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2 years in D.C.: What Walden, Wyden and Merkley did Bend Oregon — Democratic U.S. Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley and Republican U.S. Rep. Greg Walden from Hood River — were more successful at steering the political conversation than passing their own legislation. Here’s an overview of the lawmakers’ accomplishments the past two years:

By Keith Chu The Bulletin

IN CONGRESS

WASHINGTON — With the end of the 111th U.S. Congress, it’s time to take stock of how Oregon lawmakers spent their past two years, what they accomplished and how they voted on the biggest bills. On the whole, the federal lawmakers who represent Central

Sen. Ron Wyden What Wyden did: Wyden got the most attention over the past two years for bills that never received a vote. He proposed a handful of health care reform proposals, including the Healthy Americans Act, the Free Choice Act and a bill to let states

waive many of the new health care law’s requirements. He proposed simplifying the U.S. tax system, limiting deductions and lowering rates. And Wyden brokered a compromise between the timber industry and some environmental groups over Oregon forests east of the Cascades. See Congress / A4

takes stock for a likely tough ’11 By Scott Hammers

BETWEEN A ROCK AND A RIVER

The Bulletin

Bend City Manager Eric King said last week the city achieved most of its goals for 2010, but will still face a challenging 2011 as stagnant revenues butt up against the growing cost of providing services. Early each year, the City Council assembles a list of goals and priorities for the coming year. The 2010 list included a range of items falling under four broad categories: financial stability, economic development, growth management and priority programs. King described what progress the city made toward meeting its targets over the last 12 months, and what’s left unfinished as the new year begins.

Financial stability

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Jack Cramer, 23, of Corvallis, climbs a route known as “Teddy Bear’s Picnic” on Sunday at Smith Rock State Park for “one last hurrah” before going home. “It’s a nice, beautiful day. I’m happy to get to climb today, January 2, 2011,” Cramer said.

Smart phones in prison In a remote French village, – outlawed but thriving a fallen hero retreats at last By Kim Severson and Robbie Brown New York Times News Service

ATLANTA — A counterfeiter at a Georgia state prison ticks off the remaining days of his threeyear sentence on his Facebook page. He has 91 digital “friends.” Like many of his fellow inmates, he plays the online games FarmVille and Street Wars. He does it all on a Samsung smart phone, which he says he bought from a guard. And he used the same phone to help organize a short nonviolent strike among inmates at several Geor-

gia prisons last month. Technology is changing life inside prisons across the country at the same rapid-fire pace it is changing life outside. A smart phone hidden under a mattress is the modern-day file inside a cake. “This kind of thing was bound to happen,” said Martin Horn, a former commissioner of the New York City Department of Correction who teaches at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice. “The physical boundaries that we thought protected us no longer work.” See Prison / A5

TOP NEWS INSIDE CONGRESS: With GOP in a better position to push its agenda, what will be the effects? Page A3

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Philippe Petain is widely reviled for his role in the Vichy government. In fact, just one street in France bore his name. Now it no longer will, but not everyone is happy.

Illicit diamonds enrich Mugabe with another vote on horizon

By John Tagliabue New York Times News Service

TREMBLOIS-LES-CARIGNAN, France — The municipal council here on the edge of the Ardennes Forest recently voted to change a third of the village’s street names. Tremblois has only three streets, and they are named for three French heroes of World War I: Marshals Ferdinand Foch, Joseph Joffre and Philippe Petain. The problem is that Petain had a second act as head of state during World War II, when his administration in the unoccupied part of the country that was known as Vichy France collaborated with Nazi Germany in eliminating its enemies, notably the Jews. So under pressure from the national government, veterans and Jewish groups, the council voted unanimously to drop the name Petain from a little street about 600 feet long, renaming it Rue de la Belle-Croix, for a chapel at its foot. After World War I, virtually every town in France had its Rue or Avenue Petain. So vast was his fame that a dozen or so towns and cities in the United States also named streets for him. But when the signs here change this month, the last street in France bearing his name will be gone. Not everyone is happy with the decision. See Street / A4

The city started 2010 looking for a way to address what King calls “structural problems” in the budget: expenses that are projected to grow markedly faster than the city’s revenues. Although King said he had hoped the city would be further along in addressing the issue by the end of 2010, a cost-containment plan that could cut $15 million from the general fund over six years has been proposed by the city’s public safety committee. The plan includes some cuts to personnel and employee benefits, refinancing of outstanding debts, and the creation of a street utility fee to fund street maintenance. The City Council rejected a proposal for a street utility fee two years ago, King said, but will be considering the latest version of the plan soon. If it is approved, street maintenance would no longer consume a share of the general fund, freeing up a portion of that money for public safety purposes. See Bend / A4

By Brian Latham and Fred Katerere Bloomberg News

Giovanni Del Brenna / New York Times News Service

Jean-Pol Oury, the mayor of Tremblois-LesCarignan, stands in front of the town’s World War I memorial. Oury received hate mail and threats as the mayor of the last town in France with a street named for Philippe Petain. World War I, the conflict where Petain earned widespread fame, left deep scars on the town.

VILA DE MANICA, Mozambique — Enos Chikwere spills nine uncut diamonds from a bag at Restaurante Piscina in Mozambique near the Zimbabwe border and says they’re worth $75,000. “I can supply all the diamonds you need,” said Chikwere, explaining that he sneaked them into Mozambique after buying them from Zimbabwean soldiers. Chikwere and hundreds of other border smugglers are part of a chain whose money flows back into Zimbabwe, whose president for three decades, Robert Mugabe, has ruled over four violent and disputed elections since 2000. Mugabe’s policies of land seizure helped cause the economy, once the second-biggest in southern Africa, to shrink by 50 percent in eight years. See Diamonds / A5


A2 Monday, January 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Rise of the iKids: Schools test iPads in classrooms By Bruce Newman San Jose Mercury News

SAN JOSE, Calif. — Before, during and even between classes at Hillbrook School this fall, seventh-graders have been spotted on the Los Gatos, Calif., campus, sometimes burbling Spanish or Mandarin phrases into the glowing screen in their hands, other times staring into it like a looking glass. iPads — the Apple of almost every adolescent’s eye — are being provided to students at several Bay Area public and private schools this year, including Hillbrook, which claims to be the only K-8 school in America using tab- Teacher Christina Pak, left, helps Chase Kerley use his iPad durlet computers in class and sending ing a history class at Hillbrook School. Hillbrook received its iPads them home. This has led to a lot of last summer as a gift from the parents of two students. 12-year-olds swanning around the wooded hillside campus, talking to their iPads. of the wealthiest schools. Related Summoning up a virtual keyWith studies about the value board recently, Sophie Greene of computers in the classroom in- • In one Oregon school district, iPods as a learning tool, Page B3 quickly typed a note to herself in dicating that results are “all over iCal, a calendar program, then the map,” according to one local played back an audio file in which educator, low-income schools she was speaking Spanish. “We aren’t even sure what they might interpretations of a scene. “It puts record a conversation, e-mail it to be missing. the sugar in the medicine of takour teacher, Senorita Kelly,” she “The achievement gap is alive ing notes,” Bonoma said. “They explained, “then she critiques the and well,” said Judith McGarry, suddenly look forward to doing lesson in Spanish and sends that Rocketship Education’s director that because they get to interact back to us.” of development. “Private schools with this gadget.” For the 28 seventh-graders en- and very wealthy public school Apple essentially had cornered trusted with iPads districts are ab- the consumer tablet market when at Hillbrook, the solutely going to administrators at Hillbrook, Mitpictures that flash “The achievement have all sorts of ty, University High School in San across the device’s gap is alive and resources to throw Francisco and San Domenico in screen open a winat their kids. We Marin were considering the iPad dow to a wider well. Private believe that in our last summer as an educational world. The iPad al- schools and very society, all chil- implement. lows them to take dren need to be “It seemed clear to us that it’s a daily excursions wealthy public technologically revolutionary kind of tool,” said across time and school districts are literate.” Brent Hinrichs, Hillbrook’s head space to such exotRocketship, the of middle school. “It gets everyic ports as ancient absolutely going award-winning one involved all the time. That Mesopotamia and to have all sorts of nonprofit charter interaction is critical in having modern China. network them think and experience evresources to throw school The only drawwith three San ery moment that they’re in the back is that with at their kids.” Jose schools, re- classroom.” their assignments cently declined a Revolutionary or not, using all composed on — Judith McGarry, donation of iPads it as an educational tool was so iPads, the one ex- Rocketship Education from two large Sil- untested that “tech mentor” Elise cuse that no lonicon Valley com- Marinkovich had to configure the ger works for Hillpanies, preferring iPads herself. Trying to figure out brook’s seventh-graders is, “The to wait until more textbooks are how to block Facebook, and to dog ate my homework.” published digitally. install the kid-friendly browser At Archbishop Mitty High Woodside High School recently from Mobicip, she made countless School in San Jose — which in- acquired about 25 iPads for Man- visits to the Genius Bar at the Los troduced 32 iPads into the class- darin language classes, but quick- Gatos Apple store. All the effort room this fall — the devices are ly reassigned a handful for Aaron paid off. used only in class. And Stanford’s Blanding’s special ed classes for During a recent Hillbrook hisSchool of Medicine gave 92 iPads students with orthopedic impair- tory class, students fetched files outright to its first-year students ments. “It’s maybe not as impor- on the achievements of ancient this September. At Hillbrook, tant academically,” Blanding said, Mesopotamians, wrote several which received its iPads last sum- “but our kids like that when they paragraphs about them on the mer as a gift from the parents of take them into general education Pages app, inserted photographs two students, seventh-graders like classes, they hear the other kids from Geo Photo Explorer, then Sophie slip the hand-held devices talking about how cool they are.” e-mailed their work to teacher into backpacks at the end of the Hillbrook English teacher Tom Christina Pak. She projected reschool day. Hillbrook’s program Bonoma hopes he never has to go sults onto an interactive “smart has been such a hit that it will be back to teaching the old way. board” for discussion. You can expanded next year to include “The iPad has really been a almost imagine Elroy Jetson eighth-graders. game-changer,” he said. “It allows asking her a question by instant As the high-tech tablets com- us to do a lot of things in real time message. plete the first phase of these aca- that weren’t possible before.” DurSo far, only one of the $500 demic tests, the future of the iPad ing a class discussion of “A Raisin tablets has been damaged badly as an educational tool is raising in the Sun,” a play about a strug- enough to require repair. “It’s an questions about whether the most gling black family set in postwar educational tool,” said Marinkovplugged-in technology will re- Chicago, students used Anima- ich, who was thrilled when head main the exclusive digital domain tion Creator HD to record their of school Mark Silver decided

the kids should be trusted to take their iPads home. “If we just stop it at school, how is that helping them?” Mitty administrators weren’t ready to make that leap, although the school may loosen its policy next year. “The interface is very open and collaborative, and I think it fosters a lot of independent inquiry and research,” said Lisa Brunolli, an assistant principal in charge of the school’s test program. “But it quickly became frustrating that students couldn’t take them home and use them for homework.” Rocketship’s schools don’t use computers of any kind in the classroom, believing them to be a distraction from “the social learning experience,” according to McGarry. But they do promote online literacy with computer labs, and are conducting research of their own on whether computers are a help or a hindrance to learning. “We think they’re helping,” McGarry says. Books for the current school year had already been purchased when iPads were added to backpacks at schools where tablets are being tried out. Educators cling to the hope that they will be able to buy selected chapters of textbooks for use on the tablets, the way music fans pick individual songs on iTunes. That would suit Sophie just fine. “In sixth grade, my backpack was 27 pounds,” she said. “Ohhhh, my back! It was so sore. This would definitely lighten it. And it would be way more eco-friendly.” Spoken like a true iKid.

ORLANDO, Fla. — Facebook is the latest hot spot for swindlers in search of new victims. And the world’s most popular social-networking website can be a gold mine for such crooks, experts say. Scams on social-media sites are much the same as the ones you may have received as e-mail, said Kevin Johnson, a consultant for Secure Ideas, which does security research. “The big difference in the (social-networking) scams is the level of trust that the users have,” he said. “People trust them more than they trust e-mail.” Over time, we’ve become leery of unusual e-mails with strange links, but many people’s ingrained suspicions of e-mail scams have not carried over to Facebook. The social network tries to keep track but isn’t responsible for everything on its site. Cybercriminals on Facebook today come cloaked as real friends sending messages asking you to wire them money in a foreign country or posting a note on your wall with a funny video that’s really a dangerous link. The scammers are smart, sneaky and hoping you fall for their tricks. They do it for various reasons, including stealing your identity or using your personal data to sell to marketers or simply spread malicious software that can destroy your computer. They lure victims many ways, such as offering fake gift cards or a chance to win gadgets simply by clicking on a link or that oh-so-common Facebook “Like” button. But to win, the con artists say, you have to answer some questions and provide a cell phone or credit card number. “People automatically trust that, if it’s on Facebook, then it’s probably secure and vetted by Facebook in some way,” said Tom Eston, a senior consultant for SecureState, a security-management consulting firm. But even Facebook admits that keeping its customers safe is difficult. “Facebook faces a security challenge that few, if any, other companies or even governments have faced — protecting more than 500 million people on a service that is under constant attack,” company spokesman Simon Axten said. “The fact that less than 1 percent of Facebook users have ever encountered a security issue on the site is a significant achievement of which we are very proud.”

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THE BULLETIN • Monday, January 3, 2011 A3

TS  The hidden hand of diplomats in global jet deals

Party leaves Pakistan coalition, threatening government

By Eric Lipton

The Washington Post

New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The king of Saudi Arabia wanted the United States to outfit his personal jet with the same high-tech devices as Air Force One. The president of Turkey wanted the Obama administration to let a Turkish astronaut sit in on a NASA space flight. And in Bangladesh, the prime minister pressed the State Department to re-establish landing rights at Kennedy International Airport in New York. Each of these government leaders had one thing in common: They were trying to decide whether to buy billions of dollars’ worth of commercial jets from Boeing or its European competitor, Airbus. And U.S. diplomats were acting like marketing agents, offering deals to heads of state and airline executives whose decisions could be influenced by price, performance and, as with all finicky customers with plenty to spend, perks. This is the high-stakes, international bazaar for commercial jets, where tens of billions of dollars are on the line, along with hundreds of thousands of jobs. At its heart, it is a wrestling match fought daily by executives at two giant companies, Boeing and Airbus, in which each controls about half of the market for such planes. To a greater degree than previously known, diplomats are a big part of the sales force, according to hundreds of cables released by WikiLeaks, which describe politicking and cajoling at the highest levels. State Department and Boeing officials, in interviews last month, acknowledged the important role the U.S. government plays in helping them sell commercial airplanes, despite a trade agreement signed by the United States and European leaders three decades ago intended to remove politics from the process. Boeing earns about 70 percent of its commercial plane sales from foreign buyers, and is the single biggest exporter of manufactured goods in the United States. The cables make clear that both Boeing and the government set limits on their efforts, turning away requests in Turkey and Tanzania to hire “agents” who charge steep commissions — or bribes — to gain access to top government or airline officials who would decide which plane to buy. “‘Agents’ and steep ‘commissions’ have been at the heart of several corruption scandals here,” says a 2007 State Department cable recounting a demand that Boeing hire a mysterious hotel executive in Tanzania to serve as a “go between” with

WikiLeaks threat prompts Bank of America action By the time the conference call ended, it was nearly midnight at Bank of America’s headquarters in Charlotte, N.C., but the bank’s counterespionage work was only just beginning. A day earlier, on Nov. 29, the director of WikiLeaks, Julian Assange, had said in an interview that he intended to “take down” a major American bank and reveal an “ecosystem of corruption” with a cache of data from an executive’s hard drive. With Bank of America’s share price falling on the widely held suspicion that the hard drive was theirs, the executives on the call decided to take action. Since then, a team of 15 to 20 top Bank of America officials has been overseeing a broad internal investigation — scouring thousands of documents in the event that they become public, reviewing every case where a computer has gone missing and hunting for any sign that its systems might have been compromised. Whether Assange is bluffing, or has Bank of America in his sights at all, the bank’s defense strategy represents the latest twist in the controversy over WikiLeaks and Assange. The U.S. government has been examining whether Assange, an Australian, could be charged criminally for the release by WikiLeaks of hundreds of thousands of classified Pentagon and State Department diplomatic cables that became the subject of articles in The New York Times and other publications last month. Bank of America’s internal review has turned up no evidence that would substantiate Assange’s claim that he has a hard drive, according to interviews with executives there. The company declined to otherwise comment on the case. A WikiLeaks representative also declined to comment. — New York Times News Service

government officials. Payments like that, the cable said, typically were bribes that “ended up in Swiss bank accounts.”

No new coal plants begun in U.S. in ’10 By Steven Mufson The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — The headline news for the coal industry in 2010 was what didn’t happen: Construction did not begin on a single new coal-fired power plant in the United States for the second straight year. This in a nation where a fleet of coal-fired plants generates nearly half the electricity used. But a combination of low natural gas prices, shale gas discoveries, the economic slowdown and litigation by environmental groups has stopped — at least for now — breaking ground on new ones. “Coal is a dead man walkin’,” says Kevin Parker, head of asset management and a member of the executive committee at Deutsche Bank. “Banks won’t finance them. Insurance companies won’t insure them. The EPA is coming after them. ... And the economics to make it clean don’t work.” From 2000 to 2008, construction started on 20 units in 19 plants, according to Edison Electric Insti-

tute. Last year, utilities and powergenerating companies dropped plans to build 38 coal plants while announcing that they would retire 48 aging, inefficient ones, according to the environmental group Sierra Club. Although 2010 saw the collapse of climate legislation in the Senate, the Sierra Club is trumpeting such statistics as a sign that “coal is a fuel of the past.” The battle over coal plants could sharpen in 2011, as the Environmental Protection Agency deploys regulations to improve the efficiency — and lower the greenhouse gas emissions — of big power plants. As of Sunday, the EPA now requires builders of plants big enough to emit 75,000 tons of carbon dioxide a year to use the “best available control technology” in order to obtain air permits, needed before construction. Utilities, oil refiners and other industries argue that this will add prohibitive costs, and many Republican lawmakers have vowed to handcuff the EPA.

The Associated Press ile photo

House Speaker-designate John Boehner’s Republicans will hold a 241-194 majority in the House and have promised to cut spending and roll back President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul, among other initiatives.

GOP agenda’s impact may be on 2012 election By Larry Margasak The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Republican agenda for the new Congress that convenes Wednesday may have a greater impact on the 2012 elections than on the lives of Americans in the next two years. Republicans promise to cut spending, roll back President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul and prevent unelected bureaucrats from expanding the government’s role in society through regulations that tell people what they must or can’t do. Getting this agenda through the House may be easier than in the Senate, given the GOP’s 241194 majority in the House. Getting the Senate to act will be a challenge. Democrats still hold

an edge there, though smaller than the one Obama had during his first two years in the White House. Even if the next two years end in gridlock, Republicans will have built a record for the next election that they hope will demonstrate to voters that they can get it right. House Republicans also pledge to hold tough investigations and hearings on the president’s programs and policies, ending the free pass that Democratic committee chairmen gave the Obama administration the past two years. Republicans insist they’ll bring key administration officials before congressional microphones and that the public can watch the webcasts. The

friendly tone of inquiry from Democratic chairmen will be replaced by Republicans demanding answers to these questions: What’s the purpose of this program? Is this the best use of the taxpayers’ money? The chief Republican investigator, Rep. Darrell Issa of California, is raring to get started, and he’s not alone. Issa, the incoming chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, has been especially critical of what he calls waste in Obama’s economic stimulus spending. “The sooner the administration figures out that the enemy is the bureaucracy and the wasteful spending, not the other party, the better off we’ll be,” he told “Fox News Sunday.”

KARACHI, Pakistan — The second-largest party in Pakistan’s ruling coalition said Sunday that it would defect to the opposition, greatly imperiling the U.S.-allied government by leaving it without a parliamentary majority. The surprising move by the Muttahida Qaumi Movement, which dominates this southern metropolis, prompted President Asif Ali Zardari’s Pakistan People’s Party to search for ways to salvage or refashion the coalition and prevent the collapse of its government. Even if they are successful, analysts said, the development will further enfeeble the administration, diverting attention from economic woes and its U.S.-backed fight against Taliban insurgents. The MQM’s pullout came days after the party withdrew its two cabinet ministers over what it said was poor government performance, a decision many observers deemed a theatrical step meant to wrest concessions from the coalition. But the party said Sunday that popular unrest over a recent fuel price increase made it impossible for it to remain allied to the government. “This decision has been taken in the interests of the country and its people,” said Raza Haroon, a senior MQM leader. The loss of a majority could lead Parliament to hold a vote of no confidence in Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gillani, possibly triggering early elections.

Israeli PM proposes nonstop peace talks By Matti Friedman The Associated Press

JERUSALEM — Israel’s prime minister said Sunday that he’s ready to sit down with the Palestinian president for continuous one-onone talks until they reach a peace deal. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu issued his statement on Sunday in an apparent bid to breathe life into stalled Mideast peace making. Talks broke down in late September, just three weeks after they were launched at the White House, following the expiration of a limited Israeli freeze on settlement construction. Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas says Israel must halt all settlement construction on occupied lands claimed by the Palestinians before talks can resume. Netanyahu has refused, but says he is ready to discuss all “core” issues with Abbas. Those include setting the final borders between Israel and a future Palestine, determining the fate of millions of Palestinian refugees and resolving the competing claims to the holy city of Jerusalem. Over the weekend, Abbas said he believed a peace deal could be reached within two months if Netanyahu showed “good will.” He suggested that Netanyahu adopt the positions of his more dovish predecessor, Ehud Olmert. “We were close to an agreement,” Abbas said. “The Palestinian position is clear to the Israelis, and the Israeli position presented by Olmert is clear to us.”

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A4 Monday, January 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Congress Continued from A1 Despite earning positive reviews from health policy wonks and glowing coverage from liberal-leaning television and Internet outlets, Wyden was unable to win support for his health reform proposals from the White House or top Senate Democrats. Portions of Wyden’s Healthy Americans Act and a few smaller-scale proposals did find their way into the health reform bill, including: a pilot program to allow more seniors to receive health care at home, waivers to let states opt out of some new regulations beginning in 2017, and a provision that increased the number of people who will be able to buy insurance through new health care exchanges. Early in 2009, Wyden helped attach six new Oregon wilderness areas, including the Badlands east of Bend and Spring Basin Wilderness bordering the John Day River, to a larger package of public lands bills. Outside of the legislative arena, Wyden, along with Merkley and Walden, successfully pressured the U.S. Defense Department and Federal Aviation Administration to drop their objections to a major wind farm in north-central Oregon. What Wyden said: • On Dec. 16, announcing that he was diagnosed with earlystage prostate cancer: “If anything is taken away from my experience, I hope it is the importance of getting routine physicals. One in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during their lifetimes. Early detection is critical to catching this disease when treatment is most effective.” • In early October 2009, decrying the health reform bill in a Senate Finance Committee hearing — he later voted for a slightly modified version of the bill — “I ask colleagues as we wrap this

up, where in this bill does it give consumers choice? Where in this bill does it allow the typical American family to have the kinds of choices that produce competition, that hold down health care costs? Colleagues, I can’t find it in this legislation.” How Wyden voted: • The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (the stimulus) — Yes • The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (health care reform) — Yes • Tax Relief, Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization and Job Creation Act (extending the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts) — No • Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell Repeal Act (allowing gays to serve openly in the military) — Yes

Sen. Jeff Merkley What Merkley did: Merkley, in his first two years in office, managed to make a handful of changes to two of the biggest bills that passed through the Senate. Perhaps most notable was the amendment to the financial regulations bill that would limit the amount of capital banks can invest in risky financial products. Co-authored with Sen. Carl Levin, D-Mich., the provision was watered down by Senate leaders, but Merkley argued the change would make the financial system as a whole safer. Merkley was an early advocate of creating a federal fund that small banks could draw from to lend to small businesses. A $30 billion fund was included in a bill that became law in September. He also attached an amendment to the health reform bill requiring employers to give nursing mothers reasonable breaks and a private area where they can breast-feed. Merkley also took the lead in securing $10 million in aid to farmers in the Klamath Ba-

C OV ER S T OR I ES sin, with assistance from Rep. Walden. The aid passed as part of a larger bill in July. What Merkley said: • In April 2010, speaking about the FAA’s decision to delay a wind farm at Shepherds Flat: “This is just a really egregious, shortsighted act by the FAA. To me, it’s like dropping a bomb on jobs in Central Oregon.” • In November 2010, about his plan to reform the Senate’s filibuster process: “There’s many, many different ways to do it, but the underlying things are shift responsibility to those who wish to keep debate open. ... Have them have a presence that is visible to the public so there’s transparency and accountability to the public.” How Merkley voted: • The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (the stimulus) — Yes • The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (health care reform) — Yes • Tax Relief, Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization and Job Creation Act (extending the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts) — No • Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell Repeal Act (allowing gays to serve openly in the military) — Yes

Rep. Greg Walden What Walden did: As a member of the minority party in the U.S. House, Walden was essentially locked out of contributing to most meaningful legislation, but he still managed to make a mark. Early in the Congress, Walden helped draw attention to gaps in the U.S. food safety system as the top Republican on the Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee of the Committee on Energy and Commerce. A picture of Walden, holding tainted peanut products in a jar wrapped with yellow caution tape, appeared in The Wall Street Journal and elsewhere.

In 2010, Walden’s biggest impact has been as the secondranking member of the National Republican Congressional Committee, where he helped engineer a historic election victory for the GOP in the fall. After the election, Walden was picked to head the GOP transition team, which drafted new House rules and procedures for the next Congress. In his district, Walden successfully pressured Oregon and the U.S. Forest Service to repair the Wallowa Mountain Loop Road in the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest near Baker City. The road, a tourist corridor, washed out during a major rainstorm last summer. What Walden said: • On Twitter, October 2009: “Just diagnosed with likely H1N1. Ugh. Off to seclusion for awhile.” (Walden was the first member of the House to announce he had likely contracted swine flu.) • Just before the health care vote in spring 2010, correctly predicting an anti-Democratic backlash in the November election: “That’s what drives turnout, that’s what drives action.” • In November 2010, just after the election: “Words don’t matter as much as action, and I think you’ll see us keep our promises and pledges to change how the process works.” How Walden voted: • The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (the stimulus) — No • The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (health care reform) — No • Tax Relief, Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization and Job Creation Act (extending the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts) — Yes • Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell Repeal Act (allowing gays to serve openly in the military) — No Keith Chu can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at kchu@bendbulletin.com.

Giovanni Del Brenna / New York Times News Service

Jean Ponsart shovels snow last month on Rue Petain in Tremblois-Les-Carignan, France. The village is changing the name of the street under pressure over honoring Philippe Petain, considered a World War I hero and a World War II traitor. Ponsart, whose house bears the sole street sign, says he was not disturbed by the previous name.

Street Continued from A1 “It is ridiculous,” said Laurent Joste, 27, an auto mechanic from Belgium who has lived in the village for three years. “Clearly, he was a traitor in the Second World War; but these things happened decades ago. It’s not good to think like that.” World War I left deep scars in the village, which lies among the killing fields of 1914-18, near the Belgian border. It is a short drive from here to Verdun, where armies faced off for years in one of the war’s most calamitous battles. It is hard by the Marne River and Chemin des Dames ridge, where the slaughter of French troops in 1917 incited mutinies that only the calm but firm hands of Marshals Foch and Petain put down. Tremblois was leveled by shelling, save for a few houses and the church. A monument to the war dead — a statue of a French poilu, or doughboy, in bright colors — bears the names of 15 villagers, roughly 15 percent of the population then. By comparison, World War II left the village relatively untouched. For Jean Ponsart, who was 13 in 1945, the principal memory is of the endless column of U.S. trucks and tanks rumbling along Rue Foch, the main street, stopping now and then, out of precaution, but usually long enough to give candy to the village children.

His house bears the sole sign for Rue Petain (street signs in France are often on the sides of houses), and he says he is comfortable with it. He opposed a proposal to rename the street Rue Charles de Gaulle, for the leader of the French resistance in World War II and postwar president. “If it’s Petain or de Gaulle,” he said, “then Petain!” The commotion around Rue Petain began last year when a local journalist discovered the street and wrote several articles for his newspaper. At the time, two other towns in northern France had streets named for Marshal Petain, and his portrait hung in the hall of a third town, in the west of France. Under public pressure, the other streets were renamed, and a court ordered the portrait taken down. Tremblois remained the marshal’s last refuge. “It was scandalous,” said the journalist, Guillaume Levy. “I met the mayor. There were different reactions; the arguments were not political.” First there was the enduring image of Petain as the “conqueror of Verdun,” the man who won World War I for the French, Levy said by telephone. Then there was also the inconvenience. “I talked to the man on whose house the sign hangs,” he said. “He said how much it would cost, that the postman wouldn’t know where to bring letters. “Then,” he said, “it got all polemical.”

Partly, it was town versus country. The village mayor, JeanPol Oury, shows visitors the hate mail he got, including threats, for keeping the name Petain. Oury, 56, who runs a public relations company when not steering the affairs of Tremblois, said he did a survey among its 114 residents. “A majority said, ‘It doesn’t disturb me,’” he said. Still, Levy’s articles caught the attention of Jewish groups and organizations representing the war’s survivors and people who were deported during World War II by Petain’s Vichy government and the Germans who occupied the rest of France. Finally, Oury went before the town council’s nine members. “I explained the situation, that we were the last town with a Petain street,” he recounted. “I said two other towns had just renamed streets. I said it’s you who decide.” All nine voted to change the name. Many historians consider Petain as more of an enabler of the Nazis than an instigator of their designs, although that view was tinted by the discovery last year of papers suggesting that he took an active role in writing the Vichy government’s anti-Jewish laws. Historians have long blamed him for failing to desert the Nazis once their policies on extermination of the Jews became clear. He was sentenced to death in a postwar trial for treason, but de Gaulle commuted the sentence to life imprisonment. In 1921, de Gaulle, a great admirer of Petain,

honored him by naming his first son Philippe. A remnant in France still defends Petain. “In 1940, since the government was incapable of acting in the face of chaos, the first who came among the people and the politicians was Petain,” said Hubert Massol, president of the Association for the Defense of the Memory of Marshal Petain, which was founded right after the war by the marshal’s closest supporters. “Then all the mistakes were dumped on him.” Without Petain’s intervention, Massol said, “no one, not even the Jews, would have been spared.” In Tremblois, some are relieved to see the change, even if the name never bothered them. Marie Stutzmann, 46, moved from Alsace with her parents 40 years ago to a corner house on Rue Petain. Friends and acquaintances invariably reacted when she told them her address. “It doesn’t bother me,” she said. “But people raised their eyebrows.” Celine Grulet, 41, who works in the big Ferrero chocolate factory just across the border in Belgium, said: “I’m content that it’s being changed. Particularly with regard to the years after 1940.” For years she grated at the name. “But I said to myself, ‘What can I do?’” Mayor Oury cites President Nicolas Sarkozy. “Sarkozy often says, with regard to the Germans, ‘Don’t forget, but forgive.’ Why not Petain?”

S. Korea takes tough stance but leaves door open to talks The Associated Press SEOUL, South Korea — South Korea’s president vowed today not to let North Korea “covet even an inch of our territory.” But he also opened the door to possible peace talks, saying North Korean disarmament could lead to South Korean economic aid. Lee Myung-bak, addressing the country in a New Year’s

Bend Continued from A1 King said additional layoffs are the “quick solution” to the city’s budget challenges, but he wants to find another way by obtaining benefits concessions from city employees. Layoffs or reduced compensation are the only choices the city has left at this point, he said. “My preference is to try to maintain our work force,” King said. “We’re going to eventually degrade the quality of our service level if we continue to reduce.”

Economic development In late December, the city achieved a milestone in the development of Juniper Ridge, rezoning 256 acres of the northeast Bend property for light industrial development. It’s a partial completion of one of the city’s primary economic development goals for 2010, to be followed by the marketing of Juniper Ridge properties, which has yet to happen. King said a recent discussion with the Juniper Ridge board reinforced the idea that the city should get out of the marketing business and work to find a master developer that could market the properties for a cut of the proceeds. But the rezoning does mean the city can sell the properties as opportunities arise, King said, something it’s largely been unable to do since acquiring Juniper Ridge from Deschutes County 20 years ago. Also in 2010, the city launched two new programs to attract new business and assist existing businesses: a tenant relocation program and the Bend Opportunity Fund. Under the tenant relocation program, existing businesses moving from one location to another within the city are eligible for a 50 percent discount on planning and engineering fees associated with preparing their new site for occupancy. The Bend Opportunity Fund offers a “forgivable loan” to growing businesses looking to make capital investments, but companies that fail to create and maintain new jobs must pay the money back, King said, while those that achieve their goals can keep it.

Growth management Although the city did not meet its goal of completing the Urban Growth Boundary expansion in 2010, King said the city did make progress. For the first time since the process began in 2006, the city has a clear idea of what the state expects of it, and King said he’s hopeful the two sides will come to a solution on an

speech, said the Nov. 23 shelling of Yeonpyeong Island was a transformational event. Seoul, he said, would treat it as the United States did the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. However, he said, “if the North exhibits sincerity, we have both the will and the plan to drastically enhance economic cooperation.”

expansion agreeable to both the state and the city this year. In the spring, the city formed its infrastructure advisory committee, intended to assist the city in planning for future water, sewer and stormwater management needs. The group is helping the city develop a strategy for prioritizing and funding major infrastructure projects expected to be built in the coming years, King said, and has already played a key role in choosing a disinfection system for the city’s future water treatment plant. One disappointment in the growth management department was the lack of progress on the Central Area Plan, King said, a proposal to redevelop the area along Third Street between Greenwood Avenue and the railroad underpass. While there’s broad agreement on rezoning the area to allow for more intensive development, the city has been unable to secure funding for a study of how redevelopment would affect infrastructure in the area, King said, and the project has stalled.

Priority programs Four narrower issues not previously addressed were on the 2010 Priority Programs list: accessibility, Bend Area Transit, Mirror Pond and the Volunteer Beautification Program. Accessibility, more specifically the city’s ongoing efforts to come into compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, made significant headway in 2010, King said, with new handicapped-accessible parking spaces downtown and the replacement of roughly 600 curb ramps. “This is the most progress we’ve made to date on curb ramps. There was definitely some on-theground progress that was very visible in the community,” he said. In September, the city transferred management of the Bend Area Transit system to the Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council, which is developing a city-tocity transit system in the region. The transfer caps Bend’s costs at $1 million per year over the next five years, King said, and a single transit system should be more cost-efficient than two systems. The city hired a consultant to explore the options for desilting Mirror Pond, and is continuing to develop its Volunteer Beautification Program, which has taken on some of the responsibility for cleaning up roundabouts and other right-of-way properties as the city has reduced its maintenance staff. Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or at shammers@bendbulletin.com.

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Winter Allergies GivingYou the Blues? See a Board Certified Allergist/Immunologist. Sniffles and sneezes are common during the winter months, yet they’re not always due to colds and flu. Although people with pollen allergies may find a reprieve when the weather cools, those with other allergy triggers — such as mold, dust mites and pet dander — can be just as miserable in winter. Symptoms Of Winter Allergies?

Coughing, dark circles under eyes, itchy, watery eyes and nose, runny nose, sneezing. Healthy Tips:

• Your allergist can help you identify things in your home, workplace or school that may be making your asthma or allergies worse. • Keep your home clean and dry to help make it “allergen-free.” • Focus on sites where allergens accumulate-bedding, carpet and upholstered furniture. • Weekly vacuuming can help. Use a vacuum with a HEPA filter or double bags. The right care can make the difference between suffering with an allergic disease and feeling better. By visiting an experienced allergist, you can expect an accurate diagnosis, a treatment plan that works and educational information to help you manage your disease. We accept Medicare and most insurances

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Immigrants worry as Japan discourages foreign workers By Hiroko Tabuchi New York Times News Service

KASHIWA, Japan — Maria Fransiska, a young, hardworking nurse from Indonesia, is just the kind of worker Japan would seem to need to replenish its aging work force. But Fransiska, 26, is having to fight to stay. To extend her threeyear stint at a hospital outside Tokyo, she must pass a standardized nursing exam administered in Japanese, a test so difficult that only three of the 600 nurses brought here from Indonesia and the Philippines since 2007 have passed. Despite facing an imminent labor shortage as its population ages, Japan has done little to open itself up to immigration. In fact, as Fransiska and many others have discovered, the government is doing the opposite, actively encouraging foreign workers and foreign graduates of its universities and professional schools to return home while protecting tiny interest groups — in the case of Fransiska, a local nursing association afraid that an influx of foreign nurses would lower industry salaries. Experts say increased immigration provides one obvious remedy to Japan’s two decades of lethargic economic growth. Instead of accepting young workers, however — and along with them, fresh ideas — Tokyo seems to have resigned itself to a demographic crisis that threatens to stunt the

Prison Continued from A1 Although officials have long battled illegal cell phones, smart phones have changed the game. With Internet access, a prisoner can call up phone directories, maps and photographs for criminal purposes, corrections officials and prison security experts say. Gang violence and drug trafficking, they say, are increasingly being orchestrated online, allowing inmates to keep up criminal behavior even as they serve time. “The smart phone is the most lethal weapon you can get inside a prison,” said Terry Bittner, director of security products with the ITT Corp., one of a handful of companies that create cell phonedetection systems for prisons. “The smart phone is the equivalent of the old Swiss Army knife. You can do a lot of other things with it.”

A losing battle The Georgia prison strike, for instance, was about things prisoners often complain about: They are not paid for their labor. Visitation rules are too strict. Meals are bad. But the technology they used to voice their concerns was new. Inmates punched in text messages and assembled e-mail lists to coordinate simultaneous protests, including work stoppages, with inmates at other prisons. Under pseudonyms, they shared hour-by-hour updates with followers on Facebook and Twitter. They communicated with their advocates, conducted news media interviews and monitored coverage of the strike. In Oklahoma, a convicted murderer was caught in November posting photographs on his Facebook page of drugs, knives and alcohol that had been smuggled into his cell. In 2009, gang members in a Maryland prison were caught using their smart phones to approve targets for robberies and even to order seafood and cigars. Even closely watched prisoners are sneaking phones in. Last month, California prison guards found a flip phone under Charles Manson’s mattress. The logical solution would be to keep all cell phones out of prison. But that is a war that is being lost, corrections officials say. Prisoners agree. “Almost everybody has a phone,” said Mike, 33, an inmate at Smith State Prison in Georgia who, like other prisoners interviewed for this article, asked that his full name not be used for fear of retaliation. “Almost every phone is a smart phone. Almost everybody with a smart phone has a Facebook (page).” Cell phones are prohibited in all state and federal prisons in the United States, often even for top corrections officials. Punishment for a prisoner found with one varies. In some states, it is an infraction that affects parole or time off

Diamonds Continued from A1 The gems from Zimbabwe’s biggest diamond field in the Marange region are helping enrich the 86-year-old president’s party ahead of next year’s vote, according to Human Rights Watch, Partnership Africa Canada and the Zimbabwean opposition party, Movement for Democratic Change, which governs in a forced coalition with Mugabe’s party.

Accusations of funding violence

Hiroko Tabuchi / New York Times News Service

Maria Fransiska, an Indonesian nurse, left, asks for directions from a staffer Sunday at a hospital in Kashiwa, outside of Tokyo. Despite facing an imminent labor shortage as its population ages, Japan has done little to open itself up to immigration. country’s economic growth, hamper efforts to deal with its chronic budget deficits and bankrupt its social security system. The barriers to more immigration to Japan are many. Restrictive immigration laws bar the country’s struggling farms or workshops from access to foreign labor, driving some to abuse trainee programs for workers from developing countries, or hire illegal immigrants. Stringent qualification requirements shut out skilled foreign professionals, while a web of complex rules and procedures discourages entrepreneurs from

setting up in Japan. But Japan’s demographic time clock is ticking: Its population will fall by almost a third to 90 million within 50 years, according to government forecasts. By 2055, more than one in three Japanese will be over 65, as the working-age population falls by more than a third to 52 million. “The shrinking population is the biggest problem. The country is fighting for its survival,” said Hidenori Sakanaka, director of the Japan Immigration Policy Institute, an independent research organization.

“The smart phone is the most lethal weapon you can get inside a prison. The smart phone is the equivalent of the old Swiss Army knife. You can do a lot of other things with it.” — Terry Bittner, ITT Corp. for good behavior. In others, it results in new criminal charges. President Barack Obama signed a law in August making possession of a phone or a wireless device in a federal prison a felony, punishable by up to a year of extra sentencing. Still, they get in. By the thousands. In the first four months of 2010, Federal Bureau of Prisons workers confiscated 1,188 cell phones, according to Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif, who sponsored the federal measure. In California last year, officers discovered nearly 9,000 phones. Payments for cell phones range from $300 to $1,000, depending on the type of phone and the service plan. Monthly fees are generally paid by inmates’ relatives. Phones are smuggled in by guards, visitors and inmates convicted of misdemeanors with lower security restrictions. But that is not the only way. In South Carolina, where most prisons are rural and staff members have to pass through X-ray machines and metal detectors, smugglers resort to an old-fashioned method — tossing phones over fences. They stuff smart phones into footballs or launch them from a device called a potato cannon or spud gun, which shoots a projectile through a pipe. Packages are sometimes camouflaged with a coating of grass, which makes them hard for guards to detect. The drops are coordinated through texts or calls between inmates and people outside, said Jon Ozmint, director of the South Carolina Department of Corrections, which confiscates as many as 2,000 cell phones a year. The solution, Ozmint and others say, is to simply jam cell phone signals in prisons. He and prison officials from 29 other states petitioned the Federal Communications Commission last year for permission to install technology that would render cell phones useless. But there is no support from the cell phone industry. “It’s illegal, plain and simple,” said Chris Guttman-McCabe, vice president of regulatory affairs for CTIA-The Wireless Association. He cited the Communications Act of 1934, which prohibits the blocking of radio signals — or, in this case, cell phone signals — from authorized users. Although supporters of jamming disagree, Guttman-McCabe argues that the technology is not yet good enough to prevent legal cell phones nearby but not inside prison walls to be jammed. Nor does the technology assure that every inch inside a prison is blocked, he said. The solution may be a new system introduced in Mississippi. It is being tested in several other states

and has the cell phone industry’s support. Called managed access, the system establishes a network around a prison that detects every call and text. Callers using cell phones that are not on an approved list receive a message saying the device is illegal and will no longer function. At the Mississippi State Penitentiary, which houses about 3,000 inmates, 643,388 calls and texts going in and out were intercepted between July 31 and Dec. 1, 2010. The system was so successful that Mississippi is installing it at its two other penitentiaries. Finding the actual cell phones inside a prison is another solution, and several states are testing systems. For example, Maryland and New Jersey are using dogs that can sniff out the ionization of cell phone batteries.

A lifeline? The recent rise in smart phones raises larger issues for prisoners and their advocates, who say the phones are not necessarily used for criminal purposes. In some prisons, a traditional phone call is prohibitive, costing $1 per minute in many states. And cell phones can help some offenders stay better connected with their families. Mike, the Georgia inmate who was part of the recent strike, said he used his to stay in touch with his son. “When he gets off the school bus, I’m on the phone and I talk to him,” he said in an interview on his contraband cell phone. “When he goes to bed, I’m on the phone and I talk to him.” Some groups are encouraging prisons to embrace new technology while managing risks. Inmates are more likely to successfully reenter society if they maintain relationships with friends and families, said David Fathi, director of the National Prison Project at the American Civil Liberties Union. “It shows that even if they are closed institutions, prisons are still part of the larger society,” Fathi said. “They can’t be forever walled off from technological changes.” And in a world where hundreds of apps are introduced each day by developers hoping to tap new markets, a pool of prisoners with smart phones can seem an attractive new market, despite the implications. “It’s a pure business opportunity,” said Hal Goldstein, publisher of iPhone Life magazine. He predicted that games would be big, but so would the ability to download news and books. “People outside of prison become addicted to their phones,” Goldstein said. “Can you imagine if you had nothing but time on your hands?”

Annual income from the gems may reach $2 billion, assuming the country is able to export them freely, the stateowned Herald newspaper cited Mines Minister Obert Mpofu as saying in October. Mugabe is trying to amass funds for the election campaign, said Tom Porteous, the British director of New York-based Human Rights Watch, which has lobbied against abuses for the past 30 years. “Revenue from the mines is serving to prop up Mugabe and his cronies,” Porteous said in a response to e-mailed questions. “There are real concerns that diamond revenue will be used to fund political violence and intimidation of Mugabe’s opponents.” Human Rights Watch cited interviews with unidentified soldiers, diggers, community leaders, and members of government and the parliamentary portfolio committee on mines and energy to support its allegations. Partnership Africa Canada, an Ottawa-based nonprofit organization, said in a June report that Marange is controlled by the military and proceeds from the gems aren’t benefiting the country. The group cited testimony in Zimbabwe’s parliament, company statements, and interviews with unidentified diplomats and illegal miners for its conclusions. Illegal smuggling benefits Mugabe because it is mostly carried out via the military, according to the two nonprofits and interviews with six smugglers and two dealers in and around Vila de Manica, where

THE BULLETIN • Monday, January 3, 2011 A5 Chikwere, clad in Diesel jeans and wearing two gold chains, was displaying his wares. The army reports to the president. The Finance Ministry, by contrast, is controlled by Morgan Tsvangirai’s Movement for Democratic Change, or MDC, and receives revenue from legal diamond mining in the form of taxes. Mugabe’s party, the Zimbabwe African National UnionPatriotic Front, or Zanu-PF, denies the smuggling allegations. “These are just inventions of the western imperialists who are trying to discredit ZanuPF,” party spokesman Rugare Gumbo said in an interview from Harare, the country’s capital. “There is no corruption at Marange, and Zanu-PF is not using the proceeds.” Diamonds from Marange can’t be exported legally from Zimbabwe because the field hasn’t yet met an international certification standard showing that proceeds from sales aren’t used to finance conflict. Mining at Marange has been subject to allegations of military abuses of unauthorized miners and disputes over ownership of the deposit. Human Rights Watch said in June that 200 miners were killed in 2008 at the site by the military, and also reported that the army controls most of the deposits and is forcing local community members to mine the gems on its behalf. Soldiers are smuggling gems across the border, according to Human Rights Watch, which cited information it has obtained and interviews with unidentified people. Mozambique isn’t a member of the so-called Kimberley Process, an organization that includes governments and diamond industry companies and is designed to reduce the number of so-called conflict diamonds in the world. The Jerusalem-based group said it couldn’t decide on whether to allow unfettered exports from Marange at a meeting that ended on Nov. 4. The Kimberley Process says it has reduced the proportion of conflict diamonds in the world trade to 1 percent from 15 percent. Signatories, which include all major diamond-producing and buying countries, have

pledged that they won’t deal in uncertified gems.

Street of dealers A police station in Vila de Manica is situated on a street where dealers from Guinea, Lebanon, Sierra Leone and Nigeria — who all disclosed their nationalities in interviews — trade on the porches of their houses. Security guards sit outside. Mercedes, Humvee and Range Rover vehicles drive down the town’s streets, lined by freshly painted houses sprouting satellite television dishes. By contrast, the 750-mile drive to the region from Mozambique’s capital, Maputo, runs through small towns where ramshackle buildings are side-by-side with grass shacks known as baraccas. Vila de Manica has “become one of the premier purchase and departure points for Marange’s illegal diamonds,” Partnership Africa Canada said in a June report on its website. “Diamonds are being sold in this district, after they’ve been smuggled from Zimbabwe,” said Jose Tefula, district administrator for Manica District, in a Dec. 20 phone interview. “Locally we don’t have any diamonds, so the stones can only come from Zimbabwe.” A group of about 40 diamond dealers surrounded the vehicle in which two Bloomberg reporters were traveling in Vila de Manica on Nov. 26. They banged the side of the car with their fists, blocked the escape route with motor vehicles, seized and damaged a camera, and shouted “you’re dying today.” Two policemen arrived and detained the reporters for almost an hour, saying they should have sought permission to enter the area. No action was taken against the dealers. “We believe the new intransigence of Zanu-PF is down to its finding of an infinite source of wealth,” said Nicole Fritz of Johannesburg’s Southern African Litigation Centre. “There is this race to elections.” In Vila de Manica, smuggler Chikwere boasted that there was no limit to the amount of stones he could bring into Mozambique. “Don’t worry about me and the border,” he said. “I have my systems.”


N A T ION / WOR L D

A6 Monday, January 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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W  B Egyptian church bombing inquiry focuses on Alexandria-based group

Navy to investigate lewd carrier videos NORFOLK, Va. — The Navy said Sunday it will investigate “clearly inappropriate” videos broadcast to the crew of a nuclearpowered aircraft carrier in which a top officer of the ship used gay slurs, mimicked masturbation and opened the shower curtain on women pretending to bathe together. The star of the videos, made in 2006 and 2007, is a former Top Gun pilot who now commands the same ship, the Norfolk-based USS Enterprise, which was deployed in the Middle East at the time and is weeks from deploying again. The Virginian-Pilot newspaper reported on the videos in its Saturday editions and posted an edited version of one video on its website. Capt. Owen Honors appeared in the videos while he was the USS Enterprise’s executive officer — the second in command — and they aired on the ship’s closed-circuit television. Honors took over as the ship’s commander in May.

Agent: Exhaustion is reason Berry left show CHICAGO — An agent for Chuck Berry says exhaustion was the reason the rock ’n’ roll legend felt ill before a Chicago show and had to have medics check him out. Agent Dick Alen said Sunday via e-mail that the 84-year-old Berry was on a plane going home to the St. Louis area. He says he didn’t know if Berry was seeking additional medical treatment. Fire Department spokesman Joe Roccasalva says Berry felt better and signed a release after being checked out before Saturday’s show. Concertgoer Steve Handwerker says Berry gave an erratic, out-of-tune performance and had to be helped offstage. Handwerker says Berry thanked the crowd before leaving the stage. Berry is known for such classic songs as “Maybelline,” “Johnny B. Goode” and “Roll Over Beethoven.” — From wire reports

ALEXANDRIA, Egypt — Egyptian police are focusing their investigation into the New Year’s suicide bombing of a church on a group of Islamic hard-liners inspired by al-Qaida and based in the Mediterranean port city of Alexandria where the attack killed 21 people, security officials said Sunday. The bombing touched off riots and protests by Egypt’s Christian minority, who feel they are targeted and discriminated against and do not get adequate protection from authorities. There were signs of beefed-up security outside churches nationwide, and dozens returned to pray Sunday in the bombed, blood-spattered Saints Church — many of them sobbing, screaming in anger and slapping themselves in grief. Marc Chown Oved / The Associated Press

Bangladeshi police officers walk past Jordanian peacekeepers outside the Golf Hotel in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, on Saturday. U.N. patrols in Ivory Coast have been fired upon and faced off with angry crowds in recent days.

U.N. peacekeepers come under increasing threat in Ivory Coast By Marco Chown Oved The Associated Press

ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast — Some people yell “U.N. out!” as the Jordanian U.N. peacekeepers pass by in their armored personnel carriers, but these soldiers don’t understand French. One man honks his horn before dragging his thumb across his throat in a gesture that cannot be misunderstood. The United Nations declared Alassane Ouattara the winner of Ivory

Coast’s long-delayed presidential vote, but incumbent leader Laurent Gbagbo has refused to step aside now for more than a month. Gbagbo accuses the U.N. of failing to remain neutral, and the U.N. has ignored his demand for thousands of peacekeepers to leave. Now peacekeepers patrolling the streets of Abidjan are coming under growing threat — one was wounded with a machete this week when a crowd in a pro-Gbagbo neighbor-

hood attacked a convoy and set a U.N. vehicle on fire. The next day, a U.N. patrol was fired upon from a nearby building as an angry crowd surrounded them. They were forced to fire into the air to disperse the crowd, a U.N. statement said. Gbagbo accused those peacekeepers of firing on the crowd and reiterated his call for the U.N. mission to leave during a Saturday evening address on state television. The U.N. denies having fired on the crowd.

Aiming, again, to revive Babylon’s ruins New York Times News Service JIMIJMA, Iraq — The damage done to the ruins of ancient Babylon is visible from a small hilltop near the Tower of Babel, whose biblical importance is hard to envision from what is left of it today. Across the horizon are guard towers, concertina wire and dirt-filled barriers among the palm trees; encroaching farms and concrete houses from this village and others; and the enormous palace that Saddam Hussein built in the 1980s atop the city where Nebuchadnezzar II ruled.

Something else is visible, too: earthen mounds concealing all that has yet to be discovered in a city that the prophet Jeremiah called “a gold cup in the Lord’s hands, a cup that made the whole earth drunk.” Now, for the first time since the U.S. invasion in 2003, after years of neglect and violence, archaeologists and preservationists have once again begun working to protect and even restore parts of Babylon. The World Monuments Fund, working with Iraq’s State Board of Antiquities and Heritage, has drafted a con-

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servation plan to combat any further deterioration of Babylon’s ruins, and reverse some of the effects of time and Hussein’s propagandistic and archaeologically specious re-creations. In November, the State Department announced a new $2 million grant to begin work to preserve the site’s most impressive surviving ruins. They include the foundation of the Ishtar Gate, built in the sixth century B.C. by Nebuchadnezzar’s father, Nabopolassar, and adorned with brick reliefs of the Babylonian gods Marduk and Adad.

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Iran’s Ahmadinejad fires 14 senior advisers TEHRAN — Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad has fired 14 of his senior advisers, the Mehr news agency reported Sunday. One of the president’s most senior advisers and closest aide for five years, Mehdi Kalhor, confirmed the dismissals, including his own, but said he did not know the reason. The media and cultural adviser said he and the other 13 received a letter of thanks and appreciation on Sunday from the president without further elaboration. Observers believe the dismissals might be political or a cost-cutting move. If political, it remains to be seen whether the new advisers are technocrats or more ideological.

Hungary investigates explicit Ice-T songs, and he applauds BUDAPEST, Hungary — Hungary’s media authority says it is investigating a radio station for playing Ice-T songs with explicit lyrics, an announcement that got an enthusiastic response from the hip-hop star and actor. Tilos Radio argued that since the lyrics are in English and the station has very few young listeners, the songs did not have an “adverse effect on the moral development” of children under 16. Ice-T, known for his controversial “Cop Killer” track and as a star of “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit,” welcomed the dispute, posting “I love it! The world still fears me. hahaha!” on Twitter.

Rare birds in Japan found to have avian flu TOKYO — An increased number of birds are infected with avian flu in Japan this winter and experts are at a loss about how to deal with the problem. Five hooded cranes have been found to have been infected with bird flu on the Izumi Plain in Kagoshima Prefecture. The crane is a species designated for special protection by the national government. — From wire reports

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Inside

OREGON iPods recharge learning in fourth-grade class, see Page B3. OBITUARIES Szeto Wah, advocate for democracy in Hong Kong, see Page B5.

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www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JANUARY 3, 2011

STARTING TUESDAY

Well, sh ot! WORKSHOPS & FIELD TRIPS In 2011, we’re taking Well, shoot! a step further. Our photographers have developed 13 workshops where we’ll help you improve your skills and ask you to submit your homework. In addition, we’ll feature photographic field trips to 13 of Central Oregon’s signature locations and ask you to submit your best shots from there. Throughout the year, we’ll go back and forth between workshops and field trips, with each feature followed the next week by the best of reader-submitted photos, called Well shot!. Follow the series at www.bendbulletin.com/wellshoot. Coming up: Jan. 11: Field trip to the mountains • Feb. 1: Depth of field • Feb. 22: Field trip to the Old Mill District • March 1: Rule of thirds • And more...

Tuesday: Using angles

Bend shelter set to sign 2-year lease with county Bethlehem Inn will pay county per month to use former motel under proposed deal By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

MADRAS

Six firms file liens against theater business

WILL WORK FOR TOSSED TREES

Area subcontractors say they have yet to be paid for work on cinema project

Bend’s largest homeless shelter is poised to enter into a lease this week with Deschutes County and begin paying rent for the facility the shelter already occupies. County commissioners are scheduled to decide Wednesday whether to sign the lease with The Bethlehem Inn. For three years, The Bethlehem Inn has operated rent-free at a former motel that Deschutes County and the city of Bend purchased for approximately $2.5 million. During that time, county and shelter officials went back and forth over who should pay for the property. In May, board members for The Bethlehem Inn decided not to purchase the property from the county. The board had offered to purchase the property for the current market price, but county officials wanted to recoup what they spent in 2007 and would not budge. Under the proposed lease, the shelter would pay $2,034 a month and continue to perform general maintenance on the property. Deschutes County would be responsible for electrical, foundation, roof and other structural issues, according to a county staff report.

By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

Six months ago, Hunter Excavation did more than $35,000 worth of work on the site where the new Madras movie theater is expected to open. Jerry Johnson, the Madras company’s owner, has yet to be paid. And he’s not the only one waiting for a check. Six companies filed liens against the movie theater business and its owner, Chuck Nakvasil, of Portland. The liens total more than $200,000. Johnson said in 18 years of business, this is the first time he’s filed a lien. “It’s not common. The bottom line is, this guy hasn’t paid his subcontractors,” Johnson said. And Johnson is worried he will never see the money. “I need my money like everybody else in the world,” he said. Nakvasil said Sunday that the bills haven’t been paid yet in part because his lawyer has been out of town. He also said he was working on some finance issues but declined to give specifics.

Nakvasil reassures “Everyone will be paid,” he said. The theater recently pushed back its completion date. The Madras Redevelopment Commission, which agreed to pay the project $100,000 a year for five years to lure the theater to town, agreed on a later opening date. Nakvasil, who owns seven other theaters throughout the state, said in an earlier interview that his $3.5 million project will be completed this spring. He said he’s already invested $2 million on the Madras project, and it’s 80 percent complete. The theater is part of a larger project known as Jefferson Square, along U.S. Highway 97. Developer Scott Goodrich, of Bend, owns the surrounding property. See Theater / B2

Talks began in July The county and Bethlehem Inn officials began negotiating the lease in July, said Chris Clouart, managing director for the shelter. The proposed lease extends retroactively from July

If you go What: Deschutes County Commission meeting When: 10 a.m. Wednesday Where: 1300 N.W. Wall St., Bend 2010 through June 2012. “We’re very happy that we have now a two-year lease,” Clouart said Thursday. “Our board has agreed to sign this lease as it currently stands.” To purchase the property, Deschutes County took out a loan from other county funds. As a result, the county has to charge itself interest on that internal loan.

Rent to cover interest “The lease — at least in the short term — stops the bleeding in the county’s Bethlehem Inn fund by covering the cost of the interest that’s accumulating in the fund,” County Administrator Dave Kanner wrote in an email Thursday. Deputy County Administrator Erik Kropp is recommending the County Commission approve the lease, according to a staff report. The Bethlehem Inn has space for roughly 60 single adults and four families, The Bulletin has reported. Deschutes County paid approximately $2.25 million for the former Econo Lodge Motel building in northeast Bend, and the city of Bend covered the down payment of $230,000. See Shelter / B2

The Loft More snow moves on may follow after law sunny start on liquor to the week loosened

WEATHER

By Hillary Borrud

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Members of Boy Scout Troop 25, from left, Evan Brass, 12, Dannie Wright, 13, and Kevin Klett, 15, all of Bend, push a Christmas tree into the front of a trailer being filled at the Boy Scouts’ Christmas tree recycle transfer station at the Awbrey Glen Golf Course maintenance building parking area in Bend on Sunday morning.

Boy Scouts pick up holiday greenery for recycling By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

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s the trailers pulled up loaded with Christmas trees, the Boy Scouts in Bend’s Troop 25 got to work, dragging the trees onto a big truck, stacking them high and stomping them down to fit as many trees in the truck as possible. “Pass me one, literally chuck it,” Calvin Laughlin, 12, of Bend, yelled to a friend as he hauled another tree to the back of the truck, getting caught up in the mass of firs. “I’m being buried.” Sunday was the second day of the Boy Scouts’ annual Christmas tree recycling fundraiser, where Scouts pick up trees at the curb and take them to be ground up and recycled. The Scouts also will be collecting trees next weekend. So far, Laughlin said, the tree collection was going pretty well. See Trees / B2

Get your tree recycled Boy Scout troops will pick up Christmas trees for recycling again next weekend. For more information, including pickup days for the following areas, call the number for your area: • Northwest Bend (west of Third Street and north of Newport/Greenwood), 541-385-2692 • Southwest Bend (west of Third Street and south of Newport/Greenwood), 541-385-3977 • Northeast Bend (east of Third Street and north of Greenwood/U.S. Highway 20), 541-385-2672 • Southeast Bend (east of Third Street and south of Greenwood/U.S. Highway 20), 541385-3942 • Redmond, 541-385-3989 • Sunriver, 541-385-3935 • La Pine, 541-385-3971

The Bulletin

By Nick Budnick

The clear skies and sun that Central Oregonians enjoyed Sunday are forecast to continue early this week, until a storm brings clouds Wednesday and precipitation Thursday. The storm should be mild compared with recent weeks, said Ann Adams, an assistant forecaster for the National Weather Service in Pendleton. “There’s nothing we’re seeing right now that’s going to be a wallop,” Adams said.

The Bulletin

Storm expected The storm is expected to move down from British Columbia to the Pacific Northwest later in the week. In Bend, the week will likely start out clear but chilly, with daytime temperatures in the low to mid-30s and overnight lows in the teens to 20s, according to the National Weather Service website. With clouds moving in Wednesday and Thursday, high temperatures will increase to the upper 30s to low 40s, and nighttime lows will be in the 20s. See Weather / B2

SALEM — Eight months ago, Sen. Chris Telfer, RBend, introduced legislation to make it possible for a Bend club to obtain a liquor license. It passed the Legislature with unanimous support. But the Bend club owner whose story sparked the change now says he has no plans to use the new law — for the time being, at least. “I certainly don’t think it’s out of the realm of possibility to apply again for my own liquor license in the future, but I don’t need to do it right now,” said Adam Bledsoe, who coowns The Loft, a private club downtown. Bledsoe, 32, opened the club in August 2008 on the second floor of the 919 Bond Building. He had help from his partners: his brother, Drew, a former NFL all-pro quarterback, as well as Chad Wold, an investor who operates two similar clubs in Montana. Before Telfer, Rep. Gene Whisnant, R-Sunriver, and other lawmakers got involved, Bledsoe had wrangled with the Oregon Liquor Control Commission for 18 months. See Liquor / B2


COV ER S T OR I ES

B2 Monday, January 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Compiled from Bulletin staff report

CIVIL SUITS One killed in crash in Klamath County A 65-year-old Chico, Calif., woman died and two Klamath Falls residents were injured in a crash in northern Klamath County on Sunday morning, according to a news release from the Oregon State Police. The section of U.S. Highway 97 where Hadley Ann Alger, 65, lost control of her 2003 Subaru station wagon was covered in packed snow and ice. It was approximately six miles south of the county line between Deschutes and Klamath counties. As of Sunday evening, the crash was still under investigation, and police did not know why Alger lost control. Alger was driving south on Highway 97 at approximately 11:47 a.m. Sunday when she lost control and crossed broadside into the northbound lane, according to the police. Klamath Falls resident Collin Runnels,

Shelter Continued from B1 The remaining cost was supposed to be repaid through a Community Development Block Grant of up to $800,000, and a major fundraising campaign the shelter’s management planned to undertake. Yet the plans began to fall apart less than a year after the county and city purchased the facility. In May 2008, the shelter’s then-Executive Director Sandra Mears told county com-

Theater Continued from B1 The Madras community has long wanted to have its own theater. The theater is expected to have five screens and to show first-run movies. Thomas Hunziker, who owns AM-1 Roofing, of Bend, filed a lien for $27,468. He said he’s still hoping to be paid but filed the lien to protect himself. “It’s a legal thing,� he said. “Either 75 days after substantial completion or 75 days after you have been there, if you miss

Weather Continued from B1 The first chance of snow in Bend is Thursday night, and there is also a possibility of rain on Friday. Meanwhile, high temperatures this weekend are expected to be in the 30s to low 40s, and low temperatures could be in the 20s. “So it warms up a little with the moisture coming in,� Adams said. Prineville has a similar forecast, with cold and clear weather early in the week, and snow

24, was driving north on the highway in a 1988 pickup truck. Runnels attempted to avoid the crash, but collided head-on with the Subaru on its passenger side. Alger was pronounced dead at the scene. She was traveling alone, returning home from visiting a relative in the Bend area. Runnels and passenger Brittainy Anne Pendleton, also a 24year-old Klamath Falls resident, were both taken to Sky Lakes Medical Center in Klamath Falls, according to the news release. Runnels was treated for nonlife-threatening injuries, but Pendleton suffered serious injuries and was later taken by air ambulance to Oregon Health & Science University in Portland for emergency surgery. The drivers and passenger were all wearing seat belts, according to the police. Traffic was allowed to continue through, using one lane of the highway during the crash investigation.

missioners that the building did not fit the shelter’s needs. Around the same time, the federal government changed the criteria for block grants to favor permanent housing for homeless people over shelters, and the county could not secure the grant. Clouart said the shelter will “be moving forward with our plans for the future,� but he declined to elaborate. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

that day, you lose your position to file a lien. So, you wouldn’t want to do that. Even if you were 98 percent sure you were going to get paid, you don’t want to miss that date.� According to information from Jefferson County Deputy Clerk Kate Zemke, Ferguson Fire and Fabrication, of California, filed a lien for $2,576.87; Platt Electric Supply filed a lien for $47,125; and Bend Electric filed a lien for $104,450. Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

and rain next weekend. In Madras, patches of freezing fog also are part of the forecast from 10 p.m. to 10 a.m. today and Tuesday, according to the National Weather Service. Temperature ranges in Madras are expected to be similar to those in Bend and Prineville. Madras also is forecast to have a chance of rain and snow on Friday, and a continued chance of snow this weekend. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

Filed Sept. 10 (original file date on a case that changed venue)

10CV1323MA: North Star Capital Acquisition v. Ann M. Jenkins, complaint, $19,424.41 Filed Nov. 10 (original file date on a case that changed venue)

10CV1324ST: Carl and Peggy Shumway; Gerald J. Jungwirth Rollover IRA; Jamey, Timothy L. and Paulette M. Warkentin; David McConnell, trustee of the W. David McConnell and Joy Lee McConnell Trust; and Roy E. and Arlene

Hostetler v. Harris Kimble and Dale Davison, complaint, $850,000 Filed Dec. 17

10CV1306AB: CitiBank NA v. Robert Northrup, complaint, $74,670.28 Filed Dec. 20

10CV1309ST: Umpqua Bank v. Dan and Fran Berrey, Dan & Fran Berrey Trust and C.P. Management Co., dba Certified Property Management, complaint, $980,139.19 10CV311MA: Brooke McCrea v. Tristan Potters, complaint, noneconomic damages $75,000; economic damages $16,380.49 Filed Dec. 22

10CV1318MA: Safeco Insurance Co.,

as subrogee of John True, American States Insurance Co., as subrogee of Johnny True Ranch LLC v. Dometic Corp., Dometic LLC and Sundowner Trailers Inc., complaint, $396,349.66 Filed Dec. 23

10CV1321AB: EGP Investments LLC v. John Till, complaint, $36,458.55 Filed Dec. 27

10CV1322ST: Heidi A. and Donald E. Ventre v. Liberty NorthWest Insurance Corp., complaint, $340,000 10CV1326MA: Capital One Bank USA NA v. Donald E. Roberts, complaint, $21,741.14 10CV1327ST: FIA Card Services NA v. Marie F. Andre, complaint, $17,174.04

10CV1328ST: CitiBank South Dakota NA v. Kevin Pangle, complaint, $32,776.05 10CV1329ST: A minor, by and through his guardian ad litem, Douglas Fellows v. Madras Medical Group P.C., Mountain View Hospital District, dba Mountain View Hospital Foundation Inc., St. Charles Health System Inc., Suzanne El-Attar, M.D., Gary Plant, M.D., Mary Jane Davis, M.D., John Murphy, M.D., and Jane Howell, M.D., complaint, economic damages $8 million, noneconomic damages $6 million 10CV1330ST: FIA Card Services v. Jamie L. Lang aka Jamie Lee Lang aka Jamie Lang aka Jamie L. Schweickart, complaint, $22,282.91

Trees Continued from B1 “My favorite part is putting up the trees and stacking them,� he said. Sunday, about 10 boys from Troop 25 were scrambling on the truck, figuring out the best ways to pile the trees. Because the trees are conically shaped, the trick is to put the trunk of one next to the top of another, said Nathan Hildebrandt, 15. Jacob Lamken, 13, of Redmond, was helping out Sunday and planning to collect more trees next weekend to help with the fundraiser. “It’s my favorite of the year, it’s so much fun,� said Jacob Lamken, 13, of Redmond. The best part, he said, is “tree swimming� — diving into the pile of evergreens. Different troops take different sections of Bend and other Central Oregon cities, said Patrice Anderson, a Boy Scout mother and committee member. “First and foremost, it’s a community service,� she said. “We

Liquor Continued from B1 He even spent $10,000 on a lawyer to try to figure out ways around certain OLCC rules. Those rules allowed only nonprofit clubs like the Elks Lodge to get liquor licenses — not forprofit ones like The Loft. Bledsoe, who had become a vocal critic of the liquor commission, called the rules “devoid of logic� in a December 2009 interview. Telfer joined with Whisnant and other co-sponsors in the February 2010 special session to change the law for Bledsoe and any other private clubs that might be interested. The law went into effect immediately, but before it could be used, the OLCC had to adopt regulations that detailed how the law could be applied. Bledsoe attended one meeting to discuss the new rules — an Aug. 24 advisory committee meeting of the OLCC. “He was very impressive,� said Grover Simmons, a committee member. But Bledsoe became disheartened by the OLCC’s desire to require that clubs have a minimum

Members of Boy Scout Troop 25 work together while loading a trailer full of old Christmas trees in Bend on Sunday. The troop will be picking up trees next weekend as well. Andy Tullis The Bulletin

try to cover the entire community so there’s a way for people to get their trees picked up.� After cruising the streets to look for discarded trees, the Scouts take the trees to Knott Landfill to be recycled. The Christmas tree pickup

also is a fundraiser, with a suggested donation of $5. The money helps the Scouts buy equipment, Anderson said. “It pretty much pays for summer camp,� she added. People have been generous this year, Hildebrandt said,

sometimes giving more than the suggested amount. “We appreciate all the donations,� he said.

of 150 members — The Loft has about 135, he says — as well as by other concerns OLCC staff raised. “The process became so mired that I literally stopped paying attention to it,� he said. “The bottom line is that I couldn’t sit around and wait for the OLCC to make up its mind.� Late in 2009, even before Telfer introduced her bill, Bledsoe entered into an agreement with Zydeco Kitchen + Cocktails, a restaurant which had opened up downstairs. Zydeco applied to extend its liquor license, so it applied upstairs as well, and the two arranged a sublease so that the bar in the club upstairs is an extension of the business downstairs. The arrangement allowed customers of The Loft to consume liquor and cocktails on the premises. “From a customer’s perspective, it’s identical to having a liquor license,� Bledsoe. He said he originally considered the deal a temporary “Band-Aid,� noting that his club “had to give up the vast portion of the liquor revenue.� In November, the OLCC adopted rules allowing for-profit clubs that serve food and have a minimum of 100 members to

have liquor licenses. Upon reading the final regulation, Bledsoe said he could use the rule and apply for a liquor license of his own, but he is sick of dealing with the OLCC and is comfortable with his arrangement with Zydeco. “You don’t want to get things up and running smoothly and switch it,� he said, “and then get things up and running smoothly — and switch it again.� He said that even if he doesn’t use the new law in Bend, it will come in handy if he expands The Loft to other cities in Oregon, as he’d originally envisioned. “It certainly opens the door to repeating the model elsewhere,� he said. Asked about Bledsoe’s comments, OLCC spokeswoman Christie Scott said the rule-making process takes time because “stakeholders� need to be consulted in meetings to ensure a well-crafted regulation. “The whole purpose of including our stakeholders throughout the rule-making process is because they are the ones the rule will affect,� she said. She added, “It appears that Mr. Bledsoe’s concerns regarding the 150-

person requirement were heard during the rule-making process because the final rule language mentions 100 people in membership.� Whisnant said he isn’t concerned to hear Bledsoe doesn’t need the new law, saying, “Hopefully there will be other people who can use that. It’s good common sense.� Similarly, Telfer said she isn’t disappointed to hear The Loft won’t take advantage of the law. “I feel his pain, I feel his frustration,� she said of Bledsoe. “But I feel this gives other businesses the opportunity to start.� Telfer is working on a bill for the 2011 Legislature that is in part sparked by Bledsoe’s experience. It would require agencies’ regulations to be approved by legislative committees that work with that agency.

Alaska becomes the 49th state in 1959

Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-382-1811 or at kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

Nick Budnick can be reached at 503-566-2839 or at nbudnick@bendbulletin.com.

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend • www.highdesertbank.com EQUAL HOUSING L ENDER

The Associated Press Today is Monday, Jan. 3, the third day of 2011. There are 362 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Jan. 3, 1961, President Dwight D. Eisenhower announced the United States was formally terminating diplomatic and consular relations with Cuba, citing a move by the Cuban government to limit the number of U.S. diplomatic personnel in Havana to 11 persons. ON THIS DATE In 1521, Martin Luther was excommunicated from the Roman Catholic Church by Pope Leo X. In 1777, Gen. George Washington’s army routed the British in the Battle of Princeton, N.J. In 1861, more than two weeks before Georgia seceded from the Union, the state militia seized Fort Pulaski at the order of Gov. Joseph E. Brown. The Delaware House and Senate voted to oppose secession from the Union. In 1911, the first postal savings banks were opened by the U.S. Post Office. (The banks were abolished in 1966.) In 1938, the March of Dimes

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y campaign to fight polio was organized. In 1949, in a pair of rulings, the U.S. Supreme Court said that states had the right to ban closed shops. In 1959, Alaska became the 49th state as President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed a proclamation. In 1967, Jack Ruby, the man who shot and killed accused presidential assassin Lee Harvey Oswald, died in a Dallas hospital. In 1990, ousted Panamanian leader Manuel Noriega surrendered to U.S. forces, 10 days after taking refuge in the Vatican’s diplomatic mission. In 1993, President George H.W. Bush and Russian President Boris Yeltsin signed a historic nuclear missile-reduction treaty in Moscow. TEN YEARS AGO The 107th Congress opened with the Senate split evenly down the middle. Eleven people died in a house fire in Oak Orchard, Del. Oklahoma defeated Florida State, 13-2, to win the Orange Bowl and capture college

football’s Bowl Championship Series title game. FIVE YEARS AGO Lobbyist Jack Abramoff pleaded guilty to providing gifts to officials in exchange for their help; he agreed to cooperate in investigations of corruption in Congress. Iran told the U.N. nuclear watchdog agency it planned to resume nuclear fuel research. Militants broke into the home of an Afghan headmaster and beheaded him in the latest in a spate of attacks blamed on the Taliban that had forced many schools to close.

TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actor Robert Loggia is 81. Actor Dabney Coleman is 79. Hockey Hall of Famer Bobby Hull is 72. Rock musician John Paul Jones (Led Zeppelin) is 65. Actor-director Mel Gibson is 55. Actress Danica McKellar is 36. Actor Nicholas Gonzalez is 35. Singer Kimberley Locke (“American Idol�) is 33. NFL quarterback Eli Manning is 30. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “The difference between perseverance and obstinacy is that one comes from a strong will, and the other from a strong won’t.� — Henry Ward Beecher, American clergyman (1813-1887)

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THE BULLETIN • Monday, January 3, 2011 B3

O iPods fire up kids for reading While other schools put bans on personal electronics, one class embraces technology

Fourthgrader Yesenia Hernandez Ramirez practices math on an iPod Touch at Philander Lee Elementary School in Canby in early November. Students use iPod Touches to practice math and improve reading.

By Nicole Dungca The Oregonian

CANBY — With a furrowed brow and a deep breath, Dallis Engel pressed down on the screen of her iPod Touch. Then, she began to read. “My brother William is a fisherman,” she said, using a finger to trace words in Patricia MacLachlan’s book, “Sarah, Plain and Tall.” The 9-year-old stumbled over pronunciations and skipped words as an application recorded her voice. When she finished the passage, she glanced over at her teacher, Kelly Turcotte, and explained her next step. “I have to listen to it and make sure it’s perfect,” she said. “If you sound like a robot, you have to do it again.” In the Canby School District, it’s a familiar scene. While schools in the nearby North Clackamas School District and others across the nation have banned personal cellular phones or mobile Internet devices, Engel’s fourth-grade classroom at Philander Lee Elementary is fully embracing wireless technology. During a time of budget reductions — employees must take 14 furlough days this school year — the Canby School District has issued an iPod Touch to every third-grader, challenging the idea that digital technology exists largely as a distraction for a plugged-in generation.

State, federal grants Since implementing a pilot project at Philander Lee Elementary three years ago, the district has used about $250,000 in state and federal grant and rebate money to purchase the iPod Touches, a portable media player that connects to the Internet. In addition, the parent-teacher as-

Doug Beghtel The Oregonian

sociation at Lee Elementary raised about $12,000 to buy 60 iPod Touches for the school’s fourth- and fifthgraders, and another parent organization pitched in about $15,000 for 30 iPads at Eccles Elementary School. The choice of equipping third-graders first was intentional, according to Joseph Morelock, the district’s technology coordinator. The third grade is the first to take state tests, and administrators are eager to help students pass math achievement standards that have recently been raised. In presentations, Morelock has shown that several classrooms using the iPod Touches generated better test scores than the district average. He looks at iPod Touches and iPads as unparalleled tools that can be used in nearly every class. “Every kid now has their own dictionary, calculator, graphing calculator, connection to the Internet.” Turcotte and other teachers say the devices enthuse students, giving them the opportunity to practice multiplication using animated games, listen to books on iTunes or record their own reading voices. “These are the kids who hated

reading, but now there are all these things you can do on that iPod Touch,” said Turcotte, who heads a language arts class for struggling fourth-graders. “Suddenly, they feel like readers.” Students also learn at a comfortable pace, she said. Now, they can go back and practice a word or a math problem they’ve missed, minus the embarrassment. For their part, third- and fourthgraders mostly praise the goofy multiplication games, which have students play tic-tac-toe or combat aliens.

Books more exciting Engel says books become more exciting with the iPod Touch. Students often research settings of books on the Internet or listen to book recordings. “There are all these sound effects,” Engel said. “It makes you want to keep on reading and to know what happens next.” As budget cuts continue to loom, public perception has become an issue for schools dealing with doz-

ens of flashy digital tools. But Superintendent Jeff Rose defended the move to expand its iPod program, saying the money comes from grants and rebate dollars that cannot be used for teacher salaries. Besides that, he said, the school board had made the decision a few years ago to maintain technology: “In some ways, it jump-started this idea that technology needs to be somewhat of a funding priority.” The district’s efforts at infusing technology in the classroom are attracting notice. Districts from as far as Alaska and Hawaii are looking to tour their classrooms, and Apple recently named Canby’s technology innovation grant project an Apple Exemplary Program for 2010-11. Even with many districts looking at multimillion-dollar budget gaps next year, Morelock would not be surprised about Canby parents and educators pouring more money into the effort. “People like to bet on a winner,” Morelock said. “When they see kids doing well and kids getting excited about school, they want to get on board.”

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O  B Land dispute drags on a decade LEBANON — A project to build a few homes south of Lebanon has been in the works for a decade. It has taken that long for the Linn County Board of Commissioners to rule that the 15 acres south of town is not valuable farm or forestland. The Albany Democrat-Herald reported 59-yearold Bob Morris and his two brothers-in-law bought the land to build their retirement homes on it. Morris said he never thought it would take this long — and $50,000 in legal and consulting fees — to get a decision. The project has been blocked primarily by the Friends of Linn County, a group that tries to conserve farm and forestlands. Linn County Commissioner Roger Nyquist said the case shows that Oregon’s land use process is broken.

Man dies after being shot at club PORTLAND— Portland police have made an arrest in the shooting death of a 32-year-old man at a downtown club early New Year’s Day. Police say officers reported a fight and then shots fired about 1:30 a.m. that sent several hundred people pouring out of Club 915. The victim, whose name has not been released, died later at a hospital. Police interviewed several people and then arrested 31-year-old Kevin Charles Moffett and charged him with murder in the man’s death. Police say an officer who arrived at the club saw the victim lying at a street corner and fired his weapon as he dealt with “persons associated with the shooting.” Investigators say no one was hit, and the officer was placed on leave.

State trooper hit by car on icy road GRANTS PASS — An Oregon State trooper escaped with minor injuries when he was hit by a car as he stood on the shoulder of Interstate 5 just south of Grants Pass. State Police say a car went out of control on an icy stretch of pavement around 6:30 a.m. Saturday as trooper Eric Tholberg and a colleague were investigating a crash. Tholberg saw the car sliding toward him and tried to jump out of the way, but was struck in the left side and leg. The trooper was treated at a hospital for minor injuries and released. No one else was hurt, and the driver wasn’t ticketed. — From wire reports

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B4 Monday, January 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Clear the air with energy investigation

T

he independent counsel has become an established part of the American political scene, and with good reason. It gives the public reassurance that a sticky issue is being

dealt with honestly. It was most notably used first in the Watergate affair of the Nixon administration. Now Oregon’s outgoing governor, Ted Kulongski, has asked for the Oregon equivalent of the independent counsel to look into charges that the state somehow gave preferential treatment to a firm owned by the incoming governor’s girlfriend, Cylvia Hayes, of Bend. No official has suggested that Hayes, who is a partner in a pair of energy efficiency consulting groups, did anything remiss when one of the groups was awarded a subcontract to do work for the state of Oregon. TEEM, Toward Energy Efficient Municipalities, worked through a Seattle firm, R.W. Beck, under a federal stimulus contract to look into making the power grid less vulnerable to emergency outages, according to a Bulletin news article. Some suspected that state Department of Energy officials had unfairly steered the grant TEEM’s way, no doubt because of her connection to Kitzhaber. Hayes’ other group, 3E Strategies, lost the bid for the original $200,000 contract. The Department of Justice began looking into the matter in August, and officials there recently told Kulongski they could not prove beyond a reasonable doubt that no criminal ac-

tivity had taken place. That’s hardly a ringing endorsement of the actions taken by a handful of DOE employees, however, and Kulongoski has decided to pursue the matter further. To that end, he will appoint a lawyer to take a second look. He expects to name a person who is well versed in contracting and public employee collective bargaining, he said. Three of the four DOE employees in question have been on paid leave since the issue first arose, and last week the fourth, interim DOE director Mark Long, also was placed on leave. Long chose not to be interviewed during the earlier investigation. Kulongoski need not have named someone to take a second, independent look at the matter. He could simply have walked away and let his successor, John Kitzhaber, deal with whatever questions arise about TEEM, Cylvia Hayes and DOE. Instead, he chose to shift whatever political problems might arise as a result of the investigation from Kitzhaber to himself. In doing so, he also chose an action that assures Oregonians that political favor will not be a factor in the investigator’s findings.

Numbers tell the tale

A

fter more than a decade of warnings, Americans apparently remain unconvinced about the threat of greenhouse gases, global warming and other environmental threats of the 21st century. That’s evident in vehicle sales statistics from the first 11 months of 2010. Gone was our love of the likes of the hybrid Prius, the tiny Yarus and the slightly larger Civic. In their place? Midsize sport utility vehicles, from the Ford Edge to the Jeep Grand Cherokee. In fact, sales of midsize SUVs rose by some 41 percent in the first 11 months of last year, while sales of smaller, more efficient cars actually declined. It’s enough to make members of the Union of Concerned Scientists tear their hair out. The vehicle sales numbers serve to confirm what pollsters were saying for most of the last decade. Americans either believe that whatever threat global warming poses has been greatly exaggerated or that it is caused by Mother Nature, not the activities of humankind. Nor are those sentiments new. Gallop has been tracking Ameri-

cans’ attitudes about climate change for more than a decade, and with a brief exception in 2004 they’ve told the pollster that the problems climate change poses are greatly exaggerated. This spring, the number believing that rose to nearly half, 48 percent of those polled. A nearly equal number, 47 percent, told Rasmussen pollsters that climate problems stem not from human activity, but from long-term planetary trends — Mother Nature, in other words. As for fuel efficiency, we’re actually getting it, just not the way climate scientists wish. Americans love their big cars, and they want to go far and fast for as little money as possible. Fuel efficiencies have been put to use designing the bigger, more powerful vehicles Americans want, rather than the gas-thrifty mini cars we’ve been told we need. How, then, to explain the popularity of the tiny cars in the last few years? It clearly wasn’t driven by a sudden nationwide awakening to the horrors of climate change. Rather, it was the economy, and our concern for our own pocketbooks.

Shape of things to come under GOP rule By Bob Franken Hearst Newspapers

J

an. 5th is a big day. The world will be watching to see if and when the ever-emotional John Boehner breaks into tears as he takes over as House Speaker. He might not be the only one sobbing on Wednesday, since this is the official beginning of the new Congress with Nancy Pelosi getting demoted, and all the tea party wolves threatening to huff and puff and blow the House down. And the Senate. But Jan. 5 is not the only important date on the 2011 congressional calendar. Let’s also make sure we mark down March 4th. That’s when the tea party Republicans get a chance to make good on their promises of unyielding fiscal conservatism and shut down chunks of the United States government. March 4th is when the temporary spending bill passed by the old Congress expires. By then, all the feel-good hopes of compromise that marked the very end of the lame-duck session will be distant memories. It is true the ducks were able to hatch some big deals. Extended tax cuts and help for the unemployed to survive. Check. Historic social progress with repeal of the military’s controversial “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy barring out-of-the-closet gays from serving in uniform. Check. Nuclear arms reduction with ratification of the U.S.-Russia START agreement. Check. But START

was probably also the finish of grownup politics. Checkmate. We are about to discover that bipartisanship was sooooooooooo December, and so fleeting. There was just enough time for President Obama to gloat about the last-gasp accomplishments and keep a straight face while saying, “If there is any lesson to draw from these past few weeks, it is that we’re not doomed to endless gridlock.” It’s probably worth mentioning here that his aides insist the president isn’t smoking these days, considering that the new firebrands hope to light up his administration and its legislative accomplishments. Gridlock is probably the best he can hope for. The nuclear treaty was really part of a short cease-fire during the constant war that rages from one election to the next. We are now in 2012, if you are counting in campaign cycle years. The 111th was anything but a “Do Nothing Congress.” It’s a good possibility the 112th will quickly be regarded as “Do Nothing, PLEASE.” Back to that March 4th deadline for keeping government up and running: A shutdown is not inevitable. But a showdown is. In this game of chicken, neither side seems willing to make the first move away from a collision. Cooler GOP heads might have flashbacks to the last time Republicans stormed the Hill in 1994. Newt Gingrich & Co. also

refused, for a while, to make deals, and many federal agencies went out of business for a brief period. The insurgents of that era succeeded in scaring enough voters into re-electing Bill Clinton. Still, if we are to believe their campaign rhetoric, many of the tea partiers are convinced that a government shutdown is a good idea. Even established hands are preparing for one. Rep. Lynn Westmoreland, R-Ga., who is a vice chair of the National Republican Congressional Committee, the House GOP’s campaign apparatus, was exhorting party faithful back in September, “If the government shuts down, we want you with us. There’s going to have to be some pain for us to do some things that we’ve got to do to right the ship.” According to the Congressional Research Service, the “pain” that lasted from Dec. 16, 1995, to Jan. 6, 1996, resulted in a furlough for 284,000 federal employees, while 475,000 were kept on the job in a pay-you-later status because they were deemed “essential.” The latter category included uniformed military and others deemed vital to “national defense, public health, safety and crucial operations.” For whatever reason, most in the White House and on Capitol Hill are on the essential list. What a crying shame. Bob Franken is a columnist for Hearst Newspapers.

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Resolving to meet the ongoing challenge of living well By Linda P. Campbell McClatchy -Tribune News Service

“I

will pass this way but once. “If there’s any good that I can do “Let me do it now “For I’ll never pass this way again.” More than 35 years later, I still remember distinctly when Pam Simpson sang those words at the final assembly of our senior year at Lamar High School in Arlington, Texas. It’s been replaying in my mind constantly since the reunion in September that our classmate Chris Vale organized and herded almost half our 400-member graduating class to, with help from generous donors of money and time. The marvel of Google led me to a YouTube rendition of the song, which was written by Ronnie Gaylord and recorded by Glen Campbell in 1972. “I will see this day but once. “If there’s any kindness I can show “Let me show it now “For I’ll never see this day again.”

The first time I heard the words, they seemed a poignant farewell. I’ve since realized they map a strategy for living. But it’s a daunting one. Think about what it asks for. A gracious response to the crank who persistently sends hostile or annoying e-mails, as if you don’t already have plenty to do. A calm, loving hand of guidance when your children make you want to pull your hair out. A caring acknowledgment of the panhandler who approaches on a downtown sidewalk, instead of averted eyes and a retreat across the street. A patient yield to the driver who selfishly barges to the front of merging traffic lines. A polite “no, thank you” to the solicitor who calls at dinnertime — because even telemarketers need to work for a living. A sincere kindness to that co-worker or relative or acquaintance who sets. your. teeth. on. edge. This ideal requires that we not yell at

Oh, there are saints among us. And thank goodness. They go out of their way to feed the hungry, clothe the naked, comfort the afflicted, sow peace where there’s conflict, turn the other cheek, give voice to the voiceless and generally make the world a better place. the obviously blind, boneheaded ref. That we listen respectfully to ridiculously misguided political views. That we just hush when we can’t say something nice. That we treat even the most irritating, idiotic or despicable human beings like what they are: children of God.

These might appear to be trivialities. They aren’t the serious moral dilemmas and crises of faith that try our souls, but that makes them seem easy to dismiss when they shouldn’t be. On a day-to-day basis, this is hard stuff. Because most of us mere mortals aren’t saints. Oh, there are saints among us. And thank goodness. They go out of their way to feed the hungry, clothe the naked, comfort the afflicted, sow peace where there’s conflict, turn the other cheek, give voice to the voiceless and generally make the world a better place. They do it with happy hearts because it’s the right thing to do. The rest of us have to remind ourselves every single day that we’ve been given a gift that shouldn’t be wasted, spoiled or ruined through pettiness, impatience, incivility, cruelty, callousness or thoughtless indifference. On too many days, we forget. That’s why I like the idea of New Year’s resolutions. Not because they

provide a chance to set wildly impossible goals that won’t be pursued any longer than it took to write them down — but because they represent the opportunity for a fresh start on the daily challenge of living well. So I resolve, among other things: In addition to hitting the gym regularly, to find a new community volunteer project. In addition to acting less grumpy when tired, to grouse less often. In addition to being more organized and efficient, to be more reasoned, fair and understanding. And every day I fall short, I’ll get up and try again the next. “Tomorrow may be too late my friend to do all the good that you planned,” the song goes. Why not do it now? Because I’ll never pass this way again. Linda P. Campbell is a columnist and editorial writer for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, January 3, 2011 B5

O Experimental poet Janine Pommy Vega dies at 68

Szeto Wah, 79, political activist in Hong Kong By Keith Bradsher New York Times News Service

By William Grimes New York Times News Service

Janine Pommy Vega, a poet and intimate of the Beat generation luminaries Allen Ginsberg and Peter Orlovsky whose lifelong quest for transcendence took her to San Francisco in the 1960s and on a pilgrimage to neolithic goddessworship sites in the 1980s, died Dec. 23 at her home in Willow, N.Y. She was 68. The cause was a heart attack, her companion, Andy Clausen, said. Vega’s life course was set when, as a teenager in Union City, N.J., she read Jack Kerouac’s “On the Road.” “All the characters seemed to have an intensity that was missing from my life,” she wrote in her memoir “Tracking the Serpent: Journeys Into Four Continents,” published by City Lights in 1997.

Headed straight to New York City After reading a magazine article about the Beats, she and a high school friend headed for New York, where, as luck would have it, they met the poet Gregory Corso and, through him, Ginsberg and Orlovsky, who became Vega’s first lover. The day after she graduated as valedictorian of her high school in 1960, she announced to her mother, “I’m going to live with Allen Ginsberg and Peter Orlovsky in Greenwich Village,” and she embarked on her sentimental education. She worked as a waitress at the Cafe Bizarre, wrote experimental poetry in the Beat vein, wore baggy men’s clothes and a stocking cap, and fell in love with a Peruvian painter, Fernando Vega. The couple lived the Bohemian life in Paris, where she passed the hat for a folk singer and worked as a model at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts. She returned to the United States after her husband died of a heroin overdose on Ibiza. City Lights, the bookstore and publishing house in San Francisco associated with the Beats, published her first book of poetry, “Poems to Fernando,” in its Pocket Poets series in 1968. She went on to publish more than a dozen books of poetry while roaming the world on spiritual quests that included treks in the Himalayas and two years as a hermit on the Isla del Sol on Lake Titicaca in Bolivia. “Tracking the Serpent,” a kind of feminist “On the Road,” chronicled her visits in the 1980s to matriarchal power sites in the Amazon, Nepal, France and Britain.

Born in Jersey City Janine Pommy was born on Feb. 5, 1942, in Jersey City, N.J. Her father worked as a milkman in the mornings and a carpenter in the afternoons. In the mid-1970s, she began teaching poetry workshops in New York prisons through the program Incisions/Arts, whose director she became in 1987. At her death, she taught at prisons as part of the Bard Prison Initiative, a program of Bard College that confers bachelor’s degrees on inmate students. Black Sparrow Press published her most recent poetry collections, “Mad Dogs of Trieste” (2000) and “The Green Piano” (2005). In addition to Clausen, she is survived by a brother, Bill Pommy, of Tijeras, N.M.

The Associated Press ile photo

Hong Kong democracy activist Szeto Wah stands in a makeshift tribute area for late Chinese Premier Zhao Ziyang in Hong Kong on Jan. 19, 2005. Szeto, a vocal supporter of the 1989 Tiananmen Square student protests, has died at 79.

HONG KONG — Szeto Wah, a Hong Kong union leader and critic of British colonial rule who became an implacable critic of the Chinese Communist Party after the Tiananmen Square killings in 1989, died Sunday after a long struggle with lung cancer. He was 79. As a prominent leftist who had organized strikes against the British, Szeto had seemed assured of a prominent role after the British returned Hong Kong to Chinese rule in 1997. Before the Chinese military used armored vehicles and guns against peaceful demonstrators in Tiananmen Square, he was even part of the Beijing-backed committee that was drafting the Basic Law, which was to be Hong Kong’s constitution under Chinese rule. But unlike some leftists in Hong Kong, Szeto broke all ties to Beijing after the military crackdown. He became chairman of the Hong Kong Alliance in Support of Patriotic Democratic Movements of China, a position he held until his death. The alliance organizes annual candlelight vigils in downtown Hong Kong on June 4 to commemorate the deaths in Tiananmen Square and to call for an end to one-party rule in mainland China. The vigil continues to draw tens of thousands of protesters every year, and the turnout is one ba-

Paul Calle, 82, designer of postage stamps, dies By Margalit Fox New York Times News Service

Paul Calle, a commercial artist whose most famous work was no bigger than a postage stamp, died Thursday in Stamford, Conn. Calle, one of the most highly regarded stamp designers in the nation, was 82. The cause was melanoma, said his son Chris, who is also a stamp designer. Calle designed more than 40 U.S. stamps, licked by generations of postwar Americans. He was best known for the 10-cent stamp, commissioned by NASA and issued in 1969, commemorating the Apollo 11 moon landing that year. His other stamps include ones honoring Gen. Douglas MacArthur (1971), Robert Frost (1974), the International Year of the Child (1979), Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan (1980), Frederic

Remington (1981), Pearl S. Buck (1983), the Vietnam Veterans Memorial (1984) and folk-art carousel horses (1988 and again, with new artwork, in 1995). Calle’s work has been exhibited at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City and elsewhere. With Chris, he designed two 1994 stamps — a 29-cent firstclass stamp and a $9.95 expressmail stamp — commemorating the moon landing’s 25th anniversary. Father and son also collaborated on stamps for Sweden, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia and the United Nations. Paul Calle was born in Manhattan on March 3, 1928. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn and during the Korean War was an illustrator for the Army. Early in his career, Calle did

cover artwork for science-fiction pulp magazines like Galaxy, Fantasy Fiction and Super Science Stories, as well as for general-interest publications like The Saturday Evening Post. In 1962, he was among the inaugural group of artists chosen for the NASA Art Program, a documentary record of the space program that has produced thousands of works to date. Calle’s early art for the program includes a pair of 5-cent stamps, issued in 1967, depicting the Gemini capsule and astronaut Ed White making the first American spacewalk in 1965. On July 16, 1969, the day Apollo 11 was launched, Calle was the only artist allowed to observe the astronauts. That morning, when the astronauts lifted off, one of the things they carried was the engraved printing plate of Calle’s commemorative stamp.

Ruth Park, Australian novelist, dies at 93 By William Grimes New York Times News Service

Ruth Park, whose novel of the Sydney slums, “The Harp in the South,” shocked Australians in the 1940s but did not prevent her from becoming one of the country’s most revered writers, died Dec. 14 in Sydney. She was 93. Park leapt from obscurity in 1946 when her unpublished first novel, “The Harp in the South,” an unsparing picture of life in the Surry Hills neighborhood of Sydney, won first prize in The Sydney Morning Herald’s inaugural literary competition. Published two years later, the book became enormously popular, despite its frank depiction of prostitution, drunkenness, abortion and child abuse. It inspired two more novels that chronicled the further adventures of the Darcys, an IrishAustralian clan rendered with vivid Dickensian strokes. The first, “Poor Man’s Orange,” was published in the United States in 1951 as “121⁄2 Plymouth Street,” and a prequel, “Missus,” was first published in 1985 in Australia. Park was equally famous as a writer of fiction for young adults, notably “Callie’s Castle” (1974) and “Playing Beatie Bow” (1980), and as the author of the “Muddle-Headed Mongoose” series of radio plays and books for children.

Denis Dutton, founder of Arts & Letters Daily website By Elaine Woo Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Denis Dutton, a scholar, author and Internet trailblazer who founded Arts & Letters Daily, a pithy website that links thousands of devoted followers around the world to smart, provocative writing online about books, culture and ideas, died Tuesday in Christchurch, New Zealand, where he taught philosophy at the University of Canterbury. He was 66. The cause was complications of prostate cancer, said his brother, Doug, of the Dutton’s Books family, which ran independent bookstores in Los Angeles for five decades. Denis Dutton wrote books (including “The Art Instinct,” an engaging treatise on the evolution of imagination, published in 2009) but did not join the family bookselling business. He did, however, share his brothers’ enterprising spirit. He launched a scholarly journal, Philosophy and Literature, now run by Johns Hopkins University Press. Determined to recirculate out-of-print academic works, he ventured into electronic book

He loved few things more than a good argument and often would go to great lengths to debunk fraudulent ideas or their purveyors. publishing years before the current e-book rage. And, in 1998, he created Arts & Letters Daily, which the New Yorker called the “first and foremost aggregator” of well-written book reviews and other literary writing available on the Web. The magazine dubbed Dutton “the intellectual’s Matt Drudge,” a reference to the founder of the influential news site Drudge Report.

‘Incite thought’ Unlike Drudge, Dutton was not interested in breaking news. He wanted to “incite thought.” Modeled on a Victorian-era broadsheet, Arts & Letters Daily consists of three columns of witty teasers — written mainly by Dutton — about articles and essays on topics that provoked him and Managing Editor Tran Huu Dung, an economics professor at Wright State University in Ohio.

Recently their synapses fired over pieces on the decline of the soap opera, the metaphysics of lawn mowing, the enduring allure of “The Arabian Nights,” lasers and the search for the perfect golf swing, and a liberal’s critique of multiculturalism. The sources they linked to ranged from the mainstream (the Atlantic, Christian Science Monitor) to the obscure (a blog named Spiked, the Swedish magazine Axess) and swept across the political spectrum. The diversity appealed to an erudite contrarian such as Dutton, who for some years was a member of the Libertarian Party. He loved few things more than a good argument and often would go to great lengths to debunk fraudulent ideas or their purveyors. “That was his sport,” Doug Dutton said in an interview last week. The motto of Arts & Letters Daily was “Veritas Odit Mo-

ras” — Latin for Truth Hates Delay — a tidy summary of the website founder’s approach to life. A robust exchange of ideas was the daily bread when Dutton was growing up. The second of four children of William and Thelma Dutton, he was born in Los Angeles on Feb. 9, 1944, and grew up in North Hollywood.

Family of bookstores His parents had long dreamed of running a bookstore, and in 1961 risked their life savings on a Laurel Canyon Boulevard storefront to open Dutton’s Books. It was initially run by Thelma, eldest son Dave and daughterin-law Judy. Dave later took over the North Hollywood store, while Doug ran Dutton’s in Los Angeles’ Brentwood section. (Both stores are now closed.) Their sister, Dory, managed museum bookstores. In addition to his three siblings, Dutton is survived by his wife, Margit; and two children, Ben and Sonia. After graduating from North Hollywood High School, Denis studied philosophy at the Univer-

rometer of attitudes in Hong Kong toward the mainland. Many young people who barely remember the original crackdown attend, and parents take their children. Some brave mainland Chinese also come to join the vigil, though they are more often found prudently standing and watching under the tall trees that ring the concrete ball fields in Victoria Park where the vigil is held. The 20th anniversary vigil drew 150,000 people, according to the organizers, and 62,800, according to the police, the largest vigil since the first in 1990. In 1990, Szeto co-founded a political grouping that evolved into the Democratic Party, one of the largest political parties in Hong Kong. Beijing officials barred him and other party leaders from even entering mainland China after that. Szeto became one of the 60 members of the Legislative Council — half of which is selected by mainly pro-Beijing interest groups — and a consistent critic of the Beijing-backed government after 1997. He supported a compromise with the government last year that calls for an expansion of the legislature, with 10 seats elected by the general public, although only candidates from the city’s district councils could run for five of these seats.

sity of California-Santa Barbara, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in 1966 and a doctorate in 1973. In between degrees, he went to India with the Peace Corps, where he learned to play sitar from a student of Ravi Shankar (and, once home, shamelessly played for free meals at Indian restaurants). He taught philosophy at the University of Michigan from 1973 to 1984, when he moved to the University of Canterbury. In the mid-1990s, Dutton started the Bad Writing Contest to expose “pretentious, swaggering gibberish” passed off as scholarship at leading universities. It drew about 70 entries a year, singling out for its dubious honors such well-known academics as feminist theorist Judith Butler and literary critic Fredric Jameson. The “winners” were announced in his journal, Philosophy and Literature, in which Dutton could be brutal in his comments; he described Jameson, for instance, as a man who “finds it difficult to write intelligibly and impossible to write well.”

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com


WE

B6 Monday, January 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

AT HE R

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2011.

TODAY, JANUARY 3

TUESDAY

Today: Partly cloudy.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

LOW

31

10

STATE Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

25/15

22/12

27/16

29/20

Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

34/17

27/17

Mitchell

Madras

Camp Sherman  26/7 Redmond Prineville 31/10 Cascadia 33/11 30/21  Sisters 29/9 Bend Post 31/10

28/19

28/6

27/5

Burns

37/25 43/26

Idaho Falls



30/9



Partly cloudy skies will be the rule today into tonight.

Crater Lake 35/14

17/1

26/11

Elko

51/31

34/12

Helena

Boise

31/10

Redding

Silver Lake

27/4

Bend

Grants Pass

Eastern

26/7



Eugene

Christmas Valley

Chemult

10/0

36/26

30/8

22/0

Missoula

Portland

Hampton Fort Rock



39/33



19/7

19/5

Reno

32/22

San Francisco

Salt Lake City

55/42

31/18

City

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

HIGH

Moon phases New

First

Full

Last

Jan. 4

Jan. 12

Jan. 19

Jan. 26

Monday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

HIGH

Astoria . . . . . . . . 44/31/0.00 . . . . . 44/32/pc. . . . . . 43/37/pc Baker City . . . . . . .21/-2/0.00 . . . . . .21/-1/pc. . . . . . 23/19/pc Brookings . . . . . . 55/40/0.00 . . . . . 48/38/pc. . . . . . . 50/39/f Burns. . . . . . . . . . .18/-8/0.00 . . . . . .20/-5/pc. . . . . . 22/16/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 37/24/0.00 . . . . . 37/25/pc. . . . . . 38/29/pc Klamath Falls . . . . 28/7/0.00 . . . . . 33/12/pc. . . . . . 35/19/pc Lakeview. . . . . . . 28/16/0.00 . . . . . . 34/6/pc. . . . . . . 33/15/s La Pine . . . . . . . . . 24/8/0.00 . . . . . . 29/6/pc. . . . . . 34/20/pc Medford . . . . . . . 45/23/0.00 . . . . . 43/26/pc. . . . . . . 44/26/s Newport . . . . . . . 46/36/0.00 . . . . . 47/34/pc. . . . . . 45/38/pc North Bend . . . . . 54/34/0.00 . . . . . 49/39/pc. . . . . . 49/36/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 23/11/0.00 . . . . . . 20/6/pc. . . . . . 20/14/pc Pendleton . . . . . . . 19/7/0.00 . . . . . 23/14/pc. . . . . . 26/21/pc Portland . . . . . . . 37/24/0.00 . . . . . 36/26/pc. . . . . . . 36/31/c Prineville . . . . . . . 30/17/0.00 . . . . . . 33/11/s. . . . . . 35/22/pc Redmond. . . . . . . . 30/5/0.00 . . . . . 30/12/pc. . . . . . 33/21/pc Roseburg. . . . . . . 39/29/0.00 . . . . . . 44/31/f. . . . . . . 44/31/f Salem . . . . . . . . . 38/24/0.00 . . . . . 38/25/pc. . . . . . 38/30/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . .29/-2/0.00 . . . . . . . 29/9/s. . . . . . 36/18/pc The Dalles . . . . . . 31/22/0.00 . . . . . 29/21/pc. . . . . . 29/28/pc

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29/10 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 in 1964 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . -10 in 1979 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.12” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 0.12” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.10 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 1.44 in 1936 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .5:56 a.m. . . . . . .3:10 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .3:54 a.m. . . . . . .1:51 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .8:14 a.m. . . . . . .5:10 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . .11:06 a.m. . . . . .10:53 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . .12:30 a.m. . . . . .12:01 p.m. Uranus . . . . . .11:03 a.m. . . . . .10:54 p.m.

1

LOW

47 25

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy, chance of mixed showers.

43 25

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

Calgary

Seattle



29/8

Crescent

34/28

29/7

29/6

Crescent Lake

BEND ALMANAC Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:40 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 4:39 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:40 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 4:40 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 7:11 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 4:15 p.m.

FRIDAY Mostly cloudy.

38 26

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Paulina

La Pine

HIGH

NORTHWEST

Vancouver

Skies will be partly cloudy today into tonight.

LOW

36 20

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 55° Brookings • -8° Burns

THURSDAY

Mostly cloudy.

Partly cloudy skies are anticipated across the region today into early tomorrow.

Central

Brothers

28/7

19/-2



29/8

Sunriver

HIGH

23/16

34/12

32/15

Oakridge Elk Lake

Partly cloudy skies today through tomorrow.

33/16

Partly cloudy.

Tonight: Partly cloudy, cold.

HIGH

WEDNESDAY

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 36-50 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 48-79 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . 65-106 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . 92-102 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 88 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 53-57 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . . 107 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 30-32 Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 29-54

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . . Chains > 10,000 lbs. Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 Mammoth Mtn., California 10-16 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . .0-0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . .1-0

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

. . . . . . 35-38 . . . . 134-220 . . . . . . . . 84 . . . . . . . 140 . . . . . . 45-62 . . . . . . 42-47 . . . . . . . . 44

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 34/28

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

• 82° Fort Pierce, Fla.

• -26° Gunnison, Colo.

• 1.77” San Luis Obispo, Calif.

S

Calgary 23/16

S

Saskatoon 9/3

Seattle 39/33

S

S

Winnipeg 1/-15

S

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 25/12

Thunder Bay 12/-8

Halifax 35/25 Portland To ronto Portland Billings St. Paul Green Bay 32/24 28/24 36/26 20/2 28/12 23/13 Boston Boise 38/21 Buffalo Rapid City Detroit 26/11 29/26 New York 25/7 32/25 36/28 Des Moines Cheyenne Philadelphia 31/12 Chicago Columbus 31/17 37/28 31/18 36/24 Omaha San Francisco Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 29/10 54/43 City 42/29 Las St. Louis Denver Louisville 31/18 Kansas City 44/25 Vegas 33/16 44/27 39/21 40/32 Bismarck 10/-6

Albuquerque 40/16

Los Angeles 56/46 Phoenix 60/40

Honolulu 82/69

Oklahoma City 54/22

Dallas 60/39

Tijuana 59/44

Houston 63/49

Chihuahua 70/34

Anchorage 34/27

Little Rock 50/30

La Paz 75/51 Juneau 38/35

Mazatlan 80/55

Monterrey 66/51

FRONTS

Nashville 47/27

Charlotte 49/27

Atlanta 52/33 Birmingham 54/30

New Orleans 57/40

Orlando 74/51 Miami 78/63

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .51/20/0.00 . 60/28/pc . . 54/34/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .29/21/0.00 . 30/25/pc . . 32/20/sn Albany. . . . . . . . .46/32/0.06 . 32/20/pc . . . 35/22/c Albuquerque. . . .34/10/0.00 . 40/16/pc . . 41/19/pc Anchorage . . . . .42/39/0.00 . . 34/27/rs . . .34/24/rs Atlanta . . . . . . . .52/39/0.00 . . .52/33/s . . . 55/31/s Atlantic City . . . .52/41/0.11 . 39/26/pc . . 43/28/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .57/25/0.00 . 61/45/pc . . . 63/49/c Baltimore . . . . . .60/40/0.05 . 40/28/pc . . 45/26/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .24/14/0.00 . 28/12/pc . . 29/13/pc Birmingham . . . .45/32/0.00 . . .54/30/s . . . 55/33/s Bismarck . . . . . . 21/-13/0.02 . . 10/-6/sn . . . . 20/7/c Boise . . . . . . . . . .27/16/0.00 . 26/11/pc . . . 27/19/c Boston. . . . . . . . .51/41/0.04 . 38/21/pc . . . 37/26/c Bridgeport, CT. . .48/40/0.00 . 36/25/pc . . . 38/28/c Buffalo . . . . . . . .35/21/0.03 . .29/26/sn . . 33/22/sn Burlington, VT. . .48/32/0.16 . 30/19/pc . . 30/21/sn Caribou, ME . . . .38/34/0.08 . 25/10/pc . . . .20/-3/c Charleston, SC . .68/59/0.04 . . .54/36/s . . 59/39/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .67/45/0.10 . . .49/27/s . . . 52/27/s Chattanooga. . . .45/34/0.00 . . .51/27/s . . . 51/25/s Cheyenne . . . . . .30/14/0.00 . 31/17/pc . . 34/20/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .24/12/0.00 . . .31/18/c . . 26/15/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .32/23/0.00 . 40/24/pc . . . 34/21/s Cleveland . . . . . .28/21/0.00 . . .30/26/c . . 33/21/sn Colorado Springs 43/-5/0.00 . 34/10/pc . . 39/14/pc Columbia, MO . .35/12/0.00 . 43/22/pc . . . 36/22/s Columbia, SC . . .69/51/0.00 . . .55/29/s . . 57/31/pc Columbus, GA. . .61/45/0.02 . . .55/30/s . . . 59/31/s Columbus, OH. . .30/21/0.00 . 36/24/pc . . 34/20/pc Concord, NH . . . .43/33/0.04 . 31/14/pc . . . 32/19/c Corpus Christi. . .61/42/0.00 . . .68/60/c . . 70/60/sh Dallas Ft Worth. .49/25/0.00 . 60/39/pc . . 55/46/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .27/17/0.00 . 35/23/pc . . 31/19/pc Denver. . . . . . . . . .37/9/0.00 . 33/16/pc . . 39/17/pc Des Moines. . . . . .35/7/0.00 . . .31/12/c . . . 25/14/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .25/19/0.00 . . .32/25/c . . 31/21/sn Duluth . . . . . . . . . 10/-6/0.00 . . 13/-3/sn . . . .7/-4/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .45/20/0.00 . 55/28/pc . . 60/31/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . .41/15/0.00 . . 11/-1/pc . . . 13/1/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . . 7/-12/0.05 . . . 8/-8/sn . . . . 4/0/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . . 32/-5/0.00 . . .36/10/c . . . . 35/9/c

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .25/18/0.00 . . .32/22/c . . 28/16/sn Green Bay. . . . . . .20/8/0.00 . .23/13/sn . . . . 21/6/c Greensboro. . . . .58/40/0.09 . . .46/26/s . . 49/27/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .56/36/0.01 . 35/24/pc . . 40/24/pc Hartford, CT . . . .50/40/0.01 . 35/20/pc . . . 37/23/c Helena. . . . . . . . . .27/8/0.00 . . .17/1/pc . . 22/15/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .81/71/0.00 . .82/69/sh . . 82/66/sh Houston . . . . . . .58/34/0.00 . 63/49/pc . . 62/53/sh Huntsville . . . . . .42/30/0.00 . . .48/29/s . . . 50/25/s Indianapolis . . . .29/16/0.00 . 38/22/pc . . . 32/20/s Jackson, MS . . . .47/29/0.00 . . .55/33/s . . 61/38/pc Madison, WI . . . . .23/8/0.00 . . .26/12/c . . . 19/6/pc Jacksonville. . . . .74/62/0.31 . . .59/41/s . . 66/44/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .37/36/0.04 . . .38/35/r . . . .42/35/r Kansas City. . . . . .39/8/0.00 . 39/21/pc . . . 38/23/s Lansing . . . . . . . .25/18/0.00 . . .32/22/c . . 28/16/sn Las Vegas . . . . . .42/32/0.00 . . .40/32/c . . . 48/32/c Lexington . . . . . .32/20/0.00 . . .42/26/s . . . 38/22/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .35/4/0.00 . 30/11/pc . . . 31/16/s Little Rock. . . . . .44/22/0.00 . . .50/30/s . . 50/29/pc Los Angeles. . . . .52/46/0.12 . .56/46/sh . . . 59/48/s Louisville . . . . . . .35/22/0.00 . 44/27/pc . . . 40/24/s Memphis. . . . . . .41/25/0.00 . . .49/31/s . . . 50/31/s Miami . . . . . . . . .78/66/0.00 . .78/63/sh . . 78/63/pc Milwaukee . . . . .25/12/0.00 . . .28/17/c . . 22/13/pc Minneapolis . . . . .14/0/0.00 . . .20/2/sn . . . 12/4/pc Nashville . . . . . . .39/24/0.00 . . .47/27/s . . . 47/25/s New Orleans. . . .55/42/0.00 . . .57/40/s . . . 61/45/c New York . . . . . .52/44/0.00 . 36/28/pc . . 41/27/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .52/43/0.01 . 36/27/pc . . . 40/26/c Norfolk, VA . . . . .61/43/0.25 . . .43/26/s . . . 53/29/s Oklahoma City . .45/11/0.00 . . .54/22/s . . . 49/29/s Omaha . . . . . . . . .33/8/0.00 . . .29/10/c . . . 28/15/s Orlando. . . . . . . .79/60/0.01 . . .74/51/s . . 78/57/pc Palm Springs. . . .52/34/0.00 . .48/44/sh . . . 56/42/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .28/11/0.00 . . .35/20/c . . 28/18/pc Philadelphia . . . .54/41/0.09 . 37/28/pc . . 43/29/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .56/32/0.00 . 60/40/pc . . 62/41/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .40/24/0.00 . 34/25/pc . . 37/20/pc Portland, ME. . . .44/37/0.01 . 32/24/pc . . . 34/30/c Providence . . . . .50/41/0.02 . 36/22/pc . . . 38/27/c Raleigh . . . . . . . .62/46/0.17 . . .47/26/s . . . 50/28/s

Yesterday Monday Tuesday Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . 33/-2/0.00 . . .25/7/pc . . 31/14/pc Savannah . . . . . .69/55/0.00 . . .56/35/s . . 60/40/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .33/21/0.00 . .32/22/sn . . 32/17/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .39/25/0.00 . 39/33/pc . . . 41/37/c Richmond . . . . . .59/43/0.37 . . .44/27/s . . . 53/26/s Sioux Falls. . . . . . 19/-4/0.00 . . . .24/2/c . . . 20/13/s Rochester, NY . . .40/23/0.00 . . .30/25/c . . 34/24/sn Spokane . . . . . . . .20/3/0.00 . . .18/9/pc . . 24/15/sn Sacramento. . . . .51/42/0.60 . .52/34/sh . . . 54/33/s Springfield, MO. .39/11/0.00 . 44/20/pc . . . 42/25/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .35/18/0.00 . 44/25/pc . . . 37/22/s Tampa . . . . . . . . .72/62/0.00 . . .71/54/s . . 73/53/pc Salt Lake City . . . .24/7/0.00 . 31/18/pc . . . 31/20/c Tucson. . . . . . . . .64/26/0.00 . 61/34/pc . . 62/35/pc San Antonio . . . .58/33/0.00 . . .63/50/c . . . 64/54/c Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .43/15/0.00 . . .52/22/s . . . 47/30/s San Diego . . . . . .59/45/0.00 . .57/49/sh . . . 60/47/s Washington, DC .59/42/0.06 . 42/29/pc . . . 47/27/s San Francisco . . .51/49/0.36 . . .55/42/c . . . 54/42/s Wichita . . . . . . . . .41/8/0.00 . 43/17/pc . . . 41/23/s San Jose . . . . . . .53/50/0.22 . .57/40/sh . . . 57/41/s Yakima . . . . . . . .28/10/0.00 . 21/14/pc . . 24/22/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . . .29/0/0.00 . . .36/14/s . . 32/17/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .57/38/0.00 . . .59/41/c . . 63/42/pc

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .41/30/0.02 . . .39/32/c . . .35/28/sf Athens. . . . . . . . .55/41/0.31 . 59/48/pc . . 55/44/sh Auckland. . . . . . .77/61/0.00 . . .75/66/s . . . 74/64/c Baghdad . . . . . . .59/45/0.00 . . .62/45/s . . 66/44/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .86/70/0.00 . 91/73/pc . . . 90/71/c Beijing. . . . . . . . .30/18/0.00 . 28/13/pc . . . . 29/8/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .66/57/0.00 . 68/50/pc . . 66/51/sh Berlin. . . . . . . . . .36/27/0.00 . 35/22/pc . . . 30/13/c Bogota . . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 . . .66/49/c . . .65/48/dr Budapest. . . . . . .34/23/0.00 . . .26/13/c . . 25/14/pc Buenos Aires. . . .90/72/0.00 . . .85/69/s . . . 86/70/s Cabo San Lucas .73/54/0.00 . 74/55/pc . . 78/56/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . .66/52/0.00 . . .70/52/s . . . 68/53/s Calgary . . . . . . . .28/25/0.00 . . .23/16/s . . . 25/20/s Cancun . . . . . . . .81/59/0.00 . 78/60/pc . . 80/59/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .37/32/0.00 . 37/28/pc . . 44/30/pc Edinburgh . . . . . .36/32/0.00 . 44/28/pc . . .39/29/rs Geneva . . . . . . . .37/34/0.00 . . .30/18/s . . . 32/28/s Harare . . . . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . 83/63/pc . . . 81/62/s Hong Kong . . . . .63/57/0.00 . 62/57/pc . . 63/56/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . .50/45/0.00 . .46/37/sh . . 44/38/sh Jerusalem . . . . . .57/47/0.01 . 58/43/pc . . . 57/41/s Johannesburg . . .77/61/0.07 . . .77/61/t . . . .78/60/t Lima . . . . . . . . . .77/66/0.00 . 74/66/pc . . 75/64/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .54/50/0.00 . 59/48/pc . . 60/51/sh London . . . . . . . .39/36/0.00 . 37/32/pc . . 39/33/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .55/39/0.00 . . .51/33/s . . 53/37/pc Manila. . . . . . . . .86/73/0.00 . 84/71/pc . . 80/73/pc

Mecca . . . . . . . . .90/70/0.00 . . .91/73/s . . 93/72/pc Mexico City. . . . .75/45/0.00 . 71/43/pc . . . 75/44/s Montreal. . . . . . .46/28/0.13 . 27/21/pc . . 25/18/sn Moscow . . . . . . .30/21/0.18 . . . .19/4/c . . . . 20/8/c Nairobi . . . . . . . .79/57/0.00 . . .81/59/s . . . 80/57/s Nassau . . . . . . . .79/66/0.00 . 75/65/pc . . 74/64/pc New Delhi. . . . . .50/48/0.00 . . .62/44/s . . . 64/45/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .48/36/0.01 . .42/28/sh . . 40/30/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .32/19/0.00 . 21/12/pc . . .15/11/sf Ottawa . . . . . . . .46/27/0.14 . 27/21/pc . . 28/22/sn Paris. . . . . . . . . . .37/32/0.00 . 35/25/pc . . . 33/29/s Rio de Janeiro. . .90/77/0.00 . . .83/74/t . . . .85/76/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .55/43/0.00 . . .51/39/s . . . 50/35/c Santiago . . . . . . .77/55/0.00 . . .82/56/s . . . 83/53/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .70/64/0.00 . . .76/67/t . . . .77/68/r Sapporo. . . . . . . .32/28/0.00 . 32/23/pc . . .31/22/sf Seoul . . . . . . . . . . .28/5/0.00 . 26/10/pc . . 30/13/pc Shanghai. . . . . . .43/30/0.00 . 44/32/pc . . . 45/33/s Singapore . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . .86/75/t . . . .84/74/t Stockholm. . . . . .27/19/0.00 . . .15/10/s . . 32/28/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . .77/68/0.00 . .70/67/sh . . 73/66/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .61/54/0.00 . 62/51/pc . . 64/53/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .70/54/0.00 . 70/51/pc . . . 69/50/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .50/41/0.00 . . .48/35/s . . . 46/33/s Toronto . . . . . . . .30/23/0.04 . . 28/24/sf . . 32/21/sn Vancouver. . . . . .37/23/0.00 . 34/28/pc . . .37/32/rs Vienna. . . . . . . . .37/32/0.00 . . .30/17/s . . 26/18/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . .32/28/0.05 . 26/19/pc . . 30/17/pc


C

GREEN LIVING, TECHNOLOGY & SCIENCE IN OREGON

G

GREEN, ETC.

Inside

Friendly faces Former “Friends” stars Matt LeBlanc and Matthew Perry return to prime time in two new comedy series, Page C2

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THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JANUARY 3, 2011

“This is one of those stories where we came away from other portrait studios saying, ‘There’s got to be a better way.’” — Lisa Flynn, whippersnappers studio founder

AUTOMATING photo

ENHANCEMENT By Ed Merriman The Bulletin

ive angel investors have invested $350,000 to help whippersnappers studio founder Lisa Flynn expand into the global marketplace with her “secret sauce” for enhancing photographs. “We have developed a system using several types of software to modify the snapshot and make it better within a matter of minutes, where it would take someone else hours to do the same thing,” Flynn said. The blend of proprietary software for enhancing photographs that Flynn calls the “secret sauce” was developed initially to enhance photos at the four whippersnappers studios in Bend, San Francisco, Dallas and one in central Texas near the Fort Hood military base, Flynn said. The “secret sauce” is actually a combination of steps that whippersnappers has automated to “enhance the image quality by improving lighting, contrast and color to make the subject really pop out,” Flynn said. While whippersnappers’ blend of proprietary software reduces the time it takes to enhance snapshots and historical photos, Flynn said the system remains true to her belief that photography is a work of art. “It still allows the photo editor to use his creative eye” when enhancing photos, she said, adding that the process can also be used to remove or clean up signs of wear, tear and aging. Flynn credits the success of whippersnappers to a combination of her background in marketing and her husband K.C. Flynn’s skills in graphic design. From my background in marketing, I know what pictures tug at the heart strings and that sell, and K.C. has the graphic design and photo editing skills,” she said. K.C. is whippersnappers’ director of development. See Photos / C6

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Area retailers weigh in on possible ban on plastic bags By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

As the Oregon Legislature considers a statewide ban on plastic bags in grocery and retail stores when it starts up in the new year, some Central Oregon stores are already a step ahead. “Since our inception 27 years ago, we’ve never used plastic grocery bags,” said Calen Jessee, manager of Nature’s General Store in Bend. Instead, the store bags groceries in paper and encourages customers to bring reusable bags, he said, to avoid additional plastic bags ending up in the landfill. “I’m fully supportive of the ban on plastic bags,” Jessee said. While he and several other Central Oregon grocers expressed support for the proposed ban — which could be the first statewide plastic bag ban in the country — they did raise concerns about elements of the plan. The proposed ban has been more than a year in the making, said Sen. Mark Hass, DBeaverton, who is sponsoring the legislation with another Democrat and two Republicans. Only 3 percent of the plastic bags in Oregon are returned to stores to be melted down for other uses, Hass said. “Nobody knows for sure what happens to the other 97 percent,” he said. “Wherever they go, the outcome is not good, whether it’s a landfill, in the Deschutes, alongside the roadways or into the ocean.” Plastic bags make up more than 10 percent of the trash collected on Oregon beach cleanups, he said, and clog recycling sorting machines. And with different cities across Oregon considering referendums or ordinances to ban plastic bags, grocers are supportive of having a single, consistent rule statewide. The legislation calls for no plastic bags in grocery or retail stores, he said, with some exceptions, including bags for produce, meat and in pharmacies. And it calls for a 5-cent charge for paper bags, which Hass said would cover the stores’ additional cost for paper bags as well as provide an incentive for customers to bring reusable bags. One of the big problems with plastic bags is that they end up as litter, especially in the ocean, said Katy Bryce with Bend’s Environmental Center. It’s best for people to take reusable bags to the grocery store, she said. The Environmental Center will support the proposed ban. “I think it’s a step in the right direction,” she said. Jessee, with Nature’s, said that while he’s in favor of a ban on plastic bags, he doesn’t want to see a charge added to paper bags, and he questioned what the policy would be for double-bagging heavy items. “I would hate that to be mandatory,” he said. “People are very sensitive to extra costs, even if it is just a nickel.” See Bags / C6

GREEN

TECH FOCUS

Ed Merriman / The Bulletin

At the Bend headquarters for whippersnappers studio, Lisa Flynn, president and CEO, talked Dec. 23 about the company’s plans to go global with a proprietary “secret sauce” for enhancing photos of poor quality or turning badly worn snapshots into works of art.

Citizen scientists carving out new roles via the Web By Alex Wright New York Times News Service

Hanny van Arkel had been using the Galaxy Zoo website less than a week when she noticed something odd about the photograph of IC 2497, a minor galaxy in the Leo Minor constellation. “It was this strange thing,” she recalled: an enormous gas cloud, floating like a ghost in front of the spiral galaxy. A Dutch schoolteacher with no formal training in astronomy, van Arkel had joined tens of thousands of other Web volunteers to help classify photographs taken by deep-space telescopes. Stumped by the unusual image on her computer screen, she e-mailed the project staff for guidance. Staff members were stumped, too. And thus was christened the celestial body now known to astronomers worldwide as Hanny’s Voorwerp (Dutch for “object”). Stories like van Arkel’s are becoming more common, as the Internet opens up new opportunities for citizen scientists. And as millions of

people get involved in these participatory projects, scientists are grappling with how best to harness the amateurs’ enthusiasm. Some critics argue that citizen science projects are often little more than ploys to stimulate public interest rather than advance scientific knowledge. Others fret over the quality of data generated by nonspecialists. But scientists must weigh such risks against the benefits of a powerful new research tool: a vast computer network that can parcel out complex projects into small tasks that can be completed by individuals with relatively limited training. Many got their first taste of citizen science with SETI@Home, which enlisted more than 5 million users in the search for signs of extraterrestrial life. Volunteers downloaded a program that used their computers’ idle processing cycles to sift through data from radio telescopes.

The success of SETI@Home has inspired a number of other grid-computing initiatives, like Grid Republic, a consortium of more than 50 projects relying on the same screen-saver-based software, and IBM’s World Community Grid, which is being used by Chinese researchers to investigate efficient water-filtering techniques using nanotubes. Now researchers are starting to look for ways to engage contributors in more substantive ways, taking advantage of what the Internet pundit Clay Shirky calls the “cognitive surplus” of online brainpower. Like Galaxy Zoo, the Herbaria@ home project turns users into volunteer taxonomists, classifying images from collections of herbarium specimens across Britain. To date, the site’s 284 registered users have cataloged more than 75,000 specimens. Other citizen science projects en-

SCIENCE

list users as data gatherers, inviting them to contribute field observations about meteorological data, wildlife behavior and other phenomena. Cornell University’s Nestwatch provides a platform for amateur ornithologists to share observations about the nesting habits of bird species across North America. Recently, organizers have focused on tracking the effects of the BP oil spill on local birds’ nesting patterns. And Australia’s ClimateWatch project invites users to track seasonal variations in plant and animal life cycles across the Southern Hemisphere. Given the open-door participation policies, project administrators face major challenges in ensuring the integrity of their data. Staff members at Herbaria@home perform manual quality checks on about 5 percent of the incoming data, while ClimateWatch uses an algorithm to look for unusual data points, which can then be manually checked for accuracy. See Science / C6

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Riley Goldstein, 14, a courtesy clerk at Newport Avenue Market, loads a customer’s groceries into a basket Friday afternoon. Under a proposal that the Oregon Legislature will consider in the new session, plastic bags would be banned and customers charged 5 cents for paper bags.


T EL EV ISION

C2 Monday, January 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

‘Friend with benefits’ won’t offer woman a real commitment Dear Abby: My neighbor “MarDEAR ABBY lon” and I have been “friends with benefits” for almost two years. We hang out every day, and our kids My problem is the reaction I are friends. We talk about every- get when I tell people. I hear, “Oh, thing. Really, we are best friends. how could you quit your job in this We have attempted to hide our af- economy?” or “Aren’t you bored?” fair from our children (8 years old I volunteer as well as participate in and younger) and from our exes. social activities I didn’t have time Many of our friends know, but it is for when I was working. I feel my never discussed. decision is no one’s business, but My problem is, Marlon recently what do you suggest I say to those mentioned that he wants to find who give me negative reactions? a “good woman.” It upset me be— Tired of the Grief in California cause I’m in love with him. At the Dear Tired of the Grief: Perhaps same time, he makes no effort to you should resist the urge to anmeet anyone. He is always with nounce that you quit your job me — when you’d because it made think he’d be out tryyou miserable. Few ing to meet women. If one woman people can afford to Although we agreed isn’t enough do that these days, to be “FWBs,” I don’t much as they might want to be Marlon’s for him, you will like to. When you security blanket. have to start are asked if you are How do I let him employed, say that looking for a know I want more? you are not. Do not — Loves My good man — be defensive. If you Neighbor are questioned furDear Loves Your one who won’t ther, explain that Neighbor: Revisit the monopolize your you do not have subject with Marlon a job outside the time and take and ask him how home, but that you many “good wom- you for granted. do volunteer work en” he thinks he can for causes that inhandle because he terest you. If that already HAS one. It couldn’t hurt creates a negative reaction, let it to mention that you are in love be the other person’s problem and with him and have taken your re- not yours. lationship seriously. If one woman isn’t enough for Dear Abby is written by Abigail him, you will have to start look- Van Buren, also known as Jeanne ing for a good man — one who Phillips, and was founded by her won’t monopolize your time and mother, Pauline Phillips. Write take you for granted. Please un- Dear Abby at www.DearAbby derstand that if Marlon is seri- .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los ous about looking elsewhere for Angeles, CA 90069. someone to settle down with, you cannot invest any more time or emotion in him. s Turf, Inc. Dear Abby: I am in my 40s and h voluntarily quit my job several P months ago. My husband and I Mc can afford it, and my job was wn” y g ro l l making me miserable. a c o l n“

RY E S R NU

Two new shows for old ‘Friends’ LeBlanc, P erry bring their comed ic p ower to ABC and Showtime By Jeanne Jakle San Antonio Express-News

Prepare to welcome two old “Friends” back to your living rooms. Matt LeBlanc and Matthew Perry, stars of that long-running NBC hit, are returning to prime time in two new comedy series. Perry resurfaces in ABC’s “Mr. Sunshine,” which he cowrote. LeBlanc’s vehicle is “Episodes,” a Showtime comedy that comes from David Crane of “Friends.” Don’t expect either star to act anything like Joey or Chandler. Their new TV personas aren’t what you’d call likable; both are highly self-absorbed and opportunistic. They do generate plenty of humor, as do the ensemble casts around them. “Mr. Sunshine” and “Episodes” are part of a midseason lineup that’s full of such ensemble comedies, mostly of the relationship variety. Also arriving are new reality shows and dramas of the medical, crime and superhero sort. In the edgy and hilarious “Episodes,” premiering at 9:30 p.m. Sunday on Showtime, LeBlanc plays an egocentric and, much of the time, morally despicable actor. The joke? His name is Matt Le-Blanc, and his claim to fame is playing Joey on “Friends.” “There are some similarities,” LeBlanc said of the inevitable comparisons between himself and the character who

shares his name. For the most part, Matt on “Episodes” is a fictitious version of LeBlanc “without the rules.” The seven-episode show is derived from a familiar Hollywood scenario: taking a British hit to the United States and watching it get turned into something unrecognizable. It begins with a golden couple of British comedy, Sean and Beverly Lincoln (played brilliantly by Stephen Mangan and Tamsin Greig), whose show, “Lyman’s Boys” has earned them raves and awards. Their marital and professional lives take a drastic turn, however, when they’re persuaded by a powerful U.S. network president to move to Los Angeles and remake their show. “I think it’s about the crass interference in the creative process by people who are driven by forces not really concerned with what’s funny, but what’s going to sell,” said London-based producer Jimmy Mulville. An awkwardly horrifying — though darkly funny — scene has a network honcho suggesting that Sean and Beverly replace the original series’ lead actor, an erudite Royal Shakespearean vet, with Le-Blanc. Soon he’s no longer playing the headmaster of a boys’ school but the school’s hockey coach. The new title: “Pucks!” LeBlanc said the show is about what goes wrong with a relationship, particularly when

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Tamsin Greig, Matt LeBlanc and Stephen Mangan, from left, star in the upcoming comedy series “Episodes,” premiering Sunday on Showtime. a guy with such questionable values begins to drive a wedge between the spouses. “This whole thing is about a triangle,” LeBlanc said. “Beverly and Sean come to Hollywood. He wants to go there. She’s reluctant, but she loves him. So she goes. Enter Matt Le-Blanc. There the triangle is formed ... and the backdrop is this crazy world of network TV.” Another crazy world provides the backdrop for “Mr. Sunshine,” which debuts at 8:30 p.m. Feb. 9 on ABC. In it, Perry is the manager of a San Diego sports arena, where strange requests and mishaps are a daily occurrence: An elephant gets lost; a hockey rink

won’t melt in time for the circus to perform; and the owner (Allison Janney) is a PR nightmare. As for Perry’s Ben Donovan, his focus is solely on his needs; the last thing on his mind is caring about others. That is, until he turns 40 and realizes he’s alone. “I like to say that this character is me five years ago before any possible enlightenment could have come into my life,” Perry said. “I’m very in touch with that kind of drive — a selfish guy trying to have a better life and how confused a selfish person would get if he were told that the way to have a better life was to just be nicer to people.”

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The Bachelor Brad Womack starts the dating process. (N) ’ ‘14’ Å (10:01) Castle Nikki Heat (N) ’ ‘PG’ KATU News at 11 Chuck ’ ‘PG’ Å The Biggest Loser Catching up with former contestants. ’ ‘PG’ Å News How I Met Engagement Two/Half Men Mike & Molly ‘14’ Hawaii Five-0 Ke Kinohi (N) ’ ‘14’ News The Bachelor Brad Womack starts the dating process. (N) ’ ‘14’ Å (10:01) Castle Nikki Heat (N) ’ ‘PG’ News (N) House Massage Therapy ‘14’ Å Lie to Me Honey ’ ‘14’ Å News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ News on PDX-TV Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ King of Queens Antiques Roadshow (N) ‘G’ Å American Experience Robert E. Lee (N) ’ ‘PG’ Independent Lens ’ ‘PG’ Å Chuck ’ ‘PG’ Å The Biggest Loser Catching up with former contestants. ’ ‘PG’ Å News 90210 Debbie applies for a job. ‘14’ Gossip Girl ’ ‘14’ Å Married... With Married... With King of Queens Rough Cut-Mac Paint Paper Martha-Sewing Dewberry Shw Simply Ming ‘G’ Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Antiques Roadshow (N) ‘G’ Å American Experience Robert E. Lee (N) ’ ‘PG’ Independent Lens ’ ‘PG’ Å

11:30 (11:35) Nightline Jay Leno Letterman (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens Jay Leno King of Queens Caprial-John

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Bounty Hunter The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å Intervention Amber ‘PG’ Å Intervention Erin (N) ‘PG’ Å Hoarders Hanna; Kathy & Gary ‘PG’ Hoarders Robin; Ken ‘PG’ Å 130 28 18 32 Bounty Hunter (3:00) ›› “Unbreak- ››› “The Terminator” (1984, Science Fiction) Arnold Schwarzenegger, Linda Hamilton, Michael Biehn. A ›› “Swordfish” (2001, Suspense) John Travolta, Hugh Jackman, Halle Berry. An ex- ›› “Swordfish” (2001, Suspense) John Travolta, Hugh Jackman, Halle Berry. An ex102 40 39 able” (2000) cyborg assassin from the future comes to present-day L.A. Å con computer hacker is pulled into a high-tech heist. con computer hacker is pulled into a high-tech heist. Dogs 101 ’ ‘PG’ Å America’s Cutest Dog 2010 ’ ‘PG’ Dogs 101 Facts about the puli. ‘PG’ Dogs 101 Designer Dogs ‘PG’ Å Dogs 101 Ugly Dogs ’ ‘PG’ Å Dogs 101 Facts about the puli. ‘PG’ 68 50 26 38 Dogs 101 Traits. ’ ‘PG’ Å Tabatha’s Salon Takeover ‘14’ Real Housewives/Beverly Real Housewives/Beverly The Real Housewives of Atlanta ‘14’ The Real Housewives of Atlanta ‘14’ Tabatha’s Salon Takeover (N) ‘14’ Tabatha’s Salon Takeover ‘14’ 137 44 Cribs ’ Å The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ Å The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ Å ›› “The Replacements” (2000, Comedy) Keanu Reeves, Gene Hackman. ’ Å Cribs ’ 190 32 42 53 (4:00) ›› “The Replacements” (2000) Keanu Reeves. MacHEADS American Greed Mad Money Big Brother, Big Business Paid Program Paid Program 51 36 40 52 Inside the Mind of Google Larry King Live ‘PG’ Å Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Larry King Live ‘PG’ Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 Parker Spitzer (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å ›› “The Heartbreak Kid” (2007, Comedy) Ben Stiller, Michelle Monaghan, Jerry Stiller. Å Always Sunny Always Sunny Always Sunny Always Sunny Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 (3:30) Screwed Outdoorsman Joy of Fishing PM Edition Visions of NW Talk of the Town Local issues. Cooking Outdoorsman Bend on the Run Outside Presents Outside Film Festival Ride Guide ‘14’ The Element 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 12 11 Tonight From Washington Suite/Deck Wizards-Place Fish Hooks ‘G’ Wizards-Place Wizards-Place ›› “The Game Plan” (2007) Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson. Å Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Wizards-Place Wizards-Place 87 43 14 39 Suite/Deck MythBusters ’ ‘PG’ Å MythBusters ’ ‘PG’ Å American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. American Chopper-Divided Gold Rush: Alaska ’ ‘PG’ Å American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. 156 21 16 37 MythBusters ’ ‘PG’ Å (5:37) College Football Discover Orange Bowl -- Stanford vs. Virginia Tech From Miami. (Live) (9:15) SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å College Football 21 23 22 23 Orange Bowl Basketball Harlem Globetrotters From Orlando, Fla. Association SportsCenter SportsNation Å Football Live NBA Tonight NFL Presents NFL PrimeTime (N) Å 22 24 21 24 College Basketball Bowling Å Bowling Å PBA Bowling (N) Å AWA Wrestling Å College Football Sugar Bowl, played 1/1/92. Å 23 25 123 25 Tennis 1995 Australian Open Men’s Final -- Andre Agassi vs. Pete Sampras SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Pretty Little Liars ‘14’ Å Pretty Little Liars ‘14’ Å Pretty Little Liars Moments Later (N) Greek Defending Your Honor (N) ‘14’ Pretty Little Liars Moments Later The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 67 29 19 41 Pretty Little Liars ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Ace of Cakes Best Thing Ate Unwrapped Unwrapped Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Best Thing Ate Best Thing Ate Good Eats Good Eats 177 62 98 44 The Next Iron Chef Honor College Basketball Arizona at Oregon State Bensinger The Game 365 Seahawks The Final Score Profiles The Final Score 20 45 28* 26 College Basketball Gonzaga at Wake Forest ››› “Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story” (2004) Vince Vaughn. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ››› “Men of Honor” (2000) Robert De Niro. The U.S. Navy’s first black diver battles a crippling setback. ›› “21” (2008) Jim Sturgess. 131 For Rent ’ ‘G’ Income Property Designed to Sell Hunters Int’l House Hunters Property Virgins Property Virgins House Hunters Hunters Int’l Cash & Cari ‘G’ Hunters Int’l My First Place My First Place 176 49 33 43 For Rent ’ ‘G’ Modern Marvels ’90s Tech ‘PG’ Modern Marvels Acid ‘PG’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ American Pickers ‘PG’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ American Pickers Hobo Jack ‘PG’ 155 42 41 36 Modern Marvels ’80s Tech ‘PG’ Old Christine Old Christine “My Family’s Secret” (2010, Suspense) Nicholle Tom, Philip Riccio. Å “The Craigslist Killer” (2011) Jake McDorman. Premiere. ‘PG’ Å Catching the Craigslist Killer 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘PG’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann When I Was 17 That ’70s Show That ’70s Show World of Jenks 16 and Pregnant Life After Labor 3 ’ ‘14’ Å True Life ’ True Life I Have a Fetish (N) ’ Vice Guide Vice Guide 192 22 38 57 When I Was 17 SpongeBob SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ UFC Fight Night ’ ‘14’ ››› “Die Hard” (1988) Bruce Willis. A New York policeman outwits foreign thugs in an L.A. high-rise. ’ 132 31 34 46 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ V: The Final Battle (Part 1 of 3) ‘PG’ Å V: The Final Battle (Part 2 of 3) ‘PG’ Å V: The Final Battle ‘PG’ Å 133 35 133 45 (2:30) ››› “V” (1983) Marc Singer, Faye Grant, Jane Badler. ‘PG’ Å Behind Scenes Mark Chironna J. Franklin Jesse Duplantis Praise the Lord Å Joel Osteen ‘PG’ Perry Stone ‘G’ Jack Van Impe Changing-World Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ’ ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Conan ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond ››› “Morocco” (1930) Gary Cooper. A sultry nightclub singer (8:15) ››› “Crime and Punishment” (1935) Edward Arnold, Peter Lorre, Marian ›› “The Shanghai Gesture” (1941) Gene Tierney. A man dis- (11:45) ›› “Macao” ››› “Shanghai Express” (1932) Marlene Dietrich. A group of 101 44 101 29 train passengers encounters Chinese rebels. must choose between two suitors. Å Marsh. Dostoevski’s Raskolnikov kills, then helps inspector on case. covers his daughter in an Oriental gambling den. (1952) Å Cake Boss: Next Great Baker ‘PG’ Cake Boss: Next Great Baker ‘PG’ Cake Boss: Next Great Baker ‘PG’ Cake Boss: Next Great Baker ‘PG’ The Opener (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Cake Boss: Next Great Baker ‘PG’ 178 34 32 34 Four Weddings ’ ‘PG’ Å The Closer High Crimes ‘14’ Å The Closer (Part 1 of 2) ‘14’ Å The Closer (Part 2 of 2) ‘14’ Å The Closer An Ugly Game (N) ‘14’ Men of a Certain Age (N) ‘MA’ Å The Closer An Ugly Game ‘14’ Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order The Collar ’ ‘14’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ 6TEEN ‘G’ Total Drama Scooby-Doo Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Adventure Time MAD ‘PG’ King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Dining With Death ‘PG’ Å Dining With Death (N) ‘PG’ Å Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Hot in Cleveland ‘PG’ ››› “Ghost” (1990, Fantasy) Patrick Swayze. Premiere. A murder victim returns to save his beloved fiancee. 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons NCIS See No Evil ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Good Wives Club ‘PG’ Å NCIS A Mafia dumping ground. ‘PG’ WWE Monday Night RAW ’ (Live) ‘PG’ Å (11:05) Royal Pains ‘PG’ Å 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ Mario Lopez Mario Lopez Mario Lopez Mario Lopez Mario Lopez Mario Lopez Mario Lopez My Big Friggin’ Wedding (N) ’ ‘14’ Mario Lopez What Chilli Wants Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew ‘14’ 191 48 37 54 Mario Lopez PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:40) › “Sorority Boys” 2002 Barry Watson. ‘R’ Å (6:20) “Romy and Michele’s High School Reunion” ‘R’ ›› “Revenge of the Nerds” 1984 Robert Carradine. (9:35) ›› “Police Academy” 1984 Steve Guttenberg. (11:15) › “Pandorum” 2009 ’ ‘R’ ›› “The Name of the Rose” 1986, Mystery Sean Connery. ‘R’ Å (9:15) ›› “The Final Conflict” 1981, Horror Sam Neill. ‘R’ Å (11:15) “The Name of the Rose” ‘R’ ››› “The Legend of Hell House” 1973 Pamela Franklin. ‘PG’ Å Nike 6.0 HB BMX Pro The Daily Habit Insane Cinema ‘PG’ Bubba’s World Insane Cinema The Daily Habit The Daily Habit The Daily Habit Check 1, 2 ‘PG’ Stupidface ‘MA’ Amer. Misfits The Daily Habit Top 10 Golf Videos Trump’s Fabulous World of Golf The Golf Fix Golf Central Playing Lessons Trump’s Fabulous World of Golf The Golf Fix Golf Central Playing Lessons Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ “The Magic of Ordinary Days” (2005) Keri Russell, Skeet Ulrich. ‘PG’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (5:15) ›› “I Spy” 2002, Comedy Eddie Murphy, Owen Wilson. A spy recruits a boxer 24/7 Penguins/Capitals: Road to the ›› “Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian” 2009 Ben Stiller. Exhibits come Ricky Gervais: Out of England 2 - The (11:15) Taxicab Confessions: The City HBO 425 501 425 10 to help him retrieve a stolen plane. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Stand-Up Special ‘MA’ Å NHL Winter Classic ’ Å to life at one of the world’s largest museums. ’ ‘PG’ That Never Sleeps ‘MA’ Å ››› “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” 1975 Graham Chapman. ‘PG’ Arrested Dev. Arrested Dev. Larry Sanders ›› “The Center of the World” 2001, Drama Peter Sarsgaard. ‘NR’ ››› “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” 1975 ‘PG’ IFC 105 105 (4:05) “Observe and (5:35) ››› “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince” 2009, Fantasy Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma (8:15) ››› “Home Alone” 1990, Comedy Macaulay Culkin, Joe Pesci. A left-behind ››› “Greenberg” 2010, Comedy-Drama Ben Stiller, Greta Gerwig, Rhys Ifans. Two MAX 400 508 7 Report” 2009 Watson. New dangers lurk for Harry, Dumbledore and their friends. ’ ‘PG’ Å boy battles two burglars in the house. ’ ‘PG’ Å lost souls in Los Angeles make a connection. ’ ‘R’ Å Nazi Secret Weapons ‘14’ The Hunt for Hitler ‘PG’ Explorer Talibanistan ‘14’ Nazi Secret Weapons ‘14’ The Hunt for Hitler ‘PG’ Explorer Talibanistan ‘14’ Border Wars ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents Avatar: Airbender Avatar-Last Air Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents OddParents The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Iron Man: Arm. Iron Man: Armor NTOON 89 115 189 Dirt Trax TV ATV World Truck Academy Destination Muzzy’s Bow. Western Extreme Elk Chronicles Best of the West Truck Academy ATV World Dirt Trax TV Baja Unlimited Ult. Adventure Destination OUTD 37 307 43 ››› “Adventureland” 2009, Comedy-Drama Jesse Eisenberg. iTV. A college graduate “Extreme Movie” 2008 Michael Cera. iTV. Stories about teens (5:15) “Home of the Giants” 2007 Haley Joel Osment. iTV Premiere. A drug dealer › “I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell” 2009 Matt Czuchry. A cad SHO 500 500 asks a teen to throw a basketball game. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å takes a lowly job at an amusement park. ’ ‘R’ Å and sex involve a geek and a chat room. ’ ‘R’ takes his buddies on the road to ruin. Hot Rod TV ‘PG’ Hot Rod TV ‘PG’ Barrett-Jackson Special Edition ‘G’ Battle-Supercars Battle-Supercars Hot Rod TV ‘PG’ Hot Rod TV ‘PG’ Barrett-Jackson Special Edition ‘G’ Battle-Supercars Battle-Supercars Auto Racing SPEED 35 303 125 (4:30) ›› “I Am Sam” 2001, Drama Sean Penn. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (6:50) ›› “Spy Game” 2001, Suspense Robert Redford. ’ ‘R’ Å › “When in Rome” 2010 Kristen Bell. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (10:35) ›› “Daddy Day Care” 2003 Eddie Murphy. ’ STARZ 300 408 300 (4:15) “Lower Learning” 2008, Comedy ››› “Looking for Eric” 2009, Comedy-Drama Steve Evets, Eric Cantona. Soccer star ›› “Everybody’s Fine” 2009 Robert De Niro. A widower wants The King’s Speech ›› “The Boys Are Back” 2009 Clive Owen. A grieving widower (11:45) “Take” 2007 TMC 525 525 Jason Biggs. ’ ‘R’ Å Eric Cantona helps a fan sort out his life. ’ ‘NR’ Å to reconnect with his grown children. Å struggles to raise his two sons alone. Å ’ ‘R’ Sports Jobs Pregame NHL Hockey Chicago Blackhawks at Los Angeles Kings From Staples Center in Los Angeles. Hockey Central NHL Overtime (Live) Dakar Highlights Whacked Out NHL Overtime VS. 27 58 30 The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer Firestarter ’ ‘PG’ Sunset Daze ‘PG’ Sunset Daze ‘PG’ WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Monday, January 3, 2011 C3

CALENDAR TODAY

FRIDAY

GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Finding Nouf” by Zoe Ferraris; free; noon; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7085 or www.deschuteslibrary .org/calendar.

BIG BOOK SALE: A selection of books, puzzles and books on tape will be on sale; proceeds benefit the United Senior Citizens of Bend and the Bend Senior Center; 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “Happenin’ Hibernation”; $15, $10 museum members; 10 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www .highdesertmuseum.org. “BOOMERS, XERS AND MILLENNIALS — CAN WE ALL GET ALONG?”: Explore characteristics, communications styles and more about different generations; free; 1 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1034 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend, the Old Mill District and NorthWest Crossing; free; 5-9 p.m., and until 8 p.m. in NorthWest Crossing; throughout Bend. “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. “IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE”: Nine actors present a live-radio version of the classic holiday tale about George Bailey and his guardian angel; $5, free ages 5 and younger; 7 p.m.; Madras High School, 390 S.E. 10th St.; 541475-7265 or dhayes@509J.net. PAGAN JUG BAND: The Portlandbased acoustic band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “THE SECRET IN THEIR EYES”: A screening of the R-rated 2009 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541475-3351 or www.jcld.org. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.beattickets.org. GRANT SABIN: The Colorado Springs, Colo.based indie-folk act performs, with Empty Space Orchestra; $5 plus fees in advance, $7 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331.

TUESDAY GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “I AM BECAUSE WE ARE,” which explores Madonna’s journey to Malawi to see how AIDS and poverty affect children; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504.

WEDNESDAY “IT’S IN THE BAG” LECTURE SERIES: Hospitality management professor Sandy Chen presents the lecture “This Ain’t No Leisurely Bus Tour,” which will explore senior travel; free; noon-1 p.m.; OSU-Cascades Campus, Cascades Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-322-3100 or www.OSUcascades .edu/lunchtime-lectures. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, DON CARLO”: Starring Roberto Alagna, Marina Poplavskaya, Anna Smirnova, Simon Keenlyside and Ferruccio Furlanetto in an encore presentation of Verdi’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. PAGAN JUG BAND: The Portlandbased acoustic band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

THURSDAY BIG BOOK SALE: A selection of books, puzzles and books on tape will be on sale; proceeds benefit the United Senior Citizens of Bend and the Bend Senior Center; 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “Happenin’ Hibernation”; $15, $10 museum members; 10 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-3824754 or www .highdesertmuseum .org. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Zookeeper’s Wife” by Diane Ackerman; bring a lunch; free; noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1081 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. “BOOMERS, XERS AND MILLENNIALS — CAN WE ALL GET ALONG?”: Explore characteristics, communications styles and more about different generations; free; 6 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3121034 or www.deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. PAGAN JUG BAND: The Portlandbased acoustic band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: Preview night for the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; with a champagne and dessert reception; $10; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626 or www.beattickets.org.

SATURDAY “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, LA FANCIULLA DEL WEST”: Starring Deborah Voigt, Marcello Giordani and Lucio Gallo in a presentation of Puccini’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 10 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541382-6347. WINTER TRAILS DAY: Try snowshoeing, with guided hikes and refreshments; wear weather-appropriate clothing and waterproof boots; free; 10 a.m.3 p.m.; Swampy Lake Sno-park, Cascade Lakes Highway 17 miles west of Bend; 541-385-0594 or www.rei.com/stores/events/96.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

“MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. “IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE”: Nine actors present a live-radio version of the classic holiday tale about George Bailey and his guardian angel; $5, free ages 5 and younger; 7 p.m.; Madras High School, 390 S.E. 10th St.; 541-475-7265 or dhayes@509J.net. BEND COMMUNITY CONTRADANCE: Featuring caller William Watson and music by the Tune Dawgs; $7; 7 p.m. beginner’s workshop, 7:30 p.m. dance; Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; 541-330-8943. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626 or www.beattickets.org. “THE BIG LEBOWSKI”: A screening of the R-rated 1998 film, with a costume contest; $10; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. JON WAYNE & THE PAIN: The Minneapolisbased reggae rock act performs; $5 plus fees in advance, $7 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .bendticket.com.

SUNDAY “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 2 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626 or www.beattickets.org. SECOND SUNDAY: Suzanne Burns reads from a selection of her works; followed by an open mic; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 3:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboard mysteries.com. CHAMPAGNE CHAMPAGNE: The Seattle hip-hop group performs, with Mad Rad, Cloaked Characters and Joanna Lee; $8; 8 p.m.; Old Mill Music Lounge, 360 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, #210, Bend; www.bend ticket.com.

www.sistersfolkfestival.org.

TUESDAY Jan. 11 “THE AMERICAN CHARACTER”: Discuss how ideas of individualism and volunteerism are at odds within the American character; free; 6:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1032 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. RECESS — BREAK TIME FOR GROWNUPS: A night of games or crafts for adults; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1081 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar.

WEDNESDAY Jan. 12 “THE BEAT GENERATION”: Turn on to the Beat generation with Steven Bidlake; free; 6:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3121032 or www.deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.beattickets.org.

THURSDAY Jan. 13 BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “What’s the Matter?”; $15, $10 museum members; 10 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-3824754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Unaccustomed Earth” by Jhumpa Lahiri; bring a lunch; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. COUNTERINSURGENCY IN AFGHANISTAN: Joseph A. L’Etoile talks about spending 10 months in Afghanistan advising the U.S. and allied governments on counterinsurgency operations; free; 6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7257. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541312-9626 or www.beattickets.org.

FRIDAY

MONDAY

Jan. 14

Jan. 10

BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “What’s the Matter?”; $15, $10 museum members; 10 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-3824754 or www.highdesertmuseum .org. “THE HUSTLER”: A screening of the unrated 1961 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www .jcld.org. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www .beattickets.org.

BOWL GAME SCREENING: Watch Auburn play Oregon in the BCS National Championship game; $10; 5:30 p.m.; Pine Theater, 214 N. Main St., Prineville; 541-416-1014. TAILGATE AT THE TOWER: Watch the Oregon Ducks play the Auburn Tigers, with a barbecue buffet; proceeds benefit the Oregon Club of Central Oregon and the Tower Theatre Foundation; $25; 5:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL WINTER CONCERT SERIES: Featuring a performance by the North Carolinabased Steep Canyon Rangers; $15, $10 students in advance, $20, $12 students at the door; 8 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-4979 or

M T For Monday, Jan. 3

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

BLACK SWAN (R) 2:15, 4:50, 7:25 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 2:30, 7 HOW DO YOU KNOW (PG-13) 2:05, 4:40, 7:15 THE KING’S SPEECH (R) 2, 4:35, 7:10 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 2:20, 4:30, 7:30 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG-13) 2:10, 4:45, 7:20

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) 11:40 a.m., 9:15 THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER 3-D

(PG) 11:05 a.m., 1:45, 4:25, 7:05, 9:45 THE FIGHTER (R) 12:10, 2:50, 5:25, 8:05, 10:40 GULLIVER’S TRAVELS 3-D (PG) 11:55 a.m., 2, 4:05, 6:45, 9:25 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 11:20 a.m., 2:30, 6:25, 9:35 HOW DO YOU KNOW (PG-13) 11:25 a.m., 2:15, 5:05, 7:50, 10:35 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 12:20, 2:10, 2:40, 4:30, 5:15, 6:50, 7:45, 9:20, 10:05 TANGLED (PG) 11:15 a.m., 1:35, 4, 6:35, 9:10 THE TOURIST (PG-13) 12:15, 2:45, 5:20, 7:55, 10:30 TRON: LEGACY (PG) 11 a.m., 4:35, 7:20 TRON: LEGACY 3-D (PG) Noon, 3:55, 6:40, 9:40, 10:45 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 11:10 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 1:40, 2:25, 4:15, 5, 7:10, 7:35, 9:50, 10:15 UNSTOPPABLE (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 2:05, 4:50, 7:30, 10

YOGI BEAR (PG) 2:20, 4:40, 7 YOGI BEAR 3-D (PG) 11:30 a.m., 1:55, 4:10, 6:30, 8:40 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) EDITOR’S NOTE: The Orange Bowl will screen at 5:30 p.m. tonight. Doors open at 4:30 p.m.

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THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) 6:30 FAIR GAME (PG-13) 6:45 GULLIVER’S TRAVELS (PG) 4:15 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 4:45, 7 THE TOURIST (PG-13) 4:30 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 4:15, 6:45

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 4, 7

‘V’ invasion continues on a new night By David Wiegand San Francisco Chronicle

‘V’

SAN FRANCISCO — “First What: Sci-fi series returns with they want to invade us, now they its second season want to shag us!” When: 9 p.m. Tuesday on ABC So declaims rebel Kyle Hobbes (check local listings) (Charles Mesure) in “Red Sky,” tonight’s second-season premiere of ABC’s highly produced sci-fi epic, “V,” which launches Fifth Columnists having killed with hopes that a new night and her children, specifically a lot of an earlier time slot may spell egg pods containing alien soldier success after a respectable but embryos. From there, things get complinot (you should pardon the expression) earthshaking ratings cated, and the plot is propelled by questions of who’s on which side. last season. The show, which ABC has Can alien Ryan be trusted by called a “re-imagining” of the rebels when he runs away from the V’s’ mother ship to mini-series of the same name from the ’80s, is R E V I E W join the Fifth Column? What about turncoat about a bunch of aliens, human Chad Decker called The Visitors, who slither into human skin by (Scott Wolf) who says he’s seen borrowing some DNA and arrive the error of his ways and wants on earth wanting to make things in with the Fifth Column. And better for us poor dumb humans. what of Lisa? Does she sincerely Of course viewers know better, love Tyler? Is she just using him even if earth’s human population at her mother’s behest to figure out what the Fifth Column is up in the show does not. A small group of humans gets to? Or is it just an inter-species’ that the Visitors are anything but booty call? The bigger question is: Do we benevolent and forms a secret resistance group known as the care? Well, not really. The groanFifth Column. Meanwhile, many worthy dialogue, usually spoken in a monotone by real humans get alien and human chummy with their planet-guests, and The groan-worthy alike, is rarely credible and lacks a few get even clos- dialogue, usually the kind of selfer than that, like aware irony that teenage horndog spoken in a might make this Tyler Evans (Lo- monotone by enjoyable. gan Huffman) who In a couple of is gaga for slinky alien and human weeks, PBS will blonde Lisa (Lau- alike, is rarely unveil a new quarra Vandervoort), tet of its “Pioneers daughter of the credible and of Television” docVisitors’ icy queen, lacks the kind of umentaries with Anna (Morena self-aware irony a look at the early Baccarin). science -f ic tion Well, in some that might make shows, including ways, the Visitors this enjoyable. Irwin Allen’s goofy are hard to resist. “Lost in Space.” The V’s say they’re The writing in “V” just stopping by for a little chaw and a chat, and is almost as bad as the howlers will soon be on their way. But in in “Lost in Space,” but with one the meantime, earthlings dear- major difference: Allen was inest, here are a few hostess gifts: tentionally going for campiness, a cure for all kinds of diseases, but there’s not a bit of even the something called Blue Energy to accidental variety in “V.” Where end our reliance on fossil fuels, is “Mystery Science Theatre and, in the season opener, Red 3000” now that we need it? When Anna unleashes the Sky, which will fix all the environmental damage we’ve done to Red Sky, Chad runs into the our planet and end global warm- church and tells Father Jack (Joel Gretsch), a Fifth Columnist, that ing, even if it doesn’t exist. Tonight’s episode begins with he wants a second chance. “You’re not asking for a second a dream sequence in which FBI agent Erica Evans (Elizabeth chance, you’re asking for forgiveMitchell) awakens in a body- ness. Only God offers that,” Jack strewn world and goes search- answers piously. What’s that old nautical saw? ing for her son, Tyler, only to have him shrivel up in her arms “Red sky at morning, sailors’ like a rotten apple on a window take warning?” How about: “’Red sill. It’s just desserts, Anna an- Sky’ on Tuesday night, viewers nounces, for Erica and the other take flight.”

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Fridays In


C4 Monday, January 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Monday, January 3, 2011 C5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO SATURDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

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SAFE HAVENS

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HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Jan. 3, 2011: This year, you decide to take a strong stand in your life. A personal decision or event encourages growth in a new direction. You might be quite delighted with the personal transformation. Many issues will dissolve. If you are single, you attract a whole new type of suitor. Life becomes very exciting. If you are attached, your sweetie will be adjusting to you. Be generous in spirit, as all these changes aren’t easy, and it will take time. Know that everything is positive. CAPRICORN can push your buttons. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH Your perceptions might differ from others’. The issue might boil down to who is in charge. Maintain a strong profile and willingness to assume responsibility. Keep adapting to a changing situation. Tonight: Get a good night’s sleep. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Allow yourself to transform an opinion as your mental perception opens up. The more willing you are to see, the more open and content you will become. Sometimes you might find it difficult to let go of a rigid position. Tonight: Pretend you are a Vulcan —go for a mind meld. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Realize that in order to relate on an individual level, you need to consider options that revolve around a partnership.

Though you most certainly are versatile, you also can benefit from others, especially if they come from a different mindset. Tonight: Brainstorm away with a close associate. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH Defer, and you will remain content and upbeat. You might not have all the answers, and that is quite clear — but neither do others. Don’t put them on a pedestal. Think positively. Tonight: Defer to another person. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH The time has come to get ahead of a situation, clear out a problem and deal with others directly. You might not always have the right solutions, but your energy and charisma convince others that you do. Tonight: Put your feet up. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Your dynamic thinking draws many people. You might wonder which way to go with a new friendship, child or creative project. What is sure is that much will change during the next few weeks. Be ready to transform! Tonight: In the whirlwind of fun! LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH Anchor in, realizing your limits and knowing what is essential to stay steady. Everyone’s domestic life plays into other areas. You are no exception. In fact, you could be a bit more sensitive. Know that times are changing. You cannot stop that. Tonight: Hanging out. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Discuss a major change with a key associate, friend or family member. What you believe

is happening might be off. Take a seat in the peanut gallery and watch the story unfold in the next few days and weeks. Tonight: Work on detachment. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Knowing when to put a halt to spending, overeating and other frivolous yet destructive behavior remains critical. The time has come to return to a little self-discipline. Can you do it? Yes. Do you want to do it? That is up to you. Tonight: OK, OK, one last night of being a wild thing. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Didn’t you make a New Year’s resolution about going in a new direction after the holidays? Well, the time has come. Tomorrow’s Solar Eclipse will put a punctuation mark on that wildness. Why not join forces and be empowered? Tonight: As you like. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HH Knowing when to pull back is instrumental to your well-being. You could be so tired and have so much to do that you might hesitate to stop. Taking a break or easing up on yourself might improve the situation. You will re-energize given some care. Tonight: Vanish while you can. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH You know what to do and when to do it. Follow your instincts in a meeting. Not everything is as you believe. Take your time dealing with someone who might have a somewhat rogue idea. You might be revising your lists of close friends (by choice) soon enough. Tonight: Where the action is. © 2011 by King Features Syndicate


COV ER S T OR I ES

C6 Monday, January 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Science

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Paper vs. plastic? Oregon may become the first state to ban plastic bags at grocery and retail stores.

Bags Continued from C1 Bend’s Whole Foods Market has been plastic-bag free since April 2008, said Matt Collins, community relations specialist with the store. Eliminating plastic bags prompted a few customer complaints for about a month or so, and offering only paper is slightly more expensive, but Collins said it was worth it. “There are places where you’re able to recycle plastic bags,” he said. But for the most part, a lot of them end up in a landfill.” At Bend’s Newport Avenue Market, manager Spike Be-

Photos Continued from C1 The couple opened their first whippersnappers photography studio in Bend in 2006, partly out of frustration with what they saw as the poor quality, cookie-cutter approach used by other portrait studios where they took their own children for photo sessions, Flynn said. “This is one of those stories where we came away from other portrait studios saying, ‘There’s got to be a better way,’” Flynn said. The Flynns did some research, bought some equipment and opened their first whippersnappers studio five years ago. “Here we are today with four studios, and a fifth scheduled to open in January in Denver,” Flynn said. What sets whippersnappers apart is that its photo sessions are a fun, free-flowing experience where the photographers play and interact with children and family members to create “unforgettable photographs that capture the magic of your child, your family or your life,” Flynn said. Since all the photos shot at

ment said the store has always had plastic bags, but for a while wasn’t putting them out on the check stands. Pushing paper bags was a way to support the timber industry, he said. Now the plastic bags are available on the check stands, but the store mostly encourages customers to bring reusable bags through efforts like offering free reusable bags if people spend a certain amount, Bement said. “A large number of our customers do use their own bags now,” he said. “That’s always been a positive thing.” If Oregon does ban plastic bags, however, he said it should ban them at other retail stores as well as groceries.

“I think it would be good for the environment,” he said. “If they’re going to do it, they need to do it all the way.” At the Sunriver Marketplace, manager Matt Finch said he thinks banning plastic bags is probably the right direction for the state. He is seeing more customers coming through with reusable bags, he said, and they will still have the paper bag option. “I think it’d be a good thing,” Finch said. “It’s another way we can stop putting a big impact on the planet.”

whippersnappers studios around the country are processed in Bend, Flynn said K.C. and the photo editors have spent a lot of time streamlining the photo editing and processing to consistently produce high-quality photos. Their “secret sauce” for consistent photo enhancement evolved out of that effort. As an entrepreneur, Flynn said she is always looking for a way to improve the business. When they made a pitch at the Bend Venture Conference in October with a plan to go global, offering their photo enhancement services online, five angel investors attending the meeting saw promise in Flynn’s presentation, and have since invested a total of $350,000. “This new service developed off of our brick and mortar studios, but it is a service that we plan to market globally over the Internet,” Flynn said. “We need $500,000 to go global with the online arm of the business. So far, we have raised $350,000, and we hope to have the additional $150,000 soon.” In five years, the company has grown from a staff of four in Bend, including the Flynns, to nine in Bend, plus four in their three out-of-state studios.

She said once the online photoenhancing business takes off, employment is expected to grow along with global demand for their photo-enhancing services. To free her time to develop the online business, Flynn said she recently hired an operations manager to oversee the brick and mortar photo studios. For the online photo-enhancing business, Flynn said the company’s target market is people who want to enhance their special photographs, but don’t want to spend hours and hours doing it themselves. “Our online service will target people who take pride in shooting the pictures themselves. We just make it look better,” Flynn said. “It’s a software service for enhancing photos. It’s not going to be marketed as just another do-ityourself model. It is a service we provide to customers.” For more information, call whippersnappers’ headquarters in Bend at 541-389-7627, stop by the Bend studio at 121 N.W. Greenwood Ave. No. 103, or visit www.whippersnappers.com.

Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or at kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or at emerriman@bendbulletin.com.

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Continued from C1 Quality control aside, a larger question remains: Does the act of data gathering really constitute science? “These people are not doing the work of scientists,” said David Weinberger, a senior researcher at the Berkman Center for the Internet and Society at Harvard, who is writing a book about the changing shape of human knowledge in the online era. “They are doing the work of scientific instruments.” Stephen Emmott, head of computational research at Microsoft Research, agrees that most citizen science projects tend to treat participants as high-functioning cogs in a distributed machine. “Certainly this is participatory,” he said, “but is it science?” Emmott believes that before Web users can claim the mantle of citizen scientists, they will have to be given more meaningful roles. “Participants should be able to make a genuine contribution,” he said, “and get something back.” Emmott’s team is exploring new models that would involve users in the research process without compromising academic rigor. Other researchers are looking to tap the higher brain functions of Web users. Foldit turns protein research into a game, offering Web users a puzzle in the form of a multicolored knot of spirals and clumps. Each puzzle represents an amino acid, which the user tries to fold into the most efficient shape possible. By combining computational algorithms with the visual problem-solving skills of more than 100,000 Web users, the researchers hope to pioneer a new approach to solving computational problems using supplemental human brain power. While some researchers are focused on expanding the contributions of average Web users,

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others want to cultivate people than with the scientists. who have some level of scientific When Web users can review training. research in progress and engage InnoCentive offers an online scientists in open discussions, marketplace where organiza- the traditional process of peer tions can pose problems to a review based on the model of network of more than 200,000 academic publishing will face “solvers” who compete for cash some new challenges. “It opens rewards for the best solution. up another layer of participaRecent InnoCentive contests in- tion,” Weinberger said, “and clude a $1 million prize for a bio- that’s where the deep impact is marker to measure the progres- felt.” sion of Lou Gehrig’s disease, as Meanwhile, out on the open well as a $7,500 prize for better- Web, hundreds of thousands of smelling cat litter. nonscientists continue to look for Other citizen science projects opportunities to take part in sciare taking shape entific research, at the grassinspired by the roots level. DIY- “I like to tell example of people Bio is a 2-year- people that you like van Arkel, old organization who has been enwith more than can do science joying the perks 1,500 members without being a of Internet miinterested in crostardom. She conducting their scientist. It’s a life- now blogs, mainown collabora- changing thing.” tains a Twitter tive science projfeed and speaks ects. The organi- — Hanny van Arkel, at conferences zation has now Dutch schoolteacher and recently took spawned three who discovered a star turn in her physical lab astronomical object own communityspaces in Boston, using the Web generated comic Brooklyn and book. In January, San Francisco, her place in the where members annals of science can participate in projects with will finally be cemented when polymerase chain reaction tests, her name appears as co-author centrifuges and DNA sequenc- of a scientific paper documenting equipment. ing her discovery. “We’re trying to get people Still, van Arkel is under no more involved in hands-on illusions about her place in the science,” said Jason Bobe, a scientific establishment. “I like founder of DIYBio. Members to tell people that you can do are exploring opportunities to science without being a scienturn genome sequencing into a tist,” she said. “It’s a life-changgame in which participants pull ing thing.” in data from crosswalk buttons and the like to model the spread of micro-organisms in urban environments. In a recent experiment, members collected dollar bills from 50 volunteers, then extracted the DNA for sequencing to identify all the micro-organisms. As new self-organizing research communities emerge online, the long-term impact of citizen science projects may have less to do with the citizens

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S

College Basketball Inside Oregon State starts Pac-10 play at 2-0 after beating Arizona, see Page D5.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, JANUARY 3, 2011

NFL

INSIDE NFL Falcons ........31 Panthers ...... 10

Chargers ......33 Broncos .......28

Steelers ....... 41 Browns...........9

Packers ........ 10 Bears .............3

Lions............20 Vikings......... 13

Colts ............23 Titans...........20

Raiders ........31 Chiefs .......... 10

Cowboys...... 14 Eagles .......... 13

Patriots ........38 Dolphins ........7

49ers ...........38 Cardinals .......7

Buccaneers ..23 Saints .......... 13

Giants .......... 17 Redskins ...... 14

Jets ..............38 Bills................7

Texans .........34 Jaguars ........ 17

Ravens ......... 13 Bengals..........7

Seahawks .... 16 Rams..............6

Roundup, see Page D3

Seattle Seahawks’ Kentwan Balmer, left, congratulates teammate Will Herring, right, after an interception against the St. Louis Rams.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 NFL ............................................D3 Basketball ................................. D4 College football .........................D5 Cycling Central......................... D6

PREP SPORTS C O M M E N TA RY

CYCLING CENTRAL

End of the line? After 20 seasons Favre says it is Brett Favre was the NFL’s ultimate iron man for 19 years, inspiring coaches and teammates with unparalleled toughness and thrilling fans with a daredevil’s verve and a showman’s sense of the moment. Yet the once-irrepressible Favre never looked older or more fragile than in year No. 20. The magic of last season, and Brett Favre most of his brilliant career, never seemed farther away. It had to end some time. And Favre says that time is now. The 41-year-old quarterback sat out Minnesota’s season-ending loss to the Lions on Sunday with a concussion, and it appears that perhaps the toughest man to ever play in the NFL had his career end not on the field trying to rally the Vikings to another victory, but on the bench as a third-string rookie floundered in Favre’s place. No one — not even Brett Favre — can play forever. “I know it’s time, and that’s OK. It is,” Favre said after the 20-13 defeat. “Again, I hold no regrets, and I can’t think of too many players offhand that can walk away and say that. Individually and from a team standpoint, it was way more than I ever dreamed of.” He also retired in 2008 with the Packers and 2009 with the Jets, only to return to the field both times when the football bug bit him in the summer. He knows that there will be doubters again. “I don’t know for me if it’s ever easy,” Favre said. “I’m sure throughout this year, the comment has been made that, ‘We’ll wait and see in August or September’ and that’s fine. It’s time. I’m OK with it.” — The Associated Press

D

BEAU EASTES

Cowboys hope struggles stay in past after solid start to season

A

fter two years of struggling to even be competitive, Crook County’s boys basketball team may be the first great prep athletic story of the new year in Central Oregon. Following a gut-wrenching 2009-10 season in which the Cowboys went 0-23 — the season before was not much better as Crook County went 3-19 — the boys from Prineville, where wrestling traditionally rules, are 5-3 this season and are currently riding a four-game winning streak. “We’ve gotten off to a good start, which keeps things exciting for the guys and the fans,” Cowboy coach Jeff Lowenbach says. “But we’re not satisfied.” Playing for the most part with the same group of players that went winless last season, the Cowboys are ranked 15th in the latest Oregon School Activities Association Class 4A power rankings and are a threat to make the state playoffs. “They’re good,” says Mountain View coach Craig Reid, whose team is expected to be a contender in the Class 5A Intermountain Conference this season and lost to Crook County four days before Christmas. “People keep asking me what happened against (the Cowboys), but they’re a good team.” Brandon Gomes, a senior transfer from Montana, and Peyton Seaquist are a pair of 6-foot-4-inch wings who provide matchup problems for teams on the perimeter, while 6-foot guards Travis Bartels, Jordan Reeher and Jesse Morales give Crook County an athletic backcourt. Seaquist, Gomes and Bartels have all been team scoring leaders in one or more games this season, and Reeher and Morales have both recorded games in which they scored 10 points or more. See Cowboys / D4

Last year’s Cascade Stage Race. Rob Kerr / The Bulletin ile

Save the date

N F L P L AYO F F S

Falcons, Steelers, Colts, Seahawks clinch playoff berths By Barry Wilner The Associated Press

The new year offers an enticing mix of events in Central Oregon cycling, plus many of the old favorites

T

his is going to sound like a broken record. Read my yearly looks ahead from Januaries past and they sound awfully similar: “The beloved standbys are back and new flavors are being added to the local cycling menu … etc., etc.” Well, the 2011 cycling calendar for Central Oregon is a continuation of the trend. Our favorite rides and races are set to return, including most all that we called “inaugural” in 2010. Meanwhile, the calendar grows even longer and more varied with new events. Understandably, given the weather, the year begins slowly for local cycling enthusiasts. But it picks up steam by spring, and it steamrolls forward practically nonstop from May through September. While the region has lost two national events — USA Cycling championships typically move to a new site every two years — it has gained two new ones. The cyclocross and elite road nationals have moved on, but we will once again be in the national cycling spotlight as we play host to the masters road and marathon mountain bike national championships. Central Oregon continues to be a hotbed for mountain bike racing (two races held here were the most-attended mountain bike races in Oregon in 2010). Mike Ripley, the event promoter who brought us the High Cascades 100, plans to offer a new endurance race on dirt in the year ahead. The High Cascades 24 is a 24-hour mountain bike race slated for Sept. 10-11. Riders, competing solo or in teams of two or three, will compete over a 16-mile circuit

HEATHER CLARK

staged from Wanoga Sno-park. Weekday racing opportunities in Central Oregon are scheduled to expand with the addition of a mountain bike short track series in April and May and a longer lineup of time trial offerings throughout the summer. Roadies can celebrate the addition of two new local races on tap: the Tumalo Circuit on June 25, and the Oregon Bicycle Racing Association (OBRA) criterium championships on Aug. 13. Central Oregon’s enthusiasm for the surging sport of cyclocross does not appear to be waning. Back on the schedule for 2011 are the Thrilla and Crossaflixion Cup series, and Bend will be the site of a two-day stop on the Cross Crusade series calendar in October. And I doubt we have heard the last of what’s in store for fans of cyclocross this fall. In addition to a lengthy slate of races, organized group rides continue to be a popular draw in these parts. Hutch’s Bicycles is hosting six supported group road rides throughout the year (seven including the Polar Bear Ride, which took place this past Saturday), and other popular cycling tours of Central Oregon are back on the schedule as well. A listing of local cycling events taking place in 2011 continues on Page D6. While it appears that we couldn’t possibly squeeze any more into the already jampacked schedule, I predict that the 2012 look-ahead will be quite familiar: embracing the favorites, and likely welcoming a whole new slate of rides and races. See Date / D6

Inside: More Cycling Central • The calendar for Central Oregon cycling events in 2011, Page D6 • News from the area in cycling, plus a rider profile in Cycling Insider, Page D6

Seattle, Indianapolis, Atlanta and Pittsburgh clinched division titles Sunday, while Green Bay grabbed the final wild-card berth. The Seahawks, at 7-9, became the first division winner with a losing record in NFL history when they defeated St. Louis 16-6 for the NFC West championship. “We didn’t get here the way we all dreamed of getting here, but we got here,” first-year coach Pete Carroll said. “When it came down to it, the guys played a great football game tonight.” The Packers beat archrival Chicago 10-3 to secure the NFC’s sixth seed; defending league champion New Orleans has the conference’s other wild card. A last-second 43-yard field goal by the alwaysclutch Adam Vinatieri lifted the AFC South champion Colts past Tennessee 23-20. Indy was assured of its seventh division crown in eight years when the Jacksonville Jaguars lost to the Houston Texans minutes earlier. It’s the ninth straight year the Colts have reached the postseason, tying the NFL record Dallas set from 1975-83. See Playoff / D4

NFL Playoffs All Times PST

WILD-CARD PLAYOFFS Saturday, Jan. 8 New Orleans at Seattle, 1:30 p.m. (NBC) N.Y. Jets at Indianapolis, 5 p.m. (NBC) Sunday, Jan. 9 Baltimore at Kansas City, 10 a.m. (CBS) Green Bay at Philadelphia, 1:30 p.m. (Fox)

DIVISIONAL PLAYOFFS Saturday, Jan. 15 Indianapolis, Kansas City or Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 1:30 p.m. (CBS) Green Bay, New Orleans or Seattle at Atlanta, 5 p.m. (Fox) Sunday, Jan. 16 Philadelphia, New Orleans or Seattle at Chicago, 10 a.m. (Fox) N.Y. Jets, Kansas City or Baltimore at New England, 1:30 p.m. (CBS)


D2 Monday, January 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

SOCCER

Tuesday Girls basketball: Mountain View at Redmond, 7 p.m.; La Pine at Burns, 6:30 p.m.; Summit at Sisters, 5:30 p.m.; Bend at Crook County, 7 p.m.; Culver at Central Linn, 6:30 p.m. Boys basketball: Redmond at Mountain View, 7 p.m.; Burns at La Pine, 6:30 p.m.; Stayton at Sisters, 7 p.m.; Crook County at Bend, 7 p.m.; Culver at Central Linn, 8 p.m.

2 p.m. — English Premier League, Chelsea vs. Aston Villa, FSNW.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Georgetown vs. St Johns, ESPN2.

FOOTBALL 5:30 p.m. — College, Orange Bowl, Stanford vs. Virginia Tech, ESPN.

HOCKEY 6 p.m. — NHL, Chicago Blackhawks at Los Angeles Kings, VS. network.

TUESDAY BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Indiana at Minnesota, ESPN2. 5:30 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Dallas Mavericks, Comcast SportsNet Northwest.

HOCKEY 4 p.m. — NHL, Minnesota Wild at New Jersey Devils, VS. network.

FOOTBALL 5:30 p.m. — College, Sugar Bowl, Arkansas vs. Ohio State, ESPN. 6 p.m. — High school, All America Skills Challenge, ESPN2.

RADIO TODAY FOOTBALL 5:30 p.m. — College, Orange Bowl, Stanford vs. Virginia Tech, KICE-AM 940.

Wednesday Wrestling: Summit at Crook County, 7 p.m.; Redmond at Mountain View, 6 p.m. Thursday Girls basketball: Madras at Crook County, 7 p.m. Boys basketball: Crook County at Madras, 7 p.m. Wrestling: Junction City and Sweet Home at La Pine, 5 p.m.; Sisters at Elmira, 5 p.m. Friday Girls basketball: Gilchrist at Hosanna, TBA, Crook County at La Pine, 7 p.m.; Sisters at Molalla, 5:30 p.m.; Summit at Bend, 7 p.m.; Culver at Scio, 6:30 p.m. Boys basketball: La Pine at Crook County, 7 p.m.; Sisters at Molalla, 7 p.m.; La Pine at Crook County, 7 p.m.; Bend at Summit, 7 p.m.; Culver at Scio, 8 p.m.; Gilchrist at Hosanna, TBA Wrestling: Redmond at Rollie Lane in Boise, TBA; Culver at Jo-Hi Tournament in Joseph, 11 a.m. Saturday Girls basketball: Triad at Gilchrist, TBA; Lakeview at Culver; 2:30 p.m. Boys basketball: Lakeview at Culver, 4 p.m.; Triad at Gilchrist, TBA Wrestling: Summit, Madras, Mountain View, La Pine, Gilchrist at Bend High Invitational, 10 a.m.; Redmond at Rollie Lane Tournament in Boise, TBA; Crook County at Lebanon, 7 p.m.; Culver at Jo-Hi Tournament in Joseph, TBA Swimming: Redmond, Mountain View, Madras at Jay Rowan Invitational in Redmond, 9 a.m. Nordic skiing: OISRA skate and classic race at Diamond Lake, noon

FOOTBALL College

TUESDAY FOOTBALL 5:30 p.m. — College, Sugar Bowl, Arkansas vs. Ohio State, KICE-AM 940.

BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Dallas Mavericks, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690.

NCAA FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIP SUBDIVISION All Times PST ——— Championship Friday, Jan. 7 At Pizza Hut Park Frisco, Texas Eastern Washington (12-2) vs. Delaware (12-2), 4 p.m.

Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

BOWLS Subject to Change All Times PST ——— Today, Jan. 3 Orange Bowl: Stanford (11-1) vs. Virginia Tech (112), 5 p.m. (ESPN)

S   B

Tuesday, Jan. 4 Sugar Bowl: Ohio State (11-1) vs. Arkansas (10-2), 5 p.m. (ESPN)

Football • Edsall hired as Maryland head football coach: Randy Edsall, who diligently worked to build the Connecticut football program into a winner, has been hired to pull off a similar feat at Maryland. Edsall was picked Sunday to replace Ralph Friedgen, who was fired after a 10-year run at his alma mater. Edsall spent 12 years at Connecticut. He guided the Huskies out of Division I-AA (now FBS) and into the Big East, where he won a pair of conference titles and earned postseason appearances in each of the last four years. The 52-year-old Edsall emerged as a surprise candidate for the job over the weekend. He beat out former Texas Tech coach Mike Leach, who was considered the favorite when the search began on Dec. 20.

Thursday, Jan. 6 GoDaddy.com Bowl: Miami (Ohio) (9-4) vs. Middle Tennessee (6-6), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Jan. 7 Cotton Bowl: Texas A&M (9-3) vs. LSU (10-2), 5 p.m. (Fox) Saturday, Jan. 8 BBVA Compass Bowl: Pittsburgh (7-5) vs. Kentucky (6-6), 9 a.m. (ESPN) Sunday, Jan. 9 Fight Hunger Bowl: Boston College (7-5) vs. Nevada (12-1), 6 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Jan. 10 BCS National Championship: Auburn (13-0) vs. Oregon (12-0), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Betting Line Favorite

Auto racing • Sainz wins first stage of Dakar Rally: Defending champion Carlos Sainz won Sunday’s first stage of the Dakar Rally, covering the 138-mile course in 2 hours, 18 minutes, 32 seconds in Cordoba, Argentina. Sainz’s Volkswagen was 1:31 ahead of second-place Stephane Peterhansel in a BMW and 2:16 in front of Volkswagen teammate Nasser Al Attiyah. American driver Mark Miller was fourth, 4:17 behind in another Volkswagen. Ruben Faria, of Portugal, took the stage in the bike category, clocking 1:58:02. He was 29 seconds ahead of defending champion Cyril Despres and had a 1:15 lead on Marc Coma, the 2009 champion.

IN THE BLEACHERS

Saints COLTS Ravens EAGLES

NFL PLAYOFFS (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Saturday 8 8 SEAHAWKS 3 3 Jets Sunday 2.5 2.5 CHIEFS 2.5 2.5 Packers

Stanford

College Today Orange Bowl 3 3

Virginia Tech

Ohio State

January 4 Sugar Bowl 3.5 3.5

Arkansas

January 6 GMAC Bowl

Miami (Ohio)

1.5

PK

Mid. Tenn. St.

Lsu

January 7 Cotton Bowl PK 1

Texas A&M

Pitt

January 8 BBVA Compass Bowl 2.5 3.5

Kentucky

Nevada

January 9 Fight Hunger Bowl 9 7.5 Boston College

Auburn

January 10 BCS National Championship 2.5 2.5 Oregon

BASKETBALL Men’s college Sunday’s Games ——— EAST Albany, N.Y. 59, New Hampshire 44 Duquesne 95, Norfolk St. 73 Elon 70, Columbia 69 La Salle 87, Binghamton 64 Lafayette 98, Fairleigh Dickinson 92, 2OT Maine 65, Boston U. 52 Marshall 74, St. Bonaventure 65 Presbyterian 60, Navy 58 Sacred Heart 77, Holy Cross 75 Stony Brook 64, UMBC 56 Villanova 81, Rutgers 65 SOUTH Bucknell 62, Richmond 61 Charleston Southern 73, Radford 58 Charlotte 86, Georgia Tech 83, 2OT Clemson 69, The Citadel 54 Coastal Carolina 78, High Point 60 Colgate 80, Longwood 61 Duke 74, Miami 63 E. Kentucky 79, Georgia Southern 73 Fla. International 73, Louisiana-Monroe 72 George Washington 85, Howard 50 Gonzaga 73, Wake Forest 63 Liberty 59, UNC Asheville 55 Memphis 91, Tennessee St. 86 Mississippi 68, SE Louisiana 59 Morehead St. 69, Coll. of Charleston 49 North Carolina 103, St. Francis, Pa. 54 South Alabama 63, Middle Tennessee 57 Tennessee Tech 74, Bluefield 66 Tulane 88, Texas-Pan American 65 VMI 97, Gardner-Webb 76 Vanderbilt 80, Davidson 52 Virginia 64, LSU 50 Virginia Tech 99, Mount St. Mary’s, Md. 34 MIDWEST Illinois 69, Wisconsin 61 Kansas 83, Miami (Ohio) 56 Michigan 76, Penn St. 69 Robert Morris 79, Ohio 76, OT SOUTHWEST Baylor 68, Texas Southern 60 Rice 70, TCU 61 Texas Tech 70, Texas A&M-Corpus Christi 55 UTEP 74, Sam Houston St. 65

FAR WEST Air Force 81, Florida A&M 48 Colorado 85, CS Bakersfield 73 Denver 72, Ark.-Little Rock 70, OT Oregon State 76, Arizona 75 Pepperdine 84, Seattle 64 Portland St. 79, Idaho St. 72 Stanford 82, California 68 PAC-10 STANDINGS All Times PST ——— Conference All Games W L PCT W L PCT Washington 2 0 1.000 10 3 .769 Oregon St. 2 0 1.000 7 6 .538 Stanford 1 0 1.000 8 4 .666 Arizona 1 1 .500 12 3 .800 Southern Cal 1 1 .500 9 6 .600 UCLA 1 1 .500 9 5 .642 Arizona St. 1 1 .500 8 5 .615 California 0 1 .000 7 6 .538 Oregon 0 2 .000 7 7 .500 Washington St. 0 2 .000 10 4 .714 ——— Sunday’s Games Stanford 82, California 68 Oregon State 76, Arizona 75 Thursday’s Games Stanford at Arizona State, 5:30 p.m. Oregon at Washington, 5:30 p.m. Oregon State at Washington State, 7 p.m. California at Arizona, 7:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games California at Arizona State, 11:30 a.m. Stanford at Arizona, 3:30 p.m. Oregon State at Washington, 3:30 p.m. Oregon at Washington State, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 9 UCLA at USC, 7:30 p.m. Sunday’s Summary ——— OREGON ST. 76, ARIZONA 75 ARIZONA (12-3) Williams 6-6 3-10 16, Perry 2-3 1-4 5, Hill 2-3 2-2 6, Jones 9-12 2-2 20, Fogg 3-8 3-4 10, Natyazhko 0-0 0-0 0, Parrom 1-5 2-2 5, Mayes 1-3 0-0 3, Lavender 2-6 0-0 5, Horne 2-4 0-0 5. Totals 28-50 13-24 75. OREGON ST. (7-6) Johnson 2-6 0-0 4, Collier 4-4 2-5 10, Brandt 3-5 1-1 7, Cunningham 3-10 10-11 17, Haynes 4-11 9-11 18, McShane 0-0 0-0 0, Starks 1-5 0-0 2, Burton 7-12 2-4 16, Wallace 1-1 0-0 2, Nelson 0-5 0-0 0. Totals 25-59 24-32 76. Halftime—Tied 28-28. 3-Point Goals—Arizona 620 (Williams 1-1, Horne 1-2, Parrom 1-3, Mayes 1-3, Fogg 1-4, Lavender 1-5, Jones 0-1, Hill 0-1), Oregon St. 2-16 (Haynes 1-3, Cunningham 1-3, Brandt 0-1, Johnson 0-3, Nelson 0-3, Starks 0-3). Fouled Out— Hill. Rebounds—Arizona 31 (Hill, Horne 5), Oregon St. 34 (Johnson 7). Assists—Arizona 9 (Hill, Lavender, Williams 2), Oregon St. 10 (Burton, Collier, Cunningham, Haynes 2). Total Fouls—Arizona 25, Oregon St. 18. A—5,218.

Women’s college Sunday’s Games ——— EAST

Boston U. 78, Maine 40 Buffalo 58, Brown 53 Dartmouth 66, Holy Cross 57 Delaware 71, Hofstra 66 Fairfield 60, Canisius 51 Fordham 48, Albany, N.Y. 43 Hartford 62, Vermont 49 Harvard 83, Massachusetts 70 Lehigh 85, La Salle 67 Loyola, Md. 78, Manhattan 61 Marist 81, Rider 65 Maryland 74, Saint Joseph’s 60 Old Dominion 69, Towson 63 Penn 59, Lafayette 52 Siena 60, Iona 55 St. Bonaventure 67, Kent St. 52 St. Francis, Pa. 66, St. Francis, NY 54 St. Peter’s 59, Niagara 55 Temple 81, Akron 60 West Virginia 63, Cent. Connecticut St. 37 Yale 69, Bucknell 58 SOUTH American U. 64, Md.-Eastern Shore 60 Auburn 66, Alabama 55 Charlotte 60, Virginia Tech 58 Chattanooga 93, Wofford 88 Florida 64, Arkansas 53 George Mason 71, Georgia St. 47 Georgia 61, South Carolina 51 Georgia Tech 81, Jacksonville St. 52 James Madison 84, Northeastern 61 Louisiana Tech 83, Southern Miss. 61 Louisiana-Monroe 56, Fla. International 42 Middle Tennessee 67, South Alabama 59 Mississippi 72, Vanderbilt 67 Morehead St. 82, Longwood 79 N.C. State 80, Elizabeth City St. 50 Robert Morris 55, Coppin St. 51 Tennessee 73, LSU 65 Tennessee Tech 71, Saint Louis 63 Troy 64, Florida Atlantic 57 UAB 60, Austin Peay 55 UCF 72, Valdosta St. 44 UNC Wilmington 69, Drexel 61 Va. Commonwealth 73, William & Mary 61 MIDWEST Butler 61, Valparaiso 49 Cleveland St. 76, Loyola of Chicago 58 Detroit 90, Wis.-Milwaukee 76 Duquesne 86, Ball St. 51 Florida St. 75, Missouri 43 Ill.-Chicago 74, Youngstown St. 61 Indiana 80, Minnesota 79, OT Iowa St. 62, Chicago St. 48 Miami (Ohio) 65, Cincinnati 56 Michigan 60, Iowa 53 Michigan St. 70, Illinois 57 Missouri St. 75, Evansville 54 Nebraska 73, Florida A&M 57 Northwestern 76, Purdue 64 Notre Dame 97, SE Missouri 21 Ohio St. 86, Bethune-Cookman 38 Wichita St. 76, S. Illinois 53 Wis.-Green Bay 75, Wright St. 57 Wisconsin 77, Penn St. 62 SOUTHWEST Lamar 73, Rice 52 Oklahoma St. 94, Texas-Pan American 40 TCU 76, Oklahoma 69 Texas 94, Sam Houston St. 50 Tulsa 89, Stephen F.Austin 87, 2OT W. Kentucky 75, Arkansas St. 74, OT FAR WEST Air Force 80, Colgate 75, OT Arizona 67, Oregon St. 65 Arizona St. 86, Oregon 67 Ark.-Little Rock 49, Denver 46 Boise St. 89, Albertson 53 Cal Poly 83, Long Beach St. 72 Pacific 69, Cal St.-Fullerton 65 Pepperdine 66, Colorado St. 43 Santa Clara 44, San Jose St. 37 Southern Cal 60, Washington 51 Stanford 78, California 45 UC Davis 78, CS Northridge 56 UCLA 80, Washington St. 55 UTEP 74, New Mexico St. 67

Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA 39 24 10 5 53 133 110 38 20 13 5 45 101 104 38 19 13 6 44 95 93 39 20 16 3 43 101 114 40 20 17 3 43 124 115 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 37 24 8 5 53 127 92 Colorado 39 20 14 5 45 132 125 Minnesota 38 18 15 5 41 98 112 Calgary 39 18 18 3 39 105 110 Edmonton 37 12 18 7 31 95 126 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 40 23 13 4 50 114 111 San Jose 39 21 13 5 47 115 108 Anaheim 42 21 17 4 46 109 119 Los Angeles 38 22 15 1 45 113 92 Phoenix 38 17 13 8 42 106 113 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Sunday’s Games Atlanta 4, Montreal 3, OT Florida 3, N.Y. Rangers 0 Philadelphia 3, Detroit 2 Dallas 4, St. Louis 2 Nashville 4, Columbus 1 Minnesota 6, Phoenix 5, OT Vancouver 2, Colorado 1 Anaheim 2, Chicago 1 Today’s Games Boston at Toronto, 4 p.m. Florida at Carolina, 4 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Calgary, 6 p.m. Chicago at Los Angeles, 6 p.m. Vancouver at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Minnesota at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Tampa Bay at Washington, 4 p.m. Buffalo at Colorado, 6 p.m. Detroit at Edmonton, 6 p.m. Columbus at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Detroit St. Louis Nashville Columbus Chicago

TENNIS ITF HOPMAN CUP Sunday Perth, Australia Group A Serbia 3, Kazakhstan 0 Ana Ivanovic, Serbia, def. Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, 7-6 (6), 6-1. Novak Djokovic, Serbia, def. Andrey Golubev, Kazakhstan, 4-6, 6-3, 6-1. Ana Ivanovic and Novak Djokovic, Serbia, def. Yaroslava Shvedova and Andrey Golubev, Kazakhstan. 7-6 (2), 6-4. BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL Sunday Brisbane, Australia Singles Men First Round Feliciano Lopez (6), Spain, def. Philipp Petzschner, Germany, 6-4, 7-6 (11). Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, def. Thiemo de Bakker, Netherlands, 7-6 (5), 6-4. Women First Round Sally Peers, Australia, def. Alisa Kleybanova (7), Russia, 3-6, 6-4, 6-3. Bojana Jovanovski, Serbia, def. Anastasia Rodionova, Australia, 2-6, 6-2, 6-3. Jarmila Groth, Australia, def. Arantxa Parra Santonja, Spain, 6-2, 7-5. Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic, def. Akgul Amanmuradova, Uzbekistan, 6-3, 3-6, 6-2. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (5), Russia, def. Alla Kudryavtseva, Russia, 6-2, 6-7 (5), 6-3.

DEALS Transactions

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts Philadelphia 39 24 10 5 53 Pittsburgh 40 25 12 3 53 N.Y. Rangers 40 22 15 3 47 N.Y. Islanders 36 11 19 6 28 New Jersey 38 10 26 2 22 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts Boston 37 20 11 6 46 Montreal 40 21 16 3 45 Ottawa 40 16 19 5 37 Buffalo 38 16 18 4 36 Toronto 37 14 19 4 32 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts Tampa Bay 39 23 11 5 51 Washington 40 23 12 5 51 Atlanta 42 21 15 6 48 Carolina 37 18 15 4 40 Florida 36 17 17 2 36 WESTERN CONFERENCE

GF 131 127 119 84 68

GA 104 94 103 118 122

GF 108 100 90 105 89

GA 84 96 121 114 111

GF 121 120 131 108 98

GA 122 106 125 111 92

HOCKEY National Hockey League ATLANTA THRASHERS—Activated F Nik Antropov from injured reserve. Reassigned F Tim Stapleton to Chicago (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS—Reassigned G Mike Brodeur and F Jim O’Brien to Binghamton (AHL). TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING—Reassigned G Cedrick Desjardins to Norfolk (AHL). American Hockey League BRIDGEPORT SOUND TIGERS—Signed F Brandon Svendsen. COLLEGE CLEMSON—Announced offensive coordinator Billy Napier and running backs and special teams coach Andre Powell will not return next season. FLORIDA—Named Charlie Weis offensive coordinator, Aubrey Hill wide receivers coach and Travaris Robinson defensive backs coach. Retained running backs coach/recruiting coordinator Stan Drayton, linebackers coach/special teams coordinator D.J. Durkin and tight ends coach Brian White. MARYLAND—Named Randy Edsall football coach. ILLINOIS STATE—Named Larry Lyons interim director of athletics. SOUTH CAROLINA—Sophomore WR Tori Gurley announced he is entering the NFL draft.

Winter sports • Kostelic, Pietilae-Holmner win first parallel events: Ivica Kostelic of Croatia and Maria Pietilae-Holmner of Sweden won the first parallel slaloms in the World Cup on Sunday in Munich. The event was open to only the top 16 Alpine skiers. Kostelic, a slalom specialist, beat Julien Lizeroux of France over two heats in the big final by a total of 1.61 seconds. That gave him 100 points for the overall World Cup standings and $43,000. American allrounder Bode Miller won the small final, defeating Felix Neureuther of Germany by 0.05 seconds after leading by 0.25 seconds in the first heat. In the women’s big final, PietilaeHolmner trailed Tina Maze of Slovenia by 0.12 seconds after the first heat but came back to win by 0.47 seconds. Elisabeth Goergl of Austria beat Daniela Merighetti of Italy in the small final. Skiers raced side by side down a 200meter course that contained 20 gates.

Baseball • Orioles’ Alfredo Simon is main suspect in killing: Police say Baltimore Orioles pitcher Alfredo Simon is the main suspect in the fatal shooting of a man in the Dominican Republic. Dominican police said in a statement Sunday they believe Simon shot and killed 25-year-old Michel Castillo Almonte and wounded his 17-year-old brother during a New Year’s Eve dispute in the northeast coastal town of Luperon. Police say they are searching for the pitcher in his Caribbean homeland. He was born in the northwest town of Santiago. Orioles representative Felipe Alou Jr. says he has spoken with Simon and the relief pitcher insists he was not involved in the shootings.

Tennis • Lopez advances at Brisbane International: Sixthseeded Feliciano Lopez of Spain beat Philipp Petzschner of Germany 6-5, 7-6 (11) Sunday in a first-round match at the Brisbane International. In women’s first-round play, Sally Peers of Australia upset seventh-seeded Alisa Kleybanova of Russia 3-6, 6-4, 6-3, and fifth-seeded Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova beat fellow Russian Alla Kudryavtseva 6-2, 6-7 (5), 6-3. • Serbia sweeps Kazakhstan 3-0 at Hopman Cup: Novak Djokovic and Ana Ivanovic combined to give Serbia a 3-0 sweep over Kazakhstan on Sunday in their opening match at the Hopman Cup in Perth, Australia. Ivanovic defeated Yaroslava Shvedova 7-6 (6), 6-1 in the first match before Djokovic clinched the victory by rallying to beat Andrey Golubev 4-6, 6-3, 6-1. The duo completed the sweep with a 7-6 (2), 6-4 win in the mixed doubles of the annual mixed-teams event. — From wire reports

NHL ROUNDUP

Strong goalkeeping helps Canucks beat Avs The Associated Press DENVER — The Vancouver Canucks didn’t need their offensive stars to keep their streak going. Roberto Luongo made 31 saves, fourth-line forwards Alexandre Bolduc and Mason Raymond scored and the streaking Canucks beat the Colorado Avalanche 2-1 in a penalty-filled game Sunday night. Bolduc’s goal was the first of his career, and he assisted on Raymond’s tally. Raymond scored in his first game back after missing 10 games with an injured right thumb. “It’s nice to see. We’ve got guys chipping in every night, it’s not always the same guys producing,” Luongo said. “You need that over the course of an 82-game season. It’s not always going to be the same line.” Tanner Glass and Kevin Bieksa had assists for Vancouver. The Canucks have won five straight and are 12-1-2 since the end of November. Vancouver hasn’t lost in regulation since Dec. 5 against St. Louis, a span of 12 games. The Canucks are 4-0 against Colorado this season. “That’s one of the top scoring teams in the league and at the same time they are one of the best defensive teams,” Avalanche center Paul Stastny said. “They don’t just rely on one or the other. They have four lines that play pretty well and both goaltenders play pretty well. It is one of the teams that can win a shooutout game or a low scoring game.” Stastny scored his 15th goal of the season and Craig Anderson made 27 saves for the Avalanche, 1-4-1 since winning six straight. “Two games in a row we ran into some pretty good goaltending,” Avalanche coach Joe Sacco said. “Tonight, he had a pretty good night. We had chances, but weren’t able to capitalize.” There were 16 minors penalties, nine in the second period, but neither team could take advantage. Colorado was zero for six on the power play and Vancouver was zero for five. The Canucks opened the scoring seconds af-

Chris Schneider / The Associated Press

Vancouver Canucks goalie Roberto Luongo makes a save in the first period of an NHL hockey game against the Colorado Avalanche in Denver on Sunday. ter killing off one of their nine penalties. With Bieska in the box for hooking, the Avalanche were pressuring Luongo. Kevin Porter’s wideopen shot from the slot bounced out to Glass, who started a 2-on-1 with Bolduc. Glass fed Bolduc, who beat Anderson with a shot to the far side with 1:45 left in the first period. “It hasn’t been easy for the young man, he’s been hurt for most of the time in his NHL career,” Vancouver coach Alain Vigneault said. Luongo was sharp throughout, and came up with some big saves in the second period.

“He’s been outstanding and he’s pulled some games out for us,” Raymond said. “It’s a club that thinks it’s great playing for a guy like Louie.” In other games on Sunday: Flyers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Red Wings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 DETROIT — James van Riemsdyk, Daniel Carcillo and Scott Hartnell scored to help Philadelphia win for the first time in Detroit in more than 22 years. Philadelphia was 0-14-2 at Joe Louis Arena since Nov. 4, 1988. Wild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Coyotes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 ST. PAUL, Minn. — Cam Barker scored 46 seconds into overtime after Pierre-Marc Bouchard tied it with 26 seconds left in regulation for Minnesota. Thrashers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Canadiens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 MONTREAL — Dustin Byfuglien scored his third overtime goal of the season on a powerplay at 3:43 of the extra session, and Ondrej Pavelec made 47 saves for Atlanta. Predators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Blue Jackets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Shea Weber had a goal and two assists and Pekka Rinne made 19 saves for Nashville. Stars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Blues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 ST. LOUIS — Brad Richards scored the goahead goal at 6:32 of the third period and Kari Lehtonen stopped 28 shots for Dallas. Panthers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Rangers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 SUNRISE, Fla. — Tomas Vokoun made 32 saves for his fifth shutout of the season and 43rd overall, and David Booth, Chris Higgins and Stephen Weiss scored for Florida. Ducks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Blackhawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Jonas Hiller stopped Teemu Selanne on a penalty shot and finished with 21 saves to help Anaheim beat Stanley Cup champion Chicago.


NFL

THE BULLETIN • Monday, January 3, 2011 D3

Seahawks beat Rams to take NFC West crown Seattle first NFL team to make playoffs with a losing 7-9 record The Associated Press SEATTLE — Laugh all you want, the 7-9 Seattle Seahawks are going to the playoffs as champions of the NFC West. The Seahawks are the first sub-.500 division champs, taking the division with a 16-6 victory over the St. Louis Rams on Sunday night. Their reward: a home game on Saturday with the defending Super Bowl champion Saints. New Orleans beat the Seahawks 34-19 in Week 11. Making his second career start, backup quarterback Charlie Whitehurst threw a 4-yard TD pass on Seattle’s first possession, Olindo Mare kicked three second-half field goals. It makes for great jokes from critics, and the situation in the NFC Worst, er, West this season has reignited the debate whether division champs should automatically be granted home playoff games. The New York Giants and Tampa Bay have better records at 10-6, but it’s Seattle that’s playoff bound. “We didn’t get here the way we all dreamed of getting here, but we got here,” Seattle coach Pete Carroll said. “When it came down to it, the guys played a great football game tonight.” The Seahawks aren’t apologizing. In his first season as their coach, Carroll was fist-pumping and clapping his way up and down the Seattle sideline in the closing minutes as the Seahawks celebrated their first division title since capping a four-year run of dominance of the division in 2007. St. Louis (7-9) was kept out of the end zone for the second time this season and

NFL ROUNDUP rookie Sam Bradford couldn’t complete the Rams’ turnaround from winning just one game a year ago. Bradford finished 19 of 36 for 155 yards, and threw a costly interception midway through the fourth quarter. “They played better. They won and we lost. I’m proud of the football team for what they accomplished. ... The disappointment is all we feel right now,” St. Louis coach Steve Spagnuolo said. Now the question for Seattle is who will be the quarterback for its first home playoff game since a January 2008 win over Washington. Carroll was noncommittal late Sunday night who would start against the Saints. Matt Hasselbeck was active for Sunday night and went through pregame warmups, but Carroll held to his word the Seahawks were preparing for Whitehurst to be their guy after Hasselbeck injured his hip last week at Tampa Bay. Also on Sunday: Colts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Titans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 INDIANAPOLIS — Peyton Manning threw two touchdown passes and Adam Vinatieri made a 43-yard field goal as time expired, giving the Colts a victory over Tennessee and their seventh AFC South title in eight years. Texans. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Jaguars. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 HOUSTON — Arian Foster ran for 180 yards to capture the NFL rushing title for Houston. Falcons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Panthers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 ATLANTA — Matt Ryan and Atlanta put a decisive stamp on the NFC South title and home-field advantage in the playoffs. The Falcons (13-3) earned their first division title since 2004, home-field

Ted S. Warren / The Associated Press

Seattle Seahawks head coach Pete Carroll, right, hugs quarterback Charlie Whitehurst after the Seahawks beat the Rams 16-6 in an NFL football game on Sunday in Seattle. edge throughout the NFC playoffs and a bye next weekend. Steelers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Browns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 CLEVELAND — Ben Roethlisberger threw two touchdown passes and Pittsburgh won the AFC North to secure a first-round playoff bye. Ravens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Bengals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 BALTIMORE — Ed Reed had two interceptions and Ray Lewis recovered two fumbles, part of an opportunistic defense that carried Baltimore. Raiders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Michael Bush

rushed for 137 yards and a touchdown and short-handed Oakland beat playoff-bound Kansas City to gain a unique NFL distinction. The Raiders (8-8) finished 6-0 in the AFC West, the first team since the 1970 merger to go unbeaten in the division and not make the playoffs. Packers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Bears. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 GREEN BAY, Wis. — Aaron Rodgers threw a 1-yard touchdown pass to tight end Donald Lee to give Green Bay the lead, and its defense held on to clinch a wild card berth. Buccaneers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Saints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

NEW ORLEANS — Josh Freeman passed for two touchdowns but Tampa Bay failed to make the playoffs. Patriots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Dolphins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — Tom Brady threw two touchdown passes to cap a record-setting season as New England won its eighth straight. Jets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Bills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Mark Brunell threw two touchdown passes in relief of Mark Sanchez, Joe McKnight ran for a career-high 158 yards and the Jets’ defense dominated. Lions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Vikings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 DETROIT — Brett Favre stood in street clothes on the sideline in what likely was the final game of his 20-season career, watching the Lions (6-10) beat his Vikings for their fourth straight win. Cowboys. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Eagles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 PHILADELPHIA — Stephen McGee threw a 4-yard touchdown pass to Jason Witten with 55 seconds left to lead Dallas over the NFC East champs. Giants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Redsksins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 LANDOVER, Md. — The Giants got the win, but they didn’t get the help they needed to make the playoffs. 49ers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Cardinals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 SAN FRANCISCO — Alex Smith threw a 59-yard touchdown pass to Vernon Davis in what likely was the quarterback’s final hurrah with the 49ers in a matchup for last place in the awful NFC West. Chargers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Broncos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 DENVER — Rookie Ryan Mathews ran for three scores and Nate Kaeding kicked four field goals for San Diego.

NFL SCOREBOARD SUMMARIES Sunday’s Games

49ers 38, Cardinals 7 Arizona 0 7 0 0 — 7 San Francisco 7 3 21 7 — 38 First Quarter SF—Ginn Jr. 37 pass from A.Smith (Reed kick), 4:45. Second Quarter SF—FG Reed 39, 14:18. Ari—Fitzgerald 10 pass from Skelton (Feely kick), 7:30. Third Quarter SF—V.Davis 59 pass from A.Smith (Reed kick), 13:02. SF—Westbrook 6 run (Reed kick), 8:50. SF—Westbrook 6 run (Reed kick), 6:51. Fourth Quarter SF—Brown 62 interception return (Reed kick), 4:01. A—69,732. ——— Ari SF First downs 19 16 Total Net Yards 279 362 Rushes-yards 22-78 25-100 Passing 201 262 Punt Returns 3-17 1-0 Kickoff Returns 7-118 2-43 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 2-94 Comp-Att-Int 30-53-2 15-29-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 6-41 2-14 Punts 8-41.3 7-38.0 Fumbles-Lost 2-0 1-0 Penalties-Yards 8-43 5-25 Time of Possession 32:48 27:12 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Arizona: Hightower 12-30, Wright 3-23, Wells 5-16, Skelton 2-9. San Francisco: Westbrook 13-79, Dixon 11-22, A.Smith 1-(minus 1). PASSING—Arizona: Bartel 16-28-1-150, Skelton 14-25-1-92. San Francisco: A.Smith 15-29-0-276. RECEIVING—Arizona: Fitzgerald 11-125, Breaston 4-26, Roberts 4-23, Komar 3-26, Wright 3-8, S.Williams 2-26, Hightower 2-2, Wells 1-6. San Francisco: Crabtree 4-47, V.Davis 3-96, Morgan 3-59, Ginn Jr. 2-41, Walker 1-17, Westbrook 1-14, Dixon 1-2. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Chargers 33, Broncos 28 San Diego Denver

0 16 10 7 — 33 7 0 7 14 — 28 First Quarter Den—Lloyd 14 pass from Tebow (Hauschka kick), 2:57. Second Quarter SD—Mathews 27 run (Kaeding kick), 13:52. SD—FG Kaeding 42, 9:59. SD—FG Kaeding 45, 3:45. SD—FG Kaeding 47, :09. Third Quarter SD—Mathews 12 run (Kaeding kick), 11:10. SD—FG Kaeding 37, 8:31. Den—Decker 6 pass from Tebow (Hauschka kick), 3:15. Fourth Quarter SD—Mathews 31 run (Kaeding kick), 7:55. Den—Vaughn 97 kickoff return (Hauschka kick), 7:42. Den—Tebow 6 run (Hauschka kick), :26. A—74,155. ——— SD Den First downs 20 18 Total Net Yards 447 337 Rushes-yards 31-164 29-146 Passing 283 191 Punt Returns 3-95 0-0 Kickoff Returns 4-122 6-227 Interceptions Ret. 2-28 1-31 Comp-Att-Int 21-37-1 16-36-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 5-30 3-14 Punts 4-45.0 5-51.4 Fumbles-Lost 3-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 3-32 5-45 Time of Possession 34:22 25:38 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—San Diego: Mathews 26-120, Sproles 4-43, Rivers 1-1. Denver: Tebow 13-94, Moreno 6-41, Ball 6-21, Buckhalter 3-8, Lloyd 1-(minus 18). PASSING—San Diego: Rivers 21-37-1313. Denver: Tebow 16-36-2-205. RECEIVING—San Diego: Naanee 4-79, Jackson 3-53, Mathews 3-19, Floyd 2-57, Sproles 2-26, McMichael 2-22, Washington 2-20, Ajirotutu 1-17, Sperry 1-17, Kr.Wilson 1-3. Denver: Lloyd 5-73, Buckhalter 4-49, Graham 2-41, Decker 2-22, Gaffney 1-12, Ball 1-6, Moreno 1-2. MISSED FIELD GOALS—San Diego: Kaeding 53 (WR).

Packers 10, Bears 3 Chicago Green Bay

0 3 0 0 — 3 0 0 3 7 — 10 Second Quarter Chi—FG Gould 30, 4:31. Third Quarter GB—FG Crosby 23, 2:39. Fourth Quarter GB—D.Lee 1 pass from Rodgers (Crosby

kick), 12:42. A—70,833.

MISSED FIELD GOALS—Dallas: Buehler 52 (WR).

AMERICAN CONFERENCE

——— Chi GB 13 14 227 284 20-110 23-60 117 224 2-35 5-50 2-31 2-47 1-42 2-24 21-39-2 19-28-1 6-51 2-5 8-45.5 8-43.5 0-0 2-1 6-46 4-30 30:40 29:20 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Chicago: Forte 15-91, Taylor 3-11, Cutler 2-8. Green Bay: Rodgers 7-21, Starks 5-20, Jackson 7-19, Kuhn 4-0. PASSING—Chicago: Cutler 21-39-2-168. Green Bay: Rodgers 19-28-1-229. RECEIVING—Chicago: Forte 8-60, R.Davis 7-63, Olsen 5-29, Hester 1-16. Green Bay: Driver 5-41, Jennings 4-97, Nelson 2-39, Jackson 2-16, Starks 2-15, J.Jones 1-8, Kuhn 1-7, Quarless 1-5, D.Lee 1-1. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None. First downs Total Net Yards Rushes-yards Passing Punt Returns Kickoff Returns Interceptions Ret. Comp-Att-Int Sacked-Yards Lost Punts Fumbles-Lost Penalties-Yards Time of Possession

Texans 34, Jaguars 17 Jacksonville 0 17 0 0 — 17 Houston 10 10 7 7 — 34 First Quarter Hou—Foster 2 run (Rackers kick), 12:25. Hou—FG Rackers 26, 4:15. Second Quarter Jac—Jennings 3 run (Scobee kick), 14:54. Hou—Ward 35 run (Rackers kick), 12:53. Jac—FG Scobee 39, 8:40. Jac—Lewis 7 pass from Edwards (Scobee kick), 1:54. Hou—FG Rackers 33, :00. Third Quarter Hou—Daniels 5 pass from Schaub (Rackers kick), 3:47. Fourth Quarter Hou—Foster 35 run (Rackers kick), 10:49. A—71,023. ——— Jac Hou First downs 23 22 Total Net Yards 322 497 Rushes-yards 35-198 37-244 Passing 124 253 Punt Returns 1-3 3-26 Kickoff Returns 5-123 4-85 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-1 Comp-Att-Int 12-25-1 18-22-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-16 0-0 Punts 4-44.3 3-38.7 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 2-15 5-48 Time of Possession 30:48 29:12 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Jacksonville: Jennings 22108, Karim 7-52, Thomas 2-20, Edwards 4-18. Houston: Foster 31-180, Ward 4-63, Schaub 2-1. PASSING—Jacksonville: Edwards 12-251-140. Houston: Schaub 18-22-0-253. RECEIVING—Jacksonville: Jennings 434, Lewis 4-26, Hill 3-68, Thomas 1-12. Houston: Jones 5-70, Daniels 5-62, Walter 3-54, Dreessen 2-50, Foster 2-10, Ward 1-7. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Jacksonville: Scobee 46 (WL).

Cowboys 14, Eagles 13 Dallas Philadelphia

0 7 0 7 — 14 0 7 0 6 — 13 Second Quarter Phi—Hall 4 pass from Kolb (Akers kick), 14:53. Dal—Ware 17 fumble return (Buehler kick), 11:28. Fourth Quarter Phi—FG Akers 43, 14:24. Phi—FG Akers 22, 7:01. Dal—Witten 4 pass from McGee (Buehler kick), :55. A—69,144. ——— Dal Phi First downs 14 14 Total Net Yards 272 244 Rushes-yards 34-159 27-124 Passing 113 120 Punt Returns 1-0 3-31 Kickoff Returns 4-72 2-48 Interceptions Ret. 3-4 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 11-27-0 18-36-3 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-14 6-42 Punts 8-44.6 7-38.3 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 2-1 Penalties-Yards 6-45 4-40 Time of Possession 29:10 30:50 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Dallas: Jones 11-81, McGee 9-55, Choice 7-20, Gronkowski 3-9, Barber 3-3, Austin 1-(minus 9). Philadelphia: Harrison 2199, Kolb 3-12, Buckley 2-11, Hall 1-2. PASSING—Dallas: McGee 11-27-0-127. Philadelphia: Kolb 18-36-3-162. RECEIVING—Dallas: Witten 4-46, Austin 2-62, Bennett 2-11, Johnson 1-6, R.Williams 16, Jones 1-(minus 4). Philadelphia: Hall 6-84, Harrison 5-17, Harbor 4-32, Avant 1-21, Cooper 1-5, Schmitt 1-3.

East

Giants 17, Redskins 14 N.Y. Giants Washington

3 7 7 0 — 17 0 7 0 7 — 14 First Quarter NYG—FG Tynes 20, 5:03. Second Quarter NYG—Jacobs 2 run (Tynes kick), 3:06. Was—F.Davis 1 pass from Grossman (Gano kick), :22. Third Quarter NYG—Manningham 92 pass from Manning (Tynes kick), 12:19. Fourth Quarter Was—Armstrong 64 pass from Grossman (Gano kick), 5:52. A—76,189. ——— NYG Was First downs 14 20 Total Net Yards 325 385 Rushes-yards 32-82 20-67 Passing 243 318 Punt Returns 2-24 3-73 Kickoff Returns 2-36 4-82 Interceptions Ret. 1-6 1-8 Comp-Att-Int 17-29-1 26-44-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 0-0 2-18 Punts 7-41.6 4-43.5 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 3-3 Penalties-Yards 2-24 4-25 Time of Possession 32:20 27:40 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—N.Y. Giants: Jacobs 13-49, Bradshaw 15-22, Manning 4-11. Washington: Torain 18-61, K.Williams 1-4, Grossman 1-2. PASSING—N.Y. Giants: Manning 17-291-243. Washington: Grossman 26-44-1-336. RECEIVING—N.Y. Giants: Hagan 6-70, Manningham 4-101, Boss 2-29, Clayton 2-19, Bradshaw 2-8, Ware 1-16. Washington: Moss 9-74, Cooley 5-53, K.Williams 4-47, Armstrong 2-84, Austin 2-41, F.Davis 2-20, Sellers 1-9, Torain 1-8. MISSED FIELD GOALS—N.Y. Giants: Tynes 39 (WR). Washington: Gano 30 (WL).

Colts 23, Titans 20 Tennessee Indianapolis

3 3 14 0 — 20 3 10 7 3 — 23 First Quarter Ind—FG Vinatieri 48, 8:17. Ten—FG Bironas 26, 2:27. Second Quarter Ind—FG Vinatieri 44, 13:13. Ten—FG Bironas 42, 6:48. Ind—Wayne 7 pass from Manning (Vinatieri kick), 1:55. Third Quarter Ten—Britt 21 pass from Collins (Bironas kick), 11:29. Ind—Garcon 30 pass from Manning (Vinatieri kick), 9:16. Ten—C.Johnson 15 pass from Collins (Bironas kick), 4:18. Fourth Quarter Ind—FG Vinatieri 43, :00. A—67,188. ——— Ten Ind First downs 17 24 Total Net Yards 341 358 Rushes-yards 24-51 25-101 Passing 290 257 Punt Returns 2-7 0-0 Kickoff Returns 4-119 4-78 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 28-39-0 27-41-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-10 1-7 Punts 5-42.2 5-38.2 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 1-1 Penalties-Yards 7-58 5-25 Time of Possession 31:17 28:43 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Tennessee: C.Johnson 20-39, Ringer 1-5, Williams 1-5, Collins 2-2. Indianapolis: Rhodes 11-48, Addai 11-44, D.Brown 3-9. PASSING—Tennessee: Collins 28-39-0300. Indianapolis: Manning 27-41-0-264. RECEIVING—Tennessee: Cook 7-58, C.Johnson 6-51, Britt 5-85, Hall 4-19, Williams 3-24, Washington 1-38, Moss 1-18, Ringer 1-7. Indianapolis: Wayne 9-68, Garcon 7-78, Tamme 7-67, White 4-51. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Tennessee: Bironas 61 (SH).

Jets 38, Bills 7 Buffalo N.Y. Jets

0 0 7 0 — 7 3 14 7 14 — 38 First Quarter NYJ—FG Folk 28, 4:58. Second Quarter NYJ—Cole 35 interception return (Folk kick), 9:07. NYJ—Holmes 17 pass from Brunell (Folk kick), :15. Third Quarter Buf—Byrd 37 interception return (Lindell kick), 13:06. NYJ—Edwards 52 pass from Brunell (Folk kick), 6:41. Fourth Quarter NYJ—Clemens 10 run (Folk kick), 9:18.

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——— Sunday’s Games Oakland 31, Kansas City 10 New England 38, Miami 7 Atlanta 31, Carolina 10 N.Y. Jets 38, Buffalo 7 San Francisco 38, Arizona 7 Green Bay 10, Chicago 3 N.Y. Giants 17, Washington 14 Indianapolis 23, Tennessee 20

Tampa Bay 23, New Orleans 13 Detroit 20, Minnesota 13 Pittsburgh 41, Cleveland 9 Baltimore 13, Cincinnati 7 San Diego 33, Denver 28 Houston 34, Jacksonville 17 Dallas 14, Philadelphia 13 Seattle 16, St. Louis 6 Wild-card Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 8

New Orleans at Seattle, 1:30 p.m.

N.Y. Jets at Indianapolis, 5 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 9

Baltimore at Kansas City, 10 a.m.

Green Bay at Philadelphia, 1:30 p.m. ——— All Times PST

NYJ—Conner 16 run (Folk kick), 6:45. A—79,019. ——— Buf NYJ First downs 6 17 Total Net Yards 162 388 Rushes-yards 18-37 50-276 Passing 125 112 Punt Returns 2-44 4-46 Kickoff Returns 7-123 2-15 Interceptions Ret. 1-37 4-91 Comp-Att-Int 12-26-4 8-15-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-5 1-7 Punts 6-49.3 6-41.3 Fumbles-Lost 3-2 0-0 Penalties-Yards 3-15 3-25 Time of Possession 24:25 35:35 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Buffalo: Jackson 13-35, Spiller 3-5, Roosevelt 1-3, Ganther 1-(minus 6). N.Y. Jets: McKnight 32-158, B.Smith 5-60, Conner 8-44, Clemens 2-9, Richardson 2-6, Cotchery 1-(minus 1). PASSING—Buffalo: Brohm 10-23-3-106, L.Brown 2-3-1-24. N.Y. Jets: Brunell 6-12-1110, Clemens 1-2-0-6, B.Smith 1-1-0-3. RECEIVING—Buffalo: St.Johnson 5-72, Roosevelt 3-30, Jackson 1-13, Hubbard 1-8, Stupar 1-7, Martin 1-0. N.Y. Jets: Cotchery 332, McKnight 2-15, Edwards 1-52, Holmes 1-17, Cumberland 1-3. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Raiders 31, Chiefs 10

Oakland Kansas City

0 10 7 14 — 31 3 0 7 0 — 10 First Quarter KC—FG Succop 30, 11:03. Second Quarter Oak—Schilens 5 pass from J.Campbell (Janikowski kick), 8:33. Oak—FG Janikowski 38, :07. Third Quarter KC—Charles 5 run (Succop kick), 8:02. Oak—Bush 26 run (Janikowski kick), 2:26. Fourth Quarter Oak—Ford 10 run (Janikowski kick), 11:07. Oak—Routt 22 interception return (Janikowski kick), 9:11. A—67,045. ——— Oak KC First downs 21 17 Total Net Yards 344 201 Rushes-yards 37-209 29-115 Passing 135 86 Punt Returns 3-0 3-20 Kickoff Returns 3-50 5-83 Interceptions Ret. 2-39 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 16-26-0 13-36-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-25 7-56 Punts 5-46.8 6-37.7 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 1-0 Penalties-Yards 10-77 5-39 Time of Possession 33:28 26:32 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Oakland: Bush 25-137, J.Campbell 4-33, Ford 2-22, Cartwright 2-6, Bennett 1-5, Reece 2-4, Heyward-Bey 1-2. Kansas City:

Charles 14-87, Jones 10-17, Palko 1-6, Battle 4-5. PASSING—Oakland: J.Campbell 15-250-155, Boller 1-1-0-5. Kansas City: Cassel 11-33-2-115, Palko 2-3-0-27. RECEIVING—Oakland: Z.Miller 5-31, Bush 4-34, Schilens 3-24, Murphy 2-29, Ford 135, Myers 1-7. Kansas City: Bowe 5-68, Chambers 2-22, Charles 2-13, Moeaki 1-17, McCluster 1-15, Battle 1-9, Jones 1-(minus 2). MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Lions 20, Vikings 13 Minnesota Detroit

0 0 7 6 — 13 0 10 3 7 — 20 Second Quarter Det—FG Rayner 55, 6:45. Det—Burleson 7 pass from Sh.Hill (Rayner kick), :23. Third Quarter Det—FG Rayner 37, 9:58. Min—J.Allen 36 interception return (Longwell kick), 6:03. Fourth Quarter Min—FG Longwell 27, 12:05. Det—Morris 5 run (Rayner kick), 9:29. Min—FG Longwell 48, 1:55. A—57,013. ——— Min Det First downs 16 22 Total Net Yards 214 357 Rushes-yards 24-74 27-107 Passing 140 250 Punt Returns 3-9 2-16 Kickoff Returns 5-122 4-57 Interceptions Ret. 1-36 1-9 Comp-Att-Int 20-32-1 28-39-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-8 1-8 Punts 5-43.0 4-44.5 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-1 Penalties-Yards 3-25 5-33 Time of Possession 29:08 30:52 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Minnesota: Webb 5-35, Peterson 14-31, Gerhart 3-12, Harvin 2-(minus 4). Detroit: Best 10-34, Morris 12-21, Burleson 1-20, Logan 1-12, Sh.Hill 2-11, Felton 1-9. PASSING—Minnesota: Webb 20-32-1148. Detroit: Sh.Hill 28-39-1-258. RECEIVING—Minnesota: Harvin 8-72, Kleinsasser 2-22, Shiancoe 2-14, Berrian 2-11, Peterson 2-(minus 2), Camarillo 1-13, Booker 1-6, Gerhart 1-6, Tahi 1-2, Webb 0-9, Lewis 0-(minus 5). Detroit: Burleson 6-83, Scheffler 6-50, Best 6-23, B.Johnson 3-49, Pettigrew 3-19, Morris 2-24, Heller 1-6, Felton 1-4. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Buccaneers 23, Saints 13 Tampa Bay New Orleans

3 7 10 3 — 23 7 0 3 3 — 13 First Quarter TB—FG Barth 43, 9:58. NO—Graham 4 pass from Brees (Hartley kick), 4:41. Second Quarter TB—Briscoe 2 pass from Freeman (Barth kick), 6:40. Third Quarter NO—FG Hartley 45, 10:30. TB—FG Barth 32, 8:01. TB—M.Williams 18 pass from Freeman (Barth kick), 2:09. Fourth Quarter NO—FG Hartley 38, 11:17. TB—FG Barth 48, 4:01. A—70,068. ——— TB NO First downs 18 20 Total Net Yards 317 305 Rushes-yards 24-84 22-106 Passing 233 199 Punt Returns 1-4 1-7 Kickoff Returns 3-108 6-142 Interceptions Ret. 1-4 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 21-27-0 24-41-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-22 3-13 Punts 1-46.0 3-31.0 Fumbles-Lost 2-2 3-2 Penalties-Yards 7-54 5-45 Time of Possession 29:03 30:57 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Tampa Bay: Blount 19-66, Freeman 4-11, C.Williams 1-7. New Orleans: Bush 9-70, Ivory 7-33, Jones 4-6, Daniel 1-0, Meachem 1-(minus 3). PASSING—Tampa Bay: Freeman 21-260-255, Spurlock 0-1-0-0. New Orleans: Brees 22-38-1-196, Daniel 2-3-0-16. RECEIVING—Tampa Bay: Briscoe 4-65, M.Williams 4-40, Winslow 3-28, Stovall 2-45, Parker 2-33, Blount 2-2, Lumpkin 1-12, Purvis 1-11, Lorig 1-10, Gilmore 1-9. New Orleans: Arrington 7-79, Moore 6-53, Bush 5-55, Graham 2-15, Jones 2-3, Meachem 1-5, H.Evans 1-2. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Patriots 38, Dolphins 7 Miami 0 0 0 7 — 7 New England 14 10 14 0 — 38 First Quarter NE—Gronkowski 13 pass from Brady (Graham kick), 10:36. NE—Green-Ellis 1 run (Graham kick), 4:12. Second Quarter NE—FG Graham 28, 1:41.

NE—Edelman 94 punt return (Graham kick), :18. Third Quarter NE—Crumpler 10 pass from Brady (Graham kick), 11:30. NE—Tate 42 pass from Hoyer (Graham kick), 6:33. Fourth Quarter Mia—Bess 21 pass from Thigpen (Carpenter kick), 2:11. A—68,756. ——— Mia NE First downs 16 24 Total Net Yards 250 502 Rushes-yards 16-44 45-181 Passing 206 321 Punt Returns 0-0 4-112 Kickoff Returns 7-137 1-23 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-0 Comp-Att-Int 16-37-1 17-29-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 5-34 0-0 Punts 6-48.0 2-48.0 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 1-1 Penalties-Yards 5-40 5-72 Time of Possession 23:41 36:19 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Miami: Thigpen 3-21, Brown 6-14, Williams 6-5, Polite 1-4. New England: Green-Ellis 20-80, Taylor 10-35, Woodhead 2-19, Morris 5-18, Clayton 6-17, Edelman 1-13, Hoyer 1-(minus 1). PASSING—Miami: Thigpen 10-21-0-169, Henne 6-16-1-71. New England: Brady 10-160-199, Hoyer 7-13-0-122. RECEIVING—Miami: Marshall 5-97, Brown 3-39, Bess 3-35, Moore 2-46, Wallace 2-16, Polite 1-7. New England: Gronkowski 6-102, Edelman 3-72, Price 3-41, Tate 2-82, Crumpler 1-10, Morris 1-8, Green-Ellis 1-6. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Miami: Carpenter 40 (WL).

Ravens 13, Begnals 7 Cincinnati Baltimore

0 0 0 7 — 7 3 3 7 0 — 13 First Quarter Bal—FG Cundiff 25, 10:10. Second Quarter Bal—FG Cundiff 47, 4:41. Third Quarter Bal—Rice 7 run (Cundiff kick), 5:47. Fourth Quarter Cin—Simpson 11 pass from C.Palmer (Stitser kick), 12:24. A—71,088. ——— Cin Bal First downs 20 10 Total Net Yards 395 199 Rushes-yards 31-90 27-98 Passing 305 101 Punt Returns 4-49 3-14 Kickoff Returns 2-51 1-30 Interceptions Ret. 1-56 2-48 Comp-Att-Int 32-45-2 14-19-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 0-0 4-24 Punts 4-40.5 7-47.9 Fumbles-Lost 4-3 1-1 Penalties-Yards 4-49 7-45 Time of Possession 34:42 25:18 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Cincinnati: Benson 21-53, Scott 5-32, C.Palmer 2-3, Simpson 1-2, Peerman 1-0, Pressley 1-0. Baltimore: Rice 20-77, Stallworth 1-15, McGahee 2-5, Flacco 3-1, L.McClain 1-0. PASSING—Cincinnati: C.Palmer 32-452-305. Baltimore: Flacco 14-19-1-125. RECEIVING—Cincinnati: Simpson 12123, Caldwell 7-94, Coffman 3-30, Benson 3-12, Shipley 2-14, Kelly 2-6, Peerman 1-11, Scott 19, Pressley 1-6. Baltimore: Heap 3-53, Mason 3-34, L.McClain 3-4, Houshmandzadeh 2-17, Boldin 2-9, McGahee 1-8. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Cincinnati: Stitser 29 (WR).

Steelers 41, Browns 9 Pittsburgh Cleveland

14 17 7 3 — 41 0 3 0 6 — 9 First Quarter Pit—Wallace 56 pass from Roethlisberger (Suisham kick), 14:17. Pit—Mendenhall 1 run (Suisham kick), 6:57. Second Quarter Cle—FG Dawson 19, 14:43. Pit—Mendenhall 1 run (Suisham kick), 7:51. Pit—Miller 4 pass from Roethlisberger (Suisham kick), 4:53. Pit—FG Suisham 41, 1:30. Third Quarter Pit—Ward 3 pass from Randle El (Suisham kick), 7:18. Fourth Quarter Pit—FG Suisham 24, 12:32. Cle—Robiskie 20 pass from McCoy (pass failed), 6:33. A—68,303. ——— Pit Cle First downs 24 17 Total Net Yards 418 225 Rushes-yards 30-100 17-43 Passing 318 182 Punt Returns 3-5 1-11 Kickoff Returns 2-36 8-73 Interceptions Ret. 3-22 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 21-30-0 21-43-3 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-7 4-28

Punts Fumbles-Lost Penalties-Yards Time of Possession

2-56.0 0-0 3-25 33:14

3-43.7 2-0 6-46 26:46

——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Pittsburgh: Mendenhall 1436, Dwyer 9-28, Roethlisberger 4-24, Redman 3-12. Cleveland: McCoy 4-19, Bell 5-14, Hillis 6-13, Cribbs 1-0, Massaquoi 1-(minus 3). PASSING—Pittsburgh: Roethlisberger 1522-0-280, Leftwich 5-7-0-42, Randle El 1-1-0-3. Cleveland: McCoy 20-41-3-209, Wallace 1-10-1, Cribbs 0-1-0-0. RECEIVING—Pittsburgh: Ward 5-45, Miller 4-55, Brown 4-52, Wallace 3-105, Randle El 2-21, Mendenhall 1-24, Sanders 1-16, Redman 1-7. Cleveland: Watson 7-67, Bell 4-14, Massaquoi 3-50, Cribbs 3-37, Robiskie 2-35, Stuckey 1-4, Hillis 1-3. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Falcons 31, Panthers 10 Carolina Atlanta

0 0 3 7 — 10 14 7 10 0 — 31 First Quarter Atl—Gonzalez 6 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick), 10:04. Atl—Weems 55 punt return (Bryant kick), 4:24. Second Quarter Atl—White 14 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick), :51. Third Quarter Car—FG Kasay 23, 12:30. Atl—FG Bryant 47, 9:46. Atl—Turner 3 run (Bryant kick), 2:00. Fourth Quarter Car—King 2 pass from Clausen (Kasay kick), :23. A—67,349. ——— Car Atl First downs 12 24 Total Net Yards 291 352 Rushes-yards 19-137 32-99 Passing 154 253 Punt Returns 2-0 3-75 Kickoff Returns 3-47 1-20 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-0 Comp-Att-Int 19-34-1 26-38-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-28 1-3 Punts 7-49.1 4-40.8 Fumbles-Lost 4-1 2-1 Penalties-Yards 10-97 4-20 Time of Possession 24:30 35:30 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Carolina: LaFell 1-60, Stewart 13-31, Gettis 1-19, Goodson 2-14, Sutton 2-13. Atlanta: Turner 17-67, Snelling 8-17, Mughelli 28, Ryan 2-7, G.Johnson 2-1, Redman 1-(minus 1). PASSING—Carolina: Clausen 19-33-1182, LaFell 0-1-0-0. Atlanta: Ryan 22-32-0236, Redman 4-6-0-20. RECEIVING—Carolina: LaFell 4-63, Gettis 4-33, Sutton 3-21, Clowney 2-56, Rosario 2-19, King 2-1, Goodson 2-(minus 11). Atlanta: White 6-62, Gonzalez 6-53, Jenkins 5-52, Snelling 326, Finneran 2-26, Peelle 2-22, Douglas 1-19, G.Johnson 1-(minus 4). MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Seahawks 16, Rams 6 St. Louis Seattle

0 3 3 0 — 6 7 0 3 6 — 16 First Quarter Sea—Williams 4 pass from Whitehurst (Mare kick), 11:38. Second Quarter StL—FG Jo.Brown 32, 8:54. Third Quarter StL—FG Jo.Brown 27, 8:59. Sea—FG Mare 31, 3:04. Fourth Quarter Sea—FG Mare 38, 10:53. Sea—FG Mare 34, 1:37. A—67,325. ——— StL Sea First downs 10 19 Total Net Yards 184 333 Rushes-yards 15-47 35-141 Passing 137 192 Punt Returns 1-9 6-25 Kickoff Returns 5-79 3-62 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-0 Comp-Att-Int 19-36-1 22-36-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-18 0-0 Punts 9-44.0 7-34.7 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 2-1 Penalties-Yards 6-46 7-70 Time of Possession 25:15 34:45 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—St. Louis: Jackson 11-45, Darby 1-7, Karney 2-4, Robinson 1-(minus 9). Seattle: Lynch 20-75, Whitehurst 8-30, Forsett 3-28, Washington 1-4, Tate 1-3, M.Robinson 2-1. PASSING—St. Louis: Bradford 19-36-1155. Seattle: Whitehurst 22-36-0-192. RECEIVING—St. Louis: Jackson 4-39, Fells 3-39, B.Gibson 3-30, Alexander 3-14, Robinson 2-14, Amendola 2-9, Toston 1-6, Karney 1-4. Seattle: Obomanu 5-39, Martin 3-85, Washington 3-24, Forsett 3-22, Williams 3-16, Morrah 1-6, Carlson 1-3, Tate 1-3, Baker 1-1, Lynch 1-(minus 7). MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.


D4 Monday, January 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Cowboys

NBA ROUNDUP

Blazers continue home win streak

Portland beats Houston 100-85 for eighth straight at Rose Garden The Associated Press

PORTLAND — The Portland Trail Blazers haven’t had much trouble winning at home this season. They’d like to carry that success away from the Rose Garden. LaMarcus Aldridge had 25 points and 11 rebounds, Nicolas Batum added a season-high 21 points and the Trail Blazers beat the Houston Rockets 10085 Sunday night for their eighth straight win at home. Patrick Mills had a careerhigh 14 points, five assists and five steals, Wesley Matthews added 14 points and Marcus Camby had 13 rebounds and a season-high eight assists to help the Blazers improve to 12-3 at the Rose Garden. “When we are here at the Rose Garden we are consistent,” Camby said. “We win a couple and get momentum from it. Then we go out on the road and lose a few. We have to change that.” Portland, on its longest winning streak at home since a 12game run from Jan. 24 to March 9, 2009, has struggled with injuries, most notably to All-Star Brandon Roy, and has lost 13 of 19 on the road. After a threegame road trip that begins Tuesday at Dallas, the Blazers will be back for nine of the next 11 at home. Aldridge has continued his dominant play since Roy has been out with sore knees. He had his 14th double-double of the season and has scored at least 23 points in nine of the 11 games Roy has missed. Portland is 8-3 during that span. “Our chemistry has gotten better,” Aldridge said. “I think guys are really figuring out their roles.” Kevin Martin had 15 points to lead the Rockets, who were held well below their season average of 106 points per game. Courtney Lee added 12 points. Luis Scola, Aaron Brooks and Chase Budinger each had 10. The Rockets, coming off a 114-105 win over Toronto Friday, play the second game of a back-to-back today at Denver. With center Yao Ming out with a stress fracture in his ankle and Chuck Hayes sitting with a sprained ankle, Houston had a weak defensive presence down low, giving away too many easy

Don Ryan / The Associated Press

Houston Rockets forward Shane Battier, left, fights for a rebound with Portland Trail Blazers forward Nicolas Batum during the second half of their NBA basketball game in Portland on Sunday. Batum scored 21 points as the Blazers beat the Rockets 100-85. baskets to Aldridge and getting outscored 46-28 in the paint. “They’ve got some trees down there,” Martin said. “But we couldn’t get enough going inside or outside. It was a bad shooting night, which is a big reason why we lost.” Houston trailed 54-48 at halftime, but Portland pulled away with a 12-0 run to extend to lead to 75-58 with 2:14 left in the third quarter. Portland went up 19 after back-to-back fastbreak dunks by Dante Cunningham and Batum, and eventually led by 23. “Just a poor effort,” Houston coach Rick Adelman said. “That is as bad as we have played all year. We were a step behind all night.” Backup point guard Mills gave the Trail Blazers a lift in the second quarter, containing Brooks on defense and scoring 12 before halftime. Portland

went up by double digits after Batum converted a three-point play to make it 45-33. Martin scored the Rockets’ last seven points of the half to cut the deficit to six. NOTES: The Rockets’ last win over a team with a winning record was Dec. 1 against the Los Angeles Lakers. ... Portland has beaten the Rockets four straight times at the Rose Garden. ... Matthews was just three of 12 from the field but made all seven of his free throw attempts. Also on Sunday: Celtics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Raptors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 TORONTO — Paul Pierce scored 30 points, Ray Allen had 23 and Boston beat Toronto. Glenn Davis added 15 points, 11 rebounds and eight assists as Boston won for the 10th time in 11 meetings with Toronto. Pierce was disappointed with himself after scoring just 12 points and

making a season-high six turnovers in Friday’s 83-81 loss to New Orleans. He made up for that by hitting 10 of 15 shots, seven of eight free throws and grabbing seven rebounds to help Boston snap a two-game losing streak. Hawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Clippers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 LOS ANGELES — Joe Johnson scored 11 of his 29 points in the fourth quarter, Josh Smith added 22 and Atlanta rallied for the win. Johnson, who returned to the lineup on Dec. 17 after missing nine games following right elbow surgery, was seven for 20 from the field after going 18 of 51 over his previous three games. In Friday’s loss at Oklahoma City, the four-time All-Star guard missed 14 of 20 attempts — including all six from 3-point range. Smith was five for 14 after missing his first eight shots. Knicks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Pacers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 NEW YORK — Amare Stoudemire scored 26 points, including six of New York’s last seven points, and Danilo Gallinari had 19 to lead the Knicks. Danny Granger had 25 points and 17 rebounds, and Darren Collison had 22 points, six assists and five rebounds for the Pacers, who lost for the fourth time in their last five games. Mavericks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Cavaliers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 CLEVELAND — Shawn Marion scored 22 points and DeShawn Stevenson added 21, helping Dallas end a three-game skid. The Mavericks, playing without starting forwards Dirk Nowitzki and Caron Butler, used a balanced attack. Jason Terry scored 18 points, Tyson Chandler added 14 points and 14 rebounds, and Jason Kidd had 10 points and eight assists. Grizzlies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Lakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 LOS ANGELES — Rudy Gay scored 27 points, Zach Randolph added 21 points and eight rebounds, and Memphis pulled away in the second half. O.J. Mayo scored 15 points for the Grizzlies, who bounced back from two losses to wrap up their three-game road trip with a stunningly easy blowout of the twotime defending champions. Kings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Suns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 SACRAMENTO, Calif. — DeMarcus Cousins scored 13 of his career-high 28 points in the fourth quarter and Sacramento closed with a 19-2 run. Francisco Garcia had 20 points and 11 rebounds and Omri Casspi added 14 points and 10 rebounds for the Kings. Carl Landry had 11 points and 12 rebounds.

NBA SCOREBOARD EASTERN CONFERENCE

SUMMARIES Sunday’s Games

Atlantic Division Boston New York Philadelphia Toronto New Jersey

W 25 19 13 11 9

L 7 14 20 22 25

Miami Orlando Atlanta Charlotte Washington

W 26 21 22 11 8

L 9 12 14 20 24

Chicago Indiana Milwaukee Detroit Cleveland

W 22 14 13 11 8

L 10 18 18 22 26

Pct .781 .576 .394 .333 .265

GB — 6½ 12½ 14½ 17

L10 7-3 5-5 5-5 3-7 3-7

Str W-1 W-1 L-1 L-2 L-5

Home 13-2 9-7 8-6 7-10 6-9

Away 12-5 10-7 5-14 4-12 3-16

Conf 21-4 12-9 8-14 8-13 5-16

Away 12-5 9-7 10-9 3-12 0-16

Conf 16-4 16-6 16-8 7-13 5-17

Away 8-7 5-10 5-11 3-14 3-15

Conf 11-5 9-11 7-7 7-11 7-17

Southeast Division Pct .743 .636 .611 .355 .250

GB — 4 4½ 13 16½

L10 9-1 6-4 6-4 3-7 2-8

Str W-5 W-5 W-1 L-1 L-2

Home 14-4 12-5 12-5 8-8 8-8

Central Division Pct .688 .438 .419 .333 .235

GB — 8 8½ 11½ 15

L10 8-2 3-7 5-5 4-6 1-9

Str W-4 L-1 W-1 L-1 L-7

Home 14-3 9-8 8-7 8-8 5-11

WESTERN CONFERENCE L 4 8 14 17 19

San Antonio Dallas New Orleans Houston Memphis

Utah Oklahoma City Denver Portland Minnesota

W 23 23 19 18 9

L 11 12 13 16 25

L.A. Lakers Phoenix Golden State L.A. Clippers Sacramento

W 23 14 13 10 7

L 11 18 20 24 24

Pct .879 .758 .588 .485 .441

GB — 4 9½ 13 14½

L10 9-1 6-4 6-4 7-3 5-5

Str W-4 W-1 W-2 L-1 W-1

Home 19-2 13-6 13-4 10-5 9-6

Away 10-2 12-2 7-10 6-12 6-13

Conf 20-3 15-4 10-9 10-10 10-12

Away 11-5 10-6 5-10 6-13 2-17

Conf 12-10 12-8 13-7 12-11 3-18

Away 12-6 6-11 5-14 3-11 2-10

Conf 12-7 10-12 8-13 8-17 3-17

Northwest Division Pct .676 .657 .594 .529 .265

GB — ½ 3 5 14

L10 6-4 6-4 5-5 6-4 3-7

Str W-1 L-1 W-3 W-2 W-1

Home 12-6 13-6 14-3 12-3 7-8

Paciic Division Pct .676 .438 .394 .294 .226

GB — 8 9½ 13 14½

L10 Str 6-4 L-1 3-7 L-1 5-5 L-1 5-5 L-2 2-8 W-1 ——— Sunday’s Games

New York 98, Indiana 92 Boston 93, Toronto 79 Portland 100, Houston 85 Memphis 104, L.A. Lakers 85

Home 11-5 8-7 8-6 7-13 5-14

Atlanta 107, L.A. Clippers 98 Dallas 104, Cleveland 95 Sacramento 94, Phoenix 89 Today’s Games

Miami at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Minnesota at Boston, 4:30 p.m. Houston at Denver, 6 p.m.

Golden State at Orlando, 4 p.m. Philadelphia at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Detroit at Utah, 6 p.m. Tuesday’s Games

Milwaukee at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Toronto at Chicago, 5 p.m. Portland at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Detroit at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m.

San Antonio at New York, 4:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Memphis, 5 p.m. Atlanta at Sacramento, 7 p.m. All Times PST

Blazers 100, Rockets 85 HOUSTON (85) Battier 2-3 0-0 4, Scola 5-8 0-0 10, Hill 2-5 0-0 4, Lowry 2-6 1-2 6, Martin 6-17 3-3 15, B.Miller 0-3 1-2 1, Lee 4-10 4-5 12, Brooks 3-10 3-3 10, Budinger 4-6 0-0 10, Patterson 1-3 3-4 5, Jeffries 1-2 2-3 4, T.Williams 1-2 2-2 4. Totals 31-75 19-24 85. PORTLAND (100) Batum 8-12 3-3 21, Aldridge 10-22 5-5 25, Camby 1-4 1-2 3, A.Miller 1-3 1-2 3, Matthews 3-12 7-7 14, Fernandez 4-13 0-0 10, Cunningham 5-9 0-0 10, Mills 6-12 0-0 14, Marks 0-1 0-0 0, Babbitt 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 38-88 17-19 100. Houston 25 23 14 23 — 85 Portland 27 27 25 21 — 100 3-Point Goals—Houston 4-20 (Budinger 2-3, Lowry 1-2, Brooks 1-6, Battier 0-1, B.Miller 0-2, Lee 0-2, Martin 0-4), Portland 7-21 (Mills 2-4, Batum 25, Fernandez 2-7, Matthews 1-3, Aldridge 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Houston 45 (Patterson 10), Portland 56 (Camby 13). Assists—Houston 18 (Lowry, Martin 4), Portland 29 (Camby 8). Total Fouls—Houston 13, Portland 21. Technicals—Hill, Houston defensive three second, Portland defensive three second. A—20,416 (19,980).

Mavericks 104, Cavaliers 95

Southwest Division W 29 25 20 16 15

(G.Davis, Rondo 8), Toronto 20 (Calderon 10). Total Fouls—Boston 18, Toronto 22. A—19,986 (19,800).

Hawks 107, Clippers 98 ATLANTA (107) J.Smith 5-14 9-10 22, Horford 4-8 0-0 8, Jas.Collins 0-0 0-0 0, Bibby 3-6 0-0 8, Johnson 7-20 14-17 29, Ja.Crawford 7-13 8-9 24, Evans 0-2 2-2 2, Pachulia 2-3 2-2 6, Wilkins 1-1 0-0 2, Teague 3-3 0-0 6, Powell 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 32-70 35-40 107. L.A. CLIPPERS (98) Gomes 4-7 0-0 10, Griffin 11-22 9-14 31, Jordan 34 0-0 6, Davis 6-12 2-2 15, Gordon 3-14 4-6 10, Foye 3-4 0-1 6, Bledsoe 4-8 1-2 10, Aminu 1-5 2-2 4, Diogu 2-4 2-2 6. Totals 37-80 20-29 98. Atlanta 18 24 28 37 — 107 L.A. Clippers 31 22 21 24 — 98 3-Point Goals—Atlanta 8-18 (J.Smith 3-5, Bibby 23, Ja.Crawford 2-5, Johnson 1-4, Evans 0-1), L.A. Clippers 4-18 (Gomes 2-3, Bledsoe 1-2, Davis 1-5, Aminu 0-3, Gordon 0-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Atlanta 40 (Horford, J.Smith 10), L.A. Clippers 55 (Griffin 15). Assists—Atlanta 17 (Ja.Crawford, Bibby, Johnson 4), L.A. Clippers 20 (Gordon 6). Total Fouls—Atlanta 24, L.A. Clippers 25. Technicals—Atlanta defensive three second, L.A. Clippers defensive three second 2. A—16,750 (19,060).

Knicks 98, Pacers 92

DALLAS (104) Stevenson 6-13 4-5 21, Marion 11-16 0-0 22, Chandler 6-6 2-6 14, Kidd 3-13 2-2 10, Terry 8-14 0-2 18, Haywood 1-1 1-2 3, Barea 2-8 0-0 4, Jones 2-10 55 9, Cardinal 1-2 0-0 3. Totals 40-83 14-22 104. CLEVELAND (95) Parker 3-5 1-2 8, Jamison 14-22 4-5 35, Powe 1-2 0-0 2, Williams 2-11 0-0 5, Harris 1-5 0-0 2, Hickson 3-10 1-2 7, Gee 2-2 1-2 5, Sessions 9-13 1-2 19, Eyenga 2-6 0-0 4, Hollins 4-5 0-0 8. Totals 41-81 8-13 95. Dallas 27 28 24 25 — 104 Cleveland 25 22 22 26 — 95 3-Point Goals—Dallas 10-27 (Stevenson 5-12, Terry 2-4, Kidd 2-6, Cardinal 1-2, Barea 0-1, Jones 02), Cleveland 5-17 (Jamison 3-6, Parker 1-1, Williams 1-4, Hickson 0-1, Harris 0-1, Eyenga 0-4). Fouled Out—Hollins. Rebounds—Dallas 51 (Chandler 14), Cleveland 45 (Jamison 10). Assists—Dallas 26 (Kidd 8), Cleveland 25 (Sessions 12). Total Fouls—Dallas 13, Cleveland 23. A—20,562 (20,562).

INDIANA (92) Dunleavy 2-7 0-1 4, Granger 9-23 5-6 25, Foster 1-2 0-0 2, Collison 9-17 1-1 22, Rush 6-17 0-0 12, Hibbert 4-9 2-4 10, George 2-4 0-0 5, McRoberts 1-4 2-5 4, Ford 1-9 1-2 3, S.Jones 1-2 0-0 2, Posey 1-5 0-0 3. Totals 37-99 11-19 92. NEW YORK (98) Chandler 2-6 4-4 10, Gallinari 5-8 9-11 19, Stoudemire 9-24 8-13 26, Felton 5-13 4-7 14, Fields 3-5 22 10, Williams 2-3 0-0 5, Turiaf 1-3 0-1 2, Douglas 4-10 2-2 12, Walker 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 31-73 29-40 98. Indiana 32 23 22 15 — 92 New York 30 25 24 19 — 98 3-Point Goals—Indiana 7-24 (Collison 3-3, Granger 2-4, George 1-2, Posey 1-5, Ford 0-1, Dunleavy 0-4, Rush 0-5), New York 7-17 (Chandler 2-3, Fields 2-4, Douglas 2-5, Williams 1-1, Gallinari 0-1, Walker 0-1, Felton 0-2). Fouled Out—Foster. Rebounds—Indiana 70 (Granger 17), New York 53 (Turiaf 10). Assists—Indiana 19 (Collison 6), New York 16 (Douglas 7). Total Fouls—Indiana 26, New York 17. Technicals—Indiana defensive three second, Felton, Turiaf, New York defensive three second. A—19,763 (19,763).

Celtics 93, Raptors 79

Kings 94, Suns 89

BOSTON (93) Pierce 10-15 7-8 30, G.Davis 6-14 3-4 15, S.O’Neal 3-3 1-5 7, Rondo 2-3 0-2 4, Allen 10-18 0-0 23, Robinson 2-4 0-0 4, J.O’Neal 3-7 0-0 6, Harangody 1-1 0-0 2, Daniels 0-3 0-0 0, Wafer 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 38-70 11-19 93. TORONTO (79) Kleiza 3-12 0-0 7, Johnson 5-11 0-0 10, Dorsey 5-9 3-8 13, Calderon 3-14 0-2 6, DeRozan 11-25 5-8 27, E.Davis 3-5 0-1 6, Barbosa 3-12 2-3 8, Wright 1-2 0-0 2, Dupree 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 34-90 10-22 79. Boston 24 19 28 22 — 93 Toronto 23 19 20 17 — 79 3-Point Goals—Boston 6-12 (Pierce 3-3, Allen 3-5, Rondo 0-1, Daniels 0-1, Robinson 0-2), Toronto 1-14 (Kleiza 1-6, DeRozan 0-1, Calderon 0-3, Barbosa 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Boston 49 (G.Davis 11), Toronto 59 (Dorsey 13). Assists—Boston 30

PHOENIX (89) Hill 4-12 4-4 13, Pietrus 3-12 0-0 7, Lopez 2-5 0-0 4, Nash 8-8 2-2 20, Carter 7-17 0-0 17, Dudley 2-9 2-2 6, Gortat 6-10 4-7 16, Frye 1-7 0-0 2, Childress 1-2 0-0 2, Dragic 1-5 0-0 2. Totals 35-87 12-15 89. SACRAMENTO (94) Garcia 8-16 4-6 20, Thompson 4-10 3-4 11, Cousins 11-17 6-6 28, Udrih 0-3 0-0 0, Evans 2-12 2-2 6, Dalembert 0-1 0-0 0, Casspi 4-7 2-2 14, Landry 3-11 5-5 11, Greene 0-1 0-2 0, Jeter 2-6 0-0 4. Totals 3484 22-27 94. Phoenix 27 21 25 16 — 89 Sacramento 17 22 26 29 — 94 3-Point Goals—Phoenix 7-27 (Carter 3-7, Nash 22, Hill 1-2, Pietrus 1-9, Dragic 0-2, Frye 0-2, Dudley 0-3), Sacramento 4-12 (Casspi 4-6, Greene 0-1, Evans 0-1, Garcia 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Phoenix 42 (Gortat, Hill 6), Sacramento 68 (Landry

12). Assists—Phoenix 24 (Nash 12), Sacramento 21 (Cousins 6). Total Fouls—Phoenix 25, Sacramento 19. Technicals—Thompson. A—12,500 (17,317).

Grizzlies 104, Lakers 85 MEMPHIS (104) Gay 10-19 5-6 27, Randolph 9-17 3-4 21, M.Gasol 2-10 0-0 4, Conley 4-7 3-4 12, Allen 5-12 0-0 10, Mayo 5-10 3-3 15, Vasquez 2-2 0-0 5, Arthur 4-7 1-1 9, Thabeet 0-4 0-0 0, Young 0-2 1-2 1. Totals 41-90 16-20 104. L.A. LAKERS (85) Artest 0-2 0-0 0, P.Gasol 5-9 0-0 10, Bynum 4-8 1-2 9, Fisher 2-6 0-0 5, Bryant 10-22 7-8 28, Odom 3-8 1-4 7, Blake 3-4 0-0 8, Barnes 1-2 0-0 3, Brown 3-8 4-4 11, Smith 0-0 0-0 0, Walton 2-2 0-0 4, Caracter 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 33-71 13-18 85. Memphis 23 25 31 25 — 104 L.A. Lakers 18 21 23 23 — 85 3-Point Goals—Memphis 6-12 (Gay 2-4, Mayo 2-5, Conley 1-1, Vasquez 1-1, Allen 0-1), L.A. Lakers 6-18 (Blake 2-2, Barnes 1-2, Fisher 1-2, Brown 1-3, Bryant 1-7, Odom 0-1, Artest 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Memphis 54 (M.Gasol 10), L.A. Lakers 42 (Bynum 11). Assists—Memphis 30 (Conley, M.Gasol 6), L.A. Lakers 13 (Brown 3). Total Fouls—Memphis 16, L.A. Lakers 15. Technicals—Bryant. A—18,997 (18,997).

LEADERS Through Sunday’s games ——— Scoring G FG FT PTS AVG Durant, OKC 31 283 245 864 27.9 Stoudemire, NYK 33 329 207 871 26.4 Ellis, GOL 33 315 154 839 25.4 Bryant, LAL 34 300 217 864 25.4 Wade, MIA 33 279 223 810 24.5 James, MIA 35 288 233 855 24.4 Nowitzki, DAL 29 260 153 700 24.1 Rose, CHI 31 282 128 744 24.0 Anthony, DEN 25 206 165 592 23.7 Gordon, LAC 32 249 197 747 23.3 Martin, HOU 33 219 249 759 23.0 Williams, UTA 34 246 206 756 22.2 Westbrook, OKC 35 262 232 766 21.9 Beasley, MIN 32 278 114 699 21.8 Griffin, LAC 34 284 167 739 21.7 Bargnani, TOR 27 217 106 572 21.2 Granger, IND 31 228 133 655 21.1 Howard, ORL 31 228 199 655 21.1 Gay, MEM 32 256 112 668 20.9 Love, MIN 34 236 192 709 20.9 FG Percentage FG FGA PCT Hilario, DEN 149 236 .631 Okafor, NOR 146 250 .584 Odom, LAL 215 374 .575 Horford, ATL 255 444 .574 Howard, ORL 228 406 .562 Millsap, UTA 242 439 .551 Young, PHL 165 301 .548 Ibaka, OKC 138 252 .548 Nowitzki, DAL 260 477 .545 Boozer, CHI 140 257 .545 Rebounds G OFF DEF TOT AVG Love, MIN 34 164 357 521 15.3 Howard, ORL 31 107 297 404 13.0 Randolph, MEM 30 129 247 376 12.5 Griffin, LAC 34 132 293 425 12.5 Camby, POR 31 103 247 350 11.3 Gasol, LAL 34 120 248 368 10.8

Continued from D1 “We’re big, but we don’t necessarily have a big guy,” Lowenbach says, referring to the fact that Seaquist and Gomes play mostly outside the paint. “Neither one of those guys is a true post. But four of our five starters can hop down there and play post if they need to. ... We’re a lot more athletic than we have been in years past.” Entering this season on a 26game losing streak that dated back to the 2008-09 campaign, the Cowboys quickly showed they were much improved from a season ago. Crook County lost its opener 54-52 to Sweet Home — last season, the Cowboys did not come within seven points of any team all season — but topped Madras 63-44 in its second game. “I’d be lying if I said ending the streak wasn’t a relief,” Lowenbach admits. “But this year’s different. From the start of the season, we rarely mention last year.” As tough as last season was for the Cowboy faithful, Lowenbach does point out that most of his contributors this season earned valuable varsity minutes last year. “That game experience went a long way to preparing for this year,” Lowenbach says. “We were pretty young last year, but we always played hard and didn’t give up.” After its win against Madras this season, Crook County lost a pair of close games to Maza-

Playoff Continued from D1 “I think it shows the resolve of this team and our fight,” Colts defensive end Dwight Freeney said. “It doesn’t matter if we’re 6-6 and we have to win our last four, we have to do it. If we have to win the last seven, we’ll try to do it. That’s just kind of what we are and we’ve been that for a while.” So Indianapolis (10-6) hosts the New York Jets (11-5) in a rematch of last January’s AFC championship game on Saturday night. Before that, the Saints (12-4) are at Seattle. On Sunday, NFC East champion Philadelphia (10-6) hosts Green Bay (10-6) after AFC West winner Kansas City (106) is at home against Baltimore (12-4). Atlanta (13-3) won the NFC South with a 31-10 rout of Carolina. The Falcons get homefield advantage throughout the playoffs and a bye next week. They open their postseason the weekend of Jan. 15-16 in the Georgia Dome. “It’s very important,” top receiver Roddy White said. “We rarely lose in this building. We find a way to win here.” Indeed, the Falcons are 20-2 at home with quarterback Matt Ryan as a starter. The Steelers (12-4) took the AFC North with a 41-9 romp at Cleveland (5-11). They edged Baltimore in the division, making the Ravens a wild card. Pittsburgh is the No. 2 seed behind New England in the AFC and will have a bye next weekend. “We love to win the division,” Ben Roethlisberger said. “This is a hard division. We hope this is just the beginning.” New England already owned the top seed in the AFC and beat Miami 38-7 to finish 14-2, the league’s best record. The Patriots won their last eight games. “The greatest advantage we have is we don’t have to play next week and we play at home the following week,” Tom Brady said, “so that’s really what we’ve earned to this point. I don’t think we’ve earned anything more than that.” When Kansas City was

ma (48-40) and Redmond (4843) before the Cowboys hosted Mountain View on Dec. 21. While the Cougars are a completely different team from the one that went 26-2 last season and came one victory short of claiming the 2010 5A state title, they are still one of the premier programs in 5A. Having been competitive in their three losses, the Cowboys finally finished a close game and shocked the Cougars 67-63. Bartels scored a team-high 21 points and Seaquist and Gomes added 18 and 15, respectively, in Crook County’s first complete game of the season. “It made everybody realize, ‘Hey, we can really do some things,’ ” Lowenbach says about his team’s victory over the Cougars. “Early on in the season, we’d compete and find ourselves in games but come up short in the end. The Mountain View game, like those early games, we competed and found a way to win.” Using the momentum from their win over the Cougars, the Cowboys went undefeated at last week’s Sisters Holiday Tournament, defeating Junction City, Burns and Sisters over a two-day period. “We knew with the work the guys put in this offseason the wins would come,” says Lowenbach, whose team next plays at Bend High on Tuesday. “I’m just pleased they’ve come as quick as they have.” Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@ bendbulletin.com.

ripped by Oakland 31-10, it gave the Colts the chance to become the No. 3 seed. “I’m disappointed we lost, but we’ve got to bounce back,” Chiefs running back Jamaal Charles said. “We’ve got another week going. The Raiders don’t.” Baltimore defeated Cincinnati 13-7 to finish its season, while the Jets routed Buffalo 38-7. Ravens star linebacker Ray Lewis doesn’t care where his team has to travel. “I think one reason why, for us, it never matters, is because our defense, we travel very well on the road,” Lewis said. “We play extremely well on the road.” They were 5-3 away from home this season. They also won a wild-card game at New England last year. The previous season, the Ravens won at Miami and Tennessee in the playoffs. The Jets won two postseason road games last year before falling short of the Super Bowl when the Colts stopped them. “We are ready to go do what we set out to do,” coach Rex Ryan said. “If somebody is going to beat us, then they must be really good.” Also in the playoffs from the NFC is Chicago (11-5), which owns the North title and the conference’s other bye. Green Bay finished second in the division and got the final wild card on tiebreakers over Tampa Bay and the New York Giants, a pair of 10-6 teams that didn’t qualify. The last time that happened in the NFC was 1991. “Tonight was a struggle, but it’s nice to keep that momentum going,” Aaron Rodgers said after the win against the Bears. “We’ve won two in a row and now we’ve got to go (on the road). And we can’t have the kind of inconsistent performances we’ve had this year that have forced us to be the No. 6 seed.” The divisional round lineup will have Pittsburgh at home Saturday afternoon, Jan. 15, followed by Atlanta hosting a night game. On Jan. 16, Chicago hosts the early game, followed by a game at New England.

Curtis Compton / Atlanta Journal Constitution

Atlanta Falcons John Abraham, left, and Jonathan Babineaux dunk head coach Mike Smith in the final minutes of a 31-10 victory over Carolina to win the NFC South in Atlanta on Sunday.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, January 3, 2011 D5

C O L L E G E F O OT BA L L : B C S N AT I O N A L C H A M P I O N S H I P

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

Oregon arrives for BCS game By John Marshall The Associated Press

PHOENIX — Lining a red carpet next to a mariachi band, a group of fans broke into a cheer as the door to Oregon’s plane swung open. Sensing a chance to get a bit of the spotlight for himself, an airport worker in an orange vest raised his arms in mock triumph and mouthed sarcastic thank yous as he made his way down the temporary staircase. The real stars came next. Following the brief moment of levity, Oregon’s players filed off the plane, arriving in the desert on Sunday with a serious task ahead: facing top-ranked Auburn and Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback Cam Newton on Jan. 10 for the program’s first national championship. The second-ranked Ducks landed about 45 minutes early and were greeted by a decentsize crowd of Oregon fans and bowl personnel, the cheers and waving pompoms a nice welcome for what figures to be a difficult eight days of preparation and trying to avoid distractions. “We’re excited to be here,” Oregon coach Chip Kelly said inside a white tent next to Sky Harbor Airport’s executive terminal. “The amount of support we get everywhere, it’s an exciting time to be a Duck. And we’re going to meet them all on the 10th.” The Ducks had few problems with the relatively short flight from Oregon, other than defensive coordinator Nick Aliotti needing to get wanded because of his titanium hips. Now comes the biggest week in the program’s 115-year history. Oregon (12-0) had a fairly easy run through the regular season, crushing teams with an uptempo offense that had opponents feigning injuries in an attempt to slow it down. The Ducks had

OSU edges Arizona to go to 2-0 in conference The Associated Press

Paul Connors / The Associated Press

Oregon players are greeted by the BCS championship game queen and her court at Sky Harbor International Airport on Sunday in Phoenix. Oregon is scheduled to face Auburn in the championship game Jan. 10 in Glendale, Ariz. one close game — 15-13 over Cal — and led the nation with 49.3 points per game while averaging nearly 540 yards. Auburn, though, is nearly as potent on offense and has Newton, the multitalented quarterback who overcame a pay-forplay plot by his father to run away with college football’s most prestigious individual award. It’s also a bigger stage than the Ducks have ever been on before. Oregon has been in the national spotlight before, just last season in the Rose Bowl against Ohio State. But the Ducks lost that game and this one has an even brighter glow, with media

from around the country descending on the desert and an entire nation of football fans watching their every move. To avoid his players thinking about the weight of trying to win the program’s first national title and potential distractions in a winter vacation destination, Kelly and the coaching staff outlined a detailed schedule almost immediately after earning the title-game bid. After busing from the airport, Kelly said the players would go over administrative details at the team hotel Sunday afternoon and will get going in earnest with team meetings today, followed by the first outside-of-Eu-

gene practice. If everything goes right, the apex of Oregon’s preparations will hit about 6:30 p.m. local time on Jan. 10. “Every day for us is extremely important,” Kelly said. “Our players’ mindset since they got back at it after finals has been the same way. We got a real good amount of work in while we were in Eugene and now we’re down here to get six or seven days of work here and we’ll be ready to play the game. No day is more important than tomorrow and that’s where it starts.” It ends in a week, with everyone watching and everything on the line.

CORVALLIS — When his team needed him most, Calvin Haynes came up big. Haynes had an assist on Joe Burton’s go-ahead basket with 28 seconds remaining, then made four straight free throws down the stretch in Oregon State’s 76-75 win against Arizona Sunday night. Haynes had 18 points, Jared Cunningham 17 points and Burton added 16 points for the Beavers (7-6, 2-0 Pac-10), who have won three straight games against the Wildcats, the longest stretch since an 11-game streak versus Arizona that ended in 1984. Oregon State coach Craig Robinson said it was nice to see Haynes have a big moment after a slow start to his season. “We needed Calvin to be in there because Jared was in foul trouble and he just played through all of that,” Robinson said of Haynes, whose scoring has been inconsistent. “He was tired, he was getting bumped around. He made his foul shots, he was making big plays. It was great to see that happen for him.” Haynes passed to Burton for a lay-in that gave Oregon State a 72-70 lead. MoMo Jones, who led Arizona (12-3, 1-1) with 20 points, missed a shot after Burton scored. Haynes made two free throws and Kyle Fogg scored on a lay-up for the Wildcats. Haynes was fouled again and made two more free throws, and Derrick Williams, who had 16 points, made a 3-pointer with 0.1 seconds left. Arizona never trailed in the first half, which ended 28-28, and Oregon State never trailed

in the second half even though there were 11 ties in the contest, seven after halftime. Neither team ever led by more than seven points. In other games on Sunday: N o. 1 Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Miami (Fla.). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 DURHAM, N.C. — Nolan Smith scored a season-high 28 points to help Duke beat Miami in the Atlantic Coast Conference opener for both teams. No. 3 Kansas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Miami, Ohio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 LAWRENCE, Kan. — Markieff Morris had 20 points and twin brother Marcus added 18 to lead Kansas. No. 8 Villanova. . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Rutgers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 VILLANOVA, Pa. — Corey Stokes scored 23 points and Corey Fisher had 19 as Villanova won its seventh straight game. No. 21 Memphis. . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Tennessee State . . . . . . . . . . . 86 MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Antonio Barton scored 20 of his 24 points in the second half, including two key free throws with 17 seconds left, for Memphis. No. 23 Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Demetri McCamey scored 21 points and Mike Davis and Bill Cole added 11 each to lead Illinois. No. 24 Vanderbilt. . . . . . . . . . . 80 Davidson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Jeffery Taylor scored 22 points to lead four Vanderbilt players in double figures. Stanford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 California . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 STANFORD, Calif. — Jeremy Green scored 21 points and Dwight Powell had 20 to lead Stanford to a victory over California in the Pac-10 opener for both teams.

Stanford has a little Luck in facing Virginia Tech By Steven Wine The Associated Press

MIAMI — Andrew Luck threw seven interceptions and 97 incompletions during the regular season. His knowledge of the NFL is less than encyclopedic — more on that shortly — and he settled for a B in the most difficult class he has taken at Stanford, a course on mechanics called Engineering 14. Yet coach Jim Harbaugh is disinclined to find fault. “Andrew is the real deal,” Ne x t u p Harbaugh • Orange Bowl, says. “He is Stanford vs. the best player Virginia Tech I’ve ever been around, and • W h en: he’s even a Monday, finer young 5:30 p.m. man. There’s • T V :ESPN nothing about • Radio: KICE- him where I say I wish he AM 940 could do this, or I wish he didn’t do this. He is just like my wife: He is perfect. You wouldn’t change a thing about him.” Stanford’s passing paragon will take the national stage today night in the Orange Bowl, when No. 5 Stanford (11-1) faces No. 12 Virginia Tech (11-2). It could be Luck’s final college game — although only a sophomore, he’s touted as the likely No. 1 overall draft pick in April if he turns pro. The BCS game matches two teams climbing in the polls since early in the season. Virginia Tech opened with losses to Boise State and lower-tier James Madison, then regrouped and went undefeated in the Atlantic Coast Conference. Stanford lost in October to Oregon, then swept its final seven regular-season games, the latest surge in a remarkable turnaround under Harbaugh after going 1-11 in 2006. Luck was a high school junior in Houston when Stanford hired Harbaugh, who spent 15 seasons as an NFL quarterback. “I did not really know his name, to be honest,” Luck says with a sheepish laugh. “Don’t tell him I said that.” Soon enough, Luck accepted a scholarship offer from Harbaugh, and now the coach and quarterback have led the Cardinal to their first January bowl since 2000. Like Luck, Harbaugh might be bound for the NFL this year. “He’s got to do what’s best for him,” Luck says, “and I’ve got to do what’s best for me.” First there’s the matter of beating Virginia Tech, which happens to have a pretty good QB,

too. Senior Tyrod Taylor run for 438 yards this Like Harbaugh, his players was chosen ACC player season. And he’s tough: make Luck sound too good to be of the year, and he’s ofScrambling against true. ten compared with one California, he threw a “If there is any pick higher of his predecessors at forearm into the chin than the first pick, he would Tech, Michael Vick. of a safety and knocked go there,” cornerback Richard Taylor seeks his third him head over heels. Sherman says. “When he gets to bowl win in his final “Andrew looked at the next level, it will be amazing. college game. Andrew Luck him for a second and I don’t think people realize how “He’s a stud,” Luck then kept running,” good he is.” says. “When the play associate head coach That may be partly Luck’s breaks down, he’s making guys Greg Roman says. “It’s one of the fault; he’s hardly one for miss and making things hap- best moments I’ve ever had as a self-promotion. pen. You hate to go against guys coach, to witness that.” Luck’s a big reason Stanford like that, because you’ve always How often do Luck’s coaches has a shot at its first top-five fingot to be on your toes. You nev- get mad at him? Roman pauses ish since 1940, but teammates er know when they’re going to for 10 seconds, trying to recall say when his image comes on score.” the last time it happened. TV, he turns it off or changes the While Taylor’s mobility makes “Hmm. Mad at him? Hmm,” channel. him dangerous, he needs to Roman says. “It doesn’t happen “He’s so humble, sometimes prove himself as a pocket passer very often.” it’s really painful to hear him to succeed in the NFL, and he’s That’s partly because Luck talk,” senior Owen Marecic says confident he can do it. rarely makes mental mistakes. with a laugh. “It’s absolutely “I believe I can play in any of- A B-plus student majoring in genuine. But that’s what makes fense,” Taylor says. “Early in my architecture, Luck is interested him so great. He has all this talcareer I was more of a runner. As in building stadiums when he’s ent, but it doesn’t satisfy him in I got older, I think I proved I can done playing in them. He has the least. He’s always trying to be a dropback passer. I can also mastered Stanford’s complicated get better.” use my feet, but I always keep offense — his wristband supposSo while Luck’s not really perSteve Dykes / The Associated Press my eyes downfield looking for a edly lists 350 plays — and Har- fect, he is a perfectionist, hopArizona guard Lamont Jones (12) drives to the basket past Orreceiver.” baugh has talked of letting him ing for a win tonight to complete egon State’s Angus Brandt (12) during the first half of an NCAA Taylor will leave Blacksburg call plays next season. Stanford’s near-perfect season. college basketball game on Sunday in Corvallis. as the school’s career leader in passing yards, rushing yards by a quarterback and total offense. He’s 34-7 as a starter, and like Luck, he wins raves for his leadership. When the Hokies were 0-2, Taylor led a seniors-only meeting that stabilized the situation. “His legacy is that we’ll always be talking about Tyrod Taylor,” offensive coordinator Bryan Stinespring says. “That’s probably the best compliment I can give somebody.” Luck reaps similar praise, although it’s possible he won’t leave in 2011. The son of former West Virginia and Houston Oilers quarterback Oliver Luck A SLICK STOCK MAGAZINE CREATED TO HELP PROMOTE, says he’s trying not to think a lot ENCOURAGE, AND MAINTAIN AN ACTIVE, HEALTHY LIFESTYLE. about his future until after the Orange Bowl, but no one seems to doubt he’s ready for the NFL. “It’s a tough decision for Andrew, I’m sure,” says Stanford defensive coordinator Vic Fangio, who coached in the NFL for 24 Reach Central Oregon with information about your health related retail products and services! years. “But when he does come Distributed quarterly in more than 33,000 copies of The Bulletin and at distribution points throughout the market area, this new glossy out, I’ll be shocked if he’s not a magazine will speak directly to the consumer focused on health and healthy living – and help you grow your business and market share. very good NFL quarterback.” Luck will face a Tech defense ranked second in the nation For more information, please contact Kristin Morris, Bulletin Health/Medical Account Executive at 541-617-7855, with 22 interceptions. But in two e-mail at kmorris@bendbulletin.com, or contact your assigned Bulletin Advertising Executive at 541-382-1811. years as a starter, Luck has been intercepted only 11 times while throwing 41 touchdown passes. He threw for 3,051 yards this year, completing 70 percent of his passes, and finished second to Auburn’s Cam Newton in the Heisman Trophy race. Luck is 6-foot-4 and 235 pounds but mobile enough to

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D6 Monday, January 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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CYCLING INSIDER | RIDER PROFILE

Date

13, 20: Central Oregon Crit Series, Wednesday night criterium racing held at Summit High School in Bend; www.deschuteshoney.com.

The Bulletin interviews a Central Oregon cyclist as part of our weekly “Cycling Insider� feature, whose rotating topics include rider profiles, safety tips, local rides and gear reviews.

Continued from D1

16: Tour des Chutes, multidistance cancer fundraiser bike ride on roads throughout Central Oregon; www.tourdeschutes. org.

Local rider spotlight: Lucas Freeman Age: 38 Hometown: Bend Occupation: Project manager for a New Yorkbased training company; local cycling blogger (unpaid) Cycling preferences: Mountain biking and transportation riding Cycling background: Freeman rode bikes as a kid in Los Angeles, but it wasn’t until he attended college in the Bay Area that he first took up mountain biking as a form of recreation. Once he arrived in Central Oregon in the late 1990s, he took full advantage of the vast playground of mountain bike trails here. Since then, Freeman has increasingly used his bicycle for utility purposes. Freeman is married with two children — a second-grader and a 2-year-old. Becoming a local cycling blogger: Over the past five years, Freeman says, he began using his bike more as a form of getting around town, rather than just as a mode of recreation and exercise. “It became my way to take my daughter to school, go get groceries or run errands,� he says. He noticed that not many other parents were traveling with their kids by bike and, after asking around, discovered a perception of fear among parents about riding on the road with their kids. He submitted an article for publication in Central Oregon Family News, encouraging parents to commute to school with their kids and suggesting that the more families travel by bicycle, the safer the experience will be for all road users. But Freeman’s passion for local bicycle transportation advocacy didn’t stop with his published article. “There were always these ideas in my head,� he recalls. “Instead of trying to submit these ideas to some publication, I decided to start writing a blog, and that was the genesis.� Bike Around Bend: Last April, Freeman launched Bike Around Bend (www.bikearoundbend.com), a website focused primarily on bicycle commuting. Freeman, who updates the site with new blog posts one to four times each week, has since expanded his blog coverage to include other local cycling-related topics. But sharing information on cycling as it relates to transportation, infrastructure and livability in Bend is his chief aim. Because the site is still relatively new, Freeman says he has not received a lot of feedback on his blog topics. However, posts related to changes in local infrastructure seem to be generating the most buzz. “I get the sense that (bike commuters) don’t know where to find out about this kind of stuff,� he says. “Bend has this funny way of distributing its infrastructure information through different committees and working groups and advisory groups. All of a sudden, something gets pushed through

March 20: Wet-n-Windy 50, noncompetitive supported road ride from Bend to Powell Butte and back; www.hutchsbicycles.com.

17: Pre-Season Century, noncompetitive 100-mile supported road ride from Bend to Prineville and back; www.hutchsbicycles.com. 20, 27: Central Oregon Short Track Series, weeknight mountain bike racing series, location TBD; www.deschuteshoney. com.

4: Central Oregon Short Track Series, weeknight mountain-bike racing series, location TBD; www.deschuteshoney.com. 8: Cascade Chainbreaker, cross-country mountain bike race west of Bend, www.webcyclery.com. 11, 15: Central Oregon Time Trial Series, Wednesday night individual time trial racing, location TBD; www.deschuteshoney.com. 25: Central Oregon Crit Series, Wednesday night criterium racing series held at Summit High School in Bend; www. deschuteshoney.com. 28: Bend Don’t Brake, road bike race in east Bend with divisions for a range of abilities; www.bendontbrake.com.

Lucas Freeman stands with a laptop and his bike near his home in Bend on Wednesday. Freeman runs a blog called “Bike Around Bendâ€? that deals primarily with bicycle commuting. the channels and the people who are affected by it don’t know about it or haven’t noticed it yet. That’s what is ringing bells. “I look at myself as a bit of an aggregator.â€? Looking ahead: Freeman notes that the blog is his hobby — and that it is not a paid position. “I wish it was,â€? he adds. “There’s so much to write about. I’d love to do it full time, but I’m afraid that I wouldn’t be able to make enough money.â€? Freeman says he hopes to add some new features to Bike Around Bend, such as a tool that would allow users to buy and sell bike gear and equipment. He also plans to continue to focus on hot-button bicycle transportation topics in the community. “I’d love to do more in the coming year about businesses tied to cycling, and not just bike shops,â€? he continues. “There’s a lot of things going on centered around biking ‌ other than just recreating.â€? — Heather Clark

• Registration open for 2011 High Cascade 100: The 2011 High Cascades 100 is scheduled for July 23, and registration is now officially open. The High Cascades 100 is a 100-mile endurance mountain bike race that starts and finishes at Wanoga Sno-park, about 15 miles southwest of Bend on Century Drive. The race, held the past two years in August, is part of the National Ultra Endurance Series. Participation in the High Cascades 100 is limited to 200 riders. The fee to enter is $250, proceeds from which benefit the Central Oregon Trail Alliance. For more information on the race or to register, go to www.mudslingerevents.com. • Cog Wild announces 2011 schedule: Cog Wild, a mountain bike touring company based in Bend, has released its 2011 schedule of multiday mountain bike trips in Oregon. The mountain bike tours are guided and include transportation, camping or lodging fees, and meals. Multiday tours are limited to 12 riders. June 17-20, July 1-3, July 29-31, Aug. 12-14, Aug. 26-28, Sept. 9-11, Sept. 30-Oct. 2: Umpqua Mountain Bike Adventure, three days of mountain

biking and camping on the North Umpqua Trail in southwest Oregon. June 24-26, July 15-17, July 29-31, Aug. 12-14, Aug. 26-28, Sept. 9-11, Sept. 23-25, Oct. 7-9: Bike & Brew Weekend, ride singletrack in and around Bend by day, sample the region’s microbrews by night. July 15-17, Aug. 5-7, Sept. 2-4: Mount Hood Singletrack Tour, three days of mountain biking on trails near Mount Hood. July 22-24, Aug. 19-21, Sept. 2-4: Hood River Bike & Brew, mountain-bike riding on and near Mount Hood by day, while sampling Hood River’s pub scene by night. Aug. 5-7: Women’s Singletrack Weekend, mountain biking in and around Bend combined with yoga and massage. All guides are women. Aug. 19-21: Cascade Mountains Singletrack Camping, explore high-mountain trails and camping in the Cascades. Sept. 12-16: Fremont National Forest Epic Tour, point-to-point tour includes full days of riding remote and primitive singletrack in southeast Oregon. For more information on pricing or to make a reservation, go to www.cogwild.com or call 541385-7002. — Bulletin staff reports

E  C  Please e-mail sports event information to cyclingcentral@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

CAMPS/CLASSES/CLINICS INDOOR CYCLING CLASSES: At Rebound Sports Performance & Pilates, 143 S.W. Century Drive, Bend, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays; limited to eight riders per class; sessions at 6:30 a.m., noon, 5 p.m. and 6:15 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and at 6:30 a.m. and 8 a.m. on Saturdays; $150 for 10 classes, $270 for 20 classes, or $480 for 40 classes; www.ReboundSPL.com, 541-585-1500. CYCL’IN, POWER-BASED INDOOR CYCLING CLASSES: Taught by Cherie Touchette in a private studio in west Bend on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Sundays; progressive classes offered in eight-week sessions run 60 to 90 minutes in length; buy a session pass, or drop-ins welcome, cost is $92 to $196, depending on number and length of classes; drop-in fee is $14 to $17; 541-390-1633. CALIFORNIA TRAINING CAMP: Multiple-day riding camp near Paso Robles, Calif., supported by Rebound coaching staff of Bend; April 3-9; aimed at intermediate to advanced cyclists; $1,649, includes meals and lodging; limited to 10 riders; www.ReboundSPL.com; 541-585-1500.

organization looks ahead at 2011; 7 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 27; Central Oregon Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; www.cotamtb.com. SISTERS TRAILS ALLIANCE: Annual membership meeting; 7 p.m., Jan. 18; The Pines Clubhouse, 612 N. Brooks Camp Road, Sisters; jrahm@bendcable.com.

RIDES HUTCH’S NOON RIDE: Group road bike ride from Hutch’s Bicycles east-side location at noon on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and from Hutch’s west-side location at noon on Tuesdays, Thursdays; pace varies; www.hutchsbicycles.com; 541-382-6248; www.hutchsbicyclees.com. HUTCH’S SATURDAY RIDE: Group road bike ride begins at 10 a.m. Saturdays from Hutch’s Bicycles east-side Bend location, 820 N.E. Third St.; approximately 40 miles; vigorous pace; 541-382-6248; hutchsbicycles.com.

OUT OF TOWN MISCELLANEOUS DESCHUTES COUNTY BICYCLE & PEDESTRIAN ADVISORY COMMITTEE: Monthly meeting addresses bicycle and pedestrian safety issues, open to the public; Thursday, Jan. 6, Bend City Hall, Council Chamber; www.bikecentraloregon.org. CENTRAL OREGON TRAIL ALLIANCE MEETING: Monthly meeting of the local mountain bike trails

CYCLE OREGON KICKOFF PARTY: 2011 Cycle Oregon route is revealed live at the Nike Campus in Beaverton and online; Tuesday, Feb. 8; registration opens the same day for the weekend ride in July and the weeklong ride in September; 800-292-5367; www.cycleoregon.com. WORST DAY OF THE YEAR RIDE: Road bicycling tour of 18 or 45 miles with multiple food stops in and around Portland; Sunday, Feb. 13; 915 S.E. Hawthorne Ave.; $35 for adults, $10 for children; www.worstdayride.com.

23: High Cascades 100, riders in endurance mountain bike race cover 100 miles, starts and finishes at Wanoga Sno-park; www.mudslingerevents.com. 31: Lakes Loop Ride, noncompetitive and supported 50-mile road ride that loops around Mount Bachelor, www.hutchsbicycles.com.

August

May

C  B

Locally

22-24: Cascade Stage Race, four-stage, three-day OBRA-sanctioned race for amateur men; www.cascadestagerace.com.

April

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

19-24: Cascade Cycling Classic, nationally ranked six-day stage race for pro and elite men and women; www.cascadeclassic.org.

3, 10: Central Oregon Crit Series, Wednesday night criterium racing held at Summit High School in Bend; www.deschuteshoney.com. 13: Oregon Bicycle Racing Association’s Criterium Championships, criterium races crown state champs in numerous divisions, location TBD; www.obra.org. 20: Mt. Bachelor Hill Climb Time Trial, individual time trial from Bend to the parking lot at Mt. Bachelor’s Sunrise Lodge; www.mbsef.org. 27: Central Oregon Time Trial Series, Wednesday night individual time trial racing, location TBD; www.deschuteshoney. com.

29: Sisters Stampede, cross-country mountain bike race utilizes the Peterson Ridge trail system near Sisters; www. sistersstampede.com.

31-Sept. 4: USA Cycling Masters Road National Championships, amateur cyclists age 30 and older compete for national titles in criterium, road and time trial events in Bend; www.usacycling.org.

29: Southside Ride, noncompetitive and supported 60-mile road ride from Sunriver to Twin Lakes and back; www. hutchsbicycles.com.

September

TBA: Spring Fling, annual volunteer work day with the Central Oregon Trail Alliance (COTA) readies mountain bike trails for spring and summer riding; www.cotamtb.com.

1, 8, 22, 29: Thrilla Cylcocross Series, weeknight cyclocross racing held on mostly dirt circuit near Summit High School, Bend; www.webcyclery.com.

June

4: Hutch’s 100K, noncompetitive and supported 62-mile group road ride begins and ends at Tumalo State Park; www. hutchsbicycles.com.

1, 15: Central Oregon Time Trial Series, Wednesday night individual time trial racing, location TBD; www.deschuteshoney.com.

10-11: High Cascades 24, 24-hour endurance mountain bike race for individuals or teams of two or four, www.mudslingerevents.com.

8, 22, 29: Central Oregon Crit Series, Wednesday night criterium racing held at Summit High School in Bend; www. deschutes honey.com.

17: USA Cycling Marathon Mountain Bike National Championships, professional and amateur riders compete for mountain bike national titles in the 50-mile distance, starts and finishes in Bend’s Old Mill District; www.usacycling.org.

12: Double Dawg Tandem Ride, noncompetitive and supported 65-mile road ride from Bend to Smith Rock State Park and back, for two-person tandems and single riders; www. hutchsbicycles.com. 20-26: Commute Options Week, communitywide programs and activities promote use of bicycles for transportation; www.commuteoptions.org.

25-26: Sisters Mountain Bike Festival, supported mountain bike rides on Sisters-area trails; www.sistersmountainbikefestival.com.

October

24: NorthWest Crossing Criterium, Friday night criterium racing in Bend’s NorthWest Crossing neighborhood; www. deschuteshoney.com.

TBA: Biketoberfest, annual fall volunteer work day with COTA to repair/maintain area mountain bike trails; www.cotamtb. com.

25: Tumalo Circuit, road bike race held on roads in Tumalo; www.deschuteshoney.com.

14-16: Bend’s Big Fat Tour, noncompetitive and fully supported mountain bike rides on singletrack across Central Oregon; www.bendsbigfattour.com.

26: Pickett’s Charge!, cross-country mountain bike race on trails near Wanoga Sno-park, www.sunnysidesports.com.

July 2-3: Bend Super D, 8-mile mostly downhill mountain bike race starts from Wanoga Sno-park, part of statewide Oregon Super D Series; www.oregonsuperd.com. 4: Firecracker 100, noncompetitive and supported Independence Day ride from Bend to Prineville and back; www. webcyclery.com. 6, 27: Central Oregon Time Trial Series, Wednesday night individual time trial racing, location TBD; www.deschuteshoney.com. 9-10: High Desert Omnium, three-event points race includes a time trial, criterium and road race; www.highdesertomnium.com.

29-30: Cross Crusade Series, nationally recognized cyclocross racing with numerous age and ability divisions in Bend’s Old Mill District; www.crosscrusade.com.

2011 dates TBA Bend Bicycle Film Festival, collection of locally produced cycling films shown at the Tower Theatre; www.bendbicyclefilmfestival.com. Crossaflixion Cup, series of three cyclocross races for all ages/ abilities held on Saturdays in September, October and/or November, www.crossaflixioncup.com. Blitz to the Barrel, Super-D-style invitation-only pro/elite mountain bike race from Wanoga Sno-park to 10 Barrel Brewpub in Bend; men’s race in July, women’s race in August, industry-rider’s race in September.

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Fridays In


THE BULLETIN • Monday, January 3, 2011 E1

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263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Cockapoo Mix -

A Special New Year family member! (2) 8-week black & white pups. Will be under 12 lbs. $175. 541-350-1684

Maremma Guard Dog pups, purebred, great dogs, $300 each, 541-546-6171. POODLES AKC Toy. Also Pom-a-Poos or Chi-Poos. B&W, colors. 541-325-6212

Dachshunds, AKC, mini’s, (4) females: 1 black & silver; 3 choc Pug Mix Adults (3), spayed/ neutered, for personal com& tan. $375. Pics available. panions only, small re-hom541-420-6044, 541-447-3060 ing fee, 541-389-0322. Pug Mix Puppies (3), raised for personal companions, $150 ea. OBO, 541-389-0322 or 541-420-5228.

208

Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

2 male Sugar Gliders (flying squirrels) come with everything, $200. 541-604-4333. 55 Gallon corner fish tank, $200 OBO. 541-389-9268 AKC Registered English Bulldog Stud Service Comes from good bloodlines, very healthy. If interested please call (541) 610-5002. AKC Yellow Labradors 4/males for more info please visit us at www.coldcreekfarms.com 541-942-1059. AUSSIE PUPPIES, Mini & Toy, $250-$300. 1st shots, tails docked. Tris & Merles, ready 1/12. 541-420-9694 Australian Cattle Dogs / Heelers Great temperament, herding instinct. 541-279-4133 Australian Shepherd, toys & minis, 2 litters family raised $450-$600. 541-475-1166

Black Lab/Walker Hound Pups. 11 wks, 1st shots & wormed. 3 @ $50 ea. 541-382-7567

Cavalier King Charles Spaniels males $1200; females $1500 AKC reg. 541-382-7614 ww.companioncavaliers.com CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES 8-week-old lovable purebred male & female. Perfect gift for everyday $125-$150 541-279-1829

English bulldog, AKC, born 10/24/2010. Male, first shot, $1800, Super cute pup, 541-536-6262.

ROTTWEILLER PUPPIES 5 male, 1 female. $400. Won’t last long! 541-777-9392 Frenchie/Pug puppy. Last one. Adorable, smart, stout male. $700. 541-548-0747 or 541-279-3250. German Shepherd pups, 6 wks $350-$450. 541-410-7388 www.megaquest.us

Shih-poo puppy, 1 adorable female left. This sweet girl is hypo-allergenic, family raised. $350. Kelly, 541-489-3237 Siamese Kittens (4) purebred, M/F, Seal & Lilac point, $125 ea. 541-318-3396

German Shorthair Pointer A K C , champ lines, 2 females, $250. 541-550-9992.

Welsh Corgi, 7 wks, very cute & playful, 1st shot, dewclaws, tail done $350. 541.350-3981

210 Kittens still available! Cat Rescue, Adoption & Foster Team Furniture & Appliances will be open Fri. 12/31 & Sun. 1/2 from 1-4 PM !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty! (closed New Years). Lots of A-1 Washers & Dryers nice cats & kittens, low $125 each. Full Warranty. adoption fee. Altered, shots, Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s ID chip, more. Visit @ 65480 dead or alive. 541-280-7355. 78th St, Bend, 541-389-8420, 541-598-5488. Also avail. @ Appliances, new & recondifoster home, 541-815-7278 tioned, guaranteed. OverSee www.craftcats.org stock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418 LAB PUPS AKC, titled parents, FC/AFC, Blackwater Rudy is Full size pillowtop mattress, grand sire. Deep pedigreed exc cond, stored in plastic, performance/titles, OFA hips $150. 503-933-0814, Bend & elbows. 541-771-2330 www.royalflushretrievers.com GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a gaLabradoodles, Australian rage sale and don't forget to Imports - 541-504-2662 advertise in classified! www.alpen-ridge.com 385-5809. Labrador pups AKC, choco- Queen size Pillowtop mattress, late, yellow, hips guaranteed, exc cond, stored in plastic. $150-$450. 1-541-954-1727 $200. 503-933-0814, Bend Malamute/lab mix puppy for sale, female, black with white markings, 12 weeks old, $100, to loving home 541-923-1180

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266

270

Heating and Stoves

Lost and Found

Samsung 52” box big screen, 2006 excellent cond. Must sell, $400. 541-480-2652.

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call

541-598-4643.

WANTED: Reel to reel tape recorder, in excellent cond only, to $75. 541-318-5294

255

Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

Travel/Tickets Disneyland (4) 6-day Park Hoppers. Regular $216 each; sell $195 each. 541-419-2753 Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

212

Misc. Items

Antiques & Collectibles

BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

267

Fuel and Wood

258

260

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash

215

541-389-6655

Coins & Stamps

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191.

WANTED TO BUY

US & Foreign Coin & Currency collections, accum. Pre-1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling flatware. Gold coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex & vintage watches. No collection too large or small. Bedrock Rare Coins 541-549-1658

242

Exercise Equipment ParaBody 400 universal style weight machine. Includes Lat bar, leg press, shoulder and bench press. Very good cond. $500. 541-317-8985

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks! Ad must include price of item

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

246

265

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Building Materials

Beretta AL 391 Urika Sporting Clays 12 gauge, 30 in. barrel and 6 Briley Spectrum choke tubes, 1000 rounds shot $1200 OBO, 541-771-0301 CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Glock 9mm semi-auto pistol, 3 clips, ammo, box, lilke new, $500 OBO. 541-647-8931 GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

HANDGUN SAFETY CLASS for concealed license. NRA, Police Firearms Instructor, Lt. Gary DeKorte Wed. Jan. 12, 6:30-10:30 pm. Call Kevin, Centwise, for reservations $40. 541-548-4422 Remington .22 long rifle, mdl 597 with scope - synthetic stock, brand new with box. Shot 1 set rounds. $200. 541-382-2593. Ruger Blackhawk .357 Mag, 6½” $400. Verona SX401S 12 ga, NIB, $550. 541-771-5648

Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746

20 LOGS, 8”X20’ perfect for fence or accent, $1 per foot. 541-420-6235 Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

266

Heating and Stoves Harman Stove Co. pellet stove model #PP38. Super charger setting & electric blower. Motor recently serviced. Glass front. 0.75-5.5 lbs/hr. Will heat 1500 sq ft. Approved for mobile homes; UL listed. $550. 541.383.8077 strideon@silverstriders.com

LOST 12/24/10 female Blue Heeler mix, 5th St. and Lava Drive LaPine, not wearing a collar but has microchip. name is Patches. 30# 3 years, white and brown spots. (541) 536-5621. (541) -728-4397,( 541) 536-3689.

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE!

To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

• Receipts should include,

name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT dry pine, $150 for 1 cord or $290 for 2, Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Dry Lodgepole For Sale $150 per cord rounds; $170 per cord split. 35 years’ service to Central Oregon. Call 541-480-5601

SPLIT, DRY LODGEPOLE DELIVERY INCLUDED! $175/CORD. Call for half-cord prices! Leave message, 541-923-6987

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663 SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

270

Lost and Found Found around December 20 at the Redmond Airport Terminal Secure Hold area, one Ipod in case and accessories, call to identify. Gail Bloom, Airport Office Assistant, Roberts Field, 541-504-3497. FOUND Diabetes Testing Kit, SE Bend 12/25. Call to identify, 541-390-7368.

CAMPING GEAR of any sort: d Used tents, sleeping bags, tarps, blankets.

WARM CLOTHING d Rain Gear, Boots

Please drop off your donations at the BEND COMMUNITY CENTER 1036 NE FIFTH STREET (312-2069)

Questions: Call Ken Boyer, 389-3296, or Don Auxier, 383-0448 PLEASE HELP. YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit

KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

9 7 7 0 2 341

Farm Market

300 308

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Prices Reduced: Quarterhorses, females $300, males & geldings $500, 541-382-7995

Farm Equipment and Machinery

FIND IT! Tractor, Allis Chalmers, diesel, BUY IT! 4X4, loader, rear blade, PTO new tires, $6500 OBO, SELL IT! 541-536-3889,541-420-6215 The Bulletin Classiieds

286

BEND’S HOMELESS NEED OUR HELP

d

Found Jack Russell Terrier mix, female 5-8 yrs? Powell Butte Hwy, 12/26. 541-280-5823

Sales Northeast Bend

The cold weather is upon us and sadly there are still over 2,000 folks in our community without permanent shelter, living in cars, makeshift camps, getting by as best they can. The following items are badly needed to help them get through the winter:

d

O r e g o n

Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers. Thank you.

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

9mm, Ruger P95 S/S, like new, $425. Winchester 94 pre ‘64 30/30, $450. 541-647-8931

German Shepherd Pups, A K C , White, absolutely gorgeous, born October 1st. $400 OBO. 541-536-6167.

B e n d

TV, Stereo and Video

Alpaca Yarn, various colors/ blends/sparkle. 175yds/skein $7.50-8.50 ea. 541-385-4989

http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com

A v e . ,

210

Crafts and Hobbies

Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537

C h a n d l e r

Furniture & Appliances

240

English Bulldogs AKC, just 2 male Brindles left! Exclnt health, $1500. 541-290-0026 Frenchie Faux puppies, excellent! $750. Ready at 6 weeks on 12/31. 541-447-0210

S . W .

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

325

Farmers Column

358

Hay, Grain and Feed Barn stored Alfalfa $9 per bale. In Culver. 541-480-8185

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin Bluegrass Straw mid-size 3x3, $25/bale; Orchard grass hay mid-size 3x3 $45/bale. Volume discounts; delivery available. 541-480-8648. Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

375

Meat & Animal Processing 292

Sales Other Areas DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

4 Black Angus Steers, 1000 lbs. left. Buy it by the 1/4, 1/2 or whole. 1 was butchered last week. 3 will be butchered this week. Fed alfalfa for over 2 mo. and grain for over 2 mo. Great shape. Great tasting meat. 541-382-6983

Angus Beef, 1/2 or whole, grain fed, no hormones $3.44/lb., hanging weight, cut & wrap included, please call 541-383-2523.


E2 Monday, January 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Sales

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Employment

400 421

Schools and Training Area VII Plumbers JATC MA 7005 will be accepting applications for the plumbing apprenticeship applicant pool list. Please submit request for an application packet to apprenticeshipservices@ gmail.com TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

470

Domestic & In-Home Positions Live-in house/dog keeper. Mature, full-time. $1000/mo. + room/board. Valid ODL. Sisters area. 541-815-8855

476

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Dental -Front Office 4 Days a week, dental assistant preferred. Drop off resume at 2078 NE Professional Ct., Bend. 541-382-2281. Jack Miller, DMD Branden Ferguson, DDS Food Service: Quick Service Restaurant, Exp. Required, Independent worker, & capable in all positions including: Cook, counter, prepping. Wage DOE, Box 16303658, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708

Night Auditor

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today! General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

The Ranch is accepting applications for Night Auditors. Accounting background, computer skills, 10-key and basic math computation preferred. This dependable individual must be enthusiastic, customer service oriented, with a positive attitude . Duties include reconciling department ledgers and running daily reports. May be required to perform front desk duties including taking reservations and checking people in/out of the Ranch. Benefits include swimming, golf, food and merchandise discounts. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE

Employment Opportunities Crew Leader needed to ensure the safety, productivity, and cohesion of Heart of Oregon young adult crews. Experience in crew supervision and operating equipment with technical skills in forestry and environmental conservation required. Drug test, reference, ODL, and background check required. FT, year-round position with benefits. To apply, send cover letter and resume to katie.condit@heartoforegon. org by 5p.m. Jan 10th. No calls please. CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Glazier -- Residential: Must have 5 years experience & clean driving record, Shower doors & mirrors a plus. Pay DOE. Call 541-382-2500. Maintenance Supervisor. Salary DOE. Please send resume to: Precision Lumber Co., 3800 Crates Way, The Dalles, OR 97058.

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses -

The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

Sales

ATTENTION

WORK PART TIME HOURS, FULL TIME PAY

Wanna Make Bank??? AND HAVE FUN?

NEED A JOB? If You Can Answer YES To These Questions, WE WANT YOU

No Experience Necessary No Car, No Problem, Only 30 Hours Per Week PM Shifts & Weekends Available

1. Do you talk too much? 2. Do you like to have fun? 3. Do you want to make a lot of $$? 4. Are you available Wed.-Fri., 4pm-9pm & all day Sat. & Sun.?

Call Right Now 541-306-6346

Work part time with full time pay!

Independent Contractor

DON'T LAG, CALL NOW! 541-306-6346

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

SALES / FINANCE

Big Country RV,

Central Oregon’s largest RV dealer, seeks candidates for the following openings:

• RV Sales

Now expanding our RV Sales team! Product & sales training provided. Progressive commission plan to 35%, bonus plan, vac pay & benefits. Unlimited earning potential.

Independent Contractor SOFTWARE - Embedded Firmware & Windows Software Engineer: 2 full-time positions with local high-tech manufacturer of over 20 years. BS in Computer Science, Computer Engineering or Electrical Engineering; 5+ years experience. Programming in C for embedded processors, C++ and MFC for Windows applications. Competitive Salary + benefits. Resume to: jobs@DENTInstruments.com

• RV F&I Manager

2 years’ industry experience required. Full-time; Saturdays required. Exceptional pay and benefits.

• RV Sales Manager

Industry experience required. Full-time, weekends required. Exceptional pay and benefits. For consideration, please email your resume to bcrvinfo@yahoo.com The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Finance & Business

500 507

Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

573

Business Opportunities

632 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Rentals

600 604

Independent Contractor

Secure 10x20 Storage, in SE Bend, insulated, 24-hr access, $95/month, Call Rob, 541-410-4255. 605

Roommate Wanted

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

&

Call Today &

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Prineville H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

We are looking for a System Administrator to join our team of talented technicians. This is an ideal job for someone with strong technical aptitude and a degree of server experience who enjoys working in a team atmosphere. Who are we? We are a large family-owned newspaper chain with an established commitment to our customers and employees. Well placed in a beautiful town full of outdoor and recreational opportunities, we offer a work environment that is enjoyable and challenging. Responsibilities: Implement and maintain systems running on Linux/UNIX, Mac, and Windows workstations and servers, Experience in cloud hosting a plus. Manage web, file, storage, DNS, DB & version control servers. Will respond to helpdesk support requests from end users. Work on project-related tasks to deploy new systems or conduct maintenance. Handle day-to-day data backup and recovery practices. Support 802.11 networks including rollout, access control, security assessment, intrusion detention, packet capturing, and space planning. Continually investigate new technology for securing hosts on the network and monitoring activity. Participate in software development/design tasks. Participate in an on-call rotation after hours and weekends. Must be able to routinely lift 50 pounds or more. Non-Technical: We're a social bunch at Western Communications and like to keep work fun and lighthearted. The ideal applicant is a good communicator, enjoys a challenge and likes to laugh. Please send resume to resume@bendbulletin.com

Share 3 Bdrm 2 bath Prineville home. $350/mo + ½ electricity; $200 dep. Everything else paid including satellite TV. Pets/smokers OK upon approval. 541-233-6615 Share House in DRW, $400/mo incl. utils, $200 dep., 541-420-5546.

FIRST MONTH HALF-OFF! 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex. NEW CARPET & PAINT THROUGHOUT! W/D included. No smoking. No Pets. 1yr. lease. $795/mo. + $945 sec. 20076 Beth. 541-382-3813 The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634 1 & 2 bdrms Available starting at $575. Reserve Now! Limited Availability.

Alpine Meadows

2 bdrm., 2 bath apartments W/D included, gas fireplaces 339 SE Reed Met. Rd., Bend Call about Move-In Specials 541-312-4222

640

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend Enjoy living at 179 SW Hayes Ave. Spacious 2 Bdrm townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rent starts at $525 mo. 541-382-0162; 541-420-2133;541-420-0133 Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928.

Happy holidays! Enjoy living at 179 SW Hayes Ave. Spacious 2 Bdrm townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rent starts at $525 mo. 541-382-0162; 541-420-2133 541-420-0133

** Pick your Special **

2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495

Carports & Heat Pumps. Pet Friendly & No App. Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

642

642

1104 NW 7th St., #22 1 bdrm., 1 bath, $425 No credit checks. 1st & last only. Available now. Please call 541-788-3480.

2Bdrm 1bath, $540 mo. +$500 dep. W/D hkup, dishwasher, garage, W/S/G pd. Fenced yard, close to schools/shopping. 1-503-757-1949

636

2 bedroom, 2 bath next to park, Appliances avail. including big screen TV! 3 units available. $695-$750 month. 541-280-7781.

Fully furnished loft apt.

on Wall Street in Bend. All utilities paid and parking. Call 541-389-2389 for appt.

Nice, quiet 2 bdrm, new windows, W/G/S & cable paid, laundry on-site, cat OK, $575/mo, $500 dep. Call 541-389-9867; 541-383-2430

RIVER FALLS APARTMENTS LIVE ON THE RIVER WALK DOWNTOWN

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

648

Houses for Rent General

Bulletin is now offering a Apt./Multiplex Redmond The LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE

Lovely 2 bdrm, private patio, small, quiet complex, W/S/G paid, no smoking, $525+ dep, 1000 NE Butler Mkt. Rd. Call 541-633-7533.

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

631

STONE CREEK APARTMENTS

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

630

Condo / Townhomes For Rent

638

541-330-0719

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Rooms for Rent STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

Apt./Multiplex General Apt./Multiplex SE Bend Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Storage Rentals

System Administrator

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

ASK ABOUT OUR New Year Special! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, non-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

2 Bdrm townhouse, 2.5 bath, office, fenced yard w/deck, garage. 1244 “B” NE Dawson. $750 dep. $775/mo., W/S/G paid, pets possible. 541-617-8643,541-598-4932

1 bdrm. apt. fully furnished in fine 50s style. 1546 NW 1st St., $780 + $680 dep. Nice pets welcomed. 541-382-0117

A Westside Condo at Fireside Lodge, 2 bdrm, 1 bath, $595/mo. Wood stove, W/S/G paid. W/D hookup 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

River & Mountain Views! 930 NW Carlon St., 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, W/S/G paid, W/D hook-up, $650/mo. $600 dep. No pets. 541-280-7188.

Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

DUPLEX SW Redmond 2 bdrm 2 bath, garage w/opener. 1300 sq ft, w/d hkup, fenced yard, deck, w/s/g pd. $700 mo + dep. 541-604-0338

Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

Westside Townhouse 2 bdrm, 1½ bath, water and garbage removal included. No pets. $575 mo. 541-480-2092.

Like New Duplex. Nice neighborhood. 2 Bdrm 2 bath, 1-car garage, fenced, central heat & AC. Fully landscaped, $700+dep. 541-545-1825.

Call about Our Specials! Studios to 3 bedroom units from $395 to $550 • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 managed by

GSL Properties

Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2 car garage, bonus room, deck, fridge, gas stove, new paint, carpet & vinyl. $975/mo. Pets neg. Mike 541-408-8330. CLEAN 2 bdrm/1bath, new carpets, hardwood floors, gas heat & water, finished garage, storage shed, $775 mo. See at 1230 NE Viking. Clean 3 Bdrm 2 Bath, new paint/carpet, 1262 sq ft, $900/mo. Near hosp; must see! No pets/smoking. 3023 NE Byers Ct. 541-410-0794

NOTICE:

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified


THE BULLETIN • Monday, January 3, 2011 E3

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 650

687

870

881

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Commercial for Rent/Lease

Boats & Accessories

Travel Trailers

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend

Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft

827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404 Office/Warehouse Space, 6400 sq.ft., (3) 12x14 doors, on Boyd Acres Rd, 541-382-8998. The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

693

$1000 Mo. Newer immaculate 3/2.5, 1560 sq.ft., dbl. garage 1st & last, pet neg. 19827 Powers Road. 503-363-9264,503-569-3518

2/2+den, mfd. home, large lot, fenced yard, W/D hookup, shop/storage building, RV parking on site, forced air heat pump, no smoking, pet neg, 60918 Alpine Dr, $750 +$750 dep., 541-389-0209. ROMAINE VILLAGE MOBILES 61004 Chuckanut. 1900 sq.ft. 2 bdrm, 2 bath, 1/2 acre, $850. Pet OK. Call Jim, 541-388-3209.

658

Houses for Rent Redmond 1 Bdrm, 1 bath, 547 1/2 NW 7th, $550; 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 626 1/2 SW 8th, $595; 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 135 NW 10th St., $650, 541-815-1709, CopperDog PM. 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, Summerfield location, near 97, fresh interior paint, new Pergo, fully fenced. 1st & dep., $850. 503-997-7870. 4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room, w/woodstove, new carpet/paint, single garage w/opener. $795/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room, w/woodstove, new carpet/paint, single garage w/opener. $795/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 Adorable duplex in Canyon Rim Village, 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath. all appl., includes gardener. Reduced to $749/mo. 541-408-0877. Adorable duplex in Canyon Rim Village, 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath. all appl., includes gardener. Reduced to $749/mo. 541-408-0877.

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver A newer 3/2 mfd. home, 1755 sq.ft., living room, family room, new paint, private .5 acre lot near Sunriver, $795. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803.

664

Houses for Rent Furnished RIVERFRONT: walls of windows with amazing 180 degree river view with dock, canoe, piano, bikes, covered BBQ, $1250. 541-593-1414

671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent Country Quiet, 6 mi. SE. of Bend, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, wood fireplace, large yard, no pets/ smoking, $550/mo.+dep., avail. now, 541-317-8744.

On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft., mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1295. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803 On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft., mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1295. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

Real Estate For Sale

700 705

Real Estate Services * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

4628 SW 21st St., Redmond - 2250 sq ft office & warehouse. 15¢/sq ft for 1st 6 mos., + $300 cleaning dep. Avail Jan 15. 541-480-9041

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

Health forces sale, 1900 mi., 1K mi. service done, black on black, detachable windshield, back rest & luggage rack, $13,900, Mario, 541-549-4949, 619-203-4707

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $16,900 OBO. 541-944-9753

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005,

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) 745

Homes for Sale

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

Kendon stand-up motorcycle trailer, torsion bar suspension, easy load and unload, used seldom and only locally. $1700 OBO. Call 541-306-3010.

Need help ixing stuff

762

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

775

827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404

Mobile for Sale, $15,999 3 Bdrm, 2 bath. Will finance; payment $435/month; will own in 4 yrs. 253-241-4152

^^^ HOLIDAY

SPECIAL ^^^

19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

1/2 OFF ALL MOVE-IN RENTS w/Lease Agreements COMPUTERIZED PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-0053

880

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417. Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

Motorhomes

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718 Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $40,000 OBO/terms, 541-948-2126.

•Cute Apt. in Central Location - 1 Bdrm/1Bath with private fenced back yard and patio. No pets. $425 includes WSG. • Near Downtown. Large 2 Bdrm/1 Bath Apts. W/D hookups. Small fenced yard. End Units. Pets ??? $495 WST included. • Close to Pioneer Park - NW Side. Private 2 Bdrm/1 bath Upstairs Apt. w/Balcony. On-Site Laundry. Off Street Parking. $495 mo. Includes WSG. • Near Old Mill District Spacious, secure 2 Bdrm/1 Bath upstairs unit. On-site laundry. $495 mo. incl. CABLE + WST. 20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 • Spacious 2 Bdrm/1 Bath apts. Off-street parking. On-site H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. laundry. Near hospital. Just $525 includes WST. cond., stored indoors for • Furnished Mt. Bachelor Condo - 1 Bdrm/1 bath + Murphy life $11,900 OBO. bed. $550 includes WST/Wireless 541-379-3530 • Cheerful SE Townhome - Vaulted ceilings, 2 Bdrm/2 Bath. W/D included. No Pets. $550 W/S Included. Ads published in the "Boats" • Charming, cozy 2 Bdrm/1 Bath cottage in central location. classification include: Speed, Fenced backyard. $625 per month. fishing, drift, canoe, house • Vaulted Ceilings. Cute 2 Bdrm/2 Bath NE Duplex, W/D Hook and sail boats. For all other ups. Gas Fireplace. Single Garage. Private deck off master. types of watercraft, please Single Level. Pets? $675 includes WS. see Class 875. 541-385-5809 • Sweet Cedar Creek Condo - 2 Master Bdrm Suites + 1/2 bath downstairs. W/D included. Dbl. garage. Wood burning fireplace. Small pets only. $750 includes WST. • 4 Bdrm/2 Bath in NE - Fenced back yard. RV parking.Sgl. GENERATE SOME excitement in level. Sgl. garage. Gas forced air heat. Pets ok. $950 per mo. your neigborhood. Plan a ga•Sun Meadow. 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath. Media room downstairs. rage sale and don't forget to Large dbl. garage. 1579 sq. ft., W/D included. $995 per mo. advertise in classified! 385-5809. ***** FOR ADD’L PROPERTIES ***** CALL 541-382-0053 or See Website www.computerizedpropertymanagement.com

932

933

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

VW Super Beetle 1974

Wagon

1957,

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP, 90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240.

Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552.

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

14X6 UTILITY TRAILER $1200. Call Jimmy, 541-771-0789

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $122,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Travel Queen 34’ 1987 65K miles, oak cabinets, exc interior. Great extra bdrm! Reduced to $5000. 541-480-3286

Chevy 1/2 Ton 1995, 4X4, 350 engine, auto, cold A/C, new tires, brakes, shocks, & muffler, w/ camper shell, runs great. $4000. 541-706-1568

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227. Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K mi., $8395 541-598-5111. FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

931

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft &

Pickup

hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

FORD pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686 Ford Ranger 2004 Super Cab, XLT, 4X4, V6, 5-spd, A/C bed liner, tow pkg, 120K Like New! KBB Retail: $10,000 OBO 360-990-3223

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

935 Chevy Silverado 1500 1988, 4x4, step side, tow pkg., low mi. at 98K, A/C, great tries, brakes, new rear end, runs extra super, $3250 OBO, 541-548-7396 Chevy Silverado 1500 4x4, 2000, full size, Reg cab w/ long bed, white, V6, 4.3L, 20 mpg, auto trans, ABS, AC, dual airbags, tow pkg, runs & drives excellent, maint’d extremely well; non-smoker. Recent brks, bearing, tune- up, tires, trans & coolant flush. 183K mi. $4700 obo. 541-633-6953

DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2700. 541-322-6261 DODGE RAM 1990 3500, excellent condition, 12,000 miles, $5600. 541-318-4835.

1969,

152K mi. on chassis, 4 spd. transmission, 250 6 cyl. engine w/60K, new brakes & master cylinder, $2500. Please call 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800.

Mercedes-Benz 280c 1975 145k, good body & mechanical, fair interior, can email pics. $2950. 541-548-3628

Sport Utility Vehicles CHEVY BLAZER 2000, ZR2 LS 4x4, 130k miles, 90% tread left on $2000 worth of tires. Under KBB at $4995. Can be seen at Redmond’s Hwy 97 Park & Sell. 541-546-6838.

Chrysler 2005 Pacifica AWD, leather, video sys, 3.5 liter V6, loaded, 21,500 mi, $13,950. 541-382-3666

Ford Excursion 4x4 2000. Nice Red, like new, only 68k, seats 9. Just $16,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

FORD EXPLORER 1992

READY FOR SNOW! All Wheel Drive! 5 spd, loaded with all power equipment, sound system. All weather tires. Runs and drives good, Only $1800. 909-570-7067.

Dodge Ram 2001, short Infinity QX4 1998, luxury SUV Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

933

Pickups

Ford F-350 Crew 4x4 2002. Triton V-10, 118k, new tires, wheels, brakes. Very nice. Just $14,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

925

C-10 Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean

New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3750 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

Utility Trailers

Antique and Classic Autos

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns.

KOMFORT 27’ 5th wheel 2000 trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide, stored inside, in excellent condition. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more. Priced to sell at $59,500! 541-317-9185

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $4850, 541-410-3425. MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all original, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $5800. 541-330-0852.

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very

bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

FORD 350 LARIAT 2002 4x4 crewcab, 7.3 diesel 135k, dually, matching canopy, towing special, gooseneck, too! Orig. 63-year-old construction owner needs money, will trade, $17,500. (541) 815-3639 or (541) 508-8522

4WD, loaded, leather, 80K miles, $7500. CORRECTED PHONE # = 541-815-4052

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl, 5-spd., 4x4, good cond, price reduced to $7950, 541-593-4437.

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, auto, reduced to $14,999 obo 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

Ford F250 1986, 4x4, X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871.

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 1998, like new, low mi., just in time for the snow, great cond., $7000, 541-536-6223.

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $11,500. 541-408-2111

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2 slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Adult Care Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

541-322-7253

MONTANA 2000 36’

3 slides, washer and dryer, new A/C. Very nice & livable! $12,500. 541-923-7351.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 881

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

932

Antique and Classic Autos

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

Grumman AA-5 Traveler, 1/4 interest, beautiful, clean plane, $9500, 619-822-8036 www.carymathis.blogspot.com

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

Chevy

932

Boats & Accessories

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

Fifth Wheels

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Motorcycle Trailer

The Bulletin Classified ***

Sisters, turnkey horse setup, 4 acres, great barn, 3 pastures, updated house, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, pond,irrigation, RV pad w/hook ups, $575,000, 541-549-9945.

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

882

900

(4) Studded Snows 215/45R17, like new, $375. (were $700 new). 503-747-9170

around the house? Please check your ad on the Call A Service Professional first day it runs to make sure and ind the help you need. it is correct. Sometimes inwww.bendbulletin.com structions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., reduced day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunto $3000, also boots, helmet, day; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. tires, avail., 541-410-0429 If we can assist you, please call us: 870

Homes with Acreage

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $1995 for all. Bill 541-480-7930.

Autos & Transportation

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to 865 the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise ATVs "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an inPOLARIS PHOENIX tention to make any such 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new preference, limitation or disrear end, new tires, runs crimination." Familial status excellent, $1800 OBO, includes children under the 541-932-4919. age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing YAMAHA 1998 230CC mocustody of children under 18. tor, 4WD, used as utility This newspaper will not vehicle. excellent running knowingly accept any advercondition. $2000 OBO. tising for real estate which is 541-923-4161 in violation of the law. Our 541-788-3896 readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll Yamaha 350 Big Bear 1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks free telephone number for front & rear, strong machine, the hearing impaired is excellent condition. $2,200 1-800-927-9275. 541-382-4115,541-280-7024 ***

CHECK YOUR AD

Watercraft

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $19,999 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

Real Estate Wanted Cash For West Side Homes: Fast Closings Call Pat Kelley, Kelley Realty 541-382-3099

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

875

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010,

713

385-5809

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease

800

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including 1/1 cottage, woodstove, garage, utilities. 541-317-8717 deck, yard w/trees, private end of cul-de-sac, Bear Downtown Redmond Creek/15th. Avail. now. $650 Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. 1st/last/dep. 541-330-0053 $650/mo + utils; $650 security deposit. 425 SW Sixth 656 St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848

Houses for Rent SW Bend

Boats & RV’s

Travel Trailers TERRY 27’ 5th wheel 1995 with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great condition and hunting rig, $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105

885

Canopies and Campers

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437. Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, exc. cond., $13,900 or take over payments, 541-390-2504

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

RENT-A-DAUGHTER Connecting caregivers with clients. Caregivers avail. 4 hours $45. Call office for scheduling. 541-350-7391.

Barns M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

Excavating

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523.

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

S n o w

R e m o v al

H o li d a y

L i g h ti n g

Reliable 24 Hour Service • Driveways • Walkways • Parking Lots • Roof tops • De-icing Have plow & shovel crew awaiting your call! Multiple Options • Interior • Exterior • Landscape

Christmas Tree Delivery

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling •Decks •Window/Door Replacement •Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179

Same Day Response

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY

Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/410-6945

Painting, Wall Covering MARTIN JAMES

European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC

541-388-2993

Snow Removal d SNOW REMOVAL! d

Home Improvement When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

d LARGE OR SMALL, d WE DO IT ALL! 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 d www.bblandscape.com d

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678


E4 Monday, January 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN 935

975

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

Toyota RAV 4 Ltd. 2007 80K miles, moonroof, tow pkg, great condition! $13,750. 541-848-7876

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $3500. 541-548-5302

mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr brks, plus mntd stud snows. $8500 obo. 541-330-0616

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

BMW M3 COUPE E36 1998, mint condition, adult owned, low miles, needs nothing, $12,500. 541-419-2181

Buick LeSabre 2004, custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $6000; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $2900. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

Buick LeSabre Limited Edition 1985, 1 owner, always garaged, clean, runs great, 90K, $1895, 541-771-3133.

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

Jeep Cherokee Laredo, 2003, 135K miles, fully loaded, excellent condition. $6500. Call 541-749-0316

Kia Spectra LS, 2002 96K miles, black, 5-speed, runs good, $2600. Phone 541-749-0316

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

Mercedes AMG, Formula One V-12. Very Rare. Only 99k miles. Ultimate in safety, luxury & performance. Cost $135,000 to fully hand-build. Just $13,500. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

Mercedes S 430 - 4Matic, 2003, All wheel drive, silver, loaded & pampered. Exc in snow! $15,400. 541-390-3596

Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $27k. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

Mercury Grand Marquis 1984. Grandpa’s car! Like new, all lthr, loaded, garaged, 40K mi, $3495. 541-382-8399

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Pontiac Firebird 1998, exc cond, no wrecks. T-top, V6, loaded, 22/29 mpg (reg gas). $4995. 541-475-3984

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

TO: GEORGIA LILY ANN JOHNSON, (last known address) 20130 NE Reed bane, Bend, OR 97702 IN THE NAME OF THE STATE OF OREGON: You are directed: Georgia Lily Ann Johnson To appear in person before this Court at 1100 NW Bond Street, Courtroom D, Bend, Oregon, on: the 18th day of January, 2011 at 2:30 PM, for hearing on the allegations of the petition and at any subsequent court-ordered bearing. You must appear personally in the courtroom on the date and at the time listed above. An attorney may not attend the hearing in your place. NOTICE: A petition has been filed to establish jurisdiction under ORS 419B.100. You may obtain a copy of the petition by calling (541) 388-5300. If you do not appear as directed above, or do not appear at any subsequent court-ordered hearing, the Court may proceed without further notice and take jurisdiction of the child and make such orders and take such action as authorized by law including, but not limited to, establishing wardship over the child, ordering the removal of the child from the legal and physical custody of the parents or guardians and, restraining you from having contact with, or attempting to contact, the child. RIGHTS AND OBLIGATIONS You have a right to be represented by an attorney. If you wish to be represented by an attorney, please retain one as soon as possible to represent you in this proceeding. If you cannot afford to hire an attorney and you meet the state's financial guidelines, you are entitled to have an attorney appointed for you at state expense. To request appointment of an attorney to represent you at state expense, you must contact juvenile court immediately. Phone 541-388-5300 for further information. If you are a parent or other person legally obligated to support the child, you have tile obligation to support the child. You may be required to pay for compensation and reasonable expenses for the child's attorney. You may be required to pay support for the child while the child is in state financed or state supported custody. You may be required to provide health insurance coverage for the child while the child is in state financed or state supported custody. You may be required to pay other costs that arise from the child being in the jurisdiction of the Court. If you are ordered to pay for the child support or there is an existing order of support from a divorce or other proceeding, that support order may be assigned to the state to apply to the costs of the child's care. If you are ordered to appear, you must appear personally in the courtroom, unless the court has granted you an exception in advance under ORS 419B.100 to appear by other means including, but not limited to, telephonic or other electronic means.

Pontiac Grand Am 2004 FWD

Dates Issued: 9th day of December, 2010. First publication: 12/20/10 Second publication: 12/27/10 Third publication: 01/03/11

3.4L V-6 4 door, all power, 158k hwy miles. Excellent condition.

SHERYL BLACKMAN OSB 98416 Deputy District Attorney

$2,995

PORSCHE CARRERA 4S 2003 - Wide body, 6 speed, 63,000 miles, all wheel drive, no adverse history, new tires. Seal gray with light gray leather interior. $32,950. 503-351-3976

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Subaru Outback 2005 AWD, 4cyl, auto, lthr htd seats, 89K mi, reduced to $13,995 OBO 541-508-0214; 541-554-5212

SUBARUS!!! Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, V6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

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Petition No. 10JV0329 SUMMONS

541-923-8627

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

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Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

Audi A4 Avant Quattro 2003 3.0L., 92K mi, garaged, serviced, silver, fully loaded, $9300. 541-420-9478

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

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IN THE, MATTER OF: Johnson, Derrah 06/15/04 (713861) A CHILD.

4-door, 53K miles, automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $11,680. Please call 541-419-4018.

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Automobiles

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Honda Civic LX 2006,

940

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great

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Legal Notices LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES JUVENILE DEPARTMENT

Vans 1998 Dodge Ram Wagon SE 2500, Mark III conversion, 100k miles, 4 captains chairs, rear fold-down bed, hitch, $4000 and worth it! Travel in luxury. 541-318-9999 or 541-508-8522.

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

VOLKSWAGEN BUG 1965 Black , Excellent condition. Runs good. $6995. 541-416-0541.

LEGAL NOTICE Sealed bids for construction of the Central Oregon Community College Madras Campus Building 1 will be received by: Richard Brecke, Construction Project Manager at the Jefferson County School District Boardroom, Support Services Building, 445 SE Buff Street, Madras, Oregon 97741, (541) 475-6192 until 2:00 P.M., local time, Thursday January 20, 2011, and then publicly opened and read aloud. Bids received after this time will not be accepted. Briefly, the Work is described as follows: Construction of a new one-story, wood frame, masonry veneer building on a Greenfield site. The project will be located at Ashwood Road, Madras, Oregon and will incorporate approximately 8,500 square feet of gross floor area. For the project, lump sum bid will be received on forms provided in these Specifications. Complete sets of Drawings and Project Manual may be ordered by prime bidders only from Ford Graphics, for the cost of reproduction and delivery. Prime bidders are defined as General Contractors. Additional sets or partial sets may be purchased for cost of reproducing same, paid before or at time of delivery. Ford Graphics: Bend - 1151 S.E. Centennial Ct. #3 Bend, OR 97702 | Tel: 541.749.2151 Fax: 541.749.2154 Portland - 401 N.W. 14th Avenue, Portland, OR 97209 | Tel: 503.227.3424 Fax: 503.223.4254 Copies of Documents will also be on

file at the following plan rooms: Daily Journal of Commerce Plan Center, Central Oregon Builder's Exchange, Eugene Building's Exchange, Salem Contractor's exchange, McGraw Hill Plan Center, Medford Building Exchange, Oregon Contractor Plan Center. No bid will be considered unless fully completed in manner provided in the BIDDING REQUIREMENTS upon Bid Form provided in these Specifications, and accompanied by certified check or bid bond executed in favor of Owner in amount not less than 10 percent of total amount of bid. Said certified check or bid bond shall be forfeited as fixed and liquidated damages should bidder neglect or refuse to enter into Contract and provide suitable bond for faithful performance of Work in event Contract is awarded to him. The College may reject any bid not in compliance with all prescribed public contracting procedures and requirements and may reject for good cause all bids upon a finding of the agency that it is in the public interest to do so. The College reserves the right to waive any or all minor informalities or clerical errors as described in OAR 137-047-0470. No bidder may withdraw his bid after the hour set for opening until after lapse of forty-five (45) days from the bid opening. This project is subject to prevailing wage laws and is subject to Oregon Revised Statutes (ORS) 279C.800 through 279C.870 dealing with payment of prevailing wages. No bid will be received or considered by the College unless the bid contains a statement by the bid-

der that ORS 279C.838 or 279C.840 will be complied with. This project is subject to ORS 279C.370 dealing with disclosure of first tier subcontractors, 279A.120 giving preference to resident bidders, 279A.125 giving preference to recycled materials and 279A.110 discrimination in subcontracting. Central Oregon Community College By: Matthew J. McCoy, Vice-President for Administration PUBLICATION AND DATES: Bend Bulletin Bend, OR Portland Daily Journal of Commerce Portland, OR First AdvertisementTuesday December 28, 2010 Second Advertisement Monday January 3, 2011 Non-mandatory Site Walk 12:00 pm, Tuesday January 11, 2011

Get your business GRO W

ING

With an ad in The Bulletin's

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No. T10-70642 OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, TRACY ANN PIN AIRE, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 03-22Â2005, recorded 03-30-2005, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No,, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2005-18611 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 206556 PARCEL ONE (1) OF PARTITION PLAT NO. 2002-51, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1331 NE BUTLER MARKET RD. BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86,735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 08/01/2010 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $704.60 Monthly Late Charge $35.23 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. #: OR-10-396786-NH

obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $112,814.39 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.825% per annum from 07-01-2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 04-04-2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire

amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated; November 22, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 Maria De La Torre, Asst. Sec. ASAP# 3840487 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011, 01/10/2011 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0172413494 T.S. No.: 10-10478-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, GREGORY L. STECKLER AND SHARON M. STECKLER, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on September 26, 2007, as Instrument No. 2007-52108 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 258955 LOT SIXTEEN (16), THE SHIRE PHASE 1, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 61283 RING BEARER COURT, BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; Monthly Payment $2,925.00 Monthly Late Charge $146.25 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 520,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.75000 % per annum from May 1, 2010 until paid;

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. #: OR-09-331711-SH

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MARK E. COOLEY AND BRENDA L. COOLEY as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of COLUMBIA RIVER BANK MORTGAGE GROUP, as Beneficiary, dated 6/18/2003, recorded 6/24/2003, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2003-42369,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 197116 LOT 51 OF TERRANGO GLEN-PHASE THREE, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20946 LUPINE AVE BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 1/1/2010, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,190.15 Monthly Late Charge $59.51 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $143,215.52 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.2500 per annum from 12/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 4/15/2011 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 4/15/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six- month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE" You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 3/16/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR: (503) 684-3763; (800)452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 12/7/2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as Trustee 3 First American Way Santa Ana, CA 92707 Signature By Angelica Castillo, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, CARLA L. POWELL & JOHN POWELL as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE CO OF OR, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FIRST HORIZON HOME LOANS, A DIVISION OF FIRST TENNESSEE BANK N.A., as Beneficiary, dated 9/17/2007, recorded 9/20/2007, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number - at page number - fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2007-50905,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 139499 LOT 8 IN BLOCK 94 OF DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, UNIT 8, PART II, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 15751 PARK DRIVE LA PINE, OR 97739 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 9/1/2009, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,848.51 Monthly Late Charge $69.95 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $214,003.76 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.6250 per annum from 8/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 4/8/2011 at the hour of 1:00:00 PM , Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, At the front entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond St., Bend, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-573-1965 or Login to: www.priorityposting.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 4/8/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 3/9/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENACY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 12/6/2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee 3 First American Way Santa Ana, CA 92707 Signature By: Angelica Castillo, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for v this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations.

ASAP# FNMA3845486 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011, 01/10/2011, 01/17/2011

ASAP# FNMA3845493 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011, 01/10/2011


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Monday, January 3, 2011 E5

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plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on March 25, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due {other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tender-

ing the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com/ AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: December 3, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONALTITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Juan Enriquez State of California County of Orange I, the undersigned, certify that I am the Trustee Sale Officer and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original Trustee's Notice of Sale. Juan Enriquez ASAP# 3839052 12/13/2010, 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx5363 T.S. No.: 1304652-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Linda A. Wilhelm and Earl D. Wilhelm, Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated August 10, 2007, recorded August 17, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-45472 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot five (5), block five (5), Evergreen Park, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 52546 Deer Field Dr. La Pine OR 97739. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due April 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,160.71 Monthly Late Charge $57.99. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obli-

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-102385 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, MICHELLE E. THOMAS, as grantor, to AMERI TITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR MORTGAGEIT, INC., as beneficiary, dated 6/1/2006, recorded 6/7/2006, under Instrument No. 2006- 39464, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee of the IndyMac INDX Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-AR27, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-AR27 under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated August 1, 2006. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT ONE HUNDRED FORTY-NINE (149), PARKS AT BROKEN TOP, PHASE 4, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 61418 DAVIS LAKE LOOP BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of December 1, 2010 Delinquent Payments from May 01, 2010 5 payments at $ 2,214.52 each $ 11,072.60 3 payments at $ 2,923.70 each $ 8,771.10 (05-01-10 through 12-01-10) Late Charges: $ 775.11 Beneficiary Advances: $ 55.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 20,673.81 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $416,850.00, PLUS interest thereon at 6.375% per annum from 04/01/10 to 10/1/201 0, 6.375% per annum from 10/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on April 5, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 12/1/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3834751 12/13/2010, 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-70293-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JEFF STRINGHAM, TAMARA STRINGHAM as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 07-10-2006, recorded 07-14-2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No., fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-48338 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 157184 A parcel of land in the South Half of the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (S 1/2 NE 1/4 NE 1/4) of Section 25, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 12, East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, being further described as follows: Commencing at the Northeast corner of said Section 25, being a brass cap set in a monument box; thence South 00º23'48" West along the Easterly line of said section a distance of 660.76 feet to the true point of beginning of this description; thence South 89º38'59" West 30.00 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on the Westerly right of way line of Horse Butte Road; thence South 89º38'59" West, 653.75 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 05º03'40" East 163.19 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence along the arc of a 50.00 foot radius non-tangent curve concave to the Southwest, a distance of 83.16 feet, the chord of which bears South 47º24'31" East 73.90 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 52º53'06" East 81.92 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence along the arc of a 470.00 foot radius curve concave to the North, a distance of 306.92 feet, (long chord bears South 71º35'33" East 301.49 feet), to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 89º42'00" East 201.06 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 89º42'00" East 30.00 feet to a point on the centerline of said road; thence North 00º23'48" East along said centerline, 389.97 feet to the point of beginning and there terminating, EXCEPTING THEREFROM the Easterly 30.00 feet for road right of way purposes. Commonly known as: 60359 HORSE BUTTE ROAD BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 01/01/2010 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $3,767.13 Monthly Late Charge $188.35 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $572,007.38 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.5% per annum from 12-01-2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 03-28-2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: November 16, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 Maria De La Torre, Asst. Sec. ASAP# 3840425 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011, 01/10/2011

gations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $165,652.48 together with interest thereon at 7.250% per annum from March 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on April 07, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of

the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: December 01, 2010. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-358425 01/03/11, 01/10, 01/17, 01/24 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxx7725 T.S. No.: 1309226-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Kathleen M. Diehl, An Unmarried Woman, as Grantor to Key Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Headlands Mortgage Company, A California Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated August 28, 1998, recorded

September 10, 1998, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 98-40426 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot twenty (20), block five (5), Providence, Phase 5A, Deschutes County, Oregon Commonly known as: 3178 Northeast Manchester Avenue Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due April 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,400.02 Monthly Late Charge $31.20. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $72,038.94 together with interest thereon at 6.875% per annum from March 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums ad-

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vance by the beneficiary puror trust deed, at any time suant to the terms and prior to five days before the conditions of the said deed of date last set for sale. In contrust. Whereof, notice hereby struing this notice, the masis given that, Cal-Western culine gender includes the Reconveyance Corporation feminine and the neuter, the the undersigned trustee will singular includes plural, the on April 11, 2011 at the hour word "grantor" includes any of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, successor in interest to the as established by Section grantor as well as any other 187.110, Oregon Revised persons owing an obligation, Statutes, At the Bond Street the performance of which is entrance to Deschutes secured by said trust deed, County Courthouse 1164 NW the words "trustee" and "benBond, City of Bend, County of eficiary" includes their reDeschutes, State of Oregon, spective successors in intersell at public auction to the est, if any. Dated: December highest bidder for cash the 02, 2010. Cal-Western Reinterest in the said described conveyance Corporation 525 real property which the East Main Street P.O. Box grantor had or had power to 22004 El Cajon CA convey at the time of the ex92022-9004 Cal-Western Reecution by him of the said conveyance Corporation Sigtrust deed, together with any nature/By: Tammy Laird interest which the grantor or R-358641 01/03, 01/10, his successors in interest ac01/17, 01/24 quired after the execution of PUBLIC NOTICE said trust deed, to satisfy the The annual meeting of the foregoing obligations thereby members of the Deschutes secured and the costs and County Fair Association will expense of sale, including a be held at 7:00 p.m., Monreasonable charge by the day, January 17, 2011, foltrustee. Notice is further lowing a dinner at the Desgiven that any person named chutes County Fairgrounds in Section 86.753 of Oregon Expo Center, 3800 SW AirRevised Statutes has the port Way, Redmond, Oregon. right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and Deschutes County Fair the trust deed reinstated by Association payment to the beneficiary of 3800 SW Airport Way the entire amount then due Holly Garner, DCFA Secretary (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation

PUBLIC NOTICE The Bend Park & Recreation District Board of Directors will meet in a work session at 5:30 pm, Tuesday, January 4, 2011, at the district administrative offices, 799 SW Columbia, Bend, Oregon. Agenda items includes an update from the district’s Insurance Agent of Record, an update of the district’s accreditation process and presentation of the System Development Charges (SDC) fund information and long term financial forecast. The board will conduct a regular business meeting beginning at 7:00 p.m. Agenda items include contract awards for Columbia Neighborhood Park construction and Old Bend Gym Architectural Services. The board will also consider of approval the 2009-10 Financial Statement Audit and approval of a revised contract for the purchase of Miller’s Landing. The agenda and supplementary reports may be viewed on the district’s website www.bendparkandrec.org. For more information call 541-389-7275.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-102994

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-UM-102795

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JEANETTE A. JANIA, as grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE CO., as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 11/17/2006, recorded 11/22/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-77449, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by HSBC Bank USA, National Association as Trustee for Deutsche Alt-A Securities Mortgage Loan Trust, Series 2007-AR3. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT ONE (1) AND THE NORTH 40 FEET OF LOT TWO (2), IN BLOCK SIXTY-EIGHT (68) OF BEND PARK, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 409 SOUTHEAST WYE LANE BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of December 7, 2010 Delinquent Payments from August 01, 2010 4 payments at $1,853.23 each $7,412.92 1 payments at $1,62 6.2 8 each $1,626.2 8 (08-01-10 through 12-07-10) Late Charges: $379.65 Beneficiary Advances: $88.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $9,506.85 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $235,138.37, PLUS interest thereon at 7.75% per annum from 07/01/10 to 12/1/2010, 7.75% per annum from 12/01/10 to 12/01/11, 7.75% per annum from 12/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on April 11, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same.DATED: 12/7/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500 Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: 206-340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3842270 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011, 01/10/2011

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1727 T.S. No.: 1305617-09.

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, REBECCA A DOLF, INDIVIDUAL, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of SECURITY BANK, ITS SUCCESSORS AND/OR ASSIGNS, as beneficiary, dated 4/10/2001, recorded 4/16/2001 in Volume 2001, page 17424, of Deeds of Trust, under Instrument No. -, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by UMPQUA BANK. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT TWENTY-EIGHT (28), BLOCK ONE (1), ROMAINE VILLAGE, UNIT 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 19909 MAHOGANY STREET BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of December 6, 2010 Delinquent Payments from July 01, 2010 1 payments at $460.00 each $460.00 5 payments at $682.00 each $3,410.00 (07-01-10 through 12-06-10) Late Charges: $220.46 Beneficiary Advances: $109.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $4,199.46 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $67,542.44, PLUS interest thereon at 6.625% per annum from 06/01/10 to 8/1/2010, 6.625% per annum from 8/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on April 7, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at MAIN ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY JUSTICE CENTER, 1100 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a, reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 12/6/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3840521 12/13/2010, 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. OR-AGF-109811

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Bruce W. Grove An Unmarried Man, as Grantor to First American Title Ins. Co. Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage Co. Dba Commonwealth United Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, dated October 29, 2004, recorded November 01, 2004, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2004-65519 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 15 of Northpointe-phase 1, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 20695 Beaumont Dr. Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due August 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $768.94 Monthly Late Charge $38.40. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $122,009.33 together with interest thereon at 5.625% per annum from July 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on March 14, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: November 04, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is February 12, 2011, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, GARY MICHAEL JONES AND PAMELA JO JONES, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of AMERICAN GENERAL FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC., as beneficiary, dated 6/11/2008, recorded 6/13/2008, under Instrument No. 2008-25586, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by AMERICAN GENERAL FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT FORTY-SEVEN (47) IN BLOCK TWENTY-ONE (21) OF DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, RECORDED MAY 23, 1963, IN CABINET A, PAGE 106, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 56726 STELLAR DRIVE BEND, OR 97707 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of December 8, 2010 Delinquent Payments from July 20, 2010 5 payments at $698.27 each $3,491.35 (07-20-10 through 12-08-10) Late Charges: $20.00 TOTAL: $3,511.35 FAILURE TO PAY INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, IMPOUNDS AND LATE CHARGES WHICH BECAME DUE 7/20/2010 TOGETHER WITH ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, IMPOUNDS, LATE CHARGES, FORECLOSURE FEES AND EXPENSES; ANY ADVANCES WHICH MAY HEREAFTER BE MADE; ALL OBLIGATIONS AND INDEBTEDNESSES AS THEY BECOME DUE AND CHARGES PURSUANT TO SAID NOTE AND DEED OF TRUST. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $78,645.69, PLUS interest thereon at 9.600% per annum from 6/20/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on April 13, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. Sale Information Line: 714-730-2727 or Website: http://www.lpsasap.com DATED: 12/8/2010 LSI TITLE OF OREGON, LLC AS TRUSTEE By: Asset Foreclosure Services, Inc., as Agent for the Trustee 22837 Ventura Blvd., Suite 350, Woodland Hills, CA 91364 Phone: (877)237-7878 Sale Information Line:(714)730-2727 By: Norie Vergara, Trustee Sale Officer

R-355371 12/13/10, 12/20, 12/27, 01/03

ASAP# 3843980 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011, 01/10/2011


E6Monday, January 3, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Bulletin Daily Paper 01/03/11  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Monday January 3, 2011

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