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Cyclocross races to completion

It’ll take time to tell if body is Blaylock’s, officials say

Ryan Trebon, of Bend, runs up the staircase while fans cheer him on Sunday during the elite men’s race at the Cyclocross National Championships in Bend’s Old Mill District. Trebon finished second in the race to Todd Wells, of Durango, Colo. Jess Reed / The Bulletin

FOR FULL COVERAGE, SEE SPORTS, PAGE D1

TOP NEWS INSIDE

By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

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Photos courtesy Greg Burke

Madras Lake Billy Chinook Crooked River

Whychus Creek Deschutes River Sisters

Proposed Whychus-Deschutes Wilderness

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The Oregon Natural Desert Association is hoping to get stretches of the Whychus Creek and Middle Deschutes canyons designated as the WhychusDeschutes Wilderness.

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When developers first proposed building a wind farm in southwest Crook County, officials took a look at their current maps showing wildlife corridors. It showed the area as critical elk habitat, which meant the lot could not be divided into anything smaller than 320-acre parcels. The wind farm would also occupy a small part of Deschutes County. And with one step over the county line, elk habitat was not an issue. “We have the most restriction on our maps for elk habitat, and we looked at other county lines and we’re not meshing,” said Crook County Planning Director Bill Zelenka. “Where we have deer habitat, you cross over the line and there’s nothing.” Zelenka said the last time the county made any changes to its wildlife policies was in 1992. Now, there are new techniques to identifying critical wildlife habitat, and more is known about the process. Crook County is in the process of evaluating and updating its maps. It’s a process the county wants the public involved in. “The process does affect private lands and (could affect) landowners in these sensitive wildlife habitats,” said Brian Ferry, a wildlife biologist with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. See Crook / A4

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The Bulletin

Area where Whychus meets the Deschutes marked by steep canyons, popular spots, proximity to development

More than 15,000 acres, centered around the confluence of Whychus Creek with the Deschutes River, would be protected as part of the proposed Whychus-Deschutes Wilderness. The area includes steep canyons along the Middle Deschutes.

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Wilderness push: 15,000 rugged acres

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Crook County eyes wildlife rule changes and land use repercussions

Source: Oregon Natural Desert Association

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Greg Cross / The Bulletin

he steep, craggy cliffs along the lower stretch of Whychus Creek and the Middle Deschutes, including Alder Springs and the Steelhead Falls, would be a new wilderness area under a proposal from the Oregon Natural Desert Association. “It’s a really completely unique, rugged area,” said Gena Goodman-Campbell, Central Oregon wilderness coordinator with the Bend-based conservation nonprofit. “And the fact that it has remained undeveloped, and relatively untouched over the years of a lot of development in that area, it’s just a testament to that ruggedness and wildness of that canyon.” The area, which would be called the Whychus-Deschutes Wilderness, would be about 15,000 acres along Whychus Creek and the Middle Deschutes, including the confluence of the two. The area, with its cold springs, will be key spawning and rearing habitat for steelhead, Goodman-Campbell said, when the fish that have been reintroduced to the area return in a couple of years. The area also has trails and recreation sites, she said, including a popular hike to Steelhead Falls on the Deschutes River. “It’s super accessible,” she said. “Steelhead Falls, you can walk a couple hundred feet into this proposed wilderness and really get a feel of the wildness and the character of it.” And the proposed wilderness area is also right up against residential areas — including about 150 lots in Crooked River Ranch. While it’s unusual for a wilderness area to be so close to development, it’s not unheard of, Goodman-Campbell said. And having a federally designated wilderness in their backyards won’t have an impact on local land use laws for neighbors, she said. Some of the land included in the proposal is partly managed by the Crooked River National Grassland, while other sections are managed by the Prineville district of the Bureau of Land Management. See Wilderness / A5

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Detroit Lake

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Unidentified body found near Idanha Detroit Bend

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Greg Cross / The Bulletin

For risky borrowers, credit’s back ... at a price New York Times News Service

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By Eric Dash

INDEX Abby

Marion County Sheriff’s Office officials continued efforts Sunday to recover a body in the North Santiam River that might be that of missing Bend woman Lori “Woody” Blaylock. Sheriff’s office spokesman Don Thompson said there was no indication the body was Blaylock’s, adding that such a determination could take some time because the remains are badly decomposed. Kayakers discovered the body in the North Santiam River near Idanha east of Detroit Lake on Saturday. Some of Blaylock’s clothing was found in the same river last month. Blaylock was reported missing by her co-workers at St. Charles Bend on Nov. 2 after she failed to show up for work. Her husband, Steven Blaylock, was arrested on Nov. 10 on suspicion of murder, assault and tampering with evidence. He now faces a single count of murder related to her disappearance. When questioned by police, Blaylock told them his wife walked away from their home on Northeast Genet Court on Oct. 28. He said he didn’t report her missing because he believed she would come home. — Nick Grube, The Bulletin

The Oregon Natural Desert Association is gathering support for a new Whychus-Deschutes Wilderness area, west of Crooked River Ranch, along canyons carved by the Middle Deschutes and by Whychus Creek, seen here.

Credit card offers are surging again after a three-year slowdown, as banks seek to revive a business that brought them huge profits before the financial crisis wrecked the credit scores of so many Americans. The rise is striking because it includes offers to riskier borrowers who were shunned as recently as six months ago. But this time, in contrast to the boom years, when banks “preapproved” seemingly everyone, lenders are choosing their prospects more carefully and setting stricter terms to guard against another wave of losses. For consumers, the resurgence of card offers, however cautious, provides an opportunity to repair damaged credit and regain the convenience of paying with plastic. But there is a catch: The new cards have higher interest rates and annual fees. See Credit / A4


A2 Monday, December 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Free speech and policing Facebook’s underbelly By Miguel Helft New York Times News Service

PALO ALTO, Calif. — Mark Zuckerberg, the co-founder and chief executive of Facebook, likes to say that his website brings people together, helping to make the world a better place. But Facebook isn’t a utopia, and when it comes up short, Dave Willner tries to clean it up. Dressed in Facebook’s quasiofficial uniform of jeans, a T-shirt and flip-flops, the 26-year-old Willner hardly looks like a cop on the beat. Yet he and his colleagues on Facebook’s hate and harassment team are part of a virtual police squad charged with taking down content that is illegal or violates Facebook’s terms of service. That puts them on the front line of the debate over free speech on the Internet. That role came into sharp focus last week as the controversy about WikiLeaks boiled over on the Web, with coordinated attacks on major corporate and government sites perceived to be hostile to that group. Facebook took down a page used by WikiLeaks supporters to organize hacking attacks on the sites of such companies, including PayPal and MasterCard; it said the page violated the terms of service, which prohibit material that is hateful, threatening or pornographic, or incites violence or illegal acts. But it did not remove WikiLeaks’ own Facebook pages. Facebook’s decision in the WikiLeaks matter illustrates the complexities that the company grapples with, on issues as diverse as that controversy, verbal bullying among teenagers, gaybaiting and religious intolerance. With Facebook’s prominence on the Web — its more than 500 million members upload more than 1 billion pieces of content a day — the site’s role as an arbiter of free speech is likely to become even more pronounced. “Facebook has more power in determining who can speak and who can be heard around the globe than any Supreme Court justice, any king or any president,” said Jeffrey Rosen, a law professor at George Washington University who has written about free speech on the Internet. “It is important that Facebook is exercising its power carefully and protecting more speech rather than less.”

Many complaints But Facebook rarely pleases everyone. Any piece of content — a photograph, video, page or even a message between two individuals — could offend somebody. Decisions by the company not to remove material related to Holocaust denial or pages critical of Islam and other religions, for example, have annoyed advocacy groups and prompted some countries to temporarily block the site. Some critics say Facebook does not do enough to prevent certain abuses, like bullying, and may put users at risk with lax privacy policies. They also say the company is often too slow to respond to problems. For example, a page lampooning and, in some instances, threatening violence against an 11-year-old girl from Orlando, Fla., who had appeared in a music video, was still up last week, months after users reported the page to Facebook. The girl’s mother, Christa Etheridge, said

Technology Consumer Environment Education Science

Peak of popularity a wistful memory for the Wii By Ben Fritz Los Angeles Times

Jim Wilson / New York Times News Service

From left: Facebook’s hate and harassment team — James Mitchell, seated at left, Jessica Ghastin, Nick Sullivan, Slater Tow and Dave Willner — monitors a page on Facebook’s site at the company’s offices in Palo Alto, Calif. The group takes down content that is illegal or violates Facebook’s terms of service, a role that often puts it in the middle of arguments over free speech and bullying on the Web.

“Facebook has more power in determining who can speak and who can be heard around the globe than any Supreme Court justice, any king or any president.” — Jeffrey Rosen, law professor, George Washington University

she had been in touch with law enforcement authorities and was hoping the offenders would be prosecuted. “I’m highly upset that Facebook has allowed this to go on repeatedly and to let it get this far,” she said. A Facebook spokesman said the company had left the page up because it did not violate its terms of service, which allow criticism of a public figure. The spokesman said that by appearing in a band’s video, the girl had become a public figure, and that the threatening comments had not been posted until a few days ago. Those comments, and the account of the user who had posted them, were removed after The New York Times inquired about them. Facebook says it is constantly working to improve its tools to report abuse and trying to educate users about bullying. And it says it responds as fast as it can to the roughly 2 million reports of potentially abusive content that its users flag every week. “Our intent is to triage to make sure we get to the high-priority, high-risk and high-visibility items most quickly,” said Joe Sullivan, Facebook’s chief security officer. In early October, Willner and his colleagues spent more than a week dealing with one high-risk, highly visible case; rogue citizens of Facebook’s world had posted anti-gay messages and threats of violence on a page inviting people to remember Tyler Clementi and other gay teenagers who have committed suicide, on so-called Spirit Day, Oct. 20. Working with colleagues here and in Dublin, they tracked down the accounts of the offenders and shut them down. Then, using an automated technology to tap Facebook’s graph of connections between members, they tracked down more profiles for people who, as it turned out, had also been posting violent messages.

“Most of the hateful content was coming from fake profiles,” said James Mitchell, who is Willner’s supervisor and leads the team. He said that because most of these profiles, created by people he called “trolls,” were connected to those of other trolls, Facebook could track down and block an entire network relatively quickly. Using the system, Willner and his colleagues silenced dozens of troll accounts, and the page became usable again. But trolls are repeat offenders, and it took Willner and his colleagues nearly 10 days of monitoring the page around the clock to take down more than 7,000 profiles that kept surfacing to attack the Spirit Day event page.

Hidden taunts Most abuse incidents are not nearly as prominent or public as the defacing of the Spirit Day page, which had nearly 1.5 million members. As with schoolyard taunts, they often happen among a small group of people, hidden from casual view. On a morning in November, Nick Sullivan, a member of the hate and harassment team, watched as reports of bullying incidents scrolled across his screen, full of mind-numbing vulgarity. Emily looks like a brother. (Deleted) Grady is with Dave. (Deleted) Ronald is the biggest loser. (Deleted) As attacks on specific people who are not public figures, these all violated the terms of service. “There’s definitely some crazy stuff out there,” Sullivan said. “But you can do thousands of these in a day.” Nancy Willard, director of the Center for Safe and Responsible Internet Use, which advises parents and teachers on Internet safety, said her organization frequently received complaints that Facebook does not quickly remove threats against individu-

als. Jim Steyer, executive director of Common Sense Media, a nonprofit group based in San Francisco, also said that many instances of abuse seemed to fall through the cracks. “Self-policing can take some time, and by then a lot of the damage may already be done,” he said. Facebook maintains it is doing its best. “In the same way that efforts to combat bullying offline are not 100 percent successful, the efforts to stop people from saying something offensive about another person online are not complete either,” Sullivan said. Facebook faces even thornier challenges when policing activity that is considered political by some and illegal by others, such as the publication of secret diplomatic cables obtained by WikiLeaks. This year, for example, the company declined to take down pages related to “Everybody Draw Muhammad Day,” an Internet-wide protest to defend free speech that surfaced in repudiation of death threats received by two cartoonists who had drawn pictures of Muhammad. A lot of the discussion on Facebook involved people in Islamic countries debating with people in the West about why the images offended. Facebook’s team worked to separate the political discussion from the attacks on specific people or Muslims. “There were people on the page that were crossing the line, but the page itself was not crossing the line,” Mitchell said. Facebook has also sought to walk a delicate line on Holocaust denial. The company has generally refused to block Holocaust denial material, but has worked with human rights groups to take down some content linked to organizations or groups, like the government of Iran, for which Holocaust denial is part of a larger campaign against Jews. “Obviously we disagree with them on Holocaust denial,” said Rabbi Abraham Cooper, associate dean of the Simon Wiesenthal Center. But Cooper said Facebook had done a better job than many other major websites in developing a thoughtful policy on hate and harassment.

LOS ANGELES — At NextGen Video Games, it has been two months since a customer bought a Nintendo Wii, the console that became a sensation for letting players swing a virtual tennis racket or steer a virtual car with a flick of the wrist. Owner Jeff Bryson has three on hand for the holiday season, significantly fewer than last year, and he’s not even sure he’ll find buyers for those. “The Wii has really slowed down,” Bryson said on a recent evening in his Los Angeles store. “It’s tough to sell.” Just three years ago, Nintendo Co.’s video-game device was nearly impossible to find, as hard-core gamers clamored for it along with novices, including families with young children and grandparents drawn to its easy-to-use wand. From January 2007, just after it launched, until last May, the Wii was the top-selling game console nearly every month in the U.S. But things have taken a decided turn. The Wii fell to No. 3 from No. 1 this year, with U.S. sales down 24 percent in the first 10 months compared with the same period in 2009. Sales of Microsoft Corp.’s rival Xbox 360 are up 34 percent, and Sony Corp.’s PlayStation 3 has risen 15 percent. Games for the device are on a similar downward slope. Electronic Arts Inc. recently told investors that Wii game sales outside of Japan fell 34 percent in the recent quarter and are expected to be “down sharply” for the full year. Many who have bought a Wii appear to be letting it gather dust rather than buying new games. “The success of the Wii has been bound in large part to people who enjoyed it as a fad and have now moved on,” said Marc Jackson, chief executive of videogame finance and consulting firm Seahorn Capital. Makers of successful consoles such as Sony, with the PlayStation 2, made their biggest profits from royalties on games made by other publishers for their device. Nintendo isn’t seeing the same benefit. That’s one reason the Japanese company recently slashed its revenue forecast for the current fiscal year by 21 percent. “The success of the Wii was amazing, but as of late the company is not profiting from that success,” said Matt Jacobs, an analyst with ITG Investment Research. The Wii’s dominance before 2010 can hardly be understated. After Nintendo’s last console, the GameCube, lingered in third place, the company shocked many in the industry in 2006 with the Wii, which was less powerful than competing machines but introduced a motion-sensing wand instead of relying on the traditional pressing-button controller. It was an immediate hit, selling 74 million units worldwide. That success came largely from an untapped market: infrequent game players. But infrequent game players by definition don’t make for repeat customers when it comes to buying new Wii games.

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‘Angry Birds’ flocking to cell phones everywhere By Jenna Wortham New York Times News Service

It sounds like a tough sell: a game that involves catapulting birds at elaborate fortresses constructed by evil pigs. But “Angry Birds,” a hit game by Rovio, a small Finnish company, is one of the unlikeliest popculture crazes of the year — and perhaps the first to make the leap from cell phone screens to the mainstream. “Angry Birds,” in which the birds seek revenge on the eggstealing pigs, is meant to be eas-

ily played in the checkout line and during other short windows of downtime — but some players have trouble stopping. Rovio says people around the world rack up 200 million minutes of game play each day. The game has inspired parodies, homages and fervent testimonials. Homemade “Angry Birds” costumes were big hits on Halloween. Conan O’Brien demonstrated the game in a YouTube video promoting his new show, and a sketch from an Israeli TV show about a birds-and-pigs peace treaty was

popular online. Celebrities have professed their love of “Angry Birds” on social networks. Games like “Angry Birds” are reaching a wide audience of players who might never consider buying an Xbox or PlayStation, but are now carrying sophisticated game machines in their pockets — smart phones. Software developers, eager to become the next Rovio, are creating casual games for this crowd, games that are easy to learn and hard to stop playing. The trajectory of “Angry Birds”

also suggests a larger shift in the entertainment business and in the kinds of brands that can win wide popularity. And unlike many of the best-known console video games, cell phone games like “Angry Birds” are often made by small companies and catch on by word of mouth. “There’s no more formula,” said James McQuivey, an analyst at Forrester Research. “It doesn’t matter where it starts: a ringtone, a video game, book. It has a shot at the big time.” Fans of the game took to the

streets Saturday for “Angry Birds” Day, celebrating its first anniversary. Rovio worked with the Web service Meetup.com to help organize the gatherings in New York, London, Jakarta, Budapest and dozens of other cities, but fans stepped up to lead the gatherings. Although Rovio has released two dozen other mobile games, none has come close to the success of “Angry Birds.” Since it was released a year ago, 50 million copies have been downloaded, and Apple said last week that it was the bestselling iPhone app of 2010.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 13, 2010 A3

T S Afghan blast kills 6 U.S. troops Tax benefits to middle class could pay off for Obama By C.J. Chivers

New York Times News Service

ZHARE, Afghanistan — Six U.S. soldiers were killed and more than a dozen American and Afghan troops were wounded on Sunday morning when a van packed with explosives was detonated at a new jointly operated outpost in southern Afghanistan. The soldiers were inside in a small mud-walled building near

the village of Sangsar, north of the Arghandab River, when the bomber drove up to one of the walls and exploded his charge about 9 a.m. The blast could be heard eight miles away, and it sent a dusty mushroom cloud towering over the surrounding farmland. The explosion blasted a hole in the thick wall, causing the roof to collapse on soldiers inside. Others quickly arrived and clawed

and pulled at the waist-deep rubble to free the buried troops. The building had been occupied by the Americans and Afghans for only a few days, a U.S. official said, and was beside a narrow road. It was not immediately clear how the van managed to get so close without being challenged or stopped. Gen. Abdul Hameed, a commander in the Afghan National

Army, said in a telephone interview that his soldiers had tried to stop the van but that its driver ignored them and rammed the vehicle into the building. The Taliban swiftly claimed responsibility for the bombing. “We have killed numbers of Americans and Afghan soldiers and wrecked and ruined their security check post,” a Taliban spokesman said.

WikiLeaks defenders swarmed wrong target By Ian Austen New York Times News Service

OTTAWA — It is not clear if the mistake first appeared on a blog or flitted around in a Twitter message. But whatever its source, it swept Mark Jeftovic and his company, EasyDNS, into both sides of the storm over corporate support, or the lack thereof, for WikiLeaks. When Jeftovic took a look at his e-mail on the morning of Dec. 3, he was surprised to find a critical comment from a customer over his company’s decision to no longer provide domain name hosting for WikiLeaks. A quick Google search made the comment less puzzling. Several blogs and websites had posted variations of this sentence: “EasyDNS.net has cut off DNS service to WikiLeaks.” (DNS refers to the Domain Name System, which is something like a switchboard for the Internet.) WikiLeaks had indeed lost the support of the company that was providing the connection between the domain name wikileaks.org and the WikiLeaks Web servers. But that company was EveryDNS, a free provider based in the United States. The controversy took a new turn after Jeftovic took his next step. A person from outside of Canada, whom Jeftovic declined to identify, approached him on behalf of a WikiLeaks consortium to help manage the names wikileaks.org, wiki leaks.ch and wikileaks.nl. Jeftovic decided it would be hypocritical to make so much noise about having not abandoned WikiLeaks and then not help the organization when asked to do so. Jeftovic has agreed to host all three of the names on special servers isolated from the rest of the company’s servers.

South Korean vessel sinks in Antarctic; 42 in jeopardy By Hyung-jin Kim The Associated Press

SEOUL, South Korea — A South Korean fishing boat with 42 sailors aboard is sinking in the Antarctic Ocean, a coast guard official said early today. The company that owns the vessel reported that the ship was sinking in waters about 1,400 miles south of New Zealand, a South Korean Coast Guard officer said, speaking on condition of anonymity because of office rules. The officer said she no details about rescue efforts and the present state of the vessel. Eight of the 42 people aboard the ship are South Koreans, the officer said. Chinese, Indonesian and Vietnamese sailors also are aboard the ship, Yonhap news agency reported. South Korea’s YTN television station said the coast guard has asked New Zealand for help.

Diane Weiss / The Associated Press

Snow falls Sunday in downtown Detroit. The metro area is expected to get 4 to 8 inches before the storm moves out.

Storm socks Midwest, cancels flights, closes roads By Sophia Tareen The Associated Press

CHICAGO — A powerful, gusty storm dumped mounds of snow across the upper Midwest on Sunday, closing major highways in several states, canceling more than 1,600 flights in Chicago and collapsing the roof of the Minnesota Vikings’ stadium. At least four weather-related deaths were reported as the storm system dropped nearly 2 feet of snow in parts of Minnesota and marched east. A blizzard warning was in effect Sunday for parts of eastern Iowa, southeastern Wisconsin, northwestern Illinois and northern Michigan, according to the National Weather Service. Surrounding areas, including Chicago, were under winter storm warnings. Much of Iowa was under a wind-chill advisory. The wintry weather, with blowing snow that severely limited visibility, wreaked havoc on air and road travel. In the Chicago area, wind gusts of up to 50 mph, temperatures in the teens and wind chills well below zero were ex-

Record rains raise flood threat on Northwest rivers SEATTLE — Record rainfall in the Pacific Northwest triggered mudslides and threatened to cause severe flooding of some western Washington rivers Sunday. Although the rain had eased in much of southwest Washington and northwest Oregon, including Portland, downpours continued from Seattle north, swelling rivers and threatening some small towns. The rain was expected to lessen Sunday eve-

Related • Fallout from the Metrodome’s collapsing roof, Page D1 pected, along with up to 8 inches of snow. At least 1,375 flights were canceled at O’Hare International Airport, and more than 300 were canceled at Midway International Airport, Chicago Department of Aviation spokeswoman Karen Pride said. Both airports expected more cancellations and reported significant delays. Major highways in several states were closed due to poor driving conditions and accidents. Tod Pritchard of Wisconsin Emergency Management warned that Sunday afternoon would be especially difficult because temperatures were falling and at a certain point, road salt would no longer work. The storm had already dropped up to 18 inches of snow in parts of Wisconsin, he said, and light snow continued Sunday. ning, with the worst of the flood danger over by early today. Still, flood watches or warnings remained in effect for the region, and forecasters said storms could dump 6 inches or more of rain in the Cascade Range and Olympic Mountains. “We’re looking at the wettest storm system we’ve had in almost two years,” said National Weather Service meteorologist Kirby Cook in Seattle. Seattle-Tacoma International Airport set a rainfall record for the date of 1.42 inches, breaking the old mark for Dec. 11 of 1.32 inches set in 1955. Quillayute on the Pacific Coast also

By David M. Herszenhorn New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — With the Senate poised to hold a key vote this afternoon on the tax cut deal between President Barack Obama and Republicans, the political jousting has focused on what the agreement does for the wealthy and for the unemployed. But in addition to the continued lower income tax rates for everyone, the deal allocates hundreds of billions of dollars more to benefit middle- and upper-middle-income Americans. It is a bid to stimulate the economy that could pay big political dividends to Obama in 2012 — one reason he was willing to give in to Republican demands to temporarily extend all Bush-era tax rates. Austan Goolsbee, chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, appearing Sunday on “Meet the Press” on NBC, said Obama was still convinced there was no economic benefit to continuing lower tax rates for the highest earners. “That’s a bitter pill to have to deal with,” Goolsbee said. “But it’s a compromise, and by giving that one piece we were able to get a series of things that I think make a big difference to the middle class and working families.” The single most expensive component of the package — other than the continuation of all of the marginal rates — is a two-year adjustment of the Alternative Minimum Tax, to prevent it from hitting millions more households. This will cost $137 billion, according to a detailed analysis by the Congressional Joint Committee on Taxation. Middle- and upper-middle income Americans will also benefit most from the oneyear payroll tax cut, which will reduce the Social Security tax on income up to $106,800 to 4.2 percent from 6.2 percent.

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Bryon Houlgrave / The Associated Press

Kevin Eastvold, of Mason City, Iowa, pushes through the snow at the end of his driveway Sunday. Parts of the state remained under a blizzard warning Sunday. had a record for the date, 2.17 inches. The old record was 1.64 inches, set in 2002. Cook described the storm system as a “plume of very moist, warm Pacific air.” National Weather Service meteorologist Dave Elson in Portland said coastal Oregon rivers and tributaries of the Willamette River could rise out of their banks, but said the flood threat wasn’t as severe as in Washington. Portland city officials said an overnight break from the rain allowed most flooded intersections to drain. — The Associated Press

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Backers, foes say plan will pass WASHINGTON — The White House expressed confidence Sunday that President Barack Obama’s deal with Republicans will pass by year’s end, averting a Jan. 1 increase in income taxes for nearly all Americans, even the highest earners. In a sign of fading resistance, a Democratic leader said the lame-duck House will try to make changes, but won’t block the bill. Ahead of a test vote in the Senate today, Obama adviser David Axelrod predicted the president’s compromise deal would win out despite a tougher sell in the House. Majority Democrats, who lose control of the House to Republicans in January, voted last week not to allow it to reach the floor without changes to scale back relief for wealthy estates. — The Associated Press

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Sweden focuses on bombing suspect New York Times News Service STOCKHOLM — A day after two explosions struck central Stockholm, killing the man suspected of being a suicide bomber and wounding two other people, investigators began to focus on the possibility the person responsible was an Iraqi-born Swede who had attended college in Britain. Reports in British and Swedish newspapers, citing govern-

ment sources, identified the man as Taimour al-Abdaly, a 28-yearold Sunni Muslim whose family moved to Sweden from Baghdad in 1992. Officials declined to comment, saying the bomber’s identity was part of the investigation. But the suspect’s possible link to Britain was reinforced Sunday night when the Metropolitan Police in London said officers were searching a property at an address

in Bedfordshire, the county in which al-Abdaly is believed to have attended college. A spokesman said the search was “in connection with the incidents in Stockholm.” Sweden’s prime minister, Fredrik Reinfeldt, told reporters at a news conference Sunday that an investigation was still working to establish links among the explosions, the dead man and messages sent to a Swedish news agency.

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A4 Monday, December 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

‘I’m not a witch’ ties for 2010’s top quotation

Credit Continued from A1 Lenders are “tiptoeing their way back into the higher-risk pool of customers,” said John Ulzheimer, president of consumer education at Smart Credit.com. In extending credit again to riskier borrowers, lenders are looking beyond standard credit scores, on the theory that some people who might seem to be equal credit risks on the surface may in fact show differences in their spending habits or other behavior — like registering on an online job site — that suggest variations in their ability to keep up with payments.

By John Christoffersen The Associated Press

Types of borrowers Industry consultants, in their attempt to feed the demand for finer classifications of borrowers, have coined new labels to describe different borrowers with similar credit scores. One is “strategic defaulters,” whose credit scores were damaged because they walked away from a home when its value dropped below what was owed on the mortgage. These borrowers made a bad bet on real estate but may otherwise be prudent risks because they make a good living. Similarly, “first-time defaulters” once had a strong credit record but ran into financial trouble during the recession. Typically, these borrowers fell behind on some sort of loan payment after losing a job, not from taking on too much debt. By contrast, there are “sloppy payers,” who pay only some bills on time; “abusers,” who are defiant about paying; and “distressed borrowers,” who simply do not have the means to pay. The goal is to identify consumers whose credit scores are blemished but who still have the money to pay their bills. “Lenders want to prove to themselves that it is worth taking a higher risk,” said Brad Jolson, an executive of the decision management company FICO, who has helped several card companies analyze their customer base. This new approach to assessing default risk is emblematic of the challenge faced by the many banks that were hobbled by the financial crisis: They desperately want to grow again, but the memory of a near-death experience makes them wary about taking outsize risks.

Lending losses Lenders have taken $189 billion in credit card losses since 2007, according to Oliver Wyman Group, a financial consultancy. That was a significant part of the $2 trillion or so banks are estimated to have lost since the crisis began, and a contributor to the government bailout of the banking system. To stem losses, lenders halted new card offers to all but their most affluent customers. At the same time, more than 8 million consumers stopped using their credit cards, in a sign of the nationwide belt-tightening, according to TransUnion, the credit bureau. Millions more borrowers who still have cards have been compelled to pay down their balances, or are more often choosing to use cash. That has had a big impact on lenders’ bottom lines. Credit cards once gave the banking industry as much as a quarter of its profits; today those profits have all but vanished. Now that the losses have stabilized, lenders have set out to

Crook Continued from A1 ODFW will help the county identify the sensitive areas that officials believe need protection. Currently, the county has about 900,000 acres that are protected. Zelenka said he believes there are more sophisticated methods to determining wildlife habitat. He believes looking at the process holistically could mean fewer restrictions on landowners. “We want to look at what works and what doesn’t work. And how we can accommodate wildlife protection and protect property rights,” Zelenka said. Bill McCormack, who owns a large cattle ranch about 20 miles north of Brothers, said he’s interested in the county’s map update. He hopes he doesn’t have to divide or build on his cattle ranch to keep it going. He’s thought

Jim Wilson / New York Times News Service

Sue Talkington, a retired Modesto, Calif., mill worker, is trying to get rid of her credit card debt, which topped out at more than $17,000. Last month, right after she had cut up three credit cards, she received an application for a new low-end Capital One card.

Lending again to the riskiest borrowers After shunning the least creditworthy consumers during the financial crisis, credit card companies have significantly increased their offers to them recently. Card offers, by FICO credit score

Offers to people with FICO scores lower than 700, in millions 3Q ’09

3Q ’10

Capital One

0.4

22.0

HSBC

1.5

16.5

Citigroup

0.8

14.1

Discover Financial 0.8

10.4

100% 760 AND HIGHER

80 60 40

700-759 20 UNDER 700

0 ’07

’08

’09

revive their card business, and mail offers to once-troubled borrowers are roaring back. British-based HSBC mailed more than 16 million card offers in the third quarter of this year, Citigroup 14 million and Discover 10 million, all roughly tenfold increases over the same period last year, according to Synovate Mail Monitor, a market research firm. Capital One’s rate rose fiftyfold, to 22 million. In all, lenders will send about 2.5 billion credit card offers by the end of the year, Synovate estimates, compared with more than 6 billion in 2005, the peak year. The bulk of this year’s mailings is still going to affluent people, with just 17 percent going to borrowers with blemished credit. That compares with about 39 percent in 2007 and a low of 7 percent in late 2009. Many of the new lower-end cards start with high interest rates and annual fees, because new federal rules limit the ability of lenders to change the terms after payments are missed. Capital One, for example, is offering low-end cards that carry interest rates of 18 percent or higher and annual fees of up to $50. The response to the card campaigns has been strong, with roughly 4 percent of these riskier borrowers submitting applications. That is about 10 times the typical response rate for the group, though that may be partly explained by the absence of offers over the last two years. After racking up more than $17,000 in credit card charges, Sue Talkington, 69, a retired saw

about possibly putting either wind or solar power on the ranch to help out financially. He knows it’s important to keep tabs on what the county does with its comprehensive plan. “We’re always looking for another entity that we might be able to make some money off of to keep us here,” McCormack said. “There are five families on this ranch, and it takes quite a few cows to keep us all going.” Zelenka said that in 1992 Crook County established an 80acre minimum for critical habitat for deer. In Deschutes County, the county established a 40-acre minimum. “Are we being fair to our people?” Zelenka said. “Should we still be doing that? ... Those are the questions.”

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day

1.0

8.0

Chase

1.3

7.6

Bank of America

1.8

3.7

’10

Source: Synovate Mail Monitor

Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

American Express

New York Times News Service

mill worker living in Modesto, Calif., started working with a credit counselor in September to start paying down her debt. Then, last month, right after she had cut up three credit cards, she received an application for a new low-end Capital One card, the second preapproved mail offer she has received recently. She says she was stunned. “I’m trying to get out of debt, so why would I want to have a credit card to get into more debt?” Talkington asked. “It really shows me how much greed there is out there,” she added. Card issuers “aren’t interested in helping me get back on track with a credit card,” she said. “They just want my money.”

Faster rehab Since the mass marketing of credit cards began decades ago,

“I’m trying to get out of debt, so why would I want to have a credit card to get into more debt?” — Sue Talkington

lenders have waited for years to extend credit to borrowers like Talkington who have fallen on hard times — a process sometimes called “rehabilitating the customer.” But these days, rehab is happening faster because the lenders cannot afford to wait. Citigroup is testing a credit card with training wheels, known as CitiMax, devised for customers whose credit was damaged by the recession. Borrowers are required to link their credit card account to a checking, savings or brokerage account so that Citi can withdraw money if a payment is missed. Branch workers for Bank of America and Wells Fargo are steering more customers denied a traditional credit card toward “secured” cards, backed by a deposit that the owner is not permitted to touch. Wells says that more than a third of secured cardholders receive a traditional credit card after 12 months. “I graduated, as they call it, to the unsecured,” said Joshua Hoglan, 26, a college student from Las Vegas who says he became a more responsible borrower after making timely payments on a Wells Fargo secured credit card he signed up for in early 2008. He called his graduation “a great relief.”

NEW HAVEN, Conn. — Christine O’Donnell’s TV ad declaration “I’m not a witch” during her U.S. Senate campaign topped this year’s best quotes, according to a Yale University librarian. O’Donnell’s quote is cited by Fred Shapiro, associate librarian at Yale Law School, who released his fifth annual list of the most notable quotations of the year. In the ad, O’Donnell was responding to reports of her revelations that she had dabbled in witchcraft years ago. “It was such a remarkable, unconventional quote to be a part of the political discourse,” Shapiro said. The quote by O’Donnell, a tea party favorite running in Delaware, tied for first place with “I’d like my life back,” the lament made in May by BP’s CEO Tony Hayward after the worst offshore oil spill in U.S. history. “People resented the fact that he was wanting to get back to his yacht races and other aspects of his normal life when those little problems were dwarfed by the magnitude of what people on the Gulf Coast were dealing with,” Shapiro said. Shapiro noted that the top quotes stemmed from two of the biggest news stories of the year, the oil spill and the emergence of the tea party. The original Yale Book of Quotations was published in 2006. Since then, Shapiro has released an annual list of the top 10 quotes. He said they will be incorporated into the next edition of the book. Shapiro picks quotes that are famous, important or revealing of the spirit of the times. The quotes aren’t necessarily the most eloquent or admirable. O’Donnell, who lost the Senate race to Democrat Chris Coons, also made the list for questioning, during a debate in October, whether the First Amendment includes the language “separation of church and state.” She was not the only tea party candidate on the list. Sharron Angle, who lost the Senate race in Nevada to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, also made the list. “I hope that’s not where we’re going, but you know, if this Congress keeps going the way it is, people are really looking toward those Second Amendment remedies. They’re saying: My goodness, what can we do to turn this

country around?” Angle said in January. Republican Sarah Palin’s tweet: “Don’t retreat. Instead — reload!” also made the list. “The quotes become perhaps stronger, harsher, more unconventional every year,” Shapiro said. On the Democratic side, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi made the list when she spoke in March to the National Association of Counties. “We have to pass the (health care) bill so you can find out what is in it,” Pelosi said.

Here’s the list: 1. (TIE) “I’m not a witch.” Christine O’Donnell, television advertisement, Oct. 4. 1. (TIE) “I’d like my life back.” Tony Hayward, comment to reporters, May 30. 3. “If you touch my junk, I’m gonna have you arrested.” Airline passenger John Tyner, remark to Transportation Security Administration worker at San Diego airport, Nov. 13, 2010. 4. “Don’t retreat. Instead — reload!” Sarah Palin, Tweet, March 23. 5. “Chi! Chi! Chi! Le! Le! Le! Los mineros de Chile!” Chant at Chilean mine rescue, Oct. 13. 6. “I hope that’s not where we’re going, but you know, if this Congress keeps going the way it is, people are really looking toward those Second Amendment remedies. They’re saying: My goodness, what can we do to turn this country around?” Sharron Angle, radio interview in January. 7. “We have to pass the (health care) bill so you can find out what is in it.” Nancy Pelosi, speech to National Association of Counties, March 9. 8. “I’m going to take my talents to South Beach.” LeBron James, TV broadcast, July 8. 9. “You’re telling me that the separation of church and state is found in the First Amendment?” Christine O’Donnell, Delaware senatorial debate, Oct. 19. (The Associated Press reported the quote: “So you’re telling me that the separation of church and state, the phrase ‘separation of church and state,’ is in the First Amendment?”) 10. “They should never have put me with that woman. ... She was just a sort of bigoted woman who said she used to be Labour.” Gordon Brown, comments about a voter he met while campaigning for British general election, April 28.


C OV ER S T ORY

Venezuelan drivers choose ’70s rides, just ’cause they can By Simon Romero New York Times News Service

CARACAS, Venezuela — Ascending the narrow streets that wind through this city’s hillside slums, the graffiti steadily gets more radical and anti-American, repeatedly proclaiming “Yankees go home!” amid murals denouncing President Barack Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. But at the same time, the cars get bigger and more American — as in ’70s-style, gas-guzzling, Starsky-and-Hutch, Ford-GranTorino big — and American. “We like our cars to be like tanks in this country, meaning they should be huge, comfortable and preferably manufactured in the United States,” said Miguel Delgado, 52, a mechanic in Los Frailes, a slum on this city’s western fringe, where he was working on a 1976 Dodge Coronet and a 1979 Chevrolet Impala. The survival here of so many retro-chic American gas hogs, from Plymouth Valiants to Dodge Aspens and Chrysler New Yorkers, owes partly to the vagaries of Venezuela’s recent history and partly to its oil wealth. Motorists say that they drive these cars simply because they can. They smile when they hear that gasoline prices in the United States average about $3 a gallon, and much higher in parts of Europe. Venezuela provides what might be the most generous fuel subsidy anywhere. Gasoline, currently less than 10 cents a gallon, is the cheapest in the world, undercutting even Saudi Arabia and Iran, other top oil-exporting nations, according to a study of global fuel prices by the German aid agency GTZ. While Venezuela is a major oil producer, the subsidy still costs the government more than $9 billion a year. For all his populism, President Hugo Chavez has lamented its drain on public finances, calling gasoline prices “disgusting.” But he has not touched the subsidy, which many Venezuelans consider a birthright. An increase in fuel prices in 1989 helped set off riots in which hundreds, perhaps thousands, were killed. Today, filling the tank of a 1974 Lincoln Continental, a 19-footlong monster with a V-8 engine and mileage in the low teens, costs about $1, including a small tip for the gas-station attendant.

Russian protests erupt over soccer fan’s killing New York Times News Service MOSCOW — Ethnic tensions briefly erupted in Moscow over the weekend, as thousands of young men massed outside Red Square, venting their anger over the fatal shooting last week of a soccer fan by a migrant from the North Caucasus.

Wilderness

Meridith Kohut / New York Times News Service

Julio Navas, a taxi driver, navigates his 1973 Dodge Coronet through traffic in Caracas, Venezuela. In Venezuela, where gasoline is less than 10 cents a gallon and used cars retain value, big American cars can be economical.

“We like our cars to be like tanks in this country, meaning they should be huge, comfortable and preferably manufactured in the United States.” — Miguel Delgado, 52, mechanic “It’s a super-economical car,” said Jose Pereira, 41, the proud owner of one such model. Many of the vintage land yachts tooling around Caracas today were imported during the heyday of “Venezuela Saudita,” Saudi Venezuela, the period in the early 1970s when oil prices quadrupled, and this developing nation became flush with petrodollars. In the capital’s wealthier districts, SUVs like Jeep Cherokees, Ford Expeditions, even the occasional Hummer, vie for space in clogged thoroughfares with smaller Toyotas, Daewoos, Hondas and Hyundais. Thousands of motorbike couriers weave through the gridlock, adding to the chaos. Despite the newer cars, the low growl of American guzzlers still cuts through the din of traffic, evoking in some ways the love affair that people in Cuba, Ven-

ezuela’s top ally, have with pre1960 American automobiles. Some motorists say they buy the cars because spare parts are easily available. Others buy them to hedge against Venezuela’s high inflation. Used cars hold their value remarkably well here: a 1979 Ford LTD Landau, for instance, sells for about $5,200 here compared with about $1,500 in the United States. Still, the eight-cylinder workhorses remain cheaper than newer models, explaining their prevalence in some poor districts of Caracas and other cities. But the affection for the aging American giants that saves so many of them from the crushers cannot be explained by economics alone. “I love my Fairlane precisely because it is American,” said Freddy Gomez, 54, a deliveryman in this city’s gritty Boleita district who drives a red 1974 Ford Fairlane. Grinning with a

Saturn’s rings: debris from a cosmic murder By Seth Borenstein The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — One of the solar system’s most evocative mysteries — the origin of Saturn’s rings — may be a case of cosmic murder, new research suggests. The victim: an unnamed moon of Saturn that disappeared about 4.5 billion years ago. The suspect: a disk of hydrogen gas that once surrounded Saturn when its dozens of moons were forming, but has now fled the crime scene. The cause of death: a forced plunge into Saturn. And those spectacular and colorful rings are the only evidence left. As the doomed moon made its death spiral, Saturn robbed its outer layer of ice, which then formed rings, according to a new theory published online Sunday in the journal Nature. “Saturn was an accomplice, and that produced the rings,” said study author Robin Canup, an astronomer at the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colo. The mystery of Saturn’s rings “has puzzled people for centuries,” said Cornell astronomer Joe Burns, who wasn’t involved in the study and said Canup’s new theory makes sense. One of the leading theories has been that either some of Saturn’s many moons crashed into each other, or an asteroid crashed into some of them — leaving debris that formed the rings. The trouble is Saturn’s moons are half ice and half rock, and the planet’s seven rings are now as much as 95 percent ice and probably used to be all ice, Canup said. If the rings were formed by a moonon-moon crash or an asteroidon-moon, there would be more

THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 13, 2010 A5

NASA via The Associated Press

A photo from 2004, taken by the Cassini Saturn Probe, shows Saturn and its rings. A new theory suggests Saturn’s rings are debris from an unnamed moon that disappeared about 4.5 billion years ago. rocks in the rings. Something had to have stripped away the outer ice of a moon, a big moon, Canup said. So her theory starts billions of years ago when the planets’ moons were forming. A large disk of hydrogen gas circled Saturn, and that helped both create and destroy moons. Large inner moons probably made regular plunges into the planet, pulled by the disk of gas. These death spirals took about 10,000 years, and the key to understanding the rings’ origins is what happened to them during that time. According to Canup’s computer model, Saturn stripped the ice away from a huge moon while it was far enough from the planet that the ice would be trapped in a ring. The original rings were 10 to 100 times larger than they are now, but over time the ice in the outer rings has coalesced into some of Saturn’s tiny inner moons, Canup said. So what began as moons has become rings and then new moons.

This helps explain Tethys, an odd inner moon that didn’t quite fit other moon formation theories, she said. Saturn has 62 moons — 53 of them have names. New ones are discovered regularly by NASA’s Cassini probe. But this doesn’t explain rings on other planets in our solar system, such as Jupiter, Neptune and Uranus, which probably formed in a different way, Canup said. The rings and ice-rich inner moons are the last surviving remnants of this lost moon, “which is pretty neat,” Canup said. Burns said Canup’s theory explains the heavy ice components of rings better than other possibilities. Larry Esposito, who discovered one of Saturn’s rings, praised the new paper as “a very clever, original idea.” “I would call it more like cosmic recycling,” Esposito said because the moon became rings which then became moons. “It’s not so much a final demise, but a cosmic effort to reuse materials again and again.”

hint of mischief, he pointed to a decal on the Fairlane’s rear window, which showed a mathematical equation involving the Ford logo plus a bottle of spirits plus a female figure. The sum: a couple in an amorous embrace. The rubber-burning days of some of these cars might be nearing an end. News reaching here from Detroit these days speaks of exotic new electric cars like the Chevrolet Volt and the Nissan Leaf. The announcement that General Motors was pulling the plug on Pontiac, the 84-yearold brand whose sales peaked in 1973, drew gasps among some Venezuelans. “I find it hard to believe that the Americans would let Pontiac expire like that,” said Oswaldo Valdes, 21, a university student who owns a 1970 Pontiac Grand Prix. “In this country, this great automobile has decades of life ahead of it.”

Continued from A1 The Oregon Natural Desert Association is pushing for the additional layers of wilderness protection, which would prohibit motorized vehicles and development, to ensure the area stays in a natural state, Goodman-Campbell said. “It’s the same argument in my mind as the Badlands,” she said, “in that we can never predict the threats an area is going to face 10, 20, 50 years down the line.” She has started gathering support for the proposal, talking to Crooked River Ranch homeowners, and holding open houses in the area to hear what people have to say along with their concerns or ideas about the proposal. One concern that people have brought up is what designating the area a wilderness would mean for wildfire protection in the dry area. Typically, no bulldozers or other heavy machinery are used to fight wildfires in Central Oregon wilderness areas. But a designation would come with a specific fire management plan that outlined what was allowed and what wasn’t in emergency situations, she said, and how to protect homes nearby. Goodman-Campbell is also working with others on the possibility of closing some of the roads that currently go into the wilderness area — otherwise, the size of the proposed wilderness area might shrink. However, the plan currently calls for a road to Alder Springs Trailhead to stay open, with the wilderness boundary on either side, so people can

More than 60 people were arrested and 30 were injured at the Saturday rally. Though the crowd dispersed rapidly, its fury did not; on Sunday, the police reported a wave of beatings and stabbings of people from the Caucasus or Central Asia.

get to the popular recreation site. “You start with the big proposal, and then work through people’s concerns,” she said. “If there’s some things we can’t work through, we’ll make changes where we have to.” The goal, she said, is to build community support for the wilderness proposal, and in a year or so have a plan that people agree on to take to the congressional delegation to ask for its support. Gabe Parr, spokesman with the Deschutes chapter of Trout Unlimited, said he’s in favor of a wilderness area along the waterways. “It would be ideal, especially with the reintroduction of salmon and steelhead, to have stretches of the river be protected,” he said. The area has not been damaged from grazing or developed, he said, so protecting it could keep it pristine for the future. Deschutes County Commissioner Alan Unger, however, said he wanted to know more before he could support a proposal. The area is surrounded by development, he said. And sometimes, allowing vehicles into an area can help with restoration efforts at the site — there are other ways to protect places, he said, without the stricter wilderness regulations. “If the goal is to preserve it as is, wilderness sometimes creates more restrictions than we would want to put in a good management plan,” he said. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or at kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

(541)549-6406 370 E. Cascade, Sisters License #78462


L

Inside

CALIFORNIA L.A. fights reputation as haven for the homeless, see Page B2. OREGON Emergency radio system project is lagging, see Page B3. OBITUARIES Peter Marzio, director of Houston art museum, see Page B5.

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www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2010

Water system, Child care options in the spotlight aerial drones among issues before council DESCHUTES COUNTY

Input from local work force will help officials assess problems, develop solutions

By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Finding child care can be one of the more stressful and challenging situations that parents face. The availability of reliable and affordable child care is also key for employers, so they can retain a good work force. This winter, Deschutes County

officials hope to learn whether employees, employers and care providers are satisfied with local child care options. A survey conducted this month and in January will ask employees and bosses from a random sample of large employers in Deschutes County a variety of questions about child care. The answers will be included in a

report on child care challenges and potential solutions, said Mary Lorence, the early childhood specialist for the Deschutes County Commission on Children and Families. Lorence said she’s heard conflicting anecdotes about local child care. Parents have told her there is not enough available, while staff at a local nonprofit told her there are

plenty of openings. “The question then becomes, what is the true problem?” Lorence said. Perhaps child care is not of the quality parents want, or it’s not available at the times or locations they need, she added. “At the end of the report, I want to have specific ideas about what can be done to improve the situation,” Lorence said. See Child care / B5

Busy Bend councilors also plan to tackle possible code change in controversial DMV relocation case By Nick Grube The Bulletin

Bend city councilors will grapple with a number of talking-point issues during their meeting Wednesday, causing them to kick off a work session about 30 minutes before the regular starting time. Among other things, councilors will discuss unmanned aerial drones, a possible change in direction on a $73 million upgrade to the city’s water system and recommendations that aim to help eliminate a projected $17 million to $27 million budget shortfall. They will also consider making a change in the development code that, had it been in effect four months ago, would have prevented a recent spat over the DMV relocating to a shopping center in southwest Bend. On Dec. 1, councilors planned to approve giving a letter of support to open up airspace in Central Oregon to allow for test flights of unmanned aerial drones, but they removed the item from the agenda after hearing some complaints from concerned citizens and pilots. Currently, drones are not allowed to fly in general airspace and usually are only allowed to be tested in restricted military zones or other areas where special certification has been obtained. Economic Development for Central Oregon, however, wants to get the Federal Aviation Administration to open up a drone testing site in Central and Eastern Oregon airspace in an attempt to attract businesses that test the aircraft. The City Council will again consider whether to give support to the plan with a letter to the FAA after discussing the issue more thoroughly on Wednesday. Councilors will have a chance to revisit another contentious topic involving the $73 million overhaul of the Bridge Creek water system that provides about half of the city’s annual water supply. The city wants to replace about 10 miles of aging pipelines and add a state-of-the-art treatment facility to its current infrastructure that will help it meet federal clean water mandates and protect against forest fire runoff. See Council / B5

If you go What: Bend City Council meeting When: 4:30 p.m. work session, 7 p.m. meeting Wednesday Where: Bend City Hall, 710 N.W. Wall St., Bend

‘Storm after storm’ could be in store for Central Oregon By Nick Grube The Bulletin

Central Oregon can expect more rain and snow this week as moisture continues to make its way inland from the Pacific Ocean. According to the National Weather Service’s Pendleton office, the forecast calls for rain early in the week with a chance of snow showers starting Tuesday night and continuing into the weekend. “It’s still going to be fairly active weather,” said meteorologist Mary Johnson. “We just have a very active westerly flow off the Pacific, and when you have an active flow off the Pacific, it brings in storm after storm.” She said mid-20 to mid-30-degree temperatures during the week are expected to be slightly below normal, and whether areas get rain or snow will likely depend on elevations. Starting today, there’s a 60 percent chance of precipitation, with the estimated rainfall between one-tenth and one-quarter of an inch. The rain is expected to continue into Tuesday morning, with snow levels dropping from 4,000 to 3,600 feet. From Tuesday night through the remainder of the week, it should continue to be cloudy, with a chance of snow every day. Temperatures during this stretch are expected to hover in the mid- to high 20s in the evenings and stay between 35 and 36 degrees during the day. “It’s really just bands of moisture,” said Johnson about all the rain and snow in the forecast. “That’s really all it is that’s moving across.” Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

CARVING Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

FOR A

CAUSE

Jake Price, 29, of Bend, carves his snowboard around a banked corner during the Dirksen Derby at Mt. Bachelor on Sunday. Price finished second in the Derby Elite finals at the event.

Dirksen Derby participants brave soggy conditions to raise money for Tyler Eklund By Nick Grube • The Bulletin

W

et weather and soggy snow didn’t do much to dampen spirits at the fourth annual Dirksen Derby snow-

boarding race on Mt. Bachelor this weekend.

Tyler Eklund, left, and Josh Dirksen share a laugh Sunday while preparing to co-host the awards ceremony for the Dirksen Derby at Mt. Bachelor’s West Village Lodge.

Dozens of participants still showed up for the two-day, timed slalom event despite the less than ideal conditions that included torrential rain on Saturday and iffy snowpack on Sunday that made staying upright a little more challenging. “With the rain it was hectic,” said Josh Dirksen, 34, the race’s organizer. “It was fun seeing if we could have a contest in the worst weather Bachey has to offer.” He said the rain on Saturday

seemed to be coming in sideways with some strong winds. Not only did this soak many of the participants as they waited to make their runs down two different courses, he said it also caused the timing instruments at the end of the runs to sink into the snow and throw off some of the readings. While the weather was much better on Sunday, Dirksen said the previous day’s rain made the two runs a little bit more difficult to navigate. See Derby / B5


B2 Monday, December 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Bear Creek restoration project now waiting on Mother Nature Storms could wipe out results of rehab effort prompted by removal of Gold Ray Dam By Mark Freeman

CALIFORNIA

N  R CIVIL SUITS Cases involving less than $50,000 are subject to mandatory arbitration.

Restoring new banks that have been underwater since the Teddy Roosevelt administration has been a major undertaking since the 106-year-old dam was removed last summer and the impounded water receded, creating a free-flowing stream there.

Filed Nov. 29

10CV1264MA: Cavalry Portfolio Services LLC v. Kristen J. Heidtke, complaint, $11,481.15 Filed Dec. 1

The (Medford) Mail Tribune

MEDFORD — Craig Tuss strolls among the logs and rootwads precisely placed in soft sand along the newly sculpted banks of Bear Creek where it meets the Rogue River, and the one thing he knows for sure is it won’t stay this way for long. When fresh willow shoots sprout and their roots fortify the loose soil in ensuing years, these banks could become textbook examples on how to build a healthy, stable streamside riparian zone from scratch and with native plants. Or the fragile soils could be washed away in upcoming winter storms that threaten to alter or even undo hundreds of thousands of dollars’ worth of rehab work to this stretch of the Rogue exposed by the demolition of Gold Ray Dam. “We put the pieces in place, and it’s just waiting for its opportunity to work,” says Tuss, who is overseeing the post-demolition restoration efforts. “It’s all up to whether they can deal with what nature throws at it.”

Fragile situation Large storms and even minor flood events could be disastrous to Bear Creek’s confluence with the Rogue as well as the mouths of Tolo and Kelly sloughs facing erosion threats for at least the next three winters while the bank-stabilizing structures take hold. “It’s still a very fragile situation,” Tuss says. “We just need time, and time is either going to be on our side or not. “At some point this winter, we’ll have to just sit back and see what happens,” he says.

A fresh canvas For stream rehabbers, it was like a fresh canvas and a palette full of all the brushes and colors needed to paint the perfect streambank. And nowhere did the new portrait need creation than the mouth of Bear Creek. The unstable banks are threatened by Bear Creek freshets. And both banks of the mouth could collapse under the full force of Rogue flows during even a 10-year flood, the kind of high-water event that has a one in 10 chance of happening any given year.

Monica Almeida / New York Times News Service

A homeless man wheels a shopping cart filled with his belongings down a street near City Hall in downtown Los Angeles on Dec. 3.

L.A. seeks to shed image as a haven for homeless

Grass seed sprouting

By Adam Nagourney

Armed with a $507,000 NOAA-Fisheries grant and some money left over from the federal stimulus grant used for dam removal, the Corvallis-based River Design Group went to work. Computer models helped design a new meander channel for Bear Creek through the newly exposed stream bank. Specificsized rocks were placed in the lower creek to absorb some of the energy of the rushing waters. Big root-wads and timbers, many salvaged from the original timber-crib Gold Ray Dam, were dug into the banks to strengthen loose soils ready for planting. Grass seed planted in November has just begun sprouting, and fresh willow shoots are in, but not until spring will their soil-stabilizing roots fill in between the logs and root-wads. “They’re like Tinker Toys that haven’t been fortified yet,” Tuss says. “They could be washed out overnight.”

LOS ANGELES — It was just past dusk in the upscale enclave of Brentwood as a homeless man, wrapped in a tattered gray blanket, stepped into a doorway to escape a light rain, watching the flow of people on their way to the high-end restaurants that lined the street. Across town in Hollywood the next morning, homeless people were wandering up and down Sunset Boulevard, pushing shopping carts and slumped at bus stops. More homeless men and women could be found shuffling along the boardwalks of Venice and Santa Monica, while a few others were spotted near the heart of Beverly Hills, the very symbol of Los Angeles wealth. At a time when cities across the country have made significant progress over the past decade in reducing the number of homeless, in no small part by building permanent housing, the problem seems intractable in the County of Los Angeles, stretch-

New York Times News Service

“If we want to end homelessness in this country, we have to do something about L.A.” — Nan Roman, president, National Alliance to End Homelessness

ing these days from downtown to the Pacific Ocean. It has become a subject of acute embarrassment to some civic leaders, upset over the county’s faltering efforts, the glaring contrast of street poverty and mansion wealth, and any perception of a hardhearted Los Angeles unmoved by a problem that has motivated action in so many other cities. For national organizations trying to eradicate homelessness, Los Angeles — with its 48,000 people living on the streets, including 6,000 veterans, according to one count — stands as a

stubborn anomaly, an outlier at a time when there has been progress, albeit modest and at times fitful, in so many cities. Its designation as the homeless capital of America, a title that people here dislike but do not contest, seems increasingly indisputable. “If we want to end homelessness in this country, we have to do something about L.A.; it is the biggest nut,” said Nan Roman, president of the National Alliance to End Homelessness. “It has more homeless people than anyplace else.” Neil Donovan, the executive director of the National Coalition for the Homeless, said he believed that, after years of decline, there had been a slight rise in the number of homeless nationally this year because of the economic downturn. “Los Angeles’ homeless problem is growing faster than the overall national problem,” he said, “trending upward in every demographic, dashing every hope of progress anywhere.”

Saddam Hussein captured by U.S. forces in 2003 The Associated Press Today is Monday, Dec. 13, the 347th day of 2010. There are 18 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Dec. 13, 1862, Union forces suffered a major defeat to the Confederates in the Civil War Battle of Fredericksburg. ON THIS DATE In 1642, Dutch navigator Abel Tasman sighted present-day New Zealand. In 1769, Dartmouth College, in New Hampshire, received its charter. In 1835, Phillips Brooks, the American Episcopal bishop who wrote the words to “O Little Town of Bethlehem,” was born in Boston. In 1918, President Woodrow Wilson arrived in France, becoming the first chief executive to visit Europe while in office. In 1928, George Gershwin’s musical work “An American in Paris” had its premiere, at Carnegie Hall in New York. In 1944, during World War II, the U.S. cruiser Nashville was badly damaged in a Japanese kamikaze attack that claimed more than 130 lives.

T O D AY IN HISTORY In 1978, the Philadelphia Mint began stamping the Susan B. Anthony dollar, which went into circulation in July 1979. In 1981, authorities in Poland imposed martial law in a crackdown on the Solidarity labor movement. (Martial law formally ended in 1983.) In 1994, an American Eagle commuter plane crashed short of Raleigh-Durham International Airport in North Carolina, killing 15 of the 20 people on board. In 2003, Saddam Hussein was captured by U.S. forces while hiding in a hole under a farmhouse in Adwar, Iraq, near his hometown of Tikrit. TEN YEARS AGO Republican George W. Bush claimed the presidency a day after the U.S. Supreme Court shut down further recounts of disputed ballots in Florida; Democrat Al Gore conceded, delivering a call for national unity. Seven inmates made a daring escape from a maximum security prison in Kenedy, Texas. (Six of the “Texas 7” were later recaptured; one killed himself; the others

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were sentenced to death for killing a Dallas-area police officer during a robbery. One of the six, Michael Rodriguez, dropped his appeals and was executed in 2008.) President Bill Clinton ended his last presidential visit to Northern Ireland. FIVE YEARS AGO Crips gang co-founder Stanley Tookie Williams, whose supporters argued had redeemed himself inside prison, was executed in California for killing four people in robberies. Iraqis living abroad began voting in the country’s parliamentary elections. American Red Cross President Marsha Evans announced her resignation. ONE YEAR AGO The Senate passed, 57-35, a $1.1 trillion spending bill with increased budgets for vast areas of the federal government, including health, education, law enforcement and veterans programs. An attacker hurled a statuette at Italian premier Silvio Berlusconi, striking him in the face and leaving the stunned 73-year-old leader with a broken

nose and two broken teeth. (The attacker, Massimo Tartaglia, was later found unfit to stand trial.) Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Samuelson died in Belmont, Mass., at age 94. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Former Secretary of State George Shultz is 90. Actor-comedian Dick Van Dyke is 85. Actor Christopher Plummer is 81. Country singer Buck White is 80. Music/film producer Lou Adler is 77. Movie producer Richard Zanuck is 76. Singer John Davidson is 69. Actress Kathy Garver (TV: “Family Affair”) is 65. Singer Ted Nugent is 62. Rock musician Jeff “Skunk” Baxter is 62. Country musician Ron Getman is 62. Actor Robert Lindsay is 61. Country singer-musician Randy Owen is 61. Actress Wendie Malick is 60. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack is 60. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke is 57. Country singer John Anderson is 56. Singer-songwriter Steve Forbert is 56. Singer-actor Morris Day is 54. Actor Steve Buscemi is 53. Actor Johnny Whitaker is 51. Actor-comedian Jamie Foxx is 43. Actor Bart Johnson is 40. TV

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personality Debbie Matenopoulos is 36. Rock singer-musician Thomas Delonge is 35. Actor James Kyson Lee is 35. Actress Chelsea Hertford is 29. Rock singer Amy Lee (Evanescence) is 29. Country singer Taylor Swift is 21. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “To know how to say what others only know how to think is what makes men poets or sages; and to dare to say what others only dare to think makes men martyrs or reformers — or both.” — Elizabeth Charles, British writer (1828-1896)

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10CV1270AB: CitiBank South Dakota NA v. Monique Rogers, complaint, $22,939.73 10CV1271AB: CitiBank South Dakota NA v. Kenneth E. Moyer, complaint, $29,184.22 10CV1272MA: CitiBank South Dakota NA v. Stacy L. Glasser, complaint, $10,040.11 Filed Dec. 3

10CV1273AB: Cach LLC v. Denise C. Whitney, complaint, $11,881.49 10CV1274ST: Janet L. Brown v. Ronald Jinings, complaint, $351,941.91 10CV1275MA: Bradley and Kristin Holcomb v. Obsidian Development Partners LLC and John Pewther, complaint, $362,647.60 Filed Dec. 6

10CV1276AB: Brian South v. State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Co., complaint, $100,562.31 Filed Dec. 7

10CV1277MA: CMAC Inc. v. Casey E. Cooper, complaint, $12,604.08 Filed Dec. 9

10CV1282MA: Charles Lesowke v. Sears Holdings Corp. complaint, $500,000

BLM buys land inside national monument The Associated Press MEDFORD — The Bureau of Land Management has purchased roughly 300 acres inside the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument. John Gerritsma, the agency’s Ashland Resource Area manager, says the acquisition will help preserve important areas for wildlife. BLM bought the land from the Pacific Forest Trust, which purchased it in 2005. The agency paid $451,500 for the acreage, using money from the federal Land Water Conservation Fund.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 13, 2010 B3

O Emergency radio network behind schedule, over budget Cost rises from $414M to $600M as officials race to show progress before Legislature convenes The Associated Press PORTLAND — The governor of Oregon should have been celebrating the launch of a lifesaving radio network, but he didn’t: It wasn’t ready yet. The state is trying to build a system that would put all communications on a single radio system and allow public safety agencies across the state to talk to one another. Oregon’s emergency radio system is a mess. Radios are old and breaking down; they’ve failed during crises; and they often don’t allow public safety workers to talk to one another in different areas.

Race to show progress Gov. Ted Kulongoski made it a top priority to fix the system, and the Oregon Wireless Interoperability Network was supposed to do that. But the project is about two years behind schedule, and the price has soared from $414 million to nearly $600 million as officials race to show progress before the Legislature convenes in January. The network’s first major part — a chain of radio towers across Western Oregon mountaintops — was supposed to be done by this month, just before Kulongoski leaves office in January. But only two of the project’s

towers are under construction. Meanwhile, the project has new managers who say they are fixing the problems. The Oregonian, relying on interviews and records, reported that state officials running the project gave misleading information about its costs and progress.

Keep it going? Records show radio network officials used unsupported estimates of savings and lowballed the price to persuade lawmakers to fund the project. And they repeatedly handed out erroneous maps that greatly exaggerated their progress. Gov.-elect John Kitzhaber launched the project before leaving office eight years ago. Kitzhaber is returning for a third term, and he and legislators must decide whether to keep the radio network going as they grapple with a $3.5 billion state budget gap. If the state were in better economic times, Kulongoski said, the fate of the project wouldn’t be as precarious. Lawmakers in 2005 called for merging the radio systems of four state agencies: Oregon State Police and the departments of Corrections, Transportation and Forestry. Two years later, Kulongoski’s administra-

The Associated Press ile photo

Gov. Ted Kulongoski expected to see a chain of emergency radio towers stretching across the Western Oregon mountains before leaving office in January. Instead, only two of the project’s towers are under construction. tion floated its plan for new radio equipment and a sprawling web of about 300 microwave towers and radio relays on mountaintops across Oregon. The $665 million price nearly killed the idea.

System was broken The project was almost dead in December 2007 when rains pounded Oregon. People in Vernonia needed rescuing as

State offers few hospital beds for mentally ill adolescents By Emily Gillespie Corvallis Gazette-Times

CORVALLIS — Ann Weston struggled for close to a year with her son’s mental illness. She fought to make his life as normal as possible, maintaining a close relationship. But on Nov. 4, Brandon Stone took his own life, succumbing to the disease that had haunted his family for so long. “It was a tough road,” Weston said, remembering her 16-yearold son’s diagnosis of severe clinical depression in late 2009. But at least one part of that road still frustrates Weston, and she’s hoping that by calling attention to the issue, she can help other families. “There are only two hospitals in the entire state that can take adolescent mental health patients for crisis inpatient care,” Weston

said. “That’s 32 beds available.” Legacy Emanuel Hospital and Providence Medical Center, both in Portland, are the only two care facilities that offer these services, according to the Oregon Department of Human Services. Legacy Emanuel has 17 beds for patients under the age of 18. Providence has 15 beds for adolescents ages 13 to 17, plus 10 beds for children 4 to 12. “The whole state could use more beds,” said Dr. John Paisley, clinical director of the pediatric inpatient unit at Legacy Emanuel, but funding trends make it hard to pay for them. “It’s very sad to have kids of any age who need psychological help to not have essentially anywhere to go.” For Weston, the shortage became apparent last spring, when

the Nehalem River flooded their town, but state emergency teams often couldn’t talk to Clatsop County officials: The county’s emergency communication system had been wiped out in the floods. A month earlier, a family of California tourists got lost on a snowy mountain road in Southern Oregon. The case made national headlines when the father froze to death before his wife and two children were rescued. Kulongoski wanted National Guard helicopters helping with the search, but he was told it wasn’t safe; too many choppers already were in the cloud-choked skies, and not all their radios could talk to one another. Kulongoski also knew the state’s radio system was so broken and outdated that technicians had to seek replacement parts on eBay. Kulongoski picked Lindsay Ball, a former Oregon State Police trooper, to champion his plan. In September 2008, Ball persuaded lawmakers to begin funding OWIN’s construction phase by saying he found ways to cut the project’s price from $665 million to $414 million. But radio network officials can’t document those savings. Ball said in an interview this month that he did not intend to mislead anyone. “You’re trying to illustrate that I’m being deceitful to the Legislature,” he said, “and that’s not true.”

O  B Police: Theft suspect ran over woman SPRINGFIELD — Police say a Springfield woman was run over by a woman she believed stole her wallet. The Register-Guard newspaper reported that the victim was at a tavern when she realized her wallet had been taken. She ran outside with her boyfriend to try to catch another couple she believed had taken the wallet. Police say the victim ran in front of the suspect’s car. Witnesses told police that the car initially stopped, but then sped off, running over both the victim and her boyfriend. The woman is in intensive care with life-threatening head injuries. The boyfriend’s injuries were less severe. Thirty-year-old Melanie Lorraine Stewart has been charged with robbery, assault, hit and run driving and drunken driving.

Courthouse Square drags down budget SALEM — Fallout from problems at Courthouse Square is taking a big bite out of Marion County’s budget. The county set aside about $7.6 million and established a Courthouse Square “redevelopment fund” to track expenditures, such as the cost of leasing temporary office space and engineering studies. But the fund doesn’t begin to address the cost of fixing or replacing the building. John Lattimer, the chief administrative officer for Marion

County, says project costs should be better known in January when engineers are scheduled to release a report outlining options. The Courthouse Square building and bus mall were closed this summer because of structural problems. All occupants were moved out and the bus mall closed.

Security firm owner jailed in burglary TIGARD — Washington County deputies say a security company owner and two employees have been arrested following a burglary at a church school. The sheriff’s office says laptops and other electronic devices have been stolen several times this year from Oregon Episcopal School, but there were no signs of forced entry. The church had hired Northwest Merchant Patrol to check the school after hours. On Saturday, a school employee stayed overnight to watch the patrol. The school worker spotted the company’s owner, 27-year-old Stirling Anderson, of Wilsonville, and one of his employees, 21-yearold Sheldon McMillan, of Beaverton, leaving with what appeared to be stolen property. Deputies then arrested Anderson, McMillan and a third security firm employee, 39-year-old David Smith, of Wilsonville, for investigation of burglary and theft. — From wire reports

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Brandon twice attempted suicide. On both occasions, Weston said, he went to the emergency room at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center in Corvallis. “I was adamant and insistent about inpatient treatment,” said Weston. “Not many parents could have stood their ground like she did,” said her partner, Rick Humphrey. Both times, Weston said, she found emergency room doctors and other staff members uncertain about the proper protocol to follow. And she worries about families who live even farther from Portland than Corvallis. Where do they find treatment? “I haven’t the foggiest idea,” Paisley said. “It’s sad. It’s very difficult for everyone who has to help these kids.”

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B4 Monday, December 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Water diversion plan is off course

T

he WaterWatch torture has officially begun. The city of Bend is determined — and we mean deter-

mined — to plow ahead with an enormously expensive proj-

ect that will allow the continued diversion of water that otherwise would end up in Tumalo Creek and, eventually, the Deschutes River. A number of prominent Bend residents have urged the city to leave the creek alone and drill more wells to make up the difference. But most city officials, elected and otherwise, simply aren’t interested. They point to the cost of pumping well water, which the city currently avoids by piping surface water. They argue that two water sources provide greater security than one, though the aquifer that supplies Bend’s groundwater is massive. Meanwhile, as legacy projects go, drilling more wells simply doesn’t have the cachet of building pipelines, diversions, filtration plants and whatnot. So City Council has decided, in essence, to ignore the critics and forge ahead, presumably hoping that the controversy will fizzle as the surface water project gains momentum. WaterWatch, a Portland-based environmental group focused on restoring surface water flows, isn’t so easily discouraged. On Wednesday, the group blew the whistle on the city’s existing surface water system. The letter noted that Bend currently diverts more water from Bridge Creek than it actually uses, returning the excess to Tumalo Creek several miles downstream. Though the city has a right to take the water, the law requires it to use what it takes. The law doesn’t allow the city to give a portion of Bridge Creek a joyride in its pipeline, as is now the case, without doing anything useful with it. WaterWatch’s letter urges the state to shut down Bend’s surface water diversion until the city finds a way to divert only what it needs. This shouldn’t cause any significant problems, WaterWatch argues, because the city “has ample groundwater rights to serve its

existing needs.” A footnote points out that the city’s existing groundwater capacity substantially exceeds its peak one-day demand in 2010. Moreover, the city holds groundwater permits that exceed its ample groundwater capacity by more than 40 percent. We doubt the state will take the draconian step WaterWatch proposes, but Bend’s leaders should be plenty nervous anyway. WaterWatch has served notice not only that it intends to follow Bend’s project very closely, but also that it won’t hesitate to intervene. Though we’ve had our differences with WaterWatch over the years, we share the group’s concerns in this case. Last month, WaterWatch policy analyst Kimberley Priestly urged City Council “to take a harder look at moving to groundwater.” The city, she argued, “is in a unique position of holding surface water rights that it could transfer or lease instream, providing the city with a virtually no-cost mitigation obligation.” In other words, it would be both environmentally beneficial and bureaucratically feasible for the city to swap its surface water for groundwater. Moreover, doing as WaterWatch and others recommend would be consistent with a long-standing regional push to increase surface water flows, a push that has consumed millions of public dollars already. To pass up such an opportunity, as Bend is determined to do, is strange, to say the least. As long as Bend officials stick with their current course, they should expect to hear quite a bit more from WaterWatch in the coming years. They should expect to hear more from their constituents, too, as the city’s legal bills mount. This is one controversy that isn’t about to go away.

Value of simple tax code

P

resident Barack Obama apparently recognizes something that Oregon’s junior senator, Jeff Merkley, does not. The more complex the nation’s tax code, the less money you raise for your effort. Thus, while Obama is hinting at an overhaul of the U.S. code, Merkley wants to muddy the tax waters further by diverting some income taxes to Social Security. Obama’s push for simplification is in the earliest stage. He has mentioned it publicly but has not committed even to proceeding from there. He has yet to identify what he would change or how he would go about making those changes. Serious simplification of the code was a part of the plan put forward by Obama’s deficit reduction commission recently, and the reaction to it makes clear any serious changes won’t be a slam dunk. Flattening taxes — reducing rates and the number of rates — while growing revenue relies on getting rid of loopholes. And one man’s loophole is another’s deduction for

a home mortgage or something else equally dear to the heart. Yet a flatter tax done right not only raises the amount the government collects, but it’s good for business. According to The New York Times, American businesses are worried that the high rates they pay and the cost of complying with the current complicated system are making them less competitive in the world market. Now compare Obama’s willingness to simplify with Merkley’s latest. Rather than simplify, Merkley wants to end Bush-era tax cuts on those making more than $1 million and direct the money thus collected to the Social Security trust fund. Doing so, he says, will fill any gaps in the fund created by the president’s proposed two-year reduction in payroll taxes. It also takes an impossibly complicated system and makes it more so, not less. We don’t know what an Obama taxcode rewrite will look like. We do know, however, that simpler is surely better.

Obama administration’s victory in Sudan WASHINGTON — he Obama administration, elsewhere challenged by Iranian nuclear ambitions and North Korean brinksmanship, is on the verge of a major diplomatic achievement in Sudan. Barring technical failures that delay the vote, or unexpected violence, South Sudan will approve an independence referendum on Jan. 9. Six months later, a new flag will rise, a new anthem will be played. It is a rare, risky, deeply American enterprise: midwifing the birth of a new nation. Even six years ago, this outcome seemed impossible. The mainly Muslim north and the mainly Christian south were engaged in a two-decade civil war that unleashed genocide, produced millions of refugees and took about three times as many lives as the American Civil War. But in 2005, the Bush administration brokered the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, which created a government of national unity and promised an independence referendum for the south in 2011. Even six months ago, the implementation of the CPA seemed unlikely. Electoral abuses in local contests had widened bitter, sometimes violent, divisions within the south. And Obama administration policy on Sudan was uncoordinated, ineffective and widely criticized. But the summer of 2010 was a turning point. The administration was sobered by a prospect of a referendum in less than 200 days for which no one was prepared. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton had been pushing to elevate the issue to the presidential level, demanding, according to one official, “one team, one fight.” In August, President Obama declared that Denis McDonough, then the chief of staff on the National Security Council and now deputy national security adviser, would

T

MICHAEL GERSON coordinate a unified government response. The administration’s common approach, dubbed “the road map,” publicly promised the regime in Khartoum a series of carrots — reviewing its status on the state sponsors of terrorism list, beginning the lifting of sanctions and starting discussions on debt relief — in exchange for allowing the south to go quietly. Sen. John Kerry carried messages and applied pressure in both Khartoum and the southern capital of Juba. It was an effective full-court press. Southern leaders rose to the moment, encouraging an internal dialogue that has reduced the level of conflict and violence in the south. And elements of the regime in Khartoum seem prepared for sullen acceptance of southern independence, calculating that the road map might lessen Sudan’s isolation as a pariah state, and probably convinced that military re-conquest of the south is not an option anyway. Every diplomatic achievement is rewarded by new complexities. Between the independence referendum in January and full independence on July 9, 2011, a variety of issues — concerning borders, citizenship, security and the distribution of oil revenues — will need to be resolved. This will be a highstakes, trust-building exercise between two powers more accustomed to war. South Sudan will require considerable help to avoid the fate of a failed state — particularly to build its capacity to govern and fight corruption. The issue

of what to do with southern refugees in the north — there are between 1.5 million and 2 million — will be especially sensitive. It would be easy for these refugees to become hostages. And another Sudanese region in revolt — Darfur in the west — remains a muddle of open warfare and fragile negotiations, in which civilians continue to suffer. But even partial diplomatic successes are worth celebrating — and this is less partial than most. Assuming the last lap of a long race is completed, southern independence will allow these long-suffering people to govern and defend themselves — a development that remains satisfying to a revolutionary power such as America. And southern sovereignty will permanently limit the ability of Khartoum to do harm in a vast region it has harmed for too long. This success also represents the bipartisan continuity of American foreign policy — a peace process launched in one administration and continued by another. The most timely message sent by this achievement concerns the nature of the diplomatic task. It was the intention of recent WikiLeaks disclosures to reveal the names of American diplomats and expose their malign influence in the world. Well, here is a leak of my own. People such as McDonough, Michelle Gavin and Samantha Powers in the White House, along with Johnnie Carson, Scott Gration and Princeton Lyman at the State Department, are employing American power to noble purpose. I mention their names (none of them secret) because they represent how skilled, effective government officials can shape history, improve the lives of millions and bring honor to the country they serve. Michael Gerson is a member of The Washington Post Writers Group.

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Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Obama has engineered another stimulus and made fools of GOP WASHINGTON — arack Obama won the great taxcut showdown of 2010 — and House Democrats don’t have a clue that he did. In the deal struck this week, the president negotiated the biggest stimulus in American history, larger than his $814 billion 2009 stimulus package. It will pump a trillion borrowed Chinese dollars into the U.S. economy over the next two years — which just happen to be the two years of the run-up to the next presidential election. This is a defeat? If Obama had asked for a second stimulus directly, he would have been laughed out of town. Stimulus I was so reviled that the Democrats banished the word from their lexicon throughout the 2010 campaign. And yet, despite a very weak postelection hand, Obama got the Republicans to offer to increase spending and cut taxes by $990 billion over two years — $630 billion of it above and beyond extension of the Bush tax cuts. No mean achievement. After all, these are the same Republicans who spent 2010

B

running on limited government and reducing debt. And this budget busting occurs less than a week after the president’s deficit commission had supposedly signaled a new national consensus of austerity and frugality. Some Republicans are crowing that Stimulus II is the Republican way — mostly tax cuts — rather than the Democrats’ spending orgy of Stimulus I. That’s consolation? This just means that Republicans are two years too late. Stimulus II will still blow another near-$1 trillion hole in the budget. At great cost that will have to be paid after this newest free lunch, the package will add as much as 1 percent to GDP and lower the unemployment rate by about 1.5 percentage points. That could easily be the difference between victory and defeat in 2012. Obama is no fool. While getting Republicans to boost his own re-election chances, he gets them to make a mockery of their newfound, second-chance, post-Bush, tea-party, this-time-we’re-

CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER serious persona of debt-averse fiscal responsibility. And he gets all this in return for what? For a mere two-year postponement of a mere 4.6-point increase in marginal tax rates for upper incomes. And an estate tax rate of 35 percent — it jumps insanely from zero to 55 percent on Jan. 1 — that is somewhat lower than what the Democrats wanted. No, cries the left: Obama violated a sacred principle. A 39.6 percent tax rate versus 35 percent is a principle? “This is the public option debate all over again,” said Obama at his Tuesday news conference. He is right. The left never understood that to nationalize health care there is no need

for a public option because Obamacare turns the private insurers into public utilities. The left is similarly clueless on the tax cut deal: In exchange for temporarily forgoing a small rise in upper-income rates, Obama pulled out of a hat a massive new stimulus — what the left has been begging for since the failure of Stimulus I, but was heretofore politically unattainable. Obama’s public exasperation with this infantile leftism is both perfectly understandable and politically adept. It is his way back to at least the appearance of centrist moderation. The only way he will get a second look from the independents who elected him in 2008 — and abandoned the Democrats in 2010 — is by changing the prevailing (and correct) perception that he is a man of the left. Hence that news-conference attack on what the administration calls the “professional left” for its combination of sanctimony and myopia. It was Obama’s Sister Souljah moment. It had a prickly, irritated sincerity — their ideological stupidity

and inability to see the “long game” really do get under Obama’s skin — but a decidedly calculated quality, too. Where, after all, does the left go? Stay home on Election Day 2012? Vote Republican? No, says the current buzz, the left will instead challenge Obama for the Democratic nomination. Really now? For decades, African-Americans have been this party’s most loyal constituency. They vote 9-1 Democratic through hell and high water, through impeachment and recession, through everything. After four centuries of enduring much, African-Americans finally see one of their own achieve the presidency. And their own party is going to deny him a shot at his own re-election? Not even Democrats are that stupid. The remaining question is whether they are just stupid enough to not understand — and therefore vote down — the swindle of the year just pulled off by their own president. Charles Krauthammer is a member of The Washington Post Writers Group.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 13, 2010 B5

O Beth Straus helped guide revamp of botanical garden By Bruce Weber New York Times News Service

Beth Straus, who was a transformative figure at the New York Botanical Garden for nearly a half century, helping to revamp its image from that of a public park to that of a museum and fostering one of its crown jewels, the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden, died Dec. 6 at her home in Somesville, Maine. She was 94. Her death was confirmed by her daughter, Sara Straus Byruck. Straus, whose twin passions were horticulture and modern art, spent decades on the boards of both the Botanical Garden and the Museum of Modern Art in Manhattan. A native of San Francisco, she came to New York City with her husband, Donald Straus, a scion of the family that owned Macy’s department store, in the 1940s. She started at the Botanical Garden, in the Bronx, as a volunteer, mounting specimens in the herbarium. An expert gardener and horticulturist, Straus joined the board in 1966 and went on to

recruit people who would be instrumental in the garden’s transformation. They included the philanthropist Enid Haupt, whose donations before her death in 2005 totaled in the tens of millions; the designer Lynden Miller, who created and oversees the garden’s half-acre perennial garden; and the current president, Gregory Long, appointed in 1989. Since then, the number of visitors to the garden each year has increased to approximately 800,000 from 300,000. In the mid-1980s, as chairwoman of the horticulture committee, Straus came upon design drawings by Beatrix Jones Farrand for the Botanical Garden’s original rose garden, which was built in 1916 but without some architectural elements of Farrand’s plan, including an iron latticework enclosure. Straus envisioned a reconstructed, more glorious garden and persuaded David Rockefeller to donate $1 million for the project. Named for his wife, Peggy, the rose garden opened in 1988 and was renovated in 2006 and 2007.

John Fenn, Nobel Prize winner in chemistry By Kenneth Chang New York Times News Service

The Associated Press ile photo

Peter Marzio, director of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston looks at works by Jackson Pollock on display in 2003. Marzio, who directed the museum since 1982, died Thursday at the age of 67.

Peter Marzio led facility to major-museum status By William Grimes New York Times News Service

Peter Marzio, who as the director of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston for nearly 30 years elevated it to major-museum status through an ambitious program of physical expansion and a commitment to Latin American, Hispanic and Asian art, died Thursday in Houston. He was 67. The cause was cancer, Mary Haus, a spokeswoman for the museum, said.

A dynamic fundraiser

New York Times News Service ile photo

Visitors walk through the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden in the New York Botanical Garden this summer. Beth Straus, who helped foster the rose garden, died Dec. 6 at age 94.

Derby Continued from B1 This caused some people to change how they rode down the hill, so they wouldn’t fall and ruin their times. “It’s more about surviving the two courses,” Dirksen said. The Dirksen Derby is modeled after the Mt. Baker Legendary Banked Slalom in Washington. Dirksen said his contest is much smaller and really doesn’t compare to the Mt. Baker event, which in February will celebrate its 26th year. Two banked slalom courses were built for the Dirksen Derby, and the typical runs lasted about 30 seconds. Winners were determined based on their combined times on the two runs. Dirksen created the derby as a fundraising event for his friend Tyler Eklund, of Bend, who was paralyzed after a snowboarding accident in California about four years ago. All the proceeds from registration for the race go to helping pay for Eklund’s medical bills and continued care. For many people who raced in the derby, they said it was gratifying to know that their registration fees were going to help Eklund. This was also true for the participants who didn’t know the 18-year-old before the derby. “It wasn’t hard to get talked into it,” said 26-year-old Hannah Noll, who moved to Bend from Colorado. “I thought it would be fun, and it is fun.” Noll competed in the race on Saturday and said she normally wouldn’t have tried to brave the

Child care Continued from B1 The survey will be paid for with a portion of the $25,000 that Deschutes County Commissioners set aside this year, to help solve child care issues that impede economic development. Deschutes County Commissioner Alan Unger said he

“It’s just mind-blowing. It almost leaves you speechless because it shows how much people care and how much people want to help out.” — Tyler Eklund, about the Dirksen Derby rain, but because it was for a good cause, she decided that getting a little wet wasn’t that big of a deal. She said it was especially nice when she had a chance to see Eklund participate in a biski race event, where another skier guided him down the two courses. “I feel bad for him because he missed out on a lot,” Noll said. “So I feel good when I see him up here in his sit-ski because he still gets to come up here.” Eklund was paralyzed from the neck down in April 2007 when he fell during a practice run at the USA Snowboard Association National Championships in Truckee, Calif. The fall broke vertebrae in his neck, and he now has to breathe through a ventilator. But that hasn’t stopped him from making it to the mountain a couple of times a year to go skiing. And the Dirksen Derby gives him the chance to see a lot of the people he once used to ride with. “Just getting up there again is super fun,” Eklund said. “It feels

brought forward the idea because he wants to develop better child care alternatives for people. “When we end up needing an expanded work force, child care will be a big issue for us like it was in the past, when we had a low unemployment rate,” Unger said Friday. “And when you look at families that are distressed, many of them have both parents

Marzio became the director of the Houston museum in 1982, after serving as the director and chief executive of the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington. He proved to be a dynamic force, equally adept at raising money, attracting important donations and identifying new artistic territory for the museum

like I’m back with the snowboarding community.” Eklund rode in the derby on a new sit-ski he got last year. Like everyone else in the race, he fought the blustery conditions until he was able to get in his two runs on the course. Seeing the number of people who participated in the derby means a lot to Eklund, and he said he truly appreciates the support. “It’s just mind-blowing,” Eklund said. “It almost leaves you speechless because it shows how much people care and how much people want to help out.” Dirksen said Eklund will take home a first-place trophy for his derby runs. He added that it’s nice to be able to treat the event as a race since Eklund was such a competitor before his accident. And even though the weather wasn’t perfect, Dirksen said it will probably make it a more memorable event for everyone who participated. He also said the success of the derby isn’t measured by the little slips or snags in the operation. He said there’s really only one measurement of a good derby, and that’s whether Eklund has had a good time. “We’re doing this for Tyler, so this is just a chance for him to forget all the other stuff and do all the cool stuff, the fun stuff,” Dirksen said. “That’s kind of our ultimate goal is to stoke him out because if we do that, everything else just kind of falls into place.” Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

working, and that child needs to have a quality experience in child care, and we should be supportive of that.” Small employers who want to participate in the survey can call 541-385-1405 for more information. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

to explore in its exhibitions and acquisitions. Under his leadership, the museum added a sculpture garden designed by Isamu Noguchi in 1986; a center devoted to European decorative arts on a 4½-acre estate donated by Harris Masterson III and his wife, Carroll Sterling Masterson, in 1991; and the Audrey Jones Beck Building, designed by Rafael Moneo, in 2000, to house much of its permanent collection. The museum, which was founded in 1900, received several important donations while Marzio was director, notably Alfred Glassell’s collection of African, pre-Columbian and Indonesian gold; Beck’s gift of 46 Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings; and the oil heiress Caroline Wiess Law’s bequest of more than $400 million and works by de Kooning, Picasso, Arshile Gorky and others.

Council Continued from B1 Part of that plan also includes the possibility of installing a hydropower plant to generate revenues to offset the costs. The project is considered one of the largest undertakings in the city’s history. But at least one group of people, which includes Bend attorney Bill Buchanan and Old Mill developer Bill Smith, believes the project is too expensive and could have adverse impacts on Tumalo Creek water flows. This group came up with its own proposal to switch to an allwell-based system that would eliminate the need for Bridge Creek water and would rely on Central Oregon’s robust groundwater aquifer. According to the group’s proposal, this could be done for about $60 million less than the city’s current project. Buchanan and others will meet with the city’s infrastructure committee today to discuss this proposal, and councilors will follow up during their Wednesday meeting. City officials and some councilors have discounted abandoning the Bridge Creek system because they like having two sources of water and because it reduces energy costs, since it flows by gravity and doesn’t require as much money for pumping.

Innovations, changes Marzio was intent on diversifying and expanding the museum’s commitment to artists outside the European and North American mainstream. He created new departments of Asian and Latin American art and established a new research institution, the International Center for the Arts of the Americas. Although his name inevitably appeared on the short list of candidates when vacancies appeared at top museums in other cities, Marzio stayed put in Houston. Under his leadership, the museum’s attendance increased to 1.6 million visitors annually from 300,000; the operating budget to $52 million from $5 million; and the endowment to more than $1 billion from $25 million. The museum’s permanent collection more than tripled in size, to 63,000 works from 20,000.

Because most of this shortfall is a result of funding police and fire services, a committee was formed to take a look at ways to reduce some of those costs. The committee’s plan, which aims to cut about $15 million between 2012 and 2016 through various strategies, would include reductions in employee wages and benefits, delays in hiring police officers and firefighters, and reducing the general fund subsidies to departments like street maintenance and community development.

Code change?

Budget shortfall

As far as the DMV is concerned, the council will consider making a change that would not allow large government uses in commercial convenience zoning districts that are designed to serve neighboring residential areas. The DMV planned to move its offices into one of these zones at a shopping center in southwest Bend in August, setting off a firestorm of complaints from the surrounding neighborhood. When residents complained to the city, councilors told them there was nothing they could do because the government office was technically allowed in that zoning district. Since then, the Bend Planning Commission made a change to the development code that councilors will consider Wednesday, and the DMV has backed out of its lease with the shopping center and will look for a new location.

Councilors will also have a chance to look at recommendations that would allow the city to cut into its general fund shortfall.

Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

“When we end up needing an expanded work force, child care will be a big issue for us like it was in the past, when we had a low unemployment rate.” — Deschutes County Commissioner Alan Unger

John Fenn, who shared the 2002 Nobel Prize in chemistry for developing a technique that sped up the development of new drugs and the study of the molecules of life, died Friday in Richmond, Va. He was 93. A spokeswoman for Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, where Fenn was a professor of chemistry, confirmed Fenn’s death but did not provide information about its cause or his survivors. Fenn was in his 70s when he published the research that won the Nobel Prize, focusing on a new way to identify and map proteins, carbohydrates, DNA and other large biological molecules. He shared the prize with Koichi Tanaka, an engineer in Kyoto, Japan, and Kurt Wuethrich, a professor of biophysics in Zurich, who worked independently on related protein research. Fenn improved a technique known as mass spectrometry, which identifies molecules like proteins by how quickly they are accelerated in an electric field. Using his approach, biologists can now identify molecules in a matter of seconds rather than weeks, speeding up research on new drugs. The techniques have helped create a new field of biology, proteomics, in which scientists are trying to catalog the interplay of hundreds of thousands of proteins in human cells. “The possibility of analyzing proteins in detail has led to increased understanding of the processes of life,” the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences said in its citation for the 2002 prize.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com


W E AT H ER

B6 Monday, December 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, DECEMBER 13

TUESDAY

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

HIGH

LOW

54

35

STATE Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

50/36

47/34

50/38

40/28

40s Warm Springs

Marion Forks

50s

60/46

53/46

Willowdale

Mitchell

Madras

60/41

58/44

Camp Sherman 52/36 Redmond Prineville 57/39 Cascadia 59/40 56/50 Sisters 55/38 Bend Post 54/35

Oakridge Elk Lake 54/48

45/27

54/36

53/34

Fort Rock

Chemult 53/33

Vancouver 46/45

Seattle 30s

52/43

Burns 55/37

52/36

Missoula 38/33

Helena

Eugene 50s 54/42

Bend

39/26

Boise

54/35

Grants Pass

30s

46/40

52/46

Eastern

Hampton

40s

51/43

40s

Idaho Falls Redding

Elko

60/49

48/32

56/38

39/33

40s

Reno

49/36

Cloudy with a chance of widespread showers today.

Crater Lake 40/30

San Francisco

59/40

60/50

50s

Salt Lake City 51/36

60s

Sunrise today. . . . . . 7:32 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 4:27 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:33 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 4:27 p.m. Moonrise today . . . 11:57 a.m. Moonset today . . . . . . . .none

City

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

HIGH

Moon phases First

LOW

Full

Last

New

Dec. 13 Dec. 21 Dec. 27 Jan. 4

Monday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 59/53/1.31 . . . . . 52/43/sh. . . . . . 48/38/sh Baker City . . . . .not available . . . . . 42/35/sh. . . . . . 39/22/rs Brookings . . . . . . 60/54/0.20 . . . . . 55/49/sh. . . . . . 51/43/sh Burns. . . . . . . . .not available . . . . . 44/36/sh. . . . . . 37/23/rs Eugene . . . . . . . . 60/55/0.05 . . . . . 54/42/sh. . . . . . 45/36/sh Klamath Falls . . .55/29/trace . . . . . 49/35/sh. . . . . . 36/25/rs Lakeview. . . . . . . 54/34/0.00 . . . . . 48/37/sh. . . . . . 38/24/rs La Pine . . . . . . . . 51/35/0.00 . . . . . 55/35/sh. . . . . . 35/23/sn Medford . . . . . . . 48/43/0.00 . . . . . 54/43/sh. . . . . . 48/36/sh Newport . . . . . . . 61/54/0.36 . . . . . 53/45/sh. . . . . . 49/40/sh North Bend . . . . . 63/55/0.01 . . . . . 54/48/sh. . . . . . 49/42/sh Ontario . . . . . . .not available . . . . . 40/36/sh. . . . . . 42/28/rs Pendleton . . . . .not available . . . . . 50/37/sh. . . . . . 43/31/rs Portland . . . . . . . 61/48/0.23 . . . . . 52/43/sh. . . . . . . 45/39/r Prineville . . . . . . . 55/44/0.00 . . . . . 59/40/sh. . . . . . 41/26/rs Redmond. . . . . .not available . . . . . 54/35/sh. . . . . . 40/25/rs Roseburg. . . . . . . 65/51/0.02 . . . . . 55/45/sh. . . . . . 47/38/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 61/55/0.13 . . . . . 53/42/sh. . . . . . 45/38/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 56/41/0.00 . . . . . 55/38/sh. . . . . . 39/26/rs The Dalles . . . . .not available . . . . . 50/38/sh. . . . . . 42/31/rs

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW

0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55/45 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 in 1980 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.76” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . -9 in 1932 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.64” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.48” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . 10.59” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.07 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 1.28 in 1948 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .8:25 a.m. . . . . . .5:15 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .3:44 a.m. . . . . . .2:17 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .8:34 a.m. . . . . . .5:15 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . .12:24 p.m. . . . . .12:06 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .1:47 a.m. . . . . . .1:20 p.m. Uranus . . . . . .12:25 p.m. . . . . .12:18 a.m.

0

LOW

38 27

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy, chance of rain showers. HIGH

37 25

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

Calgary 40/19

Christmas Valley Silver Lake

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 65° Roseburg • 29° Klamath Falls

FRIDAY Mostly cloudy, chance of rain/snow mix.

38 26

BEND ALMANAC

56/37

48/29

40s

50s

Crescent

Crescent Lake

54/35

La Pine

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Portland

Mostly cloudy with scattered showers today.

LOW

41 26

NORTHWEST

55/36

Brothers

HIGH

THURSDAY

Mostly cloudy, chance of mixed showers.

Showers will be scattered across the Northwest today with snow falling over the Cascades.

Paulina

55/37

Sunriver 55/35

Partly to mostly cloudy and breezy with showers today. Central

50s

59/45

Mostly cloudy, rain.

Tonight: Mostly cloudy, chance of snow showers.

Today: Mostly cloudy, rain showers.

WEDNESDAY

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 38-49 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 24-56 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-0 . . . . . . 55-65 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . . . 67 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 36-43 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . . . 87 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 24-47

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . .1-0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . .1-0 Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . .4-0

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

. . . . . . 27-28 . . . . . . 50-96 . . . . . . . . 54 . . . . . . . . 48 . . . . . . 30-45 . . . . . . 15-19 . . . . . . . . 32

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

Vancouver 46/45 Seattle 51/43

Calgary 40/19

Saskatoon 21/6

Winnipeg 0/3

Quebec 40/24

Thunder Bay 6/-5

Bismarck 13/7

Halifax 52/39

Portland 49/34 Boston Rapid City Boise 53/31 Bufal o 45/23 Detroit 46/40 23/11 New York • 90° 15/10 Cheyenne 44/22 Des Moines Santa Ana, Calif. 57/32 Philadelphia Columbus 11/0 Chicago Salt Lak e 19/12 40/22 • -27° 14/5 City San Francisco Omaha Washington, D. C. 51/36 Int’l Falls, Minn. 17/7 59/51 Louisville 35/22 Las Denver 19/8 • 5.68” Kansas City Vegas 63/33 21/14 St. Louis 67/45 Bremerton, Wash. Charlotte Nashville 19/7 36/16 22/10 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Little Rock 65/28 75/52 Atlanta 47/24 34/18 30/13 Phoenix 81/52 Honolulu Birmingham 81/69 Dallas Tijuana 29/16 54/34 77/52 New Orleans 46/28 Orlando Houston 50/26 Chihuahua 58/42 74/36 Miami 63/35 Monterrey La Paz 72/43 81/56 Mazatlan Anchorage 85/55 15/1 Juneau 29/19 (in the 48 contiguous states):

Portland 52/43

Billings 44/30

FRONTS

St. Paul 3/-11

Green Bay 13/-6

To ronto 19/15

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .48/29/0.00 . . .64/35/s . . . 70/41/s Akron . . . . . . . . .37/23/0.72 . .20/13/sn . . . 20/9/sn Albany. . . . . . . . .54/19/0.61 . .40/16/sh . . 26/14/pc Albuquerque. . . .53/27/0.00 . . .65/28/s . . . 64/32/s Anchorage . . . . . .15/2/0.00 . . .15/1/pc . . .15/-1/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . .47/26/0.64 . 30/13/pc . . 35/19/pc Atlantic City . . . .57/48/0.75 . .41/26/sh . . 32/23/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .58/40/0.00 . . .63/33/s . . . 70/48/s Baltimore . . . . . .54/37/0.91 . . .36/22/c . . . 30/20/c Billings. . . . . . . . .40/25/0.05 . . .44/30/c . . 46/27/pc Birmingham . . . .53/28/0.00 . . .29/16/s . . 38/15/pc Bismarck . . . . . . . 2/-14/0.00 . . .13/7/sn . . 24/15/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .48/36/0.00 . .46/40/sh . . . .43/30/r Boston. . . . . . . . .53/30/0.38 . .53/31/sh . . 34/22/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .55/35/1.91 . .47/27/sh . . 33/22/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .38/33/0.41 . .23/11/sn . . 19/15/sn Burlington, VT. . .51/22/0.20 . . 43/19/rs . . 24/16/sn Caribou, ME . . . . .30/8/0.00 . . .46/36/r . . 40/24/sn Charleston, SC . .58/40/0.16 . 40/25/pc . . . 40/25/s Charlotte. . . . . . .48/34/0.31 . . .36/16/c . . . 34/15/s Chattanooga. . . .42/25/0.20 . . 28/15/sf . . . 29/13/s Cheyenne . . . . . .49/14/0.00 . 57/32/pc . . 53/33/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .31/19/0.13 . . .14/5/pc . . . 16/7/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .43/21/0.29 . . .22/8/sn . . . 23/8/pc Cleveland . . . . . .37/25/0.53 . .22/16/sn . . 22/14/sn Colorado Springs 39/13/0.00 . . .66/30/s . . . 62/31/s Columbia, MO . .18/12/0.03 . 18/10/pc . . 28/19/pc Columbia, SC . . .54/33/0.13 . . .40/19/c . . . 39/18/s Columbus, GA. . .54/32/0.77 . 39/17/pc . . . 44/21/s Columbus, OH. . .40/21/0.72 . .19/12/sn . . .20/10/sf Concord, NH . . . .50/16/1.25 . .44/23/sh . . 31/16/pc Corpus Christi. . .63/47/0.00 . . .64/45/s . . 73/56/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .47/33/0.00 . . .54/34/s . . . 64/48/s Dayton . . . . . . . .41/19/0.47 . .20/10/sn . . . . 20/6/sf Denver. . . . . . . . .50/10/0.00 . . .63/33/s . . . 66/32/s Des Moines. . . . . .17/4/0.01 . . .11/0/pc . . 20/16/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . .38/21/0.88 . .15/10/sn . . . . 17/9/c Duluth. . . . . . . . . 4/-10/0.00 . . . 5/-12/s . . . .10/-2/s El Paso. . . . . . . . .60/39/0.00 . . .70/38/s . . . 73/42/s Fairbanks. . . . . -23/-33/0.00 -22/-28/pc . .-23/-38/sf Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .-1/-9/0.00 . . . . 5/-4/c . . . . 12/3/c Flagstaff . . . . . . .58/26/0.00 . . .62/24/s . . . 56/27/s

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .36/19/0.20 . .19/13/sn . . . 22/5/sn Green Bay. . . . . .25/13/0.13 . . . 13/-6/s . . . .14/-1/s Greensboro. . . . .45/34/0.32 . . .34/15/c . . . 31/16/s Harrisburg. . . . . .51/34/0.67 . . .33/21/c . . . 29/18/c Hartford, CT . . . .57/27/1.43 . .46/22/sh . . 29/15/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .52/25/0.05 . .39/26/sh . . 39/24/sn Honolulu . . . . . . .79/67/0.00 . . .81/69/s . . . 82/67/s Houston . . . . . . .57/43/0.00 . . .58/42/s . . 67/60/pc Huntsville . . . . . .48/27/0.00 . 26/13/pc . . 32/17/pc Indianapolis . . . .32/21/0.12 . . .18/7/sn . . . . 21/5/s Jackson, MS . . . .51/35/0.00 . . .39/22/s . . . 46/36/s Madison, WI . . . .27/14/0.05 . . . . 9/-7/s . . . .11/-1/s Jacksonville. . . . .62/42/0.01 . 44/22/pc . . . 47/23/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .29/21/0.00 . . 29/19/sf . . .27/21/sf Kansas City. . . . . .18/8/0.02 . 21/14/pc . . . 33/25/c Lansing . . . . . . . .34/16/0.34 . .16/10/sn . . . 20/5/sn Las Vegas . . . . . .70/47/0.00 . . .67/45/s . . . 67/47/s Lexington . . . . . .41/19/0.34 . . 19/10/sf . . 21/12/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .15/4/0.00 . . . .19/9/c . . . 30/21/c Little Rock. . . . . .42/29/0.00 . . .34/18/s . . 41/29/pc Los Angeles. . . . .83/67/0.00 . . .75/52/s . . 66/52/pc Louisville. . . . . . .44/23/0.16 . . . 19/8/sf . . . . 24/9/s Memphis. . . . . . .37/26/0.00 . . .29/18/s . . 38/24/pc Miami . . . . . . . . .79/57/0.07 . .63/35/sh . . 58/39/pc Milwaukee . . . . .36/18/0.10 . . . .16/7/s . . . . 17/8/s Minneapolis . . . . . 8/-1/0.00 . . . 3/-11/s . . . . 9/6/pc Nashville . . . . . . .44/21/0.03 . 22/10/pc . . . 27/19/s New Orleans. . . .58/45/0.00 . . .46/28/s . . . 52/43/s New York . . . . . .56/39/1.23 . .44/22/sh . . 26/21/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .56/39/1.03 . 45/23/pc . . . 27/20/c Norfolk, VA . . . . .58/51/0.35 . .39/23/sh . . . 33/21/c Oklahoma City . .37/23/0.00 . . .47/24/s . . . 51/31/s Omaha . . . . . . . . .11/1/0.00 . . . .17/7/c . . . 24/18/c Orlando. . . . . . . .75/48/0.02 . . .50/26/s . . 59/31/pc Palm Springs. . . .85/56/0.00 . . .82/54/s . . . 76/51/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .27/14/0.17 . . . 11/-2/s . . 17/14/pc Philadelphia . . . .61/42/0.85 . . .40/22/c . . 29/21/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .79/50/0.00 . . .81/52/s . . . 78/52/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .41/27/0.40 . .22/14/sn . . 19/10/sn Portland, ME. . . .52/20/0.96 . . .49/34/r . . 40/29/pc Providence . . . . .54/27/1.08 . .50/27/sh . . 33/20/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . .52/37/0.40 . . .36/16/c . . . 32/16/s

Yesterday Monday Tuesday Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .22/3/0.00 . . .45/23/c . . . 44/24/c Savannah . . . . . .61/36/0.15 . 40/23/pc . . . 42/23/s Reno . . . . . . . . . .60/28/0.00 . 59/40/pc . . . .52/28/r Seattle. . . . . . . . .55/43/3.24 . .51/43/sh . . . .46/38/r Richmond . . . . . .48/39/0.78 . . .38/18/c . . . 32/15/c Sioux Falls. . . . . . . 7/-4/0.00 . . . . .8/2/c . . 17/13/pc Rochester, NY . . .43/33/0.17 . .27/13/sn . . 19/14/sn Spokane . . . . . . .45/33/0.39 . .42/36/sh . . . .37/27/r Sacramento. . . . .60/52/0.00 . 63/49/pc . . . .58/41/r Springfield, MO. .24/14/0.00 . 23/12/pc . . 36/21/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .27/15/0.13 . . . .19/7/s . . 26/21/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .67/49/0.13 . .51/30/sh . . 54/36/pc Salt Lake City . . .55/40/0.00 . 51/36/pc . . 49/33/pc Tucson. . . . . . . . .78/42/0.00 . . .80/44/s . . . 78/44/s San Antonio . . . .60/43/0.00 . . .62/38/s . . . 70/50/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .36/19/0.00 . 38/20/pc . . 47/31/pc San Diego . . . . . .83/55/0.00 . . .75/54/s . . . 65/51/s Washington, DC .45/37/0.77 . . .35/22/c . . . 31/23/c San Francisco . . .58/52/0.00 . 60/50/pc . . . .57/46/r Wichita . . . . . . . .31/14/0.00 . 36/12/pc . . 42/28/pc San Jose . . . . . . .59/54/0.00 . 65/48/pc . . . .58/45/r Yakima . . . . . . not available . .42/32/sh . . .39/25/rs Santa Fe . . . . . . .51/17/0.00 . . .57/32/s . . . 58/26/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .82/59/0.00 . . .83/51/s . . . 78/51/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .45/28/0.00 . 32/25/pc . . .34/27/rs Athens. . . . . . . . .49/34/0.00 . .53/41/sh . . 53/43/pc Auckland. . . . . . .77/64/0.00 . .73/60/sh . . 74/60/pc Baghdad . . . . . . .70/55/0.07 . 64/38/pc . . 60/35/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . . .90/76/t . . . .90/78/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .36/19/0.00 . 36/17/pc . . . 30/9/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .57/48/4.43 . .64/53/sh . . 62/52/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . .39/27/0.00 . . 28/22/sf . . .28/23/sf Bogota . . . . . . . .66/48/0.15 . . .65/50/t . . . .64/51/t Budapest. . . . . . .39/30/0.06 . . 30/21/sf . . .30/23/sf Buenos Aires. . . .68/52/0.00 . . .76/57/s . . . 83/59/s Cabo San Lucas .84/61/0.00 . . .82/58/s . . . 81/59/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .59/50/0.00 . 60/47/pc . . . 65/49/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .41/9/0.00 . . .40/19/s . . 37/26/pc Cancun . . . . . . . 82/NA/0.00 . 71/52/pc . . 73/52/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .43/30/0.00 . 42/36/pc . . 39/30/pc Edinburgh . . . . . .36/25/0.00 . 38/29/pc . . 37/31/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .41/27/0.00 . 34/24/pc . . 30/21/pc Harare. . . . . . . . .81/61/0.00 . . .79/64/t . . . .81/63/t Hong Kong . . . . .72/68/0.00 . 81/71/pc . . 81/70/sh Istanbul. . . . . . . .39/30/0.00 . .40/32/sh . . . .39/33/r Jerusalem . . . . . .48/41/0.00 . .60/49/sh . . . 62/46/s Johannesburg . . .68/54/0.23 . . .77/60/t . . . .79/62/t Lima . . . . . . . . . .73/64/0.00 . 74/61/pc . . . 74/62/s Lisbon . . . . . . . . .57/52/0.00 . . .64/55/c . . 63/53/pc London . . . . . . . .43/30/0.00 . 37/30/pc . . 37/31/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .55/39/0.00 . 60/44/pc . . 56/38/pc Manila. . . . . . . . .88/75/0.00 . . .86/77/t . . . .87/76/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .90/66/0.00 . . .82/61/s . . . 85/63/s Mexico City. . . . .70/30/0.00 . . .71/36/s . . . 72/37/s Montreal. . . . . . .37/23/0.31 . . 35/10/rs . . 20/11/pc Moscow . . . . . . . .21/5/0.11 . . 26/21/sf . . 24/19/sn Nairobi . . . . . . . .77/61/0.00 . .78/61/sh . . 79/61/pc Nassau . . . . . . . .81/59/0.00 . 75/58/pc . . 74/59/pc New Delhi. . . . . .54/48/0.00 . . .73/49/s . . . 72/49/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .55/39/0.00 . . .58/51/r . . 58/43/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .25/10/0.00 . . .15/5/pc . . . 19/7/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .36/25/0.51 . .27/11/sn . . 21/10/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . .45/36/0.00 . 34/26/pc . . . 36/29/c Rio de Janeiro. . .95/79/0.00 . . .92/76/t . . 80/70/sh Rome. . . . . . . . . .54/39/0.00 . 55/40/pc . . 51/42/sh Santiago . . . . . . .72/46/0.00 . . .75/41/s . . . 80/47/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .90/70/0.00 . .80/61/sh . . 71/63/sh Sapporo. . . . . . . .27/23/0.00 . . 32/24/sf . . . 30/20/c Seoul . . . . . . . . . .37/18/0.00 . .41/28/sh . . 37/18/pc Shanghai. . . . . . .55/48/0.14 . .60/54/sh . . 56/47/sh Singapore . . . . . .91/77/0.11 . . .89/77/t . . . .90/77/t Stockholm. . . . . . .23/3/0.00 . . .19/7/pc . . . . 18/7/s Sydney. . . . . . . . .90/64/0.00 . . .76/65/t . . . .77/64/t Taipei. . . . . . . . . .84/66/0.00 . 82/68/pc . . 79/65/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .61/48/0.56 . .62/50/sh . . . 64/50/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .57/48/0.00 . . .58/52/r . . 58/49/sh Toronto . . . . . . . .39/27/0.34 . .19/15/sn . . 22/16/pc Vancouver. . . . . .52/41/1.24 . .46/45/sh . . 45/39/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . .41/34/0.03 . . 30/22/sf . . .26/20/sf Warsaw. . . . . . . .34/27/0.19 . .32/25/sn . . .27/21/sf


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GREEN LIVING, TECHNOLOGY & SCIENCE IN OREGON Inside

GREEN, ETC.

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/greenetc

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2010

Twitter unfollowing service develops prime following TECH FOCUS

Who Unfollowed Me?, created by Bend developer, is up for an industry award By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

Attention tweeps Who Unfollowed Me? at http:// who.unfollowed .me/

As more people start using the social media website Twitter — there were 175 million registered users as of Sept. 14, the site reports — software offshoots that enhance usage are multiplying. Indeed, there is a community of people in Central Oregon who designs such software, just as others here develop iPad and iPhone applications, said Ruth Lindley, marketing manager at Economic Development for Central Oregon.

Local Web developer Collin Robinson is in the running for a Mashable award for Best Social Media Management Tool for a Twitter app he created called Who Unfollowed Me? The app lets Twitter users, or tweeps, keep track of which other tweeps stop following them.

One developer of Twitter applications, or apps, in Central Oregon is 31-year-old Collin Robinson. He has been attracting national attention in the past few weeks, as one of his creations is up for a major industry award. A freelance Web developer who lives and works in Bend, Robinson runs the design and development company CJGraphix with his wife, Jennifer. This year, under the aegis of CJGraphix, he has produced three Internet-based Twitter apps, and he hopes to release another before 2011. Who Unfollowed Me? is a free and premium service — located at http://who .unfollowed.me — that allows Twitter users, or tweeps, to keep track of which other tweeps stop following them and tweet about the intelligence directly from the site. See Twitter / C6

Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin

THE COMPOST PILE

From food waste to farm

vegetables Recycling program at Bend’s Old Mill easy for restaurants, good for farmers

By Renee Schoof McClatchy-Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — Scientists searching the Amazon have discovered new species — creatures such as a bald-headed parrot, a blue-fanged tarantula and a bright red catfish — at the rate of about one every three days for the past 10 years, the World Wildlife Fund reported recently. “What we say now, and we’re very conservative, is one in 10 known species is found in the Amazon,” said Meg Symington, a tropical ecologist and the fund’s managing director for the Amazon. “We think when all the counting is done, the Amazon could account for up to 30 percent of the species on Earth.” See Species / C6

SCIENCE

By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

M

New Amazon species ID’d every 3 days for a decade

ore than a year after three restaurants in Bend’s Old Mill District started collecting food waste so that Fields Farm could turn it into fertilizer, the restaurants are still sending off compost material by the bucketful. And the Old Mill is hoping to add more restaurants to the composting effort in 2011, said Noelle Fredland, Old Mill marketing manager. “We’re very much looking forward to having the program expand,” she said.

GREEN

Photos via World Wildlife Fund via The Associated Press

MARTIALIS HEUREKA The “Ant from Mars,” a new species of blind, subterranean, predatory ant was described from the Brazilian Amazon in 2008. It belongs to the first new genus of living ants discovered since 1923, and is likely to be a direct descendant of one of the very first ants to evolve on Earth, over 120 million years ago.

Employees collect food scraps, seen here, at Café Yumm! in 5-gallon buckets, and the food is turned into compost at a local farm. Currently, Café Yumm!, Pastini Pasteria and Strictly Organic Coffee Co. are participating. Employees put food waste and coffee grounds in 5-gallon buckets, and empty the buckets into a larger bin by the recycling and trash receptacles. Twice a week, someone from Bend’s Fields Farm picks up the material and takes it back to the farm where it is composted and turned into a fertilizer, which helps grow the vegetables sold at local farmers markets. “We’re always looking for new and different ways to push sustainability,” Fredland said, “And it’s an important thing for us to do as a community, and it’s an important thing for us to do as a business.” See Compost / C6

EUNECTES BENIENSIS The first new anaconda species was identified in 1936. Described in 2002 from Bolivia, the 4-meter-long anaconda was initially believed to be the result of hybridization between green and yellow anacondas.

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Karli Foster, co-owner and general manager of Café Yumm! in the Old Mill District, tosses lettuce scraps into a bucket containing food waste. The restaurant has several buckets around its kitchen, and every week someone from Fields Farm in Bend collects the waste for composting. It is later turned into fertilizer.

EPHEBOPUS CYANOGNATHUS The blue-fanged tarantula, a remarkable-looking spider was discovered in French Guiana in 2000. The species is entirely brown except for two vivid blue fangs.


T EL EV ISION

C2 Monday, December 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Lost keys give thieves easy access to house Dear Abby: About a month ago, my friend lost her keys in a major department store. Despite announcements in the store, the keys were never found. My friend wasn’t worried because she had her wallet and personal information in her purse. Two weeks later, her home was robbed. There was no sign of forced entry. What we learned from the police is that the little tags we carry on our key chains from major pharmacy and supermarket chains carry our names on the receipts. All the person who found the keys had to do was purchase something, swipe the card, and the receipt came up with my friend’s name printed on it! Unfortunately, her name is listed in the phone book, so the thief was able to find her house, use her house key, walk right in and take whatever he/she wanted. I no longer keep the tags on my key chain. I keep them in a separate place in my purse or in my pocket. I hope this keeps at least one person from being robbed. — Karen in Methuen, Mass. Dear Karen: So do I, and thank you for the warning. For those who prefer not to carry those little tags at all, many are linked with the shopper’s telephone number in the pharmacy’s or supermarket’s computer. If you mention it before the cashier starts ringing up your purchase, the sale can be rung up as part of the saver’s program. Inquire at the stores where you shop regularly. Dear Abby: Five years ago, when my niece was 9, we came up with the idea of making Christmas cards and sending them out to special friends and family members. We both work hard to make sure each is attractive and in good taste, and we handwrite a personal note inside. We also print on the back that the card was “handmade with love.” This has become a tradition for the two of us, and the cards are quite beautiful.

www.OasisSpaofBend.com

DEAR ABBY

1950s Miami Beach will be setting for latest period drama cable series By Hannah Sampson

Last year, after we sent them out, I received a card from a friend with a small check inside. The card read, “I’m sending you this check so you can afford to buy ‘real cards’ next year.” I was, to say the least, hurt and offended. I wondered if others felt similarly, so I asked around and was shocked to learn they, too, thought I was “cheap.” Although it cost more money and time to create each card, no one appreciated them. We won’t be making the cards this year, but how do I tell my niece why? I don’t want her feelings hurt, too. — Blue at Christmas Dear Blue: Tell your niece what you were told — and by whom — so she won’t waste any more effort on these rude and unappreciative individuals. Better she hear it from you than one of the recipients. As to the “friend” who sent the check, I hope you returned it and deleted her from your Christmas card list. What she did was uncalled for. Dear Abby: I am 13 and I have a problem. My mother gave me $20 so I could go Christmas shopping, but I forgot I was Christmas shopping and ended up buying everything for myself. Now what do I do, because she’s really mad. — In Trouble in Michigan Dear In Trouble: Apologize to your mother, admit what happened wasn’t a memory lapse as much as yielding to temptation, and start doing whatever you can to earn more money. Some suggestions: shoveling sidewalks and driveways and dog walking, if the neighbors will let you. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

MIAMI — Atlantic City has HBO’s Prohibition-era “Boardwalk Empire.” 1960s Manhattan has “Mad Men” on AMC. Now Miami Beach will have its own starring role in a period drama. “Magic City,” a series set in a fictional Miami Beach hotel in the late 1950s — when the Rat Pack played and Fidel Castro took power in Cuba — got the green light this week for 10 episodes from Starz Entertainment. Casting is set to start soon, and production will begin in 2011, though it’s still unclear how much, if any, of the series will be filmed in Miami. The show is set to air on the Starz cable channel in 2012. Writer and producer Mitch Glazer is intimately familiar with the subject matter: Growing up in Miami Beach in the 1950s and ’60s, he accompanied his engineer father to work at the area’s most glamorous hotels, including the Fontainebleau, Eden Roc, Deauville and Carillon. Glazer, a 1970 Miami Beach High grad and one-time Deauville cabana boy, said he remains obsessed with the era. “So much that ended up shaping America — politics, pop culture, everything from civil rights to geopolitical situations — came through the lobby of those hotels,” he said. Glazer said the show’s hotel is inspired by the architecture of Morris Lapidus, who fashioned

“It’s one of the heydays of the beach, with the Fontainebleau and the Eden Roc. It was just on the world’s map at that time.” — Paul George, Miami historian, about the 1950s era in which the new show “Magic City” takes place the Eden Roc and Fontainebleau. He said he would love to shoot the entire series in Miami, but Starz said it is in talks with several locations, including some outside the state. “It’s a love letter to the city and that would be the dream, to do it down there,” said Glazer, who wrote several films, including “Scrooged” and “Great Expectations.” Producers have applied for and received confirmation that they would get state incentive money to shoot the series in Florida, according to MiamiDade film offices. Tallahassee recently increased production subsidies from about $11 million a year to about $50 million a year to draw more business to the state. Local film officials hope this week’s announcement from Starz — which has ventured into original programming over the past few years — signals a boom for scripted television series in Miami. News of the “Magic City” order follows word just weeks ago that ABC wants to revive the “Charlie’s Angels” series, with a pilot to be filmed in Miami next year. With USA’s drama “Burn No-

tice” shooting its fifth season next spring in Miami-Dade and A&E crime series “The Glades” expected to shoot its second season in Dade and Broward next year, the area is eager for more television close-ups. Jeff Peel, head of the MiamiDade office of film and entertainment, said having even two scripted series shooting in the region was a big deal. “If we have four, man, this town is going to be hopping,” he said. “Burn Notice,” for example, spends about $2 million an episode — and Peel said a period drama like “Magic City” would likely pump more into the economy. “Assuming that all of this stuff actually shows up here, we’re going to be bursting at the seams,” Peel said. “Everyone who wants to be working in this industry who’s qualified will be able to work.” If “Magic City” shoots in some other city, it wouldn’t be a first for a Miami-themed show: “CSI: Miami” and “Dexter” both are filmed in Los Angeles. But Graham Winick, head of the Miami Beach film office, said negotiations about the show have been positive for

South Florida. He said the success of hits like “Burn Notice” and reality shows filmed in Miami show the popularity of the destination. “It speaks volumes to where Miami is as a brand in television and what viewers want to see, which is Miami,” Winick said. “That’s wonderful for us. It’ll help us as we move out of the economic state we’re in.” The beach was enjoying headier times during the era when the show is set, said local historian Paul George. “It’s one of the heydays of the beach, with the Fontainebleau and the Eden Roc,” George said. “It was just on the world’s map at that time.” But as Frank Sinatra crooned and the wealthy gathered at the region’s finest hotels, a darker side of Miami Beach existed under the glossy surface. The show will touch on drugs, strippers, gangsters, racial tension and global unrest as seen through the prism of the Miramar Hotel and its boss, Ike Evans. “My fantasy is of it being like Rick’s Cafe in ‘Casablanca,’ where all roads lead to and through the Miramar,” Glazer said.

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KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! Ruff News Nightly News House of Payne House of Payne Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Rachel’s-Food Wolf: Travels Steves Europe

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Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Garden Smart ‘G’ This Old House PBS NewsHour ’ Å

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Skating With the Stars (N) ’ ‘PG’ Mariah Carey: Merry Christmas The Sing-Off The remaining groups sing rock tunes. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å How I Met Engagement Two/Half Men Mike & Molly ‘14’ Skating With the Stars (N) ’ ‘PG’ Mariah Carey: Merry Christmas House Selfish ’ (PA) ‘14’ Å Lie to Me Secret Santa ’ ‘14’ Å News on PDX-TV Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ Antiques Roadshow ‘G’ Å Christmas at St. Olaf: Where Peace The Sing-Off The remaining groups sing rock tunes. (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å The Vampire Diaries The Return ‘14’ The Vampire Diaries ’ ‘14’ Å Moment-Luxury Paint Paper Sew With Nancy Dewberry Shw Antiques Roadshow ‘G’ Å Christmas at St. Olaf: Where Peace

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Castle Punked ’ ‘PG’ Å Chase Havoc Annie is injured. ‘14’ Hawaii Five-0 (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Castle Punked ’ ‘PG’ Å News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ Faith Hill, Joy to the World Chase Havoc Annie is injured. ‘14’ Married... With Married... With Simply Ming ‘G’ Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Faith Hill, Joy to the World

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A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Intervention Amy W. ‘14’ Å Intervention Amy P. ‘14’ Å Intervention Ryan; Jason ‘PG’ Å Intervention Rachel (N) ‘PG’ Å Hoarders Andrew; Shania (N) ‘PG’ Hoarders Theresa; Karen ‘PG’ Å 130 28 8 32 Intervention Miriam ‘14’ Å ›› “Prancer” (1989, Fantasy) Sam Elliott. A troubled child ›› “For Love of the Game” (1999, Drama) Kevin Costner, Kelly Preston, John C. Reilly. An aging pitcher thinks back on his life’s ››› “The Princess Bride” (1987, Adventure) Cary Elwes, Robin Wright, Mandy Patinkin. A stableboy in 102 40 39 momentous events. Å disguise sets out to rescue his beloved. Å nurses an injured reindeer back to health. Å Last American Cowboy ‘14’ Å America’s Cutest Dog 2010 ’ ‘PG’ Michael Jackson & Bubbles Bad Dog! Pilot ’ ‘PG’ Å World’s Ugliest Dog Competition ‘G’ Michael Jackson & Bubbles 68 50 12 38 Last American Cowboy Renewal ‘14’ Tabatha’s Salon Takeover ‘14’ Real Housewives/Beverly Real Housewives/Beverly The Real Housewives of Atlanta ‘14’ The Real Housewives of Atlanta ‘14’ Tabatha’s Salon Takeover (N) ‘14’ What Happens Tabatha’s Salon 137 44 The Dukes of Hazzard ’ The Dukes of Hazzard ’ Ron White: Call Me Tater Salad Ron White: Call Me Tater Salad Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders 190 32 42 53 (3:00) ›››› “Dances With Wolves” (1990, Western) Kevin Costner. ’ Biography on CNBC American Greed Mad Money Executive Vision: Leadership in Biography on CNBC Paid Program Recession Profits 51 36 40 52 Executive Vision: Leadership in Larry King Live (N) Å Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Larry King Live Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 Parker Spitzer (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 Sasquatch Gng Outdoorsman Joy of Fishing PM Edition Visions of NW Talk of the Town Local issues. Cooking Outdoorsman Bend on the Run Outside Presents Outside Film Festival Ride Guide ‘14’ The Element 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington Fish Hooks ‘G’ Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Pair of Kings ‘Y7’ Suite/Deck Shake it Up! ‘Y’ Shake it Up! ‘G’ Hannah Forever Hannah Forever Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb 87 43 14 39 Fish Hooks ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ MythBusters Firearms Folklore ‘PG’ Track Me if You Can ’ ‘PG’ Å American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. Black Ops Brothers: Howe & Howe Track Me if You Can ’ ‘PG’ Å 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ NFL Football Baltimore Ravens at Houston Texans (Live) SportsCenter (Live) Å NFL PrimeTime (N) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 Monday Night 2010 Poker 2010 World Series of Poker SportsCenter 2010 World Series of Poker SportsNation NBA Tonight NFL Presents 2010 World Series of Poker Å 22 24 21 24 (4:00) Bowl Mania Special (N) Å Boxing From April 2, 1981. Å Bowling Å Bowling Å College Football 2004 Rose Bowl -- Michigan vs. Southern California Å College Football 2003 Sheraton Hawaii Bowl -- Houston at Hawaii Å 23 25 123 25 (4:00) College Football From 1/4/04. SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 A Flintstones Christmas Carol ‘G’ “Christmas Cupid” (2010) Christina Milian, Ashley Benson. ‘14’ Å “Holiday in Handcuffs” (2007) Melissa Joan Hart, Mario Lopez. ‘PG’ Å The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Paula’s Best 30-Minute Meals Barefoot in London Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Chopped Green Apps and Lamb ‘G’ Unwrapped Holiday favorites. 177 62 46 44 B’foot Contessa Dave Niehaus Tribute to Dave Niehaus Dave Niehaus Seahawks The Final Score Profiles The Final Score 20 45 28* 26 College Basketball Portland at Denver › “Jumper” (2008, Science Fiction) Hayden Christensen, Jamie Bell. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ›› “27 Dresses” (2008) Katherine Heigl. A young woman is always a bridesmaid and never a bride. ›› “Shaft” (2000, Action) 131 Property Virgins Income Property Designed to Sell Hunters Int’l House Hunters Property Virgins Property Virgins White House Christmas 2010 (N) ‘G’ House Hunters Hunters Int’l My First Sale ‘G’ My First Place 176 49 33 43 Property Virgins American Pickers ‘PG’ Å American Pickers ‘PG’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ American Pickers (N) ‘PG’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Storage Wars Storage Wars Pawn Stars ‘PG’ 155 42 41 36 American Pickers Big Bear ‘PG’ Old Christine Old Christine “Marry Me” (2010) (Part 1 of 2) Lucy Liu, Steven Pasquale. ‘PG’ Å “Marry Me” (2010, Romance) (Part 2 of 2) Lucy Liu. Premiere. ‘PG’ Å How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘PG’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) Å The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show Å The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann When I Was 17 That ’70s Show That ’70s Show True Life ’ MTV Special ’ MTV Special ’ True Life I Have a Paranormal Ability Vice Guide Pranked ’ ‘14’ 192 22 38 57 The Seven SpongeBob SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Ways to Die Ways to Die Phowned! (N) ‘14’ Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Phowned! ’ ‘14’ Ways to Die 132 31 34 46 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ Tin Man ’ ‘PG’ Å 133 35 133 45 ››› “The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian” (2008, Fantasy) Georgie Henley, Skandar Keynes. Å Behind Scenes Mark Chironna Franklin Jesse Duplantis Praise the Lord Å Joel Osteen ‘PG’ Perry Stone ‘G’ Jack Van Impe Changing-World Our First Christmas 205 60 130 Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Conan Gwyneth Paltrow; T.J. Miller. 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond Moguls and Movie Stars: A History of ››› “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner” (1967) Spencer Tracy, Katharine Hepburn. A Moguls and Movie Stars: A History of ››› “What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?” (1962, Horror) Bette Davis, Joan Crawford, Victor Buono. Hol- “The Magnificent 101 44 101 29 Hollywood Fade Out, Fade In (N) lady takes her black fiance home to meet her parents. Å Hollywood Fade Out, Fade In lywood has-been torments famous sister in wheelchair. Seven” (1960) Wedding Day Ultimate Cake Off ’ ‘PG’ Å Bama Belles ’ ‘PG’ Å Cake Boss: Next Great Baker ‘PG’ Cake Boss: Next Great Baker ‘PG’ Fabulous Cakes (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Cake Boss: Next Great Baker ‘PG’ 178 34 32 34 Say Yes, Dress Law & Order Rapture ’ ‘14’ Bones Bodies in the Book ‘14’ Å The Closer Old Money ‘14’ Å The Closer High Crimes (N) ‘14’ Men of a Certain Age (N) ‘MA’ Å The Closer High Crimes ‘14’ Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Fake flu vaccine. ‘14’ Powerpuff Girls: Fight Billy & Mandy Save Christmas ‘Y7’ Garfield Show Dr. Seuss’ Grinch Adventure Time MAD ‘PG’ Misadv. Flapjack Johnny Test ‘Y7’ King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘PG’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ When Vacations Attack ‘G’ Å Dining With Death (N) ‘PG’ Å Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son ››› “Jerry Maguire” (1996) Tom Cruise. An attack of conscience changes an L.A. sports agent’s life. 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons NCIS Dog Tags ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS Internal Affairs ’ ‘14’ Å WWE Monday Night RAW Will Wade Barrett be forced to reinstate John Cena? ’ ‘PG’ Å (11:05) ›› “Semi-Pro” (2008) Å 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew ‘14’ My Big Friggin’ Wedding ’ ‘14’ Mario Lopez Bret Michaels Mario Lopez Bret Michaels 191 48 37 54 Basketball Wives ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:35) ›› “The Money Pit” 1986 (6:10) ››› “Sleepless in Seattle” 1993 Tom Hanks. ’ ‘PG’ Å ››› “A League of Their Own” 1992 Tom Hanks. ’ ‘PG’ Å (10:10) ›› “Bachelor Party” 1984, Comedy Tom Hanks. ‘R’ Å ››› “Max Dugan Returns” 1983 Marsha Mason. After Film School (9:15) ›› “A Christmas Carol” 1984, Fantasy George C. Scott. ››› “The Paper Chase” 1973 ›› “A Christmas Carol” 1984, Fantasy George C. Scott. Nike 6.0 HB BMX Pro The Daily Habit Insane Cinema ‘PG’ Bubba’s World Insane Cinema The Daily Habit The Daily Habit The Daily Habit Check 1, 2 ‘PG’ Stupidface ‘MA’ Amer. Misfits The Daily Habit Golf in America Golf in America PGA Tour Year in Review (N) The Golf Fix Golf Videos Golf Central Playing Lessons PGA Tour Year in Review The Golf Fix Golf Videos Playing Lessons Golf in America (4:00) “The Three Gifts” (2009) ‘PG’ ›› “Silver Bells” (2005, Drama) Anne Heche, Tate Donovan. ‘14’ Å “Moonlight and Mistletoe” (2008, Drama) ‘PG’ Å (9:42) “Santa Jr” (2002, Romance-Comedy) Lauren Holly, Judd Nelson, Nick Stabile. ‘G’ Å (4:30) › “The Tuxedo” 2002, Comedy Preview to 24/7 ›› “Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen” 2009, Science Fiction Shia LaBeouf, Megan Fox. Sam Witwicky › “The Fourth Kind” 2009, Suspense Milla Jovovich, Will Patton, Little Fockers: HBO Taxicab Confessions: The City That HBO 425 501 425 10 Jackie Chan. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Penguins holds the key to defeating an ancient Decepticon. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Elias Koteas. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å First Look Never Sleeps ’ ‘MA’ Å (4:45) ›› “Anamorph” 2007, Suspense Willem Dafoe, Clea DuVall. ‘R’ Arrested Dev. Undeclared ‘PG’ Undeclared ‘PG’ Undeclared ‘PG’ “Chaos” 2005 Jason Statham. Two detectives track a bank robber. ‘R’ (11:15) ›› “Anamorph” 2007 ‘R’ IFC 105 105 ›› “He’s Just Not That Into You” 2009, Romance-Comedy Ben Affleck. Men and (7:15) ››› “Any Given Sunday” 1999, Drama Al Pacino, Cameron Diaz, Dennis Quaid. A football coach copes with crises on and ›› “She’s Out of My League” 2010 Jay Baruchel. An average (11:45) “The Right to MAX 400 508 7 women navigate through complex relationships. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å off the field. ’ ‘R’ Å Joe lands a gorgeous girlfriend. ’ ‘R’ Å Bare All” Remaking the Shroud ‘PG’ When Rome Ruled (N) ‘14’ When Rome Ruled (N) ‘14’ Remaking the Shroud ‘PG’ When Rome Ruled ‘14’ When Rome Ruled ‘14’ Jesus’ Tomb ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ CatDog ‘G’ Å NTOON 89 115 189 Dirt Trax TV Fisher’s ATV Truck Academy Destination Pol. Muzzy’s Bow. Western Extreme Zumbo Outdoors Best of West Truck Academy Fisher’s ATV Dirt Trax TV Destination Pol. Top Truck Chal Inside Outdoors OUTD 37 307 43 (4:00) “Walled In” (5:35) ››› “In the Loop” 2009, Comedy Peter Capaldi. iTV. Politicos look for opportu- › “How to Rob a Bank” 2007 Nick Stahl. A thief and a bank Dexter Through a Glass, Darkly Dexter is Shameless ’ Å “Sex and Breakfast” 2007 Macaulay Culkin. iTV. Two couples SHO 500 500 2009 ‘R’ Å nity as the U.S. prepares for war. ’ ‘NR’ Å customer are trapped in a vault. ‘NR’ being lured into a trap. ’ ‘MA’ rediscover their relationships. ’ ‘R’ Å Hot Rod TV ‘PG’ Hot Rod TV ‘G’ Barrett-Jackson Special Edition ‘PG’ Battle-Supercars Battle-Supercars Hot Rod TV ‘PG’ Hot Rod TV ‘G’ Barrett-Jackson Special Edition ‘PG’ Battle-Supercars Battle-Supercars Auto Racing SPEED 35 303 125 (4:00) › Legion (5:45) ›› “Armored” 2009 Matt Dillon. ‘PG-13’ Å (7:15) ››› “About a Boy” 2002 Hugh Grant. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å › “Did You Hear About the Morgans?” 2009 Hugh Grant. ‘PG-13’ Å (10:50) ›› “2 Fast 2 Furious” Å STARZ 300 408 300 (4:50) › “Mother’s Boys” 1994 Jamie Lee Curtis. A manipulative ›› “Tenure” 2009, Comedy Luke Wilson. A professor tries to “Black and Blue: Legends of the Hip-Hop Cop” 2005, DocuKiss and Tail: The Hollywood Jump-Off Women exploit them- (11:05) ›› “The Killer Inside Me” 2010 TMC 525 525 mom returns to the family she abandoned. derail a rival’s tenure track. ’ ‘R’ Å mentary Premiere. ’ ‘R’ Å selves to achieve stardom in hip-hop. ‘MA’ Å Casey Affleck, Jessica Alba. ‘R’ (4:30) NHL Hockey Los Angeles Kings at Detroit Red Wings (Live) Hockey Central Whacked Out NHL Overtime (Live) Boxing ‘PG’ NHL Overtime VS. 27 58 30 Girls Like Boys Girls Like Boys The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer No Safe Place ‘PG’ John Edward Cross Country ‘PG’ WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 13, 2010 C3

CALENDAR TODAY JAZZ CONCERT: The Central Oregon Community College Big Bands Jazz performs a holiday concert under the direction of Andy Warr; $10, $8 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Pinckney Center for the Arts, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837575.

WEDNESDAY THE NORTHSTAR SESSION: The Californiabased roots-rock band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541382-5174 or www .mcmenamins.com. “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org.

THURSDAY “LIGHT UP A LIFE”: Light a candle in honor of loved ones; followed by a reception; donations accepted; 5-6 p.m.; Sisters Art Works, 204 W. Adams St.; 541-548-7483 or brvhospice@bendbroadband.com. “JOY TO YOU & ME”: A presentation of the play, which features a series of classic theater vignettes; proceeds benefit Toys for Tots; donation of unwrapped toys encouraged; 7 p.m.; Elton Gregory Middle School, 1220 N.W. Upas Ave., Redmond; 541-5266440. HOLIDAY ORGAN CONCERT: Musician Mark Oglesby plays a holiday concert and Christmas carol singalong; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th St., Redmond; 541-548-3367. “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascades theatrical.org. DICK DALE: The “king of the surf guitar” performs, with Tone Red; ages 21 and older; $20 plus fees in advance, $23 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541788-2989 or www.randompresents .com.

FRIDAY THE TRAIN MAN: Watch Michael Lavrich’s extensive collection of toy trains running on a track and ask questions; free; 10 a.m.-1 p.m. and 2-6 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7050 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. CELEBRATION OF LIGHT: Drive or take a wagon ride through an outdoor nativity and light display, with caroling; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; Madras Conservative Baptist Church, 751 N.E. 10th St.; 541-475-7287. “A CHRISTMAS CAROL”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents an adaptation of Charles Dickens’ classic holiday tale, performed by a youth and adult cast; $19 or $25, $15 ages 12 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www .towertheatre.org. “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Cascades

Theatrical Company presents Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascades theatrical.org. HOLIDAY BLUEGRASS JAMBOREE: Featuring music from The Bond Street Bluegrass Allstars, Blackstrap, Wild Rye and Greg Botsford; $5, plus donations of canned food; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541388-8331. SWEATSHOP UNION: The Vancouver, British Columbia-based hiphop act performs, with Top Shelf, Logy B and Young G; $10 plus fees in advance, $13 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www.randompresents.com.

SATURDAY REDMOND GRANGE BREAKFAST: Featuring biscuits and gravy, hash browns, scrambled eggs, coffee, hot chocolate and more; $5, $3 ages 12 and younger; 7-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Grange, 707 S.W. Kalama Ave. THE TRAIN MAN: Watch Michael Lavrich’s extensive collection of toy trains running on a track and ask questions; free; 10 a.m.-1 p.m. and 2-5 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7050 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Ellen Waterston talks about her book “Where the Crooked River Rises”; free; 1 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; 541-389-1813 or www .deschuteshistory.org. “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. CELEBRATION OF LIGHT: Drive or take a wagon ride through an outdoor nativity and light display, with caroling; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; Madras Conservative Baptist Church, 751 N.E. 10th St.; 541-475-7287. HOLIDAY CONCERT: Featuring a performance by Bill Keale; a portion of proceeds benefits the Alyce Hatch Center; $20 in advance, $22 at the door, free ages 6 and younger; 7 p.m.; Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-815-5224 or www.billkeale.com. “A CHRISTMAS CAROL”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents an adaptation of Charles Dickens’ classic holiday tale, performed by a youth and adult cast; $19 or $25, $15 ages 12 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541389-0803 or www.cascades theatrical.org. THE QUICK AND EASY BOYS: The Portland-based funk band performs; $7; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .silvermoonbrewing.com.

SUNDAY THE TRAIN MAN: Watch Michael Lavrich’s extensive collection of toy trains running on a track and ask questions; free; 1-5 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.;

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

541-617-7050 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Final performance of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541389-0803 or www.cascades theatrical.org. “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 3:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. CELEBRATION OF LIGHT: Drive or take a wagon ride through an outdoor nativity and light display, with caroling; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; Madras Conservative Baptist Church, 751 N.E. 10th St.; 541-4757287. ON A CLEAR WINTER’S NIGHT JAZZ CHRISTMAS: Featuring performances by Peter White, Mindi Abair and Rick Braun; with Santa, live reindeer, carolers and more; $26, $56 reserved; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend; www.c3events.com. “A CHRISTMAS CAROL”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents an adaptation of Charles Dickens’ classic holiday tale, performed by a youth and adult cast; $19 or $25, $15 ages 12 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541317-0700 or www .towertheatre.org. SUNRIVER MUSIC FESTIVAL CHRISTMAS CONCERT: An evening of classical and Christmas music, with maestro Lawrence Leighton Smith; $30, $40 reserved, $25 ages 65 and older, $10 ages 18 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; Sunriver Resort Great Hall, 17728 Abbot Drive; 541-593-9310, tickets@sunrivermusic.org or www .sunrivermusic.org.

MONDAY Dec. 20 THE TRAIN MAN: Watch Michael Lavrich’s extensive collection of toy trains running on a track and ask questions; free; 10 a.m.-1 p.m. and 2-6 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7050 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. THE REPTILE ZONE: Jeff from The Reptile Zone will show lizards, pythons and a tortoise; all ages welcome; free; 3 p.m.; Play Outdoors, 840 S.E. Woodland Blvd., Suite 110, Bend; 866-6082423. “A CHRISTMAS CAROL”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents an adaptation of Charles Dickens’ classic holiday tale, performed by a youth and adult cast; $19 or $25, $15 ages 12 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre .org.

TUESDAY Dec. 21 “SHARING OUR FAVORITE GENEALOGY STORIES”: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program followed by a holiday potluck; free; 10 a.m.; Rock Arbor Villa, Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-3178978,541-317-9553 or www .orgenweb.org/deschutes/bend-gs.

WEDNESDAY Dec. 22 LIVE READ: Sit in comfy chairs and

listen to short fiction read aloud by library staff; free; 6:30-7:30 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080.

FRIDAY Dec. 24 COMMUNITY CHRISTMAS EVE SERVICE: With food, carols, a choir performance and a performance by Annie Bethancourt; reservations recommended; free; 4, 5:30 and 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www .towertheatre.org. STARFEST: Explore the festive holiday light display; through Jan. 2; free; 5:50-9:30 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; www.eagle-crest.com.

SATURDAY Dec. 25 STARFEST: Explore the festive holiday light display; through Jan. 2; free; 5:50-9:30 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; www.eagle-crest.com.

SUNDAY Dec. 26 CHARITY BINGO: Event includes a canned food drive and baked-goods sale; proceeds benefit the St. Vincent de Paul food bank; $7; 2 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, 235 N.E. Fourth St., Prineville; 541-447-7659. STARFEST: Explore the festive holiday light display; through Jan. 2; free; 5:50-9:30 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; www.eaglecrest.com.

TUESDAY Dec. 28 CLASSICS BOOK CLUB: Read and discuss short stories by Henry James; free; 6-8 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7087, kevinb@dpls.us or www.dpls.us/calendar.

WEDNESDAY Dec. 29 CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT: Bird watchers of all levels walk with naturalist or independently for the annual bird survey; free; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394 or www.sunriver naturecenter.org. REVEREND HORTON HEAT: The Dallas-based rockabilly band performs, with Hillstomp; $20 plus fees in advance, $25 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www.random presents.com.

FRIDAY Dec. 31 BEND’S FIRST 1000 LIGHTS COMMUNITY WALK: Event includes a family festival, a magic show, live music and an illuminated walk; proceeds benefit the La Pine Community Kitchen; $18, $25 for families, free ages 13 and younger; all participants are asked to donate three cans of food, warm clothing or pet food; 4 p.m., walk begins 6 p.m.; Juniper Elementary School, 1300 N.E. Norton St.; www.bendsfirst 1000lightswalk.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE BASH: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event, with “The Mafioso Murders,” casino games and more; $69; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buck boardmysteries.com.

M T For Monday, Dec. 13

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

BURLESQUE (PG-13) 2:15, 4:50, 7:20 COOL IT (PG) 2:05, 5, 7:25 FAIR GAME (PG-13) 2:10, 4:40, 7:10 THE GIRL WHO KICKED THE HORNET’S NEST (R) 2:30, 7 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 2:25, 7:05 TAMARA DREWE (R) 2, 4:30, 7:15

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER 3-D (PG) 11:15 a.m., 12:10, 1:50, 2:45, 4:30, 5:20, 7, 8, 9:35, 10:35 THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) 11:45 a.m., 2:20, 4:55, 7:30, 10:05 THE TOURIST (PG-13) 11:35 a.m.,

2:15, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45 THE WARRIOR’S WAY (R) 12:25, 2:50, 5:15, 7:40, 10 TANGLED (PG) 11:40 a.m., 2:05, 4:25, 6:45, 9:30 FASTER (R) Noon, 2:25, 5:25, 7:55, 10:20 LOVE AND OTHER DRUGS (R) 11:55 a.m., 2:30, 5:05, 7:45, 10:30 BURLESQUE (PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 2, 4:40, 7:25, 10:10 TANGLED 3-D (PG) 11:10 a.m., 1:35, 4 THE NEXT THREE DAYS (PG-13) 12:15, 3:55, 6:55, 9:55 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (DP — PG-13) 6:40, 9:50 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 3:50, 7:10, 10:15 UNSTOPPABLE (PG-13) 11:25 a.m., 1:45, 4:10, 6:35, 9:40 MORNING GLORY (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 1:55, 4:20, 6:50, 9:25 MEGAMIND 3-D (PG) 11:20 a.m., 1:40, 4:05, 6:25, 9:20 DUE DATE (R) 12:20, 2:40,

5:30, 8:05, 10:25 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies. EDITOR’S NOTE: Digitally projected shows (marked as DP) use one of several different technologies to provide maximum fidelity. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) EDITOR’S NOTE: Due to Monday Night Football, no movies will be shown today.

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road,

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Redmond, 541-548-8777

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG-13) 3:30, 6:15, 9 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 5:30, 9 TANGLED (PG) 4, 6:15, 8:30 UNSTOPPABLE (PG-13) 4:45, 7, 9:15

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

BURLESQUE (PG-13) 4:30, 7 THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) 4, 6:30 MORNING GLORY (PG-13) 7 TANGLED (PG) 4:45 THE TOURIST (PG-13) 4:15, 6:45

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

DUE DATE (R) 7 MEGAMIND (G) 4

Dennis Van Tine / Abaca Press via McClatchy-Tribune News Service

The Rockettes practice high kicks at a rehearsal for the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade last month at Macy’s Herald Square in New York City.

Radio City Music Hall’s Rockettes get a leg up during Christmas tour By Donald Munro McClatchy-Tribune News Service

FRESNO, Calif. — Let’s face it. Rockettes stand out. Vanessa McMahan was hanging out Tuesday in the lobby of her San Jose hotel when a group of men came up and said hi. “They kind of figured I was a Rockette,” McMahan says. Of course, someone tipped the guys off that a group of the worldfamous dancers was staying in the hotel as part of the touring “Radio City Christmas Spectacular.” But once the word was out, it didn’t take long to single out the tall, leggy dancers in the bunch. McMahan is used to the attention. “People’s eyes light up,” she says. “It’s a great conversation starter.” The phone conversation she’s having this morning is all about plugging the Christmas show, an arena-stage extravaganza that includes a double-decker bus, a 25-by-65-foot LED screen, 16 ensemble members, eight singers, six children and, of course, lots of face time with Santa. Plus the main attraction: 18 Rockettes, or, as McMahan puts it, “36 legs.” The tour is visiting 19 cities for a total of 81 shows. One of her favorite parts of the performance is the appearance of the double-decker bus — “ridden” on by all the Rockettes — which in conjunction with the giant LED screen gives the illusion of driving through holiday scenes of New York. The show includes the “Parade of the Wooden Soldiers” and the “Living Nativity” scenes both of which have been part of the original Radio City holiday show since they were first performed in 1933. Without a doubt, the most fa-

mous move by the dancers is the “eye-high” kick — that iconic image of the women in a single line strutting their stuff in perfect synchronicity. They perform 300 eyehigh kicks in each show totaling 437,400 eye-high kicks during the tour. (Isn’t it amazing what sort of fun facts publicists send out? How about this one: Twelve hundred pairs of tights adorn the Rockettes’ world-famous legs during the 19-city run!) There are a few tricks to make the eye-high kick routine easier to pull off. The women line up by height, with the tallest in the middle. The most important thing to remember, McMahan says, is the dancers aren’t kicking as high as they can. (“We could all kick much higher,” she says with the slightly smug assurance of a professional baseball player who knows he could hit 10 home runs during batting practice.) The key is for everyone to kick at exactly the same height to create an illusion of uniformity. McMahan has had a lot of opportunities to perfect her technique. She moved from her hometown of Kansas City, Mo. to New York — this was in the days before the show’s national tour, so she’d only seen the Rockettes on TV — and stood in front of Radio City with hundreds of women auditioning for a few coveted positions in the company. After four auditions, she landed a spot in 2003. Among the highlights of her Rockette career: performing at the Tony Awards with Hugh Jackman and at the 2004 presidential inauguration. Through it all, she says, she’s had a blast. She has no problem with another important requirement of the job: smiling. “Your cheeks do hurt,” she says, “but you’re used to it.”

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Every Friday In


C4 Monday, December 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 13, 2010 C5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO SATURDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Dec. 13, 2010: This year, expect surprises, and you might not be surprised! You will feel more optimistic and positive about your personal and domestic life than you have in years. Some of you might be purchasing new homes. If you are single, spring 2011 could present a tantalizing relationship. Only you can determine its significance to you. If you are attached, you might be adding to your family, be it just a pet or adding new fun to your already exciting relationship. Plan a trip as a couple. Use care with your finances, as although you feel you are on solid ground, often there might be disruption and major expenses. Be aware, and you will be one step ahead. PISCES can be a drain. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Understanding others’ motives could be a full-time job. If someone’s behavior is weird or off, why not just ask this person what is going on? Understanding your own motives could be more important. Avoid a clash of the titans. Tonight: Take a serious look at your reactions. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH Zero in on possibilities rather than problems. You will lighten up considerably. Many unexpected developments could toss you off a preordained path. Stretch to see beyond the obvious. Tonight: Where the gang is. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH How you see a situation

and the manner in which it evolves could be far more significant than you believe. Though you could be stunned by news, you will adjust. The unexpected occurs in the workplace or with someone you look up to. Tonight: A partner or loved one could be more difficult than necessary. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Your ability to flex is put to the test. How much can you really handle and absorb? New information is forthcoming. A key figure in your life doesn’t demonstrate the same ability to flex and could be a problem right now. Tonight: Let your imagination kick in. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH The best intentions could fall to the wayside. When making plans or a to-do list, you assume a certain set of givens. Those givens could go to the wayside too quickly for your taste today. Demonstrate an innate openness. Tonight: Rethink a decision carefully. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Strap on your seat belt, as you could find that nearly everywhere you turn life presents a maze or a roller-coaster ride. Maintain your sense of humor, and you will clear it with ease. A discussion about a project or with a loved one could provide exciting ups and downs. Tonight: Stay in the moment. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH You could be flabbergasted by how fast the best laid plans fall to the wayside. You also might want to rethink a situation more carefully that involves your personal and/or domestic life. Understanding evolves for those who want it. Tonight:

Squeeze in some exercise. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH Your creativity responds to the unanticipated. You’ll move in new ways and in a new direction if you don’t get stuck in a mental attitude. In any case, knowing when to move on remains critical. Tonight: Ever playful. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Getting clear of a personal matter might not happen. You might have to accept the situation knowing that all the facts and ramifications are far from in. Use care making any financial commitments, especially if you’re feeling pressured. Tonight: Mosey on home. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Keep asking questions and listening to the responses. What seems too good to be true quite possibly is. You could discover that what you always thought of as a given is otherwise. You might have to stop and regroup. Tonight: Rethinking recent events. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH Use caution with an investment, commitment or personal spending. What you didn’t think was going to happen does occur. Your ability to flex and grow in a new direction emerges. Tonight: Give some deep thought to an idea. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH Your unpredictability comes forward and might blow what felt like a special opportunity right out. Don’t get too upset. Eventually this would have happened. You cannot suppress sides of your personality. Tonight: A hard talk with an assertive friend. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

C6 Monday, December 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Species

Compost

Continued from C1 The great diversity of life in the Amazon includes species and habitats that have direct benefits for people worldwide, Symington said. Compounds found on the skin of the poison dart frog, for example, turned out to be important for anesthesia and other medical products. The Amazon rainforests also have an impact on the regional and global climate. Some climate models show that the Amazon influences rainfall in the U.S. Midwest. The World Wildlife Fund reviewed scientific literature and counted more than 1,200 new species — including 637 plants, 257 fish, 216 amphibians, 55 reptiles, 16 birds and 39 mammals — that were discovered in the Amazon from 1999 to 2009. The full count would be much higher, because the report didn’t include the vast majority of newly found invertebrates. The report was released as the 193 member countries of the U.N. Convention on Biological Diversity meet in Japan on ways to protect the diversity of life on Earth. The World Wildlife Fund reported that at least 17 percent of the Amazon rainforest has been destroyed in the last 50 years. The fund has a program in Brazil and the seven other countries of the Amazon Basin to protect the rainforest from agriculture, ranching and roads, while promoting sustainable economic development. Cattle ranching, for example, accounts for 80 percent of the Amazon’s deforestation, Symington said. “If we can make sure ranching doesn’t expand and those ranches that exist could be more productive instead, that would be a huge gain,” she said. Logging has reduced the habitat of the bald-headed parrot, one of the new finds. It lives in only a few places in Brazil, and its population is declining. Last week, the Alliance for Zero Extinction, a coalition of conservation organizations, including the U.S. division of the World Wildlife Fund, released a report that found that 920 of the world’s most endangered wildlife species are restricted to 587 sites, and only half of them have any degree of conservation protection. The alliance said in a news release that protecting the remaining sites “could help to avert an imminent global extinction crisis.”

Continued from C1 At Café Yumm!, workers take the ends of zucchini, onion skins, pits and skins of avocados and more, and toss them into four buckets they have in the prep area, said Karli Foster, co-owner and general manager of the restaurant. “As we’re making food to order and when tickets come through, we can put that compost right there,” she said. It wasn’t hard to make the switch to throwing scraps into the compost buckets, she said — workers were already used to sorting out recycling and other materials. And as a green-minded restaurant, it meshed with the company’s philosophy, she said. “It’s been fantastic,” she said. “The busier we are, the more we see we’re composting.” Because so much material is composted, the restaurant only has to have a garbage pickup once a week, instead of two or three times, she said. “We really don’t have a lot of garbage,” Foster said. Strictly Organic has sent coffee grounds to Fields Farm for years, said Rhonda Ealy, co-owner of the coffee shop.

Twitter Continued from C1 The app is a finalist for the Best Social Media Management Tool award from the influential and highly trafficked social media blog Mashable.com. Mashable is giving out awards for the fourth consecutive year. This year, there are 25 categories for Mashable awards. Robinson has been reaching out to fellow tweeps in Bend and elsewhere to ask for votes, which can be submitted to the award site one time per day. And the tweeps are responding in great numbers. When a fellow tweep first nominated Robinson’s unfollowing app for the award, Robinson was thrilled. “If I can make it to the finals, I’ll be a happy guy,” he said he remembers thinking. On Nov. 30, when Mashable announced the five finalists for the award and he saw his app listed, he doubted he could win. “It’s a little David versus Goliath,” he said. Who Unfollowed Me? is up against a few heavy hitters in the world of Twitter apps, such as Tweetdeck, which allows users to see the latest updates from accounts they follow in categorized lists, and HootSuite, which enables users to simultaneously post on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and other social media sites. But as votes for Robinson’s app rack up on the award site, he has become more confident. “Now I actually think I can win,” he said. Robinson is quick to admit his unfollowing app was not the first of its kind.

Traffic going up daily First, he said, there was Qwitter, which e-mails Twitter users when others unfollow them. But then Qwitter stopped working, he said, and there was a void in the unfollowing-app niche. After developing it for a week, Robinson launched Who Unfollowed Me? in February. Since then, he said, “I’ve just watched the traffic go up every day.” And now other unfollowing apps have entered the market. Two of them are JustUnfollow and ManageFlitter. Qwitter has

“It’s definitely a winning proposition for everyone. It reduces our overall waste, helps out Fields Farm, (and) it reduces the cost of our trash.” — Noelle Fredland, Old Mill District marketing manager

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday In

‘A way of life’ “Composting and reusing and recycling as much as we possibly can — that’s a way of life for us and always has been,” she said. But with the Old Mill program, the management company took the lead and organized the effort, Ealy said, making it easy for the restaurant to participate. “It’s a great program,” she said, noting that the Old Mill store fills two or three 5-gallon buckets a day, just with coffee grounds. Jim Fields, owner of Fields Farm, said he’s also happy with the way the program has gone. He composts the food waste and coffee grounds with horse manure and other material to create a fertilizer that he uses to grow vegetables on his Bend farm. The compost mixture can bump up the organic matter in the soil from between 1 and 2 percent to 5 percent, he said. Most organic farms don’t make their own compost, Fields said, since doing so is almost like an additional operation that farmers have to manage.

resurfaced, too. “I started by emulating other people,” Robinson said, “and now it’s kind of funny to see other people emulate what I’m doing.” Who Unfollowed Me? is different from other social media apps Robinson has designed in the past in that people come back to use it again and again, he said. Another app Robinson released this year, called Twush, gives tweeps a way to confess a Twitter crush, or twush, on other users in their network. The idea came about after a lunch conversation with a friend a few months ago. “She said, ‘I have a Twitter crush,’” Robinson recalled. “‘Oh, you have a twush,’” he replied. Robinson went home and wrote down his idea, registered a domain name and spent a few days setting up a website for his new concept. But he has seen people use twush as a novelty, just once or maybe twice, he said. Who Unfollowed Me? is different from twush in this respect, and others. Some users pay $4.99 a year for premium services on the site, and these days Robinson is seeing 200 new accounts being registered per month. Currently, he said, the site has 350,000 registered users and receives 90,000 visits per day. The other app Robinson released this year is called Follower Review. It gives Twitter users numerical information on the ways they and their followers use the social media site: how often they retweet, or forward, information; how often they link to sites in tweets; how often they reply to others’ tweets; and how frequently they add hashtags, or labels, to their tweets. Mashable does not pay award winners. But already the nomination of Robinson’s unfollowing app has brought up thousands of new users and Twitter followers. The added attention is likely to come in handy, as Robinson continues to develop new Twitter apps and other technologies. Before the year is up, Robinson said, he hopes to release an app called So Forgetful, which will allow users to set reminders for themselves in the form of tweets and e-mails. The app originated,

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Karli Foster, of Café Yumm!, says it wasn’t hard to get kitchen staff to throw food scraps into the compost buckets. The greenminded restaurant was already sorting out recycling materials. “It’s so much more expensive and time consuming,” he said. But the mix of material — coffee grounds from all over the world, vegetable scraps from different regions and other material like hops — adds different elements to the fertilizer, he said. Making compost with waste from area restaurants keeps things local, and uses resources from Central Oregon, he said. “We really like this low-energy lifestyle,” he said.

Educating employees The biggest challenge in the program has been making sure employees know what goes in the compost bin, Fredland said. A busy summer followed by the hectic holiday season has slowed the process of other restaurants joining the program, she said, and other businesses such as Greg’s Grill and Anthony’s have separate

programs for food recycling. But she said she would like to get other restaurants, including the new Jimmy John’s Gourmet Sandwiches, on board in January. Craig McCollum, co-owner of Jimmy John’s, said the restaurant already donates good food it can no longer use to a shelter, but would be open to the composting program for food waste. Fredland said she hopes the program continues. “It’s definitely a winning proposition for everyone,” Fredland said. “It reduces our overall waste, helps out Fields Farm, (and) it reduces the cost of our trash.” Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or at kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

he said, from his wife frequently nagging him to take out the garbage on Sundays. And Robinson is eager to expand Who Unfollowed Me? to Facebook. Lindley said EDCO does not know exactly how many software developers live and work in the region. But she does know such people abound here, mostly for quality-of-life reasons. After all, their work is not necessarily tied to the region, so they might as well live here, she said. “Simply by being nominated in the Top 5,” she said, “it brings attention to the independent development community that we have, and a lot of folks don’t know that we have a lot of software developers. ... It brings attention to the kind of entrepreneurial talent and software talent that we have in Central Oregon.”

SocialEatia Robinson is not only involved in his own projects. He currently works at the office of SocialEatia, a soon-to-launch Web venture that will help restaurants and other food-related businesses coordinate their social media presence, and show hungry Web surfers posts from myriad local establishments. Robinson is designing SocialEatia’s website, and when he’s done, he will develop iPhone and Android apps for the service, said SocialEatia CEO Evan Julber. Julber said SocialEatia was born after Julber told Robinson about how a family friend of Julber’s was struggling to find time to update all her restaurant’s social media sites, and Robinson essentially said he could have an app for that. These days, Robinson said, he spends about 35 hours a week working on SocialEatia and about 20 hours a week on his own projects, including his own apps. “His work ethic is excellent,” Julber said of Robinson. “I know he’ll work till 1 or 2 in the morning, and he just loves programming and learning new programming techniques.” Jordan Novet can be reached at 541-633-2117 or at jnovet@bendbulletin.com.

7:00 P.M. Tickets available at: Newport Avenue Market Front row & premier seating available only at Saxon’s Fine Jewelers

Fine Art Illustrated By: John Hiller


S

NBA Inside Spurs rout Blazers, see Page D4.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2010

NFL Roof collapse moves Giants-Vikings game to Detroit MINNEAPOLIS — Brett Favre is getting help from the Minnesota Vikings medical staff, the athletic trainers and perhaps even the weather gods as he tries to keep his incredible consecutive starts record going. The Vikings’ home game against the New York Giants was moved to tonight in Detroit after the Metrodome’s inflated roof collapsed in a snowstorm early Sunday morning. The delay has given Favre more time to heal his sprained right shoulder, with his NFL-record streak of 297 straight regular season starts hanging in the balance. Favre barely practiced all week. He’s listed as questionable for the game after getting hit hard and slammed to the turf on his first pass of last week’s game against the Buffalo Bills. Favre sent a text message to USA Today on Sunday saying he doubts he will be able to play on Monday night “but it does buy a little time.” Interim coach Leslie Frazier said the 41-year-old quarterback will still go through a pregame workout to determine if he’s able to play. The game originally was scheduled for Sunday afternoon and already had been pushed back because of the storm that dumped 17 inches of snow on Minneapolis. But Metrodome officials told the league the roof wouldn’t be ready in time to play today or Tuesday. The league also had discussions with New Orleans, St. Louis and Indianapolis and briefly considered the University of Minnesota’s outdoor stadium before deciding to hold the game at Ford Field at 4:20 p.m. PST. For a related photo, see NFL on Page D3. — The Associated Press

INSIDE NFL Cardinals .....43 Broncos ....... 13

Jaguars ........38 Raiders ........31

Eagles ..........30 Cowboys......27

Saints ..........31 Rams............ 13

Bills.............. 13 Browns...........6

49ers ...........40 Seahawks ....21

Lions..............7 Packers ..........3

Patriots ........36 Bears .............7

Steelers .......23 Bengals..........7

Dolphins ...... 10 Jets ................6

Bucs............. 17 Redskins ...... 16

Chargers ......31 Chiefs ............0

Falcons ........31 Panthers ...... 10

49ers top Seahawks With loss by Rams, San Francisco is in the mix in the NFC West race, see Page D3

D

An unofficial race for the bigger guys, gals HEATHER CLARK

T

he 2010 Cyclocross National Championships made for a week that Central Oregon cyclocross fans will remember. In the span of five days, we experienced just about every weather extreme Mother Nature could throw at us: freezing ice and snow, driving rain and wind, and

then unseasonably warm temperatures and even some sun. Riders raced on a muddy and mucky course and in a competitive environment that I heard numerous participants describe as the most difficult ’cross racing they had ever endured. And that’s part of the reason why the top performances by local riders were so special. See Bigger / D6

BEAU EASTES

CYCLING CENTRAL

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Riders navigate a sharp corner while participating in the Clydesdale Championship race held Saturday evening on the Cyclocross Nationals course in Bend.

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2 0 1 0 C Y C L O C R O S S N AT I O N A L C H A M P I O N S H I P S

A festive final day MEN

Bend cyclist digs deep but finishes second By Mark Morical The Bulletin

The adoring hometown crowd was loud as could be, clanging cowbells and screaming his name every time he rode by. But in the end, Bend’s Ryan Trebon could not close the gap on Todd Wells. Wells, a two-time Olympic mountain biker from Durango, Colo., claimed his third U.S. Cyclocross National Championship Sunday afternoon in Bend’s Old Mill District. Wells finished the race (eight laps on a 1.8-mile course) in 1 hour, 49 seconds, holding off a hard-charging Trebon, who finished second in 1:01:14. Jeremy Powers, of Easthampton, Mass., finished third in 1:02:16. See Second / D6

WOMEN

Colorado rider claims seventh straight title By Mark Morical The Bulletin

Just how many consecutive Cyclocross National Championships will Katie Compton win? When does this unprecedented streak end? “You know, I want to win every race I start,” Compton said. “So, I don’t know, as long as the run can go.” Compton, of Colorado Springs, Colo., cruised easily to her seventh straight U.S. title Sunday in the Elite women’s race at the 2010 U.S. Cyclocross National Championships on an unseasonably mild afternoon in Bend’s Old Mill District. See Rider / D6

Changes coming in winter sports playoffs

Jess Reed / The Bulletin

Bend’s Ryan Trebon, No. 54, leads a pack of riders as they come down from the bridge during the Elite men’s race of the U.S. Cyclocross Nationals on Sunday in Bend’s Old Mill District. Pictured at the top of the bridge, in the background, is eventual race winner Todd Wells, of Durango, Colo.

he Oregon School Activities Association did the Redmond High wrestling team no favors this past offseason. Instead of competing in the Salem-based Central Valley Conference, as the Panthers have the last four years, Redmond wrestlers starting this season will qualify for the Class 6A state tournament through 6A’s Special District 4. That district includes Roseburg, winner of three of the last four 6A state team titles, and Crater, the 2009 5A state runner-up. In an effort to reduce costs — and the number of statetour na ment p a r t ic i p a n t s Inside — the OSAA • A look at altered the the districts way in which and leagues wrestlers will for Central qualify for the Oregon upcoming state teams in wrestling tournaments when swimming, it went through basketball its latest round and of reclassificawrestling, tion. Instead of Page D4 the top three wrestlers advancing from each league tournament, teams at all classifications will go to an eight-team regional or “Special District” tournament, where the top four wrestlers in each weight class will earn a berth at state. “For us individually as a school, it’s going to be pretty rough on us,” Panther wrestling coach Nathan Stanley says about the new regional format. “We’ve got the toughest region in the state. “But this will be good for the sport,” Stanley acknowledges. “It’s important we get the good kids to state.” While Redmond may have drawn the short end of the stick as far as regional matchups go, teams representing Central Oregon’s 5A schools — Bend, Mountain View and Summit — should be ecstatic with their new district. Instead of competing in a district with four-time defending state champion Hermiston or historically strong Crook County and Pendleton, Bend’s three wrestling programs will square off against teams from Southern Oregon and the Eugene area in Class 5A’s Special District 4. The OSAA’s reshuffling could also have a profound effect on Madras and Crook County, both of which will compete in Class 4A this season. The White Buffaloes finished eighth and the Cowboys 11th, respectively, at the 5A state meet last March. Madras and Crook County will compete in 4A’s Special District 2 with Eastern Oregon teams La Grande, Baker, Ontario and McLoughlin of Milton-Freewater, and with Central Oregon rivals Sisters and La Pine. See Playoffs / D4

SNOWBOARDING San Francisco 49ers safety Reggie Smith (30) celebrates with safety Dashon Goldson after intercepting Seattle Seahawks quarterback Matt Hasselbeck.

Rising star recovering a year after halfpipe crash By Eddie Pells The Associated Press

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 NFL ............................................D3 NBA .......................................... D4 College basketball .....................D5 Cycling Central......................... D6

DENVER — He’s barely visible in the picture on his iPod, unconscious in an intensive-care unit, hidden beneath a raft of tubes, machines and breathing devices. Only a long, mullet-like hairdo — hastily shaved away at the front and sides of his head to create entry points for all this apparatus — gives a hint of who he is. “That’s my third day in the hospital. It’s still crazy for me to see those,” says the patient, Kevin Pearce, who remembers nothing of that time and is thankful for that. “I would never guess that’s what I looked like. “But that actually wasn’t hard for me to see,” he says,

“because I knew I was going to be OK from all those tubes.” Nearing the one-year mark since the crash on the halfpipe in Utah that nearly killed him, Pearce is doing better than OK.

The accident An up-and-coming snowboarding star, Pearce was working on the toughest, most dangerous trick in the sport — the Double Cork 1260 — a trick that might have helped him beat Shaun White at the Olympics. See Crash / D5

Ed Andrieski / The Associated Press

Snowboarder Kevin Pearce, 23, talks about his recovery from a serious head injury during an interview in Denver last week. Nearing the one-year anniversary of the crash on the halfpipe in Utah that nearly killed him, Pearce is doing well.


D2 Monday, December 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A TELEVISION TODAY SOCCER 11:55 a.m. — English Permier League, Manchester United vs. Arsenal, ESPN2. 2 p.m. — English Permier League, Tottenham vs. Chelsea (taped), FSNW.

SCOREBOARD

Partizan (taped), FSNW.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — Women’s college, Tennessee at Baylor, ESPN2.

HOCKEY 4 p.m. — NHL, Pittsburgh Penguins at Philadelphia Flyers, VS. network.

HOCKEY 4:30 p.m. — NHL, Los Angeles Kings at Detroit Red Wings, VS. network.

RADIO TODAY

BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Memphis Grizzlies, Comcast SportsNet Northwest.

FOOTBALL 5:30 p.m. — NFL, Baltimore Ravens at Houston Texans, ESPN.

BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Memphis Grizzlies, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690. 7 p.m. — Men’s college, Jacksonville State at Oregon, KBND-AM 1110.

TUESDAY SOCCER 2:30 p.m. — UEFA Champions League, Arsenal vs.

Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B

ON DECK Tuesday Girls basketball: Sisters at Madras, 7 p.m.; Redmond at Summit, 7 p.m.; Western Mennonite at Culver, 5 p.m. Boys basketball: Madras at Sisters, 7 p.m.; Summit at Redmond, 7 p.m.; Western Mennonite at Culver, 6:30 p.m. Wrestling: Crook County at Bend, 7 p.m. Swimming: Bend High at Redmond, 4 p.m.

IN THE BLEACHERS

Thursday Girls basketball: La Pine vs. South Whidbey (Wash.) at Seaside Holiday Classic, 3:30 p.m.; Madras vs. South Whidbey (Wash.) at Seaside Holiday Classic, 6:45 p.m.; Sisters vs. Rogue River at Phoenix Invitational, 5:30 p.m. Boys basketball: La Pine vs. South Whidbey (Wash.) at Seaside Holiday Classic, 5:15 p.m.; Madras vs. Astoria at Seaside Holiday Classic, 5:15 p.m.; Sisters vs. Phoenix at Phoenix Invitational, 8:30 p.m. Wrestling: Redmond at Summit, 7 p.m.; Crook County at Culver, 6 p.m. Swimming: Sisters at Sweet Home, 3 p.m. Friday Girls basketball: Mountain View at Sandy, 7:15 p.m.; La Pine, Madras at Seaside Holiday Classic, TBA; Sisters at Phoenix Invitational, TBA; Summit at Ashland, 2 p.m.; Redmond at Sheldon, 7 p.m.; The Dalles-Wahtonka at Bend, 7 p.m.; Culver at East Linn, 6:30 p.m. Boys basketball: Sandy at Mountain View at Sky View Middle School in Bend, 7 p.m.; La Pine, Madras at Seaside Holiday Classic, TBA; Sisters at Phoenix Invitational, TBA; Crook County at Redmond, 7 p.m.; Summit at Ashland, 3:45 p.m.; Bend at The DallesWahtonka, 7 p.m.; Culver at East Linn, 8 p.m. Wrestling: Redmond, Bend, Summit, Madras, Mountain View, La Pine, Sisters at Adrian Irwin Tournament at Mountain View, 9 a.m.

CYCLOCROSS

Winter sports • United States’ Randall third in cross-country race: U.S. skier Kikkan Randall placed third in the cross country World Cup sprint race in Switzerland won by Marit Bjoergen, and Emil Joensson, of Sweden, won the men’s event. World Cup leader Bjoergen continued her dominating season with a 41st career victory Sunday. The Norwegian led Italy’s Arianna Follis by 2 seconds in the 1.4kilometer freestyle race and Randall was another 0.4 of a second back. • Vonn takes seventh in World Cup GS: Lindsey Vonn enjoyed a victory of sorts Sunday in her bid to retain the World Cup overall title. Her seventh-place finish in a giant slalom won by France’s Tessa Worley at windswept St. Moritz in Switzerland might not seem like much. But it was the best result in nearly two years in what’s easily the weakest discipline for the skier from Park City, Utah. Vonn moved 24 points closer to early leader Maria Riesch in the race for the crystal globe trophy. Riesch, Vonn’s good friend and rival, finished an uncharacteristic 19th. Worley won by 0.01 seconds for the second straight week following her giant slalom victory at Aspen, Colo. She covered the two runs on the Corviglia course in 2 minutes, 10.70 seconds to edge Tanja Poutiainen, of Finland. Tina Maze, of Slovenia, was third, 0.31 behind. Julia Mancuso, of Squaw Valley, Calif., was eighth. • Hirscher edges Raich to win World Cup slalom: Marcel Hirscher tamed the daunting Face de Bellevarde course for a second consecutive year to claim a third World Cup win Sunday in France, edging fellow Austrian Benjamin Raich in a challenging slalom that Bode Miller was unable to finish. Hirscher, who trailed leader Manfred Moelgg, of Italy, by 0.20 seconds after the first run, clocked 53.06 seconds in the afternoon to win in a combined time of 1 minute, 44.70 seconds. Most of the competitors struggled to keep their balance on the steep course and the first run saw several high-profile casualties. On a bad day for the U.S. ski team, Ligety — who won Saturday’s giant slalom in impressive fashion — missed a gate in the second run and finished 36.44 seconds off the pace in 25th place. • Reno preparing bid for 2022 Winter Olympics: Nevada boosters are working quietly behind the scenes to capture another Winter Olympics. The chairman of Reno Tahoe Winter Games Coalition, Lt. Gov. Brian Krolicki, told the Reno Gazette-Journal the group is “very serious” about preparing a bid for the 2022 Winter Games. Krolicki says winning the games would boost Reno’s economy for years before and after the games. Nearby Squaw Valley USA held the 1960 Winter Olympics. The ski resort’s president, Andy Wirth, says he’s enthusiastic about bidding for another chance. Nevada officials say they’d probably have to use taxpayer revenue to bankroll facilities but believe Olympic profits could make the state whole in the end. Olympic cities keep the lion’s share of ticket sales.

Golf • Johnson-Poulter win Shark Shootout: Dustin Johnson and Ian Poulter won the Shark Shootout in Naples, Fla., Sunday, shooting a 13-under 59 in the scramble format to beat Darren Clarke and Graeme McDowell by two shots. Johnson and Poulter took the lead with birdies on their first four holes and had no trouble the rest of the way in finishing at 30-under 186. Clarke and McDowell (59) never came closer than two strokes. The two teams passed second-round co-leaders Jerry Kelly and Steve Stricker (64) and Fred Funk and Kenny Perry (66). Kelly and Stricker, the defending champions, tied for third at 26 under with Chris DiMarco and Anthony Kim (61). The 12 teams in the tournament hosted by Greg Norman at Tiburon Golf Club played modified alternate shot in the first round and better ball in the second. • Martin defends Alfred Dunhill title: Pablo Martin survived a disastrous triple bogey to successfully defend his Alfred Dunhill Championship title Sunday in South Africa, shooting a 2-under 70 for a two-shot victory. The Spaniard had a 7 at the par-4 17th but recovered to birdie

the last for an 11-under 277 at Leopard Creek Country Club. He was two clear of Thorbjorn Olesen (66), Charl Schwartzel (70) and Anthony Michael (73), who took a one-stroke lead into the final round of the European Tour event. Martin is the first winner on the 2010-11 Race to Dubai and the first player to retain a European Tour title since Padraig Harrington won a second straight British Open in 2008. • Senior wins Australian PGA: Australia’s Peter Senior won the rain-delayed Australian PGA early today, beating Geoff Ogilvy with a par on the second hole of a playoff to become the oldest player to win a major professional tournament in Australia. The 51-year-old Senior, a regular on the Champions Tour, made a 10-foot birdie putt on the 18th hole in regulation for a 1-under 71 to match Ogilvy, the Australian Open winner last week in Sydney, at 12-under 276. Ogilvy finished with a 66. Both players parred the 18th hole on the first hole of the playoff, and Ogilvy three-putted for a bogey on the second extra hole to give Senior his third Australian PGA title.

Football • Source says Florida’s Meyer has health concerns: A person with knowledge of the situation says Urban Meyer walked away from Florida because of health concerns. Meyer has a recurring burning sensation in his chest that doctors told him last week would raise cardiovascular risk factors if he continued to coach, the person told The Associated Press on Sunday on condition of anonymity because Meyer’s health issues are confidential. The Gainesville (Fla.) Sun first reported the story. Meyer announced his resignation Wednesday and said health was not the reason he was walking away. He said he wanted to spend more time with his family. • Miami offers coaching job to Temple’s Golden: A person with knowledge of the negotiations tells The Associated Press the Miami Hurricanes have offered their coaching job to Temple’s Al Golden. Golden was expected to accept the offer, according to the person who spoke on condition of anonymity because Miami officials didn’t authorize any comment Sunday with a deal not yet completed. The person told The AP an agreement could be finalized today. Golden would replace Randy Shannon, fired Nov. 27 after the Hurricanes completed a 7-5 regular season. Golden also is believed to be a candidate for the vacant job at Pitt. The 41-year-old Golden has led a turnaround at once-moribund Temple, winning 17 games in the past two seasons.

Baseball • Mariners complete trade with Cardinals: The St. Louis Cardinals have traded infielder Brendan Ryan to the Seattle Mariners for hard-throwing right-hander Maikel Cleto. Ryan hit .223 and had 11 steals in just short of 500 plate appearances for St. Louis last season. The Cardinals get a 21-year old pitcher who can touch 100 mph. He spent last season in the California League. He had a 6.16 ERA in 23 appearances, all but two of which were starts. Cleto also pitched in the Arizona Fall League.

Soccer • Akron wins NCAA men’s title: Scott Caldwell scored in the 78th minute to help Akron beat top-ranked Louisville 1-0 on Sunday in the NCAA Division I men’s soccer championship game in Santa Barbara, Calif. Akron (22-1-2) won the title — its first in NCAA competition in any sport — a year after losing the College Cup final to Virginia in a shootout after a scoreless draw. Caldwell scored on a 15-yard shot after Louisville’s defense blocked his attempt from the top of the penalty box. The midfielder has scored all five of his career goals in the last seven postseason games. Louisville (20-1-3) was attempting to become the first undefeated team since Santa Clara in 1989. Louisville’s Buck Tufty and Aaron Horton had pointblank attempts at a tying score in the final minute in front of a crowd of 9,672 at UC Santa Barbara’s Harder Stadium. Akron took 19 shots in the match, while Louisville had 15. — The Associated Press

2010 USA CYCLING CYCLO-CROSS NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS At Bend’s Old Mill District Elite Men — 1, Todd Wells, Durango, Colo., 1:00:49. 2, Ryan Trebon, bend, 1:01:14. 3, Jeremy Powers, Easthampton, Mass., 1:02:16. 4, James Driscoll, Winooski, Vt., 1:02:52. 5, Tim Johnson, Beverly, Mass., 1:02:52. 6, Barry Wicks, Corvallis, 1:03:03. 7, Adam Craig, Bend, 1:03:29. 8, Tristan Schouten, Plymouth, Wis., 1:04:06. 9, Alexander Candelario, Reno, Nev., 1:04:39. 10, Jesse Anthony, Beverly, Mass., 1:05:08. Elite Women — 1, Katie Compton, Colorado Springs, Colo., 43:48. 2, Georgia Gould, Fort Collins, Colo., 44:19. 3, Meredith Miller, Fort Collins, Colo., 47:07. 4, Katherine Sherwin, Heber City, Utah, 47:25. 5, Susan Butler, Portland, 47:26. 6, Nicole Duke, Boulder, Colo., 47:39. 7, Laura Van Gilder, Cresco, Pa., 47:59. 8, Barbara Howe, Berkeley, Calif., 48:05. 9, Amanda Carey, Victor, Idaho, 48:06. 10, Kaitlin Antonneau, Racine, Wis., 48:21. Division 1 Collegiate Women — 1, Ashley James, Dousman, Wis., 39:10. 2, Kaitlin Antonneau, Racine, Wis., 40:14. 3, Carla Stewart, Banner Elk, N.C., 40:43. 4, Erica Zaveta, Erwinna, Pa., 40:48. 5, Sarah Sturm, Durango, Colo., 43:44. 6, Kaila Hart, Bayfield, Colo., 44:01. 7, Melissa Erickson, Alexandria, Minn., 44:14. 8, Lauren Catlin, Fairfax, Calif., 44:16. 9, Nathalie Krantz, Durango, Colo., 44:42. 10, Cinthia Lehner, Greer, S.C. Division 2 Collegiate Women — 1, Kimberly Flynn, Hixson, Tenn., 43:34. 2, Laura Ralston, Cambridge, Mass., 44:21. 3, Courtenay McFadden, Bellingham, Wash., 44:54. 4, Arielle Filiberti, Worcester, Mass., 45:49. 5, Lindsy Campbell, Missoula, Mont., 46:10. 6, Esmerelda Martinez-Ramos, Grand Junction, Colo., 47:27. 7, Hannah Neubeck, Bellingham, Wash., 48:45. 8, Christina Birch, Cambridge, Mass., 49:02. 9, Olivia Harkness, Portland, Maine, 49:10. 10, Annika Johannesen, Bend. Division 1 Collegiate Men — 1, Zach McDonald, Bainbridge Island, Wash., 41:30. 2, Chris Hurst, Lake Geneva, Wis., 41:38. 3, Bradford Perley, Banner Elk, N.C., 41:43. 4, Braden Kappius, Littleton, Colo., 42:14. 5, Eric Thompson, Banner Elk, N.C., 42:19. 6, Colton Andersen, Durango, Colo., 42:36. 7, Eric Emsky, Fall City, Wash., 43:11. 8, Brian Sheedy, Banner Elk, N.C., 43:20. 9, Rotem Ishay, Durango, Colo., 43:39. 10, Jack Hinkens, Eden Prairie, Minn., 44:12. Division 2 Collegiate Men — 1, Steve Fisher, Bellingham, Wash., 42:56. 2, Logan Wetzel, Renton, Wash., 42:56. 3, Ryan Leech, Savannah, Ga., 43:55. 4, Conor Mullervy, Boise, Idaho, 44:26. 5, Kevin Mullervy, Littleton, Colo., 44:44. 6, Matthew Obregon, Folsom, Calif., 45:55. 7, Richard Geng, Grand Junction, Colo., 46:09. 8, Ian Crane, Bellingham, Wash., 46:09. 9, Brent Poole, Salem, 46:17. 10, Matthew Willing, Weaverville, N.C., 46:39. 2010 CYCLOCROSS NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS Dec. 8-12 Old Mill District, Bend Central Oregon finishers Women Nonchampionship — 4, Shay Frazier, Bend. 10, Hailey Foster, Bend. 15, Laura Hagen, Bend. Men Nonchampionship — 4, Shane Johnson, Redmond. Men Nonchampionship 30-39 — 10, Chris Winans, Bend. 13, Brook Gardner, Bend. 30, Daniel Brewster, Bend. 33, Eric Bradley, Bend. 34, Nathan Boddie, Bend. Men Nonchampionship 40 and older — 18, Todd Raudy, Bend. 19, Derek Stallings, Bend. 21, Chad Lowe, Bend. 22, David Taylor, Bend. 27, Mark Reinecke, Bend. 28, Sean Haidet, Bend. 38, Matthew Lasala, Bend. 39, Drew Holmes, Bend. 40, Kevin English, Bend. 42, Brian Smith, Bend. 43, Rob Kerr, Bend. 44, Michael Abel, Bend. 51, Scott Meredith, Bend. 52, Rene Bates, Bend. 56, Rick Peters, Bend. 57, David Anderson, Bend. 60, Mark Backus, Bend. 61, William Myers, Bend. 63, Jeff Monson, Bend. 64, Bradley Pfeiffer, Bend. 65, Andy Barram, Bend. 66, Kevin Max, Bend. 68, Marvin Lein, Bend. Men Master 60-64 — 6, Don Leet, Bend. 12, Amory Cheney, Bend. Women Master 50-54 — 5, Karen Kenlan, Bend. Women Master 45-49 — 17, Susanna Julber, Bend. 23, Cary Steinman, Bend. Women Master 40-44 — 7, Becky Bjork, Bend. 9, Brenna Lopez-Otero, Bend. 10, Karen Oppenheimer, Bend. 14, Stephanie Uetrecht, Bend. 24, Joanne Stevens, Bend. 26, Cynthia Engel, Bend. 27, Michelle Bazemore, Bend. 30, Angela Mart, Bend. 40, Kate Dunning, Bend. 43, Gina Miller, Bend. Men Master 55-59 — 14, Gary Klingler, Bend. 28, Ralph Tolli, Bend. 38, Karl Jackson, Bend. Men Singlespeed — 1, Adam Craig, Bend. 5, Brennan Wodtli, Bend. 6, Cody Peterson, Bend. 10, John Rollert, Bend. 28, Tim Jones, Bend. 32, Derek Stallings, Bend. 40, Jared Reber, Bend. 49, Jeff Merwin, Bend. 51, Steven Chaprnka, Bend. 57, Mark Campbell, Bend. Junior Women 17-18 — 9, Annika Johannesen, Bend. Junior Men 10-12 — 9, Jett Ballantyne, Bend. Junior Men 13-14 — 5, Lance Haidet, Bend. 16, Massimo Larsen, Bend. 33, Keenan Reynolds, Bend. Junior Men 15-16 — 19, Colin Dunlap, Bend. 34, Dawson Stallings, Bend. 43, Frankie Virgen, Bend. Master Women 30-34 — 8, Serena Bishop, Bend. 39, Amber Clark, Bend. Master Women 35-39 — 10, Renee Scott, Bend. 14, Sarah Max, Bend. 29, Angelina Salerno, Bend. 31, Maren Nelson, Bend. Master Men 45-49 — 9, Eric Martin. 75, Kevin English, Bend. 85, Matthew Lasala, Bend. 91, Hiroji McKinstry, Madras. Master Men 50-54 — 19, Michael Nyberg, Bend. 33, Doug Smith, Bend. 35, Don Wright, Bend. 50, Brian Smith, Bend. 51, Dan Davis, Bend. 55, Ambrose Su, Bend. Junior Men 17-18 — 17, Cole Sprague, Bend. 25,

Andy Su, Bend. 33, Zachary Colton, Bend. Master Men 40-44 — 19, Bart Bowen, Bend. 32, Matt Williams, Bend. 55, Sean Haidet, Bend. 56, Andrew Sargent, Bend. 64, Matt Engel, Bend. 71, Chad Lowe, Bend. 72, Mike Martin, Bend. 96, Robert Uetrecht, Bend. 101, David Sjogren, Bend. 102, Michael Brown, Bend. 107, Wade Miller, Bend. 111, Jack Kelley, Bend. 133, Kenneth Wolford, Bend. Master Men 35-39 — 7, Ben Thompson, Bend. 15, John Rollert, Bend. 16, Tim Jones, Bend. 31, Kyle Wuepper, Bend. 41, Chris Winans, Bend. 52, Mike Schindler, Bend. 56, Adam Carroll, Bend. 57, John Craft, Bend. 64, Luke Mason, Bend. 70, Seth Graham, Bend. 79, Marcus Biancucci, Bend. 80, Doug LaPlaca, Bend. 81, Greg Miranda, Bend. 86, Darren Smith, Bend. Master Men 30-34 — 3, Cody Peterson, Bend. 4, Damian Schmitt, Bend. 23, Matt Fox, Bend. 28, Matt Russell, Bend. 29, John Frey, Bend. 53, Andrew Boone, Bend. 57, Anthony Broadman, Bend. Collegiate Women Division 1 — 12, Allison Halpin, Bend, OSU–Cascades. Collegiate Women Division 2 — 10, Annika Johannesen, Bend, Central Oregon Community College. Collegiate Men Division 1 — 51, Kendal Johnson, Bend, California Polytechnic-San Luis Obispo. Collegiate Men Division 2 — 15, Brian Jorgensen, Bend, Central Oregon Community College. Elite Women — 27, Serena Bishop, Bend. 34, Laura Winberry, Bend. 46, Becky Bjork, Bend. 57, Sarah Max, Bend. 64, Karen Oppenheimer, Bend. 68, Brenna Lopez-Otero, Bend. Elite Men — 2, Ryan Trebon, Bend. 7, Adam Craig, Bend. 18, Carl Decker, Bend. 37, Ben Thompson, Bend. 54, Damian Schmitt, Bend. 59, Brenna Wodtli, Bend. 73, Matt Fox, Bend. 82, John Frey, Bend. 97, Garrett McAllister, Bend. 99, Kendal Johnson, Bend.

NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Today Ravens 3 3 d-Giants 2 4 d-Detroit, MI (Ford Field)

Underdog TEXANS VIKINGS

Troy

Louisville

December 21 St. Petersburg Bowl 3 3 Southern Miss

N. Illinois

Utep Fresno St Ohio U

Boise St

December 22 Las Vegas Bowl 16.5 17

Utah

San Diego St

December 23 Poinsettia Bowl 1.5 3

Navy

Hawaii

December 24 Hawaii Bowl 12.5 11

Toledo

Tulsa

December 26 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl 2 1.5 Florida Int’l

Air Force

West Virginia Missouri Maryland Baylor Oklahoma St

December 27 Independence Bowl 1.5 2.5 Georgia Tech December 28 Champ Sports Bowl 1.5 2.5 NC State Insight Bowl PK 1 Iowa December 29 Eagle Bank Bowl 8 7 East Carolina Texas Bowl 2 2 Illinois Alamo Bowl 5.5 6 Arizona

December 30 Armed Forces Bowl Smu 7 8 Pinstripe Bowl Kansas St 3 1 Music City Bowl North Carolina 1 2 Holiday Bowl Nebraska 13.5 13.5

Army Syracuse Tennessee Washington

December 31 Meineke Car Care Bowl 4.5 4.5 South Florida Sun Bowl Miami (Fla.) 2.5 3 Notre Dame Liberty Bowl Georgia 7 6.5 Central Florida Chick-Fil-A Bowl South Carolina 3 3 Florida St Clemson

January 1 Dallas Ticket City Bowl

Alabama Miss. State Tcu Oklahoma

Stanford

January 3 Orange Bowl 3 3

Virginia Tech

Ohio State

January 4 Sugar Bowl 3.5 3.5

Arkansas

Miami (Ohio)

January 6 GMAC Bowl 1.5 1.5

Mid. Tenn. St.

Lsu

January 7 Cotton Bowl PK 1

Texas A&M

Pitt

January 8 BBVA Compass Bowl 2.5 3

Nevada

Kentucky

January 9 Fight Hunger Bowl 9 9.5 Boston College January 10 BCS National Championship 2.5 3

Oregon

BASKETBALL Men’s college

College December 18 New Mexico Bowl 12 11.5 Humanitarian Bowl 3 1 New Orleans Bowl PK 1.5

Byu

9.5 9.5 Northwestern Outback Bowl 7 7.5 Penn State Capital One Bowl 11 10 Michigan State Gator Bowl 5.5 5.5 Michigan Rose Bowl 2.5 2.5 Wisconsin Fiesta Bowl 17 17 Connecticut

Florida

Auburn

FOOTBALL Betting Line Favorite

Texas Tech

Sunday’s Games ——— FAR WEST Oregon St. 89, Texas-Pan American 69 Portland St. 93, Cal St.-Fullerton 89 San Francisco 50, Montana 48, OT San Jose St. 70, E. Washington 69 Southern Miss. 80, California 78 Stanford 55, UC Riverside 48 MIDWEST Bowling Green 76, Fla. International 67 Drake 72, Boise St. 69 IUPUI 66, Ohio 56 Illinois 86, N. Colorado 76 Indiana St. 86, Oakland City 42 Iowa St. 65, Texas Southern 54 Kent St. 56, South Florida 51 Ohio St. 85, W. Carolina 60 SOUTH Boston College 79, Maryland 75 Elon 102, Lynchburg 63 Florida St. 75, Clemson 69 Furman 76, Middle Tennessee 61 Miami 68, Stetson 54 Mississippi St. 74, N. Carolina A&T 58 South Alabama 91, Houston Baptist 62 Tennessee St. 84, LeMoyne-Owen 48 Texas Coll. 77, Louisiana-Lafayette 74 UNC Wilmington 81, Wake Forest 69 Virginia Tech 79, Penn St. 69 EAST Georgetown 89, Appalachian St. 60 Maine 74, Norfolk St. 54 Temple 82, Akron 47 Vermont 75, Marist 67 Villanova 84, La Salle 81 West Virginia 64, Duquesne 61

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 31 21 8 2 44 101 71 Philadelphia 31 19 7 5 43 105 76 N.Y. Rangers 32 18 13 1 37 96 83 New Jersey 29 8 19 2 18 53 88 N.Y. Islanders 27 5 17 5 15 59 93 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Montreal 30 18 10 2 38 78 61 Boston 28 16 8 4 36 81 56 Buffalo 30 12 14 4 28 78 84 Ottawa 31 13 16 2 28 68 92 Toronto 29 11 14 4 26 65 86 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Washington 32 18 11 3 39 98 92 Tampa Bay 30 16 10 4 36 94 106 Atlanta 30 16 11 3 35 95 88 Carolina 28 12 12 4 28 78 87 Florida 28 13 15 0 26 71 72 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 28 19 6 3 41 96 73 Chicago 31 16 12 3 35 96 89 Nashville 28 14 8 6 34 71 70 Columbus 28 16 11 1 33 74 76 St. Louis 28 14 9 5 33 72 75 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 28 16 8 4 36 91 74 Colorado 29 15 10 4 34 101 90 Minnesota 29 13 12 4 30 71 86 Edmonton 29 11 13 5 27 77 101 Calgary 30 12 15 3 27 81 89 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 29 17 10 2 36 83 80 Anaheim 33 16 13 4 36 87 98 Phoenix 28 14 8 6 34 81 77 San Jose 29 15 10 4 34 88 84 Los Angeles 27 16 10 1 33 73 65 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Sunday’s Games N.Y. Rangers 7, Washington 0 Vancouver 2, Edmonton 1 Anaheim 6, Minnesota 2 Today’s Games Los Angeles at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Atlanta at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Nashville, 5 p.m. Chicago at Colorado, 6 p.m. Columbus at Calgary, 6 p.m. Dallas at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Toronto at Edmonton, 6 p.m.

SOCCER Men’s college NCAA Division I All Times PST ——— Championship Sunday, Dec. 12 At Santa Barbara, Calif. Akron 1, Louisville 0

Sunday’s Summary ——— OREGON ST. 89, TEXAS-PAN AMERICAN 69 TEXAS-PAN AMERICAN (3-9) Mierzycki 1-5 3-4 5, Mason 2-4 2-2 6, Provost 1-4 2-2 4, Urbanus 0-8 0-0 0, Petty 10-17 7-10 32, Hearn 1-7 1-2 4, Gutridge 2-2 1-2 5, Arkwright 0-4 1-2 1, Cabrera 4-9 0-0 10, Cleveland 0-1 2-2 2, Walker 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 21-61 19-26 69. OREGON ST. (4-4) Johnson 7-9 2-3 18, Collier 3-3 3-5 9, Burton 3-6 2-3 8, Cunningham 3-4 2-2 10, Starks 3-5 2-2 10, McShane 1-2 2-2 4, Brown 0-3 1-2 1, Brandt 0-2 0-0 0, Murphy 0-0 0-1 0, Haynes 2-3 2-4 7, Deane 0-0 1-2 1, Wallace 4-7 7-9 15, Jones 1-2 0-0 2, Nelson 1-4 2-2 4. Totals 28-50 26-37 89. Halftime—Oregon St. 43-32. 3-Point Goals—TexasPan American 8-30 (Petty 5-10, Cabrera 2-5, Hearn 1-4, Arkwright 0-2, Provost 0-3, Urbanus 0-6), Oregon St. 7-16 (Cunningham 2-3, Johnson 2-3, Starks 2-4, Haynes 1-1, Jones 0-1, Nelson 0-2, Wallace 0-2). Fouled Out—Petty, Urbanus. Rebounds—Texas-Pan American 38 (Petty 6), Oregon St. 33 (Brown, Collier, Johnson 4). Assists— Texas-Pan American 8 (Hearn 3), Oregon St. 16 (Burton 4). Total Fouls—Texas-Pan American 25, Oregon St. 26. Technical—Texas-Pan American Bench. A—3,607.

Women’s college Sunday’s Games ——— FAR WEST Portland 62, Montana 55 Stanford 77, Fresno St. 40 UC Riverside 59, Washington 54 UCLA 75, Saint Mary’s, Calif. 59

SOUTHWEST Duke 73, Oklahoma St. 45 Oklahoma 63, New Mexico 60 Tennessee 92, Texas 77 Texas A&M 91, TCU 66 Texas Southern 71, Houston Baptist 62 Texas-Pan American 83, Texas St. 76 MIDWEST Butler 105, Ball St. 98, 2OT Indiana St. 92, S.C.-Upstate 64 Iowa St. 73, Columbia 27 Kansas 79, Alabama 57 Kansas St. 61, UC Davis 41 Marquette 63, Wis.-Green Bay 60 Michigan St. 85, Iona 51 Missouri St. 67, Saint Louis 57 Morehead St. 69, SIU-Edwardsville 62 Purdue 71, Murray St. 25 Toledo 56, Indiana 52 W. Michigan 69, Youngstown St. 64, OT Wisconsin 68, Wis.-Milwaukee 53 SOUTH Coastal Carolina 86, Converse 33 Florida Atlantic 68, Georgia Southern 65 Florida Gulf Coast 63, Troy 50 Florida St. 87, Jacksonville St. 39 George Mason 69, Ohio 53 Louisiana Tech 52, Southern U. 44 Louisiana-Lafayette 90, Centenary 74 Middle Tennessee 81, James Madison 75 North Carolina 78, UNLV 66 Richmond 65, Old Dominion 43 Samford 58, Clemson 48 South Carolina 77, N.C. State 63 South Florida 68, North Florida 35 Southern Tech 53, Winthrop 16 W. Kentucky 57, Florida A&M 50 Wofford 83, Bluefield 36 EAST Boston College 84, Rutgers 75 Drexel 66, Seton Hall 43 Duquesne 64, N. Dakota St. 48 Fairleigh Dickinson 69, St. Peter’s 63 Hartford 74, Dartmouth 43 Penn St. 95, Maine 41 Sacred Heart 72, Siena 33 Saint Joseph’s 46, Villanova 43 St. Francis, NY 63, IUPUI 55

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL National League ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Traded INF Brendan Ryan to Seattle for RHP Maikel Cleto. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association PHILADELPHIA 76ERS—Recalled F Craig Brackins from Springfield (NBADL). FOOTBALL National Football League DENVER BRONCOS—Fined CB Perrish Cox an undisclosed amount for missing meetings and practice after his arrest on Dec. 9 in an investigation into an alleged sexual assault. HOCKEY National Hockey League MONTREAL CANADIENS—Recalled LW Max Pacioretty from Hamilton (AHL). Assigned C David Desharnais to Hamilton. ST. LOUIS BLUES—Assigned F Stefan Della Rovere and F Dave Scatchard to Peoria (AHL). TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING—Reassigned F Marc-Antoine Pouliot to Norfolk (AHL). WASHINGTON CAPITALS—Recalled RW Andrew Gordon from Hershey (AHL). COLLEGE LOUISIANA-LAFAYETTE—Named Mark Hudspeth football coach. MEMPHIS—Announced junior basketball F Angel Garcia will leave the team at the end of the fall semester and sign a professional contract in Spain.

Canucks win third straight on the road The Associated Press EDMONTON, Alberta — Henrik Sedin had a goal and an assist and the Vancouver Canucks beat the Edmonton Oilers 2-1 on Sunday, giving them three straight road wins for the first time in more than a year. Alex Burrows also scored for the Canucks, who have won six of eight. Daniel Sedin assisted on both Vancouver goals, and Roberto Luongo stopped Magnus Paajarvi on a penalty shot. Jordan Eberle scored with 5 seconds left for the Oilers, who have lost

NHL ROUNDUP two of three but still have five wins in their last seven games. The Canucks outshot Edmonton 32-12, with the Oilers registering only one shot in the third period for the second game in a row. Vancouver opened the scoring just more than 6 minutes into the first period as Daniel Sedin made a terrific pass through traffic to Burrows, who had an empty net to shoot at. Also on Sunday:

Ducks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Wild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Corey Perry scored on a penalty shot while recording his first career hat trick, Ryan Getzlaf had two goals and Bobby Ryan also found the net, powering Anaheim to a victory over Minnesota. Rangers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Capitals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 NEW YORK — Artem Anisimov scored the first of three Rangers goals during a 3½-minute span early in the second period, and New York routed slumping Washington.


N F L

THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 13, 2010 D3

QB change leads 49ers to a rout of Seahawks Alex Smith comes off the bench to throw three TDs in San Francisco win

A DOME NO MORE

The Associated Press SAN FRANCISCO — Not only is Alex Smith playing for a job next season, he might be helping coach Mike Singletary save his. A switch of quarterbacks named Smith did wonders to keep San Francisco’s hopes alive. Alex Smith threw for 255 yards and three touchdowns in a triumphant return to the starting lineup following a five-game absence, and the 49ers improved their onceslim playoff chances with a 40-21 victory over the NFC West rival Seattle Seahawks on Sunday. The Niners muddled up the ugly West race even more with a surprisingly lopsided win. San Francisco (5-8) moved within a game of division leaders Seattle (6-7) and St. Louis (6-7), which lost 31-13 at New Orleans. The 49ers looked much more like the team that was predicted to win the division after an unbeaten preseason — not the bunch that began 0-5. “We’re a young team and today was big for us,” Singletary said. “But at the same time, today means nothing if we don’t play well next week. We have very little room for error, and we have to understand that.” Matt Hasselbeck went 27 for 42 for 285 yards and two TDs, but threw four interceptions and lost a fumble as Seattle had turnovers in five of six possessions during one stretch. “They didn’t have to do anything special today because we gave them so many good shots and good opportunities,” Seahawks coach Pete Carroll said. Vernon Davis caught five passes for 70 yards and a 42yard catch-and-run TD, Josh Morgan made a 15-yard touchdown reception and Brian West-

Ann Heisenfelt / The Associated Press

The collapsed roof of the Metrodome is shown in this aerial view in Minneapolis on Sunday. The inflatable roof of the Metrodome collapsed Sunday after a snowstorm dumped 17 inches on Minneapolis. No one was hurt, but the roof failure sent the NFL scrambling to find a new venue for the Vikings’ game against the New York Giants (see related story, Page D1).

NFL ROUNDUP brook hauled in a 62-yard touchdown pass for his longest career TD catch and longest play from scrimmage since 2006. Westbrook wound up with six catches for 87 yards. “It’s playoff mode right now,” Smith said. “It was a must-win game. We knew that all week — our backs against the wall.” Smith matched a career high by throwing for three touchdowns for the fifth time. The No. 1 overall draft pick in 2005 was back behind center in place of Troy Smith, who went 3-2 during his stint as San Francisco’s starter.

on Nov. 16, 2008. Leon Washington returned a kickoff 92 yards for a touchdown late in the third quarter — the highlight of the day for the Seahawks, who lost for the fifth time in seven games after a 4-2 start. “This one’s pretty bad,” Hasselbeck said. “It was not a good day for us. It was not a good day for me. It seems like everything was going wrong.” In other games on Sunday: Lions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Packers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DETROIT — Drew Stanton threw a 13-yard touchdown pass to Will Heller midway through the fourth quarter, and Green Bay couldn’t come back without

Dashon Goldson made a 39yard interception return for a touchdown on the third play of the second half. This was a far cry from the rivals’ matchup in Week 1, when the Seahawks won 30-6 and San Francisco failed to reach the end zone. Singletary thanked Carroll afterward for the whipping. Jeff Reed kicked four field goals Sunday for the 49ers, who had already reached their season high in points by halftime with a 30-7 lead. It was the Niners’ biggest first half since scoring 35 in a 35-16 home win over the Rams

an injured Aaron Rodgers in Detroit’s win. Jaguars. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Raiders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — David Garrard threw three touchdown passes, Maurice JonesDrew and Rashad Jennings each topped 100 yards rushing in a game filled with big plays. Buccaneers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Redskins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 LANDOVER, Md. — A flubbed extra point attempt with 9 seconds to play kept Washington from tying the game. The Redskins pulled within a point on Santana Moss’ 6-yard touchdown catch, but Nick Sundberg’s slightly high snap on a wet field went through holder Hunter Smith’s hands. Steelers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Bengals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 PITTSBURGH — Troy Polamalu and LaMarr Woodley returned interceptions by Carson Palmer for touchdowns as Cincinnati dropped a franchise record 10th straight game. Bills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Browns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. — Ryan Fitzpatrick threw an 11yard touchdown pass to David Nelson, and Leodis McKelvin made a late interception for Buffalo. Rian Lindell hit field goals of 30 and 19 yards to help the Bills (3-11) snap a three-game losing streak against Cleveland. Falcons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Panthers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Michael Turner ran for 112 yards and three touchdowns, Matt Ryan threw for another and Atlanta held onto the best record in the NFC. The Falcons (11-2) built a 17-0 halftime lead, survived a brief hiccup to start the third quarter, and cruised to their seventh straight win. Saints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Rams. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 NEW ORLEANS — Drew Brees threw for three scores, Malcolm Jenkins returned one of his two interceptions 96 yards for his first career touchdown, and New

Orleans won its sixth straight game. Marques Colston had a pair of touchdown catches in traffic as New Orleans (10-3) raced to a 14-0 lead and never trailed. Chargers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 SAN DIEGO — Philip Rivers threw two touchdown passes to Malcom Floyd and San Diego remained alive in the AFC West race. The Chiefs played without quarterback Matt Cassel, who didn’t travel after having an emergency appendectomy Wednesday. Cardinals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Broncos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 GLENDALE, Ariz. — Jay Feely became the fourth kicker in 40 years to run for a touchdown and added a career-best five field goals to help Arizona end a seven-game losing streak. Arizona rookie quarterback John Skelton completed 14 of 36 for 141 yards with no interceptions and had at least four passes dropped in his first NFL start. Patriots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Bears. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 CHICAGO — Tom Brady threw for 369 yards and two touchdowns, and New England locked up its eighth playoff berth in 10 years with a pounding of Chicago on a snowy, blustery, bone-chilling day. Dolphins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Jets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Miami turned two early turnovers into its only points in winning at the rainy Meadowlands. Much of the game was played in a downpour, which made for inept offense in the sloppy conditions. The Dolphins gained 132 yards, with Chad Henne passing for only 55, yet improved to 7-6. Eagles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Cowboys. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 ARLINGTON, Texas — DeSean Jackson had 210 yards receiving, including a 91-yard, go-ahead touchdown early in the fourth quarter. Philadelphia (9-4) ended a three-game losing skid to its NFC East rival and moved a half-game ahead of the New York Giants in the division race.

NFL SCOREBOARD SUMMARIES Sunday’s Games

49ers 40, Seahawks 21 Seattle 7 0 7 7 — 21 San Francisco 10 20 10 0 — 40 First Quarter SF—V.Davis 42 pass from A.Smith (Reed kick), 12:33. Sea—Martin 11 pass from Hasselbeck (Mare kick), 4:14. SF—FG Reed 33, :00. Second Quarter SF—FG Reed 44, 10:31. SF—Morgan 15 pass from A.Smith (Reed kick), 8:04. SF—Westbrook 62 pass from A.Smith (Reed kick), 1:50. SF—FG Reed 22, :00. Third Quarter SF—Goldson 39 interception return (Reed kick), 14:11. SF—FG Reed 36, 3:32. Sea—Washington 92 kickoff return (Mare kick), 3:18. Fourth Quarter Sea—Butler 2 pass from Hasselbeck (Mare kick), 1:55. A—69,732. ——— Sea SF First downs 20 10 Total Net Yards 361 336 Rushes-yards 22-84 27-95 Passing 277 241 Punt Returns 3-39 1-3 Kickoff Returns 7-222 4-60 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 4-62 Comp-Att-Int 27-42-4 17-27-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-8 2-14 Punts 2-41.0 5-49.4 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 8-75 2-15 Time of Possession 29:07 30:53 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Seattle: M.Robinson 3-33, Lynch 10-29, Washington 4-10, Forsett 3-5, Hasselbeck 1-5, Butler 1-2. San Francisco: Dixon 14-60, Westbrook 9-23, A.Smith 4-12. PASSING—Seattle: Hasselbeck 27-42-4285. San Francisco: A.Smith 17-27-0-255. RECEIVING—Seattle: Lynch 7-37, Butler 5-68, Martin 4-73, Stokley 3-35, Tate 3-29, Baker 1-15, Washington 1-13, Forsett 1-9, Morrah 1-8, Gibson 1-(minus 2). San Francisco: Westbrook 6-87, V.Davis 5-70, Morgan 3-82, Dixon 1-8, Walker 1-7, Crabtree 1-1. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Seattle: Mare 43 (WR).

Dolphins 10, Jets 6 Miami N.Y. Jets

10 0 0 0 — 10 0 3 0 3 — 6 First Quarter Mia—FG Carpenter 47, 7:10. Mia—Marshall 6 pass from Henne (Carpenter kick), 2:48. Second Quarter NYJ—FG Folk 35, 4:33. Fourth Quarter NYJ—FG Folk 42, 5:21. A—78,948. ——— Mia NYJ First downs 6 14 Total Net Yards 131 280 Rushes-yards 32-101 31-87 Passing 30 193 Punt Returns 0-0 9-68 Kickoff Returns 3-77 3-94 Interceptions Ret. 1-1 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 5-19-0 17-44-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 5-25 6-23 Punts 10-56.4 8-38.4 Fumbles-Lost 3-3 4-1 Penalties-Yards 5-36 6-50 Time of Possession 26:12 33:48 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Miami: Brown 16-55, Williams 10-34, Henne 4-7, Polite 2-5. N.Y. Jets: Tomlinson 19-49, Sanchez 2-20, Greene 8-17, B.Smith 2-1. PASSING—Miami: Henne 5-18-0-55, Brown 0-1-0-0. N.Y. Jets: Sanchez 17-44-1216. RECEIVING—Miami: Fasano 2-33, Marshall 2-16, Bess 1-6. N.Y. Jets: Cotchery 5-69, Keller 3-34, Greene 3-29, Holmes 2-57, Tomlinson 2-5, Edwards 1-17, McKnight 1-5. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Saints 31, Rams 13

San Diego

St. Louis 0 6 0 7 — 13 New Orleans 14 7 7 3 — 31 First Quarter NO—Colston 5 pass from Brees (Hartley kick), 8:25. NO—Colston 17 pass from Brees (Hartley kick), :24. Second Quarter StL—FG Jo.Brown 38, 11:20. StL—FG Jo.Brown 45, 1:42. NO—Jenkins 96 interception return (Hartley kick), :47. Third Quarter NO—Moore 31 pass from Brees (Hartley kick), 4:55. Fourth Quarter NO—FG Hartley 40, 14:10. StL—Bradford 1 run (Jo.Brown kick), 5:23. A—70,015. ——— StL NO First downs 14 22 Total Net Yards 327 345 Rushes-yards 24-136 29-132 Passing 191 213 Punt Returns 1-10 2-16 Kickoff Returns 6-134 3-69 Interceptions Ret. 2-8 2-105 Comp-Att-Int 18-32-2 25-40-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-40 1-8 Punts 4-54.8 2-45.0 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 1-1 Penalties-Yards 4-39 5-55 Time of Possession 26:59 33:01 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—St. Louis: Jackson 16-96, Toston 5-22, B.Gibson 1-13, Bradford 2-5. New Orleans: Ivory 7-47, P.Thomas 12-39, Bush 939, Brees 1-7. PASSING—St. Louis: Bradford 18-32-2231. New Orleans: Brees 25-40-2-221. RECEIVING—St. Louis: B.Gibson 4-67, Jackson 4-38, Fells 3-26, Amendola 3-16, Robinson 2-61, Toston 1-23, Bajema 1-0. New Orleans: Moore 5-70, Colston 5-46, Bush 5-22, Shockey 4-29, P.Thomas 4-29, Graham 1-21, D.Thomas 1-4. MISSED FIELD GOALS—St. Louis: Jo.Brown 46 (WL).

7 14 0 10 — 31 First Quarter SD—Floyd 17 pass from Rivers (Kaeding kick), 5:33. Second Quarter SD—Tolbert 8 run (Kaeding kick), 6:47. SD—Floyd 9 pass from Rivers (Kaeding kick), :40. Fourth Quarter SD—FG Kaeding 48, 8:25. SD—Mathews 15 run (Kaeding kick), 3:15. A—66,780. ——— KC SD First downs 5 25 Total Net Yards 67 426 Rushes-yards 17-48 43-207 Passing 19 219 Punt Returns 1-11 5-76 Kickoff Returns 5-102 1-27 Interceptions Ret. 1-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 9-20-0 18-24-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-29 2-7 Punts 8-45.6 2-55.0 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 2-1 Penalties-Yards 2-15 6-47 Time of Possession 19:50 40:10 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Kansas City: Charles 10-40, Battle 3-8, Jones 3-1, Palko 1-(minus 1). San Diego: Tolbert 16-66, Mathews 16-65, Sproles 6-53, Jackson 1-14, Rivers 2-5, Hester 2-4. PASSING—Kansas City: Croyle 7-17-040, Palko 2-3-0-8. San Diego: Rivers 18-241-226. RECEIVING—Kansas City: Copper 2-15, Moeaki 2-13, Charles 2-9, Chambers 1-10, Bowe 1-3, Pope 1-(minus 2). San Diego: Sproles 551, Floyd 4-51, Washington 3-50, Jackson 2-29, McMichael 2-26, Tolbert 1-13, Mathews 1-6. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

New England 7 26 3 0 — 36 Chicago 0 0 7 0 — 7 First Quarter NE—Gronkowski 7 pass from Brady (Graham kick), 5:47. Second Quarter NE—Woodhead 3 run (Graham kick), 10:16. NE—Guyton 35 fumble return (Graham kick), 9:56. NE—FG Graham 30, 4:36. NE—FG Graham 25, 3:20. NE—Branch 59 pass from Brady (kick failed), :00. Third Quarter NE—FG Graham 29, 10:56. Chi—Taylor 1 run (Gould kick), 8:43. A—62,347. ——— NE Chi First downs 27 12 Total Net Yards 475 185 Rushes-yards 35-124 14-47 Passing 351 138 Punt Returns 2-43 1-17 Kickoff Returns 1-18 7-196 Interceptions Ret. 2-13 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 27-40-0 12-26-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-18 2-14 Punts 2-35.5 5-32.2 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 4-2 Penalties-Yards 4-43 4-30 Time of Possession 39:41 20:19 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—New England: Green-Ellis 21-87, Woodhead 7-21, Taylor 3-16, Morris 1-2, Hoyer 3-(minus 2). Chicago: Forte 9-25, Cutler 2-21, Taylor 3-1. PASSING—New England: Brady 27-40-0369. Chicago: Cutler 12-26-2-152. RECEIVING—New England: Branch 8151, Welker 8-115, Gronkowski 5-43, Tate 2-40, Hernandez 2-19, Woodhead 2-1. Chicago: Bennett 3-53, Forte 2-36, Hester 2-17, Knox 2-16, Aromashodu 1-16, Taylor 1-8, Olsen 1-6. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

7 10 7 7 — 31 0 7 21 10 — 38 First Quarter Oak—D.McFadden 67 pass from J.Campbell (Janikowski kick), 10:28. Second Quarter Jac—Lewis 1 pass from Garrard (Scobee kick), 11:56. Oak—FG Janikowski 26, 6:25. Oak—Murphy 8 pass from J.Campbell (Janikowski kick), :19. Third Quarter Jac—Hill 48 pass from Garrard (Scobee kick), 12:47. Oak—D.McFadden 51 run (Janikowski kick), 11:21. Jac—Jennings 74 run (Scobee kick), 6:44. Jac—Sims-Walker 10 pass from Garrard (Scobee kick), 3:44. Fourth Quarter Jac—FG Scobee 19, 11:22. Oak—D.McFadden 36 run (Janikowski kick), 1:53. Jac—Jones-Drew 30 run (Scobee kick), 1:34. A—62,570. ——— Oak Jac First downs 21 19 Total Net Yards 476 385 Rushes-yards 25-153 34-234 Passing 323 151 Punt Returns 3-9 2-11 Kickoff Returns 5-86 5-163 Interceptions Ret. 1-0 1-7 Comp-Att-Int 22-33-1 11-22-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-21 2-8 Punts 5-42.0 5-41.4 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 4-25 6-52 Time of Possession 30:05 29:55 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Oakland: D.McFadden 16123, Bush 5-22, Boller 1-7, Reece 2-3, Ford 1-(minus 2). Jacksonville: Jennings 5-109, Jones-Drew 23-101, Garrard 5-32, Thomas 1(minus 8). PASSING—Oakland: J.Campbell 21-300-324, Boller 1-3-1-20. Jacksonville: Garrard 11-22-1-159. RECEIVING—Oakland: Murphy 6-59, Z.Miller 4-68, Reece 4-48, D.McFadden 3-86, Ford 2-43, Heyward-Bey 2-40, Myers 1-0. Jacksonville: Lewis 4-57, Jones-Drew 3-19, SimsWalker 2-23, Hill 1-48, G.Jones 1-12. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Chargers 31, Chiefs 0

Steelers 23, Bengals 7

Kansas City

Cincinnati

Patriots 36, Bears 7

0

0

0

0 — 0

East x-New England N.Y. Jets Miami Buffalo

W 11 9 7 3

L 2 4 6 10

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .846 .692 .538 .231

PF 415 273 225 256

Jacksonville Indianapolis Houston Tennessee

W 8 7 5 5

L 5 6 7 8

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .615 .538 .417 .385

PF 295 347 288 291

Pittsburgh Baltimore Cleveland Cincinnati

W 10 8 5 2

L 3 4 8 11

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .769 .667 .385 .154

PF 290 260 235 262

7

0

0

0 — 7

PA 276 242 244 339

Home 6-0-0 4-3-0 1-5-0 2-5-0

Away 5-2-0 5-1-0 6-1-0 1-5-0

AFC 8-2-0 7-3-0 5-5-0 2-7-0

NFC 3-0-0 2-1-0 2-1-0 1-3-0

Div 3-1-0 3-2-0 2-2-0 0-3-0

Away 3-3-0 3-4-0 2-4-0 3-3-0

AFC 7-3-0 5-4-0 4-4-0 2-7-0

NFC 1-2-0 2-2-0 1-3-0 3-1-0

Div 3-1-0 2-2-0 2-2-0 1-3-0

Away 6-1-0 3-3-0 2-5-0 1-6-0

AFC 8-2-0 6-3-0 3-6-0 1-8-0

NFC 2-1-0 2-1-0 2-2-0 1-3-0

Div 4-1-0 2-2-0 1-2-0 1-3-0

Away 2-5-0 2-4-0 2-5-0 1-6-0

AFC 5-5-0 6-4-0 4-5-0 2-7-0

NFC 3-0-0 1-2-0 2-2-0 1-3-0

Div 2-3-0 2-3-0 4-0-0 1-4-0

South PA 331 318 321 265

Home 5-2-0 4-2-0 3-3-0 2-5-0

North PA 198 201 252 345

Home 4-2-0 5-1-0 3-3-0 1-5-0

West Kansas City San Diego Oakland Denver

W 8 7 6 3

L 5 6 7 10

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .615 .538 .462 .231

PF 295 354 314 269

PA 268 253 307 376

Home 6-0-0 5-2-0 4-2-0 2-4-0

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East Philadelphia N.Y. Giants Washington Dallas

W 9 8 5 4

L 4 4 8 9

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .692 .667 .385 .308

PF 374 308 238 321

Atlanta New Orleans Tampa Bay Carolina

W 11 10 8 1

L 2 3 5 12

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .846 .769 .615 .077

PF 335 330 260 164

Chicago Green Bay Minnesota Detroit

W 9 8 5 3

L 4 5 7 10

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .692 .615 .417 .231

PF 253 306 227 285

W Seattle 6 St. Louis 6 San Francisco 5 Arizona 4 x-clinched playoff spot

L 7 7 8 9

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .462 .462 .385 .308

PF 261 245 243 243

PA 308 247 310 366

Home 4-2-0 5-2-0 2-5-0 1-6-0

Away 5-2-0 3-2-0 3-3-0 3-3-0

NFC 6-3-0 6-2-0 4-6-0 2-7-0

AFC 3-1-0 2-2-0 1-2-0 2-2-0

Div 3-1-0 2-2-0 2-2-0 1-3-0

Away 5-2-0 5-1-0 5-2-0 0-6-0

NFC 8-1-0 8-2-0 6-3-0 1-9-0

AFC 3-1-0 2-1-0 2-2-0 0-3-0

Div 4-0-0 3-1-0 2-3-0 0-5-0

Away 5-1-0 3-4-0 1-5-0 0-6-0

NFC 7-3-0 6-4-0 4-4-0 3-7-0

AFC 2-1-0 2-1-0 1-3-0 0-3-0

Div 4-0-0 3-2-0 1-3-0 1-4-0

Away 2-5-0 2-5-0 1-5-0 1-5-0

NFC 5-4-0 4-6-0 3-7-0 2-7-0

AFC 1-3-0 2-1-0 2-1-0 2-2-0

Div 3-2-0 2-2-0 3-1-0 2-4-0

South

Jaguars 38, Raiders 31 Oakland Jacksonville

Punts Fumbles-Lost Penalties-Yards Time of Possession

AMERICAN CONFERENCE

PA 243 240 267 338

Home 6-0-0 5-2-0 3-3-0 1-6-0

North PA 228 189 253 309

Home 4-3-0 5-1-0 4-2-0 3-4-0

West PA 329 268 280 351

Home 4-2-0 4-2-0 4-3-0 3-4-0

——— Sunday’s Games Tampa Bay 17, Washington 16 Detroit 7, Green Bay 3 Pittsburgh 23, Cincinnati 7 N.Y. Giants at Minnesota, ppd. New Orleans 31, St. Louis 13 Arizona 43, Denver 13 Miami 10, N.Y. Jets 6

Buffalo 13, Cleveland 6 Jacksonville 38, Oakland 31 Atlanta 31, Carolina 10 San Francisco 40, Seattle 21 San Diego 31, Kansas City 0 New England 36, Chicago 7 Philadelphia 30, Dallas 27

Today’s Games N.Y. Giants vs. Minnesota at Detroit, 4:20 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 16 San Francisco at San Diego, 5:20 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 19 Kansas City at St. Louis, 10 a.m. Houston at Tennessee, 10 a.m. Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m. Cleveland at Cincinnati, 10 a.m. Jacksonville at Indianapolis, 10 a.m. Atlanta at Seattle, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Pittsburgh, 1:15 p.m. Monday, Dec. 20 Chicago at Minnesota, 5:30 p.m. ——— All Times PST

Pittsburgh

0 10 3 10 — 23 First Quarter Cin—Whitworth 1 pass from C.Palmer (Stitser kick), 9:58. Second Quarter Pit—Polamalu 45 interception return (Suisham kick), 4:37. Pit—FG Suisham 23, :21. Third Quarter Pit—FG Suisham 35, 8:34. Fourth Quarter Pit—Woodley 14 interception return (Suisham kick), 12:21.

Baltimore at Houston, 5:30 p.m.

Washington at Dallas, 10 a.m. Arizona at Carolina, 10 a.m. Detroit at Tampa Bay, 10 a.m. Buffalo at Miami, 10 a.m. New Orleans at Baltimore, 10 a.m. Denver at Oakland, 1:15 p.m. Green Bay at New England, 5:20 p.m.

Pit—FG Suisham 41, 5:34. A—57,501. ——— First downs Total Net Yards Rushes-yards Passing Punt Returns Kickoff Returns Interceptions Ret. Comp-Att-Int Sacked-Yards Lost

Cin Pit 14 18 190 354 14-34 27-123 156 231 2-23 2-1 5-77 2-40 0-0 3-71 20-32-3 21-33-0 3-22 4-27

5-43.4 0-0 4-25 25:29

5-35.2 1-0 9-89 34:31

——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Cincinnati: Benson 8-19, Scott 4-15, C.Palmer 2-0. Pittsburgh: Mendenhall 18-66, Roethlisberger 3-23, Moore 4-18, Wallace 1-12, Redman 1-4. PASSING—Cincinnati: C.Palmer 20-323-178. Pittsburgh: Roethlisberger 21-33-0258. RECEIVING—Cincinnati: Ochocinco 6-71, Kelly 4-15, Benson 3-26, Shipley 3-26, Leonard 2-17, Owens 1-22, Whitworth 1-1. Pittsburgh: Ward 8-115, Wallace 5-78, Brown 3-27, Randle El 2-19, Mendenhall 1-9, Redman 1-6, Spaeth 1-4. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Bucs 17, Redskins 16 Tampa Bay Washington

0 3 6 8 — 17 0 10 0 6 — 16 Second Quarter Was—Paulsen 1 pass from McNabb (Gano kick), 4:51. TB—FG Barth 25, 2:22. Was—FG Gano 25, :10. Third Quarter TB—FG Barth 44, 11:48. TB—FG Barth 35, 4:11. Fourth Quarter TB—Winslow 41 pass from Freeman (Freeman run), 3:47. Was—Moss 6 pass from McNabb (run failed), :09. A—66,124. ——— TB Was First downs 15 22 Total Net Yards 365 399 Rushes-yards 26-103 28-188 Passing 262 211 Punt Returns 2-19 3-19 Kickoff Returns 3-43 5-72 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 15-25-0 22-35-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-4 2-17 Punts 4-44.0 5-38.6 Fumbles-Lost 2-2 1-1 Penalties-Yards 2-14 4-25 Time of Possession 28:52 31:08 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Tampa Bay: Blount 15-68, Benn 1-17, Freeman 6-10, C.Williams 3-6, Graham 1-2. Washington: Torain 24-172, K.Williams 4-16. PASSING—Tampa Bay: Freeman 15-250-266. Washington: McNabb 22-35-0-228. RECEIVING—Tampa Bay: Benn 4-122, C.Williams 4-34, Winslow 2-52, Gilmore 2-27, M.Williams 1-15, Stroughter 1-11, Graham 15. Washington: Moss 7-82, Armstrong 4-30, K.Williams 3-60, Sellers 2-28, Cooley 2-22, Torain 2-10, Paulsen 1-1, F.Davis 1-(minus 5). MISSED FIELD GOALS—Washington: Gano 34 (WL), 24 (WL).

Falcons 31, Panthers 10 Atlanta Carolina

14 3 7 7 — 31 0 0 7 3 — 10 First Quarter Atl—Gonzalez 4 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick), 13:35. Atl—Turner 1 run (Bryant kick), 6:51. Second Quarter Atl—FG Bryant 39, 2:34. Third Quarter Car—Goodson 13 run (Kasay kick), 10:29. Atl—Turner 3 run (Bryant kick), 4:41. Fourth Quarter Car—FG Kasay 36, 9:44. Atl—Turner 4 run (Bryant kick), 4:12. A—71,235. ——— Atl Car First downs 24 13 Total Net Yards 327 288 Rushes-yards 36-127 28-212 Passing 200 76 Punt Returns 2-5 2-12 Kickoff Returns 1-23 6-106 Interceptions Ret. 1-17 1-25 Comp-Att-Int 20-34-1 15-25-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-27 5-31 Punts 7-40.4 7-45.4 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-1 Penalties-Yards 1-10 6-50 Time of Possession 34:50 25:10 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Atlanta: Turner 28-112,

G.Johnson 6-8, Ryan 1-4, Mughelli 1-3. Carolina: Stewart 18-133, Goodson 9-70, Smith 1-9. PASSING—Atlanta: Ryan 20-34-1-227. Carolina: Clausen 14-24-1-107, Edwards 11-0-0. RECEIVING—Atlanta: White 8-79, Gonzalez 4-28, Jenkins 2-26, Finneran 2-13, Douglas 1-46, Mughelli 1-16, Turner 1-12, Weems 1-7. Carolina: LaFell 6-38, Sutton 3-20, Gettis 2-22, Smith 2-17, Goodson 1-6, Rosario 1-4. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Lions 7, Packers 3 Green Bay Detroit

0 0 3 0 — 3 0 0 0 7 — 7 Third Quarter GB—FG Crosby 42, 10:55. Fourth Quarter Det—Heller 13 pass from Stanton (Rayner kick), 7:55. A—57,659. ——— GB Det First downs 13 15 Total Net Yards 258 286 Rushes-yards 20-66 41-190 Passing 192 96 Punt Returns 2-28 4-37 Kickoff Returns 2-47 2-55 Interceptions Ret. 2-0 2-37 Comp-Att-Int 22-37-2 10-22-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-31 2-21 Punts 8-50.5 8-44.3 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 3-20 6-35 Time of Possession 29:12 30:48 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Green Bay: Rodgers 2-25, Jackson 7-19, Flynn 3-10, Starks 6-8, Nance 2-4. Detroit: Morris 11-51, Stanton 4-44, Best 1338, Logan 5-30, Felton 6-15, C.Johnson 1-13, Burleson 1-(minus 1). PASSING—Green Bay: Flynn 15-261-177, Rodgers 7-11-1-46. Detroit: Stanton 10-22-2-117. RECEIVING—Green Bay: Quarless 5-62, Jennings 4-52, J.Jones 3-30, Jackson 3-9, Nelson 2-26, Driver 2-12, Nance 1-14, Swain 1-12, Kuhn 1-6. Detroit: B.Johnson 2-21, Pettigrew 214, C.Johnson 1-44, Heller 1-13, Burleson 1-12, Morris 1-6, Best 1-4, Scheffler 1-3. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Detroit: Rayner 48 (WL).

Bills 13, Browns 6 Cleveland Buffalo

3 3 0 0 — 6 0 10 0 3 — 13 First Quarter Cle—FG Dawson 19, 10:11. Second Quarter Buf—D.Nelson 11 pass from Fitzpatrick (Lindell kick), 9:28. Cle—FG Dawson 25, 3:52. Buf—FG Lindell 30, :14. Fourth Quarter Buf—FG Lindell 19, 7:56. A—50,861. ——— Cle Buf First downs 9 19 Total Net Yards 187 323 Rushes-yards 25-105 42-192 Passing 82 131 Punt Returns 1-7 3-41 Kickoff Returns 4-46 3-53 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-10 Comp-Att-Int 12-20-1 14-23-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-4 2-11 Punts 4-49.8 4-43.5 Fumbles-Lost 5-2 2-1 Penalties-Yards 2-10 6-44 Time of Possession 23:50 36:10 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Cleveland: Hillis 21-108, Bell 3-8, Cribbs 1-(minus 11). Buffalo: Jackson 29-112, Fitzpatrick 4-49, Spiller 8-33, Jones 1(minus 2). PASSING—Cleveland: Delhomme 12-201-86. Buffalo: Fitzpatrick 14-23-0-142. RECEIVING—Cleveland: Hillis 4-10, Massaquoi 3-43, Robiskie 2-17, Watson 1-8, Cribbs 1-7, Stuckey 1-1. Buffalo: St.Johnson 5-42, Stupar 3-45, Jones 2-14, McIntyre 1-14, Martin 1-13, D.Nelson 1-11, Jackson 1-3. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Eagles 30, Cowboys 27 Philadelphia Dallas

7 7

7 3

3 13 — 30 10 7 — 27

First Quarter Phi—Vick 1 run (Akers kick), 11:47. Dal—Witten 1 pass from Kitna (Buehler kick), 5:33. Second Quarter Phi—Herremans 2 pass from Vick (Akers kick), 5:49. Dal—FG Buehler 50, :08. Third Quarter Dal—FG Buehler 43, 10:18. Dal—Jones 3 run (Buehler kick), 7:44. Phi—FG Akers 39, 5:06. Fourth Quarter Phi—FG Akers 50, 13:57. Phi—D.Jackson 91 pass from Vick (Akers kick), 11:24. Phi—FG Akers 28, 8:17. Dal—Witten 22 pass from Kitna (Buehler kick), 4:22. A—85,673. ——— Phi Dal First downs 18 22 Total Net Yards 429 349 Rushes-yards 27-171 24-110 Passing 258 239 Punt Returns 4-27 1-(-13) Kickoff Returns 5-108 5-94 Interceptions Ret. 2-(-12) 2-10 Comp-Att-Int 16-26-2 24-35-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-12 1-3 Punts 3-45.3 5-47.8 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-0 Penalties-Yards 6-59 5-40 Time of Possession 27:51 32:09 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Philadelphia: McCoy 16149, Vick 8-16, D.Jackson 2-6, Harrison 1-0. Dallas: Jones 13-41, Kitna 3-27, Austin 1-26, Choice 7-16. PASSING—Philadelphia: Vick 16-26-2270. Dallas: Kitna 24-35-2-242. RECEIVING—Philadelphia: D.Jackson 4210, Avant 3-18, McCoy 3-4, Hall 2-12, Cooper 1-11, Maclin 1-11, Herremans 1-2, Schmitt 1-2. Dallas: Witten 7-69, Jones 4-42, Bennett 4-30, Ogletree 3-34, R.Williams 2-23, Austin 2-22, Choice 1-17, Hurd 1-5. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Cardinals 43, Broncos 13 Denver Arizona

3 0 0 10 — 13 3 13 3 24 — 43 First Quarter Den—FG Hauschka 32, 10:36. Ari—FG Feely 36, 4:35. Second Quarter Ari—FG Feely 48, 11:50. Ari—Feely 5 run (Feely kick), 4:02. Ari—FG Feely 55, :02. Third Quarter Ari—FG Feely 23, 9:40. Fourth Quarter Ari—FG Feely 49, 14:55. Den—FG Hauschka 30, 11:20. Ari—Hightower 8 run (Feely kick), 6:07. Den—Moreno 1 run (Hauschka kick), 3:31. Ari—Hightower 35 run (Feely kick), 3:09. Ari—Dockett fumble recovery in end zone (Feely kick), 2:42. A—62,223. ——— Den Ari First downs 20 21 Total Net Yards 288 357 Rushes-yards 31-132 34-211 Passing 156 146 Punt Returns 1-10 5-72 Kickoff Returns 10-272 3-81 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 3-108 Comp-Att-Int 19-41-3 15-38-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-10 0-0 Punts 5-56.2 5-37.6 Fumbles-Lost 3-3 4-1 Penalties-Yards 8-66 7-62 Time of Possession 29:39 30:21 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Denver: Moreno 19-81, Ball 8-38, Royal 2-8, Orton 2-5. Arizona: Hightower 18-148, Breaston 1-17, Wells 6-16, StephensHowling 4-13, Skelton 3-9, Feely 1-5, Doucet 1-3. PASSING—Denver: Orton 19-41-3-166. Arizona: Skelton 15-37-0-146, Breaston 0-10-0. RECEIVING—Denver: Moreno 5-32, Royal 4-46, Gaffney 3-48, Lloyd 3-32, Decker 1-8, Graham 1-3, Buckhalter 1-0, Ball 1-(minus 3). Arizona: Fitzgerald 6-72, Doucet 2-24, Breaston 2-18, Stephens-Howling 2-11, Spach 1-9, Wright 1-7, Roberts 1-5. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Denver: Hauschka 40 (WR). Arizona: Feely 49 (WL).


D4 Monday, December 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

NBA ROUNDUP

NBA SCOREBOARD

Spurs beat Trail Blazers to take win streak to five The Associated Press SAN ANTONIO — Tim Duncan left the bench and headed toward the scorer’s table midway through the fourth quarter. Surely, the San Antonio Spurs were in trouble and calling on their All-Star bedrock to once again save them. Not really. Duncan had eight points and 13 rebounds in his 1,000th career regular-season game, but the Spurs hardly needed him while cruising to a fifth straight win with a 95-78 victory over the Portland Trail Blazers on Sunday. George Hill scored 22 in the fourth straight blowout for the Spurs, who improved the NBA’s best record to 20-3. They were well in control when Duncan re-entered the game with six minutes left to log his fist fourth-quarter appearance in four games. So what was the deal, anyway? “I think (coach Gregg Popovich’s) philosophy this year is to try not to play me in the fourth quarter at all, whether we’re winning or losing,” Duncan said. “I think he thinks our team is better without me out there. I’ve been trying to disprove him at some point.” Wesley Matthews scored 17 points for the Trail Blazers, whose winning streak was halted at four games. LaMarcus Aldridge scored 16 and Marcus Camby added 11 points and 13 rebounds. The Trail Blazers lost for the first time since ending a demoralizing six-game skid that included a players-only meeting, coach Nate McMillan saying his team wasn’t “responding to him” and Aldridge and others publicly supporting their head coach. Portland, while disappointed, took this loss much easier. “I thought we, as a unit, were staggered,” McMillan said. “We didn’t have the movement and they were physical and trying to disrupt the timing.” Brandon Roy had just nine points on four-of-16 shooting, and Portland had just three scorers in double figures. The Blazers matched their season low for points while shooting just 38 percent. Portland’s Nicolas Batum scored just five points on two of nine shooting after going zero for seven in a win Friday night at Phoenix. Roy, who was held to nine points for the second time in three games, said he tweaked his knee early in the game and that it was “a little sore going” the rest of the way. Roy missed three games last month with an injury to his left knee. “I still got some looks, but I really didn’t have the explosiveness,” he said. Roy said he expects to play today at Memphis. Manu Ginobili added 18 points for the Spurs, Tony Parker had 14 and reserve Gary Neal added 11. San Antonio improved to 5-0 on its longest homestand of the season and can end it unbeaten

Playoffs

SUMMARIES Spurs 95, Blazers 78 PORTLAND (78) Matthews 7-16 1-2 17, Aldridge 8-14 0-0 16, Camby 5-7 1-4 11, Miller 2-8 3-3 7, Roy 4-16 0-0 9, Przybilla 1-1 2-2 4, Batum 2-9 0-0 5, Fernandez 1-5 0-0 3, Mills 0-0 0-0 0, Cunningham 0-2 0-0 0, Marks 0-1 0-0 0, Johnson 3-8 0-0 6. Totals 33-87 7-11 78. SAN ANTONIO (95) Jefferson 1-3 2-2 5, Duncan 4-10 0-0 8, Blair 2-6 4-6 8, Parker 6-16 2-2 14, Ginobili 6-12 4-5 18, Hill 5-9 9-9 22, Bonner 1-1 0-0 3, Neal 4-7 1-1 11, McDyess 3-8 0-0 6, Quinn 0-1 0-0 0, Udoka 0-0 0-0 0, Splitter 0-1 0-1 0. Totals 32-74 22-26 95. Portland 17 23 21 17 — 78 San Antonio 26 24 23 22 — 95 3-Point Goals—Portland 5-15 (Matthews 2-3, Batum 1-4, Fernandez 1-4, Roy 1-4), San Antonio 9-17 (Hill 3-4, Neal 2-4, Ginobili 2-7, Jefferson 1-1, Bonner 1-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Portland 53 (Camby 13), San Antonio 51 (Duncan 13). Assists—Portland 19 (Miller 7), San Antonio 20 (Parker 6). Total Fouls—Portland 18, San Antonio 12. Technicals—Johnson, Portland Coach McMillan. Flagrant Fouls—Przybilla. A—16,743 (18,797).

Thunder 106, Cavs 77

Darren Abate / The Associated Press

San Antonio Spurs’ DeJuan Blair, left, and Portland Trail Blazers’ LaMarcus Aldridge collide during the second half of Sunday’s game in San Antonio. with a victory Wednesday night against Milwaukee. Duncan has lately been watching the Spurs coast along while resting on the bench, where the Spurs want to see their perennial All-Star as much as possible. The last time Duncan was truly essential in the fourth was Dec. 3 against Minnesota, when he finished with 22 points and 10 rebounds. Remarkably, the Spurs haven’t seen or needed those Duncan-like games during the best start in franchise history. Popovich wants to limit the wear-and-tear on his 34-year-old star, and so far the plan is working: Duncan entered the game averaging a career-low 28.8 minutes. “As the minutes continue to drop and I’m not in the fourth quarter, I’m going to become unbearable on the bench and pretty much annoy him to the point where he has to put me in,” Duncan said. “That’s my goal.” Notes: The Trail Blazers have lost five of six on the road. ... Although Duncan reached the four-digit milestone Sunday for games played in the regular season, the 34-year-old was appearing in his 1,171st game, counting the playoffs. In other games on Sunday: Knicks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .129 Nuggets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125 NEW YORK — Amare Stoudemire

2010-11 wrestling districts

scored 24 of his 30 points in the second half, Wilson Chandler made the tiebreaking 3-pointer with 30 seconds left, and New York beat Denver for its first eight-game winning streak in 16 years. Lakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99 Nets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92 NEWARK, N.J. — Kobe Bryant scored 25 of his 32 points in the second half and had two big assists in a late 8-0 run that led Los Angeles to its eighth straight win over New Jersey. 76ers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88 Hornets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70 PHILADELPHIA — Andre Iguodala and Lou Williams sparked a 17-2 run spanning the first and second quarters that catapulted Philadelphia to its fifth win in seven games. Thunder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106 Cavaliers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 OKLAHOMA CITY — Kevin Durant scored 25 points, and Jeff Green and James Harden added 19 apiece as Oklahoma City sent Cleveland to its eighth straight loss. Magic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94 Clippers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85 LOS ANGELES — Dwight Howard scored 22 points and Orlando defeated the Los Angeles Clippers, snapping skids of four games overall and three straight on the road.

CLEVELAND (77) Parker 4-8 2-2 12, Jamison 3-11 0-0 8, Varejao 3-7 1-1 7, M.Williams 3-9 2-2 8, Gibson 5-11 0-0 11, Hickson 4-9 1-5 9, J.Williams 0-5 1-2 1, Harris 1-4 0-0 2, Powe 1-2 1-3 3, Sessions 0-5 6-8 6, Graham 2-5 3-5 7, Hollins 0-1 3-4 3. Totals 26-77 20-32 77. OKLAHOMA CITY (106) Durant 10-17 3-4 25, Green 7-13 4-5 19, Ibaka 2-3 0-0 4, Westbrook 5-10 3-3 14, Sefolosha 0-2 1-2 1, Harden 6-8 5-6 19, Collison 1-1 0-0 2, White 2-6 0-2 4, Maynor 4-6 0-0 9, Ivey 1-5 0-0 2, Mullens 2-4 1-2 5, Peterson 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 41-77 17-24 106. Cleveland 17 28 13 19 — 77 Oklahoma City 31 25 30 20 — 106 3-Point Goals—Cleveland 5-15 (Parker 2-3, Jamison 2-7, Gibson 1-1, Harris 0-1, M.Williams 0-1, J.Williams 0-2), Oklahoma City 7-19 (Harden 2-3, Durant 2-4, Westbrook 1-1, Maynor 1-2, Green 1-4, Peterson 0-1, Sefolosha 0-2, Ivey 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Cleveland 56 (Varejao 16), Oklahoma City 50 (Collison 8). Assists—Cleveland 11 (M.Williams 4), Oklahoma City 25 (Westbrook 11). Total Fouls—Cleveland 21, Oklahoma City 26. A—18,203 (18,203).

Lakers 99, Nets 92 L.A. LAKERS (99) Artest 1-7 0-0 2, Odom 9-13 2-3 22, Gasol 619 3-5 15, Fisher 3-6 4-4 10, Bryant 9-19 11-13 32, Caracter 0-1 2-2 2, Barnes 1-4 0-0 3, Brown 3-8 0-0 7, Blake 1-3 2-2 4, Vujacic 0-0 0-0 0, Walton 0-1 0-0 0, Ebanks 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 3482 24-29 99. NEW JERSEY (92) Ross 0-2 0-0 0, Humphries 5-8 1-1 11, Lopez 9-21 7-9 25, Harris 6-17 4-4 16, Morrow 6-17 0-0 15, Williams 3-7 1-2 7, Favors 3-5 2-2 8, Farmar 3-9 1-1 8, Petro 0-0 0-0 0, Outlaw 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 36-89 16-19 92. L.A. Lakers 30 22 17 30 — 99 New Jersey 24 18 25 25 — 92 3-Point Goals—L.A. Lakers 7-16 (Bryant 3-6, Odom 2-3, Brown 1-1, Barnes 1-3, Blake 0-1, Artest 0-1, Walton 0-1), New Jersey 4-20 (Morrow 3-9, Farmar 1-6, Outlaw 0-1, Harris 04). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—L.A. Lakers 52 (Gasol 11), New Jersey 57 (Humphries 11). Assists—L.A. Lakers 20 (Bryant 6), New Jersey 17 (Harris 10). Total Fouls—L.A. Lakers 20, New Jersey 27. A—16,561 (18,500).

76ers 88, Hornets 70 NEW ORLEANS (70) Ariza 2-11 0-0 5, West 2-10 5-6 9, Okafor 05 2-6 2, Paul 8-12 7-7 25, Belinelli 3-9 0-0 6, Green 0-7 0-0 0, Thornton 3-8 1-2 8, Jack 3-8 2-2 8, Smith 0-2 0-0 0, Pondexter 1-1 0-0 2, Mbenga 1-5 0-0 2, Andersen 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 24-79 17-23 70. PHILADELPHIA (88) Iguodala 5-7 3-6 16, Brand 6-11 3-4 15, Hawes 3-8 0-0 6, Holiday 4-9 3-3 12, Meeks 2-9 4-5 8, Turner 3-4 0-0 7, Williams 7-15 1-2 17, Young 3-9 0-0 6, Speights 0-5 1-2 1. Totals 33-77 15-22 88. New Orleans 13 10 23 24 — 70 Philadelphia 20 25 22 21 — 88 3-Point Goals—New Orleans 5-12 (Paul 22, Andersen 1-1, Thornton 1-2, Ariza 1-2, Jack 0-1, Green 0-1, Belinelli 0-3), Philadelphia 7-17 (Iguodala 3-4, Williams 2-6, Holiday 1-1, Turner 1-1, Hawes 0-2, Meeks 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—New Orleans 52 (Ariza 10), Philadelphia 60 (Brand 13). Assists—New Orleans 4

Atlantic Division Boston New York Toronto Philadelphia New Jersey

W 19 16 9 8 6

L 4 9 15 15 18

Miami Orlando Atlanta Charlotte Washington

W 17 16 16 8 6

L 8 8 9 15 16

Chicago Indiana Milwaukee Cleveland Detroit

W 14 11 9 7 7

L 8 11 13 17 18

Pct .826 .640 .375 .348 .250

CLASS 6A

CLASS 5A

CLASS 4A

CLASS 2A/1A

Three times a charm for area hoops teams

Special District 4 Crater Comets (Central Point) Grants Pass Cavemen North Medford Black Tornado Redmond Panthers Roseburg Indians Sheldon Irish (Eugene) South Eugene Axemen South Medford Panthers Thurston Colts (Springfield)

Special District 4 Ashland Grizzlies Bend Lava Bears Churchill Lancers (Eugene) Eagle Point Eagles Marist Spartans (Eugene) Marshfield Pirates (Coos Bay) Mountain View Cougars North Eugene Highlanders Springfield Millers Summit Storm Willamette Wolverines (Eugene)

Special District 2 Baker Bulldogs Crook County Cowboys La Grande Tigers La Pine Hawks Madras White Buffaloes McLoughlin Pioneers (Milton-Freewater) Ontario Tigers Sisters Outlaws

Special District 3 Bonanza Antlers Chiloquin Panthers Culver Bulldogs Gilchrist Grizzlies North Lake Cowboys (Silver Lake) Santiam Wolverines (Mill City) Scio Loggers

For Central Oregon teams:

CLASS 6A

CLASS 5A

CLASS 4A/3A/2A/1A

Central Valley Conference McKay Scots (Salem) McNary Celtics (Keizer) North Salem Vikings Redmond Panthers South Salem Saxons Sprague Olympians (Salem) West Salem Titans

Special District 1 Ashland Grizzlies Bend Lava Bears Mountain View Cougars Summit Storm

Baker Bulldogs Corbett Cardinals Gladstone Gladiators La Grande Tigers La Salle Falcons (Milwaukie) Madras White Buffaloes Marshall Minutemen (Portland) Molalla Indians North Marion Huskies (Aurora) Portland Lutheran Blue Jays Riverdale Mavericks (Portland) Roosevelt Roughriders (Portland) Valley Catholic Valiants (Beaverton)

another in Intermountain Hybrid play will determine seeding for 5A state play-in games, and Crook County will play teams from Portland schools Marshall and Roosevelt — as Crook County did in football — for seeding in the 4A state play-in games.

Minor changes for district swim meets While wrestling will switch this season to a regional format for state-qualifying purposes, swimming will retain its district system. Redmond will compete

L10 10-0 9-1 4-6 6-4 1-9

Str W-10 W-8 W-1 W-1 L-7

Home 10-1 6-5 6-6 7-5 4-7

Away 9-3 10-4 3-9 1-10 2-11

Conf 15-2 10-4 7-9 6-12 3-12

Away 7-5 7-5 8-4 3-9 0-12

Conf 12-4 12-4 12-5 4-11 3-13

Away 5-6 5-6 2-8 3-10 2-12

Conf 3-4 7-6 7-5 6-11 4-9

Southeast Division Pct .680 .667 .640 .348 .273

GB — ½ 1 8 9½

L10 9-1 6-4 8-2 3-7 2-8

Str W-8 W-1 W-1 L-2 L-4

Home 10-3 9-3 8-5 5-6 6-4

Central Division Pct .636 .500 .409 .292 .280

GB — 3 5 8 8½

L10 7-3 5-5 4-6 1-9 2-8

Str W-5 L-1 W-2 L-8 L-4

Home 9-2 6-5 7-5 4-7 5-6

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division San Antonio Dallas New Orleans Memphis Houston

W 20 19 14 10 9

L 3 4 9 14 14

Oklahoma City Utah Denver Portland Minnesota

W 17 17 14 12 6

L 8 8 9 12 18

L.A. Lakers Phoenix Golden State Sacramento L.A. Clippers

W 17 11 8 5 5

L 7 12 15 16 20

Pct .870 .826 .609 .417 .391

GB — 1 6 10½ 11

L10 8-2 10-0 3-7 5-5 6-4

Str W-5 W-12 L-2 W-2 W-1

Home 12-2 11-3 9-3 6-5 6-4

Away 8-1 8-1 5-6 4-9 3-10

Conf 13-3 12-3 8-7 8-8 5-8

Away 9-4 7-3 4-8 5-9 1-12

Conf 9-5 8-7 9-4 7-7 2-11

Away 7-5 5-7 3-10 2-6 0-10

Conf 11-5 8-8 5-10 1-10 5-15

Northwest Division Pct .680 .680 .609 .500 .250

GB — — 2 4½ 10½

L10 7-3 7-3 6-4 4-6 2-8

Str W-3 L-1 L-1 L-1 L-1

Home 8-4 10-5 10-1 7-3 5-6

Paciic Division Pct .708 .478 .348 .238 .200

GB — 5½ 8½ 10½ 12½

L10 Str 5-5 W-1 5-5 L-3 1-9 L-6 1-9 L-1 3-7 L-3 ——— Sunday’s Games

New York 129, Denver 125 L.A. Lakers 99, New Jersey 92 Oklahoma City 106, Cleveland 77

Home 10-2 6-5 5-5 3-10 5-10

Philadelphia 88, New Orleans 70 San Antonio 95, Portland 78 Orlando 94, L.A. Clippers 85 Today’s Games

New Orleans at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Portland at Memphis, 5 p.m. Golden State at Utah, 6 p.m.

Indiana at Chicago, 5 p.m. Milwaukee at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Tuesday’s Games

Toronto at Charlotte, 4 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Washington, 4 p.m. Sacramento at Houston, 5:30 p.m. Minnesota at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.

Philadelphia at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Atlanta at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Orlando at Denver, 6 p.m. All Times PST

(Paul 3), Philadelphia 24 (Williams, Iguodala 5). Total Fouls—New Orleans 19, Philadelphia 20. Technicals—New Orleans Bench. A—13,884 (20,318).

Knicks 129, Nuggets 125 DENVER (125) Anthony 11-27 9-9 31, She.Williams 1-1 0-0 2, Nene 9-13 8-10 26, Billups 1-7 1-2 4, Afflalo 3-8 0-0 8, Harrington 6-8 4-4 19, Smith 2-8 2-4 7, Lawson 6-7 6-7 18, Ely 1-1 2-2 4, Forbes 2-3 2-2 6. Totals 42-83 34-40 125. NEW YORK (129) Chandler 10-17 2-2 27, Gallinari 4-11 6-7 16, Stoudemire 13-23 4-4 30, Fields 7-11 1-1 18, Felton 7-15 4-5 19, Turiaf 3-4 0-0 6, Douglas 2-6 7-7 13, Sha.Williams 0-1 0-0 0, Walker 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 46-88 24-26 129. Denver 24 41 24 36 — 125 New York 35 31 31 32 — 129 3-Point Goals—Denver 7-21 (Harrington 3-5, Afflalo 2-3, Smith 1-2, Billups 1-4, Nene 0-1, Anthony 0-6), New York 13-30 (Chandler 5-9, Fields 3-5, Douglas 2-5, Gallinari 2-6, Felton 1-4, Sha. Williams 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Denver 55 (Anthony 13), New York 36 (Fields 9). Assists—Denver 20 (Billups 6), New York 30 (Felton 17). Total Fouls—Denver 19, New York 23. Technicals—Nene, Stoudemire, Turiaf. Flagrant Fouls—Turiaf. A—19,387 (19,763).

Magic 94, Clippers 85 ORLANDO (94) Bass 6-13 1-4 13, Lewis 4-10 2-2 11, Howard 8-11 6-13 22, Nelson 6-12 2-2 17, Carter 6-12 0-0 13, Pietrus 1-8 2-2 4, Gortat 2-2 0-0 4, Williams 1-4 0-0 3, Redick 2-3 3-3 7. Totals 36-75 16-26 94.

L.A. CLIPPERS (85) Gomes 1-6 0-0 2, Griffin 11-23 5-11 27, Jordan 1-2 2-2 4, Davis 2-7 0-0 4, Gordon 9-23 9-9 28, Bledsoe 1-3 0-0 2, Butler 3-11 0-0 8, Aminu 1-2 0-0 2, Collins 0-0 0-0 0, Smith 0-2 1-2 1, Cook 3-5 0-1 7. Totals 32-84 17-25 85. Orlando 35 24 10 25 — 94 L.A. Clippers 14 26 19 26 — 85 3-Point Goals—Orlando 6-23 (Nelson 3-5, Carter 1-3, Williams 1-3, Lewis 1-5, Redick 01, Pietrus 0-6), L.A. Clippers 4-23 (Butler 2-7, Cook 1-2, Gordon 1-7, Bledsoe 0-1, Aminu 0-1, Gomes 0-2, Davis 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Orlando 62 (Bass 11), L.A. Clippers 47 (Griffin 16). Assists—Orlando 17 (Nelson 9), L.A. Clippers 22 (Gordon 8). Total Fouls—Orlando 22, L.A. Clippers 22. Technicals—Carter, Orlando defensive three second 3, L.A. Clippers defensive three second. A—18,278 (19,060).

LEADERS Through Sunday’s games SCORING G FG FT PTS Durant, OKC 21 186 170 574 Bryant, LAL 24 219 169 640 Stoudemire, NYK 25 247 157 656 Rose, CHI 21 203 84 527 Nowitzki, DAL 23 220 115 575 Gordon, LAC 23 180 172 563 Ellis, GOL 23 216 96 560 James, MIA 25 204 167 605 Westbrook, OKC 25 197 186 589 Martin, HOU 23 147 190 533 Anthony, DEN 21 168 136 486 Wade, MIA 24 194 151 554 Williams, UTA 25 189 150 567 Howard, ORL 22 165 143 473 Bargnani, TOR 24 193 96 512 Beasley, MIN 22 190 70 468

AVG 27.3 26.7 26.2 25.1 25.0 24.5 24.3 24.2 23.6 23.2 23.1 23.1 22.7 21.5 21.3 21.3

For Central Oregon teams (for state playoff-qualifying purposes):

CLASS 6A

CLASS 2A

Special District 1 Grant Generals (Portland) Lincoln Cardinals (Portland) Redmond Panthers Sheldon Irish (Eugene) South Eugene Axemen Thurston Colts (Eugene)

Tri-River Conference Central Linn Cobras (Halsey) Culver Bulldogs East Linn Christian Eagles (Lebanon) Kennedy Trojans (Mt. Angel) Regis Rams (Stayton) Santiam Wolverines (Mill City) Scio Loggers Western Mennonite Pioneers (Salem)

CLASS 5A Intermountain Conference Bend Lava Bears Mountain View Cougars Summit Storm

CLASS 4A

2011 swimming districts

GB — 4 10½ 11 13½

2010-11 boys and girls basketball leagues

For Central Oregon teams:

Continued from D1

Wrestling is not the only winter sport dealing with change this year. Central Oregon’s largeschool basketball teams will play one another three times in the new Intermountain Hybrid, which is made up of Redmond, Bend, Mountain View, Summit and Crook County. “I’m OK with it,” Mountain View boys basketball coach Craig Reid says. “I’d like to see at least one more team in the conference, but it’s OK. Those good rivalry games are a lot of fun.” With a five-team league, teams in the Intermountain Hybrid had little choice but to schedule one another three times. Two games against one another (a more conventional home-and-away series with each team) would have made for a league schedule of just eight games, leaving local athletic directors with the unenviable task of finding 16 nonleague games to fill the OSAA scheduling maximum of 24 regular-season contests. “It’ll be a dogfight and a slugfest,” Summit boys basketball coach and athletic director Dan Munson says about playing teams three times in the regular season. “You start playing teams three times, you’re going to start seeing the same stuff.” Similar to the OSAA’s firstyear postseason format for football, the Intermountain Hybrid basketball teams will qualify for the state playoffs by playing teams in their own classification. For example, Redmond’s boys and girls teams will compete for a 6A state playoff berth against Portland’s Grant and Lincoln and the Eugene area’s Thurston, Sheldon and South Eugene. The three Bend teams’ records against one

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Sunday’s Games

Special District 3 Blanchet Catholic Cavaliers (Salem) Cascade Cougars (Turner) Central Panthers (Independence) Creswell Bulldogs Jefferson Lions (Jefferson) Junction City Tigers Philomath Warriors Sisters Outlaws Stayton Eagles Sweet Home Huskies

in the Class 6A Central Valley Conference district meet, and Bend, Mountain View and Summit will combine with Ashland to form Class 5A’s Special District 1. In Class 4A/3A/2A/1A, Madras will be part of Special

Special District 1 Crook County Cowboys Marshall Minutemen (Portland) Roosevelt Roughriders (Portland) Tri-Valley Conference Estacada Rangers Gladstone Gladiators La Salle Falcons (Milwaukie) Madras White Buffaloes Molalla Indians North Marion Huskies (Aurora) Sky-Em League Cottage Grove Lions Elmira Falcons Junction City Tigers La Pine Hawks Sisters Outlaws Sweet Home Huskies

District 2 with a host of Portland-area schools, while Sisters will be in Special District 3 with teams from the southern Willamette Valley. Because of the lack of swim teams in Oregon’s lower classifications, qualifiers for the

CLASS 1A Mountain Valley League Butte Falls Loggers Gilchrist Grizzlies Hosanna Christian Lions (Klamath Falls) North Lake Cowboys (Silver Lake) Paisley Broncos Prospect Cougars Rogue Valley Adventist Red Tail Hawks (Medford) Triad Timberwolves (Klamath Falls) Big Sky League Arlington Honkers Central Christian Tigers (Redmond) Condon/Wheeler Knights Dufur Rangers Echo Cougars Griswold Grizzlies (Helix) Horizon Christian Hawks (Hood River) Ione Cardinals Nixyaawii Golden Eagles (Mission) Sherman Huskies (Moro) South Wasco County Redsides (Maupin)

4A/3A/2A/1A state meet will advance through four different regional meets, similar to wrestling’s new postseason format. Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@ bendbulletin.com.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 13, 2010 D5

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

Oregon State gets back to .500 The Associated Press CORVALLIS — Oregon State took a break last week to focus on final exams but got in a few good practices, too. The effort showed Sunday when the Beavers returned from the layoff to beat Texas-Pan American 89-69. “Well, that felt good,” coach Craig Robinson said. “It was good to have a sustained effort for 40 minutes. That’s helps you weather a lot of mistakes.” Omari Johnson had 18 points and Lathen Wallace added 15 for the Beavers (4-4), who led by as many as 30 points in the second half. Jared Cunningham had 10 points and six steals. Oregon State had not played since an 83-57 loss to Colorado on Dec. 4 because of finals. “We had a long stretch since the Colorado game,” Johnson said. “We’ve had a lot of practices and put in a lot of work.” Roberto Nelson, one of the most talked about recruits for Oregon State in recent years, made his long-awaited debut after redshirting last season and sitting out the fall term because of academic issues. The guard

Crash Continued from D1 Then, the fall — the accident that left him crumpled and seemingly lifeless at the bottom of the halfpipe, needing to be airlifted to the hospital, teetering between life and death. Less than two months after that terrible day, he was walking again. By April, he was out of the hospital. A few months after that, he was back home in Vermont, playing the occasional game of tennis and pingpong to help restore some of his lost eye-hand coordination. Though there is far to go, a stranger meeting him for the first time would have little clue about all he has been through over the past 11 months. The handshake is firm. The voice strong. The long, blond hair has grown back. “When you break your leg, you can’t walk for however long and you’re in a cast,” Pearce said. “When you break your head, well, I’m still in a cast but no one can tell.” Pearce returned this week to Craig Hospital in Denver, where his most intensive therapy came in the harrowing weeks and months after his New Year’s Eve accident. The report he got during his fourday return to the traumatic brain injury unit was mostly good, even if he didn’t hear the news that really would have cheered him up. “I was hoping to ride again soon, but they said my brain needed to heal for another six or seven months,” Pearce said after doctors told him that hitting his head during this still-fragile period could be devastating to his progress. “They didn’t give me the answer I was exactly looking for.” He concedes he’s impatient. After all, even with all he’s been through, Pearce is still, at heart, a 23-year-old snowboarder. Taking it easy has never been how he rolls and after this doctor’s appointment, he had to remind himself that even though he’s feeling good, there are still miles to go in what has, thus far, been a recovery that only the most enthusiastic of optimists could have imagined. “It’s a slow process,” says his brother, Adam. “You get over one thing, then you find the next thing and you have to worry about that for like a month.” But, his family says, the past 11 months have been more of a steady climb than one step forward and two steps back.

Coming back Those closest to him see subtle changes in his personality — a more affectionate, inquisitive, outgoing person, more reminiscent of the kid he was growing up than the adolescent and young adult he became. Often, however, people who make it through traumatic brain injuries re-emerge as completely different people. “From the beginning, I just never had the feeling, like, ‘Oh my God, the Kevin I knew and loved is gone,’ ” says his mother, Pia. “It just doesn’t feel that way.” One big clue: Kevin’s sense of humor never went away. He brings it into play throughout an hourlong discussion about where he is, what he remembers and where he hopes to go. “I roll with two pair of glasses,” he explains. “But it’s not because I’m a freak.” Instead, he uses one for regular walking around and another for

finished with four points in his first official game in two years. Robinson suggested the main task at hand was getting Nelson’s wind back, and giving him an introduction to the speed of the college game. “Listen, the basketball skills, I’m not worried about,” Robinson said. “I haven’t been able to talk to him about whether his lungs are burning.” Perry Petty had 32 points and six rebounds for Texas-Pan American (3-9), which was coming off a 74-52 loss to Washington State in Spokane on Friday night. Nelson committed to the Beavers after Robinson spoke at the 2008 Democratic National Convention, delivering a loving introduction to his sister Michelle Obama. It was a coup for the coach, who came to Oregon State in the midst of his brotherin-law’s successful campaign for the White House. A 6-foot-4 shooting guard from Southern California, Nelson was wooed by several big-name programs, including UCLA and Ohio State, but took a liking to Robinson.

Nelson joins the Pac-10’s youngest roster that includes four seniors, a junior, three sophomores and seven freshmen. The Beavers went up 11-3 early on back-to-back dunks from Cunningham and freshman Devon Collier. They extended the first-half lead to 19-3. Nelson came in to hearty applause with 14:08 to go in the half. Although his first appearance was marked by three fouls, three turnover and an air ball, he showed aggressiveness with a drive to the basket late in the first half while swarmed by three defenders. Nelson was one for four from the field and hit two free throws in 15 minutes. “It might take him five or six games to get warmed up, but when he gets ready, he’s going to be an asset — a major asset — for us,” Robinson said. Also on Sunday: No. 2 Ohio State . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Western Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . 60 COLUMBUS, Ohio — Jared Sullinger scored 17 points and Ohio State came out of the blocks fast to beat turnover-prone Western Carolina.

No. 9 Georgetown. . . . . . . . . . . 89 Appalachian State . . . . . . . . . . 60 WASHINGTON — Jason Clark scored 15 points, Austin Freeman added 14 and Georgetown rebounded from its first loss of the season. No. 12 Villanova. . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 La Salle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 PHILADELPHIA — Maalik Wayns scored 19 points, including the go-ahead layup with 1:09 left, for Villanova. No. 16 Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 N. Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Mike Tisdale and D.J. Richardson scored 14 points each and Mike Davis added 12 to lead Illinois. Southern Mississippi . . . . . . . . 80 California . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 BERKELEY, Calif. — Gary Flowers scored the final 12 points for Southern Mississippi, including a 3-foot turnaround jumper off the backboard with 3 seconds left, lifting the Golden Eagles to a win over California. Stanford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 UC Riverside . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 STANFORD, Calif. — Jeremy Green scored all 22 of his points in the second half, helping Stanford beat UC Riverside.

up-close vision. Vision and balance are his two biggest day-today struggles. When he takes his glasses off — stylin’ Oakleys with black, rectangular rims, pancakethick lenses and a prism built in to encourage the eyes to work in tandem — he sees double. That’s not great but better than a few months ago, when everything was one, big blur. Back home in Vermont, his typical day is largely spent doing physical therapy at the gym, where Adam is his partner in everything — working out, having fun, transportation since Kevin can’t drive. Even some things you might not expect. “Until a month ago, he had shaved me every single day for nine, 10 months,” Kevin says. He’s left-handed and because the left side of his body endured more damage, day-to-day tasks such as shaving and handling silverware have been that much more work. Had the accident not happened, had the family not spent almost every waking hour in the hospital wondering if Kevin was going to make it, they all would have been in Vancouver last February. Instead of the Olympics being the story of Shaun White vs. Shaun White — a contest in which the gold-medal winner was all but preordained and it was only a matter of how he’d do it — it would have been the story of Shaun White vs. Kevin Pearce. Pearce was that good. He had the tricks. Most notably, he had “That Trick” — the Double Cork 1260 that became the gold standard, the jump you had to throw to win and the most dangerous thing anyone can conceive of, at this point, in a halfpipe contest. To do the trick, you must flip head over heels twice while spinning 1260 degrees, much of it in a no-bailout position — head pointing down, sometimes hovering precariously above a frozen, unforgiving edge of the 22-foot-high halfpipe. There’s very little margin for error. This isn’t to say Pearce was out of line in throwing that jump on the overcast December day in Park City when he lost his bearings, hit his head and wound up the subject of a “picture in the bottom of the halfpipe where it looks like I’m dead,” as Pearce puts it. Neither he nor his family are using his accident as a wake-up call to change snowboarding, to dial down what is looking more and more like a race to see who can try the most ridiculously dangerous trick above a playing field that is essentially a rock-hard sheet of ice. “It would be so sad to me if people stopped pushing the level of snowboarding because they thought it was too dangerous,” Kevin says. All he wants is for his experience to push everyone toward wearing a helmet. It’s the helmet that saved his life that day. “It always seemed like the better the rider, the less they wear the helmet, so that part of it is real important,” Pia says. “You can’t stop the general direction (of the sport), though.”

the “I Ride 4 Kevin” stickers will be easy to spot; they sprung up almost overnight after Pearce got hurt, as a sport that can often feel like a big family reunion responded with a predictably heartfelt outpouring. This doesn’t mean the return — and another planned trip next month to the Winter X Games — will be easy. “It’s interesting thinking about being at these contests and seeing my buddies ride the halfpipe and thinking, ‘I know I could do that run, I know I could do that trick,’ ” Kevin says. “It’s going to be hard. But at the same time, it’s going to be easy, just because of the fact that I’ve seen the shape I was in, and now, I’m good enough to be at the contest and watch. That’s cool.” From Denver, the Pearces were headed to Southern California where Kevin had bought a house a few weeks before his accident but hadn’t had the chance to do some of the fix-up work he’d been plan-

ning. It will be his first trip back to the house. Fixing it up will be another milestone in Kevin’s long road back to recovery — a second chance that started with the typical post-accident question: “Why me?” He still asks that question — and will for the rest of his life — only now it’s in gratitude for the miracle he’s been given. “So many things had to go right,” says his brother, Adam. “Luck had to come into it. It’s crazy when you go down the list of things that had to go right for him to be where he is. It’s a testament to who he is as a person, but a lot of things had to go the right way.”

Back to the halfpipe Next weekend, he’ll attend a halfpipe event in Breckenridge — his first return trip to the mountain to be among the friends he used to spend almost every day with when he was snowboarding’s top up-and-coming star. Undoubtedly,

www.educate.com

541-389-9252 Bend • 2150 NE Studio Rd.

C C    C    CLASSES/CLINICS

MISCELLANEOUS

INDOOR CYCLING CLASSES: At Rebound Sports Performance & Pilates, 143 S.W. Century Drive, Bend, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays; limited to eight riders per class; sessions at 6:30 a.m., noon, 5 p.m. and 6:15 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays, and 6:30 a.m. and 8 a.m. on Saturdays; $150 for 10 classes, $270 for 20 classes, or $480 for 40 classes; www. ReboundSPL.com, 541-585-1500. CYCL’IN, POWER-BASED INDOOR CYCLING CLASSES: Taught by Cherie Touchette in a private studio in west Bend on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Sundays; progressive classes offered in eight-week sessions run 60 to 90 minutes in length; buy a session pass, or drop-ins welcome, cost is $92 to $196, depending on number and length of classes; drop-in fee is $14 to $17; 541-390-1633.

CENTRAL OREGON TRAIL ALLIANCE MEETING: Monthly meeting of the local mountain bike trails organization looks ahead at 2011; 7 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 27; Central Oregon Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; www.cotamtb.com. SISTERS TRAILS ALLIANCE: Annual membership meeting; 7 p.m., Jan. 18; The Pines Clubhouse, 612 N. Brooks Camp Road, Sisters; jrahm@bendcable.com.

RIDES POLAR BEAR RIDE: 30-mile noncompetitive group road ride from Bend to Alfalfa and back; 10 a.m., Sunday, Jan. 1; begins and ends at Hutch’s Bicycles, 820 N.E. Third St., Bend; free; hutchsbicycles.com.

C  B

Around town • Horner talk slated for Wednesday: Bend’s Chris Horner, a world-class professional cyclist and four-time Tour de France finisher, will share his experiences from the 2010 racing season this week here in Central Oregon. “An Evening with Chris Horner” is slated for 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday at Rebound Sports Performance & Pilates in Bend. The gathering is cohosted by Sagebrush Cycles of Bend. The always exuberant Horner should have plenty to share from his 2010 season, which was marked by one careerdefining highlight after another. The 39-year-old cyclist, who races for Team RadioShack with American cycling stars Lance Armstrong and Levi Lei-

pheimer, among others, finished 10th overall in last summer’s Tour de France — the best performance by an American in the famous annual stage race. Horner also recorded a major international stage-race win last April at the Tour of the Basque Country, claimed fourth place overall in May at the Tour of California, and finished the year ranked 18th in the world. Admission to Wednesday’s event is free. For more information, call 541-585-1500. Rebound Sports Performance & Pilates is located at 143 S.W. Century Drive. — Bulletin staff report


D6 Monday, December 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C YC L I NG C EN T R A L

CYCLING INSIDER | SAFETY TIP

Elite women’s winner Katie Compton keeps a slight lead on secondplace Georgia Gould before pulling away at the U.S. Cyclocross Nationals on Sunday in Bend’s Old Mill District.

The Bulletin gives a safety tip on “predictability” as part of our weekly “Cycling Insider” feature, whose rotating topics include rider profiles, safety and maintenance tips and local rides.

Jess Reed / The Bulletin

Rider Continued from D1 Georgia Gould, of Fort Collins, Colo., surged to an early lead, but Compton wasted little time catching her on the first lap. The two rode together for a while, but Compton made her move to break away from Gould on the second lap. “I just wanted to keep going hard and put her under pressure,” Compton said. “It’s a hard, unforgiving course. It’s World Cup-level difficulty. The course designers did a great job.” Compton, 32, finished the race (five laps on a 1.8-mile course) in 43 minutes, 48 seconds. Gould, 30, was second in 44:19, and Meredith

Miller, also of Fort Collins, finished third in 47:07. Portland’s Sue Butler placed fifth in 47:26. The top local rider was Bend’s Serena Bishop, who finished 27th in 50:53. Gould said she was spurred on by the throng of rowdy spectators, but it was not quite enough to get her back up to Compton. “The crowd was so awesome, I was like, ‘I wish I could channel all these people and force myself to go harder!’ ” Gould exclaimed. “But it was hard. Sometimes you try really hard and you only get second place. Sometimes that happens in a lot of races in a row.” Gould, the current national champion in mountain biking, called it “an honor to race in front of so many people.”

Second

Bigger

Continued from D1 Bend’s Adam Craig, who won the singlespeed cyclocross national title here Thursday, placed seventh in 1:03:29. Carl Decker, also of Bend, was 18th (1:06:27). After the race, Trebon called the crowd “awesome,” and he gave the estimated several thousand spectators a spirited “Thank you!” on the public address announcer’s microphone. “I couldn’t go any harder,” Trebon said. “That was it, man. That’s all I had in my legs. That really made the legs hurt.” Early in the race Powers took the lead, with Trebon, Wells, and two other riders giving serious chase. Trebon crashed on a particularly muddy stretch and dropped back into fifth position about 10 minutes into the one-hour race, but he recovered quickly. “One little spill will not make or break your day,” Trebon said. “You can come back if you’re on a good day. I was on a good day — just not a good enough day.” After the crash, Trebon found himself about 30 seconds behind the leaders and with little hope of getting back into contention for the win. “I was pretty far back, and I was thinking … this is going to be a hard day,” Trebon said. “I tried not to let it get to me.” Wells reached Powers on the second lap, and the two riders got tangled up in a muddy corner about halfway through the race. Wells continued on, but Powers lost valuable time making his bike ridable again. “My foot got stuck in his wheel,” Wells recounted, “and I’m not sure if that screwed up his wheel or not, but it took us a couple seconds to get untangled.” That helped Trebon, who surged past Powers and into second place. With the support of the crowd on a mild and breezy afternoon, Trebon at one point closed the gap on Wells to 10 seconds as he pedaled hard through the thick, heavy mud. But he never got any closer, as Wells’ jersey was a red-and-white blur racing through the crowd. “I just wanted to pace myself back into it,” Trebon said. “But I kind of burned all my matches with about two laps to go.” “For me, if I didn’t make any mistakes, I knew I could go through the corners faster than him,” Wells said of the 6-foot-5inch Trebon. “I knew at that point it was mine to lose.” The victory marked Wells’ third U.S. title of 2010 — he won the cross-country and short-track national championships in mountain biking earlier this year. Wells said the crowd along the course near the Deschutes Brewery was so loud “you couldn’t hear yourself think.” But the majority of those spectators were rooting for Trebon. “That was awesome,” the Bend rider said. “I appreciate everybody coming out here.”

Continued from D1 We celebrated together when Bend rider Adam Craig, wearing cutoff jeans and a skateboarding helmet, rode to victory in the first-ever singlespeed national championship — and seemingly without breaking a sweat. We cheered as Lance Haidet, a seventh-grader at Cascade Middle School, became the first junior rider from Bend ever to stand atop the podium at Cyclocross Nationals. We lost our voices yelling in support of Bend riders Cody Peterson and Damian Schmitt as they turned in gut-wrenching, career-best performances on Saturday afternoon to finish third and fourth, respectively, in the highly competitive Masters men 30-to-34 race. Despite all of the impressive demonstrations of racers taking their bodies and their skills to the limit, one of the highlights of the entire event was the welcome return of the unofficial “Clydesdale Cyclocross Championship of the Universe,” which was nothing short of a laughter-inducing, finger-pointing, did-you-see-that spectacle. Eligible participants were male riders over 200 pounds and female riders over 160 pounds. After several days focused on lean, cut bike racers competing for national-championship glory, the spotlight on Saturday night shone on the big men and women of cyclocross, who got their turn to compete on the nationals race course in Bend’s Old Mill District. In “Clydes” racing, the greater the girth, the better. And eating and drinking while racing was encouraged — and we’re not talking energy gels and Gatorade here. Costumes, too, were strongly encouraged, and the Clydes competing in Saturday night’s spectacle did not disappoint. A lit-up Christmas tree, a milk cow (complete with udders) and Santa Claus were among the nearly 60 husky participants who turned out to compete using bike lights to illuminate the muddy track. And this race was not a competition for merely a national championship. The stakes were much higher. Not only were the winners in each gender category declared champions of both the world and the universe, he and she earned a prize fitting for a Clydesdale: fries. A whole ’cross season’s worth. And these fries — dubbed “Belgian frites” by the vendor who sells them from his cart at Oregon’s cyclcoross races — evidently have tremendous pull. Last year’s winner, Bend’s David Taylor, won the inaugural Clydesdale Championship of the Universe in what was just his second ’cross bike race ever. When the 2010 cyclocross season rolled around this fall, Taylor, 40, told his wife that he needed to compete in the Cross Crusade series races held in the

Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com.

“I wish I could have made it a little more exciting for longer,” she added. The excitement will not end for Compton, who plans to race in the International Cycling Union Cyclo-cross World Championships in Germany next month. Compton, ranked third in the overall World Cup standings, boasts seven World Cup victories and two World Championship medals in her career. “I’m going in for the win and I’m feeling better every day,” Compton said of the World Championships. “I want to make sure I set myself up to have a great ride at worlds. “So far, so good.” Mark Morical can be reached at 541-3830318 or at mmorical@bendbulletin.com.

Portland area to cash in on his Clydesdale winnings. The 215pounder would go on to dominate the Clydesdale division, winning six out of the eight races in the series. On Saturday night, Taylor’s attempt at defending his title was thwarted when a punctured tire ended his race early. Instead, Daimeon Shanks, of Boulder, Colo., a 207-pound rider in a cotton T-shirt cut to sit above his bellybutton, captured the win Saturday. As he crossed the finish line Shanks declared, with hands raised in the air, “I’m king of the fatties!” Shanks, 30, admitted that he was gunning for the Clydesdale title after having finished second in the race last year. Earlier in the week, he took fifth in the men’s nonchampionship “B” race for riders ages 30 to 39. “I’m not good at anything except eating and pumping up tires,” Shanks said. “(Winning the Clydesdale race) was definitely my goal.” Shanks works as a mechanic for the Ralpha-Focus team, and he helped pro rider Chris Jones, of Auburn, Calif., to a top-10 finish in the Elite men’s race on Sunday. Shanks is originally from Newport on the Oregon Coast, and he promised to return to his home state next fall to race — and to claim his fries. After his all-out, 30-minute effort, Shanks was perspiring despite the chilly air and his sparse attire. He said he was on the verge of throwing up — no doubt the result of some quickly consumed adult beverages following the food offered by spectators to the riders during the race — things like pizza, doughnuts and bacon.

Clydes in Oregon About five years ago, when fields for the men’s B and C categories at Cross Crusade races were growing unmanageably large, race director Brad Ross — himself a Clydesdale — carved out a category for male riders over 200 pounds. Now the Clydesdale division at Cross Crusade series races regularly attracts as many as 100 riders and gives larger riders an opportunity to compete against their super-sized peers. The division is not recognized by USA Cycling and is not offered as a championship in any USA Cycling national championship race. “It started out as kind of a joke,” said Ross on Sunday, “but it’s turned into one of our biggest fields … literally.” The inaugural Clydesdale Cyclocross Championship of the Universe, held during the 2009 Cyclocross Nationals in Bend, attracted some 40 riders — most of them in costume — who raced in icy and freezing conditions in front of a boisterous crowd. On Saturday night, the enthusiasm meter went even higher and the “seriousness will not be tolerated” mantra was in full effect. More than 60 riders participated in the 30-minute race, including several women — and a

few men dressed as women. Also in the mix were three sets of tandem riders who combined their weights to qualify for entry. To “register,” each rider reported his or her weight (on the honor system, as the official race scale was broken), and the weight was then written down on a race bib and served as the rider’s race number. Riders were called up at the start line in the order of heaviest to lightest, then they raced four laps on the west half of the national-championship cyclocross course. A lively crowd lined nearly all of the race course, and in some places onlookers were packed in three and four deep. I heard one spectator proclaim, “That’s the best bike race I’ve ever been to.” Letting loose with the big men and women of cyclocross was a fitting end to a week of otherwise serious bike racing. And the unofficial Clydesdale Championship of the Universe, which was unique to the Bend championships, will not be forgotten anytime soon. Even as the Cyclocross National Championships move to Madison, Wis., the competition for global — universal — supremacy among Clydesdale riders is likely to stay behind in Oregon. Heather Clark can be reached at cyclingcentral@bendbulletin. com.

Erratic vehicle drivers are at best annoying and at worst accident-causing hazards. Behavior that makes a driver predictable on our roadways and streets — such as using turn signals and obeying traffic control signs — is what keeps motorists and cyclists moving along safely. Without that, chaos eventually ensues. The predictability standard we expect out of motorists applies to cyclists on the road as well. Riding in a predictable manner in many cases is the law and is simply a safer way to travel, says Kim Curley, community outreach director for Commute Options in Bend. “Predictability really is a simple etiquette that you should always follow on the roadway as any user,” she explains. “If you are unpredictable — weaving side to side in your lane or changing lanes without looking — you are a hazard to yourself and to other people.” What the rule book says: The Oregon Bicyclist Manual (available at the local department of motor vehicles and at www.oregon.gov) addresses predictable riding at length. According to the manual, cyclists should ride in a straight line and avoid weaving in and out of parked cars, which makes cyclists less visible to motorists. Cyclists should use hand signals when turning and should stop at stop signs and red lights. The manual urges cyclists at intersections to stay on the road rather than ride in the crosswalk and then suddenly reappear on the road again. Communicate with other road users: The key to riding predictably is to be engaged in your trip by riding alertly and to communicate your movements with other road users, including other cyclists and pedestrians, Curley says. “I’ve been passed by a bike in a bike lane, and they didn’t call out and it startled me,” she recalls. Curley recommends that cyclists equip their bike with a bell, which will alert other riders when passing. Cyclists should interact with other users by signaling when turning, which can be communicated by pointing with an extended arm in the direction the rider is turning. Also, obeying stop control devices and riding in the direction of traffic are standards for predictable

riding. “Vehicles are required by law to use signals, and bikes are vehicles,” Curley maintains. “You’re not being lazy when you don’t signal, you’re breaking the law. “If we all act the way we’re supposed to,” she continues, “nobody is going to be surprised.” Riding predictably through a roundabout: Safely entering, riding through and exiting any of Central Oregon’s many roundabouts can be a head-scratcher for both cyclists and motorists. When approaching a roundabout, do a shoulder check for space, and when it is safe, take the vehicle lane. Once in the vehicle lane, motorists should not attempt to pass. Riders should signal when they are exiting the roundabout and then move back into the bike lane after passing the crosswalk. Cyclists should not use the crosswalk in a roundabout UNLESS they are walking their bikes or traveling at a pedestrian speed. “The visual cues for the driver (in a roundabout crosswalk) are for someone who is moving slowly,” says Curley. “If you are darting across the crosswalk, you’re not giving the driver enough time to see you.” Where to find help: Riding erratically on the road or failing to use hand signals are mistakes made not only by inattentive or careless cyclists. Beginner riders may be less confident of their bike-handling skills, and the thought of turning their eyes to the rear while riding, or taking their hands off the handlebars to signal, might be outside their comfort zone. For those riders, the key to riding more confidently may be finding a route better suited to their experience level or practicing on the road at times when traffic is lighter. “If you want to start commuting and you’re uncomfortable with your route, call Commute Options and we’ll tell you where we ride,” Curley suggests. “Or, get help from a buddy or mentor and go out and try a route on a Saturday or Sunday when it’s not so busy so you can become familiar with it. With anything, practice makes perfect.” —Heather Clark

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THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 13, 2010 E1

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ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

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263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Border Collie mix puppies, 9 wks, 1st shots & wormed, 4 @ $100 ea. 541-852-5753, Prineville.

English Bulldog puppies, AKC, Grand sire by Champion Cherokee Legend Rock, #1 Bulldog in USA ‘06, ‘07 and ‘08, ready to go! $1300/ea. 541-306-0372

Boston Terrier, AKC 12-wk male, family raised, 1st/2nd shots, $400. 541-610-8525

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Boston Terrier Beautiful Girls! Will be ready for Christmas. Champion bred for beauty and brains. Excellent family WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Moadditions. AKC Reg. $950. torcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, 541-493-2772 ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! 541-280-7959.

Want to Buy or Rent

Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for old vintage costume, scrap, silver & gold Jewelry. Top dollar paid, Estate incl. Honest Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 WANTED: Portable Dishwasher in good working condition. Please call 541-447-7874.

1 7 7 7

Boxer Puppies, AKC, 7 wks, 2 males @$400 ea; 6 females @$500 ea. 541-408-5230

English Mastiff puppies, registered. 8 months, 1 female, 1 male, Brindle. $600 ea including Spay/Neuter. Willow Farms Mastiff 541-279-1437. ENGLISH SETTER Purebred 14 wk old pups. Great hunting/ family dogs. Females $500; male, $450. 541-280-2597 Free to good home male pitbull, brown and white, about 10 mo. old. Moving and cannot take him with us. We are in Redmond. Call Mike (541) 598-4565.

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541-280-7959.

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Items for Free FREE: Wooden side rails for short box pickup. Call 541-693-3079

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Chesapeake Pups AKC, 1st shots, great hunt/family dogs $300-$400 ea. 541-259-4739 CHIHUAHUA, 10 weeks, 2 females. $150 each. 541-678-8760.

German Shepherd Pup, 11 wks female, black, parents on site, $300. 541-536-5538

Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

AKC GERMAN SHEPHERD DOGS Gorgeous west German showline, family companion, protectors. All immunizations. 1 male, 1 female. 775-941-0302 AKC VIZSLA Pups, ready 1/10. M/$700 F/$800. Deposits. 541-430-9335 (Roseburg) Aussies - Toys & Minis, will hold for Christmas, prices start $500, 541-548-6672 or www.cattlecalltoyaussies.com

Beagle Puppies - Born 9/25, 1st/2nd shots. Great with kids! $175 (541)419-4960

French bulldog/pug mix puppies. 3 only; taking deposits. Great coat & markings. Loving personalities. Pick yours now for Christmas! $700. 541-548-0747; 541-279-3250

Chihuahua- absolutely adorable teacups, wormed, 1st shots, $250, 541-977-4686.

German Shepherd Pups, 3 white, 1 dark mahogany, 1 white donated to Sisters Wrestling team, $500 ea., 541-610-5785.

Chihuahua, Applehead, male, last one! $100. 541-593-0223.

German Shorthair Pointer A K C , champ lines, 4 male, 3 female, $375, 541-550-9992.

Chihuahuas, 2 purebred fem.,9 wks old, great Christmas gift! $200/obo. 541-815-9728

German Shorthair Puppies, AKC 10 wks old, 6 males, shots/ wormed. 5 dogs in the GSP Hall of Fame in their pedigree; excellent hunt/show or family dogs. Well socialized, $400. Also 1 4-yr male, $800; and 1 4-month female, $800. 541-923-8377; 541-419-6638 German Wirehaired Pointer, male pup. $300 or trade for guns. 541-548-3408

Chocolate

Lab

Pups, 7 weeks old, all big males,purebred no papers $150. each (541)948-2678

Griffin Wirehaired Pointer, male pup, 6 mo., both parents AKC, good hunters, great hunting potential & good natured, $500, loreencooper@centurytel.net 541-934-2423.

S . W .

BENGAL KITTENS, champion lines, ready now. $250 & up. Call 541-385-8934.

DACHSHUNDS, AKC MINI LONGHAIRED, Reds, Black & tans, Creams. $300-$600. 541-548-7514

Black Lab/Walker Hound Pups. 8 wks old, 1st shot & worming. $100. 541-382-7567

English Bulldog AKC male, “Cooper” is 8 mo. old, all shots, $1200. 541-325-3376.

Just in time for Christmas! Standard Poodle Puppy's, 1 apricot female, 2 blonde males, 2 black males, 11 weeks,up-to-date on shots, dew claws removed & tails docked, crate trained and ready for their forever homes. $500 call for more details 541-337-2122

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Pets and Supplies

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Fuel and Wood

Kittens & great cats avail. for adoption! Cat Rescue, Adoption & Foster Team, the area's only no-kill, all volunteer cat group. Petco on Sat. 11-4, Tom-Tom Motel (by Sonic) Sat/Sun 12-4 (call 541-815-7278), & sanctuary @ 65480 78th St, Bend, Sat/ Sun 1-4. Altered, shots, ID chip, etc. Low adoption fees! We'll hold your new feline til Christmas! 541-389-8420, or 598-5488, www.craftcats.org

LAB PUPPIES AKC, Hunting lines, great family pets! Family raised; Parents on site. 541-317-1867

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call

541-598-4643. Special needs cats need loving homes. 3 'wobbly' cats (born w/neurological imbalance); a cat w/partial sight; 2 declawed cats; a senior Siamese; & a cat that needs asthma meds (photo). All are healthy but have a condition making it harder to place. None need meds except the asthma cat who gets a chew pill 3 times/wk. Rescue group is seeking caring inside-only homes for these sweet cats that deserve a break & were rejected by shelters as being too hard to adopt out. Visit @ 65480 78th St, Bend, Sat/Sun 1-4. www.craftcats.org, 389-8420

LAB PUPS AKC, titled parents, Toy Poodle Puppies for sale at FC/AFC, Blackwater Rudy is an affordable price. Call grand sire. Deep pedigreed Cindy at 541 771-0522. performance/titles, OFA hips White German Shepard & elbows. 541-771-2330 Pups, AKC, absolutely gorwww.royalflush retrievers.com geous, born 10/1, $1500 Labradoodles, Australian OBO with papers, $999 OBO Imports - 541-504-2662 without, 541-536-6167 www.alpen-ridge.com Wolf hybrid 77%, 7 mos, $200. Labrador pups AKC, chocoBorder Collie/Black Lab, 5 late, yellow, hips guaranteed, mos, $75. Husky, 2 yrs, $100. $250-$450. 1-541-954-1727 Moving, need good homes. 541-852-5753 Prineville Yorkie Pups, 8 wks,tails docked, dewclaws removed, exc. Christmas presents, $550, 541-521-0535,541-536-2692 Labrador pups, quality purebred English, beautiful yellow & rare fox-red yellow, home raised, happy, $600. Eugene, 541-461-1133; 541-510-0495

Labrador purebred puppies, black, very cute, ready 12/26. $300-$400. 503-740-5312

Maltese female puppy, Darling, AKC, 4 mos., all shots, $400. 541-536-2181; 541-728-8067 Maremma Guard Dog pups, purebred, great dogs, $300 each, 541-546-6171. Miniature Schnauzer pups, purebred, salt & pepper, black, ready for Christmas, $300-$350, 541-771-1830.

Min-Pin pups, Adorable pure bred, 8 weeks old, Black & Tan, 4 males $200/ea and 1 female $300. up-to-date, on shots. Pics available. 541-633-6148 (leave msg)

Papillon pups just in time for St Nick to put under tree. $300. Taking deposits. Call 541-504-9958 POODLES AKC Toy. Also Pom-a-Poos. Home raised. 541-475-3889 541-325-6212

Sofa, chair, ottoman in excellent condition. Contemporary, navy blue. Take home a steal! $325 or BEST OFFER! 541-389-3868 anytime. The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

210

Furniture & Appliances #1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

212

Antiques & Collectibles Antique Clocks: Refurbished for Sale, come pick one out for the Holidays at 1627 NE 3rd, #5, Bend, 97701.

!Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418 Bdrm Set, by Ashley, Cherrywood; queen, dresser w/mirror,2 nightstands, five drawer chest, like new $1800 OBO. 50” Mitsubishi TV, $350 OBO. must sell! 541-526-5018. Bed, King, Premium, box spring/mattress, like new. $225. 503-930-2226, Bend.

Shih Tzu/Poodle mix, 14-week male, $250. Great Christmas present! 541-233-8202 Siamese Kittens (4) purebred, M/F, Seal & Lilac point, $125 ea. 541-318-3396

SIBERIAN HUSKY/Wolf pups, 6 wks. wormed & shots, $400 each. 541-610-3431.

263

Tools Chainsaw, Homelite, w/extra chains & tools, used little, $175, 503-933-0814, local.

255

Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

Port-a-pallet, port-a-power hyd. ram kit, in case, never used, $200, 503-933-0814, local. Toolbox, Craftsman Rollaway, dbl. stack, $200, 503-933-0814, local.

264

Snow Removal Equipment

Musical Instruments BC Rich “B****”,, Hot Pink, w/case, $250, local, 503-933-0814. Drum Set, Complete beginners, 5 drums, 4 cymbals & stool, $200, 541-408-3731. Drum Set, Royce, $200, please call 503-933-0814 for more info.

COWGIRL

RESALE

Gently Used Western Wear Turquoise, Old Pawn Squash Blossoms, Cuffs 541-549-6950

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition $3,000. 541-385-4790.

265

Building Materials Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

266

215

Coins & Stamps WANTED TO BUY

Heating and Stoves

Antique Dressmaker’s Dummy, great for clothing display? Excellent condition, $350. 541-317-4985; 541-280-0112 BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655

BUYING US & Foreign Coin & Currency collections, accum. Pre-1964 Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling flatware. Gold coins, Chainsaws, like new! Run exbars, jewelry, scrap & dental cellent! Stihl MS-460, $695! gold. Diamonds, Rolex & MS-390, $395! 026 20” $269! vintage watches. No collecHusqavarna 395XP, $595! tion too large or small. Bed281XP, $595! 372XP, $595! rock Rare Coins 541-549-1658 55XP, 20”, $295! 445XP, 20”, $295! 541-280-5006 240

Crafts and Hobbies Alpaca Yarn, various colors/ blends/sparkle. 175yds/skein $7.50-8.50 ea. 541-385-4989

246

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Remington 12 ga Model 870 tactical, clean, 1 owner, $600 cash. 541-447-7069, noon-7p

Ruger Red Label 20 ga. over & under, exc shape, $1000. Bob Queen Bed, double pillowtop, like McGee aluminum dog carrier, new, in plastic. Frame incl. $135. Call 541-948-2809 $250 503-933-0814 (local call) Ruger Vaquero old model 45LC. Excellent condition. Blue with Queen Mattress/Box Spring, exc. wood grips, have box. $475. cond, used in guest room, 541/598-7632 $180, local, 503-933-0814

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks!

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves. Pellet Stove, Whitfield Model WP2, 24” wide, $450, 541-420-7248.

267

Fuel and Wood

Open/Close sign for a business, very nice with remote control; hydraulic styling chair in very good condition; nice built-in hair drying chair, all $275. Call 541-325-9476

Dry Lodgepole For Sale $150 per cord rounds; $170 per cord split. 35 years’ service to Central Oregon. Call 541-480-5601

Log Splitter, very powerful, works great, nice Christmas present! $500. 541-389-9844 SPLIT, DRY LODGEPOLE DELIVERY INCLUDED! $175/CORD. Call for half-cord prices! Leave message, 541-923-6987

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

270

Lost and Found FOUND cat in Mt. High subdivision, Dec. 7. She has no collar, is calico/bengal colored. 541-382-1490, 541-389-4448 Found: Garage Door Opener, Bend High, 12/6, call to identify, 541-317-4951 Found: Small Shih Tsu, male, young, black/white, NE 2nd, Bend, 12/9, 541-410-7549. Lost Ring: Heirloom, green stone w/small diamonds around it, Redmond/Bend area, early as Sept., 541-447-5389 Lost: Wallet, Possibly near Ranchero in Prineville, within the last week, $50 Reward for return, 541-447-6068. Precious stone found around SE duplex near Ponderosa Park. Identify 541-382-8893. REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

286

Sales Northeast Bend

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

Ad must include price of item

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

260

GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

Oak Dining Set, 2 leaves/8 chairs, $699; Unique curved Oak Headboard, $199; & more! 541-526-1528

DVD/VHS player. $50. 541-322-0983.

Misc. Items

Fridge, 29 cu.ft, Samsung stainless side/side, new,$2800, sell $1500; W/D set, LG front load, 10 ga Ithaca semi auto shotSteam Tech., white, new gun w/26” bbl; $150 ammo $2300, sell $1200;Dishwasher, incl. All $575. 541-419-5565 Poodles Standard - AKC, stainless, new $800, sell $500; browns & blacks, AKC champ 1911 Colt 45, A1, with holster, Panasonic Plasma 50”, new sired, health & tempermant excellent condition, $900. $1750, sell $800, all Sacrifice, guaranteed, raw fed, parti Call 541-815-3619 new in boxes, consider trade pups soon, 877-385-9120 or travel trailer, 541-279-1913 Bushmaster XM-15 Predator marsanpoodles@gmail.com semi-auto .223 on bipod GENERATE SOME excitement in Portuguese Podengos,very rare w/Swift scope 6-18x44, 4 your neigborhood. Plan a gabreed, small 10” size, 10-12 clips 30, 20, 10 & 5. $1000. rage sale and don't forget to lbs, 2 females & 1 male; can 541-948-7280 advertise in classified! hold for Christmas! Call 385-5809. CASH!! 541-389-2636. See photos at For Guns, Ammo & Reloading www.bodeankennels.com Mattress Set, full size, clean, Supplies. 541-408-6900. good condition, $100. Pug Shih-Tzu Doxie mix pups, Custom Enfield Model 19-17 503-933-0814 (local call). 1st shots. $200 each. ready 375 H&H, heavy barrel, $750 now. 541-389-0322. Mini-Loveseat/hide a bed, tan, OBO. Uberti 1848 3rd gen unique, perfect for RV, $150 dragoon black powder pistol, Purebred St. Bernard Pups, 3 OBO 503-933-0814, local MSRP $409, & holster $70; females, ready to go, $250, asking $350 both, OBO. call 541-589-1633 or e-mail 541-390-1010 anlbigdogs@yahoo.com Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537

253

TV, Stereo and Video

Fender Acoustic, DG7, American made,hardshell case, exc cond, $175, 503-933-0814.

The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website. Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-7959

Santa Suit, used 1x/yr, 6 yrs, exc cond, accessories. New $275; Taurus Model 85, 38 special Resell $125 OBO. 541-420-5381 volver, blue, 2” barrel, exc. cond, $285, 541-389-9836 Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McInWanted: Collector seeks high tosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, quality fishing items. Call Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746 NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

257 Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541-280-7959.

Yorkie Pups, ready for good homes, parents on-site, 1st shots, $450, 541-536-3108

Labs, English yellow, AKC, dewclaws, vaccinations & microchipped. $600. 541-884-2742

http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com

Cock-A-Poo Pup, for loving home, ready now, $200, please call 541-504-9958.

C h a n d l e r

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT dry Lodgepole, $150 for 1 cord or $290 for 2, Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484 CASH price: Rounds $119; 2 cords/more $115 ea. Split, $149; 2 cords/more, $145 ea. (Visa/MC: $129 or Split $159 ea) Deliv avail. 541-771-8534

BEND’S HOMELESS NEED OUR HELP The cold weather is upon us and sadly there are still over 2,000 folks in our community without permanent shelter, living in cars, makeshift camps, getting by as best they can.

The following items are badly needed to help them get through the winter: d CAMPING GEAR of any sort: d Used tents, sleeping bags, tarps, blankets.

d WARM CLOTHING d Rain Gear, Boots Please drop off your donations at the BEND COMMUNITY CENTER 1036 NE FIFTH STREET (312-2069)

Questions: Call Ken Boyer, 389-3296, or Don Auxier, 383-0448 PLEASE HELP. YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

292

Sales Other Areas Barn Sale: Tue., Wed. Thur. 7 a.m., 8853 Split Rail Rd., LaPine, guns, reloading supplies, knives, spurs, saddles, antiques, collectibles, old photos, tools, books, 25 bridles & bits, fishing creels, vintage glass, western art, much more, 541-408-7348.

DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com


E2 Monday, December 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities 476

Farm Market

Employment

300 400 308

421

Farm Equipment and Machinery

Schools and Training

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

Trucks: 2 1-ton flatbed pickups, 1 Dodge 1/2-ton, & 1 Toyota Diesel pickup, 2 rubber tired backhoes, 2 Crawler tractors & 2 semi trucks with trailers, evenings 541-382-7995

325

Hay, Grain and Feed Bluegrass Straw mid-size 3x3, $25/bale; Orchard grass hay mid-size 3x3 $45/bale. Volume discounts; delivery available. 541-480-8648. Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

341

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com Retiring, young quarterhorses for sale, Very gentle, 541-382-7995.

TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

454

Looking for Employment Experienced Male Caregiver offering assistance with medical & non-medical tasks & activities. Refs. avail. upon request, 541-548-3660. Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

476

Employment Opportunities CAUTION

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320

Farmers Column A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

Orchard Grass, $165/ton, Alfalfa, $150/ton, Mix Hay, $160/ton, Feeder Hay, $100/ton, cheap delivery avail., 541-891-4087.

383

Produce and Food Wild Alaskan Salmon Fresh-Frozen Coho and Sockeye Sockeye $13.50/lb Coho $12.00/lb available for delivery From the fisherman to you! Kelvin Vaughan 907.209.2055

DENTAL ASSISTANT Our busy practice is looking for a dental assistant who is a team player with a great attitude. Xray certification and some experience preferred. Great staff and benefits. Call 541-504-0880 between 10 am and 4pm. or evenings before 8pm - 541-548-9997.

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Dental -Front Office 4 Days a week, dental assistant preferred. Drop off resume at 2078 NE Professional Ct., Bend. 541-382-2281. Jack Miller, DMD Branden Ferguson, DDS

READERS:

For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

358

Employment Opportunities

541-617-7825 Caregiver: Dependable caregiver needed for spinal injured female, Part-time transportation & refs., req. 541-610-2799.

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

H HEALTH

Driver Single Copy Driver/ Sales Assistant Driver/Sales Assistant serves as the point person for newspaper sales, collections, return pickup from stores and racks. Must have the ability to work independently with little supervision and dress professionally when representing the company. Must have valid Oregon drivers’ license and a clean driving record. Position assumes financial responsibility for news rack collections and must be able to move news racks, and assist in maintaining vehicle fleet. Position is responsible for newspaper positioning in stores, rack maintenance and cleanliness, rack cards, and store displays. Position includes acting as a sales person for various events and other single copy promotions. Schedule may change periodically and may require both day and night shifts and/or split shifts, as needed. Position is full time with benefits. Please email resume: lkeith@bendbulletin.com or mail resume to: The Bulletin, 1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, Attn: Larry K.

Flatbed Driver – Doubles Central Oregon Truck Company has an opening for a Maxi driver. Home most weekends. At least 2 years OTR Exp., clean MVR, DAC & no recent felonies. COTC offers Full benefits after 90 days, vacation pay & a great team to Work with. Apply today, www.centraloregontruck.com or 866-394-1944 ext. 117 or ext. 123.

476

476

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Front Desk Clerk

Golf Sales Coordinator

The Ranch is accepting applications for a Front Desk Clerk. Responsibilities include checking guests in/out of the Ranch, processing access passes, assisting the reservations desk, and effectively communicating with housekeeping and maintenance. Applicants must be customer service oriented, enthusiastic, and computer literate. Will be required to worknights, weekend and holidays. This is a part time position which may lead to full time work during the summer. Benefits include swimming, golf, food and merchandise discounts. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Glazier -- Residential: Must have 5 years experience & clean driving record, Shower doors & mirrors a plus. Pay DOE. Call 541-382-2500.

The Ranch is accepting applications for a full time Group Sales Coordinator in our Golf Department. The successful applicant will be responsible for selling and coordinating all golf events including group tee times and tournament logistics. Applicants must be customer service oriented, enthusiastic, and computer literate with 3 years sales experience preferred in golf, hospitality or a related field. Some travel required. Benefits include med/dent/life, vacation, 6 paid holidays, golf, food and merchandise discounts. Apply on line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE Marketing/Administration Technician Must have experience in social media, have excellent communication skills and be proficient in Publisher, Word, Email Marketing, Newsletters & Data entry. Hourly wage based on experience. Please send Resume to Box 16293852, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

OPTICAL - We are seeking a Dispensing Optician for our primary care, independent optometric office. Experience required. Applicant must possess excellent customer service skills, and frame adjustment and dispensing skills. 4-5 days per week; no weekends. Competitive benefits. Apply to DRKC@iebend.com or fax to 541-382-5702.

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

528

Finance & Business

500 507

Loans and Mortgages BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

573

Real Estate Contracts Business Opportunities LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Bend, Prineville & Madras H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

ULTRASOUND TECHNOLOGIST, Temp. Part-Time. Surgical office is seeking an ultrasound technologist for vascular and general imaging. Satisfactory completion of RVT or RDMS certification examination required. No call required. Fax resume to 541-749-2130. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

IMPROVING YOUR HEALTH AND WELL-BEING The Greatest Wealth is Health THURSDAYS • Health Datebook keeps you informed on all local health happenings & classes • Nutrition, Fitness, Money & Medicine Look for the Health SectionEvery everyMonday! Thursday! ALSO ON THURSDAYS... Hunting and Fishing in Sports! Look for the Pet Section


THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 13, 2010 E3

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 650

Houses for Rent NE Bend

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

Rentals

600 604

Storage Rentals Secure 10x20 Storage, in SE Bend, insulated, 24-hr access, $95/month, Call Rob, 541-410-4255. 605

Roommate Wanted

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 634

642

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

HOSPITAL AREA Clean quiet AWESOME townhouse. 2 Master Bdrms, 2.5 bath, all kitchen appli., W/D hookup, garage w/opener, gas heat & A/C. $645/mo. + dep. S/W/G pd. No Dogs. 541-382-2033

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

Share 2bdrm 2½ bath home near Broken Top, fully furn. $550+ ½ util. 949-940-6748 (Private Party ads only) Share home Redmond. Must like dogs; can reduce rent with Newer Duplex 2/2, close to housekeeping. $385 +util; Hospital & Costco, garage, $200 dep. Call 541-526-1528 yard maint., fireplace, W/D, W/S, pet? 1025 Rambling Share House in DRW, Ln. #1, $695. 541-420-0208 $400/mo incl. utils, $200 dep., 541-420-5546. 636

630

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Rooms for Rent Adult Foster Care In Redmond Has rooms available. Private & Medicaid accepted. Male or Female, Class 3, competitive rates, 541-504-6199 Furnished Studio, W/D, patio, fenced. Pet negotiable. $300. References. 541-548-4775 STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

Condo / Townhomes For Rent A Westside Condo at Fireside Lodge, 2 bdrm, 1 bath, $595/mo. Wood stove, W/S/G paid. W/D hookup 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. W/D included! $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz Absolutely beautiful, 1 Bdrm. 2 bath, fully furnished Condo, $695, $400 dep, near downtown & college, completely renovated, 2 Verandas, no pets/smoking, avail. now, all amenities and W/S/G/elec./A/C/Cable incl., 541-279-0590 or cheritowery@yahoo.com

Fully furnished loft apt. on Wall Street in Bend. All utilities paid and parking. Call 541-389-2389 for appt. River & Mountain Views! 930 NW Carlon St., 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, W/S/G paid, W/D hook-up, $650/mo. $600 dep. No pets. 541-280-7188.

638

Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com Call about Our Specials! Studios to 3 bedroom units from $395 to $550 • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 managed by

GSL Properties

DUPLEX SW Redmond 2 bdrm 2 bath, garage w/opener. 1300 sq. ft., w/d hookup, fenced yard, deck, w/s/g pd. $700 dep. 541-604-0338

648

Houses for Rent General The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend 3/2 House, large kitchen, great room 1500 sq.ft., large yard with sprinklers. Pets neg. 21336 Pelican Dr. $950 + deposit. Call 541-322-0708

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Real Estate For Sale

700 800 705

850

Real Estate Services

Snowmobiles

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

Yamaha 2008 Nitro 1049cc, 4 stroke, bought new Feb 2010, still under warranty, 550 miles, too much power for wife! $6000. Call 541-430-5444

656

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

658

Houses for Rent Redmond 1 Bdrm, 1 bath, 547 1/2 NW 7th, $550; 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 626 1/2 SW 8th, $595; 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 135 NW 10th St., $650, 541-815-1709, CopperDog PM. 4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room, w/woodstove, new carpet/paint, single garage w/opener. $795/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appliances, includes gardener. $795 mo. 541-408-0877. Newer, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, MFG home w/2 car garage. appl. & heat pump. 1260 sq.ft. Yard w/sprinkler system, corner lot. One pet possible on approval and dep. Quiet neighborhood. $725 mo.+ dep. 834 NE Modoc Ct., Call (503) 803-4718 Spacious 3 bdrm., 2 bath + bonus, single story, large fenced yard, dbl. garage, $950/mo. + $500 dep. 2120 NW 11th St. 541-771-6599 Terrebonne 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath in private, treed setting. Has deck, detached garage and storage, $725/month. Call 541-419-8370; 541-548-4727

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver A newer 3/2 mfd. home, 1755 sq.ft., living room, family room, on private .5 acre lot near Sunriver, $895. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803.

671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft., mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1295. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease

3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2 car garage, 632 bonus room, deck, fridge, gas Light Industrial, various sizes, 2 Bdrm. in 4-Plex, 1 bath, new North and South Bend locaApt./Multiplex General stove, new paint, carpet & carpet/paint, W/D hookups, tions, office w/bath from vinyl. $1000/mo. Pets neg. storage, deck, W/S paid, $525 $400/mo. 541-317-8717 The Bulletin is now offering a Mike 541-408-8330. + $600 dep. 541-480-4824 MORE AFFORDABLE Rental 1-Month Free Option! rate! If you have a home or 900 sq ft 1 Bdrm 1 bath, single Office / Warehouse apt. to rent, call a Bulletin F I N D I T ! car garage, all utils incl, W/D space • 1792 sq ft Classified Rep. to get the hkup, in country, very quiet. BUY IT! 827 Business Way, Bend new rates and get your ad No smkg/pets. $675/mo. 1st S E L L I T ! 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep started ASAP! 541-385-5809 + $300 dep. 541-480-9041 The Bulletin Classiieds Paula, 541-678-1404 634 Clean 3 Bdrm 2 Bath, new Office/Warehouse Space, 640 paint/carpet, 1262 sq ft, Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 6400 sq.ft., (3) 12x14 doors, Apt./Multiplex SW Bend $900/mo. Near hosp; must on Boyd Acres Rd, 1 & 2 bdrms Available see! No pets/smoking. 3023 541-382-8998. Happy holidays! Enjoy living at starting at $575. Reserve NE Byers Ct. 541-410-0794 The Bulletin offers a LOWER, 179 SW Hayes Ave. Spacious Now! Limited Availability. MORE AFFORDABLE Rental 2 Bdrm townhouses, 1.5 Alpine Meadows NOTICE: rate! If you have a home to baths, W/D hookups, fenced 541-330-0719 All real estate advertised rent, call a Bulletin Classified yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Professionally managed by here in is subject to the FedRep. to get the new rates and Rent starts at $525 mo. Norris & Stevens, Inc. eral Fair Housing Act, which get your ad started ASAP! 541-382-0162; 541-420-2133 1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease makes it illegal to advertise 541-385-5809 541-420-0133 any preference, limitation or Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet discrimination based on race, complex, park-like setting, 693 642 color, religion, sex, handicap, covered parking, w/d hookOfi ce/Retail Space Apt./Multiplex Redmond familial status or national ups, near St. Charles. $550for Rent origin, or intention to make $595/mo. 541-385-6928. ASK ABOUT OUR any such preferences, limitaHOLIDAY SPECIAL! tions or discrimination. We An Office with bath, various ** Pick your Special ** 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. insizes and locations from will not knowingly accept any 2 bdrm, 1 bath cludes storage unit & carport. $250 per month, including advertising for real estate Close to schools, parks & as low as $495 utilities. 541-317-8717 which is in violation of this shopping. On-site laundry, Carports & Heat Pumps. law. All persons are hereby Downtown Redmond no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly & No App. Fee! informed that all dwellings Pet Friendly. advertised are available on Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. Fox Hollow Apts. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS $650/mo + utils; $650 secuan equal opportunity basis. (541) 383-3152 541-923-1907 rity deposit. 425 SW Sixth Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co. The Bulletin Classified www.redmondrents.com St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848

880

882

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

Motorcycles And Accessories 745

Homes for Sale

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010,

PUBLISHER'S Health forces sale, 1900 NOTICE mi., 1K mi. service done, All real estate advertising in black on black, detachable this newspaper is subject to windshield, back rest & lugthe Fair Housing Act which gage rack, $13,900, Mario, makes it illegal to advertise 541-549-4949, 619-203-4707 "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status Harley Davidson Heritage Soft includes children under the Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras age of 18 living with parents incl. pipes, lowering kit, or legal custodians, pregnant chrome pkg., $16,900 OBO. women, and people securing 541-944-9753 custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is Harley Davidson Police Bike in violation of the law. Our 2001, low mi., custom bike readers are hereby informed very nice.Stage 1, new tires that all dwellings advertised & brakes, too much to list! in this newspaper are availA Must See Bike $10,500 able on an equal opportunity OBO. 541-383-1782 basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for Harley Davidson the hearing impaired is Screamin’ Eagle 1-800-927-9275. Electric-Glide 2005, ***

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $19,999 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Beautiful Prineville home, wood and tile throughout, 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, master on main level, bonus room, office, 6.87 acres, conveniently located between town & lake, $415,000. 541-771-3093 Sisters, turnkey horse setup, 4 acres, great barn, 3 pastures, updated house, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, pond,irrigation, RV pad w/hook ups, $575,000, 541-549-9945.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $122,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Excavating

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Handyman

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Snow Removal

Remodeling, Handyman, Professional & Honest Work. Help w/pre-holiday projects. CCB#151573 Dennis 317-9768

Reliable 24 Hour Service • Driveways • Walkways • Parking Lots • Roof tops • De-icing Have plow & shovel crew awaiting your call!

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Holiday Lighting

I DO THAT!

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling •Decks •Window/Door Re placement •Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179

Multiple Options • Interior • Exterior • Landscape

Christmas Tree Delivery EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

Fall Cleanup and Snow removal •Flower bed clean up •Irrigation repair •Senior Discounts •Landscape Maintenance

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns.

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

865

ATVs

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $1995 for all. Bill 541-480-7930. Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919. Polaris Sportsman 500X2 2007, fully equip., 825 mi., w/Big Tex 4X8 Trailer w/drive on tailgate, $4950, 541-549-4303

Yamaha 350 Big Bear 1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition. $2,200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

880

Motorhomes

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

541-322-7253

The Bulletin Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., reduced to $3000, also boots, helmet, tires, avail., 541-410-0429

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105

Motorcycle Trailer Kendon stand-up motorcycle trailer, torsion bar suspension, easy load and unload, used seldom and only locally. $1700 OBO. Call 541-306-3010.

881

Travel Trailers

KOMFORT 27’ 5th wheel 2000 trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide, stored inside, in excellent condition. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

875

Watercraft

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more. Priced to sell at $59,500! 541-317-9185

MONTANA 2000 36’ Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

882

3 slides, washer and dryer, new A/C. Very nice & livable! $12,500. 541-923-7351.

TERRY 27’ 5th wheel 1995 with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great condition and hunting rig, $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

885

Canopies and Campers

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523.

Fifth Wheels

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/410-6945

Painting, Wall Covering MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Snow Removal d SNOW REMOVAL! d d LARGE OR SMALL, d WE DO IT ALL! 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 d www.bblandscape.com d

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

Travel Queen 34’ 1987 65K miles, oak cabi-

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Barns

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, reduced to $34,000 OBO 541-610-4472; 541-689-1351

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

775

For sale by owner, 2 Bdrm 2 bath, 1970 double wide mobile home. Partially furnished. As is - $5000, cash only. 541-389-6249 day/eve

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

nets, exc interior. Great extra bdrm! Reduced to $5000. 541-480-3286

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

YAMAHA 1998 230CC motor, 4WD, used as utility vehicle. excellent running condition. $2000 OBO. 541-923-4161 541-788-3896

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

762

Homes with Acreage

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

385-5809

Redmond Homes

rage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552.

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

The Bulletin Classified ***

750

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, ga-

18’ Geary Sailboat, trailer, classic little boat, GREAT WINTER PROJECT. $400 OBO. 541-647-7135

860

Houses for Rent SW Bend 2 Bdrm 1 Bath mnfd. home on quiet cul-de-sac, with heat pump, fenced yard. W/S/G paid. $595/mo + security deposit. 541-382-8244. Near Old Mill Dist, 4 Bdrm, 2 bath, gas & wdstv fenced yard, appls, 1600 sq ft, no smkg, on culdesac $895 move-in disc. 541-389-3657

Boats & RV’s

870

Boats & Accessories

541-385-5809

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160


E4 Monday, December 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

Autos & Transportation

900 Aircraft, Parts and Service

932

933

933

935

935

940

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Vans

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

925

932

Antique and Classic Autos Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500,541-280-5677

541-385-5809

Tires, 4 Studded, 215/70R16, on 16” Toyota 5-lug alloy wheels, good tread, $475, 541-388-8841.

Powertow for Single Engine, $850. A/C mechanics tools, $1200. 541-420-0211

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Tires, New (4) Grand Treks, P255/65R16 M/S, pd $680, asking $375. 541-410-7388

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment 932

Mercedes-Benz 280c 1975 145k, good body & mechanical, fair interior, can email pics. $2950. 541-548-3628

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $4850, 541-410-3425.

541-385-5809

Redmond Airport hangar, heated, 55’ x 75’ x 18’, 12’ x 24’ office, bath with shower, $229,500. 20-year lease. Call 503-803-2051

MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all original, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

International 1981,T-axle-300 13 spd.Cummins/Jake Brake,good tires/body paint;1993 27’ stepdeck trailer, T-axle, Dove tail, ramps. $7950, 541-350-3866

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr brks, plus mntd stud snows. $8500 obo. 541-330-0616

975

Automobiles Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K mi., $8925. 541-598-5111.

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

Chevy Silverado 1500 1988, 4x4, step side, tow pkg., low mi. at 98K, A/C, great tries, brakes, new rear end, runs extra super, $4000 OBO, 541-548-7396

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com Chevy Silverado 1500 4x4, 2000, full size, Reg cab w/ long bed, white, V6, 4.3L, 20 mpg, auto trans, ABS, AC, dual airbags, tow pkg, runs & drives excellent, maint’d extremely well; non-smoker. Recent brks, bearing, tune- up, tires, trans & coolant flush. 183K mi. $4700 obo. 541-633-6953

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

GMC Jimmy 4x4 UT 1986, 2-Dr, Auto, Tow

Dodge 2500 Laramie 2008 4x4 6.7 Diesel automatic, 23K mi, 6.5’ Proline flatbed. Below Bluebk $35,500 541-447-3393

Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, auto, reduced to $14,999 obo 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256 Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Honda CRV EX 2005, 61K, 1 owner, Michelin+extra snows, moon, $13,995, 541-388-4424

Toyota RAV 4 Ltd. 2007 80K miles, moonroof, tow pkg, great condition! $13,750. 541-848-7876

940

Vans Ford F250 1986, 4x4, X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871.

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl, 5-spd., 4x4, good cond, price reduced to $7950, 541-593-4437.

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Ford F-250 XLT 1986, X-Cab, 4x4, everything works, runs good, $1250 OBO, please call 541-815-5618.

FORD pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2700. 541-322-6261

1998 Dodge Ram Wagon SE 2500, Mark III conversion, 100k miles, 4 captains chairs, rear fold-down bed, hitch, $4000 and worth it! Travel in luxury. 541-318-9999 or 541-508-8522.

Audi A4 Avant Quattro 2003 3.0L., 92K mi, garaged, serviced, silver, fully loaded, $9300. 541-420-9478

JEEP COMPASS, 2009 13,200 miles, 4x4, 5 speed. $14,999 OBO. 541-280-5866.

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 1998, like new, low mi., just in time for the snow, great cond., $7000, 541-536-6223.

Jeep Liberty Renegade 2006, 4 dr., 4WD. V-6. Leather. CD. Loaded. 1 owner. Only 18K. Red. $16,850. 541-480-3265. Dlr. #8308. Vin #248954.

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Antique and Classic Autos

Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP,

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

PRICE REDUCED TO $800 Cash! Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

package, Good condition, $1200 OBO, 541-815-9939.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds Grumman AA-5 Traveler, 1/4 interest, beautiful, clean plane, $9500, 619-822-8036 www.carymathis.blogspot.com

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

(Private Party ads only)

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

Roof Rack, Yakima, bars+lockable towers, fits on raised SUV rails, $100, 541-389-1913

Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $40,000 OBO/terms, 541-948-2126.

FORD 350 LARIAT 2002 4x4 crewcab, 7.3 diesel 135k, dually, matching canopy, towing special, gooseneck, too! Orig. 63-year-old construction owner needs money, will trade, $17,500. (541) 815-3639 or (541) 508-8522

Ford Bronco 1990 4WD w/1998 motor; engine & trans good cond, new brakes & exhaust sys; $1600 in improvements. $2250 OBO 541-323-1872

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

TIRES: 4 Schwab 225/60R18, Studless snow tires, used, 2 seasons, $225. 541-447-1668

Dodge Ram 3500 dually 2003 Cummins Diesel 24V, 113K, new tires, TorkLift hitch, exc cond, $25,900. 541-420-3250

CHEVY BLAZER 2000, ZR2 LS 4x4, 130k miles, 90% tread left on $2000 worth of tires. Under KBB at $4995. Can be seen at Redmond’s Hwy 97 Park & Sell. 541-546-6838.

The Bulletin

931

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

Chevy 1/2 Ton 1995, 4X4, 350 engine, auto, cold A/C, new tires, brakes, shocks, & muffler, w/ camper shell, runs great. $4000. 541-706-1568

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

Utility Trailers

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

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To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $11,500. 541-408-2111

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223. Chrysler 1999 AWD Town & Country LXI, 109k; 1998 Town & Country 7 passenger, leather, used but not abused. I’ll keep the one that doesn’t sell. Takes $3500 and up to buy. Bob, as you can see, likes mini vans. 541-318-9999 or 541-508-8522.

VW Super Beetle 1974

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $5800. 541-330-0852.

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3000 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

Dodge Ram 2001, short bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

ENTER AS MANY TIMES AS YOU LIKE!

Enter And Win The Bulletin’s

Nissan XTerra SE 2001 $5900 Auto, CD, Sun, Tow, 131K, V6, 4WD, Must See 541-617-8454

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Audi A4 Nearly New 2009 Only 8,000 miles & many premium options on this A4 sedan including heated leather seats, Bluetooth, iPod dock & sunroof. The Quattro all-wheel drive system performs amazingly well in all weather conditions. Asking $2500 below Kelley Blue Book! $28,995. 541-350-3502

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

WIN A 7-NIGHT MEXICAN RIVIERA CRUISE

4T H ANNUAL VACAT ION GETAWAY PROVIDED BY AND

SWEEPSTAKES!

Enjoy a spectacular vacation, courtesy of Carnival Cruise Lines, Getaways Travel, and The Bulletin. Trip for two includes seven days onboard the Carnival Splendor® roundtrip from Los Angeles. Visit the ports of Puerto Vallarta, Mazatlan and Cabo San Lucas. Room, dining, and ship entertainment included.

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO SUBSCRIBE CALL THE BULLETIN AT 541-385-5800 FOR COMPLETE RULES AND REGULATIONS Visit www.bendbulletin.com/vacationrules or stop by The Bulletin at 1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR. Additional entry forms are available in newspapers for sale across Central Oregon and in the lobby of The Bulletin. Winner will be drawn January 28, 2011.

OFFICIAL BULLETIN | GETAWAYS TRAVEL VACATION GETAWAY SWEEPSTAKES ENTRY FORM Sign me up to win The Bulletin’s Fourth Annual Subscriber Vacation Getaway Sweepstakes! Official entry form only. No other reproductions are accepted. Prizes are non-transferable to any other party and cannot be substituted for cash or any other value. Winner is responsible for all taxes. Must be 21 years of age or older.

NAME: __________________________________________________________________________ PHONE: ______________________________________ ADDRESS: _____________________________________E-MAIL (required): ___________________ BULLETIN SUBSCRIBER: ___YES ___ NO Official entry forms must be received by 3 p.m. on January 27, 2011. Entry forms may be mailed to: P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708, or dropped off at:

1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702

GETAWAYS TRAVEL 563 SW 13th St., Bend, OR 97702 • 541-317-1274 • www.getawaystravel.net

RULES: All vacations are approved on a promotional basis and are subject to availability. Blackout dates apply. Trip is valid through Jan. 31, 2012. Travel dates are final and will not be extended. Travel is not permitted during holiday periods, including both 5 days prior and after. Trips are NON-TRANSFERABLE and cannot be exchanged for cash. Trips are valid for 2 adults ONLY per room and do not include any special promotions. NO room upgrades. Winner must be at least 21 years old. Employees of participating companies and its properties, sponsors, vendors and their immediate families are not eligible to win. The Bulletin reserves the right to deem entries ineligible. One coupon per edition.


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 975

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Automobiles

Automobiles

BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

Buick LeSabre 2004, custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $5000; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $2900. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

Buick LeSabre Limited Edition 1985, 1 owner, always garaged, clean, runs great, 90K, $1895, 541-771-3133.

541-322-7253 Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

Chrysler LeSabre Cstm 1996. Go anywhere in snow, great gas mi. 44K on eng. Comfortable, reliable! $1799. 541-526-1528

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

Mercedes S430-4Matic, 2003 AWD, silver, loaded & pampered. Excellent in snow! $16,395. 541-390-3596

Mercury Grand Marquis 1984. Grandpa’s car! Like new, all lthr, loaded, garaged, 40K mi, $3495. 541-382-8399

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218. Ford Focus SE Wagon 2007 4-dr, 8800 mi, 30+ mpg, brand new cond, $12,500 obo cash. 541-475-1165 aft 6

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Pontiac Firebird T-Top 1998 mint, 125K,custom wheels/tires HO V6, 4 spd auto, 29 mpg reg. $5700 OBO. 541-475-3984

Pontiac Grand Am 2004 FWD 3.4L V-6 4 door, all power, 158k hwy miles. Excellent condition.

$3,950 541-923-8627

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, V6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Subaru Outback 2005 AWD, 4cyl, auto, lthr htd seats, 89K mi, reduced to $13,995 OBO 541-508-0214; 541-554-5212 SUBARU OUTBACK 2010, exc. cond., $21,000, call 541-330-0507,541-280-7217

SUBARUS!!! Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $3500. 541-548-5302

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles, automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018. Honda Pilot 2006, orig. owner, 42k mi., remote starter, 8-passenger, fully loaded. $21,000. Call 541-504-2627. Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

541-385-5809 Jeep Cherokee Laredo, 2003, 135K miles, fully loaded, excellent condition. $6500. Call 541-749-0316

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

Kia Spectra LS, 2002 96K miles, black, 5-speed, runs good, $2600. Phone 541-749-0316

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES

BMW M3 COUPE E36 1998, mint condition, adult owned, low miles, needs nothing, $12,500. 541-419-2181

VOLKSWAGEN BUG 1965 Black , Excellent condition. Runs good. $6995. 541-416-0541. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

THE BULLETIN • Monday, December 13, 2010 E5

BANK OF AMERICA FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE OF THE MATTIE SUE CARROLL REVOCABLE TRUST; UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE MATTIE SUE CARROLL REVOCABLE TRUST; LOUIS SLAYTON; THE OREGON DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES; Occupants of the Premises; and any and all persons claiming an interest in the Property, Defendants. 1. TO THE DEFENDANTS: SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE OF THE MATTIE SUE CARROLL REVOCABLE TRUST; UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE MATTIE SUE CARROLL REVOCABLE TRUST; AND ANY AND ALL PERSONS CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY: In the name of the State of Oregon, you are hereby required to appear and answer the complaint filed against you in the above-entitled Court and cause on or before the expiration of 30 days from the date of the first publication of this summons. The date of first publication in this matter is December 6, 2010. If you fail timely to appear and answer, Plaintiff will apply to the above-entitled court for the relief prayed for in its complaint. This is a judicial foreclosure of a deed of trust in which the Plaintiff requests that the Plaintiff be allowed to foreclose your interest in the following described real property: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER (NE 1/4 NW 1/4) OF SECTION THREE (3), TOWNSHIP EIGHTEEN (18) SOUTH, RANGE TWELVE (12) EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT WHENCE THE NORTH QUARTER CORNER OF SAID SECTION 3 BEARS NORTH 79°20'17" EAST, 702.90 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00°19"31" WEST, 100 FEET; THENCE WEST 100.63 FEET; THENCE NORTH 100 FEET; THENCE EAST 101.26 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING Commonly known as: 27 SE Cessna Drive, Bend, Oregon 97702. 3. NOTICE TO DEFENDANTS: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! A lawsuit has been started against you in the above-entitled court by BANK OF AMERICA FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff. Plaintiff's claims are stated in the written complaint, a copy of which was filed with the above-entitled Court. 4. You must "appear" in this case or the other side will win automatically. To "appear" you must file with the court a legal paper called a "motion" or "answer." The "motion" or "answer" must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days of the date of first publication specified herein along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the Plaintiff's attorney or, if the Plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the Plaintiff. 5. If you have any questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636. 6. This summons is issued pursuant to ORCP 7. ROUTH CRABTREE OLSEN, P.S. By /s/Janaya L. Carter, OSB # 032830 Attorneys for Plaintiff 13555 SE 36th St., Ste. 300 Bellevue, WA 98006 (425) 586-1991; Fax (425) 283-5991 jcarter@rcolegal.com LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-102285 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, GWEN E. HOGUE, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR SIERRA PACIFIC MORTGAGE COMPANY, INC., as beneficiary, dated 10/9/2003, recorded 10/14/2003, under Instrument No. 2003-70986, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 32 OF HOLLOW PINE ESTATES, PHASE II, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 138 SOUTHEAST AIRPARK DRIVE BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a no-

tice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of November 16, 2 010 Delinquent Payments from July 01, 2010 3 payments at $ 1,129.42 each $ 3,3 88.26 2 payments at $ 1,842.18 each $ 3,684.36 (07-01-10 through 11-16-10) Late Charges: $ 382.60 Beneficiary Advances: $ 22.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 7,477.22 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed im-

mediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $216,136.49, PLUS interest thereon at 3.5% per annum from 06/01/10 to 10/1/2010, 3.5% per annum from 10/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on March 21, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable

charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx3487 T.S. No.: 1216283-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by David A. Hunt, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Sunset Mortgage Co., as Beneficiary, dated February 22, 2006, recorded February 28, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-14015 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Parcel one (1) of partition plat 2002-33, a parcel of land located in the northwest quarter of the northeast quarter (nw1/4ne1/4) of section seventeen (17), township eighteen (18) south, range twelve (12), east of the Willamette Meridian, and a portion of lot four (4), block three (3), Fairview Acres, Deschutes County, Oregon Commonly known as: 61136 Tapadera Street Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due May 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,331.53 Monthly Late Charge $116.57. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $334,646.77 together with interest thereon at 6.625% per annum from April 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on March 07, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: October 28, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is February 05, 2011, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-353288 11/29, 12/06, 12/13, 12/20

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx0101 T.S. No.: 1268630-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Jason M. Higham and Angie K. Higham, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Homecomings Financial Network, Inc, as Beneficiary, dated April 05, 2006, recorded April 17, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-26000 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 4 in block 7 of Bradetich Park, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 21417 Bradetich Loop Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,205.63 Monthly Late Charge $110.28. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $574,795.50 together with interest thereon at 3.500% per annum from October 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on March 04, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: October 27, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is February 02, 2011, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-352895 11/29, 12/06, 12/13, 12/20

their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same.DATED: 11/16/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee , By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3818776 11/29/2010, 12/06/2010, 12/13/2010, 12/20/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0175345644 T.S. No.: 10-11445-6 . Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JOHN D. LOWRY JR. AND DONNA A LOWRY, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank N.A., as Beneficiary, recorded on March 5, 2008, as Instrument No. 200810015 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 186044 LOT FOUR (4), WISHING WELL, PHASE I, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 63263 WISHING WELL LANE,

BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $1,509.53 Monthly Late Charge $60.38 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 217,450.28 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.25000 % per annum from June 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on March 14, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street,

Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E.

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L515765 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 125904581/STAATS AP #1: 116367 Title #: 4522909 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by RIJN N. STAATS as Grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE CO. as Trustee, in favor of INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B. as Beneficiary. Dated May 9, 2007, Recorded May 16, 2007 as Instr. No. 2007-27984 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON AND AN ADDENDUM TO NOTE DATED 05/09/07, AND A MODIFICATION AGREEMENT DATED 11/28/07, RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION LOAN AGREEMENT DATED 05/09/2007, OWNER/BUILDER ADDENDUM DATED 05/09/2007, RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION LOAN ADDENDUM DATED 05/09/2007 covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 23 IN BLOCK 53 OF DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, UNIT 9, PART 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE $462,500.00 INTEREST @ 3.3406 % FROM 04/01/10 THRU 09/08/10 $6,780.95 ADVANCE - PROPERTY TAXES $4,301.61 ADVANCE - INSURANCE $3,701.00 ACCRUED LATE CHARGES $1,888.27 APPRAISAL FEE $125.00 CREDIT DUE <$721.19> PROPERTY INSPECTION $330.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$478,905.64 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 56235 STELLAR DRIVE, BEND, OR 97707-2002 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $462,500.00, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 04/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on January 17, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 09/08/10 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 921059 PUB: 12/06/10, 12/13/10, 12/20/10, 12/27/10

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L515911 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000018998/FOXHOVEN Investor No: 4006430990 AP #1: 171421 00 10500 Title #: 100514130 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by ZAC W. FOXHOVEN, TECKLA A. FOXHOVEN as Grantor, to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated March 31, 2009, Recorded April 6, 2009 as Instr. No. 2009-14014 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: A PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER (NE 1/4 SE 1/4) OF SECTION 21 AND IN THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (NW 1/4 SW 1/4) OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 17 SOUTH, RANGE 14 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY OREGON, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: SECTION 21: THE EAST 668 FEET OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER (NE1/4 SE 1/4). SECCTION 22: THE WEST HALF OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (W 1/2 W 1/2 NW 1/4 SW 1/4). Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 5 PYMTS FROM 05/01/10 TO 09/01/10 @ 2,897.71 $14,488.55 TOTAL LATE CHARGES $220.68 MISCELLANEOUS FEES $27.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$14,736.23 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 25600 ALFALFA MARKET RD., BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $410,187.08, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 04/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on January 17, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 09/09/10 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 921060 PUB: 12/06/10, 12/13/10, 12/20/10, 12/27/10


E6 Monday, December 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE

OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com/ AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their re-

spective successors in interest, if any. Dated: December 3, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONALTITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Juan Enriquez State of California County of Orange I, the undersigned, certify that I am the Trustee Sale Officer and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original Trustee's Notice of Sale. Juan Enriquez ASAP# 3839052 12/13/2010, 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011

17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com/ AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: November 18, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Michael Busby ASAP# 3822001 11/29/2010, 12/06/2010, 12/13/2010, 12/20/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0172413494 T.S. No.: 10-10478-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, GREGORY L. STECKLER AND SHARON M. STECKLER, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on September 26, 2007, as In-

strument No. 2007-52108 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 258955 LOT SIXTEEN (16), THE SHIRE PHASE 1, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 61283 RING BEARER COURT, BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; Monthly Payment $2,925.00 Monthly Late Charge $146.25 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 520,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.75000 % per annum from May 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the

terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on March 25, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due {other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx3562 T.S. No.: 1296826-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Kenneth L. Easter, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers"), As Nominee For Cmg Mortgage, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated October 05, 2006, recorded October 13, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-68664 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lots 26, 27 & 28, block SS, Deschutes River Woods, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 19011 Shoshone Road Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due February 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,750.26 Monthly Late Charge $87.51. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $305,500.00 together with interest thereon at 6.875% per annum from January 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on March 03, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: October 27, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is February 1, 2011, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-353083 11/29/10, 12/06, 12/13, 12/20

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8446 T.S. No.: 1306074-09.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-102208 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, SAMUEL MARCUS AND NANCY MARCUS, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE CO., as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 2/6/2008, recorded 2/25/2008, under Instrument No. 2008-08200, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: THE LAND REFERRED TO IN THIS POLICY IS SITUATED IN THE STATE OF OREGON, COUNTY OF DESCHUTES, CITY OF BEND, AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: LOT THIRTY-TWO (32), RIDGEWATER II, P.U.D., COUNTY OF DESCHUTES AND STATE OF OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 61115 HILMER CREEK DRIVE BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of November 10, 2010 Delinquent Payments from August 01, 2010 4 payments at $3,335.43 each $13,341.72 (08-01-10 through 11-10-10) Late Charges: $1,889.10 Beneficiary Advances: $167.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $15,397.82 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $332,359.61, PLUS interest thereon at 4.749% per annum from 07/01/10 to 1/1/2011, 4.749% per annum from 1/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on March 15, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 11/10/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500 Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: 206-340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3811758 11/22/2010, 11/29/2010, 12/06/2010, 12/13/2010

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1727 T.S. No.: 1305617-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-UM-102795 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, REBECCA A DOLF, INDIVIDUAL, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of SECURITY BANK, ITS SUCCESSORS AND/OR ASSIGNS, as beneficiary, dated 4/10/2001, recorded 4/16/2001 in Volume 2001, page 17424, of Deeds of Trust, under Instrument No. -, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by UMPQUA BANK. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT TWENTY-EIGHT (28), BLOCK ONE (1), ROMAINE VILLAGE, UNIT 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 19909 MAHOGANY STREET BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of December 6, 2010 Delinquent Payments from July 01, 2010 1 payments at $460.00 each $460.00 5 payments at $682.00 each $3,410.00 (07-01-10 through 12-06-10) Late Charges: $220.46 Beneficiary Advances: $109.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $4,199.46 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $67,542.44, PLUS interest thereon at 6.625% per annum from 06/01/10 to 8/1/2010, 6.625% per annum from 8/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on April 7, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at MAIN ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY JUSTICE CENTER, 1100 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a, reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 12/6/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3840521 12/13/2010, 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011 LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L515909 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000017855/NEWMAN Investor No: 4001434366 AP #1: 140480 Title #: 100514128 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by KEN NEWMAN, SUSAN NEWMAN as Grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES as Beneficiary. Dated May 12, 2000, Recorded May 17, 2000 as Instr. No. --- in Book 2000 Page 19351 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 3, BLOCK 30, TALL PINES-FIFTH ADDITION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 5 PYMTS FROM 05/01/10 TO 09/01/10 @ 884.63 $4,423.15 TOTAL LATE CHARGES $66.90 RETURN CHECK $25.00 MISCELLANEOUS FEES $13.50 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$4,528.55 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 53035 TARRY LANE, LAPINE, OR 97739 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $71,942.62, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 04/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on January 17, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 09/09/10 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 921061 PUB: 12/06/10, 12/13/10, 12/20/10, 12/27/10

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Robert H. Blankenship and Sandy K. Blankenship, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., As Nominee For Hyperion Capital Group, Llc, as Beneficiary, dated September 01, 2005, recorded September 12, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. x, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-60990 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: The following real property situated in Bend, County of Deschutes, and State of Oregon, to wit: Lot 1, Mt. Vista, in the City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 61203 Mount Vista Drive Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due February 1, 2010 of interest only and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,568.97 Monthly Late Charge $61.19. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $250,000.00 together with interest thereon at 5.875% per annum from January 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on March 18, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: November 10, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is February 16, 2011, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Bruce W. Grove An Unmarried Man, as Grantor to First American Title Ins. Co. Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage Co. Dba Commonwealth United Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, dated October 29, 2004, recorded November 01, 2004, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2004-65519 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 15 of Northpointe-phase 1, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 20695 Beaumont Dr. Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due August 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $768.94 Monthly Late Charge $38.40. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $122,009.33 together with interest thereon at 5.625% per annum from July 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on March 14, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: November 04, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is February 12, 2011, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, MICHELLE E. THOMAS, as grantor, to AMERI TITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR MORTGAGEIT, INC., as beneficiary, dated 6/1/2006, recorded 6/7/2006, under Instrument No. 2006- 39464, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee of the IndyMac INDX Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-AR27, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-AR27 under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated August 1, 2006. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT ONE HUNDRED FORTY-NINE (149), PARKS AT BROKEN TOP, PHASE 4, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 61418 DAVIS LAKE LOOP BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of December 1, 2010 Delinquent Payments from May 01, 2010 5 payments at $ 2,214.52 each $ 11,072.60 3 payments at $ 2,923.70 each $ 8,771.10 (05-01-10 through 12-01-10) Late Charges: $ 775.11 Beneficiary Advances: $ 55.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 20,673.81 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $416,850.00, PLUS interest thereon at 6.375% per annum from 04/01/10 to 10/1/201 0, 6.375% per annum from 10/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on April 5, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 12/1/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

R-355740 12/13, 12/20, 12/27, 01/03

R-355371 12/13/10, 12/20, 12/27, 01/03

ASAP# 3834751 12/13/2010, 12/20/2010, 12/27/2010, 01/03/2011

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-102385


Bulletin Daily Paper 12/13/10