, drugs and alcohol abuse have long been known to cause people to lose control of their emotions and say — and do — things they later regret. I publish a booklet, “The Anger in All of Us and How to Deal With It,” that was created to help people learn to control their anger. For people of all ages, it is a kind of survival guide to help them understand their anger and appropriately deal with it. It can be ordered by sending your name and mailing address, plus a check or money order for $6 (U.S. funds), to Dear Abby — Anger Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. Shipping and handling are included in the price. Most of us have been trained from early childhood to suppress anger. But it is even more important to learn to express it in ways that are constructive rather than destructive. Anger can be a positive emotion if it is channeled in the right direction. Uncontrolled, it can be a killer. Now that we have become somewhat — one hopes — civilized adults, the challenge we face when something angers us is how to deal with it effectively and constructively, rather than thoughtlessly reacting. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Parting ways with Olbermann, MSNBC kills its golden goose By Joanne Ostrow

O lbermann is a brilliant talent; Olbermann is also a hothead.

The Denver Post

Not much is clear about Keith Olbermann’s future. We can’t even be sure about what transpired in his recent past that brought him to the point of cutting ties with MSNBC. But it’s fairly obvious that MSNBC is going to be a shell of its former self without its most controversial and creative loudmouth. “Countdown” was MSNBC, and MSNBC will be an even more minor player without “Countdown.” For all its excess (“Worst Persons,” etc.), Olbermann’s show was must-viewing for a certain segment of the thinking, politically tuned-in public. What’s become clearer, in the days since Friday’s final “Countdown,” is that the network had wanted to be rid of Olbermann, and Olbermann’s representatives had sought a buyout from the network for months. MSNBC higher-ups were apparently dissatisfied with Olbermann at least since his suspension last fall, after revelations of the host’s personal political contributions — something he might have been able to do if only he’d asked permission. More likely they’ve been bumping heads with him since the beginning. Apparently it was a long history of sniping and ill will that caused the falling out. Were the folks at NBC News increasingly bothered by his Weekly Arts & Entertainment Inside

MSNBC via The Associated Press

This frame grab from MSNBC video shows Keith Olbermann on “Countdown” on Jan. 21, the day Olbermann told viewers it was his last broadcast while MSNBC e-mailed a statement that “MSNBC and Keith Olbermann have ended their contract.” The network thanked him and said, “we wish him well in his future endeavors.” lack of “objectivity,” finding Olbermann an embarrassment and increasingly keeping players like Tom Brokaw and Brian Williams away from the MSNBC brand? Yes, but were they dissatisfied enough to blow up a network? The idea pitched by MSNBC when the news broke on Friday, that Lawrence O’Donnell is strong enough to carry the prime-time slot, sounds like wishful thinking. Personally, I’m not buying the argument that the timing of the MSNBC-Olbermann divorce had anything to do with the concurrent takeover of NBC Universal by Comcast. Conspiracy theorists will see all kinds of threats

in the timing, but Comcast has bigger things to worry about than the programming for a minuscule audience on a tiny cable channel. This isn’t about the corporate realignment. It probably has more to do with ego. Olbermann is a brilliant talent; Olbermann is also a hothead. He’s never been a diplomat when doing business with network bosses. But star talents aren’t supposed to be diplomatic. That’s why they have agents and managers. Maybe Olbermann will end up with a Howard Stern-type salary and satellite radio following. Maybe he’ll join the ranks of left-leaning political humorists

on Comedy Central or HBO. As a more news-driven answer to Bill Maher, or a less satirical but equally astute observer of the political circus than Jon Stewart, Olbermann deserves an hour on one of the high-paying cable networks that would give him total freedom. Maybe he’ll join forces with the Huffington Post and do some kind of nightly webcast. His options would seem to be open; his fan base, while small, is fiercely devoted. The question going forward is, how juicy was the maneuvering to get “Countdown” off the air? Specifically, how long and how broad are the conditions of Olbermann’s “no-compete” clause? How long must he remain off TV in order to collect the $7 million or so (one year’s salary), reportedly stipulated in the contract suspension? How silent must he be about the details of his departure? And when will the nasty details begin to seep out of MSNBC? Fortunately, in the ever-expanding media universe, there’s no such thing as a steady, unchanging media job. It’s all in flux. Delivery platforms matter less than hot moments and provocative personalities.

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The Middle ‘PG’ The Middle ‘PG’ Modern Family Cougar Town (N) Minute to Win It Second Chances ’ Chase Narco, Part 2 (N) ‘14’ Å Live to Dance ’ ‘PG’ Å Criminal Minds (N) ’ ‘14’ Å The Middle ‘PG’ The Middle ‘PG’ Modern Family Cougar Town (N) American Idol Auditions No. 3 Hopefuls perform for the judges. (N) ’ ‘PG’ News on PDX-TV Burn Notice Former flame. ’ ‘PG’ Nova scienceNOW (N) ’ ‘G’ NOVA (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å (DVS) Minute to Win It Second Chances ’ Chase Narco, Part 2 (N) ‘14’ Å Nikita All the Way ’ ‘14’ Å The Vampire Diaries ’ ‘14’ Å For Your Home Katie Brown Knit-Crochet Passport, Palette Nova scienceNOW (N) ’ ‘G’ NOVA (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å (DVS)

10:00

10:30

Off the Map A Doctor Time Out ‘14’ Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Blue Bloods Family Ties (N) ’ ‘14’ Off the Map A Doctor Time Out ‘14’ News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Burn Notice Signals and Codes ‘PG’ Minds on the Edge: Mental Illness Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Married... With Married... With Cook’s Country Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Minds on the Edge: Mental Illness

11:00 KATU News at 11 News News News (N) Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens Hotspots ’ ‘G’ Å News King of Queens Cooking Class Hotspots ’ ‘G’ Å

11:30 (11:35) Nightline Jay Leno Letterman (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens Jay Leno King of Queens Scandinavian

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Dog the Bounty Hunter (N) ‘PG’ Dog the Bounty Hunter (N) Å Storage Wars Storage Wars (N) Storage Wars Storage Wars 130 28 18 32 Dog the Bounty Hunter ‘PG’ Å (3:00) “Enter the ››› “Predator” (1987, Science Fiction) Arnold Schwarzenegger, Carl Weathers, Jesse Ventura. A team is ›› “The Chronicles of Riddick” (2004, Science Fiction) Vin Diesel, Colm Feore, Thandie Newton. A fugitive ›› “The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen” (2003, Fantasy) 102 40 39 Dragon” (1973) stalked by an intergalactic trophy hunter. Å fights an invading ruler and his army. Sean Connery, Shane West. Å Bear Attack! ’ ‘PG’ Å Monsters Inside Me Lurkers ’ ‘PG’ Your Worst Animal Nightmares ‘14’ I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å I Shouldn’t Be Alive (N) ’ ‘PG’ I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å 68 50 26 38 Alone Among Grizzlies ‘PG’ Å Top Chef The chefs must fish. ‘14’ Top Chef ‘14’ Å Real Housewives/Beverly The Real Housewives of Atlanta ‘14’ The Real Housewives of Atlanta ‘14’ Top Chef The chefs must fish. ‘14’ Top Chef ‘14’ Å 137 44 The Singing Bee ’ ‘PG’ Å The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ Å The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ Å › “Son-in-Law” (1993, Comedy) Pauly Shore, Carla Gugino. ’ Red. Wedding CMT Music ‘PG’ 190 32 42 53 The Singing Bee ’ ‘PG’ Å American Greed Stephen Trantel American Greed Troy A. Titus (N) Mad Money American Greed Stephen Trantel American Greed Troy A. Titus Wealth-Risk Paid Program 51 36 40 52 American Greed Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 Parker Spitzer (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report Chappelle Show Chappelle Show South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ Tosh.0 Å Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 Naked Gn 33 Bend La Pine U of O Today PM Edition Bend on the Run Bend City Council Epic Conditions Outside Presents Paid Program Visions of NW Ride Guide ‘14’ The Element 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 12 11 Tonight From Washington Sonny-Chance Fish Hooks ‘G’ Fish Hooks ‘G’ Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Shake it Up! ‘G’ Shake it Up! ‘G’ Hannah Forever Suite/Deck Hannah Montana Hannah Montana Suite/Deck Suite/Deck 87 43 14 39 Sonny-Chance Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ MythBusters ’ ‘PG’ Å Black Ops Brothers: Howe & Howe Sons of Guns (N) Sons of Guns (N) Desert Car Kings (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Black Ops Brothers: Howe & Howe 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ NBA Basketball San Antonio Spurs at Utah Jazz (Live) SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 (4:30) College Basketball Texas at Oklahoma State Tennis Australian Open, Women’s Semifinals From Melbourne, Australia. (Live) Å 2010 World Series of Poker Å 22 24 21 24 (4:30) College Basketball North Carolina at Miami (Live) Winter X Games Classix (N) Winter X Games Classix (N) Winter X Games Winter X Games Classix (N) Winter X Games Classix (N) Winter X Games Classix (N) Winter X Games 23 25 123 25 Tennis: 1991 -- Novotna vs. Seles SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Still Standing ’ Still Standing ’ America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos The 700 Club ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Bobby Flay Best Thing Ate Bobby Flay Bobby Flay Worst Cooks in America Grill Skills Restaurant: Impossible Mainelli’s (N) Diners, Drive Diners, Drive 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa Huskies Sports Star College Basketball Western Washington at Seattle Pacific (Live) Huskies Cougars Access College Basketball Western Washington at Seattle Pacific 20 45 28* 26 Cougars Access Beavers (4:30) ››› “Assault on Precinct 13” (2005, Action) Ethan Hawke. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ››› “The Incredible Hulk” (2008, Action) Edward Norton, Liv Tyler, Tim Roth. ›› “Hancock” (2008) Will Smith, Charlize Theron. 131 Get It Sold ‘G’ Cash & Cari ‘G’ Designed to Sell Hunters Int’l House Hunters Holmes Inspection Acres of Pain ‘G’ Holmes Inspection ’ ‘G’ Å Holmes Inspection Health. ‘G’ Å The Vanilla Ice The Vanilla Ice 176 49 33 43 Get It Sold ‘G’ Nostradamus Effect ‘PG’ Å Modern Marvels Tuna ‘PG’ Å Ancient Aliens ‘PG’ Å Ancient Aliens Chariots, Gods & Beyond Investigating aliens. ‘PG’ Å How the Earth Was Made ‘PG’ 155 42 41 36 Nostradamus Effect ‘PG’ Å Old Christine Old Christine How I Met How I Met Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å ›› “Murder by Numbers” (2002, Suspense) Sandra Bullock, Ryan Gosling. Å How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Ed Show (N) The Last Word The Rachel Maddow Show The Ed Show Hardball With Chris Matthews Å 56 59 128 51 The Last Word That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show MTV Cribs ’ MTV Cribs ’ True Life Compulsive shopping. ’ Teen Mom 2 Change of Heart ‘PG’ I Used to Be Fat Jordan (N) ’ ‘PG’ I Used to Be Fat Jordan ’ ‘PG’ 192 22 38 57 The Seven ‘PG’ SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å House of Anubis SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob UFC Unleashed ’ ‘PG’ Å UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ Å UFC Unleashed ’ ‘PG’ Å MANswers ‘14’ MANswers ‘MA’ MANswers ‘MA’ MANswers ‘MA’ MANswers ‘MA’ MANswers ‘MA’ 132 31 34 46 UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ Å Star Trek: Enterprise ‘PG’ Å Ghost Hunters Bottled Spirits ‘PG’ Ghost Hunters Club Dead ‘PG’ Å Ghost Hunters International (N) ’ Face Off Welcome to the Jungle (N) Ghost Hunters International Å 133 35 133 45 Stargate SG-1 Legacy ’ ‘PG’ Å Behind Scenes Grant Jeffrey Secrets of Bible Jack Van Impe Praise the Lord (Live) Å Easter Exper. Jesse Duplantis Thru History Changing-World Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Meet the Browns Meet the Browns House of Payne House of Payne We There Yet? We There Yet? Conan (N) ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond ››› “Lucky Jordan” (1942, Drama) Alan Ladd. An Army rack- ››› “The Snows of Kilimanjaro” (1952, Adventure) Gregory Peck, Susan Hayward. A ››› “Phantom Lady” (1944) Franchot Tone. A secretary must ›››› “Love Me Tonight” (1932, Musical Comedy) Maurice Chevalier, Jeanette Mac101 44 101 29 eteer plots to sell tank plans to Nazis. restless writer searches for the meaning of life. Å help clear her boss of murder charges. Donald. Singing Paris tailor woos princess at castle. Cake Boss ‘PG’ My Deadly Appetite ’ ‘PG’ Å Ton of Love ’ ‘14’ Å My Addiction My Addiction Toddlers & Tiaras Mardi Gras ‘PG’ My Addiction My Addiction 178 34 32 34 Cake Boss ’ ‘G’ Kitchen Boss (N) Cake Boss ‘PG’ Law & Order Girl Most Likely ’ ‘14’ Bones ’ ‘14’ Å Bones The Dentist in the Ditch ‘14’ Bones Booth’s girlfriend visits. ‘14’ Bones The Devil in the Details ‘14’ Southland Code 4 ’ ‘MA’ Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order ’ ‘PG’ Å (DVS) Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ 6TEEN ‘G’ Total Drama Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Hole in the Wall Would Happen Destroy Build King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Carnivore Man v. Food ‘G’ Guide to Life Guide to Life Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations All in the Family Retired at 35 Hot in Cleveland Sanford and Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Hot in Cleveland Retired at 35 (N) Hot in Cleveland Retired at 35 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons NCIS Driven ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Suspicion ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Endgame ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS Citywide blackout. ‘14’ Å NCIS Child’s Play ’ ‘PG’ Å Fairly Legal Pilot ‘PG’ Å 15 30 23 30 NCIS Smoked ’ ‘PG’ Å Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å The X Life ‘14’ The X Life ‘14’ Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew ‘14’ Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew ‘14’ Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew Reunion (N) ’ ‘14’ Celebrity Rehab 191 48 37 54 Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:40) ›› “Look Who’s Talking” 1989 John Travolta. (6:20) ›› “Cadillac Man” 1990 Robin Williams. ’ ‘R’ ››› “Mad Max” 1979 Mel Gibson. ’ ‘R’ Å (9:35) ››› “The Road Warrior” 1981 Mel Gibson. ‘R’ “Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome” ›› “Predator 2” 1990, Science Fiction Danny Glover. ‘R’ Å ››› “The Fly” 1986, Horror Jeff Goldblum, Geena Davis. ‘R’ Å ›› “The Sitter” 1991 Kim Myers. ›› “Marked for Death” 1990, Action Steven Seagal. ‘R’ Å Insane Cinema Dare the Devil ‘14’ The Daily Habit Thrillbillies ‘14’ SLAM! (N) Å Bondi Rescue The Daily Habit College Exp. The Daily Habit Thrillbillies ‘14’ SLAM! Bondi Rescue The Daily Habit 19th Hole (N) Top 10 Top 10 Golf Videos 19th Hole Golf Central Playing Lessons Top 10 Top 10 Golf Videos 19th Hole Golfing World European Tour Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ “Growing the Big One” (2010) Shannen Doherty, Kavan Smith. ‘PG’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (4:00) ›› “Clash of the Titans” 2010 Sam ›› “Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian” 2009, (7:45) ›› “Valentine’s Day” 2010, Romance-Comedy Jessica Alba, Kathy Bates, Jessica Biel. Los Angeles Big Love A Seat at the Table Bill attempts Real Time With Bill Maher TV host RaHBO 425 501 425 10 Worthington. ‘PG-13’ Å chel Maddow. ’ ‘MA’ Å Comedy Ben Stiller, Robin Williams. ’ ‘PG’ Å residents wend their way into and out of romance. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å to stage a meeting. ’ ‘MA’ (4:45) › “The Order” 2003, Suspense Heath Ledger, Benno Fürmann. ‘R’ Undeclared ‘PG’ Ben Stiller Larry Sanders (8:35) › “London” 2005, Drama Chris Evans, Jessica Biel. ‘R’ (10:35) ›› “Hard Candy” 2006 Patrick Wilson. ‘R’ IFC 105 105 ››› “The Blind Side” 2009, Drama Sandra Bullock, Tim McGraw. A well-to-do white (4:10) › “Sugar Hill” 1974, Horror Marki (6:15) ›› “Post Grad” 2009 Alexis Bledel. A recent graduate (7:45) ››› “Brazil” 1985, Fantasy Jonathan Pryce, Robert De Niro, Katherine Helmond. A man rebels MAX 400 508 7 Bey. ’ ‘PG’ Å moves back in with her eccentric family. Å against the system in a totalitarian society. ’ ‘R’ Å couple adopts a homeless black teen. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Inside a Cult ‘PG’ Wild Justice Outlaw Hunters ‘14’ Wild Justice Born to Kill (N) ‘14’ Inside a Cult ‘PG’ Wild Justice Outlaw Hunters ‘14’ Wild Justice Born to Kill ‘14’ Wild Justice Thrill Killer ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents OddParents The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Three Delivery Three Delivery NTOON 89 115 189 Shooting USA Sighting Shooting Gallery Amer. Guardian Amer. Rifleman Impossible Shots Best Defense Cowboys Shooting USA Sighting Amer. Rifleman Amer. Guardian Impossible Shots Best Defense OUTD 37 307 43 (4:30) › “Scary Movie 2” 2001, Comedy ›› “Twilight” 2008, Romance Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson. iTV. A teen is caught Episodes Episode 3 Californication ’ Inside the NFL (iTV) NFL news and high- Shameless Aunt Ginger Fiona turns her Inside the NFL (iTV) NFL news and highSHO 500 500 ’ ‘MA’ Shawn Wayans. iTV. ’ ‘R’ up in an unorthodox romance with a vampire. ’ ‘PG-13’ ‘MA’ Å lights. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å attentions to a cop. ‘MA’ Å lights. ’ ‘PG’ Å Intersections ‘G’ Intersections Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Stealth Rider ‘14’ Stealth Rider ‘14’ Intersections ‘G’ Intersections Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Stealth Rider ‘14’ Stealth Rider ‘14’ NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 (4:40) ›› “Sex Drive” 2008 Josh Zuckerman. ‘R’ Å (6:35) › “When in Rome” 2010 Kristen Bell. ‘PG-13’ (8:10) ›› “The Proposal” 2009 Sandra Bullock. ‘PG-13’ Å Spartacus: Gods of the Arena ‘MA’ ›› “Death at a Funeral” 2010 ‘R’ STARZ 300 408 300 (4:00) “Fight Night” (5:45) ›› “W.” 2008, Docudrama Josh Brolin, Elizabeth Banks, Ellen Burstyn. The life and controversial “Miss Conception” 2008, Romance-Comedy Heather Graham, Mia Kirshner, Tom Ellis. ›› “Youth in Revolt” 2009 Michael Cera, Jean Smart. A teen › “Boogie Woogie” TMC 525 525 2008 ‘R’ presidency of George W. Bush. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å A woman searches for a man to father her child. ’ ‘R’ goes on a carnal quest to lose his virginity. ‘R’ 2009 ’ ‘R’ (4:30) NHL Hockey New Jersey Devils at Detroit Red Wings (Live) Hockey Central The T.Ocho Show NHL Overtime (Live) Boxing NHL Overtime VS. 27 58 30 Joan & Melissa: Joan Knows Best? A Stand Up Mother ‘PG’ Å Joan & Melissa: Joan Knows Best? A Stand Up Mother ‘PG’ Å Joan & Melissa: Joan Knows Best? Ghost Whisperer Leap of Faith ‘PG’ Secret Lives of Women Cults ‘14’ WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, January 26, 2011 E3

CALENDAR TODAY VEGETARIAN POTLUCK: Bring a vegetarian soup with a list of its ingredients and watch the short video “The Blue Zones”; free; 6 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-480-3017. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, LA FANCIULLA DEL WEST”: Starring Deborah Voigt, Marcello Giordani and Lucio Gallo in an encore presentation of Puccini’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. LIVE READ: Sit in comfy chairs and listen to short fiction read aloud by library staff; free; 6:30-7:30 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080. ELIZABETH COOK: The alternative country musician performs, with Tim Carroll; part of the Great Northwest Music Tour; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.beattickets.org.

THURSDAY BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “Snow!”; $15, $10 museum members, plus accompanying adult admission ($10, $9 seniors); 10 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. ADVENTURE AROUND AMERICA: Carolyn and Jim Hammond present stories and images from their RV trip through the United States; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-617-4663. LADIES NIGHT OF INDULGENCE: A night of fun, shopping and pampering for women; proceeds benefit Grandma’s House; donations of nonperishable food requested; 4:30-9 p.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend; 541-3893111, ladiesnight2010@gmail.com or www.ladiesnightbenefit.com. THE PIMPS OF JOYTIME: The funk band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.beattickets.org. THE MELODRAMATICS: The Northern California-based reggaerock band performs; free; 10 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868 or madhappylounge@gmail.com.

FRIDAY BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “Snow!”; $15, $10 museum members, plus accompanying adult admission ($10, $9 seniors); 10 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. VFW DINNER: A dinner of roast beef, mashed potatoes, vegetables and a roll; proceeds benefit a veterans relief fund; $7; 5-7 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. “DESPICABLE ME”: A screening of the 2010 PG-rated film; with pizza and refreshments; free; 6-9 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541475-3351.

DRAMA SHOWCASE: Summit High School advanced drama students perform selections that they will take to a regional acting competition; proceeds benefit a scholarship fund to attend a state competition; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-322-3300. STUDENT-DIRECTED ONE-ACT PLAYS: The Crook County High School drama department presents three student-directed plays; $3; 7 p.m.; Crook County High School, Eugene Southwell Auditorium, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-4166900, ext. 3132 or anita.hoffman@ crookcounty.k12 .or.us. VINTAGE SKI NIGHT: Watch vintage ski films, with a costume contest and more; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit The Environmental Center; $5; 7-9 p.m.; Mountain’s Edge Sports Bar and Grill, 61303 U.S. Highway 97, Unit 115, Bend; 541385-6908, info@envirocenter.org or http://envirocenter.org/calendar/ vintage-ski-night. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.beattickets.org. THAT’S SO GAY: Featuring performances by hip-hop soul duo God-Des and She, with CJ and the Dolls and True Holland; followed by a dance party; $8 in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-383-7595. WINTER RESIDENCY: The Seattlebased eccentric rock band X-Ray Press performs, with Empty Space Orchestra; $5 plus fees in advance, $7 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

SATURDAY “YEAR OF THE RIVER” EXHIBIT OPENS: New exhibit features the geology and hydrology of the Deschutes River; exhibit runs through April 10; included in the price of admission; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. CASCADE HORIZON BAND: The senior band performs a concert featuring works by Aaron Copeland, marches, patriotic songs and more, under the direction of Sue Steiger; donations accepted; 2 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-389-5121, cascadehorizonband@yahoo.com or http://cascadehorizonband.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Lauren Kessler reads from her work “My Teenage Werewolf: A Mother, A Daughter, A Journey Through the Thicket of Adolescence”; free; 3 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3121034 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/ calendar. EVENING OF ART, WINE AND MUSIC: Featuring a silent art auction, raffle, crafts, wine, live music and more; proceeds benefit the Bpositiv Foundation for Children with Cancer; free; 5-11 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; www.bpositiv.org. SPAGHETTI FEED: With a silent auction and live entertainment; proceeds benefit Habitat for Humanity; $10, $6 children and seniors, $5 VFW members; 5-8 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-548-4108. DISCOMANIA: Featuring dinner, dancing and a silent auction; proceeds benefit the Crooked River Ranch-Terrebonne Chamber of Commerce; $25; 6 p.m.; Sandbagger

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Dinner House, 5165 Clubhouse Drive, Crooked River Ranch; 541-923-2679. FOUNDATION FUNDRAISER: Featuring live music, food and live and silent auctions; proceeds benefit the Bend Surgery Center Foundation; $40; 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. ROBERT BURNS EVENING AND DINNER: A tribute to the Scottish poet, with live music, dancing, poetry recitations and dinner; $45; 6:50 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-350-5652 or highdesertcelts@gmail.com. STUDENT-DIRECTED ONE-ACT PLAYS: The Crook County High School drama department presents three student-directed plays; $3; 7 p.m.; Crook County High School, Eugene Southwell Auditorium, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-4166900, ext. 3132 or anita.hoffman@ crookcounty.k12.or.us. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.beattickets.org. MOUNTAIN COUNTRY IDOL: Central Oregon musicians compete to see who is the best country artist; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital; $5; 8 p.m.; Coyote Ranch, 1368 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-548-7700 or www.mountain997.com. SATURDAY NIGHT JOKERS & JAMS: Local comics perform, with special musical guests; $10; 8 p.m., doors open 7:30 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-977-5677. BENEFIT CONCERT: Featuring a performance by Roses at Gunpoint; proceeds benefit Tyler Eklund; $5 suggested donation; 8:30 p.m.; M & J Tavern, 102 N.W. Greenwood, Bend; 541-389-1410. 80’S VIDEO DANCE ATTACK: The 80s dance act performs, with VJ Kittyrox; $5; 9 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541788-2989 or www.randompresents .com. BETH WOOD: The Eugene-based folk rocker performs, with Shireen Amini; ages 21 and older; $8 plus fees in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

SUNDAY CASCADE HORIZON BAND: The senior band performs a concert featuring works by Aaron Copeland, marches, patriotic songs and more, under the direction of Sue Steiger; proceeds benefit the Summit High School wind ensemble; donations accepted; 2 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-389-5121, cascadehorizonband@ yahoo.com or http:// cascadehorizonband.org.

TUESDAY AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Suzanne Schlosberg talks about her book “The Good Neighbor Cookbook”; 6:30 p.m.; Camalli Book Co., 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134. GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “GASLAND: Can You Light Your Water on Fire?” a documentary about natural-gas drilling technology; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504. PUB QUIZ: Answer trivia on topics from pop culture to politics; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit the Kurera Fund; $40 per team; 6:309:30 p.m.; The Summit Saloon &

Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-306-0864, vivien@kurerafund. org or www.kurerafund.org.

WEDNESDAY Feb. 2 DAY OF ZINN: Commemorate the life and works of Howard Zinn, with readings from his works, film clips, a dinner and more; registration required for dinner portion of event; free; noon, 6 p.m. dinner and film; OSU-Cascades Campus, Cascades Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-322-3140 or ndollar@ osucascades.edu. FINDING FREMONT IN OREGON: Loren Irving talks about John Fremont and retracing the explorer’s two-year journey; free; 1:30 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; 541-617-4663. ANGELS ACROSS THE USA TOUR: Alan Pedersen performs, and speaks about grief and love; free; 7 p.m.; Partners in Care, 2075 N.E. Wyatt Court, Bend; 541-480-0667.

THURSDAY Feb. 3 GRADUATION AUCTION: Silent auction to benefit Summit High School’s graduation party; free admission; 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; 541-610-9913 or cindymckee@mac .com. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Oryx and Crake” by Margaret Atwood; bring a lunch; free; noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. “TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD”: The Bend High School drama department presents a dramatization of Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning tale; $7, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-6290. EMMA HILL AND HER GENTLEMEN CALLERS: The Portland-based folk singer performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

Embracing technology

FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend and the Old Mill District; free; 5-9 p.m.; throughout Bend. “TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD”: The Bend High School drama department presents a dramatization of Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning tale; $7, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-6290. SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL WINTER CONCERT SERIES: Featuring a performance by Tom Russell; $15, $10 students in advance, $20, $12 students at the door; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-4979 or www.sistersfolk festival.org. “TETRO”: A screening of the 2009 R-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541475-3351 or www.jcld.org. BOB MARLEY CELEBRATION & TRIBUTE SHOW: Featuring performances of Marley songs by Sashamon, Chronicle, Alcyon Massive and Escort Service Band; ages 21 and older; $7 plus fees in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; The Annex, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541788-2989 or www.actiondeniro productions.com. HILLSTOMP: Portland-based junkyard blues duo performs; ticket prices to be announced; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

REDMOND CINEMAS

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6

THE FIGHTER (R) 1:45, 5, 8, 10:35

2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

THE GREEN HORNET 3-D (PG-13) 12:20, 1:25, 3:40, 4:45, 6:35, 7:40, 9:30, 10:30

TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:25, 9:15

1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

YOGI BEAR 3-D (PG) 12:15, 4:20, 6:40

THE DILEMMA (PG-13) 4, 6:30 THE FIGHTER (R) 6:45 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 3:30, 6 SEASON OF THE WITCH (PG-13) 4:30 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 3:45, 6:15

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16

EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes.

GULLIVER’S TRAVELS 3-D (PG) 9:25

EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 12:05, 3:25, 6:55 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 12:40, 3:20, 6:20, 9:20 THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: LA FANCIULLA DEL WEST (no MPAA rating) 6:30

680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

NO STRINGS ATTACHED (R) 1:30, 4:25, 7:30, 10:05

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) 1, 3:50, 7:15, 9:50 COUNTRY STRONG (PG-13) 1:10, 4:05, 7, 9:45

SEASON OF THE WITCH (PG-13) 10:15 TANGLED (PG) 1:15, 4, 6:45, 9:35 THE TOURIST (PG-13) 1:50, 4:50, 7:55, 10:25

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) DUE DATE (R) 6 MEGAMIND (PG) 3 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG-13) 9

New York Times News Service

720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

Feb. 4

TRON: LEGACY 3-D (PG) Noon, 3:15, 6:15, 9:10

THE GREEN HORNET (PG-13) 12:45, 4:10, 7:10, 10

By Bruce Feiler

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE

FRIDAY

THE DILEMMA (PG-13) 12:55, 4:55, 7:45, 10:20

BLACK SWAN (R) 2:20, 4:50, 7:15 THE FIGHTER (R) 2:05, 4:35, 7:05 I LOVE YOU PHILLIP MORRIS (R) 2:15, 4:30, 7:30 THE KING’S SPEECH (R) 2, 4:40, 7:20 MADE IN DAGENHAM (R) 2:10, 4:45, 7:10 THE WAY BACK (PG-13) 2:30, 7

What ABC’s ‘Modern Family’ says about modern families LOS ANGELES — In his 1964 book “Understanding Media,” Marshall McLuhan helped define the modern age with his phrase, “The medium is the message.” Were he here nearly 50 years later, the critic would hardly be surprised to discover that in the most talked-about sitcom of the moment, the medium has become the punch line. Deep in the canyons of Studio 5 several weeks ago, the cast of ABC’s hit series “Modern Family” was busy filming an episode. As crew members huddled around the monitors, Cam, the portly, gay Dad portrayed by Eric Stonestreet, learned some bad news. His partner, Mitchell, had failed to mail out invitations to a fundraiser in their home that night. Cam had ordered the crab cakes and rented the harps, but he had no guests. “Get me Mitchell!” Cam shouted to his nephew, Luke. What followed was a hightech version of “Who’s on First?” Luke doesn’t know Mitchell’s number. Cam grabs the phone and presses speed dial. Mitchell lets the call go to voice mail. Luke doesn’t know how to press redial. Cam snatches the receiver and gets twisted in his headset. We’ve had five back-and-forths in 10 seconds and still nobody has managed to communicate. Shakespeare used mistaken identities to flummox his lovers. “Modern Family” uses dropped Skype connections. In the last two years, “Modern Family” has ridden timely premises like this to surging viewership and six Emmys, including outstanding comedy series. In a rare concurrence, the darling of the critics is one of the highest rated comedies on television, and is the 20th rated show overall this season. This unusual success for a family comedy raises questions: What aspects of contemporary life has it tapped into? What does “Modern Family” say about modern families? From the beginning, the creators Steve Levitan and Christopher Lloyd conceived their show around a newfangled family tree. When the series went on the air in 2009, most of the buzz centered on Mitchell and Cam, who occasionally were shown together in bed, cracked jokes at their own expense, and flaunted every stereotype. But they never kissed, and a fan-generated backlash erupted, then died down last fall after an innocuous smooch. “While I appreciated that fans care about our characters,” Stonestreet said, “I never understood why people put their focus on ‘Modern Family,’ a show that introduced a loving, grounded gay couple on television who adopted a baby, and accused it of being homophobic.”

M T For Wednesday, Jan. 26

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

BLACK SWAN (R) 4:45, 7 THE FIGHTER (R) 4:15, 6:45 GREEN HORNET (PG-13) 4:30, 7 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 4:15, 6:45

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

GULLIVER’S TRAVELS (PG) 7

But all the attention on Mitch and Cam’s lip life overshadowed deeper strands that make the show even more probative of contemporary culture. For starters, the characters in “Modern Family” are so immersed in technology that nearly every scene is refracted through a digital funhouse: an iPad screen, a cell phone camera,

“Modern Family” When: 9 p.m. Wednesdays Where: ABC

a baby monitor, a YouTube video. Characters spend half their time glancing past one another rather than communicating directly. “We used to talk about how cell phones killed the sitcom because no one ever goes to anyone’s house anymore,” said Abraham Higginbotham, a writer on the show. “You don’t have to walk into Rachel and Ross’ house, because you can call and say, ‘Hey, what’s up?’ We embrace technology so it’s part of the story.” As Ty Burrell, who plays the gadget-obsessed Phil, said: “I was just watching the Fran Lebowitz documentary ‘Public Speaking,’ and she had this basic idea that there is no institution other than media. And I had this little flash of Phil — and me — that we are parsing our personality together externally from how people perceive us.”

‘Mockumentary’ style The refraction of technology is part of a larger element: the bifurcation of how people act. “Modern Family” is the first family show to be filmed as a “mockumentary,” an approach its creators trace to Woody Allen’s “Take the Money and Run,” but which is better known from “The Office.” Originally “Modern Family” centered on a Dutch filmmaker who had been an exchange student with the Pritchetts in high school. The writers later dropped the character, but two crucial elements remain. First, characters in the middle of a scene will often glance at the camera, a disconcerting aside that has the effect of making the viewer feel both like a part of the family and an observer. Second, the characters in “Modern Family” all offer confessional interviews directly to an unidentified cameraperson. Jay may say he pretends to love his daughter’s blueberry pie, but he really hates it. As Lloyd said: “The interviews are a chance to have characters more honestly express things than they might openly do in a scene with someone. So we get a laugh from the contrast between what they’re really feeling and what they were willing to admit they were feeling in the scene.” “Modern Family” is surely the first family comedy that incorporates its own hashtag of simultaneous self-analysis directly into the storyline. But for all these technological hoo-has, the feature of the show that seems most strikingly contemporary is that it goes for the heart instead of the jugular. In nearly every 22-minute episode, the music swells in the 19th minute, any conflict gets resolved, and a tidy embrace ensues. While “Seinfeld” famously insisted on “no hugging, no learning,” “Modern Family” is built around the opposite idea: No problem is too big it can’t be swept under a hug. As Levitan summarized his show’s philosophy, “Don’t be afraid of a hug, but make sure you earn it.”


E4 Wednesday, January 26, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, January 26, 2011 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQ U ELINE BI GA R

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Wednesday, Jan. 26, 2011: This year, you take a stronger stand within the community and/or in your professional life. Often, challenges arise out of the blue. Your conventional style of detaching could be more difficult. Perhaps staying in the here and now is more important. Travel and foreigners play a strong role in 2011. If you are single, opt for a new type, and you are likely to experience success in relating. If you are attached, combine your efforts together on a project or goal. Closeness will become a given. SCORPIO thinks of you as a leader. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Consider the pros and cons of leaping over negativity, misinformation and someone’s attitude. Will it be worth the energy? Sometimes letting others sit might be more productive. Take a walk during a break in order to reduce stress. Tonight: Time to visit and share. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH Defer to others, as they are likely to throw a hissy fit if you don’t. A boss is very assertive. You might not be able to change the state of affairs. Detach, and you will gain yet another perspective. Run with it. Tonight: If any invitation appeals to you, say “yes.” GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Just when you feel as if you are soaring, someone or some situation pulls you back down to earth. A partner, however, remains

supportive. Know that you will have to push others very hard in order to achieve what you want. You also can wait. Tonight: Choose a stress-buster. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Your imagination let loose is a delight, not only to you but to everyone. Who says you need to hold back? A partner will revise his or her thinking because of you. Don’t push an older family member right now. He or she remains testy. Tonight: Find your favorite person, and share your favorite pastime. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH Your desire to eliminate tension and stress could be frustrated. Buck trends; investigate a shortcut. Just don’t say “no.” Be an investigator. Be willing to root out the real story or problem. Only then can you resolve the issue. Tonight: Willingly reiterate a conversation. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH You might opt to put in more overtime and/or get a second job. You might want to review your finances with an eye to the fact that in the past year, you never felt like you had enough. This feeling reminds you to be thrifty. Tonight: Hang out with a friend. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Pressure builds, as you deem that you might need to do more. Build financial security through real estate investments. Build emotional security through bonding more strongly with family and loved ones. Know who you can count on. Tonight: Treat yourself on the way home. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Others seek you out. You

could be flattered or annoyed. Your perspective determines your reaction. Rethink some of your knee-jerk feelings. You have more control than you realize. Communication needs to be in-depth. Tonight: As you like. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Keep your thoughts to yourself. Not only might it be somewhat easier, but also you could change your perspective given time and observation. Fatigue marks your interpersonal reactions. Your instincts guide you with funds. Tonight: Vanish while you can. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Zero in on what you want. Take control of a professional matter, if you can. Otherwise, you might have more problems. You might be holding up a mirror, as on some level you feel out of sync. Be more in touch with your needs. Tonight: Say “no” to more work and “yes” to meeting a friend. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Someone you look up to could be more provocative than you realize. You wonder what you are doing and could become frustrated. Deal with anger through detachment. Many layers of hurt exist under the anger. Resolve them first. Tonight: Working late. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH Reach out for someone at a distance whom you care about. You might wonder what is going on behind the scenes — a partner or associate seems a bit withdrawn or frothy. A meeting draws out some hard feelings. Tonight: Let your mind wander. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

E6 Wednesday, January 26, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Pods Continued from E1 “There are people out there who love these brewing methods,” said Ted Stachura, assistant editor of the single-focus, Consumer Reports-style website Coffeereview.com. “The automatic drip machine has been king of American coffee at home since the ’70s when it was introduced,” Stachura said. “And one of the reasons people like it is it’s really convenient. Machines like these take it a step further. You don’t even have to deal with the grounds.”

On the market Single-serving machines have been available since the 1990s. But sales have taken off in the American market only within the last five years. According to preliminary numbers from the Beverage Marketing Corp., which conducts national market research, the number of pods sold in 2010 leapt 50 percent over 2009 sales. Beverage Marketing Corp. Managing Director Gary Hemphill said he anticipates continued growth, although at a slower rate, in 2011. The convenience for households with just one or two people, as well as the machine’s “freshness perception,” has driven the growth, he said. Right now, because the product is still an unknown to many, educating the public is one of the key goals of single-serve machine manufacturers. Westfall said she first became interested in buying one when she saw a demonstration at a Willamette Valley Macy’s. And recently in Bend’s Bed Bath & Beyond, two televisions played loop videos describing the machine’s use as part of a 20foot display down a main aisle of the store. Operation is relatively simple: Users pour the water into a container in the machine. They take a pod, which are different based on the machine brand, and insert it into a slot. They then select size of coffee desired on the machine’s digital readout, pull the handle down, and wait less than a minute as the brew streams into a mug. Each pod is designed to be used only once, although Westfall said she uses hers twice and is pleased with the results. And, aside from coffee, consumers can also choose pods for hot chocolates, ciders and teas. There are a variety of singleserve manufacturers, with some machines focusing on espresso coffees, others on drip and a few that offer both. The largest force in single-serve

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

To make a single cup in less than a minute, users add water, insert a single-use coffee pod and pull down the handle on this Keurig machine. coffee in the U.S. is Keurig, which now has 71 percent of the market, Bloomberg reported in January. Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, which owns Keurig, also originated the K-Cup pods. They fit the Keurig single-serve machines as well as those made by companies like Cuisinart and Mr. Coffee. All three of these brands are available at Bend-area stores. Other machines require different pods. Tassimo, also available in Bend, takes T Discs. The brand offers machines that produce both drip and espressostyle coffees. Senseo, a brand owned by Sara Lee, has its own pods as well. Its Supreme 7832 machine ranked highest among 12 machines tested by Consumer Reports magazine. But local consumers must buy a Senseo online, and pod availability in Central Oregon is limited. Nespresso, which dominates the European pod market, focuses on espresso. It isn’t available in Bend, but the machines and pods can be found online at sites like Amazon.com.

There are yet other machine manufacturers. While there is no central website that describes them all, searching Amazon.com is a good place to start getting a feel for the variety. Machine price tags range from $79.99 on sale to $199 for topof-the-line models, with the exception of high-end Nespresso models. Hemphill doesn’t expect machine prices to go higher than that. “The goal is to get the machine into the household,” he said. “For the company, the pods are the key to success.”

In the cup Pods mean profit for two reasons. One is that the machine provides a built-in payoff: Keurig machines, for instance, only take K-Cups. The other is that a cup of coffee is more expensive with a single-serve machine. One cup can range from 44 cents to 83 cents with a K-Cup single-serve

machine. A cup of coffee from a bag of Tully’s grounds, for instance, costs 28 cents (see “Cost of a cup”). A part can be purchased for some single-serve machines, like those that take K-Cups, which allows drinkers to insert their own grounds. They come sold separately for about $17.99 at local stores. Aside from cost, there are other concerns about whether single-serve machines are the best way to get a cup of coffee. Some may worry about creating more waste with the pods. A few pods, like Senseo’s, are made of paper and therefore biodegradable and compostable. Other brands, like Keurig, are now working on their own ecofriendly pods. Another aspect up for debate is the quality of the coffee from a single-serve maker. In its review, Consumer Reports said the single-serve machines “rarely match the flavor and brew performance” of automatic drip makers. David Beach, co-owner of Backporch Coffee in Bend, sees more potential in the singleserve espresso makers. “Espresso is actually hard to do at home and pull off well,” he said. “So I could see wanting the pods.” But as for single-serve drip machines, Beach called the resulting brew “generic.” “I think there are better ways to make a cup of coffee at home,” he said, referring to single-serve french presses, pour-over coffee drips, and AeroPresses, a syringe-like device. Stachura, of Coffeereview .com, said the span from when the coffee goes into the pod to consumption is long enough that it will affect quality. “The best ones are not going to be as good as whole-bean coffees,” he said. “They’re going to be very good, but not the same.” He also identified pod variety as a limiting factor. Those wanting to try beans from, say, Papua New Guinea, may be out of luck. Still, Keurig last week listed 186 different kinds of K-Cups on its website. Tassimo listed 25 different T Discs. For some consumers, however, these caveats don’t outweigh the machines’ convenience. While Coffeeview.com often publishes reports with titles like “Quiet Distinction: Coffees of Guatemala” and “Fourteen Covers of a Classic Tune: Mocha-Java Blends,” in April it will put out a report on the best pod machines. “We’re doing the article because readers contacted us and want to know,” Stachura said.

Totes Continued from E1 Among them is the No. 215 tote from the Artifact Bag Co. It is made of waxed canvas, rolls down at the top like a paper bag, and fastens with leather straps and copper rivets. It’s a simple, elegant design. “My inspiration literally came from the paper sack that I used to carry my lunch in, in junior high,” said Chris Hughes, who runs his oneman operation from Omaha, Neb. “I just wanted something that had that classic line but would be reusable.” The impetus behind its creation, Hughes said, was practical: he had a new job and needed something to hold his lunch. “A lot of time, innovation is spawned from frustration,” he said. “I was seeing really ugly stuff out there, and I didn’t want to carry my lunch in it.” Hughes began selling the $45 lunch bags on Etsy.com last February, as part of a bigger collection of handmade bags. Soon after he started his own website in November (shop.artifactbags.com), No. 215 got noticed by several popular sites as a must-have. Since then, he’s had to quit his day job to keep up with demand. At the higher end, the designer Amber Pollard makes lunch totes that blend the look of a traditional hand and shoulder bag with the lunch tote. The Alfresco, for example, has a sleek, minimalist design, with the appearance of a regular handbag. The “vegan-friendly” exterior, as it’s described, is hemp fabric with faux leather trim. Inside, it has a built-in insulated lunch sack and a mesh

Dana Damewood via New York Times News Service

The No. 215 bag ($45) from Artifact Bag Co., is modeled on the classic brown paper lunch bag. ice pack pouch and beverage holder. Another, the suede Cantina, has many of the same basic lunch-friendly features, but also doubles as a multipurpose shoulder bag. They come with a higher price tag. The Alfresco regularly costs $235; the Cantina, $305. Ariane Hundt, a nutritionist and personal trainer from New York, said she often carries her lunch. She bought her tote from Built, a New York-based company that makes its bags from neoprene, which is stretchable and machine-washable. Built’s durable bags are inexpensive (hers was $25). “I prefer to invest in lasting quality than spending money on things that get thrown away after a few uses,” she said. “Plus, it’s visually appealing and cute.”

Self Referrals Welcome

541-706-6900

Heidi Hagemeier can be reached at 541-617-7828 or at hhagemeier@bendbulletin.com.

Baby & Pet Safe!

Apps

Guard mailbox as your financial forms arrive By Pamela Yip The Dallas Morning News

DALLAS — You should always guard your mail, but you need to be especially vigilant at this time of year. That’s because January is when you start receiving sensitive personal documents, such as yearend credit card summaries, your W-2 and 1099 income tax forms, and brokerage statements. Those have critical information, such as your full name, address, Social Security number and account numbers that identity thieves treasure. “People don’t understand that ‘walkers’ follow mail carriers and look through your mail for any bonanza they can find,” said Linda Foley, chairman of the Identity Theft Resource Center, a nonprofit organization in San Diego. “Mail thieves know the prime time is between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. Others take advantage of the dark of night and/or consumers’ tendencies of not checking mailboxes each day.” Some thieves even open the

Continued from E1 Available for: iPhone, iPod Touch or the iPad Cost: Free

envelopes, copy the documents, then reseal your mail and place it back in your mailbox a day later, she said. “It is one of those times of the year when everyone should be on the lookout, and if you aren’t receiving the appropriate amount of documentation you’re expecting, you need to act quickly,” said U.S. Postal Inspector Amanda McMurrey. Keep a monthly calendar of when items arrive and if they seem delayed, call the sender to find out why. Then contact the post office. The toll-free number for the U.S. Postal Service is 1-800-275-8777. In a worst-case scenario, someone may have submitted a change-of-address form without your knowledge to have your mail forwarded to them. To protect consumers, the Postal Service will automatically send letters to your old address and new address “to verify that indeed that was a legitimate change-of-address order,” McMurrey said.

Complete Auto Repair Diesel or Automotive problems?

Google Shopper This app allows you to stand in a store and find out if the product you want is available elsewhere — in a store or online — for less. Sure, we’ve talked about shopping apps like this in the past, but this one is a bit different, because it not only allows you to search by scanning the item’s bar code, but you can also use your voice. Available for: Android Cost: Free

ShopKick This app is like FourSquare combined with a scavenger hunt. Numerous high-profile technology blogs and online tech magazines have called it one to watch in 2011. Scan items and earn points that can be redeemed for prizes, gift certificates or charitable donations. Available for: Android, iPhone Cost: Free

el t es alis i D ci e Sp

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RedLaser This operates the way a lot of websites do by finding the best price on a particular item — but this one will do it while you are standing in the store. Just scan the bar code, and the RedLaser app will look up the product and give you a price comparison across the web. Available for: iPhone, Android Cost: Free

ShopSavvy Compare prices from 20,000 retailers by scanning the item’s bar code with the camera feature on your phone. Need a little reassurance about your buying decision? The app also provides reviews. Available for: iPhone, Android Cost: Free

Our Hot Carbonating Truck Mount Extraction cleans deep! We use one-fifth the amount of water compared to steam cleaners so carpet dries in 1 to 2 hours. Our cleaner, The Natural®, is green certified, non-toxic, so it’s safe for your family and pets who are allergy sensitive! Leaves no sticky residue! Using Chem-Dry resists re-soiling so your carpet fibers stay cleaner, longer! Don’t forget your area rugs & upholstery too!

VACANT 40% “Move In, Move Out” Discount and other Specials! Call for details on Tile & Stone Cleaning Too!!!

Chem-Dry of Bend Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

20% 0FF Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning 541-388-7374 Bend • 541-923-3347 Redmond Offer valid with coupon only. Excluding RVs & stairs. Not valid with other offers. Minimums apply. Payment due at time of service. Expires: Feb. 28, 2011.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, January 26, 2011 F1

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208

Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

AKC Yellow Labradors 3 Males For more info please visit us at www.coldcreekfarms.com 541-942-1059 Aussie Mini Litter, (4), shots, tails done, in-home raised, dbl reg. Ready now! $500. 541-409-0253, Redmond AUSSIE PUPPIES, mini and toy, $250, 1 male/1 female left. 1st shots, tails docked. Ready to go! 541-420-9694.

246

263

267

Tools

Fuel and Wood

Mossberg 12g Model #835 pump, camo’d, 28” barrel, 5 + 1, $200. 541-647-8931

SEARS Craftsman 10” table saw, 3 HP, saw with legs, cast iron table extensions, extra blades, $485 OBO. 541-383-7150.

WINTER SPECIAL - Dry Seasoned Lodgepole Pine, guaranteed cords. Split delivered, stacked. Prompt delivery! $175/cord. 541-350-3393

Remington 870, with rifle slug barrel, $300. 541-610-3287.

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269

Building Materials

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Toy/Mini Aussie pups, $450 +. High quality. Shots, vet, tails, etc. Call 541-475-1166

210

Furniture & Appliances !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

Australian Cattle Dogs, 4 males, 3 reds, 1 blue, 541-279-4133. Basset Hound puppies, purebred, party and lemon colored $400. 541.550.6470

Bengal mix cat, Exotic, 2 years old. To approved home only. Neutered, all shots, harness trained. Very loving. $100. 541-548-0747

Chihuahua/Poodle Pups, 9 weeks, 1st shot, $120 Cash, Call 541-678-7599.

FREE 4-yr-old female orange & white spayed tabby cat, small in size. Moving, must find good home. 541-548-2797.

POODLE Pups, AKC Toy Black/white, chocolate & other colors, so loveing, 541-475-3889

Free companion cats for seniors! Altered, shots, ID chip, more. We'll always take back for any reason. Visit Thurs/ Sat/Sun 1-4 PM, other days by appt. 65480 78th St Bend. 541-389-8420 541-598-5488 visit www.craftcats.org

Poodle, Toy, Male, 10 mo., parti colored, black & white, $300, 541-480-8372.

German Shorhair Pointers 3 male pups, 4 mos old, $400 each. 1 Female solid liver, 6 mos, $600. 1 Female liver & white, 8 mos, $800. 1 male, 4 yrs, $800. All shots/wormed. 541-923-8377 541-419-6638

SHIH-POOs 2 adorable males, family raised, don’t miss your chance to own one of the best! Price Reduced to $200 without shots. 541-744-1804

Golden Retriever Purebred Puppies ready on Valentines Day. $600. Please call Kristi at 541-280-3278.

Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.wordpress.com/

Ruger Ranch Rifle Mini-14. Hogue stock. Tasco red/ green dot scope. Sling. 3 mags. 2 boxes ammo. $625. 541-317-0730 Ruger SP101 357 grey SS, $375 S&W 329 lightweight 44, $700 Kimber 45 Classic SS, $525. 541-604-0380 Savage 110 Rifle - 25-06, good shape w/ Bushnell 3 x 9 $350 OBO - (541) 610-8518

Taurus revolver, model number M850-2 BL, .38 special, GENERATE SOME excitement in $320 OBO. 541-325-1692 your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to Wanted: Collector seeks high advertise in classified! quality fishing items. Call 385-5809. 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746 LOVESEAT, blue fabric, great shape, only $50. See on Winchester Model 54, Bolt Action, .270, circa 1920’s, $400, craigslist. 541-419-5060 please call 541-317-0116.

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call

541-598-4643. The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Gypsy is a rescued kitten, born with deformed back legs, but plays & gets around okay does not know any different. Chihuahua Pups, Apple The legs are now in the way. Head, well bred, small, $200 We tried to find appropriate Two couches: ivory leather, gray upholstered; king bed & up. 541-420-4825. prosthetic legs & a veteriframe and mattress set; narian who could attach Chihuahuas (2), Long hair, misc. 541-548-2797. them, but surgery can no shots & wormed, $250, longer wait. We are seeking a 541-977-0034. 212 vet with a big heart who Antiques & would donate time & expertise for this surgery or give a Collectibles substantial discount, & sponsors to help with associated Dropleaf table w/china cabinet, costs of surgery. After reRosewood bedroom set, covery, Gypsy will need a Friendly Village dishes, vinspecial, caring forever home. tage clothing/jewelry, more, Please contact nonprofit, for best offer. 541-480-9677 all-volunteer Cat Rescue, Adoption & Foster Team, The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The 389-8420 or 598-5488 if you Bulletin newspaper onto The Cockatiel, grey in color, $40, can help. PO Box 6441, Bend Bulletin Internet website. please call 541-382-8814 for 97708, www.craftcats.org. more info. Kittens & cats for adoption! Thurs, Sat & Sun 1-4, other English Bulldogs AKC, 2 males days by appt. Foster home left! Home raised, excellent also has small kittens, health, $1300. 541-290-0026 240 541-815-7278 to visit. AlCrafts and Hobbies Female Lab/Pitbull, 10 weeks tered, shots, ID chip, more. old, ready for a good home. Support your local no-kill, Alpaca Yarn, various colors/ Call 541-848-0110. all-volunteer rescue group. blends/sparkle. 175yds/skein 65480 78th St, Bend, $7.50-8.50 ea. 541-385-4989 Foster Kitten, 3 1/2 mo. old, 541-389-8420 541-598-5488 spayed female, gray and visit www.craftcats.org 242 white. $40. 541-548-5516. Lab Pups A K C , 6 Chocolate, Exercise Equipment 1 yellow, $650; written guarantee hips & eyes. Tidewater Retrievers, 541-266-9894 Pro-From 755 Crosstrainer Treadmill, excellent condiLAB PUPS AKC, titled parents, tion. Used maybe 10X. FC/AFC, Blackwater Rudy is Folds up and packs away. grand sire. Deep pedigreed $175 CASH, you pick up. performance/titles, OFA hips Awbrey Butte area. & elbows. 541-771-2330 Call 541-633-7307. www.royalflushretrievers.com Labradoodles, Australian 246 Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com Guns & Hunting Maremma Guard Dog pups, purebred, great dogs, $300 each, 541-546-6171.

and Fishing 12 g Charles Daily pump, synthetic stock, 18” barrel, like new, $200. 541-647-8931 12g Mossberg 500A tactical pistol grip, $350/trade. Kimber 1911 S/S custom, 45 ACP $1125. 541-647-8931 12g Mossberg Westernfield pump, 26” barrel, wood stock, $200. 541-647-8931 9mm Taurus compact stainless w/3 mags, ammo, access. $375/trade. 541-647-8931 A

O r e g o n

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Sphynx hairless cat, adult Fem, free to quiet, adult-only home. 360-936-9226

Chihuahua pups (2), Adorable, ready for their forever homes, $250 1st shots 541-280-1840

B e n d

208

Siamese Kittens (4) purebred, M/F, Seal Point, $125 each. 541-318-3396.

200

A v e . ,

Pets and Supplies Shih Tzu pups, gold & white, gold w/ black mask, & black, $385-$750, 541-788-0090

ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

C h a n d l e r

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Collector Pays Ca$h, hand guns, rifles, etc., 541-475-4275,503-781-8812

Shih Tsu Pups, 2 males, 1 black/white, 1 white/brindle, avail. 2/1, $350,541-280-2538

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Shih Tzu Puppy - 16 wks Red/Black male, $275 OBO (360) 936-9226 Redmond

GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

255

Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

260

Misc. Items BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks! Ad must include price of item

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

263

Tools CRAFTSMAN 3500 watt generator, $300. 541-317-9864 Paint sprayer - Graco 695, new seals, good unit, $800. KNAACK job-site tool box 48x30, 32" deep $150. Call 541-480-3110

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

266

Heating and Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves. PELLET STOVE: Heats 1200 Sq Ft. Good Condition, Ind.controls. $300. 541 480 4185

267

Fuel and Wood

Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers. Thank you.

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT dry lodgepole, $160 for 1 cord or $300 for 2. Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663 SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

270

Lost and Found CAR KEYS found in Drake Park, near west end of bridge on 1/21. Call 541-382-3322.

Found Australian Shepherd cross? Young fem. Old Hwy 20 East of Bend, W of Horse Ridge Trail. 541-233-8011 FOUND Electronic Car Key at Wanoga Snow Park, Sat., 1/22. Call 541-788-4069 FOUND: Fishing Gear, Cline Falls on Thurs, 1/20. Call to identify. 937-917-6264 FOUND: Nikon camera, Cool Pix E4300. Call to identity 541-385-3313. In Reply to Lost fishing equip. at Cline park on Thurs. 1/20. I saw ad in Sun. paper but the number listed is out of service. My # is 541-706-9361. Please call, will identify.

LOST WEDDING RING dropped at Cascade Village mall, 3rd & Revere or Butler Mkt & Boyd Acres. Size 6 white gold ring with band hollowed out on inside rim, 1 diamond a bit smaller than a karat flanked by strips of yellow gold. If found call 541-306-1002 REWARD REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

286

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit

Dry Seasoned Red Fir $185 per cord, split and delivered, Please Call 541-977-2040.

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE!

WILL BUY FIREWOOD By the cord or by the load. Call 541-771-8534

KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

BEND’S HOMELESS NEED OUR HELP The cold weather is upon us and sadly there are still over 2,000 folks in our community without permanent shelter, living in cars, makeshift camps, getting by as best they can. The following items are badly needed to help them get through the winter:

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

d CAMPING GEAR of any sort: d

292

Used tents, sleeping bags, tarps, blankets.

Sales Other Areas

d WARM CLOTHING d Rain Gear, Boots Please drop off your donations at the BEND COMMUNITY CENTER 1036 NE 5th St., Bend (312-2069) For special pick-ups, call Ken Boyer 389-3296 or Don Auxier, 383-0448 PLEASE HELP. YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

Llamas/Exotic Animals

300 325

Hay, Grain and Feed Bluegrass Straw mid-size 3x3, $25/bale; Volume discounts; delivery available. Please call 541-480-8648 for more info. Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

341

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

Sydney, 10 yr male Umbrella Cockatoo, needs new home, all equip included. Nice bird, talks. $499.99 to approved non-smoking home only . Call Stephanie at 541-383-2084.

358

Farmers Column 10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1461 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Lost orange tabby, yellow eyes, W. Hills area Jan 11. Answers to Libby. 541-389-7736

DRY JUNIPER FIREWOOD $175 per cord, split. Immediate delivery available. Call 541-408-6193

SPLIT, DRY LODGEPOLE DELIVERY INCLUDED! $175/CORD. Call for half-cord prices! Leave message, 541-923-6987

347

Farm Market

LOST Dog, Lhaso Mix, white, female, wearing scarf, Ash Rd, Lapine Jan 23. Missed dearly, and needs meds. 541-810-1955; 541-892-3673

Sales Northeast Bend

Lodgepole scraps in Powell Butte, very short, solid, up to 16” & punky. Fill your pickup for $15. 541-420-3906

9 7 7 0 2

DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

375

Meat & Animal Processing Angus Beef, 1/2 or whole,

WANTED: Horse or utility trailers for consignment or purchase. KMR Trailer Sales, 541-389-7857 www.kigers.com

grain fed, no hormones $3.10/lb., hanging weight, cut & wrap included, please call 541-383-2523. Butcher Lambs, Suffolk, 6-8 mos., $1.12 per pound, live weight, please call 541-934-2056.


F2 Wednesday, January 26, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Sales

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Employment

400 421

Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin 454

Looking for Employment Caregiver/Housekeeper position wanted, 15 yrs. exp.,exc. skills & refs, 541-977-2450

476

Employment Opportunities Account coordinator

Temporary Circulation Account Coordinator Temporary full-time position open in the Circulation department for a Circulation Account coordinator. Main responsibilities include data entry of new credit card or bank draft information on subscribers accounts. Processes all subscriber Auto Renew payments and maintains accurate spreadsheets for business office. Responsible for tracking and ordering Circulation office supplies. Performs monthly billing steps for several of our newspapers and acts as back up to the Customer Service rep. and billing staff. Assists with data entry of daily draw projections and returns and printing associated reports. Applicants must have excellent interpersonal skills and strong attention to detail. Must be able to work with others in a supportive team setting. Ideal candidate will have computer experience, basic accounting knowledge, proficient in data entry and strong communication and organizational skills. Please submit resumes to: The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 or by e-mail: ahusted@bendbulletin.com

Daytime Inside Sales

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

HAIRSTYLIST - Shag Salon has part-time hair station for lease. Call 541-617-7007 or 541-815-0819. Logging - Yarder Crew, Choker Setter, Rigging Slinger, Hook Tender. Exp. & refs req. Central OR. positions. 541-409-1337 Medical Office Manager for 3 physicians, busy practice. HR, Billing, AR management. Cascade Internal Medicine, 541-318-0124.

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state.

Will hire two sales people to work from the Bend Bulletin newspaper office for the Newspaper in Education sales campaign. This is soft, relaxed business to business sales. We offer a short paid training program. The average salesperson earns $400 to $700 per week, for a 27 hour work week. The dress code is very relaxed and casual. We prefer a background in "business to business" selling. This is not ad or subscription sales, however if you have previous experience in advertising sales, I will give you priority consideration. I'm looking for motivated, energetic, articulate people, with excellent communication skills. Call Melanie at 541-383-0399. Independent Contractor

Sales Established 20-year company seeking traveling sales rep. Gone Monday Friday. Company average pays $910/week. Call 800-225-6368, ext. 333. www.brechtpacific.com

We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386 SALES Avon Representatives needed. Choose your hours, your income. Call Patty, Independent Sales Representative 541-330-1836

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

Semiconductor Production Associates Looking for an exciting new job? Microsemi is looking for some new associates to work in our semiconductor area. We have openings on night shift (11 PM - 7 AM). We are seeking individuals who have had relevant job experience although not necessarily in the semiconductor industry. The job skills sought include microscope inspection, precision measurement, complex process equipment set-up and operation and accurate documentation of work performed. Familiarity with basic electronics, chemicals and cleanroom protocol is a plus. All candidates must have a good work history, good attendance, good hand-eye coordination and a willingness to learn new skills. Must be able to read and understand instructions. Please submit a resume to cfischer@microsemi.com or apply in person to 405 SW Columbia St. Bend, OR. EOE

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

DRIVER - Motivated, self-directed Independent Operator wanted for non-emergency medical transportation (wheelchair & ambulatory). Contracted position, hours vary, $600-$900/week. Already approved drivers preferred. Please send resume to wapatoshores@gmail.com or 1-866-486-6258.

Front Desk - position for WorldMark/Eagle Crest. Part-time. Strong hospitality exp. desired. Must be flexible, a GO GETTER, and must be willing to work weekends and evenings. Drug Free Workplace. Please apply at Eagle Crest, 1522 Cline Falls Rd. Redmond (3rd floor of Hotel)

600 604

Storage Rentals Secure 10x20 Storage, in SE Bend, insulated, 24-hr access, $95/month, Call Rob, 541-410-4255. 630

Rooms for Rent Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Budget Inn, 1300 S. Hwy 97, Royal 541-389-1448; & Gateway Motel, 475 SE 3rd St., 541-382-5631, Furnished Rooms: 5 days/$150+tax

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Room in CRR, $200/mo. incl. utils, rent reduction for housekeeping duties, small trained pet ok, 541-548-6635

Finance & Business

500 507

Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space 634

642

654

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

631

$99 MOVES YOU IN !!!

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments

Houses for Rent SE Bend

Condo / Townhomes For Rent Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

632

Apt./Multiplex General The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 1 & 2 bdrms Available starting at $575. Reserve Now! Limited Availability.

528

Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc. Lovely 2 bdrm, private patio, small, quiet complex, W/S/G paid, no smoking, $525+ dep, 1000 NE Butler Mkt. Rd. Call 541-633-7533.

541-330-0719

River Views! 2 bdrm., 1½ bath, W/D hook-up. W/S/G paid, $650/mo. $600 dep. small pets allowed. 930 NW Carlon, 541-280-7188.

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928.

Across from St. Charles 2 Bedroom duplex, garage, huge fenced yard, RV parking, Pets. $725/mo. 541-480-9200. Avail. Now 2-story townhouse 1407 sq. ft., 2 bdrm, 2.5 bath, garage, all appliances, washer/dryer, WSG paid. No pets/smoking. $750 mo + deposits. 541-389-7734. Beautiful 2 bdrm., 2.5 bath util., garage, gas fireplace, no smoking or pets. $675 1st+last+sec. Please Call 541-382-5570,541-420-0579

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

& Call Today &

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Loans and Mortgages

!! Snowball of a Deal !! $300 off Upstairs Apts. 2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps Lease Options Available Pet Friendly & No App. Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts.

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 2 bedroom, 2 bath deluxe energy-efficient duplexes next to park. Appliances available. single garage. $650-$695 per month. 541-280-7781. ASK ABOUT OUR New Year Special! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, non-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

Call about Our Specials! Studios to 3 bedroom units from $415 to $575 • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735

(541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

Managed by

GSL Properties

Family Housing Clean & attractive 1, 2, & 3 bedroom apartments. Rent based on income.

H La Pine & Prineville H Earn 8-10% interest on well-secured first trust deeds. Private party. 541-815-2986

Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY

•Crest Butte Apartments, 1695 NE Purcell Blvd., Bend. Newly remodeled 1 & 2 bedroom units available. Onsite laundry facilities & new playground. Close to hospital, 5 minutes to downtown & the Old Mill District. Call Krystal @ (541)389-9107. •Ridgemont Apartments, 2210 SW 19th St., Redmond. Accepting applications for 1 & 2 bedroom units in a centrally located area. Call Bobbie @ (541)548-7282. TDD 1-800-545-1833

4 Bdrm., 2 masters, 1 on main, 3 full bath, 3005 sq.ft., dbl. garage, gas fireplace, stainless appl., spa, large loft, $1700/mo., 541-306-4171.

656

Houses for Rent SW Bend 2 bedroom, 2 bath manufactured home in quiet park, handicap ramp, carport, w/s/g paid., $600/mo. $250 deposit. 541-382-8244.

Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

3 Bdrm, 2 bath, cul-de-sac, dbl. garage, no smoking, avail. 2/15, 19800 SW Wetland Ct., $850, 541-389-3594.

648

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

541-385-5809

Alpine Meadows Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

541-322-7253

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885 Tumalo - Country Setting Granny unit. 2 rooms + bath, partial kitchen, $395/mo. Call 541-389-6720, or cell, 541-550-0216.

634

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Rentals

Houses for Rent General The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend

The Bulletin Classifieds 658

Houses for Rent Redmond 3/2 1385 sq. ft., family room, new carpet & paint, nice big yard, dbl. garage w/opener, quiet cul-de-sac. $995 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803 Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809

3 Bdrm, 2 Bath 2000 sq ft The Bulletin Classifieds single story home. Dbl ga- 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1031 sq.ft., rage w/opener, air cond, fenced yard, dbl. garage, fireplace. No smoking/pets. $850/mo., $700 dep., pets 541-388-2250; 541-815-7099 neg., drive by first at 1526 NE 4th St., call 541-280-6235 4 Bdrm 2.5 bath, 1700 sq ft. Call The Bulletin At appls, fenced yd, on culde541-385-5809. sac. No smoking. Pets? 2400 Place Your Ad Or E-Mail NE Jeni Jo Ct., near hospital. $1050. 503-680-9590 At: www.bendbulletin.com Newer 3 Bdrm, 2 bath home for rent in NE Bend. Fireplace, 2 car garage. No smoking, no pets. $790 per month. Lv msg at 541-441-8254

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 2-car garage, Terrebonne, Taking appl., $895 + dep., call Bill at 541-548-5036 or 541-408-2000

3 Bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. deep garage, fresh interior paint, new Pergo, carpeted bdrms. Fully fenced w/deck. 1st & dep., $800. 503-997-7870. Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily 4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room with woodstove, new carpet, pad & paint, single garage w/opener. $895/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 Real Estate For Sale

763

860

875

881

Houses for Rent Redmond

Recreational Homes and Property

Motorcycles And Accessories

Watercraft

Travel Trailers

Adorable duplex in Canyon Rim Village, 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath. all appl., includes gardener. Reduced to $749/mo. 541-408-0877.

700

10 ACRES pines and meadow, power and phone available. good drilled well, zoned for residence. 3 miles east of town of Sprague River, $34,000. Terms: owner. 541-783-2829.

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver

705

Real Estate Services

* Real Estate Agents * A newer 3/2 mfd. home, 1755 * Appraisers * sq.ft., living room, family * Home Inspectors * room, new paint, private .5 Etc. acre lot near Sunriver, $895. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to Need help ixing stuff reach prospective B U Y E R S around the house? AND SELLERS of real esCall A Service Professional tate in Central Oregon. To and ind the help you need. place an ad call 385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

664

Houses for Rent Furnished RIVERFRONT: walls of windows with amazing 180 degree river view with dock, canoe, piano, bikes, covered BBQ, $1250. 541-593-1414

671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq. ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1195. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease 4628 SW 21st St., Redmond - 2250 sq ft office & warehouse. 15¢/sq ft for 1st 6 mos., + $300 cleaning dep. Avail Jan 15. 541-480-9041

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

What are you looking for? You’ll fi nd it in The Bulletin Classifi eds

541-385-5809 Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft 827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Warehouse with Offices in Redmond,6400 sq.ft., zoned M2, overhead crane, plenty of parking, 919 SE Lake Rd., $0.40/sq.ft., 541-420-1772.

693

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 Downtown Redmond Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. $650/mo + utils; $650 security deposit. 425 SW Sixth St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848

personals

NEW & USED HOMES: Lot Models Delivered & Set Up Start at $29,900, www.JandMHomes.com 541-350-1782 Suntree, 3 bdrm,2 bath, w/car port & shed.$19,900. Suntree, 4 bdrm, 2 bath,w/carport & shed, $25,750, 541-350-1782 www.JAndMHomes.com

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE Your Credit Is All real estate advertising in Approved this newspaper is subject to For Bank Foreclosures! the Fair Housing Act which www.JAndMHomes.com makes it illegal to advertise 541-350-1782 "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not 850 knowingly accept any adverSnowmobiles tising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll Cargo Plus Snowmobile/ ATV Trailer 1996, Single axel w/ free telephone number for spare,rear/side ramps, $650, the hearing impaired is Dave, 541-593-2247, 8-5. 1-800-927-9275.

Boats & RV’s

800

***

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

750

700 Triple, 1996 600, Tilt Trailer, front off-load, covers for snowmobiles, clean & exc. cond., package price, $3800, 541-420-1772.

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

JUNK BE GONE

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874. 388-7605, 410-6945

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Painting, Wall Covering

Domestic Services

MARTIN JAMES

I Do Professional House cleaning: 25 yrs. exp., exc refs., Senior discounts! 541-420-0366

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Drywall

Snow Removal

Complete Drywall Services Remodels & Repairs No Job Too Small. Free Exact Quotes. 541-408-6169 CAB# 177336

Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 • Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling • Decks • Window/Door Re placement • Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179

Reliable 24 Hour Service • Driveways • Walkways • Parking Lots • Roof Tops • De-Icing Have plow & shovel crew awaiting your call!

Landscape Management •Pruning Trees And Shrubs •Thinning Over Grown Areas •Removing Unwanted Shrubs •Hauling Debris Piles •Evaluate Seasonal Needs EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Houseboat 38x10, triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prineville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $122,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

nets, exc interior. Great extra bdrm! Reduced to $5000. 541-480-3286

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

881

Travel Trailers Forest River Sierra 1998, 26’, exc. cond, $6900, call 541-548-5886.

European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC

541-388-2993

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105

Snow Removal d SNOW REMOVAL! d d LARGE OR SMALL, d WE DO IT ALL! 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 d www.bblandscape.com d

875

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

Grumman AA-5 Traveler, 1/4 interest, beautiful, clean plane, $9500, 619-822-8036 www.carymathis.blogspot.com

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

Canopies and Campers

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

931

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories When ONLY the BEST will do! Bench seat split-back, out of a 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe ‘92 Ford F-250, gray, $400 Model Camper, loaded, pheOBO. 541-419-5060/pics nomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Chevrolet Chevelle Malibu 1971 Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, Factory Stock Rear-end, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as complete. Excellent cond, unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160 $150/OBO. 541-504-9693

JANUARY

8 / FEBRU

ARY 12

E M HO ST

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

VFZPV

Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $10,000,541-280-5677

925

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean

DPOUJO

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $5800. 541-330-0852.

90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523.

Utility Trailers

R

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

The Bulletin

885

Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP,

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

IP CTURE YOU

Travel Queen 34’ 1987 65K miles, oak cabi-

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more. Priced to sell at $59,500! 541-317-9185

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

OXX FBSDIP

XCFO

EIPNF

TDPN

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

When it’s time to buy, sell or enhance your home‌ please choose the following valued advertisers:

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Watercraft

Hayden Homes HiLine Homes Crooked River Realty Juniper Realty The Garner Group OJBOT M0SFHP B US O F  $ Duke Warner Realty UIBO GNPSF PNFTP I F I U JOUP E F JU W *O D&D Realty Group, LLC Bobbie Strome - John L. Scott Real Estate Heather Hocket - Century 21 Gold Country Realty LOOK FOR Redmond RE/MAX Land & Homes Real Estate PICTURE YOUR Budget Blinds of Central Oregon HOME Ginny Kansas-Meszaros - Steve Scott Realtors IN TODAY’S Cascade Sotheby’s International Realty BULLETIN! TUBUF

Landscaping, Yard Care

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

Kwik Slide 5th whl hitch bought to fit Tundra 6½’ box. mat incl. $700 obo. 541-416-1810

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, reduced to $34,000 OBO 541-610-4472; 541-689-1351

1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition. $2,200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

1969,

Aircraft, Parts and Service

TERRY 27’ 1995 5th wheel with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great rig in great cond. $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

Yamaha 350 Big Bear

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

Debris Removal

YAMAHA 1998 230CC motor, 4WD, used as utility vehicle. excellent running condition. $2000 OBO. 541-923-4161 541-788-3896

908

Pickup

152K mi. on chassis, 4 spd. transmission, 250 6 cyl. engine w/60K, new brakes & master cylinder, $2500. Please call 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800.

SFBMF

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

rage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

900

C-10

SFHPO

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

4-wheeler, black in color, custom SS wheels/tires, accessories, exc. cond., 240 miles, $5500, 541-680-8975, leave msg.

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, ga-

Alpha “See Ya� 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

KOMFORT 27’ 2000 5th wheel trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide. In excellent condition, has been stored inside. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

932

Antique and Classic Autos

OUSBM0

Philip L. Chavez Contracting Services Specializing in Tile, Remodels & Home Repair, Flooring & Finish Work. CCB#168910 Phil, 541-279-0846

Home Improvement

Polaris Sportsman 2008, 800 CC, AWD,

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Autos & Transportation

Fifth Wheels

PG$F

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

1998 Winnebago Itasca Sundancer 31 ft. 42,500 miles. Excellent Condition! Price: $25,000 541.325.1971

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

BSJFUZ

Landscaping, Yard Care

882

Fifth Wheels

JOHBW

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

Handyman

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new

12’ Navy fiberglass boat, $200 or trade for ??? 541-388-1533

755

I D O T H A T! Remodeling, Home Repairs, Professional & Honest Work. Commercial & Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 D e n n i s 3 1 7 - 9 7 6 8

66 orig. mi., Lots of accessories $4500 541-408-7348.

870

Barns

Building/Contracting

Polaris 500 2004

Boats & Accessories

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

880

Motorhomes

860

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $16,900 OBO. 541-944-9753

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

882

865

ATVs

Motorcycles And Accessories

Sunriver/La Pine Homes La Pine home on 1 acre. 4 bdrm., 2 bath, like new. All Offers Considered. www.odotproperty.com. 503-986-3638 Steve Eck.

Motorcycle Trailer Kendon stand-up motorcycle trailer, torsion bar suspension, easy load and unload, used seldom and only locally. $1700 OBO. Call 541-306-3010.

Yamaha Snowmobiles & Trailer, 1997

Redmond Homes Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

GFBUVS

Thank you St. Jude & Sacred Heart of Jesus. j.d.

745

Homes for Sale

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, January 26, 2011 F3

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Presenting 300,000 more reasons to list your properties in Picture Your Home.

PICTURE 5 TIMES MORE MARKET COVERAGE WITH THE NEW AND IMPROVED PICTURE YOUR HOME REAL ESTATE MAGAZINE. Now every property advertised in PYH will also run as an in-column ad for 4 Saturdays in The Bulletin’s Real Estate section and 4 weeks in The Central Oregon Nickel.

THATS AN IMPRESSIVE 300,000 ADDITIONAL PRINT IMPRESSIONS FOR FREE! Plus, Picture Your Home will be appear on bendbulletin.com in the Special Projects section. Viewers can view the entire book online and click on active web-links!

WANT EVEN MORE VALUE? PICTURE THIS! On the second Saturday of every month, The Bulletin will publish a quarter page, full color directory - highlighting every participating Realtor in Picture Your Home.

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $1995 for all. Bill 541-480-7930. Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, exc. cond., $16,900, 541-390-2504

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Picture Your Home Publishes every second Saturday, it is inserted in The Bulletin (over 32,000), plus thousands of additional copies are distributed in racks throughout Central Oregon. Call your Advertising Representative today at

541-382-1811

Advertising Rates: Full Page (6.833� x 9.126�) ......................... $179 1/2 Page 6.833� x 4.479�) ........................... $110 Back Page.................................................... $450 Front Page Ad Box ....................................... $300 (includes 1/2 page inside) All ads include full color


F4 Wednesday, January 26, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $27k. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

Subaru Outback 2005 AWD, 4cyl, auto, lthr htd seats, 89K mi, reduced to $12,995 OBO 541-508-0214; 541-554-5212

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

SUBARUS!!!

Buick LeSabre 2004,

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Ford 2 Door 1949, 99% Complete, $14,000, please call 541-408-7348 for more information.

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $14,500. 541-408-2111

Reach thousands of readers!

Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, auto, reduced to $14,500 obo 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

940 Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833 Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

Mercedes-Benz 280c 1975 145k, good body & mechanical, fair interior, can email pics. $2950. 541-548-3628

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $3850, 541-410-3425. MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all original, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

Vans

Ford F-350 Crew 4x4 2002. Triton V-10, 118k, new tires, wheels, brakes. Very nice. Just $14,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686 Ford Ranger 2004 Super Cab, XLT, 4X4, V6, 5-spd, A/C bed liner, tow pkg, 120K Like New! KBB Retail: $10,000 OBO 360-990-3223

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480. Toyota T100 1996 $3800. Well maintained no mechanical problems, 5-speed, 4wd, 206000 miles. Some dents and scratches. Call Dave at 541 788 8753.

Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256

custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $6000; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $2900. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $3500. 541-548-5302

AWD, leather, video sys, 3.5 liter V6, loaded, 21,500 mi, $13,950. 541-382-3666

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr brks, plus mntd stud snows. $8500 obo. 541-330-0616

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Chrysler 2005 Pacifica Honda Accord EX V6 2001 62k auto leather seats studs 6 cd sunroof roof rack optional Runs great!$8500 OBO 541-420-0049

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

VOLKSWAGEN BUG 1965 Black , Excellent condition. Runs good. $6995. 541-416-0541.

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, V6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

Mercury Grand Marquis 1984. Grandpa’s car! Like new, all lthr, loaded, garaged, 40K mi, $3495. 541-382-8399

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 53K miles, automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $11,680. Please call 541-419-4018. Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

MERCEDES C300 2008 New body style, 30,000 miles, heated seats, luxury sedan, CD, full factory warranty. $23,950.

Like buying a new car! 503-351-3976.

Pontiac Firebird 1998, exc cond, no wrecks. T-top, V6, loaded, 22/29 mpg (reg gas). $4995. 541-475-3984

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

PORSCHE CARRERA 4S 2003 - Wide body, 6

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you. Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

speed, all wheel drive, no adverse history, new tires. Seal gray with light gray leather interior. $32,950. 503-351-3976

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 Mercedes S 430 - 4Matic, 2003, All wheel drive, silver, loaded & pampered. Exc in snow! $14,800. 541-390-3596

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

H I G H

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Toyota Tercel 1997 exc. cond, one owner, 136,300 miles, $3800, Please Call 541-815-3281.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

D E S E R T

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Sport Utility Vehicles

VW Super Beetle 1974 Chrysler 2005 Pacifica New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3750 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

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Pickups

AWD, leather, video system, 3.5 liter V6, loaded, 21,500 mi., $13,950. 541-382-3666

FORD EXPLORER 1992 READY FOR SNOW! All Wheel Drive! 5 spd, loaded with all power equipment, sound system. All weather tires. Runs and drives good, Only $1800. 909-570-7067.

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

Healthy Living in Central Oregon A SLICK STOCK MAGAZINE CREATED TO HELP PROMOTE, ENCOURAGE, AND MAINTAIN AN ACTIVE, HEALTHY LIFESTYLE.

Audi A4 Avant Quattro 2003 3.0L., 92K mi, garaged, serviced, silver, fully loaded, $8900. 541-420-9478

Dodge 1500 XLT 4x4, 2007 w/ new hydraulic snow plow $6K new; 9,980 miles, many options, $19,900. 541-815-5000

Jeep CJ5 1974, 304 cu. in., 3 spd manual, Warn electric. winch, tow bar, dual mount gas cans, game rack on rear. Very clean. $4,000. 541-419-7884

DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2700. 541-322-6261 Dodge Dakota 1989, 4x4, 5spd trans, 189K, new tires, Jeep CJ7 1986 6-cyl, 4x4, 5-spd., exc. cond., consider straight body, 8' long bed. trade, $7950, please call $1500 OBO. 541-815-9758 541-593-4437.

Dodge Ram 2001, short bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 1998, like new, low mi., just in time for the snow, great cond., $7000, 541-536-6223.

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227 BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

BMW M3 COUPE E36 1998, mint condition, adult owned, low miles, needs nothing, $12,500. 541-419-2181

Central Oregon Business Owners: Reach Central Oregon with information about your health related retail products and services! Distributed quarterly in more than 33,000 copies of The Bulletin and at distribution points throughout the market area, this new glossy magazine will speak directly to the consumer focused on health and healthy living – and help you grow your business and market share. For more information, please contact Kristin Morris, Bulletin Health/Medical Account Executive at 541-617-7855, e-mail at kmorris@bendbulletin.com, or contact your assigned Bulletin Advertising Executive at 541-382-1811.

LOOK FOR THE NEXT ISSUE COMING FEB. 14 • 541-382-1811

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE 10-105751

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-105120

A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Elizabeth J. Hull, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated March 30, 2005, recorded April 8, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2005, at Page 21049, beneficial interest having been assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. as Trustee for WaMu Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2006-PR2 Trust, as covering the following described real property: A portion of Lots Four (4) and Five (5) in Block Six (6) of BROWN'S 2nd ADDITION, Deschutes County, Oregon, as follows: Commencing at a 3/4 inch pipe at the Northeast corner of said Lot 5, the initial pc thence South 40º 02'47" West along the Westerly line of the Dalles California High (SW Canal Blvd) and along the Easterly line of said Lot 5, 175.73 feet to the true point of beginning; thence South 40º 02' 47" West along the Easterly line of said L 108.16 feet to a 1/2 inch pipe, a point witnessed by a 3/4 inch pipe at the Southeast corner of said Lot 5 which bears South 40º 02' 47" West, 11.05 feet; thence North 48º 26' 50" West, a distance of 79.28 feet to a 1/2 inch pipe; thence North 16º 56' 02" a distance of 115.33 feet, a point which is North 49º 57'13" West, 22.23 feet from lot line common to said Lots 4 and 5; thence South 49º 57' 13" East, 124.53 feet to point of beginning. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 3431 S.W. Canal Blvd., Redmond, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $825.11, from June 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $140,968.77, together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.79% per annum from May 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on April 21, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest idder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 1/11/2010 By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105751

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, CHRISTOPHER T. MCGAHAN, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR BELL HOME LOANS, INC., as beneficiary, dated 7/3/2007, recorded 7/10/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-38240, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee of the IndyMac INDX Mortgage Trust 2007-FLX6, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-FLX6 under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated July 1, 2007. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT ONE (1), AWBREY BUTTE HOMESITES, PHASE THIRTY THREE, DESCHUTES COUNTY OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1959 NORTHWEST BALITCH COURT BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of January 5, 2011 Delinquent Payments from July 01, 2010 7 payments at $2,998.53 each $20,989.71 (07-01-10 through 01-05-11) Late Charges: $899.58 Beneficiary Advances: $189.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $22,078.29 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $1,028,483.55, PLUS interest hereon at 6.500% per annum from 6/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on May 6, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 1/5/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

ASAP# 3853827 01/12/2011, 01/19/2011, 01/26/2011, 02/02/2011

ASAP# 3874595 01/12/2011, 01/19/2011, 01/26/2011, 02/02/2011

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE 10-105297 A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Nathan M. Green, as grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated January 16, 2007, recorded January 22, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2007, at Page 03729, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: A parcel of land located in a portion of the Northeast One-Quarter of the Northeast One-Quarter of Section 28, Township 17 South, Range 12, East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at a 2 inch Brass Cap on pavement marking the Northeast One-Sixteenth corner of said Section 28; thence South 89º22'22" East, following the East - West centerline of the Northeast One-Quarter of said Section 28 a distance of 30.00 feet to a 5/8 inch iron rod in concrete marking the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING for this description; thence North 00º08'00" East, following the Easterly right-of-way line of Jones Road a distance of 26.85 feet to a 5/8 inch iron rod with a plastic cap; thence North 54º23'29" East a distance of 155.00 feet to a 5/8 inch iron rod with a plastic cap; thence South 13º27'03" East a distance of 122.14 feet to a 5/8 inch iron rod with a plastic cap on the East - West centerline of the Northeast One-Quarter of said Section 28; thence North 89º22'22" West, following the said East - West centerline, a distance of 154.50 feet to the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING, the terminus of this description. 10-105297 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 2684 N.E. Jones Rd., Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,260.97, from June 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,263.88, from August 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $209,608.51, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.125% per annum from May 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on April 7, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105297 ASAP# FNMA3838581 01/12/2011, 01/19/2011, 01/26/2011, 02/02/2011


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, January 26, 2011 F5

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES PROBATE DEPARTMENT Estate of DOROTHY A. DAHL, Deceased. Case No. 11PB0001MA NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative. All persons having claims against the Estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned Personal Representative at Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300, Bend, OR 97701-1957, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the Personal Representative, or the attorneys for the Personal Representative, who are Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300, Bend, Oregon 97701-1957. DATED and first published January 19, 2011. U.S. BANK, N.A. By: L. Thomas-Bush Linda Thomas-Bush. Vice President and Senior Trust Officer Personal Representative PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: U.S. Bank, N.A. Private Client Group 1025 NW Bond Street Bend, OR 97701 TEL: (541) 388-8732 ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: KARNOPP PETERSEN LLP James E. Petersen, OSB #640887 jep@karnopp.com 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300 Bend, Oregon 97701-1957 TEL: (541) 382-3011 FAX: (541) 388-5410 Of Attorneys for Personal Representative LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS David R. Burleigh has been appointed personal representative of the Estate of Alma Jean Burleigh, Deceased, by the Circuit Court, State of Oregon, Deschutes County, under case number 10PB0149BH. All persons having a claim against the estate must present the claim within four months of the first publication date of this notice to BRYANT, LOVLIEN & JARVIS, PC at 591 SW Mill View Way, Bend, OR 97702, Attn.: Melissa P. Lande, or they may be barred. Additional information may be obtained from the court records, the administrator or the followingnamed attorney for the administrator. Date of first publication: January 19, 2011. MELISSA P. LANDE BRYANT, LOVLIEN & JARVIS, PC 591 SW MILL VIEW WAY BEND, OR 97702 LEGAL NOTICE PUBLICATION FOR: DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF PIERCE JUVENILE DEPARTMENT THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO 1. SARAH DUNN, mother of MATTEO LAMPHERE; DOB: 5/25/05; Cause No. 10-7-02115-2; A Dependency Petition was filed on 11/19/10. AND TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: A Fact Finding hearing will be held on this matter on: February 8, 2011 at 1:30 p.m. at Pierce County Family and Juvenile Court, 5501 6th Avenue, Tacoma WA 98406. YOU SHOULD BE PRESENT AT THIS HEARING. THE HEARING WILL DETERMINE IF YOUR CHILD IS DEPENDENT AS DEFINED IN RCW 13.34.050(5). THIS BEGINS A JUDICIAL PROCESS WHICH COULD RESULT IN PERMANENT LOSS OF YOUR PARENTAL RIGHTS. IF YOU DO NOT APPEAR AT THE HEARING THE COURT MAY ENTER A DEPENDENCY ORDER IN YOUR ABSENCE. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Dependency Petition, call DSHS at 1-800-423-6246. To view information about your rights in this proceeding, go to www.atg.wa.gov/DPY.aspx. DATED this 3rd day of January, 2011, by DEBRA BURLESON, Deputy County Clerk PUBLISH --- January 12TH, 19TH, and 26TH, 2011 LEGAL NOTICE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Gene McLaughlin Sr. and Colleen McLaughlin, Grantor(s), to First American Title trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage, as beneficiary, recorded 01/30/2007, in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon as Instrument No. 2007-06249, which was subsequently assigned to Green Tree Servicing, LLC on March 23, 2010 under Instrument No. 2010-11759, and Katrina E. Glogowski being the successor trustee, covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: APN: 175573;

LOT 13 OF LANE KNOLLS ESTATES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON; Commonly known as 22050 White Peaks Dr, Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to section 86.753(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes. The default for which foreclosure is made is grantor’s failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $2466.72 beginning on Aug, 2010; plus late charges of $199.98; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expenses, costs, trustee’s fees and attorneys’ fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $405810.56 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.88% per annum from Aug, 2010 until paid; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expenses, costs, trustee’s fees and attorneys’ fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. Whereof, notice is hereby given that Katrina E. Glogowski, the undersigned trustee will on 03/09/2011 at the hour of 11:00 am standard time, as established by ORS 187.110, at the At the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond St, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee’s and attorney’s fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. Notice is hereby given that reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must comply with that statute. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the sale status and the opening bid. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word “grantor” includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words “trustee” and “beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Dated: November 8, 2010 /s/ by Katrina E. Glogowski, successor trustee, 2505 Third Ave. Ste. 100, Seattle, WA 98121 (206) 903-9966. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Edgar King and, Carolyn King, Husband and Wife, as grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated November 24, 2006, recorded November 30, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 78646, as covering the following described real property: Lot 219 of River Canyon Estates No. 3, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 60990 Snowbrush Drive, Bend, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $2,263.43, from April 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $329,702.06, together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.21% per annum from March 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHERE-

FORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on April 14, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 1/12/11 By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105802 ASAP# 3849116 01/12/2011, 01/19/2011, 01/26/2011, 02/02/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE 10-105915 A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Rachelle A. Bays and Eric L. Bays, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Wilmington Finance, a division of AIG Federal Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, dated December 24, 2003, recorded December 30, 2003, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2003, at Page 88213, beneficial interest having been assigned to MorEquity, Inc., as covering the following described real property: Lot One Hundred Fifteen (115), Larkspur Village, Phases V-VI, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 61126 Brookhollow Drive, Bend, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $880.07, from August 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $139,134.14, together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.5% per annum from July 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on April 21, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and

expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 01/11/2011 By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105915 ASAP# 3855433 01/12/2011, 01/19/2011, 01/26/2011, 02/02/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE 10-105709 A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Gary E. Gunville and Katherine E. Gunville, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated March 31, 2005, recorded April 18, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2005, at Page 23173, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot One Hundred Forty-Seven (147), Awbrey Village, Phase 5, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 3467 N.W. Cottage Place, Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,737.32, from June 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $371,923.72, together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.821% per annum from May 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on April 4, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed,

and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: - By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105709 ASAP# 3834762 01/12/2011, 01/19/2011, 01/26/2011, 02/02/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE 10-105750 A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Randy Kemnitz, as grantor to Old Republic Title, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Taylor, Bean & Whitaker Mortgage Corp., as Beneficiary, dated November 16, 2007, recorded December 10, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2007, at Page 63282, beneficial interest having been assigned to Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC, as covering the following described real property: All that certain land situated in the State of OR, County of Deschutes, City of Redmond, described as follows: Lot Two Hundred Thirty Seven of Cascade View Estates Phase I, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 2917 S.W. 37th Court, Redmond, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,713.22, from August 1, 2009, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,790.28, from October 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $233,670.59, together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.875% per annum from July 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on April 11, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obli-

gation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 01/11/2011 By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105750 ASAP# 3843876 01/12/2011, 01/19/2011, 01/26/2011, 02/02/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0030364855 T.S. No.: 10-12466-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, FRED GOLDFARB as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on December 22, 2004, as Instrument No. 2004-76430 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: APN: 15 13 08AD00208 THE LAND REFERRED TO HEREIN BELOW IS SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES, STATE OF OREGON, AND IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: LOT 86, RED HAWK UNIT TWO, RECORDED OCTOBER 18, 1994, IN CABINET D, PAGE 8B, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. EXCEPTING THEREFROM: BEGINNING AT A 1/2 INCH PIPE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT EIGHTY-SIX (86); THENCE SOUTH 88º 42' 00" WEST ALONG SAID RED HAWK UNIT TWO BOUNDARY AND ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LOT 86, 115.90 FEET TO A 1/2 INCH PIPE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 86; THENCE NORTH 79º 00' 00" EAST 96.66 FEET TO A 1/2 INCH PIPE ON THE NORTHEAST LINE OF SAID LOT 86; THENCE SOUTH 53º 00' 00" EAST ALONG SAID NORTHEAST LINE, 26.28 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Commonly known as: 1936 NW IVY PLACE, REDMOND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; defaulted amounts total: $4,127.65 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $114,225.26 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.00000% per annum from August 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on May 20, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714-508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730-2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word

"grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 19, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3888816 01/26/2011, 02/02/2011, 02/09/2011, 02/16/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE 10-105752 A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Darin D. Vaughan and Melissa Vaughan, husband and wife, as grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of Coldwell Banker Mortgage, as Beneficiary, dated May 2, 2006, recorded May 2, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 30502, beneficial interest having been assigned to U.S. BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST INC., as covering the following described real property: Lot 7, Block 2, Pinebrook Phase I, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 61187 Trailblazer Lane, Bend, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,859.39, from August 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $284,896.46, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.95% per annum from July 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on April 14, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 01/12/2011 By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105752 ASAP# 3845929 01/12/2011, 01/19/2011, 01/26/2011, 02/02/2011 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Joseph C. Giegerich, a single man, as grantor to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated January 12, 2005, recorded February 4, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2005, at Page 07021, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: The East half of the Southwest quarter of the Southwest quarter (E 1/2 SW 1/4 SW 1/4) of Section 23, Township 14 South, Range 11, East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 70055 Mc Kenzie Canyon Road, Sisters, OR 97759 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $940.55, from August 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $101,179.73, together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.25% per annum from July 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on April 7, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 01/12/11 By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105786 ASAP# 3836644 01/12/2011, 01/19/2011, 01/26/2011, 02/02/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0088526744 T.S. No-; 11-00111-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JOSEPH R. ACCUARDI AND CAROLEE S. ACCUARDI, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INS CO, as trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, NA, as Beneficiary, recorded on June 11, 2008, as Instrument No. 2008Â25112 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: APN:

256998 LOT THIRTY NINE (39), JULINA PARK SUBDIVISION, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2551 SW INDIAN LANE, REDMOND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes; the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; defaulted amounts total: $11,555.89 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit; The sum of $187,260.57 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.75000% per annum from May 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, me undersigned trustee will on May 23, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714Â508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 19, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3888908 01/26/2011, 02/02/2011, 02/09/2011, 02/16/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE 09-101996 A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Nancy L. Cleveland, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Long Beach Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, dated June 30, 2006, recorded July 10, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 47147, beneficial interest having been assigned to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank, as covering the following described real property: Lot Two (2), in Block Two (2), of Replat of Blocks 1 and 2, of Riverside Addition to the City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 2089 N.W. Harriman Street, Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,732.11, from December 1, 2008, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $248,675.18, together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.2% per annum from November 1, 2008, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on April 14, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Court-


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house, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 01/11/2011 By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 09-101996 ASAP# 3848758 01/12/2011, 01/19/2011, 01/26/2011, 02/02/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE 10-105834 A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Serena M. King, a married woman, as grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Coldwell Banker Mortgage, as Beneficiary, dated June 30, 2006, recorded July 5, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 45895, beneficial interest having been assigned to Deutsche Bank National Trust Company as Trustee for GSAA Home Equity Trust 2006-16, as covering the following described real property: Lot 77 of Juniper Glen North, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 2805 S.W. Indian Avenue, Redmond, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,412.87, from September 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $186,471.31, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.75% per annum from August 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on April 21, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not

later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 01/12/2011 By:KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105834 ASAP# 3855363 01/12/2011, 01/19/2011, 01/26/2011, 02/02/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE 10-105798 A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Bend Asset Management, LLC, an Oregon Limited Liability Company, as grantor to Western Title, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated March 28, 2005, recorded March 31, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2005, at Page 19293, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot Two in Block 34 of Northwest Townsite Company's Second Addition to Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 1211 N.W. Ithaca Avenue, Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,703.55, from April 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,650.27, from September 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $223,782.90, together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.813% per annum from March 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on April 11, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the per-

formance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: By: Kelly D. Sutherland Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/ wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105798 ASAP# 3843822 01/12/2011, 01/19/2011, 01/26/2011, 02/02/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE 10-104189 A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Morris L. Aron and Shirley Aron, husband and wife, as grantor to First Land Trustee Corporation, as Trustee, in favor of First Banc Mortgage, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated July 8, 2004, recorded July 20, 2004, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2004, at Page 42738, beneficial interest now held by First Bank, successor by merger to First Banc Mortgage, Inc., as covering the following described real property: A leasehold as created by that certain lease, by and between Golfside Investments, L.L.C., an Oregon Limited Liability Co., lessor, and Morris & Shirley Aron, lessee, dated July 12, 2004, a memorandum of which was recorded July 20, 2004, as Document No. 2004-42737, Official Records, for the term and upon and subject to all terms and provisions thereof, of the following described property: Lot 90, GOLFSIDE PARK P.U.D., Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 20161 Lyon Court, Bend, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $702.18, from December 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $75,307.85, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.5% per annum from November 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on March 24, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the

singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 01/12/2011 By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-104189 ASAP# 3823223 01/12/2011, 01/19/2011, 01/26/2011, 02/02/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE 10-105747 A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Damien M. Daniels, an unmarried man, as grantor to First American Title Insurance Company of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for American Home Mortgage, as Beneficiary, dated April 10, 2006, recorded April 18, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 26574, beneficial interest having been assigned to Bank of America, National Association successor by merger to LaSalle Bank NA as trustee for Washington Mutual Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates WMALT Series 2006-6 Trust, as covering the following described real property: Lot 1 in Block UU of DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 18933 Shoshone Road, Bend, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $2,443.91, from August 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $342,925.76, together with interest thereon at the rate of 7% per annum from July 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on April 14, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be con-

ducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 01/12/11 By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105747 ASAP# 3848919 01/12/2011, 01/19/2011, 01/26/2011, 02/02/2011

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE 10-105315 A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Bruce K. Harmon, as grantor to Western Title, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated April 12, 2004, recorded April 16, 2004, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2004, at Page 21394, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: THE NORTHERLY 110.43 FEET OF THE WESTERLY 100 FEET OF LOT 28, SOUTH MORELAND ACRES, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 1054 S.W. 17th Street, Redmond, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $655.59, from June 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $73,851.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.375% per annum from May 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on April 7, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 01/12/2011 By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Suc-

cessor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105315 ASAP# FNMA3838783 01/12/2011, 01/19/2011, 01/26/2011, 02/02/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE 10-105764 A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Linden A. Gross, an unmarried woman, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated April 18, 2006, recorded April 26, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 28730, as covering the following described real property: Lot 9, Lava Ridges, Phase 1, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 63116 Desert Sage Street, Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $2,145.34, from August 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $371,477.90, together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.775% per annum from July 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on April 7, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/ wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105764 ASAP# 3838697 01/12/2011, 01/19/2011, 01/26/2011, 02/02/2011

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE 10-105855 A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Jessica R. Dickinson and R. Eric Duhn, as grantor to Western Title & Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, a Washington Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated November 22, 2005, recorded November 28, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2005, at Page 81600, as covering the following described real property: Lot 17, Mason Estates, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 715 N.E. Mason Road, Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,037.30, from December 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $154,354.36, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.625% per annum from November 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on April 18, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other

than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: - By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105855 ASAP# FNMA3852733 01/12/2011, 01/19/2011, 01/26/2011, 02/02/2011

Garage Sales

Garage Sales

Garage Sales Find them in The Bulletin Classifieds!

541-385-5809

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF FILING OF APPLICATION OR NOTICE FOR ACQUISITION OF A SAVINGS ASSOCIATION This is to inform the public that under 12 C.F.R. § 574.3 of the Regulations of the Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS) for Acquisitions of Savings Associations, Investors Prime Fund, LLC, Los Altos, California will file on or about January 28th, 2011, an application with OTS, to acquire a 55% controlling interest of High Desert Bank, Bend, Oregon through the purchase of the outstanding common shares held by High Desert Bank's current majority shareholder. Anyone may submit written comments in connection with this application within 30 calendar days of the publication of this notice. The comment must be sent simultaneously to the Regional Director, Office of Thrift Supervision, to the attention of: Applications Manager, 1 South Wacker Drive, Chicago, IL 60606 and to the attention of Mark Feathers, Managing Manager of Investors Prime Fund, LLC, 419 South San Antonio Road, Suite 213, Los Altos, California 94022. Written comments in opposition to the application should address the regulatory basis for denial of such application, and be supported by the information specified in 12 C.F.R. Section 516.120(a). You may request a meeting on such application by filing a written request for a meeting with your comment to OTS. Your request should describe the nature of the issues or facts to be discussed and the reasons why written submissions are insufficient to adequately address these facts or issues. OTS will grant a meeting request only when it finds that written submissions are insufficient to address the facts or issues raised, or otherwise determines that a meeting will benefit its decision making process. You may view the non-confidential portions of the application and the non-confidential portions of all comments filed with OTS by contacting the OTS Regional Office listed above. This information is available for public viewing at the appropriate OTS Regional Office during regular business hours. If you have any questions concerning these procedures, contact: Application Manager at the OTS Regional Office at (206) 829-2606.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705, et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Reference is made to that certain trust deed made, executed, and delivered by William F. Mitchell and Elisabeth M. Mitchell, as tenants by the entirety, as Grantors, to Amerititle, Inc., an Oregon corporation, as Trustee, to secure certain obligations in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. ("MERS"), as Beneficiary, solely as nominee of HomeStreet Bank, a Washington state chartered savings bank, as Lender, dated June 17, 2005, and recorded on July 1, 2005, in the Mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, under File No. 2005-42147. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by HomeStreet Bank by assignment of deed of trust recorded on September 8, 2010, in the Mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon under File No. 2010-35235. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT SEVENTY (70) LAVA RIDGES PHASE 3, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON; The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 20962 Lava Flow Lane, Bend, Oregon 97701. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3). The default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 7 Monthly payments of $1,841.49 due from April 1, 2010 through October 1, 2010: $12,890.43; 6 Late Charges of $77.21, due on each payment not paid within 15 days of its due date, for monthly payments due on April 1, 2010, through September 1, 2010: $463.26. Advances by Lender: Property Inspection Fees:$24.00. Sub-Total of Monthly Payments, Late Charges, and Advances in arrears: $13,377.69. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $256,023.57, AS OF MARCH 1, 2010, PLUS, FROM THAT DATE UNTIL PAID, ACCRUED AND ACCRUING INTEREST AT THE RATE OF 5.3750% PER ANNUM, PLUS ANY LATE CHARGES, ESCROW ADVANCES, FORECLOSURE COSTS, TRUSTEE'S FEES, ATTORNEYS' FEES, SUMS REQUIRED FOR PROTECTION OF THE PROPERTY AND ADDITIONAL SUMS SECURED BY THE TRUST DEED. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will, on February 25, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the front entrance of Deschutes County Court, 1164 Northwest Bond Street, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees. Notice is also given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right to bring a court action to assert the non-existence of a default or any other defense to acceleration and sale. NOTICE TO TENANTS: IF YOU ARE A TENANT OF THIS PROPERTY, FORECLOSURE COULD AFFECT YOUR RENTAL AGREEMENT. A PURCHASER WHO BUYS THIS PROPERTY AT A FORECLOSURE SALE HAS THE RIGHT TO REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT AFTER GIVING YOU NOTICE OF THE REQUIREMENT. IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A FIXED-TERM LEASE, THE PURCHASER MAY REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT AFTER GIVING YOU A 30-DAY NOTICE ON OR AFTER THE DATE OF THE SALE. IF YOU HAVE A FIXED-TERM LEASE, YOU MAY BE ENTITLED TO RECEIVE AFTER THE DATE OF THE SALE A 60-DAY NOTICE OF THE PURCHASER'S REQUIREMENT THAT YOU MOVE OUT. TO BE ENTITLED TO EITHER A 30-DAY OR 60-DAY NOTICE, YOU MUST GIVE THE TRUSTEE OF THE PROPERTY WRITTEN EVIDENCE OF YOUR RENTAL AGREEMENT AT LEAST 30 DAYS BEFORE THE DATE FIRST SET FOR THE SALE. IF YOU HAVE A FIXED-TERM LEASE, YOU MUST GIVE THE TRUSTEE A COPY OF THE RENTAL AGREEMENT. IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A FIXED-TERM LEASE AND CANNOT PROVIDE A COPY OF THE RENTAL AGREEMENT, YOU MAY GIVE THE TRUSTEE OTHER WRITTEN EVIDENCE OF THE EXISTENCE OF THE RENTAL AGREEMENT. THE DATE THAT IS 30 DAYS BEFORE THE DATE OF THE SALE IS JANUARY 26, 2011. THE NAME OF THE TRUSTEE AND THE TRUSTEE'S MAILING ADDRESS ARE LISTED ON THIS NOTICE. FEDERAL LAW MAY GRANT YOU ADDITIONAL RIGHTS, INCLUDING A RIGHT TO A LONGER NOTICE PERIOD. CONSULT A LAWYER FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS UNDER FEDERAL LAW. YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO APPLY YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT AND ANY RENT YOU PREPAID TOWARD YOUR CURRENT OBLIGATION UNDER YOUR RENTAL AGREEMENT. IF YOU WANT TO DO SO, YOU MUST NOTIFY YOUR LANDLORD IN WRITING AND IN ADVANCE THAT YOU INTEND TO DO SO. IF YOU BELIEVE YOU NEED LEGAL ASSISTANCE WITH THIS MATTER, YOU MAY CONTACT THE OREGON STATE BAR AND ASK FOR THE LAWYER REFERRAL SERVICE. CONTACT INFORMATION FOR THE OREGON STATE BAR IS INCLUDED WITH THIS NOTICE. IF YOU HAVE A LOW INCOME AND MEET FEDERAL POVERTY GUIDELINES, YOU MAY BE ELIGIBLE FOR FREE LEGAL ASSISTANCE. CONTACT INFORMATION FOR WHERE YOU CAN OBTAIN FREE LEGAL ASSISTANCE IS INCLUDED WITH THIS NOTICE. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. UNLESS YOU NOTIFY US WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIVING THIS LETTER THAT YOU DISPUTE THE VALIDITY OF THE DEBT, OR ANY PORTION OF IT, WE WILL ASSUME THE DEBT IS VALID. IF YOU NOTIFY US, IN WRITING WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIPT OF THIS LETTER THAT YOU DO DISPUTE THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION OF IT, WE WILL PROVIDE VERIFICATION BY MAILING YOU A COPY OF THE RECORDS. IF YOU SO REQUEST, IN WRITING, WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE, WE WILL PROVIDE YOU WITH THE NAME AND ADDRESS OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR IF DIFFERENT FROM THE CURRENT CREDITOR. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED this 15th day of October, 2010. SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE: JULIE B. HAMILTON, Oregon Bar #092650, c/o Hillis Clark Martin & Peterson, P.S., 1221 Second Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, Washington 98101-2925, Telephone: (206) 623-1745.


Bulletin Daily Paper 01/26/11