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Good snow so far delights outdoor folk, businesses By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

A week into winter, Central Oregon’s mountains are seeing an above-average snowpack for this time of year, bringing welcome snow for skiers and good news to water managers working to fill the area’s reservoirs.

later snowstorms have built it back up to about 7 feet midmountain. “We’re in a great weather pattern for this time of year,” he said. “It’s been really great.” And even with the downturn in the economy, business is booming at the Powder House,

“Just awesome,” said Andy Goggins, director of marketing and communications for the Mt. Bachelor ski area, of the season’s snow so far. “We couldn’t ask for a better setup.” The warm spell earlier in December packed down the base of snow at the mountain, and

said owner Todd McGee. “It’s been a great year for us, probably one of our best,” he said. “It’s been very busy, and a lot is going on.” People are “ecstatic” when the sun comes out for a day of skiing, McGee said, and also happy even when it’s storming — espe-

cially since the snow is light, dry and fluffy, perfect powder for skiing. “It’s been outstanding,” he said. “It came early, it’s been really good quality snow, and it’s been continuous. Can’t ask for much better.” See Snowpack / A4

State kills Old Mill land deal, will redo its policy Purchase questioned due to family ties of official, co-owners

GRIPPY CARGO, BUT IT FLIPPED ANYWAY

By Nick Budnick The Bulletin

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

While working on the truck, he said he witnessed several other vehicles slide off the roadway. “I’ve been seeing accidents all day,” Mahaney said. “It’s been crazy.” Oregon State Police and Deschutes County dispatchers said law enforcement officials responded to numerous crashes throughout Central Oregon on Sunday as a result of slick conditions. No major injuries were reported as of 9 p.m. For more on Central Oregon’s upcoming weather, see story, Page B1.

Consolidated Towing heavy equipment supervisor Russ Mahaney climbs out of a semi truck filled with cat box litter that flipped onto its side around 3 p.m. Sunday while negotiating icy roads near Lava Butte on U.S. Highway 97. The driver was uninjured in the accident, and Mahaney said Consolidated Towing would wait until this morning to tilt the truck upright and tow it out of the ditch.

SALEM — The state of Oregon has killed a land deal that raised eyebrows in Bend and is retooling the program that spawned it. In October, top state officials were poised to approve a deal negotiated by Department of State Lands to purchase nearly a halfacre of land in Bend. But they put the deal on hold after concerns were raised over two of the property owners’ relationship to a top department official. The land is located at 291 S.W. Bluff Drive, north of The Plaza Condominiums, in the Old Mill District. Some Bend property owners and real estate professionals questioned the purchase, in part because no appraisal had been done and because the land was co-owned by the parents of the department’s assistant director, James Paul IV. Those questions led Gov. Ted Kulongoski, who chairs the state Land Board, to call for a halt to the deal at the board’s Oct. 12 meeting, as well as for a review by the state Department of Justice to ensure ethics laws were followed. In interviews last week Department of State Lands officials defended the deal — noting that DOJ’s investigation found no evidence of wrongdoing. But they said they decided to kill the deal and retool a program under which the department buys urban properties to develop them or resell them for profit. See Land / A4

Iraq’s motorcycle In Afghanistan, a military hospital rebels are mainly faces an all-encompassing mission How well do airport X-rays looking to impress Rich Hillsden and his trauma staff move an injured Afghan man onto a CT scan table at the hospital at Kandahar air base. Afghans make up about half the patients at the U.S. Navy-run hospital.

By David Brown

The Washington Post

KANDAHAR AIRFIELD, Afghanistan — Most of the time, this war-theater hospital crackles with danger and expertise, its staff members working to keep alive people who would be dead if they ended up almost anywhere else in the world. But some of the time, often in the morning, it’s quiet and almost empty, except for a few recuperating Afghans stoically watched over by family members and, today, a young girl in a pink robe exploring the corridor outside her room in a wheelchair. The hospital, which opened in May and is owned by NATO, is an odd mix of urgency and relaxation. It features patients whose stays inside its $40 million walls are both shorter and longer than any in contemporary U.S. hospitals. American soldiers critically injured on the battlefield spend only a

By John Leland New York Times News Service

BAGHDAD — Just before dusk they begin to arrive, first the motor scooters, then the bigger bikes rolling up in a cloud of leather and noise. For an hour or two each Friday, on a wide boulevard beside the Tigris River, the complexities of Baghdad life give way to a few universal questions: Can I pop a wheelie when people are watching? Can I sneak out of the house without my family noticing? And wouldn’t it be cool if there were girls here? On a recent Friday, Ali Hamra, 28, sat on his motorcycle, watching a crowd of about 75 cyclists doing tricks on the machines that are the loves of their lives. Some rode standing upright on their seats or handlebars; others pulled the front wheel in the air; still others spun their rear wheels to create clouds of black smoke. In the United States, these tricks would barely turn an eye, but in Iraq the bravado looks like the baby steps of a nascent youth culture, modeled largely — and imperfectly — on a vision from abroad. See Scooters / A5

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day or two here, many unconscious and on ventilators, before being sent to Bagram air base, then to a hospital in Germany and on to the United States. At the other end of the continuum are the Afghans who make up about half the patients.

They also come aboard medevac helicopters. They get the same immediate treatment as U.S. soldiers. Then they stay, often for weeks, until they are well enough to be transferred to a nearby Afghan hospital or discharged. See Hospital / A5

TOP NEWS INSIDE EAST COAST: Major storm turns holiday travel into troublesome tangle, Page A3 AP photo

work? Experts aren’t so sure By Derek Kravitz The Washington Post

The full-body scanners in use at 78 U.S. airports can detect small amounts of contraband and hidden weapons, all while producing controversial images of travelers. The “good catches,” federal officials say, have largely gone unnoticed amid the criticism that erupted over the ghostly X-rays and “enhanced” pat-downs. The Transportation Security Administration, which intensified airport screening last month, points to several successes: small amounts of marijuana wrapped in baggies, other drugs stitched inside underwear, ceramic knives concealed in shirt pockets. But the machines could miss something far more deadly: explosive material taped to someone’s abdomen or hidden inside a cavity. Security experts question the technology’s ability to detect chemical explosives that are odorless, far smaller than previous incarnations, and easily molded to fool machines and screeners. See Airports / A4


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F / Technology

MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY

A possible future: on-the-spot coupons, geotagged shoppers By Randall Stross New York Times News Service

Clipping coupons is a hassle. Intentionally. If shoppers were to redeem any more than just a sliver of them, manufacturers would have a self-created financial catastrophe on their hands. Digital technology could eventually make coupon-clipping with scissors a quaint oddity. And manufacturers are willing to make clipping easier, but not too easy: They don’t want to reduce prices for customers who’d buy a product anyway. Ideally, coupons will continue to be redeemed only by those who hold out for a deal — those whom marketing experts call “deal prone.” More than 3 billion coupons a year are redeemed in the United States, says Steve Boal, CEO of Coupons.com, founded in 1998 and based in Mountain View, Calif. Last year, about half of all redeemed coupons originated in the weekly coupon supplements inserted in local Sunday newspapers, according to Coupons .com’s estimate. But coupons distributed online accounted for 9.8 percent of all coupons redeemed in 2009, up sharply from 1.1 percent in 2006. (Efforts to find data from another source were unsuccessful.) By visiting Coupons.com or its affiliates, shoppers don’t have to wait for Sunday. They can browse coupon offers at any time online, by product category or expiration date, then print the selected coupons on their home printers. The digital-to-paper process still ends up requiring scissors — and you have to remember to take the coupons to the store in time. At Coupons.com, printing on a home printer requires installation of its software, which places a unique verification code on each coupon; as a result, the company says, the redemption fraud rate is less than 0.05 percent. The next step in the coupon’s evolution is the all-digital version. At Coupons.com and other sites, clicking on an onscreen display can place a coupon on a particular retailer’s loyalty card, like Safeway’s Club Card, ready to be applied at checkout. But, of course, shoppers have to remember what they placed on the card, or, at least, remember to print out a list of coupons stored on the card before heading to the store.

Apps ease use Not everyone is willing to go to such trouble. “Loyalty-cardbased coupons have had a lower redemption rate without a re-

Looking for love, Facebook users turn to apps By Brett Pulley Bloomberg News

New York Times News Service

LEFT: The GroceryiQ app is one of several existing apps for consumers that can show digital coupons for items on a shopping list. RIGHT: A prototype store map app from Point Inside. The future goal of the app is to determine accurate locations of a shopper down to within one meter and deliver coupon offers for nearby items. minder,” Boal says. Being able to see the coupons saved on your smart phone, or, even better, to have saved coupons show up automatically on the phone’s grocery-list app, would make digital coupons much easier to use. This has come to pass, with apps like GroceryiQ (a Coupons.com product), Grocery Gadget and Grocery Pal, to name just a few. The blend of Web and smartphone technology preserves the essential restriction — the discount is offered only to those who have gone to some trouble to get the coupon. But it makes coupon clipping, or “coupon clicking,” appealing to more consumers. “The retailers tell us that about one-third of the people doing direct-to-card are new to couponing,” says Robert Drescher, the chief executive of Cellfire, a digital coupon company in San Jose, Calif. “The users do skew younger and also more male.” Still, the fundamental proposition of coupons remains unchanged. “Coupons are ‘costly’ to collect. Even looking online — that’s an effort,” said Peter Darke, an associate professor of marketing at York University in Toronto. “There’s a lot of junk you have to go through to find ones you want. The amounts are small. So it takes a concerted effort to

gather enough to make it worth one’s while.”

The next step? But what if manufacturers could make coupon offers on the spot, as you stood in the aisle, within sight of the promoted product? Your cell phone would identify your shopping predilections, allowing the manufacturer to withhold the offer if you were likely to buy the product anyway. The offer could go exclusively to those who just needed a little nudge. The possibility is not a distant one. Point Inside, a mobile technology company in Bellevue, Wash., has been testing still-incomplete technology for determining where shoppers are standing in grocery stores and big-box retailers. The goal is to determine accurate locations to within one meter. “You’ll probably have to create a new term for serving an ad unit based on where you are standing in a store,” says Joshua Marti, the company’s chief executive. “‘Hyperlocal’ does not convey how local we’re talking about.” Current smart-phone technology uses GPS and Wi-Fi to find locations, but they are generally accurate only to within 30 meters or so, Marti says. And GPS loses accuracy as it penetrates walls. To build a system that will eventually solve this problem, Point Inside is relying

on other means, like a geotagged reference point outside the store. It then uses AutoCAD software to create a detailed interior map of the store, assigning latitude and longitude to every aisle position. The next technological challenge is geotagging the shoppers themselves. Next year, Marti expects the arrival of smart phones capable of serving as highly accurate, multidirectional pedometers. By knowing the exact latitude and longitude of the store’s door, then using the phone to track how many steps a shopper takes in which directions, the shopper’s current location can always be known. The vision fulfilled: Coupons sent to the phone for products within an arm’s reach. Such offers may well prove appealing. “Getting attention at the time of purchase is a huge advantage in getting the consumer to pick a particular brand,” Darke says. But the offers must be well aimed, he adds, or they will annoy people. Annoyance may come even from good offers, if they are ubiquitous. One can picture a dystopian future of cell phone screens blinking one coupon offer after another, changing with each step down a store aisle: Pick me! Pick me! No, pick me! How many discount offers can the mind absorb without blowing up?

Microchips enter the mundane By Steve Johnson

Livescribe’s Echo “Smartpen” device can record a voice on a microchip as a person takes notes during an interview or listening to a lecture.

San Jose Mercury News

SAN JOSE, Calif. — To help make football a little safer, Intel officials last month proposed having players’ helmets outfitted with microprocessors that would wirelessly alert doctors if the athletes suffered a hit hard enough to cause head injuries. And why not? Besides being installed in everything from ATMs and airport check-in kiosks to pacemakers and ocean monitoring sensors, microchips also are going into a staggering array of items that were once decidedly low-tech — from gravestones and running shoes to fish lures and writing pens. The potential market is huge. Chip sales of all types generate about $300 billion a year in sales worldwide, with personal computers and smart phones accounting for a third to half of that, according to some experts. That means $150 billion to $200 billion in sales comes from socalled embedded semiconductors, which go into pretty much anything a person can think of. And that segment is growing fast. In the future, “where won’t we find chips?” asked Jordan Selburn, principal analyst for

Technology Consumer Environment Education Science

Nhat V. Meyer San Jose Mercury News

consumer electronics at research firm iSuppli. “The answer is: Pretty close to nowhere.” Moreover, due to the sophistication of the chips being used, the difference between PCs and many formerly mundane products is quickly narrowing. “The term ‘embedded’ used to refer to a low-level, limited-function semiconductor and nobody needed to pay attention to it,” said Shane Rau, a chip expert at the market research firm IDC. “Now these devices are taking on more intelligence. They’re becoming more programmable, they’re getting faster and they’re getting communications functions built into them.” Consider these examples: • Intelligent pens: Livescribe of Oakland, Calif., sells a chip-

powered ink pen equipped with a camera and audio recorder that’s designed to help people remember precisely what was said when they review their handwritten notes. It synchronizes its voice recording with the pictures it takes of the words as they are jotted down. Then, if the pen is later tapped on one of the scribbled words, it replays what was said when that note was taken. • Computerized commodes: AquaOne Technologies of Westminster, Calif., has introduced a toilet containing chips that automatically shut off the water when it springs a leak or starts to overflow. And the Japanese company Toto reportedly has developed an intelligent potty that gathers health-related data from the user’s urine and automatical-

ly sends the information to their doctor’s office. • Fish beware: A number of fishing reels, including those made by Shimano of Japan, now have chips in them to help control how fast the spool of line spins. Some enthusiasts of the sport say that results in longer, smoother casts. Pro-Troll of Concord, Calif., also puts chips in its lures. The result, the company claims, “duplicates the electrical nerve discharge of a wounded bait fish,” prompting other fish to bite it. • Smart shoes: Adidas was widely hailed five years ago as the first company to outfit a running shoe with a chip, which automatically adjusts the shoe’s cushioning to the person’s weight and running style. Nike then followed with its own running shoe featuring a chip that fed data on the person’s pace, distance traveled and calories burned to an Apple iPod or iPhone. • Tombstone tech: A Waynesburg, Pa., company sells a coinsize, stainless steel-encased microchip for gravestone markets. Called the Memory Medallion, it tells the dead person’s story in text, photos, video or audio histories, which visitors can access by pointing their Internet-enabled cell phones at it.

NEW YORK — With the rise of the Internet, people began looking for love on websites such as Match.com and EHarmony.com. With the growing popularity of social networks, they’re turning to services like AreYouInterested.com. The dating application, available on Facebook and Apple’s iPhone, lets users see beyond the personal details of potential mates to their social circles, including friends and family. AreYouInterested.com is adding more than 50,000 users a day, according to New York-based parent SNAP Interactive Inc., compared with the 20,000 new daily users Match.com reports. AreYouInterested.com is now the largest Facebook dating application, with more than 13 million average monthly users, according to research firm AppData.com. Its popularity may cut into Match.com, part of IAC/InterActiveCorp, and EHarmony.com. “Those traditional online dating companies don’t have a large app presence like us,” SNAP Chief Executive Officer Cliff Lerner said in an interview. “Our growth, as well as the growth of a couple competitors, has come out of nowhere.” Match.com has greater appeal for serious daters and a stronger long-term business, though it may not be signing up as many new users, said Gregory Blatt, CEO of IAC. Founded in 1995, the dating site collects pages of data from users to help them find appropriate mates, with a large engineering team to refine its site and algorithms. “AreYouInterested is a flirty, fun little app,” Blatt said in an interview. “They have a few people working in a garage. We’ve got hundreds of engineers maximizing our business. You need huge degrees of sophistication, huge amounts of data behind it, and a huge community.”

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THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 27, 2010 A3

T S Immigration politics to shift Pakistan bombing By Suzanne Gamboa The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The end of the year means a turnover of House control from Democratic to Republican and, with it, Congress’ approach to immigration. In a matter of weeks, Congress will go from trying to help young, illegal immigrants become legal to debating whether children born to parents who are in the country illegally should continue to enjoy automatic U.S. citizenship. Such a hardened approach

— and the rhetoric certain to accompany it — should resonate with the GOP faithful who helped swing the House in Republicans’ favor. But it also could further hurt the GOP in its endeavor to grab a large enough share of the growing Latino vote to win the White House and the Senate majority in 2012. Legislation to test interpretations of the 14th Amendment as granting citizenship to children of illegal immigrants will emerge early next session. That is likely

to be followed by attempts to force employers to use a stilldeveloping Web system, dubbed E-Verify, to check that all of their employees are in the U.S. legally. There could be proposed curbs on federal spending in cities that don’t do enough to identify people who are in the country illegally and attempts to reduce the numbers of legal immigrants. Democrats ended the year failing for a second time to win passage of the Dream Act, which would have given hundreds of

thousands of young illegal immigrants a chance at legal status. House Republicans will try to fill the immigration reform vacuum left by Democrats with legislation designed to send illegal immigrants packing and deter others from trying to come to the U.S. Democrats, who will still control the Senate, will be playing defense against harsh immigration enforcement measures, mindful of their need to keep on good footing with Hispanic voters.

Visitors still see N. Korea stunted by its isolation By Sharon Lafraniere New York Times News Service

PYONGYANG, North Korea — Visiting Pyongyang as an outsider is like entering a parallel reality. Official escorts stuck to visitors like Velcro. The rules were clear: No interviews without permission. No exploring beyond the hotel parking lot. Opposite a journalist’s spacious room at the mostly empty Potonggang Hotel, men with briefcases left keys dangling in doors and appeared to rotate shifts. Other guests warned that dining room tables were bugged and that a dark, out-of-place wall panel was in fact a two-way mirror. Calls from the United States were blocked. Outgoing overseas calls cost $8.27 a minute. Journalists are rarely granted visas to North Korea, one of the world’s most secretive and militaristic societies. While there were no obvious signs of impending collapse, the visit offered hints of why the North might be particularly eager now to resume international aid and trade. For nearly four years, an unrelenting barrage of government propaganda has promised that North Korea will be strong and prosperous by 2012, the centennial of the birth of Kim Il Sung, the nation’s founder and the father of the current leader, Kim Jong Il. That is now 18 months away. And prosperous is the last word one would use to describe North Korea’s shuttered factories, skimpy harvests and stunted children. Interviews in the past six months with nearly 20 North Koreans who recently left for China, including several Communist Party members, suggest that faith in the leadership’s economic policies is shaken, if not lost. A few criticize the military’s predominance, and hope that Kim Jong Un, Kim Jong Il’s son and chosen successor, will shift policy. But most seemed to support Kim Jong Il’s 15-year-old “military-first” policies. They regard the United States as an implacable enemy and South Korea as an American tool, barred by Washington from uniting with the North. They insist that Japan’s 35-year occupation of the peninsula, followed by the Korean War, proves the need for an invincible defense. Billboards, patriotic songs, newspapers and movies continually reinforce that message. Every North Korean man spends up to 10 years in the military. Soldiers were spotted helping out at a Pyongyang construction site and headed through a nearby village toting shovels as a loudspeaker mounted on a tree blared patriotic messages. At one Pyongyang subway stop, called Prosperity Station, commuters read news on the threat of military conflict with South Korea from newspaper pages posted on a stand-up carousel. “We want peace,” one man declared passionately. “But we are not afraid of war. We are ready for anything.”

stirs starvation fears By Anwarullah Khan The Associated Press

KHAR, Pakistan — Some 300,000 desperately poor villagers impoverished by fighting in Pakistan’s tribal belt are wondering how they can feed themselves after a female suicide bomber killed 45 people outside a World Food Program food distribution center, triggering a districtwide suspension of the relief project. Pakistan says the attack is a sign of insurgent desperation, but the bombing and ongoing battles challenge Islamabad’s claims of victory over al-Qaida and the Taliban in this part of the porous northwest border. WFP district coordinator Shahab Khan said on Sunday that all four food relief centers run by the United Nations agency in the Bajur district had been shut indefinitely since Saturday’s bombing in the area’s main town of Khar. The WFP project in Bajur feeds 41,000 families — or 300,000 people — who returned to the district from camps for the displaced elsewhere in the country, even though their live-

lihoods having been ruined by fighting between Pakistan troops and insurgents. Painda Khan, a 48-year-old farmer who abandoned his crops months ago, said his family of 11 was now desperate for their rations of rice, flour, lentils, cooking oil and high-energy biscuits that he had been going to pick up last Monday. “We have been borrowing food from neighbors for the last five days,” said Khan, adding that his family last received supplies on Nov. 25. Gul Karim Khan, a 53-yearold who provides for a family of 10, had also found himself robbed of options by the closing of the supply centers. “We are getting into very tough times,” he said. “We don’t have any idea what we will do in the days ahead if we don’t get aid.” While food relief centers outside Bajur are still functional, WFP official Amjad Jamal said the displaced villagers were not eligible for those food rations. “We are trying to resume supplies at the earliest possible opportunity,” said Jamal.

Taliban fighters appear quieted in Afghanistan Andrew Burton / New York Times News Service

Snow blankets New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport on Sunday. Severe winter weather disrupted holiday travel by air, rail and road in the region and centered its force on the New York metropolitan area by late afternoon.

Snowstorm coats East, frustrating holiday travel By Sara Kugler Frazier The Associated Press

NEW YORK — A winter storm made travel torturous in the Northeast on Sunday, dropping a thick layer of snow that stranded thousands of airline, train and bus passengers and made motorists think twice about hitting after-Christmas sales. More than a foot of snow was expected in some areas, including New York and Boston, where an aquarium had to protect — of all things — penguin ice sculptures from the elements. A dumping of up to 20 inches had been forecast for Philadelphia, where the Eagles-Vikings NFL game was postponed because of the storm, but by early evening meteorologists said the city would end up getting no more than a foot. More than 1,400 flights had been canceled out of the New York City area’s three major airports alone, and more cancellations were expected today. For many people, however, the storm’s timing was perfect: the day after Christmas, a Sunday, no school for at least a week. “Love snowy days when I don’t have to go anywhere. Staying in — just me and my cozy new socks,” author Neesha Meminger

Julio Cortez / The Associated Press

Morris Farimi, 70, of Philadelphia, waits for a challenger in a game of chess Sunday after finding out his flight to Germany had been canceled at Newark Liberty International Airport. wrote on Twitter from her home in the Bronx. Colleen and Graham James, of Montclair, N.J., represented the other side of the coin. They were at Newark Airport with their two young children and their dachshund, trying to reach family in Iowa, but their connecting flight to Chicago was delayed more than 2½ hours. “We left the day after Christ-

mas to avoid the Christmas craze. I guess that didn’t work out so well,” Colleen James said. Airlines canceled flights throughout the Northeast and at airports in Washington, D.C., Baltimore, Chicago and the Carolinas. They expected more cancellations today, but were trying to rebook passengers and hoped to resume normal operations Tuesday.

Medicaid bonuses to reward states for insuring more children By Kevin Sack New York Times News Service

The Obama administration plans to announce today that it will make $206 million in bonus Medicaid payments to 15 states — with more than a fourth of the total going to Alabama — for signing up children who are eligible for public health insurance but had previously failed to enroll. The payments, which were established when Congress and President Barack Obama reauthorized the Children’s Health Insurance Program in 2009, are aimed at one of the most persistent frustrations in government

health care: the inability to enroll an estimated 4.7 million children who would be eligible for subsidized coverage if their families could be found and alerted. Two of every three uninsured children are thought to meet the income criteria for government insurance programs. Kathleen Sebelius, the secretary of health and human services, has called the matter “a moral obligation” and has challenged health care providers, state and local governments, and community groups to seek out eligible children. The bonus grants are distrib-

uted according to a formula. To qualify, states must have adopted at least five of eight measures aimed at streamlining enrollment for children in public insurance programs and have recorded Medicaid caseload increases that could not be attributed solely to a worsening economy. Thirty-two states did not even apply for the grants. Three of the 18 that did apply did not qualify for payments. Alabama will receive a $55 million bonus, more than twice as much as any other state, for having 133,000 more children on its Medicaid rolls than projected by a formulated baseline.

By Eric Schmitt New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The deadliest group of Taliban fighters in Afghanistan has not conducted a complex large-scale attack in the capital city of Kabul for seven months, its momentum stymied as elite U.S.-led commandos have escalated raids against the militants’ bombmakers and logisticians. But in a testament to the resiliency of the fighters, the so-called Haqqani network, and a nod to the fragility of the allied gains, the White House is not trumpeting this assessment. Instead, it is tucked into a classified portion of the Obama administration’s yearend review of its Afghanistan war strategy, and senior U.S. officials speak of it in cautious terms, as if not wanting to jinx the positive trend. That is because even in its weakened state, the network remains the most formidable enemy that American troops face in Afghanistan, and the group is showing signs of adapting its tactics and shifting its combatants to counter the allied strategy, American commanders say. In many ways, the war in

Afghanistan, particularly in the rugged eastern part, is a war against the Haqqani family, whose patriarch, Jalaluddin Haqqani, was a legendary guerrilla fighter in the Central Intelligence Agency-backed campaign to oust the Soviets from Afghanistan in the 1980s. His son, Sirajuddin, now runs the group’s daily operations from his haven in Pakistan, and he has made aggressive efforts to recruit foreign fighters from the Persian Gulf and elsewhere in Central Asia. The Haqqani network is considered a part of the Afghan Taliban, and is a key ally and protector of al-Qaida’s top leadership, whose members are believed to be hiding in Pakistan’s remote border regions. American and other Western intelligence officials believe that Pakistan’s powerful spy agency, the InterServices Intelligence Directorate, or ISI, shields the Haqqanis in exchange for the network’s attacks against Pakistan’s archrival, India, in Afghanistan.

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A4 Monday, December 27, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Land

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Snowmobilers gather near the snowbank Sunday at Dutchman Flat Sno-park. The snowpack in the Upper Deschutes and Crooked River basins is at 116 percent of average, but that can change in a hurry since it’s early in the season.

Snowpack Continued from A1 Across the Upper Deschutes and Crooked River basins, the snowpack was at 116 percent of average late last week, according to information from the Natural Resources Conservation Service. It’s still early in the season, said Kyle Gorman, south central region manager with the Oregon Water Resources Department, and the first official snowpack measurement doesn’t take place

N  B ‘Octomom’ faces eviction from home LOS ANGELES — The man who sold his Southern California home to “Octomom” Nadya Suleman said Sunday that he’s going ahead with eviction proceedings because she hasn’t made a long overdue $450,000 payment. Amer Haddadin said he’ll evict Suleman if she and her lawyer Jeff Czech don’t pay the balance on the house by Friday. A balloon payment was due Oct. 9. “I think they have money, but they are hiding the money,” Haddadin said. Suleman and Czech were served notice on Dec. 2 by mail and by hand, Haddadin said. He expects the eviction to be speedy. Suleman and her 14 children have lived in the fourbedroom house for nearly two years, ever since she brought her octuplets home to the quiet cul-de-sac in La Habra, about 25 miles east of Los Angeles. Her father purchased the home for $565,000, including a $130,000 down payment.

Abortion doctor’s killing still hot topic More than 18 months after a Wichita abortion doctor was gunned down in his church, a federal investigation into a possible conspiracy continues in Kansas City. Federal agents have questioned more people in the past few weeks, while a grand jury convened after the murder of George Tiller is still under way. The focus, according to those who have been interviewed, still appears to be on a Bible-study group that Tiller’s killer attended. At the same time, abortion-rights advocates are concerned that a recent North Carolina case signals an escalation in the threat of clinicrelated violence. Tiller was shot to death in May 2009 in the foyer of his Wichita church while serving as an usher. Scott Roeder, of Kansas City, was convicted of first-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison with no chance of parole for 50 years. David Lloyd, a Warrensburg attorney who used to attend Roeder’s Bible-study group, said an FBI agent called him at the end of November. — From wire reports

until Saturday. Because the snowpack is still relatively small this time of year — it usually reaches its peak in early April — things can change rapidly, he said. A big storm could give the snowpack a 30 percent jump on average. And a couple of sunny, snowless days can shrink the snowpack down to below average. “We’ve got to see some precipitation on an almost-daily basis,” Gorman said. But still, he said, this is a good start to the winter season. “It’s much better to be above

average,” Gorman said. “We have had a series of storms over the past month or so.” This year is shaping up to be better, water-wise, than last year. Around Christmas in 2009, the snowpack was at 76 percent — and it stayed well below average until late spring. Water managers are still feeling the effects of last year’s snowpack. Due to the relatively dry winter in 2009-10, irrigators ended up using water from Wickiup Reservoir, and so now officials need to store the winter flows to help ensure the reser-

voir will be full by the spring. The amount of water flowing into Wickiup has not changed very much recently, Gorman said. And water managers have kept the amount of water flowing out of the reservoir and into the Deschutes River relatively low — at about 25 cubic feet per second late last week — in order to increase the chances of filling the reservoir.

Airports

covered by a pat-down, would be missed, the scientists said. “It’s not an explosives detector; it’s an anomaly detector,” said Clark Ervin, who runs the Homeland Security Program at the nonprofit Aspen Institute. “Someone has to notice that there’s something out of order.” Ervin was the first inspector general for the Department of Homeland Security. PETN, or pentaerythritol tetranitrate, is hard to detect. Odorless and similar to a white crystal powder, it was used in both package bombs shipped to the United States in October and the Christmas airliner attempt last year. Those who plotted the cargo attack hid the explosive in toner cartridges and “clearly” tried to trick baggage screening technologies, according to the Department of Homeland Security. Brian Michael Jenkins, director of the Transportation Security Center at the Mineta Transportation Institute in San Jose, Calif., said he was unsure whether an advanced scanner would have discovered the explosives in Abdulmutallab’s underwear. The U.S. Government Accountability Office has said it “remains unclear” whether he would have been caught by a full-body scanner. But a random assortment of security measures — and not the reliance on one technology or method — is key, Jenkins said. “It’s the mystery that drives our adversaries crazy,” he said. “We need the unknown.” The Transportation Security Laboratory, a federal Homeland Security testing site created in 1992 at New Jersey’s Atlantic City International Airport, began testing on full-body scanners in 2007. The detailed results of the testing performed in Atlantic City are classified because of security concerns, but according to interviews with more than a dozen former and current government officials and the limited release of its findings: • The detection of weapons and contraband varied by who was evaluating the images, indicating that some transportation security officers were less adept

at spotting unusual or dangerous items. • The “backscatter” rays can be obscured by body parts and might not readily detect thin items seen “edge-on.” • Objects hidden inside the body, in cavities, might be missed by both types of the scanning machines. “If you have someone who is rather fat or who has large breasts or buttocks, that’s a factor, too,” said Anthony Fainberg, a physicist and former program manager for explosives and radiation detection at Homeland Security. Fainberg has lobbied for handheld swabbing of hands and luggage for trace detection of explosives, especially on international flights. “If you have something hidden behind flaps of flesh, it can be missed,” he said. “I’m not worried about the safety of it at all, but I am concerned about what could be missed.” To address the litany of security and privacy concerns over the full-body scanners, federal officials are testing several new technologies that will probably make their way into airports in the coming months. Homeland Security’s research and design division, the Science and Technology Directorate, is testing a software patch being developed by the two companies behind the scanning technology — Rapiscan Systems and L-3 Communications — that would produce only a generic outline of a human body accompanied by a box or colored squares indicating a hidden anomaly or specific substance. An alarm might also be used to alert screeners to potential threats. But TSA Administrator John Pistole said that the software, called automated target recognition, is not scoring well in lab tests, producing too many falsepositive errors. “It is a relatively complex math problem, but we’re confident we’re going to solve it and solve it soon,” said Peter Kant, executive vice president of Rapiscan Systems. “But these things take time.”

Continued from A1 Government testing, which has been mostly classified because of security concerns, has also raised concerns about the effectiveness of the full-body scanners. Based partly on early successes, federal officials are planning to continue an unprecedented rollout of the technology over the next year. By New Year’s Day, about 500 machines will be in use across the country. By the end of next year, 1,000 X-ray machines will be operational, accounting for roughly half of the nation’s 2,000 lanes of security checkpoints. Following the United States’ lead, several nations have begun to test or install full-body scanners, including Australia, Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Japan and Russia. U.S. officials have also considered whether the machines could be used to enhance security at passenger rail stations. Federal officials say the scanners represent the best technology that has passed both lab and field tests. But as with reading an X-ray, training is the most important factor in making sure that TSA officers can spot potentially dangerous items on passengers. “The bottom line is that we are now able to detect all types of the most dangerous weapons — nonmetallic explosive devices,” TSA spokesman Nicholas Kimball said. “Even in small amounts, it can be picked up.” Two types of scanning machines — backscatter and millimeter wave — have been installed at airports since 2007, when they were launched as part of a pilot program at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport. Both machines produce the same fullbody images that attracted controversy; they work by bouncing X-rays or radio waves off skin or concealed objects. They have been installed at a quicker rate since a failed Christmas Day terrorist attempt last year in which Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab hid explosives in his underwear on a flight from Amsterdam to Detroit. The failed attack also prompted federal officials to use the scanners as a primary security technique at airports instead of a secondary, less frequent checkpoint feature. Still, many security experts say the machines are expensive window dressing meant to put the traveling public at ease. A recent paper published in the Journal of Transportation Security by two former University of California-San Francisco physicists said that images produced by the backscatter scanners would probably fail to show a large pancake-shaped object taped to the abdomen because it would be “easily confused with normal anatomy.” As a result, a third of a kilo of PETN, a type of malleable explosive, which could be dis-

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Continued from A1 Previously, there were scant rules or guidelines in place, only a 4-year-old “asset management” plan that recommended the state take advantage of Central Oregon’s then-booming real estate market. DSL spokeswoman Julie Curtis called the plan “fairly general.” She was echoed by DSL Director Louise Solliday, who said: “We sat down and decided that before we go out and purchase more properties, we ought to take a step back and make sure that we have policies and procedures in place.” Dennis Staines, a Bend homebuilder who co-owned the property, largely declined to comment other than to say that concerns over the deal had been misplaced. Earlier, he’d said the deal, in which the state would have paid $314,000 for .45 acres, would have been a great investment. The purchase had raised questions for some because Paul’s mother, fearing foreclosure and in the middle of a divorce with Paul’s father, had been wanting to sell the land, which had been languishing on the market. She said her son alerted her that DSL was interested in investing in cities in Central Oregon. He also called their business partner, Staines, to encourage him to contact Paul’s subordinate, she said. But because Paul oversaw the department’s land purchases, he alerted that subordinate, John Russell, that he had a conflict of interest because of his parents’ ownership, and could not be involved in the deal. He also alerted Solliday. Russell, a former economic development manager for the city of Bend, hired another former Bend employee who is not a trained appraiser to look at the land and provide an informal opinion on whether it should be purchased. The department had no rules requiring a fullblown independent appraisal to value the land it purchases, and Russell did not order one. Nor was any study done to determine whether Central Oregon remained as good a real estate investment as it was in 2006. The deal marked a new direction for the department, which has a core mission of managing nearly 800,000 acres of state forest and rangeland. Although DSL engages in land swaps and sales to benefit the state’s Common School Fund, the Old Mill purchase marked the department’s first cash purchase of urban developable land for

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investment purposes. Solliday said that in addition to killing the Old Mill deal, DSL also withdrew an offer it had made on another property in Redmond. She declined to discuss the details. She said the department hoped its new rules would ensure consistency in how purchases are pursued. “There’s no reason why we should rush out and do this,” she said of the department’s desire to invest in land within city limits. “I just think it’s good government to make sure we have procedures in place.” Solliday said the rules should be completed next spring, and it’s possible the Old Mill property could be considered again. Staines said he and the Pauls have renegotiated the terms of the mortgage on the property and suggested the pressure to sell immediately has been lessened. One issue that would need to be dealt with if the state does again look at buying the property is that an environmental consultant hired by the bank that held the mortgage on the land had called for it to be tested to ensure the land is not contaminated. The consultant’s report said the land is home to 1 to 4 feet of imported fill of unknown origin. In years past, some contaminated areas had been located and cleared up near the old mill site, but the Bluff Drive property had never been tested. Prior to the land board meeting in October, Russell told The Bulletin that contrary to the consultant’s report, the land didn’t need testing. But at the October hearing, Kulongoski said the question needed to be resolved. State Treasurer Ted Wheeler, who sits on the land board, was the first to call for pulling the deal from the board’s consideration. At the time, he explained the move through a spokesman, saying “many other real estate bargains could be pursued in Central Oregon that do not give rise to questions.” Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Bend, had questioned the deal, citing the familial relationship involved. She said she is glad to hear the state is formulating rules on how it goes about such purchases in the future. “It’s good news that they’re actually looking at this in a structured, calculated and strategic manner,” she said. “Real estate is a very touchy thing, especially here in Central Oregon.” Nick Budnick can be reached at 503-566-2839 or at nbudnick@bendbulletin.com.

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THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 27, 2010 A5

W   B Egyptian bus crash kills 8 U.S. tourists CAIRO — A tour bus slammed into a truck in southern Egypt on Sunday, killing eight Americans and injuring 21 others in the latest fatal crash involving tourists, the state news agency said. The bus was taking a tour group on the 115-mile journey from Aswan to the ancient temples of Abu Simbel along Lake Nasser, when it ran into the truck carrying sand parked on the side of a single-lane desert road, killing six women and two men.

Ivory Coast strike called to oust Gbagbo

Ayman Oghanna / New York Times News Service

A young Iraqi performs on his motor scooter at a gathering of motorcycle and scooter riders earlier this year in the Jadriya district of Baghdad. Riders have started gathering weekly for impromptu shows that are gaining popularity, emulating American bikers and giving way to a sort of underground scene.

Scooters Continued from A1 “I feel I am a rebel,” Hamra said, displaying a forearm tattooed with the logo of the rapper 50 Cent. “We took this as an American style. It’s like the idea of being warriors. Motorcycle people listen to rap or rock — they have their own warrior style.” He added: “In America, the rebels have their own streets and coffee shops. So we are following them.” His friend Ahmed Hassan, 23, wore a Che Guevara T-shirt he had bought in Kurdistan. By his account, he was one of a handful of riders who started the impromptu motorcycle shows in 2002, before the war and sectarian violence drove the riders back into their homes. Now, as security has improved in the last two years, they are back in force, and Hassan has become something of a minor celebrity, appearing on the news and earning the title

Hospital Continued from A1 Some are Afghan soldiers or members of the national police. Many, however, are civilians or Taliban insurgents. It’s often difficult to tell the latter two apart, and to the workers at the hospital, which is run by the U.S. Navy, it’s largely irrelevant.

‘The hardest cases’ About 15 percent of the patients are children. Most are here because of the consequences of war. But there’s also a steady trickle of patients who have cerebral malaria, burns from kitchen fires, car accidents, snake bites and obstetrical calamities or have fallen from roofs, where families sleep in hot weather. “Those are probably the hardest cases, when the kids come in,” said Cmdr. Eric Peterson, 40, an emergency nurse. “I don’t think people expect that when they come over here.” The Navy did expect it, and planned for it. “This is the first time the Navy has sent a pediatrician as part of a wartime role,” said Capt. Jon Woods, 45, a pediatric intensive care physician. “It is a recognized part of our mission.” Pediatrics isn’t the only addition to what is considered possible and necessary in war zone medicine. The hospital also has an interventional radiologist, who can snake catheters into bleeding sites that surgeons cannot reach. It has a 64-slice CT scanner that would be the envy of any radiology department in the United States. It has a neurosurgeon. “This is a new paradigm, having a neurosurgeon in-theater. But I frankly can’t imagine not having this capability,” said Cmdr. Steven Cobery, 44, a neurosurgeon who did 120 operations between April and mid-October.

Top-notch care One of the consequences is that some Afghans receive care here and at a sister hospital at Bagram that would be unimaginable elsewhere in Afghanistan.

Ahmed Damages for his ability to repair broken bikes. “It makes me happy to be an idol, a famous person to them,” he said, seated on his bright green dirt bike. “A lot of the original people left the country because they were sick of the security situation, getting harassed by the police. Now I’m teaching a new generation how to do tricks.” Sunni and Shiite, the riders came from all parts of the city — defying parents, avoiding the police and hoping for safe passage through a city still dotted with danger zones. A police cruiser kept them under close watch. Haider Ahmed, 19, parked his scooter by the side of the road to watch his friends. His family does not approve of his being part of this scene, he said, so he had to sneak out of the house. His brother had threatened to crush his scooter if he caught him in the shows, out of fear for Ahmed’s safety. “When we’re here, we forget everything around us,” Ahmed said. “Sometimes the police come and

stop us, but we come back.” Twice the police stopped him for not having the right license plate and fined him the equivalent of $25. Ahmed, who works in a wire factory, said he spent all of his money and spare time on his bike, as others here do. A trick can take a month to learn and be over in a few seconds. Everybody tries to do a new trick every week. “It’s dangerous, and it’s not easy for anyone to learn and dare to do tricks, so that’s why I feel special and different from others,” he said. But he tempered any rebellious swagger with practical caution. “When I come here,” he said, “I’m always afraid someone will catch me.” As the sun went down, the riders seemed unwilling to return to their daily lives. One more trick, a last stunt in front of their friends — it was what they lived the rest of the week for, said Ammar Khathim, 22, who wore a T-shirt that said Street Boys. Khathim played down the idea of a motorcycle counterculture. “We are not rebelling against any-

In some cases, it would be rare in the United States. For example, Woods recently flew to a forward operating base where a newborn had been brought after a difficult delivery. The baby, four hours old, had persistent pulmonary hypertension and meconium aspiration — both life-threatening lung conditions. On the flight back, Woods breathed for the child with a squeeze bag and an endotracheal tube and gave her drugs to keep her out of shock. It was ICU care in a helicopter, delivered by a pediatric intensivist. The child stayed in the hospital for six days, recovered and went home. The alternative destination — if she had survived to get there — would have been Mirwais hospital in Kandahar City, which has a single ventilator for infants. Of course, many of the Afghan patients would not need heroic medical treatment if not for the U.S.-led war, now in its ninth year. And much of the time the circumstances of a civilian’s wounding are unknown or ambiguous. To accommodate long-staying patients, the workers at the Kandahar hospital have set aside a room for praying. Relatives are permitted to spend the night in the patient’s room. Staff members often get food for the families from the dining hall (and hold it until after sunset during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan). When a patient dies, the face is turned toward Mecca, the big toes are tied together with cloth as prescribed by Islamic law, and someone is called to say the proper prayers. “We try to be as culturally sensitive as we can, given the mission,” said Lt. Cmdr. Timothy Broderick, a nurse who heads the intermediate care ward.

for the exceptions. “We always take neurosurgical cases,” said Capt. Michael McCarten, 58, the commanding officer. “If there is a potential for a life-saving intervention, we’ll take them.” In the spring, an Afghan man arrived with his 14-year-old son, who had fallen from a tree. The man had taken the boy to one forward operating base, been turned away and taken him to another. (“Just like in the United States, parents here are very persistent,” Woods said as an aside, as Cobery, the neurosurgeon, told the story.) The boy had a skull fracture. Cobery removed a section of the skull to decompress the swollen brain. He put the skull fragment under the skin of the boy’s abdomen, where it would survive until the brain had fully healed. Three months later, the father returned with the child. Cobery put the piece of skull back where it came from. Case closed. The care and solicitousness extends to Taliban fighters, as well. The only difference is that they are under armed guard until they are handed over to other authorities. Cobery said, “Not one time has it come into my medical decisionmaking not to do something for someone because he’s a bad guy. To someone, he’s a good guy.” Several months ago, the hospital treated a man in his 20s, reportedly a Taliban fighter, who had had one leg amputated very close to the hip joint. The stump had become infected, and the infection had begun invading his pelvic cavity, an ominous development. The doctors told him that they were not sure they could save him. “He started to cry,” Woods recalled. “He said he just wanted to see his wife and kids again.” The orthopedic surgeons mixed bone cement with two antibiotics and fashioned the concoction into small beads. “In the States, this stuff is manufactured. We were our own manufacturing plant here,” Woods said. The doctors packed the wound and the pelvic outlet with the beads, then put the patient on extra-high-dose intravenous antibiotics. He survived.

Balancing act Although the hospital is important to the “hearts and minds” campaign, the military realizes the openness of the doors could compromise the main mission of saving troops’ lives. Consequently, if a certain number of beds are filled, the hospital will not take civilians unless they have been injured in combat. Except

one, just the traffic police and the police,” he said. Still, he added, riding in Iraq came with particular challenges. Replacement parts are nearly impossible to come by, so the riders had to worry about damaging their bikes. And for all the riders’ wistful thoughts of “The Wild One” or “Easy Rider,” one essential element was missing from the scene. Because the sexes in Iraq do not mingle in public for religious reasons, the shows have been a strictly male affair. Riders who have girlfriends say they cannot ride together on the men’s motorcycles. “It’s a babe magnet,” said Messar al-Saffar, 33, speaking English, “but in Iraq, it’s hard to get your girlfriend on the back.” He added: “It helps with the stress. You cannot imagine. When we go on the highway, we forget it and loosen up.”

ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast — Allies of the man who the international community says won Ivory Coast’s disputed presidential election called Sunday for a general strike that would last until the incumbent hanging on to power concedes defeat and leaves office. It was the latest form of pressure to try to force Laurent

Gbagbo from the presidency nearly a month after the United Nations said his political rival, Alassane Ouattara, won the runoff vote. Gbagbo has refused to leave despite international calls for his ouster, and West African leaders say they now will remove him by force if he fails to go.

Suspected U.S. strike kills 6 in Pakistan DERA ISMAIL KHAN, Pakistan — Suspected U.S. missiles struck a vehicle in a militant stronghold on Pakistan’s side of the border with Afghanistan early today, killing six people, Pakistani intelligence officials said. The attack in the North Waziristan tribal region came in the final days of a year that has witnessed an unprecedented number of such drone-fired strikes on Pakistani soil, part of a ramped-up U.S. campaign to take out al-Qaida and Taliban fighters seeking sanctuary outside Afghanistan. — From wire reports

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A6 Monday, December 27, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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L

Inside

B

OREGON Wildlife officials to revamp state black bear plan, see Page B3. OBITUARIES Carlos Perez, former president of Venezuela, see Page B5.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2010

To create Zone change a ‘milestone’ for Bend development preserve, New designation for 256 acres should make selling land easier for city land trust purchases 450 acres JUNIPER RIDGE

By Nick Grube The Bulletin

The city of Bend seems to have cleared another hurdle in its multimillion-dollar Juniper Ridge development that should make it easier to sell land to prospective businesses. On Wednesday, a hearings officer approved a zone change for about 256 acres of land in Juniper Ridge

The

that will be dedicated for light industrial uses, and would also allow for some limited office space, such as corporate or regional headquarters. Assuming there isn’t an appeal — which officials said is unlikely — the next step would be to split the 256acre employment subdistrict into parcels and create a marketing plan to help advertise the lots.

“There now is a clear path for developing the employment subdistrict,” Bend Development Manager Jerry Mitchell said. “The zone change was our last big push in getting land to market. It’s a big milestone for us.” Juniper Ridge is a 1,500-acre tract of land located in northeast Bend that the city received from

Deschutes County in 1990. The city wants to turn Juniper Ridge into a planned, mixed-use community that would include businesses, housing, a town center and possibly even a university. Once completed, the development might resemble something like NorthWest Crossing on Bend’s west side, but on a much larger scale. Mitchell has even described Juniper Ridge as sort of a “city within a city.” See Juniper / B2

waffles are

Bend nonprofit finalizes deal for plot along Whychus Creek, but it’s still short of $2.9M goal By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

worth the trip Skiers brave cold for free breakfast fare at Meissner Snow Shelter on Sunday morning By Nick Grube The Bulletin

H

e a r t- sh ap e d waffles, Nutella and hot cocoa

made for an out-of-theway breakfast for dozens of cross-country skiers who glided the trails at the

Conserved lands near Sisters

Virginia Meissner Sno-

The Deschutes Land Trust has purchased the Whychus Canyon Preserve, and is raising the final funds for the project this week.

park on Sunday morning. The free treats, served inside the Meissner Snow Shelter about 1.5 miles from the parking lot, were courtesy of the Tumalo Langlauf Club as part of a campaign to raise awareness about the local cross-country ski group. “It’s just one more kind of outreach opportunity for the club to let people know who we are,” said Walter McKnight, in between making waffles with an antique iron. “And what better way to get people’s attention than by giving them free food.” McKnight, 43, who donned a red and white apron and ski cap with long blond braids attached, is vice president of the Tumalo Langlauf Club. He said his group keeps the Virginia Meissner Sno-park’s trails groomed during the winter months using proceeds from membership dues and donations that are generated by events like Sunday’s waffle feed. “We just want more and more people to join the club and support what we’re doing,” he said. For some of the skiers Sunday, the waffles were a welcome surprise in a break from their treks. But many others planned their trips knowing there would be breakfast at the end of their jaunts. Lymen Smith, 50, who lives in Singapore and owns a home in Bend, was one of the people who knew he’d be eating waffles at the shelter. See Waffles / B2

“This was a very good incentive to get her out. We said there’s waffles and hot chocolate at the end, and she said ‘let’s go.’” — Lymen Smith, traveled with daughter to snow shelter

The Deschutes Land Trust has bought 450 acres of land northeast of Sisters to protect as the Whychus Canyon Preserve, designed to include a trail system that will be open to the public as well as improved fish habitat. And the group is about $20,000 shy of making its goal of raising $2.9 million for the project, which will also help fund restoration work and serve as an endowment for the property, according to Executive Director Brad Chalfant. Chalfant said he is confident that with additional pledges and anticipated donations, the Bend nonprofit will be able to reach that figure by the end of the week. “The year-end push is always a feverish one, but I think things are coming together,” he said. “We’ve had lots of conversations with folks, some pledges and some commitments that would get us to where we need to go.” The property stretches along two miles of Whychus Creek, downstream of Sisters, and the Land Trust finalized the purchase last week. Most of the funds to buy the property came from sources such as the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, which gives grants funded by the lottery, the Pelton Fund and other foundations, but the Land Trust had to raise $400,000 from private donations. The organization turned to a variety of groups who could be particularly interested in the proposed Whychus Canyon Preserve, Chalfant said, including fly fishermen and birders, hikers and Sisters residents. See Whychus / B2

Alder Springs Rimrock Ranch (private) Indian Ford Meadow Preserve Camp Polk Meadow 20 Indian Preserve 126

Whychus Creek

Whychus Canyon Preserve

Ford Creek

(450 acres) 242

Sisters

Whychus Creek

126 MILES

20

Source: Deschutes Land Trust

0

2

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

CENTRAL OREGON WEATHER

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

ABOVE: Walter McKnight, 43, from Bend, forks hot waffles from an antique waffle iron onto a plate for awaiting cross-country skiers Sunday. Aside from the batter, he said the long-handled waffle iron is the “key” ingredient. AT LEFT: Lymen Smith, 50, left, and his daughter Sadie Smith, 12, who both live in Singapore and have a house in Bend, enjoy warm waffles together at the Meissner Snow Shelter.

Cloudy with chance of rain and snow in this week’s forecast By Nick Grube The Bulletin

Don’t expect much sunshine in Central Oregon this week, as it’ll be mostly cloudy with high chances of rain and snow starting today and heading into Thursday. After that, forecasts from the National Weather Service in Pendleton show it’s probably going to get cold, with evening temperatures dipping into the teens and single digits. “It’ll be kind of wet, slushy days and snowy nights,” NWS forecaster Rob Brooks said of the early part of the week. “Toward the end of the week, it starts to get all crusty and crunched up a bit with those cold temperatures.” Today is expected to be mostly cloudy with a chance of snow in the morning that could turn into rain or snow in the afternoon. High temperatures will be between 34 and 40 degrees, with the snow level hovering around 4,000 feet. See Weather / B2


C OV ER S T OR I ES

B2 Monday, December 27, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Weather

Juniper

Continued from B1 On Tuesday, temperatures are expected to remain about the same, but snow is likely during the day, with the snow level rising to 5,000 feet. Snow showers are also likely Wednesday, with daytime temperatures estimated to be 29 to 34 degrees. Wednesday evening temperatures are expected to be 12 to 17 degrees. Beginning Thursday and heading into New Year’s Day on Saturday, the NWS forecasts it will remain cloudy and daytime temperatures will range between 22 and 29 degrees. At night however, temperatures are expected to fall to 1 to 10 degrees Thursday, 3 to 8 degrees Friday and 7 to 12 degrees Saturday.

“Yummy,” she said with a mouth full and a grin. That sentiment was something all the skiers had in common, even among those who already ate breakfast and decided they couldn’t resist having “brunch” once finding the snow shelter. “It’s fantastic,” said Heidi Thompson, 30, of Bend. “Hot food always tastes better in the back country.” The Tumalo Langlauf Club is planning to host another waffle feed at the Meissner Snow Shelter on Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 6.

Continued from B1 Since fiscal year 2005-06, the city of Bend has spent nearly $20 million on Juniper Ridge, according to a May financial report. It has only received about $9.5 million through land sales. The three businesses that have bought land in Juniper Ridge are Les Schwab, Suterra LLC and PacifiCorp. Those businesses are all in the 256acre employment subdistrict. Up until recently, the city was struggling with how to move forward with development on Juniper Ridge. Much of this had to do with traffic congestion at U.S. Highway 97 and Cooley Road that would only get worse as more businesses moved in. The Oregon Department of Transportation required major traffic improvements to take place around the intersection to help decrease congestion that would come from these additional businesses. But ODOT also wanted the improvements to take place before new businesses opened up. The city, however, didn’t have the millions of dollars to make these improvements, which basically meant Juniper Ridge and future development there was basically stuck.

Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

ODOT agreement

Nick Grube can be reached at 541-6332160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com. Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Mary Tebeau, 43, and her husband Bryan Tebeau, 43, both of Bend, leave the Meissner Snow Shelter after eating some free waffles.

Whychus Continued from B1 “The opportunity that this property creates, for essentially a future regional trail system that runs from Sisters all the way out to the (Crooked River) National Grasslands, is a pretty significant one,” he said. The proposed preserve could also provide prime habitat for steelhead that biologists are working to reintroduce to Whychus Creek, Chalfant said, adding that he was pleased to see the fishing community’s interest in the project. One thing Chalfant said he is concerned about, however, is that the donations to the Whychus Canyon project could be overshadowing regular donations for the Land Trust’s ongoing operating costs — which allow staffers to set up projects like the Whychus effort. “This is still a tough economy, and it’s a tough time for all nonprofits,” he said. “In a way, we’re competing against ourselves.” With the funds almost all in line for the Whychus Canyon Preserve, Chalfant said the question is more about when work could start on setting up a trail system and restoring habitat once the purchase goes through — something he said he hopes to do as soon as possible. “Our hope is to get the property opened up for a dedication sometime this summer,” he said, “so that we’ve got a good access point for people to get onto the property, to get down into the canyon for those that want to fish or bird.”

Waffles Continued from B1 In fact, he said it was the perfect excuse to convince his 12-year-old daughter, Sadie, to go cross-country skiing for the first time. “This was a very good incentive to get her out,” Smith said. “We said there’s waffles and hot chocolate at the end, and she said, ‘let’s go.’” With waffles in hand, Sadie said her first time cross-country skiing was easier than she thought. And though she normally chooses pancakes over waffles, she gave a single-word description for the food on Sunday.

But in October, ODOT and Bend reached an agreement where the state agency would allow for some development as long as traffic congestion didn’t exceed a certain limit and the roadway improvements were made over time. This essentially allows the city to start developing parts of Juniper Ridge without first having to do the expensive traffic improvements.

CIVIL SUITS Cases involving less than $50,000 are subject to mandatory arbitration.

Tumalo Langlauf Club Vice President Walter McKnight, 43, right, cooks heart-shaped waffles Sunday morning for cross-country skiers who stopped at the Meissner Snow Shelter for a break and a free snack.

Soviet forces take over Afghanistan in 1979 T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y

The Associated Press Today is Monday, Dec. 27, the 361st day of 2010. There are four days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Dec. 27, 1968, Apollo 8 and its three astronauts made a safe, nighttime splashdown in the Pacific. ON THIS DATE In 1831, naturalist Charles Darwin set out on a round-theworld voyage aboard the HMS Beagle. In 1904, James Barrie’s play, “Peter Pan: The Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up,” opened at the Duke of York’s Theater in London. In 1927, the musical play “Show Boat,” with music by Jerome Kern and libretto by Oscar Hammerstein II, opened at the Ziegfeld Theater in New York. In 1932, Radio City Music Hall opened in New York City. In 1945, 28 nations signed an agreement creating the World Bank. In 1949, Queen Juliana of the Netherlands signed an act recognizing Indonesia’s sovereignty after more than three

centuries of Dutch rule. In 1970, “Hello, Dolly!” closed on Broadway after a run of 2,844 performances. In 1979, Soviet forces seized control of Afghanistan. President Hafizullah Amin, who was overthrown and executed, was replaced by Babrak Karmal. In 1985, Palestinian guerrillas opened fire inside the Rome and Vienna airports; 19 victims were killed, plus four attackers who were slain by police and security personnel. American naturalist Dian Fossey, 53, who had studied gorillas in the wild in Rwanda, was found hacked to death. In 2007, opposition leader Benazir Bhutto was assassinated in Pakistan by an attacker who shot her after a campaign rally and then blew himself up. TEN YEARS AGO President Bill Clinton put the first black judge on the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals serving several Southern states. (The nomination of Roger Gregory had been stalled in the Senate, but Clinton used a recess appointment to put him on the bench.)

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Hoping for profit The city is still hoping to make a profit off of Juniper Ridge, and officials say that’s possible if they sell land at about the same pace as they have the past three years, which is about 10 acres a year. City Manager Eric King said a financial analysis, or pro forma, is being prepared to figure out different scenarios for selling the land, but he noted that there is definitely a “break-even point” within the first 256 acres of the project. “The financial stuff is still kind of a work in progress,” he said. “But our rough analysis shows that there is a high likelihood of a profit in five to 10 years.” He said that financial analysis should be completed early next year and will be presented to the Bend City Council once it’s finished. Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

N  R Filed Dec. 15

Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-382-1811 or at kramsayer@ bendbulletin.com.

City officials have said this agreement with ODOT was an imperative part of getting the recent zone change approved. Colin Stephens, manager of Bend’s Current Planning Division, said the zone change will make it easier for anyone who wants to build in Juniper Ridge’s employment subdistrict because it limits the red tape. For instance, he said when Les Schwab and Suterra first wanted to move into Juniper Ridge, the companies had to go through a public hearings process, and there would have been a traffic analysis to make sure ODOT’s restrictions were met. “That’s all been taken care of,” Stephens said. “(Now) if somebody wanted to build a building out there, it would be a fairly straightforward process.”

FIVE YEARS AGO Grass fires burned in droughtstricken Texas and Oklahoma (over the course of three days, nearly 200 homes were lost and the fires blamed for at least four deaths). Indonesia’s Aceh (ahcheh) rebels formally abolished their 30-year armed struggle for independence under a peace deal born out of the 2004 tsunami. ONE YEAR AGO Iranian security forces fired on Tehran protesters, killing at least eight and launching a new wave of arrests. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Former U.S. Sen. James A. McClure, R-Idaho, is 86. Rockabilly musician Scotty Moore is 79. Actor John Amos is 71. Actress Charmian Carr (Film: “The Sound of Music”) is 68. ABC News correspondent Cokie Roberts is 67. Rock musician Mick Jones (Foreigner) is 66. Singer Tracy Nelson is 66. Actor Gerard

Depardieu is 62. Jazz singer-musician T.S. Monk is 61. Singersongwriter Karla Bonoff is 59. Actress Tovah Feldshuh is 58. Rock musician David Knopfler (Dire Straits) is 58. Journalistturned-politician Arthur Kent is 57. Actress Maryam D’Abo is 50. Country musician Jeff Bryant is 48. Actor Ian Gomez is 46. Actress Theresa Randle is 46. Actress Eva LaRue is 44. Professional wrestler and actor Bill Goldberg is 44. Actress Tracey Cherelle Jones is 41. Bluegrass singer-musician Darrin Vincent (Dailey & Vincent) is 41. Rock musician Guthrie Govan is 39. Musician Matt Slocum is 38. Actor Wilson Cruz is 37. Singer Olu is 37. Actor Masi Oka is 36. Actor Aaron Stanford is 34. Actress Emilie de Ravin is 29. Christian rock musician James Mead (Kutless) is 28. Rock singer Hayley Williams (Paramore) is 22. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “A dollar saved is a quarter earned.” — Oscar Levant, American composer, musician, actor (born this date in 1906, died in 1972)

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THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 27, 2010 B3

O A black bear peers down from a tree in Medford in January 2007. The bear had wandered into the city in search of food before hibernation. Oregon wildlife officials are finally getting around to revamping the management plan for black bears, years after it was supposed to be completed. The Associated Press ile photo

Bear plan out of hibernation Under threat of lawsuit, wildlife officials make management revamp top priority The Associated Press MEDFORD — Oregon wildlife managers are planning to revamp the management plan for black bears — years after the update was required to be done. The plan was set for revision in the early 2000s, but the commission shelved it in favor of plans for black-tailed deer, cougar and other animals, said Ron Anglin, administrator of the agency’s Wildlife Division. Now, it is one of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife’s highest priorities, and it should be before a commission by the end of next year for final

adoption, Anglin said. Williams-based group Big Wildlife, which wants the plan to be much less hunter-oriented, filed notice in mid-November that it would sue the agency for failing to update the plan, the Mail Tribune reported.

Reduce bear killings The general public would rather see a more “cautious” approach that reduces bear killing in sport seasons as well as for damage and nuisances, Big Wildlife Program Director Spencer Lennard said.

Lennard believes the department should pull back bear killing until it can craft new science into its plan. According to department statistics, Oregon sells about 30,000 bear tags annually, with about 1,700 bears killed statewide during the spring and fall hunting seasons. The agency estimates there are from 20,000 to 30,000 bears in Oregon. For years, Big Wildlife and other wildlife advocacy groups have been critical of the agency’s management strategies for top predators such as bears and cougars. They say that the state’s liberal hunting policies and laws allowing the killing of nuisance animals are out of step with Oregon’s public at large. The new plan will incorpo-

rate new studies and procedures since the plan’s last update, Anglin said. That would include the department’s annual mark-andrecapture study to estimate bear populations, which remain fairly steady and healthy, he said.

No shortage of bears “Nothing would indicate to us that we’re running short on bears anywhere,” Anglin said. Lennard said recent spikes in hunter-killed bears in southwestern and Eastern Oregon could suggest a species under duress. “The numbers don’t necessarily mean there are more animals,” he said. “It could be that there are less, they’re having a hard time and they’re stressed.”

O  B Groups appeal BLM herbicide decision

‘Gentleman jewelry thief’ sacks store

EUGENE — Several environmental groups are appealing a Bureau of Land Management decision concerning the increased use of herbicides. Herbicides have been limited on BLM land in Oregon to just four products for decades. However, the federal agency has decided to increase the number of herbicides and the purposes for which they can be applied in Oregon. About 25 percent of Oregon is under BLM management. Under the new rule, 14 herbicides will be allowed in Western Oregon. The agency says new herbicides can be used in lower quantities and are more target-specific than those available previously. The Register-Guard said the environmental groups accuse the agency of failing to consider alternatives that pose the least risk to human health.

PORTLAND — The police are dubbing him the “gentleman jewelry thief,” but there wasn’t much genteel about the way a masked man allegedly pushed through the window of a Gresham jewelry store and took two display bins of jewelry. On his way out, however, he allegedly thanked the three female employees and told them, “It’s OK, ladies.” Gresham police say the man and the driver of an SUV pulled up outside the jewelry store at a Gresham mall Thursday night and pushed through the window of the jewelry store using only their collective weight. The driver returned to the SUV while the suspect collected the jewelry and left. Gresham police say neither suspect displayed or implied that he had a weapon.

Maintenance man arrested for sex abuse PORTLAND — The Washington County Sheriff’s Office reports that it has arrested an apartment complex maintenance man for suspicion of sexually abusing an 11-yearold boy. Deputies arrested and jailed 54-year-old Doroteo PerezTapia, of Tigard, on charges of first-degree sexual abuse. His bail was set at $250,000. Police say Perez-Tapia abused a boy who was working with him in a vacant apartment. Detectives fear there may be more victims.

Mentally ill man sues Springfield police EUGENE — An Oregon man has claimed that Springfield police used excessive force when arresting him in late December 2008, and is asking the department and the Lane County jail to revise its policies regarding mentally ill suspects in custody. The Register-Guard reported that Mark A. Kemp says in the lawsuit filed in federal court in Eugene that Springfield police officers used excessive force when he was arrested for disorderly conduct and trespassing at a gas station on Dec. 29, 2008. Kemp is seeking unspecified monetary damages. — From wire reports

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Lane County church volunteers thrive on charitable home visits Helpers head out into community to give needy gift of time By Susan Palmer The (Eugene) Register-Guard

SPRINGFIELD — The delight was palpable. It spilled over when Violet and Lilly saw the Christmas tree in John Antone’s hand, and their happy laughter was followed by a spontaneous rendition of “Jolly Old St. Nicholas.” And it wasn’t even a big tree. Ten-year-old Lilly Jacobs and her little sister, 5-year-old Violet Kissler, both stood taller. But it was the final touch of Christmas spirit for the family trying to make a home in Springfield. “Oh, thank you!” Lisa Jacobs said when Antone and his wife, Rita, knocked on her door a week ago. Jacobs, 29, a single mother of three, moved her family down from the Portland area to escape family difficulties last year, and hadn’t planned on having a tree for the holidays.

Money is tight Her apartment is small and cramped, for one thing. For another, she doesn’t have a car. And she’s getting ready to attend Lane Community College next year, so finances are tight. When her grandmother, Joanne Schuky, called a couple of weeks ago to say she’d sent presents to put under the tree, Jacobs told her the family wouldn’t be getting one. Schuky, who lives in Ocean Park, Wash., wasn’t about to let that happen. She got on the Internet, looked up the Springfield Chamber of Commerce and told them of her granddaughter’s situation. The chamber called the St. Vincent de Paul Society of Lane County, and St. Vinnie’s turned to the Antones. It’s the kind of call that John and Rita get every week as home visit volunteers for the Catholic charity. The local St. Vincent de Paul is known for homeless shelters,

“We’re here to make sure they know they’re not alone. Time is your best gift. That’s what makes it special.” — John Antone, home visit volunteer affordable housing units and extensive recycling efforts, to say nothing of its secondhand stores. But less well-known are its volunteers, about 100 locally, who do regular home visits to make sure those who are in need get taken care of. Those volunteers represent a link to the charity’s beginnings in France more than 170 years ago, St. Vincent de Paul Executive Director Terry McDonald said. Back then, a young college student studying at the Sorbonne in Paris found himself in deep discussions with fellow students about the relevance of religion in modern times, McDonald said. The conversation turned to the terrible poverty afflicting many Paris residents, and the idealistic students, led by Antoine Frederic Ozanam, concluded that they should do more than rely on the church to assist the needy, McDonald said. The students got names of those who needed help from a local church prelate and began visiting people in their homes. “They were bringing coal and wood to people in the urban east bank area of Paris in the 1830s,” McDonald said. Others took notice and began replicating the effort. Eventually the groups organized more formally, taking the name of the Catholic Church’s patron saint of poverty, St. Vincent de Paul. By 1846, there was a group in St. Louis and, eventually, the society spread across the world.

Today, it has hundreds of thousands of members in 130 countries on five continents. “No work of charity is foreign to this society,” McDonald said. But for all the high profile of the local St. Vincent de Paul, its home visit program operates in relative obscurity. The Antones have been involved in the effort for about four years. They got started after learning about it through Rita’s grown son, who became a volunteer, John Antone said. “That built a little fire,” he said. “It started a spark. The holy spirit finally got his hooks in me.”

Gift of time The home visit volunteers offer something that few people, even generous ones, give: their time. And the Antones do it all year long. Once a week, they get a list of people in their neighborhood who need help, and every Saturday, rain or shine, the Antones make their rounds. They go to the homes, not to inspect them or make sure the folks who have asked for help qualify for it in some way. “We’re here to make sure they know they’re not alone,” John Antone said. “Time is your best gift. That’s what makes it special.” Over the years, the Antones have seen almost everything: homes with no furniture where parents and children were sleeping on the floor. Apartments crammed with stuff, including fancy big televisions where people said they needed help getting clothes. They describe an alcoholic living in a 22-foot travel trailer who needed clean clothes so he wouldn’t be embarrassed when he went to his first Alcoholics Anonymous meeting. Antone smiled a little at that memory. What the man really wanted was advice on how to get his wife back, he said.

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B4 Monday, December 27, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Education study takes on seniority

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hispering “educational reform” in the Oregon Legislature is a lot like yelling “fire” in a crowded theater. You’re likely to be trampled by people scrambling for

the exit. Fortunately, public policy debates have a way of occurring with or without the enthusiastic cooperation of lawmakers. Last week, for instance, scholars at the University of Washington’s Center for Education Data and Research released a study challenging the practice of laying off public school teachers by seniority. It would make better sense, the study concludes, to make budget-related dismissals according to effectiveness. That conclusion strikes us as completely obvious, yet union contracts typically require districts to send “reduction in workforce” (RIF) notices to teachers at the bottom of the seniority ladder first. To be sure, many districts have the freedom to protect teachers in high-needs areas like math, science and special education, according to the study. But the data the study’s authors crunched reveal “strong evidence that seniority plays an outsized role in determining the teachers who are targeted for layoffs.” The data also indicate why the practice is so misguided. School districts in Washington sent out RIF notices to more than 1,700 teachers during the 2008-09 school year, and to hundreds more during the 2009-10 year. Many of these teachers retained their jobs, thanks in part to infusions of federal funding. Nevertheless, by generating a list of teachers marked for dismissal, school districts gave researchers real-world information to work with. The teachers who received RIF notices in 2008-09 had, on average, about 3.4 years of experience in Washington while the teachers who didn’t receive RIF notices had, on average, about 13.7 years of experience. The average recipient of a RIF notice also earned about $15,000 per year less than the average safe teacher. Finally, the average riffed teacher was less effective in both reading and math than the average nonriffed teacher, which isn’t surprising.

In teaching, as in many other things, experience does matter. The researchers calculated effectiveness by linking individual teachers to the performance of students in their classes. Using data provided by Washington’s department of education, the authors created “value-added” ratings for teachers who received RIF notices — and teachers who did not. Then they sought to answer the following question: Assuming that no emergency funding had materialized, what would have happened if districts had riffed their least-effective teachers rather than their least experienced? First, fewer teachers would have been fired. The teachers dismissed in the study’s effectiveness-based simulation had, on average, about eight years of seniority on teachers who actually did receive RIF notices. Thus, they also had higher salaries. To save the same amount of money, districts would have been forced to fire more teachers with comparatively low salaries. Second, dismissing the least-effective teachers helps students. According to the study, “the differences we are detecting between RIF systems are on the order of magnitude of 2½ to 3½ months of student learning.” Thus, while “the simplicity and transparency of a seniority-based system certainly has advantages,” the study concludes, “it is hard to argue that it is a system in the best interest of student achievement.” Neither is a seniority-based system in the best interest of taxpayers — including those who don’t have kids in school. If Oregonians want the biggest bang for their public education buck, they need to insist — to lawmakers and to local school officials — that the teachers are rewarded appropriately for their skill. That’s just as true of raises and promotions as it is of RIF notices.

Backers of casino were not all wrong T

he backers of a privately owned Portland casino failed badly at the polls in November, but they did win a moral victory last week. It isn’t a profitable victory, of course, but it’s bound to shape the casino debate in coming years.

Measure 75 would have allowed one — but only one — privately owned casino in Oregon. Opponents — primarily, Oregon tribes with their own casinos — argued that a private casino would hurt not only their businesses, but also state programs supported by the Oregon Lottery. Presumably, the thousands of Oregonians who pump their money into Lottery-owned terminals throughout the Portland area would, if given the chance, patronize

a glitzy private casino instead. Meanwhile, Measure 75’s backers argued that the real threat to both Oregon tribes and the state Lottery lay across the river in Washington state. The Cowlitz Indian Tribe has proposed an enormous casino only 15 miles north of the Columbia River, which, if built, would be the closest gambling mecca to Portland. At the time, however, the U.S. Department of the Interior hadn’t yet decided to take the proposed casino site into trust. Last week, the department did agree to take the land into trust, making what was once a potential threat to Oregon’s gambling operations very real. Something tells us the privatecasino debate is a long way from over.

In My View Earmarks are a form of bribery By Dean Finley Bulletin guest columnist

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here is a lot of conversation today on the subject of earmarks. It is hard to pick up a newspaper or dial in the TV or Internet news without seeing some comments on this topic. Those supporting earmarks point out how small a percentage of overall government spending that they represent and how much good they can accomplish. Those opposed to earmarks point to the millions of dollars being spent with little or no review and the amount of growth of earmarks over the past several years. They are also quick to point out some of the very questionable projects funded by earmarks. Both sides, of course, are slow to acknowledge the opposing point of view. Big or small, good or bad, earmarks have one common denominator. They are designed to promote the image of the sponsor(s) and will be quickly referred to when election time comes around. In this sense, earmarks are a form of bribery. The more money a Congress person can bring to his/her district and refer to in election cycles, the better his/her chances are of being re-elected. Certainly, every elected representative has the right to improve his or her image, but should he or she be able to do that with someone else’s money — yours? This seems to be only a small step away from the old Tammany Hall practice of buying votes. It is difficult to overemphasize the bribery side of earmarks. If someone offers a bribe to another person using his/her own money, that is between those two parties — unless, of course,

the objective of the bribe is illegal. But if someone takes money from you for the bribe, wouldn’t you have a legitimate complaint? But that is what sponsors of earmarks do. They take taxpayers’ money (yours and mine) and dole it out for their benefit — called image. Isn’t that getting pretty close to theft? Our elected representatives seem to be taking the position that taxpayer money is really theirs to spread around according to their infinite wisdom. Another aspect of earmarks is the flip side of some of them that is rarely or ever revealed. Harry Reid is a strong supporter of earmarks. In his own words, he can use them to help out Nevadans and thereby raise his image in Nevada. Does Harry get very concerned that his earmark for Nevada could harm a competing project in Oregon or Vermont or Kansas? Not likely. In fact, he probably wouldn’t even look into the possibility that it could. His primary concern is getting re-elected. Let Oregon or Vermont or Kansas representatives look out for themselves. Of course, this sets off a race to find “earmarkable” projects. Similarly, Ron Wyden will never go to Kansas and tell them how much of their money he is earmarking for Oregon. Still another aspect of earmarks is the unfair advantage it gives incumbents over challengers when election time comes around. Can a challenger refer to the millions of dollars he or she has brought home to the state over the past several years? Would Ron Wyden agree to give his challenger an equal opportunity to bring home money? Let’s hope not. One could only fear what a disaster this could bring about.

Nevertheless, the election playing field is far, far from level. It is no wonder that congressional representatives get re-elected so often in spite of a dismal approval record. Earmarks have another unique characteristic. Since expenditures have to be approved by Congress, they are never voted on by themselves. Instead, they are attached to another piece of legislation. Then a representative who otherwise would never approve of the earmark has to hold his/her nose concerning the earmark and vote for the legislation. The sponsor can, of course, point to the fact that his/her project has been approved by Congress. This is a little bit like the plea: “I didn’t rob the bank, I just drove the getaway car.” Another less well-known cousin of earmarks is “phone marks.” Elected representatives can apparently call a government department and designate that funds go to a certain project. Since the funds have already been budgeted, this does not increase the total expenses of the government, but it can certainly help one’s image. Who gave Congress this authority? Why Congress, of course. Just as they give themselves pay increases, retirement benefits and other benefits (think private jets). If it is phone marks today, can it be “Twitter marks” tomorrow? Will earmarks ever be banned? Not likely. Have you ever heard of a politician who gave up an unfair advantage? To quote Joseph Sobran, “Politics is a conspiracy of the organized but unproductive against the productive but unorganized.” Earmarks would seem to fit this description. Dean Finley lives in Redmond.

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Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

City of Bend must move forward with surface water project By Mark Capell Bulletin guest columnist

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his column is written on behalf of four Bend city councilors, Kathie Eckman, Jodie Barram, Tom Greene and Mark Capell. When voters elect city councilors, they expect them to make decisions that are in the best interests of all residents now and well into the future. Recently, the Bend City Council made some historic decisions that will help guarantee all of us a safe, clean and reliable water supply for decades. We voted to keep our Bridge Creek water source. It wasn’t an easy decision to make, but it was the right one. A few vocal critics wanted us to abandon our quality water supply from Bridge Creek and use only groundwater. That view is extremely shortsighted and, in the end, would have cost you, the rate payer, millions of dollars more. These critics wanted us to step back

and study the issue. Well, we have. In fact, very thoroughly. Over the past 30 years, the city has actually done three different studies, which involved several engineering firms and experts to look at the issue. Their conclusion? Each and every study said the same thing: Do not abandon that water supply because it’s an irreplaceable asset for the city. They say having two sources of water (Bridge Creek and groundwater) is smart, less expensive over time and more reliable. We agree, and after 30 years of study, it’s time to move forward. We now have to reinvest in the infrastructure that delivers the worldclass water from Bridge Creek to you. Our latest estimate puts the cost for the required components of the project at about $58 million, not the $73 million figure you’ve been hearing. There are some options, such as a hydropower plant, that may push the cost to

IN MY VIEW $73 million and generate revenue that will ultimately offset future rate increases. However, they are just that, options. The City Council has not voted on that part of the project yet. What does the $58 million reinvestment in our Bridge Creek infrastructure buy? First, it replaces the two pipelines that bring the water into the city. These pipes were built in the 1920s and 1950s, and, as you can image, are not in good shape or up to today’s standards. It also buys a water treatment plant required by federal regulations. We have to treat our Bridge Creek water by 2012, which is another compelling reason to move the project forward now. Other cities have spent millions of dollars fighting these regulations and failed. In addition, the new treatment plant will protect our water supply from the

effects of a wildfire. Right now, debris from a fire would shut down our Bridge Creek water supply. We simply can’t wait any longer. Yes, city water rates will increase to pay for this project. We don’t like raising rates. But this is one of those hard decisions that must be made now for the long-term benefit of the community. Having a reliable water system is a key component for jobs and economic development. We all know that is critical for the success of the city now and in the years to come. As we embark on this project, we will always keep the health of Bridge Creek, Tumalo Creek and the entire Deschutes Basin in mind. In fact, we always have. Bend is a key participant and leader on watershed issues. From the award-winning Waterwise program, to groundbreaking roles in the Deschutes Water Alliance, Bend continues to support scientifically based,

balanced, consensus-driven solutions to water-related natural resources issues. Even with this new project, there are limits on the total amount of water the city can divert from Bridge Creek. In addition, the new infrastructure will allow us to enhance stream flows, not harm them. When you turn on the tap at home, you expect a reliable flow of clean, cold water. When our fire department tackles a fire, it expects a reliable water supply with sufficient pressure. Thanks to our decisions today, you, your kids and even your grandkids will enjoy that same expectation. For many, many years, the city held off on water rate increases. The issues of aging infrastructure we face today are a result of that. Can we afford to let that trend continue? The answer is obviously no. Mark Capell is a member of the Bend City Council.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 27, 2010 B5

O Frank Bessac, circa 1948, the scholar and adventurer who fled revolution in China in a perilous yearlong trek through some of the most remote regions of Asia, died, Dec. 6 at 88. New York Times News Service

Frank Bessac, scholar and adventurer who fled from China, dies By Bruce Weber New York Times News Service

In 1949, as the forces of Mao Zedong routed the nationalists of Chiang Kai-shek and the Communist revolution spread north and west across the vast Chinese frontier, Frank Bessac, a 28-year-old Fulbright scholar in anthropology, was living among the Mongols near what is now Alashan in the Gobi desert. Bessac was well-informed about the conflict. As a former intelligence agent in China with the Office of Strategic Services — the World War II precursor of the Central Intelligence Agency — he had seen it coming. And when the Communist march threatened Inner Mongolia, where Alashan is situated, he knew he would be forced to leave the country. But rather than return to the United States by plane, Bessac, an adventurer by inclination who died this month, decided to take what he thought would be his only opportunity to explore the more isolated provinces of western China, which remained under nationalist control, so he set out over land. It would be a yearlong trek of about 2,000 miles layered with danger, privation and violence. Traveling often with serendipitous companions, often on camelback and on foot, Bessac wound his way west to Tihwa, now known as Urumqi, capital of the Sinkiang province (now Xinjiang), then south through Tibet and to safety in India. Across vast deserts and over the Himalayas, the journey took him through territory so remote that much of it had remained almost unchanged since the explorations of Marco Polo.

‘May there be a road’ “Nothing but 20,000-foot mountains and desert plains where no one can remember it has rained,” Bessac wrote of Sinkiang in an article in Life magazine shortly after returning from his trek. It was a region, he added, where the favorite farewell was “May there be a road.” Bessac shared the trip’s most perilous segment, including a full winter in an encampment at the base of mountains on the Tibetan border, with a small party that included Douglas S. MacKiernan, a U.S. diplomat who had been stationed in Tihwa. MacKiernan was also a spy. Working for the fledgling CIA, he had been keeping tabs on the border between China and Kazakhstan, in the Soviet Union, not far from where the Soviets had tested an atomic bomb in August 1949. A month later, MacKiernan and Bessac were on the road. In late April 1950, as the party was setting up camp, a Tibetan military patrol approached and, mistaking the travelers for bandits or Communists, opened fire. MacKiernan was killed along with two other men, becoming the first CIA officer to die in the line of duty. Bessac, at the time a couple of hundred yards away, heard the shots, raced toward the gunmen and confronted them waving a white flag. The killings, which the Tibetans recognized almost im-

mediately as tragic errors, were not reported in the West until months later. “A native runner took 27 days to carry the news of the incident to Lhasa, the capital of Tibet,” The New York Times reported on its front page on July 30. The Times did not mention MacKiernan’s CIA connection, which did not become publicly known until decades later. Informed of the error, government officials and the Dalai Lama, who was not yet 15, received Bessac in Lhasa as a dignitary. He was among the last Americans to see the Dalai Lama before the Chinese invasion of Tibet forced him into exile.

Professor in Montana Bessac, who met with the Dalai Lama again more than half a century later, at the WaldorfAstoria in New York last year, died Dec. 6 in Missoula, Mont., where he had taught anthropology at the University of Montana. He was 88. The cause was complications of a stroke, his daughter Joan Orielle Bessac Steelquist said. After a period of rest in Lhasa, Bessac continued his odyssey. Entering Sikkim (now a part of India), he was met by a Life reporter, and they produced a breathless account of the trip that reads like the diary of Indiana Jones. Many years later, Bessac chronicled the journey in a book, “Death on the Chang Tang: Tibet, 1950” (2006), which relied heavily on MacKiernan’s log entries as well as his own. MacKiernan’s life and death have also been recounted in books about the CIA. The accounts, though they differ on certain details, are consistent in their portrayal of the trek as an endurance test against terrain and weather amid political upheaval. Bessac and MacKiernan had been thrown together in Tihwa as the only two Americans there just as Sinkiang Province was coming under Communist control. They had to make a hasty departure, destroying documents kept in the U.S. consulate the night before they set out. Bessac wrote in his book that he was not an agent himself at the time; after the OSS was dissolved at the end of World War II, he said, he never joined the CIA. But as a result, he said, he was never sure how much MacKiernan trusted him as they dealt along the way with the conflicting and often unpredictable loyalties of Kazakhs, Tibetans, Communists, Chinese nationalists, White Russians, warlords, tribesmen and villagers. The men became sick and overtired from a diet of pure protein — wild antelope and yak cooked over fires of dried yak dung. At one point Bessac was thrown from a horse and fell on the submachine gun that was strapped to his back, cracking a vertebra and assuring back problems for decades thereafter. They coped with extreme thirst, limited oxygen at high altitudes, cold, scurvy, boredom and the persistent stress of enduring in a remote place, not to mention the wind in the Tibetan mountains.

Carlos Andres Perez, former president of Venezuela, dies By Simon Romero New York Times News Service

CARACAS, Venezuela — Carlos Andres Perez, the former president who tried to make Venezuela a leader of the developing world during a 1970s oil boom only to have his legacy upended in a tumultuous 1989 return to the presidency marked by civil unrest, coup attempts, impeachment and exile, died Saturday in Miami. He was 88. The cause was a heart attack, his daughter, Maria Francia Perez, told the news network Globovision. Perez burst onto the Latin American political scene in the mid-1970s when a quadrupling of oil prices suddenly enriched Venezuela’s government, opening the way for state-led development efforts and an era of glitzy consumption known here as “Venezuela Saudita,” or Saudi Venezuela. A gifted orator known for his bushy sideburns and flashy suits, Perez nationalized Venezuela’s oil industry and the holdings of U.S. iron-ore companies. At the same time, he secured a vocal role for Venezuela in hemispheric affairs, portending, in some ways, President Hugo Chavez’s more assertive foreign policy. In his first term, Perez re-established ties with Cuba and donated a ship to Bolivia, in support of that landlocked nation’s aspiration to regain sea access. He opposed the right-wing Somoza dictatorship in Nicaragua and encouraged Omar Torrijos, Panama’s leftist military leader, in his effort to gain sovereignty over the Panama Canal. Cultivating an independent streak that sometimes put him at odds with Washington, he tried to strengthen the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, of which Venezuela was a founding member. With that goal in mind, he bought a full-page ad in The New York Times in 1974 to publish a letter to President Gerald R. Ford. “The establishment of OPEC was a direct consequence of the

The Associated Press ile photo

Former Venezuela President Carlos Andres Perez gestures during an interview at his home in Caracas, Venezuela, in September 1996. Perez died Saturday in Miami at 88. developed countries’ use of a policy of outrageously low prices for our raw materials as a weapon of economic oppression,” Perez wrote. Perez was born Oct. 22, 1922, the 11th of 12 children, to parents who were coffee planters in Rubio, a town near the western border with Colombia. He studied law in Caracas and, in 1948, married his first cousin, Blanca Rodriguez, with whom he had six children. He was imprisoned that year for his opposition to a military coup and went into exile in 1949, roaming between Colombia, Cuba and Costa Rica, where he worked as editor of the newspaper La Republica. With the establishment of democratic rule here in 1958, he became a rising star in the government of President Romulo Betancourt. As interior minister, he oversaw a counterinsurgency against Cuban-backed guerrillas. Later, at the helm of the Democratic Action Party, he mounted his successful 1973 bid for the presidency.

That five-year term was marked by the rise of new fortunes in the private sector. Business deals were said to be discussed in the mansion belonging to his mistress, Cecilia Matos, who wore a gold replica of an oil tower on a chain around her neck; she said “Papi,” as she called the president, gave her the necklace, according to Fernando Coronil, a Venezuelan anthropologist at the graduate center of the City University of New York. After his departure from office in 1979 and the bust in the 1980s that shook Venezuela’s economy, Perez returned to power in 1989 following a campaign that demonized multilateral institutions like the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. Yet soon after taking office, Perez put in place an austerity program that included a $4.5 billion loan from the IMF. He announced spending cuts and raised gasoline prices, triggering the chaotic episode in February 1989 called the “Caracazo”: rioting and suppression by the security forces that took hundreds of lives.

Bud Greenspan, 84, filmmaker who chronicled Olympics in glory, dies By Richard Sandomir New York Times News Service

Bud Greenspan, who disdained scandals to write, produce and direct uplifting documentaries about Olympic athletes facing triumph and tragedy, died Saturday at his home in Manhattan. He was 84. The cause was Parkinson’s disease, said Nancy Beffa, his companion and business partner. Greenspan’s filmmaking style was consistently familiar; it was cinematic comfort food for those who believe in the Olympics as an inspiring, almost spiritual athletic gathering. He unapologetically glorified athletes for overcoming injuries, failures and obstacles with a straightforward storytelling style intended to strike emotional chords. “I’ve been criticized for having rose-colored glasses,” he told The New York Times in 1996. “I say if that’s true, what’s so bad? I’m not good at hurting people.” Greenspan once told The San Francisco Chronicle, “Sometimes the essence of the Olympic Games can be found in people who don’t stand on the victory podium.” From “16 Days of Glory,” about the 1984 Los Angeles Summer Olympics, to the upcoming documentary about the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, his films consisted of profiles of athletes — some stars, some unknowns — bracketed by the opening and closing ceremonies. The athletes told their stories, accompanied by stentorian narration. One day during the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Greenspan was watching the footage of a four-woman rowing race when he saw a potential episode unexpectedly unfold: One of the Russian crew members’ oars broke, and their race was over.

Showtime via The Associated Press

Bud Greenspan, who spent decades documenting the stories of Olympic athletes, died Saturday. He was 84. “How many times do you see four Russians cry?” he said. “This is an asterisk in anyone’s reporting.” But it was a story he felt compelled to follow. He was a distinctive figure, whose dark-rimmed glasses were usually perched on his shaved head. His attire came in seasonal varieties: a safari jacket over a polo shirt and a beige corduroy sport coat over a turtleneck. He preferred to let others cover cheating and scandals. In his film about the 1988 Summer Olympics in Seoul, South Korea, he ignored Ben Johnson, who won the 100-meter race in worldrecord time, in favor of Calvin Smith, who got the bronze medal after Johnson’s gold was stripped when he tested positive for taking an anabolic steroid. For Greenspan’s film about the 1994 Winter Games in Lillehammer, Norway, he skipped the sordid pre-Olympic attack

on the figure skater Nancy Kerrigan by people associated with a rival skater, Tonya Harding, to focus on the gold medalist in figure skating, Oksana Baiul. “I’m the lone survivor of idealism,” he told The Times in 1998. “I might be from another century.” Bud Greenspan, whose given name was Jonah, was born on Sept. 18, 1926, and grew up in New York. His father, Benjamin, was a New York City magistrate, a city marshal and an assistant corporation counsel; his mother, Rachel, earned a law degree after her four children were grown. He attended New York University while working at WMGM Radio (known at other times as WHN), served as an Army intelligence officer late in World War II and then returned to the station, where he became its sports director at age 21. He made additional money as an extra in the Metropolitan Opera chorus, where he was a spear carrier who was told never to sing.

Perez faced two coup attempts in 1992, the first of which was led by Chavez, thrusting the thenunknown lieutenant colonel into the national spotlight. Despite the turbulence of his second term, Perez still sought an active role for Venezuela in regional politics. He forged warm ties with Jaime Paz Zamora, the former Bolivian president, and sent a plane for Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the former Haitian president, when he was ousted in 1991. Still, resentment here festered against Perez, culminating in his impeachment and removal from office in 1993 on corruption charges involving a secretive fund used in part to pay for the bodyguards of Violeta Chamorro, the former Nicaraguan president. “When the country’s future seemed promising, his power seemed immense; when conditions deteriorated, he was abandoned even by his own supporters,” said Coronil, the anthropologist. “His trajectory illustrated the transient nature of power.”

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

2010 New Year’s Deadlines PAID OBITUARIES .............DEADLINE Friday 12/31 ...............................Wednesday 12/29 5 p.m. Saturday 1/1 ..............................Wednesday 12/29 5 p.m. Sunday 1/2 ................................Thursday 12/30 10 a.m. Monday 1/3 ................................Thursday 12/30 10 a.m. DEATH NOTICES ................DEADLINE Friday 12/31 ...............................Thursday 12/30 noon Saturday 1/1 ..............................Thursday 12/30 noon Sunday 1/2 ................................Thursday 12/30 2 p.m. Monday 1/3 ................................Thursday 12/30 2 p.m.

Obituary Dept. 541-617-7825


W E AT H ER

B6 Monday, December 27, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, DECEMBER 27

TUESDAY

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

LOW

43

32

Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

HIGH

STATE



41/32

40/31

40/32

32/23



Warm Springs

Marion Forks

42/39

39/29



Willowdale

Mitchell

Madras

Camp Sherman 37/29 Redmond Prineville 43/32 Cascadia 41/33 42/33 Sisters 40/31 Bend Post 43/32

40/31

31/20

39/29



38/28

35/27

Vancouver 43/39

Burns

Hampton 38/29

Chemult 35/26

29/21





Eugene Mostly cloudy with rain 47/42 and snow showers. Snow Grants Pass likely above 4,000 feet. 44/40 Eastern

Bend

Crater Lake 29/28

Elko

26/18

34/19

San Francisco 56/46



Idaho Falls



Mostly cloudy skies with a few sprinkles or flurries possible.

24/17

40/29

52/41

35/31

36/30

Helena Boise

43/32

Redding Christmas Valley

Silver Lake

Missoula

Portland

42/30

34/22

City



44/40

34/30

Fort Rock

46/40

Reno





Salt Lake City

43/29

36/22

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

HIGH

Moon phases Last

New

First

Full

Dec. 27 Jan. 4

Jan. 12

Jan. 19

Monday Hi/Lo/W

30

FRIDAY

Mostly cloudy, slight chance of snow LOW showers.

Astoria . . . . . . . . 47/40/0.79 . . . . . . 48/43/r. . . . . . 47/38/sh Baker City . . . . . . 40/30/0.10 . . . . . . 36/27/c. . . . . . 34/25/rs Brookings . . . . . . 51/41/0.65 . . . . . 52/49/sh. . . . . . 54/45/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 37/20/0.09 . . . . . 31/24/sn. . . . . . 34/26/rs Eugene . . . . . . . . 45/39/0.60 . . . . . 47/42/sh. . . . . . 48/36/sh Klamath Falls . . . 38/28/0.03 . . . . . . 37/28/c. . . . . . 39/28/rs Lakeview. . . . . . . 36/27/0.00 . . . . . 34/29/sn. . . . . . 38/30/rs La Pine . . . . . . . . 33/29/0.00 . . . . . 38/28/sn. . . . . . 38/23/rs Medford . . . . . . . 44/31/0.39 . . . . . 47/37/sh. . . . . . 48/37/sh Newport . . . . . . . 48/39/0.44 . . . . . 51/46/sh. . . . . . 49/39/sh North Bend . . . . . 48/39/0.98 . . . . . 51/48/sh. . . . . . 52/39/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 39/25/0.11 . . . . . .33/26/rs. . . . . . 33/27/rs Pendleton . . . . . . 53/31/0.02 . . . . . . 45/33/c. . . . . . 43/27/rs Portland . . . . . . . 44/39/0.25 . . . . . 44/40/sh. . . . . . . 45/36/r Prineville . . . . . . . 39/32/0.03 . . . . . .41/33/rs. . . . . . 41/28/rs Redmond. . . . . . .41/32/trace . . . . . .42/31/rs. . . . . . 42/26/rs Roseburg. . . . . . . 45/39/0.58 . . . . . 48/41/sh. . . . . . 51/37/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 45/38/0.71 . . . . . 47/43/sh. . . . . . 47/36/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 38/28/0.00 . . . . . .40/31/rs. . . . . . 40/23/rs The Dalles . . . . . . 47/31/0.01 . . . . . 41/34/sh. . . . . . 40/30/rs

LOW

0

MEDIUM 2

4

27

HIGH 6

8

PRECIPITATION

SKI REPORT

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . Chains or T.T. all vehicles Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . Chains or T.T. all vehicles Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . . Chains > 10,000 lbs. Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

LOW

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37/32 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.02” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 in 1980 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.17” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 in 1983 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 1.48” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.89” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . 11.43” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.93 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.69 in 1940 *Melted liquid equivalent

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

HIGH

TEMPERATURE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .6:13 a.m. . . . . . .3:33 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .3:48 a.m. . . . . . .1:58 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .8:22 a.m. . . . . . .5:11 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . .11:32 a.m. . . . . .11:16 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . .12:56 a.m. . . . . .12:28 p.m. Uranus . . . . . .11:31 a.m. . . . . .11:20 p.m.

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

Partly cloudy and cold.

9

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

Calgary

Seattle

35/29

40/28

Crescent

Crescent Lake

BEND ALMANAC Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:39 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 4:34 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:40 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 4:34 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . . . . .none Moonset today . . . 11:15 a.m.

LOW

32 14

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Paulina



HIGH

NORTHWEST

Central

Brothers

LOW

Rain and higher elevation snow will become likely across much of the Northwest today.

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 53° Pendleton • 20° Burns

THURSDAY

Mostly cloudy, snow showers, colder.

44 23

32/16

39/30

Sunriver La Pine

HIGH

41/34

41/34

Oakridge Elk Lake

Mostly cloudy skies today with rain likely.

45/38

Mostly cloudy, mixed showers.

Tonight: Mostly cloudy, snow showers.

Today: Mostly cloudy, mixed showers.

WEDNESDAY

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . 36 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 . . . . . . . . 48 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 . . . . . . 50-80 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-0 . . . . . . 64-81 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 69 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . .3-0 . . . . . . 41-44 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2-0 . . . . . . . . 77 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 30-32 Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 29-54 Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 Mammoth Mtn., California . .8-12 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . . 9 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0

. . . . . . 37-40 . . . . 134-220 . . . . . . . . 83 . . . . . . . 128 . . . . . . 39-55 . . . . . . 28-33 . . . . . . . . 39

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

Opa Locka, Fla.

• -13° Big Piney, Wyo.

• 2.75” Otis, Mass.

Honolulu 81/70

S

Vancouver 43/39

S

S

Calgary 32/16

S

Saskatoon 25/5

Seattle 46/40

S Winnipeg 28/23

S

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 18/12

Thunder Bay 29/21

Bismarck 31/15

S

Portland 31/19 Boston 32/16 Buffalo Rapid City Detroit 22/21 New York 43/19 29/18 29/22 Des Moines Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus 25/15 Chicago 38/20 26/16 28/19 26/17 Omaha San Francisco Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 32/19 56/48 City 32/21 Las Denver Louisville 36/22 Kansas City Vegas 46/25 30/18 36/25 St. Louis 57/40 Charlotte 29/19 35/15 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 51/24 64/49 45/29 32/14 41/24 Phoenix Atlanta 66/47 Birmingham 36/20 Dallas Tijuana 39/18 50/40 63/42 New Orleans 48/33 Orlando Houston 52/29 Chihuahua 55/47 69/35 Miami 58/38 Monterrey La Paz 66/50 76/52 Mazatlan Anchorage 79/52 18/4 Juneau 30/22

(in the 48 contiguous states):

• 78°

S

Portland 44/40

Boise 40/29

Billings 38/22

FRONTS

St. Paul 24/16

Green Bay 23/15

To ronto 25/20

Halifax 46/21

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .48/21/0.00 . 54/37/pc . . . 56/40/c Akron . . . . . . . . .24/20/0.02 . .26/16/sn . . 30/20/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .20/15/0.00 . .20/10/sn . . 29/17/pc Albuquerque. . . .49/29/0.00 . 51/24/pc . . 49/27/pc Anchorage . . . . . .17/4/0.00 . . .18/4/pc . . . 15/7/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . .31/26/0.00 . . .36/20/s . . . 46/29/s Atlantic City . . . .29/25/0.47 . 29/21/pc . . 35/28/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .51/25/0.00 . 56/43/pc . . 59/55/sh Baltimore . . . . . .31/25/0.02 . . .30/18/s . . 34/22/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .43/29/0.00 . 38/22/pc . . 39/22/pc Birmingham . . . .35/29/0.01 . . .39/18/s . . 46/27/pc Bismarck . . . . . . . .21/7/0.00 . 31/15/pc . . 25/13/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .48/33/0.11 . . .40/29/c . . .38/30/rs Boston. . . . . . . . .30/23/0.04 . .32/16/sn . . 33/23/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .29/25/0.19 . .31/17/sn . . 32/23/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .23/15/0.00 . .22/21/sn . . 29/26/sn Burlington, VT. . . .13/6/0.00 . . .16/6/sn . . 20/14/pc Caribou, ME . . . .25/11/0.00 . . .24/8/sn . . . . 20/5/c Charleston, SC . .43/33/0.75 . . .42/27/s . . . 51/33/s Charlotte. . . . . . .34/28/0.11 . . .35/15/s . . . 42/23/s Chattanooga. . . .31/27/0.00 . 34/14/pc . . . 43/25/s Cheyenne . . . . . .57/17/0.00 . 38/20/pc . . 40/27/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .33/24/0.17 . . .26/17/s . . . 30/20/s Cincinnati . . . . . .30/24/0.00 . . 28/15/sf . . 33/23/pc Cleveland . . . . . .27/21/0.00 . .27/19/sn . . 32/23/pc Colorado Springs 48/17/0.00 . 42/19/pc . . 44/25/pc Columbia, MO . .25/16/0.01 . . .31/21/s . . 37/26/pc Columbia, SC . . .38/33/0.43 . . .40/20/s . . . 49/26/s Columbus, GA. . .35/31/0.00 . . .44/21/s . . . 51/26/s Columbus, OH. . .26/21/0.00 . . .26/16/c . . . 31/21/s Concord, NH . . . .25/12/0.05 . . .26/7/sn . . 30/11/pc Corpus Christi. . .53/29/0.00 . 63/55/pc . . . .67/61/t Dallas Ft Worth. .42/26/0.00 . 50/40/pc . . 50/48/sh Dayton . . . . . . . .27/21/0.02 . 26/14/pc . . . 30/21/s Denver. . . . . . . . .51/18/0.00 . 46/25/pc . . 48/27/pc Des Moines. . . . .16/11/0.00 . . .25/15/s . . . 30/18/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .28/24/0.01 . 29/18/pc . . 32/23/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . .18/12/0.00 . . .22/15/s . . 31/16/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .59/27/0.00 . 61/32/pc . . 61/34/pc Fairbanks. . . . . -10/-25/0.00 -24/-34/pc . -29/-36/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .10/1/0.00 . . .26/17/s . . 27/14/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .39/20/0.00 . 41/14/pc . . 41/20/pc

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .28/22/0.00 . 29/22/pc . . 31/20/pc Green Bay. . . . . .27/16/0.00 . . .23/15/s . . 29/16/pc Greensboro. . . . .31/27/0.13 . . .32/18/s . . . 42/20/s Harrisburg. . . . . .29/24/0.00 . 27/19/pc . . 34/18/pc Hartford, CT . . . .28/22/0.04 . .26/10/sn . . 30/19/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .41/10/0.00 . .24/17/sn . . . 31/19/c Honolulu . . . . . . .80/72/1.29 . . .81/70/r . . . .79/71/r Houston . . . . . . .50/30/0.00 . 55/47/pc . . 62/57/sh Huntsville . . . . . .31/27/0.03 . . .33/12/s . . 41/26/pc Indianapolis . . . .28/19/0.00 . 27/12/pc . . 33/22/pc Jackson, MS . . . .40/32/0.00 . . .43/25/s . . . 55/40/c Madison, WI . . . .27/15/0.00 . . .23/11/s . . . 28/12/s Jacksonville. . . . .58/36/0.04 . . .49/24/s . . . 55/31/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .30/20/0.01 . .30/22/sn . . 27/16/sn Kansas City. . . . .22/11/0.00 . 36/25/pc . . 41/32/pc Lansing . . . . . . . .26/15/0.00 . 28/18/pc . . 30/19/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .60/48/0.01 . 57/40/pc . . 55/42/pc Lexington . . . . . .27/21/0.02 . . 26/15/sf . . . 32/24/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . .21/15/0.00 . 36/19/pc . . . 42/25/s Little Rock. . . . . .38/31/0.00 . . .41/24/s . . . 46/36/c Los Angeles. . . . .66/51/0.06 . . .64/49/s . . 63/51/pc Louisville . . . . . . .30/24/0.00 . 30/18/pc . . 35/27/pc Memphis. . . . . . .35/30/0.00 . . .37/27/s . . . 43/34/c Miami . . . . . . . . .69/51/0.30 . . .58/38/s . . . 66/51/s Milwaukee . . . . .30/26/0.00 . . .27/17/s . . . 30/19/s Minneapolis . . . . .24/7/0.00 . . .24/16/s . . 29/15/pc Nashville . . . . . . .30/25/0.00 . 32/14/pc . . 41/28/pc New Orleans. . . .41/37/0.00 . . .48/33/s . . 58/47/pc New York . . . . . .29/22/0.58 . .29/22/sn . . 35/25/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .30/24/0.37 . .29/22/sn . . 36/26/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .34/27/1.15 . . .34/23/s . . . 41/27/s Oklahoma City . .38/14/0.00 . 45/29/pc . . . 48/39/c Omaha . . . . . . . . .19/7/0.00 . . .32/19/s . . . 36/23/s Orlando. . . . . . . .63/39/0.10 . . .52/29/s . . . 59/32/s Palm Springs. . . .65/50/0.02 . . .62/43/s . . 64/44/pc Peoria . . . . . . . . .27/24/0.02 . . .24/13/s . . 31/19/pc Philadelphia . . . .31/24/0.14 . 28/19/pc . . 35/21/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .66/50/0.00 . 66/47/pc . . 67/47/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .24/19/0.00 . .25/16/sn . . 27/21/pc Portland, ME. . . .23/18/0.00 . .31/19/sn . . 31/17/pc Providence . . . . .28/23/0.14 . .32/15/sn . . 33/21/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . .34/28/0.50 . . .33/17/s . . . 42/20/s

Yesterday Monday Tuesday Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .42/21/0.00 . 43/19/pc . . 39/20/pc Savannah . . . . . .44/32/0.45 . . .44/26/s . . . 52/31/s Reno . . . . . . . . . .47/33/0.00 . 43/29/pc . . 44/35/sh Seattle. . . . . . . . .46/39/0.16 . . .46/40/r . . . .46/36/r Richmond . . . . . .30/28/0.14 . . .35/20/s . . . 41/20/s Sioux Falls. . . . . . . 7/-1/0.00 . 27/14/pc . . 29/19/pc Rochester, NY . . .24/19/0.00 . .21/20/sn . . 30/27/sn Spokane . . . . . . .41/30/0.10 . . 35/30/rs . . .35/24/rs Sacramento. . . . .58/46/0.40 . 55/44/pc . . . .53/47/r Springfield, MO. .28/18/0.00 . . .34/23/s . . 38/29/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .29/24/0.00 . . .29/19/s . . 38/26/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .63/45/0.01 . . .53/32/s . . . 60/35/s Salt Lake City . . .35/26/0.07 . 36/22/pc . . .38/30/rs Tucson. . . . . . . . .68/42/0.00 . 65/38/pc . . 64/40/pc San Antonio . . . .54/27/0.00 . 57/49/pc . . 60/55/sh Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .33/26/0.00 . 43/27/pc . . . 47/38/c San Diego . . . . . .62/56/0.21 . . .60/49/s . . 61/53/pc Washington, DC .34/28/0.01 . . .32/21/s . . 36/23/pc San Francisco . . .58/46/0.02 . 56/46/pc . . . .55/49/r Wichita . . . . . . . .31/22/0.00 . 42/24/pc . . . 45/33/c San Jose . . . . . . .61/43/0.00 . 57/45/pc . . . .58/51/r Yakima . . . . . . . 44/25/trace . . 37/28/rs . . .36/25/rs Santa Fe . . . . . . .47/23/0.00 . 45/18/pc . . 43/17/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .68/49/0.00 . 67/48/pc . . 67/48/pc

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .37/21/0.00 . 32/21/pc . . .28/22/sf Athens. . . . . . . . .62/55/0.00 . 62/51/pc . . . 57/42/s Auckland. . . . . . .70/59/0.00 . 75/60/pc . . . .73/67/r Baghdad . . . . . . .68/43/0.00 . . .69/44/s . . . 68/43/s Bangkok . . . . . . .88/75/0.00 . 86/74/pc . . 89/73/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .36/10/0.00 . . .41/15/s . . . 33/13/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .72/57/0.00 . . .73/52/s . . . 75/54/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .21/12/0.00 . 26/10/pc . . . 21/3/pc Bogota . . . . . . . .63/52/0.23 . .66/48/sh . . 65/46/sh Budapest. . . . . . .28/23/0.07 . . .30/19/c . . 29/13/pc Buenos Aires. . . .95/59/0.00 . 95/70/pc . . . 90/67/s Cabo San Lucas .73/54/0.00 . . .75/55/s . . 76/54/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . .77/52/0.00 . . .76/55/s . . . 74/57/s Calgary . . . . . . . .39/23/0.00 . 32/16/pc . . . 39/17/c Cancun . . . . . . . 72/NA/0.00 . 71/54/pc . . 72/56/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .41/16/0.03 . .44/35/sh . . . 50/37/c Edinburgh . . . . . .37/19/0.00 . . 35/31/sf . . 37/32/sn Geneva . . . . . . . .32/25/0.00 . 32/17/pc . . . 41/28/c Harare . . . . . . . . .81/64/0.00 . . .76/63/t . . . .79/62/t Hong Kong . . . . .61/48/0.03 . 71/58/pc . . 66/60/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . .63/52/0.38 . .59/32/sh . . 46/26/sh Jerusalem . . . . . .65/53/0.00 . . .66/47/s . . . 65/46/s Johannesburg . . .75/59/0.00 . .76/59/sh . . 79/58/sh Lima . . . . . . . . . .73/64/0.00 . 71/64/pc . . 73/65/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .48/39/0.00 . 55/50/pc . . 59/53/sh London . . . . . . . .34/19/0.00 . 38/35/pc . . 42/38/sh Madrid . . . . . . . .46/23/0.00 . 46/32/pc . . 50/33/pc Manila. . . . . . . . .82/75/0.00 . 83/75/pc . . . .84/76/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .93/70/0.00 . . .95/70/s . . . 96/71/s Mexico City. . . . .64/43/0.00 . . .70/38/s . . 72/37/pc Montreal. . . . . . . .16/9/0.00 . . . .16/9/s . . . 19/10/s Moscow . . . . . . .27/21/0.38 . . .32/17/c . . . 33/10/c Nairobi . . . . . . . .79/63/0.00 . . .80/60/t . . . .79/57/t Nassau . . . . . . . .75/64/0.00 . 64/58/pc . . 69/62/pc New Delhi. . . . . .46/45/0.00 . . .71/44/s . . . 73/53/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .46/34/0.00 . .41/35/sh . . 50/32/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .23/7/0.01 . . 10/-4/pc . . . . 9/0/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .19/10/0.00 . . . .16/9/s . . . . 19/7/s Paris. . . . . . . . . . .34/23/0.00 . 33/26/pc . . .35/31/sf Rio de Janeiro. . .90/79/0.00 . . .82/73/t . . . .83/74/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .52/41/0.03 . . .44/33/s . . . 46/32/s Santiago . . . . . . .86/59/0.00 . . .83/54/s . . . .84/53/t Sao Paulo . . . . . .84/68/0.00 . . .77/68/t . . . 78/67/c Sapporo. . . . . . . .30/21/0.00 . . 32/21/sf . . .33/20/sf Seoul . . . . . . . . . . .23/7/0.00 . . .35/24/s . . .32/17/sf Shanghai. . . . . . .45/30/0.00 . . .51/39/s . . . 50/32/s Singapore . . . . . .88/75/0.51 . . .87/75/t . . 86/73/pc Stockholm. . . . . .23/19/0.00 . . .28/22/c . . . 24/20/c Sydney. . . . . . . . .90/64/0.00 . . .68/62/r . . 69/61/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .55/46/0.00 . . .64/53/s . . . 69/57/s Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .75/48/0.00 . . .76/53/s . . . 77/54/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .52/37/0.00 . . .50/33/s . . . 57/39/s Toronto . . . . . . . .21/19/0.00 . . .25/20/s . . .32/28/sf Vancouver. . . . . .46/43/0.18 . . .43/39/r . . 45/37/pc Vienna. . . . . . . . .28/23/0.00 . 28/19/pc . . 24/13/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . .28/19/0.02 . 22/12/pc . . . 24/11/s


C

GREEN LIVING, TECHNOLOGY & SCIENCE IN OREGON

G

GREEN, ETC.

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THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2010

Cultivating growth of

GREEN JOBS

Dave Edlund, left, and Robert Schluter, co-founders of Element One, show a jug of methanol mixed with water and a hydrogen reformer coil. The items are key to the Bend company’s hydrogen fuel reformer, on the table between them.

Making equipment for solar installations, like this one seen in March near Christmas Valley, is an example of a green job.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin ile photo

Ed Merriman / The Bulletin ile photo

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin ile photo

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin ile photo

PV Powered employees work in the company’s solar inverter plant in Bend in June 2009.

On a green-job work site in June, Sunlight Solar Energy employee Marko Wessels works on a solar thermal installation on a home along the Deschutes River in southwest Bend.

New report outlines state’s plan for green-sector growth By Tim Doran

Green jobs — defined

The Bulletin

The legislation that called for the Green Jobs Growth Plan created the definition of a green job as one that: 1. Increases energy efficiency 2. Produces renewable energy 3. Prevents, reduces or mitigates environmental degradation 4. Cleans up and restores the natural environment, or 5. Provides education, consultation, policy promotion, accreditation, trading and offsets or support for any of the first four. Source: Green Jobs Growth Plan 2011 to 2019 / Oregon HB 3300

regon lawmakers will officially receive a report next month that lays out a plan to get workers trained and into green jobs and recommends ways to expand the state’s existing green economy. The “Green Jobs Growth Plan 2011 to 2019: An Eightyear Map to a Green Economy in Oregon,” developed by Bend-based 3E Strategies consulting firm, identifies ways to quickly create jobs in green sectors and also outlines ways to create careers.

O

It’s one of many efforts around the state and nation related to creating and training for green jobs. Nationwide, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act has pumped $500 million into green-jobs training programs, fueling a frenzy. U.S. Labor Secretary Hilda Solis told a gathering of union plumbers and pipe fitters last month that the federal government has invested in 189 greenjobs training programs in the U.S., according to a transcript from the Labor Department. In Oregon, the Recovery Act has provided $5.3 million to train workers in

GREEN

Keys to a future electric highway By Juan Forero The Washington Post

SUSQUES, Argentina — It’s the lightest of all metals, skitters wildly on water and can unexpectedly explode. To mine it commercially requires an elaborate process involving drilling, evaporation tanks and chemical processing. But if President Barack Obama is to fulfill his goal of putting a million electric cars on the road by 2015, a once-obscure metal crucial for the batteries in those cars, lithium, will probably be mined by the tens of thousands of tons here in the high Andes. Its boosters say lithium will one day rival petroleum in value, and that has prompted a race to secure mining rights across this craggy, bone-dry

SCIENCE mountain range where vast salt flats contain some of the world’s largest deposits. “These are the most notable reserves at the moment,” said Horacio Dias, a geologist who manages operations here for Exar, an Argentine affiliate of Canada’s Lithium Americas Corp. “We think there is enough here to last many years.” Mining executives are banking that lithium-ion batteries, which carry a longer-lasting charge than the lead acid variety long used in vehicles, will become cheap enough to help spur a

mass market for electric cars or gaselectric vehicles. The Obama administration, trying to reduce America’s reliance on foreign oil, has provided $2.4 billion in grants to car companies, battery makers and suppliers. Whether the salt beds here in the heart of South America become a lithium mecca, as mining companies predict, depends as much as anything on American scientists as far away as Watertown, Mass. There, A123 Systems, a battery technology company with roots at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is working to create lithium-ion batteries that would give electric cars a greater range — say, 200 to 300 miles — between recharging. See Lithium / C6

emerging green industries and $1.25 million to study green jobs and identify existing occupations that have green components. “(For example), what are the skills that make a green carpenter different from a nongreen carpenter?” said Erica Garavatti, a green jobs analyst with the Employment Department, which received the grant. A number of other stimulus-funded jobs programs have green hues, such as creating a master’s program in renewable energy engineering at Oregon Institute of Technology and improving the existing bachelor’s degree program. See Green / C6

High-tech electronics dressed up to look old By Roy Furchgott New York Times News Service

This has been a great year for the next new electronic thing. The iPad, new iPhone, the Nexus S, HTC Evo and other Android phones, the Kindle 3 and Microsoft’s Kinect caught the eye of consumers. But some people prefer their next new thing to look like an old thing. So what’s the appeal of the latest electronics wrapped in a retro design, like full-size jukeboxes that are really $4,000 iPod docks and manual typewriters reconfigured to work as USB keyboards? Has anyone ever said, “It’s a nice Ferrari, but it would be cooler if it

looked like a covered wagon?” There are theories: The throwback designs make challenging technology seem familiar. For the technically proficient, an old phone handset that connects to a cell phone seems comically ironic. Retro designs can also give a sense of permanence to disposable devices. Some of it is art. An example of the phenomena is a manual typewriter refashioned as a computer keyboard. Jack Zylkin, of Philadelphia, made one as a novel way for people to sign in when visiting Hive76, a Philadelphia communal studio for electronics tinkerers. See Retro / C6

OTECH


T EL EV ISION

C2 Monday, December 27, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Outspoken brother’s weight remarks weigh heavily on his sisters Dear Abby: After having been out of the U.S. for many years, I noticed upon returning that people here seem to be much fatter. I went to a family gathering, and virtually every formerly slim member of my family had also gotten bigger. I quietly mentioned it to one of my sisters, and word got around that I had “no manners.” My other sister, “Niki,” who has a degree in psychology, told me in no uncertain terms that people never talk about such things with each other. I explained to her that mentioning it once, or discussing the ballooning of America, can be appropriate. I believe our country has fattened up because of a lazy attitude toward exercise and calories. Niki vehemently opposes my discussing it. I learned later that she neglected to invite me to her son’s wedding for fear I would say something about you-know-what to her in-laws. I admit, I don’t have a silver tongue — but I’m disappointed my favorite psychologist has blackballed me and cut off communication. It’s sad to lose a sister this way. Please advise, Abby. — Brother Black Sheep Dear Brother Black Sheep: Why do I think there’s more to this story than you have written? Obesity has become an epidemic in this country, and the reasons for it are more complicated than a lazy attitude. You don’t need a “silver tongue” to apologize to your sisters for having offended them. Perhaps your “favorite psychologist” would have invited you to her son’s wedding if you had been willing to apologize. People who have weight issues know they are fat. They don’t need to debate it. And they don’t need you to remind them or imply they are lazy.

DEAR ABBY Dear Abby: I’m a 45-year-old male reader. I have been friends with “Oscar” for 20 years. He asked me to be the godparent of his new baby girl. As you can imagine, I was overwhelmed when he asked. I have never been a godparent. We discussed it at length, and I told him I needed to think it over to be sure of my decision. After a few days, I was still indecisive. Part of me wanted to do it, and part of me didn’t. I told Oscar it was an honor, but that I felt unsure and not fully committed. I knew if I were to accept and then reconsider, it wouldn’t be cool. So I bowed out to give him time to find someone else. Oscar’s reaction told me he was deeply angry and hurt. That night I hardly slept. I kept thinking how much I had disappointed my friend, his wife and their entire family. I feel terribly guilty. It’s clear that Oscar was expecting me to say yes. Is it wrong to say no when someone asks you to be a godparent? — True Friend in Wisconsin Dear True Friend: No, it’s not wrong if the person who is asked does not feel able to fulfill the obligations that go with that honor. Your friend may feel less hurt if you explain to him your reasons for not accepting and the fact that you wouldn’t want to agree if you couldn’t do everything that would be expected of you. Saying no sometimes requires tact, but I’ll give you credit for being honest about your feelings. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

TV awards and the people problem By Mary McNamara

Actress Katie Holmes, left, announces nominations for the 68th Annual Golden Globe Awards as fellow presenters Blair Underwood, second from right, and Josh Duhamel look on Dec. 14 in Beverly Hills, Calif. The Golden Globe Awards will be held Jan. 16.

Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — The always irreverent and not at all bitter Peter Tolan recently categorized the Golden Globes as an award show run by a bunch of “whores,” called the Emmys voting process deeply flawed and suggested that television critics be the only ones allowed to give out awards because they actually watch television. Having just seen the devastatingly predictable list of Golden Globes nominations — oh look, “The Big C” and “Boardwalk Empire,” which honestly thrilled no one — I say “amen, brother.” Kurt Sutter, who was on the same incendiary Hollywood Radio and Television Society panel as Tolan, seconded his colleague’s sentiments, adding that his show, “Sons of Anarchy,” got a nomination from the Television Critics Association, which meant more to him than any Emmy or Golden Globe recognition. Sweet of him to say, but utterly ridiculous, and possibly Sutter has changed his tune in the light of “Sons of Anarchy” star Katey Sagal’s recent Golden Globe nomination. One hopes not. But it is shocking, and indefensible, that a groundbreaking, well-performed show such as “Rescue Me” should go without while other much less remarkable shows rack up the noms and the gold. “Rescue Me” is not alone in this distinction of course — both “The Wire” and “The Shield,” two of the best shows of their time, were rarely, if ever honored. Even certain shows that have attained the Holy Grail combo — critical acclaim and big audience numbers — often don’t seem to have the appropriate hardware; if the television

Chris Pizzello The Associated Press

academy is really never going to give Hugh Laurie an Emmy for “House,” it should just stop nominating him. There is something to be said for Tolan’s argument that the members of the television academy are inevitably passing judgment on shows with which they are not familiar. The screening process — in which members watch a bunch of stuff in a small amount of time — is even more unfair to television than to film, not only because there is just so much more TV. Judging a show based on one or even a few episodes seems antithetical to the art form itself. The wonder and beauty of television is that, unlike any other form of entertainment, it is sustained, which is why TV critics often write again and again about various shows they have already reviewed. A good television show is an ever-

shifting biosphere. But during the awards process, television is judged less like television and more like film. It has to be — no one, not even a television critic, could possibly watch entire seasons of every single show. So is a show that has one or two stellar episodes among consistent mediocrity more awardworthy than a show that is less flashy but more solid in its excellence? Should the fact that network dramas air twice as many episodes as most cable shows be taken into account? Or is excellence excellence no matter what the package, and how on Earth is that judged anyway? Certainly critics have an advantage over the members of the various academies and even the foreign press association. We do watch a lot more television than the ordinary human and spend, or at least our editors hope, even

more time thinking about it — what the emergence of certain themes and genres means; if and how, the popularity of certain shows reflects viewers moods and concerns; why some shows founder while others soar; which shows are courageous and which simply smug, and on and on until a person (or at least a person’s spouse) could scream out loud and hightail it to Amish country. But the problem with awards of any kind is that they are voted upon by people — and people, as Jerry Seinfeld, channeling Larry David, once said, are the worst. The problem with awards is not that they are often imperfect to the point of ridicule. The problem is that we know this, and we make them seem so important anyway. Which they aren’t. Except, of course, if I’m handing them out.

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KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å News (N) ABC World News Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ This Old House Nightly Business PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å NBA Basketball Portland Trail Blazers at Utah Jazz (Live) Don’t Forget Don’t Forget That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Steves Europe OpenRoad ’ ‘G’ Garden Smart ‘G’ This Old House This Old House Nightly Business PBS NewsHour ’ Å

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››› “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” (2005) Johnny Depp. ’ Å Chuck ’ ‘PG’ Å Chuck ’ ‘PG’ Å

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Castle Anatomy of a Murder ’ ‘PG’ Chuck ’ ‘PG’ Å How I Met Engagement Two/Half Men Mike & Molly ‘14’ Hawaii Five-0 Nalowale ‘14’ Å ››› “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” (2005) Johnny Depp. ’ Å Castle Anatomy of a Murder ’ ‘PG’ House Unwritten ’ (PA) ‘14’ Å Lie to Me React to Contact ’ ‘14’ News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ News on PDX-TV Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ Antiques Roadshow ’ ‘G’ Å American Masters Classical pianist Glenn Gould. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Chuck ‘PG’ Å Chuck ’ ‘PG’ Å Chuck ’ ‘PG’ Å 90210 The Bachelors ’ ‘14’ Å Gossip Girl ’ ‘14’ Å Married... With Married... With Rough Cut-Mac Paint Paper Sew With Nancy Dewberry Shw Simply Ming ‘G’ Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Antiques Roadshow ’ ‘G’ Å American Masters Classical pianist Glenn Gould. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å

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KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman News (N) (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Lords of Nature: Life in a Land News Jay Leno King of Queens King of Queens Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Caprial-John Lords of Nature: Life in a Land

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Fatal Attractions ’ ‘PG’ Å Fatal Attractions Big Cats ‘14’ Å Fatal Attractions Reptiles ‘14’ Å Fatal Attractions Raging Bulls ‘PG’ Fatal Attractions ’ ‘PG’ Å Fatal Attractions Reptiles ‘14’ Å 68 50 26 38 Fatal Attractions My Pet Python ‘PG’ The Rachel Zoe Project ‘14’ Å Tabatha’s Salon Takeover ‘14’ The Real Housewives of Atlanta ‘14’ Real Housewives/Beverly Real Housewives/Beverly Tabatha’s Salon Takeover ‘14’ Tabatha’s Salon Takeover ‘14’ 137 44 Cribs ’ ‘PG’ Cribs ’ ‘PG’ The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘PG’ The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘PG’ ›› “Mr. Mom” (1983, Comedy) Michael Keaton, Teri Garr, Ann Jillian. 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Suite/Deck Wizards-Place Wizards-Place Good-Charlie Good-Charlie 87 43 14 39 Wizards-Place MythBusters Paper Crossbow ‘PG’ MythBusters ’ ‘PG’ Å MythBusters Mythssion Control ‘PG’ American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. Black Ops Brothers: Howe & Howe MythBusters Mythssion Control ‘PG’ 156 21 16 37 MythBusters Shredded Plane ‘PG’ NFL Football New Orleans Saints at Atlanta Falcons (Live) SportsCenter (Live) Å NFL PrimeTime (N) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 Monday Night College Basketball Connecticut at Pittsburgh (Live) Association SportsCenter 2010 World Series of Poker NBA Tonight NFL Presents College Football 22 24 21 24 College Football Boxing 1975 Muhammad Ali vs. Joe Frazier III Å Bowling Å Bowling Å College Football 1975 Rose Bowl -- Ohio State vs. Southern California College Football 1985 Rose Bowl -- Ohio State vs. USC From Jan. 1, 1985. 23 25 123 25 Boxing SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Still Standing ’ Still Standing ’ Still Standing ’ ›› “Home Alone 2: Lost in New York” (1992, Comedy) Macaulay Culkin, Joe Pesci. 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Å Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss: Next Great Baker ‘PG’ Cake Boss: Next Great Baker ‘PG’ Cake Boss: Next Great Baker ‘PG’ Cake Boss: Next Great Baker ‘PG’ American Chocolate Championship Cake Boss: Next Great Baker ‘PG’ 178 34 32 34 Cake Boss ‘PG’ Law & Order Amends ’ ‘14’ Bones The Finger in the Nest ’ ‘14’ The Closer (Part 1 of 2) ‘14’ Å The Closer (N) ‘14’ Å Men of a Certain Age (N) ‘MA’ Å The Closer (Part 2 of 2) ‘14’ Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Shangri-La ’ ‘14’ Regular Show MAD ‘PG’ Total Drama Scooby-Doo Scooby-Doo Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Adventure Time MAD ‘PG’ King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Dining With Death ‘PG’ Å Dining With Death (N) ‘PG’ Å Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son ››› “Independence Day” (1996) Will Smith, Bill Pullman. Earthlings vs. evil aliens in 15-mile-wide ships. 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons NCIS Legend ‘14’ Å NCIS Legend ‘14’ Å NCIS Gibbs works with Kort. ’ ‘14’ WWE Monday Night RAW ’ Å (11:05) ››› “Blood Diamond” 15 30 23 30 (4:00) › “The Condemned” (2007) Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew ‘14’ ››› “Grease” (1978, Musical) John Travolta, Olivia Newton-John. ’ Å My Big Friggin’ Wedding (N) ’ ‘14’ Mario Lopez Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew ‘14’ Mario Lopez 191 48 37 54 Celebrity Rehab PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:35) ›› “The Jerk” 1979 ‘R’ Å (6:10) ››› “Field of Dreams” 1989 Kevin Costner. ’ ‘PG’ Å ››› “Die Hard 2” 1990, Action Bruce Willis, Bonnie Bedelia. ’ ‘R’ Å (10:05) ›› “Marked for Death” 1990 Steven Seagal. Deuce Bigalow ›› “Bachelor Party” 1984, Comedy Tom Hanks, Tawny Kitaen. ‘R’ Å ›› “The Adventures of Ford Fairlane” 1990 Andrew “Dice” Clay. ‘R’ ›› “Terror Train” 1980 ‘R’ Å ›› “The Adventure of Sherlock Holmes’ Smarter Brother” 1975 ‘PG’ Nike 6.0 HB BMX Pro The Daily Habit Insane Cinema ‘PG’ Bubba’s World Insane Cinema The Daily Habit The Daily Habit The Daily Habit Check 1, 2 ‘PG’ Stupidface ‘MA’ Amer. Misfits The Daily Habit (3:30) Golf Tavistock Cup, Day 1 Golf Central European PGA Tour Golf Dubai World Championship, Final Round (4:00) “Santa Jr” (2002) ‘G’ Å “The Three Gifts” (2009, Drama) Dean Cain, Jean Louisa Kelly. ‘PG’ Å ›› “Eloise at Christmastime” (2003, Comedy) Julie Andrews. ‘G’ Å “Christmas in Canaan” (2009) Billy Ray Cyrus, Zak Ludwig. ‘PG’ Å (5:15) ›› “Tooth Fairy” 2010, Comedy Dwayne Johnson, Ashley Judd. A hockey 24/7 Penguins/Capitals: Road to the True Blood Bad Blood Sookie turns to Eric True Blood Beautifully Broken Eric reTrue Blood It Hurts Me Too Sookie heads True Blood 9 Crimes Eric is given a deadHBO 425 501 425 10 player must serve time as a real tooth fairy. ’ ‘PG’ Å NHL Winter Classic ’ ‘MA’ Å for help. ’ ‘MA’ Å members his past. ’ ‘MA’ Å to Jackson. ’ ‘MA’ Å line to locate Bill. ’ ‘MA’ Å (4:45) ›› “Flannel Pajamas” 2006, Romance Justin Kirk, Julianne Nicholson. ‘R’ Undeclared ‘PG’ Undeclared ‘PG’ Undeclared ‘14’ ›› “Spanking the Monkey” 1994, Comedy Jeremy Davies. ‘NR’ (11:15) ›› “Flannel Pajamas” ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (4:50) ››› “(500) Days of Summer” 2009, Romance-Comedy › “I Love You, Beth Cooper” 2009, Comedy Hayden Panettiere, (8:15) › “Land of the Lost” 2009, Comedy Will Ferrell, Anna Friel. A time-space vortex ››› “Up in the Air” 2009, Comedy-Drama George Clooney, Vera Farmiga. A frequent MAX 400 508 7 Joseph Gordon-Levitt. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Paul Rust. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å sucks three people into another reality. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å flyer reaches a life-and-career crossroads. ’ ‘R’ Å Dog Whisperer (N) ‘G’ Dog Whisperer Dueling Pit Bulls ‘G’ Dog Whisperer ‘G’ Dog Whisperer ‘G’ Dog Whisperer Dueling Pit Bulls ‘G’ Dog Whisperer ‘G’ Dog Whisperer ‘G’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Invader Zim ‘Y7’ CatDog ‘G’ Å NTOON 89 115 189 Dirt Trax TV ATV World Truck Academy Destination Muzzy’s Bow. Western Extreme Elk Chronicles Best of the West Truck Academy ATV World Dirt Trax TV Baja Unlimited Ult. Adventure Destination OUTD 37 307 43 (6:25) ››› “Chéri” 2009 Michelle Pfeiffer. An older woman ››› “Inglourious Basterds” 2009, War Brad Pitt, Mélanie Laurent, Christoph Waltz. iTV. Jewish-American (10:35) › “Punisher: War Zone” 2008, Action Ray Stevenson, (4:15) ›› “Captain Corelli’s Mandolin” 2001, Drama Nicolas SHO 500 500 Cage, Penélope Cruz, John Hurt. iTV. ’ ‘R’ teaches a courtesan’s son about love. ‘R’ Å soldiers seek Nazi scalps in German-occupied France. ’ ‘R’ Dominic West, Doug Hutchison. iTV. ’ ‘R’ Hot Rod TV ‘PG’ Hot Rod TV ‘PG’ Barrett-Jackson Special Edition ‘G’ Battle-Supercars Battle-Supercars Hot Rod TV ‘PG’ Hot Rod TV ‘PG’ Barrett-Jackson Special Edition ‘G’ Battle-Supercars Battle-Supercars Auto Racing SPEED 35 303 125 (4:45) ››› “Bolt” 2008 Voices of John Travolta. ‘PG’ (6:25) › “Old Dogs” 2009 John Travolta. ’ ‘PG’ Å › “Law Abiding Citizen” 2009, Suspense Jamie Foxx. ’ ‘R’ Å (9:50) ›› “Angels & Demons” 2009 Tom Hanks. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å STARZ 300 408 300 (4:15) ››› “Starship Troopers” 1997, Science Fiction Casper (6:25) ››› “Ransom” 1996, Suspense Mel Gibson, Rene Russo. A wealthy executive › “Next Day Air” 2009 Donald Faison. A delivery man gives a ›› “Zack and Miri Make a Porno” 2008, Romance-Comedy (11:45) ››› “Two TMC 525 525 Van Dien, Dina Meyer, Denise Richards. ’ ‘R’ turns the tables on his son’s abductor. ’ ‘R’ Å package of drugs to the wrong people. ‘R’ Å Seth Rogen, Elizabeth Banks. ’ ‘R’ Lovers” ‘R’ (4:30) NHL Hockey Minnesota Wild at Columbus Blue Jackets (Live) Hockey Central Whacked Out NHL Overtime (Live) Boxing ‘PG’ NHL Overtime VS. 27 58 30 The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å John Edward Cross Country ‘G’ WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 27, 2010 C3

CALENDAR TODAY OWL LEGENDS: Meet the largest owl in the world, along with other owls, and hear talks from a raptor biologist; $7, $5 museum members, plus admission; 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754.

TUESDAY OWL LEGENDS: Meet the largest owl in the world, along with other owls, and hear talks from a raptor biologist; $7, $5 museum members, plus admission; 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. CLASSICS BOOK CLUB: Read and discuss short stories by Henry James; free; 6-8 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-6177087, kevinb@dpls.us or www.dpls .us/calendar.

WEDNESDAY CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT: Birdwatchers of all levels walk with naturalist or independently for the annual bird survey; free; 8 a.m.4 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394 or www.sunriver naturecenter.org. OWL LEGENDS: Meet the largest owl in the world, along with other owls, and hear talks from a raptor biologist; $7, $5 museum members, plus admission; 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. REVEREND HORTON HEAT: The Dallas-based rockabilly band performs, with Hillstomp; $20 plus fees in advance, $25 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www .randompresents.com.

THURSDAY OWL LEGENDS: Meet the largest owl in the world, along with other owls, and hear talks from a raptor biologist; $7, $5 museum members, plus admission; 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. EAGLES: Celebrate the eagle, with tall tales, entertainment and food; reservations requested; $20; 7-9 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-5934394 or www.sun rivernaturecenter .org. MAGIC SHOW: Mr. Magic presents an evening of humor, interaction and magic; $5, free ages 12 and younger with an adult; 7 p.m.; Sunriver Lodge, North Pole, 17728 Abbot Drive; 800-486-8591 or www .sunriver-resort.com/traditions.

FRIDAY NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY: With skiing, followed by fireworks, sledding and live music; $22; skiing until 9 p.m., party continues through midnight; Hoodoo Mountain Resort, summit of Santiam Pass on U.S. Highway 20, west of Sisters; 541822-3799 or www.hoodoo.com/ events.htm. BEND’S FIRST 1000 LIGHTS COMMUNITY WALK: Event includes a family festival, a magic show, live music and an illuminated walk; proceeds benefit the La Pine Community Kitchen; $18, $25 for families, free ages 13 and younger; all participants are asked to donate three cans of food, warm clothing or

pet food; 4 p.m., walk begins 6 p.m.; Juniper Elementary School, 1300 N.E. Norton St.; www.bendsfirst 1000lightswalk.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY: Featuring a performance by the Armadillos and dinner; $12; 5-9 p.m.; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-536-6237. NEW YEAR’S EVE BASH: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event, with “The Mafioso Murders,” casino games and more; $59, $110 per couple; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buck boardmysteries .com. ROCKIN’ NEW YEAR’S EVE: Featuring costumes, cardboard instruments, games, crafts and more; reservations requested; $65, $55 resort guests; 6:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; Fort Funnigan, 17600 Center Drive, Sunriver; 541593-4609 or www.sunriver-resort .com/traditions. RISE UP NEW YEAR’S EVE BASH: With performances by Larry and His Flask, Barefoot Surrender, McDougall and Ether Circus; ages 21 and older; $7; 8 p.m.; Old Mill Music Lounge, 360 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, #210, Bend; www.bendticket.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY: Featuring a performance by the M80’s; $10; 8:30 p.m.; Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino, 100 Main St., Warm Springs; 541-553-1112 or http://kahneeta.com. ROCK THE OX: A New Year’s Eve party with a DJ, dancing, champagne and more; ages 21 and older; $35 plus fees; 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-382-8436 or www .bendticket.com. NEW YEAR’S AT THE MOON: Featuring performances by The Prairie Rockets and the River Pigs; $10; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .silvermoonbrewing.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE BONFIRE ON THE SNOW: Wanderlust Tours leads a short snowshoe hike to a bonfire and hand-carved snow amphitheater in the forest; a naturalist shares facts about the forest, animals and the night sky; reservations required; adults only; trips depart from Sunriver and Bend; $85 includes guide, snowshoes, transportation, food and drink; 9 p.m.-1:30 a.m.541389-8359 or www .wanderlusttours.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE CELEBRATION: Featuring a performance by the Moon Mountain Ramblers and Jukebot; free, $10 for Moon Mountain Ramblers; 9 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE CONCERT: With a performance by Sagebrush Rock; free; 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; The Original Kayo’s Dinner House and Lounge, 415 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-323-2520. NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY: With performances by Shade 13, and DJs Harlo, Rada, Ells and Defekt; free; 9 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868. NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY: Featuring a performance by Out of the Blue; $10; 9 p.m.-midnight; Bend Municipal Airport, 63132 Powell Butte Highway; 541-408-6149 or 541-480-6660. MESSAGES THROUGH MUSIC: A Slipmat Science party featuring Eternal, Roommate, Mindscape, Defekt, Ells, Kleverkill and more; ages 18 and older; $10 before 10 p.m., $15 after; 10 p.m.; Midtown complex, The Annex, Midtown Ballroom and Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

SATURDAY POLAR BEAR PLUNGE: Take an icy plunge into the Lodge Village’s outdoor pool; hot chocolate served; free; 10 a.m.; Sunriver Resort, 17600 Center Drive; 800-486-8591 or www.sunriver-resort.com/traditions.

SUNDAY FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-3 p.m.; Pine Forest Grange, 63214 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-447-5451.

MONDAY Jan. 3 GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Finding Nouf” by Zoe Ferraris; free; noon; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7085 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar.

TUESDAY Jan. 4 GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “I AM BECAUSE WE ARE,” which explores Madonna’s journey to Malawi to see how AIDS and poverty affect children; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504.

WEDNESDAY

about different generations; free; 1 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1034 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend, the Old Mill District and NorthWest Crossing; free; 5-9 p.m., and until 8 p.m. in NorthWest Crossing; throughout Bend. “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. “IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE”: Nine actors present a live-radio version of the classic holiday tale about George Bailey and his guardian angel; $5, free ages 5 and younger; 7 p.m.; Madras High School, 390 S.E. 10th St.; 541-475-7265 or dhayes@509J.net. PAGAN JUG BAND: The Portland-based classic country band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541382-5174 or www .mcmenamins.com. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www .beattickets.org.

Jan. 5 “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, DON CARLO”: Starring Roberto Alagna, Marina Poplavskaya, Anna Smirnova, Simon Keenlyside and Ferruccio Furlanetto in an encore presentation of Verdi’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-3826347. PAGAN JUG BAND: The Portlandbased classic country band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

THURSDAY Jan. 6 GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Zookeeper’s Wife” by Diane Ackerman; bring a lunch; free; noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541312-1081 or www.deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. “BOOMERS, XERS AND MILLENNIALS — CAN WE ALL GET ALONG?”: Explore characteristics, communications styles and more about different generations; free; 6 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3121034 or www.deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. PAGAN JUG BAND: The Portlandbased classic country band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: Preview night for the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $10; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.beattickets.org.

FRIDAY Jan. 7 “BOOMERS, XERS AND MILLENNIALS — CAN WE ALL GET ALONG?”: Explore characteristics, communications styles and more

SATURDAY Jan. 8 “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, LA FANCIULLA DEL WEST”: Starring Deborah Voigt, Marcello Giordani and Lucio Gallo in a presentation of Puccini’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 10 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-3826347. WINTER TRAILS DAY: Try snowshoeing, with guided hikes and refreshments; wear weatherappropriate clothing and waterproof boots; free; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Swampy Lake Sno-park, Cascade Lakes Highway 17 miles west of Bend, Bend; 541-385-0594 or www.rei .com/stores/events/96. “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-3500018 or www.buckboardmysteries .com. “IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE”: Nine actors present a live-radio version of the classic holiday tale about George Bailey and his guardian angel; $5, free ages 5 and younger; 7 p.m.; Madras High School, 390 S.E. 10th St.; 541475-7265 or dhayes@509J.net. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www .beattickets.org. “THE BIG LEBOWSKI”: A screening of the R-rated 1998 film, with a costume contest; $10; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www .towertheatre.org. JON WAYNE & THE PAIN: The Minneapolis-based reggae rock act performs; $5 in advance, $7 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331.

M T For Monday, Dec. 27

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

BLACK SWAN (R) 2:25, 5:05, 7:35, 10:10 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 2, 4:50, 7:40 HOW DO YOU KNOW (PG-13) 2:10, 4:55. 7:25, 10 THE KING’S SPEECH (R) 2:05, 4:40, 7:20, 9:55 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 2:15, 4:45, 7:45, 10:15 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG-13) 2:20, 5, 7:30, 10:05

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) 11:40 a.m., 9:15 THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA:

THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER 3-D (PG) 11:05 a.m., 1:45, 4:25, 7:05, 9:45 THE FIGHTER (R) 12:10, 2:50, 5:25, 8:05, 10:40 GULLIVER’S TRAVELS 3-D (PG) 11:55 a.m., 2, 4:05, 6:45, 9:25 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 11:20 a.m., 2:30, 6:25, 9:35 HOW DO YOU KNOW (PG-13) 11:25 a.m., 2:15, 5:05, 7:50, 10:35 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 12:20, 2:10, 2:40, 4:30, 5:15, 6:50, 7:45, 9:20, 10:05 TANGLED (PG) 11:15 a.m., 1:35, 4, 6:35, 9:10 THE TOURIST (PG-13) 12:15, 2:45, 5:20, 7:55, 10:30 TRON: LEGACY 3-D (PG) Noon, 3:55, 6:40, 9:40, 10:45 TRON: LEGACY (PG) 11 a.m., 1:50, 4:35, 7:20, 10:20 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 11:10 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 1:40, 2:25, 4:15, 5, 7:10, 7:35, 9:50, 10:15 UNSTOPPABLE (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 2:05, 4:50, 7:30, 10

VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) 10 a.m., 12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 9 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 10:30 a.m., 1, 3:30, 6, 8:30 TRON: LEGACY (PG) 10:15 a.m., 1, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 YOGI BEAR (PG) 10 a.m., 12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 7, 9:15

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE

700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) Noon, 2:30 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 12:30, 3, 5:30, 8 TANGLED (PG) Noon THE TOURIST (PG-13) 5:15, 7:45 TRON: LEGACY (PG) 2, 4:45, 7:30 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45

REDMOND CINEMAS

PINE THEATER

1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE

Bristol Palin buys home in Arizona The Associated Press MARICOPA, Ariz. — Bristol Palin has bought a five-bedroom home in Pinal County south of Phoenix. Paperwork shows the recent “Dancing With the Stars” diva and daughter of Sarah Palin is the sole purchaser of the house in the town of Maricopa. She bought it for $172,000 from a North Dakota couple. It’s not clear if Bristol Palin will be a seasonal visitor or permanent resident at the home, in a development called Cobblestone Farms. According to real estate websites, the residence is a two-level, brown stucco house with a tile roof, a landscaped front and back yard, and access to a community pool. The Arizona Republic reports

LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 4, 7

the 3,900-square-foot home was built in 2006 and was bought for a little under $330,000 at the time. It has 2½ baths and a threecar garage. Bristol Palin, 20, closed on the home in early December, buying it from Michael and Cynthia Smith, according to paperwork filed with the Pinal County Recorder’s Office. “I’m not sure why she wanted to buy that home, but we are real happy for her,” Michael Smith told The Republic. Bristol Palin came to the forefront during her mother’s 2008 vice presidential run when the Palin family announced that the then-17-year-old was pregnant. Following the birth of her son, Bristol Palin spoke out as a teen pregnancy prevention advocate.

The year Hollywood forgot about Christmas By Michael Cieply New York Times News Service

LOS ANGELES — Have a happy holiday. But don’t look for much help from Hollywood. For the first time since 2001, Christmas Day arrives without a holiday-theme movie from the major studios, or even most of the minor ones. Paramount is offering vengeance in “True Grit” and a bloody comeback in “The Fighter.” Disney has “Tron: Legacy,” its video game gone wild. Fox has released “Gulliver’s Travels.” But “Jingle Bells,” eggnog and family fights that turn into warm and fuzzy moments around the tree are almost nowhere to be found in the films left behind by executives, who have mostly abandoned Burbank for Brazil and all points of the compass.

‘Missed opportunity’

YOGI BEAR (PG) 2:20, 4:40, 7 YOGI BEAR 3-D (PG) 11:30 a.m., 1:55, 4:10, 6:30, 8:40 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) MEGAMIND (PG) Noon SECRETARIAT (PG) 2:15 EDITOR’S NOTE: The New Orleans vs. Atlanta football game will screen at 5:30 p.m. tonight. Doors open at 5 p.m.

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

“I think it’s just weird, because it looks like a real missed opportunity,” said Paul Dergarabedian, who monitors film box office results for Hollywood .com. Every year in the last eight has brought a Christmas-theme film or two, including some real hits. In 2003, for instance, New Line Cinema went on to snag a startling $173 million in domestic ticket sales when it put Will Ferrell in tights for “Elf.” Disney took in $139 million at the domestic box office with “The Santa Clause 2” in 2002, and nearly $138 million last year with “A Christmas Carol.” The most impressive Christmas-theme hit in recent memory was “How the Grinch Stole Christmas,” which took in $260 million for Universal after its release in November 2000 and became that year’s best box-office performer. Christmas films have an obvious advantage in that much of the audience has already

warmed to the seasonal subject matter. But studio executives are somewhat wary of the genre, because even a slight hitch in the production process can force them to hold a movie for a full year.

Bad timing Something like that happened to DreamWorks SKG, for instance, when it shot “Surviving Christmas,” with Ben Affleck, in early 2003, then bumped the release to late 2004, to avoid competing with a thriller, “Paycheck,” in which Affleck also starred. (“Surviving Christmas” was a flop.) This year brings a dollop of Christmas-Hanukkah cheer at the end of Universal’s “Little Fockers,” in which a nurse, played by Ben Stiller, squares off against his ex-CIA-operative father-in-law, played by Robert De Niro. “The Nutcracker in 3D,” from Freestyle Releasing, is also playing in a small number of theaters, as is “Rare Exports: A Christmas Tale,” from Oscilloscope Laboratories. (A Finnish import, “Rare Exports,” according to Jeannette Catsoulis, who reviewed it for The New York Times, “turns Santa into a savage troll and his elves into naked, wrinkly graybeards.”) And Warner Bros. is back in a few IMAX theaters with another re-release of “The Polar Express,” which was the studio’s big Christmas hit in 2004. Otherwise, it’s a matter of waiting for Hollywood to get its holiday groove back. That will happen, Dergarabedian predicted, on Nov. 23, 2011, when Sony Pictures expects to release its “Arthur Christmas.” It is an animated extravaganza, in 3-D, about toys and elves and a high-tech distribution operation based at the North Pole. This year is probably just an oversight, Dergarabedian said, adding, “I don’t think there’s a conspiracy against Santa.”


C4 Monday, December 27, 2010 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 27, 2010 C5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO SATURDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Dec. 27, 2010: This year, go off on your own fact-finding mission. You’ll often find that you are in the middle of misinformation and quarrels. The end result will prove to be better. You might assume more responsibility if you want certain tasks and situations handled in a specific way. If you are single, someone quite different could knock on your door. Why not? You will see the world quite differently because of this person. If you are attached, the two of you often struggle about who is right. Respect your differences. Both of you are coming from different places. CAPRICORN pushes you very hard. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH Your morning might be a lot more exciting than you would like. By the afternoon, delegating or having bossy associates take over becomes a pleasure. Pressure still builds, because, aren’t you the one in charge? Tonight: Spring out the door; head home. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH You might be more creative than many, and you will be more than challenged with interactions in the morning. Screen out the superficial, and dive into what must be done. You feel as if you are finally getting something done. Tonight: Doing what feels right. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH A late entry into work might

not draw the results you anticipated. You could walk into a hurricane. The smart Twin might contemplate turning around and walking out! Dig right in; others will need your input and ingenuity. Tonight: You’re feeling quite frisky, considering everything. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH You will tell others exactly what you think. The reactions you draw could be quite surprising. The problem is that you cannot take back what is said. Cocoon and just play it cool. Get your share of work done. Smile until others smile back, which could be awhile. Tonight: Mosey on home. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH The impossible (at least in your head) occurs. In your mind, others simply seem to be creating uproar. They really are expressing their dissatisfaction. An even, unpressured approach works best in this atmosphere. Return calls and messages. Tonight: Continue to play it cool! VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Expand your horizons. You could find key associates difficult to deal with. You could get fried just walking by them. Tap into your creativity, but don’t take any unusual risks. Tonight: Play it low-key. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Yes, you might wake up on the wrong side of the bed. By midafternoon, despite a challenge here and there, you feel empowered. Enter the next day with creativity and openness. You will like the results. Tonight: Whatever makes you happy! SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

HHHH You could look at the fireworks between people and wonder what happened to the spirit of Christmas. Know that people are expressing their negative feelings, and perhaps what they are upset about is indeed what they are upset about. Tonight: Get a good night’s sleep. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH You might feel like you are in the middle of a problem that has little to do with you. As a result, you want to vanish. Time is your ally, because by the afternoon, a meeting changes your focus. Be aware of the costs of a decision. Tonight: Be frugal, at least for one evening! CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH You could be caught in a misunderstanding or a misrepresentation. Your best bet is to do nothing and allow the other parties to battle it out, knowing there is more coming. Take a stronger hand in the evening. Tonight: Burning the candle at both ends. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Keep your opinions to yourself about an investment and a partnership (as long as you are not the other partner). You have a lot on your mind. Detach and take needed time. Tonight: Answer e-mail. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH You might be pushing the limits without intending to. Your best bet is to pull back and listen to someone’s objections. Is this person coming from a grounded place? A one-on-one discussion goes a long way in healing a rift. Tonight: Rearrange your plans if need be. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

C6 Monday, December 27, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Lithium

Horacio Dias, a geologist and manager of the mining company Exar, points to the moonscape-like environment high in the Andes where his Canadianowned mine is searching for lithium.

Continued from C1 A typical battery uses only a few pounds of lithium, but other components make such batteries expensive — by some estimates, well over $10,000 each — and bulky. Failure could mean that cars such as General Motors’ new Volt, a gas-electric hybrid that costs $41,000 before a $7,500 federal tax rebate to buyers, will remain too pricey for all but a small number of American car buyers. The Volt can go about 40 miles on an electric charge before the driver must switch to the car’s internal-combustion engine. Fully electric cars can go 100 or more miles between recharges.

Juan Forero The Washington Post

Promising projections “We need to demonstrate that we can reduce the cost of this over the next four or five years to make the sale of these things take off without government stimulus,” said David Vieau, chief executive of A123, which received a $249 million federal grant to build factories in Michigan. “It is a critical component for getting the volume up and helping drive the cost out while we make these batteries more efficient.” Some of the projections on the future of electric cars — and lithium use in cars

Retro Continued from C1 “I thought it would be kind of a lark,” he said. “I didn’t realize there was such demand for them.” Now he is turning out several typewriters a week, with a two- to three-week lead time for new orders.

Like a keyboard Zylkin says he starts with a typewriter that has been refurbished by a retired Remington salesman, then wires it with a sensor board that recognizes when a key is pressed. It leads to a USB plug that makes the typewriter work like any computer keyboard. Even if the type bar doesn’t hit the platen, a computer will recognize the input, but if you bang the keys hard enough you can make an old-school hard copy on paper while a computer also records your keystrokes. The typewriters sell for $600 to $900 at the website Etsy, although it is $400 if you supply your own typewriter. If you’re handy with a soldering iron, you can buy Zylkin’s doit-yourself conversion kit for $70. A variation of this theme of fashioning the old into new relies on the smart design of the old Western Electric Bell telephones. Consider the handset. Unlike today’s telephone earpieces and cabled headphone and mic arrangements, the large handset put the speaker over the ear and the microphone next to the mouth so bystanders weren’t forced to listen to bellowed phone conversations. The gadget purveyors ThinkGeek have taken that old handset and added Bluetooth so you can have some privacy while connected wirelessly to a mobile phone.

— are promising. Nissan has said that by 2020, one in 10 cars worldwide may use lithium batteries. And Pike Research, a consulting firm in Boulder, Colo., said the market for lithium-ion batteries could expand to $8 billion in five years, from less than $900 million this year. “Virtually every major car company around the globe has some sort of a hybrid electric vehicle program going,” Vieau said.

Electric cars and their gaselectric cousins are not new. Ferdinand Porsche’s hybrid was presented at a Paris exhibition in 1900. In the United States, there were 50,000 electric cars plying the roads in 1918. But big oil discoveries and Henry Ford’s introduction of the Model T quickly established the dominance of the internal-combustion engine. It is only now, with the United States consuming more than twice as much oil as it produces, that policymakers are consider-

The $25 handset can transmit and receive at a distance of about 30 feet from your phone. Crosley Radio has been making the old new again since the early 1980s when a group of investors bought a discarded radio brand and started cranking out replica radios. The company has replica Wurlitzer-style jukeboxes that play music from CDs or iPods. “What really rolls out the door is the turntables, that has been a runaway train,” said James LeMastus, president of Crosley. The company has had a hit with the Crosley AV Room Portable USB turntable, made exclusively for the youth-oriented clothing chain Urban Outfitters. The $160 portable player has built-in speakers and an amp, and a USB connection so it can be used with a computer to turn songs on vinyl records into MP3s. The company makes about 25 styles of turntables, some with iPod docks and CD and cassette tape players and recorders. They can be found at stores such as Restoration Hardware, Pottery Barn and online.

also popular with podcasters and VoIP users who want to sound as smooth as Orson Welles. The X-Tube looks like a vacuum tube from inside an old radio that would have broadcast Welles. It’s really a small processor that plugs into a computer through a USB connection to produce surround sound for headphones. The warm glow? A blue LED light.

Hi-fi reproduction The Yeti from Blue Microphones may look like something from the golden age of radio, but it is the first THX-certified microphone, meaning it is capable of high-fidelity reproduction. While it looks as if it belongs on the desk of Walter Winchell, it has three built-in miniature mics that can capture sound three ways: from just in front of the mic, in stereo or from an entire room. The Yeti works on PCs and Macs and requires no software drivers to work, although there is a free recording program for it in the iTunes store. Good enough to record your band’s demo, the $150 mic is

Fooling the brain The device processes DTS Surround Sensation software to alter the volume of certain frequencies and add delays to some sounds, all psychoacoustic tricks to fool the brain into perceiving sound as coming not just from left and right, but from the front and back as well. The device, which comes with over-the-ear headphones, isn’t easy to find in the United States, but can be ordered from Japan for about $95. Sometimes, retro designers cloak the electronics in something other than older electronics. Makers of laptop covers usually brag about the high-tech materials they use: high-impact plastics, advanced neoprenes or carbon fiber. Twelve South brags that its MacBook Pro and iPad cases use old-fashioned bookbinding technology. The covers are leather-bound and distressed to look like a collectible volume. The cases have a hard cover on top and bottom, with a zipper around the center to keep your computer secure. The BookBook covers are priced at $80 to $100, depending on the size of your computer. The company says the covers disguise the device inside and could deter thieves — unless they know that many collectible books are worth far more than the next new thing.

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ing a shift that would place less emphasis on gasoline-powered vehicles. If that happens, the role of lithium will expand dramatically, with mining companies scrambling to secure the metal, said Ann Marie Sastry, chief executive of Sakti3, an Ann Arbor, Mich., company that is working to develop batteries with more juice. Lithium is now used in ceramics, to power cell phones and laptops, and even as a component in drugs to

Green Continued from C1 And in April, the state received $20 million in Recovery Act money to expand a Portland pilot program, Clean Energy Works Portland, across the state, creating hundreds of jobs, according to the U.S. Department of Energy and Clean Energy Works Portland. Cylvia Hayes, CEO of 3E Strategies, said all the activity has generated more interest than she’s seen in her 22 years in the field. “It’s really only the last two years that anybody has cared,” she said. “It really has been a sea change.” But Oregon has been ahead of the wave, Hayes said, noting the state was the first in the nation to have a green jobs economist, Charlie Johnson, who works in the Employment Department. The Green Jobs Growth Plan also mentions Oregon’s lead in sustainability efforts. It points out The Pew Charitable Trusts’ reference to Oregon in a 2009 report as one of three states, along with Colorado and Tennessee, with large and fast-growing cleanenergy economies. Being out front helped Oregon when it came time to dole out stimulus money, according to the plan, which the Legislature authorized in 2009. While it contains many recommendations, the green

treat manic depression. Much of the world has had its eyes on Bolivia, which President Evo Morales claims has infinitely more of the metal than all other lithium-producing countries combined. His socialist government is trying to lure mining companies, but Bolivia’s terms call for those investors to also fund a Bolivian-based lithiumion battery industry.

Obstacles While Japanese and South Korean companies have expressed interest, none is producing lithium in Bolivia. And in October, Morales held a news conference to lament that firms “want to invest just to buy lithium.” “And why do they want to buy only lithium carbonate from us?” Morales asked. “So the lithium battery industry remains outside Bolivia.” Jon Hykawy, a lithium analyst at Byron Capital Markets in Toronto, said another obstacle to mining lithium in Bolivia is that the 4,000-squaremile Uyuni salt flats where the metal is found are also laced with high concentrations of magnesium. That, combined with a nationalistic government and substandard roads, would make production highly expensive, he said. “There are major lithium producers,” Hykawy said, “and they’ve all backed away.” Instead, production is picking up in Chile, the world’s largest

jobs plan’s core calls for identifying key industry sectors with the highest potential for creating green jobs and getting measurable results over the study’s eight-year time frame. Four top-priority sectors — energy efficiency, renewable energy production and generation, green manufacturing, and energy transmission and storage — should see 30 percent cumulative job growth over the period. Four second-tier sectors — green building and development, transportation, agriculture and sustainable forestry, and environmental technologies and services — should see 13 percent.

Coordinated approach To achieve the outcomes, the Green Jobs Growth Plan calls for developing a coordinated — or sectoral — approach. It recommends bringing together industry, government, education and labor to identify needed resources, such as financing, training, materials and others. It also calls for support to help construction workers develop green-building skills, recommends enhanced, coordinated green-jobs training and career programs, and suggests increasing sustainability literacy for stu-

producer, and in Argentina. The two countries account for more than half of the world’s lithium production. Among the big players are New Jersey-based Rockwood Holdings and the Sociedad Quimica y Minera de Chile, both of which mine salt flats in Chile. In Argentina, the companies include FMC of Charlotte, which relocated here from Bolivia, and Orocobre of Australia, which has agreed to provide lithium from Argentina for a major supplier to Toyota. Exar, the Argentine affiliate of Lithium Americas, has been punching exploration holes in the Cauchari-Olaroz salt flats, a moonscape-like plateau in northern Argentina not far from the Bolivian border. Evaporation tanks are used to remove the brine, leaving behind lithium that is then tested in a lab to determine its mixture with other elements. One cannot really see the finished product. Highly reactive, lithium does not occur freely in nature. “We cannot show off lithium as if it were some metal ingot,” Dias, the geologist and Exar manager, said in the company’s lab. “We only have it in a molecular state, or diluted in the brine.” But Exar and its shareholders, among them Mitsubishi, think the salt beds here may contain up to 8 million tons of lithium. That would give the company control over the world’s thirdlargest deposit.

dents in the K-12 system. The plan acknowledges the state’s budget crisis, saying most recommendations will not require additional state funding. But fully developing the top four industry sectors will cost about $1 million in the first biennium. Some members of the Oregon Senate received a summary of the Green Jobs Growth Plan earlier this month, and the entire plan, which was completed in early November, is expected to be presented to the new Legislature sometime after it convenes next month. While federal stimulus money generated much excitement about the green economy, Hayes does not believe the interest will run out with the money. In Oregon, training for jobs in the industry began before Congress approved the 2009 Recovery Act, she said, mentioning the renewable energy technology program Columbia Gorge Community College began offering in 2007. “I believe that it’s an evolution of the entire economy and work force,” she said. “I don’t believe it’s a narrow focus that will shift (when stimulus funding ends.)” Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@bendbulletin.com.

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S

D

NFL Inside A meaningless loss for the Seahawks? Yes and no, see Page D4.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, DECEMBER 27, 2010

NFL

PREP BASKETBALL

Top hoops teams in Bend for tournament C BEAU Snow falls on Lincoln Financial Field, home of the Philadelphia Eagles, on Sunday afternoon.

Winter storm sacks Eagles-Vikes game A fierce winter storm hit Sunday’s Vikings-Eagles game like a blitzing linebacker, forcing a postponement in Philadelphia that displeased Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell, and disrupted travel plans elsewhere in sports. But, overwhelmingly, the games went on. The New York Jets were forced to spend the night in Chicago, where they could mull their 38-34 loss to the Bears. The New England Patriots routed the Bills 34-3 in Buffalo, but victory came at a cost. They were unable to travel home immediately afterward. The New York Giants said there was a strong possibility they would have to stay in Wisconsin following their game with the Green Bay Packers. In cold and windy Cleveland, a jacket worn by Baltimore Ravens safety Ed Reed caught fire when he ventured too close to a sideline heater. Temperature at kickoff was 26 degrees with the wind chill at 13. The NFL shifted the Vikings-Eagles game from Sunday night to Tuesday night because of the storm that could dump more than a foot of snow on Philadelphia. The game — the first in the NFL on a Tuesday since 1946 — will be played at 5 p.m. PST, and televised nationally by NBC. Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter declared a snow emergency in the afternoon. “We’re OK with it,” Eagles coach Andy Reid said. “We’re organized and prepared for this, and we completely support what the league did from a safety standpoint for everybody.” — The Associated Press

hristmas is over, but Central Oregon basketball fans are still in line to receive one last gift before the new year. Starting Tuesday, Summit High’s boys and girls basketball teams host their annual eight-team, three-day holiday tournaments, both of which will showcase some of the better teams in the state. In the boys tournament, 6-1 Bend High is the thirdranked team in Class 5A, based on the Oregon School Activities Association’s most recent rankings. The Lava Bears open the tournament against 4-3 Ashland, which is No. 5 in the 5A rankings. Phoenix High, which is

ranked No. 4 in the most recent Class 4A rankings, also is in the boys tourney, as are Mountain View (3-4) and host Summit (2-6), both of which advanced to the 2010 state tournament last season. Bend High has been particularly impressive this season, beating three Class 6A teams, including South Medford. The Panthers, the No. 3 team in 6A, are 6-1 this season with their only defeat coming against the Lava Bears. Bend High enters this week’s tournament on a three-game winning streak and on Dec. 17 posted 92 points in a 42-point road win at The Dalles-Wahtonka. See Hoops / D5

EASTES

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 NFL ................................... D3, D4 NBA .......................................... D4 Cycling Central................. D5, D6

What: Summit Holiday Tournament Where: Summit High and Cascade Middle School When: Tuesday through Thursday Tuesday’s boys schedule (all games at Summit unless otherwise noted): West Albany vs. Mountain View, 12:45 p.m.; Ashland vs. Bend, 2:30 p.m.; Phoenix vs. Sandy (at Cascade), 4:15 p.m.; Marist vs. Summit, 6 p.m. Tuesday’s girls schedule: Sheldon vs. Bend, 11 a.m.; Marist vs. North Medford, 4:15 p.m.; Churchill vs. Madras (at Cascade), 2:30 p.m.; Liberty vs. Summit, 7:45 p.m.

NFL

CYCLING CENTRAL

Playoff pieces fall into place, Patriots clinch top seed in AFC By Barry Wilner The Associated Press

AFC teams seeking a Super Bowl berth must go through Foxborough, a place where Tom Brady hasn’t lost in the regular season since 2006. Here’s some hope for the challengers, though: The New England Patriots lost their only playoff game last season, routed at home by Baltimore. The Patriots secured home-field advantage throughout the AFC playoffs by routing the Buffalo Bills 34-3 Sunday. Brady hasn’t lost a home game in the last 27 regular-season outings, and the Patriots (13-2) are unbeaten in 16 consecutive regular-season games at Gillette Stadium since losing to Pittsburgh on Nov. 30, 2008 with Matt Cassel replacing the injured Brady. See Playoffs / D5

Submitted photos

Bend’s John Mercer pushes up a climb while cycling in Thailand earlier this year. Mercer and Emily Dooley are nearly midway through a planned 2 1⁄2 -year cycling trip through countries all over the world.

Who’s in, who’s not NFC

Globe-trotting Two Bend cyclists are a year into a worldwide bike-riding adventure

49ers fire coach Mike Singletary SAN FRANCISCO — Mike Singletary was fired by the San Francisco 49ers on Sunday night after two disappointing seasons, including a 5-10 showing this year for a franchise expected to win the NFC West. The team made the announcement late Sunday upon returning to the Bay Area, several hours after San Francisco was eliminated from playoff contention with a 25-17 loss at St. Louis. Defensive line coach Jim Tomsula was promoted to interim coach and will run the team in next Sunday’s season finale at home against Arizona. He was to be formally introduced in a news conference today. Singletary was told of his dismissal back at the team’s Santa Clara complex after the trip home by team president and CEO Jed York. “I want to thank Mike Singletary for the passion and effort that he brought to this organization,” York said in a statement. “He is a tremendous person for whom I will always have great respect.” Singletary finished with an 18-22 record in two-plus seasons. —The Associated Press

If you go

AFC Teams that have clinched playoff spots: New England (13-2), Pittsburgh (11-4), Baltimore (114), Kansas City (10-5), New York Jets (10-5). Still alive: Indianapolis (9-6), Jacksonville (9-6).

Sunday’s scores

HEATHER CLARK

Roundup, summaries, Page D3:

A Dooley, left, and Mercer pause to take a self-portrait in Malaysia. Dooley is holding up 10 fingers right after the couple hit the 10,000-kilometer mark on their trip.

Teams that have clinched playoff spots: Atlanta (12-2), Chicago (11-4), Philadelphia (10-4). Still alive: New Orleans (10-4), New York Giants (9-6), Green Bay (9-6), Tampa Bay (9-6), St. Louis (7-8), Seattle (6-9).

bout this time last year, I wrote a story about a Bend couple set to embark on a 2 1⁄2 -year cycling adventure around the globe. John Mercer and Emily Dooley left behind their jobs — at Deschutes Brewery and St. Charles Bend, respectively — their home, and their family and friends, and they did so with nothing but two touring bicycles, 60 pounds of gear and two plane tickets to Auckland, New Zealand. Their plan was to spend the ensuing 24 months riding their bikes in places like Australia, India and Southeast Asia. See Cyclists / D6

Buccaneers .............. 38 Seahawks ................ 15

Lions........................ 34 Dolphins .................. 27

Rams........................ 25 49ers ....................... 17

Redskins .................. 20 Jaguars .................... 17

Patriots .................... 34 Bills............................ 3

Bengals.................... 34 Chargers .................. 20

Bears ....................... 38 Jets .......................... 34

Broncos ................... 24 Texans ..................... 23

Ravens ..................... 20 Browns..................... 10

Colts ........................ 31 Raiders .................... 26

Chiefs ...................... 34 Titans....................... 14

Packers .................... 45 Giants ...................... 17

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

At quarterback, Thomas is Oregon’s unflappable leader By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

EUGENE — In the weeks leading to the national championship game, the quarterback chatter will naturally focus on Auburn’s Cam Newton, who certainly earned the Heisman Trophy. That said, Oregon QB Darron Thomas has a way getting noticed. Just a sophomore, Thomas has capably led the No. 2 Ducks through an undefeated season and into the Jan. 10 title game against the topranked Tigers. “Darron’s special,” Oregon coach Chip Kelly said. “He keeps getting better each game.” While Thomas has not put up gaudy numbers like Newton, he’s so important to the Ducks’ suc-

cess that the players voted him one of the three most valuable members of the team, along with running back LaMichael James and linebacker Casey Matthews. Thomas has completed 195 of 321 passes for 2,518 yards and 28 touchdowns, four shy of Akili Smith’s 1998 single-season school record. Thomas also has run for 563 yards and five scores. More importantly, he has been able to secure the trust of his teammates. “He is a leader every week. He leads our team every day. When he throws a pick, he bounces back,” James said. “The thing about him is that he is happier when someone else scores a touchdown than when he does.” See Thomas / D5

Paul Sakuma / The Associated Press

Oregon quarterback Darron Thomas celebrates with fans after the Ducks’ win over California in Berkeley, Calif., in November.


D2 Monday, December 27, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

SOCCER

Monday Girls basketball: Nike Interstate Tournament at Lake Oswego: Redmond vs. Silverton, 6:30 p.m.; Mountain View vs. West Salem, 1 p.m. Boys basketball: Madras vs. Barlow at Barlow Invitational, 7 p.m.

11:55 a.m. — English Premier League, Arsenal vs. Chelsea, ESPN2. 2 p.m. — English Premier League, Manchester vs. Sunderland, FSNW (taped).

FOOTBALL 2 p.m. — College, Independence Bowl, Air Force vs. Georgia Tech, ESPN2. 5:30 p.m. — NFL, New Orleans Saints at Atlanta Falcons, ESPN.

HOCKEY 4:30 p.m. — NHL, Minnesota Wild at Columbus Blue Jackets, VS. network.

BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m. — Men’s college, Connecticut at Pittsburgh, ESPN2. 6 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Utah Jazz, Blazer network.

TUESDAY SOCCER 11:55 a.m. — English Premier League, Birmingham City at Manchester United, ESPN2.

FOOTBALL 3:30 p.m. — College, Champs Sports Bowl, North Carolina State vs. West Virginia, ESPN. 5 p.m. — NFL, Minnesota Vikings at Philadelphia Eagles, NBC. 7 p.m. — College, Insight Bowl, Iowa vs. Missouri, ESPN.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Minnesota at Wisconsin, ESPN2. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, North Carolina at Rutgers, ESPN2. 6 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Denver Nuggets, Comcast SportsNet Northwest.

HOCKEY 4:30 p.m. — NHL, Boston Bruins at Tampa Bay Lightning, VS. network.

RADIO TODAY BASKETBALL 6 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Utah Jazz, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690.

TUESDAY FOOTBALL 3:30 p.m. — College, Champs Sports Bowl, North Carolina State vs. West Virginia, KICE-AM 940. 7 p.m. — College, Insight Bowl, Iowa vs. Missouri, KICE-AM 940.

BASKETBALL 6 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Denver Nuggets, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Football • Panthers secure No. 1 pick in April’s draft: It took a rare Sunday off for the Carolina Panthers to finally win something big this season — the No. 1 overall draft pick. The NFL-worst Panthers are on the clock for April’s draft and potentially in line to take Stanford star quarterback Andrew Luck after wins by Cincinnati and Denver. That gave the Bengals and Broncos 4-11 records and left the 2-13 Panthers with an insurmountable lead in the race to the bottom of the league with one week left. The Panthers will now wait to see if Luck decides to leave school early. Numerous draft analysts have called the 6-foot-4 Luck the best prospect in the potential daft pool. The Panthers have the league’s worst offense and managed 119 yards in Thursday’s 27-3 loss at Pittsburgh. • FIU stuns Toledo in Pizza Bowl: Jack Griffin’s 34-yard field goal on the game’s final play gave Florida International a stunning 34-32 win over Toledo on Sunday night in the Little Caesars Pizza Bowl in Detroit. The Golden Panthers, playing in their first bowl, faced fourth-and-17 on their final drive before picking up the first down on a hook-and-lateral to T.Y. Hilton. Replays showed he might have stepped out of bounds short along the sideline, but the play stood after a review, putting the ball at the Toledo 42-yard line. Moments later, Wes Carroll found Greg Ellingson across the middle to the Toledo 22, setting up the final kick for the Golden Panthers (7-6). Toledo (8-5) had taken the lead with 1:14 remaining. • Ravens LB Kindle arrested for drunken driving: Baltimore Ravens rookie linebacker Sergio Kindle has been arrested on drunken driving charges. Court records show the 23-year-old Kindle was pulled over shortly after 4 a.m. Sunday in the Jessup, Md/ area. He was charged with driving under the influence of alcohol, speeding and related offenses. Kindle, a second-round draft pick, hasn’t suited up for the Ravens this year. The former University of Texas star fractured his skull after falling down two flights of stairs in late July at a friend’s house in Austin, Texas. • Notre Dame president defends handling of sex case: Notre Dame’s president says the university acted with integrity in its handling of sexual misconduct allegations against a football player by a St. Mary’s College student who later committed suicide. Campus police conducted a “thorough and judicious investigation that followed the facts where they led,” the Rev. John I. Jenkins told the South Bend Tribune for a story Sunday. “I cannot stand by and allow the integrity of Notre Dame to be challenged so publicly,” Jenkins said. “The values at issue go to the very heart of who and what we are at Notre Dame.” St. Joseph County Prosecutor Michael Dvorak said Dec. 16 that his office won’t pursue criminal charges in the case.

Baseball • Source: Webb to Rangers: The Texas Rangers’ search for additional help for the starting rotation might have come to an end. According to a source, the team has reached a one-year deal with free-agent right-hander Brandon Webb. Neither general manager Jon Daniels nor manager Ron Washington was available for comment. A deal with Webb, which is pending a physical that likely will come early this week, is full of both potential and risk. He’s just four years removed from winning the National League Cy Young Award and he was one of the top starters in the NL for a four-year period while he was with the Arizona Diamondbacks. The risk comes because of Webb’s shoulder. He hasn’t pitched in a big-league game since Opening Day of 2009. Webb had surgery on his shoulder in August 2009. — From wire reports

IN THE BLEACHERS

Baylor Oklahoma St

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE ——— NFL INJURY REPORT NEW YORK — The National Football League injury report, as provided by the league: TODAY NEW ORLEANS SAINTS at ATLANTA FALCONS — SAINTS: OUT: TE David Thomas (knee). QUESTIONABLE: RB Christopher Ivory (hamstring). PROBABLE: NT Remi Ayodele (ankle), T Charles Brown (back), LB Danny Clark (hamstring), DT Sedrick Ellis (wrist), CB Jabari Greer (knee), DE Anthony Hargrove (knee), WR Robert Meachem (toe), LB Kawika Mitchell (hamstring), WR Courtney Roby (head), LB Jonathan Vilma (quadriceps). FALCONS: QUESTIONABLE: DE John Abraham (groin), DT Jonathan Babineaux (shoulder), LB Curtis Lofton (knee), RB Ovie Mughelli (shoulder), WR Eric Weems (knee), WR Roddy White (knee). TUESDAY MINNESOTA VIKINGS at PHILADELPHIA EAGLES — VIKINGS: OUT: S Tyrell Johnson (knee). DOUBTFUL: QB Brett Favre (concussion, neck, right shoulder). QUESTIONABLE: RB Adrian Peterson (knee), S Madieu Williams (concussion). PROBABLE: S Jamarca Sanford (concussion), CB Frank Walker (hamstring). EAGLES: OUT: LB Stewart Bradley (elbow). DOUBTFUL: LB Keenan Clayton (hamstring). QUESTIONABLE: DT Mike Patterson (knee). PROBABLE: G Nick Cole (knee), LB Moise Fokou (wrist), TE Clay Harbor (abdomen), WR DeSean Jackson (foot), T Winston Justice (knee), CB Asante Samuel (knee).

College NCAA FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIP SUBDIVISION All Times PST ——— BOWLS Subject to Change

Arizona

December 31 Meineke Car Care Bowl 4.5 5.5 South Florida Sun Bowl Miami (Fla.) 2.5 3 Notre Dame Liberty Bowl Georgia 7 6.5 Central Florida Chick-Fil-A Bowl South Carolina 3 3 Florida St Clemson

January 1 Dallas Ticket City Bowl 9.5 9.5 Northwestern Outback Bowl 7 7.5 Penn State Capital One Bowl 11 10 Michigan State Gator Bowl 5.5 5 Michigan Rose Bowl 2.5 3 Wisconsin Fiesta Bowl 17 17 Connecticut

Texas Tech Florida

Wednesday Girls basketball: Mountain View, Redmond at Nike Interstate Tournament at Lake Oswego, TBA; La Pine at Regis tournament, TBA; Gilchrist at Bend tournament, TBA, Crook County at Sisters tournament, TBA; Madras, Bend at Summit tournament, TBA Boys basketball: Mountain View, Bend at Summit Tournament, TBA; La Pine at Regis tournament, TBA; Crook County at Sisters tournament, TBA; Madras at Barlow tournament, TBA; Redmond at Abby’s tournament in Medford, TBA; Gilchrist at Mountain View tournament, TBA Wrestling: Bend at NW Duals at Westview High School, TBA; Mountain View at Nevada tournament, TBA; Culver, Crook County, Madras at Freeberry Classic in Pendleton, TBA

FOOTBALL NFL

Illinois

December 30 Armed Forces Bowl Smu 7 7 Army Pinstripe Bowl Kansas St 3 PK Syracuse Music City Bowl North Carolina 1 2 Tennessee Holiday Bowl Nebraska 13.5 14 Washington

Tuesday Girls basketball: Mountain View, Redmond at Nike Interstate Tournament at Lake Oswego, TBA; La Pine at Regis tournament, TBA; Gilchrist at Bend tournament, TBA, Crook County at Sisters tournament, TBA; Bend vs. Sheldon at the Summit Holiday Tournament, 11 a.m.; Madras vs. Churchill at Summit Holiday Tournament, 2:30 p.m.; Summit vs. Liberty at the Summit Holiday Tournament, 7:45 p.m. Boys basketball: Mountain vs. West Albany at Summit Holiday Tournament, 12:24 p.m.; Bend vs. Ashland at Summit Holiday Tournament, 2:30 p.m. Marist vs. Summit at Summit Holiday Tournament, 6 p.m.; La Pine at Regis tournament, TBA; Crook County at Sisters tournament, TBA; Madras at Barlow tournament, TBA; Redmond vs. South Eugene at Abby’s Holiday Tournament in Medford, 6 p.m.; Gilchrist at Mountain View tournament, TBA Wrestling: Redmond at Crater Duals, TBA; Mountain View at Nevada tournament, TBA

Thursday Girls basketball: Mountain View, Redmond at Nike Interstate Tournament at Lake Oswego, TBA; Gilchrist at Bend tournament, TBA; Madras, Bend at Summit tournament, TBA Boys basketball: Mountain View, Bend at Summit Tournament, TBA; Redmond at Abby’s tournament in Medford, TBA; Gilchrist at Mountain View tournament, TBA Wrestling: Bend at NW Duals at Westview High School, TBA

Texas Bowl 2 1.5 Alamo Bowl 5.5 5.5

Alabama Miss. State Tcu Oklahoma

All Times PST ——— Sunday, Dec. 26 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl: Florida International 34, Toledo 32 Today, Dec. 27 Independence Bowl: Georgia Tech (6-6) vs. Air Force (8-4), 2 p.m. (ESPN) Tuesday, Dec. 28 Champs Sports Bowl: North Carolina State (8-4) vs. West Virginia (9-3), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Insight Bowl: Missouri (10-2) vs. Iowa (7-5), 7 p.m. (ESPN) Wednesday, Dec. 29 Military Bowl: East Carolina (6-6) vs. Maryland (8-4), 11:30 a.m. (ESPN) Texas Bowl: Baylor (7-5) vs. Illinois (6-6), 3 p.m. (ESPN) Alamo Bowl: Arizona (7-5) vs. Oklahoma State (10-2), 3 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Dec. 30 Armed Forces Bowl: SMU (7-6) vs. Army (6-5), 9 a.m. (ESPN) Pinstripe Bowl: Syracuse (7-5) vs. Kansas State (7-5), 12:30 p.m. (ESPN) Music City Bowl: North Carolina (7-5) vs. Tennessee (6-6), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Holiday Bowl: Nebraska (10-3) vs. Washington (6-6), 7 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Dec. 31 Meineke Bowl: Clemson (6-6) vs. South Florida (7-5), 9 a.m. (ESPN) Sun Bowl: Notre Dame (7-5) vs. Miami (7-5), 11 a.m. (CBS) Liberty Bowl: Georgia (6-6) vs. UCF (10-3), 12:30 p.m. (ESPN) Chick-fil-A Bowl: South Carolina (9-4) vs. Florida State (9-4), 4:30 p.m. (ESPN) Saturday, Jan. 1 TicketCity Bowl: Northwestern (7-5) vs. Texas Tech (7-5), 9 a.m. (ESPNU) Capital One Bowl: Michigan State (11-1) vs. Alabama (9-3), 10 a.m. (ESPN) Outback Bowl: Florida (7-5) vs. Penn State (7-5), 10 a.m. (ABC) Gator Bowl: Michigan (7-5) vs. Mississippi State (84), 10:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Rose Bowl: TCU (12-0) vs. Wisconsin (11-1), 2 p.m. (ESPN)

Stanford

January 3 Orange Bowl 3 3

Virginia Tech

Ohio State

January 4 Sugar Bowl 3.5 3.5

Arkansas

Fiesta Bowl: Connecticut (8-4) vs. Oklahoma (11-2), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Miami (Ohio)

January 6 GMAC Bowl 1.5 1

Mid. Tenn. St.

Monday, Jan. 3 Orange Bowl: Stanford (11-1) vs. Virginia Tech (11-2), 5 p.m. (ESPN)

Lsu

January 7 Cotton Bowl PK 1

Texas A&M

Tuesday, Jan. 4 Sugar Bowl: Ohio State (11-1) vs. Arkansas (10-2), 5 p.m. (ESPN)

Pitt

January 8 BBVA Compass Bowl 2.5 3

Thursday, Jan. 6 GoDaddy.com Bowl: Miami (Ohio) (9-4) vs. Middle Tennessee (6-6), 5 p.m. (ESPN)

Nevada

January 9 Fight Hunger Bowl 9 8 Boston College

Friday, Jan. 7 Cotton Bowl: Texas A&M (9-3) vs. LSU (10-2), 5 p.m. (Fox)

Auburn

January 10 BCS National Championship 2.5 3 Oregon

Saturday, Jan. 8 BBVA Compass Bowl: Pittsburgh (7-5) vs. Kentucky (6-6), 9 a.m. (ESPN) Sunday, Jan. 9 Fight Hunger Bowl: Boston College (7-5) vs. Nevada (12-1), 6 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Jan. 10 BCS National Championship: Auburn (13-0) vs. Oregon (12-0), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Betting Line

EAGLES

NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Today 2.5 2.5 Saints Tuesday 14 14.5 Vikings

Air Force

College Today Independence Bowl 1.5 2.5 Georgia Tech

Favorite FALCONS

West Virginia Missouri

Maryland

December 28 Champ Sports Bowl 1.5 2.5 Insight Bowl PK 2.5

NC State Iowa

December 29 Eagle Bank Bowl 8 7.5 East Carolina

Kentucky

BASKETBALL Men’s college Sunday’s Games ——— EAST Richmond 69, Seton Hall 61

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF Pittsburgh 37 24 11 2 50 119 Philadelphia 35 22 8 5 49 117 N.Y. Rangers 36 20 14 2 42 108 N.Y. Islanders 33 9 18 6 24 76 New Jersey 35 9 24 2 20 61 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF Montreal 36 20 14 2 42 93 Boston 33 18 11 4 40 93 Ottawa 37 16 17 4 36 86 Buffalo 35 14 17 4 32 92 Toronto 34 13 17 4 30 79 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF Tampa Bay 36 21 10 5 47 112 Washington 38 21 12 5 47 114

GA 86 87 95 107 112 GA 83 69 108 101 103 GA 116 105

Atlanta Carolina Florida

38 19 13 6 44 120 111 34 15 15 4 34 94 105 33 16 17 0 32 91 86 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 35 22 9 4 48 117 97 Chicago 37 20 14 3 43 119 105 St. Louis 35 18 12 5 41 92 96 Nashville 35 17 12 6 40 85 87 Columbus 35 17 15 3 37 89 102 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 34 21 8 5 47 115 88 Colorado 35 19 12 4 42 122 113 Minnesota 34 16 14 4 36 83 96 Calgary 36 15 18 3 33 95 105 Edmonton 34 12 16 6 30 89 116 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 36 21 11 4 46 102 96 Los Angeles 34 21 12 1 43 102 78 San Jose 35 19 11 5 43 106 96 Anaheim 39 18 17 4 40 99 115 Phoenix 34 16 11 7 39 91 97 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Sunday’s Games Toronto 4, New Jersey 1 N.Y. Islanders 4, Montreal 1 Washington 3, Carolina 2 Tampa Bay 3, Atlanta 2, OT Chicago 4, Columbus 1 St. Louis 2, Nashville 0 Detroit 4, Minnesota 1 Ottawa 3, Pittsburgh 1 Phoenix 1, Dallas 0 Vancouver 3, Edmonton 2 Los Angeles 4, Anaheim 1 Today’s Games N.Y. Islanders at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. Minnesota at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. Boston at Florida, 4:30 p.m. Detroit at Colorado, 6 p.m. Buffalo at Calgary, 6 p.m. Los Angeles at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. NHL SCORING LEADERS Through Sunday’s Games GP G Sidney Crosby, Pit 37 30 Steven Stamkos, TB 36 28 Martin St. Louis, TB 36 14 Henrik Sedin, Van 34 8 Daniel Sedin, Van 34 18 Corey Perry, Anh 39 19 Alex Ovechkin, Was 38 13 Brad Richards, Dal 36 16 Henrik Zetterberg, Det 35 13 Pavel Datsyuk, Det 33 12 Loui Eriksson, Dal 36 15 Dustin Byfuglien, Atl 38 13 Ryan Getzlaf, Anh 39 13

A 31 22 33 36 25 22 28 24 27 27 22 24 24

PTS 61 50 47 44 43 41 41 40 40 39 37 37 37

DEALS Transactions BASKETBALL National Basketball Association CHARLOTTE BOBCATS—Named Ralph Lewis and Charles Oakley assistant coaches. TORONTO RAPTORS—Re-signed F Ronald Dupree. FOOTBALL National Football League SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS—Fired Mike Singletary, coach. Named defensive line coach Jim Tomsula interim coach. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL—Fined Boston F Milan Lucic $2,500 for throwing a punch at Atlanta D Freddy Meyer and $1,000 for his obscene gesture at the Thrashers bench in a game on Dec. 23. CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Activated F Marian Hossa from injured reserve. Recalled G Hannu Toivonen from Rockford (AHL). Placed F Patrick Kane on injured reserve. NASHVILLE PREDATORS—Recalled F Linus Klasen from Milwaukee (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS—Recalled G Mike Brodeur from Binghamton (AHL) on an emergency basis. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING—Reassigned F Johan Harju to Norfolk (AHL) and G Jaroslav Janus from Florida (ECHL) to Norfolk. COLLEGE GEORGIA—Announced RB Caleb King, CB Derek Owens and OT A.J. Harmon will not play in Friday’s Liberty Bowl because of academic issues. GEORGIA TECH—Suspended DE Anthony Eguniwe, DB Louis Young and DB Michael Peterson from the first half of the Independence Bowl on Monday for missing curfew.

NHL ROUNDUP

Crosby’s streak alive, but Sens top Pens The Associated Press OTTAWA — While Sidney Crosby managed to keep his points streak alive, the Ottawa Senators got a rare winning streak. Pittsburgh’s star center scored with 3:22 remaining to extend his streak to 24 games, but Erik Karlsson had two goals and an assist to lead Ottawa to a 3-1 win over the Penguins on Sunday night. Jason Spezza also had three points for the Senators, but left in the second with an upper-body injury. Crosby’s 30th goal, a backhand from in close, spoiled Brian Elliott’s shutout bid. But Crosby, the NHL’s leading scorer with 61 points, also had a couple of costly penalties. “It wasn’t a skill goal, but you just have to get the puck to the net,” Elliott said. “I’ll take the win any night and I won’t care if he scores on me.” Mike Fisher scored the first of Ottawa’s two power-play goals midway through the first after Crosby was sent off for hooking. Karlsson made it 2-0 at 13:42 during a delayed slashing call against Crosby, who also hooked Chris Phillips late in the second to negate a Penguins power play. “It was tough enough as it is, obviously, getting scored on,” Crosby said. “Those penalties, I don’t know, I wouldn’t say I agree with them but that happens in hockey sometimes and probably more times than not guys don’t agree with the penalties they get.” Spezza got his third assist on Karlsson’s second goal of the game, another power-play effort 20 seconds into the middle period. Spezza left moments later after he was checked into the boards from behind by Kris Letang. “I saw him going to the puck and he kind of turned his back so I didn’t want to hit him, so I put my two hands around him,” Letang said. “I think he tripped before and it kind of looked bad on the play.” Elliott turned aside 44 shots, including 22 in the second period, as Ottawa won consecutive games for

Pawel Dwulit / The Canadian Press via The Associated Press

Ottawa Senators’ Daniel Alfredsson tries to deflect the puck past Pittsburgh Penguins goalie Marc-Andre Fleury in the first period of Sunday’s game in Ottawa. the first time since a season-high four-game winning streak in early November. “It was a very good win and we showed that we are still a very good team,” Karlsson said. Also on Sunday: Capitals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Hurricanes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 RALEIGH, N.C. — Alex Ovechkin had a goal to end an eight-game drought and added an assist for Washington, which held on for the win. Mathieu Perreault and David Steckel also scored for the Capitals. They have won three of four and swept the Hurricanes on their home ice for the first time since the 1997-98 season. Blackhawks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Blue Jackets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 CHICAGO — Patrick Sharp scored two goals and Marty Turco made 26 saves to lead the Blackhawks their fourth straight win. Tomas Kopecky and Dave Bolland also scored for Chicago, which has allowed just five goals during its winning streak.

Lightning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Thrashers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 ATLANTA — Vincent Lecavalier’s second goal of the game — a power-play tally 1:13 into overtime — gave Tampa Bay the victory. Steven Stamkos also scored his 28th goal for the Lightning, who have won two straight and six of seven. Lecavalier has six goals this season and three in two games. Red Wings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Wild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 ST. PAUL, Minn. — Henrik Zetterberg had a goal and an assist, powering the Red Wings to the victory. Daniel Cleary, Kris Draper and Tomas Holmstrom also scored for Detroit, which won for just the second time in five games. Kings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Ducks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 LOS ANGELES — Dustin Brown had a goal and an assist after getting flattened by a punch, backup Jonathan Bernier made 18 saves, and the Kings beat the Ducks in the second installment of the “Freeway Faceoff.”

Wayne Simmonds, Anze Kopitar and Justin Williams also scored against Jonas Hiller, who stopped 19 of 23 shots. Coyotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Stars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 DALLAS — Jason LaBarbera stopped 29 shots for his fifth career shutout and Kyle Turris scored in the second period, leading Phoenix to the win. LaBarbera was making his fifth straight start in place of Coyotes No. 1 goalie Ilya Bryzgalov, who is out because of injury. Blues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Predators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 ST. LOUIS — Jaroslav Halak made 32 saves for his fourth shutout and David Backes scored twice, sending St. Louis to its third consecutive win. St. Louis was not called for a penalty for the first time since April 1, 2004, against Detroit. Nashville was only whistled for one infraction, when Joel Ward was sent off for tripping with 4:47 left in the game. Maple Leafs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Devils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 NEWARK, N.J. — Jonas Gustavsson stopped 29 shots, Colby Armstrong scored two goals and Toronto ended a three-game losing streak. The Devils (9-24-2), who have the fewest points in the NHL, have lost five straight and 10 of 11 this month. Islanders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Canadiens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 UNIONDALE, N.Y. — Dwayne Roloson stopped 37 shots, and the Islanders stretched their winning streak to three. Blake Comeau, Michael Grabner, P.A. Parenteau and James Wisniewski scored for the Islanders, who tied their longest winning streak of the season and extended their point streak to five games (4-0-1). Canucks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Oilers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 VANCOUVER, British Columbia — Kevin Bieksa’s goal with 24 seconds left gave the Canucks the victory. The Canucks earned their 11th win in 14 games. They have not lost in regulation since Dec. 5 against St. Louis.


NFL

Rodgers, Packers light up Giants for 45 points Green Bay controls its own destiny in the NFC playoff race The Associated Press GREEN BAY, Wis. — Aaron Rodgers returned from a concussion to turn in his sharpest performance of the season, keeping the Green Bay Packers on a path toward the playoffs with 404 yards and four touchdowns. It all came at the expense of the New York Giants, whose season is spinning out of control after the Packers blew them out 45-17 at Lambeau Field on Sunday. Rodgers was back, and so was his sense of humor. Backup Matt Flynn played well when Rodgers sat out last week with his second concussion of the season, so Rodgers joked that he had something to prove Sunday. “I had to get my job back,” Rodgers said. There wasn’t much to smile about for the Giants (9-6), who are clinging to fading playoff hopes and certainly appeared to still be in a daze after the previous week’s collapse against Philadelphia. “There’s no denying what took place,” Giants coach Tom Coughlin said. “Facts are facts. We’re responsible for it. I’m responsible for it. So we have to live with it. And as we say in this game, the only chance you have is to turn around and line up the next week.” The Giants couldn’t stop Rodgers and couldn’t hold onto the ball, as one of the league’s most turnover-prone teams lost two fumbles and watched Eli Manning throw four interceptions. As if that wasn’t enough misery for one team to handle, the Giants were stuck in Wisconsin on Sunday night because of a major snowstorm on the East Coast. At this point, they might not want to go home. “I don’t care where we’re at, it’s going to be a long night regardless,” safety Deon Grant said. “If we’d go back to New York, it’d probably be a worse night. I know they’re not going to be happy. I looked up, the Jets lost, we lost, it’s not a good look.” Green Bay (9-6) came into Sunday’s game needing to win their final two games to make the playoffs. The Packers host division-rival Chicago in their final regular-season game next Sunday. Safety Nick Collins said it felt like a playoff game. “That’s how it’s going to be next week, too,” Collins said. John Kuhn ran for two touchdowns and caught a pass for a score for the Packers. The unheralded fullback is embracing his growing folk-hero status with Packers fans, who chant “Kuuuuuuuuuhn!” when he touches the ball. “It’s pretty funny,” Kuhn said. “It’s nice. I don’t want to let them down. They call for you ahead of time, so I’ve got to try and come through.” Greg Jennings caught seven passes for 142 yards for Green Bay, while Jordy Nelson had four catches for 124 yards and a touchdown. Rodgers was sacked twice, but wasn’t under much pressure otherwise as his offensive line delivered one of its best pass protection efforts of the year. “Those guys were ready to play,” Packers coach Mike McCarthy said. “They were sick and tired of hearing about how tough the Giants were all week.” Also on Sunday: Buccaneers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Seahawks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 TAMPA, Fla. — Josh Freeman threw for 237 yards and a career-best five touchdowns to help Tampa Bay keep its playoff hopes alive. Kellen Winslow and rookie Mike Williams each had a pair of TD receptions for the Bucs (9-6), who guaranteed themselves a winning record after going 3-13 a year ago in their first season under coach Raheem Morris. Seattle (6-9) played most of the game without injured quarterback Matt Hasselbeck and lost for the seventh time in nine games. Amazingly, the Seahawks can still win the NFC West — thus earning a playoff spot with a losing record — by beating the firstplace Rams (7-8) at home next Sunday. Rams. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 49ers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 ST. LOUIS — Sam Bradford set an NFL record for comple-

THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 27, 2010 D3

NFL SCOREBOARD SUMMARIES Bucs 38, Seahawks 15 Seattle Tampa Bay

7 0 0 8 — 15 3 14 14 7 — 38 First Quarter Sea—Hasselbeck 1 run (Mare kick), 2:50. TB—FG Barth 46, :25. Second Quarter TB—Winslow 10 pass from Freeman (Barth kick), 12:23. TB—M.Williams 20 pass from Freeman (Barth kick), 6:17. Third Quarter TB—Winslow 21 pass from Freeman (Barth kick), 6:38. TB—M.Williams 7 pass from Freeman (Barth kick), 1:28. Fourth Quarter Sea—Washington 16 run (Obomanu pass from Whitehurst), 10:14. TB—Stovall 2 pass from Freeman (Barth kick), 7:56. A—46,576. Sea TB First downs 10 22 Total Net Yards 174 439 Rushes-yards 28-90 26-208 Passing 84 231 Punt Returns 2-4 1-6 Kickoff Returns 7-128 3-99 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 14-22-0 23-28-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-6 2-21 Punts 7-37.1 3-45.0 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 4-0 Penalties-Yards 1-10 3-22 Time of Possession 28:32 31:28 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Seattle: Lynch 14-53, Washington 1-16, Forsett 8-12, Whitehurst 3-5, M.Robinson 1-3, Hasselbeck 1-1. Tampa Bay: Blount 18-164, Freeman 4-23, C.Williams 4-21. PASSING—Seattle: Whitehurst 11-18-066, Hasselbeck 3-4-0-24. Tampa Bay: Freeman 21-26-0-237, J.Johnson 2-2-0-15. RECEIVING—Seattle: Carlson 3-27, Tate 3-10, Obomanu 2-18, Williams 2-15, Forsett 2-5, Morrah 1-9, Stokley 1-6. Tampa Bay: Winslow 7-98, M.Williams 3-44, C.Williams 3-22, Stovall 3-12, Briscoe 2-28, Spurlock 1-20, Benn 1-16, Parker 1-5, Graham 1-4, Blount 1-3. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Tampa Bay: Barth 40 (BK).

Rams 25, 49ers 17

Jeffrey Phelps / The Associated Press

New York Giants’ Aaron Ross (31) applies pressure as Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers (12) throws a 3-yard touchdown pass to James Jones during the first half Sunday’s game in Green Bay, Wis.

NFL ROUNDUP tions in a rookie season and his first touchdown pass in four games to put St. Louis to earn a playoff berth next week. The Rams (7-8) need to win at Seattle (6-9) next week to clinch the NFC West and secure their first playoff berth since 2004. Troy Smith was benched in the fourth quarter of a loss that eliminated the 49ers (5-10) from playoff consideration in the weak NFC West. Patriots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Bills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. — New England clinched the top seed in the AFC playoffs thanks to Tom Brady’s three touchdown passes. The Patriots (13-2) rolled to their seventh straight victory in winning the AFC East division and beating the Bills (4-11) for the 15th game in a row dating to 2003. Brady finished 15 of 27 for 140 yards and set the NFL record for most attempts (319) without an interception. He topped the mark set by Bernie Kosar in the 1990-91 seasons. Ravens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Browns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 CLEVELAND — Joe Flacco threw two touchdown passes, Baltimore’s defense bottled up Cleveland’s Peyton Hillis, and the Ravens clinched their third straight playoff appearance. Ed Reed intercepted rookie Colt McCoy twice as the Ravens (114) stayed in contention for the AFC North title. They remain tied with Pittsburgh for the division lead with one game left. Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Titans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Matt Cassel threw three touchdown passes and Eric Berry returned an interception 54 yards for another score for Kansas City, which clinched the AFC West title after San Diego lost to Cincinnati. Cassel hit 12 of his first 13 passes for the Chiefs (10-5), including touchdown tosses to Jamaal Charles on their first two possessions. Dwayne Bowe had six catches for 153 yards, including a career-best 75-yard touchdown as the Chiefs remained unbeaten in seven home games. Bengals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Chargers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 CINCINNATI — Carson Palmer threw four touchdown passes during a near-perfect performance in the swirling snow, ending the Chargers’ run of four straight AFC West titles. The Chargers (8-7) froze up in their coldest game in nearly three years, repeatedly self-destructing on a raw, windy evening. It was only San Diego’s second loss in its last 22 games in December.

Bears. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Jets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 CHICAGO — Jay Cutler threw three touchdown passes, Matt Forte ran for 113 yards and Chicago closed in on a first-round bye. The Jets (10-5) lost for the third time in four games, but clinched their second straight postseason trip under coach Rex Ryan when Jacksonville lost 2017 in overtime to Washington. The win was the seventh in eight games for the Bears (11-4), who blew an early 10-point lead and regrouped in the second half after being picked apart by Mark Sanchez early. Colts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Raiders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 OAKLAND, Calif. — Peyton Manning threw three touchdown passes and iced the game with a 27-yard keeper in a game that turned out to have little playoff meaning. The Colts (9-6) allowed Jacoby Ford to return the opening kick for a TD, overcame a pair of interceptions by Manning in the second half and survived four field goals from Sebastian Janikowski, including two from more than 50 yards, to move within a win of clinching the AFC South title for their ninth straight playoff berth. Redskins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Jaguars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Kevin Barnes intercepted David Garrard’s second pass in overtime, setting up Graham Gano’s 31-yard field goal. Rex Grossman had a touchdown pass early, and Ryan Torain added a 1-yard plunge on fourth down late as the Redskins (6-9) ended a four-game losing streak. The Jaguars (8-7) have lost two in a row and need help to make the playoffs. They need to win at Houston next week and have Tennessee upset Indianapolis to win the AFC South. Lions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Dolphins. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 MIAMI — Detroit took advantage of two interceptions to score 17 points in the final 4:37. With the comeback, the Lions (5-10) have won three consecutive games for the first time since 2007. The Dolphins (7-8), eliminated from the playoff race last week, finished 1-7 at home to match a franchise low. Broncos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Texans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 DENVER — Tim Tebow scored on a 6-yard scramble with three minutes left in his first home start to cap Denver’s comeback from a 17-0 halftime deficit. Matt Schaub was driving the Texans for a go-ahead score when Syd’Quan Thompson picked off a pass deflected by Justin Bannan at the Broncos 27 with just over a minute remaining.

East y-New England x-N.Y. Jets Miami Buffalo

W 13 10 7 4

L 2 5 8 11

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .867 .667 .467 .267

PF 480 329 266 276

Indianapolis Jacksonville Tennessee Houston

W 9 8 6 5

L 6 7 9 10

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .600 .533 .400 .333

PF 412 336 336 356

x-Pittsburgh x-Baltimore Cleveland Cincinnati

W 11 11 5 4

L 4 4 10 11

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .733 .733 .333 .267

PF 334 344 262 315

y-Kansas City San Diego Oakland Denver

W 10 8 7 4

L 5 7 8 11

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .667 .533 .467 .267

PF 356 408 379 316

AFC 9-2-0 8-3-0 5-6-0 3-8-0

NFC 4-0-0 2-2-0 2-2-0 1-3-0

Div 4-1-0 3-2-0 2-3-0 1-4-0

PA 368 385 316 410

Home 5-2-0 5-3-0 3-5-0 3-4-0

Away 4-4-0 3-4-0 3-4-0 2-6-0

AFC 7-4-0 7-4-0 3-8-0 4-7-0

NFC 2-2-0 1-3-0 3-1-0 1-3-0

Div 3-2-0 3-2-0 2-3-0 2-3-0

PA 223 263 291 382

Home 5-3-0 6-1-0 3-4-0 3-5-0

Away 6-1-0 5-3-0 2-6-0 1-6-0

AFC 8-3-0 8-3-0 3-8-0 3-8-0

NFC 3-1-0 3-1-0 2-2-0 1-3-0

Div 4-1-0 3-2-0 1-4-0 2-3-0

PA 295 294 361 438

Home 7-0-0 6-2-0 5-3-0 3-4-0

Away 3-5-0 2-5-0 2-5-0 1-7-0

AFC 6-5-0 6-5-0 5-6-0 3-8-0

NFC 4-0-0 2-2-0 2-2-0 1-3-0

Div 2-3-0 2-3-0 5-0-0 1-4-0

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East y-Philadelphia N.Y. Giants Washington Dallas

W 10 9 6 5

L 4 6 9 10

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .714 .600 .400 .333

PF 412 377 288 380

x-Atlanta New Orleans Tampa Bay Carolina

W 12 10 9 2

L 2 4 6 13

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .857 .714 .600 .133

PF 369 354 318 186

y-Chicago Green Bay Minnesota Detroit

W 11 9 5 5

L 4 6 9 10

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .733 .600 .357 .333

PF 331 378 244 342

W St. Louis 7 Seattle 6 San Francisco 5 Arizona 5 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division

L 8 9 10 10

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .467 .400 .333 .333

PF 283 294 267 282

PA 339 333 360 423

Home 4-2-0 5-3-0 2-5-0 2-6-0

Away 6-2-0 4-3-0 4-4-0 3-4-0

NFC 7-3-0 7-4-0 4-7-0 3-8-0

AFC 3-1-0 2-2-0 2-2-0 2-2-0

Div 4-1-0 2-3-0 2-3-0 2-3-0

Away 6-2-0 5-2-0 5-2-0 0-7-0

NFC 9-1-0 8-2-0 7-4-0 2-9-0

AFC 3-1-0 2-2-0 2-2-0 0-4-0

Div 4-0-0 3-1-0 2-3-0 0-5-0

Away 6-1-0 3-5-0 1-5-0 2-6-0

NFC 8-3-0 7-4-0 4-6-0 4-7-0

AFC 3-1-0 2-2-0 1-3-0 1-3-0

Div 5-0-0 3-2-0 1-4-0 1-4-0

Away 2-5-0 2-6-0 1-7-0 1-6-0

NFC 5-6-0 5-6-0 3-8-0 3-8-0

AFC 2-2-0 1-3-0 2-2-0 2-2-0

Div 3-2-0 3-2-0 3-2-0 1-4-0

South PA 261 270 305 377

Home 6-0-0 5-2-0 4-4-0 2-6-0

North PA 276 237 314 356

Home 5-3-0 6-1-0 4-4-0 3-4-0

West

Bengals 34, Chargers 20

N.Y. Giants Green Bay

San Diego Cincinnati

7 10 7 7 — 31 7 6 3 10 — 26 First Quarter Oak—Ford 99 kickoff return (Janikowski kick), 14:48. Ind—Addai 6 run (Vinatieri kick), 6:00. Second Quarter Ind—FG Vinatieri 30, 14:51. Oak—FG Janikowski 59, 9:31. Oak—FG Janikowski 38, 1:55. Ind—Tamme 18 pass from Manning (Vinatieri kick), :36. Third Quarter Oak—FG Janikowski 51, 7:53. Ind—White 4 pass from Manning (Vinatieri kick), 2:55. Fourth Quarter Oak—FG Janikowski 45, 12:59. Ind—Garcon 7 pass from Manning (Vinatieri kick), 7:38. Oak—Z.Miller 6 pass from J.Campbell (Janikowski kick), 1:51. A—52,567. Ind Oak First downs 27 16 Total Net Yards 370 290 Rushes-yards 39-191 20-80 Passing 179 210 Punt Returns 3-15 1-12 Kickoff Returns 5-123 5-188 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 2-0 Comp-Att-Int 16-30-2 29-42-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 0-0 3-21 Punts 6-42.8 6-46.8 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-0 Penalties-Yards 4-42 10-116 Time of Possession 29:59 30:01

Away 6-2-0 6-2-0 6-1-0 2-5-0

West

Packers 45, Giants 17

Indianapolis Oakland

Home 7-0-0 4-3-0 1-7-0 2-6-0

North

INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Indianapolis: Rhodes 17-98, Addai 12-45, D.Brown 6-28, Manning 3-25, Garcon 1-(minus 5). Oakland: D.McFadden 11-45, Bush 3-19, J.Campbell 3-10, Reece 3-6. PASSING—Indianapolis: Manning 1630-2-179. Oakland: J.Campbell 29-42-0-231. RECEIVING—Indianapolis: Tamme 7-78, Wayne 3-40, Garcon 3-35, White 2-20, Addai 16. Oakland: Z.Miller 9-66, Heyward-Bey 4-40, D.McFadden 4-31, Bush 3-15, Murphy 2-36, Ford 2-21, Schilens 2-16, Reece 2-2, Myers 1-4. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Oakland: Janikowski 54 (WR).

Colts 31, Raiders 26

PA 306 297 295 387

South

San Francisco 0 14 0 3 — 17 St. Louis 9 3 3 10 — 25 First Quarter StL—Jackson 1 run (Jo.Brown kick), 11:21. StL—Hall safety, 2:47. Second Quarter SF—Ginn Jr. 78 punt return (Reed kick), 9:26. StL—FG Jo.Brown 43, 5:42. SF—Crabtree 60 pass from T.Smith (Reed kick), 2:32. Third Quarter StL—FG Jo.Brown 30, 9:39. Fourth Quarter StL—Robinson 3 pass from Bradford (Jo. Brown kick), 9:36. SF—FG Reed 47, 5:41. StL—FG Jo.Brown 28, 3:51. A—52,820. SF StL First downs 12 19 Total Net Yards 331 335 Rushes-yards 21-85 28-60 Passing 246 275 Punt Returns 3-97 3-11 Kickoff Returns 6-100 5-177 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-19 Comp-Att-Int 17-34-1 28-37-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-27 1-17 Punts 6-53.8 7-42.4 Fumbles-Lost 5-1 2-1 Penalties-Yards 8-87 5-41 Time of Possession 26:52 33:08 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—San Francisco: Westbrook 1040, T.Smith 5-28, Dixon 6-17. St. Louis: Jackson 24-48, B.Gibson 2-15, Karney 1-2, Robinson 1-(minus 5). PASSING—San Francisco: T.Smith 7-191-153, A.Smith 10-15-0-120. St. Louis: Bradford 28-37-0-292. RECEIVING—San Francisco: Crabtree 6-122, V.Davis 3-70, Walker 3-17, Morgan 239, Westbrook 2-3, Ginn Jr. 1-22. St. Louis: Amendola 8-53, Alexander 6-99, B.Gibson 3-69, Fells 3-28, Robinson 3-25, Jackson 3-19, Darby 2-(minus 1). MISSED FIELD GOALS—San Francisco: Reed 34 (WL).

0 14 3 0 — 17 14 7 10 14 — 45 First Quarter GB—Nelson 80 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick), 7:53. GB—J.Jones 3 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick), 1:47. Second Quarter NYG—Nicks 36 pass from Manning (Tynes kick), 11:40. NYG—Manningham 85 pass from Manning (Tynes kick), 5:13. GB—Kuhn 8 run (Crosby kick), 1:54. Third Quarter GB—FG Crosby 31, 9:56. NYG—FG Tynes 38, 7:10. GB—D.Lee 1 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick), 4:44. Fourth Quarter GB—Kuhn 5 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick), 6:58. GB—Kuhn 1 run (Crosby kick), 4:20. A—70,649. NYG GB First downs 16 27 Total Net Yards 386 515 Rushes-yards 21-90 35-119 Passing 296 396 Punt Returns 3-13 2-7 Kickoff Returns 8-149 4-60 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 4-7 Comp-Att-Int 17-33-4 25-37-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-5 2-8 Punts 4-42.3 5-41.6 Fumbles-Lost 2-2 2-1 Penalties-Yards 5-45 3-31 Time of Possession 22:59 37:01 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—N.Y. Giants: Jacobs 8-47, Bradshaw 12-31, Manning 1-12. Green Bay: Jackson 18-39, Nance 9-32, Rodgers 2-26, Kuhn 6-22. PASSING—N.Y. Giants: Manning 17-334-301. Green Bay: Rodgers 25-37-0-404. RECEIVING—N.Y. Giants: Bradshaw 5-41, Manningham 4-132, Nicks 4-93, Ware 224, Hagan 2-11. Green Bay: Jennings 7-142, Nelson 4-124, J.Jones 4-36, Driver 3-44, Kuhn 2-7, D.Lee 2-4, Crabtree 1-21, Quarless 1-16, Jackson 1-10. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Kansas City

AMERICAN CONFERENCE

Sunday’s Games

PA 312 401 339 396

Home 5-3-0 4-3-0 4-3-0 4-4-0

——— Thursday’s Game Pittsburgh 27, Carolina 3 Saturday’s Game Arizona 27, Dallas 26 Sunday’s Games Kansas City 34, Tennessee 14 Chicago 38, N.Y. Jets 34 New England 34, Buffalo 3 Washington 20, Jacksonville 17, OT Denver 24, Houston 23 Green Bay 45, N.Y. Giants 17 Minnesota at Philadelphia, ppd., snow

t. Louis 25, San Francisco 17 Baltimore 20, Cleveland 10 Detroit 34, Miami 27 Indianapolis 31, Oakland 26 Cincinnati 34, San Diego 20 Tampa Bay 38, Seattle 15 Today’s Game

New Orleans at Atlanta, 5:30 p.m. Tuesday’s Game Minnesota at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 2 Oakland at Kansas City, 10 a.m. Miami at New England, 10 a.m. Carolina at Atlanta, 10 a.m. Buffalo at N.Y. Jets, 10 a.m. Arizona at San Francisco, 1:15 p.m. Chicago at Green Bay, 1:15 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Washington, 1:15 p.m. Tennessee at Indianapolis, 1:15 p.m.

Tampa Bay at New Orleans, 10 a.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 10 a.m. Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Cincinnati at Baltimore, 10 a.m. San Diego at Denver, 1:15 p.m. Jacksonville at Houston, 1:15 p.m. Dallas at Philadelphia, 1:15 p.m. St. Louis at Seattle, 5:20 p.m. Times PST

0 3 7 10 — 20 7 6 0 21 — 34 First Quarter Cin—Gresham 3 pass from C.Palmer (Stitser kick), 10:19. Second Quarter Cin—Simpson 10 pass from C.Palmer (kick failed), 12:54. SD—FG Kaeding 20, 1:15. Third Quarter SD—Mathews 23 run (Kaeding kick), 5:45. Fourth Quarter Cin—Shipley 3 pass from C.Palmer (Stitser kick), 13:00. SD—FG Kaeding 28, 7:18. Cin—Simpson 59 pass from C.Palmer (Stitser kick), 6:25. Cin—Scott 10 run (Stitser kick), 3:54. SD—Washington 5 pass from Rivers (Kaeding kick), 1:27. A—54,194. SD Cin First downs 23 18 Total Net Yards 313 371 Rushes-yards 22-64 38-102 Passing 249 269 Punt Returns 1-12 0-0 Kickoff Returns 6-127 4-84 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-47 Comp-Att-Int 27-40-1 16-21-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-7 0-0 Punts 4-31.8 4-32.3 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 1-1 Penalties-Yards 1-5 6-57 Time of Possession 29:51 30:09 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—San Diego: Mathews 12-55, Sproles 3-8, Rivers 1-2, Hester 2-1, Tolbert 4-(minus 2). Cincinnati: Benson 24-52, Scott 11-50, Peerman 1-1, C.Palmer 2-(minus 1). PASSING—San Diego: Rivers 27-40-1256. Cincinnati: C.Palmer 16-21-0-269. RECEIVING—San Diego: Sproles 8-55, Washington 5-40, Naanee 4-59, Jackson 4-54, Mathews 3-28, McMichael 2-13, Kr.Wilson 1-7. Cincinnati: Simpson 6-124, Caldwell 4-87, Gresham 4-56, Shipley 1-3, Scott 1-(minus 1). MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Broncos 24, Texans 23 Houston Denver

7 10 6 0 — 23 0 0 10 14 — 24 First Quarter Hou—Foster 3 run (Rackers kick), 2:41. Second Quarter Hou—Daniels 3 pass from Schaub (Rackers kick), 11:43. Hou—FG Rackers 34, :22. Third Quarter Den—Buckhalter 6 run (Hauschka kick), 12:58. Hou—FG Rackers 54, 10:14. Den—FG Hauschka 27, 7:06. Hou—FG Rackers 57, 2:34. Fourth Quarter Den—Buckhalter 23 pass from Tebow (Hauschka kick), 10:55. Den—Tebow 6 run (Hauschka kick), 3:02. A—73,691. Hou Den First downs 21 25 Total Net Yards 401 431 Rushes-yards 22-91 33-126 Passing 310 305 Punt Returns 2-14 2-19 Kickoff Returns 3-65 2-47 Interceptions Ret. 1-0 1-2 Comp-Att-Int 23-33-1 16-29-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 0-0 1-3 Punts 4-42.5 4-43.5 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 4-0 Penalties-Yards 3-24 4-27 Time of Possession 28:10 31:50 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Houston: Foster 19-91, Ward 1-3, Schaub 1-0, Jones 1-(minus 3). Denver: Buckhalter 11-42, Ball 5-38, Tebow 10-27, Moreno 7-19. PASSING—Houston: Schaub 23-33-1310. Denver: Tebow 16-29-1-308.

RECEIVING—Houston: Daniels 8-73, Jones 5-115, Foster 4-44, Dreessen 3-33, Casey 1-21, Walter 1-14, Ward 1-10. Denver: Lloyd 5111, Gaffney 4-90, Buckhalter 3-50, Royal 2-22, Moreno 1-22, Ball 1-13. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Redskins 20, Jaguars 17 (OT) Washington Jacksonville

10 0 0 7 3 — 20 0 7 3 7 0 — 17 First Quarter Was—FG Gano 48, 13:41. Was—F.Davis 1 pass from Grossman (Gano kick), 9:07. Second Quarter Jac—Thomas 19 pass from Garrard (Scobee kick), 8:18. Third Quarter Jac—FG Scobee 34, 4:57. Fourth Quarter Was—Torain 1 run (Gano kick), 12:07. Jac—Garrard 20 run (Scobee kick), 2:44. Overtime Was—FG Gano 31, 12:13. A—63,470. Was Jac First downs 15 15 Total Net Yards 251 336 Rushes-yards 24-79 23-78 Passing 172 258 Punt Returns 3-11 7-39 Kickoff Returns 3-67 5-72 Interceptions Ret. 2-46 1-0 Comp-Att-Int 19-39-1 22-38-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-10 4-41 Punts 9-40.9 7-45.4 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-0 Penalties-Yards 5-40 7-66 Time of Possession 29:53 32:54 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Washington: Torain 20-65, K.Williams 2-8, Grossman 1-5, Sellers 1-1. Jacksonville: Garrard 6-39, Jennings 15-32, Thomas 1-4, Karim 1-3. PASSING—Washington: Grossman 1939-1-182. Jacksonville: Garrard 22-38-2-299. RECEIVING—Washington: Moss 5-85, Cooley 5-48, Armstrong 2-15, F.Davis 2-10, Torain 2-4, R.Williams 1-10, Austin 1-6, K.Williams 1-4. Jacksonville: Thomas 6-96, Hill 4-77, Jennings 4-29, Lewis 3-37, Potter 2-14, SimsWalker 1-31, Bolen 1-15, G.Jones 1-0. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Jacksonville: Scobee 44 (WL).

Patriots 34, Bills 3 New England 7 17 7 3 — 34 Buffalo 3 0 0 0 — 3 First Quarter Buf—FG Lindell 26, 10:08. NE—Woodhead 29 run (Graham kick), 3:46. Second Quarter NE—Gronkowski 8 pass from Brady (Graham kick), 12:27. NE—FG Graham 34, 3:57. NE—Crumpler 4 pass from Brady (Graham kick), :33. Third Quarter NE—Gronkowski 8 pass from Brady (Graham kick), 11:27. Fourth Quarter NE—FG Graham 26, 10:15. A—68,281. NE Buf First downs 20 16 Total Net Yards 348 369 Rushes-yards 41-217 21-125 Passing 131 244 Punt Returns 0-0 1-0 Kickoff Returns 2-39 7-115 Interceptions Ret. 3-19 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 15-27-0 18-37-3 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-9 2-7 Punts 5-41.2 2-34.0 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 4-4 Penalties-Yards 6-40 6-40 Time of Possession 32:30 27:30 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—New England: Green-Ellis 19-104, Woodhead 13-93, Brady 3-13, Tate 1-12, Hoyer 4-(minus 2), Taylor 1-(minus 3). Buffalo: Jackson 13-81, Spiller 6-30, Fitzpatrick 2-14. PASSING—New England: Brady 15-27-0140. Buffalo: Fitzpatrick 18-37-3-251. RECEIVING—New England: Gronkowski 4-54, Woodhead 3-32, Welker 3-19, Branch 2-25, Crumpler 1-4, Green-Ellis 1-3, Morris 1-3. Buffalo: St.Johnson 5-58, Jones 5-54, Roosevelt 4-74, Spiller 2-54, Jackson 2-11. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Chiefs 34, Titans 14 Tennessee

0

7

7

0 — 14

14 17 3 0 — 34 First Quarter KC—Charles 14 pass from Cassel (Succop kick), 11:19. KC—Charles 5 pass from Cassel (Succop kick), 1:52. Second Quarter KC—FG Succop 35, 11:31. KC—Bowe 75 pass from Cassel (Succop kick), 7:19. Ten—Britt 53 pass from Collins (Bironas kick), 4:15. KC—Berry 54 interception return (Succop kick), :22. Third Quarter KC—FG Succop 42, 5:43. Ten—Cook 22 pass from Collins (Bironas kick), 3:35. A—65,606. Ten KC First downs 16 23 Total Net Yards 270 458 Rushes-yards 16-57 40-152 Passing 213 306 Punt Returns 3-1 5-36 Kickoff Returns 7-119 3-50 Interceptions Ret. 1-9 2-54 Comp-Att-Int 14-37-2 25-36-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-22 1-6 Punts 8-44.0 5-46.4 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 3-1 Penalties-Yards 9-74 7-84 Time of Possession 20:56 39:04 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Tennessee: C.Johnson 14-58, Collins 2-(minus 1). Kansas City: Charles 1377, Jones 23-51, Cassel 3-20, McCluster 1-4. PASSING—Tennessee: Collins 14-37-2235. Kansas City: Cassel 24-34-0-314, Croyle 1-2-1-(minus 2). RECEIVING—Tennessee: Cook 5-96, Britt 4-89, Washington 3-37, Williams 1-10, Hall 1-3. Kansas City: Bowe 6-153, Moeaki 5-63, Charles 4-40, Chambers 3-17, Castille 3-8, McCluster 2-15, Pope 1-10, Copper 1-6. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Kansas City: Succop 47 (SH).

Ravens 20, Browns 10 Baltimore Cleveland

0 13 7 0 — 20 7 3 0 0 — 10 First Quarter Cle—Robiskie 29 pass from Massaquoi (Dawson kick), 7:01. Second Quarter Bal—FG Cundiff 27, 13:35. Bal—Houshmandzadeh 15 pass from Flacco (Cundiff kick), 11:47. Bal—FG Cundiff 40, 4:06. Cle—FG Dawson 30, :03. Third Quarter Bal—Mason 22 pass from Flacco (Cundiff kick), 13:30. A—65,028. Bal Cle First downs 15 17 Total Net Yards 258 280 Rushes-yards 38-161 26-102 Passing 97 178 Punt Returns 1-1 2-17 Kickoff Returns 1-15 5-126 Interceptions Ret. 3-52 1-0 Comp-Att-Int 12-19-1 16-30-3 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-5 0-0 Punts 3-45.7 3-38.7 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 1-1 Penalties-Yards 1-5 2-20 Time of Possession 31:46 28:14 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Baltimore: Rice 25-92, McGahee 8-34, L.McClain 2-19, Flacco 3-16. Cleveland: Hillis 12-35, McCoy 4-30, Bell 727, Cribbs 2-8, Vickers 1-2. PASSING—Baltimore: Flacco 12-19-1102. Cleveland: McCoy 15-29-3-149, Massaquoi 1-1-0-29. RECEIVING—Baltimore: Mason 4-50, Houshmandzadeh 4-32, Boldin 2-15, L.McClain 1-5, Rice 1-0. Cleveland: Stuckey 4-39, Watson 3-22, Bell 2-48, Robiskie 2-35, Massaquoi 2-14, Cribbs 1-9, A.Smith 1-6, Hillis 1-5. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Bears 38, Jets 34 N.Y. Jets Chicago

0 24 7 3 — 34 10 7 21 0 — 38 First Quarter Chi—FG Gould 37, 9:40. Chi—Forte 22 run (Gould kick), 4:54. Second Quarter NYJ—Greene 3 run (Folk kick), 14:56. NYJ—Lowery 20 interception return (Folk kick), 13:52. NYJ—Tomlinson 3 run (Folk kick), 5:44. Chi—Cutler 2 run (Gould kick), 2:44. NYJ—FG Folk 26, :12. Third Quarter Chi—Knox 40 pass from Cutler (Gould kick), 13:20. Chi—Hester 25 pass from Cutler (Gould kick), 10:29. NYJ—Holmes 23 pass from Sanchez (Folk kick), 8:36. Chi—Knox 26 pass from Cutler (Gould kick), 6:06. Fourth Quarter NYJ—FG Folk 34, 14:52. A—62,310. NYJ Chi First downs 24 16 Total Net Yards 393 322 Rushes-yards 30-124 27-120 Passing 269 202 Punt Returns 3-8 1-38 Kickoff Returns 6-126 7-114 Interceptions Ret. 1-20 1-0 Comp-Att-Int 24-38-1 13-25-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 0-0 2-13 Punts 4-40.3 4-44.0 Fumbles-Lost 3-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 3-34 6-31 Time of Possession 33:51 26:09 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—N.Y. Jets: Greene 12-70, Tomlinson 13-28, B.Smith 2-18, Richardson 25, Holmes 1-3. Chicago: Forte 19-113, Taylor 4-4, Cutler 4-3. PASSING—N.Y. Jets: Sanchez 24-37-1269, B.Smith 0-1-0-0. Chicago: Cutler 13-251-215. RECEIVING—N.Y. Jets: Keller 7-79, Edwards 6-78, Holmes 4-69, Greene 2-14, Tomlinson 2-14, Cotchery 2-8, Richardson 1-7. Chicago: Knox 4-92, Forte 4-56, Hester 3-48, Bennett 1-14, Olsen 1-5. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Chicago: Gould 35 (WR).

Lions 34, Dolphins 27 Detroit Miami

3 7 7 17 — 34 3 14 7 3 — 27 First Quarter Det—FG Rayner 39, 10:56. Mia—FG Carpenter 40, :30. Second Quarter Det—Pettigrew 20 pass from Sh.Hill (Rayner kick), 12:17. Mia—Polite 4 run (Carpenter kick), 6:13. Mia—Bess 13 pass from Henne (Carpenter kick), :30. Third Quarter Det—Morris 5 run (Rayner kick), 5:49. Mia—Brown 1 run (Carpenter kick), :05. Fourth Quarter Mia—FG Carpenter 28, 9:44. Det—Best 53 pass from Sh.Hill (Rayner kick), 4:37. Det—FG Rayner 47, 2:44. Det—Levy 30 interception return (Rayner kick), 2:11. A—66,731. Det Mia First downs 14 28 Total Net Yards 275 425 Rushes-yards 21-67 37-154 Passing 208 271 Punt Returns 1-23 4-50 Kickoff Returns 3-18 5-82 Interceptions Ret. 2-30 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 14-26-0 29-44-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-14 2-7 Punts 6-46.3 4-41.3 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 5-1 Penalties-Yards 6-53 8-63 Time of Possession 22:45 37:15 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Detroit: Best 6-24, Morris 1222, Burleson 1-12, Sh.Hill 1-10, Logan 1-(minus 1). Miami: Williams 14-71, Brown 12-37, Moore 1-16, Henne 5-14, Polite 4-12, Cobbs 1-4. PASSING—Detroit: Sh.Hill 14-26-0-222. Miami: Henne 29-44-2-278. RECEIVING—Detroit: Pettigrew 4-74, C.Johnson 4-52, Morris 2-13, Best 1-53, Scheffler 1-15, B.Johnson 1-8, Burleson 1-7. Miami: Marshall 10-102, Brown 6-34, Bess 5-34, Shuler 2-44, Fasano 2-31, Williams 2-21, Polite 1-7, Moore 1-5. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.


D4 Monday, December 27, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

N F L C O M M E N TA RY

NBA SCOREBOARD

Meaningless or not, Seattle can’t find ‘on’ switch in loss By Steve Kelley The Seattle Times

TAMPA, Fla. — his was a loss that meant nothing, but said everything about the state of the Seahawks. It was a loss that sucked most of the joy out of next week’s NFC West showdown with the St. Louis Rams, a loss that looked like so many of the losses the Seahawks have suffered in their three-season swoon. It was a loss that felt like fodder for all of the critics who have mocked the rightfully mocked NFC West since mid-October. “We did not accomplish anything in this game,” coach Pete Carroll said after this latest pummeling, 38-15 by Tampa Bay. They haven’t accomplished much this entire season. Fifteen games into the Pete Carroll Era, the Seahawks aren’t any better than they were at this point last season. These double-digit defeats are the same kind of losses that got their last coach fired. “I don’t think it feels at all like last year,” argued quarterback Matt Hasselbeck, who injured his hip, scoring on the Hawks’ second possession and didn’t return. “We are a team that is trying to do a 180degree turn (from the past two seasons). “We were a really good team (in the playoff years) and then we became a really bad team and now we’re trying to make the turn. It’s not a real easy thing to do. Are we a great team right now? No, we’re not a great team. But we’re trying.” This uncompetitive, passionless mess of a game against the Bucs, however, was a sharp reminder of how far away from greatness these

T

Margaret Bowles / The Associated Press

Tampa Bay Buccaneers tight end Kellen Winslow (82) dives over Seattle Seahawks cornerback Walter Thurmond (28) to score a third-quarter touchdown during Sunday’s game in Tampa, Fla. Seattle lost, 38-15. Seahawks are. “I’m disappointed in the way that we’re executing right now,” Carroll said. “We’re going to fight and we’re going to scratch our way into this thing and see what happens next week. They (the players) know what’s at stake right now and we’re going for it again.” At this point in the season, however, it’s as if all of the college rah-rah energy that sustained the players for much of September and October has leaked out of them. Going into this final week of the season, all Carroll can hope for is the prestidigitatory power of Qwest Field. “We go into Qwest and any-

thing can happen,” Carroll said, firing off sentences as if he were in his two-minute offense. “Whether it’s on special teams, or whether we can do it on defense by taking the ball away. There’s a lot of chances for us that seem to come alive at Qwest. There’s some magic there and hopefully we can call on that again.” The Seahawks are six and nine, baby, and heading home with their destiny in their hands. Six and nine and still “All in.” Six and nine and in position to win the West. Just doesn’t sound right, does it? “We’re going to play for the NFC West championship.

That’s all there is to it. Whether anybody likes that or thinks that isn’t what’s happening. That’s the truth,” Carroll said. “The players know that. Now we have to go out and have a heck of a week in practice and perform like it means something to us and come out here on game day at Qwest and do something special. “After you look at tonight, you’re going to wonder how that’s going to happen. But we’re going to find a way. We have an opportunity this week to play for our division, which is what we set out to do from the start. Regardless of what it looks like, or what it feels like, that’s the fact.” But as players were saying after the game, teams don’t suddenly flip a switch and start playing like champions, especially 16 weeks into the season. “I don’t know if we all understand it. It’s ridiculous the opportunity that we still have,” Hasselbeck said. “It’s huge, awesome. We should be saying, ‘Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.’ Because this is just amazing. “There are teams who have had pretty good seasons, but they’re out of the playoffs. They don’t get a chance. For us to still have this opportunity, as poorly as we’ve played at times, as poorly as we played tonight, is a huge opportunity, one that very, very few teams get.” Then Hasselbeck added one sobering thought: “Having the opportunity is one thing. Doing something about it is another thing.” And, at this point in the season, the Hawks have shown no indication they are ready to take advantage of this last opportunity. Flip the switch? Right now, they can’t even find it.

Double trouble: Labor strife looms for NFL and NBA in 2011 By Ronald Blum The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Labor strife is on the horizon in the New Year for the NFL, NBA and NHL. By this time next year, two of the three leagues could be dark. The National Football League’s labor contract expires March 4, followed by the National Basketball Association’s on June 30, Major League Baseball’s on Dec. 11 and the National Hockey League’s on Sept. 15, 2012. Only baseball, interrupted by eight work stoppages from 1972-95, shows signs of peacefully reaching a new agreement. NFL players, meanwhile, are bracing for a stoppage, going so far as to post a “Lockout Watch” countdown clock on the home page of the union’s website. “The players believe this lockout is going to occur,” NFL Players Association head DeMaurice Smith said.

Three times the mess Coming out of the Great Recession, management wants to reduce the percentage of revenue that goes to players. The goal has been voiced by NFL and NBA owners, and could spill over to the NHL. “All we can say now is those seem to be the proposals from football and basketball,” former baseball players’ union head and new NHL players’ boss Donald Fehr said during an interview with The Associated Press. “While a lot of the words and phrases are the same and while all three industries have caps of various types, all three industries are different and the nature of the internal economics is not the same.” The NFL was interrupted by strikes in 1982 and 1987. The NBA was stopped by preseason lockouts in 1995, 1996 and 1998, followed by a regular-season lockout in 1998-99 that extended to Jan. 6 and wiped out the first 464 games. Hockey has had an even more tumultuous time. After a brief strike in April 1992 led to the postponement of 30 games, a 103-day lockout in 1994-95 caused the cancellation of 468 games. That was nothing compared to the lockout that obliterated the entire 2004-05 season. Given its predominant place in the American sports scene, the NFL’s labor talks are of interest to most. Running the most successful of the U.S. leagues, NFL management is worried that any gains achieved would be wiped out by

fan backlash, similar to the one baseball experienced after the 7½-month strike of 1994-95 eliminated the World Series for the first time in nine decades. Baseball’s average attendance didn’t rebound to its pre-strike level until 2007.

Sense of urgency “That’s why we would all like to get it done. And that’s why we’re completely focused and making it the highest priority to get a collective bargaining agreement. The fans want football,” Commissioner Roger Goodell said. “I think that we have been very clear about the fact that when there is uncertainty, that’s not a good thing. It’s not a good thing for the fans. It’s not a good thing for your business partners. It’s not a good thing for the potential for revenue, going at it that way. It can be damaging to the game and that’s something we’re trying to avoid.” The NFL’s deal was struck in March 2006 and was to have run through February 2013. But owners voted in May 2008 to exercise an opt-out clause that ends the agreement after the 2010 season. At the time of that opt-out vote, management said it was paying players $4.5 billion, or just under 60 percent of revenues as specified in the 2006 agreement. Twelve days after the latest labor deal was struck, Paul Tagliabue announced his intention to retire as NFL commissioner. Goodell took over that September and has a chance to put his stamp on negotiations for the first time. Smith also is new, taking over as union head after Gene Upshaw died two years ago. Switching to an 18-game regular season, up from the 16-game format that has been in place from 1978, is a chief management goal along with halving the four preseason games that have comparatively low appeal. Players want more roster spots and a decrease in offseason workouts from the current level of 14 weeks.

Ancient history? NFL players struck in 1982, resulting in the cancellation of 98 games, and again in 1987, when 14 were called off before owners used replacement players for three weeks. After the union decertified, a federal jury in Minneapolis ruled in 1992 that NFL owners violated antitrust laws when they put a limited “Plan B” free-agent system in place after the strike. The sides finally agreed

to a labor contract in January 1993, and they reached new deals long before expiration and without stoppages in 1996, 1998, 2000, 2002 and 2006. Players already have voted, team-byteam, to authorize decertifying their union. This would allow them to file an antitrust suit without the six-month wait specified after the current contract expires. Smith has advised members to save their last three game checks in case of a lockout and to prepare for the discontinuation of medical coverage, forcing them to pay out-of-pocket under the federal COBRA law. The players’ association estimated about $160 million in local spending and 3,000 jobs would be lost in each league city if the 2011 season isn’t played, figures the NFL disputed.

Stakes are high for NBA Rhetoric also is running high in the NBA, where commissioner David Stern says the league’s goal is to reduce labor costs by nearly 40 percent, or $700 million to $800 million annually. Players currently are guaranteed 57 percent of basketball revenues, and the union has offered to decrease its percentage share, albeit with salary-cap loopholes. “At the bottom, it would probably be more expensive than our current way we do things,” Stern said. “It’s a continuation of the current economic system, but with additional exceptions that would probably allow us to spend more than we currently do.” NBA union head Billy Hunter is “99 percent sure” there will be a lockout, saying owners want to slash salaries, contract lengths and guarantees, raises, and the rookie salary scale. “I don’t really see that the argument’s all that compelling for the changes that they’re asking for,” Hunter said. After running baseball’s players’ union from 1983 until his retirement in December 2009, Fehr was voted in as the NHL union head this month. Players, meanwhile, decided in June to exercise their one-year option to extend the sport’s labor contract, which was due to expire next Sept. 15. “Obviously, in the baseball situation, you had continuity of an effective organization for decades, and the last five years around here they’ve had some very difficult circumstances,” Fehr said from his new office in Toronto. “So there’s an element of rebuilding and regaining the trust and confidence of the membership.”

SUMMARIES

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Sunday’s Games

76ers 95, Nuggets 89 PHILADELPHIA (95) Iguodala 3-12 3-10 9, Brand 7-16 2-2 16, Hawes 1-5 1-2 3, Holiday 8-12 5-7 22, Meeks 3-12 9-10 17, Nocioni 0-4 0-0 0, Turner 4-11 0-1 8, Young 10-18 0-0 20, Battie 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 36-91 20-32 95. DENVER (89) Smith 4-14 0-0 9, Martin 0-6 0-0 0, Nene 46 5-5 13, Billups 6-10 8-8 24, Afflalo 6-11 2-2 14, Harrington 1-2 0-0 3, Lawson 4-12 5-6 14, Andersen 1-2 1-2 3, S.Williams 0-5 0-0 0, Forbes 4-7 0-0 9. Totals 30-75 21-23 89. Philadelphia 13 30 23 29 — 95 Denver 25 21 25 18 — 89 3-Point Goals—Philadelphia 3-14 (Meeks 25, Holiday 1-3, Iguodala 0-1, Hawes 0-1, Turner 0-1, Nocioni 0-3), Denver 8-27 (Billups 4-6, Harrington 1-2, Forbes 1-2, Lawson 1-3, Smith 1-9, Martin 0-1, Afflalo 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Philadelphia 63 (Brand 17), Denver 51 (Smith, Andersen 11). Assists—Philadelphia 18 (Iguodala 5), Denver 12 (Billups, Lawson 4). Total Fouls—Philadelphia 19, Denver 22. A—19,155 (19,155).

Atlantic Division Boston New York Philadelphia Toronto New Jersey

W 23 18 12 10 9

Miami Orlando Atlanta Charlotte Washington

W 23 18 19 9 7

L 9 12 13 19 21

Chicago Indiana Milwaukee Detroit Cleveland

W 19 13 12 10 8

L 10 15 16 20 22

Hornets 93, Hawks 86 ATLANTA (86) Williams 5-11 7-7 18, Jo.Smith 3-10 4-4 10, Horford 4-10 0-0 8, Bibby 2-8 1-2 7, Johnson 816 4-5 23, Ja.Crawford 4-9 1-1 10, Pachulia 1-2 1-3 3, Powell 0-3 0-0 0, Evans 2-3 0-0 6, Collins 0-1 1-2 1. Totals 29-73 19-24 86. NEW ORLEANS (93) Ariza 5-11 0-0 12, West 8-14 2-4 18, Okafor 6-9 2-5 14, Paul 10-17 2-3 22, Belinelli 0-6 00 0, Thornton 3-8 0-0 6, Ja.Smith 2-4 0-0 4, Mbenga 1-1 0-0 2, Jack 4-11 2-2 10, Pondexter 2-2 1-1 5, Andersen 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 41-84 9-15 93. Atlanta 27 28 16 15 — 86 New Orleans 25 21 28 19 — 93 3-Point Goals—Atlanta 9-24 (Johnson 3-6, Evans 2-3, Bibby 2-6, Ja.Crawford 1-3, Williams 1-3, Jo.Smith 0-3), New Orleans 2-17 (Ariza 2-6, Andersen 0-1, Thornton 0-2, Paul 0-2, Belinelli 03, Jack 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Atlanta 44 (Jo.Smith 12), New Orleans 54 (Okafor 15). Assists—Atlanta 17 (Bibby 5), New Orleans 15 (Paul 8). Total Fouls—Atlanta 15, New Orleans 20. Technicals—New Orleans defensive three second 2. A—15,626 (17,188).

Spurs 94, Wizards 80 WASHINGTON (80) Lewis 8-19 1-1 21, Thornton 5-10 1-2 11, Armstrong 1-5 4-4 6, Hinrich 7-10 0-0 15, Young 5-19 0-0 10, Howard 4-12 3-4 11, Seraphin 0-0 0-0 0, Wall 2-9 0-0 4, Booker 1-3 0-0 2, Hudson 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 33-88 9-11 80. SAN ANTONIO (94) Jefferson 2-5 0-0 5, Duncan 2-9 1-2 5, Blair 4-11 0-0 8, Parker 8-15 3-3 20, Ginobili 8-13 0-0 21, Bonner 4-8 0-0 9, Hill 3-3 3-4 11, McDyess 1-3 0-0 2, Neal 4-10 1-1 9, Udoka 1-3 0-0 2, Quinn 0-0 2-2 2, Splitter 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 3782 10-12 94. Washington 23 19 23 15 — 80 San Antonio 27 21 33 13 — 94 3-Point Goals—Washington 5-15 (Lewis 4-8, Hinrich 1-1, Wall 0-1, Howard 0-1, Thornton 0-1, Hudson 0-1, Young 0-2), San Antonio 10-24 (Ginobili 5-7, Hill 2-2, Parker 1-2, Bonner 1-3, Jefferson 1-4, Udoka 0-1, Neal 0-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Washington 55 (Armstrong 13), San Antonio 49 (Duncan, Jefferson 9). Assists—Washington 18 (Hinrich 7), San Antonio 27 (Parker 14). Total Fouls—Washington 17, San Antonio 15. A—18,581 (18,797).

Pct .821 .600 .400 .345 .300

GB — 6 12 13½ 15

L10 9-1 7-3 6-4 2-8 3-7

Str L-1 W-2 W-1 L-2 L-1

Home 13-1 8-7 8-6 7-9 6-8

Away 10-4 10-5 4-12 3-10 3-13

Conf 19-3 11-7 8-14 8-12 5-14

Away 11-5 7-7 8-8 3-12 0-14

Conf 15-4 13-6 15-8 5-13 4-16

Away 8-7 5-8 5-10 3-12 3-13

Conf 8-5 8-8 7-5 6-10 7-14

Southeast Division Pct .719 .600 .594 .321 .250

GB — 4 4 12 14

L10 9-1 3-7 5-5 3-7 1-9

Str W-2 W-2 L-1 L-4 L-2

Home 12-4 11-5 11-5 6-7 7-7

Central Division Pct .655 .464 .429 .333 .267

GB — 5½ 6½ 9½ 11½

L10 8-2 4-6 6-4 4-6 1-9

Str W-1 L-1 W-2 L-1 L-3

Home 11-3 8-7 7-6 7-8 5-9

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division

Grizzlies 104, Pacers 90 MEMPHIS (104) Gay 11-20 5-5 30, Randolph 7-16 4-7 18, Gasol 7-11 3-5 17, Conley 2-7 0-1 4, Henry 2-6 1-2 5, Mayo 5-14 5-5 17, Thabeet 1-2 0-2 2, Vasquez 0-3 2-2 2, Allen 3-4 1-1 7, Arthur 1-4 0-0 2, Young 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 39-88 21-30 104. INDIANA (90) Granger 8-20 10-12 29, McRoberts 0-1 0-0 0, Hibbert 5-17 4-7 14, Collison 3-8 0-0 6, Dunleavy 4-12 0-0 10, Rush 2-6 1-2 7, Posey 0-4 0-0 0, S.Jones 4-6 0-0 8, Ford 2-6 0-0 4, Foster 2-5 2-2 6, Hansbrough 2-5 2-4 6. Totals 32-90 19-27 90. Memphis 32 19 26 27 — 104 Indiana 20 26 18 26 — 90 3-Point Goals—Memphis 5-10 (Gay 3-3, Mayo 2-4, Conley 0-1, Vasquez 0-2), Indiana 7-25 (Granger 3-9, Rush 2-4, Dunleavy 2-5, Collison 0-1, McRoberts 0-1, Ford 0-1, Posey 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Memphis 61 (Randolph 16), Indiana 63 (Hibbert 10). Assists—Memphis 26 (Conley 10), Indiana 20 (Collison, Ford 4). Total Fouls—Memphis 25, Indiana 24. Technicals—Indiana defensive three second. A—12,630 (18,165).

L 5 12 18 19 21

San Antonio Dallas New Orleans Houston Memphis

W 26 23 18 14 13

L 4 5 12 15 17

Utah Oklahoma City Denver Portland Minnesota

W 21 21 16 15 7

L 9 10 13 15 24

L.A. Lakers Phoenix Golden State L.A. Clippers Sacramento

W 21 13 11 9 5

L 9 16 18 22 22

Pct .867 .821 .600 .483 .433

GB — 2 8 11½ 13

L10 9-1 9-1 5-5 7-3 5-5

Str W-1 W-4 W-2 W-4 W-1

Home 17-2 13-4 13-3 8-4 8-6

Away 9-2 10-1 5-9 6-11 5-11

Conf 17-3 14-3 10-7 10-9 9-10

Away 10-4 10-5 4-10 5-12 2-17

Conf 10-8 12-6 10-7 9-10 2-17

Away 11-5 6-10 4-12 2-11 2-9

Conf 11-5 10-11 8-13 7-16 1-15

Northwest Division Pct .700 .677 .552 .500 .226

GB — ½ 4½ 6 14½

L10 6-4 7-3 3-7 6-4 2-8

Str W-3 W-1 L-3 L-1 W-1

Home 11-5 11-5 12-3 10-3 5-7

Paciic Division Pct .700 .448 .379 .290 .185

GB — 7½ 9½ 12½ 14½

L10 Str 7-3 L-2 3-7 L-3 3-7 W-2 5-5 W-1 1-9 L-7 ——— Sunday’s Games

L.A. Clippers 108, Phoenix 103 Chicago 95, Detroit 92, OT San Antonio 94, Washington 80 Philadelphia 95, Denver 89

Home 10-4 7-6 7-6 7-11 3-13

Minnesota 98, Cleveland 97 New Orleans 93, Atlanta 86 Memphis 104, Indiana 90 Today’s Games

Detroit at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Toronto at Memphis, 5 p.m. New Orleans at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Washington at Houston, 5:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Sacramento, 7 p.m.

Orlando at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Atlanta at Milwaukee, 5 p.m. Dallas at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Portland at Utah, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday’s Games

Orlando at Cleveland, 4 p.m. New York at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Toronto at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Portland at Denver, 6 p.m.

Boston at Indiana, 4 p.m. Milwaukee at Chicago, 5 p.m. L.A. Lakers at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. All Times PST

Bulls 95, Pistons 92 (OT) CHICAGO (95) Deng 4-15 1-4 10, Boozer 12-20 7-9 31, Thomas 1-4 1-1 3, Rose 9-23 5-6 23, Bogans 2-4 0-0 6, Brewer 3-7 2-4 8, Gibson 2-8 1-2 5, Asik 2-2 0-0 4, Watson 1-5 0-0 3, Korver 0-3 2-2 2, Scalabrine 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 36-91 19-28 95. DETROIT (92) Prince 8-15 1-1 17, Villanueva 5-15 2-2 12, Wallace 0-1 0-0 0, Stuckey 6-12 4-5 16, Gordon 3-6 0-0 7, McGrady 7-13 0-0 15, Hamilton 6-14 2-2 15, Monroe 1-6 2-2 4, Maxiell 0-1 2-4 2, Bynum 2-6 0-0 4. Totals 38-89 13-16 92. Chicago 23 17 28 17 10 — 95 Detroit 15 19 23 28 7 — 92 3-Point Goals—Chicago 4-12 (Bogans 2-2, Watson 1-1, Deng 1-3, Rose 0-3, Korver 0-3), Detroit 3-13 (McGrady 1-2, Gordon 1-2, Hamilton 1-3, Bynum 0-1, Villanueva 0-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Chicago 70 (Rose 12), Detroit 48 (Villanueva 10). Assists—Chicago 17 (Rose 8), Detroit 19 (Prince 6). Total Fouls—Chicago 20, Detroit 23. A—20,765 (22,076).

T’wolves 98, Cavaliers 97 MINNESOTA (98) Beasley 10-25 6-6 28, Love 4-9 6-6 16, Milicic 2-4 0-0 4, Ridnour 7-12 4-4 23, Johnson 1-5 0-0 3, Koufos 1-3 0-0 2, Ellington 0-1 1-2 1, Flynn 4-11 2-2 11, Webster 3-12 1-2 8, Brewer 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 33-85 20-22 98. CLEVELAND (97) Moon 2-8 0-0 4, Jamison 10-21 2-4 24, Varejao 3-6 0-2 6, M.Williams 6-16 3-3 17, Parker 9-18 0-0 21, Sessions 2-3 1-2 5, J.Williams 3-6 0-0 9, Hickson 5-9 1-2 11, Hollins 0-0 0-0 0.

Totals 40-87 7-13 97. Minnesota 17 34 19 28 — 98 Cleveland 28 21 24 24 — 97 3-Point Goals—Minnesota 12-23 (Ridnour 5-5, Beasley 2-2, Love 2-3, Flynn 1-2, Johnson 1-4, Webster 1-6, Ellington 0-1), Cleveland 10-26 (J.Williams 3-5, Parker 3-9, Jamison 2-3, M.Williams 2-3, Sessions 0-1, Moon 0-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Minnesota 56 (Love 18), Cleveland 51 (Varejao 12). Assists—Minnesota 15 (Ridnour 6), Cleveland 30 (M.Williams 11). Total Fouls—Minnesota 19, Cleveland 15. A—20,562 (20,562).

Clippers 108, Suns 103 PHOENIX (103) Hill 7-14 5-5 19, Frye 5-12 1-1 12, Lopez 1-3 0-0 2, Nash 8-19 3-3 21, Dudley 1-5 4-5 6, Gortat 5-10 1-2 11, Pietrus 9-14 2-2 25, Dragic 2-6 0-0 5, Childress 1-3 0-0 2, Warrick 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 39-87 16-18 103. L.A. CLIPPERS (108) Gomes 2-5 0-0 4, Griffin 8-11 12-16 28, Jordan 3-3 3-10 9, Davis 7-12 0-0 15, Gordon 10-21 0-0 24, Bledsoe 1-3 0-0 2, Aminu 4-7 1-2 9, Collins 0-0 1-2 1, Diogu 3-8 0-0 6, Foye 2-5 4-4 10. Totals 40-75 21-34 108. Phoenix 18 31 29 25 — 103 L.A. Clippers 33 28 18 29 — 108 3-Point Goals—Phoenix 9-25 (Pietrus 5-8, Nash 2-6, Dragic 1-2, Frye 1-6, Hill 0-1, Dudley 0-2), L.A. Clippers 7-21 (Gordon 4-10, Foye 2-4, Davis 1-4, Gomes 0-1, Aminu 0-2). Fouled Out—Griffin. Rebounds—Phoenix 44 (Hill 7), L.A. Clippers 54 (Griffin 12). Assists—Phoenix 26 (Nash 15), L.A. Clippers 26 (Davis 9). Total Fouls—Phoenix 26, L.A. Clippers 22. Flagrant Fouls—Pietrus. A—19,060 (19,060).

NBA ROUNDUP

NBA-best Spurs rebound from loss to beat Wizards The Associated Press SAN ANTONIO — Tony Parker had 20 points, 14 assists and six assists and the NBA-leading San Antonio Spurs beat the short-handed Washington Wizards 94-80 on Sunday night. The Spurs improved to 24-6, rebounding from a 123-101 loss to Orlando on Thursday night that snapped their winning streak at 11. The league leaders in 3-point percentage, San Antonio shot 10 of 24 from long range. Manu Ginobili had 21 points and George Hill added 11. Hill returned to the lineup after missing four games because of a sprained right toe. Rashard Lewis, acquired last week from Orlando, had 21 points for Washington, playing without suspended forwards Andray Blatche and JaVale McGee. They were suspended for one game for conduct detrimental to the team, related to an alleged altercation outside an area club early Friday. In other games on Sunday: Clippers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Suns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 LOS ANGELES — Rookie Blake Griffin had 28 points and 12 rebounds for his 18th straight doubledouble and Los Angeles beat Phoenix for the first time in 10 games. Newly acquired Mickael Pietrus had a season-high 25 points for Phoenix, and Steve Nash finished with 21 points and 15 assists. Bulls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Pistons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 AUBURN HILLS, Mich. — Carlos Boozer had 31 points and 11 rebounds, and Derrick Rose added 23 points and matched his career high with 12 rebounds in Chicago’s overtime victory. Detroit sent the

game to overtime when Charlie Villanueva tipped home a missed shot with 0.6 seconds left. The Pistons missed three shots on the possession, but grabbed all three offensive rebounds. 76ers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Nuggets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 DENVER — Jrue Holiday had 22 points, Thaddeus Young added 20 and Philadelphia rallied in the fourth quarter to beat Denver. Chauncey Billups had 24 points and Arron Afflalo and Ty Lawson added 14 each for the Nuggets, who lost their third straight since Carmelo Anthony left the team Wednesday following the death of his sister. Timberwolves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Cavaliers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 CLEVELAND — Michael Beasley scored on a driving layup with 5.9 seconds left and finished with 28 points to help Minnesota snap its losing streak at seven. Luke Ridnour scored 23 points to help Minnesota improve to 7-24. Love added 16, including 14 in the fourth quarter, and had 18 rebounds for his NBA-leading 26th double-double. Hornets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Hawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 NEW ORLEANS — Chris Paul scored 22 points, 13 in the pivotal third quarter, to lead New Orleans. Paul was 10 of 17 from the field and also had eight assists. David West scored 18 points. Grizzlies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Pacers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 INDIANAPOLIS — Rudy Gay scored 30 points, Zach Randolph had 18 points and 16 rebounds and Memphis beat Indiana to snap a threegame losing streak. Danny Granger led the Pacers with 29 points and five rebounds.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 27, 2010 D5

Playoffs

CYCLING

Continued from D1 “We got a W, and that’s our biggest present, being able to come into the locker room and being able to see that hat and T-shirt,” nose tackle Vince Wilfork said. “That’s something to be proud of.” Baltimore (11-4) still could win the AFC North — it’s tied with Pittsburgh, which already has a playoff berth, but does not own the tiebreaker with the Steelers in the division. The Ravens won at Cleveland 20-10, and must beat Cincinnati at home and have Pittsburgh lose at Cleveland next Sunday to win the division crown. “It doesn’t matter (what Cleveland does),” Ravens star linebacker Ray Lewis said. “The only thing you can ask for in this business is to get in the dance. We’re in and we have to take care of business against Cincinnati.” Failing to win the division means Baltimore gets a wild card, something the New York Jets already own. Although the Jets (10-5) were beaten 38-34 at Chicago, they qualified when Jacksonville lost to Washington 20-17 in overtime. Just like last season, when the Jets went to the AFC title game, they will finish second to the Patriots in the AFC East. “This was a bit odd,” said Jets running back LaDainian Tomlinson, who saw the Redskins win on TV. “We went from being down, a blown opportunity to ‘we’re in.’ “I ran in (the locker room) and I was like, ‘We’re in.’ Everybody was looking at me ... then all of a sudden everybody starts to smile and talk, the mood just kind of lightens up.” Kansas City earned its first AFC West championship since 2003 when it beat Tennessee 34-17 and San Diego lost at Cincinnati. The Chargers had won the last four division

Thomas Continued from D1 After Jeremiah Masoli’s messy departure from the Ducks during the offseason, all signs pointed to fifthyear senior Nate Costa as the starter. Costa, an intern in the Springfield Police Department, was strong on leadership skills. But as more of a pure passer, he did not quite fit the mold of recent Oregon QBs like Masoli and Dennis Dixon. While Thomas was at first compared to Dixon, he in fact has a style all his own, marked by fast feet and quick decision making — a perfect fit

Bend’s Miller named to 2011 Jelly Belly team Bulletin staff report

Mike Groll / The Associated Press

New England quarterback Tom Brady has the Patriots in position for another Super Bowl run. crowns. The Chiefs improved from 4-10 last year to 10-5 with a home game against Oakland remaining. Jacksonville’s loss did not finish it off in the AFC South. Indianapolis is 9-6 after a 31-26 win at Oakland, one game in front of the Jags. That division will be decided by next weekend’s games: Tennessee at Indy, Jacksonville at Houston. Atlanta and Chicago already have qualified for the postseason in the NFC. The Bears have won the North and are in position for a first-round bye. If the Falcons (12-2) win at home against New Orleans tonight,

they will have NFC home-field advantage throughout the playoffs as well as the South title. The defending champion Saints (10-4) also get a playoff spot with a victory. Seattle was routed 38-15 at Tampa Bay, yet would win the weak NFC West by defeating St. Louis at Qwest Field next Sunday. Should that happen, the Seahawks, currently 6-9, would be the first division winner in NFL history with a losing record. The Rams are 7-8 after a 25-17 win over San Francisco that eliminated the 49ers from contention. The Buccaneers (9-6) are alive for a wild card, but need to win next

Sunday at New Orleans and get lots of help. Philadelphia (10-4) clinched the NFC East with the New York Giants’ 45-17 loss at Green Bay. The Eagles’ night game against Minnesota was moved to Tuesday night because of blizzard conditions in Philadelphia. Green Bay and the Giants both are 9-6, but the Packers hold the tiebreaker for a wild card thanks to their win over New York and would make the playoffs by beating the archrival Bears next Sunday no matter who else finished 10-6. The Bucs need to have a better overall record than those teams to get in.

for the Ducks’ speedy spread-option. “He’s a great athlete. You can tell he really has a great grip and feel for this offense,” Auburn coach Gene Chizik said. “Their running game is what most people would say ‘Wow’ and pay a lot of attention to, but their passing game is tremendous, and it gets you at the right times. Thomas, a Houston native who graduated high school early and arrived in Eugene at age 17, had limited exposure to the job as a freshman in 2008, when he was pressed into duty against Boise State because of injuries. With the Ducks down 24 points, he nearly orchestrated a comeback over the final 15 minutes, throwing

for 210 yards and three TDs in the 3732 loss. Last year he redshirted, and as a sophomore, appeared to be Costa’s understudy. But Thomas surprised many when, after the team’s final scrimmage, he won the starter’s job. “Darron understands he doesn’t have to make it happen, he just has to let it,” Kelly said. Costa proved to be a more than capable backup, and has still been one of the team’s most vocal leaders, despite going down with a knee injury in November that required surgery and ended his college career. Thomas, while confident in his own abilities, is always quick to credit oth-

ers — from James and fellow running back Kenjon Barner to receiver Jeff Maehl and his offensive line. “I’m getting better each game,” Thomas said after Oregon’s regularseason finale, a 37-20 victory over Oregon State. “There’s room to grow and room to clean up.” Thomas was already fielding Newton questions after that game, facing the inevitability that comparisons would be made. But just as he has been on the field, Thomas remained unflappable. “Oh yeah, that’s going to be a big part of it,” he said. “But I’m not really too worried about that. I’m worried about preparing for the game.”

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Bend road cyclist Carson Miller, 21, has been named to the 2011 Jelly Belly Cycling Team presented by Kenda, which is one of 10 U.S.-based UCI (International Cycling Union) Continental teams. USA Cycling last week released the list of 2011 teams and rosters from the U.S. recognized by the UCI, cycling’s international governing body. Miller, a 2007 graduate of Bend’s Summit High School, spent much of last season racing overseas as part of USA Cycling’s U23 National Development Program. He said recently that he expects to continue to divide his time between the pro squad and the national development team in 2011. Jelly Belly is a 13-rider team made up mostly of American riders. The team finished the 2010 season ranked sixth overall in the National Racing Calendar team standings. Miller said he expects Jelly Belly to contest the 2011 National Racing Calendar events and to compete in international races overseas as well.

Hoops Continued from D1 The girls field for this year’s tournament looks to be just as competitive. Churchill of Eugene is 4-1 and ranked sixth in Class 5A. Marist, also of Eugene, is 3-3 and No. 7 in the latest 5A rankings, and Bend High (6-1) is No. 8. Madras, which has won seven of its eight games this season and is ranked No. 6 in Class 4A, also is in the girls tournament. Liberty of Hillsboro, which plays host Summit in Tuesday’s first round, is 5-2 and ranked No. 10 in 5A. Games in the winners’ bracket of each tournament will be played Wednesday afternoon at Summit, and the championship games are scheduled for Thursday. The girls title game will be at 3 p.m. on Thursday, followed by the boys final scheduled for 4:45 p.m.

OSAA to meet about rankings After using computer-generated power rankings to seed the state playoffs for team sports this fall, the Oregon School Activities Association will be holding its first review on the new postseason format on Jan. 10. The OSAA’s rankings subcommittee is made up of 11 coaches, athletic directors, school administrators and OSAA personnel. For suggestions, comments or concerns on the new ranking process, contact OSAA assistant executive director Peter Weber at peterw@osaa.org or Kyle Stanfield at kyles@osaa.org. Also, a list of the 11 subcommittee members can be found at www.osaa.org. Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@bendbulletin.com.

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C YC L I NG C EN T R A L

Continued from D1 After all that, they planned to return to the U.S. and complete their expected 30-month journey by riding their bikes from the East Coast across the country en route back to Central Oregon. The couple had saved for years to finance the trip — which they estimated would cost about $43 a day. Dooley and Mercer anticipated riding approximately 40 miles a day. Prior to the current globe-trotting trip, Mercer had logged four two-week, self-supported bike tours, including a ride from Glacier National Park in Montana to Canada’s Banff and back. Dooley had less experience, but she had completed a two-week ride in Utah the previous year. When I interviewed the pair late last December — just days before they were set to depart — Mercer and Dooley said their trip was not about ticking off miles, crossing a predetermined number of countries, or getting from point A to point B in record time. Last week, I caught up by e-mail with Mercer, 39, and Dooley, 33, who were in Bangkok, Thailand. I asked them about their first year on the road, and they took time to reply. (Some of their responses were edited here for brevity.) Rob Kerr / The Bulletin ile

Heather Clark: Where are you now? Where are you headed? Mercer/Dooley: We’re in Bangkok, Thailand, now. We’re recently reunited after Emily took a twoweek trip back home for some family time. We’ve got a few days here to figure out a plan because we’re actually not sure where we’re headed. The quick-and-easy route would be to head east for Cambodia. But we usually don’t do quick and easy. So far, for this whole trip we haven’t had a rigid plan. We wake up in the morning not knowing where we’re going to sleep that night. It’s a very simple existence: eat, ride, sleep. We get to just “be human” on this trip — no bills, no deadlines, just simple, healthy living. HC: How many miles have you logged on your bikes since the beginning of your journey? M/D: So far we’ve done about 11,500 kilometers, about 7,200 miles. On days we ride, we go between 40 to 50 miles a day. HC: Can you explain your route up to this point? M/D: We spent three months in New Zealand — one month in the North island, two months in the South island. The South island is like Oregon on steroids. Rain forests, mountains, glaciers, deserts, wide open spaces; like Oregon but somehow bigger. Then we flew to Melbourne and spent five months in Australia, riding north to Cairns. Next was Indonesia for two months. What a surprise. We knew next to nothing about the country or the people before we went there, and we were blown away. Many people there are very, very poor, but by far the friendliest we have come across on our whole trip. They have nothing, but they’d still invite us in to their house as we rode by for a cup of local coffee and laughter and an attempt at conversation. Many of the people we met do not have electricity or running water, and they often times don’t use money. They trade things to make life work. We had the opportunity several times to teach English in classrooms with students from ages 8 to 18. English is a required subject in school there. We’d try to teach numbers, body parts, but the teachers were most interested in how to properly pronounce words. After Indo(nesia) was Malaysia for one month, and now Thailand. Everything has been

John Mercer and Emily Dooley, before they started the trip.

On the web John Mercer and Emily Dooley regularly update a blog of their cycling travels at www.atourownpace.com.

great, we have never felt in danger so far on our whole trip. Not even once. HC: Can you explain briefly your route plans for the next year? M/D: We’ll head to Laos and Cambodia after Thailand, then Vietnam and the Yunnan Province in China. Then hopefully Tibet, Nepal, and India. If all goes according to plan, we’ll be in India by the end of 2011. The biggest schedule keeper for us is our visa expiration date. If the route above doesn’t work out, there’s always Mongolia and the “’stans” (Kazakhstan, Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, etc.) or a flight to somewhere all together different. HC: What about your journey has surprised you the most? M/D: How easy cycle touring is once you leave (home) and how much we still like riding our bikes after a year of doing it. It was hard to get all of our ducks in a row before we left. But after we left, things got very simple really quick. Eat, sleep and ride with some sightseeing, hiking, and other fun things on the side. This trip is a lot like a mini-retirement. Most days we have no idea what day of the week it is, much less what the date is. HC: Are there items that you wish you’d taken with you, or wish you’d left at home? M/D: We have used everything we brought with us. We have a small netbook computer. John still has his mandolin with him and can’t believe it has lasted this long. It’s a great way to occupy time, and also good brain exercise. Emily wished she could have brought a washing machine and dryer. Hand washing clothes gets really old. It would be nice to be able to carry more books and we are constantly taking advantage of book exchanges when we come across them. Our gear list is posted on our web site with specifics about all of the things we have with us.

We’re not weight weenies when it comes to what we choose to carry. For most of Australia we carried boogie boards on our bikes, as well as fins, mask and snorkel. It was still hard, slow, and hot. Your body gets used to the work part of cycle touring fairly quickly. Riding with all of that weight isn’t as hard as it seems. Recently John did a two-week tour with half of the load he normally carries and didn’t notice a difference when climbing hills. HC: What has the cycling been like in the different places you’ve been? M/D: Cycling is the easy part. No matter where we are, the cycling part is always the same. It’s the people that make the different areas unique. The first week or two in a new country is always the hardest part, but also the most fun. When we arrive we usually don’t have any money (need to find an ATM), we don’t know how to say “hello” or “thank you” or anything basic like that, and we get by with a lot of hand gestures, pantomime, and laughter. Eventually we pick up a few phrases and we start to get a little better at communicating. Then it’s time for a new country and a new language, and the process repeats itself. HC: Has the trip affected your health or fitness? M/D: We’ve both lost between 7-10 kg (15-22 lbs) since we started. We feel great, we’ve had no health issues on the trip except for a stubborn dose of the common cold that we caught in Australia that stayed with us for the first month in Indonesia. Amazingly, we’ve had no gastro(intestinal) issues related to the food we’ve eaten. We eat almost exclusively out of street vendor carts. This sounds bad but they actually cook the food right there in front of you. We are always eating fresh and very likely, locally grown food so we feel pretty good. Comfort on the bike is important, not speed or weight. After a few days of no riding, we get restless, our bodies seem to crave the work. HC: What’s been your cycling (or traveling) highlight thus far, or your most memorable experience? M/D: Tough to pick one or two.

E C 

CAMPS/CLASSES

ReboundSPL.com; 541-585-1500.

CENTRAL OREGON TRAIL ALLIANCE MEETING: Monthly meeting of the local mountain bike trails organization looks ahead at 2011; 7 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 27; Central Oregon Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; www.cotamtb.com. SISTERS TRAILS ALLIANCE: Annual membership meeting; 7 p.m., Jan. 18; The Pines Clubhouse, 612 N. Brooks Camp Road, Sisters; jrahm@bendcable.com.

HUTCH’S NOON RIDE: Group road bike ride from Hutch’s Bicycles eastside location at noon on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and from Hutch’s west-side location at noon on Tuesdays, Thursdays; pace varies; www.hutchsbicycles.com; 541-3826248; www.hutchsbicycles.com. HUTCH’S SATURDAY RIDE: Group road bike ride begins at 10 a.m. Saturdays from Hutch’s Bicycles east-side location, 820 N.E. Third St.; approximately 40 miles; vigorous pace; 541-3826248; hutchsbicycles.com.

RIDES

OUT OF TOWN

POLAR BEAR RIDE: 30-mile noncompetitive group road ride from Bend to Alfalfa and back; 10 a.m., Sunday, Jan. 1; begins and ends at Hutch’s Bicycles, 820 N.E. Third St., Bend; free; hutchsbicycles.com. BEND BIKE & BREW WEEKEND: Three days of mountain biking on area trails, beer, meals and accommodations in downtown Bend; eight three-day options from June through October, 2011; $575 through Dec. 31, $625 otherwise; 541-385-7002; www.cogwild.com.

CYCLE OREGON KICKOFF PARTY: 2011 Cycle Oregon route is revealed live at the Nike Campus in Beaverton and online; Tuesday, Feb. 8; registration opens the same day for the weeklong ride in September and the weekend rides in July; 800-2925367; www.cycleoregon.com. WORST DAY OF THE YEAR RIDE: Road bicycling tour of 18 or 45 miles with multiple food stops in and around Portland; Sunday, Feb. 13; 915 S.E. Hawthorne Ave.; $35 for adults, $10 for children; www.worstdayride.com.

MISCELLANEOUS INDOOR CYCLING CLASSES: At Rebound Sports Performance & Pilates, 143 S.W. Century Drive, Bend, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays; limited to eight riders per class; sessions at 6:30 a.m., noon, 5 p.m. and 6:15 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and 6:30 a.m. and 8 a.m. on Saturdays; $150 for 10 classes, $270 for 20 classes, or $480 for 40 classes; www. ReboundSPL.com, 541-585-1500. CYCL’IN, POWER-BASED INDOOR CYCLING CLASSES: Taught by Cherie Touchette in a private studio in west Bend on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Sundays; progressive classes offered in eight-week sessions run 60 to 90 minutes in length; buy a session pass, or drop-ins welcome, cost is $92 to $196, depending on number and length of classes; drop-in fee is $14 to $17; 541-390-1633. CALIFORNIA TRAINING CAMP: Multiple-day riding camp near Paso Robles, Calif., supported by Rebound coaching staff of Bend; April 3-9; aimed at intermediate to advanced cyclists; $1,649, includes meals and lodging; limited to 10 riders; www.

Eating a picnic lunch next to a loud, grumbling glacier in New Zealand. Any time we ride over a (mountain) pass is always memorable. Our first kangaroo sighting in Australia. The island and the people of Sulawesi in Indonesia. Any time we are invited in to someone’s home for a coffee or a place to sleep.

CYCLING INSIDER RECOMMENDED RIDE

HC: What’s been the lowlight? M/D: For Emily, there have been some very, very steep climbs that have made her miserable and wonder why she is doing this to herself. But you finish the climb and then promptly forget the pain and torture. We had one bad experience in Indonesia. It’s too long to explain here. The full story is on our web site. Do a search for “A Strange Night.” HC: How is the budget working out? Is $43 a day holding up like you estimated? M/D: We still have a long way to go, but it looks like we might be pretty close to that target. We are over budget right now, but we knew New Zealand and Australia would cost more. Since we’ve been in Asia, we’ve been living on about $20 per day total for two people. This includes all of our food and a hotel most nights. We will probably finish our trip closer to $50 per day; total, not per person. This is 100 percent of our expenses for the trip (food, bike parts, accommodations, visas, flights, trains, etc.). HC: How are the bikes holding up? M/D: The bikes are doing well. No issues with the frames (Surly Long Haul Truckers). New front brakes for each of us. We’re on our third set of tires. New wheels for John. Emily needs a new front wheel sometime soon. Wheels and brakes — the parts that do the most work — have proven the most troublesome. HC: Where has been your favorite place to ride? Why? M/D: The south island of New Zealand was pretty spectacular. Coastal New South Wales, Australia, was also pretty spectacular. These would be our favorite places to ride for the scenery. Culturally, Bali was good, as was Tana Toraja on Sulawesi Island (both in Indonesia). And Indonesia as a whole was the best for the people experiences. They simply treated us like superstars everywhere we went. Thailand would be the best by far for the food.

The ride: Dodds Road Loop Distance: 25 miles Elevation gain: Approximately 500 feet Surface conditions: Range from excellent to rough, fair overall. Road shoulders are wide in some places, nonexistent in others. Description: Mostly flat with some rolling terrain; breezy conditions — typically blowing from the north or west — can make the return portion of this ride challenging. This clockwise loop begins by heading east from Bend on Neff Road, which becomes Alfalfa Market Road. Just before reaching Alfalfa, cyclists turn south on Dodds Road before returning back to Bend on U.S. Highway 20. Typically, this region of eastern Deschutes County accumulates less snow and ice, making it an ideal option for winter and spring riding. It is also often a few ticks warmer here than at the region’s higher elevations. Dodds Road Loop makes for a quick and easy afterwork or noontime option during summer and fall months as well. The volume of traffic on this route makes all the difference. Cyclists can expect to encounter light traffic at times, and heavy, fast-moving vehicle traffic on weekends and during commuting hours. Highway 20 features a wide shoulder and good pavement, but highway traffic is fast and truck traffic in particular can be a bit unnerving. See “Other ride options” below on how to avoid most of this section of the route.

Heather Clark can be reached at cyclingcentral@gmail.com.

The Bulletin gives a recommended ride as part of our weekly “Cycling Insider” feature, whose rotating topics include rider profiles, safety and maintenance tips and local rides.

Big Sky Park & Sports Complex Start /Finish Hamby Rd.

BEND 20

Neff Rd.

Stenkamp Rd.

Cyclists

Powell Butte Hwy.

D6 Monday, December 27, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Bear Creek Rd.

Ward Rd.

Highlights: The ride’s main attraction is the eight-mile section on Dodds Road, a quiet country road offering expansive High Desert views as it winds through juniper-dotted ranch land; a short section of buttery-smooth road surface is one of the most enjoyable four miles of riding in all of Deschutes County. On a clear day, views of the Three Sisters await riders as they turn northwest on Highway 20. Lowlights: Chip seal and narrow shoulders on Alfalfa Market Road, and fast-moving vehicle traffic on a six-mile section of Highway 20; this ride is ideal for winter and early-spring fitness, but other routes are preferred once temperatures warm at higher elevations. Water and food: Available at the Alfalfa Market Store, located on Alfalfa Market Road, approximately 1.5 miles farther east of the turn onto Dodds Road. Start/finish: In the winter and spring, I like to start and finish this ride from Big Sky Park, 21690 N.E. Neff Road, which allows me to avoid both the cinders and debris that clutter intown bike lanes and the higherelevation roadways that can be covered by ice and snow. Restrooms, water and picnic tables are available at Big Sky Park. Other ride options: Riders can avoid most of Highway 20 by veering right on Ten Barr Road just one mile after leaving Dodds Road. At the end of Ten Barr, turn left (west) on Bear Creek Road. Continue on Bear Creek as it crosses Highway 20, then turn right (north) on Ward Road and cross Highway 20 again. Ward Road leads cyclists back onto Hamby Road and completes the loop at Big Sky Park at the Neff Road intersection. — Heather Clark

Dodds Road Loop Alfalfa

Alfalfa Market Rd.

Alternate route to avoid U.S. Hwy. 20 portion Ten Barr Rd. Dodds Rd. MILES

Rickard Rd.

20

0

1

2

Greg Cross / The Bulletin


THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 27, 2010 E1

CLASSIFIEDS

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T h e

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ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

General Merchandise

200 205

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263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Chow Mix, “Bear” 2 yrs, raised since young pup. He’s very sweet; I’m 70 & can no longer care for him. Free to good home. 541-389-9753

Pomeranian Puppies: Don’t wait, only a few left! Christmas special $475. 541-475-3496 www.pom-a-rama.com

English Bulldogs AKC, 4 males, Brindles, excellent health, $1500. 541-290-0026

Free Olympic weight set with weights and bench. Call 541-389-0808

English Springer Spaniels, AKC Reg, black/white, housebroke, ready to go! 541-408-6322 www.kennykennels.com

Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

AKC Yellow Labradors 4/males for more info please visit us at www.coldcreekfarms.com 541-942-1059. AUSSIE PUPPIES, Mini & Toy, $250-$300. 1st shots, tails docked. Tris & Merles, ready 1/12. 541-420-9694 Australian Cattle Dogs / Heelers Great temperament, herding instinct. 541-279-4133 Australian Shepherds, 2 litters, toy/mini, family raised, $450-$600. 541-475-1166

Border Collie 10-week pups (4) 2 females left, 1st shots, and wormed, $100 ea. 541-852-5753, Prineville.

Boxer Puppies, AKC, 9 wks. 3 adorable females left at $500 each. Call 541-408-5230

Chihuahua pups, Registered males, Long coats, apple heads. $300. 541-977-4454 sagetreeacres@yahoo.com

Frenchie Faux puppies, excellent! $750. Ready at 6 weeks on 12/31. 541-447-0210 German Shepherd pups ready by Christmas. $350 to $450. 541-410-7388

B e n d

O r e g o n

246

266

270

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Heating and Stoves

Lost and Found

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Winchester model 1890, 22 cal. original, $600; Ruger P89--9mm as new in box, 2 clips holster shells $425, 541-447-8629, 541-419-4221

253

TV, Stereo and Video Samsung 52” box big screen, 2006 excellent cond. Must sell, $400. 541-480-2652.

255

Computers 212

Antiques & Collectibles The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

258

Travel/Tickets Disneyland (4) 6-day Park Hoppers. Regular $216 each; sell $195 each. 541-419-2753

260

Misc. Items

215

Coins & Stamps

240 Alpaca Yarn, various colors/ blends/sparkle. 175yds/skein $7.50-8.50 ea. 541-385-4989

242

Exercise Equipment

BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

Nordic Trak elliptical with I-Fit adapt, used little, mint cond., $250 cash/you haul. Pro-Form treadmill, EKG/grip pulse, like new, $150 cash you haul. Buy both $350. 541-306-6511

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

Fuel and Wood

Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers. Thank you.

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks!

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

308

Farm Equipment and Machinery

Moving Sale! 61135 Kepler St. Dec 18th & 27th, 9-3 both days Furniture & household, all inside. See pix on craigslist.

286

Sales Northeast Bend

HH F R E E HH G a r a g e S a l e K it Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a G a r a g e S a l e K i t F R E E !

SPLIT, DRY LODGEPOLE DELIVERY INCLUDED! $175/CORD. Call for half-cord prices! Leave message, 541-923-6987

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

325

Hay, Grain and Feed Barn stored Alfalfa $9 per bale. 541-480-8185

KIT IN C L U D E S: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PIC K U P Y O U R GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

The Bulletin

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

300

284

name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT dry Lodgepole, $150 for 1 cord or $290 for 2, Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484

Farm Market

Sales Southwest Bend

• Receipts should include,

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

9 7 7 0 2 341

267

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash

Ad must include price of item

Poodles for Christmas (3) home raised, $150. (541) 408-7370 www.ludwiglanepoodles.com

A v e . ,

210

Crafts and Hobbies

POODLES AKC Toy. Also Pom-a-Poos or Chi-Poos. B&W, colors. 541-325-6212

C h a n d l e r

Furniture & Appliances

WANTED TO BUY

German Shorthair Pointer A K C , champ lines, 1 male, 1 female, $300, 541-550-9992. German Wirehaired Pointer, choice pup, 10 wks, champ lines, $250. 541-548-3408

S . W .

US & Foreign Coin & Currency collections, accum. Pre-1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling flatware. Gold coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex & vintage watches. No collection too large or small. Bedrock Rare Coins 541-549-1658

Dachshunds, AKC, mini’s, (4) females: 1 black & silver; 3 choc & tan. $375. Pics available. 541-420-6044, 541-447-3060

Free bicycle, girls style, good cond. needs tires. Call 541-389-0808

208

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Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

292

Sales Other Areas DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

Bluegrass Straw mid-size 3x3, $25/bale; Orchard grass hay mid-size 3x3 $45/bale. Volume discounts; delivery available. 541-480-8648. People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

341

Horses and Equipment Prices Reduced: Quarterhorses, females $300, males & geldings $500, 541-382-7995

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

358

Farmers Column Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

375

Horses and Equipment

Meat & Animal Processing

200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Angus Beef, 1/2 or whole, grain fed, no hormones $3.44/lb., hanging weight, cut & wrap included, please call 541-383-2523.

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

HOLIDAY DEADLINES

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

Kittens & cats available! Cat Rescue, Adoption & Foster Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi SUPER TOP SOIL Queensland Heelers Team will be open for those audio & studio equip. McIn- www.hersheysoilandbark.com 246 Standards & mini,$150 & up. holiday adoptions on Friday tosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Screened, soil & compost 541-280-1537 & Sunday 1-4 PM (closed Guns & Hunting Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, mixed, no rocks/clods. High http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com Christmas Day). Gift certifiNAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808 and Fishing humus level, exc. for flower cates also avail. so someone beds, lawns, gardens, SCHNOODLE Male pup, 4 mos, can pick out their new pet straight screened top soil. 264 $100. ALSO Tiny toy POODLE Berretta 9mm 92F, $550. Glock later. Altered, vaccinated, ID M-29 10mm $550. Mossberg Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you Female 4 mos, cinnamon red, Snow Removal Equipment chipped, more. 389-8420, 12 ga, $300. 541-647-8931 haul. 541-548-3949. $150. 541-306-1807 598-5488, 65480 78th St, SNOWBLOWER - Troy-bilt 24” Bend, visit www.craftcats.org Browning BPS 12g pump, $375. 270 Siamese Kittens (4) pureself-propelled, never used, for photos, map & more. Winchester pre-’64 20g bred, M/F, Seal & Lilac point, Lost and Found $500. 541-385-1217, lv msg. pump, $400. S&W .38 6” re$125 ea. 541-318-3396 Lab Pups AKC - 2 blacks, 6 volver, $375. 541-647-8931 chocolates, dew claws, 1st FOUND remote control, Sirius 265 CASH!! shots & wormed. Hunters. 210 satellite sys, Forum Shopping For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Building Materials $450-$500. 541-536-5385 Center, 12/20. 541-480-2510 Furniture & Appliances Supplies. 541-408-6900. www.welcomelabs.com FOUND RING Bend Habitat RESTORE LAB PUPS AKC, titled parents, !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty! Call 541-420-7322 with exact Building Supply Resale Look at: Bendhomes.com A-1 Washers & Dryers FC/AFC, Blackwater Rudy is description & area it was lost. Quality at LOW PRICES for Complete Listings of $125 each. Full Warranty. grand sire. Deep pedigreed 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Lost Dog: Male Border Collie Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s Area Real Estate for Sale performance/titles, OFA hips Open to the public . mix, black, red collar, bedead or alive. 541-280-7355. & elbows. 541-771-2330 tween Bend/Redmond on Hwy www.royalflushretrievers.com Advertise your car! GUNS 97, 12/18, 541-604-4221 Appliances, new & recondiAdd A Picture! Buy, Sell, Trade Labradoodles, Australian Reach thousands of readers! tioned, guaranteed. Over541-728-1036. Lost: Full set of keys,w/car fob, Imports - 541-504-2662 Call 541-385-5809 stock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Bi-Mart tag, Subaru key, near www.alpen-ridge.com Smith & Wesson 9mm full The Bulletin Classifieds Maytag, 541-385-5418 Costco, 12/13, 541-388-2408 metal, sub-compact semiLabrador pups AKC, chocoauto, $425. 541-647-8931 late, yellow, hips guaranteed, Coffee Table,oak,w/3 matchBEND’S HOMELESS NEED OUR HELP ing end tables & lamps, exc. Wanted: Collector seeks high $150-$450. 1-541-954-1727 The cold weather is upon us and sadly there are still over cond, $300, 541-504-7483 quality fishing items. Call Labrador purebred pups, black, 2,000 folks in our community without permanent shelter, liv541-678-5753, 503-351-2746 1st shots/exam; ready now! Fridge, Kenmore, White, 26 cu. ing in cars, makeshift camps, getting by as best they can. $300-$400. 503-740-5312 ft., side by side, ice/water inThe following items are badly needed to door, 6 yrs. old, exc. cond., help them get through the winter: Maremma Guard Dog pups, $300. 541-788-5516 purebred, great dogs, $300 d CAMPING GEAR of any sort: d each, 541-546-6171. Used tents, sleeping bags, tarps, blankets. GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a gaMIN-PIN PUPS, perfect for d WARM CLOTHING d rage sale and don't forget to Christmas! 2 adorable pure Rain Gear, Boots advertise in classified! bred 14-wk-old males $150 385-5809. OBO, up to date on shots. Please drop off your donations at the Pics avail. 541-633-6148 BEND COMMUNITY CENTER Second Hand (leave msg) 1036 NE FIFTH STREET (312-2069) Mattresses, sets & PIT/LAB PUPPIES (5), ready to Questions: Call Ken Boyer, 389-3296, or Don Auxier, 383-0448 singles, call go now, 3 girls, 2 boys $50 PLEASE HELP. YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE. 541-598-4643. each. 541-848-0110.

Wishes you a Safe and Happy New Year! The Bulletin will be closed on Friday, New Year’s Eve and Saturday, New Year’s Day Retail & Classified Display Advertising Deadlines PUBLICATION ............................................. DEADLINE Friday 12/31 ..................................................Tuesday 12/28 Noon Go! Magazine 12/31 .....................................Tuesday 12/28 Noon Saturday 1/1 .................................................Tuesday 12/28 Noon Sunday 1/2 ..................................................Tuesday 12/28 4 p.m. Monday 1/3 ............................................. Wednesday 12/29 Noon At Home 1/4............................................ Wednesday 12/29 Noon Scene 1/8 .................................................. Thursday 12/30 8 a.m. Tuesday 1/4 ................................................ Thursday 12/30 Noon

CLASSIFIED LINE AD DEADLINES Friday 12/31 - Deadline is Noon Thursday 12/30 Saturday 1/1 - Deadline is Noon Thursday 12/30 Sunday 1/1 - Deadline is 2 p.m. Thursday 12/30 Monday 1/2 - Deadline is 2 p.m. Thursday 12/30

Classifieds • 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Circulation Telephone Service at 541-385-5800 will be open 1/1 from 6:30 am to 10:30 am to help with your delivery needs.


E2 Monday, December 27, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 476

Employment Opportunities EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Employment

400

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Glazier -- Residential: Must have 5 years experience & clean driving record, Shower doors & mirrors a plus. Pay DOE. Call 541-382-2500.

Finance and Sales Manager

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

421

Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

476

Employment Opportunities CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state.

Toyota-Scion of Bend looking for capable and qualified applicants. must have auto experience. Application and resumes accepted in person only. Must pass drug test, good driving record, and be insurable. Apply in person @ Toyota of Bend, (Ask for Casey Cooper) 2225 NE Hwy. 20, Bend.

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions.

to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

541-617-7825

Independent Contractor

SUTERRA is hiring! Chemical Systems Operators for new facility. $17/hour w/ built in OT, 38K first year. To apply go to http://www.suterra.com or fax resume to 310-966-8310

604

Real Estate Contracts

Storage Rentals

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

Secure 10x20 Storage, in SE Bend, insulated, 24-hr access, $95/month, Call Rob, 541-410-4255. 605

Roommate Wanted Share House in DRW, $400/mo incl. utils, $200 dep., 541-420-5546.

631 528

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

Call Today &

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Bend, Prineville & Madras H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

632

Apt./Multiplex General FIRST MONTH HALF-OFF! 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex. NEW CARPET & PAINT THROUGHOUT! W/D included. No smoking. No Pets. 1yr. lease. $795/mo. + $945 sec. 20076 Beth. 541-382-3813 The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 1 & 2 bdrms Available starting at $575. Reserve Now! Limited Availability.

Alpine Meadows Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Earn 8-10% interest on well-secured first trust deeds. Private party. 541-815-2986

573

Business Opportunities Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928.

** Pick your Special **

2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps. Pet Friendly & No App. Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend Absolutely beautiful, 1 Bdrm. 2 bath, fully furnished Condo, $695, $400 dep, near downtown & college, completely renovated, 2 Verandas, no pets/smoking, avail. now, all amenities and W/S/G/elec./A/C/Cable incl., 541-279-0590 or cheritowery@yahoo.com

Fully furnished loft apt. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

$595/mo. Wood stove, W/S/G paid. W/D hookup 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

541-330-0719

Operate Your Own Business Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor

Condo / Townhomes For Rent

Westside Condo at Fireside Loans and Mortgages A Lodge, 2 bdrm, 1 bath,

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

H Supplement Your Income H

&

507

The Bulletin Classifieds

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

Rentals

500 600

541-383-0386

541-385-5809

We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses -

CAUTION

Finance & Business

on Wall Street in Bend. All utilities paid and parking. Call 541-389-2389 for appt. River & Mountain Views! 930 NW Carlon St., 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, W/S/G paid, W/D hook-up, $650/mo. $600 dep. No pets. 541-280-7188.

640

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend Happy holidays! Enjoy living at 179 SW Hayes Ave. Spacious 2 Bdrm townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rent starts at $525 mo. 541-382-0162; 541-420-2133 541-420-0133

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

541-322-7253

2 bedroom, 2 bath next to park, Appliances avail. including big screen TV! 3 units available. $695-$750 month. 541-280-7781.

642

650

658

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent Redmond

Large 2 bdrm, 1 bath, large fenced backyard in nice neighborhood, $650 mo. + deposit. Call Heidi at 541-480-6679.

3 Bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, Summerfield location, near 97, fresh interior paint, new Pergo, fully fenced. 1st & dep., $850. 503-997-7870.

NOTICE:

4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room, w/woodstove, new carpet/paint, single garage w/opener. $795/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appl., incl. gardener, reduced to $749/mo. 541-408-0877. ASK ABOUT OUR HOLIDAY SPECIAL! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com Call about Our Specials! Studios to 3 bedroom units from $395 to $550 • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 managed by

GSL Properties

DUPLEX SW Redmond 2 bdrm 2 bath, garage w/opener. 1300 sq ft, w/d hkup, fenced yard, deck, w/s/g pd. $700 mo + dep. 541-604-0338

648

Houses for Rent General The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2 car garage, bonus room, deck, fridge, gas stove, new paint, carpet & vinyl. $975/mo. Pets neg. Mike 541-408-8330. CLEAN 2 bdrm/1bath, new carpets, hardwood floors, gas heat & water, finished garage, storage shed, $775 mo. See at 1230 NE Viking. Clean 3 Bdrm 2 Bath, new paint/carpet, 1262 sq ft, $900/mo. Near hosp; must see! No pets/smoking. 3023 NE Byers Ct. 541-410-0794

d d HOLIDAY

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend NW Awbrey Road 2 bedroom, 2 bath, $650 month. Avail immediately. 541-382-2920.

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend 1/1 cottage, woodstove, garage, deck, yard w/trees, private end of cul-de-sac, Bear Creek/15th. Avail. now. $650 1st/last/dep. 541-330-0053

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver A newer 3/2 mfd. home, 1755 sq.ft., living room, family room, on private .5 acre lot near Sunriver, $895. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803.

541-385-5809 664

Houses for Rent Furnished RIVERFRONT: walls of windows with amazing 180 degree river view with dock, canoe, piano, bikes, covered BBQ, $1250. 541-593-1414

671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 3 Bedroom, 2 bath mobile home for rent, $625/mo. 253-241-4152 On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft., mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1295. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

656

Houses for Rent SW Bend $1000 Mo. Newer immaculate 3/2.5, 1560 sq.ft., dbl. garage 1st & last, pet neg. 19827 Powers Road. 503-363-9264,503-569-3518

Near Old Mill Dist, 4 Bdrm, 2 bath, gas & wdstv fenced yard, appls, 1600 sq ft, no smkg, on culdesac $895 move-in disc. 541-389-3657

658

687

Houses for Rent Redmond

Commercial for Rent/Lease

1 Bdrm, 1 bath, 547 1/2 NW 7th, 4628 SW 21st St., Redmond - 2250 sq ft office & $550; 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 626 1/2 SW 8th, $595; 2 bdrm, 1 bath, warehouse. 15¢/sq ft for 1st 135 NW 10th St., $650, 6 mos., + $300 cleaning dep. 541-815-1709, CopperDog PM. Avail Jan 15. 541-480-9041

SPECIAL d d

1/2 OFF ALL MOVE-IN RENTS w/Lease Agreements COMPUTERIZED PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft

827 Business Way, Bend 541-382-0053 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep •Cute Apt. in Central Location - 1 Bdrm/1Bath with private Paula, 541-678-1404 fenced back yard and patio. No pets. $425 includes WSG. Office/Warehouse Space, • Near Downtown. Large 2 Bdrm/1 Bath Apts. W/D hookups. 6400 sq.ft., (3) 12x14 doors, Small fenced yard. End Units. Pets ??? $495 WST included. on Boyd Acres Rd, • Close to Pioneer Park - NW Side. Private 2 Bdrm/1 bath 541-382-8998. Upstairs Apt. w/Balcony. On-Site Laundry. Off Street Parking. $495 mo. Includes WSG. •Spacious, Secure in Old Mill District 2 Bdrm/1 Bath upstairs The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental unit. On-site laundry. $495 mo. incl. CABLE + WST. rate! If you have a home to • Spacious 2 Bdrm/1 Bath apts. Off-street parking. On-site rent, call a Bulletin Classified laundry. Near hospital. Just $525 includes WST. Rep. to get the new rates and • Furnished Mt. Bachelor Condo - 1 Bdrm/1 bath + Murphy get your ad started ASAP! bed. $550 includes WST/Wireless 541-385-5809 • Cheerful SE Townhome - Vaulted ceilings, 2 Bdrm/2 Bath. W/D included. No Pets. $550 W/S Included. 693 • Charming, cozy 2 Bdrm/1 Bath cottage in central location. Ofice/Retail Space Fenced backyard. $625 per month. • Vaulted Ceilings. Cute 2 Bdrm/2 Bath NE Duplex, W/D Hook for Rent ups. Gas Fireplace. Single Garage. Private deck off master. Single Level. Pets? $675 includes WS. An Office with bath, various • Sweet Cedar Creek Condo - 2 Master Bdrm Suites + 1/2 sizes and locations from bath downstairs. W/D included. Dbl. garage. Wood burning $250 per month, including fireplace. Small pets only. $750 includes WST. utilities. 541-317-8717 •Sun Meadow. 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath. Media room downstairs. Large dbl. garage. 1579 sq. ft., W/D included. $995 per mo. Downtown Redmond Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. ***** FOR ADD’L PROPERTIES ***** $650/mo + utils; $650 secuCALL 541-382-0053 or See Website rity deposit. 425 SW Sixth www.computerizedpropertymanagement.com St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 27, 2010 E3 860

875

881

882

Motorcycles And Accessories

Watercraft

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Motorcycle Trailer RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

Real Estate For Sale

700 705

Real Estate Services * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

745

rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

755 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, built in ‘03; (2) ½-acre lots, 1 buildable w/ well, south of Sunriver. Possible trade for Bend sgl. level of same value. 509-585-9050

Boats & RV’s

800

Yamaha 350 Big Bear Bounder 34’ 1994, only 1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks 18K miles, 1 owner, ga-

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010,

Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., reduced to $3000, also boots, helmet, tires, avail., 541-410-0429

870

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE Health forces sale, 1900 All real estate advertising in mi., 1K mi. service done, 762 this newspaper is subject to black on black, detachable the Fair Housing Act which Homes with Acreage windshield, back rest & lugmakes it illegal to advertise gage rack, $13,900, Mario, "any preference, limitation or Beautiful Prineville home, wood 541-549-4949, 619-203-4707 and tile throughout, 3 bdrm, discrimination based on race, 2.5 bath, master on main color, religion, sex, handicap, level, bonus room, office, familial status, marital status 6.87 acres, conveniently loor national origin, or an incated between town & lake, tention to make any such 20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 $415,000. 541-771-3093 preference, limitation or disRun About, 220 HP, V8, crimination." Familial status open bow, exc. cond., very Harley Davidson Heritage Soft includes children under the fast w/very low hours, Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras age of 18 living with parents lots of extras incl. tower, incl. pipes, lowering kit, or legal custodians, pregnant Bimini & custom trailer, chrome pkg., $16,900 OBO. women, and people securing $19,500. 541-389-1413 541-944-9753 custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our Harley Davidson Police Bike readers are hereby informed 2001, low mi., custom bike that all dwellings advertised 20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 very nice.Stage 1, new tires in this newspaper are availH.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. & brakes, too much to list! able on an equal opportunity cond., stored indoors for A Must See Bike $10,500 basis. To complain of dislife $11,900 OBO. OBO. 541-383-1782 crimination call HUD toll-free 541-379-3530 at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for Sisters, turnkey horse setup, 4 the hearing impaired is Harley Davidson acres, great barn, 3 pastures, Ads published in the "Boats" 1-800-927-9275. updated house, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, classification include: Speed, Screamin’ Eagle pond,irrigation, RV pad w/hook fishing, drift, canoe, house Electric-Glide 2005, *** ups, $575,000, 541-549-9945. and sail boats. For all other 103” motor, 2-tone, candy CHECK YOUR AD types of watercraft, please teal, 18,000 miles, exc. Please check your ad on the see Class 875. 541-385-5809 cond. $19,999 OBO, please first day it runs to make sure call 541-480-8080. it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this GENERATE SOME excitement in happens to your ad, please your neigborhood. Plan a gacontact us the first day your rage sale and don't forget to Harley Davidson Ultra ad appears and we will be advertise in classified! Classic 2008, clean, lots happy to fix it as soon as we 385-5809. of upgrades, custom exhaust, can. Deadlines are: Weekdual control heated gloves & days 12:00 noon for next 764 vest, luggage access. 15K, day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sun$17,000 OBO 541-693-3975. day; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. Farms and Ranches If we can assist you, please call us: 35 Acre irrigated, hay & cattle farm, close to Prineville, 76 385-5809 year old widower will sacriThe Bulletin Classified Malibu Skier 1988, w/cenfice for $395,000, *** ter pylon, low hours, al541-410-3425 ways garaged, new upholOWNER TERMS stery, great fun. $9500. Honda Shadow Deluxe Short sale or foreclosure does OBO. 541-389-2012. American Classic Edition. not need to keep you from 2002, black, perfect, gaowning your own home. raged, 5,200 mi. $3495. Easy terms on this 3 Bdrm 875 541-610-5799. 2.5 bath home. Drive by at Watercraft 3626 SW Volcano, Redmond and then call to see: 541-815-2986

personals KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

Single senior, seeks to dbl. for New Year Party, at Winners! Prime rib meal, 4 days, + extras, $79. 541-315-0022

rage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $1995 for all. Bill 541-480-7930.

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240.

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Grumman AA-5 Traveler, 1/4 interest, beautiful, clean plane, $9500, 619-822-8036 www.carymathis.blogspot.com

TERRY 27’ 5th wheel 1995 with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great condition and hunting rig, $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

Redmond Airport hangar, heated, 55’ x 75’ x 18’, 12’ x 24’ office, bath with shower, $229,500. 20-year lease. Call 503-803-2051

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $5800. 541-330-0852. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500,541-280-5677

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP,

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very

90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523.

Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

International 1981,T-axle-300 13 spd.Cummins/Jake Brake,good tires/body paint;1993 27’ stepdeck trailer, T-axle, Dove tail, ramps. $7950, 541-350-3866

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns.

1969,

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

MONTANA 2000 36’

885

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

Pickup

152K mi. on chassis, 4 spd. transmission, 250 6 cyl. engine w/60K, new brakes & master cylinder, $2500. Please call 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800.

3 slides, washer and dryer, new A/C. Very nice & livable! $12,500. 541-923-7351.

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

932

Antique and Classic Autos

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718 Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $40,000 OBO/terms, 541-948-2126.

Canopies and Campers

850

Yamaha 2008 Nitro 1049cc, 4 stroke, bought new Feb 2010, still under warranty, 550 miles, too much power for wife! $6000. Call 541-430-5444

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more. Priced to sell at $59,500! 541-317-9185

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Boats & Accessories Snowmobiles

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

C-10

Fifth Wheels

880

YAMAHA 1998 230CC motor, 4WD, used as utility vehicle. excellent running condition. $2000 OBO. 541-923-4161 541-788-3896

TOOL BOX fits 1991 Toyota, Diamond-plated, $100. Call 541-389-1582

882

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

Motorhomes

front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition. $2,200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

900

4 Michelin Studless ice & snow, used 1 season, 225/60/R16, $175 cash. 541-318-8668

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

ATVs

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

KOMFORT 27’ 5th wheel 2000 trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide, stored inside, in excellent condition. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

865

750

Redmond Homes

Sunriver/La Pine Homes Homes for Sale

Kendon stand-up motorcycle trailer, torsion bar suspension, easy load and unload, used seldom and only locally. $1700 OBO. Call 541-306-3010.

931

Autos & Transportation

925

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Utility Trailers When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

CarreraBelowBlueBookSale! Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $122,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Kelley Blue Book Prices as of 12/22/2010 WAS $12,395

11,995

$

NOW

2007 VW Jetta

VW Certified. Great Buy.

VW Certified.

Stk. 90102A, VIN M504921.

Stk. 3421, VIN 071339.

Kelley Blue Book $12,290

Kelley Blue Book $14,175

WAS $16,495

WAS $18,495

NOW

NOW

NOW

15,495

$

2004 Audi A6 Quattro

2003 Mercedes C320 4-Matic

Navigation, DVD, Loaded

All Wheel Drive, Low Miles.

Stk. 3545, VIN N055454.

Stk. 3520, VIN F410694.

Kelley Blue Book $15,070

Kelley Blue Book $16,550 WAS $21,495

NOW

19,995

$

17,995

$

15,895

$

WAS $15,995

NOW

14,995

$

13,895

$

2007 VW Beetle

Travel Queen 34’ 1987 65K miles, oak cabinets, exc interior. Great extra bdrm! Reduced to $5000. 541-480-3286

WAS $13,995

NOW

$

NOW

20,995

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2 slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

2008 VW Beetle

2007 Mini Cooper S

2006 BMW Z4

2009 VW Jetta TDI

VW Certified, Only 9k Miles.

Low Miles, Full Options

Top Down Fun to Drive!!

Stk. 90162A, VIN C366044.

Stk. 3414, VIN L84656

Stk. N1030, VIN LW91534.

Only 16k Miles, Nav., Moonroof.

Kelley Blue Book $15,960

Kelley Blue Book $21,230

Kelley Blue Book $22,675 WAS $23,995

WAS $21,495 Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

$

NOW

20,995

$

NOW

22,995

Available on every vehicle.

2005 Audi A6 Quattro Immaculate, Hard to Find.

881

Stk. AA30167J, VIN 134876.

Kelley Blue Book $21,290

2007 Audi A4 Quattro Audi Certified, Low Miles. Stk. 3465, VIN 125841.

Stk. A30149A, VIN N081500.

Travel Trailers

Kelley Blue Book $25,135

Kelley Blue Book $21,245

CarreraAutoOutlet cars you can get into

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105

GREAT VALUES ON RECENT TRADE-INS!

9,995

NOW

NOW

$

9,995

WAS $11,995

10,995

$

WAS $12,995

11,995

$

Photo for Illustration only

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Barns

Excavating

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Painting, Wall Covering

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107 Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Snow Removal Reliable 24 Hour Service • Driveways • Walkways • Parking Lots • Roof tops • De-icing Have plow & shovel crew awaiting your call!

Holiday Lighting Multiple Options • Interior • Exterior • Landscape

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling •Decks •Window/Door Replacement •Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

Home Improvement

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

541-390-1466 Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/410-6945

2008 Smart Fortwo

2002 Ford F-150 Super Cab

Great Condition, 2 Tire Sets

Full Options, Great Value.

Passion Model, Low Miles.

Stk. 71013L; VIN U723135.

Stk. 3534; VIN K178943.

4x4, Canopy, Low Miles.

Stk. 91000A; VIN 0207885.

Kelley Blue Book $10,045

Kelley Blue Book $12,235

Stk. 99110B; VIN CA79670.

Kelley Blue Book $10,295

NOW

13,995

$

Kelley Blue Book $13,145

WAS $16,995

14,995

$

NOW

19,995

$

NOW

$

25,995

d SNOW REMOVAL! d

d LARGE OR SMALL, d WE DO IT ALL! 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 d www.bblandscape.com d

2006 Toyota Prius 48 MPG, 1 Owner, Must See!

Stk. 3485A; VIN 7514304.

2008 Honda CRV-LX

2001 Porsche Boxster

Great Buy and MPG!

Low Miles, Well Equipped

Stk. 3454A; VIN C025561.

Kelley Blue Book $16,550

Kelley Blue Book $15,160

Stk. 3371B; VIN U660080.

Kelley Blue Book $21,525

NOW

$

26,995

WAS $27,995

$

26,995

2008 Cadillac SRX

2006 Ford F250 Super Cab

Tile, Ceramic

Stk. A31053A; VIN 199406

Stk. 91047A; VIN EA47639

Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

Kelley Blue Book $27,265

Kelley Blue Book $31,670

AWD, Full Options!

Same Day Response

2003 Toyota Camry LE

Snow Removal

Christmas Tree Delivery

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

2005 Scion xB Wagon

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

Porsche | Audi

Diesel, 4x4, Canopy, Low Miles.

2011 Jeep Liberty Almost New! Only 460 Miles

Stk. 91062A; VIN W523066 Photo for Illustration only

WAS $33,995

$

31,995

2006 Lexus GX 470

AWD, One Owner, Loaded! Stk. 71087A; VIN 0098007

Kelley Blue Book $34,240

M O T O R S

VW | BMW

Find every car on the lot at www.carreramotors.com 10 4 5 S E 3 r d S t . | B e n d | 5 41-3 8 2-17 11


E4 Monday, December 27, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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Pickups

Pickups

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833 Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

Mercedes-Benz 280c 1975 145k, good body & mechanical, fair interior, can email pics. $2950. 541-548-3628

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Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

Mercury Grand Marquis 1984. Grandpa’s car! Like new, all lthr, loaded, garaged, 40K mi, $3495. 541-382-8399

Mazda 3, 2005 5-door, dark bronze, 47,500 mi, fully loaded, very good cond, $11,950. Kent, 541-923-6723

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

Pontiac Firebird 1998, exc cond, no wrecks. T-top, V6, loaded, 22/29 mpg (reg gas). $4995. 541-475-3984

Infinity QX4 1998, luxury SUV 4WD, loaded, leather, 80K miles, $7500. CORRECTED PHONE # = 541-815-4052

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

Antique and Classic Autos

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

Toyota RAV 4 Ltd. 2007 80K miles, moonroof, tow pkg, great condition! $13,750. 541-848-7876 Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl, 5-spd., 4x4, good cond, price reduced to $7950, 541-593-4437. JEEP 2008 GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 4WD, moonroof, leather, "Perfect condition" $20,555. VIN# 222473

Vans 1998 Dodge Ram Wagon SE 2500, Mark III conversion, 100k miles, 4 captains chairs, rear fold-down bed, hitch, $4000 and worth it! Travel in luxury. 541-318-9999 or 541-508-8522.

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 1998, like new, low mi., just in time for the snow, great cond., $7000, 541-536-6223.

935

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223. Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Ford F250 1986, 4x4,

Ford F-350 Crew 4x4 2002. Triton V-10, 118k, new tires, wheels, brakes. Very nice. Just $14,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

CHEVY BLAZER 2000, ZR2 LS 4x4, 130k miles, 90% tread left on $2000 worth of tires. Under KBB at $4995. Can be seen at Redmond’s Hwy 97 Park & Sell. 541-546-6838.

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $11,500. 541-408-2111

Chrysler 2005 Pacifica

sport utility 4 WHEEL DRIVE Sport package, Navigation, 14,000 miles. $47,995

AWD, leather, video sys, 3.5 liter V6, loaded, 21,500 mi, $13,950. 541-382-3666

Lexus GX470 2009

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

VIN#X590171829

Ford Excursion 4x4 2000. Nice Red, like new, only 68k, seats 9. Just $16,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

Ford Explorer 2008 Eddie Bauer 4x4 28k mi. Loaded! $25,437

VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr brks, plus mntd stud snows. $8500 obo. 541-330-0616 Nissan XTerra SE 2001 $5900 Auto, CD, Sun, Tow, 131K, V6, 4WD, Must See 541-617-8454

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

541-598-3750

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

GMC ENVOY 2005 4 WHEEL DRIVE, 49,000 miles. V6-auto. $14,897 VIN#251359

Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

541-598-3750 DLR 0225

Hyundai Sante Fe SE 2009 V6-all wheel drive $22,586 VIN# 229471

541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

Buick LeSabre Limited Edition 1985, 1 owner, always garaged, clean, runs great, 90K, $1895, 541-771-3133.

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, V6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

Audi A4 Avant Quattro 2003 3.0L., 92K mi, garaged, serviced, silver, fully loaded, $9300. 541-420-9478

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $3500. 541-548-5302

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles, automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018. Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

Mercedes AMG, Formula One V-12. Very Rare. Only 99k miles. Ultimate in safety, luxury & performance. Cost $135,000 to fully hand-build. Just $13,500. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

Jeep Cherokee Laredo, 2003, 135K miles, fully loaded, excellent condition. $6500. Call 541-749-0316 Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CL AS S I F I E DS

Pontiac Grand Am 2004 FWD 3.4L V-6 4 door, all power, 158k hwy miles. Excellent condition.

$2,995

Reach thousands of readers!

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

541-923-8627

Automobiles

VIN#B29136

GMC Sierra Crew Cab SLT 2005, loaded, detailed & in great cond. Matching shell & sprayed bed liner& mat, just over 100k. Asking $15,800, 541-280-7068

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

975

DLR 0225

MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all original, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

Buick LeSabre Cstm 1996. Go anywhere in snow, great gas mi. 44K on eng. Comfortable, reliable! $1599. 916-690-1529

DLR 0225

FORD pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

Ford Ranger 2004 Super Cab, XLT, 4X4, V6, 5-spd, A/C bed liner, tow pkg, 120K Like New! KBB Retail: $10,000 OBO 360-990-3223

custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $6000; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $2900. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

541-598-3750

The Bulletin Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $4850, 541-410-3425.

BMW M3 COUPE E36 1998, mint condition, adult owned, low miles, needs nothing, $12,500. 541-419-2181

Buick LeSabre 2004,

Sport Utility Vehicles X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871.

BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, auto, reduced to $14,999 obo 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

940

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Kia Spectra LS, 2002 96K miles, black, 5-speed, runs good, $2600. Phone 541-749-0316

PORSCHE CARRERA 4S 2003 - Wide body, 6 speed, 63,000 miles, all wheel drive, no adverse history, new tires. Seal gray with light gray leather interior. $32,950. 503-351-3976

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Subaru Outback 2005 AWD, 4cyl, auto, lthr htd seats, 89K mi, reduced to $13,995 OBO 541-508-0214; 541-554-5212

SUBARUS!!!

Mercedes S430-4Matic, 2003 AWD, silver, loaded & pampered. Excellent in snow! $16,395. 541-390-3596

Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $27k. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

VOLKSWAGEN BUG 1965 Black , Excellent condition. Runs good. $6995. 541-416-0541.

Any 2011 VW starts with a pen.

VW Super Beetle 1974 New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3750 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

2011 Tiguan

All-new 2011 Jetta

2011 CC

933

Pickups

Chevy 1/2 Ton 1995, 4X4, 350 engine, auto, cold A/C, new tires, brakes, shocks, & muffler, w/ camper shell, runs great. $4000. 541-706-1568

$ Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K mi., $8925. 541-598-5111.

0down 0 $

(excluding title, taxes, options and dealer fees)

first month’s payment

$

0

due at signing

Example: 2011 Tiguan for $327 per month/36 month lease.

Chevy Silverado 1500 1988, 4x4, step side, tow pkg., low mi. at 98K, A/C, great tries, brakes, new rear end, runs extra super, $4000 OBO, 541-548-7396 Chevy Silverado 1500 4x4, 2000, full size, Reg cab w/ long bed, white, V6, 4.3L, 20 mpg, auto trans, ABS, AC, dual airbags, tow pkg, runs & drives excellent, maint’d extremely well; non-smoker. Recent brks, bearing, tune- up, tires, trans & coolant flush. 183K mi. $4700 obo. 541-633-6953

2011 Tiguan S-Model lease for $327 per mon./36 mos. ZERO due at signing. Offer ends 12/31/2010

DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2700. 541-322-6261

Dodge Ram 2001, short bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

Dodge Ram 2500 SLT Quad Cab 2009 Big Horn Edition 4WD, diesel, auto., tow pkg, 19k miles. Almost $4000 back of Kelley Book. $37,787 VIN# 549118

1045 SE Third Street Bend carreravw.com 541.382.1711

541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

FORD 350 LARIAT 2002 4x4 crewcab, 7.3 diesel 135k, dually, matching canopy, towing special, gooseneck, too! Orig. 63-year-old construction owner needs money, will trade, $17,500. (541) 815-3639 or (541) 508-8522

For all lease offers: Lessee responsible for damage, excess wear and insurance. Exclude taxes, title, options and dealer fees. On approved credit through primary lender. Supplies limited. Photos for illustration only. 2011 VW Tiguan with automatic transmission, MSRP $27,360. Monthly payments total $11,78244. Dealer contribution of $500. Purchase option at lease end $16,142.40. $.25/mile over 10,000 miles. Lessee responsible for a disposition fee of $350. © Volkswagen of American, Inc.

2008 Audi RS 4 4.2 Cabriolet quattro Vin#800387 2008 Audi A4 2.0T Avant quattro Vin#137252 2008 Audi A5 3.2 Coupe quattro Vin#020075 2007 Audi A4 2.0T quattro Vin#125841 2008 Audi A6 3.2 quattro Vin#090809 2009 Audi A4 2.0 quattro Vin#038989 2009 Audi A4 2.0T Cabriolet Vin#002091


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 27, 2010 E5

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES

of a deed of trust in which the Plaintiff requests that the Plaintiff be allowed to foreclose your interest in the following described real property: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER (NE 1/4 NW 1/4) OF SECTION THREE (3), TOWNSHIP EIGHTEEN (18) SOUTH, RANGE TWELVE (12) EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT WHENCE THE NORTH QUARTER CORNER OF SAID SECTION 3 BEARS NORTH 79°20'17" EAST, 702.90 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00°19"31" WEST, 100 FEET; THENCE WEST 100.63 FEET; THENCE NORTH 100 FEET; THENCE EAST 101.26 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING Commonly known as: 27 SE Cessna Drive, Bend, Oregon 97702. 3. NOTICE TO DEFENDANTS: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! A lawsuit has been started against you in the above-entitled court by BANK OF AMERICA FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff. Plaintiff's claims are stated in the written complaint, a copy of which was filed with the above-entitled Court. 4. You must "appear" in this case or the other side will win automatically. To "appear" you must file with the court a legal paper called a "motion" or "answer." The "motion" or "answer" must be given to the court clerk or

You are directed: Georgia Lily Ann Johnson To appear in person before this Court at 1100 NW Bond Street, Courtroom D, Bend, Oregon, on: the 18th day of January, 2011 at 2:30 PM, for hearing on the allegations of the petition and at any subsequent court-ordered bearing. You must appear personally in the courtroom on the date and at the time listed above. An attorney may not attend the hearing in your place.

please retain one as soon as possible to represent you in this proceeding. If you cannot afford to hire an attorney and you meet the state's financial guidelines, you are entitled to have an attorney appointed for you at state expense. To request appointment of an attorney to represent you at state expense, you must contact juvenile court immediately. Phone 541-388-5300 for further information.

unless the court has granted you an exception in advance under ORS 419B.100 to appear by other means including, but not limited to, telephonic or other electronic means.

ROUTH CRABTREE OLSEN, P.S. By /s/Janaya L. Carter, OSB # 032830 Attorneys for Plaintiff 13555 SE 36th St., Ste. 300 Bellevue, WA 98006 (425) 586-1991; Fax (425) 283-5991 jcarter@rcolegal.com

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BANK OF AMERICA FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE OF THE MATTIE SUE CARROLL REVOCABLE TRUST; UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE MATTIE SUE CARROLL REVOCABLE TRUST; LOUIS SLAYTON; THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES; Occupants of the Premises; and any and all persons claiming an interest in the Property, Defendants. 1. TO THE DEFENDANTS: SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE OF THE MATTIE SUE CARROLL REVOCABLE TRUST; UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE MATTIE SUE CARROLL REVOCABLE TRUST; AND ANY AND ALL PERSONS CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY: In the name of the State of Oregon, you are hereby required to appear and answer the complaint filed against you in the above-entitled Court and cause on or before the expiration of 30 days from the date of the first publication of this summons. The date of first publication in this matter is December 6, 2010. If you fail timely to appear and answer, Plaintiff will apply to the above-entitled court for the relief prayed for in its complaint. This is a judicial foreclosure

administrator within 30 days of the date of first publication specified herein along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the Plaintiff's attorney or, if the Plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the Plaintiff. 5. If you have any questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636. 6. This summons is issued pursuant to ORCP 7.

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES JUVENILE DEPARTMENT IN THE, MATTER OF: Johnson, Derrah 06/15/04 (713861) A CHILD. Petition No. 10JV0329 SUMMONS TO: GEORGIA LILY ANN JOHNSON, (last known address) 20130 NE Reed bane, Bend, OR 97702 IN THE NAME OF THE STATE OF OREGON:

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. #: OR-10-396786-NH

NOTICE: A petition has been filed to establish jurisdiction under ORS 419B.100. You may obtain a copy of the petition by calling (541) 388-5300. If you do not appear as directed above, or do not appear at any subsequent court-ordered hearing, the Court may proceed without further notice and take jurisdiction of the child and make such orders and take such action as authorized by law including, but not limited to, establishing wardship over the child, ordering the removal of the child from the legal and physical custody of the parents or guardians and, restraining you from having contact with, or attempting to contact, the child.

If you are a parent or other person legally obligated to support the child, you have tile obligation to support the child. You may be required to pay for compensation and reasonable expenses for the child's attorney. You may be required to pay support for the child while the child is in state financed or state supported custody. You may be required to provide health insurance coverage for the child while the child is in state financed or state supported custody. You may be required to pay other costs that arise from the child being in the jurisdiction of the Court. If you are ordered to pay for the child support or there is an existing order of support from a divorce or other proceeding, that support order may be assigned to the state to apply to the costs of the child's care.

Dates Issued: 9th day of December, 2010. First publication: 12/20/10 Second publication: 12/27/10 Third publication: 01/03/11 SHERYL BLACKMAN OSB 98416 Deputy District Attorney Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF AUCTION One (1) storage unit will be auctioned on Tuesday, December 28th, 2010, at 11:00 a.m. at All Star Storage, 136 SW Century Drive, Bend, OR. PH-541382-8808.

If you are ordered to appear, you must appear personally in the courtroom,

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No. T10-70642 OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, TRACY ANN PIN AIRE, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 03-22Â2005, recorded 03-30-2005, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No,, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2005-18611 (indicated

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Legal Notices

RIGHTS AND OBLIGATIONS You have a right to be represented by an attorney. If you wish to be represented by an attorney,

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. #: OR-09-331711-SH

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MARK E. COOLEY AND BRENDA L. COOLEY as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of COLUMBIA RIVER BANK MORTGAGE GROUP, as Beneficiary, dated 6/18/2003, recorded 6/24/2003, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2003-42369,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 197116 LOT 51 OF TERRANGO GLEN-PHASE THREE, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20946 LUPINE AVE BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 1/1/2010, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,190.15 Monthly Late Charge $59.51 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $143,215.52 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.2500 per annum from 12/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 4/15/2011 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 4/15/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six- month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE" You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 3/16/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR: (503) 684-3763; (800)452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 12/7/2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as Trustee 3 First American Way Santa Ana, CA 92707 Signature By Angelica Castillo, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, CARLA L. POWELL & JOHN POWELL as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE CO OF OR, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FIRST HORIZON HOME LOANS, A DIVISION OF FIRST TENNESSEE BANK N.A., as Beneficiary, dated 9/17/2007, recorded 9/20/2007, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number - at page number - fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2007-50905,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 139499 LOT 8 IN BLOCK 94 OF DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, UNIT 8, PART II, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 15751 PARK DRIVE LA PINE, OR 97739 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 9/1/2009, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,848.51 Monthly Late Charge $69.95 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $214,003.76 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.6250 per annum from 8/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 4/8/2011 at the hour of 1:00:00 PM , Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, At the front entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond St., Bend, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-573-1965 or Login to: www.priorityposting.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 4/8/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 3/9/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENACY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 12/6/2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee 3 First American Way Santa Ana, CA 92707 Signature By: Angelica Castillo, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for v this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations.

ASAP# FNMA3845486 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011, 01/10/2011, 01/17/2011

ASAP# FNMA3845493 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011, 01/10/2011

which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 206556 PARCEL ONE (1) OF PARTITION PLAT NO. 2002-51, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1331 NE BUTLER MARKET RD. BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86,735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 08/01/2010 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $704.60 Monthly Late Charge $35.23 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $112,814.39 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.825% per annum from 07-01-2010 until paid; plus all accrued late

charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 04-04-2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal

as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated; November 22, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 Maria De La Torre, Asst. Sec. ASAP# 3840487 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011, 01/10/2011

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1727 T.S. No.: 1305617-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Bruce W. Grove An Unmarried Man, as Grantor to First American Title Ins. Co. Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage Co. Dba Commonwealth United Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, dated October 29, 2004, recorded November 01, 2004, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2004-65519 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 15 of Northpointe-phase 1, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 20695 Beaumont Dr. Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due August 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $768.94 Monthly Late Charge $38.40. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $122,009.33 together with interest thereon at 5.625% per annum from July 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on March 14, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: November 04, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is February 12, 2011, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-355371 12/13/10, 12/20, 12/27, 01/03

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L515765 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 125904581/STAATS AP #1: 116367 Title #: 4522909 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by RIJN N. STAATS as Grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE CO. as Trustee, in favor of INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B. as Beneficiary. Dated May 9, 2007, Recorded May 16, 2007 as Instr. No. 2007-27984 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON AND AN ADDENDUM TO NOTE DATED 05/09/07, AND A MODIFICATION AGREEMENT DATED 11/28/07, RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION LOAN AGREEMENT DATED 05/09/2007, OWNER/BUILDER ADDENDUM DATED 05/09/2007, RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION LOAN ADDENDUM DATED 05/09/2007 covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 23 IN BLOCK 53 OF DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, UNIT 9, PART 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE $462,500.00 INTEREST @ 3.3406 % FROM 04/01/10 THRU 09/08/10 $6,780.95 ADVANCE - PROPERTY TAXES $4,301.61 ADVANCE - INSURANCE $3,701.00 ACCRUED LATE CHARGES $1,888.27 APPRAISAL FEE $125.00 CREDIT DUE <$721.19> PROPERTY INSPECTION $330.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$478,905.64 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 56235 STELLAR DRIVE, BEND, OR 97707-2002 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $462,500.00, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 04/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on January 17, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 09/08/10 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 921059 PUB: 12/06/10, 12/13/10, 12/20/10, 12/27/10


E6 Monday, December 27, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com/ AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine

gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: December

3, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONALTITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Juan Enriquez State of California County of Orange I, the undersigned, certify that I am the Trustee Sale Officer and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original Trustee's Notice of Sale. Juan Enriquez ASAP# 3839052 12/13/2010, 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0172413494 T.S. No.: 10-10478-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, GREGORY L. STECKLER AND SHARON M. STECKLER, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on September 26, 2007, as Instrument No. 2007-52108 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 258955 LOT SIXTEEN (16), THE SHIRE PHASE 1, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 61283 RING BEARER COURT, BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late

charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; Monthly Payment $2,925.00 Monthly Late Charge $146.25 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 520,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.75000 % per annum from May 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on March 25, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the high-

est bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due {other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-70293-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JEFF STRINGHAM, TAMARA STRINGHAM as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 07-10-2006, recorded 07-14-2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No., fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-48338 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 157184 A parcel of land in the South Half of the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (S 1/2 NE 1/4 NE 1/4) of Section 25, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 12, East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, being further described as follows: Commencing at the Northeast corner of said Section 25, being a brass cap set in a monument box; thence South 00º23'48" West along the Easterly line of said section a distance of 660.76 feet to the true point of beginning of this description; thence South 89º38'59" West 30.00 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on the Westerly right of way line of Horse Butte Road; thence South 89º38'59" West, 653.75 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 05º03'40" East 163.19 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence along the arc of a 50.00 foot radius non-tangent curve concave to the Southwest, a distance of 83.16 feet, the chord of which bears South 47º24'31" East 73.90 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 52º53'06" East 81.92 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence along the arc of a 470.00 foot radius curve concave to the North, a distance of 306.92 feet, (long chord bears South 71º35'33" East 301.49 feet), to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 89º42'00" East 201.06 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 89º42'00" East 30.00 feet to a point on the centerline of said road; thence North 00º23'48" East along said centerline, 389.97 feet to the point of beginning and there terminating, EXCEPTING THEREFROM the Easterly 30.00 feet for road right of way purposes. Commonly known as: 60359 HORSE BUTTE ROAD BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 01/01/2010 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $3,767.13 Monthly Late Charge $188.35 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $572,007.38 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.5% per annum from 12-01-2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 03-28-2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: November 16, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 Maria De La Torre, Asst. Sec. ASAP# 3840425 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011, 01/10/2011

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-102994 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JEANETTE A. JANIA, as grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE CO., as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 11/17/2006, recorded 11/22/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-77449, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by HSBC Bank USA, National Association as Trustee for Deutsche Alt-A Securities Mortgage Loan Trust, Series 2007-AR3. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT ONE (1) AND THE NORTH 40 FEET OF LOT TWO (2), IN BLOCK SIXTY-EIGHT (68) OF BEND PARK, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 409 SOUTHEAST WYE LANE BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of December 7, 2010 Delinquent Payments from August 01, 2010 4 payments at $1,853.23 each $7,412.92 1 payments at $1,62 6.2 8 each $1,626.2 8 (08-01-10 through 12-07-10) Late Charges: $379.65 Beneficiary Advances: $88.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $9,506.85 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $235,138.37, PLUS interest thereon at 7.75% per annum from 07/01/10 to 12/1/2010, 7.75% per annum from 12/01/10 to 12/01/11, 7.75% per annum from 12/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on April 11, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same.DATED: 12/7/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500 Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: 206-340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3842270 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011, 01/10/2011

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L515911 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000018998/FOXHOVEN Investor No: 4006430990 AP #1: 171421 00 10500 Title #: 100514130 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by ZAC W. FOXHOVEN, TECKLA A. FOXHOVEN as Grantor, to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated March 31, 2009, Recorded April 6, 2009 as Instr. No. 2009-14014 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: A PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER (NE 1/4 SE 1/4) OF SECTION 21 AND IN THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (NW 1/4 SW 1/4) OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 17 SOUTH, RANGE 14 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY OREGON, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: SECTION 21: THE EAST 668 FEET OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER (NE1/4 SE 1/4). SECCTION 22: THE WEST HALF OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (W 1/2 W 1/2 NW 1/4 SW 1/4). Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 5 PYMTS FROM 05/01/10 TO 09/01/10 @ 2,897.71 $14,488.55 TOTAL LATE CHARGES $220.68 MISCELLANEOUS FEES $27.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$14,736.23 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 25600 ALFALFA MARKET RD., BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $410,187.08, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 04/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on January 17, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 09/09/10 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 921060 PUB: 12/06/10, 12/13/10, 12/20/10, 12/27/10

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. OR-AGF-109811

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-UM-102795 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, REBECCA A DOLF, INDIVIDUAL, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of SECURITY BANK, ITS SUCCESSORS AND/OR ASSIGNS, as beneficiary, dated 4/10/2001, recorded 4/16/2001 in Volume 2001, page 17424, of Deeds of Trust, under Instrument No. -, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by UMPQUA BANK. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT TWENTY-EIGHT (28), BLOCK ONE (1), ROMAINE VILLAGE, UNIT 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 19909 MAHOGANY STREET BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of December 6, 2010 Delinquent Payments from July 01, 2010 1 payments at $460.00 each $460.00 5 payments at $682.00 each $3,410.00 (07-01-10 through 12-06-10) Late Charges: $220.46 Beneficiary Advances: $109.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $4,199.46 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $67,542.44, PLUS interest thereon at 6.625% per annum from 06/01/10 to 8/1/2010, 6.625% per annum from 8/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on April 7, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at MAIN ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY JUSTICE CENTER, 1100 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a, reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 12/6/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3840521 12/13/2010, 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011 LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L515909 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000017855/NEWMAN Investor No: 4001434366 AP #1: 140480 Title #: 100514128 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by KEN NEWMAN, SUSAN NEWMAN as Grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES as Beneficiary. Dated May 12, 2000, Recorded May 17, 2000 as Instr. No. --- in Book 2000 Page 19351 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 3, BLOCK 30, TALL PINES-FIFTH ADDITION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 5 PYMTS FROM 05/01/10 TO 09/01/10 @ 884.63 $4,423.15 TOTAL LATE CHARGES $66.90 RETURN CHECK $25.00 MISCELLANEOUS FEES $13.50 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$4,528.55 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 53035 TARRY LANE, LAPINE, OR 97739 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $71,942.62, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 04/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on January 17, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 09/09/10 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 921061 PUB: 12/06/10, 12/13/10, 12/20/10, 12/27/10 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-102385

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, GARY MICHAEL JONES AND PAMELA JO JONES, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of AMERICAN GENERAL FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC., as beneficiary, dated 6/11/2008, recorded 6/13/2008, under Instrument No. 2008-25586, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by AMERICAN GENERAL FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT FORTY-SEVEN (47) IN BLOCK TWENTY-ONE (21) OF DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, RECORDED MAY 23, 1963, IN CABINET A, PAGE 106, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 56726 STELLAR DRIVE BEND, OR 97707 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of December 8, 2010 Delinquent Payments from July 20, 2010 5 payments at $698.27 each $3,491.35 (07-20-10 through 12-08-10) Late Charges: $20.00 TOTAL: $3,511.35 FAILURE TO PAY INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, IMPOUNDS AND LATE CHARGES WHICH BECAME DUE 7/20/2010 TOGETHER WITH ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, IMPOUNDS, LATE CHARGES, FORECLOSURE FEES AND EXPENSES; ANY ADVANCES WHICH MAY HEREAFTER BE MADE; ALL OBLIGATIONS AND INDEBTEDNESSES AS THEY BECOME DUE AND CHARGES PURSUANT TO SAID NOTE AND DEED OF TRUST. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $78,645.69, PLUS interest thereon at 9.600% per annum from 6/20/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on April 13, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. Sale Information Line: 714-730-2727 or Website: http://www.lpsasap.com DATED: 12/8/2010 LSI TITLE OF OREGON, LLC AS TRUSTEE By: Asset Foreclosure Services, Inc., as Agent for the Trustee 22837 Ventura Blvd., Suite 350, Woodland Hills, CA 91364 Phone: (877)237-7878 Sale Information Line:(714)730-2727 By: Norie Vergara, Trustee Sale Officer

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, MICHELLE E. THOMAS, as grantor, to AMERI TITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR MORTGAGEIT, INC., as beneficiary, dated 6/1/2006, recorded 6/7/2006, under Instrument No. 2006- 39464, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee of the IndyMac INDX Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-AR27, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-AR27 under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated August 1, 2006. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT ONE HUNDRED FORTY-NINE (149), PARKS AT BROKEN TOP, PHASE 4, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 61418 DAVIS LAKE LOOP BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of December 1, 2010 Delinquent Payments from May 01, 2010 5 payments at $ 2,214.52 each $ 11,072.60 3 payments at $ 2,923.70 each $ 8,771.10 (05-01-10 through 12-01-10) Late Charges: $ 775.11 Beneficiary Advances: $ 55.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 20,673.81 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $416,850.00, PLUS interest thereon at 6.375% per annum from 04/01/10 to 10/1/201 0, 6.375% per annum from 10/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on April 5, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 12/1/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

ASAP# 3843980 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011, 01/10/2011

ASAP# 3834751 12/13/2010, 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011

Bulletin Daily Paper 12/27/10  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Monday December 27, 2010

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