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A2 Sa tu rd a y, De ce mb e r 2 5 , 2 0 1 0 • THE BUL L ETIN


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African huts, far from the grid, lit by small-scale solar power By Elisabeth Rosenthal

‘A neighborhood’: Christmas in a camp

Homeless but not hopeless

New York Times News Service

KIPTUSURI, Kenya — For Sara Ruto, the yearning for electricity began last year with the purchase of her first cell phone, a lifeline for receiving small money transfers, contacting relatives in the city or checking chicken prices at the nearest market. Charging the phone was no simple matter in this farming village far from Kenya’s electric grid. Every week, Ruto walked two miles to hire a motorcycle taxi for the three-hour ride to Mogotio, the nearest town with electricity. There, she dropped off her cell phone at a store that recharges phones for 30 cents. Yet the service was in such demand that she had to leave it behind for three full days before returning. That wearying routine ended in February when the family sold some animals to buy a small Chinese-made solar power system for about $80. Now balanced precariously atop their tin roof, a lone solar panel provides enough electricity to charge the phone and run four bright overhead lights with switches. “My main motivation was the phone, but this has changed so many other things,” Ruto said as she relaxed on a bench in the mudwalled shack she shares with her husband and six children. As small-scale renewable energy becomes cheaper, more reliable and more efficient, it is providing the first drops of modern power to people who live far from electricity grids and fuel pipelines in developing countries. See Energy / A8

The iPad goes to Washington (to the House floor, actually) By Michael D. Shear New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The iPad is coming to Capitol Hill. Tucked into new rules proposed by the incoming House Republican majority is one that could fling the chamber — for good or ill — into the 21st century: Members may use an electronic device on the House floor as long as it doesn’t “impair decorum.” The new rule would relax the ban on the use of gadgets like the iPad, iPhone or BlackBerry. Mobile phones, tablet computers and the whole universe of applications that run on them will be officially available. See Gadgets / A5

IN CONGRESS

An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 107, No. 359, 66 pages, 6 sections

By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

It’s far from ideal, residents of one enclave say, but with help from a veterans group and their own decorations, they figure to do OK

A drum of drinking water and other supplies fill a pickup truck Tuesday for their weekly delivery to a homeless camp by Central Oregon Veterans Outreach volunteers.

REDMOND — A.J. Losoya, the Redmond School Board’s newest member, took his seat last week and hopes to keep it for a long time. In part, his appointment to the board is the product of Losoya’s parents — neither of whom have a high school degree — deciding they wanted a better life for their children. Losoya, 33, gives a great A.J. Losoya deal of credit to his parents for pushing him and his brother to focus on education. He was both the first person in his family to graduate from high school and from college. When the board members chose Losoya from a pool of five applicants, they praised his finance experience, professionalism and passionate interest in education. They also discussed the diversity he would bring to the board. Losoya, who is Latino, could bring a perspective to the district leadership of schools that have seen the Hispanic population increase by about 60 percent in the past four years. Both of Losoya’s parents grew up as migrant farmers, traveling from Texas — where they grew up — through the Pacific Northwest, harvesting crops from fruit to hops. Early in his life, Losoya’s parents took him to fruit fields to pick, making a point that they wanted a different life for him. See Redmond / A8

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

“I probably won’t ever have a roof over my head, but at least we have these people (Central Oregon Veterans Outreach volunteers) helping us out,” said Richard Taylor, 64. “It gets tough sometimes, but I do all right.” Taylor, who says he served in Vietnam from 1965-1968, receives a check from the government every month, but it’s not enough to live on, he says.

By Molly Black • The Bulletin

D

avid Dunn decorated a Christmas tree this year, but unlike most Central Oregonians, he lives under it. With a tent, a tarp and a sleeping bag donated from Central Oregon Veterans Outreach,

Dunn, 42, has made himself a home in the woods near Bend. He is surrounded by a hidden neighborhood of at least 10 other self-proclaimed homeless veterans who find themselves camping out at an undisclosed location a few miles outside of town.

With red, green and silver ornaments hanging from the tree above his tent, Dunn said he has lived there for the past six years after he was hampered by a spinal injury that put him out of work. “I got a spinal disease that incapacitates me, so no one will give me work,” he said. “I would like to get a job, but I just can’t, so here I am.” Despite his homeless status, Dunn will argue that he does pretty well. In fact, he is proud of his home and was more than willing to show off the television set, radio and Coleman stove that he has acquired over the years.

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To learn more For more information about the COVO operation, founded in 2005 by members of the Bend/La Pine Vietnam Veterans of America, call 541-318-5714.

“I use cell phone batteries to power them, so I have the TV on ABC, and the radio is always tuned to Rush Limbaugh. And,” he said, “the picture on the TV is pretty good for a little portable thing.” Dunn relies on donations from Bend residents for money and work, sitting

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outside grocery stores holding a sign emphasizing a need for cash. “During the holidays, people can be pretty generous,” he said. Dunn, wearing a bucket hat stamped with buttons, small mirrors and other paraphernalia, walks to Walmart every Friday hoping to encounter a generous shopper who might give him some help. At the end of the day he returns to his home in the woods. On days when he returns with empty pockets, Dunn is appreciative of the work COVO does to keep him warm and fed each week. See Homeless / A5

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First lady fields calls as NORAD keeps tabs on Santa By Dan Elliott The Associated Press

INDEX

We use recycled newsprint The Bulletin

New board member, new outlook on Redmond schooling

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CONGRESS: Jockeying begins over redistricting, and Senate Democrats seek rule changes, Page A4

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. — Some kids who call NORAD on Christmas Eve to find out where Santa is hang up as soon as a volunteer answers the phone — probably because they expected a recording and not a real person, veteran Santa trackers say. There were some especially awed kids Friday, when one of the people answering the phone was first lady Michelle Obama. A telephone link from Hawaii, where the Obamas are on vacation, allowed her to pitch in with volunteers at Peterson Air Force Base, Colo., who were answering phone calls and e-mails for the North American Aerospace Defense Command’s Santa-tracking program. “I was ecstatic because I was talking to the president’s wife,” said Evan Race, 10, of Springfield, Ill. He and his family were in North Carolina for the holidays when they decided to call NORAD. See Santa / A5


A4 Saturday, December 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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U.S. ‘evolving’ on gay marriage, Biden says By Michael Muskal Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Vice President Joe Biden, increasingly visible as a key presidential adviser on domestic issues, predicted on Friday that the country was moving toward a growing acceptance of gay marriage. Speaking on ABC’s “Good Morning America,” Biden compared the nation’s changing views on gay marriage to the same changes he has seen on the military’s acceptance of gays and lesbians

serving openly. “I think the country is evolving, and I think there is an inevitability for a national consensus on gay marriage,” Biden said. Same-sex marriages can be legally performed in five states and Washington, D.C. Biden described how he had attended meetings during which President Barack Obama had sat down with military leaders to explain that the administration was going to push for repeal of the “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy. Under

the 1993 law, gays and lesbians had to hide their sexual orientation or face dismissal from the military. Those meetings with military figures helped prepare for the repeal of “don’t ask, don’t tell,” said Biden, who added he saw “the same thing across the country in regard to the issue of marriage.” “Don’t ask, don’t tell” was repealed in the recently concluded congressional session, and the president signed the repeal bill. The military is now examining how to implement the policy.

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Taliban up the ante in assaults on remote Pakistani outposts By Ismail Khan New York Times News Service

PESHAWAR, Pakistan — A Taliban group forced into a remote border area by Pakistani military operations struck back Friday with a large and highly coordinated attack against the government’s paramilitary forces, Pakistani officials said. A senior security official said about 150 militants initiated the simultaneous attacks on five security outposts near the Afghan border, killing 11 members of Pakistan’s Frontier Corps and wounding nine. The militants fought hand-to-hand battles with Pakistani forces at two outposts in Mohmand Agency and assaulted three others with machine guns and rockets, officials said. The militants may have been trying to forestall new attacks by the military, which has swept them from other nearby tribal areas into a relatively small area of Mohmand Agency and threatened a new offensive. “Frankly, we didn’t expect an attack of this scale and magnitude,” said the senior security official, who added that the Pakistani forces had received a warning of an impending assault. As violence has flared in Mohmand in recent months, most of the attacks against government forces have been smaller-scale ambushes of patrols or remote assaults using improvised bombs planted along roads. The senior security official, who asked not to be named because he is not authorized to speak to the media, said that 24 militants were killed in the hours of clashes, although the fighters displayed the bodies of only eight militants to the local media. “Our assessment is based on militants’ intercepts and chatter,” the official said.

The Associated Press ile photo

Pakistani soldiers and officials collect evidence earlier this month at the site of suicide bombing in Ghalanai, the main town in the Pakistani tribal area of Mohmand. On Friday, militants fought hand-to-hand battles with Pakistani forces at two outposts in Mohmand and assaulted three others from a distance.

Iraqi slays his daughter over her allegiance to al-Qaida plot

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15 16 27 40 52 16 x4 Nobody won the jackpot Friday night in the Mega Millions game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $196 million for Tuesday’s drawing.

By Rebecca Santana The Associated Press Rajanish Kakade / The Associated Press

Police officers check a man’s bag Friday outside the Taj Mahal hotel in Mumbai, India. Police were seeking four men who authorities believe entered Mumbai to carry out a terrorist attack.

‘High alert’ in India; 4 terror suspects sought The Washington Post NEW DELHI — A day after issuing a terror alert for the holiday week, police in India’s commercial capital of Mumbai launched a manhunt Friday for four terrorist suspects believed to have sneaked into the city. “The police are on high alert all over the city. We cannot take any of these intelligence inputs lightly in the holiday season,” said Nisar Tamboli, deputy commissioner of police in the Mumbai crime department. “Since yesterday, we are checking all the possible hideouts, small lodges and guesthouses, railway stations. We are checking all the vehicles that are coming into the city.”

By Michael Cooper and Sabrina Tavernise New York Times News Service

The political jockeying over how to draw new congressional districts began in earnest this week after new census data showed almost a dozen seats shifting to the South and West, leaving Republicans poised to build on their gains from November’s midterm elections and forcing several northern Democratic incumbents to begin plotting to save their jobs. The biggest immediate danger to incumbent Democrats will be in the Rust Belt, where Michigan, Pennsylvania and Ohio are all losing congressional seats and Republicans now control the state governments, giving them the power to draw the new political maps. Politicians liken this process to a game of musical chairs, wondering who will be left without a seat. With Ohio losing two seats, political analysts expect the Republicans to eliminate a Democratic seat from the Cleveland area — possibly the one now held by Rep. Dennis Kucinich. “My Aunt Betty called me after the news report, and she says, ‘Dennis, what are we going to do — are they putting you out of Congress?’ ” Kucinich said in an interview, explaining that he would try not to worry about it right now, since it is beyond his control. But he added that “the fundamental rule of politics is you have to have a district to run.” Republicans, meanwhile, are preparing for the more enviable task of drawing up new congressional districts in states where they are strong. Their victories in statehouse elections gave them control of redistricting in five of the eight states that are gaining seats, including the two biggest winners, Texas, which is adding four, and Florida, which is adding two. That has made Don Gaetz, the chairman of the Florida State Senate’s Reapportionment Committee, a popular man. “I’m just a lowly state senator from the panhandle of Florida, but I have all sorts of new friends,” Gaetz marveled. “Members of Congress who didn’t know I existed, and people who would like to be in Congress who I didn’t know existed.” The next step comes in February, when the Census Bureau will begin releasing detailed local demographic data, allowing the actual redrawing of districts to begin.

WASHINGTON — Frustrated by routine filibusters and other procedural blockades, Senate Democrats are urging their leadership to negotiate with Republicans to change the rules that govern how the Senate does business. The Democrats would leave intact the ability of the minority party to filibuster legislation and nominations, meaning that in most cases it would still take 60 votes to get anything done. But they want to require senators to be on the floor if they intend to try to debate a bill to death and would make other changes to streamline the Senate’s operations, including ending the practice of secret “holds” by a single senator on legislation or nominees. Republicans are likely to resist, and should no compromise be found, some Democrats are prepared to propose their own package of rules changes on the first day of the session. Doing so could touch off a floor fight, escalate already high partisan tensions in the chamber and hinder President Barack Obama’s ability to advance legislation. In a letter to Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada, the majority leader, Democratic senators expressed “strong sentiment” for ending what they see as Republican misuse of the process. “We believe the current abuse of the rules by the minority threatens the ability of the Senate to do the necessary work of the nation, and we urge you to take steps to bring these abuses of our rules to an end,” said the Dec. 18 letter signed by 56 Democrats and independents, including all other Democratic senators remaining in the Congress that opens Jan. 5. — New York Times News Service

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Mumbai was the site of a deadly three-day siege in November 2008 when gunmen attacked two five-star hotels, a train station, a cafe and a Jewish prayer center, killing more than 160 people. At a news conference Thursday, Mumbai police said four suspects had sneaked into the city four days earlier to carry out terrorist attacks. Authorities released a hazy sketch of a bearded man called Walid Jinnah. Holding up his image, senior police officer Himanshu Roy said the four men were members of the Pakistan-based militant group Lashkar-i-Taiba and were between 20 and 30 years old.

BAGHDAD — When police came hunting for a 19-year-old woman they believed had been recruited by al-Qaida to be a suicide bomber in a town north of Baghdad, they found she was already dead: slain by her father, who told police he strangled his daughter out of shame. The killing of Shahlaa al-Anbaky, reported by police Friday, appeared to be from an unusual melding of motives — part to defend the family honor, part to prevent her from joining the militants. But how much of each weighed in her father’s mind remains unclear, with police still investigating the details. Al-Qaida has been recruiting women for suicide attacks because they can pass checkpoints more easily than men by concealing explosives under an abaya, a loose cloak that conservative Muslim women wear. Suicide bombers have been al-Qaida’s most lethal weapon in Iraq, killing hundreds of civilians and members of Iraq’s security forces. The slaying took place in the town of Mandali, about 60 miles northeast of Baghdad in Diyala province, which only a few years ago was one of Iraq’s deadliest regions. Authorities were still trying to put together a complete picture of the killing. A Diyala police spokesman, Maj. Ghalib alKarkhi, said security forces had information the young woman had ties to al-Qaida and raided her father’s home Thursday. When questioned by police, the father, Najim al-Anbaky, told police he killed his daughter a month earlier because he found out she intended to blow herself up in a suicide attack for al-Qaida.

GOP may slow overhaul of new food safety law The Washington Post WASHINGTON — The massive overhaul of food safety laws approved by Congress this week will take years to implement and could be undercut by Republicans who don’t want to fund an expansion of the Food and Drug Administration. Rep. Jack Kingston of Georgia, the ranking GOP member on the appropriations subcommittee that oversees the FDA, said the number of cases of foodborne illnesses in the U.S. does not justify the $1.4 billion the new law is estimated to cost over five years. “I would not identify it as something that will necessarily be zeroed out, but it is quite possible it will be scaled back if it is significant overreach,” said Kingston, who is likely to become chairman of the subcommittee when Republicans assume control of the House in January.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Smaller arms next for U.S., Russia By Peter Baker New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Fresh from winning Senate approval for a new strategic arms treaty, President Barack Obama plans to return to the negotiating table with Russia next year in hopes of securing the first legal limits imposed on the smaller, battlefield nuclear weapons viewed as most vulnerable to theft or diversion. This time around, though, Obama may have an easier time with the Senate Republicans

who tried to block ratification of the new treaty, known as New START, than he will with the Russians who were his partners in writing it. As part of their case against the treaty, Senate Republicans complained that it did not cover tactical nuclear weapons, short-range bombs that have never been addressed by a Russian-American treaty. To press their point, Republicans pushed through a side resolution calling on Obama to open talks with Russia on such

weapons within a year. That was always Obama’s longstated plan for following up New START, so now he has the added advantage of a virtual Republican mandate to negotiate a new arms limitation agreement with Russia. The challenge next time will actually be Russia, which has many more of these tactical bombs deployed in Europe than the U.S. does, and in its strategic doctrine deems them critical to defending against a potential conventional attack by NATO or China.

“The good news is, with Senate approval of New START, the administration achieved the essential precondition to getting Russia to consider reductions in tactical nuclear forces,” said Stephen Young, a senior analyst with the Union of Concerned Scientists, an arms control advocacy group. “The Russians, however, will try to insist on limitations on U.S. missile defense, which is something the administration is both not inclined to do and couldn’t get through the Senate if it did.”

Homeless Continued from A3 COVO is a nonprofit that provides food, clothing, camping supplies and basic survival items to homeless veterans around the area. “These guys are great,” Dunn said of COVO volunteers. “They take real good care of me.” Every Tuesday, a small group of COVO volunteers enters the woods, taking a hike to Dunn’s hidden neighborhood, as well as many others. Each homeless veteran is provided with two canisters of propane, as well as fresh water and a sack lunch. “We try to give them whatever it is they need,” said Craig Cass, a COVO volunteer. “Pants, boots, sleeping bags, tents, hygiene kits — whatever they need.” Cass has been volunteering with COVO for the past seven months, and says it has been rewarding for him, especially considering he is a veteran himself, having served two tours in Vietnam. “They are always waiting for us,” Cass said. “And they trust us because they know we are trying to help them. It is about so much more than just giving them what they need to survive. I have been able to develop a relationship with a lot of them, and they make it a point to remember my name.” Dunn only took one canister of propane for this week, not wanting to take away from some of his fellow campers who may be more in need. “Propane is what gets us all through the winter,” Dunn said. “I don’t know what I would do without it — what any of us would do without it.” His tent shows that with a little creativity and the propane, he can survive the nights just as easily as anyone. After being given wool sweaters, Dunn decided to put them to good use, but in an unconventional manner. “I cut them all up and used them to insulate my tent,” he said. “Makes a huge difference.” Dunn’s tent is also packed full of gadgets he has either collected or made. “We’re a neighborhood,” Dunn said. “I left my family a while ago, and I am so much better off without them. For a while I thought about reconnecting with them, maybe with my sister, but now I don’t want to. I have these guys here instead,” he said.

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Jake Calhoun pulls a shopping cart of supplies provided by COVO volunteers Brad Emery, 60, and Jim Montoya, 66, behind. In addition to food and water, the supplies can include clothing, camping supplies and canisters of propane.

David Dunn, 42, plans to make it through the winter with help from propane canisters and donated wool sweaters. “I cut them all up and used them to insulate my tent,” he says. “Makes a huge difference.” Richard Taylor, Dunn’s neighbor, expressed his gratitude toward COVO while he received two canisters of propane and a milk container filled with water. “I probably won’t ever have a roof over my head, but at least we have these people (COVO volunteers) helping us out,” said Taylor, 64. “It gets tough sometimes, but I do all right.” Taylor lives in a small tent and, like Dunn, has added decorations to make it feel more like home.

“I should probably find a new American flag to hang up,” he says as he points out the tattered and torn flag hanging between two trees above his tent. “I’ve been here for about a year and a half, and don’t you like what I’ve done with the place?” All joking aside, Taylor, who says he served in Vietnam from 1965 to 1968, said he receives a check from the government every month, but explained that is not nearly enough to live off of.

“I had lots of jobs — worked as a farmer, a bus driver — but nothing really ever worked out. This (being homeless) was just easier,” he said. Taylor will walk to local stores and sit outside asking for money and food. “Sometimes I rely on food stamps,” he said, “but I get by, so it’s OK.” Jake’s Diner and the Family Kitchen also play a significant role in the COVO operation and the survival of these veterans, providing this homeless community with food and sleeping bags. “The Family Kitchen makes soup throughout the week and freezes it so we can hand it out on Tuesdays,” Cass said. “Jake’s Diner collects sleeping bags. It is a huge part of what we do. “I think most people think these people are a lost cause, and to some degree that may be true,” he said. “But the circumstances also play a huge role. Some made the decision to live this way. Some say if they were given the proper help, they would move away from this lifestyle.” Molly Black can be reached at 541-617-7836 or at mblack@bendbulletin.com.

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 25, 2010 A5

Gadgets

Jaron Lanier, the author of “You Are Not A Gadget: A Manifesto.” “This notion of the deliberative Continued from A3 body being insulated and being a Members still may not talk little bit removed was there for on the phone in the chamber a reason,” Lanier said Friday in and are supposed to use the an interview. “Real-time Tweets? devices for official business Do we want that?” only, according to a spokesApparently, we do. Mobile man for the soon-to-be speak- devices are everywhere these er, John Boehner, R-Ohio. But days. The one on Obama’s hip as long as the mute switch is can often be seen in photographs on, lawmakers will be free to snapped as he emerges from Air tap away. Force One. Even Laura Bush, the “Mr. Boehner has deep re- former first lady and a lover of spect for the institution and paper-bound books, admitted reits traditions,” said Brendan cently that she was hooked. Buck, a spokesman for the “I had not used a computer Republicans. “This is not free in the eight years I spent in the license to Skype or pay bills White House, and I didn’t know online. But we recognize that a thing about BlackBerrys,” people consume information Bush told Advertising Specialty electronically these days. Institute Radio. “And now, like It’s just silly that the House everyone in the U.S., I have one wouldn’t acin my hand every commodate moment. I’m ad“This is not free that.” dicted to it.” The decision license to Skype or The new rules represents a in the House, first vivid conces- pay bills online. But reported by Nancy sion of old- we recognize that Scola of techPresfashioned traident.com, will dition to new people consume be clarified early t e c h n o l o g y. information next month in a But while the document called nation’s law- electronically the Speaker’s makers will be these days. It’s Announced Polifully plugged cies. For example, just silly that the in, they will Buck, the Repubalso be in dan- House wouldn’t lican spokesman, ger of tuning accommodate said the use of the one another ubiquitous white that.” out. iPod earphones As the Emily would probably Post etiquette — Brendan Buck, not be allowed. website states: Republican spokesman The intent, he “Tapping on said, was to let a hand-held lawmakers look device is OK if it’s related to up the text of a bill, check a fact what’s being discussed, but or keep up on the news of the taking care of personal busi- day. Their advisers could also ness is unprofessional. Your send them important messages. associates might think that And, especially with the iPad’s you were more interested in bigger screen, lawmakers could your gadget than the business abandon paper copies of bills in at hand.” favor of electronic versions. Or Mobile technology has al- they could use Google on their ready started to sneak onto smart phone to check the accuthe floors of both the House racy of something a colleague and the Senate. While the had just said. rules of the 111th Congress On the other hand, less-highofficially banned iPads and minded members could use the other devices from the floor, devices to play games, do their there has been a “wink and a Amazon shopping or find movie nod” approach to a lawmaker listings. In Florida, where lapwho takes furtive glances at top computers are allowed to sit his BlackBerry, according to on the desks of state senators, a senior Republican aide. one member was caught with That was obvious last week, pictures of naked women on his when Sen. John Kerry, D- screen. Mass., was seen, head down, Still, Lanier envisioned a tapping out messages as he bright side, even if lawmakers sat directly behind Sen. Arlen are not using the devices strictly Specter, D-Pa., who was giv- for work. Recalling the many ing his farewell address. Ear- scenes of lawmakers’ speaking lier this month, Rep. Henry to a mostly empty chamber, he Cuellar, D-Texas, took his said, “At least if they have a little iPad to the speaker’s rostrum game to play, maybe they will atas he presided over the cham- tend more.” ber. And Rep. Eric Cantor, R-Va., was caught using his Find Your Dream Home BlackBerry during President Barack Obama’s health care In address in 2009. In the Senate, a leadership aide said no changes Every Saturday were planned, but that the rules committee could look into loosening the rules at s Turf, Inc. some point. But in the House, h P members will be free to whip Mc out their mobile phones any n” time. g ro w y l l a c o That prospect worries W i a li z e i n “ l

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Santa Continued from A3 “I was really surprised,” said his 8-year-old sister, Anna. Seven-year-old Colin Race also got to talk with Obama. It’s believed to be the first time in the 55-year history of the event that a first lady joined in, said Jamie Graybeal, NORAD’S deputy chief of staff for communications. NORAD Tracks Santa, the official name of the program, began in 1955 when a Colorado Springs newspaper ad invited kids to talk to Santa on a hot line. The phone number had a typo, and dozens of kids wound up dialing the Continental Aerospace Defense Command in Colorado Springs, the predecessor to NORAD. The officers on duty played along and began passing along reports on Santa’s progress. It’s now a cherished ritual at NORAD, a joint U.S.-Canada command that monitors the North American skies and seas from a control center at Peterson. “It’s really ingrained in the NORAD psyche and culture,” said Canadian Forces Lt. Gen. Marcel Duval, the deputy commander of NORAD, who pitches in to field French-language calls on Christmas Eve. “It’s a goodwill gesture from all of us, on our time off, to all the kids on the planet.” Duval is careful to say that tracking Santa doesn’t interfere

Ed Andrieski / The Associated Press

Air Force Lt. Col. David Hanson takes a phone call Friday from a youngster in Florida at the Santa Tracking Operations Center at Peterson Air Force Base near Colorado Springs, Colo. Volunteers will take as many as 80,000 phone calls concerning questions about Santa and his travels. with the work of watching out for enemy threats to the North American continent. Last year, NORAD Tracks Santa answered 74,000 calls and 3,500 e-mails, and organizers expect to top that this year. Although the program is aimed at children, the volunteers answering the phones have a welcome bit of news for parents, too: St. Nick won’t stop at homes unless all the kids are asleep. Volunteer Liz Anderson said that when she tells kids that, she

will sometimes hear parents say, “See! I told you.” It takes four months of planning to marshal the 1,200 volunteers, 100 telephones, 30 laptops and two big projection TV screens the exercise requires, NORAD spokeswoman Joyce Frankovis said. All the labor is volunteer. Google, Verizon, Air Canada, defense contractor Booz Allen Hamilton and others chip in. On Friday, volunteers answered calls and e-mails in two confer-

ence rooms in a building not far from NORAD’s headquarters. In a separate room, a three-member team fired out tweets and Facebook updates, checking against a schedule marked with a secrecy warning that said “Santa’s Eye Only.” Civilian and military staff wore blue Santa hats with “Special Operations Elf” written on the white trim. “It is tremendously fun,” said Jim Jenista, NORAD’s deputy chief for joint training exercises, who has been volunteering to answer the phones for nearly a decade. NORAD insiders drop hints about how they track Santa — “ultra-cool, high-tech, high-speed digital cameras,” radar, satellites and Canadian Forces fighter jets. But any inquiry into the technological particulars is met with a polite rebuff and a cryptic explanation involving the magic of Christmas. NORAD’s brass, including Duval and the commander, U.S. Adm. James Winnefeld Jr., did nearly back-to-back broadcast interviews on Friday morning, most of them on TV. During one, Winnefeld moved easily from discussing Santa to discussing terrorism and back to Santa again. He ended the interview with a gentle admonition: “Have a great Christmas and go to bed on time, because Santa only visits houses where kids are sleeping.”

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A6 Saturday, December 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

R Iraqi Christians forgo church, save for a determined few

Pilgrims and clergy pack Bethlehem for Christmas

By John Leland

The Associated Press

New York Times News Service

BETHLEHEM, West Bank — The traditional birthplace of Jesus is celebrating its merriest Christmas in years, as tens of thousands of tourists thronged Bethlehem on Friday for the annual holiday festivities in this biblical West Bank town. Officials said the turnout was shaping up to be the largest since 2000. Unseasonably mild weather, a virtual halt in Israeli-Palestinian violence and a burgeoning economic revival in the West Bank all added to the holiday cheer. By nightfall, a packed Manger Square was awash in red, blue, green and yellow Christmas lights. Merrymakers blasted horns, bands sang traditional Christmas carols in Arabic, boy scout marching bands performed and Palestinian policemen deployed around the town to keep the peace. A group of 30 tourists from Papua New Guinea, all wearing red Santa hats, walked around the nearby Church of the Nativity, built on the site where tradition holds Jesus was born. Both church officials and the Palestinian president voiced hopes for peace. Bethlehem used to attract tens of thousands of tourists from around the world for Christmas celebrations, but attendance dropped sharply following the outbreak of the second Palestinian uprising in 2000. As the fighting tapered off over the last five years, attendance steadily climbed. The town’s 2,750 hotel rooms were booked solid for Christmas week, and town officials say more hotels are under construction.

BAGHDAD — As they gathered to celebrate the birth of Jesus, the congregation here first contemplated death, represented by a spare Christmas tree decked with paper stars, each bearing a photograph of a member of a nearby church killed in a siege by Islamic militants in October. The congregants Friday night were fewer than 100, in a sanctuary built for four or five times as many. But they were determined. This year, even more than in the past, Iraqi’s dwindling Christian minority had reasons to stay home for Christmas. “Yes, we are threatened, but we will not stop praying,” the Rev. Meyassr al-Qaspotros told the Christmas Eve crowd at the Sacred Church of Jesus, a Chaldean Catholic church. “We do not want to leave the country because we will leave an empty space.” He added: “Be careful not to hate the ones killing us because they know not what they are doing. God forgive them.” Throughout Iraq, churches canceled or toned down Christmas observances this year, both in response to threats of violence and in honor of the nearly 60 Christians killed in October, when militants stormed a Syrian Catholic church and blew themselves up.

Shrinking population Since the massacre, more than 1,000 Christian families have fled Baghdad for the Kurdistan region in northern Iraq, with others going to Jordan or Syria or Turkey. Although the exact size of Iraq’s Christian population is unclear, by some estimates it has fallen to about 500,000 from a high of 1.4 million before the U.S.-led invasion of 2003. Iraq’s total population is about 30 million. This week, a new threat appeared on a website that said it represented the Islamic State of Iraq, a militant group that claimed responsibility for the

Shiho Fukada / New York Times News Service

Iraqi Christians attend services Friday at the Sacred Church of Jesus, a Chaldean Catholic church in Baghdad. “Yes, we are threatened, but we will not stop praying,” said the Rev. Meyassr al-Qaspotros. Churches in Kirkuk, Mosul and Basra canceled or curtailed services for Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. October church siege. The website referred to a church in Egypt that it said was holding two women because they had converted to Islam, and it vowed more carnage. “We swear to God, if there are only two of us left,” the text read, “one of the two will keep fighting you.” Churches in Kirkuk, Mosul and Basra canceled or curtailed services for Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, and warned congregations not to hold parties or mount displays. In Baghdad, decorations were seen in stores, but many churches scaled back or held only prayer sessions. While Our Lady of Salvation, the church attacked in October, was among those that canceled services for Christmas Eve, it planned to hold services Saturday. The Epiphany Dominican Convent canceled midnight Mass and then early Mass on Christmas morning so worshipers

could avoid risky travel at vulnerable times. During the week, the church moved one Mass to a convent, so the nuns would not have to travel in religious dress. “People are lost,” said the Rev. Rami Simon, one of five brothers at the convent. “They don’t know where they live now. Is this Iraq?” For those who dare to attend services, he said: “I say, you must accept to live like the first Christians. They celebrated in a cave, and no one knew about it. So we are not the first to live it.” But he added: “If I wasn’t a priest, I would not stay one minute in Iraq. As a priest, I find myself a missionary in my country. And some stay because we are here.” At the Sacred Church of Jesus, attendance has dropped by half since October, Qaspotros said. He said he offered this reply to people who tell him they are afraid to come to church: “You

R  B Associate Pastor Brandon Reynolds will share the message “Why Happiness is a Myth” at the 9:30 a.m. service Sunday at Antioch Church, held at Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend. • Pastor Dave Miller will share the message “A Novel Idea” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Bend Christian Fellowship, 19831 Rocking Horse Road. The 4twelve youth group meets Wednesdays at 7 p.m. • Pastor Virgil Askren will share a sermon titled “Maybe This Will Be the Last Christmas Season” at 10:15 a.m. Sunday at Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 N.E. 27th St. • A Christmas Celebration “Unto Us a Child is Born” will be at 10:45 a.m. today at Bend Seventh-Day Adventist Church, 21610 N.E. Butler Market Road. • Senior Leader Carl Borovec will share the message “Breathe of Heaven” 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Celebration Church, 1245 S. Third St., Suite C-10, Bend. • Pastor Dean Catlett will share the message “When the Angels Had Left Them,” based on Luke 2:15-20, at 10:45 a.m. Sunday at Church of Christ, 554 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. • Kelly and Becky Bechtell, from Portland, will share a special concert at 10:45 a.m. Sunday at Discovery Christian Church, 334 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. • This week’s message “Jesus Christ: The True Vine,” based on John 15, concludes the “I AM” series at 10 a.m. Sunday at Eastmont Church, 62425 Eagle Road, Bend. • Pastor Mike Johnson will share the message “The Bucket List” at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at

Faith Christian Center, 1049 N.E. 11th St., Bend. Fuel youth services are held Wednesdays at 7 p.m. • Pastor Randy Wills will share the message “Tax Shelters???” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Father’s House Church of God, 61690 Pettigrew Road, Bend. • Pastor Syd Brestel will share the message “The Core of Christmas: The Creator in a Cradle” at 10:15 a.m. Sunday at First Baptist Church, 60 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend. • The Rev. Greg Bolt will lead the services for “An Old Fashioned Carol Sing” at the 9 a.m. contemporary service, 10:45 a.m. traditional service and 5:01 p.m. evening service Sunday at First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend. • Pastor Thom Larson will share the message “The Other Wiseman,” based on Matthew 2:1-23, at the 10 a.m. service Sunday at First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend. • Pastor Keith Kirkpatrick will share the message “The Passion of God’s Contagious Love” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Journey Church, held at Bend High School, 230 N.W. Sixth St., Bend. • Pastor Randy Myers will share the message “Great Joy … After Christmas” as part of the series “Great Joy” at 9 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday at New Hope Church, 20080 Pinebrook Blvd., Bend. • The Society of St. Gregory the Great will sponsor a Latinsung Mass at 1:30 p.m. today at St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church, 409 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend. • Seminarian Ben Carnahan will share the message “Adopted” based on Galatians 4:4-7, follow-

ing a carol sing at 9:45 a.m. Sunday at Trinity Lutheran Church & School, 2550 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend. • Guest Speaker Michael Stevens will speak on the topic “Buddhism and Perspectives on the Year’s Turning” at 11 a.m. Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Central Oregon, held at Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend. • Randall Knight will share the message “God Is No Laughing Matter” at 10:45 a.m. Sunday at Westside Church, 2051 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend. Pastor Scott McBride will share the message “iWitness: Anna — Simple Worship” at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at the Westside South Campus, held at Elk Meadow Elementary School, 60880 Brookswood Blvd., Bend. • Pastor Heidi Bolt will share the message “Star Giving,” based on Matthew 2:1-12, at the 10 a.m. service Sunday at Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th St., Redmond. • Pastor Glen Schaumloeffel will share the message “Emmanuel — What Does It Mean For Us Today?,” based on Joshua 3:7, Isaiah 43:2 and Matthew 28:18, as part of the series “Christmas Presence — God With Us” at 9:30 a.m. Sunday at Community Bible Church at Sunriver, 1 Theater Drive. • The Rev. Willis Jenson will share the message “God Was Born of the Virgin St. Mary to Discharge Men’s Obligation to God and Neighbor and, Thereby, to Save Men from their Sins,” based on Galatians 4:4-5, at 11 a.m. Sunday at Concordia Lutheran Mission held at Terrebonne Grange Hall, 8286 11th St., Terrebonne.

are not supposed to be afraid. You are supposed to connect with God, and death is not the last step. If we die, we survive for God.” For Faez Shakur, 25, who attended Qaspotros’ service on Christmas Eve, this was the message he took away. “Whenever there is disaster,” he said, “it means a new day, a new life.” When he saw the tree decorated with the faces of the dead, he cried, he said. But he was where he belonged, he said. “We don’t have anything else,” he said, “just to pray and continue.”

By Tia Goldenberg and Dalia Nammari

Adel Hana / The Associated Press

Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem Fouad Twal, center, waves to the press Friday before entering the Church of Nativity for Christmas celebrations in the West Bank town of Bethlehem. Israeli officials have said they expect about 90,000 visitors in Bethlehem during the current two-week holiday season, up from 70,000 last year. But the bloodshed has left its mark. Visitors entering the town must cross through a massive metal gate in the separation barrier Israel built between Jerusalem and Bethlehem during a wave of Palestinian attacks last decade. The Roman Catholic Church’s top clergyman in the Holy Land, Latin Patriarch Fouad Twal, crossed through the gate in a traditional midday procession from Jerusalem. Later, he was to celebrate Midnight Mass, the peak of the holiday’s events in town. christiansforthedivinefeminine.com christiansforthedivinefeminine.com christiansforthedivinefeminine.com Yeah - You read it right! Check it out!


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 25, 2010 A7 “The Wheel of Dharma” Buddhism

“Celtic Cross” Christianity

“Star of David” Judaism

Christian

Foursquare

\Lutheran

Presbyterian

CHRISTIAN CHURCH OF REDMOND 536 SW 10th Redmond, OR 97756 541-548-2974 Fax: 541-548-5818

CITY CENTER A Foursquare Fellowship Senior Pastors Steve & Ginny McPherson 549 SW 8th St., P.O. Box 475, Redmond, OR 97756 • 541-548-7128

NATIVITY LUTHERAN CHURCH 60850 Brosterhous Road at Knott, 541-388-0765

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 230 NE Ninth, Bend (Across Ninth St. from Bend High) All Are Welcome, Always!

2 Worship Services 9:00 A.M. and 10:30 A.M. Sunday School-all ages Junior Church Kidmo

You Are The Most Important Part of Our Services

Friday Night Service at 6:30 P.M. Pastors Myron Wells Greg Strubhar Darin Hollingsworth Sunday, December 26 Sermon Title: “No Quick Fix” from Hebrews 1:1–4 Speaker: Pastor Myron Wells

“Omkar” (Aum) Hinduism

“Yin/Yang” Taoist/Confucianism

“Star & Crescent” Islam

Assembly of God

Bible Church

FAITH CHRISTIAN CENTER 1049 NE 11th St. • 541-382-8274 SUNDAYS: 9:30 am Sunday Educational Classes 10:30 am Morning Worship

COMMUNITY BIBLE CHURCH AND CHRISTIAN PRESCHOOL 541-593-8341 Beaver at Theater Drive, PO Box 4278, Sunriver, OR 97707

This Sunday at FAITH CHRISTIAN Pastor Mike Johnson will share his Sunday message titled, “The Bucket List” beginning at 10:30 AM On Wednesday “Fuel” youth service begins at 7:00 PM. Childcare is provided in our Sunday morning service. A number of Faith Journey Groups meet throughout the week in small groups, please contact the church for details and times. The church is located on the corner of Greenwood Avenue and NE 11th Street. www.bendfcc.com REDMOND ASSEMBLY OF GOD 1865 W Antler • Redmond • 541-548-4555 SUNDAYS Morning Worship 8:30 am and 10:30 am Life groups 9 am Kidz LIVE ages 3-11 10:30 am Evening Worship 6 pm WEDNESDAYS FAMILY NIGHT 7PM Adult Classes Celebrate Recovery Wednesday NITE Live Kids Youth Group Pastor Duane Pippitt www.redmondag.com

Baptist EASTMONT CHURCH NE Neff Rd., 1/2 mi. E. of St. Charles Medical Center Saturdays 6:00 pm (Contemporary) Eastmont Church in Bend concludes a 7 week series this weekend on the “I AM” statements of Jesus in the Gospel of John. This weekend’s message is “Jesus Christ: The True Vine” from John 15. Service times for Christmas weekend: One Worship Service on Sunday @ 10 am All are welcome.

“Transforming Lives Through the Truth of the Word” All are Welcome! SUNDAY WORSHIP AND THE WORD - 9:30 AM. Coffee Fellowship - 10:45 am Bible Education Hour - 11:15 am Nursery Care available • Women’s Bible Study - Tuesdays, 10 am • Awana Kids Club (4 yrs - 6th gr.) Sept. - May • Youth Ministry (gr. 7-12) Wednesdays 6:15 pm • Men’s Bible Study - Thursdays 9 am • Home Bible Studies are also available Preschool for 3 & 4 year olds Call for information Senior Pastor: Glen Schaumloeffel Associate Pastor: Jake Schwarze visit our Web site www.cbchurchsr.org Listen to KNLR 97.5 FM at 9:00 am. each Sunday to hear “Transforming Truth” with Pastor Glen. CROSSROADS CHURCH Come join us as one family of Believers, young and old,to worship our great God. You can expect a time of Christ-centered meaningful worship and verse by verse practical biblical teaching. We believe the gospel of Jesus Christ is the central theme of Scripture and speaks to every area of the Christian life. Sunday mornings at 9:30. Acts Series: Christ on the Crossroads. 1st Sunday of each month is HomeFront Sunday; we focus on scriptural truths in our roles and relationships in life. Extended fellowship time follows. www.crossroadschurchbend.com 63945 Old Bend-Redmond Hwy (On the corner of Old Bend-Redmond Hwy and Highway 20 on the NW side of Bend)

Calvary Chapel CALVARY CHAPEL BEND 20225 Cooley Rd. Bend Phone: (541) 383-5097 Web site: ccbend.org Sundays: 8:30 & 10:30 am Wednesday Night Study: 7 pm Youth Group: Wednesday 7 pm Child Care provided Women’s Ministry, Youth Ministry are available, call for days and times. “Teaching the Word of God, Book by Book”

Weekly Bible Studies and Ministries for all ages Contact: 541-382-5822 Pastor John Lodwick www.eastmontchurch.com

HOLY REDEEMER CATHOLIC PARISH Fr. Jose Thomas Mudakodiyil, Pastor www.holyredeemerparish.net Parish Office: 541-536-3571

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH CBA “A Heart for Bend in the Heart of Bend” 60 NW Oregon, 541-382-3862 Pastor Syd Brestel SUNDAY 9:00 AM Sunday School for everyone 10:15 AM Worship Service

HOLY REDEEMER, LA PINE 16137 Burgess Rd Tuesday, Wednesday & Friday Mass 9:00 AM Sunday Mass — 10:00 AM Confessions: Saturdays — 3:00–4:00 PM CHRISTMAS DAY Mass — 10:00 AM NEW YEAR’S EVE* — 11:00 PM Hour of Adoration followed by Mass at Midnight

At the First Baptist Church, Pastor Syd Brestel will deliver a message, “The Core of Christmas: The Creator in a Cradle,” dealing with the birth of Jesus and why it had to happen that way.

HOLY TRINITY, Sunriver 18143 Cottonwood Rd Thursday Mass — 9:30 AM Saturday Vigil Mass — 5:30 PM Sunday Mass — 8:00 AM Confessions: Thursdays 9:00–9:15 AM CHRISTMAS DAY Mass — 8:00 AM NEW YEAR’S DAY Mass* — 11:00 AM

For Kidztown, Middle School and High School activities Call 541-382-3862 www.bendchurch.org

OUR LADY OF THE SNOWS, Gilchrist 120 Mississippi Dr Sunday Mass — 12:30 PM Confessions: Sundays 12:00 –12:15 PM CHRISTMAS DAY Mass — 12:30 PM

FIRST MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH Sundays Morning Worship 10:50 am Bible Study 6:00 pm Evening Worship 7:00 pm Wednesdays Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 pm Tom Counts, Senior Pastor Ernest Johnson, Pastor 21129 Reed Market Rd, Bend, OR 541-382-6081 HIGHLAND BAPTIST CHURCH, SBC 3100 SW Highland Ave., Redmond • 541-548-4161 SUNDAYS: Worship Services: 9:00 am & 6:00 pm Traditional 10:30 am Contemporary Sunday Bible fellowship groups 9:00 am & 10:30 am For other activities for children, youth & adults, call or go to website: www.hbcredmond.org Dr. Barry Campbell, Lead Pastor PARA LA COMUNIDAD LATINA Domingos: Servicio de Adoración y Escuela Dominical - 12:30 pm Miércoles: Estudios biblicos por edades - 6:30 pm

Bible Church BEREAN BIBLE CHURCH In Partnership with American Missionary Fellowship Near Highland and 23rd Ave. 2378 SW Glacier Pl. Redmond, OR 97756 We preach the good news of Jesus Christ, sing great hymns of faith, and search the Scriptures together. Sunday Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. Bible Study - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. Pastor Ed Nelson 541-777-0784 www.berean-bible-church.org

Catholic

HOLY FAMILY, near Christmas Valley 57255 Fort Rock Rd Sunday Mass — 3:30 PM Confessions: Sundays 3:00–3:15 PM CHRISTMAS DAY Mass — 3:30 PM *The Feast of Mary, Mother of God, Sat. Jan 1, 2011 is not a Holy Day of Obligation ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI 541-382-3631 Pastors: Fr. Francis X. Ekwugha Fr. Joseph Levine CHRISTMAS MASS SCHEDULES Dec. 25, Christmas - 7:30 AM, 10 AM, New Church (no 5 PM Mass) Dec. 26 - 7:30 AM, 10 AM, 12:30 PM (Spanish), 5 PM, New Church Dec. 31, Vigil of Blessed Virgin - 11 PM Downtown Church Jan. 1, Blessed Virgin - 10 AM, New Church (not a Holy Day of obligation) There are no Bilingual Masses this year. Masses NEW CHURCH – CATHOLIC CENTER 2450 NE 27th Street Saturday - Vigil 5:00 PM Sunday - 7:30, 10:00 AM 12:30 PM Spanish & 5:00 PM Mon., Wed., Fri. - 7:00 AM & 12:15 PM St. Clare Chapel - Spanish Mass 1st, 3rd, 5th Thursdays 8:00 PM Masses HISTORIC DOWNTOWN CHURCH Corner of NW Franklin & Lava Tues., Thurs., Sat. 7:00 AM Tues. & Thurs. 12:15 PM Exposition & Benediction Tuesday 3:00 - 6:00 PM Liturgy of the Hours will be recited at 6:40 AM, before Mass each day. NEW Reconciliation Schedule* New Church at Catholic Center Wed: 7:30 - 8:00 AM & 6:00 - 7:00 PM Saturday 3:00 - 5:00 PM Historic Downtown Church Tues: 7:30 - 8:00 AM & 5:00 - 5:45 PM Saturday 8:00 - 9:00 AM *No confessions will be heard during Mass. The priest will leave the confessional at least 10 minutes prior to Mass. ST. THOMAS CATHOLIC CHURCH 1720 NW 19th Street Redmond, Oregon 97756 541-923-3390 Father Todd Unger, Pastor DECEMBER 25 CHRISTMAS DAY Christmas Mass 9:00 a.m. Mass Schedule: Weekdays 8:00 a.m. (except Wednesday) Wednesday 6:00 p.m. Saturday Vigil 5:30 p.m. First Saturday 8:00 a.m. (English) Sunday 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. (English) 12:00 noon (Spanish) Confessions on Wednesdays from 5:00 to 5:45 p.m. and on Saturdays from 4:30 to 5:15 p.m.

POWELL BUTTE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Cowboy Fellowship Saturdays Potluck 6 pm Music and the Word 7 pm Sunday Worship Services 8:30 am - 10 am - 11 am Nursery & Children’s Church Pastors: Chris Blair, Glenn Bartnik & Ozzy Osbourne 13720 SW Hwy 126, Powell Butte 541-548-3066 www.powellbuttechurch.com REAL LIFE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Like Hymns? We've Got 'em! at the RLCC Church, 2880 NE 27th Sunday Services 8 am Traditional Service (No child care for 8 am service) 9:30 am Contemporary Service with full child care 11 am Service (Full child care) For information, please call ... Minister - Mike Yunker - 541-312-8844 Richard Belding, Associate Pastor “Loving people one at a time.” www.real-lifecc.org

Christian Schools CENTRAL CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Pre K - 12th Grade Christ Centered Academic Excellence Fully Accredited with ACSI & NAAS Comprehensive High School Educating Since 1992 15 minutes north of Target 2234 SE 6th St. Redmond, 541-548-7803 www.centralchristianschools.com EASTMONT COMMUNITY SCHOOL “Educating and Developing the Whole Child for the Glory of God” Pre K - 5th Grade 62425 Eagle Road, Bend • 541-382-2049 Principal Peggy Miller www.eastmontcommunityschool.com MORNING STAR CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Pre K - 12th Grade Serving Christian Families and local churches to develop Godly leaders by providing quality Christ centered education. Fully Accredited NAAS. Member A.C .S.I. Small Classes Emphasizing: Christian Values A-Beka Curriculum, High Academics. An interdenominational ministry located on our new 18 acre campus at 19741 Baker Rd. and S. Hwy 97 (2 miles south of Wal-Mart). Phone 541-382-5091 Bus Service: from Bend, La Pine & Sunriver. www.morningstarchristianschool.org SAINT FRANCIS OF ASSISI SCHOOL Preschool through Grade 8 “Experience academic excellence and Christian values every day.” Limited openings in all grades. 2450 NE 27th St. Bend •541-382-4701 www.saintfrancisschool.net TRINITY LUTHERAN SCHOOL 2550 NE Butler Market Rd. 541-382-1850 Preschool ages 3 and 4 - 10th grade High Quality Education In A Loving Christian Environment Openings Still Available www.saints.org

Christian Science FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 1551 NW First St. • 541-382-6100 (South of Portland Ave.) Church Service & Sunday School: 10 am Wed. Testimony Meeting: 7:30 pm Reading Room: 115 NW Minnesota Ave. Mon. through Fri.: 11 am - 4 pm Sat. 12 noon - 2 pm

Eckankar ECKANKAR Religion of the Light and Sound of God 541-728-6476 www.eckankar-oregon.org www.eckankar.org FREE discussion of all faiths: “Spiritual Wisdom on Relationships” No matter who we are, where we are, we all have relationships whether it’s family, friends, or even our pets and it can get pretty overwhelming at times. There are good times, bad times, and everything in between. We will discuss on how using just a few tools can make our relationships go smoother, have more understanding and most of all how we can fill our hearts with love. Saturday, January 15, 2:00PM in the new COCC Campus Center, downstairs conference room. 2600 College Way, Bend, OR For more local information: 541-728-6476 (msg) or go to www.eckankar.org

Episcopal ST. ALBANS - REDMOND 3277 NW 10th • 541-548-4212 www.saintalbansepis.org Sunday Schedule 9:00 am Adult Education 10:00 am Morning Prayer & Holy Eucharist Presider The Rev. Dick Brown. Tuesday - 3 pm Bible Study Wednesday - 12:00 noon Holy Eucharist The Rev. Paul Morton The Rev. Dcn. Ruth Brown TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH 469 NW Wall St. • 541-382-5542 www.trinitybend.org Dec. 25th, 10 am Holy Eucharist Sunday Schedule 8 am Holy Eucharist 9:30 am Christian Education for all ages 10:30 am Holy Eucharist (w/nursery care) 5 pm Holy Eucharist The Rev. Christy Close Erskine, Pastor

Evangelical THE SALVATION ARMY 755 NE 2nd Street, Bend 541-389-8888 SUNDAY MORNING WORSHIP Sunday School 9:45 am Children & Adult Classes Worship Service – 11:00 am Major’s Robert & Miriam Keene NEW HOPE EVANGELICAL 20080 Pinebrook Blvd.• 541-389-3436 Celebrate New Life at New Hope Church! Sunday 9:00, 10:45 am, Pastor Randy Myers www.newhopebend.com

Sunday Worship Services: Daybreak Café Service 7:30 am Celebration Services 9:00 am and 10:45 am Wednesday Services High Definition (Adult) 7:00 pm UTurn - Middle School 7:00 pm Children’s Ministries 7:00 pm Thursdays High School (Connection) 6:30 pm

SERVICE TIMES 9:00 AM Informal Service Children will be dismissed from service at 9:15 AM for the Junior Church for kids preschool to 5th grade 11:00 AM Formal Service Both the 9:00 AM and 11:00 AM services to be posted with the Junior Church at 9:15 AM. Come worship with us.

Rev. Dr. Steven H Koski Senior Pastor Christmas Sunday Worship - An Old Fashioned Carol Sing 9:00 am Contemporary 10:45 am Traditional 5:01 pm Come as you are Rev. Greg Bolt, leading in worship Nursery care provided at all services

Home Bible Studies throughout the week City Care Clinic also available. Kidz Center School, Preschool

(Child care provided on Sundays.) www.nativityinbend.com Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

www.citycenterchurch.org “Livin’ the Incredible Mission”

TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH AND SCHOOL Missouri Synod • 541-382-1832 2550 NE Butler Market Road A Stephen Ministry Congregation

Wednesday Contemplative Worship 6:00 pm

Saturday, December 25 “Bethlehem Bound” 10:00 AM

www.bendfp.org 541 382 4401

DAYSPRING CHRISTIAN CENTER Terrebonne Foursquare Church enjoys a wonderful location that overlooks the majestic Cascade Range and Smith Rock. Our gatherings are refreshing, our relationships are encouraging, and family and friend oriented. Come Sunday, encounter God with us, we look forward to meeting you! Adult Bible Study, Sunday 9:30 AM Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 AM DYG (High School) & Trek (Middle School) Monday 6:30 PM Come and meet our pastors, Mike and Joyce Woodman. 7801 N. 7th St. Terrebonne West on “B” Avenue off of Hwy. 97; South on 7th St. at the end of the road 541-548-1232 dayspringchristiancenter.org WESTSIDE CHURCH “God Is No Laughing Matter” Randall Knight WEST CAMPUS 2051 NW Shevlin Park Road, Bend 97701 Sunday at 10:45am Due to the holidays there will be no services on Sat. at 6:45, Sun. at 8 or 9am Children’s Ministries for Infants thru 3rd grade Sunday at 10:45am Kurios - 1st Wednesday of each month at 6:30pm 4th Grade: Sun. 10:45am 5th Grade: Sun. 10:45am 6th thru 8th Grades: Sun. 10:45am 9th thru 12th Grades: Sun. 10:45am College/Young Adults: No gathering this week Adults: Bible Studies, Classes, Life Groups & Activities. Visit our website for more information SOUTH CAMPUS iWitness Anna — Simple Worship Scott McBride - LIVE Elk Meadow Elementary School 60880 Brookswood Blvd, Bend 97702 Sunday at 10:30am Children’s Ministries for Infants thru 5th grade Sunday at 10:30am www.westsidechurch.org 541-382-7504

Jewish Synagogues JEWISH COMMUNITY OF CENTRAL OREGON Serving Central Oregon for 20 Years. We Are a Non-Denominational Egalitarian Jewish Community All are Welcome! Our Synagogue is located at 21555 Modoc Lane, Bend, Oregon 541-385-6421 - www.jcco.bend.com Resident Rabbi Jay & Rebbetzin Judy Shupack Religious Education, Hebrew program & Bar/Bat Mitzvah Training Weekly Torah Study & Adult Education Teen Youth Group Upcoming Events: Friday, Dec. 17, 5:45pm Family vegetarian potluck followed by Shabbat service - 7pm Sat., Jan. 8 at 10 am - Shabbat service and Torah study followed by potluck vegetarian lunch TEMPLE BETH TIKVAH Temple Beth Tikvah is a member of the Union for Reform Judaism. Our members represent a wide range of Jewish backgrounds. We welcome interfaith families and Jews by choice. Our monthly activities include social functions, services, religious education, Hebrew school, Torah study, and adult education Rabbi Glenn Ettman Friday, January 7 at 6:00 pm Shabbat Service Saturday, January 8 at 9:00 am Torah Study Saturday, January 8 at 10:30 am Torah Service Saturday, January 8 at 7:00 pm Havdallah for members & guests Sunday, January 9 at 11:00 am Adult Education (call for information) All services are held at the First United Methodist Church 680 NW Bond Street Sunday School, Hebrew School and Bar/Bat Mitzvah Classes For more information about our education programs, please call: David Uri at 541-306-6000

Contemporary Worship at 8:00 AM Traditional Worship at 11:00 AM Sunday School & Bible Study at 9:30 AM Nursery provided on Sundays www.trinitylutheranbend.org church e-mail: church@saints.org Pastor Robert Luinstra • Pastor David Carnahan All Ages Welcome School: 2550 NE Butler Mkt. Rd. 541-382-1850 • www.saints.org school e-mail: info@saints.org ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH ELCA Worship in the Heart of Redmond Sunday Worship Service 8:30 am Contemporary 11:00 am Traditional Sunday School for all ages at 10:00 am Children’s Room available during services Come Experience a warm, friendly family of worshipers. Everyone Welcome - Always. A vibrant, inclusive community. A rich and diverse music program for all ages Coffee, snacks and fellowship after each service M-W-F Women’s Exercise 9:30 am Wed. Bible Study at noon 3rd Th. Women’s Circle/Bible Study 2:00 pm 4th Tues. Men’s Club 6:00 pm, dinner Youth and Family Programs Active Social Outreach 1113 SW Black Butte Blvd. Redmond, OR 97756 ~ 541-923-7466 Pastor Eric Burtness www.zionrdm.com

Mennonite THE RIVER MENNONITE CHURCH Sam Adams, Pastor Sunday, 3 pm at the Old Stone Church, 157 NW Franklin Ave., Bend Sunday School 2 years - 5th grade Nursery 0-2 years Visitors welcome Church Office: 541-389-8787 E-mail: theriver@mailshack.com Send to: PO Box 808, Bend OR 97709 www.therivermennonite.org

Nazarene BEND CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 1270 NE 27 St. • 541-382-5496 Senior Pastor Virgil Askren SUNDAY 9:00 am Sunday School for all ages 10:15 am Worship Service 5 pm Hispanic Worship Service Nursery Care & Children’s Church ages 4 yrs–4th grade during all Worship Services “Courageous Living” on KNLR 97.5 FM 8:30 am Sunday WEDNESDAY 6:30 pm Ladies Bible Study THURSDAY 10:00 am 50+ Bible Study WEEKLY Life Groups Please visit our website for a complete listing of activities for all ages. www.bendnaz.org

Non-Denominational CASCADE PRAISE CHRISTIAN CENTER For People Like You! NE Corner of Hwy 20 W. and Cooley Service Times: Sunday, 10 am Wednesday, 7 pm Youth: Wednesday, 7 pm Nursery and children's ministries Home fellowship groups Spirit Filled Changing lives through the Word of God 541-389-4462 • www.cascadepraise.org REDMOND BIBLE FELLOWSHIP Big Sky Conference Center 3732 SW 21st Street, Suite 103 (Next to Color Tile) Expositional, verse by verse teaching with emphasis on Paul’s Epistles. Great fellowship beginning at 10 am, ending at 11:30 every Sunday morning. For more information call Dave at 541-923-5314 or Mark at 541-923-6349 SOVEREIGN GRACE CHURCH Meeting at the Golden Age Club 40 SE 5th St., Bend Just 2 blocks SW of Bend High School Sunday Worship 10:00 am Sovereign Grace Church is dedicated to worshipping God and teaching the Bible truths recovered through the Reformation. Call for information about other meetings 541-385-1342 or 541-420-1667 http://www.sovereigngracebend.com/

For more information and complete schedule of services go online to www.bethtikvahbend.org or call 541-388-8826

Open Bible Standard

\Lutheran

Sunday morning worship 8:45 AM & 10:45 AM

CONCORDIA LUTHERAN MISSION (LCMS) The mission of the Church is to forgive sins through the Gospel and thereby grant eternal life. (St. John 20:22-23, Augsburg Confession XXVIII.8, 10) 10 am Sunday School 11 am Divine Service December 25 10:00 AM: Christmas Divine Service The Rev. Willis C . Jenson, Pastor. 8286 11th St (Grange Hall), Terrebonne, OR www.lutheransonline.com/ condordialutheranmission Phone: 541-325-6773 GRACE FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH 2265 NW Shevlin Park Road, Bend 541-382-6862 Sunday, December 26 Worship service 10:00 a.m. Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m. (Child Care Available) Sunday School 10:50 a.m. Men’s Bible Study Wednesday 7:15 a.m. High School Youth Group Wednesday 6:00 p.m. Pastor Joel LiaBraaten Evangelical Lutheran Church in America www.gflcbend.org

CHRISTIAN LIFE CENTER 21720 E. Hwy. 20 • 541-389-8241

Unitarian Universalist UNITARIAN UNIVERSALISTS OF CENTRAL OREGON “Diverse Beliefs, One Fellowship” We are a Welcoming Congregation Sunday, December 26, 11:00am Guest speaker Michael Stevens: “Buddhism & Prespectives on the Year’s Turning” Michael Stevens is the Founder and Director of the Natural Mind Dharma Center in Bend. Michael has a degree in Religious Studies and an extensive background in psychology, yoga, meditation, and nature studies. Childcare is provided! Everyone is Welcome! See our website for more information Meeting place: OLD STONE CHURCH 157 NW FRANKLIN AVE., BEND Mail: PO Box 428, Bend OR 97709 www.uufco.org (541) 385-3908

Unity Community UNITY COMMUNITY OF CENTRAL OREGON Join the Unity Community Sunday 10:00 am with Rev. Teri Hawkins Youth Program Provided The Unity Community meets at the Eastern Star Grange 62855 Powell Butte Hwy (near Bend Airport) Learn more about the Unity Community of Central Oregon at www.unitycentraloregon.com or by calling 541-388-1569 United Church of God

Church of God UNITED CHURCH OF GOD Saturday Services 1:30 pm Suite 204, Southgate Center (behind Butler Market Store South) 61396 S. Hwy. 97 at Powers Rd. 541-318-8329 We celebrate the Sabbath and Holy Days of the Bible as “a shadow of things to come” (Col. 2:16-17) and are committed to preaching the gospel of the Kingdom of God (re. Christ’s coming 1000-year rule on earth). Larry J. Walker, Pastor P.O. Box 36, La Pine, OR 97739, 541-536-5227 email: Larry_Walker@ucg.org Web site: www.ucgbend.org Free sermon downloads & literature including The Good News magazine & Bible course

United Methodist FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH (In the Heart of Down Town Bend) 680 NW Bond St. / 541-382-1672 Pastor Thom Larson Sermon: “The Other Wiseman” Matthew 2:1–23 One Service Only at 10:00 am *During the Week:* Womens Groups, Mens Groups, Youth Groups, Quilting, Crafting, Music & Fellowship. Open Hearts. Open Minds. Open Doors. Rev. Thom Larson firstchurch@bendumc.org

CHURCH & SYNAGOGUE DIRECTORY LISTING 4 Saturdays and TMC:

Wednesday Mid-Week Service & Youth Programs 7:00 PM

$105

Nursery Care provided for all services.

5 Saturdays and TMC:

Pastor Daniel N. LeLaCheur www.clcbend.com

$126

Presbyterian COMMUNITY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 529 NW 19th Street (3/4 mile north of High School) Redmond, OR 97756 (541) 548-3367 Rev. Rob Anderson, Pastor Rev. Heidi Bolt, Associate Pastor 8:30 am - Contemporary Music & Worship 8:30 am - Church School for Children 9:45 am - Adult Christian Education 11:00 am - Traditional Music & Worship 12:15 pm - Middle School Youth 2:00 pm - Senior High Youth Wednesday: 4:30 pm - Elementary School Program Small Groups Meet Regularly (Handicapped Accessible) www.redmondchurch.org

The Bulletin: Every Saturday on the church page. $21 Copy Changes: by 5 PM Tuesday CO Marketplace: The First Tuesday of each month. $21 Copy Changes: by Monday 1 week prior to publication

Call Pat Lynch 541-383-0396 plynch@bendbulletin.com

Directory of Central Oregon Churches and Synagogues


C OV ER S T OR I ES

A8 Saturday, December 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Redmond Continued from A3 A business graduate of Western Oregon University, Losoya’s job as a branch vice president and branch manager of Home Federal Bank in Redmond is quite far away now from that life of manual labor. “They wanted to show us that wasn’t the life they wanted us to live,” Losoya said. “Education became the focus.” Losoya and his wife, Kori Losoya, 32, live on Redmond’s west side with their four children, ages 8 months to 5 years. The Woodburn High School sweethearts have lived in Redmond for about eight years. Losoya’s parents’ education push helped, but Losoya said his interest in education has also been driven by his wife, a former fifth-grade teacher in Madras. As their family grew, Kori stayed at home to take care of the children. The family cautiously considered whether Losoya should apply to fill the school board seat left vacant by Dan Murphy’s resignation. The meetings can run several hours, and the commitment can require 20 hours a month. “It was a family decision,” Kori Losoya said. “We knew that the commitment would take. We know what the rewards would be.” Those rewards include helping shape a district where the Losoyas plan to send their children to school. A.J. Losoya hopes that in his new role he serves as an example to students in the district who have a life similar to his. That the Redmond School Board is more diverse than it was is a step forward, he said. “I think increasing diversity is very important,” Losoya said. “That’s the way the country is going.” Some of the reasons why board members picked Losoya have nothing to do with his ethnicity. The district is approaching its third consecutive budget with a shortfall — this one likely around $5 million — so some of the district’s greatest challenges relate to finance. Losoya believes that his banking background will help the district negotiate this round of

budget cuts. Losoya is familiar with some of the district’s finances already, having sat on the district’s bond savings task force that recommended the board spend about $15 million in savings from bond-related projects on upgrading several schools. The task force did not consider whether to return the money to taxpayers, but Losoya supports the board’s decision not to do so. Both with the bond savings and with the upcoming budget process, Losoya believes the district needs to spend as much money as possible directly on the schools, students and staff. The district must be innovative as it looks for ways to invest in education, he said. “We can’t wait for the economy to recover to provide a quality education,” Losoya said. “That needs to happen now.” Losoya has already inspired at least one student. Suzie Saldana, 16, is a Redmond High School junior who recently met Losoya. Losoya’s life — that he was the first in his family with a degree, for instance — could show students in difficult situations that they can step into leadership roles and go to college, she said. Saldana, a treasurer of the Redmond High Latino student group Si Tu Puedes, was impressed by how far Losoya has come. “I just think it’s amazing that he’s achieving so much,” she said. “He is setting a standard.” School Board Chairman Jim Erickson said Losoya’s life story could help the board reach more parents. He will be the only Spanish speaker on the board, and that should make it easier for Spanish-speaking parents to attend board meetings to ask questions or make statements, Erickson said. “Think how critical that is,” Erickson said. “An individual who sits in a decision-making position, who is multilingual and can help us understand not only what a person is saying but understand some of those critical factors they are expressing. My life experience doesn’t help me a whole lot in that.” Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

Energy Continued from A3 Although dwarfed by the big renewable energy projects that many industrialized countries are embracing to rein in greenhouse gas emissions, these tiny systems are playing an epic, transformative role. Since Ruto hooked up the system, her teenagers’ grades have improved because they have light for studying. The toddlers no longer risk burns from the smoky kerosene lamp. And each month, she saves $15 in kerosene and battery costs — and the $20 she used to spend on travel. In fact, neighbors now pay her 20 cents to charge their phones, although that business may soon evaporate: 63 families in Kiptusuri have recently installed their own solar power systems. “You leapfrog over the need for fixed lines,” said Adam Kendall, head of the sub-Saharan Africa power practice for McKinsey & Company, the global consulting firm. “Renewable energy becomes more and more important in less and less-developed markets.” The United Nations estimates that 1.5 billion people still live without electricity, including 85 percent of Kenyans, and that 3 billion still cook and heat with primitive fuels like wood or charcoal. There is no reliable data on the spread of off-grid renewable energy on a small scale, in part because the projects are often installed by individuals or tiny nongovernmental organizations. In Africa, nascent markets for the systems have sprung up in Ethiopia, Uganda, Malawi and Ghana as well as in Kenya, said Francis Hillman, an energy entrepreneur who recently shifted his Eritrea-based business, Phaesun Asmara, from large solar projects financed by nongovernmental organizations to a greater emphasis on tiny rooftop systems. In addition to these small solar projects, renewable energy technologies designed for the poor include simple subterranean biogas chambers that make fuel and electricity from the manure of a few cows, and “mini” hydroelectric dams that can harness the power of a local river for an entire village.

Problems linger Yet while these off-grid systems have proved their worth, the lack of an effective distribu-

Ed Ou / New York Times News Service

Sara Ruto holds a small solar-powered LED light, part of a system that also charges cell phones, at her home in Kiptusuri, Kenya. Ruto, who used to travel miles to charge her mobile phone at the nearest town with electricity, purchased a solar panel for about $80 to charge her phone and power several lights. tion network or a reliable way of financing the start-up costs has prevented them from becoming more widespread. “The big problem for us now is there is no business model yet,” said John Maina, executive coordinator of Sustainable Community Development Services, or SCODE, a nongovernmental organization based in Nakuru, Kenya, that is devoted to bringing power to rural areas. Just a few years ago, Maina said, “solar lights” were merely basic lanterns, dim and unreliable. “Finally, these products exist, people are asking for them and are willing to pay,” he said. “But we can’t get supply.” He said small African organizations like his do not have the purchasing power or connections to place bulk orders themselves from distant manufacturers, forcing them to scramble for items each time a shipment happens to come into the country. Part of the problem is that the new systems buck the traditional mold, in which power is generated by a very small number of huge government-owned companies that gradually extend the grid into rural areas. Investors are reluctant to pour money into products that serve a dispersed market of poor rural consumers because they see the risk as too high.

“There are many small islands of success, but they need to go to scale,” said Minoru Takada, chief of the U.N. Development Program’s sustainable energy program. “Off-grid is the answer for the poor. But people who control funding need to see this as a viable option.”

Driven by cell phones What has most surprised some experts in the field is the recent emergence of a true market in Africa for home-scale renewable energy and for appliances that consume less energy. As the cost of reliable equipment decreases, families have proved ever more willing to buy it by selling a goat or borrowing money from a relative overseas, for example. The explosion of cell phone use in rural Africa has been an enormous motivating factor. Because rural regions of many African countries lack banks, the cell phone has been embraced as a tool for commercial transactions as well as personal communications, adding an incentive to electrify for the sake of recharging. M-Pesa, Kenya’s largest mobile phone money transfer service, handles an annual cash flow equivalent to more than 10 percent of the country’s gross domestic product, most in tiny transactions that rarely exceed $20. The cheap renewable energy

systems also allow the rural poor to save money on candles, charcoal, batteries, wood and kerosene. In Kiptusuri, the Firefly LED system purchased by Ruto is this year’s must-have item. The smallest one, which costs $12, consists of a solar panel that can be placed in a window or on a roof and is connected to a desk lamp and a phone charger. Slightly larger units can run radios and blackand-white television sets. Of course, such systems cannot compare with a grid connection in the industrialized world. A week of rain can mean no lights. And items like refrigerators need more, and more consistent, power than a panel provides. Still, in Kenya, even grid-based electricity is intermittent and expensive: families must pay more than $350 just to have their homes hooked up. “With this system, you get a real light for what you spend on kerosene in a few months,” said Maina, of Sustainable Community Development Services. “When you can light your home and charge your phone, that is very valuable.”

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CL

FACES AND PLACES OF THE HIGH DESERT

COMMUNITY LIFE

Inside

Yule log in 3-D Television’s fake fireplace adds a new dimension to holiday tradition, Page B3

B

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/communitylife

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2010

JULIE JOHNSON

Going all-out

Stockings full of love, family ties M

y Christmas stocking depicts a family of snowmen with sequined mittens and jaunty hats. It was made of yarn and felt by the hands of my grandmother, a prolific cross-stitcher, knitter and crocheter. She stitched my name at the top and tied the little bow on the hat of the mama snowman. Of all the gifts my grandmother ever gave me, the stocking is the one I value the most. It represents her love and her devotion to our family. And it reinforces the importance of those family traditions I took for granted as a child, ignored as a teenager and came to embrace as an adult. My stocking is in good company. My grandmother, Phyllis Johnson, raised six children. She has 13 grandchildren and 21 great-grandchildren, all of whom Ryan Brennecke/The Bulletin have hand-made stockings bearing their names. My sister’s is finely wrought and shows a girl atop a staircase, gazing down at a decked-out Christmas tree at the bottom of the stairs. It’s lovely, but my stocking is bigger, I often pointed out when we were kids. Grandma knitted the first two of her grandchildren’s stockings. The rest were counted cross-stitch, except mine, which was made with a yarn-on-mesh technique. Eldest cousin Greg says his knitted stocking gets bigger every year as it stretches, giving him the edge when it comes to packing in the stocking stuffers. My snowman stocking has been with me every Christmas since I can remember. It hung on the lava-rock fireplace of the Terrebonne house where I grew up. When we traveled for Christmas, it would join the dozen other cousins’ stockings on the hearth at my grandparents’ house. I remember magical nights spent in a nest of sleeping bags in my grandparents’ family room, waiting for sleep to catch me as I listened to the grown-ups laughing over hot toddies in the kitchen. They cannily outlasted most of us cousins, waiting until we were asleep to fulfill their Santa duties. But I have sleepy memories of aunts and mothers tiptoeing to the hearth to fill cross-stitched stockings with little gifts. There the stockings would be in the morning, bows and candies peeking out of the top. Later, when I was a young adult, my stocking would be there when I came home for the holidays. When I saw it pinned to my mother’s fireplace next to my sister’s stocking, that’s when I knew I was home. That’s how I knew it was Christmas. Now, as a parent of young children, I am grateful to my grandmother for initiating this holiday tradition and perpetuating it through so many branches of our family tree. Stocking after stocking, stitch by stitch, Grandma sewed us all into her fold. When my sons received their own Christmas stockings, each letter of their names stitched into meticulous place, it was as important a ritual as a naming ceremony or a religious one, at least to me. I married a Jewish man, and became Jewish myself, so the Christmas tradition isn’t strong in my nuclear family. But with impeccable sensitivity and warmth, Grandma made my children’s Christmas stockings anyway. I wouldn’t have it any other way. I’m not sure how many more Christmas stockings my grandmother will make. After all, most of us cousins are done having children, and none of the great-grandchildren are ready for kids. And, my grandma is sick. While she is facing cancer and chemotherapy and all that entails with her usual grace and courage, she knows what her fate holds. It makes me wish that we, my family, had made my grandmother her own Christmas stocking. That we had stitched our love and devotion into a stocking for her, that she would know the value of the gift she has given each of us. Then we could tack it to her hearth and fill it up with love and she could know how cherished is this tradition she created. Julie Johnson can be reached at 541383-0308 or jjohnson@bendbulletin.com.

Central Oregonians travel the globe for a glimpse at rare total solar eclipse

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Lynn Carroll peers at the sun through his telescope in his backyard near Sisters last week. Carroll, who works part-time at the Sunriver Observatory and is passionate about the stars, took a special tour to Mexico in 1991 to see a total solar eclipse. He’ll be front and center for the 2017 total solar eclipse that will pass through Central Oregon. Below, an effect called a diamond ring occurs when the sun shines through a valley on the moon.

By Heidi Hagemeier The Bulletin

I

n ancient times they were called bad omens, anger of the gods, attacks by dragons on the sun.

See Eclipse / B6

Submitted photo

Summit High School offers New Year’s Eve baby-sitting Summit High School band students, parent chaperones and some Summit staff members will spend New Year’s Eve baby-sitting to raise money for the Summit Winds Ensemble’s April trip to Carnegie Hall in New York City. The event is for children in first through fifth grades and will take place from 5 p.m. Friday, Dec. 31, to 10 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 1. Cost is $45 for the first child, $40 for

SPOTLIGHT

the second. The event will include entertainment, dinner, snacks and breakfast. Movies, games and meals have all been planned. Children need to bring sleeping bags, pillows and pajamas. About 20 band students and 10 parent chaperones have signed up to watch the children. Parents should reserve spots for their children by Tuesday, Dec. 28. Contact: Valley Steward at 541-312-4373.

Glen Gives fulfills needs In early December, Elvia AllinoRamirez, of La Pine, received much-

needed transportation for herself and her three children thanks to Glen Gives, an all-volunteer nonprofit that provides aid to Central Oregon families in need. Allino-Ramirez gave birth to her third child in July, shortly after she was widowed. Glen Gives obtained a used vehicle donated by Awbrey Glen Golf Club. Robberson Ford donated the labor to get the vehicle in shape. Other 2010 Glen Gives recipients have included financial resources to cover cancer treatments for a young mother, new doors for a drafty mobile home, tuition to truck driving school and numerous mortgage, rent and utility payments. Since 2004, Glen Gives, made up of

Awbrey Glen residents and members of its golf club, has raised $350,000 and helped hundreds of local families. The organization identifies recipients with the help of community partners including Family Access Network, Housing Works, Mountain Star Relief Nursery, Saving Grace and others. Community business partners include Robberson Ford, Les Schwab Tires, Fred Meyer, Food For Less, Kids Paradise and Stonebriar Apartments. “Glen Gives continues to grow, and we are all proud to be a part of such a giving community,” says 2010 chair Sally Murphy. Contact: 541-480-9690. — From staff reports


T EL EV ISION

B2 Saturday, December 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Girl is betwixt and between ‘Dr. Who’ puts sci-fi spin on ‘Christmas Carol’ friend and her soon-to-be-ex “Dr. Who: A By David Wiegand

San Francisco Chronicle

Dear Abby: I really need some help. One of my friends and her boyfriend, “Jake,” have been having problems and he wants to break up with her. I have had a crush on him since I first met him. My friend knew it and dated him anyway. Jake has been flirting with me for a while now, and I feel uncomfortable because I flirted back. I’m afraid my girlfriend will think he broke up with her for me. Please help! — Stuck in the Middle Dear Stuck: Be warned. Jake appears to be someone with a roving eye and a short attention span. While he may have his eye on you, play it cool and hold off dating him until he has first dated one or two other girls. Even then, your girlfriend may not like the idea of your seeing him — but she won’t be able to accuse you of having had any involvement in their breakup. Dear Abby: My husband started smoking two years ago, and it’s driving me crazy — especially the wasted time and money. I try not to nag him, but it’s hard. Because most restaurants are now nonsmoking, when we go out to dinner, instead of smoking right before he goes in, then after we leave, he’ll get up a few minutes after we order to go outside and smoke — leaving me alone for five to 10 minutes. Sometimes he does it more than once. It makes me really uncomfortable. I feel like people are staring at me. I have asked him repeatedly not to leave me sitting there, but he won’t stop. I told him it’s rude and he should respect me enough to remain with me through an entire meal, but he refuses. Please tell me what you think about this. — Smoking Mad in Virginia Dear Smoking Mad: Your husband isn’t being willfully disrespectful. He is so addicted to nicotine that he cannot sit through an entire meal with you because

DEAR ABBY he must have another “fix”! While your suggestion that he have a cigarette before entering the restaurant is logical, he is UNABLE to go without smoking for that relatively short length of time. It’s very sad. Because you can’t convince him to recognize he has a problem, ask his doctor to help him quit. Then all I can advise is to appreciate him while you can, because his habit will eventually compromise his health. Dear Abby: I am an intellectual giant. I have nothing in common with my peers. I am smarter than all of them. I am in a gifted-andtalented program in my school, and I am still unable to carry on a conversation that everyone in the room can understand. Please help me. — Heads Above the Rest in Idaho Dear Heads Above the Rest: Being intellectually gifted is an asset — unless it isolates you because you can’t relate to others. If you’re as smart as you say you are, you should try to do what other “intellectual giants” have done — learn to analogize what you’re trying to communicate so that others of lesser intelligence can understand you. It is a skill and it may take practice, but the alternative is being unable to share your valuable insights with others. If you cannot manage what I am suggesting on your own, you may need some pointers from a psychologist to gain the tools you need. To My Christian Readers: A very Merry Christmas to you all! Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

SAN FRANCISCO — You may have heard of an old story that seems to make the rounds every year at this time, about a coldhearted old miser who rediscovers his own humanity, with the help of a bit of time travel arranged by three spirited travel agents. Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol” has been the subject of countless feature films, animated versions, TV specials and more than a few episodes of TV shows. Despite the fact that we know the story by heart, even the cheesiest version seems to have some kind of appeal. Vanessa Williams as a lady Scrooge? An animated Scrooge McDuck as Ebenezer? Oh, why not? ’Tis, as they say, the season. But just when you think there’s nothing new to do with Dickens’ 1843 story, along come Steven Moffat and the BBC’s “Dr. Who” with a pretty original take on old Scrooge.

Christmas Carol” When: 6 tonight Where: BBC America Airing on the BBC America channel on Christmas Day, “Dr. Who: A Christmas Carol” manages to be true to the concept of the original story, while portraying the Scrooge-like Kazran Sardick (Michael Gambon) as someone who pinches not only pence, but time as well. Of course, over its many decades and with 11 actors in the lead role, “Dr. Who” (Matt Smith as the Time Lord of the title these days) has been all about the fluidity of time, especially as the good doctor pops in and out of other worlds in other periods through the courtesy of his own private TARDIS, a flying police call box. In this expanded episode, Dr. Who’s friends Amy Pond (Karen Gillan) and Rory Williams (Ar-

thur Darvill) are on their honeymoon aboard a spaceship that is plummeting out of control toward Sardicktown, not only ruled, but megalomaniacally controlled, by the evil Kazran. All will be well if only Dr. Who can melt Kazran’s crusty heart enough for him to allow the spaceship to land safely. Sounds straightforward enough, but if you know “Dr. Who,” you know things are more complicated than that. In visiting Kazran’s past, we encounter the usual Dickensian elements, including Kazran’s youthful infatuation with Abigail Pettigrew (the Welsh singer Katherine Jenkins), a lovely young woman who, in the present day, is frozen in Kazran’s basement and only “warms up” once a year on Christmas Eve. The trouble is that Abigail has only a single Christmas Eve left on her meter and Kazran has denied himself the pleasure of spending that remaining day with her for years, simply because he knows it will be his last with her. Kazran has managed to make time stand still, in a way,

but in doing so, has imprisoned his own humanity and evolved into the lonely, angry man he is when Dr. Who first encounters him. Things may turn out as they always do in “Christmas Carol” adaptations, but very few versions get to that old happy ending with quite this much imagination.

CBS to shift ‘Blue Bloods’ in midseason shake-up By Scott Collins Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — CBS, the No. 1 network this fall, is revamping its schedule for midseason. “Blue Bloods,” the police drama starring Tom Selleck, will get a four-week tryout at 10 p.m. Wednesdays starting Jan. 19, the network said Tuesday. While the show will move back into its Friday night slot after that, the network has high hopes for

“Blue Bloods,” the second-mostwatched new drama this season after CBS’ “Hawaii Five-O.” Starting Feb. 16, “Criminal Minds: Suspect Behavior” will premiere in the 10 p.m. Wednesday slot. The crime series is a spin-off of “Criminal Minds,” one of CBS’ biggest hits. “The Defenders,” the legal drama with Jerry O’Connell and Jim Belushi, will move to the quiet zone of 8 p.m. Fridays starting Feb. 4.

CBS will also unfurl a couple of new series: the sitcom “Mad Love” (starting Feb. 21), headed for the Monday comedy block, and “Chaos,” a one-hour comedy-drama (April 1) slated for Fridays. “Mad Love” will be replacing “Rules of Engagement,” which is headed to Thursdays to be paired with “Big Bang Theory.” “$*! My Dad Says,” which had been in that slot, will have completed its firstseason order.

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Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune ››› “Transformers” (2007) Shia LaBeouf, Tyrese Gibson. Two races of robots wage war on Earth. ’ Å Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Community ‘PG’ 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ Law & Order: Los Angeles ’ ‘14’ Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Old Christine Old Christine “Jesse Stone: No Remorse” (2010) Tom Selleck, Kathy Baker. ‘14’ Å 48 Hours Mystery Gotti family. (N) Ugly Betty Brothers ’ ‘PG’ Å ››› “Transformers” (2007) Shia LaBeouf, Tyrese Gibson. Two races of robots wage war on Earth. ’ Å Criminal Minds ’ ‘14’ Å TV’s Funniest Holiday Moments: A Paley Center for Media Special ‘PG’ News Channel 21 Two/Half Men The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ Da Vinci’s Inquest ‘14’ Å NUMB3RS Primacy ’ ‘PG’ Å NUMB3RS Under Pressure ’ ‘PG’ Travels-Edge Steves’ Europe Globe Trekker ‘G’ Å (DVS) As Time Goes By Ladies of Letters New Tricks ’ ‘PG’ Å Trail Blazer NBA Basketball Portland Trail Blazers at Golden State Warriors (Live) Law & Order: Special Victims Unit That ’70s Show That ’70s Show House Cuddy receives gift. ’ ‘14’ House Paralysis. ’ ‘14’ Å House of Payne House of Payne Smart Travels Daisy Cooks! Christina Cooks! Katie Brown Burt Wolf: Taste Hubert Keller Holiday Table Katie Brown Travels-Edge Steves’ Europe Globe Trekker ‘G’ Å (DVS) As Time Goes By Ladies of Letters New Tricks ’ ‘PG’ Å

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KATU News at 11 Comedy.TV ‘14’ News Sat. Night Live News (11:35) Cold Case Entourage ‘MA’ Curb Enthusiasm Fringe Olivia ’ ‘14’ Å King of Queens South Park ‘14’ Masterpiece Theatre ’ ‘PG’ News Sat. Night Live Stargate Universe Light ‘PG’ Å Christina Cooks! Daisy Cooks! Song of the Mountains ’ ‘G’ Å

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Bounty Hunter Dog the Bounty Hunter ‘PG’ Å Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Billy the Exterminator ‘PG’ Å 130 28 18 32 Bounty Hunter (4:00) ››› “Scrooged” (1988) Bill Murray, ››› “Scrooged” (1988, Comedy) Bill Murray, Karen Allen, John Forsythe. TV-network ››› “Scrooged” (1988, Comedy) Bill Murray, Karen Allen, John Forsythe. TV-network ››› “Scrooged” (1988, Comedy) Bill Murray, Karen Allen, John Forsythe. TV-network 102 40 39 Karen Allen. Å bigshot meets Christmas ghosts. Å bigshot meets Christmas ghosts. Å bigshot meets Christmas ghosts. Å Pets 101 ’ ‘PG’ Å Pets 101 ’ ‘PG’ Å America’s Cutest Dog 2010 ’ ‘PG’ America’s Cutest Cat 2010 ’ ‘PG’ Bad Dog! Pilot ’ ‘PG’ America’s Cutest Cat 2010 ’ ‘PG’ 68 50 26 38 Dogs 101 Puppies ’ ‘PG’ Å Housewives/NJ Shep & Tiffany House House vs. God ’ ‘PG’ Å House Euphoria ‘PG’ Å House Euphoria ‘PG’ Å House Forever ’ ‘14’ Å House Who’s Your Daddy? ’ ‘14’ House No Reason ’ ‘14’ Å 137 44 40 Greatest Songs of the Decade ’ 190 32 42 53 ›››› “Dances With Wolves” (1990, Western) Kevin Costner, Mary McDonnell, Graham Greene. A Union officer befriends the Lakota. ’ The Suze Orman Show Holiday Help Til Debt-Part Til Debt-Part Ford: Rebuilding an American Icon The Suze Orman Show Holiday Help Til Debt-Part Til Debt-Part Paid Program Profit-Town 51 36 40 52 Behind the Counter: Story Larry King Live ‘PG’ CNN Heroes: An All-Star Tribute Larry King Live ‘PG’ CNN Heroes: An All-Star Tribute 52 38 35 48 CNN Presents ‘PG’ Å (6:54) ›› “Employee of the Month” (2006, Comedy) Dane Cook, Jessica Simpson. Å (9:29) ›› “The Girl Next Door” (2004, Romance-Comedy) Emile Hirsch, Elisha Cuthbert. Å 135 53 135 47 (4:50) ››› “Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure” (1989) Keanu Reeves. Redmond Starlight Parade Visions of NW Joy of Fishing Epic Conditions Outside Film Festival Outside Presents Paid Program Bend on the Run Ride Guide ‘14’ City Edition 11 American Perspectives C-SPAN Weekend 58 20 12 11 American Perspectives Phineas and Ferb Sonny-Chance Suite/Deck Hannah Forever Phineas and Ferb (9:15) Fish Hooks Shake it Up! ‘Y’ Hannah Montana Hannah Montana Suite Life Suite/Deck 87 43 14 39 Phineas and Ferb “Mickey’s Twice Upon a Christmas” MythBusters Duct Tape Hour ‘PG’ MythBusters Car vs. Rain ‘PG’ Å MythBusters Christmas Special ‘PG’ MythBusters ’ ‘PG’ Å MythBusters Hidden Nasties ’ ‘PG’ MythBusters Christmas Special ‘PG’ 156 21 16 37 MythBusters Red Flag to a Bull ‘PG’ NBA Basketball Portland Trail Blazers at Golden State Warriors (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 NBA Basketball Denver Nuggets at Oklahoma City Thunder (Live) Å College Basketball Hawaiian Airlines Diamond Head Classic, Final: Teams TBA (Live) SportsCenter (Live) Å Quarterback Kick-Off Special NBA Basketball: Celtics at Magic 22 24 21 24 College Basketball Boys of Fall (N) 30 for 30 (N) College Football: 1969 Rose Bowl College Football 2009 Rose Bowl -- Penn State vs. USC Å 23 25 123 25 (4:00) 30 for 30 ESPNEWS (Live) ESPNEWS (Live) ESPNEWS (Live) ESPNEWS (Live) ESPNEWS (Live) ESPNEWS (Live) SportsCenter (Live) Å Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 ›› “Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas” (2000) Jim Carrey, Jeffrey Tambor. Å ›› “Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas” (2000) Jim Carrey, Jeffrey Tambor. Å 67 29 19 41 (4:30) ›› “Home Alone 2: Lost in New York” (1992) Macaulay Culkin. Glenn Beck Geraldo at Large ’ ‘PG’ Å Jrnl Edit. Rpt Fox News Watch Red Eye Geraldo at Large ’ ‘PG’ Å Huckabee 54 61 36 50 Huckabee Challenge Sugar Destinations Bobby Flay Food Feuds Chopped Squashed Chopped Spouting Off Chopped The chefs cook octopus. Iron Chef America Paula Deen. 177 62 98 44 Iron Chef America Paula Deen. Million Dollar Challenge Million Dollar Challenge World Poker Tour: Season 8 World Poker Tour: Season 8 Seahawks Final Score The Game 365 Final Score 20 45 28* 26 World Poker Tour: Season 8 ››› “Dr. Seuss’ Horton Hears a Who!” (2008, Adventure) Jim Carrey. ››› “Kung Fu Panda” (2008) Voices of Jack Black, Angelina Jolie. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Archer ‘MA’ Archer ‘MA’ 131 House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters Divine Design ‘G’ Color Splash: Mi Dear Genevieve Curb/Block House Hunters House Hunters Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l 176 49 33 43 House Hunters Banned From the Bible II ‘PG’ Å God vs. Satan ‘PG’ Å The Real Face of Jesus? ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 (4:00) Banned From the Bible ‘PG’ “Undercover Christmas” (2003) Jami Gertz, Shawn Christian. ‘PG’ Å “A Diva’s Christmas Carol” (2000, Fantasy) Vanessa L. Williams. ‘PG’ Å The Fairy Jobmother (N) ‘PG’ Å 138 39 20 31 ›› “Comfort and Joy” (2003) Nancy McKeon, Dixie Carter. ‘PG’ Å Lockup: Raw Ain’t No Hotel Lockup: Raw A Private Hell (N) Lockup Orange County (N) Lockup Orange County (N) Lockup: Raw A Private Hell Lockup: Raw Pushing the Limits 56 59 128 51 Lockup: Raw Predatory Behavior That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show (7:58) 16 and Pregnant Ashley hopes for adoption. ‘14’ (9:29) The Challenge: Cutthroat ‘14’ Pranked Hol. Fantasy Factory Fantasy Fact. 192 22 38 57 That ’70s Show SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å Big Time Rush ’ ‘G’ Å True Jackson, VP George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob ›››› “Star Wars IV: A New Hope” (1977) Mark Hamill. Young Luke Skywalker battles evil Darth Vader. ’ (9:37) ›››› “Star Wars V: The Empire Strikes Back” (1980) Mark Hamill. ’ 132 31 34 46 (3:15) ››› “Star Wars VI: Return of the Jedi” (1983) “Shark Swarm” (2008, Suspense) John Schneider, Daryl Hannah, Armand Assante. Premiere. Deadly white sharks terrorize the California coast. ‘PG’ “Sea Beast” (2009) ‘14’ Å 133 35 133 45 “Malibu Shark Attack” (2009, Suspense) Peta Wilson. ‘14’ Å In Touch With Dr. Charles Stanley Hour of Power ‘G’ Å Mary and Joseph: A Test of Faith The Perfect Gift Singers tell the story Jesus Christ. Dino’s Branson Christmas 205 60 130 ›››› “A Christmas Story” (1983, Comedy) Peter Billingsley. Å ›››› “The Wizard of Oz” (1939, Fantasy) Judy Garland. Å (DVS) (10:15) › “Surviving Christmas” (2004) Ben Affleck, James Gandolfini. 16 27 11 28 (4:00) ›››› “A Christmas Story” ›››› “The Lion in Winter” (1968, Historical Drama) Peter O’Toole, Katharine Hepburn, Jane Merrow. Henry ›››› “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” (1966, Drama) Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton, George Segal. A ››› “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” (1958) Elizabeth Taylor, Paul Newman. An alcoholic and 101 44 101 29 II must determine which son is worthy of the crown. Å professor and his wife host an all-night drinking party. Å his wife visit his dying father in the South. Å (DVS) Fabulous Cakes ’ ‘PG’ Å Fabulous Cakes ’ ‘G’ Å Cake Boss: Next Great Baker ‘PG’ Cake Boss: Next Great Baker ‘PG’ Cake Boss: Next Great Baker ‘PG’ Cake Boss: Next Great Baker ‘PG’ 178 34 32 34 Fabulous Cakes ’ ‘G’ Å (6:15) “The Librarian: Curse of the Judas Chalice” (2008) Noah Wyle. ‘PG’ ››› “The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers” (2002) Elijah Wood. Members of a fellowship battle evil Sauron and his pawns. Mummy Return 17 26 15 27 “Librarian: Return to King” Tom and Jerry “Aloha, Scooby-Doo” (2005) Voices of Frank Welker. “Tom and Jerry: Shiver Me Whiskers” (2006, Comedy) “Scooby-Doo! and the Samurai Sword” (2009, Comedy) King of the Hill American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ American Dad ’ 84 Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ When Vacations Attack ‘PG’ Å When Vacations Attack ‘G’ Å When Vacations Attack ‘PG’ Å Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations 179 51 45 42 Man v. Food ‘G’ Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond 65 47 29 35 ››› “Independence Day” (1996) Will Smith. Premiere. Earthlings vs. evil aliens in 15-mile-wide ships. ›› “The Pacifier” (2005, Comedy) Vin Diesel, Lauren Graham. Å ››› “Elf” (2003) Will Ferrell, James Caan. Å (9:28) ››› “Elf” (2003) Will Ferrell, James Caan. Å “Welcome Home Roscoe Jenkins” 15 30 23 30 “Welcome Home Roscoe Jenkins” ››› “Pretty in Pink” (1986) Molly Ringwald, Jon Cryer. ’ VH1 Divas: Salute the Troops ’ ‘PG’ Top 40 Videos 191 48 37 54 ››› “Grease” (1978, Musical) John Travolta, Olivia Newton-John. ’ Å PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:35) ›› “Brewster’s Millions” 1985 Richard Pryor. (6:20) ›› “Valley Girl” 1983 Nicolas Cage. ‘R’ Å ›› “Revenge of the Nerds” 1984 Robert Carradine. (9:35) ››› “The Blues Brothers” 1980, Musical Comedy John Belushi. ’ ‘R’ Å ›› “Trapped in Paradise” 1994, Comedy Nicolas Cage. ‘PG-13’ Å ›› “A Christmas Carol” 1984, Fantasy George C. Scott. ›› “Trapped in Paradise” 1994 ›› “A Christmas Carol” 1984, Fantasy George C. Scott. Insane Cinema ‘PG’ Insane Cinema: Freedom of Space Weekly Update Bubba’s World Insane Cinema ‘PG’ Insane Cinema: Freedom of Space Moto: In Out American Misfits Bubba’s World Weekly Update Ultimate Matches Ultimate Matches Golf Videos Golf Central Ultimate Matches Ultimate Matches (4:00) ›› “Silver Bells” (2005) ‘14’ “Fallen Angel” (2003, Drama) Gary Sinise, Joely Richardson. ‘PG’ Å “The Christmas Card” (2006, Romance) Ed Asner, John Newton. ‘PG’ “Moonlight and Mistletoe” (2008, Drama) Candace Cameron Bure. Å (4:30) ››› “Good Hair” 2009, Documen- (6:15) ›› “17 Again” 2009, Comedy Zac Efron, Leslie Mann. A 37-year-old man mi- ›› “Tooth Fairy” 2010 Dwayne Johnson. A hockey player must (9:45) › “All About Steve” 2009 Sandra Bullock, Bradley Cooper. A smitten woman 24/7 Penguins/ HBO 425 501 425 10 tary ’ ‘PG-13’ Å raculously transforms into a teenager. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å serve time as a real tooth fairy. ‘PG’ Å follows a news cameraman around the country. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Capitals Freaks and Geeks ’ ‘PG’ Å Freaks and Geeks ’ ‘PG’ Å Freaks and Geeks ’ ‘PG’ Å Freaks and Geeks ’ ‘PG’ Å Freaks and Geeks Pilot ‘PG’ Å Freaks and Geeks ’ ‘PG’ Å Freaks and Geeks ’ ‘PG’ Å IFC 105 105 ›› “Red Heat” 1988, Action Arnold Schwarzenegger, James Belushi. A Soviet and an ››› “Up in the Air” 2009, Comedy-Drama George Clooney. Premiere. A frequent flyer (4:45) ›› “She’s Out of My League” 2010 Jay Baruchel. An ›› “Four Christmases” 2008 Vince Vaughn. A couple must MAX 400 508 7 average Joe lands a gorgeous girlfriend. ’ ‘R’ somehow fit in four holiday visits with family. Å American cop nab a Russian drug smuggler. ’ ‘R’ Å reaches a life-and-career crossroads. ’ ‘R’ Å Hooked Vampire Fish ‘PG’ Hooked Fishzilla ‘PG’ Hooked Combat Fishing ‘PG’ Hooked Vampire Fish ‘PG’ Hooked Fishzilla ‘PG’ Hooked Combat Fishing ‘PG’ Hooked More Monster Fish! ‘G’ NGC 157 157 Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ OddParents OddParents Avatar-Last Air Avatar: Airbender Glenn Martin Iron Man: Arm. Iron Man: Arm. Iron Man: Arm. NTOON 89 115 189 Tracks, Africa The Season Raglin Outdoors Ultimate Hunting High Places Lethal Wild and Raw Jimmy Big Time Ted Nugent Craig Morgan Western Extreme High Places Buck Commander Best of West OUTD 37 307 43 (5:15) ››› “Elegy” 2008, Drama Penélope Cruz, Ben Kingsley. iTV. A student awak- (7:15) ››› “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” 2008 Javier Bardem. iTV. Flings with a pair of ›› “Nine” 2009, Musical Daniel Day-Lewis, Marion Cotillard. iTV Premiere. A famous ›› “The Brothers Bloom” 2008 Rachel SHO 500 500 ens sexual possessiveness in her professor. ’ ‘R’ Å tourists complicate a painter’s life. ’ ‘PG-13’ director endures creative and personal crises. ‘PG-13’ Weisz. iTV. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Barrett-Jackson Automobile Auction From the Arena at Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas. ‘PG’ SPEED 35 303 125 (3:45) ››› “The Rookie” 2002 ‘G’ ››› “Chicago” 2002, Musical Catherine Zeta-Jones. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ›› “Alice in Wonderland” 2010, Fantasy Johnny Depp. ’ ‘PG’ Å (9:50) › “The Ugly Truth” 2009 Katherine Heigl. ’ ‘R’ Lord of the Rings STARZ 300 408 300 (5:15) ›› “Ira and Abby” 2006, Romance-Comedy Chris Messina. An indecisive neu- “Tortilla Heaven” 2007, Comedy José Zúñiga. Jesus’ face ap- The King’s Speech ››› “The Hand That Rocks the Cradle” 1992 Annabella Sciorra. A woman vows to ›› “Stepfather II” 1989, Horror Terry TMC 525 525 rotic and a free spirit meet and marry. ’ ‘R’ Å pears on one of Isidor’s tortillas. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å destroy a family she blames for her woes. ’ ‘R’ O’Quinn, Meg Foster. ‘R’ (3:00) Rocky II ››› “Rocky III” (1982, Drama) Sylvester Stallone, Mr. T, Talia Shire. ›› “Rocky IV” (1985, Drama) Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire, Burt Young. ››› “Rocky II” (1979, Drama) Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire, Burgess Meredith. VS. 27 58 30 The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Downsized ‘G’ Å Downsized ‘G’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 25, 2010 B3

CALENDAR TODAY

FRIDAY

STARFEST: Explore the festive holiday light display; through Jan. 2; free; 5:50-9:30 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; www.eagle-crest.com.

NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY: With skiing, followed by fireworks, sledding and live music; $22; skiing until 9 p.m., party continues through midnight; Hoodoo Mountain Resort, summit of Santiam Pass on U.S. Highway 20, west of Sisters; 541822-3799 or www.hoodoo.com/ events.htm. BEND’S FIRST 1000 LIGHTS COMMUNITY WALK: Event includes a family festival, a magic show, live music and an illuminated walk; proceeds benefit the La Pine Community Kitchen; $18, $25 for families, free ages 13 and younger; all participants are asked to donate three cans of food, warm clothing or pet food; 4 p.m., walk begins 6 p.m.; Juniper Elementary School, 1300 N.E. Norton St.; www.bendsfirst1000lightswalk.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY: Featuring a performance by the Armadillos and dinner; $12; 5-9 p.m.; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-536-6237. NEW YEAR’S EVE BASH: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event, with “The Mafioso Murders,” casino games and more; $59, $110 per couple; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. ROCKIN’ NEW YEAR’S EVE: Featuring costumes, cardboard instruments, games, crafts and more; reservations requested; $65, $55 resort guests; 6:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; Fort Funnigan, 17600 Center Drive, Sunriver; 541-593-4609 or www. sunriver-resort.com/traditions. RISE UP NEW YEAR’S EVE BASH: With performances by Larry and His Flask, Barefoot Surrender, McDougall and Ether Circus; ages 21 and older; $7; 8 p.m.; Old Mill Music Lounge, 360 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, #210, Bend; www.bendticket.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY: Featuring a performance by the M80’s; $10; 8:30 p.m.; Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino, 100 Main St., Warm Springs; 541-553-1112 or http://kahneeta.com. ROCK THE OX: A New Year’s Eve party with a DJ, dancing, champagne and more; ages 21 and older; $35 plus fees; 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-382-8436 or www.bendticket.com. NEW YEAR’S AT THE MOON: Featuring performances by The Prairie Rockets and the River Pigs; $10; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE BONFIRE ON THE SNOW: Wanderlust Tours leads a short snowshoe hike to a bonfire and hand-carved snow amphitheater in the forest; a naturalist shares facts about the forest, animals and the night sky; reservations required; adults only; trips depart from Sunriver and Bend; $85 includes guide, snowshoes, transportation, food and drink; 9 p.m.-1:30 a.m.541-389-8359 or www.wanderlusttours.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE CELEBRATION: Featuring a performance by the Moon Mountain Ramblers and Jukebot; free, $10 for Moon Mountain Ramblers; 9 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE CONCERT: With a performance by Sagebrush Rock; free; 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; The Original Kayo’s Dinner House and Lounge, 415 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-323-2520. NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY: With performances by Shade 13, and DJs Harlo, Rada, Ells and Defekt; free; 9 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868. NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY: Featuring a performance by Out of the Blue; $10; 9 p.m.-midnight; Bend Municipal Airport, 63132 Powell Butte Highway; 541-408-6149 or541-480-6660.

SUNDAY OWL LEGENDS: Meet the largest owl in the world, along with other owls, and hear talks from a raptor biologist; $7, $5 museum members, plus admission; 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. CHARITY BINGO: Event includes a canned food drive and baked-goods sale; proceeds benefit the St. Vincent de Paul food bank; $7; 2 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, 235 N.E. Fourth St., Prineville; 541-447-7659. STARFEST: Explore the festive holiday light display; through Jan. 2; free; 5:50-9:30 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; www.eagle-crest.com.

MONDAY OWL LEGENDS: Meet the largest owl in the world, along with other owls, and hear talks from a raptor biologist; $7, $5 museum members, plus admission; 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754.

TUESDAY OWL LEGENDS: Meet the largest owl in the world, along with other owls, and hear talks from a raptor biologist; $7, $5 museum members, plus admission; 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. CLASSICS BOOK CLUB: Read and discuss short stories by Henry James; free; 6-8 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7087, kevinb@dpls.us or www.dpls.us/calendar.

WEDNESDAY CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT: Bird-watchers of all levels walk with naturalist or independently for the annual bird survey; free; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394 or www.sunrivernaturecenter.org. OWL LEGENDS: Meet the largest owl in the world, along with other owls, and hear talks from a raptor biologist; $7, $5 museum members, plus admission; 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. REVEREND HORTON HEAT: The Dallas-based rockabilly band performs, with Hillstomp; $20 plus fees in advance, $25 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www.randompresents.com.

THURSDAY OWL LEGENDS: Meet the largest owl in the world, along with other owls, and hear talks from a raptor biologist; $7, $5 museum members, plus admission; 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. EAGLES: Celebrate the eagle, with tall tales, entertainment and food; reservations requested; $20; 7-9 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394 or www.sunrivernaturecenter.org. MAGIC SHOW: Mr. Magic presents an evening of humor, interaction and magic; $5, free ages 12 and younger with an adult; 7 p.m.; Sunriver Lodge, North Pole, 17728 Abbot Drive; 800-486-8591 or www.sunriver-resort.com/traditions.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

MESSAGES THROUGH MUSIC: A Slipmat Science party featuring Eternal, Roommate, Mindscape, Defekt, Ells, Kleverkill and more; ages 18 and older; $10 before 10 p.m., $15 after; 10 p.m.; Midtown complex, The Annex, Midtown Ballroom and Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend.

SATURDAY Jan. 1 POLAR BEAR PLUNGE: Take an icy plunge into the Lodge Village’s outdoor pool; hot chocolate served; free; 10 a.m.; Sunriver Resort, 17600 Center Drive; 800-4868591 or www.sunriverresort.com/traditions.

SUNDAY Jan. 2 FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-3 p.m.; Pine Forest Grange, 63214 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-447-5451.

MONDAY Jan. 3 GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Finding Nouf” by Zoe Ferraris; free; noon; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7085 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar.

TUESDAY Jan. 4 GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “I Am Because We Are,” which explores Madonna’s journey to Malawi to see how AIDS and poverty affect children; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504.

WEDNESDAY Jan. 5 “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, DON CARLO”: Starring Roberto Alagna, Marina Poplavskaya, Anna Smirnova, Simon Keenlyside and Ferruccio Furlanetto in an encore presentation of Verdi’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. PAGAN JUG BAND: The Portland-based classic country band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

THURSDAY Jan. 6 GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Zookeeper’s Wife” by Diane Ackerman; bring a lunch; free; noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1081 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. “BOOMERS, XERS, AND MILLENNIALS — CAN WE ALL GET ALONG?”: Explore characteristics, communications styles and more about different generations; free; 6 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. PAGAN JUG BAND: The Portlandbased classic country band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: Preview night for the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $10; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.beattickets.org.

FRIDAY Jan. 7 “BOOMERS, XERS, AND MILLENNIALS — CAN WE ALL GET ALONG?”: Explore characteristics, communications styles and more about different generations; free; 1 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1034 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend, the Old Mill District and NorthWest Crossing; free; 5-9 p.m., and until 8 p.m. in NorthWest Crossing; throughout Bend. “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. “IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE”: Nine actors present a live-radio version of the classic holiday tale about George Bailey and his guardian angel; $5, free ages 5 and younger; 7 p.m.; Madras High School, 390 S.E. 10th St.; 541475-7265 or dhayes@509J.net. PAGAN JUG BAND: The Portlandbased classic country band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.beattickets.org.

SATURDAY Jan. 8 “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, LA FANCIULLA DEL WEST”: Starring Deborah Voigt, Marcello Giordani and Lucio Gallo in a presentation of Puccini’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 10 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. WINTER TRAILS DAY: Try snowshoeing, with guided hikes and refreshments; wear weatherappropriate clothing and waterproof boots; free; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Swampy Lake SnoPark, Cascade Lakes Highway 17 miles west of Bend, Bend; 541-385-0594 or www. rei.com/stores/events/96. “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. “IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE”: Nine actors present a live-radio version of the classic holiday tale about George Bailey and his guardian angel; $5, free ages 5 and younger; 7 p.m.; Madras High School, 390 S.E. 10th St.; 541475-7265 or dhayes@509J.net. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541312-9626 or www.beattickets.org. “THE BIG LEBOWSKI”: A screening of the R-rated 1998 film, with a costume contest; $10; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. JON WAYNE & THE PAIN: The Minneapolis-based reggae rock act performs; $5 in advance, $7 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331.

M T For Saturday, Dec. 25

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

BLACK SWAN (R) 11:50 a.m., 2:25, 5:05, 7:40, 10:15 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 2:20, 5:10, 8 HOW DO YOU KNOW (PG-13) 11:40 a.m., 2:15, 4:55, 7:35, 10:10 THE KING’S SPEECH (R) 11:25 a.m., 2:05, 4:45, 7:25, 10:05 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 2:30, 5, 7:30, 10:20 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 2:10, 4:50, 7:20, 10

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) 11:40 a.m., 9:15

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER 3-D (PG) 11:05 a.m., 1:45, 4:25, 7:05, 9:45 THE FIGHTER (R) 12:10, 2:50, 5:25, 8:05, 10:40 GULLIVER’S TRAVELS 3-D (PG) 11:55 a.m., 2, 4:05, 6:45, 9:25 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 11:20 a.m., 2:30, 6:25, 9:35 HOW DO YOU KNOW (PG-13) 11:25 a.m., 2:15, 5:05, 7:50, 10:35 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 12:20, 2:10, 2:40, 4:30, 5:15, 6:50, 7:45, 9:20, 10:05 TANGLED (PG) 11:15 a.m., 1:35, 4, 6:35, 9:10 THE TOURIST (PG-13) 12:15, 2:45, 5:20, 7:55, 10:30 TRON: LEGACY 3-D (PG) Noon, 3:55, 6:40, 9:40, 10:45 TRON: LEGACY (PG) 11 a.m., 1:50, 4:35, 7:20, 10:20 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 11:10 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 1:40, 2:25, 4:15, 5, 7:10, 7:35, 9:50, 10:15

UNSTOPPABLE (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 2:05, 4:50, 7:30, 10 YOGI BEAR (PG) 2:20, 4:40, 7 YOGI BEAR 3-D (PG) 11:30 a.m., 1:55, 4:10, 6:30, 8:40 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

(PG-13) 10 a.m., 12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 9 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 10:30 a.m., 1, 3:30, 6, 8:30 TRON: LEGACY (PG) 10:15 a.m., 1, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 YOGI BEAR (PG) 10 a.m., 12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 7, 9:15

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL

720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) RED (PG-13) 9 SECRETARIAT (PG) 6

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THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) Noon LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 12:15, 2:45 TANGLED (PG) Noon THE TOURIST (PG-13) 2:30 TRON: LEGACY (PG) 2:15 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) Noon, 2:30

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 1, 4, 7

Yule log blazes in 3-D By Alessandra Stanley New York Times News Service

It had to happen: the yule log in 3-D. This latest refinement carries a whiff of retrofitted modernity, like a space capsule upholstered in chintz or a Microsoft Kinect game of croquet. But each generation has to find its own way to televise Christmas warmth, and a three-dimensional yule log is “Avatar” without blue people, “Saw 3D” with carols instead of bloodcurdling screams. “Yule Log 3-D” is not convenient to view, however. This season it’s probably easier to commandeer a real fireplace — or light a sidewalk bonfire — than to find a friend or neighbor with a working 3-D TV set. (About 38 million U.S. homes have working fireplaces; and while industry projections for 3-D TV sales over the next few years are in the millions, the research firm SNL Kagan estimates that only about 400,000 sets have been bought so far.) But it does exist and it can be seen, albeit only through special 3-D glasses. So before consumers rush out to buy a 3-D set this Christmas or next, it’s important to explore whether a television yule log is any more yule-ish or loglike with an added dimension. To find out, I had to go to the Manhattan headquarters of In Demand Networks, which has developed a 3-D yule log. It is the logical sequel to In Demand’s Yule Log HD, which has been available on Time Warner, Comcast and several other cable providers since 2002 and which is quite pleasing.

New York Times News Service

Americans began watching a yule log on TV in 1966, and can now see it in HD or 3-D. Americans began opening presents and drinking eggnog in front of a film loop of blazing flames in 1966, back when it was in black and white. That high-concept metaphor for the television as the family hearth caught on, was refilmed in 1970 and became a kitschy Christmas tradition as beloved as Andy Williams specials or the Radio City Christmas show. DVD versions come with all kinds of fancy extra features — “Yule a Go-Go” comes with dancers performing a naughty Christmas carol striptease. When viewed properly, the 3-D yule log is quite good, the flames vivid but not alarmingly feverish. It’s a cozy fire, not a conflagration. The background music, which can be muted, is an inoffensive offering of standards, from a jazz trio rendition of “O Tannenbaum” to a full orchestral version of “It Came Upon the Midnight Clear.” After a while, the 3-D log is quite hypnotic. Until, of course, you turn to the person next to you and discover that you are both wearing dark glasses indoors, and then the spell is broken.

Jim Carrey seeks a sketchy return to roots with ‘SNL’ By Steven Zeitchik Los Angeles Times

It’s hard to imagine an actor with a more peculiar career than Jim Carrey. Few comedians have succeeded in reinventing themselves so many times. And yet none seem as perpetually in a state of uncertainty. It’s a thought that came to mind when Carrey was tapped as a “Saturday Night Live” host for Jan. 8, the first time he’s appearing on the show since 1996. For many years, Carrey fluidly alternated between roles that required dramatic chops and those that made him money — “The Truman Show” and “Man on the Moon” sandwiched between “Liar, Liar” and “Me, Myself and Irene.” Or “Eternal Sunshine of the Mind” (which earned him nominations from more than a half-dozen award groups) right after “Bruce Almighty.” But the ability to toggle has failed him lately. After 2005’s “Fun with Dick & Jane,” Carrey didn’t do mentally unhinged very convincingly in the psychological thriller “The Number 23.” After “Yes Man” two years ago, he took on a more beloved character in “A Christmas Carol.” That didn’t work either. This season he’s turned in one of the more eyebrow-raising per-

formances as a gay con man in “I Love You Philip Morris,” a black comedy that about six people have seen and even fewer have embraced. Carrey’s trademark wild-eyed and loose-limbed acting manner is on full display, but it gets in the way more that it illuminates or entertains. “(He) never gets beyond his Jim Carrey-ness to let us discover the character,” wrote The Times’ Betsy Sharkey. The “SNL” appearance seems like a pretty obvious attempt to get the actor back to his roots. He has no movie to promote (“Phillip Morris” may still be hanging on in a few theaters, barely), so it’s really just about the onetime “In Living Color” star showing himself in a way that we came to like him in the first place — as a sketch comedian. And it sets the stage for another return to a safe haven, the actor’s summer 2011 movie, the family comedy “Mr. Popper’s Penguins.” Carrey should at least be given points for trying to tackle more interesting characters, something fellow broad-appeal comic actors like Adam Sandler don’t do nearly enough. It would be a shame if the recent failures would mean Carrey stopped trying, since he clearly has skills. It’s just that lately he hasn’t been very good at showing them.


B4 Saturday, December 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 25, 2010 B5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Saturday, Dec. 25, 2010: This year, you naturally seem to make the right choices. You frequently detach and don’t trigger as much. You gain a better understanding of those in your immediate circle. Some of you will travel. Others could decide to specialize in their field or just take a workshop or seminar. Get past present mental filters. Let go of rigid thinking. If you are single, a foreigner or unusual person could enter your life. As a result, you will open up to many new ideas and experiences. If you are attached, your ability to understand your significant other helps warm your bond. VIRGO always presents a calmer point of view. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Others seem to fuss. You might feel as if no matter what you do, you cannot make certain people happy. Realize that it might not be you, but rather the expectations others put on this day. Tonight. Relax, watch TV or visit with friends. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH The splendor of Christmas could have a unique quality this year. Watching a child’s or loved one’s reaction to his or her gifts could be a delight. Express your appreciation. Tonight: OK, join in; be a kid again. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH You feel very comfortable close to home. Helping a child

enjoy a new toy or visiting with a roommate who might need a pep talk feels right. A loved one or special friend pulls in closer than he or she has in a long time. Tonight: Don’t move far from your castle. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH Others express depth and caring. Be smart -- ignore a person’s sarcasm. Let go and help others enjoy themselves. Make a favorite snack or join in on a game. Tonight: Surrounded by great people! LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Somehow you have the right answer or solution to the moment. You express many different qualities. If someone close becomes difficult, could it be that he or she is jealous? Avoid a difficult situation, if possible. Remain nurturing. Tonight: Kick back and relax. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH The responsiveness of people right now can only add to the quality of your holiday. A child or loved one’s actions or thoughts make Christmas. Allow an innate playfulness to emerge. Tonight: Find an excuse to get under the mistletoe. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH Even you have off days, and unfortunately this could be one of them. A change within your immediate circle or family seems necessary. Chill. This, too, will pass. Watch a game on TV with a loved one. Tonight: Just don’t make it a late night. You need sleep. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH Communication is starred. You might have difficulty returning

all the calls or catching up with each person you want to share holiday tidings with. A neighbor has a lot going on. Be sensitive to his or her needs. Tonight: Hanging out is fun. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Events propel you into the limelight once more. You step in because someone has to. Bring people together. You naturally do the right thing. Do be careful with spending. You could do some damage, even at this late date! Tonight: Slow down. Take time for yourself. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH You are coming from a very dynamic perspective. This holiday, perhaps, has more symbolism and caring than many in the past. If you are away or simply surrounded by loved ones, kick back and enjoy. Tonight: Make it OK for your mind to wander. It will anyway. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Your mind keeps drifting back to a key person, whether he or she is a new friend or an established loved one seems to make no difference. Hopefully this person is with you. Otherwise, call. Tonight: Be a duo. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH Others come forward with requests and invitations. What you can count on is that you are no wallflower, under any circumstances. Make your choices, but don’t step on another person’s feet. Be careful about letting go of a need to control. Tonight: Just don’t be alone. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


B6 Saturday, December 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Eclipse Continued from B1 One of six total eclipses in the next 10 years will cross the entire North American continent, an event that hasn’t occurred since 1918. On Aug. 21, 2017, at 10:19 a.m., the roughly 100-mile pinstripe of darkness is predicted to pass right through Central Oregon, with the eclipse’s center skimming just north of Madras. Those who have experienced it say to prepare for a party atmosphere, with thousands of people gathering in the clearer skies of Central Oregon to share the event.

Fear, then fascination It’s only been in recent years that eclipses have been cause for celebration. Total solar eclipses are the result of what Norton calls a “fortunate accident.” It’s just by chance that our full moon perfectly blocks out the sun. But for thousands of years, these seemingly random moments when blackness engulfed daylight frightened Earth’s human inhabitants. The events became incorporated into religious beliefs; some tried to predict them. In Norse mythology, a wolflike giant periodically devoured the sun. The Greeks believed the gods were angry and considered eclipses bad luck. Four thousand years ago in China, historians wrote of two royal astronomers who failed to predict an eclipse. The emperor beheaded them. Astronomers learned how to predict eclipses in their regions with regularity in ancient times,

as well. By plotting the new moon, its different times and varying proximity to the sun, and by comparing this with the sun’s position, they could calculate when the moon and the sun would occupy the same point in the sky. Yet it wasn’t until about 30 years ago that seeing eclipses became a pop culture phenomenon. Kelly Beatty, a senior contributing editor for Sky & Telescope magazine who has led eclipse trips all over the world, said that for the last few hundred years it was mainly scientists who would travel to see eclipses, as they offered rare opportunities to see the atmosphere of the sun. Later, satellites largely replaced eclipses in scientific research. Eclipse tourism, Beatty said, was born in the early 1970s when a cruise ship altered its route to allow passengers to witness one. “They had a great time,” he said, “so people started going for the fun of it.” Today eclipse tourism remains a niche business, but the trips can certainly cost big bucks. For instance, Beatty helped organize a Sky & Telescope trip to see a total eclipse that passed over Antarctica in 2003. Since weather is notoriously unstable on the continent, they chartered a jumbo jet out of Chile at a cost of more than $300,000. In addition, the eclipse was due to appear low on the horizon. “So we could literally only sell seats on one side of the plane,” he said. “They went for $6,000 to $10,000 a seat. Seventy to eighty people took us up on it.” The jet flew into the Antarctic interior, allowing passengers to witness the eclipse, and then returned to Chile. The flight lasted 14 hours.

On the chase

The path of the Aug. 21, 2017 solar eclipse One of the six total solar eclipses of the next decade will pass through Central Oregon. The outer limits of the total eclipse are the blue lines and the center line, where it will be dark the longest, is red. Locales outside the blue lines will only see a partial solar eclipse. Maupin

While Bend resident Norton wouldn’t consider herself an eclipse addict, she would say she’s been an eclipse chaser — one who journeys near and far to see such cosmic events. Her husband, the late Richard Norton, was the founding director of the University of Arizona Flandrau Planetarium in Tucson, and together they ran a business for 30 years providing astronomy graphics and text for academic settings. They voyaged to Mexico, Romania and the ocean off the coast of Brazil to see total solar eclipses, often with Richard hired as the astronomy expert for tour groups. She said the stereotypes are true: When the eclipse nears, birds roost, the temperature drops and people stop to stare upward. The sky turns to twilight, colors change and stars pop out. “You can see why people got really scared in the past when they didn’t know it was coming,” she said. In 1999, the couple went with a group of 91 people to Bucharest, Romania, to see the total eclipse. She said traffic completely stopped while people got out of their cars to gaze at the sky. “There’s a tremendous celebration when people get to see it,” she said. “There’s screaming and yelling. It’s very exciting.” There is often also a carnival atmosphere in the lead-up to the moment. The first total eclipse Carroll saw was in 1979, the last time one occurred in the continental U.S. He waited at a perch above the Columbia River. Drumming echoed through the gorge from people gathered at the Stone-

Oregon

26 97

Warm Springs

Madras

Duration: 2 min. 2 sec.

Duration: 2 minutes

Warm Springs

WHEELER COUNTY

JEFFERSON COUNTY

97

Sisters Duration: 34 seconds

Mitchell

CROOK COUNTY

97 20

26 126

Prineville Duration: 1 min. 6 sec. DESCHUTES COUNTY

Redmond Duration: 33 seconds

Bend Source: NASA

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Beatty said there are typically three types of people who travel to see eclipses. Some are hardcore umbraphiles, who do anything it takes to get a glimpse, no matter the destination. There are roughly several thousand of those in the world, Beatty said, many of whom are German or Japanese. “Eclipses are like notches on their gun handle,” he said. Carroll said he witnessed such types in Mexico in 1991. A plane from Japan landed, people spilled on the tarmac to see the eclipse, and then they climbed back on and took off. The longest a total solar eclipse lasts is about 7½

henge replica at Maryhill, Wash. “All sorts of people were flocking to Central Oregon because the weather was better,” he said, noting that it was raining in Portland at the time. He saw his next total solar eclipse in 1991 on the Baja Peninsula of Mexico. That was one of the longest of the century, lasting almost 7 minutes. “You don’t think that’s much time,” he said, “but when you’re actually in it, it seems much longer.” Thousands of people from around the world gathered on the beach outside the region’s main city, Cabo San Lucas. Many, like Carroll, were there for almost a week as part of a tour. Tours are usually staffed with an astronomer and sometimes a meteorologist. Carroll said locals milled the crowd, hawking souvenirs and T-shirts. He picked up one with a Mayan-style sun god on it. Everyone stared at the sun, first through special Mylar viewers to protect their eyes, then when the moon completely eclipsed the sun with the naked eye — the only time one should look directly at the sun. “Everyone is awestruck,” he said. Both Carroll and Norton plan to drive north for the 2017 event. Beatty said he may be here as well. “You should absolutely see one in your lifetime,” he said. “It’s the closest thing to a religious experience in nature. That’s why right after people have seen one, the first thing out of their mouths is, ‘When’s the next one?’ ”

minutes; most are much shorter. Other eclipse chasers are amateur astronomers who lure their families to see them with the promise of an exotic holiday. “An eclipse in Mongolia is not a big draw for them, but an eclipse in Hawaii is,” he said. Lastly, there are those without a lot of specific knowledge but who have interest, disposable income and a sense of adventure. “That’s why you’ll see ads for these cruises in National Geographic or The New York Times or The New Yorker,” Beatty said. “Some of these folks are well-heeled.”

Heidi Hagemeier can be reached at 541-617-7828 or at hhagemeier@bendbulletin.com.

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Inside

OREGON Father imprisoned for filming 9-year-old son fight, see Page C2. BUSINESS Get your home tested for carbon monoxide, see Page C3. Brokerage gambles on mobile sports betting, see Page C4.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2010

Redmond schools see refinancing as a way to cut costs

AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY

Our education Aspirations for better livelihood drive up enrollment at COCC Census Bureau. The more education people make in all three counties, the less likely they are to live in poverty. Knowing that more education can mean a better job or even a job, campuses like Central Oregon Community College are seeing a rise in enrollment for unconventional students. “Some of the biggest areas we have seen growth within the past few years is in the 30- to 32-year-olds, in which enrollment has more than doubled,” said Ron Paradis, college relations director at COCC. “We also have students over the age

Editor’s note: This is the third of three parts examining different components of the American Community Survey in Central Oregon, detailing changes in population, income and education. Today: education.

Lengthening payment plan on $5M loan would free up dollars

Molly Black By Patrick Cliff

The Bulletin

The Bulletin

I

Cutting payments Currently, the district makes annual payments of about $741,000, and it believes it could reduce that amount by about $300,000. Refinancing the debt would likely spread payments over 17 more years, instead of the seven now remaining on the debt. “You’re able to allocate those dollars in the general fund to other things besides real estate,” said Mike McIntosh, director of operations. “It allows us to shift those funds to educationally sound things.” The 40-acre site, bought in 2007, was going to be home to Evergreen Elementary’s replacement. However, when it came time to decide where to locate that school — now known as Sage Elementary — the district realized the city had not grown to the northwest as had once been expected. See Loan / C7

t’s not always true, but the more education people have the more money they can make. The benefits of education are hinted at in the Central Oregon results of the American Community Survey from the

of 60, so there certainly is an increase in the enrollment of nontraditional students.” COCC is trying to do its part in accepting these nontraditional students, increasing the access residents have to return to school. The community college opened a branch in Redmond 12 years ago and has seen a huge growth in student enrollment and success on that campus. “One of the biggest issues for students and residents is simply being able to get to the campus,” Paradis said. See Education / C7

&EVDBUJPOBMBUUBJONFOU Less than 9th grade

9th to 12th grade, no diploma

High school graduate (includes equivalency)

Some college, no degree

Associate’s degree

Bachelor’s degree

Graduate or professional degree

$SPPL$PVOUZ Population 25 years and over: 15,663 3.9% 10.8%

35.5%

27.4%

6.6%

10.6%

5.3%

%FTDIVUFT$PVOUZ Population 25 years and over: 105,092 2.1%

The Redmond School District is trying to save several hundred thousand dollars on real estate costs as it faces down a 2011-12 budget shortfall that could top $5 million. As it considers possible cuts, the district is attempting to find savings in areas that won’t affect classrooms. One of the biggest savings in that area could come on a roughly $5 million loan the district used to purchase 40 acres in northwest Redmond. The district is also considering cuts, and school leadership has said repeatedly that all possibilities remain on the table.

6.0%

25.0%

27.6%

10.4%

19.2%

9.7%

+FGGFSTPO$PVOUZ Population 25 years and over: 12,760 8.8%

10.9%

6OJUFE4UBUFT 6.4%

9.1%

37.3%

22.0%

6.8%

9.5%

4.6%

Population 25 years and over: 197,440,772 29.3%

20.3%

7.4%

17.4%

10.1%

1PWFSUZSBUFCZFEVDBUJPOBMBUUBJONFOU $SPPL$PVOUZ Less than high school graduate

19.9%

High school graduate (includes equivalency) Some college or associate’s degree Bachelor’s degree or higher

9.9% 7.5% 6.1%

%FTDIVUFT$PVOUZ Less than high school graduate High school graduate (includes equivalency) Some college or associate’s degree Bachelor’s degree or higher

+FGGFSTPO$PVOUZ

21.7%

Less than high school graduate

8.9%

High school graduate (includes equivalency)

6.3% 3.2%

Some college or associate’s degree Bachelor’s degree or higher

6OJUFE4UBUFT

14.5%

Less than high school graduate

24.2%

15.6%

High school graduate (includes equivalency)

11.6%

Some college or associate’s degree

9.5% 5.9%

Bachelor’s degree or higher

8.0% 3.7%

Want to take a closer look at the American Community Survey data? The New York Times has partnered with Google to plot all of the survey data by census tract. Visit http://projects.nytimes.com/census/2010 to explore the data. Source: American Community Survey

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

The outdoors: an interpretive tour Rangers lead group on expedition through wilderness on snowshoes By Nick Grube The Bulletin

D

uring a blustery Christmas Eve morning at Mt. Bachelor’s West Village, a group of jovial Canadians and their family members skipped the usual fare and took solace in a stand of tall mountain hemlocks. Instead of hitting the slopes or gliding through the snow on cross-country skis, they opted to trudge through the woods on a free snowshoe expedition with a pair of wisecracking interpretive rangers from the U.S. Forest Service. “We wanted to be Canadians,” Rob Sleigh said with a wide grin and hint of his Canadian accent even though he now lives in Santa Rosa, Calif. “We like the snow and the cold weather.”

Short but informative trip through outdoors The tour was short, about an hour and a half long, but along the way the group learned about everything from the burrowing activities of the elusive pine marten to the geology of Broken Top and how to determine the size of a wild animal by drawing a circle around its tracks in the snow. Many of these explanations were accompanied by jokes from volunteer interpretive rangers

C

2 Central Oregon lawmakers stepping down next month By Nick Budnick The Bulletin

SALEM — Judy Stiegler and George Gilman, two Central Oregon lawmakers who are stepping down next month, will miss the job of legislating, but not the politics. One is leaving willingly, the other less so. Gilman, a longtime Medford dairy farmer, is retiring, while Stiegler, a lawyer who has George been a com- Gilman munity fixture in Bend for decades, was defeated in her re-election bid last month by Republican Jason Conger. Their terms end Jan. 9. Judy While their Stiegler paths exiting the Capitol may differ, they’ll both leave with respect and affection for the institution they leave behind. However, neither has any immediate desire to return. Stiegler, who ran unsuccessfully to represent the city of Bend in 2004 before finally ousting then-incumbent Chuck Burley four years later, is not sure she has another legislative campaign in her after the grueling one of this fall, in which she and Conger exchanged bitter attacks. “Campaigning is a tough, hard, brutal process. There is nothing easy about it,” she said. “I would have to be convinced that there is a compelling reason to put myself in that position again, (and) I have no current plans to do that.” Gilman, 71, a Republican, spent eight years in the Legislature, representing Crook, Lake and portions of Deschutes, Jackson and Klamath counties.

‘Was a good run’ “I chose to leave, and I am still very, very happy with that decision, no regrets whatsoever,” he said. “It was a good run.” Stiegler, 57, has not figured out what she will do next. Though her husband, former Deschutes County District Attorney Mike Dugan, has applied for a twoyear job as a special prosecutor in the island nation of Palau, she’s not sure she’d go with him. Whatever her next job, she expects it will involve some element of public service. See Lawmakers / C7

Ted Brownrigg and David Paulsmeyer, who led the expedition and provided a low-intensity approach to the learning.

Room for puns For instance, as the rangers were telling to the group what the moss-like substance hanging from the hemlock trees was, and how it was a symbiotic association of fungus and algae, Brownrigg, who wore a Santa hat with a bell on it, used a pun to help exemplify that relationship. “They got together and they’re lichen it,” he said. This humor, combined with the depth of knowledge about the natural history of the area, made the little jaunt all the more memorable for Rob Sleigh’s older brother, Ted, who made the trek to Central Oregon from British Columbia. “The snowshoeing was awesome,” Sleigh said. “But the little stories were great.” His sister, Diana Alley, of Vancouver, said she couldn’t agree more with her brother’s assessment. While she’s does a lot of snowshoeing in Canada, she said the rangers definitely made a good team and were full of “neat little facts” that kept her amazed. “This is something I’m really glad I didn’t miss,” she said. The Sleighs and their extended

Stiegler, Gilman reflect on time in Salem

Holiday closures

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Dave Paulsmeyer, an interpretive ranger with the U.S. Forest Service, leads the way while giving a natural history snowshoe tour Friday morning on Mt. Bachelor.

family weren’t the only ones who appreciated the way the rangers led the excursion. Rita Jenks, of Portland, also decided to trade in her skis for snowshoes. See Snowshoe / C7

“It’s just fun. I like the whole nature scene and being in the snow. I’m having a white Christmas.” — Rita Jenks, Portland resident

• The Bulletin building is closed today in observance of the Christmas holiday. • Almost all city, county, state and federal offices are closed Saturday. • Deschutes, Jefferson and Crook County public libraries are closed today. • Post offices are closed today. • Liquor stores: Today, Bend North liquor store will be open from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., and the Sunriver liquor store will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. All other liquor stores are closed. • Banks are closed. • Bend’s Juniper Swim & Fitness Center and the Cascade Swim Center in Redmond is closed.


C2 Saturday, December 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Father gets 13 months for filming son in fight

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Redmond Police Department

The Associated Press MCMINNVILLE — A father will spend 13 months in prison after pleading guilty to charges related to his filming and posting of a video of his 9-year-old son fighting with a neighbor’s son in a McMinnville parking lot. The News-Register reported that Jaime Garcia will also receive three years of probation after his guilty plea to one count each of criminal mistreatment and coercion — both felonies. At the sentencing on Monday, Yamhill County Circuit Court Judge Ronald Stone told Garcia to “get a grip” and change his life after his sentence. When police arrived at the apartment complex where Garcia’s son fought another boy, they found rotten food, dirty dishes and inadequate edible food for the children. Garcia has five children, all of whom are in their mother’s custody. In the three-minute video, adult voices cheered on the boys as Garcia’s son fought the 9-year-old son of Michael Chandler. Chandler, 34, was sentenced to 60 days in jail. The children have been removed from Garcia’s and Chandler’s homes. Police say an out-of-state caller alerted them to a video on Facebook that showed the fight. Deputy District Attorney Alicia Eagan said Garcia’s son is afraid to be alone with him.

Criminal mischief — An act of

criminal mischief was reported at 1:13 p.m. Dec. 23, in the 500 block of Northwest Fourth Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 11:30 a.m. Dec. 23, in the area of Southwest Seventh Street and Southwest Highland Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 6:48 a.m. Dec. 23, in the 3600 block of Southwest 21st Place.

Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 11:18 p.m. Dec. 23, in the area of Neff Road and Powell Butte Highway in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 12:55 p.m. Dec. 23, in the 60300 block of Cheyenne Road in Bend.

AN EXTREME SANTA

Today is Saturday, Dec. 25, the 359th day of 2010. There are 6 days left in the year. This is Christmas Day. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Dec. 25, 1990, the World Wide Web, the system providing quick access to websites over the Internet, was born in Geneva, Switzerland, as computer scientists Tim Berners-Lee and Robert Cailliau created the world’s first hyperlinked webpage. ON THIS DATE In 1066, William the Conqueror was crowned king of England. In 1776, Gen. George Washington and his troops crossed the Delaware River for a surprise attack against Hessian forces at Trenton, N.J. In 1818, “Silent Night,” written by Franz Gruber and Father Joseph Mohr, was performed for the first time, at the Church of St. Nikolaus in Oberndorf, Austria. In 1926, Hirohito became emperor of Japan, succeeding his father, Emperor Yoshihito. (Hirohito was formally enthroned almost two years later.) In 1931, New York’s Metropolitan Opera broadcast an entire live opera over radio for the first time: “Hansel and Gretel” by En-

Glow symbolizes message of peace during holidays By Nikole Hannah-jones The Oregonian

Larry Steagall / Kitsap Sun

Dressed in a Santa Claus costume, Jeremy Smith catches some air as he wakeboards at Kitsap Lake, Wash., on Friday morning. This is the 10th year that Smith has brought holiday cheer to the homes along Kitsap Lake. His boat plays Christmas music while he wakeboards, and he waves to the residents.

Hirohito becomes emperor of Japan in 1926 The Associated Press

Portland woman uses violet light to fight violence

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y gelbert Humperdinck. In 1941, during World War II, Japan announced the surrender of the British-Canadian garrison at Hong Kong. In 1989, ousted Romanian President Nicolae Ceausescu and his wife, Elena, were executed following a popular uprising. Former baseball manager Billy Martin died in a traffic accident in Fenton, N.Y. In 1991, Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev went on television to announce his resignation as the eighth and final leader of a communist superpower that had already gone out of existence. In 1995, singer Dean Martin died at his Beverly Hills home at age 78. In 2006, James Brown, the “Godfather of Soul,” died of heart failure in Atlanta at age 73. TEN YEARS AGO A fire in central China killed 309 people inside an unlicensed disco.

FIVE YEARS AGO Pope Benedict XVI marked his first Christmas as pontiff, calling for concrete actions to back up “signs of hope” in the Middle East and urging peace in Darfur, Sudan and the Korean peninsula. Opera singer Birgit Nilsson died in her native Sweden at age 87. ONE YEAR AGO Passengers aboard Northwest Airlines Flight 253 foiled an apparent attempt to blow up the plane as it was landing in Detroit by seizing suspect Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, a Nigerian accused of trying to set off explosives in his underwear. The Taliban released a video purporting to show Pfc. Bowe Bergdahl, a U.S. soldier captured more than five months earlier in eastern Afghanistan. Korean-American missionary Robert Park was arrested by border guards after crossing into North Korea; he was released in Feb. 2010. Treating all Foot Conditions 541.383.3668

TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Singer Tony Martin is 97. Actor Dick Miller is 82. Actor Gary Sandy is 65. Singer Jimmy Buffett is 64. Pro and College Football Hall-of-Famer Larry Csonka is 64. Country singer Barbara Mandrell is 62. Actress Sissy Spacek is 61. Former White House adviser Karl Rove is 60. Singer Annie Lennox is 56. Baseball Hall of Famer Rickey Henderson is 52. Actress Klea Scott is 42. Rock musician Noel Hogan (The Cranberries) is 39. Singer Dido is 39. Rhythm-and-blues singer Ryan Shaw is 30. Country singer Alecia Elliott is 28. Pop singers Lisa and Jess Origliasso (The Veronicas) are 26. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Were I a philosopher, I should write a philosophy of toys, showing that nothing else in life need to be taken seriously, and that Christmas Day in the company of children is one of the few occasions on which men become entirely alive.” — Robert Lynd, British essayist (1879-1949)

PORTLAND — Amid the red and white lights twinkling the arrival of Christmas, a purple bulb blazes outside an empty Northeast Portland home. Bullet holes riddle the house. One bullet went through the front door. Another pierced a dresser in the bedroom where an infant normally sleeps, and another landed inches from the bunk bed with an 11-yearold’s Betty Boop doll nestled on the covers. The gunshots were a message from a rival gang, angry at the young man who sometimes stays there with his family. But Debbra J. Wallace has a message of her own. This week, the day after a second round of gunshots, the 60year-old marched to the front porch of her niece’s home and screwed in the small, purple bulb. She did the same at her home and at her sister’s and passes out purple bulbs to anyone who will take one. The glow of purple in the darkness is a message to the jaded young men who shot up her niece’s home without thought to the children sleeping inside and to those in the community who she says turn a blind eye because they feel the violence won’t touch them. Purple is a combination of red, the color of the Bloods, and blue, the color of the Crips. It also is the color for the Advent season, the celebration leading to the birth of Christ at Christmas. “This color symbolizes peace to me,” says Wallace. “I want to see the city of Portland become purple at night. I would like to see it spread like a wildfire that regardless of color or faith or neighborhood, we all want peace, we all want protection for our children, we all want our children to have a future.” Wallace, a preacher’s daughter, says the idea came to her like a vision last week as she prayed for her family after the first round of gunshots. Her great-nephew had turned wayward, and his involvement in gangs brought violence to her niece’s door. The story of the Israelites who put blood on their doors so the angel of death would pass over and spare their first-born sons sprang into her head. She would mark her niece’s door hoping to spare her greatnephew’s life, and she would encourage others to do the same to spare others across the city. Wallace went to Sunlan Lighting and asked for purple

bulbs. She has given away 14 bulbs so far. When Kay Newell, known as Sunlan’s Lightbulb Lady, heard Wallace’s story, she began to tell others who came in, and some of them bought purple lights as well. “There is so much of this shooting, so much inconsideration for human life,” Newell says. “It’s a cool concept to use a color to send a message. Anything to help calm down the violence.” Wallace’s sister, LaNita Stephens, says she’s not going to take her light down. The family lives in fear since her daughter’s house got shot up. Her daughter is too scared to talk about what happened and has sent her children to stay with family members. “I would be devastated if I were planning a funeral,” Stephens says, jumping a few seconds later at an innocent noise outside. “Maybe this will change someone’s life. Just like you believe in your red and your blue, we’re going to believe in our purple.” Wallace knows it may not seem like much to some. What is a light bulb in the face of bullets? What is a light bulb in the face of the broken homes, poverty and under-education that lead young men into gangs in the first place? But, Wallace says, she had to do something. No one was hurt this time. But someone will be, if not in her family, in someone else’s. Dr. T. Allen Bethel, Wallace’s pastor at Maranatha Church and president of the Albina Ministerial Alliance, says symbols hold the potential for tremendous power. “A symbol is a sign for far more than what you see,” Bethel says. “As people begin to see those purple lights burning, they are going to say, ‘That is a symbol of a community rising and saying this has got to stop and we are coming together.’ ” Bethel will talk to his congregants about the purple lights during Sunday service and will also share with the others. He believes purple lights will spread across the city. In the bedroom of her 11-yearold great-niece, Wallace traces her finger along the jagged hole left by the bullet that crashed through the double-paned window. The little girl won’t get to open presents in her own home this year. “She’s innocent, she’s innocent,” Wallace says, her voice shaking. “Like so many children in Compton, in Chicago.” She wipes a tear. “We sit comfortably in our homes, living comfortably on our living wage and don’t understand the gangbanger who has to deal drugs to survive,” Wallace says. “Most people don’t know what to do, but at least the purple light gives us a place to start, to at least have a conversation.”

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C3

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www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2010

HOLIDAY SHOPPING

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF GE Capital to sell unit to Spanish firm General Electric’s finance unit, GE Capital, agreed Friday to sell its Mexican consumer mortgage division to Santander of Spain for 2 billion pesos, or $162 million, part of the industrial giant’s strategy to sell off noncore financial assets. Under the terms of the deal, Santander will take over GE Capital’s consumer mortgage unit in Mexico, which includes a $2 billion loan portfolio. GE Capital has provided mortgages in the country since 2002. Santander disclosed the price of the transaction in a regulatory filing with the Mexican stock exchange. The deal is expected to close in the first half of next year. Before the financial crisis, GE had relied on GE Capital for years to bolster its profits. The unit provided handsome revenue from commercial lending, and eventually provided nearly half of the parent company’s profits. But the market turmoil of 2007 and 2008 revealed weaknesses in the unit, including its heavy exposure to commercial real estate and subprime mortgages, the latter of which arose from an illtimed 2004 purchase of WMC Mortgage of California. Since the crisis, GE has sold off assets to refocus the division on safer industrial finance operations. (It sold WMC in 2007 for a $1 billion loss.)

Sales finally bounce back Spending expected to jump 3.3% to $451.5 billion By Anne D’Innocenzio The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Shoppers came back in force for the holidays, right to the end. After two dreary years, Christmas 2010 will go down as the holiday when Americans rediscovered how much they like to shop. People spent more than expected on family and friends and splurged on themselves, too — an ingredient missing for

two years. Clothing such as fur vests and beaded sweaters replaced practical items like pots and pans. Even the family dog is getting a little something extra. “You saw joy back in the holiday season,” said Sherif Mityas, partner in the retail practice at A.T. Kearney. A strong Christmas Eve augmented a great season for retailers. The National Retail Federation predicts spending this holi-

day season will reach $451.5 billion, up 3.3 percent over last year. That would be the biggest increase since 2006, and the largest total since a record $452.8 billion in 2007. The holiday season runs from Nov. 1 through Dec. 31, so a strong week after Christmas could still make this the biggest of all time. Spending numbers through Dec. 24 won’t be available until next week, and final numbers, through Dec. 31, arrive next month. See Shopping / C5

Dave Bowman, an energy technician for GreenSavers, measures carbon monoxide levels near a water heater in a Bend home earlier this month.

Accounting standards board names leader Leslie Seidman, a former auditor and accountant for JPMorgan, was named on Thursday as chairwoman of the Financial Accounting Standards Board, which sets accounting rules for American companies. Seidman, 48, has been a member of the board since 2003 and acting chairwoman since the end of September, when Robert Herz retired unexpectedly. Her appointment is for a term ending in 2013, although she could be reappointed. She takes over at a time of uncertainty for the board, whose role may change if the Securities and Exchange Commission decides to allow American companies to use rules promulgated by the International Accounting Standards Board. If it does so, the American board’s role would change in ways yet to be determined. The appointment was announced by the Financial Accounting Foundation, which administers the board. John Brennan, the foundation’s chairman, said Seidman would bring “both unparalleled standard-setting experience and outstanding leadership skills to her new role.” — From wire reports

Personal income and spending Personal income Seasonally adjusted

Change from previous month Oct. Nov.

0.3% 0.3%

$12.75 trillion

Dean Guernsey The Bulletin

Keeping homes free of carbon monoxide Turning up the heat can introduce deadly gas; professional inspections can put minds at ease By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

With cold weather gripping the region, Central Oregonians are more likely to turn up the heat at home — with a wood stove, a natural-gas furnace, a space heater or other methods. In doing so, people can unknowingly introduce carbon monoxide, or CO, into the home. Exposure to enough of the odorless gas can cause death, said Gregg Lande, a senior air quality planner with the state Department of Environmental Quality. To avoid life-threatening situations, Central Oregonians should at least install a CO monitor at home, if not also request an inspection to find out if the gas is getting caught in the home, said David Farrer, a public health toxicologist in the Oregon Health Authority’s Office of Environmental Public Health. Companies that do home performance inspections, which include testing for the pres-

ence of CO, abound in Central Oregon. Besides checking how much CO is present, certified home performance assessment technicians also figure out if it’s possible for the gas to quickly leave once present, said Dave Bowman, an energy technician for the Bend-based contractor GreenSavers USA Inc. During the part of the assessment devoted to combustion-safety testing, Bowman employs a combustion analyzer, among other tools. First, Bowman drills a quarter-inch hole in the exhaust flue of a water heater or furnace. He then inserts the probe above the combustion analyzer into the hole, and the device tells him how many parts per million of CO are inside. If he finds fewer than 40 parts per million, Bowman said, the appliance is considered to be in good operating condition. See CO / C5

$12.70

Get checked out Companies that check home performance in Central Oregon Greening Your Environment 541-639-2988 Make It Green 541-323-2525 www.homecofficiency.com Green Savers 541-330-8767 www.greensaversusa.com Inline Builders LLC 541-279-1917 www.bendremodeling.org Quality Heating 541-923-4752 www.qualityheat.com AmeriSpec 541-549-8065 www.amerispec.net/rahm JB Insulation 541-280-1634 www.jbinsulation.com

E-mail use falls as the young text and chat By Matt Richtel New York Times News Service

SAN FRANCISCO — Signs you’re an old fogy: You still watch movies on a VCR, listen to vinyl records and shoot photos on film. And you enjoy using e-mail. Young people, of course, much prefer online chats and text messages. These have been on the rise for years but are now threatening to eclipse e-mail, much as they have already superseded phone calls. Major Internet companies like Facebook are responding with message services that are focused on immediate gratification. The problem with e-mail, young people say, is that it involves a boringly long process of signing in, typing out a subject line and then sending a message that might not be received or answered for hours. And sign-offs like “sincerely” — seriously? Lena Jenny, 17, a high school senior in Cupertino, Calif., said texting was so quick that “I sometimes have an answer before I even shut my phone.” Email, she added, is “so lame.” Facebook is trying to appeal to the Lenas of the world. It is rolling out a revamped messaging service that is intended to feel less like e-mail and more like texting. The company decided to eliminate the subject line on messages after its research showed that it was most commonly left blank or used for an uninformative “hi” or “yo.” Facebook also killed the “cc” and “bcc” lines. And hitting the enter key can immediately fire off the message, a la instant messaging, instead of creating a new paragraph. The changes, company executives say, leave behind formalities that separate users from what they crave: instant conversation. “The future of messaging is more real-time, more conversational and more casual,” said Andrew Bosworth, director of engineering at Facebook, where he oversees communications tools. “The medium isn’t the message. The message is the message.” The numbers testify to the trend. The number of total unique visitors in the United States to major e-mail sites like Yahoo and Hotmail is now in steady decline, according to the research company comScore. Such visits peaked in November 2009 and have since slid 6 percent; visits among 12- to 17-year-olds fell around 18 percent. See Messaging / C5

“The future of messaging is more real time, more conversational and more casual. The medium isn’t the message. The message is the message.”

Source: Energy Trust of Oregon

— Andrew Bosworth, director of engineering at Facebook

12.50

Couple will get second chance after game show goof

12.25 12.00

By Brian Stelter

2009 2010

New York Times News Service

Personal spending Seasonally adjusted

Change from previous month Oct. 0.7% Nov. 0.4% $10.6 trillion

$10.52

10.4 10.2 10.0 2009 2010 Source: Department of Commerce AP

Which product was sold in stores first: Post-it Notes or the Sony Walkman? Gabe Okoye was sure he knew the answer. Okoye, 25, and his girlfriend, Brittany Mayti, 30, were the contestants on the first episode of “Million Dollar Money Drop,” a Fox game show that had its premiere Monday. Okoye was confident about the Post-it Notes — so confident that he persuaded Mayti to go along. Together, they wagered $800,000 of the $880,000 they had banked, out of the $1 million the show’s producers had challenged them to keep at the beginning of the program. They were wrong, Fox said. True to

the show’s title, wads of hundred-dollar bills dropped off the table with a loud whoosh. The studio audience gasped, and Okoye hung his head in his hands, bent over as if he had been punched in the stomach. “It’s OK, baby,” Mayti told him, “we still have more money.” Minutes later, they lost the remaining $80,000 and went home not only emptyhanded but “devastated,” she said, about the loss of so much money. Okoye thought to himself, “I have to make it up to her 1 million dollars’ worth.” But he was right about the Post-it Notes. See Game show / C5

Gabe Okoye, left, and Brittany Mayti, with host Kevin Pollack, compete during the premiere of Fox’s “Million Dollar Money Drop.” Michael Yarish Fox via New York Times News Service


B USI N ESS

C4 Saturday, December 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Republicans plan Bond brokerage gambles to re-examine on mobile sports betting financial overhaul By Brady Dennis The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — As the GOP prepares to seize control of the House in January, its members on the Financial Services Committee are vowing to re-examine the wide-ranging financial regulatory legislation passed this year. Among other things, the overhaul hammered out in the wake of the financial crisis establishes the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, creates oversight of the vast derivatives market and gives the government broad new authority to seize and wind down large, troubled financial firms. “We’re looking at it provision by provision,” Rep. Spencer Bachus, R-Ala., the incoming committee chairman, said in an interview. President Obama signed the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act into law in July, and Republicans have consistently described it as a massive government overreach that will stymie businesses and economic growth. It was named for its primary sponsors, Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass., and Sen. Chris Dodd, D-Conn. In particular, Bachus said Republicans want to revisit provisions that would require companies that use derivatives merely to hedge risks — such as an airline guarding against swings in fuel prices — to set aside more capital for those deals. Bachus said such “end users” did not contribute to the financial crisis and should not face the same restrictions as Wall Street firms that deal in more risky forms of derivatives. “Any attempt to require end users to come up with large amounts of capital … could certainly re-

strict their ability to hire and create jobs,” he said. “And one of our pledges to America was that we didn’t want anything in DoddFrank to be a job killer.” Bachus also has remained adamant that lawmakers take a second look at the new “resolution authority” granted by the bill, intended to allow the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. to take over and liquidate a large, failing firm in a way that doesn’t leave taxpayers on the hook or cause widespread damage to the financial system. GOP members have insisted that the law, as written, could perpetuate government bailouts because it allows federal officials to pay off a company’s creditors and assume a portion of its assets. If a sizable firm were to fail, “you’re talking about billions of dollars,” Bachus said. “The first thing we need to do with the liquidation authority, and with many of these things, is just find out: What in the world do the regulators envision it empowers them to do?” Despite the eagerness within the GOP to roll back or repeal portions of the financial regulatory overhaul, Frank and his Democratic colleagues seem largely unconcerned that significant changes will become reality. “They can’t do anything legislatively. For one thing, the things they most dislike legislatively are some of the most popular things we’ve done,” said Frank, referring specifically to the new consumer bureau, the derivatives legislation and the Volcker Rule, which limits banks from trading on their own accounts. “I can’t imagine many of their people want to vote on those.”

Oil importers grow wary in anticipation of $100 crude By Ola Galal and Lananh Nguyen Bloomberg News

CAIRO — Oil importers are growing wary of the impact of prices near two-year highs as some OPEC members foresee a further rally to the $100-a-barrel level and Arab oil ministers gather for a meeting in Cairo. Japan’s economy minister said Friday the government needs to keep an eye on climbing prices while the deputy governor of the Chinese central bank said inflation pressures are rising. Shokri Ghanem, chairman of Libya’s National Oil Corp., was the latest OPEC official to forecast $100. Iran and Venezuela have also said that represents a fair price, while Saudi Arabia, the group’s biggest exporter, said it prefers prices centered on $75, a level that oil has traded above since September. “An issue for OPEC will obviously be prices edging higher,”

said Bill Farren-Price, chief executive officer of Winchester, Britain-based consultants Petroleum Policy Intelligence. “The issue is whether we’re in a new rally, and for now the jury’s out on that. And I don’t think anyone in OPEC would disagree with that.” Brent crude oil on London’s ICE Futures Europe exchange advanced 21 percent this year, and traded Friday as high as $94.74 a barrel. Crude oil futures on the New York Mercantile Exchange gained 15 percent so far this year. Ghanem, Libya’s top oil official, told reporters Thursday that oil will rise to $100 a barrel. He was speaking in Cairo before a meeting Saturday of the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries. OAPEC includes several members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, the broader 12-nation group that influences prices by setting supply quotas.

Lee Amaitis is the president and chief executive of Cantor Gaming, a subsidiary of the Wall Street bond powerhouse Cantor Fitzgerald that runs a sports book inside the M Resort in Henderson, Nev. Cantor Gaming is applying for a license that would allow sports betting on mobile devices anywhere in Nevada, as long as the bettor had an account at a casino. Isaac Brekken New York Times News Service

By Susanne Craig New York Times News Service

LAS VEGAS — Miles from the glamour of the Las Vegas Strip, past foreclosed homes and dusty tracts of desert, the Wall Street bond powerhouse Cantor Fitzgerald has placed millions of dollars of its own money on the table. At the M Resort Spa Casino, Lee Amaitis, a former bond trader who now runs Cantor’s operations here, held court in a dimly lighted plush orange VIP booth lined with large champagne bottles. Leaning forward, he talked excitedly about the ambitious plans for the Cantor Gaming subsidiary. “There’s big money in this, especially now we are moving onto the Strip,” said Amaitis, in a gray pinstripe suit with the top two buttons of his white shirt undone. Cantor Fitzgerald is one of the biggest brokers of U.S. government securities, considered among the safest places to put one’s money. Cantor Gaming handles some of the riskiest. It runs the sports book at the M Resort, a relatively new casino popular among Las Vegas locals. It has handled — or will soon start handling — the sports betting operations at the Vegas Hard Rock Hotel and Casino and at the recently opened Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas and the Tropicana Las Vegas, all on or near the Strip. And Cantor is banking on the next frontier in gambling: a license that would allow sports betting on mobile devices anywhere in Nevada, as long as the bettor had an account at a casino. Wall Street executives usually protest when their business is compared to a casino. But there is a logic to privately held Cantor’s Vegas subsidiary, casino industry experts say. “Guys who trade Treasuries are doing it for basis points, and sports betting is not much dif-

ferent,” said Jeffrey Logsdon, an entertainment and gaming analyst for BMO Capital Markets. “Trading a million dollars in Treasuries is different than trading a billion. Sports betting is the same. You want the spread, volume and you see yourself as a matchmaker.”

Risky move Still, for Cantor it is a potentially huge risky bet. Unlike most sports books, which typically cap wagers at anywhere from $1,000 to $10,000, Cantor Gaming’s book has a take-allcomers policy, exposing it to losses if it cannot hedge its bigger bets. During Super Bowl XLIV this year, it handled a few bets in excess of $500,000. Cantor’s push into Vegas is being led by Amaitis, 61, whose past includes a conviction in his 20s for dealing cocaine. Cantor Gaming, Amaitis says, mitigates its risk through volume. And Cantor hopes to have another advantage through richer data. In 2008, Cantor Gaming bought Las Vegas Sports Consultants, the world’s largest odds-maker. It sets the odds for more than 40 percent of the casinos in Las Vegas, and Cantor used that data to expand into what is known as in-running betting, which lets people wager on portable devices on sporting events in progress. Sports betting — wagering on the outcome of events like football games and horse races — is still a small part of Las Vegas gambling. It accounts for just 1.7 percent of all gambling wins in Nevada, according to the state’s Gaming Control Board. Most large casino operators, including Caesars Entertainment and MGM Resorts, run their own sports book, taking on limited risk but keeping all the profit. Sports book operators make most of their money charging a small commission on bets. They then try to match a bet on any

given game with an opposite wager, essentially neutralizing the risk of that bet. If they can’t, operators typically try to change the money line, making it more attractive for bettors to vote on the other team. In two years, Cantor Gaming has grown into a force in Nevada. So far this year, the sports book at the M Casino has taken in more than $400 million in wagers, almost 20 percent of all the money bet on sporting events in Nevada, Amaitis says. He contends that the number will grow to $1 billion, or almost 40 percent of the market, in 2011. The firm isn’t profitable; most of its revenue is reinvested in new technology. But Amaitis predicts it will be profitable on an operating basis in 2011.

Going mobile In 2000, the Cantor Index was started in Britain, allowing spread betting on financial products and sports wagering. Spread betting allows people to wager on the price movement of a security, or in the case of sporting events, gamblers can wager on the outcome above or below a set spread. Spread betting, however, is a leveraged product, making it a riskier venture for Cantor. So instead of expanding into spread betting, in 2004 Cantor licensed its fixed-odds technology, where bettors pay up front to gamble, to the well-known online betting company Ladbrokes. But Amaitis had his sights set on a bigger prize: Las Vegas. In 2005 Cantor lobbied Nevada’s gambling commission to approve mobile gambling. A year later Cantor Gaming became the first licensee approved to manufacture and distribute hand-held gambling devices. It took another two years to get its products approved. The devices, one the size of a mobile phone and the other the size of an iPad, offer a number of

games, including sports betting, roulette and slot machines. They can be used only in casinos in which they are registered, and a number of casinos offer them, including the M, the Palazzo and the Venetian.

Huge wagers In 2008 these devices caught the attention of Anthony Marnell III and Joe Magliarditi, business partners in the soonto-be-opened M Resort. After seeing Cantor Gaming’s ability to offer in-running betting, they decided to hand over the sports book for the M Resort, which opened in March 2009, to Cantor Gaming. “Cantor understands technology and scale and was willing to make the capital investment in the book that we couldn’t,” said Marnell, the “M” of the M Casino. Magliarditi joined the Vegas Hard Rock Hotel and Casino in June, leading to the Hard Rock’s recent decision to hire Cantor to run its sports book. Cantor Gaming pays rent to operate in the casinos, and the casinos get an undisclosed cut of the profit. Cantor Gaming’s decision to take huge wagers is what sets it apart from others. A Cantor Gaming executive, Andrew Garood, said while this strategy had helped Cantor Gaming expand and attract professional bettors and high rollers, there had been some dicey moments. For instance, in November 2009, the Indianapolis Colts were two-point favorites going into a game with the New England Patriots. The Colts won the game by just one point. Cantor lost money on both the game and the spread. “I don’t see any difference between Las Vegas Boulevard and Vegas,” said Garood, a former derivatives trader who joined in Cantor in 2000. “Over time we can’t lose, but there will be games where we take a hit.”

How to make sure your new jewelry survives the holidays By Paul Sullivan New York Times News Service

There is nothing like jewelry to brighten Christmas morning. But while these presents may have been wrapped and put under the tree with care, they are more likely to vanish this month and next than at any other time during the year. According to the Chubb Group of Insurance Companies, jewelry claims are 15 percent higher in December and January than at any other time of the year. (Claims are 8 percent higher than in February, despite the popularity of jewelry as Valentine’s Day gifts.) “It’s not just theft; it’s mysterious disappearances as well,” said Janece White, vice president for Chubb, who specializes in underwriting jewelry. Nothing will turn that smile into a frown faster than the realization that a new — or prized — earring or bracelet is missing. And given the increase in prices for precious metals and stones, that loss could mean a significant financial as well as sentimental cost.

Aaron Houston / New York Times News Service

Janece White, vice president of Chubb Group of Insurance Companies, advises taking extra caution with jewelry during the year-end holiday season. Here are some ways to make sure that your gift survives the holidays — or is at least replaced at fair market value if it does not.

Precautions Having a favorite piece of jewelry stolen while it is being worn

is a persistent fear. But from a claims perspective, it is not something that happens often. Far more pieces of jewelry are reported lost or taken from a home than physically removed from a person, insurers say. Still, it is worth taking some precautions to make sure you do

not become the exception. “It doesn’t hurt to carry the pieces with you and put them on when you get to a function,” White said. “Or take a cab and treat yourself to make sure you’re more cautious.” A mugging may be comparatively rare, but guests in the home are common around the holidays. “Leaving jewelry and items that could be carried out of the house is something you have to guard against,” said Ron Laconi, president of the private client group at Chartis Insurance. “You need to be diligent in safeguarding your valuables and using your safe.” This may sound like nagging, but remember that even a check for the full value of a piece of jewelry is not really going to replace it. Jewelry, after all, is not a car or a boat; it has sentimental value.

From gift to asset And, so, in the first flush of sentimental joy, could there be anything less romantic than asking how much a ring cost?

But if that ring is nice enough to make you tear up, it probably should be insured. “Don’t be shy about asking how much it’s worth to insure it,” said Lisa Lobo, vice president at the Hartford. “I’d love to get a really cool diamond necklace, but I’d want to know how much it is worth and will my policy cover it. If it’s a $5,000 necklace but I only have $1,500 in coverage, what do I do?” The answer, of course, is buy more insurance, but most of us do not think like underwriters. We fall in love with the gift and try not to think about its cost.

Protection Don’t feel bad if you did not call your insurance agent as soon as you unwrapped that gift. Even people with substantial existing policies forget to add new items right away. Many insurers offer a backstop: For people who have policies that list high-value items separately — as opposed to a blanket policy for an overall amount of jewelry — there is usually a

grace period on new purchases. While the length of time varies, the coverage amount for an item is generally a percentage of the total amount insured. But Jonathan Crystal, executive vice president of Frank Crystal & Company, an insurance brokerage firm, warned that there were limits even to this. “The policies have a common sublimit of 25 percent of the value of the covered jewelry subject to a limit,” he said. “You could have $500,000 in jewelry already insured but the limit may still be $25,000.” Still, people who have coverage with those limits are better off than people who rely only on their homeowners’ policies to cover jewelry losses. First, any claim is subject to the deductible, whereas a claim on a valuable personal property policy will be covered for the appraised amount. More important, there is generally a small allotment for valuable items on homeowners’ insurance. Lobo said that typically the $1,500 allotted for jewelry on such a policy is also for furs and other collectibles.


B USI N ESS PEOPLE ON THE MOVE Martin E. Thompson Jr. is a new associate attorney at the law firm Stahancyk, Kent & Hook, of Bend. Thompson received his law degree from the University of South Dakota School of Law and a Master of Laws degree in taxation from the University of Washington School of Law. For the past year, Thompson has worked as a general solo practitioner in Burns. Dr. Tim Phillips of Desert Valley Equine Center in Redmond recently attended the American Association of Equine Practitioners’ 56th annual convention in Baltimore, where more than 3,000 equine veterinarians, veterinary students and veterinary technicians gathered to learn about the newest treatment options and research findings and to attend industry forums, equine welfare sessions and business management workshops. Chris Conant, with Elliott, Powell, Baden & Baker Insurance Inc. in Bend, recently attended a certified insurance counselor seminar in Portland to renew his CIC certification. The Central Oregon chapter of the Women’s Council of Realtors recently installed its 2011 board, including: Phyllis Mageau of RE/MAX Key Properties, president; Myra Girod of Steve Scott Realtors, president-elect; Pamalynn Steinfeld of Prudential Northwest Properties-Bend, vice president of membership; Judy McClurg of Sunset Mortgage Co., secretary; and Sandy Goodsell of RE/MAX Town & Country Realty in Sisters, treasurer. Alpine Real Estate announced that Mary Stratton has success-

Martin E. Thompson Jr.

Chris Conant

Dr. Tim Phillips

Phyllis Mageau

Myra Girod

Pamalynn Stenifeld

Judy McClurg

Sandy Goodsell

fully completed the principal broker’s licensing requirements and training required by the Oregon Association of Realtors.

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 25, 2010 C5

Messaging

CO

Continued from C3 The slide in e-mail does not reflect a drop in digital communication; people have just gravitated to instant messaging, texting and Facebook (4 billion messages daily). James Katz, director of the Center for Mobile Communications Studies at Rutgers University, said this was not the death of e-mail but more of a downgrade, thanks to greater choice and nuance among communications tools. “It’s painful for them,” he said of the younger generation and email. “It doesn’t suit their social intensity.” Some, predictably, turn up their noses at the informality and the abbreviated spellings that are rampant in bite-size, phonebased transmissions. Judith Kallos, who writes a blog and books about e-mail etiquette, complains that the looser, briefer and less grammatical the writing, the less deep the thoughts and emotions behind it. “We’re going down a road where we’re losing our skills to communicate with the written word,” Kallos said. Mary Bird, 65, of San Leandro, Calif., is another traditionalist, if a reticent one. “I don’t want to be one of those elders who castigate young peoples’ form of communication,” she said. “But the art of language, the beauty of language, is being lost.” Bird’s daughter, Katie Bird Hunter, 26, is on the other side of the digital communications divide and finds her parents to be out of touch. “They still use AOL,” she says, implying with her tone that she finds this totally gross.

Continued from C3 If the reading is between 40 and 100 ppm, Bowman tells homeowners to have the appliance serviced. And if the reading comes up anywhere between 100 and 400 ppm, he turns off the appliance, stops the testing and tells homeowners to get the appliance fixed. Another important tool for Bowman when he is checking CO presence is a manometer, which measures air pressure in pascals. Bowman sticks the manometer probe into the hole he made in the appliance and checks how much exhaust gas is traveling up the stack and getting outside. If the gas is not moving outside efficiently, it can get stuck in the home when fans are used, Bowman said. So he also turns on all fans in the home, creating a depressurized environment, and runs the manometer to see if CO is staying inside, rather than leaving the home. After Bowman is finished using the combustion analyzer and the manometer, he inserts a stainless steel plug in the hole he made in the appliance earlier. When anything burns, CO can result, Farrer said. A molecule of the gas contains one carbon atom and one oxygen atom. The molecule wants to add another oxygen atom to make carbon dioxide, and hemoglobin, which passes oxygen through the human body, can be a place for the molecule to attain the extra oxygen. This occurrence can render a red blood cell useless, which requires the body to generate more such cells, Farrer said. In extreme situations, he said, people can lose consciousness and suffocate. Carbon monoxide has no smell or color. “You don’t know that you’re getting exposed to it,” Farrer said. But people can notice its presence by observing a head rush upon standing up, Farrer said. After all, the chemical is heavier than air and sinks to the floor, which is why experts advise people to install CO monitors low to the ground, not up high, where fire detectors should go. Megan Clark, a market development and support coordinator with Energy Trust of Oregon, said she advises Central Oregonians to buy the CO monitor “that detects the lowest levels of CO that they can afford.”

New York Times News Service ile photo

Chanel Valentine checks text-messages on her phone during a lunch break at Woodside High School, in Woodside, Calif. Valentine says she gets more than 300 text messages a day. Hunter says she seeks to reach friends first by text, then by instant message, then with a phone call and then by e-mail. “And then,” she said, “while I’d probably never do this last one, showing up at their house.” David McDowell, senior director of product management for Yahoo Mail, conceded that the company was seeing a shift to other tools but said this was less a generational phenomenon than a situational one. Fifteenyear-olds, for example, have little reason to send private attachments to a boss or financial institution. Yahoo has added features like chat and text messaging to its email service to reflect changing habits, as has Gmail, which also offers phone calls. “Mail is now only a part of Gmail,” said Mike Nelson, a Google spokesman. “It’s video conferencing, texting, it’s IM, it’s phone calling.” Katz, the Rutgers professor, said texting and social networks better approximate how people

communicate in person — in short snippets where niceties do not matter. Over time, he said, e-mail will continue to give way to faster-twitch formats, even among older people. The changing trends have even some people in their 20s feeling old and slightly out of touch, or at least caught in the middle. Adam Horowitz, 23, who works as a technology consultant for a major accounting firm in New York, spends all day on e-mail at his office. When he leaves it behind, he picks up his phone and communicates with friends almost entirely via texts. Yet he sometimes feels caught between the two, as when he texts with his younger brothers, ages 12 and 19, who tend to send even shorter, faster messages. “When they text me, it comes across in broken English. I have no idea what they’re saying,” said Horowitz. “I may not text in full sentences, but at least there’s punctuation to get my point across. “I guess I’m old school.”

Game show

prodded television reporters to investigate. Web searches confirmed that Continued from C3 the Walkman had reached store In an embarrassing about-face, shelves in 1979, but there was unthe show’s producers acknowl- certainty about the introduction edged Thursday that they had of Post-it Notes. The notes were “incomplete information” about invented by 1977 but were not the history of Post-it Notes, and sold nationally until 1980. they invited Okoye and Mayti Okoye did some searching, too, back to try again. They did not, but “I didn’t trust Wikipedia,” he however, return the $800,000. said. The couple said they harbored “I was just like, ‘Little old me no grudge toward Fox and had can’t be right over a big company not decided whether to accept the like Fox.’ It’s that type of doubt,” invitation. he said. “To go through that again On Wednesday, as online at— maybe to lose again — that’s a tention peaked, Jeff Apploff, the lot of stress,” Okoye said by tele- game show’s executive producer, phone Thursday night. stood by the Walkman answer. Up until the Post-it Notes ques- In a statement, he said the show’s tion, the couple had been on a researchers had spoken “directroll. Only two ly” with 3M, the questions still maker of Post-it “Sometimes loomed. Notes, “and they “There’s no way people can confirmed that to re-create the although they type of situation conceive the fact had given out we had, the adren- of having that free samples in aline we had,” test markets in Mayti said. “We’ll much money. But 1977 and 1978, it just never know.” wasn’t until 1980 once it’s right in Capitalizing on that Post-its were the holiday sea- front of you — you sold in stores.” son, Fox sched- can touch it, you On Thursday, uled “Million Dolhe said the inforcan smell it — it lar Money Drop” mation from 3M for four nights in becomes much was “incomplete.” a row this week. more real.” In a new stateIt is scheduled to ment, Apploff return for a few — Gabe Okoye, “Million said the show nights in January. had learned that Dollar Money Drop” “Money Drop,” contestant “the product was based on a Britoriginally tested ish series, is the for sale in four citinverse of most game shows, in ies under the name ‘Press ’N Peel’ that it gives players $1 million in 1977, sold as ‘Post-its’ in 1979 at the beginning and challenges when the rollout introduction bethem to hold onto it by answering gan and sold nationwide in 1980.” seven questions in a row correctHe thanked viewers “who ly. It’s an intoxicating concept. brought this to our attention.” “Sometimes people can conApploff noted in the Thursday ceive the fact of having that much statement that the Post-it Notes money,” Okoye said, “but once question “was not the deciding it’s right in front of you — you question in their game.” That can touch it, you can smell it — it is why Fox is not paying the becomes much more real.” couple. In the history of game show “Million Dollar Money Drop” blunders, Monday’s mistake has not yet been renewed for a ranks right up there with the epi- second season, raising the quessode of ABC’s “Who Wants to Be tion of how the couple would a Millionaire” in 1999 that wrong- actually return to the show. “Rely asserted that Lake Michigan gardless of a Season 2, we’ll set was larger than Lake Huron. something up for them to play When the producers of “Million- again,” a Fox spokeswoman said. aire” learned that the contestant’s In the meantime, the couple, answer was correct, they invited who said on the show that they him back on the show. had been dating for about a year As in the “Millionaire” case, and that they wanted to save the producers of “Million Dol- money for a wedding, have been lar Money Drop” “decided to left to ponder what might have confront it head-on — which of been. Since the taping in Sepcourse brings them a lot of posi- tember, awkward conversations tive publicity,” said Tim Brooks, a about the show have “sparked up television historian, in an e-mail like, here and there,” Okoye said. message. She laughed as he mimicked Brooks’ assessment: “Brilliant!” her side of the conversation: But the publicity was almost “Well, if it wasn’t for you, we entirely negative earlier in the would have. ...” week when viewers started to litiShe interjected: “I didn’t say gate Post-it Notes vs. Walkman that!” online — and when Fox initially “She took it better than anydefended the wrong answer. one else would have taken it,” he There was a spike in Google said. search traffic for the term “PostMayti replied, “It actually made it Note” immediately after the our relationship stronger.” telecast Monday night, and by Speaking of the wrong-turnedTuesday morning, message right answer, Okoye said, “Now board threads had popped up it has me thinking, ‘What else is about the topic and viewers had wrong out there?’ ”

The Associated Press ile photo

Shoppers ride the F-train in New York earlier this month. The National Retail Federation predicts sales will reach their highest level since a record $452.8 billion in 2007.

Shopping Continued from C3 The economy hasn’t improved significantly from last year. Unemployment is 9.8 percent, credit remains tight and the housing market is moribund. But recent economic reports suggest employers are laying off fewer workers and businesses are spending more. Consumer confidence is rising. “I was unemployed last year, so I’m feeling better,” said Hope Jackson, who was at Maryland’s Mall in Columbia on Friday morning. Jackson bought laptops and PlayStation 2 games for her three daughters earlier in the season but was at the mall on Christmas Eve to grab $50 shirts marked down to $12 at Aeropostale. Some spending growth online has been driven by free shipping offers and convenience. From Oct. 31 through Thursday, about $36 billion has been spent online, a 15 percent increase over last year, according to MasterCard Advisors’ SpendingPulse.

Taubman Centers and Mall of America have reported strong clothing sales, which was a hard sell last year. Jewelry sales sparkled throughout the season. Stores expect solid profits because they didn’t have to slash prices as Christmas neared, analysts say. Some habits adopted during the recession lingered. Shoppers used cash more and credit cards less. The final six days of the holiday shopping season are Sunday through next Friday. They’re only 10 percent of the 61 holiday shopping days but can account for more than 15 percent of spending. For the economy, the key question is whether strong spending this holiday season will continue into the new year. Still, stores were encouraged by what they saw in the final stretch of the holiday season. Even pets made it back onto gift lists this year. Three Dog Bakery, a pet-supply chain in Clinton Township, Mich., whose specialties include $15.99 jars of banana-nut dog cookies, opened three years ago at the

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C6 Saturday, December 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus Editor’s Note: The following editorial, written by Francis P. Church, first appeared in The New York Sun in 1897. It was an immediate sensation, and became one of the most famous editorials ever written.

W

e take pleasure in answering thus prominently the communication below, expressing at the same time our great gratification that its faithful author is num-

bered among the friends of The Sun: I am 8 years old. Some of my little friends say there is no Santa Claus. Papa says, “If you see it in The Sun, it’s so.” Please tell me the truth, is there a Santa Claus? … Virginia O’Hanlon Virginia, your little friends are wrong. They have been affected by the skepticism of a skeptical age. They do not believe except they see. They think that nothing can be which is not comprehensible by their little minds. All minds, Virginia, whether they be men’s or children’s, are little. In this great universe of ours, man is a mere insect, an ant, in his intellect as compared with the boundless world about him, as measured by the intelligence capable of grasping the whole of truth and knowledge. Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus. He exists as certainly as love and generosity and devotion exist, and you know that they abound and give to your life its highest beauty and joy. Alas! How dreary would be the world if there were no Santa Claus! It would be as dreary as if there were no Virginias. There would be no childlike faith then, no poetry, no romance to make tolerable this existence. We should have no enjoyment, except in sense and sight. The external light with which childhood fills the world would be extinguished. Not believe in Santa Claus! You

might as well not believe in fairies. You might get your papa to hire men to watch in all the chimneys on Christmas eve to catch Santa Claus, but even if you did not see Santa Claus coming down, what would that prove? Nobody sees Santa Claus, but that is no sign that there is no Santa Claus. The most real things in the world are those that neither children nor men can see. Did you ever see fairies dancing on the lawn? Of course not, but that’s no proof that they are not there. Nobody can conceive or imagine all the wonders there are unseen and unseeable in the world. You tear apart the baby’s rattle and see what makes the noise inside, but there is a veil covering the unseen world which not the strongest man, nor even the united strength of all the strongest men that ever lived, could tear apart. Only faith, poetry, love, romance, can push aside that curtain and view and picture the supernal beauty and glory beyond. Is it all real? Ah, Virginia, in all this world there is nothing else real and abiding. No Santa Claus? Thank God he lives and lives forever. A thousand years from now, Virginia, nay 10 times 10,000 years from now, he will continue to make glad the heart of childhood. Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!!!!

My Nickel’s Worth Writer’s disrespect In response to the Dec. 12 guest column by Thiel Larson, I would agree on only one point. The United States has lost its “moral foundation,” by which the article is named. To attack our U.S. service people as flawed individuals is unwarranted, basing the knowledge on an online documentary with a small subset of servicemen as its focus. Our U.S. service people are volunteers who have to adhere to a strict code of moral conduct and rules of engagement, and pay severe penalties if they deviate from it, by rules of Uniform Code of Military Justice. They are honorable and put themselves in harm’s way, so that Larson has the right to write what she wants in columns and is protected from enemies, foreign and domestic. To survive and cope, they do need some ruthlessness and detachment, but to come home to people like Larson, writing a disrespectful and unappreciative article, is cruel and unwarranted. Our veterans and service people have more regard for the fragility of life than you would ever know. I invite Larson to spend some time with the Vietnam Veterans Association in Bend to come to terms with her ’60s thinking. She would truly come to see the core values of veterans of that era as a wonderful, philanthropic group. Patricia Moseley Bend

Our tax system I read with interest Carl Barnhart’s Dec. 16 letter, “Tax the rich.” Barnhart does not seem to understand how our taxation system works. I am in favor,

by the way, of the graduated tax system, but I feel that everyone should pay something. In 2010, 47 percent of Americans did not pay any federal income tax while the top several percent paid most of the tax collected. This group is also probably the ones who started the business this gentleman retired from. In the early 1980s, my wife and I started a business with our life’s savings, and it was just us, and then one employee, and then two, etc. When we sold our company, we supported 135 families. How many families, I wonder, has he supported through his efforts? Is it fair that the few top percent of taxpayers support a good share of other Americans who pay next to nothing, and in many cases create the jobs that many of us enjoy? I understand the gentleman’s frustration with the poor economy, but that is a result of all of our actions over the last several decades, and anyone who points at either political party as the culprit is naive. Both parties have acted irresponsibly. We all have wanted a free ride at every level, lived beyond our means, and do not have the political will to correct our shortcomings. We all will pay for the past. That’s just the way it works. John Rosen Diamond Bar R Ranch LLC La Pine

Bad decision We felt strong disappointment and frustration with the Deschutes County commissioners’ decision to delay a vote on the proposed labor contract involving deputy district attorneys. The commissioners’ action will apparently

allow District Attorney-elect Patrick Flaherty to fire current deputy district attorneys without just cause from unsatisfactory work performance, ethics, or other personal behavior. The indirect approval they have provided Flaherty has no rightful place in local government, as suggested by the fact that the county’s legal team reportedly approved the contract. Commissioner Tammy Baney’s comment to The Bulletin that Flaherty should be given the opportunity to comment in his official capacity seems incredible. Does anyone really believe the new district attorney would speak differently before and after his duties become official? We do not personally know any of the D.A. office personnel involved in this dispute, so our outrage is not from personal bias nor friendships. Rather, this commission action is simply unfair to public employees who work for us citizens. Ed and Elly Styskel Bend

Snow frustration We have a lot that is 120 feet by 80 feet. When it snows, my husband, who is 86 years old, clears the sidewalks. The snowplow comes along, going fast, and it covers the sidewalks, so my husband has to clear the sidewalks again. We don’t know when the snowplow is coming, so my husband can’t wait. We’re told we only have a certain amount of time to clear our walks. Why should we be penalized for what the snowplow does? Lupe Perry Redmond

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Jupiterimages.com

Wh ychus-Deschutes area should be under protection By Robert Windlinx Jr. Bulletin guest columnist

I own property right next door to the proposed Whychus-Deschutes Wilderness and I am doing everything I can to push for the permanent protection of this beautiful area. Wilderness designation for this area is important to me, not just because it is beautiful, but also for all of the positive things that this wilderness area could do for our community. I have explored every corner of the Deschutes River canyon near my property with my dogs and my fishing pole. I have seen wildlife that I never knew existed in this area. I have seen ancient Indian rock art that makes me wonder what this place was like when humans first visited. Every time I go down into the canyon, I am in awe of the natural beauty of this place, and it strengthens my faith in God. Unfortunately, I have also seen many people abusing this area by dumping

trash, leaving bonfires burning and rolling boulders off of cliffs. I have found butchered carcasses of deer and elk, dumped by poachers who have no respect for the hunting regulations that the rest of us abide by. Seeing people treating the land so disrespectfully strengthens my belief that as a steward of God’s creation, I have a responsibility to help protect Whychus-Deschutes. When I first heard about the wilderness proposal, I’ll admit that I had my doubts. I already knew that this area is beautiful and that it should be protected, but I did not know very much about how wilderness is managed. Since then, I have researched this issue and learned that the WhychusDeschutes Wilderness area has been proposed as wilderness for far longer than I have lived next door. While I am not a huge fan of increasing government restrictions, I have observed the man-

IN MY VIEW agement of this area and realized that many of the rules that wilderness designation would bring about are already in place. Most of the trails are already closed to motorized vehicles, and the activities that are popular in the WhychusDeschutes area today, such as hunting, fishing and hiking, would be allowed to continue if the area is designated as wilderness. I see two main differences between the current status of these two canyons now, and how they would be managed as the Whychus-Deschutes Wilderness. The first is permanence. Although the area is currently protected by certain rules and regulations, none of this protection is permanent. We have no guarantee that future generations will be able to hike down into the canyon and enjoy the solitude and

freedom that we currently enjoy. If Congress designates the Whychus-Deschutes Wilderness, this area will become part of the natural heritage that is passed on to future Americans for hiking, hunting, fishing, camping, education and exploration. The second change that can come with a wilderness designation is a new level of respect for these two canyons. By calling this area what it is — wilderness — we convey to visitors both present and future that this land is the best that our nation has to offer. A friend who lives next door to the newly designated Oregon Badlands Wilderness tells me that the bottom line is that wilderness simply attracts people who are more respectful of the resources. By giving this area a name that conveys to visitors the significance of the Whychus-Deschutes River canyons in our community, we can begin to educate

people who come to the area about what it means to be a visitor to wilderness and the importance of treating the land with respect. Finally, it is imperative that we look at the big picture and not be shortsighted in our decisions about the management of our public lands. In a time when we need to do as much as we can to enhance the area and help attract new businesses and workers to our region, a Whychus-Deschutes Wilderness is one thing that can add to our competitive economic advantage. It makes me proud to be involved in an effort to protect an area that is special to so many people. I encourage everyone to educate themselves about wilderness and find out more about what you can do to help designate this unique wilderness getaway in our backyards. Robert Windlinx Jr. lives in Terrebonne.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 25, 2010 C7

O Education Continued from C1 “Residents are finding the Redmond branch to be more convenient. Students are realizing they don’t necessarily have to travel to Bend to attend class. Distance is one of those things that can prevent people from going to school, and I think we are making that less of an issue,” Paradis said.

Crook and Jefferson counties used to have the lowest number of students attending COCC, but over the past four years, enrollment from those counties has increased dramatically. And the college is working on branches in both of those communities. “Jefferson County has gone up 79 percent and Crook County has increased by 74 percent. These include both traditional and nontraditional students, but either way, there is an increased

number of students applying for school,” he explained. Deschutes County, the most populous of the three counties, has seen a 46 percent increase in enrollment at COCC. Total full-time equivalent enrollment at COCC went from 3,761 in 2005-2006 to 6,386 in 2009-2010.

By Edward Wyatt Molly Black can be reached at 541-617-7836 or at mblack@bendbulletin.com.

Snowshoe Continued from C1 Jenks also took a hike with rangers, saying that they were helpful and informative. “They’re great,” Jenks said. “It’s just fun. I like the whole nature scene and being in the snow. I’m having a white Christmas.” The free guided tours at Mt. Bachelor began Dec. 18 and run through March 27. No reservations are required, and snowshoes are provided. The tours, which are open to the public, are at 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. every day through Jan. 2, excluding Christmas Day and New Year’s Day, and on weekends only after Jan. 2 because school tours are scheduled during the week. For more information about the tours, call the Snowshoe Hotline at 541-383-4055. Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

Ted Brownrigg leads the group up a trail to an outlook of the Three Sisters mountains while conducting a natural history snowshoe tour at Mt. Bachelor on Friday. Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin

Loan Continued from C1 Instead, the district decided to build in the more populous southwest section of Redmond. Though the district does not expect to build on the property immediately, it is stuck with the land because property values have declined over the past few years. The Redmond School Board

Lawmakers Continued from C1 “Right now it’s going to be nice to just take a deep breath,” she said. All the way until the election results rolled in on the evening of Nov. 2, Stiegler held out hope that she’d retain her seat. In the end, though, she lost by an 11point margin. She said that given voters’ mood across the country, she’s not sure anything could have changed the outcome of a “very strange election cycle.” She said she remains proud of the efforts she made to defend Bend’s Cascades Campus of Oregon State University and help pass a bill to preserve Skyline Forest, thus preserving natural habitat as well as scenic views from Bend. But, “I accept that when you put your name on the ballot, you accept the outcome. The voters spoke,” she said.

Smooth transition Despite her disappointment in the election results, Stiegler immediately reached out to Conger, sending a letter inviting him to meet and discuss how to make their transition a smooth one. They had coffee at McMenamin’s downtown shortly before Thanksgiving, and have spoken on the phone since then. Stiegler talked to Conger about a bill she’d been working on that is supported by the Bend La Pine Schools involving teacher benefits — one that Conger will likely pursue when he takes office. It would allow a district to opt out of the Oregon Educators Benefit Board, which provides health benefits to most public school employees, if it can find a cheaper program elsewhere that offers comparable benefits.

recently asked district staff to draw up several options for refinancing, and those eventually will include the possible cost of refinancing the debt. McIntosh expects to make a report to the board early in 2011. Board Chairman Jim Erickson said board members were excited about the possibility of saving money now, during the budget crisis. But the board also worried that saving money now could

Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

“I really think although we’re inefficient, a lot of the times we, in general, pass good legislation. … Everyone can be represented, and everyone from mill workers to lawyers have an opportunity to serve in the Oregon Legislature.”

flying his single-engine airplane around Oregon and Northern California to visit the places he never had time to because of work. A longtime member of the House Transportation Committee, he said he’s proud of the work he did on bills that led to the construction of projects to help Central Oregonians – such as road improvements to make travel cheaper for truckers, and the reload facility in Prineville that many Bend businesses use to load products onto freight trains for shipment.

— George Gilman, outgoing legislator

Stiegler also helped Conger with little things, like where he can find the district office’s pencils, pens and other supplies. “I want to try to make the transition as amicable and as smooth as possible,” she said. “I think it’s important that we keep the focus where it should be.” Conger, for his part, says he’s heard stories about how other lawmakers behaved after hardfought campaigns — leaving immediately, without ever talking to their opponents. “I’ve been really impressed with her willingness to put the campaign behind us,” he said. “I think she’s been very, very gracious. We may not agree on a lot of things, but it’s clear to me that we share a love for our home here, and both of us want what’s best for Central Oregon.”

Traveling abroad While Stiegler contemplates her next move, Gilman already knows his: a trip to Spain with Sandy Gilman, his wife and longtime administrative assistant. Then he plans to pursue his longtime hobbies: fly-fishing, and

Roy R. Neuberger, art collector, stock trader

hamstring the district in future years, Erickson said. District staff is working to estimate the total cost of the current loan versus a refinanced one. “What you’ve got to weigh that against is the long-term increase in cost,” Erickson said. “We’ll have to take a look if short-term savings justify long-term cost.”

Redistricting He said, however, that he’s happy that he’s leaving in time to miss the 2011 redistricting process in which lawmakers will redraw legislative district lines — a process often steeped in partisanship. “I won’t miss the fight over redistricting a bit,” he said. “If it truly was just to make sure people got a good representative for their district, it would be different; but there’s a lot of politics.” Still, he said he wants people to know that he respects the Legislature. “We’re fortunate in Oregon, we really have a pretty open process,” he said. “I really think although we’re inefficient, a lot of the times we, in general, pass good legislation. … Everyone can be represented, and everyone from mill workers to lawyers have an opportunity to serve in the Oregon Legislature.” He said he’s confident that he leaves the district in good hands with his successor, Mike McLane, a lawyer who ran unopposed in the November election. McLane and Conger will be sworn in Jan. 10, with the rest of the incoming 2011 Legislature. Nick Budnick can be reached at 503-566-2839 or at nbudnick@bendbulletin.com.

New York Times News Service

NEW YORK — Roy R. Neuberger, who drew on youthful passions for stock trading and art to build one of Wall Street’s most venerable partnerships and one of the country’s largest private collections of 20th-century masterpieces, died Friday at his home at the Pierre Hotel in Manhattan. He was 107. His death was confirmed by a grandson, Matthew London. Neuberger had set out to study art but ended up as a stockbroker, a life path once likened to Gauguin’s in reverse. As a founder of the investment firm Neuberger & Berman, he was one of the few people to experience three of Wall Street’s major market crises, in 1929, 1987 and 2008. Although his artistic ability left no lasting impact, his wealth did. Believing that collectors should acquire art being produced in their own time and then hold on to it, giving the public access but never selling, Neuberger accumulated hundreds of paintings and sculptures by Milton Avery, Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning and others, becoming one of America’s leading art patrons. Those works are now spread over more than 70 institutions in 24 states, many of them in the permanent collection of the Neuberger Museum of Art, which opened in 1974 on the Purchase College campus of the State University of New York. The money to buy the works came from his investments at Neuberger & Berman (now Neuberger Berman), the brokerage and investment firm he founded in 1939 with Robert B. Berman. The firm catered to wealthy individuals but also took on a less affluent clientele with the estab-

lishment, in 1950, of the Neuberger Guardian mutual fund, one of the first funds to be sold without the usual 8.5 percent upfront sales commission. His art collecting drew on the lessons he learned in the financial world. Each year he would buy more than he had bought the previous year, often purchasing large lots at a time. In 1948, for example, he bought 46 paintings by Milton Avery, whom Neuberger counted as a close friend. He eventually owned more than 100 Avery works. Roy Rothschild Neuberger was born on July 21, 1903, in Bridgeport, Conn. His father, Louis, who was 52 when Roy was born, had come to the United States from Germany as a boy. His mother, the former Bertha Rothschild, was a native of Chicago, a lover of music (she played the piano) and a “nervous, troubled woman from a large, well-to-do Jewish family, not related to the famous Rothschilds,” Neuberger wrote in an autobiography, “So Far, So Good: The First 94 Years” (John Wiley & Sons, 1997). His father was half-owner of the Connecticut Web and Buckle Co. and had an interest in the stock market, owning thousands of shares in a Montana copper company. The Neuberger family moved to Manhattan. Neuberger attended DeWitt Clinton High School, where in his senior year he was captain of the tennis team that won the Greater New York championship. He left New York University after a single year. He felt, he wrote, “that I could learn much more out in the world of business.” It was while working for two years as a buyer of upholstery fabrics for the department store B. Altman & Company that

he said he developed an eye for painting and sculpture as well as a sense for trading. Both would greatly influence his later life, as would John Galsworthy’s series of novels “The Forsyte Saga,” which described the practice among well-to-do English families of educating their children on the European continent, and “Vincent van Gogh,” a biography by Floret Fels.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com


W E AT H ER

C8 Saturday, December 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, DECEMBER 25 Today: Cloudy, slight chance of mixed showers early; widespread mixed showers late.

HIGH Ben Burkel

45

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western

39/32

Warm Springs

 Willowdale

45/29

Oakridge Elk Lake 33/17

42/25

33/27

Hampton

Crescent 40/24

Fort Rock

46/42

40/26

Chemult 40/23

Portland



Missoula 18/1

44/40

Helena

47/41

Bend

35/17

Boise

45/29

Grants Pass



41/30

48/37



Idaho Falls

Redding

Elko

53/41

Christmas Valley

34/16

42/26

34/28

Silver Lake



Eugene

44/27

36/19

Calgary

50/45



Burns

42/25

Crescent Lake

Vancouver

Reno

38/27

Increasing clouds with a slight chance of snow late.

Crater Lake 37/26

50/34

San Francisco

Salt Lake City

56/49

41/31



Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:39 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 4:32 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:39 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 4:33 p.m. Moonrise today . . . 10:08 p.m. Moonset today . . . 10:22 a.m.

New

First

Full

Dec. 27 Jan. 4

Jan. 12

Jan. 19

City

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

HIGH

LOW

HIGH

38 25

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

Moon phases Last

WEDNESDAY Partly cloudy, cooler.

43 28

BEND ALMANAC

Seattle

Snow will become likely today under mostly cloudy skies. Eastern

HIGH

41 29

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 61° Roseburg • 11° Burns

TUESDAY Mainly cloudy, scattered mixed showers.

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

37/26

Brothers

41/26

HIGH

29

Mainly cloudy, scattered mixed showers, LOW breezy.

NORTHWEST

Paulina

La Pine

LOW

MONDAY

A frontal boundary crossing the coast will produce periods of rain and mountain snow today.

Central

41/27

Sunriver

Tonight: Cloudy, scattered snow showers.

36/24

33/24

Camp Sherman 38/26 Redmond Prineville 45/29 Cascadia 43/30 44/30 Sisters 41/28 Bend Post 42/28

Expect cloudy skies with rain and mountain snow.

47/35

Madras  Mitchell 43/31

35/25

41/26

38/32

36/29

34/28

Marion Forks

Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

SUNDAY

35 20

TEMPERATURE

Astoria . . . . . . . . 52/47/0.07 . . . . . . 50/43/r. . . . . . 48/40/sh Baker City . . . . . . 37/32/0.00 . . . . . . 35/27/c. . . . . . 35/24/rs Brookings . . . . . . 57/50/0.01 . . . . . 57/45/sh. . . . . . 50/44/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 33/11/0.00 . . . . . 35/24/sn. . . . . . 34/22/sn Eugene . . . . . . . .49/42/trace . . . . . . 47/41/r. . . . . . 48/39/sh Klamath Falls . . . 44/34/0.00 . . . . . . 40/27/c. . . . . . 36/27/sn Lakeview. . . . . . . 36/12/0.00 . . . . . .42/31/rs. . . . . . 37/24/sn La Pine . . . . . . . . 42/35/0.00 . . . . . . 42/25/r. . . . . . 33/25/sn Medford . . . . . . . 59/34/0.00 . . . . . . 49/39/r. . . . . . 46/38/sh Newport . . . . . . .57/54/trace . . . . . . 52/45/r. . . . . . 50/43/sh North Bend . . . . . 57/48/0.01 . . . . . . 51/43/r. . . . . . 48/44/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 38/17/0.00 . . . . . 31/23/pc. . . . . . 33/26/rs Pendleton . . . . . . 34/31/0.00 . . . . . . 36/30/c. . . . . . 42/32/sh Portland . . . . . . .43/41/trace . . . . . . 44/40/r. . . . . . 44/39/sh Prineville . . . . . . . 43/37/0.00 . . . . . . 43/30/c. . . . . . 41/31/rs Redmond. . . . . . . 44/30/0.00 . . . . . 46/29/sn. . . . . . 40/28/rs Roseburg. . . . . . . 61/37/0.00 . . . . . 50/39/sh. . . . . . 47/38/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 47/42/0.01 . . . . . . 48/42/r. . . . . . 48/40/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 39/25/0.00 . . . . . .41/28/rs. . . . . . 39/26/rs The Dalles . . . . . . 38/36/0.04 . . . . . .40/34/rs. . . . . . 37/31/rs

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

1

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45/32 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 in 1950 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.15” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . -12 in 1990 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 1.36” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.87” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . 11.31” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.94 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 1.24 in 1964 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .6:25 a.m. . . . . . .3:44 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .3:46 a.m. . . . . . .2:00 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .8:24 a.m. . . . . . .5:11 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . .11:39 a.m. . . . . .11:22 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .1:04 a.m. . . . . .12:35 p.m. Uranus . . . . . .11:38 a.m. . . . . .11:28 p.m.

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Sunday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy, scattered snow showers, LOW cooler.

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . 2-24 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 49 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 47-79 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 65-80 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 67 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 42-44 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . . . 78 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 30-32 Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 20-48 Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Mammoth Mtn., California . . .0-0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . .2-0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

. . . . . . 38-40 . . . . 128-192 . . . . . . . . 87 . . . . . . . 120 . . . . . . 39-55 . . . . . . 28-33 . . . . . . . . 41

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

S

Vancouver 46/42

S

S

Calgary 36/24

S

Saskatoon 26/18

Seattle 50/45

S Winnipeg 16/10

S

S

Thunder Bay 21/10

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 21/13

Halifax 32/25 Portland To ronto (in the 48 Portland 30/27 St. Paul 23/16 contiguous states): 44/40 Green Bay 20/3 Boston 30/16 Boise 30/25 Buffalo Rapid City Detroit 41/30 27/19 New York 33/15 • 88° 30/23 35/25 Des Moines Opa Locka, Fla. Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus 23/7 Chicago 46/25 30/22 34/25 32/21 • -10° Omaha Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 24/4 Jordan, Mont. San Francisco Louisville City 36/27 Denver Kansas City 55/50 28/23 Las 41/31 • 1.80” 32/17 52/28 Vegas St. Louis Nashville Gainesville, Texas Charlotte 35/27 30/20 60/46 38/28 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Little Rock 53/26 Atlanta 63/53 42/20 40/23 39/28 Phoenix 73/50 Honolulu Birmingham 80/70 Dallas Tijuana 39/27 43/25 70/49 New Orleans 56/34 Orlando Houston 74/53 Chihuahua 51/32 66/27 Miami 74/64 Monterrey La Paz 68/37 78/53 Mazatlan Anchorage 80/53 10/-1 Juneau 28/26 Billings 44/24

FRONTS

Bismarck 16/-2

Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .52/39/1.15 . . .44/21/s . . . 49/27/s Akron . . . . . . . . .27/25/0.02 . .29/23/sn . . 27/16/sn Albany. . . . . . . . .30/22/0.00 . . .29/18/c . . . 27/15/c Albuquerque. . . .50/32/0.00 . . .53/26/s . . . 53/29/s Anchorage . . . . . . 3/-6/0.00 . . 10/-1/pc . . . 15/11/c Atlanta . . . . . . . .51/27/0.00 . . 39/28/rs . . .38/22/sf Atlantic City . . . .41/28/0.00 . . .35/27/c . . 35/27/sn Austin . . . . . . . . .69/49/0.70 . . .51/25/s . . . 51/22/s Baltimore . . . . . .41/29/0.00 . . .36/25/c . . 33/22/sn Billings. . . . . . . . .37/24/0.00 . . .44/24/s . . 39/25/pc Birmingham . . . .53/28/0.00 . . 39/27/rs . . 37/22/pc Bismarck . . . . . . .20/10/0.01 . . . 16/-2/s . . . 20/10/s Boise . . . . . . . . . .49/28/0.00 . 41/30/pc . . .40/30/rs Boston. . . . . . . . .38/28/0.00 . 30/25/pc . . 33/26/sn Bridgeport, CT. . .38/28/0.00 . 33/24/pc . . 36/23/sn Buffalo . . . . . . . .26/23/0.00 . .27/19/sn . . 24/15/sn Burlington, VT. . .25/17/0.00 . . . .22/8/c . . . 19/13/c Caribou, ME . . . .27/19/0.00 . . .21/15/s . . . 26/20/c Charleston, SC . .51/27/0.00 . .55/39/sh . . . 46/28/c Charlotte. . . . . . .48/18/0.00 . .38/28/sn . . 37/20/sn Chattanooga. . . .46/29/0.00 . .38/25/sn . . . 36/20/c Cheyenne . . . . . .37/26/0.00 . . .46/25/s . . . 45/27/s Chicago. . . . . . . .32/27/0.10 . .32/21/sn . . .29/15/sf Cincinnati . . . . . .35/29/0.00 . .29/20/sn . . 25/14/sn Cleveland . . . . . .29/27/0.00 . .31/23/sn . . 29/19/sn Colorado Springs 44/30/0.00 . . .49/23/s . . 50/23/pc Columbia, MO . .32/30/0.56 . 28/16/pc . . 24/12/pc Columbia, SC . . .49/23/0.00 . .47/32/sh . . .41/22/sf Columbus, GA. . .54/31/0.00 . . 48/31/rs . . 43/24/pc Columbus, OH. . .30/27/0.00 . .30/22/sn . . 25/17/sn Concord, NH . . . .33/22/0.00 . 29/15/pc . . 28/17/sn Corpus Christi. . .77/60/0.03 . . .60/33/s . . . 58/40/s Dallas Ft Worth. .50/39/0.87 . . .43/25/s . . . 46/27/s Dayton . . . . . . . .30/27/0.00 . .28/20/sn . . 25/14/sn Denver. . . . . . . . .45/23/0.00 . . .52/28/s . . 52/28/pc Des Moines. . . . .31/28/0.34 . . .23/7/pc . . . . 17/1/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .29/25/0.00 . .30/23/sn . . 30/17/sn Duluth . . . . . . . . .25/17/0.00 . . . .16/2/c . . . 17/0/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .60/35/0.00 . . .59/31/s . . . 61/34/s Fairbanks. . . . . -22/-40/0.00 . -25/-34/c . . -24/-33/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . .24/16/0.04 . . 11/-6/pc . . . 12/3/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .35/19/0.00 . . .48/24/s . . 43/23/pc

Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .30/26/0.00 . .28/21/sn . . .26/15/sf Green Bay. . . . . .29/23/0.00 . .30/16/sn . . . 25/8/pc Greensboro. . . . .46/19/0.00 . . 38/27/rs . . 34/21/sn Harrisburg. . . . . .37/27/0.00 . . .32/23/c . . . 31/20/c Hartford, CT . . . .39/27/0.00 . 30/18/pc . . 30/16/sn Helena. . . . . . . . . .13/0/0.00 . 35/17/pc . . 37/25/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .80/70/0.00 . 80/70/pc . . . .80/72/r Houston . . . . . . .67/48/0.48 . 51/32/pc . . . 51/33/s Huntsville . . . . . .49/28/0.00 . . 36/26/rs . . 34/22/pc Indianapolis . . . .34/27/0.01 . .27/15/sn . . . 24/10/c Jackson, MS . . . .59/28/0.00 . .46/26/sh . . 41/22/pc Madison, WI . . . .28/23/0.07 . . .28/13/c . . . 23/3/pc Jacksonville. . . . .57/29/0.00 . 67/41/pc . . 51/26/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .23/10/0.02 . .28/26/sn . . 33/24/pc Kansas City. . . . .34/30/0.10 . 32/17/pc . . . 26/15/s Lansing . . . . . . . .28/22/0.00 . .27/21/sn . . .25/14/sf Las Vegas . . . . . .58/42/0.00 . . .60/46/s . . 59/41/pc Lexington . . . . . .31/28/0.00 . .27/20/sn . . 26/14/sn Lincoln. . . . . . . . .32/27/0.01 . . .27/6/pc . . . . 23/8/s Little Rock. . . . . .40/33/0.05 . 40/23/pc . . . 39/21/s Los Angeles. . . . .66/49/0.00 . 63/53/pc . . 58/50/pc Louisville . . . . . . .35/30/0.00 . .28/23/sn . . . 28/16/c Memphis. . . . . . .48/34/0.00 . 36/25/pc . . 35/23/pc Miami . . . . . . . . .74/52/0.00 . 74/64/pc . . . .73/41/t Milwaukee . . . . .32/26/0.00 . .32/22/sn . . .29/13/sf Minneapolis . . . .27/22/0.18 . . . .20/3/c . . . . 15/0/s Nashville . . . . . . .39/26/0.00 . . .35/27/c . . . 30/22/c New Orleans. . . .63/44/0.00 . .56/34/sh . . . 47/29/s New York . . . . . .40/30/0.00 . . .35/25/c . . 33/24/sn Newark, NJ . . . . .42/30/0.00 . . .35/25/c . . 33/24/sn Norfolk, VA . . . . .41/31/0.00 . .40/31/sn . . 36/26/sn Oklahoma City . .40/36/0.00 . . .42/20/s . . . 36/20/s Omaha . . . . . . . .30/27/0.07 . . .24/4/pc . . . . 17/6/s Orlando. . . . . . . .67/40/0.00 . 74/53/pc . . 60/31/pc Palm Springs. . . .69/46/0.00 . 70/49/pc . . 60/45/pc Peoria . . . . . . . . .29/26/0.32 . . .26/15/c . . . . 23/9/c Philadelphia . . . .40/29/0.00 . . .34/25/c . . 34/23/sn Phoenix. . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 . . .73/50/s . . 69/49/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .29/25/0.00 . .29/19/sn . . 26/14/sn Portland, ME. . . .37/27/0.00 . 30/27/pc . . 33/28/sn Providence . . . . .39/27/0.00 . 33/22/pc . . 34/25/sn Raleigh . . . . . . . .47/22/0.00 . . 39/27/rs . . 34/22/sn

Yesterday Saturday Sunday Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .28/19/0.00 . . .33/15/s . . . 34/22/s Savannah . . . . . .51/25/0.00 . .58/39/sh . . 46/28/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .48/29/0.00 . 50/34/pc . . 43/25/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .51/44/0.11 . . .50/45/r . . 49/41/sh Richmond . . . . . .43/25/0.00 . .38/26/sn . . 32/23/sn Sioux Falls. . . . . .27/21/0.06 . . . 20/-4/c . . . . 13/2/s Rochester, NY . . .26/22/0.00 . .27/20/sn . . 24/15/sn Spokane . . . . . . .35/28/0.00 . . .35/28/c . . . .37/27/i Sacramento. . . . .55/40/0.00 . . .56/46/r . . 54/45/sh Springfield, MO. .36/30/0.35 . 28/18/pc . . 27/14/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .34/30/0.25 . 30/20/pc . . 27/16/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .67/44/0.00 . 70/54/pc . . . 60/37/s Salt Lake City . . .38/33/0.00 . . .41/31/s . . . 43/31/c Tucson. . . . . . . . .68/37/0.00 . . .73/42/s . . 68/40/pc San Antonio . . . .68/52/0.37 . . .56/29/s . . . 54/30/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .42/35/0.15 . 38/18/pc . . . 37/18/s San Diego . . . . . .67/50/0.00 . 61/54/pc . . 59/49/pc Washington, DC .41/31/0.00 . . .36/27/c . . 34/23/sn San Francisco . . .59/41/0.00 . . .56/49/r . . 56/46/sh Wichita . . . . . . . .35/30/0.02 . . .35/17/s . . . 35/18/s San Jose . . . . . . .61/43/0.00 . . .58/46/r . . 59/43/sh Yakima . . . . . . . .38/30/0.00 . .35/29/sn . . . .34/26/i Santa Fe . . . . . . .50/28/0.00 . . .46/23/s . . . 47/26/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .69/45/0.01 . . .70/51/s . . 69/48/pc

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .32/28/0.00 . 27/21/pc . . 30/23/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .68/51/0.00 . .61/46/sh . . 57/41/sh Auckland. . . . . . .72/63/0.00 . . .72/60/s . . . 77/63/s Baghdad . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 . . .67/44/s . . . 67/45/s Bangkok . . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . .88/77/sh . . 87/76/sh Beijing. . . . . . . . . .25/7/0.00 . 27/10/pc . . 33/14/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .68/59/0.00 . . .70/56/s . . 72/59/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . .32/28/0.00 . .28/19/sn . . . 23/9/pc Bogota . . . . . . . .66/50/0.19 . .65/51/sh . . 65/50/sh Budapest. . . . . . .50/43/0.16 . . 39/31/rs . . .31/20/sf Buenos Aires. . . .93/64/0.00 . . .95/65/s . . . 92/64/s Cabo San Lucas .77/61/0.00 . . .78/57/s . . . 77/56/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .73/52/0.00 . . .75/54/s . . . 76/54/s Calgary . . . . . . . .36/10/0.00 . 36/24/pc . . 35/19/pc Cancun . . . . . . . 79/NA/0.00 . .77/58/sh . . 74/55/sh Dublin . . . . . . . . .23/12/0.22 . 31/24/pc . . .35/32/rs Edinburgh . . . . . .27/10/0.00 . 29/17/pc . . 31/22/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .39/28/0.78 . . 31/17/sf . . 28/17/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .79/66/0.03 . . .83/62/t . . . .77/61/t Hong Kong . . . . .72/64/0.00 . .71/61/sh . . 69/59/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . .61/52/0.00 . .62/48/sh . . 51/39/sh Jerusalem . . . . . .61/49/0.00 . . .68/46/s . . . 72/49/s Johannesburg . . .81/61/0.03 . . .81/63/t . . . .75/60/t Lima . . . . . . . . . .75/64/0.00 . .71/62/sh . . 73/61/sh Lisbon . . . . . . . . .52/43/0.00 . .58/46/sh . . . 63/47/s London . . . . . . . .36/30/0.00 . 31/21/pc . . . 36/25/s Madrid . . . . . . . .45/30/0.00 . 45/29/pc . . . 50/30/s Manila. . . . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . . .86/74/t . . 86/75/sh

Wishing our many loyal clients, friends and neighbors a

and a Wonder-Filled New Year

www.SteveScottRealtors.com 541.388.8989

Mecca . . . . . . . . .93/72/0.00 . . .87/67/s . . . 89/68/s Mexico City. . . . .70/37/0.00 . 70/37/pc . . 71/38/pc Montreal. . . . . . .21/10/0.00 . 20/13/pc . . . 19/9/pc Moscow . . . . . . .19/16/0.24 . .31/27/sn . . 28/22/sn Nairobi . . . . . . . .81/55/0.00 . . .78/59/t . . . .79/59/t Nassau . . . . . . . .73/68/0.00 . 71/62/pc . . 74/61/sh New Delhi. . . . . .54/48/0.00 . . .66/44/s . . . 69/45/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .50/39/0.00 . 42/31/pc . . 44/36/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . 10/-2/0.00 . . . 4/-5/pc . . . . 8/0/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .23/14/0.00 . 19/10/pc . . . 18/9/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . .32/30/0.07 . . .27/16/s . . 28/18/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .86/77/0.00 . . .88/77/t . . . .88/78/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .59/52/1.00 . .54/45/sh . . 51/41/sh Santiago . . . . . . .84/52/0.00 . . .84/54/s . . 87/54/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . .81/66/0.00 . . .85/69/t . . . .84/67/t Sapporo. . . . . . . .34/23/0.11 . .29/25/sn . . 30/27/sn Seoul . . . . . . . . . . .16/7/0.00 . . . .23/9/s . . .25/14/sf Shanghai. . . . . . .46/36/0.00 . .41/32/sh . . . 45/32/s Singapore . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . .88/76/t . . . .87/76/t Stockholm. . . . . . .18/1/0.00 . . . 15/8/sf . . 20/16/sn Sydney. . . . . . . . .73/66/0.00 . 84/69/pc . . . .83/69/t Taipei. . . . . . . . . .72/59/0.00 . .65/54/sh . . 63/49/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .70/54/0.00 . . .73/53/s . . . 75/54/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .57/39/0.00 . 47/35/pc . . 48/37/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .27/23/0.00 . . .23/16/c . . 21/11/pc Vancouver. . . . . .48/45/0.51 . . .46/42/r . . . .43/37/r Vienna. . . . . . . . .48/37/0.07 . .32/21/sn . . 25/11/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . .45/37/0.07 . .38/25/sn . . .27/15/sf


S

College Basketball Inside Central Florida is undefeated behind the son of Michael Jordan, see Page D4.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, DECEMBER 25, 2010

COLLEGE SPORTS NCAA is mulling tougher penalties The NCAA has been busy this season, investigating schools from Auburn to Georgia to North Carolina while trying to crack down on problems tied to sports agents. Most of the investigations are open cases with unknown consequences for the schools. But an NCAA panel two years ago has recommended stricter punishments for schools tabbed as serious rules violators — recommendations that remain under consideration and could mark the first substantive revision to the NCAA’s penalty system since 1985. “It’s definitely not a dead issue,” NCAA spokeswoman Stacey Osburn said. “It’s still an ongoing discussion.” The subcommittee of the Division I Committee on Infractions offered its recommendations in October 2008 to the Division I Board of Directors. The group of 18 university chancellors and presidents typically takes about a year to study proposed rules revisions, Osburn said. The panel’s report is confidential. But interviews with the group’s former chairman and others knowledgeable about its contents indicate the recommendations include: • A requirement that all schools found guilty of major violations lose scholarships. Current NCAA rules list that sanction as a “presumptive” penalty. • TV bans, a penalty not applied to Division I violators since 1996. • Clarified penalties for repeat offenders. The “death penalty” — a program-crippling blow that keeps a team off the field while banning recruiting and scholarship awards — has been on the books for 25 years but applied only once, to Southern Methodist for a pay-for-play football scandal in 1987. — The Associated Press

D

NBA

Lakers finally meet the Heat on Christmas By Greg Beacham

L.A.’s Kobe Bryant

The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Kobe Bryant and Lakers coach Phil Jackson haven’t really checked out the Miami Heat much this season. They’ve caught late-night highlights and maybe logged a few minutes with a game from the opposite coast, but not a whole lot more. It’s finally time for the two-time champions to get an up-close look at their most intriguing challengers. When LeBron James, Chris Bosh and — maybe — Dwyane Wade take on the Lakers in the NBA’s Christmas showcase today, most players in both uniforms hesitate to pile any extra significance onto a television-manufactured event. See Lakers / D5

Miami’s LeBron James

Full slate of NBA If you like watching the NBA, you’re in luck today; there are five games on the air: 9 a.m. — Chicago Bulls at New York Knicks, ESPN. 11:30 a.m. — Boston Celtics at Orlando Magic, ABC. 2 p.m. — Miami Heat at Los Angeles Lakers, ABC. 5 p.m. — Denver Nuggets at Oklahoma City Thunder, ESPN. 7:30 p.m. — Portland Trail Blazers at Golden State Warriors, ESPN.

LOCAL SPORTS

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

COLLEGE FOOTBALL Tulsa storms past Hawaii, 62-35 HONOLULU — Damaris Johnson broke loose for 326 all-purpose yards to set an NCAA career record and Tulsa took advantage of six first-half turnovers to beat No. 24 Hawaii 62-35 in the Hawaii Bowl on Friday night. The Golden Hurricane (103) grounded the nation’s No. 1 passing offense most of the night and broke it open with a 21-point third quarter for their seventh straight win and third consecutive bowl victory. The short and speedy Johnson earned MVP honors, rushing for 98 yards and a touchdown and catching four passes for 101 yards and another score. Hawaii (10-4) was led by senior Greg Salas, who had 13 receptions for 214 yards and two touchdowns. — The Associated Press

Jay Reese broadcasts “The Biggest Little Sports Talk Show in Oregon” on ESPN 940 AM on Wednesday night from the Bend Radio Group studios. The show started in November and covers sports from around the state and Central Oregon.

R a d i o , fr o m C . O . ESPN 940 AM kicks off a new show, ‘The Biggest Little Sports Talk Show in Oregon,’ that covers regional and local athletics By Zack Hall The Bulletin

Those accustomed to listening to sports radio while driving home from work might have heard something out of the ordinary during their commute in recent weeks. Since late November, on weekdays from 5 to 6 p.m. on Bend’s ESPN 940 AM, Brett Favre has hardly been mentioned. Nor have other favorite ESPN topics, such as the New York Yankees or the New York Giants, been addressed by the station during that hour. Instead host Jay “Byrd” Reese has been filling that air time with local and regional sports, from Central Oregon prep sports to broader interests, such as the University of Oregon’s football team. Reese, a former radio personality in Medford who has recently moved back to Bend, and Bend Radio Group, which owns 940

AM, the local ESPN affiliate, have launched an entirely locally produced sports talk show. For the Bend Radio Group, Reese’s “Biggest Little Sports Talk Show in Oregon” represents its first venture into its own general sports talk show. “You hope you can meet their expectations and actually surpass it,” Reese, 50, said this week of Bend’s relatively untested market for local sports talk. “And on the other hand, maybe we are providing more than they thought they would ever hear in this market.” Reese had hosted a similar show in his hometown of Medford for five years until 2008. That year, he recalls, he first broached the idea of starting his own show in Central Oregon to Bend Radio Group owner Jim Gross. See Radio / D5

On the radio What: The Biggest Little Sports Talk Show in Oregon Who: Jay Reese, host Where: ESPN 940 AM When: Weekdays 5-6 p.m.

NFL

Bradford, Suh shine as rookies Tulsa wide receiver Damaris Johnson had 326 allpurpose yards on Friday.

INDEX

Rams quarterback, Lions lineman went at 1-2 in the draft, and they have been worth the high picks By Barry Wilner

Scoreboard ................................D2 Baseball .....................................D3 Football .....................................D3 Basketball ................................. D4

The Associated Press

Get in there kid, and make a difference. Few NFL drafts work out better at the top than this year’s grab bag. Look no further for reasons the St. Louis Rams and Detroit Lions

have become competitive than No. 1 overall pick Sam Bradford and No. 2 Ndamukong Suh. While it no longer is strange for a quarterback to step directly from college into an NFL starting job — Ben Roethlisberger, Matt Ryan, Joe Flacco, Matthew Stafford, Josh Freeman and Mark Sanchez did so recently — seeing a rookie lift a team from the worst record in football to playoff contention is notable. That Bradford has done it with a cast of obscure receivers makes his early impact remarkable. See Rookies / D5

The Associated Press ile

Detroit Lions defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh sacks New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady during a game in November.


D2 Saturday, December 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

Rams, Fox.

TELEVISION TODAY

1 p.m. — NFL, Seattle Seahawks at Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Fox.

BASKETBALL

5:15 p.m. — NFL, Minnesota Vikings at Philadelphia Eagles, NBC.

9 a.m. — NBA, Chicago Bulls at New York Knicks, ESPN.

5:30 p.m. — College, Little Caesars Bowl, Florida International vs. Tulsa, ESPN.

11:30 a.m. — NBA, Boston Celtics at Orlando Magic, ABC. 2 p.m. — NBA, Miami Heat at Los Angeles Lakers, ABC. 4:30 p.m. — Men’s college, Hawaiian Airlines Diamond Head Classic, consolation, ESPN2.

WINTER SPORTS Noon — U.S. Snowboard Cross Cup, NBC (taped).

RADIO TODAY

5 p.m. — NBA, Denver Nuggets at Oklahoma City Thunder, ESPN. 6:30 p.m. — Men’s college, Hawaiian Airlines Diamond Head Classic, final, ESPN2. 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Golden State Warriors, ESPN.

FOOTBALL

BASKETBALL 2 p.m. — NBA, Miami Heat at Los Angeles Lakers, KICE-AM 940. 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Golden State Warriors, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690.

4:30 p.m. — NFL, Dallas Cowboys at Arizona Cardinals, NFL Network.

SUNDAY FOOTBALL

SUNDAY FOOTBALL 10 a.m. — NFL, New York Jets at Chicago Bears, CBS. 10 a.m. — NFL, San Francisco 49ers at St. Louis

1 p.m. — NFL, Seattle Seahawks at Tampa Bay Buccaneers, KBNW-FM 96.5. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Basketball • Mississippi State suspends two for fistfight: The two Mississippi State players caught on camera fighting in the stands of the Diamond Head Classic have been suspended indefinitely and sent home from Hawaii. Renardo Sidney and Elgin Bailey, who are roommates, were involved in a fistfight after the Bulldogs’ game Thursday night. The altercation lasted for several minutes before being broken up by teammates and coaches. “I’m very sorry for this incident,” Sidney said in a statement released by the university. “I had no intention of this ever happening. I apologize for embarrassing my family, all the Mississippi State fans, my teammates and coaches. MSU athletic director Scott Stricklin sent out a tweet on Friday saying “The actions that took place in Hawaii were embarrassing to all of us who love Mississippi State. This behavior will not be tolerated.”

Football • Trufant ready to go as Seattle faces Tampa Bay: Seahawks coach Pete Carroll has not seen an injury report this small in more than two months. And it couldn’t come at a better time for his Seattle Seahawks. Carroll said Friday the Seahawks (6-8) will face Tampa Bay as healthy as they have been in quite awhile, heading into a crucial game with playoff implications for both teams. Wins by Seattle in its final two games will wrap up the NFC West title. The best piece of news Seattle got regards cornerback Marcus Trufant, who will be able to go after leaving last week’s game against Atlanta with back spasms. “There’s just a couple questions going into the game at all, and what we were hoping to have,” Carroll said. “So we’re very fortunate in that, and again like I said, I hope that that helps us.” Carroll isn’t kidding when it comes to the Seahawks health. The only player listed as questionable on Friday’s injury report was linebacker Will Herring, who has a hamstring injury. • 16 players fined by NFL: Sixteen players, eight in each conference, have been fined by the NFL for illegal hits, including Atlanta defensive end Kroy Biermann and Cincinnati linebacker Dhani Jones, each docked $15,000 Friday. Biermann received the biggest fine for helmet-to-helmet contact on Seattle quarterback Charlie Whitehurst. Jones was docked for the same infraction against Browns quarterback Colt McCoy. Overall, seven players have been fined for roughing the passer and three for flagrant fouls on defenseless receivers, two points of emphasis by the league this year. Baltimore free safety Ed Reed was fined $10,000 for hitting New Orleans quarterback Drew Brees in the face. Chicago linebacker Brian Urlacher lost $10,000 for striking a defenseless receiver in the neck and head area, his second violation. • Vick picks himself for MVP: Michael Vick’s MVP pick? That would be Michael Vick. Asked after practice Friday who he would select if he had a vote, the Philadelphia Eagles quarterback said, “You put me on the spot.” Then he added with a smile: “I would take ... myself.” Vick and Patriots quarterback Tom Brady are widely considered the top two candidates for the award, which has been won or shared by a quarterback 17 of the last 23 years. Brady leads the NFL with a 109.9 passer rating. In his last nine games, he’s thrown 21 touchdowns and no interceptions. The Patriots (12-2) have won 11 of their last 12. Vick’s 103.6 passer rating is third-highest in the NFL and leads the NFC. He also has 613 yards rushing and has run for eight TDs. • Redskins’ Kyle Shanahan responds to McNabb’s agent: Washington’s Kyle Shanahan took his turn at the microphone on Friday, challenging comments made by Donovan McNabb’s agent. Not that he provided clarity to the ongoing saga. If anything, the situation got more confusing. The Redskins offensive coordinator said Fletcher Smith’s comments were “disturbing,” so he spoke “face-to-face, man-to-man” with McNabb Thursday night at Redskins Park. He said the 12-year veteran told him that the claims made by his agent were untrue. Smith said in a statement Thursday that

the “tension” between the quarterback and the Washington coaches is due to McNabb’s suggestions for improving the Redskins’ offense. “When I talked to Donovan, he said he didn’t say any of that,” Shanahan said during a weekly television interview on CSN Washington. “I’m like, ‘well, your agent did, which to me is you.’ He said he didn’t agree with any of that, that those words didn’t come out of his mouth and that he didn’t tell his agent that stuff. So all I can go off of is what Donovan tells me.” • Jaguars’ Jones-Drew doubtful against Redskins: Jacksonville Jaguars running back Maurice Jones-Drew has missed a third consecutive day of practice, casting doubt about his availability against Washington. Jones-Drew was listed at doubtful on Friday’s injury report, but coach Jack Del Rio declined to reveal whether he expects his star to try to play against the Redskins. Del Rio says the Jaguars are “going to monitor his condition throughout the weekend.” Jones-Drew has dealt with knee problems most of the season, but his right one really became problematic after his sixth consecutive 100-yard game, Dec. 12 against Oakland. He missed two days of practice last week, and Indianapolis held him to 46 yards on the ground. He sat out practice Wednesday, Thursday and Friday this week. • Jets’ Sanchez probable, expected to play vs. Bears: Deep breath, Jets fans. It appears Mark Sanchez is going to play. The second-year quarterback was listed as probable on New York’s injury report Friday and coach Rex Ryan fully expects Sanchez to be under center, barring a late setback, to start in the team’s game at Chicago on Sunday after being limited with a sore right shoulder. “Today, I don’t think there was any question that he was out to say, ‘Hey look, I’m fine,’” Ryan said. “He was. He threw it good. He never grimaced or anything else. He’s feeling good. He really feels good right now.” Sanchez injured the shoulder — some published reports say he suffered a slight cartilage tear — during New York’s second drive in last Sunday’s 22-17 win at Pittsburgh. • Lions put QB Stafford on injured reserve: The Detroit Lions have placed quarterback Matthew Stafford on injured reserve with a separated right shoulder. Friday’s move ends Stafford’s season with two games remaining. He had played in only three games this season and 10 last year because of injuries. Stafford’s shoulder was separated in the season’s opener at Chicago. He later aggravated the injury.

Baseball • Marlins sign P Nolasco to 3-year deal: Right-handed pitcher Ricky Nolasco has signed a three-year, $26.5 million contract with the Florida Marlins. The team announced the signing Friday. In a statement from the team, Marlins owner and CEO Jeffrey Loria called Nolasco “an outstanding competitor.” Nolasco is expected to earn $6 million in 2011, $9 million in 2012 and $11.5 in 2013. He made $3.8 million last season, when he went 14-9 with a 4.51 ERA. The 28-year-old missed the final month after undergoing arthroscopic right knee surgery.

Golf • David Fay to step down as head of USGA: David Fay has decided to retire from the U.S. Golf Association after 21 years as the executive director, leaving behind a legacy that includes his successful push to stage the U.S. Open on golf courses where everyone can play. Fay turned 60 two months ago and said Friday that the USGA was in a good place for him to leave. Mike Butz, the deputy executive director, will take over until the USGA can conduct a national search for Fay’s replacement. Never afraid to take chances, Fay was behind bringing the U.S. Open to Bethpage Black in New York in 2002. It was such a big success that it returned in 2009, along with going to another public course at Torrey Pines in 2008. — The Associated Press

Third Place Mississippi 69, Saint Louis 61 Fifth Place Northeastern 86, Texas St. 78 Seventh Place ETSU 79, Appalachian St. 51

IN THE BLEACHERS

ON DECK Monday, Dec. 27 Girls basketball: Nike Interstate Tournament at Lake Oswego: Redmond vs. Silverton, 6:30 p.m.; Mountain View vs. West Salem, 1 p.m. Boys basketball: Madras vs. Barlow at Barlow Invitational, 7 p.m.

NBA

Tuesday, Dec. 28 Girls basketball: Mountain View, Redmond at Nike Interstate Tournament at Lake Oswego, TBA; La Pine at Regis tournament, TBA; Gilchrist at Bend tournament, TBA, Crook County at Sisters tournament, TBA; Bend vs. Sheldon at the Summit Holiday Tournament, 11 a.m.; Madras vs. Churchill at Summit Holiday Tournament, 2:30 p.m.; Summit vs. Liberty at the Summit Holiday Tournament, 7:45 p.m. Boys basketball: Mountain vs. West Albany at Summit Holiday Tournament, 12:24 p.m.; Bend vs. Ashland at Summit Holiday Tournament, 2:30 p.m. Marist vs. Summit at Summit Holiday Tournament, 6 p.m.; La Pine at Regis tournament, TBA; Crook County at Sisters tournament, TBA; Madras at Barlow tournament, TBA; Redmond vs. South Eugene at Abby’s Holiday Tournament in Medford, 6 p.m.; Gilchrist at Mountain View tournament, TBA Wrestling: Redmond at Crater Duals, TBA; Mountain View at Nevada tournament, TBA

FOOTBALL NFL NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE All Times PST ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF x-New England 12 2 0 .857 446 N.Y. Jets 10 4 0 .714 295 Miami 7 7 0 .500 239 Buffalo 4 10 0 .286 273 South W L T Pct PF Indianapolis 8 6 0 .571 381 Jacksonville 8 6 0 .571 319 Tennessee 6 8 0 .429 322 Houston 5 9 0 .357 333 North W L T Pct PF x-Pittsburgh 11 4 0 .733 334 Baltimore 10 4 0 .714 324 Cleveland 5 9 0 .357 252 Cincinnati 3 11 0 .214 281 West W L T Pct PF Kansas City 9 5 0 .643 322 San Diego 8 6 0 .571 388 Oakland 7 7 0 .500 353 Denver 3 11 0 .214 292 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF Philadelphia 10 4 0 .714 412 N.Y. Giants 9 5 0 .643 360 Washington 5 9 0 .357 268 Dallas 5 9 0 .357 354 South W L T Pct PF x-Atlanta 12 2 0 .857 369 New Orleans 10 4 0 .714 354 Tampa Bay 8 6 0 .571 280 Carolina 2 13 0 .133 186 North W L T Pct PF y-Chicago 10 4 0 .714 293 Green Bay 8 6 0 .571 333 Minnesota 5 9 0 .357 244 Detroit 4 10 0 .286 308 West W L T Pct PF St. Louis 6 8 0 .429 258 Seattle 6 8 0 .429 279 San Francisco 5 9 0 .357 250 Arizona 4 10 0 .286 255 x-clinched playoff spot; y-clinched division ——— Today’s Game Dallas at Arizona, 4:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Tennessee at Kansas City, 10 a.m. San Francisco at St. Louis, 10 a.m. N.Y. Jets at Chicago, 10 a.m. Baltimore at Cleveland, 10 a.m. New England at Buffalo, 10 a.m. Detroit at Miami, 10 a.m. Washington at Jacksonville, 10 a.m. Indianapolis at Oakland, 1:05 p.m. Houston at Denver, 1:05 p.m. San Diego at Cincinnati, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Green Bay, 1:15 p.m. Seattle at Tampa Bay, 1:15 p.m. Minnesota at Philadelphia, 5:20 p.m. Monday, Dec. 27 New Orleans at Atlanta, 5:30 p.m.

PA 303 259 261 353 PA 342 365 282 386 PA 223 253 271 362 PA 281 260 330 415 PA 339 288 343 396 PA 261 270 290 377 PA 242 220 314 329 PA 295 363 314 370

NFL INJURY REPORT NEW YORK — The updated National Football League injury report, as provided by the league: Today DALLAS COWBOYS at ARIZONA CARDINALS — COWBOYS: QUESTIONABLE: WR Roy Williams (groin). PROBABLE: RB Marion Barber (calf), LB Keith Brooking (foot), WR Jesse Holley (knee), LB Bradie James (knee), RB Felix Jones (shin), LB Sean Lee (shoulder, concussion), S Gerald Sensabaugh (concussion). CARDINALS: DOUBTFUL: RB LaRod Stephens-Howling (hamstring). QUESTIONABLE: LB Clark Haggans (groin), LB Joey Porter (tricep). PROBABLE: QB Derek Anderson (head, illness), DE Calais Campbell (ankle), TE Stephen Spach (illness). Sunday TENNESSEE TITANS at KANSAS CITY CHIEFS — TITANS: PROBABLE: DE Jason Babin (shoulder), K Rob Bironas (right groin), QB Kerry Collins (finger), DT Jason Jones (shoulder), DT Sen’Derrick Marks (ankle), QB Chris Simms (illness), LB David Thornton (hip). CHIEFS: OUT: S Donald Washington (ankle). PROBABLE: LB Cory Greenwood (illness). SEATTLE SEAHAWKS at TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — SEAHAWKS: QUESTIONABLE: LB Will Herring (hamstring). PROBABLE: DE Chris Clemons (ankle), C Chris Spencer (shoulder), LB Lofa Tatupu (knee), CB Marcus Trufant (back). BUCCANEERS: QUESTIONABLE: T James Lee (ankle), WR Sammie Stroughter (hamstring). PROBABLE: CB Myron Lewis (hip), LB Dekoda Watson (ankle), TE Kellen Winslow (knee). MINNESOTA VIKINGS at PHILADELPHIA EAGLES — VIKINGS: OUT: S Tyrell Johnson (knee). DOUBTFUL: QB Brett Favre (concussion, neck, right shoulder). QUESTIONABLE: RB Adrian Peterson (knee), S Madieu Williams (concussion). PROBABLE: S Jamarca Sanford (concussion), CB Frank Walker (hamstring). EAGLES: OUT: LB Stewart Bradley (elbow). DOUBTFUL: LB Keenan Clayton (hamstring). QUESTIONABLE: DT Mike Patterson (knee). PROBABLE: G Nick Cole (knee), LB Moise Fokou (wrist), TE Clay Harbor (abdomen), WR DeSean Jackson (foot), T Winston Justice (knee), CB Asante Samuel (knee). BALTIMORE RAVENS at CLEVELAND BROWNS — RAVENS: OUT: WR David Reed (head), S Tom Zbikowski (back). QUESTIONABLE: CB Chris Carr (illness), TE Todd Heap (thigh). PROBABLE: LB Brendon Ayanbadejo (knee), C Matt Birk (knee), WR Derrick Mason (ankle), G Tony Moll (illness), S Haruki Nakamura (illness), LB Jason Phillips (illness), DE Cory Redding (elbow), WR Marcus Smith (shoulder). BROWNS: DOUBTFUL: TE Robert Royal (shoulder). QUESTIONABLE: LB Eric Alexander (groin), DE Kenyon Coleman (knee), DT Shaun Rogers (ankle, hip). PROBABLE: LB Marcus Benard (shoulder), CB Sheldon Brown (shoulder), WR Joshua Cribbs (foot), RB Peyton Hillis (knee), QB Colt McCoy (illness), T John St. Clair (ankle), WR Chansi Stuckey (thigh), G Floyd Womack (knee). NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS at BUFFALO BILLS — PATRIOTS: DOUBTFUL: C Dan Connolly (concussion). QUESTIONABLE: LB Tully Banta-Cain (groin), DT Ron Brace (concussion), DE Jermaine Cunningham (calf), DE Brandon Deaderick (shoulder, flu), TE Aaron Hernandez (hip), DT Myron Pryor (back), S James Sanders (flu), DT Mike Wright (concussion). PROBABLE: CB Kyle Arrington (elbow), QB Tom Brady (right shoulder, foot), WR Deion Branch (knee), CB Devin McCourty (rib). BILLS: QUESTIONABLE: C Geoff Hangartner (knee). PROBABLE: T Demetrius Bell (knee), LB Chris Kelsay (knee). SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS at ST. LOUIS RAMS — 49ERS: OUT: TE Nate Byham (heel), T Joe Staley (fibula). QUESTIONABLE: RB Anthony Dixon (ankle). PROBABLE: CB Nate Clements (knee), WR Josh Morgan (shoulder), LB Takeo Spikes (hand), RB Brian Westbrook (not injury related), LB Patrick Willis (hand), RB DeShawn Wynn (ankle). RAMS: OUT: TE Michael Hoomanawanui (ankle). QUESTIONABLE: DE Chris Long (thigh), T Jason Smith (ankle). PROBABLE: RB Kenneth Darby (chest). DETROIT LIONS at MIAMI DOLPHINS — LIONS: OUT: QB Matthew Stafford (right shoulder). DOUBTFUL: S Louis Delmas (concussion). QUESTIONABLE: QB Shaun Hill (right finger), LB Landon Johnson (neck), QB Drew Stanton (left shoulder). PROBABLE: DE Cliff Avril (rib), RB Jahvid Best (toe), LB Vinny Ciurciu (concussion), DE Lawrence Jackson (groin), WR Calvin Johnson (ankle), DE Turk McBride (ankle), RB Maurice Morris (chest), CB Amari Spievey (back). DOLPHINS: DOUBTFUL: LB Karlos Dansby (toe). PROBABLE: S Chris Clemons (groin). WASHINGTON REDSKINS at JACKSONVILLE

JAGUARS — REDSKINS: OUT: S Reed Doughty (head), DT Kedric Golston (groin), LB Brian Orakpo (groin, hamstring). QUESTIONABLE: LB Lorenzo Alexander (hamstring), WR Brandon Banks (knee), S Macho Harris (hip), G Artis Hicks (back), LB Rocky McIntosh (hamstring), S Kareem Moore (knee), C Casey Rabach (knee), RB Mike Sellers (calf). PROBABLE: QB Donovan McNabb (hamstring). JAGUARS: OUT: LB Justin Durant (groin). DOUBTFUL: RB Maurice Jones-Drew (knee). QUESTIONABLE: WR Mike Sims-Walker (ankle). PROBABLE: T Jordan Black (ankle), S Courtney Greene (shoulder), RB Greg Jones (back), DT Terrance Knighton (back), DE Austen Lane (knee), G Vince Manuwai (foot), G Justin Smiley (head). NEW YORK JETS at CHICAGO BEARS — JETS: OUT: DE Trevor Pryce (hip), T Damien Woody (knee). DOUBTFUL: S Eric Smith (concussion). QUESTIONABLE: S James Ihedigbo (knee, ankle). PROBABLE: CB Drew Coleman (groin), CB Antonio Cromartie (groin), WR Santonio Holmes (toe), C Nick Mangold (shoulder), CB Darrelle Revis (hamstring), QB Mark Sanchez (right shoulder), WR Brad Smith (hand). BEARS: PROBABLE: WR Earl Bennett (ankle), LB Pisa Tinoisamoa (knee). HOUSTON TEXANS at DENVER BRONCOS — TEXANS: OUT: TE Garrett Graham (hamstring). QUESTIONABLE: WR Andre Johnson (ankle). PROBABLE: DE Mark Anderson (knee), T Duane Brown (shoulder), LB Brian Cushing (knee, ankle, foot), RB Arian Foster (hip), DT Damione Lewis (illness), K Neil Rackers (right hamstring), QB Matt Schaub (right elbow). BRONCOS: QUESTIONABLE: S David Bruton (ribs), S Brian Dawkins (knee), S Darcel McBath (quadricep), RB Knowshon Moreno (ribs), QB Kyle Orton (ribs), WR Demaryius Thomas (ankle). PROBABLE: TE Daniel Coats (finger), WR Eddie Royal (lower back). INDIANAPOLIS COLTS at OAKLAND RAIDERS — COLTS: OUT: S Al Afalava (ankle). QUESTIONABLE: RB Joseph Addai (neck), TE Brody Eldridge (rib), RB Mike Hart (ankle), CB Kelvin Hayden (neck), T Charlie Johnson (groin), DT Daniel Muir (chest), CB Mike Newton (neck), G Jamey Richard (hip), LB Clint Session (elbow). PROBABLE: LB Tyjuan Hagler (illness), TE Gijon Robinson (illness). RAIDERS: QUESTIONABLE: WR Johnnie Lee Higgins (ankle), P Shane Lechler (right hamstring), DE Richard Seymour (hamstring), T Langston Walker (concussion). PROBABLE: CB Nnamdi Asomugha (ankle), CB Chris Johnson (groin), WR Nick Miller (ankle), TE Zach Miller (foot), S Mike Mitchell (ribs). NEW YORK GIANTS at GREEN BAY PACKERS — GIANTS: OUT: S Will Blackmon (knee), DE Dave Tollefson (knee). PROBABLE: G Shawn Andrews (back), T David Diehl (illness), WR Mario Manningham (heel), C Shaun O’Hara (foot), WR Devin Thomas (hamstring), DE Osi Umenyiora (knee). PACKERS: OUT: DE Cullen Jenkins (calf), G Marshall Newhouse (back). DOUBTFUL: LB Frank Zombo (knee). QUESTIONABLE: LB Diyral Briggs (ankle), S Nick Collins (ribs), LB Erik Walden (quadricep). PROBABLE: T Chad Clifton (knees), CB Pat Lee (ankle), LB Clay Matthews (shin), DE Ryan Pickett (ankle), QB Aaron Rodgers (concussion), C Scott Wells (back), CB Charles Woodson (toe). SAN DIEGO CHARGERS at CINCINNATI BENGALS — CHARGERS: OUT: LB Stephen Cooper (knee), TE Antonio Gates (toe, foot). DOUBTFUL: WR Patrick Crayton (wrist), WR Malcom Floyd (hamstring). QUESTIONABLE: LB Larry English (foot), C Scott Mruczkowski (ankle). PROBABLE: LB Antwan Applewhite (ankle), RB Jacob Hester (illness), RB Ryan Mathews (illness), LB Brandon Siler (ribs), G Louis Vasquez (neck), WR Kelley Washington (hip). BENGALS: OUT: RB Brian Leonard (ankle). QUESTIONABLE: WR Chad Ochocinco (ankle), T Dennis Roland (knee), RB Bernard Scott (toe), CB Jonathan Wade (knee). PROBABLE: C Kyle Cook (elbow). Monday NEW ORLEANS SAINTS at ATLANTA FALCONS — SAINTS: DNP: TE David Thomas (knee). LIMITED: NT Remi Ayodele (ankle), T Charles Brown (back), RB Christopher Ivory (hamstring). FULL: LB Danny Clark (hamstring), DT Sedrick Ellis (wrist), CB Jabari Greer (knee), DE Anthony Hargrove (knee), WR Robert Meachem (toe), LB Kawika Mitchell (hamstring), WR Courtney Roby (head), LB Jonathan Vilma (quadricep). FALCONS: LIMITED: RB Ovie Mughelli (shoulder). FULL: DE John Abraham (groin), DT Jonathan Babineaux (shoulder), LB Curtis Lofton (knee), WR Eric Weems (knee), WR Roddy White (knee).

College

(ESPN) Fiesta Bowl: Connecticut (8-4) vs. Oklahoma (11-2), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Jan. 3 Orange Bowl: Stanford (11-1) vs. Virginia Tech (11-2), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Tuesday, Jan. 4 Sugar Bowl: Ohio State (11-1) vs. Arkansas (10-2), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Jan. 6 GoDaddy.com Bowl: Miami (Ohio) (9-4) vs. Middle Tennessee (6-6), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Jan. 7 Cotton Bowl: Texas A&M (9-3) vs. LSU (10-2), 5 p.m. (Fox) Saturday, Jan. 8 BBVA Compass Bowl: Pittsburgh (7-5) vs. Kentucky (6-6), 9 a.m. (ESPN) Sunday, Jan. 9 Fight Hunger Bowl: Boston College (7-5) vs. Nevada (12-1), 6 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Jan. 10 BCS National Championship: Auburn (13-0) vs. Oregon (12-0), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Betting Line NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Today Cowboys 6 7 CARDINALS Sunday DOLPHINS 3.5 3.5 Lions EAGLES 14 14.5 Vikings JAGUARS 6.5 7 Redskins RAMS 2.5 2.5 49ers BUCCANEERS 6.5 6.5 Seahawks Patriots 8 8 BILLS BEARS 1 1 Jets Ravens 3 3.5 BROWNS CHIEFS 5 5 Titans Colts 3 3 RAIDERS Texans 2.5 2.5 BRONCOS PACKERS 3 3 Giants Chargers 7.5 7.5 BENGALS Monday FALCONS 2.5 2.5 Saints Favorite

College Sunday Little Caesars Pizza Bowl 2 1.5 Florida Int’l

Toledo

Monday Independence Bowl 1.5 3 Georgia Tech

Air Force

West Virginia Missouri

Maryland Baylor Oklahoma St

December 28 Champ Sports Bowl 1.5 2.5 Insight Bowl PK 2.5

NC State Iowa

December 29 Eagle Bank Bowl 8 7.5 East Carolina Texas Bowl 2 1.5 Illinois Alamo Bowl 5.5 5.5 Arizona

December 30 Armed Forces Bowl Smu 7 7 Army Pinstripe Bowl Kansas St 3 PK Syracuse Music City Bowl North Carolina 1 2 Tennessee Holiday Bowl Nebraska 13.5 14 Washington

NCAA FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIP SUBDIVISION All Times PST ——— BOWLS Subject to Change All Times PST ——— Friday, Dec. 24 Hawaii Bowl: Tulsa 62, Hawaii 35

December 31 Meineke Car Care Bowl 4.5 5.5 South Florida Sun Bowl Miami (Fla.) 2.5 3 Notre Dame Liberty Bowl Georgia 7 6.5 Central Florida Chick-Fil-A Bowl South Carolina 3 3 Florida St

Sunday, Dec. 26 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl: Toledo (8-4) vs. Florida International (6-6), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN2)

January 1 Dallas Ticket City Bowl 9.5 9.5 Northwestern Outback Bowl 7 7.5 Penn State Capital One Bowl 11 10 Michigan State Gator Bowl 5.5 5 Michigan Rose Bowl 2.5 3 Wisconsin Fiesta Bowl 17 17 Connecticut

Monday, Dec. 27 Independence Bowl: Georgia Tech (6-6) vs. Air Force (8-4), 2 p.m. (ESPN) Tuesday, Dec. 28 Champs Sports Bowl: North Carolina State (8-4) vs. West Virginia (9-3), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Insight Bowl: Missouri (10-2) vs. Iowa (7-5), 7 p.m. (ESPN) Wednesday, Dec. 29 Military Bowl: East Carolina (6-6) vs. Maryland (8-4), 11:30 a.m. (ESPN) Texas Bowl: Baylor (7-5) vs. Illinois (6-6), 3 p.m. (ESPN) Alamo Bowl: Arizona (7-5) vs. Oklahoma State (10-2), 3 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Dec. 30 Armed Forces Bowl: SMU (7-6) vs. Army (6-5), 9 a.m. (ESPN) Pinstripe Bowl: Syracuse (7-5) vs. Kansas State (7-5), 12:30 p.m. (ESPN) Music City Bowl: North Carolina (7-5) vs. Tennessee (6-6), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Holiday Bowl: Nebraska (10-3) vs. Washington (6-6), 7 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Dec. 31 Meineke Bowl: Clemson (6-6) vs. South Florida (7-5), 9 a.m. (ESPN) Sun Bowl: Notre Dame (7-5) vs. Miami (7-5), 11 a.m. (CBS) Liberty Bowl: Georgia (6-6) vs. UCF (10-3), 12:30 p.m. (ESPN) Chick-fil-A Bowl: South Carolina (9-4) vs. Florida State (9-4), 4:30 p.m. (ESPN) Saturday, Jan. 1 TicketCity Bowl: Northwestern (7-5) vs. Texas Tech (7-5), 9 a.m. (ESPNU) Capital One Bowl: Michigan State (11-1) vs. Alabama (9-3), 10 a.m. (ESPN) Outback Bowl: Florida (7-5) vs. Penn State (7-5), 10 a.m. (ABC) Gator Bowl: Michigan (7-5) vs. Mississippi State (84), 10:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Rose Bowl: TCU (12-0) vs. Wisconsin (11-1), 2 p.m.

Clemson

Texas Tech Florida Alabama Miss. State Tcu Oklahoma

Stanford

January 3 Orange Bowl 3 3

Virginia Tech

Ohio State

January 4 Sugar Bowl 3.5 3.5

Arkansas

Miami (Ohio)

January 6 GMAC Bowl 1.5 1

Mid. Tenn. St.

Lsu

January 7 Cotton Bowl PK 1

Texas A&M

Pitt

January 8 BBVA Compass Bowl 2.5 3

Kentucky

Nevada

January 9 Fight Hunger Bowl 9 8 Boston College

Auburn

January 10 BCS National Championship 2.5 3 Oregon

BASKETBALL Men’s college Friday’s Games ——— TOURNAMENTS Cancun Governor’s Cup Championship Colorado St. 63, Southern Miss. 58

NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB Boston 23 4 .852 — New York 17 12 .586 7 Philadelphia 11 18 .379 13 Toronto 10 19 .345 14 New Jersey 9 21 .300 15½ Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 22 9 .710 — Atlanta 19 12 .613 3 Orlando 17 12 .586 4 Charlotte 9 19 .321 11½ Washington 7 20 .259 13 Central Division W L Pct GB Chicago 18 9 .667 — Indiana 13 14 .481 5 Milwaukee 12 16 .429 6½ Detroit 10 19 .345 9 Cleveland 8 21 .276 11 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 25 4 .862 — Dallas 23 5 .821 1½ New Orleans 17 12 .586 8 Houston 14 15 .483 11 Memphis 12 17 .414 13 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Utah 21 9 .700 — Oklahoma City 20 10 .667 1 Denver 16 11 .593 3½ Portland 15 14 .517 5½ Minnesota 6 24 .200 15 Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Lakers 21 8 .724 — Phoenix 13 15 .464 7½ Golden State 10 18 .357 10½ L.A. Clippers 8 22 .267 13½ Sacramento 5 22 .185 15 ——— Friday’s Games No games scheduled Today’s Games Chicago at New York, 9 a.m. Boston at Orlando, 11:30 a.m. Miami at L.A. Lakers, 2 p.m. Denver at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Portland at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Phoenix at L.A. Clippers, noon Minnesota at Cleveland, 3 p.m. Chicago at Detroit, 3 p.m. Atlanta at New Orleans, 4 p.m. Washington at San Antonio, 4 p.m. Memphis at Indiana, 4 p.m. Philadelphia at Denver, 5 p.m.

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 36 24 10 2 50 118 83 Philadelphia 35 22 8 5 49 117 87 N.Y. Rangers 36 20 14 2 42 108 95 N.Y. Islanders 32 8 18 6 22 72 106 New Jersey 34 9 23 2 20 60 108 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Montreal 35 20 13 2 42 92 79 Boston 33 18 11 4 40 93 69 Ottawa 36 15 17 4 34 83 107 Buffalo 35 14 17 4 32 92 101 Toronto 33 12 17 4 28 75 102 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Tampa Bay 35 20 10 5 45 109 114 Washington 37 20 12 5 45 111 103 Atlanta 37 19 13 5 43 118 108 Carolina 33 15 14 4 34 92 102 Florida 33 16 17 0 32 91 86 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 34 21 9 4 46 113 96 Chicago 36 19 14 3 41 115 104 Nashville 34 17 11 6 40 85 85 St. Louis 34 17 12 5 39 90 96 Columbus 34 17 14 3 37 88 98 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 33 20 8 5 45 112 86 Colorado 35 19 12 4 42 122 113 Minnesota 33 16 13 4 36 82 92 Calgary 36 15 18 3 33 95 105 Edmonton 33 12 15 6 30 87 113 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 35 21 10 4 46 102 95 San Jose 35 19 11 5 43 106 96 Los Angeles 33 20 12 1 41 98 77 Anaheim 38 18 16 4 40 98 111 Phoenix 33 15 11 7 37 90 97 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Friday’s Games No games scheduled Today’s Games No games scheduled Sunday’s Games Pittsburgh at Ottawa, 4 p.m. Toronto at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Montreal at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m. Washington at Carolina, 4 p.m. Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Columbus at Chicago, 4 p.m. Nashville at St. Louis, 4 p.m. Detroit at Minnesota, 4 p.m. Phoenix at Dallas, 5 p.m. Edmonton at Vancouver, 6 p.m. Anaheim at Los Angeles, 6 p.m.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL National League FLORIDA MARLINS—Agreed to terms with RHP Ricky Nolasco on a three-year contract. PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Agreed to terms with INF Garrett Akins on a minor league contract. Claimed LHP Aaron Thompson off waivers from Washington. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS—Announced the resignation of assistant coach Stephen Silas to become an assistant coach for Charlotte. Named Lloyd Pierce assistant coach. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL—Fined Cincinnati LB Dhani Jones and Atlanta DE Kroy Biermann $15,000 each for roughing the passer. Fined Chicago LB Brian Urlacher, New England CB Devin McCourty and Indianapolis S Antoine Bethea $10,000 each for unnecessary roughness. Fined Chicago DB Major Wright, Baltimore S Ed Reed and Indianapolis DE Robert Mathis $10,000 each for roughing the passer. Fined Minnesota DT Kevin Williams and Minnesota CB Antoine Winfield $7,500 each for roughing the passer. Fined New York Giants LB Jonathan Goff, Philadelphia CB Dimitri Patterson and Kansas City LB Demorrio Williams $7,500 each for unnecessary roughness. Fined New England NT Vince Wilfork and Denver RB Knowshon Moreno $5,000 each for major facemasks. Fined Dallas CB Terence Newman $5,000 for unnecessary roughness. BUFFALO BILLS—Signed DL Boo Robinson to the practice squad. DETROIT LIONS—Placed QB Matthew Stafford on injured reserve. GOLF U.S. Golf Association USGA—Announced the retirement of executive director David Fay. HOCKEY National Hockey League NEW YORK RANGERS—Assigned LW Mats Zuccarello to Connecticut (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS—Reassigned G Mike Brodeur to Binghamton (AHL). COLLEGE MISSISSIPPI STATE—Suspended Renardo Sidney and Elgin Bailey indefinitely from the men’s basketball team for fighting in the stands after a Dec. 23 game at the Diamond Head Classic in Hawaii.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 25, 2010 D3

BASEBALL

NFL NOTEBOOK

Rangers star Hamilton wants to teach true meaning of Christmas By Jeff Wilson McClatchy-Tribune News Service

FORT WORTH, Texas — The American League MVP, his wife and three daughters woke this morning to a new Christmas tradition. Mom and Dad were to give their girls only one gift each. They would all hop in a car and head to a homeless shelter later in the day to visit with those who would be lucky to receive anything at all. The significance of today’s holiday is to celebrate the birth of a man who would make the ultimate sacrifice for others. Josh and Katie Hamilton’s goal is to teach their daughters that Christmas isn’t about receiving a bounty of presents underneath a decorated tree. “We just want to let them know the true spirit of what Christmas is as far as giving,” Josh said. “God gave his son for us, and we can never do anything to repay him for that. But it taught us to give to others and to love others, and that’s what the spirit is about.” His daughters, ages 9, 5 and 2, also don’t fully understand their dad’s relationship with Jesus Christ. They don’t know the journey Hamilton has taken to become the best baseball player on the planet, as he was this year for the Texas Rangers. Many believed he would have reached his 2010 heights years earlier, but addictions to drugs and alcohol derailed his career and put him on the path to an early grave. After years of abuse, Hamilton found himself on his grandmother’s doorstep in October 2005, seeking help. He took to the Bible while sobering up, and committed his life to glorifying his lord and savior. Hamilton does that through baseball, doing incredible things with the supreme talents he was given and then telling as many people as possible about his journey. Each of the five Christmas holidays since he surrendered to Christ and a sixth sober Christmas today have reinforced what Dec. 25 means to Hamilton. “Christmas is about Christ being born, and not just about him being born but what he was going to do and what he was going to fulfill,” Hamilton said. “It’s pretty special.”

Spreading the word The message Hamilton wants folks to hear this time of year can be found while shopping at the mall or listening to the radio while driving there and searching for a parking spot. Many of the popular Christmas carols tell the story of what Christmas should be about, Hamilton said. One of the best, and one of his favorites, is “Hark the Herald Angels Sing”. “If you look at the words and do what you’re told, it says everything there is to say about God and about Christ,” he said. “You’ve got to look at it not just as songs that everybody sings. You’ve got to focus on the meaning of the words and what the songs are all about.” By now, Rangers fans know that Hamilton certainly isn’t shy about his faith and his walk with Christ. He feels it’s his duty to tell his story in public forums, which he does many times throughout a given year. He even did so in the stands of a near-empty Oakland Coliseum in late September as his teammates celebrated the Rangers’ first AL West crown since 1999 in the visitor’s clubhouse. The media presents the best vehicle for Hamilton to spread the word. He did so on ESPN during his remarkable performance in 2008 during the Home Run Derby, and he did so again on TBS in October while accepting the MVP award for the AL Championship Series. A month later, he was back on ESPN chronicling his journey after being named the AL MVP. “My platform got even bigger,” he said. But Hamilton never saw the initial interview in replays that day. Everything he had said about his faith was cut, either for time considerations or maybe for political correctness. Hamilton, though, was only mildly bothered by the omission. He still says “Merry Christmas,” and he won’t be deterred

when he sees an opening to give thanks to his Savior. “It’s all throughout the Bible, people being persecuted in Christ’s name,” he said. “That’s the way it’s always going to be. Some people won’t understand it. “The people who will be watching who need to hear it, will hear it.”

Part of the team The Rangers welcomed Hamilton and all his faults with open arms for his first spring training with them in 2008. He and his faith weren’t always so welcome in the Cincinnati clubhouse during his rookie season in 2007. But Hamilton has never browbeat his teammates about their faith. He doesn’t chide them when they enjoy a drink in his company or take the Lord’s name in vain. Those things happen often during a 162-game season and a 16-game playoff run. “If people want to talk about it, he will,” second baseman Ian Kinsler said. “He knows that he still has more to learn about it and more room to grow. He doesn’t know everything, but he knows more about it than most people in the clubhouse.” Temptation is within reach. Beer is available in the clubhouse, on the bus and on the charter flights. His teammates are mindful of his past, but they don’t worry about Hamilton suffering a relapse. “We’re going to be there to support him,” Kinsler said. “We know his past, but it’s not something we’re going to dwell on. He takes care of himself. He’s a grown man. He knows the things that tempt him, and he stays away from them.” The Rangers have accepted Hamilton for what he is, a recovering addict and alcoholic who just happens to be a supreme baseball talent and their teammate. That was never more evident than after the Rangers beat Tampa Bay in the AL Division Series and New York in the ALCS. Bottles of champagne and cans of beer waited in the clubhouse, but no one celebrated with that stuff until they popped ginger ale with Hamilton. “After everything that went on this year, it made me feel great,” he said. “It shows a lot about their character as men, as my teammates, as human beings, for them being sensitive to my situation.”

Plenty to give back Few things in baseball are as sensitive as money. Just revisit the winter meetings earlier this month. Jayson Werth jolted the landscape by signing a seven-year deal worth $126 million with the Washington Nationals. Werth, who has 120 homers and 406 RBIs with a .272 average over 2,519 career at-bats, will turn 32 on May 20. Hamilton, who has 93 homers and 331 RBIs with a .311 average over 1,776 career at-bats, will turn 30 on May 21. When his chance at free agency arrives, he will be the same age as Werth. The effects of drug abuse, though, will put Hamilton in an unprecedented category when the Rangers decide to negotiate a contract extension, either this spring or when he becomes a free agent after the 2012 season. But Hamilton said he’s not sweating anything. He just wants to be treated fairly. “I have peace that whatever happens is going to happen,” he said. “I’m not going to be hurting either way. I don’t worry myself with it. It’s about trusting the Lord. I’m going to play.” He’s had money before, thanks to a $3.96 million signing bonus in 1999 that eventually was blown mostly on drugs. By playing at an MVP level, the riches will come again. This time, in the spirit of Christmas, things will be different. “It was a valuable lesson for me to realize that it’s great to have things and be able to afford things,” Hamilton said. “But now the outlook is, I live comfortably, I’m very blessed, but how can I be an impact on God’s kingdom with what he’s allowed me to have? That’s the focus on anything now.”

Joe Howell / The Associated Press

Tennessee Titans quarterback Kerry Collins could pass 40,000 career passing yards in Sunday’s game against Kansas City.

Tennessee QB Collins is set to join elite company The Associated Press Sticking around the NFL for 16 seasons means racking up some nice career numbers, and now Tennessee quarterback Kerry Collins is close to passing a couple of the league’s greatest quarterbacks. Collins needs 13 completions to pass Joe Montana (3,409) for ninth all-time in that category. Collins also has 39,906 yards passing, and with 94 more he becomes the 12th player in NFL history to throw for 40,000 yards in a career. If he throws for 334 yards in the Titans’ final two games, he’ll pass Johnny Unitas (40,239) for 11th overall. That’s company that impresses Collins’ teammate, Randy Moss. “Just to see him to be able to reach a milestone accomplishment like that, that’s something he can really hang his hat upon, 40,000, beating Johnny Unitas,” Moss said. “That’s a legendary quarterback, so for him to be in front of Johnny U, that’s saying something.” Collins already ranks ninth in career attempts with 6,087 passes. Collins said the idea of passing Unitas is cool, but hasn’t really hit him yet. “I’m just focused on what we’re doing here. Maybe later on down the road I’ll look back and see it as a nice accomplishment. It’s one of those things I just don’t think about a lot,” Collins said.

Gerhart’s chance Adrian Peterson missed Monday’s game for Minnesota against Chicago because of a badly bruised left thigh, the first time since November 2007 that Peterson was sidelined. Peterson’s absence has been lost in the shuffle of Brett Favre’s status and the Vikings being eliminated from the playoff chase, but he was on pace for arguably his best season since his record-setting rookie year. Peterson sprained his right ankle last month, and his latest injury occurred when his leg hit quarterback Tarvaris Jackson’s during a botched sequence. That has given rookie Toby Gerhart an extended opportunity, and the second-round draft pick from Stanford finished with 77 yards on 16 carries in the loss to the Bears. “Really proud of the way he carried that football,” interim coach Leslie Frazier said. “Wish we could have given it to him even more.” Gerhart said his first game as the featured back was a fun experience. “It was a good atmosphere. People were into it,” Gerhart said.

Kid stuff The Bengals drafted Carlos Dunlap and Geno Atkins to improve their woeful pass rush. The rookies are starting to get to the quarterback, one of the few bright spots in Cincinnati’s woeful season. They’ve even got their own nickname: The Fisher-Price

Package. “We all feed off each other, and that’s why they give our package a nickname,” Dunlap said. “When we’re on the field together, there is a different type of energy.” With injuries depleting the line, Dunlap, Atkins, secondyear end Michael Johnson and third-year tackle Pat Sims have gotten a lot of playing time. The Bengals (3-11) have developed specific pass-rush packages for them, and they’re coming through. In the last two games, the Bengals have had eight sacks against AFC North rivals Pittsburgh and Cleveland. They had only six sacks in the first seven games combined. “Probably the most positive and productive thing that’s come out of this season is their development,” coach Marvin Lewis said. “They’ll go into the offseason feeling good about themselves.” Dunlap has been the most impressive of the young bunch. The second-round pick out of Florida has six sacks in the last four games. He has a team-high seven sacks overall, the most by a rookie in the AFC. He’s on pace to become the first rookie to lead the Bengals in sacks since 1990, when linebacker James Francis had eight. The Bengals thought Dunlap might need time to develop. He’s the youngest player on the team, turning 22 in February.

Leading Lions The Detroit Lions haven’t had a Pro Bowl player since the 2006 season when receiver Roy Williams earned the recognition. Detroit coach Jim Schwartz said a pair of his players should end the drought. “I don’t know how you can leave Calvin Johnson off the ballot,” Schwartz said. “I don’t know how you can leave Ndamukong Suh off the ballot. Those are fairly obvious guys.” Johnson is among NFL leaders with 12 touchdown receptions, 1,068 yards receiving and 73 catches despite facing doublecoverage on most plays. Suh has eight sacks, the highest total for a defensive tackle and for any rookie this season, and 55 tackles. The No. 2 pick in the draft is also a contender for defensive rookie of the year, but insisted the individual honors aren’t a big deal to him. “I just continue to play hard, that’s all I know how to do,” Suh said. “That’s how I approached it when I was up for all those awards in college. Obviously, they came and I was definitely more than happy to accept them. It’s great to be noticed like that, but those aren’t goals. Goals are to win games and help this organization change.” Detroit has doubled last season’s win total of two, entering Sunday’s game at Miami, and has ended some dubious streaks this season. The Lions snapped an NFL-record 26-game losing streak on the road last week at Tampa Bay, and a 19-game

skid within the division with a win over Green Bay earlier this month in what was the league’s longest such stretch since the merger four decades ago.

Dream drive As a mother, Amanda Davis knows how it feels to see hurt on your child’s face. The wife of Dallas Cowboys offensive lineman Leonard Davis and other wives of NFL players pitched in to prevent families in need from experiencing that this holiday season. “You feel really fortunate to be in this situation and blessed to be able to help out,” said Alicia Bowman, wife of Chicago Bears cornerback Zack Bowman. The wives’ Off the Field organization shopped for presents as part of The Salvation Army’s Adopt-a-Family program. Ten families around the country received $1,000 worth of food and holiday gifts, including clothes, electronics and toys from Sam’s Club. “It’s a very humbling event,” said Andrea Hanie, wife of Bears backup quarterback Caleb Hanie. “I just can picture the joy they get to experience.” Sharena Wilson, wife of Washington Redskins linebacker Chris Wilson, said the experience was especially meaningful because she had known families who struggled to buy gifts for their children when she was growing up. The “Dream Drive” events were held this year in Baltimore, Chicago, Cincinnati, Dallas, Houston, Miami, Philadelphia, Phoenix, San Francisco/Oak-

land and Washington.

Mom’s view Giants backup defensive end Dave Tollefson sprained his right knee making a special teams tackle in the first half of their excruciating loss to the Philadelphia Eagles on Sunday. He got an unexpected pep back from his mother, Debra Crocker, at halftime. Crocker had traveled from California for the game at the New Meadowlands Stadium in East Rutherford. “When I went to the locker room to get an X-ray, she was waiting down there when I came out, and she’s like: ‘What are you doing?’ “ Tollefson said. “I’m like, ‘Mom, I’m hurt.’ “She’s like, I don’t (care). Get it taped up and get the hell in there. I didn’t fly here from California to watch you ride the pine.’ “I’m like, ‘Mom, I don’t want to hear it.’ “So I love mom. If you guys (reporters) give her a call and ask her, she’ll probably be saying I should be playing this week.” Tollefson is expected to be out a couple of weeks with a sprained medial collateral ligament. Tollefson’s 13 special teams tackles are second on the team to Chase Blackburn’s 14. He also has forced fumbles on both defense and special teams.

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B A SK ET BA L L

D4 Saturday, December 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Lieberman is back At Central Florida, pair Jordans in men’s game, this time as coach MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL

UCF is undefeated, thanks to one of Michael Jordan’s sons, with another joining the Knights in the future

One of the best women’s players of all time is teaching the guys, in the NBA’s D-League

By Amy Shipley The Washington Post

SUNRISE, Fla. — After sophomore guard Marcus Jordan misfired on a jump shot minutes into a Central Florida game against Miami last Saturday, a fan sitting a few rows from the court taunted gleefully. “You’re not your father!” the man said. “Did you get a DNA test? Are you sure?” Heckling rains every time the Knights hit the road, and Jordan’s expression never changes. His head never turns. He knows he lacks his famous father’s size and ability to hover by the rim. He wears silver Air Jordan shoes and a black Air Jordan headband, but this heir Jordan did not get all of his father’s gifts. In many ways, Jordan isn’t like Mike at all. He sports black-rimmed glasses, a goatee and mustache, and tattoos up and down both arms. Yet last Saturday, he received a congratulatory text message from his father, Chicago Bulls legend Michael Jordan, minutes after using a hard-nosed, workmanlike effort to fuel a second-half comeback that resulted in a 84-78 victory. The win gave UCF a 10-0 record. It also set the stage for the Knights, who toppled No. 16 Florida on Dec. 1, to climb into the top 25 for the first time in the program’s history, entering the rankings at No. 24. Jordan, who at 6 feet 3 stands three inches shorter than his father, scored a game-high 23 points and dished out five assists, mixing level-headed, aggressive play with flashes of cold-hearted competitiveness that looked eerily familiar. He showed a flair for penetrating and getting the ball near the rim, if not always in the net, and pushing the ball upcourt. He earned the game’s most valuable player award despite limping off with just more than a minute remaining with a sprained left ankle. (He did not play until the second half of Wednesday’s win over U-Mass., finishing with seven points.)

Big shoes “I don’t think anybody could fit in those shoes as well as he does,” said Knights point guard A.J. Rompza, who has known Jordan since their high school days together at Chicago’s Whitney M. Young, the same magnet school first lady Michelle Obama attended. Plenty of UCF fans drove the 2 1⁄2 hours down Florida’s Turnpike from Orlando for Saturday’s game, so the occasional hooting was masked by cheers from enthusiastic Knights’ supporters. A true away game, Rompza said, usually involves incessant chants reminding Jordan of exactly who he is not. Said Rompza: “I always tell him, ‘I don’t know how you deal with it.’” From age three or four, when he stood in a celebratory Bulls’ locker room with his brother, sister and mother, covering his eyes to keep out the spray of champagne, Marcus Jordan understood he had a remarkable dad and unusual opportunities. It never crossed his mind that extending the family tradition, which seemed so gloriously special and fun, could be a burden. “I always wanted to play basketball,” Marcus Jordan said. “It wasn’t something like my dad was forcing me or pushing me . . . It was just me, loving playing basketball.”

Big brother Besides, it was his older brother whom he idolized. Jeffrey Jordan, who is sitting out this season after transferring to UCF from Illinois over the summer, dominated play when the two brothers competed as little boys. The pair shot soft basketballs at kid-size rims situated at either end of their playroom, which happened to have a carpet imprinted with a mini Bulls’ court. When the Jordan boys outgrew the toy hoops, they had other options to

By Harvey Araton New York Times News Service

Matthew Cavanaugh / The Associated Press

Central Florida’s Marcus Jordan, left, drives past Massachusetts’ Anthony Gurley during a game on Wednesday, in Amherst, Mass. Central Florida won 64-59 to improve to 11-0. Jordan is the son of NBA star Michael Jordan. hone their skills. Their parents’ secluded, 29,000-square-foot home in Chicago’s northern suburbs included indoor and outdoor basketball courts (also a tennis court and putting green). Marcus vividly remembers the lone time that Jeffrey, then a teenager, beat their father in a pickup game of one-onone. Michael Jordan was much too competitive to give away games; Marcus never once defeated his dad. “I wanted,” he said, “to be like my brother.” Jeffrey, two years older than Marcus, first stepped out from the family estate into the public spotlight, emerging as a talented player at Chicago’s Loyola Academy. Jeffrey Jordan chose No. 32 — the reverse of his father’s 23 — for his uniform jersey (he later opted for No. 13); Marcus, meantime, settled on No. 5 — two plus three.

Charmed life? Marcus, who turned 20 on Christmas Eve, admitted he got some exceedingly nice gifts for his birthday in his youth, and he drives a Range Rover around the UCF campus now. He spelled out his personal wealth all too clearly in August, when he tweeted that he had lost $50,000 during a trip to Las Vegas. At the time, he, his brother and Rompza were visiting his father’s fantasy basketball camp. He soon regretted the lighthearted — and careless — electronic remark. “That,” he said, “was definitely a learning experience ... It’s always been in the back of my head from both parents: Watch what you are doing. People are always watching.” Yet the most powerful message they sent was that though he would never need a summer job, he would have to work to establish his own name. Teammate David Diakite said Jordan, who some expected would take a limousine to classes, has shown no signs of entitlement. “He’s a great teammate,” Diakite said. “You’d think having a lot of money, having a million dollars, he’d be snobby or things like that. But he’s the complete opposite. . . . He’s a great person . . . and his basketball IQ is very high.” Rompza said Jordan, a hospitality major who said he would like to open his own nightclub some day, donates his old sneakers to Goodwill and picks up the tab at restaurants or other venues for teammates he knows are short on cash, but “is never flaunting; he never brags.” “My parents, being the great parents

they were, made sure I wasn’t a spoiled, snotty kid,” Jordan said. “I was raised to be humble and thankful for everything I have. I was privileged, but not spoiled. It wasn’t like I got everything I wanted.”

Knighthood Rompza persuaded Jordan, whom he calls his best friend, to join him at UCF. Jordan said he was enamored with the new campus facilities, Orlando’s weather, the rising program and the college scene. He said he and Rompza had visions of helping to put UCF, which has an enrollment of 56,000 students, on the national basketball map. When Coach Donnie Jones arrived last spring from Marshall, he was curious to see what he would get from an offspring of Michael Jordan and wasn’t disappointed. Jordan lost 18 pounds between his freshman and sophomore seasons and dropped about 4 percentage points of body fat. After averaging eight points per game last year, he stayed on campus all summer, practicing with his teammates. This year, he is averaging 15.2 points per game, second-best for the Knights. “He has incredible drive,” Jones said. “He’s very focused and very competitive. He’s a very good team player. He understands what it takes to be part of a winning program — that’s what I’m sure he’s gotten from his father.”

Visits from Dad Michael Jordan shows up on campus every once in a while to watch practice, and he’s addressed the team a few times, telling the Knights, among other things, how important it is to train with the intensity they hope to play with. Jones said he’s never gotten an unwanted piece of advice from the elder Jordan. “We’re cordial,” Jones said. “He’s not telling me how to coach my team. ... He just wants his sons to be treated like everyone else, pushed to be the best that they can be.” Jeffrey will join his younger brother on the court next year. By then, Marcus Jordan hopes, UCF will have made the NCAA tournament. That’s the goal that tantalizes him now, he said. Beating his father, now 47, in one of those one-on-one matchups doesn’t even meet his definition of a real challenge these days. “I’m pretty confident I would win that game,” Jordan said, grinning widely. “He’s up there now in age. He can’t move like he did in the ’80s and ’90s.”

Taurasi could face Olympic ban for positive drug test By Jere Longman New York Times News Service

Diana Taurasi’s positive test for a banned stimulant while playing professionally in Turkey could threaten her eligibility to play for the United States in the 2012 London Olympics. The Turkish basketball federation said Friday that Taurasi had tested positive for a stimulant that was identified as modafinil, a drug that enhances wakefulness and vigilance and is designed to treat narcolepsy, sleep apnea and sleep disorders related to shift work. It is also used off-label to combat jet lag and attention deficit disorder, and it is used recreationally to enhance alertness. The stimulant does not cause the anxiety and jitteriness associated with amphetamines. Athletes who use modafinil as a banned performance-enhancing substance, however, face suspension from

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL competition for up to two years, according to the rules of the World AntiDoping Agency. Taurasi’s case could still be declared a false positive and dismissed. But even if it were determined that Taurasi took the stimulant inadvertently, and a two-year ban were reduced, she could still face the loss of Olympic eligibility. The International Olympic Committee instituted a controversial rule in 2008 that prohibits athletes from competing in the next Winter or Summer Games if they have served a doping suspension of six months or longer. Taurasi has been provisionally suspended by her Turkish club team,

Fenerbahce of Istanbul, until the drug-testing procedure is completed, Howard L. Jacobs, Taurasi’s California-based lawyer, said Friday. So far she has missed two or three games, Jacobs said. Her doping case was first reported by The Associated Press. “She doesn’t believe that she’s ever taken anything that’s banned; the most logical explanation at this point is that the test is simply wrong,” Jacobs said in a telephone interview. Taurasi, 28, a 6-foot guard, starred at the University of Connecticut and has won two league titles with the Phoenix Mercury of the Women’s National Basketball Association. She was named the WNBA’s most valuable player in 2009 and has led the league in scoring four times. She and Australia’s Lauren Jackson are regarded by many as the two best women’s players in the world.

FORT WAYNE, Ind. — Two and a half hours before tipoff, before a single fan had entered the Allen County War Memorial Coliseum and before she had donned her pink blouse, necklace and high heels, the player who once dared to dribble among men was making her case to be more than one of the guys. “They need women in every aspect of life — why not as coach?” Nancy Lieberman said. She had come to the arena early to retrieve practice shots for her 35-year-old star, Antonio Daniels. Then she moved on to one-up her coaching opponent, Joey Meyer, by reminding him of how his father — Ray, of DePaul prominence — had befriended her when they met years ago as members of a certain little fraternity called the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. She huddled with an assistant, Scott Flemming, to review the game plan and finally, dressed to the nines, coached the Texas Legends of the NBA Developmental League, or D-League, in a loss to the Fort Wayne Mad Ants. It was a setback that Lieberman and her Legends avenged the next night.

A woman among men Can Lieberman, who was hired by the Dallas Mavericks affiliate a year before it made its debut in November, say unequivocally that she is the first professional female coach of men? She doesn’t know, or much care. “There might have been one somewhere in this country or another who put five guys on the floor and called it a pro game,” she said. “But this is a first for a league with guys who have been first-round draft picks, multimillionaires. This is the NBA.” Well, almost. The preparatory version features teams named Mad Ants and cities like Fort Wayne, requiring even the 5-foot-10 Lieberman (sans heels) to assume a near-fetal position on the commuter flight in from Indianapolis and to bunk at the low-budget Don Hall’s Guesthouse off Interstate 69. “Playing 12 years in the NBA, as I have, the things you get used to, the quality, the travel, the hotels, everything about this is humbling,” said Daniels, when asked what the D-League is like for those accustomed to the good life. But Lieberman, he said, has unusual motivational skills based on her history of spearheading the women’s basketball movement and an appreciation for the game, wherever it takes her. On Thanksgiving, when the Legends landed in Boise, Idaho, Lieberman made the best of it and was reminded why she believed she could relate to male players well enough to lead them. “We all went for dinner and went around the table and had to say one or two things about ourselves that were not related to basketball,” she said. “Some guys talked about siblings in jail, about being poor, about having children young in life and about parental situations like my own. As each one spoke, I was thinking, ‘I know how that feels.’ I know what it’s like to not have, to be a minority and to come home to what you think is not a normal family.”

Biography Lieberman was born in Brooklyn but moved to Queens with her parents, Jerry and Renee, and her older brother, Cliff. “My father left us when I was 8 and was out of my life,” she said. “So I was angry at 8, and I’m angry at 52. I’m still angry because it didn’t cost anything to love your children. I’m angry because anybody can be a father, but it takes something special to be a parent.” Her memories of childhood are haunted by the disharmony of a failing marriage, of the financial dependence on a grandfather to keep the family off welfare and in their modest home, of a craving to get away. Long before David Stern hatched the idea of adding a W to NBA, a league Lieberman would play in briefly and also coach in, she escaped to the schoolyard, developed what she calls her “lifelong love affair with a round ball.” When her mother worried aloud about what would become of her, Lieberman said: “I don’t do drugs. I don’t steal. I just want to play ball.” In another echo of what some of her players voiced on Thanksgiving in Boise, she said it was only after she made a name for herself as an early women’s college superstar in the late 1970s at Old Dominion that her father, relocated to Florida, reached out.

The road less traveled She preferred to move forward, in her own way. By the mid-1980s she was teaming with Micheal Ray Richardson

in the backcourt of a United States Basketball League outfit on Long Island after the talented Richardson was exiled from the NBA for repeated drug use. They roomed together on the road. She shadowed him to nightclubs to make sure he stayed out of trouble. Richardson and another former Knick, Geoff Huston, held up a towel so Lieberman could shower behind it when there was no private locker room for her on the road. All of her male teammates had her back when an opponent was of the opinion that she did not belong in a man’s world, dropped the ‘B’ word on her and charged at her after she fired the ball into his face and said: “Oops. You got in the way of my pass.” Daniels aside, Lieberman’s players have grown up with women’s basketball games in their high school and college gyms, with WNBA games in pro arenas. They have no idea what it was like for their new coach, pushing the limits with a chip on her shoulder the size of a basketball. “I didn’t know much about her and didn’t know what to expect,” said Joe Alexander, a forward and 2008 first-round draft pick of Milwaukee. “But I’m learning more about her history — pretty impressive.” Asked if it was awkward being lectured by Lieberman after blowing a defensive assignment, Alexander said: “I think those moments only come when you don’t have a lot of respect for your coach. That’s not the case here. She commands respect.”

Mother figure Another Legend, former Net Sean Williams, said Lieberman is unlike any coach he has had. “She’s kind of like a mom to us,” he said. “She preaches love more than anyone I’ve played for.” Yes, Lieberman said, love is her preferred four-letter word. “But I can also be in their face,” she said. “I tell them, ‘Don’t mistake my stilettos for weakness.’” Play hard, stand tall. Learn from the people around you, about overcoming the odds, or surviving one’s mistakes. The Legends’ president of basketball operations is Spud Webb, who won an NBA dunk contest at the ridiculous height of 5-7. One of Lieberman’s assistants is David Wesley, who participated in a drag race that proved fatal for a Charlotte teammate, Bobby Phills. And then there is Lieberman, who remembers being 20-something and not being able to see beyond the next half. “In my 20s, I was a jerk,” she said. “I just wanted to win. I had to win because I needed you to pay attention to me because I had zero true confidence. Everything about me was related to the ball. I played great, you praised me. Won a championship, you loved me, had to have me. Can’t live your whole life like that. I know that. I want them to learn that sooner than I did. “What I know is that maybe 20 percent of these guys will make it to the NBA but 80 percent won’t, so if I can do anything for them I want to help make them better decision-makers, better men.”

Making an impact She was moved when five of her players showed up to watch her 16-year-old son, T.J., play in a recent high school game on their night off. Her son has an active father — Lieberman’s exhusband, Tim Cline — but conversations never stray too far from the subject of male role models and paternal abandonment. “When T.J. was younger, I told my father, ‘You have one chance to be in his life, but if you screw it up, that’s it,’ ” Lieberman said. And the result? She shook her head. She shares personal stories with her players because she wants them to believe that patterns do not have to be followed. Changes can be made and challenges can be met. Lieberman has lived in Dallas for 30 years and was enjoying her life as an ESPN broadcaster. So why roam minor-league America and wind up in a Fort Wayne snowstorm, wondering if the commuter flight back to Indianapolis will ever lift off? Because in the fall of 2009 she had a chance encounter at a Starbucks store with Donnie Nelson, a Mavericks executive who was in the process of starting the Legends in Frisco, a Dallas suburb. Because the opportunity to crash another barrier arose and, as Nelson said by telephone, “It was no gimmick; I really thought Nancy would be great for these guys.” Which leads to the inevitable question — can she imagine herself landing at least an assistant’s job in the NBA? — Lieberman looked her interviewer straight in the eye and said, “Why not?”


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 25, 2010 D5

Rookies Continued from D1 Suh has been the dominant player on a Lions team that has broken a pair of ignominious skids in the past two weeks (19 consecutive division defeats and 26 straight road losses). The defensive tackle has eight sacks, the most at his position in the league — rookies or veterans. He’s also a solid runstopper and the kind of player opponents must scheme to stop from the outset. “Both of those players have had a big role for their teams and they look like the type of players their teams can build around,” says NFL draft consultant Gil Brandt. Bradford, who has taken every snap for St. Louis and has the Rams (6-8) in position to take the NFC West — wins in the final two games will do it after they went 1-15 in 2009 — is, by far, the most impressive quarterback in the rookie crop. Jimmy Clausen, Max Hall, John Skelton, Rusty Smith, Tony Pike, Joe Webb, Tim Tebow and Colt McCoy have played, with only McCoy having moderate success. “Sam is poised, he’s calm, he’s assertive,” Rams center Jason Brown says. “He’s a great player and he’s going to continue to play great,” adds St. Louis receiver Danny Amendola. Other impressive rookies on offense range from receivers Jordan Shipley of Cincinnati, Mike Williams of Tampa Bay, Jacoby Ford of Oakland and Dez Bryant of Dallas, to tight ends Jermaine Gresham of Cincinnati, Aaron Hernandez and Rob Gronkowski of New England, and Tony Moeaki of Kansas City, to running backs LeGarrette Blount of Tampa Bay, Ryan Mathews of San Diego,

Lakers Continued from D1 Most minimize every aspect of it, saying it’s no more than a holiday amusement for fans seeking a break from present-opening and eggnog-drinking. “I don’t think it’s a measuring stick for us,” James said. “It’s just another game.” Yet competitiveness usually trumps Christmas for elite NBA players. Just ask Bryant — or don’t, since he tellingly hasn’t spoken to the media since getting ejected from the Lakers’ last game. Pau Gasol and Derek Fisher concede both teams are anticipating the marquee matchup as a chance to gauge their readiness for bigger games in the months to come. And if they eventually face each other in June for the biggest prize of all, even better. “The personalities that are going to be matching up in this game, I don’t know if it can get any bigger,” said Fisher, the Lakers point guard who entertained free-agent interest from Miami last summer. “Although there will be other games in this regular season that can mean more, from a personality standpoint and a star power point, I don’t know if it can get any bigger.” Fisher believes the NBA’s impressive television ratings and overall increased spotlight this season can be traced largely to these two franchises and the Boston Celtics. All three boast oversized personalities, compelling team dynamics and remarkable success this season, but the Lakers haven’t yet played either opponent. In fact, the Lakers have monitored the Heat’s development with interest more suited to casual fans than potential rivals — something that might change today. “The dynamic players that they have, as a fan of a game, it makes it easy to watch,” Los Angeles forward Lamar Odom said. The NBA has waited seven years for a playoff matchup between Bryant and James. James’ Cavaliers beat the Lakers on Christmas last year in a game punctuated by dozens of foam hands thrown onto the Staples Center court by frustrated fans, but Cleveland couldn’t get out of the Eastern Conference in the playoffs, leading to James’ departure. “I was in Cleveland and we beat the two-time champs twice in

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Chris Ivory of New Orleans and Jahvid Best of Detroit. Linemen Mike Iupati of San Francisco, Maurkice Pouncey of Pittsburgh, Rodger Saffold of St. Louis, Zane Beadles of Denver and Jared Veldheer of Oakland have been key regulars. But Bradford has stood out, particularly with running back Steven Jackson as the only proven commodity on offense. The rookie from Oklahoma has struggled recently, with five interceptions and no touchdowns, and St. Louis just as easily can finish 6-10 as 8-8 and in the playoffs. Still, Bradford’s skills and decision making have been solid for such a difficult position and on a rebuilding team. “He’s a very focused individual,” coach Steve Spagnuolo says. “He takes care of his body and he realizes the length of this whole thing. You’re talking about the rookie walls, but he played at Oklahoma, where they’re still practicing now.” Should Bradford win The Associated Press NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year award to be announced after the season, he would become the fourth quarterback voted top rookie in seven years. Before that, no QB had won it. And if Suh takes the top defensive award, it would mark only the second time the top two choices have swept the rookie honors: running back George Rogers and linebacker Lawrence Taylor did it in 1981. Suh, from Nebraska, was the most disruptive defensive player in college a year ago. He’s barely missed a step in the pros, and the Lions’ vast improvement on defense — they allowed a league-worst 494 points in 2009 and are on track to yield 376 — can be directly attributed to his impact. Suh, who needs three sacks to set a rookie mark for his

position, also has an interception and a fumble return for a touchdown. “He’s a beast,” says Freeman, Tampa Bay’s quarterback who went to Kansas State and faced Suh every season. “As a player, knowing him on a personal level, I know he gets after it. He’s got a personal vendetta against every offense he plays. He’s going to make something happen, whether it’s stopping the run, whether it’s getting a sack ... he can do it all. He’s a complete player.” And he’s only a rookie. “I’ve never seen one like him before,” Lions defensive coordinator Gunther Cunningham says. Cunningham has worked with such Hall of Famers as Derrick Thomas and Howie Long. “That guy’s never played in this league. That kind of player, that body, that athlete, that size, that explosion.” Suh’s company among top rookie defenders this year includes tackles Gerald McCoy of Tampa Bay, Tyson Alualu of Jacksonville, Geno Atkins of Cincinnati and LaMarr Houston of Oakland; ends Jason Pierre-Paul of the New York Giants, Brandon Graham of Philadelphia and Carlos Dunlap of Cincinnati; linebackers Rolando McClain of Oakland, Koa Misi of Miami and Brandon Spikes of New England; cornerbacks Devon McCourty of New England and Joe Haden of Cleveland; and safeties Earl Thomas of Seattle, Eric Berry and Kendrick Lewis of Kansas City, and Nate Allen of Philadelphia. Also consider how many rookies have improved their clubs to the point that some — the Chiefs, Eagles, Patriots, Giants, Buccaneers, Jaguars, Rams, Seahawks and Saints — are dependent on these youngsters to perform well during the push for the playoffs. And beyond.

one season, and it didn’t get me anything,” James said. “It’s one game, guys. The media guys hype it up, but when that time is over and done with, we’ve got to move on to the next one.” Wade might miss the game with a sore knee, although Jackson expects him to play. Wade’s absence didn’t slow down the Heat on Thursday night during their win at Phoenix, with James scoring 36 points. While the Heat have been outstanding lately, the Lakers’ 21-8 record isn’t terribly impressive considering it came against the NBA’s easiest schedule to date. Los Angeles even flopped in its warmup for Miami, losing by 19 points at home to the Milwaukee Bucks on Tuesday. “I thought their comeuppance might come against Miami, but Milwaukee delivered the blow,”

Jackson said. “So maybe it got their attention so they can get focused on basketball.” Jackson has participated in more than 20 Christmas showcase games dating to his playing career with the New York Knicks. The 11-time champion coach ranks this meeting with Miami on par with Shaquille O’Neal’s return to Los Angeles with the Heat on Christmas 2004, even though he was on a one-year sabbatical from the Lakers at the time, but he doesn’t anticipate the same excitement and vigor he felt from Christmas 2008, when the Lakers snapped the defending champion Celtics’ 19-game winning streak at Staples. “This one measures up to that,” Jackson said. “I don’t think it surpasses that.”

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Jay Reese talks during “The Biggest Little Sports Talk Show in Oregon” on Wednesday night.

Radio Continued from D1 But until Reese, who had lived in Bend from 1998 to 2002, returned to Central Oregon this fall to be nearer to his 10-monthold granddaughter, Bend Radio Group had yet to pull the trigger on starting the show. Reese’s broadcasting career dates back to his days as a Medford High School student in the 1970s, first as a disc jockey working for Jerry Allen, who is now the lead University of Oregon sports announcer. Reese’s career includes a current stint as a fill-in voice for Oregon State University baseball and women’s basketball games. His track record appealed to Bend Radio Group. “He is certainly a known voice around the state,” says Mike Flanagan, programming director for 940 AM. “To Jay’s credit, he brings in the big names (as guests). I would not have wanted to do this if it was just ‘Let’s talk about the high school coaches every week.’ Bend is not that type of town. It needs the bigger name.” Reese, who produces the show and solicits advertising himself, was out of the broadcasting business throughout the 1990s. He was a basketball referee for more than 20 years, blowing his whistle in games at Oregon high schools, Division I colleges — including Pac-10 conference schools — and in NBA summer league and preseason games. Reese was trying to become a full-time NBA referee, but he fell short of his dream. So in 2002 he returned to Medford to get back into broadcasting and begin his own radio show. Like with that show, Reese wants his Bend broadcast to be

“We do the Ducks, Beavers, Blazers, and the top prep stories. I try to keep it guest-driven, versus me trying to be (like notable national radio personalities) Jim Rome or a Howard Stern, or somebody crazy like that.” — Jay Reese, host of ‘The Biggest Little Sports Talk Show in Oregon’

built around interesting guests. “We do the Ducks, Beavers, Blazers, and the top prep stories,” Reese says. “I try to keep it guest-driven, versus me trying to be (like notable national radio personalities) Jim Rome or a Howard Stern, or somebody crazy like that.” And he has quite a catalog of phone numbers of big sports names around the state, cobbled together from years in Oregon broadcasting and connections made while officiating basketball. In his only show during the past week that was not pre-empted by an ESPN college football bowl broadcast (a contractual obligation for many of ESPN’s radio affiliates to carry, according to Reese), he interviewed longtime UO assistant football coach Steve Greatwood. During the same show, Reese interviewed UO’s longtime public-address announcer, Don Essig. The bulk of Reese’s guests so far have been more regionally recognized names such as

Greatwood, and Air Force head football coach Troy Calhoun, who is a graduate of Oregon’s Roseburg High School. But Reese has also interviewed a number of standout Central Oregon athletes, such as UO track star Ashton Eaton, Portland State running back Cory McCaffrey, and Washington State hoopster Abe Lodwick. And he also interviewed Culver bareback rider Bobby Mote, who at the time was in Las Vegas and on his way to a fourth world championship at the National Finals Rodeo. Rodeo stars like Mote are hardly typical guests on a sports radio show. But to be successful in Central Oregon, Reese says he will have to expand beyond the traditional “big three” sports to reach all corners of this region’s quirky sports landscape. “By and large the mainstay is the football, basketball,” Reese says. “But with all the other interests here — the golf, the running, the biking, the skiing, the rodeo, the fishing, the outdoors — there is a lot to get to. And I am excited to do that, to meet those people and learn.” And Reese is hoping that a mix of local and regional guests will help build an audience. “It’s fun, and that’s what the show is,” Reese says. “We want to entertain people in that 5 o’clock hour, when they’ve had a long day.” Zack Hall can be reached at 541-617-7868 or at zhall@ bendbulletin.com.

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D6 Saturday, December 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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2011 COAR PRESIDENT

A New Year of Leadership The Central Oregon Association of Realtors will begin the new year with Lester Friedman as president in 2011. by Laurel Brauns for The Bulletin Advertising Department The new Central Oregon Association of Realtors (COAR) 2011 president, Lester Friedman of Coldwell Banker Morris Real Estate, has been selling real estate in the Bend area for more than 10 years with his wife, Katlin. His experience extends beyond selling, however. He has an extensive background in community involvement and leadership, and he has many innovative ideas to strengthen COAR as an organization with hopes of making the organization more valuable to its members. Friedman grew up in Portland and was living in the Seattle area in 1999 when he and Katlin decided to move to Central Oregon. They were looking for both a change of lifestyle and a change in career. He knew what he wanted in a profession. “I was looking for something that would help people achieve their dreams,” Friedman said. “Real estate was a great way for me to be able to advise people on investments and how to build wealth.” Friedman entered the real estate industry with a background in broadcast communications, sales, commercial construction, education, and corporate and community leadership. He jumped in with both feet after moving to Bend and became a highly involved member of the real estate community and well as his local community. He joined COAR immediately after becoming a Realtor and has served on a number of different committees throughout the years including the government affairs committee and the public relations/communications committee. He also served at the state level as a director for the Oregon Association of Realtors for four years and as a local director for COAR. Most recently, he served as COAR’s secretary/treasurer and president-elect, both of which are required prior to taking on the role of president. “Lester has been a very active part of the association and is very well known,” said Kathy

Ragsdale, COAR CEO. “He has been preparing to be the COAR president for years now.” In addition to his commitment to the real estate community, Friedman is active in a number of different roles and organizations in Bend. He has served eight years on the budget committee for Central Oregon Community College; he has been president of the Jewish Community of Central Oregon; and he is serving on the Bend Police Chief’s Citizen’s Advisory Committee, which is a sounding board for the Bend Police Chief about various areas of concern in the City of Bend. He also volunteers as a mountain ambassador at Mt. Bachelor where, besides helping people with directions, he likes to talk up all the positive attributes of Central Oregon as he connects with visitors to the mountain. “I love where we live — the whole Central Oregon area,” Friedman said. “I’m invested in the community, and that is good for business. It also helps bring jobs to the area.” Although one of the primary functions of COAR is to manage the Multiple Listing Services (MLS) System, other opportunities exist for which Friedman hopes to encourage member involvement. Some of COAR’s committees include: public relations, education, MLS and professional standards. Friedman also mentioned that he would like to encourage members to attend board meetings as they are open to each member. “The best way to help the association grow and improve is to be part of the leadership,” he said. “Another reason Lester will make a great president is that he is always encouraging other’s input and feelings and is always building consensus,” Ragsdale said. “He is fair-minded and professional and is always ready to study up on things to learn more about the industry.” Friedman has a number of different goals which he hopes to fulfill while serving as president of COAR. First, he states that as an organization, COAR needs to be doing more with less, just as the Realtors who the association serves have learned

Photo by Nicole Werner/The Bulletin Advertising Department

Lester Friedman, ABR, CSB, broker with Coldwell Banker Morris Real Estate in Bend, will serve as president of COAR in 2011.

“The better educated our members are, the better we can serve the community.” new ways to be productive in a tough economy. Friedman also hopes to improve the image of Realtors in the community and get the word out about how real estate agents in Central Oregon are involved in their communities. He also hopes to work on state and federal levels advocating public opportunities for homeownership.

On the educational front, Friedman is seeking to continue and to expand on bringing continuing education courses offered by COAR to its members in outlying areas including Madras, La Pine, Redmond, Prineville, Sisters and Sunriver. “The better educated our members are, the better we can serve the community,” Friedman said. “The more we know, the better we are.”


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330 SE 15th St. #9 Close to schools & shopping 1 bdrm, appliances, on-site coin-op laundry, carport, w/s/g paid. $495. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condominiums & Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space 682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condominiums & Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 634

Rentals

600 604

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 2508 NE Conners "C" 2 bdrm, 1½ bath, all appliances, utility rm., 1300 sq. ft., garage, w/s paid. $695 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Storage Rentals Secure 10x20 Storage, in SE Bend, insulated, 24-hr access, $95/month, Call Rob, 541-410-4255.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

605

541-385-5809

Roommate Wanted Share House in DRW, $400/mo incl. utils, $200 dep., 541-420-5546.

627

Vacation Rentals and Exchanges Costa Rica Home Swap Former Oregonian’s son will be married in Bend 7/29/11. 2 bdrm 2 full bath home in Atenas. “El Mejor Clima del Mundo.” Please email: wagspuravida@yahoo.com

Steens Mountain Home Lodgings See Bend Craigslist for more info, 541-589-1982.

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Condo / Townhomes For Rent A Westside Condo at Fireside Lodge, 2 bdrm, 1 bath, $595/mo. Wood stove, W/S/G paid. W/D hookup 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

62045 NE Nates Place 3 bedroom 2.5 bath four-plex with garage, full laundry room with full size washer and dryer. Easy access to Greenwood and 27th. New carpet and paint. ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT - 541-389-8558 www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

854 NE Hidden Valley #1 & #2 2 bdrm, 2.5 bath, all appliances + W/D, gas heat, garage, w/s/g paid, small pet OK. $695. 541-382-7727 BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

First Month’s Rent Free 130 NE 6th 1-2 bdrm/ 1 bath, W/S/G paid, onsite laundry, no pets, $450-$525+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414

$99 MOVES YOU IN !!! Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

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632

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Apt./Multiplex General

1225 NW Stannium

FIRST MONTH HALF-OFF! 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex. NEW CARPET & PAINT THROUGHOUT! W/D included. No smoking. No Pets. 1yr. lease. $795/mo. + $945 sec. 20076 Beth. 541-382-3813 The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

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Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 1 & 2 bdrms Available starting at $575. Reserve Now! Limited Availability.

Alpine Meadows 541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

1042 NE Rambling Ln. #2 2 bdrm, all appliances +micro, w/d hook-up, gas heat/ fireplace, garage, landscaping included, small pet ok. $695 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

1/2 month free! $799-$825 Age restricted 55+ apt rentals 2 bdrm, 2 bath units with attached garages. 541-388-1239 www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com 1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928.

20940 Royal Oak Circl. Unit B 1 bdrm/ 1 bath attached apt. Furnished or unfurnished avail. kitchen, private ent. all utlts pd. no pets. $595+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414

3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, all appliances, w/d hookup, gas fireplace, w/s/g paid, garage, cat OK. $695. 541-382-7727 BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

1544 NW Juniper Ave. $625 – 2 Bdrm ground floor apt with large rooms, fireplace, patio, off street parking. Full sized W/D, new carpet. Very near COCC. Easy access to Newport and downtown. ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT - 541-389-8558

Country Terrace 61550 Brosterhous Rd. 1 Bdrm $425 • 2 Bdrm $495 All appliances, storage, on-site coin-op laundry BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-7727 www.bendpropertymanagement.com

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Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 1264 Silverlake Blvd. #200 Old Mill 2 bdrm, 2.5 bath, all appliances + w/d, gas heat/fireplace, 1236 sq. ft., garage. W/S paid, cat ok. $795. 541-382-7727 BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Happy holidays! Enjoy living at 179 SW Hayes Ave. Spacious 2 Bdrm townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rent starts at $525 mo. 541-382-0162; 541-420-2133 541-420-0133

2960 SW 24th Ct. 2 bdrm, 2 bath, all appl., gas heat, w/d hookup, fireplace, fenced yard, garage. $625. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

2 bedroom, 2 bath next to park, Appliances avail. including big screen TV! 3 units available. $695-$750 month. 541-280-7781. A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appl., incl. gardener, reduced to $749/mo. 541-408-0877. ASK ABOUT OUR HOLIDAY SPECIAL! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

3 Bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, Summerfield location, near 97, fresh interior paint, new Pergo, fully fenced. 1st & dep., $850. 503-997-7870. Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily 4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room, w/woodstove, new carpet/paint, single garage w/opener. $795/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend Country Home! 3 bdrm 3 bath 3500+ sq. ft. home, all appliances, family room, office, triple garage, 2 woodstoves, sunroom, lrg. utility room including w/d, pantry, landscaping incl, pet OK. $3000 mo. 541-382-7727

$695 3/1.5, new paint, single garage, w/d hookups, oil heat. 915 SW Dogwood Ave $750 3/2 w/d hookups, family room, fenced, deck, sheds 3125 SW Pumice Ave $795 3/2, double garage w/ opener, w/d hookups, new carpet, breakfast bar, patio, fenced 1748 SW Kalama Ave $795 3/2.5 double garage w/opener, w/d, gas fireplace, fenced, yard maint 2885 SW Indian Circle $825 3/2 double garage w/opener, W/D, vaulted, fenced, sprinkler system 1425 SW 31st St $875 3/2 double garage w/Opener, breakfast bar, w/d hookups, gas forced air heat, fenced. 735 NE Negus Place $895 4/2 single garage, w/d hookups, wood fireplace, formal dining, deck, fenced 458 SW 12th St $995 4/2.5 new carpet! double garage, w/d hookups, gas forced air, fenced. 730 NE Negus Place $1250 Move in Special! $200 off 1st month rent, 3/2 Gated, views, .5 acre lot, dbl garage, large deck. 2345 Linnet Ln

541-923-8222

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

www.MarrManagement.com

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments

The Bulletin

Houses for Rent Sunriver

Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com Call about Our Specials! Studios to 3 bedroom units from $395 to $550 • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 managed by

GSL Properties

NW Awbrey Road 2 bedroom, 2 bath, $650 month. Avail immediately. 541-382-2920.

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend 1/1 cottage, woodstove, garage, deck, yard w/trees, private end of cul-de-sac, Bear Creek/15th. Avail. now. $650 1st/last/dep. 541-330-0053

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

20659 Daisy Lane 3 bdrm, 2 bath, all appliances, + w/d, gas heat, fireplace, fenced yard, large dbl. garage. $875. 541-382-7727 BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

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21183 Copperfield Ave

Houses for Rent General

$995 - 3 Bdrm 2 bath single story home with large yard, 2-car garage, full size laundry, in great SE neighborhood. Easy access to 27th. ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT - 541-389-8558

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

1124 NE Ulysses 3 bdrm, 2 bath, all appl., w/d hookup, fenced yard, extra storage, garage, pet considered. $850. 541-382-7727 BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

1/2 Off 1st Mo. Rent! 20732 Patriot Lane 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, all appl. incl. w/d, dlb. garage, wood floors, $995/mo.+ dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414 1435 NE Boston 3 bdrm/ 2 bath, private yard, gas frplce, all kitchen appl incld small pet neg. $895+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414

1743 NE Diablo $900 – 3 bedroom 2 bath, newly remodeled, new carpet, linoleum & fresh paint; large yard and garage. Heaters and wood stove. Available soon! ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT - 541-389-8558 www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

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A newer 3/2 mfd. home, 1755 sq.ft., living room, family room, on private .5 acre lot near Sunriver, $895. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803. VILLAGE PROPERTIES Sunriver, Three Rivers, La Pine. Great Selection. Prices range from $425 - $2000/mo. View our full inventory online at Village-Properties.com 1-866-931-1061

20371 Rocca Way 3 bdrm, 2½ bath, 1675 sq. ft. gas fireplace, fenced yard, pets ok! $950 541-382-7727

DUPLEX SW Redmond 2 bdrm 2 bath, garage w/opener. 1300 sq ft, w/d hkup, fenced yard, deck, w/s/g pd. $700 mo + dep. 541-604-0338

BEND RENTALS • Starting at $450. Furnished also avail. For virtual tours & pics apm@riousa.com 541-385-0844

Opportunity Knocks! 3.12 acre RV Park and support improvements along the Crooked River Canyon Gorge, within the community of Crooked River Ranch. 350 sq. ft. wood-frame building includes office and (2) multiBEND PROPERTY fixture restrooms (includes MANAGEMENT shower). Amenities within www.bendpropertymanagement.com the complex consist of a 4628 SW 21st St., Red18-hole golf course, RV park, mond - 2250 sq ft office & clubhouse, swimming pool, warehouse. 15¢/sq ft for 1st community store & postal 6 mos., + $300 cleaning dep. station, fire dept, ambulance, Avail Jan 15. 541-480-9041 public safety, restaurants, salons and overnight stay acLight Industrial, various sizes, commodations. $200,000. North and South Bend loca(Possible owner terms.) tions, office w/bath from MLS#201009635 $400/mo. 541-317-8717 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker Office / Warehouse 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty space • 1792 sq ft 827 Business Way, Bend 738 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404 Multiplexes for Sale Office/Warehouse Space, 6400 sq.ft., (3) 12x14 doors, 13 Units (Duplexes & Triplexes) All units 3 Bdrm, 1.5 bath, on Boyd Acres Rd, townhouse style, living 541-382-8998. downstairs, bedrooms upThe Bulletin offers a LOWER, stairs. Ad #92612. $799,000. MORE AFFORDABLE Rental Pam Lester, Principal Broker rate! If you have a home to Century 21 Gold Country rent, call a Bulletin Classified Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 Rep. to get the new rates and 745 get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Homes for Sale

693

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent 335 NE Greenwood Ave. Prime retail/office space, Greenwood frontage, 1147 sq. ft., ample parking, includes w/s. $1200 mo. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

347 NE Greenwood Ave. 400 sq. ft. office space, private entrance & restroom, 3 small offices + reception area, ample parking, includes water/sewer/ electric. $500! 541-382-7727 www.bendpropertymanagement.com

call Classified 385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad

541-385-5809

Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY

1944½ NW 2nd St Need storage or a craft studio? 570 sq. ft. garage, w/ Alley Access, Wired, Sheetrocked, Insulated, Wood or Electric Heat. $275. Call 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

on Wall Street in Bend. All utilities paid and parking. Call 541-389-2389 for appt.

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Large 2 bdrm, 1 bath, large fenced backyard in nice neighborhood, $650 mo. + deposit. Call Heidi at 541-480-6679.

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Fully furnished loft apt.

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

1 Bdrm, 1 bath, 547 1/2 NW 7th, $550; 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 626 1/2 SW 8th, $595; 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 135 NW 10th St., $650, 541-815-1709, CopperDog PM.

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1459 NW Albany d 1 bdrm $495 d d 3 bdrm $610 d Coin-op laundry. W/S/G paid, cat or small dog OK with dep. 541-382-7727 or 388-3113.

CLEAN 2 bdrm/1bath, new carpets, hardwood floors, gas heat & water, finished garage, storage shed, $775 mo. See at 1230 NE Viking. Clean 3 Bdrm 2 Bath, new paint/carpet, 1262 sq ft, $900/mo. Near hosp; must see! No pets/smoking. 3023 NE Byers Ct. 541-410-0794

10th Fairway Eagle Crest behind the gates 3 Bdrm + den, 3.5 bath, 2400 sq ft, O/S garage, W/D, deck, views quiet low maint. Year round pool, tennis golf. No smkg, pet w/dep. $1400 + sec. Possible lease option, owner will carry w/down, $349,000. 541-923-0908

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Westside Village Apts.

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

1018 NW Birch Ave. 2 bdrm/ 1 bath, 720 sq ft. house,located on large lot, close to dwntwn. Pets neg. $550+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414

When buying a home, 83% of Central Oregonians turn to

www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

Small studio close to downtown and Old Mill. $450 mo., dep. $425, all util. paid. no pets. 541-330-9769 or 541-480-7870.

3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2 car garage, bonus room, deck, fridge, gas stove, new paint, carpet & vinyl. $975/mo. Pets neg. Mike 541-408-8330.

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Absolutely beautiful, 1 Bdrm. 2 bath, fully furnished Condo, $695, $400 dep, near downtown & college, completely renovated, 2 Verandas, no pets/smoking, avail. now, all amenities and W/S/G/elec./A/C/Cable incl., 541-279-0590 or cheritowery@yahoo.com

River & Mountain Views! 930 NW Carlon St., 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, W/S/G paid, W/D hook-up, $650/mo. $600 dep. No pets. 541-280-7188.

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

660

Houses for Rent La Pine 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1500 sq.ft. on 1.1 acre, attached & detached garage, huge dog run, heat pump, A/C, dishwasher, fridge, micro, W/D, secluded, quiet, $900, refs, credit, background checks req., 541-815-9893. Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

661

Houses for Rent Prineville

www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds 429 SE Roosevelt $795 – 3 Bdrm 2 Bath single story with yard, newer carpet. Cute little place, easy access to everything. Off street parking, full size W/D, lots of sunlight. Ready to go! ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT - 541-389-8558

$695 - Move in special! $100 off 1st month rent, 2/1 double garage w/opener, W/D, covered patio, bay window, fenced. 795 NE Ochoco Ave

541-923-8222 www.MarrManagement.com

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Houses for Rent Furnished

1800 Sq.ft. Pahlish Townhome, off Brosterhous, 3 bdrm., 656 fully furnished, all dishes & cookware, W/D, hardwood Houses for Rent floors, stainless appl., plasma SW Bend TV, stereo & DVD, gas fireplace & grill, small side yard, $1000 Mo. Newer imdbl. garage, $1100/mo., incl. maculate 3/2.5, 1560 sq.ft., W/S & cable, 541-749-0546 dbl. garage 1st & last, pet neg. 19827 Powers Road. RIVERFRONT: walls of win503-363-9264,503-569-3518 dows with amazing 180 degree river view with dock, canoe, piano, bikes, covered Find It in BBQ, $1250. 541-593-1414 www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

19584 Manzanita December rent free! 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1152 sq. ft., w/d hookup, carport, storage, 1 acre lot that backs up to canal $575 mo. 541-382-7727 BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft., mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1295. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 Downtown Redmond Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. $650/mo + utils; $650 security deposit. 425 SW Sixth St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848

Real Estate For Sale

700 705

Real Estate Services * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

$114,900 1728 sq. ft. 1.19 acres. Great private setting property. MLS#201003041 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $119,500. 3 bdrm, 2 bath MLS#201005642 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

Marilyn Rohaly, Broker 541-322-9954 marilynr@johnlscott.com

510 NE Third St.

Suntree Village $57,000 This 1819+ sq. ft., 3 bed, 2 bath home features 1001 SE 15th #216 a vaulted living room and formal dining area, and a huge kitchen with eating area. Private deck overlooking the park. Separate garage & shop.

The Bulletin Classiieds

$124,740. 4 Bdrm, 1.75 bath on 1 acre. MLS#201009519 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $125,000. Brand new townhouse with fenced yard and to many amenities to list! MLS#2909950 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $129,000 3 bdrm, 2 bath MLS#201009503 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $129,000 3 bdrm, 3 bath MLS#201004065 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $129,000 4 bdrm, 2.5 bath. MLS#201008443 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 13174 SW Chipmonk Rd., Crooked River Ranch. 1400 sq. ft., 2 bedroom, 1 bath home on 5 acres. Property is completely fenced & gated. Hook-up. $140,000 MLS# 201009085 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393

Prepare to fall in love Snowberry Village $90,000 with this 3 bed, 2 bath, 1188 NE 27th #111 1600 sq. ft. triple wide overlooking the interior pond in Snowberry Village. 3 bedroom, 2 bath with separate living and great rooms, oversized 2-car garage with extra storage and lots more. Snowberry Village $109,900 The jewel of Snowberry 1188 NE 27th #76 Village. Premier 55+ park. Immaculate 3 bed, 2 bath, triple wide, 1883 sq. ft. with formal living and dining plus open great room w/skylights. Enjoy a 12' x 30' covered deck, oversized 2-car finished garage. Great location in gated Mtn. View Park $141,500 community of Mtn. View 2375 NE Buckwheat Ct. Park. Ideal floor plan, 3 bed, 2 bath, separation of bedrooms. Private w/covered front porch, separate paved parking, huge entertaining deck. Extras: vaults, custom cabinets, tile entry, skylight, solar tube, walk-in pantry, A/C & more. 1 yr. AHS included.


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 25, 2010 E3

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Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Redmond Homes

***

Looking for Unique? 5 Bedroom, 2 bath in 3262 sq.ft., on 3 acres. Large Kitchen with madrone floors, close to Shevlin Park. Interesting spaces for a multitude of family activities. Lots of natural light and incredible sunset views. Not just a house but a lifestyle, no close neighbors and no rules. It’s your property and home to enjoy your own way. Entertain young & old with ease in this home and on this property! $530,000. MLS# 201004851 or visit johnlscott. com/24593 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

Possibility! This 1782 sq. ft., 3 bdrm, 2 bath home is full of possibilities! Large living areas, including living, dining & kitchen with island/breakfast bar, pantry and china closet. Good bedroom separation with large master bath/walk-in closet. Metal roof, heat pump, skylights, a full length deck, handicap access and lots of room to build accessory bldgs add to the value of this home that is priced to sell at $65,000. MLS#2712929 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

www.dukewarner.com The Only Address to Remember for Central Oregon Real Estate

$440,000. 4-CAR GARAGE plus an exceptional 2974 sq. ft. home. Granite slab counters, knotty alder cabinets & trim, travertine floors, stainless steel appliances and slate entry. Huge bonus room w/built-in TV, bar & views, AC, central vac, fully landscaped, and extensive stamped concrete. Lana Carrell, Principal Broker 541-419-6810 Century 21 Gold Country Realty

$279,900 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2383 sq. ft. MLS#201007542 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified *** $284,900 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath MLS#201007771 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $35,900 2 bdrm, 1 bath MLS#201002495 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $45,900 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath. MLS#201008067 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

$49,900 2 bdrm, 1 bath MLS#201009284 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 $59,900 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath. MLS#201008043 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

541-322-7253

Custom 1682 Sq. Ft. Home! 1.52 acre lot boasts this beautiful 3 bed, 2 bath home, complete with den and sewing/craft room. Large living room with propane stove, solar hot water, heat pump, sunroom and lots of storage in the oversized garage and 16x25 shop, complete with compressor, hoist, overhead door & 220 power. $224,900. MLS#2712181 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty Historic farm home. 3 Bedroom, 1 bath in 1119 sq. ft. on 32.5 acres with 23 acres of COI irrigation has seen loving family life inside its walls. Could be lived in while you build your dream home or could be a modest home for a small family as is. Close to town, yet has that country feel, including mature barnyard/homestead trees. $498,000. MLS#2809587 or visit johnlscott.com/87329 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

$69,000 3 bdrm, 1 bath MLS#201006639 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 7227 NW Rainbow Rd., Crooked River Ranch. 3 Bedroom, 2 bath, 1392 sq. ft. 2 story on 4.88 acres. New oak hardwood & tile floors. Large deck with hot tub. $219,900 MLS# 201008996 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393

8264 SW Shad Rd., Crooked River Ranch. Park like setting, 1654 sq. ft. home on 2 lots totaling 2 acres. Attached 2-car garage plus a 24 x 36 shop. Wonderful mountain views. $184,000 MLS# 201010094 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393 $89,900 3 bdrm, 2 bath. MLS#201008044 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Cascade mountain views. 1 Bdrm, 1 bath in 884 sq.ft. on 2.07 acres. Super country location with peace & quiet & small cottage that is so cute. Irrigated pasture has had loving care. A big barn, shop, office awaits you with a loft fun room for parties, pool, ping pong. Easy to show. $250,000 MLS#2909664 or visit johnlscott. com/56207 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

Charming retreat located in Woodside Ranch. 2 Bdrm + den (potential 3rd bdrm), 2 bath in 1408 sq.ft. on .78 acre. Beautiful flag stone hearth in living room ready for wood or gas stove. Kitchen has tile floor, counters & back splash plus Whirlpool Estate appliances in silvertone. Garage has huge bank of cabinets. Home completely refurbished. Nestled in the trees w/easy care natural landscaping & a tree house too. Tall vaulted ceilings, beams, natural wood & stone accents. Leaded beveled glass in living room & foyer. Newer 30 yr roof & ext paint. $275,000. MLS#2711853 or visit johnlscott.com/66140 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

Hunters Circle. 3 Bedroom, 1.5 bath on 1/4 acre lot with new trees, plants and fences2007-2009. New roof in 2009, shed in 2008, water heater, interior paint, and laminate in 2007, kitchen counters and backsplash in 2008, half bath in 2008, light fixtures in 2008, washing machine in 2009. Please visit this home. $127,500. MLS#201005148 or visit johnlscott. com/89946 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

Majestic. 3 Bedroom, 2.5 bath in 1748 sq. ft. A gardener’s paradise (includes 20+ fruit trees), plenty of windows plenty of light. 3 bedrooms + a bonus room. Newer tile counters in kitchen & bathrooms. Main floor master, lily pond, and ceiling fans with lights. Handicap equipped w/grab bars throughout home & exterior. $179,000. MLS#201001304 or visit johnlscott. com/68701 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 Opportunity knocks for your family. 3 Bdrm, 3 bath in 2116 sq. ft. on 4.54 acres. Beautiful mature trees, Russian Olive, Aspen, Ponderosa, Juniper, Poplar, Maple & Willow. Pond (Clayed) With dock & water feature, fenced and cross-fenced. Work in progress inside. Kitchen and hall bath completely remodeled. $235,000 MLS#201007475 or visit johnlscott.com/37531 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 OWNER TERMS Short sale or foreclosure does not need to keep you from owning your own home. Easy terms on this 3 Bdrm 2.5 bath home. Drive by at 3626 SW Volcano, Redmond and then call to see: 541-815-2986

Porter James Edition. Reverse living townhouse configuration duplex. Each unit is 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath in 1,466ý sq. ft. It sits on a 5,227ý sq. ft. lot. Great investment opportunity or live in one unit and rent the other (rent of $650). Walk-in master closet, easy-care landscaping, and close to the Old Mill District, Deschutes River, Parks & Schools. $170,000 MLS#201009602 or visit johnlscott. com/54838 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

Stunning Cascade Views from this beautiful 2000 sq. ft. home, on nearly 1.25 acre nicely sloped lot. Newer home with new roof, paved drive, concrete porch, oversized double garage, beautiful landscaping, fenced yard and garden, large rooms, breakfast bar, walk-in pantry, hickory cabinets, vaulted ceilings, fans and picture window. $224,900. MLS#201005829 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty Tillicum Village. 4 Bedrooms, 3 baths, 2608 sq. ft. on 1.46 acre. Your own park that’s adjacent to common ground. The grounds will astound you with their beauty. 2 ponds and 2 waterfalls plus spacious garden and gardening area. Remodel includes new cabinets, new birch floors and tile floors, new windows and doors, 2 gas furnaces, new hot tub, new lighting and ceiling fans. 2 water heaters, new Trex deck and paver patio. This home and its grounds are a must preview. $399,900 MLS#2803287 or visit johnlscott. com/17418 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 Under The Tuscan Sun You must see the interior of this gorgeous Tuscan-styled home, complete with beautiful frescos and arched doorways. Privately nestled among rock outcroppings, this 3,273 square foot home sits on 10 acres with unobstructed mountain views. 20635 Bowery Lane. MLS# 201006265. $899,000 Debbie Mantorano, Broker 541-480-2089 Steve Scott Realtors Village Wiestoria. 4 Bdrm, 2.75 bath in 2129 sq.ft. A super floor plan in award winning, Europeanstyle Village Wiestoria. Alley access to garage. Home overlooks the neighborhood park. Centrally located to schools, shopping, downtown, medical facilities & recreation. Downstairs is a great room floor plan. Upstairs has family room, 2 bdrm, 1 bathroom & could be a separate living area for a family member or friend. Home has had loving care! $240,000. MLS#2911387 or visit johnlscott.com/39616 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

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Northwest Bend Homes Awbrey Heights. 5 Bdrm, 3.5 bath on 0.32 ý acre. Perfect for family, developers or investors looking for a flexible floor plan. Masterfully landscaped for privacy. Located on 2+ RS lots just 1 block from the Deschutes River. Opportunity abounds w/the current redevelopment of the neighborhood. Double garage & covered carport too. Come preview this property – it’s not a drive by! $395,000. MLS# 2803755 or visit johnlscott.com/23648. Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

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Southwest Bend Homes Deschutes River Woods. 3 Bdrm, 1.75 bath in 1329 sq. ft. custom home on DRW acre. Great room floor plan w/vaulted ceiling. All kitchen appli., are incl. Both recessed & under cabinet lighting in kitchen. Laundry room w/skylite & large pantry. New interior paint. Garage is heated & finished w/work bench. Super fenced yard w/mature Ponderosas, storage building, double canopy carport or storage structure. This home is move-in ready. $259,000. Call Bobbie at 541-480-1635 about MLS# 2802056 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 Nice SW Bend Location! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1414 sq.ft., .32 acre lot, mature landscaping, sprinkler system, RV parking. Ad #93642. $129,200. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

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Northeast Bend Homes Private Bend Setting! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1219 sq.ft., stainless appl., gas stove, Pergo flooring, mature trees. Ad #93652. $109,900 Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

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Redmond Homes $149,000! Almost 1/2 acre in Terrebonne on Hwy 97. Two different tax lots. Older manufactured currently rented. Possible future investment property. 8540 9th St. Lana Carrell, Principal Broker 541-419-6810 Century 21 Gold Country Realty

Bring all offers!! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1704 sq.ft., 1.2 acres, fenced pasture, mature landscaping, large garage w/ shop area. Ad #91962. $209,900. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 Grand Smith Rock Estate! 4 Bdrm, 3.5 bath, 3500 sq.ft., 5 acres w/3 irrigation, guest apt., barn, shop, 2 triple garages, green house. Ad # 93392. $599,900. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

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The Bulletin Huge Upgraded Home! 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, bonus room, 2416 sq.ft., back yard, covered patio. AD #93302. $233,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 Located on Canyon Rim! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1520 sq.ft., .60 acre lot, RV parking galore, vaulted family room, Mtn views. Ad #93262. $169,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 Nice SW Neighborhood! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1300 sq.ft., gas fireplace, central air, fenced, landscaped, sprinkler system. Ad #93572. $94,900. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 NW Redmond. 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1393 sq.ft., den/office, master separation, gas fireplace, breakfast nook, RV parking, fenced. Ad #93612. $80,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 NW Redmond Home. 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 1942 sq.ft., gas fireplace, vaulted ceilings, kitchen island, tile countertops, landscaped, fenced. Ad #93562. $179,900. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 Private & Gated! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1832 sq.ft., 5.3 acres, fully fenced, shop, near BLM, park like setting. Ad #93342. $275,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 REDUCED!! $139,000! Almost new 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2115 sq. ft. home located at end of cul-de-sac. Hickory cabinets, gas fireplace, large master suite, and bonus room upstairs. Fenced yard, storage building, and great mountain views. 2181 NW Kilnwood.. Lana Carrell, Principal Broker 541-419-6810 Century 21 Gold Country Realty

541-385-5809 Ideal for large, foster or home school families. Room for Horses with Panoramic Mountain Views. 5 Bdrm + unfinished space for possible 6th bdrm, 4 bath in 3300 sq. ft. on 2.8 acre. Plenty of space for family togetherness & privacy too. Country setting adjacent to public lands. Great room-kitchen, dining & family room plus large bonus/recreational room! $340,000 MLS#2900223 or visit johnlscott. com/93222 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

Kings Forest. 3 Bdrm, 1 bath, 1240 sq. ft. on 22.16 acres. Existing home is a charming old school house, extraordinary building site for for a replacement dwelling, with sweeping mountain and ranch views. Huge barn with full meat packing facility & refrigeration. Pond lined, beautiful 15 acre hay field weed-free. Impressive mature trees & the potential to raise goats, horses, cattle with numerous outbuildings. $484,500. MLS#201006994 or visit johnlscott.com/14483 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 Kings Forest. 4 Bedroom, 4 bath in 3660 sq. ft. on a 36,336 sq. ft. lot. Many wonderful features. Chef’s kitchen with maple cabinets, granite countertops, double ovens and much more. Slider off family room. Traditional dining room and formal living room, office, huge laundry, mud/work room, solid panel doors and maple hardwood flooring. Built-in desks, bookshelves, window seats in bedrooms. Large master bedroom and bathroom. Large weight & storage rooms. RV parking, kids play apparatus, tree house. Plenty of room for kids, pets and toys plus a triple garage. $425,000. MLS#2906169 or visit johnlscott.com/13379 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

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E 4Saturday, December 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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SEARCH. Find acres of properties with slideshows offering up to 10 photographs per home to showcase unique features, home interiors and exteriors, quickly and easily.

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making Central Oregon real estate, real easy.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 25, 2010 E5

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Redmond Homes

Homes with Acreage

Homes with Acreage

Farms and Ranches

Lots

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Acreages

Spectacular Views! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1624 sq.ft., 2.24 acre rim lot, huge deck, fenced, landscaped, private setting. Ad #93582. $288,900. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

15043 SW Peninsula, Crooked River Ranch. 1710 sq.ft., 3 bedroom, 2 bath on 1.83 acre rim lot with Crooked River Canyon & Smith Rock views. 1560 sq. ft. RV shop with 14' doors on both ends to drive through. $238,900 MLS# 201008425 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393

Horse Property! This 5 acre property is fully fenced with electric gate. 1782 sq. ft. home boasts a large kitchen, family room, living room and good bedroom separation, inclusive of heat pump for summer and winter comfort. 1200 sq. ft. accessory building is finished with heat and a 3/4 bath. Priced for a quick sale at $149,900. MLS#201008824 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

$1,295,000. Equestrian Estate. Beautiful main home, loaded with amenities. Also farm house, 116 x 204 sq.ft. barn, 80 x 204 sq.ft. indoor arena, has been used for shows, clinics, 17 indoor stalls, office w/bathroom. Apartment, spectator area, 150 x 300 sq. ft. outdoor arena, round pens, 60 x 62 sq.ft. foaling & breeding barn, 40 x 60 shop, 2 roll up doors vehicle lift & bathroom, 30 x 30 sq. ft. custom garage. Mtn. views galore on 19+ acres plus irrigation. 65950 93rd St. Heather Hockett, PC, Broker 541-420-9151 Century 21 Gold Country Realty

BIG DESCHUTES RIVER FRONTAGE - RIVER PARADISE ! Former Bend Elks recreation property in Haner Park. 7-8ý useable acres in 2 separate tax lots. 1.5ý miles downstream from Wickiup Reservoir with 1/4ý miles of river frontage on the Big Deschutes River. Large, flat grassy area for gatherings and a shelter with fireplace. A boat landing and dock. $575,000. MLS# 2910706 or visit johnlscott.com/59391. Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

Deschutes River & Cascade View! Flat parcel with lots of trees for privacy and an unbelievable panoramic view. This 4.24 acre property adjoins public lands, with a rim-type view that will last a lifetime! Lot is approved for septic installation. This is a one-of-a-kind at $139,900. MLS#2906726 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

Stunning Cascade View Lot on Crooked River Ranch. This fabulous lot has power and community water available at the road and has previously obtained county approval for a standard septic installation. Come to Crooked River Ranch to golf, horseback ride, play tennis, fish or ski. It is a wonderful place to “hang your hat!” $54,900. MLS#201008827 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

4.38 Acre View Lot! Backs BLM, Cascade mtn & Smith Rock views, corner lot, approved for standard septic. Ad #92572. $199,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

35 Acre irrigated, hay & cattle farm, close to Prineville, 76 year old widower will sacrifice for $395,000, 541-410-3425

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Premier Crooked River Ranch rim property. Sit on the porch swing as you take-in awesome view from Smith Rock, down the Crooked River Canyon, in both directions, ending at a pictureperfect portrait of Mt. Hood and Mt. Jefferson. Across the canyon view miles of Culver Ag lands. This 1.69 acre property boasts a newer home of modest size with lots of room to add accessory bldgs. The perfect vacation home, comes fully furnished $199,900. MLS#201009485 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

Well Maintained!! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1580 sq.ft., corner lot, landscaped, fenced, super good cents home, RV parking. Ad #93632. $179,900 Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 L o o kin g for y o ur n e x t e m plo y e e ? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

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Sunriver/La Pine Homes 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, built in ‘03; (2) ½-acre lots, 1 buildable w/ well, south of Sunriver. Possible trade for Bend sgl. level of same value. 509-585-9050

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Jefferson County Homes Prime Hwy 97 Commercial! Updated in 2006, 850 sq.ft., plenty of parking in rear, central air. Ad #93272. $154,900 Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

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Crook County Homes $139,900- 4 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath, classic home. Wood floors, tile, gas fireplace. Tons of character. Air conditioning. On 3 full lots. Detached garage shop. Good location. Agent owned. Heather Hockett, PC, Broker 541-420-9151 Century 21 Gold Country Realty $159,900! Country living with acreage and nice 1920 sq.ft., 4 bedroom, 2 bath young home w/mountain views and small shed, fenced & more. $179,900. 5487 Sioux Lp. Heather Hockett, PC, Broker 541-420-9151 Century 21 Gold Country Realty

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Homes with Acreage 10226 SW Geneva View, Crooked River Ranch. Custom 1539 sq. ft. 3 bedroom, 2 bath home on 5.5 level acres completely fenced near public land. Unobstructed views of the mountains, $225,000 MLS# 201009408 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393 13930 SW Ridge Pl., Crooked River Ranch. Upgraded, 2208 sq. ft. home on 1.1 acres located on a quiet paved cul-de-sac. 3 bedrooms, den, 2.75 baths, 9’ ceilings and a 240 sq. ft. bonus room. 3-car garage. $259,000 MLS# 201008895 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393

4. 63 Acres, Irrigated! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1188 sq.ft., detached oversized garage, setup for horses, Cascade Mtn views. Ad #93212. $179,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 4 Bed Home, close to Crooked River Ranch entrance. 1620 sq. ft., with spacious family room, living room and great bedroom separation. Large kitchen w/breakfast bar and pantry. Ceiling fans, newer carpet and tile floors, heat pump and double attached garage. Backyard is fenced with additional storage buildings and beautiful views! 2.65 acres, well groomed and wired for hot tub! $178,000. MLS#2707953 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty 5.24 Acres w/Gorgeous Smith Rock Views! 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2367 sq.ft., 3 acres COI, fenced, barn, shop, end of road privacy. Ad #93472. $348,500. Pam Lester, Principal Broker, Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 69177 Butcher Block, Sisters. Horse property! Custom 3436 sq. ft. home on 15.69 acres. 70' x 120' indoor riding arena, 30' x 80' pole building, 4-stall barn with heated tack room. $499,000 MLS# 201009686 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393 Beautiful Prineville home, wood and tile throughout, 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, master on main level, bonus room, office, 6.87 acres, conveniently located between town & lake, $415,000. 541-771-3093 Best Horse Property Ever! 2400 sq. ft. frame-built, 3-stall barn, tack, auto watering system, game room & 2 car garage, in addition to a finished 3-car garage, both with overhead doors. 5 acres is fully fenced and cross-fenced, w/7’ fencing and gated entry, private well, raised beds & fruit trees. 2233 sq. ft. 3 bdrm home w/soap stone wood stove, hot tub and heat pump. Walls of windows to enjoy 360° view! $319,000. MLS#201002899 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty Breathtaking Smith Rock Views! 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2005 sq.ft., 4.79 acres, 4.3 acres of irrigation, passive solar design, radiant floor heat. Ad #93622. $399,999 Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 Custom Single Level in Bend! 5.7 acres, 3062 sq.ft. + 2 bdrm, guest house, gourmet kitchen w/fireplace, 4.3 acre COI, barns/shop, bunkhouse, tack room, pole fenced, pond. Ad #93502. $550,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 Gardeners Delight on 9.9 Acres. 1612 sq.ft., house w/hot tub, 7.5 acres COI, huge pond, 2 greenhouses, one is 40 x 24, shop, fenced. Ad #93522. $395,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS Lodge Style Home on Deschutes River! 5 acres, approx. 575 sq.ft., of river front, Cascade views, 5 Bdrm, 5 bath, 4649 sq.ft., 2 master suites. horses OK. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 Near Walking Trails, Park & Public Land! 1704 sq. ft., 3 bdrm, 2 bath home on 1.11 acre parcel. Double attached garage, trellised front entry, fully fenced and beautifully landscaped backyard, complete with Pergola & generous sized patio. Well maintained framed home w/breakfast bar, family and living room, formal and informal dining. Not a distress sale. $164,900. MLS#201005643 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) Newly Remodeled, including kitchen cabinetry, and laminate flooring. This 3 bdrm, 2 bath home rests on 1.29 acre lot with Cascade views, landscaping, fencing, a wrap-around deck, 8x21 bonus sunroom, a turn-around driveway and a 20x20 shop. $109,000. MLS#2909620 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty NOT A SHORT SALE! $183,000! Beautiful setting on your own 2+ acres with rim rock views and a river view from the property. The nice 3+ bedroom home features sun porch, large stone hearth, open vaulted ceiling with great character beams and wood and western decor, office, very comfortable home. The property also has a small barn and a shop. The property has nice dog fenced front yard and mostly fenced for horses in the back. Great circular drive a real plus if you have a large truck or trailer. You can have this all for $183,000. 11987 Horny Hollow. Heather Hockett, PC, Broker 541-420-9151 Century 21 Gold Country Realty Sisters, turnkey horse setup, 4 acres, great barn, 3 pastures, updated house, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, pond,irrigation, RV pad w/hook ups, $575,000, 541-549-9945.

Turnkey Ranch w/Cascade Mtn Views. Built in 1993, 38+ acres w/ 26+ irrigation, barn, shop, hay shed, fenced. Ad #93352. $550,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

PALM SPRINGS GETAWAY SPECIAL Escape to one of our 2 hot springs resorts in the greater Palm Springs area at 50% off our standard rates!

$63 a night SKY VALLEY RESORTS www.SkyValleyResorts.com/specialoffer or call 888-894-7727 *Up To 1 Week. Vacation Home Tour Required. Terms and conditions apply.

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Lots $139,000 2 acres MLS#201006299 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 14297 SE Gatling Way, Prineville. Level 2 acre parcel with well, septic and power installed. Near Prineville Reservoir. $34,900 MLS# 201009032 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393 16685 SW Chinook, Crooked River Ranch. Crooked River, Smith Rock & mountain views from this 6.9 acre lot. Septic is installed, the well is drilled. $225,000 MLS# 201008671 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393

541-385-5809 7965 River Road, Crooked River Ranch. Secluded & quiet. 2.79 acres short distance to the Deschutes River & Steelhead Falls. $85,000 MLS# 201009429 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393 9148 sq.ft. Lot! Cul-de-sac, utilities stubbed in PUE, close to West Canyon Rim Park and access to the dry canyon trail. Ad #93422. $35,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com Amazing River Views into the Crooked River Canyon, from this 10.65 acre rim lot. The property goes into the river, so you can build your own private access to river fishing! The setting is private, yet near amenities for horseback riding, hiking, fishing, boating and golfing. Adjoins a community track with golf course. A rare find, at a rare price, if you are looking for river view property. $175,000. MLS#2911260 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

A real find. A 5500 sq. ft. in-fill lot with large mature ponderosas that is flat and ready to build on. City services in the street. Close to shopping, Pilot Butte & the amenities of Juniper Park. $75,000. MLS#2801608 or visit johnlscott.com/77447 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

Buildable in Ochoco West. Two neighboring lots, each over 1/5 acre. Power and water in the street. Buy both and build your dream home or buy one for a great place to park your RV. Features include: over 1,200 acres of Recreation Land, swimming pool, tennis courts, fishing lakes stocked with trout and bass, horse stables, riding trails & Community Center. Beautiful view of the Prineville Valley. $15,000 MLS #2806023 & 2806025 or visit johnlscott.com/94130 & 94216 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

Cascade Views! One-acre sloped lot, with elevated building site, to take advantage of the outstanding Cascade views. Standard septic system is installed. Power and water available at lot line. Call listing agent for owner terms! Priced to sell! $69,900. MLS#201009226 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Christmas Valley! Relaxing, tranquil, affordable getaway. Away from the hustle & bustle of city life. Located close to town, yet far enough to enjoy the starry skies. Enjoy 1 acre of 360° views in an area of great hunting, duck hunting, fishing, golfing, rock hounding, camping, bird watching or riding quads on the sand dunes. Great property for weekend RVing or build your getaway! $6,000. MLS#2902491 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

Horse Ridge East. Choose one of seven 10-acre parcels with mountain views. Your own piece of paradise where the deer, antelope and you can play. OWC for suitable buyer with 10% down. $25,000. Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 King-of-the-Mountain Views from these 2.7 acres overlooking the Cascade mountain range, from Hood to Bachelor. Already septic approved, with water and power at the road. Many beautiful home sites for your custom home. $99,900. MLS#201008526 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty Lots 4 & 5, Waterhole Pl., Crooked River Ranch. A portion of Crooked River Ranch’s historical watering hole is located on both well treed properties with views. Lot 4, 4.78 acres $70,000 MLS# 201009997. Lot 5, 3.2 acres $60,000 MLS# 201009996 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393 Postcard Views! Where else can you watch a soaring eagle dive for his catch-of-the-day, or enjoy the picture-perfect postcard view of the evening sunset behind the snow-capped Cascade Mtn. Range. Not a rooftop in sight! and at night the only light is from the millions of stars. 2.1 acres w/septic & underground power installed. Water system connection at road. Enjoy fishing, hiking, golf, tennis & horseback riding! $145,000. MLS#201008528 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

Privacy Awaits on this lovely, well-treed, 5 acre lot. This flat corner lot offers many great building sites, surrounded by old-growth Juniper. Power is at end of the road. Seller financing available with approved credit, making this a great long-term investment. Call listing agent for details. $139.900. MLS#2910929 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

Rhody Road, Sumpter. The river runs through it! Well treed 5 acre parcel with the Powder River running through the property. On the edge of the town of Sumpter in Eastern Oregon. Snow mobile in the winter, fish in the summer. Seller is a licensed Real Estate Broker. $55,000 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393 Six Acre Lot near the Crooked River Ranch entrance. Heavily treed, with mountain views through the trees. Many building sites to choose from. Two story home would provide “BIG” mountain views! $134,750. MLS#201007311 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

The Highlands at Broker Top! 10 Acres, gated, private well, utilities at lot-line, approved for cap-fil septic. Ad #93132. $535,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

Whispering Pines. Ready-to-Build 2.4 acres with easterly views on a paved road. Water & power to street and septic approval in place. $70,000 MLS#2802337 or go to johnlscott.com/83475 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 Your new homesite. Ready for construction with great building site and all the utilities in the site. Great mature trees and fenced too. Romaine Village offers access to Clubhouse/ Rec room and a pool. A must preview. $49,900. MLS# 201007937 or visit johnlscott.com/8158 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

773

Acreages

780

Mfd./Mobile Homes with Land 1.76 Acres! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1536 sq.ft., large rear deck, shop w/240v power, greenhouse, storage building. Ad #93402. $99,000 Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 Single Level on 1 Acre! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1716 sq.ft., master separation, office, fenced, flower garden, RV parking. Ad #93552. $150,000 Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

$299,000 42.5 acres close to town. Nice private setting, well treed, and has canal running through property. Lots of possibilities, very secluded, and possible irrigation. 1130 SW 53rd St. Lana Carrell, Principal Broker 541-419-6810 Century 21 Gold Country Realty

541-389-7910

105 NW Greeley Avenue • Bend, OR 97701

www. hunterproperties.info

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

LAWNAE HUNTER, Principal Broker/Owner

The Bulletin Classifieds Crooked River Ranch lot. Level lot with beautiful trees CRR has: swimming pool, hiking trails, tennis courts, park & golf course as well as senior support group & other special interest groups. Men’s & Women’s golf with reduced green fees & cart rates plus a yearly golf package that is the best in Central Oregon & a course open for play when no other is during the winter. $41,500 MLS#201005890 or visit johnlscott.com/89314 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

Stunning Views beginning with Smith Rock, down the Crooked River Gorge, overlooking the original farm houses of Gates Ranch and on to Mt. Hood, in its blanket of snow. This 1.55 acre lot has a recent approval for septic installation and power and water at the lot line. Now is the time to purchase a lot for your future dream home. $115,500. MLS#201008531 Nancy Popp, Principal Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

Endless opportunities at Evans Well. 2117 Deeded acres in 14 legal lots. Rated for 250 300 pair, this ranch operates with BLM and Forest Service leases covering approximately 60,000 acres. All parcels are surrounded by public lands. With views of the Paulina and Cascade Mountains as well as Horse Ridge and miles of open range, these parcels offer absolute privacy and seclusion, an easy, peaceful 30 minute drive to anywhere in Bend. Keep the property for yourself or use the established legal lots to create a compound for family and friends. $2,275,000 MLS#2709172 Bobby Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

$194,900

$165,000

New on the market! One acre parcel, surrounded by trees. RV parking, 2 shops & room to grow! AARON BOEHM, BROKER 541-647-2545

Great Investment Opportunity! Single-level duplex, well maintained, excellent rental history. AARON BALLWEBER, BROKER 541-728-4499

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

$139,900

$139,900

NOT A SHORT SALE! Immaculate & move-in ready. Wonderful backyard for children & pets MIKE WILSON, BROKER 541-977-5345

Like New! Corner Lot! Great Room feel. Larger bedrooms. Call Today! MIKE WILSON, BROKER 541-977-5345

$365,000

$319,900

Perfect Getaway Retreat! Nestled among the pines. A fabulous place to call your own! MIKE EVERIDGE, BROKER 541-390-0098

Traditional Sale! Immaculate & move-in ready. Upgrades throughout & access to trails! AARON BALLWEBER, BROKER 541-728-4499

$139,900

$100,000

Centrally Located! Close to medical & shopping. 3 bdrm/ 2 bath. Great room concept, tile entry SUSAN PITARRO, BROKER 541-410-8084

Corner Lot! Fully Fenced! Open floor plan with corner fireplace and hearth. Large kitchen. Must see! SUSAN PITARRO, BROKER 541-410-8084

What is a Short Sale? A short sale is a sale from seller (owner) to buyer that the Lenders agree to take a pay-off less than the existing loan amount. Owners benefit by avoiding a foreclosure on their credit, lenders get the house sold & the buyer generally receives a home that has been occupied & may be in better shape than a foreclosure home. There are many advantages to a Short Sale for all parties. Hunter Properties Brokers have a very high closing rate in this type of a sale. Call for Details! 541-389-7910


E6 Saturday, December 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

Live. Work. Play.

T H E

C E N T R A L

O R E G O N

W A Y

WHY WE LOVE

Madras:

WITH MOUNTAINS, RIVERS, FORESTS, OPEN PLAINS AND LAKES, MADRAS’ LANDSCAPE IS AS DIVERSE AS ITS CULTURE. REALTORS® know what makes Madras, Oregon special, and they will help you find the home that’s perfect for you. Located in Jefferson County, Madras is a growing community that embraces ethnic diversity like no other. The mix of people gives the region a unique fl avor, whether it be in the area’s many Mexican restaurants or in Madras’ Collage of Culture, a late-May festival that celebrates the county’s communities. One of the county’s most popular spots is Lake Billy Chinook which is located just outside Culver, a town to the south and west of Madras. Cove Palisades State Park is located at Lake Billy Chinook and offers myriad water sports, campgrounds and a marina.

s and a r d a M t n e r r Cu egon r O , y t n u o C Jefferson cs i t s i t a t S l a i t Residen

...........145 .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. s: Active Listing .............. 30 .. .. : t c ra t n o C er Pending/Und ): ...........189 s h t n o m 2 1 t pas Homes Sold (

2112 NE 4th St. Bend, Oregon 97701 541-382-6027 | E-mail: info@coar.com | www.coar.com WHAT ARE THESE SQUARES?

Introducing the mobile barcode. Now you can visit www.BendBulletin.com via your smartphone! The Bulletin is your gateway to the Web. Using your iPhone, Android, Blackberry or other smart phone device, download a current barcode reader App, (visit www.mobile-barcodes.com) then point your phone at one of the barcodes, scan it, and you will be directed to The Bulletin’s online edition.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 25, 2010 F1

CLASSIFIEDS

To place your ad visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

The Bulletin

LEGAL NOTICES

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

EMPLOYMENT

GENERAL MERCHANDISE

Find Classifieds at

www.bendbulletin.com

RENTALS/REAL ESTATE

contact us:

TRANSPORTATION

hours:

Place an ad: 541-385-5809

FAX an ad: 541-322-7253

Business Hours:

Place an ad with the help of a Bulletin Classified representative between the business hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

Include your name, phone number and address

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

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Subscribe or manage your subscription

24 Hour Message Line: 541-383-2371

On the web at: www.bendbulletin.com

Place, cancel, or extend an ad

T h e

B u l l e t i n :

ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

General Merchandise

200 205

Items for Free Free bicycle, girls style, good cond. needs tires. Call 541-389-0808 Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale Free Olympic weight set with weights and bench. Call 541-389-0808 Ottoman, Fabric covered, used, free, you haul, please call 541-312-3004.

208

Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

AUSSIE PUPPIES, Mini & Toy, $250-$300. 1st shots, tails docked. Tris & Merles, ready 1/12. 541-420-9694 Australian Cattle Dogs / Heelers Great temperament, herding instinct. 541-279-4133 Australian Shepherds, 2 litters, toy/mini, family raised, $450-$600. 541-475-1166

Border Collie 10-week pups (4) 2 females left, 1st shots, and wormed, $100 ea. 541-852-5753, Prineville.

Boxer Puppies, AKC, 9 wks. 3 adorable females left at $500 each. Call 541-408-5230

Canaries. Assorted colors including red, bronze, yellow, green. Excellent singers. 5@$40-$75 each. (541) 548-7947. CHIHUAHUA, 12-week-old super sweet black female. Perfect gift. $225. Madras 541-475-2039 after 10 a.m.

1 7 7 7

263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food

S . W .

B e n d

O r e g o n

210

255

267

282

Computers

Fuel and Wood

Sales Northwest Bend

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call

541-598-4643.

258 The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

212

Travel/Tickets Disneyland (4) 6-day Park Hoppers. Regular $216 each; sell $195 each. 541-419-2753

Coins & Stamps

Maremma Guard Dog pups, purebred, great dogs, $300 each, 541-546-6171.

WANTED TO BUY US & Foreign Coin & Currency collections, accum. Pre-1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling flatware. Gold coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex & vintage watches. No collection too large or small. Bedrock Rare Coins 541-549-1658

240

Crafts and Hobbies Alpaca Yarn, various colors/ blends/sparkle. 175yds/skein $7.50-8.50 ea. 541-385-4989

242

Exercise Equipment

GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036. Juniper Rim Game Preserve - Brothers, OR Pheasants (both roosters/hens) & Chukars, all on special! 541-419-3923; 541-419-8963

Remington 1100 12 ga. Shotgun. Includes 2 stocks-wood and synthetic, 2 barrels, screw in chokes, case, great shape, $500. 541.390.5866 Smith & Wesson 9mm full metal, sub-compact semiauto, $425. 541-647-8931 Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746

Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sale event is over! THANKS! From The Bulletin and your local Utility Companies

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks! Ad must include price of item

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809. NEED TO CANCEL OR PLACE YOUR AD? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line Call 383-2371 24 hrs. to cancel or place your ad!

Snow Removal Equipment Snowblower 21” MTD, single stage electric start, works well. $100. 541-330-2342 SNOWBLOWER - Troy-bilt 24” self-propelled, never used, $500. 541-385-1217, lv msg.

265

Building Materials Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

300 308

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Prices Reduced: Quarterhorses, females $300, males & geldings $500, 541-382-7995

Farm Equipment and Machinery

www.bendbulletin.com

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT dry Lodgepole, $150 for 1 cord or $290 for 2, Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484

541-389-6655

Farm Market

name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash

Nordic Trak elliptical with I-Fit adapt, used little, mint cond., The Bulletin Offers $250 cash/you haul. Free Private Party Ads Pro-Form treadmill, EKG/grip pulse, like new, $150 cash • 3 lines - 3 days you haul. Buy both $350. • Private Party Only • Total of items advertised 541-306-6511 must equal $200 or Less 246 • Limit one ad per month • 3-ad limit for same item Guns & Hunting advertised within 3 months and Fishing 541-385-5809 • Fax 541-385-5802 Berretta 9mm 92F, $550. Glock M-29 10mm $550. Mossberg Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIn12 ga, $300. 541-647-8931 tosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Browning BPS 12g pump, $375. Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, Winchester pre-’64 20g NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808 pump, $400. S&W .38 6” re264 volver, $375. 541-647-8931 CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

• Receipts should include,

Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers. Thank you.

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191.

215

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

208

To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

NOTICE

Misc. Items

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

Pets and Supplies

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

9 7 7 0 2 341

260

Antiques & Collectibles

208

Chihuahua pups, Registered males, Long coats, apple heads. $300. 541-977-4454 sagetreeacres@yahoo.com Chow Mix, “Bear” 2 yrs, raised PIT/LAB PUPPIES (5), ready to since young pup. He’s very go now, 3 girls, 2 boys $50 sweet; I’m 70 & can no each. 541-848-0110. longer care for him. Free to Pomeranian Puppies: Don’t wait, good home. 541-389-9753 only a few left! Christmas Dachshunds, AKC, mini’s, (4) fespecial $475. 541-475-3496 males: 1 black & silver; 3 choc www.pom-a-rama.com & tan. $375. Pics available. 541-420-6044, 541-447-3060 POODLES AKC Toy. Also Pom-a-Poos or Chi-Poos. B&W, colors. 541-325-6212 English Bulldogs AKC, 4 males, Brindles, excellent health, $1500. 541-290-0026 English Springer Spaniels, AKC Reg, black/white, housebroke, ready to go! 541-408-6322 www.kennykennels.com Poodles for Christmas (3) Frenchie Faux puppies, excelhome raised, $150. lent! $750. Ready at 6 weeks (541) 408-7370 on 12/31. 541-447-0210 www.ludwiglanepoodles.com German Shepherd Pups, A K C , White, absolutely Queensland Heelers gorgeous, born October 1st. Standards & mini,$150 & up. $650 or best offer. Please 541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com call 541-536-6167. German Shepherd pups ready SCHNOODLE Male pup, 4 mos, by Christmas. $350 to $450. $100. ALSO Tiny toy POODLE 541-410-7388 Female 4 mos, cinnamon red, $150. 541-306-1807 German Shorthair Pointer A K C , champ lines, 1 male, 1 Siamese Kittens (4) purefemale, $300, 541-550-9992. bred, M/F, Seal & Lilac point, German Wirehaired Pointer, $125 ea. 541-318-3396 choice pup, 10 wks, champ lines, $250. 541-548-3408 210 Kittens & cats available! Cat Furniture & Appliances Rescue, Adoption & Foster Team will be open for those !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty! holiday adoptions on Friday A-1 Washers & Dryers & Sunday 1-4 PM (closed $125 each. Full Warranty. Christmas Day). Gift certifiFree Del. Also wanted W/D’s cates also avail. so someone dead or alive. 541-280-7355. can pick out their new pet later. Altered, vaccinated, ID Appliances, new & recondichipped, more. 389-8420, tioned, guaranteed. Over598-5488, 65480 78th St, stock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Bend, visit www.craftcats.org Maytag, 541-385-5418 for photos, map & more. Lab Pups AKC - 2 blacks, 6 Coffee Table,oak,w/3 matchchocolates, dew claws, 1st ing end tables & lamps, exc. shots & wormed. Hunters. cond, $300, 541-504-7483 $450-$500. 541-536-5385 www.welcomelabs.com Fridge, Kenmore, White, 26 cu. ft., side by side, ice/water inLAB PUPS AKC, titled parents, door, 6 yrs. old, exc. cond., FC/AFC, Blackwater Rudy is $300. 541-788-5516 grand sire. Deep pedigreed performance/titles, OFA hips & elbows. 541-771-2330 Furniture www.royalflushretrievers.com Labradoodles, Australian Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com Visit our HUGE home decor Labrador pups AKC, chococonsignment store. New late, yellow, hips guaranteed, items arrive daily! 930 SE $150-$450. 1-541-954-1727 Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Labrador purebred pups, black, Bend • 541-318-1501 1st shots/exam; ready now! www.redeuxbend.com $300-$400. 503-740-5312

A v e . ,

Furniture & Appliances

Pets and Supplies

MIN-PIN PUPS, perfect for Christmas! 2 adorable pure bred 14-wk-old males $150 OBO, up to date on shots. Pics avail. 541-633-6148 (leave msg)

C h a n d l e r

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

SPLIT, DRY LODGEPOLE DELIVERY INCLUDED! $175/CORD. Call for half-cord prices! Leave message, 541-923-6987

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

325

286

Sales Northeast Bend

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663 SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

292

Hay, Grain and Feed Barn stored Alfalfa $9 per bale. 541-480-8185

541-322-7253

Bluegrass Straw mid-size 3x3, $25/bale; Orchard grass hay mid-size 3x3 $45/bale. Volume discounts; delivery available. 541-480-8648. Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

358

Farmers Column Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Sales Other Areas DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

375

Meat & Animal Processing Angus Beef, 1/2 or whole, grain fed, no hormones $3.44/lb., hanging weight, cut & wrap included, please call 541-383-2523.

270

Lost and Found FOUND ½” hammer drill, intersection Hwy 20 & 126, Sisters, 12/17. 541-526-1462

HOLIDAY DEADLINES

FOUND remote control, Sirius satellite sys, Forum Shopping Center, 12/20. 541-480-2510 FOUND RING Call 541-420-7322 with exact description & area it was lost. HELP YOUR AD TO stand out from the rest! Have the top line in bold print for only $2.00 extra.

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS Lost Dog: Male Border Collie mix, black, red collar, between Bend/Redmond on Hwy 97, 12/18, 541-604-4221 Lost: Full set of keys,w/car fob, Bi-Mart tag, Subaru key, near Costco, 12/13, 541-388-2408 REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

BEND’S HOMELESS NEED OUR HELP The cold weather is upon us and sadly there are still over 2,000 folks in our community without permanent shelter, living in cars, makeshift camps, getting by as best they can. The following items are badly needed to help them get through the winter:

Wishes you a Safe and Happy New Year! The Bulletin will be closed on Friday, New Year’s Eve and Saturday, New Year’s Day Retail & Classified Display Advertising Deadlines PUBLICATION ............................................. DEADLINE Friday 12/31 ..................................................Tuesday 12/28 Noon Go! Magazine 12/31 .....................................Tuesday 12/28 Noon Saturday 1/1 .................................................Tuesday 12/28 Noon Sunday 1/2 ..................................................Tuesday 12/28 4 p.m. Monday 1/3 ............................................. Wednesday 12/29 Noon At Home 1/4............................................ Wednesday 12/29 Noon Scene 1/8 .................................................. Thursday 12/30 8 a.m. Tuesday 1/4 ................................................ Thursday 12/30 Noon

CLASSIFIED LINE AD DEADLINES Friday 12/31 - Deadline is Noon Thursday 12/30 Saturday 1/1 - Deadline is Noon Thursday 12/30 Sunday 1/1 - Deadline is 2 p.m. Thursday 12/30 Monday 1/2 - Deadline is 2 p.m. Thursday 12/30

Winchester model 1890, 22 cal. original, $600; Ruger P89--9mm as new in box, 2 clips holster shells $425, 541-447-8629, 541-419-4221

d CAMPING GEAR of any sort: d

Rain Gear, Boots

Classifieds • 541-385-5809

253

TV, Stereo and Video

Please drop off your donations at the BEND COMMUNITY CENTER 1036 NE FIFTH STREET (312-2069)

The Bulletin Circulation Telephone Service at 541-385-5800 will be open 1/1 from 6:30 am to 10:30 am to help with your delivery needs.

Samsung 52” box big screen, 2006 excellent cond. Must sell, $400. 541-480-2652.

Questions: Call Ken Boyer, 389-3296, or Don Auxier, 383-0448 PLEASE HELP. YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

Used tents, sleeping bags, tarps, blankets.

d WARM CLOTHING d


F2 Saturday, December 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Employment

400 421

Schools and Training Advertise and Reach over 3 million readers in the Pacific Northwest! 30 daily newspapers, six states. 25-word classified $525 for a 3-day ad. Call (916) 288-6010; (916) 288-6019 or visit www.pnna.com/advertising_ pndc.cfm for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC) AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance. 1-877-804-5293. (PNDC)

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Advertise in 30 Daily newspapers! $525/25-words, 3days. Reach 3 million classified readers in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Washington & Utah. (916) 288-6019 email: elizabeth@cnpa.com for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC)

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

454

Looking for Employment Experienced Male Caregiver offering assistance with medical & non-medical tasks & activities. Refs. avail. upon request, 541-548-3660.

Emergency Services Director

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses -

SUTERRA is hiring! Chemical Systems Operators for new facility. $17/hour w/ built in OT, 38K first year. To apply go to http://www.suterra.com or fax resume to 310-966-8310

Finance and Sales Manager

Toyota-Scion of Bend looking for capable and qualified applicants. must have auto experience. Application and resumes accepted in person only. Must pass drug test, good driving record, and be insurable. Apply in person @ Toyota of Bend, (Ask for Casey Cooper) 2225 NE Hwy. 20, Bend.

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly.

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help?

528

Finance & Business

500 507

Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

528

573

Loans and Mortgages Loans and Mortgages Business Opportunities WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

Earn 8-10% interest on well-secured first trust deeds. Private party. 541-815-2986 Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

573

Business Opportunities A BEST-KEPT SECRET! Reach over 3 million Pacific Northwest readers with a $525/25-word classified ad in 30 daily newspapers for 3-days. Call (916) 288-6019 regarding the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection or email elizabeth@cnpa.com (PNDC)

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin

Truck Drivers needed to run out of Warm Springs, OR. Home every day. Requires CDL with doubles endorsement. Seeking drivers with winter driving experience on mountain passes. Contact 541-419-1125; 541-546-6489

Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Drivers - Taking applications for Owner Operators with 4-axle tractor trucks, or the ability to convert 3-axle truck to a 4-axle truck. Steady haul out of Madras, OR and return. 2 trips per day. Must be willing to add a driver for 2nd shift. Please contact 541-419-1125;541-546-6489

476

Employment Opportunities

The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-688-7078 www.CenturaOnline.com (PNDC)

476

Employment Opportunities

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-385-5809

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

541-383-0386

Glazier -- Residential: Must have 5 years experience & clean driving record, Shower doors & mirrors a plus. Pay DOE. Call 541-382-2500.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

Independent Contractor

476

Employment Opportunities CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825

Responsible for staff supervision and training, contract management, budget development, fiscal oversight, program operations, program development. Resource development for programs and services including design and production of grant applications, marketing of programs/ services, community outreach/ integration of volunteers. Member of Executive Director’s leadership team which implements NeighborImpact’s strategic plan. Fully benefited, exempt, Bend office location. Please see neighborimpact.org for full details, requirements. Fully benefited, exempt. Bend office location. You may scan email to hr@neighborimpact.org, snail mail, drop off at 2303 SE First St., Redmond, OR 97756, or fax to 541-316-2007.

The Bulletin

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Bend, Prineville & Madras H

is your Employment Marketplace Call

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

541-385-5809

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours

to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

1 per day

$

apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or 541-385-5809


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 25, 2010 F3

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 Boats & RV’s

800

860

870

880

882

Motorcycles And Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

Motorcycle Trailer Kendon stand-up motorcycle trailer, torsion bar suspension, easy load and unload, used seldom and only locally. $1700 OBO. Call 541-306-3010.

850

Snowmobiles

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

875

Watercraft

860

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $1995 for all. Bill 541-480-7930.

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010, Health forces sale, 1900 mi., 1K mi. service done, black on black, detachable windshield, back rest & luggage rack, $13,900, Mario, 541-549-4949, 619-203-4707

ATVs

rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919. YAMAHA 1998 230CC motor, 4WD, used as utility vehicle. excellent running condition. $2000 OBO. 541-923-4161 541-788-3896

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

881

Travel Trailers Yamaha 350 Big Bear 1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition. $2,200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

932

933

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information. Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

880

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

870

Boats & Accessories 17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

Grumman AA-5 Traveler, 1/4 interest, beautiful, clean plane, $9500, 619-822-8036 www.carymathis.blogspot.com

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin Redmond Airport hangar, heated, 55’ x 75’ x 18’, 12’ x 24’ office, bath with shower, $229,500. 20-year lease. Call 503-803-2051

Bounder 34’ 1994, only Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 18K miles, 1 owner, ga28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc. rage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP,

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792. Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $4850, 541-410-3425.

Chevy

Wagon

Chevy Silverado 1500 1988, 4x4, step side, tow pkg., low mi. at 98K, A/C, great tries, brakes, new rear end, runs extra super, $4000 OBO, 541-548-7396

1957,

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

International 1981,T-axle-300 13 spd.Cummins/Jake Brake,good tires/body paint;1993 27’ stepdeck trailer, T-axle, Dove tail, ramps. $7950, 541-350-3866

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256

Utility Trailers MONTANA 2000 36’ 3 slides, washer and dryer, new A/C. Very nice & livable! $12,500. 541-923-7351.

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

TERRY 27’ 5th wheel 1995 with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great condition and hunting rig, $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

(Private Party ads only)

VW Super Beetle 1974

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3750 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199 Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

885

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days Chevy Silverado 1500 4x4, 2000, full size, Reg cab w/ long bed, white, V6, 4.3L, 20 mpg, auto trans, ABS, AC, dual airbags, tow pkg, runs & drives excellent, maint’d extremely well; non-smoker. Recent brks, bearing, tune- up, tires, trans & coolant flush. 183K mi. $4700 obo. 541-633-6953

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

925

Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K mi., $8925. 541-598-5111.

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

Chevy 1/2 Ton 1995, 4X4, 350 engine, auto, cold A/C, new tires, brakes, shocks, & muffler, w/ camper shell, runs great. $4000. 541-706-1568

MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all original, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more. Priced to sell at $59,500! 541-317-9185

*** CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are mis understood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us: 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

The Bulletin

541-385-5809

(Private Party ads only) Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500,541-280-5677

Mercedes-Benz 280c 1975 145k, good body & mechanical, fair interior, can email pics. $2950. 541-548-3628

916 Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns.

KOMFORT 27’ 5th wheel 2000 trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide, stored inside, in excellent condition. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., reduced to $3000, also boots, helmet, tires, avail., 541-410-0429

Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $5800. 541-330-0852.

Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $40,000 OBO/terms, 541-948-2126. Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

541-385-5809

Find It in Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $19,999 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $16,900 OBO. 541-944-9753

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005,

nets, exc interior. Great extra bdrm! Reduced to $5000. 541-480-3286

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

Motorhomes

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

Travel Queen 34’ 1987 65K miles, oak cabi-

865

Motorcycles And Accessories CRAMPED FOR CASH? Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 385-5809

900

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Reach thousands of readers!

Yamaha 2008 Nitro 1049cc, 4 stroke, bought new Feb 2010, still under warranty, 550 miles, too much power for wife! $6000. Call 541-430-5444 Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $122,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

Autos & Transportation

DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2700. 541-322-6261 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

Canopies and Campers

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

personals Single senior, seeks to dbl. for New Year Party, at Winners! Prime rib meal, 4 days, + extras, $79. 541-315-0022

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

931

541-322-7253 Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

882

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, 4 Michelin Studless ice & snow, used 1 season, 225/60/R16, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non $175 cash. 541-318-8668 smoker, $8900 541-815-1523.

Fifth Wheels

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

C-10

Pickup

1969,

152K mi. on chassis, 4 spd. transmission, 250 6 cyl. engine w/60K, new brakes & master cylinder, $2500. Please call 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800.

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website) Barns

Excavating

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

Handyman

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Painting, Wall Covering

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling •Decks •Window/Door Replacement •Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

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Snow Removal Reliable 24 Hour Service • Driveways • Walkways • Parking Lots • Roof tops • De-icing Have plow & shovel crew awaiting your call!

Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

Holiday Lighting Home Improvement Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

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Multiple Options • Interior • Exterior • Landscape

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MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/410-6945

MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

d SNOW REMOVAL! d d LARGE OR SMALL, d WE DO IT ALL! 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 d www.bblandscape.com d

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

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F4 Saturday, December 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Preliminary Determination for Water Right Transfer T-10979 T-10979 filed by BILL ROATS, 61147 HAMILTON LANE, BEND OR 97702, proposes a change in points of appropriation, additional points of appropriation and a change in place of use under Certificates 86042 and 86043. Certificate 86042 allows the use of 0.66 CUBIC FOOT PER SECOND (CFS) (priority date MARCH 23, 1961) from Well #1 in Sec. 17, T 18 S, R 12 E, W.M. (Deschutes Basin) for GROUP DOMESTIC and SUPPLEMENTAL IRRIGATION in Sees. 7, 8, 9, 17 and 18. Certificate 86043 allows the use of 0.56 CFS (priority date DECEMBER 22, 1965) from Well #2 in Sec. 17, T 18 S, R 12 E, W.M. (Deschutes Basin) for GROUP DOMESTIC and IRRIGATION in Sec. 7, 8, 9, 17 and 18. The applicant proposes to move the points of appropriation to Well #10 and add 3 additional points of appropriation approximately 2.5 miles southwest in Sees. 7, 18 and 30, T 18 S, R 12 E, W.M. and to change the place of use to Sees. 7, 8, 9, 16, 17 and 18. The Water Resources Department has concluded that the proposed transfer appears to be consistent with the requirements of ORS Chapter 540 and OAR 690-380-5000. Any person may file, jointly or severally, with the Department a protest or standing statement within 30 days after the date of final publication of notice in the Department's weekly notice or of this newspaper notice, whichever is later. A protest form and additional information on filing protests may be obtained by calling (503) 986-0883. The last date of newspaper publication is [DATE OF LAST PUBLICATION]. If no protests are filed, the Department will issue a final order consistent with the preliminary determination.

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS Jane E. Meissner-Ford has been appointed Personal Representative of the Estate of Michael Vincent Ford, Deceased, by the Circuit Court, State of Oregon, Deschutes County, under case number 10-PB-0144-SF. All persons having a claim against the estate must present the claim within four months of the first publication date of this notice to BRYANT, LOVLIEN & JARVIS, PC at 591 SW Mill View Way, Bend, OR 97702, Attn.: Melissa P. Lande, or they may be barred. Additional information may be obtained from the court records, the administrator or the following-named attorney for the administrator. Date of first publication: December 25, 2010. MELISSA P. LANDE BRYANT, LOVLIEN & JARVIS, PC 591 SW MILL VIEW WAY BEND, OR 97702 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: ANNETTE M. WHITSON. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary:

OREGON HOUSING AND COMMUNITY SERVICES DEPARTMENT, STATE OF OREGON as assignee for STERLING CAPITAL MORTGAGE COMPANY. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Four (4), Block EE, DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, recorded March 22, 1962, in Plat Book 6, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: September 9, 2003. Recording No. 2003-62432 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: A payment of $800.00 for the month of April 2010; plus regular monthly payments of $838.00 each, due the first of each month, for the months of May 2010 through September 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $104,816.76; plus interest at the rate of 4.9500% per annum from March 1, 2010; plus late charges of $$83.96; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: February 17, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: NEESHA MARIE GRANT. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Sixty-three (63), EMPIRE ESTATES, recorded November 22, 2005, in Cabinet G, Page

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: A.TRUST DEED ONE: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: JESSICA L. CATON. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: March 22, 2006. Recording No.: 2006-19696 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,185.17 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of October 2008 through September 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 4. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $224,069.60; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from September 15, 2008; plus late charges of $1,180.73; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. B.TRUST DEED TWO: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: JESSICA L. CATON. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: March 22, 2006. Recording No.: 2006-19697 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $181.25 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of October 2008 through September 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 4. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $29,855.14; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from September 15, 2008; plus late charges of $405.00; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. C. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Four (4), Glacier Ridge, Phase II, recorded September 23, 1999, in Cabinet E, Page 320, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. D. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. E. TIME OF SALE. Date: February 17, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. F. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30334). DATED: October 1, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.

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payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #07754.30317). DATED: September 28, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.

935, Deschutes County,Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: March 14, 2007; Recording No.: 2007-15163 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,660.30 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of September 2008

through September 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $284,234.74; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from August 15, 2008; plus late charges of $1,049.64; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that

the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: February 17, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee con-

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Diamond Built Homes, LLC, as grantor, to AmeriTitle as trustee, in favor of Columbia River Bank, as beneficiary, dated January 11, 2007, recorded January 12, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Document No. 2007-02293, and covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: All of the blocks Three (3), Four (4), Five (5) and Six (6) of Bonne Home Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon, EXCEPTING THEREFROM, the Easterly 300 feet of Block 3, Bonne Home Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon. TOGETHER WITH that portion of vacated 17th Street and vacated alleys which inure thereto. ALSO TOGETHER WITH that portion of vacated Lexington Avenue which inures thereto by reason of Ordinance No. NS-1589, Recorded May 5, 1993 in Book 297, Page 2260, Deschutes County Records. EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion conveyed to the City of Bend by Warranty Deed recorded July 7, 2004, in Volume 2004, Page 40201, Deschutes County Records. And now known as Lots One (1) through Forty (40), NEWPORT LANDING, recorded October 20, 2007, in Cabinet H, Page 536, Deschutes County, Oregon. Real property commonly known as 1804, 1808, 1812, 1816, 1820, and 1805 NW Element Place, Bend, OR 97701; 1301, 1297, 1293, 1289, 1285, 1281, 1277, 1276, and 1294 NW Criterion Lane, Bend, OR 97701; 1717, 1713, 1709, 1705, 1701, 1697, 1693, 1689, and 1685 NW Precision Lane, Bend, OR 97701; 1214 NW Rockwood Lane, Bend, OR 97701; Lots 1, 7, 16-17, 19, 29-35, 37-38, and 40. The undersigned hereby disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above-described street address or other common designation. The said real property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Loan No. 89761: Failure to pay the total balance due and owing upon the maturity date of September 8, 2009. By reason of default, the beneficiary hereby declares all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following, to wit: Principal balance $4,293,300.00; Interest $1,242,910.34; Total $5,536,210.00*. *Total does not include interest at the rate of $2,146.65 per diem from September 1, 2010, late charges, expenditures, trustee fees, and attorney fees and costs. A total payoff amount as of a specific date is available upon request. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 2011, at the hour of 2:10 p.m., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees, and by curing any other default complained of in the notice of default, that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The mailing address for trustee, as referenced herein, is as follows: Erich M. Paetsch, P.O. Box 470, Salem, OR 97308-0470. Dated: 23rd, September: 2010. /s/Erich M. Paetsch. Erich M. Paetsch, Trustee. State of Oregon, County of Marion) ss. I, the undersigned, certify that I am the attorney or one of the attorneys for the above named trustee and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original trustee's notice of sale. /s/Erich M. Paetsch, Attorney for said Trustee. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure sale goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. They buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED: IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERT AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE." You must mail or deliver your proof not later than WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2010 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale.) Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT THE SECURITY DEPOSIT: Under state law, you must apply your security and any rent you paid in advance against current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE: The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. You may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 1-800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org, or contact the Legal Aid Services of Oregon, Central Oregon Regional Office, 817 N.W. Hill Street, Bend, OR 97701 or call (541) 385-6944 or call toll-free in Oregon at 1-800-678-6944. DATED: 23 day of September, 2010. Trustee's name: Erich M. Paetsch. Trustee's signature: /s/Erich M. Paetsch. Trustee telephone number: (503) 399 1070.

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ducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in

enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information

and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30342). DATED: October 1, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Diamond Built Homes, LLC, Golden Crest Development, LLC, Robert J. Green, and Mary G. Green, as grantors, to First American Title Insurance Company of Oregon as trustee, in favor of Columbia River Bank, as beneficiary, dated August 25, 2005, recorded September 12, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Documents No. 2005-61188 and last modified on October 8, 2008, recorded December 11, 2008, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Document No. 2008-48563, and covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: Lots 1 and Fifty-two (52) through Fifty-six (56), CENTENNIAL GLEN, RECORDED FEBRUARY 15, 2005, in Cabinet G, Page 612, Deschutes County, Oregon. Real property commonly known as 692 SE Gleneden Pl., 690 SE Reed Market St, 682 SE Reed Market Rd., 674 SE Reed Market Rd., 664 SE Reed Market Rd., and 656 SE Reed Market Rd., Bend, OR 97702. The Real Property tax identification numbers are Map and Tax Lot Nos.: 18 12 04 CD 00102; 18 12 04 CD 00153: 18 12 04 CD 00154; 18 12 04 CD 00155; 18 12 04 CD 00156; and 18 12 04 CD 00157. The undersigned hereby disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above-described street address or other common designation. The said real property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Master Note No. 83663, Loan Nos. 90259: Failure to pay the total balance due and owing upon the maturity date of July 20, 2009. By reason of default, the beneficiary hereby declares all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following, to wit: Principal balance $70,500.00; Interest $20,409.75; Total $90,909.75*. *Total does not include interest at the rate of $35.25 per diem from September 1, 2010, late charges, expenditures, trustee fees, and attorney fees and costs. A total payoff amount as of a specific date is available upon request. Master Note No. 83663, Loan Nos. 95117: Failure to pay the total balance due and owing upon the maturity date of April 30, 2009. By reason of default, the beneficiary hereby declares all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following, to wit: Principal balance $191,935.38; Interest $42,730.90; Total $234,666.30*. *Total does not include interest at the rate of $85.97 per diem from September 1, 2010, late charges, expenditures, trustee fees, and attorney fees and costs. A total payoff amount as of a specific date is available upon request. The total balance due and owing to cure the defaults consists of the total sums identified above for Loan Nos. 90259 and 95117 combined. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 2011, at the hour of 2:00 PM., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with costs, trustee's fees and attorney fees, and by curing any other default complained of in the notice of default, that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The mailing address for trustee, as referenced herein, is as follows: Erich M. Paetsch, P.O. Box 470, Salem, OR 97308-0470. Dated: 24, September, 2010. /s/Erich M. Paetsch. Erich M. Paetsch, Trustee. State of Oregon, County of Marion) ss. I, the undersigned, certify that I am the attorney or one of the attorneys for the above named trustee and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original trustee's notice of sale. /s/Erich M. Paetsch, Attorney for said Trustee. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure sale goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. They buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED: IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERT AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE." You must mail or deliver your proof not later than WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 29, 2010 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale.) Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT THE SECURITY DEPOSIT: Under state law, you must apply your security and any rent you paid in advance against current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE: The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. You may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 1-800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org, or contact the Legal Aid Services of Oregon, Central Oregon Regional Office, 817 N.W. Hill Street, Bend, OR 97701 or call (541) 385-6944 or call toll-free in Oregon at 1-800-678-6944. DATED: 24th day of September, 2010. Trustee's name: Erich M. Paetsch. Trustee's signature: /s/Erich M. Paetsch. Trustee telephone number: (503) 399 1070.

Where Buyers and Sellers Meet

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Thousands of ads daily in print and online To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, December 25, 2010 F5

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 933

935

935

975

975

975

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Dodge Ram 2001, short

CHEVY BLAZER 2000, ZR2 LS 4x4, 130k miles, 90% tread left on $2000 worth of tires. Under KBB at $4995. Can be seen at Redmond’s Hwy 97 Park & Sell. 541-546-6838.

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354. FORD 350 LARIAT 2002 4x4 crewcab, 7.3 diesel 135k, dually, matching canopy, towing special, gooseneck, too! Orig. 63-year-old construction owner needs money, will trade, $17,500. (541) 815-3639 or (541) 508-8522

Chrysler 2005 Pacifica AWD, leather, video sys, 3.5 liter V6, loaded, 21,500 mi, $13,950. 541-382-3666

Toyota RAV 4 Ltd. 2007 80K miles, moonroof, tow pkg, great condition! $13,750. 541-848-7876

940

Vans 1998 Dodge Ram Wagon SE 2500, Mark III conversion, 100k miles, 4 captains chairs, rear fold-down bed, hitch, $4000 and worth it! Travel in luxury. 541-318-9999 or 541-508-8522.

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

541-322-7253 Ford Excursion 4x4 2000. Nice Red, like new, only 68k, seats 9. Just $16,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com Infinity QX4 1998, luxury SUV 4WD, loaded, leather, 80K miles, $7500. CORRECTED PHONE # = 541-815-4052

X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871.

FORD pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

BMW M3 COUPE E36 1998, mint condition, adult owned, low miles, needs nothing, $12,500. 541-419-2181

Buick LeSabre 2004, custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $6000; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $2900. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

The Bulletin

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl, 5-spd., 4x4, good cond, price reduced to $7950, 541-593-4437.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Find It in

Mazda 3, 2005 5-door, dark bronze, 47,500 mi, fully loaded, very good cond, $11,950. Kent, 541-923-6723

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, V6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr brks, plus mntd stud snows. $8500 obo. 541-330-0616

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

Buick LeSabre Cstm 1996. Go anywhere in snow, great gas mi. 44K on eng. Comfortable, reliable! $1599. 916-690-1529

The Bulletin

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $3500. 541-548-5302

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

Mercedes AMG, Formula One V-12. Very Rare. Only 99k miles. Ultimate in safety, luxury & performance. Cost $135,000 to fully hand-build. Just $13,500. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

Buick LeSabre Limited Edition 1985, 1 owner, always garaged, clean, runs great, 90K, $1895, 541-771-3133.

975

975

975

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Pontiac Grand Am 2004 FWD

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $27k. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

3.4L V-6 4 door, all power, 158k hwy miles. Excellent condition.

$2,995 541-923-8627 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

541-385-5809

975

Automobiles

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

Nissan XTerra SE 2001 $5900 Auto, CD, Sun, Tow, 131K, V6, 4WD, Must See 541-617-8454

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

Audi A4 Avant Quattro 2003 3.0L., 92K mi, garaged, serviced, silver, fully loaded, $9300. 541-420-9478

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

speed, 63,000 miles, all wheel drive, no adverse history, new tires. Seal gray with light gray leather interior. $32,950. 503-351-3976

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929. VOLKSWAGEN BUG 1965 Black , Excellent condition. Runs good. $6995. 541-416-0541.

NEED TO SELL A CAR? Call The Bulletin and place an ad today! Ask about our "Wheel Deal"! for private party advertisers 385-5809

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles,

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure automatic, 34-mpg, exc. it is correct. Sometimes incond., $12,480, please call structions over the phone are 541-419-4018. misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner contact us the first day your miles. Black on Black. This is ad appears and we will be Honda’s true sports machine. happy to fix it as soon as we I bought it with my wife in can. Deadlines are: Weekmind but she never liked the days 12:00 noon for next 6 speed trans. Bought it new day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunfor $32K. It has never been day; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. out of Oregon. Price $17K. If we can assist you, please Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm. call us: The Bulletin Classified ***

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

PORSCHE CARRERA 4S 2003 - Wide body, 6

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

385-5809 Ford Ranger 2004 Super Cab, XLT, 4X4, V6, 5-spd, A/C bed liner, tow pkg, 120K Like New! KBB Retail: $10,000 OBO 360-990-3223

Mercury Grand Marquis 1984. Grandpa’s car! Like new, all lthr, loaded, garaged, 40K mi, $3495. 541-382-8399

(Private Party ads only)

***

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $11,500. 541-408-2111

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

CHECK YOUR AD

541-385-5809

GMC Sierra Crew Cab SLT 2005, loaded, detailed & in great cond. Matching shell & sprayed bed liner& mat, just over 100k. Asking $15,800, 541-280-7068

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 1998, like new, low mi., just in time for the snow, great cond., $7000, 541-536-6223.

Ford F-350 Crew 4x4 2002. Triton V-10, 118k, new tires, wheels, brakes. Very nice. Just $14,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

The Bulletin Classiieds

Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, auto, reduced to $14,999 obo 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

Ford F250 1986, 4x4,

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you.

Subaru Outback 2005 AWD, 4cyl, auto, lthr htd seats, 89K mi, reduced to $13,995 OBO 541-508-0214; 541-554-5212

Mercedes S430-4Matic, 2003 AWD, silver, loaded & pampered. Excellent in snow! $16,395. 541-390-3596

Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

SUBARUS!!!

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Pontiac Firebird 1998, exc cond, no wrecks. T-top, V6, loaded, 22/29 mpg (reg gas). $4995. 541-475-3984

Jeep Cherokee Laredo, 2003, 135K miles, fully loaded, excellent condition. $6500. Call 541-749-0316

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

541-322-7253

Kia Spectra LS, 2002 96K miles, black, 5-speed, runs good, $2600. Phone 541-749-0316

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Carrera Motors

HO L I D AY CL EA RA N C E EV E NT Give winter’s icy grip a firm handshake.

2011 SUBARU

2011 SUBARU

2.5i Premium • Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive • 31 mpg hwy2 • 170-hp SUBARU BOXER® engine • 2010 IIHS Top Safety Pick1

2.5i Premium • Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive • 31 mpg hwy2 • 170-hp SUBARU BOXER® engine • 2010 IIHS Top Safety Pick1

$

$

LEGACY All 2010 Volkswagen Jetta Sedans, including TDi models, qualify for 0% financing up to 60 months on approved credit.

All new 2010 MY Volkswagen Vehicles will be sold at factory invoice price, plus tax, title and documentation fees.

(Diesel Jetta Sedans are eligible for a $650 federal tax credit if purchased by 12/31/2010. Please consult your tax professional for complete information)

(Please visit dealership for information on specific vehicles, or call a VW Specialist for further information)

All 2010 Volkswagen Routans qualify for 0% financing up to 72 months on approved credit.

22,599

MSRP $23,985

LEGACY

279 per month

MSRP $23,985

Sale Price $22,599 Automatic BAD-02 VIN: B3231812

Automatic

$2,195 down, 84 months as low as 3.99% A.P.R. On Approved Credit. Dealer’s installed options, title and license not included.

BAD-02 VIN: B3236292

2011 SUBARU

FORESTER 2.5X

$

18,788

MSRP $20,844 Automatic, Moonroof AJD-11 VIN: AH515391

M O T O R S

1 0 4 5 S E 3 r d S t . | B e n d | 5 4 1 - 3 8 2 - 1 7 11 | c a r r e r a m o t o r s . c o m

18 2011 SUBARU OUTBACKS available!

$

21,999

MSRP $23,383 Automatic BFB-21 VIN: BH711346


F6 Saturday, December 25, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

FINA

LD

RRY IN! U H ! AYS

NISSAN • VOLVO • SUZUKI • HYUNDAI CHRYSLER • DODGE • JEEP

Winter’s here, and our prices are dropping faster than the temperature outside. Get here fast for cold, hard savings on hundreds of new and pre-owned vehicles.

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2010 SUZUKI KIZASHI S AWD

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2010 NISSAN ALTIMA Auto, CD, ABS, Traction Control & More...

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2010 NISSAN FRONTIER 4x4, Crew Cab, Alloys, CD, P/W, Tow Package & More...

17,999

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,

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WE’RE OUT TO SELL 300 NEW AND USED CARS, TRUCKS & SUVs BY DECEMBER 31 CENTRAL OREGON’S L ARGEST USED SELECTION! FORD EXCURSION AWD 2006 SUBARU FORESTER 4X4 2006 VOLVO S80 AWD SMOLICH CERTIFIED 73k2004 Miles, Eddie Bauer, Loaded, Premium DVD, Nav & More. VIN: C27948 31k Miles. VIN: 708432 47k Miles. VIN: 441132 Carfax-Vehicle History • Free Rental Car 105 Point Vehicle Inspection 7 Day Exchange Program 12,000 Mile/12 Month Powertrain Warranty

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NOW ONLY $16,977

LIMITED TIME $22,588

NOW ONLY $15,777

NOW ONLY $17,988

541-389-1177 1865 NE Hwy 20 • Bend (Across From Pilot Butte)

RKED ALL MA ELOW B L WEL Y BLUE KELLE OK! BO

SMOLICH HYUNDAI

SMOLICH HYUNDAI 2250 NE HWY 20 • BEND, OR

NISSAN • VOLVO • SUZUKI • HYUNDAI CHRYSLER • DODGE • JEEP

541-749-4025 Check out our website at: www.SmolichHyundai.com

All sale prices after any dealer discounts, factory rebates & applicable incentives. Terms vary. See dealer for details. Limited stock on hand. Manufactures rebates and incentives subject to change. Art for illustration purposes only. Subject to prior sale. Not responsible for typos. Chrysler and Jeep are registered trademarks of DaimlerChrysler Corporation. *Must finance with Chrysler Financial to receive CFC bonus.

w w w. s m o l i c h m o t o r s . c o m


Bulletin Daily Paper 12/25/10  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Saturday December 25, 2010

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