Issuu on Google+

Santiam snow play

Never too cold to fish Tips for winter anglers

Go northwest for winter fun, minus the crowds • OUTING, E1

SPORTS, D1

WEATHER TODAY

THURSDAY

Partly cloudy, pleasant High 50, Low 25 Page C6

• January 6, 2011 50¢

Serving Central Oregon since 1903 www.bendbulletin.com

Destination resorts Ready for the game? may get new life The Bulletin’s coverage of the Ducks’ run Bill would ease restrictions on smaller developments

for the national championship begins Saturday and continues through Tuesday, with on-the-ground reporting and photography and special pages Sunday and Tuesday.

By Nick Budnick The Bulletin

On the Web, visit www.bendbulletin.com/ducks

Merkley’s filibuster challenge must wait

SALEM — Spurred by the battle over destination resorts once slated for the Metolius River basin, a state senator from Portland hopes to bring life into a new, smaller breed of resorts.

Over the last year, state Sen. Jackie Dingfelder, D-Portland, has hosted about a dozen meetings of a work group that includes development interests, environmentalists and public officials. The group is focused on revamping Oregon’s unique destination resort law, a law that has impacted Central Oregon — home to developments like Pronghorn and Black Butte — more than any other region. See Resorts / A6

Few favor dogs in sno-parks

A ROOST WITH A VIEW

By Keith Chu

By Kate Ramsayer

The Bulletin

The Bulletin

WASHINGTON — U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley’s plans to force an overhaul of the arcane U.S. Senate rulebook will have to wait a few weeks, thanks to a strange quirk of the chamber’s conventions. Merkley, along with Sens. Tom Udall, D-N.M., and Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, introduced a resolution on We d n e s d a y that’s designed to allow for more debate between the two parties. Their resolution stems from the growing trend of using filibusters as a delaying tactic — even on bills that have enough support to pass with 60 votes. And although the members have seen support for their package grow over the past several weeks, Republican Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., pushed back against the plan. See Merkley / A6

Dozens of people have written in to the Deschutes National Forest, voicing often-vehement opinions on whether dogs should be allowed in ski areas north of the Cascade Lakes Highway. Currently, in the Cascade Lakes Highway area, dogs are allowed south of the highway on trails from Wanoga Sno-park and Edison Butte Sno-park. Last summer, Bend Fort-Rock District Ranger Shane Jeffries said the Bend-based DogPAC nonprofit approached the U.S. Forest Service with the idea of grooming some cross-country ski trails within the Tangent Loop, including the Nordeen Loop, near Swampy Lakes Sno-park, and opening the area up to skiers with dogs off-leash. See Dogs / A5

IN CONGRESS

Photos by Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Osprey nest gets cleaning

Conservative scientists take on deniers of climate change

rado Street bridge will attract migrating ospreys

By Neela Banerjee

to the Deschutes River in Bend.

McClatchy Tribune News Service

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — According to the conventional wisdom that liberals accept climate change and conservatives don’t, Kerry Emanuel is an oxymoron. Emanuel sees himself as a conservative. He believes marriage is between a man and a woman. He backs a strong military. He almost always votes Republican and admires Ronald Reagan. Emanuel is also a highly regarded professor of atmospheric science at MIT. And based on his work on hurricanes and the research of his peers, Emanuel has concluded that the scientific data show a powerful link between greenhouse gas emissions and climate change. See Scientists / A4

MON-SAT

We use recycled newsprint

U|xaIICGHy02329lz[

‘Irish Giant’ had gene mutation By Gina Kolata New York Times News Service

He was a giant of a man, 7 feet 7 inches tall, who left his home in Ireland when he was 19 and traveled to London to make his fortune as a freak. There Charles Byrne, known as the Irish Giant, garnered wealth and fame. But, suffering from tuberculosis and an excessive love of gin, he died a few years later, in 1783. A surgeon — John Hunter — bought Byrne’s corpse, boiled it in acid to remove the flesh and exhibited the skeleton in his museum in London. And there the bones remained, studied in 1909 by renowned U.S. surgeon Harvey Cushing, who removed the top of the skull and pronounced that Byrne had had a pituitary tumor. Other than that, Byrne remained a curiosity, a famous giant, the subject of a 2007 novel by British writer Hilary Mantel, yet, with only a skeleton remaining, of little interest to science. Until now: Researchers in Britain and Germany have extracted DNA from Byrne’s teeth and solved the mystery of his excessive height. See Giant / A4

Bird lovers hope a cleaned nest near the Colo-

Pacific Power lineman Bob Nelson maneuvered a cherrypicker Wednesday to allow Keeton & King contractor Tim Keeton to chisel out debris and replace sticks to make the nest more attractive to the migratory osprey. “The nest needs to be able to drain properly,” said David Dobkin, the executive director of the High Desert Ecological Research Institute, who has an office overlooking the nest. And placing new sticks in the nest, he said, is a way to encourage the birds to think that the Colorado site is a prime place to nest. “It’s been a very productive nest over the years,” Dobkin said. But last year, the osprey by the Colorado Street bridge did not have any chicks. Typically, the male osprey will arrive at a site first, and then a week or two later females show up and the male starts courting them. Last year, however, a female arrived at the nest first. And even though a male joined her later, he didn’t hang around the nest as frequently as most males do, Dobkin said. He suspects that the male osprey also paired up with a different female upstream. — Kate Ramsayer, The Bulletin

INDEX

The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 108, No. 6, 00 pages, 00 sections

Abby

E2

Business

B1-4

Calendar

E3

Classified

G1-6

Editorial

Comics

E4-5

Health Local

Crossword

E5, G2

C4

TOP NEWS INSIDE Movies

E3

Sports

D1-4

F1-6

Obituaries

C5

Stocks

B2-3

C1-6

Oregon

C3

TV listings

E2

NEW CONGRESS: As new speaker, GOP’s Boehner overhauls House rules, Page A3


A2 Thursday, January 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

The Bulletin

F / Education

MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY

Technology Consumer Environment Education Science

How to reach us

States lure professors to retire as cuts loom

STOP, START OR MISS YOUR PAPER?

541-385-5800 Phone hours: 5:30 a.m.- 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 6:30 a.m.-noon Sat.-Sun.

GENERAL INFORMATION

541-382-1811 NEWSROOM AFTER HOURS AND WEEKENDS

541-633-2157 NEWSROOM FAX

541-385-5804

By David Mildenberg and Janet Lorin

ONLINE

Bloomberg News

www.bendbulletin.com E-MAIL

bulletin@bendbulletin.com E-MAIL THE NEWSROOM Business. . business@bendbulletin.com City Desk . . . . news@bendbulletin.com Community Life . . . . . communitylife@bendbulletin.com Sports . . . . . . sports@bendbulletin.com

OUR ADDRESS 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702 Mailing address: P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 Street address:

ADMINISTRATION Chairwoman Elizabeth C. McCool 541-383-0374 Publisher Gordon Black 541-383-0339 Editor-in-Chief John Costa 541-383-0337

DEPARTMENT HEADS Advertising Director Jay Brandt. . . . . . . . . . . . 541-383-0370 Circulation and Operations Keith Foutz . . . . . . . . . . . 541-385-5805 Finance Karen Anderson. . 541-383-0324 Human Resources Sharlene Crabtree . . . . . . 541-383-0327 New Media Jan Even . . . 541-617-7849

TALK TO AN EDITOR At Home, GO! Julie Johnson . . . . . . . . . 541-383-0308 Business Editor John Stearns . . . . . . . . . . 541-617-7822 City Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . 541-383-0348 Community Life Editor Denise Costa . . . . . . . . . . 541-383-0356 Editorials Erik Lukens. . . 541-617-7816 News Editor Jan Jordan. . 541-383-0315 Photo Editor Dean Guernsey . . . . . . . . 541-383-0366 Sports Editor Bill Bigelow . 541-383-0359

REDMOND BUREAU Street address: 226 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond, OR 97756. Mailing address: P.O. Box 788, Redmond, OR 97756 Phone 541-504-2336 Fax 541-548-3203

CORRECTIONS The Bulletin’s primary concern is that all stories are accurate. If you know of an error in a story, call us at 541-383-0358.

TO SUBSCRIBE Home delivery and E-Edition: One month, $11 Print only: $10.50

By mail in Deschutes County: One month, $14.50 By mail outside Deschutes County: One month, $18 E-Edition only: One month, $8

Photos by Craig Ruttle / Newsday

Principal Kathleen Kerzner, center, celebrates with preschool children during a lesson on kindness. Children at the Mill Neck Manor School for the Deaf in Mill Neck, N.Y., deal with bullying issues through a multiweek program.

School for deaf tackles bullying By Carol Polsky Newsday

MELVILLE, N.Y. — When a deaf student bullies another using sign language, one insult hits deepest: the one meaning “you’re worthless, you’re nothing.” The phrase is expressed in sign by wiggling both hands at hip level with index fingers and thumbs forming a circle, the other fingers outstretched. Teachers at the Mill Neck Manor School for the Deaf in Nassau County, N.Y., know to look out for it. Last year, they began to notice students reacting oddly to the sign for tiger — a sweeping gesture of the fingers from nose to forehead. Students looked hurt as if they’d been told they were worthless. In fact, they had — the sign for tiger had become the code word for the insult. “The kids knew if they were caught bullying, they could get suspended or another consequence,” said Principal Kathleen Kerzner, whom students call Miss Katie. “Even though we got really good at catching the bully, it wasn’t changing the behavior. The kids just changed the signs and gave them new meanings.” Bullying is a harsh fact of school life, whether in a large socially stratified high school or here, in a small, supportive school for deaf and hearing-impaired students. Studies show students with disabilities are at higher risk for being bullied and some may also be at risk to become bullies. Administrators have recognized the need to create schoolwide cultures where

Lisa Maliyil signs to younger kids at the Mill Neck Manor School for the Deaf in Mill Neck, N.Y., as they deal with bullying issues. bullying no longer flourishes. “Bullying has been going on forever,” Kerzner said. “Everything that goes on in any other school goes on here.” This fall, Mill Neck Manor embarked on a six-week antibullying campaign involving its 120 students, from preschool to high school, who study in buildings on the wooded grounds of an old mansion near Long Island Sound. Students participated in skits, role-playing and storytelling. They made anti-bullying posters and banners and wore “Be a Buddy, Not a Bully” T-shirts. Older students mentored younger students. Some played games and

socialized with the sometimesisolated autistic deaf students. They signed cards pledging not to bully, competed to make the best short film about bullying, wrote poems and created art. In the preschool classes, students identified bullies in classic fairy tales (the wolf, the stepsisters) and earned colored sticks when they were especially nice to each other. The campaign’s purpose, Kerzner said, was to find out how students experience and understand bullying in order to develop an appropriate plan of action. “It’s like professional development of staff — to make a difference it has to be ongoing,” she

said. “It has to become part of the culture of the school.” For students, the school has a “big responsibility to explain a lot of things that are happening around them that no one else can explain to them,” Kerzner said, noting hearingimpaired children may live in families and cultures that do not understand sign language. On a recent day near the end of the six-week campaign, Johan Sanchez and other seniors arrived at the classroom of fifth- and sixth-graders. The older students enacted scenes of hurtful behavior and the “right” way and the “wrong” way for bystanders to behave. Then the younger students played the roles, with much giggling and enthusiasm. At the end, they signed cards pledging not to bully. This year’s seniors were not bullies, Kerzner said, “and I’m asking them to help make a change. ... It’s a moment in time that’s beautiful and I’m grabbing it.” In past years, Mill Neck Manor dealt with bullying as many other schools do, with occasional assemblies and social education lessons, but more often by reactively addressing individual incidents. “We realized kids were reporting problems, but the problem was still there,” Kerzner said. “I wanted the problem not to be there. I want the kids to come to school and feel safe and be in a situation where they can learn.”

TO PLACE AN AD Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . 541-385-5809 Advertising fax . . . . . . . . 541-385-5802 Other information. . . . . . 541-382-1811

OTHER SERVICES Photo reprints. . . . . . . . . 541-383-0358 Obituaries. . . . . . . . . . . . 541-617-7825 Back issues . . . . . . . . . . 541-385-5800 All Bulletin payments are accepted at the drop box at City Hall. Check payments may be converted to an electronic funds transfer. The Bulletin, USPS #552-520, is published daily by Western Communications Inc., 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702. Periodicals postage paid at Bend, OR. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Bulletin circulation department, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. The Bulletin retains ownership and copyright protection of all staff-prepared news copy, advertising copy and news or ad illustrations. They may not be reproduced without explicit prior approval.

Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

POWERBALL

The numbers drawn Wednesday night are:

22 26 32 38 40 7 Power Play: 5. The estimated jackpot is $51 million.

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn are:

6

8 16 17 22 36

Nobody won the jackpot Wednesday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $2.6 million for Saturday’s drawing.

Experts look beyond coursework to identify ‘college-ready’ skills By Sarah D. Sparks Education Week

WASHINGTON — As federal pressure intensifies to ensure students graduate ready for college and careers, researchers are beginning to go beyond identifying the subject-matter classes students need to succeed after high school and home in on the cognitive and noncognitive skills that also contribute to success. College and career readiness has become a hot political topic for education under the Obama administration. The president has set a national goal to have the highest proportion of collegeeducated adults in the world by 2020, and it’s one of the four guiding goals of the economic-stimulus package’s education grants. Yet at the same time, research shows an average of two out of five traditional college students and more than half of nontraditional ones will take at least one remedial class, and higher education administrators report incoming students frequently are not equipped to cope with the greater academic, financial and social responsibilities of college and work. More and more, research shows young people need the same cognitive and social-emotional skills to complete school and progress in the workplace. Those skills

can be taught and tested like any other subject in school. “The problem is college eligibility was what we focused on previously, not readiness; we haven’t really defined what ‘readiness’ means,” said Elena Silva, a senior policy analyst with Education Sector, a Washington think tank, at the Building a Better Student research seminar held in Washington last month. “We focused on whether they have the course credits, the time spent ... and that’s important, but we haven’t figured out if they have what they need to be really college-ready,” she said. Students are “getting through high school graduation and even then, they’re not ready.” While 43 states, Washington and the U.S. Virgin Islands have adopted the common-core academic standards as a benchmark for helping students to be considered ready for college or work, research also points to five key noncognitive indicators that a student will need to be able to complete college and become successfully employed, according to Paul Sackett, a psychology professor at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. Across education and industry, research shows the biggest predictor of success is a student’s conscientiousness, as measured

by such traits as dependability, perseverance through tasks and work ethic. Agreeableness, including teamwork, and emotional stability were the next-best predictors of college achievement, followed by variations on extroversion and open-

ness to new experiences, Sackett found. “If you take a close look at these commercial tests (given during job interviews), they are compound traits of the top three traits” predicting posthigh school success, he said.

Darrell Fasching planned to keep teaching religious studies at the University of South Florida until he was offered a year’s salary of about $90,000 to retire and give up tenure rights earned over almost three decades at the school. Fasching, 66, took the cash and left the Tampa campus Dec. 21, joining hundreds of professors at flagship universities from Illinois to Nebraska and Texas who have been coaxed into retirement with offers of as much as two years’ pay to reduce operating costs. Tenured teacher pay averages $117,000 a year at the top 200 public universities, according to figures from the Washington-based American Association of University Professors. Annual contracts for replacement instructors cost an average of $52,500, the group said an April report. With the Center for Budget & Policy Priorities in Washington forecasting states will face fiscal 2012 deficits totaling $140 billion, “these buyouts will become more common,” said Roger Meiners, who teaches economics at the University of Texas at Arlington. “Most states have horrific budget problems and they haven’t dealt with the kinds of cuts in higher education that are going to be necessary,” he said in a telephone interview. State support for colleges and universities fell 3.5 percent to $75.2 billion in fiscal 2010, following a similar drop in 2009, according to figures from the Center for the Study of Education Policy at Illinois State University in Normal. “Enrollment meanwhile continued to grow even faster, in some states by more than 10 percent,” said Paul Lingenfelter, president of Boulder, Colo.-based State Higher Education Executive Officers, in an analysis posted on the association’s website. “Severe budget shortfalls and unmet educational needs are reaching crisis proportions, and budget reductions are continuing” in some states, Lingenfelter said. Nationwide, state spending for each full-time student fell 5 percent in the past academic year and 9 percent the year before, the College Board said in an Oct. 28 report. Tuition and fees for instate students at four-year public schools rose an average of 7.9 percent this academic year to about $7,600, it said. Costs have risen 5.6 percent annually through the past decade, after inflation, the New York-based nonprofit said. Texas A&M University in College Station convinced 104 professors to retire, said Karan Watson, the interim provost. At the University of Texas in Austin, 27 of 88 eligible professors in the College of Liberal Arts accepted buyouts totaling two years of salary, said Gary Susswein, a spokesman. The buyouts may save the schools more than $15 million a year, based on average salaries for the departing educators of about $89,000 at Texas and $120,000 at Texas A&M.

Kevin Rueter, MD BEND - DOWNTOWN 18 NW OREGON AVENUE

541.389.7741 BEND - EAST SIDE 1247 NE MEDICAL CENTER DRIVE

541.318.4249 SISTERS 354 W ADAMS STREET

541.549.9609 www.highlakeshealthcare.com

Dr. Kevin Rueter is a board-certified family physician who attended medical school at Oregon Health and Sciences University in Portland and completed his residency at Southern Illinois University. Dr. Rueter’s professional interests encompass the complete scope of Family Medicine from care of the newborn to Geriatric medicine. Dr. Rueter practices at our Bend Eastside Clinic. Dr. Rueter enjoys spending time with his wife, Kathleen, and daughter, Aerilynn. He also enjoys traveling, skiing, and golf. High Lakes Health Care is a preferred provider for most major insurance plans. New patients are now being accepted at all locations. We are now open to new Medicare patients.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, January 6, 2011 A3

T S Obama close to filling staff in shake-up

Taking charge, GOP overhauls House rules By Carl Hulse

By Jeff Zeleny and Jackie Calmes

New York Times News Service

New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Jubilant Republicans took control of the House on Wednesday and installed Rep. John Boehner of Ohio as the new speaker before pushing through an overhaul of House rules intended to ease their drive to dismantle the new health care law, cut federal spending and provide the tax cuts they see as a way to jump-start the economy. In the Senate, tensions over the partisan stalemate that dominated the last session spilled over into the opening of the 112th Congress as a coalition of Democrats threatened to try to force changes that would reduce filibusters and other procedural snags that have slowed the pace of legislation the past two years. The convening of the new Congress and the first day of divided government in Washington since President Barack Obama’s inauguration two years ago was largely one of ceremony, posturing and such preliminary procedural skirmishes. But it set the stage for partisan and ideological clashes on the size and role of government and a wide array of other issues as the nation struggles to rebuild economic momentum, confront its rapidly growing debt and manage complex security threats. After accepting an oversize gavel from the departing Democratic speaker, Rep. Nancy Pelosi, Boehner promised to run the chamber in a more inclusive and businesslike way. But mindful of demands by new tea

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama closed in Wednesday on a decision to fill two top positions and recharge his administration, stopping just short of naming a new chief of staff and a top economic adviser to guide the White House through a new period of divided government. William Daley, who was commerce secretary in the Clinton administration, visited the West Wing to meet with the president and other advisers for a final series of discussions about serving as chief of staff. He has told associates that he would accept the job if it is offered to him, and administration officials said Obama was favoring him. Gene Sperling, a counselor to Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner, was expected to be named Friday as director of the National Economic Council, the top economic policy job inside the White House. He also held the position in the Clinton administration. The moves, if they are finalized by the president, would signal an effort to bring on experienced Washington hands with records of bipartisan deal-making as the White House faces the realities of a Republican-controlled House, a slimmer Democratic majority in the Senate and a resurgent grassroots conservative movement. The White House also announced Wednesday that Robert Gibbs, the press secretary and a close confidant to Obama, was stepping down to become an outside political adviser to the president and his re-election campaign.

New York Times News Service

MELBOURNE, Australia — Floodwaters appeared to be at or near their peak across much of tropical, northeastern Australia on Wednesday, with inundations affecting 40 towns and cities, as an army general was named to lead efforts to cope with the disaster. In the coastal city of Rockhampton, where hundreds of homes have been submerged and more than 100 people are living in evacuation centers, floodwaters reached a long anticipated peak as the Fitzroy River surged to around 30 feet, said Paul Birch, a senior hydrologist at the Bureau of Meteorology. “I think it’s up there for another week,” he said. In other areas of the state, waters continued to rise although predicted rains proved too light

to worsen the crisis, Birch said. Maj. Gen. Mick Slater was appointed at an emergency meeting of the cabinet of the flood-hit state of Queensland to lead a task force to cope with the recovery. “This is a disaster on an unprecedented scale and it is going to take an unprecedented, sustained effort to rebuild regional Queensland,” Anna Bligh, the state premier, told reporters at a news conference. “Maj. Gen. Mick Slater is an outstanding Queenslander, and I am pleased that he has agreed to lead the Flood Recovery Taskforce.” Flooding is a seasonal norm in Queensland, but this year’s deluges have been broader than usual. “We’ve had big floods before,” Bligh said in an interview with ABC, Australia’s public broadcaster. “We’re a tropical state. But we’ve never had them over so

party Republicans for decisive action to cut spending and rein in what they see as an overactive government, he set the House on a course to repeal the health law, take a deep bite out of this year’s budget and investigate the administration’s handling of at least a half-dozen big issues over the past two years. “The people voted to end business as usual, and today we begin to carry out their instructions,” Boehner told his assembled colleagues, referring to the election sweep that carried Republicans back to power in the House. Boehner said that excessive and wasteful federal spending had caught up with the nation and warned that “hard work and tough decisions will be required

many towns, so many cities, and had so much public infrastructure at risk because of the size of the area.” More than 200,000 people have been affected since a cyclone brought heavy rains to Queensland in December. Rains and floodwaters have destroyed vital food crops, raising the possibility of additional pressure on rising global food prices. The floods also forced much of the state’s mining industry to a halt. The Queensland Resources Council has estimated that the crisis has cost the coal export industry at least $1 billion. Analysts predict the disaster will induce a global increase in prices for coal for both steelmaking and power generation. Prime Minister Julia Gillard has promised millions of dollars in federal assistance to flood victims.

Coffee spill in cockpit Ivory Coast leader’s rival causes flight diversion still blockaded By Rob Gillies

The Associated Press

By Adam Nossiter New York Times News Service

ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast — Laundry hangs from balconies, beer bottles remain in the lobby, officials emerge unshaven from darkened corridors after lengthy but inconclusive meetings and a tent city full of T-shirted U.N. soldiers has sprung up on the steamy grounds of this hotel. This is the Hotel du Golf, the alternate seat of government of this West African nation. For weeks, this shabby resort on a filthy lagoon has been the headquarters of Alassane Ouattara, the man who governments around the world say defeated the incumbent, Laurent Gbagbo, in a presidential election Nov. 28. But it remains blockaded, even after West African diplomats announced this week that they had received promises from Gbagbo to lift a three-week siege of this increasingly disheveled-looking hotel.

TORONTO — A pilot’s spilled coffee accidentally triggered a hijacking alert and caused a United Airlines flight from Chicago to Frankfurt, Germany, to make an unscheduled stop in Canada. A Transport Canada report said United Flight 940 was diverted to Toronto late Monday and landed safely at Pearson International Airport. In a twist reminiscent of the plot of the 1964 Glenn Ford movie “Fate Is the Hunter,” the coffee spill caused distress signals to go out, including code 7500, which means hijacking or unlawful interference. The report says Canada’s defense department was notified, but that with the help of United dispatch staff the flight crew confirmed it to be a communication issue and not a hijacking. The report on Transport Canada’s website said the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration reported that United’s corporate office had indicated

Najaf to his home and then to prayers at the gold-domed Shrine New York Times News Service of Imam Ali, one of the most saBAGHDAD — Muqtada cred places in Shiite Islam. al-Sadr, the populist cleric Supporters there hailed his who emerged as the return as another show United States’ most of strength for a moveenduring foe in Iraq, ment that is now more returned Wednespowerful than at any day after more than time since the United three years of volStates invaded in 2003. untary exile in Iran Simply by setting foot in a homecoming in Iraq, al-Sadr complithat embodied his cated the nation’s byzand his movement’s Muqtada antine politics. He is the transition from bat- al-Sadr rare Iraqi figure who can tling in the streets to compete in stature with occupying the halls Prime Minister Nouri alof power. Maliki, and the dealings between “Long live the leader!” sup- al-Maliki, the arch politician, and porters shouted as a grayer al-Sadr, the rabble-rousing cleric, al-Sadr made his way from may prove a compelling political the airport in the holy city of drama in the year ahead.

By Anthony Shadid and John Leland

Charles Dharapak / Associated Press

House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, right, wipes a tear as he prepares to receive the gavel from outgoing House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., in Washington on Wednesday.

Floods in Australia nearing peak By Aubrey Belford

Powerful cleric returns to Iraq after years in Iran

that the pilot “had inadvertently squawked a 7500 code after spilling coffee on the aircraft’s radio equipment, which interfered with the communications equipment.” “The flight crew had advised that they had communication problems and subsequently reported that they had some navigation problems as well and from there the pilot in the command diverted the flight onto Toronto,” Maryse Durette, a Transport Canada spokeswoman, said Wednesday. United spokesman Rahsaan Johnson acknowledged Wednesday that one of three cockpit crew members caused the mishap by spilling a drink. “It was a beverage. During light turbulence one of the crew members’ beverages spilled, which then caused issues with the airplanes communications equipment,” Johnson said. Johnson said the crew was in contact with air traffic control throughout. He said that the pilot elected to divert the flight rather than cross the Atlantic Ocean while experiencing a communications problem.

of the 112th Congress. “No longer can we fall short,” he said. “No longer can we kick the can down the road.” In order to reverse what they say is a congressional process tilted toward spending increases, the new Republican majority in the House — over strong Democratic objections — approved rules that would require spending increases to be directly offset with cuts elsewhere. But the rules would allow future tax cuts to be enacted without offsetting spending reductions and would permit repeal of the health care legislation, which was estimated to save the government more than $140 billion over 10 years, without any requirement that those revenue losses be made up elsewhere.

Tribal violence in Jordan curbed By Ranya Kadri and Borzou Daragahi Los Angeles Times

AMMAN, Jordan — Security forces imposed a clampdown and officials warned troublemakers of consequences as calm was restored Wednesday in southern Jordan after several days of tribal violence. The clashes began Monday in Maan province following the death of two people during a fight among workers at a water project, official media reported. The troubles quickly escalated into a wider dispute between rival clans and widespread rioting. The independent Ammon News website quoted a secu-

rity source Wednesday as saying that 50 people had been arrested so far. Several had been injured. Maan has long been a hotbed of tribal disputes. Interior Minister Saad Hayel Sorrour on Tuesday insisted that a fresh deployment of security forces had restored order in the southern city. But the unrest could be a sign of broader problems for Jordan, a U.S.-backed monarchy that along with Egypt is among only two Arab states that have full diplomatic ties to neighboring Israel.

SOLAR & RADIANT HEATING SYSTEMS 541-389-7365 CCB# 18669

www.bobcatsun.com


A4 Thursday, January 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Security guard says Jackson doctor ordered him to remove evidence

Giant Continued from A1 It turned out to be a rare and mysterious gene mutation, discovered only in 2006. The researchers then found the mutation in four families from Northern Ireland, near where Byrne was born. Following a hunch, they decided to ask whether Byrne had had the mutation, too, and whether the mutation indicated that the four families were related to him. Their hunch was right. The group, led by Dr. Marta Korbonits, professor of endocrinology and metabolism at Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, reports its finding in Thursday’s issue of The New England Journal of Medicine. Symptom-producing pituitary tumors are rare, and those caused by an inherited mutated gene are rarer still. At most only 5 percent of people with them have pituitary adenomas — tumors — in their families. The tumors can lead to disfigurement — patients develop bulging foreheads and large jaws, hands and feet — and chronic severe headaches. They can also cause visual problems, because the tumor presses on the optic nerve. They may even cause milk secretion, because the tumor can secrete prolactin, a hormone that is needed for fertility and to produce milk in the breasts. Usually, tumors that secrete growth hormone start to grow in adulthood, after people have reached their full height. But when tumors start growing in children or adolescents — as they do with many patients with the mutated gene — they can result in gigantism because they make the gland churn out growth hormone, prodding bones to keep growing. Pituitary tumors are of great interest to researchers because they grow very slowly and almost never spread elsewhere in the body. Dr. Shlomo Melmed, a pituitary tumor researcher at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, explained that the tumor cells undergo premature aging. “We think it might be protective,” Melmed said, a reason the tumor does not spread. The involvement of the gene, known as AIP, in pituitary tumors is a surprise, researchers say. Mutations in the gene are associated with about 20 percent of inherited pituitary tumors when no other organ is involved. But it is not clear why mutations in this gene, which seems to be involved in metabolism — possibly to detoxify chemicals — can cause tumors or how these tumors form. “There is nothing solid scientifically,” said Dr. Constantine Stratakis, a geneticist and pituitary tumor researcher who is the

Scientists Continued from A1 “There was never a light-bulb moment but a gradual realization based on the evidence,” Emanuel said. “I became convinced by the basic physics and by the better and better observation of the climate that it was changing and it was a risk that had to be considered.” As a politically conservative climatologist who accepts the broad scientific consensus on global warming, Emanuel occupies a position shared by only a few scientists. In much the same role that marriage and abortion played in previous election cycles, denial of climate change has now become a litmus test for the right. The vast majority of Republicans elected to Congress during the midterm election doubt climate science, and senior congressional conservatives — Republican and Democrat — have vowed to fight Obama administration efforts to curtail greenhouse gas emissions. That’s why scientists such as Emanuel rattle the political pigeonholes. Some are speaking out, using their expertise and conservative credentials to challenge what many researchers consider widespread distortions about climate change. Texas Tech atmospheric scientist Katharine Hayhoe is an evangelical Christian who travels widely talking to conservative audiences and wrote a book with her husband, a pastor and former climate change denier, explaining climate change to skeptics. A physicist by training, John Cook is an evangelical Christian who runs the website skepticalscience.com, which seeks to debunk climate change deniers’ arguments. Barry Bickmore is a Mormon, a professor of geochemistry at Brigham Young University and the blogger behind Anti-Climate Change Extremism in Utah, where he re-

By Harriet Ryan and Victoria Kim Los Angeles Times

Ronan McCloskey / New York Times News Service

The skeleton of Charles Byrne, an 18th-century Irishman who gained wealth and fame as a 7-foot-7 man, at the Hunterian Museum at the Royal College of Surgeons of England in London. Researchers report that Byrne had a rare gene mutation that is probably shared by 200 to 300 people living today. acting scientific director for the Division of Intramural Research at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. And for unknown reasons, only about 30 percent of people with the mutated gene develop tumors. Korbonits said she had been aware of the Irish Giant because her work on pituitary tumors. She suspected he might have had the AIP mutation when she saw a drawing of him standing with twin brothers who also were giants, who came from a nearby village, and who were said to be related to Byrne. That, she said, “suggested it was a genetic disease.” And she had found the gene in members of four families from the same region of Ireland. Korbonits wrote to the Hunterian Museum, where Byrne’s skeleton is still displayed, and asked to test the giant’s DNA, and then she and her colleagues removed two of his molars. She enlisted the help of an expert on ancient DNA, Joachim Burger of Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany, to extract DNA from the giant’s teeth. She was worried that the DNA might be too degraded to analyze — after all, the giant’s corpse had been boiled in acid and then displayed in a museum for a couple of centuries. “It was not clear at all that we would have suitable DNA,” Korbonits said. The DNA turned out to be broken in many pieces, but it could still be analyzed. The investigators calculated that the giant and the four contemporary Irish families had a common ancestor who lived about 1,500 years ago. And, they report, there are probably 200 to 300 people living today who have inherited that same mutation. One is Brendan Holland, a 58year-old Irishman who sells mining equipment. Holland started growing excessively when he was 13, he said in a telephone interview. “I kept growing and growing,”

he said, eventually reaching a height of 6 feet 9 inches. As he grew, he said, he became less coordinated, developed frequent violent headaches and had sporadic episodes when he could not see. He had no idea what was wrong but left school when he was 19, on the theory, he said, “that all that studying was giving me headaches.” Finally, when Holland was 20 and living in London, an endocrinologist, Dr. G. Michael Besser at Barts and the London School of Medicine, figured out that Holland had a pituitary tumor. As soon as the tumor was destroyed with radiotherapy, Holland’s headaches disappeared and his growth hormone levels dropped to normal. After the AIP gene mutation was discovered in 2006, Korbonits asked to test Holland to see if he had it. He did. Then, Holland said, she started suggesting he might be related to the giant. “She was asking me pointed questions about where he lived and where I lived,” Holland said. “Then she said, ‘I think it is possible that you and this chap are related.’” With the giant’s DNA analysis, it turned out that Korbonits was right. Holland says he was touched thinking about the giant’s life, knowing how hard it is to be so tall and the subject of barbs and jeers. The genetic analysis also had another effect, he said. “I remember having a conversation with Dr. Besser when I was first diagnosed,” Holland said. “I said, ‘With eight children, why was I suffering from it and none of the others?’ He was very honest with me: He said they did not have a medical explanation.” Now, at least, Holland has an explanation for his physical problems. And that helps, he said. “I can only speak for myself,” he said, “but having a logical explanation helps me to come to terms with my condition.”

cently rebuked Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, for his climate views and posted editorials mentioning his Republican affiliation. Emanuel waded into the fray early last year. He wrote a letter to The Wall Street Journal criticizing a friend and colleague for dismissing the evidence of climate change and clinging “to the agenda of denial.” Then Emanuel added his name to the Climate Science Rapid Response Team, a website run by scientists to provide accurate information from top researchers in climaterelated fields. “I’ve always rebelled against the thinking that ideology can trump fact,” said Emanuel, 55. “The people who call themselves conservative these days aren’t conservative by my definition. I think they’re quite radical.” Paradoxically, over the last 40 years, it was conservative Republican administrations that pushed through the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency and the signing of the Endangered Species Act and the Clean Air Act. But today, most conservatives have lined up against the scientists — and transformed what started out as a technical issue into one dominated by ideology and sometimes religion. Climate scientist Michael Mann called Emanuel “a leading light” in the field. “But that has no bearing on his view that human-caused climate change is a reality — that, after all, is a scientific issue, not a political issue,” he said. A 2009 poll by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press found that only 6 percent of scientists called themselves Republicans, compared with 55 percent who identified as Democrats. A separate October 2009 Pew survey showed a marked decline from 18 months earlier in the number of people who accept global warming, with only one-third of Republican respondents saying they saw solid evidence of climate

change, the lowest percentage among any partisan group. Emanuel dislikes applying the word “skeptic” to those who deny climate change. He says all scientists are skeptical; that’s the nature of the field. His own innate skepticism meant that it took him longer than his colleagues to be persuaded of climate change, Emanuel says. He remembers thinking it ridiculous when a noted climatologist told Congress in 1988 that he was all but certain that the climate was changing. Yet, as analyses of climate data advanced through the 1990s and Emanuel found a relationship between hurricanes and climate change in his own work, he came to see a link between greenhouse gas emissions and climate change. Climate change deniers, including many in Congress, contend that because the science is not “settled,” the government should not act to curtail greenhouse gases. “Scientists are being asked to prove beyond any reasonable doubt that there is an imminent danger before we as a society do anything,” Emanuel said. “The parallel to that is saying, ‘You won’t buy property insurance unless I can prove to you that your house will catch on fire right now.’ ” Although more scientists are pushing back against climate change denial, Emanuel is not convinced it can help, given the corporate interests and the weight of the GOP arrayed against them. All of this is making him reconsider his political loyalties: For the first time in his life, he voted for a Democrat, Barack Obama, in 2008. “I am a rare example of a Republican scientist, but I am seriously thinking about changing affiliation owing to the Republicans’ increasingly anti-science stance,” he wrote in an e-mail. “The best way to elevate the number of Republican scientists is to get Republican politicians to stop beating up on science and scientists.”

LOS ANGELES — Michael Jackson’s doctor ordered a security guard to remove an IV bag apparently containing the anesthetic propofol from the stricken pop star’s bedside and then told arriving paramedics he had administered only a mild anti-anxiety drug, witnesses testified Wednesday. The guard, Alberto Alvarez, told a Superior Court judge deciding whether there is enough evidence to try Dr. Conrad Murray for involuntary manslaughter that before instructing him to call 911, the physician told him to gather up medical paraphernalia, including vials and an IV bag containing “a milk-

like substance.” Propofol, the surgical drug the coroner said caused Jackson’s death, is an opaque white liquid sometimes called “milk of amnesia” and it is at the center of the case against Murray, a 57-year-old cardiologist. The doctor acknowledged to police two days after Jackson’s death that he administered propofol to help Jackson, a chronic insomniac, fall sleep. The testimony on the second day of the preliminary hearing concerned what Murray said — and didn’t say — in the moments after Jackson stopped breathing. The first paramedic on the scene said Murray mentioned nothing about propofol, claimed his patient’s only ail-

ment was “dehydration” and understated significantly how long it had been since Jackson had stopped breathing. “It just didn’t add up,” Los Angeles City Fire Department paramedic Richard Senneff said repeatedly. From Alvarez, Judge Michael Pastor got the closest look yet at Murray’s behavior after Jackson went into respiratory arrest in a bedroom of his rented Holmby Hills mansion. When Alvarez arrived in the bedroom, he said, Murray was doing chest compressions on Jackson in the bed with one hand. He said that when he asked what had happened, the doctor said only that Jackson “had a bad reaction.”

Vadim Ghirda / The Associated Press

Romanian witch Mihaela Minca, right, and her daughter and apprentice Casanndra, left, sit in Mogosoaia, Romania, Wednesday.

Curses! Romania’s witches forced to pay income tax By Alison Mutler The Associated Press

MOGOSOIA, Romania — Everyone curses the tax man, but Romanian witches angry about having to pay up for the first time are planning to use cat excrement and dead dogs to cast spells on the president and government. Also among Romania’s newest taxpayers are fortune tellers — but they probably should have seen it coming. Superstitions are no laughing matter in Romania — the land of the medieval ruler who inspired the “Dracula” tale — and have been part of its culture for centuries. President Traian Basescu and his aides have been known to wear purple on certain days, supposedly to ward off evil. Romanian witches from the east and west will head to the southern plains and the Danube River on Thursday to threaten the government with spells and spirits because of the tax law, which came into effect Jan. 1. A dozen witches will hurl the poisonous mandrake plant into the Danube to put a hex on government officials “so evil will befall them,” said a witch named Alisia. She identified herself with one name — customary among Romania’s witches. “This law is foolish. What is there to tax, when we hardly earn anything?” she said by telephone Wednesday. “The

lawmakers don’t look at themselves, at how much they make, their tricks; they steal and they come to us asking us to put spells on their enemies.” The new law is part of the government’s drive to collect more revenue and crack down on tax evasion in a country that is in recession. In the past, the less mainstream professions of witch, astrologer and fortune teller were not listed in the Romanian labor code, as were those of embalmer, valet and driving instructor. Those who worked those jobs used their lack of registration to evade paying income tax. Under the new law, like any self-employed person, they will pay 16 percent income tax and make contributions to health and pension programs. Some argue the law will be hard to enforce, as the payments to witches and astrologers usually are made in cash and relatively small at 20 to 30 lei ($7 to $10) per consultation. Mircea Geoana, who lost the presidential race to Basescu in 2009, performed poorly during a crucial debate, and his camp blamed attacks of negative energy by their opponent’s aides. Geoana aide Viorel Hrebenciuc alleged there was a “violet flame” conspiracy during the campaign, saying Basescu and other aides dressed in purple on Thursdays to increase his chance

of victory. They continue to be seen wearing purple clothing on important days, because the color supposedly makes the wearer superior and wards off evil. Such spiritualism has long been tolerated by the Orthodox Church in Romania, and the late Communist dictator Nicolae Ceausescu and his wife, Elena, had their own personal witch. Queen witch Bratara Buzea, 63, who was imprisoned in 1977 for witchcraft under Ceausescu’s repressive regime, is furious about the new law. Sitting cross-legged in her villa in the lake resort of Mogosoaia, just north of Bucharest, she said Wednesday she planned to cast a spell using a particularly effective concoction of cat excrement and a dead dog, along with a chorus of witches. “We do harm to those who harm us,” she said. “They want to take the country out of this crisis using us? They should get us out of the crisis because they brought us into it.” “My curses always work!” she cackled in a smoky voice. She sat next to her wood-burning stove, surrounded by potions, charms, holy water and ceramic pots. Not every witch is threatening fire and brimstone. “This law is very good,” said Mihaela Minca. “It means that our magic gifts are recognized and I can open my own practice.”

Mysterious final days in ex-Pentagon aide’s death By Kathleen Brady Shea and Larry King The Philadelphia Inquirer

PHILADELPHIA — As more becomes publicly known of the final days and hours of John P. Wheeler III, an image is emerging of a man coming unglued. Less than 48 hours before the respected former Pentagon aide turned up dead last week in a Delaware landfill, Wheeler limped into a Wilmington parking garage. Coatless and confused, one of his shoes in hand, he bizarrely inquired about the location of his car, then declined offers of help, witnesses said. A day later, police said Wednesday, surveillance video captured Wheeler in downtown Wilmington again — this time looking

“confused” inside the Nemours Building about 8:30 p.m. Dec. 30. That was less than 14 hours before Wheeler’s body tumbled into a Wilmington landfill from a garbage truck. Police have called his death a homicide, but have refused to disclose how they believe Wheeler, 66, died. “I knew something wasn’t right,” said Iman Goldsborough, a parking-lot attendant who encountered Wheeler on Dec. 29, “but I never thought it would end up like this.” Also this week, police found evidence that Wheeler may have been involved in an arson attempt at the home of a couple he had been battling in court, a law enforcement source has told The Philadelphia Inquirer.

It all runs counter to the burnished public image of Wheeler, who served in Vietnam, successfully pushed for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial on the National Mall, advised presidents and Pentagon brass, and served as the first chief executive of Mothers Against Drunk Driving and as secretary of the Securities and Exchange Commission. After working at Mitre on Dec. 28, Wheeler is believed to have taken a train from Washington to Wilmington. That night, police said, smoke-bomb devices were set off in an unfinished New Castle home across from Wheeler’s that belongs to a couple with whom he was long embroiled in a court battle over the dimensions of the house.


C OV ER S T ORY

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, January 6, 2011 A5

Assistant principal shot by student dies Panel: Massive oil spill Omaha World-Herald OMAHA, Neb. — An assistant Omaha high school principal who was shot in her office Wednesday afternoon died from her injuries. Police officials announced Vicki Kaspar had died. She would’ve turned 58 today. Police said Robert Butler Jr., a 17-year-old Millard South High School student and son of an Omaha police detective, shot Principal Curtis Case and Assistant Principal Kaspar inside the school just before 1 p.m. Butler did not shoot any students. Case was listed early Wednesday evening in serious but stable condition at Creighton University Medical Center. Butler was found dead in a car from a self-inflicted gunshot wound at about 1:30 p.m. Millard Superintendent Keith Lutz described Case as “young and energetic ... I’m sure he’ll pull through this.”

Dogs Continued from A1 The Forest Service asked people to comment on the idea. It also held an open house on the subject in November. The agency has not developed a specific proposal that would change dog restrictions, however, or announced when it might do so. In one initial set of comments reviewed by The Bulletin, most people voiced strong opposition to the idea of opening up more areas to dogs, citing the safety risks of collisions between dogs and skiers, dog feces on the ski trails and recounting stories of being attacked by dogs. It’s not clear whether the initial set of comments is representative of all of the comments the agency has received. The set also included letters from some people who said that more trails are needed so dog-owners can ski with their pets in additional areas separate from snowmobilers and featuring a variety of terrain. “I have owned, trained and hunted with dogs and know they can be wonderful and useful companions under the right circumstances,” wrote one Bend resident. “Nordic skiing is not one of them. I would no more think of skiing than golfing with a dog.” Dogs could ruin groomed trails by digging them up, and could bark at or bite skiers or other dogs, the person wrote. Another person stated the Forest Service would start to ruin the area by allowing dogs on the north side of the highway. The commenter likes dogs, according to the letter, and didn’t mind them on hiking trails where it’s easier to step around dog feces. “But it’s going to be harder to avoid dog poop when it’s right in groomed ski tracks or in the middle of the trail when one is trying to snowplow,” the Bend resident wrote. Many others wrote about how much they enjoyed skiing the currently ungroomed trails of the Nordeen Loop, which leads a new warming shelter. “Don’t widen the trail,” wrote a Bend resident, who stated he or she does not usually comment on Forest Service proposals, but felt strongly about this issue. “Don’t let a small minority of skiers that want to take their dogs with them destroy and take away the best loop in Swampy from thousands of others. … You can’t mix the two uses without a lot of conflict.” Some mentioned that backcountry skiers donated money and time to build the Nordeen shelter. “It would be morally repugnant for the Forest Service to now turn this into a skate-ski highway, in essence forcing back-country skiers elsewhere,” another Bend resident wrote. Concerns about dogs jumping on skiers, or getting in the way and causing skiers to fall, were also common in the comments. “Dogs do not follow along quietly on the trail,” one person wrote. “To have a dog jump on a person on (skis) could cause a fall and serious injury. I have had dogs jump on me while hiking the Old Mill trail. Please do not let this beautiful ski area ‘go to the dogs.’ ” However, a Sunriver resident wrote in to say that more winter trails for people with dogs would be welcome. Edison is the only decent place to snowshoe with a dog in the Deschutes National Forest, the person wrote, compared with multiple options on the Mount Hood National Forest. “Yes, we could go cross-country off-trail, but our ages (in the 60s) makes it very difficult,” the Sunriver resident wrote. “And

Dave Weaver / The Associated Press

An unidentified student, center, is united with a loved one in Omaha, Neb., Wednesday outside the Millard South High School. Robert Butler Jr. was the son of Omaha Police Detective Robert Butler and attended Lincoln

Southwest High School last year. A person familiar with the investigation said it is believed Robert

with an aging dog also, we really do need a trail system to use for both activities.” Others supportive of increased access for dogs mentioned that at Wanoga, skiers with dogs must share the area with snowmobilers. “I am in support of having dogs join the winter fun via the Nordeen Loop,” wrote a spaniel owner. “I don’t have to be on the look out for snowmobilers, and the trails would be groomed regularly. I urge you to empower those of us with dogs to be allowed to use the trails that are both safe and convenient.” And Bend is a dog-friendly town, other commenters emphasized. “Being that Bend is estimated to have dogs as pets in over half its households and on the fact that we are a world class winter sports destination, it seems to make sense that both tourists and locals should have more options than one groomed trail of low quality at Wanoga,” a Bend

resident wrote. The Forest Service, in responding to a Freedom of Information Act request from The Bulletin for copies of those comments, redacted the names of the commenters, references to organizations within the comments and, in at least one case, the name of a commenter’s dog. The redactions were made because of privacy laws, said Gery Ferguson, planner with the Deschutes National Forest. “Under the Privacy Act (of 1974), we’re required to protect personally identifiable information such as their name and address,” she said. The Forest Service will release a commenter’s name and address when the comment is in response to part of a National Environmental Policy Act planning process, she said, but these comments did not fall into that category. And the federal agency redacted organization names because the groups could easily be linked to individuals in the community,

BEND

RIVER

PROMENADE,

BEND

used his father’s Glock. The younger Butler’s body was found dead in a parking lot. On an update to his Facebook page, filed from a mobile phone, Robert wrote: “Everybody that used to know me I’m sry but Omaha changed me and (expletive) me up. and the school I attend is even worse ur gonna here about the evil (expletive) I did but that (expletive) school drove me to this. I wont u guys to remember me for who I was b4 this ik. I greatly affected the lives of the families ruined but I’m sorry. goodbye.” Lincoln school officials said Wednesday that Butler transferred from Lincoln Southwest High School to Millard South on Oct. 6 but had not been forced to transfer. “He was popular with students and seemed real pleasant,” said Southwest Principal Rob Slauson, who described Butler as “a fairly normal, average” student.

Ferguson said. “What we didn’t want to release is information that could cause any kind of retribution or ability for someone to do something to that individual,” she said. The Forest Service’s manual for implementing the Freedom of Information Act states that the agency should not release information of a “private, intimate nature about individuals that would be a ‘clearly unwarranted invasion of privacy’ if disclosed.” The manual includes a list of examples of this type of exempted information, such as an individual’s place and date of birth, age, home address, Social Security number and e-mail. But the list does not include an individual’s name. However, Ferguson said names should be listed as exemptions as well, to protect a person’s privacy. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or at kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

5 41 . 317. 6 0 0 0

could happen again By Dina Cappiello and Harry R. Weber The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Decisions intended to save time and money created an unreasonable amount of risk that triggered the largest offshore oil spill in U.S. history, a disaster that could happen again without significant reforms by industry and government, the presidential panel investigating the BP blowout concluded Wednesday. The commission findings — the result of a probe requested by President Barack Obama after the April 20 rig explosion — described systemic problems within the offshore energy industry and government regulators who oversee it. Poor decisions led to technical problems that the commission, and inquires by BP and Congress, have identified as contributing to the accident that killed 11 people and led to more than 200 million gallons of oil spewing from BP’s well a mile beneath the Gulf of Mexico. BP, Halliburton and Transocean, the three key companies involved with the well and the rig that exploded, each made individual decisions that increased risks of a blowout but saved significant time or money. But ultimately, the Deepwater Horizon disaster came down to a single failure, the panel says — management. When decisions were made, no one was considering the risk they were taking. In one example cited by the commission, a BP request to set an “unusually deep cement plug” was approved by the thenMinerals Management Service in 90 minutes. That decision is one of the nine technical and engineering calls the commission says increased the risk of a blowout. “The blowout was not the product of a series of aberrational decisions made by a

rogue industry or government officials that could not have been anticipated or expected to occur again. Rather, the root causes are systemic, and absent significant reform in both industry practices and government policies, might well recur,” the commission concluded in a 48-page excerpt of its final report, obtained by The Associated Press. A final report is due to the president Jan. 11. Interior Department spokeswoman Kendra Barkoff said the report focused on areas in which the agency in charge of offshore drilling has already made improvements. “The agency has taken unprecedented steps and will continue to make the changes necessary to restore the American people’s confidence in the safety and environmental soundness of oil and gas drilling and production on the Outer Continental Shelf, while balancing our nation’s important energy needs,” Barkoff said in a statement. BP PLC in a statement issued Wednesday said the report, like its own investigation, found the accident was the result of multiple causes, involving multiple companies, but the company was working with regulators “to ensure the lessons learned from Macondo lead to improvements in operations and contractor services in deepwater drilling.” Transocean Ltd., which owned the rig being leased by BP to perform the drilling, said in response to the commission’s findings that “the procedures being conducted in the final hours were crafted and directed by BP engineers and approved in advance by federal regulators.” Halliburton Co., the cement contractor on the well, also said it acted at the direction of BP and was “fully indemnified by BP.”


A6 Thursday, January 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T ORY

As Pakistani politician is mourned, killer is lauded By Karin Brulliard The Washington Post

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — A leading ruling party politician was buried under tight security Wednesday, one day after his assassination, and he was lionized by supporters for his bravery and principles. But outside the confines of Salman Taseer’s cordoned-off funeral, his suspected killer was also lauded as heroic — for having slain a liberal politician who had dared to speak out against Pakistan’s stringent anti-blasphemy laws. The opposing responses underscored the deep cultural fractures in Muslim-majority Pakistan, where moderate voices are often drowned out by hard-line clerics, an increasingly intolerant public and a persistent Islamist insurgency. Though the weak government led by Taseer’s secular Pakistan People’s Party regularly denounces religious extremism, it has done little to dampen it. Taseer, the governor of Punjab province, was shot more than two dozen times outside an upscale marketplace in a wealthy area of Islamabad, the capital. Authorities said Mumtaz Qadri, 26, a member of the elite police force assigned to Taseer’s security detail, surrendered and confessed afterward. Photos taken at the scene showed him smiling. While thousands of top PPP officials and workers gathered for Taseer’s state funeral in the eastern city of Lahore, lawyers showered rose petals on Qadri as

Resorts Continued from A1 It includes Rep. Gene Whisnant, R-Sunriver, critical voices like the group Central Oregon LandWatch, and Deschutes County planning Director Nick Lelack — all veterans of previous resort clashes. “The experience of Deschutes County has been really valuable for shaping this process,” said Dingfelder. In 1984, the state adopted streamlined rules for destination resorts to promote tourism in rural areas, allowing them to bypass Oregon’s normal urbanoriented development process. Over the years, however, environmentalists and state land-use officials have increasingly complained that thanks to development industry lobbying, resort rules were relaxed and exploited to build large, high-end, golf-oriented subdivisions, not tourist destinations. In 2009 the debate hit Salem. One bill would have banned resorts in the Metolius basin, while another could have effectively banned new resorts in Deschutes. The first succeeded, while the second failed in the waning days of the Legislature. Dingfelder, one of the Legislature’s most prominent environmentalists, was one of several lawmakers who liked the eco-resort concept that was promoted

Merkley Continued from A1 McConnell called Merkley’s plan a package of “partisan rule changes aimed at empowering the majority at the expense of the minority,” in a Washington Post Op-Ed Wednesday. The essence of the proposal would give the minority party a guarantee that they could offer amendments, while increasing the burden on senators who delay votes, Merkley said, in an interview Wednesday morning. “Both of them are legitimate complaints that need to be addressed in the context of greater deliberation,” Merkley said. “There are the makings of a potential agreement there.” The resolution has five parts: • The “talking filibuster.” This would require senators to continuously speak on the Senate floor, a la “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington,” to hold up a vote on a measure. Currently, senators merely need to inform a bill sponsor or majority leader that they intend to filibuster to hold up proceedings. • Ending secret holds. Currently, any senator can object to a bill, essentially stopping debate, without revealing his or her identity. Secret holds can be ended, but only with a time-consuming process and 60 votes. • Guaranteeing amendments by both parties. The minority party would be guaranteed votes on three amendments that are related to the bill being debated,

Muhammed Muheisen / The Associated Press

A Pakistani mourner yells during the funeral procession of Punjab Gov. Salman Taseer, in Lahore, Pakistan, on Wednesday. Taseer was assassinated Tuesday. he arrived at an Islamabad courthouse. A national group of 500 religious scholars, meanwhile, praised his deed and issued an ominous warning to those who mourned Taseer. “One who supports a blasphemer is also a blasphemer,” the group said in a statement, which warned journalists, politicians and intellectuals to “learn” from the killing. “What Qadri did has

made every Muslim proud.” Police said they were investigating whether Qadri acted alone. The suspect was ordered to appear before one of Pakistan’s anti-terrorism courts, which convict few suspects. One Islamabad police official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said preliminary investigations revealed that Qadri had been planning the attack

for the Metolius basin, but which fell victim to a resort ban instead. “I thought there were some good things in there,” she said of the green-oriented plan. “I didn’t feel (the Metolius) was the right place.” Dingfelder initially asked the work group to look at the entire resort statute. But with the Legislature convening next week, Dingfelder has asked the group members to narrow their focus. Her draft bill would make smaller destination resorts easier to build. The “small resort” model would focus more on timeshares and shared-ownership, rather than on the residential lots that have dominated destination resorts in recent years. It would consist of 25 to 100 units of “visitor-oriented accommodations,” and would allow for investment into habitat protection and green building techniques rather than recreational facilities such as golf courses. Lelack says the law, as proposed, would make it easier to build small destination resorts, while limiting their development to lesser-quality forestland. “The small destination resort bill will provide some flexibility for new types of small resorts, and address some of the elements of the current small resort program that don’t make it economically viable,” he said. But Paul Dewey, a lawyer for the conservation group Central Oregon Landwatch, said he

thinks the current bill, focusing only on small resorts, does not do enough to protect the environment. He said the bill does nothing to place new limits on the traditional, larger resorts. Not only that, but counties don’t have the resources to enforce the timeshare requirement of the small resort, meaning they could become “essentially small subdivisions,” he said. Dingfelder, for her part, said the divergent interests that have been meeting at least have forged a common understanding of the issues around resorts. “I think we’ve gotten a lot further down the path than we were two years ago,” she said. Lelack said that the bill, as written, probably wouldn’t lead to new resorts in Central Oregon, due to a lack of forestland available for development. Whisnant led the fight against the 2009 bill that developers feared would halt new resorts in Deschutes County. He said his main goal is that new restrictions don’t halt the building of traditional resorts in the region. “I don’t have a problem with trying to make it better,” he said of the current destination resort law. “I just don’t want to take (resorts) off the table for Central Oregon.”

or in Senate lingo, “germane” amendments. • Allowing debate on bills. Currently, even the proposal to bring a bill up for debate, aka the “motion to proceed,” is something that can be filibustered. The new rules would no longer allow filibusters on those motions. • Speeding nominations. Judicial and administration nominees have ended up as casualties of the current frequency of filibuster. The new rules would still allow filibusters of nominees, but would allow a vote to break the filibuster after just two hours, rather than the 30 hour wait currently required. The proposal was supposed to receive a vote on Wednesday, the first day of the new Senate, when the chamber traditionally adopts new rules. But Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid used a procedural trick to extend the first “legislative day” until Jan. 24, at which point he promised a debate on overhauling the rules. Merkley said that kind of calendar manipulation is common in the Senate. “There have been first legislative days that stretched for months,” Merkley said. Meanwhile, Reid and McConnell announced that they plan to set up a commission to study ways to speed up the confirmation of administration nominees. The discussions between Reid and McConnell about rules changes are encouraging, Merkley said, but a rule change is the only way to ensure the Senate doesn’t get bogged down by the objections of

for days. The official also said a top police official in Rawalpindi had previously rejected Qadri for assignment to a special counterterrorism police force because of concerns about his militant religious views. That disclosure renewed questions about the vetting of security forces in this nuclear-armed nation, which the United States relies on — and funds with billions

of aid dollars — to support the war in neighboring Afghanistan. One senior security official said there was no cause for concern. “The presence of a few such people cannot be ruled out in security forces,” the official said. “However, we believe a majority of the forces are not inclined towards extremism.” Taseer had called for leniency for a Christian mother sentenced to death under the blasphemy ban, and he supported proposed amendments to prevent use of the law as a tool for persecuting minorities or settling vendettas. But those efforts were met with threats by Islamic groups, which had assailed Taseer’s stance. His killing stunned Pakistan — which has been embroiled in political crisis since a key coalition party defected to the opposition over the weekend — and was roundly condemned by many newspapers, activists and politicians. A headline in the Daily Times, a liberal newspaper published by Taseer, read: “A brave man cut down by fanaticism.” About 150 people holding placards reading “We reject religious extremism” attended a candlelight vigil at the site of the slaying. Yet as Dawn, another Englishlanguage newspaper, noted in a front-page article, few of Taseer’s supporters defended — or even commented directly on — his views about Pakistan’s ban on insults toward Islam. Nor did they focus on the violent rhetoric of some religious clerics.

Morocco arrests 27 in terror cell By J. David Goodman and Souad Mekhennet New York Times News Service

The Moroccan government arrested 27 people accused of operating a terror cell in the Western Sahara led by a member of the local branch of al-Qaida, officials said Wednesday. The group was planning suicide and car bomb attacks against Moroccan and foreign security forces as well as bank robberies in Rabat and Casablanca to finance their activities, the interior minister,

Tayeb Cherkaoui, said at a news conference carried by state media. The group’s leader was a Moroccan member of al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb, which operates in northern Africa and has camps in neighboring Algeria, Mauritania and northern Mali. The goal was to set up a “rear base” for terror planning, he said. A Moroccan security official said the cell had “links with extremists of different nationalities in European countries.” The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to comment publicly.

U.S. man, 19, says he was beaten while detained in Kuwait By Mark Mazzetti New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — A 19year-old American man detained in Kuwait two weeks ago and placed on a U.S. nofly list claims he was beaten by his Kuwaiti captors during a weeklong interrogation about possible contacts with terrorism suspects in Yemen. The teenager, Gulet Mohamed, a Somali-American who turned 19 during his captivity, said in a telephone interview Wednesday from a Kuwaiti detention cell that he was beaten with sticks, forced to stand for hours, threatened with electric shocks and warned that his mother would be imprisoned if he did not give truthful answers about his travels in Yemen and Somalia in 2009. U.S. officials have offered few details about the case, except to confirm that Mohamed is on a no-fly list and, for now at least, cannot return to the United States. Mohamed, from Alexandria, Va., remains in a Kuwaiti detention center even after Kuwait’s government, according to his brother, determined that he should be released. Mohamed said that Kuwaiti interrogators repeatedly asked whether he had met Anwar al-Awlaki, the U.S.-born cleric now hiding in Yemen who is suspected in terrorist plots by al-Qaida’s Yemen affiliate. He said the Kuwaitis also asked detailed questions about his family in the United States and his family’s clan in Somalia — information he said he assumed that U.S. officials provided to the Kuwaitis. Mohamed denies ever meeting with militants. “I am a good Muslim,” he said in the interview. “I despise terrorism.”

ENTER TO WIN A TWO NIGHT STAY AT THE FIRESIDE MOTEL IN YACHATS!

Nick Budnick can be reached at 503-566-2839 or at nbudnick@bendbulletin.com.

one or more senators. “You can have leadership take one position, but that doesn’t mean all the members are going to abide by that,” Merkley said. In addition to objections by McConnell and several other Republicans, Sen. Ben Nelson, DNeb., also came out against the rules changes on Wednesday. Also on Wednesday, U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., tried to advance his proposal to end secret holds, but was blocked, at least until the Senate returns in late January, by a Republican objection. Sen. Lamar Alexander, RTenn., objected to Wyden’s bill. He said on the Senate floor that Republicans will probably be willing to accept limits to secret holds when the issue comes up again later this month. “They have Democratic support and Republican support for that, maybe it’s the time to deal with it,” Alexander said. Wyden, who has support from Sens. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., and Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, said he hoped secret holds would die on Wednesday. “I wish we were getting this done today,” said Wyden, who has campaigned against secret holds for more than a decade, “largely because this would give us a chance on the first day of the Senate, a new session, (to say) once and for all we were deepsixing secrecy.” Keith Chu can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at kchu@bendbulletin.com.

Simply Sign Up For Our E-mail Notifications And Be Entered To Win. Don’t miss being notified about another special offer, Great grocery coupon, or Deal of the Day coupon! Get on our E-mail notification list and we’ll E-mail you when these deals are coming up in The Bulletin.

Simply E-mail us your name & physical address to:

emailnotifications@bendbulletin.com

DRAWING TO BE HELD FEBRUARY 28, 2011 Winner will be notified by E-mail. See rules and restrictions at bendbulletin.com/fireside

For more information call 541-385-5800 Motel Accommodations provided by The Fireside in Yachats FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 1-800-336-3573 OR VISIT www.firesidemotel.com


B

Lessons learned Six businesses share stories of how they failed, see Page B4.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2011

MARKET REPORT

s

2,702.20 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +20.95 +.78%

s

11,722.89 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE +31.71 +.27%

s

1,276.56 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +6.36 +.50%

s

BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 3.48 treasury CHANGE +4.19%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B2-3

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Tony’s Deli closes Tony’s Delicatessen, which sold sandwiches, salads and Italian-style entrees in the Century Park retail center on Century Drive in Bend, closed Dec. 31, co-owner Tom Coleman confirmed Wednesday. The restaurant’s neighbors include Safeway supermarket in one building and Starbucks Coffee and Taco Del Mar in another building. A Blockbuster movie rental franchise that had operated in the same building as Tony’s closed in September. Tony’s closure leaves that building empty. Tony’s opened for business in mid-2008 after Coleman and Rick Adamo had worked together at the Athletic Club of Bend and realized they wanted to have their own food business. “It’s been a tough go from Day One,� Coleman said. “We opened, you know, right before everything kinda went bust, and it’s been a challenge to build our business with this economy. And (the) Blockbuster closing didn’t help, but that’s just one thing.� Coleman said that he still has a lease on the Tony’s location and that some people have expressed interest in subleasing the space.

Honda, Ford top brand-quality survey LOS ANGELES — Toyota has been toppled in consumers’ eyes as the leading top-quality automaker, with consumers now looking more favorably on Honda and Ford, according to Consumer Reports’ 2011 Car Brand Perception Survey. A series of massive recalls over the last 18 months has tarnished Toyota’s reputation for quality, the magazine said Tuesday. Toyota Motor Corp. paid nearly $50 million in fines last year to federal safety regulators for failing to inform them promptly of defects in its vehicles and for delaying recalls. The Honda brand ranked first in the survey, with 25 percent of car owners participating in the survey naming it as the manufacturer with the best quality.

Service sector grows WASHINGTON — Strong consumer demand pushed a key measure of the economy’s service sector to its highest level in more than four years, the latest evidence that the economy is gaining strength and job growth could pick up in the new year. The Institute for Supply Management, a trade group of purchasing executives, said Wednesday that its index of service sector activity rose to 57.1 in December. Any reading above 50 indicates growth. — From staff and wire reports

Factory orders Total new orders to American factories for all manufactured goods: Seasonally adjusted $430 billion

$423.8B

420 410 400 390 380 ’09 ’10 Source: U.S. Commerce Department AP

B

DESCHUTES COUNTY

Notices of default down in 4th quarter But experts caution it’s just a lull prompted by foreclosure freeze ed by a freeze on foreclosures so lenders could review their paperwork, said Valerie Hunter, principal broker, of H&H Preferred Real Estate. “It’s going to go at the speed that it’s been going at until 2013,� said Hunter, who specializes in selling bank-owned properties in the Portland area, Central Oregon and other parts of the state. Deschutes County recorded 3,764 notices of default filings

By Tim Doran The Bulletin

As expected, the total number of initial foreclosure notices filed in Deschutes County last year exceeded the amount filed in 2009. Filings in the fourth quarter, however, dropped nearly 11 percent compared with the fourth quarter of 2009 — the first yearover-year quarterly decline in more than three years. But that was just a lull prompt-

last year, according to the county clerk’s electronic recording system, about 7 percent more than the 3,507 default notices filed in 2009. A notice of default initiates foreclosure proceedings and is generally filed after a mortgage is 90 days delinquent. Not all default notices result in foreclosure, and Deschutes County does not track actual foreclosures. See Default / B3

t

$1373.40 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE -$5.10

t

$29.173 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE -$0.319

Hiring jumped in December By Kevin G. Hall McClatchy-Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — Private businesses hired new workers at a surprisingly energetic pace in December, according to a widely tracked job-tracking report released on Wednesday. The ADP National Employment Report showed that private-sector employment rose by 297,000 in December. That’s the highest monthly gain since the report’s inception in 2000, and it’s double or triple what was expected by mainstream economists. Most important, job gains that high are what’s needed to knock down the stubbornly high unemployment rate, which has been stuck at just under 10 percent for more than a year. It was at 9.8 percent in November, with an official report on December employment due Friday. The new data suggest that last month’s disappointing official jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics may have been flawed, or at least a pothole on the road to recovery. Combined with several other recent positive indicators, the evidence that the economic recovery is strengthening appears to be mounting.

%FTDIVUFT$PVOUZOPUJDFTPGEFGBVMU #ZNPOUI

2007

2008

2009

2010

402

400

362 326

318

347

356

314

298

300

244

308 284 205

200

The Associated Press ile photo

100

0 January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

#ZRVBSUFS

September October November December

#ZZFBS 733

1,200

3,764 3,507

1,090 1,000

952 827 623

600 400

Goldman unit said to have passed on first Facebook deal

978

820

800

1,925

320 235

By Andrew Ross Sorkin and Susanne Craig

589

200

New York Times News Service

88 0

Q1 Q2

Jesse Paloger holds a sign promoting his skills and experience while fishing for a job on Wall Street in New York last month. A report found that private companies added 297,000 jobs last month, far above the 100,000 economists expected.

Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4

2007

2008

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4

2009

2010

4PVSDF%FTDIVUFT$PVOUZ$MFSLT0GGJDF

2007

2008

2009

2010

(SFH$SPTT5IF#VMMFUJO

Often hailed as a way to fight poverty, microcredit has made a few enemies Some political leaders accuse lenders of taking advantage of the poor

How to get your financial house in order in 2011

By Vikas Bajaj New York Times News Service

MUMBAI, India — Microcredit is losing its halo in many developing countries. Microcredit was once extolled by world leaders like Bill Clinton and Tony Blair as a powerful tool that could help eliminate poverty, through loans as small as $50 to cowherds, basket weavers and other poor people for starting or expanding businesses. But now microloans have sparked political hostility in Bangladesh, India, Nicaragua and other developing countries. In December, the prime minister of Bangladesh, Sheikh Hasina Wazed, who had championed microloans alongside Clinton at talks in Washington in 1997, turned her back on them. She said microlenders were “sucking blood from the poor in the name of poverty alleviation,� and she ordered an investigation into Grameen Bank, which had pioneered microcredit and along with its founder was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2006. Here in India, until recently home to the world’s fastest-growing mi-

Before Goldman Sachs bought a stake in Facebook and started offering shares to wealthy clients, a powerful investment group within the firm turned down the chance to buy a piece of the social networking behemoth, according to several people briefed on the internal discussions. Goldman Sachs Capital Partners — a group that manages and invests for pensions, sovereign wealth funds, and other prominent clients — was given the initial opportunity to invest $450 million in Facebook, said the people who were not authorized to speak publicly on the matter. Goldman gives the “first look� on many investment opportunities to the $20.3 billion fund. While most of the group’s clients are big institutions, the investors also include current and former Goldman partners. See Facebook / B3

By Claudia Buck McClatchy-Tribune News Service

New York Times News Service ile photo

Women attend a meeting to learn about microloans at the Ujjivan microcredit firm in Mumbai, India, in September. Microloans have sparked hostility in Bangladesh, India, Nicaragua and other developing countries as political leaders say lenders are taking advantage of the poor. crocredit businesses, lending has slowed sharply since the state with the most microloans adopted a strict law restricting lending. In Nicaragua, Pakistan and Bolivia, activists and politicians have urged borrowers not to repay their loans. The hostility toward microfinance is a sharp reversal from the praise and good will that politicians, social workers and bankers showered on the sec-

tor in the last decade. Philanthropists and investors poured billions of dollars into nonprofit and profit-making microlenders, who were considered vital players in achieving the United Nations’ ambitious Millennium Development Goals for 2015 that world leaders set in 2000. One of the goals was to reduce by half the number of people in extreme poverty. See Microcredit / B3

It’s that virtuous time of year for all those good intentions: Lose weight, clean out closets, learn a foreign language. For New Year’s resolutions involving money, there are two biggies: paying down debt and pumping up savings. And this month is when the holiday debt hangover kicks in. “People get shocked in January when the holiday bills start coming in. Or if they’re paying online, the shock is there,� said Terri Ciochetti, PERSONAL already a Sacramento, Calif., psychotheraFINANCE pist and former financial recovery counselor. But it can be oh-so-hard to make those New Year’s money resolutions stick. Ciochetti says that’s partly because our resolutions are too often “desperate wishes, as opposed to thought-out plans.� But it appears we’re trying. Getting through the recession has forced more Americans to sock away what money they have, boosting the nation’s dismal savings rate slightly. If you want to curb your spending and boost savings, here are some how-to’s. See Resolutions / B3


B USI N ESS

B2 Thursday, January 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

D

A-B-C-D A-Power AAR ABB Ltd ACE Ltd AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGL Res AK Steel AMB Pr AMR AOL ARYxTh h ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AVX Cp AXT Inc Aarons s Aastrom rs AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac AbitibiB n Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaPh h AcadiaRlt Accenture AccretvH n Accuride n Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActionSemi ActivePwr ActivsBliz Actuant Acuity Acxiom AdeonaPh AdobeSy Adtran AdvAuto AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeroflex n Aeropostl s AeroViron AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g AgreeRlt Agrium g AirProd Aircastle Airgas AirTran AkamaiT AkeenaS h Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon Alere AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion Alexza AlignTech Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch AllegiantT Allergan AlliData AlliancOne AlliBGlbHi AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AldIrish AlldNevG AllisChE AllosThera AllscriptH Allstate AlmadnM g AlnylamP AlphaNRs Alphatec AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AlteraCp lf AlterraCap Altria Alumina Alvarion AmBev s Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Ameresco n Amerigrp AMovilL AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AGreet AIntGr pfA AmIntlGrp AmerMed AmOriBio AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Ameriprise Amerisafe AmeriBrgn AmCasino Ametek s Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amsurg Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnadysPh AnalogDev Ancestry Andrsons AngioDyn Angiotc gh AnglogldA ABInBev Anixter AnnTaylr Annaly Anooraq g Ansys AntaresP Antigenic h Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache AptInv ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldMatl AMCC Apricus rs AquaAm ArcadiaRs ArcelorMit ArchCap ArchCoal ArchDan ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArmHld ArmourRsd ArmstrW s ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArtTech ArtioGInv ArubaNet ArvMerit AscenaRtl AscentSol AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfoL AspenIns AspenTech AsscdBanc Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen Atheros AtlasEngy AtlasPplH AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn AudCodes Augusta g Aurizon g AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium

5.65 +.03 27.95 +.20 0.48 21.92 -.44 1.30 61.99 -.21 12.77 +.17 1.20 56.38 -.11 52.89 +.67 1.76 36.08 -.04 0.20 16.72 +.24 1.12 32.80 +.55 8.57 +.47 23.68 +.01 .28 -.01 0.27 36.63 -.76 1.72 29.98 +.10 17.39 -.13 10.24 -.13 2.16 +.03 0.18 15.53 10.31 +.28 0.05 20.20 -.13 2.65 +.03 1.76 48.27 0.70 55.35 -.87 0.42 6.66 -.07 23.44 +.15 4.35 26.38 +1.15 1.20 +.02 0.72 18.30 -.12 0.90 48.28 +.01 16.50 +.09 15.67 +.06 4.02 +.22 60.59 +3.05 28.63 +1.10 2.25 +.06 2.57 +.05 0.15 12.29 -.24 0.04 26.31 +.04 0.52 58.40 -.22 17.55 +.25 1.50 -.35 32.22 +.71 0.36 36.84 +.56 0.24 62.32 +.08 3.83 +.03 13.43 +.05 8.91 +.14 0.06 5.55 -.24 6.94 +.13 27.18 -.08 0.04 10.36 +.35 6.35 +.09 14.29 +.28 15.31 +.03 24.33 +.26 29.43 +.28 1.77 +.05 0.04 31.50 +.30 99.25 +.23 6.62 +.05 4.60 -.06 2.96 +.04 41.40 -.09 0.64 71.60 -.37 2.04 23.10 -1.16 0.11 91.62 +.94 1.96 88.80 -.39 0.40 10.86 +.22 1.00 63.43 -.05 7.48 +.01 48.85 +1.71 .53 +.04 5.77 +.12 59.11 +1.70 0.86 10.98 +.14 0.56 55.16 -.18 0.34 37.01 -.07 3.00 +.02 0.12 16.56 +.04 3.95 163.15 -.24 38.25 +1.10 1.80 73.89 +.56 7.45 -.34 82.76 +1.29 1.32 +.06 19.83 +.33 12.49 +.27 0.60 24.95 +.05 0.72 56.46 +.17 0.75 51.75 +.50 0.20 70.26 +.16 70.68 -1.37 4.20 +.05 1.20 14.20 -.06 0.48 7.83 -.03 1.51 23.57 1.58 37.25 -.05 .84 -.03 25.03 -.07 6.99 +.21 4.46 -.06 20.13 +.39 0.80 31.86 -.05 4.78 10.45 +.29 65.41 +2.31 2.62 -.06 0.40 7.11 +.04 0.66 6.09 +.02 0.25 16.05 -.02 0.24 35.90 -.26 0.48 21.31 -.42 1.52 24.48 +.09 0.15 10.44 +.37 2.55 -.07 0.99 30.58 -.63 7.73 +.03 187.42 +2.41 27.35 -.21 35.01 +.27 1.54 28.40 -.06 15.14 -.67 44.29 -.50 1.29 58.88 +.78 14.35 +.26 1.35 31.85 -.07 5.60 28.69 +.29 8.02 +.16 0.44 14.47 +.07 1.84 35.96 -.55 0.10 13.16 +.22 0.72 45.04 +1.27 0.65 32.69 -.09 0.56 23.65 +.58 6.38 9.06 +.47 60.95 +4.17 18.35 -.42 2.46 +.07 28.91 +.30 50.76 -.71 0.88 25.53 -.14 0.72 59.89 +.95 18.40 +.65 0.40 34.46 +.52 0.42 15.79 +.29 0.24 39.31 +.23 56.73 -.02 7.36 +.06 0.06 51.93 -.42 21.57 +.47 14.68 -.03 0.36 76.28 +.17 7.43 +.31 1.38 -.03 0.88 37.60 +.08 33.00 +3.10 0.44 38.08 +.59 16.10 +.71 .33 -.01 0.18 46.88 0.49 56.82 -.52 3.25 61.63 +.95 24.80 -.51 2.65 17.55 +.20 1.58 53.20 +.86 1.75 +.02 1.11 +.06 0.88 6.93 +.07 0.60 45.00 +.01 9.63 +.26 0.60 124.91 +3.05 0.40 25.66 39.82 +.67 1.12 11.55 +.17 334.00 +2.71 0.28 13.76 -.21 10.87 +.31 3.54 -.10 0.62 22.71 .31 +.01 0.75 36.96 -.78 88.07 +.13 0.40 35.71 +.34 0.60 30.52 +.14 2.08 +.15 1.40 16.79 -.04 5.23 +.13 23.54 +.87 0.12 21.88 +.79 1.44 7.92 -.01 13.74 41.15 -.28 3.21 +.14 11.59 +.15 34.64 +.27 6.00 +.01 0.24 14.80 23.48 +.56 21.73 +1.11 26.32 +.02 3.69 +.12 9.65 0.60 53.75 +.77 19.03 +.68 0.60 28.75 -.02 13.12 +.07 0.04 15.00 0.64 38.43 +.15 0.18 19.36 +.24 0.52 14.33 +.08 2.41 47.28 +.46 44.64 +.64 44.26 +.13 0.20 14.58 -.27 1.40 24.31 -.28 12.89 +.14 1.36 31.62 +.11 36.02 +.44 6.67 +.15 3.70 +.09 6.90 -.04 28.19 +.15 41.24 +2.72 1.60 81.67 +.20 1.44 47.63 +.75 255.20 -3.16 21.48 -.22

Nm AvagoTch AvalRare n AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AviatNetw AvisBudg Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap B&G Foods BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJsRest BJs Whls BMB Munai BMC Sft BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s BSD Med BabckW n Baidu s BakrHu Baldor BallCp BallardPw BallyTech BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcoSBrasil BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm pfH BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkGranit h BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BkAtl A h BannerCp Banro g BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BiPCop Barclay Bar iPVix rs BarVixMdT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG Baxter BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belden Belo Bemis Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett BioRef s BioFuelEn BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR BioSante BioTime BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkBldA n BlkDebtStr BlkIntlG&I BlkRlAsst Blackstone BlockHR BlueCoat BodyCen n Boeing Boise Inc BonaFilm n Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci BoydGm Brandyw BrasilTele BreitBurn BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker Brinks BrMySq Broadcom BroadrdgF BroadSft n Broadwind BrcdeCm BroncoDrl Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrukerCp Brunswick Bsquare BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BungeLt CA Inc CB REllis CBIZ Inc CBL Asc CBOE n CBS B CDC Cp rs CEVA Inc CF Inds CGI g CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNinsure CRH CSX CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G Cadence CalDive CalaCvHi CalaCvOp CalaStrTR Calgon CaliperLSc CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CAMAC En CamdnP Cameco g CameltInf n Cameron CampSp CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar Canon CapOne CapSenL CapitlSrce CapFdF rs Caplease CapsteadM CapsThera CpstnTrb h Cardero g CardnlHlth Cardiom g CardiumTh Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters CashAm CasualMal CatalystH CatalystPh Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet CedarF CelSci Celanese Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Celsion Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE Centene CenterFncl CenterPnt CnElBras lf CentEuro CFCda g CenPacF CentAl CntryLink

D 0.07 27.99 -.01 7.30 3.57 111.99 +.31 4.17 +.07 0.80 41.61 -.28 5.25 +.12 14.71 +.24 32.80 -.32 0.88 29.65 -.38 3.32 -.14 0.92 36.05 +.11 0.68 13.44 +.03 0.60 27.47 +.78 1.97 35.71 +.36 38.52 +.80 1.74 90.50 -.84 1.74 78.84 -1.06 33.66 +.06 45.96 -1.04 .91 47.48 +.13 46.50 +.24 4.58 -.11 1.50 43.08 -.10 0.10 17.04 -.02 4.80 +.20 26.17 +.41 104.63 +3.66 0.60 55.99 +.08 0.68 63.06 +.01 0.40 70.17 +.52 1.67 +.09 42.90 +.31 0.55 9.78 -.21 0.82 20.69 +.14 0.80 10.50 -.18 0.45 13.37 -.20 0.88 16.67 +.04 0.04 14.50 +.26 2.05 25.83 -.02 7.87 +.18 2.93 +.09 .80 +.11 1.04 2.50 -.02 2.80 57.89 +.23 0.36 31.69 +1.06 1.96 56.25 -.06 1.23 0.04 2.20 -.01 3.66 -.11 48.64 +.21 25.32 +.31 58.76 +.30 0.28 17.45 +.35 35.83 -.50 63.79 -.97 0.72 91.99 +.01 1.00 16.06 +.56 0.32 20.53 +.14 0.48 49.90 -1.77 1.24 50.69 +.60 .23 +.00 18.06 +.03 5.58 +.19 0.10 5.91 -.08 0.76 76.13 +1.06 1.64 83.37 +.02 49.02 +.06 0.20 36.53 +.08 7.05 +.07 0.92 32.32 +.05 0.28 27.38 -.12 80.91 +.74 0.30 43.98 -.35 0.60 35.70 +.65 30.51 -.23 39.61 -.06 23.12 +.55 1.69 -.01 66.68 +.28 26.77 +.32 0.68 18.58 +.08 1.68 +.01 9.50 +.37 1.28 11.48 +.14 42.33 +.48 4.00 192.00 +1.96 1.42 17.81 +.12 0.32 3.82 -.02 1.36 10.55 +.05 1.09 14.50 +.15 0.40 14.96 -.01 0.60 12.59 +.29 31.36 +1.12 15.63 +1.38 1.68 67.48 +.54 0.40 8.16 +.05 6.38 +.36 .86 +.02 73.18 +.67 0.04 6.96 +.22 2.00 87.08 +.58 7.53 +.05 11.65 +.93 0.60 11.72 +.12 23.11 +.23 1.56 20.42 +.19 17.66 +.17 0.44 19.71 +.37 27.38 -.29 9.07 +.20 1.96 -.06 0.56 21.20 +.28 0.40 27.79 +.48 1.32 26.06 -.11 0.32 43.98 +.80 0.60 22.11 +.03 28.44 +3.57 2.39 -.04 5.72 +.16 7.25 +.36 21.62 +.16 0.52 33.10 -.01 0.56 17.54 -.08 8.86 -.15 0.32 24.13 +.26 0.28 13.92 +.27 16.09 -.14 0.05 20.02 +1.01 10.25 +1.51 0.16 22.92 +.41 0.80 36.67 -.06 0.10 89.76 -.03 0.46 46.33 +.11 45.15 +.23 0.92 66.85 +1.42 0.16 24.68 20.62 +.19 6.37 +.05 0.80 18.05 +.59 0.40 23.75 -.07 0.20 19.20 -.22 3.54 +.13 22.80 +1.51 0.40 137.00 +2.02 17.14 +.07 1.16 79.88 -.57 0.04 37.60 +.12 46.74 +.29 1.00 30.93 -.11 4.60 311.36 -5.63 0.84 18.75 -.05 50.18 +1.06 7.19 +.19 0.26 17.80 +.49 0.83 19.18 -1.06 1.04 65.89 +.48 0.34 8.59 +.11 15.23 +.58 0.35 35.39 +.37 22.05 +.06 0.50 35.18 +.68 0.72 38.67 -.12 0.12 37.50 -.02 8.32 5.90 +.10 1.02 12.55 -.04 1.14 13.00 -.07 0.63 9.43 +.13 14.71 +.01 6.20 +.09 0.04 8.26 +.20 6.04 +.11 13.98 +.29 1.90 -.04 1.80 54.01 +.31 0.40 39.94 -.12 23.83 +.35 49.18 -.29 1.16 34.57 +.11 1.08 66.30 +.01 0.30 44.37 +.22 1.08 64.75 +.23 13.47 +.58 51.47 -.37 0.20 45.52 +1.84 7.03 -.02 0.04 7.33 +.28 11.75 +.12 0.26 5.62 -.15 1.51 12.73 +.12 .58 .99 +.03 2.00 -.07 0.78 38.88 +.30 6.30 +.07 .42 -.01 17.77 +.22 25.41 -.07 21.04 +.43 32.27 +.85 0.40 47.55 +.46 0.72 42.48 +.17 33.41 -.36 28.51 -.16 0.14 37.94 +1.01 4.63 +.07 46.46 +.07 1.38 +.10 1.76 94.52 +.81 0.04 17.11 +.38 42.95 +2.46 0.25 16.23 +.64 .83 +.02 0.20 41.71 +.01 9.84 +.05 59.39 +.70 .37 -.01 2.72 +.42 0.43 10.94 -.03 1.19 16.73 -.07 0.80 32.96 -.58 26.10 -.14 7.67 +.21 0.78 15.77 -.06 1.56 14.40 +.18 23.42 -.21 0.01 19.77 -.16 1.85 +.10 16.93 +.13 2.90 46.39 -.34

Nm Cephln Ceradyne CeragonN Cerner CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds CharterCm ChkPoint Cheesecake Chemtura n CheniereEn ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAgri s ChiArmM ChinaBAK ChinaBiot ChinaCEd ChinaDir ChiElMot n ChiGengM ChinGerui ChinaGreen ChHousLd ChinaIntEn ChinaLife ChinaMda ChinaMed ChinaMble ChinaNGas ChinaNepst ChinNEPet ChinaPStl ChinaSecur ChinaShen ChinaTInfo ChinaUni ChiValve ChiXFash n ChinaYuch ChiCache n ChipMOS Chipotle Chiquita ChrisBnk Chubb ChungTel ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfN Citigrp CitiTdecs CitzRepB h CitrixSys CityNC ClaudeR g CleanDsl rs CleanEngy ClearEFd n Clearwire CliffsNRs ClinicData Clorox CloudPeak Coach CobaltIEn CocaCE CocaCl Coeur CogentC CognizTech CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColumLabs Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmwReit rs CmwRe pfD ComScop CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s Compellent CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComScore ComstkRs Comtech Con-Way ConAgra Concepts ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant Conmed ConocPhil Conolog hlf ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Cnvrgys ConvOrg h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopanoEn Copart Copel CoreLab s CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Cosi Inc CostPlus Costamre n Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien Crane CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc Crocs Crossh g rs CrwnCstle CrownHold CrwnMedia Crystallx g Ctrip.com s CubistPh CullenFr Cummins CurEuro CurAstla CurJpn Cyberonics Cyclacel Cymer CyprsBio h CypSemi CypSharp CytRx Cytec Cytokinet Cytomed Cytori DCT Indl DHT Hldgs DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DSW Inc DTE DanaHldg Danaher s DaqoNEn n Darden Darling DaVita DeVry DeanFds DearbrnBc DeckOut s Deere DejourE g DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DeltaAir DeltaPtr h Deluxe DemandTc DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DeutB pf DB AgriDL DBGoldSh DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE Dex One n Diageo DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver DigitalGlb Dillards

D 60.84 -.58 33.59 +1.99 13.00 -.16 94.45 +.09 2.58 +.18 36.65 +.45 3.60 +.01 36.44 +1.29 39.57 -.03 48.36 +1.48 31.14 -.24 16.06 +.21 6.39 +.12 0.30 26.50 +.28 2.88 91.44 -.16 32.20 +.25 0.16 11.74 -.15 47.18 -.75 0.69 4.06 12.58 +.17 3.79 +.04 1.95 -.07 15.25 +.51 7.41 -.08 1.68 +.06 4.99 +.28 3.72 -.65 6.23 +.04 8.11 -.94 3.03 +.01 6.66 -.22 1.54 62.58 +.36 16.62 -.21 11.31 -.14 1.85 50.09 +.03 5.72 +.06 0.28 4.15 +.19 5.52 -.01 1.93 +.13 5.28 -.01 10.24 +.44 5.31 +.40 0.23 14.49 +.07 9.86 -.25 8.23 -.54 0.25 31.20 +.46 23.67 +1.83 1.60 +.04 221.00 -1.37 13.98 -.14 0.24 5.99 +.04 1.48 59.81 -.27 1.27 24.86 -.18 0.68 69.34 +.23 5.08 +.16 22.93 +.45 0.32 90.17 +1.32 2.91 +.06 1.60 32.14 +.09 0.84 17.81 -.14 0.49 28.00 +.33 17.20 +.59 20.77 +.25 1.97 27.04 +.02 4.97 +.07 7.50 142.63 +2.53 .74 +.08 67.96 +.89 0.40 62.90 +1.36 2.07 -.08 9.40 +.71 14.09 +.29 1.40 22.04 +.54 5.33 +.03 0.56 84.93 -.30 15.15 +.35 2.20 61.94 +.37 23.50 +.73 0.60 52.54 +.26 13.21 -.04 0.48 24.64 -.17 1.76 63.49 -.38 25.85 +.11 14.56 +.65 76.19 +2.03 0.72 8.82 57.02 +1.30 3.05 -.03 2.12 79.18 -.50 21.01 -.23 0.60 18.26 +.06 2.37 +.10 0.38 22.74 +.30 0.38 21.52 +.41 0.40 43.18 -.18 0.94 40.31 +.63 0.48 16.88 -.10 2.00 26.13 +.50 1.63 21.80 +.02 31.37 38.81 +.89 30.61 +1.16 0.36 42.43 -.06 27.58 +.01 28.15 -.11 0.80 51.05 +.20 11.67 +.01 22.90 +1.27 24.10 +.03 1.00 28.70 +.34 0.40 34.95 -.70 0.92 22.69 +.05 13.50 -.09 86.51 -1.50 53.96 +1.21 1.67 +.02 26.02 +.12 2.20 67.55 -.33 .36 +.05 0.40 51.30 +.61 2.38 49.37 -.33 29.58 +.90 21.58 +.11 0.96 30.81 -.51 58.65 +1.25 14.05 +.23 .39 0.06 56.06 -.33 1.08 58.43 -.04 0.42 24.70 +.49 2.30 33.55 +.40 37.49 +.04 0.72 25.22 +.17 0.24 89.57 +.65 19.22 +.14 5.22 +.13 0.56 45.80 +.21 0.20 18.98 -.09 1.65 35.33 +.26 24.48 -.15 14.35 -.22 1.45 +.17 9.59 +.61 14.50 +.17 0.82 70.99 -1.34 8.75 +.14 0.17 8.38 +.08 50.77 -.07 1.50 17.37 -.05 28.64 +.96 0.80 46.93 -.13 0.92 41.11 +.33 1.85 41.93 +.50 0.32 2.93 +.01 67.11 -.58 17.19 +.22 2.20 -.06 42.90 -.45 33.87 +.03 2.71 +.09 .31 -.00 44.59 +.11 22.54 +.82 1.80 61.29 +.38 1.05 112.99 +1.39 0.01 131.04 -1.41 3.24 100.01 -.59 118.72 -1.75 33.35 +.39 1.51 +.03 42.84 -1.16 6.51 +.02 18.34 +.10 2.40 12.72 -.03 1.01 0.05 52.50 -.12 2.13 .64 +.04 5.45 +.17 0.28 5.19 -.06 0.40 4.70 +.02 0.78 9.23 +.01 1.33 25.60 -.19 0.15 12.40 +.39 36.05 -.46 2.24 45.84 +.01 18.24 +.38 0.08 46.87 -.05 11.27 +.88 1.28 46.16 -.54 12.86 +.77 69.46 -.86 0.24 48.31 +.68 8.87 -.06 1.85 +.14 80.65 +1.95 1.40 84.24 +1.22 .34 +.01 0.36 18.87 -.01 9.66 -.11 13.87 +.18 12.98 +.45 .76 -.02 1.00 23.34 -.30 11.93 +.78 18.70 -.36 35.21 -.28 3.21 -.01 3.60 0.20 35.04 +.33 6.53 +.10 0.93 55.00 +1.34 1.66 23.47 +.15 14.15 +.58 15.67 +.08 40.21 -.24 8.49 +.03 0.08 13.83 +.08 0.64 78.70 +.50 8.71 +1.00 2.38 74.65 -.18 0.50 68.14 +3.40 0.03 12.22 +.38 12.30 +.02 14.69 +.79 37.19 +.20 1.08 32.17 +.42 2.12 51.22 +.24 36.14 +.69 30.56 +.06 0.16 38.13 +.45

Nm

D

Diodes Dionex DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DrxEMBll s DrSCBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DirEMBr rs DirFnBear DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear Dir30TrBull DrxREBll s DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscLab rs DishNetwk Disney DrReddy DolbyLab DoleFood DollrFn DollarGen DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs DonlleyRR DoralFncl DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragonW g DrmWksA DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DurectCp DyaxCp Dycom Dynavax Dynegy rs

26.88 -.07 117.71 -.24 41.40 +.06 0.51 47.95 +.80 0.19 42.45 -.39 14.92 -.51 17.74 -.32 22.31 -.15 19.63 +.16 8.70 -.27 30.12 +.96 46.82 +2.81 0.62 31.59 -2.19 0.39 57.31 +.76 0.11 75.43 +2.41 8.42 -.14 1.55 74.30 +1.13 0.41 59.06 +.43 0.08 19.17 +.55 40.55 -.88 35.33 -.91 4.10 +.33 20.76 +.50 0.40 39.96 +.97 0.24 37.98 +.56 67.51 -.02 13.35 -.05 31.02 +.92 30.10 -.44 48.56 +.46 52.08 -2.66 1.83 43.03 -.11 16.68 +.51 1.00 80.72 +3.16 1.04 17.54 -.19 1.56 +.06 0.40 17.15 +.05 1.10 58.21 -.58 0.60 34.68 -.06 1.00 36.25 +.75 8.30 +.24 29.25 +.30 41.42 -.60 0.52 4.42 -.02 76.25 +.79 2.07 -.03 5.38 +.05 1.64 50.22 +.33 0.48 20.92 +.06 0.98 17.77 -.18 0.68 12.78 +.21 3.61 +.09 2.09 -.01 15.04 +.40 3.12 +.13 5.71 +.02

E-F-G-H ECDang n ETrade rs eBay EDAP TMS eHealth EMC Cp EMCOR ENI EOG Res EQT Corp eResrch ETF Pall n EagleBulk EaglRkEn ErthLink EstWstBcp EastChm EKodak Eaton EatnVan EV LtdDur EV MuIT EVRiskMgd EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW Ebix Inc s EchoStar Ecolab Ecopetrol eDiets.cm h EdisonInt EducMgmt EducRlty EdwLfSci s 8x8 Inc ElPasoCp ElPasoPpl Elan EldorGld g ElectArts eMagin Embraer Emcore EmersonEl Emulex Enbridge EnCana g EndvSilv g EndoPhrm Endologix Ener1 Energen Energizer EngyConv EnrgyRec EngyTsfr EgyXXI rs EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis EnerSys ENSCO Entegris Entergy EntPrPt EnterPT EntreM rs EntreeGold EntropCom EnzonPhar Equifax Equinix EqtyOne EqtyRsd EricsnTel EssexPT EsteeLdr EtfSilver Euronet EverestRe EvergE rs EvrgrSlr rs ExactSci h ExcelM ExcoRes Exelixis Exelon ExeterR gs ExideTc Expedia ExpdIntl Express n ExpScrip s ExterranH ExtraSpce ExxonMbl EZchip Ezcorp F5 Netwks FEI Co FLIR Sys FMC Corp FMC Tech FNBCp PA FSI Intl FTI Cnslt FX Ener FactsetR FairchldS FamilyDlr Fastenal FedExCp FedRlty FedInvst FelCor Ferro FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FifthStFin FifthThird FinEngin n Finisar FinLine FstAFin n FstBcPR h FstCashFn FstCwlth FstHorizon FstInRT FMajSilv g FMidBc FstNiagara FstSolar FTNDXTc FTDJInet FT ConDis FT Fincl FT RNG FTrVLDv FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FlagstB rs Flextrn Flotek h FlowInt FlowrsFds Flowserve Fluor FocusMda FEMSA FootLockr ForcePro FordM FordM wt FordC pfS ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil FormFac Fortinet Fortress FortuneBr Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel FrankRes FMCG FresKabi rt FreshMkt n Fronteer g

26.09 +.34 16.36 -.01 28.73 +.26 5.00 +.05 12.87 -.82 23.43 +.33 28.64 -.16 2.51 44.48 +.26 0.62 92.33 +.19 0.88 45.41 +.37 7.31 +.02 77.17 -.31 5.04 +.01 0.10 8.89 +.01 0.64 8.78 +.10 0.04 20.23 +.62 1.88 87.49 +.64 5.74 +.19 2.32 103.95 +.73 0.72 30.20 +.03 1.39 15.77 -.07 0.99 11.43 +.17 1.28 13.36 +.04 1.16 11.50 1.14 10.66 -.01 1.56 12.33 -.01 24.32 +.40 25.96 -.17 0.70 49.86 +.10 0.97 41.28 -.42 .53 +.03 1.28 38.42 -.49 16.95 +.27 0.20 7.50 -.23 78.82 -1.45 2.73 +.08 0.04 13.77 +.13 1.64 33.66 +.24 6.28 +.35 0.05 17.64 -.21 16.28 -.10 7.16 +.55 0.64 29.55 +.05 1.17 +.03 1.38 57.20 +.70 11.72 +.04 1.96 55.44 -.42 0.80 29.27 -.13 6.71 -.17 35.92 -.05 6.89 +.05 3.65 -.03 0.52 51.22 +.30 72.64 -.34 4.66 +.06 4.02 +.09 3.58 52.45 +.50 28.87 +1.35 5.66 +.12 2.16 31.79 +.13 0.61 22.32 -.19 32.01 -.16 1.40 51.48 +.52 7.28 -.17 3.32 72.53 -.58 2.33 42.05 +.29 2.60 45.84 -.66 6.17 +.71 3.35 -.06 13.22 +.86 12.48 +.31 0.64 36.19 +.36 82.84 +.49 0.88 18.34 +.19 1.47 51.17 -.03 0.28 11.37 +.01 4.13 116.10 +.80 0.75 82.61 +.88 29.19 -.45 18.09 +.10 1.92 83.25 -.78 1.15 +.43 3.09 -.03 6.14 +.14 5.65 0.16 19.27 -.15 7.96 +.19 2.10 42.71 +.24 6.03 +.11 9.93 +.02 0.28 25.43 +1.01 0.40 54.51 -.21 18.27 +.07 55.88 -.24 23.36 -.23 0.33 17.75 +.05 1.76 74.70 -.20 31.09 +.58 27.96 +.47 137.29 +5.22 26.80 +.25 29.43 +.35 0.50 77.77 -.79 85.91 -.34 0.48 10.25 +.10 4.19 +.02 36.20 +.04 6.56 +.36 0.92 93.71 +.20 15.78 -.14 0.62 44.99 -4.32 0.84 60.08 +.26 0.48 93.87 +.75 2.68 77.58 -.81 0.96 26.70 +.67 7.71 +.63 14.20 -.57 16.07 -.18 0.72 13.61 -.02 0.20 28.44 +.49 1.28 12.07 +.13 0.04 14.96 +.23 20.11 +.67 30.86 +.08 0.16 16.69 +.03 0.24 14.99 +.05 .49 -.01 32.14 +.08 0.04 7.25 +.09 0.72 12.36 +.37 9.48 +.03 14.43 +.08 0.04 12.29 +.28 0.60 14.04 -.00 131.60 +.48 0.10 26.29 +.33 0.04 35.29 +.61 0.09 19.89 +.08 0.19 14.84 +.10 0.05 19.67 +.08 0.40 15.11 -.02 2.20 38.02 +.13 0.64 20.08 +.32 58.93 +.49 1.79 +.09 7.89 -.06 5.38 +.10 4.02 +.24 0.80 26.10 -.11 1.16 117.00 -1.02 0.50 65.09 +.54 23.34 -.37 0.64 56.64 -.04 0.60 19.10 -.14 5.59 -.02 17.89 +.51 9.11 +.48 3.25 53.65 +.88 16.93 -.05 31.79 +.43 37.41 +.24 9.00 +.11 36.50 +1.53 5.75 +.10 0.76 60.30 -.03 72.00 -.59 34.75 +.17 1.77 21.11 -.21 1.00 110.31 -1.84 2.00 118.35 -.40 .04 38.77 +.04 10.75 -.14

Nm

How to Read the Market in Review He e a e he 2 578 mos ac ve s ocks on he New Yo k S ock Exchange Nasdaq Na ona Ma ke s and Ame can S ock Exchange Mu ua unds a e 415 a ges S ocks n bo d changed 5 pe cen o mo e n p ce Name S ocks a e s ed a phabe ca y by he company s u name no s abb ev a on Company names made up o n a s appea a he beg nn ng o each e e s s D v Cu en annua d v dend a e pa d on s ock based on a es qua e y o sem annua dec a a on un ess o he w se oo no ed Las P ce s ock was ad ng a when exchange c osed o he day Chg Loss o ga n o he day No change nd ca ed by ma k Fund Name Name o mu ua und and am y Se Ne asse va ue o p ce a wh ch und cou d be so d Chg Da y ne change n he NAV YTD % Re Pe cen change n NAV o he yea o da e w h d v dends e nves ed S ock Foo no es – PE g ea e han 99 d – ue ha been a ed o edemp on b ompan d – New 52 wee ow dd – Lo n a 12 mo e – Compan o me ed on he Ame an E hange Eme g ng Compan Ma e p a e g – D dend and ea n ng n Canad an do a h – empo a e mp om Na daq ap a and u p u ng qua a on n – S o wa a new ue n he a ea The 52 wee h gh and ow gu e da e on om he beg nn ng o ad ng p – P e e ed o ue p – P e e en e pp – Ho de owe n a men o pu ha e p e q – C o ed end mu ua und no PE a u a ed – R gh o bu e u a a pe ed p e – S o ha p b a ea 20 pe en w h n he a ea w – T ade w be e ed when he o ued wd – When d bu ed w – Wa an a ow ng a pu ha e o a o u– New 52 wee h gh un – Un n ud ng mo e han one e u – Compan n ban up o e e e hp o be ng eo gan ed unde he ban up aw Appea n on o he name D v dend Foo no es a – E a d dend we e pa d bu a e no n uded b – Annua a e p u o – L qu da ng d dend e – Amoun de a ed o pa d n a 12 mon h – Cu en annua a e wh h wa n ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen – Sum o d dend pa d a e o p no egu a a e – Sum o d dend pa d h ea Mo e en d dend wa om ed o de e ed – De a ed o pa d h ea a umu a e ue w h d dend n a ea m – Cu en annua a e wh h wa de ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen p – n a d dend annua a e no nown e d no hown – De a ed o pa d n p e ed ng 12 mon h p u o d dend – Pa d n o app o ma e a h a ue on e d bu on da e Mo a e o abo e mu be wo h $1 and ga ne o e $2 Mu ua Fund Foo no es e – E ap a ga n d bu on – P e ou da quo e n – No oad und p – Fund a e u ed o pa d bu on o – Redemp on ee o on ngen de e ed a e oad ma app – S o d dend o p – Bo h p and – E a h d dend

Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline FuelTech FuelCell FullerHB FultonFncl Fuqi Intl lf FushiCopp GATX GFI Grp GMAC31 GMX Rs GSI Cmmrc GT Solar GabDvInc GabelliET GabGldNR Gafisa s Gallaghr GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin GascoEngy Gastar grs GaylrdEnt GenProbe GencoShip GnCable GenDynam GenElec GenGrPr n GenMarit GenMills s GenMoly GenMot n GM cvpfB GenSteel Gensco GenOn En Genoptix Genpact Gentex GenuPrt GenVec h Genworth Genzyme GeoGrp Geores GaGulf Gerdau GeronCp GiantIntac GigaMed Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc GlaxoSKln GlimchRt GloblInd GlobPay GlbXLith n GlbXSilvM Globalstr h GlbSpcMet GluMobile GolLinhas GoldFLtd Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldS60 n GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google vjGrace GrafTech GrahamP n Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GranCty rs GraniteC GraphPkg GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPlainEn GreenMtC s GrnHCmdty GreenbCos Group1 GpoASur GrpoFin GpTelevisa Guess GugMultAs GugBullt17 GulfportE HCC Ins HCP Inc HSBC HSN Inc Haemon HainCel Hallibrtn Halozyme HampRB h HancHld Hanesbrds HangrOrth HanmiFncl HansenMed HansenNat HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp Harsco HartfdFn HartFn pfA HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HaupgDig HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HlthCSvc s HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HrtlndEx Heckmann HeclaM Heinz HelixEn HelmPayne Hemisphrx HSchein Herbalife HercOffsh HercTGC Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg HighOne n HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HillenInc HimaxTch HollyCp Hollysys Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomeProp Honda HonwllIntl HooperH Hormel Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HstnAEn HovnanE HudsCity HudsPac n HumGen Humana HuntJB

D 0.75

9.72 +.10 18.10 +.13 1.90 26.14 -.41 10.70 -.12 2.09 -.01 0.28 20.43 +.44 0.12 10.39 +.05 6.42 +.10 8.96 -.04 1.12 35.23 +.25 0.20 4.86 +.07 1.83 23.43 -.24 6.01 +.11 23.10 +.20 10.01 +.57 0.84 15.48 +.05 0.68 5.76 +.02 1.68 18.68 +.09 0.14 14.47 -.07 1.28 29.12 +.02 21.89 -.61 7.87 -.09 0.16 15.31 +.17 0.40 22.23 +.27 0.20 69.87 +.89 1.50 31.46 +.39 .40 -.00 4.39 +.05 36.05 +.22 58.51 -.01 14.71 -.03 33.95 -.30 1.68 70.61 +.32 0.56 18.64 +.03 15.41 +.08 0.04 3.40 +.05 1.12 36.62 +.93 6.33 -.17 38.07 +.17 2.38 55.63 +.36 2.89 +.06 36.66 +.08 3.90 +.01 19.46 +.26 0.18 15.22 -.26 0.44 30.73 +.91 1.64 51.48 -.12 .58 +.03 13.54 +.05 71.30 -.27 23.77 -.20 24.76 +1.80 24.35 +.25 0.32 14.51 -.08 5.34 +.10 0.18 7.27 +.14 1.56 +.05 0.30 27.98 -.16 37.53 +.54 0.52 15.59 +.24 2.00 38.94 -.92 0.40 8.77 +.25 6.87 +.05 0.08 46.18 +.31 0.28 22.93 -.11 0.25 25.72 -.40 1.47 +.01 0.15 17.51 +.66 2.68 +.46 0.40 15.98 -.33 0.16 17.36 -.13 0.36 44.12 -.41 4.26 -.09 1.53 23.45 +.02 1.40 174.00 +.92 1.16 89.80 +.97 18.41 +.24 12.70 +.38 609.07 +6.95 36.43 +.16 19.76 -.02 13.85 +.23 2.16 138.68 -.55 2.80 -.04 8.07 -.05 5.01 +1.01 0.52 26.89 -.07 4.10 +.07 2.78 -.05 0.07 7.89 +.02 0.83 19.55 -.09 34.14 +.54 32.59 +.09 20.88 +.79 0.40 41.46 -.20 2.02 59.12 +1.06 15.71 -.16 25.85 -.18 0.80 46.05 +.42 0.96 20.14 0.43 20.94 -.11 20.80 +.47 0.58 29.32 +.14 1.86 37.25 +.07 1.70 53.38 +1.31 30.65 -.02 59.44 +.68 26.49 -.42 0.36 39.42 -.13 7.95 +.15 .69 +.03 0.96 34.72 +.17 24.62 -.29 21.00 +.30 1.18 +.03 1.65 +.14 51.96 -.33 17.50 0.40 36.26 +1.40 46.29 +.33 8.59 +.07 0.07 11.97 -.15 1.00 45.85 +.41 0.82 29.47 +.37 0.20 28.34 +.40 1.81 26.74 +.40 12.02 +.11 1.00 46.24 +.23 4.40 28.85 -.82 2.37 -.19 1.24 23.81 -.04 8.03 +.15 5.07 +.19 2.76 47.84 +.09 0.62 16.25 +.21 9.83 +.19 1.20 21.34 -.04 27.23 +.09 21.10 +.04 27.78 +.27 0.08 16.31 +.27 4.96 -.02 10.43 -.05 1.80 49.00 -.30 12.17 +.15 0.24 49.22 +1.11 .54 -.01 62.00 -.04 1.00 68.72 +.38 3.80 -.04 0.80 10.86 +.09 0.20 6.78 +.13 1.28 46.62 +.25 14.89 +.35 0.40 79.47 +1.72 0.32 44.20 +.57 18.36 +.40 21.85 -.12 20.60 +.18 1.70 31.98 +.35 0.41 38.49 -.05 0.76 21.04 +.38 0.25 2.51 -.06 0.60 40.95 +.02 15.91 +.16 19.04 -.04 0.95 34.56 -.11 40.25 +.67 2.32 54.93 +.30 39.19 -.41 1.33 54.37 +.89 .73 +.01 1.02 49.85 -.83 20.73 +.35 12.25 -.48 54.57 -.34 1.80 23.67 +.45 0.04 18.45 +.37 0.28 5.95 -.03 0.02 18.63 +.91 4.25 +.09 0.60 13.25 +.49 0.38 15.19 +.08 24.46 +.30 55.04 -.26 0.48 41.31 +.05

Nm HuntBnk Huntsmn Hypercom Hyperdyn

D 0.04 7.18 0.40 16.35 9.08 5.35

-.01 +.54 +.44 +.21

I-J-K-L IAC Inter IAMGld g ICICI Bk IdexxLabs IEC Elec IESI-BFC g iGateCorp ING GRE ING GlbDv ING INGPrRTr ION Geoph IPG Photon iShGold s iShGSCI iSAstla iSAstria iShBraz iSCan iSFrnce iShGer iSh HK iShItaly iShJapn iSh Kor iSMalas iShMex iShNeth iShSing iSPacxJpn iSSpain iSSwedn iSSwitz iSTaiwn iSh UK iShChile iShTurkey iShSilver iShS&P100 iShDJDv iShBTips iShAsiaexJ iShChina25 iShDJTr iSSP500 iShBAgB iShEMkts iShACWX iShiBxB iSh ACWI iShIndones iSSPGth iShNatRes iShSPLatA iSSPVal iShNMuBd iShB20 T iShB7-10T iShB1-3T iS Eafe iSRusMCV iSRusMCG iShRsMd iSSPMid iShiBxHYB iShNetw iShNsdqBio iShC&SRl iSR1KV iSMCGth iSR1KG iSRus1K iSR2KV iShBarc1-3 iSR2KG iShR2K iShUSPfd iShDJTel iShDJTch iShREst iShDJHm iShFnSc iShUSEngy iShSPSm iShBasM iShDJOE iSRsMic iStar ITC Hold ITT Corp ITT Ed IconixBr IDEX Ikanos ITW Illumina Imax Corp Immucor ImunoGn ImpaxLabs ImpOil gs Incyte IndiaFd IndiaGC IndSvAm s Infinera Informat InfosysT IngerRd IngrmM Inhibitex InlandRE InovioPhm Insmed h InspPhar IntgDv ISSI IntegrysE Intel InteractBrk interClick IntcntlEx InterDig Intrface InterMune InterNAP IBM Intl Coal IntFlav IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif IntTower g InterOil g Interpublic Intersil IntraLks n IntPotash Intuit IntSurg Invacare Invesco InvMtgCap InVKSrInc InvTech IridiumCm IronMtn Isis ItauUnibH Itron IvanhoeEn IvanhM g Ivanhoe rt Ixia JCrew j2Global JA Solar JDASoft JDS Uniph JPMorgCh JPMCh wt JPMAlerian Jabil JackHenry JackInBox JacksnHw h JacobsEng Jaguar g Jamba JamesRiv JanusCap Jarden JazzPhrm Jefferies JetBlue JinkoSol n JoAnnStrs JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl

29.68 +.25 0.08 17.99 +.17 0.53 47.50 -.81 69.10 +.22 9.00 +1.20 0.50 24.25 -.41 0.26 19.55 -.23 0.54 7.81 -.06 1.20 10.88 9.95 -.03 0.31 5.77 8.27 +.12 31.39 +1.06 13.46 -.04 34.04 +.41 0.82 24.76 -.17 0.25 21.84 -.44 2.53 77.55 -.92 0.50 30.98 +.06 0.66 24.52 -.21 0.29 23.78 -.36 0.45 19.96 +.20 0.33 16.47 +.01 0.14 10.94 -.08 0.39 61.94 +.02 0.34 14.82 +.21 0.54 62.93 +.45 0.33 20.68 -.25 0.43 13.96 +.03 1.56 46.69 -.09 2.15 36.04 -.45 0.55 31.29 -.11 0.32 24.42 -.35 0.29 15.35 -.26 0.43 17.46 -.04 0.54 76.21 -1.19 1.28 69.10 +1.28 28.61 -.47 1.08 57.68 +.34 1.70 50.10 +.06 2.55 106.93 -.41 0.97 64.78 -.15 0.63 44.32 +.04 1.06 93.18 +.42 2.36 128.09 +.65 3.94 105.15 -.51 0.64 48.20 -.12 1.01 44.13 -.04 5.26 108.20 -.80 0.81 47.11 0.15 30.00 +.43 1.16 66.35 +.37 0.58 41.52 +.04 1.18 54.19 +.10 1.24 60.73 +.29 3.75 99.41 -.45 3.86 91.46 -2.06 3.35 92.74 -1.01 0.86 83.79 -.15 1.42 58.27 -.25 0.86 45.50 +.26 0.57 57.16 +.39 1.48 102.60 +.52 0.97 91.32 +.57 7.85 91.00 +.23 0.03 35.04 +.58 0.51 94.65 +.75 1.90 66.09 +.33 1.29 66.04 +.35 0.57 101.33 +.54 0.73 57.87 +.32 1.13 70.82 +.36 1.16 71.95 +.69 3.04 104.24 -.01 0.58 88.81 +1.22 0.89 79.34 +.92 2.86 38.88 -.04 0.70 23.94 +.22 0.28 65.65 +.37 1.97 56.05 +.23 0.07 13.45 +.27 0.59 59.04 +.66 0.49 39.13 +.11 0.74 69.23 +.64 0.87 77.88 +.23 0.27 55.52 +.43 0.40 50.95 +.75 8.05 +.21 1.34 63.88 +.33 1.00 52.42 +.19 64.50 +2.15 20.56 +.11 0.60 38.57 -.09 1.45 +.02 1.36 54.33 +.27 66.00 +1.77 28.12 +.61 19.58 +.19 9.63 +.18 20.80 +.50 0.44 41.02 +.34 16.37 -.18 3.87 34.69 -.18 .55 -.02 14.18 +1.87 10.64 +.29 45.59 +.14 0.90 77.38 +.50 0.28 47.27 +.28 18.97 +.05 2.90 +.10 0.57 8.94 1.33 +.11 .65 -.01 3.84 +.23 6.64 -.01 8.77 +.12 2.72 48.25 -.54 0.72 20.94 -.21 1.79 17.77 +.14 4.75 +.09 117.65 -.32 0.40 45.59 -.53 0.08 17.04 +.34 39.08 +1.12 6.32 +.26 2.60 147.05 -.59 8.49 +.26 1.08 55.86 +.15 0.24 18.61 +.65 0.50 28.14 +.34 29.45 -.07 9.27 -.12 76.98 +.21 10.62 +.15 0.48 14.55 +.22 20.10 +.61 35.82 +.57 48.74 -.55 273.63 +1.93 0.05 28.60 -.69 0.44 24.39 -.02 3.49 21.78 +.24 0.29 4.73 -.03 16.43 +.11 8.32 +.18 0.75 24.79 +.27 10.35 0.65 24.43 +.04 55.42 +.35 2.89 +.02 1.48 23.99 +.17 1.53 17.22 -.06 44.04 +.98 29.69 +.27 6.98 +.02 28.50 +.48 15.03 +.25 0.20 44.70 +.54 15.20 +.10 1.81 36.39 +.01 0.28 21.26 +.46 0.38 29.50 +.20 21.56 +.61 2.05 -.07 45.49 -.55 6.75 -.16 2.26 25.40 +.19 0.04 13.36 +.05 0.33 31.51 -.01 19.83 +.40 0.30 26.50 +.08 7.10 +.24 21.59 +1.06 60.26 +.16 1.61 -.01 2.16 63.31 -.04 0.64 40.60 +.92

nc Sa es gu es a e uno c a

Nm JonesGrp JonesLL JosABnk s JoyGlbl JnprNtwk KAR Auct KB Home KBR Inc KIT Digitl KKR n KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KV PhmA KandiTech KC Southn KapStone KA MLP Kellogg Kemet rs Kendle Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp KilroyR KimbClk Kimco KindME KindredHlt KingPhrm Kinross g KirbyCp KiteRlty KnghtCap KnightTr KnightT KodiakO g Kohls KopinCp KoreaElc KornFer Kraft KrispKrm Kroger Ku6Media Kulicke L&L Egy n L-1 Ident L-3 Com LAN Air LCA Vis LDK Solar LECG LG Display LKQ Corp LPL Inv n LSB Inds LSI Corp LTXCrd rs LaZBoy Labophm g LabCp LamResrch LamarAdv LVSands LaSalleH LasrCard Lattice LawsnSft Lazard LeapWirlss LeapFrog LearCorp LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 h LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LbtyASE LibGlobA LibGlobC LibtyMIntA LibMCapA LibStarzA LibtProp LifeTech LifeTFit LillyEli LimelghtN Limited Lincare s LincEdSv LincNat Lindsay LinearTch LinnEngy LiveNatn LivePrsn LizClaib LloydBkg Local.com LockhdM LodgeNet Loews Logitech LogMeIn LongtopFn LongweiPI Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol Lufkin s lululemn g LumberLiq LyonBas A

D 0.20 15.58 -.07 0.20 86.95 +2.56 40.67 -.34 0.70 87.50 -.96 37.88 +.72 13.99 -.12 0.25 14.31 +.55 0.20 29.68 +.06 16.56 +.42 0.23 15.14 +.69 0.56 9.63 +.19 1.00 37.90 -.58 20.37 -.01 2.58 +.01 5.19 49.96 +1.14 15.70 +.62 1.94 30.08 +.24 1.62 51.07 -.22 15.25 +.03 11.68 +.33 0.48 40.44 +.06 4.50 -.06 12.93 +.32 0.04 9.02 +.06 1.40 37.22 +.61 2.64 63.11 +.21 0.72 18.25 +.26 4.44 69.81 -.04 18.66 -.01 14.06 -.03 0.10 17.80 -.39 44.69 +.36 0.24 5.61 +.14 13.87 +.06 0.24 19.49 +.11 1.70 22.93 +.26 6.41 -.08 53.90 -.44 4.10 +.02 13.17 -.12 23.16 1.16 31.53 -.07 7.04 +.19 0.42 21.85 +.15 4.94 +.49 7.28 -.03 10.66 +.27 11.90 +.01 1.60 72.60 +1.33 0.46 29.70 -.62 7.56 +1.86 10.35 -.12 1.70 +.28 17.92 -.19 23.26 +.08 34.12 +.45 25.96 +2.00 6.14 +.13 7.36 +.04 9.33 -.06 .94 +.00 90.40 +.28 47.26 -2.15 41.03 +.92 48.03 +.30 0.44 28.08 +.90 6.25 5.86 9.46 +.13 0.50 40.77 +1.35 14.33 +.83 5.59 +.09 105.23 +4.85 0.24 35.55 -.69 1.08 23.15 +.12 0.40 30.52 -.12 0.16 19.10 +.48 0.60 47.54 +.04 0.25 30.20 +.43 1.13 +.10 1.51 +.04 0.46 8.05 -.02 34.43 +.14 0.29 5.00 +.03 37.55 +1.07 35.43 +.80 15.76 -.07 64.93 -.18 69.56 +1.20 1.90 32.02 +.22 56.58 -.15 41.25 -.11 1.96 34.78 -.25 6.49 +.42 0.60 29.58 -.34 0.80 27.02 -.04 1.00 15.80 +.52 0.20 29.71 +.14 0.34 63.47 +.88 0.92 34.50 -.03 2.64 38.00 +.33 11.61 +.21 11.38 +.50 7.06 +.05 4.26 +.06 6.88 +.32 3.00 71.92 +1.61 4.65 +.26 0.25 39.62 +.32 18.03 -.40 43.99 +1.98 35.00 +.30 2.64 +.07 4.50 81.08 +.32 10.05 +.24 0.44 24.68 +.12 1.44 103.55 -1.68 0.50 60.98 -1.08 68.49 +1.29 26.01 +1.64 34.85 -.02

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGM Rsts MIPS Tech MKS Inst MPG OffTr MSC Ind MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macys MadCatz g MSG n MagelnHl MagicSft Magma MagnaI gs Magnetek h MagHRes MaidenBrd Majesco h MMTrip n MAKO Srg ManTech Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MktVGold MkVStrMet MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktVCoal MktVIntM MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls Martek MStewrt MartMM MarvellT Masco MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Matrixx Mattel Mattson MaximIntg

2.80 88.03 +1.03 12.69 -.15 0.37 7.03 +.10 1.00 28.78 +.52 0.65 20.67 -.01 3.45 +.16 11.38 +.03 8.77 +.39 0.90 8.02 +.13 0.56 6.32 -.08 11.32 +.39 15.47 +.13 16.74 +.55 23.97 -.52 3.10 +.18 0.88 65.26 +1.02 39.32 +.52 2.00 47.23 +.15 1.80 33.13 +.62 0.20 24.97 -.12 1.19 +.03 25.03 +.27 47.11 -.21 0.50 7.27 +.40 4.83 +.06 0.72 59.00 +3.01 1.67 +.28 7.33 +.10 25.52 +.89 .81 +.04 30.76 +3.22 14.71 +.11 40.20 -.03 0.08 13.32 +.02 8.43 +.06 0.74 65.43 +2.13 0.52 17.83 +.52 1.00 37.34 -.04 0.40 58.22 -.80 24.57 -.46 0.18 39.06 -.18 2.93 37.67 -.33 0.33 54.40 +.86 3.58 57.96 -.69 0.19 49.44 +.58 0.76 21.08 +.05 2.56 42.35 -.98 0.35 41.57 +.41 0.84 27.70 -.03 0.04 6.96 -.03 31.45 +.10 4.42 +.08 1.60 84.73 -2.25 18.56 +.44 0.30 13.14 +.37 0.24 56.39 +1.31 14.15 -.22 0.60 230.29 +6.59 8.63 +.13 0.83 25.47 +.19 2.28 -.28 0.84 23.78 +.20

Nm McClatchy McCorm McDrmInt s McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MeadWvco Mechel Mechel pf MedAssets MedcoHlth Mediacom MedProp Medicis Medtrnic MelcoCrwn Mellanox MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck Meredith MergeHlth Meritage Mesab Metabolix Metalico Metalline Methanx MetLife MetroPCS Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvisn MidAApt MdwGold g MillerHer Millicom MincoG g MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s Modine Mohawk Molex MolexA MolinaH MolsCoorB Molycorp n Momenta MoneyGrm MonPwSys MonroMf s Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MS Cap6 MS China Mosaic MotrlaSol n MotrlaMo n Motricity n MuellerWat MultimGm MurphO Mylan MyriadG NCI Bld rs NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NGAS Rs h NII Hldg NIVS IntT NPS Phm NRG Egy NTN Buzz NV Energy NXP Sem n NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld NasdOMX NBkGreece NatFnPrt NatFuGas NatGrid NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NatResPtrs Natuzzi Nautilus h Navios NaviosMar Navistar NektarTh Neogen Net1UEPS NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netflix NtScout NetSolTch NetSpend n NetSuite NetwkEng NBRESec NeurMtrx Neurcrine NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NwGold g NewOriEd NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes Newport NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NextEraEn NiSource Nicor NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura Noranda n NordicAm Nordion g Nordstrm NorflkSo NoAmEn g NA Pall g NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NwstPipe NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax Novell Novlus NovoNord NSTAR NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NutriSyst NuvMuVal NvMSI&G2

D 4.99 +.12 1.12 45.71 -.37 20.26 +.04 2.44 74.66 +.35 0.94 37.50 +.66 0.72 72.33 +.51 17.75 +.61 46.50 +.15 0.90 61.77 +.57 1.00 26.99 +.21 33.00 +.25 10.45 +.20 19.60 -.01 61.27 -.49 8.52 +.07 0.80 10.95 +.28 0.24 26.61 +.35 0.90 36.49 -.38 6.81 +.03 27.03 -.33 0.36 24.55 -.05 11.98 +.02 72.11 +1.47 7.68 -.03 1.52 36.56 +.21 0.92 36.81 +1.04 3.41 -.10 23.61 +1.05 2.39 38.96 -.40 10.97 -.34 6.17 +.10 1.15 -.05 0.62 29.69 -.80 0.74 46.42 +.59 14.26 +.34 0.14 13.11 +.26 1.38 34.82 +.10 8.29 +.18 8.54 +.10 44.41 +.73 22.78 -.06 0.64 28.00 -.09 2.22 +.07 2.51 62.13 +.01 .81 -.04 0.09 26.77 +.76 7.24 96.65 +.55 2.49 -.09 0.20 28.36 +.11 6.50 +.31 10.73 -.09 5.30 -.13 3.78 -.07 20.70 17.73 +1.12 57.44 +.31 0.70 23.27 +.26 0.70 19.40 +.20 27.24 -.30 1.12 48.50 -.34 60.70 -1.10 15.54 +.22 2.96 +.13 15.87 +.10 32.45 -1.17 1.12 69.13 +.34 25.03 +.87 0.40 19.92 0.46 27.32 +.68 0.20 28.83 +.36 1.65 23.94 +.01 2.44 27.77 -.28 0.20 77.13 +2.13 39.83 +.06 32.21 -.91 19.91 +.96 0.07 4.38 +.06 5.90 +.18 1.10 75.39 +.47 21.69 +.14 21.62 -.11 13.40 +.40 16.56 +1.15 35.90 +.28 1.80 17.58 -.01 .58 +.01 43.48 +.26 2.20 +.01 7.40 +.01 19.64 -.20 .44 +.06 0.48 13.93 -.15 23.38 +1.37 1.20 31.12 +.09 23.18 +.46 0.14 30.46 +.18 23.65 -.27 0.29 1.63 -.04 13.25 -.03 1.38 67.36 +.16 7.04 45.51 +.63 0.44 66.07 -.73 0.04 8.37 +.20 1.52 26.10 -.09 0.40 13.73 -.12 1.88 36.21 +.34 2.16 34.10 +.40 3.30 -.04 2.32 +.44 0.24 5.27 -.08 1.68 19.84 +.09 58.09 +1.60 12.24 +.30 39.93 -1.50 12.08 -.07 33.92 +.91 57.87 +.49 37.13 +.49 179.73 -1.64 25.12 +1.02 1.99 +.06 12.77 +.14 27.30 +1.81 1.73 +.06 0.24 3.99 -.01 .54 -.06 7.37 +.16 26.66 +.38 15.13 +.39 7.38 -.04 .04 9.35 -.11 104.71 -.41 1.00 18.97 +.17 10.46 +.43 0.28 15.06 +.02 6.69 +.23 0.20 18.26 +.16 72.37 +1.09 0.60 58.16 -.92 5.99 -.10 18.15 +.54 0.15 14.85 -.14 0.15 16.44 -.08 0.20 22.82 +.09 2.00 52.34 -.41 0.92 17.93 +.07 1.86 50.00 1.24 84.52 +.55 15.65 -.29 22.44 -.30 0.90 36.88 +1.13 0.72 84.37 -.03 0.56 10.66 -.20 6.30 -.09 15.25 +.45 1.70 26.25 +.19 10.44 -.98 0.80 42.86 +.29 1.44 63.72 +.33 12.45 +.06 6.58 +.01 1.03 31.49 -.41 14.52 +.10 27.35 +.93 1.12 56.55 +.55 3.03 -.05 1.88 65.70 +.34 0.40 4.95 +.16 0.40 11.72 +.18 22.76 -1.03 13.62 +.20 1.99 57.73 -.67 9.74 +.09 2.58 +.05 5.95 +.02 31.41 -.11 1.41 115.53 +.75 1.70 41.46 -.43 0.50 29.31 -.45 25.98 -.12 19.62 +.80 1.45 44.32 +.49 0.70 20.31 -.11 0.47 9.19 0.70 8.77 -.03

D

NuvQualPf 0.60 7.38 -.05 NuvQPf2 0.66 7.90 -.01 Nvidia 16.98 +1.21 NxStageMd 25.06 +.11 OCZ Tech 5.11 +.11 OGE Engy 1.50 45.80 -.11 OReillyAu 58.27 +.16 OasisPet n 27.45 +.04 OcciPet 1.52 97.02 +.36 Oceaneer 72.74 +.51 OceanFr rs .96 +.01 Och-Ziff 0.88 15.56 +.30 Oclaro rs 13.64 +.54 OcwenFn 9.57 +.07 OdysMar 2.86 +.12 OfficeDpt 6.10 +.29 OfficeMax 18.43 +.25 OilSvHT 2.40 139.46 +2.07 OilStates 63.47 +.50 Oilsands g .45 -.01 OldDomF s 32.43 -.05 OldNBcp 0.28 11.90 +.11 OldRepub 0.69 13.78 -.02 Olin 0.80 20.30 +.10 OmegaHlt 1.48 22.69 +.38 Omncre 0.13 25.44 -.06 Omnicom 0.80 46.86 +.57 OmniVisn 28.31 +.32 Omnova 8.37 +.02 OnSmcnd 10.29 +.06 ONEOK 1.92 55.38 -.24 OnyxPh 37.17 +.07 OpenTable 73.71 +4.95 OpnwvSy 2.39 +.23 OpexaTher 2.40 +.84 OpexaTh wt .91 +.32 OpkoHlth 3.87 -.01 Opnext 1.98 +.10 optXprs 4.50 14.55 -.24 Oracle 0.20 31.04 -.44 OraSure 6.26 +.19 OrbitalSci 17.66 +.24 Orbitz 5.30 +.11 Orexigen 9.40 +.14 OrientEH 13.72 +.05 OrientPap 5.83 -.19 OriginAg 11.07 +.02 OshkoshCp 35.26 -.03 OssenInno n 4.65 -.09 OwensM s 0.71 29.01 -.08 OwensCorn 30.65 +.02 OwensIll 31.80 +.11 Oxigene h .24 -.01 PDL Bio 1.00 6.21 -.04 PF Chng 0.63 47.13 -.44 PG&E Cp 1.82 46.86 -.74 PHH Corp 24.10 +.48 PMC Sra 8.59 PMI Grp 3.83 +.18 PNC 0.40 61.80 +1.17 PNM Res 0.50 13.24 -.14 POSCO 1.43 112.40 +1.13 PPG 2.20 83.90 +.47 PPL Corp 1.40 26.83 -.08 PSS Wrld 22.50 -.18 Paccar 0.48 57.63 +.50 PacerIntl 7.10 +.42 PacBiosci n 15.74 -.20 PacEth h 1.04 +.08 PacOffPT 0.04 2.59 -.56 PacSunwr 5.47 +.20 PackAmer 0.60 27.09 +.87 PaetecHld 3.99 +.21 PallCorp 0.64 49.82 -.14 PanASlv 0.10 38.18 -.82 Panasonic 0.11 14.35 -.04 PaneraBrd 100.54 -.02 ParagShip 0.20 3.41 -.01 ParamTch 23.10 +.47 ParaG&S 3.93 +.19 Parexel 21.32 +.14 ParkDrl 4.63 +.13 ParkerHan 1.16 87.60 +.13 Parkrvsn h .50 -.04 PartnerRe 2.20 80.81 -.22 PatriotCoal 21.99 +1.58 Patterson 0.40 31.02 PattUTI 0.20 20.78 -.17 Paychex 1.24 31.54 +.79 PeabdyE 0.34 62.79 -.04 Pengrth g 0.84 12.98 -.01 PnnNGm 34.02 +.05 PennVa 0.23 18.09 +.50 PennVaGP 1.56 25.59 -.34 PennWst g 1.08 24.60 +.07 Penney 0.80 32.67 +.35 PenRE 0.60 14.33 +.03 Penske 17.08 +.18 Pentair 0.76 36.41 +.02 PeopUtdF 0.62 14.15 +.11 PepBoy 0.12 13.18 +.25 PepcoHold 1.08 18.22 -.13 PepsiCo 1.92 66.59 +1.18 PeregrineP 2.49 +.16 PerfectWld 23.39 -.12 PerkElm 0.28 25.41 -.19 Perrigo 0.28 63.17 -.10 PetMed 0.50 16.13 +.16 Petrohawk 19.05 +.25 PetrbrsA 1.20 33.20 -.06 Petrobras 1.20 37.18 +.20 PtroqstE 7.08 +.07 PetsMart 0.50 39.50 +.13 Pfizer 0.80 18.11 +.12 PhrmAth 3.54 -.17 PhmHTr 2.42 66.01 +.14 PharmPdt 0.60 27.25 -.05 Pharmerica 12.60 -.22 PhilipMor 2.56 58.50 -.17 PhilipsEl 0.95 30.76 -.24 PhlVH 0.15 62.66 +1.09 PhnxCos 2.64 +.08 PhotrIn 5.71 -.18 PiedNG 1.12 28.07 +.07 PiedmOfc n 1.26 20.55 +.50 Pier 1 10.66 +.27 PilgrimsP 6.85 -.03 PimCpOp 1.38 16.84 -.16 PimIncStr2 0.78 9.92 -.11 PimcoHiI 1.46 12.89 +.07 PinnclEnt 13.51 +.14 PinnaclFn 13.90 +.06 PinWst 2.10 41.38 -.28 PionDrill 8.55 -.09 PioNtrl 0.08 88.15 +.63 PitnyBw 1.46 24.34 +.05 Pixelwrks 3.47 -.25 PlainsEx 32.78 +.63 PlanarSy 2.19 +.04 PlatGpMet 2.53 -.02 PlatUnd 0.32 45.41 +.35 PlugPwr h .46 -.00 PlumCrk 1.68 38.38 +.55 PluristemT 1.69 +.08 Polaris 1.60 76.72 +1.83 Polo RL 0.40 108.30 -.06 Polycom 39.07 +.14 PolyMet g 2.27 PolyOne 13.76 -.03 Poniard h .52 -.04 Popular 3.20 +.08 PortGE 1.04 21.78 -.04 PostPrp 0.80 35.83 +.12 Potash 0.40 161.98 +5.33 Potlatch 2.04 33.02 +.40 Power-One 10.44 -.03 PwshDB 27.59 +.29 PS Agri 31.95 +.30 PS Oil 28.30 +.39 PS BasMet 24.42 +.04 PS USDBull 23.11 +.23 PwSClnEn 10.68 +.06 PwShDiv 0.28 14.08 +.02 PwShHiYD 0.33 8.92 +.03 PS OilSv 0.08 21.53 +.17 PS Retail 0.18 19.11 -.09 PSFinPf 1.26 17.69 +.03 PSETecLd 0.06 18.67 +.06 PSBldABd 1.48 24.85 -.15 PwShPfd 0.97 14.10 -.01 PShEMSov 1.58 26.78 -.12 PSIndia 0.24 25.14 -.17 PwShs QQQ 0.33 55.74 +.48 Powrwav 3.20 +.21 Praxair 1.80 94.49 -.07 PrecCastpt 0.12 142.21 +2.54 PrecDrill 10.02 +.31 PrmWBc h .39 -.02 Prestige 11.25 -.35 PriceTR 1.08 65.16 +.88 priceline 433.60+24.22 PrideIntl 31.96 +.11 PrinFncl 0.55 33.07 +.05 PrisaB n 9.52 +.02 PrivateB 0.04 14.85 +.64 ProShtQQQ 33.87 -.30 ProShtS&P 43.21 -.23 PrUShS&P 23.10 -.24 ProUltDow 0.37 55.78 +.36 PrUlShDow 20.21 -.14 ProUltMC 0.04 64.45 +.76 ProUltQQQ 85.24 +1.46 PrUShQQQ 11.10 -.18 ProUltSP 0.43 49.41 +.51 ProUShL20 39.07 +1.63 PrUSCh25 rs 28.34 -.06 ProUSRE rs 18.00 -.17 ProUSOG rs 37.13 -.25 ProUSBM rs 18.99 -.12 ProUltRE rs 0.41 50.79 +.50 ProUShtFn 14.83 -.34 ProUFin rs 0.07 69.92 +1.44 PrUPShQQQ 29.07 -.73 ProUltO&G 0.23 46.16 +.28 ProUBasM 0.04 51.19 +.27 ProShtR2K 31.72 -.36 ProUltPQQQ 158.15 +3.83 ProUSR2K 12.19 -.28 ProUltR2K 0.01 43.91 +.97 ProSht20Tr 45.25 +.96 ProUSSP500 18.58 -.29 ProUltSP500 0.38 213.77 +3.56 ProUltCrude 12.28 +.28 ProUSGld rs 29.60 +.18 ProUSSlv rs 10.82 +.26 ProUShCrude 10.33 -.24 ProSUltSilv 142.30 -5.09 ProUltShYen 16.47 +.46 ProUShEuro 20.95 +.43 ProceraNt .59 -.05 ProctGam 1.93 64.80 -.15 ProgrssEn 2.48 43.39 -.38 ProgrsSoft 43.34 +.69 ProgsvCp 1.16 20.13 +.08 ProLogis 0.45 14.65 ProspctCap 1.21 10.89 +.17 ProtLife 0.56 28.60 +.45 ProvEn g 0.72 8.14 +.15 ProvidFS 0.44 15.20 +.11 Prudentl 1.15 60.99 -.03 PSEG 1.37 31.32 -.26

Nm PubStrg PudaCoal PulseElec PulteGrp PPrIT

D 3.20 101.99 +1.00 14.27 +.32 0.10 5.43 +.17 7.98 +.29 0.71 6.29 -.01

Q-R-S-T QEP Res n 0.08 36.58 +.07 QIAGEN 19.78 -.02 QLT 7.91 +.04 QiaoXMob 4.83 +.53 QiaoXing 3.44 +.48 QlikTech n 27.40 -.63 Qlogic 17.08 +.24 Qualcom 0.76 52.03 +1.06 QuantaSvc 20.83 -.05 QntmDSS 4.23 -.01 QuantFu h .44 +.01 QstDiag 0.40 55.50 +.90 QuestSft 27.89 +.25 Questar s 0.56 17.51 +.06 Questcor 14.82 +.45 QuickLog 6.35 +.04 QksilvRes 14.91 -.05 Quiksilvr 5.27 +.02 QwestCm 0.32 7.64 -.09 RAIT Fin 2.53 +.29 RF MicD 7.78 -.09 RPC s 0.19 18.41 +.30 RPM 0.84 21.82 +.05 RSC Hldgs 10.67 +.67 RTI IntlM 26.67 -.25 RXi Phrm 2.47 +.01 Rackspace 31.81 +1.37 RadNet 3.00 +.09 RadianGrp 0.01 9.03 +.35 RadntSys 19.31 +.38 RadientPh 1.36 -.31 RadOneD 1.09 -.02 RadioShk 0.25 18.29 -.12 Radware 37.81 +.91 Rambus 20.37 -.09 RamcoG 0.65 12.82 +.34 Ramtrn 3.52 +.24 Randgold 0.17 78.17 -2.51 RangeRs 0.16 44.77 -.03 RareEle g 16.04 -.18 RJamesFn 0.52 32.50 +.07 Rayonier 2.16 56.04 +.59 Raytheon 1.50 47.70 +.71 RealD n 23.92 +.31 RealNwk 4.16 +.03 RealPage n 29.70 -.05 RltyInco 1.73 33.86 -.03 RedHat 46.55 +.40 RedRobin 20.71 -.07 Rdiff.cm 5.27 +.07 RedwdTr 1.00 15.12 +.26 RegalBel 0.68 68.60 +.32 RegalEnt 0.84 12.25 -.09 RgcyCtrs 1.85 42.15 +.22 RegncyEn 1.78 27.70 +.19 Regenrn 33.29 +.04 RegBkHT 0.59 88.27 +1.14 RegionsFn 0.04 7.21 +.18 Regis Cp 0.16 16.81 +.29 RehabCG 24.66 +.14 ReinsGrp 0.48 55.89 +.38 RelStlAl 0.40 52.62 +1.04 RenaisRe 1.00 63.58 +.23 ReneSola 9.33 -.08 RentACt 0.24 31.43 +.07 Rentech 1.28 +.01 ReprosT rs 3.02 Repsl prcld 1.86 25.13 -.02 Repsol 1.20 27.73 -.54 RepubAir 7.72 +.17 RepubSvc 0.80 29.60 -.31 RschMotn 61.92 +2.82 ResMed s 34.57 -.71 ResoluteEn 15.23 +.47 ResrceCap 1.00 7.60 +.22 ResConn 0.16 18.95 +.41 RetailHT 1.71 106.62 -.04 RetailVent 15.57 +.23 RexEnergy 13.25 +.05 RexahnPh 1.41 +.23 ReynAm s 1.96 32.85 +.01 RichrdElec 0.08 12.78 +.77 RioTinto s 0.90 69.99 -1.09 RitchieBr 0.42 23.72 +.30 RiteAid h .96 +.04 Riverbed s 37.37 +.09 RobbMyer 0.17 35.50 -.42 RobtHalf 0.52 31.59 +1.14 RockwlAut 1.40 73.84 +.20 RockColl 0.96 58.95 +.36 RockwdH 40.05 +.25 RogCm gs 1.28 34.77 +.35 Roper 0.44 76.25 +.42 RosettaR 37.67 -.47 RossStrs 0.64 62.65 +.45 Rovi Corp 65.66 +1.63 Rowan 33.46 +.26 RoyalBk g 2.00 52.29 +.02 RBScotlnd 12.74 -.01 RylCarb 48.91 +.52 RoyDShllB 3.36 67.07 -.69 RoyDShllA 3.36 66.85 -.61 RoyGld 0.44 50.80 -1.34 Royce 0.12 14.93 +.32 Rubicon g 5.43 +.09 RubiconTc 22.13 +.53 RubyTues 14.01 +.09 Ruddick 0.52 35.42 -.12 rue21 30.92 +.83 Ryanair 2.29 31.33 -.29 Ryder 1.08 51.98 +.03 RdxSPEW 0.63 47.81 +.25 RdxSPVal 0.34 29.08 +.20 Ryland 0.12 17.42 +.54 S1 Corp 7.14 +.11 SAIC 16.06 +.10 SAP AG 0.67 50.34 -.74 SBA Com 40.75 -.27 SCANA 1.90 40.52 -.17 SEI Inv 0.20 24.00 +.37 SFN Grp 10.16 +.50 SK Tlcm 18.35 -.19 SLGreen 0.40 68.07 -.19 SLM Cp 12.81 -.05 SM Energy 0.10 59.02 +.42 SpdrDJIA 2.77 117.04 +.40 SpdrGold 134.37 -.38 SpdrEMSmC 1.73 57.73 +.08 SpdrIntRE 3.39 38.99 -.09 SpdrIntlSC 0.55 30.87 -.12 SP Mid 1.51 166.10 +1.05 S&P500ETF 2.37 127.64 +.66 Spdr Div 1.74 52.09 +.09 SpdrHome 0.33 17.57 +.24 SpdrKbwBk 0.13 26.81 +.39 SpdrWilRE 1.79 61.25 +.34 SpdrITBd 1.36 32.54 -.08 SpdrLehHY 4.68 40.18 +.19 SpdrNuBST 0.49 23.78 -.07 SpdrLe1-3bll 45.86 SpdrKbw RB 0.35 26.91 +.43 SpdrRetl 0.49 47.76 -.04 SpdrOGEx 0.20 53.01 +.18 SpdrOGEq 0.28 36.33 +.41 SpdrMetM 0.38 70.08 +.47 SPX Cp 1.00 71.04 +.47 SRA Intl 21.81 +.54 STEC 19.35 +.48 STMicro 0.28 10.90 +.17 STR Hldgs 19.20 -.11 SVB FnGp 53.59 +.67 SXC Hlth s 43.28 -.01 SABESP 2.55 52.68 -.05 Safeway 0.48 21.46 -.18 StJoe 22.22 +.14 StJude 40.63 -.54 Saks 10.99 +.21 Salesforce 142.20 +6.51 SalixPhm 47.24 +.51 SallyBty 14.48 -.19 SamsO&G 1.58 +.05 SanderFm 0.60 38.59 -.01 SanDisk 52.25 +1.44 SandRdge 7.54 +.19 SangBio 6.93 +.08 Sanmina 12.59 +.46 Sanofi 1.63 32.89 -.21 Santarus 3.60 +.24 Sapient 0.35 12.11 +.04 SaraLee 0.46 17.46 +.05 Satcon h 5.16 +.22 SavientPh 11.28 +.14 Savvis 27.03 +.63 Schlmbrg 0.84 82.59 +.96 Schnitzer 0.07 68.10 +.37 Schulmn 0.62 21.98 -.30 SchwEMkt 0.23 29.18 -.12 Schwab 0.24 18.08 +.86 SciGames 10.36 +.41 Scotts 1.00 49.89 +.35 ScrippsNet 0.30 50.21 -1.53 ScrippsEW 10.46 +.26 SeabGld g 29.08 -.32 SeacorHld 15.00 101.72 +.11 SeadrillLtd 2.31 33.98 +.15 SeagateT 14.70 -.08 SealAir 0.52 25.61 +.05 Sealy 3.01 +.07 SearsHldgs 72.35 +.89 Seaspan 0.50 13.68 +.66 SeattGen 15.54 +.20 SelCmfrt 10.19 +.33 SemiHTr 0.56 32.65 -.06 SempraEn 1.56 51.90 -.57 Semtech 22.47 +.06 Senesco .30 -.01 SenHous 1.48 22.27 +.25 Sensata n 30.45 +.02 Sequenom 7.75 +.02 ServiceCp 0.16 8.22 +.01 ShandaGm 6.19 -.11 ShawGrp 35.13 +1.22 Sherwin 1.44 82.60 -1.12 Shire 0.34 72.61 -.74 ShufflMstr 11.06 +.44 Shutterfly 35.66 +1.04 SiderNac s 0.58 17.48 +.24 Siemens 3.72 119.78 -3.33 SifyTech 2.18 +.04 SigaTech h 13.69 +.54 SigmaAld 0.64 65.97 -.60 SignatBk 50.58 -.38 SignetJwlrs 42.90 +.55 SilicnImg 7.82 +.18 SilcnLab 47.53 +1.89 Slcnware 0.41 5.78 -.21 SilvStd g 25.51 -.64 SilvWhtn g 36.65 +.01 SilvrcpM g 0.08 12.18 -.28 SimonProp 3.20 98.25 +.31 Sina 75.10 -.49 SinoCkg n 12.89 +1.43 SinoHub 2.35 -.19 Sinovac 4.31 -.21

Nm SiriusXM SironaDent Skechers SkilldHcre SkyWest SkywksSol SmartM SmartT gn SmartHeat SmithWes SmithAO s SmithMicro SmithfF Smucker SmurfStn n SnapOn SocQ&M SodaStrm n Sohu.cm Solarfun SolarWinds Solera Solutia Somaxon SonicAut SonicCorp SonicSolu SonocoP Sonus SonyCp Sothebys Sourcefire SouthnCo SthnCopper SoUnCo SwstAirl SwtGas SwstnEngy SpectraEn SpectPh SpiritAero Spreadtrm SprintNex SprottSilv SprottGld n StageStrs StancrpFn SP Matls SP HlthC SP CnSt SP Consum SP Engy SPDR Fncl SP Inds SP Tech SP Util StdMic StdPac StanBlkDk StanlFrn Staples StarScient Starbucks StarwdHtl StarwdPT StateStr Statoil ASA StlDynam Steelcse SteinMrt StemCells Stereotaxis Stericycle SterlBcsh Sterlite SMadden s StewEnt StillwtrM StoneEngy Stonerdg StratHotels Stryker SuccessF SulphCo SumitMitsu SunHlth n SunLfFn g Suncor gs SunesisP h Sunoco SunOpta SunPowerA SunPwr B SunriseSen SunstnHtl Suntech SunTrst SupcndTch SupEnrgy SuperMda Supvalu SusqBnc SwRCmATR SwERCmTR SwftEng SwiftTrns n Symantec Symetra n Synaptics Syneron Syngenta Syniverse Synopsys Synovus Syntroleum Sysco TAM SA TCF Fncl TCF Fn wt TD Ameritr TECO TFS Fncl THQ TJX TRWAuto TTM Tch tw telecom TaiwSemi TakeTwo Talbots TalecrisBio Taleo A TalismE g Tanger TanzRy g TargaRes Target Taseko TASER TastyBak TataMotors Taubmn Team TeckRes g TeekayTnk Tekelec TlCmSys TelNorL TelcmNZ TelItalia Teleflex TelefEsp TelMexL Telestone Telik h Tellabs TempleInld TmpGlb TempurP Tenaris TenetHlth Tenneco Teradata Teradyn Terex Ternium Terremk TeslaMot n Tesoro TesseraT TetraTc TetraTech TevaPhrm TexInst TexRdhse Textron ThermoFis ThmBet ThomCrk g ThomsonR Thor Inds Thoratec 3M Co TibcoSft Tidwtr Tiffany Tii NtwkT Timberlnd TimberlnR TW Cable TimeWarn Timken Titan Intl TitanMach TitanMet TiVo Inc TollBros Trchmrk Toreador TorDBk g TortMLP n Total SA TotalSys TowerSemi TowersWat Toyota TractSup s TradeStatn TrCda g TransAtlH TrnsatlPet TransDigm TransGlb Transocn Travelers Travelzoo TreeHse n TriValley TridentM h TrimbleN TrinaSol s Trinity TriQuint Tri-Tech TrueBlue TrueRelig Tuppwre Turkcell TutorPerini TwoHrbInv TycoElec

D

0.16

0.56 1.60 1.28 0.73

0.30 0.10 1.12 0.28 0.20 1.82 1.68 0.60 0.02 1.00 1.04

0.30 0.86 1.17 0.57 0.78 0.49 0.99 0.16 0.60 0.32 1.27 1.36 0.36 0.52 0.30 1.32 0.04 1.02 0.30 0.16 0.50

0.06 0.08 0.12

0.72

1.44 0.40 0.60

0.04

0.35 0.04

0.20 1.13 0.04 1.04 0.92 0.20 0.20 0.82 0.60

0.47

0.25 1.55 2.15 1.00 0.20 0.32 1.75 0.60 1.28 1.65 0.77 0.68 1.36 5.25 1.35 0.08 0.44 0.54 0.68

0.50

0.75 0.52 0.08

1.16 0.40 2.10 1.00 1.00

1.60 0.85 0.72 0.02

0.64 2.44 0.36 3.13 0.28 0.30 1.05 0.28 1.60 0.84

1.44

0.32

1.20 0.66 1.00 1.48 0.64

Nm 1.65 -.02 41.81 +.45 19.91 +.35 9.53 +.55 16.61 +.61 30.20 +.57 5.91 +.11 9.18 -.21 5.14 -.03 3.72 +.04 38.89 +.87 16.87 +.04 20.10 +.33 63.25 -.04 26.48 +.81 56.76 -.59 57.65 +.07 27.06 -1.76 65.53 +.89 8.34 -.06 20.62 +.56 51.59 -.31 23.99 +.16 3.46 +.20 13.78 +.40 11.31 +1.21 15.30 +.26 34.85 +.22 2.79 -.02 36.21 +.05 45.95 +.49 26.82 +.57 38.10 -.40 48.60 -.35 24.70 +.03 13.31 -.01 36.59 +.26 37.33 -.25 25.28 +.07 6.96 +.08 20.72 +.17 18.45 +.21 4.62 +.17 13.08 +.02 11.97 -.09 17.49 +.24 46.45 -.20 38.55 +.09 31.96 +.07 29.28 +.01 37.95 +.31 68.44 +.27 16.47 +.20 35.25 +.18 25.72 +.15 31.44 -.20 29.96 +2.05 4.57 +.15 67.26 -.55 4.16 +.72 23.68 +.73 1.91 32.35 -.13 62.22 +.94 21.50 +.01 47.28 +.60 23.74 +.10 18.65 +.24 10.79 +.01 9.18 +.07 1.12 +.01 3.80 -.02 79.25 -.01 7.19 +.16 16.58 -.41 42.27 +.41 6.75 +.09 20.77 -.06 21.95 +.05 16.79 +.69 5.60 +.11 54.66 +.30 30.54 +1.31 .25 +.06 6.96 -.25 13.30 +.25 30.57 +.18 38.40 +.37 .51 +.01 40.67 -.37 7.98 +.37 13.86 +.23 13.37 +.22 7.00 +.74 10.02 -.11 8.65 +.08 29.75 +.08 1.55 -.03 34.42 -.09 11.43 +1.25 9.21 +.21 9.65 +.35 10.70 +.13 9.18 +.05 40.58 +.43 13.32 +.85 17.62 +.46 13.70 +.13 31.51 +.72 10.49 +.25 60.75 +.88 30.88 +.01 26.78 -.06 2.70 -.03 1.82 -.04 29.67 +.27 24.04 -.32 15.79 +.75 5.90 +.53 19.20 +.41 18.00 -.05 9.34 +.18 6.41 +.05 43.00 -.58 56.00 +.51 14.33 -.15 18.02 +.70 12.36 -.27 12.41 +.03 7.89 -.18 22.77 -.21 29.86 +1.36 22.20 -.14 50.69 +.20 6.94 +.13 33.78 -.25 58.94 -1.05 4.95 -.04 4.88 +.11 4.05 -2.38 29.03 -.23 50.92 +.42 25.65 +1.14 63.06 +.14 12.61 +.16 13.28 +1.27 4.66 -.08 15.33 +.35 8.31 +.06 13.40 +.27 54.19 +.31 66.93 -1.62 16.49 -.06 10.38 +.06 .83 +.06 6.80 +.10 22.71 +.56 10.64 -.18 41.47 +1.27 48.32 -.25 6.86 +.02 43.60 +.93 42.71 +.71 13.48 -.23 30.00 -.16 43.26 +.39 13.33 +.64 26.83 +.16 19.12 +.56 21.60 -.10 24.41 -.26 11.20 -.15 52.11 -.41 32.80 +.13 17.30 +.03 24.29 +.54 56.52 -.20 48.26 +.26 14.75 -.16 37.57 -.13 33.95 +.08 29.20 +.50 86.67 19.76 +.27 53.93 +1.13 60.52 -.09 3.15 -.03 24.67 +.67 1.06 +.02 67.35 -.03 33.17 +.21 49.69 +.26 20.32 +.88 20.47 +.98 17.07 +.38 9.85 +.80 19.88 +.45 61.81 +.70 17.30 +.95 74.28 +.19 24.38 +.04 54.54 -.35 15.86 +.29 1.43 -.03 53.43 +.35 80.20 +.34 47.80 +.46 7.08 +.12 37.41 -.01 52.20 +.24 3.25 +.01 75.66 +1.30 15.85 +.06 73.25 +3.60 55.24 -.33 44.57 +2.81 50.73 -.01 .51 1.63 -.28 40.26 +.25 23.48 +.17 26.94 +.63 13.57 +.45 12.90 +1.60 17.70 -.13 20.92 +.38 48.39 -.59 17.73 +.30 21.77 +.23 9.80 +.18 35.19 -.31

D

TycoIntl Tyson

0.86 42.78 +.04 0.16 16.45 +.20

U-V-W-X-Y-Z U-Store-It UBS AG UDR UGI Corp UIL Hold UQM Tech URS US Airwy US Geoth US Gold USA Tech h USEC USG UTiWrldwd UTStrcm UltaSalon UltraPt g Uluru Umpqua UndrArmr UniSrcEn UnilevNV Unilever UnionPac Unisys Unit UtdCBksGa UtdContl UtdMicro UtdNtrlF UtdOnln UPS B UtdRentals US Bancrp US NGsFd US OilFd USSteel UtdTech UtdTherap UtdhlthGp UnvAmr UnvslCp UnivDisp UnivHlthS UnivTInst UnumGrp Ur-Energy Uranerz UraniumEn UranmRs UrbanOut VCA Ant VF Cp Valassis Vale SA Vale SA pf ValeantPh ValenceT h ValeroE Validus VlyNBcp Valspar ValVis A ValueClick VanceInfo VangSTBd VangTotBd VanHiDvY VangGrth VangSmCp VangSCG VangTSM VangValu VangREIT VangDivAp W m N R D M m G

m m m m M m

G

Mw

M W& O WM W W W O W R W M W W W W W M W R W WR W W M W W W W W W m W MD W M W W W R W W W G D W W W W W W W W H O WD W R W U W m W W W W W W W H W W W Wm Wm Wm W G Wm W m W D W W W W W D m W D W m W W WW W W W W W W M W m W G OM

M R Ww m G m

mm M m w w

0.28

9.38 +.08 16.65 +.03 0.74 22.92 -.20 1.00 31.79 -.01 1.73 29.70 -.17 2.72 +.06 40.25 -.44 11.10 +.48 1.15 7.43 -.22 1.35 +.07 5.98 +.07 16.66 +.08 0.06 21.31 -.15 2.20 +.09 34.52 +.24 46.52 -.62 .10 -.00 0.20 12.63 +.14 55.54 +.89 1.56 35.77 -.19 1.11 31.06 -.48 1.11 30.52 -.40 1.52 92.96 -.12 26.57 +.78 46.28 +.40 2.23 +.26 25.35 -.18 0.08 3.09 -.04 37.13 +.40 0.40 6.87 +.14 1.88 72.90 +.11 24.48 +.79 0.20 26.82 +.06 6.11 -.16 38.52 +.44 0.20 60.58 +.40 1.70 79.23 +.11 66.56 +1.28 0.50 37.59 +.12 2.00 20.14 -.08 1.92 39.94 +.07 34.89 +2.99 0.20 44.01 -.15 1.50 19.67 -.25 0.37 25.06 +.27 2.96 +.05 3.98 +.06 5.65 -.12 3.32 -.04 35.75 -.14 23.63 +.11 2.52 85.14 +.08 31.65 -.73 0.76 35.91 +.09 0.76 31.34 -.08 0.38 29.95 +.55 1.64 -.13 0.20 23.76 +.57 0.88 30.54 -.14 0.72 14.48 +.26 0.72 33.97 -.18 5.73 +.27 16.29 -.05 35.99 +.64 2.31 80.21 -.19 3.23 79.83 -.35 1.09 42.55 +.05 0.67 62.11 +.40 0.85 73.59 +.71 0.36 79.30 +.96 1.24 65.83 +.36 1.26 54.28 +.24 1.84 55.52 +.20


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Default

wide in early October to review their procedures and paperwork after questions were raised about the documents lenders submitted and whether foreclosures were being handled properly. Most foreclosures in Oregon go through a nonjudicial process, but the freeze still slowed foreclosures in the state. Hunter said about 30 of her listings were taken off the market. Many loans made during the housing bubble came with adjustable-rate mortgages that carry low interest rates for the first three, five, seven or 10 years, and Hunter expects additional defaults

Continued from B1 The number filed in 2009 represented an 82 percent increase over 2008 filings in Deschutes County, Oregon’s hardest hit county, at least when it comes to mortgage assistance. The state, factoring in unemployment rates, housing prices and foreclosure rates, gave Deschutes County the highest number of slots in a new mortgage payment assistance program. Bank of America, the nation’s largest bank, and other big lenders halted foreclosures nation-

Resolutions

shop from a list and never shop hungry, says Ciochetti. “Don’t walk in with any cravings, and don’t buy anything in the checkout line. There’s a reason the candy, gum, soda and $5 magazines are there.”

Continued from B1

Getting started Before knowing how to cut back, you need to know where your money goes. Financial experts recommend you track your spending for at least 30 days. Write everything down — from gum to groceries. That $5 you think you spend on lunch every day may actually be $8 or $9, even $15 if you’re eating out. Three times a week, you’re forking out $45 without even realizing.

Get a cushion Everyone needs a financial safety net, a savings account for that unexpected medical, dental, car or family emergency. “What usually knocks people off a financial recovery plan is an emergency that requires a credit card: new tires for the car, the water heater goes out,” said Ciochetti. Typically, it’s recommended to set aside savings of three to six months of living expenses. “But in this economy, it’s more realistic to have one to two months of savings because more people are stretched,” said ClearPoint’s Delgado. A reasonable amount is 10 percent of your take-home pay, he said. If you get paid $1,000 every two weeks, put away at least $100 in an account that’s accessed only in an emergency. “Even if it’s only $10 to $20, it’s a start.”

Tighten the budget belt Based on your 30-day spending, decide what’s important; choose where you can economize. “It’s a cliche, but think about if you need a Starbucks coffee every day,” said Elias Delgado, spokesman with nonprofit ClearPoint Credit Counseling Solutions, which has 10 offices in California, including Sacramento. “At $5 a cup, that’s $25 a week, $100 a month. If you really want it, can you buy a pound and brew it at home or the office?” Get a budget buddy, someone to keep you motivated, suggests Ciochetti. “It’s easier to say, ‘Let’s lose 10 pounds together’ than ‘Let’s save 10 percent of our money together.’ But I’ve had clients who noticed a friend at work bringing lunch and joined them. Then others noticed ,and suddenly you’re not alone.” Other tips: Get a smaller cable TV package. Order two takeout pizzas a month instead of four, suggests Gail Cunningham, spokeswoman for the National Foundation for Credit Counseling. Review your cell phone bill: If you’re paying for unlimited texting, for instance, but rarely use it, cut back on what you’re paying for that privilege. At the grocery store, always

Credit card help When it comes to credit cards, put them on ice. Literally, says Cunningham. “The plastic in your wallet is temptation. Remove it. Put (credit cards) in a mixing bowl with water in the freezer.” Other tips: If you have multiple cards with varying debt, pay down the card with the highest interest rate first. Pay more than the minimum payment, whenever possible. Consider transferring balances to a card with a lower interest rate. But be aware: some card issuers are now charging higher transfer fees. Call your card issuer to ask — politely — about negotiating lower rates. If turned down, ask to speak with a supervisor.

when those loans reset, even if lenders agree to refinance. “When it comes up to refinance and (they’ve) got to put down another 20, 30 or 40 percent, who knows if they’re going to have the money,” she said. Some of those same reasons make University of Oregon economist Timothy Duy hesitant about reading too much into a two-month drop in the number of default notices filed in Deschutes County. Along with the foreclosure freeze, Duy said lenders holding onto properties through the end of the year also could poten-

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, January 6, 2011 B3

tially influence the number of foreclosures. If housing prices continue to fall, that could bring an increase in future foreclosure numbers, he said. With the housing market facing so many challenges, Duy said, he would like to see more data before offering any observations. “If I saw four or five months of decline, I would be more likely to say we’ve clearly hit the peak,” he said. Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@ bendbulletin.com.

Facebook

the firm. Unlike Wall Street brokers who sell shares to investors, Friedman manages money for other people. That means he has a fiduciary responsibility to act in the best interests of his clients. Goldman does not have the same obligation to many of its private wealth management clients, because it is not giving investment advice. Goldman’s critics have long complained that the firm puts its own interests ahead of clients. In the Facebook deal, Goldman is investing $450 million, at an implied $50 billion valuation. However, Goldman clients are paying a 4 percent placement fee and a 0.5 percent expense reserve fee for their shares, as well as giving up 5 percent of gains. That means that Facebook would need to be worth closer to $60 billion before they make any money. Besides those fees, Goldman is likely to earn additional money from ancillary business — with the biggest win coming from an eventual initial public offering. Facebook is expected to go public in 2012. One reason Friedman may have shied away from the Facebook offer was that his fund was burned a decade ago after loading up on technology and telecom darlings during the dot-com bubble. The unit’s third fund, a $2.8 billion vehicle raised in 1998, invested roughly 70 percent of its portfolio in such companies, according to the fund’s documents. “If by doing this investment they get Facebook’s IPO, then the fees that they make — no matter what size — make this investment a better deal for them, than all of their clients,” said Barry Schuler, managing director of venture capital firm Draper Fisher Jurvetson.

Continued from B1 But the unit’s head, Richard Friedman, a longtime Goldman partner, decided the Facebook deal was not suitable for his clients, in part owing to the high valuation. The $450 million investment values the Web company at $50 billion. After Goldman’s deal, some industry experts cautioned that Facebook’s growth would need to accelerate rapidly over the next couple of years to justify such a steep price — a risk with many brand-name technology upstarts. After Friedman passed, the Wall Street bank itself made the $450 million Facebook investment, taking the deal on its balance sheet. The firm is trying to sell another $1.5 billion of shares in the tech company to wealthy clients — a deal that is expected to be oversubscribed when it closes later this week, as early as Thursday, these people said. The decision by Friedman, who holds a seat on the firm’s vaunted management committee, has raised concerns among some of Goldman’s most sophisticated clients who have been pitched on Facebook in recent days. Several wealthy individuals approached about the offering said they had declined, in part, because of Friedman’s rejection. People briefed on Friedman’s decision said he was concerned about Facebook’s $50 billion valuation and the terms of the deal. Goldman Sachs Capital Partners frequently likes to take large positions in companies with expectations of holding them for several years or even longer. A $450 million investment in Facebook would have represented less than 1 percent of

Microcredit Continued from B1 The attention lavished on microcredit helped the sector reach more than 91 million customers, most of them women, with loans totaling more than $70 billion by the end of 2009. India and Bangladesh together account for half of all borrowers. But as with other trumpeted development initiatives that have promised to lift hundreds of millions from poverty, microcredit has struggled to turn rhetoric into tangible success. Done right, these loans have shown promise in allowing some borrowers to build sustainable livelihoods. But it has also become clear that the rapid growth of microcredit — in India some lending firms were growing at 60 percent to 100 percent a year — has made the loans much less effective.

Political backlash Meanwhile, politicians in developing nations, some of whom had long resented microlenders as competitors for the hearts and minds of the poor, have taken to depicting lenders as profiteering at the expense of borrowers. Nicaragua’s president, Daniel Ortega, for example, supported “movimiento no pago,” or the no-pay movement, which was started in 2008 by farmers after some borrowers could not pay their debts. Partly as a result of that campaign, a judge recently ordered the liquidation of one of the country’s leading microlenders, Banco del Exito, or Success Bank. “These crises happen when the microfinance sector gets saturated, when it grows too fast, and the mechanisms for controlling overindebtedness is not well developed,” said Elisabeth Rhyne, a senior official at Accion International, a Boston organization that invests in microlenders. “On the political side, politicians or political actors take advantage of an opportunity. When they see grievances, they go, ‘Wow, we can make some hay with this.’ ” In India, leaders in the southern state of Andhra Pradesh, which accounts for about a third of the country’s microloans, have accused lenders of impoverishing customers. Stories proliferated in the local news media about women who had amassed debts of $1,000 or more as loan officers cajoled them into borrowing more than they could afford and then browbeating them to re-

pay. Many had used the money to pay for televisions or health care or to soften the blow of failed crops, rather than as seed money for businesses. Microcredit firms in India were also accused of siphoning borrowers from government-run “self-help groups” — women’s organizations that can borrow small amounts at subsidized interest rates from government-owned banks. The movement against microcredit was started by opposition politicians, who have encouraged borrowers not to repay their loans and have accused senior leaders of the ruling Congress Party of being in cahoots with lenders. The Congress-led state government made the cause its own and passed a tough new law in December to cap interest rates and regulate collections. The crisis has had ripples across the nation. Banks, the primary source of money for microlenders, have turned off the tap because they are worried about the industry’s future. As a result, microlenders have slowed or stopped lending nationwide.

Need for reform Industry leaders say they hope the issues will be resolved soon. The federal government and the Reserve Bank of India, the country’s central bank, are working on new federal regulations to oversee microcredit, said Alok Prasad, chief executive of the Microfinance Institutions Network. Still, some industry officials acknowledge that the sector also needs to reform itself to overcome political opposition and live up to its promise. They say that organizations that now offer only loans need to diversify into microsavings accounts, which many specialists assert are much better than loans at alleviating poverty. The industry, they say, also needs to speed up efforts to build a credit bureau that would reduce overlending. And organizations need to measure their success not just by growth and profits, but by how fast their customers are getting out of poverty, experts say. “We at microfinance have a job to do to make it easier for politicians to support us,” said Alex Counts, the chief executive of the Grameen Foundation, a nonprofit in Washington that is not part of Grameen Bank. “Rather than make claims that get out in front of the research, we need to impose on ourselves the discipline of transparency about poverty reduction.”

Market update Northwest stocks Name

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeB rs CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.00 .04 .36f 1.68 ... .40 .80a .82 ... ... .32 .22 .72f .04 .42f ... ... .65f ... .64

10 14 21 24 15 ... ... 28 24 54 20 11 ... 11 ... 13 14 ... 16 ... 7

59.11 +1.70 +4.3 22.83 -.04 +1.4 14.50 +.26 +8.7 15.07 -.19 -3.1 67.48 +.54 +3.4 9.75 +.45 +15.4 46.54 +1.02 -1.6 60.34 +.86 +.1 70.99 -1.34 -1.7 7.50 -.15 +1.5 29.43 +.35 -1.1 44.20 +.57 +5.0 12.49 +.22 +1.8 20.94 -.21 -.4 9.02 +.06 +1.9 21.85 +.15 -2.3 5.86 ... -3.3 10.05 +.24 +6.2 20.67 -.01 +2.0 11.98 +.02 -.2 28.00 -.09 +.3

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1375.00 $1373.40 $29.173

Pvs Day $1380.00 $1378.50 $29.492

Market recap

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

1.24f .80 1.74f ... .48a ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.44 .86f .52 ... .20 .20 .24f .20 ... .60f

21 17 17 25 63 ... 36 21 ... 29 20 10 26 13 ... 17 16 13 ... ...

84.52 +.55 -1.1 42.86 +.29 +1.1 46.51 +.05 +.1 18.43 +.25 +4.1 57.63 +.50 +.5 2.19 +.04 +5.8 38.38 +.55 +2.5 142.21 +2.54 +2.2 21.46 -.18 -4.6 68.10 +.37 +2.6 82.60 -1.12 -1.4 46.45 -.20 +2.9 32.35 -.13 +.7 13.57 +.45 +16.1 12.63 +.14 +3.7 26.82 +.06 -.6 16.92 +.23 ... 32.37 +.72 +4.5 3.10 +.19 +9.9 20.16 +.61 +6.5

Prime rate Time period

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Citigrp BkofAm S&P500ETF FordM SPDR Fncl

6436397 2405809 1127110 1113538 959047

Last Chg 4.97 14.50 127.64 17.89 16.47

+.07 +.26 +.66 +.51 +.20

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Nautilus h Vonage Dex One n RAIT Fin QiaoXMob

2.32 +.44 +23.4 2.63 +.33 +14.3 8.71 +1.00 +13.0 2.53 +.29 +12.9 4.83 +.53 +12.3

Losers ($2 or more)

3.25 3.25 3.25

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name ChinaShen RareEle g RadientPh NovaGld g AvalRare n

Vol (00)

Last Chg

126819 10.24 +.44 77094 16.04 -.18 75803 1.36 -.31 71267 13.62 +.20 65338 7.30 ...

VistaGold IEC Elec ChiBotanP SunLink Tofutti

3.07 +.44 +16.7 9.00 +1.20 +15.4 2.37 +.24 +11.3 2.00 +.18 +9.9 2.09 +.18 +9.4

Chg %Chg

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

3.15 2.10 2.05 8.11 4.18

-.42 -.25 -.24 -.94 -.46

-11.8 -10.6 -10.5 -10.4 -9.9

PacOffPT ChiGengM SinoHub Aerosonic UtdCap

1,816 1,229 84 3,129 173 9

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last

659954 592575 571787 465556 464397

+.25 -.21 -.09 -.02 +.64

Last

LCA Vis StanlFrn GluMobile FstBcMiss YadkinVFn

7.56 +1.86 +32.6 4.16 +.72 +20.9 2.68 +.46 +20.7 9.78 +1.67 +20.6 2.26 +.37 +19.6

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

2.59 -.56 -17.8 3.72 -.65 -14.9 2.35 -.19 -7.5 3.20 -.20 -5.9 30.50 -1.80 -5.6

Name

Last

TastyBak Zion wt1-12 Mattson TxCapB wt ArabAmDv

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last Chg 20.77 20.94 28.00 1.65 44.64

Name

Losers ($2 or more)

Goldcp wt CaptlTr pf CapTr12 pf ChinaGreen ChinaDEd

Vol (00)

Cisco Intel Microsoft SiriusXM Atheros

Gainers ($2 or more)

Last

Name

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Diary

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

NYSE

Indexes

Chg %Chg

4.05 -2.38 -37.0 5.93 -2.07 -25.9 2.28 -.28 -10.9 12.00 -1.47 -10.9 4.50 -.50 -10.0

Diary 245 229 47 521 11 2

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,880 775 121 2,776 148 7

11,711.47 9,614.32 Dow Jones Industrials 5,219.80 3,742.01 Dow Jones Transportation 413.75 346.95 Dow Jones Utilities 8,071.43 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 2,225.48 1,689.19 Amex Index 2,704.86 2,061.14 Nasdaq Composite 1,276.17 1,010.91 S&P 500 13,567.21 10,596.20 Wilshire 5000 801.13 580.49 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

11,722.89 5,154.59 406.20 8,040.04 2,200.51 2,702.20 1,276.56 13,554.28 795.09

+31.71 +15.59 -2.32 +17.86 +1.93 +20.95 +6.36 +79.70 +9.26

YTD %Chg %Chg +.27 +.30 -.57 +.22 +.09 +.78 +.50 +.59 +1.18

52-wk %Chg

+1.26 +.94 +.30 +.95 -.36 +1.86 +1.50 +1.45 +1.46

+10.87 +24.29 +1.97 +8.98 +17.87 +17.43 +12.26 +14.83 +24.63

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Wednesday.

Key currency exchange rates Wednesday compared with late Tuesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

357.28 2,631.57 3,904.61 6,043.86 6,939.82 23,757.82 38,696.24 20,551.58 3,324.99 10,380.77 2,082.55 3,254.25 4,820.90 5,852.35

-.44 t -.62 t -.29 t +.50 s -.51 t +.38 s +.40 s +.02 s +.48 s -.17 t -.12 t +.12 s -.59 t +.14 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

.9998 1.5494 1.0037 .002020 .1511 1.3151 .1287 .012004 .081917 .0327 .000890 .1477 1.0340 .0342

1.0050 1.5583 1.0004 .002051 .1513 1.3305 .1287 .012193 .081679 .0329 .000893 .1487 1.0531 .0343

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 19.88 +0.12 +1.9 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 18.90 +0.12 +2.0 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.28 +0.02 +1.0 GrowthI 26.16 +0.11 +1.2 Ultra 22.91 +0.11 +1.1 American Funds A: AmcpA p 19.06 +0.13 +1.2 AMutlA p 25.52 +0.04 +0.8 BalA p 18.07 +0.03 +0.8 BondA p 12.13 -0.06 -0.5 CapIBA p 49.98 -0.14 +0.1 CapWGA p 35.89 -0.13 +0.5 CapWA p 20.30 -0.13 -0.6 EupacA p 41.51 -0.25 +0.3 FdInvA p 37.04 +0.11 +0.9 GovtA p 13.82 -0.08 -0.8 GwthA p 30.78 +0.10 +1.1 HI TrA p 11.32 +0.4 IncoA p 16.63 +0.5 IntBdA p 13.38 -0.04 -0.4 ICAA p 28.44 +0.06 +1.0 NEcoA p 25.82 +0.15 +1.9 N PerA p 28.68 -0.08 +0.2 NwWrldA 54.97 -0.10 +0.7 SmCpA p 39.21 +0.11 +0.9 TxExA p 11.81 -0.02 -0.1 WshA p 27.52 +0.11 +1.1 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 30.18 -0.17 +0.1 IntlEqA 29.45 -0.17 +0.1 IntEqII I r 12.48 -0.07 +0.2 Artisan Funds: Intl 21.94 NA MidCap 33.83 NA MidCapVal 20.08 NA Baron Funds: Growth 51.69 +0.23 +0.9 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.66 -0.06 -0.4 DivMu 14.27 -0.01 +0.1

TxMgdIntl 15.77 -0.11 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 17.65 +0.03 GlAlA r 19.48 -0.03 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.20 -0.03 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 17.68 +0.03 GlbAlloc r 19.56 -0.03 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 54.47 +0.47 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 29.37 +0.18 DivEqInc 10.24 +0.03 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 30.32 +0.18 AcornIntZ 40.90 -0.24 ValRestr 51.09 +0.24 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.26 +0.05 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 11.28 -0.07 USCorEq2 11.14 +0.08 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 34.72 +0.19 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 35.07 +0.19 NYVen C 33.58 +0.19 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.18 -0.03 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 22.43 -0.05 EmMktV 36.59 -0.12 IntSmVa 17.20 -0.12 LargeCo 10.05 +0.05 USLgVa 20.55 +0.12 US Small 21.67 +0.25 US SmVa 25.97 +0.27 IntlSmCo 17.12 -0.13 Fixd 10.32 IntVa 18.50 -0.08 Glb5FxInc 10.84 -0.04 2YGlFxd 10.14 -0.01 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 71.32 +0.31

+0.3 +0.7 +0.3 +0.3 +0.7 +0.3 +2.0 +0.4 +1.4 +0.4 +1.1 -0.9 +0.2 +1.5 +1.1 +1.1 +1.1 -0.3 +1.2 +1.2 +1.5 +2.1 +1.5 +1.6 -0.3 +0.7 -0.4 -0.1 +1.6

Income 13.20 IntlStk 35.82 Stock 110.00 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.50 Eaton Vance I: GblMacAbR 10.28 LgCapVal 18.55 FMI Funds: LgCap p 15.78 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.85 FPACres 26.93 Fairholme 36.40 Federated Instl: KaufmnR 5.55 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 20.16 StrInA 12.40 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 20.35 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.65 FF2015 11.40 FF2020 13.88 FF2020K 13.28 FF2025 11.61 FF2030 13.89 FF2035 11.58 FF2040 8.09 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.85 AMgr50 15.49 Balanc 18.36 BalancedK 18.36 BlueChGr 46.29 Canada 58.14 CapAp 25.76 CpInc r 9.56 Contra 68.46 ContraK 68.43 DisEq 22.94 DivIntl 30.22 DivrsIntK r 30.19 DivGth 28.79

-0.04 -0.2 -0.16 +0.3 +0.68 +2.1 +0.08 +1.5 +0.1 +0.08 +1.5 +0.09 +1.1 +0.07 +0.5 +0.56 +2.3 +0.03 +0.9 +0.10 +1.0 -0.03 +0.2 +0.10 +1.0

+0.02 +0.01 +0.02 +0.02 +0.02 +0.01 +0.05 -0.01 +0.01 +0.01 +0.43 +0.18 +0.20 +0.03 +0.35 +0.36 +0.11 -0.19 -0.19 +0.16

+0.4 +0.5 +0.7 +0.7 +0.8 +0.9 +1.0 +1.0 +1.4 +0.5 +0.7 +0.7 +2.1 +1.7 +1.4 +1.1 +1.1 +1.8 +0.2 +0.2 +1.3

EmrMk 26.65 Eq Inc 45.17 EQII 18.62 Fidel 32.67 FltRateHi r 9.83 GNMA 11.43 GovtInc 10.36 GroCo 85.23 GroInc 18.60 GrowthCoK 85.18 HighInc r 9.01 Indepn 24.81 IntBd 10.50 IntmMu 10.03 IntlDisc 33.18 InvGrBd 11.34 InvGB 7.35 LgCapVal 12.07 LatAm 59.27 LevCoStk 28.81 LowP r 38.61 LowPriK r 38.59 Magelln 72.19 MidCap 29.23 MuniInc 12.26 NwMkt r 15.74 OTC 56.46 100Index 8.90 Ovrsea 32.41 Puritn 18.08 SCmdtyStrt 12.51 SrsIntGrw 11.23 SrsIntVal 10.02 StIntMu 10.60 STBF 8.44 SmllCpS r 20.12 StratInc 11.10 StrReRt r 9.56 TotalBd 10.68 USBI 11.27 Value 69.52 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 50.70 Fidelity Spartan:

-0.01 +0.28 +0.11 +0.15 +0.01 -0.06 -0.06 +1.07 +0.12 +1.07 +0.01 +0.18 -0.05 -0.17 -0.06 -0.04 +0.07 +0.05 +0.20 +0.07 +0.07 +0.31 +0.26 -0.02 -0.05 +0.85 +0.05 -0.31 +0.03 +0.05 -0.09 -0.06 -0.01 -0.02 +0.22 -0.03 +0.01 -0.05 -0.07 +0.36

+1.1 +2.1 +2.0 +1.6 +0.4 -0.3 -0.6 +2.5 +1.6 +2.5 +0.9 +1.9 -0.4 +0.4 -0.5 -0.5 +2.0 +0.4 +1.4 +0.6 +0.6 +0.7 +1.3 +0.6 +2.8 +1.8 -0.2 +0.9 -1.0 -0.5 +0.8 -0.2 +2.7 +0.1 -0.2 -0.3 -0.5 +1.2

-0.79 -4.5

ExtMkIn 38.66 +0.34 500IdxInv 45.16 +0.23 IntlInxInv 35.14 -0.28 TotMktInv 36.96 +0.21 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 45.16 +0.23 TotMktAd r 36.96 +0.21 First Eagle: GlblA 46.43 -0.16 OverseasA 22.60 -0.18 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.32 -0.02 FoundAl p 10.58 HYTFA p 9.63 -0.02 IncomA p 2.19 USGovA p 6.71 -0.03 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p IncmeAd 2.18 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.21 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 20.93 +0.07 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 7.01 -0.05 GlBd A p 13.65 +0.01 GrwthA p 17.97 -0.04 WorldA p 15.01 -0.04 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.68 +0.02 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 40.90 +0.24 GMO Trust III: Quality 20.27 -0.01 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 14.88 Quality 20.27 -0.01 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.33 MidCapV 36.63 +0.22 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.04 -0.08 CapApInst 37.32 +0.29 IntlInv t 60.04 -0.59 Intl r 60.59 -0.59

+1.3 +1.5 -0.1 +1.5 +1.5 +1.5 +0.2 -0.3 -0.1 +1.1 +1.0 -0.4 +0.4 +1.0 +1.0 +1.4 +0.4 +0.4 +1.0 +1.1 +0.4 +1.7 +0.8 +1.9 +0.8 +0.5 +1.3 -0.5 +1.6 +0.1 +0.1

Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 35.22 +0.11 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 35.23 +0.12 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 43.16 +0.23 Div&Gr 19.76 +0.06 Advisers 19.52 +0.06 TotRetBd 10.86 -0.04 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.13 -0.07 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r 16.74 -0.03 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 16.35 +0.07 EqIncA 8.71 +0.03 GrIncA p 19.60 +0.12 HYMuA 8.95 -0.02 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 24.09 +0.09 AssetStA p 24.79 +0.09 AssetStrI r 25.00 +0.10 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.43 -0.05 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.42 -0.05 HighYld 8.21 +0.01 IntmTFBd 10.77 ShtDurBd 10.95 -0.02 USLCCrPls 21.06 +0.13 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 52.08 +0.24 PrkMCVal T 22.69 +0.09 Twenty T 66.90 +0.35 John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggr 12.44 +0.05 LSBalanc 13.01 +0.02 LSGrwth 12.98 +0.04 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.99 -0.06 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 22.40 -0.06 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 15.07 -0.04 Longleaf Partners:

+1.7 +1.7 +1.9 +1.3 +1.0 -0.3 -1.3 +0.1 +1.1 +1.4 +2.0 -0.3 +1.5 +1.6 +1.6 -0.3 -0.3 +0.7 +0.1 -0.2 +1.9 +2.8 +0.5 +1.8 +1.3 +0.9 +1.1 +1.0 +0.9 -0.1

Partners 28.67 +0.17 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.26 -0.03 StrInc C 14.87 -0.03 LSBondR 14.21 -0.03 StrIncA 14.79 -0.03 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.06 -0.06 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.85 +0.09 BdDebA p 7.85 +0.01 ShDurIncA p 4.60 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.62 -0.01 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.20 +0.02 ValueA 23.17 +0.14 MFS Funds I: ValueI 23.27 +0.14 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.54 -0.08 Matthews Asian: AsianGIInv 18.15 +0.04 PacTgrInv 23.84 +0.01 MergerFd 15.82 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.33 -0.05 TotRtBdI 10.33 -0.05 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 38.08 +0.22 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 29.56 +0.01 GlbDiscZ 29.91 +0.01 QuestZ 17.86 +0.02 SharesZ 21.08 +0.07 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 45.94 +0.23 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 47.61 +0.24 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.33 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 27.76 -0.05 Intl I r 19.39 -0.17 Oakmark r 41.95 +0.21

+1.5 -0.1 -0.1 -0.6 +2.3 +0.5 -0.2 +0.7 +1.6 +1.6 -0.8 +0.6 +1.7 +0.3 -0.4 -0.3 +2.0 +1.3 +1.3 +1.0 +1.4

-0.1 NA +0.1 -0.1 +1.6

Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.78 +0.02 GlbSMdCap 15.49 -0.02 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 43.86 +0.14 DvMktA p 36.53 -0.14 GlobA p 60.51 -0.16 GblStrIncA 4.29 -0.01 Gold p 47.58 -0.55 IntBdA p 6.51 -0.04 MnStFdA 32.93 +0.26 RisingDivA 15.62 +0.04 S&MdCpVl 32.13 +0.13 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.18 +0.04 S&MdCpVl 27.56 +0.11 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 14.13 +0.04 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 6.63 -0.02 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 36.14 -0.13 IntlBdY 6.50 -0.05 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.80 -0.06 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.57 AllAsset 12.09 ComodRR 9.19 +0.01 HiYld 9.36 +0.01 InvGrCp 10.45 -0.06 LowDu 10.36 -0.04 RealRtnI 11.30 -0.06 ShortT 9.86 -0.01 TotRt 10.80 -0.06 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.30 -0.06 TotRtA 10.80 -0.06 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.80 -0.06 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.80 -0.06 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.80 -0.06 Perm Port Funds:

+0.9 +0.1 +0.6 +0.2 +0.2 -4.5 -0.8 +1.7 +0.7 +0.3 +0.7 +0.3 +0.7 -0.6 +0.2 -0.9 -0.4 NA NA -1.1 +0.7 -0.3 -0.3 -0.5 -0.4 -0.5 -0.4 -0.4 -0.4 -0.4

Permannt 45.39 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 41.42 Price Funds: BlChip 38.72 CapApp 20.49 EmMktS 35.80 EqInc 24.07 EqIndex 34.38 Growth 32.60 HlthSci 30.78 HiYield 6.83 IntlBond 9.77 IntlStk 14.29 MidCap 59.15 MCapVal 23.97 N Asia 19.49 New Era 52.24 N Horiz 33.85 N Inc 9.44 R2010 15.43 R2015 11.98 R2020 16.58 R2025 12.16 R2030 17.47 R2040 17.62 ShtBd 4.84 SmCpStk 34.79 SmCapVal 36.49 SpecIn 12.35 Value 23.78 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.81 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.71 PremierI r 20.28 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 37.72 S&P Sel 19.87 Scout Funds: Intl 32.24 Selected Funds: AmShD 41.88 AmShS p 41.90 Templeton Instit:

-0.06 -0.9 +0.21 +1.1 +0.30 +0.06 -0.03 +0.12 +0.18 +0.23 +0.20 +0.02 -0.12 -0.07 +0.49 +0.15 +0.03 +0.14 +0.35 -0.05 +0.01 +0.02 +0.03 +0.03 +0.05 +0.06 -0.01 +0.33 +0.34 -0.04 +0.14

+1.5 +0.9 +1.5 +1.6 +1.5 +1.4 +1.7 +0.8 -1.8 +0.4 +1.1 +1.1 +1.6 +0.2 +1.1 -0.5 +0.6 +0.8 +0.9 +1.0 +1.1 +1.1 -0.2 +1.0 +1.0 +1.9

+0.08 +2.0 +0.08 +0.5 +0.03 -0.3 +0.20 +1.5 +0.10 +1.5 -0.28 -0.4 +0.22 +1.1 +0.21 +1.1

ForEqS 20.02 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 53.09 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 28.14 IntValue I 28.75 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 23.83 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 10.71 CpOpAdl 77.64 EMAdmr r 40.40 Energy 122.37 ExtdAdm 41.83 500Adml 117.59 GNMA Ad 10.69 GrwAdm 31.96 HlthCr 52.04 HiYldCp 5.72 InfProAd 25.43 ITBdAdml 11.12 ITsryAdml 11.24 IntGrAdm 61.71 ITAdml 13.28 ITGrAdm 9.86 LtdTrAd 11.00 LTGrAdml 9.18 LT Adml 10.67 MCpAdml 93.04 MuHYAdm 10.09 PrmCap r 68.97 ReitAdm r 78.80 STsyAdml 10.66 STBdAdml 10.52 ShtTrAd 15.86 STIGrAd 10.75 SmCAdm 35.27 TtlBAdml 10.53 TStkAdm 32.03 WellslAdm 52.47 WelltnAdm 54.09 Windsor 46.28 WdsrIIAd 46.39 Vanguard Fds:

-0.21 -0.1 +0.21 +2.6 -0.21 +0.4 -0.22 +0.4 -0.11 -0.01 +0.42 -0.06 +0.13 +0.37 +0.60 -0.05 +0.19 +0.07 -0.13 -0.09 -0.08 -0.37 -0.01 -0.06 -0.13 -0.02 +0.46 -0.01 +0.26 +0.45 -0.02 -0.03 -0.01 -0.02 +0.37 -0.06 +0.18 -0.20 -0.02 +0.29 +0.27

+1.1 +1.4 +0.4 +1.3 +1.5 -0.4 +1.1 +0.8 +0.4 -0.4 -0.8 -0.8 +0.3 +0.1 -0.6 -1.7 +0.9 +1.0 +0.5 -0.2 -0.3 -0.2 +1.4 -0.6 +1.5 -0.2 +0.7 +1.5 +1.8

AssetA 24.63 CapOpp 33.62 DivdGro 14.47 Energy 65.17 EqInc 20.56 Explr 73.99 GNMA 10.69 GlobEq 18.09 HYCorp 5.72 HlthCre 123.33 InflaPro 12.95 IntlGr 19.40 IntlVal 32.37 ITIGrade 9.86 LifeCon 16.39 LifeGro 22.22 LifeMod 19.65 LTIGrade 9.18 Morg 18.30 MuInt 13.28 PrecMtls r 25.97 PrmcpCor 13.87 Prmcp r 66.48 SelValu r 18.94 STAR 19.18 STIGrade 10.75 StratEq 18.56 TgtRetInc 11.27 TgRe2010 22.36 TgtRe2015 12.47 TgRe2020 22.21 TgtRe2025 12.70 TgRe2030 21.84 TgtRe2035 13.20 TgtRe2040 21.69 TgtRe2045 13.62 USGro 18.54 Wellsly 21.66 Welltn 31.32 Wndsr 13.72 WndsII 26.14 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 117.58 EMkt 30.75

+0.02 +0.19 +0.04 +0.07 +0.03 +0.75 -0.05 +0.03 +0.16 -0.06 -0.11 -0.16 -0.06 -0.03 +0.02 -0.02 -0.13 +0.12 -0.01 -0.38 +0.03 +0.26 +0.08 -0.01 -0.02 +0.12 -0.03 -0.03 -0.01 -0.01 +0.01 +0.01 +0.02 +0.04 +0.02 +0.15 -0.08 -0.01 +0.09 +0.15

+0.7 +1.1 +0.6 +0.4 +0.9 +1.5 -0.4 +1.3 +0.4 +0.8 -0.4 +0.3 +0.7 -0.6 +0.2 +0.7 +0.4 -1.7 +1.5 +0.1 -2.9 +0.7 +1.0 +1.0 +0.5 -0.2 +1.3 -0.1 +0.2 +0.4 +0.5 +0.6 +0.7 +0.8 +0.9 +0.9 +1.6 -0.2 +0.7 +1.6 +1.8

+0.60 +1.5 -0.04 +1.4

Extend

41.82 +0.38 +1.4

Growth

31.96 +0.19 +1.1

MidCap

20.50 +0.10 +0.9

SmCap

35.24 +0.37 +1.4

SmlCpGth

22.28 +0.27 +1.6

SmlCpVl

16.20 +0.14 +1.2

STBnd

10.52 -0.03 -0.3

TotBnd

10.53 -0.06 -0.6

TotlIntl

15.77 -0.09 +0.1

TotStk

32.02 +0.18 +1.5

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst ExtIn

9.96 -0.07 -0.2 41.83 +0.38 +1.4

FTAllWldI r

93.96 -0.52 +0.1

GrwthIst

31.96 +0.19 +1.1

InfProInst

10.36 -0.05 -0.4

InstIdx

116.76 +0.60 +1.5

InsPl

116.76 +0.60 +1.5

InsTStPlus

28.96 +0.16 +1.5

MidCpIst

20.55 +0.10 +0.9

SCInst

35.27 +0.37 +1.4

TBIst

10.53 -0.06 -0.6

TSInst

32.04 +0.19 +1.5

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

97.13 +0.49 +1.5

STBdIdx

10.52 -0.03 -0.3

TotBdSgl

10.53 -0.06 -0.6

TotStkSgl

30.92 +0.18 +1.5

Western Asset: CorePlus I

10.79

NA


B USI N ESS

B4 Thursday, January 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M  BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY HOLDING EMPLOYEES AND OTHERS ACCOUNTABLE: Learn to ensure that team members do their jobs well and take responsibility for contributing to a common goal; $85; 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or noncredit.cocc.edu. LEADERSHIP SKILLS SERIES: Central Oregon Community College’s Small Business Development Center will offer a nine-month series designed to give managers and team leaders the skills they need to succeed in their organizations; entire series costs $645, individual seminars are $85; 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7700 or www.cocc.edu/. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: An overview on how to research investments, place online trade orders for stocks, bonds and mutual funds, and manage finances. Presented by Luiz Soutomaior. Registration required by Jan. 4; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@ schwab.com or www.schwab.com.

FRIDAY FREE TAX RETURN REVIEWS: If you think you paid too much or missed a deduction, Zoom Tax can help. Call or stop by for an appointment; free; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave. , Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Housing Works, 405 S.W. Sixth St.; 541-323-7405. THE SOCIAL NONPROFIT: Learn about social media strategies for nonprofits. Space is limited. Registration required by Jan. 5; free; 10-11 a.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704.

SATURDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. JEFFERSON COUNTY LIVESTOCK ASSOCIATION ANNUAL MEETING: Amy Derby, Wheeler County extension agent, and Tim DeBoodt, Crook County extension agent, will speak. Lunch included; 10:30 a.m.; Central Oregon Livestock Auction Yards, 3457 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras; 541-475-3851. JEFFERSON COUNTY LIVESTOCK ASSOCIATION ANNUAL BANQUET: Dinner schedule includes award presentations and silent auction. RSVP requested but not required; $20; 5:30 p.m.; Inn at Cross Keys Station, 66 N.W. Cedar St., Madras; 541-489-3350 or541-546-9446.

TUESDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. KNOW COMPUTERS FOR BEGINNERS: Sign up online, at the reference desk, or call 541-6177080; free; 10:30 a.m.-noon; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. KNOW WORD FOR BEGINNERS: Sign up online, at the reference desk or call 541-617-7080; free; 2-3:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037.

WEDNESDAY HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Learn the basic steps needed to open a business. Registration required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837290 or noncredit.cocc.edu.

THURSDAY Jan. 13 IMPLEMENTING LEAN OFFICE: Learn about Lean Office, a workplace improvement method aimed at eliminating waste, reducing costs

and stress, and improving efficiency. Five-session online course offered by Jocelyn Coverdale and Tracy Campbell; free Introduction; 9-10 a.m.; www.simplicated.com. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE YOUNG PROFESSIONALS NETWORK: To prepay via PayPal, go to www. visitredmondoregon.com; $5 in advance or $10 at the door; 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Healthy Habits, 222 N.W. Seventh St., Suite 5; 541-923-5191. SMALL-BUSINESS RETIREMENT SOLUTIONS: Learn about smallbusiness retirement plan choices and factors to consider when choosing a plan. Presented by Luiz Soutomaior. Registration required by Jan. 11; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@ schwab.com or www.schwab.com.

City of Bend

Jeanna L. Persson, 1345 N.W. Hartford Ave., $283,594 Michael Carr, 2246 N.W. High Lakes Loop, $255,495 Deschutes County

Dennis & Lillian Smith Joint

How 6 companies bit the dust in 2010

New York Times News Service

Jan. 14 REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Redmond Habitat for Humanity ReStore, 1242 S. U.S. Highway 97; 541-548-1406. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. SUSTAINABLE HOMES PROFESSIONAL: Learn building science topics intended for builders, architects, designers and trades people. Six-month class meets twice per month. Registration required by Jan. 13; $1,400; 9 a.m.5 p.m.; Earth Advantage Institute, 345 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-480-7303.

MONDAY Jan. 17 LEADING AND MOTIVATING IN THE REAL WORLD: Executive education course offered by Cornell University’s School of Hotel Administration suitable for professional hoteliers and restaurateurs. Early registration encouraged, class continues through Jan. 19; $1,895; OSUCascades Campus, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-480-8700 or http://www.osucascades.edu/ cornellexecprogram/home. ANNUAL MEETING OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY FAIR ASSOCIATION: 7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541548-2711.

TUESDAY Jan. 18 VISIT BEND BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING: Open to the public. Please RSVP to Valerie@visitbend. com to reserve a seat; 9 a.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave.; 541-382-8048. KNOW INTERNET FOR BEGINNERS: Sign up online, at the reference desk or call 541-617-7080; free; 10:30 a.m.-noon; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. KNOW WORD II: Sign up online, at the reference desk or call 541617-7080; free; 2-3:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. BEGINNING QUICKBOOKS PRO: Registration required. Class continues Jan. 20; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. BUILD A PROFESSIONAL WEBSITE FOR YOUR BUSINESS: Learn to use the industry standard, Wordpress, to create a customized website. Registration required; $149; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or noncredit.cocc.edu.

THURSDAY Jan. 20 STRATEGIC PRICING FOR HOTELS: Executive education course offered by Cornell University’s School of Hotel Administration suitable for professional hoteliers and restaurateurs. Early registration encouraged, class continues through Jan. 22; $1,895; OSUCascades Campus, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-480-8700 or www.osucascades.edu/ cornellexecprogram/home.

Revocable Living Trust, 18285 Plainview Road, Bend $387,387.24 Nate Powell, 4962 N.W. 57th St., Redmond, $289,037.22 Laakmann Living Trust, 61644 Belmore Loop, Bend, $658,576.09 Crook County

Donald L. Rodgers, 7950 N.W. Newell Lane, Prineville, $267,811

U.N. notes sharp rise in world food prices By William Neuman

FRIDAY

NEWS OF RECORD PERMITS

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Collene Funk at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

Andy Manis / New York Times News Service

Elizabeth Kavanaugh and Jeff Rank stand outside their former business, Large Format Digital, in Edgerton, Wis. The company, which printed advertisements on the side panels of trucks, opened in 1998 and closed in March, with the recession taking away much of its business.

By Eilene Zimmerman New York Times News Service

In business, numbers usually tell the story. If you use them to judge 2010, it was probably a better year for small businesses than 2009. In the first quarter of 2010, for example — the most recent period for which the data are available — there was a net loss of 96,000 companies with fewer than 100 employees, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In 2009, the loss was 400,000 companies. Numbers, however, do not tell the whole story. Behind every one of those small businesses that failed was an entrepreneur with an idea and a dream. “It was very painful,” said one of those owners, Elizabeth Kavanaugh, whose 12-year-old business, Large Format Digital, closed in March. “My husband and I are still struggling with the aftermath.” Marc Hedlund, co-founder of Wesabe, a now-defunct personal finance site, wrote on his blog that while he was “enormously sad” about the closing of his business, he hoped that by writing about the difficulties Wesabe faced he would “inform other people who try to start companies in the future.” In that spirit, here are the stories of six small businesses that closed their doors in 2010.

Wesabe The personal finance website, based in San Francisco, opened in 2006 and closed in July. At its peak: Wesabe was one of the first movers in the Web 2.0 financial space. Its founders, Hedlund and Jason Knight, envisioned a site that would help consumers budget their money and make better spending decisions. The company received two rounds of venture capital financing totaling $4.7 million and signed up 150,000 members in its first year. What went wrong: Ten months after Wesabe’s introduction, a competitor, Mint. com, appeared. As Hedlund acknowledges, Mint had a better name and better design and was easier to use. Within nine months, Mint had 300,000 users and $17 million in venture financing. In 2009, Mint was sold to Intuit for $170 million. Looking back: Hedlund wishes he had simplified the consumer’s experience. “We wanted to help people,” he said, “but it was too much work to get that help.”

Gotham concierge A personal assistance and professional organizing service in Manhattan, Gotham Concierge opened in 2004 and closed in August. At its peak: In the summer of 2008, Alison Kero, Gotham’s founder, was running errands and handling tasks for more clients than she could handle, from busy housewives to disorganized lawyers and hedge fund managers. What went wrong: As home prices and the stock market plummeted in the fall of 2008,

Kero’s clients began cutting back. She spent thousands of dollars on advertising that did not work. Worse, she became increasingly frustrated with the tedium of running errands. In July, when one of her two remaining clients forgot about a meeting — and then blamed Kero for not reminding her about it — she decided to close up shop. Looking back: “I realize now I didn’t love what I did,” she said. “I loved running a business.” In late October, she moved to Denver and started a pet care business, Alicat Pet Service.

iParents.com A social network for parents and families, based in Wyncote, Pa., iParents.com opened in 2008 and closed in January 2010. At its peak: Don Milley founded iParents.com at a time when Facebook was still gaining traction with middle-aged people. “iParents was a place where family members would be able to interact with each other online, share schedules, news, photos and coordinate activities,” Milley said. Nine months after opening, the site had 70,000 members and venture capitalists were interested in investing about $3 million — if it could get to 100,000 members. What went wrong: Too much time and money were spent on enhanced functionality, like text-alert reminders about appointments and the ability to turn family photos into refrigerator magnets. “All the bells and whistles diluted our premise — to be a community for parents and families,” Milley said. In late 2009, he hired a marketing company in Florida to do online outreach and run a photo contest to try to get to 100,000 members. He paid $18,000 for the work and never heard from the company again. “That was the death knell for us,” he said. Looking back: Although Facebook was a competitor, Milley felt there was ample room for iParents, too: “The cause of death was really a lack of focus on building a community — that, and we ran out of working capital.” In November, Milley started PerDiemDeals.com, which sells Groupon-style coupons to small-business owners.

Large format digital Based in Edgerton, Wis., the company printed advertisements on the side panels of trucks. It opened in 1998 and closed in March. At its peak: In 2006, business took off, growing about 60 percent a year until 2008. In 2007, sales were $3 million and the company had 15 employees. What went wrong: When the business was growing, Kavanaugh and Jeff Rank, her cofounder and husband, decided to spend $1 million to build their own installation facility, which they believed would save them money in the long term. The mortgage closed on the

same day in September 2008 that Lehman Brothers filed for bankruptcy. Within a month, Large Format’s workload fell 50 percent. “It was literally like someone turned off a faucet,” said Kavanaugh. Looking back: “I wish I had spoken to an attorney right after the closing and a CPA with small-business expertise,” said Kavanaugh. “Maybe they would have told us we didn’t have to go through with building.” Her remaining six employees bought her customer list and started a similar company, Fetch Graphics. Kavanaugh was hired as social program manager.

Varvitsiotis Architecture Based in Eugene., the firm did mostly commercial work. It opened in 1996 and closed in February. At its peak: In 2008, Varvitsiotis had six employees, more than half a million dollars in annual revenue and five projects under way — enough work for two years. Richard Barbis, the founder, had plans to build the business into a 15- to 20person firm and was grooming two employees to be partners. What went wrong: When the stock market fell in 2008, clients started to cancel projects. Too much of the company’s work was in the private sector, Barbis said, as opposed to the public sector where many projects were financed with government stimulus money. With work scarce, bigger firms started competing with Varvitsiotis for the smaller projects it usually landed. Looking back: “We were hit from all sides,” said Barbis. His new business, Opa Cove, sells sporting good products for children.

Petite Palate A gourmet baby food company based in Long Island City, N.Y., Petite Palate opened in 2006 and closed in October. At its peak: In the spring of 2007, Petite Palate’s organic frozen baby food was sold on Amazon Grocery and in about 100 stores in the Northeast and Midwest. The founders, Lisa Beels, a personal chef, and Christine Naylor, a former cookbook publicist, were presenting their business plan to potential investors, hoping to raise $2.5 million to $5 million. What went wrong: In the fall of 2008, potential investors, skittish about the economy, pulled out. The company was struggling to get its products into the freezer section of grocery stores — yet Beels and Naylor stuck to their concept because they believed frozen food was healthier for children than food in jars or pouches. Looking back: Beels said she and Naylor should have been more open to producing shelf-stable formulations. “It took us a long time to acknowledge that and by then we were in debt and couldn’t support the company,” Beels said. Her new personal chef business is called Haute Palate.

World food prices continued to rise sharply in December, bringing them close to the crisis levels that provoked shortages and riots in poor countries three years ago, according to newly released United Nations data. Prices are expected to remain high this year, prompting concern that the world may be approaching another crisis, although economists cautioned that many factors, like adequate stockpiles of key grains, could prevent a serious problem. The United Nations data measures commodity prices on the world export market. Those are generally far removed from supermarket prices in wealthy countries like the United States. In this country, food price inflation has been relatively tame, and prices are forecast to rise only 2 to 3 percent this year. But the situation is often different in poor countries that rely more heavily on imports. The food price index of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization rose 32 percent from June to December, according to the report published Wednesday. In December, the index was slightly higher than it was in June 2008, its previous peak. The index is not adjusted for inflation, however, making an exact comparison over time difficult. The global index was pushed up last year by rising prices for cooking oils, grains, sugar and meat, all of which could continue to remain high or rise. Abdolreza Abbassian, an economist for the organization, which is based in Rome, said that bad weather affecting commodity crops in many exporting countries might help keep prices high over the next several

Qualcomm makes $3.2B acquisition to ride new gadget wave By Andrew Vanacore The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Tech companies are sweating it out to keep ahead of what consumers want from their gadgets. Just look at Qualcomm Inc., which struck a $3.2 billion deal Wednesday in hopes of tapping into the explosion of Wi-Fi connected devices such as tablet computers and TVs. Qualcomm is a pioneer in the cell phone industry — if you have a Verizon or Sprint phone, a piece of its silicon is probably helping you access the Web, get e-mail and make calls. But the company decided it needed to buy Wi-Fi chip maker Atheros Communications Inc. to ensure that it didn’t miss the next big leap in connectivity. Apple Inc. has sold more than 7 million iPads and imitators are lining up even now to show off competing tablets at this week’s International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. Most of them will connect to the Internet via Wi-Fi, even if many of them can also use a cellular network. Electronics we don’t often associate with the Web are starting to connect as well. Atheros has chips that go into TVs and even wireless Nintendo games. “Almost everything now seems to have Wi-Fi in it,” said Jeff Brown, a vice president at UBM TechInsights. And at Qualcomm, Wi-Fi technology was “one of their major holes.” In buying Atheros, Qualcomm will become a one-stop shop for gadget makers that want both cellular and Wi-Fi capability, giving it a competitive edge.


L

Inside

New program allows homeowners to lease solar panels, see Page C3.

OBITUARIES Congressman William R. Ratchford, 76, see Page C5. www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2011

Deschutes to review costs on recycling education County paying firm to inform public on how to reduce trash

Bend to fix Tumalo’s muddy flow “We believe (the city) can probably, through a combination of maintenance and planning their operations differently, keep the water in the pipes.” — Eric Nigg, DEQ eastern regional water quality manager

DEQ asks city to ensure sediment discharges into Deschutes tributary don’t happen again By Nick Grube The Bulletin

The city of Bend could face enforcement action from the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality if officials here can’t fix a glitch in the municipal water system that occasionally dumps large amounts of sediment into Tumalo Creek.

Last week, the DEQ sent a letter to the city urging it to find a solution to the sedimentation problem in the creek, and asked the municipality to come up with changes that could be implemented to ensure it doesn’t happen again. While that letter didn’t indicate the city would face fines or any

other actions for not complying with the state agency’s request, DEQ Eastern Regional Water Quality Manager Eric Nigg said enforcement could eventually occur should the water system continue to discharge sediment into the Deschutes River tributary. “What we’ve asked them to do is operate in a way where this doesn’t happen,” Nigg said. “We are trying to get this stopped, and that’s kind of the primary focus. The city has been cooperative, and we hope that they can pre-

City Council elects Jeff Eager as new mayor

The Bulletin

By Nick Grube The Bulletin

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Amaya Thomas, 10, smiles as she tries to hula hoop and ride a unicycle at the same time Wednesday morning at Pine Ridge Elementary. Amaya is one of about 50 students who come into school an hour early four days each week to practice riding unicycles.

Power of one Unicycle club inspires Pine Ridge Elementary students By Sheila G. Miller • The Bulletin On Wednesday mornings, it’s easy for 11-year-old Bryce Bozovich to get out of bed and ready for school. Sure, the fifth-grader has to be at Pine Ridge Elementary by 8 a.m. But knowing he’ll get to ride a unicycle makes it a bit easier. “This is really fun to me,” he said. “This is the only place I can unicycle because it’s icy outside.” Bryce is one of about 50 students who come before school at least once each week to hone their unicycle skills. The program is a brainchild of Carisa Thomason, a P.E. teacher at Pine Ridge who started the program a few years ago after students who already had some unicycle skills wanted to show

her their moves. She wanted to learn the skill herself, and these days she can mount and ride the unicycle around the gym with relative ease. That first year, only about 10 fourthand fifth-graders came in the mornings before school. For a while, Thomason bought unicycles off of Craigslist so students without their own would have the option of participating. See Unicycles / C5

Redmond Airport manager is retiring after 21 years By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

Carrie Novick, the Redmond Airport manager for 21 years, will retire at the end of the current fiscal year on June 30. Novick, 68, made the announcement in a letter to Redmond City Manager David Brandt sent earlier this week. Her retirement comes after she led the $40 million airport expansion, which increased the terminal’s size by almost seven times. It is now 136,000 square feet. When Novick started in

vent this from happening again.” The discharge of sediment comes from a series of pipes and ditches the city uses to put excess water it takes from Bridge Creek back into Tumalo Creek when there isn’t enough demand in town to use it all. For the most part, this excess water is clear when it is diverted back into Tumalo Creek from the Outback Treatment Facility about two miles up Skyliners Road west of Bend. See Tumalo / C5

BEND

BEFORE-SCHOOL BALANCING ACT

By Hillary Borrud Deschutes County officials plan to re-evaluate in upcoming months whether to continue paying The Environmental Center in Bend $156,000 a year to educate people about recycling and ways to reduce waste. The three county commissioners voted unanimously Wednesday to extend the center’s contract by six months, until the end of the current fiscal year. During that time, commissioners will weigh whether to sign another contract with the center, during budget discussions for the next fiscal year. Commissioners said W e d n e s d ay Inside they antici• Deschutes pate a difficult supports budget year drone beginning in July, and the testing, county’s DePage C5 partment of Solid Waste has already struggled financially during the recession. In 2010, the department laid off two employees and closed Knott Landfill on Sundays to balance its budget. The budget process starts with a meeting today about major issues that will come up later in the process. Officials will meet again in May. State law obligates the county, and all communities with populations over 10,000, to provide several programs aimed at reducing the amount of waste that goes into their landfills. But Oregon laws do not mandate how much governments must spend on these programs, said Susan Christensen, a natural resource specialist for the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality in Bend. The contract makes up 2.5 percent of the Department of Solid Waste’s budget, according to a document provided by the director of the county Department of Solid Waste, Timm Schimke. The department is funded by landfill fees charged to the public and local garbage haulers. Over the past 18 years, Deschutes County spent approximately $1.8 million on recycling education and promotion, according to figures from the Department of Solid Waste. During that time, 723,981 tons of waste were diverted from Knott Landfill. That is the equivalent of adding 6.3 years to the life of the landfill, which Schimke estimates saved the county $7 million in transportation costs. See Landfill / C5

C

OREGON Rainier chief of police fatally shot, see Page C3.

Redmond, the airport had about 70,000 available seats on flights for a full year. Now that number is about 240,000, she said. Novick’s original plan upon arriving in Redmond was to stay only about five years. “We were so busy, I don’t think I even thought about time going by,” Novick said. “I remember at 10 years, I looked up and said, ‘Whoa, it’s been 10 years.’” Novick praised the city councilors and city managers whom she worked for over her career, in particular their willingness to take on big projects like the

recent expansion. Novick also gave credit to her staff, which now numbers about a dozen people. Novick was the only employee when she began working at the airport, she said. Brandt, though, credited Novick with leading the airport from a tiny outpost to what it is today. “She’s a legend. She built that airport literally from a tiny airfield at the end of a dirt road,” Brandt said. “It’s quite an accomplishment and I’m sure she’ll be missed.” See Manager / C2

Trivia Bee Many of Pine Ridge Elementary’s unicycles were paid for with a grant from the Education Foundation for the Bend-La Pine Schools. Classroom grants are funded with proceeds from the 6th Annual Trivia Bee, which will be held at 6 p.m. on Feb. 11 at the Tower Theatre. The bee, presented by Miller Lumber, will feature live music and appetizers from Zydeco Kitchen + Cocktails. The foundation is currently seeking trivia teams, audience members and sponsors to participate in the event. Tickets are $20 and are available now at www.towertheatre.org. For more information about sponsorship or team registration, call Executive Director Heather Vihstadt at 541-322-5493 or e-mail education.foundation@bend.k12.or.us.

Bend City councilors elected a new mayor and welcomed into their midst local businessman Scott Ramsay during a ceremony Wednesday evening at the Municipal Courthouse. After Ramsay was sworn in, the council voted unanimously, and with no debate, to make Councilor Jeff Eager the new mayor and Councilor Jodie Barram the mayor pro-tem. Eager, 35, is a partner at the Balyeat, Eager & Steel, LLP law firm in Bend. He was elected to his first-term on the council in November 2008. He grew up in Bend, and was a press secretary and legislative assistant for U.S. Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River, from 1999 to 2001. He’s taking over the mayor position from Councilor Kathie Eckman, who has served more than 15 years on the city council over the past several decades, including two separate terms as mayor from 1991 to 1992 and 2009 to 2010.

Tough decisions ahead As part of a speech he gave after being elected by his peers, Eager said the city will face a lot of tough decisions in the years ahead, mostly related to the city’s budget, which is facing a general fund shortfall that could be upward of $20 million over the next several years. He also said it’s important to engage community members in the government process before the council moves ahead with large decisions. An example of this he gave after the ceremony was the city’s proposed $58 million to $73 million upgrade to its surface water infrastructure that has drawn recent criticism from some in the community for being too expensive and possibly detrimental to Tumalo Creek. “One of the things that I’m hoping to focus on as mayor and along with my fellow councilors is to really try to put people in touch with their city government,” Eager said. See Bend / C2

ST. CHARLES UNION VOTE UNDECIDED A sign at St. Charles Bend notifies employees of the union election that took place Wednesday. About 600 employees were eligible to vote on whether to join a local chapter of the Service Employees International Union. As of Wednesday night, the vote was too close to call, with 251 voting against and 255 voting in favor of representation. An additional 34 votes are being contested by either the hospital or the SEIU. Pete Erickson The Bulletin


C OV ER S T OR I ES

C2 Thursday, January 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

L B  Bulletin staff report

Warm Springs man sentenced for abuse A Warm Springs man will serve nearly 16 years in prison for sexually abusing two underage girls, a federal court determined Tuesday. U.S. District Court Judge Ancer L. Haggerty sentenced Bryson Sutterlee, 24, to 188

months in prison for forcibly abusing the two girls, both members of his family. One of the victims was under 12 years old when the abuse occurred, the U.S. Department of Justice said in a news release, while the other was younger than 16. Upon release from prison, Sutterlee will serve five years

on supervised release and will be required to participate in a sex offender treatment program. He will be required to register as a sex offender and will be prohibited from having any communication or contact with the two victims. The court will be required to approve any contact with minors.

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 7:35 a.m. Jan. 4, in the 2800 block of Northeast Huettl Lane. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and purse stolen at 7:52 a.m. Jan. 4, in the area of Northwest 13th Street and Northwest Galveston Avenue. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 8:35 a.m. Jan. 4, in the 300 block of Northwest Riverfront Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:29 a.m. Jan. 4, in the 1800 block of Northeast Third Street. DUII — Ralph Wayne Womack, 51, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:16 p.m. Jan. 4, in the 1800 block of Northeast Third Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and firearm stolen at 12:31 p.m. Jan. 4, in the 100 block of Southeast Airpark Drive. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 12:39 p.m. Jan. 4, in the 20100 block of Pinebrook Boulevard. Theft — Propane tanks were reported stolen at 12:53 p.m. Jan. 4, in the 61300 block of South U.S. Highway 97.

Theft — A theft was reported at 3:31 p.m. Jan. 4, in the 62900 block of North U.S. Highway 97. DUII — Andrew Dale Atkinson, 25, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:54 a.m. Jan. 5, in the area of Boyd Acres Road and Shaniko Lane. Redmond Police Department

Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 8:35 p.m. Jan. 4, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 3:44 p.m. Jan. 4, in the area of Northwest Fifth Street and Northwest Cedar Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 3:09 p.m. Jan. 4, in the 2400 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 11:51 a.m. Jan. 4, in the 1700 block of Southwest Parkway Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:36 a.m. Jan. 4, in the 100 block of Northwest Sixth Street. Prineville Police Department

DUII — Kimberly Patrick, 41, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:58 a.m. Jan. 4, in the area of Northwest Gardner Road. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:50 p.m. Jan. 4, in the 100 block of Northwest Greenwood in Bend. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:44 p.m. Jan. 4, in the area

of East Jefferson Avenue and South Locust Street in Sisters. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 9:56 a.m. Jan. 4, in the 52600 block of Center Drive in La Pine. DUII — Chris A. Eaton, 41, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:08 a.m. Jan. 4, in the area of Powers Road and Southeast Third Street in Bend.

BEND FIRE RUNS Monday 7:38 p.m. — Chimney or flue fire, 60172 Crater Road. 15 — Medical aid calls. Tuesday 20 — Medical aid calls.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the website at www. humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541923-0882 — or refer to the website at www.redmondhumane.org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Domestic long-haired cat — Adult female, muted tortoiseshell; found near Northwest Eighth Street and Northwest Spruce Place.

Truck driver convicted of 10 ‘Freeway Killer’ slayings in ’82 The Associated Press Today is Thursday, Jan. 6, the sixth day of 2011. There are 359 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Jan. 6, 1941, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, in his State of the Union address, outlined a goal of “Four Freedoms�: Freedom of speech and expression; the freedom of people to worship God in their own way; freedom from want; freedom from fear. ON THIS DATE In 1540, England’s King Henry VIII married his fourth wife, Anne of Cleves. (The marriage lasted about six months.) In 1759, George Washington and Martha Dandridge Custis were married in New Kent County, Va. In 1838, Samuel Morse and Alfred Vail gave the first successful public demonstration of their telegraph, in Morristown, N.J. In 1861, Florida militiamen seized the federal arsenal at Chattahoochee. In 1912, New Mexico became the 47th state. In 1919, the 26th president of the United States, Theodore Roosevelt, died in Oyster Bay, N.Y., at age 60. In 1942, the Pan American Airways Pacific Clipper arrived in New York more than a month after leaving California and following a westward route. In 1950, Britain recognized the Communist government of China. In 1967, U.S. Marines and South Vietnamese troops launched Operation Deckhouse Five, an offensive in the Mekong River delta. In 1982, truck driver William G. Bonin was convicted in Los Angeles of 10 of the “Freeway Killer� slayings of young men and boys. (Bonin was later convicted of four other killings; he was executed in 1996.) TEN YEARS AGO With the vanquished Vice President Al Gore presiding (in his capacity as president of the Senate), Congress formally certified George W. Bush the win-

T O D AY IN HISTORY ner of the bitterly contested 2000 presidential election. FIVE YEARS AGO Al-Qaida’s No. 2 official, Ayman al-Zawahri, said in a videotape that a recent U.S. decision to withdraw some troops from Iraq represented “the victory of Islam.� Hugh Thompson, Jr., a former Army helicopter pilot honored for rescuing Vietnamese civilians from his fellow GIs during the My Lai massacre, died in Alexandria, La., at age 62. The 115-year-old Pilgrim Baptist Church of Chicago was gutted by fire. Velvetvoiced singer Lou Rawls died in Los Angeles at age 72. ONE YEAR AGO James von Brunn, a 89-yearold white supremacist charged in a deadly shooting at Washington’s Holocaust museum, died in North Carolina, where he’d been held while awaiting trial. British Prime Minister Gordon Brown fended off a challenge to his leadership from within his own ruling Labour party just months before general elections. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Pollster Louis Harris is 90. Bluegrass performer Earl Scruggs is 87. Retired MLB AllStar Ralph Branca is 85. Author E.L. Doctorow is 80. Actress Bonnie Franklin is 67. Musician Joey, the CowPolka King (Riders in the Sky) is 62. Former FBI director Louis Freeh is 61. Rock singermusician Kim Wilson (The Fabulous Thunderbirds) is 60. Singer Jett Williams is 58. Rock musician Malcolm Young (AC-DC) is 58. Actor-comedian Rowan Atkinson is 56. World Golf Hall of Famer Nancy Lopez is 54. Rhythmand-blues singer Kathy Sledge is 52. TV chef Nigella Lawson is

51. Rhythm-and-blues singer Eric Williams (BLACKstreet) is 51. Movie composer A.R. Rahman (Film: “Slumdog Millionaire�) is 45. Movie director John Singleton is 43. TV personality Julie Chen is 41. Actor Danny Pintauro (“Who’s the Boss?�) is 35. Actress Rinko Kikuchi (Film: “Babel�) is 30. NBA player Gilbert Arenas is 29. Rock singer Alex Turner (Arctic Monkeys) is 25. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Simplicity is an acquired taste. Mankind, left free, instinctively complicates life.� — Katharine Fullerton Gerould, American author (1879-1944)

Nick Grube / The Bulletin

Bend City Councilor Jeff Eager, second from left, was unanimously approved as Bend’s new mayor Wednesday at the Municipal Courthouse. Newcomer Scott Ramsay, far right, was also sworn in on the council during the ceremony, along with councilors Mark Capell, third from left, and Jodie Barram, fourth from left. Also pictured are councilors Tom Greene, far left, and Jim Clinton, second from right.

Bend Continued from C1 Joining him at the head of the council is Barram, a substitute educational assistant with the High Desert Education Service District, and a former Bend planning commissioner. While she lost the 2008 election to Eager, she was appointed to the governing body shortly after then-Councilor Bill Friedman died. She ran unopposed in last November’s election. After Eager, she is the second youngest person on the council at 37.

Ramsay the only new face on council Barram, Ramsay and Councilor Mark Capell, who beat out two challengers in the November election to win his second consecutive four-year term on the council, were all sworn in by Municipal Court Judge Brian Hemphill on Wednesday. Of those individuals, Ramsay will be the only new face on the council. Running for a vacant seat in the November election, Ramsay beat out Downtown Bend Business Association Execu-

Manager Continued from C1 Mayor George Endicott also lauded Novick’s work, pointing to her ability to pursue grant money and other funding to pay for projects. Endicott estimated that about half of the airport expansion

tive Director Chuck Arnold by three votes. He was one of the top fundraisers in the council races, and ran on a platform that he said would draw upon his experience as a businessman who owns both the Sun Mountain Fun Center and Casarama, an antique and vintage store on Division Street. After he took his seat on the council, he said that despite his small margin of victory over Arnold he will not pander to only the segment of voters who cast their votes in his favor during the election, and will make decisions based on what he believes is best for Bend. “I have a very level head and broad perspective,� Ramsay said. “I will work my very hardest to make sure ... I work for the betterment of the community.� Ramsay is replacing Councilor Oran Teater, who decided not to run in the November election. As part of Wednesday’s ceremony, the councilors bid farewell to Teater, who has served on the council for ten years, including two consecutive four-year terms from 1996 to 2004, and a twoyear stint as mayor from 2003 to 2004. Teater’s most recent shift on the council lasted two years, from 2009 to 2010, after he was appointed to fill a vacancy left

by Chris Telfer who resigned to take a position in the state senate. During his outgoing speech, Teater urged the city councilors to explore making the mayor an elected position rather than one that is chosen by the councilors. He also said that with the state of the economy and Bend’s budget that he did not “envy� the councilors’ job.

was paid for with state and federal grants. The city does not plan on waiting to find a replacement for Novick, Endicott said. Redmond will start a nationwide search as soon as possible. “We’d like to have some over-

lap,� Endicott said. “Running an airport is such a complicated business and each one is unique.�

Beautification program He also said he considers one of his greater achievements over the past two years to be his involvement with the Bend Beautification Program that enlists volunteers to help with landscaping tasks throughout the city, such as pulling weeds and maintaining roundabouts and medians. He said that since that program began the city has had more than 1,500 volunteers contribute 12,000 hours of work. “We are fortunate to live in a community that gives back,� Teater said. “Remember that the price you pay for living here is giving back to your community.� Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

Chapter 7 Personal Bankruptcy Find Your Dream Home In

$500 plus required court fees

Real Estate

Cascade Legal Clinic 63356 Nels Anderson Rd Bend, OR 97701 541.815.0125 www.cascadelegalclinic.com

Every Saturday

H I G H

D E S E R T

Healthy Living in Central Oregon A SLICK STOCK MAGAZINE CREATED TO HELP PROMOTE, ENCOURAGE, AND MAINTAIN AN ACTIVE, HEALTHY LIFESTYLE.

Central Oregon Business Owners: Reach Central Oregon with information about your health related retail products and services! Distributed quarterly in more than 33,000 copies of The Bulletin and at distribution points throughout the market area, this new glossy magazine will speak directly to the consumer focused on health and healthy living – and help you grow your business and market share. For more information, please contact Kristin Morris, Bulletin Health/Medical Account Executive at 541-617-7855, e-mail at kmorris@bendbulletin.com, or contact your assigned Bulletin Advertising Executive at 541-382-1811.

Find It All Online

bendbulletin.com

LOOK FOR THE NEXT ISSUE COMING FEBRUARY 14


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, January 6, 2011 C3

O O  B Oops! Almanac lists Dudley as governor PORTLAND — The list of new governors in the World Almanac and Book of Facts is wrong on one fact — the winner in Oregon was not Republican Chris Dudley. The Oregonian reported the respected almanac was under a tight deadline when it went to print the day after the Nov. 2 election, when Dudley was clinging to a slight lead. But last-minute results from Multnomah County, with the largest population in Oregon, gave Democrat John Kitzhaber the victory. Sarah Janssen, the World Almanac’s editor, said it was the first mistake found in the 2011 edition of the book, and she would personally correct the online version. But Janssen said there’s nothing she could do to fix the 1,008-page print version found in libraries, schools and on office desks around the world.

Don Ryan / The Associated Press

Police officers walk through the scene where a Rainier Police Chief Ralph Painter was shot and killed Wednesday in Rainier. The suspect was later wounded in a shootout with other officers, the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office said.

Rainier police chief killed in struggle with suspect Veteran lawman gunned down while investigating report of theft By Nigel Duara

Columbia County Sheriff Jeff Dickerson, left, and Rainier Mayor Jerry Cole talk about the shooting death of the city’s police chief. Painter was shot and killed while on a disturbance call.

The Associated Press

RAINIER — The popular police chief of this small town was shot to death Wednesday while investigating a report of an attempted car theft at a strip mall, authorities said. The suspect was wounded by gunfire shortly afterward after several officers rushed to the scene. The killing of Rainier Police Chief Ralph Painter, 55, stunned the town of 1,800 along the Columbia River, which had never before lost an officer in the line of duty. “Ralph Painter has been here for over 20 years and worked his way up through the ranks from police officer to sergeant to police chief,” said Mayor Jerry Cole. “It’s like the dream job, or dream town, for a police officer. He’ll be missed greatly.” Cole said Rainier’s police force consisted of Painter and four other officers, and it was not unusual for the chief to respond to a call. “We’re a small agency, and we use every resource available.” Painter has a son in law enforcement, Cole said. “It’s just a sad day for Rainier,” he said. The suspect was not identified Wednesday. Columbia County Sheriff Jeff Dickerson said he’s not believed to be from Rainier. Authorities said he was hospitalized. At a news conference, Dickerson would not say how the suspect was armed, or whether Painter was shot with his own weapon. He said he didn’t know who fired the round that hit the suspect. Painter went to the Rainier Sound Authority shop, a car audio dealer, about 10:45 a.m. because “a person there was trying to take a vehicle that did not belong to him,” the sheriff said.

Don Ryan The Associated Press

Tony Lystra / The (Longview) Daily News

Law enforcement officers detain a man suspected of fatally shooting Rainier Police Chief Ralph Painter on Wednesday. “When he arrived, he confronted a suspect,” Dickerson said. “The suspect fired a shot at the chief and struck him, and he died as a result of the injuries.”

Program allows homeowners to lease solar panels cheaply The Associated Press PORTLAND — Under a new program, Oregon homeowners can choose to lease solar panel systems instead of buying, avoiding upfront costs while reducing electricity bills. The Oregonian reported that contractors in a handful of states are starting to offer solar panel leases, and Oregon is joining the trend, thanks to regulations that took effect Jan. 1.

Managers of SolarCity, a California-based company, said Oregon homeowners can go solar for as little as $20 a month. The new financing option, which incorporates state and federal tax credits, results from an Oregon Energy Department rule change. The new approach departs from programs that have required homeowners to spend thousands of dollars on systems that gradually yield returns.

Witnesses said other officers from a variety of agencies arrived at the strip mall quickly, eventually numbering as many as 30.

The officers ordered a man to drop a weapon and fired multiple shots into the Sound Authority building, said John Harper, who is opening a tobacco store. “The cops just unleashed on him,” he told the Longview Daily News. The Rev. Jeff McCracken of the Rainier Assembly of God church described 20 to 30 police cars converging on the strip mall and a man “kinda wandering around” a late 1960s Chevelle. “They started yelling at him to drop the weapon, which we hadn’t seen because he was on the far side of the vehicle,” McCracken told AP Radio in a phone interview. He said he told people in the church to get down. “A round came through the window that I was looking through, about six inches above my head where I’d just been standing,” McCracken said. “There’s gunfire going off from the police officers, as well, so we just got out of there as quickly as we could.”

Barking dog provides prompt fire alert HAPPY VALLEY — Oscar the Labradoodle proved to be a valuable fire alarm Wednesday. His insistent barking alerted his Happy Valley, Ore., owner to a neighbor’s blazing minivan. Clackamas Fire District 1 spokesman Steve McAdoo said Oscar’s owner found the dog looking out a window at the fire, barking relentlessly. She called 911 and fire crews were able to extinguish the blaze before it spread to the neighbor’s home. McAdoo said the minivan may be a total loss. The fire also charred the exterior of the garage doors. McAdoo praised the pup, saying “because of Oscar’s actions, someone noticed the fire before it spread to the home from the minivan.”

Ashland parks worker accused of theft ASHLAND — An Ashland Parks and Recreation Department employee has been accused of theft. The Ashland Daily Tidings reported that 48-year-old Rebecca Bianco was arrested Tuesday and charged with stealing $43,390 from the department over a two-year period.

Bianco was accused of funneling fraudulent refunds for recreation classes or park facility rentals into several credit card accounts belonging to her. The charges include aggravated theft, aggravated identity theft, computer crime and falsifying business records. Bianco was placed on paid administrative leave in early November. Two other parks employees have been accused of theft in recent months in an apparently unrelated case.

Marion County dog shelter at capacity SALEM — A wave of stray dogs this week has overwhelmed the Marion County Dog Control and Shelter. Office manager Sonya Pulvers told the (Salem) Statesman Journal that fireworks on New Year’s Eve may have led to the increase in strays. The shelter took in 25 dogs Monday and several more Tuesday. Pulvers said the county holds the dogs for as many as five days before putting them up for adoption. Some may go to dog rescue programs but others are euthanized. The Willamette Humane Society has not seen a similar upswing.

Eugene man pleads guilty to sex abuse EUGENE — A Eugene man has pleaded guilty to repeatedly sexually abusing a boy and filming some of the sexual encounters. The (Eugene) Register-Guard reported that David James Woodworth made the plea Tuesday to 20 counts that included sexual abuse, sodomy and using a child in a display of sexually explicit conduct. He previously denied the allegations. Judge Charles Zennache says Woodworth could face more than 306 years in prison, since 16 of the charges carry mandatory minimum prison terms under state law. Court documents show that Lane County authorities arrested Woodworth in September after a woman said she found in his computer dozens of photos of him sexually abusing a boy. An affidavit shows the woman also told authorities she found child pornography in a photo album and on his cell phone. — From wire reports

Why Are hese People Smiling? hey just had their Skin Cancer Check and can smile knowing they are Skin Cancer free. Early detection is key. Diagnosis & treatment of skin cancer Mole Evaluation & removal Acne, Eczema & Rashes

Warts & Lesions Parisian Peel® Microdermabrasion Skin Rejuvenation Products/ Sunscreens, M.D. Forte

Allison Dermatology & Skin Cancer Center “he Skin Cancer Specialists” Dawn S. Allison, M.D.

Cassidy Juda,

Board Certified Dermatologist, Mayo Clinic Trained

PA-C

Call 541-322-9000 1510 SW Nancy Way, Suite 1 | On Bend’s west side (Near the Century/Colorado roundabout)


C4 Thursday, January 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Street fee must be temporary

W

hen the Bend City Council last considered a street utility fee 18 months ago, we held our noses and supported it. The idea doesn’t smell much better today,

no matter how necessary it may be. For that reason, any citywide fee used to generate money for streets should be set to expire in 2014, when the city can float a gasoline tax that would be paid by all who fill their tanks in Bend. City officials make a plausible case that they need to find more money to maintain streets. Bend’s backlog for repairs stood at about $12 million in the summer of 2009, and the city’s revenue picture has not brightened since then. The city will, of course, see additional revenue as a result of an increase in the state gas tax that went into effect this year. Still, say city officials, the difference won’t fill the maintenance gap. The proposal to reconsider a street utility fee comes from Bend’s Public Safety Funding Committee, which is looking at a variety of ways to preserve core city services. The city has not updated figures since it last looked at them 18 months ago, when the City Council rejected a similar proposal. Still, it’s worth considering again. Ultimately, a utility tax (er, fee) isn’t a particularly fair way to raise money for streets. A hike in the gas tax is, but the 2009 Legislature took

Bend’s backlog for repairs stood at about $12 million in the summer of 2009, and the city’s revenue picture has not brightened since then. that option off the table, at least temporarily. When lawmakers hiked the state’s gas tax last year, they gave cities a small window to impose fuel taxes on their own. Bend didn’t take advantage of the opportunity. Fortunately, the state’s prohibition on local taxes expires in 2014, at which time Bend should seek to replace any road fee with a tax. Fuel taxes, unlike fees paid by homeowners, fall not only on Bend residents, but on all who use our streets and fill up their cars while doing so. Tourists will pay, as will commuters. Those who drive more will pay more than those who drive less or not at all. If the City Council absolutely must scrape up more money for street maintenance soon, it should do so by means of a fee that expires as soon as a far better option — a local gas tax — becomes available.

Specialty court for veterans could work S

pecialty courts have become something of a hot item in Oregon, and with good reason. When they function properly, they divert potential criminals before their crimes escalate. Now Deschutes County and the Partnership to End Poverty are working together to start a specialty court that will target veterans in the way its other specialty courts target participants. If the court does become reality, it will join 50 or so similar courts around the United States in places as diverse as Buffalo, N.Y., Tucson, Ariz., and Clark County, Wash. Establishing a veterans court makes sense, says Scott Cooper, executive director of the partnership. Nationwide, he says, a high percentage of veterans returning from Afghanistan and Iraq suffer from either traumatic brain injury or post-traumatic stress disorder, conditions that can raise the possibility of substance abuse and involvement in the criminal justice system, among other things. Cooper notes that once a person has a criminal record, whether or not he is a veteran, he is much more likely to be poor in the future. The proposed veterans court won’t give all veterans a pass for all behavior, however, Cooper says. The court will be available only to those accused of relatively minor, nonvio-

lent crimes. Meanwhile, participation is voluntary, and not just for the veteran. The district attorney’s office can decline to participate in the court on a caseby-case basis, and the crime victim also will have to approve. Veterans who do wish to participate will have to have or obtain a diagnosis of injury or PTSD to participate. The court will differ from mental health courts because veterans will be paired with mentors from Central Oregon Veterans Outreach, Cooper said. As with other specialty courts, those charged in the new veterans court will not automatically escape a sentence for their crimes. Instead, sentences, which court officials say will be comparable to sentences imposed in other specialty courts, will be deferred while the defendant receives treatment for his or her problems. If treatment is completed successfully, the charges will be dropped, according to an earlier report in The Bulletin. Studies that track specialty courts and those who appear in them find lower recidivism rates and reduced substance abuse, according to “American Corrections: Theory, Research, Practice and Policy” by Matt DiLisi and Peter John Conis. That’s just what those behind the veterans court are hoping for.

My Nickel’s Worth What about cats? I’m curious, so I must ask. At least twice this winter there have been dogs rescued from the icy waters in Bend. I am all for the rescue of these dogs, but the fire departments say they can’t be bothered with rescuing cats from trees. What is the difference? They are both animals in distress. They both need human help. They are both loved by someone, or at least we care about them as living, breathing creatures. I would like to see more compassion for all animals by the fire departments of the area, please. Donna Reed La Pine

The rich and taxes Regarding Alan Pachtman’s letter “Cowardly Obama” and Carl Barnhart’s letter “Tax the rich,” I am so very tired of their mantra about taxing the rich more. Let’s consider the facts. The top 1 percent of wage earners pay 39 percent of the taxes; the top 5 percent pay 60 percent of taxes; the top 50 percent pay 97 percent of taxes; and the bottom 43 percent pay zero taxes. Gosh, even Pachtman and Barnhart can see that the higher earners already pay more than their fair share of taxes to support those who don’t. I for one believe everyone should pay some federal/state taxes. Instead of trying to extort more from the higher earners, why not demand that our government spend less and quit wasting our money? With more than 6,000 pork projects in the latest

spending bill, it is obvious our liberal politicians have not a clue of the crisis we are in currently. It is not a tax problem. It is a spending problem. You cannot tax the country into prosperity, but you can certainly spend it into bankruptcy. John Stolz Bend

Land Trust success Thank you for Kate Ramsayer’s recent article, “Land Trust buys Whychus Preserve.” Central Oregon owes a huge thank you to the generous donors who made it possible for the Deschutes Land Trust to carry on its 15-year history of protecting irreplaceable Central Oregon lands and water. Purchase of the Whychus Preserve will allow the land trust to create improved habitat for returning steelhead, establish a community trail along the lower reaches of Whychus Creek and improve habitat for birds and migrating deer. Without the land trust’s generous donors — and its volunteers and staff — none of this would be possible. Kim McCarrel Bend

Military not in charge In Russell Williams’ Dec. 28 letter to the editor, “Military is in charge,” nothing could be further from the truth. I fear he is either an anti-war enthusiast — but who isn’t? — or left-wing, antiUnited States zealot. If the military were in charge, they would have received all the reinforcements they had asked for in Afghani-

stan. The threat to the peace of the U.S. would have been shortened. As a result, Obama’s hold-back of troops has permitted this Muslim threat to claim more of our young people than is necessary. Williams probably also thinks that Roosevelt’s policies brought us out of the Depression. In this he again is in error. In 1938 we were in a deep depression. Then in 1939 the Nazis attacked the British. We came up with the Lend Lease program, re-established the military capability and began shipping war materials to the British. The war effort to fight the dictators, such as the Nazis and Japanese, brought us out of the Depression. Ernest De Corte Redmond

Bad cartoon Regarding the Jan. 3 editorial cartoon The Bulletin chose to print, you’ve shown extremely poor taste in passing on a cheap shot at a teenager (at the time of her pregnancy), regardless of the political persuasion of her mother, Sarah Palin. I’m sure the cartoonist feels he’s justified in this smutty endeavor because of perceived hypocritical statements from the young girl’s parent. There is no justification! A follow-up cartoon should then depict President Obama marching his daughter (as he said he would do) to an abortion clinic if she made a “mistake.” Shame on The Bulletin for further embarrassing a young girl for her “mistake,” which she has owned up to without murdering an unborn child. Perry Pattison Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Restoring river’s path might be best Mirror Pond solution By Tim Galvin Bulletin guest columnist

W

hat to do with Mirror Pond? It’s no surprise, really: The Bend community remains mired in the muck over how to pay for the dredging of Mirror Pond (“Fixing Mirror Pond demands a new look, officials say,” The Bulletin, Dec. 26). After all, who wants to pony up the $5 million or so to dig out Mirror Pond, especially knowing that the process will likely have to be repeated, at an ever-escalating cost, in another 20 years or so? One nearby landowner and the Bend Park and Recreation District even had to pay this fall to harvest the weeds that thrive in the silt of Mirror Pond — a short-term measure to address a problem gone seriously awry (The Bulletin, Oct. 25). So why not consider a permanent fix? More to the point, why not consider re-

storing the Deschutes River to its natural channel and flow as it meanders through Bend? Sure, lots of folks have weighed in with the view that, given Mirror Pond’s “iconic” status, it must be dredged and restored. Surprisingly, even The Bulletin, when it comes to Mirror Pond, seems quick to abandon the paper’s regular demands for government austerity and caution, calling Mirror Pond a “staple of postcards.” “There’s no need to study anything … Rather than dithering, studying, and fussing … (city) councilors should concentrate on the real issue at hand: finding the money to fix the pond as soon as possible, nothing more (The Bulletin, Dec. 28, 2007).” Seriously? In this period of dwindling budget coffers, shouldn’t we set aside sentiment and ask some much harder questions before taxpayers are asked to

IN MY VIEW dredge up more funds? For example, do the economic benefits of restoring Mirror Pond outweigh the costs? And just what are those economic benefits, and who receives them? Perhaps more telling are those who receive the economic benefits willing to pay the costs of regular dredging? If not, why should taxpayers in general be on the hook for these costs? Why not instead restore the Deschutes River to its natural channel and flow through Bend — at least as “natural” as the present managed river system would allow? Imagine a future in which the current mud flats of a silted Mirror Pond are replaced — permanently — by an expanded green space in Drake Park. A larger central park at the heart of Bend would better accom-

modate a range of civic activities, from farmers markets to concerts to bike paths. What’s more, some of the same planning and conservation expertise that was applied so admirably to riparian restoration near the Old Mill District could be adopted with equal benefit to a renewed Deschutes River along an expanded Drake Park. Yes, preserving icons is important. Yet is there anything more iconic to our region than the major river that defines it? Perhaps there are several good reasons — more than just sentimental — against re-establishing the Deschutes’ original path through Bend. But what are they? And are those technical or cost considerations more insurmountable than the challenge of dredging Mirror Pond every generation? Some apparently blame other causes such as irregular releases from Wickiup for the

sediment buildup in Mirror Pound (The Bulletin, Dec. 26), but that overlooks the much more fundamental fact that where there’s a dam, there will likely be sediment gathering behind it. Restoring the Deschutes to a near natural state in Bend would also require money, of course. But it seems that both public and private funds are much more readily available for projects that seek to restore nature’s work in a lasting way. For numerous examples, see www. tu.org/press-room/trout-magazine. Let’s finish this job, once and for all, and put the problem behind us. Finally, there may be another benefit to a permanent solution: The absence of mud and stagnant water just might make Drake Park less inviting to resident Canada geese. Tim Galvin lives in Bend.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, January 6, 2011 C5

O Arthur E. Scofield

D

N   Donna Coleen Milbrandt, of Bend Aug. 24, 1937 - Dec. 25, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: A memorial service will be held, Saturday, January 15, 2011 at 1:00 PM at Hospice House Chapel, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, OR 97701. Contributions may be made to:

Hospice House, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, OR 97701.

Gerardo Antonio Robles Arreola “Tony”, of Madras June 14, 1991 - Dec. 31, 2010 Arrangements: Bel-Air Funeral Home, 541-475-2241 Services: Rosario - Domingo, 9 de enero del 2011, at 7:00 PM, at Bel-Air Colonial Chapel. Misa Catolica - Lunes, 10 de enero del 2011 at 10:00 AM, at Iglesia de San Patricio. Rosary - Sunday, January 9, 2011, at 7:00 pm, at Bel-Air Chapel. Mass - Monday, January 10, 2011, at 10:00 AM, at St. Patrick's Catholic Church, Madras.

Gilbert "Gil" R. Martinez, of La Pine April 28, 1942 - Jan. 5, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel 541-536-5104 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: Recitation of the Rosary will be held at Baird Memorial Chapel, located at 16468 Finley Butte Road, La Pine on Friday, January 7 at 7:00 pm. Mass of Christian Burial will be held at Holy Redeemer Catholic Church located at 16137 Burgess Road in La Pine on Saturday, January 8 at 11:00 am with graveside service immediately following at La Pine Community Cemetery. A reception will follow graveside, and will be held at the La Pine Senior Center on Huntington Road in La Pine. Contributions may be made to:

“CANcancer" in care of St. Charles Foundation, 2500 NE Neff Road, Bend, Oregon 97701 or Partners in Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, Oregon 97701 www.partnersbend.org

Loren George Williams, of La Pine July 15, 1941 - Jan. 3, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine, 541-536-5104, www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: Memorial: Saturday, 1/8/11 at 11:00 a.m. at Crescent Creek Church, 52340 Huntington Road, La Pine, Oregon.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

April 29, 1914 - Dec. 8, 2010 Arthur E. Scofield, formerly of Sisters, passed away December 8 at age 96. A service will be held at a later date. Art was born April 29, 1914 in Moorhead, Minnesota. He came to Oregon in 1921 and lived in the Portland area until moving to Sisters in 1971. He was a skilled fabricator and carpenter and member of the Sisters Church of Christ. He loved to explore, camp and fish in Central Oregon. Art was preceded in death by a son, Allen, and his wife of 64 years, Emily. Survivors include daughter, Rosemary of Florence, OR, son Harold of Sparks, NV, three grandchildren and one great-grandchild. He was aided in the difficulties of old age by a kind and close friend, Lew Rems of Bend. Interment will be in the family plot in Camp Polk Cemetery near Sisters. The family suggests remembrances to the Food Bank.

Congressman William R. Ratchford, 76 By Emma Brown The Washington Post

William R. Ratchford, a Democrat who served three terms in Congress as a representative from Connecticut and who later became a lobbyist and a Clinton administration official, died Jan. 2 at Goodwin House Bailey’s Crossroads in Falls Church, Va. He was 76 and had Parkinson’s disease. Ratchford represented Connecticut from 1979 until 1984. His 5th District was a swath of the southwestern part of the state that included wealthy suburbs as well as struggling mill towns in the Naugatuck Valley and small cities with industrial pasts. He held seats on the Education and Labor Committees, the Permanent Select Committee on Aging and, in his third term, the powerful Appropriations Committee. After winning election in 1978, Ratchford survived the Republican tide of 1980 and won again in 1982. He lost his reelection bid in 1984 to Republican John G. Rowland, who went on to become Connecticut’s governor. Ratchford, who remained in the Washington area, took a job with the lobbying firm Gold & Leibengood. His first day at work was Jan. 4, 1985, the day after his congressional term expired - a quick turnaround that he said was due in part to having sons in college. “The tuition bills keep coming,” Ratchford told The New York Times in the waning days of his term. “That doesn’t give you much time to contemplate your future.”

Unicycles Continued from C1 In 2010, Thomason applied for and received a $1,200 grant from the Education Foundation for the Bend-La Pine Schools to purchase 11 unicycles. Now about 50 students are learning to unicycle at Pine Ridge Elementary, including a large beginners’ group and a smaller, more advanced group. On Wednesday, the advanced intermediate group cycled around the gym practicing tricks, hopping on and off their unicycles and wearing intense looks of both concentration and joy. Heather Vihstadt, the executive director of the education foundation, said she was drawn to the grant because it was innovative. “It’s so different,” she said. “But it’s promoting physical fitness and the kids obviously love it. There’s a huge demand for it.” The $1,200 grant was one of 29 classroom grants the foundation handed out in 2010. Overall, the foundation gave nearly $41,000 to teachers to provide everything from updated keyboard instruments to new document cameras to a greenhouse. “I thought this was really cre-

Tumalo Continued from C1 But several times a year, the culverts and ditches near the treatment facility become clogged with debris — sometimes from beaver dams — or get overwhelmed when more water comes through the system than the diversion pipes can handle. When this happens, the water spills out of the ditches and around the pipes, cascading down a steep embankment and causing a significant amount of erosion along its way to Tumalo Creek. That then turns the normally clear water of the creek to a muddy brown. Nigg said the DEQ has received complaints about this turbidity over the years, but wasn’t able to pinpoint the city as the culprit until a Bend resident who was jogging through Shevlin Park took some pictures and video of the sedimentation and submitted them to the state agency. The DEQ performed a field inspection of the city’s water system early last month, and has now asked the city if it’s feasible to make some minor changes to its operations. Some of these changes include whether the city should install some sort of device to reduce the amount of debris that clogs its infrastructure or if it should partner with Bend Parks & Recreation to inspect the ditches and culverts to ensure there isn’t anything blocking them. Other slight alterations the DEQ wants Bend to explore is whether it could install an alarm system to notify city staff about possible clogs or if it should implement a training program that outlines clear procedures for managing and preventing future overflows. “We expect to get some kind of response by the middle of the

Landfill Continued from C1 Once Knott Landfill closes, the cost of transporting garbage to the landfill will likely increase, because future landfills will be farther from Bend. “I guess I believe the investment in education and promotion is money well spent,” Schimke said. The county solicited proposals for the service from other companies, and only one other company — a firm in Northern California — responded. The firms that have typically responded in the past were public relations firms, and they proposed advertising campaigns to promote recycling and waste diversion, Schimke said. “These guys are out there in the streets, in the classrooms,” Schimke said of The Environmental Center. “It’s very much one-on-one with the citizens, an ongoing effort. We haven’t been able to come close to that with anyone else, with the dollars we’re willing to spend.” Mike Riley, executive director

ative and outside the box,” Vihstadt said. That’s part of what appealed to Thomason. “I like to do things that are not traditional,” Thomason said. “You don’t see many people unicycling.” It may not seem like an obvious early-morning activity. But Thomason said she’s seen many benefits. Parents report that on unicycle days, kids get themselves up and ready for school in order to be on time. “It’s a motivational tool,” Thomason said. Other students who have struggled with traditional sports or have had behavior issues in school have found success on the unicycle, giving them a sense of accomplishment and cutting down on problems. “It also teaches perseverance,” she said. “They just try and try and try.” Other benefits include an increase in core strength and legwork, balance and other physical skills. And for some students who might be restless at the idea of sitting in a classroom all day, a little before-school unicycling gets rid of some of that energy. Plus, while balancing on one wheel might be nerve-wracking

Photo courtesy of Bill Buchanan

Clean and muddy water runs down Tumalo Creek in Shevlin Park in November after part of the city of Bend’s Bridge Creek water system became clogged with debris. The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality is working with the city to find a solution to the problem. month and then develop some type of plan,” Nigg said. “We believe they can probably, through a combination of maintenance and planning their operations differently, keep the water in the pipes.” According to Heidi Lansdowne, the project manager for Bend’s Water Division, the city has already increased its monitoring and cleaning of the overflow ditches and culverts, and has included these into a “standard operating procedure” document. She said the city is also in the process of setting up an alarm system that will help notify staff members about possible overflows over the weekends when

inspections normally do not occur. “The problem of the overflow at Outback is being addressed now,” Lansdowne said. “The problem of the overflow at Outback will also be addressed when we do the surface water project.” The city’s approved $58 million upgrade to the Bridge Creek system should remedy the overflow issue because it will include a new pipeline and intake facility that can limit how much water is diverted to only the amount that is needed to meet demand in the city. That overhaul will also include a water treatment facility and a possible hydropower plant

Commissioners support drone testing area Deschutes County commissioners on Wednesday pledged their unanimous support for a proposal to open a military operations area to the testing of drones. The military area covers eastern Deschutes County, southern Crook County, western Harney County and northeastern Lake County. The idea, which was proposed by the nonprofit Economic Development for Central Oregon, already won the endorsement of the Bend City Council in December. Some councilors did withhold their support, citing concerns raised by some constituents about the military use of unmanned vehicles in the Middle East. Federal lawmakers are also working to move the proposal forward. In mid-December, Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley wrote a letter to the head of the Federal Aviation Administration, urging the agency to explore the proposal. “At this point, we believe that this is an intriguing proposal and that central Oregon may be uniquely positioned for this type of activity,” the lawmakers wrote. Tom Towslee, a spokesman for Wyden, said Tuesday that the Federal Aviation Administration was in the process of drafting a response to the letter. — Hillary Borrud, The Bulletin

of The Environmental Center, said his organization is working on a wide variety of programs to increase recycling and prevent the creation of waste in the first

for adults, kids are more brave. “Kids learn so much faster and they have much less fear,” Thomason said. Jacob Ellender, 9, has been participating in the unicycle program for a year and a half. He actually owns a unicycle but it’s missing some bolts, so for now he’s using one of the school’s. The best part of the unicycle mornings is getting to ride around. “We get to play hockey or basketball” on the unicycles, he said. Amaya Thomas, 10, also enjoys the hockey, but more than that it’s about spending time with her friends and challenging herself. “I’ve always wanted to try something that’s harder, to reach out for something,” she said. “And it’s fun.” So far, Amaya’s working on level-one aspects of unicycling, like mounting unassisted and riding 50 meters before dismounting with the unicycle in front. For the first few weeks of the 2010-11 school year, three or four students showed up for every available unicycle. But the fervor has quieted, and now there are about 50 regulars who come in a few mornings a week. The beginners, Thomason said, spend a lot of time balancing on the wall and falling. But

place. These efforts range from classroom education of school children, to increasing recycling at events and during demolition and construction.

the advanced intermediate group can not only ride, they practice mounting the unicycle in different ways, jumping off of mats, even riding with their stomachs on the seats. Four signs hang on the wall of the gym detailing the different skills required for a student to move from one level of unicycling to the next. Some students spend their mornings working on achieving new skills, and Thomason watches them and checks the skill off on a checklist. Others enjoy simply rolling around. Originally, Thomason had hoped to do a unicycle unit in her physical education classes, but because of concerns about helmets and safety, she decided to simply offer it before school. Soon Thomason hopes to organize the unicycle students to perform at an assembly and eventually at halftime of a basketball game. But for now, the group sometimes looks like controlled chaos. Bryce has reached the third skill level, working on skills like hopping five times and riding with the stomach on the seat for 10 meters. He’s pretty proud of himself. “I was doing it last year and it was really frustrating for me,” he

that could increase the overall cost to $73 million. City Manager Eric King said the city is now working on its official response to the DEQ’s letter and expects to have something to the state agency in the coming weeks. For the most part, he said all the questions the DEQ asked seemed appropriate and are things the city “should do anyway” to be proactive in preventing future overflows and turbidity in Tumalo Creek. “It all seems reasonable,” King said. “Those are all steps that we are committed to taking.” Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

“A small part of that (county) budget comes back around to make sure that system is efficient,” Riley said. “The cheapest option for our community is to keep the current landfill open as long as possible.” Commissioner Alan Unger said he had questions about why the Department of Solid Waste was spending 2.5 percent of its budget on the education program. Learning to recycle and reuse materials is a benefit to the community, Unger said, “because we waste things all the time.” But the county also needs to examine what it pays for, “because these are really hard times.” Commissioner Tammy Baney said the county’s budget process would be a good time to determine whether to continue paying for The Environmental Center programs, and if so, how much. Officials will soon have to make “tough decisions” on the county budget, she said. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

said. “I was scared to get off the wall. I was like a magnet on the wall. I thought I was going to fall when I pushed off.” This year, Bryce tried again and was able to make strides. Still, he’s had challenges, like free-mounting the unicycle without assistance or the wall to help. “I had big bruises all over,” he said. That’s certainly a side-effect of a roomful of unicycling children. “They’re like magnets,” Thomason said, laughing. All around her, kids toppled off their cycles and ran into another. But with their helmets and the spongy gym floor, the students popped right back up and back onto their unicycles. Brooklynn Anderson, 9, just wanted a new challenge. “I know how to ride a bike, and I wanted to try it with one wheel,” she said. “It’s hard. The hardest part is staying on the unicycle.” Indeed, throughout the gym students waved their arms around while astride the onewheeled contraptions. “It’s really fun and you get to hang out with your friends,” Brooklynn said. Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.


W E AT H ER

C6 Thursday, January 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2011.

TODAY, JANUARY 6 Today: Partly to mostly cloudy with pleasant temperatures.

HIGH Ben Burkel

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE



38/30

Ruggs

Condon

38/29

38/27

39/26



Warm Springs 44/28

46/22

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

48/27

Camp Sherman  42/22 Redmond Prineville 50/25 Cascadia 47/26 49/26 Sisters  46/24 Bend Post 50/25

47/24

45/22

47/21

27/7

Hampton

Crescent 40/20



41/15

Chemult 40/19

Fort Rock

Vancouver 46/44

34/21

Seattle



49/43

45/22

Partly to mostly cloudy skies today. Partly to mostly cloudy tonight. Eastern

49/23

35/26

Helena

47/35

Bend

41/31



Idaho Falls Elko

59/36

28/8



36/22

Partly to mostly cloudy skies today. Partly to mostly cloudy tonight.

Crater Lake 42/27





36/25

Redding

Silver Lake

37/22

Boise

50/25

Grants Pass

Christmas Valley

City

Missoula

Eugene

22/13



35/16

Reno

41/19

San Francisco



55/43

Salt Lake City 25/17

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:40 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 4:42 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:40 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 4:44 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 8:54 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 7:30 p.m.

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

HIGH

LOW

Moon phases First

Full

Last

New

Jan. 12

Jan. 19

Jan. 26

Feb. 2

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

TEMPERATURE

1

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

SKI REPORT

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . . Chains > 10,000 lbs. Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46/27 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 in 1984 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . -10 in 1974 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.30” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 0.30” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.27 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.42 in 1935 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .5:57 a.m. . . . . . .3:06 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .3:57 a.m. . . . . . .1:48 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .8:10 a.m. . . . . . .5:10 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . .10:55 a.m. . . . . .10:44 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . .12:19 a.m. . . . . .11:49 a.m. Uranus . . . . . .10:52 a.m. . . . . .10:42 p.m.

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

Astoria . . . . . . . . 48/35/0.89 . . . . . . 50/42/r. . . . . . 47/37/sh Baker City . . . . . . . 25/9/0.00 . . . . . . 33/20/c. . . . . . 34/22/sn Brookings . . . . . . 51/41/0.00 . . . . . 52/41/pc. . . . . . 52/41/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . .25/-7/0.00 . . . . . . 31/20/c. . . . . . 34/19/sn Eugene . . . . . . . .48/34/trace . . . . . . 47/35/c. . . . . . 47/36/sh Klamath Falls . . . 28/11/0.00 . . . . . 41/19/pc. . . . . . 39/24/pc Lakeview. . . . . . . .28/-2/0.00 . . . . . 40/17/pc. . . . . . 39/22/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 43/25/0.00 . . . . . . 45/21/c. . . . . . 40/27/sn Medford . . . . . . . 42/30/0.00 . . . . . 40/31/pc. . . . . . 47/34/sh Newport . . . . . . . 48/41/0.06 . . . . . . 52/42/c. . . . . . 49/40/sh North Bend . . . . . 52/43/0.00 . . . . . 51/38/pc. . . . . . 52/39/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . . 24/9/0.00 . . . . . . 29/21/c. . . . . . 32/25/sn Pendleton . . . . . . 34/17/0.00 . . . . . . 39/33/c. . . . . . 41/29/rs Portland . . . . . . . 39/30/0.34 . . . . . . 46/39/r. . . . . . . 45/36/r Prineville . . . . . . . 43/26/0.00 . . . . . . 47/26/c. . . . . . 44/27/rs Redmond. . . . . . . 48/27/0.00 . . . . . . 44/28/c. . . . . . 45/26/rs Roseburg. . . . . . . 47/35/0.00 . . . . . . 45/36/c. . . . . . 50/37/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 47/32/0.08 . . . . . . 47/36/c. . . . . . 47/36/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 44/26/0.00 . . . . . . 46/24/c. . . . . . 44/25/rs The Dalles . . . . . . 40/27/0.00 . . . . . . 41/35/c. . . . . . 42/32/rs

LOW

35 16

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

Friday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy and cool. HIGH

34 16

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

Calgary

46/39

Burns

45/21

Crescent Lake

BEND ALMANAC

MONDAY Mostly cloudy and chilly.

38 18

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 52° North Bend • -7° Burns

SUNDAY

Mostly cloudy, slight chance of mixed LOW showers.

HIGH

47 26

Portland

Brothers

Mostly cloudy, slight chance of rain LOW showers.

NORTHWEST

42/22

La Pine

HIGH

SATURDAY

Northwestern portions of the region will have rain, with some snow for the far northern interior.

Paulina

46/23

Sunriver

38/13

Rain north with snow above 6,000 feet today. Rain/snow north tonight. Central

50/31 43/27

Oakridge Elk Lake

LOW

25

Western Maupin

Marion Forks

Tonight: Partly cloudy and cool.

50

Bob Shaw

Government Camp

FRIDAY

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 36-50 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 48-79 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . 63-104 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . 87-102 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 84 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 49-57 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . 102 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . no report Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . .1-0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . . 2 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

. . . . . . 34-37 . . . . 134-220 . . . . . . . . 80 . . . . . . . 129 . . . . . . 45-62 . . . . . . 42-47 . . . . . . 44-45

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

S

Vancouver 46/44 Seattle 49/43

S Calgary 34/21

S

S

Saskatoon 29/17

S

S

S

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 19/14

Winnipeg 8/0

Halifax 28/22 P ortland Billings Bismarck P ortland (in the 48 29/18 25/15 44/32 46/39 St. Paul Green Bay contiguous states): To ronto Boston Buffalo 16/0 28/23 Rapid City 18/3 Boise 30/17 35/29 36/25 45/24 Detroit New York • 83° 31/20 37/30 Des Moines Cheyenne Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Philadelphia Columbus 31/13 Chicago 43/27 33/18 41/28 23/10 • -16° San Francisco Omaha Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 56/45 Merrill, Wis. 36/15 City Louisville 41/30 Las Denver 39/26 25/17 Kansas City • 2.12” Vegas 52/26 45/26 St. Louis 53/37 Quillayute, Wash. Charlotte 36/22 49/28 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 43/20 65/48 56/32 42/28 52/33 Phoenix Atlanta 66/43 Honolulu 49/30 Birmingham Dallas 78/64 Tijuana 49/32 59/36 67/46 New Orleans 62/42 Orlando Houston 67/42 Chihuahua 65/40 72/35 Miami 79/53 Monterrey La Paz 73/48 75/58 Mazatlan 80/58 Anchorage 18/9 Juneau 33/21 Thunder Bay 8/-6

FRONTS

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .60/33/0.00 . . .60/31/s . . 64/34/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .28/18/0.00 . .31/21/sn . . 23/15/sn Albany. . . . . . . . .35/21/0.00 . . .32/21/c . . 31/20/sn Albuquerque. . . .43/23/0.00 . . .43/20/s . . . 43/22/s Anchorage . . . . .32/26/0.00 . . . .18/9/s . . . 25/17/s Atlanta . . . . . . . .48/38/0.16 . 49/30/pc . . 45/27/pc Atlantic City . . . .41/27/0.02 . . .41/27/c . . .39/26/rs Austin . . . . . . . . .72/48/0.00 . . .67/34/s . . 63/46/pc Baltimore . . . . . .40/22/0.00 . . .40/28/c . . 36/21/sn Billings. . . . . . . . .41/25/0.00 . . .44/32/c . . 39/21/sn Birmingham . . . .53/37/0.02 . 49/32/pc . . 52/30/pc Bismarck . . . . . . .27/18/0.08 . . .25/15/c . . . . 23/3/sf Boise . . . . . . . . . .31/15/0.00 . 36/25/pc . . . 38/29/c Boston. . . . . . . . .39/29/0.00 . . .35/29/c . . 35/28/sn Bridgeport, CT. . .41/28/0.00 . . .35/28/c . . 37/27/sn Buffalo . . . . . . . .29/20/0.00 . .30/17/sn . . 25/16/sn Burlington, VT. . .29/23/0.03 . .29/20/sn . . 30/18/sn Caribou, ME . . . . .22/9/0.00 . . . .18/3/c . . 22/15/sn Charleston, SC . .47/38/0.35 . 51/37/pc . . 54/35/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .45/26/0.00 . 49/28/pc . . 44/22/pc Chattanooga. . . .41/28/0.24 . 45/30/pc . . 39/23/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .36/23/0.00 . 43/27/pc . . . 43/20/c Chicago. . . . . . . . .29/8/0.00 . . .23/10/c . . . 20/13/c Cincinnati . . . . . .36/19/0.00 . .36/19/sn . . . 25/13/c Cleveland . . . . . .29/23/0.00 . .31/22/sn . . 24/18/sn Colorado Springs 47/19/0.00 . . .51/22/s . . . 48/21/s Columbia, MO . .46/23/0.00 . 38/24/pc . . 37/19/pc Columbia, SC . . .49/29/0.03 . 52/30/pc . . 50/26/pc Columbus, GA. . .46/40/0.13 . 52/31/pc . . . 53/31/s Columbus, OH. . .30/18/0.00 . .33/18/sn . . 23/13/sn Concord, NH . . . .34/10/0.00 . . .31/14/c . . 32/19/sn Corpus Christi. . .77/63/0.00 . . .68/44/s . . 73/52/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .58/33/0.00 . . .59/36/s . . . 64/38/s Dayton . . . . . . . .32/15/0.00 . .32/17/sn . . 20/11/sn Denver. . . . . . . . .43/20/0.00 . . .52/26/s . . . 52/23/s Des Moines. . . . .41/16/0.00 . . .31/13/c . . . . 25/9/c Detroit. . . . . . . . .26/18/0.00 . .31/20/sn . . 25/15/sn Duluth . . . . . . . . . .14/0/0.04 . . . 7/-9/pc . . . .9/-6/sn El Paso. . . . . . . . .52/26/0.00 . 59/32/pc . . 62/35/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . . 20/-1/0.00 . . 5/-16/sn . . -5/-20/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . . 16/-3/0.04 . . . .13/2/c . . . .10/-4/c Flagstaff . . . . . . . 47/-3/0.00 . . . .42/7/s . . . 39/19/c

ENTER AS MANY TIMES AS YOU LIKE!

Enter And Win The Bulletin’s

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .26/21/0.00 . . .25/15/c . . 22/13/sn Green Bay. . . . . . .20/0/0.04 . . . .18/3/c . . . . 15/6/sf Greensboro. . . . .44/24/0.00 . 46/29/pc . . 38/20/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .37/25/0.00 . . .37/24/c . . 33/20/sn Hartford, CT . . . .38/21/0.00 . . .33/24/c . . 32/22/sn Helena. . . . . . . . .38/31/0.00 . . .37/22/c . . . 35/24/c Honolulu . . . . . . .79/65/0.00 . 78/64/pc . . . 77/62/s Houston . . . . . . .72/62/0.07 . . .65/40/s . . . 69/45/s Huntsville . . . . . .43/32/0.40 . 45/30/pc . . 40/23/pc Indianapolis . . . .34/17/0.00 . . .29/18/c . . . 23/13/c Jackson, MS . . . .62/47/0.36 . 55/35/pc . . . 58/35/s Madison, WI . . . . .25/4/0.04 . . .19/0/pc . . . . 15/4/c Jacksonville. . . . .54/36/0.41 . 58/36/pc . . . 60/34/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .37/33/0.04 . .33/21/sn . . . 28/14/c Kansas City. . . . .44/20/0.00 . 45/26/pc . . 43/22/pc Lansing . . . . . . . .23/10/0.00 . . 26/15/sf . . 23/12/sn Las Vegas . . . . . .51/32/0.00 . . .53/37/s . . 54/38/pc Lexington . . . . . .37/16/0.00 . . .36/22/c . . 27/16/sn Lincoln. . . . . . . . .41/12/0.00 . 39/19/pc . . 34/17/pc Little Rock. . . . . .56/42/0.00 . . .52/33/s . . . 52/32/s Los Angeles. . . . .68/45/0.00 . 65/48/pc . . 63/48/pc Louisville . . . . . . .38/21/0.00 . . .39/26/c . . . 27/17/c Memphis. . . . . . .49/39/0.06 . 48/35/pc . . 45/32/pc Miami . . . . . . . . .80/66/0.00 . .79/53/sh . . . 71/53/s Milwaukee . . . . . .25/7/0.03 . . .22/11/c . . .18/11/sf Minneapolis . . . . .25/3/0.04 . . .16/0/pc . . . .16/-1/c Nashville . . . . . . .37/29/0.09 . 42/28/pc . . 35/21/pc New Orleans. . . .70/60/0.90 . . .62/42/s . . . 62/45/s New York . . . . . .39/32/0.00 . . .37/30/c . . 37/25/sn Newark, NJ . . . . .41/29/0.00 . . .37/28/c . . 36/24/sn Norfolk, VA . . . . .42/29/0.00 . 44/28/pc . . 40/24/pc Oklahoma City . .53/25/0.00 . . .56/32/s . . . 59/29/s Omaha . . . . . . . .42/17/0.00 . . .36/15/c . . . 29/14/c Orlando. . . . . . . .78/55/0.00 . .67/42/sh . . . 66/44/s Palm Springs. . . .65/41/0.00 . . .67/45/s . . 63/40/pc Peoria . . . . . . . . .38/14/0.00 . . .27/13/c . . .23/12/sf Philadelphia . . . .39/29/0.00 . . .41/28/c . . 37/23/sn Phoenix. . . . . . . .62/38/0.00 . . .66/43/s . . 62/43/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .29/19/0.00 . .34/19/sn . . 25/15/sn Portland, ME. . . .35/17/0.00 . . .29/18/c . . 31/19/sn Providence . . . . .40/25/0.00 . . .35/25/c . . 37/25/sn Raleigh . . . . . . . .46/26/0.00 . 47/30/pc . . 41/22/pc

Yesterday Thursday Friday Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .41/8/0.00 . . .45/24/c . . . 39/17/c Savannah . . . . . .49/35/0.31 . 53/36/pc . . 55/34/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .37/18/0.00 . . .41/19/s . . 43/26/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .43/35/0.14 . . .49/43/r . . . .45/38/r Richmond . . . . . .45/24/0.00 . 44/28/pc . . 38/21/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . .29/12/0.00 . . .28/9/sn . . . . 23/4/sf Rochester, NY . . .31/20/0.04 . .31/20/sn . . 27/17/sn Spokane . . . . . . .31/21/0.12 . . .36/33/c . . .37/27/rs Sacramento. . . . .54/33/0.00 . . .55/37/s . . 56/40/pc Springfield, MO. .47/34/0.00 . . .41/29/s . . 44/24/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .44/25/0.00 . . .36/22/c . . .33/18/sf Tampa . . . . . . . . .73/58/0.00 . .66/49/sh . . 66/49/pc Salt Lake City . . .30/12/0.00 . 25/17/pc . . . 26/21/c Tucson. . . . . . . . .58/31/0.00 . . .66/37/s . . 65/37/pc San Antonio . . . .72/54/0.00 . . .69/35/s . . 72/43/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .55/25/0.00 . . .54/33/s . . . 54/30/s San Diego . . . . . .68/48/0.00 . 66/50/pc . . 60/47/pc Washington, DC .43/31/0.00 . . .41/30/c . . 36/22/sn San Francisco . . .55/38/0.00 . . .55/43/s . . 55/43/pc Wichita . . . . . . . .53/16/0.00 . . .52/27/s . . . 52/25/s San Jose . . . . . . .58/34/0.00 . . .59/41/s . . 58/41/pc Yakima . . . . . . . .30/24/0.04 . . .38/32/c . . .37/28/rs Santa Fe . . . . . . .38/19/0.00 . 34/14/pc . . 36/17/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .63/44/0.00 . . .66/43/s . . 63/43/pc

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .37/30/0.00 . . .39/37/r . . 39/38/sh Athens. . . . . . . . .50/37/0.00 . .54/42/sh . . 55/41/pc Auckland. . . . . . .77/64/0.00 . 80/65/pc . . 78/66/sh Baghdad . . . . . . .61/46/0.00 . 64/43/pc . . . 64/42/s Bangkok . . . . . . .90/73/0.00 . 88/73/pc . . 88/72/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .28/18/0.00 . . .30/11/s . . 32/14/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .66/54/1.28 . .62/53/sh . . 62/51/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . .27/14/0.00 . . 33/30/rs . . .36/33/rs Bogota . . . . . . . .66/50/0.00 . .68/49/sh . . 65/50/sh Budapest. . . . . . .25/21/0.00 . 32/25/pc . . . 39/35/c Buenos Aires. . . .84/70/0.00 . 85/68/pc . . 88/69/pc Cabo San Lucas .79/59/0.00 . 78/59/pc . . 77/58/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . . .66/50/s . . . 66/51/s Calgary . . . . . . . .41/12/0.00 . 34/21/pc . . .31/11/sf Cancun . . . . . . . 81/NA/0.00 . 80/61/pc . . 77/59/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .43/34/0.14 . 39/29/pc . . .39/37/rs Edinburgh . . . . . .39/30/0.00 . 31/22/pc . . 32/30/sn Geneva . . . . . . . .39/23/0.00 . . .44/41/r . . . .47/43/r Harare . . . . . . . . .82/61/0.00 . . .80/61/t . . . .79/60/t Hong Kong . . . . .61/54/0.00 . 68/59/pc . . 66/57/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . .46/41/0.00 . 40/27/pc . . . 40/25/s Jerusalem . . . . . .57/33/0.00 . 57/39/pc . . . 59/40/s Johannesburg . . .73/57/1.56 . . .72/58/t . . . .72/59/t Lima . . . . . . . . . .73/64/0.00 . .74/64/sh . . 75/64/sh Lisbon . . . . . . . . .63/59/0.00 . . .62/56/r . . 60/55/sh London . . . . . . . .45/39/0.00 . . .42/37/r . . . .46/40/r Madrid . . . . . . . .50/45/0.00 . .59/48/sh . . 55/43/sh Manila. . . . . . . . .88/72/0.00 . 87/75/pc . . 83/74/sh

Mecca . . . . . . . . .86/73/0.00 . 89/72/pc . . 88/69/pc Mexico City. . . . .77/46/0.00 . . .76/42/s . . . 77/41/s Montreal. . . . . . .25/16/0.06 . . 25/18/sf . . . 26/20/c Moscow . . . . . . . .18/7/0.00 . . .17/8/pc . . . 22/13/s Nairobi . . . . . . . .82/59/0.00 . . .81/59/t . . 81/57/pc Nassau . . . . . . . .81/63/0.00 . 80/63/pc . . 71/57/sh New Delhi. . . . . .45/43/0.00 . . .69/45/s . . . 68/45/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .48/30/0.00 . . 41/30/rs . . 41/26/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .28/21/0.14 . .25/16/sn . . . 23/14/s Ottawa . . . . . . . .25/18/0.00 . . 26/19/sf . . . 25/20/c Paris. . . . . . . . . . .45/28/0.00 . . .45/42/r . . 48/43/sh Rio de Janeiro. . .90/79/0.00 . . .86/76/t . . . .87/75/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .54/39/0.10 . . .55/45/c . . . 57/46/c Santiago . . . . . . .88/52/0.00 . . .81/57/s . . . 81/56/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .84/68/0.00 . . .81/68/t . . . .81/71/t Sapporo. . . . . . . .25/21/0.00 . .26/22/sn . . .25/20/sf Seoul . . . . . . . . . .28/16/0.00 . . . .23/6/s . . . 29/11/s Shanghai. . . . . . .39/36/0.00 . . .39/26/s . . . 43/30/s Singapore . . . . . .90/75/2.99 . . .87/75/t . . . .85/76/t Stockholm. . . . . .32/25/0.00 . .26/18/sn . . . 28/17/s Sydney. . . . . . . . .73/63/0.00 . .74/65/sh . . 76/64/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .68/57/0.00 . .58/52/sh . . 60/51/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .63/55/0.61 . 64/52/pc . . . 64/51/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .52/36/0.00 . 45/33/pc . . 43/30/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .30/21/0.00 . . 28/23/sf . . 23/16/sn Vancouver. . . . . .41/36/0.52 . . .46/44/r . . . .44/35/r Vienna. . . . . . . . .25/23/0.00 . . .31/25/c . . . 44/39/c Warsaw. . . . . . . .23/10/0.00 . 32/27/pc . . .36/32/rs

WIN A 7-NIGHT MEXICAN RIVIERA CRUISE

4T H ANNUAL VACAT ION GETAWAY PROVIDED BY AND

SWEEPSTAKES!

Enjoy a spectacular vacation, courtesy of Carnival Cruise Lines, Getaways Travel, and The Bulletin. Trip for two includes seven days onboard the Carnival Splendor® roundtrip from Los Angeles. Visit the ports of Puerto Vallarta, Mazatlan and Cabo San Lucas. Room, dining, and ship entertainment included.

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO SUBSCRIBE CALL THE BULLETIN AT 541-385-5800 FOR COMPLETE RULES AND REGULATIONS Visit www.bendbulletin.com/vacationrules or stop by The Bulletin at 1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR. Additional entry forms are available in newspapers for sale across Central Oregon and in the lobby of The Bulletin. Winner will be drawn January 28, 2011.

OFFICIAL BULLETIN | GETAWAYS TRAVEL VACATION GETAWAY SWEEPSTAKES ENTRY FORM Sign me up to win The Bulletin’s Fourth Annual Subscriber Vacation Getaway Sweepstakes! Official entry form only. No other reproductions are accepted. Prizes are non-transferable to any other party and cannot be substituted for cash or any other value. Winner is responsible for all taxes. Must be 21 years of age or older.

NAME: __________________________________________________________________________ PHONE: ______________________________________ ADDRESS: _____________________________________E-MAIL (required): ___________________ BULLETIN SUBSCRIBER: ___YES ___ NO Official entry forms must be received by 3 p.m. on January 27, 2011. Entry forms may be mailed to: P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708, or dropped off at:

1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702

GETAWAYS TRAVEL 563 SW 13th St., Bend, OR 97702 • 541-317-1274 • www.getawaystravel.net

RULES: All vacations are approved on a promotional basis and are subject to availability. Blackout dates apply. Trip is valid through Jan. 31, 2012. Travel dates are final and will not be extended. Travel is not permitted during holiday periods, including both 5 days prior and after. Trips are NON-TRANSFERABLE and cannot be exchanged for cash. Trips are valid for 2 adults ONLY per room and do not include any special promotions. NO room upgrades. Winner must be at least 21 years old. Employees of participating companies and its properties, sponsors, vendors and their immediate families are not eligible to win. The Bulletin reserves the right to deem entries ineligible. One coupon per edition.


S

NBA Inside Aldridge leads Blazers past Rockets, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2011

COLLEGE FOOTBALL Beavers receiver Rodgers granted medical hardship CORVALLIS — Oregon State flanker James Rodgers has been granted a medical hardship for this past season, meaning he can return for 2011. Rodgers, a senior, played in four of the team’s first five games before he OSU’s James suffered a Rodgers left knee injury that required surgery. “I’m thankful for this opportunity and that I have another chance to play at Oregon State,” Rodgers said in a press release. “I want to thank the fans and everyone for their support.” A team captain, Rodgers was averaging 176.8 all-purpose yards per game when he was injured, ranking him sixth in the nation. Rodgers, the older brother of running back Jacquizz Rodgers, had not used a redshirt season while at Oregon State. “We always believed that James met the requirements to gain a fifth year,” head coach Mike Riley said. “But it is certainly nice to make everything official. James is a special person and a special player. I’m excited to get to work with him for another year.” — From wire reports

C O L L E G E F O OT BA L L : B C S N AT I O N A L C H A M P I O N S H I P

Oregon’s Bair is a different kind of Duck Defensive tackle Brandon Bair is married and 26 years old, but he’s been a big part of UO’s success this season By John Marshall

Next up

The Associated Press

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz— Excited after arriving in the desert for the BCS national championship, Oregon’s players filed off the team plane carrying backpacks and shoulder bags, some of them shooting video of the waiting throng down below. Defensive tackle Brandon Bair? He was holding his daughter in one arm, fumbling with a car seat with the other and trying to make sure his wife had everything. “All the other guys were walking behind us

• BCS National Championship, Oregon vs. Auburn • When: Jan. 10, 5:30 p.m. • TV: ESPN and coach (Jerry) Azzinaro was yelling at one of them, ‘help him out a little, take the car seat,’” Bair said. “That’s just a part of being a parent.” See Duck / D3

Don Ryan / The Associated Press

Oregon’s Brandon Bair (88) tries to block a punt by Portland State kicker Thomas Duyndam during a game in September. Bair, at the age of 26, is eight years older than some of his teammates.

PREP WRESTLING

Panthers, Cowboys take IMC Hybrid matches Bulletin staff report

Michigan fires coach Rodriguez ANN ARBOR, Mich. — Michigan hired Rich Rodriguez to take college football’s winningest program to another level. He did just that, and it cost him his job. Rodriguez was fired Wednesday after going 15-22 in three disappointing seasons, including an 0-6 record combined against rivals Ohio State and Michigan State, and staining the proud program with a handful of NCAA violations. “Michigan is not used to this,” said athletic director Dave Brandon, who met with Rodriguez on Tuesday and again Wednesday before announcing the firing. “I believe this is the best decision for the future of Michigan football,” Brandon said. “We have not achieved at the level that I expect.” Rodriguez, who was highly successful at West Virginia before arriving in Ann Arbor, was just 6-18 in Big Ten play and 11-11 at home. The school will buy out the final three years of Rodriguez’s contract for $2.5 million, bringing its overall cost in hiring and firing him to $12.5 million. Brandon said he will immediately begin a search for a replacement. — The Associated Press

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Paul Mosely, 46, of La Pine, casts while fly fishing at the Fall River fish hatchery south of Sunriver in December. Angling in winter presents a lot of challenges, but it can still be enjoyable.

Out in the cold? Want to fish in the winter in Central Oregon? Here are a few tips for wetting a line when the temperature drops By Mark Morical The Bulletin

The weather is frigid, the fish are not extremely active, and success can be as hard to come by as a warm ray of sun. Some might consider trout fishing during the winter in Central Oregon an exercise in futility. Yet those hardy anglers who venture to the Crooked, Fall, Metolius and Middle Deschutes rivers this time of year know better. And many of them know some helpful hints to maximize the winter angling experience. Before you head out into the ice and snow to cast a line on one of Central Or-

HUNTING & FISHING egon’s scenic rivers this winter, take a few pointers from those in the know. • Always layer up. Dressing in layers is a good idea for all outdoor activities in the winter, including fishing. “The first thing I would say, especially in our area, is to be layered up and be warm,” says Bob Gaviglio, owner of the Sunriver Fly Shop.

• The lighter the better. Because smaller flies tend to work better than larger flies in the winter, Gaviglio recommends using a light rod. Four-weight rods and finer tippets are a plus, he says. • Timing is everything when fishing during the winter. Fish are going to be active only during the warmest parts of the day, unlike in summertime, when fish tend to be more active during the cool of mornings and evenings. Fly anglers always talk about keeping “banker’s hours” during the winter — not necessarily 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., but more like 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., according to Gaviglio. See Winter / D4

BASEBALL Former Michigan coach Rich Rodriguez.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 NBA ...........................................D3 College basketball .....................D3 Hunting & Fishing .................... D4

D

Alomar, Blyleven elected to Hall of Fame By Tyler Kepner New York Times News Service

Roberto Alomar was 9 years old in 1977 when his father, Sandy, was traded from the Yankees to the Texas Rangers. Alomar and his brother tagged along to games at old Arlington Stadium, playing ball in the parking lot with the other players’ sons, including 4-year-old Todd Blyleven. Late in the next decade, Alomar embarked on a career as one of the most dynamic all-around players in base-

ball history. Todd’s father, Bert, was still pitching then, quietly compiling impressive statistics that have, at last, become impossible to ignore. Alomar and Blyleven were elected to the Hall of Fame on Wednesday, Alomar in his second year on the ballot, Blyleven in his 14th. Alomar received 523 of 581 votes, for 90 percent, while Blyleven finished with 463, for 79.7 percent. Candidates needed 436 votes, or 75 percent, to be enshrined. See Hall / D4

Redmond and Crook County each cruised to easy Intermountain Hybrid wrestling wins Wednesday night, as the Panthers rolled past host Mountain View 54-9, while the Cowboys defeated Summit in Prineville 69-3. Redmond won 11 of 14 matches against the Cougars, including the first four of the night. In the most competitive match of the night, Panther freshman Ty George defeated Mountain View’s Jake McDonald 2-1 at 119 pounds. George recorded a first-period takedown and held on for the win. Brandon Short (103 pounds), Allen Jeppsen (112), Boomer Fleming (145), Tanner Barichio (152) and Gunner Sigado (171) all recorded pins for Redmond, which wrestles at the Rollie Lane Invitational in Nampa, Idaho, this weekend. “Tanner Barichio getting a pin in his first varsity match was big,” Panther coach Nathan Stanley said. “And Sarek Shields wrestled really well at 160 pounds, losing 11-9 to a kid (Wyatt Bloom) who we think is real good. Allen Jeppsen also did well at 112 pounds.” Trevor Roberts (215 pounds), Connor Wiese (189) and Bloom (160) all posted wins for the Cougars, who are scheduled to compete at the Bend High Invitational on Friday. At Crook County High School, the Cowboys won every match but one against the Storm. Sean Seefeldt defeated Crook County’s Lucas Smith in the night’s 171pound match for Summit’s lone victory. Freshman Grayson Munn registered a 13-11 overtime win at 112 pounds and Rhett Smith posted a 16-0 technical fall at 215 pounds to highlight the Cowboys’ night. Crook County is off until Saturday’s six-team Lebanon Invitational. The Storm are back on the mat Saturday as well, wrestling at Bend High’s tournament.

Roberto Alomar got into the Hall of Fame in his second year on the ballot Mark Duncan / The Associated Press ile


D2 Thursday, January 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

sion, championship game, Delaware vs. Eastern Washington, ESPN2.

TELEVISION TODAY GOLF 6 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Africa Open, first round, Golf Channel. 2:30 p.m. — PGA Tour, Tournament of Champions, first round, Golf Channel.

BASKETBALL

5 p.m. — NBA, Houston Rockets at Orlando Magic, ESPN. 5 p.m. — College, Cotton Bowl, LSU vs. Texas A&M, Fox. 5 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Minnesota Timberwolves, Comcast SportsNet Northwest. 7:30 p.m. — NBA, New York Knicks at Phoenix Suns, ESPN.

BOXING

4 p.m. — Men’s college, Xavier at Cincinnati, ESPN2. 5 p.m. — NBA, Oklahoma City Thunder at Dallas Mavericks, TNT.

7 p.m. — Mauricio Herrera vs. Ruslan Provonikov, ESPN2.

5:30 p.m. — Men’s college, Oregon at Washington, FSNW. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, Northwestern at Illinois, ESPN2.

TODAY

7:30 p.m. — NBA, Denver Nuggets at Sacramento Kings, TNT.

BASKETBALL

5 p.m. — College, GoDaddy.com Bowl, Miami (Ohio) vs. Middle Tennessee State, ESPN.

5:30 p.m. — Men’s college, Oregon at Washington, KBND-AM 1110. 7 p.m. — Men’s college, Oregon State at Washington State, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690.

FRIDAY

FRIDAY

GOLF 6 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Africa Open, second round, Golf Channel. 2:30 p.m. — PGA Tour, Tournament of Champions, second round, Golf Channel.

FOOTBALL 4 p.m. — College, Football Championship Subdivi-

BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Minnesota Timberwolves, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Football

on his serve — and 11 of 37 overall.

• Owner: Time to let Vince Young go: Tennessee Titans owner Bud Adams says it’s time to let Vince Young go and for the franchise to find its next quarterback. The Titans released a statement Wednesday night in which Adams said Young won’t be on the team’s roster next season, but he’s still evaluating the coaching staff. “We have two critical decisions to make, the direction of the coaching staff and the future at the quarterback position. They are separate issues to me and will be dealt with separately,” Adams said. Young is 30-17 in his five NFL seasons, but only 13-14 against teams finishing a season at .500 or better. He’s also battled questions over his work ethic, leadership and injuries. • Stanford’s Harbaugh to meet with 49ers: Stanford coach Jim Harbaugh was meeting Wednesday with the San Francisco 49ers about their head coach vacancy, a person with knowledge of the situation said. Harbaugh returned Tuesday night to the Bay Area from a 40-12 Orange Bowl victory over Virginia Tech in Miami that gave the Cardinal a program-best 12-1 record. Aside from his alma mater, the Miami Dolphins and Denver Broncos are teams believed to have interest in Harbaugh. • Saints RB Thomas out for the playoffs: The defending champion Saints will have try to repeat without their top two power running backs. Pierre Thomas, one of the stars of last season’s Super Bowl run, was placed on injured reserve on Wednesday because of his injured ankle. The Saints made that move only one day after placing leading rusher Chris Ivory on injured reserve because of a left foot injury that occurred during Sunday’s regular season finale. When the Saints (11-5) open the playoffs in Seattle (7-9) on Saturday, the only remaining healthy running backs from their regular season roster will be Reggie Bush and Julius Jones. • Jets appealing NFL’s $100K fine: The New York Jets are appealing the $100,000 fine issued by the NFL last week for violating league rules when assistant coach Sal Alosi ordered players to form a sideline wall, then tripped Miami’s Nolan Carroll during a punt return last month. Meeting with the media for the first time since the fine, special teams coordinator Mike Westhoff says Wednesday that he doesn’t want to discuss it because it is “an unresolved issue” and the Jets are appealing it. The team confirmed it is appealing the fine, calling it “a typical course of action.” The fine was in response to the actions of Alosi, the Jets’ strength and conditioning coach, and comments made by Westhoff, who said other teams employ similar sideline wall tactics.

Soccer

Baseball • Beltre, Texas agree to deal: Adrian Beltre is taking over as the everyday third baseman for the AL champion Texas Rangers, and Michael Young is switching positions again. The Rangers introduced Beltre as their new third baseman Wednesday after agreeing on a $96 million, sixyear contract with the All-Star. Beltre is expected to hit fourth behind AL MVP and major league batting champion Josh Hamilton and ahead of slugger Nelson Cruz. Beltre, a two-time Gold Glove winner, hit .321 with 28 homers, 102 RBIs and 49 doubles in 154 games during his only season with Boston and was an All-Star for the first time in his career.

Tennis • Nadal, Federer advance: Top-ranked Rafael Nadal overcame a second-set collapse to beat Lukas Lacko of Slovakia 7-6 (3), 0-6, 6-3 Wednesday and join Roger Federer in the quarterfinals of the Qatar Open. Earlier, Federer beat fellow Swiss Marco Chiudinelli 7-6 (5), 7-5. Nadal, who is also playing doubles with Marc Lopez, had a fever earlier this week and looked uncharacteristically slow and sluggish on court. In the second set, he won just five of 18 points

Today Girls basketball: Madras at Crook County, 7 p.m. Boys basketball: Crook County at Madras, 7 p.m. Wrestling: Junction City and Sweet Home at La Pine, 5 p.m.; Sisters at Elmira, 5 p.m.

• Lilly retires: Kristine Lilly only seemed as if she would play forever. The last remaining player from the U.S. teams that transformed women’s soccer from a fringe college sport into an international phenomenon announced Wednesday that she is retiring at 39. Her 352 appearances is an international record, and she is both the youngest and oldest player to score for the U.S. She is second only to Mia Hamm in both goals scored (130) and assists (105).

Basketball • Clippers’ Griffin to take part in dunk contest: Blake Griffin is bringing his ferocious dunks to the slam dunk contest. The Los Angeles Clippers rookie will join Milwaukee point guard Brandon Jennings and big men JaVale McGee of Washington and Serge Ibaka of Oklahoma City in next month’s event at All-Star weekend, the NBA announced Wednesday. Griffin’s powerful slams have made him a YouTube sensation and the leading candidate for Rookie of the Year honors, and his presence brings a needed boost to what was a lackluster event last year. He will have home-court advantage in the contest at Staples Center on Feb. 19. • Coach: No more gambling on Grizzlies’ flights: Grizzlies coach Lionel Hollins has banned gambling on flights for Memphis after a fight between Tony Allen and O.J. Mayo on board an airplane during a return trip from Los Angeles. The team confirmed Allen and Mayo had a “brief altercation” on the charter flight back to Memphis on Monday, a day after a 104-85 win over the Lakers. • UW loses starter for season: Starting guard Abdul Gaddy will miss the rest of the regular season for No. 23 Washington after tearing the anterior cruciate ligament in his left knee. Gaddy suffered the injury in practice on Tuesday when he planted on a drive to the basket. Gaddy had started all 13 games for Washington (10-3) and averaged 8.5 points and 3.8 assists. Oregon plays at Washington today.

Golf • PGA commish supports a strong European Tour: The European Tour is stronger than ever, and PGA Tour commissioner Tim Finchem says he’s glad to see it. The new golf season begins today with the balance of power shifting toward Europe, which has the new world No. 1 in Lee Westwood and seven players among the top 11 in the world. Westwood, PGA champion Martin Kaymer and Rory McIlroy have decided not to take up membership in America, and the European Tour over the last two years has increased to 13 the number of events required of its players. All three were eligible for the Tournament of Champions at Kapalua, Hawaii, but chose not to attend. “This recent focus on three or four players, particularly as it relates to Europe, does not cause us concern,” Finchem said. “We see the need for these players to support the tour in Europe. We feel like a strong European Tour is in everybody’s interests — in our interests.”

Auto racing • Coma takes overall motorbike lead in Dakar Rally: Marc Coma’s motorbike lead was trimmed to 2 seconds while Carlos Sainz stretched his advantage in cars by winning his third stage in the Dakar Rally on Wednesday. With the race crossing the Andes into Chile’s Atacama Desert, Spain’s Coma finished 16 seconds ahead of French rival Cyril Despres to win the 129-mile fourth stage. Defending champion Sainz won the stage by 50 seconds over Volkswagen teammate Nasser Al-Attiyah. The victory pushed him 4 minutes, 24 seconds ahead of Al-Attiyah in the overall. — From wire reports

Xavier Malisse (7), Belgium, def. Stephane Robert, France, 6-2, 6-2.

IN THE BLEACHERS

Brisbane International Wednesday Brisbane, Australia Singles Second Round Florian Mayer (7), Germany, def. Richard Berankis, Lithuania, 6-4, 4-6, 6-4. Santiago Giraldo, Colombia, def. Benjamin Becker, Germany, 6-3, 6-4. Andy Roddick (2), United States, def. Alexandr Dolgopolov, Ukraine, 6-4, 6-1. Kevin Anderson, South Africa, def. Feliciano Lopez (6), Spain, 6-3, 6-1. Marcos Baghdatis (5), Cyprus, def. Lukasz Kubot, Poland, 6-2, 6-2. Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic, def. Mardy Fish (4), United States, 6-3, 6-1.

Friday Girls basketball: Gilchrist at Hosanna, TBA, Crook County at La Pine, 7 p.m.; Sisters at Molalla, 5:30 p.m.; Summit at Bend, 7 p.m.; Culver at Scio, 6:30 p.m. Boys basketball: La Pine at Crook County, 7 p.m.; Sisters at Molalla, 7 p.m.; La Pine at Crook County, 7 p.m.; Bend at Summit, 7 p.m.; Culver at Scio, 8 p.m.; Gilchrist at Hosanna, TBA Wrestling: Redmond at Rollie Lane in Boise, TBA; Culver at Jo-Hi Tournament in Joseph, 11 a.m.

PREP SPORTS Wrestling

RADIO

7:30 p.m. — Men’s college, Cal at Arizona, FSNW.

FOOTBALL

ON DECK

Qatar ExxonMobil Open Wednesday Doha, Qatar Singles Second Round Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (3), France, def. Sergei Bubka, Ukraine, 6-2, 6-4. Viktor Troicki (6), Serbia, def. Teymuraz Gabashvili, Russia, 6-3, 6-1. Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def. Marco Chiudinelli, Switzerland, 7-6 (5), 7-5. Ivo Karlovic, Croatia, def. Philipp Kohlschreiber (8), Germany, 7-5 (5), 6-7 (4), 7-6 (2). Guillermo Garcia-Lopez (7), Spain, def. Illya Marchenko, Ukraine, 6-1, 6-4. Ernests Gulbis (5), Latvia, def. Antonio Veic, Croatia, 6-3, 6-1. Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Lukas Lacko, Slovakia, 7-6 (3), 0-6, 6-3. Nikolay Davydenko (4), Russia, def. Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, 6-4, 7-5.

Wednesday’s results ——— INTERMOUNTAIN HYBRID REDMOND 54, MOUNTAIN VIEW 9 At Mountain View 103 — Short, R, pins Slaught, MV, 5:27. 112 — Jeppsen, R, pins Pitcher., MV, 4:50. 119 — George, R, def. McDonald, MV, 2-1. 125 — Lindquist, R, def. Crew, MV, 7-0. 130 — Brinkley, R, def. Combs, MV, tech fall, 15-0. 135 — Rystedt, R, def. Ayers, MV, 13-7. 140 — Peebles, R, def. Samples, MV, 6-0. 145 — Fleming, R, pins Amodeo, MV, :47. 152 — Barichio, R, pins Dillard, MV, 1:15. 160 —Bloom, MV, def. Shields, R, 11-9. 171 — Sigado, R, pins, Miller, MV, 4:08. 189 — Wiese, MV, def. Knapp, R, 7-4. 215 — Roberts, MV, def. Saulsbury, R, 3-1. 285 — Redmond wins by forfeit.

FOOTBALL NFL Playoffs All Times PST ——— Wild-card Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 8 New Orleans at Seattle, 1:30 p.m. (NBC) N.Y. Jets at Indianapolis, 5 p.m. (NBC) Sunday, Jan. 9 Baltimore at Kansas City, 10 a.m. (CBS) Green Bay at Philadelphia, 1:30 p.m. (Fox)

College BOWLS Subject to Change All Times PST ——— Today, Jan. 6 GoDaddy.com Bowl: Miami (Ohio) (9-4) vs. Middle Tennessee (6-6), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Jan. 7 Cotton Bowl: Texas A&M (9-3) vs. LSU (10-2), 5 p.m. (Fox)

Betting Line Favorite Saints COLTS Ravens EAGLES

NFL PLAYOFFS (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Saturday 8 10.5 SEAHAWKS 3 2.5 Jets Sunday 2.5 3 CHIEFS 2.5 2.5 Packers

COLLEGE Today GoDaddy.com Bowl Mid. Tenn. St. 1.5 (Miami) PK Miami (Ohio)

Lsu

Friday Cotton Bowl PK 2

Pitt

Saturday BBVA Compass Bowl 2.5 3.5

Texas A&M

Kentucky

Nevada

Sunday Fight Hunger Bowl 9 7.5 Boston College

Auburn

Monday BCS National Championship 2.5 2.5 Oregon

BASKETBALL Men’s college Wednesday’s Games ——— FAR WEST Air Force 77, Utah 69 Colorado 92, W. New Mexico 70 New Mexico 102, CS Bakersfield 62 SOUTHWEST Mississippi 75, SMU 57 San Diego St. 66, TCU 53 St. Bonaventure 68, Ark.-Little Rock 55 Texas-Arlington 72, Houston Baptist 57 Tulane 85, Rice 81 UTEP 69, Tulsa 59 MIDWEST Dayton 60, Saint Louis 50 Kansas 99, UMKC 52 Missouri 98, North Alabama 58 Nebraska 68, Savannah St. 48 Wisconsin 66, Michigan 50 SOUTH Appalachian St. 74, Davidson 66 Belmont 70, Stetson 53 Duke 85, UAB 64 ETSU 80, Kennesaw St. 69 James Madison 99, Towson 68 Lipscomb 75, Florida Gulf Coast 61 Louisville 73, Seton Hall 54 Mercer 70, S.C.-Upstate 59 Middle Tennessee 78, North Texas 71 N.C. State 87, Elon 72 North Florida 57, Campbell 55 Old Dominion 49, Northeastern 34 Richmond 71, Charlotte 59 Southern Miss. 85, Houston 73 Tennessee 104, Memphis 84 UCF 65, Marshall 58 UNC Wilmington 59, Georgia St. 56 Va. Commonwealth 52, Drexel 48 W. Carolina 81, Georgia Southern 58 Wake Forest 79, High Point 63 EAST Columbia 76, Lafayette 73

Delaware 61, William & Mary 48 Duquesne 75, Saint Joseph’s 63 George Washington 72, La Salle 67 Hartford 61, Maine 59 Harvard 78, Boston College 69 Hofstra 87, George Mason 74 Marquette 73, Rutgers 65 Princeton 68, Marist 57 Purdue 83, Penn St. 68 Temple 70, Fordham 51 Yale 77, Holy Cross 76, OT PAC-10 STANDINGS All Times PST ——— Conference All Games W L PCT W L PCT Washington 2 0 1.000 10 3 .769 Oregon St. 2 0 1.000 7 6 .538 Stanford 1 0 1.000 8 4 .666 Arizona 1 1 .500 12 3 .800 Southern Cal 1 1 .500 9 6 .600 UCLA 1 1 .500 9 5 .642 Arizona St. 1 1 .500 8 5 .615 California 0 1 .000 7 6 .538 Oregon 0 2 .000 7 7 .500 Washington St. 0 2 .000 10 4 .714 Today’s Games Stanford at Arizona State, 5:30 p.m. Oregon at Washington, 5:30 p.m. Oregon State at Washington State, 7 p.m. California at Arizona, 7:30 p.m.

Women’s college Wednesday’s Games ——— FAR WEST BYU 75, UNLV 64 Long Beach St. 64, CS Northridge 50 TCU 49, San Diego St. 47 UC Irvine 70, Cal St.-Fullerton 65 Utah 77, Air Force 40 Wyoming 83, Colorado St. 43 SOUTHWEST Texas A&M-Corpus Christi 84, Texas-Pan American 70 MIDWEST Bowling Green 66, Ohio 54 Buffalo 61, Akron 45 Cent. Michigan 72, W. Michigan 62 DePaul 71, Providence 38 E. Michigan 79, N. Illinois 63 Iowa 63, Minnesota 57 Kent St. 76, Miami (Ohio) 62 Notre Dame 73, Marquette 55 Ohio St. 83, Indiana 65 Toledo 63, Ball St. 46 Xavier 83, Missouri 51 SOUTH Appalachian St. 78, Coll. of Charleston 62 Arkansas St. 62, Fla. International 61 Belmont 59, Stetson 45 Campbell 80, North Florida 73, 2OT Cincinnati 57, South Florida 56 Denver 51, W. Kentucky 50 ETSU 73, Kennesaw St. 61 Florida Gulf Coast 75, Lipscomb 57 Louisiana-Lafayette 73, Troy 63 Middle Tennessee 83, North Texas 63 S.C.-Upstate 70, Mercer 64 Savannah St. 71, Md.-Eastern Shore 50 South Alabama 65, Florida Atlantic 53 UNC-Greensboro 55, Georgia Southern 51 W. Carolina 60, Davidson 48 EAST Connecticut 81, Villanova 35 Duquesne 70, Pittsburgh 62 Hartford 73, Maine 43 Lafayette 64, Columbia 63 Massachusetts 75, Holy Cross 50 Monmouth, N.J. 57, Bryant 39 West Virginia 67, Seton Hall 46

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF Pittsburgh 41 26 12 3 55 135 Philadelphia 39 24 10 5 53 131 N.Y. Rangers 41 23 15 3 49 121 N.Y. Islanders 37 12 19 6 30 89 New Jersey 39 10 27 2 22 69 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF Boston 38 21 11 6 48 110 Montreal 40 21 16 3 45 100 Buffalo 39 16 18 5 37 108 Ottawa 40 16 19 5 37 90 Toronto 38 14 20 4 32 90 Southeast Division

GP W L OT Pts GF GA 41 24 12 5 53 123 130 41 23 12 6 52 120 107 43 22 15 6 50 134 127 39 18 15 6 42 112 117 38 18 18 2 38 104 98 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 40 25 10 5 55 138 113 Nashville 39 20 13 6 46 99 94 St. Louis 38 20 13 5 45 101 104 Chicago 42 21 18 3 45 130 122 Columbus 40 20 17 3 43 103 118 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 39 26 8 5 57 134 96 Colorado 40 21 14 5 47 136 128 Minnesota 39 19 15 5 43 100 113 Calgary 41 18 20 3 39 108 118 Edmonton 38 12 19 7 31 98 131 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 41 24 13 4 52 118 113 San Jose 40 21 14 5 47 118 112 Anaheim 43 21 18 4 46 110 123 Los Angeles 39 22 16 1 45 116 96 Phoenix 39 18 13 8 44 110 115 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Wednesday’s Games N.Y. Rangers 2, Carolina 1, OT Pittsburgh 8, Tampa Bay 1 Atlanta 3, Florida 2 Dallas 4, Chicago 2 Vancouver 3, Calgary 1 Nashville 4, Anaheim 1 Today’s Games Minnesota at Boston, 4 p.m. St. Louis at Toronto, 4 p.m. Philadelphia at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Pittsburgh at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. Phoenix at Colorado, 6 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Edmonton, 6 p.m. Nashville at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Buffalo at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Tampa Bay Washington Atlanta Carolina Florida

GA 95 104 104 120 124 GA 85 96 118 121 113

TENNIS WTA WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— Brisbane International Wednesday Brisbane, Australia Singles Second Round Andrea Petkovic, Germany, def. Jelena Dokic, Australia, 6-0, 6-1. Dominika Cibulkova, Slovakia, def. Roberta Vinci, Italy, 6-2, 7-5. Barbora Zahlavova Strycova, Czech Republic, def. Sally Peers, Australia, 6-4, 6-1. Petra Kvitova, Czech Republic, def. Ksenia Pervak, Russia, 1-6, 6-4, 6-2. Marion Bartoli (4), France, def. Iveta Benesova, Czech Republic, 6-1, 3-6, 6-0. ASB Classic Wednesday Auckland, New Zealand Singles Second Round Peng Shuai, China, def. Svetlana Kuznetsova (3), Russia, 2-6, 6-4, 6-4. Maria Sharapova (1), Russia, def. Renata Voracova, Czech Republic, 6-3, 7-5. Simona Halep, Romania, def. Elena Vesnina, Russia, 2-6, 6-4, 4-0 retired. Greta Arn, Hungary, def. Sofia Arvidsson (8), Sweden, 4-6, 7-5, 7-5. Heather Watson, Britain, def. Carla Suarez Navarro (9), Spain, 7-6 (5), 6-1. Yanina Wickmayer (2), Belgium, def. Sabine Lisicki, Germany, 6-2, 3-6, 6-2. Kateryna Bondarenko, Ukraine, def. Anne Keothavong, Britain, 7-5, 6-3. Julia Goerges (4), Germany, def. Alize Cornet, France, 6-2, 6-4.

ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— Aircel Chennai Open Wednesday Chennai, India Singles Second Round Tomas Berdych (1), Czech Republic, def. Ivan Dodig, Croatia, 6-2, 6-4. Blaz Kavcic, Slovenia, def. Robert Kendrick, United States, 6-2, 6-2. Bjorn Phau, Germany, def. Richard Gasquet (4), France, 1-6, 7-6 (5), 7-6 (4).

ITF INTERNATIONAL TENNIS FEDERATION ——— Hopman Cup Wednesday Perth, Australia Group B United States 2, Italy 1 Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States, def. Francesca Schiavone, Italy, vs. 6-4, 6-4. John Isner, United States, def. Potito Starace, Italy, 7-6 (5), 4-6, 6-4. Francesca Schiavone and Potito Starace, Italy, def. John Isner and Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States, 6-7 (5), 6-2, 10-3 tiebreak. France 1, Britain 1 Kristina Mladenovic, France, def. Laura Robson, Britain, 6-4, 3-6, 6-0. Andy Murray, Britain, def. Nicolas Mahut, France, 7-6 (3), 7-6 (5). Kristina Mladenovic and Nicolas Mahut, France, def. Laura Robson and Andy Murray, Britain, 6-4, 6-2.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Agreed to terms with INF Cesar Izturis on a one-year contract. BOSTON RED SOX—Claimed C Max Ramirez off waivers from Texas. Designated RHP Matt Fox for assignment. CLEVELAND INDIANS—Agreed to terms with RHP Doug Mathis on a minor league contract. NEW YORK YANKEES—Claimed RHP Brian Schlitter off waivers from Chicago (NL). OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Named Rick Magnante manager, Casey Myers hitting coach, John Wasdin pitching coach and Travis Tims athletic trainer for Vermont (N.Y.-Penn). Named Mike Henriques minor league strength and conditioning coordinator and Phil Mastro Dominican minor league trainer. TEXAS RANGERS—Agreed to terms with 3B Adrian Beltre on a six-year contract. TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Claimed LHP Wilfredo Ledezma off waivers from Pittsburgh. National League MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Agreed to terms with RHP Takashi Saito on a one-year contract. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association ATLANTA HAWKS—Waived G-F Damien Wilkins. TORONTO RAPTORS—Waived F Ronald Dupree. WASHINGTON WIZARDS—Waived G Lester Hudson. FOOTBALL National Football League DENVER BRONCOS—Named John Elway executive vice president of football operations. Promoted chief operating officer Joe Ellis team president. GREEN BAY PACKERS—Signed LB Desmond Bishop to a four-year contract extension. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS—Signed WR Kevin Curtis. Placed DB Donald Washington on injured reserve. Signed TE Cody Slate to the practice squad. HOUSTON TEXANS—Named Wade Phillips defensive coordinator. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Signed LB Marques Murrell. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS—Placed RB Pierre Thomason injured reserve. Signed RB Joique Bell from the Philadelphia practice squad. OAKLAND RAIDERS—Signed WR Damola Adeniji, WR Shaun Bodiford, TE Kevin Brock, DE Tommie Hill, G Alex Parsons, FB Manase Tonga, RB Louis Rankin, G Roy Schuening, LB Quentin Scott, P Glenn Pakulak and CB Joe Porter to reserve/future contracts. SAN FRANCISCO 49ers—Named Trent Baalke general manager. Signed G Nick Howell, WR Kevin Jurovich, WR Lance Long, RB Xavier Omon and K Fabrizio Scaccia to reserve/future contracts. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Placed TE Chris Baker and G Chester Pitts on injured reserve. Placed RB Chris Henry on practice squad/injured reserve. Released LB Vuna Tuihalamaka from the practice squad. Signed RB Andre Anderson and TE Nick Tow-Arnett to the practice squad. HOCKEY National Hockey League ATLANTA THRASHERS—Placed F Ben Eager on injured reserve, retroactive to Dec. 28. COLLEGE CALIFORNIA—Announced men’s basketball G Gary Franklin is transferring. CLEMSON—Announced DE Da’Quan Bowers will enter the NFL draft. MICHIGAN—Fired football coach Rich Rodriguez. MINNESOTA—Granted men’s basketball G Devoe Joseph a release from his scholarship. NOTRE DAME—Announced TE Kyle Rudolph will enter the NFL draft. OREGON STATE—Announced senior WR James Rodgers has been granted a medical hardship for this past season.

NHL ROUNDUP

Penguins light up Lightning for eight goals The Associated Press PITTSBURGH — Chris Kunitz scored three goals, Evgeni Malkin got Pittsburgh going with a goal seven seconds into the game and the Penguins, playing for the first time since the Winter Classic, beat the Tampa Bay Lightning 8-1 on Wednesday night. Alex Goligoski added a goal and set up three others and Kris Letang had three assists to help the Penguins end a two-game losing streak. The Penguins’ record for fastest goal to start a game is 6 seconds by Jean Pronovost in 1976. Pittsburgh scored four times on its first eight shots while opening a 5-0 lead in the first against the Lightning. Tampa Bay was 9-1-1 in its previous 11 after beating Washington 1-0 in overtime Tuesday night. Chris Conner, Tyler Kennedy and Mark Letestu also scored for Pitts-

burgh. Marc-Andre Fleury made 31 saves, allowing only Adam Hall’s goal early in the third. Despite all the goals, NHL scoring leader Sidney Crosby had only an assist. Lightning star Steven Stamkos was awarded a penalty shot early in the second period, but slipped in the left circle as he skated toward the net and didn’t get a shot off. Also on Wednesday: Rangers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Hurricanes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 NEW YORK — Mats Zuccarello scored his first NHL goal 3:09 into overtime and Henrik Lundqvist made 31 saves to lift New York past Carolina. Thrashers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Panthers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 SUNRISE, Fla. — Rich Peverley scored twice and Ondrej Pavelec made

33 saves for Atlanta. Predators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Ducks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Patric Hornqvist scored in his third straight game, Pekka Rinne made 40 saves and Nashville beat Anaheim for its third straight victory. Stars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Blackhawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 CHICAGO — Mike Ribeiro broke a tie midway through the second period with his second power-play goal, and Brenden Morrow also scored with the man advantage for Dallas. Canucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Flames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 VANCOUVER, British Columbia — Roberto Luongo made 43 saves and Vancouver beat Calgary to extend its winning streak to seven games and break a tie for the top spot in the overall NHL standings.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, January 6, 2011 D3

NBA SCOREBOARD SUMMARIES

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Wednesday’s Games

Blazers 103, Rockets 100 PORTLAND (103) Batum 4-9 0-0 10, Aldridge 11-18 5-8 27, Camby 4-8 2-2 10, A.Miller 5-8 1-2 11, Matthews 4-12 1-2 9, Cunningham 5-10 0-0 10, Fernandez 3-11 5-5 12, Mills 5-9 0-0 14, Przybilla 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-85 14-19 103. HOUSTON (100) Battier 6-9 0-0 13, Scola 2-8 2-2 6, Hill 4-9 1-3 9, Lowry 2-7 3-4 8, Martin 13-18 13-15 45, Lee 0-5 2-2 2, Patterson 0-0 1-2 1, B.Miller 3-7 0-0 7, Budinger 2-4 0-0 5, T.Williams 1-3 1-2 4. Totals 33-70 23-30 100. Portland 31 24 19 29 — 103 Houston 25 22 33 20 — 100 3-Point Goals—Portland 7-19 (Mills 4-7, Batum 2-3, Fernandez 1-7, Matthews 0-2), Houston 11-20 (Martin 6-8, Budinger 1-1, T.Williams 1-1, B.Miller 1-2, Battier 1-2, Lowry 1-3, Lee 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Portland 40 (Aldridge 13), Houston 53 (Scola 12). Assists—Portland 21 (Fernandez 5), Houston 23 (Lowry 7). Total Fouls—Portland 21, Houston 22. Technicals—B.Miller. A—14,125 (18,043).

Duck

NBA ROUNDUP

Atlantic Division Boston New York Philadelphia Toronto New Jersey

W 27 20 14 12 10

L 7 14 21 23 25

Miami Orlando Atlanta Charlotte Washington

W 28 23 24 12 8

L 9 12 14 21 25

Chicago Indiana Milwaukee Detroit Cleveland

W 23 14 13 11 8

L 11 18 20 24 27

Pct .794 .588 .400 .343 .286

GB — 7 13½ 15½ 17½

L10 7-3 5-5 4-6 3-7 4-6

Str W-3 W-2 W-1 W-1 W-1

Home 15-2 10-7 9-6 7-10 7-9

Away 12-5 10-7 5-15 5-13 3-16

Conf 21-4 12-9 9-14 9-14 6-16

Away 13-5 9-7 12-9 4-12 0-17

Conf 18-4 17-6 16-8 7-14 5-18

Away 8-8 5-10 5-13 3-16 3-15

Conf 12-6 9-11 7-9 7-11 7-18

Southeast Division Pct .757 .657 .632 .364 .242

GB — 4 4½ 14 18

L10 9-1 7-3 7-3 4-6 2-8

Str W-7 W-7 W-3 W-1 L-3

Home 15-4 14-5 12-5 8-9 8-8

Central Division Pct .676 .438 .394 .314 .229

GB — 8 9½ 12½ 15½

L10 7-3 3-7 3-7 4-6 1-9

Str L-1 L-1 L-2 L-3 L-8

Home 15-3 9-8 8-7 8-8 5-12

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division

Clippers 106, Nuggets 93 DENVER (93) Anthony 12-26 7-9 31, Martin 0-3 0-0 0, Nene 6-11 0-1 12, Billups 5-14 10-11 25, Afflalo 3-5 3-4 10, Harrington 1-7 0-0 3, J.Smith 2-7 4-4 9, Andersen 1-2 1-2 3, Lawson 0-2 0-0 0, Carter 0-1 0-0 0, Forbes 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 30-80 25-31 93. L.A. CLIPPERS (106) Gomes 5-10 0-0 13, Griffin 8-18 6-9 22, Jordan 5-7 4-6 14, Davis 7-13 0-0 16, Gordon 9-20 6-6 28, Bledsoe 3-8 1-3 8, Aminu 1-7 0-2 2, Foye 0-6 1-1 1, Diogu 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 3991 18-27 106. Denver 23 20 31 19 — 93 L.A. Clippers 30 21 31 24 — 106 3-Point Goals—Denver 8-19 (Billups 5-8, Afflalo 1-2, Harrington 1-3, J.Smith 1-3, Lawson 0-1, Anthony 0-2), L.A. Clippers 10-27 (Gordon 4-8, Gomes 3-5, Davis 2-5, Bledsoe 1-3, Foye 0-2, Aminu 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Denver 54 (Nene, Anthony 9), L.A. Clippers 63 (Jordan 20). Assists—Denver 16 (J.Smith 4), L.A. Clippers 23 (Davis 8). Total Fouls—Denver 24, L.A. Clippers 23. Technicals—Denver delay of game, Denver defensive three second, L.A. Clippers defensive three second 3. A—17,540 (19,060).

Hawks 110, Jazz 87 ATLANTA (110) Smith 3-8 5-5 12, Horford 9-16 0-0 18, Collins 2-5 0-0 4, Bibby 1-5 0-0 3, Johnson 10-17 3-4 28, Ja.Crawford 9-18 4-5 26, Pachulia 0-0 0-0 0, M.Evans 3-6 4-4 13, Powell 1-2 0-0 2, Jo.Crawford 1-1 0-0 2, Teague 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 40-79 16-18 110. UTAH (87) Kirilenko 7-13 2-2 19, Elson 0-1 0-0 0, Jefferson 6-17 1-2 13, D.Williams 5-15 7-9 19, Bell 3-5 1-2 9, Miles 2-7 2-2 6, Fesenko 0-2 3-4 3, Price 1-5 3-4 5, Watson 1-2 3-4 5, J.Evans 2-3 0-0 4, Hayward 1-1 2-2 4. Totals 28-71 24-31 87. Atlanta 30 25 31 24 — 110 Utah 17 24 28 18 — 87 3-Point Goals—Atlanta 14-25 (Johnson 5-7, Ja.Crawford 4-7, M.Evans 3-5, Smith 12, Bibby 1-4), Utah 7-14 (Kirilenko 3-3, Bell 2-3, D.Williams 2-6, Miles 0-1, Price 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Atlanta 52 (Horford 8), Utah 39 (Jefferson 7). Assists—Atlanta 24 (Bibby 8), Utah 16 (D.Williams 9). Total Fouls—Atlanta 27, Utah 16. Technicals—Atlanta defensive three second, D.Williams, Utah defensive three second. A—19,911 (19,911).

Warriors 110, Hornets 103 GOLDEN STATE (110) D.Wright 5-13 0-4 13, Lee 4-8 5-5 13, Biedrins 2-2 0-0 4, Curry 6-11 8-8 21, Ellis 10-23 6-7 29, Amundson 3-8 1-3 7, Law 2-4 0-0 4, Udoh 3-3 0-0 6, Williams 1-5 3-3 5, Radmanovic 3-4 1-2 8. Totals 39-81 24-32 110. NEW ORLEANS (103) Ariza 6-9 1-3 15, West 7-14 2-3 16, Okafor 2-4 2-6 6, Paul 6-12 10-14 24, Belinelli 7-12 0-0 16, Pondexter 2-6 0-0 4, Smith 1-5 2-2 4, Thornton 0-1 0-0 0, Green 4-10 3-3 11, Jack 3-3 1-2 7. Totals 38-76 21-33 103. Golden State 29 18 25 38 — 110 New Orleans 34 24 24 21 — 103 3-Point Goals—Golden State 8-20 (D.Wright 3-5, Ellis 3-6, Radmanovic 1-2, Curry 1-3, Law 0-1, Williams 0-3), New Orleans 6-16 (Paul 2-2, Ariza 2-3, Belinelli 2-6, Pondexter 0-1, Green 0-4). Fouled Out—Okafor. Rebounds—Golden State 43 (Amundson 12), New Orleans 57 (Ariza, Okafor 10). Assists—Golden State 22 (Curry, Ellis 4), New Orleans 24 (Paul 13). Total Fouls—Golden State 23, New Orleans 25. Technicals—Golden State defensive three second, Okafor, Paul. A—13,532 (17,188).

San Antonio Dallas New Orleans Houston Memphis

W 29 26 21 16 16

L 6 8 15 19 19

Utah Oklahoma City Denver Portland Minnesota

W 24 23 20 19 9

L 12 13 14 17 27

L.A. Lakers Phoenix Golden State L.A. Clippers Sacramento

W 25 14 14 11 7

L 11 19 21 24 25

Pct .829 .765 .583 .457 .457

GB — 2½ 8½ 13 13

Nets 96, Bulls 94 CHICAGO (94) Deng 7-17 3-6 17, Boozer 4-10 4-7 12, Thomas 3-4 1-2 7, Rose 7-13 5-7 21, Bogans

Str L-2 W-2 L-1 L-3 W-2

Home 19-2 14-6 14-5 10-6 10-6

Away 10-4 12-2 7-10 6-13 6-13

Conf 20-3 16-4 10-10 10-12 11-12

Away 11-5 10-7 5-11 7-14 2-18

Conf 12-10 12-9 14-8 13-12 3-18

Away 13-6 6-11 6-15 3-11 2-10

Conf 13-7 10-13 9-13 9-17 3-17

Northwest Division Pct .667 .639 .588 .528 .250

GB — 1 3 5 15

L10 6-4 5-5 5-5 7-3 3-7

Str L-1 L-2 L-1 W-1 L-2

Home 13-7 13-6 15-3 12-3 7-9

Paciic Division Pct .694 .424 .400 .314 .219

GB — 9½ 10½ 13½ 16

L10 Str 6-4 W-2 3-7 L-2 5-5 W-1 6-4 W-1 2-8 L-1 ——— Wednesday’s Games

Toronto 120, Cleveland 105 Orlando 97, Milwaukee 87 Boston 105, San Antonio 103 Golden State 110, New Orleans 103 Atlanta 110, Utah 87 L.A. Lakers 99, Phoenix 95

Home 12-5 8-8 8-6 8-13 5-15

New Jersey 96, Chicago 94 Philadelphia 109, Washington 97 Charlotte 108, Minnesota 105, OT Portland 103, Houston 100 L.A. Clippers 106, Denver 93 Today’s Games

Oklahoma City at Dallas, 5 p.m.

Denver at Sacramento, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Games

San Antonio at Indiana, 4 p.m. New Jersey at Washington, 4 p.m. Utah at Memphis, 5 p.m. Houston at Orlando, 5 p.m. Cleveland at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. New York at Phoenix, 7:30 p.m.

Chicago at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Toronto at Boston, 4:30 p.m. Portland at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Miami at Milwaukee, 5:30 p.m. New Orleans at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m. All Times PST

David J. Phillip / The Associated Press

Houston Rockets’ Luis Scola shoots as Portland Trail Blazers’ Marcus Camby (23) defends during the first quarter of Wednesday’s game in Houston.

Aldridge leads Blazers to victory The Associated Press

1-1 0-0 3, Brewer 4-8 1-2 9, Gibson 2-7 2-2 6, Asik 1-2 2-2 4, Watson 3-8 2-2 9, Korver 2-7 0-0 6. Totals 34-77 20-30 94. NEW JERSEY (96) Outlaw 2-6 2-2 7, Favors 3-4 1-2 7, Lopez 512 4-8 14, Harris 6-15 5-6 18, Graham 4-7 3-3 11, Humphries 10-15 0-2 20, Vujacic 5-12 0-0 13, Farmar 1-2 0-0 2, Petro 2-4 0-0 4. Totals 38-77 15-23 96. Chicago 24 23 18 29 — 94 New Jersey 25 21 32 18 — 96 3-Point Goals—Chicago 6-19 (Rose 2-5, Korver 2-6, Bogans 1-1, Watson 1-3, Brewer 0-1, Gibson 0-1, Deng 0-2), New Jersey 5-12 (Vujacic 3-7, Harris 1-1, Outlaw 1-3, Farmar 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Chicago 50 (Boozer 9), New Jersey 50 (Humphries 11). Assists—Chicago 17 (Boozer 5), New Jersey 20 (Harris 11). Total Fouls—Chicago 22, New Jersey 26. A—15,025 (18,500).

76ers 109, Wizards 97 WASHINGTON (97) Lewis 7-11 2-3 18, Blatche 8-18 1-1 17, McGee 2-6 0-2 4, Wall 6-14 5-8 18, N.Young 9-16 1-1 21, Seraphin 2-2 0-0 4, Hinrich 5-11 3-3 13, Howard 0-3 0-0 0, Thornton 1-1 0-0 2, Booker 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 40-82 12-18 97. PHILADELPHIA (109) Nocioni 3-5 3-4 10, Brand 6-9 5-6 17, Hawes 2-7 0-0 4, Holiday 10-14 6-9 26, Meeks 1-2 2-2 5, Turner 1-5 0-0 2, T.Young 4-6 3-4 11, Williams 7-10 10-11 26, Speights 4-7 0-2 8, Kapono 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 38-67 29-38 109. Washington 26 26 23 22 — 97 Philadelphia 29 21 26 33 — 109 3-Point Goals—Washington 5-12 (N.Young 2-3, Lewis 2-4, Wall 1-4, Hinrich 0-1), Philadelphia 4-9 (Williams 2-2, Meeks 1-2, Nocioni 1-3, Holiday 0-1, Kapono 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Washington 40 (Lewis 10), Philadelphia 46 (Nocioni 10). Assists—Washington 26 (Wall 14), Philadelphia 20 (Holiday 9). Total Fouls—Washington 27, Philadelphia 17. Technicals—Philadelphia defensive three second 2. A—12,434 (20,318).

Celtics 105, Spurs 103 SAN ANTONIO (103) Jefferson 4-10 3-3 14, Duncan 8-15 2-2 18, Blair 1-7 0-0 2, Parker 8-13 2-2 18, Ginobili 712 7-8 24, Bonner 4-10 0-0 10, Hill 1-9 1-1 3, Neal 4-6 1-1 10, McDyess 2-4 0-0 4. Totals 39-86 16-17 103. BOSTON (105) Pierce 7-10 2-2 18, Davis 10-18 3-5 23, S.O’Neal 2-3 0-3 4, Rondo 6-10 0-0 12, Allen 13-16 3-5 31, J.O’Neal 2-5 0-0 4, Daniels 3-4 0-0 6, Robinson 3-5 0-0 7, Wafer 0-3 0-0 0, Harangody 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 46-75 8-15 105. San Antonio 25 26 21 31 — 103 Boston 27 22 28 28 — 105 3-Point Goals—San Antonio 9-22 (Ginobili 3-6, Jefferson 3-6, Bonner 2-3, Neal 1-3, Parker 0-1, Hill 0-3), Boston 5-9 (Pierce 2-2, Allen 2-4, Robinson 1-2, Wafer 0-1). Fouled Out— J.O’Neal. Rebounds—San Antonio 39 (Ginobili 8), Boston 45 (Rondo 10). Assists—San Antonio 20 (Parker 5), Boston 34 (Rondo 22). Total Fouls—San Antonio 14, Boston 17. Technicals—San Antonio Coach Popovich, Pierce, Boston defensive three second 2. A—18,624 (18,624).

L10 7-3 7-3 5-5 6-4 5-5

Raptors 120, Cavs 105 TORONTO (120) Johnson 6-9 0-1 12, Kleiza 1-4 0-0 3, Bargnani 10-20 2-2 25, Calderon 8-10 1-1 20, DeRozan 6-15 1-1 13, Barbosa 8-17 4-5 22, Davis 3-3 2-3 8, Wright 7-9 1-1 15, Dorsey 1-1 0-2 2, Alabi 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 50-88 11-16 120. CLEVELAND (105) Gee 2-4 4-5 9, Jamison 11-21 5-7 32, Varejao 1-4 2-2 4, Williams 5-11 0-0 11, Gibson 5-11 1-2 13, Eyenga 7-10 1-1 16, Sessions 2-4 12-12 16, Powe 1-1 1-2 3, Hollins 0-1 1-2 1, Harris 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 34-67 27-33 105. Toronto 26 40 24 30 — 120 Cleveland 38 25 21 21 — 105 3-Point Goals—Toronto 9-18 (Calderon 3-3, Bargnani 3-6, Barbosa 2-8, Kleiza 1-1), Cleveland 10-19 (Jamison 5-7, Gibson 2-4, Gee 1-1, Williams 1-3, Eyenga 1-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Toronto 44 (Wright 9), Cleveland 38 (Varejao 8). Assists—Toronto 35 (Calderon 17), Cleveland 28 (Williams 9). Total Fouls—Toronto 26, Cleveland 21. Technicals—Varejao. A—20,562 (20,562).

Lakers 99, Suns 95 L.A. LAKERS (99) Artest 4-10 0-0 11, Gasol 3-10 0-0 6, By-

num 6-10 2-7 14, Fisher 2-7 0-0 4, Bryant 9-17 4-6 24, Odom 6-12 0-0 12, Blake 3-6 0-0 7, Brown 3-7 7-7 13, Barnes 3-5 0-0 6, Walton 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 40-85 13-20 99. PHOENIX (95) Hill 4-12 2-2 10, Gortat 4-7 4-6 12, Lopez 1-3 0-0 2, Nash 4-8 2-2 11, Carter 6-13 0-0 13, Frye 3-8 1-1 10, Pietrus 3-6 0-0 8, Dudley 8-11 2-4 21, Dragic 2-4 0-0 5, Warrick 1-2 1-2 3. Totals 36-74 12-17 95. L.A. Lakers 31 18 31 19 — 99 Phoenix 24 26 23 22 — 95 3-Point Goals—L.A. Lakers 6-23 (Artest 3-5, Bryant 2-6, Blake 1-4, Fisher 0-2, Odom 0-2, Brown 0-2, Barnes 0-2), Phoenix 11-23 (Dudley 3-4, Frye 3-6, Pietrus 2-5, Dragic 12, Nash 1-2, Carter 1-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—L.A. Lakers 60 (Odom 10), Phoenix 35 (Gortat 9). Assists—L.A. Lakers 20 (Gasol 6), Phoenix 25 (Nash 10). Total Fouls—L.A. Lakers 20, Phoenix 19. Technicals—Fisher, Gasol, L.A. Lakers defensive three second, Frye. A—18,105 (18,422).

Magic 97, Bucks 87 MILWAUKEE (87) Mbah a Moute 2-5 2-4 6, Ilyasova 2-10 0-0 5, Bogut 2-5 2-10 6, Dooling 0-4 0-0 0, Salmons 5-17 2-2 13, Boykins 4-14 2-2 12, Maggette 7-9 6-8 21, Brockman 1-2 0-2 2, Sanders 7-10 1-4 15, Douglas-Roberts 3-8 0-0 7. Totals 33-84 15-32 87. ORLANDO (97) Turkoglu 5-8 2-5 13, Bass 4-8 2-2 10, Howard 9-16 10-15 28, Nelson 3-9 3-4 10, J.Richardson 6-13 1-2 13, Anderson 2-5 2-3 7, Redick 4-9 2-2 10, Arenas 2-9 0-0 6. Totals 35-77 22-33 97. Milwaukee 17 16 24 30 — 87 Orlando 25 24 22 26 — 97 3-Point Goals—Milwaukee 6-14 (Boykins 22, Maggette 1-1, Douglas-Roberts 1-1, Ilyasova 1-2, Salmons 1-5, Dooling 0-3), Orlando 5-22 (Arenas 2-2, Turkoglu 1-3, Anderson 1-4, Nelson 1-4, Redick 0-4, J.Richardson 0-5). Fouled Out—Bogut. Rebounds—Milwaukee 65 (Sanders 8), Orlando 56 (Howard 13). Assists—Milwaukee 11 (Boykins, Dooling, Bogut 2), Orlando 23 (Nelson 9). Total Fouls—Milwaukee 27, Orlando 19. A—18,846 (18,500).

Bobcats 108, Timberwolves 105 CHARLOTTE (108) D.Brown 1-4 2-3 4, Diaw 7-20 0-0 16, K.Brown 3-6 2-7 8, Augustin 4-17 6-7 16, Henderson 3-7 1-2 7, McGuire 5-5 0-0 10, Carroll 3-8 1-2 9, Thomas 10-18 1-1 21, Najera 4-9 1-2 11, Livingston 3-4 0-0 6. Totals 43-98 14-24 108. MINNESOTA (105) Beasley 11-25 4-8 28, Love 11-16 10-11 35, Milicic 1-2 1-3 3, Ridnour 4-7 0-0 8, Johnson 4-14 0-0 10, Brewer 3-6 0-2 6, Flynn 2-3 2-2 8, Webster 1-8 2-4 5, Pekovic 0-1 0-0 0, Koufos 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 38-85 19-30 105. Charlotte 24 33 14 24 13 — 108 Minnesota 23 20 30 22 10 — 105 3-Point Goals—Charlotte 8-26 (Najera 2-4, Augustin 2-6, Carroll 2-6, Diaw 2-10), Minnesota 10-25 (Love 3-5, Flynn 2-2, Beasley 2-4, Johnson 2-8, Webster 1-4, Brewer 0-1, Ridnour 0-1). Fouled Out—Diaw. Rebounds—Charlotte 59 (K.Brown 14), Minnesota 64 (Love 15). Assists—Charlotte 25 (Augustin 8), Minnesota 19 (Love 5). Total Fouls—Charlotte 22, Minnesota 20. Technicals—Thomas, Minnesota defensive three second. A—14,881 (19,356).

HOUSTON — The Portland Trail Blazers were determined not to drop a second straight close game on Wednesday after a three-point loss to Dallas a night earlier. LaMarcus Aldridge scored 27 points and grabbed 13 rebounds to make sure that didn’t happen, leading the Trail Blazers to a 103-100 win over the Houston Rockets. The loss spoiled a sensational performance by Kevin Martin, who finished with a seasonhigh 45 points for Houston. “It comes down to making plays,” Portland coach Nate McMillan said. “Last night, we didn’t do that and didn’t get stops. Tonight, we did.” Rudy Fernandez gave Portland the lead with less than a minute remaining. Martin missed a shot on the other end and Aldridge grabbed the rebound and extended the lead with his bucket a few seconds later. Luis Scola missed a shot for Houston and Aldridge was fouled on the rebound. Aldridge hit two free throws with 5 seconds remaining before Kyle Lowry made a 3-pointer with 3.1 seconds left to cut the lead to 102-100. Andre Miller made a free throw before Courtney Lee’s shot at the buzzer bounced off the rim. The Trail Blazers, who are one spot ahead of the Rockets in the Western Conference standings, own the head-to-head tiebreaker over Houston with the win. “It’s big for us,” Aldridge said. “We didn’t really want to talk about the tiebreaker because you don’t want to put too much pressure on it, but everybody knew that if it comes down to it with them, we should be good.” The Rockets were without point guard Aaron Brooks, who missed the game after re-injuring the left ankle that kept him out 21 games earlier this season on Monday in a loss to Denver. The Rockets led 85-76 when Martin took a breather with about 10 minutes remaining. Portland took advantage of his absence to go on a 13-4 run capped by four points by Aldridge to tie it at 89 about 4 minutes later. The Trail Blazers took their first lead of the fourth quarter on a 3-pointer by Patrick Mills that made it 92-91 with about 5½ minutes remaining. Mills matched his career high with 14 points for Portland and Fernandez finished with 12 points and five assists. Also on Wednesday: Celtics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Spurs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 BOSTON — Rajon Rondo had 22 assists, 12 points and 10 rebounds for his 11th career triple-double, adding six steals to help Boston

beat San Antonio in a matchup of the NBA’s top two teams. Magic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Bucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 ORLANDO, Fla. — Dwight Howard had 28 points and 13 rebounds, and Orlando held off the injury-depleted Milwaukee Bucks for its seventh straight victory. Nets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Bulls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 NEWARK, N.J. — Sasha Vujacic made the tiebreaking basket with 5.3 seconds left and New Jersey snapped a five-game losing streak by beating Chicago. 76ers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Wizards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 PHILADELPHIA — Jrue Holiday and Lou Williams each scored 26 points, and Philadelphia returned from its longest road trip of the season to beat Washington. Raptors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Cavaliers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 CLEVELAND — Andrea Bargnani scored 25 points, Leandro Barbosa added 22 and Jose Calderon had a season-high 17 assists to help Toronto end an 11-game losing streak in Cleveland. Hawks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Jazz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 SALT LAKE CITY — Joe Johnson scored 28 points, making five of seven 3-pointers, and Jamal Crawford added 26 off the bench as Atlanta beat Utah. Warriors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Hornets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 NEW ORLEANS — Monta Ellis scored 29 points and Golden State rallied past New Orleans. Trailing by 10 after three quarters, the Warriors went on a 27-7 run in the first 7 minutes of the fourth to go ahead for good. Bobcats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Timberwolves. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 MINNEAPOLIS — Tyrus Thomas had 21 points and 11 rebounds, and Charlotte rallied from eight points down in the final three minutes to pull out an overtime victory against Minnesota. Clippers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Nuggets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 LOS ANGELES — Eric Gordon scored 28 points, including four 3-pointers, to help Los Angeles snap Denver’s four-game winning streak. Blake Griffin had 22 points and 18 rebounds to tie a franchise record with his 22nd consecutive double-double. Lakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Suns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 PHOENIX — Kobe Bryant scored 24 points and four other Los Angeles players reached double figures as the Lakers held off Phoenix.

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

No. 1 Duke still rolling, routs UAB to stay undefeated The Associated Press DURHAM, N.C. — Nolan Smith scored a career-high 33 points to help No. 1 Duke beat Alabama-Birmingham 85-64 on Wednesday night. Kyle Singler added 15 points and scored his 2,000th career point during a gameopening 26-4 run that took the drama out of this one early. The Blue Devils (14-0) never let the Blazers (10-3) closer than 14 points the rest of the way. Duke has won 24 straight games dating back to last season’s run to the Atlantic Coast Conference and NCAA tournament championships, and 32 of 33 overall. UAB’s Jamarr Sanders hit a 3-pointer on the game’s first possession only to see the Blue Devils answer with 16 straight points to blow the game open.

Duke has won all but two games by double-digit margins as it heads into the heart of its ACC schedule. The Blue Devils face Maryland at Cameron Indoor Stadium on Sunday, and still have nonconference games at St. John’s and at home against Temple. Also on Wednesday: No. 3 Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99 UMKC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 LAWRENCE, Kan. — Josh Selby had 16 points to lead six Kansas players in double figures and the Jayhawks (14-0) defeated UMKC. No. 6 San Diego State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 TCU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 FORT WORTH, Texas — Malcolm Thomas had 18 points and 10 rebounds, Kawhi Leonard added 14 points and 11

rebounds and the duo also keyed a gameturning run after halftime and San Diego State stretched its season-opening winning streak to 16 in a row. No. 9 Missouri . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 North Alabama . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 COLUMBIA, Mo. — Kim English scored a season-high 20 points in the first half alone to lead seven players in double figures and the Tigers (14-1) romped over Division II North Alabama. No. 11 Purdue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 Penn State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 STATE COLLEGE, Pa. — JaJuan Johnson had 15 points and 15 rebounds, and the Boilermakers’ defense clamped down on Big Ten-leading scorer Talor Battle in a win for Purdue (14-1, 3-0) over the Nittany Lions.

No. 15 BYU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89 No. 25 UNLV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 LAS VEGAS — Jimmer Fredette scored 39 points to lead the Cougars (15-1, 1-0) over the Rebels in the Mountain West Conference opener. No. 19 Central Florida. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Marshall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 ORLANDO, Fla. — Marcus Jordan had 26 points and five assists and Central Florida (14-0, 1-0 in Conference USA) remained unbeaten. Tennessee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .104 No. 21 Memphis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 KNOXVILLE, Tenn. — Tobias Harris scored 17 points and grabbed 15 rebounds and the Volunteers (10-4) got their third win over a ranked opponent this season with a rout of the Tigers (11-3).

Continued from D1 Parenthood isn’t the only thing that separates Bair from his teammates — or just about any player in the country. At 26, he’s eight years older than some of the freshmen on Oregon’s roster, at least two more than just about everybody else. Bair is married, has been for nearly three years to Jordan, the relative of a family friend. He writes poetry and cooks — Dutch oven potatoes are a specialty — serves as a Sunday school teacher and volunteers with a Boy Scout troop. Bair owns a used car business, High Point Auto, and is licensed, bonded and insured. He already has a degree in counseling and educational psychology and worked a sales and marketing internship with an auto auction during the fall semester. Bair also put off college football for two years so he could serve a two-year Mormon mission with Spanishspeaking farm workers in Florida, and is an unendingly positive force who’s energized just by living life. “Obviously, he’s a father so he knows how to carry himself,” Oregon senior linebacker Casey Matthews said. “The thing about him that’s different than most people is I don’t think he ever gets tired. He’s got a motor. He’s always excited. He’ll always have a smile on his face no matter what goes on.” After starring at South Fremont High School in St. Anthony, Idaho, Bair worked hard at staying in shape while on his mission and arrived at Eugene as a defensive end, figuring he’d be nothing more than a backup with the ends the Ducks already had on the roster. A series of injuries in 2008 forced Bair inside and when Azzinaro arrived the next season, he saw an opportunity to use the rangy lineman as sort of a hybrid who could play up and down the line. It worked out pretty well. Relatively lanky at 6-foot7, 272 pounds, Bair can, at times, look like a toothpick trying to maneuver between rolling boulders. He makes up for it with speed, agility, can’ttell-by-looking-at-him power and an exceptionally analytical football mind. Bair also plays with a relentlessness fueled by that eternally positive approach, going hard on every single play, no matter what happened on the one before. As a junior, Bair led Oregon’s defensive linemen with 45 tackles, including 8.5 for losses, and he was one of the best in the nation at tackling for losses this season, notching 15.5. A tight end in high school, he also caught a 2-point conversion against Southern Cal for the first points of his college career and has helped the second-ranked Ducks get to the cusp of their first national championship. “He’s a good player,” Auburn offensive coordinator Gus Malzahn said. “He’s a big, rangy guy and he can run, so that’s what stands out to me.” Bair’s character is what gets attention around Eugene. Though teammates often rib Bair about his age, they admire his dedication, in life and on the field, and the positive spin he puts on everything. If someone needs an example of how to do something, they turn to Bair. If someone needs advice on how to handle a situation, even head coach Chip Kelly, Bair is the first stop. He is, and not just because of his age, like a respected uncle at Oregon. “We look up to him,” Matthews said. Bair has a bright future, whether it’s in the NFL, the car dealership or whatever he decides to do. No matter where life leads him, though, Jordan and little Brooklyn — she’s almost 1½ — will always come first. That was evident when the Bairs considered leaving their daughter with a family member for the title game, then thought better of it and brought her along for the plane ride with the team. “I want to be able to be there and take pictures with them afterward,” he said. “I love them to death and anybody who knows me or has read about me understands that is my life, and it’s definitely a neat thing to have them around.” Even if it is a little hectic getting off planes.


D4 Thursday, January 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Hall Continued from D1 “What an amazing thing,� Alomar said on a conference call from Toronto. “I got to hit against him, saw him when I was young and now I’m getting the chance to go in the Hall of Fame with him.� Barry Larkin was third in the voting, at 62.1 percent, followed by Jack Morris (53.5 percent), Lee Smith (45.3 percent) and Jeff Bagwell (41.7 percent). In his first election after admitting steroid use, the former slugger Mark McGwire dropped to 19.8 percent, his lowest share in five appearances on the ballot. Rafael Palmeiro, who hit 569 homers but failed a drug test in 2005, received only 11 percent. Alomar and Blyleven narrowly missed induction last year, Alomar by eight votes and Blyleven by five. Most players who come that close are elected the next year, and Alomar, a 10-time Gold Glove second baseman, said he expected to make it. Blyleven, who played for the Minnesota Twins in half of his 22 seasons, took nothing for granted. “It’s been 14 years of praying and waiting,� he said on a conference call from Fort Myers, Fla. “I thank the baseball writers of America for, I’m going to say, finally getting it right.� When he first appeared on the ballot in 1998, Blyleven collected only 17.5 percent of the vote. The next year, that figure dropped to 14.1 percent; a candidate must have at least 5 percent to remain under consideration, with a maximum of 15 years on the ballot. Blyleven did not receive even half the votes until 2006, his ninth year of eligibility. But many bloggers mounted a convincing campaign on his behalf, stressing Blyleven’s value beyond his mediocre .534 winning percentage. Blyleven cited Rich Lederer of BaseballAnalysts.com. “He’s one guy that’s really brought out so many different stats than just wins and losses,� said Blyleven, who was 287-250. “As a pitcher, sometimes you can’t control wins. You can’t control losses. But what you can control is innings you pitch, if you keep your club in the game, all those things, and I think they’re brought out a lot more today than they were even 10 years ago.� Blyleven ranks high in two categories that show a pitcher’s dominance: strikeouts (fifth, with 3,701) and shutouts (ninth, with 60). Every other pitcher in the top 20 in shutouts was in the Hall of Fame, as was every other eligible pitcher in the top 17 in strikeouts. He also ranks highly in a much newer metric, Wins Above Replacement, which tries to show how many victories a player produces compared with a replacement who might be called up from the minors. According to Baseball-Reference.com, Blyleven ranks 13th among pitchers on that list, and was the only eligible pitcher in the top 27 who was not already in Cooperstown. Blyleven, who said he consults Baseball-Reference.com as a broadcaster for the Twins, has long been fascinated by statistics. “I’m kind of a baseball geek as far as numbers,� he said. “I always looked at numbers, even as a young kid coming up. I admired Walter Johnson and Cy Young. How could one guy pitch over 7,000 innings, like Cy Young? I wanted to be like him.� Alomar’s case was more obvious. He made 12 All-Star teams in a row, from 1990 through 2001. He is the only Gold Glove winner in baseball history to finish his career with a .300 average and at least 2,700 hits, 200 home runs and 450 stolen bases. Like Blyleven, he played for two World Series winners and generally excelled in October. Signed by the San Diego Padres out of Puerto Rico in 1985, Alomar spent his prime years with the Toronto Blue Jays, the Baltimore Orioles and the Cleveland Indians, reaching the playoffs with all of them. His productivity came to an abrupt halt with the Mets in 2002, and he retired in spring training 2005. Some voters may have penalized Alomar last year for spitting in the face of the umpire John Hirschbeck during an argument in 1996. But Hirschbeck forgave Alomar years ago, and Alomar has donated money to fight the brain disease that has afflicted Hirschbeck’s children. “I feel good that I have a good relationship with John,� Alomar said. “He forgives me, his family forgives me, and we both move on.� Alomar was born to a baseball family; his father’s career spanned 15 seasons, and his brother, Sandy Jr., was a six-time All-Star catcher. Blyleven is one of only nine major leaguers born in the Netherlands, and the only one to play more than four seasons. His father moved the family to Canada before Blyleven was 2, and they moved again, to Southern California, when Blyleven was 5. He grew up listening to the Dodgers radio broadcasters, Vin Scully and Jerry Doggett, and their vivid descriptions of Sandy Koufax’s curveball. Blyleven would make it his signature pitch. “I threw it and threw it and threw it against a block wall until I could get it over for strikes,� Blyleven said. “My dad built me a mound in the backyard with a canvas backdrop over our horseshoe pits, and I would go back there and just throw and throw and throw until I developed it, and it became my curveball. And I could throw it over at any time, any count.� Alas, he did not have many chances to throw it to Alomar. They met just once, in Blyleven’s final major league season, 1992. Alomar had a flyout, a triple and a walk, and Blyleven allowed six runs. “I’m glad I got the chance to face him when he wasn’t as good as before,� Alomar said, laughing. “But he was a tough, tough pitcher.�

2011 Hall of Fame Voting 581 votes cast, 436 needed (x-elected) x-Roberto Alomar 523 (90.0%), x-Bert Blyleven 463 (79.7%), Barry Larkin 361 (62.1%), Jack Morris 311 (53.5%), Lee Smith 263 (45.3%), Jeff Bagwell 242 (41.7%), Tim Raines 218 (37.5%), Edgar Martinez 191 (32.9%), Alan Trammell 141 (24.3%), Larry Walker 118 (20.3%), Mark McGwire 115 (19.8%), Fred McGriff 104 (17.9%), Dave Parker 89 (15.3%), Don Mattingly 79 (13.6%), Dale Murphy 73 (12.6%), Rafael Palmeiro 64 (11.0%), Juan Gonzalez 30 (5.2%), Harold Baines 28 (4.8%), John Franco 27 (4.6%), Kevin Brown 12 (2.1%), Tino Martinez 6 (1.0%), Marquis Grissom 4 (0.7%), Al Leiter 4 (0.7%), John Olerud 4 (0.7%), B.J. Surhoff 2 (0.3%), Bret Boone 1 (0.2%), Benito Santiago 1 (0.2%), Carlos Baerga 0, Lenny Harris 0, Bobby Higginson 0, Charles Johnson 0, Raul Mondesi 0, Kirk Rueter 0.

Stranded — a solo elk hunt in the Eagle Caps

H & F  C   FISHING

GARY LEWIS

A

t his home in Enterprise in northeast Oregon, Barry Cox, of Del Sol Wilderness Adventures, looked at the storm gathered over the Eagle Caps. No stranger to bad weather, Cox told himself, “It looks like a real good day to be home.� He thought of 31-year-old Jeremy Johnson, of La Pine, the archery hunter he had packed in to the wilderness two days before. He figured Jeremy would be alright. He had packed well despite the 10-day forecast of sunny weather. But where the trail topped out above 8,000 feet, the snow blew sideways and the wind searched with cold fingers. Jeremy Johnson, on a solo hunt in the Eagle Cap Wilderness, had left his gear under a tarp, and spike-camped in his bivy sack (sleeping bag cover) overlooking an alpine basin. Mindful of bears, he had cached his food in a tree a few hundred yards from the gear. On opening day, he glassed two rams and a small herd of elk. That was when the weather turned. By midday, a freak late-summer storm held the mountains in an icy grip. “The high winds and sideways snow chilled my soaking-wet body to the bone. I arrived at my gear stash at 9 p.m. and was really looking forward to setting up that tent, building a fire and getting into some dry clothes.� Something didn’t look right. “I flipped the tarp back to find nothing there but my bow target, and the Wilderness Athlete hat I wore in the day before.� Some 10 miles from the nearest road, thieves had stolen his tent, stove, bedding, clothes and spare bow. With the light all but gone from the western sky, and snow that blew on 40 mph winds, he needed to make shelter fast. From the top of the ridge, he found he had cell reception. He made a call to Barry and left the message that his camp had been stolen, but that he was going to stay and hunt. “I have learned to embrace adversity,� Jeremy said later. “After losing the family business to a fire, after another fire that destroyed my home, after a fight with cancer, I don’t want

Photo courtesy Jeremy Johnson

On opening day of the 2010 archery elk season, Jeremy Johnson, of La Pine, returned to his camp site to find his gear stolen. With only the clothes on his back and a tarp for shelter, Johnson stayed a week in the high country to continue his solo hunt. to waste time whining, complaining about my situation, or giving up. Instead I want to milk every last lesson I can out of adversity and turn it into a growing experience.� The guys that stole his camp had left him little more than a soaking-wet set of Sitka Gear camo clothes on his back, his Lathrop & Sons boots, and his hidden store of food. Jeremy didn’t waste his strength with anger. All year he had saved for and planned this trip. All he could do now was hope to survive it. “I started hiking off the hill to find a place to set up the tarp.� Down the slopes, near a lake, he saw two tents and walked in. The two hunters said they were headed out in the morning, but they suggested Jeremy stay overnight in one of their tents. In the morning, Jeremy headed back into the wilds with his bow. On the trail back up the mountain, Barry passed a dozen other hunters headed downhill to escape the weather. High on the ridge, where Barry had left Jeremy, he deposited a dome tent and a few supplies. “I was real impressed that Jeremy stuck it out,� Barry said. “The psychology of going solo for a week or more beats you down and you get physically exhausted and give up. He hung in there and I was real proud of him.� The days that followed challenged Jeremy physically and mentally. Never in the same place more than twice, he slept in his thin bivy sack with only

FLY-TYING CORNER

HUNTING

trees for shelter. One night in a rainstorm he was unable to sleep and just waited for daylight. A swirling wind made the elk difficult to stalk. Every day had its failures and small successes. Only twice in seven days did he build a fire. On Wednesday, he returned to find the dome tent Barry had left on Sunday. The shelter gave him a chance to dry out. Seven days after his gear was stolen, he peered over the edge of the rimrock to find four bulls 125 yards below him. Twenty minutes later, he had circled close with cow calls to cover his stalk. When the biggest bull, a five-by-six, stood up in his bed, Jeremy loosed his arrow. Most hunters would have given up long before. Ten miles from the road, hundreds of miles from home and hearth, it takes uncommon toughness, skill, discipline and determination to bring home the meat. This is the fourth year for our High Desert Backcountry Outdoorsman award. This year, the bronzed Danner trophy will be presented to a La Pine man to commemorate a solo wilderness hunt that defied wicked weather and wickeder men. Gary Lewis is the host of “High Desert Outdoorsman� and author of “John Nosler — Going Ballistic,� “Black Bear Hunting,� “Hunting Oregon� and other titles. Contact Lewis at www.GaryLewisOutdoors. com.

BEND CASTING CLUB: The Bend Casting Club is a group of local fly anglers from around Central Oregon who are trying to improve their casting technique; club meets on the fourth Wednesday of each month, from 6 to 8 p.m., at the Orvis Casting Course in Bend’s Old Mill District; 541-306-4509 or bendcastingclub@gmail.com. THE SUNRIVER ANGLERS CLUB: Meets on the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Sunriver Fire Station. Contact: www.sunriveranglers.org. THE CENTRAL OREGON FLYFISHERS CLUB: Meets on the third Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Bend Senior Center, 1600 SE Reed Market Road. Contact: www.coflyfishers.org.

THE BEND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the King Buffet at the north end of the Wagner Mall, across from Robberson Ford in Bend. Contact: Bendchapter_oha@yahoo.com. THE REDMOND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Redmond VFW Hall.

SHOOTING BEND TRAP CLUB: Five-stand and skeet shooting Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m; trap shooting on Thursdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.; located east of Bend, at Milepost 30 off U.S. Highway 20; contact Marc Rich at 541-388-1737 or visit www.bendtrapclub.com. REDMOND ROD & GUN CLUB: Rifle and Pistol are Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; skeet is Tuesdays and Sundays beginning at 10 a.m.; trap is Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. to closing, and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; 2011 Family Memberships now available for $50; non-members are welcome; www.rrandgc.com. PINE MOUNTAIN POSSE: Cowboy action shooting club that shoots at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at Milepost 24; second Sunday of each month; 541-318-8199 or www. pinemountainposse.com.

FISHING REPORT

Anglers report early success on Hood River Here is the weekly fishing report for selected areas in an around Central Oregon, provided by fisheries biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife: Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

CENTRAL ZONE

Berry Nymph Gooseberry Olive, by Fly and Field Outfitters.

By Gary Lewis For The Bulletin

Back when I was learning to fly-fish on a creek near my parent’s home, someone gave me a patch of moose hair. With it, I tied a Mosquito Larva and it became one of my favorite patterns. Its weakness was the brittleness of the materials. The Berry Nymph Gooseberry Olive makes me recall late evenings on the creek when the line tightened with the pull of a big trout. Tied with materials that will stand up to fish after fish, this

new pattern could earn a place in your fly box. In still water, use a floating line and a long, fine leader. In spring creeks, use an indicator and tie two in tandem to search out trout prospecting for food on the bottom. Tie this pattern on a No. 1416 scud hook. Slide a bead up against the eye of the hook. Tie the tail with grizzly hackle and small gold tinsel. For the body, use olive floss with a flo-green wire rib. For the wing, use grizzly hackle and gold tinsel. Finish with a dark green synthetic dubbing behind the bead.

Winter Continued from D1 “It’s a neat time to go out and just enjoy being out, but you don’t have to be out all day,â€? Gaviglio says. “Patience is important. The fish aren’t moving like they did. But you could still have a good day.â€? • Don’t expect the fish to chase anything. Keep working areas, but also try fishing different types of water, Gaviglio suggests. And do not spend the whole day in one little slot. “You have to put it (the fly) close to their nose,â€? Gaviglio says, referring to the fish. “I think you can fish an area thoroughly and spend some time there, but then decide to move. But half the fun of fishing in the winter is moving around — seeing stuff

CROOKED RIVER BELOW BOWMAN DAM: Rain and snow events have resulted in high flows recently; please exercise caution when wading. Anglers are reminded that angling methods are restricted to artificial flies and lures from Oct. 31, 2010 to May 28, 2011. According to recent angler reports, the trout seem to be larger this year than in recent years. DESCHUTES RIVER (Mouth to the Northern Boundary of the Warm Springs Reservation): Summer steelhead can still be found in good numbers from the Columbia upstream to the reservation boundary for the persistent angler. Winter trout fishing can also be good in the Deschutes, though fish are generally less responsive in very cool temperatures. Whitefish, however, seem to be more responsive in cool water temperatures. HOOD RIVER: Anglers are reporting decent early success on bright winter steelhead in the lower

and just being out.â€? • Nymphing is the best bet for fly anglers in the wintertime. Bug hatches generally last only half an hour to an hour on cold days, Gaviglio observes, which does not leave much time for fishing. “It’s better to decide to nymph fish, and then change as you see things change,â€? Gaviglio says. Saw bugs, scud patterns and egg patterns can all work well during the winter on Central Oregon streams. When there is a hatch, blue wing olive and midges are the norm. • Do not let your fishing line ice up. A product called Stanley’s Ice-Off Paste can be applied to the guides of a rod to prevent the line from freezing to the rod. “If your guides ice up, you could snap your rod, because your line

river. Steelhead anglers should expect fish numbers to increase throughout the month and February, with a peak in March and April. LAKE BILLY CHINOOK: Anglers are encouraged to note the special regulations for the Metolius Arm of Billy Chinook Reservoir; angling is closed in the Metolius arm from Oct. 31-Mar. 1. METOLIUS RIVER: Trout fishing has been good. Insect hatches should offer opportunities for good dry fly fishing. OCHOCO RESERVOIR: Although there are no recent reports, anglers are reporting improved fishing over past years. Opportunities for 12 to 20-inch rainbow trout should improve with the warmer weather. PRINEVILLE RESERVOIR: Anglers continue to report good fishing and have reported catching larger trout than in recent years. Anglers should consult the 2010 Sport Fishing Regulations (page 63) for maximum length requirements and bag limits for both largemouth and smallmouth bass. PRINEVILLE YOUTH FISHING POND: Young anglers are catching rainbow trout and an occasional largemouth bass. SHEVLIN YOUTH FISHING POND: The pond is open to children 17 years old and younger with a bag limit of two fish.

won’t go through so you’ll cast too hard,â€? Gaviglio explains. • Emerger action is important. Gaviglio says that emerger patterns work well on the Fall River, and he notes that anglers can occasionally catch a trout on a streamer. “If you’re nymphing and nothing’s happening, do a slow rise on every drift (imitating an emerger),â€? Gaviglio says. “A lot of people drift stuff on the bottom and can’t figure out why they (the fish) won’t take it. (Fish) do pay attention to things coming up.â€? • Stay drier on the Crooked River, less wind-battered on the Metolius River. The Crooked and Metolius rivers offer good fishing year-round. Of the two, the Metolius is the most protected from the wind, according to Dave Merrick, of Fly & Field Outfit-

ters in Bend. But the Crooked River, he adds, typically gets less rain and snow. “But it’s a little more windy,â€? Merrick says of the Crooked River. “The canyon funnels the wind.â€? • Many fishing locations remain accessible during the winter in Central Oregon. While fly anglers tend to focus on the Metolius, Fall, Crooked and Middle Deschutes rivers, bait anglers can find opportunities on Lake Billy Chinook, Haystack Reservoir, Prineville Reservoir and Ochoco Reservoir. Whatever your type of fishing, stay warm and dry, and as always, be patient — especially in the depths of winter. Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com.


O

E

ADVENTURES IN THE CENTRAL OREGON OUTDOORS Inside

Jersey girls (and boys)

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

Snooki and the gang are back for the third season of MTV’s “Jersey Shore,” Page E2

OUTING

www.bendbulletin.com/outing

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2011

As snowpack settles, trails are ‘looking pretty decent’ But rain and higher temperatures are in the forecast, expert warns By David Jasper The Bulletin

Compared with last week, when deep snow conditions and “light fluffy stuff” made getting around a challenge, the snowpack is settling nicely around Deschutes National Forest, trails specialist Chris Sabo reported Wednesday. “Things are looking pretty decent right now,” says Sabo, adding that 90 percent of winter trails are in good condition. However, with rain and warming in the forecast, that could make things a little sloppy, he adds. In other news, forest personnel are seeking information as to the possible culprit behind recent vandalism at Swampy Lakes Sno-park: mainly, graffiti in restrooms, shelters and on maps. “We would like to make contact with this individual or individuals, and get it stopped. So we are asking for help from the public to assist in that,” he says. Those with relevant information should call 541693-6911 to report it. Sabo also brings up a different issue, one that often comes up this time of year: snowshoes and trail etiquette. “If they’re new to snowshoeing and not familiar with trail etiquette, we do ask that snowshoers do not step on the ski tracks within a blue-diamond trail corridor, that they step and create a separate snowshoe track to the side. Either side would work; two feet out works real well,” he says. When beginners or snowshoe renters walk through cross-country ski tracks, “it makes the enjoyment factor for skiers go down, and it becomes a safety issue, too, for skiers, when it’s tracked-out by snowshoers, because of the track being modified by snowshoers.” Snowshoers also have the option of following snowshoe-specific trails at sno-parks such as Virginia Meissner and Swampy Lakes. The trails are designated with blue-diamond markers featuring a yellow snowshoe symbol on the inside of the diamond. See Trails / E3

TRAIL UPDATE

SPOTLIGHT St. Charles Foundation gets $500K for its patient navigator program The St. Charles Foundation, the philanthropic arm of St. Charles Health System, has received $500,000 from several donors to grow its patient navigator program. Patient navigators, who for years have been available to breast cancer patients, help guide newly diagnosed patients through the health system, explaining treatment options and offering emotional support. The grants, the largest of which came from PacificSource Health Plans, will fund a new breast cancer navigator, a lung cancer navigator, a general cancer navigator and two heart patient navigators. One heart navigator will be used for pediatric patients. Contact: 541-706-2984.

Nonprofits invited to take part in Sagebrush Classic registration Nonprofits from Central Oregon are invited to participate in the 2011 Sagebrush Classic registration event. This event is for organizations that wish to take part in the Sagebrush Classic. The registration will take place Jan. 11 at 5:30 p.m. at the Deschutes Brewery Mountain Room, 901 S.W. Simpson Ave., Bend. Organizations should RSVP via e-mail to nonprofits@sagebrush.org. Groups should also bring a completed application and an IRS tax determination letter.

Corrections A story headlined “1,500 memorized names and 21 years later, Shari’s waitress to retire,” which appeared Sunday, Jan. 2, on Page C1, incorrectly identified the church to which Millie Cummins belongs. Cummins attends the Church of the Nazarene in Bend. The Bulletin regrets the error.

Solitude at the

sno-park

You can avoid the crowds if you’re willing to venture out to the Santiam Junction area By Alandra Johnson The Bulletin

W

hen I think about places to cross-country ski or snowshoe, my mind naturally travels up the Cascade Lakes Highway. The sno-parks there offer great variety and beautiful scenery, plus they are located conveniently close to town. The problem is, these sno-parks can be wildly popular with other Central Oregonians. On some bluebird Saturdays, it can feel as if the entire city of Bend has headed out to hit the local trails. Finding parking can be tricky or even impossible. This made me wonder about other options for those craving snowy trails. Sure

there are other sno-parks in Central Oregon. There are options near Prineville and Paulina Lake as well as options by Tumalo Falls and Sisters. But I had a different idea in mind. Every trip I take to Portland or Eugene, I whiz by numerous sno-parks near Santiam Pass. They always intrigued me. But whenever it was time to head to a sno-park, those far-off options had faded from my mind. Brad Peterson, wilderness trails and winter recreation manager for Detroit and Sweet Home ranger districts, offered his insights into three of the sno-parks west of Santiam Junction. Even on the busiest day, Peterson has never seen any of the parking lots for these parks full. See Outing / E6

To Salem 22

Mountain View Shelter

Big Springs Sno-park

Trails

Maxwell Sno-park Lava Lake

20

126

Santiam Junction To Sisters, Bend

Lava Lake Sno-park

20

To Corvallis

ABOVE: Mark Thackray, of Corvallis, skis into a ray of sunlight at Lava Lake Snopark near Santiam Pass. The sno-park is one of the least-used in the area. Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

126

To Eugene Greg Cross / The Bulletin


T EL EV ISION

E2 Thursday, January 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Taking illicit photos could land girl in legal hot water Back to the Jersey Shore SEASON 3 PREMIERE

Dear Abby: I would like to share some important information with “Don’t Want to Lose Him in the U.S.A.” (Nov. 10). She’s the young lady who is being pressured by her boyfriend to take photos of her classmates in the girls’ locker room. The students at the high school where I teach recently attended a program on Internet and online safety. One of the things that really surprised them was learning cell phone calls don’t just go from one phone to another. All text messages and calls are transmitted through cell phone towers, which route the calls or texts to the company’s server. All sent messages and photos are stored on the provider’s server. This means pictures deleted from the phone are never really deleted — and text messages and photos never go away. They still exist in the virtual world. Should those pictures become the center of a court case, the information is subject to “discovery.” With the right equipment, law enforcement can retrieve deleted photos from anyone’s cell phone. “Don’t Want to Lose Him” needs to clearly understand she might be prosecuted for producing, distributing and possessing child pornography. — A High School Teacher in Churchville, Va. Dear Teacher: Thank you for delivering a valuable message that may provide a wake-up call for all my readers. Read on: Dear Abby: Refusing to take the photos, but keeping it quiet, is not enough. I think “Don’t

DEAR ABBY What “Don’t Want to Lose Him” is being pressed to do is called “sexting,” and it is a criminal offense in almost every state in the U.S. Want to Lose Him” should make copies of your column and paste them on every locker to warn all the girls they are at risk — even when they think they have privacy. She should also tell the principal, who may be able to provide extra protection. — Sheila in Gig Harbor, Wash. Dear Abby: I think the issue of that young woman’s low self-esteem should be addressed. Her boyfriend is holding her hostage to his wishes and desires, and will probably always do so if she continues to stay with him. It’s important that “Don’t Want to Lose Him” learns to love the principled, intelligent person she already is and continue to stand up for herself. Eventually, someone will appreciate her good qualities and she won’t have to settle for less than she deserves. — Been There in Arizona Dear Abby: “Don’t Want to Lose Him” should report this to a trusted adult or school counselor. At the very least, this girl needs to know she will be doing a great service if she lets the other girls know so they can be

By Verne Gay

on the lookout for someone sneaking a camera or cell phone into their locker room. She could also use some support and affection that doesn’t come from a manipulative, self-serving “boyfriend.” — Lisa in San Rafael, Calif. Dear Abby: I am a mental health professional. What “Don’t Want to Lose Him” is being pressed to do is called “sexting,” and it is a criminal offense in almost every state in the U.S. The young lady and whomever receives and distributes those photos could be convicted of a felony, serve prison time and live the rest of their lives as registered sex offenders. There have been cases of young people — victims of sexting — who have committed suicide over the humiliation of being exposed against their will. Once these photos go “viral,” they are on the Internet forever. Parents, friends, teachers and schools need to make it a priority to talk to kids about the moral, legal and social ramifications of taking these kinds of photos of themselves and others. — Jacqueline in Gibsonia, Pa. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden

cPh

Every Tuesday In AT HOME

Reason to watch: A new cast member with impulse-control issues, Snooki’s pal Deena Nicole Cortese, joins in the third-season premiere tonight. And let’s not forget Nicole “Snooki” Polizzi, Mike “The Situation” Sorrentino, Paul “DJ Pauly D” Delvecchio, Jenni “JWOWW” Farley, Vinny Guadagnino, Ronnie OrtizMagro and Sammi “Sweetheart” Giancola. Catching up: Miami seems so yesterday. Wrapping in late October, the second season saw the gang’s alliances shift and fracture in Florida — largely over a “note” that detailed Ron’s infidelities and made girlfriend Sammi go nuts. (They broke up, but they’re back together.) Also, Angelina Pivarnick got her walking papers. What tonight’s about: Back in Seaside Heights and back in the house that made them famous, cast members straggle in; the first couple to arrive are Ron and Sammi. This is a crucial plot point because they pick the threebed upstairs room, which means someone else has to bunk with them. Who will that lucky sucker be? JWOWW arrives next, and greets Sammi with a grunt; yes, they’re still hating each other. But Jenni instantly figures out the third-season dynamic: “They (Ron and Sammi) took the upstairs room which (messed) it up for everyone else in the house.” Vinny and Paulie eventually wander in, pick their rooms, and the same with Snooki and newcomer Deena; Mike finally arrives and becomes the loser in this game of musical beds. What it will be like rooming

The Associated Press ile photo

“Jersey Shore” cast members attend the MTV Video Music Awards in Los Angeles in September. From left: Ronnie Ortiz-Magro, Paul “DJ Pauly D” Delvecchio, Mike “The Situation” Sorrentino,Nicole “Snooki” Polizzi, Jenni “JWOWW” Farley, Deena Nicole Cortese, Sammi “Sweetheart” Giancola and Vinny Guadagnino.

‘Jersey Shore’ Wh e n : 10 p.m. Thursdays Where: MTV

with on-again, off-again snuggle bunnies Ron and Sammi — who appears to be this season’s Angelina? Torture? Massive buzz kill? And what about that newcomer, Deena, whom MTV says is a longtime Snooki pal? My say: Deena Nicole Cortese is a 23-year-old dental assistant from a small central Jersey town called New Egypt — and all semblance of middle-class normalcy apparently ends right there. Deena arrives bombed; brawls with Ronnie; calls Sammi the B-

s Turf, Inc.

RYn” E S R w NU ly g ro

M

Newsday

W e s p e c i a li z e i n “ l

Featured Business of the Week:

oc al

lunch dinner tasty

TURF • TREES SHRUBS • FERTILIZER Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444

541-546-9081

1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend • www.highdesertbank.com

2019 SW Park Lane • Culver

EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

2754 northwest crossing drive 541 385 1777 • portellowinecafe.com

Sewing & Vacuum Center

word about 38 times (my unofficial count); strips bare naked for Sitch; and initiates a full-fledged fist-on-face smackdown between two housemates. It’s almost like watching a full 13-episode season wrapped up in one 40-minute edition. What’s going on here? Most likely a few things. By MTV’s pragmatic calculus, “Jersey Shore” probably has grown about as far as it’s going to, and with 6 million viewers for its secondseason finale, that’s more than adequate. But this also means the show must now play to the fan base. Simply put, keep fans happy, and you’ve got a franchise that can last a few years. Disappoint them, and the third season will be the last.

B e st Brands, Selectio n & Servi ce

541-382-3882

304 N.E. 3rd St. • Bend BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

THURSDAY PRIME TIME 1/6/11 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW # KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 173 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

5:00

5:30

KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! Ruff News Nightly News House of Payne House of Payne Sara’s Meals Primal Grill Travels-Edge Steves Europe

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News News (N) ABC World News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ Burt Wolf Nightly Business News News Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Steves Europe Burt Wolf Burt Wolf Nightly Business

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Victory Garden Woodwright PBS NewsHour ’ Å

8:00

8:30

Wipeout (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Community ‘14’ 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ Big Bang Theory $..! My Dad Says Wipeout (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Million Dollar Money Drop (N) ‘PG’ News on PDX-TV Oregon Art Beat Field Guide Community ‘14’ 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ The Vampire Diaries Plan B ’ ‘14’ Woodsmith Shop Glass-Vicki Oregon Art Beat Field Guide

9:00

9:30

Grey’s Anatomy Disarm (N) ’ ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ Outsourced ‘PG’ CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘PG’ Grey’s Anatomy Disarm (N) ’ ‘14’ Bones ’ (PA) ‘14’ Å Without a Trace ’ ‘PG’ Å Doc Martin Martin’s first patient. ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ Outsourced ‘PG’ Nikita One Way ’ ‘14’ Å Art Workshop Joy/Painting Doc Martin Martin’s first patient. ‘PG’

10:00

10:30

11:00

(10:01) Private Practice (N) ’ ‘14’ KATU News at 11 The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ News The Mentalist Bloodsport (N) ’ ‘14’ News (10:01) Private Practice (N) ’ ‘14’ News (N) News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Without a Trace The Line ‘14’ Å King of Queens American Experience Oswald’s Ghost ’ ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ News Married... With Married... With King of Queens Gourmet’s Adven Jacques Pepin Sara’s Meals American Experience Oswald’s Ghost ’ ‘PG’

11:30 (11:35) Nightline Jay Leno Letterman (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens Ribbon of Sand Jay Leno King of Queens Primal Grill Ribbon of Sand

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Bounty Hunter The First 48 Twist of Fate ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 (N) ‘PG’ Å The First 48 Hale Storm ‘14’ Å The First 48 Underworld ‘14’ Å 130 28 18 32 Bounty Hunter (2:30) ››› “True ›› “Eraser” (1996, Action) Arnold Schwarzenegger, James Caan, Vanessa Williams. A government agent ›› “The Quick and the Dead” (1995, Western) Sharon Stone, Gene Hackman, Russell Crowe. Cowgirl ›› “The Quick and the Dead” (1995) Sharon Stone. Cowgirl 102 40 39 Lies” Å protects a witness from gunrunners. Å seeks revenge on outlaw in Redemption. seeks revenge on outlaw in Redemption. Natural World ’ ‘PG’ Å Alaska Dogs (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Alaska Wildlife Troopers (N) ’ ‘PG’ Natural World ’ ‘PG’ Å 68 50 26 38 Big Cat Diary ‘G’ Big Cat Diary ‘G’ Big Cat Diary ‘G’ Big Cat Diary ‘G’ Yellowstone Bison ’ ‘G’ Å Real Housewives/Beverly Real Housewives/Beverly Real Housewives/Beverly Real Housewives/Beverly Real Housewives/Beverly Real Housewives/Beverly What Happens Real Housewives 137 44 The Dukes of Hazzard ‘PG’ Å The Dukes of Hazzard ‘PG’ Å ›››› “Unforgiven” (1992) Clint Eastwood. Clint Eastwood’s Oscar-winning portrait of an aged gunman. ’ 190 32 42 53 (4:00) ›››› “Unforgiven” (1992, Western) Clint Eastwood. ’ Å The Facebook Obsession (N) The Facebook Obsession Mad Money The Facebook Obsession The Facebook Obsession Sexier-90 Days! Shark Vacuum 51 36 40 52 60 Minutes on CNBC Larry King Live ‘PG’ Å Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Larry King Live ‘PG’ Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 Parker Spitzer (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report Futurama ’ ‘PG’ Futurama ’ ‘PG’ Futurama ’ ‘14’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘MA’ Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 Larry-Cable Bend La Pine U of O Today PM Edition Cooking City Club of Central Oregon The Buzz Epic Conditions Outside Presents Paid Program Visions of NW Ride Guide ‘14’ The Element 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 12 11 Tonight From Washington Sonny-Chance Fish Hooks ‘G’ Hannah Forever Wizards-Place Wizards-Place “Princess Protection Program” (2009), Demi Lovato ‘G’ Suite/Deck Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Wizards-Place Wizards-Place 87 43 14 39 Sonny-Chance Two Weeks in Hell ’ ‘14’ Å Two Weeks in Hell ’ ‘14’ Å Secrets of the Secret Service ‘PG’ American Chopper-Divided Auction Kings ’ Oddities (N) ‘PG’ Secrets of the Secret Service ‘PG’ 156 21 16 37 Track Me if You Can ’ ‘PG’ Å SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 College Football GoDaddy.com Bowl -- Miami (Ohio) vs. Middle Tennessee State From Mobile, Ala. (Live) College Basketball Northwestern at Illinois (Live) SportsCenter NFL Live (N) Tim Tebow - Everything in Between NFL’s Greatest Games From Jan. 5, 2003. Å SportsNation 22 24 21 24 College Basketball 30 for 30 Å Homecoming With Rick Reilly Å AWA Wrestling Å College Football Washington at USC 23 25 123 25 Tennis: 1996 Australian Open Women’s Final -- Huber vs. Seles SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Still Standing ’ Still Standing ’ ›› “Bruce Almighty” (2003, Comedy) Jim Carrey, Morgan Freeman. ›› “Evan Almighty” (2007, Comedy) Steve Carell, Morgan Freeman. The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Paula’s Best 30-Minute Meals Ace of Cakes Best Thing Ate Iron Chef America Iron Chef America Ace of Cakes (N) Unwrapped Chopped Sticking to It 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa College Basketball Oregon at Washington (Live) College Basketball California at Arizona (Live) Huskies College Basketball Oregon at Washington 20 45 28* 26 College Hoops (4:00) › “The Marine” (2006) ›› “Six Days, Seven Nights” (1998) Harrison Ford, Anne Heche. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ››› “Rush Hour” (1998, Action) Jackie Chan, Chris Tucker. 131 Bang, Buck Income Property Designed to Sell Hunters Int’l House Hunters Selling New York Selling New York Selling New York Selling New York House Hunters Hunters Int’l Cash & Cari ‘G’ Hunters Int’l 176 49 33 43 Bang, Buck Brad Meltzer’s Decoded ‘PG’ Å Brad Meltzer’s Decoded ‘PG’ Å Ancient Aliens The Mission Possible alien missions on Earth. ‘PG’ Å Brad Meltzer’s Decoded (N) ‘PG’ Stan Lee’s Superhumans ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 UFO Hunters First Contact ‘PG’ Old Christine Old Christine How I Met How I Met Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å “Deadly Relations” (1993) Robert Urich, Shelley Fabares. ‘14’ Å How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann Jersey Shore Gone Baby Gone ‘14’ Jersey Shore Girls Like That ’ ‘14’ Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore Back Into the Fold ‘14’ Jersey Shore Back to the Shore ‘14’ Jersey Shore Back to the Shore ‘14’ 192 22 38 57 Jersey Shore Dirty Pad ‘14’ Å SpongeBob SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Gangland Boys of Destruction ‘14’ Gangland Machete Slaughter ’ ‘14’ Gangland The Barrio Azteca. ’ ‘14’ TNA Wrestling (N) ’ ‘14’ Å MANswers ‘MA’ MANswers ‘PG’ 132 31 34 46 Gangland Silent Slaughter ‘14’ Å Ghost Whisperer Dead Eye ’ ‘PG’ Ghost Whisperer Blood Money ‘PG’ Ghost Whisperer Blood Money ‘PG’ Ghost Whisperer Dead Ringer ‘PG’ Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å 133 35 133 45 Ghost Whisperer On Thin Ice ‘PG’ Behind Scenes David Jeremiah Win.-Wisdom This Is Your Day Praise the Lord Å Live-Holy Land Best of Praise Grant Jeffrey Changing-World Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘G’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ ›› “Failure to Launch” (2006) Matthew McConaughey. Å Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Conan ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond (9:15) ›› “Two Way Stretch” (1960, Comedy) Peter Sellers, Wilfrid Hyde-White. Two ›››› “The Ladykillers” (1955) Alec Guin›››› “I’m All Right, Jack” (1960, Comedy) Ian Carmichael, Peter Sellers. A man suf- ››› “Heavens Above!” (1963, Comedy) Peter Sellers, Cecil Parker, Isabel Jeans. 101 44 101 29 fering delusions works in his uncle’s factory. Å English clergyman is sent by mistake to a snobbish parish. prisoners plan to break out of jail and then back in. ness, Katie Johnson. Say Yes, Dress Cake Boss: Next Great Baker ‘PG’ Sarah Palin’s Alaska ’ ‘PG’ Å Sarah Palin’s Alaska ’ ‘PG’ Å Sarah Palin’s Alaska ’ ‘PG’ Å Sarah Palin’s Alaska ’ ‘PG’ Å Sarah Palin’s Alaska ’ ‘PG’ Å 178 34 32 34 Say Yes, Dress NBA Basketball Denver Nuggets at Sacramento Kings (Live) Å Inside the NBA (Live) Å Bones ’ ‘14’ Å 17 26 15 27 NBA Basketball Oklahoma City Thunder at Dallas Mavericks (Live) Å Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ 6TEEN ‘G’ Total Drama Scooby-Doo Adventure Time Regular Show MAD ‘PG’ King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Bacon Paradise ‘G’ Å Carnivore Carnivore Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Sandwich Paradise ‘G’ Å 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Roseanne ‘PG’ (11:31) Roseanne 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons House Both Sides Now ’ Å House Unwritten ’ ‘14’ Å ›› “National Treasure” (2004) Nicolas Cage. A man tries to steal the Declaration of Independence. Å (10:58) ›› “Jurassic Park III” 15 30 23 30 House Under My Skin ’ ‘14’ Å Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew ‘14’ Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew ‘14’ Saturday Night Live Skits featuring Will Ferrell. ’ ‘14’ Saturday Night Live Best of Will Ferrell, Volume 2 ‘14’ ››› “Fight Club” (1999) ’ 191 48 37 54 What Chilli Wants Mario Lopez PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:00) She-Devil (5:40) ›› “D3: The Mighty Ducks” 1996 Emilio Estevez. ’ ‘PG’ Å In the House ››› “Up” 2009 Voices of Ed Asner. ’ ‘PG’ Å (9:40) ›› “Angels & Demons” 2009, Suspense Tom Hanks. Premiere. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ›› “Predator 2” 1990, Science Fiction Danny Glover. ‘R’ Å ›› “The Entity” 1982, Horror Barbara Hershey, Ron Silver, George Coe. ‘R’ Å ›› The Fly II ›› “Eyewitness” 1981, Suspense William Hurt. ‘R’ Å Bubba’s World Bubba’s World ASP Women’s The Daily Habit Bubba’s World Dirt Demons Bondi Rescue The Daily Habit College Exp. The Daily Habit Bubba’s World Dirt Demons Bondi Rescue The Daily Habit (3:00) PGA Tour Golf Hyundai Tournament of Champions, First Round From Kapalua, Hawaii. Golf Central PGA Tour Golf Hyundai Tournament of Champions, First Round From Kapalua, Hawaii. Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Little House on the Prairie Bunny ‘G’ “The Nanny Express” (2009) Vanessa Marcil, Brennan Elliot. ‘PG’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls “War Games: The 24/7 Penguins/Capitals: Road to the ›› “Men in Black II” 2002 Tommy Lee Jones. Agents Jay and REAL Sports With Bryant Gumbel ’ ›› “Ghosts of Girlfriends Past” 2009, Romance-Comedy Mat- The Dilemma: HBO Cathouse: What’s Real Sex Xtra: PorHBO 425 501 425 10 Dead Code” NHL Winter Classic ’ Å Kay defend Earth from a sultry alien enemy. ’ ‘PG’ Å thew McConaughey. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å First Look on the Menu? ’ nucopia ››› “Carrie” 1976, Horror Sissy Spacek, Piper Laurie, William Katt. ‘R’ (7:15) ››› “Heathers” 1989, Comedy Winona Ryder, Christian Slater, Shannen Doherty. ‘R’ ›› “Havoc” 2005, Drama Anne Hathaway. ‘R’ (11:15) ››› “Carrie” 1976 ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (4:00) › “Half Past (5:40) ››› “Up in the Air” 2009, Comedy-Drama George Clooney, Anna Kendrick. A ››› “Catch Me if You Can” 2002, Comedy-Drama Leonardo DiCaprio, Tom Hanks, Christopher Walken. A ›› “8 Heads in a Duffel Bag” 1997 Joe Pesci. A mob courier (11:35) Lingerie 04 MAX 400 508 7 Dead” 2002 frequent flyer reaches a life-and-career crossroads. ’ ‘R’ Å teenage scam artist poses as a pilot, surgeon and lawyer. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å loses his bag of severed heads at an airport. ‘R’ ’ ‘MA’ Å American Serengeti ‘G’ Night of the Hunt ‘G’ Conquering Niagara ‘PG’ American Serengeti ‘G’ Night of the Hunt ‘G’ Conquering Niagara ‘PG’ Border Wars Dead of Night ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents OddParents The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Fantastic Four Fantastic Four NTOON 89 115 189 Beyond the Hunt Whitetail Nation Magnum TV Wardens Bow Madness Ult. Adventures Wild and Raw Whitetail Pro Lethal Beyond the Hunt Wild Outdoors Outdoors Speargun Hunter Driven TV OUTD 37 307 43 “Mother Ghost” 2002 Mark Thompson. iTV. A piece of jewelry (6:25) Kathleen Madigan: Gone Madigan ›› “Extract” 2009 Jason Bateman. A freak workplace accident (9:15) ›› “Zack and Miri Make a Porno” 2008 Seth Rogen, Traci Lords. iTV. Friends Next Stop for Char- I Can’t Believe I’m SHO 500 500 (iTV) ’ ‘MA’ Å lie Turkey ’ changes a grieving man’s life. ’ ‘NR’ throws a factory owner’s life into chaos. ‘R’ devise an odd plan to solve their money problems. ’ ‘R’ Still Single Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Dangerous Drives ‘PG’ Battle-Supercars Battle-Supercars Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Dangerous Drives ‘PG’ Battle-Supercars Battle-Supercars MotoGP Racing Spain SPEED 35 303 125 Underworld (5:20) ›› “Sex Drive” 2008 Josh Zuckerman. ‘R’ Å Starz Studios (7:25) ›› “Armored” 2009 Matt Dillon. ‘PG-13’ Å ›› “Blade II” 2002, Horror Wesley Snipes, Kris Kristofferson. ’ ‘R’ Å “Underworld: Rise of the Lycans” STARZ 300 408 300 (4:30) “Lake City” 2008, Drama Sissy (6:05) ››› “Buffalo 66” 1998, Drama Vincent Gallo, Christina Ricci. An ex-con con- ›› “Outlander” 2008, Action James Caviezel, Ron Perlman. Premiere. An alien joins ››› “You Kill Me” 2007 Ben Kingsley. A boozy hit man meets a (11:35) “Grand Theft TMC 525 525 Spacek. ’ ‘R’ Å cocts a crazy plan to impress his parents. ’ ‘R’ Å forces with Vikings to hunt his enemy. ’ ‘R’ Å relative of one of his victims. ’ ‘R’ Å Parsons” WEC WrekCage Å World Extreme Cagefighting Ben Henderson vs. Anthony Pettis NHL Overtime (Live) Dakar Highlights WEC WrekCage Å Whacked Out NHL Overtime VS. 27 58 30 My Fair Wedding With David Tutera My Fair Wedding With David Tutera My Fair Wedding With David Tutera Rich Bride, Poor Bride ‘PG’ Å Rich Bride, Poor Bride ‘PG’ Å Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å My Fair Wedding With David Tutera WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, January 6, 2011 E3

CALENDAR THURSDAY Jan. 6 BIG BOOK SALE: A selection of books, puzzles and books on tape will be on sale; proceeds benefit the United Senior Citizens of Bend and the Bend Senior Center; 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “Happenin’ Hibernation”; $15, $10 museum members, plus accompanying adult admission ($10, $9 seniors); 10 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-3824754 or www. highdesertmuseum .org. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Zookeeper’s Wife” by Diane Ackerman; bring a lunch; free; noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1081 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/ calendar. “BOOMERS, XERS AND MILLENNIALS — CAN WE ALL GET ALONG?”: Explore characteristics, communications styles and more about different generations; free; 6 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3121034 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. PAGAN JUG BAND: The Portlandbased acoustic band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins .com. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: Preview night for the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $10; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.beattickets.org.

FRIDAY Jan. 7 BIG BOOK SALE: A selection of books, puzzles and books on tape will be on sale; proceeds benefit the United Senior Citizens of Bend and the Bend Senior Center; 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “Happenin’ Hibernation”; $15, $10 museum members, plus accompanying adult admission ($10, $9 seniors); 10 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www .highdesertmuseum.org. “BOOMERS, XERS AND MILLENNIALS — CAN WE ALL GET ALONG?”: Explore characteristics, communications styles and more about different generations; free; 1 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1034 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend and the Old Mill District; free; 5-9 p.m.; throughout Bend. LION KING SING-ALONG: Dress in lion-king costumes and sing along with the movie; proceeds benefit the Summit High School drama club; $5 suggested donation; 5 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-322-3300. “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. “IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE”: Nine actors present a live-radio version of the classic holiday tale about George

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Bailey and his guardian angel; $5, free ages 5 and younger; 7 p.m.; Madras High School, 390 S.E. 10th St.; 541-475-7265 or dhayes@509J .net. PAGAN JUG BAND: The Portlandbased acoustic band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins .com. “THE SECRET IN THEIR EYES”: A screening of the R-rated 2009 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541475-3351 or www .jcld.org. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: Opening night of the presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; with a champagne and dessert reception; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.beattickets.org.

SATURDAY Jan. 8 VFW BREAKFAST: Community breakfast with pancakes, sausage, ham, eggs, coffee and more; $7, $6 seniors and children; 8-10:30 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. DOG FUN MATCH: Dogs compete in a variety of classes; proceeds benefit the Deschutes County 4-H dog program; $5 per class, free for spectators; 9 a.m., 8:15 a.m. registration; North Sister, Three Sisters Conference and Convention Center, Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-280-3856. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, LA FANCIULLA DEL WEST”: Starring Deborah Voigt, Marcello Giordani and Lucio Gallo in a presentation of Puccini’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 10 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. WINTER TRAILS DAY: Try snowshoeing, with guided hikes and refreshments; wear weatherappropriate clothing and waterproof boots; free; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Swampy Lake Sno-park, Cascade Lakes Highway 17 miles west of Bend, Bend; 541-385-0594 or www.rei .com/stores/events/96. “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. “IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE”: Nine actors present a live-radio version of the classic holiday tale about George Bailey and his guardian angel; $5, free ages 5 and younger; 7 p.m.; Madras High School, 390 S.E. 10th St.; 541-475-7265 or dhayes@509J .net. BEND COMMUNITY CONTRADANCE: Featuring caller William Watson and music by the Tune Dawgs; $7; 7 p.m. beginner’s workshop, 7:30 p.m. dance; Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; 541-330-8943. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www .beattickets.org. “THE BIG LEBOWSKI”: A screening of the R-rated 1998 film, with a costume contest; $10; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend;

541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre .org. JON WAYNE & THE PAIN: The Minneapolis-based reggae rock act performs; $5 plus fees in advance, $7 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.silvermoonbrewing .com.

crafts for adults; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1081 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar.

WEDNESDAY Jan. 12

SUNDAY Jan. 9 “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 2 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www .beattickets.org. CHARITY BINGO: Event includes a baked-goods sale; proceeds benefit the diabetes research center at the University of Iowa; $7; 2 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, 235 N.E. Fourth St., Prineville; 541-447-7659. SECOND SUNDAY: Suzanne Burns reads from a selection of her works; followed by an open mic; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 3:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. CHAMPAGNE CHAMPAGNE: The Seattle hip-hop group performs, with Mad Rad, Cloaked Characters and JoAnna Lee; $8 plus fees in advance, $10 at the door; 8 p.m.; Old Mill Music Lounge, 360 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, #210, Bend; art@ riseupinternational.com or www.bendticket.com.

MONDAY Jan. 10 BOWL GAME SCREENING: Watch Auburn play Oregon in the BCS National Championship game; $10; 5:30 p.m.; Pine Theater, 214 N. Main St., Prineville; 541-416-1014. TAILGATE AT THE TOWER: Watch the Oregon Ducks play the Auburn Tigers, with a barbecue buffet; proceeds benefit the Oregon Club of Central Oregon and the Tower Theatre Foundation; $25; 5:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www .towertheatre.org. SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL WINTER CONCERT SERIES: Featuring a performance by the North Carolinabased Steep Canyon Rangers; $15, $10 students in advance, plus fees, or $20, $12 students at the door; 8 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-4979 or www.sistersfolkfestival.org.

TUESDAY Jan. 11 “THE AMERICAN CHARACTER”: Discuss how ideas of individualism and volunteerism are at odds within the American character; free; 6:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1032 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Doug Merlino talks about his book “The Hustle: One Team and Ten Live in Black and White”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Between the Covers, 645 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-385-4766. RECESS — BREAK TIME FOR GROWNUPS: A night of games or

MOVIE NIGHT AND POTLUCK: A screening of “Big Night,” with an Italian dinner potluck; free; 6-8:30 p.m.; Grandview Hall, Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; slowfoodhighdesert@gmail.com. “THE BEAT GENERATION”: Turn on to the Beat generation with Steven Bidlake; free; 6:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541312-1032 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www. beattickets.org.

THURSDAY Jan. 13 BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “What’s the Matter?”; $15, $10 museum members, plus accompanying adult admission ($10, $9 seniors); 10 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Unaccustomed Earth” by Jhumpa Lahiri; bring a lunch; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. COUNTERINSURGENCY IN AFGHANISTAN: Joseph A. L’Etoile talks about spending 10 months in Afghanistan advising the U.S. and allied governments on counterinsurgency operations; free; 6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7257. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www. beattickets.org.

FRIDAY Jan. 14 BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “What’s the Matter?”; $15, $10 museum members, plus accompanying adult admission ($10, $9 seniors); 10 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org. “THE HUSTLER”: A screening of the unrated 1961 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541475-3351 or www.jcld.org. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www. beattickets.org. JAZZ AT THE OXFORD: The Mel Brown Quartet performs; tickets must be purchased online; $25 plus fees; 8-10:30 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541382-8436 or www.bendticket.com.

M T For Thursday, Jan. 6

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

BLACK SWAN (R) 2:15, 4:50, 7:25 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 2:30, 7 HOW DO YOU KNOW (PG-13) 2:05, 4:40, 7:15 THE KING’S SPEECH (R) 2, 4:35, 7:10 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 2:20, 4:30, 7:30 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG-13) 2:10, 4:45, 7:20

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) 11:40 a.m., 9:15 THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER 3-D (PG) 11:05 a.m., 1:45, 4:25, 7:05, 9:45 THE FIGHTER (R) 12:10, 2:50, 5:25, 8:05, 10:40 GULLIVER’S TRAVELS 3-D (PG) 11:55 a.m., 2, 4:05, 6:45, 9:25 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 11:20 a.m., 2:30, 6:25, 9:35

HOW DO YOU KNOW (PG-13) 11:25 a.m., 2:15, 5:05, 7:50, 10:35 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 12:20, 2:10, 2:40, 4:30, 5:15, 6:50, 7:45, 9:20, 10:05 TANGLED (PG) 11:15 a.m., 1:35, 4, 6:35, 9:10 THE TOURIST (PG-13) 12:15, 2:45, 5:20, 7:55, 10:30 TRON: LEGACY (PG) 11 a.m., 4:35, 7:20 TRON: LEGACY 3-D (PG) Noon, 3:55, 6:40, 9:40, 10:45 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 11:10 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 1:40, 2:25, 4:15, 5, 7:10, 7:35, 9:50, 10:15 UNSTOPPABLE (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 2:05, 4:50, 7:30, 10 YOGI BEAR (PG) 2:20, 4:40, 7 YOGI BEAR 3-D (PG) 11:30 a.m., 1:55, 4:10, 6:30, 8:40 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.)

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

THE NEXT THREE DAYS (PG-13) 6 UNSTOPPABLE (PG-13) 9

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

GULLIVER’S TRAVELS (PG) 4, 6 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 3:30, 6 TRON: LEGACY (PG) 3:45, 6:30 YOGI BEAR (PG) 4:45, 7

BRITAIN’S ROYAL WEDDING

Archbishop of Canterbury to lead nuptials New details revealed as plans move forward for April 29 event at Westminster Abbey By Gregory Katz The Associated Press

LONDON — The bride will arrive by car and leave in a carriage, as befits a newly minted princess. Those key details and others about the upcoming nuptials of Prince William and Kate Middleton emerged Wednesday in advance of their April 29 wedding at Westminster Abbey. Prince Charles’ representative broke weeks of silence with a statement that Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams will marry the couple in an 11 a.m. ceremony that will include several other prominent clergy. The wedding of William — a young Navy helicopter rescue pilot who is second in line for the throne — and Middleton, his girlfriend and confidante for nearly eight years, is expected to draw a gigantic global audience via television and the Internet.

Plans in place The palace also lifted the secrecy surrounding the processional route the newlyweds will take from Westminster Abbey to Buckingham Palace — information deemed vital to those hoping to get out early and catch a glimpse of the couple as they glide by in a horse-drawn carriage. The parade route, likely to be thronged by well-wishers regardless of the weather, will take William and Middleton through the storied heart of ceremonial London, where so many joyous and solemn occasions have been marked. Palace officials said Queen Elizabeth II, William’s grandmother, would host a reception at Buckingham Palace after the wedding ceremony, with guests drawn from the wedding congregation. The night of the wedding, Prince Charles is to host a dinner and dance at Buckingham Palace

Trails

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) 6:30 FAIR GAME (PG-13) 6:45 GULLIVER’S TRAVELS (PG) 4:15 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 4:45, 7 THE TOURIST (PG-13) 4:30 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 4:15, 6:45

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 4, 7

Continued from E1 Conditions at Wanoga Snoplay area are getting fast and icy. “Folks are really starting to crank on the slope there. Parents, watch your kids closely. If the hill speeds are picking up, just allow them to go halfway up or something, where they’re not going to gain so much speed that they end up in the parking lot,” Sabo says. That’s happened in the past. “Kids are just screaming with joy, but we don’t want them going in the parking lot.” Jumps are a constant safety is-

The Associated Press ile photo

Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams will conduct the service when Prince William and Kate Middleton wed on April 29, palace officials announced Wednesday. for family members and close friends of the newlyweds.

Breaking it down Joe Little, managing editor of Majesty magazine, told The Associated Press that he was surprised that Middleton has chosen to arrive at Westminster Abbey by car rather than in a carriage. “It’s not unprecedented, but we automatically assumed Kate would be in the glass coach, as was the case with Diana and with Sarah Ferguson,” he said. “But obviously that was decided against. We don’t know why; it might have been seen as ostentatious.” Other traditions have changed with the times, he said. “In the old days there would have been a wedding breakfast for the immediate family, but this will be a much bigger reception, with many more people attending, a more inclusive affair,” he said. In addition, he said, the queen is not hosting a ball a few nights before the wedding, as she would have done in the past, and instead Charles is hosting a gala event the night of the wedding. “It’s slightly different,” he said. “Change is not necessarily a bad thing.”

sue, and therefore are prohibited at the hill. “I had a young man have a sitdown strike when I was trying to cut one down,” Sabo reports. “They like to catch their air, but that’s where, probably, the majority of injuries occur. “It’s not in the air itself, so much as the landing. Landings can be hard,” he says. “Keep the speeds down, and keep the sleds on the ground. No ramps, no air. It gets hazardous. We don’t have anybody up there with a pilot’s license, likely.” David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@bendbulletin.com.


E4 Thursday, January 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, January 6, 2011 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUE LINE BI GAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Thursday, Jan. 6, 2011: This year, you put 100 percent into your work. You might not achieve at the level you want and expect. You have to put in many extra hours in order to reach your goals. Financially, you won’t back away, as you need the funds, and you will receive them. If you are single, you might have difficulty meeting the right person. Part of the issue is how you project yourself. Take a hard look in the mirror. If you are attached, remember that there is more to life than work. Make special time for you and your sweetie. Ultimately, your relationship takes a higher priority. AQUARIUS views money in an interesting manner. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH Others believe you understand a lot more than you do. Sometimes allowing this type of misrepresentation might be smart, as more will be revealed. A partner or loved one might be very discouraging. Is this person having a bad-hair day? Tonight: Wherever you can relax. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH Assume responsibility and worry less about the end results. At a certain point, you won’t care in the least. Open up to new ideas. Your sense of humor helps loosen tension and, in some fashion, revitalize your energy. Tonight: A must appearance. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Reach out for someone

at a distance. How you feel could change radically as you deal with others. Brainstorming won’t help move someone off his or her position. Keep getting more information, and the story will come out. Tonight: Listen to news. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Open up to new beginnings. Listen to a family member or roommate. He or she might be negative. One-on-one relating enhances a bond. Be more nurturing and understanding with others. Tonight: Have a long-overdue talk. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Your creativity surges. You are more serious than need be. An even pace might be boring. Listen to your instincts. If you have several options, take the most upbeat. Avoid a dour neighbor or relative. Schedule meetings for late in the day. Tonight: Where the action is. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Understand what is happening. Listen to news with an open mind. If you need to, talk to a creative person you trust. Honor what might be occurring. Refuse to be challenged. Others might have too many suggestions. Go with the flow. Tonight: Go for the action. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH A conversation could perk up your mood and help you smile from ear to ear. What is quite clear is that you don’t have the whole story. Are you ready to change gears? Take a walk or plan on a fun lunch to lighten up your mood. Tonight: Let the fun continue. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH Take a personal day, please.

Your spirit will lighten up the moment and allow for greater feedback. You might be slightly more negative than you realize, especially with a domestic matter. Open up to new ideas. Tonight: Happy at home. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH You can ask until you are blue in the face and still not get the answer. Your sixth sense is generally correct, but not when you are getting negativity from others. Be careful about snap judgments. Tonight: Consider hanging with more upbeat friends. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH You might be more in tune with a money matter than you have been of late. You could see a situation far differently from in the past. A boss could be pushing you beyond your limits. This person rethinks his or her approach. Tonight: A force to be dealt with. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH A friend demonstrates his or her loyalty. Good news surrounds a particular effort. Right now, certain planets pave the way to success and happiness should you be open and creative. Understanding will evolve if you detach. Tonight: Start your weekend early. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Know when to pull back and perhaps proceed in a different direction. You know what is happening behind the scenes. Relate on an individual level. Feedback from a close partner or associate could be negative. Tonight: Vanish while you can. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


E6 Thursday, January 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C D  

ORGANIZATIONS TODAY BACHELOR BEAUTS SQUARE DANCE CLUB: $4; 7-9 p.m.; Pine Forest Grange, Bend; 503-931-0413. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; see website for location; www.bendhabitat. org, 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BINGO: 6 p.m.; Elks Lodge, Bend; 541-382-1371. CENTRAL OREGON RESOURCES FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING: 10:30 a.m.; 20436 S.E. Clay Pigeon Court, Bend; 541-388-8103. COMMUNICATORS PLUS TOASTMASTERS: 6:30 p.m.; IHOP Restaurant, Bend; 541-480-1871. DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION: 6 p.m.; Morning Star Christian School, Bend; 541-389-5400. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HARMONEERS MEN’S CHORUS: 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, Bend; 541382-3392 or www.harmoneers.net. KIWANIS INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Meadow Lakes Restaurant, Prineville; 541-416-2191. REDMOND DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-322-9453. ROTARY CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon; Juniper Golf Course; 541-419-1889 or www.redmondoregonrotary.com. SONS OF NORWAY: Scandinavian heritage; 7:30 p.m.; Fjeldheim Lodge Hall, Bend; 541-382-4333. SPANISH CONVERSATION: 3:305 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-749-2010. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15-3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507.

FRIDAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY:

9 a.m.-3 p.m.; see website for location; www.bendhabitat. org, 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING PLAY GROUP: 10 a.m.-noon; www. bendap.org or 541-504-6929. BEND KNIT UP: 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Bend; http://groups.yahoo. com/group/bendknitup. BINGO: 5:45 p.m.; Redmond VFW; 541-526-0812. BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTORS CLUB: noon-1:30 p.m.; Sunset Mortgage, Bend; fayephil@bendbroadband. com or 541-306-4171. GAME NIGHT: 7 p.m.; DRRH Community Center, Sunriver; 541-598-7502. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HOMELESS LEADERSHIP COALITION: 8-9:30 a.m.; Bend Public Library; www.cohomeless.org. PEACE VIGIL: 4-5:30 p.m.; Brandis Square, Bend; 541-388-1793. TOPS NO. OR 607: Take Off Pounds Sensibly; 8:30 a.m.; Redmond Seventh-day Adventist Church; 541-546-3478 or www.TOPS.org.

SATURDAY THE ACCORDION CLUB OF CENTRAL OREGON: 1:30 p.m.; Cougar Springs Senior Living Facility, Redmond; hmh@coinet. com or kgkment@aol.com. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; see website for location; www.bendhabitat. org, 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. CHAPTER ONE BOOK CLUB: 10 a.m.-noon; Sunriver Area Public Library; 541-312-1080. COMPANEROS FRIENDS SPANISH/

ENGLISH GROUP: 9:30-11:30 a.m.; Green Plow Coffee Roasters, Redmond; 541-382-4366 or www. latinocommunityassociation.org. DAR BEND CHAPTER: 1 p.m.; Deschutes County Historical Society, Bend; 541-322-6996. JUMPIN’ JUNIPER GOOD SAMS: Camping group; 541-382-7031. OREGON TRAIL APPALOOSA HORSE CLUB: 1 p.m.; Izzy’s Pizza, Redmond; 541-306-9957 or www.otahc.org. REDMOND CHESS CLUB: 10 a.m.; Brookside Manor, Redmond; 541-410-6363.

SUNDAY A COURSE IN MIRACLES: 10 a.m. study group; 1012 N.W. Wall St., Suite 210, Bend; 541-390-5373. BENDUBS CAR CLUB: 7 p.m.; Cascade Lakes Lodge, Bend; www.bendubs.com. BEND DRUM CIRCLE: 3 p.m.; Tulen Center, Bend; 541-389-1419. BINGO: 12:30 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. BINGO: 1-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-388-1133. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-815-0669. DESCHUTES COUNTY FOURWHEELERS: 5 p.m. dinner, 6 p.m. meeting; Papa’s Pizza, Bend; 541-389-0090 or www. deschutescounty4wheelers.com.

MONDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Coffee and crafting; 10 a.m.; Romaine Village Recreation Hall, Bend; 541-389-7292. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63144 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND GO CLUB: 6-9 p.m.; Whole Foods Market, Bend; 541-3859198 or www.usgo.org. BEND KIWANIS CLUB: Noon; King Buffet, Bend; 541-389-3678.

BEND ZEN: 7-9 p.m.; Old Stone Church, Bend; 541-382-6122. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. CENTRAL OREGON INVENTORS GROUP: 6-7:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Environmental Center, Bend; 541-480-2320. CENTRAL OREGON SWEET ADELINES: 6:30-9 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-322-0265. INDEPENDENT ORDER OF ODD FELLOWS: 6 p.m.; Bend VFW Hall; 541-382-5376. LIONS INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Noon; The Apple Peddler, Prineville; 541-447-6926. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE: 7-9 p.m.; Sons of Norway Hall, Bend; 541-549-7511 or 541-410-5784. SOUTH CENTRAL LITTLE LEAGUE BOARD: 6:30 p.m.; Midstate Electric, La Pine; 541-536-9845. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15-3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507.

TUESDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Walk; 9 a.m.; Farewell Bend Park; 541-610-4164. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63144 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND ELKS LODGE #1371: 7:30 p.m.; 63120 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-389-7438 or 541-382-1371. BEND HIGHNOONERS TOASTMASTER CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; New Hope Church, Classroom D, Bend; 541-350-6980. BINGO: 6 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, Prineville; 541-447-7659. CASCADE HORIZON SENIOR BAND: 3:45-6 p.m.; High Desert Middle School band room, Bend; 541-382-2712. CENTRAL OREGON CHESS CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; Aspen Ridge Retirement Home, Bend; www.bendchess.com. CENTRAL OREGON COALITION

Datebook is a weekly calendar of regularly scheduled nonprofit events and meetings. Listings are free, but must be updated monthly to continue to publish. Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-383-0351.

FOR ACCESS: 3-4:30 p.m.; Deschutes Services Building, Bend; 541-815-0482. CIVIL AIR PATROL: The High Desert Squadron senior members and youth aerospace education cadet meetings; 7 p.m.; Marshall High School, Bend; 541-923-3499. CRIBBAGE CLUB: 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-317-9022. HIGH DESERT CORVETTES CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; Chloe at North Redmond Station; 541-923-1369. HIGH DESERT RUG HOOKERS: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541 382-5337. HIGH DESERT SADDLE CLUB: 7 p.m.; Izzy’s Pizza, Redmond; 541-923-2605. LA PINE LIONS CLUB: Noon; John C. Johnson Center, La Pine; 541-536-9235. PFLAG CENTRAL OREGON: 6:30 p.m.; Nativity Lutheran Church, Bend; 541-317-2334 or www. pflagcentraloregon.org. PINOCHLE NIGHT: 7 p.m.; DRRH Community Center, Sunriver; 541-598-7502. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF REDMOND: Noon; Izzy’s, Redmond; 541-306-7062. TUESDAY KNITTERS: 1-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-399-1133. WOMEN’S GROUP (GRUPO DE MUJERES): 6-8 p.m.; Grace Baptist Church, Bend; 541-382-4366.

WEDNESDAY AMERICAN LEGION POST 4: 6:30 p.m.; Bend VFW, Bend; 541-389-2867. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63144 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; Environmental Center, Bend; 541-420-4517. BEND KNITUP: 5:30-8 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-728-0050. BEND/SUNRISE LIONS CLUB: 7-8 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-389-8678.

BINGO: 5:45 p.m.; Redmond VFW; 541-526-0812. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 and 7 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-788-7077. CASCADES MOUNTAINEERS: 7 p.m.; Central Oregon Environmental Center, Bend; 541-549-1322. CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY GAY/STRAIGHT ALLIANCE NETWORK SUPPORT GROUP: 6-8 p.m.; office@humandignitycoalition. org or 541-385-3320. EASTERN CASCADES MODEL RAILROAD CLUB: 7 p.m.; 21520 S.E. Modoc Lane, Bend; 541-317-1545. EFT CIRCLE: 7 p.m.; 1012 N.W. Wall St., Suite 210, Bend; 541-390-5373. EXPERIMENTAL AIRCRAFT ASSOCIATION: 6:30 p.m.; Bend Airport; 541-419-5496 or www.eaa1345.org. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. KIWANIS CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon-1 p.m.; Izzy’s Pizza, Redmond; 541-548-5935 or www.redmondkiwanis.org. LA PINE LIONS CLUB: Noon; Newberry Hospice, La Pine; 541-536-7399. MOMS CLUB OF BEND: 10:3011:30 a.m.; First United Methodist Church, Bend; 541-389-5249 or www.momsclubofbendor.org. NEWCOMERS CLUB OF BEND: Hospitality coffee for women; RSVP required; 10 a.m.; 541-647-1043 or visit www. newcomersclubofbend.com.. OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: 7 p.m.; China Sun Buffet, Bend; 541-382-7969. PRIME TIME TOASTMASTERS: 12:051:05 p.m.; 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-416-6549. REDMOND AREA TOASTMASTER CLUB: 11:50 a.m.-1 p.m.; City Center Church, Redmond; 541383-0396 or 541-410-1758. RICE ITALIAN CONVERSATION GROUP: 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-447-0732.

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Dale Blackburn, of Corvallis, snowshoes with his dogs at Maxwell Butte Sno-park this week.

Outing

are some limited views, but “nothing spectacular.”

Continued from E1 Unlike some local sno-parks, these do not offer separate trails for skiers and snowshoers. Peterson recommends that people grab a map before hitting the parks. They are available online (go to www.fs.usda.gov/willamette and search for the name of the sno-park) or at a local ranger station. He also suggests people check with the Oregon Department of Transportation to make sure there is access to the parking lot of a particular sno-park. Because the entrances are located along highways, sometimes after heavy snowfall the parking lots can get blocked by snow plowing.

Big Springs Sno-Park

Lava Lake Sno-Park This sno-park is one of the least used in the area, according to Peterson. It is located about four miles west of Santiam Junction on U.S. Highway 20. Lava Lakes is relatively small and offers three loop routes. The trails are for cross-country skiers and snowshoers, although there is some shared use with snowmobilers on some of the trails. A majority of the trails travel through a unit of replanted trees and also offer a more open, clear setting. The loops are mostly easy, but Peterson says people can run into challenging spots. One loop option takes skiers down to Lava Lake, which is a wide-open expanse. Peterson says this is a good option for beginners. There

This sno-park is located three miles west of Santiam Junction on state Highway 22. The trails of this park travel through large old growth trees in a closed-canopy setting. The giant trees mean visitors may encounter some tree wells and stump holes early in the season, but those are not much of a problem once the heavy snow fills them in, according to Peterson. Big Springs offers some beginning and intermediate routes as well as one more difficult option. One of the routes does include some shared use with snowmobilers for about a mile. Peterson likes this park because you can “ski almost the whole sno-park in a day, covering a lot of ground.” This sno-park also offers access to Lava Lake, although it’s a fairly long trip. While this park doesn’t offer much in the way of views, its appeal comes from the chance to travel amid some really big old growth timber.

Maxwell Butte Sno-Park This is the busiest of the three parks and is located 3.5 miles west of Santiam Junction on state Highway 22. It offers ample parking. Peterson says this is also the most substantial of all of the snoparks, offering about 25 miles or more of trails. The options are varied and diverse. There are

If you go For more information, contact the Detroit Ranger District at 503-854-3366, or log on to www.fs.usda.gov/willamette.

easy trails that travel along road beds as well as advanced routes that travel along summer trails. About one third of the routes travel through old growth forest and the remainder are more out in the open and cut through some replanted areas. Peterson also praises this sno-park for the views it offers, including vistas of Maxwell Butte, Three Finger Jack and Duffy Butte. These spots are especially visible from Mountain View Shelter, a large structure that can be accessed from several trails. On a clear day, visitors can see Mount Washington and the North Sister as well as Three Finger Jack, which is just five or six miles away. Visitors can get to the shelter by traveling up a 1.5-mile direct route, which includes some intermediate trails. There is another, significantly longer option that sticks to easy trails. The shelter is a hot spot because people are allowed to stay overnight in it. Peterson says it sleeps about 15 people, some on cots, some on the ground. Large parties need to call ahead, but otherwise the sleeping options are available on a firstcome, first-served basis. Alandra Johnson can be reached at 541-617-7860 or at ajohnson@bendbulletin.com.


H

F

IMPROVING YOUR HEALTH AND WELL-BEING Fitness Your next hike into the Oregon wilderness can be less painful with trekking poles, Page F3

HEALTH

www.bendbulletin.com/health

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 2011

Illustration by Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Factory efficiency in health care

St. Charles adopts lean practices in effort to streamline operations and improve care

By Betsy Q. Cliff • The Bulletin Until last summer, a room in the central processing department at St. Charles Redmond looked like a “cluttered garage,” said operating room manager Julie Nave. Nurses enter the room often to pick up surgical supplies and other necessities, which had been moved in when the hospital’s new tower opened in 2006. No one had organized it since. MO There was equipment that was no longer used, things belonging to doctors who had long since left, and piles and piles of stuff that needed cataloging. Nurses had to move carts out of the way to get what they needed. It cost the nurses valuable time and it cost the hospital money. Since the inventory was not well controlled, supplies often expired and had to be donated or thrown away.

MEDICINE

INSIDE

MONEY Vital stats Prices at Oregon hospitals are on the rise, Page F5

NUTRITION Vitamins Peanut butter contains some copper, but why is the mineral important? Page F6

Then, trained staff from St. Charles Health System spent a week cleaning and organizing it. A system was put in place to notify the materials N E Y management department when a supply ran out. Excess equipment was taken out of the room. The carts were removed. Things were labeled. It cut down on the time staff needed to spend in that room, said Nave, leaving them more time to spend with patients. In addition, they also brought more supplies directly into the operating room, eliminating the need for nurses to leave in the middle of an operation. See Lean / F5

Group acupuncture casting a wider net Patients feel relaxed, calm when not alone for pinpoint treatment By John-John Williams IV The Baltimore Sun

BALTIMORE — Constant headaches and migraines had Diana Schulin considering acupuncture, but she found herself tensing at the thought of sitting alone in a room while being poked by a dozen needles. She finally took the plunge, and she’s glad she did. The needles remain. But at least now she has company. The health care information worker is among a small but growing number of people experiencing the ancient Asian treatment in a group. Some come for the lower cost, while some, like Schulin, are drawn by

the camaraderie. “Because the other people are there, you feel relaxed,” said Schulin, a Baltimore resident. “It makes you feel more comfortable. “Traditional acupuncture clinics are a little more tense. You are there by yourself. When you are in the room with other people, there is a sense of calm.” Acupuncture — the practice of inserting needles in specific spots of the human body — is nothing new. But the concept of community acupuncture is relatively rare in this country. There are about 200 community acupuncture clinics in the U.S.; a majority is found along the coasts and in larger cities, according to Fred Wolfson, who opened Acupuncture for All in Baltimore’s Mount Washington neighborhood nine weeks ago after working at a similar practice in Frederick, Md. Wolfson said the concept is modeled after group clinics in Asia, which have historically been low-cost. See Acupuncture / F4

“(It) is not easy. You are asking people to change the way they behave. You’re asking them to change the way they work.” — Cory Hammond, specializes in lean practices at St. Charles

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

LISA LEWIS, MD MEDICAL DIRECTOR, PARTNERS IN CARE MEDICAL DIRECTOR, HOSPICE HOUSE BOARD CERTIFIED IN PALLIATIVE & INTERNAL MEDICINE WORKING WITH LOCAL HOSPICES & HOSPICE HOUSE FOR THE PAST 5 YEARS

Compassionate Care You Can Count On. For three decades, Central Oregon’s experts in chronic and terminal care. Competence, caring and compassion 24 hours each day.

Ask your Physician or call us directly for information at 541.382.5882

HOSPICE HOME HEALTH HOSPICE HOUSE TRANSITIONS

SERVING CENTRAL OREGON 24 HOURS EVERYDAY 541.382.5882

www.partnersbend.org


F2 Thursday, January 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

H D

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin .com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

SUPPORT GROUPS AIDS EDUCATION FOR PREVENTION, TREATMENT, COMMUNITY RESOURCES AND SUPPORT (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7402. AIDS HOT LINE: 800-342-AIDS. AL-ANON: 541-728-3707 or www.centraloregonal-anon.org. AL-ANON PRINEVILLE: 541-416-0604. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS (AA): 541-548-0440 or www.coigaa.org. ALS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-977-7502. ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION: 541-548-7074. ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP: 541-948-7214. AUTISM RESOURCE GROUP OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-788-0339. BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING: 541-385-1787. BEND S-ANON FAMILY GROUP: 888-285-3742. BEND ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 541-382-6122 or 541-382-6651. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUPS: 541-382-5882. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP/ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 541-383-3910. BRAIN TUMOR SUPPORT GROUP: 541-350-7243 BREAST CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-7743. BREAST-FEEDING SUPPORT GROUP: 541-385-1787. CANCER INFORMATION LINE: 541-706-7743. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-536-7399. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. CELEBRATE RECOVERY: New Hope Church, Bend, 541-480-5276; Faith Christian Center, Bend, 541382-8274; Redmond Assembly of God Church, 541-548-4555; Westside Church, Bend, 541-3827504, ext. 201; Metolius Friends Community Church, 541-546-4974. CENTRAL OREGON ALZHEIMER’S/ DEMENTIA CAREGIVERS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-504-0571 CENTRAL OREGON AUTISM ASPERGER’S SUPPORT TEAM: 541-633-8293. CENTRAL OREGON AUTISM SPECTRUM RESOURCE AND FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-279-9040. CENTRAL OREGON COALITION FOR ACCESS (WORKING TO CREATE ACCESSIBLE COMMUNITIES): 541-385-3320. CENTRAL OREGON DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY GROUP: 541-420-2759 CENTRAL OREGON DOWN SYNDROME NETWORK: 541548-8559 or www.codsn.org. CENTRAL OREGON FAMILIES WITH MULTIPLES: 541-3305832 or 541-388-2220. CENTRAL OREGON LEAGUE OF AMPUTEES SUPPORT GROUP (COLA): 541-480-7420 or www.ourcola.org. CENTRAL OREGON RIGHT TO LIFE: 541-383-1593. CHILD CAR SEAT CLINIC (PROPER INSTALLATION INFORMATION FOR SEAT AND CHILD): 541-504-5016. CHILDREN’S VISION FOUNDATION: 541-330-3907. CHRONIC PAIN SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-7730. CLARE BRIDGE OF BEND (ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP): 541-385-4717 or rnorton1@ brookdaleliving.com. COMPASSIONATE FRIENDS (FOR THOSE GRIEVING THE LOSS OF A CHILD): 541-3300301 or 541-388-1146. CREATIVITY & WELLNESS — MOOD GROUP: 541-647-0865. CROOKED RIVER RANCH ADULT GRIEF SUPPORT: 541-548-7483. DEFEATCANCER: 541-706-7743. DESCHUTES COUNTY MENTAL HEALTH 24-HOUR CRISIS LINE: 541-322-7500. DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE: 541-5499622 or 541-771-1620. DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP: 541-617-0543. DIABETIC SUPPORT GROUP: 541-598-4483. DISABILITY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-388-8103. DIVORCE CARE: 541-410-4201. DOUBLE TROUBLE RECOVERY: Addiction and mental illness group; 541-317-0050. DYSTONIA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-388-2577. EATING DISORDER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-322-2755. ENCOPRESIS (SOILING): 541-5482814 or encopresis@gmail.com. EVENING BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-460-4030

Submitted photo

Davon Cabraloff leads a Zumba class at Central Oregon Community College. See the Classes listing for details. FAMILY PLANNING SERVICES (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER: 541-389-5468. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS: Redmond 541-280-7249, Bend 541-390-4365. GAMBLING HOT LINE: 800-233-8479. GLUTEN INTOLERANCE GROUP (CELIAC): 541-389-1731. GRANDMA’S HOUSE: Support for pregnant teens and teen moms; 541-383-3515. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 541306-6633, 541-318-0384 or mullinski@bendbroadband.com. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 541-548-7483. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUPS: For the bereaved; 541-771-3247. GRIEFSHARE (FAITH-BASED) RECOVERY CLASS: 541-389-8780. HEALING ENCOURAGEMENT FOR ABORTION-RELATED TRAUMA (H.E.A.R.T.): 541-318-1949. HEALTHY BEGINNINGS: Free screenings ages 0-5; 541-383-6357. HEALTHY FAMILIES OF THE HIGH DESERT (FORMERLY READY SET GO): Home visits for families with newborns; 541-749-2133 HEARING LOSS ASSOCIATION: 541-848-2806 or hlaco2@gmx.com. IMPROVE YOUR STRESS LIFE: 541-706-2904. JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER: 541-389-7665. LA LECHE LEAGUE OF BEND: 541-317-5912. LIVING WELL (CHRONIC CONDITIONS): 541-322-7430. LIVING WELL WITH CANCER FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. LIVING WITH CHRONIC ILLNESSES SUPPORT GROUP: 541-536-7399. LUPUS & FIBROMYALGIA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-526-1375. MADRAS NICOTINE ANONYMOUS GROUP: 541-993-0609. MAN-TO-MAN PROSTATE CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. MATERNAL/CHILD HEALTH PROGRAM (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. MEN’S CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-5864. MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. NARCONON: 800-468-6933. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS (NA): 541-416-2146. NATIONAL ALLIANCE ON MENTAL ILLNESS OF CENTRAL OREGON (NAMI): 541-408-7779 or 541-504-1431. NEWBERRY HOSPICE OF LA PINE: 541-536-7399. OREGON COMMISSION FOR THE BLIND: 541-447-4915. OREGON CURE: 541-475-2164. OREGON LYME DISEASE NETWORK: 541-312-3081 or www.oregonlyme.org. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS: 541-306-6844. PARENTS OF MURDERED CHILDREN (POMC) SUPPORT GROUP: 541-410-7395. PARISH NURSES AND HEALTH MINISTRIES: 541-383-6861. PARKINSON’S SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. PARTNERS IN CARE: Home health and hospice services; 541-382-5882. PFLAG CENTRAL OREGON: For parents, families and friends of lesbians and gays; 541-317-2334 or www.pflagcentraloregon.org. PLAN LOVING ADOPTIONS NOW

Arts & Entertainment Every Friday

(PLAN): 541-389-9239. PLANNED PARENTHOOD: 888-875-7820. PMS ACCESS LINE: 800-222-4767. PREGNANCY RESOURCE CENTERS: Bend, 541-385-5334; Madras, 541-475-5338; Prineville, 541-4472420; Redmond, 541-504-8919. PULMONARY HYPERTENSION SUPPORT GROUP: 541-548-7489. RECOVERING COUPLES ANONYMOUS (RCA): 541-389-0969 or www.recovering-couples.org. SAVING GRACE SUPPORT GROUPS: Bend, 541-382-4420; Redmond, 541-504-2550, ext. 1; Madras, 541-475-1880. SCLERODERMA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-480-1958. SELF-ESTEEM GROUP FOR WOMEN: 541-389-7960. SEXAHOLICS ANONYMOUS: 541-595-8780. SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASE TESTING (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. SOUP AND SUPPORT: For mourners; 541-548-7483. SUPPORT GROUP FOR FAMILIES WITH DIABETIC CHILDREN: 541-526-6690. TOBACCO FREE ALLIANCE: 541322-7481. TOPS OR: Bend, 541388-5634; Culver, 541-546-4012; Redmond, 541-923-0878. VETERANS HOTLINE: 541-408-5594 or 818-634-0735. VISION NW: Peer support group; 541-330-0715. VOLUNTEERS IN MEDICINE: 541-330-9001. WINTER BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-475-3882, ext. 4030, or www.mvhd.org. WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-385-0747 WOMEN’S SELF-ESTEEM GROUP: 541-389-7960. WOMEN’S SUPPORT GROUP FOR ANGER, ANXIETY, OR DEPRESSION: 541-389-7960. WOMEN SURVIVING WITH CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 541-388-3179.

CLASSES MEDICARE ABC’S AND D’S: Clear One Health Plans presents a series on making informed decisions about Medicare; free; 541-330-2577. • BEND SENIOR CENTER: 4:30-5:30 p.m. today • ST. CHARLES REDMOND: 6:30-7:30 p.m. Jan. 18 • ST. CHARLES BEND: 6:30-7:30 p.m. Jan. 24. NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS FOR SURVIVORS: With movement and goal setting for cancer survivors; RSVP required; free; 5:30 p.m. Tuesday; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-706-7743. PARENTING CLASSES: Learn strategies for difficult-to-manage behaviors, including noncompliance and inattentiveness; $180 per couple; 6:30-7:45 p.m. Thursdays, Jan. 13Feb. 17; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-706-6843 to enroll. ZUMBA FITNESS: Get a total-body workout as you dance; $45; 6:15 p.m. Tuesdays, Jan. 11-March 1; Central Oregon Community College, Mazama Gym, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; http://noncredit. cocc.edu or 541-383-7290. • ACTIVE LIFE FITNESS: Tai Chi; 541-389-7536 or 541-788-7537.

• ADVENTURE BOOT CAMP: Bend Boot Camp, www.bendbootcamp. com; 541-350-5343. • AFTERNOON FIT KIDS: Ages 5-12; 541-389-7665. • ANITA ELSEY: Feldenkrais; 541-408-3731. • ARTICULATION THERAPY CLASSES: 541-550-9424 or www.ashtangayogabend.com. • ASMI YOGA: 541-385-1140 or www.asmiyoga.com. • BABY BOOMERS & BEYOND: Yoga instruction; 541-948-9770. • BABY BOOT CAMP: Strollerfitness program; 541-617-6142 or www.babybootcamp.com. • BAKESTARR: Support for type 1 diabetics ages 18-24; 541-5984483 or www.bakestarr.com. • BALANCE YOGA CLASSES & RETREATS: Hilloah Rohr, 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • BEND FELDENKRAIS CENTER: 541-788-9232. • BEND SENIOR CENTER: Dance, Tai Chi, Feldenkrais Awareness Movement, Middle Eastern Belly Dance and more; 541-388-1133. • BEND YOGA: 503-998-8902. • BIKRAM’S YOGA COLLEGE OF INDIA: 541-389-8599 or www.bikramyogabend.com. • THE BODHI TREE, YOGA & HEALING ARTS: 541-390-2827. • BOOT CAMP FITNESS FOR WOMEN: 541-815-3783. • BOOST FAMILY FITNESS: 541-3905286 or www.boostfam.com. • BREEMA’S NINE PRINCIPLES OF HARMONY: 541-593-8812. • BRINGING THE BUDDHIST 8 FOLD PATH TO MINDFUL DAILY PRACTICE: Hilloah Rohr, 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE: 541383-7290 or www.cocc.edu. • CENTRAL OREGON GYMNASTICS ACADEMY: 541-385-1163 or www.cogymnastics.com. • CHICKS RIDE SKI CONDITIONING CLINICS: Elizabeth Goodheart at elizabethgoodheart2@gmail .com or 541-593-1095.

• CHRONIC PAIN CLASSES: 541-3187041 or www.healingbridge.com. • CLASSIC HATHA YOGA/ANANDA INSPIRED: Lorette Simonet; 541-3859465 or www.wellnessbend.com. • COMPASSIONATE COMMUNICATION CLASSES: Peace Center, www. pcoco.org or 541-325-3174. • CORE: Yoga; 541-389-6595 or www.coreconditioning.info. • FIT FOR THE KING EXERCISE MINISTRY: 541-923-3925 or www.fitfortheking.info. • FITNESS GUIDE SERVICE: 541-388-1685 or www.fitness guideservice.com. • FOCUS PHYSICAL THERAPY: Yoga, feldenkrais; 541-385-3344 or www.focusphysio.com. • FUNCTIONAL FITNESS TRAINING: PEAK Training Studio, 541-647-1346. • GOLF FITNESS AND PERFORMANCE: Chris Cooper, 541-350-1631 or ccooper@taiweb.com. • GOLF FITNESS CLASSES: WillRace Performance Training Studio, 541-419-9699. • HEALING BRIDGE PHYSICAL THERAPY: Feldenkrais, back classes, screenings, 541-318-7041 or www.healingbridge.com. • HEALTHY HAPPENINGS: St. Charles Health Systems; smoking cessation, parenting preparation; 541-706-6390 or www.stcharleshealthcare.org. • HULA HOOP CLASSES: www.hoop dazzle.com or 541-312-6910. • IMAGINE HEALTH NOW: QiGong classes; 541-318-4630, maggie@ imaginehealthnow.com or www .imaginehealthnow.com. • INNERGYSTICS: Yoga, cardio, weight lifting and meditation; 541-388-7395. • IYENGAR YOGA OF BEND: Nadine Sims; 541-318-1186 or www.yogaofbend.com. • IYENGAR YOGA CLASSES: 541-948-9770 or robyncastano@ bendbroadband.com. • JAZZERCISE: www.jazzercise.com or 541-280-5653. • JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER: 541-389-7665. • KIDS YOGA: 541-385-5437. • LAUGHTER YOGA: 541-420-2204. • LAUGHTER YOGA CLUB: 541389-0831 or www.pcoco.org. • LIVING FITNESS: Personal training; 541-382-2332. • MOVEMENT THAT MATTERS: Redmond Senior Center; 541-548-6067. • NAMASPA: Baptiste Power Vinyasa Yoga; Suzie Harris; 541550-8550 or www.namaspa.com. • NORTHWEST CROSSING: Yoga; 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • PILATES CENTER OF BEND: 541-389-2900 or www.pilatescenter ofbend.com. • PILATES CONNECTION: Mat, chair and equipment classes; 541-420-2927 or www.bendpilates connection.com. • PILATES FOR CANCER RECOVERY: 541-647-1900 or www.shelleybpilates.com. • PILATES MAT AND EQUIPMENT

Laser Resurfacing | Fraxel | Restylane Precision Liposuction | Botox

Call 541.330.6160 www.aesthetics-md.com

INSTRUCTION: FreshAirSports.com/ pilates or 541-318-7388. • QIGONG CLASSES: Michelle Wood, 541-330-8894. • REBOUND PILATES: 541-585-1500 or www.reboundpilates.com. • REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT: 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org. • REDMOND RUNNING GROUP: dedwards@bendbroadband.com. • SALLY’S HATHA YOGA: 541-3900927 or www.sallyshathayoga.com. • SILVER STRIDERS: 541-3838077 or www.silverstriders.com. • SPIRIT OF PILATES INC.: 541-3301373 or www.spiritofpilates.com. • STROLLER STRIDES: Strollerfitness; 541-598-5231 or www.strollerstrides.com. • SUNDANCE FOOTCARE LLC: Marguerite Saslow conducts nail clinics; 541-815-8131 or canyonwren2646@yahoo.com. • TERPSICHOREAN DANCE STUDIO: Yoga; 541-388-8497. • THERAPEUTIC YOGA PROGRAM: 541-350-1617. • TUESDAY PERFORMANCE GROUP: 541-317-3568. • TULEN CENTER FOR MARTIAL ARTS AND WELLNESS: 541-550-8550. • WILLRACE PERFORMANCE TRAINING STUDIO: 541-3503938 or runkdwrun@msn.com. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: Dynamic Group Fitness: 541-350-0064. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: Seven Peaks Elementary School; 541-419-9699. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: WRP Training Studio; 541-788-5743. • YOGA FOR 55 +: 541-948-9770. • YOGA FOR PEAK PERFORMANCE: 541-322-9642 or info@ bend-yoga.com. • YOGA HEART OF REDMOND: 541633-0530 or www.ericamason.net . • YOGA JOURNEY: 541-419-6778. • YOGA TO GO: robyncastano@ bendbroadband.com or 541-948-9770. • ZUMBA: Dance-based fitness classes; Davon Cabraloff; 541-383-1994. • ZUMBA FITNESS: Latin rhythms dance-based fitness classes; 541-678-2707.

Get a taste of Food, Home & Garden In

AT HOME Every Tuesday


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, January 6, 2011 F3

F

Next week Ten fitness goals you shouldn’t overlook in the new year.

STABILITY AND STRENGTH

IN MOTION

Take a load off on your hike with trekking poles

Elderly women can find many benefits in strength training A once-weekly strength-training program for elderly women can help reduce health care costs and improve cognitive functioning, according to a study published last month in the Archives of Internal Medicine. The study followed seniors who had completed a 12-month tailored exercise program and tracked them for another year. Even though the exercise program had ended, many of the test subjects continued strength training on their own. The study found that the women who underwent the weekly strength-training program were more active after the study had ended than they had been before the study. They scored better on tests of cognitive functioning and had lower health care costs. They also experienced fewer falls than members of the control group, which had conducted balance and toning exercises. The once-weekly group also showed more gains over the long term than those who did strength training twice a week. “What we realized was that this

Thinkstock

By Jeannine Stein Los Angeles Times

Hiking is great exercise, but all that climbing up and down can result in some sore muscles. Add some trekking poles, however, and that soreness could be lessened, a study found. Researchers from the United Kingdom took 26 men and 11 women who were physically active to the highest peak in England and Wales for a day hike. About half the study participants used trekking poles on the ascents and descents, while the rest used no poles and acted as a control group. Otherwise, the groups were similar — they hiked together, so times were comparable. Everyone also carried a day pack and ate the same food. Average heart rates for the two groups on the ascents and descents were about equal. But differences showed up for rates of perceived exertion, a measure of how hard people think they’re working, based on monitoring functions such as heart rate, perspiration and breathing. Those with the trekking poles had significantly lower RPE than the control group on parts of the ascents, while there were no differences in RPE on the descents. Those with poles had less muscle soreness than those in the control group. The pole group also showed a reduced loss of strength and a speedier recovery right after hiking, as well as one and two days afterward, compared with the control group. In the study the authors specu-

Lowering weights has more benefits By Jeannine Stein Los Angeles Times

Thinkstock

Trekking poles, a study found, can limit the rate of exertion and muscle soreness. lated that the lower RPE scores in the trekking pole group may be chalked up to the fact that the poles provided more stability and less load on the lower limbs during the ascents. Less muscle sore-

ness might be attributed to the poles redistributing the load on the lower limbs to the upper body. The study appears in the January issue of the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

How to exercise your body — and your brain By Alison Johnson Daily Press (Newport News, Va.)

Physical exercise isn’t just good for your heart and muscles. “Any kind of exercise will keep blood flowing to your brain, and there is evidence it may help new brain cells grow,” said Gino Colombara, Executive Director of the Alzheimer’s Association Southeastern Virginia Chapter. Here are some workouts that may be particularly helpful to brain health: Take a dance class. You’ll be increasing your heart rate and also challenging your brain as you learn various steps. Tai chi, karate or step aerobics — or any class that’s new to you — will have the same benefits. Do some circuit training. The quick alternation between resistance and cardio will force you to work on both memory and coordination. Go to a group class. Keep-

Thinkstock

ing up social connections also boosts brain health, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. So after a workout, invite a fellow exerciser out for some coffee. Sign up for yoga. The deep breathing will deliver a good dose of oxygen to your brain, and the learning curve for new moves is a mental challenge. Lift weights. Strength training requires concentration and focus. It also builds muscle, which improves the heart’s abil-

ity to pump oxygen-filled blood all over the body including the brain. Take a walk … Walking will increase blood circulation and send more oxygen and glucose to feed your brain cells (especially since your leg muscles won’t take up too much of either substance during a less strenuous workout). … or a run. Studies in mice have indicated regular running can boost brain cell survival rates. Use your less dominant hand. Say you’re right-handed: try playing tennis or catching a ball with your left hand for a while. See if your brain can adjust.

LOS ANGELES — Strength training mostly consists of concentric exercises (when the muscles shorten to lift something, as in lifting a weight to do a bicep curl) and eccentric exercises (when the muscles lengthen to lower something). But could one action provide more benefits than the other? A study found that half an hour of eccentric exercise a week boosted muscle strength and lowered insulin resistance more than concentric exercise. Twenty women were randomly assigned to an exercise group that did either concentric or eccentric movements once a week for eight weeks. Exercises for both groups consisted of leg extensions, which target the quadriceps muscles in the front of the thigh. Researchers discovered that after the short weekly bouts of movement, the eccentric exercise group substantially increased muscle strength and performance, decreased insulin resistance and improved blood lipid profiles more than concentric exercise. After two months, resting energy expenditure (the number of calories burned while at rest) increased 5 percent, similar to what people experience after endurance training or more traditional strength training that includes concentric and eccentric exercise. In the study, which appears in the January issue of the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, the authors concluded that eccentric exercise may provide some practical advantages. They wrote, “People who wish to participate in activities containing eccentric actions may perform exercises with strong eccentric component, such as bench stepping, downhill walking, or placing emphasis on the negative phase of conventional resistance exercises.”

Dr. Patrick Evoy Dr. Ambrose Su Dr. Kristy Six Dr. Jeremy Dahlenburg

Our board certified podiatric physicians & surgeons can diagnose and treat a variety of foot problems. Bend, Redmond & Prineville appointments available

(541) 388-2861 2408 NE Division, Bend (541) 923-3970 CASCADE FOOT CLINIC , LLC 1228 N. Canal, Redmond

group was more successful at being able to maintain the same level of physical activity,” said Teresa Liu-Ambrose, an assistant professor of physical therapy at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, and principal investigator of the study. — Markian Hawryluk, The Bulletin

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

INTEGRATIVE CARE FOR YOUR MIND & BODY

Without Surgery or Laser • Immediate Results Call Now for Appointments Introducing 541-419-5181 Vitamin Infusion! • • • •

Rachel Collins-Goss RN, CCE 62910 OB Riley Rd #140

Reverse and Prevent Skin Aging Heal Acne – Amazing Results! Wrinkles /Fine Lines /Enlarged Pores Loss of Facial & Neck Tone

FREE Brow Wax with any Facial Learn MORE ABOUT OUR TREATMENTS @ www.Clear-Complexions.com

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday

FREE 7 Day Pass for new customers Call for other new customer specials BEND: 541-280-5653 REDMOND: 541-923-6265

Winter Fun Can Be Hard on Feet. Don’t Ignore Foot Pain!

Thinkstock

Strength training can prevent falls and reduce health care costs for elderly women, a study shows.

Compassionate Individual Care for Whole Body Wellness

Ron Rosen MD PC

• Medical Acupuncture • Prolotherapy • Functional Medicine • PRP

• Manual Medicine • Chinese Herbs • Allergy Treatments • Nutrition

Integrative Medicine 541-388-3804 • 918 NE 5th St., Bend www.ronaldrosenmdpc.com

For Advertising Information Contact Kristin Morris, Account Executive Call 541.617.7855 kmorris@bendbulletin.com


F4 Thursday, January 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M Study shows vitamin D link to newborns catching colds By Eryn Brown Los Angeles Times

Photos by Gene Sweeney Jr. / Baltimore Sun

The Acupuncture for All clinic in Baltimore treats several patients at a time in a peaceful, communal room, which keeps the costs down for patients.

Acupuncture Continued from F1 Community acupuncture patients say they are drawn to the clinics because of the combination of low cost, accessibility, and the community concept. Patients at clinics such as Wolfson’s pay between $20 to $40 a treatment. (Traditional practices charge up to $90 per visit.) Wolfson goes an extra step and offers a sliding scale. He never challenges the amount of money he receives. Payments are deposited in a drop box in the clinic. “Patients pay what they can afford,” he said. “Everyone’s financial situation is different. There are people who ask if they can pay below that $20 fee because of their financial situation. That is fine. I don’t turn anyone away.” Low cost is the biggest draw of community acupuncture businesses, according to Karen Jackson-Williams, a licensed acupuncturist who works at Honey-Bee Free Acupuncture in Greenbelt, Md., and Tai Sophia Institute in Laurel, Md. Jackson-Williams, who has been following the community acupuncture model for the past two years, said lower cost helps expose more people to the treatment. “If anything, it would be a benefit to a traditional practitioner,” she said. “People get to have a good first experience at a reduced price. Then they have the opportunity to later use a private practitioner if they want.” The lower price also allows patients to receive frequent treatments, which maximizes the benefits of acupuncture, Wolfson said. “Because of the low cost, patients are able to do the follow-up treatment,” Wolfson said. “That is an important piece of community acupuncture. It is not about just getting enough money for an acupuncture treatment. This model allows people to go through a whole course of treatment. They are able to see if acupuncture is a modality for them.” And community acupunc-

Lynn Hunobice gets acupuncture treatment on her feet and arthritic joints for balance and energy. turists are able to treat a larger number of patients in a shorter amount of time. At most community clinics, each visit typically lasts about an hour. An intake questionnaire is completed so that the acupuncturist can individualize the proper plan for each patient. After customers roll up their sleeves and remove their shoes, they are ready for the treatment. “The needles stay in on average 45 minutes,” Wolfson said. “The nice thing about the clinic is that people who want to stay longer can stay. But most people feel done after 45 minutes.” Despite Acupuncture for All’s high-volume mission, the clinic is surprisingly quiet. The gurgle from a water fountain meshes with relaxing music playing overhead. Seven reclining seats are arranged in a circular fashion. The walls are painted with a cobalt blue and adorned with framed pictures of exotic locations. A large oriental rug in the center of the room pays homage to the technique’s origins. The dimmed lights give the room a relaxed feel. “It’s like being in your living room,” Schulin said.

Wolfson encourages a tranquil environment. “A majority of people fall asleep,” Wolfson said. “We may whisper a little bit as I am putting in the needles. But generally the treatment room is very quiet.” One night, there was a constant flow of patients, including Lynn Hunobice, an activity director for a local retirement community, who visits the clinic at least once a week. Hunobice sought out acupuncture because she needed a source of relief from arthritis and the daily stress involved in her job. “I needed to bring a balance to life,” she said. “I have a very intense job. I can get overwhelmed with it.” Wolfson stresses that community acupuncture and acupuncture in general is not for everyone. “Acupuncture is not going to be the treatment that helps everyone,” he said. “If they can’t do a consistent course of treatment and the treatments become sporadic, then they can’t decide if this is the treatment for them or not.”

LOS ANGELES — Even as a high-profile panel of experts recently disputed the conventional wisdom that Americans don’t get enough vitamin D — and that vitamin D deficiencies create greater risk of disease — new research shows that newborns with low levels of vitamin D have higher rates of respiratory infection and wheezing than infants born with more vitamin D in their systems. There was no correlation, however, between low vitamin D levels and asthma. The study, published recently in the journal Pediatrics, expanded on earlier work by Dr. Carlos Camargo of the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston that had shown that babies born to mothers who took vitamin D supplements were less likely to develop wheezing during childhood. This time around, instead of focusing on supplement intake, Camargo and his team looked at the levels of vitamin D in newborn cord blood samples collected from a group of 922 children in New Zealand who had participated in a study on asthma and allergies between 1997 and 2001. In addition to allowing researchers to collect cord blood, the babies’ mothers had filled out periodic questionnaires about their children’s health up until the children turned 5. The researchers mined the data to determine rates of wheezing, infections and asthma in the group and correlate them with vitamin D levels in the cord blood. They found that the lower the amount of vitamin D, the higher the risk of wheezing. Newborns with particularly low levels of the vitamin — about one in five — were twice as likely to develop respiratory infections such as colds, coughs and ear infections during the first three months of life, the team reported. But even though asthma doesn’t appear to result directly from low vitamin D levels, treating asthmatic kids with vitamin D could still be effective because it might reduce respiratory infections that can exacerbate the condition, the researchers wrote.

F A C T VS. FICTION T H E C L A IM :

Going out in the cold makes you more susceptible to the flu. THE REALITY: That idea is false, said Dr. Richard Fawcett, an infectious disease specialist and health officer at the Deschutes County Health Department. “There’s no data to suggest that flu will take hold when a person has had exposure to the elements.” Fawcett said the notion that going out in the cold causes illness likely took hold because the flu virus typically circulates during the colder months of the year. The flu virus survives better in low humidity, Oregon State University researchers

reported last year. January and February are typically the least humid months of the year. In reality, Fawcett said, it’s more likely that being inside during the cold months is the culprit. When people spend lots of time indoors in close proximity to one another, they may be more likely to spread germs, causing flu to spread faster during that time of year. — Betsy Q. Cliff, The Bulletin

THERMOGRAPHY

Beware the hype on new breast test By Nara Schoenberg Chicago Tribune

If the Internet buzz about a pain-free, radiation-free alternative to mammography sounds too good to be true, there’s a reason for that. Breast thermography — recently touted as the “best breast test” by Oprah favorite Dr. Christiane Northrup, writing in the Huffington Post — has never been proven effective for routine breast cancer screening in a large-scale, randomized study, experts say. The FDA has never approved it for that purpose. Last year Oregon’s attorney general shut down a troubled health clinic, accusing it, in part, of misrepresenting thermography as superior to mammography for breast cancer screening. “The bottom line is that the proven technology for screening for breast cancer is X-ray or digital mammography. And that is the only proven technology,” says Robert Smith, director of cancer screening for the American Cancer Society. Northrup responded to a request for comment with an email saying, in part, “Thermography has been shown to pick up abnormalities in the heat in the breast many years before a lesion would likely show up

in a mammogram. The ideal is to use both technologies when appropriate.” Breast thermography uses infrared cameras to detect subtle heat elevation associated with tumors, which tend to have more blood flow and higher metabolic rates than normal tissue. Thermography was considered a promising screening technology in the 1960s, but it fell out of favor with doctors in the 1970s when a large study found that it detected only 39 percent of breast cancers, while mammography picked up 78 percent. Thermography advocates argue that the technology has improved vastly since then, and they may have a point. A small study of thermography as a supplement to mammography, published in the American Journal of Surgery in 2008, found that thermography has an impressive 97 percent sensitivity rate, meaning that it correctly identified 97 percent of the women who had cancer. Unfortunately, its specificity rate, the proportion of women correctly identified by the test as not having cancer, was a disappointing 44 percent. (Modern mammography has a sensitivity rate ranging from 77 percent to 95 percent and a specificity rate from 94 percent to 97 percent.)

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day

Start your new year resolutions with us! Get fit & have fun! Fitness 101 classes for the beginner • Expanded yoga & pilates classes 175 weekly fitness classes • Open lap & recreation swimming State of the art fitness center • Hot tub, steam room, and sauna

For more details, call (541) 389-POOL (7665) or visit us at 800 NE 6th. www.juniperswimandfitness.com


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, January 6, 2011 F5

M VITAL STATS Prices Prices in Oregon hospitals hospitals A recent report from America's Health Insurance Plans found that prices in Oregon hospitals increased substantially in each year between 2005 and 2009. The report measured the amount of money actually paid to hospitals by private insurers, which can impact premiums and co-payments of beneficiaries.

Average annual increase in price of common procedures Appendix removal Balloon angioplasty without heart attack Cesarean delivery Hip joint replacement Knee joint replacement Normal newborn Surgical repair of herniated disk (back)

11% 8%

12% 11% 10% 10% 10%

Vaginal delivery

14%

Vaginal hysterectomy

13%

Source: America’s Health Insurance Plans and Office for Oregon Health Policy and Research Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

PEOPLE Please send information about people involved in health issues to communitylife@bendbulletin .com. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Alisha Hopper, the executive director of HealthMatters of Central Oregon, has been selected as a member of the consumer advisory group of the Health Insurance Exchange. The group will help the Health Insurance Exchange — which allows people to Alisha Hopper compare price and quality of health plans — to plan and develop the statewide program. Laura Goold, an occupational therapist at Southside Laura Goold Physical Therapy in Bend, has attended an advanced lymphedema therapists’ class at the Foldi Clinic in Germany. Goold is certified to treat primary and secondary lymphedema. Mandala Yoga Community has hired two new instructors. Ulla Lundgren will teach anusara yoga and Uma Kleppinger will teach ashtanga, yin and ninja warrior yoga. Kleppinger will also teach BikeYoga in Bend.

Lean Continued from F1 Procedures are much more efficient, said Nave, and in some cases that has shortened the time patients spend under the knife. “That’s a huge benefit.” The organization of the central processing room at St. Charles Redmond is part of a larger effort by the entire St. Charles Health System, which also operates hospitals in Bend and Prineville. Taking methods developed by companies in other industries, most notably Toyota Motor Corp., the hospital system is striving to create efficiency in the way it does business. It’s looking for ways to reduce waste, improve quality, ease staff frustrations and, ultimately, make things better for patients. The methods, known as lean practices, have long been used in other industries, but hospitals have only recently caught on. “In terms of reliability, the health care industry is so much behind others,” said Joan Wellman, a Seattlebased consultant who helps health care entities incorporate lean practices. Some companies in other industries, she said, “have so few process and quality problems that they measure (errors) in parts per million. In health care we measure in parts per hundred. Quality problems are much more frequent.” As a way to address quality problems, many health care organizations are now looking at lean practices. In a recent survey, Wellman said, about half of the country’s hospitals had at least some type of lean effort. The draw is the opportunity to improve quality while simultaneously reducing cost. Lean aims to get rid of things that make a job more complex, such as extra steps in a process or excess paperwork. Cutting waste both drives down expenses and often results in better outcomes for patients. Lean practices are established by examining specific areas or functions of the organization. For instance, the hospital examined how to reduce the time it takes to get lab results back or cut wait times in emergency rooms. By tackling these areas, the organization can run more smoothly and serve patients better. “In a lean system,” said Wellman, “you are constantly focused on the patient, making value for the patient.”

Employees are experts A primary tenet of lean practices, and a key aim of St. Charles, is to empower employees to change things for the better. The idea is that the people actually doing the work — not managers or executives — are in the best position to improve how it’s done. One of the first lean projects at St. Charles Bend involved

“You are asking people to change the way they behave. You’re asking them to change the way they work.” Many organizations have trouble convincing people that the lean initiative is a worthwhile effort, said Graben. One challenge, he said is “convincing people that they need to change, that they need to improve.” Graben said that once employees see good results, that their work is made easier or that they have more time to spend with patients, they often come around. In that way, he said, using techniques from corporate America can, paradoxically, make the hospital a more caring place to be. By helping fix the problems that vex those who tend to patients, he said, “it can be more of a caring environment. ... (Lean) can equip them to do a better job with the clinical aspects of care.” Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Pam Johnson, a sterile processing technologist at St. Charles Redmond, gathers supplies in the central processing room at the hospital. St. Charles Health System plans to make the entire organization more efficient using techniques borrowed from manufacturing and other industries. Cleaning up this room was one of the first projects. the emergency department. The doors leading from the ER to the main hospital at St. Charles Bend had to be opened manually, which made it difficult for nurses to wheel patients through them. Often, said Vikki Hickmann, a registered nurse in the ER, she would be holding the doors with her hip, while awkwardly grabbing the bottom of the gurney to get a patient through them. Seeing the opportunity to improve the situation, Hickmann and others spearheaded the installation of a button to open the doors automatically. Now, they can stay near the patient’s head, talking to them or monitoring vital signs. “The ones at the bedside really know what they need to take care of patients well,” said Hickmann. Another project, in the intensive care unit at St. Charles Bend, involved cleaning out a room that could have been used for patients but was instead being used for storage. The very day they finished cleaning it out, the unit was full. Had the new room not been available, that patient would likely have been transferred to Portland or elsewhere in the Willamette Valley, said JoAnn Miller-Watts, who focuses on implementing lean practices throughout the health system. This kind of project is exactly the kind of win-win that lean practices aim for. Patients clearly benefit by staying close to home, and the hospital benefits by keeping the revenue. In addition, it reduces the cost of that patient’s care overall — by avoiding the transfer to another institution — and could improve the patient’s medical outcome by delivering treatment faster than if they had to go to another hospital. Changes are typically “little but big,” said Katie Williams, who also specializes in implementing lean practices at St. Charles. She said projects she implements are often the lowhanging fruit of inefficiency, but that no one has had a chance to tackle them.

Put Life Back in Your Life Living Well with Ongoing Health Issues Workshops begin Jan. 20. If you have conditions such as diabetes, arthritis, high blood pressure, heart disease, chronic pain and anxiety, the Living Well with ongoing health issues program can help you take charge of your life. The six-week workshop and the book “Living a Healthy Life with Chronic Conditions” costs only $10.

Living Well serves the communities of Deschutes, Crook and Jefferson counties

Workshop series offered: Jan. 20 - Feb. 28 Bend Workshop Times (please call for class locations) Jan. 20 to Feb. 24, 2 to 4:30 p.m. (Thursdays) Jan. 24 to Feb. 28, 2:30 to 5 p.m. (Mondays) Jan. 24 to Feb. 28, 6 to 8:30 p.m. (Mondays)

For a complete list of Living Well sponsors or to pre-register, please visit

www.livingwellco.org

(541) 322-7430

“Anyone can do a lean project, but whether you can transform your organization using these principles is the question.” — Joan Wellman, Seattle-based consultant on lean practices

Staff are often so busy caring for patients, they don’t have the time to step back, ask how things are working and potentially change them. “You only have windows of 15 to 20 minutes,” said Hickmann. “You can’t be taking care of patients while you’re trying to improve a process. It’s too disjointed.”

Resistance Not everyone at St. Charles is enamoured of the new approach. A group of employees at St. Charles Bend filed a petition in November seeking to join a chapter of a union that represents health care workers. (A vote on the union took place Wednesday, but results were not in by presstime.) Among the grievances listed by those pushing for the union: corporate efficiency.

“I have worked at St. Charles for 25 years and have seen it change from a warm, friendly place that felt like a family to a place that feels less like a hospital and more like a corporation,” wrote Kathy Korne, a phlebotomist, on a website explaining the effort, www.wearestcharles.org, Ken Daniels, an employee who works in central processing spoke of his dislike for recent changes during union negotiations. “The last three to five years have been a huge change,” he said. “It’s gone corporate.” To be sure, these employees were not speaking specifically of the lean approach. But the lean initiative has been one of the central pillars of the health system’s efforts to incorporate business principles into the management of its hospitals. St. Charles has also begun using other management techniques borrowed from corporate America and has employed costcutting measures more familiar at large companies than nonprofit hospitals, including laying off staff to outsource certain functions and cutting pay for employees. Buy-in is a challenge among some employees, acknowledge St. Charles staff who work on lean practices. “Lean is not easy,” said Cory Hammond, who specializes in lean practices at St. Charles.

Will it last? Whether or not St. Charles can convince those on the front lines of patient care that the lean approach is worthwhile will almost surely determine whether the effort succeeds. With just 13 projects under their belt, “we’re infantile in this process,” said Miller-Watts. Being able to keep focused on the approach and maintain the improvements will be a challenge, she acknowledged. “Sustainability is the hardest piece.” Both Miller-Watts and Hammond left their posts at the hospital to concentrate full time on facilitating lean projects. Others work part time on the projects. The organization is currently in the process of recruiting more employees to become lean facilitators and run more projects. Even with the best case scenario, it will take years for the health system to change behavior enough that lean principles dominate the way the hospital runs. “Anyone can do a lean project,” said Wellman, “but whether you can transform your organization using these principles is the question.” Wellman said it often takes at least a decade for an organization to really transform itself. “Those that have been at it for 10 years are really good, 20 years are incredible. And Toyota is like watching a ballet.” Betsy Q. Cliff can be reached at 541-383-0375 or bcliff@ bendbulletin.com.


F6 Thursday, January 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

N VITAMINS TAKE YOUR VITAMINS: A regular look at the sources and benefits of vitamins and minerals.

Feeding young vegetarians doesn’t have to be tricky for concerned parents

Copper Copper is a required nutrient found naturally in such foods as seafood, liver, green vegetables, whole grains, lentils and nuts. Copper helps to regulate blood pressure and is needed to absorb iron. Some laboratory studies have suggested that copper may have antioxidant and anti-cancer properties, but high levels of copper have also been linked to a higher risk of certain cancers. Some people wear copper bracelets to help with arthritis, but there is no scientific evidence supporting the practice. Most people get enough copper from eating a balanced diet, although copper is generally added to multivitamins as well. Copper pipes and cookware also leach minute particles of copper into water or food. Copper toxicity is rare, but adults are advised not to take more than 10 milligrams per day, due to an increased risk of liver damage. People with Wilson’s disease, a genetic disorder that allows copper to build up in the body, should not take copper supplements. Diabetics should also avoid supplements containing copper, as the mineral can affect blood sugar levels. People with a copper deficiency can also have low iron levels, to the point of anemia, and may develop osteoporosis. Zinc supplements and large doses of vitamin C can block copper absorption. — Markian Hawryluk, The Bulletin Recommended daily allowance, in micrograms Men (19+): 0.9 mg Women (19+): 0.9 mg Pregnant women: 1 mg Breast-feeding women: 1.3 mg Children (0-6 months): 0.2 mg* Children (7-12 months): 0.2 mg Children (1-3 years): 0.3 mg Children (4-8 years): 0.4 mg Children (9-13 years): 0.7 mg Children (14-18): 0.9 mg

Oysters (cooked, 3 oz.): 6.4 mg Baking chocolate (1 oz.): 0.9 mg Cashews (1 oz.): 0.6 mg Peanut butter (2 tbsp): 0.6 mg Potato skin (from one potato): 0.5 mg Sources: Mayo Clinic, American Cancer Society, NutritionData.com

*No RDA has been set for children younger than 6 months; estimated adequate intake provided instead.

Good sources Calf liver (cooked, 3 oz.): 12.6 mg Thinkstock

Two tablespoons of peanut butter contain 0.6 mg of copper.

Calcium? From nondairy sources? It’s possible ... By Sam McManis McClatchy-Tribune News Service

You don’t have to eat cheddar cheese to get your daily dose of calcium. Read on for nondairy options:

1.

How many almonds would you have to eat to equal the 240 milligrams of calcium in 1 ounce of hardened cheddar cheese? a) 1 cup

No meat? No fish? No big deal

b) 2 ½ cups c) 4 cups

2.

How many ounces of salmon would you have to eat to equal the 300 milligrams of calcium in 1 cup of milk? a) 5 ounces b) 7.5 ounces c) 10 ounces

ANSWERS: 1: b; 2: a Source: www.fitsugar.com

By Carolyn Butler Special to The Washington Post

Both of my sons have been voracious carnivores from the get-go, devouring baby beef and chicken purees with gusto before graduating to gnawing spare ribs clean, inhaling full pots of meatballs and downing two to three hot dogs in a sitting. Over the past several months, however, my 4-yearold has started to reject nearly all forms of animal protein, one by one: First, steak was declared “too tough,” then chicken “yucky,” and on and on, with pork, sausage, ground beef, fish of any sort and even, last week, his once beloved franks. Hence, the macaroni-andcheese marathon at our dinner table of late. While Eli’s distaste for meat may just be a brief spurt of picky eating, a small but growing number of children and adolescents are consciously opting for a vegetarian diet. Earlier this year, a nationwide survey of 1,258 8- to 18-year-olds found that 3 percent never eat meat, poultry or seafood, up from 1.4 percent in 1995. That’s an estimated 1.4 million young vegetarians today, says Reed Mangels, nutrition advisor for the Vegetarian Resource Group. (That Baltimore-based organization commissioned the online survey, whose findings cannot be considered as reliable as polls using more traditional methodology.) Mangels points out that twothirds of these meatless kids are vegan, meaning that they also forgo animal products such as dairy and eggs. Vegetarianism “is definitely a more mainstream choice than ever before,” says Mangels, whose family, including two teenage girls, is vegan. Research on adult vegetarians suggests that a plant-based diet provides many ongoing health benefits, including a lower incidence of obesity, coronary heart disease, high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes and possibly certain types of cancer. (One of the latest studies on the topic, a small sampling published this summer in the peer-reviewed Nu-

4 Thinkstock photos, illustration by Althea Borck / The Bulletin

trition Journal, suggests that vegetarians may be less depressed and have better mood profiles than meat-eaters.) Lalita Kaul, a nutrition professor at Howard University College of Medicine in Washington, D.C., and a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association, says eating a wellplanned, well-balanced vegetarian diet “can be healthful and appropriate at any age.” But avoiding meat and other animal products doesn’t automatically ensure good nutrition. “‘Vegetarian’ is not synonymous with ‘healthy’; you have to be making good, healthy food choices and avoiding junk food,” says Hemant Sharma, a pediatrician at Washington’s Children’s National Medical Center. In fact, he points out, parents of a young vegetarian often need to be extra-vigilant in monitoring their offspring’s diet: “It’s important to pay special attention and to plan different factors of a plant-based diet out carefully, to ensure that growing children get all of the nutrients they need.” Sharma notes that typically, the more strict the kid is about being vegetarian (i.e., the more foods avoided), the more oversight is needed. “Flexitarians,” who occasionally eat meat, and “pesca-

tarians,” who consume fish, are on the less worrisome end of the spectrum, and true vegans, who don’t touch milk, eggs or even honey, are at the opposite end. Experts agree that getting enough food overall is key. “In plant-based diets, which tend to be very high in fiber, children often get a sense of fullness before they really ingest enough calories as they need, or eat enough food to provide adequate energy,” says Sharma, who recommends three meals and three snacks a day for his vegetarian patients, all filled with such energy-dense options as nuts, seeds and avocado, as well as such high-protein foods as tofu and other soy products, beans and, for those who aren’t vegan, low-fat dairy and eggs. The main sources of concern about vitamins and minerals that meat-eaters get but that vegetarians might not are iron (particularly for teenage girls) and, for vegans, vitamin D, Vitamin B12 and calcium, says registered dietitian Mangels. Still, she emphasizes that it is entirely possible to get the proper levels of all nutrients with some planning and a multivitamin if necessary. My own finicky foodie aside, many kids choose to eat less meat or to become all-out vegetarians

for perfectly valid, even admirable, reasons, from taste and moral objections to family preferences. But Sharma counsels that parents of older children who opt for a plantbased diet try to suss out whether their motives are entirely pure. “It’s important to look for clues and assess whether this choice to be a vegetarian might reflect an underlying eating disorder … which can sometimes present with just a restriction in what an adolescent will be willing to eat,” he says. Happily, cooking for a lone vegetarian or two doesn’t have to be stressful or take much more effort, says Mangels, who suggests focusing on the meatless meals your family already eats, such as the aforementioned macaroni and cheese, a hearty minestrone or lentil soup, or bean burritos. From there, “it’s all about looking at foods that you can make vegetarian or not quickly, like stir-frying a whole lot of vegetables and offering both tofu and chicken, so that everyone can mix what they like,” she says, noting that giving up meat is positive for the environment and can be much less expensive. “Just try seeing it as an opportunity to help the whole family eat healthier.”


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, January 6, 2011 G1

CLASSIFIEDS

To place your ad visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

The Bulletin

LEGAL NOTICES

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

EMPLOYMENT

GENERAL MERCHANDISE

Find Classifieds at

www.bendbulletin.com

RENTALS/REAL ESTATE

contact us:

TRANSPORTATION

hours:

Place an ad: 541-385-5809

FAX an ad: 541-322-7253

Business Hours:

Place an ad with the help of a Bulletin Classified representative between the business hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

Include your name, phone number and address

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Subscriber Services: 541-385-5800

Classified Telephone Hours:

Subscribe or manage your subscription

24 Hour Message Line: 541-383-2371 Place, cancel, or extend an ad

On the web at: www.bendbulletin.com

B u l l e t i n :

ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

General Merchandise

200 202

Want to Buy or Rent PAYING CASH FOR OLD WATCHES WORKING OR NOT Call 541-706-0891

205

Items for Free FREE Pit Bull Puppies, only 2 left. Call 541-410-6320.

263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies Lhaso Apso, 9-yr female needs home of older person, no children/pets. 541-788-6630

Chia-Doodle Pups, 7 weeks, 1st shot, $160 Cash, Call 541-678-7599.

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

POODLES AKC Toy. Also Pom-a-Poos or Chi-Poms. B&W, colors. 541-475-3889

A Queensland Heelers Special New Year family Standards & mini,$150 & up. member! (2) 8-week black & 541-280-1537 white pups. Will be under 12 http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com lbs. $175. 541-350-1684 Shih-poo puppy, 1 adorable Dachshunds, AKC, mini’s, (2) fefemale left. This sweet girl is males: chocolate/tan dapple, hypo-allergenic, family raised. $375. Photos available. $350. Kelly, 541-489-3237 541-420-6044, 541-447-3060 Shih-Poos 3 adorable males left, family raised, don’t miss your chance to own one of the best! $300 541-744-1804 Siberian Husky, 6 mo. old, male, shots, house-broke, $200. 541-480-6858.

English bulldog, AKC, born 10/24/2010. Male, first shot, $1800, Super cute pup, 541-536-6262. English Bulldogs AKC, 2 males left! Home raised, excellent health, $1500. 541-290-0026 Free Airdale, Female, 3 yrs. old, housebroken, trail ride, good watch dog, 541-815-1629.

AKC Registered English Bulldog Stud Service Comes from good bloodlines, very healthy. If interested please call (541) 610-5002. AKC Yellow Labradors 4/males for more info please visit us at www.coldcreekfarms.com 541-942-1059. AUSSIE PUPPIES, Mini & Toy, $250-$300. 1st shots, tails docked. Tris & Merles, ready 1/12. 541-420-9694 Australian Cattle Dogs / Heelers Great temperament, herding instinct. 541-279-4133 Australian Shepherd, toys & minis, 2 litters family raised $450-$600. 541-475-1166

Black Lab/Walker Hound Pups. 11 wks, 1st shots & wormed. 3 @ $50 ea. 541-382-7567

Welsh Corgi, 7 wks, very cute & playful, 1st shot, dewclaws, tail done $350. 541.350-3981

210 !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

Frenchie/Pug puppy. Last one. Adorable, smart, stout male. $700. 541-548-0747 or 541-279-3250.

$125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

www.megaquest.us

Lab Pups AKC - 2 blacks, 2 chocolates, dew claws, 1st shots & wormed. Hunters. $450-$500. 541-536-5385 www.welcomelabs.com

246

260

267

Misc. Items

Fuel and Wood

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

GIA N T G u n & K n if e S h o w Portland Expo Center Jan. 8 and 9, 2011 Sat., 9-6, Sun. 9-4 Admission $9 503-363-9564 wesknodelgunshows.com G U N S Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

HANDGUN SAFETY CLASS for concealed license. NRA, Police Firearms Instructor, Lt. Gary DeKorte Wed. Jan. 12, 6:30-10:30 pm. Call Kevin, Centwise, for reservations $40. 541-548-4422 Ruger, Mini 14, scope, sling, & (3) 20 shot clips, $520, call 541-548-6277. WANTED Hunting Rifle & Pistol. Cash paid. 541-550-9830 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

211

Children’s Items Trampoline, round, large, great shape, $40, please call 541-815-5618.

212

Antiques & Collectibles The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

248

Health and Beauty Items O.P.I. AXXIUM soak-off gel lacquer kit, $30. 541-749-8127.

253

TV, Stereo and Video Samsung 52” box big screen, 2006 excellent cond. Must sell, $400. 541-480-2652.

255

Computers 215

Coins & Stamps WANTED TO BUY US & Foreign Coin & Currency collections, accum. Pre-1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling flatware. Gold coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex & vintage watches. No collection too large or small. Bedrock Rare Coins 541-549-1658

Alpaca Yarn, various colors/ blends/sparkle. 175yds/skein $7.50-8.50 ea. 541-385-4989 ATTENTION CRAFTERS! Spring Fair, March 25-27 at Douglas County Fairgrounds. Our 36th year. Booths available for quality crafts. For info send SASE to: Spring Fair 2011, PO Box 22, Dillard, OR 97342

241

Bicycles and Accessories

LAB PUPS AKC, titled parents, FC/AFC, Blackwater Rudy is grand sire. Deep pedigreed performance/titles, OFA hips & elbows. 541-771-2330 www.royalflushretrievers.com

Labrador, black approx 6-yr fem. some training, very sweet, free to good home. 541-433-9312 Labrador pups AKC, chocolate, yellow, hips guaranteed, $150-$450. 1-541-954-1727

242

Exercise Equipment AB LOUNGE SPORT, LIKE NEW $30; TEETER HANG UP, $175 NEITHER USED 541-678-0162

246

Guns & Hunting and Fishing Furniture

.22 Stevens Model 860 Rifle, good condition, $170 or best offer. 541-647-8931 Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 541-318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call

541-598-4643.

B e n d

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Over- Motorized Mt. Bike, 2 hours on new engine. no lic. required. German Shepherd pups, 6 wks stock sale. Lance & Sandy’s $295. 541-388-0871 lv msg. $350-$450. 541-410-7388 Maytag, 541-385-5418

Kittens still available! Cat Rescue, Adoption & Foster Team will be open Fri. 12/31 & Sun. 1/2 from 1-4 PM (closed New Years). Lots of nice cats & kittens, low adoption fee. Altered, shots, ID chip, more. Visit @ 65480 78th St, Bend, 541-389-8420, 541-598-5488. Also avail. @ foster home, 541-815-7278 See www.craftcats.org

A v e . ,

210

Crafts and Hobbies

Furniture & Appliances

Labradoodles, Australian Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

Cavalier King Charles Spaniels males $1200; females $1500 AKC reg. 541-382-7614 ww.companioncavaliers.com

C h a n d l e r

Furniture & Appliances

240

A-1 Washers & Dryers

55 Gallon corner fish tank, $200 OBO. 541-389-9268

S . W .

Cockapoo Mix -

208

Pets and Supplies

1 7 7 7

Astra 40cal. A-75, Spain-made sub-compact w/2 mags & case, $425. 541-647-8931 Beretta 12ga 686 White Onyx, retails new $2100; mint! Sell $1600. 415-235-9410 (Bend) Beretta AL 391 Urika Sporting Clays 12 gauge, 30 in. barrel and 6 Briley Spectrum choke tubes, 1000 rounds shot $1200 OBO, 541-771-0301

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

260

Misc. Items BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191.

Moving boxes: used 1X inc. wardrobes. Moved from 4200 SF house, there's a bunch of them. Asking $50 cash OBO. 541-633-7307. U pick up and must take ALL. In Awbrey Butte area. W a n t e d - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

261

Medical Equipment Electronic Adjustable Bed, twin size, wireless remote adjusts foot & head for max comfort. 3 yrs old with minimum use. $495. 541-504-0975

265

Building Materials 20 LOGS, 8”X20’ perfect for fence or accent, $1 per foot. 541-420-6235 Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

266

Heating and Stoves Harman Stove Co. pellet stove model #PP38. Super charger setting & electric blower. Motor recently serviced. Glass front. 0.75-5.5 lbs/hr. Will heat 1500 sq ft. Approved for mobile homes; UL listed. $525. 541.383.8077 strideon@silverstriders.com NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

267

Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include,

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS?

name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks! Ad must include price of item

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809

Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers. Thank you. All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT lodgepole, $150 for 1 cord or $290 for 2. Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484

BEND’S HOMELESS NEED OUR HELP The cold weather is upon us and sadly there are still over 2,000 folks in our community without permanent shelter, living in cars, makeshift camps, getting by as best they can. The following items are badly needed to help them get through the winter:

d

CAMPING GEAR of any sort: d Used tents, sleeping bags, tarps, blankets.

d

WARM CLOTHING d Rain Gear, Boots

Browning 12 ga BPS pump, good/used bird gun, $200. 541-647-8931

Please drop off your donations at the BEND COMMUNITY CENTER 1036 NE FIFTH STREET (312-2069)

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Questions: Call Ken Boyer, 389-3296, or Don Auxier, 383-0448 PLEASE HELP. YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

O r e g o n

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Dry Lodgepole For Sale $150 per cord rounds; $170 per cord split. 35 years’ service to Central Oregon. Call 541-480-5601

SPLIT, DRY LODGEPOLE DELIVERY INCLUDED! $175/CORD. Call for half-cord prices! Leave message, 541-923-6987 WILL BUY FIREWOOD By the cord or by the load. Call 541-771-8534

Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663 SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

270

Lost and Found

300 308

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Free Horses, broke to ride, 1 Appaloosa, 1 Thoroughbred, to good homes, 541-306-0285

Farm Equipment and Machinery

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

325

Hay, Grain and Feed Barn stored Alfalfa $9 per bale. In Culver. 541-480-8185

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Bluegrass Straw mid-size 3x3, $25/bale; Orchard grass hay mid-size 3x3 $45/bale. Volume discounts; delivery available. 541-480-8648. Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

Found around December 20 at the Redmond Airport Terminal Secure Hold area, one Ipod in case and accessories, call to identify. Gail Bloom, Airport Office Assistant, Roberts Field, 541-504-3497. FOUND Bassett Hound, 3-4 year female, Riggs & Reif, Powell Butte, Jan 2. 541-548-7142 FOUND ski poles at Meissner Ski Park. Call to identify 541-548-4628 LOST 12/24/10 female Blue Heeler mix, 5th St. and Lava Drive LaPine, not wearing a collar but has microchip. name is Patches. 30# 3 years, white and brown spots. (541) 536-5621. (541) -728-4397,( 541) 536-3689.

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com Stalls/paddocks (2) avail. Family barn, 3 mi. west of Redmond, daily turnout, arena, round pen, ride to river, hay available. 541-480-5260. Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

358

Farmers Column 10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1461 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

375

Meat & Animal Processing Angus Beef, 1/2 or whole, grain fed, no hormones $3.44/lb., hanging weight, cut & wrap included, please call 541-383-2523.

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

Oregon Classified Advertising Network

9 7 7 0 2 341

Farm Market

269

Check out OCANs online at classifieds.oregon.com!

T h e

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

YOUR AD WILL RECEIVE CLOSE TO 2,000,000 EXPOSURES FOR ONLY $250! Oregon Classified Advertising Network is a service of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association.

Week of January 3, 2011

Business Opportunity DO YOU earn $800 in a day? Your own local candy route! 25 machines and candy all for $9995. 877-915-8222. All major credit cards accepted.

Employment DRIVERS- COMPANY drivers up to 40k first year. New team pay! Up to .48cents/ mile CDL training available. Regional locations. (877) 369-7104. www.centraldrivingjobs.net. DRIVER- DRIVE Knight in 2011! Get paid for what you hauled yesterday. Top equipment! Van and refrigerated. CDL-A, three months OTR experience. 800-419-9569. www.driveknight.com. SEEKING 10 year or newer 3/4 ton or larger trucks to deliver RVs from our Oregon and Idaho facilities to dealers across the Western U.S. and Canada. No force dispatch! 1-866-764-1601 or www.qualitydriveaway.com

Miscellaneous HIP REPLACEMENT surgery: If you had hip replacement surgery between 2005-present and suffered problems requiring a second revision surgery you may be entitled to compensation. Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727.


G2 Thursday, January 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Employment

400 421

Schools and Training Area VII Plumbers JATC MA 7005 will be accepting applications for the plumbing apprenticeship applicant pool list. Please submit request for an application packet to apprenticeshipservices@ gmail.com TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state.

Employment Opportunities Apartment Community Manager needed in Bend, full-time Qualifications: • Must have Property Management experience • Must understand financials, budgeting and rent growth • Must have excellent communication skills with all levels of staff • Must be able to live on-site; 3 Bdrm Apt. • Tax Credit exp. preferred

To apply please send resume to kpetersen@princeton property.com or Fax to 503-794-9045

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

476

Crew Leader needed to ensure the safety, productivity, and cohesion of Heart of Oregon young adult crews. Experience in crew supervision and operating equipment with technical skills in forestry and environmental conservation required. Drug test, reference, ODL, and background check required. FT, year-round position with benefits. To apply, send cover letter and resume to katie.condit@heartoforegon. org by 5p.m. Jan 10th. No calls please.

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 Caregiver Prineville senior care home looking for Care Manager for two 24-hour shifts per week. Must be mature and compassionate, and pass criminal background check. Ref. required. 541-447-5773.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today! Crusher

476

476

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Dental -Front Office 4 Days a week, dental assistant preferred. Drop off resume at 2078 NE Professional Ct., Bend. 541-382-2281. Jack Miller, DMD Branden Ferguson, DDS

Night Auditor

Food Service - Bruno’s Grocery & U-bake is hiring for Cashier & Pizza Maker. Apply in person at 1709 NE 6th St., Bend. No phone calls.

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Food Service - Bruno’s Grocery & U-bake is hiring for Cashier & Pizza Maker. Apply in person at 1709 NE 6th St., Bend. No phone calls. General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Superintendant

McMurry Ready Mix Co. An Equal Opportunity Employer is currently hiring a CRUSHER SUPERINTENDANT Must have 3 years experience, good knowledge of computers, mechanical & electrical skills. Knowledge of Gradations. Must be will to relocate & travel. Good driving record. Job duties include: Supervising crushing crew, ordering parts, paper work, MSHA regulations, scheduling, trucks & repairs. Contact Dave Ondriezek at 307-259-3891

CAUTION

The Ranch is accepting applications for Night Auditors. Accounting background, computer skills, 10-key and basic math computation preferred. This dependable individual must be enthusiastic, customer service oriented, with a positive attitude . Duties include reconciling department ledgers and running daily reports. May be required to perform front desk duties including taking reservations and checking people in/out of the Ranch. Benefits include swimming, golf, food and merchandise discounts. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

541-383-0386

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Maintenance Supervisor. Salary DOE. Please send resume to: Precision Lumber Co., 3800 Crates Way, The Dalles, OR 97058.

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

Come Join the Best Team Around! Pre-Employment Drug Screen Required. Drug Free Workplace.

(Private Party ads only)

Finance & Business

Rentals

500 600 507

604

Real Estate Contracts

Storage Rentals

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

Secure 10x20 Storage, in SE Bend, insulated, 24-hr access, $95/month, Call Rob, 541-410-4255.

528

605

Loans and Mortgages

Roommate Wanted

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

Share 3 Bdrm 2 bath Prineville home. $350/mo + ½ electricity; $200 dep. Everything else paid including satellite TV. Pets/smokers OK upon approval. 541-233-6615

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200. Earn 8-10% interest on well-secured first trust deeds. Private party. 541-815-2986

573

Business Opportunities Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

630

Rooms for Rent STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

Condo / Townhomes For Rent 2 Bdrm townhouse, 2.5 bath, office, fenced yard w/deck, garage. 1244 “B” NE Dawson. $750 dep. $775/mo., W/S/G paid, pets possible. 541-617-8643,541-598-4932 Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755. Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

632

Apt./Multiplex General FIRST MONTH HALF-OFF! 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex. NEW CARPET & PAINT THROUGHOUT! W/D included. No smoking. No Pets. 1yr. lease. $795/mo. + $945 sec. 20076 Beth. 541-382-3813 The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

System Administrator

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H 286

288

288

Sales Northeast Bend Sales Southeast Bend Sales Southeast Bend

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Jack & Dorothy Donnelly

MOVING

SALE

61297 KING SAUL Friday, Jan. 7 • Saturday, Jan. 8,

Winter Hours 9 -4

Crowd control admittance numbers issued at 8:00 am on Friday.

(Take 15th St. south from Reed Market Rd., go to King Hezekiah, left to King David, right to King Saul) 13' custom-made duck boat on trailer; 12 ga. Shotgun; 22 rifle; Pellet gun; Hundreds of duck and goose decoys and other hunting camo items. Antique sofa and chair; side chair; New trundle bed, never used paid $600. Three oak twin captains beds; Oak bookcase and TV stand; Lovely oriental style rug; Hide a bed; China cabinet; Two Kitchen cabinets; Granite topped kitchen island; Dinette set with two chairs; Rubbermaid storage sheds; lots of Rubbermaid storage bins; fishing gear. four older quilts; oak triple dresser with wing mirrors; buffet/dresser; large TV-older; oak coffee table; Honda 650 generator; 21" self propelled John Deere lawn mower; Quilt fabric and pieces and patterns; Misc. Kitchen appliances and cook's essentials pots and pans; Antique china head doll and bisque doll and compo doll; Side-by-side refrigerator, and washer and dryer; Handmade settee made in North Carolina; Chicken collection; drapes and curtains for sale; Lots and lots of linens; Wicker chair, rocker, table, and footstool; Wicker dog crate and bed steps; Cedar chest; Two white storage cabinets; Lawn and garden tools; Misc. electrical tools; Wheelbarrow and wheeled cart; Electric bird bath; Covered swing; Patio table and solar umbrella; Vacuum and electric broom; Liberty Blue dishes; Mikasa set of china; Antique Eastlake table and nice lamp; Antique clock; lamps; books; records; record player; and lots and lots of other items. www.deedysestatesales.com Handled by: Deedy's Estate Sales Co. LLC 541-419-2242 days 541-382-5950 eves

290

Sales Redmond Area Indoor Estate Sale: Everything must go, appl., furniture, bedding, lots of goodies, 2312 NE 5th St, Fri. & Sat 9-4

NOTICE Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sale event is over! THANKS! From The Bulletin and your local Utility Companies

www.bendbulletin.com

292

Sales Other Areas DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

Operate Your Own B u siness FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Prineville H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

We are looking for a System Administrator to join our team of talented technicians. This is an ideal job for someone with strong technical aptitude and a degree of server experience who enjoys working in a team atmosphere. Who are we? We are a large family-owned newspaper chain with an established commitment to our customers and employees. Well placed in a beautiful town full of outdoor and recreational opportunities, we offer a work environment that is enjoyable and challenging. Responsibilities: Implement and maintain systems running on Linux/UNIX, Mac, and Windows workstations and servers, Experience in cloud hosting a plus. Manage web, file, storage, DNS, DB & version control servers. Will respond to helpdesk support requests from end users. Work on project-related tasks to deploy new systems or conduct maintenance. Handle day-to-day data backup and recovery practices. Support 802.11 networks including rollout, access control, security assessment, intrusion detention, packet capturing, and space planning. Continually investigate new technology for securing hosts on the network and monitoring activity. Participate in software development/design tasks. Participate in an on-call rotation after hours and weekends. Must be able to routinely lift 50 pounds or more. Non-Technical: We're a social bunch at Western Communications and like to keep work fun and lighthearted. The ideal applicant is a good communicator, enjoys a challenge and likes to laugh. Please send resume to resume@bendbulletin.com


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, January 6, 2011 G3

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 658

Houses for Rent Redmond

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

634

642

650

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

1 & 2 bdrms Available starting at $575. Reserve Now! Limited Availability.

ASK ABOUT OUR New Year Special! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, non-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Alpine Meadows 541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928.

** Pick your Special **

2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps. Pet Friendly & No App. Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts.

Call about Our Specials! Studios to 3 bedroom units from $415 to $575 • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 Managed by

GSL Properties

(541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

Lovely 2 bdrm, private patio, small, quiet complex, W/S/G paid, no smoking, $525+ dep, 1000 NE Butler Mkt. Rd. Call 541-633-7533.

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend Fully furnished loft apt. on Wall Street in Bend. All utilities paid and parking. Call 541-389-2389 for appt. Nice, quiet 2 bdrm, new windows, W/G/S & cable paid, laundry on-site, cat OK, $575/mo, $500 dep. Call 541-389-9867; 541-383-2430

RIVER FALLS APARTMENTS LIVE ON THE RIVER WALK DOWNTOWN

1 bdrm. apt. fully furnished in fine 50s style. 1546 NW 1st St., $780 + $680 dep. Nice pets welcomed. 541-382-0117

638

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend STONE CREEK APARTMENTS 2 bdrm., 2 bath apartments W/D included, gas fireplaces 339 SE Reed Met. Rd., Bend Call about Move-In Specials 541-312-4222

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 1104 NW 7th St., #22 1 bdrm., 1 bath, $425 No credit checks. 1st & last only. Available now. Please call 541-788-3480. 2Bdrm 1bath, $540 mo. +$500 dep. W/D hkup, dishwasher, garage, W/S/G pd. Fenced yard, close to schools/shopping. 1-503-757-1949

DUPLEX SW Redmond 2 bdrm 2 bath, garage w/opener. 1300 sq ft, w/d hkup, fenced yard, deck, w/s/g pd. $700 mo + dep. 541-604-0338 Like New Duplex. Nice neighborhood. 2 Bdrm 2 bath, 1-car garage, fenced, central heat & AC. Fully landscaped, $700+dep. 541-545-1825.

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

Clean 3 Bdrm 2 Bath, new paint/carpet, 1262 sq ft, $900/mo. Near hosp; must see! No pets/smoking. 3023 NE Byers Ct. 541-410-0794

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend

4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room, w/woodstove, new carpet/paint, single garage w/opener. $795/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 Adorable duplex in Canyon Rim Village, 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath. all appl., includes gardener. Reduced to $749/mo. 541-408-0877. Adorable duplex in Canyon Rim Village, 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath. all appl., includes gardener. Reduced to $749/mo. 541-408-0877.

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver A newer 3/2 mfd. home, 1755 sq.ft., living room, family room, new paint, private .5 acre lot near Sunriver, $795. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803.

664

Houses for Rent Furnished RIVERFRONT: walls of windows with amazing 180 degree river view with dock, canoe, piano, bikes, covered BBQ, $1250. 541-593-1414

671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent Country Quiet, 6 mi. SE. of Bend, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, wood fireplace, large yard, no pets/ smoking, $550/mo.+dep., avail. now, 541-317-8744.

On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft., mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1295. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803 On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft., mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1295. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease 4628 SW 21st St., Redmond - 2250 sq ft office & warehouse. 15¢/sq ft for 1st 6 mos., + $300 cleaning dep. Avail Jan 15. 541-480-9041 Free Standing Office Bldg: Private offices, small conference room, perfect for medical, prime Bend, multi-line phones, $1250, lease, 541-385-6598.

1/1 cottage, woodstove, garage, deck, yard w/trees, private Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locaend of cul-de-sac, Bear tions, office w/bath from Creek/15th. Avail. now. $650 $400/mo. 541-317-8717 1st/last/dep. 541-330-0053

656

541-322-7253

Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft

658

827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404

Houses for Rent Redmond

Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft

827 Business Way, Bend 1 Bdrm, 1 bath, 547 1/2 NW 7th, 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404 $550; 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 626 1/2 Houses for SW 8th, $595; 2 bdrm, 1 bath, Office/Warehouse Space, Rent General 135 NW 10th St., $650, 6400 sq.ft., (3) 12x14 doors, 541-815-1709, CopperDog PM. on Boyd Acres Rd, The Bulletin is now offering a 541-382-8998. LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1031 sq.ft., fenced yard, dbl. garage, Rental rate! If you have a $850/mo., $700 dep., pets The Bulletin offers a LOWER, home to rent, call a Bulletin MORE AFFORDABLE Rental neg., drive by first at 1526 Classified Rep. to get the rate! If you have a home to NE 4th St., call 541-280-6235 new rates and get your ad rent, call a Bulletin Classified started ASAP! 541-385-5809 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, Rep. to get the new rates and Summerfield location, near get your ad started ASAP! 650 97, fresh interior paint, new 541-385-5809 Pergo, fully fenced. 1st & Houses for Rent 693 dep., $850. 503-997-7870.

648

NE Bend

3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2 car garage, bonus room, deck, fridge, gas stove, new paint, carpet & vinyl. $975/mo. Pets neg. Mike 541-408-8330.

3 Bdrm. Duplex, garage, fenced yard, $650/mo. 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, fenced yard, sprinkler system, dbl. garage, $750, No Application Fee, Pets considered, refs required. Call 541-923-0412.

700 800 705

850

Real Estate Services

Snowmobiles

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

3 Polaris Snowmobiles: 1989 Indy Trail, $600; 1998 RMK 500, $1200; and 2000 RMK 700, $1800. 541-419-4890

745

Homes for Sale

Excavating

CHECK YOUR AD

385-5809

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

The Bulletin is your

Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise. www.bendbulletin.com

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling •Decks •Window/Door Replacement •Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179 I DO THAT! Remodeling, Home Repairs, Professional & Honest Work. Commercial & Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 317-9768

Home Improvement Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Snow Removal Reliable 24 Hour Service • Driveways • Walkways • Parking Lots • Roof tops • De-icing Have plow & shovel crew awaiting your call!

Landscape Management •Pruning Trees And Shrubs •Thinning Over Grown Areas •Removing Unwanted Shrubs •Hauling Debris Piles •Evaluate Seasonal Needs EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/410-6945

Painting, Wall Covering MARTIN JAMES

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

762

Homes with Acreage Sisters, turnkey horse setup, 4 acres, great barn, 3 pastures, updated house, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, pond,irrigation, RV pad w/hook ups, $575,000, 541-549-9945.

771

Lots $139,000 2 acres MLS#201006299 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

(Private Party ads only)

Health forces sale, 1900 mi., 1K mi. service done, black on black, detachable windshield, back rest & luggage rack, $13,900, Mario, 541-549-4949, 619-203-4707

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

Premier Crooked River Ranch rim property. Sit on the porch swing as you take-in awesome view from Smith Rock, down the Crooked River Canyon, in both directions, ending at a pictureperfect portrait of Mt. Hood and Mt. Jefferson. Across the canyon view miles of Culver Ag lands. This 1.69 acre property boasts a newer home of modest size with lots of room to add accessory bldgs. The perfect vacation home, comes fully furnished $199,900. MLS#201009485 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

Motorcycle Trailer Kendon stand-up motorcycle trailer, torsion bar suspension, easy load and unload, used seldom and only locally. $1700 OBO. Call 541-306-3010.

875

Watercraft

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $1995 for all. Bill 541-480-7930.

rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919. YAMAHA 1998 230CC motor, 4WD, used as utility vehicle. excellent running condition. $2000 OBO. 541-923-4161 541-788-3896

870

Boats & Accessories

d SNOW REMOVAL! d

Lot Models With Furniture. Delivered & Set Up Start at $29,900, J & M Homes www.jandmhomes.com 541-350-1782

Tile, Ceramic

Suntree, 3 bdrm,2 bath, w/car port & shed.$19,900. Suntree, 4 bdrm, 2 bath,w/carport & shed, $25,750, 541-350-1782 www.JAndMHomes.com

Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

Your Credit Is Approved For Bank Foreclosures! www.JAndMHomes.com 541-350-1782

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718 Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $40,000 OBO/terms, 541-948-2126.

Grumman AA-5 Traveler, 1/4 interest, beautiful, clean plane, $9500, 619-822-8036 www.carymathis.blogspot.com

916

Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP,

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277 Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

925

Utility Trailers 14X6 UTILITY TRAILER $1200. Call Jimmy, 541-771-0789

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240.

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, reduced to $34,000 OBO 541-610-4472; 541-689-1351

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944 Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns.

KOMFORT 27’ 2000 5th wheel trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide. In excellent condition, has been stored inside. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

Travel Queen 34’ 1987 65K miles, oak cabi-

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

931

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 4 Studded Tires, with chains, 195-60/R15, used 1 season, $150 OBO. 541-389-9764 C-Class Mercedes Snow Tires with wheels, set of 4, $500. 541-419-4890. Six studded tires: EuroWinter 11 404s, 195/70R14 on rims, 5-lug, used one season, $300. 541-749-8127.

Antique and Classic Autos C-10

Pickup

1969,

152K mi. on chassis, 4 spd. transmission, 250 6 cyl. engine w/60K, new brakes & master cylinder, $2500. Please call 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800.

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $122,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

932 Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $5800. 541-330-0852. Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more. Priced to sell at $59,500! 541-317-9185

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

MONTANA 2000 36’ Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

Travel Trailers

3 slides, washer and dryer, new A/C. Very nice & livable! $12,500. 541-923-7351.

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. TERRY 27’ 1995 5th wheel with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great rig in great cond. $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

885

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Canopies and Campers Gearbox 30’ 2005, all the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

900

880

881 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

Autos & Transportation

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Motorhomes

nets, exc interior. Great extra bdrm! Reduced to $5000. 541-480-3286

Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., reduced to $3000, also boots, helmet, tires, avail., 541-410-0429

Fifth Wheels

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

Yamaha 350 Big Bear 1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition. $2,200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

882

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

865

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

ATVs

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

Oregon License #186147 LLC

d LARGE OR SMALL, d WE DO IT ALL! 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 d www.bblandscape.com d

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

NEW & USED HOMES:

Snow Removal

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

750

European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist 541-388-2993

881

Travel Trailers

The Bulletin Classified ***

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010,

*** Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

870

Boats & Accessories

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or Harley Davidson Heritage Soft discrimination based on race, Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras color, religion, sex, handicap, incl. pipes, lowering kit, familial status, marital status chrome pkg., $16,900 OBO. or national origin, or an in541-944-9753 tention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents Harley Davidson Police Bike or legal custodians, pregnant 2001, low mi., custom bike women, and people securing very nice.Stage 1, new tires custody of children under 18. & brakes, too much to list! This newspaper will not A Must See Bike $10,500 knowingly accept any adverOBO. 541-383-1782 tising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed Harley Davidson that all dwellings advertised Screamin’ Eagle in this newspaper are availElectric-Glide 2005, able on an equal opportunity 103” motor, 2-tone, candy basis. To complain of disteal, 18,000 miles, exc. crimination call HUD toll-free cond. $19,999 OBO, please at 1-800-877-0246. The toll call 541-480-8080. free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

Christmas Valley! Relaxing, tranquil, affordable getaway. Away from the hustle & 2 bedroom, 2 bath next to park, CLEAN 2 bdrm/1bath, new car- 4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family bustle of city life. Located Downtown Redmond pets, hardwood floors, gas Appliances avail. including close to town, yet far enough room, w/woodstove, new Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. heat & water, finished gabig screen TV! 3 units availto enjoy the starry skies. En$650/mo + utils; $650 secucarpet/paint, single garage rage, storage shed, $775 mo. able. $695-$750 month. joy 1 acre of 360° views in an rity deposit. 425 SW Sixth w/opener. $795/mo. See at 1230 NE Viking. 541-280-7781. area of great hunting, duck St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 hunting, fishing, golfing, rock hounding, camping, bird watching or riding quads on the sand dunes. Great property for weekend RVing or build your getaway! $6,000. MLS#2902491 Nancy Popp, Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website) Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

Barns

Boats & RV’s

Redmond Homes

Houses for Rent SW Bend $1000 Mo. Newer immaculate 3/2.5, 1560 sq.ft., dbl. garage 1st & last, pet neg. 19827 Powers Road. 503-363-9264,503-569-3518 ROMAINE VILLAGE MOBILES 61004 Chuckanut. 1900 sq.ft. 2 bdrm, 2 bath, 1/2 acre, $850. Pet OK. Call Jim, 541-388-3209.

Real Estate For Sale

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523.

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & humWhen ONLY the BEST will do! mingbirds, white soft top & 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe hard top, Reduced to $5,500, Model Camper, loaded, phe541-317-9319,541-647-8483 nomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, original owner, V8, auto58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as matic, great shape, $9000 unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160 OBO. 530-515-8199

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, exc. cond., $13,900 or take over payments, 541-390-2504

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833 Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962


G4 Thursday, January 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles 933

935

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $4850, 541-410-3425. MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all original, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256

VW Super Beetle 1974 New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3750 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

933

Pickups

Smolich Auto Mall

The Bulletin Classifieds

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

Hummer H2 2005 Now Only $29,995

Audi A4 Avant Quattro 2003 3.0L., 92K mi, garaged, serviced, silver, fully loaded, $9300. 541-420-9478 Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, V6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you. Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

Lexus IS250 2007 25K Miles! Vin #023074

New Price $21,988

Jeep Cherokee Laredo, 2003, 135K miles, fully loaded, excellent condition. $6500. Call 541-749-0316 Buick LeSabre Limited Edition 1985, 1 owner, always garaged, clean, runs great, 90K, $1895, 541-771-3133.

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

Now Only $15,465 $4800 below Kelly Blue Book

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $3500. 541-548-5302

BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 53K miles, automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $11,680. Please call 541-419-4018.

Kia Spectra LS, 2002 96K miles, black, 5-speed, runs good, $2600. Phone 541-749-0316

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl, 5-spd., 4x4, good cond, price reduced to $7950, 541-593-4437.

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 1998, like new, low mi., just in time for the snow, great cond., $7000, 541-536-6223.

Chevy HHR LT 2006 VIN #644129

Price Reduced Now Only $9,250

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $11,500. 541-408-2111

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Chrysler 2005 Pacifica AWD, leather, video sys, 3.5 liter V6, loaded, 21,500 mi, $13,950. 541-382-3666

Pontiac Torrent SUV AWD 2008 37K Miles! Vin #110246

Now Only $15,450

541-385-5809 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Dodge Durango 4X4 2003 Vin #623412

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer

Only $9,999 Dodge Ram 2001, short HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Suzuki Grand Vitara 4X4 2010 Navigaion, alloys & more! 1K Miles! Vin #100784

Now Only $23,755 Ford Excursion 4x4 2000. Nice Red, like new, only 68k, seats 9. Just $16,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

NISSAN

FORD EXPLORER 1992

smolichmotors.com

READY FOR SNOW! All Wheel Drive! 5 spd, loaded with all power equipment, sound system. All weather tires. Runs and drives good, Only $1800. 909-570-7067. Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer Ford F-350 Crew 4x4 2002. Triton V-10, 118k, new tires, wheels, brakes. Very nice. Just $14,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

Toyota RAV 4 Ltd. 2007 80K miles, moonroof, tow pkg, great condition! $13,750. 541-848-7876

940

Vans

Honda Ridgeline 4X4 2008 29K Miles!! VIN #531969

Price Reduced Now Only $21,877

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Preliminary Determination for Water Right Transfer T-10672

Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

DODGE RAM 1990 3500, excellent condition, 12,000 miles, $5600. 541-318-4835.

X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871.

custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $6000; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $2900. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

Special Offer

smolichmotors.com

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Special Offer

Ford F250 1986, 4x4,

Buick LeSabre 2004,

Special Offer

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

smolichmotors.com

Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, auto, reduced to $14,999 obo 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

Smolich Auto Mall

Loaded! 54K Miles! VIN #110071

CHEVY BLAZER 2000, ZR2 LS 4x4, 130k miles, 90% tread left on $2000 worth of tires. Under KBB at $4995. Can be seen at Redmond’s Hwy 97 Park & Sell. 541-546-6838.

Smolich Auto Mall

FORD 350 LARIAT 2002 4x4 crewcab, 7.3 diesel 135k, dually, matching canopy, towing special, gooseneck, too! Orig. 63-year-old construction owner needs money, will trade, $17,500. (541) 815-3639 or (541) 508-8522

VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr brks, plus mntd stud snows. $8500 obo. 541-330-0616

BMW M3 COUPE E36 1998, mint condition, adult owned, low miles, needs nothing, $12,500. 541-419-2181

Smolich Auto Mall

Super Nice! 71K Miles! VIN #008926

HYUNDAI

bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

Audi TT Quattro 2005

Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K mi., $8395 541-598-5111.

DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2700. 541-322-6261

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

935

Special Offer

Chevy Silverado 1500 4x4, 2000, full size, Reg cab w/ long bed, white, V6, 4.3L, 20 mpg, auto trans, ABS, AC, dual airbags, tow pkg, runs & drives excellent, maint’d extremely well; non-smoker. Recent brks, bearing, tune- up, tires, trans & coolant flush. 183K mi. $4700 obo. 541-633-6953

975

Automobiles

Special Offer

Sport Utility Vehicles

Smolich Auto Mall

Chevy Silverado 1500 1988, 4x4, step side, tow pkg., 101K miles, A/C, great tires, brakes, new rear end, runs extra super, $2250 OBO. 541-548-7396

975

Automobiles

Automobiles

smolichmotors.com International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

975

Automobiles

975

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily Ford Ranger 2004 Super Cab, XLT, 4X4, V6, 5-spd, A/C bed liner, tow pkg, 120K Like New! KBB Retail: $10,000 OBO 360-990-3223

975

Automobiles

The Bulletin Classiieds

932

Mercedes-Benz 280c 1975 145k, good body & mechanical, fair interior, can email pics. $2950. 541-548-3628

975

Automobiles

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

Antique and Classic Autos

FORD pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

940

Vans

1998 Dodge Ram Wagon SE 2500, Mark III conversion, 100k miles, 4 captains chairs, rear fold-down bed, hitch, $4000 and worth it! Travel in luxury. 541-318-9999 or 541-508-8522.

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

T-10672 filed by Cascade Timberlands, (Oregon), LLC (15 SW Colorado, Suite 3, Bend, OR 97702), proposes a change in place of use and a change in character of use under Certificate 13628. The right allows the use of up to 2.33 Cubic Feet per Second (CFS) (priority date September 1, 1898) from Big Marsh Creek in Sec. 20, T 24 S, R 7 E, W.M. for Irrigation in Sec. 20. The applicant proposes to create an instream use beginning in Big Marsh Creek (from the diversion to the confluence with Crescent Creek, into Crescent Creek to the confluence with the Little Deschutes River, and into the Little Deschutes River to the mouth), at a maximum of 2.33 CFS, and to establish mitigation credits in the Little Deschutes Zone of Impact. The application was amended to reduce the number of acres proposed for transfer and to cancel a portion of Certificate 13628. The Water Resources Department has concluded that the proposed transfer appears to be consistent with the requirements of ORS Chapter 540 and OAR 690-380-5000. The Department has also concluded that the proposed transfer appears to result in mitigation credits pursuant to OAR 690-521-0300 & OAR 690-521-0400. Any person may file, jointly or severally, with the Department a protest or standing statement within 30 days after the date of final publication of notice in the Department's weekly notice or of this newspaper notice, whichever is later. A protest form and additional information on filing protests may be obtained by calling (503) 986-0883. The last date of newspaper publication is January 13, 2011. If no protests are filed, the Department will issue a final order consistent with the preliminary determination. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8397 T.S. No.: 1306040-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Paul B. Heatherman and Patricia Heatherman Husband And Wife, as Grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated December 14, 2007, recorded December 19, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-64833 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: UNIT 15 IN RUSTY HILLS CONDOMINIUMS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, AS DESCRIBED IN THAT CERTAIN DECLARATION OF UNIT OWNERSHIP RECORDED JULY 01, 1980 IN BOOK 324, PAGE 39, DEED RECORDS AND RERECORDED JULY 23, 1981 IN HOOK 344, PAGE 845, DEED RECORDS, APPERTAINING TO A TRACT OF LAND SITUATED IN LOTS 6-11, BLOCK 7, REPLAT OF BLOCKS 6 AND 7, RIVERSIDE ADDITION AS DESCRIBED IN DECLARATION WHICH DECLARATION IS INCORPORATED HEREIN BY REFERENCE AND MADE A PART HEREOF AS IF FULLY SLIT FORTH HEREIN, TOGETHER WITH A PERCENTAGE OF THE COMMON ELEMENTS AS SET FORTH IN SAID DECLARATION APPERTAINING TO SAID UNIT, AND ALSO TOGETHER WITH THE COMMON AREAS AS SET FORTH ON THE PLAT OF Rusty HILLS CONDOMINIUMS. Commonly known as: 2163 NW Hill St. Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the

onthly payment due august 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $975.34 Monthly Late Charge $38.43. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $117,390.10 together with interest thereon at 6.500% per annum from July 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on April 04, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: November 22, 2010. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/ By: Tammy Laird R-357320 12/23/10, 12/30, 01/06, 01/13

Where buyers meet sellers.

Your Future Is Here. Whether you’re looking for a home or need a service, your future is in these pages.

Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 385-5809

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx3348 T.S. No.: 1307566-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Donna Sue Freeborn, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow Co., as Trustee, in favor of Accubanc Mortgage A Division of National City Bank Of Indiana A National Banking Association, as Beneficiary, dated October 21, 2005, recorded October 26, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-73187 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: A tract of land located in the Southeast One-quarter (SE1/4) of Section Twenty-seven (27), Township Fourteen (14) South, Range Thirteen (13), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the South One-quarter corner or said Section 27; thence North 00°05'34" East 47,00 feet; thence South 89°53'53" East 301.91 feet to the true point of beginning for said tract; thence North 24°32'21" West 143.55 feet; thence along an arc of a 175.00 foot radius curve to the right 132.27 feet, the chord of which bears North 22°51'15" West,. 129.14 feet; thence North 18°45'56 East 172,07 feet; thence along an arc of a 100.00 foot radius curve to the left 24.25 feet, the chord of which bears North 11°49'01" East, 24.20 feet; thence North 04°52'07 East 82.30 feet; thence East 388.46 feet; thence South 07°53'30" East 534.14 feet; thence North 89°53'53" West 462.93 feet to the true point of beginning. Commonly known as: 1085 NE Oneil Way Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed nd notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due April 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,428.16 Monthly Late Charge $121.36. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $363,193.98 together with interest thereon at 6.500% per annum from March 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on April 04, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding

dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: November 22, 2010. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-357314 12/23/10, 12/30, 01/06, 01/13

Get your business GRO W

ING

With an ad in

The Bulletin's

"Call A Service Professional" Directory LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 1000329670 T.S. No.: 10-10908-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, FRANK CONTINO AND MICHAEL STEINER as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW, as trustee, in favor of SILVER FALLS BANK, as Beneficiary, recorded on February 22, 2005, as Instrument No. 2005-09960 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: "The terms and conditions of said deed of trust were modified by Loan Modification Agreement recorded 9/13/2006 as Instrument No. 2006-62244; and also modified by Loan Modification Agreement recorded 7/28/2007 as Instrument No. 2010-29238 and are subject to all of the terms and conditions contained herein. APN: 242360 LOT ONE HUNDRED SIXTY-TWO (162), ESTATES AT PRONGHORN, PHASE 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 23063 CANYON VIEW LOOP, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3} of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; defaulted amounts total:$229,777.67 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $1,575,145.64 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.25000% per annum from August 14, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on April 22, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at

the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: December 28, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3867847 01/06/2011, 01/13/2011, 01/20/2011, 01/27/2011

Garage Sales

Garage Sales

Garage Sales Find them in The Bulletin Classifieds!

541-385-5809 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEES NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0061257002 T.S. No.: 10-11898-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, CANDICE BURNS, A SINGLE PERSON as Grantor to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INS CO., as trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK NA, as Beneficiary, recorded on December 23, 2005, as Instrument No. 2005-88220 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: APN: 241008 LOT EIGHTEEN (18), FORREST COMMONS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1315 NW 18TH STREET, REDMOND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; defaulted amounts total:$5,687.82 By this rea-

son of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $163,200.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.62500% per annum from May 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on April 25, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: December 28, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3867430 01/06/2011, 01/13/2011, 01/20/2011, 01/27/2011


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, January 6, 2011 G5

975

975

975

975

975

975

975

975

975

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

PORSCHE CARRERA 4S 2003 - Wide body, 6

Special Offer

Special Offer

Special Offer

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

Mercury Grand Marquis 1984. Grandpa’s car! Like new, all lthr, loaded, garaged, 40K mi, $3495. 541-382-8399

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Mercedes AMG, Formula One V-12. Very Rare. Only 99k miles. Ultimate in safety, luxury & performance. Cost $135,000 to fully hand-build. Just $13,500. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

Pontiac G6 2 Dr., Coupe 2006

Pontiac Firebird 1998, exc cond, no wrecks. T-top, V6, loaded, 22/29 mpg (reg gas). $4995. 541-475-3984

86K Miles! Vin #110246 (photo for illustration use only)

63K Miles! Vin #148687

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Now Only $10,877

Smolich Auto Mall

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com

smolichmotors.com

Employment Marketplace

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

Call

Pontiac G5 2009

541-385-5809

2 Door, 37K Miles! Vin #146443

to advertise.

Now Only $8,999

www.bendbulletin.com NISSAN

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

541-389-1178 • DLR

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

smolichmotors.com 366

Sell an Item

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Subaru Forrester 4X4 2006

Special Offer

FAST! If it's under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for

$10 - 3 lines, 7 days $16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

366

Special Offer

31K Miles!! VIN #708432

Now Only $17,999

Pontiac Grand Prix GTP 2005 97K Miles! Vin #160909

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Now Only $7,950

Find It in NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

SUBARUS!!!

VOLKSWAGEN BUG 1965 Black , Excellent condition. Runs good. $6995. 541-416-0541.

366

The Bulletin is your

Special Offer

541-749-4025 • DLR

Subaru Outback 2005 AWD, 4cyl, auto, lthr htd seats, 89K mi, reduced to $13,995 OBO 541-508-0214; 541-554-5212

Special Offer

NISSAN

HYUNDAI

Reach thousands of readers!

Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $27k. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

Pontiac Grand Prix 2008

Now Only $11,420

541-389-1178 • DLR

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Pontiac G6 4 Dr., 2006 Now Only $7,450

32K Miles! Vin #171092

Smolich Auto Mall Mercedes S 430 - 4Matic, 2003, All wheel drive, silver, loaded & pampered. Exc in snow! $15,400. 541-390-3596

speed, 63,000 miles, all wheel drive, no adverse history, new tires. Seal gray with light gray leather interior. $32,950. 503-351-3976

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Toyota Corolla LE 2008 54K Miles! Vin #946661

New Price $9,978

The Bulletin HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

366

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-OC-102412

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-1 03590

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, ERIC V. ARBAK AND JODI D. ARBAK, TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as Trustee, in favor of SAXON MORTGAGE, INC. D/B/A SAXON HOME MORTGAGE, as beneficiary, dated 8/9/2006, recorded 8/16/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-56191, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by DEUTSCHE BANK TRUST COMPANY AMERICAS as Indenture Trustee for the registered holders of SAXON ASSET SECURITIES TRUST 2006-3 MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET BACKED NOTES, SERIES 2006-3. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 47 IN BLOCK 19 OF OREGON WATER WONDERLAND, UNIT NO.2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 55853 SNOW GOOSE ROAD BEND, OR 97707 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of December 2, 2010 Delinquent Payments from August 01, 2010 5 payments at $ 1,768.59 each $ 8,842.95 (08-01-10 through 12-02-10) Late Charges: $ 891.60 Beneficiary Advances: $ 965.50 Suspense Credit: $ -857.22 TOTAL: $ 9,842.83 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $203,239.48, PLUS interest thereon at 7.550% per annum from 7/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on April 6, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 12/2/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, RICHARD MURCHIE, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR USA DIRECT FUNDING, as beneficiary, dated 2/7/2008, recorded 2/15/2008, under Instrument No. 2008- 06927, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by OneWest Bank, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT TWELVE (12), CLIFFS, RECORDED AUGUST 28, 2003, IN CABINET G, PAGE 29, DESCHUTES COUNTY RECORDS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1735 NORTHWEST CLIFFSIDE WAY REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of December 2, 2010 Delinquent Payments from October 01, 2009 3 payments at $2,054.60 each $6,163.80 12 payments at $2,166.88 each $26,002.56 (10-01-09 through 12-02-10) Late Charges: $1,140.44 Beneficiary Advances: $3,681.40 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $36,988.20 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $296,651.73, PLUS interest thereon at 5% per annum from 09/01/09 to 1/1/2010,5% per annum from 01/01/10 to 01/01/11, 5% per annum from 1/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on April 6, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 12/2/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

ASAP# 3836075 12/16/2010, 12/23/2010, 12/30/2010, 01/06/2011

ASAP# 3836091 12/16/2010, 12/23/2010, 12/30/2010, 01/06/2011

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: F517909 OR Unit Code: F Loan No: 0060366507/BEND ASSET AP #1: 103673 Title #: 4644906 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by BEND ASSET MANAGEMENT LLC as Grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY as Trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. as Beneficiary. Dated November 8, 2005, Recorded November 8, 2005 as Instr. No. 2005-77006 in Book --Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: THE SOUTHERLY 51 FEET OF LOTS 17, 18, 19, AND 20, BLOCK 4, KENWOOD, DESCHUTES COUNTY OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 5 PYMTS FROM 06/01/10 TO 10/01/10 @ 1,903.09 $9,515.45 5 L/C FROM 06/01/10 TO 10/01/10 @ 68.04 $340.20 MISCELLANEOUS FEES $30.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$9,885.65 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 1455 NORTHWEST 8TH STREET, BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $284,000.00, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 05/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on February 22, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 10/15/10 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 923861 PUB: 01/06/11, 01/13/11, 01/20/11, 01/27/11

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-103292

LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: F516907 OR Unit Code: F Loan No: 0999432032/HANSON Investor No: 174357078 AP #1: 151002 D0 01000 Title #: 100572519 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by THURLOW E. HANSON, LENA V. KOUZNETSOVA as Grantor, to WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL NATIONAL BANK as Trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. as Beneficiary. Dated December 20, 2005, Recorded January 18, 2006 as Instr. No. 2006-03335 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 2 OF BLOCK 2 IN BITTERBRUSH SUBDIVISION, CITY OF SISTERS, COUNTY OF DESCHUTES, IN THE STATE OF OR. AS RECORDED IN MB168 PG436 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 8 PYMTS FROM 02/15/10 TO 09/15/10 @ 373.14 $2,985.12 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$2,985.12 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 16639 BITTERBRUSH LN, SISTERS, OR 97759 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $103,618.81, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 01/15/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on January 31, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 09/22/10 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 922349 PUB: 12/16/10, 12/23/10, 12/30/10, 01/06/11

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705etseq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, etseq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-103586

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, BRIAN E MITCHELL, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR MORTGAGEIT, INC., as beneficiary, dated 5/17/2006, recorded 5/24/2006, under Instrument No. 200635974, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee of the Residential Asset Securitization Trust 2006-A10, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-J under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated July 1, 2006. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT ONE HUNDRED NINETEEN (119), RIVER'S EDGE VILLAGE, PHASE X, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 3316 NORTHWEST FAIRWAY HEIGHTS DRIVE BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of December 8, 2010 Delinquent Payments from August 01, 2010 5 payments at $2,683.33 each $13,416.65 (08-01-10 through 12-08-10) Late Charges: $805.02 Beneficiary Advances: $44.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $14,265.67 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $460,000.00, PLUS interest thereon at 7.000% per annum from 7/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on April 12, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same.DATED: 12/8/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, MICHAEL M. LINDNER AND JANICE M. LINDNER, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INS, CO, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR U.S. FINANCIAL FUNDING INC., as beneficiary, dated 6/22/2007. recorded 7/16/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-38986, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee of the IndyMac INDX Mortgage Trust 2007-FLX6, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-FLX6 under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated July 1, 2007. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 3 OF RIVER CANYON ESTATES, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 19696 HOLLYGRAPE STREET BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of December 2, 2010 Delinquent Payments from September 01, 2009 16 payments at $ 1,642.94 each $ 26,287.04 (09-01-09 through 12-02-10) Late Charges: $ 985.80 Beneficiary Advances: $ 5,189.20 Suspense Credit: $ -1,114.12 TOTAL: $ 31,347.92 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $459,113.10, PLUS interest thereon at 7.375% per annum from 8/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on April 6, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET. BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 12/2/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

ASAP# 3843944 12/23/2010, 12/30/2010, 01/06/2011, 01/13/2011

ASAP# 3836080 12/16/2010, 12/23/2010, 12/30/2010, 01/06/2011


G6 Thursday, January 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

www.bendhomes.com

SEARCH. Find acres of properties with slideshows offering up to 10 photographs per home to showcase unique features, home interiors and exteriors, quickly and easily.

FIND. Find homes in The Bulletin’s classified listings as well as standard MLS listings. Advanced search options allow you to locate homes based on architectural style, neighborhood amenities, views and more.

BUY. Use financial tools, such as the mortgage calculator, to estimate an approximate mortgage amount and provide insight into how much you can afford.

making Central Oregon real estate, real easy.


Bulletin Daily Paper 01/06/11