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Teen arrested in Reed Market Road car-window shootings By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

Bend police arrested a 17-year-old male on suspicion of shooting out car windows with a BB gun as the vehicles drove along Reed Market Road. The juvenile, who was not identified by The Bulletin because of his

age, is being held at the Deschutes County Juvenile Detention Center on five counts of reckless endangering and four counts of criminal mischief. On Dec. 9 at about 6:40 p.m., officers were called to the intersection of Reed Market and Alderwood

Plane flips on landing at Sunriver; pilot unhurt

Circle, near the Woodriver Village neighborhood. Three drivers reported that their vehicles’ windows had been broken by a projectile as they were driving. Later, a fourth person reported a similar experience. “Imagine driving down the road and having a window blown out next

to you; that is obviously dangerous,” said Lt. Ken Stenkamp, of the Bend Police Department. The pellets all struck and shattered the vehicles’ rear windows. Perfectly round holes were left where the pellets went through. See Shootings / A5

FALLING IN LOVE WITH A FROZEN LANDSCAPE

Merkley pushing to restrict filibusters Oregon Democrat, colleagues plan to force a vote when the Senate convenes on Jan. 5

By Lauren Dake

By Keith Chu

The Bulletin

The Bulletin

A man’s single-engine aircraft flipped as he was trying to land at the Sunriver Airport on Sunday morning. At about 9:53 a.m., firefighters and law enforcement officials responded to a report of an accident at the airport. Officials found the man’s Piper Cub aircraft upside down about 20 feet from the runway. The plane had just landed and was slowing when it flipped and landed on its roof near the south end of the runway. “There was snow on the runway and areas adjoining the runway,” said Jim Bennett, with the Sunriver Fire Department. “Whether that was a factor of flipping the plane is unknown. NTSB (National Transportation Safety Board) is going to have to determine that.” The pilot was not injured. He was able to exit his plane, and there was no fuel spill or fire. The plane’s roof and propeller appeared to have sustained damage. Airport officials declined to identify the pilot. “My understanding is the pilot’s normal home airport is Sunriver,” Bennett said. “He took off earlier in the morning from the airport, and he was returning home.” Sunriver Fire and Rescue, Sunriver Police, Oregon State Police and the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office responded to the incident. Sunriver Airport Manager Stephanie Hartung declined to comment on the incident, and representatives from Sunriver’s marketing team could not be reached for comment.

WASHINGTON — On the first day of the new U.S. Senate, Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., and a few colleagues want to cause some trouble. After trying for months to persuade other members to reform the Senate rules that allow a single senator to block bills or create lengthy delays, Merkley and Sen. Tom Udall, D-N.M., plan to force a vote on new rules for the U.S. Senate when it convenes on Jan. 5. What those rules will be is still in flux, the men said in a conference call with reporters. The goal, though, is to find a balance between letting members of the minority party air their views and letting the Senate move more quickly to pass bills, especially those supported by more than 60 senators. Right now, a single member who opposes a bill can filibuster Sen. Jeff the same piece of legislation at Merkley, several points in the process, cre- D-Ore., is ating a delay of a week or longer, among the even if the measure draws an lawmakers overwhelming majority. who think the In the opinion of many new current filibusmembers, including Udall and ter system is Merkley, that needs to change. bogging down “The institution is hurting, the legislative it’s broken, it needs help,” Udall process. said. Although changing Senate rules normally requires 67 votes, the Senate can adopt new rules on the first day of a new session with a simple majority, Merkley and Udall said. See Filibusters / A4

IN CONGRESS

More news from Washington, D.C. • Top two Senate Republicans vow to vote against Obama’s nuclear treaty with Russia, Page A3

Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

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Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

KOREAS: South refuses to reconsider plan for live-fire drills, Page A3

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As snow flutters down, Rima Wilson, 40, of Bend, takes a break from cross-country skiing to look out over the frozen landscape at a viewpoint for Tumalo Falls on Sunday morning. “As I was skiing out here, I was thinking of how thankful I am that I live here,” Wilson said. “It is gorgeous today,” she added before continuing her skiing trek. There’s a chance of more snow today, with mixed showers possible. To find out more about what’s in the forecast for Central Oregon, see Weather, Page B6.

High court justices offer receptive ear to business interests By Adam Liptak New York Times News Service

As students confront more strains, so do college mental health centers By Trip Gabriel New York Times News Service

STONY BROOK, N.Y. — Rushing a student to a psychiatric emergency room is never routine, but when Stony Brook University logged three trips in three days, it did not surprise Jenny Hwang, the director of counseling. It was deep into the fall semester, a time of mounting stress with finals looming and the holiday break not far off, an anxiety all its own.

On a Thursday afternoon, a freshman who had been scraping bottom academically posted thoughts about suicide on Facebook. If I were gone, he wrote, would anybody notice? An alarmed student told staff members in the dorm, who called Hwang after hours, who contacted the campus police. Officers escorted the student to the county psychiatric hospital. There were two more runs over that weekend. See Colleges / A5

New York Times News Service ile photo

Psychologist Michael Bombardier counsels a student at Stony Brook University in New York.

WASHINGTON — Almost 40 years ago, a Virginia lawyer named Lewis Powell warned that the nation’s free enterprise system was under attack. He urged the U.S. Chamber of Commerce to assemble “a highly competent staff of lawyers” and retain outside counsel “of national standing and reputation” to appear before the Supreme Court and advance the interests of American business. “Under our constitutional system, especially with an activist-minded Supreme Court,” he wrote, “the judiciary may be the most important instrument for social, economic and political change.” Powell, who joined the Supreme Court a year later in 1972 and died in 1998, got his wish — and never more so than with the court led by Chief Justice John Roberts. The chamber now files briefs in most major business cases. The side it supported in the last term won 13 of 16 cases. Six of those were decided with a majority vote of five justices, and five of those decisions favored the chamber’s side. One of them was Citizens United, in which the chamber successfully urged the court to guarantee what it called “free corporate speech” by lifting restrictions on campaign spending. See Court / A4


A2 Monday, December 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Kim DiFrancesco, of Elmhurst, Ill., is practicing a vanishing art. She not only sends out traditional holiday cards — 250 of them — she also writes a personal greeting on each.

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Christmas greetings no longer in the cards? Technology is having a chilling effect on the popularity of traditional paper holiday cards By Sandra M. Jones Chicago Tribune

If it seems like you’re getting fewer holiday cards this year, don’t worry. Chances are it has nothing to do with your popularity. The practice of sending Christmas cards is fading — collateral damage of the digital age. After experiencing slowing growth since 2005, Christmas card sales declined in 2009. While the drop was slight, 0.4 percent, according to research firm Mintel International Group, evidence is building that the next generation of correspondents is unlikely to carry on the tradition with the same devotion as their parents. The rise of social networking, smart phones and Apple iPads is changing the way friends and family stay in touch, diminishing the Christmas card’s long-standing role as the annual social bulletin. “People are up to date all the time on Facebook,” said Kit Yarrow, a Golden Gate University professor who studies the 20and 30-somethings of the Generation Y culture. “Gen Yers are notorious for not sending thankyou notes and not RSVPing. I just think that method of communication is foreign to them. And that doesn’t bode well for the future of holiday cards.” Americans sent more than 1.8 billion Christmas cards through the mail last year, according to greeting card industry statistics. That figure is expected to drop to 1.5 billion this holiday season. Facebook, for its part, passed the 500 million member milestone in July. The outlook is particularly weak for teenagers and college students, who are accustomed to communicating in ways that are more immediate, more efficient and more cost-effective, said Pamela Danziger, president of Unity Marketing. “Compared to these instant forms of communication, addressing a preprinted card and sending it via snail mail seems like an antiquated waste of time,” Danziger said.

Once a time-saver A British businessman is credited with creating the Christmas card in 1843 — as a way to save time. Too busy to write a personal holiday greeting, Henry Cole hired a well-known London artist to design a card he could send to all his acquaintances, according to a version of the story recounted by greeting card maker Hallmark Cards Inc. Louis Prang, a German immigrant, is said to have brought

Outlook isn’t merry or bright for card sales While Christmas remains the holiday that sparks the most greeting card sales, fewer people send cards each year, according to Unity Marketing. The percentage of consumers buying greeting cards for Christmas fell from 77 percent in 2005 to 73 percent in 2007 and to 62 percent in 2009, according to the Stevens, Pa.-based market research firm’s 2010 report on greeting cards and stationery. — Chicago Tribune

the Christmas card tradition to America in 1875. The recent decline doesn’t mean Christmas cards can’t make a comeback. While no data are yet available, Danziger has gathered anecdotal evidence in recent weeks that suggest consumers are feeling the need to connect outside the electronic world, for Christmas in particular. “I don’t know if it’s going to pick up traction, but there may very well be people who have given up Christmas cards and who are returning,” said Danziger. “I think it’s just a backlash to the virtual world. You may have 600 friends on Facebook, but really only 30 of them mean anything to you.”

High-tech cards American Greetings Corp. and Hallmark Cards — the two biggest greeting card publishers in the U.S. — are doing their best to grab consumers’ attention with high-tech cards that light up, record music and connect to the Web. “We see social networking as a tremendous opportunity,” said Steve Laserson, vice president of greeting cards at American Greetings. “The more people stay connected, the more likely they are to also correspond with a paper card.” American Greetings introduced a sing-a-long Christmas card this year — a traditional greeting card with a recording chip that allows the sender to sing along with background music for “Jingle Bells” and other carols. The company also sells a digital slide show card with a small LCD screen that displays up to 50 photos. The card comes with a USB port so recipients can transfer the images to their computers. Meanwhile, Internet-based photo publisher Shutterfly Inc. introduced a feature this year that allows customers to share a sneak peek of their card design on their blog, Web site or Facebook page.

Greeting cards have faced competition from the telephone to the fax and the Internet. Online or e-cards represent less than 1 percent of the estimated $11 billion annual greeting card market, according to Mintel. Chris Ruys has been sending holiday cards for decades, typically mailing a couple hundred paper cards each Christmas. This year she got fed up with the paper and decided it was time to save some trees. “Last year, holiday e-cards seemed to be gaining popularity and, in my mind, respect,” Ruys said. “So I decided, I’m going to do this. The biggest reason isn’t the cost. It’s an environmental issue. It’s one small step toward going green.” At the same time, Helen Levinson, who earns her living as president of digital marketing firm Desert Rose Design, is sending her friends and clients handwritten greeting cards. It’s a way to stand out from the clutter, she said. “We move so quickly, the holidays for me is a time to slow down a bit and appreciate the people around you,” said Levinson. “You need to put on the brakes occasionally and just say thank you.” Kim DiFrancesco, 43, started writing Christmas cards when she was in college. She buys her cards from the Humane Society as a way to donate to a cause. It usually takes her three weeks to address the more than 200 cards on her list. “I might not talk to these people all year, but at Christmas they’re going to get a card from me,” said DiFrancesco. “It’s not like the card itself is special, but I think people are excited to open up something that is handwritten.” Anthropologist Robbie Blinkoff is making an effort to combine the virtual and physical world of holiday cards this year by posting a holiday card on his blog (thewildpigtailproject.com) and asking people to print and mail it.

Social connections The idea is to remind people that creating social connections takes time and work. The sender doesn’t get an immediate response, as with a text message or Facebook post, but chances are the greeting will have a long-lasting effect, said Blinkoff, co-founder of Context Based Research Group in Baltimore. The recession has taken the focus off material goods and made people hungry for social connection, he said. “To an anthropologist, a little thing like a Christmas card is not a little thing. It’s about something much bigger than a piece of paper,” Blinkoff said. “Cards are disappearing, but the desire for what’s behind them has never been bigger. This is not the year to not send a card. It’s a year to create new ones.”

Technology Consumer Environment Education Science

It may be time to loosen Google’s grip on the digital world By Steven Pearlstein

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In case you hadn’t noticed, Google isn’t just a Web search company any longer. In addition to online advertising, it’s moving into operating system and application software, mobile telephone software, e-mail, Web browsers, maps and video aggregation. It’s also in the process of assembling the world’s biggest digital library of books and visual materials. Google portrays each new line of business as a logical extension of its core mission to expand digital horizons in ways that allow people to use the Internet to improve their lives. It’s a noble goal, and Google does it very well — so well, in fact, that it boasts a market value of $190.2 billion, a profit margin of 30 percent, and cash and marketable securities on its balance sheet worth $33 billion. The question now is how much bigger and more dominant we want this innovative and ambitious company to become.

the case with Groupon, the local Web advertising company, had the hot startup decided last month to accept Google’s reported $6 billion offer.

A monopolist? In theory, antitrust laws were meant to restrict such acquisitions by a monopolist. In practice, it hasn’t worked out that way. Decades of cramped judicial opinions have so limited application of antitrust laws that each transaction can be considered only in terms of how it affects the niche market that an acquiring company hopes to enter. Since Google generally has little existing presence in the market segments of the companies it buys, regulators fear that they will be unable to prove that any one transaction will substantially lessen competition. One at a time, these deals might appear to be relatively benign. But taken together, they allow Google to increase the scale and scope of its activities and to further enhance its controlling position across a range of sectors. Moreover, by swooping in and buying these promising firms, Google forecloses on the possibility that they might be purchased by companies such as Microsoft or Facebook, which could use them to mount a serious challenge to Google’s dominant position. Such a motive is suggested by the extraordinary premiums that Google has been willing to pay for its purchases. The ease with which Google has been able to extend its dominance reflects, in large part, the inability to adapt century-old antitrust laws to the different economics of a high-tech economy susceptible to winner-take-all competition. Antitrust regulators are well aware of these new economic realities. They hold conferences on them, cite them in speeches and use them to justify modest changes in merger guidelines. They were broadly cited in the groundbreaking antitrust case against Microsoft brought during the Clinton administration. But so far, neither the Justice Department nor the Federal Trade Commission has been willing to use them to mount a broad challenge to Google and its strategy of using acquisitions to expand and protect its existing monopoly.

Earned its dominance Google has already achieved a near-monopoly in Web search and search advertising, and has cleverly used that monopoly and the profits it generates to achieve dominant positions in adjacent or complementary markets. Success in those other markets, in turn, further strengthens Google’s Web search dominance. There is nothing improper or illegal about Google’s monopoly — like Microsoft and IBM before it, it earned that dominance fair and square. And given the dynamic nature of the technology sector, it would probably be counterproductive to prevent Google from using its money and talent to expand into new areas. Where I have a problem, however, is in allowing Google to buy its way into new markets and new technologies, particularly when the firms being bought already have a dominant position in their respective market niches. That was the case with the company’s recent acquisitions of You Tube, DoubleClick and AdMob. It is the case with Google’s proposed $700 million acquisition of ITA Software, the leading provider of software used in online searches for airline flights, which is currently under review by the Justice Department. And it would have been

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THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 20, 2010 A3

T S Nuclear treaty with Russia faces obstacles in the Senate

South Korean marines patrol Yeonpyeong Island on Sunday. The South showed no signs of reconsidering a live-fire drill planned for today or Tuesday, as the U.N. Security Council held an emergency meeting to address rising tensions on the Korean peninsula.

Top two Republicans vow to block pact

Ahn Young-joon The Associated Press

By Peter Baker New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The top two Senate Republicans declared Sunday that they would vote against President Barack Obama’s nuclear treaty with Russia as the bipartisan spirit of last week’s tax-cut deal devolved into a sharp battle over national security in the waning days of the session. With some prominent Republicans angry over passage of legislation ending the ban on gay men and lesbians serving openly in the military, the mood in the Senate turned increasingly divisive, and Obama and Democratic lawmakers scrambled to hold together a coalition to approve the treaty. “I’ve decided that I cannot support the treaty,” Sen. Mitch McConnell, the Republican leader in the Senate, said on CNN’s “State of the Union.” “I think the ver ification provisions are “I’ve decided i nadequate, that I cannot and I do worry support the about the mistreaty. I think sile defense the verification implications provisions are of it.” While inadequate, the treaty was and I do worry signed eight about the missile defense months ago, he said, “Rushing implications it right before of it.” Christmas, it — Senate strikes me as Minority trying to jam Leader Mitch us.” McConnell Sen. Harry Reid, the Democratic majority leader, moved to hold a vote on Tuesday to close off debate, saying, “You either want to keep nuclear weapons out of the hands of terrorists or you don’t.” But the fate of the treaty, known as New START, was complicated by an acrimonious deadlock over spending and the political subtext about whether the pact’s approval would rejuvenate a weakened president after his party’s midterm election defeat. For the second day, Obama’s supporters defeated a Republican amendment that would have blocked approval of the treaty by the end of the year. But the 60-32 vote left them short of the twothirds majority they will need for final approval, and the White House lost a Republican it had hoped would join them on the decisive vote expected later this week. The debate on the Senate floor came hours after McConnell and Sen. Jon Kyl of Arizona said they would vote against the treaty. While their opposition was not a surprise, the question was how aggressively McConnell in particular would lobby the handful of wavering Republicans who will decide the matter. One Republican who had previously signaled willingness to support the treaty suggested Sunday that he would not. Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina cited the sour mood engendered by Democrats forcing votes on other topics in recent days, including the bill on gays in the military that passed Saturday. “If you really want to have a chance of passing START, you better start over and do it in the next Congress because this lame duck has been poisoned,” Graham said on CBS’ “Face the Nation.” “I’m not going to vote for START,” he added, “until I hear from the Russians that they understand we can develop four stages of missile defense, and if we do, they won’t withdraw from the treaty.”

IN CONGRESS

S. Korea edges closer to live-fire exercises By Chico Harlan The Washington Post

SEOUL, South Korea — South Korea on Sunday showed no sign of reconsidering its plan for livefire drills on Yeonpyeong Island, despite North Korean threats of retaliation and mounting international efforts to prevent an intra-peninsular showdown. South Korean military officials on Sunday reiterated their intention to hold the drills today or Tuesday, depending on clear weather, setting up a potential crisis that the United Nations Security Council was addressing in a closed-door emergency meeting that lasted into Sunday evening. North Korea has said that if Seoul goes ahead with the artil-

BEND

RIVER

lery drills on Yeonpyeong Island — seven miles from the North Korean coastline — it will lead to “catastrophe.”

‘Exercise restraint’ Russia urged the emergency gathering of the Security Council, circulating a draft statement that calls “on all parties concerned to exercise maximum restraint.” It also suggested that U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon send an envoy to North and South Korea “to settle peacefully the current crisis situation.” South Korea could use the growing international pressure as a cover to cancel its latest military exercises, but weeks ear-

PROMENADE,

BEND

lier Seoul drew fierce domestic criticism for its feeble response to North Korea’s Nov. 23 shelling of Yeonpyeong Island, an attack that killed two marines and two civilians. Since then South Korea has replaced its defense minister and increased its aggressive rhetoric, vowing airstrikes if Pyongyang attacks again.

Dialogue urged The State Department has defended Seoul’s right to hold the drills, and about 20 U.S. military members will take part in the live-fire drill. But China has spoken out against the drills, with Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Jiang Yu urging “dialogue rather than confrontation.”

5 41 . 317. 6 0 0 0

IRAQ

Influential cleric’s anti-American forces are poised for gains By Jack Healy New York Times News Service

AMARA, Iraq — The Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr, who in the past decade has been both an anti-American insurgency leader and a behind-the-scenes power broker, is not expected to be personally in attendance when Iraq’s leaders sketch out a new government today. But with his followers standing to gain control of powerful government posts, his influence is likely to become apparent in many facets of Iraqi public life. Maysan province was a stronghold for al-Sadr until sweeps by the Iraqi Army in 2008 helped break the grip of his militia forces and political change ousted his ally from the governorship here last year. Now, the winds are shifting, and the area has become a stage for al-Sadr’s political resurgence. His followers are pushing for control of the governor’s seat here in Maysan province again, one of several positions they hope to gain as rewards for joining the political coalition that will keep their one-time enemy, Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, in office after the months-long wrangling that followed March’s inconclusive elections. That the party, still Iraq’s most fiercely populist and antiAmerican bloc, has come this far is a reflection of the Sadrists’ efforts in recent years to recast

U.S. political plan may be faltering As Iraqi politicians put the final touches on a longawaited new government, a U.S.-sponsored proposal to curb the powers of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki is still taking shape. The plan aims to create a national strategic council to guide policy decisions. But after months of haggling, Iraqi lawmakers remain divided over how much power the council should have and who should sit on it. With Maliki expected to announce at least a partial Cabinet as soon as today, experts say the council risks becoming an afterthought — illustrating the limits of the United States’ ability to influence politics in Iraq as it prepares to withdraw its remaining 50,000 troops by next December. — McClatchy-Tribune News Service themselves as maturing politicians who can actually govern. “We want to show the world we are a modern people, an intellectual people,” said Fathal Namaa, the group’s political director in Maysan. “We don’t want to be radical Islamists. I tell my supporters, don’t dress all in black or carry weapons.”


A4 Monday, December 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Amendment would empower states to repeal federal law

Court Continued from A1 The chamber’s success rate is but one indication of the Roberts court’s leanings on business issues. A new study, prepared for The New York Times by scholars at Northwestern University and the University of Chicago, analyzed some 1,450 decisions since 1953. It showed that the percentage of business cases on the Supreme Court docket has grown in the Roberts years, as has the percentage of cases won by business interests. The Roberts court, which has completed five terms, ruled for business interests 61 percent of the time, compared with 46 percent in the last five years of the court led by Chief Justice William Rehnquist, who died in 2005, and 42 percent by all courts since 1953. Those differences are statistically significant, the study found. It was prepared by Lee Epstein, a political scientist at Northwestern’s law school; William Landes, an economist at the University of Chicago; and Judge Richard Posner, who serves on the federal appeals court in Chicago and teaches law at the University of Chicago. The Roberts court’s engagement with business issues has risen along with the emergence of a breed of lawyers specializing in Supreme Court advocacy, many of them veterans of the U.S. solicitor general’s office, which represents the federal government in the court. These specialists have been extraordinarily successful, both in persuading the court to hear business cases and to rule in favor of their clients. The Supreme Court’s business docket has stayed active in the current term, which began in October. In one week this month, the court heard arguments in a case brought by the chamber challenging an Arizona law that imposes penalties on companies that hire illegal workers. It also agreed to hear two cases that could reshape class-action and environmental law. The chamber had urged the court to hear both cases. The Chamber of Commerce spent tens of millions of dollars in the recent midterm elections, mostly to help Republican candidates. It says that it has 300,000 members, businesses and organizations “of every size, sector and region,” and that its spending furthered the interests of some 3 million businesses, most of them small ones. But the chamber’s mission is by no means limited to the elected branches of government. “A central function of the chamber,” it told the Supreme Court in a recent brief, “is to represent the interests of its members in important matters before the courts.”

Litigation unit The vehicle for that is the litigation unit that was envisioned by Powell, the National Chamber Litigation Center, which says it is “the voice of business in the courts on issues of national concern to the business community.” Its board includes executives from some of the nation’s biggest companies, including Ford Motor Co., Verizon Communications Inc., Lockheed Martin Corp., Viacom Inc. and GlaxoSmithKline PLC. On the center’s 30th anniversary in 2007, Carter Phillips, who often represents the chamber and has argued more Supreme Court cases than any active lawyer in private practice, reflected on its influence. “I know from personal experience that the chamber’s support carries significant weight with the justices,” he wrote. “Except for the solicitor general representing the United States, no single entity has more influence on what cases the Supreme Court decides and how it decides them than the National Chamber Litigation Center.”

By Kate Zernike New York Times News Service

New York Times News Service ile photo

Theodore Olson, right, shown leaving the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., persuaded the court to hear an environmental case and to rule for his client, making it easier to dump mining waste into an Alaskan lake. A new study analyzing some 1,450 decisions since 1953 showed that the percentage of business cases on the Supreme Court docket has grown in John Roberts’ years, as has the percentage of cases won by business interests.

“The fraction of business cases on the docket has grown from 21 percent in the last five years of the Rehnquist court to 27 percent during the Roberts years. This isn’t a small jump.” — Lee Epstein, a political scientist at Northwestern University’s law school

68% success rate A study prepared by the Constitutional Accountability Center, a liberal group, examined the center’s success rate in the Supreme Court. It found that the positions supported by the chamber prevailed 68 percent of the time in the Roberts court, compared with 56 percent in the last 11 years of the Rehnquist court, a period without changes in the court’s membership. Robin Conrad, executive vice president of the chamber’s litigation unit, said the center’s analysis was flattering but superficial, and she questioned its comparisons. The chamber does not participate in all business cases, she said. The mix of cases before the court has changed over time and the chamber has become more active. But Conrad acknowledged her group’s exceptional track record. “Why have we been successful?” she asked. “I’d like to think it’s because of the quality of the arguments and the briefs we present to the court.” Doug Kendall, president of the Constitutional Accountability Center, drew a different conclusion, saying the numbers proved that the Roberts court increasingly sided with corporate interests. He also said the study documented “a sharp ideological divide that did not exist before 2005.” In the last 11 terms of the Rehnquist court, the five more conservative justices voted for the chamber’s position 61 percent of the time, while the four more liberal justices voted for it 48 percent of the time. In the first five terms of the Roberts court, the corresponding bloc of five more conservative justices voted for the chamber’s position 74 percent of the time, and the four more liberal justices 43 percent of the time. But counting votes is not the same thing as assessing results, Conrad said. “Our research has shown that the vast majority of business decisions are decided by a lopsided majority of 7 to 2 or more,” she said. Over the Roberts court’s first five terms, Conrad said, only 10 percent of the business docket was decided by the classic 5-to-4 split, with Justice Anthony Kennedy joining the court’s four more conservative members in the majority. The idea that the Supreme Court reflexively rules for the

chamber and other business interests is too simplistic, many legal scholars and practitioners say. If the court favors business, they say, it is as part of a broader orientation toward free markets and a wariness of many kinds of lawsuits. An additional explanation for the recent successes of business interests in the Supreme Court may lie in the rise of specialized practice groups at major law firms led by veterans of the solicitor general’s office.

Academic, legal work Turning service as U.S. solicitor general into a career at a commercial firm is a relatively new phenomenon, according to a recent article by Matthew Sundquist in The Charleston Law Review. From 1952 to 1981, he wrote, former solicitors general usually became judges, joined law schools or worked as public servants. In the next 15 years, they split their time between academic and legal work, often consulting with law firms with specialized Supreme Court practices. Starting in 1996, every former solicitor general, with one exception, has gone on to supervise a Supreme Court practice at a major law firm, earning as much as $5 million a year. The exception is Justice Elena Kagan, who joined the court in August. These specialists make their livings representing business interests, and they have used the skills they honed in government service to achieve notable successes in the Supreme Court. They had a particularly good run, for instance, in environmental cases in the term that ended in 2009. “For the first time, a series of industry clients last term turned repeatedly to the expert Supreme Court bar for assistance in a host of cases arising under federal pollution control laws,” Richard Lazarus, a law professor at Georgetown, wrote in The Yale Law Journal Online last February. “The result was palpable and formed the basis of the best term that industry has ever enjoyed before the court in environmental cases.” Among these lawyers were some of the most prominent members of the specialized Supreme Court bar. Though the odds of obtaining Supreme Court review are about one in 100, these lawyers persuaded the court to hear

four cases that “would not have seemed to have a remote chance of review,” Lazarus wrote. They won every time. In one of the cases, Theodore Olson, who had served as solicitor general in the administration of President George W. Bush, persuaded the court not only to hear the case but also to rule for his client, making it easier to dump mining waste into an Alaskan lake.

Pro-business trend? But a broader look at the Roberts court’s environmental cases by Jonathan Adler, a law professor at Case Western Reserve University, found no pro-business trend. “The Roberts court’s environmental decisions issued to date suggest neither a disposition toward business nor a hostility toward environmental regulation,” Adler wrote in his article, published last year in The Santa Clara Law Review. “The ‘pro-business’ position has prevailed in some cases, and lost in others. If the relative magnitude of the cases is taken into account, it is even more difficult to argue that the Roberts court has been ‘pro-business’ in this area.” There has been less dispute about the victories business groups have recently enjoyed in other areas of the law. David Franklin, a law professor at DePaul University, wrote in another article in The Santa Clara Law Review last year that the chamber had been quite successful in the Roberts court in four of what he considered five main categories of cases — punitive damages, arbitration of consumer and other disputes, the standards for early dismissal of lawsuits, and federal pre-emption of state laws governing injury and other suits. The “conspicuous exception,” he said, was employment discrimination. The numbers support Franklin’s conclusions, but they are small and not statistically significant. Even in employment discrimination cases, however, the available numbers are subject to two interpretations. True, the Roberts court’s 16 decisions have been evenly divided, according to an analysis by Epstein at Northwestern. But the Rehnquist court ruled in favor of people claiming discrimination more often — 64 percent of the time. All of this is to say that determining whether the Supreme Court is “pro-business” or “antibusiness” can be difficult. There will always be exceptions. It is clear, though, that the Supreme Court these days is increasingly focused on business issues. “The fraction of business cases on the docket has grown from 21 percent in the last five years of the Rehnquist court to 27 percent during the Roberts years,” Epstein said. “This isn’t a small jump.”

Attacks target security forces in Afghanistan By Ray Rivera and Sangar Rahimi New York Times News Service

KABUL, Afghanistan — Insurgents intensified pressure on Afghan security forces Sunday, killing five Afghan army training officers in a suicide attack in Kabul, and attacking an army recruiting center in the city of Kunduz. At least four Afghan soldiers and four police officers were killed in the Kunduz assault in a firefight that lasted more than 12 hours, government officials said. In the Kabul attack, two insurgents armed with AK-47s and

grenades opened fire on a bus carrying the army trainers. One of the attackers ran into the bus and blew himself up, killing five officers and wounding nine others, the Defense Ministry said. The attack occurred on the main road between Kabul and the eastern city of Jalalabad. The road has been the site of many similar attacks on NATO vehicles and supply trucks. In Kunduz, a group of insurgents on motorcycles stormed the front gate of the recruitment center in the heart of Kunduz City, ac-

cording to an army officer at the scene, who asked not to be named because he was not authorized to talk to reporters. The attackers shot and killed the gate security guards and entered the main courtyard, where two of them blew themselves up, the officer said. A fierce firefight erupted with the remaining insurgents as some 200 U.S. and Afghan army forces cordoned off the area and pounded the compound with heavy machine gun fire. The gunfire finally stopped about 6:30 p.m. as government

forces took control of the building, local officials said. Officials said at least four Afghan soldiers and four police officers had been killed in the fighting, though the damage was still being assessed. There were no immediate reports on civilian casualties. The Taliban claimed responsibility for both attacks and promised a bloody year in 2011. “We will carry out more attacks in the future,” a Taliban spokesman, Zabiulla Mjahid, said by telephone.

The same people driving the lawsuits that seek to dismantle the Obama administration’s health care overhaul have set their sights on an even bigger target: a constitutional amendment that would allow a vote of the states to overturn any act of Congress. Under the proposed “repeal amendment,” any federal law or regulation could be repealed if the legislatures of two-thirds of the states voted to do so. The idea has been propelled by the wave of Republican victories in the midterm elections. Initially promoted by Virginia lawmakers and tea party groups, it has the support of legislative leaders in 12 states. It also won the backing of the incoming House majority leader, Rep. Eric Cantor, when it was introduced this month in Congress. Like any constitutional amendment, it faces enormous hurdles: It must be approved by both chambers of Congress and then by three-quarters of, or 38, state legislatures. The repeal amendment reflects a larger debate about federal power at a time when the public’s approval of Congress is at a historic low. In the last several years, many states have passed so-called sovereignty resolutions, largely symbolic, aimed at nullifying federal laws they do not agree with.

Filibusters Continued from A1 They’ve dubbed their plan “the Constitutional Option.” Merkley used the food safety bill that passed the Senate this year as an example. Even though the bill passed with more than 60 votes, Republicans filibustered the measure three times, delaying the bill by the equivalent of three weeks. He argued that filbusters should be allowed, but only if the lawmaker is really trying to make a point — and stays on the Senate floor, delivering a speech, “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington”-style. The current practice, where a senator merely has to say that he or she intends to filibuster a bill, makes it too easy to gum up the works, Merkley said. “If no senator at some point is ready to continue the debate, then we should automatically go to a majority vote,” he said. The trick in drafting the rules proposal will be attracting enough votes, Udall and Merkley said. They’ll have to convince senior Democrats,

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Randy Barnett, a law professor at Georgetown University who helped draft the language of the repeal amendment, argued it stood a better chance than others that have failed to win ratification. “This is something state legislatures have an interest in pursuing,” Barnett said, “because it helps them fend off federal encroachment and gives them a seat at the table when Congress is proposing what to do.” Marianne Moran, a lawyer in Florida who runs the website RepealAmendment.org, said that legislative leaders in Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, New Jersey, South Carolina, Texas and Utah, as well as Virginia, were backing the amendment. “Considering we’ve had 12 states get on board in the last two or three months that we’ve been pushing this, I think we’re getting some speed,” Moran said. “No amendment has ever been ratified without a broad national consensus — it’s an uphill battle — but we’ve done it 27 times as a country, and I think we can get enough states to agree.” Proponents say their effort is not directed at any one law or set of laws. “Our desire is to have it in place so we can repeal as things come up,” Moran said. “What we’re trying to do is to draw a line in the sand saying the federal government has gone too far.”

some of whom are reluctant to rewrite the rulebook to make a major change to how business is done. And so far, no Republicans have signed on to either senator’s reform proposal. Merkley said he wants to write the rules in a way that won’t do too much damage to the rights of the minority party, since Democrats will surely be in the minority at some point in the future. One concession that Republicans might support, Merkley said, is allowing a more open amendment process. “I think there needs to be, as part of this debate, a consideration of how members create amendments,” Merkley said. Udall agreed that shutting down Republican rights would be counterproductive. “We don’t want to make any rules changes that would hurt our ability to speak out if we’re in a minority situation,” Udall said. “We’re trying to focus on how to make the Senate a better institution, make it a better legislative body.” Keith Chu can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at kchu@bendbulletin.com.

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Colleges Continued from A1 They included one late Saturday night when a student grew concerned that a friend with a prescription for Xanax, the antianxiety drug, had swallowed a fistful. On Sunday, a supervisor of residence halls, Gina Vanacore, sent a BlackBerry update to Hwang, who has championed programs to train students and staff members to intervene to prevent suicide. “If you weren’t so good at getting this bystander stuff out there,” Vanacore wrote in mock exasperation, “we could sleep on the weekends.” Stony Brook is typical of American colleges and universities these days, where national surveys show that nearly half of the students who visit counseling centers are coping with serious mental illness, more than double the rate a decade ago. More students take psychiatric medication, and there are more emergencies requiring immediate action. “It’s so different from how people might stereotype the concept of college counseling, or back in the ’70s students coming in with existential crises: Who am I?” said Hwang, whose staff of 29 includes psychiatrists, clinical psychologists and social workers. “Now they’re bringing in life stories involving extensive trauma, a history of serious mental illness, eating disorders, self-injury, alcohol and other drug use.” A recent survey by the American College Counseling Association found that a majority of students seek help for normal postadolescent trouble like romantic heartbreak and identity crises. But 44 percent in counseling have severe psychological disorders, up from 16 percent in 2000, and 24 percent are on psychiatric medication, up from 17 percent a decade ago. The most common disorders today: depression, anxiety, suicidal thoughts, alcohol abuse, attention disorders, self-injury and eating disorders. Stony Brook, an academically demanding branch of the State University of New York (its admission rate is 40 percent), faces the mental health challenges typical of a big public university. It has 9,500 resident students and 15,000 who commute from off campus. The highly diverse student body includes many who are the first in their families to attend college and carry intense pressure to succeed, often in engineering or the sciences. Stony Brook has seen a sharp increase in demand for counseling — 1,311 students began treatment during the past academic year, a rise of 21 percent from a year earlier. At the same time, budget pressures from New York State have forced a 15 percent cut in mental health services over three years.

Shifting to triage Near the student union in the heart of campus, the Student Health Center building dates from the days when a serious undergraduate health problem was mononucleosis. But the hiring of Judy Esposito, a social worker with experience counseling Sept. 11 widows, to start a triage unit three years ago was a sign of the new reality in student mental health. At 9 a.m. on the Tuesday after the campus’ very busy weekend, Esposito had just passed the Purell dispenser by the entrance when she noticed two colleagues hurrying toward her

Shootings Continued from A1 Two of the vehicles hit were headed east on Reed Market, two were headed west. “It recklessly creates a hazard,” Stenkamp said of the shootings. “You get some BB guns and if they hit in the right place, they can cause injury, the loss of an eye.” Bend Police officers canvassed the nearby neighborhood. “We did a neighborhood canvass and determined where the projectile came from and that it was a BB gun,” Stenkamp said. “Then we were able to determine he was the suspect.” On Wednesday, officers arrested the youth. They also seized as evidence the BB gun believed to have been used in the shootings. Stenkamp declined to say whether the youth lived in the neighborhood from where the pellets were fired. Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 20, 2010 A5 Jenny Hwang, director of counseling at Stony Brook University, meets with a student in the Student Health Center in Stony Brook, N.Y., on Nov. 30. Hwang leads a staff of 29 who help students with a growing list of mental health problems. New York Times News Service ile photo

office. Before she had taken off her coat, they were updating her about a junior who had come in the previous week after cutting herself and expressing suicidal thoughts. Esposito’s triage team fields 15 to 20 requests for help a day. After brief interviews, most students are scheduled for a longer appointment with a psychologist, which leads to individual treatment. The one in six who does not become a patient is referred to other university departments like academic advising, or to off-campus therapists if long-term help is needed. There are no charges for on-campus counseling. This day the walk-ins included a young man complaining of feeling friendless and depressed. Another student said he was struggling academically, feared that his parents would find out and was drinking and feeling hopeless. Professionals in a mental health center are mindful of their own well being. For this reason the staff had planned a potluck holiday lunch. While a turkey roasted in the kitchen that serves as the break room, Es-

posito helped warm up candied yams, stuffing and the storebought quiche that was her own contribution. Just then Regina Frontino, the triage assistant who greets walk-ins at the front desk, swept into the kitchen to say a student had been led in by a friend who feared that she was suicidal. Esposito rushed to the lobby. From a brief conversation, she knew that the distraught student would have to go to the hospital. The counseling center does not have the ability to admit suicidal or psychotic students overnight for observation or to administer powerful drugs to calm them. It arranges for them to be taken to the Stony Brook University Medical Center, on the far side of the 1,000-acre campus. The hospital has a 24-hour psychiatric emergency room that serves all of Suffolk County. “They’re not going to fix what’s going on,” Esposito said, “but in that moment we can ensure she’s safe.” She called Tracy Thomas, an on-call counselor, to calm the student, who was crying intermittently, while she phoned the emergency room and informed

Hwang, who called the campus police to transport the young woman.

Reaching out Even though the appointment books of Stony Brook counselors are booked solid, all national evidence suggests that vastly more students need mental health services. Forty-six percent of college students said they felt “things were hopeless” at least once in the previous 12 months, and nearly a third had been so depressed that it was difficult to function, according to a 2009 survey by the American College Health Association. Then there is this: Of 133 student suicides reported in the American College Counseling Association’s survey of 320 institutions last year, fewer than 20 had sought help on campus. Alexandria Imperato, 23, remembers that as a Stony Brook freshman all her high school friends were talking about how great a time they were having in college, while she felt miserable. She faced family issues and the

pressure of adjusting to college. “You go home to Thanksgiving dinner, and the family asks your brother, how is his gerbil, and they ask you, ‘What are doing with the rest of your life?’” Imperato said. She learned she had clinical depression. She eventually conquered it with psychotherapy, Cymbalta and lithium. She went on to form a Stony Brook chapter of Active Minds, a national campus-based suicide-prevention group. “I knew how much better it made me feel to find others,” said Imperato, who plans to be a nurse. On recent day, she was one of two dozen volunteers in black T-shirts reading “Chill” who stopped passers-by in the Student Activities Center during lunch hour. “Would you like to take a depression screening?” they asked, offering a clipboard with a onepage form to all who unplugged their ear buds. Students checked boxes if they had difficulty sleeping, felt hopeless or “had feelings of worthlessness.” They were offered a chance to speak privately with a psychologist in a nearby office. Sixteen said yes. One student who said yes to an impromptu interview with a counselor after filling out a depression screening was a psychology major, a senior from upstate New York. As it happened, Hwang had wandered over from the counseling center to check on the screenings, and the young woman spent a long time conferring with her, never removing her checked coat or backpack. “I don’t have motivation for things anymore,” the student said afterward. “This place just depresses me the whole time.” She had been unaware that students could walk in unannounced to the counseling center. “I thought you had to make an appointment,” she said. “Yes,” she said, “I’ll do that.”

Demise of ‘don’t ask’ reinvigorates gay marriage supporters New York Times News Service WASHINGTON — As gay people around the country reveled in the historic Senate vote to repeal the military’s “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy, a liberal media watchdog group said it planned to announce today that it is setting up a “communications war room for gay equality” in an effort to win the movement’s next and biggest battle: for a right to same-sex marriage. The new group, Equality Matters, is an outgrowth of Media Matters, an organization backed by wealthy liberal donors. It will be run by Richard Socarides, a former domestic policy adviser to President Bill Clinton who has been deeply critical of President Barack Obama’s record on gay rights. A well-known gay journalist, Kerry Eleveld, the Washington correspondent for The Advocate, will leave that magazine in January to edit the new group’s website, equalitymatters.org, which is expected to go online this morning. For the gay-rights movement, the right to marry is the holy grail, because so many other benefits — including Social Security and health benefits for gay partners, adoption rights, tax benefits and others — flow from it.


A6 Monday, December 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

WOR L D

ISRAEL

Riot police block demonstrators trying to storm the government building in the Belarusian capital, Minsk, on Sunday. Protesters took to the streets after the opposition claimed that voting was rigged in the presidential election.

Body of slain American tourist found The Associated Press JERUSALEM — Israeli police discovered the body of an American woman, hands bound and full of stab wounds, in a forest outside Jerusalem on Sunday, a day after a friend said Arab assailants attacked the pair during a hike in the hills. The friend, who suffered light wounds but managed to escape, said one of the two attackers approached them with what looked like a long bread knife and carefully removed her Star of David necklace before stabbing her where it had hung. Police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld said authorities were treating the attack as political in nature, while not ruling out that it could have been criminal. Police said there were no signs that the wounded women had been sexually assaulted or robbed. Rosenfeld identified the slain woman as Christine Logan, a 40-year-old American tourist. Her hometown was not released. Logan’s friend, Kaye Susan Wilson, reported Logan missing on Saturday after the two were attacked in a forest near the Jewish farming community of Mata, some 12 miles southwest of Jerusalem.

Sergei Grits The Associated Press

Post-election violence rocks Belarusian capital Anti-government protesters clash with riot police By Michael Schwirtz New York Times News Service

MINSK, Belarus — Anti-government protesters were beaten back by swarms of riot police Sunday when they tried to storm the Belarus government headquarters here in an outburst of anger and frustration over the apparent re-election of the country’s authoritarian president, Alexander Lukashenko. Thousands of people converged on Independence Square, heeding

the call of opposition leaders who called Sunday’s election a farce and accused Lukashenko of keeping the country locked in dictatorship. In 16 years as president, he has muzzled the news media, eliminated political opponents and emboldened the secret police. Exit polls showed Lukashenko with 70 to 80 percent of the votes cast. At one point, protesters charged the entrance of the government headquarters, breaking through

glass doors and trying to push through barricades that had been erected inside. But armored riot troops quickly overwhelmed them, at times funneling them toward packs of plainclothes toughs who beat them. Earlier in the evening, one of the leading opposition candidates appeared to have been beaten unconscious in a separate attack. By late Sunday evening, police officers wielding shields and clubs occupied large swaths of downtown Minsk, and protesters had begun to disperse.

Haitians worry as U.S. plans to resume deportations By Kirk Semple New York Times News Service

The Obama administration has been quietly moving to resume deportations of Haitians for the first time since the earthquake last January. In New York’s Haitian diaspora, the reaction has been far from muted, including frustration and fear among immigrants and anger from their advocates, who say that an influx of deportees will

only add to the country’s woes. “I don’t think Haiti can handle more challenges than what it has right now,” said Mathieu Eugene, a Haitian-American member of the New York City Council. “The earthquake, the cholera, the election — everything’s upside down in Haiti.” Federal officials suspended deportations to Haiti immediately after the Jan. 12 earthquake. In addition, a special immigration

status was extended to Haitians in the U.S., allowing them to remain temporarily and work. Many Haitians, including some with criminal convictions, were released from detention centers across the country. But in recent weeks, Immigration and Customs Enforcement has begun rounding up Haitian immigrants again, including some who had been released earlier this year, immigration law-

yers said. On Dec. 10, the agency disclosed, in response to questions from The Associated Press, that it would resume deportations by mid-January. Immigration officials said they would deport only Haitians who had been convicted of crimes and had finished serving their sentences, but Eugene and other Haitian community leaders said Haitians were bracing for a resumption of wider deportations.

W   B Somalian militia loses ground to rival

homes were scorched, 32 of them destroyed.

MOGADISHU, Somalia — An Islamist militia abandoned several key positions in and outside this capital late Sunday, the latest indication that it has proven the weaker in its rivalry with al-Shabab, the radical militant group that now controls much of Somalia. Fighters loyal to the militia, Hizbul Islam, controlled large swaths of territory in southern and central Somalia, including in Mogadishu, but were steadily losing ground to al-Shabab. Both groups were united in the fight against the weak transitional government and the forces of the African Union Mission, but had a different political agenda and leadership.

Gas prices soar after subsidy cuts in Iran

28 killed in Mexican oil pipeline blast SAN MARTIN TEXMELUCAN, Mexico — A massive oil pipeline explosion lay waste to parts of a central Mexican city Sunday, incinerating people, cars, houses and trees as gushing crude turned streets into flaming rivers. At least 28 people were killed, 13 of them children, in a disaster authorities blamed on oil thieves. Officials had identified all but four of the dead by Sunday night. Although they released some names, they didn’t say if they were all residents of San Martin Texmelucan or possible suspects. At least 52 people were hurt, and 84 remained in a shelter late Sunday after fleeing San Martin, about 55 miles east of Mexico City. More than 115

TEHRAN, Iran — Gasoline prices nearly quadrupled on Sunday and riot police guarded filling stations around the capital as deep cuts in subsidies on fuel and other essential goods took effect. After midnight Sunday, the price of subsidized gasoline jumped to about $1.44 a gallon from about 38 cents. Similar increases went into effect for natural gas and diesel fuel, with subsidy reductions for other commodities expected to be phased in gradually. President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad announced the longanticipated cuts in a live TV interview on Saturday night, calling the reform “a great victory for Iran.”

Palestinian leader lunches with Israelis RAMALLAH, West Bank — Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas hosted a rare twohour meeting with about 60 Israeli politicians, public figures and activists at his headquarters on Sunday, in an effort to reach out to the Israeli public at a time when the official peace process is at a standstill. The unusual gathering originated with an invitation from the Palestinian side and was organized by the Geneva Initiative, a group of Israeli and Palestinian figures who negotiated an unofficial blueprint for a permanent peace accord in 2003. — From wire reports

A firefighter carries a puppy to safety after an oil pipeline explosion in San Martin Texmelucan, Mexico, on Sunday. Rodolfo Perez The Associated Press


L

Inside

OREGON Biologist gives insight into state’s wolves, see Page B3.

B

Portland may be backdrop for new TV drama, see Page B6.

OBITUARIES Tommaso Padoa Schioppa, 70, architect of the euro, see Page B5. www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2010

Area program gives hope to weary job seekers Hexavalent Counselors help pair unemployed with companies for on-the-job training chromium in Bend tap within EPA standard By Megan Kehoe The Bulletin

After being out of work for two years, Kerry Knouse, 50, says he’s not optimistic about his future in the job market. But now, with the help of a new job program through the Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council, he says he’s beginning to

feel a spark of hope. “My hope is that this program will help open some doors for me,” said Knouse, of Bend. “It’s tough to stay positive in these times, but I’m doing my best.” Knouse, who was laid off from his job in construction two years ago, is one of the first workers seeking a job

through the Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council’s On-the-Job Training Program. The program was just recently given a grant of $115,000 through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, and helps pair job seekers with employers for job training that leads to a permanent position. COIC partially reimburses employers

for the training hours, and employers are free to hire who they choose. “Our goal is to help people who have had prolonged unemployment, and to help them overcome the barriers that are preventing them from finding employers,” said COIC employment counselor Leslie Mitts. “We try to identify what skills a worker is lacking and identify those so they can be trained.” See Training / B2

SETTING UP FOR A FESTIVE PHOTO

Study of city’s water shows levels of possible carcinogen are well below agency’s mark, but above California’s proposed goal By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

A test of tap water in 35 cities across the U.S. has found the possible carcinogen hexavalent chromium in 31 of those cities — including Bend. The amount of the chemical found in Bend is significantly below the Environmental Protection Agency’s standard for total chromium in drinking water, but also exceeds a proposed goal for the state of California’s drinking water. The study found concentrations of hexavalent chromium of 0.78 parts per billion in Bend’s tap water, which is below the EPA’s standard of 100 parts per billion of hexavalent chromium and another form of the chemical. “The good news in all of this is it’s still below the one standard we have,” said Harold Rogers, EPA’s coordinator for the drinking water program in Oregon.

‘Need to be concerned’

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Photographer Kyle Stott, 30, of Redmond, from left, snaps a photo of Brianna Intlekofer, 9, while she sits on Santa’s lap with her brother Braeden Intlekofer, 6, both of Bend, at Santa Land at the Old Mill District in Bend on Sunday afternoon.

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Candy canes holiday wishes Santa Claus hears kids’ gift lists during visit to Old Mill in Bend By Lauren Dake • The Bulletin

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he man in the red suit with the white, curly beard wasn’t the real Santa Claus and Jackson Intlekofer, 9, knew it.

“I’m not allowed to say it’s not Santa,” Jackson said. The Santa Claus handing out candy canes in Bend’s Old Mill District was Jackson’s dad. The fourth-grader figured his dad was helping out the real gift giver this season. “I assume the real Santa Claus is at the North Pole,” Jackson said. Children lined up to sit on Santa’s lap Sunday afternoon. Some of them ran screaming with open arms toward Santa. Neal Thompson, 3, couldn’t wait to tell Santa about the monster trucks he was hoping to get this year. Other children came prepared with a list. From Spiderman venom to new plates, Gabriel Burns, 4, had a variety of requests on his handwritten note. Chris Intlekofer said the requests this year have ranged from Barbie dolls to Batman toys. One child asked for a horse and another for a University of Oregon Ducks football uniform. One just wanted to know where Santa’s reindeer were waiting for him while he was visiting the Old Mill. In his first couple of hours dressed as Santa, Intlekofer quickly found that, in general, the children under 3 take one look at him and start screaming. The older children are usually more prepared. Owen Johnson, 9, of La Pine, is hoping to find a 1-carat diamond under his tree this year. See Santa / B2

Well, sh ot! wants your ideas.

Santa holds his trusty jingle bells in his gloved hand while waiting for more children to sit on his lap and tell him what they want for Christmas.

But an author of the study from the Environmental Working Group, a nonprofit based in Washington, D.C., said that the results should encourage federal and state agencies to set standards for the chemical. “We certainly need to be concerned about this contaminant in a much broader region of the U.S.,” said Rebecca Sutton, senior scientist with the Environmental Working Group, a nonprofit based in Washington, D.C. Hexavalent chromium is a heavy metal that can get into water supplies either through the surrounding geology or from industrial sources, like plating operations or wood preservation industries, according to a fact sheet from the California Environmental Protection Agency. A National Toxicology Program study using rodents has led to concerns that hexavalent chromium in drinking water can lead to cancer, according to the state. See Chromium / B2

CENTRAL OREGON WEATHER

Week’s forecast shows no sign of less snow, cold By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

It looks likely this week will be another white one for Central Oregonians. “There is a chance for precipitation virtually every day,” said Doug Weber, a meteorologist with the U.S. Weather Service in Pendleton. Today’s temperature could reach 38 degrees but will drop overnight to the low 20s. Snow showers are likely to last into the evening and overnight, according to Weber. More snow is expected Tuesday, with a 30 percent chance of flurries throughout the day and night. Wednesday could bring more of a snow-rain mix during the day, but will probably turn into snow showers overnight. The temperatures are expected to remain in the mid- to high 30s during the day, dropping to the low to mid-20s overnight. “What’s happening on Thursday is you have a 40 percent chance of rain-snow in the morning, and a 40 percent chance of snow into the evening and overnight,” Weber said. The temperatures for Thursday are expected to be in the same range as earlier in the week. On Friday, the high could reach 40 degrees. But more snow and precipitation are expected throughout the day. “The models don’t indicate a break in the system,” Weber said. “System after system keeps coming down.” Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

Well, shoot!, The Bulletin’s popular weekly picture-taking advice feature and showcase for some of Central Oregon’s best amateur photographers, is seeking ideas for its next series. If you have an idea or suggestion, please e-mail azeigert@bendbulletin.com.


B2 Monday, December 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Santa

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Continued from B1 “I’m really into rocks,” he said. “I would add it to my rocks and gems collection.” He wasn’t sure if Santa’s elves would make him a diamond or go out looking for one. If it was the latter, he had some advice. “The elves have to look in caves,” he said. Liam Ronan, also 9, was impressed his baby sister didn’t cry when she saw Santa. The first time he met Santa, he cried, he said. But now, the two are like old friends. “He really hasn’t changed that much,” Liam said of Santa, whom he saw last year as well. Santa will be appearing every day leading up to Christmas Eve at the Santa Land building between Allyson’s Kitchen and Greg’s Grill in the Old Mill District. It’s free for children to sit on Santa’s lap. A professional photographer is on-site, and photos are available for purchase.

CIVIL SUITS Cases involving less than $50,000 are subject to mandatory arbitration.

Chromium Continued from B1 And a study of people in China who were exposed to high levels of the chemical showed an increased rate of stomach cancer. Because of this, California in 2009 drafted a proposed public health goal that would set 0.06 parts per billion as the level where hexavalent chromium does not pose a significant risk, meaning people could have a one-in-a-million risk of developing cancer from drinking water contaminated with that level. The public health goal is not designed to be the boundary between safe and harmful levels, according to the state’s fact sheet. And it’s not a standard, but something that policymakers can use to set standards. The Environmental Working Group’s study found that tap water in 25 cities exceeded California’s proposed public health goal of 0.06 parts per billion of hexavalent chromium. In Bend, a single tap water sample had 0.78 parts per billion of hexavalent chromium, according to the report. The highest amount tested was in Norman, Okla., where the hexavalent chromium concentration was 12.9 parts per billion. “These were just single samples. We wanted to broadly test a wide region of the U.S.,” Sutton said. “It’s kind of a snapshot — what’s our water like today.”

10CV1283SF: Gabriel Gotarez v. G & C La Pine LLC dba the Car Wash and Christopher S. Roberts, complaint, $108,000

TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Dec. 20, 1860, South Carolina became the first state to secede from the Union as all 169 delegates to a special convention in Charleston voted in favor of separation. ON THIS DATE In 1790, the first successful cotton mill in the United States began operating at Pawtucket, R.I. In 1803, the Louisiana Purchase was completed as ownership of the territory was formally transferred from France to the United States. In 1864, Confederate forces evacuated Savannah, Ga., as Union Gen. William T. Sherman continued his “March to the Sea.” In 1945, the Office of Price Administration announced the end of tire rationing, effective Jan. 1, 1946. In 1963, the Berlin Wall was opened for the first time to West Berliners, who were allowed one-day visits to relatives in the Eastern sector for the holidays. In 1976, Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley died at age 74. In 1978, former White House chief of staff H.R. Haldeman was released from prison after serving 18 months for his role in the Watergate cover-up. In 1987, more than 4,300 people were killed when the Dona

10CV1295ST: Kathleen St. Clair, trustee of the Norman and Kathleen St. Clair Trust, v. Michael A. and Kenneth B. Clarke, complaint, $160,000

Filed Dec. 10

Families wait in line for their children to get a photo taken with Santa, while another family, at right, reviews the image just taken of their child at Santa Land in Bend’s Old Mill District on Sunday afternoon.

Hexavalent chromium Hexavalent chromium is a heavy metal, and has been shown in studies to cause cancer in laboratory animals. Another study of people exposed to high levels of the hexavalent chromium showed they had an increased rate of stomach cancer, according to the state of California. The chemical can contaminate drinking water through both natural deposits in rocks and industrial sources such as chrome plating, said Harold Rogers with the Environmental Protection Agency. Although both groundwater and surface water could be contaminated with the chemical, it is probably more likely to be in groundwater, he said, closer to the deposits. Ways to treat drinking water to get rid of hexavalent chromium include certain filtration treatments, ion exchange and reverse osmosis, Rogers said. However, Steve Prazak, laboratory manager at Bend’s water quality laboratory, noted that the amount of hexavalent chromium found is well within the federal EPA standards. “We are following EPA rules,” Prazak said. “And if EPA sets guidance levels (for hexavalent chromium), then you know for certain the city of Bend is going to jump all over it. We are going to follow.” EPA sets the limit for total chromium — which includes both the harmful hexavalent version as well as trivalent chromium, an essential nutrient — at 100 parts per billion. State records show that Bend’s regular water testing has not detected any chromium in the water since 2004, when the level of the two types of chromium was about 1.4 parts per billion. In 23 years, the city has detected total chromium 12 times, Prazak said, each time between

U.S. sends troops to oust Noriega in 1989 Today is Monday, Dec. 20, the 354th day of 2010. There are 11 days left in the year.

10CV1291MA: The American Insurance Co. v. Severson Fire Protection Inc., complaint, $445,859 Filed Dec. 14

Filed Dec. 9

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y

The Associated Press

Filed Dec. 13

Filed Aug. 2

10CV1262ST: GMAC Inc. v. Sydney F. and Richard N. Brogdon, complaint, $16,295.26

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

complaint, $38,244 10CV1288ST: Michael Walker v. Transnation Title Insurance Co., complaint, $30,864

20 times and 100 times below the federal limit. Prazak also noted that if tap water is not sampled correctly, the results could be skewed from airborne chromium or other factors. “There’s a lot of variables here that would be interesting to look at,” he said. Rogers, with the EPA, said he had questions about the sampling and testing procedure as well. “There’s a lot of questions when somebody goes out and takes a tap sample themselves,” he said, such as the protocols from the laboratory or the plumbing in the location where the water was collected. The EPA has not set any drinking water standards for hexavalent chromium alone, he said, so he couldn’t say whether a level of 0.78 parts per billion is of concern. Marcia Bailey, a toxicologist

with the EPA’s regional office in Seattle, said that the amount of hexavalent chromium found in Bend is not that high. The EPA does look at hexavalent chromium levels in Superfund sites, and that level wouldn’t trigger the agency to make a company clean up the chemical. “It’s not huge,” she said. “If it were a manufacturing facility ... we would not be alarmed by this number.” Sutton, with the Environmental Working Group, said that it’s a personal choice for people whether they should be concerned about the presence of hexavalent chromium in drinking water. If people are worried, she said, they could install a reverse-osmosis water filter that is certified to remove the chemical. Sutton said that with the broad occurrence of hexavalent chromium in drinking water, the group would like to see more sensitive testing specifically for hexavalent chromium. California should move forward with approving a final public health goal for hexavalent chromium, and then set a safety standard for the chemical in drinking water, she said, adding that the federal EPA should set standards as well. “We really want to see regulations that protect our health, and safety standards that guarantee clean drinking water,” she said. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or at kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actress Audrey Totter is 93. Comedian Charlie Callas is 83. Actor John Hillerman is 78. Actress Kathryn Joosten is 71. Rock musician-music producer Bobby Colomby is 66. Psychic/illusionist Uri Geller is 64. Producer Dick Wolf (“Law & Order”) is 64. Rock musician Alan Parsons is 62. Actor Michael Badalucco is 56. Actor Joel Gretsch is 47. Singer David Cook (“American Idol”) is 28. Actor Jonah Hill is 27. Singer JoJo is 20. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “We are all citizens of history.” — Clifton Fadiman, American author, editor and radio personality (1904-1999)

10CV1297MA: West Bend Property Co. LLC v. Kirby Nagelhout Construction Co., complaint, $141,543.95

Training

will provide him with training and a full-time job, Knouse says he has a backup plan in case things don’t pan out. He has considered opening an organic herb farm if he is unable to find work. Or, if the job drought continues, Knouse says he will leave Central Oregon and move closer to a big city, where he hopes there will be more opportunities. COIC employment counselor Kathy Sharpe-McCord said that since COIC learned of the new funds, it has sent 120 notices out to job seekers who would qualify for the program. Sharpe-McCord says now the priority is getting employers on board with the training program. “We’re looking for employers in industries that have growth and the opportunity for permanent employment,” said Sharpe-McCord. “We want the employees to have stability in their job.” COIC will accept a variety of employers into the On-the-Job Training Program, though due to grant specifications, public entities and casinos cannot participate. Businesses that do qualify must be offering a full-time, permanent position that requires more training than an orientation session. COIC has until June of 2012 to use the grant. However, Sharpe-McCord said that she hopes the money will be used up long before the deadline. “We’d love to have a few workers placed by the beginning of this year,” said Sharpe-McCord. “We’d rather use the funds now, and have people placed in jobs sooner rather than later.”

Continued from B1 According to Mitts, the program is specifically geared toward job seekers who have difficulties getting hired because of being out of work for a prolonged period of time or because of other circumstances, such as having a criminal record. She hopes that by having a training system in place for these workers, they will gain the skills they need for the job market, along with a secure job provided by the employer. “It’s upsetting for a lot of these people to be out of work so long ” said Mitts. “We’re hoping to give participants a sense of hope, and a leg up on the competition out there.” Knouse, who signed up for the program through his employment counselor, says he hopes that it will help him find a secure position in a more stable field. Originally from Kansas, Knouse grew up in Portland, and has worked in construction for most of his life. After losing his job in Seaside, Knouse moved to Central Oregon for lower rent rates, and has been working to attain a degree in computer information systems at Central Oregon Community College. However, Knouse had to quit pursuing the degree after his tuition assistance program funds ran out, and he could not renew them because he was laid off prior to April 2009. Now, Knouse is returning to the job hunt, and says he is willing to work in a variety of fields — just so long as he has a chance at a permanent job opportunity. “I’d really like to find an employer who pays me a living wage and can employ me for the long run,” said Knouse. “But it’s hard, because of my age, and because I’m having to look for work in a completely different field than what I’ve had experience in.” Though he hopes the program

Megan Kehoe can be reached at 541-383-0354 or at mkehoe@bendbulletin.com.

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Paz, a Philippine passenger ship, collided with the tanker Vector off Mindoro island. In 1989, the United States launched Operation Just Cause, sending troops into Panama to topple the government of Gen. Manuel Noriega. In 1999, the Vermont Supreme Court ruled that homosexual couples were entitled to the same benefits and protections as wedded couples of the opposite sex. TEN YEARS AGO President-elect George W. Bush named businessman Paul O’Neill to be his Treasury Secretary; Ann Veneman to be the first female Secretary of Agriculture; Mel Martinez to be Secretary of Housing and Urban Development; and Don Evans, Secretary of Commerce.

Filed Dec. 15

10CV1284MA: HCA Equipment Finance LLC v. Mountain States Trucking LLC and David A. Farmer,

D E C E M B E R

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Surface Water Improvement project information

donations at any time. Customers who need help paying their water bills and meet the qualifications can apply for the funds.

the winter. It also provides valuable information in identifying neighbors who may need assistance in the event of a disaster.

Like many cities across the country, Bend is faced with a range of increasing costs related to the water supply. Under pressure from new federal regulatory requirements and an aging infrastructure, the City must now cover the expense of new surface water treatment and transmission line replacement.

City water customers could be eligible for up to $150 credit on their utility bills. Although the City currently has an assistance program to help with sewer and stormwater charges, it’s only available to low income senior and/or disabled persons. This new program includes the same income limits but does not include the senior or disabled qualification and provides assistance for water customers.

The program is organized by the City’s Neighborhood Associations and the Bend Beautification Program. For more information,find and contact your Neighborhood Association at www.bendneighborhoods.com, email the Bend Beautification Program at howard@ bendcable.com, or call 541-388-5579.

As a resource, water has always been undervalued. Nowhere in the world is safe drinking water more available at an extremely low cost than in the United States. Bend is no different, and residents expect that when they turn on the tap, do their laundry, wash their cars, run their sprinklers or fight a fire, that a steady stream of clean water will be waiting for them. Take the time to learn more. Visit www.ci.bend.or.us/ surfacewater.

Water bill assistance program The City of Bend is still accepting donations for its water utility bill assistance program. Customers can request to be billed a one time donation or a recurring monthly amount on their regular utility statements. They can also make changes or discontinue the

To make a donation or to find out more about the program, call 541-388-5515.

Help a neighbor this winter For nine years now, neighbors have been helping neighbors during harsh winter conditions. The Good Samaritan Assistance Program is a way to get involved or get help if you need it. Volunteers can “adopt” a neighbor and assist them in keeping their driveways and sidewalks free of snow or maybe pick up a couple of needed items from the market. It’s not a major commitment. A few minutes of a volunteer’s time shoveling a walkway goes a long way in helping an elderly neighbor stay safe through

Get involved in your neighborhood The Orchard District Neighborhood Association will hold its annual general membership meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 18. The meeting will take place at the Hollinshead Barn from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Directions to the barn are available on the Bend Park and Recreation District website at www.bendparksandrec.org.

City Council The Bend City Council meets the first and third Wednesdays of each month. For upcoming meeting dates, agendas and more information, visit www. ci.bend.or.us.

For more information, go to www.ci.bend.or.us • City Hall 541-388-5505


THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 20, 2010 B3

O Biologist sheds light on wolf behavior, habits Little reason to fear legendary predator, state expert tells OHA By Dick Mason The (La Grande) Observer

LA GRANDE — Wolves are not bloodless killers, but they can appear to be. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife biologist Russ Morgan explained why and much more during a recent presentation about wolves at a meeting of the Union/Wallowa county chapter of the Oregon Hunters Association. Morgan, the ODFW’s wolf program coordinator, pointed out that wolf kills can appear perplexing because often they barely have a scratch. The reason is wolves kill with multiple bites that often do not break an animal’s skin. The bites trigger massive internal bleeding. “Multiple-bite trauma causes hemorrhaging (internal bleeding) and bruising,” Morgan said. The hemorrhaging and bruising are apparent when the animal is cut open. This is why when animals suspected of being killed by wolves are examined it is important to conduct an internal exam similar to an autopsy, Morgan said. Such exams help confirm that a wolf killed the animal. The walking stride of wolves also deceives. The back feet of wolves often step right into the tracks of their front feet. The gait makes their tracks appear they are those of a two-legged animal, Morgan said. The biologist said he knows of no dogs that walk in such a manner. The Observer reported that wolves began arriving in Northeast Oregon from Idaho in 1999. Presently, there are between 22 and 30 wolves in Northeast Oregon, 16 in an Imnaha area pack, six in a Wenaha area pack, at least two between La Grande and Baker City, and several north of the Wenaha area.

Wolf tracks The low total number of wolves means the odds of seeing one in Northeast Oregon are remote, but the likelihood of spotting evidence of the legendary predator is better. “Your chances of spotting wolf tracks are 90 percent greater than seeing wolves,” Morgan said. Many people report they confuse wolf tracks with coyote tracks. This should not be

a problem since wolf tracks are twice the size of a coyote’s, Morgan said. The Imnaha pack is being monitored by ODFW biologists with the aid of radio collars attached to three of its members. The importance of radio collars should not be underestimated, Morgan said. “No matter what you think of wolves, these radio collars are valuable,” Morgan said. “Without them, we would not know nearly as much.” Everyone, including people who object to the presence of wolves, should embrace the collars because they help biologists determine what wolves are killing and if conservation goals are being met, Morgan said. “One goal of the ODFW is to delist wolves (from the state endangered species protected list),” Morgan said. Maintaining radio collars on wolves is difficult because the animals are exceptionally hard on them. Wolves chew collars and damage them in the process of killing prey, Morgan said.

‘Red Riding Hood syndrome’ Wolves first entered Oregon from Idaho in 1999. Since then they have killed livestock and will continue to do so, Morgan said. The ODFW has received no reports of wolves attacking people since then, and Morgan believes it is extremely unlikely it ever will. Morgan said that over the past 100 years, there have been only two documented human deaths from wolf attacks in North America. “You can’t say this about almost any other large animal, including deer, bears and cougars,” Morgan said. “We have to get over the Red Riding Hood syndrome.” Morgan emphasized that while the incidence of attacks by healthy wolves is extremely low, this does not mean that there could not be one. The biologist was asked last week if people should be concerned when they encounter a wolf barking at them. The answer is no. “Repetitive wolf barking is a territorial behavior. There is no evidence that barking or howling is a threatening behavior,” Morgan said. Determining if a wolf is preparing to attack a person is difficult if not impossible. “There is no way to tell if wolves are aggressive because conflict with humans is so rare,” Morgan said.

FOCUS ON COMMUNITY

O  B Probable outbreak among raccoons TILLAMOOK — State wildlife officials are investigating a probable outbreak of canine distemper among raccoons along the north coast from Seaside to Astoria. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife said there have been numerous complaints in recent weeks about sick and injured raccoons. Canine distemper is a contagious viral disease that infects raccoons, coyotes, skunks and unvaccinated dogs. It does not affect humans. KATU-TV reported commercial wildlife control operators have disposed of 10 sick raccoons so far. Officials say to keep your distance from an animal that may be affected. Scobel Wiggins / Corvallis Gazette-Times

Oregon State University students make 400 jars of jelly last week to donate to the OSU Emergency Food Pantry in Corvallis. From left are Arthi Padamanabhan, Melissa Sales, Emily Del Bel, Laura Mealy and Sam Ellison.

OSU science club cooks up donations for pantry Students donate batch of jelly to help stocks shelves for campus food bank By Raju Woodward The (Corvallis) Gazette-Times

CORVALLIS — Members of Oregon State University’s Food and Fermentation Science Club know how to have fun — they regularly participate in beerbrewing, cheese-making and bread-baking events. Last week, 17 members met in the pilot plant at Wiegand Hall to work on another yummy project, this time for charity. They made red raspberry and dark sweet cherry jellies that will be donated to the OSU Emergency Food Pantry, which works with the Oregon Food Bank. Club Vice President Melissa Sales, a senior in food science, said the club is trying to become more involved in the community. Last month, it held a food drive that collected about six boxes worth of donated food. But last week’s jelly-making session was the first time club members combined their interests and expertise to make food for charity. Besides the fact that it is relatively easy and inexpensive to make, Sales said there was an-

“We really want to incorporate community service into the club. We all know how to (do) this stuff and are interested in it. So why not help those in need?” — Emily Del Bel, president of OSU Food and Fermentation Science Club

other reason club officers decided to make jelly for the OSU Emergency Food Pantry. “I’ve volunteered with the food pantry on campus before,” Sales said. “Jelly always seemed to be something it ran short of every time.” Kerr Concentrates of Salem donated a gallon each of red raspberry and dark sweet cherry fruit juice to the club, and Campanga of Lebanon donated hundreds of 8-ounce jars.

Rural schools getting a boost from charter status

Jeff Clawson, who manages the pilot plant and helps the students with their projects, said enough fruit juice was donated to make about 200 pounds of jelly — enough to fill about 400 jars. “This is some great-smelling jelly,” Clawson said, as he sniffed the air at the plant. “The people that receive this jelly are going to love it.” Marlin Mueller III, a senior in food science, was participating in his second project with the Food and Fermentation Science Club. He recently switched his major from engineering and said he’s enjoying applying science in new ways. “One of the benefits of this club is that the science that is used is very applicable to everyday life,” Mueller said. “Sometimes it was hard to make those kinds of connections when I was an engineering major.” Club President Emily Del Bel, a junior in food science and technology, said if last week’s effort is a success, the club will try to hold similar events more often. “We really want to incorporate community service into the club,” Del Bel said. “We all know how to (do) this stuff and are interested in it. So why not help those in need?”

Deputies remain unnamed in shooting MEDFORD — Sheriffs’ deputies who shot a man in an illegal marijuana grow operation in the Salt Creek area in August will continue to remain unnamed. The Jackson County Sheriff’s Department, along with Oregon State Police and the Oregon Attorney General’s Office, told the Medford Mail Tribune that the deputies are still in danger. More than four months after the shooting of a 20-year-old Mexican national, the suspects remain at large. The shooting was found to be justified. Itali Arellano-Vargas was killed.

Crash on Interstate 5 kills pedestrian PORTLAND — Oregon state troopers are investigating a crash on Interstate 5 in Wilsonville that killed a pedestrian. Trooper Naymon Frank says 26-year-old Julio Sezar Valentin, of Gervais, was killed early Sunday after he was hit by a commercial truck. Frank said the truck’s driver, 57-year-old Blaise G. Anderson, of Farmington, Wash., was unable to avoid Valentin, who was walking with his back to traffic in the darkness. — From wire reports

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By Kimberly Melton The Oregonian

ELKTON — “White Christmas” blasts from a boombox in the corner of Elkton’s high school cafeteria as teenagers wearing Santa hats fill plates with turkey, dressing, mashed potatoes and gravy. After having their fill, parents and board members watch in amusement as students and staff descend on a table of gifts, tearing off bows and digging through gift bags to find puzzle books, flashlights, hoof picks, bath soaps, and overflowing tins of cookies and chocolates. For at least 30 years, the people of Elkton have kicked off winter break with a Christmas community lunch and gift exchange. But it’s a tradition that two years ago many feared would be lost. When newly hired superintendent Mike Hughes arrived in this town overlooking the Umpqua River in 2008, Elkton School District was dying. With dwindling enrollment and a state funding crisis, Hughes told community members the 130-student K-12 school — split between two buildings — would likely have to close its doors within two to three years. Now, nearly three years later, Elkton has new computers, new

curriculum and materials, and nearly 80 new students. What changed? Elkton became a charter school. Elkton School District is one of a growing number of rural and remote school districts in Oregon that is using the charter school law to survive. Throughout the Portland metropolitan area, school districts have cut school days, eliminated teaching positions and programs to cope with declines in state revenue and federal support. In rural areas, though, a similar decline in revenue can completely wipe out a district’s transportation staff, counselor, and math and science teachers. Oregon’s charter school law, intended to be an avenue of innovation, prevents districts from turning all their schools into charters. But if the district has only one K-12 school, state law provides an exception. And with the charter school designation comes access to $500,000 federal grants and fewer state requirements. It’s a little-used clause in the charter school law, but becoming more common. The number of Oregon districts making the switch has more than doubled to 12 since 2008. Three single-school dis-

tricts have alerted the Oregon Department of Education they intend to apply for 2011 federal charter school grants. “The problem is the lack of revenue,” said Mark Jeffrey, who led the state’s first single-school district charter conversion in Paisley in 2003. “Even in a good economy, remote districts struggle.”

Oregon Board of Education member Nikki Squire said she’s not surprised to see rural districts doing whatever they can to survive. But as the Education Department looks to be more efficient, she said, board members and other state leaders will have to consider district consolidations.

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B4 Monday, December 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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EPA should heed biomass letter

T

he federal Environmental Protection Agency may not, in fact, be out to kill the nation’s burgeoning biomass fuel industry, but that’s not apparent in some of the agency’s

recent actions. Earlier this year, it proposed clean air rules that would have killed the market for wood pellets and bricks like those that will be manufactured in John Day. While the EPA says it understands the value of biomass, it is close to implementing a rule that treats the stuff as a nonrenewable resource, putting it on a par with fossil fuels. Biofuels apparently are a conundrum to the agency charged with protecting the nation’s environment. They do emit greenhouse gases as they’re burned to generate electricity. Unlike coal and gas, however, the gases they emit would be released anyway as they decomposed. In that respect, they’re a far cleaner proposition than oil, coal and other fossil fuels. Now, as the EPA prepares to issue rules governing greenhouse gas emissions, it has yet to make an exception for biofuels. That’s got most of Oregon’s delegation to the U.S. House of Representatives (all but Portland’s Earl Blumenauer) in a tizzy. They’re among the 32 members of the House who recently wrote the agency and asked it to propose rules recognizing the value of biomass, even as it announces a so-called “tailoring rule” next month. In fact, Reps. Greg Walden, R-Hood River, and Peter DeFazio, DSpringfield, are leading the charge to have the agency act immediately on biomass.

Biomass offers great promise on several fronts, but it won’t be able to deliver if the industry never advances beyond its infancy. What they’re asking is far from unreasonable. As they note in their letter, EPA has said it recognizes the role of biomass fuels in reducing harmful emissions. Further, they note, the agency has apparently committed to writing supplemental rules regarding biomass. If it fails to do so before the tailoring rule is put in place Jan. 11, they fear that investment in biomass will dry up, jeopardizing the future of a fuel source that promises not only renewable energy but a market for woody debris that creates fire hazards on the nation’s public lands. Moreover, the jobs biomass plants would create are likely to be in rural areas where they’re badly needed. EPA should take the letter from Congress to heart. Biomass offers great promise on several fronts, but it won’t be able to deliver if the industry never advances beyond its infancy. The agency’s recognition that woody biofuel and coal are far different things is critical to the industry’s growth.

Plastic bag ban just won’t die I

t should surprise no one that grocers support a proposal to ban single-use plastic bags that’s sure to be before the Oregon Legislature. But why in the world are legislators, inundated as they are by real problems, wasting political capital on a complete non-problem? Sen. Mark Hass, D-Beaverton, and Sen. Jason Atkinson, R-Central Point, were unable to push a similar measure through the special legislative session held earlier this year. Not deterred, they’re prepared to try again. This time the statewide ban will be accompanied by a 5-cent charge for every paper bag a grocer uses. Grocers will simply pocket the 5-cent tax, which no doubt explains why they’re not opposed to the scheme. As for the environmental goodness of all this, Hass and Atkinson are right about plastic’s problems. The bags’ light weight makes them prone to flying away from landfills and elsewhere. And, though they’re

not easily recyclable, they often find their way into recycling sorting machines, which jam as a result. Jamming, in turn, sends more recyclables into the neighborhood landfill. Paper has problems of its own, of course, though they’re apparently of little concern to Hass and Atkinson. It takes more water to make paper bags for one thing, and doing so creates “significantly larger greenhouse emissions,” according to Green Cities California, which studied the matter. Meanwhile, Oregonians might wonder if flyaway bags are the worst thing this state faces, given how much attention they’re getting from Hass and Atkinson. They might expect — we know we do — their lawmakers to devote their time first and foremost to the state’s budget and the need to trim $3.5 billion to balance the darned thing. That gap and the need to close it are far more important than a feel-good ban on plastic.

My Nickel’s Worth Payroll tax cut On Dec. 10, Sen. Sanders, I-Vt., spoke 8½ hours against Obama’s tax cut extension plan that adds $900 billion to the current deficit. A Bulletin article on Dec. 11 outlines some of the proposed legislation in detail, but fails to define the “one-year cut in payroll taxes.” This is not a cut in the federal income tax payroll withholding, but a 2 percent tax cut in your FICA (Social Security) deduction. Reducing the rate from 6.2 percent to 4.2 percent is estimated to remove more than $120 billion from Social Security funding in one year and will neither increase nor decrease the debt. Funded by employee/employer payroll tax of equal percentages up to $106,800 of individual payroll income, this tax has successfully funded Social Security for 75 years. Congress has “borrowed” billions from the trust fund and never repaid a dime. What this one-year tax holiday produces is a poison pill for Social Security, moving the program from worker-funded independence to dependence upon general fund revenue. Social Security is an insurance program providing retirement, disability and survivor’s benefits. It is not welfare. In placing it at the mercy of Congress to compete for general funds, it becomes a welfare program. The Re-

publican Congress in one year, calling it a tax hike, will refuse reinstatement. Privatize Social Security? Trust Wall Street? Private 401(k)s have been hammered twice since 2000. Harriett Heisey Bend

Generous residents First, let me say wow, and then thank you! Thank you to Bulletin reporter Leon Pantenburg for telling the SCOOTR story with such compassion and insight. Thank you to Bulletin staff for putting that story front and center for the community to see. And thank you to the wonderful community of Central Oregon for its extreme generosity! The donations we have received allowed our organization to go from stressing over how we were going to provide the help we have always strived to give to the needy children in our community, to being able to shop for and give to all the kids on our list! After 31 years in this community, I know how blessed I am to live in this wonderful place, and that fact was reinforced a hundredfold this past week! My phone number was the contact number listed, and I am glad I was able to talk briefly with all the giving, compassionate, folks that helped SCOOTR

this year with its mission to make Christmas for the needy kids in the south county area. I am overwhelmed and humbled and completely sincere when I say we would not have been able to do it without your help! Thank you, and I know you will have a Merry Christmas because it is already in your heart! Ann Gawith secretary, SCOOTR, Inc.

Stoned in Bend I am so glad to see five medical marijuana “clubs” opening up here in Bend. Central Oregon is indeed an underserved area when it comes to helping people with marijuana needs. With double-digit unemployment in the area, we have a lot of anxiety and need a place for people to go while they are waiting for the job market to improve. According to some recent articles, these “clubs” will have on-site medical staff to provide you a card if you don’t have one. Since they won’t be selling the substance, your membership and donations should be tax-deductible. Who needs Proposition 74? When the job market does recover and you are asked what you have been doing, you can tell the prospective employer, “I’ve been stoned.” Tom Hall Sunriver

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

With tax deal, President Obama’s comeback is well under way WASHINGTON — f Barack Obama wins re-election in 2012, as is now more likely than not, historians will mark his comeback as beginning on Dec. 6, the day of the Great Tax Cut Deal of 2010. Obama had a bad November. Selfconfessedly shellacked in the midterm election, he fled the scene to Asia and various unsuccessful meetings, only to return to a sad-sack lame-duck Congress with ghostly dozens of defeated Democrats wandering the halls. Now, with his stunning tax deal, Obama is back. Holding no high cards, he nonetheless managed to resurface suddenly not just as a player but as orchestrator, dealmaker and central actor in a high $1 trillion drama. Compare this with Bill Clinton, greatest of all comeback kids, who, at a news conference a full five months after his shellacking in 1994, was reduced to plaintively protesting that “the president is relevant here.” He had been so humiliatingly sidelined that he did not really recover until late 1995 when he

I

outmaneuvered Newt Gingrich in the government-shutdown showdown. And that was Clinton responding nimbly to political opportunity. Obama fashioned out of thin air his return to relevance, an even more impressive achievement. Remember the question after Election Day: Can Obama move to the center to win back the independents who had abandoned the party in November? And if so, how long would it take? Answer: five weeks. An indoor record, although an asterisk should denote that he had help — Republicans clearing his path and sprinkling it with rose petals. Obama’s repositioning to the center was first symbolized by his joint appearance with Clinton, the quintessential centrist Democrat, and followed days later by the overwhelming 81-19 Senate majority that supported the deal. That bipartisan margin will go a long way toward erasing the partisan stigma of Obama’s first two years, marked by Stimulus I that passed without a single House Republican and a health care bill

CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER that garnered no congressional Republicans at all. Despite this, some on the right are gloating that Obama had been maneuvered into forfeiting his liberal base. Nonsense. He will never lose his base. Where do they go? Liberals will never have a president as ideologically kindred — and they know it. For the left, Obama is as good as it gets in a country that is barely 20 percent liberal. The conservative gloaters were simply fooled again by the flapping and squawking that liberals ritually engage in before folding at Obama’s feet. House liberals did it with Obamacare; they did it with the tax deal. Their boisterous protests are reminiscent of the floor demonstrations we used to see at party

conventions when the losing candidate’s partisans would dance and shout in the aisles for a while before settling down to eventually nominate the other guy by acclamation. And Obama pulled this off at his lowest political ebb. After the shambles of the election and with no bargaining power — the Republicans could have gotten everything they wanted on the Bush tax cuts retroactively in January without fear of an Obama veto — he walks away with what even Paul Ryan admits was $313 billion in superfluous spending. Including a $6 billion subsidy for ethanol. Why, just a few weeks ago Al Gore, the Earth King, finally confessed that ethanol subsidies were a mistake. There is not a single economic or environmental rationale left for this boondoggle that has induced American farmers to dedicate an amazing 40 percent of the U.S. corn crop — for burning! And the Republicans have just revived it. Even as they were near unanimously voting for this monstrosity, Republicans began righteously protesting $8.3 bil-

lion of earmarks in Harry Reid’s omnibus spending bill. They seem not to understand how ridiculous this looks after having agreed to a Stimulus II that even by their own generous reckoning has 38 times as much spending as all these earmarks combined. The greatest mistake Ronald Reagan’s opponents ever made — and they made it over and over again — was to underestimate him. Same with Obama. The difference is that Reagan was so deeply self-assured that he invited underestimation — low expectations are a priceless political asset — whereas Obama’s vanity makes him always needing to appear the smartest guy in the room. Hence that display of prickliness in his disastrous post-deal news conference last week. But don’t be fooled by defensive style or thin-skinned temperament. The president is a very smart man. How smart? His comeback is already a year ahead of Clinton’s. Charles Krauthammer is a member of The Washington Post Writers Group.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 20, 2010 B5

O Rene Le Berre, 78, directed fight against river blindness in Africa By Richard Goldstein New York Times News Service

Rene Le Berre, a French entomologist who helped inspire an international campaign that saved millions of West Africans from the parasitic disease river blindness, died Dec. 6 in l’Aiguillon-sur-Mer on France’s western coast. He was 78. The cause was cardiovascular disease complicated by diabetes, said a former colleague, Dr. Joel Breman of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md. Onchocerciasis, the formal name for river blindness, had once been a scourge in the fertile river basins of tropical Africa. Transmitted when black flies living in rapidly running rivers bite a victim repeatedly, releasing parasitic worms into the body, the disease brings excruciating itching, creates nodules under the skin and often results in blindness. Victims can remain infected for 15 years. The path toward conquering river blindness in Africa began in 1972 at a small medical clinic in Upper Volta, now Burkina Faso.

Black flies Le Berre, who had long been working in West Africa on insecticide programs to kill black flies, met for three hours at that clinic with Robert McNamara, former secretary of defense in the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, who was visiting Africa as president of the World Bank. Le Berre, who had contracted a mild form of river blindness in Africa, spoke halting English, but the photographs he showed to McNamara told a gruesome tale. They depicted African youngsters guiding lines of men who had been blinded, and portrayed riverblindness sufferers with disfiguring nodules. In September 1973, the World Bank announced plans for a 20-year, $120 million program to fight river blindness in Africa. It joined with the World Health Organization and other international agencies to form the Onchocerciasis Control Program.

“To convince someone like Mr. McNamara wasn’t easy when you’re a Frenchman in the middle of nowhere,” Le Berre once recalled in a publication of the River Blindness Foundation, whose operations were assumed by the Carter Center in 1996. “But it was a golden opportunity.” Le Berre, who had mapped thousands of breeding sites for black flies during the 1960s, directed aerial attacks on them for the international control program, deploying small planes and helicopters to spray insecticides.

‘Kind of guerrilla war’ “It is not a war where you say you will win, it is a kind of guerrilla war,” he told The Associated Press in 1977, reflecting on the long road to controlling river blindness. The focus on combating the disease changed in the 1980s when Merck & Co. in the United States began donating millions of doses of the drug ivermectin to Africans in river blindness regions. Ivermectin weakens the parasitic worms released by the black flies, enabling the body’s natural defenses to destroy them. According to the World Health Organization, the control program, which ended in 2002, protected millions of people in 11 African countries from the effects of river blindness and enabled cultivation and resettlement in river basins after villagers terrified of river blindness had fled to less productive uplands. Rene Le Berre was born in Quimper, France, on March 3, 1932. He graduated from the University of Rennes, was trained in medical entomology at the Institut Pasteur in Paris and received a science doctorate from the University of Orsay. After working in Africa, he continued his disease eradication efforts for the World Health Organization at its Geneva headquarters. Le Berre had been living in retirement at l’Aiguillon-surMer. He is survived by his wife, Eliane, and a son, Francois, of Bangkok.

The Associated Press ile photo

Tommaso Padoa Schioppa speaks during an economic conference in Athens on Nov. 29. The Italian economist, one of the intellectual architects of the euro and a member of the European Central Bank’s first executive board, has died at age 70.

Italy’s Padoa Schioppa, 70, architect of the euro, dies By Nicole Winfield The Associated Press

ROME — Italian economist Tommaso Padoa Schioppa, one of the intellectual architects of the euro and a member of the European Central Bank’s first executive board, has died. He was 70. Padoa Schioppa, economy minister under Premier Romano Prodi, died Saturday night after suffering a heart attack during a dinner in Rome with friends, according to one of those present, his one-time deputy Vincenzo Visco. The unexpected death stunned Italy’s political and business elite, who remembered him as a passionate promoter of the European project and its single currency. “He was among those who knew how to translate the European ideal into concrete and learned analyses and projects, giving in particular a lasting contribution to the birth of the euro and the eurozone,” Italian President Giorgio Napolitano said. During his seven year term at

R. Richard Rubottom, influential U.S. diplomat

the ECB, Padoa Schioppa was one of the six members charged with guiding the euro through its first vital years after being introduced in 11 member nations on Jan. 1, 1999.

‘Man of reflection’ “He contributed decisively in the early years of the euro to the reputation of the ECB as a major actor in international and European cooperation,” ECB President Jean-Claude Trichet said in a statement. The eurozone, he said, “is losing a man of reflection, of action and of vision, fully dedicated to European unity.” Prior his appointment to the ECB, Padoa Schioppa held many prestigious posts in the Italian business and banking world. He first gained international recognition as the director-general for economic and financial affairs at the European Commission 1979-83. In 1993 he became deputy director-general of Banca d’Italia.

New York Times News Service

R. Richard Rubottom, a diplomat who influenced and helped hone U.S. policy toward Latin America in the late 1950s, a time of economic and political tumult that culminated in Fidel Castro’s takeover in Cuba, died Dec. 6 in Austin, Tex. He was 98. His family announced the death. Rubottom rose from modest roots — his parents ran a boardinghouse in central Texas — to become the “official most responsible for defining United States Cuban policy” in the years immediately surrounding the 1959 Cuban revolution, the historian Thomas Paterson wrote in “Contesting Castro: The United States and the Triumph of the Cuban Revolution” (1994). Rubottom began grappling with foreign policy issues in Latin America as assistant secretary of state for inter-American affairs from 1956 to 1960. In 1958 he accompanied Vice President Richard Nixon on a widely publicized tour of Latin America that was marred by violent demonstrations against the United States. After protesters in Caracas, Venezuela, shattered windows in the vice president’s car, news reports suggested that Nixon partly blamed Rubottom for allowing his motorcade to be put in harm’s way.

As a high-level strategist on U.S. policy toward Cuba in the late 1950s, Rubottom was portrayed in books and news reports as a strong early supporter of the country’s repressive leader, Fulgencio Batista, as he battled the rebellion led by Fidel Castro. But Rubottom later worried that Batista’s “brutal retaliatory tactics” were eroding his support and questioned whether the United States should continue to sell tanks to Cuba after it became known that Batista was using them against his domestic opponents, a violation of U.S. law. Batista ultimately canceled the tank order. With the rise of Castro, Rubottom represented the State Department in meetings with military and intelligence officials on whether, how and when to try to eliminate him both before and after he seized power in January 1959. Yet when Castro visited the United States in April 1959 as Cuba’s new leader, Rubottom was on hand to greet him, and he was deputized to ask Castro what U.S. aid he would like. Castro said none. Some politicians and historians have criticized Rubottom for not identifying Castro as a Communist before he took control. But Adolf Berle, a former assistant secretary of state, wrote in The New York Times Book Review in 1962 that he knew for certain Rubottom had

not known. However, he and his deputy, William Wieland, were convinced that Castro was “a hopeless megalomaniac,” Berle wrote, and that the “optimistic image created by the uninformed American press” was wrong. In 1960, Rubottom created a controversy by telegraphing Gov. Edmund G. Brown of California with an appeal by the Uruguayan government to halt the planned execution of Caryl Chessman, a convicted robber and rapist who had become a global cause celebre for opponents of capital punishment. Brown granted Chessman a 60day reprieve, although he was ultimately executed. Rubottom said he had merely been passing on information that related to U.S. foreign policy — Uruguay opposed the death penalty — but his action ignited a debate over federal intervention in state matters and prompted President Dwight D. Eisenhower to issue a statement saying the execution was entirely a California matter. Roy Richard Rubottom Jr. was born on Feb. 13, 1912, in Brownwood, Texas. He won a scholarship to Southern Methodist University, where he was president of his class and editor of the college newspaper. After graduating in 1932 with a journalism degree, he stayed on at SMU to earn a master’s in international relations in 1935.

Lectured across globe Padoa Schioppa was the executive board director with special responsibility for international relations, payment systems and banking supervision. He traveled widely lecturing in important financial centers from New York to Tokyo and Beijing advocating the importance and potential of the euro. An ardent supporter of the European project, the trilingual Padoa Schioppa acknowledged the

Cubs’ Cavarretta, named National League MVP in ‘45 By Richard Goldstein New York Times News Service

By Douglas Martin

He surprised many in 1997 when he moved to Consob, Italy’s stock market watchdog. As chairman he fought to introduce reforms in the Italian stock market particularly those to clamp down on insider trading. More recently, the Greek government tapped him to help deal with the country’s debt crisis and Fiat Industrial named him to the board just last week. But it was his role in shepherding in the euro that made his mark.

Phil Cavarretta, who played 20 seasons for the Chicago Cubs and won the National League’s most valuable player award and batting championship in 1945, the last time the Cubs captured a pennant, died Saturday in Lilburn, Ga. He was 94. His death, at a hospice, resulted from a stroke he sustained on Dec. 7, his son, Phil Jr., said. A native of Chicago’s North Side, Cavarretta was taken by his coach at Lane Tech High School for a tryout at Wrigley Field in the spring of 1934 after his team had won its fourth straight city championship. When the Cubs took batting practice, the 17-yearold Cavarretta faced pitcher Pat Malone, “a grizzled old veteran,” according to Cavarretta. “I was only 135 pounds,” Cavarretta recalled in an interview with The Chicago Sun-Times. “He thought I was the bat boy, but I sprayed the ball around pretty good and he yelled, ‘Get that little guy out of there.’” That wasn’t about to happen. Playing first base and the outfield at Wrigley Field from 1934 to 1953, and serving as the Cubs’ player-manager for two and a half seasons, Cavarretta became one of the most popular figures in the team’s history. A left-handed batter with an unremarkable 5-foot-11, 175pound frame, Cavarretta was hardly a power hitter in the mold of the Cubs stars Hack Wilson, Ernie Banks and Sammy Sosa. He had only 95 career home

runs. But he had 1,977 hits and a .293 career batting average. He played for three Cubs pennant winners — in 1935 and 1938 and then in baseball’s last wartime season, when he beat out the Boston Braves’ Tommy Holmesby a wide margin for MVP honors and took the batting title with a .355 average. Playing mostly at first base for the ’45 Cubs, Cavarretta headed a lineup that included Stan Hack at third base and Andy Pafko, Bill Nicholson and Peanuts Lowrey in the outfield. Cavarretta, exempted from military service because of a perforated eardrum, was an All-Star from 1944 through 1947 and tied the St. Louis Cardinals’ Stan Musial for the league lead in hits in 1944 with 197, batting .321 that season.

challenge that lack of political union presented to the euro. He repeatedly argued that “a strong currency requires a strong economy and a strong polity, not only a competent central bank.” With the euro well on its way, Prodi named Padoa Schioppa economy minister after winning the 2006 elections and tasked him with the difficult job of trying to revive Italy’s zero-growth economy. It was a post he held until Prodi lost to Premier Silvio Berlusconi in 2008. Padoa Schioppa, educated in Milan and Massachusetts, was married with three children. Funeral arrangements weren’t immediately announced. Rome’s mayor offered city hall for the wake, noting that Padoa Schioppa’s death was a loss for the entire nation.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

2010 Christmas Deadlines PAID OBITUARIES .............DEADLINE Friday 12/24 ...............................Wednesday 12/22 5 p.m. Saturday 12/25 ..........................Wednesday 12/22 5 p.m. Sunday 12/26 ............................Thursday 12/23 10 a.m. Monday 12/27 ............................Thursday 12/23 10 a.m. DEATH NOTICES ................DEADLINE Friday 12/24 ...............................Thursday 12/23 noon Saturday 12/25 ..........................Thursday 12/23 noon Sunday 12/26 ............................Thursday 12/23 2 p.m. Monday 12/27 ............................Thursday 12/23 2 p.m.

Obituary Dept. 541-617-7825


W E AT H ER

B6 Monday, December 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, DECEMBER 20

TUESDAY

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

HIGH

LOW

38

23

STATE Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

33/25

32/23

35/27

29/23

Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

41/30

34/30

Madras



39/28

Mitchell

Oakridge Elk Lake 35/32

26/11

35/20

Seattle

35/19

Portland

Burns

Cloudy with a chance for snow today.

36/21

Chemult 34/17

28/17

Helena

46/37

Bend

37/27

44/37

Redding

Elko

50/43

30/19

Reno



31/23



32/18

37/22

Silver Lake

Idaho Falls



Christmas Valley

27/9

Boise

38/23

Grants Pass

37/21

29/13

Missoula

Eugene

Eastern

33/20

Fort Rock



43/37

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:37 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 4:29 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:37 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 4:30 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 4:03 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 7:06 a.m.

Cloudy with a chance for snow today.

Crater Lake 27/22

38/26

San Francisco



54/48

Salt Lake City 37/29



City

LOW

HIGH

Moon phases Full

Last

New

First

Dec. 21 Dec. 27 Jan. 4

Jan. 12

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

Monday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

HIGH

Astoria . . . . . . . . 43/38/0.24 . . . . . 45/39/sh. . . . . . 46/39/sh Baker City . . . . . . 32/22/0.24 . . . . . 33/23/sn. . . . . . 34/24/sn Brookings . . . . . . 48/40/0.93 . . . . . . 49/45/r. . . . . . 47/44/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 31/22/0.32 . . . . . 33/19/sn. . . . . . 32/22/sn Eugene . . . . . . . . 43/35/0.27 . . . . . 46/37/sh. . . . . . 46/37/sh Klamath Falls . . . 34/27/0.32 . . . . . 35/25/sn. . . . . . 34/27/sn Lakeview. . . . . . . 34/30/0.38 . . . . . 32/23/sn. . . . . . 31/26/sn La Pine . . . . . . . . 32/25/0.00 . . . . . 36/19/sn. . . . . . 32/22/sn Medford . . . . . . . 42/37/0.32 . . . . . 45/37/sh. . . . . . 46/38/sh Newport . . . . . . . 45/37/0.21 . . . . . 49/42/sh. . . . . . 50/40/sh North Bend . . . . . 45/41/0.81 . . . . . 49/43/sh. . . . . . 49/42/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 34/29/0.25 . . . . . .32/25/rs. . . . . . 32/26/rs Pendleton . . . . . . 29/22/0.07 . . . . . .35/27/rs. . . . . . . 33/27/c Portland . . . . . . . 42/36/0.10 . . . . . 42/36/sh. . . . . . . 42/36/r Prineville . . . . . . . 30/23/0.03 . . . . . . 40/24/r. . . . . . 36/22/sn Redmond. . . . . . . 32/25/0.07 . . . . . 38/22/sn. . . . . . 38/23/sn Roseburg. . . . . . . 43/38/0.70 . . . . . 46/38/sh. . . . . . 43/39/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 42/31/0.17 . . . . . 47/37/sh. . . . . . 47/37/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 29/25/0.00 . . . . . 36/22/sn. . . . . . 34/22/sn The Dalles . . . . . . 35/32/0.06 . . . . . .34/28/rs. . . . . . . 36/29/c

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31/25 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 in 1946 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.15” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . -5 in 1984 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 1.06” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.87” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . 11.01” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.28 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.74 in 1929 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .7:11 a.m. . . . . . .4:21 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .3:44 a.m. . . . . . .2:07 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .8:29 a.m. . . . . . .5:12 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . .11:58 a.m. . . . . .11:39 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .1:22 a.m. . . . . .12:54 p.m. Uranus . . . . . .11:58 a.m. . . . . .11:47 p.m.

1

LOW

38 28

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy chance mixed showers.

38 27

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

Calgary

42/36

Hampton

34/18

41/31

36/20

La Pine

Crescent

Vancouver

Paulina

36/19

Crescent Lake 

BEND ALMANAC Yesterday’s regional extremes • 48° Brookings • 13° Meacham

FRIDAY Mostly cloudy.

38 27

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Central

Brothers

Sunriver

HIGH

NORTHWEST

10/6

36/21

LOW

36 23

41/25

Camp Sherman 33/20 Redmond Prineville 38/23 Cascadia 40/24 37/34 Sisters 36/22 Bend Post 38/23

HIGH

THURSDAY

Mostly cloudy.

Showers are expected west of the Cascades today, with snow to the east.

Cloudy skies with rain showers likely today.

40/29

Mostly cloudy.

Tonight: Mostly cloudy.

Today: Mostly cloudy, chance mixed showers.

Ben Burkel

WEDNESDAY

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . 2-24 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . . . 47 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-0 . . . . . . 34-66 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . .10-0 . . . . . . 67-87 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . .5-0 . . . . . . . . 68 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . .7-0 . . . . . . 39-41 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . . . 78 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 30-32 Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 20-48

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . Chains or T.T. all vehicles Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . Chains or T.T. all vehicles Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . . Chains > 10,000 lbs. Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Mammoth Mtn., California 35-50 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 22 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . .7-0 Taos, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . .0-0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . .8-0

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

. . . . . . 28-30 . . . . . 90-131 . . . . . . . . 57 . . . . . . . 103 . . . . . . 36-52 . . . . . . 22-27 . . . . . . . . 43

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

Vancouver 41/31

S

S

Calgary 10/6

S

Saskatoon 6/1

Seattle 43/37

S Winnipeg 12/-2

S

S

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 23/4

Thunder Bay 27/19

Halifax 36/32 P ortland Billings (in the 48 To ronto P ortland Green Bay 34/21 contiguous states): 28/9 St. Paul 30/19 42/36 23/22 24/20 Boston Boise 35/26 Buffalo Detroit 37/27 • 78° 27/16 New York 26/22 Rapid City Des Moines McAllen, Texas 34/26 28/11 Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus 34/25 Salt Lake Chicago • -14° 40/24 28/21 35/23 City 31/28 Omaha San Francisco Waterloo, Iowa Washington, D. C. 36/21 37/29 54/49 34/22 • 4.00” Denver Louisville Kansas City 52/30 37/32 Half Moon Bay, Calif. 45/34 St. Louis Charlotte Nashville 40/33 Los Angeles 46/28 Las 49/39 Albuquerque 57/54 Vegas 57/36 Little Rock 58/48 58/49 Oklahoma City Atlanta Honolulu 70/42 52/37 Birmingham Phoenix 78/69 55/45 Tijuana Dallas 73/56 58/54 75/47 New Orleans Orlando 66/57 Houston 64/42 Chihuahua 73/63 73/39 Miami 72/59 Monterrey La Paz 79/52 80/53 Mazatlan Anchorage 79/53 18/2 Juneau 18/12 Bismarck 19/2

FRONTS

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .72/42/0.00 . 79/44/pc . . . 78/45/s Akron . . . . . . . . .25/10/0.00 . . .25/19/c . . . .30/20/i Albany. . . . . . . . .30/12/0.00 . . .32/18/c . . . 30/19/c Albuquerque. . . .58/38/0.00 . 57/36/pc . . 56/35/pc Anchorage . . . . . .15/2/0.00 . . . .18/2/c . . . . 11/3/c Atlanta . . . . . . . .47/28/0.00 . . .52/37/s . . . 55/48/c Atlantic City . . . .41/22/0.02 . 36/24/pc . . 39/30/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .69/27/0.00 . . .74/51/s . . . 77/50/s Baltimore . . . . . .37/22/0.00 . 32/20/pc . . 35/24/pc Billings. . . . . . . . . .17/7/0.00 . . .28/9/sn . . 31/15/pc Birmingham . . . .51/24/0.00 . 55/45/pc . . 61/42/sh Bismarck . . . . . . . 13/-5/0.00 . . .19/2/sn . . . .10/-3/c Boise . . . . . . . . . .41/33/0.55 . . 37/27/rs . . . 37/27/c Boston. . . . . . . . .37/25/0.00 . .35/26/sn . . 35/30/sn Bridgeport, CT. . .37/24/0.00 . . .35/19/c . . 39/26/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .24/21/0.00 . .27/16/sn . . . 30/20/c Burlington, VT. . .32/12/0.00 . . .26/17/c . . 27/22/sn Caribou, ME . . . .29/16/0.00 . .23/23/sn . . 33/23/sn Charleston, SC . .47/37/0.00 . . .51/35/s . . . 57/47/s Charlotte. . . . . . .47/24/0.00 . . .46/28/s . . 50/34/pc Chattanooga. . . .45/24/0.00 . . .50/35/c . . 52/39/sh Cheyenne . . . . . .50/25/0.00 . 40/24/pc . . . 35/23/c Chicago. . . . . . . .21/14/0.00 . . .31/28/c . . . .33/25/i Cincinnati . . . . . . .32/9/0.00 . 31/26/pc . . 37/24/sn Cleveland . . . . . .25/14/0.00 . .25/21/sn . . . .30/22/i Colorado Springs 60/20/0.00 . 54/25/pc . . . 43/27/c Columbia, MO . .41/28/0.00 . . .41/33/c . . . 41/24/c Columbia, SC . . .48/34/0.00 . . .51/29/s . . 55/37/pc Columbus, GA. . .53/36/0.00 . . .57/36/s . . 62/51/pc Columbus, OH. . . .28/9/0.00 . 28/21/pc . . 34/21/sn Concord, NH . . . .35/11/0.00 . . .31/18/c . . 29/20/sn Corpus Christi. . .74/38/0.00 . . .77/60/s . . . 77/58/s Dallas Ft Worth. .62/39/0.00 . 75/47/pc . . . 76/49/s Dayton . . . . . . . .26/15/0.00 . 28/21/pc . . 34/20/sn Denver. . . . . . . . .61/15/0.00 . 52/30/pc . . . 47/26/c Des Moines. . . . .27/12/0.01 . . .34/25/c . . . .31/18/i Detroit. . . . . . . . .25/18/0.00 . 26/22/pc . . 31/21/sn Duluth . . . . . . . . . .15/9/0.00 . . .20/19/c . . 26/17/sn El Paso. . . . . . . . .69/46/0.00 . . .72/40/s . . . 71/40/s Fairbanks. . . . . -17/-28/0.00 . -21/-33/c . . -25/-36/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . . . .9/2/0.00 . . .20/8/sn . . . . 17/2/c Flagstaff . . . . . . .41/37/0.06 . .43/35/sh . . 42/34/sh

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .27/21/0.00 . . .27/23/c . . 31/26/sn Green Bay. . . . . .20/11/0.00 . . .23/22/c . . 32/25/sn Greensboro. . . . .42/26/0.00 . . .42/27/s . . 45/31/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .33/17/0.00 . 32/19/pc . . 36/21/sn Hartford, CT . . . .34/20/0.00 . . .33/19/c . . .32/22/sf Helena. . . . . . . . . .16/4/0.01 . . .27/9/sn . . 23/10/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .74/69/4.89 . . .78/69/r . . 80/69/sh Houston . . . . . . .62/37/0.00 . . .73/63/s . . . 77/62/s Huntsville . . . . . .47/26/0.00 . . .53/41/c . . 56/42/sh Indianapolis . . . .29/12/0.00 . . .31/29/c . . . .35/25/i Jackson, MS . . . .53/30/0.00 . 64/52/pc . . 70/54/pc Madison, WI . . . . .20/8/0.00 . .27/26/sn . . . .33/22/i Jacksonville. . . . .48/42/0.00 . . .58/39/s . . . 66/50/s Juneau. . . . . . . . . .22/7/0.00 . 18/12/pc . . 25/15/pc Kansas City. . . . .45/30/0.00 . 45/34/pc . . . 38/23/c Lansing . . . . . . . .24/18/0.00 . 26/18/pc . . . .30/22/i Las Vegas . . . . . .65/55/0.00 . . .58/48/r . . . .56/49/r Lexington . . . . . .29/19/0.00 . . .35/29/c . . 39/28/sh Lincoln. . . . . . . . .39/26/0.00 . 40/22/pc . . . 30/17/c Little Rock. . . . . .50/25/0.00 . . .58/49/c . . 63/40/pc Los Angeles. . . . .63/57/2.35 . . .57/54/r . . . .60/54/r Louisville . . . . . . .32/21/0.00 . . .37/32/c . . .41/29/rs Memphis. . . . . . .50/27/0.00 . . .55/49/c . . 59/40/sh Miami . . . . . . . . .69/61/0.00 . . .72/59/s . . . 75/59/s Milwaukee . . . . .25/16/0.00 . . .30/29/c . . . .34/27/i Minneapolis . . . . .15/3/0.00 . .24/20/sn . . . 26/14/c Nashville . . . . . . .42/20/0.00 . . .49/39/c . . 52/35/sh New Orleans. . . .56/41/0.00 . 66/57/pc . . . 73/58/s New York . . . . . .37/30/0.00 . 34/26/pc . . 36/27/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .39/24/0.00 . 35/25/pc . . 37/25/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .38/33/0.00 . . .36/25/s . . 42/31/pc Oklahoma City . .55/29/0.00 . 70/42/pc . . 59/31/pc Omaha . . . . . . . .32/21/0.00 . 36/21/pc . . . 27/16/c Orlando. . . . . . . .59/50/0.00 . . .64/42/s . . . 71/49/s Palm Springs. . . .61/56/0.05 . . .66/53/r . . . .65/53/r Peoria . . . . . . . . . .26/6/0.00 . . .32/29/c . . . 35/22/c Philadelphia . . . .37/25/0.00 . 35/23/pc . . 38/25/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .75/56/0.00 . 73/56/pc . . 74/53/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .26/12/0.00 . . .27/19/c . . 29/21/sn Portland, ME. . . .35/19/0.00 . .34/21/sn . . 33/26/sn Providence . . . . .36/22/0.00 . .35/24/sn . . 35/28/sn Raleigh . . . . . . . .43/32/0.00 . . .41/25/s . . 46/32/pc

Yesterday Monday Tuesday Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .21/15/0.00 . .28/11/sn . . . . 24/7/c Savannah . . . . . .52/39/0.00 . . .54/34/s . . . 61/49/s Reno . . . . . . . . . .47/33/0.46 . .38/26/sn . . .41/36/rs Seattle. . . . . . . . .47/36/0.05 . .43/37/sh . . . .45/37/r Richmond . . . . . .38/28/0.00 . . .35/23/s . . 40/26/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . . 20/-7/0.00 . .29/16/sn . . . 21/4/pc Rochester, NY . . .27/21/0.00 . .28/16/sn . . 31/21/pc Spokane . . . . . . .27/21/0.01 . .32/24/sn . . . 31/24/c Sacramento. . . . .56/48/1.31 . . .55/45/r . . . .55/47/r Springfield, MO. .48/29/0.00 . . .50/36/c . . 48/25/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .39/23/0.01 . . .40/33/c . . . 41/26/c Tampa . . . . . . . . .58/50/0.00 . . .65/48/s . . . 71/56/s Salt Lake City . . .50/32/0.28 . .37/29/sn . . . 36/31/c Tucson. . . . . . . . .74/45/0.00 . 75/48/pc . . 75/50/pc San Antonio . . . .67/34/0.00 . . .75/53/s . . . 77/55/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .53/28/0.00 . 63/40/pc . . 55/28/pc San Diego . . . . . 63/60/trace . . .61/56/r . . . .61/55/r Washington, DC .38/30/0.00 . . .34/22/s . . 36/25/pc San Francisco . . .59/52/1.43 . . .54/48/r . . . .55/50/r Wichita . . . . . . . .51/24/0.00 . 58/31/pc . . . 46/25/c San Jose . . . . . . .61/55/0.70 . . .56/48/r . . . .57/50/r Yakima . . . . . . . 36/30/trace . .30/23/sn . . . 31/26/c Santa Fe . . . . . . .49/24/0.00 . . .52/33/c . . 51/30/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .68/49/0.00 . 74/56/pc . . 72/55/sh

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .25/21/0.14 . 32/26/pc . . .34/28/rs Athens. . . . . . . . .62/48/0.00 . . .56/50/c . . . 57/49/s Auckland. . . . . . .72/66/0.00 . .73/69/sh . . 74/66/sh Baghdad . . . . . . .68/46/0.00 . 67/47/pc . . . 68/46/s Bangkok . . . . . . .88/70/0.00 . 80/65/pc . . 81/67/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .52/19/0.00 . . .48/25/s . . . 47/24/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .66/57/0.42 . . .70/50/s . . . 71/53/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . . .23/1/0.00 . .27/16/sn . . 30/17/sn Bogota . . . . . . . .66/46/0.43 . . .66/49/c . . 68/47/pc Budapest. . . . . . . .21/0/0.00 . 36/26/pc . . . 37/25/c Buenos Aires. . . .81/54/0.00 . . .80/64/s . . . 83/66/s Cabo San Lucas .75/52/0.00 . . .78/57/s . . . 80/56/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .68/48/0.00 . 71/56/pc . . . 72/55/s Calgary . . . . . . . . . .9/1/0.01 . . . 10/6/sf . . . 25/16/s Cancun . . . . . . . 81/NA/0.00 . 77/58/pc . . 76/57/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .37/16/0.00 . . 35/18/rs . . 33/20/sn Edinburgh . . . . . .32/19/0.00 . 29/14/pc . . 28/16/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .41/28/0.00 . . 33/27/rs . . 35/28/sh Harare . . . . . . . . .81/64/0.55 . . .77/62/t . . . .78/61/t Hong Kong . . . . .72/61/0.00 . . .63/55/s . . . 62/52/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .55/45/0.10 . .56/41/sh . . 57/40/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .63/49/0.00 . . .61/45/s . . . 62/43/s Johannesburg . . .79/54/0.43 . . .78/58/s . . 76/57/sh Lima . . . . . . . . . .75/64/0.00 . 73/64/pc . . 74/64/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .57/48/0.00 . . .58/46/r . . . .59/43/r London . . . . . . . .32/19/0.00 . . 37/31/sf . . .38/29/rs Madrid . . . . . . . .55/39/0.11 . .41/31/sh . . . .45/32/r Manila. . . . . . . . .84/75/0.02 . . .85/78/t . . . .86/73/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .93/73/0.00 . . .94/71/s . . . 93/70/s Mexico City. . . . .73/37/0.00 . . .75/42/s . . . 76/39/s Montreal. . . . . . .23/14/0.00 . 21/17/pc . . 36/32/sn Moscow . . . . . . .23/14/0.05 . .22/14/sn . . . 25/5/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . .79/57/0.00 . . .81/58/s . . 79/57/sh Nassau . . . . . . . .79/66/0.00 . 75/63/pc . . 73/66/pc New Delhi. . . . . .50/45/0.00 . . .69/47/s . . . 71/46/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .54/34/0.00 . .61/44/sh . . 55/45/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .16/14/0.01 . . .19/0/pc . . . .15/-9/s Ottawa . . . . . . . .27/23/0.01 . 27/16/pc . . 30/26/sn Paris. . . . . . . . . . .43/28/0.48 . .38/35/sn . . 40/36/sh Rio de Janeiro. . .91/81/0.00 . . .87/76/s . . . 86/75/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .48/32/0.00 . .58/35/sh . . 59/36/sh Santiago . . . . . . .82/50/0.00 . . .79/53/s . . . 77/52/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .82/66/0.00 . . .75/68/t . . . .74/67/t Sapporo. . . . . . . .34/27/0.00 . . .40/32/r . . 36/25/pc Seoul . . . . . . . . . .50/32/0.00 . . .42/29/s . . . 43/30/c Shanghai. . . . . . .61/39/0.00 . . .55/34/s . . . 54/32/s Singapore . . . . . .86/75/0.15 . . .86/75/t . . . .87/76/t Stockholm. . . . . .21/16/0.00 . . .21/9/sn . . . . 10/6/sf Sydney. . . . . . . . .82/61/0.00 . . .81/57/s . . . 77/59/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . .73/57/0.00 . .70/55/sh . . 71/52/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .70/48/0.00 . . .72/52/s . . . 73/53/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .50/43/0.00 . .59/44/sh . . 56/45/sh Toronto . . . . . . . .25/23/0.01 . . .30/19/c . . . 28/23/c Vancouver. . . . . .45/36/0.22 . . 41/31/rs . . . .45/39/r Vienna. . . . . . . . . .21/5/0.00 . 35/25/pc . . . 37/27/c Warsaw. . . . . . . .23/12/0.00 . . .21/8/sn . . . 27/19/c

STORMS PUMMEL CALIFORNIA

ENTER TO WIN A TWO NIGHT STAY AT THE FIRESIDE MOTEL IN YACHATS! Noah Berger / The Associated Press

A driver navigates a flooded stretch of the Great Highway in San Francisco on Sunday. Storms are dropping inches of rain throughout California and blanketing the Sierra Mountains with several feet of snow.

Portland may become show’s backdrop By Maxine Bernstein The Oregonian

PORTLAND — In an effort to resurrect his damaged career, a Portland police detective works with three genius scientists from a private think tank to solve the murder of one of their co-workers. It’s the storyline of a one-hour pilot show for TBS. The new crime drama is being filmed in Portland, features Portland police patrol cars, a replica of the Portland police badge and the force’s old blue uniforms.

‘Brain Trust’ The show’s name: “Brain Trust.” “It’s a play on the think tank geniuses,” co-producer Rachel Olschan said of the name. While the Portland police may not be the geniuses in this program, they’ve been assured that any, and every episode, if the network approves a series, will portray the Portland police in a positive light. “Just the fact they’re allowing us to say Portland Police Bureau, it helps us a lot because then

we don’t have to make our own name, design our own insignia,” Olschan said. “It ends up saving a whole bunch of steps.” And why not let the actors use the historic Portland police twotone blue uniform, which the bureau is abandoning? “We’ve loaned them our soonto-be old uniforms” said Sgt. Pete Simpson, a bureau spokesman, “because we’ve got a lot of them.” This month, Olschan’s Electric Entertainment production team — the same team that’s been in town to film the TNT series “Leverage” — had cameras rolling at the Wapato jail and Kelley Point Park. On Sunday, they had been filming “Brain Trust” downtown at Southwest Third Avenue and Salmon Street. “They’ve been very, very interested in making sure they’re doing it authentically, and they represent the police bureau well,” Simpson said. The production team chose to shoot the show in Portland, citing Oregon’s film and video rebate and tax credit incentives, crew base and local talent for supporting roles. Olschan says “Brain Trust” is

written to be lighthearted and funny. Actor D.B. Sweeney plays the detective Billy Doyle. Sweeney has been spending time at the police bureau to pick up some tips of the trade.

Effort for authenticity “He’s been talking to people, hearing their stories, to help his character,” Simpson said. “They will be the Portland Police Bureau. If it goes to series, we’ll be working with them to make sure it’s authentic.” Detective Doyle’s career and life have hit rock bottom. In his effort to try to save a woman’s life, the bad guy got away because the detective broke all the rules, failing to go by the book, Olschan said. But the murder case he now faces may redeem his career, according to the script. “The supernerds end up helping him solve the case” Olschan said, “and he in turn helps the three, who are dysfunctional, work together as a team.” So far, no actual Portland officers have been tapped as extras. But if the series is a go, Olschan added, “Who knows?”

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GREEN LIVING, TECHNOLOGY & SCIENCE IN OREGON Inside

GREEN, ETC.

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/greenetc

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2010

“The lesson in it for me — if you keep it sustainable, you’ll probably be able to weather it through.” — Paul Schmitz, owner of Boxcar Productions building products supply company in Bend

Fiber-optic highway to stretch into rural Oregon By Tim Doran The Bulletin

BendBroadband has taken the first steps toward building the fiber-optic highway that will bring high-speed Internet to areas of Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties. Using federal money from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, along with its own contribution, the company has started conducting environmental assessments and awarding construction contracts to build five fiber-optic lines that will bring broadband to La Pine, Madras, Prineville and Sunriver, said Frank Miller, BendBroadband’s chief technology officer. Federal stimulus funding provided $7.2 billion nationwide to extend high-speed Internet to underserved areas, according to a Nov. 1 report by the Oregon Broadband Advisory Council. Oregon received $52 million in federal broadband loans and grants, the report states, and BendBroadband won a $4.4 million grant to build the fiber-optic network to the four Central Oregon communities. The company will kick in $1.9 million to bring the total project cost to around $6.3 million. In Bend, Redmond and Sisters, high-speed Internet has been available for more than a dozen years, Miller said in an e-mail, and in its application for the federal stimulus grant, BendBroadband described Bend as “an island of broadband opportunity” and “a technology oasis,” as a result of the company’s “foresight and investment.” “... But the surrounding areas of Central Oregon lack adequate broadband connectivity to this oasis, to each other, and to the Internet beyond,” the application states. BendBroadband and representatives from government, health care, education, public safety and business formed the Central Oregon Fiber Alliance to build the high-speed Internet highway over an area nearly the size of New Jersey, according to the application. When connected, it will bring broadband to government, educational and health care institutions throughout the region, making services available to benefit the public. See Fiber-optic / C6

TECH FOCUS

Photos by Dean Guernsey / The Bulletin

Paul Schmitz, owner of Boxcar Productions, holds on to his dogs Sammy, left, and Eddie, in front of the northwest Bend house he is building with reused materials and techniques designed to save energy.

Deconstructing and

reconstructing Bend builder finds sustainability niche that includes repurposing material By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

or Bend builder Paul Schmitz, the key to surviving the financial downturn has been thinking sustainably. In addition to his building product supply company, Boxcar Productions, which deals in materials Schmitz has repurposed from buildings he has taken apart, he is constructing a house to use as little energy as possible and considering how to develop a sustainably minded community on a block in northwest Bend. As the building industry crashed in the last couple years, he decided to use an idle lot on that block to plant a garden and fruit trees, and try his hand at raising chickens, selling produce and eggs to local restaurants. “I’m not crying the blues, I’m a very lucky guy. There’s a lot of guys in my shoes that are dead in the water,” said Schmitz, 43. “The lesson in it for me — if you keep it sustainable, you’ll probably be able to weather it through.” One of his sustainability ventures involves taking down buildings and homes, and salvaging the materials — from lumber to railings to roofing — for use in other projects. See Boxcar / C6

F

GREEN

Standing in front of a wall of recycled lumber, Schmitz examines a piece of recycled, flattened corrugated metal like ones he has used as siding shingles on a Bend house he is building.

Clues to the animal kingdom’s birth in single-cell predator By Sean B. Carroll New York Times News Service

The Environmental Protection Agency is worried about a lot of things in our water — polychlorinated biphenyls, dibromochloropropane, Cryptosporidium parvum — to name just a few of the dozens of chemicals or organisms it monitors. However, in nearly every creek and lake, and throughout the oceans, there is one important group of multisyllabic microbes that the EPA does not track, and until recently, most biologists heard and knew very little about — the choanoflagellates. Before you spit out that glass of water or dunk your swimsuit in Clorox, relax. These tiny organisms are harmless, but they are important for other reasons. They are part of the so-called nanoplankton and play critical roles in the

SCIENCE ocean food chain. Choanoflagellates are voracious single-cell predators. The beating of their long flagellum both propels them through the water and creates a current that helps them to collect bacteria and food particles in the collar of 30 to 40 tentacle-like filaments at one end of the cell. There can be thousands to millions of choanoflagellates in a gallon of sea water, which may filter 10 to 25 percent of coastal surface water per day. Choanoflagellates in turn serve as food for planktonic animals like crustacean larvae, which are consumed by larger animals, and so on

up the food chain. Theirs is a humble existence compared with the larger, more charismatic residents of the oceans like lobsters, fish, squids and whales. But recent studies suggest that these obscure organisms are among the closest living single-celled relatives of animals. In other words, choanoflagellates are cousins to all animals in the same way that chimpanzees are cousins to humans. Just as the study of great apes has been vital to understanding human evolution, biologists are now scrutinizing choanoflagellates for clues about one of the great transitions in history — the origin of the animal kingdom. For most of the first 2.5 billion years of life on Earth, most species were microscopic, rarely exceeding 1 millimeter in size, and unicellular. See Predator / C6

Scott Nichol via New York Times News Service

LEFT: The feeding cells of sponges, which resemble choanoflagellates. Recent studies suggest that choanoflagellates are among the closest living single-celled relatives of all animals. RIGHT: A choanoflagellate with its long flagellum and collar of filaments.


T EL EV I

C2 Monday, December 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Curious grandsons wonder about Santa

S ION

Which TV shows are telling the truth? By Chuck Barney

From left, Dijon Talton, Lea Michele, Amber Riley, Jenna Ushkowitz and Chris Colfer perform in “The Power of Madonna” episode of “Glee,” which aired April 20 on Fox. In reality, it would take a whole semester to prepare for such a routine.

Contra Costa Times

Dear Abby: I have two small grandsons. They asked me why Santa Claus begs for money in front of the shopping mall. I was shocked by the question and didn’t know what to tell them. So I said it was to get toys for all the other boys and girls. My grandsons also asked me if Santa goes to bingo. I gave them the same answer. My daughter (their mom) was also surprised by their questions. I’m a bingo enthusiast, so I guess that’s why they asked. Did I answer properly? What would you have said? — Grandma Gloria in Ohio Dear Grandma Gloria: You handled the questions masterfully. Had I been asked, my response would have differed only slightly. I might have said Santa was asking for donations so he could buy toys for the little boys and girls whose families couldn’t afford them this Christmas — and then handed Santa something from me and the grandkids. Dear Abby: Please help California’s public hospitals and firefighters by spreading a winter safety message that can help your readers prevent serious injury, disfigurement and death. Every winter we see house fires and burns caused by candles, fireplaces and space heaters, which are often used to heat or light homes during the cold, dark days of winter. Children are at particular risk. Our hospitals’ burn centers say that at least one-third of their patients are under the age of 4. We all know children are curious and will touch just about anything that catches their eye, but very young children don’t have the reflexes to remove their hand quickly when they touch something hot. That’s why we urge parents of young children to be especially vigilant throughout the winter months. Christmas trees also become increasingly hazardous after

www.OasisSpaofBend.com

DEAR ABBY the holidays, when people wait too long to dispose of trees that have dried out and become more flammable. — Melissa Stafford Jones, California Association of Public Hospitals, and Kevin Nida, California State Firefighters’ Association Dear Melissa and Kevin: I’m pleased to help remind my readers about the danger of burns in winter, and your warning that the longer Christmas trees are kept, the more easily they ignite. After reading your letter I spoke with Capt. Steve Ruda, public information officer for the Los Angeles Fire Department, who pointed out that putting up a Christmas tree early increases the chances of a fire hazard. (Trees that are sold “freshly cut” are actually cut down in October.) He suggests that a good time to consider taking the tree down is when you touch it and the needles fall off easily. Readers, search online for more safety tips, in both English and Spanish, at www.caph.org or www.csfa.net. They’re offered as public service messages from both of the above associations. Dear Abby: Our mother embarrasses the heck out of us in restaurants. She makes lavish requests and is constantly complaining. How do we tell her she’s embarrassing us? — We Got a Lemon Dear Got a Lemon: How about saying it in plain English when you’re in private? And if she persists, don’t take her to restaurants you visit often. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www .DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

We all know that plausibility is not one of television’s greatest strengths. For decades, some of the world’s top minds have wondered how the professor on “Gilligan’s Island” could rig a lie-detector machine out of bamboo and other crude materials but couldn’t manage to build a decent raft. It certainly would be awesome if our TV sets came with built-in lie detectors — the better to determine when fact stops and fiction takes over. With such technology beyond our grasp, we instead decided to recruit several reliable sources and subject a few current shows to a thorough reality check. Here’s what we found:

‘Glee’ The situation: This musical comedy would have us believe that McKinley High School’s misfit crooners can produce song-and-dance routines at the drop of a hat. Each episode is stuffed with up to seven numbers, some quite spectacular. What’s the real story? Reality check: That’s an “over-the-top fantasy,” insists Ken Rawdon, choral director at Mt. Eden High School in Hayward, Calif. In preparing for competition, it takes his acclaimed show choir an entire semester to master a polished, 22-minute routine consisting of all — or parts of — seven to eight songs, along with a couple of costume changes. As for those elaborate production numbers, Rawdon says the show’s “glitz factor” is pretty hard to touch. “We really have no budget,” he says. “My credit card is our budget.” Oh, and FYI: Rawdon insists he gets along just fine with the school’s cheerleading coach.

The Associated Press ile photo

‘The Big Bang Theory’

‘Hawaii Five-0’

The situation: Leonard (Johnny Galecki), Sheldon (Jim Parsons) and their pals are brilliant but socially inept physicists. Is the science they spout accurate? Reality check: UCLA physics professor David Saltzberg, who serves as the science consultant for the show, says he does his best to make sure it is. Saltzberg sprinkles the scripts with actual jargon and theories, and is even responsible for producing those complex equations that appear on the white boards in the show. “I write them so they don’t appear to be nonsense, but I also try to have fun with them,” says Saltzberg, who once invited some of his grad students to a taping after they had taken an exam and delighted in their stunned reactions when they realized the exam’s solutions were right there on the board. As for the personalities of the nerdy characters, Saltzberg says that they’re “not that much of a stretch.”

The situation: Like its predecessor, this remake posits that the major criminal cases in Hawaii are handled by an elite federalized task force that answers to the governor. But does such a unit exist? Reality check: No way, says Gordon Pang, cops reporter for the Honolulu Star-Advertiser. “Most police functions are handled by the four county governments,” he tells us. “There are state law enforcement officers — conservation officers, harbors and airport security, and sheriffs Treating all Foot Conditions 541.383.3668 www.optimafootandankle.com Bend | Redmond | Prineville

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that deal with courts, etc. But none have quite the authority as the fictional ‘Five-0.’”

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BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

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BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

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KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! Ruff News Nightly News House of Payne House of Payne Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Caprial-John Wolf: Travels Steves Europe

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KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News News (N) ABC World News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ This Old House Nightly Business News News Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Steves Europe OpenRoad ’ ‘G’ This Old House Nightly Business

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Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Garden Smart ‘G’ This Old House PBS NewsHour ’ Å

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Skating With the Stars (N) ’ ‘PG’ Castle Beckett’s relationship with Demming. ’ ‘PG’ Å KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline The Sing-Off The winning group is announced. ’ ‘PG’ Å Perfect Couples News Jay Leno How I Met Engagement Two/Half Men Mike & Molly ‘14’ Hawaii Five-0 Lanakila ’ ‘14’ Å News Letterman Skating With the Stars (N) ’ ‘PG’ Castle Beckett’s relationship with Demming. ’ ‘PG’ Å News (N) (11:35) Nightline Million Dollar Money Drop Competing for up to $1 million. (N) ‘PG’ Å News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ News on PDX-TV Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Antiques Roadshow (N) ’ ‘G’ Å Secrets of the Dead ’ ‘PG’ Independent Lens The Calling Ordained religious professionals. (N) ‘PG’ The Sing-Off The winning group is announced. ’ ‘PG’ Å Perfect Couples News Jay Leno 90210 2021 Vision ’ ‘14’ Å Gossip Girl War at the Roses ’ ‘14’ Married... With Married... With King of Queens King of Queens Moment-Luxury Paint Paper Sew With Nancy Dewberry Shw Simply Ming ‘G’ Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Caprial-John Antiques Roadshow (N) ’ ‘G’ Å Secrets of the Dead ’ ‘PG’ Independent Lens The Calling Ordained religious professionals. (N) ‘PG’

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Intervention Lorna ‘PG’ Å Intervention Ashley Ashley. ‘14’ Intervention Rob ‘14’ Å Intervention Darick (N) Å Hoarders Andrew; Lydia (N) ‘PG’ Hoarders ‘PG’ Å 130 28 8 32 Intervention Marquel ‘14’ Å ›››› “Miracle on 34th Street” (1947, Fantasy) Maureen O’Hara, John Payne. An (3:15) “Christmas in (5:45) ››› “Holiday Inn” (1942, Musical Comedy) Bing Crosby, Fred Astaire, Marjorie Reynolds. An (10:15) ›››› “Miracle on 34th Street” (1947) Maureen O’Hara, John Payne. An 102 40 39 Connecticut” entertainer’s country inn is only open on holidays. Å adwoman’s boyfriend defends Macy’s Santa in court. adwoman’s boyfriend defends Macy’s Santa in court. Pit Bulls and Parolees ’ ‘PG’ Å Pit Bulls and Parolees ’ ‘PG’ Å Pit Bulls and Parolees ’ ‘PG’ Å Pit Bulls and Parolees ’ ‘PG’ Å Pit Bulls and Parolees ’ ‘PG’ Å Pit Bulls and Parolees ’ ‘PG’ Å 68 50 12 38 Pit Bulls and Parolees Sin City ‘PG’ Tabatha’s Salon Takeover ‘14’ Real Housewives/Beverly Real Housewives/Beverly The Real Housewives of Atlanta ‘14’ The Real Housewives of Atlanta ‘14’ Tabatha’s Salon Takeover (N) ‘14’ Tabatha’s Salon Takeover ‘14’ 137 44 The Dukes of Hazzard ’ The Dukes of Hazzard ’ CMA Awards 2010 Performances include Dierks Bentley, Kenny Chesney, Lady Antebellum and Keith Urban. ’ 190 32 42 53 (4:00) CMA Awards 2010 ’ Biography on CNBC Å American Greed Mad Money Executive Vision: Leadership in Biography on CNBC Å Cook Healthy Home Makeover 51 36 40 52 Executive Vision: Leadership in Larry King Live ‘PG’ Å Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Larry King Live ‘PG’ Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 Parker Spitzer (N) (5:27) Tosh.0 ‘14’ (5:57) Scrubs ‘14’ (6:27) Scrubs ‘14’ Daily Show Colbert Report (7:58) South Park (8:28) South Park (8:59) South Park (9:29) South Park South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 Vegas Vacation Outdoorsman Joy of Fishing PM Edition Visions of NW Talk of the Town Local issues. Cooking Outdoorsman High Desert Word Travels ’ Talk of the Town Local issues. Ride Guide ‘14’ Outside Presents 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington Hannah Montana Sonny-Chance Fish Hooks ‘G’ Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb ›››› “Beauty and the Beast” (1991) Premiere. Suite/Deck Fish Hooks ‘G’ Fish Hooks ‘G’ Suite/Deck Suite/Deck 87 43 14 39 Wizards-Place American Chopper ’ ‘PG’ Å American Chopper ’ ‘PG’ Å American Chopper ’ ‘PG’ Å American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. Black Ops Brothers: Howe & Howe American Chopper ’ ‘PG’ Å 156 21 16 37 American Chopper ’ ‘PG’ Å NFL Football Chicago Bears at Minnesota Vikings (Live) SportsCenter (Live) Å NFL PrimeTime (N) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 Monday Night 2010 World Series of Poker Final Table, from Las Vegas. SportsCenter SportsNation Å NFL Presents NBA Tonight 2010 Poker 2010 World Series of Poker Å 22 24 21 24 2010 World Series of Poker College Football Rose Bowl, played 1/1/88. Å Bowling Å Bowling Å AWA Wrestling Å NBA Eastern Conference Final Game 5, from May 26, 2010. (N) 23 25 123 25 College Football SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Winnie Pooh Pooh Christmas Phineas-Ferb Prep- Landing “Santa Buddies” (2009) George Wendt, Christopher Lloyd. Premiere. Å “Santa Buddies” (2009, Comedy) George Wendt, Christopher Lloyd. Å 67 29 19 41 (4:00) “Snow 2 Brain Freeze” ‘PG’ Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Paula’s Best 30-Minute Meals Ultimate Recipe Showdown ‘G’ Unwrapped Unwrapped Deli Best Thing Ate Best Thing Ate Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Good Eats ‘G’ Good Eats 177 62 46 44 B’foot Contessa Warren Miller Warren Miller College Basketball San Francisco at Washington Seahawks The Final Score Profiles The Final Score 20 45 28* 26 College Basketball Arizona at North Carolina State ››› “Kung Fu Panda” (2008) Voices of Jack Black, Angelina Jolie. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ›› “Baby Mama” (2008, Comedy) Tina Fey, Amy Poehler, Greg Kinnear. ›› “The Family Stone” (2005) Dermot Mulroney, Sarah Jessica Parker. 131 House Hunters Property Virgins Property Virgins House Hunters Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l My First Place My First Place 176 49 33 43 Income Property Income Property Income Property Designed to Sell Hunters Int’l Seven Deadly Sins Pride ‘14’ Å American Pickers ‘PG’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ American Pickers (N) ‘PG’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Storage Wars Pawn Stars ‘PG’ 155 42 41 36 (4:00) The Exodus Decoded ‘PG’ American Pickers ‘PG’ Å “Single Santa Seeks Mrs. Claus” (2004) Crystal Bernard. ‘PG’ Å “12 Men of Christmas” (2009) Kristin Chenoweth, Josh Hopkins. ‘PG’ Å How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘PG’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann True Life ’ True Life ’ 16 and Pregnant Megan ’ ‘14’ Teen Mom 2: Girls-Teen Mom 2 True Life I’m an Albino (N) ’ Vice Guide True Life ’ 192 22 38 57 True Life ’ SpongeBob SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å SpongeBob OddParents Big Time Rush ’ ‘G’ Å My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids George Lopez ’ Glenn Martin The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob (5:55) UFC Unleashed ’ ‘PG’ (7:06) UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ (8:16) ››› “Bad Santa” (2003) Billy Bob Thornton, Tony Cox. ’ (10:33) ››› “Bad Santa” (2003) Billy Bob Thornton. 132 31 34 46 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘PG’ “Triassic Attack” (2010) Steven Brand, Raoul Trujillo. ‘14’ Å ›› “Jurassic Park III” (2001) Sam Neill, William H. Macy. Premiere. Gundam Revival Tokko ‘14’ Å 133 35 133 45 ›› “The Land That Time Forgot” (2009) C. Thomas Howell. Å Behind Scenes Mark Chironna J. Franklin Jesse Duplantis Christmas Snow ‘G’ Joel Osteen ‘PG’ Perry Stone ‘G’ Jack Van Impe Changing-World For This Reason I Came 205 60 130 Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ’ ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Conan (N) 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond ›››› “8 1/2” (1963) Marcello Mastroianni, ››› “The Shop Around the Corner” (1940) Margaret Sullavan, (8:45) ››› “The Great Dictator” (1940, Comedy) Charles Chaplin, Paulette Goddard, Jack Oakie. Barber ››› “Baby Doll” (1956, Drama) Karl Malden, Carroll Baker, Eli Wallach. A man 101 44 101 29 spends the day with the child-bride of his rival. James Stewart, Frank Morgan. Å (DVS) who looks like dictator meets fellow dictator. Å Claudia Cardinale. Wedding Day Ultimate Cake Off Roller Derby! ‘PG’ Cake Boss: Next Great Baker ‘PG’ Cake Boss: Next Great Baker ‘PG’ Cake Boss: Next Great Baker ‘PG’ Fabulous Cakes (N) ’ ‘G’ Å Cake Boss: Next Great Baker ‘PG’ 178 34 32 34 Wedding Day Law & Order Rumble ’ ‘14’ Bones ’ ‘14’ Å The Closer High Crimes ‘14’ Å The Closer (N) ‘14’ Å Men of a Certain Age (N) ‘MA’ Å The Closer (Part 1 of 2) ‘14’ Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Paradigm ’ ‘14’ Dr. Seuss’ Grinch Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Adventure Time MAD ‘PG’ Misadv. Flapjack Johnny Test ‘Y7’ King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ’ ‘14’ Å ››› “Shrek” (2001, Comedy) Voices of Mike Myers, Eddie Murphy. 84 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations When Vacations Attack ‘PG’ Å Dining With Death (N) ‘PG’ Å Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son ›› “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” (1989) Chevy Chase. (11:08) Roseanne (11:37) Roseanne 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons NCIS Heartland ’ ‘PG’ Å (6:59) NCIS Nine Lives ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Borderland ’ ‘14’ Å WWE Monday Night RAW ’ ‘PG’ Å (11:05) ››› “Ocean’s Thirteen” 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew ‘14’ My Big Friggin’ Wedding ’ ‘14’ Mario Lopez Bret Michaels Mario Lopez Bret Michaels 191 48 37 54 Basketball Wives ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:40) ›› “Maid in Manhattan” 2002 Jennifer Lopez. ›› “G-Force” 2009, Action Bill Nighy. ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “Sex Drive” 2008, Comedy Josh Zuckerman, Clark Duke. ’ ‘R’ Å (9:50) › “Fired Up” 2009 Nicholas D’Agosto. ‘PG-13’ Industrial Light After Film School ›› “The Manhattan Project” 1986, Suspense John Lithgow. ‘PG-13’ Å ›› “Smilla’s Sense of Snow” 1997, Suspense Julia Ormond, Gabriel Byrne. ‘R’ Å ›› “Smilla’s Sense of Snow” 1997, Suspense Julia Ormond. ‘R’ Å Rampage-Evo Red Bull: Rampage Retrospective The Daily Habit Red Bull X-Fighters 2010 Rome (N) Bondi Rescue The Daily Habit Uncharted ‘PG’ The Daily Habit Red Bull X-Fighters 2010 Rome Bondi Rescue The Daily Habit Golf Videos Golf Videos Golf Videos Golf Videos The Golf Fix Golf Videos Golf Videos Golf Central Golf Videos Golf Videos The Golf Fix Golf Videos Golf Videos GolfNow D.C. (4:00) “Naughty or Nice” (2004) ‘PG’ The Nuttiest Nutcracker ‘G’ Å Christmas Tree ›› “The Ultimate Gift” (2006, Drama) Drew Fuller, James Garner, Abigail Breslin. Å “Karroll’s Christmas” (2004) Tom Everett Scott, Verne Troyer. ‘PG’ Å 24/7 Penguins/Capitals: Road to the “You Don’t Know Jack” 2010, Docudrama ››› “Fantastic Mr. Fox” 2009, Comedy Voices of George Cloo- “The Special Relationship” 2010 Michael Sheen. Prime Minister “Temple Grandin” 2010, Docudrama Claire Danes, Catherine O’Hara. The scientist HBO 425 501 425 10 NHL Winter Classic ’ ‘MA’ Å ney, Meryl Streep. ’ ‘PG’ Å Tony Blair and President Bill Clinton. ‘NR’ Å becomes an advocate for autistics and livestock. ’ Å Al Pacino. ’ ‘NR’ Å ››› “Chopper” 2000, Drama Eric Bana, Vince Colosimo. ‘R’ Arrested Dev. Undeclared ‘PG’ Undeclared ‘PG’ Undeclared ‘PG’ ››› “Requiem for a Dream” 2000, Drama Ellen Burstyn, Jared Leto. ‘R’ (11:15) ››› “Chopper” 2000 ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (8:15) › “The Skulls” 2000, Suspense Joshua Jackson, Paul Walker. A college fresh- › “Couples Retreat” 2009, Comedy Vince Vaughn, Jason Bateman. Four Midwestern (4:45) ››› “George A. Romero’s Diary of the Dead” 2007, Hor- ››› “The Hangover” 2009 Bradley Cooper. Three pals must MAX 400 508 7 ror Michelle Morgan. ’ ‘R’ Å find a missing groom after a wild bash. ’ ‘R’ man joins an elite, dangerous society. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å couples descend on an island resort. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Sunken Treasures of the Nile ‘G’ Secrets of the Hope Diamond ‘G’ World’s Biggest Cave (N) ‘G’ Sunken Treasures of the Nile ‘G’ Secrets of the Hope Diamond ‘G’ World’s Biggest Cave ‘G’ The First Jesus? ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Invader Zim ‘Y7’ SpongeBob NTOON 89 115 189 Dirt Trax TV ATV World Truck Academy Destination Muzzy’s Bow. Western Extreme Elk Chronicles Best of the West Truck Academy ATV World Dirt Trax TV Baja Unlimited Ult. Adventure Destination OUTD 37 307 43 (4:45) ››› “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” 2008, Comedy-Drama ›› “Finishing the Game” 2007 Roger Fan. Studio chiefs seek a ›› “Flawless” 2007, Crime Drama Michael Caine. iTV. A janitor convinces a frustrated ››› “The Road” 2009, Drama Viggo Mortensen, Kodi Smit-McPhee. iTV. A father and SHO 500 500 Javier Bardem. iTV. ’ ‘PG-13’ replacement for the late Bruce Lee. ‘NR’ executive to help him steal diamonds. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å son wander through a post-apocalyptic world. ‘R’ Hot Rod TV ‘PG’ Hot Rod TV ‘G’ Barrett-Jackson Special Edition ‘G’ Test Drive Battle-Supercars Hot Rod TV ‘PG’ Hot Rod TV ‘G’ Barrett-Jackson Special Edition ‘G’ Test Drive Battle-Supercars Auto Racing SPEED 35 303 125 Rush Hour 2 2001 (5:20) ››› “Chicago” 2002 Catherine Zeta-Jones. ’ Starz Studios ››› “Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs” 2009 ’ ›› “Sweet Home Alabama” 2002 Reese Witherspoon. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (10:50) ››› “District 9” 2009 ‘R’ STARZ 300 408 300 ››› “Big Fan” 2009 Patton Oswalt. A football fan’s meeting with ›› “Igor” 2008, Comedy Voices of John Cusack, Steve Bus›› “Twilight” 2008, Romance Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson. A teen is caught up (10:05) ›› “Vanilla Sky” 2001, Suspense Tom Cruise, Penélope Cruz. A disfigured TMC 525 525 his idol takes a dark turn. ’ ‘R’ Å cemi, John Cleese. ’ ‘PG’ Å in an unorthodox romance with a vampire. ’ ‘PG-13’ womanizer cannot distinguish dreams from reality. ’ ‘R’ (4:30) NHL Hockey Anaheim Ducks at Boston Bruins (Live) Hockey Central Whacked Out NHL Overtime (Live) Boxing ‘PG’ NHL Overtime VS. 27 58 30 The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å John Edward Cross Country ‘PG’ WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 20, 2010 C3

CALENDAR TODAY THE TRAIN MAN: Watch Michael Lavrich’s extensive collection of toy trains running on a track and ask questions; free; 10 a.m.-1 p.m. and 2-6 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7050 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. THE REPTILE ZONE: Jeff from The Reptile Zone will show lizards, pythons and a tortoise; all ages welcome; free; 3 p.m.; Play Outdoors, 840 S.E. Woodland Blvd., Suite 110, Bend; 866-608-2423. “A CHRISTMAS CAROL”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents an adaptation of Charles Dickens’ classic holiday tale, performed by a youth and adult cast; $19 or $25, $15 ages 12 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www .towertheatre.org. LUNAR ECLIPSE PARTY: Watch a presentation on lunar eclipses, then watch the eclipse through telescopes; dress for cold weather; $6, $4 ages 2-12, free for observatory members; 9-11 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394.

TUESDAY “SHARING OUR FAVORITE GENEALOGY STORIES”: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program followed by a holiday potluck; free; 10 a.m.; Rock Arbor Villa, Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-317-8978, 541-317-9553 or www.orgenweb .org/deschutes/bend-gs.

STARFEST: Explore the festive holiday light display; through Jan. 2; free; 5:50-9:30 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; www.eagle-crest.com.

MONDAY Dec. 27

VEGETARIAN POTLUCK: Bring a vegetarian dish with a list of its ingredients, a gift worth less than $5 for a gift exchange, and 24 of your favorite cookies; free; 6 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-480-3017. LIVE READ: Sit in comfy chairs and listen to short fiction read aloud by library staff; free; 6:30-7:30 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080.

THURSDAY NO EVENTS LISTED.

FRIDAY COMMUNITY CHRISTMAS EVE SERVICE: With food, carols, a choir performance and a performance by Annie Bethancourt; reservations recommended; free; 4, 5:30 and 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www .towertheatre.org. STARFEST: Explore the festive holiday light display; through Jan. 2; free; 5:50-9:30 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; www.eagle-crest.com. ’ TWAS THE NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS: Featuring holiday trivia, caroling and a live reading of the holiday poem; free admission; 78 p.m.; Sunriver Resort, Homestead Room, 57081 Meadow Road; 800486-8591 or www.sunriver-resort .com/traditions.

SATURDAY STARFEST: Explore the festive holiday light display; through Jan. 2; free; 5:50-9:30 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; www.eagle-crest.com.

SUNDAY CHARITY BINGO: Event includes a canned food drive and baked goods sale; proceeds benefit the St. Vincent de Paul food bank; $7; 2 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, 235 N.E. Fourth St., Prineville; 541-447-7659.

541-389-8359 or www.wander lusttours.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE CELEBRATION: Featuring a performance by the Moon Mountain Ramblers and Jukebot; free, $10 for Moon Mountain Ramblers; 9 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

NO EVENTS LISTED.

SATURDAY TUESDAY Dec. 28 CLASSICS BOOK CLUB: Read and discuss short stories by Henry James; free; 6-8 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7087, kevinb@dpls.us or www.dpls.us/calendar.

WEDNESDAY Dec. 29 CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT: Birdwatchers of all levels walk with naturalist or independently for the annual bird survey; free; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394 or www .sunrivernaturecenter.org. REVEREND HORTON HEAT: The Dallas-based rockabilly band performs, with Hillstomp; $20 plus fees in advance, $25 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www .randompresents.com.

Jan. 1 POLAR BEAR PLUNGE: Take an icy plunge into the Lodge Village’s outdoor pool; hot chocolate served; free; 10 a.m.; Sunriver Resort, 17600 Center Drive; 800-486-8591 or www.sunriver-resort.com/traditions. “EAT, DRINK AND BE DEADLY!”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350- 0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com.

SUNDAY Jan. 2 “EAT, DRINK AND BE DEADLY!”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 3:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries .com.

MONDAY THURSDAY Dec. 30

WEDNESDAY

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

NO EVENTS LISTED.

FRIDAY Dec. 31 BEND’S FIRST 1000 LIGHTS COMMUNITY WALK: Event includes a family festival, a magic show, live music and an illuminated walk; proceeds benefit the La Pine Community Kitchen; $18, $25 for families, free ages 13 and younger; all participants are asked to donate three cans of food, warm clothing or pet food; 4 p.m., walk begins 6 p.m.; Juniper Elementary School, 1300 N.E. Norton St.; www .bendsfirst1000lightswalk.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE BASH: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event, with “The Mafioso Murders,” casino games and more; $59, $110 per couple; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboard mysteries .com. ROCKIN’ NEW YEAR’S EVE: Featuring costumes, cardboard instruments, games, crafts and more; reservations requested; $65, $55 resort guests; 6:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; Fort Funnigan, 17600 Center Drive, Sunriver; 541593-4609 or www.sunriver-resort .com/traditions. ROCK THE OX: A New Year’s Eve party with a DJ, dancing, champagne and more; ages 21 and older; $35 plus fees; 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-382-8436 or www .bendticket.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE BONFIRE ON THE SNOW: Wanderlust Tours leads a short snowshoe hike to a bonfire and hand-carved snow amphitheater in the forest; a naturalist shares facts about the forest, animals and the night sky; reservations required; adults only; trips depart from Sunriver and Bend; $85 includes guide, snowshoes, transportation, food and drink; 9 p.m.-1:30 a.m.;

Jan. 3 GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Finding Nouf” by Zoe Ferraris; free; noon; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7085 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar.

TUESDAY Jan. 4 GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “I AM BECAUSE WE ARE,” which explores Madonna’s journey to Malawi to see how AIDS and poverty affect children; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504.

WEDNESDAY Jan. 5 “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, DON CARLO”: Starring Roberto Alagna, Marina Poplavskaya, Anna Smirnova, Simon Keenlyside and Ferruccio Furlanetto in an encore presentation of Verdi’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541382-6347.

THURSDAY Jan. 6 GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Zookeeper’s Wife” by Diane Ackerman; bring a lunch; free; noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541312-1081 or www.deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. “BOOMERS, XERS AND MILLENNIALS, CAN WE ALL GET ALONG?”: Explore characteristics, communications styles and more about different generations; free; 6 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3121034 or www.deschuteslibrary .org/calendar.

FRIDAY Jan. 7 “BOOMERS, XERS AND MILLENNIALS, CAN WE ALL GET ALONG?”: Explore characteristics, communications styles and more about different generations; free; 1 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1034 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend, the Old Mill District and NorthWest Crossing; free; 5-9 p.m., and until 8 p.m. in NorthWest Crossing; throughout Bend. “EAT, DRINK AND BE DEADLY!”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www .beattickets.org.

SATURDAY Jan. 8 “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, LA FANCIULLA DEL WEST”: Starring Deborah Voigt, Marcello Giordani and Lucio Gallo in a presentation of Puccini’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 10 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-3826347. “EAT, DRINK AND BE DEADLY!”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www .beattickets.org. “THE BIG LEBOWSKI”: A screening of the R-rated 1998 film; $10; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www .towertheatre.org. JON WAYNE & THE PAIN: The Minneapolis-based reggae rock act performs; $5 in advance, $7 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331.

SUNDAY Jan. 9 “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 2 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www .beattickets.org. SECOND SUNDAY: Suzanne Burns reads from a selection of her works; followed by an open mic; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3121034 or www.deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. “EAT, DRINK AND BE DEADLY!”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 3:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com.

M T For Monday, Dec. 20

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

BLACK SWAN (R) 2:15, 4:40, 7:10 FAIR GAME (PG-13) 2:25, 5, 7:20 THE GIRL WHO KICKED THE HORNET’S NEST (R) 2:35, 7:05 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 2:40, 7 HOW DO YOU KNOW (PG-13) 2:10, 4:45, 7:25 TAMARA DREWE (R) 2, 4:50, 7:15

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

BURLESQUE (PG-13) 6:50, 9:35 THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER 3-D (PG) 12:40, 3:55, 6:30, 9:15 THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG)

11:30 a.m., 2:15, 5, 7:45, 10:25 DUE DATE (R) 12:45, 3:05, 5:25, 8:05, 10:40 THE FIGHTER (R) 11:05 a.m., 1:45, 4:45, 7:25, 10:05 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 11:20 a.m., 2:30, 6:25, 9:30 HOW DO YOU KNOW (PG-13) 10:55 a.m., 1:35, 4:15, 7:10, 10 LOVE AND OTHER DRUGS (R) 11:25 a.m., 9:45 MEGAMIND (PG) 11:55 a.m., 2:10, 4:30 THE NEXT THREE DAYS (PG-13) 2:05, 6:35 TANGLED (PG) 11:10 a.m., 1:40, 4:20, 6:55, 9:20 TRON: LEGACY 3-D (PG) 11:35 a.m., 12:05, 2:25, 4:05, 5:10, 7, 8, 9:55, 10:45 TRON: LEGACY (PG) 11 a.m., 1:50, 4:40, 7:30, 10:20 THE TOURIST (PG-13) 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:40, 10:15 UNSTOPPABLE (PG-13) 12:30,

2:55, 5:20, 7:55, 10:35 YOGI BEAR (PG) 11:45 a.m., 2, 4:35, 6:45, 9:10 YOGI BEAR 3-D (PG) 12:25, 2:40, 4:55, 7:15, 9:40 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) EDITOR’S NOTE: Due to Monday Night Football, no movies will be shown today.

VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) 10 a.m., 12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 9 TANGLED (PG) 10:30 a.m., 1, 4, 6:15, 8:30 TRON: LEGACY (PG) 10:15 a.m., 1, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 YOGI BEAR (PG) 10 a.m., 12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 7, 9:15

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) 4:30, 7 FAIR GAME (PG-13) 7:15 TANGLED (PG) 5 THE TOURIST (PG-13) 4:45, 7:15 TRON: LEGACY (PG) 4:15, 7

PINE THEATER

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE

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MEGAMIND (PG) 4 UNSTOPPABLE (PG-13) 7

Serial dating pro ready to tell all in ‘Science of Single’ By Ellen McCarthy

getting married and all that stuff.” WASHINGTON — It started The process of forcing herwith a particularly bad date. A self into social situations helped date Rachel Machacek had met her acquire a more realistic tack online, who didn’t crack a smile when it comes to dating: These the whole night and then literally days, “I’m usually thinking, ran away from her without so ‘Ugh, this probably isn’t gonna much as a farewell handshake. be the one. But I’ll get to know The Washington resident was someone, and maybe they’ll know 32 then and had been single for someone.’” seven years, often spending A year of nonstop dating Saturday nights with her cat, a — with all the implicit highs batch of cookies and lows — also and a litany of proved to Machcomplaints about “I was heaving acek, who works the difficulties of as a marketing dating. To get mo- these enormous manager and tivated, she im- expectations on freelance writer, mersed herself that she could do in the world of my dates. Like, it. She could take dating self-help ‘OK, this might charge of her sobooks and wrote cial life, proacabout her expe- be The One.’ And tively find dates riences for The this poor guy who and survive even Washington Post. worst of them. doesn’t even know theSitting A book deal at home followed, sending me, doesn’t know with the cat Machacek on a what he’s in for — and cookies “is yearlong advenso much easier ture to investigate ’cause I’ve already — it’s safe, and “what happens planned out my you know it,” she when you use all says. “I’ve been the resources you wedding dress OK with living possibly can to and where we’re a single life, for meet and date the the most part. getting married opposite sex.” But I don’t really “The Science and all that stuff.” want that forever. of Single,” which I would like to be hits bookstores — Rachel Machacek, with someone Jan. 3, is her ac- author eventually and count of that (hibernating) experiment — a does not bring memoir that’s equal parts you any closer to that. Not even funny, mortifying and insight- close.” ful, and stands to make MachOne of the things Machacek acek into the Bridget Jones of realized is that “Washington is so Washington. small when it comes to dating.” The book traces her forays And she knows it’s about to get a into singles events, online dat- lot smaller for her once the book ing, matchmaking services, is published and her prospective blind dates and dating coaches. dates discover it via Google. Approaching the endeavor with “Some guys do have a proba not-so-scientific method that lem with it,” she says. “And if turns her into a romance-seek- they read that, I might not have ing guinea pig, she encounters the chance to express who I am debacles any veteran singleton now.” will recognize: dates that bear But Machacek is proud of the no resemblance to their online book and hopes it will give solprofile, conversations that run ace to other singles. dry in two minutes, and baffling “It can be lonely being single, behavior — in her case, a man when you don’t have someone who drank from the same water to come home to and share your glass as a dog and another who life with. In some ways its really loudly declared that their waiter awesome, ’cause you’re free to smelled like a vagina. do whatever the heck you want. The worst kind of disappoint- But I felt like I was having fewer ment was also the most com- and fewer people to commisermon: The guys she went out ate with,” she says. “So I really with weren’t who she hoped wanted to create something that they’d be. “I was heaving these people could actually commiserenormous expectations on my ate with. dates,” says Machacek, now 37. “And hopefully inspire them,” “Like, ‘OK, this might be The she adds. “If they’re not open to One.’ And this poor guy who the possibilities or if they haven’t doesn’t even know me, doesn’t explored all the dating possibiliknow what he’s in for — ’cause ties, maybe they’ll go, ‘Oh, OK, if I’ve already planned out my she did that, I could do that. No wedding dress and where we’re one dies.’” The Washington Post

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME


C4 Monday, December 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 20, 2010 C5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO SATURDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Dec. 20, 2010: This year, allow greater give-and-take with key people in your life. Unusual creativity will come forward, though you might need to give up some of what you feel is right. In fact, as you broaden your mental horizons, your life becomes more dynamic. If you are single, many suitors seem to appear out of the ethers. Take your time choosing and committing. If you are attached, allow more give-andtake between you and your sweetie. GEMINI often challenges you. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH A strong sense of direction defines your morning. The ability to flex becomes more important as the day continues. Communication might be off, as many people could respond to only a few words rather than a total concept. Staying even could be very important. Tonight: Having discussions, catching up on friends’ news, answering e-mail. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH A steady path seems to be the only way to go most of the time, especially when dealing with finances. What happens and how you proceed become an issue when the unexpected starts running riot. Tonight: Center yourself, then clear up a misunderstanding. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Smile this morning. You have the capability to handle whatever you must. A key figure or situation could become quite

demanding, fraught with unexpected developments this afternoon. Remember, you’ve got what it takes. Tonight: Blowing off steam and maybe having some fun on the way. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HH The smart Moon Child will decide to break from his or her usual routine. You need that extra time to center and perhaps finish off some holiday errands. For you, it is important to be prepared, and that you will be. Tonight: Keep it low-key. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You could be overwhelmed; many people seek you out. Though you focus on one issue at a time, you could be a little taken aback by the time you spend working with others. Confusion surrounds communication. A partner or dear friend is nearly instinctive. Tonight: Where the crowds are. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Take the lead. Others knock on your door. Friends call requesting this or that. Be careful dealing with so many people. You might not be so effective. Your intuition helps with last-minute errands. Tonight: A must appearance. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Keep reaching out for those at a distance, whether it’s family, friends or associates. Make the most of the good humor of the moment. Don’t stand on ceremony with an unreturned call. Remember, “’tis the season.” Tonight: Touch base with a special person in your life. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH You have a way with a key associate or partner. You need to be creative in how you

approach this person, yet you generally get an agreement. Could the person in question be a secret admirer? Tonight: Make it comfortable and cozy. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Others seem to know they have the power to make what they want happen. It nearly boils down to whether you are willing to be a player or you want to be a witness. Either way works; the choice is yours. Tonight: Touch base with someone you have been on the outs with. It is Christmastime. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Tackle as much as you can today. The real objective is to complete anything not related to the holiday season but is pending. Use your instincts with a financial matter or key gift. You know which way to go. Tonight: Get wrapping, etc., done. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Your imagination will kick in, especially if you hit a financial brick wall. You’ll find a way to sail right through, and quickly at that. Investigate an opportunity, even if the person presenting it has been harsh or outrageous. Know when to look past the obvious. Tonight: Kick up your heels. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Know your limits and understand where a family member is coming from. You upset others when you let go and become unpredictable. Misunderstandings could happen. Confirm meetings, etc. Tonight: Home is where your heart is.

© 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C6 Monday, December 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Predator Continued from C1 Many different kinds of larger life forms, including fungi, animals and plants, subsequently evolved independently from separate single-celled ancestors. The evolution of multicellularity was a critical step in the origin of each of these groups because it opened the way to the emergence of much more complex organisms in which different cells could take on different tasks. And the emergence of larger organisms drove profound changes in ecology that changed the face of the planet. Scientists are eager to understand how transitions from a unicellular to multicellular lifestyle were accomplished. Reconstructing events that happened more than 600 million years ago, in the case of animals, is a great challenge. Ideally, one would have specimens from just before and immediately after the event. But the unicellular ancestor of animals and those first animals are long extinct. So information has to be gleaned from living sources.

In the beginning This is where comparisons between choanoflagellates and animals come into play. The close kinship between choanoflagellates and animals means that there once lived a single-celled ancestor that gave rise to two lines of evolution — one leading to the living choanoflagellates and the other to animals. Choanoflagellates can tell us a lot about that ancestor because any characteristics that they share with animals must have been present in that ancestor and then inherited by both groups. By similar logic, whatever animals have but choanoflagellates lack probably arose during animal evolution. There are striking physical resemblances between choanoflagellates and certain animal cells, specifically the feeding cells of sponges, called choanocytes. Sponge choanocytes also have a flagellum and possess a collar of filaments for trapping food. Similar collars have been seen on several kinds of animals cells. These similarities indicate that the unicellular ancestor of animals probably had a flagellum and a collar, and may have been much like a choanoflagellate. But even more surprising and informative resemblances between choanoflagellates and animals have been revealed at the level of DNA. Recently, the genome sequence of one choanoflagellate species was analyzed by a team led by Nicole King and Daniel Rokhsar at the University of California, Berkeley. They identified many genetic features that were shared exclusively between choanoflagellates and animals. These included 78 pieces of proteins, many of which in animals are involved in making cells adhere to one another. The presence of so many cell adhesion molecules in choanoflagellates was very surprising. The scientists are trying to figure out what all of those molecules are doing in a unicellular creature. One possibility is that the molecules are used in capturing prey. Whatever the explanation, the presence of those genes in a unicellular organism indicates that much of the machinery for making multicellular animals was in place long before the origin of animals. It may be that rather than evolving new genes, animal ancestors simply used what they had to become multicellular. There may be selective advantages to forming colonies, like avoiding being eaten by other small predators. And in fact, some choanoflagellates do form multicellular colonies at stages of their life cycle. King and her colleagues Stephen Fairclough and Mark Doyel investigated one such species to determine whether colony formation occurred by dividing cells staying together, the way animal embryos form, or by individual cells aggregating together, as some protists like slime molds do. The scientists found that colonies formed exclusively by dividing cells staying together. They suggested that the ancient common ancestor of choanoflagellates and animals was capable of forming simple colonies and that this property may well have been a first step on the road to animal evolution. The world is full of microbes, and we spend a lot of worry and effort trying to keep them off and out of our bodies. It is humbling to ponder that still swimming within that microscopic soup are our distant cousins.

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Decoding the brain, with help from a fly By Nicholas Wade New York Times News Service

Taiwanese researchers have managed to bar code some 16,000 of the 100,000 neurons in a fruit fly’s brain and to reconstruct the brain’s wiring map. In terms similar to those that define computers, the team describes the general architecture of the fly’s brain as composed of 41 local processing units, 58 tracts that link the units to other parts of the brain and six hubs. Biologists see this atlas of the fly brain as a first step toward understanding the human brain. Six of the chemicals that transmit messages between neurons are the same in both species. The general structure — two hemispheres with copious cross-links — is also similar. “I think this is the beginning of a new world,” said Ralph Greenspan, a neurobiologist at the University of California, San Diego. Biologists should now be able to match the fruit fly’s well-studied behaviors to the brain circuits established by the new atlas, he said. The atlas is maintained on a supercomputer in Taiwan that fly biologists around the world can query. They can also add to the atlas by uploading their own images of fruit fly neurons. “So I think this will really accelerate progress,” said Josh Dubnau, a neurobiologist at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York. The Taiwan team is led by Ann-Shyn Chiang, who has been working on the project for the last decade. He has assembled a group of 40 people, who include computer programmers and engineers, working on a budget of about $1 million a year.

3-D map of neurons The basis of the atlas is a technique for visualizing the three-dimensional structure of individual neurons, including the cell’s nucleus, its long axon, and the little branches, or dendrites, which it uses to make contact with other neurons. The complex structure of a neuron can be made apparent with a green fluorescent protein modeled on one used by jellyfish. The gene for the protein is inserted into the fruit fly’s genome, along with another gene that represses it. Chiang developed a technique for lifting the repression on the gene in just one neuron at a time. When the gene is expressed, the green fluorescent protein reaches every part of the neuron, defining its structure in exquisite detail. He also invented a remarkable solvent for making the

Fiber-optic Continued from C1 For example, high-speed Internet will allow residents in the areas to use telemedicine to reach regional, state and national health care providers. Central Oregon Community College will be able to provide distance education from the main campus in Bend to rural sites in Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties. It also will build optical networks to business parks in each city, to spur economic development, according to the application. Along with creating two permanent jobs at BendBroadband, the project will employ 14 fiber technicians for a year and create 59 other full-time jobs during construction, according to the application. BendBroadband estimates improved high-speed Internet connections in the region will eventually lead to 115 permanent jobs. The project calls for contractors to install about 130 miles of fiber-optic cable on five different routes in Central Oregon: • Bend to Prineville • Bend to La Pine • Bend to Sunriver • Madras to Prineville • Redmond to Madras Slightly more than 86 per-

Drosophila brain transparent. This is essential if the glowing green neuron is to be imaged precisely. The solvent is so effective that if a researcher fails to keep an eye on the dissected brain as it lies on a microscope slide, the brain will simply disappear when the solvent is added, Dubnau said. Each fly’s brain is a different size and shape, so Chiang’s team had to define average dimensions for the female and the male brain, creating a virtual brain with standard dimensions. They then developed algorithms for recasting the 3-D image of each neuron so as to bring it into register with the standard brain. This means that the 16,000 neuron images, each taken from a different fly, can all be compared. Each neuron is then given a bar code with the coordinates of where its cell nucleus lies within the standard Drosophila brain, as well as information about which other parts of the brain the neuron connects to, and which kind of chemical transmitter it uses.

‘A hybrid system’ The fly brain turns out to be “a hybrid system of grid computing and a supercomputer,” Chiang said. “It tells us how a complex brain is put together and operates. Given the growing evidence for conservation in genetic programs underlying brain development and function, the human brain is likely to consist of similar basic operation units.” The only nervous system so far explored in greater detail is that of the C. elegans roundworm, another laboratory organism. But the little worm’s system has only 302 neurons and perhaps does not fully deserve to be called a brain. The fly brain, with its 100,000 neurons, may prove a better starting point for understanding the human brain, which has an estimated 100 billion neurons, each with about 1,000 synapses. “The beauty of this paper is in the completeness of what he did; it’s in the foresight it took to develop over a decade or more a whole suite of new methods to tackle a problem they saw as fundamental,” Dubnau said, referring to the Chiang team’s work. Chiang’s report is published in the latest issue of Current Biology. “Yesterday I almost fell out of my chair,” said Olaf Sporns, who designs computer models of neural circuits at Indiana University. The matrix showing the interconnectivity of the fly brain in Chiang’s article struck Sporns as amazingly similar to the matrix he had constructed recently for the human cortex.

cent of the line will be above ground, using existing power and telephone poles where available, according to BendBroadband’s construction bidding documents. The project will bring highspeed connections to 25 buildings housing public agencies and nonprofits, such as local governments, public safety agencies, libraries, schools and health care providers. Consumers will likely have to wait a little longer. The federal grant calls for extending the fiber-optic network to the communities. Internet Service Providers in the communities will need to provide the connections to homes. Officially, BendBroadband received the award in late June, according to a federal Recovery Act website. The company expected to spend about $55,600 through the second quarter, mostly on administrative, architectural, engineering, and legal fees and expenses related to obtaining rights of way, according to a status report filed with the government in late October. BendBroadband hopes to start construction next summer, Miller said in the e-mail, and begin service in early 2012. Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@bendbulletin.com.

Boxcar Continued from C1 “We get some incredible products, so I can repurpose them and bring them back to life,” he said. With the building industry’s slowdown, builders are looking at new techniques or options, said Andy High, vice president of government affairs with the Central Oregon Builders Association. “You’re just seeing people getting creative,” High said. Some people are reclaiming wood from old barns, others are taking advantage of the slow times to figure out how to be more efficient in their trades, he said. Schmitz’s venture to reclaim building materials started earlier in 2001, when he began getting contracts with mills to take apart buildings no longer in use in Northern California and Oregon. Other people looked at the big mill structures and were frightened by the size, Schmitz said. “I saw all that wood, and the amazing opportunity,” he said. He sold the lumber from the mill buildings to Japan, and up and down the West Coast, and with the money started buying the nine lots — some with existing houses, as well as an old lumber shed, on a block of Northwest Fresno Avenue, Schmitz said. He also built a house on Northwest Davenport Avenue in Bend, orienting it to catch heat and light from the sun in a passive solar design, constructing it with many recycled materials. The deconstruction business slowed down with the housing downturn, he said, and others got into the business as well. “They’re just trying to make a living, and everyone’s trying to do the right thing,” Schmitz said. And with piles of lumber and equipment on his property, Schmitz said the city of Bend told him he needed to start actually constructing or deconstructing something or face fines. So, even though the timing was poor to start a building project, Schmitz got a permit and spent a year taking apart a house that was on one of the Fresno Avenue lots. He got a building permit to start constructing a new house in summer 2008. “I took the chance, starting this house,” he said. The plan for the house incorporates passive solar designs, including south-facing windows and a cement floor that acts as a battery, storing heat during the summer and releasing it in the winter. On a cold day last week, the sunny front room was warm, even without insulation installed, and Schmitz remarked that he needed a thermometer to demonstrate how warm it was. It’s also designed to incorporate solar panels on its south-facing roof, both to generate electricity and to power a hot-water heater. The goal is to get as close as possible to “net zero,” the point at which a building produces as much power as its occupants use — and to do so as simply as possible, Schmitz said.

“We have to look at development and construction in a different way,” he said. And that goes for construction materials as well. Beams in the Fresno house have nail holes where, in a previous incarnation, they were attached to other pieces of lumber. Schmitz took some metalwork from a crane shed and turned it into the rail of the staircase — a beam salvaged from a single-wide trailer provides the base, and mahogany boards from a Lancair pallet will be fashioned into the steps themselves. The caps of the stair railings also are mahogany, from railroad boxcars, after which Schmitz named his company.

Recession hits But the house isn’t finished yet — he didn’t have the money to complete it. More than two years later, however, he has sold the house on Davenport Avenue and plans to use the proceeds to finish the residence on Fresno. When the recession hit, he looked around to see what else he could do to be sustainable. He had land next door to the Fresno house, he said. So, two years ago, he planted a garden, growing greens, carrots, potatoes, onions, Jerusalem artichokes and more. As late as last week, he still had the Jerusalem artichokes — a tuber — in the ground, as well as some carrots and hardy cabbage. “The biggest thing I’ve gained from the slowdown was this garden,” he said. And he and a friend started a business, called Fish Lips, selling fish caught that day on the Columbia River to restaurants.

“It’s another sustainable business that has given me good opportunities,” he said, noting that they can only catch fish when Native American tribes and state Department of Fish and Wildlife biologists say the run is healthy enough. Some businesses have picked up, but others have slowed down. He still restores old, decaying log homes, but that business isn’t as busy as it was in the past, he said. And although there have not been as many deconstruction projects, he has one coming up for a mill that involves taking apart three sheds that will produce 100,000 board feet of lumber and piles of tin roofing. He’s also thinking about what to do with the other properties on the Fresno block. Schmitz envisions a community where people have a stake in the garden, and know their neighbors — he doesn’t want fences on the front of property, instead considering marking property by fruit trees, berry bushes or other natural elements. He’s thinking of smaller homes — that’s what people need in this economy, he said — or maybe installing apartments in an old lumberyard building on one of the lots. Schmitz said he wants to keep building, and building smarter, but also is attracted to new niches that could be a creative outlet. “It’s great because I end up doing these niche businesses, then everyone else starts to follow,” Schmitz said. “You’re looking for that next thing.” Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or at kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

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NBA Inside Grant Hill and Steve Nash lead Phoenix over Oklahoma City, see Page D4.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, DECEMBER 20, 2010

WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL UConn women win 88th straight, match UCLA men NEW YORK — Geno Auriemma and Connecticut matched UCLA’s record streak in one of basketball’s most famous arenas. Already with no equal in women’s hoops, UConn won its 88th straight game Sunday to tie the mark set by coach John Wooden and his UCLA men’s teams from 1971-74. Tiffany Hayes scored 26 points and Maya Moore added 22 to help the top-ranked Huskies rout No. 11 Ohio State 81-50 in the Maggie Dixon Classic at Madison Square Garden. “The number’s the number. I don’t know if that changes me a whole lot right now,” Auriemma said. “I’m going to go to a good restaurant tonight. I’m going to have a good bottle of wine. I would have done that either way.” UConn already owned the longest winning streak in NCAA women’s basketball history. Next up, the Huskies (10-0) can surpass the UCLA men Tuesday night at home against No. 15 Florida State. Connecticut matched the Bruins’ mark before a crowd of 15,232 — the second-biggest for a women’s game at Madison Square Garden. With 40 seconds left, the crowd rose and chanted “88! 88!” — The Associated Press

Another cyclocross event hits Bend in 2011 By Heather Clark For The Bulletin

Central Oregon recently bade farewell to the Cyclocross National Championships, but it will welcome in 2011 a cyclocross racing doubleheader that could again attract hundreds of racers to the region. A stop on Oregon’s annual Cross Crusade Series will make its permanent new home in Bend, Visit Bend CEO Doug

LaPlaca has confirmed. The two-day Halloween Cross Crusades, most recently held at the Clatsop County Fairgrounds in Astoria on the Oregon Coast, are set next year for Saturday, Oct. 29, and Sunday, Oct. 30, and will be held in Bend’s Old Mill District. In 2010, the Halloween races attracted approximately 600 riders per day. LaPlaca said last week that

CYCLING CENTRAL he expects to position the Cross Crusades in Bend as a national event, noting that he hopes to draw riders from not only the Northwest but from across the country. Festivities will kick off on Fri-

day, Oct. 28, with a celebration in downtown Bend. The racing will take place on Saturday and Sunday, when the competition is expected to include many elements of the recent Cyclocross National Championships, such as the staircase, the flyover obstacle, and live music. Another party will be staged on Saturday night, and Sunday will be the Halloween event’s popular costume day.

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

A group of racers speed through the dust in the Wave 5 start of the Cascade Chainbreakers mountain bike race, west of Bend in May.

“The initial interest from the (cycling) industry,” said LaPlaca, “has been very positive.” Cross Crusade is an eight-race cyclocross series held annually in October and November at venues in the Portland area and around northwest Oregon. Cross Crusade races were last staged east of the Cascades in 2005. The series each year attracts more participants than any other cyclocross series in the country.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Riders in the back of the main field take handouts as they try to finish Stage 3 of the Cascade Cycling Classic in July.

INSIDE NFL Bengals........ 19 Browns......... 17

Lions............23 Buccaneers ..20

Cowboys......33 Redskins ......30

Panthers ...... 19 Cardinals ..... 12

Titans...........31 Texans ......... 17

Ravens .........30 Saints .......... 24

Colts ............34 Jaguars ........ 24

Falcons ........34 Seahawks .... 18

Chiefs ..........27 Rams............ 13

Raiders ........39 Broncos .......23

Bills.............. 17 Dolphins ...... 14

Jets ..............22 Steelers ....... 17

Eagles ..........38 Giants ..........31

Patriots ........31 Packers ........27

Huge rally lifts Eagles over Giants Philadelphia scores 28 point in the final 7:28 for a victory over New York, see Page D3

Jess Reed / The Bulletin

Competitors take part in the elite women’s race of the U.S. Cyclocross Nationals in Bend on Sunday, Dec. 12.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Racers begin their climb up Archie Briggs Road during the third lap of the U23 USA Cycling road race in June.

A big year on bikes Central Oregon made its mark in the world of cycling in 2010

C

ycling enthusiasts in Central Oregon have much for which to be proud in 2010. This past year was marked by record turnouts at biking events, impressive local, national and international performances by our hometown pros, tremendous progress

by our trail-building organizations and their volunteers, and generous fundraising for local charities. As 2010 draws to a close, let’s look back at the year’s many highlights that took place on, or otherwise involved, bikes. Participation numbers at mountain bike races statewide were up in 2010, and nowhere was that more evident than in Central Oregon. The Cascade Chainbreaker led all Oregon mountain

HEATHER CLARK

bike races with a record turnout of 425 riders. The newly established Sisters Stampede crosscountry mountain bike race stormed onto the Central Oregon racing scene in May, attracting nearly 400 riders in its first running on the Peterson Ridge network of trails. It certainly earned my nod as the best new biking event of 2010 in Central Oregon. In road racing, Central Oregon’s

marquee stage race — the Cascade Cycling Classic — underwent a makeover in 2010 and attracted a record 194 riders in the pro men’s race. Organizers swapped out a road race for a more spectator-friendly evening prologue, which was staged in Bend’s Old Mill District. The CCC also added a brutal climbing stage that sent riders over the old McKenzie Pass before finishing atop Three Creeks Road near Sisters. Among the high-profile riders who starred on the Central Oregon cycling stage in 2010 was Mara Abbott. See Bikes / D6

Going from hoops to headlocks Philadelphia Eagles’ Michael Vick gestures during the fourth quarter of Sunday’s game against the New York Giants. The Eagles beat the Giants 38-31.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 NFL ............................................D3 Basketball ................................. D4 Skiing ........................................D5 Cycling Central..................... D5-6

Madras wrestling star Adrian Phillips takes to the mats after giving up basketball

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on Oliver’s recruitment of Adrian Phillips to the Madras High wrestling team last season wasn’t exactly under the radar. Oliver needed a heavyweight to fill out his roster, and he could not stop thinking about the 6-foot-2inch, 270-pound Phillips, who was playing junior varsity basketball for the White Buffaloes. “Several times I told Allen (Hair, Madras’ head boys basketball coach) he needed to kick Adrian off the (basketball) team,” Oliver recalls with a chuckle.

BEAU EASTES Phillips, then a junior, eventually joined the wrestling team last season and finished sixth in the 285pound bracket at the 2010 Class 5A state tournament. This season, after spending last summer wrestling at camps and in freestyle tournaments, Phillips is 9-1 and a serious contender for the 2011 Class 4A state heavyweight title. (Madras moved from 5A to 4A this school year after a decrease in enrollment.) “He’s a whole nother kid than he was last year,” Oliver says about Phillips, who entering last weekend was The Oregon Wrestling Forum’s top-ranked 4A heavyweight. “He’s

driven, and he’ll do anything you ask him to do.” Because of his quickness and athleticism, Phillips’ transition from high-tops to headgear last winter was surprisingly smooth. He placed third in his first tournament, Pendleton’s Free Berry Invitational over the winter break, and then went 50 during Madras’ own invitational dual tournament in early January, helping the Buffs to a runner-up finish. Phillips blazed through the regular season before winning the Intermountain Conference district title with a 7-5 triple-overtime victory over Bend’s Nick Russell in the 285-pound final. “I knew I could be one of the better wrestlers out there,” recalls Phillips, who wrestled in junior high. “But I didn’t think I’d progress this fast.” This season has been even better. See Headlocks / D5

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Madras High wrestler Adrian Phillips.


D2 Monday, December 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

SOCCER

Today Girls basketball: Summit at Eagle Point, 6 p.m.; Western Mennonite at Culver, 5 p.m. Boys basketball: Western Mennonite at Culver, 6:30 p.m.

11:55 a.m. — English Premier League, Manchester City vs. Everton, ESPN2. 2 p.m. — English Premier League, Chelsea vs. Manchester United (taped), FSNW.

HOCKEY 4:30 p.m. — NHL, Anaheim Ducks at Boston Bruins, VS. network.

FOOTBALL 5:30 p.m. — NFL, Chicago Bears at Minnesota Vikings, ESPN.

BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — NBA, Milwaukee Bucks at Portland Trail Blazers, Comcast SportsNet Northwest.

TUESDAY TENNIS 11 a.m. — Match for Africa, Roger Federer vs. Rafael Nadal, ESPN2.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — Men’s college, William & Mary at North Carolina, ESPN2. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, UNLV at Kansas State, ESPN2. 7 p.m. — Men’s college, Idaho at Oregon, Comcast SportsNet Northwest.

HOCKEY 4:30 p.m. — NHL, New Jersey Devils at Washington Capitals, VS. network.

FOOTBALL 5 p.m. — College, Beef ‘O’ Brady’s Bowl, Louisville vs. Southern Mississippi, ESPN.

RADIO TODAY BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — NBA, Milwaukee Bucks at Portland Trail Blazers, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690.

TUESDAY BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — Men’s college, Idaho at Oregon, KBND-AM 1110. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Golf • Els beats Goosen by shot to win South African Open title: Ernie Els has won the South African Open in Durban, South Africa, for the fifth time, shooting a 6-under 66 to beat Retief Goosen by one shot. Els had five birdies, an eagle and a bogey Sunday to finish at 25-under 257 in the rain-delayed European Tour event, where South Africans took the top four spots. The course was shortened to 17 holes because of a water-logged green on the par-3 fourth, where all players were given a par score.

Baseball • Brewers trade for Royals’ Greinke: The Milwaukee Brewers are going all in for 2011, acquiring former Cy Young winner Zack Greinke in a trade Sunday with the Kansas City Royals. The Royals acquired shortstop Alcides Escobar, outfielder Lorenzo Cain and right-handed pitching prospects Jake Odorizzi and Jeremy Jeffress from the Brewers in exchange for Greinke, shortstop Yuniesky Betancourt and cash considerations. Greinke was 10-14 with a 4.17 ERA for the Royals last season.

Water sports • Lochte leaves with 6 golds and a silver: Ryan Lochte won three more events at the short-course world championships Sunday in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, and headed home with an impressive haul of six golds and one silver. On the final night of competition, Lochte started off with personal victories in the 200 backstroke and 100 individual medley, and then pushed the United States ahead of Russia in the third leg of the 400 medley relay and celebrated as teammate Garrett Weber-Gale held on for the win. • AP Source: Newport, R.I., in talks for America’s Cup: Negotiations have intensified to bring the America’s Cup back to Newport, R.I., in 2013, a person with knowledge of the talks told The Associated Press on Thursday. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because no agreement is in place. — The Associated Press

Smu

IN THE BLEACHERS

Kansas St North Carolina Nebraska

RUSS READ MEMORIAL At Mt. Bachelor Dec. 19 Place, name, (first run, second run), total time Men’s Giant Slalom 1, Aidan Daly-Jensen, (59.56, 1:00.54), 2:00.10. 2, Kristoff Fowler, (1:00.23, 59.89), 2:00.12. 3, Tyler Horton, (1:00.00, 1:00.31), 2:00.31. 4, Pierce Whalen, (1:00.15, 1:00.91), 2:01.06. 5, Tim Hill, (1:00.73, 1:00.91), 2:01.64. 6, Stephan Splitstoser, (1:00.74, 1:01.06), 2:01.80. 7, Christian Schuster, (1:01.40, 1:01.02), 2:02.42. 8, Max Stamler, (1:01.22, 1:01.59), 2:02.81. 9, Scotty Daletas, (1:01.44, 1:02.08), 2:03.52. 10, Trevor Olsen, (1:01.79, 1:02.26), 2:04.05. 11, Wilder Von Rohr, (1:02.33, 1:02.17), 2:04.50. 12, Danny W. O’Neal, (1:02.37, 1:02.14), 2:04.51. 13, Jordan DeJarnett, (1:02.06, 1:02.64), 2:04.70. 14, Alec Ramsey, (1:02.34, 1:02.67), 2:05.01. 15, Colin Yost, (1:02.07, 1:03.00), 2:05.07. 16, Greg Wanta, (1:03.11, 1:02.84), 2:05.95. 17, Kurt Vetterlein, (1:02.74, 1:03.31), 2:06.05. 18, Luke Winters, (1:03.35, 1:02.93), 2:06.28. 19, Steven Lantz, (1:03.53, 1:02.85), 2:06.38. 20, Davis Keeney, (1:03.17, 1:03.80), 2:06.97. 21, Dalton Tuor, (1:04.03, 1:03.19), 2:07.22. 22, Tobias Macedo, (1:04.38, 1:03.27), 2:07.65. 23, Keenan S. Seidel, (1:04.95, 1:03.34), 2:08.29. 24, Cade J. Scroggins, (1:04.51, 1:04.01), 2:08.52. 25, Montana Kurahara, (1:04.17, 1:04.60), 2:08.77. 26, Tanner Lujan, (1:04.90, 1:04.08), 2:08.98. 27, Jackson Hukari, (1:04.55, 1:04.74), 2:09.29. 28, James Ralston, (1:04.95, 1:04.35), 2:09.30. 29, Nicolas Lanker, (1:04.60, 1:05.15), 2:09.75. 30, Andrew Glass, (1:05.40, 1:05.31), 2:10.71. 31, Riley Shearer, (1:05.43, 1:05.32), 2:10.75. 32, Chase Ganim, (1:05.11, 1:05.93), 2:11.04. 33, Colin Maxwell, (1:05.24, 1:05.80), 2:11.04. 34, Nicholas Dodds, (1:05.62, 1:05.44), 2:11.06. 35, Jack Botti, (1:05.24, 1:06.13), 2:11.37. 36, Casey Shannon, (1:05.25, 1:06.26), 2:11.51. 37, Kenneth Collins, (1:05.73, 1:06.17), 2:11.90. 38, Alex Reuland, (1:05.62, 1:06.39), 2:12.01. 39, Nathan Hoyt, (1:05.80, 1:06.55), 2:12.35. 40, Chase Fuller, (1:06.55, 1:06.96), 2:13.51. 41, Oscar Stevenson, (1:07.15, 1:08.05), 2:15.20. 42, Elliot Wiitala, (1:07.27, 1:07.97), 2:15.24. 43, Hanson Urdahl, (1:06.91, 1:08.85), 2:15.76. 44, Hunter Kern, (1:06.87, 1:08.99), 2:15.86. 45, Austin Pena, (1:08.05, 1:07.94), 2:15.99. 46, William Reuland, (1:08.02, 1:08.78), 2:16.80. 47, Trevor Maxwell, (1:08.20, 1:09.13), 2:17.33. 48, Nolan Skerbeck, (1:09.13, 1:09.02), 2:18.15. 49, James Cory, (1:09.15, 1:09.48), 2:18.63. 50, Mitchell Law, (1:09.18, 1:09.99), 2:19.17. 51, Jeremy Wood, (1:11.91, 1:09.28), 2:21.19. 52, Andrew Beckwith, (1:10.44, 1:11.08), 2:21.52. 53, Kevin Panton, (1:11.08, 1:10.55), 2:21.63. 54, Samuel Flecker, (1:09.96, 1:12.06), 2:22.02. 55, Aubrey Anderson, (1:09.37, 1:12.73), 2:22.10. 56, Andis Solomon, (1:10.38, 1:11.90), 2:22.28. 57, Thomas Wimberly, (1:09.86, 1:12.84), 2:22.70. 58, Christian W. Bennett, (1:10.29, 1:12.89), 2:23.18. 59, Bern Anderes, (1:11.07, 1:12.33), 2:23.40. 60, Coby Pruder, (1:15.06, 1:16.26), 2:31.32. 61, Joel Caswell, (1:14.58, 1:16.86), 2:31.44. 62, Parker Spear, (1:14.93, 1:16.86), 2:31.79. 63, Christopher McNabb, (1:18.58, 1:16.47), 2:35.05. Women’s Giant Slalom 1, Kyla Miller, (1:01.97, 1:01.83), 2:03.80. 2, Kate Puddy, (1:04.38, 1:03.16), 2:07.54. 3, Nahanni Lukes, (1:04.06, 1:04.26), 2:08.32. 4, Jenna Lou Jansky, (1:04.40, 1:04.26), 2:08.66. 5, Mackenzie Green, (1:04.56, 1:04.73), 2:09.29. 6, Elyse Burandt, (1:05.00, 1:04.32), 2:09.32. 7, Brooke Kelley, (1:04.99, 1:04.62), 2:09.61. 8, Elle Truax, (1:04.25, 1:05.78), 2:10.03. 9,

January 1 Dallas Ticket City Bowl 9.5 9.5 Northwestern Outback Bowl 7 7.5 Penn State Capital One Bowl 11 10 Michigan State Gator Bowl 5.5 5.5 Michigan Rose Bowl 2.5 2.5 Wisconsin Fiesta Bowl 17 17 Connecticut

Texas Tech Florida Alabama Miss. State

Thursday Girls basketball: Culver at Ione, 4 p.m. Boys basketball: Culver at Ione, 5:30 p.m. Monday, Dec. 27 Girls basketball: Nike Interstate Tournament at Lake Oswego: Redmond vs. Silverton, 6:30 p.m.; Mountain View vs. TBA Boys basketball: Madras vs. Barlow at Barlow Invitational, 7 p.m.

ALPINE SKIING

Tennessee Washington

Clemson

Wednesday Boys basketball: Redmond tournament, TBA Wrestling: Crook County at Pasco Tournament at Pasco High, TBA

Wednesday, Dec. 29 Girls basketball: Mountain View, Redmond at Nike Interstate Tournament at Lake Oswego, TBA; La Pine at Regis tournament, TBA; Gilchrist at Bend tournament, TBA, Crook County at Sisters tournament, TBA; Madras, Bend at Summit tournament, TBA Boys basketball: Mountain View, Bend at Summit Tournament, TBA; La Pine at Regis tournament, TBA; Crook County at Sisters tournament, TBA; Madras at Barlow tournament, TBA; Redmond at Abby’s tournament in Medford, TBA; Gilchrist at Mountain View tournament, TBA Wrestling: Bend at NW Duals at Westview High School, TBA; Mountain View at Nevada tournament, TBA; Culver, Crook County, Madras at Freeberry Classic in Pendleton, TBA

Army Syracuse

December 31 Meineke Car Care Bowl 4.5 5.5 South Florida Sun Bowl Miami (Fla.) 2.5 3 Notre Dame Liberty Bowl Georgia 7 6.5 Central Florida Chick-Fil-A Bowl South Carolina 3 3 Florida St

Tuesday Girls basketball: Crook County at Mountain View, 7 p.m.; La Pine at Lakeview, 5 p.m.; Sisters at Burns, 7 p.m.; Bend at Madras, 7 p.m.; Grant Union at Culver, 5 p.m. Boys basketball: Mountain View at Crook County, 7 p.m.; La Pine at Lakeview, 6:30 p.m.; Burns at Sisters, 5 p.m.; Madras at Bend, 7 p.m.; Eagle Point at Summit, 6 p.m.; Redmond tournament, TBA; Grant Union at Culver, 6:30 p.m. Wrestling: Crook County at Pasco Tournament at Pasco High, TBA

Tuesday, Dec. 28 Girls basketball: Mountain View, Redmond at Nike Interstate Tournament at Lake Oswego, TBA; La Pine at Regis tournament, TBA; Gilchrist at Bend tournament, TBA, Crook County at Sisters tournament, TBA; Madras, Bend at Summit tournament, TBA Boys basketball: Mountain View, Bend at Summit Tournament, TBA; La Pine at Regis tournament, TBA; Crook County at Sisters tournament, TBA; Madras at Barlow tournament, TBA; Redmond vs. South Eugene at Abby’s Holiday Tournament in Medford, 6 p.m.; Gilchrist at Mountain View tournament, TBA Wrestling: Redmond at Crater Duals, TBA; Mountain View at Nevada tournament, TBA

7 8 Pinstripe Bowl 3 PK Music City Bowl 1 2 Holiday Bowl 13.5 14

Tcu Oklahoma

Sofia Clement, (1:05.51, 1:04.56), 2:10.07. 10, Caroline Suppiger, (1:04.79, 1:06.07), 2:10.86. 11, Phoebe Rogers, (1:06.40, 1:04.65), 2:11.05. 12, Izzie Raitt, (1:05.30, 1:05.86), 2:11.16. 13, Megan Ganim, (1:06.06, 1:05.32), 2:11.38. 14, Kathleen Daly-Jensen, (1:06.95, 1:04.46), 2:11.41. 15, Taylor N. Bauernfeind, (1:05.94, 1:05.62), 2:11.56. 16, Beth S. Mixon, (1:05.60, 1:06.20), 2:11.80. 17, Dena L. Horstkotte, (1:05.68, 1:06.35), 2:12.03. 18, Madison Hayes-Lattin, (1:07.20, 1:05.09), 2:12.29. 19, Kelsey Spadaro, (1:07.10, 1:05.50) 2:12.60. 20, Kate Christoferson, (1:07.47, 1:05.16), 2:12.63. 21, Gracie Struthers, (1:07.50, 1:05.37), 2:12.87. 22, Lani Wahl, (1:06.54, 1:07.60), 2:14.14. 23, Jessica Berge, (1:08.02, 1:06.43), 2:14.45. 24, Alyson Mat, (1:07.92, 1:06.64), 2:14.56. 25, Mckinley Guenzel, (1:07.34, 1:07.26), 2:14.60. 26, Tessa Yost, (1:08.65, 1:06.24), 2:14.89. 27, Shannen N. Burton, (1:08.02, 1:07.15), 2:15.17. 28, Madeline Chaves, (1:07.93, 1:07.46), 2:15.39. 29, Kayla Lanker, (1:08.00, 1:08.09), 2:16.09. 30, Breanne Mat, (1:08.39, 1:07.81), 2:16.20. 31, Emily Sarich, (1:08.11, 1:08.16), 2:16.27. 32, Allie R. Spadaro, (1:10.42, 1:06.64), 2:17.06. 33, Madeline Ewers, (1:08.43, 1:08.94), 2:17.37. 34, Kelli Clarke, (1:10.26, 1:07.65), 2:17.91. 35, Kendra Ash, (1:08.41, 1:09.70), 2:18.11. 36, Meera Champawat, (1:08.67, 1:09.48), 2:18.15. 37, Abby Howard, (1:09.23, 1:09.96), 2:19.19. 38, Kelsey McKelvey, (1:09.38, 1:10.18), 2:19.56. 39, Molly Clarke, (1:09.15, 1:10.83), 2:19.98. 40, Eloise Loen, (1:09.15, 1:11.65), 2:20.80. 41, Cadence Pearce, (1:10.71, 1:11.51), 2:22.22. 42, Shelby Cutter, (1:10.68, 1:11.79), 2:22.47. 43, Payton Rigert, (1:12.81, 1:13.80), 2:26.61. 44, Hailey Kern, (1:22.59, 1:11.40) 2:33.99.

FOOTBALL NFL NFL Injury Report NEW YORK — The National Football League injury report, as provided by the league (OUT - Definitely will not play; DNP - Did not practice; LIMITED - Limited participation in practice; FULL - Full participation in practice): TODAY CHICAGO BEARS at MINNESOTA VIKINGS — BEARS: FULL: RB Chester Taylor (knee), CB Charles Tillman (foot), LB Pisa Tinoisamoa (knee). VIKINGS: DNP: QB Brett Favre (chest/ankle/right shoulder), G Steve Hutchinson (thumb), RB Adrian Peterson (ankle/knee), S Jamarca Sanford (concussion). LIMITED: DE Ray Edwards (ankle). FULL: CB Asher Allen (ankle), QB Joe Webb (hamstring).

Music City Bowl: North Carolina (7-5) vs. Tennessee (6-6), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Holiday Bowl: Nebraska (10-3) vs. Washington (6-6), 7 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Dec. 31 Meineke Bowl: Clemson (6-6) vs. South Florida (7-5), 9 a.m. (ESPN) Sun Bowl: Notre Dame (7-5) vs. Miami (7-5), 11 a.m. (CBS) Liberty Bowl: Georgia (6-6) vs. UCF (10-3), 12:30 p.m. (ESPN) Chick-fil-A Bowl: South Carolina (9-4) vs. Florida State (9-4), 4:30 p.m. (ESPN) Saturday, Jan. 1 TicketCity Bowl: Northwestern (7-5) vs. Texas Tech (7-5), 9 a.m. (ESPNU) Capital One Bowl: Michigan State (11-1) vs. Alabama (9-3), 10 a.m. (ESPN) Outback Bowl: Florida (7-5) vs. Penn State (7-5), 10 a.m. (ABC) Gator Bowl: Michigan (7-5) vs. Mississippi State (84), 10:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Rose Bowl: TCU (12-0) vs. Wisconsin (11-1), 2 p.m. (ESPN) Fiesta Bowl: Connecticut (8-4) vs. Oklahoma (11-2), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Jan. 3 Orange Bowl: Stanford (11-1) vs. Virginia Tech (11-2), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Tuesday, Jan. 4 Sugar Bowl: Ohio State (11-1) vs. Arkansas (10-2), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Jan. 6 GoDaddy.com Bowl: Miami (Ohio) (9-4) vs. Middle Tennessee (6-6), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Jan. 7 Cotton Bowl: Texas A&M (9-3) vs. LSU (10-2), 5 p.m. (Fox) Saturday, Jan. 8 BBVA Compass Bowl: Pittsburgh (7-5) vs. Kentucky (6-6), 9 a.m. (ESPN) Sunday, Jan. 9 Fight Hunger Bowl: Boston College (7-5) vs. Nevada (12-1), 6 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Jan. 10 BCS National Championship: Auburn (13-0) vs. Oregon (12-0), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Betting Line Favorite Bears

College BOWLS Subject to Change All Times PST ——— Tuesday, Dec. 21 Beef ‘O’ Brady’s Bowl: Louisville (6-6) vs. Southern Mississippi (8-4), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Wednesday, Dec. 22 MAACO Bowl: Utah (10-2) vs. Boise State (11-1), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Dec. 23 Poinsettia Bowl: San Diego State (8-4) vs. Navy (8-3), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Dec. 24 Hawaii Bowl: Hawaii (10-3) vs. Tulsa (9-3), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Sunday, Dec. 26 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl: Toledo (8-4) vs. Florida International (6-6), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Monday, Dec. 27 Independence Bowl: Georgia Tech (6-6) vs. Air Force (8-4), 2 p.m. (ESPN) Tuesday, Dec. 28 Champs Sports Bowl: North Carolina State (8-4) vs. West Virginia (9-3), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Insight Bowl: Missouri (10-2) vs. Iowa (7-5), 7 p.m. (ESPN) Wednesday, Dec. 29 Military Bowl: East Carolina (6-6) vs. Maryland (8-4), 11:30 a.m. (ESPN) Texas Bowl: Baylor (7-5) vs. Illinois (6-6), 3 p.m. (ESPN) Alamo Bowl: Arizona (7-5) vs. Oklahoma State (10-2), 3 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Dec. 30 Armed Forces Bowl: SMU (7-6) vs. Army (6-5), 9 a.m. (ESPN) Pinstripe Bowl: Syracuse (7-5) vs. Kansas State (7-5), 12:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Louisville

NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Today 6 8 VIKINGS College December 21 St. Petersburg Bowl 3 3 Southern Miss

Boise St

December 22 Las Vegas Bowl 16.5 17

Utah

San Diego St

December 23 Poinsettia Bowl 1.5 5

Navy

Hawaii

December 24 Hawaii Bowl 12.5 10.5

Tulsa

December 26 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl 2 1.5 Florida Int’l

Toledo

Air Force

West Virginia Missouri

Maryland Baylor Oklahoma St

December 27 Independence Bowl 1.5 3 Georgia Tech December 28 Champ Sports Bowl 1.5 2.5 Insight Bowl PK 2

NC State Iowa

December 29 Eagle Bank Bowl 8 7 East Carolina Texas Bowl 2 1.5 Illinois Alamo Bowl 5.5 5.5 Arizona December 30 Armed Forces Bowl

Stanford

January 3 Orange Bowl 3 3

Virginia Tech

Ohio State

January 4 Sugar Bowl 3.5 3.5

Arkansas

Miami (Ohio)

January 6 GMAC Bowl 1.5 1

Mid. Tenn. St.

Lsu

January 7 Cotton Bowl PK 1

Texas A&M

Pitt

January 8 BBVA Compass Bowl 2.5 3.5

Kentucky

Nevada

January 9 Fight Hunger Bowl 9 9.5 Boston College

Auburn

January 10 BCS National Championship 2.5 3 Oregon

BASKETBALL Men’s college Sunday’s Games ——— EAST Boston College 93, Bryant 77 Cent. Connecticut St. 74, Niagara 71 Holy Cross 75, Marist 57 Long Island U. 91, Army 85 Maine 78, Colgate 57 Sacred Heart 71, Yale 62 Seton Hall 68, N.J. Tech 45 SOUTH Arizona 72, N.C. State 62 Clemson 71, UNC Greensboro 61 Florida Atlantic 60, Louisiana-Monroe 58 Louisiana-Lafayette 68, Lamar 65 Marshall 98, VMI 70 McNeese St. 65, Sacramento St. 63 Northwestern St. 86, Canisius 74 SE Missouri 76, Jacksonville St. 67 Tenn.-Martin 87, William Woods 57 Tennessee St. 70, Morehead St. 64, OT Tennessee Tech 65, E. Illinois 64 UAB 58, Alabama A&M 40 MIDWEST Indiana 102, S. Carolina St. 60 Iowa St. 71, Dartmouth 42 N. Iowa 68, SIU-Edwardsville 47 Notre Dame 88, Stony Brook 62 SOUTHWEST North Texas 85, Texas St. 62 FAR WEST Boise St. 91, Texas-Pan American 62 Colorado 104, Longwood 59 New Mexico 84, The Citadel 58 UC Riverside 78, Montana St. 67 Washington State 85, Santa Clara 79 (OT)

Women’s college Sunday’s Games ——— EAST American International 71, Rhode Island 64, OT Army 60, Loyola, Md. 52 Boston College 85, UNC Wilmington 55 Bryant 59, Holy Cross 47 Canisius 66, Cornell 58 Cent. Connecticut St. 61, New Hampshire 48 Connecticut 81, Ohio St. 50 Fairfield 64, St. Francis, NY 50 Georgetown 72, Missouri St. 59 La Salle 78, Rider 58 Long Island U. 59, Stony Brook 43 Massachusetts 72, Wagner 69 Miami (Ohio) 77, Northeastern 61 Penn St. 64, Delaware 55 Saint Joseph’s 70, Princeton 61, 2OT Temple 55, Villanova 43 Texas A&M 79, Rutgers 50 Texas Tech 78, Pittsburgh 65 Vanderbilt 80, Duquesne 59 SOUTH Austin Peay 70, E. Kentucky 60 Bethune-Cookman 60, North Florida 57 Butler 71, Coastal Carolina 63 Georgia 66, High Point 61 Hampton 78, IPFW 77, 2OT Jacksonville St. 62, SE Missouri 48 LSU 68, Louisiana Tech 53 Louisiana-Lafayette 80, New Orleans 63 Maryland 79, Delaware St. 49 Memphis 76, N. Carolina A&T 51 Morehead St. 62, Tennessee St. 58 North Carolina 75, South Carolina 51 South Alabama 69, Northwestern St. 61 South Florida 61, SMU 55 Tenn.-Martin 68, Indiana St. 66 Tennessee 82, Stanford 72, OT Tennessee Tech 65, E. Illinois 58 W. Kentucky 60, Grambling St. 43

MIDWEST Akron 102, Ursuline 45 Dayton 70, Colorado 50 Kansas 91, SIU-Edwardsville 52 Kent St. 88, Vermont 36 Missouri 72, N.J. Tech 37 Northwestern 88, N. Arizona 70 Ohio 63, Presbyterian 57 Saint Louis 60, Florida Atlantic 52 Toledo 63, Wis.-Milwaukee 59 UMKC 62, Troy 55 W. Illinois 83, Judson 35 Wichita St. 95, Texas-Pan American 55 SOUTHWEST Arkansas 67, Oklahoma 57 Charlotte 62, Arkansas St. 44 Houston 92, Louisville 80 Lamar 88, Houston Baptist 52 TCU 94, Sam Houston St. 76 FAR WEST Arizona 71, New Mexico St. 59 California 81, Texas-Arlington 56 Long Beach St. 72, Florida A&M 62 Oregon 100, Saint Mary’s, Calif. 71 Portland 86, Pacific 73 Santa Clara 63, Seattle 60 UC Davis 78, Sacramento St. 55 TOURNAMENT St. John’s Chartwell Holiday Classi Championship St. John’s 56, UC Santa Barbara 47 Third Place Fresno St. 88, Southern Miss. 51 Women of Troy Tournament Championship Southern Cal 74, San Diego St. 64

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Philadelphia 34 22 7 5 49 117 82 Pittsburgh 33 21 10 2 44 104 78 N.Y. Rangers 35 20 14 1 41 105 91 New Jersey 32 9 21 2 20 58 98 N.Y. Islanders 30 6 18 6 18 65 104 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Montreal 33 19 12 2 40 87 72 Boston 31 17 10 4 38 89 65 Ottawa 35 14 17 4 32 81 106 Buffalo 33 13 16 4 30 84 95 Toronto 32 12 16 4 28 72 96 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Washington 35 19 12 4 42 104 99 Atlanta 34 18 11 5 41 109 97 Tampa Bay 32 18 10 4 40 99 108 Carolina 31 15 12 4 34 89 94 Florida 30 14 16 0 28 80 78 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 32 20 8 4 44 105 88 Nashville 32 17 9 6 40 83 79 Chicago 35 18 14 3 39 111 103 St. Louis 31 15 11 5 35 81 88 Columbus 32 16 13 3 35 82 90 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Colorado 33 19 10 4 42 121 105 Vancouver 30 18 8 4 40 98 77 Minnesota 31 14 13 4 32 75 90 Calgary 33 14 16 3 31 90 96 Edmonton 31 12 14 5 29 84 108 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 33 20 10 3 43 95 90 San Jose 33 17 11 5 39 100 94 Anaheim 36 17 15 4 38 93 106 Los Angeles 31 18 12 1 37 90 75 Phoenix 31 15 9 7 37 88 87 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Sunday’s Games Dallas 4, Detroit 3, OT Chicago 3, Los Angeles 2 Washington 3, Ottawa 2 Colorado 3, Montreal 2 Today’s Games Atlanta at Toronto, 4 p.m. Florida at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Phoenix at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Anaheim at Boston, 4:30 p.m. Carolina at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Vancouver at St. Louis, 5 p.m. Calgary at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Anaheim at Buffalo, 4 p.m. St. Louis at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Calgary at Columbus, 4 p.m. New Jersey at Washington, 4:30 p.m. Montreal at Dallas, 6 p.m. Los Angeles at Colorado, 6:30 p.m. Edmonton at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS—Agreed to terms with RHP Toru Murata on a minor league contract. KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Traded RHP Zack Greinke, SS Yuniesky Betancourt and cash considerations to Milwaukee for SS Alcides Escobar, OF Lorenzo Cain, RHP Jake Odorizzi and RHP Jeremy Jeffress. HOCKEY National Hockey League CAROLINA HURRICANES—Reassigned D Bryan Rodney to Charlotte (AHL). NASHVILLE PREDATORS—Assigned F Steve Begin and G Mark Dekanich to Milwaukee (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS—Recalled G Mike Brodeur from Binghamton (AHL) on an emergency basis. ST. LOUIS BLUES—Activated D Roman Polak from injured reserve. Placed C Dave Scatchard on injured reserve. Assigned D Ian Cole to Peoria (AHL). Recalled F Adam Cracknell from Peoria. COLLEGE ELON—Announced the resignation of football coach Pete Lembo to become football coach at Ball State. MIAMI—Announced offensive line coach Jeff Stoutland, wide receivers coach/recruiting coordinator Aubrey Hill and linebackers coach Micheal Barrow will return in 2011.

NHL ROUNDUP

Avs win sixth straight, beat Canadiens The Associated Press

Chris Schneider / The Associated Press

Montreal Canadiens left wing Mathieu Darche tries to deflect a shot past Colorado Avalanche goalie Craig Anderson in the third period of an NHL hockey game in Denver on Sunday. The Avalanche won 3-2.

DENVER — T.J. Galiardi used his torso instead of his stick. It worked just as well and gave him reason to puff out his chest after the game. Galiardi broke a second-period tie with his chest bump of the puck into the net to help the Colorado Avalanche win their sixth straight game, 3-2 over the Montreal Canadiens on Sunday night. “It was ugly but they all count,” Galiardi said, grinning. Galiardi recently returned after missing more than a month with a fractured right wrist. His presence is paying off as he has two goals in as many games. But with this goal, even Galiardi had to shake his head at his fortune. The puck hit him just before he tumbled into the vicinity of goalie Carey Price, along with a Canadiens defenseman and Avalanche teammate Greg Mauldin. As Price fell back, the puck trickled through his pads and into the net. The officials took a few moments to review the goal. Not that Galiardi was the least bit concerned.

“I knew I didn’t do any motions with my hands or a high stick so I figured it would stand,” Galiardi said. And it did. Canadiens coach Jacques Martin had no quibbles with the goal, either. “We turned the puck (over) in the neutral zone,” Martin said. “They attacked the net well and capitalized on it.” That seemed to be the case most of the night. Ryan Wilson and Kevin Porter also scored for the Avalanche, the highest-scoring team in the NHL. Michael Cammalleri and Alexandre Picard scored for Montreal. The Canadiens pulled Price for an extra skater with 1:08 left, but couldn’t get anything past Craig Anderson, who finished with 27 saves. Anderson was solid in net all night as he matched a career high by winning his sixth straight start. He helped the Avalanche kill a late penalty and earlier thwarted a scoring attempt from Andrei Kostitsyn, lunging out of the net and knocking the puck off Kostitsyn’s stick. “We found a way,” Anderson said. “It

doesn’t matter if it’s 3-2 or 6-5, we’re finding ways to win.” The only thing Anderson was displeased with was a late slashing penalty called on him at the end as his emotions — unlike the puck — got away from him. “I apologized to the ref for taking that 2minute slash. It was uncalled for,” he said. In other games on Sunday: Capitals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Senators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 OTTAWA — Mathieu Perreault scored twice, Eric Fehr had a goal and an assist and Washington ended its losing streak at eight games, beating Ottawa. Stars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Red Wings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 DETROIT — Loui Eriksson scored at 4:18 of overtime to give Dallas a comeback victory over Detroit in a game between the top two teams in the Western Conference standings. Blackhawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Kings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 CHICAGO — Jonathan Toews, Duncan Keith and Fernando Pisani scored, rookie Corey Crawford made 26 saves and disciplined Chicago beat Los Angeles.


NFL

THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 20, 2010 D3

Late punt return helps Eagles stun Giants DeSean Jackson scores on final play of game to finish Eagles’ rally

streak, scrambling for the Jets’ first offensive touchdown in 12 quarters and leading a decisive field-goal drive as New York beat Pittsburgh. Despite losing, the Steelers (10-4) were told by the NFL nearly an hour after the game ended that they secured a playoff spot via a series of complicated strength-of-schedule tiebreakers. Colts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Jaguars. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 INDIANAPOLIS — Peyton Manning threw two touchdown passes and Donald Brown ran for another score as Indianapolis stayed in the playoff hunt. The Colts (8-6) share the AFC South lead with Jacksonville (8-6) and can clinch a seventh division title in eight years by winning their last two games. Ravens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Saints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 BALTIMORE — Ray Rice ran for 153 yards and scored two touchdowns, and Baltimore ended New Orleans’ six-game winning streak. The Ravens (104) won by reviving their lagging running game and managing to hold onto a fourth-quarter lead. Raiders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Broncos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 OAKLAND, Calif. — Jason Campbell threw a 73-yard touchdown pass to Marcel Reece and Jacoby Ford scored on a 71-yard run to help Oakland overcome Tim Tebow’s two long touchdowns in his first career start and beat Denver. Michael Bush added two short touchdown runs to keep the Raiders (7-7) in the hunt for a playoff berth for at least one more week. Bills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Dolphins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 MIAMI — Ryan Fitzpatrick threw two touchdown passes and the resurgent Bills elimi-

The Associated Press EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Just call it the great escape. DeSean Jackson scored on a 65-yard punt return on the final play of the game and the Eagles scored 28 points in the final 7:28 to stun the New York Giants 3831 and take over first place in the NFC East. “I was thinking to myself like ‘they’re not going to kick it to me,’ ” Jackson said. “I was thinking he was going to kick it out of bounds. But it got to me. From there, I just used my instincts and my speed to get into the end zone.” Emphasizing his candidacy for the MVP award, Michael Vick threw for two touchdowns and ran for another in the incredible late rally that all but clinched the division for the Eagles (10-4) and left Giants coach Tom Coughlin so angry he threw his notes as Jackson backed into the end zone. Philadelphia swept the season series with New York (9-5) and only needs to win one of its final two games or have New York lose one of its two. Atlanta clinched a playoff spot with the Giants’ loss. On the winning play, Matt Dodge lined up to punt with 14 seconds to play and the rookie got off a line drive kick that Jackson bobbled at his 35. Once he regained control, Jackson broke threw the initial line of coverage

Kathy Willens / The Associated Press

Philadelphia Eagles’ DeSean Jackson celebrates as he returns a punt for a touchdown during the final play of Sunday’s game against the New York Giants in East Rutherford, N.J. The Eagles beat the Giants 38-31.

NFL ROUNDUP and sped down the right sideline. It was apparent he was about to score, but instead of simply going into the end zone, he danced along the goal line before going

in with zeros showing on the clock. In other games on Sunday: Jets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Steelers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 PITTSBURGH — Mark Sanchez stood up to the pressure created by the Steelers’ defense and his team’s two-game losing

nated the Dolphins from playoff contention. Buffalo looked woeful in a season-opening loss at home against Miami, but that was before Fitzpatrick took over at quarterback. He went 16 for 26 for 223 yards in the rematch. Bengals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Browns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 CINCINNATI — Cedric Benson ran for a season-high 150 yards and a touchdown, and Cincinnati ended a 10-game losing streak that matched the longest in franchise history. Cincinnati took a straight-ahead approach against the Browns (5-9), who clinched their 10th losing record in 12 years since returning as an expansion team. Lions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Buccaneers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 TAMPA, Fla. — Dave Rayner’s third field goal, a 34-yarder with 9:51 left in overtime, allowed Detroit to end the longest road losing streak in NFL history at 26 games. Rayner kicked a 28-yarder as time expired in regulation to force the extra period. Falcons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Seahawks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 SEATTLE — Matt Ryan threw for 174 yards and three touchdowns, Jonathan Babineaux recovered a fumble for a touchdown and Atlanta wrapped up an NFC playoff spot with a win over Seattle. The Falcons (12-2) won their eighth straight game, their longest winning streak since the 1998 Super Bowl season. Panthers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Cardinals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Jimmy Clausen outplayed John Skelton in a matchup of rookie quarterbacks, John Kasay kicked four field goals, and Carolina snapped a seven-game losing streak. Jonathan Stewart rushed for 137 yards and the Panthers

(2-12) gave coach John Fox a win in likely his final home game. Titans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Texans. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Kerry Collins threw for two touchdowns and 237 yards and Chris Johnson ran for a TD and 130 yards as Tennessee snapped a six-game losing streak. With the win and Indianapolis downing Jacksonville 34-24, the Titans (68) keep their slim playoff hopes alive. Cowboys. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Redskins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 ARLINGTON, Texas — David Buehler made a 39-yard field goal with 50 seconds left, giving Dallas a win that was a lot tougher than it had to be. The Cowboys led 27-7 early in the third quarter and 30-14 at the start of the fourth. They could have broken the game open even wider but got only field goals out of drives that reached the 20, 2 and 3, and failed to score on drives that reached the 1 and 18. Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Rams. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 ST. LOUIS — Matt Cassel returned to the lineup 11 days after an emergency appendectomy and threw a touchdown pass in leading Kansas City. Jamaal Charles scored on a short run and helped clinch it with a late 80-yard burst for the Chiefs (95), who retained a one-game lead over the Chargers in the AFC West. Patriots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Packers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — Dan Connolly rumbled 71 yards with what is believed to be the longest kickoff return by an offensive lineman in NFL history, and Tom Brady threw two touchdown passes as New England edged Green Bay for its sixth straight win.

NFL SCOREBOARD SUMMARIES Sunday’s Games

Raiders 39, Broncos 23 Denver Oakland

14 3 3 3 — 23 14 3 6 16 — 39 First Quarter Oak—Ford 71 run (Janikowski kick), 13:14. Den—Tebow 40 run (Hauschka kick), 9:40. Den—Lloyd 33 pass from Tebow (Hauschka kick), 7:38. Oak—Bush 1 run (Janikowski kick), 3:20. Second Quarter Den—FG Hauschka 46, 14:09. Oak—FG Janikowski 49, 1:02. Third Quarter Oak—FG Janikowski 35, 7:27. Den—FG Hauschka 35, 5:03. Oak—FG Janikowski 47, 1:29. Fourth Quarter Oak—Reece 73 pass from J.Campbell (Janikowski kick), 14:32. Den—FG Hauschka 45, 10:04. Oak—Groves safety, 7:37. Oak—Bush 1 run (Janikowski kick), 3:37. A—44,246. ——— Den Oak First downs 9 20 Total Net Yards 235 502 Rushes-yards 33-106 41-264 Passing 129 238 Punt Returns 2-8 5-47 Kickoff Returns 8-171 7-138 Interceptions Ret. 2-40 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 8-16-0 15-26-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-9 0-0 Punts 7-43.9 4-37.0 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 1-1 Penalties-Yards 10-93 9-84 Time of Possession 26:03 33:57 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Denver: Tebow 8-78, Ball 15-20, Moreno 4-5, Buckhalter 6-3. Oakland: D.McFadden 20-119, Ford 1-71, J.Campbell 541, Bush 12-24, Reece 3-9. PASSING—Denver: Tebow 8-16-0-138. Oakland: J.Campbell 15-26-2-238. RECEIVING—Denver: Lloyd 4-79, Gaffney 1-32, Buckhalter 1-17, R.Quinn 1-9, Moreno 1-1. Oakland: D.McFadden 4-39, Z.Miller 439, Ford 3-47, Reece 2-79, Heyward-Bey 1-20, Murphy 1-14. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Jets 22, Steelers 17 N.Y. Jets Pittsburgh

7 3 7 5 — 22 0 10 7 0 — 17 First Quarter NYJ—B.Smith 97 kickoff return (Folk kick), 14:48. Second Quarter Pit—Spaeth 9 pass from Roethlisberger (Suisham kick), 7:29. NYJ—FG Folk 25, 2:48. Pit—FG Suisham 42, :33. Third Quarter Pit—Mendenhall 2 run (Suisham kick), 9:03. NYJ—Sanchez 7 run (Folk kick), 5:14. Fourth Quarter NYJ—FG Folk 34, 10:07. NYJ—Taylor safety, 2:38. A—62,568. ——— NYJ Pit First downs 17 25 Total Net Yards 276 378 Rushes-yards 27-106 25-147 Passing 170 231 Punt Returns 2-32 1-4 Kickoff Returns 5-145 5-72 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 19-29-0 23-44-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-0 3-33 Punts 4-36.8 4-38.0 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-0 Penalties-Yards 3-19 3-35 Time of Possession 28:42 31:18 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—N.Y. Jets: Tomlinson 1149, Greene 12-40, Sanchez 3-15, B.Smith 1-2. Pittsburgh: Mendenhall 17-100, Roethlisberger 2-25, Wallace 1-8, Moore 4-7, Redman 1-7. PASSING—N.Y. Jets: Sanchez 19-29-0170. Pittsburgh: Roethlisberger 23-44-0-264. RECEIVING—N.Y. Jets: Edwards 8-100, Holmes 6-40, Keller 3-19, Tomlinson 1-6, Greene 1-5. Pittsburgh: Wallace 7-102, Sanders 7-78, Spaeth 3-27, Ward 2-34, Brown 2-15, Randle El 1-8, Moore 1-0. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Falcons 34, Seahawks 18 Atlanta Seattle

0 17 17 0 — 34 7 3 0 8 — 18 First Quarter Sea—Lynch 1 run (Mare kick), 7:28. Second Quarter Atl—Snelling 3 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick),

14:14. Atl—FG Bryant 27, 4:51. Sea—FG Mare 38, 2:05. Atl—Jenkins 24 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick), :19. Third Quarter Atl—Babineaux fumble recovery in end zone (Bryant kick), 10:12. Atl—FG Bryant 25, 4:20. Atl—White 5 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick), :52. Fourth Quarter Sea—Whitehurst 1 run (Obomanu pass from Whitehurst), 8:29. A—67,101. ——— Atl Sea First downs 21 15 Total Net Yards 266 234 Rushes-yards 37-98 21-91 Passing 168 143 Punt Returns 1-12 2-3 Kickoff Returns 1-46 4-76 Interceptions Ret. 2-38 1-17 Comp-Att-Int 20-35-1 18-33-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-6 2-11 Punts 4-45.0 4-41.3 Fumbles-Lost 2-0 2-1 Penalties-Yards 4-35 10-76 Time of Possession 35:25 24:35 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Atlanta: Turner 25-82, Ryan 66, Snelling 4-6, G.Johnson 1-4, Douglas 1-0. Seattle: Lynch 12-60, Whitehurst 3-10, Forsett 2-9, Washington 1-6, Hasselbeck 2-4, M.Robinson 1-2. PASSING—Atlanta: Ryan 20-35-1-174. Seattle: Whitehurst 8-16-0-83, Hasselbeck 10-17-2-71. RECEIVING—Atlanta: White 7-65, Gonzalez 4-26, Snelling 4-15, Jenkins 3-48, Douglas 110, Peelle 1-10. Seattle: Williams 8-66, Morrah 2-14, Forsett 2-7, M.Robinson 2-7, Carlson 1-31, Lynch 1-17, Obomanu 1-7, Stokley 1-5. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Ravens 30, Saints 24 New Orleans Baltimore

7 7 3 7 — 24 7 14 3 6 — 30 First Quarter NO—Graham 18 pass from Brees (Hartley kick), 9:03. Bal—Dickson 34 pass from Flacco (Cundiff kick), 4:43. Second Quarter Bal—Rice 10 run (Cundiff kick), 14:20. Bal—Rice 17 pass from Flacco (Cundiff kick), 10:05. NO—Graham 1 pass from Brees (Hartley kick), :22. Third Quarter NO—FG Hartley 47, 6:24. Bal—FG Cundiff 33, 2:15. Fourth Quarter NO—Moore 15 pass from Brees (Hartley kick), 11:34. Bal—FG Cundiff 32, 10:03. Bal—FG Cundiff 27, :09. A—71,432. ——— NO Bal First downs 21 17 Total Net Yards 269 356 Rushes-yards 14-27 39-208 Passing 242 148 Punt Returns 1-9 2-35 Kickoff Returns 6-143 4-97 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-0 Comp-Att-Int 29-46-1 10-20-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-25 3-24 Punts 6-42.2 5-38.6 Fumbles-Lost 2-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 6-68 10-68 Time of Possession 28:31 31:29 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—New Orleans: P.Thomas 620, Jones 4-11, Bush 4-(minus 4). Baltimore: Rice 31-153, McGahee 7-53, Flacco 1-2. PASSING—New Orleans: Brees 29-46-1267. Baltimore: Flacco 10-20-0-172. RECEIVING—New Orleans: Bush 7-36, Colston 6-80, Graham 5-29, Henderson 3-53, Shockey 3-26, Moore 2-26, Meachem 2-17, P.Thomas 1-0. Baltimore: Rice 5-80, Dickson 2-33, Mason 1-42, Houshmandzadeh 1-15, Boldin 1-2. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Chiefs 27, Rams 13 Kansas City St. Louis

0 14 3 10 — 27 6 0 0 7 — 13 First Quarter StL—FG Jo.Brown 37, 6:56. StL—FG Jo.Brown 52, 4:43. Second Quarter KC—Pope 2 pass from Cassel (Succop kick), 6:49. KC—Charles 2 run (Succop kick), 1:47. Third Quarter KC—FG Succop 53, 10:18. Fourth Quarter KC—FG Succop 38, 12:20. StL—Jackson 5 run (Jo.Brown kick), 4:04. KC—Jones 2 run (Succop kick), 3:26.

A—55,669. ——— KC StL 21 14 383 224 42-210 21-69 173 155 8-74 3-48 4-62 6-149 2-24 1-8 15-29-1 21-43-2 3-11 3-26 6-47.5 8-46.4 0-0 1-0 5-40 9-60 31:44 28:16 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Kansas City: Charles 11-126, Jones 22-62, Cassel 6-17, Battle 2-9, McCluster 1-(minus 4). St. Louis: Jackson 19-67, Bradford 2-2. PASSING—Kansas City: Cassel 15-29-1184. St. Louis: Bradford 21-43-2-181. RECEIVING—Kansas City: Chambers 3-42, Charles 3-27, Moeaki 3-25, Bowe 2-53, Jones 1-16, Castille 1-12, McCluster 1-7, Pope 1-2. St. Louis: Amendola 7-60, Jackson 5-37, Fells 4-47, B.Gibson 3-29, Robinson 2-8. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None. First downs Total Net Yards Rushes-yards Passing Punt Returns Kickoff Returns Interceptions Ret. Comp-Att-Int Sacked-Yards Lost Punts Fumbles-Lost Penalties-Yards Time of Possession

Bengals 19, Browns 17 Cleveland Cincinnati

7 0 0 10 — 17 0 10 6 3 — 19 First Quarter Cle—Royal 20 pass from McCoy (Dawson kick), 12:08. Second Quarter Cin—Benson 18 run (Stitser kick), 12:52. Cin—FG Stitser 25, 4:19. Third Quarter Cin—FG Stitser 39, 11:11. Cin—FG Stitser 34, 3:33. Fourth Quarter Cle—FG Dawson 23, 14:06. Cin—FG Stitser 20, 9:58. Cle—Robiskie 46 pass from McCoy (Dawson kick), 2:13. A—56,342. ——— Cle Cin First downs 14 22 Total Net Yards 278 397 Rushes-yards 14-59 45-188 Passing 219 209 Punt Returns 0-0 2-26 Kickoff Returns 6-92 4-73 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 19-25-0 14-23-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-24 0-0 Punts 5-37.0 1-34.0 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 3-25 6-55 Time of Possession 21:57 38:03 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Cleveland: Hillis 14-59. Cincinnati: Benson 31-150, Scott 8-40, C.Palmer 5-(minus 1), Leonard 1-(minus 1). PASSING—Cleveland: McCoy 19-25-0243. Cincinnati: C.Palmer 14-23-0-209. RECEIVING—Cleveland: Watson 7-92, Robiskie 5-82, Royal 2-29, Hillis 2-23, Massaquoi 1-11, Cribbs 1-4, Stuckey 1-2. Cincinnati: Caldwell 4-89, Ochocinco 2-36, Simpson 2-30, Shipley 2-14, Leonard 1-20, Cosby 1-11, Gresham 1-6, Kelly 1-3. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Colts 34, Jaguars 24 Jacksonville Indianapolis

0 10 7 7 — 24 7 7 10 10 — 34 First Quarter Ind—Collie 7 pass from Manning (Vinatieri kick), 11:21. Second Quarter Jac—FG Scobee 22, 14:13. Ind—Collie 27 pass from Manning (Vinatieri kick), 9:51. Jac—Thomas 78 punt return (Scobee kick), 3:51. Third Quarter Ind—D.Brown 43 run (Vinatieri kick), 12:19. Ind—FG Vinatieri 34, 8:47. Jac—Sims-Walker 6 pass from Garrard (Scobee kick), 3:54. Fourth Quarter Ind—FG Vinatieri 37, 9:57. Jac—Sims-Walker 1 pass from Garrard (Scobee kick), 1:54. Ind—Hagler 41 kickoff return (Vinatieri kick), 1:47. A—67,147. ——— Jac Ind First downs 20 19 Total Net Yards 356 376 Rushes-yards 22-67 24-155 Passing 289 221 Punt Returns 4-99 1-3 Kickoff Returns 7-176 4-92 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-31 Comp-Att-Int 24-38-1 29-39-0

AMERICAN CONFERENCE East x-New England N.Y. Jets Miami Buffalo

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Indianapolis Jacksonville Tennessee Houston

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Kansas City San Diego Oakland Denver

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——— Sunday’s Games Kansas City 27, St. Louis 13 Tennessee 31, Houston 17 Philadelphia 38, N.Y. Giants 31 Cincinnati 19, Cleveland 17 Indianapolis 34, Jacksonville 24 Atlanta 34, Seattle 18 N.Y. Jets 22, Pittsburgh 17

Dallas 33, Washington 30 Carolina 19, Arizona 12 Detroit 23, Tampa Bay 20, OT Buffalo 17, Miami 14 Baltimore 30, New Orleans 24 Oakland 39, Denver 23 New England 31, Green Bay 27 Today’s Game

Chicago at Minnesota, 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 23 Carolina at Pittsburgh, 5:20 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 25 Dallas at Arizona, 4:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 26 Tennessee at Kansas City, 10 a.m. N.Y. Jets at Chicago, 10 a.m. New England at Buffalo, 10 a.m. Washington at Jacksonville, 10 a.m. Houston at Denver, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Green Bay, 1:15 p.m. Minnesota at Philadelphia, 5:20 p.m.

San Francisco at St. Louis, 10 a.m. Baltimore at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Detroit at Miami, 10 a.m. Indianapolis at Oakland, 1:05 p.m. San Diego at Cincinnati, 1:05 p.m. Seattle at Tampa Bay, 1:15 p.m. Monday, Dec. 27

New Orleans at Atlanta, 5:30 p.m. ——— All Times PST

Fourth Quarter Was—Moss 5 pass from Grossman (Cooley pass from Grossman), 13:44. Was—Cooley 5 pass from Grossman (Sellers pass from Grossman), 7:37. Dal—FG Buehler 39, :50. A—86,904. ——— Was Dal First downs 23 25 Total Net Yards 341 434 Rushes-yards 15-55 31-134 Passing 286 300 Punt Returns 0-0 2-54 Kickoff Returns 5-98 4-89 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 2-(-9) Comp-Att-Int 25-43-2 25-37-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 5-36 2-5 Punts 4-39.5 2-41.0 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 2-0 Penalties-Yards 3-25 9-70 Time of Possession 24:39 35:21 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Washington: Torain 11-53, K.Williams 1-4, Moss 2-(minus 1), Grossman 1-(minus 1). Dallas: Jones 12-70, Choice 1553, Kitna 4-11. PASSING—Washington: Grossman 2543-2-322. Dallas: Kitna 25-37-0-305. RECEIVING—Washington: Moss 8-72, Armstrong 5-100, Cooley 5-62, Torain 5-48, Sellers 1-27, K.Williams 1-13. Dallas: Witten 10-140, Hurd 4-35, Choice 4-31, Austin 3-38, Jones 2-47, Gronkowski 1-12, Bennett 1-2. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Dallas: Buehler 35 (WL).

Lions 23, Buccaneers 20 Detroit Tampa Bay

7 3 7 3 3 — 23 0 14 0 6 0 — 20 First Quarter Det—Burleson 10 pass from Stanton (Rayner kick), 2:06. Second Quarter TB—M.Williams 24 pass from Freeman (Barth kick), 12:29. TB—Blount 39 run (Barth kick), 3:41. Det—FG Rayner 41, :55. Third Quarter Det—Morris 10 run (Rayner kick), 10:16. Fourth Quarter TB—FG Barth 30, 8:51. TB—FG Barth 26, 1:39. Det—FG Rayner 28, :00. Overtime Det—FG Rayner 34, 9:51. A—47,692. ——— Det TB First downs 26 22 Total Net Yards 433 403 Rushes-yards 28-181 28-176 Passing 252 227 Punt Returns 0-0 3-31 Kickoff Returns 6-91 4-76 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 23-38-0 22-33-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 0-0 3-25 Punts 4-39.5 3-39.3 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 7-57 9-65 Time of Possession 33:05 32:04 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Detroit: Morris 15-109, Burleson 1-25, Stanton 2-24, Best 6-12, Logan 4-11. Tampa Bay: Blount 15-110, C.Williams 7-38, Freeman 5-29, Graham 1-(minus 1). PASSING—Detroit: Stanton 23-37-0-252, Logan 0-1-0-0. Tampa Bay: Freeman 21-32-0251, J.Johnson 1-1-0-1. RECEIVING—Detroit: C.Johnson 10-152, Burleson 4-28, Scheffler 3-18, Morris 3-10, Pettigrew 2-25, B.Johnson 1-19. Tampa Bay: M.Williams 6-96, Winslow 4-46, Benn 3-34, Graham 3-21, C.Williams 2-26, Spurlock 1-19, Gilmore 1-9, Stroughter 1-1, Purvis 1-0. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Bills 17, Dolphins 14 Buffalo Miami

Sacked-Yards Lost Punts Fumbles-Lost Penalties-Yards Time of Possession

1-5 4-48.0 3-1 6-55 30:22

1-8 6-39.2 0-0 6-68 29:38

——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Jacksonville: Jones-Drew 15-46, Jennings 3-13, Garrard 4-8. Indianapolis: D.Brown 14-129, Rhodes 9-26, James 1-0. PASSING—Jacksonville: Garrard 24-381-294. Indianapolis: Manning 29-39-0-229. RECEIVING—Jacksonville: Jennings 7-64, Lewis 6-63, Sims-Walker 4-42, Thomas 363, Hill 2-40, Jones-Drew 2-22. Indianapolis: Collie 8-87, Tamme 7-34, Garcon 5-44, Wayne 5-34, White 1-16, Robinson 1-6, D.Brown 1-4, Rhodes 1-4. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Cowboys 33, Redskins 30 Washington Dallas

0 7 7 16 — 30 10 10 10 3 — 33 First Quarter Dal—FG Buehler 42, 10:46. Dal—Austin 3 pass from Kitna (Buehler kick), 4:09. Second Quarter Dal—FG Buehler 20, 12:50. Was—Torain 19 pass from Grossman (Gano kick), 9:35. Dal—Witten 14 pass from Kitna (Buehler kick), 3:44. Third Quarter Dal—Choice 3 run (Buehler kick), 12:06. Was—Moss 10 pass from Grossman (Gano kick), 9:49. Dal—FG Buehler 20, 4:26.

0 10 7 0 — 17 0 7 0 7 — 14 Second Quarter Buf—Nelson 18 pass from Fitzpatrick (Lindell kick), 10:37. Buf—FG Lindell 29, 6:34. Mia—Brown 6 run (Carpenter kick), 2:37. Third Quarter Buf—St.Johnson 15 pass from Fitzpatrick (Lindell kick), 6:14. Fourth Quarter Mia—Marshall 9 pass from Henne (Carpenter kick), 7:02. A—65,511. ——— Buf Mia First downs 15 22 Total Net Yards 282 326 Rushes-yards 27-71 19-65 Passing 211 261 Punt Returns 1-34 1-0 Kickoff Returns 1-14 3-67 Interceptions Ret. 1-9 1-9

Comp-Att-Int Sacked-Yards Lost Punts Fumbles-Lost Penalties-Yards Time of Possession

16-26-1 33-45-1 2-12 3-15 6-36.2 3-46.0 0-0 2-1 5-44 4-35 28:37 31:23 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Buffalo: Jackson 15-36, Fitzpatrick 3-19, Spiller 9-16. Miami: Brown 10-39, Williams 7-19, Curtis 1-6, Polite 1-1. PASSING—Buffalo: Fitzpatrick 16-26-1223. Miami: Henne 33-45-1-276. RECEIVING—Buffalo: St.Johnson 6-69, Nelson 3-61, Roosevelt 2-35, Spiller 2-21, Jones 1-29, Chandler 1-8, Stupar 1-0. Miami: Marshall 11-106, Bess 9-78, Williams 5-34, Fasano 3-30, Polite 2-6, Cobbs 1-13, Curtis 1-6, Brown 1-3. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Miami: Carpenter 48 (WR), 61 (SH), 53 (WL), 48 (WR).

Eagles 38, Giants 31 Philadelphia N.Y. Giants

0 3 7 28 — 38 7 17 0 7 — 31 First Quarter NYG—Manningham 35 pass from Manning (Tynes kick), 3:36. Second Quarter Phi—FG Akers 34, 13:02. NYG—Manningham 33 pass from Manning (Tynes kick), 8:17. NYG—FG Tynes 25, :48. NYG—Nicks 8 pass from Manning (Tynes kick), :05. Third Quarter Phi—Maclin 8 pass from Vick (Akers kick), 3:56. Fourth Quarter NYG—Boss 8 pass from Manning (Tynes kick), 8:17. Phi—Celek 65 pass from Vick (Akers kick), 7:28. Phi—Vick 4 run (Akers kick), 5:28. Phi—Maclin 13 pass from Vick (Akers kick), 1:16. Phi—D.Jackson 65 punt return (Akers kick), :00. A—81,223. ——— Phi NYG First downs 19 20 Total Net Yards 418 364 Rushes-yards 21-197 31-100 Passing 221 264 Punt Returns 3-75 5-35 Kickoff Returns 6-102 5-113 Interceptions Ret. 1-0 1-13 Comp-Att-Int 21-35-1 23-39-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-21 2-25 Punts 6-41.2 7-36.9 Fumbles-Lost 3-2 2-1 Penalties-Yards 5-30 4-35 Time of Possession 26:31 33:29 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Philadelphia: Vick 10-130, McCoy 10-64, Harrison 1-3. N.Y. Giants: Bradshaw 19-66, Jacobs 12-34. PASSING—Philadelphia: Vick 21-35-1242. N.Y. Giants: Manning 23-39-1-289. RECEIVING—Philadelphia: Maclin 7-59, McCoy 4-13, D.Jackson 3-52, Avant 3-35, Celek 2-72, Harrison 1-7, Harbor 1-4. N.Y. Giants: Manningham 8-113, Nicks 6-63, Boss 3-59, Hagan 3-36, Bradshaw 2-14, Beckum 1-4. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Titans 31, Texans 17 Houston Tennessee

0 3 7 7 — 17 21 3 7 0 — 31 First Quarter Ten—Washington 3 pass from Collins (Bironas kick), 10:20. Ten—Gage 1 pass from Collins (Bironas kick), 6:38. Ten—C.Johnson 11 run (Bironas kick), 2:32. Second Quarter Hou—FG Rackers 37, 5:45. Ten—FG Bironas 30, :00. Third Quarter Hou—Johnson 12 pass from Schaub (Rackers kick), 9:17. Ten—Ringer 7 run (Bironas kick), :28. Fourth Quarter Hou—Walter 4 pass from Schaub (Rackers kick), 6:28. A—69,143. ——— Hou Ten First downs 26 19 Total Net Yards 323 359 Rushes-yards 17-30 30-147 Passing 293 212 Punt Returns 1-12 1-2 Kickoff Returns 4-88 4-92 Interceptions Ret. 1-1 1-19 Comp-Att-Int 35-54-1 14-24-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-32 3-25 Punts 4-36.0 4-37.5 Fumbles-Lost 2-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 9-66 12-76 Time of Possession 32:29 27:31 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS

RUSHING—Houston: Foster 11-15, Ward 6-15. Tennessee: C.Johnson 24-130, Ringer 4-19, Collins 2-(minus 2). PASSING—Houston: Schaub 35-54-1325. Tennessee: Collins 14-24-1-237. RECEIVING—Houston: Walter 7-79, Jones 7-50, Johnson 6-58, Foster 6-46, Daniels 4-45, Dreessen 4-36, Ward 1-11. Tennessee: Britt 6-128, Cook 3-42, Washington 2-20, Williams 1-39, C.Johnson 1-7, Gage 1-1. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Panthers 19, Cardinals 12 Arizona Carolina

0 3 0 9 — 12 6 7 6 0 — 19 First Quarter Car—FG Kasay 28, 10:22. Car—FG Kasay 29, :14. Second Quarter Car—King 16 pass from Clausen (Kasay kick), 8:42. Ari—FG Feely 23, :36. Third Quarter Car—FG Kasay 24, 12:12. Car—FG Kasay 43, :27. Fourth Quarter Ari—Breaston fumble recovery in end zone (run failed), 5:41. Ari—FG Feely 30, :54. A—71,849. ——— Ari Car First downs 11 16 Total Net Yards 218 303 Rushes-yards 17-43 45-177 Passing 175 126 Punt Returns 2-9 2-52 Kickoff Returns 6-174 2-35 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-34 Comp-Att-Int 17-33-1 13-19-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-21 2-15 Punts 6-42.2 3-33.7 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 1-1 Penalties-Yards 4-39 6-58 Time of Possession 23:04 36:56 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Arizona: Hightower 6-16, Wells 8-11, Skelton 2-10, Stephens-Howling 16. Carolina: Stewart 27-137, Goodson 10-21, Clausen 5-14, Fiammetta 3-5. PASSING—Arizona: Skelton 17-33-1-196. Carolina: Clausen 13-19-0-141. RECEIVING—Arizona: Fitzgerald 9-125, Hightower 3-12, Breaston 2-42, Doucet 1-8, Spach 1-7, Stephens-Howling 1-2. Carolina: LaFell 3-33, Gettis 3-32, Goodson 2-27, Smith 2-22, King 1-16, Rosario 1-9, Stewart 1-2. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Patriots 31, Packers 27 Green Bay 3 14 7 3 — 27 New England 7 7 7 10 — 31 First Quarter GB—FG Crosby 31, 8:45. NE—Green-Ellis 33 run (Graham kick), 6:19. Second Quarter GB—J.Jones 66 pass from Flynn (Crosby kick), 14:51. GB—Jennings 1 pass from Flynn (Crosby kick), 2:17. NE—Hernandez 2 pass from Brady (Graham kick), 1:08. Third Quarter NE—Arrington 36 interception return (Graham kick), 12:04. GB—Kuhn 6 pass from Flynn (Crosby kick), 5:08. Fourth Quarter GB—FG Crosby 19, 13:49. NE—FG Graham 38, 11:05. NE—Hernandez 10 pass from Brady (Graham kick), 7:14. A—68,756. ——— GB NE First downs 26 14 Total Net Yards 369 249 Rushes-yards 38-143 16-113 Passing 226 136 Punt Returns 4-26 3-11 Kickoff Returns 6-128 4-97 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-36 Comp-Att-Int 24-37-1 15-24-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 5-25 3-27 Punts 4-41.3 5-40.4 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 2-0 Penalties-Yards 2-15 7-52 Time of Possession 40:48 19:12 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Green Bay: Jackson 22-99, Kuhn 6-21, Flynn 3-13, Nance 6-11, Jennings 1-(minus 1). New England: Woodhead 9-59, Green-Ellis 6-38, Hernandez 1-16. PASSING—Green Bay: Flynn 24-37-1251. New England: Brady 15-24-0-163. RECEIVING—Green Bay: J.Jones 5-95, Jennings 4-30, Driver 3-31, Kuhn 3-27, Nance 2-16, Johnson 2-15, Quarless 2-12, Nelson 1-16, Swain 1-6, Jackson 1-3. New England: Hernandez 4-31, Welker 3-42, Branch 2-33, Green-Ellis 2-12, Gronkowski 125, Woodhead 1-12, Tate 1-5, Crumpler 1-3. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.


B A SK E

D4 Monday, December 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

T BALL

Arenas eager for ’new beginning’ playing for Magic By Antonio Gonzalez The Associated Press

ORLANDO, Fla. — Gilbert Arenas was so eager to leave Washington he didn’t even pack his bags. After he found out his trade to the Magic was official, he ended his workout, grabbed a pair of shoes, said his goodbyes and caught the first flight to Orlando. There was no time to waste. The chance to start over had finally arrived. “This is a new beginning for me,” Arenas said late Saturday night in a gray Magic practice T-shirt and black shorts, finishing a workout in the team’s practice facility. “This is a true new beginning. Changing my number was a new beginning, but this is a real new beginning with a new city, new people and new team, and I get to start fresh.” The Magic only hope he leaves all his problems behind. Arenas was suspended 50 games last season for bringing a gun into Washington’s locker room. He also faked an injury to sit out a preseason game this year, and his off-the-cuff remarks were a constant distraction for a young team now built around No. 1 overall pick John Wall. Arenas never really fit with Washington once Wall took the reins as the franchise player and new point guard. The Wizards were going through growing pains this season, as young teams do, and Arenas felt their plans no longer included him. “I sensed something when I was coming off the bench,” Arenas said. “The excuse was that they needed scoring off the bench. My questions was, ‘Where’s the scoring from the starting five?’ I figured they were probably shipping me out because I was playing well and some people would probably have some interest in me.” The interest came from a place so many had expected but always wondered if it would really happen — Arenas included. Magic president of basketball operations Otis Smith has been a close friend, mentor and “father figure,” in Arenas’ words, to the guard since they were together at Golden State — Smith in the front office and Arenas a young player. They often speak with each other, and Smith has never given up hope that the three-time All-Star might again be one of the NBA’s most dynamic players. Now it’s Smith who might be putting his own Magic legacy at stake with a bold move so many other teams refused to make. “We have a tendency not to forgive people in this country,” Smith said. “We have a tendency to hold onto things a little bit longer, particularly if they play professional sports. And I always say that some times good people do stupid things, and that one’s right on the top of the list. But I feel comfortable with who he is, knowing him since he was 19 years old.” Arenas is still due about $60 million over four years, one of the biggest reasons — along

with recurring knee problems that limited him to 47 games the previous three seasons — many teams also stayed clear. But the Magic were able to unload another ballooning contract in Rashard Lewis, who still has two more years after this season remaining on a $118 million, six-year deal. Arenas has showed signs this season that he can be close to what he once was when healthy. The 28-year-old has averaged 17.3 points and 5.6 assists, scoring a season-high 31 points against the Magic on Nov. 27. “I had to prove a point,” he said, laughing. Those around the league are also wondering how much Arenas has left. “Just a few years back he was an MVP candidate,” Miami’s LeBron James said. “Injuries and off-the-court issues have plagued his career the last few years. Do we know he’s going to get back to the MVP type feel? We don’t know. But he’s a great player and he’s had some great battles with me in a Cavs uniform and him in a Wizards uniform.” One thing is certain: The Magic are in desperate need of a spark. They have lost six of their last seven games to drop from first to fourth in the Eastern Conference. The slide is magnified by 12-game winning streaks by Miami and Boston, a ripple effect that was enough to force Orlando to revamp the roster again. The Magic also acquired Hedo Turkoglu and Jason Richardson from the Phoenix Suns in a major roster shake-up Saturday. They sent Vince Carter, Mickael Pietrus, Marcin Gortat, their 2011 first-round draft pick and cash to Phoenix. How it will all work is another story. Magic coach Stan Van Gundy said matter-of-factly that Jameer Nelson will remain the starting point guard and that one player among Arenas, Turkoglu and Richardson will have to come off the bench. Arenas already volunteered himself. That still leaves plenty to resolve on a team that has slowly slipped from an NBA finals appearance two years ago. Orlando’s Dwight Howard, still trying to process his revamped team, doesn’t foresee any major problems. “You have me and Jameer as leaders,” Howard said. “There’s no way you cannot fit into our team.” Arenas, for his part, doesn’t think it will be a difficult transition. Arenas and Richardson formed a top tandem when they were with Golden State. Orlando also was Arenas’ favorite team growing up, Penny Hardaway was his favorite player — he plans to take Hardaway’s No. 1 jersey— and most of his friends and family live in Florida. As for learning the offense? “Their plays are easy,” Arenas joked. “If you have the open shot, take it. If not, pass to Dwight.”

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

Arizona holds off N.C. State The Associated Press

Alonzo Adams / The Associated Press

Phoenix Suns guard Steve Nash, center, works to keep the ball away from Oklahoma City Thunder defenders Kevin Durant, right, and Serge Ibaka, during the first half of Sunday’s game in Oklahoma City, Sunday. Phoenix won 113-110.

Veteran players lead Suns over Thunder NBA ROUNDUP

The Associated Press OKLAHOMA CITY — Grant Hill and the Phoenix Suns didn’t wait for their reinforcements to arrive to try and get their season turned around. Hill turned back the clock to score a season-high 30 points, Steve Nash added 20 points and 10 assists and the short-handed Suns snapped Oklahoma City’s five-game winning streak by beating the Thunder 113-110 on Sunday night. Phoenix played while waiting for trade acquisitions Vince Carter, Marcin Gortat and Mickael Pietrus to join the team but found a way to edge past the Thunder down the stretch. “I think guys are going to come out and play, obviously, anytime that happens,” Hill said. “Sometimes when you’re on the other side and you see that a team’s not at full strength, there’s a little bit of a letdown.” The Suns were ahead most of the night but let a 13-point lead slip away before recovering to take the lead for good on Robin Lopez’s right-handed dunk with 6:45 left. Kevin Durant led the Thunder with 28 points, and Russell West-

brook and Jeff Green scored 19 apiece for Oklahoma City, which got within a point in the final 7 seconds but never got the chance to take the lead as the teams traded foul shots. The 38-year-old Hill scored 30 points for the first time since he had 39 for Orlando in a Feb. 27, 2005, loss to Miami. He also had a game-high 11 rebounds. “It’s Benjamin Button all over again,” Phoenix coach Alvin Gentry quipped, referring to Brad Pitt’s movie character who got younger over time. Gentry even suggested Hill could get back to scoring 25 points per game if the Suns kept him for four more years. “Nothing surprises me that he does,” Gentry said. “Me personally, and I know I’m probably a little biased, but if anybody should be on the All-Star team this year, it should be him.” In other games on Sunday: Celtics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Pacers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 BOSTON — Paul Pierce had his seventh career triple-double

and Boston extended its winning streak to 13 games by holding off Indiana. Pierce finished with 18 points, 12 assists and 10 rebounds. Lakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Raptors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110 TORONTO — Kobe Bryant scored 20 points, Pau Gasol had 19 and the Los Angeles Lakers won their fifth straight game. Andrew Bynum had 16 points and Shannon Brown 14 for the Lakers, who finished a sevengame road trip at 6-1 and have won eight of nine overall. Nets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Hawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 NEWARK, N.J. — Devin Harris had 22 points and eight assists, and Brook Lopez added 16 points for New Jersey. Pistons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111 Hornets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 AUBURN HILLS, Mich. — Will Bynum made a driving layup with 7.4 seconds left in overtime to lead Detroit over New Orleans. Rockets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Kings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Kevin Martin scored 22 points and Houston won for the fourth time in five games.

NBA SCOREBOARD EASTERN CONFERENCE

SUMMARIES Sunday’s Games

Thunder 110, Suns 113 PHOENIX (113) Hill 9-17 12-14 30, Frye 5-11 1-2 12, Lopez 9-10 1-2 19, Nash 7-9 4-4 20, Dudley 0-2 2-2 2, Warrick 2-4 3-4 7, Childress 5-9 0-0 10, Dragic 4-7 2-2 11, Barron 1-4 0-0 2. Totals 42-73 25-30 113. OKLAHOMA CITY (110) Durant 8-19 11-14 28, Green 6-12 5-7 19, Ibaka 0-2 0-0 0, Westbrook 5-17 9-11 19, Sefolosha 4-9 0-0 11, Harden 1-3 9-9 11, Collison 8-10 3-3 19, White 1-4 0-0 2, Maynor 0-1 1-2 1. Totals 33-77 38-46 110. Phoenix 25 29 28 31 — 113 Oklahoma City 23 22 40 25 — 110 3-Point Goals—Phoenix 4-12 (Nash 2-2, Dragic 1-1, Frye 1-5, Childress 0-1, Hill 0-1, Dudley 0-2), Oklahoma City 6-21 (Sefolosha 3-5, Green 2-6, Durant 1-6, Maynor 0-1, Westbrook 0-1, Harden 0-2). Fouled Out—Westbrook. Rebounds—Phoenix 49 (Hill 11), Oklahoma City 39 (Collison 8). Assists—Phoenix 23 (Nash 10), Oklahoma City 20 (Westbrook 9). Total Fouls— Phoenix 30, Oklahoma City 23. Technicals—. A—18,203 (18,203).

Atlantic Division Boston New York Philadelphia Toronto New Jersey

W 22 16 11 10 8

Miami Orlando Atlanta Charlotte Washington

W 21 16 17 9 6

L 8 10 12 17 19

Chicago Indiana Milwaukee Detroit Cleveland

W 16 12 10 9 8

L 9 14 15 19 19

Pct .846 .571 .407 .357 .286

GB — 7 11½ 13 15

L10 10-0 7-3 7-3 3-7 2-8

Str W-13 L-3 W-1 L-1 W-1

Home 12-1 6-7 8-6 7-8 6-8

Away 10-3 10-5 3-10 3-10 2-12

Conf 18-2 10-7 8-12 8-11 5-14

Away 9-5 7-6 8-7 3-11 0-13

Conf 15-4 12-5 13-8 5-12 3-15

Away 6-6 5-8 3-9 2-12 3-12

Conf 5-4 8-8 7-5 5-9 7-13

Southeast Division Pct .724 .615 .586 .346 .240

GB — 3½ 4 10½ 13

L10 10-0 4-6 5-5 3-7 1-9

Str W-12 L-2 L-1 L-2 L-7

Home 12-3 9-4 9-5 6-6 6-6

Central Division Pct .640 .462 .400 .321 .296

GB — 4½ 6 8½ 9

L10 7-3 3-7 5-5 3-7 1-9

Str L-1 L-1 L-2 W-1 W-1

Home 10-3 7-6 7-6 7-7 5-7

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division

Pistons 111, Hornets 108 NEW ORLEANS (108) Ariza 2-11 5-6 9, West 12-21 8-9 32, Okafor 5-9 3-3 13, Paul 9-16 2-2 23, Belinelli 2-6 0-0 6, Green 4-7 2-4 11, Smith 2-6 2-2 6, Thornton 1-5 1-2 3, Jack 2-6 0-0 4, Mbenga 0-0 1-2 1, Pondexter 0-0 0-0 0, Andersen 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 39-87 24-30 108. DETROIT (111) Prince 12-16 3-5 28, Villanueva 6-17 4-6 17, Wallace 0-0 0-2 0, Gordon 9-21 3-4 25, McGrady 2-6 0-0 4, Monroe 2-3 0-0 4, Wilcox 1-5 0-0 2, Bynum 8-10 3-4 21, Maxiell 1-1 0-0 2, Summers 3-4 0-2 8. Totals 44-83 13-23 111. New Orleans 20 31 27 22 8 — 108 Detroit 20 21 31 28 11 — 111 3-Point Goals—New Orleans 6-15 (Paul 35, Belinelli 2-3, Green 1-1, Jack 0-1, Thornton 0-2, Ariza 0-3), Detroit 10-23 (Gordon 4-9, Summers 2-2, Bynum 2-3, Prince 1-2, Villanueva 1-5, McGrady 0-2). Fouled Out—Okafor. Rebounds—New Orleans 57 (Okafor 12), Detroit 46 (Prince 12). Assists—New Orleans 18 (Paul 10), Detroit 26 (Bynum 9). Total Fouls—New Orleans 23, Detroit 23. Technicals—. A—16,452 (22,076).

L 4 12 16 18 20

San Antonio Dallas New Orleans Houston Memphis

W 23 21 16 12 12

L 3 5 11 15 16

Oklahoma City Utah Denver Portland Minnesota

W 19 19 16 14 6

L 9 9 10 14 22

L.A. Lakers Phoenix Golden State L.A. Clippers Sacramento

W 21 13 9 7 5

L 7 13 17 21 20

Pct .885 .808 .593 .444 .429

GB — 2 7½ 11½ 12

L10 9-1 9-1 4-6 7-3 4-6

Str W-8 W-2 L-1 W-2 L-2

Home 14-2 13-4 11-3 8-4 8-5

Away 9-1 8-1 5-8 4-11 4-11

Conf 15-3 14-3 10-7 8-9 9-10

Away 9-4 8-4 4-8 5-11 1-16

Conf 11-6 9-8 10-5 9-9 2-15

Away 11-5 6-8 3-12 2-11 2-9

Conf 11-5 10-9 6-12 5-15 1-14

Northwest Division Pct .679 .679 .615 .500 .214

GB — — 2 5 13

L10 7-3 6-4 6-4 6-4 2-8

Str L-1 W-1 W-1 W-2 L-5

Home 10-5 11-5 12-2 9-3 5-6

Paciic Division Pct .750 .500 .346 .250 .200

GB — 7 11 14 14½

L10 Str 8-2 W-5 5-5 W-1 2-8 L-1 4-6 W-2 1-9 L-5 ——— Sunday’s Games

Boston 99, Indiana 88 L.A. Lakers 120, Toronto 110 Detroit 111, New Orleans 108, OT

Home 10-2 7-5 6-5 5-10 3-11

New Jersey 89, Atlanta 82 Houston 102, Sacramento 93 Phoenix 113, Oklahoma City 110 Today’s Games

Nets 89, Hawks 82

Evan Vucci / The Associated Press

Former Washington Wizards guard Gilbert Arenas, center, plays Philadelphia in November. The Orlando Magic acquired the troubled guard from the Wizards and Hedo Turkoglu and Jason Richardson from the Phoenix Suns in a major roster shakeup Saturday.

ATLANTA (82) Williams 4-9 0-0 8, Smith 3-9 7-8 15, Horford 6-12 3-3 15, Bibby 8-15 1-2 19, Johnson 4-16 5-6 14, Collins 0-1 1-2 1, Evans 1-3 0-0 2, Powell 3-6 0-0 6, Teague 0-2 2-2 2, Pachulia 0-0 0-0 0, Wilkins 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 29-74 19-23 82. NEW JERSEY (89) Outlaw 3-12 0-0 7, Humphries 2-5 0-0 4, Lopez 5-15 6-7 16, Harris 8-18 6-9 22, Graham 5-8 0-0 10, Favors 1-3 1-1 3, Vujacic 4-10 0-0 10, Farmar 2-5 2-2 7, Petro 1-1 0-0 2, Murphy 4-7 0-0 8. Totals 35-84 15-19 89. Atlanta 30 13 19 20 — 82 New Jersey 23 20 19 27 — 89 3-Point Goals—Atlanta 5-17 (Smith 2-3, Bibby 2-7, Johnson 1-6, Williams 0-1), New

Orlando at Atlanta, 4 p.m. New Orleans at Indiana, 4 p.m. Dallas at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Portland, 7 p.m. Minnesota at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m.

Utah at Cleveland, 4 p.m. Charlotte at Washington, 4 p.m. Phoenix at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. Houston at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday’s Games

Oklahoma City at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Philadelphia at Chicago, 5 p.m. Golden State at Sacramento, 7 p.m.

Dallas at Orlando, 4 p.m. New Jersey at Memphis, 5 p.m. Milwaukee at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m. ——— All Times PST

Jersey 4-13 (Vujacic 2-4, Farmar 1-1, Outlaw 14, Murphy 0-1, Harris 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Atlanta 45 (Horford, Smith 10), New Jersey 57 (Graham 7). Assists—Atlanta 22 (Johnson 6), New Jersey 19 (Harris 8). Total Fouls—At-

lanta 22, New Jersey 20. Technicals—Atlanta defensive three second. A—11,295 (18,500).

Rockets 102, Kings 93

HOUSTON (102) Battier 2-5 0-0 5, Scola 7-14 3-4 17, Hayes 3-7 0-0 6, Lowry 5-10 1-2 13, Martin 6-15 7-7 22, Hill 3-4 3-6 9, Brooks 3-10 0-0 9, Budinger 3-7 2-2 9, Miller 1-6 0-0 3, Lee 4-5 1-1 9. Totals 37-83 17-22 102. SACRAMENTO (93) Greene 3-13 0-0 8, Jackson 4-7 0-0 8, Cousins 8-15 3-5 19, Udrih 0-7 6-6 6, Evans 6-21 0-0 14, Dalembert 3-7 2-2 8, Landry 4-8 3-4 11, Garcia 5-8 2-2 14, Casspi 1-2 0-0 3, Jeter 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 35-91 16-19 93. Houston 26 26 27 23 — 102 Sacramento 31 26 24 12 — 93 3-Point Goals—Houston 11-25 (Brooks 3-6, Martin 3-6, Lowry 2-3, Budinger 1-3, Battier 1-3, Miller 1-3, Lee 0-1), Sacramento 7-14 (Garcia 2-3, Greene 2-3, Evans 2-5, Casspi 1-1, Udrih 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Houston 64 (Hayes 11), Sacramento 46 (Cousins 8). Assists—Houston 28 (Lowry 7), Sacramento 18 (Udrih 7). Total Fouls—Houston 17, Sacramento 19. A—13,599 (17,317).

Celtics 99, Pacers 88 INDIANA (88) Granger 5-20 8-9 19, Foster 1-3 0-0 2, Hibbert 8-23 1-1 17, Collison 5-14 5-5 15, Rush 3-6 0-0 6, Hansbrough 0-4 0-0 0, Dunleavy 4-6 0-0 10, Ford 6-11 1-1 13, Posey 1-4 0-0 3, S.Jones 1-5 1-2 3. Totals 34-96 16-18 88. BOSTON (99) Pierce 6-8 6-6 18, Garnett 4-10 1-2 9, S.O’Neal 4-8 3-3 11, Robinson 7-15 2-2 18, Allen 8-16 0-1 17, Davis 8-14 2-2 18, Erden 0-0 0-0 0, Daniels 4-4 0-0 8, Bradley 0-1 0-2 0, Wafer 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-76 14-18 99. Indiana 23 25 17 23 — 88 Boston 30 21 18 30 — 99 3-Point Goals—Indiana 4-18 (Dunleavy 23, Posey 1-4, Granger 1-7, Ford 0-1, Rush 0-1, Collison 0-2), Boston 3-14 (Robinson 2-5, Allen 1-6, Davis 0-1, Pierce 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Indiana 51 (Hibbert 14), Boston 52 (Pierce 10). Assists—Indiana 17 (Dunleavy, Ford 3), Boston 23 (Pierce 12). Total Fouls—Indiana 18, Boston 23. Technicals—Dunleavy, D.Jones, Pierce, Boston Coach Rivers. A—18,624 (18,624).

RALEIGH, N.C. — Arizona turned away every secondhalf surge from North Carolina State before putting on a game-clinching run of its own. It was the kind of toughness Sean Miller wanted to see from his young club on the road. Derrick Williams scored 22 points and the Wildcats used a 10-0 spurt to beat the Wolfpack 72-62 on Sunday, handing N.C. State a frustrating loss for the second straight season. Last year, the Wildcats (102) beat the Wolfpack at home on a last-second layup. This time, Williams and the Wildcats had things in hand well before that point, holding N.C. State scoreless for 5½ minutes to turn a one-possession game into a 12-point margin that held up against the coldshooting Wolfpack (6-4). It could help Arizona’s NCAA tournament resume by the end of the regular season considering N.C. State was picked to finish fourth in the Atlantic Coast Conference, though Miller wasn’t ready to talk about that. “I don’t want to put the cart too far ahead here because we really kind of made our mind up in the fall to really stay locked in on becoming better,” Miller said. “Anytime you take over a program, especially where we were two springs ago — kind of an awkward time at Arizona — you have to build. And it doesn’t happen all at once.” It was another big performance for Williams, the 6foot-8 sophomore who has led Arizona in scoring in every game but one this year. He went six-for-nine from the field and 10-for-11 at the foul line. “I’m quicker than most people my size, so I was just trying to get my shoulders past that person’s shoulders and draw the contact,” Williams said. “Every time I do that, they end up fouling me.” Kevin Parrom added 11 points for the Wildcats, who led by four at halftime and maintained that margin the entire second half. Arizona shot 48 percent after halftime and held the Wolfpack to 32 percent for the game, including a miserable shooting day for heralded N.C. State freshmen C.J. Leslie and Ryan Harrow. Also on Sunday: No. 24 Notre Dame . . . . . . . .88 Stony Brook. . . . . . . . . . . . . .62 SOUTH BEND, Ind. — Tim Abromaitis scored 22 points to lead Notre Dame to a win over Stony Brook. Carleton Scott made all eight of his shots, including three 3-pointers, and had 20 points. Ben Hansbrough had 14 points with eight assists for Notre Dame (10-1). Washington State . . . . . . . . .85 Santa Clara. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 SANTA CLARA, Calif. — Klay Thompson hit a key 3-pointer in regulation and scored seven of his 23 points in overtime as Washington State rallied from a 10-point second-half deficit to beat Santa Clara.

Lakers 120, Raptors 110 L.A. LAKERS (120) Artest 2-3 2-2 6, Odom 5-9 1-2 11, Gasol 9-15 1-2 19, Fisher 2-8 2-4 7, Bryant 6-12 8-9 20, Bynum 4-6 8-10 16, Blake 2-5 0-0 6, Barnes 4-10 2-2 12, Brown 5-7 2-2 14, Walton 2-4 5-6 9. Totals 41-79 31-39 120. TORONTO (110) Kleiza 11-21 0-0 26, Johnson 7-12 0-0 14, Davis 0-3 0-0 0, Calderon 8-14 2-2 20, DeRozan 6-12 11-11 23, Dorsey 2-3 2-5 6, Wright 3-3 0-0 6, Bayless 1-7 2-2 4, Barbosa 3-12 4-5 11, Alabi 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-87 21-25 110. L.A. Lakers 28 29 29 34 — 120 Toronto 34 15 30 31 — 110 3-Point Goals—L.A. Lakers 7-19 (Brown 2-3, Barnes 2-4, Blake 2-5, Fisher 1-4, Odom 0-1, Bryant 0-2), Toronto 7-22 (Kleiza 4-10, Calderon 2-5, Barbosa 1-5, Bayless 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—L.A. Lakers 57 (Barnes 9), Toronto 39 (Kleiza 10). Assists—L.A. Lakers 20 (Bryant, Gasol 4), Toronto 27 (Calderon 12). Total Fouls—L.A. Lakers 21, Toronto 28. Technicals—L.A. Lakers defensive three second. A—19,935 (19,800).

Ethan Hyman / The News & Observer

Arizona’s Derrick Williams (23) dunks as North Carolina State’s C.J. Williams (21) defends during the second half of Sunday’s game in Raleigh, N.C. Arizona defeated N.C. State 72-62.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 20, 2010 D5

COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL

Titles become a regular thing at Penn State By Eric Olson The Associated Press

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Penn State’s Russ Rose makes it sound so simple, winning those four straight national championships in women’s volleyball. “I don’t think we’re training any different than people,” the longtime Nittany Lions’ coach said, “but there are some levels of expectations, and the older kids understand it and the younger kids understand it, and that’s what we’re doing at Penn State.” The Nittany Lions’ run to another title, completed Saturday night with a three-set sweep of California, has been overshadowed by Connecticut’s domination of women’s basketball. Penn State (32-5) is the only Division I volleyball program to have strung together more than two titles and boasted an NCAA-record 109match win streak before losing to Stanford in September. Rose’s volleyball program has reached the point where anything less than winning, and winning championships, is a surprise. The Lions are that good, even in a year when they took their lumps early after having to break in a new setter and replace Megan Hodge, one of the greatest players in the history of the college game. A total of 34 athletes have been part of Penn State’s championship teams from 2007-10. Only three of them — Blair Brown, Arielle Wilson and Alyssa D’Errico — have been members of all four. The players come and go. The constant is the 57-year-old Rose, a Chicago native who has been coaching since the mid-1970s, wrote his master’s thesis at Nebraska on volleyball statistics and took over at Penn State in 1979. “Penn State’s done it,” Rose said. “I’ve been the coach, but Penn State’s really why it’s happened. I’ve had terrific support.” Rose and Hawaii’s Dave Shoji are the only Division I volleyball coaches with more than 1,000 career wins, and Rose is the only one with five national championships. His first came in 1999, after his teams had been national runner-up three of the six previous years. Cal coach Rich Feller, who has known Rose for three decades and has lost to him four straight years in the postseason, said Rose has an eye for talent and an ability to make a good player great. “He knows what he wants out of a recruit,” Feller said. “He goes out and gets the ones that fit his system. He’s probably a little bit like the Bobby Knight. If you are willing to do it his way — probably not quite like that — but if you’re willing to do it his way, you’re going to play well.”

SKIING: WORLD CUP ROUNDUP

American Ligety continues early hot streak The Associated Press ALTA BADIA, Italy — Hermann Maier, Ingemar Stenmark, Michael von Gruenigen, Ted Ligety. Ted Ligety? Yes, Ted Ligety. The 26-year-old Park City, Utah, skier raced to his third straight World Cup giant slalom victory Sunday, matching a feat last accomplished by Maier 10 seasons ago. Stenmark (1979) and von Gruenigen (1995) are the only other skiers to open a season with three straight giant slalom victories. Sweeter still for Ligety, he mastered the steep Gran Risa — the gold standard in the giant slalom. “I’m so happy. It was always my dream to win here on such a classic course,” Ligety said. “This is the premier GS hill on the World Cup tour without a doubt.” Ligety joined an Alta Badia winners’ roll that started with Swedish star Stenmark 25 seasons ago. Alberto Tomba, the irrepressible Italian, inscribed his name four times, and Bode Miller did it in 2002. “Tomba has won here ... and all the big names. It’s cool to be on that list of guys, for sure,” said Ligety, who also took the lead in the World Cup overall standings. Ligety has eight career World Cup victories, all in giant slalom. His big victories the past two weekends in Beaver Creek, Colo., and Val d’Isere, France, ensured a buzz in the freezing Italian Dolomite mountains resort when Ligety came out of the starting gate. “(Ted) is amazing right now,” Miller said. “GS is amazing to watch when someone is skiing like that.” Ligety had a two-run time of 2 minutes, 31.99 seconds. Cyprien Richard, the first-round leader, was 0.14 seconds back, and fellow Frenchman Thomas Fanara was third — 0.55 seconds back. “Ted is a big champion,” Richard said. “The second run was my fault. I missed my concentration to make this mistake.” Ligety rallied in the second run. “I knew I could make it up on a hill like this,” Ligety said. “I definitely had a lot of confidence after winning the last two races by large amounts.” Miller, who finished 2.86 seconds

Marco Trovati / The Associated Press

Ted Ligety passes a gate during the first run of an alpine ski men’s World Cup giant slalom race, in Alta Badia, Italy, Sunday. Ligety, 26, won his third World Cup giant slalom on Sunday. back in 15th, joined a throng of United States skiers and staff in the finish area cheering Ligety on to stretch the streak. “It’s inspiring,” U.S. downhill racer Steven Nyman said. “Ted was just on the money. He’s just so balanced on his skis.” Ligety’s lead is less likely, with his maximum points in giant slalom lifting him to a 321-315 advantage over Silvan Zurbriggen, the Swiss winner of Saturday’s downhill in nearby Val Gardena who failed to qualify for the second run Sunday. “I would not bet on myself,” joked Ligety, when asked about his overall prospects with around 25 races remaining. Ligety will struggle in speed events after poor snow conditions affected his offseason program,

CYCLING INSIDER | GIFT IDEAS FOR CYCLISTS

though he compensated with a complete conditioning regime after a right knee injury in 2009. “I’m in really good shape this year,” he said, pointing also to confidence in his skis from new supplier Head. Ligety’s eighth career World Cup win took him within one of Miller’s U.S. record in GS. Few doubt it could arrive Jan. 8 at the most traditional of GS races held on the snow-packed cow pastures of Adelboden, Switzerland. “That would be something crazy,” Ligety acknowledged. “It’s hard for me to fathom. But I’m skiing good enough that I could win there.” In another event on Sunday: Vonn wins super-combi VAL D’ISERE, France — Lindsey Vonn has captured her second

straight World Cup race, taking the overall standings lead with a victory in the super-combined. The American put together a dominant performance in the super-G and an assured slalom run to win, a day after she had won the downhill at Val d’Isere, France. Austrians Elisabeth Goergl and Nicole Hosp finished second and third, respectively. The defending three-time overall World Cup champion seized the overall lead from Maria Riesch of Germany, who finished fifth. Her victory came a day after she was honored as the 2010 Female Athlete of the Year, chosen by members of The Associated Press. Vonn also has a victory this season in the super-G in Lake Louise, Alberta.

Headlocks

“He’s real quick for his size,” Oliver says. “He looks like he’s asleep out there, but when he decides to go, he’s pretty quick.” With a summer full of matches and a month of practices under his belt, Phillips says he is constantly working to make his opponents react to him on the mat. “That’s the main thing, getting that first takedown,” Phillips says. “I’ve improved on that a lot since last year. … This year I’m moving around a lot more, where last year I waited for them to make the first move.” “Most big men, they wrestle kind of slow and (not very explosive),” Phillips adds. “They don’t shoot, they just wait and react. This year, I want to make a name for myself by being quick and moving a lot. … I want to show people a big man can wrestle like a 189-pounder.”

E C 

Please e-mail sports event information to cyclingcentral@ bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

CAMPS/CLASSES/ CLINICS

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Sunnyside Sports in Bend recommends these items as gifts for the passionate cyclist. Pro Torque Wrench Kit, Knog 7 Function MultiTool, Chrome Soma messenger bag and the Garmin Edge 800. Only five shopping days remain before Christmas, and if you are like me, you are still wringing your hands over what to get the cyclist(s) on your list. I called up Mike Schindler, co-owner of Sunnyside Sports in Bend, to solicit his ideas for this year’s hottest holiday gifts for cycling enthusiasts. These were his top picks: For the traveler: Garmin Edge 800, a GPS (global positioning system) bike computer with an industry-first touch screen. The latest version of the Garmin bicycle computer includes all the bells and whistles of a cyclometer, but it also functions like the navigation system in your car. Riding vacation in France? Simply download maps from Garmin, and find the best riding routes while getting turn-by-turn instructions. The computer is also compatible with wattage meters. At a cost of $450-$650, this is a pricey gadget. But no unwieldy maps, and not getting lost on a bicycle vacation? Now that’s close to priceless. For the do-it-yourselfer: Shimano Pro Torque Wrench. Schindler recommends this tool for home mechanics, particularly those performing work on high-end carbon bikes. The torque wrench, which retails for $120, is the consumer version of what the mechanics use behind the counter in the bike shop, a tool Schindler says can run up to $500. Torque wrenches prevent overtightening carbon parts, such as handlebars, seatposts and stems, which can cause them to crack, or undertightening, which can cause them to loosen. “It’s easy to use and it’s made for tightening at a relatively low torque,” Schindler explains. “Carbon is strong, but not strong in crush strength. People will overtighten and crack it if they’re not watching it.

“This is a good investment,” he continues. “It would make a really nice tool for someone.” For the commuter/bicycle transportation enthusiast: Soma bag by Chrome. This messenger-style backpack and laptop bag is trendy, stylish and practical, says Schindler. The bag incorporates a seat-belt buckle to clasp in front and lies nicely across a rider’s back, he observes. Schindler notes that the bag has “crossover” appeal, serving both as a functional cycling bag, with organized compartments and a padded computer sleeve, and as a stylish over-the-shoulder bag or handbag, for carrying while off the bike. Schindler says one reason he likes the Soma bag is that it is not “a boring computer bag, but still (is) based in bike culture and more useable than a big messenger bag.” The Soma bag by Chrome retails for $140 and comes in an array of colors. For the novice: 7 Tool from Knog. Knog is an Australia-based maker of stylishly designed bike accessories, tools and lights, and its 7 Tool would be a much-appreciated gift for the beginner cyclist on your list. A pocket-sized multitool is a must for quick repairs when riding on the road or on the trail. The Knog version features seven tools: 2-, 3-, 4-, 5and 6-hex keys, plus a Phillips-head screwdriver and a bottle opener. At 2 inches wide by 2 inches long, this light, 117-gram tool costs $30 and fits easily into a seatpost bag or a jersey pocket. “Along with your spare tube, patch kit and bike levers, this tool would get you through most incidents you’re going to run into riding outside,” says Schindler. “It would be a good one for someone to build their emergency kit with.” —Heather Clark

INDOOR CYCLING CLASSES: at Rebound Sports Performance & Pilates, 143 S.W. Century Drive, Bend, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays; limited to eight riders per class; sessions at 6:30 a.m., noon, 5 p.m. and 6:15 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and 6:30 a.m. and 8 a.m. on Saturdays; $150 for 10 classes, $270 for 20 classes, or $480 for 40 classes; www. ReboundSPL.com, 541-585-1500. CYCL’IN, POWER-BASED INDOOR CYCLING CLASSES: Taught by Cherie Touchette in a private studio in west Bend on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Sundays; progressive classes offered in eight-week sessions run 60 to 90 minutes in length; buy a session pass, or drop-ins welcome, cost is $92 to $196, depending on number and length of classes; drop-in fee is $14 to $17; 541-390-1633. CALIFORNIA TRAINING CAMP: Multiple-day riding camp near Paso Robles, Calif., supported by Rebound coaching staff of Bend ; April 3-9; aimed at intermediate to advanced cyclists; $1,649, includes meals and lodging; limited to 10 riders; www. ReboundSPL.com; 541-585-1500.

MISCELLANEOUS CENTRAL OREGON TRAIL ALLIANCE MEETING: Monthly meeting of the local mountain bike trails organization looks ahead at 2011; 7 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 27; Central Oregon Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; www.cotamtb.com. SISTERS TRAILS ALLIANCE: Annual membership meeting; 7 p.m., Jan. 18; The Pines Clubhouse, 612 N. Brooks Camp Road, Sisters; jrahm@bendcable.com.

RIDES POLAR BEAR RIDE: 30-mile noncompetitive group road ride from Bend to Alfalfa and back; 10 a.m., Sunday, Jan. 1; begins and ends at Hutch’s Bicycles, 820 N.E. Third St., Bend; free; hutchsbicycles.com.

Continued from D1 Working on being more aggressive and less reactionary, Phillips won the Culver Invitational on Dec. 11 and placed third at the highly competitive 18-team Adrian Irwin Memorial Tournament at Mountain View in Bend this past weekend. “This year I’m a lot more confident,” says Phillips, who earned all-Tri-Valley Conference football honors this fall as a defensive lineman. “I’ve gotten a lot better at throwing moves, moves that are more physical from doing freestyle (wrestling).” Extremely light of foot for a young man weighing 270 pounds, Phillips has found success in the heavyweight division with a more aggressive style of wrestling that is more common in lighter weights.

Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@ bendbulletin.com.

HOLIDAY DEADLINES Wishes you a Safe and Merry Christmas The Bulletin will be closed on Friday, Christmas Eve and Saturday, Christmas Day

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C YC L I NG C EN T R A L

D6 Monday, December 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Bikes Continued from D1 The Boulder, Colo., cyclist sandwiched becoming the first American to win the prestigious Giro Donne women’s stage race in Italy between claiming two championships in Bend: the elite women’s road race national title in June, and the overall women’s crown at the Cascade Cycling Classic in July. Bend once again hosted two national championship cycling events this past year — the above-mentioned Elite, U23 and Junior Road National Championships in June, and the Cyclocross National Championships just this month. According to an OSU-Cascades economic impact study, each national championship event is estimated to have brought to our region between $1 and $1.4 million in direct tourism spending. Local interest in bike racing continued into the fall with the start of cyclocross season. The annual Thrilla cyclocross series, held on Thursday evenings in September, moved to more spacious digs near NorthWest Crossing in west Bend, in part to accommodate larger field sizes. Racers turned out for Thrilla events in droves — to the tune of nearly 200 participants each night. Enthusiasm for cyclocross racing continued its meteoric rise in Oregon with another record-breaking Cross Crusade series opener, for which 1,506 riders rolled up to the start line at Alpenrose Dairy in Portland, maintaining the event’s status as the most-attended one-day cyclocross race in the country. Central Oregon cyclists were impressive, to say the least, in 2010. Bend’s own Chris Horner produced a highlight-reel season that included a top-10 overall finish at the Tour de France, the best result by an American this year in cycling’s most prestigious stage race. Ian Boswell, a recent graduate of Bend’s Summit High School, turned heads on the professional racing circuit when he rode with the likes of Levi Leipheimer to a third-place finish at the Tour of Utah. That ride, combined with several other exceptional climbing performances, led Boswell, 19, to be named the 2010 Domestic Road Breakthrough Rider of the Year by the bible of cycling, VeloNews Magazine. Chris Sheppard, of Bend, was the brightest star among off-roaders in Central Oregon in 2010. The professional mountain biker won four cross-country races in Oregon, including the Sisters Stampede, and went on to win the grueling BC Bike Race, a mountain bike stage race in his native Canada. Sheppard’s standout year, which included celebrating the birth of his first child with his wife, April Lawyer, continued into the fall, when he won four Cross Crusade series races in the elite men’s field en route to claiming the Ca-

C.O. bike events benefit charities in 2010 Bend’s Big Fat Tour: A total of $8,000 to Bend’s Community BikeShed, Central Oregon Trail Alliance (COTA), and the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon (for creation of a youth mountain bike program) Bend Bicycle Film Festival: A total of $3,500 to COTA and the Bend Endurance Academy High Cascades 100: $5,000 to COTA Firecracker 100: $1,900 to the Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation WebCyclery movie nights (at McMenamins Old St. Francis School theater and at the Tower Theatre): $1,500 to COTA Tour des Chutes: A total of $80,000 to the St. Charles Medical Center Cancer Survivorship Program and the Livestrong Foundation High Desert Omnium: A total of $500 to Saving Grace and Sara’s Project, with additional monies awarded to Bend Bella Cyclists club members to attend a mountain bike skills camp Cyclocross National Championships: $16,000 to Tumalo Langlauf Club; $4,000 to The Trust for Public Land (to help purchase Miller’s Landing property along the Deschutes River in Bend); $3,000 to Rise Up International Laurent Rebours / The Associated Press

Stage winner Pierrick Fedrigo, of France, Ruben Plaza Molina, of Spain, Christopher Horner, of the U.S., Carlos Barredo, of Spain, and Sandy Casar, of France, left to right, cross the finish line of the 16th stage of the Tour de France cycling race in July. Horner, of Bend, was the top finisher for an American at the Tour de France. nadian Cyclocross National Championship crown in October. My pick for Central Oregon’s amateur cyclist of the year goes to Teri Sheasby, the 49-year-old mother of two from Bend who frequently held her own against the nation’s — and in some cases, the world’s — strongest female bike racers. The diminutive Sheasby, whose strength is pedaling uphill, recorded a third-place finish in the penultimate mountain stage of the Mt. Hood Cycling Classic near Hood River. She also placed 11th in the Cascade Cycling Classic’s McKenzie Pass Road Race, and she finished second overall in the hilly Elkhorn Classic Stage Race near Baker City. As a group, Central Oregon cyclocross racers were more competitive this year than last. At the recent cyclocross championships, seven area riders claimed spots on the nationals podium — more than double the number of riders who stood there in 2009. Numerous nonracing cycling events in Central Oregon continued to attract

multitudes of cyclists. Those events included the Tour des Chutes, an annual road bike ride in which this year some 1,000 riders raised money for cancer charities, and Bend’s Big Fat Tour, a guided of tour of Central Oregon’s beloved singletrack, enjoyed this past October by nearly 200 riders. In many instances, area cycling events served dual purposes, offering either competition or a riding experience while serving as a fundraiser for a local charity or nonprofit. Riders who participated in these events in 2010 helped play a part in raising tens of thousands of dollars for cancer research, local trails advocacy and youth sports development, among other worthy causes (see “C.O. bike events benefit charity”). Local mountain bikers had plenty to cheer in 2010. The Central Oregon Trail Alliance was awarded a $56,000 grant, which quickened the pace of new trail construction at the Wanoga Complex. The trail system, located about 15 miles southwest of Bend, hosted its first cross-

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country mountain bike race, the popular annual Pickett’s Charge!, back in June. COTA volunteers in 2010 built 12 miles of new singletrack, maintained more than 500 miles of existing singletrack, and logged a whopping 5,000 hours of volunteer trail work, according to COTA president Woody Starr. In Sisters, the Sisters Trail Alliance officially unveiled the renovated Peterson Ridge trail system, which included trail upgrades and 20 miles of new singletrack. Volunteers there recorded some 250 hours of trail work to complete the two-year project, according to lead trail-builder John Rahm. Looking back at the flurry of activity surrounding cycling in our community in 2010 makes me prouder than ever to call Central Oregon home. It also has me excited for what’s in store in the year to come. Heather Clark can be reached at 541-382-1811 or at cyclingcentral@ bendbulletin.com.

RACING DAYS IN CENTRAL OREGON IN 2010 Total number of bike race days: 46 Mountain bike races (including super Ds): 5 Cyclocross races: 12 Road bike races (including time trials and criteriums): 29

2010 CENTRAL OREGON TRAIL ALLIANCE BY THE NUMBERS (Source: Woody Starr, chairman) 12 — Miles of new singletrack built 512 — Miles of existing singletrack in Central Oregon maintained 5,104 — Total number of volunteer work hours (not including administrative work) 145 — Highest single-day turnout for volunteers (Spring Fling, held on May 22) 400 — Current COTA members; that is one member for approximately every 1.4 miles of bike trail maintained

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Want to Buy or Rent Wanted: Adjustable Swivel Piano Stool, please call 541-382-4573 Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for old vintage costume, scrap, silver & gold Jewelry. Top dollar paid, Estate incl. Honest Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006

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Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

AKC Bullmastiff puppies born 11-23-10. 916 856-9992 or kcarey@sacsheriff.com Aussies - Toys & Minis, will hold for Christmas, prices start $500, 541-548-6672 or www.cattlecalltoyaussies.com

Australian cattle dogs avail. 2/1, taking deposits. $300 541-279-4133, 541-548-5493 Australian Shepherds, 2 litters, toy/mini, family raised, $450-$600. 541-475-1166

Australian Shepherds (toy) Wanted: Huge heart w/ fenced yard. Sheba & Jackson were rescued and are seeking fabulous home. Both are crate trained, leash trained, house trained, and have been spayed/neutered & had all shots. Nominal adoption fee, 541-389-5470. BENGAL KITTENS, champion lines, ready now. $250 & up. Call 541-385-8934. Boston Terrier Beautiful Girls! Will be ready for Christmas. Champion bred for beauty and brains. Excellent family additions. AKC Reg. $950. 541-493-2772

Boxer Puppies, AKC, 9 wks. 3 adorable females left at $500 each. Call 541-408-5230

Canaries. Assorted colors including red, bronze, yellow, green. Excellent singers. 5@$40-$75 each. (541) 548-7947.

French bulldog/pug mix puppies. 3 only; taking deposits. Great coat & markings. Loving personalities. Pick yours now for Christmas! $700. 541-548-0747; 541-279-3250 German Shepherd Pup, 11 wks female, black, parents on site, $300. 541-536-5538 German Shepherd Pups, A K C , White, absolutely gorgeous, born October 1st. $650 or best offer. Please call 541-536-6167.

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BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

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Labrador pups AKC, chocolate, yellow, hips guaranteed, $250-$450. 1-541-954-1727

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Labrador purebred puppies, black, very cute, ready 12/26. $300-$400. 503-740-5312

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Electronic Adjustable Bed, twin size, wireless remote adjusts foot & head for max comfort. 3 yrs old with minimum use. $495. 541-504-0975

541-389-6655

BUYING Dining Set, Oak, Pedestal Base Lionel/American Flyer trains, 246 42" round w/built-in 18" leaf accessories. 541-408-2191. Guns & Hunting and 6 chairs. $325 Chainsaws, like new! Run ex541-389-7213 evenings. and Fishing cellent! Stihl MS-460, $695! Maremma Guard Dog pups, Fridge, Kenmore, White, 26 cu. MS-390, $395! 026 20” $269! purebred, great dogs, $300 ft., side by side, ice/water inHusqavarna 395XP, $595! 30-06 rifle, 30-32 rifle; also each, 541-546-6171. door, 6 yrs. old, exc. cond., 281XP, $595! 372XP, $595! quality horse tack for sale; $400 OBO, 541-788-5516 55XP, 20”, $295! 445XP, 20”, Min-Pin pups, Adorable pure Cash only. 541-420-0021. $295! 541-280-5006 bred, 8 weeks old, Black & GENERATE SOME excitement in Tan, 4 males $200/ea and 1 your neigborhood. Plan a ga300 Weatherby Magnum Mach female $300. up-to-date, on rage sale and don't forget to DO YOU HAVE V, USA, 99.9%,call for details, shots. Pics available. advertise in classified! SOMETHING TO SELL 541-536-3889,541-420-6215 541-633-6148 (leave msg) 385-5809. FOR $500 OR LESS? Pomeranian Puppies - Cutest Mattress Set, full size, clean, 380 AMT Back-up, $300; Fox B-SE 12 ga., $375, others, Non-commercial good condition, $100. Poms in Central Oregon! Call 541-771-5648. advertisers can 503-933-0814 (local call). 541-475-3496 and also visit: place an ad for our www.pom-a-rama.com Queen Mattress/Box Spring, exc. .38 Special S&W, 14-2 revolver, 6” barrel, 95% condition, cond, used in guest room, Pomeranian Puppies ready for "Quick Cash Special" $475 OBO. 541-647-8931 $180, local, 503-933-0814 Christmas! 11 wks, 1st shots, 1 week 3 lines 9 MM, Ruger, P89DC, Stainless, dew claws, Black female $10 bucks Second Hand full-size semi-auto pistol, w/ or $300, Chocolate male $250. Mattresses, sets & ammo. $425. 541-647-8931 2 weeks $16 bucks! Call 541-749-8591 Lhasa Apso pup, adorable, exc personality, $250. Linda 503-888-0800 (Madras)

Poodles for Christmas (3) home raised, $150. (541) 408-7370 www.ludwiglanepoodles.com PUG PUPPIES, 6 weeks old, fawn, 2 males, $300 ea., 1 female, $350. 541-610-5133 or 541-416-0814. Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com

Siamese Kittens (4) purebred, M/F, Seal & Lilac point, $125 ea. 541-318-3396

541-598-4643. The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

9 MM, S&W 6904, full metal, sub-compact semi-auto pistol, $475. 541-647-8931

Ad must include price of item

Astra 380 semi-auto, old/reliable, box & ammo, $200. 541-647-8931

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809

Browning A-Bolt .338 Win Mag w/Boss & Nikon 3-9x40 scope, $780 cash. 541-306-6511 Bushmaster XM-15 Predator semi-auto .223 on bipod w/Swift scope 6-18x44, 4 clips 30, 20, 10 & 5. $1000. 541-948-7280 CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Tower entertainment center, 3 glass shelves + drawer, $60. 541-647-2685, or 633-5629.

Crab Pods (2), commercial size, 12”x40”, 40 lbs ea., $50 ea., 541-617-1133

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GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

Antiques & Collectibles

SIBERIAN HUSKY/Wolf pups, 6 Cavalier King Charles Span- German Shepherd pups ready wks. wormed & shots, $400 by Christmas. $350 to $450. iels $1200 to $1500 AKC Reg. each. 541-610-3431. 541-410-7388 ww.companioncavaliers.com needs/senior cats 541-382-7614 German Shorthair Pointer Special seeking new homes! 3 A K C , champ lines, 4 male, 3 CHIHUAHUA, 12-week-old su'wobbly' cats, born w/neurofemale, $375, 541-550-9992. per sweet black female. Perlogical imbalance issues, fect gift. $225. Madras Golden Retriever English Cream 3 Hummel music boxes, 3, otherwise healthy, social, 541-475-2039 after 10 a.m. $50 each. okay w/litter box, etc., inAKC Christmas pups! Males, 8 Hummel pictures, $40 side only & no stairs. Sweet 14 wks, $550. 541-852-2991 each. Call 541.408.2215, or middle-aged cat w/limited Chihuahua pups, Great Kittens & great cats avail. for pamwilson_3@msn.com vision in one eye, declawed, Christmas Gift! 6 weeks adoption! Cat Rescue, Adopinside only. Two nice deold. $300. 541-977-4817 tion & Foster Team, the clawed cats, inside only. Shy Antique Clocks: Refurbished jesse1215@gmail.com area's only no-kill, all volunbut sweet cat with no teeth, for Sale. Come pick one out teer cat rescue, will be at okay w/canned or small for the Holidays. Petco on Sat. 12/18. Foster kibble dry food. Two senior 1627 NE 3rd, #5, Bend. kittens avail. @ Tom-Tom cats, very loving. Very nice 541-678-8923. Motel (next to Sonic) all cat who needs $15/mo. week, 541-815-7278. Sancworth of asthma meds. Aftuary open for adoptions on fectionate three legged cat, Thurs/Sat/Sun 1-4 PM, other inside only. Gorgeous & days by appt. Will hold your sweet cat that has to have Chihuahuas, 2 purebred fem.,9 new pet up to 2 wks. Closed daily heart meds. Two young wks old, great Christmas gift! Christmas Day except for cats w/limited vision in one $200/obo. 541-815-9728 those picking up their new COWGIRL RESALE eye. Six shy older kittens that pet. Open Sun., Dec. 26. Gift Chow/Mix male, 2 yrs, gentle, Gently Used Western Wear need a quiet home & socialcertificates avail. so somesweet disposition, free to Turquoise, Old Pawn izing. See many of them at one can pick their pet, call good home. 541-389-9753 Squash Blossoms, Cuffs www.craftcats.org. Most for details! Altered, shots, ID 541-549-6950 would not be accepted or chip, more. Low adoption kept for long at a traditional Find It in The Bulletin reserves the right fees; we still have a lot due shelter, but they are safe at to publish all ads from The to Redmond shelter refusing The Bulletin Classifieds! CRAFT even if they stay for Bulletin newspaper onto The all. 541-389-8420; 647-2181; 541-385-5809 the rest of their natural lives. Bulletin Internet website. 598-5488; www.craftcats.org We'd love to see them all have great new homes, Cowboy Corgis ready to go unthough. Adoption fee reder your tree. Corgi/Aussie duced or waived for right cross. Lots of color! 7 fehome. If you have room in males $250 ea 541-792-0808 215 your heart & home for a very Coins & Stamps DACHSHUNDS, AKC MINI special cat that has seen LONGHAIRED, Reds, Black & some hard times, please visit LAB MIX Free to good home! WANTED TO BUY tans, Creams. $300-$600. Cat Rescue, Adoption & FosDARBY I am a cute, active 541-548-7514 ter Team's sanctuary or call US & Foreign Coin & Currency 7-yr old Black Lab/Border collections, accum. Pre-1964 541-389-8420; 541-598-5488 collie mix looking for a new Dachshunds, AKC, mini’s, (5) fesilver coins, bars, rounds, Also have many other cats & energetic place to call home. males,chocolate dapple, $375, sterling flatware. Gold coins, kittens that just need loving I am house trained with all 541-420-6044, 541-447-3060 bars, jewelry, scrap & dental forever homes. Open house/ shots and love to romp outgold. Diamonds, Rolex & adoptions Thurs/Sat/Sun 1-4 English Bulldog puppy, AKC, doors. Call my owners for vintage watches. No collecPM, other days by appt. If Grand sire by Champion more info, 541-382-7829. tion too large or small. Bedyou cannot adopt, please Cherokee Legend Rock, #1 rock Rare Coins 541-549-1658 support our work. We are all Bulldog in USA ‘06, ‘07 and Lab Pups AKC - 2 blacks, 6 volunteer & receive no gov’t chocolates, dew claws, 1st ‘08, 1 male! $1000. 240 funds, so must rely on kind shots & wormed. Hunters. 541-306-0372 people to help us care for the Crafts and Hobbies $450-$500. 541-536-5385 English Springer Spaniels, AKC cats that have no one else www.welcomelabs.com Reg, black/white, housebroke, looking out for them. CRAFT, Alpaca Yarn, various colors/ LAB PUPS AKC, titled parents, ready to go! 541-408-6322 P O Box 6441, Bend 97708. blends/sparkle. 175yds/skein FC/AFC, Blackwater Rudy is www.kennykennels.com Have a safe & warm holiday! $7.50-8.50 ea. 541-385-4989 grand sire. Deep pedigreed FREE KITTENS ready for performance/titles, OFA hips VIZSLA AKC Pups, ready 1/10. Meade 8 inch Telescope LX200 Christmas! To good homes. & elbows. 541-771-2330 M/$600 F/$750. Deposits. GPS Call for details $1800 541-777-0470. www.royalflushretrievers.com 541-430-9335 (Roseburg) 541-306-6169 Bend

M-1 Garand, $750. Remington Model 725, .30-06, $700. Call 541-610-3732 Remington 1100 12 ga. Shotgun. Includes 2 stocks-wood and synthetic, 2 barrels, screw in chokes, case, great shape, $500. 541.390.5866 Rossi 12 gauge 3 inch magnum double barrel stagecoach gun. 20 inch barrels w/hammers. $275. 541-548-0675 Ruger Blackhawk, .357 Magnum. In perfect condition, just like new. Has alternate cylinder that allows you to shoot 9mm as well. Comes with leather holster & any .357 ammo I have. $399 obo. 541-420-0801 Taurus Model 85, 38 special Revolver, blue, 2” barrel, exc cond, now $275. 541-389-9836

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Art, Jewelry and Furs Statue, made by DS Bartos, Bronzed cowboy & horse, $150, 541-617-1133.

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TV, Stereo and Video Samsung 52” box big screen, 2006 excellent cond. Must sell, $400. 541-480-2652.

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Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

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Musical Instruments Fender Acoustic, DG7, American made,hardshell case, exc cond, $175, 503-933-0814.

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Fuel and Wood

263 Chop Saw, Delta 10” mitre, $100, please call 541-617-1133 Chop Saw, Delta, Saw Buck, 8” compound mitre., $200, 541-617-1133 Compactor, gas powered, Jumping Jack, $115, 541-410-3425.

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Snow Removal Equipment

Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers. Thank you.

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition $3,000. 541-385-4790.

BEND’S HOMELESS NEED OUR HELP The cold weather is upon us and sadly there are still over 2,000 folks in our community without permanent shelter, living in cars, makeshift camps, getting by as best they can. The following items are badly needed to help them get through the winter:

d

Pellet Stove, Westfield, like new, extra parts. $500 cash. You haul. 541-548-3467

Tools

singles, call

POODLES AKC Toy. Also Pom-a-Poos. Home raised. 541-475-3889 541-325-6212

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Heating and Stoves

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT dry Lodgepole, $150 for 1 cord or $290 for 2, Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

CAMPING GEAR of any sort: d Used tents, sleeping bags, tarps, blankets.

d

WARM CLOTHING d

Rain Gear, Boots * 50 TURKEYS and 80 pounds of HAM desperately needed for the annual Christmas Day Dinner, Saturday, Dec. 25.* Please drop off your donations at the BEND COMMUNITY CENTER 1036 NE FIFTH STREET (312-2069) Questions: Call Ken Boyer, 389-3296, or Don Auxier, 383-0448 PLEASE HELP. YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

Lodgepole CASH price: Rounds $119/cord; 2 cords/more $115 ea. Split, $149/cord; 2 cords/more, $145 ea. (Visa/ MC: $129/cord or Split $159 ea) Deliv avail. 541-771-8534

SPLIT, DRY LODGEPOLE DELIVERY INCLUDED! $175/CORD. Call for half-cord prices! Leave message, 541-923-6987

HOLIDAY DEADLINES Wishes you a Safe and Merry Christmas The Bulletin will be closed on Friday, Christmas Eve and Saturday, Christmas Day

Retail & Classified Display Advertising Deadlines PUBLICATION ............................................. DEADLINE Friday 12/24 ..................................................Tuesday 12/21 Noon Go! Magazine 12/24 .....................................Tuesday 12/21 Noon Saturday 12/25 .............................................Tuesday 12/21 Noon Sunday 12/26 ..............................................Tuesday 12/21 4 p.m. Monday 12/27 ......................................... Wednesday 12/22 Noon At Home 12/28........................................ Wednesday 12/22 Noon Scene 1/1 .................................................. Thursday 12/23 8 a.m. Tuesday 12/28 ............................................ Thursday 12/23 Noon

CLASSIFIED LINE AD DEADLINES Friday 12/24 - Deadline is Noon Thursday 12/23 Saturday 12/25 - Deadline is Noon Thursday 12/23 Sunday 12/26 - Deadline is 2 p.m. Thursday 12/23 Monday 12/27 - Deadline is 2 p.m. Thursday 12/23

Classifieds • 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Circulation Telephone Service (at 541-385-5800) will be open 12/25 from 6:30 am to 10:30 am to help with your delivery needs.


E2 Monday, December 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663 SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

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Lost and Found Found Camera: 12/11, near Deschutes River Trail at Reed Mkt bridge,call to ID 541-389-8799 FOUND Camera on Awbrey Rd, 12/17. Call to identify. 541-385-8538. FOUND ½” hammer drill, intersection Hwy 20 & 126, Sisters, 12/17. 541-526-1462 Found Rx Glasses, rectangular frame, near Badlands Wilderness, 12/12, 541-318-1686 LOST Bifocals w/gold chain, Cascade Village Shopping Ctr, 12/14? 541-317-1942

Farm Market

300 400 Farm Equipment and Machinery

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

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Hay, Grain and Feed Bluegrass Straw mid-size 3x3, $25/bale; Orchard grass hay mid-size 3x3 $45/bale. Volume discounts; delivery available. 541-480-8648.

For More Ads

Lost Kodak camera on Dec. 14th at Cascade Middle School gym. 541-480-3122.

341

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

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Sales Other Areas DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

Shetland Pony, $100, please call 541-383-4552 for more info.

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Employment Opportunities CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state.

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

358

Farmers Column Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

375

Meat & Animal Processing Angus Beef, 1/2 or whole, grain fed, no hormones $3.44/lb., hanging weight, cut & wrap included, please call 541-383-2523.

Toyota-Scion of Bend looking for capable and qualified applicants. must have auto experience. Application and resumes accepted in person only. Must pass drug test, good driving record, and be insurable. Apply in person @ Toyota of Bend, (Ask for Casey Cooper) 2225 NE Hwy. 20, Bend. General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Glazier -- Residential: Must have 5 years experience & clean driving record, Shower doors & mirrors a plus. Pay DOE. Call 541-382-2500. Glaziers: Part-time, experienced, through January, to start immediately. Please Contact Mike at 503-956-5645.

For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

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PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Experienced Male Caregiver offering assistance with medical & non-medical tasks & activities. Refs. avail. upon request, 541-548-3660.

We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320

Sales Northeast Bend

KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

454

541-617-7825 Caregiver Prineville senior care home looking for Care Manager for two 24-hour shifts per week. Must be mature and compassionate, and pass criminal background check. Ref. required. 541-447-5773.

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Finance & Business

Housekeeping Part time position, some hotel resort cleaning exp. preferred. Must be able to work weekends. Please apply at Worldmark Eagle Crest, 1522 Cline Falls Rd. Redmond (3rd floor of Hotel)

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

CAUTION

READERS:

507

We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386 Tax Preparer wanted part-time Mon-Fri, January-April, 2011. 20-25 hours/week. Send resume and contact info to asetax@gmail.com The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

Secure 10x20 Storage, in SE Bend, insulated, 24-hr access, $95/month, Call Rob, 541-410-4255.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Roommate Wanted

Loans and Mortgages

Share 3bdrm Redmond home; pvt bath. Can reduce rent with housekeeping! $385 + util; $200 dep. 916-690-1529 cell

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

573

Business Opportunities Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

Call Today &

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

** Pick your Special **

2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps. Pet Friendly & No App. Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

Call about Our Specials! Studios to 3 bedroom units from $395 to $550 • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 managed by

GSL Properties HOSPITAL AREA Clean quiet AWESOME townhouse. 2 Master Bdrms, 2.5 bath, all kitchen appli., W/D hookup, garage w/opener, gas heat & A/C. $645/mo. + dep. S/W/G pd. No Dogs. 541-382-2033

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DUPLEX SW Redmond 2 bdrm 2 bath, garage w/opener. 1300 sq ft, w/d hkup, fenced yard, deck, w/s/g pd. $700 mo + dep. 541-604-0338

648

Houses for Rent General

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend The Bulletin is now offering a 1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. W/D included! $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz

H Bend, Prineville & Madras H Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

650

627

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Vacation Rentals and Exchanges

Absolutely beautiful, 1 Bdrm. 2 bath, fully furnished Condo, $695, $400 dep, near downtown & college, completely Clean 3 Bdrm 2 Bath, new Costa Rica Home Swap paint/carpet, 1262 sq ft, renovated, 2 Verandas, no Former Oregonian’s son will be $900/mo. Near hosp; must pets/smoking, avail. now, all married in Bend 7/29/11. 2 see! No pets/smoking. 3023 amenities and bdrm 2 full bath home in NE Byers Ct. 541-410-0794 W/S/G/elec./A/C/Cable Atenas. “El Mejor Clima del incl., 541-279-0590 or Large 2 bdrm, 1 bath, large Mundo.” Please email: cheritowery@yahoo.com wagspuravida@yahoo.com fenced backyard in nice neighborhood, $650 mo. + Fully furnished loft apt. 630 deposit. Call Heidi at on Wall Street in Bend. All 541-480-6679. Rooms for Rent utilities paid and parking. Call 541-389-2389 for appt. Mobile in NE Bend, 840 sq ft Free 1st mo., furnished studio, electric & gas, heat pump, $350, no smoking, dep+last, River & Mountain Views! large yard, W/S/G incl. No 541-548-4775,541-280-4598 930 NW Carlon St., 2 bdrm., pets, no smoking. $600/mo, 1.5 bath, W/S/G paid, W/D $500 deposit. 541-382-1365 hook-up, $650/mo. $600 dep. No pets. 541-280-7188. NOTICE: All real estate advertised 638 here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which Apt./Multiplex SE Bend makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or 2 Bdrm. in 4-Plex, 1 bath, new discrimination based on race, carpet/paint, W/D hookups, color, religion, sex, handicap, storage, deck, W/S paid, $525 familial status or national + $600 dep. 541-480-4824 origin, or intention to make 631 1-Month Free Option! any such preferences, limitaCondo / Townhomes tions or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any For Rent What are you advertising for real estate which is in violation of this looking for? You’ll A Westside Condo at Fireside law. All persons are hereby Lodge, 2 bdrm, 1 bath, fi nd it in The informed that all dwellings $595/mo. Wood stove, advertised are available on W/S/G paid. W/D hookup Bulletin Classifieds an equal opportunity basis. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 The Bulletin Classified Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. Looking for your next included, Spacious 2 & 3 employee? 640 bdrm., with garages, Place a Bulletin help Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 541-504-7755. wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 632 Happy holidays! Enjoy living at readers each week. 179 SW Hayes Ave. Spacious Apt./Multiplex General Your classified ad will 2 Bdrm townhouses, 1.5 also appear on baths, W/D hookups, fenced FIRST MONTH HALF-OFF! 3 bendbulletin.com which yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex. NEW currently receives over Rent starts at $525 mo. CARPET & PAINT THROUGH1.5 million page views OUT! W/D included. No 541-382-0162; 541-420-2133 every month at 541-420-0133 smoking. No Pets. 1yr. lease. no extra cost. $795/mo. + $945 sec. Bulletin Classifieds 642 20076 Beth. 541-382-3813 Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place The Bulletin is now offering a Apt./Multiplex Redmond your ad on-line at MORE AFFORDABLE Rental ASK ABOUT OUR bendbulletin.com rate! If you have a home or HOLIDAY SPECIAL! apt. to rent, call a Bulletin 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. inClassified Rep. to get the 656 cludes storage unit & carport. new rates and get your ad Close to schools, parks & Houses for Rent started ASAP! 541-385-5809 shopping. On-site laundry, SW Bend no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. $1000 Mo. Newer imOBSIDIAN APARTMENTS maculate 3/2.5, 1560 sq.ft., 541-923-1907 dbl. garage 1st & last, pet www.redmondrents.com neg. 19827 Powers Road. 541-322-7253 503-363-9264,503-569-3518

541-385-5809

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle. DRIVER - CDL A or B NAPA DC is seeking experienced driver for a FT, temporary position. Current CDL w/HazMat. Min 2 yrs experience, good driving record, dependable, drug free, Able to drive nights in winter conditions. An EEO employer. Fax resume to 503-286-1485.

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

605 528

Independent Contractor

&

604

Storage Rentals

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state.

Rentals

500 600

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

Looking for Employment

Poultry, Rabbits,

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE!

TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

333

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit

421

Schools and Training

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

and Supplies Lost Keys on Keyring, East Side of Bend, week of 12/6, 2 New Hampshire Red & 1 Susplease call 541-382-4924. sex bantam roosters need own flocks. Not for eating! $5 TURN THE PAGE ea. 541-389-9861 Leave msg.

The Bulletin

Employment

308

476

Employment Opportunities

Finance and Sales Manager

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

476

Employment Opportunities

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 1 & 2 bdrms Available starting at $575. Reserve Now! Limited Availability.

Alpine Meadows 541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928.

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

658

Houses for Rent Redmond 1 Bdrm, 1 bath, 547 1/2 NW 7th, $550; 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 626 1/2 SW 8th, $595; 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 135 NW 10th St., $650, 541-815-1709, CopperDog PM. 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, Summerfield location, near 97, fresh interior paint, new Pergo, fully fenced. 1st & dep., $850. 503-997-7870. 4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room, w/woodstove, new carpet/paint, single garage w/opener. $795/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803


THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 20, 2010 E3

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 865

880

882

932

933

ATVs

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

Pickups

Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., reduced to $3000, also boots, helmet, tires, avail., 541-410-0429

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Antique and Classic Autos

Boats & RV’s RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space 658

Houses for Rent Redmond

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

Real Estate For Sale

A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appl., incl. gardener, reduced to $749/mo. 541-408-0877.

700

Spacious 3 bdrm., 2 bath + bonus, single story, large fenced yard, dbl. garage, $950/mo. + $500 dep. 2120 NW 11th St. 541-771-6599

Real Estate Services

705

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * Terrebonne 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath * Home Inspectors * in private, treed setting. Has Etc. deck, detached garage and storage, $725/month. Call The Real Estate Services classi541-419-8370; 541-548-4727 fication is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real es659 tate in Central Oregon. To Houses for Rent place an ad call 385-5809

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

3 Bedroom, 2 bath mobile home for rent, $600/mo. 253-241-4152 On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft., mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1295. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease 4628 SW 21st St., Redmond - 2250 sq ft office & warehouse. 15¢/sq ft for 1st 6 mos., + $300 cleaning dep. Avail Jan 15. 541-480-9041

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft 827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404 Office/Warehouse Space, 6400 sq.ft., (3) 12x14 doors, on Boyd Acres Rd, 541-382-8998.

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

693

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 Downtown Redmond Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. $650/mo + utils; $650 security deposit. 425 SW Sixth St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848

TERRY 27’ 5th wheel 1995 with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great condition and hunting rig, $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

870 Yamaha 2008 Nitro 1049cc, 4 stroke, bought new Feb 2010, still under warranty, 550 miles, too much power for wife! $6000. Call 541-430-5444

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010, Health forces sale, 1900 mi., 1K mi. service done, black on black, detachable windshield, back rest & luggage rack, $13,900, Mario, 541-549-4949, 619-203-4707 Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $16,900 OBO. 541-944-9753

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $19,999 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $122,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

Travel Queen 34’ 1987 65K miles, oak cabi-

745

Homes for Sale

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE 762 All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to Homes with Acreage the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise Beautiful Prineville home, wood Shadow Deluxe "any preference, limitation or and tile throughout, 3 bdrm, Honda American Classic Edition. discrimination based on race, 2.5 bath, master on main 2002, black, perfect, gacolor, religion, sex, handicap, level, bonus room, office, familial status, marital status raged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 6.87 acres, conveniently loor national origin, or an in541-610-5799. cated between town & lake, tention to make any such $415,000. 541-771-3093 preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status The Bulletin includes children under the To Subscribe call age of 18 living with parents 541-385-5800 or go to or legal custodians, pregnant www.bendbulletin.com women, and people securing KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like custody of children under 18. new cond, low miles, street This newspaper will not Sisters, turnkey horse setup, 4 legal, hvy duty receiver hitch acres, great barn, 3 pastures, knowingly accept any adverbasket. $4500. 541-385-4975 updated house, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, tising for real estate which is pond,irrigation, RV pad w/hook in violation of the law. Our ups, $575,000, 541-549-9945. readers are hereby informed Motorcycle Trailer that all dwellings advertised Kendon stand-up motorPeople Look for Information in this newspaper are availcycle trailer, torsion bar able on an equal opportunity About Products and Services suspension, easy load and basis. To complain of disEvery Day through unload, used seldom and crimination call HUD toll-free only locally. $1700 OBO. The Bulletin Classifieds at 1-800-877-0246. The toll Call 541-306-3010. free telephone number for 764 the hearing impaired is 865 Farms and Ranches 1-800-927-9275.

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523.

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

Autos & Transportation Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

900

881

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Travel Trailers

***

CHECK YOUR AD

35 Acre irrigated, hay & cattle farm, close to Prineville, 76 year old widower will sacrifice for $395,000, 541-410-3425

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are Just bought a new boat? misunderstood and an error Sell your old one in the can occur in your ad. If this classiieds! Ask about our happens to your ad, please Super Seller rates! contact us the first day your 541-385-5809 ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we 775 can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next Manufactured/ day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for SunMobile Homes day; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please For sale by owner, 2 Bdrm 2 call us: bath, 1970 double wide mo385-5809 bile home. Partially furThe Bulletin Classified nished. As is - $5000, cash *** only. 541-389-6249 day/eve Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

ATVs

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new

Sailboard, Kerma, complete package, $150, please call 541-617-1133.

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

880

Motorhomes

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240.

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833 Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718 Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $40,000 OBO/terms, 541-948-2126.

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. Grumman AA-5 Traveler, 1/4 interest, beautiful, clean 541-389-9188. plane, $9500, 619-822-8036 www.carymathis.blogspot.com 882

Fifth Wheels

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417. Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

Redmond Airport hangar, heated, 55’ x 75’ x 18’, 12’ x 24’ office, bath with shower, $229,500. 20-year lease. Call 503-803-2051

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

International 1981,T-axle-300 13 spd.Cummins/Jake Brake,good tires/body paint;1993 27’ stepdeck trailer, T-axle, Dove tail, ramps. $7950, 541-350-3866

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

931

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $4850, 541-410-3425. MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all original, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition. $2,200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552.

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, reduced to $34,000 OBO 541-610-4472; 541-689-1351

Barns M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Handyman

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

I DO THAT!

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Remodeling, Handyman, Professional & Honest Work. Help w/pre-holiday projects. CCB#151573 Dennis 317-9768

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling •Decks •Window/Door Replacement •Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Snow Removal Reliable 24 Hour Service • Driveways • Walkways • Parking Lots • Roof tops • De-icing Have plow & shovel crew awaiting your call!

Holiday Lighting Multiple Options • Interior • Exterior • Landscape

Christmas Tree Delivery

Debris Removal

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

Excavating

Home Improvement

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Masonry MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/410-6945

Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

Painting, Wall Covering MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

KOMFORT 27’ 5th wheel 2000 trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide, stored inside, in excellent condition. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) Chevy Tahoe LT3 4WD 2007. Beautiful Red. CD. Leather. 1 owner. Exc. cond. Ext. Warranty. $29,500. VIN 132901 541-480-3265. DLR 8308.

Ford Excursion 4x4 2000. Nice Red, like new, only 68k, seats 9. Just $16,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

VW Super Beetle 1974 New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3750 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

933

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl, 5-spd., 4x4, good cond, price reduced to $7950, 541-593-4437.

Pickups

Chevy 1/2 Ton 1995, 4X4, 350 engine, auto, cold A/C, new tires, brakes, shocks, & muffler, w/ camper shell, runs great. $4000. 541-706-1568

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 1998, like new, low mi., just in time for the snow, great cond., $7000, 541-536-6223.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Chevy Silverado 1500 1988, 4x4, step side, tow pkg., low mi. at 98K, A/C, great tries, brakes, new rear end, runs extra super, $4000 OBO, 541-548-7396

Dog Divider for Subaru Legacy, $40, please call 541-617-1133. Ford F-150/Expedition 2wd 96-03, Four-16" OEM steel wheels, $120. (541)383-2429 TIRES: 4 Schwab 225/60R18, Studless snow tires, used, 2 seasons, $225. 541-447-1668

Chevy Silverado 1500 4x4, 2000, full size, Reg cab w/ long bed, white, V6, 4.3L, 20 mpg, auto trans, ABS, AC, dual airbags, tow pkg, runs & drives excellent, maint’d extremely well; non-smoker. Recent brks, bearing, tune- up, tires, trans & coolant flush. 183K mi. $4700 obo. 541-633-6953

932

Antique and Classic Autos

DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2700. 541-322-6261

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $11,500. 541-408-2111

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Mercedes-Benz GL-550 2008 VIN: 4JGBF86E18A325542, Mileage: 39,324, Exterior Sand Beige, Interior: Macadamia. $51,977 OBO. Call Scott @ 541-604-4113 or scott@sts4evr.com.

Nissan XTerra SE 2001 $5900 Auto, CD, Sun, Tow, 131K, V6, 4WD, Must See 541-617-8454

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

Dodge Ram 2001, short bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

•Flower bed clean up •Irrigation repair •Senior Discounts •Landscape Maintenance

Chevy Suburban 1994 ¾-ton 4x4, runs great, very reliable, new tires & brakes, $1800 OBO. 541-728-1036

package, Good condition, $1200 OBO, 541-815-9939.

Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K mi., $8925. 541-598-5111.

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

Fall Cleanup and Snow removal

CHEVY BLAZER 2000, ZR2 LS 4x4, 130k miles, 90% tread left on $2000 worth of tires. Under KBB at $4995. Can be seen at Redmond’s Hwy 97 Park & Sell. 541-546-6838.

4 Michelin Studless ice & snow, used 1 season, 225/60/R16, $175 cash. 541-318-8668

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

Chad L. Elliott Construction

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

GMC Jimmy 4x4 UT 1986, 2-Dr, Auto, Tow

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

FORD pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories Yamaha 350 Big Bear

Ford F-350 Crew 4x4 2002. Triton V-10, 118k, new tires, wheels, brakes. Very nice. Just $14,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

Mercedes-Benz 280c 1975 145k, good body & mechanical, fair interior, can email pics. $2950. 541-548-3628

rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919. YAMAHA 1998 230CC motor, 4WD, used as utility vehicle. excellent running condition. $2000 OBO. 541-923-4161 541-788-3896

1957,

908

916 Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Wagon

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

nets, exc interior. Great extra bdrm! Reduced to $5000. 541-480-3286

875

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $1995 for all. Bill 541-480-7930.

Chevy

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

Watercraft Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871.

885

Canopies and Campers

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2 20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Ford F250 1986, 4x4,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Boats & Accessories

750

671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent

850

Snowmobiles

Redmond Homes

Sunriver A newer 3/2 mfd. home, 1755 sq.ft., living room, family room, on private .5 acre lot near Sunriver, $895. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803.

800

Snow Removal d SNOW REMOVAL! d

d LARGE OR SMALL, d WE DO IT ALL! 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 d www.bblandscape.com d

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more. Priced to sell at $59,500! 541-317-9185

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

MONTANA 2000 36’ 3 slides, washer and dryer, new A/C. Very nice & livable! $12,500. 541-923-7351.

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $5800. 541-330-0852. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500,541-280-5677

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

FORD 350 LARIAT 2002 4x4 crewcab, 7.3 diesel 135k, dually, matching canopy, towing special, gooseneck, too! Orig. 63-year-old construction owner needs money, will trade, $17,500. (541) 815-3639 or (541) 508-8522

Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, auto, reduced to $14,999 obo 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

Toyota RAV 4 Ltd. 2007 80K miles, moonroof, tow pkg, great condition! $13,750. 541-848-7876


E4 Monday, December 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 975

975

Automobiles

Automobiles PORSCHE CARRERA 4S 2003 - Wide body, 6

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160. Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

940

975

975

Vans

Automobiles

Automobiles

1998 Dodge Ram Wagon SE 2500, Mark III conversion, 100k miles, 4 captains chairs, rear fold-down bed, hitch, $4000 and worth it! Travel in luxury. 541-318-9999 or 541-508-8522.

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles,

mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223. Ford Focus SE Wagon 2007 4-dr, 8800 mi, 30+ mpg, brand new cond, $12,500 obo cash. 541-475-1165 aft 6 Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr brks, plus mntd stud snows. $8500 obo. 541-330-0616

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, V6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

Mercedes S430-4Matic, 2003 AWD, silver, loaded & pampered. Excellent in snow! $16,395. 541-390-3596

Jeep Cherokee Laredo, 2003, 135K miles, fully loaded, excellent condition. $6500. Call 541-749-0316

Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $27k. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

Kia Spectra LS, 2002 96K miles, black, 5-speed, runs good, $2600. Phone 541-749-0316

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267 Pontiac Firebird 1998, exc cond, no wrecks. T-top, V6, loaded, 22/29 mpg (reg gas). $4995. 541-475-3984

Pontiac Grand Am 2004 FWD 975

Automobiles

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $3500. 541-548-5302

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Subaru Outback 2005 AWD, 4cyl, auto, lthr htd seats, 89K mi, reduced to $13,995 OBO 541-508-0214; 541-554-5212

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Mercury Grand Marquis 1984. Grandpa’s car! Like new, all lthr, loaded, garaged, 40K mi, $3495. 541-382-8399

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Mazda 3, 2005 5-door, dark bronze, 47,500 mi, fully loaded, very good cond, $11,950. Kent, 541-923-6723

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

SUBARUS!!!

automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018.

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Mercedes AMG, Formula One V-12. Very Rare. Only 99k miles. Ultimate in safety, luxury & performance. Cost $135,000 to fully hand-build. Just $13,500. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

speed, 63,000 miles, all wheel drive, no adverse history, new tires. Seal gray with light gray leather interior. $32,950. 503-351-3976

3.4L V-6 4 door, all power, 158k hwy miles. Excellent condition.

$3,950 541-923-8627

VOLKSWAGEN BUG 1965 Black , Excellent condition. Runs good. $6995. 541-416-0541. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Any 2011 VW starts with a pen.

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

2011 Tiguan

All-new 2011 Jetta

2011 CC

BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

$

0down 0 $

(excluding title, taxes, options and dealer fees)

first month’s payment

$

0

due at signing

Example: 2011 Tiguan for $327 per month/36 month lease.

Buick LeSabre 2004, custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $6000; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $2900. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

2011 Tiguan S-Model lease for $327 per mon./36 mos. ZERO due at signing. Offer ends 12/31/2010

Buick LeSabre Cstm 1996. Go anywhere in snow, great gas mi. 44K on eng. Comfortable, reliable! $1599. 916-690-1529

Buick LeSabre Limited Edition 1985, 1 owner, always garaged, clean, runs great, 90K, $1895, 541-771-3133.

Chevy Cavalier 1990, 2.2, auto, owned by mechanic, call for details. $995. 541-480-5950

1045 SE Third Street Bend carreravw.com 541.382.1711

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

1000

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE City of Bend Request for Proposals Traffic Signal Efficiency The City of Bend requests proposals for traffic engineering services to perform operational analyses, develop and implement traffic signal timing plans, and evaluate and design associated infrastructure upgrades for existing isolated and coordinated traffic signals. Required work will include the collection of traffic counts and the performance of other data collection or studies as necessary to quantify and report reductions in fossil fuel emissions achieved through the implementation of the project improvements.

For all lease offers: Lessee responsible for damage, excess wear and insurance. Exclude taxes, title, options and dealer fees. On approved credit through primary lender. Supplies limited. Photos for illustration only. 2011 VW Tiguan with automatic transmission, MSRP $27,360. Monthly payments total $11,78244. Dealer contribution of $500. Purchase option at lease end $16,142.40. $.25/mile over 10,000 miles. Lessee responsible for a disposition fee of $350. © Volkswagen of American, Inc.

given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days of the date of first publication specified herein along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the Plaintiff's attorney or, if the Plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the Plaintiff. 5. If you have any questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636. 6. This summons is issued

pursuant to ORCP 7. ROUTH CRABTREE OLSEN, P.S. By /s/Janaya L. Carter, OSB # 032830 Attorneys for Plaintiff 13555 SE 36th St., Ste. 300 Bellevue, WA 98006 (425) 586-1991; Fax (425) 283-5991 jcarter@rcolegal.com

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF AUCTION One (1) storage unit will be auctioned on Tuesday, December 28th, 2010, at 11:00 a.m. at All Star Storage, 136 SW Century Drive, Bend, OR. PH-541382-8808.

541-385-5809

This project is an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project funded through the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy and Efficiency Block Grant Program. Sealed proposals must be submitted by January 18, 2011, 3:00 PM, at City Hall, 710 NW Wall Street, 2nd Floor, Bend, Oregon, 97701, Attn: Gwen Chapman, Purchasing Manager. Proposals will not be accepted after deadline. The outside of the package containing the proposal shall identify the project: Traffic Signal Efficiency (EG10AH). Solicitation packets may be obtained from Central Oregon Builder's Exchange (COBE) at www.plansonfile.com (click on Public Works) or 1902 NE 4th Street, Bend, Oregon. Proposers must register with COBE as a document holder to receive notice of addenda. This can be done on the COBE website or by phone at 541-389-0123. Proposers are responsible for checking the website for the issuance of any addenda prior to submitting a proposal. Proposal results are available from COBE. The City of Bend reserves the right to: 1) reject any or all proposal not in compliance with public solicitation procedures and requirements, 2) reject any or all proposals in accordance with ORS 279B.100, 3) select consultant on the basis of the proposals or to conduct interviews with the highest qualified proposers after scoring, 4) seek clarifications of any or all proposals, and 5) to select the proposal which appears to be in the best interest of the City. Dated: December 20, 2010 Gwen Chapman Purchasing Manager 541-385-6677 LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES

Audi A4 Avant Quattro 2003 3.0L., 92K mi, garaged, serviced, silver, fully loaded, $9300. 541-420-9478

BMW M3 COUPE E36 1998, mint condition, adult owned, low miles, needs nothing, $12,500. 541-419-2181

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Legal Notices

BANK OF AMERICA FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE OF THE MATTIE SUE CARROLL REVOCABLE TRUST; UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE MATTIE SUE CARROLL REVOCABLE TRUST; LOUIS SLAYTON; THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES; Occupants of the Premises; and any and all persons claiming an interest in the Property, Defendants. 1. TO THE DEFENDANTS: SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE OF THE MATTIE SUE CARROLL REVOCABLE TRUST; UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE MATTIE SUE CARROLL REVOCABLE TRUST; AND ANY AND ALL PERSONS CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY: In the name of the State of Oregon, you are hereby required to appear and answer the complaint filed against you in the above-entitled Court and cause on or before the expiration of 30 days from the date of the first publication of this summons. The date of first publication in this matter is December 6, 2010. If you fail timely to appear and answer, Plaintiff will apply to the above-entitled court for the relief prayed for in its complaint. This is a judicial foreclosure of a deed of trust in which the Plaintiff requests that the Plaintiff be allowed to foreclose your interest in the following described real property: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER (NE 1/4 NW 1/4) OF SECTION THREE (3), TOWNSHIP EIGHTEEN (18) SOUTH, RANGE TWELVE (12) EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT WHENCE THE NORTH QUARTER CORNER OF SAID SECTION 3 BEARS NORTH 79°20'17" EAST, 702.90 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00°19"31" WEST, 100 FEET; THENCE WEST 100.63 FEET; THENCE NORTH 100 FEET; THENCE EAST 101.26 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING Commonly known as: 27 SE Cessna Drive, Bend, Oregon 97702. 3. NOTICE TO DEFENDANTS: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! A lawsuit has been started against you in the above-entitled court by BANK OF AMERICA FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff. Plaintiff's claims are stated in the written complaint, a copy of which was filed with the above-entitled Court. 4. You must "appear" in this case or the other side will win automatically. To "appear" you must file with the court a legal paper called a "motion" or "answer." The "motion" or "answer" must be

1000

1000

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. #: OR-09-331711-SH Reference is made to that certain deed made by, CARLA L. POWELL & JOHN POWELL as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE CO OF OR, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FIRST HORIZON HOME LOANS, A DIVISION OF FIRST TENNESSEE BANK N.A., as Beneficiary, dated 9/17/2007, recorded 9/20/2007, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number - at page number - fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2007-50905,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 139499 LOT 8 IN BLOCK 94 OF DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, UNIT 8, PART II, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 15751 PARK DRIVE LA PINE, OR 97739 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 9/1/2009, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,848.51 Monthly Late Charge $69.95 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $214,003.76 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.6250 per annum from 8/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 4/8/2011 at the hour of 1:00:00 PM , Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, At the front entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond St., Bend, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-573-1965 or Login to: www.priorityposting.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 4/8/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 3/9/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENACY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 12/6/2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee 3 First American Way Santa Ana, CA 92707 Signature By: Angelica Castillo, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for v this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# FNMA3845493 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011, 01/10/2011


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 20, 2010 E5

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NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com/ AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: December 3, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONALTITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Juan Enriquez State of California County of Orange I, the undersigned, certify that I am the Trustee Sale Officer and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original Trustee's Notice of Sale. Juan Enriquez ASAP# 3839052 12/13/2010, 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-102285 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, GWEN E. HOGUE, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR SIERRA PACIFIC MORTGAGE COMPANY, INC., as beneficiary, dated 10/9/2003, recorded 10/14/2003, under Instrument No. 2003-70986, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 32 OF HOLLOW PINE ESTATES, PHASE II, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No. T10-70642 OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, TRACY ANN PIN AIRE, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 03-22Â2005, recorded 03-30-2005, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No,, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2005-18611 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 206556 PARCEL ONE (1) OF PARTITION PLAT NO. 2002-51, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1331 NE BUTLER MARKET RD. BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86,735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 08/01/2010 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALL-

MENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $704.60 Monthly Late Charge $35.23 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $112,814.39 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.825% per annum from 07-01-2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 04-04-2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of

the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx0101 T.S. No.: 1268630-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Jason M. Higham and Angie K. Higham, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Homecomings Financial Network, Inc, as Beneficiary, dated April 05, 2006, recorded April 17, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-26000 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 4 in block 7 of Bradetich Park, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 21417 Bradetich Loop Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,205.63 Monthly Late Charge $110.28. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $574,795.50 together with interest thereon at 3.500% per annum from October 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on March 04, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: October 27, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is February 02, 2011, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-352895 11/29, 12/06, 12/13, 12/20

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx3562 T.S. No.: 1296826-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Kenneth L. Easter, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers"), As Nominee For Cmg Mortgage, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated October 05, 2006, recorded October 13, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-68664 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lots 26, 27 & 28, block SS, Deschutes River Woods, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 19011 Shoshone Road Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due February 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,750.26 Monthly Late Charge $87.51. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $305,500.00 together with interest thereon at 6.875% per annum from January 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on March 03, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: October 27, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is February 1, 2011, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-353083 11/29/10, 12/06, 12/13, 12/20

sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated; November 22, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 Maria De La Torre, Asst. Sec. ASAP# 3840487 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011, 01/10/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0172413494 T.S. No.: 10-10478-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, GREGORY L. STECKLER AND SHARON M. STECKLER, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on September 26, 2007, as Instrument No. 2007-52108 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 258955 LOT SIXTEEN (16), THE SHIRE PHASE 1, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 61283 RING BEARER COURT, BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and

the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; Monthly Payment $2,925.00 Monthly Late Charge $146.25 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 520,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.75000 % per annum from May 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on March 25, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front en-

trance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due {other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L515765 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 125904581/STAATS AP #1: 116367 Title #: 4522909 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by RIJN N. STAATS as Grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE CO. as Trustee, in favor of INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B. as Beneficiary. Dated May 9, 2007, Recorded May 16, 2007 as Instr. No. 2007-27984 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON AND AN ADDENDUM TO NOTE DATED 05/09/07, AND A MODIFICATION AGREEMENT DATED 11/28/07, RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION LOAN AGREEMENT DATED 05/09/2007, OWNER/BUILDER ADDENDUM DATED 05/09/2007, RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION LOAN ADDENDUM DATED 05/09/2007 covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 23 IN BLOCK 53 OF DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, UNIT 9, PART 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE $462,500.00 INTEREST @ 3.3406 % FROM 04/01/10 THRU 09/08/10 $6,780.95 ADVANCE - PROPERTY TAXES $4,301.61 ADVANCE - INSURANCE $3,701.00 ACCRUED LATE CHARGES $1,888.27 APPRAISAL FEE $125.00 CREDIT DUE <$721.19> PROPERTY INSPECTION $330.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$478,905.64 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 56235 STELLAR DRIVE, BEND, OR 97707-2002 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $462,500.00, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 04/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on January 17, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 09/08/10 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 921059 PUB: 12/06/10, 12/13/10, 12/20/10, 12/27/10

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be: 138 SOUTHEAST AIRPARK DRIVE BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of November 16, 2 010 Delinquent Payments from July 01, 2010 3 payments at $ 1,129.42 each $ 3,3 88.26 2 payments at $ 1,842.18 each $ 3,684.36 (07-01-10 through 11-16-10) Late Charges: $ 382.60 Beneficiary Advances: $ 22.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 7,477.22 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encum-

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1727 T.S. No.: 1305617-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Bruce W. Grove An Unmarried Man, as Grantor to First American Title Ins. Co. Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage Co. Dba Commonwealth United Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, dated October 29, 2004, recorded November 01, 2004, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2004-65519 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 15 of Northpointe-phase 1, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 20695 Beaumont Dr. Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due August 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $768.94 Monthly Late Charge $38.40. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $122,009.33 together with interest thereon at 5.625% per annum from July 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on March 14, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: November 04, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is February 12, 2011, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-355371 12/13/10, 12/20, 12/27, 01/03

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L515911 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000018998/FOXHOVEN Investor No: 4006430990 AP #1: 171421 00 10500 Title #: 100514130 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by ZAC W. FOXHOVEN, TECKLA A. FOXHOVEN as Grantor, to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated March 31, 2009, Recorded April 6, 2009 as Instr. No. 2009-14014 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: A PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER (NE 1/4 SE 1/4) OF SECTION 21 AND IN THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (NW 1/4 SW 1/4) OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 17 SOUTH, RANGE 14 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY OREGON, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: SECTION 21: THE EAST 668 FEET OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER (NE1/4 SE 1/4). SECCTION 22: THE WEST HALF OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (W 1/2 W 1/2 NW 1/4 SW 1/4). Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 5 PYMTS FROM 05/01/10 TO 09/01/10 @ 2,897.71 $14,488.55 TOTAL LATE CHARGES $220.68 MISCELLANEOUS FEES $27.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$14,736.23 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 25600 ALFALFA MARKET RD., BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $410,187.08, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 04/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on January 17, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 09/09/10 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 921060 PUB: 12/06/10, 12/13/10, 12/20/10, 12/27/10

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. OR-AGF-109811 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, GARY MICHAEL JONES AND PAMELA JO JONES, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of AMERICAN GENERAL FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC., as beneficiary, dated 6/11/2008, recorded 6/13/2008, under Instrument No. 2008-25586, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by AMERICAN GENERAL FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT FORTY-SEVEN (47) IN BLOCK TWENTY-ONE (21) OF DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, RECORDED MAY 23, 1963, IN CABINET A, PAGE 106, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 56726 STELLAR DRIVE BEND, OR 97707 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of December 8, 2010 Delinquent Payments from July 20, 2010 5 payments at $698.27 each $3,491.35 (07-20-10 through 12-08-10) Late Charges: $20.00 TOTAL: $3,511.35 FAILURE TO PAY INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, IMPOUNDS AND LATE CHARGES WHICH BECAME DUE 7/20/2010 TOGETHER WITH ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, IMPOUNDS, LATE CHARGES, FORECLOSURE FEES AND EXPENSES; ANY ADVANCES WHICH MAY HEREAFTER BE MADE; ALL OBLIGATIONS AND INDEBTEDNESSES AS THEY BECOME DUE AND CHARGES PURSUANT TO SAID NOTE AND DEED OF TRUST. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $78,645.69, PLUS interest thereon at 9.600% per annum from 6/20/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on April 13, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. Sale Information Line: 714-730-2727 or Website: http://www.lpsasap.com DATED: 12/8/2010 LSI TITLE OF OREGON, LLC AS TRUSTEE By: Asset Foreclosure Services, Inc., as Agent for the Trustee 22837 Ventura Blvd., Suite 350, Woodland Hills, CA 91364 Phone: (877)237-7878 Sale Information Line:(714)730-2727 By: Norie Vergara, Trustee Sale Officer ASAP# 3843980 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011, 01/10/2011


E6 Monday, December 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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brances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $216,136.49, PLUS interest thereon at 3.5% per annum from 06/01/10 to 10/1/2010, 3.5% per annum from 10/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on March 21, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the

grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obli-

gation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same.DATED: 11/16/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee , By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3818776 11/29/2010, 12/06/2010, 12/13/2010, 12/20/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0175345644 T.S. No.: 10-11445-6 . Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JOHN D. LOWRY JR. AND DONNA A LOWRY, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank N.A., as Beneficiary, recorded on March 5, 2008, as Instrument No. 200810015 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 186044 LOT FOUR (4), WISHING WELL, PHASE I, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OR-

EGON Commonly known as: 63263 WISHING WELL LANE, BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $1,509.53 Monthly Late Charge $60.38 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 217,450.28 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.25000 % per annum from June 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on March 14, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street,

Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714508-5100

SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com/ AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: November 18, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Michael Busby ASAP# 3822001 11/29/2010, 12/06/2010, 12/13/2010, 12/20/2010

PUBLIC NOTICE The December 21, 2010, meeting of the Bend Park & Recreation District Board of Directors has been cancelled. The Board will resume a regular meeting schedule Tuesday January 4, 2011. The January 4 agenda and supplementary reports will be posted on the district’s web site www.bendparksandrec.org, Friday, December 30, 2010. For more information call 541-389-7275.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-102385

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-70293-OR

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, MICHELLE E. THOMAS, as grantor, to AMERI TITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR MORTGAGEIT, INC., as beneficiary, dated 6/1/2006, recorded 6/7/2006, under Instrument No. 2006- 39464, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee of the IndyMac INDX Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-AR27, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-AR27 under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated August 1, 2006. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT ONE HUNDRED FORTY-NINE (149), PARKS AT BROKEN TOP, PHASE 4, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 61418 DAVIS LAKE LOOP BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of December 1, 2010 Delinquent Payments from May 01, 2010 5 payments at $ 2,214.52 each $ 11,072.60 3 payments at $ 2,923.70 each $ 8,771.10 (05-01-10 through 12-01-10) Late Charges: $ 775.11 Beneficiary Advances: $ 55.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 20,673.81 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $416,850.00, PLUS interest thereon at 6.375% per annum from 04/01/10 to 10/1/201 0, 6.375% per annum from 10/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on April 5, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 12/1/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3834751 12/13/2010, 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JEFF STRINGHAM, TAMARA STRINGHAM as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 07-10-2006, recorded 07-14-2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No., fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-48338 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 157184 A parcel of land in the South Half of the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (S 1/2 NE 1/4 NE 1/4) of Section 25, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 12, East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, being further described as follows: Commencing at the Northeast corner of said Section 25, being a brass cap set in a monument box; thence South 00º23'48" West along the Easterly line of said section a distance of 660.76 feet to the true point of beginning of this description; thence South 89º38'59" West 30.00 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on the Westerly right of way line of Horse Butte Road; thence South 89º38'59" West, 653.75 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 05º03'40" East 163.19 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence along the arc of a 50.00 foot radius non-tangent curve concave to the Southwest, a distance of 83.16 feet, the chord of which bears South 47º24'31" East 73.90 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 52º53'06" East 81.92 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence along the arc of a 470.00 foot radius curve concave to the North, a distance of 306.92 feet, (long chord bears South 71º35'33" East 301.49 feet), to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 89º42'00" East 201.06 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 89º42'00" East 30.00 feet to a point on the centerline of said road; thence North 00º23'48" East along said centerline, 389.97 feet to the point of beginning and there terminating, EXCEPTING THEREFROM the Easterly 30.00 feet for road right of way purposes. Commonly known as: 60359 HORSE BUTTE ROAD BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 01/01/2010 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $3,767.13 Monthly Late Charge $188.35 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $572,007.38 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.5% per annum from 12-01-2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 03-28-2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: November 16, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 Maria De La Torre, Asst. Sec. ASAP# 3840425 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011, 01/10/2011

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Legal Notices

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8446 T.S. No.: 1306074-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx3487 T.S. No.: 1216283-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Robert H. Blankenship and Sandy K. Blankenship, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., As Nominee For Hyperion Capital Group, Llc, as Beneficiary, dated September 01, 2005, recorded September 12, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. x, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-60990 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: The following real property situated in Bend, County of Deschutes, and State of Oregon, to wit: Lot 1, Mt. Vista, in the City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 61203 Mount Vista Drive Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due February 1, 2010 of interest only and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,568.97 Monthly Late Charge $61.19. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $250,000.00 together with interest thereon at 5.875% per annum from January 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on March 18, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: November 10, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is February 16, 2011, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by David A. Hunt, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Sunset Mortgage Co., as Beneficiary, dated February 22, 2006, recorded February 28, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-14015 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Parcel one (1) of partition plat 2002-33, a parcel of land located in the northwest quarter of the northeast quarter (nw1/4ne1/4) of section seventeen (17), township eighteen (18) south, range twelve (12), east of the Willamette Meridian, and a portion of lot four (4), block three (3), Fairview Acres, Deschutes County, Oregon Commonly known as: 61136 Tapadera Street Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due May 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,331.53 Monthly Late Charge $116.57. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $334,646.77 together with interest thereon at 6.625% per annum from April 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on March 07, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: October 28, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is February 05, 2011, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-355740 12/13, 12/20, 12/27, 01/03

R-353288 11/29, 12/06, 12/13, 12/20

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-UM-102795 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, REBECCA A DOLF, INDIVIDUAL, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of SECURITY BANK, ITS SUCCESSORS AND/OR ASSIGNS, as beneficiary, dated 4/10/2001, recorded 4/16/2001 in Volume 2001, page 17424, of Deeds of Trust, under Instrument No. -, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by UMPQUA BANK. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT TWENTY-EIGHT (28), BLOCK ONE (1), ROMAINE VILLAGE, UNIT 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 19909 MAHOGANY STREET BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of December 6, 2010 Delinquent Payments from July 01, 2010 1 payments at $460.00 each $460.00 5 payments at $682.00 each $3,410.00 (07-01-10 through 12-06-10) Late Charges: $220.46 Beneficiary Advances: $109.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $4,199.46 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $67,542.44, PLUS interest thereon at 6.625% per annum from 06/01/10 to 8/1/2010, 6.625% per annum from 8/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on April 7, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at MAIN ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY JUSTICE CENTER, 1100 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a, reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 12/6/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3840521 12/13/2010, 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011 LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L515909 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000017855/NEWMAN Investor No: 4001434366 AP #1: 140480 Title #: 100514128 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by KEN NEWMAN, SUSAN NEWMAN as Grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES as Beneficiary. Dated May 12, 2000, Recorded May 17, 2000 as Instr. No. --- in Book 2000 Page 19351 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 3, BLOCK 30, TALL PINES-FIFTH ADDITION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 5 PYMTS FROM 05/01/10 TO 09/01/10 @ 884.63 $4,423.15 TOTAL LATE CHARGES $66.90 RETURN CHECK $25.00 MISCELLANEOUS FEES $13.50 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$4,528.55 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 53035 TARRY LANE, LAPINE, OR 97739 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $71,942.62, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 04/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on January 17, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 09/09/10 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 921061 PUB: 12/06/10, 12/13/10, 12/20/10, 12/27/10 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-102994 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JEANETTE A. JANIA, as grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE CO., as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 11/17/2006, recorded 11/22/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-77449, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by HSBC Bank USA, National Association as Trustee for Deutsche Alt-A Securities Mortgage Loan Trust, Series 2007-AR3. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT ONE (1) AND THE NORTH 40 FEET OF LOT TWO (2), IN BLOCK SIXTY-EIGHT (68) OF BEND PARK, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 409 SOUTHEAST WYE LANE BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of December 7, 2010 Delinquent Payments from August 01, 2010 4 payments at $1,853.23 each $7,412.92 1 payments at $1,62 6.2 8 each $1,626.2 8 (08-01-10 through 12-07-10) Late Charges: $379.65 Beneficiary Advances: $88.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $9,506.85 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $235,138.37, PLUS interest thereon at 7.75% per annum from 07/01/10 to 12/1/2010, 7.75% per annum from 12/01/10 to 12/01/11, 7.75% per annum from 12/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on April 11, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same.DATED: 12/7/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500 Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: 206-340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3842270 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011, 01/10/2011


Bulletin Daily Paper 12/20/10