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Vote on VA hiring delay holds up aid for vets DA labor contract set today By Keith Chu The Bulletin

WASHINGTON — The lengthy federal hiring process has tied up federal housing aid for two dozen Central Oregon veterans for more than six months, despite a backlog of local vets who are seeking help. That delay has local housing officials and veterans’ advocates steaming,

even as the temperatures hover around freezing. And although the U.S. Veterans Administration said this week that the wait is normal and it is close to releasing the housing aid, local groups say the process has already taken too long. When Redmond housing agency HousingWorks was issued 25 federal housing vouchers earmarked for mili-

tary veterans this spring, the news was welcome, said Executive Director Cyndy Cook. The only catch? Unlike most housing vouchers, which are managed by a local housing agency, these vouchers had to be personally approved by a U.S. Veterans Affairs Department caseworker, who interviews recipients to ensure they meet the program’s criteria. See Veterans / A4

“It’s very difficult to know that you’re sitting on 20-plus vouchers for veterans and you can’t get them out the door because the VA has not produced their case managers.” — Cyndy Cook, executive director, HousingWorks

HARSH WEATHER: Trees jeopardized; twister strikes near Salem

By Erin Golden The Bulletin

Deschutes County commissioners are expected to vote today on a labor contract between the county and a recently formed union of deputy district attorneys — a move incoming District Attorney Patrick Flaherty has urged the commission to delay. The controversy over the contract comes down to one specific section: A list of situations under which the district attorney can discipline or Patrick discharge emFlaherty ployees and the procedure the district attorney must follow. It would mark a significant shift for the county’s prosecutors, who are currently “at will” employees subject to termination without cause. The attorneys believe the additional layer of job security is necessary to prevent Flaherty from creating a major staffing shake-up when he takes over for Mike Dugan in January. Flaherty, meanwhile, argues that the “just cause” provision is a deliberate attempt to limit his ability to do his job. See Contract / A5

Tree falls on couple’s cars near Sunriver By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

St. Charles VP picked as health adviser for Kitzhaber By Betsy Q. Cliff The Bulletin

Mike Bonetto, a vice president at St. Charles Health System, has been tapped to head governorelect John Kitzhaber’s health policy efforts. Bonetto will be a senior policy adviser to the incoming governor, Kitzhaber confirmed Tuesday. “I think Mike Bonetto Mike is one of the brightest lights around on this issue,” said Kitzhaber. “He’s very well-known among the players interested in health care in Oregon, and he works well among Republicans and Democrats,” Kitzhaber said. “He came to my mind very, very early” as a potential adviser. See Bonetto / A4

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Stacy Pyatt, 51, walks under a ponderosa tree that fell, crushing her Ford Explorer and a Dodge Ram pickup just feet from her home in Spring River. She said she heard a loud “crack” around 12:15 a.m. Tuesday, followed by a loud thud as the tree settled.

TORNADO HITS AUMSVILLE A building on the corner of Sixth Street and Mill Creek Road lies in ruins Tuesday afternoon in Aumsville after a tornado touched down just before noon in the small rural town seven miles east of Salem. The tornado was an EF2 on the Enhanced Fujita scale, meaning it caused considerable damage, said Miles Higa, a meteorologist in the Portland office of the National Weather Service. Witnesses reported heavy damage to some buildings and said people were trapped in their cars, but no injuries were reported. — Staff and wire reports

Matthew Aimonetti / for The Bulletin

SPRING RIVER — Before heading out of town for a few days, Scott Pyatt set his wife, Stacy, up with plenty of food, firewood and other essentials. Stacy, 51, said she was “prepared for anything” — except what happened early Tuesday morning. About 12:15 a.m., Stacy heard a sharp crack outside. Seeing nothing outside the window, Stacy and her five Chihuahuas went Inside back to bed. A • Where is few minutes the weather later, Stacy going to go heard a much from here? louder noise, Page C6 and looked out to see a large tree resting on top of the family’s two vehicles, barely 15 feet from her bedroom. The tree, roughly 60 feet long and two feet in diameter, caved in the roof and shattered the windshield of the family’s 1994 Ford Explorer, coming to rest atop the steering wheel. Their 1997 Dodge Ram pickup was less damaged, but appears to not be drivable. Stacy said the family was only carrying liability insurance on the vehicles. Stacy, who works at the Ross Dress For Less in Bend, provides the only income for her, Scott, 46, and Scott’s 13-yearold son, Dakota. She took the day off work Tuesday, and is still trying to figure out how to get herself to and from work and eventually purchase a replacement vehicle. See Tree / A4

U.S. intelligence offers dim view of war in Afghanistan By Elisabeth Bumiller New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — As President Barack Obama prepares to release a review of U.S. strategy in Afghanistan that will claim progress in the 9-yearold war there, two new classified intelligence reports offer a

more negative assessment and say there is a limited chance of success unless Pakistan hunts down insurgents operating from havens on its Afghan border. The reports, one on Afghanistan and one on Pakistan, say that although there have been

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gains for the United States and NATO in the war, the unwillingness of Pakistan to shut down militant sanctuaries in its lawless tribal region remains a serious obstacle. U.S. military commanders say insurgents freely cross from Pakistan into Af-

ghanistan to plant bombs and fight U.S. troops and then return to Pakistan for rest and resupply. The findings in the reports, called National Intelligence Estimates, represent the consensus view of the United States’ 16 intelligence agencies, as op-

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posed to the military, and were provided last week to some members of the Senate and House Intelligence committees. The findings were described by a number of U.S. officials who read the reports’ executive summaries. See Review / A5

TOP NEWS INSIDE CENSUS: Newly released data show wealthiest regions in U.S., Page A3


A2 Wednesday, December 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Great Lakes recovery lacks leadership Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

MILWAUKEE — If the Asian carp mustering in the waterways south of Chicago actually do gobble their way into Lake Michigan and topple the multibillion-dollar Great Lakes fishery, it won’t be a first. Over a half-century ago, the Great Lakes collapsed in the manner many now fear. Crippled in the 1940s by decades of overfishing and a century’s worth of wanton pollution, the lakes suffered a knockout blow when sea lamprey slithered their way in from the Atlantic Ocean via man-made shipping canals. The ancient vampires that suck the blood — and life — out of their prey found heaven in our fish-filled, glacially carved lakes that are a mere 10,000 years old — ecological babies, really. And just as vulnerable. It was an environmental debacle that is hard to fathom. In Lake Michigan alone the annual lake trout harvest in 1946 was 6.5 million pounds; nine years later crews pulled in a scant 34 pounds of the fish. “The lamprey was the first to really expose the people of this region to what a single invasive species is capable of,” says Marc Gaden of the Great Lakes Fishery Commission. Gone was the sweet, pink trout flesh that fed the cities that put the industrial muscle into America. The collapse was even more dire for the little fishing communities. “People’s livelihoods evaporated before their eyes,” Gaden says. “Lamprey literally changed the way of life in the region.” It was the kind of doomsday scenario that is feared with the carp today — a fear that has spawned a courtroom battle pitting Great Lakes states against one another at this most vulnerable moment. The difference is that the ecological crisis triggered by the lamprey invasion 60 years ago didn’t tear us apart. It brought us together. There are a few things you can do when you have carp invading your biggest lakes. You can ignore it. You can fight about how to deal with it. You can call for more studies. Or you can close ranks, marshal all the cunning, muscle and tools you have and go for the kill.

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citing a Government Accountability Office report that revealed some 20 federal agencies were involved in regulating invasive species management nationwide, and their efforts were woefully uncoordinated.

By Dan Egan

Tasmania’s approach In Australia, they go for the kill. When word broke that a handful of common carp had been plucked from two of the biggest and most popular fishing lakes on the wild and previously carpfree island of Tasmania, officials didn’t fumble about for a plan that would make everyone happy. “It was first found on a Monday or a Tuesday,” says Chris Wisniewski, Tasmania’s carp eradication boss, “and by the weekend, the lakes were shut down.” That was 1995. Today the larger lake — Lake Sorell, a body of water substantially bigger than Madison’s Lake Mendota — remains closed to everyone except Wisniewski. He and his carp-killing crew work around the clock and calendar chasing down the species that has already overrun much of the Australian mainland. The carp, likely planted by rogue anglers, would surely be raging out of control across the island of Tasmania, an area more than twice the size of Massachusetts, but Wisniewski and his crew have put together an impres-

Little unity

Photos by Dan Egan / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Chris Wisniewski, of Inland Fisheries Service in Tasmania, says officials are closing in on the adult fish left in the last Tasmanian lake known to be infested with carp. He estimates the lake also has about 2,000 juvenile carp, down from about 18,000 a year ago. sive quiver to beat back the invaders — poison, pheromones, radio trackers, electrodes, fish-eggsmothering lime and sophisticated computer modeling, as well as traditional tools such as nets. With an assassin’s focus, they have driven down the adult population to a handful, two of which are implanted with radio transmitters to act as “Judas fish” and lead fishery crews to the last of the other adults. “We know them individually,” a spray-drenched Wisniewski yells as he powers his seatless Jeepof-a-boat through the pounding waves of Lake Sorell toward the radio signals of “fish 404.” “And we haunt them.” It is a sustained assault that has already eradicated the carp population in the adjacent smaller lake. University of Minnesota biologist and carp expert Peter Sorensen was floored when he first learned of the carp battle under way Down Under. “I thought: Oh my God, they’re actually doing it,” says Sorensen, who is working with the Australian crew to deploy cutting-edge pheromone-based traps that use sex hormones to lure in the last of the adults. “These guys are going out every day in boats — every day — and actually doing it.” Sorensen sees what’s happening on Lake Sorell as a schoolroom for any government bent on getting control of an invasive species. The key, he says, is to learn everything you can about the species, the habitat it’s invaded and the tools needed to squeeze its numbers down, hopefully to zero. Then you focus on the Achilles’ heel in the species’ life cycle, and if you don’t have tools to exploit that weakness, you invent them. Sorensen says it would be worth the trip for U.S. biologists and decision makers to head to Tasmania to see what can be accomplished when an invasive species is attacked with what biologists call “integrated pest management.” “I think it would help reset their mind-set, just to see what it can do.” Many argue there has been no focused and coordinated plan of attack. Fishery officials have known for years, for example, that the Asian carp invasion was headed

toward the Great Lakes. And for years politicians did little but cobble together a largely experimental electric barrier system on the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal just miles from Lake Michigan — a system that was not turned up to a voltage strong enough to repel young carp until just last year, once DNA evidence revealed the carp were at the door.

Asian carp director Much has been made about the recent appointment of President Barack Obama’s Asian carp director, but his job is to basically coordinate federal agency efforts on the matter — he has no legal authority to lead a lamprey-style project. “No one is in charge. No one is actually obligated to prevent those

fish from getting into the Great Lakes — and by that I mean, actually required by law to prevent that from happening,” says Joel Brammeier, president of the conservation group Alliance for the Great Lakes. “This has been the recurring problem with invasive species management — it only succeeds when somebody is in charge.” This point was underscored several years ago when regional resource managers put together the blueprint for what helped shape Obama’s Great Lakes Restoration Initiative — a multiyear Everglades-style program for the Great Lakes toward which the government has already committed $475 million. That blueprint called for an “Aquatic Invasive Species Integrated Management Program,”

Today it is clear that there is little unity in the region over how to protect the Great Lakes from the next invasion. When a single Asian carp was plucked from Lake Michigan waters in June, Wisconsin and other states sued for immediate action to close two Chicago navigation locks as an emergency measure to wall off the carp-infested Mississippi River basin from the Great Lakes. Federal officials declined, and lawyers on both sides spent the fall in court arguing about what the carp find means and what we should do about it. A federal judge in Chicago recently ruled against closing the locks. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, meanwhile, has just announced the details of a study that will look at what it would take to solve the carp problem by recreating the natural separation between Lake Michigan and the Mississippi basin that the Chicago canals destroyed a century ago. That study probably won’t be done until 2015. Contrast that to how Australia has chosen to address fresh threats. Four years after Tasmania closed the two popular lakes after carp were found, an invasive mussel similar to the zebra mussel was detected in the waters near Darwin. Three marinas were quarantined within five days, infested vessels were ordered removed from the water, and loads of mussel-killing chemicals were pumped into the marina waters. The mussel colonies were destroyed, and they never made a comeback.

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Giles Campbell experiments in a Tasmanian lab with zebra fish that have been genetically manipulated to reproduce only males — a tool fishery managers believe could be used to help control carp populations.

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, December 15, 2010 A3

T S Air Force says leaked cables Data reveal nation’s are off-limits on its network wealthiest counties U.S. CENSUS

By Eric Schmitt

New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The Air Force is barring its personnel from using work computers to view the websites of The New York Times and more than 25 other news organizations and blogs that have posted secret cables obtained by WikiLeaks, Air Force officials said Tuesday. When Air Force personnel on the service’s computer network try to view the websites of The Times, the British newspaper The Guardian, the German magazine Der Spiegel, the Spanish newspaper El Pais and the French newspaper Le Monde, as well as other sites that posted full confidential cables, the screen says “Access Denied: Internet usage is logged and monitored,” according to an Air Force official whose access was blocked and who shared the screen warning with The Times. Violators are warned that they face punishment if they try to view classified material from unauthorized websites. Some Air Force officials acknowledged that the steps taken might be in vain since many military personnel could access the documents from home computers, despite admonishments from superiors not to read the cables without proper clearances. Computer network specialists within the Air Force Space Command last week followed longstanding procedures to

Elsewhere

• WikiLeaks founder wins bail ruling in London, Page A6

“When classified documents appear on a website, a judgment will be made whether it will be blocked. It’s an issue we’re working through right now.” — Lt. Col. Brenda Campbell, spokeswoman, Air Force Space Command keep classified information off unclassified computer systems. “News media websites will be blocked if they post classified documents from the WikiLeaks website,” said Lt. Col. Brenda Campbell, a spokeswoman for the Air Force Space Command in Colorado Springs. “This is similar to how we’d block any other website that posted classified information.”

Excerpts OK Campbell said that only sites posting full classified documents, not just excerpts, would be blocked. “When classified documents appear on a website, a judgment

will be made whether it will be blocked,” she said. “It’s an issue we’re working through right now.” Spokesmen for the Army, Navy and Marines said they were not blocking the websites of news organizations, largely because guidance has already been issued by the Obama administration and the Defense Department directing hundreds of thousands of federal employees and contractors not to read the secret cables and other classified documents published by WikiLeaks unless the workers have the required security clearance or authorization. “Classified information, whether or not already posted on public websites or disclosed to the media, remains classified, and must be treated as such by federal employees and contractors, until it is declassified by an appropriate U.S. Government authority,” said a notice sent Dec. 3 by the Office of Management and Budget, which is part of the White House, to agency and department heads. Steven Aftergood of the Federation of American Scientists, a secrecy specialist, said dozens of agencies, as well branches of the military and government contractors, had issued their own policy instructions based on the OMB memo. “It’s a self-defeating policy that will leave government employees less informed than they ought to be,” Aftergood said.

By Carol Morello and Dan Keating The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — The Washington area’s affluence and education levels make it the wealthiest and most educated region in the nation, according to census data released Tuesday that reflect five years of relative prosperity compared with the rest of the country. During that period, Fairfax and Loudoun counties in Virginia were the only two U.S. counties with median household incomes surpassing $100,000. Tiny Falls Church, Va., which is an independent city and counted separately, had that median income level, as well. Five of the region’s suburban counties — Fairfax, Arlington, Loudoun in Virginia, Montgomery and Howard in Maryland — plus Alexandria and Falls Church in Virginia, were among 17 places in the United States in which more than half of the residents have at least a bachelor’s degree. In Loudoun, more than a third of the households are married couples with children, making it one of the country’s bastions of the traditional family. The District of Columbia, Baltimore and Richmond reflected the other extreme, with nuclear families making up fewer than one in 10 households. The census data released Tuesday offer a more intimate glimpse of hundreds of the Washington region’s neighborhoods than has been

available. Among other things, the data will be used to provide a better understanding of segregation in the area and other U.S. communities. The figures combine information gathered from 2005 to 2009 in the American Community Survey, a detailed questionnaire mailed monthly to a cross section of Americans.

Biggest data release in ‘history of mankind’ The estimates were among 11 billion statistics made available in what Census Bureau Director Robert Groves called the biggest release of data “in the history of mankind” for 670,000 geographical units, including school districts and census tracts. It encompasses boom times, the descent into recession and the first inklings of recovery. William Frey of the Brookings Institution has started to mine the data, concluding that segregation is declining nationally and locally. In his analysis of the 100 largest metropolitan areas, 61 experienced declines in segregation between blacks

and whites. In Washington, Frey found that the average white person lives in a neighborhood that is 63 percent white, the average black person lives in a neighborhood that is 79 percent African American and the average Hispanic person lives in a neighborhood in which one out of four neighbors is Hispanic. That represents a small but noticeable improvement since 2000. But John Logan, a sociologist at Brown University who has studied neighborhood segregation, said that in his analysis of 330 metropolitan regions, progress is at a standstill. His research shows that the average white person in an American city lives in a neighborhood that is 74 percent white and that the average African American lives in a majority-black neighborhood.

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The Associated Press

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, center, accompanied by Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., left, and Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., walks to the podium on Capitol Hill in Washington on Tuesday.

Conservatives pressuring GOP on tax-cut compromise By Jennifer Steinhauer New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Republicans are under pressure from the Tea Party movement and some other conservatives to reject the compromise tax bill, potentially complicating its passage and highlighting how the Republican Party is likely to face a persistent rightward push when it takes control of the House next month. A group called the Tea Party Patriots circulated a petition this week calling the compromise a bad back-room deal with President Barack Obama that violates the principles that Tea Party candidates campaigned on, like reducing the deficit, in the midterm elections. Sarah Palin has criticized the deal, and former Gov. Mitt Romney of Massachusetts said in an op-ed piece in USA Today on Tuesday that he opposed it. Commentators like Rush Limbaugh and conservative bloggers are also weighing in on the deal, and proclaiming it wanting. The tax-cut package passed its first test in the Senate on Monday with overwhelming Republican support, and the number of House Republicans who have

expressed opposition remains limited. The Senate is expected to vote on the bill as early as this morning, and the House could take it up shortly after. Aides to House Republican leaders said they still expected a sizable majority of their members to vote for the legislation. But each defecting Republican represents another Democrat who must be swayed to vote for the bill and adds to the public relations problem for the legislation, which neither party has promoted as a thing of beauty.

‘We’ve heard there are earmarks in there’ Rep. Michele Bachmann, RMinn., is against the package, said her spokesman, Sergio Gor. “She would like to see an up-or-down vote solely on extending tax cuts without other conditions,” Gor said. “Also, we’ve heard there are earmarks in there. It is turning into a Christmas tree with a bunch of ornaments.” Rep. Mike Pence of Indiana, the outgoing chairman of the House Republican Conference, told a conservative radio show host Tuesday that “I will not vote

for this tax deal when it comes to the floor of the House of Representatives.” Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., fiercely criticized the bill in a news release as “an incomplete effort that fails to create a permanent tax structure,” and he hinted that he might not vote for it. The unrest may foreshadow the dynamic that is coming in January with the 112th Congress, which will be chock-full of Tea Party-affiliated freshmen. “I think presidential aspirants will try to out-conservative each other for their own purposes,” Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, the incoming House budget chairman, said in an interview with The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, in reference to Romney’s opposition. Brad Dayspring, a spokesman for Rep. Eric Cantor of Virginia, the Republican whip, was equally pointed in an e-mail. “Playing political chess with the budgets of millions of working families and small businesses is dangerous,” he said. While the rightward push may influence some members of Congress, it was clear that the Senate was unmoved.

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A4 Wednesday, December 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Mexican fugitive safe as member of government By Randal C. Archibold New York Times News Service

MEXICO CITY — Despite being a federal fugitive, accused of laundering millions of dollars for one of Mexico’s most ruthless drug cartels, Julio Cesar Godoy says he simply walked into the national legislature here unnoticed in September, right past the cordon of federal police officers watching the building. He then raised his right arm, swore allegiance to the Mexican Constitution and, 15 months after disappearing from public view, finally claimed the congressional seat he won last year. It was too late for prosecutors to do much about it. Godoy’s newly conferred status came with a special perk: immunity from prosecution. Mexico’s attorney general has been incensed at Godoy’s ability to hide in plain sight, while others debate intriguing details in local news reports, like accounts that Godoy had actually been spirited into the building’s basement garage in another lawmaker’s car.

Veterans Continued from A1 That meant the VA needed to hire a new case manager to help Central Oregon veterans. Six months later, HousingWorks has been receiving money for the vouchers, but a case manager still hasn’t been hired. So HousingWorks has money to help homeless vets, but isn’t allowed to spend it, Cook said. “It’s very difficult to know that you’re sitting on 20-plus vouchers for veterans and you can’t get them out the door because the VA has not produced their case managers,” Cook said. “There are people asking us why can’t you get this money on the street?” The VA is in the process of hiring 10 case officers to manage housing vouchers across the region and hopes to have someone in place soon, said Eileen Devine, network homeless coordinator for the Portland VA office. “They did interviews, they selected someone and the person should be on board fairly shortly,” Devine said. The Portland VA received authority to hire a new social worker at the same time HousingWorks began receiving the voucher funds, Devine said. “The thing about the … program to realize is when the vouchers arrive at the housing authority, within that week is when the medical center receives the funding to hire the social worker,” she said. A case manager is necessary, Devine said, because the vouchers are targeted at chronically homeless vets who need help beyond housing, including counseling. “The folks we take into this program need pretty intense follow-up, which is why it’s hard to do case management from afar,” she said.

“It undermined the seriousness of the Chamber of Deputies and the rule of law that he could just show up and take the oath,” said John Bailey, a Georgetown University professor who studies organized crime and democracy in Mexico. “The natural reaction was, ‘What is going on here?’” For many lawmakers, the Godoy affair stands out for its brazenness, causing a political firestorm that has lasted months.

Lower house vote On Tuesday night, the chamber, Mexico’s lower house of Congress voted to strip Godoy of his immunity and legislative duties, a development that could lead to his eventual arrest and trial — if he can be found. Godoy has professed his innocence, calling the charges a political vendetta against him by President Felipe Calderon’s governing party. But he was not at Tuesday’s session. His lawyer attended the session in his place, leaving Godoy’s own

caseworker at Central Oregon Veterans Outreach oversee the recipient, with help from the Portland VA office, said Kenny LaPoint, who manages the voucher program at HousingWorks. The VA decided that its staff was stretched too thin to allow more vouchers to be released, Devine said. “I pretty much begged them to allow a voucher to be released,” LaPoint said. So far, the whole process has just taken too long, Cook said. “We’ve got some large veteran housing challenges and the VA is the one that is not reacting in a timely manner, which is just mind-boggling to me,” Cook said. Keith Chu can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at kchu@bendbulletin.com.

“I am no little angel, but neither am I a criminal.” — Julio Cesar Godoy, Mexican legislator, fugitive whereabouts unclear. Federal prosecutors contend that Godoy is an important associate of the top leaders of La Familia, a cultlike drug organization that is among the most violent in Mexico. A legislative panel Monday said it found that Godoy had, among other things, not explained the origins of $2.2 million deposited in his bank accounts or calls from his cell phone to known gang leaders. A memo from federal prosecutors to lawmakers said Godoy had been among a group of local mayors, police officers and other officials in the state of Michoacan serving as paid informers for the cartel. Godoy is the half-brother of the state’s governor, Leonel Godoy, who has said he was unaware of any

Bonetto Continued from A1 Bonetto is the first major policy head announced by the governor-elect. He said he would also be announcing advisers in education, economy and natural resources in the next few weeks. Bonetto has been with St. Charles, parent company of hospitals in Bend, Redmond and Prineville, since 2008. “I’m extremely honored that the governor would think of me for this position,” Bonetto said. He said that the state’s large revenue shortfall presented a “challenge” but also “an interesting opportunity to do some formative things.” One of Bonetto’s primary tasks, Kitzhaber said, will be

illicit activity his brother may have engaged in. In a twist to a case with many of them, Julio Cesar Godoy was supposedly caught on tape discussing cartel affairs with Servando Gomez, a top cartel leader known as La Tuta, who emerged last week in a drama of his own. It was discovered that Gomez had been collecting a salary for the past 15 years from the Education Ministry, from a previous job as a schoolteacher.

Elusive legislator A former mayor, Godoy was elected to the legislature in 2009, but he disappeared from public only days later after federal charges were filed against him accusing him of ties to organized crime and money laundering. The federal government considered him a fugitive. How Godoy eluded the police for so long remains a mystery. When he surfaced, he no longer had a mustache, and news reports said his hair was noticeably grayer. Godoy said he was

reducing costs for the Oregon Health Plan, Oregon’s Medicaid program that targets those unable to afford commercial health insurance. If nothing is done, Kitzhaber said, the program faces a $1 billion shortfall, potentially reducing services by up to 40 percent.

Efficiency It will be up to Bonetto to figure out how to reduce that service cut in the first year and, in subsequent years, make the health system more efficient so that the existing dollars stretch further. Prior to this appointment, Bonetto had been active in health reform at the state and local level. He is a member of the Oregon Health Policy Board, which has

Help with rent The vouchers allow low-income families who rent an approved apartment to pay about 30 percent of their income toward rent, with the rest of the costs picked up by the housing agency. For people with no income the vouchers can pay all housing costs, including some utilities, Cook said. Not counting the veterans program, HousingWorks distributes 1,080 vouchers, with a waiting list that tops 1,200 people, Cook said. The agency doesn’t keep a waiting list for the veterans program, because the VA chooses the recipients of those vouchers, she said. But Chuck Hemmingway, executive director at Central Oregon Veterans Outreach in Bend, said he’s sent more than 50 names of vets in need to the Portland VA. “We were told don’t take any more names because we don’t want to dash expectations,” Hemmingway said. “Am, I going to tell that guy, ‘No, you’re too late, you can’t be considered?’ ” U.S. Army veteran Paul Lucas said he and his wife Taysha, also a vet, are hoping they’ll qualify for some kind of housing aid. Right now, they’re living in an apartment, but Lucas, 38, said money is short; he and Taysha are both unemployed, and they have a sevenweek-old son, Allistair. The couple came to Bend from Beaverton in April, but neither has found a job, outside of an occasional guitar lesson by Paul. Finding work, Lucas said, “is nearly impossible, I can say that much.” So far, HousingWorks has persuaded the VA to release one of the 25 vouchers, on the promise that a

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at his home the entire time. But his supporters worked to get him into his legislative seat and attain the immunity that comes with it. Mexican law provides legislators freedom from prosecution as a check against political persecution by the executive branch. While Francisco Blake Mora, the interior secretary, has insisted that the evidence against Godoy is solid, a judge last summer issued a ruling that Godoy had the right to take his seat despite the pending charges — although the ruling said nothing about how he would get into the legislative building without being arrested first. Still, Godoy arrived at the legislative building in the heart of the capital Sept. 23 and was sworn in, to the shock and dismay of the authorities. Afterward, he walked out free, saying later, “I am no little angel, but neither am I a criminal.”

overseen health reform in the state. He is also a co-founder of HealthMatters of Central Oregon, a local nonprofit that works to improve health care in the area. Jim Diegel, St. Charles’ CEO, said he was thrilled for his colleague. “It’s exciting. I don’t know what else to say. I’m very happy for him.” Diegel said that Bonetto had been one of the chief architects of St. Charles’ efforts to create an integrated health system, where all a person’s medical needs are met by one organization.

He will be missed Though Diegel said that selfishly, he would miss Bonetto’s contributions, he understood the decision. “The opportunity to assist our governor with working

Tree Continued from A1 “It was devastating,” Stacy said. “Every time I look out the window, I feel like crying.” The simultaneous destruction of both of their cars is just the latest in a series of difficulties for the Pyatts. In 2007, Scott was arrested on suspicion of growing marijuana, and served 19 months in prison. Since his release almost two years ago, he’s turned his life around, Stacy said, but between the sluggish economy, his criminal record, and his stillsuspended driver’s license, he’s been unable to find work. Bud Officer, a neighbor, said the Pyatts have been good neighbors since moving into the area three years ago, and that he and other residents of the community southwest of Sunriver plan to help them clean up the mess and find a loaner vehicle. “We’re going to get her food, and get her some help, and with a little bit of luck, Christmas will go on this year for her family,” he said. Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.

on health policy and health legislation during a very critical period is an opportunity you can’t pass up.” Prior to working at St. Charles, Bonetto served as senior vice president for planning and development at Clear Choice Health Plans. He has a doctorate in public health with a concentration in policy from Oregon State University. Bonetto said that his family would stay in Bend and he will commute to Salem for the job. Bonetto’s appointment was first reported by The Lund Report, a nonprofit health newsletter based in Portland, but later pulled from the website. Betsy Q. Cliff can be reached at 541-383-0375 or bcliff@bendbulletin.com.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, December 15, 2010 A5

Teen pot use on rise The Washington Post WASHINGTON — Marijuana use continues to increase among young people in the United States, according to an annual federally funded survey of drug, alcohol and cigarette use among U.S. youths. The proportion of eighth-graders who say they smoke pot daily increased from 1 percent to 1.2 percent between 2009 and 2010, while the rate among 10th-graders went from 2.8 percent to 3.3 percent, and among high school seniors from 5.1 percent to 6.1 percent, according to the Monitoring the Future Survey, which

New York Times News Service ile photo

Some injured Afghan National Army soldiers are turned away after attempting to board a medevac helicopter with the 101st Combat Aviation Brigade, and must wait for the next helicopter, after many were wounded when a van packed with explosives detonated beside a small joint outpost near the village of Sangsar, Afghanistan, on Monday.

Review Continued from A1 U.S. military commanders and senior Pentagon officials have already criticized the reports as out of date and say that the cut-off date for the Afghanistan report, Oct. 1, does not allow it to take into account what the military cites as tactical gains in Kandahar and Helmand provinces in the south in the six weeks since. Pentagon and military officials also say the reports were written by desk-bound Washington analysts who have spent limited time, if any, in Afghanistan and have no feel for the war. Both sides have found some areas of agreement in the period leading up to Obama’s review, which will be made public Thursday. The intelligence reports, which rely heavily on assessments from the CIA and the Defense Intelligence Agency, conclude that CIA drone strikes on leaders of al-Qaida in the tribal regions of Pakistan have had an impact and that security has improved in the parts of Helmand and Kandahar provinces in southern Afghanistan where the United States has built up its troop presence. For their part, U.S. commanders and Pentagon officials say they do not

“We have to deal with the world we have, not the world we’d like.” — Bruce Reidel, senior fellow, Brookings Institute yet know if the war can be won without more cooperation from Pakistan. But after years and billions spent trying to win the support of the Pakistanis, they are now proceeding on the assumption that there will be limited help from them. The U.S. commanders and officials readily describe the havens for insurgents in Pakistan as a major impediment to military operations. “I’m not going to make any bones about it, they’ve got sanctuaries and they go back and forth across the border,” Maj. Gen. John Campbell, the commander of NATO forces in eastern Afghanistan, told reporters last week in the remote Kumar province of Afghanistan. “They’re financed better, they’re better trained, they’re the ones who bring in the higher-end IEDs.” Campbell was referring to improvised explosive devices, the military’s name for the insurgent-made bombs, the leading cause of U.S. military deaths in

Afghanistan. U.S. commanders say their plan in the next few years is to kill large numbers of insurgents in the border region — the military refers to it as “degrading the Taliban” — and at the same time build up the Afghan National Army to the point that the Afghans can at least contain an insurgency still supported by Pakistan. “That is not the optimal solution, obviously,” said Bruce Riedel, a former CIA official and now a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, who led a White House review of Afghan strategy last year that resulted in Obama sending the additional forces. “But we have to deal with the world we have, not the world we’d like. We can’t make Pakistan stop being naughty.” Publicly, U.S. officials and military commanders continue to praise Pakistan and its military chief, Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, if only for acknowledging the problem. “Gen. Kayani and others have been clear in recognizing that they need to do more for their security and indeed to carry out operations against those who threaten other countries’ security,” Gen. David Petraeus, the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan, said last week.

Contract Continued from A1 The extent to which the contract would tie Flaherty’s hands is unclear. It lists 12 types of actions that could lead to an employee’s dismissal, including violations of state and federal law or county code, failure to meet set job performance standards, providing false information and willful disregard of the district attorney’s prosecutorial philosophies and objectives. If Flaherty wanted to fire one his deputies, he would have to document and explain how the employee’s conduct fell into one of the 12 categories and show that he followed the agreed-upon procedure in making the decision. Paula Barran, a Portland attorney who represents employers in labor-related cases, said it’s the type of provision that tends to make employers hold off on firing employees, or at least think very carefully. In many cases, she said, employers know that they could be at risk for a legal challenge if they don’t follow the contract terms to the letter. “I’ve been involved in a lot of conversations with employers, kind of walking through the decision-making process, and that is on people’s minds,” she said. “(They’re thinking) ‘What happens if I take a risk, do it in this circumstance?’ ”

questioned 46,482 students from 396 public and private schools. Because cigarette smoking has been declining among high school seniors, marijuana is now more popular than cigarettes by some measures. In 2010, 21.4 percent of high school seniors had used marijuana in the past 30 days, while 19.2 percent had smoked cigarettes, according to the survey, which is conducted by the University of Michigan. The perception that regular marijuana smoking is harmful decreased among 10th-graders from 59.5 percent to 57.2 percent and among 12th-graders from

But county officials and the attorney for the deputy district attorney’s union have argued that the contract falls far short from guaranteeing employees absolute job security. County Counsel Mark Pilliod said the county was obligated to negotiate a contract once it was notified that the prosecutors had formed a union — and obligated by law to include a discussion about employee grievance processes as a part of the negotiations. He said many aspects of the contract are similar to those negotiated by other county unions, which allow disputes to be settled by an arbitrator.

Frustrated voters Pilliod dismissed Flaherty’s argument that restrictions imposed by the contract would frustrate the voters that elected him. “They voted in favor of Patrick Flaherty and not in favor of Mike Dugan,” Pilliod said. “Did they say something else? Did they say, ‘We want the house to be cleaned?’ Are there members of the District Attorney’s Office that need to be terminated?” For his part, Flaherty said the potential approval of the contract will have no bearing on his decision to turn over an estimated 20 percent of his staff at the start of his term. Because the union’s effort to get a just cause provision in the contract was done to impact his actions — and

52.4 percent to 46.8 percent in 2010. Ecstasy use also increased, according to the survey, with 2.4 percent of eighth-graders and 4.7 percent of 10th-graders saying they had used the drug in the past year. That’s up from 1.3 percent and 3.7 percent, respectively. Binge drinking continued to drop. Among high school seniors, 23.2 percent reported having had five or more drinks in a row during the past two weeks, down from 25.2 percent in 2009 and a drop from the peak of 31.5 percent in 1998.

done without his participation — Flaherty said he feels he has no legal reason to abide by the agreement. “The appointments that I decide to make or not make will be unaffected by a union contract or a formation of the union because they don’t have anything to do with the union or with the potential contract,” he said. “The appointment decisions are completely independent of this process.” If fired prosecutors have grounds to challenge his decisions, Flaherty said he worries that the legal wrangling could prevent him from filling their spots with new hires. Pilliod said delaying the commission’s vote on the contract could put the county in a tough spot. Under state law, the two parties involved in the negotiations must come to an agreement within 150 days or the issue will be sent to an arbitrator. If a delay pushed the matter into arbitration, Pilliod said it’s possible that the union could ask for more, including salary increases. The proposed contract does not include any guarantees of increases to wages and benefits. Instead, union members would be eligible for merit-based step increases in pay offered to nonunion management employees in other county departments. Erin Golden can be reached at 5 4 1 -6 1 7 -7 8 3 7 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.


W OR L D

A6 Wednesday, December 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

German Assange wins bail ruling; remains in custody authorities raid Islamic groups in 3 states By Ravi Somaiya

New York Times News Service

By Alan Cowell and Michael Slackman New York Times News Service

BERLIN — The German Interior Ministry ordered simultaneous raids in three states Tuesday against what it called Salafist networks suspected of seeking the imposition of an Islamic state. The action signaled growing concern over the radical messages of some Islamic groups. The raids, in Bremen, Lower Saxony and North Rhine-Westphalia, were not linked to a recent terror alert reportedly inspired by phone calls from a man who said he wanted to quit working with terrorists and who warned of a pending Mumbaistyle attack, the Interior Ministry said. The ministry statement said the raids were directed at two groups — Invitation to Paradise, in the cities of Brunswick and Moenchengladbach, and the Islamic Culture Center of Bremen, on the North Sea coast. The two groups work closely together and share the same ideology. The authorities are seeking to outlaw both groups. The raids appeared to represent a departure for the German authorities in their dealings with radical Muslim groups. They were conducted under the authority of postwar laws enacted with an eye to the Nazis to ensure against the overthrow of the state or Constitution by extremist groups. Previously, those statutes had been invoked primarily against right-wing nationalist and neo-Nazi groups, and German intelligence had focused primarily on individual Muslim extremists rather than groups. There was no indication that any arrests were made.

LONDON — Julian Assange, the jailed founder of the antisecrecy group WikiLeaks, was ordered freed on $315,000 bail Tuesday but remained at least temporarily in custody awaiting a final decision on whether he will be extradited to Sweden over accusations of sexual offenses against two women. Assange was driven back to Wandsworth Prison in London on Tuesday night, past cheering and whistling supporters and scores of flashbulbs, pending an appeal of the bail ruling by Swedish authorities. The appeal must be heard at Britain’s High Court within the next 48 hours.

Judge Howard Riddle, presiding over a packed and rapt courtroom at Westminster Magistrate’s Court in Central London, said that his decision to jail Assange as a “serious flight risk” at an initial hearing Dec. 7 was “marginal” and that, with conditions, Assange should now be freed until further proceedings Jan. 11.

‘Mansion arrest’

Riddle was swayed Tuesday, he told the court, when a friend of Assange’s offered to allow Assange to stay at a country mansion in Sussex, an hour from London. Assange, according to conditions the judge laid out, must spend every night at

the mansion, Ellingham Hall, a 10-bedroom home on a 650acre estate owned by Vaughan Smith, the wealthy founder of a journalists’ club in London. Geoffrey Robertson, one of Britain’s most prominent lawyers, who is assisting Assange’s defense team, described the situation as less house arrest and more “mansion arrest.” But Assange, a 39-year-old Australian, will be electronically tagged to track his movements and must agree to curfews — from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. Additionally, he will be stripped of his passport and will be required to present himself to the police every evening.

DEMONSTRATORS CLASH WITH POLICE IN ITALY

Akira Suemori / The Associated Press

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange reacts behind the heavily tinted window of a police van as he arrives at Wandsworth Prison in London on Tuesday.

Italian PM survives no-confidence vote By Henry Chu Los Angeles Times

Alessandra Tarantino / The Associated Press

Demonstrators clash with police in Rome’s Piazza del Popolo Square on Tuesday. Premier Silvio Berlusconi won back-to-back votes of confidence in the Italian parliament Tuesday to survive one of the toughest tests of his political life. As lawmakers cast their votes, a violent core of anti-Berlusconi protesters outside clashed with police, smashing shop windows, setting cars on fire and hurling firecrackers, eggs and paint.

LONDON — Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi squeaked through a vote of no confidence in his government Tuesday, surviving one of the toughest tests of his leadership but emerging with his power severely weakened. The media magnate, who has led Italy for most of the last decade, secured the barest of majorities in a vote marred by scuffles in the lower house of Parliament. Lawmakers voted 314-311 in favor of the government. Earlier, the Italian Senate gave a thumbs-up to Berlusconi by a comfortable margin. That was expected, because Berlusconi’s center-right coalition commands a safe majority in the upper chamber. But in the lower house, the outcome was in doubt until almost the last minute after days of political horse-trading and even scrutiny of the health of three pregnant law-

makers, who had vowed to vote against Berlusconi but were at risk of going into labor at any moment. The no-confidence motion was put forward by opponents who argued that Berluscon i’s sc a nda l-r idden private life, his alleged attempts to head off inve s t igat ion s into his busiSilvio ness dealings Berlusconi and the lackluster state of the economy made his continued tenure as prime minister impossible. But the 74-year-old Berlusconi is one of the great escape artists of Italian politics. He defended his record in speeches before both houses of Parliament on Monday, and warned that jettisoning him now would be an act of madness at a time of extreme economic delicacy because of the crisis over the euro.


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At Work Dim prospects for the poorly educated, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2010

MARKET REPORT

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STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

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The Bulletin

Deadline nears for Cornell classes Thursday is the registration deadline for two Cornell University courses coming to Oregon State University-Cascades Campus next month. The classes, tailored to hospitality industry professionals, mark the second installment of the Cornell School of Hotel Administration’s executive education program, which began in August. The courses are the program’s only offerings outside Cornell’s New York state campus. “Leading and Motivating in the Real World” is scheduled for Jan. 17-19. The instructor will be J. Bruce Tracey, associate professor at the Cornell School of Hotel Administration. “Interactive Marketing for the Hospitality Industry” is scheduled Jan. 20-22. The instructor will be Lisa Klein Pearo, visiting assistant professor at the Cornell hotel school. For more information about the courses and to register, visit www.osucascades.edu/cornell execprogram/courses.

Ireland blocks bank plan to pay bonuses

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Vacancy rates ‘pretty positive overall’ for commercial property in Bend By Ed Merriman Signs of a slowly improving economy are reflected in lower third-quarter vacancies for most classes of property in the Bend area, according to the Market Summary by Compass Commercial Real Estate Services. “It is pretty positive overall,” said Bruce Kemp, a partner and past president at Compass. “Mainly we’re seeing positive absorption, meaning more people are moving in than moving out. More people are leasing space than vacating space, so that is lowering our vacancy rates.”

Bend-based Compass publishes a Market Summary newsletter quarterly to keep potential real estate buyers and sellers informed about vacancy rates, economic trends and other factors affecting the Bend/Central Oregon market. The Market Summary released Dec. 7 showed the citywide office vacancy rate decreased from 20 percent in the second quarter to 19.8 percent in the third quarter, with downtown vacancy rates declining to 11.6 percent, which Compass reported as the lowest vacancy rate of any area in Bend. See Vacancy / B5

Bend’s commercial vacancy rates 20% 20 Office vacancy rates

12.8%

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7%

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3.6%

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Note: Retail rates were not tracked until mid-2007. Source: Compass Commercial Real Estate Services

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

CLEAN ENERGY TECHNOLOGY

Conquering wind power by making up the rules

Estimated monthly inventories and retail sales for U.S. businesses.

Inventories: $460 billion

$452.4B

$29.759 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.160

Glimmers of hope in Oregon job market SALEM — The latest unemployment numbers released Tuesday showed signs of life in Oregon’s job market. The Employment Department said unemployment in November remained at about 10.6 percent, essentially unchanged in a year, but behind that number lies evidence of economic recovery. Private-sector employment has rebounded from its low point in March. In November, private sector payrolls rose by 6,300 jobs, following a similar gain the month before. University of Oregon economist Tim Duy said that pace is vigorous for Oregon, although it still leaves the state well shy of making up for the job losses of the Great Recession. The size of Oregon’s labor force has, for the first time, topped 2 million people — up by 3 percent over the past 12 months, the Employment Department said. The increase followed a precipitous drop in the previous year as the recession bit hard. See Jobs / B2

Illustrated books finding their way onto color tablet screens Children’s picture books a priority for publishers By Julie Bosman New York Times News Service

Retail sales and optimism increase

Business inventories

s

The Associated Press

25%

LONDON — Allied Irish Banks, the lender that is being bailed out by the government, has decided not to award senior staff about 40 million euros ($53 million) in bonuses for 2008 after the country’s finance ministry intervened late Monday. Ireland’s finance minister, Brian Lenihan, told RTE radio on Tuesday that it was “galling to think” that at a time when taxpayers were investing in the bank, 36 million to 40 million euros “would be paid out of that bank to employees in respect to bonuses during a period that the bank got itself into the difficulties it is now in.” The bank has already received 3.5 billion euros in government aid.

WASHINGTON — Retail sales increased more than forecast in November and optimism among small businesses rose to a three-year high, signaling the economy was gaining momentum as the holiday season began. The 0.8 percent gain in purchases followed a 1.7 percent jump in October that was larger than previously estimated, Commerce Department figures showed Tuesday in Washington. The National Federation of Independent Business’ sentiment gauge rose by 1.5 points to 93.2, the highest since December 2007, as more companies projected sales will grow. — From staff and wire reports

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Doug Kanter / New York Times News Service

Workers assemble wind turbines at the Gamesa factory in Tianjin, China, in October. The Spanish company once controlled a third of the Chinese market, but with government help, Chinese companies now control 85 percent of the market.

China poised to dominate manufacturing of turbines by instituting policies that favor its companies

By Keith Bradsher New York Times News Service

TIANJIN, China — Judging by the din at its factory here one recent day, the Spanish company Gamesa might seem to be a thriving player in the Chinese wind energy industry it helped create. But Gamesa has learned the hard way, as other foreign manufacturers have, that competing for China’s business means playing by house rules that are often stacked in Beijing’s favor. Nearly all the components that Gamesa assembles into million-dollar turbines here, for example, are made by local suppliers — companies Gamesa trained to meet onerous local content requirements. And these same suppliers undermine Gamesa by selling parts to its Chinese competitors — wind turbine makers that barely existed

in 2005, when Gamesa controlled more than onethird of the Chinese market. But in the five years since, the upstarts have grabbed more than 85 percent of the wind turbine market, aided by low-interest loans and cheap land from the government, as well as preferential contracts from the state-owned power companies that are the main buyers of the equipment. Gamesa’s market share now is only 3 percent. With their government-bestowed blessings, Chinese companies have flourished and now control almost half of the $45 billion global market for wind turbines. The biggest of those players are now taking aim at foreign markets, particularly the United States, where General Electric has long been the leader. See Wind / B2

Millions of consumers have embraced black-and-white ereaders like the Kindle for reading simple novels or nonfiction — but books with color illustrations have generally remained better read in print. Now publishers are making headway in converting their enormous libraries of illustrated titles to e-books, hoping to capitalize on the growing popularity of the Apple iPad and the Nook Color and their ability to showcase books with color photographs and illustrations. Apple said Tuesday that it was set to make a major push into illustrated books Wednesday, introducing more than 100 titles to its iBookstore, an assortment of children’s books, photography books and cookbooks. Some of the most popular children’s picture books of all time will be available, including some of the “Olivia” picture books, published by Simon & Schuster. Other titles are “Ad Hoc at Home,” a lavish cookbook by chef Thomas Keller; “Beginnings,” by photographer Anne Geddes; and “In the National Parks,” a photograph collection by Ansel Adams. See Books / B2

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U.S. too reliant on China for rare earths, study says

420 2009 2010

Sales:

$335.7B

$340 billion

By Keith Bradsher New York Times News Service

330 320 310 300 2009

2010

Note: All figures are seasonally adjusted Source: Department of Commerce AP

HONG KONG — The United States is too reliant on China for minerals crucial to new clean energy technologies, making the American economy vulnerable to shortages of materials needed for a range of green products — from compact fluorescent light bulbs to electric cars to giant wind turbines. So warns a detailed report to be released this morning by the U.S. Energy

Department. The report, which predicts that it could take 15 years to break American dependence on Chinese supplies, calls for the nation to increase research and expand diplomatic contacts to find alternative sources, and to develop ways to recycle the minerals or replace them with other materials. At least 96 percent of the most crucial types of the so-called rare earth minerals are now produced in China, and Beijing has wielded various export controls to

limit the minerals’ supply to other countries while favoring its own manufacturers that use them. “The availability of a number of these materials is at risk due to their location, vulnerability to supply disruptions and lack of suitable substitutes,” the report says, which also mentions some concerns about a few other minerals imported from elsewhere, such as cobalt from the Congo. See Rare earths / B5

New York Times News Service

Pages from “Olivia Goes to Venice” by Ian Falconer are displayed on an iPad. Publishers are starting to convert their enormous libraries of illustrated titles to e-books, hoping to capitalize on the growing popularity of tablets.


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B2 Wednesday, December 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Fed stands firm on plan to buy $600B in bonds By Sewell Chan New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The Federal Reserve, batting away unusually fierce criticisms, forged ahead Tuesday with its effort to prop up the economic recovery by buying $600 billion in Treasury bonds. But interest rates on government bonds continued to march upward, appearing to defy one of the Fed’s goals for the bond-buying program: lowering long-term interest rates. The yield on the benchmark 10-year note surged to 3.47 percent, up from 3.27 percent late Monday, and the highest level since May. In their last scheduled meeting of the year, Fed policymakers stuck with the bond-buying plan they announced Nov. 3, finding that the recovery was “continuing, though at a rate that has been insufficient to bring down unemployment.” In its statement, the Fed did not publicly acknowledge, much less react to, the uncertainty in the bond markets or the criticisms leveled by foreign central banks

and conservative economists, among others. Nor did it mention the biggest surprise it has confronted in the six weeks since its bond-buying announcement, the Obama administration’s $858 billion deal with congressional Republicans to extend all of the Bush-era tax cuts in return for some short-term fiscal stimulus. By raising expectations for growth next year — along with heightening concerns about the size of the deficit — the tax-cut compromise has complicated the Fed’s bond-buying strategy, which was devised over the summer. Unsurprisingly, the committee voted to keep the benchmark short-term interest rate — the federal funds rate at which banks lend to each other overnight — at a target of zero to 0.25 percent, the level it has been at since December 2008. And it repeated its stance that the fed funds rate would remain “exceptionally low” for “an extended period,” the phrases it has used since March 2009.

Airline industry is improving but remains fragile, group says New York Times News Service PARIS — Profitability among airlines is improving, propelled by a strong third quarter, especially in the Asia-Pacific region. But the sector is still “fragile” and European carriers in particular remain hamstrung by relatively weak demand, an industry

Jobs Continued from B1 The labor force consists of people who have jobs or are looking for them. It doesn’t include people in the military, or who are in prisons or other institutions. It is computed from Census surveys. Typically, job-seekers get discouraged and drop out of the labor force as recessions take hold. As things begin to get better, they rejoin the labor force. When both jobs and the labor force grow, the unemployment rate tends to remain stable. Economists say the rate is a “lagging indicator” because it doesn’t generally fall until an economic

Books Continued from B1 Publishers have been eager to sell illustrated books in digital form, particularly picture books for children, since they could eventually become a significant additional source of revenue. Simon & Schuster said its children’s picture books on the Apple list, which also include “And Tango Makes Three” by Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell, “TippyTippy-Tippy, Hide!” by Candace Fleming and “When Dinosaurs Came With Everything” by Elise Broach, would be its first to be published in the iBook store. Jon Anderson, the publisher of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing, said the publishing house had been “itching to do it since e-books became possible,” but there were always limitations because the books were in color. “It finally gives us the opportunity to have our picture books join the e-book revolution,” Anderson said in an interview. “It gives us a great opportunity to monetize our content in a way that we previously haven’t been able to.” He said that by early 2011, the company hoped to release picture e-books at the same time as the print versions, which is standard practice now for trade books and their digital counterparts. The iPad and the Nook Color are two of the newest devices that have opened up possibilities for publishers who are converting their illustrated books into ebooks, but industry experts have predicted that more devices will become available. Many iPad users, seeing the potential for the device to be used as an educational tool, have been

group said Tuesday. The International Air Transport Association revised its industry outlook for 2010 to a net profit of $15.1 billion, substantially higher than its forecast in September of $8.9 billion. It also raised projections for 2011, to a net profit of $9.1 billion from $5.3 billion.

recovery is well under way. Duy and private economics consultant Bill Conerly both said the jobs report Tuesday was encouraging because it showed gains in most private-sector areas. The conspicuous exception was construction, still depressed by the collapse of real estate bubbles in the Portland region, Bend and elsewhere. But both Duy and Conerly said that while the November jobs report is encouraging, it’s too early to celebrate. The job losses from the Great Recession were so great that it will take years to recover them, perhaps as much as half a decade. “It’s good news, but I wouldn’t get overly excited,” Conerly said.

clamoring for digital children’s books to be available in greater numbers. But converting image-heavy books into digital form has not been easy. Authors are careful to monitor how their work appears on a screen, and publishers have struggled to replicate the experience of reading a print book. Other publishers whose books will be featured in the iBookstore include HarperCollins, Disney Publishing, the Hachette Book Group, Macmillan and Workman Publishing, Apple said. The prices of e-books with pictures will be generally in line with print prices. Some of the books released Wednesday for Apple devices like the iPad are exclusive to the iBookstore, while others are available through other digital book retailers. But some features, including the ability to view two consecutive pages as one uninterrupted image, are not available through reading applications from Kindle and Nook for Apple devices. Books available in the Nook Store are readable on the Nook Color, an e-reader that Barnes & Noble began selling in October for $249. The titles published by HarperCollins, including books in the “Amelia Bedelia” and “Fancy Nancy” series, have been available on the Nook Color for about a month. They are the first picture books the publisher has made available digitally. Some publishers have also had success breaking into the digital space by turning books into applications for mobile devices. Disney Publishing says it has reached 1 million downloads of its book apps, featuring Winnie the Pooh, Disney princesses and characters from “Toy Story.”

OV E R

S T OR I ES

Wind Continued from B1 The story of Gamesa in China follows an industrial arc traced in other businesses, like desktop computers and solar panels. Chinese companies acquire the latest Western technology by various means and then take advantage of government policies to become the world’s dominant, low-cost suppliers. It is a pattern that many economists say could be repeated in other fields, like high-speed trains and nuclear reactors, unless China changes the way it plays the technology development game — or is forced to by its global trading partners. Companies like Gamesa have been so eager to enter the Chinese market that they not only bow to Beijing’s dictates but have declined to complain to their own governments, even when they see China violating international trade agreements. Even now, Gamesa is not crying foul — for reasons that are also part of the China story. Although the company’s market share in China has atrophied, the country’s wind turbine market has grown so big, so fast that Gamesa now sells more than twice as many turbines in China as it did when it was the market leader five years ago. “If we would not have done it, someone else would have done it,” said Jorge Calvet, Gamesa’s chairman and chief executive.

Entry into China Gamesa, an old-line machinery company that entered the wind turbine business in 1994, is a modern Spanish success story. Its factories in Pamplona and elsewhere in Spain have produced wind turbines installed around the world. With sales of $4.4 billion last year, Gamesa is the world’s thirdlargest turbine maker, after Vestas of Denmark, the longtime global leader, and GE. With its relatively low Spanish labor costs, Gamesa became an early favorite a decade ago when China began buying significant numbers of imported wind turbines, as Beijing started moving toward clean energy. Gamesa also moved early and aggressively to beef up sales and maintenance organizations within China, amassing 35 percent of the market by 2005. But Chinese officials had begun to slip new provisions into the bidding requirements for some state-run wind farms, requiring more and more of the content of turbines to be equipment produced within China — not imported. Those piecemeal requirements soon led to a blanket requirement. On July 4, 2005, China’s top economic policy agency, the National Development and Reform Commission, declared that wind farms had to buy equipment in which at least 70 percent of the value was domestically manufactured. “Wind farms not meeting the requirement of equipment localization rate shall not be allowed to be built,” stated the directive, known as Notice 1204.

Doug Kanter / New York Times News Service

Workers prepare a wind turbine for transport at the Gamesa factory in Tianjin, China. Trade lawyers say that setting any local content requirement — let alone one stipulating such a high domestic share — was a violation of the rules of the World Trade Organization, the international body that China had joined just four years earlier. Rather than fight, Gamesa and the other leading multinational wind turbine makers all opted to open factories in China and train local suppliers to meet the 70 percent threshold. In the United States, where there are no local-content requirements, the wind turbine industry uses an average of 50 percent U.S.-made parts. For its U.S. operations, Gamesa relies somewhat more than that on U.S. suppliers, but it still imports some parts from Spain, including crucial gearboxes. It was not until the summer of 2009, when senior Obama administration officials started looking at barriers to U.S. clean energy exports, that the United States pressed China hard about Notice 1204. The Chinese government revoked it two months later. But by then, the policy was no longer needed. Some Gamesa wind turbines exceeded 95 percent local content.

A battle takes shape The U.S. investigation of China goes beyond local content, and the WTO has other weapons at its disposal. The trade organization, for example, has authority to order the repayment of subsidies a government gives to its export industries to the detriment of foreign competitors. The United Steelworkers’ petition — the union spurred an investigation into whether China’s clean energy policies violated WTO rules — cites various forms of subsidies and support that China has given to its industries in potential violation of international trade rules. That includes low-interest loans from state-owned banks and grants of cheap or free land, as well as other perks not available to foreign companies operating in China. As for the state-owned wind farms that are the main buyers of wind energy equipment, China has many policies to preserve their dominance, while limiting market oppor-

tunities for foreign companies that might try to develop wind farms. Those policies — all potential WTO violations, according to some experts — are an open secret. Earlier this autumn the Chinese wind turbine maker Ming Yang Wind Power Group made an initial public offering of its shares on the New York Stock Exchange, as prelude to entering the U.S. wind energy market. The financial disclosures in the company’s prospectus acknowledged that “we obtained land and other policy incentives from local governments,” as well as deals requiring that the municipal governments’ wind farms buy turbines only from Ming Yang.

China looks abroad Gamesa, among other multinational turbine makers, so far has benefited from the growing market in China, despite policies that have increasingly relegated those companies to fighting over ever-thinner slices of the pie. But that dynamic could be changing. The Chinese government is now slowing the approval of new wind farms at home. The pause, whose duration is unclear, is meant to give the national electricity system time to absorb thousands of new turbines that have already been erected and not yet connected to the grid. Gamesa had an ample order book lined up before the government applied the brakes. But the government policy means that the Chinese turbine makers, having become giants on the backs of companies like Gamesa, must now look beyond their captive national market for further growth. Sinovel, China’s biggest wind turbine maker, has said it wants to become the world’s largest by 2015. The company’s chairman and president, Han Junliang, said in October at the annual China Wind Power industry conference in Beijing that his

goal was to sell as many turbines overseas as within China. Sinovel is among the Chinese companies now opening U.S. sales offices in preparation for a big export push next year. They are backed by more than $13 billion in low-interest loans issued this past summer by Chinese government-owned banks; billions more are being raised in initial public offerings led mainly by Morgan Stanley this autumn in New York and Hong Kong. Multinationals are alarmed. Vestas, for example, is closing four factories in Denmark and one in Sweden, and laying off one-eighth of its 24,000-person labor force this autumn, in an effort to push its costs down closer to Asian levels, its chief, Engel, said. The Chinese push, clouded by the Obama administration’s investigation of the steelworkers’ complaint, could complicate the climate change debate in the West. Wind farm developers in the West are worried that Western governments may be less enthusiastic about encouraging renewable energy requirements if these programs are perceived as creating jobs in China instead of at home. The provincial government of Ontario in Canada now wants to take a page from China’s playbook by trying to require 25 percent local content for wind energy projects and 50 percent for solar power projects in the province. The Japanese government responded by filing a WTO complaint against Canada in September, asserting that Ontario was violating the WTO prohibition on local content requirements. By contrast, Japan has never filed a WTO complaint on any issue against China, for fear of harming diplomatic relations with its large neighbor. Meanwhile, the Chinese government is intent on turning its wind energy industry into the global leader, helping manufacturers coordinate export strategies and providing various sorts of technical assistance.

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, December 15, 2010 B3

A W For poorly educated, recovery out of reach Job prospects went from bad to awful when the economy was hit by recession

Zachary Brame, 22, plays a video game in the basement at his parents’ home in Kansas City, Kan. He does not have a college degree but hopes a computer certification course can lead to a job. “It’s just terrible waiting and hoping all the time,” he said. “It gets old.”

By Scott Canon and Diane Stafford McClatchy-Tribune News Service

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Among the sons and daughters of the suburbs and the country club set, the recession turned good times to bad. Their less-accomplished peers, who didn’t make it through college or who never even made it to campus, have seen dismal prospects go from bad to awful. These are the workers for whom the misery of the recession comes in torrents. In better times, “they’d get the worst jobs,” said John Hornbeck of Episcopal Community Services in Kansas City. “Now the barrier is just a flat-out lack of jobs, period.” Certainly millions of the young and lightly educated find ways to make a living at the menial end of the job market. But the struggles of those who can’t get work pose observes, “If you look at people in an extra burden for the rest of trouble with the law, an awful lot us — in the form of fewer people of them are out of work.” paying taxes, more needing govMore critically, Jencks said, is ernment handouts and, perhaps, that those at the bottom rungs in a threat of growing crime. an extended recession may be so “These people run through their cut off from a work-a-day exisunemployment. ... Then some of tence that they won’t bounce back them get into legal trouble,” said even when the job market turns Christopher Jencks, who studies around. poverty issues at Harvard UniverStatistics show they tend to desity. “Some end up stealing stuff, lay marriage but not children. So overdose on drugs. All kinds of this downturn might amp up the bad stuff. number of single moms who, on “Society picks up not all of average, are more likely to lean the broken glass, but some of it. on their families and the governAnd some of it gets stuck in our ment to make the rent and stock feet. We share the cost with the the pantry. victims.” At a key time in their lives, At the bottom of the recession these would-be workers aren’t dein 2009, unemployment swelled to veloping work habits. And they’re about 10 percent. But for blue-col- not making the connections to lar folks, the rate was closer to 17 the mainstream of society they’ll percent. need to achieve independence. For a less definable class of They risk, Jencks said, slipping young people who merely aspire into a permanent situation that to blue-collar work, the buzz-kill doesn’t fit with any American economy looks especially bleak. sense of success. This group lacks both formal “After having been rejected 25 training and the so-called soft times, it gets hard to make the skills — things like the ability 26th call,” he said. “They’re the to look a boss in the eye or the people who would have got factounderstanding that they should ry jobs years ago. But they may be show up at 8:50 for in danger of falla job that starts at ing out of touch “It used to be that with the rest of 9 a.m., not 9ish. They make up a the high school us.” disproportionate number of the 6.8 degree was your Dashed million Americans ticket to a manual dreams who aren’t just unjob, a semiskilled employed but who Zachary Brame have been on the job that paid sheepishly grins hunt for work for when asked what a year or longer. really well and he does with his The previous high bought you and time: Spends it for the long-term on the computer. your dependents unemployed, since Playing games or the number was a middle-class studying Japanese first tracked in existence. Not to better appreci1948, was 3 million ate Japanese aniduring the dreary anymore.” mation. In his pardays of the early ents’ basement. — Joel Devine, a Tulane 1980s. “It’s such a cli“The old manu- University sociologist che,” he said. facturing economy It’s not where honed physical he wants to be or skills such as lifting and manual where he plans to be. But the path dexterity,” wrote Richard Florida to escape, to independence, hasn’t in “The Great Reset.” shown up yet. “But two sets of skills matter He had decent high school more now: analytical skills ... and grades and graduated from Sumsocial intelligence skills.” ner Academy in Kansas City, Kan., in 2007. Like so many teenage boys of his generation, he has Getting cut off always been game for computer The long-term jobless rate ig- and video games: first-person nores those who’ve taken unend- shooter games, online fantasy ing job rejections as a sign to sim- stuff like World of Warcraft, Wii. ply to stop asking. That took him to Tempe, Ariz., “We hear they just need to pick and the University of Advancing themselves up and get a job,” said Technology to learn how to creDennis Chapman, the develop- ate games. He did well on genment director at City Union Mis- eral education classes and the sion in Kansas City. “That’s easier beginner courses on fashioning said than done.” virtual environments. One study in Missouri found Then the economy nose-dived, that each high school dropout and he calculated his prospects costs the state $4,000 a year in lost of actually making a salary taxes and higher Medicaid and that could handle the roughly prison costs. Another estimated $60,000 in debt he’d have upon that the U.S. economy would miss graduation. Suddenly, the math out on $335 billion in lifetime didn’t work. earnings compared with what it “As the money was going would reap had the high school through my hands,” said the 22dropouts of 2009 earned their year-old Brame, “it was getting diplomas. more upsetting.” Jencks, the Harvard poverty He returned to Kansas City, scholar, is quick to point out that Kan., in spring 2008. He worked experts have yet to find a con- with his carpenter father framsensus on whether rising job- ing houses and then laboring lessness cranks up crime rates. in a warehouse. But the work For the most accurately tracked was spotty and not something crimes like murder, the correla- he could see himself doing for tion is weak. Lesser crimes are months, much less years. tracked less closely, but as Jencks Brame found he could go to

Allison Long Kansas City Star

Kansas City Kansas Community College studying the trumpet — something he’d excelled at in high school — on a scholarship. He stuck with that for two semesters, but his heart was never in it. So he was back pounding the streets. This summer he landed in a monthlong course to certify himself as a computer technician — picking up geeky knowhow for plugging in motherboards and keyboarding around viruses. This is a guy habitually without any cash, dependent on a free bus pass, who had to wait weeks to save up money for the test that would vouch for his computer bona fides. His subsequent certification, he hopes, might mean a steady paycheck. “It’s just terrible waiting and hoping all the time. It gets old.”

work for several months carting food orders to cars at a Sonic franchise. Then she returned to Kansas City to be with her mother and spent four months working at a KFC restaurant. But she felt as if she was being asked to do too many things and left. She launched a frustrating search for some other way to make a living in telemarketing or “customer service.” She was told again and again she didn’t have experience. So in September she went to see a military recruiter. Now she’s excited about joining the Army and about the promise it offers her of training as a dental hygienist: “I’m excited. It’ll be something different.” The idea of combat “doesn’t

bother me as much as it might bother someone else. ... Anything that takes my mind off things will be good.” After all, she has spent the past few months living at a homeless shelter and looking for some kind of work. “Anything,” she said, “to take my mind off what I’ve had going on here.” Still, the Army was never something she’d dreamed of. “But this is what I’ve got,” she said. “I’m going to make something out of it.”

Something to show The demand for workers with minimal education and skills has been steadily dropping at least since the 1970s, as the U.S.

economy has slowly shed its manufacturing jobs. “It used to be that the high school degree was your ticket to a manual job, a semiskilled job that paid really well and bought you and your dependents a middle-class existence,” said Joel Devine, a Tulane University sociologist. “Not anymore.” In a good economy, said career marketplace director Benita Ugoline at the Urban League of Greater Kansas City, “people with spotty work histories or little education and little skill development” work for janitorial services, hotel housekeeping, temporary security jobs. But she said even those jobs will stay beyond the reach of people who are shut out of the job market now if they can’t improve themselves. If you don’t have a general equivalency diploma, Ugoline said, you’ll be ignored by employers now and for years to come. It’s not just the certificate but the skills it represents. Somebody who can’t get online, can’t submit an electronic résumé that was put together and stored on a memory stick — is just too far behind. And if this recession leaves a young man or woman with a big gap in work history, that will last into a rebounded economy. She says people need to get that GED, or vocational training, both to boost their skills and to show employers they didn’t just let the years pass without accomplishing anything. “They assume you are not a quality worker, which may or may not be true,” Ugoline said. “You need to have something to show them.” Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

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Worst at the bottom As the executive director of Workforce Partnership — a collection of one-stop career centers in the Kansas City area — Scott Anglemyer sees the frustration. It’s worst, he says, for those at the bottom. Think of a McDonald’s. We picture it as the place for people in their teens and early 20s to get a taste of the workplace. Today, though, those jobs increasingly are filled by folks with graying hair. The entry-level landscape would be tough for those at the bottom “no matter what,” Anglemyer said. “Now it’s several orders of magnitude harder.” Keep in mind that these young folks often were raised by parents or others looking after them who were employed only on the margins of society, if at all. They frequently shifted from one school to the next, passed from mother to uncle to grandmother. They look for work, not sure where they might sleep tonight. They know their relatives can’t just spring for dinner or a clean shirt. That makes them all the less prepared to field a phone call from a prospective boss, to scrounge up clean clothes for an interview, to navigate public transit to get to a job site. Anglemyer said that a few years ago employers would say, “Just send us a warm body.” “We don’t have anybody asking for warm bodies anymore.”

Hope in the Army Schakia Odums was always a decent student, pulling down mostly B’s. She liked math and had a good enough ear for music to excel at the double bass. As she neared graduation from Paseo Academy of Fine and Performing Arts in Kansas City, Mo., in spring 2009, she pictured herself going to college, hoping to secure an accounting degree from Grambling State University or the University of Missouri-Kansas City. But her family couldn’t get the money together. Her efforts at nailing down a scholarship — her 16 on the ACT would make acceptance to many colleges iffy — produced nothing. So she went to Louisiana, where she’d spent her grade school years, to live with her father and

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A-B-C-D A-Power AAR ABB Ltd ABM ACE Ltd AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGIC Cv AGIC Cv2 AGL Res AK Steel AMB Pr AMN Hlth AMR AOL ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AVX Cp AXT Inc Aarons s Aastrom rs AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac Abiomed AbitibiB wi Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaRlt Accenture AccoBrds Accuray AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivePwr ActivsBliz Actuant Acuity Acxiom AdeonaPh AdobeSy Adtran AdvAuto AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs Advntrx rs AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeroflex n Aeropostl s AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd AirTrnsp AirMedia Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT AkeenaS h AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon Alere AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion Alexza AlignTech Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliHlthC AlliancOne AlliBGlbHi AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AldIrish AlldNevG AllisChE AllosThera AllotComm AllscriptH Allstate AlmadnM g AlphaNRs Alphatec AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AlteraCp lf AlterraCap Altria Alumina Alvarion AmBev Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AmIntlGrp AmerMed AmO&G AmOriBio AmRepro AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Ameriprise AmeriBrgn AmCasino Ametek Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amtech Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnadysPh AnalogDev Ancestry Angiotc gh AnglogldA ABInBev AnnTaylr Annaly Ansys AntaresP Antigenic h Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache AptInv ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldIndlT ApldMatl AMCC Apricus rs AquaAm ArQule Arbitron ArcelorMit ArchCap ArchCoal ArchDan ArcticCat ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArmHld ArmourRsd ArmstrW s Arris ArrowEl ArtTech ArtioGInv ArubaNet ArvMerit AsburyA AscentSol AshfordHT Ashland AsiaEntRs AsiaInfoL AspenIns AspenTech AsscdBanc AsdEstat Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth Atheros AtlasEngy Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn AudCodes Aurizon g AutoNatn AutoChina Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch

5.14 -.18 26.84 -.11 0.48 21.52 +.42 0.54 25.80 +.16 1.30 60.68 +.06 11.31 -.08 1.20 55.38 -.49 48.17 +.12 1.08 9.90 +.01 1.02 9.08 -.03 1.76 35.80 -.03 0.20 14.74 -.22 1.12 30.98 -.84 5.90 -.03 7.73 -.09 25.57 +.16 0.27 37.13 -.20 1.68 29.34 +.56 15.60 -.18 10.20 -.07 1.92 +.09 0.18 15.02 +.06 8.38 -.29 0.05 20.28 -.27 2.25 -.10 1.76 48.05 +.57 0.70 55.14 +.45 0.42 6.56 -.05 9.12 -.05 21.75 4.03 +.02 26.63 -2.04 0.72 17.94 -.01 0.90 46.58 +.68 8.40 -.10 6.25 -.02 51.10 -4.98 26.50 -.50 2.30 -.09 0.15 12.00 -.02 0.04 27.69 +.78 0.52 59.39 -.11 18.02 +.22 .83 -.01 28.15 +.34 0.36 34.44 0.24 68.03 +.03 3.98 12.73 -.07 8.05 -.18 0.06 5.51 +.02 6.53 -.04 2.38 -.18 28.02 -.24 0.04 9.08 -.24 6.20 +.02 13.69 -.08 15.30 -.68 23.90 +.10 1.53 -.03 0.04 30.75 -.17 95.82 -.88 6.42 +.26 4.58 +.12 2.56 -.03 38.90 +.20 0.18 82.29 -.39 0.11 80.97 -1.40 1.96 87.59 -1.09 7.45 -.19 6.40 -.21 0.40 10.25 -.23 1.00 63.58 +.08 7.40 -.01 0.18 35.76 -1.56 49.49 -1.19 .39 -.01 56.34 -.15 0.86 11.40 +.19 0.56 55.64 +.59 0.34 37.22 -.03 3.07 +.01 0.12 14.20 -.16 3.95 162.43 +1.71 34.49 +.01 1.80 69.43 +.06 7.53 -.15 78.23 +3.07 1.02 -.05 18.71 +.19 11.28 +.13 0.60 23.34 +.19 0.72 53.10 -.62 0.20 70.58 +1.28 69.10 +.07 3.50 -.21 4.15 +.03 1.20 13.54 +.02 0.48 7.56 -.07 1.51 23.08 -.12 1.58 37.05 +.25 1.22 -.06 26.11 -.14 6.25 -.04 3.82 -.11 8.98 +.33 18.25 +.28 0.80 30.95 -.09 4.60 +.05 52.74 -.12 2.33 +.05 0.40 7.09 -.06 0.66 5.77 +.01 0.25 15.93 -.06 0.24 37.31 +.40 0.48 21.60 +.03 1.52 24.79 +.05 0.15 9.04 +.01 2.31 -.11 4.95 142.95 +.63 5.92 +.12 173.94 -.31 27.19 -.12 27.41 -.19 1.54 28.83 +.28 45.94 +.93 1.29 57.21 +.32 1.62 -.09 12.66 +.17 1.35 30.44 -.11 5.60 29.49 -.20 7.72 -.06 0.44 15.12 -.25 1.84 36.08 +.21 0.10 12.80 +.20 0.72 46.20 -.17 51.77 +3.25 19.36 +.57 10.17 +.03 2.23 -.01 6.89 +.07 30.92 +.20 50.44 +.43 0.88 24.94 -.06 0.72 55.12 -.75 0.40 31.94 +.52 0.42 16.64 -1.26 0.36 60.05 +.03 56.76 +2.65 7.37 -.20 0.06 53.20 -.10 23.15 -1.81 13.93 +.30 0.36 68.97 -.74 7.52 -.29 .98 0.88 37.49 -.07 28.49 -.42 .22 0.18 50.54 +1.01 0.49 57.89 +.03 27.12 +.85 2.60 18.21 -.01 52.02 +.15 1.49 -.01 .92 +.03 0.92 7.26 -.02 0.60 44.62 +.49 9.28 -.03 0.60 116.25 -.55 0.40 24.85 -.24 37.86 -.79 1.12 11.29 +.01 320.29 -1.38 0.68 31.63 +.12 0.28 13.30 +.09 10.37 +.23 3.45 +.06 0.62 22.13 +.31 5.57 -.11 0.40 39.56 +1.40 0.75 37.07 -.25 89.40 +.05 0.40 32.18 -.09 0.60 30.56 -.13 15.97 +.82 1.54 -.02 1.40 16.81 -.28 4.49 +.04 23.65 +.05 0.12 18.66 -.12 1.44 8.02 13.74 41.02 +.16 10.70 -.06 33.68 -.17 5.97 -.01 0.24 14.47 +.08 22.27 -.23 19.97 +.68 16.94 +.14 3.60 +.05 9.31 -.80 0.60 52.70 +1.01 9.78 -.49 16.07 -.20 0.60 29.35 -.01 12.70 +.03 0.04 15.05 +.10 0.68 15.14 -.08 0.64 38.32 -.22 0.18 18.58 -.03 0.52 13.46 -.01 2.41 49.16 +.38 43.93 +.13 33.94 -.62 43.38 -.17 11.65 -.64 1.36 31.49 +.30 37.36 -.40 5.83 -.10 7.31 -.06 26.93 +.27 24.94 -.04 38.92 +.37 1.40 78.73 +.41 1.44 46.83 +.36 262.66 -1.84 20.32 +.42 0.07 26.29 -.29

Nm AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AvisBudg Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap B&G Foods B2B Inet BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJsRest BJs Whls BMC Sft BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s BSD Med BT Grp BabckW n Baidu s BakrHu Baldor BallCp BallyTech BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcoSBrasil BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkAML pfQ BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BannerCp Banro g BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil Barclay Bar iPVix rs BarVixMdT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BeaconPw BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belden Belo Bemis Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BigBand h BBarrett Biocryst Biodel BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR BioSante BioScrip BioTime BlkHillsCp BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkBldA n BlkCpHY VI BlkCrAll4 BlkDebtStr BlkDvAch BlkrkHigh BlkIntlG&I BlkMuIntD BlkMunHIQ BlMunhNYQ BlMunyNYQ BlkMuniyQ3 BlkMunvst BlkMuniyld Blackstone BlockHR Blount BlueCoat Bluegreen BdwlkPpl Boeing Boise Inc BonaFilm n BoozAllen n Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci BoydGm Brandyw BrasilTele BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker BrMySq BrdbdHT Broadcom BroadrdgF BroadSft n Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfInfra BrkfldPrp BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrownFB BrukerCp Brunswick BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BungeLt CA Inc CB REllis CBIZ Inc CBL Asc CBOE n CBS B CEVA Inc CF Inds CGI g CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp CKX Inc CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNinsure CRH CSX CTC Media CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY CabotO&G CadencePh Cadence CalDive CalmsAst CalaCvHi CalaCvOp CalaStrTR Calgon Calix n Calpine CAMAC En CamdnP Cameco g CameltInf n Cameron CampSp CampCC n CIBC g CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar Canon CapGold n CapOne CapProd CapitlSrce CapFedF CapsteadM CapsThera CpstnTrb h Cardero g Cardica CardnlHlth CardiumTh Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet CelSci Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom

D 3.57 110.40 -1.77 3.78 -.14 0.80 41.70 +.31 14.84 -.12 33.10 +.24 0.88 29.22 -.04 3.00 -.15 0.92 36.82 -.16 0.68 13.63 +.14 .92 -.01 0.60 26.58 -.30 1.97 35.64 +.30 37.59 +.06 0.48 8.54 +.07 1.74 90.85 -.24 1.74 79.45 -.31 36.99 -1.14 44.88 -.61 47.58 +.87 44.44 +1.01 4.10 +.02 1.50 42.12 -.75 0.10 15.55 -.05 5.28 +1.54 1.04 28.72 -.41 25.00 +.14 106.62 -1.69 0.60 55.17 +.12 0.68 63.38 +.02 0.40 69.04 +.78 42.29 -1.04 1.34 62.55 -1.91 0.57 10.61 -.13 0.82 19.81 -.02 0.80 11.13 -.02 0.33 13.24 -.21 0.88 14.93 0.04 12.40 -.14 6.98 -.15 2.53 -.01 2.16 25.09 -.22 1.80 47.03 +.26 1.04 2.66 -.16 2.80 61.66 -.06 0.36 29.20 -.13 1.96 56.35 +.24 0.04 1.68 -.02 3.74 +.03 46.97 -.14 24.90 +.04 0.28 17.13 -.19 38.90 +.21 64.66 +.16 0.72 89.57 +3.52 1.00 14.88 +.04 0.32 20.55 +.19 0.48 53.15 -.73 15.35 -.01 1.24 51.80 +1.44 .24 +.01 4.74 -.06 0.10 6.14 -.04 0.76 70.43 +.40 1.64 83.39 +.97 48.80 +1.17 0.20 36.94 +.18 6.78 -.01 0.92 32.61 +.03 0.28 27.23 -.03 80.24 -.10 0.30 43.01 +.74 0.60 35.52 -6.18 27.91 -.09 2.80 -.02 39.08 -.90 5.13 +.15 1.63 +.01 65.74 -.15 27.10 -.08 0.68 17.57 -.09 1.51 +.01 5.09 -.13 8.48 +.29 1.44 30.89 +.26 1.28 11.68 -.57 42.04 -.12 4.00 182.66 +.78 1.42 17.26 -.06 0.99 11.19 +.12 0.83 11.80 -.05 0.32 3.77 0.65 10.50 +.18 0.17 2.01 -.02 1.36 10.65 -.11 0.86 13.27 -.21 0.90 12.11 -.37 0.95 13.10 0.85 12.18 +.11 0.86 12.15 -.04 0.71 8.80 -.04 0.99 12.65 -.17 0.40 13.83 +.06 0.60 13.13 -.17 16.31 +.23 28.04 -.98 2.73 2.06 30.70 +.02 1.68 64.49 +.70 0.40 7.94 +.06 7.00 -.15 18.69 +.12 1.21 -.03 67.45 +.60 0.04 5.81 -.01 2.00 82.66 -1.39 7.04 -.05 9.72 +.02 0.60 10.54 -.12 21.03 -.09 17.78 -.02 0.44 19.91 +.28 26.73 +.10 8.97 +.05 1.90 -.03 0.56 20.56 -.18 1.32 26.55 +.29 0.16 13.72 -.19 0.32 44.98 -.72 0.60 22.23 -.40 24.10 -1.74 2.01 +.03 5.35 -.05 20.09 +.09 0.52 31.38 -.04 1.10 20.65 -.02 0.56 17.17 +.08 0.34 10.59 +.04 8.84 -.06 0.32 24.06 +.21 0.28 14.03 -.16 1.28 69.41 +.76 17.22 -.24 0.05 17.81 -.03 0.16 20.98 +.06 0.80 39.31 +.07 0.10 89.53 +.08 0.46 49.53 -.35 44.87 -.80 0.92 62.62 +.06 0.16 24.47 +.29 20.40 +.23 6.40 -.02 0.80 17.18 -.53 0.40 22.95 -.06 0.20 17.89 +.09 20.73 -1.75 0.40 117.46 -2.54 16.49 -.01 1.16 78.46 +.39 0.04 37.15 -.35 43.48 -.06 4.07 -.03 1.00 30.90 +.23 4.60 323.25 +.53 0.84 18.93 +.04 46.86 +.32 6.69 +.03 0.26 17.30 -.00 0.83 20.94 +.75 1.04 63.62 -.16 0.52 23.79 +1.11 0.34 8.54 -.19 13.34 -.12 0.35 34.08 +.33 22.61 +.30 0.50 34.70 +.11 0.12 36.22 -.73 7.86 +.07 8.22 -.10 5.67 -.17 0.30 12.90 +.18 1.02 12.25 -.34 1.14 12.53 -.16 0.63 9.10 +.02 15.65 +.15 16.22 +.32 12.94 +.05 2.83 -.06 1.80 51.85 -.87 0.28 38.32 -.53 20.25 -.75 49.50 -.73 1.16 34.74 +.22 12.67 -.18 3.48 78.25 +.81 1.08 66.74 -.08 0.30 42.77 -.13 1.08 64.28 +.40 12.83 -.19 48.79 -.21 5.06 +.14 0.20 42.10 -.12 0.93 8.95 +.03 0.04 6.86 +.04 2.00 24.45 -.57 1.51 12.49 +.05 .52 -.52 .92 +.01 1.57 +.01 3.27 -.04 0.78 37.26 +.26 .42 -.00 17.13 +.02 24.47 +.28 19.82 -.31 0.68 40.20 +.43 34.50 -.12 0.40 42.80 -.58 0.72 39.33 +.47 29.05 -.43 31.37 -.18 1.76 92.09 +.46 0.04 15.36 -.86 36.96 -.61 .83 -.06 0.20 39.83 +.27 6.12 +.14 9.41 +.04 57.81 +1.08 .37 -.01 3.59 33.24 -.09

Nm Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE CenterFncl CenterPnt CnElBrasil CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g CentAl CntryLink Cenveo Cephln Cepheid Cerner CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh CharterCm ChkPoint Cheesecake Chemtura n CheniereEn ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinaBAK ChinaDigtl ChinaEd ChiGengM ChinaIntEn ChinaLife ChinaMM ChinaMda ChinaMed ChiMYWd n ChinaMble ChNBorun n ChinNEPet ChinaPStl ChinaSecur ChinaShen ChiShngd n ChinaTDv lf ChinaUni ChiValve ChinaYuch ChiCache n ChipMOS Chipotle Chiquita ChrisBnk Chubb ChungTel ChurchDwt CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigrp CitzRepB h CitrixSys CityNC CityTlcm ClaudeR g CleanEngy Clearwire ClickSft CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPeak Coach CobaltIEn n CocaCE CocaCl Codexis n Coeur CogdSpen Cognex CognizTech CohStInfra CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColumLabs Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmwReit rs ComScop CmtyBkTr CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s CompDivHd CompssMn Compellent CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Comtech Con-Way ConAgra ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Cnvrgys ConvOrg h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopanoEn Copart Copel Corcept CoreLab s CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd CostPlus Costamre n Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien Crane Credicp CrSuisInco CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc Crocs Crossh glf CrosstexE CrosstxLP CrwnCstle CrownHold Crystallx g Ctrip.com s CubistPh CullenFr Cummins Curis CurEuro CyberDef lf Cyclacel CyprsBio h CypSemi CypSharp CytRx Cytec Cytokinet Cytomed Cytori DCP Mid DCT Indl DDi Corp DG FastCh DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DTE DanaHldg Danaher s Darden Darling DaVita DeVry DeanFds DeckOut s Deere DejourE g DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DeltaAir DeltaPtr h Deluxe DemandTc DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DB AgriDL DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE Dex One n DexCom Diageo DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver DigitalGlb Dillards

D 0.43 10.07 +.11 0.86 16.92 -.04 0.80 31.23 +.30 7.26 -.05 0.78 16.10 +.17 1.56 13.54 -.15 24.28 -.89 19.99 -.46 0.01 20.14 -.04 15.69 -.23 2.90 45.92 +.70 5.75 +.08 63.18 +.23 21.77 -.93 92.91 +.69 2.19 +.07 34.61 -.12 3.68 37.01 +.20 44.80 +.17 31.53 -1.02 15.32 -.08 5.45 +.34 0.30 23.02 +.11 2.88 88.38 +.01 30.97 -.69 0.16 11.85 -.02 50.38 -1.26 0.69 4.22 1.69 -.04 2.00 8.26 -.02 2.48 -.14 1.63 -.11 7.25 -.34 1.54 63.58 -.52 3.28 -.18 15.76 -.90 11.00 -.27 9.76 -.14 1.85 49.82 -.26 10.84 +.69 5.69 -.07 1.49 +.02 4.80 -.07 4.25 -.25 3.96 -.04 2.49 +.38 0.23 14.54 +.09 10.31 -.42 0.25 27.39 -.99 21.77 -2.37 1.49 -.05 227.90 +1.79 13.19 -.03 0.24 5.35 +.01 1.48 59.49 -.16 1.27 23.97 +.02 0.68 67.70 +.71 19.10 +.02 0.32 86.34 +.34 2.53 -.05 1.60 31.99 -.05 0.84 17.91 -.10 0.49 28.70 +.83 16.00 -.44 19.54 -.04 4.69 -.12 .68 +.01 68.54 -.54 0.40 60.00 -.15 0.52 14.48 -.54 1.68 +.10 14.06 -.20 5.70 -.33 7.05 +.24 0.56 75.63 +.02 2.20 62.51 +.08 20.70 -.64 0.60 57.61 +.27 12.36 -.27 0.48 25.74 -.15 1.76 63.90 -.95 9.75 -.08 27.21 +.08 0.40 6.10 -.02 0.32 30.57 +.13 69.68 -.60 0.96 16.50 +.13 0.72 8.32 -.34 60.98 -3.09 2.74 -.02 2.12 80.78 +1.43 20.42 -.13 0.60 17.43 -.21 1.80 0.38 21.99 +.67 0.38 20.70 +.56 0.40 40.77 +.23 0.94 39.55 +.13 0.48 17.13 +.04 2.00 24.22 -.48 31.27 -.03 .74 35.19 +.58 30.86 -.07 0.36 40.81 +.85 1.36 17.78 +.35 1.56 87.37 -.43 27.86 -.12 29.85 -.76 0.80 48.91 +2.00 11.67 +.11 24.65 -.50 1.00 27.80 -.09 0.40 35.24 -.15 0.92 22.20 83.07 +.26 53.37 -.58 1.63 -.05 2.20 65.65 +.18 0.40 43.00 -.55 2.38 49.50 +.32 28.00 -2.94 21.53 +.18 0.96 28.28 +.19 58.03 -.76 13.23 -.12 .36 +.01 0.06 58.30 +.23 1.08 57.62 +.78 0.42 23.68 +.62 2.30 31.97 -.01 35.24 +.43 0.72 24.42 -.29 4.17 +.10 0.24 89.28 +.25 18.18 -.04 4.37 -.04 0.56 46.98 -.18 0.20 18.87 -.43 1.65 33.48 -.56 25.08 +.43 12.82 -.19 10.92 +.02 12.75 +.48 0.82 71.21 +.47 8.16 +.03 0.17 7.86 -.03 51.20 +2.30 1.50 16.95 +.29 26.93 +.10 0.80 45.09 +1.70 0.92 40.25 +.46 1.70 123.10 -1.64 0.32 3.36 -.05 1.85 40.39 +.28 0.32 2.88 +.01 67.52 -3.00 17.64 -.10 .38 -.02 0.28 9.00 1.00 14.05 -.05 42.39 +.44 33.80 +.39 .32 -.01 38.64 -5.89 21.98 +.33 1.80 59.31 -.08 1.05 108.29 +1.60 1.86 +.10 0.01 133.30 -.12 2.78 +.19 1.55 -.01 5.75 +.96 17.54 -.08 2.40 12.75 -.13 1.01 -.01 0.05 51.27 +.43 2.15 -.13 .47 -.01 5.18 -.05 2.44 35.68 0.28 5.16 -.05 0.40 11.43 -.27 27.18 -.95 0.78 9.14 +.02 1.33 25.79 -.01 0.15 11.26 -.10 2.24 46.17 -.04 17.05 +.59 0.08 45.73 -.06 1.28 48.35 -.19 13.19 +.03 71.29 +.57 0.24 44.60 -.58 8.04 -.22 79.92 -.66 1.40 82.54 +.63 .31 -.01 0.36 18.80 10.65 +.01 13.31 -.04 13.07 -.01 .83 +.07 1.00 21.69 +.04 11.00 -.09 19.29 -.48 36.28 -.28 3.36 -.15 3.62 -.04 0.20 33.75 +.59 5.62 +.04 0.93 53.45 -.17 12.56 -.32 41.46 +.11 8.30 -.01 0.08 13.16 -.03 0.64 73.61 -.27 7.70 +.03 12.96 +.89 2.38 73.85 -.23 0.50 64.84 -.76 0.03 10.86 -.31 12.99 -.12 13.35 -.01 36.61 +.50 1.08 31.13 +.32 2.12 51.45 -1.50 38.18 +.65 31.24 +.12 0.16 35.87 -.29

Nm

D

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117.82 -.01 40.25 +.08 6.26 44.15 -.04 5.68 38.57 +.16 16.48 +.02 0.20 20.80 +.67 25.03 +.24 21.88 -.06 10.13 +.24 26.16 -.63 7.35 47.03 +1.85 1.32 32.48 -1.44 3.41 49.86 -1.69 4.77 69.26 +.01 9.21 -.02 8.06 68.35 +.17 5.06 53.04 -.58 0.08 19.15 +.05 42.08 +.06 36.61 +.05 .18 +.00 18.41 +.02 0.40 37.24 +.11 5.42 -.09 67.24 -.41 11.65 +.13 27.28 -.97 30.50 -.50 47.58 -.27 55.88 +.03 1.83 42.00 -.05 15.17 +.03 1.00 81.71 -1.85 1.04 17.48 +.17 1.38 -.04 38.73 -.70 0.40 16.09 -.18 1.10 57.73 -.07 0.60 34.06 -.02 1.00 37.28 +.24 8.92 -.22 30.04 -.22 25.67 +.11 41.22 -.23 0.52 4.16 -.08 0.59 7.41 -.05 81.42 -.86 1.85 -.02 6.20 -.10 1.64 49.13 +.57 0.48 21.49 -.53 0.98 17.66 +.12 0.68 11.09 -.06 3.00 -.10 14.62 +.23 0.16 18.79 +.94 2.55 +.11 4.01 +.15 5.45 -.23 1.08 10.50 -.26

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27.06 -2.09 0.25 13.69 +.04 15.61 -.31 30.75 +.47 4.40 -.23 22.66 +.17 29.44 +.16 2.51 44.29 +.52 0.62 91.65 +.95 0.88 43.34 +.15 5.15 +.02 0.10 8.96 0.64 9.10 +.02 0.04 19.00 -.03 1.88 81.45 +.39 5.22 +.17 2.32 98.90 +.48 0.72 31.39 -.09 1.39 15.40 +.05 0.92 11.14 -.35 1.80 13.10 -.08 1.62 11.20 +.02 1.53 10.38 +.04 1.56 12.82 -.01 22.75 -.63 0.70 49.56 +.62 0.97 43.90 +1.00 1.28 38.48 +.12 78.15 +2.10 2.25 -.03 0.04 13.52 -.01 1.64 32.76 -.21 5.85 -.05 0.05 18.37 +.21 15.79 +.03 0.38 29.75 +.24 1.56 63.00 +9.14 21.13 +1.06 1.38 57.98 +.14 11.65 -.58 1.96 55.14 -.23 0.80 28.20 -.43 7.25 -.05 36.41 +.24 6.65 +.26 1.00 46.20 -.02 4.49 +.06 24.83 -.11 0.52 46.29 -.13 70.24 -.49 5.17 +.24 3.58 50.44 -.57 26.33 +.19 5.69 +.04 2.16 29.05 -.18 0.61 23.86 -.31 1.40 51.57 -.06 7.12 -.28 3.32 70.71 +.04 2.70 -.10 2.33 41.00 -.07 2.60 46.31 -1.06 2.84 -.03 11.26 +.10 .70 -.13 0.64 35.08 -.08 84.32 -.41 1.20 53.72 -.51 0.88 16.93 -.13 1.47 50.49 -.73 0.28 10.78 +.13 0.75 78.94 +2.23 29.36 -.07 11.79 +.07 1.92 86.03 -.17 .66 -.02 5.72 +.28 5.87 -.09 0.16 18.97 +.04 7.21 +.40 2.10 40.93 +.16 6.09 +.02 9.23 +.04 0.28 25.57 -.57 0.40 56.05 +.01 16.53 +.07 54.86 +.54 23.12 -.61 0.33 17.05 -.45 1.76 72.18 -.18 27.41 -1.19 133.65 -5.41 27.39 -.43 0.50 79.80 -.11 87.35 -.35 0.48 9.83 +.12 4.63 +.44 35.93 +.06 6.18 -.27 13.10 0.92 92.81 -3.47 15.12 -.35 0.62 49.20 +.17 0.84 58.99 +.11 0.48 93.33 -.98 20.80 +.26 2.68 75.78 -.72 0.24 6.47 +.05 0.96 26.39 +.35 6.74 -.06 14.85 -.14 16.40 -.51 0.72 13.95 -.03 0.20 27.80 -.11 1.28 11.70 +.06 0.04 14.27 -.22 25.14 -.32 0.16 18.57 +.10 0.24 14.97 +.01 .34 -.01 0.04 7.03 +.10 0.72 10.45 -.47 8.05 -.24 0.04 10.63 +.16 0.60 13.44 +.05 0.80 15.59 -.21 27.31 -.09 137.04 +.24 34.51 -.26 0.11 14.51 -.07 2.20 36.01 +.28 0.64 19.24 +.27 59.68 +.53 1.47 +.03 1.56 15.50 +.31 7.80 +.09 4.10 +.01 3.91 -.04 0.80 26.14 +.80 1.16 116.31 -.21 0.50 61.79 22.24 +.72 0.64 56.21 -.13 1.41 -.18 0.60 19.23 +.30 5.41 -.03 16.42 -.05 7.76 -.07 16.00 +.20 32.79 +.27 35.91 -.57 9.47 -.73 31.08 -.83 5.42 -.09 0.76 61.93 -.85 72.79 -.40 32.89 -.62 1.77 21.54 +.08 0.88 116.44 -.97 2.00 114.82 -.71 .04 -.00 11.28 -.08 0.75 9.34 +.01 16.62 -.22 1.90 25.35 -.57 31.11 +.46 1.43 -.25 0.12 9.51 +.05

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D 6.40 -.21 4.75 1.12 35.64 -.43 0.20 4.98 -.07 5.34 -.37 22.99 -.14 7.71 -.14 8.80 -.33 34.69 -.38 2.57 0.68 5.47 -.03 1.68 18.51 -.08 0.14 13.91 -.22 1.28 29.59 +.11 21.74 -.18 8.14 +.31 0.16 15.43 -.12 0.40 20.91 -.27 0.20 70.55 +.17 1.50 31.32 +.81 32.71 +.07 .33 +.01 4.20 -.11 34.06 -.58 56.65 +1.63 14.99 -.11 5.19 -.14 35.64 +.32 12.62 +.24 1.68 69.98 +.58 0.56 17.69 +.07 15.03 -.24 0.04 3.36 -.20 1.12 36.44 +.46 5.39 -.06 33.89 +.09 2.38 50.72 38.22 +1.73 3.58 +.07 20.98 +3.00 0.18 14.95 +.13 0.44 29.17 +.16 22.81 +.55 1.64 50.75 -.10 .47 13.03 -.08 70.20 -.10 24.91 +.30 24.44 +.15 0.32 13.77 -.21 4.78 +.01 0.18 6.91 0.30 29.81 -.35 37.21 +.38 0.52 14.49 +.19 2.00 39.86 -.12 2.76 +.03 0.40 8.09 -.33 2.98 +.01 6.99 -.06 0.08 44.31 +.34 26.09 -.20 19.39 +.03 1.49 -.01 0.15 17.60 0.40 15.15 -.23 0.68 14.86 +.65 0.16 18.49 +.43 0.15 27.20 -1.00 0.36 46.16 +.02 4.54 +.18 1.53 23.44 -.26 1.40 167.33 -2.15 1.16 85.62 -.49 17.30 11.42 -.02 594.91 +.29 35.43 +.05 20.29 -.14 2.16 134.83 +1.06 2.19 -.12 8.31 -.08 18.82 -.09 0.52 28.93 +.12 2.77 -.05 0.07 7.83 -.10 0.83 19.37 +.04 51.70 -3.10 31.75 -.21 11.30 -.13 20.90 -1.83 0.40 42.29 +1.29 15.04 +.03 0.52 24.99 +.25 0.80 47.33 +.13 0.03 31.13 -.33 7.46 +.01 11.13 +.01 20.60 -1.59 0.58 28.82 -.09 1.86 32.96 +.44 0.81 164.34 -1.89 1.70 52.68 +.05 2.00 26.70 -.29 29.43 -.21 64.00 +1.75 0.36 41.08 -.07 7.56 -.02 .68 +.07 25.46 -.54 21.25 +.15 .98 -.03 1.44 +.10 51.04 +1.94 17.43 -.08 0.40 33.66 +.25 46.67 -.59 7.41 -.15 0.07 12.75 +.11 1.00 46.14 +.38 11.98 -.50 0.82 27.42 -.04 0.30 13.04 -.16 0.20 25.68 +.10 1.81 25.07 -.12 12.06 -.19 1.00 48.79 +.40 4.40 31.34 -.15 1.24 22.54 +.26 8.26 -.27 4.58 +.08 2.76 44.78 -.76 9.29 +.17 1.20 20.38 -.27 26.39 -.32 19.95 +.72 27.93 +.73 0.08 16.19 -.13 4.33 -.03 11.03 +.03 1.80 50.30 +.45 28.78 -.02 0.57 5.55 -.04 13.10 -.23 0.24 47.89 -.21 .51 +.01 60.06 +1.07 1.00 68.78 +.47 2.91 -.02 0.80 10.29 -.12 0.20 6.31 +.01 1.28 47.65 +.55 13.64 -.05 0.40 74.09 -.03 0.32 41.54 -.11 18.02 +.05 22.19 -2.43 19.68 -.43 1.70 29.55 -.09 0.41 41.62 +.42 0.76 19.80 +.28 0.25 2.00 -.11 24.19 -1.56 0.60 37.50 -.47 15.45 17.75 +.33 0.95 34.72 +.16 41.14 -.26 2.32 54.44 -.33 37.95 +.07 1.33 52.53 +.53 0.44 18.00 +.29 0.20 4.25 -.03 1.02 51.30 +.21 20.74 -.20 56.62 +.60 1.80 22.00 -.23 0.04 17.02 -.22 4.12 -.22 54.60 +.21 0.60 12.30 -.08 23.72 -.06 56.03 -.51 0.48 39.82 -.14 0.04 6.30 -.36 0.40 15.82 +.02

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29.74 17.39 -.16 48.97 -.28 27.73 -.25 22.75 +.04 20.88 -.22 7.65 +.03 11.04 10.33 +.01 0.31 5.50 7.96 -.31 13.63 +.01 0.81 25.62 +.12 0.76 21.52 -.16 2.58 76.91 +.07 0.42 30.63 -.02 0.30 24.40 -.01 0.48 19.31 -.02 0.45 16.69 -.03 0.16 10.76 +.05 0.39 58.63 +.41 0.25 14.15 +.06 0.75 61.13 +.15 0.38 13.75 -.02 1.37 47.30 +.08 2.26 38.78 -.13 0.21 15.04 +.05 0.44 17.50 -.02 1.22 67.98 -.09 28.81 -.06 1.08 56.15 +.11 1.69 49.95 +.19 2.53 105.81 -1.02 0.68 43.78 -.09 1.01 91.19 -.36 2.34 125.10 +.13 3.90 104.78 -.59 0.59 46.96 +.07 5.27 107.44 -.66 0.64 46.54 +.07 0.89 42.06 +.28 0.08 28.89 -.27 1.13 65.36 +.05 0.82 38.23 -.04 0.36 40.76 -.13 1.22 52.71 -.03 1.24 58.77 +.07 3.74 97.30 -1.72 3.86 92.14 -1.37 3.26 92.80 -.99 0.88 83.91 -.04 1.38 58.34 +.09 0.83 44.25 -.08 0.52 56.14 +.01 0.99 89.59 -.09 7.85 89.38 +.44 91.57 +.99 1.85 63.33 -.74 1.28 63.97 +.02 3.16 107.43 -.42 0.72 56.91 +.07 1.11 69.17 +.09 1.06 70.23 -.03 3.11 104.06 -.13 0.47 86.47 -.07 0.79 77.31 -.04 0.08 110.23 +.02 2.87 38.84 -.29 1.88 54.25 -.56 0.08 12.54 -.10 0.27 56.40 -.57 0.59 56.42 -.44 0.50 37.96 -.13 0.58 67.78 -.04 0.91 75.03 -.03 0.89 50.15 -.24 0.20 61.09 -.29 7.20 +.05 1.34 61.90 +.67 1.00 50.36 +.36 61.56 -.73 21.52 +1.20 20.13 +.33 1.30 +.05 1.36 51.41 +.22 65.50 +.79 26.09 -.47 6.08 -.06 20.14 +.74 8.90 +.33 3.51 +.07 19.29 -.06 0.44 38.41 +.43 15.21 -.03 1.26 34.70 -.25 2.82 38.07 10.06 -.20 7.99 +.15 43.72 -.56 0.90 71.30 +.84 0.28 45.79 +1.00 18.45 -.15 2.19 -.70 0.57 8.31 -.37 1.13 +.03 26.77 +.31 .58 -.03 7.20 -.02 14.59 +.44 6.99 -.08 8.23 -.07 2.72 49.40 -.03 0.72 21.47 -.03 1.73 +.23 116.38 -1.37 0.42 19.59 -.03 0.40 38.29 -.80 12.70 +.46 13.53 +.12 5.81 +.03 2.60 145.82 +1.54 7.09 -1.07 1.08 55.67 +.22 0.24 16.69 +.22 0.50 26.55 -.14 29.88 -.22 9.76 -.04 76.24 +.34 11.00 -.11 0.48 14.92 -.14 19.16 -.03 32.29 +.08 48.48 +.18 260.00 +5.30 0.44 22.83 -.20 3.49 23.47 +.42 1.03 11.94 -.07 1.06 12.95 -.16 0.29 4.55 -.06 15.73 +.01 9.45 +.05 0.75 24.74 +.47 33.82 +.01 9.81 +.17 16.62 0.60 23.16 +.06 55.67 -.28 2.61 +.10 24.43 -.21 16.02 -.11 43.72 -.12 6.90 +.07 13.68 -.18 0.20 40.79 -.72 1.81 35.86 -.13 2.00 26.65 -.23 1.68 25.51 -.29 0.28 17.14 +.43 0.38 29.54 +.25 20.42 -.24 1.23 -.10 42.83 -.11 7.05 +.06 2.15 +.03 22.88 -.04 0.04 12.35 +.03 0.33 31.08 -.20 17.96 -.31 0.30 25.82 -.13 6.69 -.09 21.49 +.18 44.88 -.41 1.63 2.16 62.77 +.91 0.64 38.29 +.49 0.20 15.68 +.18 0.20 81.44 +.37 1.20 -.01 39.83 +.01 4.85 +.10 0.70 80.21 -.39 35.75 -.41 0.08 0.53 0.88 0.50 0.26 0.54 1.20

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D 51.59 +.56 12.32 -.30 29.40 -.27 13.47 +.03 9.00 -.02 39.20 +.23 21.39 +.25 5.58 -.30 47.78 -.16 14.95 +.03 0.76 39.81 +.78 1.92 28.99 +.08 1.62 51.02 +.80 11.49 -.97 0.48 39.38 +1.00 4.73 -.02 11.42 -.12 0.04 8.16 -.14 1.40 33.85 -.18 2.64 62.01 +.37 0.72 16.76 -.34 4.44 70.41 -.18 4.44 64.96 +.17 17.09 +.29 41.81 +.19 14.22 +.01 0.10 18.49 +.16 44.02 -.61 13.04 -.26 13.52 +.02 0.24 19.19 -.66 1.70 21.26 -1.05 15.44 +.29 6.24 -.24 53.58 +.18 13.00 +.04 22.96 +.74 1.16 31.39 +.51 28.06 +.09 7.57 +.31 0.42 21.00 -.11 7.46 -.05 11.22 -.62 11.86 +.02 1.60 70.90 +.29 0.46 31.10 +.18 10.20 +.09 1.24 +.17 18.21 -.07 3.58 -.05 23.04 +.24 33.65 -.12 5.93 +.02 7.64 -.02 8.36 -.27 85.53 +1.64 52.33 +.20 38.16 +.50 0.20 39.73 -.03 4.93 -.94 43.65 -1.61 0.44 25.54 -.37 5.25 -.19 9.16 +.04 0.50 39.10 -.16 11.57 -.16 6.11 -.12 95.81 +2.50 2.42 +.03 0.24 35.58 -.08 1.08 22.51 +.15 0.40 30.48 +.27 0.16 17.25 -.46 0.60 47.09 +.18 0.25 28.21 -.06 .96 +.01 1.55 -.11 0.46 8.05 -.19 35.69 -1.22 0.29 4.87 +.01 36.34 -.11 34.49 -.17 15.81 +.05 61.45 -.70 68.34 +.14 1.90 30.30 -.25 54.72 +1.16 40.92 -.21 36.89 +.51 11.72 +.08 1.96 35.09 +.12 6.60 -.17 0.60 30.84 +.06 0.80 26.46 +.41 1.00 15.43 -.01 0.20 28.00 +.29 0.92 34.53 -.09 2.64 36.37 -.26 3.70 -.06 6.64 -.45 11.62 -.08 10.11 +.12 7.29 -.10 1.45 4.30 -.05 5.71 -.53 3.00 70.02 +1.40 0.25 38.54 -.17 19.54 -.34 45.33 -.32 36.52 -2.20 2.65 +.05 4.50 82.47 +.50 9.30 -.16 0.44 25.11 +.11 1.44 108.03 +3.37 0.50 57.88 -.25 67.80 -2.07 23.21 +.18 31.99 +.13 0.25 0.20 0.23 0.56 1.00

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MB Fncl MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MCR MGF MFS HYMu MIN h MMT MGIC MGM Rsts MIPS Tech MPG OffTr MSC Ind MSCI Inc MYR Grp Macatawa Macerich MackCali Macys MadCatz g MagelnHl MagelMPtr MagicSft Magma MagnaI gs MagHRes MaidenBrd MAKO Srg Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MktVGold MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktV Indo MktV Viet MktVCoal MktVIntM MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls Martek MStewrt MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Matrixx Mattel Mattson

2.80 83.86 -1.47 0.04 16.47 +.16 9.98 -.39 0.37 7.12 -.05 1.00 26.93 +.11 0.65 20.23 -.02 3.18 -.01 11.72 -.12 7.92 -.02 0.90 8.28 -.02 1.44 8.98 -.02 0.53 6.64 +.03 0.36 4.05 -.12 0.57 6.19 +.04 0.66 6.60 -.05 9.63 -.05 12.95 -.23 14.86 -1.11 2.43 -.08 0.88 64.37 +.14 37.02 +.32 18.59 -1.12 3.75 +.69 2.00 44.14 -.86 1.80 30.23 -.32 0.20 25.18 +.23 1.04 +.05 46.27 +.71 2.98 55.32 -.07 0.50 7.80 -.08 4.65 -.06 0.72 50.50 +.03 6.01 -.09 26.02 -.05 15.10 +.06 0.08 13.09 -.27 8.46 +.77 0.74 62.89 +.12 0.52 16.53 -.13 1.00 34.97 0.11 62.13 -.09 0.08 37.12 +.32 42.21 +.16 0.42 50.95 -.20 0.45 58.93 +.07 0.18 87.01 -1.21 0.04 28.46 -1.54 0.31 44.71 -.21 0.74 20.72 -.36 2.56 42.30 +.34 0.35 41.58 -.19 0.84 26.95 +.21 0.04 5.73 -.20 22.57 +.32 4.70 -.03 1.60 93.59 +1.84 19.13 -.02 0.30 13.03 -.22 2.75 30.99 +.10 0.24 50.81 +.44 14.04 -.29 0.60 254.12 -5.23 7.98 +2.86 0.83 25.46 +.06 3.16 -.10

Nm MaximIntg Maxygen McClatchy McCorm McDrmInt s McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MeadWvco Mechel Mechel pf MecoxL n MedAssets MedcoHlth Mediacom MedProp MediCo Medicis Medivation Medtrnic MelcoCrwn Mellanox MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck Meredith Mesab Metabolix Metalico Metalline Methanx MetLife MetroPCS Microchp Micromet MicronT MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvisn MillerHer MillerPet Millicom MincoG g MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s Mohawk MoleInsP h Molex MolsCoorB Molycorp n Momenta MoneyGrm MonPwSys Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MSEMDDbt Mosaic Motorola Motricity n Move Inc MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NCI Bld rs NCR Corp NFJDvInt NGAS Rs h NIC Inc NII Hldg NIVS IntT NRG Egy NTT DOCO NV Energy NXP Sem n NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NaraBncp NasdOMX NBkGreece NatCity pfA NatFuGas NatGrid NatInstru NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP Navios NaviosMar Navistar NektarTh NeoStem Ness Tech Net1UEPS NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netflix NetSolTch NetSpend n NetSuite NBRESec NeurMtrx Neurcrine NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NewEnSys NwGold g NY&Co NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes Newport NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NextEraEn NiSource Nicor NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NoahEduc NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura Noranda n NordicAm Nordson Nordstrm NorflkSo NA Pall g NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaMeas NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax Novell Novlus NSTAR NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NuBldAm n NuvDivA NvIMO NuMulCGv NvMAd NuvMuVal NuvPP NvMulSI&G NvMSI&G2 NuvPI NuvPI2 NuvQInc

D 0.84 24.32 -.26 1.00 6.84 +.08 4.50 +.11 1.12 46.85 +.41 19.71 -.18 2.44 77.11 0.94 36.21 +.05 0.72 68.52 +1.17 15.43 -.13 47.02 +.07 0.90 61.98 -.23 1.00 25.91 +.03 28.41 +.29 9.15 +.20 6.79 +.08 19.43 +.27 63.66 +.55 8.50 -.01 0.80 10.07 -.05 14.19 +.20 0.24 27.81 +.45 13.19 +.36 0.90 36.14 +.03 5.59 -.16 24.18 -.27 0.36 24.62 +.39 11.97 -.01 70.84 -1.64 6.87 +.07 1.52 36.55 +.45 0.92 35.43 +.18 2.39 56.43 -.01 11.64 +.06 5.39 +.05 1.11 +.02 0.62 30.79 +.03 0.74 43.76 -.16 12.37 -.16 1.38 34.59 -.10 7.49 +.04 8.06 -.08 23.59 -.71 0.64 27.62 +.38 1.65 -.04 0.09 23.25 +.04 4.20 -.27 7.24 90.87 +3.44 2.33 -.11 0.20 26.27 +.14 6.19 -.33 10.81 -.79 5.13 -.01 3.44 +.01 20.00 +.19 58.40 +.33 .23 -.02 0.70 23.02 +.04 1.12 49.74 +.50 33.79 -.49 14.40 +.05 2.81 +.06 16.80 -.21 1.12 60.66 -.35 24.51 +.15 0.40 20.48 +.06 0.42 27.33 +.08 0.20 26.63 -.31 1.20 15.78 -.08 0.20 65.50 -1.07 8.46 21.28 -1.06 2.82 +.07 0.07 3.94 -.07 1.10 70.46 -.67 20.68 +.85 22.78 -.21 12.00 +.92 15.05 0.60 16.20 .44 +.02 0.55 9.18 +.07 44.18 +1.21 2.41 -.01 18.68 -.06 0.57 16.80 +.11 0.48 13.99 +.07 18.73 -.13 1.20 29.35 -.21 22.61 -.30 0.14 32.13 +.06 11.90 -.50 9.60 +.05 22.48 -.23 0.29 1.88 +.03 1.66 24.97 -.19 1.38 64.26 -1.27 7.04 44.24 -.23 0.52 36.87 +.64 0.44 63.52 -.47 0.04 7.79 +.15 1.52 25.89 -.19 0.40 13.64 +.06 1.88 34.34 -.72 0.24 5.27 -.07 1.68 19.21 +.36 58.91 +.46 12.59 -.12 1.47 +.02 5.47 +.27 12.23 +.08 32.46 -.32 53.49 -2.09 37.72 +.10 178.45 -5.35 1.75 +.20 14.23 -.01 24.51 -.45 0.24 3.80 -.04 .56 +.05 8.17 +.27 26.24 +.11 15.17 -.32 7.02 +.02 7.54 -.25 9.63 +.31 4.16 +.12 1.00 17.67 9.29 -.06 0.28 14.36 +.04 5.93 +.06 0.20 17.53 +.02 71.12 -.34 0.60 61.74 -.13 6.15 -.16 17.15 +.18 0.15 14.40 +.06 0.15 16.17 -.01 0.20 22.29 +.15 2.00 51.43 -.66 0.92 17.30 -.01 1.86 49.89 +.06 1.24 89.28 +.05 15.74 -.17 22.69 -.09 2.01 +.06 0.90 35.07 +.11 0.72 81.88 +.13 0.56 9.95 -.01 6.28 +.07 11.54 -.45 1.70 26.09 -.25 0.84 87.63 +.16 0.80 41.77 +.11 1.44 62.36 +.12 6.41 +.03 1.03 31.81 +.21 13.35 24.98 -.10 1.12 54.50 +.04 3.09 -.03 1.88 64.71 +.71 0.40 4.31 0.40 11.24 -.05 7.30 -.32 14.45 -.34 1.99 55.83 +.71 9.03 -.26 2.47 +.12 6.01 +.01 32.52 -.21 1.70 42.11 +.35 23.49 +.76 18.65 +.34 1.45 43.19 +.48 1.40 18.10 -.13 0.91 12.60 -.22 0.86 12.58 -.18 1.39 13.30 -.13 0.99 12.67 -.34 0.47 8.91 -.14 0.94 13.25 -.21 0.68 8.16 +.06 0.70 8.55 +.01 0.92 12.52 -.16 0.89 12.79 -.12 0.95 13.28 -.18

NuvQualPf NuvQPf2 Nvidia NxStageMd O2Micro OCZ Tech OGE Engy OReillyA h OasisPet n OcciPet Oceaneer OceanFr rs Och-Ziff Oclaro rs OcwenFn OdysMar OfficeDpt OfficeMax OilSvHT OilStates Oilsands g OldDomF s OldNBcp OldRepub Olin OmegaHlt Omncre Omnicell Omnicom OmniVisn Omnova OnSmcnd Oncolyt g 1800Flowrs ONEOK OnyxPh OpenTxt OpenTable OpnwvSy OpkoHlth Opnext OptimerPh optXprs Oracle Orbcomm OrbitalSci Orexigen OrientEH OrienPap n OriginAg Oritani s Orthovta OshkoshCp OvShip OwensM s OwensCorn OwensIll Oxigene h PDL Bio PF Chng PG&E Cp PHH Corp PimShMat PMC Sra PMI Grp PNC PNM Res PPG PPL Corp PRGX Glbl PSS Wrld Paccar PacBiosci n PacCapB h PacEth h PacSunwr PackAmer PainTher PallCorp PalmrM PanASlv Panasonic PaneraBrd Pantry ParagShip ParamTch ParaG&S Parexel ParkDrl ParkerHan PrtnrCm PartnerRe PatriotCoal Patterson PattUTI Paychex PeabdyE Pegasys lf Pengrth g PnnNGm PennVa PennWst g PennantPk Penney PenRE Penske Pentair PeopUtdF PepBoy PepcoHold PepsiCo PeregrineP PerfectWld PerkElm Perrigo PetMed Petrohawk PetrbrsA Petrobras PtroqstE PetsMart Pfizer PhrmAth PhmHTr PharmPdt Pharmacyc PhilipMor PhilipsEl PhlVH PhnxCos PhotrIn PiedNG PiedmOfc n Pier 1 PilgrmsP n PimcoCA2 PimcCA3 PimcoCpI PimCpOp PimIncStr2 PimcoHiI PimcoMuni PimcoMu2 PimcMu3 PimcoStrat PinnclEnt PinWst PionDrill PionHiIn PioMunHi PioNtrl PitnyBw PlainsAA PlainsEx Plantron PlatGpMet PlatUnd PlugPwr h PlumCrk Polaris Polo RL Polycom PolyMet g PolyOne Polypore Popular PortGE PostPrp Potash Potlatch Power-One PwshDB PS Agri PS USDBull PS USDBear PwSWtr PSFinPf PSETecLd PSBldABd PSVrdoTF PShNatMu PwShPfd PwShs QQQ Powrwav Praxair PrecCastpt PrecDrill PremGlbSv PrmWBc h PriceTR priceline PrideIntl PrinctnR PrinFncl PrisaA n PrisaB n PrivateB ProShtDow ProShtS&P PrUShS&P ProUltDow PrUlShDow ProUltMC ProUltQQQ PrUShQQQ ProUltSP ProUShL20 ProUSL7-10T PrUSCh25 rs ProUSEM rs ProUSRE rs ProUSOG rs ProUSBM rs ProUltRE rs ProUShtFn ProUFin rs PrUPShQQQ ProUltO&G ProUBasM ProShtR2K ProUSR2K ProUltR2K ProSht20Tr ProUSSP500 ProUltSP500 ProUltCrude ProUSSlv rs ProUShCrude ProSUltSilv ProUltShYen ProUShEuro

D 0.60 0.66

7.10 -.09 7.57 -.11 14.59 +.02 23.59 +.37 5.84 -.21 4.38 -.07 1.50 45.27 +.28 61.81 +.54 25.89 -.66 1.52 94.10 +.22 73.82 +1.02 .96 -.01 0.88 14.02 -.15 12.12 -.14 9.28 2.36 -.01 4.68 -.09 16.97 -.73 2.40 137.18 -1.01 62.70 -.82 .44 -.01 30.46 +.15 0.28 11.38 +.16 0.69 13.41 +.11 0.80 20.34 +.10 1.48 20.85 +.01 0.13 24.37 +.27 13.95 +.02 0.80 46.61 +.15 29.23 -2.30 8.39 -.01 9.01 -.16 6.63 -.01 2.45 +.05 1.92 54.72 +.48 34.54 +1.04 46.96 +.73 68.17 -4.39 2.31 -.04 3.70 +.12 1.77 -.01 11.08 +.28 4.50 19.50 -.70 0.20 30.51 +.10 2.65 -.04 17.75 +.22 9.01 -.01 11.97 -.31 6.64 +.13 9.86 -.23 0.40 11.90 +.11 2.01 +.02 35.62 +.07 1.75 34.89 -.76 0.71 28.67 +.64 29.21 +.13 30.25 +.03 .20 -.00 1.00 6.14 +.11 0.63 50.86 +.07 1.82 47.67 +.44 22.16 +.07 1.07 100.64 +.06 8.10 -.09 3.43 -.08 0.40 60.41 +.41 0.50 12.56 -.04 2.20 81.33 +.87 1.40 25.50 -.05 5.90 +.03 21.79 +.07 0.48 57.22 +.85 14.05 +.06 .29 +.00 .78 -.02 5.77 +.02 0.60 26.79 +.19 2.00 6.57 -.01 0.64 49.61 +.10 12.85 +.09 0.10 39.82 -.18 0.11 14.18 +.01 104.30 +.82 18.04 -2.11 0.20 3.43 -.02 22.94 +.13 2.87 +.03 19.90 +.40 4.39 -.04 1.16 86.10 -.29 3.99 20.20 -.18 2.20 79.44 -.66 16.69 -.36 0.40 30.15 +.49 0.20 21.57 -.51 1.24 30.55 +.05 0.34 61.42 -.43 0.12 35.10 +.37 0.84 13.00 -.07 33.77 -.64 0.23 17.68 -.36 1.08 22.98 +.61 1.04 12.57 -.18 0.80 32.47 -.36 0.60 14.15 -.49 16.86 +.44 0.76 35.78 -.10 0.62 13.39 -.04 0.12 13.75 +.12 1.08 18.27 +.03 1.92 65.59 +.06 1.57 -.01 23.40 -.07 0.28 25.68 +.12 0.28 65.88 -.54 0.50 18.13 +.06 18.55 -.41 1.12 31.10 +.14 1.12 34.07 +.14 7.72 +.11 0.50 39.58 +.25 0.80 17.11 -.08 3.66 +.06 2.42 65.34 +.56 0.60 26.50 +.46 5.91 +.10 2.56 59.39 +.69 0.95 30.07 -.04 0.15 66.49 -1.64 2.40 -.02 6.27 -.03 1.12 29.63 +.42 1.26 19.72 +.03 10.41 -.24 7.24 +.19 0.75 8.39 +.14 0.72 8.80 +.20 1.28 14.70 +.04 1.38 15.90 +.04 0.78 9.60 +.10 1.46 11.99 -.33 0.98 12.29 +.25 0.78 9.78 +.08 0.84 10.18 +.43 0.90 10.01 +.03 13.61 -.25 2.10 41.29 +.27 7.55 -.01 1.65 14.53 -.30 1.08 13.00 0.08 84.64 +.44 1.46 23.87 +.08 3.80 62.42 +.02 30.23 -.34 0.20 37.55 +.12 2.18 +.05 0.32 45.24 +.01 .39 +.02 1.68 36.68 -.22 1.60 78.11 +1.31 0.40 111.82 +.08 39.03 +.12 2.05 -.07 12.95 +.02 41.38 -.47 3.01 -.02 1.04 22.11 +.11 0.80 33.95 -.59 0.40 136.96 -.90 2.04 32.12 +.11 10.50 -.49 26.43 -.07 30.54 -.17 22.91 +.04 26.92 +.01 0.11 19.27 +.04 1.31 17.71 -.13 0.11 18.25 +.03 1.36 24.98 -.14 0.08 24.99 1.11 22.13 -.38 1.01 14.20 -.08 0.33 54.40 +.10 2.42 +.03 1.80 92.57 -.80 0.12 139.72 -2.29 9.46 -.15 6.71 -.13 .38 -.00 1.08 62.78 -.67 400.24-11.76 32.19 -.35 1.07 -.05 0.55 32.42 +.60 8.44 +.05 9.90 -.05 0.04 14.27 +.05 44.82 -.16 44.51 -.04 24.47 -.05 0.40 53.54 +.46 21.13 -.18 0.04 61.73 -.14 80.86 +.17 11.72 -.05 0.43 46.71 +.09 39.11 +1.05 43.62 +.88 29.58 +.12 33.30 -.07 19.79 +.34 39.87 +.26 20.72 -.01 0.41 46.64 -.81 16.48 +.27 0.09 63.35 -.99 31.60 -.12 0.23 43.14 -.32 0.10 47.17 -.05 32.73 +.01 13.01 -.01 0.01 41.44 -.01 45.25 +.60 20.28 -.05 0.48 196.57 +.44 11.77 +.03 10.89 -.04 10.85 -.01 145.41 -.90 16.68 +.13 20.29 +.03

Nm

D

ProctGam ProgrssEn ProgsvCp ProLogis ProspctCap ProspBcsh Protalix ProtLife ProvET g ProvidFS Prudentl PSEG PubStrg PudaCoal PulteGrp PMMI PMIIT PPrIT

1.93 2.48 1.16 0.45 1.21 0.70 0.56 0.72 0.44 1.15 1.37 3.20 0.53 0.52 0.71

Nm 63.55 +.36 43.95 +.13 20.44 -.43 13.50 -.36 10.41 +.11 38.58 +1.10 9.14 -.01 26.61 8.14 +.13 14.60 -.05 56.33 -.41 31.46 +.28 99.22 -.11 12.12 +.02 6.82 -.21 6.58 -.07 5.66 +.06 6.08 +.09

Q-R-S-T QEP Res n 0.08 37.49 -.42 QIAGEN 19.92 +.39 QiaoXing 1.75 -.08 QlikTech n 23.79 +.37 Qlogic 17.45 -.19 Qualcom 0.76 49.18 +.06 QuantaSvc 20.06 +.24 QntmDSS 3.62 -.22 QuantFu h .50 -.01 QstDiag 0.40 52.00 +1.02 QuestSft 27.48 +.21 Questar s 0.56 17.36 -.08 Questcor 15.13 +.08 QksilvRes 14.60 -.03 Quiksilvr 5.33 +.06 QwestCm 0.32 7.57 +.14 RAIT Fin 2.09 -.05 RBS pfG 1.52 13.91 -.32 RF MicD 7.85 +.01 RLI Cp 1.16 52.74 -1.06 RPC s 0.19 19.67 -1.24 RPM 0.84 21.35 +.40 RSC Hldgs 9.97 +.18 RTI Biolog 2.73 +.03 RTI IntlM 27.15 -.30 Rackspace 31.49 -.04 RadianGrp 0.01 7.88 -.13 RadntSys 19.90 -.13 RadientPh .34 -.02 RadioShk 0.25 18.63 -.58 Radware 38.31 -.49 Ralcorp 62.72 -.04 Rambus 19.93 -.35 Randgold 0.17 89.97 -1.25 RangeRs 0.16 41.87 -.41 RareEle g 9.21 -.49 RJamesFn 0.52 31.68 -.02 Rayonier 2.16 52.31 -.08 Raytheon 1.50 45.63 +.16 RealD n 26.25 +.39 RealNwk 3.99 +.12 RltyInco 1.73 33.81 -.04 RedHat 47.68 -.77 Rdiff.cm 4.02 -.37 RedwdTr 1.00 14.70 +.05 RegalBel 0.68 65.99 -.44 RegalEnt 0.84 14.62 +.08 RgcyCtrs 1.85 40.55 -.61 RegncyEn 1.78 26.48 -.11 Regenrn 30.61 -.05 RegBkHT 0.59 82.39 -.82 RegionsFn 0.04 6.21 -.34 Regis Cp 0.16 18.66 -.06 ReinsGrp 0.48 53.04 -.54 RelStlAl 0.40 49.45 -.25 ReneSola 8.24 -.06 RentACt 0.24 30.01 +.05 Rentech 1.34 -.11 Repsol 1.20 28.38 -.05 RepubAir 7.36 -.05 RepubSvc 0.80 30.03 -.38 RschMotn 60.45 -.36 ResMed s 34.53 +1.15 ResoluteEn 13.97 -.15 ResrceCap 1.00 7.30 +.09 RetailHT 1.71 104.93 -.23 RexEnergy 12.96 +.22 ReynAm s 1.96 32.28 +.21 RightNow 23.98 -.42 RioTinto s 0.90 70.35 -.85 RitchieBr 0.42 20.76 +.12 RiteAid .92 +.00 Riverbed s 34.25 -1.67 RobbMyer 0.17 35.07 -.02 RobtHalf 0.52 30.57 +.41 RockTen 0.80 55.20 +.14 RockwlAut 1.40 71.87 +.61 RockColl 0.96 58.24 +.31 RockwdH 41.80 +.19 RogCm gs 1.28 34.21 -.41 Rollins s 0.24 19.22 -.15 Roper 0.44 77.37 +.04 RosettaR 36.40 -.04 RossStrs 0.64 63.14 -.16 Rovi Corp 56.16 -1.06 Rowan 33.55 -.03 RoyalBk g 2.00 52.02 -.34 RBScotlnd 13.03 -.21 RylCarb 41.55 -.45 RoyDShllB 3.36 65.82 +.50 RoyDShllA 3.36 65.96 +.54 RoyGld 0.44 54.56 +.48 Rubicon g 5.39 +.07 RubiconTc 22.70 -1.01 RubyTues 13.31 -.05 Ruddick 0.52 37.87 +.17 Rural/Met 14.00 +.50 Ryder 1.08 47.04 +.44 RdxSPEW 0.62 46.61 Ryland 0.12 16.10 -.16 S1 Corp 6.76 +.06 SAIC 15.39 SAP AG 0.67 49.76 +.36 SBA Com 39.80 SCANA 1.90 40.85 +.28 SEI Inv 0.20 23.86 -.04 SFN Grp 9.75 +.22 SK Tlcm 18.65 -.10 SLGreen 0.40 63.98 -.84 SLM Cp 12.25 -.10 SM Energy 0.10 54.06 -1.44 SpdrDJIA 2.57 115.01 +.52 SpdrGold 136.18 +.13 SpdrIntlSC 0.42 30.42 +.11 SP Mid 1.54 162.90 -.11 S&P500ETF 2.31 124.67 +.11 Spdr Div 1.68 51.90 +.20 SpdrHome 0.12 17.13 -.10 SpdrKbwBk 0.11 24.81 -.39 SpdrKbwIns 0.43 42.50 -.19 SpdrLehHY 4.13 40.01 +.20 SpdrNuBST 0.43 23.66 -.26 SpdrNuBMu 0.88 21.63 -.44 SpdrLehAgB 2.72 55.83 -.31 SpdrLe1-3bll 45.86 SpdrKbw RB 0.30 25.18 +.07 SpdrRetl 0.57 47.26 -.19 SpdrOGEx 0.20 50.51 -.42 SpdrMetM 0.35 66.16 -.04 SPX Cp 1.00 71.27 -.20 SRA Intl 21.06 +.42 STEC 16.49 -.82 STMicro 0.28 10.19 -.05 STR Hldgs 20.00 -.41 SVB FnGp 50.73 -.18 SWS Grp 0.04 4.26 -.03 SXC Hlth s 44.13 +.34 Safeway 0.48 20.93 -.26 StJoe 17.80 +.23 StJude 41.65 +.80 Saks 11.60 +.09 Salesforce 136.32 -7.56 SalixPhm 44.67 +1.34 SallyBty 14.02 +.02 SamsO&G 1.13 -.02 SanderFm 0.60 40.15 -2.33 SanDisk 49.38 -.49 SandRdge 6.60 +.12 SangBio 5.67 +.14 Sanmina 10.95 -.11 Sanofi 1.63 33.16 +.29 Santarus 2.99 Sapient 0.35 12.52 +.39 SaraLee 0.46 16.26 +.37 Satcon h 4.09 -.09 SavientPh 11.63 -.17 Savvis 25.36 -.90 Schlmbrg 0.84 81.33 -1.10 Schnitzer 0.07 63.12 +1.49 SchUSSmC 0.27 33.80 -.02 Schwab 0.24 16.74 -.03 SchMau 0.60 60.88 +1.59 SciGames 9.38 +.27 Scotts 1.00 51.46 +.81 ScrippsEW 9.97 +.02 SeabGld g 27.00 -.48 SeacoastBk 1.31 SeacorHld 15.00 101.01 +.24 SeadrillLtd 2.31 34.25 -.51 SeagateT 14.71 -.30 SealAir 0.52 24.63 +.24 Sealy 2.90 -.08 Seanergy 1.00 -.04 SearsHldgs 68.22 +.30 Seaspan 0.50 12.39 +.20 SeattGen 15.80 +.17 SelCmfrt 8.91 -.06 SelMedHld 6.73 +.22 SemiHTr 0.56 32.59 +.01 SemiLeds n 24.37 -.61 SempraEn 1.56 51.75 +.40 Semtech 24.20 -.23 SenHous 1.48 20.73 -.54 Senomyx 7.69 +1.08 Sensata n 29.20 +.27 Sequenom 6.66 +.09 ServiceCp 0.16 8.36 -.05 7DaysGrp 21.80 -2.46 ShandaGm 6.64 +.23 Shanda 38.35 -.15 ShawGrp 34.41 -.42 ShengdaTc 4.69 -.12 Sherwin 1.44 79.38 +1.20 Shire 0.34 70.57 -.18 Shutterfly 33.56 -.94 SiderNac s 0.58 16.96 Siemens 3.72 121.89 +.05 SigmaDsg 13.39 +.13 SigmaAld 0.64 66.58 +.14 SignatBk 47.32 -.46 SignetJwlrs 42.87 +.18 SilganH s 0.42 34.77 +.01 SilicGrIn 9.26 -.27 SilicnImg 7.24 -.36 SilcnLab 46.61 +.01 Slcnware 0.41 5.89 +.08 SilvStd g 27.64 -.21 SilvWhtn g 39.16 -.17 SilvrcpM g 0.08 12.59 -.26 SimonProp 2.40 97.67 -1.26 Sina 68.67 -2.49

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D 0.43

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0.32 0.92 1.20

Nm 8.36 +.17 5.89 +.35 4.58 -.07 1.39 +.01 40.32 +1.30 21.72 -.43 7.00 +.06 5.36 +.01 26.89 -.21 4.33 +.47 6.19 -.40 9.39 +.11 5.39 -.19 3.73 -.09 41.96 -.59 15.79 +.11 19.95 -.10 65.53 -.02 26.08 +.12 22.56 -.90 52.52 -.33 30.22 -1.55 69.69 -2.15 24.97 +.08 8.54 +.10 18.57 -.06 51.44 +.08 3.00 +.52 22.71 +.13 2.91 +.05 13.27 +.42 9.57 -.11 10.77 -.19 33.98 +.21 2.64 -.03 35.63 -.25 44.75 +.09 25.37 -.32 37.86 -.04 47.12 -.20 24.73 -.07 12.88 +.04 10.93 +.64 35.31 -.92 8.58 -1.16 24.83 -.14 32.24 -.01 5.65 -.02 20.70 +.09 16.74 +.13 4.38 +.01 13.05 +.08 12.29 +.12 46.06 +.42 37.42 -.03 31.66 +.32 29.28 +.14 37.37 -.01 66.15 -.31 15.61 -.14 34.58 +.16 25.18 +.04 31.35 +.09 3.84 -.04 64.17 +.55 21.99 -.23 1.82 +.04 32.11 +.12 59.40 -1.03 20.30 -.11 45.20 -.16 22.70 +.04 17.06 +.15 10.26 -.06 9.11 1.07 -.03 3.59 +.04 80.40 +.90 6.50 15.06 +.25 45.33 -.37 6.21 +.11 21.20 +.10 22.02 -.47 15.85 +.54 4.92 -.06 54.05 +.97 30.01 -.58 .16 -.01 6.72 +.10 30.20 +.25 36.29 -.05 .36 -.01 39.34 -.36 7.76 +.02 13.60 +.02 13.12 +.02 5.42 +.11 10.51 -.09 8.53 +.16 26.99 -.26 .98 +.12 34.27 -.06 8.60 -.20 8.55 +.03 8.78 +.21 10.19 -.06 8.87 -.02 40.06 +.09 17.26 +.13 30.02 +.15 26.84 -2.73 58.07 +.23 30.82 +.02 26.86 +.14 2.43 +.03 29.17 -.25 6.10 -.26 24.25 -.02 14.97 -.29 18.62 +.01 17.11 +.03 8.19 +.09 5.71 +.09 10.78 +.05 44.46 +.35 53.03 +.40 14.60 -.06 16.49 +.02 11.91 +.01 12.06 +.14 8.62 -.17 22.32 +.05 29.64 -1.34 20.30 +.02 49.40 -.22 6.92 +.03 26.54 +.02 31.73 -.35 59.08 +.29 5.19 +.06 4.59 -.08 29.68 +1.12 47.59 -.55 15.00 +.37 44.56 -.55 12.30 -1.69 57.47 +.20 32.19 -.51 27.00 -.05 12.00 11.31 -.13 4.48 +.17 14.52 -.10 7.99 +.07 13.19 +.11 54.57 +1.13 69.74 +.32 15.67 -.22 10.90 -.45 6.64 -.09 22.51 +.03 16.14 -.19 10.22 -.44 36.34 -.46 46.84 -.56 6.48 -.01 .61 -.03 41.22 +1.11 42.45 +.02 13.66 -.08 27.84 +.66 39.58 -.23 12.76 -.24 28.53 -2.02 16.74 -.38 20.56 +.04 25.33 -.02 11.46 -.07 52.85 -.57 20.84 -.18 32.80 +.20 17.47 -.16 23.89 +.23 27.55 +.72 55.11 -.45 13.59 -.40 36.68 -.28 32.13 +1.17 27.93 +.51 85.84 +.54 20.36 -.22 50.86 -.90 63.17 -.35 25.10 +.12 1.06 64.94 +.31 31.47 -.16 47.67 -.05 18.20 +.09 19.61 +.08 16.98 -.09 8.12 -.15 18.56 -.15 61.50 -.49 14.96 -.60 72.86 -.33 24.50 +.15 53.79 +.60 15.20 -.07 26.10 -.03 1.39 +.01 78.04 +.06 47.75 +.17 37.62 +.27 52.66 +.26 3.40 +.04 70.99 +.33 15.10 -1.83 72.80 +.33 55.34 +.05 40.20 -2.77 18.60 -.73 22.55 -.08 40.76 -.90 22.83 -.14 25.07 -.10 12.06 -.05 21.98 +.18 24.68 +.32 47.44 -.12

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Rare earths Continued from B1 The Energy Department report is being released the same morning that Cabinet officials from China and the United States will meet in Washington to discuss economic and commercial issues. While no detailed agenda has been released, the talks are expected to include American objections to China’s tightening restrictions on rare earth exports — like a two-month halt this autumn on shipments to Japan, and a shorter-lived slowdown of exports to the United States and Europe. And on Tuesday, China’s finance ministry announced on its website, and the official Xinhua news agency later reported as well, that China plans to increase its export taxes on some rare earths next year. The ministry did not say how much the taxes would increase. Although World Trade Organization rules ban export taxes, China has imposed them on rare earths for the last four years. David Sandalow, the assistant secretary of energy for policy and international affairs, who oversaw preparation of the Energy Department report, said in a tele-

Vacancy Continued from B1 West-side office vacancy rates declined slightly to 17.3 percent, with vacant space declining in 13 buildings and increasing in nine buildings, according to the survey. For office buildings within the Third Street/U.S. Highway 97 corridor, the survey showed the overall office vacancy rate at 31.2 percent, up slightly from the previous quarter. In the retail property class, the survey showed vacancy rates declined a half-point to 10.3 percent overall for the seven retail market areas. Individual, vacancy rates ranged from a low of 2.3 percent for the Old Mill District shops, 4.2 percent for the North Highway 97 area; 8.1 percent downtown; 8.1 percent for central Highway 97; 9.1 percent for the east side; 16.6 percent for the west side and 20.3 percent for South Highway 97. For Bend-area industrial

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, December 15, 2010 B5

phone interview that the timing of the report’s release and the American-China Cabinet meetings was coincidental. But the report reflects an emerging view within the American government that domestic sources of rare earths are needed, in addition to suppliers in many other countries, to ensure the viability of clean energy manufacturing in the United States. “We can build a new industry and put our clean energy future on a sound footing, creating many new jobs in the process,” Sandalow said. Still, the report presents a fairly gloomy assessment of the United States’ ability to wean itself from Chinese imports. For as long as the next 15 years, the supplies of at least five minerals that come almost exclusively from China will remain as vulnerable to disruption as they are absolutely vital to the manufacture of small yet powerful electric motors, energy-efficient compact fluorescent bulbs and other clean energy technologies, the report said. The five minerals are medium and heavy rare earth elements of which China mines an estimated 96 percent to 99.8 percent of the world’s supply: dysprosium, terbium, neodymium, europium and

yttrium. China also increasingly dominates the manufacture of clean energy technologies that require such minerals, including the production of million-dollar wind turbines. Chinese export restrictions have added up to $40 a pound to world prices, which makes a big difference particularly for some of the less expensive rare earths, like lanthanum, that sell for several dollars a pound in China. That is among the reasons, along with cheap labor and extensive Chinese government subsidies, that many clean energy manufacturers have found it cheaper to shift production to China. Sandalow said that wind turbine manufacturers were capable of building very large turbines without rare earths. But using rare earths could reduce the per megawatt cost of wind energy and improve its competitiveness through savings on other materials, like steel and copper. He cautioned that the United States had been putting far fewer resources than China into exploring ways to use the powerful magnetic and other properties of rare earths. “There are thousands of rare earth researchers in China and

dozens in the United States, and that underscores both the challenge and the opportunity,” he said. “Their expertise in this area is significant.”

property, the survey showed the vacancy rate increased overall from 16.6 percent in the second quarter to 20 percent in the third quarter, with individual industrial vacancies ranging from 0 percent for the west side, to 17.3 for the southeast, 23.4 percent for the northeast and 26.3 percent for the central area. “Compass surveyed 291 industrial buildings for the third quarter industrial survey. The buildings in the sample totaled nearly 3.975 million square feet. There is now 794,000 square feet of available space for lease. This is 139,000 square feet more than 90 days ago,” according to an excerpt from the survey.

that were selling at the peak of the market for $120 per square foot in 2005 and 2006. Now, we’ve had recent sales in the $40to $50-per-square-foot range,” Kemp said. However, Kemp said, most of the industrial vacancies were in eight buildings of 20,0000 square feet or more. Among smaller industrial buildings, the survey showed a much lower vacancy rate of 12.4 percent. “What we’re seeing in the small spaces is pretty positive. That is where the recovery generally starts, and larger spaces will fill up as the recovery heats up,” Kemp said. In the Redmond industrial market, the survey showed strong leasing activity, with a record 61,000-square-foot increase in leased space. After a 3.6 percentage point decline in the vacancy rate, the Redmond industrial vacancy rate now stands at 25.6 percent, with 375,000 square feet of space

available for lease in 76 buildings containing a total of 1.465 million square feet, according to the survey. Kemp said investors who are buying industrial buildings in Bend and Redmond for about half of the current $70- to $90per-square-foot construction cost are likely to double their money if they hold on to those buildings until 2012 or 2013, when Compass is projecting the Central Oregon economy is likely to rebound.

Buyer’s market As a result of the economic downturn and high vacancy rates among large industrial buildings, Kemp said he believes this may be “the best buyer’s market in 25 years. “We have industrial buildings

Looming challenges China’s finance ministry, in announcing plans to raise export taxes on some rare earths, did not indicate which minerals might be affected. Since 2006, China has imposed an export tax of 15 percent on light rare earths like lanthanum and cerium, which are needed for oil refining and glass manufacturing, and 25 percent on heavy rare earths like dysprosium and terbium. China mines about 92 percent of the world’s light rare earths. Dysprosium, which helps rare earth magnets preserve their magnetism at high temperatures, is mined almost exclusively in southern China and sells for $95 a pound in China and $135 a pound outside, including the export tax. Dysprosium has emerged as the mineral most vital to clean energy industries yet most vulnerable to supply disruptions, the report said. Dudley Kingsnorth, a prominent rare earth mining consultant

The big picture The market survey also looked at “big picture” factors such as a yearlong trend of increases in the value of publicly traded stocks, the healthiest corporate profits in more than three years, five consecutive months of increasing consumer spending, shrinking inventories of consumer goods, historically low interest rates and slight increases in wages and employment. “At the time of this writing, the

in Perth, Australia, said he agreed that a dysprosium shortage was likely. He added that he expected that a rare earth shortage would slow the overall adoption of new rare earth technologies by clean energy industries for at least the next five years. American and Japanese officials have said that they might file a legal challenge at the World Trade Organization to China’s taxes on rare earth exports, as well as on quotas that China imposes on rare earth exports. Until this autumn, Chinese officials had portrayed their rare earth policies as an effort to force high-tech companies to move their factories to China and retain supplies for domestic industries. The Chinese government has recently shifted to describing the export restrictions as an environmental measure, noting that extracting and processing the minerals can be a highly toxic process that has also resulted in leaks of radioactive mining waste into the groundwater in northern China. But while WTO rules allow export restrictions for environmental reasons, that is only if a country also restricts domestic consumption, which China has not done.

Demand for rare earths and China’s virtual chokehold on supplies have prompted some overseas companies to enter, or re-enter, the field. Molycorp, an American company that in August made an initial public offering of its shares on the New York Stock Exchange, plans to open in 2012 a large rare earth mine at Mountain Pass, Calif., that closed in 2002 after prices were undercut by Chinese competitors. Molycorp announced on Monday that it had received the last of the construction permits needed to proceed. The Lynas Corp. of Australia plans to open at the end of next year a large rare earths mine at Mount Weld, Australia. But both the Molycorp and Lynas mines will produce mostly light rare earths and relatively little of the medium and heavy rare earths needed for magnets and other significant clean energy applications. Dozens of small mining companies hope to open new mines in the United States and elsewhere that could tap reserves of medium and heavy rare earths. But these small companies face formidable legal, financial, marketing and management obstacles, the Energy Department report said.

(stock) market is up over 8 percent and hit new highs for 2010, which bodes well for the recovery moving ahead,” according to the survey. “Another positive factor is the increase in business-to-business activity,” according to the survey, which said “the increase in durable and nondurable goods orders are outpacing the increase in inventories, which will spur future demand for production. “Future demand for production creates more jobs, which in turn creates more spendable dollars,” according to an excerpt from the Compass survey. Kemp said those factors led Compass to project the residential real estate market bottomed out in 2009 and 2010 and will begin to turn the corner in 2011.

Over the past year, he said investors have bought about 1,200 subdivision lots, with utilities, sidewalks and street work included, at prices ranging from $20,000 to $25,000 in the Bend area. Those lots were selling for $100,000 and up at the peak of the building boom, and Kemp said the current selling prices are less than the $30,000 it costs to develop the lots with utilities, streets and sidewalks. “Basically, at these prices, the land is free,” Kemp said. The Compass survey is projecting the commercial real estate market will lag behind the residential recovery somewhat.

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Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or emerriman@ bendbulletin.com.

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Div

PE

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeB rs CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.00 .04 .36f 1.68 ... .40 .80a .82 ... ... .32 .22 .72f .04 .42f ... ... .65f ... .64f

10 14 18 26 14 ... ... 28 24 56 18 11 ... 12 ... 12 13 ... 16 ... 7

YTD Last Chg %Chg 56.34 22.30 12.40 16.48 64.49 6.35 46.06 61.06 71.21 7.78 27.39 41.54 12.92 21.47 8.16 21.00 5.25 9.30 20.23 11.97 27.62

-.15 +.10 -.14 -.16 +.70 -.14 -.11 +.16 +.47 +.51 -.43 -.11 +.21 -.03 -.14 -.11 -.19 -.16 -.02 -.01 +.38

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

+63.0 +3.3 -17.7 +34.1 +19.1 -6.6 +67.6 +56.4 +20.3 +224.2 -16.3 -19.4 -2.9 +5.2 +47.0 +2.3 +94.4 +33.2 -14.3 +35.5 -9.4

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1398.00 $1403.60 $29.759

Pvs Day $1397.00 $1397.30 $29.599

Market recap

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

1.24f .80 1.74f ... .48a ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.44 .86f .52 ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .60f

23 17 17 23 62 ... 34 21 ... 27 19 10 26 12 ... 17 15 12 ... ...

89.28 +.05 +35.1 41.77 +.11 +11.1 47.00 +.47 +4.4 16.97 -.73 +33.7 57.22 +.85 +57.8 2.15 +.02 -23.5 36.68 -.22 -2.9 139.72 -2.29 +26.6 20.93 -.26 -1.7 63.12 +1.49 +32.3 79.38 +1.20 +28.8 46.06 +.42 +15.1 32.11 +.12 +39.2 12.06 -.05 +101.0 11.61 -.04 -13.4 25.94 -.24 +15.2 15.54 -.05 -19.6 29.82 -.40 +10.5 2.86 +.03 +36.2 17.92 +.02 +13.1

Prime rate Time period

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Citigrp BkofAm S&P500ETF GenElec SPDR Fncl

5734426 1531861 1340110 758717 670548

Last Chg 4.69 12.40 124.67 17.69 15.61

-.12 -.14 +.11 +.07 -.14

Gainers ($2 or more) Name EMS FtBcp pfE FtBcp pfC FtBcp pfA FtBcp pfD

Last 63.00 14.51 14.75 14.43 14.45

Chg %Chg +9.14 +1.51 +1.50 +1.38 +1.20

+17.0 +11.6 +11.3 +10.6 +9.1

Losers ($2 or more) Name BestBuy Intl Coal Spartch 7DaysGrp hhgregg

Last 35.52 7.09 8.58 21.80 22.19

Indexes

Most Active ($1 or more) Name Taseko NovaGld g YM Bio g KodiakO g VantageDrl

Last Chg

73066 5.19 +.06 66824 14.45 -.34 58245 1.65 -.14 52582 6.24 -.24 48647 2.15 +.06

Gainers ($2 or more) Name Solitario CheniereEn Ever-Glory Hyperdyn UtdCap

Last

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

HuntBnk Microsoft Cisco PwShs QQQ Intel

1294716 626500 559363 537646 403698

6.30 27.62 19.54 54.40 21.47

-.36 +.38 -.04 +.10 -.03

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

2.53 +.26 +11.5 5.45 +.34 +6.7 2.00 +.12 +6.4 3.40 +.15 +4.6 29.85 +1.25 +4.4

Name

Last

Matrixx BSD Med Macatawa SoltaMed CyprsBio h

7.98 +2.86 +55.9 5.28 +1.54 +41.2 3.75 +.69 +22.5 3.00 +.52 +21.0 5.75 +.96 +20.0

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

-14.8 -13.1 -11.9 -10.1 -9.9

Lannett FieldPnt MinesMgt HQ SustM VistaGold

4.93 3.86 3.26 4.62 2.53

-.94 -16.0 -.40 -9.4 -.28 -7.9 -.38 -7.6 -.20 -7.3

ZionO&G wt CSP Inc ADDvntgT VeecoInst Ctrip.com s

1,342 1,703 110 3,155 176 113

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

178 298 40 516 11 55

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Vol (00)

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg -6.18 -1.07 -1.16 -2.46 -2.43

Nasdaq

Last

Diary

5.43 3.83 3.07 42.19 38.64

Chg %Chg -2.47 -1.03 -.60 -7.78 -5.89

-31.3 -21.2 -16.4 -15.6 -13.2

Diary 1,342 1,294 150 2,786 157 25

11,480.03 9,614.32 Dow Jones Industrials 5,114.69 3,742.01 Dow Jones Transportation 413.75 346.95 Dow Jones Utilities 7,887.10 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 2,177.58 1,689.19 Amex Index 2,645.79 2,061.14 Nasdaq Composite 1,246.73 1,010.91 S&P 500 13,234.43 10,596.20 Wilshire 5000 779.86 580.49 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

11,476.54 5,037.07 400.40 7,855.22 2,130.03 2,627.72 1,241.59 13,169.84 771.66

+47.98 -17.68 +.86 +5.20 +6.62 +2.81 +1.13 +3.93 -.44

YTD %Chg %Chg +.42 -.35 +.22 +.07 +.31 +.11 +.09 +.03 -.06

52-wk %Chg

+10.05 +22.87 +.60 +9.33 +16.72 +15.80 +11.34 +14.04 +23.39

+9.80 +20.97 -1.26 +9.99 +19.88 +19.38 +12.06 +15.47 +27.27

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Tuesday.

Key currency exchange rates Tuesday compared with late Monday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

351.82 2,635.69 3,902.87 5,891.21 7,027.40 23,431.19 37,901.04 20,708.58 3,288.96 10,316.77 2,009.05 3,176.91 4,850.90 5,889.05

+.15 s -.04 t +.27 s +.52 s -.03 t +.49 s +.02 s +.36 s -.07 t +.22 s +.62 s -.17 t +.20 s +.76 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

.9998 1.5776 .9948 .002114 .1502 1.3387 .1287 .011955 .080710 .0325 .000873 .1470 1.0426 .0334

.9973 1.5871 .9926 .002107 .1500 1.3404 .1286 .012000 .080736 .0326 .000875 .1463 1.0333 .0333

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 18.46 +0.02 +12.4 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.19 +0.01 +11.9 GrowthI x 25.64 -0.05 +16.7 Ultra x 22.52 -0.02 +15.9 American Funds A: AmcpA p 18.63 +12.8 AMutlA p 25.26 +0.09 +11.2 BalA p 17.78 -0.01 +11.5 BondA p 12.10 -0.07 +6.4 CapIBA p 50.20 +0.14 +7.8 CapWGA p 35.82 +0.15 +7.4 CapWA p 20.48 -0.06 +4.8 EupacA p 41.76 +0.08 +8.9 FdInvA p 36.45 +0.06 +12.6 GovtA p 14.30 -0.10 +4.7 GwthA p 30.34 +0.03 +11.0 HI TrA p 11.24 -0.01 +13.9 IncoA p 16.67 +0.02 +11.1 IntBdA p 13.38 -0.06 +4.3 ICAA p 28.04 +0.08 +9.7 NEcoA p 25.37 +0.07 +12.8 N PerA p 28.70 +0.04 +11.9 NwWrldA 54.99 +0.13 +16.5 SmCpA p 38.97 +0.07 +23.6 TxExA p 11.75 -0.10 +1.3 WshA p 27.19 +0.11 +12.3 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 30.67 +8.6 IntlEqA 29.87 +8.3 IntEqII I r 12.71 +0.01 +7.9 Artisan Funds: Intl 21.94 -0.04 +6.2 MidCap 33.43 -0.19 +30.8 MidCapVal 20.37 -0.01 +13.3 Baron Funds: Growth 50.14 +0.05 +21.4 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.60 -0.09 +7.7 DivMu 14.25 -0.05 +2.4 TxMgdIntl 15.63 +0.05 +4.1 BlackRock A:

EqtyDiv 17.32 +0.04 +11.6 GlAlA r 19.34 +0.01 +8.4 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.02 +0.01 +7.6 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 17.34 +0.04 +11.9 GlbAlloc r 19.44 +0.01 +8.7 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 52.55 -0.25 +18.2 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 29.62 -0.04 +23.6 DivEqInc 9.96 +0.01 +14.2 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 30.57 -0.04 +24.0 AcornIntZ 40.55 +0.10 +20.6 ValRestr 48.86 +0.08 +15.8 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 11.12 +0.03 +12.5 USCorEq2 10.79 +19.8 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 33.98 +0.10 +10.9 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 34.32 +0.10 +11.2 NYVen C 32.87 +0.09 +10.1 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.50 -0.05 +6.7 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 21.66 +0.12 +20.8 EmMktV 35.24 +0.18 +19.0 IntSmVa 16.72 +0.05 +14.8 LargeCo 9.77 +0.01 +13.5 USLgVa 19.64 +0.01 +17.3 US Small 21.05 -0.01 +28.8 US SmVa 25.04 -0.01 +28.2 IntlSmCo 16.76 +0.06 +20.9 Fixd 10.31 -0.01 +1.1 IntVa 18.27 +0.05 +9.9 Glb5FxInc 10.85 -0.04 +5.0 2YGlFxd 10.14 +1.6 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 69.91 +0.12 +11.2 Income 13.28 -0.05 +6.2 IntlStk 35.99 +0.08 +13.0 Stock 106.98 +0.36 +12.4 Eaton Vance A:

LgCpVal 17.98 NatlMunInc 8.76 Eaton Vance I: GblMacAbR 10.27 LgCapVal 18.04 FMI Funds: LgCap p 15.41 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.83 FPACres 26.61 Fairholme 36.04 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 5.43 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 19.88 StrInA 12.68 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 20.06 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.71 FF2015 11.44 FF2020 13.89 FF2020K 13.27 FF2025 11.59 FF2030 13.85 FF2035 11.52 FF2040 8.05 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.47 AMgr50 15.32 Balanc 18.08 BalancedK 18.08 BlueChGr 44.92 Canada 56.92 CapAp 25.16 CpInc r 9.45 Contra 67.77 ContraK 67.82 DisEq 22.38 DivIntl 30.05 DivrsIntK r 30.02 DivGth 27.93 EmrMk 25.98 Eq Inc 43.45 EQII 17.91

+8.3 -0.18 -3.2 +4.5 +0.01 +8.6 +0.08 +9.8 +3.0 +0.11 +11.3 +0.03 +19.8 +0.01 +16.5 -0.03 +15.6 -0.03 +8.7 -0.04 +15.9 -0.03 +10.3 -0.02 +10.5 -0.03 +11.4 -0.03 +11.6 -0.02 +12.3 -0.02 +12.5 -0.01 +13.0 -0.01 +13.2 -0.01 +14.8 -0.02 +12.1 -0.04 +12.3 -0.04 +12.4 -0.16 +18.4 -0.03 +19.2 -0.08 +17.5 +15.8 -0.09 +16.5 -0.10 +16.6 -0.06 +7.5 +0.04 +8.9 +0.04 +9.1 -0.03 +19.1 +0.15 +16.6 +0.03 +13.0 +0.02 +11.4

Fidel 31.88 FltRateHi r 9.80 GNMA 11.40 GovtInc 10.47 GroCo 82.48 GroInc 18.04 GrowthCoK 82.44 HighInc r 8.97 Indepn 24.15 IntBd 10.49 IntmMu 10.04 IntlDisc 32.95 InvGrBd 11.33 InvGB 7.33 LgCapVal 11.64 LatAm 57.33 LevCoStk 27.65 LowP r 37.79 LowPriK r 37.77 Magelln 70.59 MidCap 28.18 MuniInc 12.18 NwMkt r 15.87 OTC 54.36 100Index 8.62 Ovrsea 32.25 Puritn 17.81 SCmdtyStrt 12.09 SrsIntGrw 11.24 SrsIntVal 9.97 StIntMu 10.62 STBF 8.45 SmllCpS r 19.29 StratInc 11.31 StrReRt r 9.42 TotalBd 10.75 USBI 11.27 Value 67.42 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 53.22 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 37.94 500IdxInv 44.14 IntlInxInv 35.88

-0.02 +13.1 +7.2 -0.07 +6.2 -0.05 +4.4 -0.48 +19.6 -0.02 +12.9 -0.48 +19.8 +12.9 -0.07 +21.2 -0.05 +6.8 -0.05 +2.1 +0.06 +10.5 -0.05 +6.4 -0.03 +7.4 -0.01 +9.6 +0.06 +13.1 -0.07 +21.1 +0.05 +18.8 +0.05 +19.0 -0.14 +10.7 -0.04 +20.6 -0.11 +1.6 -0.03 +11.1 -0.18 +18.9 +0.01 +10.8 -0.01 +5.8 -0.03 +12.9 -0.05 +10.9 +0.02 +15.8 +0.02 +4.0 -0.02 +2.0 -0.01 +3.5 -0.05 +21.0 -0.03 +9.0 -0.04 +11.2 -0.05 +7.5 -0.06 +5.4 -0.11 +20.0 +0.27 +35.5 -0.03 +26.1 +0.04 +13.5 +0.11 +7.4

TotMktInv 36.39 +0.03 +15.7 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 44.14 +0.04 +13.5 TotMktAd r 36.40 +0.03 +15.7 First Eagle: GlblA 46.70 +0.22 +16.8 OverseasA 22.89 +0.09 +17.6 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.22 -0.15 -0.5 FoundAl p 10.59 +0.03 +9.7 HYTFA p 9.56 -0.12 +1.7 IncomA p 2.16 +0.01 +11.9 USGovA p 6.69 -0.04 +5.0 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p +12.0 IncmeAd 2.14 +11.6 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.17 +10.7 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 20.79 +0.05 +10.1 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 7.07 +0.02 +7.9 GlBd A p 13.66 +0.04 +11.7 GrwthA p 17.73 +0.09 +7.2 WorldA p 14.97 +0.06 +7.2 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.69 +0.04 +11.4 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 40.37 +0.09 +9.5 GMO Trust III: Quality 20.07 +0.10 +5.3 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 14.58 +0.11 +19.0 Quality 20.07 +0.10 +5.4 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.26 +12.7 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.75 -0.08 +6.7 CapApInst 36.87 -0.10 +11.8 IntlInv t 59.97 +0.12 +10.3 Intl r 60.71 +0.12 +10.6 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 34.21 +0.05 +11.5 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 34.22 +0.06 +11.8

Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 41.99 +0.02 +14.8 Div&Gr 19.57 +0.04 +11.7 Advisers 19.31 -0.02 +10.7 TotRetBd 11.19 -0.07 +6.2 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.56 +0.03 -1.7 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 15.96 +0.05 +6.7 CmstkA 15.55 +0.04 +14.3 EqIncA 8.47 +10.8 GrIncA p 18.93 +0.03 +11.0 HYMuA 8.91 -0.11 +3.2 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 23.64 -0.07 +8.5 AssetStA p 24.31 -0.08 +9.3 AssetStrI r 24.51 -0.08 +9.6 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.43 -0.05 +6.3 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.42 -0.06 +6.5 HighYld e 8.13 -0.02 +13.6 IntmTFBd e 10.75 -0.06 +1.6 ShtDurBd e 10.96 -0.03 +2.8 USLCCrPls 20.41 +0.02 +12.3 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 50.28 +0.05 +18.3 PrkMCVal T 22.37 +0.01 +13.0 Twenty T 65.33 +0.15 +6.1 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.03 -0.01 +12.2 LSGrwth 13.03 +13.8 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.62 +0.05 +20.5 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 21.95 +0.05 +20.1 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 14.88 -0.23 -1.6 Longleaf Partners: Partners 27.84 +0.10 +15.6 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.08 -0.05 +12.1 StrInc C 14.76 -0.05 +11.2 LSBondR 14.03 -0.05 +11.8 StrIncA 14.68 -0.05 +11.9

Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.27 -0.08 +9.9 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.34 -0.02 +11.7 BdDebA p 7.76 -0.01 +11.9 ShDurIncA p 4.62 -0.01 +6.0 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.65 -0.01 +5.2 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.95 -0.02 +8.6 ValueA 22.52 +0.07 +10.0 MFS Funds I: ValueI 22.62 +0.08 +10.3 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.73 +0.01 +8.2 Matthews Asian: AsianGIInv 17.77 +0.01 +17.4 PacTgrInv 23.13 +20.7 MergerFd 16.10 +3.6 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.30 -0.06 +10.4 TotRtBdI 10.29 -0.07 +10.5 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 36.97 -0.24 +31.2 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 29.58 +0.07 +10.7 GlbDiscZ 30.00 +0.07 +11.0 QuestZ 18.76 +0.03 +8.9 SharesZ 21.00 +0.05 +10.5 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 45.38 +0.12 +20.2 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 47.04 +0.12 +19.8 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.27 +12.7 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 27.57 +0.10 +7.9 Intl I r 19.53 +0.08 +16.0 Oakmark r 41.38 +0.01 +11.7 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp x 7.63 -0.49 +15.0 GlbSMdCap 15.26 +0.04 +22.4 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 43.39 +0.06 +8.7 DvMktA p 35.32 +0.07 +22.8

GlobA p 60.19 +0.15 +15.3 GblStrIncA 4.24 -0.02 +14.2 Gold p 54.97 +0.13 +53.0 IntBdA p 6.53 -0.01 +6.1 MnStFdA 31.98 +0.01 +14.3 RisingDivA 15.47 +0.04 +12.3 S&MdCpVl 31.31 -0.02 +17.8 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.02 +0.03 +11.4 S&MdCpVl 26.87 -0.02 +16.9 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 13.98 +0.04 +11.5 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 6.61 -0.08 +0.5 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 35.02 +0.06 +23.2 IntlBdY 6.53 -0.01 +6.4 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.73 -0.06 +7.2 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.82 -0.06 +8.7 AllAsset 12.42 -0.05 +11.8 ComodRR 8.97 -0.08 +17.3 HiYld 9.25 -0.01 +13.2 InvGrCp 10.37 -0.05 +10.3 LowDu 10.31 -0.04 +4.0 RealRtnI 11.19 -0.10 +5.9 ShortT 9.85 -0.01 +1.8 TotRt 10.73 -0.06 +7.5 TR II 10.25 -0.07 +6.5 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.31 -0.04 +3.6 RealRtA p 11.19 -0.10 +5.5 TotRtA 10.73 -0.06 +7.0 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.73 -0.06 +6.3 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.73 -0.06 +7.2 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.73 -0.06 +7.4 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 44.94 -0.07 +17.0 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 40.50 +0.12 +14.2 Price Funds:

BlChip x 38.02 CapApp x 20.07 EmMktS 35.39 EqInc 23.29 EqIndex 33.42 Growth x 32.08 HlthSci 29.90 HiYield 6.76 IntlBond 9.95 IntlStk 14.27 MidCap e 58.07 MCapVal x 23.18 N Asia 19.33 New Era 51.19 N Horiz 33.83 N Inc 9.41 R2010 15.55 R2015 12.00 R2020 16.55 R2025 12.10 R2030 17.33 R2040 17.43 ShtBd 4.84 SmCpStk x 33.76 SmCapVal x 35.47 SpecIn 12.29 Value x 22.80 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.29 VoyA p 23.45 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.53 PremierI r 20.10 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 36.68 S&P Sel 19.31 Scout Funds: Intl 32.32 Selected Funds: AmShD 41.00 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 20.42 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 51.78 Thornburg Fds:

-0.10 +16.1 -0.37 +12.7 +0.19 +17.6 +0.06 +13.2 +0.03 +13.2 -0.12 +16.7 +0.41 +14.3 +13.3 -0.03 +3.2 +0.01 +13.3 -2.21 +27.1 -0.36 +13.9 +0.11 +19.8 -0.12 +17.3 -0.02 +32.3 -0.04 +6.1 -0.01 +11.5 -0.01 +12.5 -0.01 +13.4 +14.0 -0.01 +14.6 +15.0 -0.01 +2.8 -1.30 +30.0 -0.81 +23.0 -0.03 +8.5 -0.38 +13.3 +0.01 +12.0 -0.05 +19.3 +0.03 +22.6 +0.05 +24.9 +0.03 +14.4 +0.02 +13.4 +0.02 +11.9 +0.13 +11.8 +0.06 +6.1 +0.09 +11.8

IntValA p 27.99 IntValue I 28.62 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 23.91 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 10.67 CpOpAdl 76.42 EMAdmr r 39.68 Energy 123.31 ExtdAdm 40.87 500Adml 114.80 GNMA Ad 10.87 GrwAdm 31.37 HlthCr 53.18 HiYldCp 5.68 InfProAd 25.49 ITBdAdml 11.16 ITsryAdml 11.47 IntGrAdm 62.13 ITAdml 13.22 ITGrAdm 10.02 LtdTrAd 11.00 LTGrAdml 9.10 LT Adml 10.61 MCpAdml 91.70 MuHYAdm 10.02 PrmCap r 68.30 ReitAdm r 75.79 STsyAdml 10.81 STBdAdml 10.57 ShtTrAd 15.87 STFdAd 10.84 STIGrAd 10.76 SmCAdm 34.59 TtlBAdml 10.57 TStkAdm 31.28 WellslAdm 52.54 WelltnAdm 53.44 Windsor 44.79 WdsrIIAd 45.36 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 24.27 CapOpp 33.07 DivdGro 14.40

+0.03 +13.5 +0.02 +13.9 +0.07 +12.8 -0.08 +2.1 +10.1 +0.19 +16.5 +0.06 +10.0 -0.04 +25.1 +0.11 +13.5 -0.07 +5.9 +0.03 +15.9 +0.43 +5.9 -0.01 +11.7 -0.19 +4.7 -0.10 +8.2 -0.07 +6.7 +0.05 +15.0 -0.10 +1.6 -0.06 +9.5 -0.02 +1.9 -0.10 +7.7 -0.11 +0.7 -0.03 +23.6 -0.10 +1.6 +0.31 +10.8 -0.90 +22.8 -0.02 +2.5 -0.02 +3.7 -0.01 +1.0 -0.03 +3.0 -0.01 +5.0 -0.03 +25.8 -0.05 +5.6 +0.03 +15.6 -0.12 +9.5 -0.02 +9.7 +12.2 +0.11 +9.2 -0.07 +13.7 +10.1 +0.06 +10.5

Energy 65.64 EqInc 20.33 Explr 72.10 GNMA 10.87 GlobEq 17.98 HYCorp 5.68 HlthCre 125.97 InflaPro 12.97 IntlGr 19.51 IntlVal 32.58 ITIGrade 10.02 LifeCon 16.35 LifeGro 22.05 LifeMod 19.62 LTIGrade 9.10 Morg 17.96 MuInt 13.22 PrecMtls r 27.69 PrmcpCor 13.74 Prmcp r 65.79 SelValu r 18.72 STAR 19.15 STIGrade 10.76 StratEq 18.40 TgtRetInc 11.27 TgRe2010 22.58 TgtRe2015 12.57 TgRe2020 22.30 TgtRe2025 12.72 TgRe2030 21.80 TgtRe2035 13.19 TgtRe2040 21.63 TgtRe2045 13.66 USGro 18.26 Wellsly 21.68 Welltn 30.94 Wndsr 13.27 WndsII 25.56 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 114.76 EMkt 30.13 Extend 40.82 Growth 31.36 MidCap 20.19

+0.03 +10.0 +0.08 +13.8 -0.03 +25.8 -0.07 +5.8 +0.03 +14.7 -0.01 +11.6 +1.01 +5.9 -0.10 +4.5 +0.02 +14.8 +0.10 +6.4 -0.06 +9.3 -0.03 +10.0 +13.4 -0.03 +11.8 -0.10 +7.6 -0.03 +17.6 -0.10 +1.6 +0.18 +35.5 +0.06 +13.5 +0.30 +10.7 +17.4 -0.02 +10.3 -0.01 +4.9 -0.01 +20.4 -0.04 +8.1 -0.05 +10.0 -0.01 +11.1 -0.01 +11.7 +12.4 +12.9 +0.01 +13.5 +0.01 +13.5 +0.01 +13.6 +10.9 -0.05 +9.4 -0.01 +9.6 +12.1 +0.07 +9.1 +0.10 +13.4 +0.14 +16.3 -0.04 +24.9 +0.03 +15.7 -0.01 +23.4

SmCap

34.54 -0.03 +25.7

SmlCpGth

21.66 -0.03 +28.7

SmlCpVl

16.01 -0.01 +22.6

STBnd

10.57 -0.02 +3.6

TotBnd

10.57 -0.05 +5.5

TotlIntl

15.82 +0.06 +9.8

TotStk

31.26 +0.02 +15.4

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst

10.21 +0.03

ExtIn

40.90 -0.03 +25.2

NS

FTAllWldI r

94.77 +0.33 +10.6

GrwthIst

31.38 +0.03 +16.0

InfProInst

10.38 -0.08 +4.7

InstIdx

114.04 +0.10 +13.5

InsPl

114.05 +0.10 +13.5

InsTStPlus

28.27 +0.02 +15.6

MidCpIst

20.27 -0.01 +23.6

SCInst

34.61 -0.03 +25.9

TBIst

10.57 -0.05 +5.6

TSInst

31.28 +0.02 +15.5

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

94.83 +0.09 +13.5

STBdIdx

10.57 -0.02 +3.7

TotBdSgl

10.57 -0.05 +5.6

TotStkSgl

30.19 +0.02 +15.5

Western Asset: CorePlus I

10.70 -0.07 +10.6


B USI N ESS

B6 Wednesday, December 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M  BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY

TUESDAY

MONDAY

INTERACTIVE WORKSHOP TO ASSIST SMALL BUSINESSES : The city of Redmond, partnering with the Oregon MicroEnterprise Network, will provide free market research services to Redmond small businesses through a program called MarketLink. Learn how qualifying business owners can apply to receive free and confidential customized research through the MarketLink program; free; 8-9 a.m.; Redmond Fire & Rescue, 341 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-923-7761.

PORTFOLIO REVIEW AND CURRENT MARKET UPDATE: Hosted by Matthew Leeden, financial adviser; free; 2-6 p.m.; Paulson Investment Co. Inc., 1444 N.W. College Way, Suite 7, Bend; 541-385-0444.

Jan. 3

THURSDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $20 “Discount Day”; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhour training.com. BEND TOASTMASTERS MEETING: Come and learn how Toastmasters may benefit you; free; 6:30 p.m.; IHOP, 30 N.E. Bend River Mall Drive; 541-480-1871.

FRIDAY FREE TAX RETURN REVIEWS: If you think you paid too much or missed a deduction, Zoom Tax can help. Call or stop by for an appointment; free; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave. , Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541617-8861.

SATURDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

MONDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

WEDNESDAY

OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

Dec. 22 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Abby’s Pizza, 1938 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

THURSDAY Dec. 23 BEND TOASTMASTERS MEETING: Come and learn how Toastmasters may benefit you; free; 6:30 p.m.; IHOP, 30 N.E. Bend River Mall Drive; 541-480-1871.

TUESDAY Dec. 28 PORTFOLIO REVIEW AND CURRENT MARKET UPDATE: Hosted by Matthew Leeden, financial adviser; free; 2-6 p.m.; Paulson Investment Co. Inc., 1444 N.W. College Way, Suite 7, Bend; 541-385-0444. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 4-8:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541447-6384 or www.happyhour training.com.

THURSDAY Jan. 6 HOLDING EMPLOYEES AND OTHERS ACCOUNTABLE: Learn to ensure that team members do their jobs well and take responsibility for contributing to a common goal; $85; 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. LEADERSHIP SKILLS SERIES: Central Oregon Community College’s Small Business Development Center will offer a nine-month series designed to give managers and team leaders the skills they need to succeed in their organizations; entire series costs $645, individual seminars are $85; 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7700 or http://www.cocc.edu/.

FRIDAY Jan. 7 FREE TAX RETURN REVIEWS: If you think you paid too much or missed a deduction, Zoom Tax can help. Call or stop by for an appointment; free; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave. , Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: 8:309:30 a.m.; Housing Works, 405 S.W. Sixth St.; 541-323-7405.

SATURDAY THURSDAY Dec. 30 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-3306384 or www.happyhourtraining .com. BEND TOASTMASTERS MEETING: Come and learn how Toastmasters may benefit you; free; 6:30 p.m.; IHOP, 30 N.E. Bend River Mall Drive; 541-480-1871.

Jan. 8 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

CHICAGO — Trying to track recalled products and foods that might be harmful to children is a nightmare for parents because there’s no single place to look. Until now. The new site www.Click CheckandProtect.org, a Consumer Reports companion site, is the product of a newly formed National School Safety Coalition convened by Consumer Reports, the National Parent Teacher Association and the National School Boards Association. “The whole idea is to get the information into the homes of school-aged children,” said Don Mays, senior director of safety for Consumer Reports. The hope is not only to encourage parents to check the site but also to have its new information distributed by weekly school newsletters sent to children’s homes — anything to make it easier for parents to learn about recalls, he said. The coalition will distribute safety alerts and recall notices on such children’s products as toys, food, medicines and furniture.

Dec. 31

OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

Other resources • ClickCheckandProtect.org, a Web clearinghouse for recalls and safety alerts. • CPSC.gov provides e-mail alerts about product recalls. • Text alerts. Text the word “SAFE” to 76666 to have recall and safety alerts delivered to your phone. • SafeProducts.gov, which goes live in March, will allow consumers to file and review reports of dangerous products.

Recalls by manufacturers are difficult to track, not only because there are so many but also because different regulators handle different recalls. For example, the Consumer Product Safety Commission announces recalls for products, the Food and Drug Administration

The Associated Press

BANKRUPTCIES Chapter 7 Filed Dec. 8

Jeffrey A. and Nancy J. Maddox, 61535 S. U.S. Highway 97 Suite 9-316, Bend Jeffery L. and Terri A. Brinkley, 903 N.E. Snowberry St., Prineville Gerald S. Shane, 2260 N.E. Third St., Prineville Phillip R. Workman, 2015 N.W. Cedar Ave., Redmond James D. Poling, 609 N.E. Stoneridge Lane, Prineville Amy I. New, 2105 N.W. 12th St., Redmond Daniel R. and Leann J. Vogt, 61612 Summer Shade Drive, Bend and 4385 Ryan Court, Gilbert, Ariz., respectively

PARIS — France’s competition regulator has found “possible” abuses by Google Inc. in its online advertising practices because of its dominant market position, in a study released Tuesday that could influence a Europe-wide probe into the company’s search services.

The report by the French Competition Authority is not legally binding, and Google dismissed its conclusions as too narrow to have widespread impact. Still, the report presents a new challenge to Google in France, where the search engine is seen by many as too powerful and has faced several legal disputes.

Filed Dec. 9

Charles H. Mills Jr., 1700 Wells Acre Road #4, Bend Nicole M. Franz, 61301 Fairfield Drive, Bend Katherine Jameson, 76811 S.E. Paulina Highway, Paulina Lauri L. Allen, 20240 Reed Lane M-345, Bend P. Edmund and J. Kelly Turner, 155 N.E. Craven Road #N-6, Bend Filed Dec. 10

Michael D. II and Deena M. Goss, P.O. Box 968, Madras Debbra R. Stevens, 5063 S. U.S. Highway 97 #3, Redmond Brenda M. Moe, 6599 N.W. 69th Place, Redmond Judith E. Sumners, 20583 Chivas Place, Bend Katina I. Taber, 63216 Wishing Well Lane, Bend Filed Dec. 13

William D. Griffith, 19090 Obsidian Road, Bend Larry A. and Amanda J. Moss, 20733 Kilburne Loop, Bend Keith R. and Sharon E. Burden, 63663 Ranch Village Drive, Bend JoAnn L. Owens, 20 Fairview Heights Loop, Burns Oleta K. Yancey, 61339 S.W. Sparrow Court, Bend

Audi will make your first payment on select models. Exceptional values are yours for a limited time during the Season of Audi.

FRIDAY

Website offers parents centralized list of recalls Chicago Tribune

Google faces challenge in France

Jan. 11

Jan. 14

By Gregory Karp

NEWS OF RECORD

TUESDAY

FRIDAY EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541617-8861.

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Collene Funk at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

for food and medications and Department of Agriculture for meat. A poll by Consumer Reports showed Americans believe it is important to know about product recalls, but they are not confident that they are getting adequate information. More than half of Americans said they never or rarely filled out the registration cards that come with products. Those registrations are used to notify consumers directly of recalls. “A child shouldn’t be put at risk of injury or death simply because the information on recalled products didn’t get to schools, caregivers and parents,” said Jim Guest, president of Consumer Reports. In March, the Consumer Product Safety will launch SafeProducts.gov, a database that will allow consumers to report dangerous products and see what others have reported.

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

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2011 Audi A4 Quattro 2.0T Sedan

36-Month Lease

ZERO due at lease inception. Excludes taxes, title, other options and dealer charges.

Financing as low as

1.9%* APR

2011 Audi Q5 Models

Carrera Motors 1045 SE Third Street Bend, OR 97702 541-382-1711 carreraaudi.com

The Season of AUDI Event Audi will make the first months payment up to $1,000 Must be financed thru Audi Financial Services. Offer ends Jan 5th, 2010. Lease and premier purchases are not eligible for this offer.

†Audi of America, Inc. defines the A4 competitive class as automatic transmission versions of the 2010 Audi A4 2.0T, and the 2010 BMW 328i, Mercedes-Benz C300 and Lexus IS 250. “Fuel-efficiency” and “best in class highway mpg” based on EPA highway fuel economy estimates for each model; 30 highway mpg for A4 2.0T automatic. Your mileage may vary. *Rate based on MSRP $36,940 of 2011 A4 and destination charge. Monthly payments total $17,469.36. Purchase option at lease end for $21,055.80. 36-month closed-end lease offered to qualified customers in [state(s) or market(s) here] by Audi Financial Services through participating dealers. Must take delivery by 12/31/2010. Lessee responsible for $0.25/mile over 10,000 miles per year, insurance, a disposition fee of $350 and other financial liabilities at lease end. Advertised offer requires dealer contribution. Model shown: . Higher MSRP will affect lease price. Prices exclude taxes, title, other options and dealer charges. ©2010 Audi of America, Inc. See your dealer, visit audiusa.com or call 1-800-FOR-AUDI for more details. †Audi of America, Inc. defines the A4 competitive class as automatic transmission versions of the 2010 Audi A4 2.0T, and the 2010 BMW 328i, Mercedes-Benz C300 and Lexus IS 250. “Fuel-efficiency” and “best in class highway mpg” based on EPA highway fuel economy estimates for each model; 30 highway mpg for A4 2.0T automatic. Your mileage may vary. *1.9% APR financing available on select new 2011 Audi A4 models through Audi Financial Services to qualified buyers through Dec. 31, 2010. Model shown: A4. Prices exclude taxes, title, other options and dealer charges. ©2010 Audi of America, Inc. See your dealer, visit audiusa.com or call 1-800-FOR-AUDI for more details.


C

L

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2010

Bend pair may face more fraud charges Activities continued after grand jury convened, prosecutor says By Erin Golden The Bulletin

The Bend couple indicted last month on more than 40 counts of securities fraud, aggravated theft, identity theft and other crimes related to their wellness center company could soon be facing additional charges. Todd Andrew Surgeon Sr., 40, and Laurie Jeanne Rose, 42, the owners of Surgeons Inc., were arrested last week after a

months-long investigation into allegations that they stole money from franchisees and made false statements about their company’s finances.

Lower bail denied On Tuesday, the pair appeared in separate Deschutes County Circuit Court hearings through a video link from jail. Attorneys for Surgeon and Rose

SPIRIT OF THE SEASON

asked to have their clients’ bail, currently set at $500,000 and $50,000, respectively, lowered. Both requests were denied after a prosecutor told the judges that the prosecution had heard from more victims — and has plans to bring back the grand jury to consider more charges. The couple is accused of making deals with people who wanted to open wellness center franchises and then failed to deliver

REDMOND

equipment after collecting money. The alleged scams involved at least a dozen victims.

More fraud alleged Deputy District Attorney Van McIver said Surgeon and Rose kept up the same activities even after they’d talked to police and knew they were under investigation. “When we were in grand jury, they were in Portland, getting new investors,” he said. See Fraud / C5

Laurie Jeanne Rose

Todd Andrew Surgeon

City halts plan for ice rink this year Increasing costs force leaders to delay project until next holiday season

Know an act of kindness in Central Oregon? E-mail dguernsey@bendbulletin.com, and we’ll spread the word. Submit your own photos at www.bendbulletin.com/season.

Making the holidays happen

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Tanner Jacobson, 3, of Redmond, and his grandfather Tom Hignell, 60, of Bend, give a present to Pfc. Jake Shukle, of Bend, as part of the Marine Corps Reserve Toys for Tots program at Shopko in Bend on Tuesday. The program was started shortly after WWII to help provide toys for needy children across the country, according to the Toys for Tots website. The program collects new toys and distributes them to needy children at Christmas.

By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

REDMOND — A proposed ice skating rink in Redmond will not open this year, after the projected cost more than doubled to about $100,000. The city still plans to open an ice rink, but not until Thanksgiving 2011. By taking more time, city staff members believe they can keep the project cost to about $40,000. The cost soared after a cooling system the city planned to rent was rented to another rink. Then the original contractor dropped out of the project, and the city staff was unable to find someone to do the work as cheaply. City staff could not justify spending that much money on the rink, according to Community Development Director Heather Richards. “We feel it’s not a prudent budget,” Richards said of the ballooned cost. City councilors were disappointed by the news, which was delivered during their Tuesday morning meeting. Several of them have described how excited community members were for the rink to open. Richards tried to temper that disappointment, saying that with more time, the city could put together a cheaper and more permanent project. The city, for instance, would have time to put pipes for the rink underground instead of above ground, as had been the plan. City staff will also be able to build the rink and its railings over the summer. Richards said several volunteers have come forward to help with the rink, but many were unavailable until next year. See Rink / C5

New policy for naming parks, buildings OK’d By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

BEND-LA PINE SCHOOL DISTRICT

Board makes choice for interim member Cheri Helt appointed to fill Wells Ashby’s seat till May election By Sheila G. Miller

DRAMATIC INTERPRETATION

years. He is an instructional dean at Central Oregon Community College. “I’ve been back and forth every day since we interviewed the candidates,” board chairwoman Peggy Kinkade said before the vote. “I feel really good about the choice we’ve had to make, and I’ll feel good about the result regardless of which candidate is appointed.”

The Bulletin

The Bend-La Pine School board on Tuesday selected Cheri Helt to serve as an interim board member representing west Bend until an election in May. Helt will replace Wells Ashby, a Deschutes County district attorney who was elected as Deschutes County Circuit Court judge on Nov. 2. Today is Ashby’s last day as a board member. “I’m excited to represent the kids of Bend-La Pine Schools,” Helt said during the meeting. Helt has three children, two of school age who attend Miller Elementary. She and her husband own Zydeco Kitchen + Cocktails. She serves on the board of the Education Foundation for Bend-La Pine Schools.

Holtzclaw other finalist Helt vied with Michael Holtzclaw for the position. Holtzclaw served on the City of Bend Planning Commission for eight years and on the High Desert Education Service District board for six

REDMOND — If you want to name a Redmond park after a civic leader, you might be in luck. If you hope to rename it for your favorite snack — say, Snickers Park — you should find another suggestion. On Tuesday, the Redmond City Council unanimously passed a new policy that offers general guidance on naming public buildings and spaces. The policy, though, is flexible and allows for exceptions. Work on the policy began in response to a push to rename Maple Avenue Bridge after Joe Mansfield, a former Redmond city councilor who died in late 2009. That drive highlighted the city’s lack of a naming policy for public buildings, parks and land. The council, for instance, could name a park after someone, but that should only happen two years or more after the person’s death, the policy says. A benefactor who donates half or more of the cost of a project is eligible to have that facility named after him or her. See Naming / C5

Five candidates The two were among five candidates who interviewed before the board Dec. 7. During that meeting, board members voted for two candidates to narrow the pool to two finalists; Holtzclaw received six votes; Helt received four in a second vote to break a tie between her and another candidate. Helt said she’s looking forward to working with state legislators on budget issues, particularly the declining percentage of the state budget that K-12 education has received since 2005. “I look forward to going and meeting with them to see if we can’t get that percentage back up,” she said. Kinkade was pleased with the result. “I really felt like we had great options,” Kinkade said. Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

School district to eye shorter Wednesdays By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Gracie Finch, 5, and fellow thespians reach to the sky during Drama Club on Monday at Westside Village Magnet School in Bend. Turn to Page C3 for the full story.

REDMOND — The Redmond School District might let students out a few hours early on Wednesdays next year. Or the district might start classes late once a week. Either way, the district is working to find time for its staff’s professional development. The district is about to revisit a discussion it had last school year about early-release Wednesdays. Under last year’s plan, the district would have released students early Wednesday afternoon, freeing up time for weekly staff training sessions. Training time for Redmond’s teachers has dwindled in recent years, with nonteaching days lost to budget cuts for this school year. Six were cut from this year’s calendar. See Release / C5


C2 Wednesday, December 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 9:15 a.m. Dec. 10, in the area of Alderwood Circle and Southwest Reed Market Road. Unlawful entry — Gasoline was reported stolen from a vehicle at 9:31 a.m. Dec. 10, in the 63000 block of Northeast 18th Street. Burglary — A safe was reported stolen at 10 a.m. Dec. 10, in the 1200 block of Northwest Galveston Avenue. Burglary — A computer was reported stolen at 10:01 a.m. Dec. 10, in the 900 block of Northwest Brooks Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported and an arrest made at 1 p.m. Dec. 10, in the 2500 block of Northeast Twin Knolls Drive. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 2:52 p.m. Dec. 10, in the 2000 block of U.S. Highway 20 East. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 9:21 p.m. Dec. 10, in the 900 block of Southeast Polaris Court. DUII — Nina Rimer, 19, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:37 a.m. Dec. 11, in the area of Northeast First Street and Northeast Franklin Avenue. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 6:41 a.m. Dec. 11, in the 600 block of Southeast Gleneden Place. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and computer and GPS stolen at 11:52 a.m. Dec. 11, in the 1100 block of Northeast Sixth Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:15 p.m. Dec. 11, in the 2000 block of Northeast Linnea Drive. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported and an arrest made at 6:35 p.m. Dec. 11, in the 2300 block of Northeast Eighth Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:04 p.m. Dec. 11, in the 3300 block of North U.S. Highway 97 business route. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 9:27 p.m. Dec. 11, in the 63400 block of North U.S. Highway 97 business route. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 9:50 p.m. Dec. 11, in the 2600 block of Northeast U.S. Highway 20. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 10:49 p.m. Dec. 11, in the 61500 block of South U.S. Highway 97 business route. DUII — Sadie Rose Christensen, 30, was arrested on suspicion of driving

under the influence of intoxicants at 11:35 p.m. Dec. 11, in the 900 block of Northwest Broadway Street. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 12:11 a.m. Dec. 12, in the 2600 block of Northeast U.S. Highway 20. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 8:51 a.m. Dec. 12, in the 61500 block of Brosterhous Road. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:48 a.m. Dec. 12, in the 61200 block of South U.S. Highway 97 business route. Unauthorized use — A truck was reported stolen at 5 p.m. Dec. 12, in the 1800 block of Northeast Monterey Avenue. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 5:24 p.m. Dec. 12, in the 3100 block of Northeast Richmond Court. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:40 p.m. Dec. 12, in the 61500 block of South U.S. Highway 97 business route. Burglary — A bicycle was reported stolen at 7:55 a.m. Dec. 13, in the 60900 block of Grayson Way. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:15 a.m. Dec. 13, in the 200 block of Northeast Sixth Street. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 4 p.m. Dec. 13, in the 61100 block of Parrell Road. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 5:25 p.m. Dec. 13, in the 2600 block of Northeast Ocker Drive. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 11:42 p.m. Dec. 13, in the 21000 block of Carl Street. DUII — Thomas Kevin Lange, 53, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:22 a.m. Dec. 14, in the 61200 block of Parrell Road. Redmond Police Department

DUII — Kim Wayne Powell, 56, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10 p.m. Dec. 13, in the 400 block of Southwest Glacier Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 6:53 p.m. Dec. 13, in the 1500 block of Northeast Third Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 5:42 p.m. Dec. 13, in the 2300 block of Southwest Umatilla Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:11 p.m. Dec. 13, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 10:42 a.m. Dec. 13, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Criminal mischief — Slashed tires were reported at 10:24 a.m. Dec. 13, in the 2500 block of Northwest Elm Avenue. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 8:25 a.m. Dec. 13, in the 800 block of Northwest Redwood Avenue.

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Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8:13 a.m. Dec. 13, in the 3000 block of Southwest Volcano Circle. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8:05 a.m. Dec. 13, in the 3000 block of Southwest Volcano Circle. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:50 a.m. Dec. 13, in the 1100 block of Southwest Black Butte Boulevard. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

DUII — Lavern Wayne Sorenson, 51, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 6:17 p.m. Dec. 13, in the area of U.S. Highway 372 near milepost 11 in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5:54 p.m. Dec. 13, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 132 in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:13 p.m. Dec. 13, in the 51500 block of U.S. Highway 97 in La Pine. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 9:07 a.m. Dec. 13, in the 16300 block of White Tail Lane in La Pine. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen and recovered at 8:52 a.m. Dec. 13, in the 7800 block of Seventh Street in Terrebonne. Oregon State Police

DUII — Mark S. Berry, 55, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:56 p.m. Dec. 13, in the area of Northwest Pershall Way and Northwest 10th Street in Redmond. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5:36 p.m. Dec. 13, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 133. DUII — John Paul Parrish, 29, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:08 a.m. Dec. 14, in the area of Northwest Third Street and Northwest Greenwood Avenue in Bend.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the website at www. humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541-923-0882 — or refer to the website at www. redmondhumane.org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Pit Bull and Labrador Retriever mix — Two male puppies, black and white; found in the 200 block of Southeast Evergreen Avenue.

Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Mt. Bachelor’s website down Mt. Bachelor’s website, http:// www.mtbachelor.com, was down Tuesday after information-technology employees at the mountain’s parent company, Powdr Corp. of Park City, Utah, “lost track of the renewal date� for the site’s domain name, according to spokesman Andy Goggins. The Utah employees spotted the problem early Tuesday and “got it all squared away� by 7:30 a.m. PST, Goggins said. An employee at the company from which the mountain bought the domain name said the domain name expired Tuesday. “When it expired, it was basically turned off, but it’s been turned back on now,� said Shaun Heffelfinger, a domain and billing support representative with the Networking Solutions, a company based in Herndon, Va., that offers Web services. The site should be back up for all viewers this morning, Goggins and Heffelfinger said.

experts in engineering, water resources, conservation and economics to a public forum to discuss the City of Bend’s proposed $73 million upgrade to its Bridge Creek system. The discussion, which will be moderated by Matt Shinderman, a senior instructor of natural resources at OSU-Cascades, will focus on the city’s plans to take more water from Bridge Creek and explore other alternatives. One of those alternatives will be whether the city should stop using surface water from Bridge Creek and instead drill more wells for groundwater. Some themes the panel will explore include the costs of the various water options, the potential environmental impacts of a taking surface water versus groundwater, the design and decision process the city went through, and how the city’s proposed project fits into regional water conservation efforts. The event is scheduled for 7 p.m. Jan. 24 at Cascades Hall on College Way in Bend. Admission is free.

Grant gives food aid OSU-Cascades to hold to Jefferson County surface water forum Oregon has received a test Oregon State University-Cascades has invited a number of

grant for new ways of providing nutrition assistance and help-

Today is Wednesday, Dec. 15, the 349th day of 2010. There are 16 days left in the year.

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y

TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Dec. 15, 1791, the Bill of Rights went into effect following ratification by Virginia. ON THIS DATE In 1890, Sioux Indian Chief Sitting Bull and 11 other tribe members were killed in Grand River, S.D., during a confrontation with Indian police. In 1893, Antonin Dvorak’s Symphony No. 9 in E minor, Op. 95, “From the New World,� was rehearsed before the public at New York’s Carnegie Hall (the official world premiere was held the next day). In 1938, groundbreaking for the Jefferson Memorial took place in Washington, D.C. with President Franklin D. Roosevelt taking part in the ceremony. In 1939, the motion picture “Gone With the Wind� had its

world premiere in Atlanta. In 1944, a single-engine plane carrying bandleader Glenn Miller, a major in the U.S. Army Air Forces, disappeared over the English Channel while en route to Paris. American forces invaded Mindoro Island in the Philippines. In 1960, Teflon-coated skillets first went on sale, at Macy’s flagship store in New York City. In 1961, former Nazi official Adolf Eichmann was sentenced to death by an Israeli court. In 1964, Canada’s House of Commons approved dropping the “Red Ensign� flag in favor of a new design. In 1965, two U.S. manned spacecraft, Gemini 6A and Gemini 7, maneuvered to within 10 feet of each other while in orbit. In 1979, the deposed Shah of Iran left the United States for Panama, the same day the International Court of Justice in The Hague issued a provisional order for Iran to free all American hostages.

Solicitation for New Committee Members for the Central Oregon Regional Public Transportation Advisory Committee Looking for individuals interested in being an Advisory Member to the Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council (COIC) in carrying out its regional public transportation efforts for Central Oregon. COIC governs and operates Cascades East Transit (CET) and Bend Area Transit (BAT). Members need to participate in two hour meetings held the 3rd Wednesday of each month. Representation is needed from the following communities: Bend

Culver/Metolius

Redmond/Terrebonne

Madras

La Pine/Sunriver

Prineville/Powell Butte

Sisters

Warm Springs

Completed applications must be received by 1/17/11. Applications and additional information is available at www.coic.org/publicmeetingnotices.htm.

TEN YEARS AGO The long-troubled Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine was closed for good. Federal regulators ordered an overhaul of California’s electricity market in a push to control skyrocketing prices and curtail supply shortages. First lady and Sen.-elect Hillary Rodham Clinton agreed to an $8 million book deal with Simon and Schuster for her White House memoirs. (“Living History� was released in 2003.) FIVE YEARS AGO Millions of Iraqis turned out to choose a parliament in a mostly peaceful election. Former Sen. William Proxmire, the Wisconsin Democrat who’d fought government waste with his “Golden Fleece� awards, died in Sykesville, Md. at age 90. ONE YEAR AGO World leaders began arriving in Copenhagen, kicking U.N.

$10,000 grant given to HealthMatters A grant of $10,000 was awarded to HealthMatters of Central Oregon to support the organization’s community health improvement initiatives, according to a news release. The nonprofit organization, which is dedicated to improving the health of Central Oregonians through active community participation, received the grant through the Robert W. Chandler Discretionary Fund of the Oregon Community Foundation. The money will go toward helping the nonprofit create a long-term funding strategy for its four health initiatives.

Wolverines should be protected, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says By Matt Volz The Associated Press

HELENA — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service says the wolverine should be to be added to the list of endangered and threatened species. But, the federal agency adds, adding the wolverine now is precluded by higher priorities — that is, other species considered in greater danger. The agency says in a decision posted Monday that the small mammal known for its ferocity will be added to the candidate species list. The Fish and Wildlife Ser-

vice says wolverine’s range in the U.S. includes portions of Montana, Idaho, Washington, Wyoming, Colorado, Oregon, Utah and California. Two years ago, the agency found the wolverine was not eligible for listing under the federal Endangered Species Act. Environmentalists sued, and last year the agency agreed to issue a new finding. Tim Preso, an attorney with Earthjustice, told The Associated Press the new finding is a breakthrough that reverses past denials by the federal gov-

Plane carrying bandleader Glenn Miller disappears in ’44 The Associated Press

ing low-income children access healthy foods. The grant, part of the Summer Electronic Benefit Transfer for Children demonstrations, will pay for summer programs for children in nine school districts throughout Linn and Jefferson counties; low-income families with school-age children will receive a benefit card they can use in stores to buy up to $60 worth of food per child per month during the summertime. Oregon will also receive $189,479 for the project’s administration and operation.

climate talks into high gear in a quest to deliver a deal to curb emissions of heat-trapping greenhouse gases. The Washington, D.C. City Council voted to legalize same-sex marriage. Boeing’s new 787 jetliner went on its longdelayed first test flight, lifting off from Paine Field in Everett, Wash. Evangelist Oral Roberts died in Newport Beach, Calif. at age 91. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actor-comedian Tim Conway is 77. Singer Cindy Birdsong (The Supremes) is 71. Rock musician Dave Clark (The Dave Clark Five) is 68. Rock musician Carmine Appice (Vanilla Fudge) is 64. Actor Don Johnson is 61. Movie director Julie Taymor is 58. Movie director Alex Cox is 56. Actor Justin Ross is 56. Rock musician Paul Simonon (The Clash) is 55. Political strategist Donna Brazile is 51. Country singer Doug Phelps (Brother Phelps; Kentucky Headhunters) is 50. Movie producerdirector Reginald Hudlin is 49. Actress Helen Slater is 47. Actor Michael Shanks is 40. Actor

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Stuart Townsend is 38. “Crowdhyper� Kito Trawick (Ghostown DJs) is 33. Actor Adam Brody is 31. Actor George O. Gore II is 28. Actress Stefania Owen (TV: “Running Wilde�) is 13. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Silence is more musical than any song.� — Christina Rossetti, British poet (1830-1874)

ernment that the wolverine faces the threat of extinction. However, the wolverine will now be mired in a backlog of other species waiting to receive federal protection, he said. “If history is any guide, it takes a very long time for any action to be taken on this backlog,� Preso said. “It’s like being stuck in the waiting room of a hospital when you’re in need of care.�

Get a taste of Food, Home & Garden In

AT HOME Every Tuesday


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, December 15, 2010 C3

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A special section featuring news from schools in Deschutes, Jefferson and Crook counties

Students turn classroom into a stage Drama Club gives youngsters venue to practice acting By Megan Kehoe The Bulletin

Belle Hodgert, 13, slowly lowered the limp body to the gray carpet. She carefully moved its arms and legs into an exaggerated and lifeless pose. Though the class didn’t know it, Belle had just “murdered” her drama teacher. “I call this, ‘dead person,’” Belle said to the class, grinning and pointing to drama teacher Lisa Elrod on the floor. Elrod sat up from the carpet, rolling her eyes at the dramatic and grim sculpture Belle had just molded her into. But Elrod couldn’t help smiling too. On Monday afternoon, students of Westside Village Magnet School’s Drama Club worked on their acting skills through a variety of exercises, including sculpting one another into poses, pretending to be a variety of animals and even rehearsing and discussing Shakespeare.

Range of ages Elrod oversees the club. About 40 students ages 5 to 13, many of whom have been in the club for several years, participated in Monday’s session. “I love Drama Club because you just forget about everything else going on in your life,” said Porter Parker-Smyth, 10, who says she wants to be an actress one day. “It also inspires you to do more things, like singing and playing music.” The high-paced class began with Elrod dividing the students into three groups and directing students in a warm-up exercise that tested both their listening ability and their knowledge of stage direction. “Move, move, move — freeze!” Elrod yelled, as students spun

T E E N F E AT S Amanda Squiemphen-Yazzie won first place for a speech she delivered at the Oregon Indian Education Association and was selected to attend the National Indian Education Association conference in San Diego, where she received a second award. Her speech focused on educational challenges faced by Native American youths. Squiemphen-Yazzie, of Warm Springs, is a senior at Madras High School. Sam Hayden was recently awarded the rank of Eagle Scout from the Boy Scouts of America. Hayden is a member of Boy Scout Venture Crew 460 in Bend. He is the son of Cary and Ramie Hayden. His community service project was making improvements to the outdoor lighting at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints located on Tekampe Road in Bend. Hayden and his volunteers contributed more than 80 hours to the project.

C O N TAC T U S SCHOOL BRIEFS: Items and announcements of general interest. Please include details and contact information. Phone: 541-617-7831 E-mail: smiller@bendbulletin.com TEEN FEATS: The Bulletin wants to recognize high school students’ achievements off the playing fields. Do you know of teens who have been recognized recently for their academic achievements or who have won an award or certificate for their participation in clubs, choirs or volunteer groups? If so, please submit the information and a photo. Phone: 541-383-0358 Mail: P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 E-mail: youth@bendbulletin.com

“I love Drama Club because you just forget about everything else going on in your life. It also inspires you to do more things, like singing and playing music.” — Porter Parker-Smyth, Drama Club member around the room wildly before stopping in midmovement, their faces frozen in awkward expressions. After a few more jolting episodes of the exercise, Elrod tested the students’ memory of stage positions. “Stage right!” Students scurried off to the

left side of the room — their right side. “Stage left!” Elrod yelled. Students switched directions and drifted to the other side of the room. After a few more tests, Elrod directed the students to line up in the middle of the room and rehearse an excerpt of Shakespearean verse they had been working on. Students recited lines from “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” in unison, their voices thundering inside the small music room as they acted out the dramatic words. “The raging rocks and shivering shocks …,” they began, starting with their arms reaching toward the heavens and ending the excerpt kneeling on the floor in despair, funneling all their energy into the performance. After the students ran through the passage a few times, Elrod

IN BRIEF Area students win Inventerprise contest

Entries solicited for Scholastic Art Awards

About 640 students competed in the 2010 Inventerprise contest to come up with new ideas to enhance human capabilities or develop devices for people with physical or medical disabilities. Below, the winners: • Quinn Burket, a Summit High senior, won first place and $1,000 for his idea of flexible sports padding that hardens on impact. • Alex Sarmiento of Summit High and Kingston Steele of Madras High share the secondplace prize and $500 for devices to measure blood toxins. • Joseph Schlatter, a Sisters High senior, and Jake Thompson, a junior at Bend High, received high school division honorable mentions. • Sam Drutman and Billy Morton, of Pilot Butte Middle School, won the middle school division for a gum that changes color depending on blood-sugar levels.

The Central Oregon Scholastic Art Awards is now accepting entries from teenage artists in the area. The awards program is the regional affiliate for the national 2011 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards. The program, sponsored by the Oregon Art Education Association, is available for students in seventh through 12th grades; submissions are due Jan. 4, but director Pat Roberts recommends registering by Friday. All artwork that receives a gold key, silver key or honorable mention will be exhibited at the Pinckney Gallery at Pence Hall on Central Oregon Community College’s campus. Submissions are judged locally by a panel, and top works are submitted for the national competition. National winners are announced in the spring. One senior entry will receive a $500 scholarship; all gold key winners will be entered in the national competition. The local program is focused on visual arts, but students interested in submitting entries for the writing awards can do so directly. For more information about the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards or how to enter the competition, call Pat Roberts at Pilot Butte Middle School at 541-3557524 or e-mail pat.roberts@bend .k12.or.us. For more information on the national competition, go to www.artandwriting.org.

Immunization exclusion in February Students who have incomplete vaccination records will be excluded from school beginning Feb. 16. State law requires all children in both public and private schools, preschools, Head Start and child care facilities to demonstrate they’re current on immunizations or have a religious or medical exemption. This year, new vaccinations are required for some children. Hib vaccine, for a bacterial disease, is required for all children ages 4 and younger. The Tdap vaccine, for tetanus, diphtheria and acellular pertussis (whooping cough), is required for seventh-, eighth- and ninth-graders. The two-dose series for hepatitis A is now required for children between 18 months of age and second grade. To have your child immunized, contact your family doctor or call Oregon SafeNet at 1-800SAFENET or 1-800-723-3638. No one is turned away from the local health department because they can’t pay for vaccines.

Deadline nears for MATHCOUNTS contest The deadline for Central Oregon middle school students and teachers to register for February’s regional MATHCOUNTS competition is Dec. 31. MATHCOUNTS, a nonprofit national math enrichment competition program, offers free materials. It is sponsored by Professional Engineers of Oregon. To register and receive free materials, go to www.mathcounts. org. For more information call Tom Headley at 541-749-1417. — Bulletin staff reports

asked them to interpret it. “It’s like, similar to a great depression of some sort,” Porter said of the first few lines. “It’s talking about something cataclysmic or apocalyptic,” said Paul Freihoefer, 12.

Acting like animals After a long discussion about the excerpt, the class dramatically shifted gears, going from lofty interpretations of Shakespeare to an exercise in which students acted out various animals. Elrod sat in the back, directing the students out on the stage.

Amanda Fender, 9, back left, Gracie Finch, 5, lower left, and Alice Bouchard, 8, express horror during Drama Club on Monday at Westside Village Magnet School in Bend.

spiders, sea horses, starfish and even “Octorillas,” a cross between an octopus and gorilla, transforming the room into a zoo of mythical animals. Belle said one of the reasons she’s been involved with the Drama Club for seven years is the welcoming environment, which allows students to be anything they want to be. “We have all ages in here, and it’s nice because everyone’s included,” said Belle. “Everyone works together, and it’s fun collaborating with other kids.”

Rob Kerr The Bulletin

Students ended the session with an exercise called “student sculptures,” in which students worked in pairs to mold one another into a scene, which they then presented to the class. Reed Fine, 10, stood frozen with a pouting expression, holding an imaginary microphone. Her acting partner, Lili Bouchard, 11, explained to the class what the life sculpture represented. “I call this, ‘Irritated Singer,’” Lili said. Students laughed at Reed’s drama queen expression. Other student sculptures included mad parents, angry neighbors and playing children, making the exercise a display of creativity as well as acting ability. Elrod said the club provides students with a lot more than lessons in Shakespeare and acting. “What they’re doing looks easy,” she said, “but it actually takes a lot of cooperation to work together like that. They’re learning a lot about teamwork and camaraderie here.”

“Now, you guys are kangaroos,” Elrod said. Students on the floor began hopping around on the carpet stage. Strange snorts and noises erupted from the actors, who were unsure exactly what sound a kangaroo makes. After a few moments, Elrod commanded the students to be monkeys. A monkey noise proved easier to replicate for the actors, as crazed screeches and howls filled the room while students crawled and jumped around the carpet. During the rest of the exercise, students got to be jellyfish,

‘Student sculptures’

Megan Kehoe can be reached at 541-383-0354 or at mkehoe@bendbulletin.com


C4 Wednesday, December 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Allow Flaherty to do his job

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s elected officials, county commissioners are the last people we’d expect to tell voters to stuff it. But Deschutes County’s three commissioners are on the verge of do-

ing just that. Today, they’ll consider, and perhaps approve, a union contract that would undermine the authority of voters, who in May replaced longtime DA Mike Dugan with Patrick Flaherty. The deputy DAs who formed the union after Dugan’s loss did so largely to protect their jobs. Flaherty indicated shortly after his victory that he intends to make some staff changes, and the contract now before commissioners would make that exceptionally difficult, not to mention expensive. Deputy DAs, who are now “at will” employees hired and fired at the DA’s discretion, would be protected by “just cause” language. To be sure, the contract would give Flaherty the authority to dismiss deputies for a number of reasons, from insubordination to ignoring his philosophies and objectives in prosecuting criminals. But the task would become much more onerous than it is now, and Flaherty wouldn’t be free to make staff changes simply because he wanted to — regardless of how beneficial those changes might be. In other words, the contract would make it harder for Flaherty to do the job voters gave him. That’s why approving the contract today would be an insult not only to Flaherty, but also to the thousands of county residents who voted for him. For that reason, commissioners should sit on their hands today and, in fact, do nothing until Flaherty takes office next month. What would happen if commissioners do the right thing? “If the contract isn’t executed,” says County Attorney Mark Pilliod, “then obviously the protections offered employees are not there.” Presumably, then, Flaherty would have an opportunity to make staff changes without encountering as many complications and expenses, leaving him free to do the job he was elected to do. Delaying the contract in this fashion would not kill it outright, of course. Whether through arbitration or some other avenue, the union will succeed in getting a contract at some point. But the commissioners don’t have to approve one before Flaherty takes office, and if they respect voters in the least they won’t. We haven’t forgotten how bitter this spring’s campaign was, and we can’t say we were surprised when Dugan’s staff organized and sought additional job protection in response to Flaherty’s victory. Moreover, we sympathize with the deputy DAs who might find themselves without jobs next month. But none of these are good reasons for the County Commission to approve the contract now. Voters chose Flaherty because they wanted to move the DA’s office in a different direction, and moving an office becomes a lot harder when the staff has,

Voters chose Flaherty because they wanted to move the DA’s office in a different direction, and moving an office becomes a lot harder when the staff has, in effect, been frozen in place. … To force a potentially hostile team upon a new DA would all but ensure conflict and, perhaps, dysfunction. in effect, been frozen in place. For the next four years, Flaherty will run an office that decides how to prosecute citizens accused of crimes. That’s an enormous amount of power, and the person who wields it deserves the ability to surround himself with people he trusts. To force a potentially hostile team upon a new DA would all but ensure conflict and, perhaps, dysfunction. Yet that is, in effect, what Deschutes County’s commissioners would do by approving the deputy DAs’ contract today. Moreover, approving the contract today would virtually guarantee significant legal bills in the near future. Flaherty intends to appoint deputy DAs as he sees fit, regardless of the presence or absence of a contract. He argues that state law gives DAs the authority to appoint — and, by extension, to remove — deputies as they see fit, making the contract’s “just cause” protections invalid. He could be right, but either way he intends to force the issue. By approving a contract today, then, commissioners would put taxpayers on the hook for some potentially whopping legal bills. We’d like to think commissioners have greater respect for the public’s hard-earned money than that. There are probably those who believe Patrick Flaherty, barring a union contract, would use his newfound authority to cashier highly competent deputies for petty, political reasons. We don’t think this would be the case. But if it is, then he would have handed his detractors a big club to pummel him with in four years. Much the same can be said of the two county commissioners who’ll still be around in January. By throwing up a protective cocoon around deputy DAs, they would, in effect, tell county voters to stuff it. That’s a big club to hand a future opponent.

My Nickel’s Worth Spending’s the problem Washington reporters state that the recent tax deal “adds $900 billion to the deficit and debt” (Bulletin: “Tax deal,” Dec. 8). Excessive spending is the problem, not tax collections. In the last two years, the U.S. budget more than doubled and the deficit tripled. From 2009 to 2011 (proposed), increases have been: Energy, 87 percent; Education, 77 percent; Foreign aid, 64 percent; EPA, 38 percent; State, 34 percent; National Science Foundation, 28 percent; Agriculture, 27 percent; Interior, 19 percent; Health and Human Services, 17 percent; (Source: www.guardian.co.uk/ news/datablog/2010/feb/01/obamab u d g e t- 2 011- d e f i c i t- s p e n d i n g department#data) These increases have grossly distorted our deficit and debt, not tax rates. We need a new appropriations bill at 2008 levels or less. Plus, the budget must reimburse the $2.5 trillion that Congress has robbed from the Social Security Trust Fund for decades (www. fedsmith.com/article/2328/no-moneysocial-security-trust-fund.html). If necessary, eliminate foreign aid to pay back Social Security for our citizens. Americans first! Such a budget

would restore confidence and should pass through the 2011 House. If the Senate stonewalls, its legacy will be cast as being against fiscal prudence. If President Obama were to veto such a bill, his signature would block fiscal sanity. If Congress can’t accomplish this emergency spending reduction, we’ll find more new senators and representatives and a president with principles in 2012. Steve Wilkes Bend

With pitchforks in hand, we’ve become a nation that punishes success and bails out failure. Onerous layers of mandates, regulations, and oversight, along with this government’s deficit-spending, “saviorbased” economy, has more to do with impeding job creation than declaring class warfare with punitive tax policies on the financially successful. Roy Fullerton Bend

Peasant society

Business as usual

Anne Philiben’s Nov. 25 letter, “The rich and jobs,” declares the rich “do not create jobs,” and in fact, “their influence on hiring is minimal.” Philiben further states that the solution to job creation is “giving lower and middle classes more money.” A few weeks earlier, syndicated columnist Victor Davis Hanson wrote “Impoverishing America with peasant beliefs.” In it he states, “Traditional peasant societies believe in only a limited good. The more your neighbor earns, the less someone else gets. Envy rather than admiration of success reigns. … A newly peasant-minded America is willing to become collectively poorer so that some will not become wealthier.” Philiben’s letter defines the new social order in America. Wealth creation is now wealth redistribution, equal opportunity is now equal outcome, and free choice is now mandated choice.

“For too long, the U.S. tax code has benefited the wealthy and well-connected at the expense of the vast majority of Americans. President Obama’s aims to restore fairness to the tax system by providing the Making Work Pay tax cut to 95 percent of working families while closing loopholes that prevent wealthy companies and individuals from paying a fair share.” The above passage is quoted from the White House website under “Taxes.” Note the grammatical error. Obama is attempting to cut a deal with Republicans to extend the Bush tax cuts for all Americans, including the wealthy. This is the change that was promised? The rich get richer and federal employees are mandated to accept a two-year wage freeze? This is no change, this is business as usual! Marv Brophy Bend

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We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

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Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

The U.S. can prosper in the middle-class century A

fter you read this column, go to YouTube and search “Hans Rosling and 200 countries.” You’ll see a Swedish professor describe the growth of global wealth and wellbeing over the past 200 years. He presents an animated time-lapse chart. It starts in 1810, when the nations of the world were clumped on the bottom left-hand side of the chart because they had low income and low life expectancy. Then the industrial revolution kicks in and the nations of the West surge upward and to the right as they get richer and healthier. By 1948, it’s like a race, with the United States out front and the other nations of the world stretched in a long tail behind. Then, over the past few decades, the social structure of the world changes. The Asian and Latin American countries begin to catch up. With the exception of the African nations, living standards start to converge. Now most countries are clumped toward the top end of the chart, thanks to the incredible reductions in global poverty and improvements in health.

This convergence is great news, but the change in the global social structure has created a psychological crisis in the U.S. Since World War II, we’ve built our national identity on our rank among the nations — at the front with everybody else trailing behind. But in this age of convergence, the world doesn’t have much of a tail anymore. Some people interpret this loss of leaddog status as a sign of national decline. Other people think we are losing our exceptionalism. But the truth is, there’s just been a change in the shape of the world community. In a world of relative equals, the U.S. will have to learn to define itself not by its rank, but by its values. It will be important to have the right story to tell, the right purpose and the right aura. It will be more important to know who you are. Americans seem uncertain about how to answer that question. But one answer is contained in Rosling’s chart. What is the core feature of the converging world? It is the rise of a gigantic global middle class. In 2000, the World Bank classified 430

DAVID BROOKS million people as middle class. By 2030, there will be about 1.5 billion. In India alone, the ranks of the middle class will swell to 583 million from 50 million. To be middle class is to have money to spend on non-necessities. But it also involves a shift in values. Middle-class parents have fewer kids but spend more time and money cultivating each one. They often adopt the bourgeois values — emphasizing industry, prudence, ambition, neatness, order, moderation and continual self-improvement. They teach their children to lead different lives from their own, and as Karl Marx was among the first to observe, unleash a relentless spirit of improvement and openness that alters every ancient institution. Last year, the Pew Research Center surveyed the global middle class and

found that middle-class people are more likely than their poorer countrymen to value democracy, free speech and an objective judiciary. They were more likely to embrace religious pluralism and say that you don’t have to believe in God to be good. Over the next few decades, a lot of people are going to get rich selling education, self-help and mobility tools to the surging global bourgeoisie. The United States has a distinct role to play in this world. American culture was built on the notion of bourgeois dignity. We’ve always been lacking in aristocratic grace and we’ve never had much proletarian consciousness, but America did produce Ben Franklin, one of the original spokesmen of middle-class values. It did produce Horatio Alger, who told stories about poor boys and girls who rose to middle-class respectability. It does produce a nonstop flow of self-help leaders, from Dale Carnegie to Oprah Winfrey. It did produce the suburbs and a new sort of middle-class dream. Americans could well become the champions of the gospel of middle-class

dignity. The U.S. could become the crossroads nation for those who aspire to join the middle and upper-middle classes, attracting students, immigrants and entrepreneurs. To do this, we’d have to do a better job of celebrating and defining middle-class values. We’d have to do a better job of nurturing our own middle class. We’d have to have the American business class doing what it does best: catering to every nook and cranny of the middleclass lifestyle. And we’d have to emphasize that capitalism didn’t create the American bourgeoisie. It was the social context undergirding capitalism — the community clubs, the professional societies, the religious charities and Little Leagues. For centuries, people have ridiculed American culture for being tepid, materialistic and middle class. But Ben Franklin’s ideas won in the end. The middle-class century could be another American century. David Brooks is a columnist for The New York Times.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, December 15, 2010 C5

O D

N   Douglas Darrell Walke, of Redmond Nov. 5, 1949 - Dec. 11, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond 541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: Viewing: 12:00 pm - 5:00 pm, Thur., Dec. 16, at funeral home; Service 11:00 am, Fri., Dec. 17, at the Terrebonne Grange with potluck reception at approx. 12:30 pm.

Naming Continued from C1 But according to the policy, the council should avoid naming something public after a commercial product. The names of existing structures should not be changed, the policy states. Councilor Shirlee Evans backed the policy, saying it gave the city a framework for decision-making. “It shows we’re not biased. We don’t name everything after council members,” Evans said. “There are other important people in the community that deserve to have something named after them.” The policy, effective immediately, was put together over the

past several months. The Maple bridge name remains the same, but the new policy gives the council a tool for deciding on proposals like the Mansfield one, according to Betty Borgen, assistant to the city manager. Until now, such decisions were made without any guidance. “I think the main concern is we get something in place, so there are a few guidelines in place,” Borgen told the council. “If you don’t have anything, it’s hard to say no.” Some councilors expressed concerns about losing future naming options. They said they were worried that the policy eliminates too many options. “I think this is a great guideline, but I’m not thrilled about this because it doesn’t allow us flex-

ibility,” Councilor Ed Boero said. The councilors, though, all agreed to pass the policy. Mayor George Endicott argued that the policy makes suggestions while not forbidding the council from making a naming decision. In the end, Borgen said, passing the policy could actually inspire locals to come up with ideas for naming parks and buildings. There may now be more instances like the push to rename Maple Bridge, she said. “It may be something that encourages citizens to step forward and be a little more active with suggestions,” she said. Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

Contributions may be made to:

Children's charity of contributor's choice.

James Edward McNeil, of Redmond Oct. 23, 1941 - Dec. 13, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A private memorial service will be held at a later date.

Lillian Louise Carney, of Klamath Falls, OR Sept. 13, 1916 - Dec. 10, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel of La Pine, (541) 536-5104 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: No services are scheduled.

Patsy Holechek, of Culver March 9, 1927 - Dec. 9, 2010 Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel, 541-548-3219 Services: No services at this time.

William Carl Johnson, of Culver Sept. 17, 1920 - Dec. 7, 2010 Arrangements: Bel-Air Funeral Home, 541-475-2241 Services: Services will be held on Wed., Dec. 15, 2010, at 11 am, at Culver City Park.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Release Continued from C1 District staff are working on details of the latest proposal. The district, for instance, still needs to figure out whether an early-release model or latestart approach works better for Redmond. Whatever the design, the district hopes to keep the same number of class hours. The changed schedule would be designed to carve regular time out from the school calendar for professional development. The extra time would not be free time, according to Alishia Anderson, a Title I reading teacher at John Tuck Elementary in Redmond. “It wouldn’t be for (teacher prep), or leaving early or doctor appointments,” said Anderson, who is working on the plan. “It would be specifically for professional development.” Anderson and others from the Redmond district have been talking to other Oregon districts with early release or late start. In Central Oregon, Bend-La Pine Schools release students early on Wednesdays. The Sisters School District starts class each Wednesday about an hour later than normal.

Fraud Continued from C1 Rose does not have a criminal record, but Surgeon served a prison sentence in Nevada after he was convicted of racketeering, embezzlement and other financial

LOS ANGELES — J. Michael Hagopian, an educational filmmaker who spent 40 years gathering the testimonies of Armenian genocide survivors to provide evidence of one of the most contentious events in world history, died of natural causes Friday at his home in Thousand Oaks, northwest of Los Angeles. He was 97. His death was announced by the Armenian Film Foundation, which he established in 1979 to preserve Armenian heritage and culture. The filmmaker was a survivor of the genocide, which historians estimate resulted in the deaths

crimes related to his activities in Oregon, California and Nevada. Rose’s attorney, Brendan Alexander, argued that his client and Surgeon, her fiance, had big hopes for their business, telling people it “could be the next Microsoft.” “That’s the hardest thing,” he said. “They just want to believe

Arnold Weiss, 86, found Hitler’s will The Washington Post WASHINGTON — For a halfcentury, Arnold Weiss was best known as a Washington lawyer and founder of an international investment group. Perhaps it was his desire to move beyond World War II and the memories it conjured that kept him silent for so long about his clandestine wartime mission. Weiss, who died of pneumonia Dec. 7 at 86 in Rockville, Md., was the man who found Adolf Hitler’s last will and political testament. He grew up in a Jewish orphanage in Germany just as the Nazis were coming to power, then made

J. Michael Hagopian, 97, filmmaker who chronicled Armenian genocide Los Angeles Times

Redmond hopes to have more specifics early in 2011. The district has parents and staff working on the committee that is considering the plan, according to Lynn Evans, the district’s human resources director. One of the main concerns, as it was in Bend-La Pine, was what students would do when not in school. Redmond already has after-school programs at its five community schools, and the district could potentially expand the hours of those programs, Evans said. The district pulled back on the early-release plan last year because it ran out of planning time, Evans said. The district started the work earlier this year, and Evans hopes a workable plan can be finalized. Finding such a plan is critical for teachers, according to Evans. Currently, Redmond will replace regular teachers with substitutes for periodic training. That’s an uneven approach and breaks up the schedule too much, Evans said. It is also an expensive approach. The district has budgeted about $57,000 this year to pay for substitutes to cover for teachers in training. At a rate of $180 per day, that is not enough

of as many as 1.5 million Armenians in Ottoman-ruled Turkey beginning in 1915. The Turkish government acknowledges a smaller number of deaths and attributes them to war, famine and disease, not genocide. It also contends that both Turks and Armenians lost their lives. Hagopian’s determination to refute the Turkish claims led him to his life’s work: compiling 400 interviews with Armenian genocide survivors and witnesses. He used their accounts in several films on the World War I-era disaster that historians consider the first major genocide of the 20th century.

to give every one of the district’s 358 teachers a day of training, according to Evans. “It’s not the best practice,” Evans said. “We don’t think pulling teachers out of the room is the best, but without established (training) time, that’s done.” Kathy Moss is president of the Tumalo Community School Parent Teacher Community and has one child each in the Bend-La Pine and Redmond districts. She remembers parents worrying over the effect of the schedule, but families have adjusted to early-release Wednesdays, she said. Families at Tumalo and in the rest of the Redmond district would do the same, Moss predicted. If Redmond also adopts a schedule change, Moss hopes they follow Bend-La Pine’s example, with after school programs and a shortened Wednesday. The weekly benefit is not exclusive to teachers, Moss said. “I think for the kids … Wednesday is a really good day,” Moss said. “(Students) push hard, get a little reprieve, recuperate, then get back into it. It think it’s a good day in the middle of the week.” Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

in their dream, to have it go.” Rose is scheduled to enter pleas on the charges on Dec. 23. Surgeon will be back in court for his plea hearing on Dec. 29. Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

Rink Continued from C1 The new schedule will also allow the city to search for sponsors to help fund the project. Councilor Shirlee Evans, who abstained from the original vote to approve the rink, again urged Redmond staff to look for another rink location. At Centennial, the rink would be about 4,000 square feet — about half the size of other area rinks. That would limit its use to very young children, Evans said. Some residents also are unhappy with the rink, period, Evans said. For instance, Evans received one phone call from a resident disturbed that Redmond might spend thousands of dollars during tight budget times. Redmond planned to pay for the rink with Downtown Urban Renewal District funds, money reserved for projects in the downtown area. Councilor Ed Onimus sug-

gested a larger rink would be more popular, while competing with bigger rinks in Sunriver and at Seventh Mountain Resort. Richards said staff would look for other possible locations, but she noted that few outdoor spots in the city have the power capacity that Centennial Park does. “That’s a deal-breaker for most (locations),” Richards said. The proposed rink, wherever its location, will likely open the weekend after Thanksgiving 2011, according to the new city plan. Mayor George Endicott had pushed hard for the rink to open in Centennial Park on this New Year’s Eve. Endicott said the city had little choice but to delay the rink because of the increased cost. “It’s very disappointing,” Endicott said. “It is what it is, and we have to do the right thing.” Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

Vernon Clayton Peterson Sr. June 1, 1914 — December 11, 2010 Vernon Clayton Peterson Sr. was a longtime resident of Redmond, since 1970, and owned the Village Squire Motel. He was preceded in death by his wife, Mayme Ida Peterson in 2000. Vernon was born June 1, 1914, in Thedford, Nebraska, to Denver H. and Nona Mae Peterson. He was preceded in death by his sisters, Ruth Brown and Delores Peterson, and by his brother, Willis Peterson. He is survived by his sister, Janice Palmer; his sons, Vernon Clayton Peterson Jr. (wife, Florence) of Benjamin, Utah, and Gary Lee Peterson of Farmington, Utah; grandchildren Tiffanie Leyvas (husband, David), Clayton Peterson, Kimberly Kay Looby, Shane Lee Peterson, Christian Z. Peterson, Cassie E. Stauffer (husband, Kurt), Annie V. Peterson; great-grandchildren Markie Peterson, Gunnar Peterson, Hannah Leyvas, and David Leyvas. Contributions can be made to Partners In Care, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, OR 97701. Visitation will be held from 2pm to 6pm on Friday, December 17, 2010, at Deschutes Memorial Chapel. Services will be held at 1pm on Saturday, December 18, 2010, at Deschutes Memorial Chapel. Please visit www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com to leave online condolences for the family.

Andrew “Andy” Bettencourt of Fort Rock, Oregon, passed away peacefully with his family at his side on December 8, 2010. He was 76.

his way to the United States at 13. Because of his German-language skills, Army counterintelligence officials deployed him back to Europe during World War II. In the autumn of 1945, after a 10-hour interrogation of a courier, Weiss was taken to a farm on the outskirts of Munich, where a manila envelope in a suitcase was hidden at the bottom of a dry well. Weiss opened the package and read the typed heading on the first page: “Mein privates Testament,” signed by Hitler on April 29, 1945, at 4 a.m — the day before he died.

Andy was born to Andre and Gertrude (Santos) Bettencourt on January 7, 1934 in Benicia, California. In 1969, Andy along with his new bride, Sharon moved from San Jose, California to Fort Rock, Oregon. Andy was fiercely proud of his family, ranching and God. Andy is preceded in death by his parents. Andy is survived by his wife Sharon of 41 years; his daughters Annamae Avila, Andrea England, Laura House, Rachel Whittenburge; his sons Michael Bettencourt and John Bettencourt. Other survivors include his fourteen grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Andy was a member of Knights of Columbus and active in the Catholic Church. He helped in serving breakfast at the Easter Sunrise Service in Fort Rock for 40 years and enjoyed his visits and talks over a “half-o-cup” of coffee. He originally had a small dairy and over the years frequented livestock auctions purchasing cattle for the ranch. Andy loved spending time with his grandchildren and got a chuckle out of joking with his family and friends. Recitation of the Rosary will be held on Saturday, December 18, 2010 at 1:30 PM, followed by a Memorial Mass at 2:00 PM at St. Thomas Catholic Church, 1720 NW 19th Street, Redmond, OR 97756. A potluck dinner with family and friends will be held on Sunday, December 19, 2010 at 3:00 PM at the Fort Rock Grange in Fort Rock. Memorial contributions in Andy’s memory may be made to Fort Rock Grange, P.O. Box 88, Fort Rock, OR 97735. Baird Funeral Home of Bend is in charge of arrangements 541-382-0903, www.bairdmortuaries.com.

William Robert Mayfield March 25, 1924 - December 10, 2010 William Robert Mayfield, surrounded by his loving family, entered heaven on December 10, 2010. Bill married Marian Pickles on June 25, 1947, and they enjoyed 63 ½ years of marriage. Bill was born in Medford, Oregon, but from the age of 8 he lived the remainder of his life in the Redmond vicinity. He spent his early years cattle ranching with his father, Howard Mayfield. Bill served in the Army Corp of Engineers during World War II, after basic training at Camp Abbott, (eventually to become Sunriver Resort). Ironically, he and his father bought Camp Abbott in a partnership, developing a successful ranching business. Always a man of integrity, his business was not conducted with contracts and lawyers, but rather handshakes. A back injury necessitated a second career. In 1961 Bill entered into partnerships in Real Estate. Initially selling and developing properties through Northwest Ranch Brokers and then opening Mayfield Realty with his son, Bob, in 1987. Bill retired from real estate in 1997, but his life continued to be very busy. Bill was a man of humility who served selflessly. Several associations that he contributed his life to were, The Deschutes County Fair Association, Masons, Shriners, Redmond Hospital Board, Oregon Realtor of the Year, Redmond City Council, maintained The Redmond South “Y” flower beds with daughter, Jan, and grunt extraordinaire to Fred Humble at the Redmond Community Church. Bill lived the epitome of a Godly life. He accepted the Lord in his 70s and the family finds peace knowing he is now anew in heaven. A celebration of life will take place on Saturday, December 18th, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. at the Redmond Community Church, 237 NW 9th Street, Redmond, Oregon. In lieu of flowers, please consider donations to Hospice House of Bend.


W E AT H ER

C6 Wednesday, December 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, DECEMBER 15 Today: Mostly cloudy, a few stray snow showers, cooler.

HIGH Ben Burkel

40

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

Western 39/27

37/26

43/29

27/21

Ruggs

Condon

 Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

44/28

36/18

Mitchell

Madras

38/23

42/26

Camp Sherman 36/18 Redmond Prineville 40/21 Cascadia 39/22 Paulina 39/22 32/18 Sisters 39/20 Bend Post   40/21 36/19 Oakridge Elk Lake Brothers Sunriver 37/20

36/18

28/9

37/17



33/16

35/18

Fort Rock

BEND ALMANAC

Vancouver 42/38

27/4

Seattle Missoula 31/20

 Bend

Helena 32/13

Boise

40/21



36/24

Idaho Falls 31/16

Redding

Elko

51/36

35/16

36/20

Silver Lake

32/15



Reno

33/18

Partly to mostly cloudy with a chance of mountain snow showers.

Crater Lake 25/20

41/24

San Francisco



54/46





Salt Lake City 37/18

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

HIGH

Moon phases Full

LOW

Last

New

First

Dec. 21 Dec. 27 Jan. 4

Jan. 12

Wednesday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 53/42/0.50 . . . . . 45/38/sh. . . . . . 46/36/sh Baker City . . . . . . 45/35/0.06 . . . . . 34/19/sn. . . . . . . 32/19/c Brookings . . . . . . 54/46/0.45 . . . . . 46/40/sh. . . . . . 48/44/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 40/32/0.13 . . . . . 34/19/sn. . . . . . 31/20/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 56/43/0.69 . . . . . 44/34/sh. . . . . . 43/33/sh Klamath Falls . . . 46/35/0.45 . . . . . 32/19/pc. . . . . . 34/24/pc Lakeview. . . . . . . 45/36/0.23 . . . . . 33/17/pc. . . . . . 34/25/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 39/31/0.25 . . . . . 35/17/sn. . . . . . 37/23/sn Medford . . . . . . . 56/43/0.28 . . . . . 42/30/pc. . . . . . 43/32/pc Newport . . . . . . . 54/45/0.37 . . . . . 47/39/sh. . . . . . 48/38/sh North Bend . . . . . 56/46/0.67 . . . . . 45/39/sh. . . . . . 47/40/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 42/33/0.25 . . . . . 38/23/pc. . . . . . 32/24/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 56/39/0.23 . . . . . . 42/26/c. . . . . . 38/27/pc Portland . . . . . . . 55/43/0.52 . . . . . 44/36/sh. . . . . . 43/35/sh Prineville . . . . . . . 41/31/0.08 . . . . . . 39/22/c. . . . . . 39/25/pc Redmond. . . . . . . 50/33/0.15 . . . . . . 38/23/c. . . . . . 36/22/pc Roseburg. . . . . . . 57/44/0.43 . . . . . 42/33/sh. . . . . . 43/36/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 55/44/0.80 . . . . . 44/36/sh. . . . . . 45/34/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 40/32/0.16 . . . . . 39/20/sn. . . . . . 38/25/sn The Dalles . . . . . . 53/40/0.22 . . . . . . 42/30/c. . . . . . . 38/28/c

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39/32 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.31” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 in 2006 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.07” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . -8 in 1932 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.76” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.79” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . 10.71” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.73 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.91 in 2003 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .8:05 a.m. . . . . . .5:02 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .3:44 a.m. . . . . . .2:14 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .8:33 a.m. . . . . . .5:14 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . .12:16 p.m. . . . . .11:56 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .1:40 a.m. . . . . . .1:13 p.m. Uranus . . . . . .12:17 p.m. . . . . .12:10 a.m.

1

LOW

38 25

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Thursday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy, isolated showers. HIGH

39 25

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES City

43/35

Christmas Valley

Chemult

Calgary

Mostly cloudy, widespread showers.

38 25

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

39/19

31/11

HIGH

NORTHWEST

Eugene Mostly cloudy skies today. 44/34 Continued mostly cloudy Grants Pass tonight. 41/32 Eastern

Hampton

Crescent

Crescent Lake

LOW

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:33 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 4:28 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:34 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 4:28 p.m. Moonrise today . . . 12:42 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 1:49 a.m.

SUNDAY

Mostly cloudy, showers developing by midday.

40 21

44/36

32/19

35/17

HIGH

21

Portland

Burns

La Pine

LOW

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 57° Roseburg • 30° Meacham

SATURDAY

Mostly cloudy.

Tonight: Mostly cloudy.

Showers with snow above 2,000 feet today. Rain and snow tonight. Central

42/27

FRIDAY

Showers will be likely in the west, with snow over the Cascades.

STATE

Maupin

Government Camp

THURSDAY

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 38-49 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 24-56 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 . . . . . . 51-65 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . . 4 . . . . . . . . 60 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 32-37 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . . . 70 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 24-47

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. Chains or T.T. all vehicles Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Taos, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

. . . . . . 26-27 . . . . . . 50-96 . . . . . . . . 52 . . . . . . . . 46 . . . . . . 30-45 . . . . . . 15-18 . . . . . . . . 31

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

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S

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S

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Vancouver 42/38

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

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Calgary 27/4

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Saskatoon 25/11

Seattle 43/35 Portland 44/36

Cheyenne 44/17 San Francisco 55/48

Crane Lake, Minn.

• 1.71” Blue Canyon, Calif.

Salt Lake City Las 37/18 Vegas 63/45

Los Angeles 60/51 Phoenix 74/52

Tijuana 65/49

Honolulu 81/67

Denver 50/26

Juneau 24/11

Mazatlan 81/54

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S S

Kansas City 33/23

Portland 26/11 To ronto 22/13

Green Bay 18/9

Des Moines 24/20 Chicago 23/21 Omaha 28/18

Albuquerque 62/40 Oklahoma City 55/27

Chihuahua 75/36

Anchorage 1/-7

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Quebec 19/13 Halifax 36/24

Boston 27/18 New York 29/22 Philadelphia 31/22 Washington, D. C. 33/22

Buffalo

Detroit 22/10

21/17

Columbus 22/16 Louisville 29/27

St. Louis 31/27

Charlotte 39/30

Nashville 33/31

Little Rock 48/44 Dallas 75/43

La Paz 78/55

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Thunder Bay 13/-5

Rapid City 37/17

Mesa, Ariz.

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Winnipeg 16/5

St. Paul 18/13

• 82° • -29°

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Bismarck 23/8

Billings 39/18

Boise 36/24

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Birmingham 38/36

Atlanta 39/36

New Orleans 66/58

Houston 74/59

Orlando 58/34 Miami 63/50

Monterrey 83/55

FRONTS

At least 150 years old, Ozzie the tortoise is heading south By Saul Hubbard The (Eugene) Register-Guard

EUGENE — Getting older may not make most people feel particularly special, but in the world of giant tortoises, the older you get, the more special you become. Ozzie, a 600-pound male Aldabra giant tortoise currently lodged at the Santa Clara Animal Hospital, is at least 150 years old, or so his owners were told when they purchased him from an Indiana circus.

True age unknown But he could be even older, said Sean Barrett, a veterinarian at the animal hospital. The only foolproof way of verifying Ozzie’s age would be to carbon date a small fragment of his shell, he said. Carbon dating is a scientific method used to learn the true age of ancient materials. Carbon dating was done on Adwaita, a giant tortoise at a zoo in Calcutta, India. It revealed

him to be about 255 years old at the time of his death in 2006, making him one of the oldest creatures of modern times. And Ozzie may be closing in on him. “It’s really remarkable when you think about how long Ozzie’s been alive,” Barrett said. “All the things he’s seen. It’s hard to wrap your head around being alive for that long.” Ozzie certainly looks ancient. With his small, jet black eyes; primitive-looking cranium; long, retractable, leathery neck; and huge frame, he can make visitors feel as if they’re meeting a dinosaur face to face. “He’s really a gentle giant, and as prehistoric as he is, he has a lot of personality,” said Barrett, who reports that Ozzie typically lights up when he’s around young children. Ozzie was brought to the animal hospital because of a pulmonary tract infection that caused him to stop eating. But he’s on the mend now, Barrett said.

Because Aldabra giant tortoises are native to the Seychelles an archipelago off the eastern coast of Africa Ozzie has had some difficulty adjusting to Oregon’s winter climate, even in a heated indoor enclosure.

Moving to Texas As a result, his publicity-shy owners, who wished to remain anonymous, soon will be moving him, with the help of a specialty hauler, to a new compound in Texas, where the dry climate should agree with him more. “He likes it at 80 or even 85 degrees,” Barrett said. As you might imagine, Ozzie doesn’t move quickly. Not when he munches on his favorite snack food, bananas, nor when he raises himself up onto his four sturdy legs and starts lumbering around. “But once he gets moving, there’s not much you can do to stop him,” Barrett said. “He just thunders through stuff; he’s like a massive linebacker.”

O  B Recounts confirm results in Senate races PORTLAND — Recounts won’t change the outcome of two Oregon state Senate, leaving Democrats with a 16-14 majority. Republican Dave Dotterrer conceded Tuesday that he had lost to the Democratic incumbent, Dr. Alan Bates, in Jackson County. Dotterrer, though, will still be going to Salem this winter — as a legislative aide to Republican Rep. Dennis Richardson. Democrats have said Tuesday that they won’t seek a broader recount in the Clackamas County race between incumbent Democrat Martha Schrader and Republican victor Alan Olsen. A partial recount matched the initial vote tally exactly,

and Senate Majority Leader Diane Rosenbaum said the party wouldn’t seek a broader recount.

Woman’s body found in Columbia River GRESHAM— Gresham police say a Vancouver, Wash., woman whose body was found Monday night in the Columbia River was a drowning victim. The Multnomah County medical examiner has identified her as 42-year-old Kimberlee Ast and determined the cause of death was drowning. Her family told police she went to Islands Moorage but never made it home. Residents searching the area found her body near the dock. Gresham police Officer John Rasmussen says it appears the

woman slipped on the dock and fell into the river.

Prosecutor pleads guilty to misconduct SALEM — An Oregon prosecutor has pleaded guilty to official misconduct after he admitted using his position to seek sexual favors. The Oregon attorney general’s office said Tuesday that Rand Overton, a Lincoln County deputy district attorney, was sentenced to 30 days in jail, two years on probation and is prohibited from working as a government lawyer. Overton was initially charged in May based on a single victim. Once the charges became public, two additional victims came forward. — From wire reports

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .75/46/0.00 . . .82/34/s . . . 54/28/s Akron . . . . . . . . .16/10/0.10 . . .22/12/c . . . 27/15/c Albany. . . . . . . . .20/15/0.03 . . .19/12/c . . . 27/19/c Albuquerque. . . .60/30/0.00 . 62/40/pc . . 50/35/sh Anchorage . . . . . .17/1/0.02 . . . . 1/-7/s . . . . . 8/-6/s Atlanta . . . . . . . .33/14/0.00 . . .39/36/c . . . .57/49/r Atlantic City . . . .26/19/0.00 . 32/22/pc . . 35/29/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .73/26/0.00 . . .75/51/s . . . 70/39/s Baltimore . . . . . .28/20/0.00 . . .33/19/s . . 33/22/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .46/34/0.00 . 39/18/pc . . 34/14/pc Birmingham . . . .37/14/0.00 . .38/36/sh . . 62/46/sh Bismarck . . . . . . . .18/5/0.00 . . . .23/8/c . . . . 18/3/c Boise . . . . . . . . . .49/40/0.31 . 36/24/pc . . 35/25/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .36/23/0.00 . . .27/18/c . . . 31/19/c Bridgeport, CT. . .25/21/0.00 . . .29/22/c . . . 35/25/c Buffalo . . . . . . . .19/10/0.15 . .21/17/sn . . 28/19/sn Burlington, VT. . .18/12/0.10 . . .17/7/sn . . 22/17/sn Caribou, ME . . . .56/39/0.05 . .29/16/sn . . 29/13/sn Charleston, SC . .41/21/0.00 . . .44/36/c . . 59/53/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .35/15/0.00 . . .39/30/c . . . .43/34/r Chattanooga. . . .32/14/0.00 . . . 36/33/i . . . .51/38/r Cheyenne . . . . . .53/33/0.00 . 44/17/pc . . . 31/14/c Chicago. . . . . . . . .21/6/0.00 . 23/21/pc . . 29/19/sn Cincinnati . . . . . .24/10/0.00 . 25/21/pc . . . .31/22/i Cleveland . . . . . .22/15/0.00 . .23/15/sn . . . 28/18/c Colorado Springs 62/32/0.00 . 50/20/pc . . 28/12/sn Columbia, MO . . .21/5/0.00 . . .32/25/c . . 33/20/pc Columbia, SC . . .40/18/0.00 . . .43/32/c . . . 48/47/c Columbus, GA. . .40/19/0.00 . . .49/40/c . . 63/51/sh Columbus, OH. . . .20/7/0.00 . 22/16/pc . . 29/19/sn Concord, NH . . . .30/18/0.00 . . . .21/7/c . . . 26/14/c Corpus Christi. . .75/37/0.00 . . .79/58/s . . . 79/56/s Dallas Ft Worth. .68/33/0.00 . . .75/43/s . . . 57/35/s Dayton . . . . . . . . .20/6/0.00 . 22/18/pc . . 29/20/sn Denver. . . . . . . . .70/35/0.00 . 50/26/pc . . 34/22/sn Des Moines. . . . . .19/7/0.00 . .24/20/sn . . . . 26/8/c Detroit. . . . . . . . . .21/9/0.00 . 22/10/pc . . 24/18/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . 13/-16/0.00 . . .15/3/pc . . . 16/3/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .71/32/0.00 . . .73/41/s . . . 65/35/s Fairbanks. . . . . . -7/-27/0.00 . -29/-44/s . -33/-43/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .18/9/0.00 . . .17/9/sn . . . 16/4/sn Flagstaff . . . . . . .56/22/0.00 . . .46/26/c . . .40/20/rs

Yesterday WednesdayThursday Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .25/13/0.00 . . .26/17/s . . 28/17/sn Rapid City . . . . . .46/26/0.00 . . .37/17/c . . 33/12/pc Green Bay. . . . . . .17/1/0.01 . . . .18/9/s . . 25/12/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .56/44/0.02 . 41/24/pc . . 47/35/pc Greensboro. . . . .31/16/0.00 . 37/28/pc . . .35/33/rs Richmond . . . . . .28/20/0.00 . . .35/20/s . . 36/25/sn Harrisburg. . . . . .25/17/0.00 . 32/18/pc . . 35/21/pc Rochester, NY . . .18/11/0.18 . .21/17/sn . . 28/19/sn Hartford, CT . . . .26/20/0.00 . . .26/13/c . . . 31/18/c Sacramento. . . . .55/52/0.14 . 54/36/pc . . 55/44/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .45/27/0.03 . . .32/13/c . . . 29/8/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . . .21/7/0.00 . . . 31/27/i . . . 32/22/c Honolulu . . . . . . .84/72/0.00 . . .81/67/s . . . 80/66/s Salt Lake City . . .55/34/0.00 . .37/18/sn . . 30/22/pc Houston . . . . . . .71/37/0.00 . . .74/59/s . . . 74/51/s San Antonio . . . .72/38/0.00 . . .77/50/s . . . 75/44/s Huntsville . . . . . .32/13/0.00 . . . 35/33/i . . 52/38/sh San Diego . . . . . .60/54/0.00 . . .60/50/c . . 60/52/pc Indianapolis . . . . .21/4/0.00 . 23/20/pc . . 29/15/sn San Francisco . . .61/53/0.14 . 54/46/pc . . 54/49/pc Jackson, MS . . . .48/22/0.00 . 55/53/pc . . 68/52/pc San Jose . . . . . . .61/52/0.01 . 57/45/pc . . 57/49/pc Madison, WI . . . . 14/-9/0.00 . 19/12/pc . . 25/10/sn Santa Fe . . . . . . .60/20/0.00 . 56/33/pc . . 45/30/sn Jacksonville. . . . .45/20/0.00 . 52/32/pc . . . 67/47/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .20/10/0.00 . .24/11/sn . . . 22/9/sn Kansas City. . . . .29/20/0.00 . 33/23/pc . . 34/21/pc Amsterdam. . . . .34/23/0.00 . . 37/29/rs . . .38/31/rs Lansing . . . . . . . . .21/5/0.00 . . .24/10/s . . 25/14/sn Athens. . . . . . . . .57/42/0.01 . .53/40/sh . . 48/39/sh Las Vegas . . . . . .62/44/0.00 . 63/45/pc . . 56/38/pc Auckland. . . . . . .75/68/0.00 . 75/60/pc . . 68/60/sh Lexington . . . . . . .20/2/0.00 . 26/24/pc . . . .32/23/i Baghdad . . . . . . .61/48/0.00 . . .66/44/s . . . 68/43/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . .33/20/0.01 . 31/18/pc . . . 32/15/c Bangkok . . . . . . .91/77/1.10 . 92/78/pc . . . .90/78/t Little Rock. . . . . .37/22/0.00 . 48/44/pc . . . 52/32/s Beijing. . . . . . . . .25/10/0.00 . . .25/11/s . . 36/18/pc Los Angeles. . . . .59/53/0.00 . . .60/51/c . . 60/55/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .68/55/0.11 . . .64/52/s . . . 68/54/s Louisville . . . . . . . .25/6/0.00 . 29/27/pc . . 33/24/sn Berlin. . . . . . . . . .32/27/0.00 . .28/22/sn . . 29/21/pc Memphis. . . . . . .34/21/0.00 . . . 44/42/i . . 52/32/sh Bogota . . . . . . . .64/50/0.11 . . .61/49/r . . 69/47/sh Miami . . . . . . . . .53/36/0.00 . . .63/50/s . . . 75/62/s Budapest. . . . . . .27/19/0.00 . . 30/22/sf . . 27/18/pc Milwaukee . . . . . .21/6/0.00 . . .23/18/s . . 28/17/sn Buenos Aires. . . .88/63/0.00 . . .85/61/s . . . 86/63/s Minneapolis . . . . 10/-6/0.00 . .18/13/sn . . . 20/8/sn Cabo San Lucas .79/55/0.00 . . .79/59/s . . . 78/57/s Nashville . . . . . . . .28/8/0.00 . . . 33/31/i . . 46/32/sh Cairo . . . . . . . . . .66/52/0.00 . . .69/49/s . . . 72/51/s New Orleans. . . .51/33/0.00 . 66/58/pc . . . 73/57/c Calgary . . . . . . . .39/18/0.00 . . .27/4/pc . . . . 21/1/s New York . . . . . .23/19/0.01 . . .29/22/c . . 35/23/pc Cancun . . . . . . . 70/NA/0.00 . 73/52/pc . . . 77/57/s Newark, NJ . . . . .26/19/0.01 . . .29/22/c . . 35/22/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .41/28/0.00 . 44/35/pc . . .36/24/rs Norfolk, VA . . . . .28/22/0.00 . . .35/21/s . . 36/27/sn Edinburgh . . . . . .37/30/0.00 . 41/33/pc . . 33/21/sn Oklahoma City . .52/27/0.00 . . .55/27/s . . . 43/27/c Geneva . . . . . . . .34/19/0.00 . . .31/20/c . . .31/24/sf Omaha . . . . . . . .28/17/0.00 . 28/18/pc . . . 27/11/c Harare . . . . . . . . .82/64/0.00 . . .79/62/t . . . .82/63/t Orlando. . . . . . . .49/28/0.00 . . .58/34/s . . . 68/47/s Hong Kong . . . . .75/68/0.00 . .77/69/sh . . 71/60/sh Palm Springs. . . .76/49/0.00 . . .71/46/c . . 67/46/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . .46/37/0.14 . .41/35/sh . . . .43/36/r Peoria . . . . . . . . . 19/-1/0.00 . . .26/21/c . . 29/15/sn Jerusalem . . . . . .57/42/0.00 . . .65/47/s . . . 71/52/s Philadelphia . . . .27/19/0.00 . 31/22/pc . . 34/27/pc Johannesburg . . .72/61/0.11 . . .67/57/t . . . .68/59/t Phoenix. . . . . . . .78/51/0.00 . 74/52/pc . . 64/48/sh Lima . . . . . . . . . .68/63/0.00 . 72/61/pc . . 71/61/sh Pittsburgh . . . . . .17/12/0.00 . .23/14/sn . . 28/17/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .54/50/0.00 . . .62/47/s . . . 58/41/s Portland, ME. . . .44/27/0.02 . . .26/11/c . . . 25/15/c London . . . . . . . .41/34/0.00 . .39/32/sh . . .40/27/rs Providence . . . . .30/21/0.00 . . .28/15/c . . . 33/20/c Madrid . . . . . . . .59/39/0.00 . . .47/25/s . . . 45/25/s Raleigh . . . . . . . .35/16/0.00 . 37/28/pc . . . .36/34/r Manila. . . . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . .88/75/t . . . .86/77/t

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . .42/21/0.00 . . .47/35/c . . 63/53/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .45/39/0.81 . .43/35/sh . . 44/34/sh Sioux Falls. . . . . .21/14/0.00 . .23/10/sn . . . 21/4/pc Spokane . . . . . . .44/36/0.40 . . .35/24/c . . 31/21/pc Springfield, MO. .36/22/0.01 . . .36/28/c . . . 35/23/c Tampa . . . . . . . . .48/32/0.00 . . .56/40/s . . . 69/54/s Tucson. . . . . . . . .80/47/0.00 . . .75/47/s . . 65/41/sh Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .44/21/0.00 . 50/30/pc . . 42/26/pc Washington, DC .28/22/0.00 . . .33/22/s . . 35/25/pc Wichita . . . . . . . .41/21/0.00 . 43/25/pc . . 40/24/pc Yakima . . . . . . . .45/35/0.34 . . .35/23/c . . . 35/25/c Yuma. . . . . . . . . .79/50/0.00 . . .76/52/c . . 69/49/pc

INTERNATIONAL Mecca . . . . . . . . .97/64/0.00 . . .88/67/s . . . 88/66/s Mexico City. . . . .70/36/0.00 . . .71/37/s . . . 73/38/s Montreal. . . . . . .16/12/0.31 . .19/13/sn . . .25/16/sf Moscow . . . . . . .25/10/0.00 . . 19/10/sf . . . . 15/5/sf Nairobi . . . . . . . .75/61/0.00 . .78/60/sh . . 77/60/sh Nassau . . . . . . . .66/57/0.00 . 71/59/pc . . . 78/63/s New Delhi. . . . . .52/46/0.00 . . .74/51/s . . . 76/52/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .59/54/1.10 . 46/30/pc . . 43/31/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . .21/3/0.00 . . .20/13/s . . 29/13/sn Ottawa . . . . . . . .14/10/0.18 . .18/11/sn . . .25/16/sf Paris. . . . . . . . . . .34/25/0.00 . 36/28/pc . . .40/30/rs Rio de Janeiro. . .86/77/0.00 . . .84/72/t . . . .85/73/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .48/32/0.00 . 45/33/pc . . 44/34/pc Santiago . . . . . . .81/54/0.00 . 80/45/pc . . . 78/43/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .64/63/0.02 . .72/63/sh . . 76/67/sh Sapporo. . . . . . . .37/32/0.03 . .22/13/sn . . .25/15/sf Seoul . . . . . . . . . .32/16/0.00 . 24/10/pc . . 28/13/pc Shanghai. . . . . . .50/43/0.00 . .43/37/sh . . . 46/32/s Singapore . . . . . .88/77/0.15 . . .89/77/t . . . .87/77/t Stockholm. . . . . .27/18/0.00 . . .30/17/s . . 31/21/sn Sydney. . . . . . . . .73/68/0.00 . 83/69/pc . . . .75/66/t Taipei. . . . . . . . . .73/63/0.00 . .75/65/sh . . 66/52/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .68/50/0.00 . . .66/51/s . . . 70/55/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .57/46/0.00 . 53/43/pc . . 48/40/sh Toronto . . . . . . . .18/10/0.06 . 22/13/pc . . . 27/17/c Vancouver. . . . . .46/37/0.27 . .42/38/sh . . . .41/35/r Vienna. . . . . . . . .27/23/0.00 . .31/23/sn . . 29/19/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . .19/12/0.05 . 28/15/pc . . 29/17/pc


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D

NFL Inside Avoiding helmet-to-helmet hits? Some players say it’s not possible, see Page D2.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2010

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

PREP GIRLS BASKETBALL

TEE TO GREEN

Winter rules, revisited The Pacific Northwest Golf Association is stressing a new and stricter option for preferred lies when the weather gets nasty Business Wire

Nike unveiled its next generation of Nike Pro Combat uniforms for the University of Oregon and selected other schools on Tuesday.

As if the Ducks didn’t have enough football uniforms ... ARLINGTON, Texas — Just what the Oregon Ducks needed: new uniforms. Thanks to Nike, Oregon will be wearing new “Pro Combat” uniforms when the Ducks play for the national college football championship next month. Nike showed off the new uniforms, and its new Air Zoom Alpha Talon cleats, Tuesday at Cowboys Stadium. Boise State, TCU and Florida will join Oregon as the first schools to don the new uniforms in their upcoming bowl games. Nike designer Todd Van Horne said he consulted with Ducks coach Chip Kelly when he designed the uniform. “Chip Kelly wants to be the fastest team in the country, so we designed the uniforms so that they will actually look like a blur on the field,” Van Horne said. “It’s all about speed at Oregon.” The No. 2 Ducks, already famous for having scores of uniform design and color combinations, will be styling in their latest gear when they square off against No. 1 Auburn in the Bowl Championship Series title game on Jan. 10 in Glendale, Ariz. — The Associated Press

J

im Hawkes did not like the fact that golfers in his Eagle Crest Resort men’s club were using preferred lies to improve their positions in the rough in winter tournaments. The intent of the preferred lies rule — a local rule used primarily during the winter — was to allow golfers playing in adverse conditions to wipe mud off their ball and move their ball onto safer ground if the ball found an abnormal course condition, such as a frozen divot. The preferred lies rule is commonly called “lift, clean, and place.”

ZACK HALL

Hawkes, a Sisters resident who has also been the handicapping chair for 17 years at Eagle Crest, near Redmond, saw too many golfers using preferred lies to fluff up their ball in the rough — an abuse of the rule’s intent. Rules hounds like to call that “lift, clean, and cheat.” So this fall Hawkes changed the interpretation of the rule at Eagle Crest to the interpretation observed by the United States Golf Association, allowing preferred lies only in the fairway. See Rules / D5

The preferred lies policy is a local rule, but the Pacific Northwest Golf Association is now recommending that clubs adopt rules that conform to the USGA’s suggestion that preferred lies, if used at all, are limited to the fairway.

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Summit player Raja Char, right, gets pressured by a pair of Redmond defenders during Tuesday night’s girls basketball game at Summit High School in Bend.

Storm defense comes up big Summit wins 42-28 to keep Redmond winless this season

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Bulletin staff report A stout Summit defensive effort helped the Storm to a 42-28 girls basketball win over Redmond in Intermountain Hybrid action on Tuesday night. The host Storm (3-2) limited Redmond to just nine points in the first half. “They really bought into the style of play we wanted to run,” said Summit coach Ryan Cruz. The Storm held a 25-9 lead at halftime. See Storm / D3

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Streak puts UConn women and 1970s UCLA in same class?

INSIDE

By Jere Longman New York Times News Service

NBA

STORRS, Conn. — About 15 years ago, Geno Auriemma met John Wooden, who put a grandfatherly hand on his knee as the two coaches talked basketball. Then, after Connecticut won the 2000 women’s NCAA title, Wooden said that he enjoyed the selfless way the Huskies played. “I’ve never met their coach, but he seems like a wonderful young man,” Wooden told a magazine reporter. Auriemma, the UConn coach, keeps a copy of the article framed in his office as a selfdeprecating reminder that Wooden had forgotten their encounter. See Streak / D5

76ers .......................................... 82 Nets ............................................ 77 Lakers ....................................... 103 Wizards....................................... 89 Bobcats ...................................... 97 Raptors ....................................... 91 Pistons...................................... 103 Hawks ......................................... 80 Rockets ......................................118 Kings ........................................ 105 Nuggets .....................................111 Magic.......................................... 94 Warriors.................................... 108 Timberwolves ............................. 99

‘Melo scores 35, Nuggets top Magic Denver improves to 11-1 at home behind Anthony’s big game, see Page D3

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D3 College basketball .....................D3 Prep sports ................................D3 NBA .......................................... D4 Tee to Green....................... D5-D6

M L B C O M M E N TA RY Numbers game Highest average baseball salaries Player/team/current contracts (in millions) Alex Rodriguez New York Yankees • 2008-17 $27.5 Ryan Howard Philadelphia Phillies • 2012-16 $25.0 Cliff Lee Philadelphia Phillies • 2011-15 $24.0 CC Sabathia New York Yankees • 2009-15 $23.0 Joe Mauer Minnesota Twins • 2011-18 $23.0 Johan Santana New York Mets • 2008-13 $22.9

Mark Teixeira New York Yankees • 2009-16 $22.5 SOURCES: Player and team management

AP

Lee deal with Phillies proves we know less than we think we do By Thomas Boswell The Washington Post

N

ot so fast. When everybody knows the future, be careful. Last month, everybody in the Ballpark in Texas as the World Series ended was almost certain they knew what uniforms Cliff Lee, Carl Crawford and Jayson Werth were going to be wearing after they signed the biggest free-agent contracts of the offseason: Yankees, Angels and Red Sox. And Lee to New York was a lock. Instead, it’s turned out to be the Phillies, Red Sox and Nationals that get to hold the holiday news conferences and toast themselves. Everybody, as is so often the case in baseball, was dead wrong, just as they (we) were wrong about a Rangers-Giants Series. No one saw it coming. These days, that seems to be the new norm. See Lee / D5

Lee agrees to $120M deal to pitch for Phillies NEW YORK — Turns out the Philadelphia Phillies do have enough money for both Cliff Lee and Roy Halladay — and Roy Oswalt and Cole Hamels, too. A year after Phillies traded him away, Lee chose to rejoin them and form a fearsome foursome that is the envy of all of baseball. The free-agent pitcher passed up an extra $30 million from the New York Yankees and reached a preliminary agreement on a $120 million, fiveyear contract with the Phillies. Lee, the 2008 AL Cy Young Award winner, helped the defending champion Phillies reach the 2009 World Series, but he was sent to Seattle in a trade last Dec. 16. Seattle traded Lee to Texas in July, and Lee pitched the Rangers into the World Series.

Cliff Lee in 2009


D2 Wednesday, December 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD ON DECK

TELEVISION TODAY BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — NBA, Boston Celtics at New York Knicks, ESPN. 6:30 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Dallas Mavericks, ESPN, Comcast SportsNet Northwest.

HOCKEY 4 p.m. — NHL, New York Rangers at Pittsburgh Penguins, VS. network.

THURSDAY GOLF 6:30 a.m. — PGA European Tour, South African Open, first round, Golf Channel.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — Boys high school, Lew Wallace (Ind.) vs. Simeon (Ill.), ESPN. 5 p.m. — NBA, Atlanta Hawks at Boston Celtics, TNT. 6 p.m. — Boys high school, Findlay Prep (Nev.) vs. Yates (Texas), ESPN. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, LewisClark State at Gonzaga, FSNW. 7:30 p.m. — NBA, San Antonio Spurs at Denver Nuggets, TNT.

VOLLEYBALL 4 p.m. — Women’s college, NCAA tournament, semifinal, Texas vs. Penn State, ESPN2. 6 p.m. — Women’s college, NCAA tournament, semifinal, Cal vs. USC, ESPN2 (time is approximate, starts after previous semifinal).

MIXED MARTIAL ARTS 6 p.m. — World Extreme Cagefighting, Ben Henderson vs. Anthony Pettis, VS. network.

RADIO TODAY BASKETBALL 6 p.m. — Men’s college, Oregon State at Montana, KICE-AM 940. 6:30 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Dallas Mavericks, KBND-AM 1110, KRCOAM 690, Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

TITANS COLTS PANTHERS BENGALS DOLPHINS GIANTS COWBOYS BUCCANEERS RAVENS Falcons STEELERS RAIDERS PATRIOTS

IN THE BLEACHERS

Thursday Girls basketball: La Pine vs. South Whidbey (Wash.) at Seaside Holiday Classic, 3:30 p.m.; Madras vs. South Whidbey (Wash.) at Seaside Holiday Classic, 6:45 p.m.; Sisters vs. Rogue River at Phoenix Invitational, 5:30 p.m. Boys basketball: La Pine vs. South Whidbey (Wash.) at Seaside Holiday Classic, 5:15 p.m.; Madras vs. Astoria at Seaside Holiday Classic, 5:15 p.m.; Sisters vs. Phoenix at Phoenix Invitational, 8:30 p.m. Wrestling: Redmond at Summit, 7 p.m.; Crook County at Culver, 6 p.m. Swimming: Sisters at Sweet Home, 3 p.m.

Bears

Friday Girls basketball: Mountain View at Sandy, 7:15 p.m.; La Pine, Madras at Seaside Holiday Classic, TBA; Sisters at Phoenix Invitational, TBA; Summit at Ashland, 2 p.m.; Redmond at Sheldon, 7 p.m.; The Dalles-Wahtonka at Bend, 7 p.m.; Culver at East Linn, 6:30 p.m. Boys basketball: Sandy at Mountain View at Sky View Middle School in Bend, 7 p.m.; La Pine, Madras at Seaside Holiday Classic, TBA; Sisters at Phoenix Invitational, TBA; Crook County at Redmond, 7 p.m.; Summit at Ashland, 3:45 p.m.; Bend at The DallesWahtonka, 7 p.m.; Culver at East Linn, 8 p.m. Wrestling: Redmond, Bend, Summit, Madras, Mountain View, La Pine, Sisters at Adrian Irwin Tournament at Mountain View, 9 a.m. Saturday Girls basketball: Mountain View at Mountain View (Wash.), 4 p.m.; La Pine, Madras at Seaside Holiday Classic, TBA; Sisters at Phoenix Invitational, TBA; Summit at Ashland, 2 p.m.; Redmond at South Eugene, 3:30 p.m.; Bend at Klamath Union, 1:45 p.m.; Culver at Gervais, 3 p.m. Boys basketball: La Pine, Madras at Seaside Holiday Classic, TBA; Sisters at Phoenix Invitational, TBA; Summit at Ashland, 3:45 p.m.; Klamath Union at Bend, 1:45 p.m.; Culver at Gervais, 4:30 p.m. Wrestling: Redmond, Bend, Summit, Madras, Mountain View, La Pine, Sisters at Adrian Irwin Tournament at Mountain View, 9 a.m.; Culver at Thurston High, 9:30 a.m.; Gilchrist at Summit JV Invitational, 8 a.m. Swimming: Summit, Mountain View at CVC Invitational in Salem, 8 a.m.

FOOTBALL NFL NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE All Times PST ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF x-New England 11 2 0 .846 415 N.Y. Jets 9 4 0 .692 273 Miami 7 6 0 .538 225 Buffalo 3 10 0 .231 256 South W L T Pct PF Jacksonville 8 5 0 .615 295 Indianapolis 7 6 0 .538 347 Houston 5 8 0 .385 316 Tennessee 5 8 0 .385 291 North W L T Pct PF Pittsburgh 10 3 0 .769 290 Baltimore 9 4 0 .692 294 Cleveland 5 8 0 .385 235 Cincinnati 2 11 0 .154 262 West W L T Pct PF Kansas City 8 5 0 .615 295 San Diego 7 6 0 .538 354 Oakland 6 7 0 .462 314 Denver 3 10 0 .231 269 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Giants 9 4 0 .692 329 Philadelphia 9 4 0 .692 374 Washington 5 8 0 .385 238 Dallas 4 9 0 .308 321 South W L T Pct PF Atlanta 11 2 0 .846 335 New Orleans 10 3 0 .769 330 Tampa Bay 8 5 0 .615 260 Carolina 1 12 0 .077 164 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 9 4 0 .692 253 Green Bay 8 5 0 .615 306 Minnesota 5 8 0 .385 230 Detroit 3 10 0 .231 285 West W L T Pct PF Seattle 6 7 0 .462 261 St. Louis 6 7 0 .462 245 San Francisco 5 8 0 .385 243 Arizona 4 9 0 .308 243 x-clinched playoff spot ——— Monday’s Games N.Y. Giants 21, Minnesota 3

PA 276 242 244 339 PA 331 318 355 265 PA 198 229 252 345 PA 268 253 307 376 PA 250 308 310 366 PA 243 240 267 338 PA 228 189 274 309 PA 329 268 280 351

Louisville

Betting Line Favorite CHARGERS RAMS

NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Thursday 9 8.5 Sunday NL NL

Underdog

Fresno St Ohio U

Boise St

San Diego St

December 23 Poinsettia Bowl 1.5 5

Navy

Hawaii

December 24 Hawaii Bowl 12.5 11

Tulsa

Utah

December 26 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl 2 1.5 Florida Int’l December 27 Independence Bowl 1.5 2.5

West Virginia Missouri

Maryland Baylor Oklahoma St

December 28 Champ Sports Bowl 1.5 2.5 Insight Bowl PK 1 December 29 Eagle Bank Bowl 8 7.5 Texas Bowl 2 2 Alamo Bowl 5.5 6

December 30 Armed Forces Bowl 7 8 Pinstripe Bowl Kansas St 3 PK Music City Bowl North Carolina 1 2 Holiday Bowl Nebraska 13.5 13.5 Smu

Georgia Tech

NC State Iowa

East Carolina Illinois Arizona

Army Syracuse Tennessee Washington

December 31 Meineke Car Care Bowl Clemson 4.5 4.5 South Florida Sun Bowl Miami (Fla.) 2.5 3 Notre Dame Liberty Bowl Georgia 7 6.5 Central Florida Chick-Fil-A Bowl South Carolina 3 3 Florida St January 1 Dallas Ticket City Bowl 9.5 9.5 Northwestern Outback Bowl 7 7.5 Penn State Capital One Bowl 11 10 Michigan State Gator Bowl 5.5 5.5 Michigan Rose Bowl 2.5 2.5 Wisconsin Fiesta Bowl 17 17 Connecticut

Texas Tech Florida Alabama Miss. State Tcu Oklahoma

Stanford

January 3 Orange Bowl 3 3

Virginia Tech

Ohio State

January 4 Sugar Bowl 3.5 3.5

Arkansas

Miami (Ohio)

January 6 GMAC Bowl 1.5 1.5

Mid. Tenn. St.

Lsu

January 7 Cotton Bowl PK 1

Texas A&M

49ers Chiefs

Utep

December 22 Las Vegas Bowl 16.5 17

Air Force

College

VIKINGS

December 21 St. Petersburg Bowl 3 3 Southern Miss

Toledo

Associated Press All-America Team FIRST TEAM OFFENSE Quarterback — Cam Newton, junior, 6-foot-6, 250 pounds, Auburn. Running backs — LaMichael James, sophomore, 5-9, 185, Oregon; Kendall Hunter, junior, 5-9, 200, Oklahoma State. Tackles — Gabe Carimi, senior, 6-7, 327, Wisconsin; Nate Solder, senior, 6-9, 315, Colorado. Guards — Rodney Hudson, senior, 6-2, 282, Florida State; John Moffitt, senior, 6-5, 323, Wisconsin. Center — Chase Beeler, senior, 6-3, 285, Stanford. Tight end — Michael Egnew, junior, 6-6, 235, Missouri. Wide receivers — Justin Blackmon, sophomore, 6-1, 205, Oklahoma State; Ryan Broyles, junior, 5-11, 183, Oklahoma. All-purpose player — Randall Cobb, junior, 5-11, 186, Kentucky. Kicker — Alex Henery, senior, 6-2, 175, Nebraska. DEFENSE Ends — Da’Quan Bowers, junior, 6-4, 275, Clemson; Ryan Kerrigan, senior, 6-4, 263, Purdue. Tackles — Nick Fairley, junior, 6-5, 298, Auburn; Stephen Paea, senior, 6-1, 311, Oregon State. Linebackers — Luke Kuechly, sophomore, 6-3, 235, Boston College; Greg Jones, senior, 6-1, 240, Michigan State; Von Miller, senior, 6-3, 243, Texas A&M. Cornerbacks — Patrick Peterson, junior, 6-1, 222, LSU; Prince Amukamara, senior, 6-1, 205, Nebraska. Safeties — Tejay Johnson, senior, 6-1, 212, TCU; Quinton Carter, senior, 6-1, 200, Oklahoma. Punter — Chas Henry, junior, 6-3, 222, Florida. ——— SECOND TEAM OFFENSE Quarterback — Andrew Luck, sophomore, Stanford. Running backs — Jordan Todman, junior, Connecticut; Mikel Leshoure, junior, Illinois.

Texans Jaguars Cardinals Browns Bills Eagles Redskins Lions Saints SEAHAWKS Jets Broncos Packers

Troy

N. Illinois

Tackles — Lee Ziemba, senior, Auburn; Derek Sherrod, senior, Mississippi State. Guards — Stefen Wisniewski, senior, Penn State; Justin Boren, senior, Ohio State. Center — Jake Kirkpatrick, senior, TCU. Tight end — Lance Kendricks, senior, Wisconsin. Wide receivers — Alshon Jeffrey, sophomore, South Carolina; Julio Jones, junior, Alabama. All-purpose player — Damaris Johnson, junior, Tulsa. Kicker — Dan Bailey, senior, Oklahoma State. DEFENSE Ends — J.J. Watt, junior, Wisconsin; Jeremy Beal, senior, Oklahoma. Tackles — Drake Nevis, senior, LSU; Jared Crick, junior, Nebraska. Linebackers — Tank Carder, junior, TCU; Justin Houston, junior, Georgia; Lavonte David, junior, Nebraska. Cornerbacks — Jayron Hosley, sophomore, Virginia Tech; Cliff Harris, sophomore, Oregon. Safeties — Mark Barron, junior, Alabama; Ahmad Black, senior, Florida. Punter — Drew Butler, junior, Georgia. ——— THIRD TEAM OFFENSE Quarterback — Kellen Moore, junior, Boise State. Running backs — Vai Taua, senior, Nevada; John Clay, junior, Wisconsin. Tackles — Anthony Castonzo, senior, Boston College; Nate Potter, junior, Boise State. Guards — Barrett Jones, sophomore, Alabama; Caleb, Schlauderaff, senior, Utah. Center — Ryan Pugh, senior, Auburn. Tight end — D.J. Williams, senior, Arkansas. Wide receivers — Greg Salas, sophomore, Hawaii; Titus Young, senior, Boise State. All-purpose player — Denard Robinson, sophomore, Michigan. Kicker — Dannny Hrapmann, junior, Southern Mississippi. DEFENSE Ends — Adrian Clayborn, senior, Iowa; Sam Acho, senior, Texas. Tackles — Billy Winn, junior, Boise State; Marcell Dareus, junior, Alabama. Linebackers — Mason Foster, senior, Washington; Nate Irving, senior, North Carolina State; Akeem Ayers, junior, UCLA. Cornerbacks — Reggie Rembert, senior, Air Force; Stephon Gilmore, freshman, South Carolina. Safeties — Rahim Moore, junior, UCLA; Eric Hagg, senior, Nebraska. Punter — Kyle Martens, junior, Rice.

1.5 5 2.5 2 5.5 3 6 6 2 6 6 6.5 NL Monday NL NL

College December 18 New Mexico Bowl 12 11.5 Humanitarian Bowl 3 1 New Orleans Bowl PK 1

Byu

Baltimore 34, Houston 28, OT Thursday’s Game San Francisco at San Diego, 5:20 p.m. Sunday’s Games Kansas City at St. Louis, 10 a.m. Washington at Dallas, 10 a.m. Houston at Tennessee, 10 a.m. Arizona at Carolina, 10 a.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m. Detroit at Tampa Bay, 10 a.m. Cleveland at Cincinnati, 10 a.m. Buffalo at Miami, 10 a.m. Jacksonville at Indianapolis, 10 a.m. New Orleans at Baltimore, 10 a.m. Atlanta at Seattle, 1:05 p.m. Denver at Oakland, 1:15 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Pittsburgh, 1:15 p.m. Green Bay at New England, 5:20 p.m. Monday, Dec. 20 Chicago at Minnesota, 5:30 p.m.

1.5 5 2.5 1 6 3 6 5.5 2 6.5 6.5 6.5 NL

January 8 BBVA Compass Bowl 2.5 3.5

Pitt

Nevada

Auburn

Kentucky

January 9 Fight Hunger Bowl 9 9.5 Boston College January 10 BCS National Championship 2.5 3

Oregon

BASKETBALL Men’s college Tuesday’s Games ——— FAR WEST Pacific 69, Santa Clara 59 S. Utah 68, Okla. Panhandle St. 51 Saint Mary’s, Calif. 75, UC Riverside 56 Wyoming 55, Denver 43 SOUTHWEST Louisiana Tech 80, Houston Baptist 57 Texas 70, North Florida 48 MIDWEST Chicago St. 88, Trinity, Ill. 69 Cincinnati 99, Georgia Southern 54 DePaul 61, Wis.-Milwaukee 47 Michigan 64, N.C. Central 44 N. Illinois 80, Ill.-Chicago 78 North Dakota 74, Mayville St. 57 Wright St. 53, Cent. Michigan 49 SOUTH Jackson St. 80, Spring Hill 32 Mississippi St. 67, Alabama St. 46 Oakland, Mich. 89, Tennessee 82 Tulane 57, New Orleans 53 EAST American U. 66, UMBC 53 Rutgers 79, Fairleigh Dickinson 65 St. Francis, NY 69, Dartmouth 61

30 29 31 30

16 10 4 36 108 95 13 12 4 30 71 86 13 15 3 29 84 91 11 14 5 27 78 105 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 30 18 10 2 38 86 82 Anaheim 33 16 13 4 36 87 98 Los Angeles 28 17 10 1 35 78 65 San Jose 30 15 10 5 35 90 87 Phoenix 28 14 8 6 34 81 77 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Tuesday’s Games Philadelphia 3, Pittsburgh 2 Toronto 4, Edmonton 1 Today’s Games Boston at Buffalo, 4 p.m. Phoenix at New Jersey, 4 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Anaheim at Washington, 4 p.m. St. Louis at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. Atlanta at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Carolina at Florida, 4:30 p.m. San Jose at Nashville, 5 p.m. Colorado at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. Columbus at Vancouver, 7 p.m.

DEALS Transactions

Women’s college Tuesday’s Games ——— FAR WEST Denver 56, N. Colorado 45 Oregon St. 62, Weber St. 55 UC Riverside 74, Oregon 69 UC Santa Barbara 86, CS Bakersfield 83, OT SOUTHWEST Ark.-Little Rock 72, Saint Mary’s, Calif. 60 Baylor 65, Tennessee 54 MIDWEST Ohio St. 87, S.C.-Upstate 55 UC Davis 78, Wichita St. 66 Wright St. 75, S. Illinois 53 SOUTH Alabama A&M 75, Minnesota 68 Campbell 67, N.C. Central 61 Georgia Southern 54, Stetson 49 LSU 77, Texas Southern 47 McNeese St. 60, Louisiana-Monroe 41 Savannah St. 57, Alabama St. 45 South Florida 63, Wake Forest 54

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts Philadelphia 32 20 7 5 45 Pittsburgh 32 21 9 2 44 N.Y. Rangers 32 18 13 1 37 New Jersey 29 8 19 2 18 N.Y. Islanders 28 5 18 5 15 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts Montreal 30 18 10 2 38 Boston 28 16 8 4 36 Ottawa 32 13 16 3 29 Buffalo 30 12 14 4 28 Toronto 30 12 14 4 28 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts Washington 32 18 11 3 39 Atlanta 31 17 11 3 37 Tampa Bay 30 16 10 4 36 Carolina 28 12 12 4 28 Florida 28 13 15 0 26 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts Detroit 29 19 7 3 41 Nashville 29 15 8 6 36 Chicago 32 16 13 3 35 Columbus 29 16 11 2 34 St. Louis 28 14 9 5 33 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts Vancouver 28 16 8 4 36

Colorado Minnesota Calgary Edmonton

GF GA 108 78 103 74 96 83 53 88 59 98 GF 78 81 71 78 69

GA 61 56 96 84 87

GF GA 98 92 99 91 94 106 78 87 71 72 GF GA 96 78 76 70 101 96 76 79 72 75 GF 91

GA 74

BASEBALL American League DETROIT TIGERS—Released RHP Alfredo Figaro and sold his contract to Orix (Japanese Pacific League). NEW YORK YANKEES—Agreed to terms with RHP Mariano Rivera on a two-year contract. OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Agreed to terms with DH/OF Hideki Matsui on a one-year contract. TAMPA BAY RAYS—Named Steve Watson pitching coach of Charlotte (FSL) and Neil Allen pitching coach of Durham (IL). National League CINCINNATI REDS—Agreed to terms with OF Jay Bruce on a six-year contract. LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Agreed to terms with C Dioner Navarro on a one-year contract. PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Agreed to terms with 1B Lyle Overbay on a one-year contract and OF Matt Diaz on a two-year contract. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Agreed to terms with C Gerald Laird on a one-year contract. WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Agreed to terms with OF/1B Matt Stairs on a minor league contract. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association MEMPHIS GRIZZLIES—Assigned F DeMarre Carroll to Dakota (NBADL). FOOTBALL National Football League BUFFALO BILLS—Placed WR Lee Evans on injured reserve and TE Shawn Nelson on the reserve, non-football injury/illness list. Signed G Colin Brown and T Erik Pears. Signed WR Bobby Williams to the practice squad. Released OL Marc Dile from the practice squad. CAROLINA PANTHERS—Placed G Travelle Wharton, DE Everette Brown and LB Jason Williams on injured reserve. Signed DT Corvey Irvin and CB R.J. Stanford from the practice squad. Signed DT Tommie Duhart to the practice squad. CLEVELAND BROWNS—Signed DB Coye Francies. Waived DB Eric King. Signed LB Eric Bakhtiari to the practice squad. MIAMI DOLPHINS—Placed OT Vernon Carey on injured reserve. Signed WR Kevin Curtis. MINNESOTA VIKINGS—Placed CB Chris Cook on injured reserve. Signed OT Thomas Welch from the practice squad. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES—Signed DE Derrick Burgess. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Placed WR Deon Butler on injured reserve. Signed G Paul Fanaika from Cleveland’s practice squad. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS—Placed DT Gerald McCoy and LB Quincy Black on injured reserve. Signed DE George Johnson and LB Tyrone McKenzie from the practice squad. WASHINGTON REDSKINS—Released P Hunter Smith. Signed P Sam Paulescu. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS—Signed senior vice president of hockey operations David McNab and coach Randy Carlyle to a contract extension through the 2011-12 season. CAROLINA HURRICANES—Recalled D Bryan Rodney from Charlotte (AHL) on an emergency basis. NEW JERSEY DEVILS—Placed LW Brian Rolston on waivers. Recalled C Tim Sestito from Albany (AHL). NEW YORK ISLANDERS—Returned D Dylan Reese and R Rhett Rakhshani to Bridgeport (AHL). VANCOUVER CANUCKS—Assigned F Guillaume Desbiens to Manitoba (AHL). SOCCER Major League Soccer DC UNITED—Signed D Ethan White. COLLEGE ARKANSAS-MONTICELLO—Named William “Hud” Jackson football coach. CONNECTICUT—Added freshman C Enosch Wolf to the men’s basketball roster.

NFL

Running backs, defenders familiar with helmet knocks The league is cracking down on defensive players who lead with the helmet, but offensive players are free to lower their heads

Union’s concussion committee talks about 18 games WASHINGTON — The medical director for the NFL players’ union says there could be about 250,000 additional plays — and therefore extra collisions and extra injuries — in the regular season if the league moves to an 18-game schedule. “It’s hard for me, as a physician advising the players, to say, ‘You’re not going to have more injuries, including concussions, with a quarter of a million more snaps,’” said Dr. Thom Mayer, co-chairman of the Mackey-White Traumatic Brain Injury Committee, which met Tuesday at the union’s headquarters. The league has made increasing the regular-season schedule from 16 games to 18 a centerpiece of its negotiations with the union for a new collective bargaining agreement. The CBA expires in March, and the union has said it expects the owners to lock out the players. According to NFL data obtained by The Associated Press, the number of concussions being reported this season is up more than 20 percent from 2009, and more than 30 percent from 2008. — The Associated Press

By R.B. Fallstrom The Associated Press

ST. LOUIS — A couple of weeks ago, Steven Jackson figured he made helmetto-helmet contact on a dozen of his 28 carries against the Cardinals. Sometimes it was a matter of defenders taking a certain angle, sometimes it was the St. Louis Rams’ bruiser lowering the boom for that extra yard. Just another typical, head-jarring day for a punishing 235-pound back closing in on his sixth consecutive 1,000-yard season. Giving it, taking it, playing hard but clean. “I feel like there’s very few guys that intentionally try to tackle with their head and to knock guys out,” said Jackson, now in his seventh season. “The times I have had concussions, I’ve just taken it as a part of the game and that guys are just playing fast.” Even as NFL data shows that the number of reported concussions has increased more than 20 percent from 2009, and more than 30 percent from 2008, the guys who grind out the tough yards — and some of those who tackle them — say knocking heads is inevitable. Their overriding sentiment: let’s just play. “It’s not a tickling contest,” Rams defensive end James Hall said. “I’m not looking for any protection.” There’s nothing stopping Jackson, Michael Turner or Arian Foster from ramming forward, full speed ahead for the first-down marker. Jackson gave Cardinals linebacker Harold Hayes a good, incidental conking on a no-gain carry to

Gerald Herbert / The Associated Press

St. Louis Rams running back Steven Jackson (39) is upended by New Orleans Saints safety Darren Sharper during a game on Sunday. Running backs like Jackson say helmet-to-helmet contact is nearly unavoidable during an NFL game. start the second half back on Dec. 5. Arizona safety Adrian Wilson clocked Jackson a couple of times with helmeton-helmet contact, and Hayes got in a lick when he pushed Jackson out of bounds on another play. Nobody was jumping up and down, tapping their helmet and begging for a call. Just football. “I hope they don’t start fining the running backs for leading with their helmets because the linebackers and tackles definitely are not defenseless players,” Falcons fullback Ovie Mughelli said. “If they can’t get out of the way, that sounds like a personal problem for them.” Back in Pop Warner ball, running backs are taught to stay low. It gives tack-

lers a smaller target, and it’s safer for the runner. So guess which part of the body is out front? “I know people don’t want us to run through the hole straight up and get our chests blown off,” Broncos running back Correll Buckhalter said. “It’s just a natural thing for the running back to run with his head down.” Vikings running back Adrian Peterson never worries about getting penalized for lowering his head. The defender who lowers his head in response will, he believes, attract all the attention. “Actually, I’ve had a couple of collisions where I thought, ‘Hey, well, maybe that guy’s going to get fined because I know that was a helmet-to-helmet hit,’” Peter-

son said. “But there was no fine issued and it was no big deal to me. It is what it is.” Broncos rookie running back Knowshon Moreno said the only way through some holes is to “submarine through,” though he believes that makes him more vulnerable. “If the running back has his head down, all sorts of things can happen,” he said. It is difficult, if not impossible, for a defensive player to be ruled defenseless. So, advantage offense. “You get a lot of running backs trying to ram into you, Earl Campbell-esque,” Broncos linebacker Mario Haggan said. “The last thing you want to do is hit a guy who’s 250 pounds like Steven Jackson and think about the way you’re going to hit him.” Earlier this season, Packers linebacker Nick Barnett complained he’s faced too many backs with their heads straight down “trying to truck you.” Cowboys linebacker DeMarcus Ware said there’s a double standard, adding, “If they are leading with their head and you hit them, they’re not going to call it.” Broncos outside linebacker Jason Hunter isn’t alone in questioning some of

the fines handed out for helmet-to-helmet hits. “I understand the league wants to try and protect its players, and do everything they can to make sure everybody’s playing safe and fair,” Hunter said. “But at the same time it’s a violent game, and sometimes when you’re going in there at 100 mph you’re not focused on how you’re going to hit the guy, you’re just going to make the hit.” Added Falcons linebacker Erik Coleman: “You don’t have air brakes. You can’t stop when you’ve left your feet.” Ron Bartell, the Rams’ top coverage cornerback, missed Sunday’s loss at New Orleans with a stinger to his neck and left shoulder suffered in a game a week earlier. “It’s one of those things, if you take a hit the wrong way or tackle somebody the wrong way it’s something that just may happen,” Bartell said. He said bluntly that the NFL is guilty of “overlegislating.” “It’s easy for them to sit back and make judgments when they’re never played the game, especially nowadays and guys are so big and so fast,” Bartell said. “I understand about protecting players but it’s a little bit overboard.”


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, December 15, 2010 D3

PREP ROUNDUP

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Football • Ducks’ James named allAmerican: University of Oregon running back LaMichael James was named to The Associated Press All-America team Tuesday. The NCAA’s leading rusher with 1,682 yards and 22 total touchdowns, James was previously named All-America by the American Football Coaches Association, the Walter Camp Football Foundation and the Football Writers Association of America. Sophomore Cliff Harris made the AP’s second team at cornerback. No player in college football has more pass breakups than Harris, who recorded 15 during the regular season. Heisman Trophy winner Cam Newton and defensive tackle Nick Fairley from Auburn were also voted to The Associated Press All-America football team along with James. The top-ranked Tigers and No. 2 Ducks will play in the Bowl Championship Series title game Jan. 10 in Glendale, Ariz. Auburn is one of five teams with two players on the first team, along with Wisconsin, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State and Nebraska. Heisman runner-up Andrew Luck of Stanford was the second-team quarterback. For a complete list, see Scoreboard, Page D2. • Seattle places Butler on IR: The Seattle Seahawks have placed wide receiver Deon Butler on injured reserve and signed offensive lineman Paul Fanaika off the Cleveland Browns practice squad. The Seahawks made the moves on Tuesday. Butler suffered a broken right leg catching a 2-yard touchdown pass late in Seattle’s 40-21 loss to San Francisco on Sunday. Butler underwent surgery Sunday night at Stanford Hospital and was expected to remain in the Bay Area for a few days. He finished the season with 36 catches for 385 yards and four TDs. Fanaika was originally a seventh-round pick of Philadelphia in 2009. He spent the end of last season on Washington’s active roster before signing with the Browns in the offseason. • Broncos’ Cox sex charges carry life sentence: Denver Broncos rookie cornerback Perrish Cox faces up to life in prison if convicted of sexual assault charges filed by prosecutors last week. A portion of the case unsealed by a Douglas County judge Tuesday shows the sexual assault charges are Class 3 and Class 4 felonies, which carry a sentence of between two years to life in prison. They involve a helpless victim. Other details of the case remain sealed. Cox, who played in the Broncos’ loss to the Arizona Cardinals on Sunday, is free on $50,000 bail. Cox could face a four-game suspension from the NFL next season for violating the league’s personal conduct code. Commissioner Roger Goodell doesn’t need a player to be convicted to punish him. • Muschamp introduced as Florida coach: Will Muschamp spent part of his childhood in Gainesville, growing up just a few streets from Florida Field and cheering for the Gators. He left in the mid-80s, then returned as a player at Georgia and as an assistant coach with Auburn and LSU. He’s back again — this time in a much different capacity. Muschamp, who agreed to a five-year contract worth $13.5 million to replace Urban Meyer, was formally introduced as Florida’s new coach Tuesday. He took center stage for a 40-minute news conference filled with confidence, enthusiasm and witty one-liners. Muschamp says he plans to hire his staff after the Outback Bowl and intends to install a pro-style offense, welcome news for Florida fans who groaned about the spread all season. • QB-thin Vikings hope Favre can return: Brett Favre’s career isn’t quite over yet. The Minnesota Vikings have been eliminated from playoff contention, but they still need someone to play quarterback for their final three games. Interim coach Leslie Frazier said the 41-yearold Favre is his choice — and he may be back in time for Monday night’s game against Chicago. Favre was feeling better Tuesday, according to Frazier, after his NFL-record streak of starting 297 straight regularseason games ended Monday with him on the sideline at Ford Field in Detroit during Minnesota’s loss to the Giants. He is nursing a sprained throwing shoulder and a numb hand, but an ultrasound on Favre’s neck and shoulder revealed no nerve

Cowboys top Lava Bears in wrestling

damage, Frazier said. • Vikings change venues as Metrodome roof gets fixed: The Minnesota Vikings are getting ready for a frigid night of football after officials said Tuesday that the Metrodome’s torn roof won’t be ready for Monday night’s matchup against the Chicago Bears, forcing the game to move to University of Minnesota’s TCF Bank Stadium. Inspectors found that damage from the weekend snowstorm that dumped more than 17 inches in Minneapolis and busted through the Metrodome’s Teflon roof was worse than initially thought, according to the Metropolitan Sports Facilities Commission. • Terrell Owens blames Bengals coaches: Receiver Terrell Owens says the Cincinnati Bengals’ lousy season is the result of underachieving “from the top down,” and he particularly points a finger at the coaches. Teammate Chad Ochocinco asked Owens during “The T.Ocho Show” on the Versus cable network Tuesday night why he thinks the team is 2-11. “I think there’s underachieving from the top down,” Owens said. “You start with the owner, you start with the coaches. And obviously we as players, we are a product of what the coaches are coaching us throughout the course of the week.”

Bulletin staff report

Soccer • Gay rights groups condemn FIFA exec: A leading international gay rights group demanded Tuesday that FIFA make an official apology following Sepp Blatter’s comment about homosexual fans thinking of traveling to Qatar for the 2022 World Cup. Blatter, president of world football’s governing body, said Monday in an apparently lighthearted remark that gay fans “should refrain from any sexual activities” during the tournament in Qatar, where homosexual behavior is illegal. Juris Lavrikovs, communications director for the European branch of the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association, said the comments were “very unfortunate and have left people deeply offended. I think they should come out with a strong statement and not just wash it away and hide behind it with some wishy-washy comments. We are talking about a very basic human right that is being violated.”

Basketball • N.J.’s Williams to Houston in 3-team deal: The Houston Rockets will acquire swingman Terrence Williams from New Jersey in a three-team trade that gives the Nets two more first-round draft picks for potential use in a Carmelo Anthony deal, a person with knowledge of the trade said Tuesday. The Nets would receive the Rockets’ first-round draft pick in 2012, the Los Angeles Lakers’ first-round pick in 2011 and current Lakers shooting guard Sasha Vujacic, the person told The Associated Press on Tuesday. The Lakers get veteran Joe Smith in the trade, which was first reported by Yahoo.com. The deal cannot be completed until today, because Smith signed with the Nets in the offseason as a free agent and is not eligible to be dealt until Dec. 15.

Baseball • A’s and Matsui finalize deal: The Oakland Athletics have landed their new designated hitter. The A’s and free agent slugger Hideki Matsui finalized a $4.25 million, oneyear contract Tuesday after he passed a physical. The sides had agreed to terms during the weekend. Matsui can earn an additional $100,000 in bonuses. Oakland formally introduced Matsui on Tuesday afternoon in a news conference attended by more than 100 media members — mostly Japanese — and featuring 17 television cameras. • Reds announce RF Bruce’s $51M, 6-year deal: General manager Walt Jocketty officially announced on Tuesday that the Cincinnati Reds and Bruce had reached agreement on a six-year contract through the 2016 season with a club option for 2017. The outfielder’s deal is worth $51 million. The 23-yearold Bruce established himself as one of the NL’s premier right fielders while helping the Reds win the NL Central title. He hit .281 with 25 home runs and 70 RBIs in 148 games. — From wire reports

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Summit player Kristen Parr goes up for a shot while being guarded by Redmond player Monica Johnson, left, during the first half of Tuesday night’s game in Bend.

Storm Continued from D1 Summit could afford to switch to cruise control in the second half, still holding a comfortable margin over the 0-3 Panthers. “Their zone really hurt us,” noted Redmond coach Nathan Covill. Redmond put up 13 points to Summit’s nine in the final period, but the damage had been done. “We’ve got to get more consistent scor-

ing,” added Covill. Kaleigh Phillips led the home team with a game-high 13 points, while Raja Char posted 11 points and was 9 for 11 from the foul line. Karlee Nordstrom led the Panthers’ effort with nine points, and Jesslyn Albrecht recorded her second 12-rebound game of the season. Redmond is at Sheldon Friday in search of its first win, while Summit travels to face Crescent Valley Friday in the two-day Ashland Tournament.

PREP SCOREBOARD BASKETBALL Tuesday’s results

Girls ——— CLASS 4A NONCONFERENCE ——— SISTERS (39) — Taylor Nieri 12, Henson 9, McConville 5, Kaiser 3, Herron 2, Allen 2, Yozcamp 2, Kernutt 2. Totals 15 7-13 39. MADRAS (47) — Lucy Suppah 13, Scott 9, Wahnetah 6, M. Smith 4, J. Smith 4, Sampson, R. Suppah. Totals 15 14-28 47. Sisters 9 13 8 9 — 39 Madras 8 13 15 11 — 47 Three-point goals — Sisters: Nieri 2; Madras: L. Suppah 2, Scott. ——— INTERMOUNTAIN HYBRID ——— REDMOND (28) — Karlee Nordstrom 9, Flanagan 4, Edwards 4, Wilson 4, Albrecht 4, Capps 4, Quackernack. Totals 13 1-6 28. SUMMIT (42) — Kaleigh Phillips 13, Char 11, Edwards 7, Parr 6, Solomon 5, Gieber, Audia. Totals 13 16-23 42. Redmond 3 6 6 13 — 28 Summit 14 11 8 9 — 42 Three-point goals — Redmond: Nordstrom

Boys ——— INTERMOUNTAIN HYBRID ——— REDMOND (57) — Carter 26, Mitch Dahlen 12, Lau 12, Matt Dahlen 3, Gerdes 2, Larkin 2, Genz, McGhehey, Tavita, Jackson, Reed. Totals 21 12-19 57. SUMMIT (37) — Cramer 21, Soto 6, Menefee 5, Peters 3, Hamann 2, Laubacher, Cattell, Bishop, Mauser, Moore. Totals 13 5-7 37. Redmond 10 19 12 16 — 57

Summit 11 12 9 5 — 37 Three-point goals — Sisters: Lau 2, Matt Dahlen. Summit: Cramer 5, Peters. ——— CLASS 4A NONCONFERENCE ——— SISTERS (48) — Erickson 21, Harrison 17, Boehm 5, Hodges 1, Mickel 2, Miller 2. Totals 19 8-11 48. MADRAS (43) — Queaphama-Mehlberg 14, Ahern 14, Haugen 2, Brown, 1, Palmer 4, McConnell 4, Zacharias 4. Totals 18 5-9 43. Sisters 13 10 11 14 — 48 Madras 14 9 9 11 — 43 Three-point goals — Sisters: Harrison, Boehm. Madras: Queaphama-Mehlberg 2.

WRESTLING CROOK COUNTY AT BEND DUAL Team score — Crook County 71, Bend 3. 125 — Dawson Barber, CC, def. Tyler Ornelas, B. 130 — Cole McCarty, CC, def. Cody Bullard, B, 4:28. 135 — Andy Katzenberger, CC, def. Greg Prescott, B, 3:55. 140 — Cody Pfau, CC, def. Nathan Ellis, B, 1:09. 145 — Jared George, CC, def. Nick Warren, B, 1:52. 152 — Trevor Wilson, CC, def. Isaac Simar, B, 1:58. 160 — Jake Zeigler, CC, def. Gunnar Crawford, B, 7-4. 171 — Trevor Augh, CC, def. Willie Abt, B, 4-0. 189 — Bryson Martin, CC, def. Kenny Dailey, B, 16-1. 215 — Shane Buck, B, def. Rhett Smith, CC, 11-5. 285 — Alex Pierce, CC, def. D.J. Thompson, B, 2:41. 103 — Brent Howard, CC, by forfeit. 112 — Grayson Munn, CC, def. Noah Haines, B, 1:12. 119 — John Crites, CC, def. Nico Spring, B, 1:26.

SWIMMING BEND AT REDMOND DUAL Tuesday’s results At Cascade Swim Center, Redmond BOYS Team scores — Redmond 102; Bend 68.

200 medley relay — 1, Redmond, 2:00.33; 2, Bend ‘A,’ 2:07.97; 3, Bend ‘B,’ 2:16.37. 200 freestyle— 1, Matthew Carpenter, R, 2:08.48; 2, Matthew Kerins, B, 2:27.54; 3, Michael Bird, B, 2:33.53. 200 individual medley— 1, Joshua DeCelles, B, 2:40.16; 2, Ryan Clark, R, 2:46.34; 3, Andrew Leyton, R, 2:49.52. 50 freestyle — 1, Jake White, R, 25.8; 2, Teddy Tsai, R, 27.94; 3, William O’Connell, B, 28.45. 100 butterfly — 1, Justin Gillette, B, 1:12.81; 2, Tom Gilbert, R, 1:13.43; 3, Teddy Tsai, R, 1:13.66. 100 freestyle — 1, Jake White, R, 58.74; 2, Mitchell McGinnis, B, 1:05.71; 3, William O’Connell, B, 1:06.52. 400 freestyle — 1, Tom Gilbert, R, 5:02.5; 2, Philip Aulie, R, 5:02.94; 3, Matthew Kerins, B, 5:13.04. 200 freestyle relay — 1, Redmond ‘A,’ 1:47.76; 2, Bend, 1:56.72; 3, Redmond ‘C,’ 1:59.44. 100 backstroke — 1, Matthew Carpenter, R, 1:05.12; 2, Philip Aulie, R, 1:10.2; 3, Justin Short, B, 1:14.16. 100 breaststroke — 1, Joshua DeCelles, B, 1:16.56; 2, Ryan Clark, R, 1:19.96; 3, Jon Wash, R, 1:29.77. 400 freestyle relay — 1, Redmond ‘A,’ 4:25.65; 2, Bend, 4:28.72; Redmond ‘C,’ 4:48.37. GIRLS Team scores — Redmond 107, Bend 62. 200 medley relay — 1, Redmond A, 2:19.30; 2, Bend High A, 2:19.74; 3, Redmond C, 2:36.15. 200 freestyle — 1, Haley Houghton, R, 2:24.29; 2, Bailey Kosanke, R, 2:26.59; 3, Ciarra Hogue, 2:40.09. 200 individual medley — 1, Brooke Miller, B, 2:38.74; 2, Teagan Perkins, R, 2:42.46; 3, Rachel Haney, R, 2:42.90. 50 freestyle — 1, Jenny Whitem Rm 30.29; 2, Rachel Haney, R, 31.05; 3, Madeleine Torres, B, 31.22. 100 butterfly — 1, Brooke Miller, 2, Marissa Vallie, R, 1:15.47; 3, Haley Houghton, R, 1:17.13. 100 freestyle — 1, Rita Cohen, R, 1:10.04; 2, Kaylin Ivy, B, 1:11.08; 3, Madeleine Torres, B, 1:11.46. 500 freestyle —1, Name, School, time. 200 freestyle relay — 1, Redmond A, 2:04.29; 2, Bend A, 2:07.99; 3, Redmond B, 2:08.19. 100 backstroke — 1, Jenny White, R, 1:18.09; 2, Allison Moss, R, 1:21.31; 3, Nikki Hancock, B, 1:35.02. 100 breaststroke — 1, Teagan Perkins, R, 1:24.20; 2, Marissa Vallie, R, 1:25.72; 3, Ciara Hogue, B, 1:26.48. 400 freestyle relay — 1, Redmond A, 4:36.17; 2, Bend A, 4:57.44; 3, Bend B, 5:42.01.

NHL ROUNDUP

Flyers end Penguins’ win streak The Associated Press PHILADELPHIA — The Pittsburgh Penguins’ winning streak came to an end even as Sidney Crosby kept his point-scoring run alive. Scott Hartnell scored a power-play goal at 9:54 of the third period and the Philadelphia Flyers snapped Pittsburgh’s 12-game winning streak with a 3-2 victory on Tuesday night. “It’s the battle of Pennsylvania,” Hartnell said. “It was a big measuring game. It was intense and we played well enough to win.” Pittsburgh center Evgeni Malkin returned after missing four games with a knee injury, and scored two goals to give him 10 for the season. Crosby assisted on both of Malkin’s goals, extending his point streak to 19 games. He has 20 goals and 18 assists in matching his career-long streak from Oct. 6-Nov. 17, 2007. Crosby has 62 points (26 goals, 36 assists) in 36 career games against Philadelphia.

“You never like losing and just because we won however many we won doesn’t change that feeling, and I don’t think it ever will,” Crosby said. “You go out there and you work hard and you have an objective in mind to win a game and you don’t — so no, it’s not a good feeling. Luckily for us we have a game (Wednesday) night, so we can look to respond.” Claude Giroux and Nikolay Zherdev also scored for the Flyers, who have won five of six games to vault into first place in the Atlantic Division. Philadelphia (20-7-5) also leads the NHL with 45 points. The Penguins hadn’t lost since a 3-2 overtime defeat to the New York Rangers on Nov. 15. Also on Tuesday: Maple Leafs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Oilers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 EDMONTON, Alberta — Kris Versteeg had a goal and an assist and Toronto kicked off its Western Canada road trip with a victory over Edmonton.

Crook County won in convincing fashion on Tuesday night, as the Class 4A Cowboys defeated Class 5A Bend 71-3. The Cowboys scored 47 points against the Lava Bears in Bend before the host school earned its only victory of the night. “We were aggressive and it paid off,” said Crook County coach Jake Huffman. The lone win for Bend was Shane Buck at 215 pounds, who beat Rhett Smith, 11-5. It was a solid road victory for the Cowboys, highlighted by Cody Pfau’s fall of Nathan Ellis at 140 pounds in just one minute and nine seconds and Bryson Martin’s 16-1 decision over Kenny Dailey at 189 pounds. “Our guys were ready to go,” added Huffman. “We’ve got more experience than they have at this point.” A great test awaits Crook County on Thursday night, when the Cowboys travel to defending Class 2A state champ Culver. Bend will compete in the Adrian Irwin Invitational hosted by Mountain View this weekend. BOYS BASKETBALL Redmond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Summit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 REDMOND — The visiting Storm led by a point after the first quarter, but Redmond senior Brad Carter led the charge from there as Redmond cruised to a 20-point victory in Intermountain Hybrid action. Twenty of Carter’s game-high 26 points came in the first half. Mitch Dahlen and Connor Lau each scored 12 points for the Panthers. Summit junior Dylan Cramer scored a team-high 21 points, including five three pointers. On Friday Redmond (1-2) will host Crook County, and Summit (1-4) will face Crescent Valley in the Ashland Rotary Hoops Classic. Sisters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43 SISTERS — The Outlaws’ explosive duo of John Erickson and Eli Harrison combined to score 38 of Sisters’ 48 points in a Class 4A victory over visiting Madras. Erickson tallied 21 and Harrison 17 in a game that wasn’t decided until the fourth quarter. “We got the ball inside and got better looks,” said Sisters coach Rand Runco about the final period. Justin Queaphama-Mehlberg and Bobby Ahern each scored 14 points for the White Buffaloes. On Thursday Sisters (2-1) plays at a tourney in Phoenix, while Madras (0-4) will face Astoria in the Seaside Classic. Culver-Western Mennonite postponed Weather conditions in the mountain passes prompted the postponement of Culver’s scheduled Tri-River Conference home games in both boys and girls basketball against Western Mennonite on Tuesday. The boys game has been rescheduled for next Monday, Dec. 20, at 6:30 p.m. at Culver High School, while the girls play at 5 p.m. Both teams travel to Lebanon to face East Linn Christian in conference games Friday. GIRLS BASKETBALL North Lake. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Central Christian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 SILVER LAKE — The Tigers fell by 33 points on the road. Central Christian (0-5) plays its first Class 1A Big Sky league game at Echo on Friday. Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Sisters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 MADRAS — Holding Sisters to 17 secondhalf points, Madras rolled to 4-0 after another strong defensive game. The White Buffaloes also received help from the bench in the form of Rachel Simmons, who recorded seven points, six rebounds and three steals. Lucy Suppah led Madras with a 13-point effort. Taylor Nieri scored 12 points for the Outlaws (0-3). Sisters is on the road at the Phoenix Invitational Thursday, while Madras travels to the Seaside Holiday Classic. SWIMMING Redmond sweeps in home meet REDMOND — The Panthers captured wins in both the boys and girls meet in a home dual against Bend High at the Cascade Swim Center. The boys won 102-68, and the girls prevailed 10762. The Panthers excelled in the relays, winning every team event on both the boys and girls sides. Brooke Miller scored wins for the Lava Bears in the 200-meter individual medley and the 100 butterfly. Jake White led Redmond with first-place finishes in the 50 and 100 freestyle. Jenny White added Panthers victories in the 50 freestyle, as well as the 100 back.

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

Oakland upsets No. 7 Tennessee The Associated Press KNOXVILLE, Tenn. — Keith Benson had 26 points and 10 rebounds and Oakland beat No. 7 Tennessee 89-82 on Tuesday night, three days after losing by a point to then-No. 7 Michigan State. The Vols held a 76-68 lead with just over seven minutes left in the game. Oakland (6-5) used a 13-0 run of mostly free throws and took an 81-76 lead. Brian Williams led the Vols (7-1) with 18 points and 13 rebounds. In other Top-25 games on Tuesday: Drexel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 No. 20 Louisville. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Gerald Colds scored 20 points and Drexel (7-1) handed Louisville (8-1) its first loss in its new downtown arena. No. 22 Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70 North Florida. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 AUSTIN, Texas — Gary Johnson scored 17 points and tied his career-high with 12 rebounds for Texas (8-2).


D4 Wednesday, December 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

NBA SCOREBOARD

NBA ROUNDUP

Anthony scores 35 as Nuggets handle Magic The Associated Press DENVER — Denver Nuggets general manager Masai Ujiri put the kibosh on the latest rumors and reports that star forward Carmelo Anthony was headed to the New Jersey Nets. “There’s nothing going on. Nothing,” Ujiri told The Associated Press as he walked out of the Pepsi Center with team president Josh Kroenke following Denver’s impressive 111-94 win over the Orlando Magic on Tuesday night. “I would think if ’Melo was getting traded, he’d know that right? He’s earned that,” Ujiri said as Kroenke nodded in agreement. The first Anthony heard of the latest buzz of a big trade to the Big Apple was from reporters crowded around his locker and checking their smart phones after he scored 35 points in the win over the Magic. “Who? I haven’t heard that one. Am I? I don’t know, dawg. This is new,” Anthony responded when a reporter relayed a report that he would be headed to New Jersey on Wednesday. “I haven’t heard that. I’m officially saying I know nothing about it,” Anthony added. “When I have some more information, you guys will know.” Asked if he expects to be at the Pepsi Center on Thursday night when Denver faces the Spurs, Anthony said: “I’ve got a game here Thursday night against San Antonio and that’s what I’m focused on. All that other stuff, I’m not even paying attention to right now. I don’t even know, you just caught me by surprise with that one.” A day earlier, Anthony denied an ESPN report that he had told the Nuggets he would only accept a trade to the New York Knicks. If this indeed was Anthony’s farewell, it was a good one. The Nuggets pulled away in the final five minutes to beat the Magic despite J.J. Redick’s career-high 29 points. With Denver leading 92-91, Arron Afflalo’s 3pointer jump-started the Nuggets on a 19-3 run to close the game.

SUMMARIES

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Tuesday’s Games

Nuggets 111, Magic 94 ORLANDO (94) Bass 5-11 0-0 10, Lewis 2-9 2-2 8, Howard 9-15 3-5 21, Nelson 1-10 2-2 4, V.Carter 6-15 4-4 18, Gortat 1-3 0-0 2, Redick 9-12 5-7 29, J.Williams 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 34-78 16-20 94. DENVER (111) Anthony 14-21 7-11 35, S.Williams 1-3 0-0 2, Nene 4-7 2-2 10, Lawson 6-12 3-3 16, Afflalo 6-10 0-0 15, Harrington 4-10 0-0 12, Smith 6-13 2-3 16, Ely 0-0 0-0 0, A.Carter 2-4 0-0 5, Forbes 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 43-80 14-19 111. Orlando 31 24 23 16 — 94 Denver 29 32 18 32 — 111 3-Point Goals—Orlando 10-27 (Redick 6-9, V.Carter 2-4, Lewis 2-7, Howard 0-1, J.Williams 0-2, Nelson 0-4), Denver 11-26 (Harrington 4-10, Afflalo 3-4, Smith 2-4, A.Carter 1-2, Lawson 1-4, Anthony 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Orlando 41 (Howard 14), Denver 49 (Anthony 11). Assists—Orlando 20 (Nelson 8), Denver 24 (Lawson 6). Total Fouls—Orlando 23, Denver 15. Technicals—V.Carter, Howard, Orlando Coach Van Gundy, Nene, Denver Coach Karl, Smith. A—16,247 (19,155).

Atlantic Division Boston New York Philadelphia Toronto New Jersey

W 19 16 9 9 6

Miami Orlando Atlanta Charlotte Washington

W 18 16 16 9 6

L 8 9 10 15 17

Chicago Indiana Milwaukee Detroit Cleveland

W 15 11 10 8 7

L 8 12 13 18 17

Jack Dempsey / The Associated Press

Orlando Magic guard Vince Carter, left, knocks the ball from the hands of Denver Nuggets forward Carmelo Anthony during the first half of Tuesday night’s game in Denver. Anthony hit 14 of 21 shots from the field and pulled down 11 rebounds. Nene had 10 points and 10 rebounds for the Nuggets, who were coming off a 1-3 trip and improved to an NBA-best 111 at home. Anthony’s three-point play put Denver on top 98-91 moments before Nene and Dwight Howard drew a double-technical for shoving each other under the Magic’s basket. Anthony added a rim-rattler of a dunk that sent the satisfied fans streaming to the exits with two minutes left and his free throw with 1:34 left capped his night. Howard had 21 points and 14 rebounds for Orlando. Orlando has dropped five of six with an increasingly shaky defense. “We’ve got to play defense. It’s got to be everybody,” Howard said. Also on Tuesday: Lakers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103 Wizards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89 WASHINGTON — Kobe Bryant took over the game by scoring 16 of his 24 points in the third quarter, and Andrew Bynum added seven points in his season debut as Los Angeles beat undermanned Washington.

76ers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Nets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 NEWARK, N.J. — Spencer Hawes scored a season-high 18 points and Philadelphia snapped an eight-game road losing streak by beating slumping New Jersey. Rockets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Kings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 HOUSTON — Luis Scola had 23 points and 10 rebounds in three quarters, and Houston cruised past Sacramento. Pistons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Hawks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 AUBURN HILLS, Mich. — Richard Hamilton scored 24 points and Detroit ended a fourgame losing streak. Bobcats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Raptors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Nazr Mohammed had 18 points and eight rebounds, Tyrus Thomas hit the go-ahead jumper with just over a minute left, and Charlotte overcame Stephen Jackson’s poor night to beat Toronto. Warriors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .108 Timberwolves. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99 OAKLAND, Calif. — Reggie Williams had 22 of his 26 points in the second half, Monta Ellis scored 34 points and Golden State snapped a seven-game losing streak.

Pistons 103, Hawks 80 ATLANTA (80) Williams 1-4 3-4 6, Smith 8-17 8-12 26, Horford 7-14 3-4 17, Bibby 6-11 0-0 14, Evans 1-2 0-0 3, Ja.Crawford 1-6 0-0 2, Wilkins 2-5 0-0 4, Pachulia 0-2 0-0 0, Teague 2-3 0-0 4, Powell 2-4 0-0 4. Totals 30-68 14-20 80. DETROIT (103) Prince 4-7 1-2 10, Monroe 2-3 1-2 5, Wallace 1-4 0-0 2, Stuckey 4-9 8-8 16, Hamilton 9-20 4-4 24, Villanueva 10-17 0-0 23, McGrady 5-9 2-2 16, Gordon 1-6 0-0 2, Wilcox 1-3 3-3 5. Totals 37-78 19-21 103. Atlanta 19 18 24 19 — 80 Detroit 28 21 15 39 — 103 3-Point Goals—Atlanta 6-14 (Bibby 2-3, Smith 2-3, Evans 1-2, Williams 1-3, Horford 0-1, Ja.Crawford 0-2), Detroit 10-22 (McGrady 4-6, Villanueva 3-7, Hamilton 2-4, Prince 1-1, Stuckey 0-1, Gordon 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Atlanta 39 (Horford 12), Detroit 48 (Villanueva 11). Assists—Atlanta 17 (Bibby 6), Detroit 26 (Stuckey 10). Total Fouls—Atlanta 18, Detroit 15. A—12,526 (22,076).

Bobcats 97, Raptors 91 TORONTO (91) Weems 4-13 0-0 9, Johnson 5-9 2-4 12, Bargnani 4-14 3-5 12, Bayless 6-14 3-4 17, DeRozan 7-14 0-3 14, Davis 3-5 0-0 6, Barbosa 4-11 1-2 12, Kleiza 3-9 2-3 9, Wright 0-0 0-0 0, Dorsey 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 36-89 11-21 91. CHARLOTTE (97) Wallace 5-7 6-10 16, Diaw 4-10 1-2 9, Mohammed 8-11 2-5 18, Augustin 4-12 3-4 12, Jackson 3-8 1-2 7, Thomas 6-12 2-3 14, K.Brown 5-8 0-0 10, Livingston 2-3 2-2 6, McGuire 0-1

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WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division

Rockets 118, Kings 105 SACRAMENTO (105) Greene 1-4 2-2 5, Thompson 5-10 5-5 15, Cousins 8-15 1-2 17, Udrih 5-8 0-0 10, Head 4-11 2-2 11, Landry 6-10 5-9 17, Casspi 3-6 2-2 10, Garcia 5-7 0-0 10, Jeter 4-7 0-0 8, Dalembert 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 42-80 17-22 105. HOUSTON (118) Battier 1-6 0-0 3, Scola 10-19 3-4 23, Hayes 5-6 1-1 11, Lowry 4-7 2-4 12, Martin 5-15 2-2 14, Budinger 7-10 1-2 18, Hill 4-8 5-5 13, Lee 5-10 1-2 11, Miller 2-4 1-1 7, Smith 3-5 0-0 6, Jeffries 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 46-92 16-21 118. Sacramento 30 18 24 33 — 105 Houston 27 31 33 27 — 118 3-Point Goals—Sacramento 4-11 (Casspi 2-2, Greene 1-1, Head 1-4, Thompson 0-1, Jeter 0-1, Garcia 0-1, Udrih 0-1), Houston 1023 (Budinger 3-4, Miller 2-4, Lowry 2-4, Martin 2-5, Battier 1-4, Smith 0-1, Jeffries 0-1). Fouled Out—Hill. Rebounds—Sacramento 48 (Thompson 10), Houston 46 (Scola 10). Assists—Sacramento 21 (Jeter, Udrih 6), Houston 31 (Lowry 9). Total Fouls—Sacramento 18, Houston 20. Technicals—Cousins. A—13,414 (18,043).

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L10 Str 5-5 W-2 5-5 L-3 2-8 W-1 1-9 L-2 3-7 L-3 ——— Tuesday’s Games

Charlotte 97, Toronto 91 L.A. Lakers 103, Washington 89 Houston 118, Sacramento 105 Golden State 108, Minnesota 99

Home 10-2 6-5 6-5 3-10 5-10

Philadelphia 82, New Jersey 77 Detroit 103, Atlanta 80 Denver 111, Orlando 94 Today’s Games

L.A. Lakers at Indiana, 4 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Cleveland at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Sacramento at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Milwaukee at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. Portland at Dallas, 6:30 p.m.

Boston at New York, 4 p.m. Chicago at Toronto, 4 p.m. Charlotte at Memphis, 5 p.m. Houston at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Minnesota at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Thursday’s Games

Washington at New Jersey, 4 p.m. San Antonio at Denver, 7:30 p.m.

Atlanta at Boston, 5 p.m. ——— All Times PST

0-0 0, Henderson 0-1 0-0 0, Carroll 2-2 1-1 5, D.Brown 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 39-75 18-29 97. Toronto 29 24 19 19 — 91 Charlotte 20 27 25 25 — 97 3-Point Goals—Toronto 8-26 (Barbosa 3-7, Bayless 2-5, Weems 1-3, Kleiza 1-4, Bargnani 1-4, DeRozan 0-3), Charlotte 1-6 (Augustin 1-2, Jackson 0-2, Diaw 0-2). Fouled Out—Jackson. Rebounds—Toronto 52 (Johnson 12), Charlotte 58 (Mohammed 8). Assists—Toronto 21 (Bayless 9), Charlotte 24 (Augustin 7). Total Fouls— Toronto 23, Charlotte 21. Technicals—Jackson. A—12,482 (19,077).

Lakers 103, Wizards 89 L.A. LAKERS (103) Artest 4-8 2-3 10, Odom 6-8 6-7 18, Gasol 6-11 4-6 16, Fisher 3-7 0-0 6, Bryant 7-13 6-10 24, Bynum 1-5 5-8 7, Walton 0-1 0-0 0, Barnes 1-5 2-2 4, Blake 0-3 0-0 0, Brown 6-13 2-2 16, Caracter 0-1 2-2 2. Totals 34-75 29-40 103.

WASHINGTON (89) Thornton 3-9 5-8 11, Yi 1-2 0-0 2, McGee 6-8 0-0 12, Hinrich 3-10 1-2 7, Arenas 5-15 0-0 11, Armstrong 2-6 0-0 4, Booker 4-7 1-1 9, Young 9-21 3-3 21, Seraphin 2-6 2-2 6, Martin 2-7 0-0 6. Totals 37-91 12-16 89. L.A. Lakers 22 35 35 11 — 103 Washington 24 22 24 19 — 89 3-Point Goals—L.A. Lakers 6-21 (Bryant 4-6, Brown 2-6, Odom 0-1, Artest 0-1, Blake 0-2, Fisher 0-2, Barnes 0-3), Washington 3-19 (Martin 2-6, Arenas 1-7, Hinrich 0-2, Young 04). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—L.A. Lakers 55 (Odom 10), Washington 55 (Booker, McGee, Seraphin 9). Assists—L.A. Lakers 23 (Gasol 7), Washington 19 (Arenas 10). Total Fouls—L.A. Lakers 19, Washington 28. A—16,513 (20,173).

Warriors 108, T’wolves 99 MINNESOTA (99)

Beasley 9-16 0-1 19, Love 6-18 1-2 13, Milicic 12-19 1-1 25, Ridnour 1-9 3-4 5, Johnson 2-5 0-0 4, Pekovic 1-2 0-1 2, Flynn 1-2 0-0 3, Brewer 1-6 8-10 11, Webster 6-8 3-5 17. Totals 39-85 16-24 99. GOLDEN STATE (108) D.Wright 4-14 2-3 12, Lee 4-10 2-2 10, Biedrins 3-4 1-4 7, Ellis 13-24 5-7 34, Williams 8-13 6-8 26, Law 3-4 2-3 9, Amundson 3-6 1-4 7, Radmanovic 1-2 0-0 3, Gadzuric 0-0 0-0 0, Udoh 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 39-77 19-31 108. Minnesota 25 26 25 23 — 99 Golden State 17 37 25 29 — 108 3-Point Goals—Minnesota 5-18 (Webster 2-2, Flynn 1-2, Brewer 1-2, Beasley 1-3, Love 0-3, Ridnour 0-3, Johnson 0-3), Golden State 11-22 (Williams 4-7, Ellis 3-4, D.Wright 2-8, Radmanovic 1-1, Law 1-2). Fouled Out—Beasley. Rebounds—Minnesota 52 (Love 14), Golden State 52 (Biedrins 12). Assists—Minnesota 26 (Ridnour 11), Golden State 21 (Ellis 6). Total Fouls—Minnesota 25, Golden State 20. Technicals—Minnesota defensive three second 2, Ellis, Golden State defensive three second. A—17,615 (19,596).

76ers 82, Nets 77 PHILADELPHIA (82) Iguodala 2-9 3-4 8, Brand 7-14 1-2 15, Hawes 8-11 0-0 18, Holiday 5-11 7-7 19, Meeks 4-13 3-4 12, Battie 2-3 0-0 4, Turner 0-3 0-0 0, Young 1-4 0-0 2, Speights 1-1 0-0 2, L.Williams 0-5 2-2 2. Totals 30-74 16-19 82. NEW JERSEY (77) Ross 0-0 0-0 0, Humphries 1-10 0-0 2, Lopez 6-11 4-4 16, Harris 4-11 5-8 14, Graham 3-7 0-0 6, Morrow 0-0 0-0 0, Outlaw 6-17 0-0 14, Farmar 3-10 3-4 10, Favors 3-6 4-7 10, Petro 0-1 0-0 0, Uzoh 2-9 1-1 5. Totals 28-82 17-24 77. Philadelphia 26 14 19 23 — 82 New Jersey 20 14 21 22 — 77 3-Point Goals—Philadelphia 6-16 (Hawes 2-3, Holiday 2-3, Iguodala 1-3, Meeks 1-6, L.Williams 0-1), New Jersey 4-13 (Outlaw 2-6, Harris 1-2, Farmar 1-3, Uzoh 0-1, Graham 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Philadelphia 45 (Turner 6), New Jersey 63 (Humphries, Favors 13). Assists—Philadelphia 20 (Holiday 5), New Jersey 13 (Harris 6). Total Fouls—Philadelphia 20, New Jersey 18. Technicals—Graham, New Jersey defensive three second. A—10,151 (18,500).

LEADERS Through Tuesday’s Games ——— SCORING G FG FT PTS AVG Durant, OKC 21 186 170 574 27.3 Bryant, LAL 25 226 175 664 26.6 Stoudemire, NYK 25 247 157 656 26.2 Nowitzki, DAL 24 232 118 605 25.2 Rose, CHI 22 209 86 544 24.7 Gordon, LAC 23 180 172 563 24.5 Ellis, GOL 25 236 101 610 24.4 James, MIA 26 210 175 625 24.0 Anthony, DEN 22 182 143 521 23.7 Westbrook, OKC 25 197 186 589 23.6 Wade, MIA 25 202 165 586 23.4 Williams, UTA 26 197 160 597 23.0 Martin, HOU 24 152 192 547 22.8 Howard, ORL 23 174 146 494 21.5 Beasley, MIN 23 199 70 487 21.2 Granger, IND 22 161 92 464 21.1 REBOUNDS G OFF DEF TOT AVG Love, MIN 25 120 269 389 15.6 Randolph, MEM 21 89 169 258 12.3 Howard, ORL 23 67 212 279 12.1 Griffin, LAC 25 97 200 297 11.9 Noah, CHI 23 93 177 270 11.7 Gasol, LAL 25 90 193 283 11.3 Camby, POR 25 86 192 278 11.1 Horford, ATL 26 65 190 255 9.8 Biedrins, GOL 25 82 163 245 9.8 Odom, LAL 25 58 186 244 9.8 ASSISTS G AST AVG Rondo, BOS 19 261 13.7 Nash, PHX 21 215 10.2 Williams, UTA 26 256 9.8 Paul, NOR 24 236 9.8 Kidd, DAL 24 213 8.9 Wall, WAS 15 133 8.9 Westbrook, OKC 25 219 8.8 Felton, NYK 25 218 8.7 Rose, CHI 22 183 8.3 Miller, POR 24 176 7.3

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, December 15, 2010 D5

Streak Continued from D1 “It brings you back down to earth and reminds you no matter how important you think you are, a lot of people don’t give two rips about you and what you’re doing,” Auriemma said. This week and possibly much longer, though, Auriemma and Wooden will be connected by college basketball’s most treasured winning streak. A victory against 11th-ranked Ohio State (7-1) on Sunday at Madison Square Garden would give top-ranked UConn (9-0) its 88th consecutive victory, matching the Division I record set by Wooden’s teams at UCLA from 1971 to 1974. The overall record is held by the women’s team at Wayland Baptist University of Plainview, Texas, which won 131 consecutive games from 1953 to 1958, nearly three decades before the NCAA began sponsoring women’s basketball. As UConn victories have piled up like snow, Auriemma has been careful not to compare himself to Wooden or UConn’s streak to UCLA’s, or his seven national titles at UConn to the 10 that Wooden won in 12 seasons with the Bruins, including seven in a row from 1967 to 1973. “What John Wooden and UCLA did will never be duplicated,” Auriemma said. He prefers to describe men’s and women’s basketball as trains traveling on parallel tracks. “We’re not competing against the same people,” Auriemma said. He added: “The only thing I would ever say is, we’re the only ones in position to be able to do something that everybody thinks is pretty significant. No one else has and no one else can right now. So now that we’re here, let’s get it done. Let’s win.” Pamela Grundy, a co-author of “Shattering the Glass: The Remarkable History of Women’s Basketball” (New Press, 2005), said the UConn and UCLA powerhouses should be appreciated as if they were boxers fighting in different weight classes. “Sugar Ray Robinson did not beat the heavyweights, but that doesn’t mean people didn’t think he was great,” Grundy said in a telephone interview. “You achieve within your own sphere.” Wooden told The Wall Street Journal before he died in June at age 99 that UConn’s streak was “good for the game,” adding, “There’s some incentive for others to come up to Connecticut’s level.”

The UConn and UCLA streaks occurred at identical times in the development of men’s and women’s college basketball. This season is the 30th in which the NCAA has sponsored women’s basketball and a postseason tournament. The 30th season of the men’s NCAA tournament occurred in 1968 — right in the middle of UCLA’s championship run. UConn’s success appears no less formidable than UCLA’s. The Huskies, seeking a third consecutive national title, play in a 64team NCAA tournament field, while UCLA played in a 25-team field until Wooden’s final championship in 1975. Only one team per conference was allowed into the men’s tournament in those days. And until the 1974 tournament, UCLA faced only teams from Western states to reach the Final Four, which limited challenges to the Bruins’ supremacy. As Sports Illustrated noted recently, the UConn women have defeated 16 teams ranked in the top 10 during their streak — six more than UCLA did. “This argument, is it as good as the UCLA streak? Absolutely,” Terri Mitchell, the longtime Marquette women’s coach, said here Thursday after the Golden Eagles lost to UConn, 79-47. In recent telephone interviews, some of Wooden’s former players spoke graciously about Connecticut. “If they break the record, it’s a great thing,” said Andre McCarter, a guard on UCLA’s 1975 championship team. “I’d ask Coach, what do you think about the record, and he’d say records are meant to be broken. His thinking was, we set ’em, come and get ’em. The Connecticut girls are saying, ‘We’re coming to get something from you.’ It’s definitely legitimate. Doing 88 of anything in a row is something: passing 88 tests, eating 88 doughnuts.” Marques Johnson, a forward on the 1975 UCLA team, said Wooden often spoke with admiration of women’s basketball. “He almost liked to watch women more than men,” Johnson said. “It reminded him of when he was a player. There is not excessive showboating. Free throws are made, open 15-foot jumpers are made. There are not a lot of dunks and crossovers that bring attention to the individual. It’s more about the team, the essence of what basketball is about.” Pete Trgovich, a guard on UCLA’s title teams of 1973 and 1975, said, “I want to congratulate them.” Then he laughed and added, “Just think, someday they

may compare us to those great Connecticut women’s teams.” UConn’s last defeat came against Stanford, 82-73, in the national semifinals on April 6, 2008. The current team is led by Maya Moore, a two-time national player of the year. Yet with five freshmen, inexperience at center and erratic perimeter shooting, this team is not considered the equal of UConn’s best team, the 2001-2 squad that finished 39-0 with Sue Bird, Diana Taurasi, Swin Cash, Asjha Jones and Tamika Williams. The current team has shown flashes of greatness and brought Auriemma moments of exasperation, with younger players sometimes standing around and waiting for Moore to carry the load. During those times, or when Moore is on the bench, Auriemma said, UConn can be “somewhat unwatchable, very unwatchable, unbearable, excruciating.” Still, the Huskies play with a familiar confidence and relentlessness. They erased an eight-point deficit in the final minutes to defeat second-ranked Baylor, 65-64, last month. And they are rapacious defensively, holding opponents to 20.2 points in the second half. Holy Cross managed only seven points in the final 20 minutes in a 117-37 defeat last month, while Marquette scored four field goals in the final 16 minutes last week. And, as with other women’s teams, the UConn stars stay in school for four years, while the top men often leave after a year or two. “If you get two of the best players together for three years,” Jim Foster, the Ohio State women’s coach, said of Moore and the now graduated center Tina Charles, “a lot of stuff can happen that can’t happen in the men’s game right now.” In any case, Auriemma said, he does not want his career to be defined by tying UCLA’s streak Sunday or breaking it Tuesday against Florida State. “If we were to win against Ohio State and Florida State, does that make me, wow, you’re the greatest coach in the history of college basketball?” Auriemma said. “Really, why is that? How am I any different than I was two weeks ago? “If you didn’t think that two weeks ago, why would you think that two weeks from now? If you are able to be consistently good over a long period of time, then you look back and you say, I was able to do something when a lot of people couldn’t do it. And then you go, OK, I’m happy about that.”

CENTRAL OREGON COURSE UPDATE

A look back at Quail Run Golf Course in 2010 By Zack Hall The Bulletin

The Bulletin continues a weekly Tee To Green feature in which we check in via e-mail with golf professionals at Central Oregon courses for an offseason update. This week we contacted Todd Sickles, director of golf at Quail Run Golf Course in La Pine.

Q: A:

How was business in 2010?

Business in 2010 started great for us being able to open March 1. Unfortunately the spring weather was not as cooperative and the season didn’t get going until June. The rest of the season proved to be better as we surpassed 2009 rounds, which was a very positive outcome for us.

Q: A:

Were any changes of note made to the facility this past year? This past year we made some very nice changes to the facility and how customers can access tee times and golf course information (with our new website, www.golfquailrun.com). We reconstructed the pond on No. 14 so it would hold water and make for a nicer feature. We constructed a new building on the range facility so we could move the range dispenser in a more efficient location, and did some small changes in the golf shop and landscaping around the clubhouse.

Q: A:

Are any changes and/or improvements to the facility scheduled for 2011? We are always adding projects and making the facility better. In 2011, our goal will be to continue to give the best golfing experience

Continued from D1 In the early hours after Lee’s out-of-the-blue signing with Philadelphia, everybody in baseball is now full of certainty once again. They (we) know who will be in the 2011 World Series and probably win it, too. The Phillies with their Four Aces — Lee, Roy Halladay, Roy Oswalt and Cole Hamels — have just been anointed. In the blissful aftermath of seeing Lee turn down an extra $30 million not to become a New York Yankee, there is widespread holiday cheer. Never before has a $120 million deal — that’s $24 million a year for a 32-year-old pitcher who has gone 14-13 and 12-9 the last two years — been hailed as healthy for baseball. Apparently, anything that blocks the Yankees from buying a world title is good for baseball. Besides, the prospect of a World Series between the Phillies and the winter’s other big winner, the Boston Red Sox, has the appeal of novelty. Have these ancient franchises ever met in the World Series? Not since 1915. Just a handful of years ago, the Red Sox hadn’t won a Series in 86 years and the Phillies had won only one championship in over a century. “I almost feel sorry for the Yankees,” a general manager said a few days ago. “They have to pay Lee anything he wants because the starting rotation they have now is just awful.” That was the voice of “everyone” — and a very knowledgeable insider. Perhaps Lee saw the same staff disease in the Bronx. CC Sabathia and his 290 pounds have a bad knee. A.J. Burnett flopped to 10-15. Phillip Hughes faded under innings weight. Do you really want to lock yourself into that maelstrom for seven years? Now, in a matter of hours, the Phillies have been transformed. Monday, they were a team with an aging everybody-over-30 lineup that had a suspect bullpen and just lost a key cog in Werth. How were they going to match up against that young San Francisco Giants pitching rotation of Tim Lincecum, Matt Cain, Madison Bumgarner and Jonathan San-

chez, with Barry Zito viable, too? Now (all together), everybody sees a Phils dynasty that will dominate the National League for years and become — in a phrase that has gained instant currency — The New Yankees. Once again, not so fast. The Phils are going to win a ton of games the next couple of years, even though Halladay, Oswalt and Lee will be 33, 33 and 32, respectively, on Opening Day of 2011. Those ages are the back end of a pitcher’s prime. Add three years, if the Phils can keep them healthy and together that long, and they’re well into the hurling twilight zone. We should enjoy what the Phillies will be serving up in 2011 because history says that nothing is an unbeatable hand in baseball — not even four aces. The royal flush of baseball is good fortune in the postseason. And that’s never guaranteed. Ask the 1971 Baltimore Orioles, the team made famous by its four 20-game winners: Jim Palmer, Dave McNally, Mike Cuellar and Pat Dobson. Yes, they won the World Series that year. But, even in that era before free agency when it was less difficult to keep rosters together, the ’71 title was the only Baltimore flag between 1966 and 1983. Magazine covers hailed them as The Best Damn Team in Baseball. And they were. But, strictly speaking, only once. Even more to the point, ask the Atlanta Braves of 1993 to 2002. That is the team that really educates us about the realistic hopes, and fears, of the current Phillies. The signing of free agent Greg Maddux by the Braves just six days before Christmas of 1992 is the true parallel to the Phils’ coup in grabbing Lee away from the Yankees. That’s the last time baseball saw four starting pitchers on the same staff with this much glamour and postseason experience. Except those Braves were much, much younger and seemed even more certain to dominate — even warp — the sport than these Phillies. The Maddux signing was the “Cliffmas” signing of the 1990s. The deal was supposed to ice a whole chunk of the decade for the Braves. Atlanta had lost the two

previous Series in tough battles. They had back-to-back 20-game winner Tom Glavine and John Smoltz, whose postseason work in 1991-92 (nine starts, 5-0 record, 2.13 earned-run average) gave him the dominant big-game credibility that Lee now has. And they had southpaw Steve Avery, as coveted then as Hamels is now, whose 18-8 season in 1991 helped them to the Series. Most staggering were the ages of those aces: 27, 27, 26 and Avery, 23. Unlike the Phils, they all came with low mileage and hadn’t even reached their primes. How could they fail? They didn’t. Maddux, Glavine and Smoltz pitched together for 10 seasons and will all presumably waltz into the Hall of Fame. And, a fact many forget, they got plenty of help from different fourth starters who truly did make them Four Aces in several years. In 1993, Avery went 18-6. In 1997, Denny Neagle was 20-5. And in 1998, Neagle was 17-18 and Kevin Millwood went 17-8 while the Big Three were 55-18. But in all three of those years, when their four top starters had exactly the kind of years the Phils hope to see in 2011, the Braves never got past the NL Championship Series. True, the Braves finished first in the NL East for 14 consecutive seasons. But perhaps their most unique distinction was winning only one World Series. Maybe that’s the record that never gets broken. Now, everyone gets to guess the remaining mega-moves that this winter holds. Forget how wrong everybody has been so far. The Cubs were supposed to sign Adam Dunn, while the White Sox lost Paul Konerko. Guess what: They’re both White Sox now. So, who ends up with Adrian Beltre? Do Matt Garza and Zack Grienke get traded? Since the Nationals over-bid for Werth to make themselves a credible home for more free agents, whom do they ambush next? And what do all those teams that had budget space left open for Lee or Crawford or Werth do now? Here’s the good news. We really don’t know. And the fireworks are not over yet.

Number of holes: 18 Status: Open seasonally Location: 16725 Northridge Drive, La Pine Tee times: 541-536-1303 or 800-895-GOLF Course stats: Par 72, 6,897 yards Director of golf: Todd Sickles Course designer: Jim Ramey (original nine, 1991; second nine, 2006) Extras: Driving range, putting and chipping area, practice bunkers, snack bar, pro shop Website: www.quailrun.com possible and continue to maintain the facility at a championship level.

Q: A:

What is your outlook for the Central Oregon golf industry next season? We are optimistic but obviously concerned about 2011 and the future economy. There is a lot of golf offered in Central Oregon, but we can use this to our advantage by continued efforts in making Central Oregon a five-star golf destination. We have wonderful facilities and a great group of PGA professionals working hard to bring golfers to Central Oregon. We need to continue our efforts in promoting Central Oregon golf so that all of the golf courses will prosper and help the rest of Central Oregon businesses as well. Zack Hall can be reached at 541-617-7868 or at zhall@bendbulletin.com.

L G  B   Bulletin looking for help from area golfers The Bulletin is seeking golfers to share how the economic slowdown of recent has affected their golfing habits. Have economic circumstances limited the amount of golf you play each year? Have you been able to find affordable ways to play golf? Or have you made certain sacrifices to stay on the course? And are you hopeful that you will be able to play more golf in 2011? The Bulletin wants to know. Anyone interested is asked to

call Bulletin reporter Zack Hall at 541-617-7868 or e-mail him at zhall@bendbulletin.com.

Ghost Tree invite moving to Sunriver SUNRIVER — The Ghost Tree Invitational, a popular Central Oregon fundraising golf tournament and culinary event, announced Tuesday that it plans to relocate to Sunriver Resort from Bend’s Pronghorn Club for the 2011 tournament. The event is scheduled for Thursday through Saturday, Aug. 11-13, 2011, and has a schedule that includes a Thurs-

Rules Lee

Quail Run Golf Course

Continued from D1 “We used to be a lot more lenient than this,” says Hawkes, adding that under the old interpretation of the rule players in Eagle Crest’s men’s club could take a club length of relief almost anywhere on the course. “That, I think, got abused. “We have areas (of rough) that were 6 inches deep … and guys were propping (the ball) up on that.” Turns out Hawkes was ahead of the game. The Pacific Northwest Golf Association recently approved a change to its preferred lies policy to fit closer to the USGA’s interpretation of the local rule. Clubs can choose the stricter version of preferred lies or another option that the Oregon Golf Association is recommending, which is as easy to understand as “lift, clean, and RE-place.” And the two major changes in the revamped policy will be a change for some winter-loving golfers who use preferred lies as a local rule. Here are the two most notabale changes to rounds played in, as the PNGA puts it, “unpleasant course conditions:”

‘Cleaning the ball’ This new option instructs golfers to first mark the ball as a golfer would on a green, clean the mud off the ball, and then place the golf ball EXACTLY on its original mark without improving the lie, other than a hazard. This option can be used anywhere, including the rough. “That’s probably not a bad rule,” Hawkes says. If a club opts to use preferred lies, the PNGA now recommends the USGA interpretation: allowing preferred lies to be used only in a fairway. Before, the PNGA recommended as part of preferred lies a 36-inch rule, even in the rough, in which a golfer could drop a golf ball within three feet or a club length of where the ball initially had settled. The PNGA’s adjustment comes as a welcome relief to Craig Winter, the Oregon Golf Association’s director of rules education. The PNGA — an umbrella organization made up of the golf associations in Oregon, Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Washington, and British Columbia — had for 20 years operated under the same preferred lies policy. In 2004, as part of the United States Golf Association’s overhaul of the Rules of Golf, the national golf organization began to interpret preferred lies for the first time. It allowed for the preferred lies to be used only in the fairway. And the USGA added the “cleaning ball” option. Until this change however, the Pacific Northwest had followed its own interpretation of the rule that dated back two decades, long before the USGA took a hands-on approach, Winter says.

day golf skills challenge and celebrity auction, a double-shotgun golf tournament on Friday, and Dinner on the Range on Saturday. The golf tournament will be played at Sunriver’s Crosswater Club. In 2010, the Ghost Tree Invitational hosted more than 220 golfers and more than 1,300 guests at its Dinner on the Range. Pronghorn had hosted the Ghost Tree for the past five years. For more information call 541-585-3560 or visit www. ghosttreeinvitational.com. — Bulletin staff reports

Now the USGA and the PNGA, including the OGA, are all in line. “The problem that was so prevalent before was a golfer never had a bad lie,” Winter says. “They could hit it anywhere they wanted to and they were always going to have that perfect lie, either sitting up on top of the rough or … sitting well in the fairway or the fringe.” Still, to cut confusion the OGA recommends using clean, place, and replace in the majority of situations. “Anytime you can keep people from placing their ball on the course, you are more playing under the Rules of Golf,” Winter says. “There is a big difference between the placing and REplacing. Cleaning the ball uses the replacing option. You put (the ball) right back where you lifted it from. “Preferred lies uses the placing option, which is so contrary to what golf is.”

No free drops The PNGA also now recommends that a golfer treat an assumed plugged golf ball that cannot be found as he or she would any other lost ball: Take a one-stroke penalty and return to the tee. Previously, the PNGA’s policy allowed golfers to take a free drop if every golfer in his or her playing group agreed that the ball was lost because it had been “embedded,” or plugged, in soft turf. “That option is no longer published anywhere as an official golf association position,” Winter says. This is not a major problem in often-frozen Central Oregon. It can be a real issue, though, during a winter round in the soggy Willamette Valley. But an effective two-stroke penalty seems like a harsh ruling for a golfer who loses a golf ball through no fault of his or her own. “That’s the main reason we turn off our handicapping December 1 through March 1, because that is going to happen to people,” Winter says. “It certainly doesn’t really give you a true measure of your play if you lose two balls during your round and have to go back to the tee.” So why bother? “Somebody loses their ball in a tree and somebody loses their ball on the ground; the guy on the ground gets a free drop because he is buddies with the other guys in his group,” Winter explains. “The guy in the tree nobody likes, so he has to go back to the tee. That’s not how golf is played.” The recommended changes will be in effect immediately as a local rule for OGA and PNGA events played under local winter rules. But Winter says it will take some time before the changes are adopted universally at the club level. Adds Winter: “Because you need to get it out of the system, and that’s a lot of education, it will take awhile.” Zack Hall can be reached at 541-617-7868 or at zhall@bendbulletin.com.


T EE T O G R EEN

D6 Wednesday, December 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

GOLF SCOREBOARD LOCAL

Hole-In-One Report

The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf results listings and events calendar. Clearly legible items should be faxed to the sports department, 541-385-0831, e-mailed to sports@bendbulletin.com, or mailed to P.O. Box 6020; Bend, OR 97708.

Dec. 13 THE GREENS AT REDMOND Jim Glass, Redmond No. 16. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-iron

Club Results CROOKED RIVER RANCH Central Oregon Winter Series Make-Up Pot Game, Dec. 12 Better Ball Gross: 1, Dennis Glender/Fred Johnson, 64. Todd Goodew/Jeff Storm, 66; Pat Huffer/Denny Irby, 66. Net: 1, Vene Dunham/Art Crossley, 55. 2, Jay Wiggins/Marv Bibler, 57. 3, George Mitchener/ Jim Platz, 60. Skins — Jerry Harris/Frank Earls, No. 4.

at 541-923-6343 or e-mail him at crrpat@crookedriverranch.com. Feb. 4 — Central Oregon Winter Series tournament at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. Tournament is a two-person scramble. No more than one professional allowed per team. Cost is $25 for professionals, $45 for amateurs. Cart and optional gross skins competition cost extra. All players must sign up by noon on the Thursday before the event. To register or for more information, call Pat Huffer, head pro at Crooked River Ranch, at 541-923-6343 or e-mail him at crrpat@crookedriverranch.com. Feb. 18 — Central Oregon Winter Series tournament at Crooked River Ranch. Tournament is a two-person better ball. No more than one professional allowed per team. Cost is $25 for professionals, $45 for amateurs. Cart and optional gross skins competition cost extra. All players must sign up by noon on the Thursday before the event. To register or for more information, call Pat Huffer, head pro at Crooked River Ranch, at 541-923-6343 or e-mail him at crrpat@ crookedriverranch.com.

Calendar TOURNAMENTS Jan. 14 — Central Oregon Winter Series tournament at KahNee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino near Warm Springs. Tournament is a two-person triple six. No more than one professional allowed per team. Cost is $25 for professionals, $45 for amateurs. Cart and optional gross skins competition cost extra. All players must sign up by noon on the Thursday before the event. To register or for more information, call Pat Huffer, head pro at Crooked River Ranch,

DESERT PEAKS Thursday Men’s Club, Dec. 9 Net Stableford 1, Don Lupinacci, 37. 2, Wes Graves, 35. 3, Val Paterson, 29. KP — Ken Southwick. Long Drive — Joe Kirkwood. Sunday Group Play, Dec. 12 Blind Draw Gross: 1, Bob Ringering/Cruz Bocenegra, 158. 2, Denny Story/Ed McDaniel, 159. Net: 1, Spud Gephart/Jim Manion, 140. 2, George Jones/Francisco Morales, 150. KP — Val Paterson. Long Drive — Cruz Bocenegra.

G W Reed Saxon / The Associated Press ile

Tiger Woods, right, talks with caddie Steve Williams during the pro-am round at the Chevron World Challenge in Thousand Oaks, Calif., earlier this month.

A different year for Woods, and his caddie By Doug Ferguson The Associated Press

THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. — Steve Williams never imagined that losing his wallet could fuel so much speculation that he was on his way out as Tiger Woods’ caddie. Hours after the U.S. Open at Pebble Beach, where Woods closed with a 75 and offered some veiled criticism of his caddie’s advice in the final round, Williams was sitting alone in the Monterey airport while staring intently at his cell phone. A golf blogger recognized him, took his picture and posted it with the headline, “Steve Williams at the airport, without Tiger Woods.” Never mind that Williams lives in New Zealand and Woods lives in Florida. Along with Woods’ post-round comments, it was enough to wonder if Williams would be employed much longer. Told about the photo months later, Williams started laughing. “I left my wallet in the rental car,” he said, explaining the text he was reading on his phone. “The speculation is incredible, how many people thought I would be fired or that I would retire. People just make up these stories. Look, I work as a golf caddie. It’s all I’ve ever done. I’m working for arguably one of the greatest players who ever played, who is fully committed to breaking Jack Nicklaus’ record. “Why would I quit in midstream?” Williams, who is a part-time Sunriver resident, has been on the bag for more than a dozen years with Woods, and they have shared some happy times — 72 victories around the world, including 13 major championships. He also was guilty by association through some unpleasant times. Williams never heard from his boss a year ago in December when Woods’ personal life was collapsing with each report of infidelity. Most people assumed Williams was part of the deceit, and even his repeated denials didn’t change some opinions. Getting through the gossip on and off the course wasn’t easy on Williams or his family. Getting back to the golf hasn’t been as fun, either. Woods not only failed to win for the first time in his career, there were a couple of times when they finished a weekend round before lunch. The caddie sure wasn’t expecting a year like this. “When you compete at this level, a large percentage of your success is due to your mental preparation,” he said. “And evidently, Tiger’s mind wasn’t as sharp due to his own personal problems. He’s come back from an injury before. I’ve caddied for him for 12 years, and the two times he had long layoffs, he came back like nothing had happened. I didn’t think a lot would change.” It didn’t take long to realize he was wrong. Sure, Woods returned at the Masters and got right back in the mix. He opened with a 68, closed with a 69 and tied for fourth. Williams knows his game better than anyone, and none of the indicators were appealing. “It was evident after Augusta that it was going to be a bit of a struggle,” Williams said. “Then, of

course, he was questioning his own swing and whether it might be time to change his swing. As soon as he made that decision, I knew right there and then it was going to be more of a rebuilding year. Which is fine.” No one felt sorry for Williams. His worst year working for Woods was in 2004 — two victories, fourth on the PGA Tour money list with over $5 million, top 10s in all but five of his 21 tournaments. Which caddie wouldn’t take that? The feeling among some of his peers was, “Welcome to our world.” For most of the year, Woods looked no different — certainly no better — than some of the players in his group, whether it was Jason Bohn at the Memorial, D.A. Points at Aronomink or even 22-year-old Kieran Pratt, who made his pro debut at the Australian Masters and beat Woods by one shot when they were paired together. “I race cars to win, and I caddie to win,” Williams said. “I certainly couldn’t be out here working for a player that can’t win tournaments. That would have no appeal to me at all. Winning is what you want to do.” So what was the appeal this year? “I quite enjoyed the challenge sometimes,” Williams said. “The battle this year was making it to the FedEx Cup, then trying to make it through. It’s not a position we’re used to being in. But it was not frustrating at all.” What he found frustrating was wondering which guy was going to show up for work. Three days after his divorce, Woods missed only one fairway and two greens and opened with a 65 at The Barclays. Two days later, he opened his round by hitting a 5-wood off the property. He was in last place at one point late in his first round in Boston. The next day he shot a 65. “When he got it right, it was great to see. But he couldn’t keep doing it,” Williams said. “You go to the golf course and wonder if he’s got what he had yesterday, or can he improve from what he had yesterday. But that’s what happens when you change your swing.” Early in the second round of the Chevron World Challenge, Williams had seen enough. “The tide is turning,” he said as he walked off the third green. He was impressed with the progress Woods had made on his new swing in just four months. The last swing change took close to a year. Williams left California believing the worst was behind them. “I’m pretty confident when the new year starts that Tiger will be fully ingrained with this new swing,” he said. The old year could not end soon enough. Woods was signing autographs at Sherwood when he was asked about his longtime caddie. “He’s been a heck of a caddie, there’s no doubt about that,” Woods said. After a few seconds of silence as he continued to sign, Woods looked up and added for emphasis, “And he’s a great friend.” Woods needed a little of both this year.

Holida y Gift Sp (or ju ecial

PGA EUROPEAN SOUTH AFRICAN OPEN Site: Durban, South Africa. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Durban Country Club (6,733 yards, par 72). Purse: $1.32 million. Winner’s share: $208,330. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-Sunday, 6:30-9:30 a.m.). Last year: Scotland’s Richie Ramsay won at Pearl Valley, beating India’s Shiv Kapur with a birdie on the first hole of a playoff. Last week: Spain’s Pablo Martin successfully defended his Alfred Dunhill Championship title. Notes: South Africa’s Retief Goosen and Tim Clark top the field in the 100th playing of the tournament. Goosen won in 1995 at Randpark and 2006 at The Links at Fancourt. Clark won in 2002 and 2005, both at Durban. ... First played in 1893, the tournament is the second oldest national championship behind the British Open (1860). It is being played at Durban Country Club for the record 17th time. ... South African star Ernie Els, the 1992, ’96, ’98 and ’06 winner, is skipping the event. ... Gary Player won a record 13 times, the first in 1956 and last in 1981. ... The tournament is the second event of the European tour’s “2011” schedule. After a two-week break, the two tours will resume play with the Africa Open at East London in Eastern Cape. ———

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For all lease offers: Lessee responsible for damage, excess wear and insurance. Exclude taxes, title, options and dealer fees. On approved credit through primary lender. Supplies limited. Photos for illustration only. 2011 VW Tiguan with automatic transmission, MSRP $27,360. Monthly payments total $11,78244. Dealer contribution of $500. Purchase option at lease end $16,142.40. $.25/mile over 10,000 miles. Lessee responsible for a disposition fee of $350. © Volkswagen of American, Inc.


S

E

HELPING YOU MAKE GOOD BUYING DECISIONS Inside

SAVVY SHOPPER

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/savvyshopper

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2010

INSIDE Dear Abby Fear of aids haunts future for woman with risky past, Page E2

SHOPPING IN BRIEF Bend market to host holiday tasting event Bend’s C.E. Lovejoy’s Brookswood Market, a grocery store that specializes in gourmet foods, will host the Hometown Holiday Fancy Food Tasting from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday. The free event will feature tastings of beer, wine and food. Items will range from goat chevre infused with fig to craft mustards to chocolate wine. Other Central Oregon vendors will be on hand. For instance, Eberhard’s Dairy will offer ice cream samples and Rocky Mountain Foods will serve up pulled pork. There will be a cooking demonstration with the chef from Blue Olive restaurant and a kids’ ornament decorating contest will also be held. The Quons will perform their acoustic folk music in the afternoon. C.E. Lovejoy’s is located at 19530 Amber Meadow Drive. Contact: 541-388-1188.

Get wild (but tasteful) art at warehouse sale Peruse art, ceramics and a variety of gift items Saturday when Jill’s Wild (But Tasteful!) Women, a Bendbased wholesale business, opens its Courtesy Jill’s Wild (But Tasteful!) Women warehouse to the public. The business formerly existed as an art gallery in downtown Bend. It has since converted to solely wholesale, shipping Jill Haney-Neal’s art to galleries and gift shops across the country. Items available for sale at the warehouse include prints, greeting cards, aprons, tote bags and a variety of ceramics. There is also a seconds shelf, which features merchandise that either has damaged packaging or slight flaws available at a cheaper price. Free wine and chocolate will also be on hand. The opening will take place from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the warehouse, 20512 Nels Anderson Place building 3, unit A, in Bend. Contact: 541-617-6078.

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APPS Central Oregon smart phone users have local choices Central Oregon smart-phone users have local choices

By Heidi Hagemeier The Bulletin

ou can follow basketball in Poughkeepsie and find the best cocktail lounges in Portland, but search your smart phone for Central Oregon-specific applications and the list is going to be short. And local techies say that’s no surprise. Smart phone use grew here only within the last six months, they say, as 3G coverage in the High Desert improved. And writing software for

Y

KPOV

such devices, known as applications or “apps,” can be a time-consuming affair. Yet in the near future, they say, expect to see more locally oriented apps available for both Apple and Android products. “It’s coming really soon,” said Jack Robson, president of Bend-based software firm Nimble Development. “We’ll talk a year from now and there will be tons of apps on Central Oregon.” Those who develop Central Oregon apps initially will likely be locals who do so as a hobby,

Circle 8

not as part of a commercial venture. One such dabbler is Sunriver-area resident Michael Harper, whose day job is software development. For fun, however, he crafted one of the few local apps out there, a road and bike trail guide to Sunriver Resort called Circle 8. The project took months to launch: He biked the whole resort carrying a GPS, wrote the app and then awaited Apple approval. It first went up in Apple’s App Store in September. See Apps / E6

Moto mApps Oregon

BrewTour OR

Last chance to buy Witty book If you want a copy of Jim Witty’s book, “Meet Me in the Badlands: Exploring Central Oregon with Jim Witty,” now is the time to get one as they are almost out of stock and there are no plans to print more. Witty wrote an Outings column for The Bulletin for years before his death in November 2008; the book is a compilation of those columns. Copies are available at Camalli Book Company, Between the Covers, REI and Pine Mountain Sports in Bend, and at Paulina Springs Books in Redmond. — Heidi Hagemeier, The Bulletin

Submitted photo

iPhone, Android screen shots

Subtle cheer

Eye creams: How A touch here or there makes holiday outfits shine much is too much? By Melissa Magsaysay Los Angeles Times

We’ve all had our slip-ups with self-expression around the holidays. Maybe you doubled up with red and green scrunchies in the ’90s or donned a pair of those flashing “ornament” earrings. Whatever your holiday fashion faux pas, there’s no reason to dress like a Christmas tree — and no need to be overwhelmed with the prospect of having to buy a new outfit for the swirl of social events. By adding an accessory or two, a little black dress or brown V-neck sweater can be instantly transformed into something festive. For this holiday season think about rich fabrics such as velvet or satin, as well as things that shine and sparkle. And use these accessories — a clutch, a brooch, a belt — in small doses. You might start with the easiest (and perhaps least expensive) strategy: A classic red lipstick is one way to add a pop of color to your look. Red lips are a big trend this season, and they always brighten up dark colors and heavier fabrics. See Holiday / E6

Holiday outfits can include several fun items that when added to an ensemble make for a festive look. Pictured here is a Tory Burch sequin scarf ($275). Kirk McKoy Los Angeles Times

By Alexia Elejalde-Ruiz Chicago Tribune

Shortly after I turned 30, a concerned aesthetician at a department store makeup counter warned that lest I look forward to crow’s feet, dark circles and unsightly puffiness, I’d better start using eye cream. Then she showed me a tiny pot with a $98 price tag, and I think I aged a few years from sticker shock. Is eye cream really worth it? See Eyes / E3

La Mer, Kiehl’s and Oil of Olay Total Effects eye creams are recommended by Dr. Lisa Airan. McClatchy-Tribune News Service


T

E2 Wednesday, December 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Fear of AIDS haunts future for woman with risky past Dear Abby: I am a 34-yearold woman who finally beat a 13-year battle with drugs. I now have a job, a car, a place of my own and a bank account. My problem is, while I was on drugs I prostituted myself in order to support my habit. Now I’m terrified I have AIDS, and afraid I’ll be told I don’t have long to live. I’m not dating right now, but I’ve had a couple of boyfriends since getting sober. I’m scared for them, but so afraid of getting a death sentence that I’ve never mentioned my fears to anyone. I know I’m being selfish with these guys’ lives, but I’m paralyzed by my fear. What am I going to do? — Terrified in the U.S.A. Dear Terrified: What you are going to do is get yourself tested! Please understand that the fear you are dealing with is the same that anyone who has had multiple sex partners has had to face. You must realize that being exposed to HIV and having AIDS are not the same. If you have been exposed to HIV — and therefore test “positive” — you need to know it ASAP so you can be prescribed anti-viral medications that can PREVENT you from getting AIDS. Getting on those meds can save your life. And you can save the lives of your former boyfriends, too, if you are HIV positive, by telling them to get tested. Dear Abby: I have known my husband for eight years and have been married to him for three. He is a unique and funny man, but he does have a few annoying quirks. The biggest one, and the reason I’m writing to you, is his need to have music blaring in our car. It’s not just when we’re driving, but also when we’re going through drive-thru restaurants, banks and gas stations. Gas stations are the worst because he turns the volume up even louder so he can hear it outside. Not only is it painful to my ears, but it’s embarrassing. I have asked him a number of times to turn it down, but it just leads to arguments. Can you help

DEAR ABBY me talk to him before I lose my hearing? — Bleeding Ears in Spring Valley, Calif. Dear Bleeding Ears: Could it be that your husband suffers from hearing loss (probably from listening to too-loud music), which is why he needs the volume turned up so high? Arguing with him won’t help. He should be checked by an audiologist — a hearing specialist — so that he doesn’t damage his hearing further, and yours won’t be affected. Protecting your hearing is important. That’s why you should consider using ear plugs when you drive with him. P.S. And when you get to the gas station, offer to pump the gas for him. If he refuses, then leave the car with him. Dear Abby: My husband is 7 feet tall and we recently became parents of a beautiful baby girl. Everywhere we go, people make comments about my husband’s height. He is used to being the target of stares and comments, having experienced it his whole life. Our daughter may grow up to be tall; how would you handle this? — Angela in Bethlehem, Pa. Dear Angela: I would teach my daughter — regardless of her height — to be proud of who she is. If your daughter turns out to be tall, she’ll have plenty of company, because each generation seems to be growing taller than the last one. A woman’s height does not have to be a disadvantage unless she views it that way. If you stress the qualities you feel are important, chances are that’s the person she’ll grow up to be. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

EL EV ISION

‘P aris’ paints portrait of arts’ golden age By Jonathan Storm The Philadelphia Inquirer

A scintillating documentary emerges from the cacophony of reruns and reality tonight. “Paris: The Luminous Years — Toward the Making of the Modern” looks carefully and insightfully at a key crossroads in the history of art. Rick and Ilsa always had Paris in “Casablanca.” Perry Miller Adato’s film demonstrates why the world will forever be grateful for the city, as well. The two-hour film takes us to a critical time and place in cultural history, where artists of all stripes from many countries came together to explode earlier traditions in painting, sculpture, poetry, fiction, music and dance. Adato’s archival assemblage takes us on a tour of the city from 1905 to 1930, touching on seminal works ranging from Picasso’s “Demoiselles d’Avignon” to Joyce’s “Ulysses” to the StravinskyNijinsky ballet “The Rite of Spring.” Many of the guides are the artists from the era and their collaborators, captured in filmed interviews years ago. The lineup is impressive. It’s riveting to listen to such giants as Stravinsky, Aaron Copland, Marc Chagall, and Marcel Duchamp discuss the times and their work. Also amusing. Jean Cocteau recalls the grousing of a gentleman who had come to see the strikingly avant-garde Ballets Russes production of “Parade” (sets and costumes by Picasso, music by Eric Satie, scenario by Cocteau, program notes by Guillaume Apollinaire) in 1917: “ ‘If I had known that it was so silly, I would have brought my children.’ ” “It was a big compliment,”

Rue des Archives via Public Broadcasting Service

A painter is seen working in Montmartre in the early 20th century.

Cocteau said. Even more instructive are the comments by the artists’ supporters, dealers, publishers and chroniclers. D.H. Kahnweiler recalls the first time a raggedy Picasso came into his gallery, looked around without saying a word, but with piercing eyes that stopped the dealer cold, and left. Kahnweiler tracked the starving artist back to Bateau-Lavoir in Montmartre, where Picasso kept his home and studio, and a great partnership was born. Montmartre in the first decade of the 20th century was a rural district where prices were low. Bateau-Lavoir (“washerwoman’s boat,” a name purportedly bestowed on a rundown assortment of shacks and shanties by poet Max Jacob) was, at various times before World War I, the home of Picasso, Jacob, Juan Gris, Georges Braque, Modigliani, Matisse, Cocteau, Apollinaire and Gertrude Stein. Sylvia Beach, who owned and ran the bookstore Shakespeare and Company, recalls how she met James Joyce and subsequently published “Ulysses” when everyone else in the world

Self Referrals Welcome

was afraid of its strangeness and sexuality. It was a difficult alliance, narrator Concetta Tomei explains. After type was set, Joyce scrawled 90,000 more words on the proofs, and they had to start all over again. Shakespeare and Company was the rendezvous in the ’20s for such English-speaking authors as Joyce, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ezra Pound and Stein, who seemed to be sort of the mother superior of the entire artistic epoch. Contemporary commentators also speak with energy and authority in “The Luminous Years.” “How do you define art?” the New Yorker’s Calvin Tompkins asks rhetorically. “People used to think they knew. After Duchamp, nobody’s sure.” Adato herself is a celebrated artist of arts documentaries, with Directors Guild and Emmy awards on her mantel for works on Georgia O’Keeffe, Dylan

Sewing & Vacuum Center

‘Paris: The Luminous Years’ When: 9 tonight Where: OPB

Thomas, and Mary Cassatt, among others. She combines contemporary Paris scenes with ones from the olden days, as the transportation transforms from horses to motor vehicles. The movie contains hundreds of images of artworks, and some of the re-stagings of dance segments will be as jaw-dropping to those unfamiliar with them today as they were when the ballets were originally performed nearly 100 years ago. “The Luminous Years” is luminous itself, a fascinating look that will leave almost everyone who watches it with a better understanding and appreciation of modern art than they had before they started.

Central Oregon’s Vacuum Exp ert

(541)549-6406 370 E. Cascade, Sisters 541-706-6900

License #78462

541-382-3882

304 N.E. 3rd St. •Bend

541-388-4418

BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

WEDNESDAY PRIME TIME 12/15/10 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

5:00

5:30

KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! Ruff News Nightly News House of Payne House of Payne Everyday Food Scandinavian Tracks Ahead ‘G’ Steves Europe

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News News (N) ABC World News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ‘14’ Rudy Maxa Nightly Business News News Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Steves Europe Travelscope ‘G’ Rudy Maxa Nightly Business

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Garden Smart ‘G’ This Old House PBS NewsHour ’ Å

8:00

8:30

9:00

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The Middle ‘PG’ Better With You Modern Family Modern Family The Sing-Off The groups sing a medley of songs. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Survivor: Nicaragua (N) ’ Å Criminal Minds 25 to Life (N) ’ ‘14’ The Middle ‘PG’ Better With You Modern Family Modern Family Human Target Dead Head (N) ‘14’ Hell’s Kitchen 2 Chefs Compete ‘14’ News on PDX-TV Burn Notice Double Booked ’ ‘PG’ Christmas With the Mormon Paris the Luminous Years (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å The Sing-Off The groups sing a medley of songs. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å The Vampire Diaries ’ ‘14’ Å The Vampire Diaries Plan B ’ ‘14’ For Your Home Katie Brown Knit & Crochet Passport-Palett Christmas With the Mormon Paris the Luminous Years (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å

10:00

10:30

Cougar Town ’ Cougar Town ’ Law & Order: Special Victims Unit The Defenders Nevada v. Riley ‘14’ Cougar Town ’ Cougar Town ’ News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Burn Notice Good Soldier ‘14’ Å Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Married... With Married... With Test Kitchen Lidia’s Italy ‘G’

11:00 KATU News at 11 News News News (N) Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens In the Life ‘PG’ News King of Queens Everyday Food In the Life ‘PG’

11:30 (11:35) Nightline Jay Leno Letterman (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens In the Life ‘PG’ Jay Leno King of Queens Scandinavian In the Life ‘PG’

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

The First 48 A body is dumped. ‘14’ The First 48 ‘14’ Å Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Storage Wars (N) Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars 130 28 8 32 CSI: Miami Deep Freeze ‘14’ Å (5:15) ››› “The Sum of All Fears” (2002, Suspense) Ben Affleck, Morgan Freeman, James Cromwell. Terrorists plan to detonate ››› “Independence Day” (1996, Science Fiction) Will Smith, Bill Pullman, Jeff Goldblum. Earthlings vs. evil aliens in 15-mile-wide ››› “The Terminator” (1984) Arnold 102 40 39 a nuclear bomb in the U.S. Å ships. Schwarzenegger. Å Confessions: Animal Hoarding ‘14’ The Tiger Next Door ’ ‘14’ Å I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å 68 50 12 38 Confessions: Animal Hoarding ‘14’ Top Chef Chocolate. ‘14’ Å Top Chef Finale ‘14’ Å Top Chef Finale ‘14’ Å Top Chef History Never Repeats ‘14’ Top Chef Night at the Museum ‘14’ Top Chef New York’s Finest (N) ‘14’ What Happens Top Chef ‘14’ 137 44 The Dukes of Hazzard Big Daddy The Dukes of Hazzard Vance’s Lady ›› “A Smoky Mountain Christmas” (1986, Musical) Dolly Parton, Lee Majors. ‘G’ Cable Guy’s Christmas Luau 190 32 42 53 (4:30) ›› “A Smoky Mountain Christmas” (1986) ‘G’ Behind the Counter: Story Behind the Counter: Story Mad Money Behind the Counter: Story Behind the Counter: Story Sexier-90 Days! Zumba Body 51 36 40 52 Marijuana USA Larry King Live (N) Å Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Larry King Live Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 Parker Spitzer (N) (5:27) Tosh.0 ‘14’ (5:57) Scrubs ‘14’ (6:27) Scrubs ‘14’ Daily Show Colbert Report (7:58) Futurama (8:28) Futurama (8:59) Futurama (9:29) Futurama Futurama ’ ‘14’ Futurama ’ ‘14’ Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 Weeknd-Bernie Bend La Pine U of O Today PM Edition Visions of NW Bend City Council (Live) Epic Conditions Word Travels ’ Paid Program Visions of NW Ride Guide ‘14’ Outside Presents 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington Good-Charlie Suite Life Suite Life Pair of Kings ‘Y7’ Suite Life ››› “Happy Feet” (2006) Voices of Elijah Wood, Robin Williams. Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb 87 43 14 39 Good-Charlie Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab: Dark Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ MythBusters Alaska Special ’ ‘PG’ MythBusters ’ ‘PG’ Å MythBusters (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å MythBusters Christmas Special ‘PG’ MythBusters ’ ‘PG’ Å 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab: Dark NBA Basketball Portland Trail Blazers at Dallas Mavericks (Live) SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 NBA Basketball Boston Celtics at New York Knicks The Herbies 30 for 30 SportsCenter NFL Live (N) SportsNation Å NBA Tonight Association NBA Basketball: Celtics at Knicks 22 24 21 24 NFL Live (N) College Football From Jan. 1, 1983. Å College Football 2003 Insight Bowl -- California vs. Virginia Tech Å College Football Å 23 25 123 25 College Football: 2005 Rose Bowl SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Pixar Short Films ‘PG’ Å Prep- Landing ››› “Finding Nemo” (2003, Comedy) Voices of Albert Brooks, Ellen DeGeneres. Å The 700 Club Dr. Michael Roizen. ‘G’ 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Home Cooking 30-Minute Meals Iron Chef America Flay vs. Morimoto Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Chopped When Chefs Collide Diners, Drive Diners, Drive 177 62 46 44 B’foot Contessa Seahawks Dave Niehaus Beavers Cougars Access Huskies Bensinger My Own Words Huskies Cougars Access Beavers The Final Score Football Preview Seahawks 20 45 28* 26 Bensinger (4:00) ›› “The Family Stone” Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men › “Deck the Halls” (2006, Comedy) Danny DeVito, Matthew Broderick. › “Deck the Halls” (2006, Comedy) Danny DeVito, Matthew Broderick. 131 Get It Sold ‘G’ Income Property Designed to Sell Hunters Int’l House Hunters Property Virgins Property Virgins Celebrity Holiday Homes ‘G’ Å House Hunters Hunters Int’l Property Virgins Property Virgins 176 49 33 43 Get It Sold ‘G’ Cities of the Underworld ‘PG’ Å Cities of the Underworld ‘PG’ Å American Pickers ‘PG’ Å Third Reich The Fall The downfall of the Third Reich. (N) ‘PG’ Å Nostradamus Effect ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 (4:00) The Naturalized ‘PG’ Å American Pickers Mole Man ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ ››› “Kate & Leopold” (2001) Meg Ryan, Hugh Jackman. Å How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show MTV Cribs ’ MTV Cribs ’ 16 and Pregnant ’ ‘14’ Å 16 and Pregnant Megan ’ ‘14’ The Challenge: Cutthroat (N) ’ ‘14’ The Challenge: Cutthroat Reunion 192 22 38 57 The Seven SpongeBob “The Boy Who Cried Werewolf” (2010) Victoria Justice. ’ ‘G’ Å My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Ways to Die Ways to Die Phowned! (N) ‘14’ Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die MANswers ‘14’ Phowned! ’ ‘14’ Ways to Die 132 31 34 46 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘PG’ Ghost Hunters Judgement Day ‘PG’ Ghost Hunters Crossing Over ‘PG’ Ghost Hunters Glimmer Men ’ ‘PG’ Ghost Hunters ’ ‘PG’ Å Ghost Hunters Inhuman Entity ‘PG’ 133 35 133 45 “Lightning Strikes” (2009, Suspense) Kevin Sorbo. ‘14’ Å Behind Scenes Grant Jeffrey Secrets of Bible Jack Van Impe Praise the Lord Å Nativity Jesse Duplantis Thru History Changing-World Toymaker’s Dream 205 60 130 Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ House of Payne House of Payne Meet the Browns Meet the Browns Meet the Browns Meet the Browns Conan (N) ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond (10:15) ›››› “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” (1966, Drama) Elizabeth Taylor. A ››› “Night of the Living Dead” (1968, Horror) Duane Jones, Judith O’Dea, Karl Hard- Moguls and Movie Stars: A History of (8:15) ›››› “Bonnie and Clyde” (1967) Warren Beatty, Faye Dunaway. Bonnie 101 44 101 29 man. People hide in a house from walking corpses. Å Hollywood Fade Out, Fade In Parker and Clyde Barrow become 1930s outlaw lovers. Å professor and his wife host an all-night drinking party. Å Untold Stories of the E.R. ‘PG’ Å Sarah Palin’s Alaska ’ ‘PG’ Å My Skin Is Killing Me (N) ‘PG’ Å Untold Stories of the E.R. (N) ’ ‘14’ The Boy With Bloody Tears (N) ‘PG’ Untold Stories of the E.R. ‘14’ Å 178 34 32 34 Untold Stories of the E.R. ‘PG’ Å Law & Order Lost Boys ’ ‘14’ Bones Boy in the Time Capsule ‘14’ Bones The Knight on the Grid ‘14’ Bones The Doctor in the Photo ‘14’ Bones The Baby in the Bough ‘14’ CSI: NY ’ ‘14’ Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Patsy ’ ‘14’ Chowder ‘Y7’ Dr. Seuss’ Grinch Grandma Got Run Over/Reindeer Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Hole in the Wall Would Happen Destroy Build Regular Show MAD ‘PG’ King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food’s Greatest Moments Man-Carnivore Man-Carnivore Carnivore Man v. Food ‘G’ Pasta Paradise (N) ‘G’ Å Man-Carnivore Carnivore 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Hot in Cleveland ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons NCIS The team hunts for a killer. ‘14’ ››› “Elf” (2003, Comedy) Will Ferrell, James Caan, Bob Newhart. Å Psych The Polarizing Express ‘PG’ Psych Polar bear’s innocence. ‘PG’ Burn Notice Dead or Alive ‘PG’ 15 30 23 30 NCIS The team hunts a killer. ‘14’ Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Bret Michaels Let’s Spend the Night Together: Greatest Groupies Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew ‘14’ Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew ‘14’ 191 48 37 54 40 Naughtiest Celebrity Scandals Stars’ actions dominate headlines. ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:15) ›› “St. Elmo’s Fire” 1985 (6:10) ›› “Maid in Manhattan” 2002 Jennifer Lopez. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ›› “Groundhog Day” 1993 Bill Murray. ’ ‘PG’ Å (9:45) ›› “The Proposal” 2009 Sandra Bullock. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Tears of the Sun ›› “The Adventure of Sherlock Holmes’ Smarter Brother” 1975 ‘PG’ ›› “Trapped in Paradise” 1994, Comedy Nicolas Cage. ‘PG-13’ Å “The Adventures of Ford Fairlane” ›› “Trapped in Paradise” 1994, Comedy Nicolas Cage. ‘PG-13’ Å Props ‘PG’ Empire of Dirt (N) The Daily Habit Thrillbillies ‘14’ SLAM! (N) ‘14’ Bondi Rescue The Daily Habit Insane Cinema The Daily Habit Thrillbillies ‘14’ SLAM! ‘14’ Å Bondi Rescue The Daily Habit Top 10 Top 10 Ryder Cup Highlights (N) Top 10 Golf Videos Golf Central Playing Lessons Ryder Cup Highlights Top 10 Golf Videos European Tour Golf in America (4:00) “Karroll’s Christmas” ‘PG’ ›› “Eloise at Christmastime” (2003, Comedy) Julie Andrews. ‘G’ Å “The Santa Incident” (2010, Comedy) Ione Skye, Greg Germann. ‘PG’ Å “Debbie Macomber’s Mrs. Miracle” (2009) James Van Der Beek. ‘PG’ Å (4:30) › “Leap Year” 2010 Amy Adams, (6:15) › “Street Fighter: The Legend of Chun-Li” 2009, Action Kristin Kreuk. Warrior ›› “Terminator Salvation” 2009, Science Fiction Christian Bale. Humanity fights back 24/7 Penguins/Capitals: Road to the 24/7 Penguins/Capitals: Road to the HBO 425 501 425 10 Matthew Goode. ’ ‘PG’ Å Chun-Li sets out to stop evil Bison’s grab for power. Å against Skynet’s machine army. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å NHL Winter Classic (N) ‘PG’ Å NHL Winter Classic ’ ‘PG’ Å (4:45) ››› “Bug” 2006, Suspense Ashley Judd, Michael Shannon. ‘R’ Arrested Dev. Whitest Kids ››› “Bully” 2001, Drama Brad Renfro. Teens beat a bully to death in a swamp. ‘R’ ›› “Spanking the Monkey” 1994 Jeremy Davies. IFC 105 105 (4:00) ››› “Private Parts” 1997, Biogra- (5:50) › “Mr. Deeds” 2002 Adam Sandler. A pizza maker inher- ››› “Cast Away” 2000, Drama Tom Hanks, Helen Hunt, Nick Searcy. A courier company executive is ma- ›› “She’s Out of My League” 2010 Jay Baruchel. An average (11:45) Life on Top MAX 400 508 7 phy Howard Stern. ’ ‘R’ Å ’Å its a fortune from a distant relative. ‘PG-13’ rooned on a remote island. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Joe lands a gorgeous girlfriend. ’ ‘R’ Å Lockdown (N) ’ ‘14’ Border Wars Cartel Crackdown ‘PG’ Wild Justice Felony Friday (N) ‘14’ Lockdown ’ ‘14’ Border Wars Cartel Crackdown ‘PG’ Wild Justice Felony Friday ‘14’ Cain and Abel: Brothers at War ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Action League NTOON 89 115 189 S.W.A.T. Maga Shooting USA Sighting Gun Nuts Amer. Rifleman Impossible Shots Shooting Gallery Cowboys Shooting USA Sighting Best Defense Cowboys Pheasants For. Amer. Rifleman OUTD 37 307 43 ›› “Tyler Perry’s the Family That Preys” 2008, Drama Kathy Bates. iTV. Greed and Inside the NFL (iTV) NFL news and high- Jamie Kennedy: Uncomfortable (iTV) (3:35) “Irresistible” (5:25) ››› “Chéri” 2009 Michelle Pfeiffer. An older woman (11:05) Inside the NFL (iTV) NFL news SHO 500 500 lights. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å ’ ‘MA’ Å 2006 ‘R’ teaches a courtesan’s son about love. ‘R’ Å scandal test the mettle of two family matriarchs. ’ ‘PG-13’ and highlights. ’ ‘PG’ Å Intersections Intersections ‘G’ Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Stealth Rider ‘14’ Stealth Rider ‘14’ Intersections Intersections ‘G’ Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Stealth Rider ‘14’ Stealth Rider ‘14’ Wounded Warriors Garage SPEED 35 303 125 (3:45) Planet 51 (5:20) ›› “Confessions of a Shopaholic” 2009 ‘PG’ (7:05) ››› “District 9” 2009, Science Fiction Sharlto Copley. ’ ‘R’ Å › “Law Abiding Citizen” 2009, Suspense Jamie Foxx. ’ ‘R’ Å “Lord of the Rings” STARZ 300 408 300 (4:20) ›› “Twilight” 2008 Kristen Stewart. A teen is caught up in (6:25) ›› “Rain” 2008 Renel Brown. A teenager reconnects with ››› “Adventureland” 2009, Comedy-Drama Jesse Eisenberg. A college graduate “The Narrows” 2008, Drama Kevin Zegers, Vincent D’Onofrio, Sophia Bush. A student TMC 525 525 an unorthodox romance with a vampire. ’ her estranged, drug-addicted mother. ‘R’ takes a lowly job at an amusement park. ’ ‘R’ Å has to balance his roots with a new world. ’ ‘R’ Å NHL Hockey New York Rangers at Pittsburgh Penguins Hockey Central The T.Ocho Show Whacked Out NHL Overtime › “Bloodsport” (1988, Adventure) Jean-Claude Van Damme, Donald Gibb. NHL Overtime VS. 27 58 30 ›› “Miss Congeniality” 2000, Comedy Sandra Bullock, Michael Caine. ‘PG-13’ Å Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å The Locator ‘G’ The Locator ‘G’ ›› “Miss Congeniality” 2000, Comedy Sandra Bullock, Michael Caine. ‘PG-13’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, December 15, 2010 E3

CALENDAR TODAY GIFT WRAPPING AND BAKE SALE: Bring holiday gifts for wrapping and buy baked goods; proceeds benefit the Summit High School Sparrow Club; donations accepted; 1:304:30 p.m.; Umpqua Bank, 2755 N.W. Crossing Drive, Suite 113, Bend; 541-318-3641. THE NORTHSTAR SESSION: The California-based roots-rock band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www .mcmenamins.com. “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org.

“MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541389-0803 or www.cascades theatrical.org. HOLIDAY BLUEGRASS JAMBOREE: Featuring music from The Bond Street Bluegrass Allstars, Blackstrap, Wild Rye and Greg Botsford; $5, plus donations of canned food; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331. SWEATSHOP UNION: The Vancouver, British Columbia-based hip-hop act performs, with Top Shelf, Logy B and Young G; $10 plus fees in advance, $13 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www.randompresents.com.

SATURDAY THURSDAY “LIGHT UP A LIFE”: Light a candle in honor of loved ones; followed by a reception; donations accepted; 5-6 p.m.; Sisters Art Works, 204 W. Adams St.; 541-548-7483 or brvhospice@bendbroadband.com. “JOY TO YOU & ME”: A presentation of the play, which features a series of classic theater vignettes; proceeds benefit Toys for Tots; donation of unwrapped toys encouraged; 7 p.m.; Elton Gregory Middle School, 1220 N.W. Upas Ave., Redmond; 541-526-6440. HOLIDAY ORGAN CONCERT: Musician Mark Oglesby plays a holiday concert and Christmas carol sing-along; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th St., Redmond; 541-548-3367. “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. DICK DALE: The “king of the surf guitar” performs, with Tone Red; ages 21 and older; $20 plus fees in advance, $23 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7882989 or www.randompresents.com.

FRIDAY THE TRAIN MAN: Watch Michael Lavrich’s extensive collection of toy trains running on a track and ask questions; free; 10 a.m.-1 p.m. and 2-6 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7050 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. GIFT WRAPPING AND BAKE SALE: Bring holiday gifts for wrapping and buy baked goods; proceeds benefit the Summit High School Sparrow Club; donations accepted; 1:30-5:30 p.m.; Umpqua Bank, 2755 N.W. Crossing Drive, Suite 113, Bend; 541-318-3641. “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. CELEBRATION OF LIGHT: Drive or take a wagon ride through an outdoor nativity and light display, with caroling; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; Madras Conservative Baptist Church, 751 N.E. 10th St.; 541-475-7287. “A CHRISTMAS CAROL”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents an adaptation of Charles Dickens’ classic holiday tale, performed by a youth and adult cast; $19 or $25, $15 ages 12 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www .towertheatre.org.

REDMOND GRANGE BREAKFAST: Featuring biscuits and gravy, hash browns, scrambled eggs, coffee, hot chocolate and more; $5, $3 ages 12 and younger; 7-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Grange, 707 S.W. Kalama Ave.. “SILVER CITY HOLIDAYS” EXHIBIT OPENS: New exhibit features a recreated 1880s mining town; exhibit runs through Dec. 31; included in the price of admission; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. THE TRAIN MAN: Watch Michael Lavrich’s extensive collection of toy trains running on a track and ask questions; free; 10 a.m.-1 p.m. and 2-5 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7050 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. PHOTOS WITH FRONTIER SANTA: Take pictures with a Victorian-era Father Christmas; proceeds benefit the museum’s educational programs; $10 plus museum admission, $5 for museum members; 11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Ellen Waterston talks about her book “Where the Crooked River Rises”; free; 1 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; 541-389-1813 or www.deschuteshistory.org. “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. CELEBRATION OF LIGHT: Drive or take a wagon ride through an outdoor nativity and light display, with caroling; free; 6:308 p.m.; Madras Conservative Baptist Church, 751 N.E. 10th St.; 541-475-7287. HOLIDAY CONCERT: Featuring a performance by Bill Keale; a portion of proceeds benefits the Alyce Hatch Center; $20 in advance, $22 at the door, free ages 6 and younger; 7 p.m.; Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-815-5224 or www.billkeale.com. “A CHRISTMAS CAROL”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents an adaptation of Charles Dickens’ classic holiday tale, performed by a youth and adult cast; $19 or $25, $15 ages 12 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.tower theatre.org. “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. THE SOULSTICE JUBILEE: Featuring performances by Mosley Wotta and Eric Tollefson and the World’s Greatest Lovers; a portion of proceeds benefits the KIDS Center; $10 plus fees in advance, $13 at the door; 8 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; http:// parallel44presents.com. CROWN POINT: The Portland-based alternative pop-rock band performs; free; 9 p.m.; JC’s Bar & Grill, 642 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-383-3000. THE QUICK AND EASY BOYS: The Portland-based funk band performs; $7; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .silvermoonbrewing.com.

Experimental Art Theatre presents an adaptation of Charles Dickens’ classic holiday tale, performed by a youth and adult cast; $19 or $25, $15 ages 12 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

TUESDAY “SHARING OUR FAVORITE GENEALOGY STORIES”: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program followed by a holiday potluck; free; 10 a.m.; Rock Arbor Villa, Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-3178978,541-317-9553 or www.orgen web.org/deschutes/bend-gs.

WEDNESDAY Dec. 22

SUNDAY THE TRAIN MAN: Watch Michael Lavrich’s extensive collection of toy trains running on a track and ask questions; free; 1-5 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7050 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Final performance of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascades theatrical.org. “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 3:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. CELEBRATION OF LIGHT: Drive or take a wagon ride through an outdoor nativity and light display, with caroling; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; Madras Conservative Baptist Church, 751 N.E. 10th St.; 541-475-7287. ON A CLEAR WINTER’S NIGHT JAZZ CHRISTMAS: Featuring performances by Peter White, Mindi Abair and Rick Braun; with Santa, live reindeer, carolers and more; $26, $56 reserved; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend; www.c3events.com. “A CHRISTMAS CAROL”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents an adaptation of Charles Dickens’ classic holiday tale, performed by a youth and adult cast; $19 or $25, $15 ages 12 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. SUNRIVER MUSIC FESTIVAL CHRISTMAS CONCERT: An evening of classical and Christmas music, with maestro Lawrence Leighton Smith; $30, $40 reserved, $25 ages 65 and older, $10 ages 18 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; Sunriver Resort Great Hall, 17728 Abbot Drive; 541-5939310, tickets@sunrivermusic.org or www.sunrivermusic.org.

MONDAY THE TRAIN MAN: Watch Michael Lavrich’s extensive collection of toy trains running on a track and ask questions; free; 10 a.m.-1 p.m. and 2-6 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7050 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. THE REPTILE ZONE: Jeff from The Reptile Zone will show lizards, pythons and a tortoise; all ages welcome; free; 3 p.m.; Play Outdoors, 840 S.E. Woodland Blvd., Suite 110, Bend; 866-608-2423. “A CHRISTMAS CAROL”: Bend

VEGETARIAN POTLUCK: Bring a vegetarian dish with a list of its ingredients, a gift worth less than $5 for a gift exchange, and 24 of your favorite cookies; free; 6 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-480-3017. LIVE READ: Sit in comfy chairs and listen to short fiction read aloud by library staff; free; 6:30-7:30 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080.

THURSDAY Dec. 23 No calendar events.

FRIDAY Dec. 24 COMMUNITY CHRISTMAS EVE SERVICE: With food, carols, a choir performance and a performance by Annie Bethancourt; reservations recommended; free; 4, 5:30 and 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www .towertheatre.org. STARFEST: Explore the festive holiday light display; through Jan. 2; free; 5:50-9:30 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; www.eagle-crest.com. ‘TWAS THE NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS: Featuring holiday trivia, caroling and a live reading of the holiday poem; free admission; 7-8 p.m.; Sunriver Resort, Homestead Room, 57081 Meadow Road; 800-486-8591 or www.sunriver-resort.com/traditions.

SATURDAY Dec. 25

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

BURLESQUE (PG-13) 2:15, 4:50, 7:20 COOL IT (PG) 2:05, 5, 7:25 FAIR GAME (PG-13) 2:10, 4:40, 7:10 THE GIRL WHO KICKED THE HORNET’S NEST (R) 2:30, 7 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 2:25, 7:05 TAMARA DREWE (R) 2, 4:30, 7:15

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER 3-D (PG) 11:15 a.m., 12:10, 1:50, 2:45, 4:30, 5:20, 7, 8, 9:35, 10:35 THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) 11:45 a.m., 2:20, 4:55, 7:30, 10:05 THE TOURIST (PG-13) 11:35

a.m., 2:15, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45 THE WARRIOR’S WAY (R) 12:25, 2:50, 5:15, 7:40, 10 TANGLED (PG) 11:40 a.m., 2:05, 4:25, 6:45, 9:30 FASTER (R) Noon, 2:25, 5:25, 7:55, 10:20 LOVE AND OTHER DRUGS (R) 11:55 a.m., 2:30, 5:05, 7:45, 10:30 BURLESQUE (PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 2, 4:40, 7:25, 10:10 TANGLED 3-D (PG) 11:10 a.m., 1:35, 4 THE NEXT THREE DAYS (PG13) 12:15, 3:55, 6:55, 9:55 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (DP — PG-13) 6:40, 9:50 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 3:50, 7:10, 10:15 UNSTOPPABLE (PG-13) 11:25 a.m., 1:45, 4:10, 6:35, 9:40 MORNING GLORY (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 1:55, 4:20, 6:50, 9:25 MEGAMIND 3-D (PG) 11:20 a.m., 1:40, 4:05, 6:25, 9:20 DUE DATE (R) 12:20, 2:40,

5:30, 8:05, 10:25 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies. EDITOR’S NOTE: Digitally projected shows (marked as DP) use one of several different technologies to provide maximum fidelity. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE (PG) 3 HEREAFTER (PG-13) 6 THE TOWN (R) 9

N   N  Usher kicked in face by frenzied fan

wasn’t hurt and cracked a joke about it.

NEW YORK — Being a sex symbol has its dangers, as Usher learned firsthand at his New York City concert. The crooner brought an ecstatic female fan onstage Usher Monday night for a serenade of his sensual song “Trading Places” at Madison Square Garden. He sat her on a couch while he caressed her. Then, after they changed positions, the overexcited fan tried to move her leg to get closer to him. Her stiletto boot heel knocked him in the nose. The fan tried to smooth things over by massaging Usher’s face, but there was no need: Usher

Portman may produce gross-out girl movies NEW YORK — Natalie Portman thinks gross-out, juvenile humor isn’t just for guys. She believes women appreciate lewd humor, too. In the January 2011 issue of Vogue magazine, the Academy Award-nominated actress says she’s started her own production company and is interested in making comedic films like “The Hangover” for women. In the article, Portman says women are typically “not allowed” to be “beautiful and funny.” She also believes it’s frowned upon for females to be vulgar. Her latest movie, “Black Swan,” is now in theaters. The January issue of Vogue goes on sale nationwide Dec. 21. — From wire reports

STARFEST: Explore the festive holiday light display; through Jan. 2; free; 5:50-9:30 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; www.eagle-crest.com.

The verdict SUNDAY Dec. 26 CHARITY BINGO: Event includes a canned food drive and baked-goods sale; proceeds benefit the St. Vincent de Paul food bank; $7; 2 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, 235 N.E. Fourth St., Prineville; 541-447-7659. STARFEST: Explore the festive holiday light display; through Jan. 2; free; 5:50-9:30 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; www.eagle-crest.com.

MONDAY Dec. 27 No calendar events.

TUESDAY Dec. 28 CLASSICS BOOK CLUB: Read and discuss short stories by Henry James; free; 6-8 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7087, kevinb@dpls.us or www.dpls.us/calendar.

M T For Wednesday, Dec. 15

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG-13) 3:30, 6:15, 9 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 5:30, 9 TANGLED (PG) 4, 6:15, 8:30 UNSTOPPABLE (PG-13) 4:45, 7, 9:15

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

BURLESQUE (PG-13) 4:30, 7 THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) 4, 6:30 MORNING GLORY (PG-13) 7 TANGLED (PG) 4:45 THE TOURIST (PG-13) 4:15, 6:45

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

DUE DATE (R) 7 MEGAMIND (G) 4

If you want to save your pennies, you’ll do just fine nourishing your eye area with regular facial moisturizer. But if you’re screaming for eye cream, here are a few recommendations from Dr. Lisa Airan — for a variety of budgets.

LA MER EYE CONCENTRATE Using multiple forms of La Mer’s “miracle broth,” a bio-fermented blend of sea kelp, calcium, magnesium, citrus oil, eucalyptus, alfalfa and sunflower, this pricey cream contains a magnetized mineral manufacturers say reduces the appearance of dark circles and puffiness. The silver-tip applicator it comes with, designed to pick up the exact amount of product and improve microcirculation, feels cool to the skin, and each stroke did seem to calm morning puffiness and brighten dark circles. $165 for a 0.5-ounce tub at cremedelamer.com

KIEHL’S CREAMY EYE TREATMENT WITH AVOCADO Made with avocado oil, shea butter, beta carotene and vitamins A and E, the green-tinted cream goes on thick and creamy, so it takes a bit of rubbing to blend it in, which “bursts a barrier so that water is then released for maximum moisturization,” according to the marketing materials (it’s true; you can feel the sudden slickness of the water as you pat the cream into your skin). The cream feels cool and refreshing upon application, and it leaves the eye area glistening for a while. $25.50 for a 0.5-ounce tub at kiehls.com

OIL OF OLAY TOTAL EFFECTS EYE TRANSFORMING CREAM This lightweight eye cream slips on smoothly and absorbs immediately. Promising to treat the seven signs of aging — including minimizing wrinkles, brightening dark circles, reducing puffiness and balancing color — it touts the ingredient VitaNiacin, a blend of vitamins E, B5 and B3, but also contains cucumber extract, aloe vera and dimethicone. Circles do appear slightly brighter after application, and hours later, the area still feels quenched. $18.29 for a 0.5-ounce tub at amazon.com.

Eyes Continued from E1 It’s true that our eyes need special attention. The skin around the eyes is the thinnest on your body, so it is more susceptible to extrinsic aging, caused mostly by sun exposure, and intrinsic aging, caused mostly by fat loss around the eyes and creasing of the skin due to repetitive contracting of the eye muscles, said Dr. Jeffrey Benabio, a San Diego dermatologist who runs thedermblog.com. The early signs of aging start to emerge in the 30s, he said, so that’s a good age to start moisturizing around the eyes, to help plump the skin and smooth fine lines. But you don’t need an eyespecific cream, he said. “Using any moisturizer for a period of time, even if it is not an eye cream, will significantly improve the appearance of fine lines for most people,” Benabio said. Even the best creams can

only help smooth fine lines and tighten the lower eyelid skin, Benabio said, so be wary of products that claim to eliminate dark circles, which are notoriously difficult to treat. Still, some people prefer to use a separate eye cream. The thicker consistency keeps it from migrating into their eyes, it helps eye makeup stay on or they just like how it feels. Dr. Lisa Airan, a New York dermatologist, recommends a separate eye cream for patients who have oily skin and a tendency to form milial cysts, which are like tiny whiteheads around their eyes. She says to choose an eye cream that’s lightweight and contains a small concentration of retinol, which has been shown to stimulate collagen growth. Other ingredients to look for are glycerol, vitamin C, silicone derivatives such as dimethicone and antioxidants, which in theory can help reduce damage to the sensitive area by soaking up free radicals, Benabio said.


E4 Wednesday, December 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, December 15, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Wednesday, Dec. 15, 2010: This year, letting go may be the key to your success. Don’t stand on ceremony any longer, and give up any vindictiveness, if possible. Greater creativity and energy will result. If you are single, a major love affair could define your next year. Look to meeting this person probably in the first half of 2011. If you are attached, the two of you could be welcoming a new addition to your family. Of course, this might be a new pet, so don’t fret! Romance seems to be in the air spring 2011. Artists and creative sorts bloom this year, possibly creating their life’s masterpiece. ARIES can be provocative and fun at the same time. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Don’t let a sense of negativity or redundancy over an issue or situation aggravate you. Take a deep breath, with the knowledge that there is something better ahead. Creativity often stems from frustration like this. Tonight: Detach from your daily life. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HH The less said the better, considering the mood you are in. In fact, if you can take a personal day or decide to exit from one day of your life, the time is now. Consider yourself on sabbatical. Tonight: Greet a loved one with a big smile. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH You attempt to home in on the basics yet are continuously distracted by an idea or a loved

one. Make this diversion OK, and you will find that you have an easier time concentrating. Watch a key loved one or associate take that extra step. Tonight: Getting into some Santa chores. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Take a stand, understanding that something better lies ahead. Your ability to deal with a domestic matter and work matter (or community matter) at the same time might not be up to par. Leave one before going to the other. Prioritize in order to get results. Tonight: Understand that all the nurturing in the world cannot change some issues. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Keep reaching out for others, and don’t stand on ceremony. Everyone is a bit uptight right now. Why would you be any different? If you can get past tension, you could be instrumental in eliminating it for you and for others. Tonight: Detach rather than react. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH Relate on a one-on-one level, opening up doors if possible. What you think is creative or a great project could get shut down. Relax. This, too, will pass. Use care with spending. A mistake or risk could be a problem. Tonight: Snuggle in, even if it is with the cat! LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH Do you realize the kibosh you are putting on others’ ideas and plans? Let go of negativity and try to loosen up. Then communication will become more fulfilling and worthwhile. Establish limits. Tonight: Go with a suggestion.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH You might be tired or a little depressed. Not realizing this drain, you could go out and wonder why others react so strangely. Know when to leave an uncomfortable situation. Focus on your to-do list only. Tonight: Put your feet up. Chill. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You generally can count on your ingenuity, but perhaps not at the moment. You could be overthinking a situation, trying to figure out the best way. Friends, associates and others in general don’t seem to be helpful. Tonight: Let off steam. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Realize your limitations and why issues involving boundaries are happening. A parent, elder or boss could be in a bad mood. Don’t you think it has gone on a little too long? Perhaps you could be as much at fault here. Tonight: Do some serious soul searching. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Keep conversations moving. If you aren’t able to get enough information or detach sufficiently in order to see the big picture, relax. A friend could be instrumental in helping you. For some, a meeting allows negativity to clear up. Tonight: Favorite spot, favorite people. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Understand that a partner feels frightened and uptight. All your efforts lead to nowhere. Know when and how to let go. You also might decide to take the lead with spending or a risk. You appear to be more flexible. Tonight: Treat yourself too! © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

E6 Wednesday, December 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Holiday Continued from E1 A color called Le Rouge from YSL Beaute is a true red, and its shiny gold packaging makes for a handsome addition to a vanity. For a little bit of sheen to the eyelid and brow bone, try Bobbi Brown’s Sparkle Glamour Quad (which comes with four palettes of color), which gives a partygoer the option of creating a sexy smoky eye or playing it safe with a glittery champagne eye shadow. Literal touches of sparkle are easy to find this time of year, and a little really does go a long way. Try wearing sequins or glitter by way of a neutral colored scarf, such as the nude version from Tory Burch that features one side of solid wool and the other decorated with a smattering of copper-colored palettes. Henri Bendel offers stackable rhinestone bracelets that are fastened with a velvet bow, a piece that could dress up anything from a black suit to jeans and a sweater. Gentlemen, please ditch the reindeer tie and instead opt for a few dapper flourishes that

Apps Continued from E1 He said soon after the launch, feedback streamed in asking for more local content. “Hiking trails, Phil’s Trail, those are the kinds of things people want to see apps for,” Harper said. “I think it’s going to happen as more people move into the area,” he continued. “There will be more tech-savvy people here. They will see issues and say, ‘I wonder if there’s a technical solution for that.’” In the meantime, there are a few more apps on the market that aren’t exclusive to Central Oregon, yet offer useful local information. The key to finding them is making broader searches in the App Store or Android Market. Instead of “Mt. Bachelor,” type in “ski Oregon.” Or you can always try creating one yourself. That’s what Cory Pratt did. The Bend resident took about seven months to craft The Hatch and The Hatch Lite, Apple apps that give anglers information on their favorite rivers. Pratt encourages others to give it a try. “There’s enough resources out there on the Internet and in books for someone who understands programming to do it.” Want to find your way on the slopes or to the nearest frothy brew? Here are a few of our favorite apps providing cool tools for Central Oregon living:

Circle 8 Compatibility: iPhone, iPad and iPod touch, requires iOS 4.0 or later Price: $1.99 Last updated: Dec. 10 Other versions: None What it does: Circle 8 is like a Google map but better; it also includes roundabouts, bike paths and key locations throughout Sunriver Resort. You can also search for locations (where is the North Pool?) and intersections, and then zoom in on your target. And with the new GPS component the app can pinpoint your location within the resort. Who is it for: For anyone who has ever blundered through Sunriver Resort as Clark Griswold does London, this app is for you. It’s also a must-have for tourists.

Add a touch of sparkle to a simple outfit with Casadei jeweled peep toe heels. can, in truth, be worn any time of year. Woolrich and Converse have teamed up for a holiday collection that includes a pair

of rugged wool Chuck Taylors. They’re part lumberjack, part creative executive and can be worn with a pair of dark jeans and a solid sweater for work or a private holiday party. For something dressier, the oversized burgundy bow tie from the Lanvin for H&M collection is fun and looks great with a suit or under a V-neck sweater. And for a festive but subtle approach to holiday dressing, try slipping on some bright colored or patterned socks, which can be worn with sneakers and jeans or a suit and oxfords. Paul Smith generally has a wide selection of colorful socks, including a pair in a red and gray harlequin pattern. Top it all off by lighting a scented candle while you’re dressing up at home — or wrap one for a hostess gift. Annick Goutal’s Noel candle and room spray is a subtle mix of citrus and pine and doesn’t overwhelm a room once lighted. So it’s not so difficult to get seasonal, is it? That Christmas sweater can remain in the bottom drawer another year if you follow our basic rule: It’s probably best to sparkle sparingly.

Cool factor: It’s named after the missing roundabout in the Sunriver Resort road system, Circle 8. After researching why the circles jump from 7 to 9, app creator Michael Harper now believes the resort planned No. 8, but then gave up the land in a deal with the U.S. Forest Service. The local joke is that when unpleasant visitors ask for directions, tell them to take the first left at Circle 8.

Terms to know Smart phone: A device that lets you make phone calls but also offers features that you might find on a computer, such as the ability to send and receive e-mail, edit documents and access the Web. iOS: Apple-based operating system. It’s the same “i” that’s used in iPhone and iPad. App: Short for application. An app is a software program designed specifically for a device like an iPhone or an Android smart phone.

The Hatch Lite Compatibility: iPhone, iPad and iPod touch, requires iOS 2.2.1 or later Price: Free Last updated: Nov. 20, 2009 Other versions: Information for rivers in more than 30 states is available on The Hatch, which costs 99 cents. What it does: Want to know which flies are likely best on the Crooked River in June? Align these two elements and click. A list of flies will appear. When you choose a fly, a picture pops up, as well as the suggested sizes and recommended patterns. The app covers several of the most renowned fly fishing rivers in Oregon, including the Lower Deschutes, Middle Deschutes, Fall, Crooked and Metolius. Who is it for: Local anglers and visitors alike will appreciate the tips on how to pack before setting out. And if you need to change strategy on the go, the app is a good guide. App creator Cory Pratt also advises it’s best paired with advice from local fly shops, which always have the most up-to-date info. Cool factor: Bend resident Pratt designed the app himself, with advice from area anglers and fly shops.

RoadCam Oregon Compatibility: iPhone, iPad and iPod touch, requires iOS 3.0 or later Price: $1.99 Last updated: Aug. 5 Other versions: None What it does: Check how blustery the Santiam Pass is as you approach. With just a tap, this app connects users to the Oregon Department of Transportation’s video cameras along highways throughout the state, including Central Oregon and the mountain passes. Users can also create

Sources: Michael Harper, www.wisegeek.com, www.about.com

a favorites list for even speedier navigation. But you must have a signal for the app to function. Who is it for: It’s a no-brainer for anyone driving over the Cascades in winter. Cool factor: ODOT’s Web cams also list temperature and wind speed at the locations.

iTrailMap 3D Compatibility: iPhone, iPad and iPod touch, requires iOS 3.0 or later Price: $4.99 Last updated: Nov. 16 Other versions: Another version called iTrailMap is also available for free in Apple and Android versions, but they are essentially downloaded ski area maps. They don’t require a cell signal — handy for midmountain — but don’t have nifty GPS components. What it does: First, you download ski area maps — the app offers all the areas in Oregon, including Mt. Bachelor, Hoodoo and the Mt. Hood resorts. If that’s all you want, snag a free version. But for the price of a mega latte you can get more. Lost in the trees below Bachelor’s Northwest Chairlift? If you get a signal, you can locate yourself and where the nearest ski run is with the GPS function. Throughout the course of the day you can also track total vertical, miles skied and other stats, shooting it later to Web site www.3dskier .com to gloat over your day. Who is it for: If you’re just as comfortable grasping a phone with frigid hands as a paper

Carve it, climb it, crush it. Deep snow adrenaline junkies!

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Henri Bendel bracelets ($68 each) will deliver festiveness to your holiday outfit.

map, this app is for you. The GPS factor can be extremely helpful, but don’t count on a signal always being available, even on well-serviced mountains like Bachelor. Cool factor: Planning a European ski vacation? Or a Utah getaway? iTrailMap’s library of available ski areas is massive. But you’re still out of luck for a few regions, such as Alaska or Scandinavia.

Moto mApps Oregon Compatibility: Android devices Price: $1.99 Last updated: Dec. 3 Other versions: There is a free version that offers maps only but no GPS capabilities. What it does: This is the app for nonwinter motorized recreation. It functions much like iTrailMap 3D, offering GPS function, trails and directions for motorized trails. And it includes major riding areas around Central Oregon, such as Millican, East Fort Rock and Santiam Pass. Who is it for: Again, folks who feel just as comfortable with digital as with paper will like the palm-of-your-hand convenience. Cool factor: Android device owners finally get in on the fun. And the on-screen compass is an excellent plus.

KPOV Compatibility: iPhone, iPad and iPod touch, requires iOS 3.0 or later Price: Free Last updated: July 19 Other versions: None What it does: Plays what’s on now at Bend’s listener-supported radio station. Who is it for: Anyone who wants a mini-radio in their pocket for when the usual playlist gets dull. Treating all Foot Conditions 541.383.3668 www.optimafootandankle.com Bend | Redmond | Prineville

Cool factor: Finally, an app even a Luddite can love. This app is ridiculously simple to use: Turn to on. Volume up or down. That’s it.

State Parks OR Compatibility: iPhone, iPad and iPod touch, requires iOS 3.0 or later Price: $1.99 Last updated: Nov. 25 Other versions: None What it does: This is a digital encyclopedia of Oregon state parks, including those throughout Central Oregon. While it doesn’t map trails, it can give you the basics on any park, from fees to hours to boat launches. Who is it for: If you’re relatively new to the region and eager to explore, you’ll appreciate the allin-one-place pile of information. But if you’ve been going to, say, Smith Rock State Park for years, this may not tell you too much that’s new. Cool factor: Who knew La Pine State Park is home to the state’s largest Ponderosa pine tree?

hours, location, website and possibly other interesting info, like the name of the head brewmaster. You can also create your own beer database to remember your favorites. Who is it for: Those who — reasonably so — can’t keep Bend’s umpteen different brewpubs straight in their heads. But it will not tell you what seasonal is on tap. Cool factor: It’s not hard to figure out … it helps you find fine craft beer. Heidi Hagemeier can be reached at 541-617-7828 or at hhagemeier@bendbulletin.com.

GIFT

SALE

BrewTour OR Compatibility: iPhone, iPad and iPod touch, requires iOS 3.1.2 or later Price: Free Last updated: April 8 Other versions: None What it does: What if you don’t know where to find the nearest brewpub? BrewTour OR uses GPS technology to guide you there. You can also search by Oregon city. If you select a listing, the app shows you the pub’s

Home Decor Copperware Pottery Fireplace and BBQ Accessories

FIRESIDE Stoves • Fireplaces • Spas Pottery andSince Home Accessories 1979

424 NE Third St., Bend 2 blocks south of Franklin

541-382-2597 www.bendfireside.com


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, December 15, 2010 F1

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T h e

B u l l e t i n :

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1 7 7 7

S . W .

202

208

210

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264

269

Pets and Supplies

Furniture & Appliances

TV, Stereo and Video

Snow Removal Equipment

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Farm Market

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

300

Chihuahuas, 2 purebred fem.,9 wks old, great Christmas gift! $200/obo. 541-815-9728

BENGAL KITTENS, champion lines, ready now. $250 & up. Call 541-385-8934.

German Shepherd Pups, 3 white, 1 dark mahogany, 1 white donated to Sisters Wrestling team, $500 ea., 541-610-5785.

Boxer Puppies, AKC, 7 wks, 2 males @$400 ea; 6 females @$500 ea. 541-408-5230

Chesapeake Pups AKC, 1st shots, great hunt/family dogs $300-$400 ea. 541-259-4739

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Chihuahua- absolutely adorable teacups, wormed, 1st shots, $250, 541-977-4686. Chihuahua, Applehead, male, last one! $100. 541-593-0223.

Chihuahua pups, Great Christmas Gift! 6 weeks old. $300. 541-977-4817 jesse1215@gmail.com

9 7 7 0 2

208

German Shepherd Pup, 11 wks female, black, parents on site, $300. 541-536-5538

Boston Terrier Beautiful Girls! Will be ready for Christmas. Champion bred for beauty and brains. Excellent family additions. AKC Reg. $950. 541-493-2772

O r e g o n

Pets and Supplies

Beagle Puppies - Born 9/25, 1st/2nd shots. Great with kids! $175 (541)419-4960

Boston Terrier, AKC 12-wk male, family raised, 1st/2nd shots, $400. 541-610-8525

B e n d

208

LAB PUPPIES AKC, Hunting lines, great family pets! Family raised; Parents on site. 541-317-1867

Chow/Mix male, 2 yrs, gentle, WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Mosweet disposition, free to Lab Pups AKC - 2 blacks, 6 torcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, good home. 541-389-9753 chocolates, dew claws, 1st ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! Cock-A-Poo Pup, for loving shots & wormed. Hunters. 541-280-7959. home, ready now, $200, $450-$500. 541-536-5385 Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for please call 541-504-9958. www.welcomelabs.com old vintage costume, scrap, silver & gold Jewelry. Top DACHSHUNDS, AKC MINI LAB PUPS AKC, titled parents, LONGHAIRED, Reds, Black & FC/AFC, Blackwater Rudy is dollar paid, Estate incl. Hontans, Creams. $300-$600. grand sire. Deep pedigreed est Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 541-548-7514 performance/titles, OFA hips Wanted washers and dryers, & elbows. 541-771-2330 working or not, cash paid, Dachshunds, AKC, mini’s, (5) fe- www.royalflushretrievers.com males,chocolate dapple, $375, 541-280-7959. Labradoodles, Australian 541-420-6044, 541-447-3060 Imports - 541-504-2662 204 English Bulldog AKC male, www.alpen-ridge.com Santa’s Gift Basket “Cooper” is 8 mo. old, all shots, $1200. 541-325-3376. Labrador pups AKC, chocoPotato Lefse late, yellow, hips guaranteed, Redmond area, $16/dozen. $250-$450. 1-541-954-1727 ENGLISH SETTER Purebred 14 541-548-7178 wk old pups. Great hunting/ family dogs. Females $500; FIND IT! 208 male, $450. 541-280-2597 BUY IT! Pets and Supplies SELL IT! English Springer Spaniels, AKC The Bulletin Classiieds Reg, black/white, housebroke, ready to go! 541-408-6322 The Bulletin recommends Labrador purebred puppies, www.kennykennels.com extra caution when black, very cute, ready 12/26. purchasing products or $300-$400. 503-740-5312 Free Kittens, Pet Quality, ready services from out of the to go to there forever homes, Labs, English yellow, AKC, dewarea. Sending cash, checks, 541-420-0097. claws, vaccinations & microor credit information may chipped. $600. 541-884-2742 be subjected to fraud. For more information about an Lhasa Apso pup, adorable, advertiser, you may call the exc personality, $250. Linda Oregon State Attorney 503-888-0800 (Madras) General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at Maremma Guard Dog pups, 1-877-877-9392. purebred, great dogs, $300 French bulldog/pug mix pupeach, 541-546-6171. pies. 3 only; taking deposits. Great coat & markings. Lov- Miniature Schnauzer pups, ing personalities. Pick yours purebred, salt & pepper, now for Christmas! $700. black, ready for Christmas, Aussie/Shepherd pups 6 wks, 541-548-0747; 541-279-3250 $300-$350, 541-771-1830. (2) both are Blue Merle. $100 each. Call 541-536-4440, or GERMAN SHEPHERD DOGS AKC Min-Pin pups, Adorable pure 503-310-2514 Gorgeous west German showbred, 8 weeks old, Black & line, family companion, proTan, 4 males $200/ea and 1 Aussies - Toys & Minis, will tectors. All immunizations. 1 female $300. up-to-date, on hold for Christmas, prices male, 1 female. shots. Pics available. start $500, 541-548-6672 or 775-941-0302 541-633-6148 (leave msg) www.cattlecalltoyaussies.com

Border Collie/Blue Heeler mix pups, 9 wks, 1st shots & wormed, 4 @ $100 ea. 541-852-5753, Prineville.

A v e . ,

Pets and Supplies

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

200 Want to Buy or Rent

C h a n d l e r

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

German Shepherd Pups, A K C , White, absolutely gorgeous, born October 1st. $650 or best offer. Please call 541-536-6167.

Papillon pups just in time for St Nick to put under tree. $300. Taking deposits. Call 541-504-9958 POODLES AKC Toy. Also Pom-a-Poos. Home raised. 541-475-3889 541-325-6212

Special needs cats need loving homes. 3 'wobbly' cats (born w/neurological imbalance); a cat w/partial sight; 2 declawed cats; a senior Siamese; & a cat that needs asthma meds (photo). All are healthy but have a condition making it harder to place. None need meds except the asthma cat who gets a chew pill 3 times/wk. Rescue group is seeking caring in- WANTED: Portable Dishwasher in good working condition. side-only homes for these Please call 541-447-7874. sweet cats that deserve a break & were rejected by Wanted washers and dryers, shelters as being too hard to working or not, cash paid, adopt out. Visit @ 65480 541-280-7959. 78th St, Bend, Sat/Sun 1-4. 212 www.craftcats.org, 389-8420 VIZSLA AKC Pups, ready 1/10. M/$700 F/$800. Deposits. 541-430-9335 (Roseburg)

Antiques & Collectibles

Wolf hybrid 77%, 7 mos, $200. Husky, blue eyes, 2 yrs, $100. Moving, need good homes, please call 541-852-5753 Prineville Yorkie Pups, 8 wks,tails docked, dewclaws removed, exc. Christmas presents, $550, 541-521-0535,541-536-2692

210

Furniture & Appliances #1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

COWGIRL

RESALE

Gently Used Western Wear Turquoise, Old Pawn Squash Blossoms, Cuffs 541-549-6950 The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

215 Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-7959 !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

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The Bulletin

Coins & Stamps WANTED TO BUY

Samsung 52” box big screen, 2006 excellent cond. Must sell, $400. 541-480-2652.

255

Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

257

Musical Instruments Acoustic Guitar Yamaha FD02, perfect cond., $195. 541-480-5950 BC Rich “B****”,, Hot Pink, w/case, $250, local, 503-933-0814. Drum Set, Complete beginners, 5 drums, 4 cymbals & stool, $200, 541-408-3731. Fender Acoustic, DG7, American made,hardshell case, exc cond, $175, 503-933-0814.

Appliances, new & recondi- Meade 8 inch Telescope LX200 tioned, guaranteed. OverGPS Call for details $1800 stock sale. Lance & Sandy’s 541-306-6169 Bend Maytag, 541-385-5418

$3,000. 541-385-4790.

265

308

Farm Equipment and Machinery

Building Materials Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

266

Heating and Stoves

325 NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, Hay, Grain and Feed advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to Bluegrass Straw mid-size 3x3, 270 models which have been $25/bale; Orchard grass hay certified by the Oregon Demid-size 3x3 $45/bale. VolLost and Found partment of Environmental ume discounts; delivery Quality (DEQ) and the fed- FOUND cat in Mt. High subdiviavailable. 541-480-8648. eral Environmental Protecsion, Dec. 7. She has no coltion Agency (EPA) as having Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedlar, is calico/bengal colored. met smoke emission stan- 541-382-1490, 541-389-4448 ding Straw & Garden Straw; dards. A certified woodstove Kentucky Bluegrass; Com260 can be identified by its certi- Found: Garage Door Opener, post; 541-546-6171. Bend High, 12/6, call to fication label, which is perMisc. Items identify, 541-317-4951 manently attached to the 341 stove. The Bulletin will not Antique Dressmaker’s Dummy, knowingly accept advertising Found Rx Glasses, rectangular Horses and Equipment great for clothing display? frame, near Badlands Wilderfor the sale of uncertified Excellent condition, $350. ness, 12/12, 541-318-1686 200 ACRES BOARDING woodstoves. 541-317-4985; 541-280-0112 Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, BUYING AND SELLING Pellet Stove, Westfield, like Found: Small Shih Tsu, male, & pastures, lessons & kid’s young, black/white, NE 2nd, All gold jewelry, silver and gold new, extra parts. $500 cash. programs. 541-923-6372 Bend, 12/9, 541-410-7549. coins, bars, rounds, wedding You haul. 541-548-3467 www.clinefallsranch.com sets, class rings, sterling sil267 ver, coin collect, vintage Look at: Bendhomes.com Find exactly what watches, dental gold. Bill Fuel and Wood for Complete Listings of Fleming, 541-382-9419. you are looking for in the Area Real Estate for Sale CLASSIFIEDS Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

US & Foreign Coin & Currency 541-389-6655 collections, accum. Pre-1964 BUYING silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling flatware. Gold coins, Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex & Chainsaws, like new! Run exvintage watches. No colleccellent! Stihl MS-460, $695! tion too large or small. BedMS-390, $395! 026 20” $269! rock Rare Coins 541-549-1658 Husqavarna 395XP, $595! 281XP, $595! 372XP, $595! 240 55XP, 20”, $295! 445XP, 20”, $295! 541-280-5006 Crafts and Hobbies Alpaca Yarn, various colors/ blends/sparkle. 175yds/skein $7.50-8.50 ea. 541-385-4989

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT dry Lodgepole, $150 for 1 cord or $290 for 2, Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484

Lost Ring: Heirloom, green stone w/small diamonds around it, Redmond/Bend area, early as Sept., 541-447-5389 Lost: Wallet, Possibly near Ranchero in Prineville, within the last week, $50 Reward for return, 541-447-6068. REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

280

Estate Sales

241 CASH price: Rounds $119; 2 "Quick Cash Special" Bed, King, Premium, box cords/more $115 ea. Split, Huge Estate Sale, Inside Bicycles and 1 week 3 lines spring/mattress, like new. $149; 2 cords/more, $145 ea. Collectibles, antiques, misc, Fri$10 bucks Poodles Standard - AKC, Accessories $225. 503-930-2226, Bend. (Visa/MC: $129 or Split $159 Sun, Dec 17-19, 9am-? 2816 German Shorthair Pointer or browns & blacks, AKC champ ea) Deliv avail. 541-771-8534 N Adams Dr, Madras. Signs at A K C , champ lines, 4 male, 3 2 weeks $16 bucks! sired, health & tempermant Dining Set, Oak, Pedestal Base Schwinn mtn bike, shock, ShiHwy 26. Call 541-475-3496 CRUISE THROUGH classified female, $375, 541-550-9992. 42" round w/built-in 18" leaf mano equipped, 6 mo. new. guaranteed, raw fed, parti when you're in the market for Ad must and 6 chairs. $325 $120. 541-480-5950 pups soon, 877-385-9120 or 286 German Shorthair Puppies, AKC a new or used car. include price of item 541-389-7213 evenings. marsanpoodles@gmail.com 10 wks old, 6 males, shots/ 242 Sales Northeast Bend wormed. 5 dogs in the GSP Portuguese Podengos,very rare GENERATE SOME excitement in www.bendbulletin.com Exercise Equipment Hall of Fame in their pedibreed, small 10” size, 10-12 your neigborhood. Plan a gaor gree; excellent hunt/show or lbs, 2 females & 1 male; can rage sale and don't forget to Gift Certificate For Downtown Call Classifieds at DRY, SEASONED HH FREE HH family dogs. Well socialized, hold for Christmas! Call advertise in classified! 541-385-5809 FIREWOOD Athletic Club, 3 mo. for Garage Sale Kit $400. Also 1 4-yr male, $800; 541-389-2636. See photos at 385-5809. 1 cord, split & delivered. couple, $100, 541-382-3479 and 1 4-month female, $800. www.bodeankennels.com $130/cord. Santa Suit, used 1x/yr, 6 yrs, exc Mattress Set, full size, clean, 541-923-8377; 541-419-6638 246 Please call 541-610-6713. Place an ad in The Bulletin cond, accessories. New $275; Pug Shih-Tzu Doxie mix pups, good condition, $100. for your garage sale and sell $125 OBO. 541-420-5381 1st shots. $200 each. ready Griffin Wirehaired Pointer, Guns & Hunting 503-933-0814 (local call). SPLIT, DRY LODGEPOLE receive a Garage Sale Kit now. 541-389-0322. male pup, 6 mo., both parDELIVERY INCLUDED! and Fishing FREE! Mini-Loveseat/hide a bed, tan, ents AKC, good hunters, $175/CORD. unique, perfect for RV, $150 357 Taurus $500 w/ammo 12 great hunting potential & Purebred St. Bernard Pups, 3 Call for half-cord prices! KIT INCLUDES: females, ready to go, $250, OBO 503-933-0814, local good natured, $500, Leave message, 541-923-6987 ga. 870 tactical, $450. • 4 Garage Sale Signs call 541-589-1633 or e-mail loreencooper@centurytel.net 541-447-7069 noon - 7pm • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use anlbigdogs@yahoo.com 541-934-2423. 269 Toward Your Next Ad Bushmaster XM-15 Predator Queensland Heelers Gardening Supplies • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale semi-auto .223 on bipod Standards & mini,$150 & up. Just in time for Christmas! Success!” w/Swift scope 6-18x44, 4 & Equipment 541-280-1537 Standard Poodle Puppy's, 1 • And Inventory Sheet clips 30, 20, 10 & 5. $1000. http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com apricot female, 2 blonde 541-948-7280 PICK UP YOUR males, 2 black males, 11 BarkTurfSoil.com Shih Tzu/Poodle mix, 14-week Oak Dining Set, 2 leaves/8 Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi CASH!! GARAGE SALE weeks,up-to-date on shots, male, $250. Great Christchairs, $699; Unique curved For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Instant Landscaping Co. audio & studio equip. McInKIT AT: dew claws removed & tails mas present! 541-233-8202 Oak Headboard, $199; & tosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, PROMPT DELIVERY Supplies. 541-408-6900. 1777 SW Chandler Ave. docked, crate trained and more! 916-690-1529 (cell) Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, 541-389-9663 Bend, OR 97702 Siamese Kittens (4) pureready for their forever Custom Enfield Model 19-17 NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808 bred, M/F, Seal & Lilac point, Queen Bed, double pillowtop, like homes. $500 call for more 375 H&H, heavy barrel, $750 $125 ea. 541-318-3396 details 541-337-2122 new, in plastic. Frame incl. OBO. Uberti 1848 3rd gen BEND’S HOMELESS NEED OUR HELP $250 503-933-0814 (local call) dragoon black powder pistol, SIBERIAN HUSKY/Wolf pups, 6 The cold weather is upon us and sadly there are still over MSRP $409, & holster $70; wks. wormed & shots, $400 Queen Mattress/Box Spring, exc. Kittens & great cats avail. for 2,000 folks in our community without permanent shelter, livIndoor Garage Sale: 62701 asking $350 both, OBO. each. 541-610-3431. adoption! Cat Rescue, Adoping in cars, makeshift camps, getting by as best they can. cond, used in guest room, Larkview Rd off Eagle & 541-390-1010 tion & Foster Team, the $180, local, 503-933-0814 Oakview, Fri. & Sat. 10-3, The following items are badly needed to area's only no-kill, all volunGUNS furniture, baby items, VHS, help them get through the winter: teer cat group. Petco on Sat. Buy, Sell, Trade Second Hand 11-4, Tom-Tom Motel (by 541-728-1036. d CAMPING GEAR of any sort: d Mattresses, sets & 292 Sonic) Sat/Sun 12-4 (call Used tents, sleeping bags, tarps, blankets. singles, call Ruger Vaquero old model 45LC. 541-815-7278), & sanctuary Sales Other Areas Excellent condition. Blue with @ 65480 78th St, Bend, Sat/ 541-598-4643. d WARM CLOTHING d wood grips, have box. $475. Sun 1-4. Altered, shots, ID DON'T FORGET to take your Rain Gear, Boots 541/598-7632 chip, etc. Low adoption fees! signs down after your gaWe'll hold your new feline til rage sale and be careful not Sofa, chair, otto- Taurus Model 85, 38 special RePlease drop off your donations at the Christmas! 541-389-8420, or to place signs on utility man in excellent condition. volver, blue, 2” barrel, exc. BEND COMMUNITY CENTER 598-5488, www.craftcats.org poles! Contemporary, navy blue. cond, $285, 541-389-9836 1036 NE FIFTH STREET (312-2069) www.bendbulletin.com Take home a steal! $325 or Questions: Call Ken Boyer, 389-3296, or Don Auxier, 383-0448 Lab black/Walker Hound Pups. Wanted: Collector seeks high BEST OFFER! 541-389-3868 8 wks old, 1st shot & wormquality fishing items. Call anytime. PLEASE HELP. YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE. ing. $100. 541-382-7567 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

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Farmers Column A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com


F2 Wednesday, December 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Employment

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Real Estate For Sale

900 sq ft 1 Bdrm 1 bath, single car garage, all utils incl, W/D hkup, in country, very quiet. No smkg/pets. $675/mo. 1st + $300 dep. 541-480-9041

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Driver General Single Copy Driver/ DO YOU NEED A Sales Assistant GREAT EMPLOYEE Driver/Sales Assistant serves RIGHT NOW? as the point person for Call The Bulletin before newspaper sales, collections, noon and get an ad in to return pickup from stores publish the next day! and racks. Must have the 385-5809. ability to work independently with little supervision Customer Service RepreVIEW the Classifieds at: and dress professionally sentative – Redmond, Orwww.bendbulletin.com when representing the comegon Central Oregon pany. Must have valid OrIntergovernmental Council egon drivers’ license and a (COIC) is hiring a part-time clean driving record. Posiindividual to work in the Castion assumes financial recades East Ride Center sponsibility for news rack Glazier -- Residential: Must (CERC). This position rehave 5 years experience & collections and must be able ceives and processes ride reclean driving record, Shower to move news racks, and asquests from individuals doors & mirrors a plus. Pay sist in maintaining vehicle wanting to access Medicaid DOE. Call 541-382-2500. fleet. Position is responsible transportation service and pubfor newspaper positioning in lic transit services on Casstores, rack maintenance and The Bulletin cades East Transit (CET). Pocleanliness, rack cards, and sition work hours will vary is your store displays. Position inwith a minimum of 20 per cludes acting as a sales perEmployment Marketplace week, work will be between son for various events and Call 7:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. other single copy promoMon.-Fri. Work is a tions. Schedule may change 541-385-5809 call-center environment. periodically and may require High school diploma or both day and night shifts to advertise! equivalent plus one year and/or split shifts, as www.bendbulletin.com work experience in a related needed. Position is full time field, or the equivalent comwith benefits. Please email bination of education and exresume: lkeith@bendbulleperience in a related field tin.com or mail resume to: may be substituted. PreferThe Bulletin, 1777 SW Chanence will be given to qualidler Ave., Bend, Attn: Larry K. fied bilingual applicants. Glaziers: Part-time, experiStarting salary $12.94 per enced, through January, to hour. Excellent pro-rated The Bulletin Classifieds is your start immediately. Please benefit package. Contact Mike at Employment Marketplace Application available on the 503-956-5645. COIC website www.coic.org Call 541-385-5809 today! Golf Sales Coordinator at local COIC offices or at Administration – 2363 SW Front Desk Clerk Glacier Place, Redmond, OR 97756. In order to be considered for this position, a completed application must be received by 4:00 p.m., Wednesday, December 16, 2010, in the Redmond Administration office. The Ranch is accepting Faxed applications will be acapplications for a cepted (541)923-3416. COIC full time Group Sales The Ranch is accepting is an equal opportunity emCoordinator in our applications for a ployer/program. Auxiliary Golf Department. Front Desk Clerk. aids and services are availThe successful applicant Responsibilities include able upon request for indiwill be responsible for selling checking guests in/out viduals with disabilities. and coordinating of the Ranch, all golf events including group processing access passes, DENTAL ASSISTANT tee times and Our busy practice is looking for assisting the reservations desk, tournament logistics. a dental assistant who is a and effectively communicating Applicants must be with housekeeping and team player with a great atcustomer service oriented, titude. Xray certification and maintenance. Applicants must enthusiastic, and be customer service some experience preferred. computer literate with 3 years oriented, enthusiastic, and Great staff and benefits. Call sales experience computer literate. Will be 541-504-0880 between 10 preferred in golf, hospitality or required to worknights, am and 4pm. or evenings a related field. weekend and holidays. This is before 8pm - 541-548-9997. Some travel required. a part time position which Benefits include may lead to full time work Dental -Front Office med/dent/life, during the summer. Benefits 4 Days a week, dental assisvacation, 6 paid holidays, golf, tant preferred. Drop off re- include swimming, golf, food food and merchandise and merchandise discounts. sume at 2078 NE Profesdiscounts. Apply on line at Apply on-line at sional Ct., Bend. www.blackbutteranch.com. www.blackbutteranch.com. 541-382-2281. BBR is a drug free work place. BBR is a drug free Jack Miller, DMD EOE work place. EOE Branden Ferguson, DDS CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

421

Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

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Looking for Employment Experienced Male Caregiver offering assistance with medical & non-medical tasks & activities. Refs. avail. upon request, 541-548-3660.

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Employment Opportunities CAUTION

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Employment Opportunities

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825 Caregiver: Dependable caregiver needed for spinal injured female, part-time. Transportation & references required. 541-610-2799.

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Bend, Prineville & Madras H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Housekeeping Part time position, some hotel resort cleaning exp. preferred. Must be able to work weekends. Please apply at Worldmark Eagle Crest, 1522 Cline Falls Rd. Redmond (3rd floor of Hotel) Mystery Shoppers, Earn up to $100 per day. Undercover shoppers needed to judge retail & dining establishments. No exp. req. Small fee req. Call 877-758-2846.

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

Finance & Business

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Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

604

Storage Rentals Secure 10x20 Storage, in SE Bend, insulated, 24-hr access, $95/month, Call Rob, 541-410-4255. 605

Rooms for Rent

Adult Foster Care In Redmond Has rooms available. Private & Medicaid accepted. Male or Female, Class 3, competitive rates, 541-504-6199

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Rent/Lease Option 650 sq ft 1 bdrm 2 bath, near park, river, downtown & COCC; indoor pool. $600 incl utils. Sharon, 541-408-0337

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Apt./Multiplex General FIRST MONTH HALF-OFF! 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex. NEW CARPET & PAINT THROUGHOUT! W/D included. No smoking. No Pets. 1yr. lease. $795/mo. + $945 sec. 20076 Beth. 541-382-3813 The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz

Happy holidays! Enjoy living at 179 SW Hayes Ave. Spacious 2 Bdrm townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rent starts at $525 mo. 541-382-0162; 541-420-2133 541-420-0133

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Apt./Multiplex Redmond ASK ABOUT OUR HOLIDAY SPECIAL! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments

Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

130 NE 6th 1 bdrm/ 1 bath, W/S/G paid, onsite laundry, no smkg or pets, close to Bend High. $495+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414

Call about Our Specials! Studios to 3 bedroom units from $395 to $550 • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735

Alpine Meadows

Carports & Heat Pumps. Pet Friendly & No App. Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

HOSPITAL AREA Clean quiet AWESOME townhouse. 2 Master Bdrms, 2.5 bath, all kitchen appli., W/D hookup, garage w/opener, gas heat & A/C. $645/mo. + dep. S/W/G pd. No Dogs. 541-382-2033

$99 MOVES YOU IN !!! Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

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Houses for Rent SW Bend 2 Bdrm 1 Bath mnfd. home on quiet cul-de-sac, with heat pump, fenced yard. W/S/G paid. $595/mo + security deposit. 541-382-8244.

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Houses for Rent Redmond

1 Bdrm, 1 bath, 547 1/2 NW 7th, $550; 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 626 1/2 SW 8th, $595; 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 2 Bdrm. in 4-Plex, 1 bath, new 135 NW 10th St., $650, carpet/paint, W/D hookups, 541-815-1709, CopperDog PM. storage, deck, W/S paid, $525 4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family + $600 dep. 541-480-4824 room, w/woodstove, new 1-Month Free Option! carpet/paint, single garage 640 w/opener. $795/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 Apt./Multiplex SW Bend

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

1 & 2 bdrms Available starting at $575. Reserve Now! Limited Availability.

Mobile in NE Bend, 840 sq ft electric & gas, heat pump, large yard, W/S/G incl. No pets, no smoking. $600/mo, $500 deposit. 541-382-1365

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541-330-0719

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Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

paint/carpet, 1262 sq ft, $900/mo. Near hosp; must see! No pets/smoking. 3023 NE Byers Ct. 541-410-0794

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY

2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. W/D included! $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

Absolutely beautiful, 1 Bdrm. 2 bath, fully furnished Condo, Share 2bdrm 2½ bath home $695, $400 dep, near downnear Broken Top, fully furn. town & college, completely $550+ ½ util. 949-940-6748 renovated, 2 Verandas, no pets/smoking, avail. now, all Share 3bdrm Redmond home; amenities and pvt bath. Can reduce rent with W/S/G/elec./A/C/Cable housekeeping! $385 + util; incl., 541-279-0590 or $200 dep. 916-690-1529 cell cheritowery@yahoo.com Share House in DRW, River & Mountain Views! $400/mo incl. utils, $200 930 NW Carlon St., 2 bdrm., dep., 541-420-5546. 1.5 bath, W/S/G paid, W/D hook-up, $650/mo. $600 630 dep. No pets. 541-280-7188.

** Pick your Special **

Business Opportunities

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend Clean 3 Bdrm 2 Bath, new

Roommate Wanted

1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928.

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Newer Duplex 2/2, close to Hospital & Costco, garage, yard maint., fireplace, W/D, W/S, pet? 1025 Rambling Ln. #1, $695. 541-420-0208

636

541-383-0386 ULTRASOUND TECHNOLOGIST, A Westside Condo at Fireside Lodge, 2 bdrm, 1 bath, Temp. Part-Time. $595/mo. Wood stove, Surgical office is seeking an W/S/G paid. W/D hookup ultrasound technologist for 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 vascular and general imaging. Satisfactory completion Long term townhomes/homes of RVT or RDMS certification for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. examination required. No call included, Spacious 2 & 3 required. Fax resume to bdrm., with garages, 541-749-2130. 541-504-7755.

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

600

Condo / Townhomes For Rent

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

CAUTION

Rentals

A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appliances, includes gardener. $795 mo. 541-408-0877.

Newer, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, MFG home w/2 car garage. appl. & heat pump. 1260 sq.ft. Yard w/sprinkler system, corner lot. One pet possible on approval and dep. Quiet neighborhood. $725 mo.+ dep. 834 NE Modoc Ct., Call (503) 803-4718 Spacious 3 bdrm., 2 bath + bonus, single story, large fenced yard, dbl. garage, $950/mo. + $500 dep. 2120 NW 11th St. 541-771-6599 Terrebonne 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath in private, treed setting. Has deck, detached garage and storage, $725/month. Call 541-419-8370; 541-548-4727

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Houses for Rent Sunriver A newer 3/2 mfd. home, 1755 sq.ft., living room, family room, on private .5 acre lot near Sunriver, $895. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803.

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Mobile/Mfd. for Rent

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Real Estate Services * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

745

Homes for Sale PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. ***

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

750

Redmond Homes

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

650

Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft

Homes with Acreage

Houses for Rent NE Bend

827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404

1/2 Off 1st Mo. Rent! 20732 Patriot Lane 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, all appl. incl. w/d, dlb. garage, wood floors, $995/mo.+ dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414

Office/Warehouse Space, 6400 sq.ft., (3) 12x14 doors, on Boyd Acres Rd, 541-382-8998.

On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft., mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1295. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

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Commercial for Rent/Lease

managed by

GSL Properties

DUPLEX SW Redmond 2 bdrm 2 bath, garage w/opener. 1300 sq ft, w/d hkup, fenced yard, deck, w/s/g pd. $700 mo + dep. 541-604-0338

1435 NE Boston 3 bdrm/ 2 bath, private yard, gas frplce, all kitchen appl incld small pet neg. $895+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2 car garage, bonus room, deck, fridge, gas stove, new paint, carpet & vinyl. $1000/mo. Pets neg. Mike 541-408-8330.

762 Beautiful Prineville home, wood and tile throughout, 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, master on main level, bonus room, office, 6.87 acres, conveniently located between town & lake, $415,000. 541-771-3093

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent

Sisters, turnkey horse setup, 4 acres, great barn, 3 pastures, updated house, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, pond,irrigation, RV pad w/hook ups, $575,000, 541-549-9945.

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

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775

Downtown Redmond For sale by owner, 2 Bdrm 2 Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. bath, 1970 double wide mo$650/mo + utils; $650 secubile home. Partially furrity deposit. 425 SW Sixth nished. As is - $5000, cash St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848 only. 541-389-6249 day/eve


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 Boats & RV’s

800 850

Snowmobiles

Yamaha 2008 Nitro 1049cc, 4 stroke, bought new Feb 2010, still under warranty, 550 miles, too much power for wife! $6000. Call 541-430-5444

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Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

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Health forces sale, 1900 mi., 1K mi. service done, black on black, detachable windshield, back rest & luggage rack, $13,900, Mario, 541-549-4949, 619-203-4707

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $16,900 OBO. 541-944-9753

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $19,999 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Kendon stand-up motorcycle trailer, torsion bar suspension, easy load and unload, used seldom and only locally. $1700 OBO. Call 541-306-3010.

YAMAHA 1998 230CC motor, 4WD, used as utility vehicle. excellent running condition. $2000 OBO. 541-923-4161 541-788-3896

Yamaha 350 Big Bear 1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition. $2,200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., reduced to $3000, also boots, helmet, tires, avail., 541-410-0429

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

Travel Queen 34’ 1987 65K miles, oak cabi-

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns.

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

881

Travel Trailers

the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105 2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $1995 for all. Bill 541-480-7930. Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

880

Motorhomes

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

882

Fifth Wheels

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240.

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552.

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417. Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718 Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $40,000 OBO/terms, 541-948-2126.

Grumman AA-5 Traveler, 1/4 interest, beautiful, clean plane, $9500, 619-822-8036 www.carymathis.blogspot.com

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Excavating

90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

KOMFORT 27’ 5th wheel 2000 trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide, stored inside, in excellent condition. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107 Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more. Priced to sell at $59,500! 541-317-9185

International 1981,T-axle-300 13 spd.Cummins/Jake Brake,good tires/body paint;1993 27’ stepdeck trailer, T-axle, Dove tail, ramps. $7950, 541-350-3866

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

Utility Trailers

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

MONTANA 2000 36’ 3 slides, washer and dryer, new A/C. Very nice & livable! $12,500. 541-923-7351.

931

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 2 Les Schwab 1857013 M/S studded, good as new. $80. 541-480-5950.

TERRY 27’ 5th wheel 1995 with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great condition and hunting rig, $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

885

TIRES: 4 Schwab 225/60R18, Studless snow tires, used, 2 seasons, $225. 541-447-1668 Tires, New (4) Grand Treks, P255/65R16 M/S, pd $680, asking $375. 541-410-7388

Canopies and Campers Trailmaker studded 2357515, 75% on Ford 5 hole spoke rims $195. 541- 480-5950

932

Antique and Classic Autos Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523.

The Bulletin Classifieds

Handyman

I DO THAT! Remodeling, Handyman, Professional & Honest Work. Help w/pre-holiday projects. CCB#151573 Dennis 317-9768

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling •Decks •Window/Door Replacement •Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179

Snow Removal Reliable 24 Hour Service • Driveways • Walkways • Parking Lots • Roof tops • De-icing Have plow & shovel crew awaiting your call!

Holiday Lighting Multiple Options • Interior • Exterior • Landscape

Christmas Tree Delivery EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Dodge Ram 3500 dually 2003 Cummins Diesel 24V, 113K, new tires, TorkLift hitch, exc cond, $25,900. 541-420-3250

FORD 350 LARIAT 2002 4x4 crewcab, 7.3 diesel 135k, dually, matching canopy, towing special, gooseneck, too! Orig. 63-year-old construction owner needs money, will trade, $17,500. (541) 815-3639 or (541) 508-8522

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, auto, reduced to $14,999 obo 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

Ford F250 1986, 4x4, FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

1998 Dodge Ram Wagon SE 2500, Mark III conversion, 100k miles, 4 captains chairs, rear fold-down bed, hitch, $4000 and worth it! Travel in luxury. 541-318-9999 or 541-508-8522.

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223. Chrysler 1999 AWD Town & Country LXI, 109k; 1998 Town & Country 7 passenger, leather, used but not abused. I’ll keep the one that doesn’t sell. Takes $3500 and up to buy. Bob, as you can see, likes mini vans. 541-318-9999 or 541-508-8522.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871. FORD pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

PRICE REDUCED TO $800 Cash! Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833 Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

Mercedes-Benz 280c 1975 145k, good body & mechanical, fair interior, can email pics. $2950. 541-548-3628

Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500,541-280-5677

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

Fall Cleanup and Snow removal •Flower bed clean up •Irrigation repair •Senior Discounts •Landscape Maintenance

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $4850, 541-410-3425.

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

935

Sport Utility Vehicles CHEVY BLAZER 2000, ZR2 LS 4x4, 130k miles, 90% tread left on $2000 worth of tires. Under KBB at $4995. Can be seen at Redmond’s Hwy 97 Park & Sell. 541-546-6838. Ford Bronco 1990 4WD w/1998 motor; engine & trans good cond, new brakes & exhaust sys; $1600 in improvements. $2250 OBO 541-323-1872

MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all original, many extras. Sacrifice GMC Jimmy 4x4 UT 1986, 2-Dr, Auto, Tow $6000. 541-593-3072 package, Good condition, OLDS 98 1969 $1200 OBO, 541-815-9939. 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355 Hyundai Sante Fe SE 2009 V6-all wheel drive

$22,586 VIN# 229471

541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256

VW Super Beetle 1974 New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3000 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

933

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl, 5-spd., 4x4, good cond, price reduced to $7950, 541-593-4437.

JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 2008 Laredo 4WD moonroof, leather, "Perfect condition" . $20,555

Chevy 1/2 Ton 1995, 4X4, 350 engine, auto, cold A/C, new tires, brakes, shocks, & muffler, w/ camper shell, runs great. $4000. 541-706-1568

Chevy Silverado 1500 1988, 4x4, step side, tow pkg., low mi. at 98K, A/C, great tries, brakes, new rear end, runs extra super, $4000 OBO, 541-548-7396 Chevy Silverado 1500 4x4, 2000, full size, Reg cab w/ long bed, white, V6, 4.3L, 20 mpg, auto trans, ABS, AC, dual airbags, tow pkg, runs & drives excellent, maint’d extremely well; non-smoker. Recent brks, bearing, tune- up, tires, trans & coolant flush. 183K mi. $4700 obo. 541-633-6953

Dodge 2500 Laramie 2008 4x4 6.7 Diesel automatic, 23K mi, 6.5’ Proline flatbed. Below Bluebk $35,500 541-447-3393

DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2700. 541-322-6261

Snow Removal

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

Audi A4 Avant Quattro 2003 3.0L., 92K mi, garaged, serviced, silver, fully loaded, $9300. 541-420-9478

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227 BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

BMW M3 COUPE E36 1998, mint condition, adult owned, low miles, needs nothing, $12,500. 541-419-2181

custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $5000; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $2900. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

DLR# 0225

Buick LeSabre Limited Edition 1985, 1 owner, always garaged, clean, runs great, 90K, $1895, 541-771-3133.

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $11,500. 541-408-2111

Mercedes-Benz GL-550 2008 VIN: 4JGBF86E18A325542, Mileage: 39,324, Exterior Sand Beige, Interior: Macadamia. $51,977 OBO. Call Scott @ 541-604-4113 or scott@sts4evr.com.

Chevy Cavalier 1990, 2.2, auto, owned by mechanic, call for details. $995. 541-480-5950

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

Honda Pilot 2006, orig. owner, 42k mi., remote starter, 8-passenger, fully loaded. $21,000. Call 541-504-2627. Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

$37,787 541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

Mazda 3, 2005 5-door, dark bronze, 47,500 mi, fully loaded, very good cond, $11,950. Kent, 541-923-6723 To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

Mercedes S430-4Matic, 2003 AWD, silver, loaded & pampered. Excellent in snow! $16,395. 541-390-3596

Mercury Grand Marquis 1984. Grandpa’s car! Like new, all lthr, loaded, garaged, 40K mi, $3495. 541-382-8399

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Pontiac Firebird T-Top 1998 mint, 125K,custom wheels/tires HO V6, 4 spd auto, 29 mpg reg. $5700 OBO. 541-475-3984

3.4L V-6 4 door, all power, 158k hwy miles. Excellent condition.

$3,950 541-923-8627

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929. Buick LeSabre Cstm 1996. Go anywhere in snow, great gas mi. 44K on eng. Comfortable, reliable! $1599. 916-690-1529

Ford Focus SE Wagon 2007 4-dr, 8800 mi, 30+ mpg, brand new cond, $12,500 obo cash. 541-475-1165 aft 6

Subaru Outback 2005 AWD, 4cyl, auto, lthr htd seats, 89K mi, reduced to $13,995 OBO 541-508-0214; 541-554-5212 SUBARU OUTBACK 2010, exc. cond., $21,000, call 541-330-0507,541-280-7217

SUBARUS!!! Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

Quad Cab SLT 2009 Big Horn Edition 4WD, diesel, automatic, tow package, 19,000 miles. Almost $4000 back of Kelley Book. VIN# 549118

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

Nissan XTerra SE 2001 $5900 Auto, CD, Sun, Tow, 131K, V6, 4WD, Must See 541-617-8454

bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

Dodge Ram 2500

Kia Spectra LS, 2002 96K miles, black, 5-speed, runs good, $2600. Phone 541-749-0316

Pontiac Grand Am 2004 FWD Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

Reach thousands of readers!

Dodge Ram 2001, short

975

Buick LeSabre 2004,

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

d SNOW REMOVAL! d d LARGE OR SMALL, d WE DO IT ALL! 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 d www.bblandscape.com d

automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018.

Automobiles

VIN# 222473

Painting, Wall Covering MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr brks, plus mntd stud snows. $8500 obo. 541-330-0616

541-598-3750

Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K mi., $8925. 541-598-5111.

Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles,

JEEP COMPASS, 2009 13,200 miles, 4x4, 5 speed. $14,500 OBO. 541-280-5866.

Masonry

Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/410-6945

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $3500. 541-548-5302

The Bulletin

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 1998, like new, low mi., just in time for the snow, great cond., $7000, 541-536-6223.

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $5800. 541-330-0852.

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Jeep Cherokee Laredo, 2003, 135K miles, fully loaded, excellent condition. $6500. Call 541-749-0316

Pickups

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

975

Automobiles

925

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

940

Vans

Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP,

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Barns

933

Pickups

900

Redmond Airport hangar, heated, 55’ x 75’ x 18’, 12’ x 24’ office, bath with shower, $229,500. 20-year lease. Call 503-803-2051

nets, exc interior. Great extra bdrm! Reduced to $5000. 541-480-3286

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

932

Antique and Classic Autos

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all

ATVs

rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

875

865

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

Watercraft

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

Motorcycle Trailer

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $122,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, reduced to $34,000 OBO 541-610-4472; 541-689-1351

Autos & Transportation

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

Motorcycles And Accessories

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010,

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, December 15, 2010 F3

Toyota RAV 4 Ltd. 2007 80K miles, moonroof, tow pkg, great condition! $13,750. 541-848-7876

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, V6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

VOLKSWAGEN BUG 1965 Black , Excellent condition. Runs good. $6995. 541-416-0541.


F4 Wednesday, December 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES Probate Department In the Matter of the Estate of Mariann Clark, Deceased. Case No. 10-PB-0020 NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above captioned estate. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned Personal Representative at: 250 NW Franklin Avenue, Suite 402, Bend, Oregon 97701, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the Personal Representative, or the lawyer for the Personal Representative, Patricia L. Heatherman, P.C. Dated and first published on December 8, 2010. /s/ Ronald D. Clark, Personal Representative Personal Representative: Ronald D. Clark 17527 48th Street Ct. E. Lake Tapps, WA 98391 Tel: (253) 677-3768 Attorney For Personal Representative: Patricia Heatherman, OSB #932990 Patricia L. Heatherman, P.C. 250 NW Franklin Avenue Suite 402 Bend, OR 97701 Tel: (541) 389-4646 Fax: (541) 389-4644 E-mail: patricia@heathermanlaw.com LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Permit Amendment T-10973 T-10973 filed by BEND TRAP CLUB, PO BOX 7774, BEND, OR 97708, proposes a change in point of appropriation and a change in place of use under Permit G-16505. The permit allows the use of 0.05 CUBIC FOOT PER SECOND (priority date JUNE 18, 2007) from a well in Sec. 5, T 20 S, R 16 E, W.M. (DRY RIVER Basin) for IRRIGATION in Sec. 5 and 6, T 20 S, R 16 E, W.M. The Water Resources Department has concluded that the proposed permit amendment appears to be consistent with the requirements of ORS 537.211. The last date of newspaper publication is December 29, 2010. LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Sheriff's Sale Execution in Foreclosure (Real Property). WASHINGTON FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION; Plaintiff, vs. TODD D. MCKAY; SHARI L. MCKAY; OREGON WATER WONDERLAND PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, UNIT II, INC., an Oregon corporation; and DOES 1-2, being all occupants or other persons or parties claiming any right, title, lien, or interest in the property described in the Second Amended Complaint herein; Defendants. Case No. 10CV0140MA. Notice is hereby given that I will on January 20, 2010, at 11:10 a.m. at the front, west, entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash, the following real property, known as 55986 Black Duck Road, Bend, Oregon 97707 (Real Property No. 2), to wit, Lot Eight (8), Block Thirty-four (34), OREGON WATER WONDERLAND, UNIT 2, recorded March 18, 1970, in Cabinet A, Page 365, Deschutes County, Oregon; Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution (Real Property) issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated November 18, 2010, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein WASHINGTON FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION as plaintiff, recovered General Judgment Based On Default on September 15, 2010, against TODD D. MCKAY; SHARI L. MCKAY; OREGON WATER WONDERLAND PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, UNIT II, INC., an Oregon corporation; and DOES 1-2, being all occupants or other persons or parties claiming any right, title, lien, or interest in the property described in the Second Amended Complaint herein; as defendants. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a) The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b) Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c) Approved uses for the property; (d) Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e) Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f) Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON, Deschutes County Sheriff. By Jinnie L. Willard, Civil Technician. Published in Bend Bulletin. Date of First and Successive Publications: December 15, 2010, December 22, 2010, December 29, 2010. Date of Last Publication January 5, 2011. Attorney: Nancy K. Cary, OSB #902254, Hershner Hunter, PO Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440, 541-686-8511. Conditions of Sale: Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale.

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Sheriff's Sale Execution in Foreclosure (Real Property). STATE OF OREGON, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND COMMUNITY SERVICES, ASSIGNEE OF BANK OF THE CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER; Plaintiff, vs. GINA R. MANN; DOES 1-2, being the occupants of or parties in possession or claiming any right to possession of the Real Property commonly known as 51599 Ash Road, LaPine, Oregon; DOES 3-5, being the children of Marlene Telliano Mann aka Marlene Estelle Mann or their issue, and being the unknown heirs and devisees of Marlene Telliano Mann aka Marlene Estelle Mann and also all other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title, lien, or interest in the property described in the Complaint herein; Defendant. Case No.10CV0493AB. Notice is hereby given that I will on January 20, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. at the front, west, entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash, the following real property, known as 51599 Ash Road, LaPine, Oregon 97739, to wit, Lot Three (3) and the West 30 feet of Lot Four (4), Block Two (2), C. L. & D. RANCH TRACTS, recorded June 20, 1963, in Cabinet A, Page 106, Deschutes County, Oregon. Said sale is made under a WRIT OF EXECUTION issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated November 19, 2010, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein STATE OF OREGON, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND COMMUNITY SERVICES, ASSIGNEE OF BANK OF THE CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER as plaintiff, recovered GENERAL JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE on October 29, 2010, against GINA R. MANN; DOES 1-2, being the occupants of or parties in possession or claiming any right to possession of the Real Property commonly known as 51599 Ash Road, LaPine, Oregon; DOES 3-5, being the children of Marlene Telliano Mann aka Marlene Estelle Mann or their issue, and being the unknown heirs and devisees of Marlene Telliano Mann aka Marlene Estelle Mann and also all other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title, lien, or interest in the property described in the Complaint herein; as defendant. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a) The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b) Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c) Approved uses for the property; (d) Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e) Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f) Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON, Deschutes County Sheriff. By Jinnie L. Willard, Civil Technician. Published in Bend Bulletin. Date of First and Successive Publications: December 15, 2010, December 22, 2010, December 29, 2010. Date of Last Publication January 5, 2011. Attorney: Nancy K. Cary, OSB #902254, Hershner Hunter, PO Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440, 541-686-8511. Conditions of Sale: Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale. LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Sheriff's Sale Execution in Foreclosure (Real Property). WASHINGTON FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION; Plaintiff, vs. TODD D. MCKAY; SHARI L. MCKAY; OREGON WATER WONDERLAND PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, UNIT II, INC., an Oregon corporation; and DOES 1-2, being all occupants or other persons or parties claiming any right, title, lien, or interest in the property described in the Second Amended Complaint herein; Defendants. Case No. 10CV0140MA. Notice is hereby given that I will on January 20, 2010, at 11:20 a.m. at the front, west, entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash, the following real property, known as 16698 Sprague Loop, LaPine, Oregon 97739 (Real Property No. 1), to wit, Lot one (1), Block Eight (8), LAZY RIVER SOUTH, recorded August 29, 1968, in Cabinet A, Page 171, Deschutes County, Oregon; Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution (Real Property) issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated November 18, 2010, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein WASHINGTON FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION; as plaintiff, recovered General Judgment Based On Default on September 15, 2010, against TODD D. MCKAY; SHARI L. MCKAY; OREGON WATER WONDERLAND PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, UNIT II, INC., an Oregon corporation; and DOES 1-2, being all occupants or other persons or parties claiming any right, title, lien, or interest in the property described in the Second Amended Complaint herein; as defendants. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a) The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b) Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c) Approved uses for the property; (d) Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e) Rights of neighboring prop-

erty owners; and (f) Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON, Deschutes County Sheriff. By Jinnie L. Willard, Civil Technician. Published in Bend Bulletin. Date of First and Successive Publications: December 15, 2010, December 22, 2010, December 29, 2010. Date of Last Publication January 5, 2011. Attorney: Nancy K. Cary, OSB #902254, Hershner Hunter, PO Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440, 541-686-8511. Conditions of Sale: Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale. LEGAL NOTICE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Francis W. Schultz, Grantor(s), to Western Title & Escrow Company trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration System, as beneficiary, recorded 12/05/2006, in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon as Instrument No. 2006-79607, which was subsequently assigned to Green Tree Servicing, LLC on October 6th, 2010 under Instrument No. 2010-39693, and Katrina E. Glogowski being the successor trustee, covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: APN: 125235; Lot 18, Block 58, Oregon Water Wonderland Unit 2, Deschutes County, Oregon; Commonly known as 17197 Wood Duck Court, Bend, OR 97707. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to section 86.753(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes. The default for which foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $2185.78 beginning on April, 2010; plus late charges of $499.95; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys' fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $339558.22 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.75% per annum from April, 2010 until paid; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys' fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/ premiums, if applicable. Whereof, notice is hereby given that Katrina E. Glogowski, the undersigned trustee will on 02/04/2011 at the hour of 11:00 am standard time, as established by ORS 187.110, at the at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. Notice is hereby given that reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must comply with that statute. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the sale status and the opening bid. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Dated: September 23, 2010 by /s/ Katrina E. Glogowski, 2505 Third Ave., Ste. 100, Seattle, WA 98121, (206) 903-9966.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by William T. Dunham and Mary Lou Dunham, an undivided ½ interest and W.T. and Mary Lou Dunham, an undivided ½ interest, as grantor, to AmeriTitle, an Oregon corporation, as trustee, in favor of Northwest Investment Specialists, an undivided 50% interest and Little Chemical, LLC, an undivided 50% interest, as beneficiary, dated January 4, 2008, recorded on January 8, 2008, in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2008 00953, covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to-wit: Lot Four (4), Block Three (3), LAZY RIVER WEST, Deschutes County, Oregon There is a default by grantor or other person owing an obligation, performance of which is secured by the trust deed, or by the successor in interest, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision. The default for which foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Failure to pay full interest payments of $1,300 per month from and after April 2009. Failure to pay all principal due, in the amount of $120,000, on or before January 4, 2010, together with interest and late fees. By reason of the default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following, to-wit: $120,000 plus interest at the rate of 18% per annum from and after March 4, 2009 until paid, plus late fees of $65 per month for the months of April through December 2009, together with a single late fee of $6,000 for failure to repay the debt in full prior to January 19, 2010, plus costs and fees incurred herein. Notice hereby is given that the beneficiary and successor trustee, by reason of the default, have elected and do hereby elect to foreclose the trust deed by advertisement and sale pursuant to ORS 86.705 to 86.795, and to cause to be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described property which grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest grantor or grantor's successor in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and the expenses of the sale, including the compensations of the trustee as provided by law, and the reasonable fees of trustee's attorneys. The sale will be held at the hour of 2:00 o'clock, P.M., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110 on January 28, 2011 at Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying the sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. William Dickas, Successor Trustee, 520 SW Yamhill St. #600, Portland, Oregon 97204-1329. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Charles W. Knotts and Seanne L. Knotts, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor to Western Title and Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Argent Mortgage Company, LLC, as Beneficiary, dated June 16, 2006, recorded July 6, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 46441, beneficial interest having been assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., not in its individual capacity, but as trustee to the RMAC REMIC Trust, Series 2009-10, as covering the following described real property: Lot 91, Valleyview, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 2432 S.W. 35th Drive, Redmond, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded

pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,929.13, from June 1, 2007, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $277,627.95, together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.35% per annum from May 1, 2007, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on March 3, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt

to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 12/08/10 By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-104343 ASAP# 3796403 12/08/2010, 12/15/2010, 12/22/2010, 12/29/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Warren Freeborn, an unmarried person, as grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for InstaMortgage.com, as Beneficiary, dated January 25, 2007, recorded January 30, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2007, at Page 05895, beneficial interest having been assigned to U.S. Bank National Association as Trustee of J.P. Morgan Alternative Loan Trust 2007-A2, as covering the following described real property: Lot 11 of COURTYARD ACRES, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 20572 Boyd Court, Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $2,733.55, from August 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $450,812.83, together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.96% per annum from July 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on March 14, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then

be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 12/07/2010 By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105569ASAP# 3813623 12/08/2010, 12/15/2010, 12/22/2010, 12/29/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE 10-105355 A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Jose M. Calderon Sr. and Josie S. Calderon, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of American General Financial Services (DE), Inc., as Beneficiary, dated August 3, 2006, recorded August 7, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 54130, as covering the following described real property: Lot 5 in Block "A" of the replat of a portion of Lot 2 in Block 1 of Dana-Butler, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 2439 S.W. Volcano Avenue, Redmond, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,727.83, from March 10, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $161,835.53, together with

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx9912 T.S. No.: 1305819-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by J. O. Hanna and Sara Lee Hanna As Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Xx, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank Of Indiana A National Banking Association, as Beneficiary, dated June 29, 2006, recorded June 30, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-45464 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 223, Cascade View Estates Phase 4, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 3827 SW Volcano Ave. Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due August 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,126.50 Monthly Late Charge $86.91. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $253,683.70 together with interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from July 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on March 14, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: November 04, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is February 12, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-354462 12/08/10, 12/15, 12/22, 12/29

interest thereon at the rate of 11% per annum from February 10, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on March 7, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or

had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then

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LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Sheriff's Sale Execution in Foreclosure (Real Property) PERSONAL INVESTMENT INC., Plaintiff, vs. ROBERT E. DUNCAN, KRISTINE R. DUNCAN, AKA KRISTINE HARRIS DUNCAN, KEVIN J. DESJARDINS, ROCKCREEK INCORPORATED, KLD CONSTRUCTION LLC, and KIMBERLY MOUNTAIN DEVELOPMENT LLC; Defendants. Case No. 10CV0524MA Notice is hereby given that I will on January 13, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. at the front, west, entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash, the real property described in the attached Exhibit "A". EXHIBIT "A" Parcel I: Real property known as 1966 SW 42nd Street, Redmond, Oregon 97756 (LOT 5) ; 1978 SW 42nd Street, Redmond, Oregon 97756 (LOT 6); 1988 SW 42nd Street, Redmond, Oregon 97756 (LOT 7); 1996 SW 42nd Street, Redmond, Oregon 97756 (LOT 8); 1999 SW 42nd Street, Redmond, Oregon 97756 (LOT 9); 1987 SW 42nd Street, Redmond, Oregon 97756 (LOT 10); 1955 SW 42nd Street, Redmond, Oregon 97756 (LOT 13) ; 1939 SW 42nd Street, Redmond, Oregon 97756 (LOT 14); and 1927 SW 42nd Street, Redmond, Oregon 97756 (LOT 15); to wit; Lots 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 15 and 16 of Juniper Meadows in the Plat Recorded April 7, 2007, in Cabinet H, page 312, Deschutes County, Oregon records. Parcel II: Real property known as 1977 SW 42nd Street, Redmond, Oregon 97756 (LOT 11), to wit; Lot 11 of Juniper Meadows in the Plat Recorded April 7, 2007, In Cabinet H, page 312, Deschutes County, Oregon Records. Parcel III: Real property known as 1930 SW 42nd Street, Redmond, Oregon 97756 (LOT 2), to wit: Lot 2 of Juniper Meadows in the Plat Recorded April 7, 2007, In Cabinet H, page 312, Deschutes County, Oregon Records. Parcel IV: Real property known as 1942 SW 42nd Street, Redmond, Oregon 97756 (LOT 3), to wit; Lot 3 of Juniper Meadows in the Plat Recorded April 7, 2007, In Cabinet H, page 312, Deschutes County, Oregon Records. Parcel V: Real property known as 1958 SW 42nd Street, Redmond, Oregon 97756 (LOT 4), to wit; Lot 4 of Juniper Meadows in the Plat Recorded April 7, 2007, In Cabinet H, page 312, Deschutes County, Oregon Records. Parcel VI: Real property known as 1910 SW 42nd Street, Redmond, Oregon 97756 (LOT 1), to wit; Lot 1 of Juniper Meadows in the Plat Recorded April 7, 2007, In Cabinet H, page 312, Deschutes County, Oregon Records. Parcel VII: Real property known as 1890 SW Salmon Avenue, Redmond, Oregon 97756, to wit; Commencing at the NW corner of the NW Quarter of the SW Quarter of section 21, township 15S, range 13, East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, thence Southerly along the west line of said NW1/4SW1/4 a distance of 330 feet; thence easterly along a line parallel with the North line of said NW/4SW1/4 a distance of 132 feet; thence northerly along a line parallel with said west line of said NW1/4SW1/4 a distance of 330 feet to said north line of said NW1/4SW1/4; thence westerly along said north line of said NW1/4SW1/4 a distance of 132 feet to said point of commencing. Excepting therefrom a parcel of land situate in a portion of the SW1/4 of section 21, township 15S, range 13, East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, more particularly described as: Commencing at the ¾" pipe monumenting the W1/4 corner of section 21, Township 21S, Range 13, East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, the initial point; thence south 00 degrees 10'52" East along the West line of the SW1/4 of said section 21, 30.00' to the south line of the North 30.00 feet of said SW1/4; thence north 89 degrees 59'00" East along said south line, 50.00 feet to a ½" pipe and the true point of beginning; thence south 00 degrees 10'42" east parallel with said west line, 100.81 feet to a ½" pipe; thence south 88 degrees 43"58" east, 82.02 feet to a ½" pipe, thence North 00 degrees 10'52" west, 102.65 feet to a ½" pipe on said south line; thence south 89 degrees 59'00" west along the south line and the south lien of SW Salmon Avenue, 81.99 feet to the point of beginning. Also excepting therefrom that portion dedicated to the City of Redmond through Dedicated Deed recorded August 16, 1999, Instrument No. 1999-39920, Deschutes County Official Records. Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution in Foreclosure issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated November 9, 2010, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein Personal Investment Inc. as plaintiff, recovered General Judgment on September 23, 2010, against Robert E. Duncan, Kristine R. Duncan, Kevin J. Desjardins, Rockcreek Incorporated, KLD Construction LLC, and Kimberly Mountain Development LLC as defendants. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a) The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b) Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c) Approved uses for the property; (d) Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e) Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f) Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff By Jinnie L. Willard, Civil Technician Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications: December 8, 2010; December 15, 2010 and December 22, 2010 Date of Last Publication December 29, 2010 Attorney: David B. Hydes, OSB #83246 156 S. Timber Creek Drive Sisters, Oregon 97759 (541) 420-1946 Conditions of Sale: Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale.


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, December 15, 2010 F5

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be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 12/07/2010 By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105355 ASAP# 3801485 12/08/2010, 12/15/2010, 12/22/2010, 12/29/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE 10-105295, A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Belen Tebaldi, as grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for HSBC Mortgage Corporation (USA), as Beneficiary, dated May 1, 2008, recorded May 7, 2008, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2008, at Page 20179, beneficial interest having been assigned to HSBC Mortgage Corporation (USA), as covering the following described real property: Lot 13 in Block 28 of Oregon Water Wonderland, Unit No. 2, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 17238 Blue Heron Road nka 17238 Blue Heron Drive, Bend, OR 97707 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,388.69, from April 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $189,767.10, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.5% per annum from March 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on February 24, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes

any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 12/8/10 By: Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105295 ASAP# FNMA3786931 12/08/2010, 12/15/2010, 12/22/2010, 12/29/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE 10-105583 A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Ralph A. Sutterfield and Johanna J. Sutterfield, as grantor to Regional Trustee Services, as Trustee, in favor of Beneficial Oregon Inc., as Beneficiary, dated April 16, 2004, recorded April 20, 2004, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2004, at Page 22267, as covering the following described real property: The West half of the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (W1/2NE1/4NE1/4) of Section Nine (9), Township Eighteen (18) South, Range Thirteen (13), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 61600 Gribbling Road, Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $2,778.17, from December 21, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $398,325.08, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.14% per annum from November 21, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on March 10, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following:

This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 11/04/10 By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105583 ASAP# 3805460 12/08/2010, 12/15/2010, 12/22/2010, 12/29/2010

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Theodore Kennedy, and, Maria Kennedy, husband and wife, as grantor to First Land Trustee Corporation, as Trustee, in favor of First Bank, as Beneficiary, dated December 8, 2004, recorded December 15, 2004, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2004, at Page 74853, as covering the following described real property: Lot 58, GOLFSIDE PARK P.U.D., Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 61121 Geary Drive #61, Bend, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,000.65, from June 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $107,522.97, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.625% per annum from May 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on March 10, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 12/08/10 By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105474 ASAP# 3806206 12/08/2010, 12/15/2010, 12/22/2010, 12/29/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE 09-103065 A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Charles D. Rimel, Jerri A. Rimel, as grantor to Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Fidelity Mortgage Inc., as Beneficiary, dated November 23, 2005, recorded January 31, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 07110, beneficial interest having been assigned to HSBC Bank USA, N.A., as Indenture Trustee for the registered Noteholders of Renaissance Home Equity Loan Trust 2005-4, Renaissance Home Equity Loan Asset-Backed Notes, Series 2005-4, as covering the following described real property: Lot Forty-Five (45), RED HAWK UNIT FIVE, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 2034 N.W. Jackpine Place, Redmond, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,412.58, from July 1, 2008, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $206,803.61, together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.74% per annum from June 1, 2008, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on March 10, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 12/07/2010 By: Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 09-103065 ASAP# 3805941 12/08/2010, 12/15/2010, 12/22/2010, 12/29/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THE AMOUNT OF YOUR INDEBTEDNESS TO THE BENEFICIARY, THEIR SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST AND/OR ASSIGNEES AS RECITED BELOW, AS OF THE DATE OF THIS NOTICE/LETTER, IS $309,885.79. INTEREST FEES AND COSTS WILL CONTINUE TO-ACCRUE AFTER THE DATE OF THIS NOTICE/LETTER. UNLESS YOU DISPUTE THE VALIDITY OF THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION THEREOF WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIVING NOTICE OF THIS DOCUMENT, THIS OFFICE WILL ASSUME THE DEBT TO BE VALID. IF YOU NOTIFY THIS OFFICE IN WRITING WITHIN THE 30-DAY PERIOD THAT THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION THEREOF IS DISPUTED, VERIFICATION OF THE DEBT WILL BE OB-

TAINED AND WILL BE MAILED TO YOU. UPON WRITTEN REQUEST WITHIN 30 DAYS, THE NAME AND ADDRESS OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR, IF DIFFERENT FROM THE CURRENT CREDITOR, WILL BE PROVIDED. NOTICE: WE ARE A DEBT COLLECTOR. THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR PURPOSES OF DEBT COLLECTION. Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Jennifer Williams and Richard L. Williams II, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor, to U.S. Bank Trust Company, National Association, as trustee, in favor of U.S. Bank National Association ND, as beneficiary, dated July 6, 2007, recorded July 11, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recording Num-

ber 2007-38412, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: Parcel 1 of Partition Plat No. 2007-41, being a partition of Lot 40 of Boyd Acres View Estates Phase 3, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Both the beneficiary and the trustee, David A. Weibel, will sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statues 86.753(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay the following sums: 1.Monthly Payments: Delinquent Monthly Payments Due from 2/1/2010 through 10/1/2010: 3 payment(s) at $1752.00 and 6 payment(s) at $1971.63; Total Payments: $17,085.78; Accrued Late Charges:$623.20; Property

Inspection: $95.00. THE SUM OWING ON THE OBLIGATION SECURED BY THE TRUST DEED: $17,803.98. 2.Delinquent Real Property Taxes, if any. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Unpaid balance is $307,385.79 as of October 6. In addition there are attorney's fees and foreclosure costs which as of the date of this notice are estimated to be $2,500.00. Interest, late charges and advances for the protection and preservation of the property may accrue after the date of this notice WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, David A. Weibel, on February 16, 2011 at the

hour of 11:00 am, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said trust deed together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing instrument shall constitute notice, pursuant to ORS 86.740, that the Grantor of the Trust Deed described below has defaulted on its obligations to beneficiary, and that the Beneficiary and Successor Trustee under the Trust Deed have elected to sell the property secured by the Trust Deed: TRUST DEED AND PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: This instrument makes reference to that certain line of credit deed of trust dated May 9, 2006 and recorded on May 16, 2006, as instrument number 2006-33961, as modified by that certain modification of deed of trust dated September 19, 2007 and recorded on October 1, 2007, as instrument number 2007-53101, in the Official Records of Deschutes County, State of Oregon, wherein WILDHORSE MEADOWS, LLC, an Oregon limited liability company, is the Grantor, AMERITITLE is the Trustee, and PREMIERWEST BANK, an Oregon state chartered commercial bank, is the Beneficiary (the "Trust Deed"). The aforementioned Trust Deed covers property (the "Property") described as: Parcels located in Section 1 of Township 15 South and Range 10 East of the Willamette Meridian, and a parcel located in Section 6 of Township 15 South and Range 11 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. For a full legal description, see Exhibit A attached hereto. Also commonly described as: 16900 Aspen Lakes Dr, Sisters, OR 97759. The tax parcel number(s) are: 159857 and 180017. The undersigned hereby certifies that she has no knowledge of any assignments of the Trust Deed by the Trustee or by the Beneficiary or any appointments of a Successor Trustee other than the appointment of DENISE J LUKINS, as Successor Trustee as recorded in the property records of the county in which the Property described above is situated. Further, the undersigned certifies that no action has been instituted to recover the debt, or any part thereof, now remaining secured by the Trust Deed. Or, if such action has been instituted, it has been dismissed except as permitted by ORS 86.735(4). The name and address of Successor Trustee are as follows: Denise J Lukins, Salmon Creek Law Offices, 1412 NE 134th St Ste 130, Vancouver WA 98685, Telephone: (360) 576-5322. The Trust Deed is not a "Residential Trust Deed", as defined in ORS 86.705(3), thus the requirements of Chapter 19, Section 20, Oregon Laws 2008, and Chapter 864 [S.B. 628], Oregon Laws 2009, do not apply. DEFAULT BY GRANTOR AND ELECTION TO SELL: There are continuing and uncured defaults by the Grantor that, based on the provisions of the Trust Deed, authorize the foreclosure of the Trust Deed and the sale of the Property described above, which uncured and continuing defaults include but are not necessarily limited to the following: 1. Grantor's failure to pay to Beneficiary, when and in the full amounts due, monthly installments as set forth on the Note secured by said Deed of Trust. Monthly installments in the approximate amount of $30,477.06, which includes principal and interest, are due for the months of August 2009 through February 2010 and each and every month thereafter until paid. Late charges through and including March 8, 2010 total $13,714.65. Interest due as of (i.e., through and including) March 8, 2010 is in the amount of $167,013.80 and continues to accrue at the rate of 7.6042% per annum or $829.32 per diem. ALL AMOUNTS are now due and payable along with all costs and fees associated with this foreclosure. 2. As to the defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of your Deed of Trust, you must cure each such default. Listed below are the defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of your Deed of Trust. Opposite each such listed default is a brief description of the action necessary to cure the default and a description of the documentation necessary to show that the default has been cured. The list does not exhaust all possible other defaults; any and all defaults identified by Beneficiary or the Successor Trustee that are not listed below must also be cured. OTHER DEFAULT/ Description of Action Required to Cure and Documentation Necessary to Show Cure/ Non-Payment of Taxes and/or Assessments/ Deliver to Successor Trustee written proof that all taxes and assessments against the Real Property are paid current. TOTAL UNCURED MONETARY (PAYMENT) DEFAULT: By reason of said uncured and continuing defaults, the Beneficiary has accelerated and declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed and the Property immediately due and payable. The sums due and payable being the following: Unpaid principal amount owing pursuant to the Obligations, as of March 8, 2010: $3,980,752.78/ Unpaid interest owing pursuant to the Obligations as of March 8, 2010: $167,013.80/ Accrued and unpaid fees, costs and collection expenses to March 8, 2010: $13,935.65/ TOTAL DUE: $4,161,702.23. Accordingly, the sum owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed is $4,161,702.23, as of March 8, 2010, together with interest accruing on the principal portion of that amount, plus additional costs and expenses incurred by Beneficiary and/or the Successor Trustee (including their respective attorney's fees, costs, and expenses). Notice is hereby given that the Beneficiary, by reason of the uncured and continuing defaults described above, has elected and does hereby elect to foreclose said Trust Deed by advertisement and sale pursuant to ORS 86.735 et seq., and to cause to be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the Grantor's interest in the subject Property, which the Grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time the Grantor executed the Trust Deed in favor of the Beneficiary, along with any interest the Grantor or the Grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed as well as the expenses of the sale, including compensation of the Trustee as provided by law, and the reasonable fees of Trustee's attorneys. The Trustee's Sale was originally set for July 27, 2010 at 11 a.m. The Trustee's duly authorized agent first postponed the Trustee's Sale to September 15, 2010 and then postponed the sale a second time to January 21, 2011. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the sale will be held at the hour of 11:00 a.m., in accordance with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, on Friday, January 21, 2011, on the front steps of the main entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon 97701. RIGHT OF REINSTATEMENT: Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five (5) days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed satisfied by (A) payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, together with the costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the terms of the obligation, as well as Successor Trustee and attorney fees as prescribed by ORS 86.753); and (B) by curing all such other continuing and uncured defaults as noted in this Notice. DATED: March 12, 2010. By: Denise J Lukins, OSB 95339, Successor Trustee. Salmon Creek Law Offices, 1412 NE 134th St Ste 130, Vancouver WA 98685, Telephone: (360) 576-5322, Facsimile: (360) 576-5342, Email: dlukins@salmoncreeklawoffices.com. Exhibit A, Legal Description Parcels located in Section 1 of Township 15 South and Range 10 East of the Willamette Meridian, and a parcel located in Section 6 of Township 15 South and Range 11 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon as shown on this map and fully described as follows: PARCEL A: Beginning at a 5/8" iron rod at the northeast corner of said Section 1; thence South 00°05'30" East 2654.95 feet to a 1/2" iron rod at the east 1/4 corner of said Section 1; thence South 89°49'39" West 1332.18 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at the center - east 1/16th corner; thence South 00°06'38" East 2640.63 feet, along the west line of the east 1/2 of the southeast 1/4 to a 5/8" iron rod on the northerly right-of-way of Highway 126; thence following said northerly right-of-way, 46.76 feet along the arc of a 13720.99 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears South 89°53'04" West 46.76 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 89°58'55" West 1446.90 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 276.40 feet along the arc of an 1808.64 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears North 85°37'40" West 276.13 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 81°16'19" West 14.95 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on the easterly right-of-way of Camp Polk Road; thence leaving said northerly right-of-way and following said easterly right-of way, 22.48 feet along the arc of a 25.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears North 55°30'46" West 21.73 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 29°45'13" West 497.60 feet; thence 153.36 feet along the arc of an 1879.86 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears North 27°25'00" West 153.32 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 25°04'46" West 1231.02 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 472.61 feet along the arc of a 2894.79 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears North 29°45'24" West 472.08 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod on the southerly right-of-way of Aspen Lakes Drive; thence leaving said northeasterly right-of-way of Camp Polk Road and following said southerly right-of-way of Aspen Lakes Drive, North 57°37'54" East 575.86 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on the southerly right-of-way of Lady Caroline Drive; thence leaving said southerly right-of-way of Aspen Lakes Drive and following said southerly right-of-way of Lady Caroline Drive, 60.96 feet along the arc of a 480.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears South 24°07'44" East 60.92 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod at the northerly most corner of Lot 20 of said subdivision; thence South 20°29'26" East 18.06 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 135.49 feet along the arc of a 520.00 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears South 27°57'18" East 135.11 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod at the easterly most corner of said Lot 20; thence leaving said southerly right-of-way of Lady Caroline Drive, South 46°14'40" West 227.51 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at the southerly most corner of said Lot 20; thence South 29°47'09" East 556.35 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at the southerly most corner of Lot 23; thence North 36°34'26" East 179.58 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at the southwest corner of Lot 24; thence North 84°01'53" East 189.89 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at the southwest corner of Lot 25; thence North 84°20'23" East 381.96 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at the southwest corner of Lot 27; thence North 88°08'36" East 185.04 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at the southwest corner of Lot 28; thence South 84°41'47" East 754.16 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at an angle point in the southerly boundary of Lot 31; thence North 27°18'45" East 484.29 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at the southerly most corner of Lot 34; thence North 21°31'36" East 243.54 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at the easterly most corner of said Lot 34; thence North 38°00'56" West 129.34 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on the southeasterly right-of-way of Lady Caroline Drive, on the boundary of Golf Course Estates at Aspen Lakes Phase 3; thence following said southeasterly right-of-way of Lady Caroline Drive and said Phase 3 boundary, North 43°55'13" East 114.64 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 138.81 feet along the arc of a 540.00 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears North 36°33'22" East 138.43 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 29°11'30" East 151.08 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 229.35 feet along the arc of a 540.00 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears North 17°01'27" East 227.63 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 146.59 feet along the arc of a 770.00 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears North 00°35'49" West 146.37 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 144.66 feet along the arc of a 370.00 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears North 17°15'04" West 143.74 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 41.55 feet along the arc of a 480.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears North 25°58'17" West 41.54 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence leaving said southeasterly right-of-way of Lady Caroline Drive, South 79°29'44" East 74.94 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 22°12'47" East 168.63 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 37°06'41" East 163.06 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 75°26'53" East 130.00 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 85°48'29" East 173.53 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 82°58'21" East 156.19 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 77°20'49" East 172.68 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 61°21'18" East 160.98 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 11°51'46" West 135.95 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 00°02'15" East 189.85 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 13°44'49" West 279.51 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 83°11'46" West 340.98 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 73°40'42" West 508.62 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 76°07'09" West 161.87 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 83°36'08" West 178.72 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at the northwest corner of Lot 78 of said Phase 3 subdivision; thence leaving said Phase 3 boundary, North 03°07'58" West 742.91 feet to the north line of said Section 1; thence North 89°39'21" East 1718.24 feet to the point of beginning. PARCEL B: Beginning at a 2-1/2" iron pipe at the northwest corner of said Section 1; thence South 00°05'15" East 794.99 feet, along the west line of said Section 1, to a 5/8" iron rod on the northeasterly right-of-way of Camp Polk Road; thence leaving said west line and following said northeasterly right-of-way, South 22°17'07" East 21.15 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 206.23 feet along the arc of a 550.87 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears South 11°33'37" East 205.03 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 00°50'07" East 76.12 feet to the point of beginning; thence leaving said northeasterly right-of-way, North 86°17'57" East 542.44 feet; thence North 65°27'23" East 239.99 feet; thence North 36°40'27" East 185.58 feet; thence North 29°26'13" East 183.26 feet; thence North 30°35'14" East 126.12 feet; thence North 57°52'04" East 48.69 feet; thence North 64°56'48" East 327.42 feet; thence North 86°56'18" East 100.26 feet; thence South 74°11'43" East 286.33 feet; thence North 88°36'06" East 127.05 feet; thence North 05°39'17" West 52.45 feet; thence North 85°01'35" East 68.58 feet; thence North 40°47'35" East 157.83 feet; thence South 87°06'25" East 307.51 feet; thence South 84°17'57" East 189.50 feet; thence South 81°20'47" East 185.46 feet; thence North 89°58'21" East 185.53 feet; thence South 86°58'13" East 179.93 feet; thence South 65°03'44" East 169.60 feet; thence South 33°46'44" East 167.79 feet; thence South 22°17'25" East 186.47 feet; thence North 71°04'55" East 161.60 feet; thence 24.28 feet along the arc of a 2154.99 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears South 03°27'20" East 24.28 feet); thence South 03°07'58" East 271.71 feet to the northerly right-of-way of Royal Coachman Drive; thence following said northerly right-of-way, 32.59 feet along the arc of a 443.00 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears South 89°37'42" West 32.58 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 87°31'15" West 77.27 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on the boundary of Golf Course Estates at Aspen Lakes Phase 2; thence leaving said northerly right-of-way and following said Phase 2 boundary, North 02°28'45" West 4.00 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 54.67 feet along the arc of a 1020.00 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears South 85°59'07" West 54.67 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 84°26'59" West 200.69 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 33°56'34" West 357.48 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 52°22'27" West 327.16 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 76°25'02" West 431.08 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 56°18'45" West 98.83 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 12°31'41" East 159.78 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 06°10'07" West 165.82 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 14°34'02" West 120.24 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 67°00'02" West 210.91 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 55°44'09" West 159.78 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 46°53'56" West 164.38 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 64°20'18" West 157:29 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 13°48'03" West 30.00 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 89°26'18" West 318.62 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 73°30'45" West 168.19 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 77°28'31" West 107.45 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 87°06'40" West 359.25 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence leaving said Phase 2 boundary, South 68°29'31" West 118.85 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at the adjusted northwest corner of Lot 42 of Golf Course Estates at Aspen Lakes Phase 1 on the boundary of said Phase 1 subdivision; thence following said Phase 1 boundary, South 13°13'44" West 272.80 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 10°13'56" East 179.02 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 36°12'59" East 220.83 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 21°07'01" East 936.42 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 61°17'43" East 431.83 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on the southwesterly right-ofway of Royal Coachman Drive; thence following said southwesterly right-of-way, 196.32 feet along the arc of a 480.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears South 39°32'40" East 194.96 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 27°49'38" East 5.15 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on the northwesterly right-of-way of Aspen Lakes Drive; thence leaving said southwesterly right-of-way and following said northwesterly right-of-way, South 57°37'54" West 589.15 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on said northeasterly right-of-way of Camp Polk Road; thence leaving said northwesterly right-of-way and following said northeasterly right-of-way, 6.43 feet along the arc of a 2894.79 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears North 36°28'46" West 6.43 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 36°32'35" West 1548.95 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 278.87 feet along the arc of a 447.46 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears North 18°41'21" West 274.38 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 00°50'07" West 455.15 feet to the point of beginning. PARCEL C: Beginning at a 5/8" iron rod at the westerly most corner of Lot 43 of Golf Course Estates at Aspen Lakes Phase 1 and on the easterly right-of-way of Royal Coachman Drive; thence following said easterly right-of-way, 89.99 feet along the arc of a 580.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears North 18°34'58" West 89.90 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 14°08'17" West 159.06 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 122.06 feet along the arc of a 280.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears North 01°38'59" West 121.10 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod at the southwesterly corner of Lot 76 of Golf Course Estates at Aspen Lakes Phase 2; thence leaving said easterly right-of-way and following the boundary of said Phase 2, South 72°32'35" East 200.00 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 87°34'38" East 325.36 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 65°47'07" East 171.57 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 70°43'18" East 172.29 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 44°55'51" East 177.08 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 66°48'39" East 170.94 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 19°15'57" East 70.00 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 69°16'08" East 804.33 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 85°15'25" East 146.42 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 85°13'31" East 373.77 feet; thence leaving said Phase 2 boundary, South 17°10'55" East 221.39 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at the northwest corner of Lot 97 of Golf Course Estates at Aspen Lakes Phase 3; thence following the boundary of said Phase 3, South 17°10'55" East 499.00 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 10°02'44" East 275.42 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 13°02'10" East 189.50 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 88°34'47" East 107.59 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on the northerly right-of-way of said Lady Caroline Drive; thence following said northerly right-of-way, South 29°11'30" West 114.64 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 128.53 feet along the arc of a 500.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears South 36°33'22" West 128.18 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 43°55'13" West 114.64 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on the boundary of said Golf Course Estates at Aspen Lakes Phase 1; thence leaving said Phase 3 boundary and following said Phase 1 boundary, 84.62 feet along the arc of a 730.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears South 47°14'28" West 84.57 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 50°33'44" West 210.90 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 110.15 feet along the arc of a 1020.00 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears South 47°28'06" West 110.10 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 44°22'28" West 85.26 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 248.52 feet along the arc of a 280.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears South 69°48'04" West 240.45 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 84°46'19" West 48.85 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 105.93 feet along the arc of a 520.00 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears South 89°23'33" West 105.74 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 83°33'24" West 204.40 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 125.27 feet along the arc of a 980.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears South 87°13'07" West 125.19 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 89°07'10" West 110.17 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 153.02 feet along the arc of a 1020.00 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears South 86°34'58" West 152.88 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 82°17'06" West 20.76 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 82.16 feet along the arc of a 980.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears South 84°41'12" West 82.14 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 87°05'18" West 154.34 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 280.96 feet along the arc of a 280.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears North 64°09'56" West 269.32 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 35°25'10" West 101.50 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 125.07 feet along the arc of a 480.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears North 27°57'18" West 124.72 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 20°29'26" West 18.06 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 66.59 feet along the arc of a 520.00 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears North 24°09'32" West 66.54 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 27°49'38" West 104.96 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 160.76 feet along the arc of a 520.00 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears North 36°41'03" West 160.12 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod on the southerly right-of-way of Green Drake Court; thence leaving said northerly right-of-way and following said southerly right-of-way, North 48°07'22" East 82.32 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 256.77 feet along the arc of a 730.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears North 58°11'58" East 255.45 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 68°16'33" East 30.00 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence leaving said Phase 1 boundary, North 68°16'33" East 175.00 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at the westerly most corner of Lot 18 of said Phase 1; thence leaving said southerly right-of-way, South 38°50'05" East 266.47 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on said Phase 1 boundary; thence following said Phase 1 boundary, North 57°55'46" East 639.08 feet, (erroneously described as 786.53 feet), to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 45°57'28" East 344.47 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 68°39'56" East 99.24 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence leaving said Phase 1 boundary, North 36°04'40" East 134.88 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on said Phase 1 boundary; thence North 06°56'23" West 341.05 feet, along said Phase 1 boundary, to a 5/8" iron rod; thence leaving said Phase 1 boundary, South 87°10'38" West 202.98 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on said Phase 1 boundary; thence following said Phase 1 boundary, South 66°26'30" West 360.56 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 54°26'22" West 329.58 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 63°52'11" West 800.18 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence leaving said Phase 1 boundary, South 56°38'30" West 179.06 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on said Phase 1 boundary; thence following said Phase 1 boundary, South 21°53'47" East 294.55 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on the northerly right-of-way of said Green Drake Court; thence following said northerly right-of-way, South 48°07'22" West 35.00 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on said easterly right-of-way of Royal Coachman Drive; thence leaving said northerly right-of-way and following said easterly right-of-way, 11.70 feet along the arc of a 520.00 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears North 50°37'02" West 11.70 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 51°15'42" West 165.61 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 68.01 feet along the arc of a 980.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears North 49°16'25" West 68.00 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence leaving said easterly right-of-way, North 14°19'14" East 240.33 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 48°35'49" West 145.30 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 61°07'48" West 158.88 feet to the point of beginning.


F6 Wednesday, December 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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five days before the date last set for the sale to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), paying all advances authorized under the trust deed, including all costs and expenses incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, and by curing any other default complained of therein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. DATED: October 13, 2010. David A. Weibel, Trustee. For Information Call: Bishop, White, Marshall & Weibel, P.S., 720 Olive Way, Suite 1301, Seattle, WA 98101, (206) 622-7527. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 501367425 Title Order No: 100494046-OR-GNO T.S. No.: OR08000106-10-1 Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JOHN WWATFORD AS HIS SOLE & SEPARATE PROPERTY. As Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE TRUST, INC. as Lender and MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, recorded on April 17, 2007, as Instrument No. 2007-22062 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 206887 LOT TWENTY-SIX (26), RIDGEWATER PHASES 1 AND 2 P.U.D., DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 61165 RIDGEWATER LOOP, BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; Monthly Payment $2579.52 Monthly Late Charge $128.98 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $427,191.04 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.75000 % per annum from April 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, the undersigned trustee will on January 11, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 1, 2010 LSI Title Company of Oregon G. Sheppard C/O TRUSTEE CORPS 2112 BUSINESS CENTER DRIVE, 2ND FLOOR, IRVINE, CA 92612 For Sale information contact: (714) 573-1965, (714) 573 7777, and (949) 252 8300 THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT, ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3733781 12/01/2010, 12/08/2010, 12/15/2010, 12/22/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 502337725 Title Order No: 100493911-OR-GNO T.S. No.: OR07000044-10-1 Reference is made to that certain deed made by, LUKE DEMARCO AND STACI DEMARCO as Grantor to AMERITTITLE, as trustee, in favor of WILLAMETTE VALLEY BANK, A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK as Lender and MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRA-

TION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, recorded on November 19, 2008, as Instrument No. 2008-46129 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 181141 LOT FIVE (5), BLOCK FOUR (4), PROVIDENCE PHASE 3, RECORDED MARCH 18, 1992, IN CABINET C, PAGE 626, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 3161 NE MANCHESTER AVE, BEND, OR 97701-8184 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; Monthly Payment $1591.44 Monthly Late Charge $79.57 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 205,704.53 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.00000 % per annum from February 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, the undersigned trustee will on January 11, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front

entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their re-

spective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 1, 2010 LSI Title Company of Oregon G. Sheppard C/O TRUSTEE CORPS 2112 BUSINESS CENTER DRIVE, 2ND FLOOR, IRVINE, CA 92612 For Sale information contact: (714) 573-1965, (714) 573 7777, (949) 252 8300 ASAP# 3733623 12/01/2010, 12/08/2010, 12/15/2010, 12/22/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 502061644 Title Order No: 100494005-OR-GNO T.S. No.: OR07000045-10-1 Reference is made to that certain deed made by, WILLIAM A. BRITTAIN AND MONA B. BRITTAIN, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INS. CO. PORTLAND, as trustee, in favor of PREMIER MORTGAGE RESOURCES LLC, A OREGON LLC as Lender and MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, recorded on July 22, 2008, as Instrument No. 2008-30852 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 151303CA03200 LOT 66 OF NI-LA-SHA, PHASES 2 AND 3, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2312 NE 5TH STREET, REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-10-395607-NH Reference is made to that certain deed made by, Christopher E. Clark Deanna L. Clark as Grantor to Deschutes County Title Company, as trustee in favor of Liberty Savings and Loan Association, as Beneficiary, dated 12/1/1989, recorded 12/6/1989, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. - at page No. -, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 89-32465, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 108650 Lot Twenty (20), in Block Four (4), Hunters Circle, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 20643 Smith & Wesson Court Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: The installment of principal and interest which became due on 12/1/2009, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustees fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising form or associated with beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $725.94 Monthly Late Charge $26.68 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $40,780.88 together with interest thereon at the rate of 10.0000 per annum from 11/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 3/31/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187,110, Oregon Revised Statutes, Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-573-1965 or Login to: www.priorityposting.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 3/31/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL December 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER December 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 3/1/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENACY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 11/23/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee 3220 El Camino Real Irvine, CA 92602 Signature By: Angelica Castillo, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-545-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder's rights against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# 3828115 12/08/2010, 12/15/2010, 12/22/2010, 12/29/2010

to pay payments which became due; Monthly Payment $1822.48 Monthly Late Charge $91.12 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 264,744.56 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.00000 % per annum from April 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, the undersigned trustee will on January 11, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse,

1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of

said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 1, 2010 LSI Title Company of Oregon C/O TRUSTEE CORPS 2112 BUSINESS CENTER

DRIVE, 2ND FLOOR, IRVINE, CA 92612 For Sale information contact: (714) 573-1965, (714) 573 7777, and (949) 252 8300 THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT, ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3733771 12/01/2010, 12/08/2010, 12/15/2010, 12/22/2010

Public Notice In previously published materials relating to proposed rule changes to be effective January 1, 2011 for reimbursement for the Pharmaceutical Services Program of the Division of Medical Assistance Programs, it was stated the Division's intent to reimburse enrolled pharmacies at a rate of Wholesale Ac-

quisition Cost (WAC) as published by First DataBank plus 6.25 percent when no Actual Acquisition Cost (AAC) is available to the Division or its contractor to establish a rate for reimbursement to pharmacies. Subsequently, the Division has revised the proposed rule changes to reimburse at the Wholesale Acquisition Cost in these situations. Comments may be sent to DMAP Pharmacy Program Manager, 500 Summer St. NE, E35, Salem, OR 97301-1077.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing instrument shall constitute notice, pursuant to ORS 86.740, that the Grantor of the Trust Deed described below has defaulted on its obligations to beneficiary, and that the Beneficiary and Successor Trustee under the Trust Deed have elected to sell the property secured by the Trust Deed: TRUST DEED AND PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: This instrument makes reference to that certain deed of trust dated September 10, 2007 and recorded on September 20, 2007, as instrument number 2007-50910, in the Official Records of Deschutes County, State of Oregon, wherein WILDHORSE MEADOWS, LLC, an Oregon limited liability company, is the Grantor, AMERITITLE is the Trustee, and PREMIERWEST BANK, an Oregon state chartered commercial bank, is the Beneficiary (the "Trust Deed"). The aforementioned Trust Deed covers property (the "Property") described as: Tract A, GOLF COURSE ESTATES AT ASPEN LAKES PHASE I; and Parcels located in Section 1 of Township 15 South and Range 10 East of the Willamette Meridian, and a parcel located in Section 6 of Township 15 South and Range 11 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. For a full legal description, see Exhibit A attached hereto. Also commonly described as: 16900 Aspen Lakes Dr, Sisters, OR 97759. The tax parcel number(s) are: 159857 and 180017. The undersigned hereby certifies that she has no knowledge of any assignments of the Trust Deed by the Trustee or by the Beneficiary or any appointments of a Successor Trustee other than the appointment of DENISE J LUKINS, as Successor Trustee as recorded in the property records of the county in which the Property described above is situated. Further, the undersigned certifies that no action has been instituted to recover the debt, or any part thereof, now remaining secured by the Trust Deed. Or, if such action has been instituted, it has been dismissed except as permitted by ORS 86.735(4). The name and address of Successor Trustee are as follows: Denise J Lukins, Salmon Creek Law Offices, 1412 NE 134th St Ste 130, Vancouver WA 98685, Telephone: (360) 576-5322. The Trust Deed is not a "Residential Trust Deed", as defined in ORS 86.705(3), thus the requirements of Chapter 19, Section 20, Oregon Laws 2008, and Chapter 864 [S.B. 628], Oregon Laws 2009, do not apply. DEFAULT BY GRANTOR AND ELECTION TO SELL: There are continuing and uncured defaults by the Grantor that, based on the provisions of the Trust Deed, authorize the foreclosure of the Trust Deed and the sale of the Property described above, which uncured and continuing defaults include but are not necessarily limited to the following: 1. Grantor's failure to pay to Beneficiary, when and in the full amounts due, monthly installments as set forth on the Note secured by said Deed of Trust. Monthly installments in the approximate amount of $6,787.79, which includes principal and interest, are due for the months of August 2009 through February 2010 and each and every month thereafter until paid. Late charges through and including March 8, 2010 total $3,393.80. Interest due as of (i.e., through and including) March 8, 2010 is in the amount of $12,640.34 and continues to accrue at the rate of 8.6181% per annum or $79.50 per diem. ALL AMOUNTS are now due and payable along with all costs and fees associated with this foreclosure. 2. As to the defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of your Deed of Trust, you must cure each such default. Listed below are the defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of your Deed of Trust. Opposite each such listed default is a brief description of the action necessary to cure the default and a description of the documentation necessary to show that the default has been cured. The list does not exhaust all possible other defaults; any and all defaults identified by Beneficiary or the Successor Trustee that are not listed below must also be cured. OTHER DEFAULT/ Description of Action Required to Cure and Documentation Necessary to Show Cure/ Non-Payment of Taxes and/or Assessments/ Deliver to Successor Trustee written proof that all taxes and assessments against the Real Property are paid current/ Grantor has further defaulted by failing to cure defaults (cross-defaults) under Loan 483079019. Pursuant to the express provisions of the loan documents evidencing Beneficiary's loans to Grantor, Grantor's continuing and uncured defaults with respect to Loan 483079019 constitute an additional event of default under the Trust Deed/ Payment of all amounts due and cure of all defaults associated with Loan 483079019. TOTAL UNCURED MONETARY (PAYMENT) DEFAULT: By reason of said uncured and continuing defaults, the Beneficiary has accelerated and declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed and the Property immediately due and payable. The sums due and payable being the following: Unpaid principal amount owing pursuant to the Obligations, as of March 8, 2010: $336,701.86/ Unpaid interest owing pursuant to the Obligations as of March 8, 2010: $12,640.34/ Accrued and unpaid fees, costs and collection expenses to March 8, 2010: $3,589.80/ TOTAL DUE: $352,932.00. Accordingly, the sum owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed is $352,932.00, as of March 8, 2010, together with interest accruing on the principal portion of that amount, plus additional costs and expenses incurred by Beneficiary and/or the Successor Trustee (including their respective attorney's fees, costs, and expenses). Notice is hereby given that the Beneficiary, by reason of the uncured and continuing defaults described above, has elected and does hereby elect to foreclose said Trust Deed by advertisement and sale pursuant to ORS 86.735 et seq., and to cause to be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the Grantor's interest in the subject Property, which the Grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time the Grantor executed the Trust Deed in favor of the Beneficiary, along with any interest the Grantor or the Grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed as well as the expenses of the sale, including compensation of the Trustee as provided by law, and the reasonable fees of Trustee's attorneys. The Trustee's Sale was originally set for July 27, 2010 at 11 a.m. The Trustee's duly authorized agent first postponed the Trustee's Sale to September 15, 2010 and then postponed the sale a second time to January 21, 2011. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the sale will be held at the hour of 11:00 a.m., in accordance with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, on Friday, January 21, 2011, on the front steps of the main entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon 97701. RIGHT OF REINSTATEMENT: Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five (5) days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed satisfied by (A) payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, together with the costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the terms of the obligation, as well as Successor Trustee and attorney fees as prescribed by ORS 86.753); and (B) by curing all such other continuing and uncured defaults as noted in this Notice. DATED: March 12, 2010. By: Denise J Lukins, OSB 95339, Successor Trustee, Salmon Creek Law Offices, 1412 NE 134th St Ste 130, Vancouver WA 98685. Telephone: (360) 576-5322. Facsimile: (360) 576-5342. Email: dlukins@salmoncreeklawoffices.com. Exhibit A Legal Description Parcel 1: Tract A, GOLF COURSE ESTATES AT ASPEN LAKES PHASE I, recorded June 24, 1991, in Cabinet C, Page 539, Deschutes County, Oregon. Parcel 2: Parcels located in Section 1 of Township 15 South and Range 10 East of the Willamette Meridian, and a parcel located in Section 6 of Township 15 South and Range 11 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon as shown on this map and fully described as follows: PARCEL A: Beginning at a 5/8" iron rod at the northeast corner of said Section 1; thence South 00°05'30" East 2654.95 feet to a 1/2" iron rod at the east 1/4 corner of said Section 1; thence South 89°49'39" West 1332.18 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at the center - east 1/16th corner; thence South 00°06'38" East 2640.63 feet, along the west line of the east 1/2 of the southeast 1/4 to a 5/8" iron rod on the northerly right-of-way of Highway 126; thence following said northerly right-of-way, 46.76 feet along the arc of a 13720.99 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears South 89°53'04" West 46.76 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 89°58'55" West 1446.90 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 276.40 feet along the arc of an 1808.64 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears North 85°37'40" West 276.13 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 81°16'19" West 14.95 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on the easterly right-of-way of Camp Polk Road; thence leaving said northerly right-of-way and following said easterly right-of way, 22.48 feet along the arc of a 25.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears North 55°30'46" West 21.73 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 29°45'13" West 497.60 feet; thence 153.36 feet along the arc of an 1879.86 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears North 27°25'00" West 153.32 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 25°04'46" West 1231.02 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 472.61 feet along the arc of a 2894.79 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears North 29°45'24" West 472.08 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod on the southerly right-of-way of Aspen Lakes Drive; thence leaving said northeasterly right-of-way of Camp Polk Road and following said southerly right-of-way of Aspen Lakes Drive, North 57°37'54" East 575.86 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on the southerly right-of-way of Lady Caroline Drive; thence leaving said southerly right-of-way of Aspen Lakes Drive and following said southerly right-of-way of Lady Caroline Drive, 60.96 feet along the arc of a 480.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears South 24°07'44" East 60.92 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod at the northerly most corner of Lot 20 of said subdivision; thence South 20°29'26" East 18.06 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 135.49 feet along the arc of a 520.00 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears South 27°57'18" East 135.11 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod at the easterly most corner of said Lot 20; thence leaving said southerly right-of-way of Lady Caroline Drive, South 46°14'40" West 227.51 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at the southerly most corner of said Lot 20; thence South 29°47'09" East 556.35 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at the southerly most corner of Lot 23; thence North 36°34'26" East 179.58 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at the southwest corner of Lot 24; thence North 84°01'53" East 189.89 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at the southwest corner of Lot 25; thence North 84°20'23" East 381.96 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at the southwest corner of Lot 27; thence North 88°08'36" East 185.04 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at the southwest corner of Lot 28; thence South 84°41'47" East 754.16 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at an angle point in the southerly boundary of Lot 31; thence North 27°18'45" East 484.29 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at the southerly most corner of Lot 34; thence North 21°31'36" East 243.54 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at the easterly most corner of said Lot 34; thence North 38°00'56" West 129.34 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on the southeasterly right-of-way of Lady Caroline Drive, on the boundary of Golf Course Estates at Aspen Lakes Phase 3; thence following said southeasterly right-of-way of Lady Caroline Drive and said Phase 3 boundary, North 43°55'13" East 114.64 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 138.81 feet along the arc of a 540.00 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears North 36°33'22" East 138.43 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 29°11'30" East 151.08 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 229.35 feet along the arc of a 540.00 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears North 17°01'27" East 227.63 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 146.59 feet along the arc of a 770.00 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears North 00°35'49" West 146.37 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 144.66 feet along the arc of a 370.00 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears North 17°15'04" West 143.74 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 41.55 feet along the arc of a 480.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears North 25°58'17" West 41.54 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence leaving said southeasterly right-of-way of Lady Caroline Drive, South 79°29'44" East 74.94 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 22°12'47" East 168.63 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 37°06'41" East 163.06 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 75°26'53" East 130.00 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 85°48'29" East 173.53 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 82°58'21" East 156.19 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 77°20'49" East 172.68 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 61°21'18" East 160.98 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 11°51'46" West 135.95 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 00°02'15" East 189.85 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 13°44'49" West 279.51 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 83°11'46" West 340.98 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 73°40'42" West 508.62 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 76°07'09" West 161.87 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 83°36'08" West 178.72 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at the northwest corner of Lot 78 of said Phase 3 subdivision; thence leaving said Phase 3 boundary, North 03°07'58" West 742.91 feet to the north line of said Section 1; thence North 89°39'21" East 1718.24 feet to the point of beginning. PARCEL B: Beginning at a 2-1/2" iron pipe at the northwest corner of said Section 1; thence South 00°05'15" East 794.99 feet, along the west line of said Section 1, to a 5/8" iron rod on the northeasterly right-of-way of Camp Polk Road; thence leaving said west line and following said northeasterly right-of-way, South 22°17'07" East 21.15 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 206.23 feet along the arc of a 550.87 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears South 11°33'37" East 205.03 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 00°50'07" East 76.12 feet to the point of beginning; thence leaving said northeasterly right-of-way, North 86°17'57" East 542.44 feet; thence North 65°27'23" East 239.99 feet; thence North 36°40'27" East 185.58 feet; thence North 29°26'13" East 183.26 feet; thence North 30°35'14" East 126.12 feet; thence North 57°52'04" East 48.69 feet; thence North 64°56'48" East 327.42 feet; thence North 86°56'18" East 100.26 feet; thence South 74°11'43" East 286.33 feet; thence North 88°36'06" East 127.05 feet; thence North 05°39'17" West 52.45 feet; thence North 85°01'35" East 68.58 feet; thence North 40°47'35" East 157.83 feet; thence South 87°06'25" East 307.51 feet; thence South 84°17'57" East 189.50 feet; thence South 81°20'47" East 185.46 feet; thence North 89°58'21" East 185.53 feet; thence South 86°58'13" East 179.93 feet; thence South 65°03'44" East 169.60 feet; thence South 33°46'44" East 167.79 feet; thence South 22°17'25" East 186.47 feet; thence North 71°04'55" East 161.60 feet; thence 24.28 feet along the arc of a 2154.99 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears South 03°27'20" East 24.28 feet); thence South 03°07'58" East 271.71 feet to the northerly right-ofway of Royal Coachman Drive; thence following said northerly right-of-way, 32.59 feet along the arc of a 443.00 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears South 89°37'42" West 32.58 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 87°31'15" West 77.27 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on the boundary of Golf Course Estates at Aspen Lakes Phase 2; thence leaving said northerly right-of-way and following said Phase 2 boundary, North 02°28'45" West 4.00 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 54.67 feet along the arc of a 1020.00 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears South 85°59'07" West 54.67 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 84°26'59" West 200.69 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 33°56'34" West 357.48 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 52°22'27" West 327.16 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 76°25'02" West 431.08 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 56°18'45" West 98.83 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 12°31'41" East 159.78 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 06°10'07" West 165.82 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 14°34'02" West 120.24 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 67°00'02" West 210.91 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 55°44'09" West 159.78 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 46°53'56" West 164.38 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 64°20'18" West 157:29 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 13°48'03" West 30.00 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 89°26'18" West 318.62 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 73°30'45" West 168.19 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 77°28'31" West 107.45 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 87°06'40" West 359.25 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence leaving said Phase 2 boundary, South 68°29'31" West 118.85 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at the adjusted northwest corner of Lot 42 of Golf Course Estates at Aspen Lakes Phase 1 on the boundary of said Phase 1 subdivision; thence following said Phase 1 boundary, South 13°13'44" West 272.80 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 10°13'56" East 179.02 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 36°12'59" East 220.83 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 21°07'01" East 936.42 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 61°17'43" East 431.83 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on the southwesterly right-of-way of Royal Coachman Drive; thence following said southwesterly right-ofway, 196.32 feet along the arc of a 480.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears South 39°32'40" East 194.96 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 27°49'38" East 5.15 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on the northwesterly right-of-way of Aspen Lakes Drive; thence leaving said southwesterly right-of-way and following said northwesterly right-of-way, South 57°37'54" West 589.15 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on said northeasterly right-of-way of Camp Polk Road; thence leaving said northwesterly right-of-way and following said northeasterly right-of-way, 6.43 feet along the arc of a 2894.79 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears North 36°28'46" West 6.43 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 36°32'35" West 1548.95 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 278.87 feet along the arc of a 447.46 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears North 18°41'21" West 274.38 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 00°50'07" West 455.15 feet to the point of beginning. PARCEL C: Beginning at a 5/8" iron rod at the westerly most corner of Lot 43 of Golf Course Estates at Aspen Lakes Phase 1 and on the easterly right-of-way of Royal Coachman Drive; thence following said easterly right-of-way, 89.99 feet along the arc of a 580.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears North 18°34'58" West 89.90 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 14°08'17" West 159.06 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 122.06 feet along the arc of a 280.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears North 01°38'59" West 121.10 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod at the southwesterly corner of Lot 76 of Golf Course Estates at Aspen Lakes Phase 2; thence leaving said easterly right-of-way and following the boundary of said Phase 2, South 72°32'35" East 200.00 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 87°34'38" East 325.36 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 65°47'07" East 171.57 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 70°43'18" East 172.29 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 44°55'51" East 177.08 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 66°48'39" East 170.94 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 19°15'57" East 70.00 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 69°16'08" East 804.33 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 85°15'25" East 146.42 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 85°13'31" East 373.77 feet; thence leaving said Phase 2 boundary, South 17°10'55" East 221.39 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at the northwest corner of Lot 97 of Golf Course Estates at Aspen Lakes Phase 3; thence following the boundary of said Phase 3, South 17°10'55" East 499.00 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 10°02'44" East 275.42 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 13°02'10" East 189.50 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 88°34'47" East 107.59 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on the northerly right-of-way of said Lady Caroline Drive; thence following said northerly right-of-way, South 29°11'30" West 114.64 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 128.53 feet along the arc of a 500.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears South 36°33'22" West 128.18 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 43°55'13" West 114.64 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on the boundary of said Golf Course Estates at Aspen Lakes Phase 1; thence leaving said Phase 3 boundary and following said Phase 1 boundary, 84.62 feet along the arc of a 730.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears South 47°14'28" West 84.57 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 50°33'44" West 210.90 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 110.15 feet along the arc of a 1020.00 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears South 47°28'06" West 110.10 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 44°22'28" West 85.26 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 248.52 feet along the arc of a 280.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears South 69°48'04" West 240.45 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 84°46'19" West 48.85 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 105.93 feet along the arc of a 520.00 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears South 89°23'33" West 105.74 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 83°33'24" West 204.40 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 125.27 feet along the arc of a 980.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears South 87°13'07" West 125.19 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 89°07'10" West 110.17 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 153.02 feet along the arc of a 1020.00 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears South 86°34'58" West 152.88 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 82°17'06" West 20.76 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 82.16 feet along the arc of a 980.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears South 84°41'12" West 82.14 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 87°05'18" West 154.34 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 280.96 feet along the arc of a 280.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears North 64°09'56" West 269.32 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 35°25'10" West 101.50 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 125.07 feet along the arc of a 480.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears North 27°57'18" West 124.72 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 20°29'26" West 18.06 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 66.59 feet along the arc of a 520.00 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears North 24°09'32" West 66.54 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 27°49'38" West 104.96 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 160.76 feet along the arc of a 520.00 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears North 36°41'03" West 160.12 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod on the southerly right-of-way of Green Drake Court; thence leaving said northerly right-of-way and following said southerly right-of-way, North 48°07'22" East 82.32 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 256.77 feet along the arc of a 730.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears North 58°11'58" East 255.45 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 68°16'33" East 30.00 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence leaving said Phase 1 boundary, North 68°16'33" East 175.00 feet to a 5/8" iron rod at the westerly most corner of Lot 18 of said Phase 1; thence leaving said southerly right-of-way, South 38°50'05" East 266.47 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on said Phase 1 boundary; thence following said Phase 1 boundary, North 57°55'46" East 639.08 feet, (erroneously described as 786.53 feet), to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 45°57'28" East 344.47 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 68°39'56" East 99.24 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence leaving said Phase 1 boundary, North 36°04'40" East 134.88 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on said Phase 1 boundary; thence North 06°56'23" West 341.05 feet, along said Phase 1 boundary, to a 5/8" iron rod; thence leaving said Phase 1 boundary, South 87°10'38" West 202.98 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on said Phase 1 boundary; thence following said Phase 1 boundary, South 66°26'30" West 360.56 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 54°26'22" West 329.58 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 63°52'11" West 800.18 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence leaving said Phase 1 boundary, South 56°38'30" West 179.06 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on said Phase 1 boundary; thence following said Phase 1 boundary, South 21°53'47" East 294.55 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on the northerly right-of-way of said Green Drake Court; thence following said northerly right-of-way, South 48°07'22" West 35.00 feet to a 5/8" iron rod on said easterly right-of-way of Royal Coachman Drive; thence leaving said northerly right-of-way and following said easterly right-of-way, 11.70 feet along the arc of a 520.00 foot radius curve left (the long chord of which bears North 50°37'02" West 11.70 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 51°15'42" West 165.61 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence 68.01 feet along the arc of a 980.00 foot radius curve right (the long chord of which bears North 49°16'25" West 68.00 feet) to a 5/8" iron rod; thence leaving said easterly right-of-way, North 14°19'14" East 240.33 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence North 48°35'49" West 145.30 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 61°07'48" West 158.88 feet to the point of beginning.


Bulletin Daily Paper 12/15/10  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Wednesday December 15, 2010

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